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Sample records for infant nutritional factors

  1. Factors associated with infant feeding practices and nutritional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors associated with infant feeding practices and nutritional status among children ... and practices on infant feeding, socio-demographic factors that influence choice of ... refusal by the child to breastfeed or feeding on complementary food.

  2. Total parenteral nutrition - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007239.htm Total parenteral nutrition - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a method of feeding that bypasses ...

  3. Factors associated with nutritional status of infants and young children in Somali Region, Ethiopia: a cross- sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekadu, Yirgu; Mesfin, Addisalem; Haile, Demewoz; Stoecker, Barbara J

    2015-09-02

    Inadequate nutrition during the first two years of life may lead to childhood morbidity and mortality, as well as inadequate brain development. Infants are at increased risk of malnutrition by six months, when breast milk alone is no longer sufficient to meet their nutritional requirements. However the factors associated with nutritional status of infants after 6 months of age have received little attention in pastoralist communities of Ethiopia. Therefore this study aimed to identify the factors associated with nutritional status of infants and young children (6-23 months) in Filtu town, Somali Region, Ethiopia. A cross-sectional community-based study was conducted. Simple random sampling was employed to select 214 infants for the study. Univariable and multivariable logistic regressions models were used in the statistical analysis. The strength of association was measured by odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Both the crude (COR) and adjusted odds ratios (AOR) are reported. The prevalence of wasting, stunting and underweight among infants and young children were 17.5% (95% CI: 12.91-23.22), 22.9% (95% CI: 17.6-28.9) and 19.5% (95% CI: 14.58-25.3) respectively. The multivariable logistic regression model showed that breastfeeding was independently associated with reduced odds of wasting (AOR = 0.38(95% CI: 0.14-0.99)). Diarrhea in the past 15 days (AOR = 2.13 (95% CI: 1.55-4.69)) was also associated with increased odds for wasting. The independent predictors of reduced odds for stunting were dietary diversity score ≥ 4 (AOR = 0.45(95% CI: 0.21-0.95)) and introduction of complementary feeding at 6 months (AOR = 0.25 (95% CI: 0.09-0.66)). Bottle feeding was associated with increased odds of stunting (AOR = 3.83 (95% CI: 1.69-8.67)). Breastfeeding was associated with reduced odds of underweight (AOR = 0.24 (95% CI: 0.1-0.59)), while diarrheal disease in the past 15 days was associated with increased odds of underweight (AOR = 3.54 (95% CI: 1

  4. INNOVATIONS IN NUTRITION AS RISK-DECREASING FACTOR OF ALIMENTARY-DEPENDENT DISEASES IN INFANTS

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    T.V. Borodulina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of breast feeding in Sverdlovsk region during last 5 years is analyzed. An adherence to breast feeding increases in presence of regional social support of pregnant and nursing women and provision with dry specialized milk mixture «Bellakt Mama». All artificially fed children 0–8 months old received adopted mixture «Bellakt 0–12», and children under 3 years old have opportunity (if they have social need to receive liquid and past-like milk products for children’s nutrition, dry milk products for children after 1 year old and quick-dissolving cereals. Special attention is given to children’s nutrition in boarding schools. Rachitis, hypotrophy, functional intestinal disorders and other alimentary-dependent states are diagnosed 1.3 times frequently and anemia — 1.7 times frequently in children from orphans’ houses and boarding schools than in whole population. For the correction of micronutrient deficiency in infants, fortified milk drink «Be Healthy» («Bud Zdorov» was developed; it contains prophylactic doses of vitamins (A, D, E, C, PP and microelements (iodine, iron, zinc, selenium.Key words: infants, health, nutrition, milk mixture(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2011; 10 (4: 111–114

  5. Nutritional management of newborn infants: Practical guidelines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ming Ben

    2008-01-01

    The requirements of growth and organ development create a challenge in nutritional management of newborn infants, especially premature newborn and intestinal-failure infants. Since their feeding may increase the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis, some high-risk infants receive a small volume of feeding or parenteral nutrition (PN) without enteral feeding. This review summarizes the current research progress in the nutritional management of newborn infants. Searches of MEDLINE (1998-2007), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, Issue 3, 2007), abstracts and conference proceedings, references from relevant publications in the English language were performed, showing that breast milk is the preferred source of nutrients for enteral feeding of newborn infants. The number of nutrients found in human milk was recommended as a guideline in establishing the minimum and maximum levels in infant formulas. The fear of necrotizing enterocolitis and feeding intolerance are the major factors limiting the use of the enteral route as the primary means of nourishing premature infants. PN may help to meet many of the nutritional needs of these infants, but has significant detrimental side effects. Trophic feedings (small volume of feeding given at the same rate for at least 5 d) during PN are a strategy to enhance the feeding tolerance and decrease the side effects of PN and the time to achieve full feeding. Human milk is aey component of any strategy for enteral nutrition of all infants. However, the amounts of calcium, phosphorus, zinc and other nutrients are inadequate to meet the needs of the very low birth weight (VLBW) infants during growth. Therefore, safe and effective means to fortify human milk are essential to the care of VLBW infants.

  6. Challenges of infant nutrition research: a commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Alan S; Hay, William W

    2016-04-22

    Considerable advances have been made in the field of infant feeding research. The last few decades have witnessed the expansion in the number of studies on the composition and benefits of human milk. The practice of breastfeeding and use of human milk represent today's reference standards for infant feeding and nutrition. Additional research regarding the benefits of breastfeeding is needed to determine which factors in human milk and in the act of breastfeeding itself, singly or in combination, are most important for producing the beneficial effects on infant growth, body composition, and neurodevelopmental outcome. We examine evidence that breastfeeding confers health benefits and offer suggestions on how best to interpret the data and present it to the public. We also describe some examples of well-designed infant nutrition studies that provide useful and clinically meaningful data regarding infant feeding, growth, and development. Because not all mothers choose to breastfeed or can breastfeed, other appropriate feeding options should be subjected to critical review to help establish how infant formula and bottle feeding can confer benefits similar to those of human milk and the act of breastfeeding. We conclude with the overarching point that the goal of infant feeding research is to promote optimal infant growth and development. Since parents/families may take different paths to feeding their infants, it is fundamental that health professionals understand how best to interpret research studies and their findings to support optimal infant growth and development.

  7. Infant and Newborn Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It has all the necessary vitamins and minerals. Infant formulas are available for babies whose mothers are not able or decide not to breastfeed. Infants usually start eating solid foods between 4 and ...

  8. Factors that influence breastfeeding decisions among special supplemental nutrition program for women, infants, and children participants from Central Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murimi, Mary; Dodge, Candace Mire; Pope, Janet; Erickson, Dawn

    2010-04-01

    Although human milk provides optimal nutrition for infants, fewer than one third of US infants are breastfed exclusively for 6 months or more. The objectives of this study were to determine the factors that have the greatest impact on the decisions to breastfeed, and to determine the effect of formula provided by the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) on the initiation and duration of breastfeeding among WIC participants in a rural parish in central Louisiana. A cross-sectional study was done between September 2007 and March 2008 among 130 WIC participants. Approximately half (51%) of the participants reported breastfeeding their youngest child for a mean of 15.7+/-14.9 weeks, with more white mothers breastfeeding than did African-American mothers or other races (Paffect their decision to breastfeed than those who said incentives affected their decision to breastfeed (Peffective and clear education about the benefits of breastfeeding, and that this advice influenced their decision to breastfeed their children. These findings underscore the importance of emphasizing the health benefits of breastfeeding to increase initiation and duration rates among WIC participants. Copyright (c) 2010 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. RISK FACTORS AND PECULIARITIES OF NUTRITION OF INFANTS WITH CHRONIC DIARRHEA

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    T.S. Lazareva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of observation of children from 2,5 months to 4 years old, treated in hospital with diagnosis chronic diarrhea are analyzed in this article. Diarrhea debuted in first year of living in most cases. The reason of onset of diarrhea often was alimentary factor. Hereditary predisposition, pathologic pregnancy, and diseases in women at the time of pregnancy played an important role in development of disease. Nutrition of children in early age was characterized by low duration of breast feeding and early conversion of children to the mixed and artificial feeding. Main food stuffs in children's nutrition on mixed and artificial feeding was adapted milk formulas, and rarely non adapted milk food (cow's and goat's milk, kefir. Only 30% of mothers had a definite knowledge of proper child's feeding and advantages of breast feeding. This fact indicates necessity of more active educational work by medical staff.Key words: children, chronic diarrhea, nutrition.

  10. [Iodine nutritional status and risk factors for iodine deficiency in infants and children of the french North department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouessel, G; Bouarfa, K; Soudan, B; Sauvage, J; Gottrand, F; Turck, D

    2003-02-01

    Iodine deficiency is responsible for a higher mortality and morbidity in neonates and infants. It has not yet disappeared in European countries, especially in Southern and Eastern Europe. The present study aimed at evaluating the status of iodine nutrition of infants living in the North department (France) and at studying risk factors for iodine deficiency. The study was conducted in primary health care centres in 160 healthy infants aged ten days to six years (mean +/- SD: 17.7 +/- 2.5 months). Data included: familial thyroid disease history, type of feeding at inclusion, timing of introduction of complementary foods, nutritional status (weight, height, head and arm circumference), as well as maternal education level and family socio-economical status. Iodine status was assessed by urinary iodine excretion. Urinary iodine concentration ranged from 4 to 1042 microg/l (median +/- SD: 195,5 +/- 21,6 microg/l). Thirty-eight (24%) of 160 children were iodine deficient (urinary iodine iodine deficiency (50-99 microg/l: 17%), moderate iodine deficiency (20-49 microg/l: 5%), severe iodine deficiency (iodine status and age, sex, geographic origin of the children, as well as social and occupational group of the parents. Breast-feeding did not prevent from iodine deficiency. Iodine status did not differ between the cow's milk fed group and the group that was not fed cow's milk. Formula feeding was associated with iodine deficiency (p = 0,02). Prevalence of severe iodine deficiency was very low in this population. However, iodine status was not optimal.

  11. Current concepts in infant nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronner, Y L; Paige, D M

    1992-01-01

    Nutritional needs vary during the first year of life according to the infant's individualized pattern of growth and amount of physical activity. After delivery, the infant must make many physiologic adjustments, develop immunologic defenses, and take in adequate nutrients for survival. The type and consistency of foods change as the gastrointestinal system matures and becomes able to metabolize the components and excrete the needed metabolites of increasingly complex foods. The recommended dietary allowance for infancy is based on the amount of nutrients provided to healthy infants in human milk during the first six months of life and on the consumption of formula and increasing amounts of solid food during the second six months. The introduction of solid foods should parallel the developmental changes that occur within the central nervous system throughout the first year; these provide a level of readiness for the infant to manage foods of various textures from full liquid to soft. Even though significant technologic advances have led to changes in the way infants can be fed, human milk is still the optimal choice. Most women can be encouraged to breast-feed regardless of their own nutritional status or dietary intake. Contraindications can be managed on an individual basis. If women do not elect to breast-feed, suitable commercial formulas are available. The important issue in feeding is that of providing a variety of appropriately prepared foods offered in a nonjudgmental atmosphere so that the foundation is laid for the development of good food habits.

  12. Breast feeding and infant nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G V; Calvert, L J; Kanto, W P

    1978-04-01

    Breast feeding is a management problem requiring knowledge of the physiology of lactation, maternal and infant nutritional requirements, and specifics such as drugs which enter the milk. The job of the physician is to allay anxiety; this helps establish the let-down reflex and increases milk production. "Caking," mastitis and even abscesses are not indications for weaning. Rest, warm compresses and frequent nursing are indicated. Breast-fed infants have less tendency to obesity than those who are bottle-fed. Early solid foods in the diet are not needed.

  13. Update in Maternal and Infant Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Elizabeth M.

    1989-01-01

    This review emphasizes research that confirms or questions established practices regarding maternal and infant nutrition. Controversial issues include weight gain and use of vitamins and mineral supplements during pregnancy and the effects of second-hand smoke. Infant nutrition topics include use of unmodified cow's milk, level of fat, and…

  14. The role of taurine in infant nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesney, R W; Helms, R A; Christensen, M; Budreau, A M; Han, X; Sturman, J A

    1998-01-01

    The importance of taurine in the diet of pre-term and term infants has not always been clearly understood and is a topic of interest to students of infant nutrition. Recent evidence indicates that it should be considered one of the "conditionally essential" amino acids in infant nutrition. Plasma values for taurine will fall if infants are fed a taurine-free formula or do not have taurine provided in the TPN solution. Urine taurine values also fall, which is indicative of an attempt by the kidney to conserve taurine. The very-low-birth-weight infant, for a variety of reasons involving the maturation of tubular transport function, cannot maximally conserve taurine by enhancing renal reabsorption and, hence, is potentially at greater risk for taurine depletion than larger pre-term or term infants, and certainly more than older children who have taurine in their diet. Taurine has an important role in fat absorption in pre-term and possibly term infants and in children with cystic fibrosis. Because taurine-conjugated bile acids are better emulsifiers of fat than glycine-conjugated bile acids, the dietary (or TPN) intake has a direct influence on absorption of lipids. Taurine supplementation of formulas or TPN solutions could potentially serve to minimize the brain phospholipid fatty acid composition differences between formula-fed and human milk-fed infants. Taurine appears to have a role in infants, children, and even adults receiving most (> 75%) of their calories from TPN solutions in the prevention of granulation of the retina and electroencephalographic changes. Taurine has also been reported to improve maturation of auditory-evoked responses in pre-term infants, although this point is not fully established. Clearly, taurine is an important osmolyte in the brain and the renal medulla. At these locations, it is a primary factor in the cell volume regulatory process, in which brain or renal cells swell or shrink in response to osmolar changes, but return to their

  15. Enteral nutrition of the premature infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Jin Cho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Early nutritional support for preterm infants is critical because such support influences long-term outcome. Minimal enteral feeding should be initiated as soon as possible if an infant is stable and if feeding advancement is recommended as relevant to the clinical course. Maternal milk is the gold standard for enteral feeding, but fortification may be needed to achieve optimal growth in a rapidly growing premature infant. Erythromycin may aid in promoting gastrointestinal motility in cases that exhibit feeding intolerance. Selected preterm infants need vitamins, mineral supplements, and calorie enhancers to meet their nutritional needs. Despite all that is known about this topic, additional research is needed to guide postdischarge nutrition of preterm infants in order to maintain optimal growth and neurodevelopment.

  16. Advances in nutrition of the newborn infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Jane E; Cormack, Barbara E; Alexander, Tanith; Alsweiler, Jane M; Bloomfield, Frank H

    2017-04-22

    Nutrition of newborn infants, particularly of those born preterm, has advanced substantially in recent years. Extremely preterm infants have high nutrient demands that are challenging to meet, such that growth faltering is common. Inadequate growth is associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcomes, and although improved early growth is associated with better cognitive outcomes, there might be a trade-off in terms of worse metabolic outcomes, although the contribution of early nutrition to these associations is not established. New developments include recommendations to increase protein supply, improve formulations of parenteral lipids, and provide mineral supplements while encouraging human milk feeding. However, high quality evidence of the risks and benefits of these developments is lacking. Clinical trials are also needed to assess the effect on preterm infants of experiencing the smell and taste of milk, to determine whether boys and girls should be fed differently, and to test effects of insulin and IGF-1 supplements on growth and developmental outcomes. Moderate-to-late preterm infants have neonatal nutritional challenges that are similar to those infants born at earlier gestations, but even less high quality evidence exists upon which to base clinical decisions. The focus of research in nutrition of infants born at term is largely directed at new formula products that will improve cognitive and metabolic outcomes. Providing the most effective nutrition to preterm infants should be prioritised as an important focus of neonatal care research to improve long-term metabolic and developmental outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimizing nutrition of the preterm infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, William W Jr

    2017-01-01

    The goal of nutrition of the preterm infant is to meet the growth rate of the healthy fetus of the same gestational age and to produce the same body composition of the healthy fetus in terms of organ growth, tissue components, and cell number and structure. Nutritional quantity and quality are fundamental for normal growth and development of preterm infants, including neurodevelopmental outcomes. Failure to provide the necessary amounts of all of the essential nutrients has produced not only growth failure, but also increased morbidity and less than optimal neurodevelopment. Growth velocities during the NICU hospitalization period for preterm infants exert a significant effect on neurodevelopmental and anthropometric outcomes. Despite the obvious need for optimal nutrition, growth failure is almost universal among preterm infants. There is every reason, therefore, to optimize nutrition of the preterm infant, in terms of total energy and protein, but also in terms of individual components such as amino acids, specific carbohydrates and lipids, and even oxygen. This review presents scientific rationale for nutrient requirements and practical guidelines and approaches to intravenous and enteral feeding for preterm infants. Intravenous feeding, including amino acids, should be started right after birth at rates that are appropriate for the gestational age of the infant. Enteral feeding should be started as soon as possible after birth, using mother's colostrum and milk as first choices. Enteral feeding should begin with trophic amounts and advanced as rapidly as tolerated, decreasing IV nutrition accordingly, while maintaining nutrient intakes at recommended rates. Feeding protocols are valuable for improving nutrition and related outcomes. Further research is needed to determine the optimal nutrition and rate of growth in preterm infants that will achieve optimal neurocognitive benefits while minimizing the longer-term risk of chronic diseases.

  18. ALLERGIC PROCTOCOLITIS IN INFANTS: analysis of the evolution of the nutritional status

    OpenAIRE

    CAMARGO,Ludmilla S; SILVEIRA,Jonas AC; TADDEI,José AAC; Fagundes Neto,Ulysses

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Allergic proctocolitis is a disease that affects infants in the first months. The change in feed is the primary factor for clinical improvement and maintenance of the nutritional status of the infant. Objective Study the anthropometric evolution of infants with allergic proctocolitis at diagnosis and 1 to 6 months after nutritional intervention. Methods A retrospective cohort of infants with allergic proctocolitis diagnosis followed at the Pediatric Gastroenterology Ins...

  19. COMMERCIAL BABY PORRIDGES IN NUTRITION OF INFANTS

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    I. N. Zakharova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article covers the issue of the most important product among additional food for infants — baby porridges. It includes historical data on usage of various cereal crops in human nutrition. A special significance of porridges in culture of food and traditions of Russian population is highlighted. The authors give information about nutritional value and chemical composition of different cereals — buckwheat, rice, pearl-barley, millet, oats etc. A special attention is given to differences in concentrations of nutrients and micronutrients manufactured by different ways from the same kind of cereal. The necessity to feed infants with commercial baby porridges is based in the article. There are also represented characteristics of various commercial porridges for nutrition of infants: hypoallergenic, glutenfree and containing gluten, enriched with pre- and probiotics. The article also contains data on nutritional value of milk and milk-free porridges. The authors raised a discussion on possibility and standards of usage of different additional components, such as sugar, maltodextrin, honey, vanillin, vegetable oils in production of infant porridges. The selection of certain type of porridges as additional food for healthy and infants with different diseases and digestive disorders is based.

  20. Postheparin plasma lipases and carnitine in infants during parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovamo, L

    1985-03-01

    Lipoprotein lipase is the rate-limiting factor for hydrolyzing triglycerides to glycerol and fatty acids. Carnitine is a cofactor in the transport of long-chain fatty acids through the mitochondrial membrane for oxidation. To assess these determinants of fat utilization during total parenteral nutrition, lipoprotein and hepatic lipase activities and carnitine concentrations of nine newborn infants, operated on because of gastrointestinal anomalies during the first day of life, were measured with specific methods. Total parenteral nutrition was built up in 3 days whereafter the infants received 3 g/kg of fat at a constant rate of infusion for 24 h/day. Lipoprotein lipase activity of post-heparin plasma increased from 14 to 35 mumol free fatty acids/ml/h during parenteral nutrition whereas hepatic lipase activity remained unchanged at 40 mumol free fatty acids/ml/h. Serum free carnitine and acylcarnitine levels decreased significantly during parenteral nutrition; urinary excretion of carnitine decreased also. In addition, serum cholesterol and phospholipids increased markedly during parenteral nutrition whereas serum triglycerides, free fatty acids, and blood beta-hydroxybutyrate remained unchanged. Serum apolipoprotein A-I concentrations were unaltered, apolipoprotein A-II underwent a transient increase, and apolipoprotein B increased monotonically during parenteral nutrition. The results suggest that under the present circumstances neither lipoprotein lipase activity nor carnitine resources are rate-limiting for the utilization of fat in newborn infants during total parenteral nutrition.

  1. Nutritional care of premature infants: microminerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domellöf, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Microminerals, including iron, zinc, copper, selenium, manganese, iodine, chromium and molybdenum, are essential for a remarkable array of critical functions and need to be supplied in adequate amounts to preterm infants. Very low birth weight (VLBW) infants carry a very high risk of developing iron deficiency which can adversely affect neurodevelopment. However, a too high iron supply in iron-replete VLBW infants may induce adverse effects such as increased infection risks and impaired growth. Iron needs are influenced by birth weight, growth rates, blood losses (phlebotomy) and blood transfusions. An enteral iron intake of 2 mg/kg/day for infants with a birth weight of 1,500-2,500 g and 2-3 mg/kg/day for VLBW infants is recommended. Higher doses up to 6 mg/kg/day are needed in infants receiving erythropoietin treatment. Regular monitoring of serum ferritin during the hospital stay is advisable. Routine provision of iron with parenteral nutrition for VLBW infants is not recommended. Less certainty exists for the advisable intakes of other microminerals. It appears prudent to provide enterally fed VLBW infants with daily amounts per kilogram body weight of 1.4-2.5 mg zinc, 100-230 μg copper, 5-10 μg selenium, 1-15 μg manganese, 10-55 μg iodine, 0.03-2.25 μg chromium, and 0.3-5 μg molybdenum. Future scientific findings may justify deviations from these suggested ranges.

  2. Infant mortality and child nutrition in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancer, Diane; Rammohan, Anu; Smith, Murray D

    2008-09-01

    The excess female infant mortality observed in South Asia has typically been attributed to gender discrimination in the intra-household allocation of food and medical care. However, studies on child nutrition find no evidence of gender differences. A natural explanation could be that in environments of high infant mortality of females, the surviving children are healthier, so that child nutrition cannot be studied independently of mortality. In this paper, we use data from the 2004 Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey to investigate if there are any gender differences in survival probabilities and whether this leads to differences in child nutrition. We argue the importance of establishing whether or not there exists a dependence relationship between the two random variables--infant mortality and child nutrition--and in order to detect this we employ a copula approach to model specification. The results suggest, for example, that while male children have a significantly lower likelihood of surviving their first year relative to female children, should they survive they have significantly better height-for-age Z-scores. From a policy perspective, household wealth and public health interventions such as vaccinations are found to be important predictors of better nutritional outcomes.

  3. Trend of Nutritional Support in Preterm Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Yau Ho

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Without appropriate nutritional support, preterm infants fail to grow after birth and have malnutrition. The main reason for delayed feeding is fear of immaturity of gastrointestinal function. The principles of nutritional practice should be as follows: (1 minimal early initiation of enteral feeding with breast milk (0.5–1 mL/h to start on Day 1 if possible and gradual increase as tolerated; (2 early aggressive parenteral nutrition as soon as possible; (3 provision of lipids at rates that will meet the additional energy needs of about 2–3 g/kg/d; and (4 attempt to increase enteral feeding rather than parenteral nutrition.

  4. SOUR MILK FORMULAS IN NUTRITION OF INFANTS

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    E.F. Lukushkina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Health-giving properties of fermented food are related to the fact, that acid medium improves assimilation of protein and fat, increases absorption of iron and zinc, improves digestion. But the kefir and other sour milk food based on the whole milk can’t be used in nutrition of infants as human milk substitute because of high content of protein, high osmolarity, deficiency of vitamins and microelements. The article describes the results of clinical approbation of new modern sour milk formula «NAN sour milk», containing proper amount of high-quality protein (OptiPro, enriched with lactalbumin and all sufficient vitamins and microelements. This mixture contains also probiotics (B. lactis, providing high functionality of this food. Key words: infants, sour milk formula, nutrition.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(1:136-141

  5. FRUIT NUTRITIVE FACTOR NETWORK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanqing QU; Yumei JIANG; Daren HE

    2009-01-01

    As an research example of the widely existing cooperation-competition systems, the authors present an empirical investigation on a fruit nutritive factor network. It is described by a node-weighted bipartite graph. The fruit nutritive factors are defined as the nodes, and two nodes are connected by an edge if at least one fruit contains these two nutritive factors. The fruits are defined as the collaboration acts. The node-weight Writ, which signifies the "importance degree" of each actor node, is defined as the content of a nutritive factor in a fruit. The empirical investigation results show some unique features.The node-weight distributions take so-called "shifted power law" function forms, but the act-weight distribution takes a normal form. The degree and act-degree distributions show impulsive-spectrum like forms. These observations may be helpful for the study of fruits. The network description method proposed in this article may be universal for a kind of cooperation-competition systems.

  6. Totally vegetarian diets and infant nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinwell, E D; Gorodischer, R

    1982-10-01

    Observations on the deleterious effects of a totally vegetarian diet in infancy are reported and the difficulties encountered in the prevention of nutritional deficiencies in a vegan religious community are discussed. Twenty-five infants of this community who were seen at the hospital showed evidence of protein-calorie malnutrition, iron- and vitamin B12-deficient anemia, rickets, zinc deficiency, and multiple recurrent infections. Evidence of growth retardation was also found in 47 infants seen at the local mother-child health (well-baby) clinic. Samples of breast milk showed low levels of carbohydrate (1.6 to 3.5 gm/100 ml), protein (0.8 to 1.4 gm/100 ml), and fat (2.4 to 4.1 gm/100 ml). The main constituent of the infants' diet after the age of 3 months (a "soya milk" prepared at the community's central kitchen) was extremely dilute with a very low calorific value (13.7 kcal/100 ml). Persistent attempts to find dietary modifications that would satisfy both the vegan philosophy and also the recommended dietary allowances failed. This problem represents a scientific and medicosocial challenge to pediatricians and nutritionists.

  7. Documentation of functional and clinical effects of infant nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koletzko, Berthold; Szajewska, Hania; Ashwell, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    The Early Nutrition Academy and the Child Health Foundation, in collaboration with the Committee on Nutrition, European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, held a workshop in March 2011 to explore guidance on acquiring evidence on the effects of nutritional interven...... interventions in infants and young children. The four objectives were to (1) provide guidance on the quality and quantity of evidence needed to justify conclusions on functional and clinical effects of nutrition in infants and young children aged......The Early Nutrition Academy and the Child Health Foundation, in collaboration with the Committee on Nutrition, European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, held a workshop in March 2011 to explore guidance on acquiring evidence on the effects of nutritional...

  8. Multiple nutritional deficiencies in infants from a strict vegetarian community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmora, E; Gorodischer, R; Bar-Ziv, J

    1979-02-01

    Severe nutritional deficiencies developed in four infants from a new vegan religious community. They had received breast milk until the age of 3 months; thereafter, breast milk was supplemented with or replaced by extremely low caloric-density preparations. All of the infants had profound protein-caloric malnutrition, severe rickets, osteoporosis, and vitamin B12 and other deficiencies. One infant died, while the three others had an uneventful recovery. After discharge of the infants from the hospital, the community responded well to a modification of the infants' diet, which did not violate their vegetarian philosophy. However, they refused to give their infants vitamin B12 on a regular basis.

  9. [Hypoallergenic milks (HA formulas) in infant nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoppi, G

    1993-01-01

    According to the definition of the European Scientific Committee for Food, hypoallergenic or hypoantigenic formulas (HA-formulas) are those which contain hydrolysed protein derived both from casein or whey. Soy-based formulas are not comprised in this definition since it has been demonstrated from several years that soy-protein, in several circumstances, may be highly allergenic. Hypoallergenic formulas contain besides hydrolysed protein, carbohydrate and lipid in amount and proportion similar to those indicated by ESPGAN recommendations on adapted formulas. As far as it concerns composition in lipid, recently great attention has been given to optimal supply and ratio of omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids. Hypoallergenic formulas are therefore suitable for balanced nutrition of suckling infants. Specific indications on prevention of atopic diseases are not treated.

  10. Transition Phase Nutrition Recommendations: A Missing Link in the Nutrition Management of Preterm Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Ann-Marie; Fenton, Sarah; Murphy, Brendan P; Kiely, Mairead E

    2017-03-01

    Despite the availability of international nutrition recommendations, preterm infants remain vulnerable to suboptimal nutrition. The standard approach of assessing nutrient intakes chronologically may make it difficult to identify the origin of nutrient deficits and/or excesses. To develop a "nutrition phase" approach to evaluating nutrition support, enabling analysis of nutrient intakes during the period of weaning from parenteral nutrition (PN) to enteral nutrition (EN), called the transition (TN) phase, and compare the data with those analyzed using the standard "chronological age" approach to assess whether the identification of nutrient deficits and/or excesses can be improved. Analysis of a comprehensive nutrition database developed using actual nutrient intake data collected on an hourly basis in 59 preterm infants (birth weight ≤1500 g, gestation phase analysis approach revealed substantial macronutrient and energy deficits during the TN phase. In particular, deficits were identified as maximal during the EN-dominant TN phase (enteral feeds ≥80 mL/kg/d) of the infant's nutrition course. In contrast, the chronological age analysis approach did not reveal a corresponding pattern of deficit occurrence but rather intakes that approximated or exceeded recommendations. Actual intakes of nutrients, analyzed using a nutrition phase approach to evaluating nutrition support, enabled a more infant-driven rather than age-driven application of nutrition recommendations. This approach unmasked nutrient deficits occurring during the transition phase. Overcoming nutrient deficits in this nutrition phase should be prioritized to improve the nutrition management of preterm infants.

  11. Early Nutritional Interventions for Brain and Cognitive Development in Preterm Infants: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Nora; Garcia-Rodenas, Clara L.

    2017-01-01

    Adequate nutrition is important for neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm-born infants. In this review, we aim to summarize the current knowledge on nutritional interventions initiated during the hospital stay targeting brain and cognitive development benefits in preterm human infants. Studies can broadly be split in general dietary intervention studies and studies investigating specific nutrients or nutritional supplements. In general, mother’s breast milk was reported to be better for preterm infants’ neurodevelopment compared to infant formula. The differences in methodologies make it difficult to conclude any effects of interventions with individual nutrients. Only protein and iron level studies showed some consistent findings regarding optimal doses; however, confirmatory studies are needed. This review does not support some widely accepted associations, such as that between long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation and visual development. Clear nutritional recommendations cannot be made based on this review. However, the type of infant nutrition (i.e., breast milk versus formula or donor milk), the timing of the nutritional intervention, and the dose of the nutrient/supplement have been found to be relevant factors in determining the success of nutritional intervention studies in preterm infants. PMID:28241501

  12. Influence of feeding practices and associated factors on the nutritional status of infants in rural areas of Madhya Pradesh state, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshram, Indrapal Ishwarji; Kodavanti, Mallikharjun Rao; Chitty, Gal Reddy; Manchala, Ravindranath; Kumar, Sharad; Kakani, Sreerama Krishna; Kodavalla, Venkaiah; Avula, Laxmaiah; Narsimhachary Veera, Brahmam Ginnela

    2015-03-01

    A community based cross-sectional study was undertaken in rural Madhya Pradesh (MP). The nutritional status of infants was assessed using WHO Child Growth Standards. Only 26% of infants received breast-feeding within 1 hour of birth. About 57% of children 6 to 11 months old received complementary feeding (CF). The prevalence of underweight, stunting, and wasting was 41%, 29%, and 33%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that the risk of underweight and stunting was 1.4 times higher among children belonging to scheduled castes and scheduled tribes compared with others, 1.4 to 1.6 times among children from households with the lowest wealth index, and 1.5 times among children of illiterate mothers. Hygienic practices, birth weight, home delivery, and CF practices were also significantly (P < .01) associated with undernutrition in multivariate analysis. Undernutrition is an important health problem in MP, and urgent steps are required to formulate policies and strategies to improve infant and young child feeding practices, socioeconomic conditions, and literacy and encouraging institutional delivery and personal hygiene.

  13. Nutritional recommendations for the late-preterm infant and the preterm infant after hospital discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapillonne, Alexandre; O'Connor, Deborah L; Wang, Danhua; Rigo, Jacques

    2013-03-01

    Early nutritional support of preterm infants is critical to life-long health and well being. Numerous studies have demonstrated that preterm infants are at increased risk of mortality and morbidity, including disturbances in brain development. To date, much attention has focused on enhancing the nutritional support of very low and extremely low birth weight infants to improve survival and quality of life. In most countries, preterm infants are sent home before their expected date of term birth for economic or other reasons. It is debatable whether these newborns require special nutritional regimens or discharge formulas. Furthermore, guidelines that specify how to feed very preterm infants after hospital discharge are scarce and conflicting. On the other hand, the late-preterm infant presents a challenge to health care providers immediately after birth when decisions must be made about how and where to care for these newborns. Considering these infants as well babies may place them at a disadvantage. Late-preterm infants have unique and often-unrecognized medical vulnerabilities and nutritional needs that predispose them to greater rates of morbidity and hospital readmissions. Poor or inadequate feeding during hospitalization may be one of the main reasons why late-preterm infants have difficulty gaining weight right after birth. Providing optimal nutritional support to late premature infants may improve survival and quality of life as it does for very preterm infants. In this work, we present a review of the literature and provide separate recommendations for the care and feeding of late-preterm infants and very preterm infants after discharge. We identify gaps in current knowledge as well as priorities for future research. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Urinary oxalate excretion by very low birth weight infants receiving parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campfield, T; Braden, G

    1989-11-01

    Renal calcifications have been described in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, and diuretic drug-associated hypercalciuria is believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of this lesion. Hyperoxaluria is an important cause of renal stone formation in children and adults. Because parenteral nutrition solutions contain the oxalate precursors ascorbate and glycine, the relationship between total parenteral nutrition administration and oxalate excretion in VLBW infants was examined. Administration of approximately 0.5 g of total parenteral nutrition protein per kilogram per day to VLBW infants was associated with an increased urinary oxalate concentration and an increased urinary oxalate to creatinine ratio, when compared with VLBW infants receiving a glucose and electrolyte solution. A further increase in urinary oxalate concentration and oxalate to creatinine ratio was noted when total parenteral nutrition protein was increased to approximately 1.5 g of protein per kilogram per day. In VLBW infants who receive total parenteral nutrition, elevated urinary oxalate concentrations may develop and may be a factor in the pathogenesis of nephrocalcinosis in these infants.

  15. Nutritional status, breastfeeding, and evolution of Infants with acute viral bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornelles, Cristina T L; Piva, Jefferson P; Marostica, Paulo J C

    2007-09-01

    Acute viral bronchiolitis is a common respiratory infectious disease of infancy. A prospective study was carried out with 175 infants aged up to six months to evaluate their nutritional and breastfeeding status as possible risk factors for unfavourable evolution of previously-healthy infants from a care hospital. Immunofluorescence test for virus and anthropometric assessment were performed. Outcomes were length of oxygen-use, length of hospital stay, and type of hospital unit needed. Seventy-three percent of the infants were well-nourished, 6% undernourished, 8.6% at a nutritional risk, 10.9% overweight, and 1.7% obese. Eighty-one percent of the undernourished and nutritionally at-risk infants and 72% of the well-nourished, overweight, and obese infants did not receive exclusive breastfeeding. The median length of hospital stay was four days and of oxygen-use was 60 hours. The nutritional status did not affect the clinical course of previously-healthy infants with acute viral brochiolitis. The duration of exclusive breastfeeding, but not type of breastfeeding, was inversely related to the length of oxygen-use and the length of hospital stay. Shorter exclusive breastfeeding was observed in infants who were assigned to a paediatric ward or to an intensive care unit. In conclusion, longer duration of breastfeeding was associated with better clinical outcomes.

  16. Prebiotics and probiotics in infant nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker-Zierikzee, A.

    2005-01-01

    IntroductionIn general breast-fed infants suffer less from infection, which could be partly explained by the specificcompostionand metabolic activity of their intestinalmicroflora. During the last two decades, many attempts have been made to mimic the intestinal flora of breast fed infants in formula fed infants. Bothprebioticsandprobioticsbased concepts have been developed to beneficially change the intestinalmicrofloraand thus induce positive health effects. We conducted two infant nutritio...

  17. Current safety standards in infant nutrition--a European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernell, Olle

    2012-01-01

    Foods intended specifically for infants and young children are considered under European community law and are defined in specific commission directives. In principal, these directives conclude that such foods must be safe, have a special composition, be distinguishable from normal foods, be suitable for fulfilling particular nutritional requirements, and should, when marketed, indicate such suitability. Since infant formulas are intended as the sole source of nutrition during the first months of life, their nutritional adequacy and safety are particularly strictly regulated. The Scientific Committee on Food report from 2003, on which the current commission directive is based, makes clear recommendations on how benefits, suitability, and safety of modifications beyond established standards should be documented and evaluated. These principles resulted in part from a workshop on characterization of infant food modifications in the EU and two position papers by the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN). These papers are reviewed below.

  18. 76 FR 38109 - National Advisory Council on Maternal, Infant and Fetal Nutrition: Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... Food and Nutrition Service National Advisory Council on Maternal, Infant and Fetal Nutrition: Notice of... National Advisory Council on Maternal, Infant and Fetal Nutrition. DATES: Date and Time: July 19-21, 2011... Maternal, Infant, and Fetal Nutrition will meet to continue its study of the Special Supplemental...

  19. Effect of hospital nutrition support on growth velocity and nutritional status of low birth weight infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas S. Azzeh

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infants with low birth weights are provided with hospital nutrition support to enhance their survivability and body weights. However, different hospitals have different nutrition support formulas. Therefore, the effectiveness of these nutrition support formulas should be investigated. Objective: To assess the effect of hospital nutrition support on growth velocity and nutritional status of low birth weight infants at Al-Noor hospital, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted between October, 2010 and December, 2012. Three hundred newborns were recruited from Al-Noor Hospital in Makkah city, Saudi Arabia. Infants were selected according to their birth weights and were divided equally into three groups; (i Low Birth Weight (LBW infants (15012500 g birth weight, (ii Very Low Birth Weight (VLBW infants (1001-1500 g birth weight and (iii Extremely Low Birth Weight (ELBW infants ( 0.05 were observed among groups. Serum calcium, phosphorus and potassium levels at discharge were higher (p < 0.05 than that at birth for ELBW and VLBW groups; while sodium level decreased in ELBW group to be within normal ranges. Albumin level was improved (p < 0.05 in ELBW group. Conclusion: Health care management for low birth weight infants in Al-Noor Hospital was not sufficient to achieve normal growth rate for low birth weight infants, while biochemical indicators were remarkably improved in all groups.

  20. 76 FR 16599 - Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC): Income Eligibility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC): Income Eligibility Guidelines AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... income eligibility of persons applying to participate in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program...

  1. What could infant and young child nutrition learn from sweatshops?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagoe-Moses Isabella

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adequate infant and young child nutrition demands high rates of breastfeeding and good access to nutrient rich complementary foods, requiring public sector action to promote breastfeeding and home based complementary feeding, and private sector action to refrain from undermining breastfeeding and to provide affordable, nutrient rich complementary foods. Unfortunately, due to a lack of trust, the public and private sectors, from both the North and the South, do not work well together in achieving optimal infant and young child nutrition. Discussion As the current debate in infant and young child nutrition is reminiscent of the "sweatshop" debate fifteen years ago, we argue that lessons from the sweatshops debate regarding cooperation between public and private sectors - and specific organizational experiences such as the Ethical Trading Initiative in which companies, trade unions, and civil society organizations work together to enhance implementation of labour standards and address alleged allegations - could serve as a model for improving cooperation and trust between public, civil society and private groups, and ultimately health, in infant and young child nutrition. Summary Lessons from the sweatshops debate could serve as a model to promote cooperation and trust between public and private groups, such that they learn to work together towards their common goal of improving infant and young child nutrition.

  2. What could infant and young child nutrition learn from sweatshops?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Peter A; Ansett, Sean; Sagoe-Moses, Isabella

    2011-05-05

    Adequate infant and young child nutrition demands high rates of breastfeeding and good access to nutrient rich complementary foods, requiring public sector action to promote breastfeeding and home based complementary feeding, and private sector action to refrain from undermining breastfeeding and to provide affordable, nutrient rich complementary foods. Unfortunately, due to a lack of trust, the public and private sectors, from both the North and the South, do not work well together in achieving optimal infant and young child nutrition. As the current debate in infant and young child nutrition is reminiscent of the "sweatshop" debate fifteen years ago, we argue that lessons from the sweatshops debate regarding cooperation between public and private sectors - and specific organizational experiences such as the Ethical Trading Initiative in which companies, trade unions, and civil society organizations work together to enhance implementation of labour standards and address alleged allegations - could serve as a model for improving cooperation and trust between public, civil society and private groups, and ultimately health, in infant and young child nutrition. Lessons from the sweatshops debate could serve as a model to promote cooperation and trust between public and private groups, such that they learn to work together towards their common goal of improving infant and young child nutrition.

  3. Nutrition of preterm infants in relation to bronchopulmonary dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tschirch Edda

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background The pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD is multifactorial. In addition to prenatal inflammation, postnatal malnutrition also affects lung development. Methods A retrospective study was performed to analyse during the first two weeks of life the total, enteral and parenteral nutrition of premature infants ( Results Ninety-five premature infants were analysed: 26 with BPD (27 ± 1 weeks and 69 without BPD (28 ± 1 weeks. There was no statistical significant difference in the total intake of fluids, calories, glucose or protein and weight gain per day in both groups. The risk of developing BPD was slightly increased in infants with cumulative caloric intake below the minimal requirement of 1230 kcal/kg and a cumulative protein intake below 43.5 g/kg. Furthermore, the risk of developing BPD was significantly higher when infants had a cumulative fluid intake above the recommended 1840 ml/kg. In infants who developed BPD, the enteral nutrition was significantly lower than in non-BPD infants [456 ml/kg (IQR 744, 235 vs. 685 (IQR 987, 511]. Infants who did not develop BPD reached 50% of total enteral feeding significantly faster [9.6 days vs. 11.5]. Conclusions Preterm infants developing BPD received less enteral feeding, even though it was well compensated by the parenteral nutrient supply. Data suggest that a critical minimal amount of enteral feeding is required to prevent development of BPD; however, a large prospective clinical study is needed to prove this assumption.

  4. Infant nutrition and lifelong health: current perspectives and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, S M

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the role and importance of nutrition in early postnatal life, as an influence on lifelong vulnerability to poor health, is an important part of current research. We need to be able to define optimal patterns of infant feeding, not just to support growth and development in infancy, but also as determinants of later health. To date, much of the focus on the long-term effects of infant nutrition has been on milk feeding, to compare breast and formula feeding and to evaluate the effects of exclusivity, timing and duration of feeding different types of milk in infancy; other aspects of infant feeding such as age at introduction of solid foods and type of weaning diet have received less attention, and relatively little is known about their links to later health. Contemporary data are needed to enable us to move beyond explanation of historical infant feeding data in order to understand and predict health outcomes in future generations. Ongoing and new population studies, that include infants from diverse settings, will be key to providing generalizable data that can be used to define optimal feeding practice. There are some methodological challenges ahead, although significant progress has already been made, and further progress is envisaged in the future. In particular, the opportunity to bring together epidemiological studies and new mechanistic insights that will help identify key aspects of infant nutrition and their causal effects offer great promise both in moving this field forward as well as the potential for health benefits for future generations.

  5. Nutritional outcomes in infants with food allergy after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wen-Yi; Xu, Zhuo-Ming; Hong, Li; Wu, Qian-Yue; Zhang, Yue-Yue

    2017-06-09

    Food allergy is a rapidly growing public health concern because of its increasing prevalence, as well as life-threatening potential. There is limited knowledge on the nutritional status for the pediatric congenital heart disease (CHD) patients with food allergy. This study investigated both clinical and nutritional outcomes according to the CHD infants with food allergy. Forty CHD infants with food allergy and 39 controls were recruited in Shanghai, China. The height and weight for age and weight for height were converted to z-scores to evaluate their effects on nutritional status before and after CHD operation. Cow's milk showed the most frequently sensitized food allergen. The WHZ in the ≥2 allergen group was different before operation and after operation (P = .040). The number of sensitized food allergens significantly correlated with the WHZ (r = -0.431, P = .001), WAZ (r = -0.465, P = .000), and HAZ (r = -0.287, P = .025). Infection and NT-BNP showing negative correlation with WHZ and WAZ of infants with food allergy. The increased number of sensitized food allergens is associated with negative effects on both short-term and long-term nutritional status in infants with CHD. Therefore, the meticulous and continuous evaluation and management of both growth and nutritional status should be considered in CHD patients with a high number of sensitized food allergens. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Nutrition therapy in critically ill infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, Heather E; Wischmeyer, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Infants and children are susceptible to the profound metabolic effects of critical illness. In addition, preexisting malnutrition and obesity have adverse consequences during the intensive care unit stay. Early enteral and parenteral feeding can improve nutrition deficits, but neither has been sufficiently studied to show an effect on clinical outcomes in pediatric critical care. Indirect calorimetry is a useful technique that identifies patients receiving inadequate or excessive nutrition, but this technique is underused.

  7. 76 FR 35095 - Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC): Exclusion of Combat...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... Service 7 CFR Part 246 RIN 0584-AE04 Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and... regulations governing the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) a... 246--SPECIAL SUPPLEMENTAL NUTRITION PROGRAM FOR WOMEN, INFANTS AND CHILDREN (WIC) 0 1. The...

  8. 76 FR 59885 - Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC): Implementation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... Service 7 CFR Part 246 RIN 0584-AE13 Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and... into the regulations governing the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and... NUTRITION PROGRAM FOR WOMEN, INFANTS AND CHILDREN 0 1. The authority citation for part 246 continues to...

  9. Infant Nutrition and 12 and 18 Months Secure Base Behavior: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachs, Theodore D.; Posada, German; Carbonell, Olga A.; Creed-Kanashiro, Hillary; Gurkas, Pinar

    2011-01-01

    A notable omission in studies of developmental links to early nutritional deficiencies is infant attachment. In those few studies investigating associations between infant nutrition and attachment, nutrition was defined solely by physical growth, and infants had moderate-severe growth retardation. In this study, we utilized multiple markers of…

  10. Nutritional requirements and parenteral nutrition in preterm infants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    airway pressure, and artificial surfactant therapy have resulted in improvement .... 3 g/kg/day is well tolerated without adverse effects and provides the required .... Randomized trial of early diet in preterm infants and later intelligence quotient.

  11. Gluconeogenesis is Not Regulated by Either Glucose or Insulin in Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants Receiving Total Parenteral Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chacko, Shaji K.; Ordonez, Jorge; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Sunehag, Agneta L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine potential factors regulating gluconeogenesis (GNG) in extremely low birth weight infants receiving total parenteral nutrition. Study design Seven infants (birth weight, 0.824 +/- 0.068 kg; gestational age, 25.4 +/- 0.5 weeks; postnatal age, 3.3 +/- 0.2 days) were studied for 1

  12. Vitamin D status in infants: relation to nutrition and season

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergard, M.; Arnberg, K.; Michaelsen, K. F.;

    2011-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study, the primary objective was to assess the plasma concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) in healthy 9-month-old infants (n = 255). The secondary objective was to evaluate nutritional variables and season in relation to 25(OH) D. The concentration of 25(OH) D was 77...

  13. Lipids in infant nutrition and their impact on later development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, ER

    1996-01-01

    Numerous studies on infant nutrition show that breast-feeding has a beneficial effect on growth, morbidity, and neurological and cognitive functioning later in life, Moreover, there are indications that a relationship exists between the diet consumed during early childhood and morbidity in adulthood

  14. 78 FR 17631 - Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC): Income Eligibility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC): Income Eligibility Guidelines AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S... Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children Program (WIC). These income...

  15. 78 FR 36163 - National Advisory Council on Maternal, Infant and Fetal Nutrition; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... Food and Nutrition Service National Advisory Council on Maternal, Infant and Fetal Nutrition; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the... Council on Maternal, Infant and Fetal Nutrition. DATES: Date and Time: July 23-25, 2013, 9:00 a.m.-5:30...

  16. Phospholipids in Human Milk and Infant Formulas: Benefits and Needs for Correct Infant Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilla, Antonio; Diego Quintaes, Késia; Barberá, Reyes; Alegría, Amparo

    2016-08-17

    The composition of human milk has served as a basis for the development of infant formulas, which are used when breastfeeding is not possible. Among the human milk nutrients, 50% of the total energetic value corresponds to fat, with a high level of fatty acids and 0.2-2.0% present in the form of phospholipids (PLs). The PL contents and fatty acid distribution in PL species have been investigated as bioactive elements for the production of infant formulas, since they offer potential benefits for the optimum growth and health of the newborn infant. The differences in the amount of PLs and in fatty acid distribution in PL species between human milk and infant formulas can imply biologically significant differences for newborn infants fed with infant formulas versus human milk-mainly due to the greater proportion of sphingomyelin with respect to phosphatidylcholine in infant formulas. The limited information referred to the characterization of fatty acid distribution in PL species in infant formulas or in ingredients used to enrich them merits further research in order to obtain products with benefits similar to those of human milk in terms of infant growth, visual acuity, and neurological development. The present review establishes the scientific basis for helping to adjust formulations to the requirements of infant nutrition.

  17. 77 FR 17006 - Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC): Income Eligibility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC): Income Eligibility Guidelines AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), USDA. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... determining the income eligibility of persons applying to participate in the Special Supplemental...

  18. Iron intakes of Australian infants and toddlers: findings from the Melbourne Infant Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT) Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Linda A; McNaughton, Sarah A; Campbell, Karen J; Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A

    2016-01-28

    Fe deficiency remains the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and young children are at particular risk. Preventative food-based strategies require knowledge of current intakes, sources of Fe, and factors associated with low Fe intakes; yet few data are available for Australian children under 2 years. This study's objectives were to determine intakes and food sources of Fe for Australian infants and toddlers and identify non-dietary factors associated with Fe intake. Dietary, anthropometric and socio-demographic data from the Melbourne Infant Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial Program were analysed for 485 infants (mean age: 9·1 (sd 1·2) months) and 423 toddlers (mean age: 19·6 (sd 2·6) months) and their mothers. Dietary intakes were assessed via 24-h recalls over 3 non-consecutive days. Prevalence of inadequate Fe intake was estimated using the full probability approach. Associations between potential non-dietary predictors (sex, breast-feeding status, age when introduced to solid foods, maternal age, maternal education, maternal employment status and mother's country of birth) and Fe intakes were assessed using linear regression. Mean Fe intakes were 9·1 (sd 4·3) mg/d for infants and 6·6 (sd 2·4) mg/d for toddlers. Our results showed that 32·6 % of infants and 18·6 % of toddlers had inadequate Fe intake. Main food sources of Fe were Fe-fortified infant formula and cereals for infants and toddlers, respectively. Female sex and current breast-feeding were negatively associated with infant Fe intakes. Introduction to solid foods at or later than 6 months was negatively associated with Fe intake in toddlers. These data may facilitate food-based interventions to improve Australian children's Fe intake levels.

  19. Prebiotics and probiotics in infant nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker-Zierikzee, A.

    2005-01-01

    IntroductionIn general breast-fed infants suffer less from infection, which could be partly explained by the specificcompostionand metabolic activity of their intestinalmicroflora. During the last two decades, many

  20. Prebiotics and probiotics in infant nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker-Zierikzee, A.

    2005-01-01

    IntroductionIn general breast-fed infants suffer less from infection, which could be partly explained by the specificcompostionand metabolic activity of their intestinalmicroflora. During the last two decades, many attemp

  1. Feeding practices and nutritional status of infants in Morogoro Municipality, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, John G; Kimambo, Stella C; Lwelamira, James E

    2013-07-01

    Breast feeding practice especially exclusive breast feeding (EBF) is a major determinant of child growth and development. In Tanzania, most women breastfeed their infants for long periods, but many introduce alternative feeding too early in life. The objective of this study was to determine factors affecting EBF and the relationship between feeding practices and the nutritional status of infants. This cross-sectional survey, using a semi-structured questionnaire, was conducted in Morogoro Municipality in Tanzania. The study involved lactating women recruited from five randomly selected health facilities. Demographic, clinical, knowledge and practices related to infant feeding as well as infant anthropometric information were collected. Infant nutritional status was assessed based on weight-for-age, height-for-age and weight- for- height. There were wide variations in knowledge and practice of breastfeeding among women. Majority (92%) of the respondents gave colostrums to infants although more than 50% did not know its benefits. Eight percent of the respondents discarded colostrums on the account that it is not good for their neonates. Only 23.1% of the respondents thought that infants should be breastfed exclusively during the first six months of infancy. Ninety-eight percent of infants infants aged 2-3 months and 22.3% among those who were above 3 months of age. No child in the ≥ 4 months old was exclusively breastfed. Over 80% of the infants had normal weights, 13% were stunted and 8% wasted. EBF was associated with higher scores for height- for- age Z (P feeding practices in the study population were largely suboptimal. As a result, considerable proportions of children had poor health indicators. Thus, correct breastfeeding practices should be supported and promoted to improve the well-being of children.

  2. Age-appropriate feeding practices and nutritional status of infants attending child welfare clinic at a Teaching Hospital in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar M Lawan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Appropriate infant feeding is the key to optimum infant and child development and survival. This study investigates age-appropriate infant feeding practices and nutritional status of infants attending the immunization and child welfare clinic at Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital. Materials and Methods: Using a cross-sectional descriptive design, a sample of 300 sets of infants (age ≤12 months and caregivers was systematically selected and studied. The data were analyzed using the MINITAB ® 12.21 (USA statistical software. Results: All the infants studied were still on breast milk. Most of the mothers demonstrated correct body positioning (89.9 and attachment (78.7% during breastfeeding, and effective suckling was demonstrated in 77.0%. Interestingly, none of the infants was either exclusively breastfed for 6 months or currently on exclusive breastfeeding. Furthermore, only 64 (58.2% of the 110 infants that were more than 6 months of age had appropriately been started on complementary feeding from 6 months of age. Overall, most caregivers (88.7% had "fair" to "good" infant feeding practices. The practices were significantly associated with their level of education, and their relationship with the infants. Up to 40.0% and 73.7% of the infants had varying degrees of wasting and stunting respectively. Infant feeding practices and the age of the infants emerged as the only factors significantly associated with stunting, while both the caregivers′ practices and age of the infants emerged as significant predictors of wasting in the infants. Conclusion and Recommendations: Barely 3 years to the 2015 target of the millennium development goals (MDGs, infant feeding and nutritional status still poses a serious threat to the dream of realizing the MDG-4. The Ministry of Health and relevant developing partners in this region should as a matter of urgency, formulate and implement a strong community-based public health intervention program to

  3. Carnitine deficiency in premature infants receiving total parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, D; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, E; Wolf, H

    1980-03-01

    Carnitine plays a significant role in fatty acid utilization and ketone body production. Its availability is especially important during the immediate postnatal period. To determine whether low birth weight infants who cannot be orally fed are at risk of developing carnitine deficiency, we compared the carnitine blood levels and urinary excretion of 12 premature infants (Group A) receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) with those of 8 infants of similar gestational age and birth weight (Group B) who received carnitine-containing milk formulas. In Group A, serum levels of total and free carnitine fell after 5 days of carnitine-deficient parenteral nutrition, and urinary excretion was significantly reduced. Serum levels and urinary excretion increased after the onset of oral feedings. The control Group B exhibited no significant changes in carnitine blood levels between the first and fifth days of life, but did show a later increase. Children in Group A had lower carnitine blood levels compared to those in Group B on the fifth day of life. These findings suggest that premature infants are not able to synthesize enough carnitine to maintain blood levels, and that carnitine deficiency can occur following TPN. Further investigation of metabolic consequences secondary to deficient carnitine intake in premature infants is necessary before carnitine supplementation should be considered.

  4. Infant nutrition, physical growth, breastfeeding, and general nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oski, F A

    1994-06-01

    Breastfeeding and its consequences continue to attract the attention of investigators. Breastfeeding has again been shown to reduce the development of otitis media during the 1st year of life. Although the development of hyperbilirubinemia is increased with breastfeeding it has been shown to be easily controllable without the discontinuation of breastfeeding. Although it is apparent that infants that are breastfed for periods of more than 6 months weigh less than formula-fed counterparts it remains to be established which growth pattern is optimal.

  5. Nutrition, growth, and allergic diseases among very preterm infants after hospital discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariassen, Gitte

    2013-01-01

    to be breastfed (p = 0.09). Infant age at discharge and duration of hospitalization did not influence breastfeeding at discharge. Increase in weight Z-score from birth to discharge was largest in the bottle-fed group compared to the breastfed group (p = 0.000), probably due to feeding practice the last week......The aims of this PhD thesis were: 1. Primarily to investigate the effect, of adding human milk fortifier to mother's milk while breastfeeding very preterm infants after hospital discharge, on growth until 1 year corrected age (CA) 2. Secondarily to describe breastfeeding rate and factors associated...... with breastfeeding among very preterm infants at hospital discharge. 3. To describe possible feeding-problems during the intervention-period, and allergic diseases during the first year of life, among very preterm infants related to their nutrition after hospital discharge. 4. To describe the content...

  6. Aggressive parenteral nutrition and growth velocity in preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almudena Ribed Sánchez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Parenteral administration of nutrients to sustain newborns' growth represents an important therapeutic challenge. Objective: To describe parenteral nutrition (PN practices in a tertiary hospital and evaluate postnatal growth in preterm infants. Material and methods: Observational retrospective study over 3 months. Data on infants born or admitted to the Neonatal Department and starting PN were collected. Demographics, anthropometric data, daily caloric, protein intake data and PN components used were collected. Growth velocity was characterized by the average daily weight gain and compared to intrauterine growth. Results: 68 preterm infants started PN during the study period. Most infants (65% were born by caesarean and mean gestational age was 33 weeks. Twenty five percent of newborns did not regain birth weight. The remaining 75% regained birth weight on the 3rd day of PN and average daily weight gain was 16 g/kg/d, ranging between 12 and 22 g/kg/d. Although weight gain approximated intrauterine rate, most infants born <30 weeks gestation did not achieve median birth weight of the reference population. Early aggressive PN was administered with an average of 3, 11 and 3 g/Kg/d of proteins, carbohydrates and lipids respectively, reaching a maximum on the 4th day of 4, 18, 4 g/kg/d, respectively. Discussion: Aggressive PN is used in the hospital setting. The preterm infants reached birth weight earlier and had a greater velocity of growth than in other clinical trials and similar to intrauterine.

  7. Characteristics of Microencapsulated Nutritional Oil for Infant Formula Food

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Lulu; LAI Ying; LI Xiaodong

    2009-01-01

    Nutritional oil for infant formula food was mieroeneapsulated by the spray drying method with coating materials including maltodextrin (MD), soy protein isolate (SPI), and emulsifier (soy lecithin). Vegetable oil blend was prepared by mixing coconut oil, safflower oil and soybean oil at a ratio to achieve a fatty acid profile comparable to human milk fat (HMF). The fatty acid composition of the product was determined by capillary gas chromatograph. As a result, the composition was as close as possible to that of HMF, it could be used for infant fomular food to make up some deficiencies of milk powder in nutrition and functional properties. Furthermore, the glass transition temperature (T,g) of the wall material was determined by DSC and its Tg was 66.42℃. It provided a theoretical basis for the storage of the product at the normal temperature.

  8. Percutaneous catheter use in newborn infants with parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García del Río, M; Lastra-Sanchez, G; Martínez-Léon, M; Martínez-Valverde, A

    1998-12-01

    The well known negative effect of infection on nutrition causes the cycle 'infection-malnutrition-infection'. Prolonged parenteral nutrition requires central venous catheterization. Due to the possibility of 'catheter related sepsis' (CRS) catheters should be used correctly to avoid septic complications. A very high percentage of central venous catheters (CVC) removed because of presumed infections are not infected when culture is done. In some patients infections are successfully treated with antibiotics without catheter removal. Removal of the line is recommended when catheter-associated sepsis is suspected or proven, but not for the extremely ill preterm infant or when such removal may be impractical. A therapeutic protocol is suggested to avoid future canalizations in the neonate, sometimes in a critical situation. Current literature referring to CRS in the newborn infant is reviewed.

  9. 7 CFR 250.66 - Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women... ITS JURISDICTION Household Programs § 250.66 Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants... Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC Program) under part 246...

  10. 75 FR 15603 - Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC): Vendor Cost...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... Service 7 CFR Part 246 RIN 0584-AD71 Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and... Register on October 8, 2009, entitled ``Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and... published a final rule in the Federal Register, entitled ``Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for...

  11. 75 FR 38771 - National Advisory Council on Maternal, Infant and Fetal Nutrition: Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ...: 2010-16331] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food and Nutrition Service National Advisory Council on Maternal... National Advisory Council on Maternal, Infant and Fetal Nutrition. Date and Time: July 27-29, 2010, 9 a.m... Maternal, Infant and Fetal Nutrition will meet to continue its study of the Special Supplemental...

  12. Clinical practice: vegetarian infant and child nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Winckel, Myriam; Vande Velde, Saskia; De Bruyne, Ruth; Van Biervliet, Stephanie

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this review is to give insight on the benefits and risks of vegetarianism, with special emphasis on vegetarian child nutrition. This eating pattern excluding meat and fish is being adopted by a growing number of people. A vegetarian diet has been shown to be associated with lower mortality of ischaemic heart disease and lower prevalence of obesity. Growth in children on a vegetarian diet including dairy has been shown to be similar to omnivorous peers. Although vegetarianism in adolescents is associated with eating disorders, there is no proof of a causal relation, as the eating disorder generally precedes the exclusion of meat from the diet. A well-balanced lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, including dairy products, can satisfy all nutritional needs of the growing child. In contrast, a vegan diet, excluding all animal food sources, has at least to be supplemented with vitamin B(12), with special attention to adequate intakes of calcium and zinc and energy-dense foods containing enough high-quality protein for young children. The more restricted the diet and the younger the child, the greater the risk for deficiencies.

  13. Infant feeding: beyond the nutritional aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselia A.P. Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To draw attention to the importance of interaction between caregiver and child during feeding and the influence of parenting style on dietary habit formation. Source of data: A search was performed in the PubMed and Scopus databases for articles addressing responsive feeding; the articles considered most relevant by the authors were selected. Synthesis of data: The way children are fed is decisive for the formation of their eating habits, especially the strategies that parents/caregivers use to stimulate feeding. In this context, responsive feeding has been emphasized, with the key principles: feed the infant directly and assist older children when they already eat on their own; feed them slowly and patiently, and encourage children to eat but do not force them; if the child refuses many types of foods, experiment with different food combinations, tastes, textures, and methods of encouragement; minimize distractions during meals; and make the meals an opportunity for learning and love, talking to the child during feeding and maintaining eye contact. It is the caregiver's responsibility to be sensitive to the child's signs and alleviate tensions during feeding, and make feeding time pleasurable; whereas it is the child's role to clearly express signs of hunger and satiety and be receptive to the caregiver. Conclusion: Responsive feeding is very important in dietary habit formation and should be encouraged by health professionals in their advice to families.

  14. Infant feeding: beyond the nutritional aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Giselia A P; Costa, Karla A O; Giugliani, Elsa R J

    2016-01-01

    To draw attention to the importance of interaction between caregiver and child during feeding and the influence of parenting style on dietary habit formation. A search was performed in the PubMed and Scopus databases for articles addressing responsive feeding; the articles considered most relevant by the authors were selected. The way children are fed is decisive for the formation of their eating habits, especially the strategies that parents/caregivers use to stimulate feeding. In this context, responsive feeding has been emphasized, with the key principles: feed the infant directly and assist older children when they already eat on their own; feed them slowly and patiently, and encourage children to eat but do not force them; if the child refuses many types of foods, experiment with different food combinations, tastes, textures, and methods of encouragement; minimize distractions during meals; and make the meals an opportunity for learning and love, talking to the child during feeding and maintaining eye contact. It is the caregiver's responsibility to be sensitive to the child's signs and alleviate tensions during feeding, and make feeding time pleasurable; whereas it is the child's role to clearly express signs of hunger and satiety and be receptive to the caregiver. Responsive feeding is very important in dietary habit formation and should be encouraged by health professionals in their advice to families. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  15. FEATURES OF INTENSIVE NUTRITIONAL SUPPORT OF PREMATURE INFANTS IN INTENSIVE CARE UNIT (PART 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V. Romanenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the modern approaches to preterm infants feeding, principles of parenteral and enteral nutrition. The importance of adequate control of deficit status in preterm infants at different periods of developmental care is marked. Arguments for using the enriched milk or specialized formulas for prematurity during the in-clinic and out-clinic periods of care are provided.Key words: premature infants, enteral nutrition, formulas for premature infants, breast milk, breast milk enriches.

  16. Comparing Infant Nutrition in Wanted and Unwanted Pregnancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Khosravi Anbaran

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe current study was conducted to investigate the relationship between unwanted pregnancy based on couples’ opinions and infant nutrition type in women referred to the health centers in Mashhad city and their husbands.Materials and MethodsIn this analytical-descriptive study, unwanted or wanted progenies were studied from the viewpoints of 366 women referred to the health centers in Mashhad city, Iran and their husbands, and also their relationships with infant nutrition type at the age of 4 months. The data were collected through questionnaires. The validity and reliability of the method and instruments were confirmed by content validity and test-retest. Moreover, data analysis was done using SPSS-16.0 software.ResultsThe average age of women in wanted pregnancy was 26.43±4.57 years and 27.57±5.22 years in unwanted women. The results showed a statistically significant relationship between unwanted pregnancy from the viewpoints of couples and infant's nutritional status (P=0.03. The prevalence of unwanted pregnancy in women with lower education (middle and high school was higher than those with higher education.ConclusionOur results showed a significant association between baby’s nutrition and unwanted pregnancy. Furthermore, an increased use of non-exclusive breastfeeding in unwanted pregnancy is necessary. Hence, proper use of contraceptive methods, preventing the adverse consequences of unwanted pregnancy such as non-exclusive breastfeeding, useful educational strategies, counseling and health services are necessary to be taken into account.

  17. 婴幼儿营养性缺铁性贫血相关危险因素分析%Analysis of the related risk factors of the nutritional iron deifciency anemia in the infants and children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵玮婷; 傅弦琴; 杜兆辉

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨社区儿童保健门诊婴幼儿营养性缺铁性贫血相关危险因素及预防措施,以降低婴幼儿贫血发生率。方法:选取2012年10月至2013年9月出生,在浦东新区潍坊社区卫生服务中心儿童保健门诊常规定期体检的婴幼儿作为研究对象,回顾性分析其临床资料,包括孕周、出生体重、喂养情况、血常规检查等,分析发生营养性缺铁性贫血的高危因素及防治措施。结果:在406例研究对象中,6月龄贫血69例,贫血率17.00%;12月龄贫血31例,占比7.64%;6月龄贫血患儿到12月龄时治愈率79.71%;6月龄,辅食添加及时组贫血率10.49%,不及时组28.33%,两组差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。Logistic回归分析显示孕周小、出生体重低、不及时添加辅食是婴幼儿营养性缺铁性贫血的高危因素。结论:应加强围生期保健,合理喂养,及时添加辅食;加强对有高危因素的婴幼儿进行儿童系统保健和健康教育,定期检查,早期发现贫血,早期治疗,提高儿童生存质量。%Objective:To investigate the risk factors and preventive measures of the nutritional iron deifciency anemia (IDA) in the infants and children in the community health care clinic in order to reduce their anemia incidence.Methods:The infants who were born from September 2012 to October 2013 and had the regular physical examination in Weifang Community Health Service Center of Pudong New District were selected and regarded as the research objects. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed, which included the gestational age, birth weight, feeding, blood routine tests etc. The risk factors of the occurrence of the nutritional IDA and the preventive measures were analyzed. Results:In 406 objects, 69 six-month-old cases were diagnosed as anemia, and the anemia rate accounted for 17%, and 31 twelve-month-old ones as anemia and its rate 7.64%. The curative rate in the

  18. New Methods for the Analysis of Fat-Soluble Vitamins in Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Don

    2016-01-01

    The AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN) defined fat-soluble vitamins (FSVs) to include vitamins A, D, E, and K. The levels of FSVs have been closely scrutinized because of a number of factors, including nutrition value especially in foods used to provide sole-source nutrition and the potential for health risks associated with content both below and above recommended levels. Stricter scrutiny and emphasis on nutrient-level compliance with regulatory requirements placed an increased demand on analytical methods that were fit-for-purpose, provided accurate and precise results. Over time, compendial methods have been developed and published by organizations such as AOAC INTERNATIONAL, the European Committee for Standardization, the International Dairy Federation, and the International Organization for Standardization, among others. In general, these methods have shown adequate precision for regulatory compliance based on example food matrixes for which they were designed. However, method evaluation for infant formulas and adult nutritional products was limited to very few matrixes within these categories. As such, method applicability gaps were noted and correlated with more complicated or diverse product matrixes. AOAC undertook the task of modernizing test methods for the determination of nutrients in infant formulas and in adult nutritional products formulated specifically for both healthy adults and those requiring specific nutritional intake. Composition of products in this category continued to evolve, which in turn presented increasing and new challenges to analytical methodology. A summary of a new generation of candidate compendial methods for determination of FSVs in these matrixes, identified by SPIFAN, is presented here.

  19. Early nutrition, growth and cognitive development of infants from birth to 2 years in Malaysia: a study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Nurliyana, Abdul Razak; Mohd Shariff, Zalilah; Mohd Taib, Mohd Nasir; Gan, Wan Ying; Tan, Kit-Aun

    2016-01-01

    Background The first 2 years of life is a critical period of rapid growth and brain development. During this period, nutrition and environmental factors play important roles in growth and cognitive development of a child. This report describes the study protocol of early nutrition, growth and cognitive development of infants from birth to 2 years of age. Methods/Design This is a prospective cohort study of mothers and infants recruited from government health clinics in Seremban district in Ne...

  20. Diaper Dermatitis in Infants Admitted to Social Pediatrics Health Center: Role of Socio-demographic Factors and Infant Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayaoglu, Semra; Kivanc-Altunay, Ilknur; Sarikaya, Sezgi

    2015-10-01

    To determine infant diaper dermatitis (DD) at pediatrics health center; its relation to socio-demographic factors and infant care. The study included 113 infants aged 0-24 mo. Data on infants' age, sex, weight, mothers' education, nutrition, diaper change frequency, cleaning methods and prophylactic cream use were recorded. Infants with minimum one time rash, were accepted to have DD. Seventy six (67.3 %) infants had DD [32 girls (42.1 %), 44 boys (57 %), mean age: 6.5 mo]. Infants with DD had significantly higher age than those without (p 0.001). DD frequency in infants ≥4.5 mo-old was 5.8(2.4-13.7) times more than in infants ≤4.5 mo. Cleaning material types did not affect DD frequency. No significant difference was observed in DD with diaper change of ≤3 times and ≥4 times. Significant difference in DD increase was observed with supplementary food intake vs. without it (p 0.000). DD frequency in infants with supplementary food intake was 6.4 times (2.4-17.1) more than in those without it. Human milk intake was statistically significant in causing less occurrence of DD as shown in univariate model (p food intake and lack of cream use seem to be accountable for DD whereas human milk intake lessened the occurrence of DD. Mothers should be informed on dermatitis care and encouraged for breastfeeding.

  1. Cytokine responses in very low birth weight infants receiving glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van den Berg; R.M. van Elburg; L. Vermeij; A. van Zwol; G.R. van den Brink; J.W.R. Twisk; E.E.S. Nieuwenhuis; W.P.F. Fetter

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Very low birth weight (VLBW) infants receiving glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition may present with a lower infection rate, which may result from enhanced antimicrobial innate or Th1 cytokine responses. We investigated whether glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition in VLBW infants increase

  2. Minimal Enteral Nutrition to Improve Adaptation After Intestinal Resection in Piglets and Infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aunsholt, Lise; Qvist, Niels; Sangild, Per Torp

    2017-01-01

    be well tolerated in patients with short bowel syndrome. METHODS: In experiment 1, 3-day-old piglets with 50% distal small intestinal resection were fed parenteral nutrition (PN, n = 10) or PN plus MEN given as either colostrum (PN-COL, n = 5) or formula (PN-FORM, n = 9) for 7 days. Intestinal nutrient......BACKGROUND: Minimal enteral nutrition (MEN) may induce a diet-dependent stimulation of gut adaptation following intestinal resection. Bovine colostrum is rich in growth factors, and we hypothesized that MEN with colostrum would stimulate intestinal adaptation, compared with formula, and would......, enteral colostrum supplementation was well tolerated, and no infants developed clinical signs of cow's milk allergy. CONCLUSION: Minimal enteral nutrition feeding with bovine colostrum and formula induced similar intestinal adaptation after resection in piglets. Colostrum was well tolerated by newly...

  3. Early nutrition, growth and cognitive development of infants from birth to 2 years in Malaysia: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurliyana, Abdul Razak; Mohd Shariff, Zalilah; Mohd Taib, Mohd Nasir; Gan, Wan Ying; Tan, Kit-Aun

    2016-09-29

    The first 2 years of life is a critical period of rapid growth and brain development. During this period, nutrition and environmental factors play important roles in growth and cognitive development of a child. This report describes the study protocol of early nutrition, growth and cognitive development of infants from birth to 2 years of age. This is a prospective cohort study of mothers and infants recruited from government health clinics in Seremban district in Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia. Infants are followed-up at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months of age. Pre-natal factors that include mother's pre-pregnancy body mass index, gestational weight gain, blood glucose and blood pressure during pregnancy, infant's gestational age, birth weight and head circumference at birth are obtained from patient card. Post-natal factors assessed at each follow-up are feeding practices, dietary intake, anthropometric measurements and cognitive development of infants. Iron status is assessed at 6 months, while infant temperament and home environment are assessed at 12 months. Maternal intelligence is assessed at 18 months. Early life nutritional programming is of current interest as many longitudinal studies are actively being conducted in developed countries to investigate this concept. The concept however is relatively new in developing countries such as Malaysia. This study will provide useful information on early nutrition and infant development in the first two years of life which can be further followed up to identify factors that track into childhood and contribute to growth and cognitive deviations.

  4. Diarrheal Illness among Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program Participants in Miami, Florida: Implications for Nutrition Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Evelyn P.; Trepka, Mary Jo; Newman, Frederick L.; Huffman, Fatma G.; Dixon, Zisca

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess risk factors for diarrheal illness among clients of a Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) clinic in Miami, FL. Design: A cross-sectional survey with questions about demographics, food safety practices, and diarrheal illness. Setting: WIC clinic operated by the Miami-Dade County Health…

  5. The Sanitation Hygiene Infant Nutrition Efficacy (SHINE) Trial: Rationale, Design, and Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Jean H; Jones, Andrew D; Manges, Amee; Mangwadu, Goldberg; Maluccio, John A; Mbuya, Mduduzi N N; Moulton, Lawrence H; Ntozini, Robert; Prendergast, Andrew J; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J; Tielsch, James M

    2015-12-15

    Child stunting and anemia are intractable public health problems in developing countries and have profound short- and long-term consequences. The Sanitation Hygiene Infant Nutrition Efficacy (SHINE) trial is motivated by the premise that environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) is a major underlying cause of both stunting and anemia, that chronic inflammation is the central characteristic of EED mediating these adverse effects, and that EED is primarily caused by high fecal ingestion due to living in conditions of poor water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH). SHINE is a proof-of-concept, 2 × 2 factorial, cluster-randomized, community-based trial in 2 rural districts of Zimbabwe that will test the independent and combined effects of protecting babies from fecal ingestion (factor 1, operationalized through a WASH intervention) and optimizing nutritional adequacy of infant diet (factor 2, operationalized through an infant and young child feeding [IYCF] intervention) on length and hemoglobin at 18 months of age. Within SHINE we will measure 2 causal pathways. The program impact pathway comprises the series of processes and behaviors linking implementation of the interventions with the 2 child health primary outcomes; it will be modeled using measures of fidelity of intervention delivery and household uptake of promoted behaviors and practices. We will also measure a range of household and individual characteristics, social interactions, and maternal capabilities for childcare, which we hypothesize will explain heterogeneity along these pathways. The biomedical pathway comprises the infant biologic responses to the WASH and IYCF interventions that ultimately result in attained stature and hemoglobin concentration at 18 months of age; it will be elucidated by measuring biomarkers of intestinal structure and function (inflammation, regeneration, absorption, and permeability); microbial translocation; systemic inflammation; and hormonal determinants of growth and anemia

  6. 78 FR 32183 - Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC): Implementation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food and Nutrition Service 7 CFR Part 246 RIN 0584-AE21 Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC): Implementation of the Electronic Benefit Transfer- Related Provisions of Public Law 111-296; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Nutrition...

  7. A Comparison of Nutritional Antioxidant Content in Breast Milk, Donor Milk, and Infant Formulas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Corrine; Lyden, Elizabeth; Furtado, Jeremy; Van Ormer, Matthew; Anderson-Berry, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Human milk is the optimal food for human infants, including infants born prematurely. In the event that a mother of a hospitalized infant cannot provide breast milk, donor milk is considered an acceptable alternative. It is known that the macronutrient composition of donor milk is different than human milk, with variable fat content and protein content. However, much less is known about the micronutrient content of donor milk, including nutritional antioxidants. Samples of breast milk from 12 mothers of infants hospitalized in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit until were collected and analyzed for concentrations of nutritional antioxidants, including α-carotene, β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein + zeaxanthin, retinol, and α-tocopherol. Additionally, a homogenized sample of donor milk available from a commercial milk bank and samples of infant formulas were also analyzed. Concentrations of nutritional antioxidants were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. Compared to breast milk collected from mothers of hospitalized infants, commercially available donor milk had 18%–53% of the nutritional antioxidant content of maternal breast milk. As donor milk is becoming a common nutritional intervention for the high risk preterm infant, the nutritional antioxidant status of donor milk–fed premature infants and outcomes related to oxidative stress may merit further investigation. PMID:27801820

  8. 儿童保健门诊中婴幼儿营养性缺铁性贫血患病情况及相关因素%Infant Nutritional Iron Deficiency Anemia in Child Health Clinic in the Prevalence Rate and the Related Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄秋红

    2014-01-01

    目的探讨儿童保健门诊中婴幼儿营养性缺铁性贫血患病调查结果,并对相关性因素进行分析。方法选择我院自2010年5月~2013年8月进行健康体检婴幼儿共3250例,对本组体检婴幼儿进行抽血检测血常规,观察其营养状况及营养性缺铁性贫血患病情况,采用Logistic回顾分析相关因素。结果根据缺铁性贫血诊断标准,3250例受检婴幼儿中,共检出存在缺铁性贫血368例婴幼儿,营养缺铁性贫血检出率为11.3%。其中6个月~1岁年龄段缺铁性发病率最高,为13.7%,1~2岁年龄段缺铁性贫血发病率最低,为10.5%。结论婴幼儿时期易出现营养性缺铁性贫血,特别是1岁以下婴幼儿出现缺铁性贫血的几率最高,因此要加强婴幼儿营养知识的宣传及普及,特别是6个月以后的辅食添加,减少营养性缺铁性贫血的发生,提高婴幼儿营养水平,促进婴幼儿的健康发展。%Objective To study the infantile nutritional iron deficiency anemia in children health care clinic survey results, and analyze the correlation factors. Methods our hospital from May 2010 to August 2013, physical examination, a total of 3250 cases of infant to draw blood detection routine group medical infants and young children, to observe the nutritional status and nutritional iron deficiency anemia prevalence, adopting Logistic related factors were reviewed. Results According to the diagnostic criteria, iron deficiency anemia patients, 3250 cases of infants and young children, 368 cases with detection is iron deficiency anemia were infants and young children, nutritional iron deficiency anemia detection rate of 11.3%. Aged 6 months - 1 iron deficiency incidence is highest, at 13.7%, incidence of iron deficiency anemia minimum 1~2 years old age, at 10.5%. Conclusion Early childhood nutritional iron deficiency anemia is seen, especially in infants under one year of age appear the highest rates of iron deficiency anemia, so

  9. Quantification of EUGR as a Measure of the Quality of Nutritional Care of Premature Infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenlang Lin

    Full Text Available To develop an index of the quality of nutritional care of premature infants based on the change in weight Z score from birth to discharge and to illustrate the use of this index in comparing the performance of different NICUs.Retrospective data analysis was performed to compare the growth of premature infants born in three perinatal centers. Infants with gestational age ≤ 32 weeks who survived to discharge from 2006 to 2010 were included. Weight Z scores at birth and discharge were calculated by the method of Fenton. Using data from one NICU as the reference, a multivariable linear regression model of change in weight Z score from birth to discharge was developed. Employing this model, a benchmark value of change in weight Z score was calculated for each baby. The difference between this calculated benchmark value and the baby's observed change in weight Z score was defined as the performance gap for that infant. The average value of the performance gaps in a NICU serves as its quality care index.1,714 infants were included for analysis. Change in weight Z score is influenced by birth weight Z score and completed weeks of gestation; thus the model for calculating the benchmark change in weight Z score was adjusted for these two variables. We found statistically significant differences in the average performance gaps for the three units.A quality care index was developed based on change in weight Z score from birth to discharge adjusted for two initial risk factors. This objective, easily calculated index may be used as a measurement of the quality of nutritional care to rank the performance of different NICUs.

  10. Infant Nutrition and Later Health: A Review of Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Fall

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing recognition of the need for a lifecourse approach to understanding the aetiology of adult disease, and there is now significant evidence that links patterns of infant feeding to differences in health outcomes, both in the short and longer term. Breastfeeding is associated with lower rates of infection in infancy; in high-income populations, it is associated with reductions in blood pressure and total blood cholesterol, and lower risks of obesity and diabetes in adult life. Breastfeeding rates are suboptimal in many countries, and strategies to promote breastfeeding could therefore confer important benefits for health at a population level. However, there are particular challenges in defining nutritional exposures in infancy, including marked social gradients in initiation and duration of breastfeeding. In recent studies of low and middle-income populations of children and young adults, where the influences on infant feeding practice differ, beneficial effects of breastfeeding on blood pressure, BMI and risk of diabetes have not been confirmed, and further information is needed. Little is currently known about the long-term consequences of differences in the timing and nature of the weaning diet. Future progress will depend on new studies that provide detailed prospective data on duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding together with appropriate characterisation of the weaning diet.

  11. Gut microbiota in Malawian infants in a nutritional supplementation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Yin Bun; Xu, Ying; Mangani, Charles; Fan, Yue-Mei; Dewey, Kathryn G; Salminen, Seppo Jaakko; Maleta, Kenneth; Ashorn, Per

    2016-02-01

    To examine whether two forms of lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) or a micronutrient-fortified corn-soya blend were associated with development of the gut microbiota in Malawian infants, to assess the microbiota profiles at the age of 6 and 18 months and to follow the changes during the 12-month period. This was a substudy of a 4-arm randomised controlled trial conducted in rural Malawi. Infants at the age of 6 months were randomised to receive no supplement during the primary follow-up period (control), 54 g/day of micronutrient-fortified LNS with milk protein base (milk LNS), 54 g/day of micronutrient-fortified LNS with soya protein base (soya LNS), or 71 g/day of micronutrient-fortified corn-soya blend for 12 months. Stool samples were collected at baseline (6 months) and end of trial (18 months). The 16S rRNA gene was amplified and subjected to multiplex sequencing. A total of 213 infants had paired microbiota data at 6 and 18 months of age. The Dirichlet-multinomial test showed no significant difference in microbiota profile between the four intervention groups at either age (each P > 0.10). Bifidobacterium longum was most abundant at both ages. Lactobacillus ruminis, Shigella and Salmonella were present. The abundance of Prevotella and Faecalibacterium increased with age (each P < 0.001), while Bifidobacteriaceae and Enterobacteriaceae exhibited significant decrease (each P < 0.001). Nutritional supplementation by LNS or corn-soya blend for twelve months did not affect the gut microbiota profile in the rural Malawian context. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Inadequate feeding of infant and young children in India: lack of nutritional information or food affordability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Nisha

    2013-10-01

    Despite a rapidly growing economy and rising income levels in India, improvements in child malnutrition have lagged. Data from the most recent National Family Health Survey reveal that the infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices recommended by the WHO and the Indian Government, including the timely introduction of solid food, are not being followed by a majority of mothers in India. It is puzzling that even among rich households children are not being fed adequately. The present study analyses the socioeconomic factors that contribute to this phenomenon, including the role of nutritional information. IYCF practices from the latest National Family Health Survey (2005-2006) were analysed. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to establish the determinants of poor feeding practices. The indicators recommended by the WHO were used to assess the IYCF practices. India. Children (n 9241) aged 6-18 months. Wealth was shown to have only a small effect on feeding practices. For children aged 6-8 months, the mother's wealth status was not found to be a significant determinant of sound feeding practices. Strikingly, nutritional advice on infant feeding practices provided by health professionals (including anganwadi workers) was strongly correlated with improved practices across all age groups. Exposure to the media was also found to be a significant determinant. Providing appropriate information may be a crucial determinant of sound feeding practices. Efforts to eradicate malnutrition should include the broader goals of improving knowledge related to childhood nutrition and IYCF practices.

  13. Perinatal Factors Associated with Infant Maltreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Fujiwara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The association between birth outcomes and child maltreatment remains controversial. The purpose of this study is to test whether infants without congenital or chronic disease who are low birth weight (LBW, preterm, or small for gestational age (SGA are at an increased risk of being maltreated.Methods: A hospital-based case-control study of infants without congenital or chronic diseases who visited the National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, between April 1, 2002 and March 31, 2005 was conducted. Cases (N = 35 and controls (N = 29 were compared on mean birth weight, gestational age, and z-score of birth weight.Results: SGA was significantly associated with infant maltreatment after adjusting for other risk factors (adjusted odds ratio: 4.45, 95% CI: 1.29–15.3. LBW and preterm births were not associated with infant maltreatment.Conclusion: Infants born as SGA are 4.5 times more at risk of maltreatment, even if they do not have a congenital or chronic disease. This may be because SGA infants tend to have poorer neurological development which leads them to be hard-to-soothe and places them at risk for maltreatment.

  14. [Nutritional dilemmas in extremely low birth weight infants and their effects on childhood, adolescence and adulthood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelo, José Simon; Martinez, Francisco Eulógio

    2005-03-01

    To review the recent medical literature on nutrition of extremely low birth weight infants, focusing on nutritional disorders and their effects on childhood, adolescence and adulthood. An extensive review of the related literature was performed using MEDLINE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the Best Evidence database. There is a growing body of evidence that early nutritional practices may affect short-term growth and development outcome. In addition, these practices may play a role in determining adult health and disease. There is still much to be learned about safe and efficacious nutrient administration in preterm infants; about techniques to assess the effect of different nutritional strategies; and about the long-term effects of these regimens on development outcome, growth and disease. Despite recent progress in neonatal nutrition, there is a lack of basic and clinical research to better define the nutritional requirements of preterm infants and the best way to meet these requirements, avoiding long-term undesirable consequences.

  15. Relationship between the nutritional status of breastfeeding Mayan mothers and their infants in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frojo, Gianfranco A; Rogers, Nathaniel G; Mazariegos, Manolo; Keenan, John; Jolly, Pauline

    2014-04-01

    A case-control study was conducted to determine the association between maternal height and infant length-for-age, and to evaluate how this association is modified by either maternal or infant nutritional status. We hypothesised that maternal excess caloric intake [measured as body mass index (BMI)] would increase the association, while infant nutrition (measured in main meals consumed in addition to breastfeeding) will diminish the effect. Mother and infant pairs in Chimaltenango, Guatemala, were measured for anthropometric values and nutritional status, and mothers were interviewed to elicit nutritional and socio-economic information. Infant length was converted into z-scores based on the World Health Organization's (WHO) standards. Odds ratios (ORs), associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) were calculated. Cases were infants below 2 z-scores of the WHO's length-for-age, while controls were infants within the -2 to 2 z-score range. Cases (n = 84) had an increased odds (OR: 3.00, 95% CI: 1.57-5.74) of being born to a stunted mother (below 145 cm) when compared with controls (n = 85). When adjusted for potential confounders, the OR decreased to 2.55 (95% CI: 1.30-5.02). Negative RERI values were produced for the joint exposure of maternal BMI ≥ 25 and maternal stuntedness (RERI: -0.96), as well as for the joint exposure of maternal stuntedness and infant nutrition (RERI: -2.27). Our results confirm that maternal stuntedness is a significant contributor to infant stuntedness; however, this association is modified negligibly by maternal nutritional status and significantly by infant nutritional status, each in a protective manner.

  16. Effect of traditional food supplements on nutritional status of lactating mothers and growth of their infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajale, Neha; Khadilkar, Anuradha; Chiponkar, Shashi; Unni, Jyothi; Mansukhani, Nina

    2014-01-01

    During lactation, traditional food supplements (TFS) are commonly consumed in India to increase lactation performance and health of mothers. TFS are rich in fats, nuts, dry fruits, and sugars and indulging in such supplements for 3 to 6 mo postpartum may put the mother at risk for obesity. The aim of this study was to assess the nutrient quality of TFS and its effect on nutritional status of lactating mothers and infant's weight gain in first 6 mo after delivery. A random sample of 125 Indian urban lactating mothers (28.9 ± 3.2 y) was assessed within 6 mo postpartum for anthropometry, diet by 24-h recall on 3 random days, along with socioeconomic factors, lactation history, and infant's birth weight and current weight. Among 18 different TFS, 50% TFS were rich in calcium, 33% rich in iron, 38% in zinc, and only 13% were good sources of vitamins. Mothers consuming TFS (n = 75) had significantly higher fat intakes than mothers consuming no TFS Supplements (NTS; n = 50). A higher weight gain was seen in TFS mothers (10.5%) than NTS mothers (8.8%) after adjusting for number of days after delivery, parity, mother's age, and breast-feeding practices (P infants of TFS mothers (120.7% ± 7.3%) was higher than in infants of NTS mothers (96.2% ± 7.8%; P = 0.024) after adjusting for infant's age and mother's breast-feeding practices. TFS may be modified to increase its micronutrient quality and to reduce fat contents with the goal of reducing the risk for obesity in mothers, while still benefiting infant growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hypothyroidism among military infants born in countries of varied iodine nutrition status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Tyler C

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iodine deficiency is a global problem representing the most common preventable cause of mental retardation. Recently, the impact of subtle deficiencies in iodine intake on children and pregnant women has been questioned. This study was designed to compare hypothyroidism among infants born to US military families in countries of varied iodine nutrition status. Methods A cohort design was used to analyze data from the Department of Defense Birth and Infant Health Registry for infants born in 2000-04 (n = 447,691. Hypothyroidism was defined using ICD-9-CM codes from the first year of life (n = 698. The impact of birth location on hypothyroidism was assessed by comparing rates in Germany, Japan, and US territories with the United States, while controlling for infant gender, plurality, gestational age, maternal age, maternal military status, and military parent's race/ethnicity. Results Hypothyroidism did not vary by birth location with adjusted odds ratios (OR as follows: Germany (OR 0.82, [95% CI 0.50, 1.35], Japan (OR 0.67, [95% CI 0.37, 1.22], and US territories (OR 1.29, [95% CI 0.57, 2.89]. Hypothyroidism was strongly associated with preterm birth (OR 5.44, [95% CI 4.60, 6.42]. Hypothyroidism was also increased among infants with civilian mothers (OR 1.24, [95% CI 1.00, 1.54], and older mothers, especially ages 40 years and older (OR 2.09, [95% CI 1.33, 3.30]. Conclusions In this study, hypothyroidism in military-dependent infants did not vary by birth location, but was associated with other risk factors, including preterm birth, civilian maternal status, and advanced maternal age.

  18. Influencing factors of parenteral nutrition associated cholestasis in preterm infant%早产儿胃肠外营养相关性胆汁淤积的影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴雅娟; 吕庆鹏; 李翠霞

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the related factors of parenteral nutrition associated cholestasis in preterm infant and to provide theoretical basis for clinical intervention .Methods Retrospective analysis was conducted on hospitalization data of 146 preterm infants receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) in Second People’s Hospital of Nanhai District during January 2010 to April 2014.The cases were divided into control group (without cholestasis, n=110) and observation group (cholestasis, n=36), and they were compared in birth weight, PN duration, fasting time, hospitalization length, PN nutrient solution ratio, infection, antibiotics and mechanical ventilation .Results There were significant differences between two groups in birth weight , PN duration, fasting time, sugar calories ratio, amino acid calories ratio, fat lactic acid calories ratio, milk calories ratio, and total calories ratio (t value was 5.469, 12.921, 14.802, 8.156, 9.217, 10.108, 19.982 and 14.698, respectively, all P<0.05).The differences in infection incidence and mechanical ventilation rate were significant between two groups (χ2 value was 4.105 and 4.891, respectively, both P<0.05).Multiple stepwise Logistic analysis showed that long duration of PN (OR=2.147, 95%CI:1.040-3.807), long fasting time (OR=2.751,95%CI:1.970-4.408), high glucose calories ratio (OR=2.433, 95%CI:1.583-3.901), high fat lactic acid calories ratio (OR=2.907,95%CI:2.072-5.833), high amino acid calories ratio (OR=2.779,95%CI: 2.018 -4.540), mechanical ventilation (OR=1.511,95%CI:1.067 -3.908) and infection (OR=1.275, 95%CI:1.021-3.460) were risk factors of premature infants with parenteral nutrition associated cholestasis , while high birth weight was the protective factor (OR=0.672,95%CI:0.070-0.759).Conclusion Cholestasis in preterm infants threatens life and health of them.Clinicians should control infection , the use of mechanical ventilation , and opening of milk as early as possible .PN duration needs to be reduced and PN

  19. Risk factors of parenteral nutrition associated cholestasis in preterm infant%早产儿胃肠外营养相关性胆汁淤积影响因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨慧; 王卫; 刘晓红

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨早产儿胃肠外营养相关性胆汁淤积的影响因素.方法 对2008年10月至2011年5月在我院新生儿重症监护病房进行胃肠外营养持续14天以上的早产儿资料进行回顾性分析,按照是否发生胆汁淤积分为病例组和对照组,比较两组胃肠外营养时间、禁食时间、体重增长及三大营养素提供热卡等的差别.结果 研究期间共有102例早产儿应用胃肠外营养14天以上,病例组21例,对照组81例,胃肠外营养相关性胆汁淤积发生率20.6%.病例组禁食时间(天)长于对照组[(9.9±4.9)比(5.7±3.3)],氨基酸及脂肪乳提供热卡比率(%)高于对照组[(7.8±3.5)比(4.2±2.0),(17.8±8.2)比(10.5±5.4)],每天总热卡[kcal/(kg·d)]低于对照组[(109.1±35.3)比(128.8±27.6)],发生喂养困难的比例高于对照组(60.0%比33.3%),差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05).多因素分析结果显示,禁食时间长、氨基酸和脂肪乳提供热卡比率高是发生胆汁淤积的危险因素(OR值分别为4.758、6.128、3.756),经口喂养提供热卡比率高是保护性因素(OR值0.012),P均<0.05.结论 胃肠外营养相关性胆汁淤积的发生与氨基酸及脂肪乳提供热卡比率高、禁食时间长有关,经口喂养提供热卡高为保护因素.%Objective To determine risk factors of parenteral nutrition associated cholestasis ( PNAC ) in preterm infants. Methods This retrospective analysis was conductcd on hospitalization data of 102 preterm infants receiving parenteral nutrition ( PN ) for more than 14 days in N1CU. The patients were assigned into the PNAC ( 21 cases ) and the control non-PNAC ( 81 cases ) groups. The duration of time for which patients were restricted from oral feeding ( NPO ) and received parental nutrition; the patients'caloric intake from glucose, protein and intralipid; and the patients' weiglit gain were compared and subjected to statistical analyses. Results The incidence of PNAC occurrence was 20. 6% . Comparing to

  20. Infants at Risk: Perinatal and Neonatal Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsitt, Lewis P.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews studies of infant behavior and development. Delineates a behavioral hypothesis relating prenatal and neonatal risk factors in infancy to crib death. The mutual dependence of experience and neurostructural development suggests that infancy is a period of critical learning experiences. (Author/RH)

  1. Standardized parenteral nutrition in preterm infants: early impact on fluid and electrolyte balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobelli, Silvia; Bonsante, Francesco; Vintéjoux, Amélie; Gouyon, Jean-Bernard

    2010-06-01

    Parenteral nutrition is commonly given to premature infants. It has previously been suggested that standardized parenteral nutrition (SPN) may offer nutritional advantages compared to individualized parenteral nutrition (IPN). However, whether the same level of biochemical control is assured with SPN and with IPN remains uncertain. To compare fluid and electrolyte balance in preterm infants receiving IPN versus SPN in the first week of life. 107 infants born at birth weight) at day 7 was significantly higher in IPN than in SPN (7.7 +/- 5.8 vs. 4.2 +/- 6.5) without differences in urine output/input fluid intake ratio and glomerular renal function between the two groups. There were no significant differences in water and sodium balance in preterm infants who received IPN versus SPN. The risk of NOHK was higher in IPN. Also, SPN significantly increased amino acid and caloric intakes, and it reduced early weight loss.

  2. Determinants of infant nutritional status in Dabat district, North Gondar, Ethiopia: A case control study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amarech Asratie Wubante

    2017-01-01

    .... Therefore, this study is aimed to assess determinants of infant nutritional status. Methods A community based nested case-control study was conducted from February to June 2013 in Dabat district...

  3. Nutritional adequacy of goat milk infant formulas for term infants: a double-blind randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shao J; Sullivan, Thomas; Gibson, Robert A; Lönnerdal, Bo; Prosser, Colin G; Lowry, Dianne J; Makrides, Maria

    2014-05-01

    The safety and nutritional adequacy of goat milk infant formulas have been questioned. The primary aim of the present study was to compare the growth and nutritional status of infants fed a goat milk infant formula with those of infants fed a typical whey-based cow milk infant formula. The secondary aim was to examine a range of health- and allergy-related outcomes. A double-blind, randomised controlled trial with 200 formula-fed term infants randomly assigned to receive either goat or cow milk formula from 2 weeks to at least 4 months of age was conducted. A cohort of 101 breast-fed infants was included for comparison. Weight, length and head circumference were measured at 2 weeks and 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 12 months of age. Nutritional status was assessed from serum albumin, urea, creatinine, Hb, ferritin, and folate and plasma amino acid concentrations at 4 months. Z-scores for weight, length, head circumference and weight for length were not different between the two formula-fed groups. There were differences in the values of some amino acids and blood biomarkers between the formula-fed groups, but the mean values for biomarkers were within the normal reference range. There were no differences in the occurrence of serious adverse events, general health, and incidence of dermatitis or medically diagnosed food allergy. The incidence of parentally reported blood-stained stools was higher in the goat milk formula-fed group, although this was a secondary outcome and its importance is unclear. Goat milk formula provided growth and nutritional outcomes in infants that did not differ from those provided by a standard whey-based cow milk formula.

  4. Enhanced nutrition improves growth and increases blood adiponectin concentrations in very low birth weight infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin W. Blakstad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adequate nutrient supply is essential for optimal postnatal growth in very low birth weight (VLBW, birth weight<1,500 g infants. Early growth may influence the risk of metabolic syndrome later in life. Objective: To evaluate growth and blood metabolic markers (adiponectin, leptin, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 in VLBW infants participating in a randomized nutritional intervention study. Design: Fifty VLBW infants were randomized to an enhanced nutrient supply or a standard nutrient supply. Thirty-seven infants were evaluated with growth measurements until 2 years corrected age (CA. Metabolic markers were measured at birth and 5 months CA. Results: Weight gain and head growth were different in the two groups from birth to 2 years CA (weight gain: pinteraction=0.006; head growth: pinteraction=0.002. The intervention group improved their growth z-scores after birth, whereas the control group had a pronounced decline, followed by an increase and caught up with the intervention group after discharge. At 5 months CA, adiponectin concentrations were higher in the intervention group and correlated with weight gain before term (r=0.35 and nutrient supply (0.35≤r≤0.45. Leptin concentrations correlated with weight gain after term and IGF-1 concentrations with length growth before and after term and head growth after term (0.36≤r≤0.53. Conclusion: Enhanced nutrient supply improved early postnatal growth and may have prevented rapid catch-up growth later in infancy. Adiponectin concentration at 5 months CA was higher in the intervention group and correlated positively with early weight gain and nutrient supply. Early nutrition and growth may affect metabolic markers in infancy.Clinical Trial Registration (ClinicalTrials.gov no.: NCT01103219

  5. Health and nutrition content claims on websites advertising infant formula available in Australia: A content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Nina J; Gribble, Karleen D

    2017-10-01

    The use of health and nutrition content claims in infant formula advertising is restricted by many governments in response to WHO policies and WHA resolutions. The purpose of this study was to determine whether such prohibited claims could be observed in Australian websites that advertise infant formula products. A comprehensive internet search was conducted to identify websites that advertise infant formula available for purchase in Australia. Content analysis was used to identify prohibited claims. The coding frame was closely aligned with the provisions of the Australian and New Zealand Food Standard Code, which prohibits these claims. The outcome measures were the presence of health claims, nutrition content claims, or references to the nutritional content of human milk. Web pages advertising 25 unique infant formula products available for purchase in Australia were identified. Every advertisement (100%) contained at least one health claim. Eighteen (72%) also contained at least one nutrition content claim. Three web pages (12%) advertising brands associated with infant formula products referenced the nutritional content of human milk. All of these claims appear in spite of national regulations prohibiting them indicating a failure of monitoring and/or enforcement. Where countries have enacted instruments to prohibit health and other claims in infant formula advertising, the marketing of infant formula must be actively monitored to be effective. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Continuous intravenous infusion of ampicillin and gentamicin during parenteral nutrition in 88 newborn infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colding, H; Møller, S; Andersen, G E

    1982-01-01

    Ampicillin and gentamicin were dissolved once a day in an L-amino acid solution especially prepared for parenteral nutrition of newborn infants and infused continuously to 88 infants in whom septicaemia was suspected or had been proved. The mean dosages were 162 and 5.3 mg/kg per 24 hours...

  7. Continuous intravenous infusion of ampicillin and gentamicin during parenteral nutrition in 88 newborn infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colding, H; Møller, S; Andersen, G E

    1982-01-01

    Ampicillin and gentamicin were dissolved once a day in an L-amino acid solution especially prepared for parenteral nutrition of newborn infants and infused continuously to 88 infants in whom septicaemia was suspected or had been proved. The mean dosages were 162 and 5.3 mg/kg per 24 hours...

  8. Shared Principles of Ethics for Infant and Young Child Nutrition in the Developing World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daar Abdallah S

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The defining event in the area of infant feeding is the aggressive marketing of infant formula in the developing world by transnational companies in the 1970s. This practice shattered the trust of the global health community in the private sector, culminated in a global boycott of Nestle products and has extended to distrust of all commercial efforts to improve infant and young child nutrition. The lack of trust is a key barrier along the critical path to optimal infant and young child nutrition in the developing world. Discussion To begin to bridge this gap in trust, we developed a set of shared principles based on the following ideals: Integrity; Solidarity; Justice; Equality; Partnership, cooperation, coordination, and communication; Responsible Activity; Sustainability; Transparency; Private enterprise and scale-up; and Fair trading and consumer choice. We hope these principles can serve as a platform on which various parties in the in the infant and young child nutrition arena, can begin a process of authentic trust-building that will ultimately result in coordinated efforts amongst parties. Summary A set of shared principles of ethics for infant and young child nutrition in the developing world could catalyze the scale-up of low cost, high quality, complementary foods for infants and young children, and eventually contribute to the eradication of infant and child malnutrition in the developing world.

  9. A Comparison of Nutritional Antioxidant Content in Breast Milk, Donor Milk, and Infant Formulas

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Human milk is the optimal food for human infants, including infants born prematurely. In the event that a mother of a hospitalized infant cannot provide breast milk, donor milk is considered an acceptable alternative. It is known that the macronutrient composition of donor milk is different than human milk, with variable fat content and protein content. However, much less is known about the micronutrient content of donor milk, including nutritional antioxidants. Samples of breast milk from 12...

  10. Breast functions perceived by Korean mothers: infant nutrition and female sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Youngmee; Sohn, Min; Yoo, Eunkwang

    2010-04-01

    The descriptive cross-sectional study of 2,235 Korean postpartum women was conducted to explore (a) feeding types with related factors, (b) the perceived benefits of each feeding type, (c) the perceived sexuality-related barriers to breast-feeding, and (d) the perceived relative significance of breast functions. The most frequently utilized feeding type was breast-feeding only. The gender of infants, vaginal delivery, not being employed, having a nuclear family, previous breast-feeding experience, and previously receiving breast-feeding education were statistically significant factors of breast-feeding. Breast-feeding and mixed feeding mothers indicated that their feeding choices were based on nutritional benefits, convenience, and improving family relationships. Only breast-feeding mothers reported changes in breast shape as a perceived sexuality-related barrier to breast-feeding. All mothers reported that infant feeding was a more significant concern than female sexual functioning, but post hoc Schéffe revealed that the breast-feeding mothers appreciated infant feeding function more than female sexual functioning.

  11. Nutritional requirements and feeding recommendations for small for gestational age infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudehope, David; Vento, Maximo; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Pachi, Paulo

    2013-03-01

    We define the small for gestational age (SGA) infant as an infant born ≥ 35 weeks' gestation and nutritional requirements and provides short- and long-term benefits. Several distinct patterns of intrauterine growth restriction are identified among the heterogeneous grouping of SGA infants; each varies with regard to neonatal morbidities, requirements for neonatal management, postnatal growth velocities, neurodevelopmental progress, and adult health outcomes. There is much we do not know about nutritional management of the SGA infant. We need to identify and define: infants who have "true" growth restriction and are at high risk for adverse metabolic outcomes in later life; optimal growth velocity and "catch-up" growth rates that are conducive with life-long health and well being; global approaches to management of hypoglycemia; and an optimal model for postdischarge care. Large, rigorously conducted trials are required to determine whether aggressive feeding of SGA infants results in improved nutritional rehabilitation, growth, and neurodevelopmental outcomes. Before birth, maternal supplementation with specific nutrients reduces the rate and severity of growth restriction and may prevent nutrient deficiency states if infants are born SGA. After birth, the generally accepted goal is to provide enough nutrients to achieve postnatal growth similar to that of a normal fetus. In addition, we recommend SGA infants be allowed to "room in" with their mothers to promote breastfeeding, mother-infant attachment, and skin-to-skin contact to assist with thermoregulation. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Vitamin D nutritional status in preterm infants and response to supplementation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Roberta A

    2013-07-14

    Little is known about vitamin D status in preterm infants and their response to supplementation. To investigate this, we assessed serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels using RIA in a consecutive sample of stable preterm very low birth weight (VLBW) infants (born ≤ 32 weeks gestation or birth weight ≤ 1·5 kg), and we explored associated factors. Serum 25OHD level was first assessed once infants were tolerating feeds (n 274). If this first 25OHD level was below 50 nmol\\/l (20 ng\\/ml), which is the level associated with covering requirements in terms of skeletal health in the majority, then we recommended prolonged augmented vitamin D intake ( ≥ 10 μg (400 IU) daily) from a combination of fortified feeds and vitamin supplements and follow-up re-assessment at approximately 6 weeks corrected age (n 148). The first assessment, conducted at a median for chronological age of 18 (interquartile range (IQR) 11-28) d, found that 78 % had serum 25OHD levels below 50 nmol\\/l. Multivariable analysis demonstrated that the determinants of serum 25OHD levels were duration of vitamin D supplementation and gestational age at birth (r 2 0·215; P< 0·001). At follow-up, after a median of 104 (IQR 78-127) d, 87 % achieved levels ≥ 50 nmol\\/l and 8 % had levels >125 nmol\\/l, a level associated with potential risk of harm. We conclude that low 25OHD levels are an issue for preterm VLBW infants, warranting early nutritional intervention. In infants with serum 25OHD levels < 50 nmol\\/l, a vitamin D intake of ≥ 10 μg (400 IU) daily achieves target levels in the majority; however, further work is needed to determine the exact dose to safely meet target levels without overcorrection.

  13. Nutritional risk factors for postmenopausal osteoporosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Olfa Berriche

    2016-07-26

    Jul 26, 2016 ... Aim: The purpose of our study was to identify nutritional risk factors of osteoporosis of two ..... the diet: three studies comparing women with vegetarian diets ... The lack of positive relationships between dairy consump- tion and ...

  14. 78 FR 19180 - Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC): Income Eligibility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food and Nutrition Service Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC): Income Eligibility Guidelines Correction In notice document 2013-6547 appearing on pages 17631-17632...

  15. Nutritional follow-up of critically ill infants receiving short term parenteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delgado Artur Figueiredo

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have tried to characterize the efficacy of parenteral support of critically ill infants during short period of intensive care. We studied seventeen infants during five days of total parenteral hyperalimentation. Subsequently, according to the clinical conditions, the patients received nutritional support by parenteral, enteral route or both up to the 10th day. Evaluations were performed on the 1st, 5th, and 10th days. These included: clinical data (food intake and anthropometric measurements, haematological data (lymphocyte count, biochemical tests (albumin, transferrin, fibronectin, prealbumin, retinol-binding protein and hormone assays (cortisol, insulin, glucagon. Anthropometric measurements revealed no significant difference between the first and second evaluations. Serum albumin and transferrin did not change significantly, but mean values of fibronectin (8.9 to 16 mg/dL, prealbumin (7.7 to 18 mg/dL, and retinol-binding protein (2.4 to 3.7 mg/dL increased significantly (p < 0.05 from the 1st to the 10th day. The hormonal study showed no difference for insulin, glucagon, and cortisol when the three evaluations were compared. The mean value of the glucose/insulin ratio was of 25.7 in the 1st day and 15.5 in the 5th day, revealing a transitory supression of this hormone. Cortisol showed values above normal in the beginning of the study. We conclude that the anthropometric parameters were not useful due to the short time of the study; serum proteins, fibronectin, prealbumin, and retinol-binding protein were very sensitive indicators of nutritional status, and an elevated glucose/insulin ratio, associated with a slight tendency for increased cortisol levels suggest hypercatabolic state. The critically ill patient can benefit from an early metabolic support.

  16. Neonatal parenteral nutrition hypersensitivity: a case report implicating bisulfite sensitivity in a newborn infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, Robert K; Baxter, Louise M; Larrabee, Paige B

    2009-01-01

    This report describes a case of parenteral nutrition hypersensitivity in a 37 weeks' gestation infant with congenital diaphragmatic hernia complicated by bowel necrosis and functional short bowel syndrome. The patient developed a rash with subsequent urticaria beginning on the 50th day of life. The reactions were confirmed with a positive rechallenge. After the amino acid solution was replaced with a non-bisulfite-containing product, the infant was able to continue to receive nutrition support through parenteral nutrition without recurrence of symptoms. It is speculated that the bisulfite additive in the amino acid solution may have interacted with the lipid emulsion to sensitize the patient.

  17. The Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial (INFANT an early intervention to prevent childhood obesity: Cluster-randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Karen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple factors combine to support a compelling case for interventions that target the development of obesity-promoting behaviours (poor diet, low physical activity and high sedentary behaviour from their inception. These factors include the rapidly increasing prevalence of fatness throughout childhood, the instigation of obesity-promoting behaviours in infancy, and the tracking of these behaviours from childhood through to adolescence and adulthood. The Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial (INFANT aims to determine the effectiveness of an early childhood obesity prevention intervention delivered to first-time parents. The intervention, conducted with parents over the infant's first 18 months of life, will use existing social networks (first-time parent's groups and an anticipatory guidance framework focusing on parenting skills which support the development of positive diet and physical activity behaviours, and reduced sedentary behaviours in infancy. Methods/Design This cluster-randomised controlled trial, with first-time parent groups as the unit of randomisation, will be conducted with a sample of 600 first-time parents and their newborn children who attend the first-time parents' group at Maternal and Child Health Centres. Using a two-stage sampling process, local government areas in Victoria, Australia will be randomly selected at the first stage. At the second stage, a proportional sample of first-time parent groups within selected local government areas will be randomly selected and invited to participate. Informed consent will be obtained and groups will then be randomly allocated to the intervention or control group. Discussion The early years hold promise as a time in which obesity prevention may be most effective. To our knowledge this will be the first randomised trial internationally to demonstrate whether an early health promotion program delivered to first-time parents in their existing social groups

  18. Situational analysis of infant and young child nutrition policies and programmatic activities in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuehler, Sara E; Ly Wane, Coudy Thierno

    2011-04-01

    Progress towards reducing mortality and malnutrition among children nutrition in the Sahel', starting with an analysis of current activities related to infant and young child nutrition (IYCN). The main objectives of the situational analysis are to compile, analyse and interpret available information on infant and child feeding and the nutrition situation of children nutrition division was developed to support a national nutrition strengthening programme; (4) the national nutrition counsel was organized to coordinate nutritional activities across various organizations and governmental sectors, involving representatives from health, agriculture and surveillance; and (5) an integrated communications programme was developed to support harmonized behaviour change communication tools for the health and nutrition sectors. Along with these activities, a number of programme evaluations were conducted to ensure that programmes obtain desired results. Although useful, these evaluations were not rigorous enough to identify effective programmes that contributed to the mentioned reductions in the prevalence of underweight and mortality, and increases in exclusive breastfeeding. The policy and programme framework is well established for support of optimal IYCN practices in Senegal. Despite the recent improvements in infant and young child nutritional status indicators, there is still much to do. Greater resources and continued capacity building are needed to: (1) conduct necessary research for adapting training materials and programme protocols to programmatic needs; (2) improve and carry out monitoring and evaluation that identify effective programme components; and (3) apply these findings in developing, expanding and improving effective programmes.

  19. The right infant nutrition: do nutrition and growth matter in the 6 to 24 month period?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Agostoni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades several studies tested the hypothesis that at early developmental stages certain foods or nutrients, in specific amounts, fed during limited sensitive periods, may lead to clinical alterations that take place decades later (early nutritional programming of long term health. In spite of suggestions from different early dietary habits, epidemiologic data show that episodes of rapid growth (growth acceleration hypothesis, whichever the dietary habits, are associated with later unfavorable health conditions and should be prevented. Early fast weight gain may be associated with increased likelihood of developing insulin resistance, dyslipidemic conditions, obesity, elevated blood pressure, and endothelial dysfunction. Accordingly, infant’s growth pattern may represent the interaction between genetic background and environment, inclusive of nutrition. The branch of science focusing on these aspects is known as epigenetics. Different studies have shown on the other hand a reduced growth in infants with specific disorders (milk allergy, HIV even before the overt clinical symptoms of the disease. Within this context the nutritionist’s task is the prevention of deficiencies, but intervention strategies to prevent malnutrition should emphasize improvements in linear growth in the first 2-3 years of life rather than aim at gaining weight, to prevent the event of rapid early weight gain. The present constraints of the global economic crisis require cost/benefit analyses for all the interventions to optimize nutrition and growth in early years. Recent indications for complementary feeding indicate the beneficial effects of introducing earlier food items such as egg and fish, together with breastfeeding continuation through the first year, in reducing the later risk of immune allergic disorders and metabolic impairments. Proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 22nd-25th, 2014

  20. Maternal willingness to pay for infant and young child nutrition counseling services in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuong H.; Hoang, Minh V.; Hajeebhoy, Nemat; Tran, Lan M.; Le, Chung H.; Menon, Purnima; Rawat, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Background Alive & Thrive Vietnam, a 6-year initiative (2009–2014), has developed and incorporated elements of social franchising into government health services to provide high-quality nutrition counseling services to improve infant and young child feeding practices. One element of franchising that has not yet been implemented is fee for service, which is a potential financing mechanism for sustaining services in the long run. Objective This research aims to estimate maternal willingness to pay (WTP) for nutrition counseling services and to examine potential factors associated with their WTP. Design and methods Data were drawn from an impact evaluation survey of 2,511 women with a child <2 years old from four provinces in Vietnam. An iterative bidding technique was employed to explore individual WTP. The first bid was defined as VND 20,000 (~US$ 1), which was approximately the level of the actual service cost. Depending on the participant response, the bid increased or decreased. Finally, the respondents were asked about the highest price they would be willing to pay for the service. Results Overall, 92.6% of clients reported a need for nutrition counseling services for children <2 years. The WTP rates at bid levels of VND 5,000, 10,000, 20,000, 40,000, and 100,000 were 95.2, 94.4, 90.7, 68.9, and 33.4%, respectively. The mean and median of the maximum WTP were VND 58,500 and 50,000, respectively. In multiple regression models, WTP rates were higher among younger women, the Kinh majority group, and better educated and wealthier women. Conclusion A high demand for nutrition counseling coupled with a WTP by almost all segments of society would potentially cover costs of delivery for nutrition counseling services in Vietnam. PMID:26328947

  1. Maternal willingness to pay for infant and young child nutrition counseling services in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuong H. Nguyen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alive & Thrive Vietnam, a 6-year initiative (2009–2014, has developed and incorporated elements of social franchising into government health services to provide high-quality nutrition counseling services to improve infant and young child feeding practices. One element of franchising that has not yet been implemented is fee for service, which is a potential financing mechanism for sustaining services in the long run. Objective: This research aims to estimate maternal willingness to pay (WTP for nutrition counseling services and to examine potential factors associated with their WTP. Design and methods: Data were drawn from an impact evaluation survey of 2,511 women with a child <2 years old from four provinces in Vietnam. An iterative bidding technique was employed to explore individual WTP. The first bid was defined as VND 20,000 (~US$ 1, which was approximately the level of the actual service cost. Depending on the participant response, the bid increased or decreased. Finally, the respondents were asked about the highest price they would be willing to pay for the service. Results: Overall, 92.6% of clients reported a need for nutrition counseling services for children <2 years. The WTP rates at bid levels of VND 5,000, 10,000, 20,000, 40,000, and 100,000 were 95.2, 94.4, 90.7, 68.9, and 33.4%, respectively. The mean and median of the maximum WTP were VND 58,500 and 50,000, respectively. In multiple regression models, WTP rates were higher among younger women, the Kinh majority group, and better educated and wealthier women. Conclusion: A high demand for nutrition counseling coupled with a WTP by almost all segments of society would potentially cover costs of delivery for nutrition counseling services in Vietnam.

  2. Fatores determinantes do crescimento infantil Determinant factors of infant growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia de Azevedo Mello Romani

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Esta revisão enfoca os fatores que interferem no crescimento de crianças nos primeiros anos de vida. Foram utilizadas informações de artigos publicados em revistas científicas, teses e publicações de organizações internacionais. O crescimento infantil se constitui em um dos melhores indicadores de saúde da criança e o retardo estatural representa atualmente, a característica antropométrica mais representativa do quadro epidemiológico da desnutrição no Brasil. Ressaltando a importância do fator genético no crescimento, a revisão abrange com maior ênfase a atuação dos fatores extrínsecos, sabendo-se que o processo de crescimento resulta da interação entre a carga genética e os fatores do meio ambiente, os quais premitirão a maior ou menor expressão do potencial genético. Face a comprovada natureza multicausal do crescimento infantil, vários estudos têm sido desenvolvidos, buscando relacionar variáveis biológicas, socioeconômicas, maternas, ambientais, culturais, demográficas, nutricionais, entre outras, com a sua etiologia, seu desenvolvimento e sua manutenção. A revisão apresentada reforça o interesse em investigações sobre o crescimento na primeira infância que devem ser permanentes, devido, principalmente, às repercussões a longo prazo sobre a saúde infantil.This review focuses on factors interfering with growth during the first years of life. Information was collected from articles published in indexed scientific journals, theses, technical books and publications of international organizations. Infant growth is one of the best health indicators, and linear growth retardation is currently the most representative anthropometric characteristic of child nutrition epidemiology in Brazil. The review indicates the value of genetics in growth, focusing, however on the influence of the extrinsic factors. Growth process results from interaction between genetic and environmental factors, determining variation

  3. Carnitine deficiency in premature infants receiving total parenteral nutrition: effect of L-carnitine supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Sommerfeld, E; Penn, D; Wolf, H

    1983-06-01

    To investigate whether L-carnitine supplementation may correct nutritional carnitine deficiency and associated metabolic disturbances in premature infants receiving total parenteral nutrition, an intravenous fat tolerance test (1 gm/kg Intralipid over four hours) was performed in 29 premature infants 6 to 10 days of age (15 receiving carnitine supplement 10 mg/kg . day L-carnitine IV, and 14 receiving no supplement). Total carnitine plasma values were normal or slightly elevated in supplemented but decreased in nonsupplemented infants. In both groups, fat infusion resulted in an increase in plasma concentrations of triglycerides, free fatty acids, D-beta-hydroxybutyrate, and short-chain and long-chain acylcarnitine, but total carnitine values did not change. After fat infusion, the free fatty acids/D-beta-hydroxybutyrate ratios were lower and the increase of acylcarnitine greater in supplemented infants of 29 to 33 weeks' gestation than in nonsupplemented infants of the same gestational age. This study provides evidence that premature infants of less than 34 weeks' gestation requiring total parenteral nutrition develop nutritional carnitine deficiency with impaired fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis. Carnitine supplementation improves this metabolic disturbance.

  4. [Nutrition in infants with esophagocolonoplasty for esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagău, N; Cocu, S; Geczi-Toth, I; Studnicska, D; Ciuce, C

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this clinical prospective study was the follow up of a nutritional management protocol for children with esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula for whom the esophageal substitution was performed with left vascularized colon. In this study entered infants aged 3 months to 18 months old with a major nutritional deficit, due to respiratory infections complications, parastomal leaks and accelerated gastrointestinal transit. All infants were underweight, with a single exception, who had no preoperative complications. The patient was enterally fed postoperatively, all the other patients receiving combined enteral and parenteral nutrition for 5-6 days. The enteral nutrition was delivered early through a trans-anastomotic feeding tube. In the 5th-7th day, complete enteral nutrition was obtained. The parenteral nutrition followed our own recipe: a 10% amino-acid mixture, 50% glucose and Ringer plus electrolytes and vitamins. There was a critical transitional stage between the gastric tube feeding and the oral nutrition. These infants have the suction and the deglutition reflexes modified, followed by oral sensory and motor deficits. After the release from the hospital the patients have been surveyed, the oldest reaching now the age of 7. The earlier the reconstruction was performed, the less problems in oral nutrition were encountered.

  5. High incidence of rickets in extremely low birth weight infants with severe parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis and bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soon Min; Namgung, Ran; Park, Min Soo; Eun, Ho Sun; Park, Kook In; Lee, Chul

    2012-12-01

    Risk factors for rickets of prematurity have not been re-examined since introduction of high mineral formula, particularly in ELBW infants. We analyzed the incidence and the risk factors of rickets in extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants. As a retrospective case-control study from 2004 to 2008, risk factors were analyzed in 24 patients with rickets versus 31 patients without. The frequency of rickets in ELBW infants was 24/55 (44%). Infants with rickets were diagnosed at 48.2 ± 16.1 days of age, and improved by 85.3 ± 25.3 days. By radiologic evaluation, 29% were grade 1 rickets, 58% grade 2 and 13% grade 3. In univariate analysis, infants with rickets had significantly higher incidence of patent ductus arteriosus, parenteral nutrition associated cholestasis (PNAC), severe PNAC and moderate/severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). In multiple regression analysis, after adjustment for gestation and birth weight, rickets significantly correlated with severe PNAC and with moderate/severe BPD. Serum peak alkaline phosphatase levels were significantly elevated in rickets (P rickets of prematurity remains high and the incidence of severe PNAC and moderate/severe BPD was significantly increased 18 and 3 times, respectively.

  6. Age-appropriate feeding practices and nutritional status of infants attending child welfare clinic at a Teaching Hospital in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Lawan, Umar M.; Gboluwaga T Amole; Jahum, Mahmud G.; Abdullahi Sani

    2014-01-01

    Background: Appropriate infant feeding is the key to optimum infant and child development and survival. This study investigates age-appropriate infant feeding practices and nutritional status of infants attending the immunization and child welfare clinic at Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital. Materials and Methods: Using a cross-sectional descriptive design, a sample of 300 sets of infants (age ≤12 months) and caregivers was systematically selected and studied. The data were analyzed using the MINI...

  7. Lipid Quality in Infant Nutrition: Current Knowledge and Future Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Delplanque, Bernadette; Gibson, Robert; Koletzko, Berthold; Lapillonne, Alexandre; Strandvik, Birgitta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dietary lipids are key for infants to not only meet their high energy needs but also fulfill numerous metabolic and physiological functions critical to their growth, development, and health. The lipid composition of breast milk varies during lactation and according to the mother's diet, whereas the lipid composition of infant formulae varies according to the blend of different fat sources. This report compares the compositions of lipids in breast milk and infant formulae, and highlig...

  8. Improving Infant Nutrition: Breast Milk as the Benchmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diaz, J.

    2017-01-01

    Bridging the gap between commercial infant formulas and the complexities of human breast milk means shifting current commercial production schemes and prioritizing important bioactive ingredients essential for neonates.

  9. [Effect of positive nutritional support strategy on extrauterine growth restriction in preterm infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Min; Zhu, Yan-Ping; Wang, Li

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the effects of positive nutritional support in the early stage after birth on the nutritional status during hospitalization and extrauterine growth restriction (EUGR) in preterm infants. There were two groups of preterm infants. Group A (n=99) was given the previous nutritional program, while group B (n=101) was given positive nutritional support. The nutritional intake, growth rate and EUGR incidence were compared between the two groups. Compared with group A, group B had significantly higher enteral calorie intake and total calorie intake within one week after birth. Additionally, the age of first feeding, time of regaining birth weight, duration of intravenous nutrition, time to full enteral feeding, and length of hospital stay in group B were all shorter than in group A. Group B also had less physiological weight loss than group A. Among the preterm infants with a gestational age less than 32 weeks, group B had faster increases in body weight, head circumference, and body length and a lower incidence of EUGR compared with group A. Among the preterm infants with a gestational age not less than 32 weeks, group B had faster increases in body weight and a lower incidence of EUGR (evaluated based on body weight and head circumference) compared with group A. During hospitalization, group B had significantly lower incidence of feeding intolerance, necrotizing enterocolitis, and sepsis than group A. Positive nutritional support strategy, applied in preterm infants early after birth, can effectively improve their nutritional status during hospitalization and reduce the incidence of EUGR without increasing the incidence of related complications during hospitalization.

  10. Exclusive breastfeeding rate and factors associated with infant feeding practices in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yovita Ananta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Breast milk is the ideal food for infants. According to the 2007 Indonesian National Household Health Survey, only 23% of mothers exclusively breastfeed for six months.Objectives To determine the rate of exclusive breastfeeding in Indonesia, to evaluate factors associated with infant feeding practices, and to compare the nutritional and developmental status between exclusively-breastfed and formula-fed infants.Methods A survey was conducted in hospitals located in 17 provinces in Indonesia. The rate of exclusive breastfeeding was calculated. Many variables were investigated as potential predictors for exclusive breastfeeding using a multivariable logistic regression analysis. Further analysis was performed to compare the nutritional and developmental status between exclusively breastfed and formula-fed infants at the time of survey.Results From 1,804 infant subjects, the overall rate of exclusive breastfeeding was 46.3%, ranging from 10.5% in East Java to 66.9% in Jambi. Predominant breastfeeding, complementary feeding, and formula feeding rates were 14.3%, 8.6%, and 30.7%, respectively. Maternal unemployment was associated with a longer duration of breastfeeding (P=0.000. There were significantly more formula-fed infants who were undernourished compared to exclusively-breastfed infants (14% vs. 8%, P=0.001. There were also significantly more infants in the formula-fed group who had abnormal head circumference compared to those in the exclusively-breastfed group (9% vs. 6%, P=0.031. Child development, as assessed by the Pre-screening Developmental Questionnaire, was similar between the two groups (P=0.996.Conclusion The overall rate of exclusive breastfeeding in Indonesia is 46.3%. Maternal unemployment is associated with longer duration of breastfeeding. Exclusive breastfed infants have significant better growth and head circumference compared to formula fed infants, while the development is similar between the two groups.

  11. Exclusive breastfeeding rate and factors associated with infant feeding practices in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yovita Ananta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Breast milk is the ideal food for infants. According to the 2007 Indonesian National Household Health Survey, only 23% of mothers exclusively breastfeed for six months. Objectives To determine the rate of exclusive breastfeeding in Indonesia, to evaluate factors associated with infant feeding practices, and to compare the nutritional and developmental status between exclusively-breastfed and formula-fed infants. Methods A survey was conducted in hospitals located in 17 provinces in Indonesia. The rate of exclusive breastfeeding was calculated. Many variables were investigated as potential predictors for exclusive breastfeeding using a multivariable logistic regression analysis. Further analysis was performed to compare the nutritional and developmental status between exclusively breastfed and formula-fed infants at the time of survey. Results From 1,804 infant subjects, the overall rate of exclusive breastfeeding was 46.3%, ranging from 10.5% in East Java to 66.9% in Jambi. Predominant breastfeeding, complementary feeding, and formula feeding rates were 14.3%, 8.6%, and 30.7%, respectively. Maternal unemployment was associated with a longer duration of breastfeeding (P=0.000. There were significantly more formula-fed infants who were undernourished compared to exclusively-breastfed infants (14% vs. 8%, P=0.001. There were also significantly more infants in the formula-fed group who had abnormal head circumference compared to those in the exclusively-breastfed group (9% vs. 6%, P=0.031. Child development, as assessed by the Pre-screening Developmental Questionnaire, was similar between the two groups (P=0.996. Conclusion The overall rate of exclusive breastfeeding in Indonesia is 46.3%. Maternal unemployment is associated with longer duration of breastfeeding. Exclusive breastfed infants have significant better growth and head circumference compared to formula fed infants, while the development is similar between the two groups.

  12. [Nutritional composition of infant milk formulas. Level of compliance in their manufacture and adequacy of nutritional needs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardí Piñana, C; Aranda Pons, N; Bedmar Carretero, C; Arija Val, V

    2015-12-01

    A high percentage of infants are fed with infant formulas. The aim of this study was to assess compliance with the Technical and Safety Regulations in the manufacture of Spanish infant formulas, analyse their adequacy to the recommendations of nutritional composition and the Dietary References Intakes for infants. A total of 31 infant formulas were analysed, of which 18 were infant formulas, 10 follow-on formulas, and 3 growing-up milks. The European Technical and Safety Regulations, the Spanish Dietary Reference Intakes and the Institute of Medicine of the United States and Canada, were used for the assessment of compliance and adequacy. The energy and macronutrient content of analysed infant formulas is placed in the middle of the range indicated in the Technical and Safety Regulations, and meets the recommended amounts. However, most micronutrients such as phosphorus, calcium, retinol, vitamin D, E, C, B6, B12, thiamin, riboflavin, and folate are at the lower limit of the Technical and Safety Regulations. However, the recommended consumption of infant formulas exceeded the Dietary References Intakes for vitamin E, C, retinol, vitamin B and folate, and vitamin B12 for follow-on formulas. Infant formulas are within the reference values of the European Technical and Safety Regulations in energy and macronutrients, but we believe that the level of micronutrients should be reviewed, based on current scientific data on infant requirements and possible adverse effects. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Factors Associated With Infant Bed-Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heere, Megan; Moughan, Beth; Alfonsi, Joseph; Rodriguez, Jennifer; Aronoff, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Bed-sharing is associated with sudden infant death syndrome and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for newborn bed-sharing. Methods: Postpartum mothers from a university maternity service were contacted by phone to complete a survey. Demographic and environmental data were collected; newborn bed-sharing and sleep environment were self-reported. Results: A total of 1261 mothers completed surveys; bed-sharing was reported by 79 mothers (6.3%). Multivariate logistic regression identified referral to a nurse (odds ratio [OR] = 10; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.5-30) and sleep location “other” than a crib, bassinet, or Pack and Play (OR = 7.1; 95% CI = 1.9-25.9) as factors associated with an increased risk of bed-sharing; formula feeding (OR = 0.4; 95% CI = 0.20-0.77) and crib sleeping (OR = 0.49; 95% CI = 0.26-0.86) reduced this risk. Conclusion: Infants with no identifiable places to sleep, significant health issues, and who are breastfed are more likely to bed-share. Interventional studies should be directed at these factors. PMID:28229101

  14. Optimizing Nutrition in Preterm Low Birth Weight Infants-Consensus Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R Kishore; Singhal, Atul; Vaidya, Umesh; Banerjee, Saswata; Anwar, Fahmina; Rao, Shashidhar

    2017-01-01

    Preterm birth survivors are at a higher risk of growth and developmental disabilities compared to their term counterparts. Development of strategies to lower the complications of preterm birth forms the rising need of the hour. Appropriate nutrition is essential for the growth and development of preterm infants. Early administration of optimal nutrition to preterm birth survivors lowers the risk of adverse health outcomes and improves cognition in adulthood. A group of neonatologists, pediatricians, and nutrition experts convened to discuss and frame evidence-based recommendations for optimizing nutrition in preterm low birth weight (LBW) infants. The following were the primary recommendations of the panel: (1) enteral feeding is safe and may be preferred to parenteral nutrition due to the complications associated with the latter; however, parenteral nutrition may be a useful adjunct to enteral feeding in some critical cases; (2) early, fast, or continuous enteral feeding yields better outcomes compared to late, slow, or intermittent feeding, respectively; (3) routine use of nasogastric tubes is not advisable; (4) preterm infants can be fed while on ventilator or continuous positive airway pressure; (5) routine evaluation of gastric residuals and abdominal girth should be avoided; (6) expressed breast milk (EBM) is the first choice for feeding preterm infants due to its beneficial effects on cardiovascular, neurological, bone health, and growth outcomes; the second choice is donor pasteurized human milk; (7) EBM or donor milk may be fortified with human milk fortifiers, without increasing the osmolality of the milk, to meet the high protein requirements of preterm infants; (8) standard fortification is effective and safe but does not fulfill the high protein needs; (9) use of targeted and adjustable fortification, where possible, helps provide optimal nutrition; (10) optimizing weight gain in preterm infants prevents long-term cardiovascular complications; (11

  15. Mother, Infant, and Household Factors Associated with the Type of Food Infants Receive in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eYarnoff

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We explore the complex factors associated with infant feeding by analyzing what mother, infant, and household factors are associated with the types of food given to infants. We seek to quantify associations in order to inform public health policy about the importance of target populations for infant feeding programs. Methods: We used data from the Demographic Health Survey in 20 developing countries for multiple years to examine mother, infant, and household factors associated with six types of food given to infants (exclusive breastfeeding, non-exclusive breastfeeding, infant formula, milk liquids, non-milk liquids, and solid foods. We performed a seemingly unrelated regressions analysis with community-year fixed effects to account for correlation between food types and control for confounding factors associated with community resources, culture, time period, and geography in the pooled analysis.Results: We found that several mother, infant, and household characteristics were associated with each of the feeding types. Most notably, mother’s education, working status, and weight are significantly associated with the type of food given to infants. We provide quantified estimates of the association of each of these variables with six types of food given to infants. Conclusions: By identifying maternal characteristics associated with infant feeding and quantifying those associations, we help public health policymakers generate priorities for targeting infant feeding programs to specific populations that are at greatest risk. Higher educated, working mothers are best to target with exclusive breastfeeding programs for young infants. Mothers with lower education are best to target with complementary feeding programs in infants older than 1 year. Finally, while maternal weight is associated with higher levels of exclusive breastfeeding the association is too weak to merit targeting of breastfeeding programs to low-weight mothers.

  16. Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity - Women, Infant, and Child

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset includes data on weight status for children aged 3 months to 4 years old from Women, Infant, and Children Participant and Program Characteristics. This...

  17. Studies of the nutritional quality of commercial ‘ready to eat‘ infant foods in the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Zand Fard, Nazanin

    2011-01-01

    Infancy is a time of rapid physiological (e.g. anthropometric, immunological and neurological) development. Hence, during this period of life nutritional requirements are at their highest in relation to body mass. There is a paucity of data with respect to the nutritional quality of complementary foods manufactured in the UK for infants and young children. The primary objective of this study was to examine the nutritional value of ‘ready to feed‘ complementary infant foods on the UK market in...

  18. [Nutrition of infants during the 1st year of life: viewpoint of the nutritionist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapparov, M M; Levachev, M M

    2001-01-01

    The article of discussion character is devoted to a problem of adequacy of breast milk substitutes to a true breast milk composition. The data on a multiple composition of breast milk including both nutrients and factors of growth--biologically active substances of breast milk are resulted. In paper was accentuated that the solution of a problem of adequate nutrition of children during first year of life in the first place is connected to propagation of need of breast feeding, health nutrition of mother in the pregnancy period and breast feeding and also with further adaptation of breast milk substitutes with the count of physiological need of infant organism in a wide diversification macro- and micro-nutrients. In this connection it is important to take into account not only indispensable nutrients (indispensable amino acids, fatty acids, mineral substances and trace elements), but also wide quantity of trace components of milk with the expressed biological activity, indispensable for normal development of a children[symbol: see text]s organism in early age.?

  19. [Nutritional factors in preventing osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Jiménez, Juan Antonio; Consuegra Moya, Belkis; Martín Jiménez, María Teresa

    2015-07-18

    Osteoporosis, main risk factor for suffering fragility fractures, is an important public health problem which has undoubted social, health and economic impact; but mainly causes pain, functional limitation and severe alterations in the patient's quality of life. Its current prevalence is very high and a further increase is expected due to a higher life expectancy and the progressive ageing of the population. In the prevention of osteoporosis, the main goal is to prevent fragility fractures; for this reason, it is necessary to: 1) promote bone formation in youth, to get sufficient bone mass peak, 2) reduce bone loss in adulthood, especially after menopause, 3) maintain bone health throughout life, and 4) prevent falls. There is enough evidence that multifactorial strategies (assessment of risk factors, healthy lifestyle habits, smoking cessation, moderation in alcohol consumption, physical exercise, outdoor activity with prudent exposure to sunlight, and a varied and balanced diet), are effective in the population at risk. Regarding factors for the prevention of osteoporosis, current recommendations are: increased consumption of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and fluoride; provide adequate vitamin D (even with fortified food if necessary); consumption of foods rich in omega-3 acids; reduction of salt and prepared ready meals; sufficient but moderate intake of protein and, in the absence of intolerance, promote the consumption of milk and dairy products, especially yogurt and fermented milk products.

  20. Incidence and risk factors for infantile colic in Iranian infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elham Talachian; Ali Bidari; Mohammad Hossein Rezaie

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess the incidence of infantile colic and its association with variable predictors in infants born in a community maternity hospital, Tehran, Iran.METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, mothers who gave birth to live newborns between February 21 and March 20, 2003 at the hospital were invited to join to the study. For every infant-mother dyad data were collected on infant gender, type of delivery, gestational age at birth, birth weight, birth order, and mother'sreproductive history. Then mothers were given a diary to document the duration of crying/fussiness behav-iors of their infants for the next 12 wk. We scheduled home visits at the time the infants were 3 mo of age to collect the completed diaries and obtain additional information on infants' nutritional sources and identify if medications were used for colic relief. Cases of colic were identified by applying Wessel criteria to recordeddata. Chi-square and Mann-whitney U tests were usedto compare proportions for non-parametric and para-metric variables, respectively.RESULTS: From 413 infants, follow-up was completedfor 321 infants. In total, 65 infants (20.24%) satisfiedthe Wessel criteria for infantile colic. No statistical sig-nificance was found between colicky and non-colickyinfants according to gender, gestational age at birth,birth weight, type of delivery, and, infant's feedingpattern. However, firstborn infants had higher rate for developing colic (P = 0.03).CONCLUSION: Colic incidence was 20% in this popu-lation of Iranian infants. Except for birth order status,no other variable was significantly associated with in-fantile colic.

  1. Nutritional management and follow up of infants and children with food allergy: Italian Society of Pediatric Nutrition : Italian Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology Task Force Position Statement

    OpenAIRE

    Giovannini, M.; D'Auria, E; Caffarelli, C.; Verduci, E.; Barberi, S.; Indinnimeo, L; Iacono, I.D.; Martell,A.; Riva, E; Bernardini, R

    2014-01-01

    Although the guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of food allergy recognize the role of nutrition, there is few literature on the practical issues concerning the nutritional management of children with food allergies. This Consensus Position Statement focuses on the nutritional management and follow-up of infants and children with food allergy. It provides practical advices for the management of children on exclusion diet and it represents an evidence-based consensus on nutritional inter...

  2. Early nutrition mediates the influence of severity of illness on extremely LBW infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenkranz, Richard A; Das, Abhik; Wrage, Lisa A; Poindexter, Brenda B; Higgins, Rosemary D; Stoll, Barbara J; Oh, William

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate whether differences in early nutritional support provided to extremely premature infants mediate the effect of critical illness on later outcomes, we examined whether nutritional support provided to "more critically ill" infants differs from that provided to "less critically ill" infants during the initial weeks of life, and if, after controlling for critical illness, that difference is associated with growth and rates of adverse outcomes. One thousand three hundred sixty-six participants in the NICHD Neonatal Research Network parenteral glutamine supplementation randomized controlled trial who were alive on day of life 7 were stratified by whether they received mechanical ventilation for the first 7 d of life. Compared with more critically ill infants, less critically ill infants received significantly more total nutritional support during each of the first 3 wk of life, had significantly faster growth velocities, less moderate/severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia, less late-onset sepsis, less death, shorter hospital stays, and better neurodevelopmental outcomes at 18-22 mo corrected age. Rates of necrotizing enterocolitis were similar. Adjusted analyses using general linear and logistic regression modeling and a formal mediation framework demonstrated that the influence of critical illness on the risk of adverse outcomes was mediated by total daily energy intake during the first week of life.

  3. Certificate of Analysis, Standard Reference Material® 1849, Infant/Adult Nutritional Formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standard Reference material (SRM) 1849 is intended primarily for validation of methods for determining proximates, fatty acids, vitamins, elements and nucleotides in infant and adult nutritional formulas and similar materials. This SRM can also be used for quality assurance when assigning values to ...

  4. Maternal and Infant Nutrition Education Materials. January 1981-October 1988. Quick Bibliography Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Holly Berry

    The materials cited in this annotated bibliography focus on maternal and infant health and the critical importance of good nutrition. Audiovisuals and books are listed in 152 citations derived from online searches of the AGRICOLA database. Materials are available from the National Agricultural Library or through interlibrary loan to a local…

  5. 191 Weaning Practices and Nutritional Status of Infants in Isoko ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    leafy vegetables, soymilk, fish and fruits to enhance their nutritional status. Introduction. The first few ... that undergraduate students in the University of Nigeria, Nsukka commenced weaning after the 4th ..... Adayemi College of. Education.

  6. Early Nutritional Interventions for Brain and  Cognitive Development in Preterm Infants: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Nora; Garcia-Rodenas, Clara L

    2017-02-23

    Adequate nutrition is important for neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm-born infants. In this review, we aim to summarize the current knowledge on nutritional interventions initiated during the hospital stay targeting brain and cognitive development benefits in preterm human infants. Studies can broadly be split in general dietary intervention studies and studies investigating specific nutrients or nutritional supplements. In general, mother's breast milk was reported to be better for preterm infants' neurodevelopment compared to infant formula. The differences in methodologies make it difficult to conclude any effects of interventions with individual nutrients. Only protein and iron level studies showed some consistent findings regarding optimal doses; however, confirmatory studies are needed. This review does not support some widely accepted associations, such as that between long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation and visual development. Clear nutritional recommendations cannot be made based on this review. However, the type of infant nutrition (i.e., breast milk versus formula or donor milk), the timing of the nutritional intervention, and the dose of the nutrient/supplement have been found to be relevant factors in determining the success of nutritional intervention studies in preterm infants.

  7. The effect of maternal near miss on adverse infant nutritional outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulce M. Zanardi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the association between self-reported maternal near miss and adverse nutritional status in children under one year of age. METHODS: This study is a secondary analysis of a study in which women who took their children under one year of age to the national vaccine campaign were interviewed. The self-reported condition of maternal near miss used the criteria of Intensive Care Unit admission; eclampsia; blood transfusion and hysterectomy; and their potential associations with any type of nutritional disorder in children, including deficits in weight-for-age, deficits in height-for-age, obesity and breastfeeding. The rates of near miss for the country, regions and states were initially estimated. The relative risks of infant adverse nutritional status according to near miss and maternal/childbirth characteristics were estimated with their 95% CIs using bivariate and multiple analyses. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of near miss was 2.9% and was slightly higher for the Legal Amazon than for other regions. No significant associations were found with nutritional disorders in children. Only a 12% decrease in overall maternal breastfeeding was associated with near miss. Living in the countryside and child over 6 months of age increased the risk of altered nutritional status by approximately 15%, while female child gender decreased this risk by 30%. Maternal near miss was not associated with an increased risk of any alteration in infant nutritional status. CONCLUSIONS: There was no association between maternal near miss and altered nutritional status in children up to one year of age. The risk of infant adverse nutritional status was greater in women living in the countryside, for children over 6 months of age and for male gender.

  8. Infant nutrition in the first seven days of life in rural northern Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aborigo, Raymond Akawire; Moyer, Cheryl A; Rominski, Sarah; Adongo, Philip; Williams, John; Logonia, Gideon; Affah, Gideon; Hodgson, Abraham; Engmann, Cyril

    2012-08-02

    Good nutrition is essential for increasing survival rates of infants. This study explored infant feeding practices in a resource-poor setting and assessed implications for future interventions focused on improving newborn health. The study took place in the Kassena-Nankana District of the Upper East Region of northern Ghana. In-depth interviews were conducted with 35 women with newborn infants, 8 traditional birth attendants and local healers, and 16 community leaders. An additional 18 focus group discussions were conducted with household heads, compound heads and grandmothers. All interviews and discussions were audio taped, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using NVivo 9.0. Community members are knowledgeable about the importance of breastfeeding, and most women with newborn infants do attempt to breastfeed. However, data suggest that traditional practices related to breastfeeding and infant nutrition continue, despite knowledge of clinical guidelines. Such traditional practices include feeding newborn infants water, gripe water, local herbs, or traditionally meaningful foods such as water mixed with the flour of guinea corn (yara'na). In this region in Ghana, there are significant cultural traditions associated with breastfeeding. For example, colostrum from first-time mothers is often tested for bitterness by putting ants in it - a process that leads to a delay in initiating breastfeeding. Our data also indicate that grandmothers - typically the mother-in-laws - wield enormous power in these communities, and their desires significantly influence breastfeeding initiation, exclusivity, and maintenance. Prelacteal feeding is still common in rural Ghana despite demonstrating high knowledge of appropriate feeding practices. Future interventions that focus on grandmothers and religious leaders are likely to prove valuable in changing community attitudes, beliefs, and practices with regard to infant nutrition.

  9. Situational analysis of infant and young child nutrition policies and programmatic activities in Chad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuehler, Sara E; Nadjilem, Djasndibye

    2011-04-01

    Progress towards reducing mortality and malnutrition among children nutrition in the Sahel', starting with an analysis of current activities related to infant and young child nutrition (IYCN). The main objectives of the situational analysis are to compile, analyse, and interpret available information on infant and child feeding, and the nutrition situation of children nutrition policy was yet ratified in Chad, so the target of many documents reviewed was the malnourished child. Researchers have identified some barriers to optimal feeding practices. However, the majority of these surveys were small scale, so they do not necessarily provide information relevant to the general population. Expanded surveys would be needed for developing evidence-based educational messages targeted to local needs. Reviewed training materials and related programmes being implemented in Chad provide specific guidance for nearly all of the key IYCN topics, except for appropriate feeding choices for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Some of the programmes were intended for national coverage, but we could not confirm whether these programmes were actually implemented nationally. Monitoring and evaluation reports were available for some small-scale programmes, but few of these evaluated whether IYCN-specific programme components were implemented as designed and none evaluated whether participants adopted the promoted feeding practices. Establishment of the policy and programme framework has commenced for improving IYCN practices. Formative research is needed to guide the development of evidence-based training materials and programmes to address the nutritional needs of infants and children. Once more directed programmes are established, there is a further need for rigorous monitoring and evaluation to ensure that training is adequate, programmes are implemented as designed, and effective programmes are identified for expansion nationally. Evaluations are also needed to

  10. Mechanisms of Sucrose and Non-Nutritive Sucking in Procedural Pain Management in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharyn Gibbins

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The administration of sucrose with and without non-nutritive sucking (NNS has been examined for relieving procedural pain in newborn infants. The calming and pain-relieving effects of sucrose are thought to be mediated by endogenous opioid pathways activated by sweet taste. The orogustatory effects of sucrose have been demonstrated in animal newborns, and in preterm and full term human infants during painful procedures. In contrast to sucrose, the analgesic effects of NNS are hypothesized to be activated through nonopioid pathways by stimulation of orotactile and mechanoreceptor mechanisms. Although there is uncertainty as to whether the effects of sucrose and NNS are synergistic or additive, there is sufficient evidence to support the efficacy of combining the two interventions for procedural pain relief in infants. In this review article, the underlying mechanisms of sucrose and NNS, separately and in combination for relieving procedural pain in preterm and full term infants, are examined. Clinical and research implications are addressed.

  11. Infant Temperament Characteristics Related to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and Its Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmanson, Igor A.

    2006-01-01

    Three major components have been repeatedly implicated for the origin(s) of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS): system, minor sickness and surroundings. All these factors also frame infant temperament, and therefore it seems logical to suppose that the babies who either succumb to or are at risk of SIDS may present with certain behavioral…

  12. Diffuse alopecia; nutritional factors and supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güneş Gür Aksoy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hair is constantly produced and shed. The hair follicles producing the hair require calories, proteins, trace elements, and vitamins for this intense biosynthetic activity. Thus, hair growth quality and quantity are closely related to an individuals diet. The nutritional factors that are important for hair growth, and thus should be evaluated, and if deficient replaced in alopecias will be discussed in this review.

  13. Pregnancy and Infants' Outcome: Nutritional and Metabolic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, C; Cetin, I; Agostoni, C; Desoye, G; Devlieger, R; Emmett, P M; Ensenauer, R; Hauner, H; Herrera, E; Hoesli, I; Krauss-Etschmann, S; Olsen, S F; Schaefer-Graf, U; Schiessl, B; Symonds, M E; Koletzko, B

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is a complex period of human growth, development, and imprinting. Nutrition and metabolism play a crucial role for the health and well-being of both mother and fetus, as well as for the long-term health of the offspring. Nevertheless, several biological and physiological mechanisms related to nutritive requirements together with their transfer and utilization across the placenta are still poorly understood. In February 2009, the Child Health Foundation invited leading experts of this field to a workshop to critically review and discuss current knowledge, with the aim to highlight priorities for future research. This paper summarizes our main conclusions with regards to maternal preconceptional body mass index, gestational weight gain, placental and fetal requirements in relation to adverse pregnancy and long-term outcomes of the fetus (nutritional programming). We conclude that there is an urgent need to develop further human investigations aimed at better understanding of the basis of biochemical mechanisms and pathophysiological events related to maternal-fetal nutrition and offspring health. An improved knowledge would help to optimize nutritional recommendations for pregnancy.

  14. Infant food from quality protein maize and chickpea: optimization for preparing and nutritional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón-Valdez, C; Milán-Carrillo, J; Cárdenas-Valenzuela, O G; Mora-Escobedo, R; Bello-Pérez, L A; Reyes-Moreno, C

    2005-06-01

    The present study had two objectives: to determine the best combination of nixtamalized maize flour (NMF) from quality protein maize and extruded chickpea flour (ECF) for producing an infant food, and to evaluate the nutritional properties of the optimized NMF/ECF mixture and the infant food. Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to determine the best combination of NMF/ECF; the experimental design (Lattice simplex) generated 11 assays. Mixtures from each assay were evaluated for true protein and available lysine. Each one of 11 mixtures was used for preparing 11 infant foods that were sensory evaluated for acceptability. A common optimum value for the three response variables was obtained utilizing the desirability method. The best combination of NMF/ECF for producing an infant food was NMF = 26.7%/ECF = 73.3%; this optimized mixture had a global desirability of 0.87; it contained 19.72% dry matter (DM) proteins, 6.10% (DM) lipids, 71.45% (DM) carbohydrates, and 2.83% (DM) minerals; its essential amino acids profile covered the amino acids requirements for children 10-12 years old. The infant food prepared from optimized mixture had an in vitro protein digestibility of 87.9%, and a calculated protein efficiency ratio of 1.86. Infant food could be used to support the growth of infants in developing countries.

  15. Nutritional status and diarrheal illness as independent risk factors for alveolar pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Christian L; Fraser, Drora; Givon-Lavi, Noga; Greenberg, David; Gorodischer, Raphael; Bar-Ziv, Jacob; Dagan, Ron

    2005-11-15

    Community-acquired alveolar pneumonia (CAAP) is typically associated with bacterial infections and is especially prevalent in vulnerable populations worldwide. The authors studied nutritional status and diarrheal history as risk factors for CAAP in Bedouin children pneumonia with regard to nutritional status and diarrhea history. Controls were frequency matched to cases on age and enrollment month. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations of CAAP with nutritional status and recent diarrhea experience. Anemia (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 3.32, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.24, 4.94; p or =1 diarrhea episodes within 31 days prior to enrollment (AOR = 2.30, 95% CI: 1.26, 4.19; p = 0.007) were identified as risk factors for CAAP. Results suggest that improving antenatal care and the nutritional status of infants may reduce the risk of CAAP in Bedouin children. Furthermore, they suggest that vaccines developed to prevent diarrhea may also lower the risk of CAAP.

  16. Personalized Nutrition for the Diverse Needs of Infants and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    The field of nutrition is building the basic science necessary to produce a revolutionary shift in agriculture and public health, moving from dietary guidelines for populations to foods and diets for individuals. Considerable epidemiologic and mechanistic research has documented that humans respond...

  17. Nutritional Management of Acute Diarrhea in Infants and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, Washington, DC. Food and Nutrition Board.

    Written primarily for health professionals advising on programs and policy related to nutrition and diarrhea therapy, this report is aimed at management of diarrhea in less-developed countries, but its information and technical insights are relevant to an understanding of diarrhea and its management throughout the world. Technical in orientation…

  18. Pattern of head growth and nutritional status of microcephalic infants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-07-08

    for the same age and sex) divided by the ... cut-offs for out-of-range or biologically improbable values ... three nutritional deficits a composite variable termed “any ..... Wolf MJ, Wolf B, Bijleveld C, Beunen G, Casaer P. Acquired ...

  19. 1 Feeding practices and nutritional status of infants in Morogoro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Permission was sought from the Morogoro Region Health authority to .... study has potential negative and indirect effects on child nutrition, feeding patterns and ... represents a more accurate reflection of current period of sickness and short term food .... Semba, R.D. (2008) Effect of parental education on child stunting.

  20. Infant milk feeding practices in the Netherlands and associated factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanting, C.I.; Wouwe, J.P. van; Reijneveld, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to describe infant feeding practices and associated factors, and to explore mothers' main reasons for starting and stopping breastfeeding. Methods: We performed a national inquiry into milk feeding practices among 9133 Dutch infants aged <7 mo by means of a

  1. Infant milk feeding practices in the Netherlands and associated factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanting, Caren; Van Wouwe, JP; Reijneveld, SA

    2005-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to describe infant feeding practices and associated factors, and to explore mothers' main reasons for starting and stopping breastfeeding. Methods: We performed a national inquiry into milk feeding practices among 9133 Dutch infants aged = 38 wk of gestation, with a

  2. Infant milk feeding practices in the Netherlands and associated factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanting, Caren; Van Wouwe, JP; Reijneveld, SA

    2005-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to describe infant feeding practices and associated factors, and to explore mothers' main reasons for starting and stopping breastfeeding. Methods: We performed a national inquiry into milk feeding practices among 9133 Dutch infants aged = 38 wk of gestation, with a bir

  3. [Health and nutritional status of 'alternatively' fed infants and young children, facts and uncertainties. II. Specific nutritional deficiencies; discussion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnelie, P C; Van Staveren, W A; Hautvast, J G

    1985-12-01

    This article, which is the second in a series of two articles, discusses available scientific information on the nutritional status of infants and preschool children on alternative diets with regard to calcium, iron, vitamin B12 and D. Some favourable aspects of alternative food habits in such children are also mentioned. Most studies report low intakes of vitamin D and in vegan and macrobiotic children also of calcium and vitamin B12, but it cannot be excluded that some alternative sources of these nutrient may have been missed. Deficiencies have been described for vitamin D and B12 but the evidence is often unconvincing. For example, exposure to sunlight has not been measured in most of the studies on rickets. From the literature available, it would appear that there is a need for longitudinal research on the growth and development of alternatively fed infants and preschool children and for information on the nutrient composition of alternative foods.

  4. FEATURES OF INTENSIVE NUTRITIONAL SUPPORT OF PREMATURE INFANTS IN THE POSTRESUSCITATION PERIOD AFTER DISCHARGE FROM HOSPITAL (PART 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V. Romanenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This review considers specific problems of premature infants in the first year of life related to nutritional deficiencies and lack of basic food nutrients. The features of nutritional support of premature infants who underwent resuscitation phase in the first year of life, the usefulness of the new «mixes for premature infants, discharged from the hospital» in order to intensify the programming power of artificial feeding are discussed. Key words: preterm infants, very low body weight, extremely low body weight, intensive care and neonatal intensive care, enteral nutrition, special mixtures for premature, «the mixture for premature infants, discharged from the hospital». (Pediatric Pharmacology. — 2011; 8 (5: 91–96.

  5. Serum folate levels among healthy infants aged 6–8 months: relation to infants’ nutritional status indicators and maternal knowledge-attitude-practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutik Ernawati

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin B12 and folate deficiency can cause anemia which may lead growth and development impairments. This study was aimed to determine serum folate levels among infants aged 6–8 months and the relation to infants’ nutritional indicators and maternal knowledge-attitude-practice about infant feeding.Methods: A cross–sectional design was implemented in infants aged 6–8 months and their mothers as respondents who met the study criteria. Data collected among the infants included sex, age, length, weight, intake of energy, protein and folate (based on a one–month semi–quantitative FFQ and a 24–hour food recall, serum folate and hemoglobin levels. Data collected among the mothers included age, education level, income based on average minimum monthly wage, knowledge, attitude and behavior concerning infant’s feeding, i.e. breast milk and complementary feeding practices.Results: This study found that the median of serum folate levels was 43.05 nmol/L with values ranging from 19.92 nmol/L to 104.24 nmol/L. Serum folate level had a strong positive correlation with its related factors, protein and folate intake.Conclusions: Protein-folate–rich complementay food should be provided to infants aged 6 months and over to maintain serum folate level. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:138-42Keywords: Folate, infants, nutrient intake, nutritional status

  6. nutritional status of children under five years and associated factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Identification of core factors influencing nutrition of this population supports plans to alleviate child ... This study sought to determine the nutritional status of children under five years and associated ... The primary determinants of malnutrition as.

  7. Risk Factors for Late-onset Hyponatremia and Its Influence on Neonatal Outcomes in Preterm Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sohee; Choi, Chang Won; Kim, Ee-Kyung; Kim, Han-Suk; Kim, Beyong Il; Choi, Jung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Late-onset hyponatremia (LOH), hyponatremia occurring after two weeks of age with the achievement of full feeding, is the result of a negative sodium balance caused by inadequate salt intake or excessive salt loss due to immature renal or intestinal function in preterm infants. The aims of our study were to identify the risk factors for LOH and its influence on neonatal outcomes. This was a retrospective cohort analysis of 161 preterm infants born before 34 weeks of gestation between June 2009 and December 2010 at Seoul National University Hospital. LOH was defined as a sodium level ≤ 132 mEq/L or 133-135 mEq/L with oral sodium supplementation. LOH occurred in 49 (30.4%) of the studied infants. A lower gestational age, a shorter duration of parenteral nutrition, the presence of respiratory distress syndrome, the use of furosemide, and feeding with breast milk were significant risk factors for LOH. In terms of neonatal outcomes, the infants with LOH had longer hospital stays and higher risks of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and retinopathy of prematurity requiring surgery. LOH lasting at least 7 days significantly increased moderate to severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, and extra-uterine growth retardation. LOH is commonly observed in preterm infants; it may be a risk factor for bronchopulmonary dysplasia and retinopathy of prematurity or a marker of illness severity. PMID:25829814

  8. [Psychology and nutrition in the ontogenetic development in the infant-adolescence years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuillerat Alfonso, R

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between the psychic development and the nutritional condition from the fetal stage up to the teenage years is the innermost objective of this study. The importance of eating and having an adequate diet during the pregnancy period, the training of the future mother to breast feed in the first months of the baby's life and the subsequent application of the ablactación process and its relation with psychomotor development and the personality progression in the different stages of the psychological, physiological and social development of the infant-adolescent period. The results shown were obtained from various studies carried out in the Nutritional Clinical Service. They are related to the reinduction of breast feeding in children less than 4 months of age with protein energetic malnutrition, as well as other stages of the infant-juvenile obese and other chronic and genetic diseases related to the nourishment and nutrition (diabetes, fenilcetonuria, hiperamonemia, homocistinuria y fibrosis quística), in which the close relationship betweeen the Psychology, and the Nutrition stands, all through the Psychotherapeutic and educational treatments and based on the application of the clinic psychology in the prevention, promotion and treatment of the nutritional alterations and other chronic and genetic diseases related to nourishment and malnutrition. Aspects related to the psychological and social characterizations as well as the personality evolution of these patients and their relatives environment are established.

  9. Early Nutritional Interventions for Brain and  Cognitive Development in Preterm Infants: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Schneider

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Adequate nutrition is important for neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm‐born infants. In this review, we aim to summarize the current knowledge on nutritional interventions initiated during the hospital stay targeting brain and cognitive development benefits in preterm human infants. Studies can broadly be split in general dietary intervention studies and studies investigating specific nutrients or nutritional supplements. In general, mother’s breast milk was reported to be better for preterm infants’ neurodevelopment compared to infant formula. The differences in methodologies make it difficult to conclude any effects of interventions with individual nutrients. Only protein and iron level studies showed some consistent findings regarding optimal doses; however, confirmatory studies are needed. This review does not support some widely accepted associations, such as that between long‐chain polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation and visual development. Clear nutritional recommendations cannot be made based on this review. However, the type of infant nutrition (i.e., breast milk versus formula or donor milk, the timing of the nutritional intervention, and the dose of the nutrient/supplement have been found to be relevant factors in determining the success of nutritional intervention studies in preterm infants.

  10. Impact of feeding and breastfeeding practices on the nutritional status of infants in a district of Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshram, I I; A, Laxmaiah; K, Venkaiah; N V, Brahmam G

    2012-01-01

    Infant feeding practices have a major role in determining the nutritional status of children and are associated with household socioeconomic and demographic factors. We did a cross-sectional household study to assess feeding practices of infants and young children in rural areas of Medak district, Andhra Pradesh. A total of 805 child-mother pairs were included using systematic random sampling. Age-specific feeding patterns were described using frequencies, proportions and survival analysis. Logistic regression was done with feeding practice as dependent and sociodemographic factors as independent variables. Breastfeeding was universal in the study area. Only 22% of mothers initiated breastfeeding within one hour whereas 44% initiated it within three hours after delivery. The median duration of exclusive breastfeeding was 5.5 months. Pre-lacteal use was high (44.7%). Only 41% of infants were exclusively breastfed for 6 months and 58% of infants (6-11 months) received complementary feeding at 6-9 months of age. Timely initiation of breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months was significantly more likely among mothers belonging to scheduled castes and scheduled tribes (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.10-0.76 and OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.08-0.76). Timely initiation of complementary feeding was more likely among scheduled caste and scheduled tribe communities (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.11-0.54). Early initiation of breastfeeding (within an hour of birth) and other feeding practices were associated with community, type of family and education of mother. Efforts are needed to promote early initiation of breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months and age-appropriate complementary feeding among infants. Copyright 2012, NMJI.

  11. Modernization of AOAC Nutrient Methods by Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Darryl

    2016-01-01

    Infant formula is one of the most highly regulated products in the world. To comply with global regulations and to ensure the products are manufactured within product specifications, accurate analytical testing is required. Most of the AOAC INTERNATIONAL legacy test methods for infant formula were developed and validated in the 1980s and 1990s. Although these methods performed very well for many years, infant formulas have been updated, and today's products contain many new and novel ingredients. There were a number of cases in which the legacy AOAC methods began to result in problems with the analysis of modern infant formulas, and the use of these methods caused some disputes with regulatory agencies. In 2010, AOAC reached an agreement with the International Formula Council, which has changed its name to the Infant Nutrition Council of America, regarding a project to modernize these AOAC infant-formula test methods. This agreement led to the development of Standard Method Performance Requirements (SMPRs(®)) for 28 nutrients. After SMPR approval, methods were collected, evaluated, validated, and approved through the AOAC Official Methods(SM) process. Forty-seven methods have been approved as AOAC First Action Methods, and eight have been approved as Final Action.

  12. Neurology of Nutritional Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Infants: Case Series From India and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goraya, Jatinder Singh; Kaur, Sukhjot; Mehra, Bharat

    2015-11-01

    We studied 27 infants aged 6 to 27 months with vitamin B12 deficiency also known as "infantile tremor syndrome" in India. All were exclusively breast-fed by vegetarian mothers. Developmental delay or regression, pallor, skin hyperpigmentation, and sparse brown hair were present in all. Majority were hypotonic and involuntary movements were encountered in 18. Anemia and macrocytosis was found in 83% and 71% infants, respectively. Low serum vitamin B12 was present in 12 of 21 infants. Seven of the 9 infants with normal serum vitamin B12 had received vitamin B12 before referral. Twelve mothers had low serum vitamin B12. Cerebral atrophy was present in all the 9 infants who underwent neuroimaging. Treatment with vitamin B12 resulted in dramatic improvement in general activity and appetite within 48 to 72 hours followed by return of lost milestones. Tremors resolved in all by 3 to 4 weeks. Nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency is a treatable cause of neurologic dysfunction in infants. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Association of maternal depression and infant nutritional status among women living with HIV in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaya, Sylvia; Garcia, Maria E; Li, Nan; Lienert, Jeffrey; Twayigize, William; Spiegelman, Donna; Smith Fawzi, Mary C

    2016-07-01

    Antenatal and post-natal depression has demonstrated a significant burden in sub-Saharan Africa, with rates ranging from 10% to 35%. However, perinatal women living with HIV in Tanzania have reported an even greater prevalence of depression (43-45%). The primary goal of this study was to examine the relationship between maternal depression and infant malnutrition among women living with HIV. The design was a retrospective cohort study within the context of a randomised controlled trial among women living with HIV and their infants. Within this trial, 699 mother-child pairs were analysed for the present study. Although antenatal depression was not associated with infant malnutrition and post-natal depression was negatively associated [relative risk (RR = 0.80, P = 0.04], cumulative depression demonstrated a positive association with infant wasting (RR = 1.08, P nutritional status was observed for episodic vs. chronic depression. These findings suggest that providing evidence-based services for persistent depression among women living with HIV may have an effect on infant malnutrition. In addition, other positive outcomes may be related to infant cognitive development as well as HIV disease prognosis and survival among women.

  14. Breastfeeding progression in preterm infants is influenced by factors in infants, mothers and clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maastrup, Ragnhild; Hansen, Bo Moelholm; Kronborg, Hanne;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Many preterm infants are not capable of exclusive breastfeeding from birth. To guide mothers in breastfeeding, it is important to know when preterm infants can initiate breastfeeding and progress. The aim was to analyse postmenstrual age (PMA) at breastfeeding milestones...... in different preterm gestational age (GA) groups, to describe rates of breastfeeding duration at pre-defined times, as well as analyse factors associated with PMA at the establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. METHODS: The study was part of a prospective survey of a national Danish cohort of preterm infants...... based on questionnaires and structured telephone interviews, including 1,221 mothers and their 1,488 preterm infants with GA of 24-36 weeks. RESULTS: Of the preterm infants, 99% initiated breastfeeding and 68% were discharged exclusively breastfed. Breastfeeding milestones were generally reached...

  15. Infant formula and infant nutrition: bioactive proteins of human milk and implications for composition of infant formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2014-03-01

    Human milk contains an abundance of biologically active components that are highly likely to contribute to the short- and long-term benefits of breastfeeding. Many of these components are proteins; this article describes some of these proteins, such as α-lactalbumin, lactoferrin, osteopontin, and milk fat globule membrane proteins. The possibility of adding their bovine counterparts to infant formula is discussed as well as the implications for infant health and development. An important consideration when adding bioactive proteins to infant formula is that the total protein content of formula needs to be reduced, because formula-fed infants have significantly higher concentrations of serum amino acids, insulin, and blood urea nitrogen than do breastfed infants. When reducing the protein content of formula, the amino acid composition of the formula protein becomes important because serum concentrations of the essential amino acids should not be lower than those in breastfed infants. Both the supply of essential amino acids and the bioactivities of milk proteins are dependent on their digestibility: some proteins act only in intact form, others act in the form of larger or small peptides formed during digestion, and some are completely digested and serve as a source of amino acids. The purity of the proteins or protein fractions, potential contaminants of the proteins (such as lipopolysaccharide), as well as the degree of heat processing used during their isolation also need to be considered. It is likely that there will be more bioactive components added to infant formulas in the near future, but guidelines on how to assess their bioactivities in vitro, in animal models, and in clinical studies need to be established. The extent of testing needed is likely going to depend on the degree of complexity of the components and their bioequivalence with the human compounds whose effects they are intended to mimic.

  16. Nutritional management of breastfeeding infants for the prevention of common nutrient deficiencies and excesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Soo Moon

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Breastfeeding is the best source of nutrition for every infant, and exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months is usually optimal in the common clinical situation. However, inappropriate complementary feeding could lead to a nutrient-deficient status, such as iron deficiency anemia, vitamin D deficiency, and growth faltering. The recent epidemic outbreak of obesity in Korean children emphasizes the need for us to control children’s daily sedentary life style and their intakes of high caloric foods in order to prevent obesity. Recent assessment of breastfeeding in Korea has shown that the rate is between 63% and 89%; thus, up-to-dated evidence-based nutritional management of breastfeeding infants to prevent common nutrient deficiencies or excesses should be taught to all clinicians and health care providers.

  17. Nutritional management of breastfeeding infants for the prevention of common nutrient deficiencies and excesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jin Soo

    2011-07-01

    Breastfeeding is the best source of nutrition for every infant, and exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months is usually optimal in the common clinical situation. However, inappropriate complementary feeding could lead to a nutrient-deficient status, such as iron deficiency anemia, vitamin D deficiency, and growth faltering. The recent epidemic outbreak of obesity in Korean children emphasizes the need for us to control children's daily sedentary life style and their intakes of high caloric foods in order to prevent obesity. Recent assessment of breastfeeding in Korea has shown that the rate is between 63% and 89%; thus, up-to-dated evidence-based nutritional management of breastfeeding infants to prevent common nutrient deficiencies or excesses should be taught to all clinicians and health care providers.

  18. Factors influencing surfactant composition in the newborn infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, M

    1978-07-01

    In order to evaluate the surfactant maturation of the neonate, tracheal aspirates were analyzed in 84 newborn infants with 12h of birth. Using 2-dimensional thin-layer chromatography, 9 different phospholipids were identified. Dynamic surface tension measurements were performed with a modified Wilhelmy balance. Five different groups of infants with typical phospholipid patterns were characterized: i.e., 1. Normal term newborn. 2. RDS in the preterm infant. 3. Acceleration of lung maturity in preterm infants without RDS. 4. Retardation in term infants with RDS. 5. Therapeutic induction of pulmonary maturity in preterm infants following maternal glucocorticoid administration. Mature lung effluent contains high concentrations of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phsophatidylglycerol (PG). In infants with RDS, PC is low and PG absent. Accelerated lung maturity was observed after chronic prenatal stress, such as prolonged rupture of the membranes, chronic vaginal bleeding, and maternal hepatitis or drug addiction. Retardation of pulmonary maturity was seen in infants with alpha-1-AT-deficiency, maternal diabetes and maternal hypothyroidism. Administration of methylprednisolone to the mother 24 h to 72h before birth induced both the synthesis of PC and PG in the preterm infants, resulting in an almost full-term phospholipid pattern as early as 31 weeks of gestation. The significance of these factors on the pathogenesis of RDS is discussed.

  19. Neuroimaging identifies increased manganese deposition in infants receiving parenteral nutrition12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschner, Judy L; Anderson, Adam; Slaughter, James Christopher; Aschner, Michael; Steele, Steven; Beller, Amy; Mouvery, Amanda; Furlong, Heather M; Maitre, Nathalie L

    2015-01-01

    Background: Manganese, an essential metal for normal growth and development, is neurotoxic on excessive exposure. Standard trace element–supplemented neonatal parenteral nutrition (PN) has a high manganese content and bypasses normal gastrointestinal absorptive control mechanisms, which places infants at risk of manganese neurotoxicity. Magnetic resonance (MR) relaxometry demonstrating short T1 relaxation time (T1R) in the basal ganglia reflects excessive brain manganese accumulation. Objective: This study tested the hypothesis that infants with greater parenteral manganese exposure have higher brain manganese accumulation, as measured by MR imaging, than do infants with lower parenteral manganese exposure. Design: Infants exposed to parenteral manganese were enrolled in a prospective cohort study. Infants classified as having high manganese exposure received >75% of their nutrition in the preceding 4 wk as PN. All others were classified as having low exposure. Daily parenteral and enteral manganese intakes were calculated. Whole-blood manganese was measured by high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Brain MR relaxometry was interpreted by a masked reviewer. Linear regression models, adjusted for gestational age (GA) at birth, estimated the association of relaxometry indexes with total and parenteral manganese exposures. Results: Seventy-three infants were enrolled. High-quality MR images were available for 58 infants, 39 with high and 19 with low manganese exposure. Four infants with a high exposure had blood manganese concentrations >30 μg/L. After controlling for GA, higher parenteral and total manganese intakes were associated with a lower T1R (P = 0.01) in the globus pallidus and putamen but were not associated with whole-blood manganese (range: 3.6–56.6 μg/L). Elevated conjugated bilirubin magnified the association between parenteral manganese and decreasing T1R. Conclusion: A short T1R for GA identifies infants at risk of

  20. The impact of maternal characteristics, infant temperament and contextual factors on maternal responsiveness to infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tester-Jones, Michelle; O'Mahen, Heather; Watkins, Edward; Karl, Anke

    2015-08-01

    Postnatal maternal depressive symptoms are consistently associated with impairments in maternal attunement (i.e., maternal responsiveness and bonding). There is a growing body of literature examining the impact of maternal cognitive factors (e.g., rumination) on maternal attunement and mood. However, little research has examined the role of infant temperament and maternal social support in this relationship. This study investigated the hypothesis that rumination would mediate (1) the relationship between depressive symptoms and attunement and (2) the relationship between social support and attunement. We further predicted that infant temperament would moderate these relationships, such that rumination would demonstrate mediating effects on attunement when infant difficult temperament was high, but not low. Two hundred and three mothers completed measures on rumination, depressive symptoms, attunement, perceived social support and infant temperament. Rumination mediated the effect of postnatal maternal depressive mood on maternal self-reported responsiveness to the infant when infants were low, but not high, in negative temperament. When infants had higher negative temperament, there were direct relationships between maternal depressive symptoms, social support and maternal self-reported responsiveness to the infant. This study is limited by its cross-sectional and correlational nature and the use of self-report measures to assess a mother's awareness of her infant needs and behaviours, rather than observational measures of maternal sensitivity. These findings suggest potentially different pathways to poor maternal responsiveness than those expected and provide new evidence about the contexts in which maternal cognitive factors, such as rumination, may impact on the mother-infant relationship.

  1. Nutritional zinc status in weaning infants: association with iron deficiency, age, and growth profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Su; Chang, Ju Young; Hong, Jeana; Ko, Jae Sung; Seo, Jeong Kee; Shin, Sue; Lee, Eun Hee

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the correlation between iron deficiency (ID) and zinc deficiency (ZD) and explored the demographic, anthropometric, and feeding-related factors associated with hypozincemia and hair zinc content in weaning infants. Infants aged 6-24 months were recruited, their feeding history was recorded, and their heights and weights were measured. Hemoglobin content, serum iron/total iron-binding capacity, and ferritin and zinc concentrations of serum and hair (using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy) were assessed. Among 101 infants, 64 (63.4 %) infants exhibited ID. The median serum zinc concentration in iron-deficient infants was lower than that in non-iron-deficient infants, respectively, 73.5 μg/dL (interquartile range [IQR], 65.0-83.8) vs. 87.0 μg/dL (IQR, 77.5-97.0; p = 0.001). The frequency of hypozincemia was also significantly higher in the iron-deficient group than in the non-iron-deficient group (21 out of 64 [32.8 %] vs. 4 out of 37 [10.8 %], respectively; p = 0.014). In multiple regression analysis, the risk of hypozincemia was significantly increased in infants with ID (p = 0.026), mildly underweight infants (weight-for-age Z score status (p > 0.1); however, there was an inverse relationship between hair zinc concentrations and age of infants (r = -0.250; p = 0.024). In weaning infants, ID is a risk factor for hypozincemia. Hair zinc concentrations appeared to decrease as the age of infants increased during late infancy. Further large-scale studies are needed to validate the relationship between hypozincemia and mild degrees of weight gain impairment in this age group.

  2. Nutritional Factors and Osteoarthritis: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. R N Srivastava

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common disease according to TNS Arogya survey 2007. Although OA was previously thought to be a progressive degenerative disorder, it is now known that spontaneous arrest or reversal of disease can occur. Conventional medications are often effective for symptomatic relief but they can also cause significant side effects and do not slow the progression of disease. Though the role of nutritional factors in OA has been suggested as early as 700 BC, it was first established in the 1960s. Several nutritional factors are helpful in relieving the symptoms of OA and they might positively affect the progression of the disease without any side effects. Preliminary evidences suggest several of these may have a role in influencing the course of OA. Studies have proven the role of these factors and experiment based results have established their therapeutic role. Research is ongoing on the beneficial properties of plant derived extracts for OA and nutraceuticals industries are accordingly making firm contribution to this sector. This article focuses the role of nutrients to slow down the progression of OA and their future aspects.

  3. Determinants of infant nutritional status in Dabat district, North Gondar, Ethiopia: A case control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wubante, Amarech Asratie

    2017-01-01

    Background Malnutrition is the top cause of global burden of disease, disability and mortality among infants. Over two-thirds of deaths of children globally occur during the first year of life (infancy). Malnutrition among infants is substantially high in Ethiopia. Therefore, this study is aimed to assess determinants of infant nutritional status. Methods A community based nested case-control study was conducted from February to June 2013 in Dabat district. A total of 80 cases and 320 controls (1:4 ratios) were studied. Relevant data was extracted from the community based survey data set. Anthroplus software was used to identify cases and controls. Determinants of infant nutritional status were identified using multivariate analysis. Results Among the total of 80 cases and 320 controls, more than half (52.5%) of the cases and the controls (53.8%) were males and females, respectively. Breast Feeding (BF) was started immediately after birth in only 43.8% of the cases. Nearly 94% of the mothers of the cases had no breast feeding information as part of Ante Natal Care (ANC) follow up. Maternal age (AOR: 0.29; 95% CI: 0.11–0.76), having radio (AOR: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.22–0.82), lack of toilet facility (AOR: 2.24; 95% CI: 1.16–4.33), deprivation of colostrum (AOR: 1.76; 95% CI: 1.01–1.06) and method of complementary feeding (AOR: 2.82; 95% CI: 1.33–5.99) were associated with wasting. Conclusions This study has found that inappropriate infant feeding; nutritional information gap and lack of toilet facility as significant predictors of malnutrition. Hence, joint interventions, including counseling of mothers about benefits of colostrum feeding and use of appropriate feeding method, toilet utilization and mass media such as radio possession, are needed to address the problem in Dabat district. PMID:28346497

  4. Enhanced lipid utilization in infants receiving oral L-carnitine during long-term parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, R A; Whitington, P F; Mauer, E C; Catarau, E M; Christensen, M L; Borum, P R

    1986-12-01

    Fourteen infants requiring long-term total parenteral nutrition but able to tolerate small quantities of enteral feedings were randomized into carnitine treatment and placebo control groups. All infants had received nutritional support devoid of carnitine. Plasma carnitine levels and observed plasma lipid indices were not different before supplementation. Under standardized, steady-state conditions, 0.5 g/kg fat emulsion (intralipid) was administered intravenously over 2 hours both before and after infants received 7 days of continuous nasogastric or gastric tube L-carnitine (50 mumol/kg/day) or placebo. Plasma triglyceride, free fatty acid, acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and carnitine concentrations were observed at 0 (start of lipid infusion), 2, and 4 hours for pre- and post-treatment periods, and in addition at 6 and 8 hours after carnitine supplementation. Infants receiving carnitine had significantly greater beta-hydroxybutyrate plasma concentrations (P less than 0.05) and carnitine (P less than 0.001) at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours, and greater plasma acetoacetate concentrations (P less than 0.05) at 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours, compared with controls. Twenty-four-hour urinary carnitine excretion was very low for both groups before supplementation; after supplementation, excretion was higher (P less than 0.05) in the carnitine group. No significant differences were found between groups for plasma triglyceride or free fatty acid concentrations at any observation period. This study demonstrated enhanced fatty acid oxidation, as evidenced by increased ketogenesis, with L-carnitine supplementation in infants receiving long-term total parenteral nutrition.

  5. The effect of music reinforcement for non-nutritive sucking on nipple feeding of premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Jayne M; Cassidy, Jane; Grant, Roy; Cevasco, Andrea; Szuch, Catherine; Nguyen, Judy; Walworth, Darcy; Procelli, Danielle; Jarred, Jennifer; Adams, Kristen

    2010-01-01

    In this randomized, controlled multi-site study, the pacifier-activated-lullaby system (PAL) was used with 68 premature infants. Dependent variables were (a) total number of days prior to nipple feeding, (b) days of nipple feeding, (c) discharge weight, and (d) overall weight gain. Independent variables included contingent music reinforcement for non-nutritive sucking for PAL intervention at 32 vs. 34 vs. 36 weeks adjusted gestational age (AGA), with each age group subdivided into three trial conditions: control consisting of no PAL used vs. one 15-minute PAL trial vs. three 15-minute PAL trials. At 34 weeks, PAL trials significantly shortened gavage feeding length, and three trials were significantly better than one trial. At 32 weeks, PAL trials lengthened gavage feeding. Female infants learned to nipple feed significantly faster than male infants. It was noted that PAL babies went home sooner after beginning to nipple feed, a trend that was not statistically significant.

  6. Study protocol: Mother and Infant Nutritional Assessment (MINA) cohort study in Qatar and Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naja, Farah; Nasreddine, Lara; Al Thani, Al Anoud; Yunis, Khaled; Clinton, Michael; Nassar, Anwar; Farhat Jarrar, Sara; Moghames, Patricia; Ghazeeri, Ghina; Rahman, Sajjad; Al-Chetachi, Walaa; Sadoun, Eman; Lubbad, Nibal; Bashwar, Zelaikha; Bawadi, Hiba; Hwalla, Nahla

    2016-05-04

    The Middle East and North Africa region harbors significant proportions of stunting and wasting coupled with surging rates of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Recent evidence identified nutrition during the first 1000 days of life as a common denominator not only for optimal growth but also for curbing the risk of NCDs later in life. The main objective of this manuscript is to describe the protocol of the first cohort in the region to investigate the association of nutrition imbalances early in life with birth outcomes, growth patterns, as well as early determinants of non-communicable diseases. More specifically the cohort aims to 1) examine the effects of maternal and early child nutrition and lifestyle characteristics on birth outcomes and growth patterns and 2) develop evidence-based nutrition and lifestyle guidelines for pregnant women and young children. A multidisciplinary team of researchers was established from governmental and private academic and health sectors in Lebanon and Qatar to launch the Mother and Infant Nutritional Assessment 3-year cohort study. Pregnant women (n = 250 from Beirut, n = 250 from Doha) in their first trimester are recruited from healthcare centers in Beirut, Lebanon and Doha, Qatar. Participants are interviewed three times during pregnancy (once every trimester) and seven times at and after delivery (when the child is 4, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months old). Delivery and birth data is obtained from hospital records. Data collection includes maternal socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics, dietary intake, anthropometric measurements, and household food security data. For biochemical assessment of various indicators of nutritional status, a blood sample is obtained from women during their first trimester. Breastfeeding and complementary feeding practices, dietary intake, as well as anthropometric measurements of children are also examined. The Delphi technique will be used for the development of the nutrition and lifestyle

  7. The interventions of nutritional education on malnutrition infants mothers in Wonokromo Surabaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiwik Afridah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Mother’s knowledge has great affect to the nutritional status of the infants, because mother has a big role in providing the food in the family. That Knowledge was heavily influenced by social circumstances of the family's such as lack of family income that may affect the mother's in providing the food in the family. The research objective is to examine the effect of nutrition education intervention on body weight of malnutrition infants in RW 07 Wonokromo, Surabaya.This study uses a pre-experimental study design with pre-post test type approach. The subjects were children aged six months to five years who are malnutrition and poor nutrition, with indexes BW/U is less than Z score, located in Wonokromo Village, Surabaya. Sampling techniques in a study conducted by simple random sampling. Analysis of differences nutritional status of children before and after giving of nutrition education were tested by paired t test (paired t test and differences of mother’s knowledge before and after giving of nutrition education were tested by Wilcoxon signed rank test.Results of statistically tests by using a paired t-test obtained P Value (0.108 > α (0.05 means there is no different on giving of nutrition education intervention on weight infants in the RW. 07 Wonokromo Village, Surabaya. Results of statistically tests by using the Wilcoxon signed rank test obtained P Value (0.157 > α (0.05 means there is no different on giving of nutrition education intervention on parent’s knowledge level of a toddler in the RW. 07 Wonokromo Village Surabaya.Required planning and strategies to change behavior and awareness of nutrition and health. Using 4P concept for viewpoint of trainers/educators and 4C for viewpoint of participants or trained, and performed by ABC approach (Advocacy, Situation control and the Movement Atmosphere/mobilization. Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1\\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style

  8. Different methods for assessment of nutritional status in newborn infants based on physical and anthropometric indexes: a short review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Rashidi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Several complications during childhood is associated with nutritional status of infants at birth. Therefore, nutritional status of newborns must be evaluated properly after birth. Assessment of the nutritional status of neonates based on anthropometric and physical indices is simple and inexpensive without the need for advanced medical equipment. However, no previous studies have focused on the assessment methods of the nutritional status of infants via anthropometric and physical indices. This study aimed to review some of the key methods used to determine the nutritional status of neonates using anthropometric and physical indices. To date, most studies have focused on the diagnosis of fetal malnutrition (FM and growth monitoring. In order to diagnose FM, researchers have used growth charts and Ponderal index (PI based on anthropometric indices, as well as Clinical Assessment of Nutritional (CAN Score based on physical features. Moreover, in order to assess the growth status of infants, growth charts were used. According to the findings of this study, standard intrauterine growth curves and the PI are common measurement tools in the diagnosis of FM. Furthermore, CAN score is widely used in the evaluation of the nutritional status of neonates. Given the differences in the physical features of term and preterm infants, this index should be adjusted for preterm neonates. Longitudinal growth charts are one of the most prominent methods used for monitoring of the growth patterns of infants.

  9. Risk Factors of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and Risk Factors for Sleep Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmanson, Igor A.

    2011-01-01

    Relationship between major risk factors of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and sleep disorders in the infants is the subject of review and discussion. Improper micro-environmental characteristics (especially poor environmental organisation and lack of developmental stimulation), pre-term delivery and/or infant low birth weight, prone sleep…

  10. Clinical presentation and metabolic consequences in 40 breastfed infants with nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency--what have we learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honzik, Tomas; Adamovicova, Miriam; Smolka, Vratislav; Magner, Martin; Hruba, Eva; Zeman, Jiri

    2010-11-01

    Maternal vitamin B(12) (Cbl) deficiency causes nutritional Cbl deficiency in breastfed infants. To analyse clinical presentation and metabolic consequences in 40 breastfed infants with Cbl deficiency. Cbl levels in serum and breast milk were determined by an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay, methylmalonic acid level by GC/MS, plasma homocysteine by HPLC and propionylcarnitine by MS/MS. Profound Cbl deficiency was found in 17 children (69 ± 17 ng/l, controls 200-900), and milder Cbl deficiency in 23 children (167 ± 40 ng/l). Maternal Cbl deficiency was mostly caused by insufficient Cbl absorption. Only six mothers were vegetarian. The average age at diagnosis was 4.4 ± 2.5 months. Clinical symptoms included failure to thrive (48% of children), hypotonia (40%), developmental delay (38%) and microcephaly (23%). 63% of children had anaemia (megaloblastic in 28% of all children). All but one patient had methylmalonic aciduria, 80% of patients had hyperhomocysteinemia and 87% had increased aminotransferases. Propionylcarnitine was elevated in two out of 25 infants. Comparing groups with severe and mild Cbl deficiency, a marked difference was found in severity of clinical and laboratory changes. Maternal Cbl status and diagnostic delay are the major factors influencing severity and progression of Cbl deficiency in breastfed infants. In our cohort, propionylcarnitine was not sufficiently sensitive marker of Cbl deficiency. Although symptoms are reversible on Cbl substitution, permanent neurological damage can result. Selective screening for Cbl deficiency is indicated in all breastfed infants with failure to thrive, hypotonia, developmental delay, microcephaly or megaloblastic anaemia. The best prevention in future could be the screening of all pregnant women. Copyright © 2009 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF NUTRITION ON PHYSICAL AND NEUROPSYCHICAL DEVELOPMENT OF INFANTS: RESULTS OF 12-MONTHS OBSERVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Legon’kova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic ingredient of normal nutrition in infants is breast milk. If breast feeding is impossible the choice of artificial feeding formula should be made taking into account the qualities of formula which must be extremely close to that ones of breast milk. Objectives: to evaluate of state of health of infants having breast and artificial feeding. Methods: effectiveness and tolerance to adopted formula «Nutrilon Comfort» compared to standard milk formula and breast milk were analyzed. Dynamics of physical and neuro-psychical development of children was observed during 12 months. The cases of infectious diseases and tolerance to artificial feeding formulas were estimated. Results: prolonged observation of children from the group of adopted formula with immunomodulatory factors (long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and prebiotics showed its complex action (influence on physical, neuro-psychical development and infectious morbidity is similar to that one of breast feeding. Acute respiratory infections and atopic dermatitis in children having breast feeding and adopted formula developed rarely than in children from group of standard formula (p < 0.05. Conclusion: nutrition with «Nutrilon Comfort» formula in cases when breast feeding is impossible allows child’s development similar to children with breast feeding.

  12. Plasma carnitine concentration and lipid metabolism in infants receiving parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, M L; Helms, R A; Mauer, E C; Storm, M C

    1989-11-01

    The relationships among plasma total carnitine concentration, postnatal age, and fatty acid metabolism were evaluated in 57 infants receiving parenteral nutrition. Concentrations of plasma carnitine, triglycerides, free fatty acids, acetoacetate, and beta-hydroxybutyrate were determined before and at 2 and 4 hours from the beginning of a standardized 2-hour lipid infusion. Plasma carnitine concentrations declined with increasing postnatal age. There were no significant differences in gestational age or triglyceride concentrations between infants less than or equal to 4 weeks of age and those greater than 4 weeks of age, whereas free fatty acid concentrations were lower and acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were higher in the younger infants. Infants less than or equal to 4 weeks of age were further grouped according to plasma carnitine concentration greater than 13 nmol/ml (group 1) and less than or equal to 13 nmol/ml (group 2) and were then compared with infants greater than 4 weeks of age (group 3). There were no significant differences in triglyceride concentrations among the three groups; free fatty acids, acetoacetate, and beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations for group 2 patients were similar to those of group 1 patients or fell between values for group 1 and group 3 patients. These results demonstrate decreasing plasma carnitine concentrations and possibly for more than 4 weeks.

  13. Urinary tract infection in full-term newborn infants: risk factor analysis

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    Falcão Mário Cícero

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the correlation of risk factors to the occurrence of urinary tract infection in full-term newborn infants. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective study (1997 including full-term infants having a positive urine culture by bag specimen. Urine collection was based on: fever, weight loss > 10% of birth weight, nonspecific symptoms (feeding intolerance, failure to thrive, hypoactivity, debilitate suction, irritability, or renal and urinary tract malformations. In these cases, another urine culture by suprapubic bladder aspiration was collected to confirm the diagnosis. To compare and validate the risk factors in each group, the selected cases were divided into two groups: Group I - positive urine culture by bag specimen collection and negative urine culture by suprapubic aspiration, and Group II - positive urine culture by bag specimen collection and positive urine culture by suprapubic aspiration . RESULTS: Sixty one infants were studied, Group I, n = 42 (68.9% and Group II, n = 19 (31.1%. The selected risk factors (associated infectious diseases, use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, renal and urinary tract malformations, mechanical ventilation, parenteral nutrition and intravascular catheter were more frequent in Group II (p<0.05. Through relative risk analysis, risk factors were, in decreasing importance: parenteral nutrition, intravascular catheter, associated infectious diseases, use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, mechanical ventilation, and renal and urinary tract malformations. CONCLUSION: The results showed that parenteral nutrition, intravascular catheter, and associated infectious diseases contributed to increase the frequency of neonatal urinary tract infection, and in the presence of more than one risk factor, the occurrence of urinary tract infection rose up to 11 times.

  14. Maternal mental health and nutritional status of six-month-old infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Kulik Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze if maternal mental health is associated with infant nutritional status at six month of age. METHODS A cross-sectional study with 228 six-month-old infants who used primary health care units of the city of Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil. Mean weight-for-length and mean weight-for-age were expressed in z-scores considering the 2006 World Health Organization reference curves. Maternal mental health was measured by the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. The following cutoff points were used: ≥ 3 for common mental disorders, ≥ 5 for more severe mental disorders, and ≥ 9 for depression. The statistical analysis employed adjusted linear regression models. RESULTS The prevalence of common mental disorders, more severe mental disorders and depression was 39.9%, 23.7%, and 8.3%, respectively. Children of women with more severe mental disorders had, on average, a weight-for-length 0.37 z-scores lower than children of women without this health harm (p = 0.026. We also observed that the weight-for-length indicator of children of depressed mothers was, on average, 0.67 z-scores lower than that of children of nondepressed women (p = 0.010. Maternal depression was associated with lower mean values of weight-for-age z-scores (p = 0.041. CONCLUSIONS Maternal mental health is positively related to the inadequacy of the nutritional status of infants at six months.

  15. Effect of glutamine with auxiliary enteral and parenteral nutrition on feeding intolerance of low birth weight infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Dong Cai; Chun-Hong Chen; Yan-Fang Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the clinical effects of glutamine assisted enteral nutrition and parenteral nutrition on improving the feeding intolerance of low birth weight infants.Methods: A total of 40 cases of low birth weight infants (LBW) in our hospital from May 2013 to June 2015 were selected, which were divided equally into the observation group and the control group according to the different nutritional intervention methods. Patients in the control group received routine enteral nutrition and parenteral nutrition while children of observed group received glutamine assisted enteral and parenteral nutrition. Differences of children’s growth and development indicators, nutritional status and levels of calcium and phosphorus, gastrin and motilin levels, mucosal barrier and immune function were compared between two groups. Results:After receiving nutritional intervention, children in the observation group had higher levels of serum leptin, GH, IGF-I and adiponectin than the control group patients, while Cor values were lower. The observation group patients who received nutritional intervention had higher TSF, AMC, TP, ALB, calcium and phosphorus levels than the control group, while the ALP values were lower; children of observation group who received nutrition intervention had higher GAS and MOT levels than the control group; children of observation group after intervention had higher peripheral blood CD3+T, CD4+T and CD4+/CD8+ levels than the control group children, while D-lactic acid and blood ammonia levels were lower.Conclusion:Glutamine assisted enteral nutrition and parenteral nutrition could improve the feeding intolerance of low birth weight infants, and it improved the nutritional status as well as growth and development of children as a whole, and thus had positive clinical significance.

  16. Influential and prognostic factors of small for gestational age infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong-li; LIU Jun-tao; GAO Jin-song; YANG Jian-qiu; BIAN Xu-ming

    2009-01-01

    Background Small for gestational age (SGA) infants are associated with a high rate of oligohydramnios, stillbirth and cesarean delivery. Among SGA patients there is a higher risk of neonatal complications, such as polycythemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and hypothermia. Additionally, the SGA infant is prone to suffer from major neurologic sequelae, as well as cardiovascular system disease, in later life. Proper monitoring and therapy during pregnancy are, therefore, of utmost importance. The present study aimed to investigate the influential and prognostic factors of SGA infants.Methods From January 2001 to June 2007, a total of 55 SGA neonatal infants were included in a study group. All were born at Peking Union Medical College Hospital, with regular formal antenatal examinations. In addition, a total of 122 cases of appropriate for gestational age (AGA) infants were bom at the same time and were registered into a control group. All cases were singleton pregnancies with detailed information of the maternal age, gravidity, parity, maternal height and weight, complications, uterine height and abdominal circumference, results from transabdominal ultrasonography between 32-38 gestational weeks, pregnancy duration, delivery manner, placenta, umbilical cord, and neonatal complications.Results Significant differences were observed in placenta weight and neonatal malformations between the study and control groups. Multivariate analysis revealed increased parity, maternal hyperthyroidism and hyperthyroidism history as risk factors. Fetal abdominal circumferences less than 30 and 32 cm at 32-38 gestational weeks respectively, as determined by ultrasonography, resulted in a Youden index of 0.62.Conclusions SGA infants were associated with a greater risk of smaller placentas and infant malformations. Increased parity, maternal hyperthyroidism, and a hyperthyroid history were risk factors for SGA infants. Fetal abdominal circumference less than 30 cm at 32 gestational weeks and less

  17. Commercial baby food consumption and dietary variety in a statewide sample of infants receiving benefits from the special supplemental nutrition program for women, infants, and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Kristen M; Black, Maureen M

    2010-10-01

    Dietary variety and exposure to fruits and vegetables in infancy have been associated with nutritional benefits and later acceptance of these foods. The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of fruit and vegetable commercial baby food consumption and its relation to dietary variety during infancy. A cross-sectional statewide telephone survey of 733 Maryland mothers and infants receiving benefits from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) was conducted between July 2004 and July 2005. A 24-hour dietary recall was examined to assess infant dietary variety. Among infants from birth to age 5 months, 54% had consumed complementary foods in the past 24 hours; 60% received commercial baby foods. Among infants aged 6 to 12 months, 98% had consumed complementary foods in the past 24 hours; 81% received commercial baby foods. In the latter age range, the average daily number of different types of fruits and vegetables consumed was 1.5±1.2, range 0 to 6). In a multivariate model, infants aged 6 to 12 months who received commercial baby foods consumed a greater variety of fruits and vegetables (β=.54, 95% confidence interval 0.26-0.84; Pbaby food is consumed by a majority of WIC infants, although many mothers introduce it before the recommended age of 6 months. Among infants aged 6 to 12 months, commercial baby food is associated with dietary variety in fruits and vegetables. By encouraging consumption of fruits and vegetables after 6 months of age, either through the provision of commercial baby foods and/or education and resources related to the preparation of fruits and vegetables for infants, WIC can increase dietary variety and appropriate introduction of complementary foods among infants. Copyright © 2010 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 早产儿院内营养策略进展及其意义%Progress and significance of early nutrition in preterm infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯琪

    2013-01-01

    Early nutrition of preterm infants is crucial for their early and long term health. There are many unclears and challenges in their early nutrition. Great variations exist in clinical practice. This review focuses on the new concepts and advantages on early nutrition of preterm infants. Mineral enteral feeding, early onset enteral feeding, human milk feeding and its related issues, and the new strategy in parentral nutrition are discussed and emphasized.

  19. Smell and Taste to Improve Nutrition in Very Preterm Infants: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beker, Friederike; Opie, Gillian; Noble, Elizabeth; Jiang, Yannan; Bloomfield, Frank H

    2017-01-01

    The perception of smell and taste, though present early in development, is not routinely considered in the care of preterm infants. Smell and taste are known to increase gut motility, insulin secretion, and the release of appetite, digestive and metabolic hormones. We aimed to investigate the effect of regular smell and taste on the time from birth to full enteral feeds, and the feasibility of the study protocol in very preterm infants. In a randomized controlled trial, infants <29 weeks' postmenstrual age (PA) were assigned to receive either the smell and taste of milk before each feed or to have no exposure to the smell and taste of milk (control). Infants in the treatment group (n = 28) and control group (n = 23) were born at a mean (SD) PA of 26.7 (1.5) and 27.2 (1.4) weeks, respectively. They reached full enteral feeds at a median (IQR) of 13.5 (10.0-19.0) and 15.5 (11.0-22.0) days, respectively. Survival analysis showed an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.63 (95% confidence interval 0.91-2.91; p = 0.10) for the effect on the time to establish full enteral feeds. Repeated-measures analysis indicated significant group differences in weight z scores at 36 weeks' PA and at discharge in favor of the intervention (p < 0.05). These data indicate that the smell and taste of milk may improve milk tolerance and weight in preterm infants. The role of regular smell and taste in promoting enteral nutrition and growth in preterm infants merits a larger trial powered to detect important outcomes. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Nutrition, growth, and allergic diseases among very preterm infants after hospital discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariassen, Gitte

    2013-01-01

    - and bottle-fed at discharge. Compared to mothers in lower social groups and mothers who smoked, mothers in higher social groups and "non-smokers" were significantly (p = 0.000 and p = 0.003 respectively) more often breastfeeding their very preterm infants at discharge. Single birth infants tended more often......The aims of this PhD thesis were: 1. Primarily to investigate the effect, of adding human milk fortifier to mother's milk while breastfeeding very preterm infants after hospital discharge, on growth until 1 year corrected age (CA) 2. Secondarily to describe breastfeeding rate and factors associated...... of macronutrients in human milk from mothers delivering very preterm. This PhD thesis is based on a prospective, randomized, and controlled interventional birth cohort study. A total of 633 very preterm infants with a gestational age (GA) ≤ 32 + 0 weeks were recruited consecutively from July 2004 until August 2008...

  1. Maternal and infant nutritional supplementation practices in Ireland: implications for clinicians and policymakers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tarrant, R C

    2011-06-01

    This prospective Irish observational study examined maternal and infant nutritional supplement use. From an initial sample of 539 mothers recruited from the Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital in Dublin (during 2004-2006), 450 eligible mothers were followed up at 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum. Only 200 women (44.4%) complied with peri-conceptional folic acid at the recommended time with strong social patterning associated with its uptake. Almost 10% of the sample (n = 44) consumed a combined multivitamin and mineral supplement during pregnancy. A vitamin D-containing supplement was provided to only 5 (1.1%) and 15 (3.3%) infants at 6 weeks and 6 months, respectively. A national guideline that advises on adequate and safe use of both vitamin and multivitamin supplements during pregnancy with particular reference to vitamin A and D is warranted. Given the re-emergence of rickets in Ireland, and the reported morbidities associated with vitamin D insufficiency, promoting and monitoring compliance with 200 IU [5 microg] daily vitamin D supplements to all infants particularly those from higher risk groups from birth to 1 year, should be a public health priority.

  2. [Iron nutrition in Mapuche infants fed with human milk (2d phase)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, E; Hertrampf, E; Rodríguez, E; Illanes, J C; Palacios, L; Llaguno, S; Lettelier, A

    1990-01-01

    Blood hemoglobin, serum iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and serum ferritin were measured in 140 healthy rural mapuche (southern Chile's indigenous ethnic group) infants aged 8 to 15 months: 90 had been exclusively breast fed for the first 5 or 6 months of life, then solid foods were introduced but cow's milk was never given to them. The remaining 50, which were all weaned at nearly 4 months of age and then given cow's milk and solid foods at the corresponding age, were designated as controls. Anemia was detected in 4.5% of breast fed infants and in 38% of controls. Evidence of iron deficient erythropoiesis was found in 5% and 81% of cases and controls, respectively. Human milk apparently protects this ethnic group from iron deficiency anemia and this protection seems to be better in mapuche infants than in other groups of chilean infants, because these late have shown 30% incidence of anemia around the first year of life in other studies. More studies on differences in iron nutritional state among mapuche and non mapuche are needed and are under way.

  3. The potential effectiveness of the nutrition improvement program on infant and young child feeding and nutritional status in the Northwest and Southwest regions of Cameroon, Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinsma, Kate; Nkuoh, Godlove; Nshom, Emmanuel

    2016-11-15

    Despite the recent international focus on maternal and child nutrition, little attention is paid to nutrition capacity development. Although infant feeding counselling by health workers increases caregivers' knowledge, and improves breastfeeding, complementary feeding, and children's linear growth, most of the counselling in sub-Saharan Africa is primarily conducted by nurses or volunteers, and little is done to develop capacity for nutrition at the professional, organizational, or systemic levels. The Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Services Nutrition Improvement Program (NIP) has integrated a cadre of nutrition counselors into prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV programs, infant welfare clinics, and antenatal clinics to improve infant and young child feeding practices (IYCF). The study objective was to evaluate the effects of NIP's infant feeding counselors on exclusive breastfeeding (EBF), complementary feeding (CF), and children's linear growth. A cross-sectional evaluation design was used. Using systematic random sampling, caregivers were recruited from NIP sites (n = 359) and non-NIP sites (n = 415) from Infant Welfare Clinics (IWCs) in the Northwest (NWR) and Southwest Regions (SWR) of Cameroon between October 2014 and April 2015. Differences in EBF and CF practices and children's linear growth between NIP and non-NIP sites were determined using chi-square and multiple logistic regression. After adjusting for differences in religion, occupation, and number of months planning to breastfeed, children were almost seven times (Odds Ratio [OR]: 6.9; 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 2.30, 21.09; β = 1.94) more likely to be exclusively breastfed at NIP sites compared to non-NIP sites. After adjusting for differences in occupation, religion, number of months planning to breastfeed, rural environment, economic status, attending other Infant Welfare Clinics, and non-biological caregiver, children were five times (OR: 5.5; CI: 3.37, 9.02;

  4. Nutritional Risk Factors in the Cardiovascular Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Karajibani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: With respect to the effective dietary factors on heart diseases (HDs, the present research aims to study the dietary risk factors of people with cardiovascular diseases. Materials and Methods: The demography and anthropometric information as well as the nutritional condition for 80 patients hospitalized in the Cardiovascular Ward of Zahedan Khatam al-Anbia (PBUH Hospital were determined through dietary recall and indices of lipid profile.Results: As per the findings of this study, for BMI, 26.2% of the patients were overweighed, 10.1% of patients had obesity, and 43.5% of the patients had abdominal obesity for waist to hip ratio. The mean of cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, and HDL were 198.2±52.8, 136.8±66.3, 139±35.4, and 40±10.2 mg/dl, respectively. Imbalance in the macronutrient intakes were observed in patients.Conclusion: Given the fact that the indices under study are inappropriate, the patients are those who are subject to cardiovascular diseases in a constant and chronic manner.

  5. Nutrition of preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia after hospital discharge – Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercília Guimarães

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia often present with severe growth failure at discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit. Catch-up growth accelerates after hospital discharge, nevertheless, feeding problems may need a specialized approach. Following the revision of the scientific literature on the most relevant aspects on nutrition of patients with bronchopulmonary dysplasia after hospital discharge in Part I, in this article the Authors present and discuss important issues such as catch up growth, swallow dysfunction, gastroesophageal reflux, and how to improve feeding competences.

  6. Prevalence, etiological factors and the treatment of infant exogenous obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edio Luiz Petroski

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, there has been considerable interest in the effects of excessive weight gain during childhood, due to the fact that the development of fat tissue in this period is a determinant of adult body composition. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of infant obesity, to identify possible etiological factors, and to highlight treatments that have been used to reduce and/or prevent child obesity. Results have shown that obesity has increased more than any other nutritional problem in both developed and developing countries over the last decade. Etiological factors linked to childhood obesity were early weaning, introduction of inadequate nutrition, and physical inactivity. The treatment of childhood obesity requires a multidisciplinary team consisting of a doctor, nutritionist, psychologist, and physical educator. There are also some general recommendations to be followed: a balanced diet for adequate growth and weight control, and controlled physical exercise together with individual and family emotional support. Parental cooperation is important for the best results. Schools also have a fundamental role in teaching children positive attitudes and behavior towards physical activity and nutrition. RESUMO Nos últimos anos, o interesse sobre os efeitos do ganho de peso excessivo na infância tem aumentado consideravelmente, devido ao fato que o desenvolvimento da celularidade adiposa neste período ser determinante nos padrões de composição corporal de um indivíduo adulto. Este trabalho teve como objetivo investigar a prevalência da obesidade infantil, identificar os possíveis fatores etiológicos além de verifi car quais as intervenções que se destacaram nesta última década como forma de diminuir e/ou prevenir a obesidade em crianças. Os resultados encontrados foram que a obesidade é uma das enfermidades nutricionais que mais têm apresentado aumento de sua prevalência, tanto nos pa

  7. Are we adequately providing support services for optimal infant nutrition in Australia? A study in regional NSW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedus, Jessica; Mullan, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from the literature suggests that parents of infants in Australia may not be receiving appropriate professional assistance to support best practice in infant feeding. This study aimed to investigate whether services for infant nutrition (including breastfeeding, infant formula feeding and support for at-risk infants) complied with current recommendations. Relevant services in a regional area of NSW completed a questionnaire to characterise the assistance they provided for parents of infants in the first 6 months of life. Services for breastfeeding, unlike services for use of infant formula, were consistent with recommendations in the literature. Services were significantly more likely to provide education (χ2 (1, n = 44) = 5.939, P < 0.025) and various forms of professional support (χ2 (1, n = 44) = 20.29, P < 0.0001) for breastfeeding compared with infant formula. At-risk infants were mostly identified through growth monitoring, and extra support services were mostly provided on site. Parents of at-risk infants were encouraged to attend services; strategies included involving family in consultations, offering multiple services on site, free services and home visits. Other important measures recommended in the literature, such as providing continuous care from the antenatal period and transport, were provided infrequently.

  8. Infant feeding and the concept of early nutrition programming: a comparison of qualitative data from four European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Martina A; von Rosen-von Hoewel, Julia; Martin-Bautista, Elena; Szabó, Eva; Campoy, Cristina; Decsi, Tamás; Morgan, Jane; Gage, Heather; Koletzko, Berthold; Raats, Monique

    2009-01-01

    The concept of early nutrition programming is appearing in policy documents, leaflets and magazine articles with different types of statements. However, the level of representation and influence of this concept is unknown in the area of infant nutrition. We established the degree of reflection and the impact of the concept of nutrition programming among the different government stakeholders of infant nutrition in four European countries. In each country, a list of stakeholders in the area of infant feeding was established and key persons responsible for the remit of infant nutrition were identified. We conducted standardised face-to-face or phone interviews from January 2006 to January 2007. The interview guide included questions about the concept of nutrition programming. All interviews were digitally recorded and qualitative data analysis was done using QRS NVivo V2. In total, we analyzed 17 interviews from government organizations in England (5 interviews), Germany (4 interviews), Hungary (3 interviews) and Spain (5 interviews). The concept of nutrition programming was recognized from 4/5 English and 3/4 German interviewees, whereby one organisation reflected the concept in their documents in both countries. In Hungary, 1/3 interviewees recognised the concept and reflected it in their documents. All interviewed Spanish governmental bodies (5/5) recognised the concept of nutrition programming and three of them reflected the concept in their documents. The concept of early nutrition programming was widely recognized among the key persons of government bodies in all four European countries. However, the concept was not necessarily represented in the produced documents.

  9. Role of Protein and Amino Acids in Infant and Young Child Nutrition: Protein and Amino Acid Needs and Relationship with Child Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uauy, Ricardo; Kurpad, Anura; Tano-Debrah, Kwaku; Otoo, Gloria E; Aaron, Grant A; Toride, Yasuhiko; Ghosh, Shibani

    2015-01-01

    Over a third of all deaths of children under the age of five are linked to undernutrition. At a 90% coverage level, a core group of ten interventions inclusive of infant and young child nutrition could save one million lives of children under 5 y of age (15% of all deaths) (Lancet 2013). The infant and young child nutrition package alone could save over 220,000 lives in children under 5 y of age. High quality proteins (e.g. milk) in complementary, supplementary and rehabilitation food products have been found to be effective for good growth. Individual amino acids such as lysine and arginine have been found to be factors linked to growth hormone release in young children via the somatotropic axis and high intakes are inversely associated with fat mass index in pre-pubertal lean girls. Protein intake in early life is positively associated with height and weight at 10 y of age. This paper will focus on examining the role of protein and amino acids in infant and young child nutrition by examining protein and amino acid needs in early life and the subsequent relationship with stunting.

  10. Factors influencing gastrointestinal tract and microbiota immune interaction in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, María Carmen; Cernada, María; Neu, Josef; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Gormaz, María; Vento, Máximo

    2015-06-01

    The role of microbial colonization is indispensable for keeping a balanced immune response in life. However, the events that regulate the establishment of the microbiota, their timing, and the way in which they interact with the host are not yet fully understood. Factors such as gestational age, mode of delivery, environment, hygienic measures, and diet influence the establishment of microbiota in the perinatal period. Environmental microbes constitute the most important group of exogenous stimuli in this critical time frame. However, the settlement of a stable gut microbiota in preterm infants is delayed compared to term infants. Preterm infants have an immature gastrointestinal tract and immune system which predisposes to infectious morbidity. Neonatal microbial dynamics and alterations in early gut microbiota may precede and/or predispose to diseases such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), late-onset sepsis or others. During this critical period, nutrition is the principal contributor for immunological and metabolic development, and microbiological programming. Breast milk is a known source of molecules that act synergistically to protect the gut barrier and enhance the maturation of the gut-related immune response. Host-microbe interactions in preterm infants and the protective role of diet focused on breast milk impact are beginning to be unveiled.

  11. Quantification of intraoral pressures during nutritive sucking: methods with normal infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, William Christopher; Buist, Neil R M; Geary, Annmarie; Buckley, Scott; Adams, Elizabeth; Jones, Albyn C; Gorsek, Stephen; Winter, Susan C; Tran, Hanh; Rogers, Brian R

    2011-09-01

    We report quantitative measurements of ten parameters of nutritive sucking behavior in 91 normal full-term infants obtained using a novel device (an Orometer) and a data collection/analytical system (Suck Editor). The sucking parameters assessed include the number of sucks, mean pressure amplitude of sucks, mean frequency of sucks per second, mean suck interval in seconds, sucking amplitude variability, suck interval variability, number of suck bursts, mean number of sucks per suck burst, mean suck burst duration, and mean interburst gap duration. For analyses, test sessions were divided into 4 × 2-min segments. In single-study tests, 36 of 60 possible comparisons of ten parameters over six pairs of 2-min time intervals showed a p value of 0.05 or less. In 15 paired tests in the same infants at different ages, 33 of 50 possible comparisons of ten parameters over five time intervals showed p values of 0.05 or less. Quantification of nutritive sucking is feasible, showing statistically valid results for ten parameters that change during a feed and with age. These findings suggest that further research, based on our approach, may show clinical value in feeding assessment, diagnosis, and clinical management.

  12. Nutritional status and complementary feeding among HIV-exposed infants: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenju, Pili; Liu, Enju; Hertzmark, Ellen; Spiegelman, Donna; Kisenge, Rodrick; Kupka, Roland; Aboud, Said; Manji, Karim P; Duggan, Christopher; Fawzi, Wafaie W

    2016-09-30

    Complementary feeding is crucial for improving child survival and promoting growth and development, particularly among HIV-exposed children who have higher risk of morbidity and mortality than their un-exposed peers. This prospective study employed an infant and child feeding index (ICFI) to measure complementary feeding and determine its association with nutritional status among 2092 HIV-exposed infants followed from 6 to 24 months of age in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The ICFI measured both quality and quantity of complementary feeding, including current breastfeeding status, food consistency, dietary diversity scores (DDS), food group frequency score, and meal frequency. The ICFI score ranged from 0 to 9; the median score was 6 (Inter-Quartile Range, IQR= 4-7). After adjusting for potential confounders, high ICFI scores were associated with reduced risk of stunting (high vs. low tertile hazard ratio, HR: 0.72; 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.57, 0.91; Pnutrition programs in low-income countries to emphasize educating HIV-exposed children's caregivers on the importance of dietary diversity and optimal complementary feeding to improve nutritional status in this important subpopulation.

  13. Risk factors and prediction for functional and chronic inflammatory bowel diseases in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marushko RV

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective — to determine mainly significant risk factors and prediction for development of functional bowel disease and chronic non-ulcerative non-specific colitis in infants. Materials and methods. Retrospective studies were conducted using the method of questioning parents and analysis of medical records of 344 infants in the age from 6 months to 3 years of life, including 134 infants with functional constipation (FC , 64 infants with functional diarrhea (FD and 146 children with chronic non-specific not-ulcerative colitis (CNNC. The control group included 50 healthy children of similar age and gender. In groups of children retrospectively determined the frequency of risk factors. To compare the data between different groups was used analysis of Pearson c2 criteria and relative risks (relative risk, RR with 95% confidence intervals. Prediction for the development of FC, FD and CNNC was applied the method of discriminant function analysis based on the analysis of 51 essential marks. Results. Mathematical analysis of risk factors for bowel diseases allowed to identify the most important of them, in particular, family history of diseases of the digestive system, including bowel disease, complications during pregnancy and at birth disorders, women chronic extragenital diseases, chronic diseases of women characterized by prolonged exposure in the body to opportunistic or pathogenic bacteria, nutritional and feeding disorders, high infection index and history of infectious diseases. Revealed by the discriminant function analysis significant risk factors, represent their important role in the development of functional bowel disorders and chronic non-specific non-ulcerative colitis. Conclusions. Identifying the risk factors for the development and application of prediction algorithm for functional bowel diseases and chronic non-specific non-ulcerative colitis is enable to develop the effective treatment and preventive measures to reduce the

  14. Presentation of an infant with nutritional deficiency dermatitis as the initial manifestation of cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojković Anđelka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cystic fibrosis (CF is a multisystemic autosomal recessive disease most frequently recognized by characteristic respiratory and/or digestive manifestations. Exceptionally rare, as is the case with the infant we are presenting, the initial sign of the disease can be nutritional deficiency dermatitis (NDD. Case Outline. A three-month-old male infant of young and healthy non-consanguineous parents, born at term after the first uneventful pregnancy, was hospitalized due to atopic dermatitis (AD-like skin changes, failure to thrive and normochromic anemia (Hb 60 g/L. As exclusively breast-fed, failure to thrive was attributed to hypogalactia and skin changes to nutritional allergy, so that, besides exclusion of cow’s milk protein and other highly allergenic foods in mother’s diet, hypoallergenic milk formula was added to the child’s diet. However, dietetic measures were without effect, and the child was re-hospitalized at age 4.5 months, this time in the condition of severe malnutrition with hypoproteinemic edemas, extensive dermatitis, moderate hepatosplenomegaly and recurrent normochromic anemia (Hb 57 g/L. After plasma-free erythrocyte transfusion, correction of hypoalbuminemia and two-week parenteral and semi-elementary nutrition resulted in gradual recovery of the child, also including the resolution of skin changes. Having in mind the clinical course of the disease, as well as the response to applied therapeutic measures, CF was suspected as the cause of the child’s problems, which was also confirmed by a high level of sweat chlorine (92 mmol/L and DNA analysis (∆F508/∆F508. Conclusion. Our experience indicates that NDD, as the initial manifestation of CF, should be also kept in mind in differential diagnosis of the infant’s AD-like changes.

  15. Cigarette Smoking as a Risk Factor for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Bengt; Cnattingius, Sven

    1990-01-01

    Examines risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome based on Swedish births between 1983 and 1985. Results indicate that maternal smoking doubles the risk of infant death, and infants of smokers also died sooner. The more the mother smoked the more likely her infant was to die. (JS)

  16. Aluminium exposure from parenteral nutrition in preterm infants and later health outcomes during childhood and adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewtrell, Mary S; Edmonds, Caroline J; Isaacs, Elizabeth; Bishop, Nick J; Lucas, Alan

    2011-08-01

    Aluminium is the most common metallic element, but has no known biological role. It accumulates in the body when protective gastrointestinal mechanisms are bypassed, renal function is impaired, or exposure is high - all of which apply frequently to preterm infants. Recognised clinical manifestations of aluminium toxicity include dementia, anaemia and bone disease. Parenteral nutrition (PN) solutions are liable to contamination with aluminium, particularly from acidic solutions in glass vials, notably calcium gluconate. When fed parenterally, infants retain >75% of the aluminium, with high serum, urine and tissue levels. Later health effects of neonatal intravenous aluminium exposure were investigated in a randomised trial comparing standard PN solutions with solutions specially sourced for low aluminium content. Preterm infants exposed for >10 d to standard solutions had impaired neurologic development at 18 months. At 13-15 years, subjects randomised to standard PN had lower lumbar spine bone mass; and, in non-randomised analyses, those with neonatal aluminium intake above the median had lower hip bone mass. Given the sizeable number of infants undergoing intensive care and still exposed to aluminium via PN, these findings have contemporary relevance. Until recently, little progress had been made on reducing aluminium exposure, and meeting Food and Drug Administration recommendations (<5 μg/kg per d) has been impossible in patients <50 kg using available products. Recent advice from the UK Medicines and Healthcare regulatory Authority that calcium gluconate in small volume glass containers should not be used for repeated treatment in children <18 years, including preparation of PN, is an important step towards addressing this problem.

  17. Nutrition status and associated factors among children in public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutrition status and associated factors among children in public primary ... Incidence of diarrhea, colds/coughs increased the risk of stunting and ... less than four varieties of food groups by the children were important predictors of malnutrition.

  18. Factors impacting on the nutritional status of population aged 45 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors impacting on the nutritional status of population aged 45 years and ... Information on selected demographic and socio-economic household ... and obesity are problems facing this population group aged 45 years and above in Nairobi.

  19. nutrition status and associated morbidity risk factors among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-09-01

    Sep 1, 2014 ... ORPHANAGE CHILDREN IN SELECTED PUBLIC PRIMARY SCHOOLS WITHIN ... Objective: Compare the nutrition status and associated risk factors of primary school ..... Multivariable analysis of determinants of malnutrition.

  20. Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durnin, J V

    1976-07-01

    Nutrition appeared somewhat late on the scene in the I.B.P. projects in the U.K., but eventually it occupied an integral part of many of the H.A. (human adaptability) investigations. The nutritional data obtained in the studies of isolated and nearisolated communities in Tristan da Cunha and in New Guinea provided information of wide nutritional significance. There were also detailed and extensive studies in Israel which, similarly to those in New Guinea, attempted to relate nutritional factors to enviroment, working conditions, and physical fitness. Some extraordinarily low energy intakes found in Ethiopians have induced much speculation on the extent which man can adequately adapt to restricted food supplies. Interesting nutritional observations, of general importance, have also arisen from results obtained on such disparate groups as Glasgow adolescents, Tanzanian and Sudanese students, children in Malawi and vegans in the U.K.

  1. Feeding and Nutrition of Infants and Young Children. Guidelines for the WHO European Region. WHO Regional Office for Europe. 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Aileen; Fleischcer Michælsen, Kim

    2000-01-01

    Good feeding practices will prevent malnutrition and early growth retardation, which is still common in some parts of the WHO European Region, especially countries of the former Soviet Union. Despite the importance of nutrition and feeding of infants and young children, limited attention has been...

  2. The role of maternal nutrition in growth and health of Indonesian infants: a focus on vitamin A and iron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, M.K.

    2001-01-01

    Nutrition during pregnancy is important for women's health, pregnancy outcome, and infant growth and health. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether weekly supplementation with iron and vitamin A of pregnant women improves growth and health, as indicated by reduced morbidity and

  3. The role of maternal nutrition in growth and health of Indonesian infants: a focus on vitamin A and iron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, M.K.

    2001-01-01

    Nutrition during pregnancy is important for women's health, pregnancy outcome, and infant growth and health. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether weekly supplementation with iron and vitamin A of pregnant women improves growth and health, as indicated by reduced morbidity and impr

  4. 2013 Nutrition Risk Evidence Review Panel. Evidence Review for: The Risk Factor of Inadequate Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Nutrition Risk Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) met for a site visit in Houston, TX on November 20 - 21, 2013. The SRP reviewed the new Evidence Report for the Risk Factor of Inadequate Nutrition (from here on referred to as the 2013 Nutrition Evidence Report), as well as the Research Plan for this Risk. Overall, the SRP thinks the well-qualified research team has compiled an excellent summary of background information in the 2013 Nutrition Evidence Report. The SRP would like to commend the authors in general and particularly note that while the 2013 Nutrition Evidence Report has been written using a single nutrient approach, the research plan takes a much more integrated and physiologically based approach.

  5. Introducing infant and young child feeding indicators into national nutrition surveillance systems: lessons from Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajeebhoy, Nemat; Nguyen, Phuong Hong; Tran, Do Thanh; de Onis, Mercedes

    2013-09-01

    A comprehensive set of infant and young child feeding (IYCF) indicators for international use was published in 2008. We describe the process followed to incorporate these indicators into Vietnam's National Nutrition Surveillance System (NNSS). Following its establishment in 1980, the National Institute of Nutrition introduced the Vietnam NNSS to provide an evidence base for nutrition interventions. While anthropometric indicators based on international standards were regularly used for programme purposes, data on IYCF could not be collected with similar rigor until 2010. In 2009, with support from Alive & Thrive and UNICEF, the NNSS questionnaire was reviewed and additional content incorporated to measure IYCF practices. The tool was pilot-tested in 10 provinces and revised before nationwide roll-out in 2010.The tool comprises four pages, the first three of which focus on collecting data relating to maternal nutrition and IYCF. The last page is flexibly designed to incorporate planners' data requests for other relevant activities (e.g. mass media interventions, food security). Once analysed, the data are presented in a report comprising provincial profiles and maps illustrating IYCF practices. Importantly, the IYCF data have been used for policy advocacy (e.g. maternity leave legislation, advertisement law), programme planning, trend monitoring and capacity building. Adoption of the IYCF indicators was successful due to strategic timing, a phased approach, buy-in from stakeholders and capacity building at all levels to ensure the quality and use of data. Further revisions to the NNSS (e.g. sampling methodology, quality assurance systems) will be important to ensure the reliability of indicators.

  6. Risk factors for nutritional status determination and indications for preventive nutrition therapy in hospitalized gastroenterological patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roganović Branka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Risk factors for the intrahospital nutritional status worsening (NSW have not been precisely defined in the literature. The objective was defining thoese factors among gastroenterological patients and defining the risk patients requiring a preventive nutritional therapy. Methods. In 650 gastroenterological patients, NSW was evaluated on the basis of reducing of the six parameters: body weight, body mass index (BMI, triceps skinfold thickness (TSF, midupper arm muscle circumference (MAMC, serum albumin level (ALB, and lymphocyte count (LYM. The influence on NSW was tested for 13 factors concerning characteristics of the patient, disease, and diagnostic procedures. Among the factors influencing significantly the NSW, primary and secondary risk factors were selected. After scoring of risk factors had been performed, the risk-score for NSW (RSNSW was defined. The critical value of RSNSW which required preventive nutritional therapy was also calculated. Results. The incidence of NSW was in the range 29.2%−57.9%. The presence of general complications and severe disease activity were considered as primary risk factors, whereas malignant disease, age above 71, hepato-billiary tract involvement, hospitalization longer than 14 days, and mobility worsening were considered as secondary risk factors. The best predictive value for the NSW was proved for the RSNSW ≥ 6. Because of that, preventive nutritional therapy should be indicated in patients presenting with both primary risk factors or in patients presenting with one primary factor combined with three secondary risk factors at least. Conclusion. There are 7 risk factors for NSW in gastroenterological patients, but they are not of the same importance - two primary and five secondary risk factors can be differentiated. Preventive nutritional therapy is indicated only in patients having both primary risk factors or in those presenting with one primary risk factor combined with three

  7. Clinical analysis of risk factors of parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis in very low birthweight infants%极低出生体质量儿胃肠外营养相关性胆汁淤积危险因素临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨军; 李水霞; 陈莉娜

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk factors of parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis (PNAC)in very low birth weight infants (VLBWI).Methods VLBWI who were accorded with inclusion and exclusion criteria of this study:treatment for parenteral nutrition (PN)for over 14 days in West China Second University Hospital of Sichuan University from May 2008 to May 2014 were chosen as study subjects.By retrospectively analyzed method,they were divided into PNAC group and non PNAC group according to whether suflered from PNAC or not.First of all,according to the clinical experience,the influence factors of PNAC were identified and carried on the single factor analysis,then comprehensively considered with statistically significant variables and professional knowledge,multiple factors unconditional logistic regression analysis method was used to further analyze the independent and risk factors of PNAC. Results ① A total of 1 72 cases of VLBWI were chosen as study subjects finally.According to whether suffered from PNAC or not,they were divided into PNAC group (n=29)and non PNAC group (n=143), and the incidence of PNAC was 1 6.9%.There were no significant differences between two groups among gender ratio,gestational age at delivery and mode of delivery,etc.(P > 0.05 ).② According to clinical experience,the single factor analysis results about 27 clinical observation items and 1 9 nutritional factors which may lead to PNAC showed that 8 clinical observation items and 5 nutritional factors were influence factors of PNAC,such as VLBWI,less than appropriate for gestational age (SGA),long fasting time and longer duration of PN,higher amino acid and fat emulsion calories,milk lower calories,higher neonatal infections,such as infectious pneumonia,sepsis,neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC)and septic shock rate,lower breastfeeding and oral probiotics rate,and all the differences were statistically significant (t/χ2 =3.306,3.306,1.790,1.231,3.1 93,2.81 5,2.5 1 9,4.61 5,3

  8. Nutritional and technological evaluation of an enzymatically methionine-enriched soy protein for infant enteral formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Regil, Luz María; de la Barca, Ana María Calderón

    2004-03-01

    Enzymatically modified soy proteins have the amino acid profile and functional properties required for dietary support. The objective of this study was to evaluate the nutritional and technological properties of an enzymatically modified soy protein ultrafiltered fraction with bound methionine (F(1-10)E) to be used as a protein ingredient for infant enteral formulas. F(1-10)E was chemically characterized and biologically evaluated. Thirty-six weaning Wistar rats were fed during 3 weeks with a 4% casein-containing diet. Rats were divided into three groups and recovered for 3 weeks with 18% protein-containing diets based on: (1) F(1-10)E, (2) casein or (3) soy isolate+methionine. Nutritional indicators were weight gain, protein efficiency ratio, plasma proteins, apparent digestibility and protein in the carcass. Additionally, F(1-10)E was added as a protein ingredient of an enteral formula, and its sensory and rheological properties were compared with a hydrolyzed-whey protein commercial formula. F(1-10)E contained 68% protein and 5% sulphur amino acids, with 60% of peptides 0.05) in weight gain (108 g and 118 g, respectively), protein efficiency ratio (2.7), apparent digestibility (93% and 95%), plasma proteins (5.7 mg/100 ml) and carcass protein (61%), and better than soy isolate-based+methionine diet (Pformula and our formula was similar during a 24-h period. Sensory acceptability was 8 for our formula and 3.5 for the commercial one, on a scale of 1-10 (Pprotein source in infant enteral formulas.

  9. Speciation as an analytical aid in trace element research in infant nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brätter, P; Blasco, I N; Negretti de Brätter, V E; Raab, A

    1998-05-01

    The aim of this work was twofold: to study the binding pattern of trace elements in formulas as compared with breast milk and the relationship between trace elements in breast milk and in maternal dietary intake. To investigate the binding form of trace elements in these nutritive fluids, methods for protein separation were combined with methods for trace element determination in the eluted fractions. HPLC and ICP-AES or ICP-MS were coupled on-line for the simultaneous speciation of elements of nutritional interest, viz., Ca, K, Mg, P, S, Co, Cu, Fe, I, Mn, Mo, Se and Zn, and also the heavy metals Cd and Pb in both human mild whey and formulas. In order to minimize interactions between the labile metal protein complexes and the column material, size-exclusion chromatography was used for protein separation. The binding pattern of trace elements in formulas is significantly different from that in breast milk and depends on its main component (cow's milk or soy), its processing (hydrolysis) and the chemical form (inorganic) of the added compounds. For example, compared with breast-fed infants the iron supply of formula-fed infants is much higher (up to 20-fold); in addition, the binding forms of Fe are very different in the two fluids. This has to be evaluated with respect to interactions with other elements during intestinal uptake. The investigation of breast milk samples from different regions of the world showed comparable shapes for teh elution profiles and for Mo and Se a dependence on the regional maternal dietary intake. Speciation studies carried out on breast milk samples as a function of the selenium content showed significant changes in the zinc-binding pattern. In particular, citrate (as a zinc-binding component) was found to decrease with increasing dietary selenium intake of the mother.

  10. Risk factors for macrosomia in infants born to Latina women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcicki, JM.; Hessol, NA.; Heyman, MB.; Fuentes-Afflick, E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess risk factors for macrosomic infant birth among Latina women. Study Design Prospective study of Latina women recruited during pregnancy from prenatal clinic at San Francisco General Hospital. Information was obtained through a structured interview and review of medical records. Result A total of 11% of women delivered macrosomic infants (birth weight >4000 g). In unadjusted analyses, significant risk factors for macrosomia included older maternal age, increasing gravidity, previous history of macrosomic birth and pre-pregnancy overweight. After adjusting for confounders using multivariate analyses, older mothers (10-year increments) had an elevated risk of macrosomia (odds ratio (OR) 2.59; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28 to 5.24). Conclusion Efforts to reduce macrosomia in Latina women should focus on older mothers. PMID:18596709

  11. Risk factors for wheezing in infants born in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venero-Fernández, S J; Suárez-Medina, R; Mora-Faife, E C; García-García, G; Valle-Infante, I; Gómez-Marrero, L; Abreu-Suárez, G; González-Valdez, J; Fabró-Ortiz, D Dania; Fundora-Hernández, H; Venn, A; Britton, J; Fogarty, A W

    2013-11-01

    Cuba is a unique country, and despite limited economic development, has an excellent health system. However, the prevalence of asthma symptoms in children in Havana, Cuba, is unusually high. As early life exposures are critical to the aetiology of asthma, we have studied environmental influences on the risk of wheezing in Cuban infants. Cross-sectional study. A random sample of 2032 children aged 12-15 months living in Havana was selected for inclusion in the cohort. Data were collected using questionnaires administered by researchers. Of 2032 infants invited to participate, 1956 (96%) infants provided data. The prevalence of any wheeze was 45%, severe wheeze requiring use of emergency services was 30% and recurrent wheeze on three or more occasions was 20%. The largest adjusted risk factors for any wheeze were presence of eczema [odds ratio (OR) 2.09; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.48-2.94], family history of asthma (OR 2.05; 95% CI 1.60-2.62), poor ventilation in the house (OR 1.99; 95% CI 1.48-2.67), attendance at nursery (OR 1.78; 95% CI 1.24-2.57), male sex (OR1.52; 95% CI 1.19-1.96) and the number of smokers in the house (P Cuba. As the prevalence of smoking in the house is high (51%), intervention studies are required to determine effective strategies to improve infant health.

  12. Parenteral nutrition in very low birth weight infants in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hopewell, J

    2012-02-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) plays an important role in providing nutrients for infants unable to tolerate enteral feeds study was to look at PN prescribing in neonatal units in the United Kingdom (U.K.) and Ireland, in particular in infants < 1.5 kg. A postal questionnaire was administered to the 235 neonatal units. The response rate was 179 (76%), of which 136 (76%) used PN. The initial amount of protein prescribed was 0.1-2 g\\/kg\\/day in 102 units (91%), >2 g\\/kg\\/day in 4 (4%) and 5 (5%) used no protein. 88 (80%) started lipids with the first PN prescription. Only 5 units (5%) started with >1 g\\/kg\\/day. The maximum dose of lipids and protein both varied from 2 - >4 g\\/kg\\/day. The initial glucose infusion rate was 4-8 mg\\/kg\\/min. Interestingly only 44% of units started PN in the first 24 hours of age. Hence results show great variation in PN prescribing.

  13. Evidence Report: Risk Factor of Inadequate Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.; Heer, Martina

    2015-01-01

    The importance of nutrition in exploration has been documented repeatedly throughout history, where, for example, in the period between Columbus' voyage in 1492 and the invention of the steam engine, scurvy resulted in more sailor deaths than all other causes of death combined. Because nutrients are required for the structure and function of every cell and every system in the body, defining the nutrient requirements for spaceflight and ensuring provision and intake of those nutrients are primary issues for crew health and mission success. Unique aspects of nutrition during space travel include the overarching physiological adaptation to weightlessness, psychological adaptation to extreme and remote environments, and the ability of nutrition and nutrients to serve as countermeasures to ameliorate the negative effects of spaceflight on the human body. Key areas of clinical concern for long-duration spaceflight include loss of body mass (general inadequate food intake), bone and muscle loss, cardiovascular and immune system decrements, increased radiation exposure and oxidative stress, vision and ophthalmic changes, behavior and performance, nutrient supply during extravehicular activity, and general depletion of body nutrient stores because of inadequate food supply, inadequate food intake, increased metabolism, and/or irreversible loss of nutrients. These topics are reviewed herein, based on the current gap structure.

  14. Identifying perinatal risk factors for infant maltreatment: an ecological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallisey Elaine J

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Child maltreatment and its consequences are a persistent problem throughout the world. Public health workers, human services officials, and others are interested in new and efficient ways to determine which geographic areas to target for intervention programs and resources. To improve assessment efforts, selected perinatal factors were examined, both individually and in various combinations, to determine if they are associated with increased risk of infant maltreatment. State of Georgia birth records and abuse and neglect data were analyzed using an area-based, ecological approach with the census tract as a surrogate for the community. Cartographic visualization suggested some correlation exists between risk factors and child maltreatment, so bivariate and multivariate regression were performed. The presence of spatial autocorrelation precluded the use of traditional ordinary least squares regression, therefore a spatial regression model coupled with maximum likelihood estimation was employed. Results Results indicate that all individual factors or their combinations are significantly associated with increased risk of infant maltreatment. The set of perinatal risk factors that best predicts infant maltreatment rates are: mother smoked during pregnancy, families with three or more siblings, maternal age less than 20 years, births to unmarried mothers, Medicaid beneficiaries, and inadequate prenatal care. Conclusion This model enables public health to take a proactive stance, to reasonably predict areas where poor outcomes are likely to occur, and to therefore more efficiently allocate resources. U.S. states that routinely collect the variables the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS defines for birth certificates can easily identify areas that are at high risk for infant maltreatment. The authors recommend that agencies charged with reducing child maltreatment target communities that demonstrate the perinatal risks

  15. Low-fat, high-carbohydrate parenteral nutrition (PN) may potentially reverse liver disease in long-term PN-dependent infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Marianne Skytte; Jørgensen, Marianne Hørby; Husby, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    , which prevents and reverses PNAC in adults, could do the same in infants. This regimen could potentially avoid the problem of diminished energy input after removing nutritional lipids. METHODS: Infants developing PNAC over a 2-year period were started on a low-fat PN regimen with calories primarily from......INTRODUCTION: Parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis (PNAC) is a complication of long-term parenteral nutrition (PN). Removal of lipids may reverse PNAC but compromises the energy to ensure infant growth. The purpose of this study was to test whether a low-fat, high-carbohydrate PN regimen...

  16. The Stakeholders’ Views on Factors Influencing Nutrition Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeruszka-Bielak, Marta; Sicinska, Ewa; de Wit, Liesbeth;

    2015-01-01

    ) participated in the study. The remaining interviewees represented non-governmental organisations (n=6), industry (n=4) or were independent academic or health professional experts (n=5). Data were analysed by theoretical interpretative thematic analysis. Insights from interviewees on the development...... of micronutrient policies were grouped using the Public Health Nutrition Policy-making model. The main factors infl uencing the micronutrient policies were: systematic monitoring of nutrition and health, causal relationships between consumers’ diet-related behaviours and health outcomes, scientific recommendations...... engagement, relationships between stakeholders (Policy and institutions area). The spectrum and weight of the factors influencing nutritional policy depends on nutrient, country and degree of its “advanced status” within nutrition policy, political environment, culture and socio-economic conditions as well...

  17. [NUTRITIONAL AND SOCIODEMOGRAPHIC FACTORS IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE: RURAL VIEW].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Meza, Mónica; Morales-Sánchez, Eddic Willie; Pacheco-Moisés, Fermin; Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), its prevalent in population to 65 years of age, nevertheless can occur earlier. Patients with PD exhibit motor and no motor symptoms these may relate with changes in nutritional habits during disease progression. The prevalence of PD and nutritional factor could be different in rural areas compared to urban regions and can be associated with sociocultural and demographic features. It has been suggested a possible association between excessive intake of saturated fats and low consumption of vitamins such as B6 with EP, however, the results are still not conclusive. Some of significant factors could affect nutritional habits and status in PD in rural areas, are: health status, economic availability, environmental and geographical factors, among others. This review presents some eating habits and sociodemographic factors in PD principally in rural areas.

  18. Nutritional and Anti-nutritional Composition of Strychnos innocua ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mal. Usman

    Keywords: Strychnos innocua, Fruits, Nutrition, Antinutritional factors, Minerals, Proximate composition ... numerous types of edible wild plants are exploited as sources of food to .... in the diet of pregnant women, nursing mothers and infants to.

  19. Determination of vitamin A (retinol) in infant formula and adult nutritionals by liquid chromatography: First Action 2011.15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Jonathan W; Silvera, Karlene R; McSherry, Elliot; Dowell, Dawn

    2012-01-01

    During the "Standards Development and International Harmonization: AOAC INTERNATIONAL Mid-Year Meeting," held on June 29, 2011, an Expert Review Panel (ERP) reviewed the method for the "Determination of Vitamins A (Retinol) and E (alpha-Tocopherol) in Foods by Liquid Chromatography: Collaborative Study," published by Jonathan W. DeVries and Karlene R. Silvera in J. AOAC Int. in 2002. After evaluation of the original validation data, an ERP agreed in June 2011 that the method meets standard method performance requirements (SMPRs) for vitamin A, as articulated by the Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals. The ERP granted the method First Action status, applicable to determining vitamin A in ready-to-eat infant and adult nutritional formula. In an effort to achieve Final Action status, it was recommended that additional information be generated for different types of infant and adult nutritional formula matrixes at varied concentration levels as indicated in the vitamin A (retinol) SMPR. Existing AOAC LC methods are suited for specific vitamin A analytical applications. The original method differs from existing methods in that it can be used to assay samples in all nine sectors of the food matrix. One sector of the food matrix was powdered infant formula and gave support for the First Action approval for vitamin A in infant and adult nutritional formula. In this method, standards and test samples are saponified in basic ethanol-water solution, neutralized, and diluted, converting fats to fatty acids and retinol esters to retinol. Retinol is quantitated by an LC method, using UV detection at 313 or 328 nm for retinol. Vitamin concentration is calculated by comparison of the peak heights or peak areas of retinol in test samples with those of standards.

  20. Late onset sepsis and intestinal bacterial colonization in very low birth weight infants receiving long-term parenteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Castro Cordeiro Fernandes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to establish the late onset sepsis (LOS rate of our service, characterize the intestinal microbiota and evaluate a possible association between gut flora and sepsis in surgical infants who were receiving parenteral nutrition (PN. METHODS: Surveillance cultures of the gut were taken at the start of PN and thereafter once a week. Specimens for blood culture were collected based on clinical criteria established by the medical staff. The central venous catheter (CVC tip was removed under aseptic conditions. Standard laboratory methods were used to identify the microorganisms that grew on cultures of gut, blood and CVC tip. RESULTS: 74 very low birth weight infants were analyzed. All the infants were receiving PN and antibiotics when the gut culture was started. In total, 21 (28.4% infants experienced 28 episodes of LOS with no identified source. Coagulase negative staphylococci were the most common bacteria identified, both in the intestine (74.2% and blood (67.8%. All infections occurred in patients who received PN through a central venous catheter. Six infants experienced episodes of microbial translocation. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, LOS was the most frequent episode in neonates receiving parenteral nutrition who had been submitted to surgery; 28.6% of this infection was probably a gut-derived phenomenon and requires novel strategies for prevention.

  1. Soy protein infant formulae and follow-on formulae: a commentary by the ESPGHAN Committee on Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostoni, Carlo; Axelsson, Irene; Goulet, Olivier; Koletzko, Berthold; Michaelsen, Kim Fleischerm; Puntis, John; Rieu, Daniel; Rigo, Jacques; Shamir, Raanan; Szajewska, Hania; Turck, Dominique

    2006-04-01

    This comment by the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) Committee on Nutrition summarizes available information on the composition and use of soy protein formulae as substitutes for breastfeeding and cows' milk protein formulae as well as on their suitability and safety for supporting adequate growth and development in infants. Soy is a source of protein that is inferior to cows' milk, with a lower digestibility and bioavailability as well as a lower methionine content. For soy protein infant formulae, only protein isolates can be used, and minimum protein content required in the current European Union legislation is higher than that of cows' milk protein infant formulae (2.25 g/100 kcal vs. 1.8 g/100kcal). Soy protein formulae can be used for feeding term infants, but they have no nutritional advantage over cows' milk protein formulae and contain high concentrations of phytate, aluminum, and phytoestrogens (isoflavones), which might have untoward effects. There are no data to support the use of soy protein formulae in preterm infants. Indications for soy protein formulae include severe persistent lactose intolerance, galactosemia, and ethical considerations (e.g., vegan concepts). Soy protein formulae have no role in the prevention of allergic diseases and should not be used in infants with food allergy during the first 6 months of life. If soy protein formulae are considered for therapeutic use in food allergy after the age of 6 months because of their lower cost and better acceptance, tolerance to soy protein should first be established byclinical challenge. There is no evidence supporting the use of soy protein formulae for the prevention or management of infantile colic, regurgitation, or prolonged crying.

  2. Nutritional Deficiencies, the Absence of Information and Caregiver Shortcomings: A Qualitative Analysis of Infant Feeding Practices in Rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Ai; Marsh, Lauren; Zhou, Huan; Medina, Alexis; Luo, Renfu; Shi, Yaojiang; Zhang, Linxiu; Kenny, Kaleigh; Rozelle, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Development during the first two years of life is critical and has a lasting impact on a child's health. Poor infant and child nutrition can lead to deficiencies in essential micronutrients, which may cause a weakened immune system and lasting effects on children's growth and development. Recent studies in rural Shaanxi Province found an anemia prevalence of 54.3% among rural children aged six to twelve months. While new large-scale, quantitative research has begun to catalogue the extent of child malnutrition and anemia, no effort has yet been made to look more closely at the potential reasons for rural children's nutritional deficiencies through qualitative analysis. This study aims to elucidate some of the fundamental causes of poor complementary feeding practices that may lead to anemia among children in rural Shaanxi Province, China. We interviewed sixty caregivers participating in a large survey on child health and nutrition. We conducted three waves of interviews with children's primary caregivers in seventeen rural villages within four nationally-designated poverty counties in the southern part of Shaanxi Province. The qualitative analysis reveals that poor complementary feeding practices are common across our sample. Information gathered from our interviews suggests that complementary feeding practices are impeded by two constraints: absence of understanding topics related to infant health and nutrition under caregivers, as well as inadequate sources of information on these topics. Poverty does not appear to constrain child feeding practices. Our results uncover lack of proper knowledge on infant and child nutrition among rural caregivers in China. This situation causes them to fail incorporating micronutrient rich foods in their children's diet. Age-appropriate complementary feeding can stimulate children's physical and cognitive development, but in its absence it leads to iron-deficiency anemia. We suggest that steps be taken to educate caregivers to

  3. Effect of Nutrition Education by Paraprofessionals on Dietary Intake, Maternal Weight Gain, and Infant Birth Weight in Pregnant Native American and Caucasian Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Janice; Williams, Glenna; Hunt, Donna

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of nutrition instruction provided to 366 pregnant Native American and Caucasian teens by paraprofessionals determined that it effectively improved their dietary intake, maternal weight gain, and infant birth weight. Further modifications for Native Americans were suggested. (SK)

  4. Related Factors with Nutritional Habits and Nutrition Knowledge of University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhat Vancelik

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to find the level of the nutrition knowledge and nutritional habits of the students of Ataturk University and to determine the influential factors. The study was carried out during May-June 2005 and the universe of the study consisted of seventeen thousands students attending their formal education in Ataturk University Campus. The sampling was done via simple randomization method and the sample size was 1120 students. A single class from all grades of each faculty was included in the sample and all of the students in each class were invited to participate to the study. Mean age and body mass index of the students were 21.6 ± 1.9 year and 21.9 ± 2.7 kg/m2, respectively. Sixty six percent of the students were male and 96.6% of them were single. It was determined that smoking, regular alcohol drinking and performing regular sport were found to effect nutritional habit score, significantly. It was found out that 87.4% of the students passed one meal a day, and the breakfast was the most often passed meal. Mean score of nutritional habit and nutrition knowledge was significantly high in males and females, respectively. Mean nutrition knowledge scores of student who were living in cities were higher, significantly. It was found that marital status, type of family, the residential place didn’t significantly affect nutrition knowledge score. There was a significant and positive correlation between body mass index, nutritional habit scores and monthly personal income. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(4: 242-248

  5. Related Factors with Nutritional Habits and Nutrition Knowledge of University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhat Vancelik

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to find the level of the nutrition knowledge and nutritional habits of the students of Ataturk University and to determine the influential factors. The study was carried out during May-June 2005 and the universe of the study consisted of seventeen thousands students attending their formal education in Ataturk University Campus. The sampling was done via simple randomization method and the sample size was 1120 students. A single class from all grades of each faculty was included in the sample and all of the students in each class were invited to participate to the study. Mean age and body mass index of the students were 21.6 ± 1.9 year and 21.9 ± 2.7 kg/m2, respectively. Sixty six percent of the students were male and 96.6% of them were single. It was determined that smoking, regular alcohol drinking and performing regular sport were found to effect nutritional habit score, significantly. It was found out that 87.4% of the students passed one meal a day, and the breakfast was the most often passed meal. Mean score of nutritional habit and nutrition knowledge was significantly high in males and females, respectively. Mean nutrition knowledge scores of student who were living in cities were higher, significantly. It was found that marital status, type of family, the residential place didn’t significantly affect nutrition knowledge score. There was a significant and positive correlation between body mass index, nutritional habit scores and monthly personal income. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(4.000: 242-248

  6. Infant siblings and the investigation of autism risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newschaffer Craig J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Infant sibling studies have been at the vanguard of autism spectrum disorders (ASD research over the past decade, providing important new knowledge about the earliest emerging signs of ASD and expanding our understanding of the developmental course of this complex disorder. Studies focused on siblings of children with ASD also have unrealized potential for contributing to ASD etiologic research. Moving targeted time of enrollment back from infancy toward conception creates tremendous opportunities for optimally studying risk factors and risk biomarkers during the pre-, peri- and neonatal periods. By doing so, a traditional sibling study, which already incorporates close developmental follow-up of at-risk infants through the third year of life, is essentially reconfigured as an enriched-risk pregnancy cohort study. This review considers the enriched-risk pregnancy cohort approach of studying infant siblings in the context of current thinking on ASD etiologic mechanisms. It then discusses the key features of this approach and provides a description of the design and implementation strategy of one major ASD enriched-risk pregnancy cohort study: the Early Autism Risk Longitudinal Investigation (EARLI.

  7. Factors influencing feeding practices of extreme poor infants and young children in families of working mothers in Dhaka slums: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitrot, Mathilde Rose Louise

    2017-01-01

    Background Nutritional status differs between infants and young children living in slum and non-slum conditions—infants and young children living in City Corporation slums are likely to have worse nutritional status compared to those from non-slums. Furthermore, families in slums tend to engage female labor in cash-earning activities as a survival strategy; hence, a higher percentage of mothers stay at work. However, little is known about feeding practices for infants and young children in families with working mothers in slums. This study aims to understand the factors that determine feeding practices for infants and young children living in families with working mothers in Dhaka slums. Methods This study adopted a qualitative approach. Sixteen In-depth Interviews, five Key Informant Interviews, and Focused Group Discussions were conducted with family members, community leaders, and program staff. Method triangulation and thematic analyses were conducted. Results Feeding practices for infants and young children in families with working mothers are broadly determined by mothers’ occupation, basis civic facilities, and limited family buying capacity. Although mothers have good nutritional knowledge, they negotiate between work and feeding their infants and young children. Household composition, access to cooking facilities, and poverty level were also found to be significant determining factors. Conclusion The results suggest a trade-off between mothers’ work and childcare. The absence of alternative care support in homes and/or work places along with societal factors outweighs full benefits of project interventions. Improving alternative childcare support could reduce the burden of feeding practice experienced by working mothers and may improve nutritional outcomes. PMID:28207894

  8. Nutrition support practice: a study of factors inherent in the delivery of nutrition support services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agriesti-Johnson, C; Dwyer, K; Steinbaugh, M

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of intercorrelation among dietitian, physician, and team nutrition support functions. Eight hundred and eighty dietitians and physicians were asked to respond to a questionnaire describing nutrition support functions as reported in the literature and validated by a panel of nutrition support physicians and dietitians. Two hundred and fifty-four completed questionnaires were included in the study, 84 from physicians and 170 from dietitians. Intercorrelations among function statements were subjected to factor analysis. The magnitude and consistency of factor loadings suggest that nutrition support is not perceived as independent components, but as a comprehensive pattern or structure. However, there was one important difference in perception. The sample tended to have an "enteral" orientation to the dietitian role and a "parenteral" orientation to the physician and team roles. The data support the contention that all members of nutrition support teams need a common core of knowledge and a set of highly developed process skills which can best be attained through an integrated, rather than segmented, approach to team training.

  9. An Irish Cohort Study of Risk and Protective Factors for Infant Language Development at 9?Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Sinéad; Quigley, Jean

    2014-01-01

    This nationally representative study of Irish infants explores whether the set of child and environmental factors established as predicting language outcomes aged 3?years would also predict language and communication development as early as age 9?months. Associations between infant and environmental characteristics and infant language outcomes at…

  10. The prevalence and factors associated with stunting among infants aged 6 months in a peri-urban South African community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsungo, Tonderayi M; Kruger, Herculina S; Faber, Mieke; Rothman, Marinel; Smuts, Cornelius M

    2017-09-07

    To determine the prevalence and factors associated with stunting in 6-month-old South African infants. This cross-sectional study was part of the baseline of a randomized controlled trial. Weight-for-length, length-for-age and weight-for-age Z-scores were based on the WHO classification. Blood samples were analysed for Hb, plasma ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR). Socio-economic, breast-feeding and complementary feeding practices were assessed by questionnaire. Setting/Subjects Infants aged 6 months (n 750) from a peri-urban area of Matlosana Municipality, North West Province of South Africa. Stunting, underweight, wasting and overweight affected 28·5, 11·1, 1·7 and 10·1 % of infants, respectively. Exclusive breast-feeding to 6 months of age was reported in 5·9 % of the infants. Multivariable binary logistic regression showed that birth weight (OR=0·12; 95 % CI 0·07, 0·21, P8·3 mg/l) concentrations. The association between stunting and lower birth weight, shorter maternal height and male sex reflects possibly the intergenerational origins of stunting. Therefore, interventions that focus on improving preconceptual and maternal nutritional status, combined with strategies to promote appropriate infant feeding practices, may be an important strategy to prevent stunting in vulnerable settings.

  11. Nutritional Deficiencies, the Absence of Information and Caregiver Shortcomings: A Qualitative Analysis of Infant Feeding Practices in Rural China

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Ai; Marsh, Lauren; Zhou, Huan; Medina, Alexis; Luo, Renfu; Shi, Yaojiang; Zhang, Linxiu; Kenny, Kaleigh; Rozelle, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Development during the first two years of life is critical and has a lasting impact on a child’s health. Poor infant and child nutrition can lead to deficiencies in essential micronutrients, which may cause a weakened immune system and lasting effects on children's growth and development. Recent studies in rural Shaanxi Province found an anemia prevalence of 54.3% among rural children aged six to twelve months. While new large-scale, quantitative research has begun t...

  12. Food sources of total energy and nutrients among U.S. infants and toddlers: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the dietary intakes of infants and toddlers is important because early life nutrition influences future health outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine the dietary sources of total energy and 16 nutrients in a nationally representative sample of U.S. infants and toddlers aged 0...

  13. Health Behaviors, Nutritional Status, and Anthropometric Parameters of Roma and Non-Roma Mothers and Their Infants in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambouskova, Jolana; Dlouhy, Pavel; Krizova, Eva; Prochazka, Bohumir; Hrncirova, Dana; Andel, M

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To compare maternal health behaviors, maternal nutritional status, and infant size at birth of Romas and non-Romas in the Czech Republic. Design: Maternal interviews and food frequency questionnaire, maternal blood samples, physical measurements of mothers and infants. Setting: Hospital, maternal/child care center; 2-4 days postpartum.…

  14. The effect of glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition on intestinal permeability in very-low-birth-weight infants : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Anemone; Fetter, Willem P. F.; Westerbeek, Elisabeth A. M.; van der Vegt, Ina M.; van der Molen, Hilda R. A.; van Elburg, Ruurd M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants are susceptible to glutamine depletion. Glutamine depletion has negative effects on intestinal integrity. The lower infection rate in VLBW infants receiving glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition may originate from improved intestinal integrity, as refl

  15. Health Behaviors, Nutritional Status, and Anthropometric Parameters of Roma and Non-Roma Mothers and Their Infants in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambouskova, Jolana; Dlouhy, Pavel; Krizova, Eva; Prochazka, Bohumir; Hrncirova, Dana; Andel, M

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To compare maternal health behaviors, maternal nutritional status, and infant size at birth of Romas and non-Romas in the Czech Republic. Design: Maternal interviews and food frequency questionnaire, maternal blood samples, physical measurements of mothers and infants. Setting: Hospital, maternal/child care center; 2-4 days postpartum.…

  16. The extended Infant Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT Extend) Program: a cluster-randomized controlled trial of an early intervention to prevent childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Karen J; Hesketh, Kylie D; McNaughton, Sarah A; Ball, Kylie; McCallum, Zoë; Lynch, John; Crawford, David A

    2016-02-18

    Understanding how we can prevent childhood obesity in scalable and sustainable ways is imperative. Early RCT interventions focused on the first two years of life have shown promise however, differences in Body Mass Index between intervention and control groups diminish once the interventions cease. Innovative and cost-effective strategies seeking to continue to support parents to engender appropriate energy balance behaviours in young children need to be explored. The Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT) Extend Program builds on the early outcomes of the Melbourne InFANT Program. This cluster randomized controlled trial will test the efficacy of an extended (33 versus 15 month) and enhanced (use of web-based materials, and Facebook® engagement), version of the original Melbourne InFANT Program intervention in a new cohort. Outcomes at 36 months of age will be compared against the control group. This trial will provide important information regarding capacity and opportunities to maximize early childhood intervention effectiveness over the first three years of life. This study continues to build the evidence base regarding the design of cost-effective, scalable interventions to promote protective energy balance behaviors in early childhood, and in turn, promote improved child weight and health across the life course. ACTRN12611000386932. Registered 13 April 2011.

  17. The role of infant nutrition in the prevention of future disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron eShaoul

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that nutrition is part of the environmental factors affecting the incidence of various diseases. The effect starts in the prenatal life and affects fetal growth and continues in early life and throughout childhood. The effect has been shown on various disease states such as allergic diseases, hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular diseases, obesity, type II diabetes and metabolic syndrome and immunologic diseases such as celiac disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus. It seems that the recommendations of exclusive breastfeeding until the age of 4 months and subsequently exposure to various solid foods has beneficial effect in terms of allergic, immune and cardiovascular diseases prevention. Will these recommendations change the natural course of these diseases is unknown yet, but there is an accumulating evidence that indeed this is the case. In this review we review the evidence of early nutritional intervention and future disease prevention.

  18. The role of infant nutrition in the prevention of future disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elenberg, Yigal; Shaoul, Ron

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that nutrition is part of the environmental factors affecting the incidence of various diseases. The effect starts in the prenatal life and affects fetal growth and continues in early life and throughout childhood. The effect has been shown on various disease states such as allergic diseases, hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular diseases, obesity, type II diabetes and metabolic syndrome, and immunologic diseases such as celiac disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus. It seems that the recommendations of exclusive breastfeeding until the age of 4 months and subsequently exposure to various solid foods has beneficial effect in terms of allergic, immunologic, and cardiovascular diseases prevention. Will these recommendations change the natural course of these diseases is unknown yet, but there is accumulating evidence that indeed this is the case. In this review, we review the evidence of early nutritional intervention and future disease prevention.

  19. Differential effects of risk factors on infant wheeze and atopic dermatitis emphasize a different etiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Simonsen, Jacob B; Petersen, Janne;

    2005-01-01

    indicate that infant wheezing is an atopic phenotype. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether potential risk factors for infant wheeze and AD have similar effects on these 2 phenotypes, indicating a common etiology. METHODS: A total of 34.793 mother-child pairs enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort were......-feeding, number of older siblings, day care attendance, and pets in the home. CONCLUSION: The majority of risk factors had differential effects on infant wheeze and AD indicative of a different etiology. Infant wheezing does not seem to be etiologically linked to the epidemic of atopic disease, and infant...

  20. Session 6: Infant nutrition: future research developments in Europe EARNEST, the early nutrition programming project: EARly Nutrition programming - long-term Efficacy and Safety Trials and integrated epidemiological, genetic, animal, consumer and economic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewtrell, M S

    2007-08-01

    Increasing evidence from lifetime experimental studies in animals and observational and experimental studies in human subjects suggests that pre- and postnatal nutrition programme long-term health. However, key unanswered questions remain on the extent of early-life programming in contemporary European populations, relevant nutritional exposures, critical time periods, mechanisms and the effectiveness of interventions to prevent or reverse programming effects. The EARly Nutrition programming - long-term Efficacy and Safety Trials and integrated epidemiological, genetic, animal, consumer and economic research (EARNEST) consortium brings together a multi-disciplinary team of scientists from European research institutions in an integrated programme of work that includes experimental studies in human subjects, modern prospective observational studies and mechanistic animal work including physiological studies, cell-culture models and molecular techniques. Theme 1 tests early nutritional programming of disease in human subjects, measuring disease markers in childhood and early adulthood in nineteen randomised controlled trials of nutritional interventions in pregnancy and infancy. Theme 2 examines associations between early nutrition and later outcomes in large modern European population-based prospective studies, with detailed measures of diet in pregnancy and early life. Theme 3 uses animal, cellular and molecular techniques to study lifetime effects of early nutrition. Biomedical studies are complemented by studies of the social and economic importance of programming (themes 4 and 5), and themes encouraging integration, communication, training and wealth creation. The project aims to: help formulate policies on the composition and testing of infant foods; improve the nutritional value of infant formulas; identify interventions to prevent and reverse adverse early nutritional programming. In addition, it has the potential to develop new products through industrial

  1. Retinopathies in premature infants, incidence, risk factors, prevention and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernenkov Yu.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Research Objective: Analysis of incidence and accompanying states, detection of risk factors of retinopathies in premature infants (RN, dynamic monitoring and improvement of medical actions. Material and Methods: 134 children have been surveyed in the group of risk on development of RN for the last 2 years. Results: From 134 surveyed infants with gestation from 22 to 37 weeks and body weight at birth from 750 to 2500 kg. At 56 children (41,8% the retinopathy of various degree of expressiveness has been revealed. 38 children with RN of 1-2 stages (67,8% from which at 22 (39,3% —the disease ended with the induced regress after a course of «retinalamin», at 16 (28,6% of RN — spontaneous regress. 4 children (7,1% had RN 2-3 of the Art., 3-4 Art. at 12 (21,4%, and 5 Art. a cicatricial phase with retinal detachment — 2 (3,5%. In 12 cases the laser photocoagulation in the eye centers is carried out. Conclusion: The revealed relationship of cause and effect of risk factors of formation of RN with features of a current ofthe neonatal period at patients with RN, promoted development of the system of monitoring, implementation of the program of treatment and rehabilitation of prematurely born children suffering RN. Ophthalmologic screening of premature infants with the use of the ophthalmologic digital pediatric camera "Ret Cam 3" allows to diagnose a retinopathy at early stages, in due time to hold preventive an3 medical measures that allows to lower the invalidization of this group of children.

  2. Nutrition, insulin, insulin-like growth factors and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannucci, E

    2003-01-01

    The incidence of colon, pancreatic, and kidney cancers, as well as aggressive prostate cancer in men, and breast and endometrial cancer in women is invariably high in Western countries. Nutritional and related factors have been typically implicated. This review presents a model integrating nutrition, insulin and IGF-1 physiology ("bioactive" IGF-1), and carcinogenesis based on the following: (1) insulin and the IGF-1 axis function in an integrated fashion to promote cell growth and survival; (2) chronic exposure to these growth properties enhances carcinogenesis; (3) factors that influence bioactive IGF-1 will affect cancer risk. The model presented here summarizes the data that chronic exposure to high levels of insulin and IGF-1 may mediate many of the risk factors for some cancers that are high in Western populations. This hypothesis may help explain some of the epidemiologic patterns observed for these cancers, both from a cross-national perspective and within populations. Of particular importance is that some of relevant factors are modifiable through nutritional and lifestyle interventions. Out of a variety of perspectives presented, nutritional manipulation through the insulin pathway may be more feasible than attempting to influence total IGF-1 concentrations, which are determined largely by growth hormone. Further study is required to test these conclusions.

  3. Evaluation of Online and In-Person Nutrition Education Related to Salt Knowledge and Behaviors among Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Lauren E; Whaley, Shannon E; Gurzo, Klara; Meza, Martha; Rosen, Nila J; Ritchie, Lorrene D

    2017-09-01

    The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) differs from other federal nutrition programs in that nutrition education is a required component. WIC programs traditionally provide in-person education, but recently some WIC sites have started offering online education. Education focused on reducing salt intake is an important topic for WIC participants because a high-sodium diet has been associated with high blood pressure, and low-income populations are at increased risk. Our aim was to examine the impacts of traditional in-person and online nutrition education on changes in knowledge, self-efficacy, and behaviors related to reducing salt intake in low-income women enrolled in WIC. Although a comparison of groups was not the primary focus, a randomized trial examining the impact of online and in-person nutrition education on participant knowledge, self-efficacy, and behaviors related to salt intake was conducted. Five hundred fourteen WIC participants from three Los Angeles, CA, WIC clinics received either in-person (n=257) or online (n=257) education. Questionnaires assessing salt-related knowledge, self-efficacy, and behaviors were administered at baseline and 2 to 4 months and 9 months later from November 2014 through October 2015. Positive changes in knowledge and self-efficacy were retained 2 to 4 months and 9 months later for both groups (Peducation resulted in improvements during a 9-month period in knowledge, self-efficacy, and reported behaviors associated with reducing salt intake in a low-income population. Offering an online education option for WIC participants could broaden the reach of nutrition education and lead to long-term positive dietary changes. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Brazilian infant motor and cognitive development: Longitudinal influence of risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Keila Rg; Valentini, Nadia C; Saccani, Raquel

    2016-12-01

    Infant developmental delays have been associated with several risk factors, such as familial environmental, individual and demographic characteristics. The goal of this study was to longitudinally investigate the effects of maternal knowledge and practices, home environment and biological factors on infant motor and cognitive outcomes. This was a prospective cohort study with a sample of 49 infants from Southern Brazil. The infants were assessed three times over 4 months using the Alberta Infant Motor Scale and the Bayley Scale of Infant Development (Mental Development Scale). Parents completed the Daily Activities Scale of Infants, the Affordances in The Home Environment for Motor Development - Infant Scale, the Knowledge of Infant Development Inventory and a demographic questionnaire. Generalized estimating equation with Bonferroni method as the follow-up test and Spearman correlation and multivariate linear backward regression were used. Cognitive and motor scores were strongly associated longitudinally and increased over time. Associations between the home affordances, parental practices and knowledge, and motor and cognitive development over time were observed. This relationship explained more variability in motor and cognitive scores compared with biological factors. Variability in motor and cognitive development is better explained by environment and parental knowledge and practice. The investigation of factors associated with infant development allows the identification of infants at risk and the implementation of educational programs and parental training to minimize the effects of developmental delay. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  5. ESPGHAN Committee on Nutrition Position Paper. Intravenous lipid emulsions and risk of hepatotoxicity in infants and children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojsak, Iva; Colomb, Virginie; Braegger, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to perform a systematic review with meta-analysis of available scientific evidence regarding the role of different intravenous lipid emulsions (ILE) in the pathogenesis of cholestasis and parenteral nutrition associated liver disease (PNALD).A systematic review...... term use and 3 in infants and children receiving long term parenteral nutrition (PN).Meta-analysis showed no differences in the rate of cholestasis or bilirubin levels associated with short term use of different ILEs. Due to high heterogeneity of the long-term studies no meta-analysis could...... of patients. The ESPGHAN Committee on Nutrition concludes that there is no evidence of a difference in rates of cholestasis or bilirubin levels between different ILE for short term use in neonates. The use of multicomponent FO containing ILE may contribute to a decrease in total bilirubin levels in children...

  6. Determination of Chloride in Infant Formula and Adult/Pediatric Nutritional Formula by Potentiometric Titration: Single-Laboratory Validation, First Action 2015.07.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolong, Wu; Fengxia, Zhang; Xiaoning, Ma; Fengjuan, Zhou; Brunelle, Sharon L

    2016-01-01

    A potentiometric method for determination of chloride was validated against AOAC Standard Method Performance Requirement (SMPR(®)) 2014.015. Ten AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN) matrixes, including National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1849a, were tested in duplicate on 6 independent days. The repeatability (RSDr) ranged from 0.43 to 1.34%, and the intermediate reproducibility (RSDiR) ranged from 0.80 to 3.04%. All results for NIST SRM 1849a were within the range of the certified concentration (701 ± 17 mg/100 g). Recovery was demonstrated with two overspike levels, 50 and 100%, in the 10 SPIFAN matrixes. Samples were tested in duplicate on 3 different days, and all results were within the SMPR requirement of 95 to 105%. The LOQs of the method for powdered products and ready-to-feed or reconstituted products were 20 mg/100 g and 2.2 mg/100 mL, respectively. A wide analytical range from the LOQ to 99.5% chlorine content can be reached with an appropriate dilution factor, but in practice, the upper analytical value observed in routine matrix testing was approximately 1080 mg/100 g in skim milk powder. This is a rapid, simple, and reliable chlorine-testing method applicable to infant formula, adult nutritionals, and ingredients used in these dairy-based products, such as skim milk powder, desalted whey powder, whey protein powder, and whole milk powder.

  7. On the Importance of Processing Conditions for the Nutritional Characteristics of Homogenized Composite Meals Intended for Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östman, Elin; Forslund, Anna; Tareke, Eden; Björck, Inger

    2016-06-03

    The nutritional quality of infant food is an important consideration in the effort to prevent a further increase in the rate of childhood obesity. We hypothesized that the canning of composite infant meals would lead to elevated contents of carboxymethyl-lysine (CML) and favor high glycemic and insulinemic responses compared with milder heat treatment conditions. We have compared composite infant pasta Bolognese meals that were either conventionally canned (CANPBol), or prepared by microwave cooking (MWPBol). A meal where the pasta and Bolognese sauce were separate during microwave cooking (MWP_CANBol) was also included. The infant meals were tested at breakfast in healthy adults using white wheat bread (WWB) as reference. A standardized lunch meal was served at 240 min and blood was collected from fasting to 360 min after breakfast. The 2-h glucose response (iAUC) was lower following the test meals than with WWB. The insulin response was lower after the MWP_CANBol (-47%, p = 0.0000) but markedly higher after CANPBol (+40%, p = 0.0019), compared with WWB. A combined measure of the glucose and insulin responses (ISIcomposite) revealed that MWP_CANBol resulted in 94% better insulin sensitivity than CANPBol. Additionally, the separate processing of the meal components in MWP_CANBol resulted in 39% lower CML levels than the CANPBol. It was therefore concluded that intake of commercially canned composite infant meals leads to reduced postprandial insulin sensitivity and increased exposure to oxidative stress promoting agents.

  8. On the Importance of Processing Conditions for the Nutritional Characteristics of Homogenized Composite Meals Intended for Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östman, Elin; Forslund, Anna; Tareke, Eden; Björck, Inger

    2016-01-01

    The nutritional quality of infant food is an important consideration in the effort to prevent a further increase in the rate of childhood obesity. We hypothesized that the canning of composite infant meals would lead to elevated contents of carboxymethyl-lysine (CML) and favor high glycemic and insulinemic responses compared with milder heat treatment conditions. We have compared composite infant pasta Bolognese meals that were either conventionally canned (CANPBol), or prepared by microwave cooking (MWPBol). A meal where the pasta and Bolognese sauce were separate during microwave cooking (MWP_CANBol) was also included. The infant meals were tested at breakfast in healthy adults using white wheat bread (WWB) as reference. A standardized lunch meal was served at 240 min and blood was collected from fasting to 360 min after breakfast. The 2-h glucose response (iAUC) was lower following the test meals than with WWB. The insulin response was lower after the MWP_CANBol (−47%, p = 0.0000) but markedly higher after CANPBol (+40%, p = 0.0019), compared with WWB. A combined measure of the glucose and insulin responses (ISIcomposite) revealed that MWP_CANBol resulted in 94% better insulin sensitivity than CANPBol. Additionally, the separate processing of the meal components in MWP_CANBol resulted in 39% lower CML levels than the CANPBol. It was therefore concluded that intake of commercially canned composite infant meals leads to reduced postprandial insulin sensitivity and increased exposure to oxidative stress promoting agents. PMID:27271662

  9. Plasma fatty acids in premature infants with hyperbilirubinemia: before-and-after nutrition support with fish oil emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Catherine J; Havranek, Thomas G; Revenis, Mary E; Hassanali, Zahra; Scavo, Louis M

    2013-02-01

    Infants who are dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN) sometimes develop PN-associated cholestasis (PNAC). A compassionate use protocol, approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the institutional review board, guided enrollment of hospitalized infants with PNAC (3 weeks). Plasma concentrations of essential fatty acids were monitored before and after a soybean-based PN lipid, infused at 3 g/kg body weight/d, was replaced by an experimental fish oil-based intravenous fat emulsion (FO-IVFE) at 1.0 g/kg/d. All participants were born premature (n = 10; 20% male). At enrollment, infants were (mean ± SD) 86.5 ± 53.5 days of life and weighed 2.24 ± 0.87 kg; direct bilirubin was 5.5 ± 1.3 mg/dL. After treatment, blood concentrations significantly increased from baseline (P effects were observed attributable to FO-IVFE. Discontinuation of FO-IVFE was typically due to infants (body weight 3.76 ± 1.68 kg) transitioning to enteral feeding rather than for resolution of hyperbilirubinemia (direct bilirubin 7.9 ± 4.8 mg/dL). These exploratory results suggest that FO-IVFE raises circulating ω-3 fatty acids in premature infants without development of ω-6 deficiency in the 8.3 ± 5.8-week time frame of this study.

  10. On the Importance of Processing Conditions for the Nutritional Characteristics of Homogenized Composite Meals Intended for Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin Östman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional quality of infant food is an important consideration in the effort to prevent a further increase in the rate of childhood obesity. We hypothesized that the canning of composite infant meals would lead to elevated contents of carboxymethyl-lysine (CML and favor high glycemic and insulinemic responses compared with milder heat treatment conditions. We have compared composite infant pasta Bolognese meals that were either conventionally canned (CANPBol, or prepared by microwave cooking (MWPBol. A meal where the pasta and Bolognese sauce were separate during microwave cooking (MWP_CANBol was also included. The infant meals were tested at breakfast in healthy adults using white wheat bread (WWB as reference. A standardized lunch meal was served at 240 min and blood was collected from fasting to 360 min after breakfast. The 2-h glucose response (iAUC was lower following the test meals than with WWB. The insulin response was lower after the MWP_CANBol (−47%, p = 0.0000 but markedly higher after CANPBol (+40%, p = 0.0019, compared with WWB. A combined measure of the glucose and insulin responses (ISIcomposite revealed that MWP_CANBol resulted in 94% better insulin sensitivity than CANPBol. Additionally, the separate processing of the meal components in MWP_CANBol resulted in 39% lower CML levels than the CANPBol. It was therefore concluded that intake of commercially canned composite infant meals leads to reduced postprandial insulin sensitivity and increased exposure to oxidative stress promoting agents.

  11. Nutrition and the insulin-like growth factor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estívariz, C F; Ziegler, T R

    1997-08-01

    Nutritional status is a key regulator of the circulating and tissue insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system. IGF-I mRNA and protein levels decrease in tissues such as liver and intestine with fasting and are restored with refeeding. Additional studies suggest that the level of protein and calorie intake independently regulate plasma IGF-I concentrations in man. The level of nutrition effects the biological actions of recombinant growth hormone (GH) and IGF-I administration in humans. Limited data demonstrate that plasma and tissue levels of the insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are also sensitive to nutrient intake. Specific micronutrients, such as potassium, magnesium and zinc also appear to be important for optimal IGF-I synthesis and anabolic effects in animal models. Malnutrition is common in elderly patients, however, the interaction between specific nutrients, general nutritional status and the aging process on the IGF system is incompletely understood. Mechanisms of nutrient-IGF system interactions which may affect the biological actions of IGF-I, IGF-II, and the IGFBPs are increasingly being determined in basic studies. The effects of underlying nutritional status and responses to dietary intake will be important to evaluate in clinical studies of the IGF system and exogenous growth factor therapy.

  12. Nutritional factors in herpes zoster, postherpetic neuralgia, and zoster vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jen-Yin; Chang, Chia-Yu; Lin, Yung-Song; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2012-12-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) results from a reactivation of latent varicella-zoster virus (VZV). HZ and its most common complication, termed postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), often cause long-term psychological distress and physical disabilities leading to profoundly negative impacts on the quality of patients' lives. The incidence and severity of HZ and PHN increase with advanced age as a consequence of declining cell-mediated immunity. Aging has been linked to progressive senescence of the immune system and also is associated with a greater susceptibility to nutritional deficiencies. Suppressing VZV reactivation depends on intact cell-mediated immunity, which requires adequate nutrients to maintain its efficient function. Contrarily, nutritional deficiencies may lead to dysfunction of the host immune responses. Recently, micronutrient deficiencies have been shown to increase the risk of HZ and PHN and to affect the immune response to vaccinations, whereas nutritional supplements effectively reduce herpetic pain and pain in patients with PHN. As the elderly population grows, the incidence and severity of HZ and PHN are expected to increase and cause a substantial financial burden on the health care system. Thus, enhancing knowledge of the risk factors of HZ and PHN and developing better interventions to treat and prevent HZ and PHN are important to public health. This article provides an overview of the present understanding of the association among nutritional deficiencies, diminished cell-mediated immunity, and the risk of HZ and PHN, and then illustrates the potential of nutritional intervention in the prevention, vaccination, and management of HZ and PHN.

  13. Nutritional strategies for premature infants%早产儿临床营养支持策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邬方彦; 贲晓明

    2015-01-01

    As survival of premature infants has increased,nutritional support has become a more prominent component of patient care.Aggressive nutritional strategies can reduce the incidence of extrauterine growth retardation (EUGR),speed up the physical growth and promote the development of intelligence.But excessive weight gain may also increase the risk of obesity and cardiovascular diseases in the future.This review mainly introduces and interprets the "enteral nutrient supply for preterm infants:commentary from the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN),2010",to provide an evidence-based medicine nutritional guideline for preterm infants.%随着近年来早产儿成活率的提高,营养支持成为新生儿重症监护的一个重要内容.积极的营养支持策略可减少宫外生长发育迟缓,加快体格生长,促进智能发育.但体质量过度增长,也可能会增加远期肥胖和心血管疾病的风险.现主要介绍并解读“2010欧洲儿科胃肠肝病学与营养学会(ESPGHAN)对于早产儿肠内营养需求的建议”,为早产儿医护人员提供一个循证医学的营养摄入指南.

  14. The Stakeholders’ Views on Factors Influencing Nutrition Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeruszka-Bielak, Marta; Sicinska, Ewa; de Wit, Liesbeth

    2015-01-01

    of micronutrient policies were grouped using the Public Health Nutrition Policy-making model. The main factors infl uencing the micronutrient policies were: systematic monitoring of nutrition and health, causal relationships between consumers’ diet-related behaviours and health outcomes, scientific recommendations......The objective was to identify the main factors infl uencing micronutrient policies in the opinion of policy actors in ten European countries. Study was carried out during Jan-Nov 2010 in European countries: the Czech Republic, Denmark, England, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway...... from national bodies (Science area); scientific recommendations from international authorities and experiences of other countries, EU legislation, cultural factors (Wider context) and political environment, national capacity to deal with the problem, national legislation, economics, stakeholder...

  15. Factors associated with nutrition label use among female college students applying the theory of planned behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Min Ju

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Use of nutrition labels in food selection is recommended for consumers. The aim of this study is to examine factors, mainly beliefs explaining nutrition label use in female college students based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). SUBJECTS/METHODS The subjects were female college students from a university in Seoul, Korea. The survey questionnaire was composed of items examining general characteristics, nutrition label use, behavioral beliefs, normative beliefs, corresponding motivation to comply, and control beliefs. The subjects (n = 300) responded to the questionnaire by self-report, and data from 275 students were analyzed using t-test or χ2-test. RESULTS The results showed that 37.8% of subjects were nutrition label users. Three out of 15 behavioral beliefs differed significantly by nutrition label use. Nutrition label users agreed more strongly on the benefits of using nutrition labels including 'comparing and selecting better foods' (P nutrition label use. Twelve out of 15 control beliefs differed significantly by nutrition label use. These included beliefs regarding constraints of using nutrition labels (e.g., time, spending money for healthy foods) and lack of nutrition knowledge (P nutrition labels in food selection was also significantly related to nutrition label use (P nutrition label use. To promote nutrition label use, nutrition education might focus on increasing perceived control over constraints of using nutrition labels, acquiring skills for checking nutrition labels, as well as the benefits of using nutrition labels and receiving support from significant others for nutrition label use. PMID:25671070

  16. Investigations to environmental factors on sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Althoff, H.; Wehr, K.; Michels, S.; Prajsnar, D.; Einbrodt, H.J.

    1987-05-01

    The discussions on noxious environmental factors concerning SIDS was a motive for systematically postmortal chemical-toxicological investigations on 54 SIDS-cases and 2 controlcases of the same age. Tissue levels of arsenic, lead, cadmium, mercury and pentachlorphenol as well as other organic noxes were measured in several organs. Furthermore COHb-concentrations were determined. Inspite of the wide scattering values the measured extreme levels as well as the arithmetic mean- and the median averages of As, Pb, Cd, Hg, PCP and COHb ranged in concentration sizes which - according to present knowledge - can't be supposed of toxic effects. It was observed that infants from an urban environment didn't show a higher degree of the examined noxes than infants from rural regions. Also there were neither differences between SIDS-cases and controls, nor correlations between often morphologically detected infections of the respiratory system, including laryngitis - and superior concentrations of these noxes in the organs of SIDS-cases.

  17. Timing of nutritional interventions in very-low-birth-weight infants: optimal neurodevelopment compared with the onset of the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafeber, Harrie N; van de Lagemaat, Monique; Rotteveel, Joost; van Weissenbruch, Mirjam

    2013-08-01

    Recent nutritional research in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants is focused on the prevention of protein malnutrition during the first postnatal weeks. At this early age, nutritional protein fortification depends on amino acid infusion via a central vein because of the immature gastrointestinal tract. In 2010 new guidelines on nutrition were proposed by the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition nutrition committee. In particular, the relative increase in the protein fraction in the nutrition of these infants aims to prevent early postnatal weight loss, to prevent morbidity, and to stimulate neurodevelopment. On the other hand, an increasing number of follow-up studies in VLBW infants indicate that, in particular, those infants who show rapid growth after preterm birth are at risk of metabolic consequences and cardiovascular disease later in life. In this review, we describe the quest to develop a customized diet that offers optimal nutrition at several time points of growth and development during the first year of life. This diet should prevent early malnutrition, enhance neurodevelopment, and limit the increase in total body fat during the first 6 mo. We question whether one type of early diet suffices for normal neurodevelopment with a normal body composition in later life or whether we need several types of diet at various stages of development.

  18. Determination of vitamin B12 in infant formula and adult nutritionals using HPLC after purification on an immunoaffinity column: first action 2011.09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Ursula; Degenhardt, Katharina; Raffler, Guenther; Nelson, Maria

    2012-01-01

    During the "Standards Development and International Harmonization: AOAC INTERNATIONAL Mid-Year Meeting," on June 29, 2011, the method "Determination of vitamin B12 in infant formula and adult nutritionals using HPLC after purification on an immunoaffinity column" was recommended by an Expert Review Panel and adopted as AOAC Official First Action status. The method is applicable for the determination of vitamin B12 in milk-based infant formula. Vitamin B12 is extracted from the sample in sodium acetate buffer in the presence of potassium cyanide. After purification and concentration with an immunoaffinity column (IAC), vitamin B12 is determined by LC with UV detection (361 nm). Data supplied by CLF demonstrated linear response over a wide range of concentrations (1.4-39 microg/100 mL). The analytical range is 0.2-10 microg/100 g, depending on the capacity of the IACs (0.01-0.5 microg), the input weight, and dilutions. Recovery rates were assessed using National Institute of Standards and Technology SRM 1849, and determined to be 95.1%, with SD of 0.34 and CV of 9.0. Measurement uncertainty (UE) was 0.8 microg/100 g, which was calculated from the validation data. It is an expanded measurement uncertainty and was obtained through multiplication with a coverage factor k. LOQ values were reported as 0.10 microg/100 g. The performance characteristics of the method met the standard method performance requirements set forth by the AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals; thus, the method was determined to be appropriate for First Action status.

  19. Incidence and Risk Factors of Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Cholestasis in Omani Neonates; Single centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharef W. Sharef

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis (PNAC is one of the most challenging complications of prolonged parenteral nutrition (PN in neonates. There is a lack of research investigating its incidence in newborn infants in Oman and the Arab region. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the incidence of PNAC and its risk factors in Omani neonates. Methods: This retrospective study took place between January and April 2014. All neonates who received PN for ≥14 days during a four-year period (June 2009 to May 2013 at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU in Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman, were enrolled. Results: A total of 1,857 neonates were admitted to the NICU over the study period and 135 neonates (7.3% received PN for ≥14 days. Determining the incidence of PNAC was only possible in 97 neonates; of these, 38 (39% had PNAC. The main risk factors associated with PNAC were duration of PN, duration of enteral starvation, gastrointestinal surgeries, blood transfusions and sepsis. Neonates with PNAC had a slightly higher incidence of necrotising enterocolitis in comparison to those without PNAC. Conclusion: This study found a PNAC incidence of 39% in Omani neonates. There were several significant risk factors for PNAC in Omani neonates; however, after logistic regression analysis, only total PN duration remained statistically significant. Preventive strategies should be implemented in NICUs so as to avoid future chronic liver disease in this population.

  20. Obesity and overweight: Impact on maternal and milk microbiome and their role for infant health and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Mantrana, Izaskun; Collado, Maria Carmen

    2016-08-01

    Obesity, particularly in infants, is becoming a significant public health problem that has reached "epidemic" status worldwide. Obese children have an increased risk of developing obesity-related diseases, such as metabolic syndromes and diabetes, as well as increased risk of mortality and adverse health outcomes later in life. Experimental data show that maternal obesity has negative effects on the offspring's health in the short and long term. Increasing evidence suggests a key role for microbiota in host metabolism and energy harvest, providing novel tools for obesity prevention and management. The maternal environment, including nutrition and microbes, influences the likelihood of developing childhood diseases, which may persist and be exacerbated in adulthood. Maternal obesity and weight gain also influence microbiota composition and activity during pregnancy and lactation. They affect microbial diversity in the gut and breast milk. Such microbial changes may be transferred to the offspring during delivery and also during lactation, affecting infant microbial colonisation and immune system maturation. Thus, an adequate nutritional and microbial environment during the peri-natal period may provide a window of opportunity to reduce the risk of obesity and overweight in our infants using targeted strategies aimed at modulating the microbiota during early life.

  1. Causes and risk factors for infant mortality in Nunavut, Canada 1999–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins Sorcha A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The northern territory Nunavut has Canada’s largest jurisdictional land mass with 33,322 inhabitants, of which 85% self-identify as Inuit. Nunavut has rates of infant mortality, postneonatal mortality and hospitalisation of infants for respiratory infections that greatly exceed those for the rest of Canada. The infant mortality rate in Nunavut is 3 times the national average, and twice that of the neighbouring territory, the Northwest Territories. Nunavut has the largest Inuit population in Canada, a population which has been identified as having high rates of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS and infant deaths due to infections. Methods To determine the causes and potential risk factors of infant mortality in Nunavut, we reviewed all infant deaths ( Results Sudden death in infancy (SIDS/SUDI; 48% and infection (21% were the leading causes of infant death, with rates significantly higher than for Canada (2003–2007. Of SIDS/SUDI cases with information on sleep position (n=42 and bed-sharing (n=47, 29 (69% were sleeping non-supine and 33 (70% were bed-sharing. Of those bed-sharing, 23 (70% had two or more additional risk factors present, usually non-supine sleep position. CPT1A P479L homozygosity, which has been previously associated with infant mortality in Alaska Native and British Columbia First Nations populations, was associated with unexpected infant death (SIDS/SUDI, infection throughout Nunavut (OR:3.43, 95% CI:1.30-11.47. Conclusion Unexpected infant deaths comprise the majority of infant deaths in Nunavut. Although the CPT1A P479L variant was associated with unexpected infant death in Nunavut as a whole, the association was less apparent when population stratification was considered. Strategies to promote safe sleep practices and further understand other potential risk factors for infant mortality (P479L variant, respiratory illness are underway with local partners.

  2. Determination of Labeled Fatty Acids Content in Milk Products, Infant Formula, and Adult/Pediatric Nutritional Formula by Capillary Gas Chromatography: Collaborative Study, Final Action 2012.13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golay, Pierre-Alain; Moulin, Julie

    2016-01-01

    identified by comparison with the retention times of pure analytical standards. Quantification of fatty acids was done relative to C11:0 FAME as internal standard and to instrument response factors (determined separately using calibration standards mixture). The performance of the method (i.e., transesterification) was monitored in all samples using the second internal standard, C13:0 TAG. RSDR values were summarized separately for labeled fatty acids in SPIFAN materials and ISO-IDF materials due to different expression of results. This method was applied to representative dairy, infant formula, and adult/pediatric nutritional products and demonstrated global acceptable reproducibility precision for all fatty acids analyzed (i.e., 46 individuals and/or groups) for these categories of products.

  3. Executive summary: evaluation of the evidence to support practice guidelines for nutritional care of preterm infants-the Pre-B Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiten, Daniel J; Steiber, Alison L; Hand, Rosa K

    2016-02-01

    Preterm birth (infants born at nutritional care of preterm infants. To address the current state of knowledge and to support systematic reviews that will be used to develop evidence-informed guidance, a consortium consisting of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the ASN, the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the Food and Drug Administration, the CDC, the USDA/Agricultural Research Service (USDA/ARS), and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development/NIH initiated the Pre-B Project. The project included the constitution of 4 thematic working groups charged with the following tasks: 1) develop a series of topics/questions for which there is sufficient evidence to support a systematic review process to be conducted by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' Evidence Analysis Library (EAL), leading to the development of new guidelines for nutritional care of preterm infants, and 2) develop a targeted research agenda to address priority gaps in our understanding of the role of nutrition in the health and development of preterm/neonatal intensive care unit infants. This review consists of a project overview including a summary of a workshop hosted by the USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center and summary reports of the 4 working groups established to address the following themes: 1) nutrient specifications, 2) clinical/practical issues in enteral feeding, 3) gastrointestinal and surgical issues, and 4) current standards for assessing infant feeding outcomes. These reports will serve as the basis for the ultimate guideline development process to be conducted by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' EAL. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Total iodine in infant formula and nutritional products by inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry: First Action 2012.14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacquette, Lawrence H; Levenson, Alan M; Thompson, Joseph J; Dowell, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    After an assessment of data generated from a single-laboratory validation study published in the Journal of AOAC INTERNATIONAL 95, 169-176 (2012), a method for determining the total level of iodine in infant formula and nutritional products was presented for consideration for adoption by AOAC during the AOAC Annual Meeting held September 30-October 3, 2012 in Las Vegas, NV. An Expert Review Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals concluded that the method met the established standard method performance requirements, and approved the method as AOAC Official First Action. The method involves digestion of the sample with nitric acid in a closed vessel microwave oven, followed by determination by inductively coupled plasma/MS using tellurium as the internal standard. The method LOQ for total iodine was 1.5 microg/100 g, but a practical LOQ was used at 5 microg/100 g total iodine. The analytical range of the method was 5-100 microg/100 g total iodine. The recoveries from 15 spiked nutritional products ranged from 90 to 105%.

  5. Nutritional factors for longevity in Okinawa--present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, G; Murakami, K; Gushiken, M

    1992-01-01

    Several factors, such as environment and heredity, are presumed to be related to longevity. Of these nutrition is believed to function as a regulatory factor. Okinawa prefecture is well known as the leading area for longevity in the world. We therefore examined present and past nutrition records together with the background of all the 88 centenarians (18 male, 70 female) who are living in Okinawa in 1991. Their leading occupation was agriculture, and they were in work until the 8th decade. They took rice or potato as carbohydrate with abundant vegetables and vegetable protein or fish protein. Although they did not take a rich diet it was well balanced, and was assumed to be related to longevity because of the decreased incidence of atherosclerosis; together with a good genetic background, suggested by the accumulation of longevity in their siblings.

  6. Women's autonomy and social support and their associations with infant and young child feeding and nutritional status: community-based survey in rural Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei, Shirin; Contreras, Mariela; Zelaya Blandón, Elmer; Persson, Lars-Åke; Hjern, Anders; Ekström, Eva-Charlotte

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the associations of women's autonomy and social support with infant and young child feeding practices (including consumption of highly processed snacks and sugar-sweetened beverages) and nutritional status in rural Nicaragua. Cross-sectional study. Feeding practices and children's nutritional status were evaluated according to the WHO guidelines complemented with information on highly processed snacks and sugar-sweetened beverages. Women's autonomy was assessed by a seventeen-item questionnaire covering dimensions of financial independence, household-, child-, reproductive and health-related decision making and freedom of movement. Women's social support was determined using the Duke-UNC Functional Social Support Questionnaire. The scores attained were categorized into tertiles. Los Cuatro Santos area, rural Nicaragua. A total of 1371 children 0-35 months of age. Children of women with the lowest autonomy were more likely to be exclusively breast-fed and continue to be breast-fed, while children of women with middle level of autonomy had better complementary feeding practices. Children of women with the lowest social support were more likely to consume highly processed snacks and/or sugar-sweetened beverages but also be taller. While lower levels of autonomy and social support were independently associated with some favourable feeding and nutrition outcomes, this may not indicate a causal relationship but rather that these factors reflect other matters of importance for child care.

  7. Working group reports: evaluation of the evidence to support practice guidelines for nutritional care of preterm infants-the Pre-B Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiten, Daniel J; Steiber, Alison L; Carlson, Susan E; Griffin, Ian; Anderson, Diane; Hay, William W; Robins, Sandra; Neu, Josef; Georgieff, Michael K; Groh-Wargo, Sharon; Fenton, Tanis R

    2016-02-01

    The "Evaluation of the Evidence to Support Practice Guidelines for the Nutritional Care of Preterm Infants: The Pre-B Project" is the first phase in a process to present the current state of knowledge and to support the development of evidence-informed guidance for the nutritional care of preterm and high-risk newborn infants. The future systematic reviews that will ultimately provide the underpinning for guideline development will be conducted by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' Evidence Analysis Library (EAL). To accomplish the objectives of this first phase, the Pre-B Project organizers established 4 working groups (WGs) to address the following themes: 1) nutrient specifications for preterm infants, 2) clinical and practical issues in enteral feeding of preterm infants, 3) gastrointestinal and surgical issues, and 4) current standards of infant feeding. Each WG was asked to 1) develop a series of topics relevant to their respective themes, 2) identify questions for which there is sufficient evidence to support a systematic review process conducted by the EAL, and 3) develop a research agenda to address priority gaps in our understanding of the role of nutrition in health and development of preterm/neonatal intensive care unit infants. This article is a summary of the reports from the 4 Pre-B WGs.

  8. [Nutritional status as a factor and a result of nutritional and food security and their representations in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa Pedraza, Dixis

    2004-01-01

    We approach the determining factors and results of food and nutritional security in Brazil. The following aspects are considered: i. The concept to be studied; ii, The form of measuring a particular factor; iii. A Brazilian characterization on the subject, and iv. conclusions. Nutritional status is primarily a result of the balance between the needs and the spending of food energy and other essential nutrients and, secondarily, of multiple determinants in a given space, represented by physical, genetic, biological, cultural, psychosocio-economic and environmental factors. According to this, there are 3 basic causes of nutritional disorders: food, health and care. Because the repercussions of the economic changes on the nutritional status are not immediate, food security is only one factor of nutritional status and because subjects adapt differently to low food intake, the most adequate nutritional indicators in studies of food and nutritional security are the childhood indicators and the indicators of historical trends. The interpretation of nutritional indicators poses 3 main problems: to determine if the problem is really one of food security; to establish the degree of importance of the problem, and to determine which could be the appropriate normative intervention. The studies of nutritional status in Brazil show considerable improvement in the anthropometric indicators, emphasizing that the worst conditions prevail in the North East region and in the rural areas. Regarding micronutrient deficiencies, the absence of nationwide studies and the great advances in the programs to tackle this deficiencies, mainly vitamin A and iodine deficiencies are highlighted.

  9. Risk factors for diarrhea-associated infant mortality in the United States, 2005-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehal, Jason M; Esposito, Douglas H; Holman, Robert C; Tate, Jacqueline E; Callinan, Laura S; Parashar, Umesh D

    2012-07-01

    Diarrhea-associated deaths among US children increased from the mid-1980s through 2006, particularly among infants. Understanding risk factors for diarrhea-associated death could improve prevention strategies. Records of singleton infants with diarrhea listed anywhere on the death certificate were selected from the US Linked Birth/Infant Death data for the period, 2005 to 2007; characteristics of these infants were compared with those of infants who survived their first year. During 2005 to 2007, 1087 diarrhea-associated infant deaths were reported; 86% occurred among low birth weight (LBW, risk ratio: 91.9, 95% confidence interval: 77.4-109.0) and younger median age at death (7 versus 15 weeks, Pdiarrhea-associated death among LBW and NBW infants were sepsis (26%) and volume depletion (20%), respectively. Among LBW infants, 97% of diarrhea-associated deaths occurred in inpatient settings, whereas 27% of NBW infant deaths occurred in outpatient settings and 5.3% in the decedent's home. Male sex, black race, unmarried status and low 5-minute Apgar score (diarrhea-associated morality should focus on understanding and improving management of diarrhea in vulnerable LBW infants. For prevention of diarrhea-associated deaths in NBW infants, educating mothers who fit the high-risk profile regarding home hydration therapy and timely access to medical treatment is important.

  10. The metabolic effects of oral L-carnitine administration in infants receiving total parenteral nutrition with fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coran, A G; Drongowski, R A; Baker, P J

    1985-12-01

    beta-Oxidation, an important pathway in the metabolism of free fatty acids, occurs within the mitochondria in mammals. L-Carnitine is an essential cofactor in the transfer of long-chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Maintenance of normal carnitine concentrations in whole blood and tissues, either through diet or biosynthesis, would appear necessary for adequate utilization of fat as an energy source. Infants, especially premature ones, without an exogenous dietary source of carnitine, have decreased plasma carnitine levels compared with infants receiving carnitine-supplemented feedings. To determine the importance of carnitine supplementation in a total parenteral nutrition program in infants in which a fat emulsion serves as a major calorie source, the following study was undertaken. Twelve infants receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) with fat for seven days were divided into two treatment groups. Group 1 was orally supplemented for seven days with carnitine (70 mumol/l/kg/24 h in 24 mL of 5% dextrose), while the second group received seven days of placebo supplementation (dextrose 5%, 24 cc/24 h). Plasma carnitine levels in the carnitine-supplemented group were significantly higher (29 +/- 8 nmol/mL) than in the control group (12.4 +/- 3.5 nmol/mL) after seven days of treatment. However, clearance of serum triglycerides and free fatty acids was not significantly different between the two groups. Baseline triglyceride levels in the carnitine-supplemented group were 96 +/- 42 mg/dL, increased to 242 +/- 101 mg/dL after the lipid challenge and decreased to 121 +/- 47 mg/dL two hours after the lipid infusion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Enteral Nutrient Supply for Preterm Infants : Commentary From the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition Committee on Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agostoni, C.; Buonocore, G.; Carnielli, V. P.; De Curtis, M.; Darmaun, D.; Decsi, T.; Domellof, M.; Embleton, N. D.; Fusch, C.; Genzel-Boroviczeny, O.; Goulet, O.; Kalhan, S. C.; Kolacek, S.; Koletzko, B.; Lapillonne, A.; Mihatsch, W.; Moreno, L.; Neu, J.; Poindexter, B.; Puntis, J.; Putet, G.; Rigo, J.; Riskin, A.; Salle, B.; Sauer, P.; Shamir, R.; Szajewska, H.; Thureen, P.; Turck, D.; van Goudoever, J. B.; Ziegler, E. E.

    The number of surviving children born prematurely has increased substantially during the last 2 decades. The major goal of enteral nutrient supply to these infants is to achieve growth similar to foetal growth coupled with satisfactory functional development. The accumulation of knowledge since the

  12. Sudden infant death syndrome, childhood thrombosis, and presence of genetic risk factors for thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T B; Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Banner, Jytte

    2000-01-01

    in the child. This prompted us to investigate these genetic markers of thromboembolic disease in 121 cases of sudden infant death syndrome and in relevant controls, in the expectation of a more frequent occurrence of these markers if thrombosis is an etiological factor in sudden infant death syndrome......Sudden infant death syndrome or "cot death" has until the late eighties been a significant cause of death in children between the ages of 1 month and 1 year. Approximately two per 1000 children born alive dies of sudden infant death syndrome each year in Western Europe, North America, and Australia....... The vulnerability of the infant brain stem to ischemia has been suggested to be a conceivable cause of sudden infant death syndrome. This is compatible with a hypothesis that genetic risk factors for cerebral thrombosis could cause microinfarction in the brain stem during the first month of life, affecting vital...

  13. Sudden infant death syndrome, childhood thrombosis, and presence of genetic risk factors for thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, TB; Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Lundemose, JB

    2000-01-01

    . The vulnerability of the infant brain stem to ischemia has been suggested to be a conceivable cause of sudden infant death syndrome. This is compatible with a hypothesis that genetic risk factors for cerebral thrombosis could cause microinfarction in the brain stem during the first month of life, affecting vital......Sudden infant death syndrome or "cot death" has until the late eighties been a significant cause of death in children between the ages of 1 month and 1 year. Approximately two per 1000 children born alive dies of sudden infant death syndrome each year in Western Europe, North America, and Australia...... in the child. This prompted us to investigate these genetic markers of thromboembolic disease in 121 cases of sudden infant death syndrome and in relevant controls, in the expectation of a more frequent occurrence of these markers if thrombosis is an etiological factor in sudden infant death syndrome...

  14. Factors Associated with Recurrent Infant Feeding Practices in Subsequent Births.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Jason P; Bond, Diana; de Vroome, Michelle; Yip, Elizabeth; Nassar, Natasha

    2016-11-01

    Previous breastfeeding experience has been associated with subsequent infant feeding practices. However, few longitudinal studies have investigated formula-only feeding patterns or the full range of potentially associated characteristics. This study aimed to determine the recurrence of infant feeding practices and maternal, birthing, and infant characteristics associated with recurrent formula-only feeding and changes between exclusive breastfeeding and formula-only feeding across subsequent births. We conducted a population-based record-linkage study of 317 027 mothers, with a term singleton live-birth in 2007-2011, New South Wales, Australia. Infant feeding patterns were described using sequential birth pairs. For mothers with a first and second birth, robust Poisson regression was used to investigate the association between maternal, birthing, and infant characteristics and infant feeding patterns. Combined relative risks (RRs) were calculated for selected maternal characteristics. Across 69 994 sequential birth pairs, the recurrence rate of formula-only feeding was 71%, and 92% for exclusive breastfeeding. Maternal characteristics breastfeeding to formula-only feeding (RR, 9.0; 95% CI, 7.4-10.7), and being less likely to change from formula-only feeding to exclusive breastfeeding (RR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.38-0.59). Infant feeding practices were strongly recurrent, highlighting the importance of successful breastfeeding for first-time mothers. Additional support for young mothers from disadvantaged backgrounds accounting for infant feeding history, experiences, and common barriers could improve recurrent exclusive breastfeeding and positively affect infant and maternal health.

  15. 早产儿肠道外营养支持技术%Approach to parenteral nutrition in premature infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    印学蕾; 贲晓明

    2015-01-01

    After birth,the premature infants usually need a proper way for intestinal nutrition.The composition and configuration of nutrition admixture must meet the special requirements of the premature infants.In the first few days,because of invisible water lose,they should maintain a stable internal environment,and 1 week later,they need to gradually achieve a stable growth rate.Parenteral nutrition may lead to various complications,such as infection,metabolic complications,etc.monitoring the index,then adjusting the dosage,and achieving full enteral nutrition as soon as possible,may be effective prevention measures.%早产儿出生后常需要选择合适的肠道外营养输入途径.而早产儿静脉营养液的组成和配置也有特殊要求,以满足早产儿独特的生理特点和发育规律.早产儿出生后最初几天不显性失水较多,需要维持内环境稳定,而1周后则需要逐渐实现稳定的增长速率.静脉营养可能发生各种并发症,如感染、代谢性并发症等.注意监测指标,及时调整剂量,以及尽早过渡到全肠内营养,可以有效预防并发症的发生.

  16. Evaluation of Method-Specific Extraction Variability for the Measurement of Fatty Acids in a Candidate Infant/Adult Nutritional Formula Reference Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Benjamin J

    2017-05-01

    To address community needs, the National Institute of Standards and Technology has developed a candidate Standard Reference Material (SRM) for infant/adult nutritional formula based on milk and whey protein concentrates with isolated soy protein called SRM 1869 Infant/Adult Nutritional Formula. One major component of this candidate SRM is the fatty acid content. In this study, multiple extraction techniques were evaluated to quantify the fatty acids in this new material. Extraction methods that were based on lipid extraction followed by transesterification resulted in lower mass fraction values for all fatty acids than the values measured by methods utilizing in situ transesterification followed by fatty acid methyl ester extraction (ISTE). An ISTE method, based on the identified optimal parameters, was used to determine the fatty acid content of the new infant/adult nutritional formula reference material.

  17. Promoting health: action in infant nutrition - doi: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v35i1.14045

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Freitas Casimiro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Thousands of children under five die from preventable diseases. Community interventions that emphasize primary care on health and nutrition have been identified as one of the solutions to overcome this problem. This study aimed to develop educational workshops to improve the perception of mothers about infant nutrition, using a qualitative approach with technical educational workshops, in a Health Unit of the City of Fortaleza, during the period from February to June 2008. The seven participants were mothers accompanying their children in childcare consultation. The analysis of data was made through a survey and saturation of responses, from where the thematic categories emerged: the contribution of educational workshops, breastfeeding and introduction of complementary feeding. The educational activities allowed a better awareness of mothers in relation to child nutrition and development of critical awareness of their essential role on children nutrition. In conclusion, the professional should emphasize the importance and benefits of adequate diet, and for this is necessary educational strategies in health, offering exchanges of knowledge, since they are different experiences in which the learning is significant.  

  18. Comparison of growth and nutritional evolution stages in infants with working mothers and infants with housewife mothers in Isfahan

    OpenAIRE

    Shams, Behzad; Golshiri, Parasto; Saleki, Azam; Isfagani, Motahereh Rabar; Najimi, Arash

    2012-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that the growth status of the children with working mothers is about 2 standard deviations lower than that of the children of housewife mothers. It seems that absence of mothers in the second stage of nutritional evolution (attachment), which is a very sensitive stage, has an important role in initiating and continuation of an appropriate supplemental feeding. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 50 children of working mothers and 50 children of...

  19. Factors Associated with Effective Nutrition Interventions for Pregnant Indigenous Women: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashman, Amy M; Brown, Leanne J; Collins, Clare E; Rollo, Megan E; Rae, Kym M

    2017-08-01

    Indigenous people continue to experience health disparities relative to non-Indigenous populations. Interventions to improve nutrition during pregnancy in these groups may improve health outcomes for mothers and their infants. The effectiveness of existing nutrition intervention programs has not been reviewed previously. The objective was to identify interventions targeting improving nutrition-related outcomes for pregnant Indigenous women residing in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries, and to identify positive factors contributing to successful programs. Thirteen electronic databases were searched up until October 2015. Key words identified studies intervening to improve nutrition-related outcomes for pregnant Indigenous women. Two reviewers assessed articles for inclusion and study quality and extracted data. Only studies published in English were included. Data were summarized narratively. Abstracts and titles were screened (n=2,566) and 315 full texts were reviewed for eligibility. This review included 27 articles from 20 intervention programs from Australia, Canada, and the United States. The most prevalent measurable outcomes were birth weight (n=9) and breastfeeding initiation/duration (n=11). Programs with statistically significant results for these outcomes employed the following nutrition activities: individual counseling/education (n=8); delivery by senior Indigenous woman (n=2), peer counselor (n=3), or other Indigenous health worker (n=4); community-wide interventions (n=2); media campaigns (n=2); delivery by non-Indigenous health professional (n=3); and home visits (n=3). Heterogeneity of included studies made it challenging to make firm recommendations regarding program success. Authors of included studies recommended community consultation be included when designing studies and working with communities at all stages of the research process. Individualized counseling/education can contribute to successful program

  20. Biotin and carnitine deficiency due to hypoallergenic formula nutrition in infants with milk allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hisako; Tokuriki, Shuko; Okuno, Takashi; Shigematsu, Yosuke; Yasushi, Akiba; Matsuyama, Go; Sawada, Ken; Ohshima, Yusei

    2014-04-01

    Amino acid formulas and hydrolyzed formulas given to infants in Japan with milk allergies theoretically contain little, if any, biotin and carnitine. We assessed biotin and carnitine insufficiency in six infants with milk allergy who were fed amino acid formulas and/or hydrolyzed formulas, by measuring urine 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid (3-HIA) and serum free carnitine (C0), respectively. All patients presented with elevated urine 3-HIA and lowered serum C0 compared with post-menstrual age-matched infants who were fed breast milk or standard infant formulas. Supplementation with biotin and L-carnitine immediately improved the insufficiency. Care should be taken to avoid biotin and carnitine deficiency in allergic infants fed amino acid or hydrolyzed formulas.

  1. Factors associated with nutrition label use among female college students applying the theory of planned behavior

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hyun Jeong Lim; Min Ju Kim; Kyung Won Kim

    2015-01-01

    Use of nutrition labels in food selection is recommended for consumers. The aim of this study is to examine factors, mainly beliefs explaining nutrition label use in female college students based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB...

  2. Pediatrician and Parent Opinion on Nutrition in Infants Under 3 Years: Results of Pilot Survey Conducted in Central Federal District of the Russian Federation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Borovik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rational nutrition management in infants under 3 years is an important part of their adequate development at this age and in future.Objective: Our aim was to evaluate awareness of pediatricians and parents concerning rational nutrition management in infants under 3 years.Methods: 300 pediatricians and 300 parents of infants under 3 years who live in Moscow, Ivanovo, and Yaroslavl were enrolled in pilot survey.Results: Pediatricians' recommendations on child nutrition management satisfied the majority of parents (252; 84%, however, less than half of families (135; 45% followed them. In other cases the child's ration depended on mother's opinion on the matter (96; 32% and on child's food preference. «Unhealthy» food such as groceries and provision, processed food, spices, seafood, fast food, chocolate, candies, and sweets as well as soda was included in child's ration at the age of 2 and its consumption frequency increased significantly at the age of 3. Pediatricians strongly recommended special dairy for infants from the age of 1 (known as the 3rd formula. In fact, only half of children in Moscow eat them, and 27–30% of children in Ivanovo and Yaroslavl.Conclusion: Harmful breach of nutrition management in infants under 3 years is detected. Evidently, parents are not competent on the question. Optimization of educational activities performed by pediatricians, medical stuff, and mass media is required.

  3. The Effect of Fish Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion and Soybean Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion on Cholestasis Associated with Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition in Premature Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Leilei; Zhang, Jing; Gao, Jiejin; Qian, Yan; Ling, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To retrospectively study the effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsion and soybean oil-based lipid emulsion on cholestasis associated with long-term parenteral nutrition in premature infants. Methods. Soybean oil-based lipid emulsion and fish oil-based lipid emulsion had been applied in our neonatology department clinically between 2010 and 2014. There were 61 qualified premature infants included in this study and divided into two groups. Soybean oil group was made up of 32 premature infants, while fish oil group was made up of 29 premature infants. Analysis was made on the gender, feeding intolerance, infection history, birth weight, gestational age, duration of parenteral nutrition, total dosage of amino acid, age at which feeding began, usage of lipid emulsions, and incidence of cholestasis between the two groups. Results. There were no statistical differences in terms of gender, feeding intolerance, infection history, birth weight, gestational age, duration of parenteral nutrition, total dosage of amino acid, and age at which feeding began. Besides, total incidence of cholestasis was 21.3%, and the days of life of occurrence of cholestasis were 53 ± 5.0 days. Incidence of cholestasis had no statistical difference in the two groups. Conclusion. This study did not find the different role of fish oil-based lipid emulsions and soybean oil-based lipid emulsions in cholestasis associated with long-term parenteral nutrition in premature infants. PMID:27110237

  4. The Effect of Fish Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion and Soybean Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion on Cholestasis Associated with Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition in Premature Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To retrospectively study the effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsion and soybean oil-based lipid emulsion on cholestasis associated with long-term parenteral nutrition in premature infants. Methods. Soybean oil-based lipid emulsion and fish oil-based lipid emulsion had been applied in our neonatology department clinically between 2010 and 2014. There were 61 qualified premature infants included in this study and divided into two groups. Soybean oil group was made up of 32 premature infants, while fish oil group was made up of 29 premature infants. Analysis was made on the gender, feeding intolerance, infection history, birth weight, gestational age, duration of parenteral nutrition, total dosage of amino acid, age at which feeding began, usage of lipid emulsions, and incidence of cholestasis between the two groups. Results. There were no statistical differences in terms of gender, feeding intolerance, infection history, birth weight, gestational age, duration of parenteral nutrition, total dosage of amino acid, and age at which feeding began. Besides, total incidence of cholestasis was 21.3%, and the days of life of occurrence of cholestasis were 53±5.0 days. Incidence of cholestasis had no statistical difference in the two groups. Conclusion. This study did not find the different role of fish oil-based lipid emulsions and soybean oil-based lipid emulsions in cholestasis associated with long-term parenteral nutrition in premature infants.

  5. The Effect of Fish Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion and Soybean Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion on Cholestasis Associated with Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition in Premature Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Leilei; Zhang, Jing; Gao, Jiejin; Qian, Yan; Ling, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To retrospectively study the effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsion and soybean oil-based lipid emulsion on cholestasis associated with long-term parenteral nutrition in premature infants. Methods. Soybean oil-based lipid emulsion and fish oil-based lipid emulsion had been applied in our neonatology department clinically between 2010 and 2014. There were 61 qualified premature infants included in this study and divided into two groups. Soybean oil group was made up of 32 premature infants, while fish oil group was made up of 29 premature infants. Analysis was made on the gender, feeding intolerance, infection history, birth weight, gestational age, duration of parenteral nutrition, total dosage of amino acid, age at which feeding began, usage of lipid emulsions, and incidence of cholestasis between the two groups. Results. There were no statistical differences in terms of gender, feeding intolerance, infection history, birth weight, gestational age, duration of parenteral nutrition, total dosage of amino acid, and age at which feeding began. Besides, total incidence of cholestasis was 21.3%, and the days of life of occurrence of cholestasis were 53 ± 5.0 days. Incidence of cholestasis had no statistical difference in the two groups. Conclusion. This study did not find the different role of fish oil-based lipid emulsions and soybean oil-based lipid emulsions in cholestasis associated with long-term parenteral nutrition in premature infants.

  6. International Comparisons of Infant Mortality and Related Factors : United States and Europe, 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MacDorman, M.F.; Mathews, T.J.; Mohangoo, A.D.; Zeitlin, J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This report investigates the reasons for the United States' high infant mortality rate when compared with European countries. Specifically, the report measures the impact on infant mortality differences of two major factors: the percentage of preterm births and gestational age-specific i

  7. Determination of vitamin A in infant formula and adult nutritionals by UPLC-UV: First Action 2011.07.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trisconi, Marie-José; Campos-Gimenez, Esther; Jaudzems, Greg; Dowell, Dawn

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin A, a fat-soluble vitamin, is essential for health and plays an important part in vision, bone growth, reproduction, regulating the immune system, cell function, and skin health. Due to the advances in technology and the expansion of its uses, LC technologies are being studied for effectiveness in detecting and quantifying vitamin A in an effort to help determine the amount of vitamin A in various types of samples. For this reason, an Expert Review Panel agreed on June 29, 2011, at the "Standards Development and International Harmonization: AOAC INTERNATIONAL Mid-Year Meeting," to approve "Determination of Vitamin A in Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals by UPLC-UV" as AOAC Official Method 2011.07. To move from First to Final Action status, it was recommended that additional information be generated for all types of infant formulas and adult nutritional formula matrixes at varied concentration levels, as indicated in the standard method performance requirements. International units or retinol equivalents typically represent the concentration of vitamin A in food and supplements. However, for the purpose of this method, the concentration represented is presented in microg/100 g.

  8. Early consumption of liquids different to breast milk in Mexican infants under 1 year: results of the probabilistic National Health and Nutrition Survey 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinorah González-Castell

    Full Text Available Introduction: Studies on infant dietary intake do not generally focus on the types of liquids consumed. Objective: To document by age and breastfeeding status, the types of liquids present in the diet of Mexican children under 1 year of age (< 1 y who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Survey 2012 (ENSANUT-2012. Methods: Analysis of the infant < 1 y feeding practices from the ENSANUT-2012 survey in non-breastfed (non-BF and breastfed (BF infants by status quo for the consumption of liquids grouped in: water, formula, fortified LICONSA milk, nutritive liquids (NL; thin cereal-based gruel with water or milk and coffee with milk and non-nutritive liquids (non-NL as sugared water, water-based drinks, tea, beans or chicken broth, aguamiel and coffee. In this infants < 1 y we analyzed the not grouped consumption of liquids in the first three days of life (newborns from the mother's recall. Percentage and confidence intervals (95% CI were calculated adjusting for survey design. Statistical differences were analyzed by Z test. Results: We observed a high consumption of human milk followed by formula (56.7% and water (51.1% in infants under 6 months of age (< 6 mo. The proportion of non-BF infants consuming non-NL was higher than for BF infants (p < 0.05. More than 60% of older infants (6 mo and < 1 y consumed formula and were non-BF. In newborns formula consumption was predominant, followed by tea or infusion and water. Conclusions: Non-breast milk liquids are present undesirably in Mexican infants' diet and non-NL are consumed earlier than NL, revealing inadequate early dietary practices.

  9. Factors affecting nutritional status of Malaysian primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaini, M Z Anuar; Lim, C T; Low, W Y; Harun, F

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the nutritional status of a randomly selected cohort of school children and the factors affecting it. This random survey was conducted in the state of Selangor, involving 1,405 primary students (aged 9-10 years from 54 national primary schools). Physical examination was carried out on all the students. Information on the students was also obtained from the parents. Blood samples were taken by using the finger pricking technique. Body mass index (BMI) was used as a measure of physical growth. The students were mainly from urban areas (82.9%). The mean age was 9.71 years and a higher proportion was females (51%). Malays constituted 83.6%, Indians 11.6% and Chinese 4.2% of the study population. The mean weight and height were 32.30 kg and 135.18 cm respectively. The mean BMI was 17.42 kg/m2, with 1.2% of the students underweight, 76.3% normal BMI, 16.3% overweight and 6.3% were obese. Nutritional status was significantly related to blood pressure, history of breast feeding, eating fast food, taking canned/bottled drinks, income and educational level of parents. Significant differences in nutritional status between sexes and locations (rural/urban) were also found. The prevalence of overweight and obese children was of concern. There is thus an urgent need for the School Health Program to periodically monitor the school children's eating habits and physical growth. Appropriate counselling on nutritional intake and physical activities should be given not only to schoolchildren but also to their teachers and parents or caregivers.

  10. The risk factors of recurrent urinary tract infection in infants with normal urinary systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Yoon Hee; Lee, Jung Won; Lee, Seung Joo

    2009-02-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) frequently recurs and increases the risk of renal scarring even in infants with normal urinary tracts. Our study was aimed to find preventive measures for recurrent UTI in these infants. One-hundred ninety infants, who were diagnosed with their first febrile UTI and were proven to have normal urinary systems, were enrolled. We investigated the incidence of recurrent UTI during the following year and the following risk factors: gender, young age, phimosis, vaginal reflux, and acute pyelonephritis (APN) diagnosed by 99m-technetium dimercaptosuccinic acid ((99m)Tc-DMSA)(+) scintigraphy. The incidence of recurrent UTI was 21.1%. The difference in recurrence rate according to gender was not significant. The recurrence rate in infants less than 6 months of age was 25.8%, which was significantly higher than the 7.7% in older infants (P = 0.045). In male infants with persistent non-retractile prepuces, recurrent UTI developed in 34.0%, which was significantly higher than the 17.6% in male infants with retractile prepuces (P = 0.022). The presence of APN in male infants increased the likelihood of recurrent UTI when analyzed by multivariate logistic regression [odds ratio 4.6, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.6-13.0, P = 0.003]. The presence of vaginal reflux and APN in female infants gave no significant difference to the incidence of recurrent UTI. In infants with normal urinary systems, age less than 6 months, non-retractile prepuces and APN in male infants, were the most important risk factors for recurrent UTIs. It is suggested that non-retractile prepuces should be adequately treated to become retractile in young male infants with APN.

  11. Infant Mortality in Novo Hamburgo: Associated Factors and Cardiovascular Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, Camila de Andrade; Stein, Airton Tetelbom; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2015-01-01

    Background Infant mortality has decreased in Brazil, but remains high as compared to that of other developing countries. In 2010, the Rio Grande do Sul state had the lowest infant mortality rate in Brazil. However, the municipality of Novo Hamburgo had the highest infant mortality rate in the Porto Alegre metropolitan region. Objective To describe the causes of infant mortality in the municipality of Novo Hamburgo from 2007 to 2010, identifying which causes were related to heart diseases and if they were diagnosed in the prenatal period, and to assess the access to healthcare services. Methods This study assessed infants of the municipality of Novo Hamburgo, who died, and whose data were collected from the infant death investigation records. Results Of the 157 deaths in that period, 35.3% were reducible through diagnosis and early treatment, 25% were reducible through partnership with other sectors, 19.2% were non-preventable, 11.5% were reducible by means of appropriate pregnancy monitoring, 5.1% were reducible through appropriate delivery care, and 3.8% were ill defined. The major cause of death related to heart disease (13.4%), which was significantly associated with the variables ‘age at death’, ‘gestational age’ and ‘birth weight’. Regarding access to healthcare services, 60.9% of the pregnant women had a maximum of six prenatal visits. Conclusion It is mandatory to enhance prenatal care and newborn care at hospitals and basic healthcare units to prevent infant mortality. PMID:25993588

  12. Infant Mortality in Novo Hamburgo: Associated Factors and Cardiovascular Causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Andrade Brum

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infant mortality has decreased in Brazil, but remains high as compared to that of other developing countries. In 2010, the Rio Grande do Sul state had the lowest infant mortality rate in Brazil. However, the municipality of Novo Hamburgo had the highest infant mortality rate in the Porto Alegre metropolitan region. Objective: To describe the causes of infant mortality in the municipality of Novo Hamburgo from 2007 to 2010, identifying which causes were related to heart diseases and if they were diagnosed in the prenatal period, and to assess the access to healthcare services. Methods: This study assessed infants of the municipality of Novo Hamburgo, who died, and whose data were collected from the infant death investigation records. Results: Of the 157 deaths in that period, 35.3% were reducible through diagnosis and early treatment, 25% were reducible through partnership with other sectors, 19.2% were non-preventable, 11.5% were reducible by means of appropriate pregnancy monitoring, 5.1% were reducible through appropriate delivery care, and 3.8% were ill defined. The major cause of death related to heart disease (13.4%, which was significantly associated with the variables ‘age at death’, ‘gestational age’ and ‘birth weight’. Regarding access to healthcare services, 60.9% of the pregnant women had a maximum of six prenatal visits. Conclusion: It is mandatory to enhance prenatal care and newborn care at hospitals and basic healthcare units to prevent infant mortality.

  13. Infant Mortality in Novo Hamburgo: Associated Factors and Cardiovascular Causes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brum, Camila de Andrade [Instituto de Cardiologia/Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia (IC/FUC), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Stein, Airton Tetelbom [Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Grupo Hospitalar Conceição (GHC), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Universidade Luterana do Brasil (ULBRA), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Pellanda, Lucia Campos, E-mail: luciapell.pesquisa@cardiologia.org.br [Instituto de Cardiologia/Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia (IC/FUC), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-04-15

    Infant mortality has decreased in Brazil, but remains high as compared to that of other developing countries. In 2010, the Rio Grande do Sul state had the lowest infant mortality rate in Brazil. However, the municipality of Novo Hamburgo had the highest infant mortality rate in the Porto Alegre metropolitan region. To describe the causes of infant mortality in the municipality of Novo Hamburgo from 2007 to 2010, identifying which causes were related to heart diseases and if they were diagnosed in the prenatal period, and to assess the access to healthcare services. This study assessed infants of the municipality of Novo Hamburgo, who died, and whose data were collected from the infant death investigation records. Of the 157 deaths in that period, 35.3% were reducible through diagnosis and early treatment, 25% were reducible through partnership with other sectors, 19.2% were non-preventable, 11.5% were reducible by means of appropriate pregnancy monitoring, 5.1% were reducible through appropriate delivery care, and 3.8% were ill defined. The major cause of death related to heart disease (13.4%), which was significantly associated with the variables ‘age at death’, ‘gestational age’ and ‘birth weight’. Regarding access to healthcare services, 60.9% of the pregnant women had a maximum of six prenatal visits. It is mandatory to enhance prenatal care and newborn care at hospitals and basic healthcare units to prevent infant mortality.

  14. The effect of circumcision on the frequency of urinary tract infection, growth and nutrition status in infants with antenatal hydronephrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Engin; Yavascan, Onder; Turan, Ozlem; Kangin, Murat; Bal, Alkan; Alparslan, Caner; Sirin Kose, Seda; Kuyum, Pinar; Aksu, Nejat

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of circumcision on the frequency of urinary tract infection (UTI), growth development, and the nutrition status in infants with antenatal hydronephrosis (AH). The data were collected prospectively between 1998 and 2010. Infants with a fetal pelvis diameter of >5 mm identified with antenatal ultrasound were followed-up. Body height and weight were expressed as HZ scores (observed height - median height/standard deviation) and WZ scores (observed weight - median weight/Standard deviation). The nutritional status was evaluated and the body weight was transformed to a weight-for-height index (WHI = weight/median weight for the height age × 100). The HZ and WZ scores or WHI were calculated for each patient at the first and last visits. The chi-square and Student's t tests were used for statistical analysis. A p value circumcised. The mean monitoring time was 45±24.9 months and the mean age of circumcision was 14 ± 16.06 months. The pre-circumcision UTI frequency (2.97 ± 1.14/y) was significantly higher than post-circumcision period (0.25 ± 0.67/y) (p circumcision UTI frequency (2.97 ± 1.14/y) was significantly higher than the UTI frequency observed in female cases (0.85 ± 0.91/y) and in the overall study group (0.73 ± 0.79/y) (p circumcised subjects (0.18 ± 1.01) was statistically higher than uncircumcised subjects (-0.26 ± 0.92) (p circumcised males (0.13 ± 1.24) with VUR was higher than the uncircumcised patients (0.03 ± 0.55) (p > 0.05). In obstructive uropathy groups, the HZ of the circumcised males (-0.13 ± 0.54) was also found to be higher than uncircumcised males (-0.49 ± 0.66) (p circumcised males, no statistically significant effect of circumcision on the nutrition status was detected. In conclusion, postnatal early circumcision of infants with AH seems to prevent frequent UTIs and nutritional disturbances enabling

  15. Nutritional Status and Related Factors in Elderly Nursing Home Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Zahra Bostani Khalesi; Mahshid Bokaie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A challenge for health care providers is that there will be a distinct rise globally in the number of elderly people aged 80 years and over. Malnutrition is a well-known problem among elderly people. The aim of this study was to determine nutritional status and its associated risk factors in elderly nursing home residents in Tehran, Iran. Methods: The cross-sectional study was carried out among 385 elderly people aged 60 years or elder in 2014. All subjects who were attending to...

  16. [Nutrition and Metabolism Group of the Spanish Neonatology Society: recommendations and evidence for dietary supplementation with probiotics in very low birth weight infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narbona López, E; Uberos Fernández, J; Armadá Maresca, M I; Couce Pico, M L; Rodríguez Martínez, G; Saenz de Pipaon, M

    2014-12-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are an important tool for improving healthcare. In recent years there has been accumulating evidence on the impact of nutritional supplementation with probiotics in the very low birth weight infants. With no uniformity in microorganisms and strains used. The Spanish Neonatology Society (SENeo), through its Nutrition and Metabolism Group has undertaken to develop recommendations that will be useful as a guide for the neonatologist in this field.

  17. Determination of vitamin A (retinol) in infant and medical nutritional formulas with AOAC method 992.06 using a modified extraction procedure: single-laboratory validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Linda B; Schimpf, Karen J; Stiner, Lisa A; Schmitz, Daniel J

    2010-01-01

    The applicability of AOAC Official Method 992.06, vitamin A (retinol) in milk-based infant formula can be extended to specialty infant formulas, and medical and adult nutritional products with a few minor modifications to the sample preparation procedure. Currently, AOAC Official Method 992.06 is only applicable to milk-based infant formulas containing >500 IU vitamin A per reconstituted quart. When this method is used as written to test specialty infant formulas, vitamin A recoveries are low compared to results generated with alternate validated vitamin A methods. AOAC Method 992.06 vitamin A recoveries can be improved significantly in specialty infant formulas if the amount of potassium hydroxide used during the saponification step is doubled. With this one minor modification to the sample preparation procedure, AOAC Method 992.06 demonstrates acceptable precision and accuracy for the quantitation of vitamin A (retinol) in specialty infant formulas, milk- and soy-based infant formulas, and adult and medical nutritionals. Because increasing the amount of potassium hydroxide can cause emulsions to form, 2-4 mL aliquots of reagent alcohol may need to be added to some samples to separate the organic and aqueous layers during the extraction step. A single-laboratory validation of these modifications was completed. During validation, 15 different product matrixes were analyzed. The intermediate precision averaged 2.70% RSD, and spike recovery data averaged 96.3%.

  18. Initial Nutritional Assessment of Infants With Cleft Lip and/or Palate: Interventions and Return to Birth Weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Alison; Thaete, Kristi; Snell, Audrey; Chesser, Connie; Goldak, Claudia; Huff, Helen

    2017-03-01

      To assess and quantify cleft team practices with regard to nutritional support in the neonatal period Design :  Retrospective review.   Tertiary pediatric hospital.   One hundred consecutive newborn patients with a diagnosis of cleft lip and/or cleft palate between 2009 and 2012.   Birth weight, cleft type, initial cleft team weight measurements, initial feeding practices, recommended nutritional interventions, and follow-up nutritional assessments.   All patients in the study were evaluated by a registered dietitian and an occupational feeding therapist. Average birth weight and average age at the first cleft team visit were similar for each cleft type: cleft lip (CL), cleft lip and palate (CLP), and cleft palate (CP). The calculated age (in days) for return to birth weight was significantly different between cleft types: CL = 13.58 days, CLP = 15.88 days, and CP = 21.93 days. Exclusive use of breast milk was 50% for patients with CL, 30.3% for patients with CLP, and 21.4% for patients with CP. Detailed nutritional interventions were made for 31 patients at the first visit: two with CL, 14 with CLP, and 15 with CP.   Distinct differences were seen in neonatal weight gain between cleft types. There was significantly greater total weight gain for patients with CL at their first visit and significantly slower return to birth weight for patients with isolated CP. Patients with CL required far fewer interventions at the initial assessment and were more likely to be provided breast milk exclusively or in combination with formula. Infants with CP were far less likely to receive any breast milk. Patients with CLP and CP required frequent nutritional interventions.

  19. Influence of nutritional status, age and sex on infant hair zinc concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, M A; Leão, E; Penna, F J

    1989-01-01

    1. Zinc concentration was measured in hair samples from 57 infants (27 boys and 30 girls) aged 7 to 24 months. Twenty-eight infants were considered eutrophic and 29 presented chronic and severe malnutrition. 2. Hair segments less than 3-cm long were cut close to the scalp in the occipital area and washed in deionized water and acetone. Zinc levels were measured by neutron-activation. 3. Hair zinc concentration decreased with age in both eutrophic and malnourished infants from 160 micrograms/g at 7 months to 90 micrograms/g at 24 months. 4. No statistically significant difference in hair zinc concentration was detected between eutrophic and malnourished infants (148 +/- 60 vs 128 +/- 57 micrograms/g hair, mean +/- SD) or between sexes.

  20. [Usefulness of a soy- and oatmeal-based formula in infant nutrition. Nitrogen balance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Valle Canseco, F; Villanueva Clift, H; Escobedo, M; Reyes Govea, J; Hernández Nevárez, M C; Briones, J; Muñóz, M de J; Talamás Abbud, A

    1980-01-01

    A soy flour and oatmeal formula added with vitamins and minerals is presented. Nitrogen balance is carried out in 6 malnourished infants undergoing recovery as compared with a commercial milk formula, finding no significant statistical differences between the two formulas.

  1. Parent decision factors, safety strategies, and fears about infant sleep locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Jennifer J; Marvin, Alexis; Strook, Samantha

    2017-04-01

    Infant sleep safety is a primary concern of parents. Infant sleep locations vary around the world. This pilot study investigated the decision factors, fears, and safety strategies reported by parents internationally. participants (n=49) recruited online from 10 countries completed an anonymous Internet survey in English and submitted a picture of the infant's primary nighttime sleep location. Pictures were coded into 'shared' (29%) or 'separate' (71%) sleep surfaces. primary decision factors about infant sleep location were safety, comfort, family sleep quality, and overall ease. Parents maximized safety by providing a clear sleep surface, no blankets, no toys, sleep sack use, and a firm mattress. Different worries and fears emerged depending on the sleep surface. differences in the specific worries and strategies used by parents when deciding whether to share or not share a sleep surface with an infant may be used to tailor future interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Factors associated to infant mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ester, Pablo Viguera; Torres, Alberto; Freire, José M; Hernández, Valentín; Gil, Ángel

    2011-09-05

    Half of the 10 million children who die annually in the world are from Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The reasons are known, but lack of will and resources avoid the development of sustainable policies. Associated factors to the high infant mortality rate (IMR) in SSA have been investigated in this research. An ecological multi-group study was designed comparing rates within SSA. The dependent variable is the IMR and health services, economic and development indicators are the independent variables. Information and data sources were WHO, World Bank, UNICEF and UNDP (1997-2007). IMR mean value is 92.2 (per 1000 live births) and a relationship with several of the factors could be observed. In the bi-variate analysis direct relationship was observed with maternal mortality rate and an inverse relationship was observed with prenatal care coverage, births assisted by skilled health personnel, gross national income per capita, per capita government expenditure on health, social security expenditure, adult literacy rate, net primary school enrolment rate, population with access to safe drinking water (in urban and rural areas) and with population with access to basic sanitation in rural areas. In the multi-variate analysis IMR had an inverse relationship with children under 5 years with diarrhoea who receive oral re-hydration, with social security expenditure as percentage of general government expenditure on health and with per capita government expenditure on health. The situation in SSA would change if their inhabitants received education and information to demand more equitable polices and better investments from their governments.

  3. An Epidemiological Study on Infant Mortality and Factors Affecting it in Rural Areas of Birjand, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokab Namakin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Infant mortality rate is one of the most expressive indicators of development in all countries. The aim of this study was to determine the cause of infant mortality and risk factors in rural areas of Birjand in Iran. Methods: This population based case-control study covered 156 infants who died when aged less than one-year in health houses of Birjand between January 2004 and December 2005. For each case, two controls were selected matching one-to-one to the case considering variables of residency and their date of birth. The data was collected through interview with mothers and reviewing infants files in health houses. Findings: 57.7 percent of deaths in under one year old infants happened during the first month of their lives. The most important causes of death in neonates were prematurity and low birth weight (44.4% later gastroenteritis (30.3%. In addition, the study showed that 9.6 percent of infants had died because of narcotic toxicosis. Moreover, the study showed a significant relationship between infant mortality and parents level of education, mothers addiction, age of mother in the first pregnancy, prematurity, low birth weight, type of delivery and exclusive breast feeding. Conclusion: Special attention to infantile period and special care for infants born to at-risk mothers, as well as providing special health education can cause a dramatic reduction in infants mortality rate.

  4. Factors associated with weaning practices in term infants: a prospective observational study in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tarrant, R C

    2010-11-01

    The WHO (2001) recommends exclusive breast-feeding and delaying the introduction of solid foods to an infant\\'s diet until 6 months postpartum. However, in many countries, this recommendation is followed by few mothers, and earlier weaning onto solids is a commonly reported global practice. Therefore, this prospective, observational study aimed to assess compliance with the WHO recommendation and examine weaning practices, including the timing of weaning of infants, and to investigate the factors that predict weaning at ≤ 12 weeks. From an initial sample of 539 pregnant women recruited from the Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital, Dublin, 401 eligible mothers were followed up at 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum. Quantitative data were obtained on mothers\\' weaning practices using semi-structured questionnaires and a short dietary history of the infant\\'s usual diet at 6 months. Only one mother (0.2%) complied with the WHO recommendation to exclusively breastfeed up to 6 months. Ninety-one (22.6%) infants were prematurely weaned onto solids at ≤ 12 weeks with predictive factors after adjustment, including mothers\\' antenatal reporting that infants should be weaned onto solids at ≤ 12 weeks, formula feeding at 12 weeks and mothers\\' reporting of the maternal grandmother as the principal source of advice on infant feeding. Mothers who weaned their infants at ≤ 12 weeks were more likely to engage in other sub-optimal weaning practices, including the addition of non-recommended condiments to their infants\\' foods. Provision of professional advice and exploring antenatal maternal misperceptions are potential areas for targeted interventions to improve compliance with the recommended weaning practices.

  5. Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for staff development or offered staff development on nutrition and dietary behavior to those who teach health education increased ... for staff development or offered staff development on nutrition and dietary behavior to those who teach health education increased ...

  6. Risk factors for Group B Streptococcus colonisation and disease in Gambian women and their infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Doare, K.; Jarju, S.; Darboe, S.; Warburton, F.; Gorringe, A.; Heath, P.T.; Kampmann, B.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives To determine risk factors for GBS colonisation in Gambian mothers and in their infants from birth to day 60–89 of age. Methods Swabs and breastmilk from mothers/infant pairs were collected and cultured on selective agar. Negative samples were analysed for GBS DNA via real-time PCR. Positive isolates were serotyped using multiplex PCR and gel-agarose electrophoresis. Results Seven hundred and fifty women/infant pairs were recruited. 253 women (33.7%) were GBS-colonised at delivery. The predominant serotypes were: V (55%), II (16%), III (10%), Ia (8%) and Ib (8%). 186 infants were colonised (24.8%) at birth, 181 (24.1%) at 6 days and 96 at day 60–89 (14%). Infants born before 34 weeks of gestation and to women with rectovaginal and breastmilk colonisation at delivery had increased odds of GBS colonisation at birth. Season of birth was associated with increased odds of persistent infant GBS colonisation (dry season vs. wet season AOR 2.9; 95% CI 1.6–5.2). Conclusion GBS colonisation is common in Gambian women at delivery and in their infants to day 60−89 and is dominated by serotype V. In addition to maternal colonisation, breastmilk and season of birth are important risk factors for infant GBS colonisation. PMID:26763186

  7. The factors affecting morbidity and mortality in low birth-weight infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervan Bekdaş

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available jective: To investigate the frequency of short term morbidity and mortality and the factors affecting them for the infants born with low birth-weight at our hospitalMethods: At our hospital, 195 infants born with low birthweight within a period of 18 months were identified and 150 infants born with normal birth-weights were selected as the control group. Results: Within the mentioned period of time, 4.4% (n=168 of the infants born in our hospital had low birthweight, 0.7% (n=27 had very low birth-weight (VLBW. Multiple pregnancies and asphyxiating birth rates were significantly high in these infants as compared to the control group. (p=0.029, p=0.011, respectively. For VLBW infants, the rates of asphyxiating birth (OR=14.2, 95% CI (6.6-30.7, p<0.001, hospitalization at the neonatal intensive care unit (OR=34.8, 95% CI (4.7-256.3, p<0,001 and diagnosis of respiratory distress syndrome (OR=11.5, 95% CI (4-33.5, p<0.001 were significantly high. In all infants, the transient metabolic disorders were identified at a significantly high rate (p=0.045. The birth-weight and gestational age of infants were inversely correlated with their fetal and neonatal mortalities (for all p<0.001. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the most important factor affecting infants was multiple pregnancies. The birth-weight and gestational age of infants were inversely correlated with their morbidity and mortality rates.Key words: Low birth weight, perinatal risk factors, morbidity, mortality

  8. [Infant nutrition in Switzerland 1978. A prospective study on the nutritional habits during the first 6 months of life. I. Natural nutrition: breast feeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tönz, O; Schwaninger, U; Holzherr, E; Schafroth, M

    1980-06-14

    With the help of 55 nurses counseling young mothers in northern, central and eastern Switzerland the feeding habits of 371 infants born in March and April 1978 were studied during the first 6 months of life. Infants who were still breastfed at the end of the observation period were monitored for another 6 months. 92% of all infants were breastfed during the puerperium (62% receiving exclusively mother's milk). At the end of the second month some 60% of the infants were breast-fed (40% exclusively). At the end of the fourth month the numbers were 30% (15%) and after 6 months 18% (2%). The "mean corrected nursing period" was 10.25 weeks. The length of this period showed a direct correlation with the socioeconomic class of the family and especially with the educational status of the mother. A small difference in duration of the nursing period between male and female infants was not statistically significant, although during childbed there was a significant difference in favour of boys. There appeared to be a relationship between duration of nursing and age, parity and bodyweight of the mother. There were marked differences in frequency and duration of breast-feeding according to whether rooming-in was practiced during childbed or not. At the end of the first half year of life babies with a long nursing period had a significantly lower body weight than those with partial or no breastfeeding. A much smaller difference in body length resulted in a lower and probably more favourable weight/length ratio. There was no difference in head circumference. As compared with other industralized European countries, the authors regard current nursing habits in Switzerland as satisfactory.

  9. Food Sources of Total Energy and Nutrients among U.S. Infants and Toddlers: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Carley A; Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A; Campbell, Karen J; Nicklas, Theresa A

    2015-08-14

    Understanding the dietary intakes of infants and toddlers is important because early life nutrition influences future health outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine the dietary sources of total energy and 16 nutrients in a nationally representative sample of U.S. infants and toddlers aged 0-24 months. Data from the 2005-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. Dietary intake was assessed in 2740 subjects using one 24-h dietary recall. The population proportion was used to determine the contribution of foods and beverages to nutrient intakes. Overall infant formulas and baby foods were the leading sources of total energy and nutrients in infants aged 0-11.9 months. In toddlers, the diversity of food groups contributing to nutrient intakes was much greater. Important sources of total energy included milk, 100% juice and grain based mixed dishes. A number of foods of low nutritional quality also contributed to energy intakes including sweet bakery products, sugar-sweetened beverages and savory snacks. Overall non-flavored milks and ready-to-eat cereals were the most important contributors to micronutrient intakes. In conclusion this information can be used to guide parents regarding appropriate food selection as well as inform targeted dietary strategies within public health initiatives to improve the diets of infants and toddlers.

  10. Food Sources of Total Energy and Nutrients among U.S. Infants and Toddlers: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carley A. Grimes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the dietary intakes of infants and toddlers is important because early life nutrition influences future health outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine the dietary sources of total energy and 16 nutrients in a nationally representative sample of U.S. infants and toddlers aged 0–24 months. Data from the 2005–2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. Dietary intake was assessed in 2740 subjects using one 24-h dietary recall. The population proportion was used to determine the contribution of foods and beverages to nutrient intakes. Overall infant formulas and baby foods were the leading sources of total energy and nutrients in infants aged 0–11.9 months. In toddlers, the diversity of food groups contributing to nutrient intakes was much greater. Important sources of total energy included milk, 100% juice and grain based mixed dishes. A number of foods of low nutritional quality also contributed to energy intakes including sweet bakery products, sugar-sweetened beverages and savory snacks. Overall non-flavored milks and ready-to-eat cereals were the most important contributors to micronutrient intakes. In conclusion this information can be used to guide parents regarding appropriate food selection as well as inform targeted dietary strategies within public health initiatives to improve the diets of infants and toddlers.

  11. Determination of folate in infant formula and adult/pediatric nutritional formula by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: First Action 2013.13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisser-Redeuil, Karine; Bénet, Sylvie; Gimenez, Catherine; Campos-Giménez, Esther; Maria, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    A UHPLC-MS/MS method for the determination of folate (vitamin B9) in infant formula and adult/pediatric nutritional formula was assessed for compliance with standard method performance requirements set forth by the AOAC INTERNATIONAL Stakeholder Panel for Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN). A single-laboratory validation (SLV) study was conducted as the first step in the process to validate the method. In the study, 12 matrixes, representing the range of infant and adult nutritional products, were evaluated for folate [the sum of supplemental folic acid plus 5-methyl tetrahydrofolic acid (5-Me THF)]. Method response was linear in the range of 1.0-900 ng/mL, corresponding to 0.33-300 microg/l100 g in reconstituted sample. LOD for folic acid and 5-Me THF, expressed in reconstituted product, were 0.10 microg/100 g and 0.05 microg/100 g, respectively, and LOQ were 0.33 microg/100 g and 0.10 microg/100 g, respectively. Repeatability was AOAC First Action status for the determination of folates in infant formula and adult/pediatric nutritional formula.

  12. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2014. Scientific Opinion on the essential composition of infant and follow-on formulae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on the essential composition of infant and follow-on formula. This opinion reviews the opinion provided by the Scientific Committee on Food...

  13. An exclusive human milk-based diet in extremely premature infants reduces the probability of remaining on total parenteral nutrition: A reanalysis of the data

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously shown that an exclusively human-milk-based diet is beneficial for extremely premature infants who are at risk for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). However, no significant difference in the other primary study endpoint, the length of time on total parenteral nutrition (TPN), was fo...

  14. Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Team Approach and Fish Oil Emulsion Administration in the Management of Infants with Short Bowel Syndrome and Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana MGA Sant’Anna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the authors’ experience with the implementation of a multidisciplinary approach and use of fish oil emulsion (FOE in the management of infants with short bowel syndrome (SBS and parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD.

  15. A controlled-flow vacuum-free bottle system enhances preterm infants' nutritive sucking skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucile, Sandra; Gisel, Erika; Schanler, Richard J; Lau, Chantal

    2009-06-01

    We have shown that a controlled-flow vacuum-free bottle system (CFVFB) vs. a standard bottle (SB) facilitates overall transfer and rate of milk transfer, and shortens oral feeding duration in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants. We aimed to understand the basis by which this occurs. Thirty infants (19 males; 27 +/- 1 weeks gestation) were randomized to a CFVFB or SB. Outcomes monitored at 1-2 and 6-8 oral feedings/day when infants were around 34 and 36 weeks postmenstrual age, respectively, included: overall transfer (% volume taken/volume prescribed), rate of milk transfer (ml/min), sucking stage, frequency of suction (#S/s) and expression (#E/s), suction amplitude (mmHg), and sucking burst duration (s). At both periods we confirmed that infants using a CFVFB vs. SB demonstrated greater overall transfer and rate of milk transfer, along with more mature sucking stages. Suction and expression frequencies were decreased with CFVFB vs. SB at 1-2 oral feeding/day; only that of suction was reduced at 6-8 oral feedings/day. No group differences in suction amplitude and burst duration were observed. We speculate that oral feeding performance improves without significant change in sucking effort with a CFVFB vs. SB. In addition, we have shown that VLBW infants can tolerate faster milk flow than currently presumed. Finally, the use of a CFVFB may reduce energy expenditure as it enhances feeding performance without increasing sucking effort.

  16. Evaluation and Reauthorization of the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Hearings before the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry, United States Senate; and the Subcommittee on Nutrition of the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry, United States Senate. Ninety-Eighth Congress Second Session, March 15 and April 9, 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry.

    This document records hearings before the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry and its sub-committee on Nutrition. The hearings, dated March 15 and April 9, 1984, were conducted in order to evaluate and reauthorize the special supplemental food program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC), due to expire in 1984. Testimony…

  17. The nutritional requirements of infants. Towards EU alignment of reference values: the EURRECA network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermoso, Maria; Tabacchi, Garden; Iglesia-Altaba, Iris; Bel-Serrat, Silvia; Moreno-Aznar, Luis A; García-Santos, Yurena; García-Luzardo, Ma del Rosario; Santana-Salguero, Beatriz; Peña-Quintana, Luis; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Moran, Victoria Hall; Dykes, Fiona; Decsi, Tamás; Benetou, Vassiliki; Plada, Maria; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Raats, Monique M; Doets, Esmée L; Berti, Cristiana; Cetin, Irene; Koletzko, Berthold

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a review of the current knowledge regarding the macro- and micronutrient requirements of infants and discusses issues related to these requirements during the first year of life. The paper also reviews the current reference values used in European countries and the methodological approaches used to derive them by a sample of seven European and international authoritative committees from which background scientific reports are available. Throughout the paper, the main issues contributing to disparities in micronutrient reference values for infants are highlighted. The identification of these issues in relation to the specific physiological aspects of infants is important for informing future initiatives aimed at providing standardized approaches to overcome variability of micronutrient reference values across Europe for this age group. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Some Aspects of Nutrition Education Associated with Feeding Infants and Toddlers in Rural Farm Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshy, S.; Bhagat, R.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the findings of a survey on what foods should be given to toddlers. Concludes that there is a need for greater awareness among rural mothers about child feeding and nutrition education. (JOW)

  19. Late preterm infants – impact of perinatal factors on neonatal results. A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Jakiel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Infants born between the 34[sup]th[/sup] – 36[sup]th[/sup] week of pregnancy account for 75% of all preterm infants. Their seemingly slight immaturity is related to serious health problems. Objective. The aim of the study was to analyse perinatal factors that influence the occurrence in infants of such problems as respiratory failure, metabolic problems and early onset sepsis (EOS. Materials and method. The material for the study included all mothers and their late preterm infants: 34+0 – 36+6 born in our hospital (a tertiary referral academic centre in 2010 and 2011. The course of pregnancy and delivery, the type of delivery, applied preventive measures and treatment, as well as demographic data and the clinical state of infants were all analysed. Data from individual documentation of each mother and infant were collected by 5 designated people and data reliability was independently monitored by a random control of the documentation conducted by the supervising person. Results. A statistically significant relationship between the occurrence of respiratory distress syndrome and infant immaturity, bad state after birth and sepsis in infants were confirmed. Sepsis was more common in the case of vaginal delivery, and coexisted with respiratory distress syndrome. The mother’s diseases during pregnancy, a perinatal preventive antibiotic therapy, and possible delivery complications did not influence the infection. Perinatal asphyxia in an infant positively correlated with a Caesarean section and respiratory distress syndrome after birth. Conclusions. It is necessary to thoroughly establish the type of delivery of a late preterm infant in order to prevent an infection in the newborn child. The improvement of diagnosis of intrauterine hypoxia may reduce the number of Caesarean sections. The decision about late preterm delivery should be based on indices of the mother’s state of health. Premature delivery is related to the

  20. Maternal and infant factors associated with reasons for introducing solid foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amy; Rowan, Hannah

    2016-07-01

    The current UK Department of Health advice is to introduce solid foods to infants at around 6 months of age, when the infant is showing signs of developmental readiness for solid foods. However, many mothers introduce solid foods before this time, and for a wide variety of reasons, some of which may not promote healthy outcomes. The aim of the current study was to examine infant and maternal characteristics associated with different reasons for introducing solid foods. Seven hundred fifty-six mothers with an infant aged 6-12 months old completed a questionnaire describing their main reason for introducing solid foods alongside demographic questions, infant weight, gender, breast/formula feeding and timing of introduction to solid foods. The majority of mothers introduced solid foods for reasons explicitly stated in the Department of Health advice as not signs of readiness for solid foods. These reasons centred on perceived infant lack of sleep, hunger or unsettled behaviour. Maternal age, education and parity, infant weight and gender and breast/formula feeding choices were all associated with reasons for introduction. A particular association was found between breastfeeding and perceiving the infant to be hungrier or needing more than milk could offer. Male infants were perceived as hungry and needing more energy than female infants. Notably, signs of readiness may be misinterpreted with some stating this reason for infants weaned prior to 16 weeks. The findings are important for those working to support and educate new parents with the introduction of solid foods in understanding the factors that might influence them.

  1. Assessing the Patient with Abdominal Obesity: Metabolic and Nutritional Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Pop

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abdominal obesity is a confirmed cardio-vascular risk factor and the elements influencing it are subject for research and intervention. The available nutritional evaluation methods are time consuming, subjective and a standardized approach is missing. Aim: Standardized evaluation of patients with abdominal obesity. Material and methods: Cross-sectional study on a convenience sample of 85 subjects who presented in the Endocrinology Outpatient Clinic of the Emergency Mures County Hospital between February - April 2013. Variables: age, sex, environment, BMI, waist, blood glucose, triglycerides, HDL-Cholesterol, blood pressure. Each patient filled a food frequency questionnaire. Results: None of the subjects had a “normal” food pyramid. Sex has no influence on the food pyramid. The meat and protein food group is the only one significantly influenced by the environment (p = 0.04. Patients with dyslipidemia consume lower amounts of sweets (1.13 vs. 1.83 servings, p = 0.007. Patients requiring metabolic treatment have significant higher waist values (101.32 vs. 93.07 cm, p=0.03. Patients with simple abdominal obesity consume significant lower amounts of meat and protein and higher amounts of fruit and vegetables. Conclusions: A standardized approach to the patient with abdominal obesity using nutritional assessment tools and metabolic evaluation helps to identify those at risk and to give more tailored recommendations

  2. EFFICACY OF PREBIOTIC DOSE OF LACTULOSE IN FUNCTIONAL NUTRITION OF INFANTS WITH ENTEROCOLITIS AND INTESTINAL DISBIOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye.R. Meskina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a data from a clinical study describing different clinical effects of lactulose. The direction of drug’s efficacy depends on different dose of lactulose. The use of prebiotic dose (milk mixture «Bifidus 1, 2» improves the state of intestinal micro flora, favors to the increase of efficacy of usually used treatment and decreases the probability of unfavorable rehabilitation period in infants with infectious enterocolitis and intestinal disbiosis.Key words: infants, infectious enterocolitis, intestinal micro flora, short-chain fatty acids, lactulose.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2011; 10 (4: 105–110

  3. Determination of Chloride in Infant Formula and Adult/Pediatric Nutritional Formula by Automated Potentiometry: Single-Laboratory Validation, First Action 2015.08.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaudzems, Gregory G

    2015-01-01

    A direct potentiometric method involving titration against a standard volumetric silver nitrate solution using a silver electrode to detect the end point was evaluated for the determination of chloride in infant formula and adult/pediatric nutritional formula. It was assessed for compliance against AOAC Standard Method Performance Requirements (SMPR®) established by the AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN). A single-laboratory validation (SLV) study was conducted as a first step in the process to validate the method. In this SLV, 17 SPIFAN matrixes representing a range of infant formula and adult nutritional products were evaluated for their chloride content. The analytical range was found to be between 1.4 and 1060 mg/100 g reconstituted product or ready-to-feed (RTF) liquid. The LOQ was estimated as 1.4 mg/100 g. Method repeatability was between 0.03 and 1.60% in the range of 20 to 167 mg/100 g RTF, and intermediate precision was between 0.09 and 2.77% in the same range. Recovery values based on spiking experiments at two different levels of chloride ranged from 99.0 to 103% for 15 different SPIFAN products. Evaluation of trueness was performed on National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 1849a (Infant/Adult Nutritional Formula) and showed 97.2% of the theoretical value, with no bias at the 95% confidence level. Based on the results of the SLV, the method met the SMPR and was approved as a First Action method by the AOAC Expert Review Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals on March 17, 2015.

  4. On the nutrition and health of infant and young child%论当前的婴幼儿营养与保健研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何亚清

    2013-01-01

    婴幼儿时期的营养与保健是孩子健康成长的重要组成部分,婴幼儿时期的营养问题可能会导致儿童不可逆转的生长和认知发育迟缓,以及近期和远期的不良后果。因此,当前婴幼儿营养与保健问题成为家长普遍关注的话题。其中母乳喂养和合理的添加辅助食品是预防儿童营养不良的重要举措。本文将分析当前婴幼儿营养与保健方面存在的问题,进而提出婴幼儿营养与保健的方法。%The nutrition and health of infant period is an important part of the healthy growth of children, nutritional problems of infants and young children may lead to irreversible growth and cognitive retardation, and short-term and long-term adverse consequences. Therefore, the current problems of infant nutrition and health has become a topic of common concern of parents. The breastfeeding and to add supplementary food reasonably are important measure to prevent child malnutrition. This article will analyze the existing problems of nutrition and health of infants, and then put forward the method of nutrition and health of infants and young children.

  5. Breastfeeding Progression in Preterm Infants Is Influenced by Factors in Infants, Mothers and Clinical Practice: The Results of a National Cohort Study with High Breastfeeding Initiation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maastrup, Ragnhild; Hansen, Bo Moelholm; Kronborg, Hanne; Bojesen, Susanne Norby; Hallum, Karin; Frandsen, Annemi; Kyhnaeb, Anne; Svarer, Inge; Hallström, Inger

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim Many preterm infants are not capable of exclusive breastfeeding from birth. To guide mothers in breastfeeding, it is important to know when preterm infants can initiate breastfeeding and progress. The aim was to analyse postmenstrual age (PMA) at breastfeeding milestones in different preterm gestational age (GA) groups, to describe rates of breastfeeding duration at pre-defined times, as well as analyse factors associated with PMA at the establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. Methods The study was part of a prospective survey of a national Danish cohort of preterm infants based on questionnaires and structured telephone interviews, including 1,221 mothers and their 1,488 preterm infants with GA of 24–36 weeks. Results Of the preterm infants, 99% initiated breastfeeding and 68% were discharged exclusively breastfed. Breastfeeding milestones were generally reached at different PMAs for different GA groups, but preterm infants were able to initiate breastfeeding at early times, with some delay in infants less than GA 32 weeks. Very preterm infants had lowest mean PMA (35.5 weeks) at first complete breastfeed, and moderate preterm infants had lowest mean PMA at the establishment of exclusive breastfeeding (36.4 weeks). Admitting mothers to the NICU together with the infant and minimising the use of a pacifier during breastfeeding transition were associated with 1.6 (95% CI 0.4–2.8) and 1.2 days (95% CI 0.1–2.3) earlier establishment of exclusive breastfeeding respectively. Infants that were small for gestational age were associated with 5.6 days (95% CI 4.1–7.0) later establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. Conclusion Breastfeeding competence is not developed at a fixed PMA, but is influenced by multiple factors in infants, mothers and clinical practice. Admitting mothers together with their infants to the NICU and minimising the use of pacifiers may contribute to earlier establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. PMID:25251690

  6. Effectiveness of a normative nutrition intervention (diet, physical activity and breastfeeding) on maternal nutrition and offspring growth: the Chilean maternal and infant nutrition cohort study (CHiMINCs).

    OpenAIRE

    Garmendia, ML; Corvalan, C; Araya, M.; Casanello, P; Kusanovic, JP; Uauy, R

    2015-01-01

    Background Maternal obesity before and during pregnancy predicts maternal and infant risks of obesity and its associated metabolic conditions. Dietary and physical activity recommendations during pregnancy as well as weight monitoring are currently available in the Chilean primary health care system. However some of these recommendations are not updated and most of them are poorly implemented. We seek to assess the effectiveness of an intervention that enhances the implementation of updated n...

  7. CLINICAL NUTRITION INVOLVING A SPECIALIZED PROTEINAND CALORIE-RICH PEDIATRIC MILK PRODUCT FOR ENTERAL FEEDING OF INFANTS WITH PROTEIN-CALORIE DEFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Namazova-Baranova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Premature infants with extremely low and very low birth weight with a severe overlapping perinatal pathology often feature slower growth rate within the first year of life and require special nutritional support.Objective: Our aim was to study physical development of infants with protein-calorie deficiency in the setting of using a specialized protein- and calorie-rich pediatric milk product for enteral feeding.Methods: We analyzed tolerability and efficacy of clinical nutrition within the framework of a prospective two-month-long case series. We assessed actual children’s diets and the chemical composition thereof. We determined body weight and length, body mass index (BMI, adipodermal flap thickness over the triceps. Anabolic effect of clinical nutrition was assessed on the basis of transthyretin concentration dynamics.Results: The study involved 30 infants with protein-calorie deficiency (7 term infants and 23 premature infants with a severe perinatal pathology. High tolerability of the formula under analysis was registered in most patients. Termination of functional gastrointestinal tract disorders (posseting, colics, flatulence, constipations was observed in 23 (87% patients. In most cases, the use of a protein- and calorie-rich formula as a part of a therapeutic diet helped to satisfy children’s protein demand and improve their weight/length parameters: BMI increased in 19 (72% children, body weight — in 16 (63%, body length — in 24 (92%, adipodermal flap thickness over the triceps — in all the children (100%. We observed transthyretin concentration increase from 162 (157; 171 in the beginning of the study to 187 (170; 208 mg/l in the end thereof (p = 0.028.Conclusion: A specialized protein- and calorie-rich product for enteral feeding may be used for feeding infants with protein-calorie deficiency born with a severe a perinatal pathology, including premature infants.

  8. Is iron and zinc nutrition a concern for vegetarian infants and young children in industrialized countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Rosalind S; Heath, Anne-Louise M; Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A

    2014-07-01

    Well-planned vegetarian diets are considered adequate for all stages of the life cycle, despite limited data on the zinc status of vegetarians during early childhood. The bioavailability of iron and zinc in vegetarian diets is poor because of their higher content of absorption inhibitors such as phytate and polyphenols and the absence of flesh foods. Consequently, children as well as adult vegetarians often have lower serum ferritin concentrations than omnivores, which is indicative of reduced iron stores, despite comparable intakes of total iron; hemoglobin differences are small and rarely associated with anemia. However, data on serum zinc concentrations, the recommended biomarker for identifying population groups at elevated risk of zinc deficiency, are sparse and difficult to interpret because recommended collection and analytic procedures have not always been followed. Existing data indicate no differences in serum zinc or growth between young vegetarian and omnivorous children, although there is some evidence of low serum zinc concentrations in vegetarian adolescents. Some vegetarian immigrants from underprivileged households may be predisposed to iron and zinc deficiency because of nondietary factors such as chronic inflammation, parasitic infections, overweight, and genetic hemoglobin disorders. To reduce the risk of deficiency, the content and bioavailability of iron and zinc should be enhanced in vegetarian diets by consumption of fortified cereals and milk, by consumption of leavened whole grains, by soaking dried legumes before cooking and discarding the soaking water, and by replacing tea and coffee at meals with vitamin C-rich drinks, fruit, or vegetables. Additional recommended practices include using fermented soy foods and sprouting at least some of the legumes consumed. Fortified foods can reduce iron deficiency, but whether they can also reduce zinc deficiency is less certain. Supplements may be necessary for vegetarian children following very

  9. The nutritional requirements of infants. Towards EU alignment of reference values: the EURRECA network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermoso, M.; Tabacchi, G.; Iglesia-Altaba, I.; Bel-Serrat, S.; Moreno-Aznar, L.A.; Garcia-Santos, Y.; Rosario Garcia-Luzardo, Del M.; Santana-Salguero, B.; Pena-Quintana, L.; Serra-Majem, L.; Hall Moran, V.; Dykes, F.; Decsi, T.; Benetou, V.; Plada, M.; Trichopoulou, A.; Raats, M.M.; Doets, E.L.; Berti, C.; Cetin, I.; Koletzko, B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the current knowledge regarding the macro- and micronutrient requirements of infants and discusses issues related to these requirements during the first year of life. The paper also reviews the current reference values used in European countries and the methodological

  10. Maternal diets, nutritional status, and zinc in contemporary Mexican infants' teeth: Implications for reconstructing paleodiets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolphin, Alexis E; Goodman, Alan H

    2009-11-01

    Despite attempts to use zinc (Zn) concentrations in hard tissues to comment upon the degree of carnivory in past populations, zinc has yielded inconsistent trophic level effects. The question of what, if anything, zinc in human enamel reveals regarding past diets is the focus of this research. We test whether the zinc content of deciduous tooth enamel from contemporary Mexican infants varies by maternal dietary variables such as zinc intake, proportion of animal products consumed, and dietary components that are known to impact zinc absorption. Deciduous teeth were collected from former participants in a longitudinal study of maternal and infant diet and function in highland Mexico. The Zn/Ca ratios of both prenatal and postnatal regions of 37 anterior teeth representing 26 individuals were assessed via laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Maternal dietary data collected during lactation were not correlated with zinc levels in the early postnatal enamel of infants' teeth, which were forming at the same time. In the case of prenatal enamel, zinc values were correlated with the consumption of foods known to influence Zn bioavailability, most notably tortillas (P = 0.008; r = 0.510), but not with meat consumption. Unexpectedly, women who consumed diets with poor zinc bioavailability during pregnancy gave birth to infants whose prenatal enamel demonstrated the highest Zn/Ca ratios, possibly due to enhanced zinc absorption during pregnancy for those mothers suffering most from long-term micronutrient deficiency. These results would suggest that zinc is not a reliable trophic level indicator.

  11. Allergic diseases among very preterm infants according to nutrition after hospital discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariassen, Gitte; Faerk, Jan; Kjær, Birgitte Esberg Boysen

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether a cow's milk-based human milk fortifier (HMF) added to mother's milk while breastfeeding or a cow's milk-based preterm formula compared to exclusively mother's milk after hospital discharge, increases the incidence of developing allergic diseases among very preterm infants (V...

  12. Administration of gentamicin and ampicillin by continuous intravenous infusion to newborn infants during parenteral nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colding, H; Andersen, G E

    1982-01-01

    Gentamicin and ampicillin were dissolved in an L-amino acid solution especially prepared for newborn infants and infused intravenously over 24 h in 7 babies with serious neonatal surgical problems. Serum concentrations of the antibiotics were maintained rather constant and well above the minimal ...

  13. The Role of Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in the Nutrition of Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.O. Dobrianskyi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPSFA are the main functional fats of mother’s milk. The predominant and functionally most important LCPSFA are arachidonic acid (AA and docosahexanoic acid (DHA. In addition to imitation of breast milk, there are two important reasons to add LCPSFA in infant formula for babies. Firstly, infants can not synthesize sufficient number of LCPSFA to compensate for the lack of these substances in food. Secondly, the brain tissue, the retina of the eyes and immune system require a large number of LCPSFA as a building material and functional components to support intensive growth and development in early childhood. This period is critical for the formation and development of organs, therefore, optimal supply of substrates is necessary for their optimal functioning. These ideas, combined with the results of over 20 randomized controlled clinical trials and numerous other studies that show the positive impact of food LCPSFA on the health and development of infants, indicate the need for enrichment of baby food with DHA and AK. The most studied positive effects of this enrichment are the improvement of visual function and cognitive development of young children. According to new data, increased consumption of LCPSFA is associated with beneficial effects on immune functions and cardiovascular system of infants.

  14. Growth status related to brain responses, nutrition, home environment, and behavior in infants and toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    To investigate whether growth status in infants and toddlers affects processes involved in speech perception and discrimination, cortical event-related potentials (ERPs) to consonant-vowel syllables were recorded from 48 healthy babies: 26 low in growth status (LGS, <25th percentile in growth measur...

  15. Risk factors of sensorineural hearing loss in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borradori, C; Fawer, C L; Buclin, T; Calame, A

    1997-01-01

    Among 547 preterm infants of Ototoxicity appeared closely related to a prolonged administration and higher total dose of ototoxic drugs, particularly aminoglycosides and furosemide. Finally, we strongly recommend to prospectively and regularly perform audiologic assessment in sick preterm children as hearing loss is of delayed onset and in most cases bilateral and severe.

  16. Infant Constipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prenatal Baby Bathing & Skin Care Breastfeeding Crying & Colic Diapers & Clothing Feeding & Nutrition Preemie Sleep Teething & Tooth Care ... Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Baby > Diapers & Clothing > Infant Constipation Ages & Stages Listen Español Text ...

  17. [Improvement in diurnal oral ingestion in the malnourished newborn infant induced by the administration of nocturnal enteral nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson-Chagoyán, O C; López-Ayllón, R M; Ríos-Espinosa, E; Arteaga-Noriega, M M; Camacho-Gutiérrez, J

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was evaluate the impact of nocturnal nasogastric tube feeding on diurnal caloric intake in children with severe energy protein-calorie malnutrition. Sixteen infants admitted to the Pediatric Nutrition Department with severe malnutrition were randomly assigned into groups: eight children in group A and eight in group B. Infants in both groups received 100% of their caloric requirements by oral feeding ad libitum. An additional 30% caloric charge was given to patients in group A by nocturnal nasogastric tube feeding. At admission and at their 7th day, weight, height, arm circumference, triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness were recorded. Weight for age, weight for height, height for age and upper arm muscle circumference were estimated. Every meal was weighted and measured before and after being eaten in order to calculate the child caloric intake using food composition tables. There were no statistically differences in all parameters between groups at admission. At discharge significant differences on caloric intake were found (179.7 +/- 75.34 kcal vs. 98.38 +/- 37.73 kcal; p 0.02). This findings suggest that nocturnal support with an extra caloric supply over the normal requirements for age improve the diurnal caloric intake of children with severe protein energy malnutrition.

  18. Nutrition in pregnancy and lactation: how a healthy infant is born

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Mecacci

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Maternal nutrition during pregnancy and lactation influences the growth and potential development of the fetus and contributes to the maturity of a healthy baby.The lack of sufficient calories, of macro- and micronutrients, can lead to deficiencies in building materials for the development and growth of the fetus: moreover there is growing evidence that the maternal nutritional status can alter the epigenetic state of the fetal genome, therefore alterations in nutrition during crucial periods of fetal development may result in developmental adaptations that permanently change the physiology, the metabolism of the offspring, and, as a consequence, predispose these individuals to diseases as adults.In this review we collected indications for the recommended intake of calories and nutrients for a healthy diet during pregnancy and lactation, also analyzing some nutritional choices that may increase the risk of nutritional deficiencies and the way to prevent them.Pregnancy-related dietary changes should begin prior to conception, with appropriate modifications throughout pregnancy and lactation, and appropriate supplementation of vitamins and minerals. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  19. Clinical Factors Associated With Chest Imaging Findings in Hospitalized Infants With Bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazif, Joanne M; Taragin, Benjamin H; Azzarone, Gabriella; Rinke, Michael L; Liewehr, Sheila; Choi, Jaeun; Esteban-Cruciani, Nora

    2017-10-01

    Despite recommendations against routine imaging, chest radiography (CXR) is frequently performed on infants hospitalized for bronchiolitis. We conducted a review of 811 infants hospitalized for bronchiolitis to identify clinical factors associated with imaging findings. CXR was performed on 553 (68%) infants either on presentation or during hospitalization; 466 readings (84%) were normal or consistent with viral illness. Clinical factors significantly associated with normal/viral imaging were normal temperature (odds ratio = 1.66; 95% CI = 1.03-2.67) and normal oxygen saturation (odds ratio = 1.77; 95% CI = 1.1-2.83) on presentation. Afebrile patients with normal oxygen saturations were nearly 3 times as likely to have a normal/viral CXR as patients with both fever and hypoxia. Our findings support the limited role of radiography in the evaluation of hospitalized infants with bronchiolitis, especially patients without fever or hypoxia.

  20. Factors predicting sensory profile of 4 to 18 month old infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Pedrosa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify environment factors predicting sensory profile of infants between 4 and 18 months old. METHODS: This cross-sectional study evaluated 97 infants (40 females e 57 males, with a mean age of 1.05±0.32 years with the Test of Sensory Functions in Infants (TSFI and also asked 97 parents and 11 kindergarten teachers of seven daycare centers to answer the Affordances in the Home Environment for Motor Development-Infant Scale (AHEMD-IS. The AHEMD-IS is a questionnaire that characterizes the opportunities in the home environment for infants between 3 and 18 months of age. We tested the association between affordances and the sensory profile of infants. Significant variables were entered into a regression model to determine predictors of sensory profile. RESULTS: The majority of infants (66% had a normal sensory profile and 34% were at risk or deficit. Affordances in the home were classified as adequate and they were good in the studied daycare centers. The results of the regression revealed that only daily hours in daycare center and daycare outside space influenced the sensory profile of infants, in particular the Ocular-Motor Control component. CONCLUSIONS: The sensory profile of infants was between normal and at risk. While the family home offered adequate affordances for motor development, the daycare centers of the infants involved demonstrated a good quantity and quality of affordances. Overall, we conclude that daily hours in the daycare center and daycare outside space were predictors of the sensory profile, particular on Ocular-Motor Control component.

  1. Nutritional Rehabilitation of HIV-Exposed Infants in Malawi: Results from the Drug Resources Enhancement Against AIDS and Malnutrition Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Erba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infant malnutrition in sub-Saharan Africa is a public health priority and a challenge in high HIV prevalence areas. The Drug Resources Enhancement Against AIDS and Malnutrition program, with multiple medical centers in Sub-Saharan Africa, developed an innovative intervention for the surveillance and control of malnutrition. In a pilot initiative, 36 HIV-exposed children were evaluated at baseline upon presentation for malnutrition and at six months post- treatment. Parameters included HIV-free survival, nutritional status and change in diet. Food diary data was entered and processed using the Nutrisurvey (WHO software. At 6 months post-intervention, a significant improvement in anthropometric parameters was noted. Slowing of linear growth was observed in patients with malaria with a mean gain in centimetres of 4.4 ± 1.7 as compared to 5.6 ± 1.7 in children with no malaria, p < 0.048 (CL 95%: −2.32, −0.01. Dietary diversity scores increased from 5.3 ± 1.9 to 6.5 ± 1.3, p < 0.01 at 6 months. A significant increase (+25%, p < 0.02 in the number of children eating fish meals was noted. Our pilot data describes positive outcomes from a rehabilitative nutritional approach based on use of local foods, peer education, anthropometric and clinical monitoring in areas of high food insecurity. The relationship between malaria and linear growth retardation requires further investigation.

  2. Effects of prenatal factors and temperament on infant cortisol regulation in low-income Mexican American families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecken, Linda J; MacKinnon, David P; Jewell, Shannon L; Crnic, Keith A; Gonzales, Nancy A

    2015-12-01

    Prenatal psychosocial exposures can significantly affect infant health and development. Infants with higher temperamental negativity are theorized to be more susceptible to environmental exposures. We evaluated the interaction of prenatal maternal exposures and infant temperamental negativity to predict infant cortisol response to mildly challenging mother-infant interaction tasks. Participants included 322 Mexican American mother-infant dyads (mother age 18-42; 82% Spanish-speaking; modal family income $10,000-$15,000). Mothers reported depressive symptoms and social support prenatally and infant temperamental negativity at 6 weeks postpartum. Salivary cortisol was collected from infants before and after mother-infant interaction tasks at 12 weeks. Higher prenatal maternal depressive symptoms and lower social support predicted higher cortisol among infants with higher temperamental negativity. Higher infant temperamental negativity predicted an increase in maternal distress and a decrease in social support from prenatal to 12 weeks postpartum. Interactive influences of maternal social-contextual factors and infant temperament may influence the development of infant neurobiological regulation and promote or strain maternal and infant adaptation over time.

  3. Effect of maternal status and breastfeeding practices on infant nutritional status - a cross sectional study in the south-west region of Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohidul; Rahman, Shahinur; Kamruzzaman; Islam, Mominul; Samad, Abdus

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to address the current scenario of LBW and infant nutritional and to analyze the effect of maternal status and pattern of their breast feeding practices on perinatal and postnatal infant development. Methods Cross-sectional study design with structured questionnaires was used among 510 mother-infant pair to collect data. Maternal anthropometric, socio-economic and demographic characteristics and breast feeding practice were used as independent variable and birth weight and infant growth status as dependent variable. Descriptive and crosstab analysis were used to analyze the effect. Results The study revealed that about 29.4% infants were born with low birth weight (LBW). Mother with no education and from low income family were more likely (OR: 3.484, 95%CI: 1.993-6.089 and OR: 2.078, 95% CI: 1.274-3.387) to have LBW infant compared with mother with higher education and from higher income family. Similarly, lower maternal height, weight and MUAC (breastfeeding was found among 45% mother. Postnatal growth and development of infant was not found significantly different (P > 0.05) among those who breast feed exclusively and non-exclusively. Conclusion The study confirms that lower level of maternal education; family income and anthropometric measurement significantly increase the risk of LBW. The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding practice was not found satisfactory. PMID:24847401

  4. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I is a Marker for the Nutritional State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Colin P; Grimberg, Adda

    2015-12-01

    Measurement of the serum concentration of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-l) is generally used as a screening investigation for disorders of the growth hormone (GH)/IGF-I axis in children and adolescents with short stature. IGF-I concentration is sensitive to short-term and chronic alterations in the nutritional state, and the interpretation of IGF-I measurements requires knowledge of the child's nutritional status. In this review, we summarize the effects of nutrition on the GH/IGF-I axis, and review the clinical implications of these interactions throughout childhood, both in under-nutrition and over-nutrition.

  5. Glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition in very low birth weight infants. Design of a double-blind randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN73254583

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twisk Jos WR

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enteral feeding of very low birth weight (VLBW infants is a challenge, since metabolic demands are high and administration of enteral nutrition is limited by immaturity of the gastrointestinal tract. The amino acid glutamine plays an important role in maintaining functional integrity of the gut. In addition, glutamine is utilised at a high rate by cells of the immune system. In critically ill patients, glutamine is considered a conditionally essential amino acid. VLBW infants may be especially susceptible to glutamine depletion as nutritional supply of glutamine is limited in the first weeks after birth. Glutamine depletion has negative effects on functional integrity of the gut and leads to immunosuppression. This double-blind randomised controlled trial is designed to investigate the effect of glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition on feeding tolerance, infectious morbidity and short-term outcome in VLBW infants. Furthermore, an attempt is made to elucidate the role of glutamine in postnatal adaptation of the gut and modulation of the immune response. Methods VLBW infants (gestational age

  6. FATHERS' AND MOTHERS' REPRESENTATIONS OF THE INFANT: ASSOCIATIONS WITH PRENATAL RISK FACTORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreeswijk, Charlotte M J M; Rijk, Catharina H A M; Maas, A Janneke B M; van Bakel, Hedwig J A

    2015-01-01

    Parents' representations of their infants consist of parents' subjective experiences of how they perceive their infants. They provide important information about the quality of the parent-infant relationship and are closely related to parenting behavior and infant attachment. Previous studies have shown that parents' representations emerge during pregnancy. However, little is known about prenatal (risk) factors that are related to parents' representations. In a prospective study, 308 mothers and 243 fathers were followed during pregnancy and postpartum. Prenatal risk factors were assessed with an adapted version of the Dunedin Family Services Indicator (T.G. Egan et al., ; R.C. Muir et al., ). At 26 weeks' gestation and 6 months' postpartum, parents' representations of their children were assessed with the Working Model of the Child Interview (C.H. Zeanah, D. Benoit, L. Hirshberg, M.L. Barton, & C. Regan). Results showed stability between pre- and postnatal representations, with fathers having more disengaged representations than did mothers. In addition, prenatal risk factors of parenting problems were associated with the quality of parents' prenatal (only in mothers) and postnatal representations. This study provides valuable information concerning parents at risk of developing nonbalanced representations of their children. In clinical practice, these families could be monitored more intensively and may be supported in developing a more optimal parent-infant relationship. © 2015 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  7. Household food insecurity, maternal nutritional status, and infant feeding practices among HIV-infected Ugandan women receiving combination antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sera L; Plenty, Albert H J; Luwedde, Flavia A; Natamba, Barnabas K; Natureeba, Paul; Achan, Jane; Mwesigwa, Julia; Ruel, Theodore D; Ades, Veronica; Osterbauer, Beth; Clark, Tamara D; Dorsey, Grant; Charlebois, Edwin D; Kamya, Moses; Havlir, Diane V; Cohan, Deborah L

    2014-11-01

    Household food insecurity (HHFI) may be a barrier to both optimal maternal nutritional status and infant feeding practices, but few studies have tested this relationship quantitatively, and never among HIV-infected individuals. We therefore described the prevalence of HHFI and explored if it was associated with poorer maternal nutritional status, shorter duration of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) and fewer animal-source complementary foods. We assessed these outcomes using bivariate and multivariate analyses among 178 HIV-infected pregnant and breastfeeding (BF) women receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in the PROMOTE trial (NCT00993031), a prospective, longitudinal cohort study in Tororo, Uganda. HHFI was common; the prevalence of severe, moderate, and little to no household hunger was 7.3, 39.9, and 52.8 %, respectively. Poor maternal nutritional status was common and women in households experiencing moderate to severe household hunger (MSHH) had statistically significantly lower body mass index (BMIs) at enrollment (21.3 vs. 22.5, p < 0.01) and prior to delivery (22.6 vs. 23.8, p < 0.01). BMI across time during pregnancy, but not gestational weight gain, was significantly lower for MSHH [adjusted beta (95 % CI) -0.79 (-1.56, -0.02), p = 0.04; -2.06 (-4.31, 0.19), p = 0.07], respectively. The prevalence (95 % CI) of EBF at 6 months was 67.2 % (59.7-73.5 %), and the proportion of women BF at 12 months was 80.4 % (73.3-85.7 %). MSHH was not associated with prevalence of EBF at 6 months or BF at 12 months. However, among those women still EBF at 4 months (81.4 % of population), those experiencing MSHH were significantly more likely to cease EBF between 4 and 6 months (aHR 2.38, 95 % CI 1.02-5.58). The prevalence of HHFI, maternal malnutrition, and suboptimal infant feeding practices are high and the causal relationships among these phenomena must be further explored.

  8. Iodine nutrition in breast-fed infants is impaired by maternal smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, Peter; Nøhr, Susanne B; Pedersen, Klaus M

    2004-01-01

    the sodium-iodide symporter responsible for iodide transport in the lactating mammary gland. Smoking during the period of breastfeeding increases the risk of iodine deficiency-induced brain damage in the child. Women who breastfeed should not smoke, but if they do, an extra iodine supplement should......Lack of iodine for thyroid hormone formation during the fetal stage and/or the first years of life may lead to developmental brain damage. During the period of breastfeeding, thyroid function of the infant depends on iodine in maternal milk. We studied healthy, pregnant women admitted for delivery...... and their newborn infants. Cotinine in urine and serum was used to classify mothers as smokers (n = 50) or nonsmokers (n = 90). Smoking and nonsmoking mothers had identical urinary iodine on d 5 after delivery, but smoking was associated with reduced iodine content in breast milk (smokers 26.0 micro g/liter vs...

  9. Probiotics in human milk and probiotic supplementation in infant nutrition: a workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Henrike; Rodríguez, Juan Miguel; Salminen, Seppo; Szajewska, Hania

    2014-10-14

    Probiotics in human milk are a very recent field of research, as the existence of the human milk microbiome was discovered only about a decade ago. Current research is focusing on bacterial diversity and the influence of the maternal environment as well as the mode of delivery on human milk microbiota, the pathways of bacterial transfer to milk ducts, possible benefits of specific bacterial strains for the treatment of mastitis in mothers, and disease prevention in children. Recent advances in the assessment of early host-microbe interactions suggest that early colonisation may have an impact on later health. This review article summarises a scientific workshop on probiotics in human milk and their implications for infant health as well as future perspectives for infant feeding.

  10. The prevalence of active nutritional rickets in Egyptian infants in Cairo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amani Osman Mahmoud

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Rickets is still prevalent in Egypt; however, at a lower prevalence than that reported before. We recommend examining all infants at the age of 18 months by primary health care physicians and screening by ALP as this age showed a prevalence of rickets of 12/1000 to direct proper treatment and avoid the physical deformities resulting from insufficient calcium and/or vitamin D in infants in the early stages of walking. For the screening and diagnosis of rickets in a limited resources country like Egypt, we recommend the measurement of ALP. Proper education about calcium rich foods, adequate number of servings/day and adequate sun exposure is of paramount importance.

  11. Iodine nutrition in breast-fed infants is impaired by maternal smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, Peter; Nøhr, Susanne B; Pedersen, Klaus M

    2004-01-01

    the sodium-iodide symporter responsible for iodide transport in the lactating mammary gland. Smoking during the period of breastfeeding increases the risk of iodine deficiency-induced brain damage in the child. Women who breastfeed should not smoke, but if they do, an extra iodine supplement should......Lack of iodine for thyroid hormone formation during the fetal stage and/or the first years of life may lead to developmental brain damage. During the period of breastfeeding, thyroid function of the infant depends on iodine in maternal milk. We studied healthy, pregnant women admitted for delivery...... and their newborn infants. Cotinine in urine and serum was used to classify mothers as smokers (n = 50) or nonsmokers (n = 90). Smoking and nonsmoking mothers had identical urinary iodine on d 5 after delivery, but smoking was associated with reduced iodine content in breast milk (smokers 26.0 micro g/liter vs...

  12. Complementary feeding practices and nutritional status of children 6 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2015-01-30

    Jan 30, 2015 ... This study aimed to determine the factors contributing to the complementary feeding practices ... Nutrition education on appropriate Infant and Young Child Feeding among ...... Determinants of Dietary Diversity, Africa Crop.

  13. Integrating nutrition and early child-development interventions among infants and preschoolers in rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Rao, Sylvia; Hurley, Kristen M; Nair, Krishnapillai Madhavan; Balakrishna, Nagalla; Radhakrishna, Kankipati V; Ravinder, Punjal; Tilton, Nicholas; Harding, Kimberly B; Reinhart, Greg A; Black, Maureen M

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development, design, and implementation of an integrated randomized double-masked placebo-controlled trial (Project Grow Smart) that examines how home/preschool fortification with multiple micronutrient powder (MNP) combined with an early child-development intervention affects child development, growth, and micronutrient status among infants and preschoolers in rural India. The 1-year trial has an infant phase (enrollment age: 6-12 months) and a preschool phase (enrollment age: 36-48 months). Infants are individually randomized into one of four groups: placebo, placebo plus early learning, MNP alone, and MNP plus early learning (integrated intervention), conducted through home visits. The preschool phase is a cluster-randomized trial conducted in Anganwadi centers (AWCs), government-run preschools sponsored by the Integrated Child Development System of India. AWCs are randomized into MNP or placebo, with the MNP or placebo mixed into the children's food. The evaluation examines whether the effects of the MNP intervention vary by the quality of the early learning opportunities and communication within the AWCs. Study outcomes include child development, growth, and micronutrient status. Lessons learned during the development, design, and implementation of the integrated trial can be used to guide large-scale policy and programs designed to promote the developmental, educational, and economic potential of children in developing countries. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. Recommended Feeding and Dietary Practices To Improve Infant and Maternal Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Academy for Educational Development, Washington, DC.

    The LINKAGES Project is intended to improve breastfeeding and related complementary feeding and maternal dietary practices. The project, in consultation with technical experts and program managers, identified a set of recommended feeding and dietary practices intended to break the cycle of poor health and nutrition that passes from generation to…

  15. Factors related to transfusion in very low birthweight infants treated with erythropoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, R. F.; Obladen, M.; Messinger, D.; Wardrop, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    The need for red cell transfusions is reduced but not eliminated by recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) in very low birthweight (VLBW) infants. To detect factors associated with the decision to transfuse VLBW infants during rhEPO treatment and to explain rhEPO 'non-responders', the subgroup of those 120 VLBW infants who were treated with rhEPO 750 IU/kg per week in the second European Multicentre rhEPO Trial was evaluated. Sixty (50%) infants received at least one transfusion during erythropoietin treatment. Transfusion was frequent in infants with extremely low birthweight (79% for 750-999 g), low gestational age (70% for or = 1 ml/kg per day). The prognostic variables birthweight, initial haematocrit, and gestational age were found to be most predictive for transfusion. To improve rhEPO response in VLBW infants, there is a need to minimise diagnostic blood loss, to prevent iron deficiency, and to develop rational criteria for transfusion in preterm infants. PMID:8777681

  16. Multiple nutritional factors and the risk of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shiqian; Rayman, Margaret P

    2017-03-14

    Background Hashimoto's Thyroiditis (HT) is considered to be the most common autoimmune disease. It is currently accepted that genetic susceptibility, environmental factors and immune disorders contribute to its development. Regarding nutritional factors, evidence implicates high iodine intake, deficiencies of selenium and iron with a potential relevance of vitamin D status. To elucidate the role of nutritional factors in the risk, pathogenesis and treatment of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis (HT), PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched for publications on iodine, iron, selenium and vitamin D and risk/treatment of HT. Summary Iodine: Chronic exposure to excess iodine intake induces autoimmune thyroiditis, partly because highly-iodinated thyroglobulin is more immunogenic. Recent introduction of universal salt iodization can have a similar, though transient, effect. Iron: Iron deficiency impairs thyroid metabolism. Thyroid peroxidase (TPO), the enzyme responsible for the production of thyroid hormones is a heme (iron-containing) enzyme; it becomes active at the apical surface of thyrocytes only after binding heme. HT patients are frequently iron-deficient as autoimmune gastritis, which impairs iron absorption, is a common co-morbidity. Treatment of anemic women with impaired thyroid function with iron improved thyroid-hormone concentrations while thyroxine and iron together were more effective in improving iron status. Selenium: Selenoproteins are essential to thyroid action. In particular, the glutathione peroxidases protect the thyroid by removing excessive hydrogen peroxide produced there for thyroglobulin iodination. Genetic data implicate the anti-inflammatory selenoprotein S in HT risk. There is evidence from observational studies and randomized controlled trials that selenium/selenoproteins can reduce TPO-antibody titer, hypothyroidism and post-partum thyroiditis. Vitamin D: Lower vitamin D status has been found in HT patients than in controls and inverse

  17. Nutritional status in the era of target therapy: poor nutrition is a prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer with activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sehhoon; Park, Seongyeol; Lee, Se-Hoon; Suh, Beomseok; Keam, Bhumsuk; Kim, Tae Min; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Young Whan; Heo, Dae Seog

    2016-11-01

    Pretreatment nutritional status is an important prognostic factor in patients treated with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy. In the era of target therapies, its value is overlooked and has not been investigated. The aim of our study is to evaluate the value of nutritional status in targeted therapy. A total of 2012 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were reviewed and 630 patients with activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation treated with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) were enrolled for the final analysis. Anemia, body mass index (BMI), and prognostic nutritional index (PNI) were considered as nutritional factors. Hazard ratio (HR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for each group were calculated by Cox proportional analysis. In addition, scores were applied for each category and the sum of scores was used for survival analysis. In univariable analysis, anemia (HR, 1.29; p = 0.015), BMI lower than 18.5 (HR, 1.98; p = 0.002), and PNI lower than 45 (HR, 1.57; p nutritional status is a prognostic marker in NSCLC patients treated with EGFR TKI. Hence, baseline nutritional status should be more carefully evaluated and adequate nutrition should be supplied to these patients.

  18. [Prevalence and factors associated with non-nutritive sucking behavior. Cross sectional study among 5- to 6-year-old Senegalese children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngom, Papa Ibrahima; Diagne, Falou; Samba Diouf, Joseph; Ndiaye, Allé; Hennequin, Martine

    2008-06-01

    Sucking behaviours have been described in the literature under two facets i.e. nutritive and non nutritive. Nutritive sucking refers to breast feeding, bottle feeding or a combination of both. Non nutritive sucking habits are mentioned when children suck their thumb or another finger(s), a pacifier or any other object. Non nutritive sucking habits (NNSH) are suspected to potentially induce dentoalveolar anomalies and thus may constitute a public dental health problem. Anthropological and historical data suggest that non nutritive sucking habits are associated with modern pattern of life. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence and factors associated with NNSH in Senegalese children 5/6 years old. Data of this study were collected using a structured questionnaire administered by the investigators to mothers or caregivers of 443 children (231 boys and 212 girls) aged 5/6 years. Three types of data were collected: data on the social background of the children including place of residence (urban, suburban and rural) and the mother's occupation (workers, employee, executive, housewife), data regarding former and present sucking habits and information on the feeding pattern of the children when they were infants (breast feeding, bottle feeding or a combination of both). The results indicated a prevalence rate of 16.50% and 17.20% respectively for digit and pacifier sucking in this population. Also, a significant association was found between children's non nutritive sucking habits in one hand and the mothers' occupation and feeding pattern on the other hand. Breast fed children are less prone to develop a non nutritive sucking habit than bottle fed children. Longitudinal studies are necessary to verify the nature of these associations. The identification of factors associated with non nutritive sucking habits would permit to develop and target recommendations for the prevention of such habits.

  19. Pneumothorax in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome: focus on risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Terzic

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pneumothorax is a life threatening condition, more often seen in immature infants receiving mechanical ventilation. It carries a significant risk of death and impaired outcome.Objective: To determine predictive factors for the occurrence of pneumothorax in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS.Patients and methods: The present study was conducted in a tertiary research and educational hospital, NICU, Pediatric Clinic UKC Sarajevo, from January 2010 to December 2013. All infants had chest X-ray at admission, and were treated due to RDS with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP, mechanical ventilation, or high frequency oscillatory ventilation. At admission we registered data regarding birth weight, gestational age, Apgar score, prenatally given steroids. Inclusion criteria were fulfilled by 417 infants. Data about timing, circumstances, side and treatment of pneumothorax were gathered from medical records.Results: Mean birth weight was 1,477 g, mean gestational age 29.6 weeks. We report 98 infants who did not survive. We also report incidence of pneumothorax in 5% of the infants with RDS. In this study pneumothorax and non-pneumothorax groups didn’t differ regarding sex, gestational age (median 29 and 30 nor birth weight (p = 0.818. Apgar score at the 1st and 5th minute of life had no influence in genesis of pulmonary air leak, neither prenatally given steroids (p = 0.639, nor surfactant administration. There was a low coverage of preterm infants with prenatal steroids (overall 28.29%. We found that FiO2 ≥ 0.4 in the first 12 hours of life, and need for mechanical ventilation are predicting factors for developing pneumothorax (p < 0.05.Conclusion: Together with mechanical ventilation, inspired fraction of oxygen higher than 40%, needed to provide adequate oxygenation in the first 12 hours of life in preterm infants, could be a predictive factor in selecting the highest risk babies for development of

  20. 高位肠造瘘患儿营养治疗1例报告%Nutritional therapy for an infant with jejuno-colostomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王位苹; 汤庆娅

    2014-01-01

    目的:了解高位肠造瘘营养治疗对短肠综合征(SBS)患儿的作用。方法分析1例3月龄高位肠造瘘SBS患儿在关瘘前后的营养治疗过程,明确营养治疗对其预后的影响。结果肠外营养支持有利于SBS患儿维持生命,而合理的肠内营养可增强患儿的肠内耐受性,减少并发症,改善预后。结论合理的营养支持可减少SBS患儿并发症并改善其预后。%Objective To investigate the effect of nutritional therapy for an infant with short bowel syndrome (SBS) who had jejuno-colostomy. Methods An individualized nutritional support before and after the closure of jejunum colostomy was provided to a 3-month-old girl with SBS who had jejuno-colostomy so as to find out its influence on prognosis. Results Paren-teral nutrition is a life-saving therapy for infants with SBS. The proper enteral nutrition can improve intestinal tolerance and re-duce the incidence of postoperative complications, and improve outcomes of SBS infants. Conclusions Appropriate nutrition therapy is important to reduce the complications and improve the prognosis of SBS infants.

  1. Factors connected with professional satisfaction and dissatisfaction among nutrition teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Cleia Graziele Lima do Valle; Costa, Nilce Maria da Silva Campos

    2016-08-01

    Teacher satisfaction can be reflected in the success of higher education institutions to provide meaningful learning to their students. This study analyzed the professional satisfaction of nutrition teachers at a federal institution of higher education by identifying the factors that generated satisfaction and dissatisfaction for them and also the feelings that they envisioned for themselves at the end of their careers. This is a descriptive and exploratory study with a qualitative approach. A questionnaire and semi-structured interviews were performed. The results showed that 72.7% of the teachers were satisfied with their profession. In relation to satisfaction were considered: the fulfillment of a vocation; research and extension activities; the development and recognition of students and society; learning; autonomy; flexibility; and relationships with students. In relation to dissatisfaction were considered: overloading due to work, administration, bureaucratic duties and assistance; lack of interest and respect from students; relationships with colleagues and managers; devaluation in the role of teaching; large classes and poor physical infrastructure. The respondents expressed a positive attitude and had no desire to leave their profession. Further studies are required regarding factors leading to satisfaction and dissatisfaction for teachers, in order to contribute to their productivity and well-being.

  2. Onset and evolution of stunting in infants and children. Examples from the Human Nutrition Collaborative Research Support Program. Kenya and Egypt studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, C G; Harrison, G G

    1994-02-01

    The etiology of the early onset of stunting is diverse among populations of varying biological, environmental and cultural circumstances. This is exemplified within the Nutrition CRSP project, which took place in three different populations and ecological conditions. Within each study area a different mix and varying proportions of causative factors were identified. At least in Kenya, and probably in Mexico, the problem has its antecedents in prepregnancy and pregnancy. Powerful determinants of the infants' size at birth and during the first 6 months of life are maternal size upon entry into pregnancy, and weight and fat gain during pregnancy and lactation. In all three countries a low pregnancy weight gain was observed. Notably in Kenya, where the energy intake of the mother decreases progressively throughout pregnancy, not only do mothers gain only half as much as European or North American women, but they even lose weight and fat in the last month of pregnancy, and some mothers gain no weight or lose weight during the whole of pregnancy. Mothers in Kenya start lactation with relatively poor fat stores. Although their energy intake increases somewhat during lactation, preliminary estimates suggest that these increases may be insufficient to maintain their bodily integrity, to carry out their normal tasks of daily living, and to produce a sufficient amount of milk for optimal infant growth. In addition to an energy deficit, diet quality is a problem, particularly in Kenya and Mexico and less so in Egypt. Intakes of animal products and animal protein are very low. Zinc and iron intakes are not only low, but the bioavailability of these nutrients is poor because of the high phytate, fiber and tea content of the diet. Also vitamin B12 intake is extremely low, and at least mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency (IDD) is present in Kenya. The above micronutrients have been demonstrated to affect the linear growth of the Kenyan children, even after confounding factors have

  3. Nutrition risk factors among home delivered and congregate meal participants: need for enhancement of nutrition education and counseling among home delivered meal participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, S; Bai, Y; Piemonte, J

    2011-11-01

    The short-term impact of nutrition education and counseling intervention on nutrition risk factors among home delivered (HDM) and congregate (CGM) meal participants using Nutrition Survey Risk Screening was studied. A two-year intervention was conducted with 355 participants (n=259 CGM, n=96 HDM). Various nutrition behaviors that affect the nutrition risk score were compared. Congregate and home delivered meal locations in a northern county of New Jersey. CGM and HDM participants in a northern county of New Jersey age 60 and older. CGM participants received regular topical nutrition education and counseling in a classroom format with cooking demo, discussion, and handouts. The HDM participants only received the printed material (same handouts) and counseling by telephone. Demographics, medical condition, risk factors data were collected. All participants completed the 12 items checklist Nutrition Survey Risk Screening. Nutritional behaviors assessed include number of meals eaten per day, servings of fruits and vegetables and nutrition risk score. A score of 6 or more points was defined as persons at high risk nutritionally. The impact of the intervention was evaluated using ANOVA/chi-square on Nutrition Survey Risk Screening. Nutrition education and counseling intervention improved nutrition risk scores; 5.76 to 5.32 (p=0.14) in CGM, 8.1 to 6.1 (peffective nutrition education and counseling.

  4. Contributing death factors in very low-birth-weight infants by path method analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Ghojazadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neonatal deaths account for 40% of deaths under the age of 5 years worldwide. Therefore, efforts to achieve the UN Millennium Development Goal 4 of reducing childhood mortality by two-thirds by 2015 are focused on reducing neonatal deaths in high-mortality countries. The aim of present study was to determine death factors among very low-birth-weight infants by path method analysis. Materials and Methods: In this study, medical records of 2,135 infants admitted between years 2008 and 2010 in neonatal intense care unit of Alzahra Educational-Medical centre (Tabriz, Iran were analysed by path method using statistical software SPSS 18. Results: Variables such as duration of hospitalisation, birth weight, gestational age have negative effect on infant mortality, and gestational blood pressure has positive direct effect on infant mortality that at whole represented 66.5% of infant mortality variance (F = 1018, P < 0.001. Gestational age termination in the positive form through birth weight, and also gestational blood pressure in negative form through hospitalisation period had indirect effect on infant mortality. Conclusion: The results of the study indicated that the duration of low-birth-weight infant′s hospitalisation is also associated with infant′s mortality (coefficient -0.7; P < 0.001. This study revealed that among the maternal factors only gestational blood pressure was in relationship with infants′ mortality.

  5. Relationship of nutritional factors to the cause, dissolution, and prevention of canine uroliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, C A; Polzin, D J; Lulich, J P; Kruger, J M; Johnston, G R; O'Brien, T D; Felice, L J

    1989-05-01

    Nutritional factors play a variable role in the etiopathogenesis of canine struvite, ammonium urate, cysteine, calcium oxalate, and silica uroliths. Knowledge of these factors allows modification of diets to promote dissolution of selected minerals within uroliths.

  6. Use of food labels, awareness of nutritional programmes and participation in the special supplemental program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC): results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2005-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcicki, Janet M; Heyman, Melvin B

    2013-07-01

    Use of nutritional labels in choosing food is associated with healthier eating habits including lower fat intake. Current public health efforts are focusing on the revamping of nutritional labels to make them easier to read and use for the consumer. The study aims to assess the frequency of use of nutritional labels and awareness of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) nutritional programmes by low-income women including those participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) as surveyed in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006. Many low-income women do not regularly use the nutrition facts panel information on the food label and less than half had heard of the USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans (38.9%). In multivariate logistic regression, we found that WIC participation was associated with reduced use of the nutrition facts panel in choosing food products [odds ratio (OR) 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.22-0.91], the health claims information (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.32-0.28) and the information on carbohydrates when deciding to buy a product (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.20-0.97) in comparison with WIC eligible non-participants. Any intervention to improve use of nutritional labels and knowledge of the USDA's nutritional programmes needs to target low-income women, including WIC participants. Future studies should evaluate possible reasons for the low use of nutrition labels among WIC participants in comparison with eligible non-participants.

  7. The Differential Effect of Traditional Risk Factors on Infant Birthweight among Blacks and Whites in Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, James W., Jr.; Davis, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes the effects of the following factors on low birth weight of 103,072 Black and White infants in Chicago: (1) median family income; (2) maternal age; (3) education; and (4) marital status. Concludes that family income shows racial disparity and that traditional risk factors do not completely explain racial differences in neonatal outcome.…

  8. Hypothyroidism Among Military Infants Born in Countries of Varied Iodine Nutrition Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    1.9 billion people, 31% of the world’s population, live in areas of iodine deficiency [1]. Iodine deficiency disorders affect over 200 million people...iodine nutrition varies between countries. Early public health efforts focused on severe iodine deficiency with the goal of preventing goiter and cretin...NHANES) III, performed from 1988 to 1994, the World Health Organization (WHO) has classified US iodine intake as “more than adequate” [3]. However, the

  9. Cot deaths in Edinburgh: infant feeding and socioeconomic factors.

    OpenAIRE

    Mason, J K; Harkness, R. A.; Elton, R.A.; Bartholomew, S

    1980-01-01

    One hundred and twenty-six consecutive cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in the Edinburgh area have been studied with particular reference to the interrelationship of feeding, associated biochemical changes, and social status. There was an excess of cases born to parents in Social Classes IV and V: the effect was maximal in children who dies beyond 12 weeks of age. A low-grade uraemia was discovered in approximately one-fifth of the cases; analysis showed this to be related most st...

  10. Alimentación infantil en países con diferentes grados de desarrollo económico : biomarcadores y factores nutricionales clave en la salud del niño = Infant feeding in countries with different degrees of economic development : biomarkers and nutritional factors key in child health

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Palacios, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    Honduras es un país de la región centroamericana considerado por la FAO como de ingresos medios-bajos, lo que indica que ciertos grupos de población rural, indígenas, o pobres, y especialmente la infantil, se encuentran en riesgo de desnutrición. El promedio de desnutrición crónica en la región, asciende hasta el 80% en comunidades vulnerables. En este contexto, el objetivo general de esta Tesis Doctoral ha sido diseñar herramientas, así como identificar y evaluar los principales factores que...

  11. Mortality risk factors among HIV-exposed infants in rural and urban Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerma, Ragna S; Wit, Ferdinand W N M; Orock, Sammy Oben; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Hartdorff, Caroline M; Bakia, Affuenti; van Hensbroek, Michael Boele

    2015-02-01

    HIV-exposed infants, including those who do not become infected, have higher morbidity and mortality rates than HIV unexposed infants. The underlying mechanisms of this difference are largely unknown. The objective of this study was to identify the risk factors for mortality among HIV-exposed (infected as well as uninfected) infants in a prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) programme in Cameroon. We analysed the data from 319 mother-infant pairs included in a PMTCT programme at a rural and an urban hospital between 2004 and 2012. The programme offered free formula feeding, monthly follow-up visits and antiretroviral therapy (ART) according to national PMTCT guidelines. Mother-infant pairs were divided in three study groups, based on year of recruitment and study site: (I) rural hospital, 2004-07; (II) rural hospital, 2008-12; (III) urban hospital, 2008-12. Two hundred and eighty-five medical records were included in the final analysis. Infant mortality rates were 23.9%, 20.0% and 5.3% in group I, II and III, respectively (P = 0.02). Hazard ratios of infant mortality were 6.4 (P < 0.001) for prematurity, 4.6 (P = 0.04) for no maternal use of ARTs, 5.6 (P = 0.025) for mixed feeding, 2.7 for home deliveries (P = 0.087) and 0.4 (P = 0.138) for urban study group. In this programme, prematurity, no ART use, and the practice of mixed feeding were independent predictors of infant mortality. Mixed feeding and not using ART increased the hazard of death, probably through its increased risk of HIV infection. Although mortality rates were significantly higher in the rural area, rural setting was not a risk factor for infant mortality. These findings may contribute to the development of tailor-made programmes to reduce infant mortality rates among HIV-exposed infants. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Role of Protein and Amino Acids in Infant and Young Child Nutrition: Considerations for the Development and Delivery of High Quality Complementary Food Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shibani; Kurpad, Anura; Tano-Debrah, Kwaku; Otoo, Gloria E; Aaron, Grant A; Toride, Yasuhiko; Uauy, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of malnutrition in infants and children is multifaceted and requires the following: access to and intake of nutritious food starting at birth with exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 mo of life, continued breastfeeding in combination with complementary foods from 6-24 mo of age, access to clean drinking water and sanitation, and access to preventive and curative health care (including prenatal). Nutrient-dense complementary foods can improve nutritional status and have long-term benefits; however, in a review of plant-based complementary foods in developing countries, most of them failed to meet many micronutrient requirements. There is need to provide other cost-effective alternatives to increase the quality of the diet during the complementary feeding stage of the lifecycle. This paper provides an overview of the development, testing, efficacy and effectiveness of the delivery of KOKO Plus on the growth and nutritional status of infants 6-24 mo of age.

  13. Choline in infant formula and adult/pediatric nutritional Formula by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography/ Tandem mass spectrometry: AOAC First Action 2012.18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Frederic; Gimenez, Catherine; Fontannaz, Patric; Kilinc, Tamara; Campos-Giménez, Esther; Dowell, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    The method described below is for the determination of choline in infant formula and adult/pediatric nutritional formula by ultra high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The single-laboratory validation data were submitted to the Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN) Expert Review Panel (ERP) for review at the AOAC INTERNATIONAL Annual Meeting held September 30 to October 3, 2012 in Las Vegas, NV. The ERP determined that the data reviewed met the standard method performance requirements set by SPIFAN, and the method was approved as AOAC Official First Action. The analytical range was found to be between 0.16 and 3.2 microg/mL. The recovery rates were within 80-120% at 50 and 100% of native levels for all samples. Repeatability precision (RSDr) was < 3%, with intermediate reproducibility (RSDir) no higher than 4%.

  14. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2013. Scientific Opinion on nutrient requirements and dietary intakes of infants and young children in the European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver a Scientific Opinion on the nutrient requirements and dietary intakes of infants and young children in the European Union. This Opinion describes the dietary...... requirements of infants and young children, compares dietary intakes and requirements in infants and young children in Europe and, based on these findings, concludes on the potential role of young-child formulae in the diets of infants and young children, including whether they have any nutritional benefits...... when compared with other foods that may be included in the normal diet of infants and young children. The Panel concluded on the levels of nutrient and energy intakes that are considered adequate for the majority of infants and young children, and evaluated the risk of inadequate nutrient intakes...

  15. Alimentos utilizados ao longo da história para nutrir lactentes The history of infant nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Diez Castilho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Resgatar a história da alimentação infantil, com o intuito de compreender a prática da amamentação. FONTES DOS DADOS: O levantamento bibliográfico foi realizado nas bases MEDLINE, LILACS e SciELO, Internet, enciclopédias, livros científicos e leigos, literatura, arte e história. Foram consultados textos sobre os cuidados com lactentes em diferentes épocas, a história da Medicina, e artigos científicos recentes sobre nutrição infantil. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: Durante o período pré-industrial, os costumes pouco variaram, e a chance de sobrevivência estava relacionada ao aleitamento materno ou à sua substituição pelo leite de uma ama. Caso isso não fosse possível, os lactentes recebiam leite animal, alimentos pré-mastigados ou papas pobres em nutrientes e contaminadas, que determinavam altos índices de mortalidade. Nada podia substituir a amamentação com sucesso, e dela dependia a sobrevivência da espécie. Com a Revolução Industrial, as mulheres, que costumavam amamentar, foram trabalhar nas fábricas, motivando a busca de alternativas para nutrir os lactentes. O consumo de leite animal e fórmulas (diluídas, farinhas, leite em pó, bem como a introdução precoce de alimentos comprometeram a saúde das crianças. O movimento feminista e a pílula anticoncepcional determinaram queda da natalidade. As fábricas, visando o lucro, desenvolveram fórmulas modificadas e investiram em propaganda. A sociedade reagiu com um movimento de incentivo ao aleitamento. CONCLUSÕES: Atualmente, reconhecem-se as vantagens do leite materno, e recomenda-se aleitamento exclusivo até os 6 meses, complementado com outros alimentos a partir dessa idade até pelo menos os 2 anos. A alimentação infantil, natural ou artificial, sempre foi determinada e condicionada pelo valor social atribuído à amamentação.OBJECTIVE: To retrace the history of infant nutrition with the objective of better understanding breastfeeding. SOURCES

  16. Bowel Perforation in Premature Infants with Necrotizing Enterocolitis: Risk Factors and Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We aim to determine risk factors and clinical outcomes for bowel perforation in premature infants with NEC. We analyzed clinical data of 57 cases of premature infants with NEC at our NICU between January 2010 and December 2012. Based on the presence of bowel perforation, we divided these infants into two groups: perforated NEC group (n=10 and nonperforated NEC group (n=47. We compared general information, clinical characteristics, and laboratory findings between groups. The perforated NEC group, compared to the nonperforated NEC group, had significantly lesser gestational age, lower birth weight, higher prevalence of apnea, mechanical ventilation, sepsis and shock, lower blood pH, higher levels of blood glucose, abnormal WBC count and thrombocytopenia, and elevated CRP (all P<0.05. Moreover, the perforated NEC group had significantly longer durations of fasting and TPN usage, higher incidences of EUGR and cholestasis, longer duration of antibiotics, higher frequency of advanced antibiotics use, and poorer prognosis than the nonperforated NEC group (all P<0.05. Bowel perforation in premature infants with NEC was associated with multiple risk factors. Early identification of some of these risk factors in premature infants with NEC may help implement early intervention to reduce the incidence of bowel perforation and thereby improve the prognosis.

  17. Determination of Carotenoids in Infant, Pediatric, and Adult Nutritionals by HPLC with UV-Visible Detection: Single-Laboratory Validation, First Action 2017.04.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimpf, Karen J; Thompson, Linda D; Pan, Shang-Jing

    2017-09-12

    This reversed-phase HPLC method uses C30 chromatography and UV-Vis spectroscopy to determine cis and trans isomers of lutein, β-carotene, and lycopene in infant, pediatric, and adult nutritionals. Samples are saponified with a mixture of potassium hydroxide, tetrahydrofuran, and methanol, and carotenoids are extracted from saponified samples with 75 + 25 hexane-methyl tertiary butyl ether (MtBE). After extraction, a portion of the organic layer is evaporated to dryness, and the residue is dissolved in 75 + 25 10% butylated hydroxytoluene in methanol-MtBE. Prepared samples are injected into a C30 HPLC column where cis and trans isomers of lutein, β-carotene, and lycopene are separated with a methanol-MtBE gradient and detected with UV-Vis spectroscopy at 445 nm. Total carotenoid concentrations are calculated by comparison of sample peak areas with the areas of trans carotenoid standards of known concentration. During a single-laboratory validation of this method, total lutein repeatability and intermediate precision ranged from 1.89 to 14.9 and 1.93 to 14.0%, respectively, in infant and adult nutritional matrixes with concentrations >1 μg/100 g. Total β-carotene repeatability and intermediate precision ranged from 1.81 to 6.77 and 3.07 to 16.2%, respectively, in infant and adult nutritional matrixes with concentrations >1 μg/100 g, and total lycopene repeatability and intermediate precision ranged from 3.01 to 6.37 and 4.29 to 10.3%, respectively, in infant and adult nutritional matrixes with concentrations >1 μg/100 g. Mean overspike recoveries ranged from 90.3 to 95.3, 89.3 to 108, and 97.3 to 109% for lutein, β-carotene, and lycopene, respectively. The method also demonstrated good linearity. For lutein, r averaged 0.99991 over a standard range of approximately 10-250 µg/L trans-lutein. with average calibration errors of <1%. For β-carotene and lycopene, r averaged 0.99993 and 0.9998 over standard ranges of approximately 25-500 and 5-100 µg/L with

  18. Diet, Activity, and Overweight Among Preschool-Age Children Enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer A. Nelson, MPH; Kathleen Carpenter, MS, RD, CDN; Mary Ann Chiasson, DrPH

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Overweight is affecting children at younger ages and in increasing numbers, putting them at risk for a lifetime of chronic disease. Consumption of unhealthy foods and time spent watching television have increased concurrently. Methods Parents of 526 children aged 2 to 4 years old enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) answered questions about their children’s food and beverage consumption, television-viewing and computer...

  19. Determination of vitamin B12 in infant formula and adult nutritionals by surface plasmon resonance: First Action 2011.16 (test kit method).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Pathik; O'Kane, Anthony A; Dowell, Dawn

    2012-01-01

    At the "Standards Development and International Harmonization: AOAC INTERNATIONAL Mid-Year Meeting" on June 29, 2011, an Expert Review Panel (ERP) agreed to further examine AOAC Official Method 2011.01, "Determination of Vitamin B12 by Surface Plasmon Resonance," for use with infant formula and adult nutritionals. The original collaborative study was conducted using the Biacore Q biosensor instrument and the Biacore Q Qflex Kit Vitamin B12 PI. Samples included in the study were infant formula, cereals, premixes, vitamin tablets, dietary supplements, and baby food. Eleven laboratories participated in the collaborative study. The results demonstrated a repeatability RSD (RSDr) of 1.59-27.8 and HorRat values for reproducibility of 0.34-1.89 in samples with levels ranging from ppm to ppb. The assay studied is a label-free protein binding-based assay that uses the principle of surface plasmon resonance to measure the interaction between vitamin B12 and a specific binding protein by passing a portion of the prepared sample extract combined with binding protein solution across a functionalized sensor chip. The response from the functionalized sensor chip is given as free-binding protein, as the mixture binds to the prepared surface of the chip. The ready-to-use Qflex Kit Vitamin B12 PI provides the reagents and accessories necessary to perform this assay. AOAC Method 2011.01 was approved by the AOAC Method Committee on Food Nutrition for Official First Action status, applicable to a wide range of food products, dietary supplements, and multivitamin premixes. After evaluation of the validation data available, an ERP agreed in June 2011 that the method meets standard method performance requirements, as articulated by the Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals. The ERP granted the method First Action status, applicable to infant formula and adult/pediatric nutritional formula.

  20. Maternal lifestyle and nutritional status in relation to pregnancy and infant health outcomes in Western China: protocol for a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Li; Pan, Xiong-Fei; Lee, Andy H; Binns, Colin W; Yang, Chun-Xia; Sun, Xin

    2017-06-19

    Improving the health and nutrition of women and children is a priority for Western China, where the economy is less developed. Due to the dynamic nature of lifestyle, modern food habits and nutrition, there is a need to update our limited knowledge and understanding of maternal lifestyle and nutritional status and their impact on pregnancy and infant health outcomes. While breast milk is the preferred feeding option, infant formula use is widespread in China. It is thus necessary to examine the effects of formula consumption on growth and morbidity. This is an ongoing prospective cohort study started in 2015 in Chengdu, Sichuan Province. A sample of 1901 pregnant women at 15-20 weeks of gestation were recruited from four maternal and child health hospitals and are followed prospectively to 12 months post partum. Detailed information on maternal lifestyle and nutritional status, obstetric complications, pregnancy outcomes, infant feeding practices, illnesses of the mother and infant and growth trajectory is collected through personal interviews, anthropometric measures and medical records and local health management system records retrieval. Multilevel mixed regression models, adjusted for clustering, will be applied to investigate the association between various exposure variables of interest and the longitudinal outcomes, taking into account the correlated data structure and the nesting of observations. Kaplan-Meier test and Cox regression analysis will be used to analyse the time-to-event data. Ethical approval has been obtained from the ethics committee of West China School of Public Health, Sichuan University and the Human Research Ethics Committee of Curtin University. Results will be presented at national and international conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Medical Evaluation of the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and Children. Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs, United States Senate, Ninety-Fourth Congress, 2d Session. Committee Print.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs.

    This paper reports a medical evaluation of a federal program providing funds for special nutritious food supplements to low income pregnant and lactating women, infants, and children up to four years of age who are nutritional risks. Growth, dietary intake, and biochemical measures were obtained for study infants at the time of enrollment in the…

  2. Energetic and nutritional constraints on infant brain development: implications for brain expansion during human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnane, Stephen C; Crawford, Michael A

    2014-12-01

    The human brain confronts two major challenges during its development: (i) meeting a very high energy requirement, and (ii) reliably accessing an adequate dietary source of specific brain selective nutrients needed for its structure and function. Implicitly, these energetic and nutritional constraints to normal brain development today would also have been constraints on human brain evolution. The energetic constraint was solved in large measure by the evolution in hominins of a unique and significant layer of body fat on the fetus starting during the third trimester of gestation. By providing fatty acids for ketone production that are needed as brain fuel, this fat layer supports the brain's high energy needs well into childhood. This fat layer also contains an important reserve of the brain selective omega-3 fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), not available in other primates. Foremost amongst the brain selective minerals are iodine and iron, with zinc, copper and selenium also being important. A shore-based diet, i.e., fish, molluscs, crustaceans, frogs, bird's eggs and aquatic plants, provides the richest known dietary sources of brain selective nutrients. Regular access to these foods by the early hominin lineage that evolved into humans would therefore have helped free the nutritional constraint on primate brain development and function. Inadequate dietary supply of brain selective nutrients still has a deleterious impact on human brain development on a global scale today, demonstrating the brain's ongoing vulnerability. The core of the shore-based paradigm of human brain evolution proposes that sustained access by certain groups of early Homo to freshwater and marine food resources would have helped surmount both the nutritional as well as the energetic constraints on mammalian brain development.

  3. Nutrition Economic Evaluation of Allergy Treatment in Infants and Children: background for probiotic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soili Alanne

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of food allergy is based on avoidance of the foods, which cause symptoms, and their replacement with nutritionally comparable foods. The cost of food allergy and elimination diets to families and society is poorly known. Our results suggest that estimation of dietary costs on the basis of dietary records was possible but challenging. In infancy, cost differences were small but vary depending on the age group with the reduction of median yearly costs around 180–240€. Thus, further studies are required for a more accurate cost estimate and an estimation of the impact of specific probiotics.

  4. NUTRITION DURING PREGNANCY

    OpenAIRE

    Banjari, Ines

    2015-01-01

    The health of the new-born is largely a function of the mother's nutritional, general and reproductive health status. Therefore, pregnancy is considered as a critical window in child’s growth and development. Several characteristics of a woman prior or in early pregnancy, as well as external, environmental factors affect pregnancy outcomes. External factors account for 30% of the pregnancy outcome and infant's birth weight, and mother’s diet during pregnancy is one of the most important ones....

  5. 危重早产儿肠外营养支持研究进展%Research Progress of Parenteral Nutrition Support in Premature Infants with Heavy Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄剑飞

    2013-01-01

    Because of the organ hypoplasia,premature infants suffer from malnutrition easily. The application of parenteral nutrition support in premature infants can significantly improve the survival rate and quality of life. The parenteral nutrition support include the infusion of glucose, amino acids, fat, electrolyte, vitamin and trace elements. The infusion pathways mainly include peripheral intravenous infusion and central intravenous infusion. Here is to make a review on the research progress of parenteral nutrition support in premature infants.%危重早产儿由于器官功能发育不全,出生后往往容易出现营养不良的情况,肠外营养支持在危重早产儿治疗中的应用能显著提高早产儿的存活率和生存质量.肠外营养支持主要包括葡萄糖、氨基酸、脂肪以及电解质、维生素和多种微量元素的输注,输注途径主要包括经外周静脉输注和经中心静脉输注两大途径.现对危重早产儿肠外营养支持的研究进展进行综述.

  6. Relationship between Matern al Nutritional Status and Infant Birth Weight of Vegetarians in DKI Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Fikawati

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Infant’s birth weight, especially low birth weight (LBW, areintergenerational issues that will affect the cycle of life.Vegetarian diets are at risk because limited food consumption could cause nutrient deficiencies. This retrospective studyaims to determine the relationship between maternal nutritional status (pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI and weight gain during pregnancy and infant’s birth weight among vegetarians in Jakarta. The total sample of 85 children aged 1 month to 5 years was selected purposively. Results showed that the mean of pre-pregnancy BMI of vegetarian mothers is 20.2 kg/m2 (±2.2 kg/m2, pregnancy weight gain is 15.5 kg (±6.4 kg and infant’s birth weight is 3212 gs (±417.7 gs. Pre-pregnancy BMI and pregnancy weight gain were significantly associated with infant’s birth weight of vegetarians. There is no relationship between pre-pregnancy BMI and pregnancy weight gain. Multivariate analysis found that pre-pregnancy BMI, protein, vitamin B12, iron, and Zn intakes and sex has relationship with infant’s birthweight. It is recommended that vegetarian mothers should get information about the importance of pre-pregnancy nutrition, optimal pregnancy weight gain, and maintaining adequate intake of protein, vitamin B12, iron, and Zn during pregnancy

  7. 早产儿早期应用静脉营养的研究进展%Progress of early intravenous nutrition in preterm infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘秀丽

    2011-01-01

    In recent years,premature nutritional problems is newborn pediatric paramount concenrn problem.For three material(glucose,protein and fat)metabolism and utilization.premature infants has its own characteristics.In order to avoid side effect,classic parenteral nutrition plan provide for fat emulsion and amino acid gradually,but make premature infants in poor nutrition state.Recent clinical studies have shown that early nutrition is particularly important.Premature infants bom in 24 hours has been given full amount vein nutrition could provide good basis of energy.and avoid associated complications.%早产儿的营养问题是近年来新生儿科极为关注的问题.对于三大物质(葡萄糖、蛋白质及脂肪)的代谢及利用,早产儿有其自身的特点.经典的静脉营养方案为了避免其对早产儿产生的不良反应,都是循序渐进地给予脂肪乳及氨基酸,但易使早产儿处于营养缺乏状态.近几年的临床研究表明,生后24h内即给予早产儿足量的静脉营养液不仅为早产儿的生长发育提供了良好的能量基础,而且不会使早产儿出现相关并发症.

  8. Preterm nutrition and the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramel, Sara E; Georgieff, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    The brain is the most highly metabolic organ in the preterm neonate and consumes the greatest amount of nutrient resources for its function and growth. As preterm infants survive at greater rates, neurodevelopment has become the primary morbidity outcome of interest. While many factors influence neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants, nutrition is of particular importance because the healthcare team has a great deal of control over its provision. Studies over the past 30 years have emphasized the negative neurodevelopmental consequences of poor nutrition and growth in the preterm infant. While all nutrients are important for brain development, certain ones including glucose, protein, fats (including long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids), iron, zinc, copper, iodine, folate and choline have particularly large roles in the preterm infant. They affect major brain processes such as neurogenesis, neuronal differentiation, myelination and synaptogenesis, all of which are proceeding at a rapid pace between 22 and 42 weeks' post-conception. At the macronutrient level, weight gain, linear growth (independent of weight gain) and head circumference growth are markers of nutritional status. Each has been associated with long-term neurodevelopment. The relationship of micronutrients to neurodevelopment in preterm infants is understudied in spite of the large effect these nutrients have in other young populations. Nutrients do not function alone to stimulate brain development, but rather in concert with growth factors, which in turn are dependent on adequate nutrient status (e.g. protein, zinc) as well as on physiologic status. Non-nutritional factors such as infection, corticosteroids, and inflammation alter how nutrients are accreted and distributed, and also suppress growth factor synthesis. Thus, nutritional strategies to optimize brain growth and development include assessment of status at birth, aggressive provision of nutrients that are critical in this time

  9. Nutrition myths - the factor influencing the quality of children's diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slávka Mrosková

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyse the influence of parents' belief in nutrition myths on the frequency of their serving certain foods to their children. Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Survey carried out with 297 respondents - parents of children aged 5-18 years. The data collection took place between September 2013 and December 2014. The questionnaire focussed on 14 nutrition myths related to selected foods (milk, dairy products, meat, offal, fruit, vegetables, eggs, fish, legumes, soya, and flour dishes. At the same time, the parents reported the frequency of their serving the monitored foods to their children. In the statistical analysis, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used. Results: For nine nutrition myths we found significant negative coefficients between a certain nutrition myth and the frequency of the serving of the food. The nutrition myths related to the consumption of fish (r = -0.328, eggs (r = -0.203, soya (r = -0.301; -0.290, offal (r = -0.155, meat (r = -0.128, milk (r = -0.272; -0.254, and fruit/vegetables (r = -0.104. Conclusion: The belief in nutrition myths appears to be a determinant modifying parental behaviour and subsequently the quality of children's diets.

  10. Supply- and Demand-Side Factors Influencing Utilization of Infant and Young Child Feeding Counselling Services in Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuong H; Kim, Sunny S; Nguyen, Tuan T; Tran, Lan M; Hajeebhoy, Nemat; Frongillo, Edward A; Ruel, Marie T; Rawat, Rahul; Menon, Purnima

    2016-01-01

    Adequate utilization of services is critical to maximize the impact of counselling on infant and young child feeding (IYCF), but little is known about factors affecting utilization. Our study examined supply- and demand-side factors associated with the utilization of IYCF counselling services in Viet Nam. We used survey data from mothers with children Higher maternal education was associated with higher utilization both for one-time and repeated use. Being a farmer, belonging to an ethnic minority, and having a wasted child were associated with greater likelihood of achieving the minimum recommended number of visits, whereas child stunting or illness were not. Distance to health center was a barrier to repeated visits. Among supply-side factors, good counselling skills (PR: 1.3-1.8) was the most important factor associated with any service use, whereas longer employment duration and greater work pressure of health center staff were associated with lower utilization. Population attributable risk estimations showed that an additional 25% of the population would have achieved the minimum number of visits if exposed to three demand-generation strategies, and further increased to 49% if the health staff had good counseling skills and low work pressure. Our study provides evidence that demand-generation strategies are essential to increase utilization of facility-based IYCF counselling services in Viet Nam, and may be relevant for increasing and sustaining use of nutrition services in similar contexts.

  11. Genetic and environmental factors in associations between infant growth and adult cardiometabolic risk profile in twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touwslager, Robbert N H; Gielen, Marij; Mulder, Antonius L M; Gerver, Willem J M; Zimmermann, Luc J; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Houben, Alfons J H M; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Derom, Catherine; Vlietinck, Robert; Loos, Ruth J F; Zeegers, Maurice P

    2013-10-01

    Accelerated infant growth is associated with an altered, mostly adverse adult cardiometabolic risk profile. The importance of genetic and environmental factors to these associations is unclear. The objective was to examine the importance of genetic and environmental factors in the associations between infant growth and adult cardiometabolic risk factors (anthropometric characteristics, lipids, insulin sensitivity, leptin, blood pressure, and fibrinogen) in twins. Cardiometabolic risk factors were assessed in 240 twin pairs (aged 18-34 y) from the East Flanders Prospective Twin Survey. Infant growth was defined as change in weight z score. We regressed intrapair differences in growth during 4 growth windows (0-1, 1-6, 6-12, and 12-24 mo) against intrapair differences in the risk factors in monozygotic and dizygotic twins separately. Within monozygotic twin pairs only, associations between infant growth and most adult lipids, glucose, leptin, and blood pressure (eg, systolic blood pressure: b = 5.95 mm Hg per change in z score, P = 0.01 in monozygotic twins; b = -1.64, P = 0.82 in dizygotic twins from 12 to 24 mo) were found. Within dizygotic twin pairs only, associations between growth and triglycerides and fibrinogen (eg, fibrinogen: b = 0.07 ln mg/dL per change in z score, P = 0.31 in monozygotic twins; b = 0.79, P = 0.01 in dizygotic twins from 0 to 1 mo) were identified. Most associations showed a detrimental effect of accelerated growth, but beneficial associations were also identified (eg, total-to-high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol ratio: b = -0.22 per change in z score from 1 to 6 mo, P = 0.008 in monozygotic twins). Our data showed that environmental factors play a role in the associations between infant growth and most adult lipids, glucose, leptin, and blood pressure, whereas genetic factors are involved regarding triglycerides and fibrinogen.

  12. Promoting Healthy Growth or Feeding Obesity? The Need for Evidence-Based Oversight of Infant Nutritional Supplement Claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Lampl

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD model recognizes growth in infancy and childhood as a fundamental determinant of lifespan health. Evidence of long-term health risks among small neonates who subsequently grow rapidly poses a challenge for interventions aiming to support healthy growth, not merely drive weight gain. Defining healthy growth beyond “getting bigger” is essential as infant and young child feeding industries expand. Liquid-based nutritional supplements, originally formulated for undernourished children, are increasingly marketed for and consumed by children generally. Clarifying the nature of the evidentiary base on which structure/function claims promoting “healthy growth” are constructed is important to curb invalid generalizations. Evidence points to changing social beliefs and cultural practices surrounding supplementary feeding, raising specific concerns about the long-term health consequences of an associated altered feeding culture, including reduced dietary variety and weight gain. Reassessing the evidence for and relevance of dietary supplements’ “promoting healthy growth” claims for otherwise healthy children is both needed in a time of global obesity and an opportunity to refine intervention approaches among small children for whom rapid subsequent growth in early life augments risk for chronic disease. Scientific and health care partnerships are needed to consider current governmental oversight shortfalls in protecting vulnerable populations from overconsumption. This is important because we may be doing more harm than good.

  13. Promoting Healthy Growth or Feeding Obesity? The Need for Evidence-Based Oversight of Infant Nutritional Supplement Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampl, Michelle; Mummert, Amanda; Schoen, Meriah

    2016-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) model recognizes growth in infancy and childhood as a fundamental determinant of lifespan health. Evidence of long-term health risks among small neonates who subsequently grow rapidly poses a challenge for interventions aiming to support healthy growth, not merely drive weight gain. Defining healthy growth beyond “getting bigger” is essential as infant and young child feeding industries expand. Liquid-based nutritional supplements, originally formulated for undernourished children, are increasingly marketed for and consumed by children generally. Clarifying the nature of the evidentiary base on which structure/function claims promoting “healthy growth” are constructed is important to curb invalid generalizations. Evidence points to changing social beliefs and cultural practices surrounding supplementary feeding, raising specific concerns about the long-term health consequences of an associated altered feeding culture, including reduced dietary variety and weight gain. Reassessing the evidence for and relevance of dietary supplements’ “promoting healthy growth” claims for otherwise healthy children is both needed in a time of global obesity and an opportunity to refine intervention approaches among small children for whom rapid subsequent growth in early life augments risk for chronic disease. Scientific and health care partnerships are needed to consider current governmental oversight shortfalls in protecting vulnerable populations from overconsumption. This is important because we may be doing more harm than good. PMID:27845744

  14. Environmental and nutritional factors affecting geosmin synthesis by Anabaena sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadoun, I M; Schrader, K K; Blevins, W T

    2001-04-01

    A cyanobacterium isolated from a source-water reservoir during a spring odor and taste episode and identified as Anabaena sp. consistently produced geosmin during laboratory culture on modified BG-11 liquid medium. Maximal geosmin/biomass occurred at 20 degrees C and a light intensity of 17 microE/m2/s; geosmin/chla values directly correlated with increasing light intensity (r2 = 0.95, P geosmin synthesis; at 17 microE/m2/s, increasing temperature stimulates chla production (to 25 degrees C) while repressing geosmin synthesis (above 20 degrees C). Nutritional factors promoting biomass, chla, and geosmin synthesis by Anabaena sp. were also investigated. For cultures grown at 17 microE/m2/s and 20 degrees C for 20 days, both ammonium-N and nitrate-N generally enhanced the growth of Anabaena sp. Nitrate-N promoted more chla production (r2 = 0.99) than ammonium-N. Geosmin synthesis was directly correlated with ammonium-N concentrations (r2 = 0.89), with low nitrate-N (123.5 micrograms/l) favoring maximal geosmin production (2.8 micrograms/l). Increasing nitrate-N concentrations promoted a three-fold increase in chla content with geosmin synthesis decreased by two-fold. Geosmin/mg biomass was directly related to ammonium-N concentration; high nitrate-N levels suppressed geosmin production. No geosmin was detected at or below 118 micrograms phosphate-phosphorus/l. Geosmin, dry weight biomass, and chla production were correlated with increasing phosphorus (P) concentration (r2 = 0.76, 0.96 and 0.98, respectively). No geosmin was detected when copper was present in growth media at or above 6.92 micrograms Cu2+/l (CuSO4.5H2O). Dry weight biomass and chla production were negatively correlated with Cu2+ ion concentrations.

  15. Reflux and GERD in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z Celiac Disease Eosinophilic Esophagitis Inflammatory Bowel Disease Nutrition & Obesity Reflux & GERD Reflux & GERD in Infants Symptoms & Diagnosis ... Nutrition (NASPGHAN) Celiac Disease Eosinophilic Esophagitis Pediatric IBD Nutrition & Obesity Reflux & GERD Research & Grants Our Supporters Site Map © ...

  16. Nutritional status and its health-related factors among older adults in rural and urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Su-Hui; Cheng, Hsin-Yi; Chuang, Yeu-Hui; Shao, Jung-Hua

    2015-01-01

    To compare health-related characteristics, nutrition-related factors and nutritional status of older adults living in rural and urban counties of Taiwan. The older adult population of Taiwan is increasing. Furthermore, older people living in rural areas have shorter life expectancy and more chronic diseases than their urban counterparts. However, little is known about the health-related characteristics, nutrition-related factors and nutritional status of older adults living in rural and urban areas of Taiwan, limiting nurses' ability to identify and care for older adults at risk of poor nutritional health. Cross-sectional, comparative. Older adults were randomly selected from names of residents of an adjacent rural and urban area of northern Taiwan and having completing the 2009 health evaluation. From March-July 2010, older adult participants (N = 366) provided data on demographic and health-related information, nutritional self-efficacy, health locus of control and nutritional status. Data were analysed by descriptive statistics and compared using chi-square and t-test. Older rural participants had significantly lower educational level, less adequate income, higher medication use, lower scores on self-rated health status and researcher-rated health status and lower self-rated healthy eating status than their urban counterparts. Moreover, rural participants had significantly lower nutritional self-efficacy, higher chance health locus of control and poorer nutritional status than their urban counterparts. Our results suggest that nurses should assess older adults living in rural areas for nutritional health and nutrition knowledge. Based on this assessment, nurses should develop easy, practical and accessible nutritional programmes for this population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Nutritional status and related factors of patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyan; Lu, Yuhan; Fang, Yu

    2014-04-14

    The scored Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) is considered to be the most appropriate tool for detecting malnutrition in cancer patients. In particular, malignant tumours derived from the gastrointestinal tract may impair nutrient intake and absorption and cause malnutrition. We carried out a cross-sectional study to assess the nutritional status and related factors of patients with gastrointestinal cancer. Nutritional status was determined using the scored PG-SGA in patients (n 498) with advanced gastrointestinal cancer admitted to the Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology Unit at Beijing Cancer Hospital between 1 August 2012 and 28 February 2013. The possible related factors including age, sex, hospitalisation frequency and pathology were explored. We found that 98% of the patients required nutrition intervention and 54% of the patients required improved nutrition-related symptom management and/or urgent nutritional support (PG-SGA score ≥9). Factors related to malnutrition were age (r 0.103, Pcancer had a lower risk of malnutrition than patients with other types of gastrointestinal cancer (F=35.895, Pnutritional status of gastrointestinal patients, especially those at a higher risk of malnutrition, such as elderly patients, those hospitalised for the first time, male patients and those with other types of gastrointestinal cancer except rectal cancer. The nutritional status of these patients should be evaluated and they should be given proper nutrition education and nutritional support in a timely manner.

  18. Study on the risk factors related vertical transmission of HBV positive couples to their infant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张荣莲

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the risk factors and the rate of HBV vertical transmission from HBsAg-positive couple to their infant. Methods 46 families who had antenatal examination at Fujian Provincial Maternal and Child Health Hospital during August 2010 and November 2011 were

  19. Feeding practices in infants: ritual factors dominating mother's education - a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: Ritual and customary factors have much impact then mother's education on breast feeding practices of infants. Apart from education, breast feeding awareness programme should be increased including both literate and illiterate mothers. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(4.000: 1642-1647

  20. Risk Factors for Gross Motor Dysfunction in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Suzanne H.; Eldridge, Bev J.; Galea, Mary P.; Harris, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    Infants with congenital heart disease (CHD) that is severe enough to require early surgery are at risk for cognitive and motor delays, as well as musculoskeletal impairments, and are best managed by an interdisciplinary team during their hospital stay and after discharge. The purpose of this article is to review some of the risk factors associated…

  1. Risk Factors for Gross Motor Dysfunction in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Suzanne H.; Eldridge, Bev J.; Galea, Mary P.; Harris, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    Infants with congenital heart disease (CHD) that is severe enough to require early surgery are at risk for cognitive and motor delays, as well as musculoskeletal impairments, and are best managed by an interdisciplinary team during their hospital stay and after discharge. The purpose of this article is to review some of the risk factors associated…

  2. Diagnosis and Risk Factors of Acute Kidney Injury in Very Low Birth Weight Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankana Daga

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: The determination of AKI using the pRIFLE and AKIN criteria yielded different results. pRIFLE appears to be more sensitive in VLBW infants. A high CRIB II score was recorded for AKI. Future studies are necessary to develop a uniform definition and identify the risk factors to improve the outcomes in this population.

  3. Drug-Exposed Infant Cases in Juvenile Court: Risk Factors and Court Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagatun-Edwards, Inger; Saylor, Coleen

    2000-01-01

    This longitudinal study of social services and juvenile court files identified factors associated with court outcomes for drug exposed infants (N=118). Regression analysis suggested that mothers' compliance with court orders was the major predictor of court outcomes although chi square analysis found ethnicity, past referrals, and criminal record…

  4. Comparison of Risk Factors in Necrotizing Enterocolitis among Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

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    Ferda Ozlu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Necrotizing enterocolitis is one of the important problems of premature infants. The incidence is about 1-5% in infants followed in neonatal care units and inversely related to gestational age and birth weight. Materials and Methods: In this study, 31 infants with necrotizing enterocolitis and 31 infants with similar gestational age and birth weight as control group hospitalized in Cukurova University Neonatal Care Unit between 1 January 2001-31 January 2004 were evaluated. Results: The incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis in this period was 1.4 (31/2214 admission. Mean gestational age was 30.5  3.2 weeks (25-36, mean birth weight was 1331  384 (730-2150 grams while 71% was younger than 32 gestational weeks and 67.7% was under 1500 grams. The signs of NEC were detected at a mean of 11.2  10. (2-38 days. Twenty-six (83.9% were being fed at the time of the necrotizing enterocolitis signs appeared. According to the Walsh and Kliegman classification, 19 (61.3% infants were in stage 1 (17 were 1a, 2 were 1b; 3 (9.6% infants were in stage 2a, 9 (%29.1 infants were in stage 3 (7 were in 3b. Blood culture was positive in 7 (%22.6 infants with predominance of gram negative microorganisms (5 infants. Eleven (%35.5 infants were exitus, 12 were discharged. Hypoxia, respiratory distress syndrome, intraventricular hemorrhage and umbilical catheterization were significant risk factors in necrotizing enterocolitis . Thrombocytopenia, leucopenia and high C-reactive protein levels were significantly high in necrotizing enterocolitis group. Breast feeding is significantly high in control group. Conclusion: Necrotizing enterocolitis, is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in neonatal intensive care units. Early breast feeding with small amounts, increasing amount of milk slowly, antenatal steroids, caring hygiene rules can prevent the development of it. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 642-647

  5. Factors influencing nutrition education for patients with low literacy skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macario, E; Emmons, K M; Sorensen, G; Hunt, M K; Rudd, R E

    1998-05-01

    Although there has been increasing attention to cancer prevention among low-income and minority populations, only a few nutrition interventions have addressed the special needs of people with low literacy skills. To determine the best provider and the most effective format for a nutrition intervention targeting patients with low literacy skills, we conducted interviews with literacy experts and health care providers and focus groups with members of adult basic education classes. Thirty-five literacy experts and health-center-based physicians, nurses, and nutritionists in Boston, Mass, were interviewed. In addition, 50 volunteer clients from 4 Boston-based adult basic education programs participated in 6 focus groups. Results suggested that health care providers consider nutrition to be a fundamental health education topic, but that its successful inculcation in patients with limited literacy skills is hindered mostly by insufficient provider time. Almost all providers agreed that patients need to be referred to nutritionists for nutrition education. Although most providers and patients acknowledged that patients perceive physicians to be the authorities on health, patients with low literacy skills turned first to family members and friends for health information. These results suggest that effective nutrition interventions must build on patients' social networks; appear in a visually based, interactive format; and be culturally appropriate.

  6. Nutritional interventions to reduce cardiovascular risk factors: an Iranian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifi N

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nasrin Sharifi,1 Reza Amani2 1Department of Nutrition, 2Health Research Institute, Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Paramedicine, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran Abstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of death not only in industrialized and developed countries but also in developing societies. Changes in lifestyle of the population living in developing countries, which is due to the socioeconomic and cultural transition, are important reasons for increase in the rate of CVD. This observation has led to extensive body of researches on CVD prevention. In Iran, as a developing country in the Middle East, the increasing incidence of CVD has prompted the health policy-makers to emphasize on nutritional interventions as a part of the main strategies to alleviate the condition. Hence, in this article, we aimed to review the nutritional interventions on preventing CVDs from the perspectives of Iranian lifestyles and dietary patterns using data search sources such as Medline, Google scholar, and Iran doc. Keywords: nutrition, intervention, cardiovascular disease, Iran

  7. Can nutritional modulation of maternal intestinal microbiota influence the development of the infant gastrointestinal tract?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thum, Caroline; Cookson, Adrian L; Otter, Don E; McNabb, Warren C; Hodgkinson, Alison J; Dyer, Jolon; Roy, Nicole C

    2012-11-01

    The gastrointestinal microbiota plays an important role in maintaining host health by preventing the colonization of pathogens, fermenting dietary compounds, and maintaining normal mucosal immunity. Particularly in early life, the composition of the microbiota profoundly influences the development and maturation of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) mucosa, which may affect health in later life. Therefore, strategies to manipulate the microbiota during infancy may prevent the development of some diseases later in adult life. Earlier research suggested that term fetuses are sterile and that the initial bacterial colonization of the newborn GIT occurs only after the baby transits through the birth canal. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the colonization and/or contact of the fetus with the maternal GIT microbiota may start in utero. After vaginal birth, the colonization of the neonate GIT continues through contact with maternal feces and vaginal bacteria, leading to a relatively simple microbial community that is influenced by feeding type (breast vs. formula feeding). Maternal GIT microbiota, vaginal microbiota, and breast milk composition are influenced by maternal diet. Alterations of the maternal GIT microbiota composition via supplementation with probiotics and prebiotics have been shown; however, transfer of these benefits to the offspring remains to be demonstrated. This review focuses on the influence of maternal GIT microbiota during the pre- and postpartum periods on the colonization of the infant GIT. In particular, it examines the manipulation of the maternal GIT microbiota composition through the use of probiotics and/or prebiotics and subsequent consequences for the health of the offspring.

  8. Children's perceptions of weight, obesity, nutrition, physical activity and related health and socio-behavioural factors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Economos, Christina D; Bakun, Peter J; Herzog, Julia Bloom; Dolan, Peter R; Lynskey, Vanessa M; Markow, Dana; Sharma, Shanti; Nelson, Miriam E

    .... An online survey was conducted with children to capture their perceptions of weight, overweight, nutrition, physical activity and related socio-behavioural factors. Within the USA. US children (n 1224) aged 8-18 years...

  9. The influence of socio-demographic factors on the nutritional status ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition ... Objectives: To determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity, as well as socio-demographic risk factors associated with childhood overweight and obesity in the Stellenbosch area, Western ...

  10. Design of a randomised controlled trial on immune effects of acidic and neutral oligosaccharides in the nutrition of preterm infants: carrot study

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    Fetter Willem PF

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevention of serious infections in preterm infants is a challenge, since prematurity and low birth weight often requires many interventions and high utility of devices. Furthermore, the possibility to administer enteral nutrition is limited due to immaturity of the gastrointestinal tract in the presence of a developing immune system. In combination with delayed intestinal bacterial colonisation compared with term infants, this may increase the risk for serious infections. Acidic and neutral oligosaccharides play an important role in the development of the immune system, intestinal bacterial colonisation and functional integrity of the gut. This trial aims to determine the effect of enteral supplementation of acidic and neutral oligosaccharides on infectious morbidity (primary outcome, immune response to immunizations, feeding tolerance and short-term and long-term outcome in preterm infants. In addition, an attempt is made to elucidate the role of acidic and neutral oligosaccharides in postnatal modulation of the immune response and postnatal adaptation of the gut. Methods/Design In a double-blind placebo controlled randomised trial, 120 preterm infants (gestational age Discussion Especially preterm infants, who are at increased risk for serious infections, may benefit from supplementation of prebiotics. Most studies with prebiotics only focus on the colonisation of the intestinal microflora. However, the pathways how prebiotics may influence the immune system are not yet fully understood. Studying the immune modulatory effects is complex because of the multicausal risk of infections in preterm infants. The combination of neutral oligosaccharides with acidic oligosaccharides may have an increased beneficial effect on the immune system. Increased insight in the effects of prebiotics on the developing immune system may help to decrease the (infectious morbidity and mortality in preterm infants. Trial registration Current

  11. The potential effectiveness of the nutrition improvement program on infant and young child feeding and nutritional status in the Northwest and Southwest regions of Cameroon, Central Africa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reinsma, Kate; Nkuoh, Godlove; Nshom, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    .... Although infant feeding counselling by health workers increases caregivers' knowledge, and improves breastfeeding, complementary feeding, and children's linear growth, most of the counselling in sub...

  12. Prevalence of and risk factors for late diagnosis of HIV infection in Brazilian infants and children

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    Lígia Mara Dolce de Lemos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Late human immunodeficiency virus (HIV diagnosis is an important cause of HIV-related morbidity and mortality in infants and children. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study of HIV-infected children diagnosed in Sergipe, in northeastern Brazil, between 2002 and 2011 aimed to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for late HIV diagnosis. RESULTS: Of 55 infants and children with confirmed infection, 42 (76.5% were diagnosed at ≥ 12 months old. No antiretroviral prophylaxis during delivery (OR 5.48, 95% CI 1.11-32.34 was associated with late diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: More than 75% of cases were diagnosed late. Efforts are needed to improve early HIV diagnosis in infants.

  13. Risk factors for hearing loss in infants under universal hearing screening program in Northern Thailand

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    Poonual W

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Watcharapol Poonual,1 Niramon Navacharoen,2 Jaran Kangsanarak,2 Sirianong Namwongprom3 1Clinical Epidemiology Program, 2Department of Otolaryngology, 3Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand Objective: To define the risk factors for hearing loss in infants (aged 3 months under universal hearing screening program. Materials and methods: A total of 3,120 infants (aged 3 months who underwent hearing screening using a universal hearing screening program using automated otoacoustic emission test between November 1, 2010 and May 31, 2012 in Uttaradit Hospital, Buddhachinaraj Hospital, and Sawanpracharuk Hospital (tertiary hospitals located in Northern Thailand were included in this prospective cohort study. Results: Of the 3,120 infants, 135 (4.3% were confirmed to have hearing loss with the conventional otoacoustic emission test. Five of these 135 infants (3.7% with hearing loss showed test results consistent with auditory brainstem responses. From the univariable analysis, there were eleven potential risk factors associated with hearing deterioration. On multivariable analysis, the risk factors independently associated with hearing loss at 3 months were birth weight 1,500–2,500 g (risk ratio [RR] 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1–2.6, APGAR score <6 at 5 minutes (RR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1–4.4, craniofacial anomalies (RR 2.5, 95% CI 1.6–4.2, sepsis (RR 1.8, 95% CI 1.0–3.2, and ototoxic exposure (RR 4.1, 95% CI 1.9–8.6. Conclusion: This study concluded that low birth weight, APGAR score <6 at 5 minutes, craniofacial anomalies, sepsis, and ototoxic exposure are the risk factors for bilateral hearing loss in infants (aged 3 months and proper tests should be performed to identify these risk factors. As an outcome, under the present circumstances, it is suggested that infirmary/physicians/general practitioners/health action centers/polyclinics should carry out universal hearing screening in all

  14. Exploring the risk factors for sudden infant deaths and their role in inflammatory responses to infection

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    Caroline eBlackwell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The risk factors for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS parallel those associated with susceptibility to or severity of infectious diseases. There is no evidence that a single infectious agent is associated with SIDS; the common thread appears to be induction of inflammatory responses to infections. In this review, interactions between genetic and environmental risk factors for SIDS are assessed in relation to the hypothesis that many infant deaths result from dysregulation of inflammatory responses to minor infections. Risk factors are assessed in relation to three important stages of infection: 1 bacterial colonisation (frequency or density; 2 induction of temperature-dependent toxins; 3 induction or control of inflammatory responses.In this article we review the interactions among risk factors for SIDS for their effects on induction or control of inflammatory responses. The risk factors studied are genetic factors (sex, cytokine gene polymorphisms among ethnic groups at high or low risk of SID; developmental stage (changes in cortisol and testosterone levels associated with 2-4 month age range; environmental factors (virus infection, exposure to cigarette smoke. These interactions help to explain differences in the incidences of SIDS observed between ethnic groups prior to public health campaigns to reduce these infant deaths.

  15. STUDY ON SOME FACTORS FOR HEALTHY NUTRITION ENVIRONMENT IN RESTAURANTS IN SOUTHWESTERN BULGARIA

    OpenAIRE

    Ludmila Ivanova; Julieta Trifonova; Ilinka Terziyska

    2012-01-01

    The purpose – The purpose of the study is to conduct a regional survey in tourist companies in Southwestern Bulgaria for examining some key factors for building/forming a healthy nutrition environment. Design – The special focus is given to analysis of the key factors for creating healthy nutrition environment in restaurants. Methodology – A cross sectional survey conducted including 34 respondents from 120 operating hotels with restaurants in Southwestern Bulgaria and 30 independent restaura...

  16. The Knowledge and Attitudes of Mothers about Infant Nutrition in Iğdır

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Yetim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Errors in complementary feeding may lead to important problems in child’s physical and mental development. In this study, we aimed to investigate feeding practices, attitudes and knowledge of mothers with infants aged 20-36 months, who attended the outpatient departments. Materials and Methods: Research was performed in the center of Iğdır and the town of Iğdır called Tuzluca. Two hundred three mothers with children aged 20 to 36 months that attended Iğdır and Tuzluca State Hospitals between June-July 2012 constituted the study population. A questionnaire consisting of 11 questions was administered. Questions were asked in detail by a physician. Results: Seventy percent of mothers had breastfed their babies within 1 hour after birth, 92% within 1-24 hours. All mothers thought that breastfeeding was the best for their babies. The mean duration of breastfeeding was 17.0±8.0 months, complementary feeding was started at 6.4 months. Twenty two mothers began to give complementary foods to their babies before 6 months, 51% at 6 months, 15.7% between 6-9 months, and 11% at 9 months and later. The first choice as a complementary food was homemade yogurt (67% and the second was yoghurt from market (47%. Vegetables and fruit puree were not among the first choices of complementary foods. Sixty three percent of mothers received information from people around (mother, mother-in-law, sister-in-law, neighbor, etc., 31% of from health personnel in the family health centers. Conclusions: Mothers in Iğdır and Tuzluca seemed to need counseling about complementary feeding. Health workers with current and practical knowledge should give accurate information to mothers.

  17. Characterisation of anaemia and associated factors among infants and pre-schoolers from rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Krishnapillai Madhavan; Fernandez-Rao, Sylvia; Nagalla, Balakrishna; Kankipati, Radhakrishna Vijaya; Punjal, Ravinder; Augustine, Little Flower; Hurley, Kristen M; Tilton, Nicholas; Harding, Kimberly B; Reinhart, Greg; Black, Maureen M

    2016-04-01

    In India, national databases indicate anaemia prevalence of 80 % among 6-35-month-old children and 58 % among 36-59-month-old children. The present study aimed to characterise anaemia and the associated factors among infants and pre-schoolers living in rural India. Multivariate logistic regression analysis of data collected prior to an intervention trial. Fe-deficiency with anaemia (IDA), Fe deficiency with no anaemia (IDNA) and anaemia without Fe deficiency were defined. Serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and sTfR/log ferritin index were used to indicate Fe status. Twenty-six villages of Nalgonda district, Telangana, India. Data were collected in community sites. Participants Four hundred and seventy-six infants (aged 6-12 months), 316 pre-schoolers (aged 29-56 months) and their mothers. Prevalence of anaemia among infants and pre-schoolers was 66·4 and 47·8 %, prevalence of IDA was 52·2 and 42·1 %, prevalence of IDNA was 22·2 and 29·8 %, prevalence of anaemia without Fe deficiency was 14·2 and 5·7 %. Among infants, anaemia was positively associated with maternal anaemia (OR=3·31; 95 % CI 2·10, 5·23; Panaemia was positively associated with maternal anaemia (OR=3·77; 95 % CI 1·94, 7·30; PAnaemia prevalence continues to be high among infants and pre-schoolers in rural India. Based on sTfR/ferritin index, Fe deficiency is a major factor associated with anaemia. Anaemia is also associated with inflammation among pre-schoolers and with maternal anaemia among infants and pre-schoolers, illustrating the importance of understanding the aetiology of anaemia in designing effective control strategies.

  18. 杭州市售婴幼儿食品营养标签调查%Nutrition labeling of infant and toddler food in Hangzhou city

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘淼; 任艳军; 余灿清; 吕筠; 李立明; 王胜锋; 陈勇; 洪志恒; 孙点剑一; 杜宇坤; 苏萌; 杨雅平; 刘庆敏

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the nutrition labeling status of infant and toddler foods sold in Hangzhou city. Methods A survey on nutrition label and the normative judgment of infant and toddler food was carried out in one big supermarket in Hangzhou using a pre-designed questionnaire. Results A total of 253 kinds of infant and toddler food were investigated. The number of food with nutrition labeling for nutrition facts,nutrition claim and nutrition function claim were 250(98. 8% ) ,241 (95. 3% ), and 113 (44. 7% ), respectively. The nutrition element with relative higher claim rate were energy(100%) ,carbonhydrate(65. 2% ),protein(89. 2% ),fat(96. 8% ) .vitamin Bl(84. 8% ) .vitamin A(83. 6%) ,iorn (88. 8% ) ,and zinc(85. 2% ) .respectively,for 250 food lables surveyed. There were 739 nutrition claims and 339 function claims. The normative judgement showed claims with inconsistent words. Conclusion The nutrition labeling rate of infant and toddler food was high,but the normalization was poor. It's necessary to strengthen the normative part for consumers to choose healthy infant and toddler food more conveniently.%目的 了解浙江省杭州市售婴幼儿食品营养标签标示现状并分析存在的问题.方法 采用自行设计的食品标签评价表,抄录杭州市世纪联华超市庆春路店内全部婴幼儿食品营养标签并判断标签标示内容的规范性.结果 共调查婴幼儿食品253种,标示营养成分表、营养声称、营养成分功能声称的分别有250(98.8%)、241(95.3%)、113种(44.7%);标示率较高的营养成分是能量、碳水化合物、蛋白质、脂肪、维生素B1、维生素A、铁、锌,标示率分别为100.0% (250/250)、95.2% (238/250)、89.2%(223/250)、96.8% (242/250)、84.8% (212/250)、83.6% (209/250)、88.8%(222/250)、85.2%(213/250);共出现739条营养声称,出现频数较多的是益生元/菌13.3% (98/739)、花生四烯酸11.5%(85/739)、胆碱9.3% (69/739)

  19. Maternal Nutritional Factors and Low Birth Weight in a Health Area Factores nutricionales maternos y el bajo peso al nacer en un área de salud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarelis Rodríguez Fuentes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: low birth weight is multifactorial and is commonly attributed to maternal, fetal and environmental causes. Dietary habits linked to inadequate maternal nutritional factors are decisive. Objective: to identify maternal nutritional factors related to low birth weight in patients of the consultation Area # I in Cienfuegos. Methods: an analytical, retrospective and case-control study was conducted from January 2006 to December 2008. We studied 50 mothers of low birth weight infants (cases and 100 mothers of normal weight children (controls at a rate of 2 per case. They were selected out of birth records in the health area. Obstetric medical records were reviewed and an interview was applied to each patient in order to assess their nutritional habits according to meals frequency and more widely consumed food groups. The data processing was performed using SPSS version 15,0. The results are presented in tables with absolute frequencies, percentages and results of the statistical techniques used. Results: maternal age, nutritional status in early pregnancy, weight gain during pregnancy and hemoglobin in the third quarter emerged as risk factors. Women with unstable and insufficient eating habits were 33 times more likely to have low birth weight infants and women who reported unhealthy diets according to more widely consumed food groups were estimated to be nine times more exposed to risk. Conclusions: maternal nutritional factors influenced the incidence of low birth weight, primarily in the cases of inadequate eating habits.Fundamento: el bajo peso al nacer es multifactorial y se atribuye a causas maternas, fetales y ambientales. Los hábitos alimentarios inadecuados unidos a otros factores nutricionales maternos son determinantes. Objetivo: identificar los factores nutricionales maternos relacionados con el bajo peso al nacer en pacientes del Área I del municipio Cienfuegos. Métodos: se realizó un estudio analítico, retrospectivo, de

  20. 营养护理对早产低出生体重儿营养状况的影响%Influence of nutritional nursing on the nutrition condition of low birth weight premature infant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎娟; 杜惠妍; 陈汶钰; 黄艾艾

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of nutritional nursing on the nutrition condition of the premature low birth weight infant. Methods 86 premature low birth weight infants who were born in our hospital from October,2011 to October,2013 were selected and divided into control group and interfere group by digital randomized according to the order of admission, each group included 43 infants. Infants in the control group were nursed in regular nursing method while the infants in the interfere group were nursed with nutritional nursing. We compared the blood sugar level, albumin level, time to grow to regular birth weight and the like. Results The nutritional interfere in premature low birth weight infant can significantly lower reduce the time for growing to regular birth weight, nasal tube and the intestinal nutrition level increasing to 418.4kj/kg(P<0.05). Compared with the control group, the blood total protein level, the albumin level, the blood sugar level and the total lymphocyte level of interfere group significantly increase and the blood urea nitrogen decrease(P<0.05).The curative effective rate in interfere group is higher than that of the control group(P < 0.05). Conclusion Early nutritional nursing interfere in premature low birth weight infant can well prevent the occurrence of malnutrition.%目的:探讨营养护理干预对早产低出生体质量儿营养状况的影响。方法选取2011年10月~2013年10月在我院出生的早产低出生体质量儿86例,并根据患者入院顺序按数字随机法分为对照组和干预组,每组各43例。对照组进行常规护理,干预组进行早期营养护理干预,比较实验前后两组血糖、白蛋白和恢复出生体质量的时间等。结果对早产低出生体质量儿进行营养护理干预可缩短其恢复出生体质所需时间、留置鼻管时间以及肠道营养达到418.4kj/kg时间(P<0.05)。与对照组比较,干预组试验后的血浆总蛋白、血浆白

  1. [Processed baby foods for infants and young children: a dietary advance? A position paper by the Committee on Nutrition of the French Society of Paediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghisolfi, J; Bocquet, A; Bresson, J-L; Briend, A; Chouraqui, J-P; Darmaun, D; Dupont, C; Frelut, M L; Girardet, J-P; Goulet, O; Hankard, R; Rieu, D; Siméoni, U; Turck, D; Vidailhet, M

    2013-05-01

    Processed baby foods designed for infants (4-12 months) and toddlers (12-36 months) (excluding infant formula, follow-on formula, the so-called growing-up milks, and cereal-based foods for infants), which are referred to as baby foods, are specific products defined by a European regulation (Directive 2006/125/CE). According to this Directive, such foods have a composition adapted to the nutritional needs of children of this age and should comply with specifications related to food safety in terms of ingredients, production processes, and prevention of infectious and toxicological hazards. Hence, they differ from ordinary foods and from non-specific processed foods. This market segment includes the full range of foods that can be part of children's diet: dairy products (dairy desserts, yoghurts, and fresh cheese), sweet products (nondairy desserts, fruit, and drinks), and salty products (soups, vegetable-based foods, meat, fish, and full dishes). This market amounted to 89,666 MT in France in 2011 and 83,055 MT in 2010 (a total of 325,524 MT in the 27 countries of the European Union in 2010, including 90,438 MT in Germany, 49,144 MT in Spain, and 40,438 MT in Italy). The consumption of baby foods in France varies with infant age and parental choice. Baby foods account for 7 % of total energy intake at 4-5 months, 28 % at 6-7 months, 27 % at 8-11 months, 17 % at 1-17 months, and 11 % at 18-24 months. Among parents, 24 % never offer their children any baby foods, 13 % do so 1-3 days/week and 63 % 4-7 days/week. Among consumers, 55 % of children eat more than 250 g/day of baby foods. As baby foods only account for a minor fraction of overall food intake, their impact on the quality of young children's diet is much less than that of growing-up milks, particularly for preventing insufficient iron and vitamin D intake. Their consumption, however, has an indirect benefit on the nutritional quality of the diet and on food safety, particularly regarding toxicological hazards

  2. Impact of the 5As brief counseling on smoking cessation among pregnant clients of Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) clinics in Ohio☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaiya, Oluwatosin; Sharma, Andrea J.; Tong, Van T.; Dee, Deborah; Quinn, Celia; Agaku, Israel T.; Conrey, Elizabeth J.; Kuiper, Nicole M.; Satten, Glen A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We assessed whether smoking cessation improved among pregnant smokers who attended Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Supplemental Nutrition Program clinics trained to implement a brief smoking cessation counseling intervention, the 5As: ask, advise, assess, assist, arrange. Methods In Ohio, staff in 38 WIC clinics were trained to deliver the 5As from 2006 through 2010. Using 2005–2011 Pregnancy Nutrition Surveillance System data, we performed conditional logistic regression, stratified on clinic, to estimate the relationship between women's exposure to the 5As and the odds of self-reported quitting during pregnancy. Reporting bias for quitting was assessed by examining whether differences in infants' birth weight by quit status differed by clinic training status. Results Of 71,526 pregnant smokers at WIC enrollment, 23% quit. Odds of quitting were higher among women who attended a clinic after versus before clinic staff was trained (adjusted odds ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.04–1.29). The adjusted mean infant birth weight was, on average, 96 g higher among women who reported quitting (P < 0.0001), regardless of clinic training status. Conclusions Training all Ohio WIC clinics to deliver the 5As may promote quitting among pregnant smokers, and thus is an important strategy to improve maternal and child health outcomes. PMID:26529063

  3. Mothers prefer fresh fruits and vegetables over jarred baby fruits and vegetables in the new Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children food package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Loan P; Whaley, Shannon E; Gradziel, Pat H; Crocker, Nancy J; Ritchie, Lorrene D; Harrison, Gail G

    2013-01-01

    This study examined Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) participant use and satisfaction with jarred baby foods, assessed preference for cash value vouchers (CVVs) for fruits and vegetables vs jarred baby foods, and examined whether preferences varied among selected ethnic groups. A survey of California WIC participants and statewide redemption data were used. Participants reported high satisfaction with the CVV for fruits and vegetables and jarred baby foods, with statistically significant variation across ethnic groups. About two thirds of all participants reported a preference for CVVs for fruits and vegetables over jarred baby foods. Redemption data indicated declining redemption rates for jarred fruits and vegetables with increasing age of the infant across all ethnic groups. Although the addition of jarred fruits and vegetables to the food package for infants ages 6-11 months was well received, many caregivers want the option to choose between jarred foods and fresh fruits and vegetables. Copyright © 2013 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. All rights reserved.

  4. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in preterm infants with retinopathy of prematurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manizheh Mostafa Gharehbaghi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP is the main cause of visual impairment in preterm newborn infants. Objective: This study was conducted to determine whether insulin-like growth factor binding protein -3 (IGFBP-3 is associated with proliferative ROP and has a role in pathogenesis of the disease in premature infants. Materials and Methods: A total of 71 preterm infants born at or before 32 weeks of gestation participated in this study. Studied patients consisted of 41 neonates without vaso-proliferative findings of ROP as the control group and 30 preterm infants with evidence of severe ROP in follow up eye examination as the case group. Blood samples obtained from these infants 6-8 weeks after birth and blood levels of IGFBP-3 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results: The mean gestation age and birth weight of the studied patients were 28.2±1.6 weeks and 1120.7±197 gram in the case group and 28.4±1.6 weeks and 1189.4±454 gram in the control group (P=0.25 and P=0.44 respectively. The infants in the case group had significantly lower Apgar score at first and 5 min after birth. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein -3 (IGFBP-3 was significantly lower in the patients with proliferative ROP than the patients without ROP [592.5±472.9 vs. 995.5±422.2 ng/ml (P=0.009]. Using a cut-off point 770.45 ng/ml for the plasma IGFBP-3, we obtained a sensitivity of 65.9% and a specificity of 66.7% in the preterm infants with vasoproliferative ROP. Conclusion: Our data demonstrated that the blood levels IGFBP-3 was significantly lower in the patients with ROP and it is suspected that IGFBP-3 deficiency in the premature infants may have a pathogenetic role in proliferative ROP.

  5. Epidemiology of nutritional rickets in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Atawi M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In most developing countries, nutritional rickets is a major health problem. The aim of this study was to explore the magnitude of nutritional rickets among Saudi infants, and the various clinical presentations, as well as to address the possible operating risk factors behind the disease. We carried out a retrospective study at King Abdulaziz Medical City-King Fahad National Guard Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The records of Saudi infants under the age of 14 months over a 10-year period (between January 1990 and January 2000 were reviewed. Infor-mation collected included age, sex, clinical presentations, biochemical, radiological findings, infant nutrition, presence of other nutritional deficiencies and exposure to sunlight. There were 283 infants diagnosed with nutritional rickets due to Vitamin D deficiency (67% males who were between 6 and 14 months of age. Among the total, 70% were exclusively breast-fed, and 23% were breast-fed until the age of 1 year. The most frequent clinical presentation was hypo-calcemic convulsions (34% followed by chest infections (33% and gastroenteritis (25%. In conclusion, nutritional rickets is still prevalent in Saudi Arabia with the primary etiology being vitamin D deficiency. Therefore we recommend that every infant, who is exclusively on breast-feeding, has routine supplement of vitamin D in the range of 200 IU/day (alone or as apart of multivitamin, started soon after birth until the time of weaning.

  6. Indoor Residential Chemical Exposures as Risk Factors for Asthmaand Allergy in Infants and Children: a Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendell, M.J.

    2006-03-01

    Most research into effects of residential indoor air exposures on asthma and allergies has focused on exposures to biologic allergens, moisture and mold, endotoxin, or combustion byproducts. This paper briefly reviews reported findings on associations of asthma or allergy in infants or children with risk factors related to indoor chemical emissions from residential materials or surface coatings. Associations, some strong (e.g., odds ratios up to 13), were reported. The most frequently identified risk factors were formaldehyde, aromatic organic compounds such as toluene and benzene, plastic materials and plasticizers, and recent painting. Exposures and consequent effects from indoor sources may be exacerbated by decreased ventilation. Identified risk factors may be proxies for correlated exposures. Findings suggest the frequent occurrence of important but preventable effects on asthma and allergy in infants and children worldwide from modern residential building materials and coatings.

  7. Parents' dietary patterns are significantly correlated: findings from the Melbourne Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioret, Sandrine; McNaughton, Sarah A; Crawford, David; Spence, Alison C; Hesketh, Kylie; Campbell, Karen J

    2012-08-01

    The objectives of the present study were to identify dietary patterns independently in first-time mothers and fathers, and to examine whether these patterns were correlated within families. Dietary intakes were collected at baseline in the Melbourne Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial Program using a validated FFQ in 454 pairs of first-time mothers and fathers. Education level was reported in associated questionnaires. Principal components analyses included frequencies of fifty-five food groups and were performed independently in mothers and fathers. Spearman's correlation coefficients were used to assess associations between dietary pattern scores. A total of four dietary patterns were identified in mothers and fathers. Of these, three dietary patterns had similar characteristics between these two populations, namely 'Fruits and vegetables', 'High-energy snack and processed foods', 'High-fat foods' in mothers; and 'Fruits', 'High-energy snack and processed foods', 'High-fat foods' in fathers. The following two additional patterns were identified: 'Cereals and sweet foods' in mothers and 'Potatoes and vegetables' in fathers. Patterns incorporating healthier food items were found to be positively associated with parent education. An inverse association with education was found for the 'High-fat foods' and 'High-energy snack and processed foods' dietary patterns. Qualitatively similar patterns between corresponding mothers and fathers were the most strongly correlated (ρ = 0·34-0·45, P dietary patterns between mothers and fathers, suggesting that it is worth deriving patterns separately when considering couples, and more generally between men and women. Exploring how these various patterns correlate within households provides important insights to guide the development and implementation of family-based interventions.

  8. Effects of high carnitine supplementation on substrate utilization in low-birth-weight infants receiving total parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulkers, E J; Lafeber, H N; Degenhart, H J; Przyrembel, H; Schlotzer, E; Sauer, P J

    1990-11-01

    Parenterally fed preterm neonates are known to be at risk for carnitine deficiency. We studied substrate utilization in low-birth-weight infants receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) with (A) and without (B) supplementation of 48 mg carnitine.kg-1.d-1 on days 4-7 (birth weights 1334 +/- 282 vs 1318 +/- 248 g, gestational age 32 +/- 2 vs 32 +/- 2 wk, A vs B, respectively). TPN consisted of 11 g glucose.kg-1.d-1 and 2.4 g.kg-1.d-1 of both protein and fat. Plasma carnitine concentrations at day 7 were for free carnitine 11.8 +/- 5.0 vs 164 +/- 56 mumol/L and for acyl carnitine 3.8 +/- 2.0 vs 33.9 +/- 15.4 mumol/L, respectively. Indirect calorimetry at day 7 showed a higher fat oxidation (0.21, -0.31 to +0.60 vs 1.18, 0.70 to 1.95 g. kg-1.d-1, respectively, P less than 0.02, median and interquartile range) in group B and a higher protein oxidation (0.37, 0.30-0.43 vs 0.63, 0.53-0.88 g.kg-1.d-1, P less than 0.001). The time to regain birth weight was also higher in group B (7, 5.5-9 vs 9, 7-14 d, P less than 0.05). Carnitine supplementation and calorie intake were the best explanatory variables for metabolic rate (R2 = 0.45, P less than 0.002). We conclude that carnitine supplementation of TPN in this dosage does not seem advisable.

  9. A 10-year performance trajectory of top nutrition journals′ impact factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Jani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: This study was performed to evaluate the impact factors (IFs and total citations of ISI-indexed nutrition journals in a 10-year period from 1999 to 2008 in order to assess the quality of nutrition journals. Materials and Methods: For this retrospective study, the IF and total citation data from 1998 to 2008 were collected through Journal Citation Reports of Thomson Scientific Corporation Web of Knowledge. We selected five highly cited journals in the "nutrition and dietetics" category for our analysis. These journals include Annual Reviews in Nutrition (ANNU REV NUTR, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (AJCN, Progress in Lipid Research (PROG LIPID RES, Journal of Nutrition (J NUTR, and International Journal of Obesity (INT J OBESITY Results: All five selected journals were ranked as one of the top ten "nutrition and dietetics" journals between 1999 and 2008 in ISI database. Most of selected journals′ IF had an upward trend during the 10-year period with fluctuation in some cases. AJCN consistently received the greatest number of total citations during the study period, although its IF was not the highest among the five journals studied. Conclusion: The IF illustrated changes in relative rankings of five highly cited journals included in the "nutrition and dietetics" category of the Web of Knowledge. Rank according to the absolute number of citations received, however, did not correlate with rank according to IF.

  10. [Prognostic morbidity and mortality factors in hospital enteral nutrition: prospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Pérez, O; Meoro Avilés, A; Martínez, A; Boix, E; Aznar, S; Martín, Ma D; Picó, A M

    2005-01-01

    To determine the prognostic factors that may best for see the outcome of an enteral nutritional intervention and to assess the assistance quality of a nutrition unit. Patients that required enteral nutrition during hospital admission at a third level center. Observational prospective study in which 160 patients were included by means of consecutive sampling, for a 6-months follow-up period. Underlying pathology, disability degree, nutritional assessment, type of enteral nutrition, complications, nursing care, and clinical course of patients were determined. severe caloric and protein hyponutrition was diagnosed in 48.4 and 52.9% of patients; stress degree was moderate in 52.2% and severe in 36.5%. In 88.2% of patients variation of protein parameters was unchanged or improved, with a 0.26 g/dL increase in albumin levels and 2.4 m/dL in prealbumin (p enteral nutritional intervention in the hospitalized patient (p enteral nutritional support at the hospital setting, to advance in patients care and promote the development of nutritional therapy.

  11. Hearings Before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate, Ninety-Third Congress, First Session. Maternal, Fetal, and Infant Nutrition--1973. Part 1--Consequences of Malnutrition; Part 2--Government Responses. Hearings Held Washington, D.C., June 5, 6, and 7, 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs.

    Part One of these hearings before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate includes the testimony of scientists and doctors engaged in research regarding the relationship between maternal, fetal, and infant nutrition and optimum mental and physical development of the child. In testimony it was shown that the…

  12. 62 NUTRITION IN HIV: A REVIEW *L. M. Houtzager *Nutrition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... nutritional status, treatment, food and nutrition interventions continues ... infection and poor nutritional status are interlinked. .... ART has on growth among infants and children ..... RN, Body composition studies in patients with ...

  13. Prenatal exposure to residential air pollution and infant mental development: modulation by antioxidants and detoxification factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guxens, Mònica; Aguilera, Inmaculada; Ballester, Ferran; Estarlich, Marisa; Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Lertxundi, Aitana; Lertxundi, Nerea; Mendez, Michelle A; Tardón, Adonina; Vrijheid, Martine; Sunyer, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution effects on children's neurodevelopment have recently been suggested to occur most likely through the oxidative stress pathway. We aimed to assess whether prenatal exposure to residential air pollution is associated with impaired infant mental development, and whether antioxidant/detoxification factors modulate this association. In the Spanish INfancia y Medio Ambiente (INMA; Environment and Childhood) Project, 2,644 pregnant women were recruited during their first trimester. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and benzene were measured with passive samplers covering the study areas. Land use regression models were developed for each pollutant to predict average outdoor air pollution levels for the entire pregnancy at each residential address. Maternal diet was obtained at first trimester through a validated food frequency questionnaire. Around 14 months, infant mental development was assessed using Bayley Scales of Infant Development. Among the 1,889 children included in the analysis, mean exposure during pregnancy was 29.0 μg/m3 for NO2 and 1.5 μg/m3 for benzene. Exposure to NO2 and benzene showed an inverse association with mental development, although not statistically significant, after adjusting for potential confounders [β (95% confidence interval) = -0.95 (-3.90, 1.89) and -1.57 (-3.69, 0.56), respectively, for a doubling of each compound]. Stronger inverse associations were estimated for both pollutants among infants whose mothers reported low intakes of fruits/vegetables during pregnancy [-4.13 (-7.06, -1.21) and -4.37 (-6.89, -1.86) for NO2 and benzene, respectively], with little evidence of associations in the high-intake group (interaction p-values of 0.073 and 0.047). Inverse associations were also stronger in non-breast-fed infants and infants with low maternal vitamin D, but effect estimates and interactions were not significant. Our findings suggest that prenatal exposure to residential air pollutants may adversely affect infant mental

  14. Predictors' factors of nutritional status of male chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirabbasi, Elham; Najafiyan, Mahin; Cheraghi, Maria; Shahar, Suzana; Abdul Manaf, Zahara; Rajab, Norfadilah; Abdul Manap, Roslina

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a systemic disease that leads to weight loss and muscle dysfunction resulting in an increase in mortality. This study aimed to determine the prevalence rate of malnutrition and nutritional status and also factors associated with nutritional status. A total of 149 subjects were involved in the cross-sectional study. The study was conducted at two medical centers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The results of the study showed that malnutrition was more prevalent (52.4%) in the subjects with severe stages of COPD as compared to mild and moderate COPD stages (26.2%) (P nutrition intervention.

  15. Evaluation Protocol for Review of Method Validation Data by the AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals Expert Review Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Brendon D; Indyk, Harvey E; Blake, Christopher J; Konings, Erik J M; Jacobs, Wesley A; Sullivan, Darryl M

    2015-01-01

    Methods under consideration as part of the AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals process are to be evaluated against a set of Standard Method Performance RequirementsSM (SMPRs) via peer review by an expert review panel (ERP). A validation protocol and a checklist have been developed to assist the ERP to evaluate experimental data and to compare multiple candidate methods for each nutrient. Method performance against validation parameters mandated in the SMPRs as well as additional criteria are to be scored, with the method selected by the ERP proceeding to multilaboratory study prior to Final Action approval. These methods are intended to be used by the infant formula industry for the purposes of dispute resolution.

  16. Risk factors for excess weight loss and hypernatremia in exclusively breast-fed infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. Çaglar

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Data were prospectively obtained from exclusively breast-fed healthy term neonates at birth and from healthy mothers with no obstetric complication to determine risk factors for excess weight loss and hypernatremia in exclusively breast-fed infants. Thirty-four neonates with a weight loss > or = 10% were diagnosed between April 2001 and January 2005. Six of 18 infants who were eligible for the study had hypernatremia. Breast conditions associated with breast-feeding difficulties (P < 0.05, primiparity (P < 0.005, less than four stools (P < 0.001, pink diaper (P < 0.001, delay at initiation of first breast giving (P < 0.01, birth by cesarean section (P < 0.05, extra heater usage (P < 0.005, extra heater usage among mothers who had appropriate conditions associated with breast-feeding (P < 0.001, mean weight loss in neonates with pink diaper (P < 0.05, mean uric acid concentration in neonates with pink diaper (P < 0.0001, fever in hypernatremic neonates (P < 0.02, and the correlation of weight loss with both serum sodium and uric acid concentrations (P < 0.02 were determined. Excessive weight loss occurs in exclusively breast-fed infants and can be complicated by hypernatremia and other morbidities. Prompt initiation of breast-feeding after delivery and prompt intervention if problems occur with breast-feeding, in particular poor breast attachment, breast engorgement, delayed breast milk "coming in", and nipple problems will help promote successful breast-feeding. Careful follow-up of breast-feeding dyads after discharge from hospital, especially regarding infant weight, is important to help detect inadequate breast-feeding. Environmental factors such as heaters may exacerbate infant dehydration.

  17. Risk Factors for Intraventricular Hemorrhage in Very Low Birth Weight Infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Larijani

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the risk factors which predispose to the development of high grade IVH (grade 3 and 4 in very low birth weight infants. Material & Methods: In a retrospective case control clinical study files of all premature infants with birth weights less than 1500 grams admitted between April 2004 and Oct 2005 to the neonatal intensive care unit of Akbar Abadi hospital in Tehran were reviewed. 39 infants with IVH grade 3 and 4 were identified. A control group of 82 VLBW infants matched for gestational age and birth weight were selected. Prenatal data, delivery characteristics, neonatal course data and reports of cranial ultrasonography were carefully collected for both groups. Those variables that achieved significance (p<0.05 in univariate analysis entered to multivariate logistic regression analysis. Findings: A total of 325 VLBW infants were evaluated. Mortality rate was 21.5%. Of the remaining the incidence of high grade IVH was 15.5%. Multivariate logistic analysis showed that following factors are associated with greater risk of high grade IVH occurrence: Low gestational age (OR: 3.72; 95% CI: 1.65-8.38, low birth weight (OR: 3.42; 95% CI: 1.65-8.38, low Apgar score at 5 minute (OR:1.58; 95% CI:1.59-6.32, hyaline membrane disease (HMD, OR: 3.16; 95% CI: 1.42-7.45 and maternal tocolytic therapy with magnesium sulfate (OR: 4.40; 95% CI: 1.10-24.5. Conclusion: Our results showed that maternal tocolytic therapy, mechanical ventilation, low gestational age, low birth weight, apnea, and low 5 minute Apgar score increased the risk of major IVH.

  18. Nutritional intake and weight z-scores in very low birth weight infants in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Proaño

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS Determinar las ingestas nutricionales en los recién nacidos de muy bajo peso al nacer y su respectivo crecimiento en el primer mes de vida. Adicionalmente, identificar factores para un desenlace negativo en el periodo neonatal de esta población. METODOS Estudio de serie de casos desarrollado en un hospital de tercer nivel en Lima, Perú desde 2011 a 2012. La información se obtuvo de las historias médicas. No se utilizó un protocolo de nutrición durante el estudio. La ingesta diaria del volumen, la energía y las proteínas fue registrada al igual que el puntaje z del peso de manera semanal. Se utilizó regresión logística para identificar factores asociados a un desenlace adverso, que se define como mortalidad neonatal o restricción de crecimiento extrauterino en los primeros 28 días de vida. RESULTADOS Luego del criterio de selección, se incluyeron a 76 participantes. Las ingestas nutricionales fueron similares a los valores descritos en la literatura, pero la ingesta proteica fue sub óptima durante las cuatro semanas. El puntaje z del peso al nacer se asocia con un desenlace adverso (p=0,035. Se determinó que un puntaje z menor de 1,09 predice un desenlace negativo con un área bajo la curva ROC de 96,8% (93,5%, 100%, con un intervalo de confianza del 95%. CONCLUSIÓN Las ingestas proteicas fueron sumamente deficientes en este estudio. Sin embargo, un desenlace adverso se asocia más a un pobre puntaje z al nacer que a factores relacionados a la nutrición.

  19. Initial amino acid intake influences phosphorus and calcium homeostasis in preterm infants--it is time to change the composition of the early parenteral nutrition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Bonsante

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early aggressive parenteral nutrition (PN, consisting of caloric and nitrogen intake soon after birth, is currently proposed for the premature baby. Some electrolyte disturbances, such as hypophosphatemia and hypercalcemia, considered unusual in early life, were recently described while using this PN approach. We hypothesize that, due to its impact on cell metabolism, the initial amino acid (AA amount may specifically influence the metabolism of phosphorus, and consequently of calcium. We aim to evaluate the influence of AA intake on calcium-phosphorus metabolism, and to create a calculation tool to estimate phosphorus needs. METHODS: Prospective observational study. Phosphate and calcium plasma concentrations and calcium balance were evaluated daily during the first week of life in very preterm infants, and their relationship with nutrition was studied. For this purpose, infants were divided into three groups: high, medium and low AA intake (HAA, MAA, LAA. A calculation formula to assess phosphorus needs was elaborated, with a theoretical model based on AA and calcium intake, and the cumulative deficit of phosphate intake was estimated. RESULTS: 154 infants were included. Hypophosphatemia (12.5% and hypercalcemia (9.8% were more frequent in the HAA than in the MAA (4.6% and 4.8% and in the LAA group (0% and 1.9%; both p<0.001. DISCUSSION: Calcium-phosphorus homeostasis was influenced by the early AA intake. We propose to consider phosphorus and calcium imbalances as being part of a syndrome, related to incomplete provision of nutrients after the abrupt discontinuation of the placental nutrition at birth (PI-ReFeeding syndrome. We provide a simple tool to calculate the optimal phosphate intake. The early introduction of AA in the PN soon after birth might be completed by an early intake of phosphorus, since AA and phosphorus are (along with potassium the main determinants of cellular growth.

  20. Accelerating improvements in nutritional and health status of young children in the Sahel region of Sub-Saharan Africa: review of international guidelines on infant and young child feeding and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuehler, Sara E; Hess, Sonja Y; Brown, Kenneth H

    2011-04-01

    The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child holds governments responsible to ensure children's right to the highest attainable standard of health by providing breastfeeding support, and access to nutritious foods, appropriate health care, and clean drinking water. International experts have identified key child care practices and programmatic activities that are proven to be effective at reducing infant and young child undernutrition, morbidity, and mortality. Nevertheless, progress towards reducing the prevalence of undernutrition has been sporadic across countries of the Sahel sub-region of Sub-Saharan Africa. In view of this uneven progress, a working group of international agencies was convened to 'Reposition children's right to adequate nutrition in the Sahel.' The first step towards this goal was to organize a situational analysis of the legislative, research, and programmatic activities related to infant and young child nutrition (IYCN) in six countries of the sub-region: Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, and Senegal. The purposes of this introductory paper are to review current information concerning the nutritional and health status of infants and young children in the Sahel and to summarize international guidelines on optimal IYCN practices. These guidelines were used in completing the above-mentioned situational analyses and encompass specific recommendations on: (i) breastfeeding (introduction within the first hour after birth, exclusivity to 6 months, continuation to at least 24 months); (ii) complementary feeding (introduction at 6 months, use of nutrient dense foods, adequate frequency and consistency, and responsive feeding); (iii) prevention and/or treatment of micronutrient deficiencies (vitamin A, zinc, iron and anaemia, and iodine); (iv) prevention and/or treatment of acute malnutrition; (v) feeding practices adapted to the maternal situation to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV; (vi) activities to ensure food

  1. “I rarely read the label”: Factors that Influence Thai Consumer Responses to Nutrition Labels

    OpenAIRE

    Rimpeekool, Wimalin; Banwell, Cathy; Seubsman, Sam-ang; Kirk, Martyn; Yiengprugsawan, Vasoontara; Sleigh, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Background: This qualitative study employed the Knowledge-Attitude-Behaviour (KAB) model and Health Belief Model (HBM) to investigate factors influencing Thai consumer decision making about use of nutrition labels. Labels include both Nutrition Information Panels (1998-) and Guideline Daily Amounts labels (2011-). Method: In-depth interviews were conducted with 34 participants representing two socio-demographic extremes in Thailand – “urban Bangkok” (university educated consumers) and “provin...

  2. Gut Microbiome and Infant Health: Brain-Gut-Microbiota Axis and Host Genetic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Xiaomei; Xu, Wanli; Romisher, Rachael; Poveda, Samantha; Forte, Shaina; Starkweather, Angela; Henderson, Wendy A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of the neonatal gut microbiome is influenced by multiple factors, such as delivery mode, feeding, medication use, hospital environment, early life stress, and genetics. The dysbiosis of gut microbiota persists during infancy, especially in high-risk preterm infants who experience lengthy stays in the Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Infant microbiome evolutionary trajectory is essentially parallel with the host (infant) neurodevelopmental process and growth. The role of the gut microbiome, the brain-gut signaling system, and its interaction with the host genetics have been shown to be related to both short and long term infant health and bio-behavioral development. The investigation of potential dysbiosis patterns in early childhood is still lacking and few studies have addressed this host-microbiome co-developmental process. Further research spanning a variety of fields of study is needed to focus on the mechanisms of brain-gut-microbiota signaling system and the dynamic host-microbial interaction in the regulation of health, stress and development in human newborns.

  3. Gut Microbiome and Infant Health: Brain-Gut-Microbiota Axis and Host Genetic Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Xiaomei; Xu, Wanli; Romisher, Rachael; Poveda, Samantha; Forte, Shaina; Starkweather, Angela; Henderson, Wendy A

    2016-09-01

    The development of the neonatal gut microbiome is influenced by multiple factors, such as delivery mode, feeding, medication use, hospital environment, early life stress, and genetics. The dysbiosis of gut microbiota persists during infancy, especially in high-risk preterm infants who experience lengthy stays in the Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Infant microbiome evolutionary trajectory is essentially parallel with the host (infant) neurodevelopmental process and growth. The role of the gut microbiome, the brain-gut signaling system, and its interaction with the host genetics have been shown to be related to both short and long term infant health and bio-behavioral development. The investigation of potential dysbiosis patterns in early childhood is still lacking and few studies have addressed this host-microbiome co-developmental process. Further research spanning a variety of fields of study is needed to focus on the mechanisms of brain-gut-microbiota signaling system and the dynamic host-microbial interaction in the regulation of health, stress and development in human newborns.

  4. Risk factors for adverse outcomes of Indigenous infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Gabrielle B; Chatfield, Mark D; Morris, Peter S; Chang, Anne B

    2016-06-01

    Hospitalized bronchiolitis imposes a significant burden among infants, particularly among Indigenous children. Traditional or known risk factors for severe disease are well described, but there are limited data on risks for prolonged hospitalization and persistent symptoms. Our aims were to determine factors (clinical and microbiological) associated with (i) prolonged length of stay (LOS); (ii) persistent respiratory symptoms at 3 weeks; (iii) bronchiectasis up to ∼24 months post-hospitalisation; and (iv) risk of respiratory readmissions within 6 months. Indigenous infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis were enrolled at Royal Darwin Hospital between 2008 and 2013. Standardized forms were used to record clinical data. A nasopharyngeal swab was collected at enrolment to identify respiratory viruses and bacteria. The median age of 232 infants was 5 months (interquartile range 3-9); 65% male. On multivariate regression, our 12 point severity score (including accessory muscle use) was the only factor associated with prolonged LOS but the effect was modest (+3.0 hr per point, 95%CI: 0.7, 5.1, P = 0.01). Presence of cough at 3 weeks increased the odds of bronchiectasis (OR 3.0, 95%CI: 1.1, 7.0, P = 0.03). Factors associated with respiratory readmissions were: previous respiratory hospitalization (OR 2.3, 95%CI: 1.0, 5.4, P = 0.05) and household smoke (OR 2.6, 95%CI: 1.0, 6.3, P = 0.04). Increased severity score is associated with prolonged LOS in Indigenous children hospitalized with bronchiolitis. As persistent symptoms at 3 weeks post-hospitalization are associated with future diagnosis of bronchiectasis, optimising clinical care beyond hospitalization is needed to improve long-term respiratory outcomes for infants at risk of respiratory disease. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:613-623. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Hypocarnitinemic hypoglycemia and heart failure in an infant with a constant parenteral elementary nutrition during measles vaccination-related febrile illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okanari, K; Takahashi, M; Maeda, T; Sato, K; Suenobu, S; Izumi, T

    2007-12-01

    A 1-year and 11-month-old female infant with bilateral lesions of the thalamus, basal ganglia, cerebellar and brainstem disease died from heart failure 9 days after being administered a measles vaccination. She had a high fever, hypocarnitinemic and non-ketotic hypoglycemia, serum levels of total carnitine 7.4 micromol/L, free carnitine 5.6 micromol/L, acylcarnitine 1.8 micromol/L and glucose 13 mg/dL. Due to feeding difficulty, the patient, however, had been administered parenteral elementary nutrition through a feeding tube since early infancy. The commercially available parenteral nutrition solutions do not contain carnitine. A secondary carnitine deficiency followed by non-ketotic hypoglycemia-related heart failure may readily develop even in a patient without valproic acid, during high fever.

  6. Sepsis risk factors in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Michaël; Le Sache, Nolwenn; Mokhtari, Mostafa; Fagherazzi, Guy; Cuzon, Gaelle; Bueno, Benjamin; Fouquet, Virginie; Benachi, Alexandra; Eleni Dit Trolli, Sergio; Tissieres, Pierre

    2017-12-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a rare congenital anomaly and remains among the most challenging ICU-managed disease. Beside severe pulmonary hypertension, lung hypoplasia and major abdominal surgery, infective complications remain major determinants of outcome. However, the specific incidence of sepsis as well as associated risk factors is unknown. This prospective, 4-year observational study took place in the pediatric intensive care and neonatal medicine department of the Paris South University Hospitals (Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France), CDH national referral center and involved 62 neonates with CDH. During their ICU stay, 28 patients (45%) developed 38 sepsis episodes. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP: 23/38; 31.9 VAP per 1000 days of mechanical ventilation) and central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSI: 5/38; 5.5 per 1000 line days) were the most frequently encountered infections. Multivariate analysis showed that gestational age at birth and intra-thoracic position of liver were significantly associated with the occurrence of sepsis. Infected patients had longer duration of mechanical and noninvasive ventilation (16.2 and 5.8 days, respectively), longer delay to first feeding (1.2 days) and a longer length of stay in ICU (23 days), but there was no difference in mortality. Healthcare-associated infections, and more specifically VAP, are the main infective threat in children with CDH. Sepsis has a significant impact on the duration of ventilator support and ICU length of stay but does not impact mortality. Low gestational age and intra-thoracic localization of the liver are two independent risk factors associated with sepsis.

  7. Overview of Longitudinal Survey of Newborns in the 21st Century: Factors Affecting Infant Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sata, Fumihiro; Fukuoka, Hideoki; Ozaki, Takashi; Ito, Yoshiya; Yoshiike, Nobuo; Takimoto, Hidemi

    2017-01-01

    There are two major nationwide birth cohort studies in Japan, namely, the Longitudinal Survey of Newborns in the 21st Century conducted by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW) and the Japan Environment and Children's Study (JECS) conducted by the Ministry of Environment. The former was a longitudinal questionnaire survey focusing on environmental and socioeconomic factors for descriptive epidemiology conducted every year since 2001 by mail. The latter was based on 15 unit centers nationwide with environmental measurements and collection of biological samples for environmental risk evaluation. Both are prospective birth cohort studies whose findings will be expected as the basis for establishing health policies. The data obtained in the former study can be used for research with permission from MHLW. To date, there have been more than ten published studies using those data. We have reviewed these studies and introduced our preliminary findings on factors affecting infant growth. Employment before delivery, educational background of parents, household income, and smoking habit of both parents have been suggested to affect infant growth. We will analyze the associations between socioeconomic factors and infant growth trajectory to elucidate the most adequate intervention for children.

  8. Risk factors for insufficient perioperative oral nutrition after hip fracture surgery within a multi-modal rehabilitation programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai B; Jensen, Pia S; Kehlet, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    To examine oral nutritional intake in the perioperative phase in elderly hip fracture patients treated according to a well-defined multi-modal rehabilitation program, including unselected oral nutritional supplementation, and to identify independent risk factors for insufficient nutritional intake....

  9. Sport nutrition and doping factors in swimming; parallel analysis among athletes and coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajber, Dorica; Rodek, Jelena; Escalante, Yolanda; Olujić, Dragana; Sekulić, Damir

    2013-05-01

    The sport nutrition and doping are known to be important issues in sports, but there is evident lack of studies which investigated those issues in swimming, especially with regard to parallel analysis of coaches and athletes. The first aim of this study was to compare knowledge of swimming coaches and their athletes about nutrition and doping. Also, we have identified interrelationships between studied sociodemographic-, sport-; nutrition- and doping-related-factors. The sample of subjects comprised 55 athletes (20.3 +/- 2.2 years of age; 24 females) and 22 coaches (mean age 36.5 +/- 7.8 years; 4 females) from Croatia (98% of respondents). In the first phase of the investigation we have validated specific questionnaires to determine the knowledge of sport nutrition (KSN), and knowledge on doping (KD). The test-retest correlation and percentage of equally responded queries revealed both questionnaires as reliable. The discriminative validity was proven also since coaches scored better than their athletes on both questionnaires. Athletes declared their coaches as the primary sources of knowledge about nutrition and doping. Among coaches, formal and self-education are equally important sources of information about doping and nutrition. The age is negatively, while the formal education is positively correlated to KD and KSN scores among coaches. Consequently, permanent educational programs about nutrition and doping are emphasized, especially among older coaches and younger athletes.

  10. New supplements to infant formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshach Adiv, Orly; Berant, Moshe; Shamir, Raanan

    2004-12-01

    Foods, which, in addition to their nutritional attributes, contain also elements that are considered to be health-promoting, have been termed "functional foods". In this regard, human milk has gained recognition as being the ultimate functional food for infants - by its biological compatibility, nutritional value and the undisputed added value of its health promoting qualities. Intensive research activity has recently evolved in a quest to identify and define the components of human milk that might confer disease-preventing and health-enhancing properties and to determine the instances and clinical conditions in which these factors become particularly important. The outcome of such research would also provide a rationale for advocating the supplementation of commercial infant formulas with such substances. In effect, the body of data accumulated from scientific and clinical studies on nucleotides, probiotics, prebiotics and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in human milk and as additives to infant formula, has become regarded as convincing enough by the infant formula industry so as to launch into the market formulas supplemented with one or more of these factors - in an effort to emulate human milk and its beneficial effects. The following review is intended for the reader to obtain a general idea of the new supplements that have been introduced to infant formulas. We summarize the pertinent experimental and clinical observations concerning each of the supplements, pointing out their potential specific benefits, their possible disadvantages and the issues that still remain unresolved.

  11. Effect of some Socio-economic Factors on the Nutritional Status of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of some Socio-economic Factors on the Nutritional Status of Pregnant and ... dietary intake as well as some socio-economic and demographic factors. ... Daily food intakes were measured by 24hour-diet recall and food models to ...

  12. Dietary diversity, meal frequency and associated factors among infant and young children in Northwest Ethiopia: a cross- sectional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beyene, Melkamu; Worku, Abebaw Gebeyehu; Wassie, Molla Mesele

    2015-01-01

    .... The objective of this study is to assess minimum dietary diversity, meal frequency and its associated factors among infant and young children aged 6-23 months in Dangila Town, Northwest Ethiopia...

  13. Beliefs about whole-grain foods by food and nutrition professionals, health club members, and special supplemental nutrition program for women, infants, and children participants/State fair attendees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquart, Len; Pham, Anh-Tram; Lautenschlager, Lauren; Croy, Michael; Sobal, Jeffery

    2006-11-01

    Whole-grain foods are important components of healthful diets that may help prevent chronic diseases. Consumer beliefs that influence consumption of whole grains are poorly understood. This analysis surveyed three groups regarding their beliefs about whole-grain foods. The groups were food and nutrition professionals (n=103), health club members (n=103), and individuals representing various consumer segments of the general population, including participants in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and state fair attendees (n=68). Most respondents were aware of the term whole-grain foods, but less often reported that they use the term. Bread and cereal were most often named as examples of whole-grain foods. Lack of processing and use of the entire grain were the major reasons a food was perceived as being a whole-grain food. The major benefit of eating whole grains was reported to be fiber intake. Food and nutrition professionals provided more differentiated responses, whereas WIC/state fair participants had fewer and less elaborate responses. Assessing beliefs about whole grains offers insights to nutrition professionals for encouraging healthful food consumption.

  14. Effect of mouse nerve growth factor on brain development in premature infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Ban; Zhong-He Wan

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the effect of application of mouse nerve growth factor in neonatal period on brain development in premature infants.Methods:A total of 37 cases of premature infants given birth in our hospital from 1st January, 2015 to 30th December, 2015 were selected as research subjects and divided into observation group (n=18) and control group (n=19) according to different ways of intervention. Control group didn’t receive exogenous drugs, observation group received mouse nerve growth factor (NGF) treatment in neonatal period, and then differences in results of brain magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalogram, brainstem auditory evoked potential, scores of Gesell developmental scale, levels of NSE, S-100β, 8-OHdG and 8-I-PGF2α and levels of TLR-4, TNF-α, IL-18 and so on of two groups after intervention were compared.Results:Proportions of normal MRI, EEG and BAEP of observation group were higher than those of control group, and proportions of severely abnormal were significantly lower than those of control group; scores of Gesell developmental scale motor, adaptive behavior, language and social skills of observation group in 3 months and 6 months of corrected gestational age were higher than those of control group; serum NSE, S-100β, 8-OHdG and 8-I-PGF2α levels of observation group after 3 months and 6 months of corrected gestational age were lower than those of control group ; serum TLR-4, TNF-α, IL-18, NF-κB and MMP-9 levels of observation group after 6 months of corrected gestational age were lower than those of control group, and levels of EGF and SOD were higher than those of control group.Conclusion: Application of mouse nerve growth factor in neonatal period of premature infants helps to promote nerve cell growth and development and optimize brain function of premature infants, and it has active clinical significance.

  15. Kinetics and dose calculations of ampicillin and gentamicin given as continuous intravenous infusion during parenteral nutrition in 88 newborn infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colding, H; Møller, S; Bentzon, M W

    1983-01-01

    Ampicillin and gentamicin were administered continuously intravenously to 88 newborn infants using individually calculated dosages. For infants with a mean value of plasma clearance of the antibiotics, it was calculated that the serum ampicillin and gentamicin concentrations would be between 35...

  16. Kinetics and dose calculations of ampicillin and gentamicin given as continuous intravenous infusion during parenteral nutrition in 88 newborn infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colding, H; Møller, S; Bentzon, M W

    1983-01-01

    Ampicillin and gentamicin were administered continuously intravenously to 88 newborn infants using individually calculated dosages. For infants with a mean value of plasma clearance of the antibiotics, it was calculated that the serum ampicillin and gentamicin concentrations would be between 35-5...

  17. Continuous intravenous infusion of ampicillin and gentamicin during parenteral nutrition to 36 newborn infants using a dosage schedule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colding, H; Møller, S; Andersen, G E

    1984-01-01

    Ampicillin and gentamicin were given continuously i.v. to 36 newborn infants using a dosage schedule and the results were compared with those obtained in an earlier study including 88 infants who received individually calculated dosages. With the dosage schedule the variation in the serum concent...

  18. Continuous intravenous infusion of ampicillin and gentamicin during parenteral nutrition to 36 newborn infants using a dosage schedule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colding, H; Møller, S; Andersen, G E

    1984-01-01

    Ampicillin and gentamicin were given continuously i.v. to 36 newborn infants using a dosage schedule and the results were compared with those obtained in an earlier study including 88 infants who received individually calculated dosages. With the dosage schedule the variation in the serum concent...

  19. High frequencies of elevated alkaline phosphatase activity and rickets exist in extremely low birth weight infants despite current nutritional support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Bruce R

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteopenia and rickets are common among extremely low birth weight infants (ELBW, Methods We evaluated all ELBW infants admitted to Texas Children's Hospital NICU in 2006 and 2007. Of 211 admissions, we excluded 98 patients who were admitted at >30 days of age or did not survive/stay for >6 weeks. Bone radiographs obtained in 32 infants were reviewed by a radiologist masked to laboratory values. Results In this cohort of 113 infants, P-APA was found to have a significant inverse relationship with BW, gestational age and serum phosphorus. In paired comparisons, P-APA of infants Conclusion Elevation of P-APA >600 IU/L was very common in ELBW infants. BW was significantly inversely related to both P-APA and radiologic rickets. No single value of P-APA was related to radiological findings of rickets. Given the very high risk of osteopenia and rickets among ELBW infants, we recommend consideration of early screening and early mineral supplementation, especially among infants

  20. Outcomes and factors associated with infant abusive head trauma in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuño, Miriam; Pelissier, Lindsey; Varshneya, Kunal; Adamo, Matthew A; Drazin, Doniel

    2015-07-31

    OBJECT Head trauma is the leading cause of death in abused children, particularly prior to the age of 2 years. An awareness of factors associated with this condition as well as with a higher risk of mortality is important to improve outcomes and prevent the occurrence of these events. The objective of this study was to evaluate outcomes and factors associated with poor outcomes in infants with diagnosed abusive head trauma (AHT). Patient characteristics, socioeconomic factors, and secondary conditions such as retinal bleeding, contusion, and fractures were considered. METHODS Data were obtained from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. From the Kids' Inpatient Database (KID) sample, the authors identified infants no older than 23 months who had been diagnosed with AHT in 2000, 2003, 2006, and 2009. All statistical analyses were conducted in SAS 9.2. Descriptive statistics were provided, and multivariate logistic regression models were applied to evaluate factors associated with mortality and nonroutine discharge. RESULTS A total of 5195 infants were analyzed in this study. Most infants (85.5%) had ages ranging between 0 and 11 months and were male (61.6%). Overall mortality was 10.8%, with a rate of 9.8% in the 0- to 11-month-old cohort and 16.5% in the 12- to 23-month-olds (p = 0.0003). The overall nonroutine discharge rate of 25.6% increased significantly from 23.3% to 39.0% with increasing age (0-11 vs 12-23 months of age, p older infants (12-23 vs 0-11 months, OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.18-2.77) with a secondary diagnosis of retinal bleeding (OR 2.85, 95% CI 2.02-4.00) or shaken baby syndrome (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.48-2.94) had an increased risk of mortality; these factors were similarly associated with an increased odds of a nonroutine discharge. A higher income ($30,001-$35,000 vs $1-$24,999) was associated with a reduction in the odds of mortality (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.29-0.72). In the subset of cases (1695 [32

  1. Associations of infant nutrition with insulin resistance measures in early adulthood: evidence from the Barry-Caerphilly Growth (BCG study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan M Williams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggest that over-nutrition in early infancy may programme long-term susceptibility to insulin resistance. OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of breast milk and quantity of infant formula and cows' milk intake during infancy with insulin resistance measures in early adulthood. DESIGN: Long-term follow-up of the Barry Caerphilly Growth cohort, into which mothers and their offspring had originally been randomly assigned, between 1972-1974, to receive milk supplementation or not. Participants were the offspring, aged 23-27 years at follow-up (n = 679. Breastfeeding and formula/cows' milk intake was recorded prospectively by nurses. The main outcomes were insulin sensitivity (ISI(0 and insulin secretion (CIR(30. RESULTS: 573 (84% individuals had valid glucose and insulin results and complete covariate information. There was little evidence of associations of breastfeeding versus any formula/cows' milk feeding or of increasing quartiles of formula/cows' milk consumption during infancy (<3 months with any outcome measure in young adulthood. In fully adjusted models, the differences in outcomes between breastfeeding versus formula/cows' milk feeding at 3 months were: fasting glucose (-0.07 mmol/l; 95% CI: -0.19, 0.05; fasting insulin (8.0%; -8.7, 27.6; ISI(0 (-6.1%; -11.3, 12.1 and CIR(30 (3.8%; -19.0, 32.8. There was also little evidence that increasing intakes of formula/cows' milk at 3 months were associated with fasting glucose (increase per quartile of formula/cows' milk intake = 0.00 mmol/l; -0.03, 0.03; fasting insulin (0.8%; -3.2, 5.1; ISI (0 (-0.9%; -5.1, 3.5 and CIR(30 (-2.6%; -8.4, 3.6. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence that increasing consumption of formula/cows' milk in early infancy was associated with insulin resistance in young adulthood.

  2. Nutritional and toxic factors in selected wild edible plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guil, J L; Rodríguez-García, I; Torija, E

    1997-01-01

    Nutritional (ascorbic acid, dehydroascorbic acid and carotenes); antinutritional and toxic components (oxalic acid, nitrate and erucic acid) were determined in sixteen popular species of wild edible plants which are collected for human consumption in southeast Spain. Ascorbic + dehydroascorbic acids contents were very high in several species, especially in Chenopodium album L. (155 mg/100 g). Carotenoid content ranged from 4.2 mg/100 g (Stellaria media Villars) to 15.4 mg/100 g (Amaranthus viridis L.). A range of values was found for oxalic acid from absence to 1100 mg/100 g of plant material. Nitrate contents ranged from 47 mg/100 g (Salicornia europaea L.) to 597 mg/100 g (Amaranthus viridis L.). Low amounts of erucic acid were found in the Cruciferae family (Sisymbrium irio L. 1.73%; Cardaria draba L. 1.23%) and Plantago major L. 3.45%.

  3. Infant feeding options, other nonchemoprophylactic factors, and mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpey, Kwasi; Kabaso, Mushota; Weaver, Mark A; Kasonde, Prisca; Mukonka, Victor; Bweupe, Maximillian; Mukundu, Jonathan; Mandala, Justin

    2012-01-01

    The role of antiretroviral drugs in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV is well known. The objective of this study is to explore how nonchemoprophylactic factors, including infant feeding practices, mother's HIV status disclosure, mode and place of delivery, infant gender, and maternal age, are related to MTCT. The study analyzed program data of DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results from dried blood spot samples and selected client information from perinatally exposed infants aged 0 to 12 months. A total of 8237 samples were analyzed. In all, 84% of the mothers ever breast-fed their children. In instances where both mother and baby received intervention, the transmission rates of HIV were higher among those who are still breast-feeding after 6 to 12 months. Disclosure, location, and mode of delivery did not have an effect on the transmission rates of HIV when both mother and baby received prophylaxis. Nonchemoprophylaxis factors, especially breast-feeding, play a key role in perinatal transmission of HIV.

  4. Low birth weight and fetal anaemia as risk factors for infant morbidity in rural Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalanda, Boniface; Verhoeff, Francine; le Cessie, Saskia; Brabin, John

    2009-06-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) and fetal anaemia (FA) are common in malaria endemic areas. To investigate the incidence of infectious morbidity in infants in rural Malawi in relation to birth weight and fetal anaemia, a cohort of babies was followed for a year on the basis of LBW (<2500) and FA (cord haemoglobin < 12.5 g/dl). A matched group of normal birth weight (NBW), non-anaemic (NFA) new-borns were enrolled as controls. Morbidity episodes were recorded at 4-weekly intervals and at each extra visit made to a health centre with any illness. Infants in the NBW NFA group experienced an average of 1.15 (95% C.I. 0.99, 1.31), 1.04 (0.89, 1.19), 0.92 (0.73, 1.11) episodes per year of malaria, respiratory infection and diarrhoea respectively. Corresponding values for the LBW FA group were 0.83 (0.5, 1.16), 0.82 (0.5, 1.16) and 0.76 (0.33, 1.19). FA was not associated with a higher incidence of morbidity, but was significantly associated with a shorter time to first illness episode (p = 0.014). LBW was not a significant risk factor for higher morbidity incidence. LBW and FA were not significant risk factors for incidence of illness episodes in infants.

  5. Dairy proteins and soy proteins in infant foods nitrogen-to-protein conversion factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maubois, J-L; Lorient, D

    Protein content of any source is classically determined through the analysis of its nitrogen content done for more 100 years by the Kjeldahl method, and the obtained result is multiplied by a number named nitrogen conversion factor (NCF). The value of NCF is related to the amino acid composition of the protein source and to the eventual presence of side groups covalently bound to some amino acids of the protein chain. Consequently, the value of NCF cannot be identical for all sources of food proteins. The aim of this paper is to review the available knowledge on the two allowed protein sources for infant food formulas, milk and soybean, in order to bring the right scientific basis which should be used for the revision of both European legislation and Codex Standard for Infant Formulas.

  6. Nutritional and biochemical properties of human milk: II. Lipids, micronutrients, and bioactive factors.