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Sample records for industry toxicity grading

  1. Hazard report. Don't use industrial-grade gases for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The use of industrial-grade gases instead of medical-grade gases for clinical applications increases the risk of introducing undesirable and even toxic contaminants into the clinical environment. Hospitals should have policies in place to ensure that gases of the appropriate type and grade are used for the intended application.

  2. Construction Industry Related Mathematics: Seventh Grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, Scott

    The field tested construction industry-related mathematics unit is intended to familiarize seventh grade students with various facets of the construction industry, including the various occupations available and the mathematical abilities and other skills and training necessary to pursue an occupation in the industry. The final set of activities…

  3. Acute Toxicity Grade 3 and 4 After Irradiation in Children and Adolescents: Results From the IPPARCA Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pixberg, Caroline [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Koch, Raphael [Institute of Biostatistics and Clinical Research, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Eich, Hans Theodor, E-mail: Hans.Eich@ukmuenster.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Koeln, Koeln (Germany); Martinsson, Ulla [Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden); Kristensen, Ingrid [Department of Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Matuschek, Christiane [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany); Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Pohl, Fabian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany); Elsayad, Khaled [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Christiansen, Hans [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Willich, Normann [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Lindh, Jack [Department of Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå (Sweden); Steinmann, Diana [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: In the context of oncologic therapy for children, radiation therapy is frequently indicated. This study identified the frequency of and reasons for the development of high-grade acute toxicity and possible sequelae. Materials and Methods: Irradiated children have been prospectively documented since 2001 in the Registry for the Evaluation of Side Effects After Radiation in Childhood and Adolescence (RiSK) database in Germany and since 2008 in the registry for radiation therapy toxicity (RADTOX) in Sweden. Data were collected using standardized, published forms. Toxicity classification was based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Results: As of June 2013, 1500 children have been recruited into the RiSK database and 485 into the RADTOX registry leading to an analysis population of 1359 patients (age range 0-18). A total of 18.9% (n=257) of all investigated patients developed high-grade acute toxicity (grades 3/4). High-grade toxicity of the bone marrow was documented for 63.8% (n=201) of those patients, oral mucositis for 7.6% (n=24), and dermatitis for 7.6% (n=24). Patients with high-grade acute toxicity received concomitant chemotherapy more frequently (56%) than patients with no or lower acute toxicity (31.5%). In multivariate analyses, concomitant chemotherapy, diagnosis of Ewing sarcoma, and total radiation dose showed a statistically noticeable effect (P≤.05) on acute toxicity, whereas age, concomitant chemotherapy, Hodgkin lymphoma, Ewing sarcoma, total radiation dose, and acute toxicity influenced the time until maximal late toxicity. Conclusions: Generally, high-grade acute toxicity after irradiation in children and adolescence occurs in a moderate proportion of patients (18.9%). As anticipated, the probability of acute toxicity appeared to depend on the prescribed dose as well as concomitant chemotherapy. The occurrence of chronic toxicity correlates with the prior acute

  4. Escalation with Overdose Control Using Ordinal Toxicity Grades for Cancer Phase I Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourad Tighiouart

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We extend a Bayesian adaptive phase I clinical trial design known as escalation with overdose control (EWOC by introducing an intermediate grade 2 toxicity when assessing dose-limiting toxicity (DLT. Under the proportional odds model assumption of dose-toxicity relationship, we prove that in the absence of DLT, the dose allocated to the next patient given that the previously treated patient had a maximum of grade 2 toxicity is lower than the dose given to the next patient had the previously treated patient exhibited a grade 0 or 1 toxicity at the most. Further, we prove that the coherence properties of EWOC are preserved. Simulation results show that the safety of the trial is not compromised and the efficiency of the estimate of the maximum tolerated dose (MTD is maintained relative to EWOC treating DLT as a binary outcome and that fewer patients are overdosed using this design when the true MTD is close to the minimum dose.

  5. SCREENING FOR TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS USING SEMIPERMEABLE MEMBRANE DEVICES WITH RAPID TOXICITY ASSAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A time-integrated sampling device interfaced with two toxicity-based assays is reported for monitoring volatile toxic industrial chemicals (TICs). Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) using dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as the fill solvent accumulated each of 17 TICs from the vapor...

  6. Grading-System-Dependent Volume Effects for Late Radiation-Induced Rectal Toxicity After Curative Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, Hans Paul van der; Bergh, Alphons van den; Schilstra, Cornelis; Vlasman, Renske; Meertens, Harm; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the association between the dose distributions in the rectum and late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC), Late Effects of Normal Tissue SOMA, and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 3.0 graded rectal toxicity among patients with prostate cancer treated with RT. Methods and Materials: Included in the study were 124 patients who received three-dimensional conformal RT for prostate cancer to a total dose of 70 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. All patients completed questionnaires regarding rectum complaints before RT and during long-term follow-up. Late rectum Grade 2 or worse toxicity, according to RTOG/EORTC, LENT SOMA, and CTCAE v3.0 criteria, was analyzed in relation to rectal dose and volume parameters. Results: Dose-volume thresholds (V40 ≥65%, V50 ≥55%, V65 ≥45%, V70 ≥20%, and a rectum volume ≤140 cm 3 ), significantly discriminated patients with late Grade 0-1 and Grade 2 or worse rectal toxicity, particularly using the LENT SOMA and CTCAE v3.0 systems. The rectum volume receiving ≥70 Gy (V70) was most predictive for late Grade 2 or worse rectal toxicity with each of the grading systems. The associations were strongest, however, with use of the LENT SOMA system. Conclusions: Volume effects for late radiation-induced rectal toxicity are present, but their clinical significance depends on the grading system used. This should be taken into account in the interpretation of studies reporting on radiation-induced rectal toxicity

  7. [Source identification of toxic wastewaters in a petrochemical industrial park].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Yu, Yin; Zhou, Yue-Xi; Chen, Xue-Min; Fu, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Miao

    2014-12-01

    Petrochemical wastewaters have toxic impacts on the microorganisms in biotreatment processes, which are prone to cause deterioration of effluent quality of the wastewater treatment plants. In this study, the inhibition effects of activated sludge's oxygen consumption were tested to evaluate the toxicity of production wastewaters in a petrochemical industrial park. The evaluation covered the wastewaters from not only different production units in the park, but also different production nodes in each unit. No direct correlation was observed between the toxicity effects and the organic contents, suggesting that the toxic properties of the effluents could not be predicted by the organic contents. In view of the variation of activated sludge sensitivity among different tests, the toxicity data were standardized according to the concentration-effect relationships of the standard toxic substance 3, 5-dichlorophenol on each day, in order to improve the comparability among the toxicity data. Furthermore, the Quality Emission Load (QEL) of corresponding standard toxic substance was calculated by multiplying the corresponding 3, 5-dichlorophenol concentration and the wastewater flow quantity, to indicate the toxicity emission contribution of each wastewater to the wastewater treatment plant. According to the rank list of the toxicity contribution of wastewater from different units and nodes, the sources of toxic wastewater in the petrochemical industrial park were clearly identified. This study provides effective guidance for source control of wastewater toxicity in the large industrial park.

  8. Toxicity evaluation of the process effluent streams of a petrochemical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, J L R; Dezotti, M; Sant'Anna, G L

    2007-02-01

    The physico-chemical characteristics and the acute toxicity of several wastewater streams, generated in the industrial production of synthetic rubber, were determined. The acute toxicity was evaluated in bioassays using different organisms: Danio rerio (fish), Lactuca sativa (lettuce) and Brachionus calyciflorus (rotifer). The removal of toxicity attained in the industrial wastewater treatment plant was also determined upstream and downstream of the activated sludge process. The results obtained indicate that the critical streams in terms of acute toxicity are the effluents from the liquid polymer unit and the spent caustic butadiene washing stage. The biological treatment was able to partially remove the toxicity of the industrial wastewater. However, a residual toxicity level persisted in the biotreated wastewater. The results obtained with Lactuca sativa showed a high degree of reproducibility, using root length or germination index as evaluation parameters. The effect of volatile pollutants on the toxicity results obtained with lettuce seeds was assessed, using ethanol as a model compound. Modifications on the assay procedure were proposed. A strong correlation between the toxic responses of Lactuca sativa and Danio rerio was observed for most industrial effluent streams.

  9. Grading Dysphagia as a Toxicity of Head and Neck Cancer: Differences in Severity Classification Based on MBS DIGEST and Clinical CTCAE Grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goepfert, Ryan P; Lewin, Jan S; Barrow, Martha P; Warneke, Carla L; Fuller, Clifton D; Lai, Stephen Y; Weber, Randal S; Hutcheson, Katherine A

    2018-04-01

    Clinician-reported toxicity grading through common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) stages dysphagia based on symptoms, diet, and tube dependence. The new dynamic imaging grade of swallowing toxicity (DIGEST) tool offers a similarly scaled five-point ordinal summary grade of pharyngeal swallowing as determined through results of a modified barium swallow (MBS) study. This study aims to inform clinicians on the similarities and differences between dysphagia severity according to clinical CTCAE and MBS-derived DIGEST grading. A cross-sectional sample of 95 MBS studies was randomly selected from a prospectively-acquired MBS database among patients treated with organ preservation strategies for head and neck cancer. MBS DIGEST and clinical CTCAE dysphagia grades were compared. DIGEST and CTCAE dysphagia grades had "fair" agreement per weighted κ of 0.358 (95% CI .231-.485). Using a threshold of DIGEST ≥ 3 as reference, CTCAE had an overall sensitivity of 0.50, specificity of 0.84, and area under the curve (AUC) of 0.67 to identify severe MBS-detected dysphagia. At less than 6 months, sensitivity was 0.72, specificity was 0.76, and AUC was 0.75 while at greater than 6 months, sensitivity was 0.22, specificity was 0.90, and AUC was 0.56 for CTCAE to detect dysphagia as determined by DIGEST. Classification of pharyngeal dysphagia on MBS using DIGEST augments our understanding of dysphagia severity according to the clinically-derived CTCAE while maintaining the simplicity of an ordinal scale. DIGEST likely complements CTCAE toxicity grading through improved specificity for physiologic dysphagia in the acute phase and improved sensitivity for dysphagia in the late-phase.

  10. Migration of nonylphenol from food-grade plastic is toxic to the coral reef fish species Pseudochromis fridmani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Heather J; Marciano, Kathleen; Downs, Craig A

    2015-11-01

    Nonylphenol (NP) is a non-ionic surfactant used extensively in industrial applications, personal care products, and many plastics. We exposed marine orchid dottybacks (Pseudochromis fridmani) for 48h to either glass, Teflon, or two bags labeled as FDA food-grade polyethylene (PE1 and PE2) from different manufacturers. The PE2 bags leached high levels of NP into the contact water, which were taken up by the fish, and decreased short and long-term survival. Concentrations of NP that leached from the bags were consistent with 96h LC50 values determined in this study, indicating NP is the likely toxic agent. Despite being similarly labeled, the NP concentrations that leached from the bags and the resultant toxicity to the fish varied dramatically between manufacturers. This study highlights that some plastics, labeled as food-safe, can be highly toxic to aquatic animals, and could pose a greater threat to humans than previously realized. This study also highlights risks for aquatic animals exposed to increasing quantities of plastic waste. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Determination of some toxic gaseous emissions at Ama Industrial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of some toxic gaseous emissions at Ama Industrial Complex, Enugu, south eastern Nigeria. ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... A study of some gases emitted from three industries at Ama industrial complex, Nigeria, was carried out ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  12. The Industrial Toxics Project: Targeting chemicals for environmental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, W.M.

    1991-01-01

    In September, 1990, the Administrator of the US Environmental Protection Agency committed the Agency to a program of targeting chemicals for multi-media risk reduction activities through pollution prevention. The Industrial Toxics Project will place emphasis on obtaining voluntary commitments from industry to reduce releases of toxic chemicals to the air, water, and land with a goal of reducing releases nationwide by 33% by 1992 and 50% by 1995. An initial list of 18 chemicals have been selected based on recommendations from each Agency program. The chemicals selected are subject to reporting under the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Program which will provide the basis for tracking progress. The chemicals are characterized by high production volume, toxicity and releases and present the potential for significant risk reduction through pollution prevention. This presentation will discuss the focus and direction of this new initiative

  13. Toxicity of Neatex (industrial detergent) and Norust CR 486 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Populations of indigenous epigeic adult earthworms, Aporrectodea longa, were exposed to varying concentrations of two chemicals (industrial detergent and corrosion inhibitor) in natural soil to determine the acute toxicity of the chemicals. Earthworm acute toxicity test (OECD) 207 method was employed. After two weeks of ...

  14. Grand Rounds: An Outbreak of Toxic Hepatitis among Industrial Waste Disposal Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Kim, Eun A; Choi, Jung-Keun; Choi, Sung-Bong; Suh, Jeong-Ill; Choi, Dae Seob; Kim, Jung Ran

    2006-01-01

    Context Industrial waste (which is composed of various toxic chemicals), changes to the disposal process, and addition of chemicals should all be monitored and controlled carefully in the industrial waste industry to reduce the health hazard to workers. Case presentation Five workers in an industrial waste plant developed acute toxic hepatitis, one of whom died after 3 months due to fulminant hepatitis. In the plant, we detected several chemicals with hepatotoxic potential, including pyridine...

  15. Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Sauerheber

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity from ingestion is distinct from fully soluble toxic industrial fluorides. The toxicity of fluoride is determined by environmental conditions and the positive cations present. At a pH typical of gastric juice, fluoride is largely protonated as hydrofluoric acid HF. Industrial fluoride ingested from treated water enters saliva at levels too low to affect dental caries. Blood levels during lifelong consumption can harm heart, bone, brain, and even developing teeth enamel. The widespread policy known as water fluoridation is discussed in light of these findings.

  16. Physiologic conditions affect toxicity of ingested industrial fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerheber, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity from ingestion is distinct from fully soluble toxic industrial fluorides. The toxicity of fluoride is determined by environmental conditions and the positive cations present. At a pH typical of gastric juice, fluoride is largely protonated as hydrofluoric acid HF. Industrial fluoride ingested from treated water enters saliva at levels too low to affect dental caries. Blood levels during lifelong consumption can harm heart, bone, brain, and even developing teeth enamel. The widespread policy known as water fluoridation is discussed in light of these findings.

  17. Toxicity identification evaluation of cosmetics industry wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Elisa Dias; Mounteer, Ann H; Leão, Lucas Henrique de Souza; Bahia, Renata Cibele Barros; Campos, Izabella Maria Ferreira

    2013-01-15

    The cosmetics industry has shown steady growth in many developing countries over the past several years, yet little research exists on toxicity of wastewaters it generates. This study describes a toxicity identification evaluation conducted on wastewater from a small Brazilian hair care products manufacturing plant. Physicochemical and ecotoxicological analyses of three wastewater treatment plant inlet and outlet samples collected over a six month period revealed inefficient operation of the treatment system and thus treated wastewater organic matter, suspended solids and surfactants contents consistently exceeded discharge limits. Treated wastewater also presented high acute toxicity to Daphnia similis and chronic toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. This toxicity was associated with suspended solids, volatile or sublatable and non-polar to moderately polar organic compounds that could be recovered in filtration and aeration residues. Seven surfactants used in the largest quantities in the production process were highly toxic to P. subcapitata and D. similis. These results indicated that surfactants, important production raw materials, are a probable source of toxicity, although other possible sources, such as fragrances, should not be discarded. Improved treatment plant operational control may reduce toxicity and lower impact of wastewater discharge to receiving waters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Low Interrater Reliability in Grading of Rectal Bleeding Using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Toxicity Scales: A Survey of Radiation Oncologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huynh-Le, Minh-Phuong; Zhang, Zhe; Tran, Phuoc T.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Song, Daniel Y.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To measure concordance among genitourinary radiation oncologists in using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI CTC) and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading scales to grade rectal bleeding. Methods and Materials: From June 2013 to January 2014, a Web-based survey was sent to 250 American and Canadian academic radiation oncologists who treat prostate cancer. Participants were provided 4 case vignettes in which patients received radiation therapy and developed rectal bleeding and were asked for management plans and to rate the bleeding according to NCI CTC v.4 and RTOG late toxicity grading (scales provided). In 2 cases, participants were also asked whether they would send the patient for colonoscopy. A multilevel, random intercept modeling approach was used to assess sources of variation (case, respondent) in toxicity grading to calculate the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Agreement on a dichotomous grading scale (low grades 1-2 vs high grades 3-4) was also assessed, using the κ statistic for multiple respondents. Results: Seventy-two radiation oncologists (28%) completed the survey. Forty-seven (65%) reported having either written or been principal investigator on a study using these scales. Agreement between respondents was moderate (ICC 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.47-0.58) when using NCI CTC and fair using the RTOG scale (ICC 0.28, 95% CI 0.20-0.40). Respondents who chose an invasive management were more likely to select a higher toxicity grade (P<.0001). Using the dichotomous scale, we observed moderate agreement (κ = 0.42, 95% CI 0.40-0.44) with the NCI CTC scale, but only slight agreement with the RTOG scale (κ = 0.19, 95% CI 0.17-0.21). Conclusion: Low interrater reliability was observed among radiation oncologists grading rectal bleeding using 2 common scales. Clearer definitions of late rectal bleeding toxicity should be constructed to reduce this variability and avoid ambiguity in both

  19. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the reported effects for exposure to many of the toxic industrial chemicals is DNA damage. The present study describes a simple, rapid and innovative assay to detect DNA damage resulting from exposure of surrogate DNA to toxic industrial chemicals (acrolein, allylamine, ch...

  20. A Food-Grade Cloning System for Industrial Strains of Lactococcus lactis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Kim I.; Larsen, Rasmus; Kibenich, Annette; Junge, Mette P.; Johansen, Eric

    2000-01-01

    We have previously reported the construction of a food-grade cloning vector for Lactococcus using the ochre suppressor, supB, as the selective marker. This vector, pFG1, causes only a slight growth inhibition in the laboratory strain MG1363 but is unstable in the industrial strains tested. As supB suppresses both amber and ochre stop codons, which are present in 82% of all known lactococcal genes, this undesirable finding may result from the accumulation of elongated mistranslated polypeptides. Here, we report the development of a new food-grade cloning vector, pFG200, which is suitable for overexpressing a variety of genes in industrial strains of Lactococcus lactis. The vector uses an amber suppressor, supD, as selectable marker and consists entirely of Lactococcus DNA, with the exception of a small polylinker region. Using suppressible pyrimidine auxotrophs, selection and maintenance are efficient in any pyrimidine-free medium including milk. Importantly, the presence of this vector in a variety of industrial strains has no significant effect on the growth rate or the rate of acidification in milk, making this an ideal system for food-grade modification of industrially relevant L. lactis strains. The usefulness of this system is demonstrated by overexpressing the pepN gene in a number of industrial backgrounds. PMID:10742196

  1. On The Generation of Interferometric Colors in High Purity and Technical Grade Aluminum: An Alternative Green Process for Metal Finishing Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yuting; Santos, Abel; Ho, Daena; Wang, Ye; Kumeria, Tushar; Li, Junsheng; Wang, Changhai; Losic, Dusan

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Toward green processes in metal finishing industry by rationally designed electrochemical anodization. Biomimetic photonic films based on nanoporous anodic alumina produced in high purity and technical grade aluminum foils display vivid colors that can be precisely tuned across the visible spectrum. The presented method is a solid rationale aimed toward green processes for metal finishing industry. - Highlights: • Environmentally friendly approach to color aluminum through biomimetic photonic films. • Nanoporous anodic alumina distributed Bragg Reflectors (NAA-DBRs). • Rationally designed galvanostatic pulse anodization approach. • Macroscopic and microscopic differences in high purity and technical grade aluminum. • Substitute method for conventional coloring processes in metal finishing industry. - Abstract: Metal finishing industry is one of the leading pollutants worldwide and green approaches are urgently needed in order to address health and environmental issues associated with this industrial activity. Herein, we present an environmentally friendly approach aimed to overcome some of these issues by coloring aluminum through biomimetic photonic films based on nanoporous anodic alumina distributed Bragg Reflectors (NAA-DBRs). Our study aims to compare the macroscopic and microscopic differences between the resulting photonic films produced in high purity and technical grade aluminum in terms of color features, appearance, electrochemical behavior and internal nanoporous structure in order to establish a solid rationale toward optimal fabrication processes that can be readily incorporated into industrial methodologies. The obtained results reveal that our approach, based on a rational galvanostatic pulse anodization approach, makes it possible to precisely generate a complete palette of colors in both types of aluminum substrates. As a result of its versatility, this method could become a promising alternative to substitute

  2. Characteristics of particulate-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emitted from industrial grade biomass boilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoyang; Geng, Chunmei; Sun, Xuesong; Yang, Wen; Wang, Xinhua; Chen, Jianhua

    2016-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are carcinogenic or mutagenic and are important toxic pollutants in the flue gas of boilers. Two industrial grade biomass boilers were selected to investigate the characteristics of particulate-bound PAHs: one biomass boiler retro-fitted from an oil boiler (BB1) and one specially designed (BB2) biomass boiler. One coal-fired boiler was also selected for comparison. By using a dilution tunnel system, particulate samples from boilers were collected and 10 PAH species were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The total emission factors (EFs) of PAHs ranged from 0.0064 to 0.0380 mg/kg, with an average of 0.0225 mg/kg, for the biomass boiler emission samples. The total PAH EFs for the tested coal-fired boiler were 1.8 times lower than the average value of the biomass boilers. The PAH diagnostic ratios for wood pellets and straw pellets were similar. The ratio of indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene/[indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene+benzo(g,h,i)perylene] for the two biomass boilers was lower than those of the reference data for other burning devices, which can probably be used as an indicator to distinguish the emission of biomass boilers from that of industrial coal-fired boilers and residential stoves. The toxic potential of the emission from wood pellet burning was higher than that from straw pellet burning, however both of them were much lower than residential stove exhausts. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Comparative studies of industrial grade carbon black powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chawla, Komal, E-mail: komalchawla.rs@gmail.com; Chauhan, Alok P. S., E-mail: chauhan.alok@gmail.com, E-mail: alok.chauhan@alumni.stonybrook.edu [Department of Physics and Material Science and Engineering, Jaypee Institute of Information Technology, A-10, Sector-62, Noida-201307, UP, India. (India)

    2016-05-06

    Comparative studies of two dissimilar industrial grade Carbon Black (CB) powders (N375 and N405) were conducted. The structure, surface area and particle size are the three important characteristics of CB powder that determine their processability and application as filler in preparing rubber compounds. The powders were characterized for their structure using dibutyl phthalate absorption (DBPA), particle size via laser particle size analyzer and surface area by nitrogen adsorption method. The structural characterization showed that N405 had lower DBPA in comparison to N375, confirming low structure of N405 grade CB powder. It was observed from the particle size analysis that N375 was coarser than N405 grade CB. The total surface area values were determined by the BET method based on the cross sectional area of the nitrogen molecule. N375, a coarse grade CB powder with high structure, depicted less surface area as compared to N405.

  4. ASSESSMENT OF TOXICITY OF INDUSTRIAL WASTES USING CROP PLANT ASSAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Alice Teacă

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollution has a harmful action on bioresources, including agricultural crops. It is generated through many industrial activities such as mining, coal burning, chemical technology, cement production, pulp and paper industry, etc. The toxicity of different industrial wastes and heavy metals excess was evaluated using crop plant assays (germination and hydroponics seedlings growth tests. Experimental data regarding the germination process of wheat (from two cultivars and rye seeds in the presence of industrial wastes (thermal power station ash, effluents from a pre-bleaching stage performed on a Kraft cellulose – chlorinated lignin products or chlorolignin, along with use of an excess of some heavy metals (Zn and Cu are presented here. Relative seed germination, relative root elongation, and germination index (a factor of relative seed germination and relative root elongation were determined. Relative root elongation and germination index were more sensitive indicators of toxicity than seed germination. The toxic effects were also evaluated in hydroponics experiments, the sensitivity of three crop plant species, namely Triticum aestivum L. (wheat, Secale cereale (rye, and Zea mays (corn being compared. Physiological aspects, evidenced both by visual observation and biometric measurements (mean root, aerial part and plant length, as well as the cellulose and lignin content were examined.

  5. A Study on the D. magna and V. fischeri Toxicity Relationship of Industrial Wastewater from Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, S.; Lee, S.; Chun Sang, H.; Park, T. J.; Kim, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that high concentration of TDS (total dissolved solid) in industrial effluent gives rise to the toxicity to the Daphnia magna toxicity test. D. magna is vulnerable to relatively low TDS concentration showing the 24-hr EC50 of Salinity 0.6% (as the sea salt concentration). Recently, standard mandatory toxicity testing using Daphnia magna has been used to monitor industrial effluent toxicity according to Korea standard method (Acute Toxicity Test Method of the Daphnia magna Straus (Cladocera, Crustacea), ES 04704. 1a) under regulation. Since only one acute toxicity testing is applied in the present, we are trying to introduce microbial battery for more complete toxicity assessment. In this study, the acute toxicities between daphnids and microbes were compared. The results of D. magna and Vibrio fischeri toxicity test from 165 industrial wastewater effluents showed high positive correlation. In addition, the possibility of predicting daphnia toxicity from the bacterial toxicity data amounts to 92.6% if we consider salinity effect (>5ppt) together. From this study, we found that the V. fischeri toxicity test is a powerful battery tool to assess the industrial wastewater toxicity. Here, we suggest that luminescent bacteria toxicity test be useful not only for complete toxicity assessment which can't be obtained by daphnia toxicity testing only but also for the reduction cost, time, and labor in the Korean society. Keywords : D. magna, V. fischeri, Industrial waste water, battery test Acknowledgement This research was supported by a grant (15IFIP-B089908-02) from Plant Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean government

  6. High-grade acute organ toxicity as positive prognostic factor in primary radio(chemo)therapy for locally advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, Hendrik Andreas; Bosch, Jan; Hennies, Steffen; Hess, Clemens F.; Christiansen, Hans [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. Medicine Goettingen (Germany); Jung, Klaus [Dept. of Medical Statistics, Univ. Medicine Goettingen (Germany); Overbeck, Tobias [Dept. of Haematology and Oncology, Univ. Medicine Goettingen (Germany); Matthias, Christoph; Roedel, Ralph M. [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Univ. Medicine Goettingen (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: to test for a possible correlation between high-grade acute organ toxicity during primary radio(chemo)therapy and treatment outcome in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Patients and methods: from 05/1994 to 01/2009, 216 HNSCC patients were treated with radio(chemo)therapy in primary approach. They received normofractionated (2 Gy/fraction) irradiation including associated nodal drainage sites to a cumulative dose of 70 Gy. 151 patients received additional concomitant chemotherapy (111 patients 5-fluorouracil/mitomycin C, 40 patients cisplatin-based). Toxicity during treatment was monitored weekly according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), and any toxicity grade CTC {>=} 3 of mucositis, dysphagia or skin reaction was assessed as high-grade acute organ toxicity for later analysis. Results: a statistically significant coherency between high-grade acute organ toxicity and overall survival as well as locoregional control was found: patients with CTC {>=} 3 acute organ toxicity had a 5-year overall survival rate of 4% compared to 8% in patients without (p < 0.01). Thereby, multivariate analyses revealed that the correlation was independent of other possible prognostic factors or factors that may influence treatment toxicity, especially concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy technique or treatment-planning procedure. Conclusion: these data indicate that normal tissue and tumor tissue may behave similarly with respect to treatment response, as high-grade acute organ toxicity during radio(chemo)therapy showed to be an independent prognostic marker in the own patient population. However, the authors are aware of the fact that a multivariate analysis in a retrospective study generally has statistical limitations. Therefore, their hypothesis should be further analyzed on biomolecular and clinical levels and other tumor entities in prospective trials. (orig.)

  7. ASSESSMENT OF TOXICITY OF INDUSTRIAL WASTES USING CROP PLANT ASSAYS

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen Alice Teacă; Ruxanda Bodîrlău

    2008-01-01

    Environmental pollution has a harmful action on bioresources, including agricultural crops. It is generated through many industrial activities such as mining, coal burning, chemical technology, cement production, pulp and paper industry, etc. The toxicity of different industrial wastes and heavy metals excess was evaluated using crop plant assays (germination and hydroponics seedlings growth tests). Experimental data regarding the germination process of wheat (from two cultivars) and rye seed...

  8. Toxicity of Neatex (industrial detergent) and Norust CR 486 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-06-02

    Jun 2, 2006 ... strictly asking industrial operators to sustainably manage the disposal of ... Toxicity modifying factors considered were exposure duration and mortality. The test .... soils is bond to expose organisms living and breeding there to ...

  9. Bacterial removal of toxic phenols from an industrial effluent

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    Jul 4, 2008 ... Chlorinated phenols, widely used in industries, are of growing concern owing to their high toxicity, .... phenol-degradation ability of bacterial isolate at the high phenol .... ed virtually no decrease in the respiratory response over.

  10. Concurrent radiotherapy with temozolomide vs. concurrent radiotherapy with a cisplatinum-based polychemotherapy regimen. Acute toxicity in pediatric high-grade glioma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, Clemens; Kortmann, Rolf D.; Bueren, Andre O. von; Bojko, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Marion; Kramm, Christof M.; Pietsch, Torsten; Gielen, Gerrit H.; Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Bison, Brigitte

    2018-01-01

    As the efficacy of all pediatric high-grade glioma (HGG) treatments is similar and still disappointing, it is essential to also investigate the toxicity of available treatments. Prospectively recorded hematologic and nonhematologic toxicities of children treated with radiochemotherapy in the HIT GBM-C/D and HIT-HGG-2007 trials were compared. Children aged 3-18 years with histologically proven HGG (WHO grade III and IV tumors) or unequivocal radiologic diagnosis of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) were included in these trials. The HIT-HGG-2007 protocol comprised concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide, while cisplatinum/etoposide (PE) and PE plus ifosfamide (PEI) in combination with weekly vincristine injections were applied during radiochemotherapy in the HIT GBM-C/D protocol. Regular blood counts and information about cellular nadirs were available from 304 patients (leukocytes) and 306 patients (thrombocytes), respectively. Grade 3-4 leukopenia was much more frequent in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (n = 88, 52%) vs. HIT-HGG-2007 (n = 13, 10%; P <0.001). Grade 3-4 thrombopenia was also more likely in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (n = 21, 12% vs. n = 3,2%; P <0.001). Grade 3-4 leukopenia appeared more often in children aged 3-7 years (n = 38/85, 45%) than in children aged 8-12 years (n = 39/120, 33%) and 13-18 years (24/100, 24%; P =0.034). In addition, sickness was more frequent in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (grade 1-2: 44%, grade 3-4: 6% vs. grade 1-2: 28%, grade 3-4: 1%; P <0.001). Radiochemotherapy involving cisplatinum-based polychemotherapy is more toxic than radiotherapy in combination with temozolomide. Without evidence of differences in therapeutic efficacy, the treatment with lower toxicity, i. e., radiotherapy with temozolomide should be used. (orig.) [de

  11. Characterizing the adoption of low-grade hardwood lumber by the secondary wood processing industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Smith; Wibke Pohle; Philip Araman; Dan Cumbo

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the adoption of low-grade lumber in the secondary hardwood industry. Factors influencing decisions regarding the utilization of low-grade lumber were identified and value-added opportunities to increase the use of low-grade lumber among manufacturers currently using higher grades were evaluated. Data were collected via a nationwide mail survey...

  12. Industrial grade versus scientific pure: Influence on melt properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, I.; Hembree, W.; Yang, F.; Busch, R.; Meyer, A.

    2018-04-01

    Viscosity, density, and the undercooling ability of the Zr-based bulk glass forming melt, which was manufactured in two different degrees of purity, have been studied. Investigations have been carried out by means of Couette rheometry and electrostatic and electromagnetic levitation with the latter under microgravity conditions. We found that oxygen and impurities present in industrial grade metals do not significantly alter the melt viscosity and density, while they clearly affect the undercooling ability. Comparing container based and containerless results showed that Couette rheometry can be applied in the temperature range between 1150 K and 1375 K, where it provides reliable data, but only at a rather low oxygen content. Higher oxygen contents, as in the case of the industrial grade alloy, cause measurement artefacts. In the case of Zr59.3Cu28.8Al10.4Nb1.5 alloys, these findings allow a better localization of the key factors dominating the glass forming ability.

  13. Predictors of Grade 3 or Higher Late Bowel Toxicity in Patients Undergoing Pelvic Radiation for Cervical Cancer: Results From a Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, Supriya, E-mail: schopra@actrec.gov.in [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Dora, Tapas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Chinnachamy, Anand N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Thomas, Biji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Kannan, Sadhna [Epidemiology and Clinical Trials Unit, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Phurailatpam, Reena; Paul, Siji N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The present study investigates relationship between dose–volume parameters and severe bowel toxicity after postoperative radiation treatment (PORT) for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2010 to December 2012, a total of 71 patients undergoing PORT were included. Small bowel (SB) and large bowel (LB) loops were contoured 2 cm above the target volume. The volume of SB and LB that received 15 Gy, 30 Gy, and 40 Gy was calculated (V15 SB, V15 LB, V30 SB, V30 LB, V40 SB, V 40 LB). On follow-up, bowel toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0. A reciever operating characteristic (ROC) curve identified volume thresholds that predicted for grade 3 or higher toxicity with highest specificity. All data was dichotomized across these identified cut-off values. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed using SPSS, version 15. Results: The median patient age was 47 years (range, 35-65 years). Of the 71 patients, 46 received image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy, and 25 received conformal radiation (50 Gy in 25 fractions for 5 weeks). Overall, 63 of 71 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. On a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 8-29 months), grade 2 or higher bowel toxicity was seen in 22 of 71 patients (30.9%) and grade 3 or higher bowel toxicity was seen in 9 patients (12.6%). On univariate analysis, V15 SB <275 cc (P=.01), V30 SB <190 cc (P=.02), V40 SB <150 cc (P=.01), and V15 LB <250 cc (P=.03), and V40 LB <90 cc (P=.04) predicted for absence of grade 3 or higher toxicity. No other patient- or treatment-related factors were statistically significant. On multivariate analysis, only V15 SB (P=.002) and V15 LB (P=.03) were statistically significant. Conclusions: V 15 Gy SB and LB are independent predictors of late grade 3 or higher toxicity. Restricting V15 SB and V15 LB to <275 cc and <250 cc can reduce grade 3 or higher toxicity to less than 5%.

  14. TOXICITY OF INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENT ON TOTAL CHLOROPHYLL CONTENT OF CERTAIN AQUATIC MACROPHYTES

    OpenAIRE

    Singh Priti; Vishen Ashish; Wadhwani R; Pandey Y.N

    2012-01-01

    To assess the toxicity of industrial effluents on certain macrophytes, the total chlorophyll content of free floating, submerged and emergent macrophytes were estimated in concentrations of industrial effluents at varying exposure duration. The result revealed reduction in total chlorophyll content of exposed macrophytes at higher concentrations of industrial effluents on prolonged duration.

  15. Concurrent radiotherapy with temozolomide vs. concurrent radiotherapy with a cisplatinum-based polychemotherapy regimen : Acute toxicity in pediatric high-grade glioma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Clemens; von Bueren, André O; Bojko, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Marion; Pietsch, Torsten; Gielen, Gerrit H; Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Bison, Brigitte; Kortmann, Rolf-D; Kramm, Christof M

    2018-03-01

    As the efficacy of all pediatric high-grade glioma (HGG) treatments is similar and still disappointing, it is essential to also investigate the toxicity of available treatments. Prospectively recorded hematologic and nonhematologic toxicities of children treated with radiochemotherapy in the HIT GBM-C/D and HIT-HGG-2007 trials were compared. Children aged 3-18 years with histologically proven HGG (WHO grade III and IV tumors) or unequivocal radiologic diagnosis of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) were included in these trials. The HIT-HGG-2007 protocol comprised concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide, while cisplatinum/etoposide (PE) and PE plus ifosfamide (PEI) in combination with weekly vincristine injections were applied during radiochemotherapy in the HIT GBM-C/D protocol. Regular blood counts and information about cellular nadirs were available from 304 patients (leukocytes) and 306 patients (thrombocytes), respectively. Grade 3-4 leukopenia was much more frequent in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (n = 88, 52%) vs. HIT-HGG-2007 (n = 13, 10%; P <0.001). Grade 3-4 thrombopenia was also more likely in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (n = 21, 12% vs. n = 3,2%; P <0.001). Grade 3-4 leukopenia appeared more often in children aged 3-7 years (n = 38/85, 45%) than in children aged 8-12 years (n = 39/120, 33%) and 13-18 years (24/100, 24%; P =0.034). In addition, sickness was more frequent in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (grade 1-2: 44%, grade 3-4: 6% vs. grade 1-2: 28%, grade 3-4: 1%; P <0.001). Radiochemotherapy involving cisplatinum-based polychemotherapy is more toxic than radiotherapy in combination with temozolomide. Without evidence of differences in therapeutic efficacy, the treatment with lower toxicity, i. e., radiotherapy with temozolomide should be used.

  16. Intensity of adjuvant chemotherapy regimens and grade III-V toxicities among elderly stage III colon cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Erning, F N; Razenberg, L G E M; Lemmens, V E P P; Creemers, G J; Pruijt, J F M; Maas, H A A M; Janssen-Heijnen, M L G

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to provide insight in the use, intensity and toxicity of therapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) and capecitabine monotherapy (CapMono) among elderly stage III colon cancer patients treated in everyday clinical practice. Data from the Netherlands Cancer Registry were used. All stage III colon cancer patients aged ≥70 years diagnosed in the southeastern part between 2005 and 2012 and treated with CAPOX or CapMono were included. Differences in completion of all planned cycles, cumulative dosages and toxicity between both regimens were evaluated. One hundred ninety-three patients received CAPOX and 164 patients received CapMono; 33% (n = 63) of the patients receiving CAPOX completed all planned cycles of both agents, whereas 55% (n = 90) of the patients receiving CapMono completed all planned cycles (P characteristics, CapMono was associated with a lower odds of developing grade III-V toxicity than CAPOX (odds ratio 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.33-0.89). For patients treated with CAPOX, the most common toxicities were gastrointestinal (29%), haematological (14%), neurological (11%) and other toxicity (13%). For patients treated with CapMono, dermatological (17%), gastrointestinal (13%) and other toxicity (11%) were the most common. CAPOX is associated with significantly more grade III-V toxicities than CapMono, which had a pronounced impact on the cumulative dosage received and completion of all planned cycles. In this light, CapMono seems preferable over CAPOX. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. VAPOR SAMPLING DEVICE FOR INTERFACE WITH MICROTOX ASSAY FOR SCREENING TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A time-integrated sampling system interfaced with a toxicity-based assay is reported for monitoring volatile toxic industrial chemicals (TICs). Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the fill solvent accumulated each of 17 TICs from the vapor...

  18. Toxicity Identification and Evaluation for the Effluent from Wastewater Treatment Plant in Industrial Complex using D.magna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Keum, H.; Chun Sang, H.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the interests on the impacts of industrial wastewater on aquatic ecosystem have increased with concern about ecosystem protection and human health. Whole effluent toxicity tests are used to monitor toxicity by unknown toxic chemicals as well as conventional pollutants from industrial effluent discharges. This study describes the application of TIE (toxicity identification evaluation) procedures to an acutely toxic effluent from a wastewater treatment plant in industrial complex which was toxic to Daphnia magna. In TIE phase I (characterization step), the toxic effects by heavy metals, organic compounds, oxidants, volatile organic compounds, suspended solids and ammonia were screened and revealed that the source of toxicity is far from these toxicants group. Chemical analysis (TIE phase II) on TDS showed that the concentration of chloride ion (6,900 mg/L) was substantially higher than that predicted from EC50 for D. magna. In confirmation step (TIE phase III), chloride ion was demonstrated to be main toxicant in this effluent by the spiking approach, species sensitivity approach and deletion approach. Calcium, potassium, magnesium, sodium, fluorine, sulfate ion concentration (450, 100, 80, 5,300, 0.66, 2,200mg/L) was not shown toxicity from D. magna. Finally, we concluded that chloride was the most contributing toxicant in the waste water treatment plant. Further research activities are needed for technical support of toxicity identification and evaluation on the various types of wastewater treatment plant discharge in Korea. Keywords : TIE, D. magna, Industrial waste water Acknowledgement This research was supported by a grant (15IFIP-B089908-02) from Plant Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean government

  19. Assessment of the toxicity level of an industrial eco-system for its hazardous metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husaini, S.N.; Matiullah; Arif, M.

    2011-01-01

    Pakistan is an agricultural country, yet it is facing a serious threat due to the shortage of water resources and degradation of the agricultural land by the pollution of industrial effluents. A limited number of the current industries are equipped with proper operating treatment plants. Generally, the untreated effluents are disposed off to the open environment which is used for irrigation purposes. Therefore, vegetables and crops grown around the industrial areas is a major potential source of metal poisoning which pose a serious risk to the general public. Hence, study of the toxicity level in vegetables and crops is highly desirable. In this regard, systematic studies have been carried out to determine concentration levels of toxic elements in the samples of vegetables, crops, effluents and soil collected from the industrial areas of the Faisalabad. After processing, these samples were analyzed using neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectrometric techniques. The highest concentrations of toxic metals were observed for As (2.73 ± 0.34) in cabbage, Cd (1.5 ± 0.1), Ni (5.1 ± 0.9) and Pb (4.3 ± 0.2) in corn, Co (0.65 ± 0.02), and Sb (0.09 ± 0.01) in carrot, Cr (9.63 ± 1.3), Mn (46.5 ± 4.2) and Se (1.03 ± 0.1) in millet, Cu (11.3 ± 1.1) in tomato vegetables and crop samples. Although, the observed toxicity levels in vegetables and crop samples were higher than those grown in non-industrial areas, yet these toxicity levels are within the safe recommended limits. (author)

  20. Do Industries Pollute More in Poorer Neighborhoods? Evidence From Toxic Releasing Plants in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Lopamudra Chakraborti; José Jaime Sainz Santamaría

    2015-01-01

    Studies on industrial pollution and community pressure in developing countries are rare. We employ previously unused, self-reported toxics pollution data from Mexico to show that there exists some evidence of environmental justice concerns and community pressure in explaining industrial pollution behavior. We obtain historical data on toxic releases into water and land for the time period 2004 to 2012. We focus on 7 major pollutants including heavy metals and cyanide. To address endogeneity c...

  1. Acute and subchronic oral toxicity studies in rats with nanoscale and pigment grade titanium dioxide particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warheit, D B; Brown, S C; Donner, E M

    2015-10-01

    Data generated using standardized testing protocols for toxicity studies generally provide reproducible and reliable results for establishing safe levels and formulating risk assessments. The findings of three OECD guideline-type oral toxicity studies of different duration in rats are summarized in this publication; each study evaluated different titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles of varying sizes and surface coatings. Moreover, each study finding demonstrated an absence of any TiO2 -related hazards. To briefly summarize the findings: 1) In a subchronic 90-day study (OECD TG 408), groups of young adult male and female rats were dosed with rutile-type, surface-coated pigment-grade TiO2 test particles (d50 = 145 nm - 21% nanoparticles by particle number criteria) by oral gavage for 90 days. The no-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for both male and female rats in this study was 1000 mg/kg bw/day, the highest dose tested. The NOAEL was determined based on a lack of TiO2 particle-related adverse effects on any in-life, clinical pathology, or anatomic/microscopic pathology parameters; 2) In a 28-day repeated-dose oral toxicity study (OECD TG 407), groups of young adult male rats were administered daily doses of two rutile-type, uncoated, pigment-grade TiO2 test particles (d50 = 173 nm by number) by daily oral gavage at a dose of 24,000 mg/kg bw/day. There were no adverse effects measured during or following the end of the exposure period; and the NOAEL was determined to be 24,000 mg/kg bw/day; 3) In an acute oral toxicity study (OECD TG 425), female rats were administered a single oral exposure of surface-treated rutile/anatase nanoscale TiO2 particles (d50 = 73 nm by number) with doses up to 5000 mg/kg and evaluated over a 14-day post-exposure period. Under the conditions of this study, the oral LD50 for the test substance was >5000 mg/kg bw. In summary, the results from these three toxicity studies - each with different TiO2 particulate-types, demonstrated an absence of

  2. Monitoring of toxic elements present in sludge of industrial waste using CF-LIBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rohit; Rai, Awadhesh K; Alamelu, Devanathan; Aggarwal, Suresh K

    2013-01-01

    Industrial waste is one of the main causes of environmental pollution. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied to detect the toxic metals in the sludge of industrial waste water. Sludge on filter paper was obtained after filtering the collected waste water samples from different sections of a water treatment plant situated in an industrial area of Kanpur City. The LIBS spectra of the sludge samples were recorded in the spectral range of 200 to 500 nm by focusing the laser light on sludge. Calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (CF-LIBS) technique was used for the quantitative measurement of toxic elements such as Cr and Pb present in the sample. We also used the traditional calibration curve approach to quantify these elements. The results obtained from CF-LIBS are in good agreement with the results from the calibration curve approach. Thus, our results demonstrate that CF-LIBS is an appropriate technique for quantitative analysis where reference/standard samples are not available to make the calibration curve. The results of the present experiment are alarming to the people living nearby areas of industrial activities, as the concentrations of toxic elements are quite high compared to the admissible limits of these substances.

  3. Evaluation of toxicity level of the polluted eco-system for an industrial city of Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husaini, S.N.; Matiullah; Akram, M.; Arif, M.

    2011-01-01

    The indiscriminate discharge of untreated industrial effluents and solid wastes into the open environment poses a serious threat to the ecosystem. Gujranwala is an industrial city of Pakistan wherein a large number of different industries are situated and majority of them are not equipped with proper recycling or effluent treatment plants. Unfortunately, untreated industrial effluents are locally used for the irrigation purposes which may result in higher concentrations of toxic metals in the crops and vegetables. Therefore, prime objective of the present study was to determine concentrations of toxic metals in the polluted soils, vegetables and crops grown in the vicinity of industrial areas using neutron activation analysis technique. The results obtained showed higher values of toxic metals in the studied samples. The observed highest concentration of As (0.94 ± 0.06) in spinach, Br (69 ± 9) in turnip, Co (0.83 ± 0.01) in millet, Cr (51.7 ± 4.2) in wheat, Mn (76.2 ± 7.3) in tomato, Sb (0.5 ± 0.06) in rice, Cl (31698 ± 3921) and Se (3.4 ± 0.4) in carrot. These values are higher than those reported in the literature. (author)

  4. Microcontroller based, ore grade measuring portable instruments for uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dheeraj Reddy, J.; Narender Reddy, J.

    2004-01-01

    Ore Face Scanning and Bore Hole Logging are important essential activities which are required to be carried out in any Uranium mining industry. Microcontroller based, portable instruments with built-in powerful embedded code for data acquisition (of Radiation counts) and Ore Grade calculations will become a handy measuring tool for miners. Nucleonix Systems has recently developed and made these two portable instruments available to UCIL, which are under use at Jaduguda and Narvapahar mines. Some of the important features of these systems are compact, light weight, portable, hand held, battery powered. Modes of Data Acquisition: CPS, CPM and ORE GRADE. Detector: Sensitive GM Tube. Choice of Adj. TC (Time Constant) in 'ORE GRADE', acquisition mode. Built-in automatic BG (Background) recording and subtraction provided to indicate net CPS, CPM or ore GRADE in PPM. Can store 1000 readings at users choice. Built-in RS232 serial port facilitates data downloading into PC. This paper focuses on design concepts and technical details for the above two products. (author)

  5. Toxicity Evaluation of Through Fish Bioassay Raw Bulk Drug Industry Wastewater After Electrochemical Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Satyanarayan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Considering the high pollution potential that the synthetic Bulk Drug industry Wastewater (BDW possesses due to the presence of variety of refractory organics, toxicity evaluation is of prime importance in assessing the efficiency of the applied wastewater treatment system and in establishing the discharge standards. Therefore, in this study the toxic effects of high strength bulk drug industry wastewater before and after electrochemical treatment on common fish Lebistes reticulatus-(peter were studied under laboratory conditions. Results indicated that wastewater being very strong in terms of color, COD and BOD is found to be very toxic to the studied fish. The LC50 values for raw wastewater and after electrochemical treatment with carbon and aluminium electrodes for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours ranged between, 2.5-3.6%, 6.8-8.0%, 5.0-5.8% respectively. Carbon electrode showed marginally better removals for toxicity than aluminium electrode. It was evident from the studies that electrochemical treatment reduces toxicity in proportion to the removal efficiency shown by both the electrodes. The reduction in toxicity after treatment indicates the intermediates generated are not toxic than the parent compounds. Furthermore, as the electrochemical treatment did not result in achieving disposal standards it could be used only as a pre-treatment and the wastewater needs further secondary treatment before final disposal.

  6. Findings of the inspection grading system on industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloria Doloressa

    2011-01-01

    The use of industrial radiography techniques evolve rapidly and widely. Various jobs in industry require the examination of welding techniques / connecting pipes and metal construction. The use of industrial radiography is one type of utilization of nuclear energy must get control so that its use does not cause harmful impacts to worker safety, community, and environment. Regulations is done through inspections, in order to supervise the observance of the terms in the licensing and legislation in the field of nuclear safety. The main purpose of inspection is to ensure the utilization of radiation sources of radiation have been used with. Findings of the inspection is a decline in the performance of licensees in meeting safety requirements. The Grading System to the findings of the inspection needs to be done to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of inspection, and it is expected that the company can improve the management of radiation safety. (author)

  7. Frequency and impact of grade three or four toxicities of novel agents on outcomes of older patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (alliance A151611).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarico, Michael; Foster, Jared C; Seisler, Drew; Lafky, Jacqueline M; Hurria, Arti; Jatoi, Aminah; Cohen, Harvey J; Muss, Hyman B; Bartlett, Nancy; Cheson, Bruce D; Jung, Sin-Ho; Leonard, John P; Byrd, John C; Nabhan, Chadi

    2018-04-16

    Older patients with cancer suffer from chemotherapy-related toxicities more frequently than younger patients. As novel agents are being used more commonly in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), toxicities of these agents in older patients have not been well studied. Further, impact of these toxicities on outcomes in the elderly is unknown. This study aimed to answer both questions. We reviewed 14 Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology trials that enrolled CLL and/or NHL patients between 2004-2014. Toxicity was assessed per the NCI-CTCAE (version 3-5). Probabilities of experiencing grade three or four hematologic and non-hematologic toxicities were modeled as a function of clinical and disease-related factors using logistic regression. 1199 patients (409 age ≥ 65; 790 age four hematologic [odds ratio (OR) 1.70; p = 0.009: 95% CI (1.57-1.84)] and non-hematologic toxicities [OR 1.47; p = 0.022; 95% CI (1.39-1.55)] were increased in older patients with CLL, as well as odds of grade three or four non-hematologic toxicities [OR 1.89; p = 0.017; 95% CI (1.64-2.17)] in older patients with NHL. Grade three or four hematologic toxicities were associated with inferior OS and PFS in older patients with NHL [HR 3.14; p = 0.006; 95% CI (2.25-4.39) for OS and 3.06; p = 0.011; 95% CI (2.10-4.45) for PFS], though not in CLL. A prognostic model predicting grade three or four toxicities was also developed. CLL and NHL patients ≥ 65 year encounter more toxicities than younger patients even when treated with novel biologic agents. Development of grade three or four hematologic toxicities lead to inferior PFS and OS in NHL but not in CLL. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Reactive formulations for a neutralization of toxic industrial chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D [Albuqueruqe, NM; Betty, Rita G [Rio Rancho, NM

    2006-10-24

    Decontamination formulations for neutralization of toxic industrial chemicals, and methods of making and using same. The formulations are effective for neutralizing malathion, hydrogen cyanide, sodium cyanide, butyl isocyanate, carbon disulfide, phosgene gas, capsaicin in commercial pepper spray, chlorine gas, anhydrous ammonia gas; and may be effective at neutralizing hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, ethylene oxide, methyl bromide, boron trichloride, fluorine, tetraethyl pyrophosphate, phosphorous trichloride, arsine, and tungsten hexafluoride.

  9. Decomposition of toxicity emission changes on the demand and supply sides: empirical study of the US industrial sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hidemichi; Okamoto, Shunsuke; Kagawa, Shigemi; Managi, Shunsuke

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the changes in the toxicity of chemical emissions from the US industrial sector over the 1998-2009 period. Specifically, we employed a multiregional input-output analysis framework and integrated a supply-side index decomposition analysis (IDA) with a demand-side structural decomposition analysis (SDA) to clarify the main drivers of changes in the toxicity of production- and consumption-based chemical emissions. The results showed that toxic emissions from the US industrial sector decreased by 83% over the studied period because of pollution abatement efforts adopted by US industries. A variety of pollution abatement efforts were used by different industries, and cleaner production in the mining sector and the use of alternative materials in the manufacture of transportation equipment represented the most important efforts.

  10. Host Response to Environmental Hazards: Using Literature, Bioinformatics, and Computation to Derive Candidate Biomarkers of Toxic Industrial Chemical Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    military threat chemicals with adverse health effects and clinical outcomes to improve diagnostic potential after exposure to toxic industrial...end organ injury following chemical exposures in the field. Markers of end-organ injury and toxicity and other health effects markers, particularly...Biomarkers of Toxic Industrial Chemical Exposure Major Jonathan D. Stallings *1 , Danielle L. Ippolito 1 , Anders Wallqvist 2 , B. Claire McDyre 3 , and

  11. Acute and Chronic Toxicity of Soluble Fractions of Industrial Solid Wastes on Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Flohr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrial wastes may produce leachates that can contaminate the aquatic ecosystem. Toxicity testing in acute and chronic levels is essential to assess environmental risks from the soluble fractions of these wastes, since only chemical analysis may not be adequate to classify the hazard of an industrial waste. In this study, ten samples of solid wastes from textile, metal-mechanic, and pulp and paper industries were analyzed by acute and chronic toxicity tests with Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri. A metal-mechanic waste (sample MM3 induced the highest toxicity level to Daphnia magna(CE50,48 h=2.21%. A textile waste induced the highest toxicity level to Vibrio fischeri (sample TX2, CE50,30 min=12.08%. All samples of pulp and paper wastes, and a textile waste (sample TX2 induced chronic effects on reproduction, length, and longevity of Daphnia magna. These results could serve as an alert about the environmental risks of an inadequate waste classification method.

  12. Ashwagandha leaf derived withanone protects normal human cells against the toxicity of methoxyacetic acid, a major industrial metabolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyandoko, Didik; Ishii, Tetsuro; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2011-05-04

    The present day lifestyle heavily depends on industrial chemicals in the form of agriculture, cosmetics, textiles and medical products. Since the toxicity of the industrial chemicals has been a concern to human health, the need for alternative non-toxic natural products or adjuvants that serve as antidotes are in high demand. We have investigated the effects of Ayurvedic herb Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) leaf extract on methoxyacetic acid (MAA) induced toxicity. MAA is a major metabolite of ester phthalates that are commonly used in industry as gelling, viscosity and stabilizer reagents. We report that the MAA cause premature senescence of normal human cells by mechanisms that involve ROS generation, DNA and mitochondrial damage. Withanone protects cells from MAA-induced toxicity by suppressing the ROS levels, DNA and mitochondrial damage, and induction of cell defense signaling pathways including Nrf2 and proteasomal degradation. These findings warrant further basic and clinical studies that may promote the use of withanone as a health adjuvant in a variety of consumer products where the toxicity has been a concern because of the use of ester phthalates.

  13. Ashwagandha leaf derived withanone protects normal human cells against the toxicity of methoxyacetic acid, a major industrial metabolite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didik Priyandoko

    Full Text Available The present day lifestyle heavily depends on industrial chemicals in the form of agriculture, cosmetics, textiles and medical products. Since the toxicity of the industrial chemicals has been a concern to human health, the need for alternative non-toxic natural products or adjuvants that serve as antidotes are in high demand. We have investigated the effects of Ayurvedic herb Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera leaf extract on methoxyacetic acid (MAA induced toxicity. MAA is a major metabolite of ester phthalates that are commonly used in industry as gelling, viscosity and stabilizer reagents. We report that the MAA cause premature senescence of normal human cells by mechanisms that involve ROS generation, DNA and mitochondrial damage. Withanone protects cells from MAA-induced toxicity by suppressing the ROS levels, DNA and mitochondrial damage, and induction of cell defense signaling pathways including Nrf2 and proteasomal degradation. These findings warrant further basic and clinical studies that may promote the use of withanone as a health adjuvant in a variety of consumer products where the toxicity has been a concern because of the use of ester phthalates.

  14. The Auto Industry. Grade Nine. Resource Unit (Unit IV). Project Social Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Project Social Studies Curriculum Center.

    Unit four of this curriculum plan for ninth grade social studies outlines a study of the automobile industry in the United States. Objectives state the desired generalizations, skills, and attitudes to be developed. A condensed outline of course content precedes expanded guidelines for teaching procedures and suggested resource materials. A…

  15. Integrated design and optimization of technologies for utilizing low grade heat in process industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Dong-Hun; Binns, Michael; Kim, Jin-Kuk

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Implementation of a modeling and design framework for the utilization of low grade heat. • Application of process simulator and optimization techniques for the design of technologies for heat recovery. • Systematic and holistic exploitation for the recovery of industrial low grade heat. • Demonstration of the applicability and benefit of integrated design and optimization framework through a case study. - Abstract: The utilization of low grade heat in process industries has significant potential for improving site-wide energy efficiency. This paper focuses on the techno-economic analysis of key technologies for energy recovery and re-use, namely: Organic Rankine Cycles (ORC), boiler feed water heating, heat pumping and absorption refrigeration in the context of process integration. Process modeling and optimization in a holistic manner identifies the optimal integrated configuration of these technologies, with rigorous assessment of costs and technical feasibility of these technologies. For the systematic screening and evaluation of design options, detailed process simulator models are evaluated and optimization proceeds subject to design constraints for the particular economic scenarios where technology using low grade heat is introduced into the process site. Case studies are presented to illustrate how the proposed modeling and optimization framework can be useful and effective in practice, in terms of providing design guidelines and conceptual insights for the application of technologies using low grade heat. From the case study, the best options during winter are the ORC giving a 6.4% cost reduction for the ideal case with low grade heat available at a fixed temperature and boiler feed water heating giving a 2.5% cost reduction for the realistic case with low grade heat available at a range of temperatures. Similarly during summer boiler feed water heating was found to be the best option giving a 3.1% reduction of costs considering a

  16. Evaluation of the toxicity of fluids employed in the metallic tool industrial machining using aquatic ecotoxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, Ricardo dos Santos

    2006-01-01

    Eco toxicological analyses have being used to monitor environmental samples, industrial effluents and complex substances. With the objective to analyze the toxicity of cutting fluids used in the machinery industry, acute toxicity test with species of three different trophic levels: Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia similis, Daphnia laevis e Danio rerio, were performing. The samples of fluids were analyzed by COD, phenol, pH, color, density and surfactants. The physical and chemical parameters are the according with the brazilian law, CONAMA 357 (D.O.U. 2005). The results of the toxicity tests showed that the cutting fluids have high toxicity to the organisms used in this study and the gamma radiation treatment was not efficient to decrease the matrix. The biodegradation in soil demonstrated be effective to the cutting fluids and the indigenous bacteria were identified and isolated to possible treatment of soils contaminated with these kinds of substances. The monitoring and management of residues of cutting fluids are necessary to preservation of aquatic live, in consequence of their high toxicity. (author)

  17. Marine toxicity and persistence of surfactants used in the petroleum producing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddin, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of marine toxicity and biodegradability data for surfactants used in the petroleum industry. Surfactants are key chemicals in the formulation of products such as emulsifiers, demulsifiers, dispersants and inhibitors. They are also used directly as foaming and defoaming agents. Because they function at low concentrations, below 1%, and have a tendency to adsorb on solid surfaces, their long-term environmental effects are minimal. In applications such as cementing, surfactants cannot migrate into the environment and, thus, have no bioavailability. The possibility of environmental contamination has caused well operators and regulatory agencies to require fish toxicity and persistence data for products used in servicing wells. This data has been organized for nonionic, anionic, cationic and amphoteric surfactants. Nonionic surfactants are toxic to fish at concentrations below 10 mg/L to over 2500 mg/L depending on their chemical compositions. Anionic surfactants are toxic to fish at concentrations under 1 mg/L to several hundred mg/L depending on their chemical compositions. cationic and amphoteric surfactants are generally toxic to fish at concentrations below 50 mg/L. Overall efforts are aimed at low toxicity and high biodegradability with the least compromise in product efficiency. This requires the continual testing and environmental evaluation of surfactants summarized herein

  18. Metal-organic frameworks for the removal of toxic industrial chemicals and chemical warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbitt, N Scott; Mendonca, Matthew L; Howarth, Ashlee J; Islamoglu, Timur; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K; Snurr, Randall Q

    2017-06-06

    Owing to the vast diversity of linkers, nodes, and topologies, metal-organic frameworks can be tailored for specific tasks, such as chemical separations or catalysis. Accordingly, these materials have attracted significant interest for capture and/or detoxification of toxic industrial chemicals and chemical warfare agents. In this paper, we review recent experimental and computational work pertaining to the capture of several industrially-relevant toxic chemicals, including NH 3 , SO 2 , NO 2 , H 2 S, and some volatile organic compounds, with particular emphasis on the challenging issue of designing materials that selectively adsorb these chemicals in the presence of water. We also examine recent research on the capture and catalytic degradation of chemical warfare agents such as sarin and sulfur mustard using metal-organic frameworks.

  19. Variations in productivity and performance in grade lumber industries in Kentucky, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia-1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert P. Dempsey; Gilbert P. Dempsey

    1987-01-01

    Sawmill effectiveness is crucial to the growth and development of wood industries among locales, states, regions, and countries. Productivity ratios, structural factors, and other indicators of economic performance were used to measure the relative productive efficiency of the grade hardwood lumber industries in Kentucky, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. Despite...

  20. Evaluation of toxic metals in the industrial effluents and their segregation through peanut husk fence for pollution abatement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husaini, S.N.; Zaidi, J.H.; Matiullah; Akram, M.

    2011-01-01

    The industrial pollution is exponentially growing in the developing countries due to the discharge of untreated effluents from the industries in the open atmosphere. This may cause severe health hazards in the general public. To reduce this effect, it is essential to remove the toxic and heavy metals from the effluents before their disposal into the biosphere. In this context, samples of the effluents were collected from the textile/yarn, ceramics and pulp/paper industries and the concentrations of the toxic metal ions were determined using neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique. The observed concentration values of the As, Cr and Fe ions, in the unprocessed industrial effluents, were 4.91 ± 0.8, 9.67 ± 0.7 and 9.71 ± 0.8 mg/L, respectively which was well above the standard recommended limits (i.e. 1.0, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/L, respectively). In order to remove the toxic metal ions from the effluents, the samples were treated with pea nut husk fence. After this treatment, 91.5% arsenic, 81.9% chromium and 66.5% iron metal ions were successfully removed from the effluents. Then the treated effluents contained concerned toxic metal ions concentrations within the permissible limits as recommended by the national environmental quality standards (NEQS). (author)

  1. Toxic industrial deposit remediation by ant activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilkova, Veronika; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Toxic industrial deposits are often contaminated by heavy metals and the substrates have low pH values. In such systems, soil development is thus slowed down by high toxicity and acidic conditions which are unfavourable to soil fauna. Ants (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) are considered tolerant to heavy metal pollution and are known to increase organic matter content and microbial activity in their nests. Here, we focused on soil remediation caused by three ant species (Formica sanguinea, Lasius niger, and Tetramorium sp.) in an ore-washery sedimentation basin near Chvaletice (Czech Republic). Soil samples were taken from the centre of ant nests and from the nest surroundings (>3 m from nests). Samples were then analyzed for microbial activity and biomass and contents of organic matter and nutrients. As a result, ant species that most influenced soil properties was F. sanguinea as there were higher microbial activity and total nitrogen and ammonia contents in ant nests than in the surrounding soil. We expected such a result because F. sanguinea builds conspicuous large nests and is a carnivorous species that brings substantial amounts of nitrogen in insect prey to their nests. Effects of the other two ant species might be lower because of smaller nests and different feeding habits as they rely mainly on honeydew from aphids or on plant seeds that do not contain much nutrients.

  2. Defusing the Toxics Threat: Controlling Pesticides and Industrial Waste. Worldwatch Paper 79.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postel, Sandra

    The use of pesticides in agriculture and the discarding of industrial chemical waste into the air, soil, and water constitute two major pathways of human exposure to toxic substances. It is argued that these practices release hundreds of millions of tons of potentially hazardous substances into the environment each year. Speculation continues into…

  3. Neoadjuvant Interdigitated Chemoradiotherapy Using Mesna, Doxorubicin, and Ifosfamide for Large, High-grade, Soft Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremity: Improved Efficacy and Reduced Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhary, Mudit; Sen, Neilayan; Jeans, Elizabeth B; Miller, Luke; Batus, Marta; Gitelis, Steven; Wang, Dian; Abrams, Ross A

    2018-05-18

    Patients with large, high-grade extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS) are at high risk for both local and distant recurrence. RTOG 95-14, using a regimen of neoadjuvant interdigitated chemoradiotherapy with mesna, doxorubicin, ifosfamide, and dacarbazine followed by surgery and 3 cycles of adjuvant mesna, doxorubicin, ifosfamide, and dacarbazine, demonstrated high rates of disease control at the cost of significant toxicity (83% grade 4, 5% grade 5). As such, this regimen has not been widely adopted. Herein, we report our institutional outcomes utilizing a modified interdigitated chemoradiotherapy regimen, without dacarbazine, and current radiotherapy planning and delivery techniques for high-risk STS. Adults with large (≥5 cm; median, 12.9 cm), grade 3 extremity STS who were prospectively treated as part of our institutional standard of care from 2008 to 2016 are included. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy consisted of 3 cycles of mesna, doxorubicin, and ifosfamide (MAI) and 44 Gy (22 Gy in 11 fractions between cycles of MAI) after which patients underwent surgical resection and received 3 additional cycles of MAI. Twenty-six patients received the MAI treatment protocol. At a median follow-up of 47.3 months, 23 (88.5%) patients are still alive. Three year locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival are 95.0%, 64.0%, and 95.0%, respectively. There have been no therapy-related deaths or secondary malignancies. The nonhematologic grade 4 toxicity rate was 7.7%. Neoadjuvant interdigitated MAI radiotherapy followed by resection and 3 cycles of adjuvant MAI has resulted in acceptable and manageable toxicity and highly favorable survival in patients at greatest risk for treatment failure.

  4. Concurrent radiotherapy with temozolomide vs. concurrent radiotherapy with a cisplatinum-based polychemotherapy regimen. Acute toxicity in pediatric high-grade glioma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Clemens; Kortmann, Rolf D. [University of Leipzig Medical Center, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Leipzig (Germany); Bueren, Andre O. von [University Medical Center Goettingen, Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Geneva, Department of Pediatrics, CANSEARCH Research Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Bojko, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Marion; Kramm, Christof M. [University Medical Center Goettingen, Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Pietsch, Torsten; Gielen, Gerrit H. [University of Bonn Medical Center, Department of Neuropathology, Brain Tumor Reference Center of the DGNN, Bonn (Germany); Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Bison, Brigitte [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    As the efficacy of all pediatric high-grade glioma (HGG) treatments is similar and still disappointing, it is essential to also investigate the toxicity of available treatments. Prospectively recorded hematologic and nonhematologic toxicities of children treated with radiochemotherapy in the HIT GBM-C/D and HIT-HGG-2007 trials were compared. Children aged 3-18 years with histologically proven HGG (WHO grade III and IV tumors) or unequivocal radiologic diagnosis of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) were included in these trials. The HIT-HGG-2007 protocol comprised concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide, while cisplatinum/etoposide (PE) and PE plus ifosfamide (PEI) in combination with weekly vincristine injections were applied during radiochemotherapy in the HIT GBM-C/D protocol. Regular blood counts and information about cellular nadirs were available from 304 patients (leukocytes) and 306 patients (thrombocytes), respectively. Grade 3-4 leukopenia was much more frequent in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (n = 88, 52%) vs. HIT-HGG-2007 (n = 13, 10%; P <0.001). Grade 3-4 thrombopenia was also more likely in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (n = 21, 12% vs. n = 3,2%; P <0.001). Grade 3-4 leukopenia appeared more often in children aged 3-7 years (n = 38/85, 45%) than in children aged 8-12 years (n = 39/120, 33%) and 13-18 years (24/100, 24%; P =0.034). In addition, sickness was more frequent in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (grade 1-2: 44%, grade 3-4: 6% vs. grade 1-2: 28%, grade 3-4: 1%; P <0.001). Radiochemotherapy involving cisplatinum-based polychemotherapy is more toxic than radiotherapy in combination with temozolomide. Without evidence of differences in therapeutic efficacy, the treatment with lower toxicity, i. e., radiotherapy with temozolomide should be used. (orig.) [German] Die Wirksamkeit verschiedener Protokolle zur Radiochemotherapie bei Kindern mit hochmalignen Gliomen (''high-grade glioma'', HGG) ist aehnlich und leider noch enttaeuschend. Es

  5. Biochars made from agro-industrial by-products remove chlorine and lower water toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzachristas, Andreas; Xirou, Maria; Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Dailianis, Stefanos; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.

    2016-04-01

    Chlorination is the most common disinfection process for water and treated wastewater. For the industrial use of water in food production, chlorine can add undesired taste and odor to the final product. For this reason, dechlorination is desired for food industries that use municipal tap water. For treated wastewater discharge or reuse, chlorine can be toxic to the receiving aqueous systems and to the irrigated plants. In both the above cases, dechlorination is also required. Traditionally activated carbon has been used as the ideal material for the removal of chlorine. The main mechanisms that describe the interaction between activated carbon and HOCl or OCl- are described by the following equations (AWWA, 1990): HOCl + C* → C*O + H+ + Cl- (1), OCl- + C* → C*O + Cl- (2) Where C* and C*O represent the activated carbon surface and a surface oxide, respectively. The present study proposes the use of agro-industrial by-products for the production of biochars that will be used for dechlorination of tap-water used for food-industry production. Different raw materials such as malt spent rootlets, coffee residue, olive and grape seeds, etc. are used for the production of biochar. Various temperatures and air-to-solid ratios are tested for optimizing biochar production. Batch tests as well as a column test are employed to study the dechlorination efficiency and kinetics of the different raw and biochar materials as well as those of commercial activated carbons. As chlorine concentration increases the removal also increases linearily. After 1 and 24 hours of contact the chlorine relative removal efficiencies for the biochar made from olive seeds are 50 and 77 ± 4%, respectively. It seems that the removal kinetics are faster during the first hour; then, removal continues but with a slower rate. Most of the biochars tested (with 3 mg of solid in 20 mL of chlorine solution at initial concentration Co=1.5 mg/L) demonstrated removal efficiencies with an average of 9.4 ± 0

  6. Small Bowel Dose Parameters Predicting Grade ≥3 Acute Toxicity in Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: An Independent Validation Study Comparing Peritoneal Space Versus Small Bowel Loop Contouring Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Robyn; Chakraborty, Santam; Nygren, Ian; Sinha, Richie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether volumes based on contours of the peritoneal space can be used instead of individual small bowel loops to predict for grade ≥3 acute small bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A standardized contouring method was developed for the peritoneal space and retrospectively applied to the radiation treatment plans of 67 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for rectal cancer. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data were extracted and analyzed against patient toxicity. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression were carried out for both contouring methods. Results: Grade ≥3 small bowel toxicity occurred in 16% (11/67) of patients in the study. A highly significant dose-volume relationship between small bowel irradiation and acute small bowel toxicity was supported by the use of both small bowel loop and peritoneal space contouring techniques. Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that, for both contouring methods, the greatest sensitivity for predicting toxicity was associated with the volume receiving between 15 and 25 Gy. Conclusion: DVH analysis of peritoneal space volumes accurately predicts grade ≥3 small bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy, suggesting that the contours of the peritoneal space provide a reasonable surrogate for the contours of individual small bowel loops. The study finds that a small bowel V15 less than 275 cc and a peritoneal space V15 less than 830 cc are associated with a less than 10% risk of grade ≥3 acute toxicity

  7. A Food-Grade Cloning System for Industrial Strains of Lactococcus lactis

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, Kim I.; Larsen, Rasmus; Kibenich, Annette; Junge, Mette P.; Johansen, Eric

    2000-01-01

    We have previously reported the construction of a food-grade cloning vector for Lactococcus using the ochre suppressor, supB, as the selective marker. This vector, pFG1, causes only a slight growth inhibition in the laboratory strain MG1363 but is unstable in the industrial strains tested. As supB suppresses both amber and ochre stop codons, which are present in 82% of all known lactococcal genes, this undesirable finding may result from the accumulation of elongated mistranslated polypeptide...

  8. Will bottle-grade PET demand lure fiber-grade capacity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coeyman, M.

    1993-01-01

    As demand for bottle-grade polyethylene terephthalate (PET) continues strong and new capacity hastens to meet it, some industry observers wonder if conversions to bottle-grade from fiber-grade capacity will become an industry trend. Taiwan's Nan Ya Plastics was recently said to be considering such a switch, but company sources say it has no such plans. Peter Driscoll, senior partner at PCI Fibres ampersand Raw Materials (Crawley, UK), says that while it is true that demand for the bottle-grade material remains unsatisfied, he doubts that many conversions will take place. You must remember, says Driscoll, that it is not always possible to switch, and that even where it is possible there are limitations

  9. The effects of sequential versus concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy on survival and toxicity in patients with newly diagnosed high-grade astrocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinberg, Lawrence; Grossman, Stuart A.; Piantadosi, Steven; Zeltzman, Michel; Wharam, Moody

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of sequential versus concurrent administration of cranial radiotherapy and cisplatin/carmustine (BCNU) chemotherapy on survival and toxicity in newly diagnosed high-grade astrocytomas. Methods and Materials: From 1988 to 1996, 101 patients were treated on 2 therapeutic protocols for malignant glioma that used the identical chemotherapy regimen but differed in the timing of cranial radiotherapy. The eligibility criteria for the 2 protocols were identical. In the first protocol (1988-1991, 52 patients), cisplatin 120 mg/BCNU 120 mg i.v. over 72 h, was given for 3 monthly cycles prior to cranial radiotherapy. After a response rate of 42%, with a median survival of 13 months was achieved with this sequential regimen, a successor protocol (1992-1996, 49 patients) was developed in which cranial radiotherapy began concurrently with the start of the identical chemotherapy regimen. Chemotherapy was delayed but not discontinued if prolonged grade III/IV hematologic toxicity was experienced, but protocol therapy was discontinued if disease progression or thromboembolic events occurred. Survival outcome and hematologic toxicity were compared for the patients treated on these protocols. Results: Seventy-seven percent of sequentially-treated patients and 68% of concurrently-treated patients completed all planned therapy. Kaplan-Meier survival was similar to concurrent or sequential administration of chemotherapy and radiotherapy (median 12.8 months vs. 13.8 months, respectively). Hematologic toxicity was significantly less in sequentially- versus concurrently-treated patients, with median nadir per cycle (2.9 vs. 1.8 x 10 3 /mm 3 ) (p < 0.001), and incidence of grade 3/4 leukopenia 40% versus 77% (p = 0.002). There was also an increase in platelet transfusion requirements in concurrently-treated patients, but no significant worsening of anemia. We postulate that the worsened leukopenia results from the effects of concurrent radiotherapy on

  10. Personal care product preservatives: risk assessment and mixture toxicities with an industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajo, Jose B; Perdigón-Melón, Jose A; Petre, Alice L; Rosal, Roberto; Letón, Pedro; García-Calvo, Eloy

    2015-04-01

    The aquatic toxicity of eight preservatives frequently used in personal care products (PCPs) (iodopropynyl butylcarbamate, bronopol, diazolidinyl urea, benzalkonium chloride, zinc pyrithione, propylparaben, triclosan and a mixture of methylchloroisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone) was assessed by means of two different approaches: a battery of bioassays composed of single species tests of bacteria (Vibrio fischeri and Pseudomonas putida) and protozoa (Tetrahymena thermophila), and a whole biological community resazurin-based assay using activated sludge. The tested preservatives showed considerable toxicity in the studied bioassays, but with a marked difference in potency. In fact, all biocides except propylparaben and diazolidinyl urea had EC50 values lower than 1 mg L(-1) in at least one assay. Risk quotients for zinc pyrithione, benzalkonium chloride, iodopropynyl butylcarbamate and triclosan as well as the mixture of the studied preservatives exceeded 1, indicating a potential risk for the process performance and efficiency of municipal sewage treatment plants (STPs). These four single biocides explained more than 95% of the preservative mixture risk in all bioassays. Each individual preservative was also tested in combination with an industrial wastewater (IWW) from a cosmetics manufacturing facility. The toxicity assessment was performed on binary mixtures (preservative + IWW) and carried out using the median-effect principle, which is a special case of the concept of Concentration Addition (CA). Almost 70% of all experiments resulted in EC50 values within a factor of 2 of the values predicted by the median-effect principle (CI values between 0.5 and 2). The rest of the mixtures whose toxicity was mispredicted by CA were assessed with the alternative concept of Independent Action (IA), which showed higher predictive power for the biological community assay. Therefore, the concept used to accurately predict the toxicity of mixtures of a preservative

  11. Toxicity assessment of industrial chemicals and airborne contaminants: transition from in vivo to in vitro test methods: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakand, S; Winder, C; Khalil, C; Hayes, A

    2005-12-01

    Exposure to occupational and environmental contaminants is a major contributor to human health problems. Inhalation of gases, vapors, aerosols, and mixtures of these can cause a wide range of adverse health effects, ranging from simple irritation to systemic diseases. Despite significant achievements in the risk assessment of chemicals, the toxicological database, particularly for industrial chemicals, remains limited. Considering there are approximately 80,000 chemicals in commerce, and an extremely large number of chemical mixtures, in vivo testing of this large number is unachievable from both economical and practical perspectives. While in vitro methods are capable of rapidly providing toxicity information, regulatory agencies in general are still cautious about the replacement of whole-animal methods with new in vitro techniques. Although studying the toxic effects of inhaled chemicals is a complex subject, recent studies demonstrate that in vitro methods may have significant potential for assessing the toxicity of airborne contaminants. In this review, current toxicity test methods for risk evaluation of industrial chemicals and airborne contaminants are presented. To evaluate the potential applications of in vitro methods for studying respiratory toxicity, more recent models developed for toxicity testing of airborne contaminants are discussed.

  12. Common toxicity criteria: version 2.0. an improved reference for grading the acute effects of cancer treatment: impact on radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotti, Andy; Byhardt, Roger; Stetz, Joanne; Gwede, Clement; Corn, Benjamin; Fu, Karen; Gunderson, Leonard; McCormick, Beryl; Morris, Mitchell; Rich, Tyvin; Shipley, William; Curran, Walter

    2000-01-01

    In 1997, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) led an effort to revise and expand the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) with the goal of integrating systemic agent, radiation, and surgical criteria into a comprehensive and standardized system. Representatives from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) participated in this process in an effort to improve acute radiation related criteria and to achieve better clarity and consistency among modalities. CTC v. 2.0 replaces the previous NCI CTC and the RTOG Acute Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria and includes more than 260 individual adverse events with more than 100 of these applicable to acute radiation effects. One of the advantages of the revised criteria for radiation oncology is the opportunity to grade acute radiation effects not adequately captured under the previous RTOG system. A pilot study conducted by the RTOG indicated the new criteria are indeed more comprehensive and were preferred by research associates. CTC v. 2.0 represents an improvement in the evaluation and grading of acute toxicity for all modalities

  13. Tomotherapy for prostate adenocarcinoma: A report on acute toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keiler, Louis; Dobbins, Donald; Kulasekere, Ravi; Einstein, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: To analyze the impact of Tomotherapy (TOMO) intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) on acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity in prostate cancer. Materials and methods: The records of 55 consecutively treated TOMO patients were reviewed. Additionally a well-matched group of 43 patients treated with LINAC-based step and shoot IMRT (LINAC) was identified. Acute toxicity was scored according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicity criterion. Results: The grade 2-3 acute GU toxicity rates for the TOMO vs. LINAC groups were 51% vs. 28% (p = 0.001). Acute grade 2 GI toxicity was 25% vs. 40% (p = 0.024), with no grade 3 GI toxicity in either group. In univariate analysis, androgen deprivation, prostate volume, pre-treatment urinary toxicity, and prostate dose homogeneity correlated with acute GI and GU toxicity. With multivariate analysis use of Tomotherapy, median bladder dose and bladder dose homogeneity remained significantly correlated with GU toxicity. Conclusions: Acute GI toxicity for prostate cancer is improved with Tomotherapy at a cost of increased acute GU toxicity possibly due to differences in bladder and prostate dose distribution

  14. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy for Cervical and Endometrial Cancer: A Prospective Report on Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandecasteele, Katrien; Tummers, Philippe; Makar, Amin; Eijkeren, Marc van; Delrue, Louke; Denys, Hannelore; Lambert, Bieke; Beerens, Anne-Sophie; Van den Broecke, Rudy; Lambein, Kathleen; Fonteyne, Valérie; De Meerleer, Gert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report on toxicity after postoperative intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) for cervical (CC) and endometrial cancer (EC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-four CC and 41 EC patients were treated with postoperative IMAT. If indicated, para-aortic lymph node irradiation (preventive or when affected, PALN) and/or concomitant cisplatin (40 mg/m², weekly) was administered. The prescribed dose for IMAT was 45 Gy (CC, 25 fractions) and 46 Gy (EC, 23 fractions), followed by a brachytherapeutic boost if possible. Radiation-related toxicity was assessed prospectively. The effect of concomitant cisplatin and PALN irradiation was evaluated. Results: Regarding acute toxicity (n = 65), Grade 3 and 2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity was observed in zero and 63% of patients (79% CC, 54% EC), respectively. Grade 3 and 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was observed in 1% and 18% of patients, respectively. Grade 2 (21%) and 3 (12%) hematologic toxicity (n = 41) occurred only in CC patients. Seventeen percent of CC patients and 2% of EC patients experienced Grade 2 fatigue and skin toxicity, respectively. Adding cisplatin led to an increase in Grade >2 nausea (57% vs. 9%; p = 0.01), Grade 2 nocturia (24% vs. 4%; p = 0.03), Grade ≥2 hematologic toxicity (38% vs. nil, p = 0.003), Grade ≥2 leukopenia (33% vs. nil, p = 0.009), and a strong trend toward more fatigue (14% vs. 2%; p = 0.05). Para-aortic lymph node irradiation led to an increase of Grade 2 nocturia (31% vs. 4%, p = 0.008) and a strong trend toward more Grade >2 nausea (44% vs. 18%; p = 0.052). Regarding late toxicity (n = 45), no Grade 3 or 4 late toxicity occurred. Grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity, genitourinary toxicity, and fatigue occurred in 4%, 9%, and 1% of patients. Neither concomitant cisplatin nor PALN irradiation increased late toxicity rates. Conclusions: Postoperative IMAT for EC or CC is associated with low acute and late toxicity. Concomitant chemotherapy and PALN irradiation influences acute but

  15. An assessment of whole effluent toxicity testing as a means of regulating waters produced by the oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, S.L.; Bergman, H.L.

    1993-01-01

    Approximately 500 million barrels of produced water are discharged to Wyoming's surface waters by the oil and gas industry. This discharges are of two types: direct and indirect. The direct discharges have been issued NPDES permits requiring whole effluent toxicity testing. Toxicity testing requirements have not been incorporated into permits written for indirect discharges because of the applicability of toxicity testing for regulating these waters has not been determined. Preliminary testing has shown that most produced waters are toxic at the point of discharge because of high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, but that the toxicity of an indirect discharge is often lost before it reaches a receiving stream. Thus, whole effluent toxicity testing of an indirect discharge may be overly stringent, resulting in treatment or reinjection of the water or closure of the well. Any of these options would have severe economic consequences for oil producers and the state's agricultural industry. The purpose of this study was to determine whether whole effluent toxicity testing actually predicts the in-stream effects of indirect discharges on water quality and benthic invertebrate populations. The authors will report the results of short-term ambient toxicity tests and in-stream bioassessments performed upstream and downstream of six indirect discharges located in four drainages in Wyoming

  16. Prospective Evaluation of Severe Skin Toxicity and Pain During Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Vu, Thi Trinh Thuc; Mitera, Gunita; Bosnic, Sandy; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Truong, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively capture acute toxicities and pain associated with postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT), to analyze patient and treatment risk factors for severe side effects. Methods and Materials: Women referred for PMRT were prospectively enrolled and assessed weekly during and after radiation therapy. The endpoint included severe National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects grade 3 moist desquamation, other skin symptoms, and pain. Results: Of 257 patients, 73 (28.4%) experienced extensive moist desquamation, 84 (32.7%) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects skin toxicity grade 3, and 57 (22.2%) a pain impacting on daily life activities. Among symptoms only grade 3 moist desquamation was significantly associated with severe pain (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, smoking, high-energy photons, and skin bolus were significantly associated with severe moist desquamation. Skin toxicity doubled for smokers, with 40% severe pain, 48% grade 3 moist desquamation, and 64% grade 3 skin toxicity. Without skin bolus 4.2% had severe pain, none moist desquamation, and 2.1% grade 3 skin toxicity. When skin bolus was used on alternate days, the frequency increased to 15% for pain, 22% for moist desquamation, and 26% for grade 3 skin toxicity. When bolus was used daily, 32% had pain, 41% moist desquamation, and 47% grade 3 skin toxicity. Symptoms peaked 1 to 2 weeks after the end of PMRT. Conclusions: The present cohort study suggests excessive radiation toxicity after PMRT. Among factors associated with an increase of toxicity are smoking habits and the use of skin bolus

  17. Prospective Evaluation of Severe Skin Toxicity and Pain During Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pignol, Jean-Philippe, E-mail: j.p.pignol@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus University, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Vu, Thi Trinh Thuc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Mitera, Gunita [Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bosnic, Sandy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Verkooijen, Helena M. [Imaging Division, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Truong, Pauline [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively capture acute toxicities and pain associated with postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT), to analyze patient and treatment risk factors for severe side effects. Methods and Materials: Women referred for PMRT were prospectively enrolled and assessed weekly during and after radiation therapy. The endpoint included severe National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects grade 3 moist desquamation, other skin symptoms, and pain. Results: Of 257 patients, 73 (28.4%) experienced extensive moist desquamation, 84 (32.7%) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects skin toxicity grade 3, and 57 (22.2%) a pain impacting on daily life activities. Among symptoms only grade 3 moist desquamation was significantly associated with severe pain (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, smoking, high-energy photons, and skin bolus were significantly associated with severe moist desquamation. Skin toxicity doubled for smokers, with 40% severe pain, 48% grade 3 moist desquamation, and 64% grade 3 skin toxicity. Without skin bolus 4.2% had severe pain, none moist desquamation, and 2.1% grade 3 skin toxicity. When skin bolus was used on alternate days, the frequency increased to 15% for pain, 22% for moist desquamation, and 26% for grade 3 skin toxicity. When bolus was used daily, 32% had pain, 41% moist desquamation, and 47% grade 3 skin toxicity. Symptoms peaked 1 to 2 weeks after the end of PMRT. Conclusions: The present cohort study suggests excessive radiation toxicity after PMRT. Among factors associated with an increase of toxicity are smoking habits and the use of skin bolus.

  18. Whole acute toxicity removal from industrial and domestic effluents treated by electron beam radiation: emphasis on anionic surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, M.C.F.; Romanelli, M.F; Sena, H.C.; Pasqualini da Silva, G.; Sampa, M.H.O.; Borrely, S.I.

    2004-01-01

    Electron beam radiation has been applied to improve real industrial and domestic effluents received by Suzano wastewater treatment plant. Radiation efficacy has been evaluated as toxicity reduction, using two biological assays. Three sites were sampled and submitted for toxicity assays, anionic surfactant determination and electron beam irradiation. This paper shows the reduction of acute toxicity for both test-organisms, the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri and the crustacean Daphnia similis. The raw toxic effluents exibitted from 0.6 ppm up to 11.67 ppm for anionic surfactant before being treated by the electron beam. Radiation processing resulted in reduction of the acute toxicity as well as surfactant removal. The final biological effluent was in general less toxic than other sites but the presence of anionic surfactants was evidenced

  19. Whole acute toxicity removal from industrial and domestic effluents treated by electron beam radiation: emphasis on anionic surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, M.C.F. E-mail: mariacristinafm@uol.com.br; Romanelli, M.F; Sena, H.C.; Pasqualini da Silva, G.; Sampa, M.H.O.; Borrely, S.I

    2004-10-01

    Electron beam radiation has been applied to improve real industrial and domestic effluents received by Suzano wastewater treatment plant. Radiation efficacy has been evaluated as toxicity reduction, using two biological assays. Three sites were sampled and submitted for toxicity assays, anionic surfactant determination and electron beam irradiation. This paper shows the reduction of acute toxicity for both test-organisms, the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri and the crustacean Daphnia similis. The raw toxic effluents exibitted from 0.6 ppm up to 11.67 ppm for anionic surfactant before being treated by the electron beam. Radiation processing resulted in reduction of the acute toxicity as well as surfactant removal. The final biological effluent was in general less toxic than other sites but the presence of anionic surfactants was evidenced.

  20. Restaurant Industry. Grade Three. One in a Series of Career Development Curriculum Units for the Elementary Classroom. (Third Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Gail; And Others

    Focusing on the occupational clusters of health, hospitality and recreation, this unit entitled "Restaurant Industry" is one of four grade 3 units which are part of a total set of twenty-seven career development curriculum units for grades K-6. This unit is organized into four sections. Section 1 identifies two career…

  1. Study of whole effluent acute toxicity test (Daphnia magna as an evaluation of Ministry of Environment and Forestry Decree No. 3 In 2014 concerning industrial performance rank in environmental management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohmah Neng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Only 15% of the industries in Citarum Watershed, specifically in Bandung Regency, West Bandung Regency, Sumedang Regency, Bandung City and Cimahi City, are registered as PROPER industries. They must comply to indicators as set in the Minister of Environment and Forestry Decree No. 3 In 2014 concerning Industrial Performance Rank in Environmental Management, as a requirement to apply for PROPER. Wastewater treatment and management, referencing to Minister of Environment and Forestry Decree No. 5 In 2014 concerning Wastewater Effluent Standards, must be performed to be registered as PROPER industries. Conducting only physical-chemical parameter monitoring of wastewater is insufficient to determine the safety of wastewater discharged into the river, therefore additional toxicity tests involving bioindicator are required to determine acute toxicity characteristic of wastewater. The acute toxicity test quantifies LC50 value based on death response of bioindicators from certain dosage. Daphnia magna was used as bioindicator in the toxicity test and probit software for analysis. In 2015-2016, the number of industries that discharged wastewater exceeding the standard was found greater in non-PROPER industries than in PROPER industries. Based on the toxicity level, both PROPER and non-PROPER industries have toxic properties, however PROPER industries of 2015-2016 is more toxic with LC5096 value reaching 2.79%.

  2. Long-term evaluation of lethal and sublethal toxicity of industrial effluents using Daphnia magna and Moina macrocopa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xianliang; Kang, Sung-Wook; Jung, Jinho

    2010-06-15

    Acute toxicity and feeding rate inhibition of effluent from a wastewater treatment plant and its adjacent stream water on Daphnia magna and Moina macrocopa were comparatively studied. The acute toxicity of the final effluent (FE) fluctuated greatly over the sampling period from January to August 2009. Toxicity identification results of the FE in July 2009 showed that Cu originating from the Fenton's reagent was likely a key toxicant. In addition, the feeding rate of both species was still inhibited by the FEs in which acute toxicity was not observed. These findings indicate that the feeding response would be a useful tool for monitoring sublethal effects of industrial effluents. For the acute toxicity test, M. macrocopa was more sensitive than D. magna, but the opposite result was true in the case of the feeding rate inhibition. These suggest that different species have different sensitivities to toxic chemicals and to the test methods. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Genitourinary Toxicity After High-Dose-Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy Combined With Hypofractionated External Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: An Analysis to Determine the Correlation Between Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters in HDR Brachytherapy and Severity of Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Kitano, Masashi; Satoh, Takefumi; Kotani, Shouko; Uemae, Mineko; Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Okusa, Hiroshi; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Baba, Shiro; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the severity of genitourinary (GU) toxicity in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and to explore factors that might affect the severity of GU toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 100 Japanese men with prostate cancer underwent 192 Ir HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Mean (SD) dose to 90% of the planning target volume was 6.3 (0.7) Gy per fraction of HDR. After 5 fractions of HDR treatment, EBRT with 10 fractions of 3 Gy was administrated. The urethral volume receiving 1-15 Gy per fraction in HDR brachytherapy (V1-V15) and the dose to at least 5-100% of urethral volume in HDR brachytherapy (D5-D100) were compared between patients with Grade 3 toxicity and those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Prostate volume, patient age, and International Prostate Symptom Score were also compared between the two groups. Results: Of the 100 patients, 6 displayed Grade 3 acute GU toxicity, and 12 displayed Grade 3 late GU toxicity. Regarding acute GU toxicity, values of V1, V2, V3, and V4 were significantly higher in patients with Grade 3 toxicity than in those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Regarding late GU toxicity, values of D70, D80, V12, and V13 were significantly higher in patients with Grade 3 toxicity than in those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Conclusions: The severity of GU toxicity in HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT for prostate cancer was relatively high. The volume of prostatic urethra was associated with grade of acute GU toxicity, and urethral dose was associated with grade of late GU toxicity.

  4. Baking Industry. Grade 2. One in a Series of Career Development Curriculum Units for the Elementary Classroom. (Second Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Jennifer; And Others

    Focusing on the occupational clusters of natural resources and manufacturing, this unit entitled "Baking Industry" is one of four grade 2 units which are part of a total set of twenty-seven career development curriculum units for grades K-6. This unit is organized into four sections. Section 1 identifies one career development-centered…

  5. Toxicity after post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy using Australian guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Stephen; Aherne, Noel J; Last, Andrew; Assareh, Hassan; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2017-12-01

    We evaluated single institution toxicity outcomes after post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT) via image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) with implanted fiducial markers following national eviQ guidelines, for which late toxicity outcomes have not been published. Prospectively collected toxicity data were retrospectively reviewed for 293 men who underwent 64-66 Gy IG-IMRT to the prostate bed between 2007 and 2015. Median follow-up after PPRT was 39 months. Baseline grade ≥2 genitourinary (GU), gastrointestinal (GI) and sexual toxicities were 20.5%, 2.7% and 43.7%, respectively, reflecting ongoing toxicity after radical prostatectomy. Incidence of new (compared to baseline) acute grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity was 5.8% and 10.6%, respectively. New late grade ≥2 GU, GI and sexual toxicity occurred in 19.1%, 4.7% and 20.2%, respectively. However, many patients also experienced improvements in toxicities. For this reason, prevalence of grade ≥2 GU, GI and sexual toxicities 4 years after PPRT was similar to or lower than baseline (21.7%, 2.6% and 17.4%, respectively). There were no grade ≥4 toxicities. Post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT using Australian contouring guidelines appears to have tolerable acute and late toxicity. The 4-year prevalence of grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity was virtually unchanged compared to baseline, and sexual toxicity improved over baseline. This should reassure radiation oncologists following these guidelines. Late toxicity rates of surgery and PPRT are higher than following definitive IG-IMRT, and this should be taken into account if patients are considering surgery and likely to require PPRT. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  6. In silico analysis of Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase active site with toxic industrial dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Nirmal K; Vindal, Vaibhav; Narayana, Siva Lakshmi; Ramakrishna, V; Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan; Srinivas, M

    2012-05-01

    Laccases belong to multicopper oxidases, a widespread class of enzymes implicated in many oxidative functions in various industrial oxidative processes like production of fine chemicals to bioremediation of contaminated soil and water. In order to understand the mechanisms of substrate binding and interaction between substrates and Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase, a homology model was generated. The resulted model was further validated and used for docking studies with toxic industrial dyes- acid blue 74, reactive black 5 and reactive blue 19. Interactions of chemical mediators with the laccase was also examined. The docking analysis showed that the active site always cannot accommodate the dye molecules, due to constricted nature of the active site pocket and steric hindrance of the residues whereas mediators are relatively small and can easily be accommodated into the active site pocket, which, thereafter leads to the productive binding. The binding properties of these compounds along with identification of critical active site residues can be used for further site-directed mutagenesis experiments in order to identify their role in activity and substrate specificity, ultimately leading to improved mutants for degradation of these toxic compounds.

  7. Enhancement of struvite pellets crystallization in a full-scale plant using an industrial grade magnesium product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutchik, D; Morales, N; Vázquez-Padín, J R; Garrido, J M

    2017-02-01

    A full-scale struvite crystallization system was operated for the treatment of the centrate obtained from the sludge anaerobic digester in a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Additionally, the feasibility of an industrial grade Mg(OH) 2 as a cheap magnesium and alkali source was also investigated. The struvite crystallization plant was operated for two different periods: period I, in which an influent with low phosphate concentration (34.0 mg P·L -1 ) was fed to the crystallization plant; and period II, in which an influent with higher phosphate concentration (68.0 mg P·L -1 ) was used. A high efficiency of phosphorus recovery by struvite crystallization was obtained, even when the effluent treated had a high level of alkalinity. Phosphorus recovery percentage was around 77%, with a phosphate concentration in the effluent between 10.0 and 30.0 mg P·L -1 . The experiments gained struvite pellets of 0.5-5.0 mm size. Moreover, the consumption of Mg(OH) 2 was estimated at 1.5 mol Mg added·mol P recovered -1 . Thus, industrial grade Mg(OH) 2 can be an economical alternative as magnesium and alkali sources for struvite crystallization at industrial scale.

  8. Duodenal Toxicity After Fractionated Chemoradiation for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Patrick; Das, Prajnan; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Beddar, Sam; Briere, Tina; Pham, Mary; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Crane, Christopher H., E-mail: ccrane@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Improving local control is critical to improving survival and quality of life for patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC). However, previous attempts at radiation dose escalation have been limited by duodenal toxicity. In order to guide future studies, we analyzed the clinical and dosimetric factors associated with duodenal toxicity in patients undergoing fractionated chemoradiation for LAPC. Methods and Materials: Medical records and treatment plans of 106 patients with LAPC who were treated with chemoradiation between July 2005 and June 2010 at our institution were reviewed. All patients received neoadjuvant and concurrent chemotherapy. Seventy-eight patients were treated with conventional radiation to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions; 28 patients received dose-escalated radiation therapy (range, 57.5-75.4 Gy in 28-39 fractions). Treatment-related toxicity was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess prognostic influence of clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related factors by using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. Results: Twenty patients had treatment-related duodenal toxicity events, such as duodenal inflammation, ulceration, and bleeding. Four patients had grade 1 events, 8 had grade 2, 6 had grade 3, 1 had grade 4, and 1 had grade 5. On univariate analysis, a toxicity grade ≥2 was associated with tumor location, low platelet count, an absolute volume (cm{sup 3}) receiving a dose of at least 55 Gy (V{sub 55} {sub Gy} > 1 cm{sup 3}), and a maximum point dose >60 Gy. Of these factors, only V{sub 55} {sub Gy} ≥1 cm{sup 3} was associated with duodenal toxicity on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 6.7; range, 2.0-18.8; P=.002). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a duodenal V{sub 55} {sub Gy} >1 cm{sup 3} is an important dosimetric predictor of grade 2 or greater duodenal toxicity and establishes it as a

  9. The use of sugar and alcohol industry waste in the adsorption of potentially toxic metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Oseas Silva; Mendonça, André Gustavo Ribeiro; Santos, Josué Carinhanha Caldas; Silva, Amanda Paulina Bezerra; Costa, Silvanio Silverio Lopes; Oliveira, Luciana Camargo; Carmo, Janaina Braga; Botero, Wander Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    One of the waste products of the industrial process of the sugar and alcohol agribusiness is filter cake (FC). This waste product has high levels of organic matter, mainly proteins and lipids, and is rich in calcium, nitrogen, potassium and phosphorous. In this work we characterized samples of FC from sugar and alcohol industries located in sugarcane-producing regions in Brazil and assessed the adsorption of potentially toxic metals (Cu(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Ni(II) and Cr(III)) by this waste in mono- and multi-elemental systems, seeking to use FC as an adsorbent in contaminated environments. The characterization of FCs showed significant differences between the samples and the adsorption studies showed retention of over 90% of potentially toxic metals. In a competitive environment (multi-metallic solution), the FC was effective in adsorbing all metals except lead, but less effective compared to the mono-metallic solution. These results show the potential for use of this residue as an adsorbent in contaminated environments.

  10. Chemical Compounds Toxic to Invertebrates Isolated from Marine Cyanobacteria of Potential Relevance to the Agricultural Industry

    KAUST Repository

    Essack, Magbubah

    2014-10-29

    In spite of advances in invertebrate pest management, the agricultural industry is suffering from impeded pest control exacerbated by global climate changes that have altered rain patterns to favour opportunistic breeding. Thus, novel naturally derived chemical compounds toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates are of interest, as potential pesticides. In this regard, marine cyanobacterium-derived metabolites that are toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates continue to be a promising, but neglected, source of potential pesticides. A PubMed query combined with hand-curation of the information from retrieved articles allowed for the identification of 36 cyanobacteria-derived chemical compounds experimentally confirmed as being toxic to invertebrates. These compounds are discussed in this review.

  11. Chemical Compounds Toxic to Invertebrates Isolated from Marine Cyanobacteria of Potential Relevance to the Agricultural Industry

    KAUST Repository

    Essack, Magbubah; Alzubaidy, Hanin S.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Archer, John A.C.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of advances in invertebrate pest management, the agricultural industry is suffering from impeded pest control exacerbated by global climate changes that have altered rain patterns to favour opportunistic breeding. Thus, novel naturally derived chemical compounds toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates are of interest, as potential pesticides. In this regard, marine cyanobacterium-derived metabolites that are toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates continue to be a promising, but neglected, source of potential pesticides. A PubMed query combined with hand-curation of the information from retrieved articles allowed for the identification of 36 cyanobacteria-derived chemical compounds experimentally confirmed as being toxic to invertebrates. These compounds are discussed in this review.

  12. Chemical Compounds Toxic to Invertebrates Isolated from Marine Cyanobacteria of Potential Relevance to the Agricultural Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essack, Magbubah; Alzubaidy, Hanin S.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Archer, John A. C.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of advances in invertebrate pest management, the agricultural industry is suffering from impeded pest control exacerbated by global climate changes that have altered rain patterns to favour opportunistic breeding. Thus, novel naturally derived chemical compounds toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates are of interest, as potential pesticides. In this regard, marine cyanobacterium-derived metabolites that are toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates continue to be a promising, but neglected, source of potential pesticides. A PubMed query combined with hand-curation of the information from retrieved articles allowed for the identification of 36 cyanobacteria-derived chemical compounds experimentally confirmed as being toxic to invertebrates. These compounds are discussed in this review. PMID:25356733

  13. Late Toxicity After Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: An Exploration of Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters to Limit Genitourinary and Gastrointestinal Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pederson, Aaron W.; Fricano, Janine; Correa, David; Pelizzari, Charles A. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Liauw, Stanley L., E-mail: sliauw@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for prostate cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and propose dose-volume histogram (DVH) guidelines to limit late treatment-related toxicity. Methods and Materials: In this study 296 consecutive men were treated with IMRT for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Most patients received treatment to the prostate with or without proximal seminal vesicles (90%), to a median dose of 76 Gy. Concurrent androgen deprivation therapy was given to 150 men (51%) for a median of 4 months. Late toxicity was defined by Common Toxicity Criteria version 3.0 as greater than 3 months after radiation therapy completion. Four groupings of DVH parameters were defined, based on the percentage of rectal or bladder tissue receiving 70 Gy (V{sub 70}), 65 Gy (V{sub 65}), and 40 Gy (V{sub 40}). These DVH groupings, as well as clinical and treatment characteristics, were correlated to maximal Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity. Results: With a median follow-up of 41 months, the 4-year freedom from maximal Grade 2+ late toxicity was 81% and 91% for GU and GI systems, respectively, and by last follow-up, the rates of Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity were 9% and 5%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, whole-pelvic IMRT was associated with Grade 2+ GU toxicity and age was associated with Grade 2+ GI toxicity. Freedom from Grade 2+ GI toxicity at 4 years was 100% for men with rectal V{sub 70} {<=}10%, V{sub 65} {<=}20%, and V{sub 40} {<=}40%; 92% for men with rectal V{sub 70} {<=}20%, V{sub 65} {<=}40%, and V{sub 40} {<=}80%; and 85% for men exceeding these criteria (p = 0.13). These criteria were more highly associated with GI toxicity in men aged {>=}70 years (p = 0.07). No bladder dose-volume relationships were associated with the risk of GU toxicity. Conclusions: IMRT is associated with low rates of severe GU or GI toxicity after treatment for prostate cancer. Rectal dose constraints

  14. Late Toxicity After Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: An Exploration of Dose–Volume Histogram Parameters to Limit Genitourinary and Gastrointestinal Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pederson, Aaron W.; Fricano, Janine; Correa, David; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Liauw, Stanley L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for prostate cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and propose dose–volume histogram (DVH) guidelines to limit late treatment-related toxicity. Methods and Materials: In this study 296 consecutive men were treated with IMRT for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Most patients received treatment to the prostate with or without proximal seminal vesicles (90%), to a median dose of 76 Gy. Concurrent androgen deprivation therapy was given to 150 men (51%) for a median of 4 months. Late toxicity was defined by Common Toxicity Criteria version 3.0 as greater than 3 months after radiation therapy completion. Four groupings of DVH parameters were defined, based on the percentage of rectal or bladder tissue receiving 70 Gy (V 70 ), 65 Gy (V 65 ), and 40 Gy (V 40 ). These DVH groupings, as well as clinical and treatment characteristics, were correlated to maximal Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity. Results: With a median follow-up of 41 months, the 4-year freedom from maximal Grade 2+ late toxicity was 81% and 91% for GU and GI systems, respectively, and by last follow-up, the rates of Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity were 9% and 5%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, whole-pelvic IMRT was associated with Grade 2+ GU toxicity and age was associated with Grade 2+ GI toxicity. Freedom from Grade 2+ GI toxicity at 4 years was 100% for men with rectal V 70 ≤10%, V 65 ≤20%, and V 40 ≤40%; 92% for men with rectal V 70 ≤20%, V 65 ≤40%, and V 40 ≤80%; and 85% for men exceeding these criteria (p = 0.13). These criteria were more highly associated with GI toxicity in men aged ≥70 years (p = 0.07). No bladder dose–volume relationships were associated with the risk of GU toxicity. Conclusions: IMRT is associated with low rates of severe GU or GI toxicity after treatment for prostate cancer. Rectal dose constraints may help limit late GI morbidity.

  15. Esophageal Toxicity From High-Dose, Single-Fraction Paraspinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, Brett W.; Jackson, Andrew; Hunt, Margie; Bilsky, Mark; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the esophageal toxicity from single-fraction paraspinal stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and identify dosimetric and clinical risk factors for toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 204 spinal metastases abutting the esophagus (182 patients) were treated with high-dose single-fraction SRS during 2003-2010. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Dose-volume histograms were combined to generate a comprehensive atlas of complication incidence that identifies risk factors for toxicity. Correlation of dose-volume factors with esophageal toxicity was assessed using Fisher’s exact test and logistic regression. Clinical factors were correlated with toxicity. Results: The median dose to the planning treatment volume was 24 Gy. Median follow-up was 12 months (range, 3-81). There were 31 (15%) acute and 24 (12%) late esophageal toxicities. The rate of grade ≥3 acute or late toxicity was 6.8% (14 patients). Fisher’s exact test resulted in significant median splits for grade ≥3 toxicity at V12 = 3.78 cm 3 (relative risk [RR] 3.7, P=.05), V15 = 1.87 cm 3 (RR 13, P=.0013), V20 = 0.11 cm 3 (RR 6, P=0.01), and V22 = 0.0 cm 3 (RR 13, P=.0013). The median split for D2.5 cm 3 (14.02 Gy) was also a significant predictor of toxicity (RR 6; P=.01). A highly significant logistic regression model was generated on the basis of D2.5 cm 3 . One hundred percent (n = 7) of grade ≥4 toxicities were associated with radiation recall reactions after doxorubicin or gemcitabine chemotherapy or iatrogenic manipulation of the irradiated esophagus. Conclusions: High-dose, single-fraction paraspinal SRS has a low rate of grade ≥3 esophageal toxicity. Severe esophageal toxicity is minimized with careful attention to esophageal doses during treatment planning. Iatrogenic manipulation of the irradiated esophagus and systemic agents classically associated with radiation recall reactions are

  16. Secret science: tobacco industry research on smoking behaviour and cigarette toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, David; Collishaw, Neil E; Callard, Cynthia

    2006-03-04

    A lack of scientific data remains the principal obstacle to regulating cigarette toxicity. In particular, there is an immediate need to improve our understanding of the interaction between smoking behaviour and product design, and its influence on cigarette deliveries. This article reviews internal tobacco industry documents on smoking behaviour research undertaken by Imperial Tobacco Limited (ITL) and British-American Tobacco (BAT). BAT documents indicate that smokers vary their puffing behaviour to regulate nicotine levels and compensate for low-yield cigarettes by smoking them more intensely. BAT research also shows that the tar and nicotine delivered to smokers is substantially greater than the machine-smoked yields reported to consumers and regulators. Internal documents describe a strategy to maximise this discrepancy through product design. In particular, BAT developed elastic cigarettes that produced low yields under standard testing protocols, whereas in consumers' hands they elicited more intensive smoking and provided higher concentrations of tar and nicotine to smokers. Documents also show that BAT pursued this product strategy despite the health risks to consumers and ethical concerns raised by senior scientists, and paired it with an equally successful marketing campaign that promoted these cigarettes as low-tar alternatives for health-concerned smokers. Overall, the documents seem to reveal a product strategy intended to exploit the limitations of the testing protocols and to intentionally conceal from consumers and regulators the potential toxicity of BAT products revealed by BAT's own research. Tobacco industry research underscores the serious limitations of the current cigarette testing protocols and the documents describe deceptive business practices that remain in place.

  17. Toxicity after intensity-modulated, image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias; Ok, Sami; Polat, Buelent; Sweeney, Reinhart A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate toxicity after dose-escalated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated treatment planning (IMRT) and image-guided treatment (IGRT) delivery. Patients and Methods: 100 patients were treated with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) IMRT for prostate cancer: doses of 76.23 Gy and 60 Gy in 33 fractions were prescribed to the prostate and the seminal vesicles, respectively, for intermediate- and high-risk patients (n = 74). The total dose was 73.91 Gy in 32 fractions for low-risk patients and after transurethral resection of the prostate (n = 26). The pelvic lymphatics were treated with 46 Gy in 25 fractions in patients with high risk of lymph node metastases using an SIB to the prostate (n = 25). IGRT was practiced with cone-beam computed tomography. Acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was evaluated prospectively (CTCAE v3.0). Results: Treatment was completed as planned by all patients. Acute GI and GU toxicity grade ≥ 2 was observed in 12% and 42% of the patients, respectively, with 4% suffering from GU toxicity grade 3. 6 weeks after treatment, the incidence of acute toxicity grade ≥ 2 had decreased to 12%. With a median follow-up of 26 months, late GI and GU toxicity grade ≥ 2 was seen in 1.5% and 7.7% of the patients at 24 months. Four patients developed late toxicity grade 3 (GI n = 1; GU n = 3). Presence of acute GI and GU toxicity was significantly associated with late GI (p = 0.0007) and GU toxicity (p = 0.006). Conclusion: High-dose radiotherapy for prostate cancer using IMRT and IGRT resulted in low rates of acute toxicity and preliminary results of late toxicity are promising. (orig.)

  18. Toxicity after intensity-modulated, image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flentje, Michael [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany); Guckenberger, Matthias; Ok, Sami; Polat, Buelent; Sweeney, Reinhart A.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate toxicity after dose-escalated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated treatment planning (IMRT) and image-guided treatment (IGRT) delivery. Patients and Methods: 100 patients were treated with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) IMRT for prostate cancer: doses of 76.23 Gy and 60 Gy in 33 fractions were prescribed to the prostate and the seminal vesicles, respectively, for intermediate- and high-risk patients (n = 74). The total dose was 73.91 Gy in 32 fractions for low-risk patients and after transurethral resection of the prostate (n = 26). The pelvic lymphatics were treated with 46 Gy in 25 fractions in patients with high risk of lymph node metastases using an SIB to the prostate (n = 25). IGRT was practiced with cone-beam computed tomography. Acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was evaluated prospectively (CTCAE v3.0). Results: Treatment was completed as planned by all patients. Acute GI and GU toxicity grade {>=} 2 was observed in 12% and 42% of the patients, respectively, with 4% suffering from GU toxicity grade 3. 6 weeks after treatment, the incidence of acute toxicity grade {>=} 2 had decreased to 12%. With a median follow-up of 26 months, late GI and GU toxicity grade {>=} 2 was seen in 1.5% and 7.7% of the patients at 24 months. Four patients developed late toxicity grade 3 (GI n = 1; GU n = 3). Presence of acute GI and GU toxicity was significantly associated with late GI (p = 0.0007) and GU toxicity (p = 0.006). Conclusion: High-dose radiotherapy for prostate cancer using IMRT and IGRT resulted in low rates of acute toxicity and preliminary results of late toxicity are promising. (orig.)

  19. Environmental technology applications: fact file on toxic contaminants in industrial waste process streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newkirk, H.W.

    1977-05-11

    This report is a compendium of facts related to chemical materials present in industrial waste process streams which have already been declared or are being evaluated as hazardous under the Toxic Substances Control Act. Since some 400 chemicals are presently covered by consensus standards, the substances reviewed are only those considered to be a major threat to public health and welfare by Federal and State regulatory agencies. For each hazardous material cited, the facts relate, where possible, to an identification of the stationary industrial sources, the kind of waste stream impacted, proposed regulations and established effluent standards, the volume of emissions produced each year, the volume of emissions per unit of industrial product produced, present clean-up capabilities, limitations, and costs. These data should be helpful in providing information for the assessment of potential problems, should be of use to the manufacturers of pollution control equipment or of chemicals for pollution control, should be of use to the operators or potential operators of processes which produce pollutants, and should help to define industry-wide emission practices and magnitudes.

  20. The efficacy of Pistacia Terebinthus soap in the treatment of cetuximab-induced skin toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tastekin, Didem; Tambas, Makbule; Kilic, Kemal; Erturk, Kayhan; Arslan, Deniz

    2014-12-01

    This open-labeled phase II, efficacy-finding study evaluated the efficiency and safety of Pistacia terebinthus soap in metastatic colorectal cancer patients who developed cetuximab induced skin toxicity. Patients who received cetuximab plus chemotherapy and developed Grade 2 or 3 skin toxicity were treated twice daily with a soap made of oil extracted from Pistacia terebinthus. During treatment, no topical or oral antibiotics, corticosteroids or other moisturizers were used. Patients were examined 1 week later and their photographs were taken. Fifteen mCRC patients who developed skin toxicity while receiving first-line CTX in combination with chemotherapy were included into the study. Eight patients were male and the median age was 58 (25-70). Sixty percent of the patients (n:9) had Grade 3 skin toxicity. Complete response rates in patients with Grade 2 and Grade 3 skin toxicities were 100 and 33%, respectively. In the remaining patients with Grade 3 toxicity the skin toxicity regressed to Grade 1. The objective response rate was 100%, and no delay, dose reduction or discontinuation of CTX treatment due to skin toxicity was necessary. Skin toxicity reoccurred in all patients when patients stopped administering the soap and therefore they used it throughout the cetuximab treatment. Pistacia terebinthus soap seemed to be used safely and effectively in the treatment of skin toxicity induced by Cetuximab.

  1. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: rigid compliance to dose-volume constraints as a warranty of acceptable toxicity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Michael J; Nadalin, Wladmir; Weltman, Eduardo; Hanriot, Rodrigo M; Luz, Fábio P; Cecílio, Paulo J; Cruz, José C da; Moreira, Frederico R; Santos, Adriana S; Martins, Lidiane C

    2007-01-01

    To report the toxicity after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for patients with localized prostate cancer, as a sole treatment or after radical prostatectomy. Between August 2001 and December 2003, 132 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IMRT and 125 were evaluable to acute and late toxicity analysis, after a minimum follow-up time of one year. Clinical and treatment data, including normal tissue dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints, were reviewed. Gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) signs and symptoms were evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scales. Median prescribed dose was 76 Gy. Median follow-up time was of 26.1 months. From the 125 patients, 73 (58.4%) presented acute Grade 1 or Grade 2 GI and 97 (77.2%) presented acute Grade 1 or Grade 2 GU toxicity. Grade 3 GI acute toxicity occurred in only 2 patients (1.6%) and Grade 3 GU acute toxicity in only 3 patients (2.4%). Regarding Grade 1 and 2 late toxicity, 26 patients (20.8%) and 21 patients (16.8%) presented GI and GU toxicity, respectively. Grade 2 GI late toxicity occurred in 6 patients (4.8%) and Grade 2 GU late toxicity in 4 patients (3.2%). None patient presented any Grade 3 or higher late toxicity. Non-conformity to DVH constraints occurred in only 11.2% of treatment plans. On univariate analysis, no significant risk factor was identified for Grade 2 GI late toxicity, but mean dose delivered to the PTV was associated to higher Grade 2 GU late toxicity (p = 0.042). IMRT is a well tolerable technique for routine treatment of localized prostate cancer, with short and medium-term acceptable toxicity profiles. According to the data presented here, rigid compliance to DHV constraints might prevent higher incidences of normal tissue complication

  2. Understanding the tolerance of the industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae against a major class of toxic aldehyde compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, ZongLin Lewis

    2018-07-01

    Development of the next-generation biocatalyst is vital for fermentation-based industrial applications and a sustainable bio-based economy. Overcoming the major class of toxic compounds associated with lignocellulose-to-biofuels conversion is one of the significant challenges for new strain development. A significant number of investigations have been made to understand mechanisms of the tolerance for industrial yeast. It is humbling to learn how complicated the cell's response to the toxic chemicals is and how little we have known about yeast tolerance in the universe of the living cell. This study updates our current knowledge on the tolerance of industrial yeast against aldehyde inhibitory compounds at cellular, molecular and the genomic levels. It is comprehensive yet specific based on reproducible evidence and cross confirmed findings from different investigations using varied experimental approaches. This research approaches a rational foundation toward a more comprehensive understanding on the yeast tolerance. Discussions and perspectives are also proposed for continued exploring the puzzle of the yeast tolerance to aid the next-generation biocatalyst development.

  3. Lethal toxicity of industrial chemicals to early life stages of Tilapia guineensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezemonye, L I N; Ogeleka, D F; Okieimen, F E

    2008-08-30

    The toxic effects of industrial chemicals on three early life stages of an economically important fish, Tilapia guineensis were investigated using the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) # 203 recommended semi-static renewal bioassay. The assessment was necessary for the uncontrollable disposal of Neatex (liquid detergent) and Norust CR 486 (corrosion inhibitor) into the Niger Delta environment of Nigeria. The estimated 96-h LC(50) for 7-, 14- and 28-day-old fish in Norust CR 486 exposure was considered "more toxic" than Neatex in all life stages and was dependent on species age, exposure duration and environment. In the fresh water test, for Neatex and Norust CR 486 exposures for day 7, 14 and 28, the 96-h LC50 were 8.79, 17.10 and 82.42 mg/l and 5.55, 13.58 and 20.21 mg/l, respectively. In the brackish test, 15.42 and 46.52 mg/l, not determined (ND) and 7.35, 13.95 and 24.50mg/l were obtained. Differential toxicity was observed in the fresh and brackish water fish for the two chemicals and controls at pchemicals provides a rationale for regulatory surveillance and monitoring of both chemicals in the fragile Niger Delta environment.

  4. Justice in the Air: Tracking Toxic Pollution from America's Industries and Companies to Our States, Cities, and Neighborhoods

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Ash; James Boyce; Grace Chang; Justin Scoggins; Manuel Pastor

    2009-01-01

    This new environmental justice study, (co-authored by PERI’s James Boyce, Michael Ash, & Grace Chang, along with Manuel Pastor, Justin Scoggins, & Jennifer Tran of the Program for Environmental and Regional Equity at the University of Southern California) examines not only who receives the disproportionate share of toxic air releases -- low-income communities and people of color -- but who is releasing them. Justice in the Air: Tracking Toxic Pollution from America's Industries and Companies ...

  5. Impact of Toxicity Grade and Scoring System on the Relationship Between Mean Lung Dose and Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis in a Large Cohort of Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, Susan L.; Jin Hekun; Wei Xiong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To compute the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) as a function of mean lung dose (MLD), with RP scored using three grading systems and analyzed at four threshold levels of toxicity in a large cohort of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: On the basis of medical records and radiographic images, RP was scored retrospectively in 442 patients with NSCLC who had ≥6 months of follow-up after the end of RT. The severity of RP was scored for each patient using the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0 (CTC2.0); the NCI Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 (CTCAE3.0); and the grading system of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). For each grading system and for each of four levels of toxicity (Grade ≥1, ≥2, ≥3, ≥4), the Lyman, logistic, and log-logistic normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models were fitted to the data as functions of MLD. The parameter estimates from the model fits are listed in table form, and the RP risk estimates are presented graphically for the Lyman and log-logistic NTCP models. Results: The results presented here illustrate the impact of scoring system and level of toxicity on the relationship between MLD and RP risk. Conclusions: These results facilitate quantitative comparisons between our data and studies of RP risk reported by others, and several examples of such comparisons are provided.

  6. Predictors of Toxicity After Image-guided High-dose-rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Gynecologic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Larissa J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of grade 3-4 complications and grade 2-4 rectal toxicity after three-dimensional image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed for 51 women (22 with primary disease and 29 with recurrence) treated with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. A single interstitial insertion was performed with image guidance by computed tomography (n = 43) or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 8). The median delivered dose in equivalent 2-Gy fractions was 72.0 Gy (45 Gy for external-beam radiation therapy and 24 Gy for brachytherapy). Toxicity was reported according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events. Actuarial toxicity estimates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: At diagnosis, the median patient age was 62 years and the median tumor size was 3.8 cm. The median D90 and V100 were 71.4 Gy and 89.5%; the median D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 64.6 Gy, 61.0 Gy, and 52.7 Gy, respectively. The actuarial rates of all grade 3-4 complications at 2 years were 20% gastrointestinal, 9% vaginal, 6% skin, 3% musculoskeletal, and 2% lymphatic. There were no grade 3-4 genitourinary complications and no grade 5 toxicities. Grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was observed in 10 patients, and grade 3-4 complications in 4; all cases were proctitis with the exception of 1 rectal fistula. D2cc for rectum was higher for patients with grade 2-4 (68 Gy vs 57 Gy for grade 0-1, P=.03) and grade 3-4 (73 Gy vs 58 Gy for grade 0-2, P=.02) rectal toxicity. The estimated dose that resulted in a 10% risk of grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was 61.8 Gy (95% confidence interval, 51.5-72.2 Gy). Discussion: Image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy results in acceptable toxicity for women with primary or recurrent gynecologic cancer. D2cc for the rectum is a reliable predictor of late rectal complications. Three-dimensional-based treatment planning should be performed to ensure

  7. Urethral toxicity after LDR brachytherapy: experience in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Nobumichi; Asakawa, Isao; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2015-01-01

    Urinary toxicity is common after low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy, and the resolution of urinary toxicity is a concern. In particular, urinary frequency is the most common adverse event among the urinary toxicities. We have previously reported that approximately 70% of patients experience urinary frequency during the first 6 months after seed implantation. Most urinary adverse events were classified as Grade 1, and Grade 2 or higher adverse events were rare. The incidence of urinary retention was approximately 2-4%. A high International Prostate Symptom Score before seed implantation was an independent predictor of acute urinary toxicity of Grade 2 or higher. Several previous reports from the United States also supported this trend. In Japan, LDR brachytherapy was legally approved in 2003. A nationwide prospective cohort study entitled Japanese Prostate Cancer Outcome Study of Permanent Iodine-125 Seed Implantation was initiated in July 2005. It is an important issue to limit urinary toxicities in patients who undergo LDR brachytherapy. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Definition and manufacture of vitreous matrices using innovative processes for the confinement of nuclear wastes or industrial toxic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boen, R.; Ladirat, C.; Lacombe, J.

    1997-01-01

    Vitrification appears as a solution to toxic mineral waste confinement; this solution has been demonstrated at an industrial level for radioactive wastes. The utilization of cold crucible direct induction melting furnaces, associated to various waste pre-treatments and well-adapted gas processing, leads to the confinement of numerous toxic mineral wastes in a borosilicate vitreous matrix which quality and long term behaviour may be precisely defined

  9. Can dosimetric parameters predict acute hematologic toxicity in rectal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Juefeng; Liu, Kaitai; Li, Kaixuan; Li, Guichao; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    To identify dosimetric parameters associated with acute hematologic toxicity (HT) in rectal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy. Ninety-three rectal cancer patients receiving concurrent capecitabine and pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were analyzed. Pelvic bone marrow (PBM) was contoured for each patient and divided into three subsites: lumbosacral spine (LSS), ilium, and lower pelvis (LP). The volume of each site receiving 5–40 Gy (V 5, V10, V15, V20, V30, and V40, respectively) as well as patient baseline clinical characteristics was calculated. The endpoint for hematologic toxicity was grade ≥ 2 (HT2+) leukopenia, neutropenia, anemia or thrombocytopenia. Logistic regression was used to analyze correlation between dosimetric parameters and grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Twenty-four in ninety-three patients experienced grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Only the dosimetric parameter V40 of lumbosacral spine was correlated with grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Increased pelvic lumbosacral spine V40 (LSS-V40) was associated with an increased grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity (p = 0.041). Patients with LSS-V40 ≥ 60 % had higher rates of grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity than did patients with lumbosacral spine V40 < 60 % (38.3 %, 18/47 vs.13 %, 6/46, p =0.005). On univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis, lumbosacral spine V40 and gender was also the variable associated with grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Female patients were observed more likely to have grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity than male ones (46.9 %, 15/32 vs 14.8 %, 9/61, p =0.001). Lumbosacral spine -V40 was associated with clinically significant grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Keeping the lumbosacral spine -V40 < 60 % was associated with a 13 % risk of grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity in rectal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy

  10. Recycling of silicon: from industrial waste to biocompatible nanoparticles for nanomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, N. K.; Natashina, U. A.; Tamarov, K. P.; Gongalsky, M. B.; Solovyev, V. V.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Sivakov, V.; Osminkina, L. A.

    2017-09-01

    The formation of photoluminescent porous silicon (PSi) nanoparticles (NPs) is usually based on an expensive semiconductor grade wafers technology. Here, we report a low-cost method of PSi NPs synthesis from the industrial silicon waste remained after the wafer production. The proposed method is based on metal-assisted wet-chemical etching (MACE) of the silicon surface of cm-sized metallurgical grade silicon stones which leads to a nanostructuring of the surface due to an anisotropic etching, with subsequent ultrasound fracturing in water. The obtained PSi NPs exhibit bright red room temperature photoluminescence (PL) and demonstrate similar microstructure and physical characteristics in comparison with the nanoparticles synthesized from semiconductor grade Si wafers. PSi NPs prepared from metallurgical grade silicon stones, similar to silicon NPs synthesized from high purity silicon wafer, show low toxicity to biological objects that open the possibility of using such type of NPs in nanomedicine.

  11. Emergency planning and preparedness for the deliberate release of toxic industrial chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, David; Simpson, John

    2010-03-01

    Society in developed and developing countries is hugely dependent upon chemicals for health, wealth, and economic prosperity, with the chemical industry contributing significantly to the global economy. Many chemicals are synthesized, stored, and transported in vast quantities and classified as high production volume chemicals; some are recognized as being toxic industrial chemicals (TICs). Chemical accidents involving chemical installations and transportation are well recognized. Such chemical accidents occur with relative frequency and may result in large numbers of casualties with acute and chronic health effects as well as fatalities. The large-scale production of TICs, the potential for widespread exposure and significant public health impact, together with their relative ease of acquisition, makes deliberate release an area of potential concern. The large numbers of chemicals, together with the large number of potential release scenarios means that the number of possible forms of chemical incident are almost infinite. Therefore, prior to undertaking emergency planning and preparedness, it is necessary to prioritize risk and subsequently mitigate. This is a multi-faceted process, including implementation of industrial protection layers, substitution of hazardous chemicals, and relocation away from communities. Residual risk provides the basis for subsequent planning. Risk-prioritized emergency planning is a tool for identifying gaps, enhancing communication and collaboration, and for policy development. It also serves to enhance preparedness, a necessary prelude to preventing or mitigating the public health risk to deliberate release. Planning is an iterative and on-going process that requires multi-disciplinary agency input, culminating in the formation of a chemical incident plan complimentary to major incident planning. Preparedness is closely related and reflects a state of readiness. It is comprised of several components, including training and exercising

  12. Carbon nanotubes enhanced the lead toxicity on the freshwater fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, D S T; Alves, O L; Barbieri, E

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are promising nanostructures for many applications in materials industry and biotechnology. However, it is mandatory to evaluate their toxicity and environmental implications. We evaluated nitric acid treated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (HNO 3 -MWCNT) toxicity in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and also the lead (Pb) toxicity modulation after the nanotube interaction. Industrial grade multiwalled carbon nanotubes [Ctube 100, CNT Co. Ltd] were treated with 9M HNO 3 for 12h at 150°C to generate oxygenated groups on the nanotube surface, to improve water dispersion and heavy metal interaction. The HNO 3 -treated multiwalled carbon nanotubes were physico-chemically characterized by several techniques [e.g. TEM, FE-SEM, TGA, ζ-potential and Raman spectroscopy]. HNO 3 -MWCNT did not show toxicity on Nile tilapia when the concentration ranged from 0.1 to 3.0 mg/L, and the maximum exposure time was 96h. After 24, 48, 72 and 96h the LC50 values of Pb were 1.65, 1.32, 1.10 and 0.99 mg/L, respectively. To evaluate the Pb-nanotube interaction influence on the ecotoxicity, we submitted the Nile tilapia to different concentrations of Pb mixed with a non-toxic concentration of HNO 3 -MWCNT (1.0 mg/L). After 24, 48, 72, 96 h the LC50 values of Pb plus nanotubes were: 0.32, 0.25, 0.20, 0.18 mg/L, respectively. These values showed a synergistic effect after Pb-nanotube interaction since Pb toxicity increased over five times. X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was used to confirm lead adsorption on the carbon nanotube oxidized surface. The exposure of Nile tilapia to Pb plus HNO 3 -MWCNT caused both oxygen consumption and ammonium excretion decrease, when compared to the control. Finally, our results show that carbon nanotubes interact with classical pollutants drawing attention to the environmental implications.

  13. Acute in vitro and in vivo toxicity of a commercial grade boron nitride nanotube mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodali, Vamsi K; Roberts, Jenny R; Shoeb, Mohammad; Wolfarth, Michael G; Bishop, Lindsey; Eye, Tracy; Barger, Mark; Roach, Katherine A; Friend, Sherri; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Chen, Bean T; Stefaniak, Aleksandr; Jordan, Kevin C; Whitney, Roy R; Porter, Dale W; Erdely, Aaron D

    2017-10-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are an emerging engineered nanomaterial attracting significant attention due to superior electrical, chemical and thermal properties. Currently, the toxicity profile of this material is largely unknown. Commercial grade BNNTs are composed of a mixture (BNNT-M) of ∼50-60% BNNTs, and ∼40-50% impurities of boron and hexagonal boron nitride. We performed acute in vitro and in vivo studies with commercial grade BNNT-M, dispersed by sonication in vehicle, in comparison to the extensively studied multiwalled carbon nanotube-7 (MWCNT-7). THP-1 wild-type and NLRP3-deficient human monocytic cells were exposed to 0-100 µg/ml and C57BL/6 J male mice were treated with 40 µg of BNNT-M for in vitro and in vivo studies, respectively. In vitro, BNNT-M induced a dose-dependent increase in cytotoxicity and oxidative stress. This was confirmed in vivo following acute exposure increase in bronchoalveolar lavage levels of lactate dehydrogenase, pulmonary polymorphonuclear cell influx, loss in mitochondrial membrane potential and augmented levels of 4-hydroxynonenal. Uptake of this material caused lysosomal destabilization, pyroptosis and inflammasome activation, corroborated by an increase in cathepsin B, caspase 1, increased protein levels of IL-1β and IL-18 both in vitro and in vivo. Attenuation of these effects in NLRP3-deficient THP-1 cells confirmed NLRP3-dependent inflammasome activation by BNNT-M. BNNT-M induced a similar profile of inflammatory pulmonary protein production when compared to MWCNT-7. Functionally, pretreatment with BNNT-M caused suppression in bacterial uptake by THP-1 cells, an effect that was mirrored in challenged alveolar macrophages collected from exposed mice and attenuated with NLRP3 deficiency. Analysis of cytokines secreted by LPS-challenged alveolar macrophages collected after in vivo exposure to dispersions of BNNT-M showed a differential macrophage response. The observed results demonstrated acute

  14. Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Carcinoma of the Prostate: Analysis of Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coote, Joanna H.; Wylie, James P.; Cowan, Richard A.; Logue, John P.; Swindell, Ric; Livsey, Jacqueline E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Dose escalation for prostate cancer improves biological control but with a significant increase in late toxicity. Recent estimates of low α/β ratio for prostate cancer suggest that hypofractionation may result in biological advantage. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) should enable dose escalation to the prostate while reducing toxicity to local organs. We report late toxicity data of a hypofractionated IMRT regime. Methods and Materials: Eligible men had T2-3N0M0 adenocarcinoma prostate, and either Gleason score ≥ 7 or prostate-specific antigen 20-50 ng/L. Patients received 57-60 Gy to prostate in 19-20 fractions using five-field IMRT. All received hormonal therapy for 3 months before radiotherapy to a maximum of 6 months. Toxicity was assessed 2 years postradiotherapy using the RTOG criteria, LENT/SOMA, and UCLA prostate index assessment tools. Results: Acute toxicity was favorable with no RTOG Grade 3 or 4 toxicity. At 2 years, there was 4% Grade 2 bowel and 4.25% Grade 2 bladder toxicity. There was no Grade 3 or 4 bowel toxicity; one patient developed Grade 3 bladder toxicity. UCLA data showed a slight improvement in urinary function at 2 years compared with pretreatment. LENT/SOMA assessments demonstrated general worsening of bowel function at 2 years. Patients receiving 60 Gy were more likely to develop problems with bowel function than those receiving 57 Gy. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that hypofractionated radiotherapy using IMRT for prostate cancer is well tolerated with minimal late toxicity at 2 years posttreatment. Ongoing studies are looking at the efficacy of hypofractionated regimes with respect to biological control.

  15. Smartphone-based grading of apple quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianglin; Li, Ting

    2018-02-01

    Apple quality grading is a critical issue in apple industry which is one economical pillar of many countries. Artificial grading is inefficient and of poor accuracy. Here we proposed to develop a portable, convenient, real-time, and low cost method aimed at grading apple. Color images of the apples were collected with a smartphone and the grade of sampled apple was assessed by a customized smartphone app, which offered the functions translating RGB color values of the apple to color grade and translating the edge of apple image to weight grade. The algorithms are based on modeling with a large number of apple image at different grades. The apple grade data evaluated by the smartphone are in accordance with the actual data. This study demonstrated the potential of smart phone in apple quality grading/online monitoring at gathering and transportation stage for apple industry.

  16. Solubilization of industrial grade plant protein by enzymatic hydrolysis monitored by vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bevilacqua, Marta; Pratico, Giulia; Plesner, Johanne

    2017-01-01

    Protein hydrolysates are of great interest in the food industry due to their nutritional and functional properties, but their use often implies solubilization in water and therefore hamper the use of plant proteins with inherent low water solubility. Protein solubility in water can be modified...... (1H NMR and IR) coupled with chemometrics analysis in monitoring the hydrolysis of five different industrial grade plant proteins by the enzyme Alcalase. Logarithmic modeling of the PCA (Principal Component Analysis) scores confirmed that they can represent a measurement of the solubilized protein...

  17. Iodine 125 prostate brachytherapy: prognostic factors for long-term urinary, digestive and sexual toxicities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyen, J.; Mohammed Ali, A.; Ginot, A.; Ferre, M.; Castelli, J.; Hannoun-Levi, J.M.; Chamorey, E.; Mohammed Ali, A.; Quintens, H.; Amiel, J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose For patients with good urinary function and presenting with a low risk prostate cancer, prostate brachytherapy using iodine implants represents one of the techniques of reference. This retrospective analysis investigates urinary (U), digestive (D) and sexual (S) toxicities and their prognostic factors of duration. Material and methods From August 2000 to November 2007, 176 patients presenting with prostate adenocarcinoma underwent interstitial brachytherapy. Urinary, digestive and sexual toxicities were classified according to Common toxicities criteria for adverse events, version 3.0 (C.T.C.A.E. V 3.0). For each toxicity (U, D, S), the number of complications U (dysuria, nicturia), D (proctitis, diarrhea) and S (sexual dysfunction, loss of libido) was listed and analyzed according to criteria related to the patient, implant, dosimetric data and characteristics of the toxicity. Prognostic factors identified in univariate analysis (U.V.A.) (Log Rank) were further analyzed in multivariate analysis (M.V.A.) (Cox model). Results With a median follow-up of 26 months (1-87), 147 patients (83.5 %) presented urinary toxicities. Among them, 29.5 % (86 patients) and 2.4 % (seven patients) presented grade 2 and 3 U toxicity respectively. In U.V.A., urinary grade toxicity greater than or equal to 2 (p = 0.037), the presence of initial U symptoms (p = 0.027) and more than two urinary toxicities (p 0.00032) were recognized as prognostic factors. The number of U toxicities was the only prognostic factor in M.V.A. (p = 0.04). D toxicity accounted for 40.6 % (71 patients). Among them, 3 % (six patients) were grade 2. None were grade 3. Two factors were identified as prognostic factors either in U.V.A. and M.V.A.: the number of D toxicities greater than or equal to 2 (univariate analysis: p = 0,00129, multivariate analysis: p = 0,002) and age less than or equal to 65 years (univariate analysis: p = 0,004, multivariate analysis: p 0,007). Eighty-three patients (47

  18. Urethra-Sparing, Intraoperative, Real-Time Planned, Permanent-Seed Prostate Brachytherapy: Toxicity Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilli, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada); Taussky, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.taussky.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada); Donath, David; Le, Hoa Phong; Larouche, Renee-Xaviere; Beliveau-Nadeau, Dominique; Hervieux, Yannick; Delouya, Guila [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To report the toxicity outcome in patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing {sup 125}I permanent-seed brachytherapy (BT) according to a urethra-sparing, intraoperative (IO), real-time planned conformal technique. Methods and Materials: Data were analyzed on 250 patients treated consecutively for low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer between 2005 and 2009. The planned goal was urethral V{sub 150} = 0. Acute and late genitourinary (GU), gastrointestinal (GI), and erectile toxicities were scored with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 3.0). Median follow-up time for patients with at least 2 years of follow-up (n = 130) was 34.4 months (range, 24-56.9 months). Results: Mean IO urethra V{sub 150} was 0.018% {+-} 0.08%. Mean prostate D{sub 90} and V{sub 100} on day-30 computed tomography scan were 158.0 {+-} 27.0 Gy and 92.1% {+-} 7.2%, respectively. Mean IPSS peak was 9.5 {+-} 6.3 1 month after BT (mean difference from baseline IPSS, 5.3). No acute GI toxicity was observed in 86.8% of patients. The 3-year probability of Grade {>=}2 late GU toxicity-free survival was 77.4% {+-} 4.0%, with Grade 3 late GU toxicity encountered in only 3 patients. Three-year Grade 1 late GI toxicity-free survival was 86.1% {+-} 3.2%. No patient presented Grade {>=}2 late GI toxicity. Of patients with normal sexual status at baseline, 20.7% manifested Grade {>=}2 erectile dysfunction after BT. On multivariate analysis, elevated baseline IPSS (p = 0.016) and high-activity sources (median 0.61 mCi) (p = 0.033) predicted increased Grade {>=}2 late GU toxicity. Conclusions: Urethra-sparing IO BT results in low acute and late GU toxicity compared with the literature. High seed activity and elevated IPSS at baseline increased long-term GU toxicity.

  19. Determination of the toxic variability of lipophilic biotoxins in marine bivalve and gastropod tissues treated with an industrial canning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Carlos; Oyaneder-Terrazas, Javiera; Contreras, Cristóbal; Del Campo, Miguel; Torres, Rafael; Contreras, Héctor R

    2016-11-01

    Contamination of shellfish with lipophilic marine biotoxins (LMB), pectenotoxins (PTXs), yessotoxins (YTXs) and okadaic acid (OA) toxin groups in southern Chile is a constant challenge for the development of miticulture considering the high incidence of toxic episodes that tend to occur. This research is focused on using methodologies for assessing the decrease in toxins of natural resources in Chile with high value, without altering the organoleptic properties of the shellfish. The species were processed through steaming (1 min at 121°C) and subsequent canning (5 min at 121°C). Changes in the profiles of toxins and total toxicity levels of LMB in endemic bivalves and gastropods were determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The total reduction of toxicity (≈ 15%) was not related to the destruction of the toxin, but rather to the loss of LMB on removing the shells and packing media of canned products (***p < 0.001). Industrial processing of shellfish reduces LMB contents by up to 15% of the total initial contents, concomitant only with the interconversion of PTX-group toxins into PTX-2sa. In soft bottom-dwelling species with toxicities beyond the standard for safe human consumption (≥ 160 μg OA-eq kg - 1 ), toxicity can be reduced to safe levels through industrial preparation procedures.

  20. The Rodeo and Cattle Industry -- Its Rich Spanish-Mexican Heritage. A Bilingual-Bicultural Resource Booklet for Teachers, Pre-School through Grade Six.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archuleta, Lena, Comp.

    This teacher resource book describes the Spanish-Mexican contribution to the cattle industry, rodeo, and cowboy culture. It provides background material, resources, and activities for developing a bilingual-bicultural education course for primary, intermediate, and upper grades. The first three sections discuss the cattle industry, American rodeo,…

  1. Acute toxicity of chemoradiation for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedel, C.; Fietkau, R.; Keilholz, L.; Grabenbauer, G.G.; Kessler, H.; Martus, P.; Sauer, R.

    1997-01-01

    Between 1987 and 1995, 120 patients with rectal cancer (73 patients with primary tumor, 47 with recurrent disease) received chemoradiation for rectal cancer. Fifty-six patients received preoperative chemoradiation, 64 patients were treated postoperatively. Radiation was given by 4-field box technique with 6 to 10 MV-photons. Daily fraction size was 1.8 Gy, total dose 50.4 Gy (range: 41,4 to 56 Gy) ± 5.4 Gy (range: 3.6 to 19.8 Gy) local boost in selected cases, specified to the ICRU reference point. During the first and fifth week of radiation 5-FU at a dose of 1000 m 2 /d for 120 hours was administered by continuous infusion. Toxicity was recorded following (modified) WHO-criteria. Results: Acute grade 3 toxicity occurred mainly as diarrhea (33%), perineal skin reaction (37%), and leukopenia (10%). Extension of the treatment volume including paraaortic lymph nodes (L3) led to a significant increase of grade 3-diarrhea (68% vs. 25%, p = 0.0003) and grade 3-leukopenia (18% vs. 8%, p 0.03). After abdominoperineal resection less patients suffered from grade 3-diarrhea (8% vs. 47% after sphincter preserving procedures, p = 0.0006), whereas severe perineal erythema occurred more frequently (56% vs. 29%, p 0.02). Women had significantly more toxic side effects (grade 3-diarrhea: 39% vs. 16% in men, p = 0,04; grade 2 to 3-nausea/emesis: 21% vs 8% in men, p 0.018; grade 2 to 3-leukopenia 53% vs. 31% in men, p = 0.02). After preoperative chemoradiation a significant reduction of grade 3-diarrhea (11% vs 29%, p 0.03) and grade 3-erythema (16% vs. 41%, p = 0.04) was noted. (orig./AJ) [de

  2. Application of graded QA in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchill, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    All current schemes for grading of quality assurance are developments or variations on three themes; defining and grouping the planning and systematic actions which constitute the quality assurance approach, defining and classifying the safety, economic and other factors which influence the extent of quality assurance necessary, and using classification or grading schedules to relate grades of quality assurance to classes of factors. The codes and standards which define the actions needed for good management are listed and discussed. A typical equipment classification schedule or a light water reactor is shown. Contract interface documentation and surveillance requirements are discussed. (UK)

  3. Bio-testing integral toxicity of corrosion inhibitors, biocides and oil hydrocarbons in oil-and gas-processing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chugunov, V.A.; Kholodenko, V.P.; Irkhina, I.A.; Fomchenkov, V.M.; Novikov, I.A. [State Research Center for Applied Microbiology, Obolensk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    In recent years bioassays have been widely used for assessing levels of contamination of the environment. This is due to the fact that test-organisms provide a general response to toxicants present in samples. Based on microorganisms as test objects, it is possible to develop cheap, sensitive and rapid assays to identify environmental xenobiotics and toxicants. The objective of the research was to develop different microbiological assays for assessing integral toxicity of water environments polluted with corrosion inhibitors, biocides and hydrocarbons in oil- and gas-processing industry. Bio-luminescent, electro-orientational, osmo-optic and microorganism reducing activity assays were used for express evaluation of integral toxicity. They are found to determine promptly integral toxicity of water environments containing various pollutants (oil, oil products, corrosion inhibitors, biocides). Results conclude that the assays may be used for analyzing integral toxicity of water polluted with hydrocarbons, as well as for monitoring of water changes as a result of biodegradation of pollutants by microorganisms and their associations. Using a kit of different assays, it is also possible to evaluate ecological safety of biocides, corrosion inhibitors, and their compositions. Bioassays used as a kit are more effective than each assay individually, allowing one to get complete characterization of a reaction of bacterial test organisms to different environments. (authors)

  4. Poisoning of bees by industrial arsenic emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaroslav, S

    1962-01-01

    Massive poisoning of bees by industrial arsenic emissions in Czechoslovakia are reviewed. Arsenic emissions from an ore processing plant in Tesin were responsible for massive bee deaths after World War I. Massive death of bees was observed in 1938 in the Krompach region around a copper ore smelting plant which emitted arsenic. Other accidents were reported in 1954 and 1957 in areas around industrial plants and power plants using arsenopyrite-containing low-grade coal or lignite. Arsenic was emitted bound in fly-ash in the form of arsenic trioxide or, in the case of coals containing alkaline chlorides, in the form of arsenic trichloride. The arsenic contamination extended to areas within a radius of 3 to 7 km. Settled fly-ash contained 0.0004 to 0.75 percent arsenic, which was soluble in a citrate-hydrochloric acid solution of pH 3.9, which corresponds to the gastric acid of bees. The arsenic uptake by the bees from pollen was calculated to amount to 1 microgram daily, against a toxic dose of 0.37 microgram. The toxic effect of arsenic on bees can be abated by adding colloidal iron hydroxide to the sugar solution which they are fed.

  5. Poisoning of bees by industrial arsenic emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svoboda, J

    1962-01-01

    Massive poisoning of bees by industrial arsenic emissions in Czechoslovakia are reviewed. Arsenic emissions from an ore processing plant in Tesin were responsible for massive bee deaths after World War I. Massive death of bees was observed in 1938 in the Krompach region around a copper ore smelting plant which emitted arsenic. Other accidents were reported in 1954 and 1957 in areas around industrial plants and power plants using arsenopyrite-containing low-grade coal or lignite. Arsenic was emitted bound in fly-ash in the form of arsenic trioxide or, in the case of coals containing alkaline chlorides, in the form of arsenic trichloride. The arsenic contamination extended to areas within a radius of 3-7 km. Settled fly-ash contained 0.0004-0.75% arsenic, which was soluble in a citrate-hydrochloric acid solution of pH 3.9, which corresponds to the gastric acid of bees. The arsenic uptake by the bees from pollen was calculated to amount to 1 microgram daily, against a toxic dose of 0.37 microgram. The toxic effect of arsenic on bees can be abated by adding colloidal iron hydroxide to the sugar solution which they are fed. 5 references.

  6. Bioassay directed identification of toxicants in sludge and related reused materials from industrial wastewater treatment plants in the Yangtze River Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Binbin; Guo, Jing; Li, Fuxing; Giesy, John P; Wang, Lianjun; Shi, Wei

    2017-02-01

    Industrialized development of the Yangtze River Delta, China, has resulted in larger amounts of wastes, including sludges from treatment of these wastes. Methods to manage and dispose, including reuse were urgently needed. Sludge and reused products were collected from two largest factories, KEYUAN and HENGJIA where treated sludges were turned into bricks or sludge cake to be placed in landfills, respectively. Metals and organic compounds were quantified in sludges and leachates assessed by use of toxicity characterized leaching procedure (TCLP) while acute toxicity was determined by Daphnia magna. Nine metals were detected in all raw sludges with concentrations of Cr and Ni exceeding Chinese standards. For sludge leachate, concentrations of metals were all less than Chinese standards, which changed little after being made into cake by HENGJIA, but were significantly less after being made into brick by KEYUAN. Toxicity units (TU) for all samples are greater than 1.0 indicating that they are potentially toxic to aquatic organisms. TUs changed little after being made into filter cake, but were 10-fold less after being made into bricks. Cr and Ni contributed most to the total toxicity followed by Zn and Cu. Making of sludges into K-brick 1 resulted in better inactivation of contaminants, which resulted in less toxic potencies. So that is the recommended method for handling of industrial sludges. To further assure their safe reuse, additional research on identification of key toxicants and potential hazards, based on additional endpoints, by combining bio-tests and chemical analysis should be done for reused sludges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Toxicity and efficacy of re-irradiation of high-grade glioma in a phase I dose- and volume escalation trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per; Costa, Junia

    2017-01-01

    .1-3.5) and the median overall survival was 7.0 months (95%CI: 3.5-10.5). Early side effects were mild and included headache and fatigue. Seven patients were progression-free beyond 10 weeks and were evaluable for late toxicity. Among these patients, three (43%) suffered late adverse events which included radionecrosis......INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of PET and MRI guided re-irradiation of recurrent high-grade glioma (HGG) and to assess the impact of radiotherapy dose, fractionation and irradiated volume. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with localized, recurrent HGG...... (grades III-IV) and no other treatment options were eligible for a prospective phase I trial. Gross tumor volumes for radiotherapy were defined using T1-contrast enhanced MRI and (18)F-fluoro-ethyl tyrosine PET. Radiotherapy was delivered using volumetric modulated arc therapy with a 2-mm margin. The dose...

  8. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy: predictive clinical and dosimetric factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciammella, Patrizia; Podgornii, Ala; Galeandro, Maria; Micera, Renato; Ramundo, Dafne; Palmieri, Tamara; Cagni, Elisabetta; Iotti, Cinzia

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate toxicity and cosmetic outcome in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant hypo fractionated radiotherapy to the whole breast, and to identify the risk factors for toxicity. Two hundred twelve women with early breast cancer underwent conserving surgery were enrolled in the study. The patients received 40.05 Gy in 15 daily fractions, 2.67 Gy per fraction. The boost to the tumor bed was administered with a total dose of 9 Gy in 3 consecutive fractions in 55 women. Physician-rated acute and late toxicity and cosmetic outcome (both subjective and objective) were prospectively assessed during and after radiotherapy. In our population study the mean age was 63 with the 17% (36 pts) of the women younger than 50 years. The median follow-up was 34 months. By the end of RT, 35 patients out of 212 (16%) no acute toxicity, according to the RTOG criteria, while 145 (68%) and 31 patients (15%) developed grade 1 and grade 2 acute skin toxicity, respectively. Late skin toxicity evaluation was available for all 212 patients with a minimum follow up of 8 months. The distribution of toxicity was: 39 pts (18%) with grade 1 and 2 pts (1%) with grade 2. No worse late skin toxicity was observed. Late subcutaneous grade 0-1 toxicity was recorded in 208 patients (98%) and grade 2 toxicity in 3 patients (2%), while grade 3 was observed in 1 patient only. At last follow up, a subjective and objective good or excellent cosmetic outcome was reported in 93% and 92% of the women, respectively. At univariate and multivariate analysis, the late skin toxicity was correlated with the additional boost delivery (p=0.007 and p=0.023). Regarding the late subcutaneous tissue, a correlation with diabetes was found (p=0.0283). These results confirm the feasibility and safety of the hypofractionated radiotherapy in patients with early breast cancer. In our population the boost administration was resulted to be a significant adverse prognostic factor for acute

  9. Toxicity and outcome of pelvic IMRT for node-positive prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.C.; Luetjens, J.; Eckert, F.; Bamberg, M.; Alber, M.; Schilling, D.; Belka, C.; Gaswindt, U.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study reports on the treatment techniques, toxicity, and outcome of pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for lymph node-positive prostate cancer (LNPPC, T1-4, c/pN1 cM0). Patients and methods: Pelvic IMRT to 45-50.4 Gy was applied in 39 cases either after previous surgery of involved lymph nodes (n = 18) or with a radiation boost to suspicious nodes (n = 21) with doses of 60-70 Gy, usually combined with androgen deprivation (n = 37). The prostate and seminal vesicles received 70-74 Gy. In cases of previous prostatectomy, prostatic fossa and remnants of seminal vesicles were given 66-70 Gy. Treatment-related acute and late toxicity was graded according to the RTOG criteria. Results: Acute radiation-related toxicity higher than grade 2 occurred in 2 patients (with the need for urinary catheter/subileus related to adhesions after surgery). Late toxicity was mild (grade 1-2) after a median follow-up of 70 months. Over 50% of the patients reported no late morbidity (grade 0). PSA control and cancer-specific survival reached 67% and 97% at over 5 years. Conclusion: Pelvic IMRT after the removal of affected nodes or with a radiation boost to clinically positive nodes led to an acceptable late toxicity (no grade 3/4 events), thus justifying further evaluation of this approach in a larger cohort. (orig.)

  10. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Radiotherapy, and the Risk of Acute and Chronic Toxicity: The Mayo Clinic Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinn, Melva E.; Gold, Douglas G. M.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Osborn, Thomas G.; Brown, Paul D.; Miller, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the acute and chronic toxic effects of radiotherapy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods and Materials: Medical records of 21 consecutive patients with SLE, who had received 34 courses of external beam radiotherapy and one low-dose-rate prostate implant, were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with discoid lupus erythematosus were excluded. Results: Median survival was 2.3 years and median follow-up 5.6 years. Eight (42%) of 19 patients evaluable for acute toxicity during radiotherapy experienced acute toxicity of Grade 1 or greater, and 4 (21%) had acute toxicity of Grade 3 or greater. The 5- and 10-year incidence of chronic toxicity of Grade 1 or greater was 45% (95% confidence interval [CI], 22-72%) and 56% (95% CI, 28-81%), respectively. The 5- and 10-year incidence of chronic toxicity of Grade 3 or greater was 28% (95% CI, 18-60%) and 40% (95% CI, 16-72%), respectively. Univariate analysis showed that chronic toxicity of Grade 1 or greater correlated with SLE renal involvement (p < 0.006) and possibly with the presence of five or more American Rheumatism Association criteria (p < 0.053). Chronic toxicity of Grade 3 or greater correlated with an absence of photosensitivity (p < 0.02), absence of arthritis (p < 0.03), and presence of a malar rash (p < 0.04). Conclusions: The risk of acute and chronic toxicity in patients with SLE who received radiotherapy was moderate but was not prohibitive of the use of radiotherapy. Patients with more advanced SLE may be at increased risk for chronic toxicity

  11. Predictive factors for gastroduodenal toxicity based on endoscopy following radiotherapy in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, H. [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Health Sciences and Technology; Oh, D.; Park, H.C.; Han, Y.; Lim, D.H. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kang, S.W. [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiologic Science; Paik, S.W. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Medicine

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to determine predictive factors for gastroduodenal (GD) toxicity in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients who were treated with radiotherapy (RT). Patients and methods: A total of 90 HCC patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) before and after RT were enrolled. RT was delivered as 30-50 Gy (median 37.5 Gy) in 2-5 Gy (median 3.5 Gy) per fraction. All endoscopic findings were reviewed and GD toxicities related to RT were graded by the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. The predictive factors for the {>=} grade 2 GD toxicity were investigated. Results: Endoscopic findings showed erosive gastritis in 14 patients (16 %), gastric ulcers in 8 patients (9 %), erosive duodenitis in 15 patients (17 %), and duodenal ulcers in 14 patients (16 %). Grade 2 toxicity developed in 19 patients (21 %) and grade 3 toxicity developed in 8 patients (9 %). V{sub 25} for stomach and V{sub 35} for duodenum (volume receiving a RT dose of more than x Gy) were the most predictive factors for {>=} grade 2 toxicity. The gastric toxicity rate at 6 months was 2.9 % for V{sub 25} {<=} 6.3 % and 57.1 % for V{sub 25} > 6.3 %. The duodenal toxicity rate at 6 months was 9.4 % for V{sub 35} > 5.4 % and 45.9 % for V{sub 35} > 5.4 %. By multivariate analysis including the clinical factors, V{sub 25} for stomach and V{sub 35} for duodenum were the significant factors. Conclusion: EGD revealed that GD toxicity is common following RT for HCC. V{sub 25} for the stomach and V{sub 35} for the duodenum were the significant factors to predict {>=} grade 2 GD toxicity. (orig.)

  12. Helical tomotherapy in the treatment of pediatric malignancies: a preliminary report of feasibility and acute toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beltrán César

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation therapy plays a central role in the management of many childhood malignancies and Helical Tomotherapy (HT provides potential to decrease toxicity by limiting the radiation dose to normal structures. The aim of this article was to report preliminary results of our clinical experience with HT in pediatric malignancies. Methods In this study 66 consecutive patients younger than 14 years old, treated with HT at our center between January 2006 and April 2010, have been included. We performed statistical analyses to assess the relationship between acute toxicity, graded according to the RTOG criteria, and several clinical and treatment characteristics such as a dose and irradiation volume. Results The median age of patients was 5 years. The most common tumor sites were: central nervous system (57%, abdomen (17% and thorax (6%. The most prevalent histological types were: medulloblastoma (16 patients, neuroblastoma (9 patients and rhabdomyosarcoma (7 patients. A total of 52 patients were treated for primary disease and 14 patients were treated for recurrent tumors. The majority of the patients (72% were previously treated with chemotherapy. The median prescribed dose was 51 Gy (range 10-70 Gy. In 81% of cases grade 1 or 2 acute toxicity was observed. There were 11 cases (16,6% of grade 3 hematological toxicity, two cases of grade 3 skin toxicity and one case of grade 3 emesis. Nine patients (13,6% had grade 4 hematological toxicity. There were no cases of grade 4 non-hematological toxicities. On the univariate analysis, total dose and craniospinal irradiation (24 cases were significantly associated with severe toxicity (grade 3 or more, whereas age and chemotherapy were not. On the multivariate analysis, craniospinal irradiation was the only significant independent risk factor for grade 3-4 toxicity. Conclusion HT in pediatric population is feasible and safe treatment modality. It is characterized by an acceptable level of

  13. Helical tomotherapy in the treatment of pediatric malignancies: a preliminary report of feasibility and acute toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesbah, Latifa; Marsiglia, Hugo; Matute, Raúl; Usychkin, Sergey; Marrone, Immacolata; Puebla, Fernando; Mínguez, Cristina; García, Rafael; García, Graciela; Beltrán, César

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy plays a central role in the management of many childhood malignancies and Helical Tomotherapy (HT) provides potential to decrease toxicity by limiting the radiation dose to normal structures. The aim of this article was to report preliminary results of our clinical experience with HT in pediatric malignancies. In this study 66 consecutive patients younger than 14 years old, treated with HT at our center between January 2006 and April 2010, have been included. We performed statistical analyses to assess the relationship between acute toxicity, graded according to the RTOG criteria, and several clinical and treatment characteristics such as a dose and irradiation volume. The median age of patients was 5 years. The most common tumor sites were: central nervous system (57%), abdomen (17%) and thorax (6%). The most prevalent histological types were: medulloblastoma (16 patients), neuroblastoma (9 patients) and rhabdomyosarcoma (7 patients). A total of 52 patients were treated for primary disease and 14 patients were treated for recurrent tumors. The majority of the patients (72%) were previously treated with chemotherapy. The median prescribed dose was 51 Gy (range 10-70 Gy). In 81% of cases grade 1 or 2 acute toxicity was observed. There were 11 cases (16,6%) of grade 3 hematological toxicity, two cases of grade 3 skin toxicity and one case of grade 3 emesis. Nine patients (13,6%) had grade 4 hematological toxicity. There were no cases of grade 4 non-hematological toxicities. On the univariate analysis, total dose and craniospinal irradiation (24 cases) were significantly associated with severe toxicity (grade 3 or more), whereas age and chemotherapy were not. On the multivariate analysis, craniospinal irradiation was the only significant independent risk factor for grade 3-4 toxicity. HT in pediatric population is feasible and safe treatment modality. It is characterized by an acceptable level of acute toxicity that we have seen in this highly

  14. Late Toxicity After Definitive Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Thoracic Esophageal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morota, Madoka; Gomi, Kotaro; Kozuka, Takuyo; Chin, Keisho; Matsuura, Masaaki; Oguchi, Masahiko; Ito, Hisao; Yamashita, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate late cardiopulmonary toxicities after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for esophageal carcinomas. Methods and Materials: From February 2002 through April 2005, 74 patients with clinical Stage I-IVB carcinoma of the esophagus were treated with CCRT. Sixty-nine patients with thoracic squamous cell carcinoma were the core of this analysis. Patients received 60 Gy of radiation therapy in 30 fractions over 8 weeks, including a 2-week break, and received 2 cycles of fluorouracil/cisplatin chemotherapy concomitantly. Initial radiation fields included primary tumors, metastatic lymph nodes, and supraclavicular, mediastinal, and celiac nodes areas. Late toxicities were assessed with the late radiation morbidity scoring scheme of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organiation for Research and Treatment of Cancer. Results: The median age was 67 years (range, 45-83 years). The median follow-up time was 26.1 months for all patients and 51.4 months for patients still alive at the time of analysis. Five cardiopulmonary toxic events of Grade 3 or greater were observed in 4 patients, Grade 5 heart failure and Grade 3 pericarditis in 1 patient, and Grade 3 myocardial infarction, Grade 3 radiation pneumonitis, and Grade 3 pleural effusion. The 2-year cumulative incidence of late cardiopulmonary toxicities of Grade 3 or greater for patients 75 years or older was 29% compared with 3% for younger patients (p = 0.005). Conclusion: The CCRT used in this study with an extensive radiation field is acceptable for younger patients but is not tolerated by patients older than 75 years.

  15. High-dose intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer: early toxicity and biochemical outcome in 772 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Fuks, Zvi; Hunt, Margie; Yamada, Yoshiya; Marion, Christine; Ling, C. Clifton; Amols, Howard; Venkatraman, E.S.; Leibel, Steven A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To report the acute and late toxicity and preliminary biochemical outcomes in 772 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between April 1996 and January 2001, 772 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with IMRT. Treatment was planned using an inverse-planning approach, and the desired beam intensity profiles were delivered by dynamic multileaf collimation. A total of 698 patients (90%) were treated to 81.0 Gy, and 74 patients (10%) were treated to 86.4 Gy. Acute and late toxicities were scored by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity grading scales. PSA relapse was defined according to The American Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology Consensus Statement. The median follow-up time was 24 months (range: 6-60 months). Results: Thirty-five patients (4.5%) developed acute Grade 2 rectal toxicity, and no patient experienced acute Grade 3 or higher rectal symptoms. Two hundred seventeen patients (28%) developed acute Grade 2 urinary symptoms, and one experienced urinary retention (Grade 3). Eleven patients (1.5%) developed late Grade 2 rectal bleeding. Four patients (0.1%) experienced Grade 3 rectal toxicity requiring either one or more transfusions or a laser cauterization procedure. No Grade 4 rectal complications have been observed. The 3-year actuarial likelihood of ≥ late Grade 2 rectal toxicity was 4%. Seventy-two patients (9%) experienced late Grade 2 urinary toxicity, and five (0.5%) developed Grade 3 urinary toxicity (urethral stricture). The 3-year actuarial likelihood of ≥ late Grade 2 urinary toxicity was 15%. The 3-year actuarial PSA relapse-free survival rates for favorable, intermediate, and unfavorable risk group patients were 92%, 86%, and 81%, respectively. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the feasibility of high-dose IMRT in a large number of patients. Acute and late rectal toxicities seem to be

  16. A modified inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire and the Vaizey Incontinence questionnaire are more sensitive measures of acute gastrointestinal toxicity during pelvic radiotherapy than RTOG grading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, Usman; McGough, Camilla; Hackett, Claire; Blake, Peter; Harrington, Kevin J.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Tait, Diana; Norman, Andrew R.; Andreyev, H. Jervoise N.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Simple scales with greater sensitivity than Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading to detect acute gastrointestinal toxicity during pelvic radiotherapy, could be clinically useful. Methods and Materials: Do questionnaires used in benign gastrointestinal diseases detect toxicity in patients undergoing radiotherapy? The patient-completed Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBDQ) and Vaizey Incontinence questionnaires were compared prospectively at baseline and at Week 5 to physician-completed RTOG grading. Results: A total of 107 patients, median age 63 years, were recruited. After 5 weeks of treatment, patients with gynecologic and gastrointestinal cancer were more symptomatic than urologic patients (p 0.012; p = 0.014). Overall, 94% had altered bowel habits, 80% loose stool, 74% frequency, 65% difficult gas, 60% pain, >48% distress, 44% tenesmus, >40% restrictions in daily activity, 39% urgency, 37% fecal incontinence, and 40% required antidiarrheal medication. The median RTOG score was 1 (range, 0-2), median IBDQ score 204.5 (range, 74-224), and median Vaizey score 5 (range, 0-20). Chemotherapy preceding radiotherapy increased fecal incontinence (p 0.002). RTOG scores stabilized after 3 weeks, IBDQ scores peaked at Week 4, and Vaizey scores worsened throughout treatment. IBDQ and Vaizey scores distinguished between groups with different RTOG scores. Conclusion: The IBDQ and Vaizey questionnaires are reliable and sensitive, offering greater insight into the severity and range of symptoms compared with RTOG grading

  17. Comparative analysis of pharmaceuticals versus industrial chemicals acute aquatic toxicity classification according to the United Nations classification system for chemicals. Assessment of the (Q)SAR predictability of pharmaceuticals acute aquatic toxicity and their predominant acute toxic mode-of-action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanderson, Hans; Thomsen, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    data. Pharmaceuticals were found to be more frequent than industrial chemicals in GHS category III. Acute toxicity was predictable (>92%) using a generic (Q)SAR ((Quantitative) Structure Activity Relationship) suggesting a narcotic MOA. Analysis of model prediction error suggests that 68...

  18. Absorbable hydrogel spacer use in men undergoing prostate cancer radiotherapy: 12 month toxicity and proctoscopy results of a prospective multicenter phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhl, Matthias; DeWeese, Theodore L; Herfarth, Klaus; Eble, Michael J; Pinkawa, Michael; Triest, Baukelien van; Kalisvaart, Robin; Weber, Damien C; Miralbell, Raymond; Song, Danny Y

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the recommended treatment options for localized prostate cancer. In randomized trials, dose escalation was correlated with better biochemical control but also with higher rectal toxicity. A prospective multicenter phase II study was carried out to evaluate the safety, clinical and dosimetric effects of the hydrogel prostate-rectum spacer. Here we present the 12 months toxicity results of this trial. Fifty two patients with localized prostate cancer received a transperineal PEG hydrogel injection between the prostate and rectum, and then received IMRT to a dose of 78 Gy. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity were recorded during treatment and at 3, 6 and 12 months following irradiation by using the RTOG/EORTC criteria. Additionally, proctoscopy was performed 12 months after treatment and the results were scored using the Vienna Rectoscopy Scale (VRS). Of the patients treated 39.6% and 12.5% experienced acute Grade 1 and Grade 2 GI toxicity, respectively. There was no Grade 3 or Grade 4 acute GI toxicity experienced in the study. Only 4.3% showed late Grade 1 GI toxicity, and there was no late Grade 2 or greater GI toxicity experienced in the study. A total of 41.7%, 35.4% and 2.1% of the men experienced acute Grade 1, Grade 2 and Grade 3 GU toxicity, respectively. There was no Grade 4 acute GU toxicity experienced in the study. Late Grade 1 and Grade 2 GU toxicity was experienced in 17.0% and 2.1% of the patients, respectively. There was no late Grade 3 or greater GU toxicity experienced in the study. Seventy one percent of the patients had a VRS score of 0, and one patient (2%) had Grade 3 teleangiectasia. There was no evidence of ulceration, stricture or necrosis at 12 months. The use of PEG spacer gel is a safe and effective method to spare the rectum from higher dose and toxicity

  19. Preliminary analysis of risk factors for late rectal toxicity after helical tomotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Natsuo; Soga, Norihito; Ogura, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine risk factors for late rectal toxicity for localized prostate cancer patients treated with helical tomotherapy (HT). The patient cohort of this retrospective study was composed of 241 patients treated with HT and followed up regularly. Toxicity levels were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading scale. The clinical and dosimetric potential factors increasing the risk of late rectal toxicity, such as age, diabetes, anticoagulants, prior abdominal surgery, prescribed dose, maximum dose of the rectum, and the percentage of the rectum covered by 70 Gy (V70), 60 Gy (V60), 40 Gy (V40) and 20 Gy (V20) were compared between ≤ Grade 1 and ≥ Grade 2 toxicity groups using the Student's t-test. Multivariable logistic regression analysis of the factors that appeared to be associated with the risk of late rectal toxicity (as determined by the Student's t-test) was performed. The median follow-up time was 35 months. Late Grade 2-3 rectal toxicity was observed in 18 patients (7.4%). Age, the maximum dose of the rectum, V70 and V60 of the ≥ Grade 2 toxicity group were significantly higher than in those of the ≤ Grade 1 toxicity group (P=0.00093, 0.048, 0.0030 and 0.0021, respectively). No factor was significant in the multivariable analysis. The result of this study indicates that the risk of late rectal toxicity correlates with the rectal volume exposed to high doses of HT for localized prostate cancer. Further follow-up and data accumulation may establish dose-volume modeling to predict rectal complications after HT. (author)

  20. Toxic releases from power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, E.S.

    1999-01-01

    Beginning in 1998, electric power plants burning coal or oil must estimate and report their annual releases of toxic chemicals listed in the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) published by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This paper identifies the toxic chemicals of greatest significance for the electric utility sector and develops quantitative estimates of the toxic releases reportable to the TRI for a representative coal-fired power plant. Key factors affecting the magnitude and types of toxic releases for individual power plants also are discussed. A national projection suggests that the magnitude of electric utility industry releases will surpass those of the manufacturing industries which current report to the TRI. Risk communication activities at the community level will be essential to interpret and provide context for the new TRI results

  1. SU-F-T-133: Uniform Scanning Proton Therapy for Lung Cancer: Toxicity and Its Correlation with Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Y; Rana, S; Larson, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the toxicity of uniform scanning proton therapy for lung cancer patients and its correlation with dose distribution. Methods: In this study, we analyzed the toxicity of 128 lung cancer patients, including 18 small cell lung cancer and 110 non small cell lung cancer patients. Each patient was treated with uniform scanning proton beams at our center using typically 2–4 fields. The prescription was typically 74 Cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) at 2 CGE per fraction. 4D Computerized Tomography (CT) scans were used to evaluate the target motion and contour the internal target volume, and repeated 3 times during the course of treatment to evaluate the need for plan adaptation. Toxicity data for these patients were obtained from the proton collaborative group (PCG) database. For cases of grade 3 toxicities or toxicities of interest such as esophagitis and radiation dermatitis, dose distributions were reviewed and analyzed in attempt to correlate the toxicity with radiation dose. Results: At a median follow up time of about 21 months, none of the patients had experienced Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. The most common adverse effect was dermatitis (81%: 52%-Grade 1, 28%-Grade 2, and 1% Grade 3), followed by fatigue (48%), Cough (46%), and Esophagitis (45%), as shown in Figure 1. Severe toxicities, such as Grade 3 dermatitis or pain of skin, had a clear correlation with high radiation dose. Conclusion: Uniform scanning proton therapy is well tolerated by lung cancer patients. Preliminary analysis indicates there is correlation between severe toxicity and high radiation dose. Understanding of radiation resulted toxicities and careful choice of beam arrangement are critical in minimizing toxicity of skin and other organs.

  2. SU-F-T-133: Uniform Scanning Proton Therapy for Lung Cancer: Toxicity and Its Correlation with Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y; Rana, S; Larson, G [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To analyze the toxicity of uniform scanning proton therapy for lung cancer patients and its correlation with dose distribution. Methods: In this study, we analyzed the toxicity of 128 lung cancer patients, including 18 small cell lung cancer and 110 non small cell lung cancer patients. Each patient was treated with uniform scanning proton beams at our center using typically 2–4 fields. The prescription was typically 74 Cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) at 2 CGE per fraction. 4D Computerized Tomography (CT) scans were used to evaluate the target motion and contour the internal target volume, and repeated 3 times during the course of treatment to evaluate the need for plan adaptation. Toxicity data for these patients were obtained from the proton collaborative group (PCG) database. For cases of grade 3 toxicities or toxicities of interest such as esophagitis and radiation dermatitis, dose distributions were reviewed and analyzed in attempt to correlate the toxicity with radiation dose. Results: At a median follow up time of about 21 months, none of the patients had experienced Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. The most common adverse effect was dermatitis (81%: 52%-Grade 1, 28%-Grade 2, and 1% Grade 3), followed by fatigue (48%), Cough (46%), and Esophagitis (45%), as shown in Figure 1. Severe toxicities, such as Grade 3 dermatitis or pain of skin, had a clear correlation with high radiation dose. Conclusion: Uniform scanning proton therapy is well tolerated by lung cancer patients. Preliminary analysis indicates there is correlation between severe toxicity and high radiation dose. Understanding of radiation resulted toxicities and careful choice of beam arrangement are critical in minimizing toxicity of skin and other organs.

  3. Toxic industrial chemicals and chemical weapons: exposure, identification, and management by syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassoni, Anthony J; French, Robert N E; Walter, Frank G

    2015-02-01

    Toxidromes aid emergency care providers in the context of the patient presenting with suspected poisoning, unexplained altered mental status, unknown hazardous materials or chemical weapons exposure, or the unknown overdose. The ability to capture an adequate chemical exposure history and to recognize toxidromes may reduce dependence on laboratory tests, speed time to delivery of specific antidote therapy, and improve selection of supportive care practices tailored to the etiologic agent. This article highlights elements of the exposure history and presents selected toxidromes that may be caused by toxic industrial chemicals and chemical weapons. Specific antidotes for toxidromes and points regarding their use, and special supportive measures, are presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Consolidating Risk Estimates for Radiation-Induced Complications in Individual Patient: Late Rectal Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, Phillip; Devisetty, Kiran [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Tarima, Sergey S. [Division of Biostatistics, Institute for Health and Society, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lawton, Colleen A.F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Semenenko, Vladimir A., E-mail: vsemenenko@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To test the feasibility of a new approach to synthesize published normal tissue complication data using late rectal toxicity in prostate cancer as an example. Methods and Materials: A data survey was performed to identify the published reports on the dose-response relationships for late rectal toxicity. The risk estimates for Grade 1 or greater, Grade 2 or greater, and Grade 3 or greater toxicity were obtained for a test cohort of patients treated at our institution. The influence of the potential factors that might have affected the reported toxicity levels was investigated. The studies that did not conform to the general data trends were excluded, and single, combined risk estimates were derived for each patient and toxicity level. Results: A total of 21 studies of nonoverlapping patient populations were identified. Three studies provided dose-response models for more than one level of toxicity. Of these 21 studies, 6, 14, and 5 were used to derive the initial risk estimates for Grade 1, 2, and 3 or greater toxicity, respectively. A comparison of risk estimates between the studies reporting rectal bleeding and rectal toxicity (bleeding plus other symptoms) or between studies with follow-up <36 months and {>=}36 months did not reveal significant differences (p {>=} .29 for all comparisons). After excluding three reports that did not conform to the general data trends, the combined risk estimates were derived from 5 reports (647 patients), 11 reports (3,369 patients), and 5 reports (1,330 patients) for Grade 1, 2, and 3 or greater toxicity, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed approach is feasible and allows for more systematic use of published dose-response data to estimate the complication risks for the individual patient.

  5. Consolidating Risk Estimates for Radiation-Induced Complications in Individual Patient: Late Rectal Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, Phillip; Devisetty, Kiran; Tarima, Sergey S.; Lawton, Colleen A.F.; Semenenko, Vladimir A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test the feasibility of a new approach to synthesize published normal tissue complication data using late rectal toxicity in prostate cancer as an example. Methods and Materials: A data survey was performed to identify the published reports on the dose–response relationships for late rectal toxicity. The risk estimates for Grade 1 or greater, Grade 2 or greater, and Grade 3 or greater toxicity were obtained for a test cohort of patients treated at our institution. The influence of the potential factors that might have affected the reported toxicity levels was investigated. The studies that did not conform to the general data trends were excluded, and single, combined risk estimates were derived for each patient and toxicity level. Results: A total of 21 studies of nonoverlapping patient populations were identified. Three studies provided dose–response models for more than one level of toxicity. Of these 21 studies, 6, 14, and 5 were used to derive the initial risk estimates for Grade 1, 2, and 3 or greater toxicity, respectively. A comparison of risk estimates between the studies reporting rectal bleeding and rectal toxicity (bleeding plus other symptoms) or between studies with follow-up <36 months and ≥36 months did not reveal significant differences (p ≥ .29 for all comparisons). After excluding three reports that did not conform to the general data trends, the combined risk estimates were derived from 5 reports (647 patients), 11 reports (3,369 patients), and 5 reports (1,330 patients) for Grade 1, 2, and 3 or greater toxicity, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed approach is feasible and allows for more systematic use of published dose–response data to estimate the complication risks for the individual patient.

  6. In silico prediction of Tetrahymena pyriformis toxicity for diverse industrial chemicals with substructure pattern recognition and machine learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Feixiong; Shen, Jie; Yu, Yue; Li, Weihua; Liu, Guixia; Lee, Philip W; Tang, Yun

    2011-03-01

    There is an increasing need for the rapid safety assessment of chemicals by both industries and regulatory agencies throughout the world. In silico techniques are practical alternatives in the environmental hazard assessment. It is especially true to address the persistence, bioaccumulative and toxicity potentials of organic chemicals. Tetrahymena pyriformis toxicity is often used as a toxic endpoint. In this study, 1571 diverse unique chemicals were collected from the literature and composed of the largest diverse data set for T. pyriformis toxicity. Classification predictive models of T. pyriformis toxicity were developed by substructure pattern recognition and different machine learning methods, including support vector machine (SVM), C4.5 decision tree, k-nearest neighbors and random forest. The results of a 5-fold cross-validation showed that the SVM method performed better than other algorithms. The overall predictive accuracies of the SVM classification model with radial basis functions kernel was 92.2% for the 5-fold cross-validation and 92.6% for the external validation set, respectively. Furthermore, several representative substructure patterns for characterizing T. pyriformis toxicity were also identified via the information gain analysis methods. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hardwood lumber widths and grades used by the furniture and cabinet industries: Results of a 14-mill survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan Wiedenbeck; John Brown; Neal Bennett; Everette Rast

    2003-01-01

    Data on red oak lumber width, length, and grade were collected at 14 furniture and cabinet industry rough mills to identify relationships among these lumber attributes and the degree to which they differ from mill to mill. Also, this information is needed to formulate valid lumber size distributions that will improve the quality of theresults obtained in mill and...

  8. Bio-processing of Agro-industrial Wastes for Production of Food-grade Enzymes: Progress and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmjit S Panesar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: In the era of global industrialization, enzymes are being used extensively in the various sectors including food processing. Owing to the high price of enzymes, various initiatives have been undertaken by the R&D sector for the development of new processes or improvement in the existing processes for production of cost effective enzymes. With the advancement in the field of biotechnology, different bioprocesses are being used for utilization of different agro-industrial residues for the production of various enzymes. This review focuses on different types of agro-industrial wastes and their utilization in the production of enzymes. The present scenario as well as the future scope of utilization of enzymes in the food industry has also been discussed.Results and Conclusion: The regulations from the various governmental as well as environmental agencies for the demand of cleaner environment have led to the advancement in various technologies for utilization of the wastes for the production of value-added products such as enzymes. Among the different types of fermentation, maximum work has been carried under solid state conditions by batch fermentation. The research has indicated the significant potential of agro-industrial wastes for production of food-grade enzymes in order to improve the economics of the process.Conflict of interests: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  9. Toxic releases and risk disparity: a spatiotemporal model of industrial ecology and social empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Hannah; Ogunseitan, Oladele A

    2015-06-02

    Information-based regulations (IBRs) are founded on the theoretical premise that public participation in accomplishing policy goals is empowered by open access to information. Since its inception in 1988, the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) has provided the framework and regulatory impetus for the compilation and distribution of data on toxic releases associated with industrial development, following the tenets of IBR. As TRI emissions are reputed to disproportionately affect low-income communities, we investigated how demographic characteristics are related to change in TRI emissions and toxicity risks between 1989 and 2002, and we sought to identify factors that predict these changes. We used local indicators of spatial association (LISA) maps and spatial regression techniques to study risk disparity in the Los Angeles urban area. We also surveyed 203 individuals in eight communities in the same region to measure the levels of awareness of TRI, attitudes towards air pollution, and general environmental risk. We discovered, through spatial lag models, that changes in gross and toxic emissions are related to community ethnic composition, poverty level, home ownership, and base 1989 emissions (R-square=0.034-0.083). We generated a structural equation model to explain the determinants of social empowerment to act on the basis of environmental information. Hierarchical confirmatory factor analysis (HCFA) supports the theoretical model that individual empowerment is predicted by risk perception, worry, and awareness (Chi-square=63.315, p=0.022, df=42). This study provides strong evidence that spatiotemporal changes in regional-scale environmental risks are influenced by individual-scale empowerment mediated by IBRs.

  10. Toxic Releases and Risk Disparity: A Spatiotemporal Model of Industrial Ecology and Social Empowerment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Aoyagi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Information-based regulations (IBRs are founded on the theoretical premise that public participation in accomplishing policy goals is empowered by open access to information. Since its inception in 1988, the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI has provided the framework and regulatory impetus for the compilation and distribution of data on toxic releases associated with industrial development, following the tenets of IBR. As TRI emissions are reputed to disproportionately affect low-income communities, we investigated how demographic characteristics are related to change in TRI emissions and toxicity risks between 1989 and 2002, and we sought to identify factors that predict these changes. We used local indicators of spatial association (LISA maps and spatial regression techniques to study risk disparity in the Los Angeles urban area. We also surveyed 203 individuals in eight communities in the same region to measure the levels of awareness of TRI, attitudes towards air pollution, and general environmental risk. We discovered, through spatial lag models, that changes in gross and toxic emissions are related to community ethnic composition, poverty level, home ownership, and base 1989 emissions (R-square = 0.034–0.083. We generated a structural equation model to explain the determinants of social empowerment to act on the basis of environmental information. Hierarchical confirmatory factor analysis (HCFA supports the theoretical model that individual empowerment is predicted by risk perception, worry, and awareness (Chi-square = 63.315, p = 0.022, df = 42. This study provides strong evidence that spatiotemporal changes in regional-scale environmental risks are influenced by individual-scale empowerment mediated by IBRs.

  11. Prostate hypofractionated radiation therapy with injection of hyaluronic acid: acute toxicities in a phase 2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapet, Olivier; Decullier, Evelyne; Bin, Sylvie; Faix, Antoine; Ruffion, Alain; Jalade, Patrice; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Udrescu, Corina; Enachescu, Ciprian; Azria, David

    2015-03-15

    Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) in prostate cancer can be developed only if the risk of rectal toxicity is controlled. In a multicenter phase 2 trial, hypofractionated irradiation was combined with an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) to preserve the rectal wall. Tolerance of the injection and acute toxicity rates are reported. The study was designed to assess late grade 2 toxicity rates. The results described here correspond to the secondary objectives. Acute toxicity was defined as occurring during RT or within 3 months after RT and graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. HA tolerance was evaluated with a visual analog scale during the injection and 30 minutes after injection and then by use of the Common Terminology Criteria at each visit. From 2010 to 2012, 36 patients with low-risk to intermediate-risk prostate cancer were included. The HA injection induced a mean pain score of 4.6/10 ± 2.3. Thirty minutes after the injection, 2 patients still reported pain (2/10 and 3/10), which persisted after the intervention. Thirty-three patients experienced at least 1 acute genitourinary toxicity and 20 patients at least 1 acute gastrointestinal toxicity. Grade 2 toxicities were reported for 19 patients with urinary obstruction, frequency, or both and for 1 patient with proctitis. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were reported. At the 3-month visit, 4 patients described grade 2 obstruction or frequency, and no patients had any grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities. The injection of HA makes it possible to deliver hypofractionated irradiation over 4 weeks with a dose per fraction of > 3 Gy, with limited acute rectal toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Injection of Hyaluronic Acid: Acute Toxicities in a Phase 2 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapet, Olivier; Decullier, Evelyne; Bin, Sylvie; Faix, Antoine; Ruffion, Alain; Jalade, Patrice; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Udrescu, Corina; Enachescu, Ciprian; Azria, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) in prostate cancer can be developed only if the risk of rectal toxicity is controlled. In a multicenter phase 2 trial, hypofractionated irradiation was combined with an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) to preserve the rectal wall. Tolerance of the injection and acute toxicity rates are reported. Methods and Materials: The study was designed to assess late grade 2 toxicity rates. The results described here correspond to the secondary objectives. Acute toxicity was defined as occurring during RT or within 3 months after RT and graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. HA tolerance was evaluated with a visual analog scale during the injection and 30 minutes after injection and then by use of the Common Terminology Criteria at each visit. Results: From 2010 to 2012, 36 patients with low-risk to intermediate-risk prostate cancer were included. The HA injection induced a mean pain score of 4.6/10 ± 2.3. Thirty minutes after the injection, 2 patients still reported pain (2/10 and 3/10), which persisted after the intervention. Thirty-three patients experienced at least 1 acute genitourinary toxicity and 20 patients at least 1 acute gastrointestinal toxicity. Grade 2 toxicities were reported for 19 patients with urinary obstruction, frequency, or both and for 1 patient with proctitis. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were reported. At the 3-month visit, 4 patients described grade 2 obstruction or frequency, and no patients had any grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities. Conclusions: The injection of HA makes it possible to deliver hypofractionated irradiation over 4 weeks with a dose per fraction of > 3 Gy, with limited acute rectal toxicity

  13. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Injection of Hyaluronic Acid: Acute Toxicities in a Phase 2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapet, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.chapet@chu-lyon.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); EMR3738, Université Lyon 1, Lyon (France); Decullier, Evelyne; Bin, Sylvie [Pole Information Médicale Evaluation Recherche, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Lyon (France); EA SIS, Université de Lyon, Lyon (France); Faix, Antoine [Department of Urology, Clinique Beausoleil, Montpellier (France); Ruffion, Alain [Université Lyon 1, Lyon (France); Department of Urology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Jalade, Patrice [Department of Medical Physics, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Fenoglietto, Pascal [Department of Radiation Oncology and Physics, Institut du Cancer de Montpellier, Montpellier (France); Udrescu, Corina; Enachescu, Ciprian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology and Physics, Institut du Cancer de Montpellier, Montpellier (France)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) in prostate cancer can be developed only if the risk of rectal toxicity is controlled. In a multicenter phase 2 trial, hypofractionated irradiation was combined with an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) to preserve the rectal wall. Tolerance of the injection and acute toxicity rates are reported. Methods and Materials: The study was designed to assess late grade 2 toxicity rates. The results described here correspond to the secondary objectives. Acute toxicity was defined as occurring during RT or within 3 months after RT and graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. HA tolerance was evaluated with a visual analog scale during the injection and 30 minutes after injection and then by use of the Common Terminology Criteria at each visit. Results: From 2010 to 2012, 36 patients with low-risk to intermediate-risk prostate cancer were included. The HA injection induced a mean pain score of 4.6/10 ± 2.3. Thirty minutes after the injection, 2 patients still reported pain (2/10 and 3/10), which persisted after the intervention. Thirty-three patients experienced at least 1 acute genitourinary toxicity and 20 patients at least 1 acute gastrointestinal toxicity. Grade 2 toxicities were reported for 19 patients with urinary obstruction, frequency, or both and for 1 patient with proctitis. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were reported. At the 3-month visit, 4 patients described grade 2 obstruction or frequency, and no patients had any grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities. Conclusions: The injection of HA makes it possible to deliver hypofractionated irradiation over 4 weeks with a dose per fraction of > 3 Gy, with limited acute rectal toxicity.

  14. DNA Repair Alterations in Children With Pediatric Malignancies: Novel Opportunities to Identify Patients at Risk for High-Grade Toxicities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebe, Claudia E.; Fricke, Andreas; Schneider, Ruth; Simon, Karin; Kuehne, Martin; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Graeber, Stefan; Graf, Norbert; Ruebe, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a pilot study, the phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) foci approach for identifying patients with double-strand break (DSB) repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging cancer therapy. Methods and Materials: The DSB repair capacity of children with solid cancers was analyzed compared with that of age-matched control children and correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses (n = 47). Double-strand break repair was investigated by counting γH2AX foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after irradiation of blood samples. Results: Whereas all healthy control children exhibited proficient DSB repair, 3 children with tumors revealed clearly impaired DSB repair capacities, and 2 of these repair-deficient children developed life-threatening or even lethal normal-tissue toxicities. The underlying mutations affecting regulatory factors involved in DNA repair pathways were identified. Moreover, significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity were observed between children with tumors and control children, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DSB repair function. Conclusions: Double-strand break repair alteration in children may predispose to cancer formation and may affect children's susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. Phosphorylated H2AX analysis of blood samples allows one to detect DSB repair deficiencies and thus enables identification of children at risk for high-grade toxicities.

  15. Hypofractionated Breast Radiation: Shorter Scheme, Lower Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Isabel; Tovar, María Isabel; Zurita, Mercedes; Guerrero, Rosario; Expósito, Manuela; Del Moral, Rosario

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed the toxicity and cosmetic outcomes for patients who had undergone 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with a hypofractionated schedule and identified the risk factors associated with such a schedule. A total of 143 patients were treated for breast cancer (stage 0-III) with a hypofractionated radiation schedule after breast-conserving surgery from 2006 to 2011. Most patients received 42.4 Gy in 16 daily fractions, 2.65 Gy per fraction to the whole breast plus an additional simultaneous integrated or sequential boost to the tumor bed. The median follow-up period was 36 months. Mild acute skin toxicity was observed in 62%; 7% of the patients developed moderate skin toxicity, but no grade 4 toxicity was observed. The prevalence of fibrosis within the boost area was 5%, but no grade ≥ 2 was observed. The prevalence of fibrosis of any grade was greater in the nonboost (23%) than in the boost area. Of all the patients, 91% had good or excellent cosmetic outcomes. From the multivariate analysis, the incidence of epithelitis correlated with the patient's treated volume (P = .044). The incidence of acute toxicity correlated with the boost type to the tumor bed and the total treatment dose (P = .012 and P = .002, respectively). Also, a poor to fair cosmetic outcome was significantly associated statistically with the surgery type (P = .05), boost type (P = .004), and total dose (P = .001). Delivering whole-breast irradiation with a hypofractionated schedule of 42.4 Gy plus a simultaneous integrated boost to the tumor bed appears to be a safe and effective technique, with good cosmetic results and lower toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Removal of toxic Cr(VI) ions from tannery industrial wastewater using a newly designed three-phase three-dimensional electrode reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace Pavithra, K.; Senthil Kumar, P.; Carolin Christopher, Femina; Saravanan, A.

    2017-11-01

    In this research, the wastewater samples were collected from leather tanning industry at different time intervals. The parameters like pH, electrical conductivity, temperature, turbidity, chromium and chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the samples were analyzed. A three-phase three-dimensional fluidized type electrode reactor (FTER) was newly designed for the effective removal of toxic pollutants from wastewater. The influencing parameters were optimized for the maximum removal of toxic pollutants from wastewater. The optimum condition for the present system was calculated as: contact time of 30 min, applied voltage of 3 V and the particle electrodes of 15 g. The particle electrode was characterized by using FT-IR analysis. Langmuir-Hinshelwood and pseudo-second order kinetic models were fits well with the experimental data. The results showed that the FTER can be successfully employed for the treatment of industrial wastewater.

  17. Late toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Coletti, F.; Rafailovici, L.; Filomia, M.L.; Chiozza, J.; Dosoretz, B.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study is to describe and classify chronic complications due to radiotherapy in breast cancer. Also the impact of radiotherapy on the quality of life of patients is evaluated. Materials and methods: 50 patients with breast cancer at early stages (78% in situ, 22% I and II) treated with radiotherapy in breast volume plus boost (45/50 Gy + 18/20 Gy) with a follow up over 5 years. Acute toxicities were found retrospectively and chronic toxicities were assessed though physical examination and review of complementary studies. To facilitate data collection, pre printed forms were used. Bibliographic searches were made. Results: 10% received chemotherapy and 64% tamoxifen. The predominant chronic toxicity were found in skin (66%), although grade I and II (hyperpigmentation 26%, dryness 22%, telangiectasia 10% fibrosis, 4%, other 4%). A 50% of the patients showed hypoesthesia in ipsilateral upper limb. The other toxicities were presented in low rate and magnitude: mastodynia 16%; actinic pneumonitis 4%, pyrosis 4%, Tachycardia 2%, among others. Of the patients with acute toxicity, only 30% were grade III. The 70% of the patients had a positive impact of radiotherapy on quality of life. Conclusions: We found low rates and degrees of late toxicity. It was noticed a relationship between acute and chronic toxicity, because those who presented adverse effects during treatment developed late effects. It reflects the importance of integrating monitoring as part of radiation treatment. It should be adopted a single score of late toxicity measurement to unify data from different series. (authors) [es

  18. Selective surface oxidation and segregation upon short term annealing of model alloys and industrial steel grades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan, S.

    2007-07-01

    Segregation and selective oxidation phenomena of minor alloying elements during annealing of steel sheets lead to the formation of bare spots after hot-dip galvanizing. This thesis highlights the influence of annealing conditions and the effect of alloying elements on the selective oxidation in model alloys and some industrial steel grades. Model alloys of binary (Fe-2Si, Fe-2Mn, Fe-0.8Cr), ternary (Fe-2Mn-2Si, Fe-2Mn-0.8Cr, Fe-1Mn-0.8Cr, Fe-1Si-0.8Cr, Fe-2Si-0.8Cr) and quarternary (Fe-2Mn-2Si-0.8Cr) systems were studied. In the case of steels, standard grade interstitial free (IF) steels and experimental grade tensile strength 1000 MPa steel were investigated. All specimens were annealed at 820 C in N{sub 2}-5%H{sub 2} gas atmospheres with the wide range of dew points (i.e. -80 to 0 C). The surface chemistry after annealing and its wettability with liquid Zn have been correlated as a function of dew points by simulating the hot-dip galvanizing process at laboratory scale. (orig.)

  19. Toxicity of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in the Treatment of Intracranial Tumors in Patients With Collagen Vascular Diseases or Multiple Sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowell, Dot; Tatter, Stephen B.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Guzman, Allan F. de; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Lovato, James F.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Shaw, Edward G.; Urbanic, James J.; Chan, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess toxicity in patients with either a collagen vascular disease (CVD) or multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with intracranial radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Between January 2004 and April 2009, 6 patients with MS and 14 patients with a CVD were treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for intracranial tumors. Treated lesions included 15 total brain metastases in 7 patients, 11 benign brain tumors, 1 low grade glioma, and 1 cavernous malformation. Toxicities were graded by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute/Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria. “Rare toxicities” were characterized as those reported in the scientific literature at an incidence of 3 (range, 0.14–7.8 cm 3 ). Of the 14 patients with CVD, none experienced a Grade 3 or 4 toxicity or a toxicity characterized as rare. Of the 6 patients with MS, 3 experienced rare toxicities, and two of these were Grade 3 toxicities. Rare complications included a patient experiencing both communicating hydrocephalus and facial nerve palsy, as well as 2 additional patients with motor cranial nerve palsy. High-grade toxicities included the patient with an acoustic neuroma requiring ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement for obstructive hydrocephalus, and 1 patient with a facial nerve schwannoma who experienced permanent facial nerve palsy. Interval between radiosurgery and high-grade toxicities ranged from 1 week to 4 months. Conclusions: Our series suggests that patients with MS who receive GKRS may be at increased risk of rare and high-grade treatment-related toxicity. Given the time course of toxicity, treatment-related edema or demyelination represent potential mechanisms.

  20. Grain Grading and Handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendleman, Matt; Legacy, James

    This publication provides an introduction to grain grading and handling for adult students in vocational and technical education programs. Organized in five chapters, the booklet provides a brief overview of the jobs performed at a grain elevator and of the techniques used to grade grain. The first chapter introduces the grain industry and…

  1. Toxicity report of once weekly radiation therapy for low-risk prostate adenocarcinoma: preliminary results of a phase I/II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menkarios, Cathy; Fortin, Bernard; Lambert, Carole; Vigneault, Éric; Brochet, Nicolas; Nguyen, David HA; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Jolicoeur, Marjory; Beauchemin, Marie-Claude; Villeneuve, Hugo; Van Nguyen, Thu

    2011-01-01

    Increasing clinical data supports a low α/β ratio for prostate adenocarcinoma, potentially lower than that of surrounding normal tissues. A hypofractionated, weekly radiation therapy (RT) schedule should result in improved tumour control, reduced acute toxicity, and similar or decreased late effects. We report the toxicity profile of such treatment. We conducted a multi-institution phase I/II trial of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for favourable-risk prostate cancer (T1a-T2a, Gleason ≤ 6 and PSA < 10 ng/ml). RT consisted of 45 Gy in nine 5 Gy fractions, once weekly. Primary end-points were feasibility and late gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity (RTOG scale), while secondary end-points included acute GI toxicity, acute and late genitourinary (GU) toxicity, biochemical control, and survival. Between 2006 and 2008, 80 patients were treated. No treatment interruptions occurred. The median follow-up is 33 months (range: 20-51). Maximal grade 1, 2, and 3 acute (< 3 months) GU toxicity was 29%, 31% and 5% respectively (no grade 4). Acute GI grade 1 toxicity was reported in 30% while grade 2 occurred in 14% (no grade 3 or 4). Crude late grade ≥ 3 toxicity rates at 31 months were 2% for both GU and GI toxicity. Cumulative late grade ≥ 3 GI toxicity at 3 years was 11%. Two patients had PSA failure according to the Phoenix definition. The three-year actuarial biochemical control rate is 97%. Weekly RT with 45 Gy in 9 fractions is feasible and results in comparable toxicity. Long term tumour control and survival remain to be assessed

  2. High-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using daily fiducial marker-based position verification: acute and late toxicity in 331 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lips, Irene M; Dehnad, Homan; Gils, Carla H van; Boeken Kruger, Arto E; Heide, Uulke A van der; Vulpen, Marco van

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the acute and late toxicity after high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with fiducial marker-based position verification for prostate cancer. Between 2001 and 2004, 331 patients with prostate cancer received 76 Gy in 35 fractions using IMRT combined with fiducial marker-based position verification. The symptoms before treatment (pre-treatment) and weekly during treatment (acute toxicity) were scored using the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). The goal was to score late toxicity according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) scale with a follow-up time of at least three years. Twenty-two percent of the patients experienced pre-treatment grade ≥ 2 genitourinary (GU) complaints and 2% experienced grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) complaints. Acute grade 2 GU and GI toxicity occurred in 47% and 30%, respectively. Only 3% of the patients developed acute grade 3 GU and no grade ≥ 3 GI toxicity occurred. After a mean follow-up time of 47 months with a minimum of 31 months for all patients, the incidence of late grade 2 GU and GI toxicity was 21% and 9%, respectively. Grade ≥ 3 GU and GI toxicity rates were 4% and 1%, respectively, including one patient with a rectal fistula and one patient with a severe hemorrhagic cystitis (both grade 4). In conclusion, high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker-based position verification is well tolerated. The low grade ≥ 3 toxicity allows further dose escalation if the same dose constraints for the organs at risk will be used

  3. High-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using daily fiducial marker-based position verification: acute and late toxicity in 331 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boeken Kruger Arto E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We evaluated the acute and late toxicity after high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT with fiducial marker-based position verification for prostate cancer. Between 2001 and 2004, 331 patients with prostate cancer received 76 Gy in 35 fractions using IMRT combined with fiducial marker-based position verification. The symptoms before treatment (pre-treatment and weekly during treatment (acute toxicity were scored using the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC. The goal was to score late toxicity according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC scale with a follow-up time of at least three years. Twenty-two percent of the patients experienced pre-treatment grade ≥ 2 genitourinary (GU complaints and 2% experienced grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI complaints. Acute grade 2 GU and GI toxicity occurred in 47% and 30%, respectively. Only 3% of the patients developed acute grade 3 GU and no grade ≥ 3 GI toxicity occurred. After a mean follow-up time of 47 months with a minimum of 31 months for all patients, the incidence of late grade 2 GU and GI toxicity was 21% and 9%, respectively. Grade ≥ 3 GU and GI toxicity rates were 4% and 1%, respectively, including one patient with a rectal fistula and one patient with a severe hemorrhagic cystitis (both grade 4. In conclusion, high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker-based position verification is well tolerated. The low grade ≥ 3 toxicity allows further dose escalation if the same dose constraints for the organs at risk will be used.

  4. Toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) as asymmetric weapons: the design basis threat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, L.

    2009-01-01

    Asymmetric warfare concepts relate well to the use of improvised chemical weapons against urban targets. Sources of information on toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) and lists of high threat chemicals are available that point to likely choices for an attack. Accident investigations can be used as a template for attacks, and to judge the possible effectiveness of an attack using TICs. The results of a chlorine rail car accident in South Carolina, USA and the Russian military assault on a Moscow theater provide many illustrative points for similar incidents that mighty be carried out deliberately. Computer modeling of outdoor releases shows how an attack might take into consideration issues of stand-off distance and dilution. Finally, the preceding may be used to estimate with some accuracy the design basis threat posed by the used of TICs as weapons.(author)

  5. Colorimetric sensor array for determination and identification of toxic industrial chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Liang; Musto, Christopher J; Kemling, Jonathan W; Lim, Sung H; Zhong, Wenxuan; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2010-11-15

    A low-cost yet highly sensitive colorimetric sensor array for the detection and identification of toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) has been developed. The sensor consists of a disposable array of cross-responsive nanoporous pigments whose colors are changed by diverse chemical interactions with analytes. Clear differentiation among 20 different TICs has been easily achieved at both their IDLH (immediately dangerous to life or health) concentration within 2 min of exposure and PEL (permissible exposure limit) concentration within 5 min of exposure with no errors or misclassifications. Detection limits are generally well below the PEL (in most cases below 5% of PEL) and are typically in the low ppb range. The colorimetric sensor array is not responsive to changes in humidity or temperature over a substantial range. The printed arrays show excellent batch to batch reproducibility and long shelf life (greater than 3 months).

  6. Nature and prevalence of non-additive toxic effects in industrially relevant mixtures of organic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvez, Shahid; Venkataraman, Chandra; Mukherji, Suparna

    2009-06-01

    The concentration addition (CA) and the independent action (IA) models are widely used for predicting mixture toxicity based on its composition and individual component dose-response profiles. However, the prediction based on these models may be inaccurate due to interaction among mixture components. In this work, the nature and prevalence of non-additive effects were explored for binary, ternary and quaternary mixtures composed of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs). The toxicity of each individual component and mixture was determined using the Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition assay. For each combination of chemicals specified by the 2(n) factorial design, the percent deviation of the predicted toxic effect from the measured value was used to characterize mixtures as synergistic (positive deviation) and antagonistic (negative deviation). An arbitrary classification scheme was proposed based on the magnitude of deviation (d) as: additive (50%, class-IV) antagonistic/synergistic. Naphthalene, n-butanol, o-xylene, catechol and p-cresol led to synergism in mixtures while 1, 2, 4-trimethylbenzene and 1, 3-dimethylnaphthalene contributed to antagonism. Most of the mixtures depicted additive or antagonistic effect. Synergism was prominent in some of the mixtures, such as, pulp and paper, textile dyes, and a mixture composed of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. The organic chemical industry mixture depicted the highest abundance of antagonism and least synergism. Mixture toxicity was found to depend on partition coefficient, molecular connectivity index and relative concentration of the components.

  7. Proton Therapy for Spinal Ependymomas: Planning, Acute Toxicities, and Preliminary Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amsbaugh, Mark J. [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Grosshans, David R., E-mail: dgrossha@mdanderson.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); McAleer, Mary Frances; Zhu, Ron; Wages, Cody; Crawford, Cody N.; Palmer, Matthew; De Gracia, Beth; Woo Shiao; Mahajan, Anita [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To report acute toxicities and preliminary outcomes for pediatric patients with ependymomas of the spine treated with proton beam therapy at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: Eight pediatric patients received proton beam irradiation between October 2006 and September 2010 for spinal ependymomas. Toxicity data were collected weekly during radiation therapy and all follow-up visits. Toxicities were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: All patients had surgical resection of the tumor before irradiation (7 subtotal resection and 1 gross total resection). Six patients had World Health Organization Grade I ependymomas, and two had World Health Organization Grade II ependymomas. Patients had up to 3 surgical interventions before radiation therapy (range, 1-3; median, 1). Three patients received proton therapy after recurrence and five as part of their primary management. The entire vertebral body was treated in all but 2 patients. The mean radiation dose was 51.1 cobalt gray equivalents (range, 45 to 54 cobalt gray equivalents). With a mean follow-up of 26 months from the radiation therapy start date (range, 7-51 months), local control, event-free survival, and overall survival rates were all 100%. The most common toxicities during treatment were Grade 1 or 2 erythema (75%) and Grade 1 fatigue (38%). No patients had a Grade 3 or higher adverse event. Proton therapy dramatically reduced dose to all normal tissues anterior to the vertebral bodies in comparison to photon therapy. Conclusion: Preliminary outcomes show the expected control rates with favorable acute toxicity profiles. Proton beam therapy offers a powerful treatment option in the pediatric population, where adverse events related to radiation exposure are of concern. Extended follow-up will be required to assess for late recurrences and long-term adverse effects.

  8. 40 CFR 125.66 - Toxics control program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (1) An applicant that has known or suspected industrial sources of toxic pollutants shall have an... any applicant which has no known or suspected industrial sources of toxic pollutants or pesticides and.... (a) Chemical analysis. (1) The applicant shall submit at the time of application a chemical analysis...

  9. A basic toxicity classification of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    In the course of its work in the field of health and safety the International Atomic Energy Agency has often met the practical requirement for grading radionuclides in order of their relative radiotoxicities. This need was particularly evident when the Agency's Basic Safety Standards for the protection of health against ionizing radiation were in preparation, when it was necessary to exempt quantities of radionuclides from inclusion in the norms. A basic toxicity grading might be of help to laboratories in meeting some of their requirements in problems related to waste management as well as for the design of experimental facilities. It should also serve as a basis for the development of safety criteria for laboratory equipment and procedures for handling and transporting various quantities and kinds of radionuclides. The purpose of the present Report is to make a toxicity grading of the radionuclides according to the risk of biological injury which they may cause when they have become incorporated in the human body. 4 refs, 4 tabs

  10. A basic toxicity classification of radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-04-01

    In the course of its work in the field of health and safety the International Atomic Energy Agency has often met the practical requirement for grading radionuclides in order of their relative radiotoxicities. This need was particularly evident when the Agency's Basic Safety Standards for the protection of health against ionizing radiation were in preparation, when it was necessary to exempt quantities of radionuclides from inclusion in the norms. A basic toxicity grading might be of help to laboratories in meeting some of their requirements in problems related to waste management as well as for the design of experimental facilities. It should also serve as a basis for the development of safety criteria for laboratory equipment and procedures for handling and transporting various quantities and kinds of radionuclides. The purpose of the present Report is to make a toxicity grading of the radionuclides according to the risk of biological injury which they may cause when they have become incorporated in the human body. 4 refs, 4 tabs.

  11. Antioxidants as potential medical countermeasures for chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Cameron S; Day, Brian J

    2016-01-15

    The continuing horrors of military conflicts and terrorism often involve the use of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and toxic industrial chemicals (TICs). Many CWA and TIC exposures are difficult to treat due to the danger they pose to first responders and their rapid onset that can produce death shortly after exposure. While the specific mechanism(s) of toxicity of these agents are diverse, many are associated either directly or indirectly with increased oxidative stress in affected tissues. This has led to the exploration of various antioxidants as potential medical countermeasures for CWA/TIC exposures. Studies have been performed across a wide array of agents, model organisms, exposure systems, and antioxidants, looking at an almost equally diverse set of endpoints. Attempts at treating CWAs/TICs with antioxidants have met with mixed results, ranging from no effect to nearly complete protection. The aim of this commentary is to summarize the literature in each category for evidence of oxidative stress and antioxidant efficacy against CWAs and TICs. While there is great disparity in the data concerning methods, models, and remedies, the outlook on antioxidants as medical countermeasures for CWA/TIC management appears promising. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Recovery of anaerobic digestion after exposure to toxicants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.; Parkin, G.F.; Speece, R.E.

    1979-12-01

    The concept that methane fermentation cannot tolerate chronic or slug doses of toxicants has almost totally precluded methane fermentation as a viable contender for the treatment of industrial wastewaters. This study assayed a wide variety of toxicants, heavy metals, inorganic salts, organic chemicals, solvents, and antibiotics which are used in industrial processes and, therefore, appear in the industrial wastewaters therefrom. Toxicity was related to the reduction in methane production of a control containing no toxicant. The response of methane fermentation after exposure to a toxicant was assayed with unacclimated cultures as well as cultures which had been acclimated to increasing concentrations of the toxicant over long periods of time. The reversible nature of the toxicants was assayed by adding slug doses to plug flow anaerobic filters and recording gas production prior to, during, and after toxicant addition.

  13. Homogeneous sonophotolysis of food processing industry wastewater: Study of synergistic effects, mineralization and toxicity removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, A; Monteagudo, J M; Sanmartín, I; Gómez, P

    2013-03-01

    The mineralization of industrial wastewater coming from food industry using an emerging homogeneous sonophotolytic oxidation process was evaluated as an alternative to or a rapid pretreatment step for conventional anaerobic digestion with the aim of considerably reducing the total treatment time. At the selected operation conditions ([H(2)O(2)]=11,750ppm, pH=8, amplitude=50%, pulse length (cycles)=1), 60% of TOC is removed after 60min and 98% after 180min when treating an industrial effluent with 2114ppm of total organic carbon (TOC). This process removed completely the toxicity generated during storing or due to intermediate compounds. An important synergistic effect between sonolysis and photolysis (H(2)O(2)/UV) was observed. Thus the sonophotolysis (ultrasound/H(2)O(2)/UV) technique significantly increases TOC removal when compared with each individual process. Finally, a preliminary economical analysis confirms that the sono-photolysis with H(2)O(2) and pretreated water is a profitable system when compared with the same process without using ultrasound waves and with no pretreatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Toxicity of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in the Treatment of Intracranial Tumors in Patients With Collagen Vascular Diseases or Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowell, Dot [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Bourland, J. Daniel; Guzman, Allan F. de; Ekstrand, Kenneth E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Ellis, Thomas L. [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Lovato, James F. [Division of Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Shaw, Edward G.; Urbanic, James J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Chan, Michael D., E-mail: mchan@wfubmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess toxicity in patients with either a collagen vascular disease (CVD) or multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with intracranial radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Between January 2004 and April 2009, 6 patients with MS and 14 patients with a CVD were treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for intracranial tumors. Treated lesions included 15 total brain metastases in 7 patients, 11 benign brain tumors, 1 low grade glioma, and 1 cavernous malformation. Toxicities were graded by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute/Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria. 'Rare toxicities' were characterized as those reported in the scientific literature at an incidence of <5%. Results: Median follow-up time was 16 months. Median dose to the tumor margin was 13.0 Gy (range, 12-21 Gy). Median size of tumor was 5.0 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.14-7.8 cm{sup 3}). Of the 14 patients with CVD, none experienced a Grade 3 or 4 toxicity or a toxicity characterized as rare. Of the 6 patients with MS, 3 experienced rare toxicities, and two of these were Grade 3 toxicities. Rare complications included a patient experiencing both communicating hydrocephalus and facial nerve palsy, as well as 2 additional patients with motor cranial nerve palsy. High-grade toxicities included the patient with an acoustic neuroma requiring ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement for obstructive hydrocephalus, and 1 patient with a facial nerve schwannoma who experienced permanent facial nerve palsy. Interval between radiosurgery and high-grade toxicities ranged from 1 week to 4 months. Conclusions: Our series suggests that patients with MS who receive GKRS may be at increased risk of rare and high-grade treatment-related toxicity. Given the time course of toxicity, treatment-related edema or demyelination represent potential mechanisms.

  15. A Machine Vision System for Automatically Grading Hardwood Lumber - (Industrial Metrology)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard W. Conners; Tai-Hoon Cho; Chong T. Ng; Thomas T. Drayer; Philip A. Araman; Robert L. Brisbon

    1992-01-01

    Any automatic system for grading hardwood lumber can conceptually be divided into two components. One of these is a machine vision system for locating and identifying grading defects. The other is an automatic grading program that accepts as input the output of the machine vision system and, based on these data, determines the grade of a board. The progress that has...

  16. 75 FR 43142 - United States Standards for Grades of Refried Beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ...] United States Standards for Grades of Refried Beans AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION... comments on the possible establishment of voluntary United States Standards for Grades of Refried Beans... industry requested that USDA develop grade standards for canned refried beans to be used by the industry...

  17. Reporting Late Rectal Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Curative Radiation Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Sergio L.; Souhami, Luis; Joshua, Bosede; Vuong, Te; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Long-term rectal toxicity is a concern for patients with prostate cancer treated with curative radiation. However, comparing results of late toxicity may not be straightforward. This article reviews the complexity of reporting long-term side effects by using data for patients treated in our institution with hypofractionated irradiation. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with localized prostate cancer treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy alone to a dose of 66 Gy in 22 fractions were prospectively assessed for late rectal toxicity according to the Common Toxicity Criteria, Version 3, scoring system. Ninety percent of patients had more than 24 months of follow-up. Results are compared with data published in the literature. Results: We found an actuarial incidence of Grade 2 or higher late rectal toxicity of 27% at 30 months and a crude incidence of Grade 2 or higher late rectal toxicity of 18%. This was mostly severe toxicity documented during follow-up. The incidence of Grade 3 rectal toxicity at the last visit was 3% compared with 13% documented at any time during follow-up. Conclusion: Comparison of late toxicity after radiotherapy in patients with prostate cancer must be undertaken with caution because many factors need to be taken into consideration. Because accurate assessment of late toxicity in the evaluation of long-term outcome after radiotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer is essential, there is a need to develop by consensus guidelines for assessing and reporting late toxicity in this group of patients

  18. High-grade use of waste propane streams in the Dutch chemical industry. An exploratory study in the context of the Chemical Industry Roadmap; Hoogwaardig gebruik van reststromen propaan in de Nederlandse chemische industrie. Een verkenning binnen de Routekaart Chemie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Buck, A.; Afman, M.R.; Croezen, H.J.; Van Lieshout, M.

    2012-09-15

    In the context of the Dutch chemical industry's Roadmap the industry is actively seeking concrete ways of improving the efficiency of its products and processes. One option is to make higher-grade use of current waste streams, as feedstocks for other products, for example. This study focuses on propane waste streams from the oil and gas processing industry. Today these are used partly as fuel (fuel gas) but there are no technical barriers to converting propane to propylene, which can then be used as a feedstock. Higher-grade use of this particular waste stream leads to CO2 emission reductions in the production chain. Given the high market price of propylene, such a move may also be economically attractive. The study focuses on the Rotterdam region, because propane suppliers and companies seeking propylene are in closest proximity there [Dutch] In het kader van de Routekaart Chemie is de chemische industrie actief op zoek naar concrete opties om in haar processen en producten de efficiency te verhogen. Een route is daarbij om reststromen hoogwaardiger te benutten en in te zetten als grondstof voor andere producten. Dit onderzoek richt zich op reststromen propaan uit de olie- en gasverwerkende industrie. Deze worden nu deels als brandstof (stookgas) ingezet maar technisch is het mogelijk propaan om te zetten in propeen, dat als grondstof voor de chemische industrie kan worden gebruikt. Door het hoogwaardiger benutten van deze reststroom wordt in de keten een reductie van CO2 gerealiseerd. Tegelijk kan het economisch interessant zijn, vanwege de hoge marktprijzen van propeen. De studie focust op de regio Rotterdam, omdat leveranciers van propaan en afnemers van propeen daar het meest dichtbij elkaar gevestigd zijn.

  19. Reported case of a grade 3 toxicity after treatment of an hepatic metastasis by CyberKnife{sup R}; Cas rapporte d'une toxicite de grade 3 apres traitement d'une metastase hepatique par CyberKnife{sup R}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, A.S.; Taste-George, H.; Marchesi, V.; Buccheit, I.; Beckendorf, V.; Peiffert, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Vandceuvre -les-Nancy (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors briefly describe the treatment plan dosimetry for a patient irradiated several times with CyberKnife in the liver and suffering from a grade 3 toxicity of gastric-antrum-ulcer type. They conclude that dose constraints for organs at risk must be scrupulously respected within the frame of hypo-fractionated treatments because side effects can be severe and difficult to treat. Short communication

  20. Occurrence and Concentrations of Toxic VOCs in the Ambient Air of Gumi, an Electronics-Industrial City in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Ok Baek

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to characterize the occurrence and concentrations of a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs including aliphatic, aromatic, halogenated, nitrogenous, and carbonyl compounds, in the ambient air of Gumi City, where a large number of electronics industries are found. Two field monitoring campaigns were conducted for a one year period in 2003/2004 and 2010/2011 at several sampling sites in the city, representing industrial, residential and commercial areas. More than 80 individual compounds were determined in this study, and important compounds were then identified according to their abundance, ubiquity and toxicity. The monitoring data revealed toluene, trichloroethylene and acetaldehyde to be the most significant air toxics in the city, and their major sources were mainly industrial activities. On the other hand, there was no clear evidence of an industrial impact on the concentrations of benzene and formaldehyde in the ambient air of the city. Overall, seasonal variations were not as distinct as locational variations in the VOCs concentrations, whereas the within-day variations showed a typical pattern of urban air pollution, i.e., increase in the morning, decrease in the afternoon, and an increase again in the evening. Considerable decreases in the concentrations of VOCs from 2003 to 2011 were observed. The reductions in the ambient concentrations were confirmed further by the Korean PRTR data in industrial emissions within the city. Significant decreases in the concentrations of benzene and acetaldehyde were also noted, whereas formaldehyde appeared to be almost constant between the both campaigns. The decreased trends in the ambient levels were attributed not only to the stricter regulations for VOCs in Korea, but also to the voluntary agreement of major companies to reduce the use of organic solvents. In addition, a site planning project for an eco-friendly industrial complex is believed to play a contributory

  1. Acute and late toxicities of radiotherapy for patients with discoid lupus erythematosus: a retrospective case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Ajaykumar B

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate acute and late toxicities of radiotherapy for patients with discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE. Methods A retrospective review was performed of patients with DLE who received radiotherapy at our institution between 1980 and 2005. Patients with other connective tissue disorders were excluded. Control patients were matched 2:1 with the DLE treatment courses based on age, cancer diagnosis, year of treatment, radiotherapy dose, and sex. Acute (within 30 days from the completion of radiotherapy and late toxicities were evaluated for each treatment course using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 3.0. Results Twelve patients with DLE received a total of 15 radiotherapy courses. The median follow-up time was 2.6 years (range, 0.0-15.2 years. Acute toxicity of any organ was observed in 10 (67% treatment courses, of which 2 (13% were Grade 3 or higher. Acute Grade 1 or 2 dermatologic toxicity was observed in 8 courses (53%. Late toxicity of any organ was observed in 7 of 12 (58% evaluable treatment courses, of which 3 (23% were grade 3 or higher. Late grade 1 or 2 dermatologic toxicity was observed in 5 (42% courses. No patient experienced acute or late Grade 3 or higher dermatologic toxicity. The rates of any organ or dermatologic acute and late toxicity were not significantly different between DLE and control treatment courses. Conclusions Our findings do not suggest an increased risk of toxicity to the skin or other organs in patients with DLE receiving radiotherapy.

  2. Acute and late toxicities of radiotherapy for patients with discoid lupus erythematosus: a retrospective case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Ajaykumar B; Hallemeier, Christopher L; Petersen, Ivy A; Jensen, Ashley W; Osborn, Thomas G; Miller, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate acute and late toxicities of radiotherapy for patients with discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE). A retrospective review was performed of patients with DLE who received radiotherapy at our institution between 1980 and 2005. Patients with other connective tissue disorders were excluded. Control patients were matched 2:1 with the DLE treatment courses based on age, cancer diagnosis, year of treatment, radiotherapy dose, and sex. Acute (within 30 days from the completion of radiotherapy) and late toxicities were evaluated for each treatment course using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 3.0. Twelve patients with DLE received a total of 15 radiotherapy courses. The median follow-up time was 2.6 years (range, 0.0-15.2 years). Acute toxicity of any organ was observed in 10 (67%) treatment courses, of which 2 (13%) were Grade 3 or higher. Acute Grade 1 or 2 dermatologic toxicity was observed in 8 courses (53%). Late toxicity of any organ was observed in 7 of 12 (58%) evaluable treatment courses, of which 3 (23%) were grade 3 or higher. Late grade 1 or 2 dermatologic toxicity was observed in 5 (42%) courses. No patient experienced acute or late Grade 3 or higher dermatologic toxicity. The rates of any organ or dermatologic acute and late toxicity were not significantly different between DLE and control treatment courses. Our findings do not suggest an increased risk of toxicity to the skin or other organs in patients with DLE receiving radiotherapy

  3. Acute toxicity profile in prostate cancer with conventional and hypofractionated treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viani, Gustavo Arruda; Zulliani, Giseli Correa; Stefano, Eduardo Jose; Silva, Lucas Bernardes Godoy da; Silva, Bruna Bueno da; Crempe, Yuri Bonicelli; Martins, Vinicius Spazzapan; Ferrari, Ricardo Jose Rambaiolo; Pólo, Mariana Colbachini; Rossi, Bruno Thiago; Suguikawa, Elton

    2013-01-01

    To compare the acute toxicities in radical treatment of prostate cancer between conventional schedule (C-ARM) with 78 Gy/39 fractions and hypofractionation conformal treatment (H-ARM) with 69 Gy/23 fractions. This prospective double arm study consisted of 217 patients with prostate cancer, 112 in H-ARM and 105 in C-ARM arm. C-ARM received conventional six- field conformal radiotherapy with 78 Gy in 39 fractions while H-ARM received hypofractionation with 69 Gy in 23 fractions. Weekly assessment of acute reactions was done during treatment and with one, and 3 months using RTOG scale. Univariated analysis was performed to evaluate differences between the incidences of acute reaction in the treatment arms. Variables with p value less than 0.1 were included in the multivariated logistic regression. There was no difference between H-ARM versus C-ARM for severity and incidence in genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) acute toxicity. During the treatment comparing H-ARM with C-ARM no differences was observed for GI toxicity (grade 0–3; H-ARM = 45.5%, 34%, 18.7% and 1.8% versus C-ARM = 47.6%, 35.2%, 17.2% and 0). For acute GU toxicity no difference was detected between H-ARM (grade 0–3; 22.3%, 54.5%, 18.7% and 4.5%) and C-ARM (grade 0–3; 25.8%, 53.3%, 17.1% and 3.8%). At the 3- months follow-up, persistent Grade > =2 acute GU and GI toxicity were 2.5% and 1.8% in H-ARM versus 5.7% and 3% in C-ARM (p > 0.05). In univariated and multivariated analyses, there was not any dosimetric predictor for GI and GU toxicity. Our data demonstrate that hypofractionated radiotherapy achieving high biological effective dose using conformal radiotherapy is feasible for prostate cancer, being well tolerated with minimal severe acute toxicity

  4. Predictors of radiation-induced esophageal toxicity in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Anurag K.; Lockett, Mary Ann; Bradley, Jeffrey D.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and clinical/dosimetric predictors of acute and late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3-5 esophageal toxicity in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 207 consecutive patients with NSCLC who were treated with high-dose, definitive 3D-CRT between March 1991 and December 1998. This population consisted of 107 men and 100 women. The median age was 67 years (range 31-90). The following patient and treatment parameters were studied: age, gender, race, performance status, sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, presence of subcarinal nodes, pretreatment weight loss, mean dose to the entire esophagus, maximal point dose to the esophagus, and percentage of volume of esophagus receiving >55 Gy. All doses are reported without heterogeneity corrections. The median prescription dose to the isocenter in this population was 70 Gy (range 60-74) delivered in 2-Gy daily fractions. All patients were treated once daily. Acute and late esophageal toxicities were graded by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Patient and clinical/dosimetric factors were coded and correlated with acute and late Grade 3-5 esophageal toxicity using univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Of 207 patients, 16 (8%) developed acute (10 patients) or late (13 patients) Grade 3-5 esophageal toxicity. Seven patients had both acute and late Grade 3-5 esophageal toxicity. One patient died (Grade 5 esophageal toxicity) of late esophageal perforation. Concurrent chemotherapy, maximal point dose to the esophagus >58 Gy, and a mean dose to the entire esophagus >34 Gy were significantly associated with a risk of Grade 3-5 esophageal toxicity on univariate analysis. Concurrent chemotherapy and maximal point dose to the esophagus >58 Gy retained significance on multivariate analysis. Of 207 patients

  5. Plasma citrulline levels predict intestinal toxicity in patients treated with pelvic radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onal, Cem; Kotek, Ayse; Arslan, Gungor; Topkan, Erkan (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Baskent Univ. Faculty of Medicine, Adana (Turkey)), E-mail: hcemonal@hotmail.com; Unal, Birsel (Dept. of Biochemistry, Baskent Univ. Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)); Yavuz, Aydin; Yavuz, Melek (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Akdeniz Univ. Faculty of Medicine, Antalya (Turkey))

    2011-11-15

    Background. Radiotherapy (RT) for abdominal and pelvic malignancies often causes severe small bowel toxicity. Citrulline concentrations are known to decrease with intestinal failure. We thus evaluated the feasibility of plasma citrulline levels in predicting radiation-induced intestinal toxicity. Material and methods. Fifty-three patients (36 prostate cancer, 17 endometrial cancer) who received 45 Gy pelvic RT using conventional fractionation were prospectively evaluated. Patients with prostate cancer received an additional 25-30.6 Gy conformal boost. Plasma citrulline levels were assessed on day 0, mid- (week 3) and post-RT (week 8), and four months post-RT. Dose-volume histogram, citrulline concentration changes, and weekly intestinal toxicity scores were analyzed. Results. Mean age was 63 years (range: 43-81 years) and mean baseline citrulline concentration was 38.0 +- 10.1 mumol/l. Citrulline concentrations were significantly reduced at week 3 (27.4 +- 5.9 mumol/l; p < 0.0001), treatment end (29.9 +- 8.8 mumol/l; p < 0.0001), and four months post-treatment (34.3 +- 12.1; p 0.01). The following factor pairs were significantly positively correlated: Citrulline concentration/mean bowel dose during, end of treatment, and four months post-RT; dose-volume parameters/citrulline change groups; cumulative mean radiation dose/intestinal toxicity at end and four months post-RT; citrulline changes/intestinal toxicity during and end of RT. Citrulline concentration changes significantly differed during treatment according to RTOG intestinal toxicity grades (p < 0.0001). Although the citrulline changes differed significantly within RTOG intestinal toxicity grades (p = 0.003), the difference between Grade 0 and Grade 1 did not differ significantly at the end of the treatment. At four months after RT, no significant differences were apparent. Conclusion. Citrulline-based assessment scores are objective and should be considered in measuring radiation-induced intestinal toxicity

  6. Plasma citrulline levels predict intestinal toxicity in patients treated with pelvic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onal, Cem; Kotek, Ayse; Arslan, Gungor; Topkan, Erkan; Unal, Birsel; Yavuz, Aydin; Yavuz, Melek

    2011-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy (RT) for abdominal and pelvic malignancies often causes severe small bowel toxicity. Citrulline concentrations are known to decrease with intestinal failure. We thus evaluated the feasibility of plasma citrulline levels in predicting radiation-induced intestinal toxicity. Material and methods. Fifty-three patients (36 prostate cancer, 17 endometrial cancer) who received 45 Gy pelvic RT using conventional fractionation were prospectively evaluated. Patients with prostate cancer received an additional 25-30.6 Gy conformal boost. Plasma citrulline levels were assessed on day 0, mid- (week 3) and post-RT (week 8), and four months post-RT. Dose-volume histogram, citrulline concentration changes, and weekly intestinal toxicity scores were analyzed. Results. Mean age was 63 years (range: 43-81 years) and mean baseline citrulline concentration was 38.0 ± 10.1 μmol/l. Citrulline concentrations were significantly reduced at week 3 (27.4 ± 5.9 μmol/l; p < 0.0001), treatment end (29.9 ± 8.8 μmol/l; p < 0.0001), and four months post-treatment (34.3 ± 12.1; p 0.01). The following factor pairs were significantly positively correlated: Citrulline concentration/mean bowel dose during, end of treatment, and four months post-RT; dose-volume parameters/citrulline change groups; cumulative mean radiation dose/intestinal toxicity at end and four months post-RT; citrulline changes/intestinal toxicity during and end of RT. Citrulline concentration changes significantly differed during treatment according to RTOG intestinal toxicity grades (p < 0.0001). Although the citrulline changes differed significantly within RTOG intestinal toxicity grades (p = 0.003), the difference between Grade 0 and Grade 1 did not differ significantly at the end of the treatment. At four months after RT, no significant differences were apparent. Conclusion. Citrulline-based assessment scores are objective and should be considered in measuring radiation-induced intestinal toxicity

  7. Priorities for toxic wastewater management in Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, A. [Sustainable Development Policy Institute, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    1996-12-31

    This study assesses the number of industries in Pakistan, the total discharge of wastewater, the biological oxygen demand (BOD) load, and the toxicity of the wastewater. The industrial sector is a major contributor to water pollution, with high levels of BOD, heavy metals, and toxic compounds. Only 30 industries have installed water pollution control equipment, and most are working at a very low operational level. Priority industrial sectors for pollution control are medium- to large-scale textile industries and small-scale tanneries and electroplating industries. Each day the textile industries discharge about 85,000 m{sup 3} of wastewater with a high BOD, while the electroplating industries discharge about 23,000 m{sup 3} of highly toxic and hazardous wastewater. Various in-plant modifications can reduce wastewater discharges. Economic incentives, like tax rebates, subsidies, and soft loans, could be an option for motivating medium- to large-scale industries to control water pollution. Central treatment plants may be constructed for treating wastewater generated by small-scale industries. The estimated costs for the treatment of textile and electroplating wastewater are given. The legislative structure in Pakistan is insufficient for control of industrial pollution; not only do existing laws need revision, but more laws and regulations are needed to improve the state of affairs, and enforcement agencies need to be strengthened. 15 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

  8. Toxicity effects of nickel electroplating effluents treated by photoelectrooxidation in the industries of the Sinos River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuti, T; Rodrigues, Mas; Arenzon, A; Bernardes, A M; Zoppas-Ferreira, J

    2015-05-01

    The Sinos river Basin is an industrial region with many tanneries and electroplating plants in southern Brazil. The wastewater generated by electroplating contains high loads of salts and metals that have to be treated before discharge. After conventional treatment, this study applied an advanced oxidative process to degrade organic additives in the electroplating bright nickel baths effluent. Synthetic rinsing water was submitted to physical-chemical coagulation for nickel removal. The sample was submitted to ecotoxicity tests, and the effluent was treated by photoelectrooxidation (PEO). The effects of current density and treatment time were evaluated. The concentration of total organic carbon (TOC) was 38% lower. The toxicity tests of the effluent treated using PEO revealed that the organic additives were partially degraded and the concentration that is toxic for test organisms was reduced.

  9. Toxicity effects of nickel electroplating effluents treated by photoelectrooxidation in the industries of the Sinos River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Benvenuti

    Full Text Available The Sinos river Basin is an industrial region with many tanneries and electroplating plants in southern Brazil. The wastewater generated by electroplating contains high loads of salts and metals that have to be treated before discharge. After conventional treatment, this study applied an advanced oxidative process to degrade organic additives in the electroplating bright nickel baths effluent. Synthetic rinsing water was submitted to physical-chemical coagulation for nickel removal. The sample was submitted to ecotoxicity tests, and the effluent was treated by photoelectrooxidation (PEO. The effects of current density and treatment time were evaluated. The concentration of total organic carbon (TOC was 38% lower. The toxicity tests of the effluent treated using PEO revealed that the organic additives were partially degraded and the concentration that is toxic for test organisms was reduced.

  10. Opportunities for low-grade heat recovery in the UK food processing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Richard; Harvey, Adam; Reay, David

    2013-01-01

    Energy efficiency in the process industry is becoming an increasingly important issue due to the rising costs of both electricity and fossil fuel resources, as well as the tough targets for the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions outlined in the Climate Change Act 2008. Utilisation of waste heat sources is key to improving industrial energy efficiency, with an estimated 11.4 TWh of recoverable heat being wasted each year, a quarter of which is from the food and drinks processing sector. This paper examines the low-grade waste heat sources common to the food and drinks processing sector and the various opportunities for the use of this heat. A review of the best available technologies for recovery of waste heat is provided, ranging from heat transfer between source and sink, to novel technologies for the generation of electricity and refrigeration. Generally, the most economic option for waste heat recovery is heat exchange between nearby/same process source and sink, with a number of well-developed heat exchangers widely available for purchase. More novel options, such as the use of organic Rankine cycles for electricity generation prove to be less economical due to high capital outlays. However, with additional funding provision for demonstration of such projects and development of modular units, such technologies would become more common

  11. A general method for selection of riboflavin-overproducing food grade micro-organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutten Ger

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study describes a strategy to select and isolate spontaneous riboflavin-overproducing strains of Lactobacillus (Lb. plantarum, Leuconostoc (Lc. mesenteroides and Propionibacterium (P. freudenreichii. Results The toxic riboflavin analogue roseoflavin was used to isolate natural riboflavin-overproducing variants of the food grade micro-organisms Lb. plantarum, Lc. mesenteroides and P. freudenreichii strains. The method was successfully employed for strains of all three species. The mutation(s responsible for the observed overproduction of riboflavin were identified for isolates of two species. Conclusion Selection for spontaneous roseoflavin-resistant mutants was found to be a reliable method to obtain natural riboflavin-overproducing strains of a number of species commonly used in the food industry. This study presents a convenient method for deriving riboflavin-overproducing strains of bacterial starter cultures, which are currently used in the food industry, by a non-recombinant methodology. Use of such starter strains can be exploited to increase the vitamin content in certain food products.

  12. Acute toxicity of chlorantraniliprole to non-target crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) associated with rice-crayfish cropping systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbee, Gary C; McClain, W Ray; Lanka, Srinivas K; Stout, Michael J

    2010-09-01

    Chlorantraniliprole, a novel anthranilic diamide insecticide, was recently introduced into the United States where rice-crayfish crop rotations are practiced to control rice water weevil (Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel) infestations. Chlorantraniliprole has high margins of mammalian safety and excellent insecticidal efficacy, but its toxicity to non-target crayfish is uncertain. In this study, the acute toxicity of chlorantraniliprole to the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii Girard was determined using aquatic and feeding assays. The aquatic 96 h median lethal toxicity (LC(50)) data indicate that technical-grade chlorantraniliprole is highly toxic (US EPA category) to crayfish with an LC(50) of 951 microg L(-1) (95% CL = 741-1118 microg L(-1)). A no observed effect concentration (NOEC) of 480 microg L(-1) was recorded. Neither the 36 day chronic feeding study, where crayfish fed on chlorantraniliprole-treated rice seed in aquaria, nor the 144 h acute feeding test, where crayfish fed on rice seeds treated with chlorantraniliprole, produced mortality or abnormal behavior. Chlorantraniliprole is three orders of magnitude less acutely toxic to P. clarkii than lambda-cyhalothrin and etofenprox, two pyrethroid insecticides also used in rice, and is less likely to cause acute crayfish toxicity in rice pond ecosystems. Based on acute toxicity data, the use of chlorantraniliprole should be more compatible with rice-crayfish crop rotations than pyrethroids. (c) 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Sub-chronic toxicity of low concentrations of industrial volatile organic pollutants in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, Catherine; Allshire, Ashley; Pelt, Frank N.A.M. van; Heffron, James J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Organic solvents form an important class of pollutants in the ambient air and have been associated with neurotoxicity and immunotoxicity in humans. Here we investigated the biological effects of sub-chronic exposure to industrially important volatile organic solvents in vitro. Jurkat T cells were exposed to toluene, n-hexane and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) individually for 5 days and solvent exposure levels were confirmed by headspace gas chromatography. A neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) was exposed to toluene for the same period. Following exposure, cells were harvested and toxicity measured in terms of the following endpoints: membrane damage (LDH leakage), perturbations in intracellular free Ca 2+ , changes in glutathione redox status and dual-phosphorylation of MAP kinases ERK1/2, JNK and p38. The results show that sub-chronic exposure to the volatile organic solvents causes membrane damage, increased intracellular free calcium and altered glutathione redox status in both cell lines. However, acute and sub-chronic solvent exposure did not result in MAP kinase phosphorylation. Toxicity of the solvents tested increased with hydrophobicity. The lowest-observed-adverse-effect-levels (LOAELs) measured in vitro were close to blood solvent concentrations reported for individuals exposed to the agents at levels at or below their individual threshold limit values (TLVs)

  14. Outcomes and toxicity from a prospective study of moderately hypofractionated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gang Wang, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to report the long-term outcomes and toxicity results of a prospective trial of moderately hypofractionated, image guided radiation therapy (RT for localized prostate cancer. Methods and materials: Patients were enrolled between December 2006 and February 2012. Patients in group 1 were stage T1-T2b, had a Gleason score (GS of 2 to 6 or 7 (3 + 4 with only 1 lobe involved, and had prostate-specific antigen levels ≤10 ng/mL. Group 2 patients were stage ≥T2c, had a GS ≥7 (4 + 3, a GS 7 (3 + 4 involving both lobes, or a PSA >10 ng/mL and ≤30 ng/mL. All patients underwent transrectal ultrasound guided fiducial (Visicoil placement prior to computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging simulation. Daily cone beam computed tomography with online correction was used. The prescribed dose was 64 Gy in 20 fractions. The primary endpoint was acute and late toxicity. The secondary endpoint was biochemical control. Results: A total of 40 patients with a median age of 70 years were recruited for the study. Twenty-two patients (55% were in group 1, and 18 patients (45% were in group 2. Thirteen patients (32.5% were classified as low, 26 patients (65% as intermediate, and 1 patient (2.5% as high risk per the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. The median follow-up time was 59 months. Five-year biochemical control was 100% and 94.4% for groups 1 and 2, respectively. Thirteen patients (32.5% developed acute gastrointestinal (GI toxicities grade ≥2 and 3 (7.5% developed acute grade 3 GI toxicity. A total of 17 patients (42.5% developed grade ≥2 acute genitourinary toxicities and 1 (2.5% developed acute grade 3 dysuria. Two patients (5% developed late GI toxicities grade ≥2. There was 1 case (2.5% of grade 4 fistula requiring sigmoid resection. Seven patients (17.5% developed grade ≥2 late genitourinary toxicities; 2 patients (5% late grade 3 urinary frequency/urgency. Conclusions

  15. gaseous emissions from some industries at ama industrial complex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2015-08-11

    Aug 11, 2015 ... air quality standards. Therefore, it is recommended that these companies should determine appropriate control measures to reduce these toxic emissions. Key words: Toxic gaseous emissions, type, concentrations, Ama Industrial Complex, Nigeria. INTRODUCTION. Air pollutants such as carbon dioxide ...

  16. The pallet industry: a changing hardwood market

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.P. Dempsey; D.G. Martens

    1991-01-01

    From its inception during World War II, the wooden pallet industry has grown to become the Nation's largest industrial consumer of hardwood lumber products. Since most of the raw material in wooden pallets is lower grade lumber, the pallet industry's growth, efficiency, and changing raw material inputs must be of concern to the grade hardwood lumber industry...

  17. Characterization of food-grade titanium dioxide: the presence of nanosized particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Doudrick, Kyle; Bi, Xiangyu; Hristovski, Kiril; Herckes, Pierre; Westerhoff, Paul; Kaegi, Ralf

    2014-06-03

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is widely used in food products, which will eventually enter wastewater treatment plants and terrestrial or aquatic environments, yet little is known about the fraction of this TiO2 that is nanoscale, or the physical and chemical properties of TiO2 that influence its human and environmental fate or toxicity. Instead of analyzing TiO2 properties in complex food or environmental samples, we procured samples of food-grade TiO2 obtained from global food suppliers and then, using spectroscopic and other analytical techniques, quantified several parameters (elemental composition, crystal structure, size, and surface composition) that are reported to influence environmental fate and toxicity. Another sample of nano-TiO2 that is generally sold for catalytic applications (P25) and widely used in toxicity studies, was analyzed for comparison. Food-grade and P25 TiO2 are engineered products, frequently synthesized from purified titanium precursors, and not milled from bulk scale minerals. Nanosized materials were present in all of the food-grade TiO2 samples, and transmission electron microscopy showed that samples 1-5 contained 35, 23, 21, 17, and 19% of nanosized primary particles (average hydrodynamic diameter of >100 nm. Food-grade samples contained phosphorus (P), with concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 1.8 mg of P/g of TiO2. The phosphorus content of P25 was below inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection limits. Presumably because of a P-based coating detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the ζ potential of the food-grade TiO2 suspension in deionized water ranged from -10 to -45 mV around pH 7, and the iso-electric point for food-grade TiO2 (grade materials, and although the presence of amorphous TiO2 could not be ruled out, it is unlikely on the basis of Raman analysis. The food-grade TiO2 was solar photoactive. Cationic dyes adsorbed more readily to food-grade TiO2 than P25, indicating very different potentials for

  18. Acute Skin Toxicity Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Who's at Risk?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Laser, Benjamin; Kowalski, Alex V.; Fontenla, Sandra C.; Pena-Greenberg, Elizabeth; Yorke, Ellen D.; Lovelock, D. Michael; Hunt, Margie A.; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We examined the rate of acute skin toxicity within a prospectively managed database of patients treated for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and investigated factors that might predict skin toxicity. Methods: From May 2006 through January 2008, 50 patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center with 60 Gy in three fractions or 44-48 Gy in four fractions. Patients were treated with multiple coplanar beams (3-7, median 4) with a 6 MV linac using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and dynamic multileaf collimation. Toxicity grading was performed and based on the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects. Factors associated with Grade 2 or higher acute skin reactions were calculated by Fisher's exact test. Results: After a minimum 3 months of follow-up, 19 patients (38%) developed Grade 1, 4 patients (8%) Grade 2, 2 patients (4%) Grade 3, and 1 patient Grade 4 acute skin toxicity. Factors associated with Grade 2 or higher acute skin toxicity included using only 3 beams (p = 0.0007), distance from the tumor to the posterior chest wall skin of less than 5 cm (p = 0.006), and a maximum skin dose of 50% or higher of the prescribed dose (p = 0.02). Conclusions: SBRT can be associated with significant skin toxicity. One must consider the skin dose when evaluating the treatment plan and consider the bolus effect of immobilization devices

  19. Toxicity identification evaluation methods for identification of toxicants in refinery effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barten, K.A.; Mount, D.R.; Hackett, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    During the last five years, the authors have used Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) methods to characterize and identify the source(s) of toxicity in effluents from dozens of municipal and industrial facilities. In most cases, specific chemicals responsible for toxicity have been identified. Although generally successful, the initial experience was that for several refinery effluents, they were able only to qualitatively characterize the presence of organic toxicants; standard toxicant identification procedures were not able to isolate specific organic chemicals. They believe that organic toxicity in these refinery effluents is caused by multiple organic compounds rather than by just a few; evidence for this includes an inability to isolate toxicity in a small number of fractions using liquid chromatography and the presence of very large numbers of compounds in isolated fractions. There is also evidence that the toxicant(s) may be ionic, in that the toxicity of whole effluent and isolated fractions often show increasing toxicity with decreasing pH. Finally, positive-pressure filtration has also reduced toxicity in some samples. In this presentation the authors summarize their experiences with refinery effluents, focusing on typical patterns they have observed and alternative procedures they have used to better understand the nature of these toxicants

  20. Prospective evaluation of radiation-induced skin toxicity in a race/ethnically diverse breast cancer population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Jean L.; Takita, Cristiane; Reis, Isildinha M.; Zhao, Wei; Lee, Eunkyung; Nelson, Omar L.; Hu, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated predictors of radiation-induced skin toxicity in a prospective study of a tri-racial/ethnic breast cancer population. We evaluated patient demographics, tumor characteristics, and treatment variables in the first 392 patients in a prospective study assessing radiation-induced skin toxicity. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to evaluate potential predictors of skin toxicity. The study consists of 59 non-Hispanic whites (NHW; 15%), 241 Hispanic Whites (HW; 62%), 79 black or African Americans (AA; 20%), and 13 others (3%). Overall, 48% developed grade 0–1 skin toxicity, 49.8% grade 2, and 2.2% grade 3 by the National Cancer Institute's Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) scale. Twenty-one percent developed moist desquamation. In multivariate analysis, higher body mass index (BMI; OR = 2.09; 95%CI = 1.15, 3.82), higher disease stage (OR = 1.82; 95%CI = 1.06, 3.11), ER-positive/PR-negative status (OR = 2.74; 95%CI = 1.26, 5.98), and conventionally fractionated regimens (OR = 3.25; 95%CI = 1.76, 6.01) were significantly associated with higher skin toxicity grade after adjustment for age, race, ethnicity, ER status, and breast volume. BMI specifically predicted for moist desquamation, but not degree of erythema. In this racially and ethnically diverse cohort of breast cancer patients receiving radiation to the intact breast, risk factors including BMI, disease stage, and conventionally fractionated radiation predicted for higher skin toxicity grade, whereas age, race, ethnicity, and breast volume did not. BMI specifically predicted for moist desquamation, suggesting that preventive measures to address this particular outcome should be investigated

  1. Use of other industry standards to facilitate the procurement and dedication of commercial-grade items

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beard, R.L.; Rosch, F.C.; Sanwarwalla, M.H.; Tjernlund, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear utilities are embarking on innovative approaches for reducing costs in all aspects of engineering, operation, maintenance, and procurement to produce power cheaply and efficiently and remain competitive with other power producers. In the area of procurement, utilities are increasingly obtaining commercial-grade items for use in safety-related applications. This trend is occurring because of lack of suppliers capable or willing to meet 10 CFR 21 and 10 CFR 50 App. B requirements and because of the absence of original equipment suppliers or the spiraling cost associated with procuring items' basic components safety-related from original suppliers. Utilities have been looking at ways to reduce procurement costs. One promising means to reduce costs is to utilize information provided in other nonnuclear industry standards regarding the specification, control, manufacture, and acceptance of the critical characteristics required of the item to perform its design function. A task force was instituted under the sponsorship of the Electric Power Research Institute to investigate the feasibility of using items manufactured to other industry standards in nuclear safety-related applications. This investigation looked at a broad spectrum of available industry standards pertaining to the design, function, manufacture, and testing of items and determined that some standards are more useful than others. This paper discusses the results of this investigation and how credit from the controls exercised for items manufactured to certain existing industry standards can be taken to minimize dedication costs

  2. Hypofractionated IMRT of the Prostate Bed After Radical Prostatectomy: Acute Toxicity in the PRIAMOS-1 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, Sonja, E-mail: sonja.katayama@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Striecker, Thorbjoern; Kessel, Kerstin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Sterzing, Florian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Habl, Gregor [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Edler, Lutz [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Herfarth, Klaus [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy as primary treatment for prostate cancer is currently being investigated in large phase 3 trials. However, there are few data on postoperative hypofractionation. The Radiation therapy for the Prostate Bed With or Without the Pelvic Lymph Nodes (PRIAMOS 1) trial was initiated as a prospective phase 2 trial to assess treatment safety and toxicity of a hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of the prostate bed. Methods and Materials: From February to September 2012, 40 patients with indications for adjuvant or salvage radiation therapy were enrolled. One patient dropped out before treatment. Patients received 54 Gy in 18 fractions to the prostate bed with IMRT and daily image guidance. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities (according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0) were recorded weekly during treatment and 10 weeks after radiation therapy. Results: Overall acute toxicity was favorable, with no recorded adverse events grade ≥3. Acute GI toxicity rates were 56.4% (grade 1) and 17.9% (grade 2). Acute GU toxicity was recorded in 35.9% of patients (maximum grade 1). Urinary stress incontinence was not influenced by radiation therapy. The incidence of grade 1 urinary urge incontinence increased from 2.6% before to 23.1% 10 weeks after therapy, but grade 2 urge incontinence remained unchanged. Conclusions: Postoperative hypofractionated IMRT of the prostate bed is tolerated well, with no severe acute side effects.

  3. Acute genitourinary toxicity after high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer: Correlation between the urethral dose in HDR brachytherapy and the severity of acute genitourinary toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Ito, Kazuto; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Noda, Shin-ei; Harashima, Koichi; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Nakayama, Yuko; Yamamoto, Takumi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Nakano, Takashi; Niibe, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    computed tomography images. The number of patients in each fractionation group was as follows: 13 in the 5-Gy group; 19 in the 7-Gy group, and 38 in the 9-Gy group. The tumor stage was T1 in 10 patients, T2 in 36 patients, and T3 in 24 patients. The Gleason score was 2-6 in 11 patients, 7 in 34 patients, and 8-10 in 25 patients. Androgen ablation was performed in all the patients. The median follow-up duration was 14 months (range 3-42 months). The toxicities were graded based on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. Results: The main symptoms of acute GU toxicity were dysuria and increase in urinary frequency or nocturia. The grade distribution of acute GU toxicity in the patients was as follows: Grade 0-1, 39 patients (56%), and Grade 2-4, 31 patients (44%). One patient who developed acute urinary obstruction was classified as having Grade 4 toxicity. Comparison of the distribution of the grade of acute GU toxicity among the different fractionation groups revealed no statistically significant differences among the groups. The urethral dose in HDR brachytherapy was evaluated using the following DVH parameters: V30 (percentage of the urethral volume receiving 30% of the prescribed radiation dose), V80, V90, V100, V110, V120, V130, and V150. The V30-110 values in the patients with Grade 2-4 acute GU toxicity were significantly higher than those in patients with Grade 0-1 toxicity. On the other hand, there were no significant differences in the V120-150 values between patients with Grade 0-1 and Grade 2-4 toxicity. Regarding the influence of the number of needles implanted for the radiation therapy, patients with 11 needles or less showed a significantly higher incidence of Grade 2-4 acute GU toxicity compared with those with 12 needles or more (p < 0.05). Conclusions: It was concluded that HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT is feasible for localized prostate cancer when

  4. Incidence and risk of hematologic toxicities in cancer patients treated with regorafenib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Zhao, Hong

    2017-11-07

    Regorafenib, an oral vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, has been approved for the treatment of several malignancies. As a non-traditional cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agent, regorafenib is often associated with hematologic toxicities. Here we searched PubMed and Embase up to June 2017 for relevant clinical trials. Eligible studies include trials in which subjects treated with 160 mg of regorafenib daily during the first 21 days of each 28-day cycle, and adequate safety data profile reporting thrombocytopenia, anemia, neutropenia and leucopenia. Statistical analyses were conducted to calculate the overall incidences, relative risks (RRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 2,341 subjects from 16 trials were included in the present studies. The incidences of regorafenib associated all-grade and high-grade hematologic toxicities were: thrombocytopenia, 22% and 3%; anemia, 20% and 3%; neutropenia, 10% and 2%, and leucopenia, 13% and 2%, respectively. Regorafenib-treated subjects had a significant increased risk of all-grade (RR=6.35; 95% CI, 3.19-12.64) and high-grade (RR=6.27; 95% CI, 1.69-23.26) thrombocytopenia, all-grade (RR=2.76; 95% CI, 1.63-4.68) and high-grade (RR=5.38; 95% CI, 1.60-18.06) anemia. Our results suggested that regorafenib therapy was associated with significantly increased risks of hematological toxicities, and hematologic monitoring at regular intervals should be advised to clinician.

  5. Comparison of conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy techniques for treatment of pelvic tumors. Analysis of acute toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrigno, Robson; Santos, Adriana; Martins, Lidiane C; Weltman, Eduardo; Chen, Michael J; Sakuraba, Roberto; Lopes, Cleverson P; Cruz, José C

    2010-01-01

    This retrospective analysis reports on the comparative outcome of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities between conformal radiation therapy (CRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques in the treatment of patients with pelvic tumors. From January 2002 to December 2008, 69 patients with pelvic tumors underwent whole pelvic CRT and 65 underwent whole pelvic IMRT to treat pelvic lymph nodes and primary tumor regions. Total dose to the whole pelvis ranged from 50 to 50.4 Gy in 25 to 28 daily fractions. Chemotherapy (CT) regimen, when employed, was based upon primary tumor. Acute GI and GU toxicities were graded by RTOG/EORTC acute radiation morbidity criteria. Absence of GI symptoms during radiotherapy (grade 0) was more frequently observed in the IMRT group (43.1% versus 8.7; p < 0.001) and medication for diarrhea (Grade 2) was more frequently used in the CRT group (65.2% versus 38.5%; p = 0.002). Acute GI grade 1 and 3 side effects incidence was similar in both groups (18.5% versus 18.8%; p = 0.95 and 0% versus 7.2%; p = 0.058, respectively). Incidence of GU toxicity was similar in both groups (grade 0: 61.5% versus 66.6%, p = 0.54; grade 1: 20% versus 8.7%, p = 0.06; grade 2: 18.5% versus 23.5%, p = 0.50 and grade 3: 0% versus 1.5%, p > 0.99). This comparative case series shows less grade 2 acute GI toxicity in patients treated with whole pelvic IMRT in comparison with those treated with CRT. Incidence of acute GU toxicity was similar in both groups

  6. Studies of toxic metals removal in industrial wastewater after electron-beam treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Marcia Almeida

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Oxidation Process, using electron-beam, have been studied by scientific community due to its capacity to mineralize the toxic organic compound from highly reactive radical's formation. The electron-beam treatment process has been adopted by several countries for organic compounds removal and to effluents and sewers biological degradation. In this work, studies of metals removal in the simulated aqueous solutions and in the actual industrial effluents were carried out, using electron-beam treatment. The effluents samples were collected at ETE/SABESP (Governmental Wastewater Treatment Plant) in Suzano, SP city. The sampling was outlined at three distinctive sites: Industrial Receiver Unit, Medium Bar, and Final Effluent. The effluents samples were irradiated using different irradiation doses (20, 50, 100, 200 and 500 kGy). The removal behavior of metals Ca, CI, S, P, K, Al, Fe, As, Ni, Cr, Zn, Si, Co, Mn, As, Se, Cd, Hg and Pb was verified. The elements determination was accomplished with the x-ray fluorescence (WD-XRFS) technique using Fundamental Parameters method and thin film samples. The elements Fe, Zn, Cr and Co presented a removal > 99% to 200 kGy of irradiation dose in industrial effluent. At the same dose, P, Al and Si presented a removal of 81.8%, 97.6% and 98.7%, respectively. Ca and S were removed more than 80% at 20 kGy and Na, CI and K did not presented any degree of removal. As, Se, Cd, Hg and Pb removal was studied in the simulated aqueous solutions and industrial effluents with scavengers addition (EDTA and HCOONa). The elements As and Hg presented a removal of 92% and 99%, respectively, with HCOONa, at 500 kGy irradiation dose. The Se presented a 96.5% removal at same irradiation dose without scavengers addition. The removal of Cd and Pb did not give a significant removal, once all of the assay were carried out in the oxidant medium. (author)

  7. Neurological Toxicity in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Treated with Modified FOLFOX6 plus Bevacizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Otsu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the toxicity and efficacy of modified FOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with particular regard to oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. Toxicity was graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTCAE (version 3.0. The evaluation was especially focused on grade 2 oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. The estimated median treatment time to occurrence of grade 2 sensory neuropathy was 7.3 months. The estimated median cumulative dose to occurrence of grade 2 sensory neuropathy was 931 mg/m 2 . This study clarified the treatment time from first dose as well as the cumulative dose of oxaliplatin leading to grade 2 neuropathy. It may be important to institute some clinical countermeasures when grade 2 neuropathy occurs so as to reduce the chance of progression to irreversible grade 3 neuropathy.

  8. Nomogram to predict rectal toxicity following prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Bernard Delobel

    Full Text Available To identify predictors of acute and late rectal toxicity following prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT, while integrating the potential impact of RT technique, dose escalation, and moderate hypofractionation, thus enabling us to generate a nomogram for individual prediction.In total, 972 patients underwent RT for localized prostate cancer, to a total dose of 70 Gy or 80 Gy, using two different fractionations (2 Gy or 2.5 Gy/day, by means of several RT techniques (3D conformal RT [3DCRT], intensity-modulated RT [IMRT], or image-guided RT [IGRT]. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of acute and late rectal toxicity. A nomogram was generated based on the logistic regression model used to predict the 3-year rectal toxicity risk, with its accuracy assessed by dividing the cohort into training and validation subgroups.Mean follow-up for the entire cohort was 62 months, ranging from 6 to 235. The rate of acute Grade ≥2 rectal toxicity was 22.2%, decreasing when combining IMRT and IGRT, compared to 3DCRT (RR = 0.4, 95%CI: 0.3-0.6, p<0.01. The 5-year Grade ≥2 risks for rectal bleeding, urgency/tenesmus, diarrhea, and fecal incontinence were 9.9%, 4.5%, 2.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. The 3-year Grade ≥2 risk for overall rectal toxicity increased with total dose (p<0.01, RR = 1.1, 95%CI: 1.0-1.1 and dose per fraction (2Gy vs. 2.5Gy (p = 0.03, RR = 3.3, 95%CI: 1.1-10.0, and decreased when combining IMRT and IGRT (RR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.3-0.8, p<0.01. Based on these three parameters, a nomogram was generated.Dose escalation and moderate hypofractionation increase late rectal toxicity. IMRT combined with IGRT markedly decreases acute and late rectal toxicity. Performing combined IMRT and IGRT can thus be envisaged for dose escalation and moderate hypofractionation. Our nomogram predicts the 3-year rectal toxicity risk by integrating total dose, fraction dose, and RT technique.

  9. Comparative Toxicity and Dosimetric Profile of Whole-Pelvis Versus Prostate Bed-Only Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deville, Curtiland, E-mail: deville@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Vapiwala, Neha [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hwang, Wei-Ting [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lin Haibo; Bar Ad, Voichita; Tochner, Zelig; Both, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To assess whether whole-pelvis (WP) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer (PCa) after prostatectomy is associated with increased toxicity compared to prostate-bed only (PB) IMRT. Methods and Materials: All patients (n = 67) undergoing postprostatectomy IMRT to 70.2 Gy at our institution from January 2006 to January 2009 with minimum 12-month follow-up were divided into WP (n = 36) and PB (n = 31) comparison groups. WP patients received initial pelvic nodal IMRT to 45 Gy. Pretreatment demographics, bladder and rectal dose-volume histograms, and maximum genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were compared. Logistic regression models evaluated uni- and multivariate associations between pretreatment demographics and toxicities. Results: Pretreatment demographics including age and comorbidities were similar between groups. WP patients had higher Gleason scores, T stages, and preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, and more WP patients underwent androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). WP minimum (Dmin) and mean bladder doses, bladder volumes receiving more than 5 Gy (V5) and V20, rectal Dmin, and PB bladder and rectal V65 were significantly increased. Maximum acute GI toxicity was Grade 2 and was increased for WP (61%) vs. PB (29%) patients (p = 0.001); there was no significant difference in acute Grade {>=}2 GU toxicity (22% WP vs. 10% PB; p = 0.193), late Grade {>=}2 GI toxicity (3% WP vs. 0% PB; p = 0.678), or late Grade {>=}2 GU toxicity (28% WP vs. 19% PB; p = 0.274) with 25-month median follow-up (range, 12-44 months). On multivariate analysis, long-term ADT use was associated with Grade {>=}2 late GU toxicity (p = 0.02). Conclusion: Despite dosimetric differences in irradiated bowel, bladder, and rectum, WP IMRT resulted only in clinically significant increased acute GI toxicity in comparison to that with PB IMRT, with no differences in GU or late GI toxicity.

  10. Late toxicity and five year outcomes after high-dose-rate brachytherapy as a monotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Oesch, Sebastian L; Rentsch, Cyrill A; Isaak, Bernhard; Cihoric, Nikola; Manser, Peter; Thalmann, George N; Aebersold, Daniel M

    2014-01-01

    To determine the 5-year outcome after high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) as a monotherapy. Between 10/2003 and 06/2006, 36 patients with low (28) and intermediate (8) risk prostate cancer were treated by HDR-BT monotherapy. All patients received one implant and 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy within 48 hours for a total prescribed dose (PD) of 38 Gy. Five patients received concomitant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Toxicity was scored according to the common terminology criteria for adverse events from the National Cancer Institute (CTCAE) version 3.0. Biochemical recurrence was defined according to the Phoenix criteria and analyzed using the Kaplan Meier method. Predictors for late grade 3 GU toxicity were analyzed using univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses. The median follow-up was 6.9 years (range, 1.5-8.0 years). Late grade 2 and 3 genitourinary (GU) toxicity was observed in 10 (28%) and 7 (19%) patients, respectively. The actuarial proportion of patients with late grade 3 GU toxicity at 5 years was 17.7%. Late grade 2 and 3 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were not observed. The crude erectile function preservation rate in patients without ADT was 75%. The 5 year biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS) rate was 97%. Late grade 3 GU toxicity was associated with the urethral volume (p = 0.001) and the urethral V 120 (urethral volume receiving ≥120% of the PD; p = 0.0005) after multivariate Cox regression. After HDR-BT monotherapy late grade 3 GU was observed relatively frequently and was associated with the urethral V 120 . GI toxicity was negligible, the erectile function preservation rate and the bRFS rate was excellent

  11. Toxicity after reirradiation of pulmonary tumours with stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peulen, Heike; Karlsson, Kristin; Lindberg, Karin; Tullgren, Owe; Baumann, Pia; Lax, Ingmar; Lewensohn, Rolf; Wersäll, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess toxicity and feasibility of reirradiation with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) after prior lung SBRT for primary lung cancer or lung metastases. Patients and materials: Twenty-nine patients reirradiated with SBRT on 32 lung lesions (11 central, 21 peripheral) were retrospectively reviewed. Median follow-up time was 12 months (range 1–97). The primary endpoint was toxicity, secondary endpoints were local control and overall survival time. Toxicity was scored according to the NCI-CTCAE version 3. Results: Grade 3–4 toxicity was scored 14 times in eight patients. Three patients died because of massive bleeding (grade 5). Larger clinical target volumes (CTV) and central tumour localization were associated with more severe toxicity. There was no correlation between mean lung dose (MLD) and lung toxicity. Local control at 5 months after reirradiation was 52%, as assessed by CT-scan (n = 12) or X-thorax (n = 3). A larger CTV was associated with poorer local control. Kaplan–Meier estimated 1- and 2-year survival rates were 59% and 43%, respectively. Conclusions: Reirradiation with SBRT is feasible although increased risk of toxicity was reported in centrally located tumours. Further research is warranted for more accurate selection of patients suitable for reirradiation with SBRT.

  12. Enhanced toxic cloud knockdown spray system for decontamination applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betty, Rita G [Rio Rancho, NM; Tucker, Mark D [Albuquerque, NM; Brockmann, John E [Albuquerque, NM; Lucero, Daniel A [Albuquerque, NM; Levin, Bruce L [Tijeras, NM; Leonard, Jonathan [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-09-06

    Methods and systems for knockdown and neutralization of toxic clouds of aerosolized chemical or biological warfare (CBW) agents and toxic industrial chemicals using a non-toxic, non-corrosive aqueous decontamination formulation.

  13. Hematological Toxicity After Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiosurgery for Treatment of Metastatic Gynecologic Malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunos, Charles A., E-mail: charles.kunos@UHhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Debernardo, Robert [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Radivoyevitch, Tomas [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Fabien, Jeffrey; Dobbins, Donald C.; Zhang Yuxia; Brindle, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate hematological toxicity after robotic stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) for treatment of women with metastatic abdominopelvic gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: A total of 61 women with stage IV gynecologic malignancies treated with abdominopelvic SBRT were analyzed after ablative radiation (2400 cGy/3 divided consecutive daily doses) delivered by a robotic-armed Cyberknife SBRT system. Abdominopelvic bone marrow was identified using computed tomography-guided contouring. Fatigue and hematologic toxicities were graded by retrospective assignment of common toxicity criteria for adverse events (version 4.0). Bone marrow volume receiving 1000 cGy (V10) was tested for association with post-therapy (median 32 days [25%-75% quartile, 28-45 days]) white- or red-cell counts, hemoglobin levels, and platelet counts as marrow toxicity surrogates. Results: In all, 61 women undergoing abdominopelvic SBRT had a median bone marrow V10 of 2% (25%-75% quartile: 0%-8%). Fifty-seven (93%) of 61 women had received at least 1 pre-SBRT marrow-taxing chemotherapy regimen for metastatic disease. Bone marrow V10 did not associate with hematological adverse events. In all, 15 grade 2 (25%) and 2 grade 3 (3%) fatigue symptoms were self-reported among the 61 women within the first 10 days post-therapy, with fatigue resolved spontaneously in all 17 women by 30 days post-therapy. Neutropenia was not observed. Three (5%) women had a grade 1 drop in hemoglobin level to <10.0 g/dL. Single grade 1, 2, and 3 thrombocytopenias were documented in 3 women. Conclusions: Abdominopelvic SBRT provided ablative radiation dose to cancer targets without increased bone marrow toxicity. Abdominopelvic SBRT for metastatic gynecologic malignancies warrants further study.

  14. Hematological Toxicity After Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiosurgery for Treatment of Metastatic Gynecologic Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunos, Charles A.; Debernardo, Robert; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Fabien, Jeffrey; Dobbins, Donald C.; Zhang Yuxia; Brindle, James

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate hematological toxicity after robotic stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) for treatment of women with metastatic abdominopelvic gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: A total of 61 women with stage IV gynecologic malignancies treated with abdominopelvic SBRT were analyzed after ablative radiation (2400 cGy/3 divided consecutive daily doses) delivered by a robotic-armed Cyberknife SBRT system. Abdominopelvic bone marrow was identified using computed tomography-guided contouring. Fatigue and hematologic toxicities were graded by retrospective assignment of common toxicity criteria for adverse events (version 4.0). Bone marrow volume receiving 1000 cGy (V10) was tested for association with post-therapy (median 32 days [25%-75% quartile, 28-45 days]) white- or red-cell counts, hemoglobin levels, and platelet counts as marrow toxicity surrogates. Results: In all, 61 women undergoing abdominopelvic SBRT had a median bone marrow V10 of 2% (25%-75% quartile: 0%-8%). Fifty-seven (93%) of 61 women had received at least 1 pre-SBRT marrow-taxing chemotherapy regimen for metastatic disease. Bone marrow V10 did not associate with hematological adverse events. In all, 15 grade 2 (25%) and 2 grade 3 (3%) fatigue symptoms were self-reported among the 61 women within the first 10 days post-therapy, with fatigue resolved spontaneously in all 17 women by 30 days post-therapy. Neutropenia was not observed. Three (5%) women had a grade 1 drop in hemoglobin level to <10.0 g/dL. Single grade 1, 2, and 3 thrombocytopenias were documented in 3 women. Conclusions: Abdominopelvic SBRT provided ablative radiation dose to cancer targets without increased bone marrow toxicity. Abdominopelvic SBRT for metastatic gynecologic malignancies warrants further study.

  15. Hypofractionated Prostate Radiotherapy with or without Conventionally Fractionated Nodal Irradiation: Clinical Toxicity Observations and Retrospective Daily Dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Andrew M; Bishop, Justin M; Jacob, Rojymon; Dobelbower, Michael C; Kim, Robert Y; Yang, Eddy S; Smith, Heather; Wu, Xingen; Fiveash, John B

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate toxicity associated with the addition of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) to a hypofractionated regimen for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials. Fifty-seven patients received pelvic image-guided IMRT to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions with a hypofractionated simultaneous boost to the prostate to 70 Gy. Thirty-one patients received prostate-only treatment to 70 Gy in 28 fractions. Results. Median followup was 41.1 months. Early grade ≥2 urinary toxicity rates were 49% (28 of 57) for patients receiving ENI and 58% (18 of 31) for those not (P = 0.61). Early grade ≥2 rectal toxicity rates were 40% (23 of 57) and 23% (7 of 31), respectively (P = 0.09). The addition of ENI resulted in a 21% actuarial rate of late grade ≥2 rectal toxicity at 4 years, compared to 0% for patients treated to the prostate only (P = 0.02). Retrospective daily dosimetry of patients experiencing late rectal toxicity revealed an average increase of 2.67% of the rectal volume receiving 70 Gy compared to the original plan. Conclusions. The addition of ENI resulted in an increased risk of late rectal toxicity. Grade ≥2 late rectal toxicity was associated with worse daily rectal dosimetry compared to the treatment plan.

  16. Contamination levels, toxicity profiles, and emission sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the soils of an emerging industrial town and its environs in the Southeastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofomatah, Anthony C; Okoye, Chukwuma O B

    2017-11-09

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in Nnewi and its environs were determined. Soil samples were extracted by sonication using hexane:dichloromethane (3:1) mixture and determined by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection. The total PAHs concentrations (μg/kg) were 16.681 to 46.815, being three orders of magnitude lower than the maximum permissible level recommended by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). These concentrations followed this order: industrial ˃ farmlands ˃ commercial ˃ residential. Industrialized areas showed higher concentrations (p ˂ 0.05) than the other areas. Diagnostic ratios show that the major source of PAHs was the open burning of industrial and agricultural wastes, as shown by the occurrence of highest concentrations in the industrial areas, followed by agricultural areas. Benzo[a]pyrene equivalent values showed non-pollution and very low toxicity. Nevertheless, it was clear that industrialization has had some impact on the PAHs levels in soils and the total environment in this area and could be problematic with time, except with proper environmental management.

  17. FLUORIDE TOXICITY – A HARSH REALITY

    OpenAIRE

    Bandlapalli Pavani; Mandava Ragini; David Banji; Otilia J F Banji; N Gouri Pratusha

    2011-01-01

    There are many incidents of fluoride toxicity whether it is acute or chronic. Fluoride toxicity is an environmental hazard which arises from the upper layers of geological crust and is dissolved in water. Prolonged drinking of such water causes chronic fluoride toxicity. Use of fluoride containing compounds for various purposes such as dental products, metal, glass, refrigerator and chemical industries act as a source of fluoride poisoning and increase the risk of toxicity. This review reflec...

  18. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Analysis of Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Undergoing Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Cisplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Daniel R.; Song, William Y.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Rose, Brent S.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J.; Mell, Loren K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that increased bowel radiation dose is associated with acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in cervical cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), using a previously derived normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model. Methods: Fifty patients with Stage I–III cervical cancer undergoing IMRT and concurrent weekly cisplatin were analyzed. Acute GI toxicity was graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, excluding upper GI events. A logistic model was used to test correlations between acute GI toxicity and bowel dosimetric parameters. The primary objective was to test the association between Grade ≥2 GI toxicity and the volume of bowel receiving ≥45 Gy (V 45 ) using the logistic model. Results: Twenty-three patients (46%) had Grade ≥2 GI toxicity. The mean (SD) V 45 was 143 mL (99). The mean V 45 values for patients with and without Grade ≥2 GI toxicity were 176 vs. 115 mL, respectively. Twenty patients (40%) had V 45 >150 mL. The proportion of patients with Grade ≥2 GI toxicity with and without V 45 >150 mL was 65% vs. 33% (p = 0.03). Logistic model parameter estimates V50 and γ were 161 mL (95% confidence interval [CI] 60–399) and 0.31 (95% CI 0.04–0.63), respectively. On multivariable logistic regression, increased V 45 was associated with an increased odds of Grade ≥2 GI toxicity (odds ratio 2.19 per 100 mL, 95% CI 1.04–4.63, p = 0.04). Conclusions: Our results support the hypothesis that increasing bowel V 45 is correlated with increased GI toxicity in cervical cancer patients undergoing IMRT and concurrent cisplatin. Reducing bowel V 45 could reduce the risk of Grade ≥2 GI toxicity by approximately 50% per 100 mL of bowel spared.

  19. Interdisciplinary Student/Teacher Materials in Energy, the Environment, and the Economy: 3, Energy, Engines, and the Industrial Revolution, Grades 8, 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Barbara; And Others

    This instructional unit for grades 8-9 combines science and social studies in a look at the broad social and economic upheavals that took place during the industrial revolution, giving special emphasis to the role of energy. The invention and development of the steam engine is highlighted in one lesson. Other lessons show how the industrial…

  20. A combined approach to investigate the toxicity of an industrial landfill's leachate: Chemical analyses, risk assessment and in vitro assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baderna, D.; Maggioni, S.; Boriani, E.; Gemma, S.; Molteni, M.; Lombardo, A.; Colombo, A.; Bordonali, S.; Rotella, G.; Lodi, M.; Benfenati, E.

    2011-01-01

    Solid wastes constitute an important and emerging problem. Landfills are still one of the most common ways to manage waste disposal. The risk assessment of pollutants from landfills is becoming a major environmental issue in Europe, due to the large number of sites and to the importance of groundwater protection. Furthermore, there is lack of knowledge for the environmental, ecotoxicological and toxicological characteristics of most contaminants contained into landfill leacheates. Understanding leachate composition and creating an integrated strategy for risk assessment are currently needed to correctly face the landfill issues and to make projections on the long-term impacts of a landfill, with particular attention to the estimation of possible adverse effects on human health and ecosystem. In the present study, we propose an integrated strategy to evaluate the toxicity of the leachate using chemical analyses, risk assessment guidelines and in vitro assays using the hepatoma HepG2 cells as a model. The approach was applied on a real case study: an industrial waste landfill in northern Italy for which data on the presence of leachate contaminants are available from the last 11 years. Results from our ecological risk models suggest important toxic effects on freshwater fish and small rodents, mainly due to ammonia and inorganic constituents. Our results from in vitro data show an inhibition of cell proliferation by leachate at low doses and cytotoxic effect at high doses after 48 h of exposure. - Research highlights: → We study the toxicity of leachate from a non-hazardous industrial waste landfill. → We perform chemical analyses, risk assessments and in vitro assays on HepG2 cells. → Risk models suggest toxic effects due to ammonia and inorganic constituents. → In vitro assays show that leachate inhibits cell proliferation at low doses. → Leachate can induce cytotoxic effects on HepG2 cells at high doses.

  1. The Leap into 4th Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Fourth grade is a pivotal year, in which students commonly face increased academic demands. According to Anderson, teachers can help students make a smooth transition to 4th grade by introducing these new challenges in ways that are in line with 4th graders' common developmental characteristics: incredible energy and emotion, industriousness and…

  2. Interaction, transformation and toxicity assessment of particles and additives used in the semiconducting industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Eduard; Karunaratne, Dinusha P; Babu, S V; Wallace, Kenneth N; Andreescu, Silvana

    2018-02-01

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is a widely used technique for the manufacturing of integrated circuit chips in the semiconductor industry. The process generates large amounts of waste containing engineered particles, chemical additives, and chemo-mechanically removed compounds. The environmental and health effects associated with the release of CMP materials are largely unknown and have recently become of significant concern. Using a zebrafish embryo assay, we established toxicity profiles of individual CMP particle abrasives (SiO 2 and CeO 2 ), chemical additives (hydrogen peroxide, proline, glycine, nicotinic acid, and benzotriazole), as well as three model representative slurries and their resulting waste. These materials were characterized before and after use in a typical CMP process in order to assess changes that may affect their toxicological profile and alter their surface chemistry due to polishing. Toxicity outcome in zebrafish is discussed in relation with the physicochemical characteristics of the abrasive particles and with the type and concentration profile of the slurry components pre and post-polishing, as well as the interactions between particle abrasives and additives. This work provides toxicological information of realistic CMP slurries and their polishing waste, and can be used as a guideline to predict the impact of these materials in the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermodynamic Modeling of Multi-phase Solid–Liquid Equilibria in Industrial-Grade Oils and Fats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Jeppe Lindegaard; Miller, Rasmus L.; Woodley, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Compositional thermodynamic phase separation is investigated for industrial-grade vegetable oils with complex compositions. Solid–liquid equilibria have been calculated by utilizing the Margules 2-suffix activity-coefficient model in combination with minimization of the Gibb’s free energy...... of the system. On the basis of quasi-equilibrium solid-fat content (SFC) measurements, a new approach to the estimation of the interaction parameters, needed for the activity-coefficient model, has been developed. The parameters are fitted by matching the SFC of two oils at various degrees of dilution...... and isothermal temperatures. Subsequently, the parameters are successfully validated against three oils, rich in asymmetric and symmetric triacylglycerols (TAG), respectively. The new approach developed is shown to be very flexible, allowing incorporation of additional TAG and polymorphic states. It thereby...

  4. Random Forests to Predict Rectal Toxicity Following Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ospina, Juan D.; Zhu, Jian; Chira, Ciprian; Bossi, Alberto; Delobel, Jean B.; Beckendorf, Véronique; Dubray, Bernard; Lagrange, Jean-Léon; Correa, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To propose a random forest normal tissue complication probability (RF-NTCP) model to predict late rectal toxicity following prostate cancer radiation therapy, and to compare its performance to that of classic NTCP models. Methods and Materials: Clinical data and dose-volume histograms (DVH) were collected from 261 patients who received 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer with at least 5 years of follow-up. The series was split 1000 times into training and validation cohorts. A RF was trained to predict the risk of 5-year overall rectal toxicity and bleeding. Parameters of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model were identified and a logistic regression model was fit. The performance of all the models was assessed by computing the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: The 5-year grade ≥2 overall rectal toxicity and grade ≥1 and grade ≥2 rectal bleeding rates were 16%, 25%, and 10%, respectively. Predictive capabilities were obtained using the RF-NTCP model for all 3 toxicity endpoints, including both the training and validation cohorts. The age and use of anticoagulants were found to be predictors of rectal bleeding. The AUC for RF-NTCP ranged from 0.66 to 0.76, depending on the toxicity endpoint. The AUC values for the LKB-NTCP were statistically significantly inferior, ranging from 0.62 to 0.69. Conclusions: The RF-NTCP model may be a useful new tool in predicting late rectal toxicity, including variables other than DVH, and thus appears as a strong competitor to classic NTCP models

  5. Electrocoagulation for the treatment of textile industry effluent--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandegar, V; Saroha, Anil K

    2013-10-15

    Various techniques such as physical, chemical, biological, advanced oxidation and electrochemical are used for the treatment of industrial effluent. The commonly used conventional biological treatment processes are time consuming, need large operational area and are not effective for effluent containing toxic elements. Advanced oxidation techniques result in high treatment cost and are generally used to obtain high purity grade water. The chemical coagulation technique is slow and generates large amount of sludge. Electrocoagulation has recently attracted attention as a potential technique for treating industrial effluent due to its versatility and environmental compatibility. This technique uses direct current source between metal electrodes immersed in the effluent, which causes the dissolution of electrode plates into the effluent. The metal ions, at an appropriate pH, can form wide range of coagulated species and metal hydroxides that destabilize and aggregate particles or precipitate and adsorb the dissolved contaminants. Therefore, the objective of the present manuscript is to review the potential of electrocoagulation for the treatment of industrial effluents, mainly removal of dyes from textile effluent. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Complex mixture-associated hormesis and toxicity: the case of leather tanning industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Giovanni; Castello, Giuseppe; Gallo, Marialuisa; Borriello, Ilaria; Guida, Marco

    2008-01-01

    A series of studies investigated the toxicities of tannery-derived complex mixtures, i.e. vegetable tannin (VT) from Acacia sp. or phenol-based synthetic tannin (ST), and waste-water from tannin-based vs. chromium-based tanneries. Toxicity was evaluated by multiple bioassays including developmental defects and loss of fertilization rate in sea urchin embryos and sperm (Paracentrotus lividus and Sphaerechinus granularis), and algal growth inhibition (Dunaliella tertiolecta and Selenastrum capricornutum). Both VT and ST water extracts resulted in hormetic effects at concentrations ranging 0.1 to 0.3%, and toxicity at levels > or =1%, both in sea urchin embryo and sperm, and in algal growth bioassays. When comparing tannin-based tannery wastewater (TTW) vs. chromium-based tannery effluent (CTE), a hormesis to toxicity trend was observed for TTW both in terms of developmental and fertilization toxicity in sea urchins, and in algal growth inhibition, with hormetic effects at 0.1 to 0.2% TTW, and toxicity at TTW levels > or =1%. Unlike TTW, CTE showed a monotonic toxicity increase from the lowest tested level (0.1%) and CTE toxicity at higher levels was significantly more severe than TTW-induced toxicity. The results support the view that leather production utilizing tannins might be regarded as a more environmentally friendly procedure than chromium-based tanning process.

  7. Thermophysical properties of composite fuel based on T grade coal (Alardinskoe deposit) and timber industry wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankovsky, S. A.; Tolokolnikov, A. A.; Gubin, V. E.; Slyusarskiy, K. V.; Zenkov, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    Results of experimental studies of composite fuel thermal decomposition processes based on T grade coal (Alardinskoe deposit) and timber industry wastes (fine wood) are presented. C, H, N, S weight percentage of each component of composite fuel was determined experimentally. It has been established that with an increase in wood concentration up to 50% in composite fuel, its energy characteristics decrease by less than 3.6%, while the yield of fly ash is 39.7%. An effective composite fuel composition has been defined as 50%/50%. Results of performed experimental studies suggest that it is possible to use composite fuels based on coal and wood at thermal power plants.

  8. Acute toxicity of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer: Impact of irradiated volume, type of surgery, sex and sequence of treatment modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fietkau, R.; Roedel, C.; Grabenbauer, G.G.; Kessler, H.; Martus, P.; Sauer, R.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: In an attempt to reduce acute toxicity of CRT for rectal cancer we retrospectively evaluated potential factors that influence the severity of toxic side-effects. Materials and Methods: Between 1987 and 1995, 120 patients (pts, 73 with primary tumor, 47 with recurrent disease) received CRT for rectal cancer. RT was given by 3-4 field box technique with 6-10 MV-photons. Daily fraction size was 180 cGy, total dose 5040 cGy including 540 cGy local boost. Dose was specified to the ICRU reference point. During the first and fifth week of RT 5-FU (1000 mg/m 2 /24 h) was administered by continuous infusion for 120 hours. 56 pts received preoperative CRT, 64 pts were treated postoperatively. Toxicity was recorded following (modified) WHO-criteria. Results: Acute grade 4 toxicity was limited to 3 pts (leukopenia, sepsis, arrhythmia). Acute grade 3 toxicity occurred mainly as diarrhea (33%), perineal skin reaction (37%), and leukopenia (9%). Extension of the treatment volume including paraaortic lymph nodes (L3) led to a significant increase of grade 3 diarrhea (68% vs. 25%, p = 0,0003) and grade 3 leukopenia (18% vs. 8%, p = 0,03). After abdominoperineal resection less pts suffered from grade 3 diarrhea (8% vs. 47% after sphincter-preserving procedures, p = 0,0006), whereas severe perineal erythema occurred more frequently (56% vs. 29%, p = 0,02). Women had significantly more toxic side effects (grade 3 diarrhea: 39% vs. 16% in men, p = 0.04; grade 2 to 3 nausea/emesis: 21% vs. 8% in men, p = 0.018; grade 2 to 3 leukopenia: 53% vs. 31% in men, p = 0, 02). After preoperative CRT a significant reduction of grade 3 diarrhea (11% vs. 29%, p = 0.03) and grade 3 erythema (16% vs. 41%, p = 0.04) was noted. Conclusion: In order to reduce acute treatment related toxicity preoperative CRT deserves further evaluation. Careful attention should be paid to the extension of treatment volume to the paraaortic region. Individual adjustment of 5-FU dosage by monitoring its systemic

  9. Toxic chemicals: risk prevention through use reduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Higgins, Thomas E; Sachdev, Jayanti A; Engleman, Stephen A

    2011-01-01

    "Catastrophic events such as the Bhopal, India tragedy and rising incidences of cancer in areas neighboring industrial facilities have heightened concern over the use of toxic chemicals in manufacturing and industry...

  10. Air toxics: A new concern for the utility industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torrens, I.; Chow, W.

    1992-01-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Acts Amendments call for EPA studies on utility emissions of potentially hazardous air pollutants and their impact, prior to any decision on regulation of these emissions. The Electric Power Research Institute is carrying out a comprehensive assessment of air toxics risk assessment, consisting of data compilation and analysis, field measurements of priority air toxics at power plants and test facilities, atmospheric transport and deposition, and health/ecological risk assessment. The paper reports on progress to data and objectives of the EPRI assessment

  11. The problem of industrial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdan, Fouad

    1998-01-01

    The paper is the result of a feasibility study conducted for the Green peace Office in Lebanon. The overall goal of the study was to work towards implementing a national waste management plan and to combat the import of hazardous wastes from developing countries.The author focuses on the illegal trade of industrial wastes from developed to under developed countries. The trade of toxic wastes causes on environmental pollution. As for Lebanese industries, the main problem is toxic industrial wastes. About 4000 tones/day of domestic wastes are produced in Lebanon. 326000 tones of industrial wastes contain toxic substances are annually produced and wastes growth rate is expected to increase to one million tone/year in 2010. A disaster is threatening Lebanon especially that no policy were taken to deal with the huge growth of wastes. This problem affect on population health especially in the region of Bourj Hammoud. Analysis of ground water in the region of Chekka, confirm the existence of water pollution caused by toxic materials In addition, analysis of Petro coke used in the National Lebanese Cement Industry, contain a high rate of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. Green peace is aware of the danger of wastes in air, water and land pollution and preventing environment of any source of pollution this will certainly lead to a sustainable development of the country

  12. Urinary and Rectal Toxicity Profiles After Permanent Iodine-125 Implant Brachytherapy in Japanese Men: Nationwide J-POPS Multi-institutional Prospective Cohort Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Toshio, E-mail: ohashi@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Yorozu, Atsunori; Saito, Shiro [National Hospital Organization Tokyo Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan); Tanaka, Nobumichi [Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Nara (Japan); Katayama, Norihisa [Okayama University School of Medicine, Okayama (Japan); Kojima, Shinsuke; Maruo, Shinichiro; Kikuchi, Takashi [Translational Research Informatics Center, Hyogo (Japan); Dokiya, Takushi [Kyoundo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Fukushima, Masanori [Translational Research Informatics Center, Hyogo (Japan); Yamanaka, Hidetoshi [Institutes of Preventive Medicine, Kurosawa Hospital, Gunma (Japan)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To assess, in a nationwide multi-institutional cohort study begun in 2005 and in which 6927 subjects were enrolled by 2010, the urinary and rectal toxicity profiles of subjects who enrolled during the first 2 years, and evaluate the toxicity profiles for permanent seed implantation (PI) and a combination therapy with PI and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Baseline data for 2339 subjects out of 2354 patients were available for the analyses. Toxicities were evaluated using the National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, and the International Prostate Symptom Scores were recorded prospectively until 36 months after radiation therapy. Results: Grade 2+ acute urinary toxicities developed in 7.36% (172 of 2337) and grade 2+ acute rectal toxicities developed in 1.03% (24 of 2336) of the patients. Grade 2+ late urinary and rectal toxicities developed in 5.75% (133 of 2312) and 1.86% (43 of 2312) of the patients, respectively. A higher incidence of grade 2+ acute urinary toxicity occurred in the PI group than in the EBRT group (8.49% vs 3.66%; P<.01). Acute rectal toxicity outcomes were similar between the treatment groups. The 3-year cumulative incidence rates for grade 2+ late urinary toxicities were 6.04% versus 4.82% for the PI and the EBRT groups, respectively, with no significant differences between the treatment groups. The 3-year cumulative incidence rates for grade 2+ late rectal toxicities were 0.90% versus 5.01% (P<.01) for the PI and the EBRT groups, respectively. The mean of the postimplant International Prostate Symptom Score peaked at 3 months, but it decreased to a range that was within 2 points of the baseline score, which was observed in 1625 subjects (69.47%) at the 1-year follow-up assessment. Conclusions: The acute urinary toxicities observed were acceptable given the frequency and retention, and the late rectal toxicities were more favorable than those of other

  13. Soil metal concentrations and toxicity: Associations with distances to industrial facilities and implications for human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aelion, C. Marjorie; Davis, Harley T.; McDermott, Suzanne; Lawson, Andrew B.

    2009-01-01

    Urban and rural areas may have different levels of environmental contamination and different potential sources of exposure. Many metals, i.e., arsenic (As), lead (Pb), and mercury (Hg), have well-documented negative neurological effects, and the developing fetus and young children are particularly at risk. Using a database of mother and child pairs, three areas were identified: a rural area with no increased prevalence of mental retardation and developmental delay (MR/DD) (Area A), and a rural area (Area B) and an urban area (Area C) with significantly higher prevalence of MR/DD in children as compared to the state-wide average. Areas were mapped and surface soil samples were collected from nodes of a uniform grid. Samples were analyzed for As, barium (Ba), beryllium (Be), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), Pb, manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), and Hg concentrations and for soil toxicity, and correlated to identify potential common sources. ArcGIS was used to determine distances between sample locations and industrial facilities, which were correlated with both metal concentrations and soil toxicity. Results indicated that all metal concentrations (except Be and Hg) in Area C were significantly greater than those in Areas A and B (p ≤ 0.0001) and that Area C had fewer correlations between metals suggesting more varied sources of metals than in rural areas. Area C also had a large number of facilities whose distances were significantly correlated with metals, particularly Cr (maximum r = 0.33; p = 0.0002), and with soil toxicity (maximum r = 0.25; p = 0.007) over a large spatial scale. Arsenic was not associated with distance to any facility and may have a different anthropogenic, or natural source. In contrast to Area C, both rural areas had lower concentrations of metals, lower soil toxicity, and a small number of facilities with significant associations between distance and soil metals

  14. Comparative analysis of pharmaceuticals versus industrial chemicals acute aquatic toxicity classification according to the United Nations classification system for chemicals. Assessment of the (Q)SAR predictability of pharmaceuticals acute aquatic toxicity and their predominant acute toxic mode-of-action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanderson, Hans; Thomsen, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    data. Pharmaceuticals were found to be more frequent than industrial chemicals in GHS category III. Acute toxicity was predictable (>92%) using a generic (Q)SAR ((Quantitative) Structure Activity Relationship) suggesting a narcotic MOA. Analysis of model prediction error suggests that 68...... a comprehensive database based on OECD's standardized measured ecotoxicological data and to evaluate if there is generally cause of greater concern with regards to pharmaceutical aquatic toxicological profiles relative to industrial chemicals. Comparisons were based upon aquatic ecotoxicity classification under...... the United Nations Global Harmonized System for classification and labeling of chemicals (GHS). Moreover, we statistically explored whether the predominant mode-of-action (MOA) for pharmaceuticals is narcosis. We found 275 pharmaceuticals with 569 acute aquatic effect data; 23 pharmaceuticals had chronic...

  15. Application of biotechnology in management of industrial wastes containing toxic metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, L L; Fekete, F A; Huybrechts, M M.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Biology; Sillerud, L O [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Blacke, II, R C [Meharry Medical Coll., Nashville, TN (United States); Pigg, C J [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The role of microorganisms in transformation and absorption of metals in the environment is examined in this article. Understanding the metabolic processes by which microorganisms interact with toxic metals is paramount for any bioremediation process dealing with restoration of toxic waste site. Bacteria, fungi, and yeast that displayed resistance to lead, mercury, or chromium were isolated from the environment. Cotolerance studies revealed that many of these organisms could grow in high concentrations of several different toxic elements. Transformation of chromium, mercury, and lead was displayed by means of the isolated bacterial strains. Data regarding the activities of these organisms can provide a basis for use of metal/tolerant organisms in bioremediation of toxic wastes containing mercury, chromium, and lead. (author) 1 fig., 7 tabs., 28 refs.

  16. Acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity of image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer using a daily water-filled endorectal balloon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deville, Curtiland; Both, Stefan; Bui, Viet; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Tan, Kay-See; Schaer, Mattia; Tochner, Zelig; Vapiwala, Neha

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose was to report acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity rates for prostate cancer patients undergoing image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) with a daily endorectal water-filled balloon (ERB H2O ), and assess associations with planning parameters and pretreatment clinical characteristics. The first 100 patients undergoing prostate and proximal seminal vesicle IG-IMRT with indexed-lumen 100 cc ERB H2O to 79.2 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions at our institution from 12/2008- 12/2010 were assessed. Pretreatment characteristics, organ-at-risk dose volume histograms, and maximum GU and GI toxicities (CTCAE 3.0) were evaluated. Logistic regression models evaluated univariate association between toxicities and dosimetric parameters, and uni- and multivariate association between toxicities and pretreatment characteristics. Mean age was 68 (range 51–88). Thirty-two, 49, and 19 patients were low, intermediate, and high-risk, respectively; 40 received concurrent androgen deprivation. No grade 3 or greater toxicities were recorded. Maximum GI toxicity was grade 0, 1, and 2 in 69%, 23%, and 8%, respectively. Infield (defined as 1 cm above/below the CTV) rectal mean/median doses, D75, V30, and V40 and hemorrhoid history were associated with grade 2 GI toxicity (Ps < 0.05). Maximum acute GU toxicity was grade 0, 1, and 2 for 17%, 41%, and 42% of patients, respectively. Infield bladder V20 (P = 0.03) and pretreatment International Prostate Symptom Scale (IPSS) (P = 0.003) were associated with grade 2 GU toxicity. Prostate IG-IMRT using a daily ERB H2O shows low rates of acute GI toxicity compared to previous reports of air-filled ERB IMRT when using stringent infield rectum constraints and comparable GU toxicities

  17. Systematic Review of Radiation Therapy Toxicity Reporting in Randomized Controlled Trials of Rectal Cancer: A Comparison of Patient-Reported Outcomes and Clinician Toxicity Reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, Alexandra, E-mail: a.gilbert@leeds.ac.uk [Leeds Institute of Cancer & Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Ziegler, Lucy; Martland, Maisie [Leeds Institute of Cancer & Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Davidson, Susan [The Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Efficace, Fabio [Italian Group for Adult Hematologic Diseases, Rome (Italy); Sebag-Montefiore, David; Velikova, Galina [Leeds Institute of Cancer & Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    The use of multimodal treatments for rectal cancer has improved cancer-related outcomes but makes monitoring toxicity challenging. Optimizing future radiation therapy regimens requires collection and publication of detailed toxicity data. This review evaluated the quality of toxicity information provided in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of radiation therapy in rectal cancer and focused on the difference between clinician-reported and patient-reported toxicity. Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched (January 1995-July 2013) for RCTs reporting late toxicity in patients treated with regimens including preoperative (chemo)radiation therapy. Data on toxicity measures and information on toxicity reported were extracted using Quantitative Analyses of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic recommendations. International Society for Quality of Life Research standards on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) were used to evaluate the quality of patient-reported toxicity. Twenty-one RCT publications met inclusion criteria out of 4144 articles screened. All PRO studies reported higher rates of toxicity symptoms than clinician-reported studies and reported on a wider range and milder symptoms. No clinician-reported study published data on sexual dysfunction. Of the clinician-reported studies, 55% grouped toxicity data related to an organ system together (eg “Bowel”), and 45% presented data only on more-severe (grade ≥3) toxicity. In comparison, all toxicity grades were reported in 79% of PRO publications, and all studies (100%) presented individual symptom toxicity data (eg bowel urgency). However, PRO reporting quality was variable. Only 43% of PRO studies presented baseline data, 28% did not use any psychometrically validated instruments, and only 29% of studies described statistical methods for managing missing data. Analysis of these trials highlights the lack of reporting standards for adverse events and reveals the differences between clinician and

  18. Source contribution and risk assessment of airborne toxic metals by neutron activation analysis in Taejeon industrial complex area - Concentration analysis and health risk assessment of airborne toxic metals in Taejeon 1,2 industrial Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Jang, M. S.; Nam, B. H.; Yun, M. J. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    The study centers on one-year continual concentration analysis using ICP-MS and on health risk assessment of 15 airborne toxic metals in Taejeon 1,2 industrial complex. About 1-year arithmetic mean of human carcinogen, arsenic, hexavalent chromium and nickel subsulfide is 6.05, 2.40 and 2.81 ng/m{sup 3} while the mean of probable human carcinogen, beryllium, cadmium and lead is 0.06, 3.92, 145.99 ng/m{sup 3}, respectively. And the long-term arithmetic mean concentration of non-carcinogenic metal, manganese is 44.60 ng/m{sup 3}. The point risk estimate for the inhalation of carcinogenic metals is 7.0 X10{sup -5}, which is higher than a risk standard of 10{sup -5}. The risk from human carcinogens is 6.2X10{sup -5}, while that from probable human carcinogens is 8.0X10{sup -6}, respectively. About 86 % of the cancer risk is due to the inhalation of human carcinogens, arsenic and hexavalent chromium. Thus, it is necessary to properly manage both arsenic and hexavalent chromium risk in Taejeon 1,2 industrial complex. 37 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs. (Author)

  19. 40 CFR 129.4 - Toxic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS TOXIC POLLUTANT EFFLUENT... material consisting of technical grade chlorinated camphene having the approximate formula of C10 H10 Cl8... molecule which has been chlorinated to varying degrees. [42 FR 2613, Jan. 12, 1977, as amended at 42 FR...

  20. Predictive factors for acute and late urinary toxicity after permanent interstitial brachytherapy in Japanese patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Ryuta; Bekku, Kensuke; Katayama, Norihisa

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the frequency of and to determine predictive factors associated with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group urinary toxicity in prostate brachytherapy patients. From January 2004 to April 2011, 466 consecutive Japanese patients underwent permanent iodine-125-seed brachytherapy (median follow up 48 months). International Prostate Symptom Score and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity data were prospectively collected. Prostate volume, International Prostate Symptom Score before and after brachytherapy, and postimplant analysis were examined for an association with urinary toxicity, defined as Radiation Therapy Oncology Group urinary toxicity of Grade 1 or higher. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the factors associated with urinary toxicity. The rate of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group urinary toxicity grade 1 or higher at 1, 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 months was 67%, 40%, 21%, 31%, 27% and 28%, respectively. Grade 2 or higher urinary toxicity was less than 1% at each time-point. International Prostate Symptom Score was highest at 3 months and returned to normal 12 months after brachytherapy. On multivariate analysis, patients with a larger prostate size, greater baseline International Prostate Symptom Score, higher prostate V100, higher prostate V150, higher prostate D90 and a greater number of seeds had more acute urinary toxicities at 1 month and 12 months after brachytherapy. On multivariate analysis, significant predictors for urinary toxicity at 1 month and 12 months were a greater baseline International Prostate Symptom Score and prostate V100. Most urinary symptoms are tolerated and resolved within 12 months after prostate brachytherapy. Acute and late urinary toxicity after brachytherapy is strongly related to the baseline International Prostate Symptom Score and prostate V100. (author)

  1. Quality of Life and Toxicity after SBRT for Organ-Confined Prostate Cancer, a Seven Year Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Jay Katz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT yields excellent disease control for lowandintermediate-risk prostate cancer by delivering high doses of radiation in a small number offractions. Our report presents a 7-year update on treatment toxicity and quality of life (QOLfrom 515 patients treated with prostate SBRT.Methods: From 2006 to 2009, 515 patients with clinically localized, low-, intermediate- andhigh-risk prostate cancer were treated with SBRT using Cyberknife technology. Treatmentconsisted of 35 to 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions. Seventy-two patients received hormone therapy.Toxicity was assessed at each follow up visit using the Expanded Prostate Cancer IndexComposite (EPIC questionnaire and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG urinaryand rectal toxicity scale.Results: Median follow up was 72 months. The actuarial 7-year freedom from biochemicalfailure was 95.8%, 89.3% and 68.5% for low-, intermediate- and high-risk groups, respectively(p < 0.001. No patients experienced acute Grade III or IV acute complications. Fewer than 5%of patients had any acute Grade II urinary or rectal toxicity. Late toxicity was low, with Grade IIrectal and urinary toxicity of 4% and 9.1%, respectively, and Grade III urinary toxicity of 1.7%.Mean EPIC urinary and bowel QOL declined at 1 month post-treatment, returned to baseline by2 years and remained stable thereafter. EPIC sexual QOL declined by 23% at 6-12 months andremained stable afterwards. Of patients potent at baseline evaluation, 67% remained potent atlast follow-up.Conclusions: This study suggests that SBRT, when administered to doses of 35 to 36.25 Gy, isefficacious and safe. With long-term follow up in our large patient cohort, we continue to findlow rates of late toxicity and excellent rates of biochemical control.

  2. Phase II trial of brachytherapy alone after lumpectomy for select breast cancer: Toxicity analysis of RTOG 95-17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuske, Robert R.; Winter, Kathryn; Arthur, Douglas W.; Bolton, John; Rabinovitch, Rachel; White, Julia; Hanson, William; Wilenzick, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) can be delivered with brachytherapy within 4-5 days compared with 5-6 weeks for conventional whole breast external beam radiotherapy. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 95-17 is the first prospective phase I-II cooperative group trial of APBI alone after lumpectomy in select patients with breast cancer. The toxicity rates are reported for low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) APBI on this trial. Methods and Materials:: The inclusion criteria for this study included invasive nonlobular tumors ≤3 cm after lumpectomy with negative surgical margins and axillary dissection with zero to three positive axillary nodes without extracapsular extension. The patients were treated with either LDR APBI (45 Gy in 3.5-5 days) or HDR APBI (34 Gy in 10 twice-daily fractions within 5 days). Chemotherapy (≥2 weeks after APBI) and/or tamoxifen could be given at the discretion of the treating physicians. Results: Between August 1997 and March 2000, 100 women were enrolled in this study, and 99 were evaluated. Of the 99 women, 33 were treated with LDR and 66 with HDR APBI. The median follow-up for all patients was 2.7 years (range, 0.6-4.4 years) and was 2.9 years for LDR and 2.7 years for HDR patients. Toxicities attributed to APBI included erythema, edema, tenderness, pain, and infection. Of the 66 patients treated with HDR APBI, 2 (3%) had Grade 3 or 4 toxicity. Of the 33 patients treated with LDR, 3 (9%) had Grade 3 or 4 toxicity during brachytherapy. Late toxicities included skin thickening, fibrosis, breast tenderness, and telangiectasias. No patient experienced late Grade 4 toxicity; the rate of Grade 3 toxicity was 18% for the LDR and 4% for the HDR groups. Conclusion: Acute and late toxicity for this invasive breast radiation technique was modest and acceptable. Patients receiving chemotherapy, a nonprotocol therapy, had a greater rate of Grade 3 toxicity. The study design did not allow for this to be tested

  3. Preliminary report of toxicity following 3D radiation therapy for prostate cancer on 3DOG/RTOG 9406

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalski, Jeff M.; Purdy, James A.; Winter, Kathryn; Roach, Mack; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Sandler, Howard M.; Markoe, Arnold M.; Ritter, Mark A.; Russell, Kenneth J.; Sailer, Scott; Harms, William B.; Perez, Carlos A.; Wilder, Richard B.; Hanks, Gerald E.; Cox, James D.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective Phase I dose escalation study was conducted to determine the maximally-tolerated radiation dose in men treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT) for localized prostate cancer. This is a preliminary report of toxicity encountered on the 3DOG/RTOG 9406 study. Methods and Materials: Each participating institution was required to implement data exchange with the RTOG 3D quality assurance (QA) center at Washington University in St. Louis. 3D CRT capabilities were strictly defined within the study protocol. Patients were registered according to three stratification groups: Group 1 patients had clinically organ-confined disease (T1,2) with a calculated risk of seminal vesicle invasion of < 15%. Group 2 patients had clinical T1,2 disease with risk of SV invasion ≥ 15%. Group 3 (G3) patients had clinical local extension of tumor beyond the prostate capsule (T3). All patients were treated with 3D techniques with minimum doses prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV). The PTV margins were 5-10 mm around the prostate for patients in Group 1 and 5-10 mm around the prostate and SV for Group 2. After 55.8 Gy, the PTV was reduced in Group 2 patients to 5-10 mm around the prostate only. Minimum prescription dose began at 68.4 Gy (level I) and was escalated to 73.8 Gy (level II) and subsequently to 79.2 Gy (level III). This report describes the acute and late toxicity encountered in Group 1 and 2 patients treated to the first two study dose levels. Data from RTOG 7506 and 7706 allowed calculation of the expected probability of observing a ≥ grade 3 late effect more than 120 days after the start of treatment. RTOG toxicity scores were used. Results: Between August 23, 1994 and July 2, 1997, 304 Group 1 and 2 cases were registered; 288 cases were analyzable for toxicity. Acute toxicity was low, with 53-54% of Group 1 patients having either no or grade 1 toxicity at dose levels I and II, respectively. Sixty-two percent of Group

  4. Machine grading of lumber : practical concerns for lumber producers

    Science.gov (United States)

    William L. Galligan; Kent A. McDonald

    2000-01-01

    Machine lumber grading has been applied in commercial operations in North America since 1963, and research has shown that machine grading can improve the efficient use of wood. However, industry has been reluctant to apply research findings without clear evidence that the change from visual to machine grading will be a profitable one. For instance, mill managers need...

  5. Use of commercial grade item dedication to reduce procurement costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosch, F.

    1995-01-01

    In the mid-1980s, the Nuclear Regulatory Industry (NRC) began inspecting utility practices of procuring and dedicating commercial grade items intended for plant safety-related applications. As a result of the industry efforts to address NRC concerns, nuclear utilities have enhanced existing programs and procedures for dedication of commercial grade items. Though these programs were originally enhanced to meet NRC concerns, utilities have discovered that the dedication of commercial grade items can also reduce overall procurement costs. This paper will discuss the enhancement of utility dedication programs and demonstrates how utilities have utilized them to reduce procurement costs

  6. Identification of water soluble and particle bound compounds causing sublethal toxic effects. A field study on sediments affected by a chlor-alkali industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosch, Carme; Olivares, Alba; Faria, Melissa; Navas, Jose M.; Olmo, Ivan del; Grimalt, Joan O.; Pina, Benjamin; Barata, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    A combination of cost effective sublethal Daphnia magna feeding tests, yeast- and cell culture-based bioassays and Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) procedures was used to characterize toxic compounds within sediments collected in a river area under the influence of the effluents from a chlor-alkali industry (Ebro River, NE Spain). Tests were designed to measure and identify toxic compounds in the particulate and filtered water fractions of sediment elutriates. The combined use of bioassays responding to elutriates and dioxin-like compounds evidenced the existence of three major groups of hazardous contaminants in the most contaminated site: (A) metals such as cadmium and mercury bound to sediment fine particles that could be easily resuspended and moved downstream, (B) soluble compounds (presumably, lye) able to alkalinize water to toxic levels, and (C) organochlorine compounds with high dioxin-like activity. These results provided evidence that elutriate D. magna feeding responses can be used as surrogate assays for more tedious chronic whole sediment tests, and that the incorporation of such tests in sediment TIE procedures may improve the ability to identify the toxicity of particle-bound and water-soluble contaminants in sediments.

  7. The Impact of Pretreatment Prostate Volume on Severe Acute Genitourinary Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizer, Ayal A.; Anderson, Nicole S.; Oh, Steven C.; Yu, James B.; McKeon, Anne M.; Decker, Roy H.; Peschel, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of pretreatment prostate volume on the development of severe acute genitourinary toxicity in patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2007, a consecutive sample of 214 patients who underwent IMRT (75.6 Gy) for prostate cancer at two referral centers was analyzed. Prostate volumes were obtained from computed tomography scans taken during treatment simulation. Genitourinary toxicity was defined using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 3.0 guidelines. Acute toxicity was defined as any toxicity originating within 90 days of the completion of radiation therapy. Patients were characterized as having a small or large prostate depending on whether their prostate volume was less than or greater than 50 cm 3 , respectively. Genitourinary toxicity was compared in these groups using the chi-square or Fisher's exact test, as appropriate. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to further assess the impact of prostate volume on severe (Grade 3) acute genitourinary toxicity. Results: Patients with large prostates (>50 cm 3 ) had a higher rate of acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity (p = .02). Prostate volume was predictive of the likelihood of developing acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity on bivariate (p = .004) and multivariate (p = .006) logistic regression. Every 27.0 cm 3 increase in prostate volume doubled the likelihood of acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity. Conclusions: Patients with larger prostates are at higher risk for the development of severe acute genitourinary toxicity when treated with IMRT for prostate cancer.

  8. The dose-volume relationship of acute small bowel toxicity from concurrent 5-FU-based chemotherapy and radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baglan, Kathy L.; Frazier, Robert C.; Yan Di; Huang, Raywin R.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Robertson, John M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: A direct relationship between the volume of small bowel irradiated and the degree of acute small bowel toxicity experienced during concurrent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiotherapy for rectal carcinoma is well recognized but poorly quantified. This study uses three-dimensional treatment-planning tools to more precisely quantify this dose-volume relationship. Methods and Materials: Forty patients receiving concurrent 5-FU-based chemotherapy and pelvic irradiation for rectal carcinoma had treatment-planning CT scans with small bowel contrast. A median isocentric dose of 50.4 Gy was delivered using a posterior-anterior and opposed lateral field arrangement. Bowel exclusion techniques were routinely used, including prone treatment position on a vacuum bag cradle to allow anterior displacement of the abdominal contents and bladder distension. Individual loops of small bowel were contoured on each slice of the planning CT scan, and a small bowel dose-volume histogram was generated for the initial pelvis field receiving 45 Gy. The volume of small bowel receiving each dose between 5 and 40 Gy was recorded at 5-Gy intervals. Results: Ten patients (25%) experienced Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 3+ acute small bowel toxicity. A highly statistically significant association between the development of Grade 3+ acute small bowel toxicity and the volume of small bowel irradiated was found at each dose level. Specific dose-volume threshold levels were found, below which no Grade 3+ toxicity occurred and above which 50-60% of patients developed Grade 3+ toxicity. The volume of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy (V 15 ) was strongly associated with the degree of toxicity. Univariate analysis of patient and treatment-related factors revealed no other significant predictors of severe toxicity. Conclusions: A strong dose-volume relationship exists for the development of Grade 3+ acute small bowel toxicity in patients receiving concurrent 5-FU-based chemoradiotherapy

  9. Acute genitourinary toxicity after high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer: Second analysis to determine the correlation between the urethral dose in HDR brachytherapy and the severity of acute genitourinary toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Noda, Shin-ei; Ito, Kazuto; Yamamoto, Takumi; Kashiwagi, Bunzo; Nakano, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We have been treating localized prostate cancer with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) at our institution. We recently reported the existence of a correlation between the severity of acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity and the urethral radiation dose in HDR brachytherapy by using different fractionation schema. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of the urethral dose in the development of acute GU toxicity more closely than in previous studies. For this purpose, we conducted an analysis of patients who had undergone HDR brachytherapy with a fixed fractionation schema combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Methods and Materials: Among the patients with localized prostate cancer who were treated by 192-iridium HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT at Gunma University Hospital between August 2000 and November 2004, we analyzed 67 patients who were treated by HDR brachytherapy with the fractionation schema of 9 Gy x two times combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Hypofractionated EBRT was administered at a fraction dose of 3 Gy three times weekly, and a total dose of 51 Gy was delivered to the prostate gland and seminal vesicles using the four-field technique. No elective pelvic irradiation was performed. After the completion of EBRT, all the patients additionally received transrectal ultrasonography-guided HDR brachytherapy. The planning target volume was defined as the prostate gland with a 5-mm margin all around, and the planning was conducted based on computed tomography images. The tumor stage was T1c in 13 patients, T2 in 31 patients, and T3 in 23 patients. The Gleason score was 2-6 in 12 patients, 7 in 34 patients, and 8-10 in 21 patients. Androgen ablation was performed in all the patients. The median follow-up duration was 11 months (range 3-24 months). The toxicities were graded based on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organization

  10. Toxic emissions during co-combustion of biomass-waste wood-lignite blends in an industrial boiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaras, P; Skodras, G; Sakellaropoulos, G P; Blumenstock, M; Schramm, K W; Kettrup, A

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to study the PCDD/F emissions during the co-combustion of waste wood/coal co-combustion in an industrial boiler and to determine the relation of the toxic emissions to the fuel properties. Co-combustion experiments were performed in a 13.8 MWthermal industrial moving grate combustor. The fuels which were examined in this study included Greek lignite, natural uncontaminated wood, power poles and medium density fibers (MDFs) which were by-products of the plant production process. Fuel blends were prepared by mixing single components in various concentrations. PCDD/F emissions were collected during experimental runs and were analyzed according to standard methods. Low PCDD/F emissions were obtained during the co-combustion tests, lower than the limit value of 0.1 ng TEQ/Nm3. The lowest values were observed during the combustion of fuel blends containing MDF, possibly due to the inhibitory action of some of the N-containing MDF ingredients, such as urea. No direct correlation was found between the PCDD/F and the copper emissions, while examination of the PCDD/F homologue patterns revealed the predominance of the lower chlorinated isomers over the higher ones.

  11. Industrial pollution load assessment in Phnom Penh, Cambodia using an industrial pollution projection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San, Vibol; Spoann, Vin; Schmidt, Johannes

    2018-02-15

    Approximately 56% out of the total 1302 Cambodian firms are operated in the Capital city of Cambodia. The necessary information on industrial pollution to set strategies, priorities and action plans on environmental protection issues is absent in Cambodia. In the absence of this data, effective environmental protection cannot be implemented. The objective of this study is to estimate industrial pollution load by employing the Industrial Pollution Projection System, a rapid environmental management tool for assessment of pollution load, to produce a scientific rational basis for preparing future policy direction to reduce industrial pollution in Phnom Penh city. Factory data between 1994 and 2014 obtained from the Ministry of Industry and Handicraft of Cambodia were used in our study. Due to the high number of employees, the total environmental load generated in Phnom Penh city was estimated to be 476,981Mg in 2014. Phnom Penh city generated 189,109Mg of VOC, 165,411Mg of toxic chemicals to air, 38,523Mg of toxic chemicals to land, and 28,968Mg of SO 2 in 2014. The results of the estimation show that the Textiles and Apparel sector was the highest generators of toxic chemicals into land and air, and toxic metals into land, air and water, while the Basic Metal sector was the greatest contributor of toxic chemicals to water. The Textiles and Apparel sector alone emitted 436,016Mg of total pollution load. The results indicate that the Dangkao and Meanchey districts were the greatest emitters of all pollutants in Phnom Penh. The results suggest that reduction in industrial pollution could be achieved by focusing on the most polluting sectors and areas. Adopting waste minimization strategies, which include cleaner production processes, will not only reduce the cost of controlling pollution, it will also make manufacturing more efficient thereby increasing profits while reducing pollution load in the long run. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Acute Toxicity in Definitive Versus Postprostatectomy Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Jonathan C.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Nguyen, Khanh H.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) injury and the dose-volume response in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with image-guided radiotherapy using helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between November 2004 and March 2007, 146 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with helical tomotherapy at the City of Hope Medical Center. Of the 146 patients, 70 had undergone prostatectomy. Acute GI and GU toxicities were evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Cancer of Medical scoring system. Events were scored for patients developing Grade 2 or greater morbidity within 90 days after the end of radiotherapy (RT). The dosimetric parameters included the minimal dose received by the highest 10%, 20%, 50%, 80%, and 90% of the target volume, the mean rectal dose, minimal rectal dose, maximal rectal dose, and the volume receiving ≥45, ≥65, and ≥70 Gy. These variables, plus the status of radical prostatectomy, hormonal therapy, RT techniques, and medical conditions, were included in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. A goodness-of-fit evaluation was done using the Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic. Results: A dose-response function for acute GI toxicity was elicited. The acute GI Grade 2 or greater toxicity was lower in the definitive RT group than in the postoperative RT group (25% vs. 41%, p <0.05). Acute GU Grade 2 or greater toxicity was comparable between the two groups. No grade 3 or greater complications were observed. No dosimetric variable was significant for GU toxicity. For acute GI toxicity, the significant dosimetric parameters were the minimal dose received by 10%, 20%, and 50% of the target volume and the mean rectal dose; the most predictive parameter was the minimal dose received by 10% of the target volume. The dose-modifying factor was 1.2 for radical prostatectomy. Conclusion: The results of our

  13. Anatomy-based inverse planning dose optimization in HDR prostate implant: A toxicity study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoudieh, Alireza; Tremblay, Christine; Beaulieu, Luc; Lachance, Bernard; Harel, Francois; Lessard, Etienne; Pouliot, Jean; Vigneault, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the acute and late complications in patients who have received HDR implant boost using inverse planning, and to determine dose volume correlations. Patients and methods: Between September 1999 and October 2002, 44 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer (PSA ≥10 ng/ml, and/or Gleason score ≥7, and/or Stage T2c or higher) were treated with 40-45 Gy external pelvic field followed by 2-3 fraction of inverse-planned HDR implant boost (6-9.5 Gy /fraction). Median follow-up time was 1.7 years with 81.8% of patients who had at least 12 months of follow up (range 8.6-42.5. Acute and late morbidity data were collected and graded according to RTOG criteria. Questionnaires were used to collect prostate related measures of quality of life, and international prostate symptom score (IPSS) before and after treatment. Dose-volume histograms for prostate, urethra, bladder, penis bulb and rectum were analyzed. Results: The median patient age was 64 years. Of these, 32% were in the high risk group, and 61% in the intermediate risk group. 3 patients (7%) had no adverse prognostic factors. A single grade 3 GU acute toxicity was reported but no grade 3-4 acute GI toxicity. No grade 3-4 late GU or GI toxicity was reported. Acute (late) grade 2 urinary and rectal symptoms were reported in 31.8 (11.4%) and 4.6% (4.6%) of patients, respectively. A trend for predicting acute GU toxicity is seen for total HDR dose of more than 18 Gy (OR=3.6, 95%CI=[0.96-13.5], P=0.058). The evolution of toxicity is presented for acute and late GU/GI toxicity. Erectile dysfunction occurs in approximately 27% of patients who were not on hormonal deprivation, but may be taking sildenafil. The IPSS peaked on averaged 6 weeks post-implant and returned to the baseline at a median of 6 months. Conclusions: Inverse-planned HDR brachytherapy is a viable option to deliver higher dose to the prostate as a boost without increasing GU or rectal

  14. Ability of radiation therapists to assess radiation-induced skin toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, Urvi; Cox, Jennifer; Rinks, Marianne; Gaur, Pankaj; Back, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy has seen enhancement of the radiation therapist (RT) role, with RTs and nurses performing duties that were traditionally in the radiation oncologist's (RO) domain. This study aimed to assess whether RTs can consistently grade radiation-induced skin toxicity and their concordance with the gradings given by ROs. Digital photographs of skin reactions were taken at weeks 1, 3 and 6 of radiotherapy on nine patients with breast cancer. The randomly ordered photographs were reviewed once by eight ROs and four RO registrars and on two occasions separated by 6 weeks by 17 RTs. All graded the skin toxicities using the revised Radiation Therapy Oncology Group system. No significant difference was seen between the median scores of the RTs at the first scoring session and the RO/Registrar group. The RTs at both measurement times showed greater inter-rater reliability than the RO/Registrars (W=0.6866, time 1 and 0.6981 time 2, vs. 0.6517), with the experienced RTs the most consistent (W=0.7078). The RTs also showed high intra-rater reliability (rho=0.8461, P<0.0010). These results from RTs with no specific preparation indicate that experienced RTs could assess breast cancer skin toxicity as part of their role.

  15. TU-F-12A-09: GLCM Texture Analysis for Normal-Tissue Toxicity: A Prospective Ultrasound Study of Acute Toxicity in Breast-Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T; Yang, X; Curran, W; Torres, M [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the morphologic and structural integrity of the breast glands using sonographic textural analysis, and identify potential early imaging signatures for radiation toxicity following breast-cancer radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Thirty-eight patients receiving breast RT participated in a prospective ultrasound imaging study. Each participant received 3 ultrasound scans: 1 week before RT (baseline), and at 6-week and 3-month follow-ups. Patients were imaged with a 10-MHz ultrasound on the four quadrant of the breast. A second order statistical method of texture analysis, called gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), was employed to assess RT-induced breast-tissue toxicity. The region of interest (ROI) was 28 mm × 10 mm in size at a 10 mm depth under the skin. Twenty GLCM sonographic features, ratios of the irradiated breast and the contralateral breast, were used to quantify breast-tissue toxicity. Clinical assessment of acute toxicity was conducted using the RTOG toxicity scheme. Results: Ninety-seven ultrasound studies (776 images) were analyzed; and 5 out of 20 sonographic features showed significant differences (p < 0.05) among the baseline scans, the acute toxicity grade 1 and 2 groups. These sonographic features quantified the degree of tissue damage through homogeneity, heterogeneity, randomness, and symmetry. Energy ratio value decreased from 108±0.05 (normal) to 0.99±0.05 (Grade 1) and 0.84±0.04 (Grade 2); Entropy ratio value increased from 1.01±0.01 to 1.02±0.01 and 1.04±0.01; Contrast ratio value increased from 1.03±0.03 to 1.07±0.06 and 1.21±0.09; Variance ratio value increased from 1.06±0.03 to 1.20±0.04 and 1.42±0.10; Cluster Prominence ratio value increased from 0.98±0.02 to 1.01±0.04 and 1.25±0.07. Conclusion: This work has demonstrated that the sonographic features may serve as imaging signatures to assess radiation-induced normal tissue damage. While these findings need to be validated in a larger cohort, they suggest

  16. Nasal manifestations in chromium industry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyer, R G; Kumar, Gaurav

    2003-04-01

    People working in mines, plating factories, cement industries are mainly exposed to chrome substances, IIexavalent chromium has been implicated for its toxic effect on the nasal mucosa. Hereby we present a rare study of 28 patients who attended out patient department of Otorhinolaryngology at SSG Hospital, Baroda from a nearby chromium industry. This study aims to present various nasal manifestations of toxic effects of prolonged chromium exposure.

  17. phytochemical composition and acute toxicity evaluation of aqueous

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    2012-12-02

    Dec 2, 2012 ... based upon single chemicals, many medicinal and aromatic plants exert their ... metaphorically used to describe toxic effects on larger and more complex ..... Chemical Industries. Branch, Division of Industrial Operations,.

  18. Impact of Industrial Grade Modified PVA to Vinyl Acetate Semi-continuous Emulsion Polymerization and Properties of Final Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas DUBININKAS

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Successful vinyl acetate radical emulsion polymerization in water with different type of industrial grade poly(vinyl alcohol were produced by semi continuous way. The poly(vinyl alcohol type has crucial impact on dispersion rheological as well on films and bonding strength properties. It should be stated that the films containing modified poly (vinyl alcohol has better water resistance and mechanical properties. Poly(vinyl alcohol with higher ethylene moieties content and high hydrolization degree determines extremely low viscosity of final dispersion.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.1.3823

  19. Quality of Life and Toxicity From Passively Scattered and Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, Thomas J.; Munsell, Mark F.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quyhn Nhu; Mathai, Benson; Zhu, X. Ron; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Amos, Richard A.; Dong, Lei; Mahmood, Usama; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.; Hoffman, Karen E.; McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after proton beam therapy. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ≥0.5 × baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence of modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ≥2 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity and argon plasma coagulation were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 226 men received PSPT, and 65 received SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was 1 grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade ≥3 GI or GU toxicity. Argon plasma coagulation application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs SSPT 1.5%; P=.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion: Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ≥2 GI or GU toxicity, with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long-term comparative results in a

  20. Intensity-modulated arc therapy with cisplatin as neo-adjuvant treatment for primary irresectable cervical cancer. Toxicity, tumour response and outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandecasteele, K.; Eijkeren, M. van; Meerleer, G. de [Ghent University Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Makar, A.; Broecke, R. van den; Tummers, P. [Ghent University Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Gynecology; Delrue, L. [Ghent University Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology; Denys, H. [Ghent University Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Medical Oncology; Lambein, K. [Ghent University Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Pathology; Lambert, B. [Ghent University Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The goal of this work was to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of intensity-modulated arc therapy {+-} cisplatin (IMAT {+-} C) followed by hysterectomy for locally advanced cervical cancer. Patients and methods: A total of 30 patients were included in the study. The primary tumour and PET-positive lymph node(s) received a simultaneous integrated boost. Four weeks after IMAT {+-} C treatment, response was evaluated. Resection consisted of hysterectomy with or without lymphadenectomy. Tumour response, acute and late radiation toxicity, postoperative morbidity and outcome were evaluated. Results: All hysterectomy specimens were macroscopically tumour-free with negative resection margins; pathological complete response was 40%. In 2 patients, one resected lymph node was positive. There was no excess in postoperative morbidity. Apart from two grade 3 hematologic toxicities, no grade 3 or 4 acute radiation toxicity was observed. No grade 3, 1 grade 4 (4%) intestinal, and 4 grade 3 (14%) urinary late toxicities were observed. The 2-year local and regional control rates were 96% and 100%, respectively. The 2-year distant control rate was 92%. Actuarial 2-year progression free survival rate was 89%. Actuarial 1- and 2-year overall survival rates were 96% and 91%, while 3-year overall survival was 84%. Conclusion: Surgery after IMAT {+-} C is feasible with low postoperative morbidity and radiation toxicity. Local, regional, distant control and survival rates are promising. (orig.)

  1. MONITORING THE AIR FOR TOXIC AND GENOTOXIC COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A time-integrated sampling system interfaced with a toxicity-based assay is reported for monitoring volatile toxic industrial chemicals (TICs). Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the fill solvent accumulated each of 17 TICs from the vapor p...

  2. Standardized Total Average Toxicity Score: A Scale- and Grade-Independent Measure of Late Radiotherapy Toxicity to Facilitate Pooling of Data From Different Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, Gillian C., E-mail: gillbarnett@doctors.org.uk [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); West, Catharine M.L. [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Coles, Charlotte E. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Pharoah, Paul D.P. [Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Talbot, Christopher J. [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Elliott, Rebecca M. [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Tanteles, George A. [Department of Clinical Genetics, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Symonds, R. Paul [Department of Cancer Studies and Molecular Medicine, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Jennifer S. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Dunning, Alison M. [Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Burnet, Neil G. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bentzen, Soren M. [University of Wisconsin, School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Human Oncology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The search for clinical and biologic biomarkers associated with late radiotherapy toxicity is hindered by the use of multiple and different endpoints from a variety of scoring systems, hampering comparisons across studies and pooling of data. We propose a novel metric, the Standardized Total Average Toxicity (STAT) score, to try to overcome these difficulties. Methods and Materials: STAT scores were derived for 1010 patients from the Cambridge breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy trial and 493 women from University Hospitals of Leicester. The sensitivity of the STAT score to detect differences between patient groups, stratified by factors known to influence late toxicity, was compared with that of individual endpoints. Analysis of residuals was used to quantify the effect of these covariates. Results: In the Cambridge cohort, STAT scores detected differences (p < 0.00005) between patients attributable to breast volume, surgical specimen weight, dosimetry, acute toxicity, radiation boost to tumor bed, postoperative infection, and smoking (p < 0.0002), with no loss of sensitivity over individual toxicity endpoints. Diabetes (p = 0.017), poor postoperative surgical cosmesis (p = 0.0036), use of chemotherapy (p = 0.0054), and increasing age (p = 0.041) were also associated with increased STAT score. When the Cambridge and Leicester datasets were combined, STAT was associated with smoking status (p < 0.00005), diabetes (p = 0.041), chemotherapy (p = 0.0008), and radiotherapy boost (p = 0.0001). STAT was independent of the toxicity scale used and was able to deal with missing data. There were correlations between residuals of the STAT score obtained using different toxicity scales (r > 0.86, p < 0.00005 for both datasets). Conclusions: The STAT score may be used to facilitate the analysis of overall late radiation toxicity, from multiple trials or centers, in studies of possible genetic and nongenetic determinants of radiotherapy toxicity.

  3. Moist skin care can diminish acute radiation-induced skin toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momm, F.; Weissenberger, C.; Bertelt, S.; Henke, M.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Radiation treatment may induce acute skin reactions. There are several methods of managing them. Validity of these methods, however, is not sufficiently studied. We therefore investigated, whether moist skin care with 3% urea lotion will reduce acute radiation skin toxicity. Patients and Methods: 88 patients with carcinomas of the head and neck undergoing radiotherapy with curative intent (mean total dose 60 Gy, range: 50-74 Gy) were evaluated weekly for acute skin reactions according to the RTOG-CTC score. In 63 patients, moist skin care with 3% urea lotion was performed. The control group consisted of 25 patients receiving conventional dry skin care. The incidence of grade I, II, and III reactions and the radiation dose at occurrence of a particular reaction were determined and statistically analyzed using the log-rank test. The dose-time relations of individual skin reactions are described. Results: At some point of time during radiotherapy, all patients suffered from acute skin reactions grade I, > 90% from grade II reactions. 50% of patients receiving moist skin care experienced grade I reactions at 26 Gy as compared to 22 Gy in control patients (p = 0.03). Grade II reactions occurred at 51 Gy versus 34 Gy (p = 0.006). Further, 22% of the patients treated with moist skin care suffered from acute skin toxicity grade III as compared to 56% of the controls (p = 0.0007). Conclusion: Moist skin care with 3% urea lotion delays the occurrence and reduces the grade of acute skin reactions in percutaneously irradiated patients with head and neck tumors. (orig.)

  4. Sarcopenia is linked to treatment toxicity in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Maximilien; Antoun, Sami; Dalban, Cécile; Malka, David; Mansourbakht, Touraj; Zaanan, Aziz; Latko, Ewa; Taieb, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy toxicity could be linked to decreased skeletal muscle (sarcopenia). We evaluated the effect of sarcopenia on chemotherapy toxicity among metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. All consecutive mCRC patients in 3 hospitals were enrolled in this prospective, cross-sectional, multicenter study. Several nutritional indexes and scores were generated. Computed tomography (CT) images were analyzed to evaluate cross-sectional areas of muscle tissue (MT), visceral adipose tissue (VAT), and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT). Toxicities were evaluated in the 2 mo following clinical evaluation. Fifty-one mCRC patients were included in the study. Sarcopenia was observed in 71% of patients (39% of women and 82% of men) whereas only 4% and 18% were considered as underweight using body mass index (BMI) or severely malnourished using the Nutritional Risk Index (NRI), respectively. Grade 3-4 toxicities were observed in 28% of patients. In multivariate analysis including age, sex, BMI, sarcopenia, SAT, and VAT, the only factor associated with Grade 3-4 toxicities was sarcopenia (odds ratio = 13.55; 95% confidence interval [1.08; 169.31], P = 0.043). In mCRC patients undergoing chemotherapy, sarcopenia was much more frequently observed than visible malnutrition. Despite the small number of patients included in our study, we found sarcopenia to be significantly associated with severe chemotherapy toxicity.

  5. Definitive Reirradiation for Locoregionally Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer With Proton Beam Therapy or Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: Predictors of High-Grade Toxicity and Survival Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAvoy, Sarah; Ciura, Katherine; Wei, Caimiao; Rineer, Justin; Liao, Zhongxing; Chang, Joe Y.; Palmer, Matthew B.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: DGomez@mdanderson.org

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Intrathoracic recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after initial treatment remains a dominant cause of death. We report our experience using proton beam therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy for reirradiation in such cases, focusing on patterns of failure, criteria for patient selection, and predictors of toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 patients underwent reirradiation for intrathoracic recurrent NSCLC at a single institution. All doses were recalculated to an equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD2). All patients had received radiation therapy for NSCLC (median initial dose of 70 EQD2 Gy), with median interval to reirradiation of 17 months and median reirradiation dose of 60.48 EQD2 Gy. Median follow-up time was 6.5 months (range, 0-72 months). Results: Ninety-nine patients (97%) completed reirradiation. Median local failure-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and overall survival times were 11.43 months (range, 8.6-22.66 months), 11.43 months (range, 6.83-23.84 months), and 14.71 (range, 10.34-20.56 months), respectively. Toxicity was acceptable, with rates of grade ≥3 esophageal toxicity of 7% and grade ≥3 pulmonary toxicity of 10%. Of the patients who developed local failure after reirradiation, 88% had failure in either the original or the reirradiation field. Poor local control was associated with T4 disease, squamous histology, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score >1. Concurrent chemotherapy improved DMFS, but T4 disease was associated with poor DMFS. Higher T status, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≥1, squamous histology, and larger reirradiation target volumes led to worse overall survival; receipt of concurrent chemotherapy and higher EQD2 were associated with improved OS. Conclusions: Intensity modulated radiation therapy and proton beam therapy are options for treating recurrent non-small cell lung cancer. However, rates of

  6. Potential of Reinforced Indonesian Glulam Beams Using Grade I (Bengkirai, Grade II (Kamper, Grade III (Nyatoh Woods for Use in Structural Wood Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saptahari Sugiri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Wood is a natural resource that is renewable and available in various species in tropical countries. Its abundancy in nature makes it easy to obtain, thus making it a nature friendly material for use in construction. Indonesia is the most important source of tropical wood in the world after Brazil, making the use of wood for structural elements very desirable. It is estimated that 4000 different varieties of wood exist in Indonesia. This estimate is based on the herbarium species collected by the Forestry Research Institute, currently counting nearly 4000 types of trees with a diameter of more than 40 cm. In the Indonesian wood structure code, the strength of woods is divided into 3 grades (grade I, II and III. This paper presents an evaluation of the mechanical properties of glulam wood sourced from native Indonesian timber: Bengkirai wood (grade I, Kamper wood (grade II, and Nyatoh wood (grade III, thus proving the potential for Indonesian wood as industrial structural elements in wooden constructions.

  7. Toxicity evaluation and prediction of toxic chemicals on activated sludge system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bijing; Xie, Li; Yang, Dianhai; Arcangeli, Jean-Pierre

    2010-05-15

    The gaps of data for evaluating toxicity of new or overloaded organic chemicals on activated sludge system resulted in the requirements for methodology of toxicity estimation. In this study, 24 aromatic chemicals typically existed in the industrial wastewater were selected and classified into three groups of benzenes, phenols and anilines. Their toxicity on activated sludge was then investigated. Two indexes of IC(50-M) and IC(50-S) were determined respectively from the respiration rates of activated sludge with different toxicant concentration at mid-term (24h) and short-term (30min) time intervals. Experimental results showed that the group of benzenes was the most toxic, followed by the groups of phenols and anilines. The values of IC(50-M) of the tested chemicals were higher than those of IC(50-S). In addition, quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) models developed from IC(50-M) were more stable and accurate than those of IC(50-S). The multiple linear models based on molecular descriptors and K(ow) presented better reliability than single linear models based on K(ow). Among these molecular descriptors, E(lumo) was the most important impact factor for evaluation of mid-term toxicity. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Toxic Effects of Peracetic Acid Used as a Chemical Weapon During Workers Riots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovic-Stosic, J.; Todorovic, V.; Segrt, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is a mixture of acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, often used as antimicrobial agent on food processing equipment. It may explosively decompose on shock, friction or concussion. PAA is a strong oxidant, corrosive to the eyes, skin, respiratory and digestive tract. Depending on concentration, contact may cause severe burns of the skin or the eyes, and inhalation may cause lung edema. We report toxic effects of PAA used as a chemical weapon in workers riots. Group of workers attacked the security guards in beverage plant, throwing out beer bottles filled with PAA. Bottles exploded, producing irritant mists and fumes, and splashing some of the guards with acid. After about 20 minutes of exposure in the closed space, 30 persons were transported to the emergency room; 22 of them were transferred to the hospital. After the initial treatment, 10 patients were admitted for further treatment. The symptoms of exposure included burning sensation and pain of the eyes, throat and skin, cough and shortness of breath. Effects on the eyes included redness and corneal erosions. Pulmonary disturbances were prolonged expirium and wheezing by auscultation, and hypoxemia. Skin burns were ranged as grade I-III. Treatment included rinse of eyes and skin, systemic therapy with corticosteroids, beta adrenergic drugs and theophylline. Surgical treatment was necessary in grade III skin burns. A variety of common industrial chemicals may be misused as a chemical weapon. We point out the hazards of serious toxic effects of PAA if used in riots or terrorists attacks. (author)

  9. Influence of Fractionation Scheme and Tumor Location on Toxicities After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Large (≥5 cm) Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Multi-institutional Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Vivek [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Shostrom, Valerie K. [Department of Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Zhen, Weining; Zhang, Mutian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Braunstein, Steve E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Holland, John [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Hallemeier, Christopher L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Harkenrider, Matthew M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, Illinois (United States); Iskhanian, Adrian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Attia, Albert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Lee, Percy [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Wang, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Decker, Roy H. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); McGarry, Ronald C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Simone, Charles B., E-mail: charlessimone@umm.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: To describe the impact of fractionation scheme and tumor location on toxicities in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for ≥5-cm non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as part of a multi-institutional analysis. Methods: Patients with primary ≥5-cm N0 M0 NSCLC who underwent ≤5-fraction SBRT were examined across multiple high-volume SBRT centers. Collected data included clinical/treatment parameters; toxicities were prospectively assessed at each institution according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Patients treated daily were compared with those treated every other day (QOD)/other nondaily regimens. Stratification between central and peripheral tumors was also performed. Results: Ninety-two patients from 12 institutions were evaluated (2004-2016), with median follow-up of 12 months. In total there were 23 (25%) and 6 (7%) grade ≥2 and grade ≥3 toxicities, respectively. Grades 2 and 3 pulmonary toxicities occurred in 9% and 4%, respectively; 1 patient treated daily experienced grade 5 radiation pneumonitis. Of the entire cohort, 46 patients underwent daily SBRT, and 46 received QOD (n=40)/other nondaily (n=6) regimens. Clinical/treatment parameters were similar between groups; the QOD/other group was more likely to receive 3-/4-fraction schemas. Patients treated QOD/other experienced significantly fewer grade ≥2 toxicities as compared with daily treatment (7% vs 43%, P<.001). Patients treated daily also had higher rates of grade ≥2 pulmonary toxicities (P=.014). Patients with peripheral tumors (n=66) were more likely to receive 3-/4-fraction regimens than those with central tumors (n=26). No significant differences in grade ≥2 toxicities were identified according to tumor location (P>.05). Conclusions: From this multi-institutional study, toxicity of SBRT for ≥5-cm lesions is acceptable, and daily treatment was associated with a higher rate of toxicities.

  10. A discussion on several problems in determination of uranium ore grade criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhixiang.

    1991-01-01

    The course of determination of uranium ore grade criteria in China is briefly introduced. The cut-off grade minimum industrial grade and allowable minimum average grade uranium ore bodies used in China are reviewed. The meanings and role of various grade criteria and their economic basis for determination in uranium exploration, mining and sorting are discussed and the author's ideas are given

  11. Association of rectal toxicity with thermal dose parameters in treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer with radiation and hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurwitz, Mark D.; Kaplan, Irving D.; Hansen, Jorgen L.; Prokopios-Davos, Savina; Topulos, George P.; Wishnow, Kenneth; Manola, Judith; Bornstein, Bruce A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Although hyperthermia has been used for more than two decades in the treatment of pelvic tumors, little is known about the potential impact of heat on rectal toxicity when combined with other treatment modalities. Because rectal toxicity is a concern with radiation and may be exacerbated by hyperthermia, definition of the association of thermal dose parameters with rectal toxicity is important. In this report, we correlate rectal toxicity with thermal dose parameters for patients treated with hyperthermia and radiation for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with T2b-T3b disease (1992 American Joint Committee On Cancer criteria) enrolled in a Phase II study of external beam radiation ± androgen-suppressive therapy with two transrectal ultrasound hyperthermia treatments were assessed for rectal toxicity. Prostatic and anterior rectal wall temperatures were monitored for all treatments. Rectal wall temperatures were limited to 40 deg. C in 19 patients, 41 deg. C in 3 patients, and 42 deg. C in 8 patients. Logistic regression was used to estimate the log hazard of developing National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 2 toxicity based on temperature parameters. The following were calculated: hazard ratios, 95% confidence intervals, p values for statistical significance of each parameter, and proportion of variability explained for each parameter. Results: Gastrointestinal toxicity was limited to Grade 2. The rate of acute Grade 2 proctitis was greater for patients with an allowable rectal wall temperature of >40 deg. C. In this group, 7 of 11 patients experienced acute Grade 2 proctitis, as opposed to 3 of 19 patients in the group with rectal wall temperatures limited to 40 deg. C (p=0.004). Preliminary assessment of long-term toxicity revealed no differences in toxicity. Hazard ratios for acute Grade 2 proctitis for allowable rectal wall temperature, average rectal wall Tmax, and average prostate Tmax were 9.33 (p=0.01), 3

  12. Dose-volume analysis of predictors for chronic rectal toxicity after treatment of prostate cancer with adaptive image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos; Martinez, Alvaro; Kestin, Larry L.; Yan Di; Grills, Inga; Brabbins, Donald S.; Lockman, David M.; Liang Jian; Gustafson, Gary S.; Chen, Peter Y.; Vicini, Frank A.; Wong, John W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose We analyzed our experience treating localized prostate cancer with image-guided off-line correction with adaptive high-dose radiotherapy (ART) in our Phase II dose escalation study to identify factors predictive of chronic rectal toxicity. Materials and Methods From 1999-2002, 331 patients with clinical stage T1-T3N0M0 prostate cancer were prospectively treated in our Phase II 3D conformal dose escalation ART study to a median dose of 75.6 Gy (range, 63.0-79.2 Gy), minimum dose to confidence limited-planning target volume (cl-PTV) in 1.8 Gy fractions (median isocenter dose = 79.7 Gy). Seventy-four patients (22%) also received neoadjuvant/adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. A patient-specific cl-PTV was constructed using 5 computed tomography scans and 4 sets of electronic portal images by applying an adaptive process to assure target accuracy and minimize PTV margin. For each case, the rectum (rectal solid) was contoured from the sacroiliac joints or rectosigmoid junction (whichever was higher) to the anal verge or ischial tuberosities (whichever was lower), with a median volume of 81.2 cc. The rectal wall was defined using the rectal solid with an individualized 3-mm wall thickness (median volume = 29.8 cc). Rectal wall dose-volume histogram was used to determine the prescribed dose. Toxicity was quantified using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria 2.0. Multiple dose-volume endpoints were evaluated for their association with chronic rectal toxicity. Results Median follow-up was 1.6 years. Thirty-four patients (crude rate 10.3%) experienced Grade 2 chronic rectal toxicity at a median interval of 1.1 years. Nine patients (crude rate = 2.7%) experienced Grade ≥3 chronic rectal toxicity (1 was Grade 4) at a median interval of 1.2 years. The 3-year rates of Grade ≥2 and Grade ≥3 chronic rectal toxicity were 20% and 4%, respectively. Acute toxicity predicted for chronic: Acute Grade 2-3 rectal toxicity (p 40% respectively. The volume

  13. Determination of toxic elements in foodstuffs in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Van Minh; Le Thi Ngoc Trinh; Nguyen Giang; Le Tat Mua; Nguyen Mong Sinh

    2006-01-01

    The studying samples of this work have been collected from different areas of Vietnam including industrial areas in HCM city, Dongnai, Vungtau and non-industrial area, Dalat city. The concentrations of the toxic elements as: As, Hg, Cr, Co, Fe, Cu, Cd, Se, As, Zn, Pb in many foodstuff samples together with intercomparison sample which have been distributed by National Food Administration (Sweden) were analyzed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA), Radiochemical Neutron Activation Analysis (RNAA); Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS) and Anodic Stripping Voltammeter (ASV). The obtained results shown that the concentration of toxic elements in the collected samples from selected industrial areas of Vietnam are lower than the maximum permissible concentrations. (author)

  14. Phase II trial of cystemustine, a new nitrosourea, as treatment of high-grade brain tumors in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, H; Cure, H; Adenis, A; Fargeot, P; Terret, C; Lentz, M A; Madelmont, J C; Fumoleau, P; Hanausk, A; Chollet, P

    2000-09-01

    This study included 39 patients (37 evaluable, of whom 30 patients with recurrent gliomas and 7 patients with gliomas untreated by radiotherapy); they were enrolled into a phase II trial using a new nitrosourea, cystemustine, administrated every 2 weeks at 60 mg/m2 as a 15 min-infusion. Pathology at inclusion was (WHO classification): 14 glioblastomas, 20 grade 3-4 astrocytomas and 3 grade 3 oligodendrogliomas. Four partial responses have been obtained, giving an overall response rate of 10.8%. Four additional patients had a partial response, which for various reasons was not confirmed 4 weeks later; 12 patients had a stable disease for at least 8 weeks, 15 patients had progressive disease. Of the 4 responses, 2 were with a grade 3 oligodendroglioma and 2 glioblastoma. Toxicity (WHO grading) was mainly hematological: leukopenia (16.2% grade 3-4), neutropenia (29.7% grade 3-4), thrombopenia (27% grade 3-4). No other toxicity greater than grade 2 was observed. In conclusion, cystemustine at 60 mg/m2 has moderate clinical activity in relapsing glioma. Our results warrant further investigation of this agent with an increased dose or modified scheme.

  15. Duodenal and Other Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Cervical and Endometrial Cancer Treated With Extended-Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to Paraaortic Lymph Nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poorvu, Philip D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sadow, Cheryl A. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Townamchai, Kanokpis; Damato, Antonio L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To characterize the rates of acute and late duodenal and other gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities among patients treated for cervical and endometrial cancers with extended-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (EF-IMRT) to the paraaortic nodes and to analyze dose-volume relationships of GI toxicities. Methods and Materials: Fifty-three patients with endometrial or cervical cancer underwent EF-IMRT to the paraaortic nodes, of whom 46 met the inclusion criteria for GI toxicity and 45 for duodenal toxicity analysis. The median prescribed dose to the paraaortic nodes was 54 Gy (range, 41.4-65 Gy). The 4 duodenal segments, whole duodenum, small bowel loops, peritoneum, and peritoneum plus retroperitoneal segments of colon were contoured retrospectively, and dosimetric analysis was performed to identify dose-volume relationships to grade ≥3 acute (<90 day) and late (≥90 day) GI toxicity. Results: Only 3/46 patients (6.5%) experienced acute grade ≥3 GI toxicity and 3/46 patients (6.5%) experienced late grade ≥3 GI toxicity. The median dose administered to these 6 patients was 50.4 Gy. One of 12 patients who received 63 to 65 Gy at the level of the renal hilum experienced grade 3 GI toxicity. Dosimetric analysis of patients with and without toxicity revealed no differences between the mean absolute or fractional volumes at any 5-Gy interval between 5 Gy and the maximum dose. None of the patients experienced duodenal toxicity. Conclusions: Treatment of paraaortic nodes with IMRT is associated with low rates of GI toxicities and no duodenal-specific toxicity, including patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy. This technique may allow sufficient dose sparing of the bowel to enable safe dose escalation to at least 65 Gy.

  16. Duodenal and Other Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Cervical and Endometrial Cancer Treated With Extended-Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to Paraaortic Lymph Nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poorvu, Philip D.; Sadow, Cheryl A.; Townamchai, Kanokpis; Damato, Antonio L.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the rates of acute and late duodenal and other gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities among patients treated for cervical and endometrial cancers with extended-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (EF-IMRT) to the paraaortic nodes and to analyze dose-volume relationships of GI toxicities. Methods and Materials: Fifty-three patients with endometrial or cervical cancer underwent EF-IMRT to the paraaortic nodes, of whom 46 met the inclusion criteria for GI toxicity and 45 for duodenal toxicity analysis. The median prescribed dose to the paraaortic nodes was 54 Gy (range, 41.4-65 Gy). The 4 duodenal segments, whole duodenum, small bowel loops, peritoneum, and peritoneum plus retroperitoneal segments of colon were contoured retrospectively, and dosimetric analysis was performed to identify dose-volume relationships to grade ≥3 acute (<90 day) and late (≥90 day) GI toxicity. Results: Only 3/46 patients (6.5%) experienced acute grade ≥3 GI toxicity and 3/46 patients (6.5%) experienced late grade ≥3 GI toxicity. The median dose administered to these 6 patients was 50.4 Gy. One of 12 patients who received 63 to 65 Gy at the level of the renal hilum experienced grade 3 GI toxicity. Dosimetric analysis of patients with and without toxicity revealed no differences between the mean absolute or fractional volumes at any 5-Gy interval between 5 Gy and the maximum dose. None of the patients experienced duodenal toxicity. Conclusions: Treatment of paraaortic nodes with IMRT is associated with low rates of GI toxicities and no duodenal-specific toxicity, including patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy. This technique may allow sufficient dose sparing of the bowel to enable safe dose escalation to at least 65 Gy

  17. Correlation of dosimetric parameters obtained with the analytical anisotropic algorithm and toxicity of chest chemoradiation in lung carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartier, Lysian; Auberdiac, Pierre; Khodri, Mustapha; Malkoun, Nadia [Departement de Radiotherapie, Institut de Cancerologie de la Loire, St-Priest en Jarez (France); Chargari, Cyrus [Service d' Oncologie Radiotherapie, Hopital d' Instruction des Armees du Val-de-Grace, Paris (France); Thorin, Julie [Departement de Sante Publique, Unite de Statistique, Institut de Cancerologie de la Loire, St-Priest en Jarez (France); Melis, Adrien [Departement d' Oncologie Medicale, Institut de Cancerologie de la Loire, St-Priest en Jarez (France); Talabard, Jean-Noeel; Laroche, Guy de [Departement de Radiotherapie, Institut de Cancerologie de la Loire, St-Priest en Jarez (France); Fournel, Pierre [Departement d' Oncologie Medicale, Institut de Cancerologie de la Loire, St-Priest en Jarez (France); Tiffet, Olivier [Service de Chirurgie Thoracique, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint Etienne, Saint Etienne (France); Schmitt, Thierry [Departement de Radiotherapie, Institut de Cancerologie de la Loire, St-Priest en Jarez (France); and others

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze and revisit toxicity related to chest chemoradiotherapy and to correlate these side effects with dosimetric parameters obtained using analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) in locally unresectable advanced lung cancer. We retrospectively analyzed data from 47 lung cancer patients between 2005 and 2008. All received conformal 3D radiotherapy using high-energy linear accelerator plus concomitant chemotherapy. All treatment planning data were transferred into Eclipse 8.05 (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and dosimetric calculations were performed using AAA. Thirty-three patients (70.2%) developed acute pneumopathy after radiotherapy (grades 1 and 2). One patient (2.1%) presented with grade 3 pneumopathy. Thirty-one (66%) presented with grades 1-2 lung fibrosis, and 1 patient presented with grade 3 lung fibrosis. Thirty-four patients (72.3%) developed grade 1-2 acute oesophagic toxicity. Four patients (8.5%) presented with grades 3 and 4 dysphagia, necessitating prolonged parenteral nutrition. Median prescribed dose was 64 Gy (range 50-74) with conventional fractionation (2 Gy per fraction). Dose-volume constraints were respected with a median V20 of 23.5% (maximum 34%) and a median V30 of 17% (maximum 25%). The median dose delivered to healthy contralateral lung was 13.1 Gy (maximum 18.1 Gy). At univariate analysis, larger planning target volume and V20 were significantly associated with the probability of grade {>=}2 radiation-induced pneumopathy (p = 0.022 and p = 0.017, respectively). No relation between oesophagic toxicity and clinical/dosimetric parameters could be established. Using AAA, the present results confirm the predictive value of the V20 for lung toxicity as already demonstrated with the conventional pencil beam convolution approach.

  18. Technology and the uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, T.C.

    2000-01-01

    Continuing economic and regulatory pressures on the uranium industry can be countered only through advances in technology. Low prices, the 'ALARA' principle, and concerns about 'sustainability' require the industry to continually improve upon its already impressive record of performance. Technological improvement in the uranium industry is necessary in order to: 1) Maintain our resource base through the discovery of ever deeper deposits; 2) Improve the efficiency with which we may exploit - a) very high-grade deposits by remote underground mining methods - b) very low-grade deposits with environmentally-benign, in situ, leaching methods - and c) moderate-grade, near-surface deposits by open-pit mining methods; 3) Meet increasingly stringent and, in many cases, arbitrary and unrealistic environmental and safety requirements; and 4) Cope with increasing competition from an expanding number of sources of secondary supply. Manifestations of the uranium industry's ability to improve its performance through technology can be seen in many ways including: a continuing reduction in production costs; large gains in productivity; and a truly superior record of employee safety. Maintenance of these trends requires both innovation and the open sharing of information. (author)

  19. Technology and the uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, T.C.

    2002-01-01

    Continuing economic and regulatory pressures on the uranium industry can be countered only through advances in technology. Low prices, the 'ALARA' principle, and concerns about 'sustainability' require the industry to continually improve upon its already impressive record of performance. Technological improvement in the uranium industry is necessary in order to: (a) Maintain our resource base through the discovery of ever deeper deposits; (b) Improve the efficiency with which we may exploit (i) very high-grade deposits by remote underground mining methods (ii) very low-grade deposits with environmentally-benign, in situ leaching methods - and (iii) moderate-grade, near-surface deposits by open-pit mining methods (c) Meet increasingly stringent and, in many cases, arbitrary and unrealistic environmental and safety requirements; and (d) Cope with increasing competition from an expanding number of sources of secondary supply. Manifestations of the uranium industry's ability to improve its performance through technology can be seen in many ways including: a continuing reduction in production costs; large gains in productivity; and a truly superior record of employee safety. Maintenance of these trends requires both innovation and the open sharing of information. (author)

  20. Long-Term Outcome and Toxicity of Salvage Brachytherapy for Local Failure After Initial Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burri, Ryan J.; Stone, Nelson N.; Unger, Pam; Stock, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To describe long-term outcomes and toxicity after salvage brachytherapy (BT) for local failure after initial radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2008, 37 men with local failure after initial prostate radiotherapy (32 external-beam radiation therapy [EBRT] and 5 BT) underwent salvage BT with 103 Pd or 125 I. Estimates of freedom from biochemical failure (FFbF, Phoenix definition) and cause-specific survival (CSS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicities were graded using CTCv3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 86 months (range, 2-156). The median dose to 90% of the prostate volume was 122 Gy (range, 67-166). The 10-year FFbF and CSS were 54% and 96%, respectively. On univariate analysis, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >10 ng/mL at initial diagnosis was significantly associated with FFbF (p = 0.01), and there were trends for both age <70 years (p = 0.08) and PSA <6 ng/mL (p = 0.08) at the time of salvage BT. On multivariate analysis, only presalvage PSA <6 ng/mL (p = 0.046) was significantly associated with improved FFbF. There were three Grade 3 toxicities and one Grade 4 toxicity. Pelvic lymph node dissection before salvage BT was the only variable significantly associated with Grade ≥2 toxicity (p = 0.03). Conclusion: With a median follow-up of 86 months, salvage prostate BT was associated with a 10-year FFbF of 54% and CSS of 96%. Improved FFbF was associated with a presalvage PSA <6 ng/mL. Toxicity was worse in patients who had undergone pelvic lymph node dissection before salvage BT. Careful patient selection for salvage BT may result in improved outcomes and reduced toxicity.

  1. Predictive factors of gastroduodenal toxicity in cirrhotic patients after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Haeyoung; Lim, Do Hoon; Paik, Seung Woon; Yoo, Byung Chul; Koh, Kwang Gheol; Lee, Joon Hyoek; Choi, Moon Seok; Park, Won; Park, Hee Chul; Huh, Seung Jae; Choi, Doo Ho; Ahn, Yong Chan

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: To identify predictive factors for the development of gastroduodenal toxicity (GDT) in cirrhotic patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and methods: We retrospectively analyzed dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and clinical records of 73 cirrhotic patients treated with 3D-CRT for HCC. The median radiation dose was 36 Gy (range, 30-54 Gy) with a daily dose of 3 Gy. The grade of GDT was defined by the Common Toxicity Criteria Version 2. The predictive factors of grade 3 GDT were identified. Results: Grade 3 GDT was found in 9 patients. Patient's age and the percentage of gastroduodenal volume receiving more than 35 Gy (V 35 ) significantly affected the development of grade 3 GDT. Patients over 50 years of age developed grade 3 GDT more frequently than patients under 50 years of age. The risk of grade 3 GDT grew exponentially as V 35 increased. The 1-year actuarial rate of grade 3 GDT in patients with V 35 35 ≥5% (4% vs. 48%, p 35 were the most predictive factors for the development of grade 3 GDT in patients treated with RT.

  2. Discrimination of uranium chemo-toxic and radio-toxic effects: definition of biological markers for evaluating professional risks in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darolles, Carine

    2010-01-01

    Uranium (U) is a heavy metal that is also considered as an alpha emitter. Thus the origin of U toxicity is both chemical and radiological. The identification of bio-markers to discriminate chemical and radiological toxicity for a given U compound is required to assess accurately the health effects of isotopic mixtures such as depleted U in 235 U with a low specific activity. Data from the literature show that the best candidates are cytogenetic markers. In the present work, the assessment of bio-markers of U contamination was performed on three cellular models (mouse fibroblasts, rat lymphocytes and human lymphocytes) that were exposed to different isotopic mixtures of U. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (MN) centromere assay was performed to discriminate the chemo-toxic and radio-toxic effects of U. This study showed that the evaluation of micronuclei in bi-nucleated cells could not assess U genotoxicity accurately. Instead, the assessment of centromere-negative micronuclei and nucleo-plasmic bridges correlated with the radio-toxic effects of U. The evaluation of centromere-positive micronuclei and micronuclei in mono-nucleated cells correlated with the chemo-toxic effects of U. These cytogenetic markers should be validated on different biological models and could be proposed to discriminate radiological and chemical toxicity of a given isotopic mixture of U. These four cytogenetic markers could be a useful complement of the classical dosimetric bio-markers for the assessment of internal uranium contamination. (author)

  3. Galvanizing industry: evaluation of exposure levels using biomonitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C.; Sabino, Claudia de V.S.; Amaral, Angela Maria; Mattos, Silvania V. de M.; S. Filho, Serafim; Maia, Elene Cristina P.

    1999-01-01

    In Brazil, statistical surveys concerning occupational diseases refer to accidents and damages. The surveys do not refer to the occupational diseases developed through long exposures to hazardous work conditions, involving physical risk and toxic chemical substances. The Program of Medical Control of Occupational Health determines the Maximum Biological Levels Allowed and the Values of Normality References. But concerning metal and toxic inorganic, values of only few elements are established. In Belo Horizonte and surroundings areas, which is an important industrial centre in the country, there are different industries distributed over various areas. There are about 80 galvanizing industries which are responsible for the majority of the metal contamination hospitalities. A preliminary sampling was performed in order to conduct a survey of the exposures to elements related to occupational diseases in galvanizing industry. The preliminary results for toxic and non-toxic elements obtained using hair and fingernails as biomonitors are shown. The K 0 parametric neutron activation analysis method was applied and the elements determined were: Ag, Al, Au, Cl, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, I, Mn, Na, Ti, V, Ta, and Zn. (author)

  4. Value of low-dose 2 X 2 Gy palliative radiotherapy in advanced low-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, M.; Wirth, A.; Ryan, G.; MacManus, M.

    2006-01-01

    Low-dose radiotherapy over the last decade has been reported to provide effective palliation for patients with low-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In this retrospective case series of 10 patients, we report our early experience using low-dose radiotherapy (usually 2 x2 Gy) for patients with advanced-stage follicular, mucosal associated lymphoid tissue, mantle cell and small lymphocytic lymphomas. Median follow up was 27 weeks. Response rates were high (complete response, 70%; partial response, 20%), the response durable and the toxicity was minimal (no toxicity greater than grade 1). Low-dose irradiation is an effective treatment option for patients with low-grade lymphomas with local symptoms Copyright (2006) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  5. Immunotoxicity, genotoxicity and epigenetic toxicity of nanomaterials: New strategies for toxicity testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusinska, Maria; Tulinska, Jana; El Yamani, Naouale; Kuricova, Miroslava; Liskova, Aurelia; Rollerova, Eva; Rundén-Pran, Elise; Smolkova, Bozena

    2017-11-01

    The unique properties of nanomaterials (NMs) are beneficial in numerous industrial and medical applications. However, they could also induce unintended effects. Thus, a proper strategy for toxicity testing is essential in human hazard and risk assessment. Toxicity can be tested in vivo and in vitro; in compliance with the 3Rs, alternative strategies for in vitro testing should be further developed for NMs. Robust, standardized methods are of great importance in nanotoxicology, with comprehensive material characterization and uptake as an integral part of the testing strategy. Oxidative stress has been shown to be an underlying mechanism of possible toxicity of NMs, causing both immunotoxicity and genotoxicity. For testing NMs in vitro, a battery of tests should be performed on cells of human origin, either cell lines or primary cells, in conditions as close as possible to an in vivo situation. Novel toxicity pathways, particularly epigenetic modification, should be assessed along with conventional toxicity testing methods. However, to initiate epigenetic toxicity screens for NM exposure, there is a need to better understand their adverse effects on the epigenome, to identify robust and reproducible causal links between exposure, epigenetic changes and adverse phenotypic endpoints, and to develop improved assays to monitor epigenetic toxicity. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical Factors Predicting Late Severe Urinary Toxicity After Postoperative Radiotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: A Single-Institute Analysis of 742 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzarini, Cesare, E-mail: cozzarini.cesare@hsr.it [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Fiorino, Claudio [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Da Pozzo, Luigi Filippo [Department of Urology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Alongi, Filippo; Berardi, Genoveffa; Bolognesi, Angelo [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Briganti, Alberto [Department of Urology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Broggi, Sara [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Deli, Aniko [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Guazzoni, Giorgio [Department of Urology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Perna, Lucia [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Pasetti, Marcella; Salvadori, Giovannella [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Montorsi, Francesco; Rigatti, Patrizio [Department of Urology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Di Muzio, Nadia [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical factors independently predictive of long-term severe urinary sequelae after postprostatectomy radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Between 1993 and 2005, 742 consecutive patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy with either adjuvant (n = 556; median radiation dose, 70.2 Gy) or salvage (n = 186; median radiation dose, 72 Gy) intent. Results: After a median follow-up of 99 months, the 8-year risk of Grade 2 or greater and Grade 3 late urinary toxicity was almost identical (23.9% vs. 23.7% and 12% vs. 10%) in the adjuvant and salvage cohorts, respectively. On univariate analysis, acute toxicity was significantly predictive of late Grade 2 or greater sequelae in both subgroups (p <.0001 in both cases), and hypertension (p = .02) and whole-pelvis radiotherapy (p = .02) correlated significantly in the adjuvant cohort only. The variables predictive of late Grade 3 sequelae were acute Grade 2 or greater toxicity in both groups and whole-pelvis radiotherapy (8-year risk of Grade 3 events, 21% vs. 11%, p = .007), hypertension (8-year risk, 18% vs. 10%, p = .005), age {<=} 62 years at RT (8-year risk, 16% vs. 11%, p = .04) in the adjuvant subset, and radiation dose >72 Gy (8-year risk, 19% vs. 6%, p = .007) and age >71 years (8-year risk, 16% vs. 6%, p = .006) in the salvage subgroup. Multivariate analysis confirmed the independent predictive role of all the covariates indicated as statistically significant on univariate analysis. Conclusions: The risk of late Grade 2 or greater and Grade 3 urinary toxicity was almost identical, regardless of the RT intent. In the salvage cohort, older age and greater radiation doses resulted in a worse toxicity profile, and younger, hypertensive patients experienced a greater rate of severe late sequelae in the adjuvant setting. The causes of this latter correlation and apparently different etiopathogenesis of chronic damage in the two subgroups were unclear and deserve additional investigation.

  7. High-dose-rate brachytherapy as monotherapy delivered in two fractions within one day for favorable/intermediate-risk prostate cancer: preliminary toxicity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghilezan, Michel; Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye, Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy

    2012-07-01

    To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy × 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy × 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of ≤12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6-40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Favorable-risk prostate cancer patients treated with a single implant HDR-BT to 24-27 Gy in two fractions

  8. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy Delivered in Two Fractions Within One Day for Favorable/Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Toxicity Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghilezan, Michel, E-mail: mghilezan@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J. Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. Results: The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6-40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Conclusions: Favorable

  9. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy Delivered in Two Fractions Within One Day for Favorable/Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Toxicity Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghilezan, Michel; Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J. Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy × 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy × 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of ≤12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. Results: The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6–40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Conclusions: Favorable-risk prostate cancer patients treated with

  10. IMRT for Sinonasal Tumors Minimizes Severe Late Ocular Toxicity and Preserves Disease Control and Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duprez, Fréderic; Madani, Indira; Morbée, Lieve; Bonte, Katrien; Deron, Philippe; Domján, Vilmos; Boterberg, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; De Neve, Wilfried

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report late ocular (primary endpoint) and other toxicity, disease control, and survival (secondary endpoints) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for sinonasal tumors. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2009, 130 patients with nonmetastatic sinonasal tumors were treated with IMRT at Ghent University Hospital. Prescription doses were 70 Gy (n = 117) and 60–66 Gy (n = 13) at 2 Gy per fraction over 6–7 weeks. Most patients had adenocarcinoma (n = 82) and squamous cell carcinoma (n = 23). One hundred and one (101) patients were treated postoperatively. Of 17 patients with recurrent tumors, 9 were reirradiated. T-stages were T1–2 (n = 39), T3 (n = 21), T4a (n = 38), and T4b (n = 22). Esthesioneuroblastoma was staged as Kadish A, B, and C in 1, 3, and 6 cases, respectively. Results: Median follow-up was 52, range 15–121 months. There was no radiation-induced blindness in 86 patients available for late toxicity assessment (≥6 month follow-up). We observed late Grade 3 tearing in 10 patients, which reduced to Grade 1–2 in 5 patients and Grade 3 visual impairment because of radiation-induced ipsilateral retinopathy and neovascular glaucoma in 1 patient. There was no severe dry eye syndrome. The worst grade of late ocular toxicity was Grade 3 (n = 11), Grade 2 (n = 31), Grade 1 (n = 33), and Grade 0 (n = 11). Brain necrosis and osteoradionecrosis occurred in 6 and 1 patients, respectively. Actuarial 5-year local control and overall survival were 59% and 52%, respectively. On multivariate analysis local control was negatively affected by cribriform plate and brain invasion (p = 0.044 and 0.029, respectively) and absence of surgery (p = 0.009); overall survival was negatively affected by cribriform plate and orbit invasion (p = 0.04 and <0.001, respectively) and absence of surgery (p = 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT for sinonasal tumors allowed delivering high doses to targets at minimized ocular toxicity, while maintaining disease control and

  11. IMRT for Sinonasal Tumors Minimizes Severe Late Ocular Toxicity and Preserves Disease Control and Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duprez, Frederic, E-mail: frederic.duprez@ugent.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Madani, Indira; Morbee, Lieve [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Bonte, Katrien; Deron, Philippe; Domjan, Vilmos [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Boterberg, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report late ocular (primary endpoint) and other toxicity, disease control, and survival (secondary endpoints) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for sinonasal tumors. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2009, 130 patients with nonmetastatic sinonasal tumors were treated with IMRT at Ghent University Hospital. Prescription doses were 70 Gy (n = 117) and 60-66 Gy (n = 13) at 2 Gy per fraction over 6-7 weeks. Most patients had adenocarcinoma (n = 82) and squamous cell carcinoma (n = 23). One hundred and one (101) patients were treated postoperatively. Of 17 patients with recurrent tumors, 9 were reirradiated. T-stages were T1-2 (n = 39), T3 (n = 21), T4a (n = 38), and T4b (n = 22). Esthesioneuroblastoma was staged as Kadish A, B, and C in 1, 3, and 6 cases, respectively. Results: Median follow-up was 52, range 15-121 months. There was no radiation-induced blindness in 86 patients available for late toxicity assessment ({>=}6 month follow-up). We observed late Grade 3 tearing in 10 patients, which reduced to Grade 1-2 in 5 patients and Grade 3 visual impairment because of radiation-induced ipsilateral retinopathy and neovascular glaucoma in 1 patient. There was no severe dry eye syndrome. The worst grade of late ocular toxicity was Grade 3 (n = 11), Grade 2 (n = 31), Grade 1 (n = 33), and Grade 0 (n = 11). Brain necrosis and osteoradionecrosis occurred in 6 and 1 patients, respectively. Actuarial 5-year local control and overall survival were 59% and 52%, respectively. On multivariate analysis local control was negatively affected by cribriform plate and brain invasion (p = 0.044 and 0.029, respectively) and absence of surgery (p = 0.009); overall survival was negatively affected by cribriform plate and orbit invasion (p = 0.04 and <0.001, respectively) and absence of surgery (p = 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT for sinonasal tumors allowed delivering high doses to targets at minimized ocular toxicity, while maintaining disease control and survival

  12. Acute toxicity of postoperative IMRT and chemotherapy for endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tierney, R.M.; Powell, M.A.; Mutch, D.G.; Gibb, R.K.; Rader, J.S.; Grigsby, P.W.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the acute toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with and without chemotherapy in patients with endometrial cancer. A total of 19 patients with stages IB-IVB endometrial cancer who underwent surgery and postoperative IMRT were reviewed. The treatment planning goal was to cover the tissue at risk and minimize the dose to the bladder, bowel, and bone marrow. Median dose was 50.4 Gy (range 49.6-51.2 Gy). Altogether, 14 patients underwent chemotherapy; most were given carboplatin and paclitaxel. Toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 (CTCAE). The prescribed radiation treatment was completed in all patients. The prescribed cycles of chemotherapy were completed in all 14 patients, except one who received five of six cycles limited by prolonged thrombocytopenia. Chemotherapy was delayed in two patients (14%). Three patients required growth factor support during chemotherapy, and one patient required a blood transfusion. Acute grades 3-4 hematological toxicity occurred in 9 of the 14 patients (64%) who underwent chemotherapy. None experienced acute grade 3 or 4 genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity. Adjuvant IMRT and chemotherapy following surgery in patients with endometrial cancer is well tolerated and did not lead to treatment modification in most patients. (author)

  13. [Behavioral-cognitive disorders due to chronic exposure to industrial and environmental toxic substances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangone, Carlos A; Genovese, Osvaldo; Abel, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    A review of neurotoxics is made, given the low tendency to investigate for chronic exposure to environmental and industrial potential central nervous system toxic substances (heavy metals, insecticides, organic solvents and carbon monoxide) in the history of a patient consulting for behavioral - cognitive complains, and considering the potential overturn of the disease if a correct diagnosis and early treatment is made. to determine the onset of the cognitive - behavioral features, presentation pattern, diagnosis and treatment of such neurotoxics (NT). systematized search in Cochrane and Medline reviews, Embase and Lilacs. chronic exposure to neurotoxics can produce personality changes (sleeping problems, excitation, depression, delusions and hallucinations) as well as cognitive problems (memory, learning, language and cognitive reaction problems). NT may cause changes in the neuron morphology and its sub cellular structures, affecting its normal biochemistry and physiology (proteins and neurotransmitters synthesis). The clinical history, diagnosis and treatment of each neurotoxic are discussed. The NT must be taken in consideration among the possible different etiologies when a patient with a bizarre behavioral cognitive syndrome is examined.

  14. Rectal balloon use limits vaginal displacement, rectal dose, and rectal toxicity in patients receiving IMRT for postoperative gynecological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Chia; Wuu, Yen-Ruh; Yanagihara, Theodore; Jani, Ashish; Xanthopoulos, Eric P; Tiwari, Akhil; Wright, Jason D; Burke, William M; Hou, June Y; Tergas, Ana I; Deutsch, Israel

    2018-01-01

    /inferior 2.22 ± 2.04 mm, laterally 3.41 ± 3.62 mm, and anterior/posterior 3.86 ± 3.45 mm. The avg vector magnitude was 6.60 ± 4.14 mm. For acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities, 50% experienced grade 1 toxicities and 18% grade 2 GI toxicities. For acute genitourinary (GU) toxicities, 21% had grade 1 and 18% had grade 2 toxicities. For late GU toxicities, 7% had grade 1 and 4% had grade 2 toxicities. RB for gynecological patients receiving IMRT in the postoperative setting can limit V40 rectal dose and vaginal displacement. Although V30 constraints were not met, patients had limited acute and late toxicities. Further studies are needed to validate these findings. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dose-response of acute urinary toxicity of long-course preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L.; Bentzen, Søren M.; Jakobsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-course preoperative chemoradiotherapy (chemo-RT) improves outcomes for rectal cancer patients, but acute side effects during treatment may cause considerable patient discomfort and may compromise treatment compliance. We developed a dose-response model for acute urinary toxicity...... based on a large, single-institution series. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In total 345 patients were treated with (chemo-)RT for primary rectal cancer from January 2007 to May 2012. Urinary toxicity during RT was scored prospectively using the CTCAE v 3.0 cystitis score (grade 0-5). Clinical variables...... and radiation dose to the bladder were related to graded toxicity using multivariate ordinal logistic regression. Three models were optimized, each containing all available clinical variables and one of three dose metrics: Mean dose (Dmean), equivalent uniform dose (EUD), or relative volume given x Gy or above...

  16. Study of efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated thoracic radiotherapy 17 gray in 2 fractions for palliation in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arif, S.; Rasul, S.; Haider, N.; Mahmood, A.; Syed, A.S.; Nadeem, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated thoracic radiotherapy 17 Gray (Gy) in 2 fractions for palliation in advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma. Study design: A quasi-experimental study. Place and duration of study: Oncology department, Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from 4th July 2008 to 4th Nov 2009. Material and Methods: Fifty four patients with histologically and/or cytologically confirmed unresectable stages III and IV non small cell lung cancer, with performance status 2 or 3 and expected survival > 2 months were treated with megavoltage radiation therapy 17 Gy in 2 fractions one week apart, with symptoms due to intrathoracic disease (cough, dyspnea and hemoptysis) and toxicity due to radiation therapy (dysphagia secondary to esophagitis) assessed as per common toxicity criteria adverse event version 3.0 on day 0 before treatment and day 30 after start of treatment. Results: Grades of cough, hemoptysis and dyspnea showed significant improvement after treatment (p<0.001). A total of 42.68% patients showed an improvement in grade of cough (23 out of 54 patients), 85.7% of patients showed improvement in grade of hemoptysis (36 out of 42 patients) and 55.65% patients showed improvement in grade of dyspnea (30 out of 54 patients). Twenty two point two percent patients (12 out of 54) showed increase in grade of dysphagia. Although, there was a statistically significant increase in grade of dysphagia after treatment but it was limited to grade 1 and 2 only. Considering that no patient had grade 3 or 4 dysphagia, this toxicity was acceptable. Conclusion: Based on our results hypofractionated thoracic radiotherapy, 17 Gy in 2 fractions, is effective with acceptable toxicity in palliation in advanced non small cell lung cancer and is recommended as it will result in shorter duration of hospital stay and low hospital stay charges. (author)

  17. Paclitaxel poliglumex, temozolomide, and radiation for newly diagnosed high-grade glioma: a Brown University Oncology Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyapalan, Suriya; Boxerman, Jerrold; Donahue, John; Goldman, Marc; Kinsella, Timothy; Dipetrillo, Thomas; Evans, Devon; Elinzano, Heinrich; Constantinou, Maria; Stopa, Edward; Puthawala, Yakub; Cielo, Deus; Santaniello, Alyson; Oyelese, Adetokunbo; Mantripragada, Kalyan; Rosati, Kayla; Isdale, Debora; Safran, Howard

    2014-10-01

    Paclitaxel poliglumex (PPX), a drug conjugate that links paclitaxel to poly-L-glutamic acid, is a potent radiation sensitizer. Prior studies in esophageal cancer have demonstrated that PPX (50 mg/m/wk) can be administered with concurrent radiation with acceptable toxicity. The primary objective of this study was to determine the safety of the combination of PPX with temozolomide and concurrent radiation for high-grade gliomas. Eligible patients were required to have WHO grade 3 or 4 gliomas. Patients received weekly PPX (50 mg/m/wk) combined with standard daily temozolomide (75 mg/m) for 6 weeks with concomitant radiation (2.0 Gy, 5 d/wk for a total dose of 60 Gy). Twenty-five patients were enrolled, 17 with glioblastoma and 8 with grade 3 gliomas. Seven of 25 patients had grade 4 myelosuppression. Hematologic toxicity lasted up to 5 months suggesting a drug interaction between PPX and temozolomide. For patients with glioblastoma, the median progression-free survival was 11.5 months and the median overall survival was 18 months. PPX could not be safely combined with temozolomide due to grade 4 hematologic toxicity. However, the favorable progression-free and overall survival suggest that PPX may enhance radiation for glioblastoma. A randomized study of single agent PPX/radiation versus temozolomide/radiation for glioblastoma without MGMT methylation is underway.

  18. Acute radiotherapy toxicity in 57 dogs with gross and microscopic mast cell tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, L; Tanis, J B; Harper, A; Amores-Fuster, I; Killick, D R; Finotello, R

    2018-05-15

    Mast cell tumours (MCTs) are commonly treated with radiation therapy, most often in a microscopic disease setting. Poorer outcomes are expected in patients with gross disease, and irradiation of gross disease may be associated with greater toxicity. The aim of this study was to compare acute radiation adverse events (AE) in dogs with gross and microscopic MCTs receiving radiotherapy. Fifty-seven dogs were included, 28 with gross disease and 29 with microscopic. In order to assess mucosal and skin toxicity, patients were assigned to 2 groups: head (29 patients, 14 patients with gross and 15 microscopic) and other sites (28 patients, 14 each). All were treated with external beam radiotherapy, and toxicity assessed at the end of treatment and 10 to 14 days later (first recheck). All patients developed some acute radiation toxicity by the end of the course. However, there was no difference in the severity of toxicity between gross and microscopic disease in either site group at either time point. The only variable associated with an increased frequency of grade 2 or 3 toxicity at the first recheck was the use of prednisolone prior to radiotherapy (P = .05). No other factors were identified which were associated with increased toxicity. For the head group, the site of highest grade toxicity was mucosa or, if included in the field, nasal planum, which was often more severely affected than the mucosa. No significant late toxicity was identified. Two dogs developed acute haematemesis during the radiotherapy course, but both completed the course without further events. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Iodine 125 prostate brachytherapy: prognostic factors for long-term urinary, digestive and sexual toxicities;Curietherapie de prostate par iode 125: facteurs pronostiques de longue duree de toxicite urinaire, digestive et sexuelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyen, J.; Mohammed Ali, A.; Ginot, A.; Ferre, M.; Castelli, J.; Hannoun-Levi, J.M. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Dept. de Radiotherapie Oncologique, 06 - Nice (France); Chamorey, E. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Unite de Statistiques Medicales, 06 - Nice (France); Mohammed Ali, A. [Faculte de Medecine, SOHAG (Egypt); Quintens, H.; Amiel, J. [CHU Pasteur, Service d' Urologie, 06 - Nice (France)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose For patients with good urinary function and presenting with a low risk prostate cancer, prostate brachytherapy using iodine implants represents one of the techniques of reference. This retrospective analysis investigates urinary (U), digestive (D) and sexual (S) toxicities and their prognostic factors of duration. Material and methods From August 2000 to November 2007, 176 patients presenting with prostate adenocarcinoma underwent interstitial brachytherapy. Urinary, digestive and sexual toxicities were classified according to Common toxicities criteria for adverse events, version 3.0 (C.T.C.A.E. V 3.0). For each toxicity (U, D, S), the number of complications U (dysuria, nicturia), D (proctitis, diarrhea) and S (sexual dysfunction, loss of libido) was listed and analyzed according to criteria related to the patient, implant, dosimetric data and characteristics of the toxicity. Prognostic factors identified in univariate analysis (U.V.A.) (Log Rank) were further analyzed in multivariate analysis (M.V.A.) (Cox model). Results With a median follow-up of 26 months (1-87), 147 patients (83.5 %) presented urinary toxicities. Among them, 29.5 % (86 patients) and 2.4 % (seven patients) presented grade 2 and 3 U toxicity respectively. In U.V.A., urinary grade toxicity greater than or equal to 2 (p = 0.037), the presence of initial U symptoms (p = 0.027) and more than two urinary toxicities (p 0.00032) were recognized as prognostic factors. The number of U toxicities was the only prognostic factor in M.V.A. (p = 0.04). D toxicity accounted for 40.6 % (71 patients). Among them, 3 % (six patients) were grade 2. None were grade 3. Two factors were identified as prognostic factors either in U.V.A. and M.V.A.: the number of D toxicities greater than or equal to 2 (univariate analysis: p = 0,00129, multivariate analysis: p = 0,002) and age less than or equal to 65 years (univariate analysis: p = 0,004, multivariate analysis: p 0,007). Eighty-three patients (47

  20. Predictors of Toxicity Associated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy to the Central Hepatobiliary Tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmundson, Evan C.; Wu, Yufan; Luxton, Gary; Bazan, Jose G.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric predictors of hepatobiliary (HB) toxicity associated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver tumors. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 96 patients treated with SBRT for primary (53%) or metastatic (47%) liver tumors between March 2006 and November 2013. The central HB tract (cHBT) was defined by a 15-mm expansion of the portal vein from the splenic confluence to the first bifurcation of left and right portal veins. Patients were censored for toxicity upon local progression or additional liver-directed therapy. HB toxicities were graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. To compare different SBRT fractionations, doses were converted to biologically effective doses (BED) by using the standard linear quadratic model α/β = 10 (BED10). Results: Median follow-up was 12.7 months after SBRT. Median BED10 was 85.5 Gy (range: 37.5-151.2). The median number of fractions was 5 (range: 1-5), with 51 patients (53.1%) receiving 5 fractions and 29 patients (30.2%) receiving 3 fractions. In total, there were 23 (24.0%) grade 2+ and 18 (18.8%) grade 3+ HB toxicities. Nondosimetric factors predictive of grade 3+ HB toxicity included cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) histology (P<.0001), primary liver tumor (P=.0087), and biliary stent (P<.0001). Dosimetric parameters most predictive of grade 3+ HB toxicity were volume receiving above BED10 of 72 Gy (V BED10 72) ≥ 21 cm 3 (relative risk [RR]: 11.6, P<.0001), V BED10 66 ≥ 24 cm 3 (RR: 10.5, P<.0001), and mean BED10 (Dmean BED10 ) cHBT ≥14 Gy (RR: 9.2, P<.0001), with V BED10 72 and V BED10 66 corresponding to V40 and V37.7 for 5 fractions and V33.8 and V32.0 for 3 fractions, respectively. V BED10 72 ≥ 21 cm 3 , V BED10 66 ≥ 24 cm 3 , and Dmean BED10 cHBT ≥14 Gy were consistently predictive of grade 3+ toxicity on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: V BED10 72, V BED10 66, and Dmean BED10 to cHBT are

  1. Toxicity assays applied for evaluation of ionizing radiation and zeolites adsorption as treatment technologies for coloured effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higa, Marcela Cantelli

    2008-01-01

    Textile industry is one raising commercial activity in Brazil. This activity has been generating important environmental interferences such as colour and bad biological effects into aquatic environment. Liquid textile effluents are toxic to lived organisms and may present low biological degradability. Although foreseen at federal regulation, the effluent quality is not controlled by toxicity assays in the country. These assays are carried out to determine the potential effects of chemical substances and effluents to cause negative effects to the exposed organisms. The present work aimed whole toxicity evaluation as well as the applicability of two different treatment techniques: ionizing radiation and zeolite adsorption. The efficacy of them were evaluated using eco toxicity bases and real effluents. Two different industries from Sao Paulo State contributed to this project supplying their real effluents. The samples were collected at a Textile Industry and at a Chemical Industry (dying producer) and after the measurement of whole toxicity the samples were submitted to treatments. Toxicity assays were carried out for Daphnia similis and for Vibrio fischeri. Sample irradiations were performed at an Electron Beam Accelerator at CTR/IPEN. Zeolites treatment is an P and D activity from CQMA/IPEN which contributed to this Project. Zeolites v/ere prepared from fly ash previously being used as an adsorber material. Both treatments (electron irradiation and zeolite adsorption) resulted on important toxicity and colour reduction. Concerning irradiation the effluents from chemical industry required higher radiation doses than that from textile activity. The radiation dose to be suggested is 40 kGy (toxicity reduction > 60%) for the chemical effluents and 0.5 kGy for the textile effluents (toxicity reduction > 90%). When zeolite adsorption was evaluated the Z1M6 resulted in 85%o v/hole toxicity reduction and ZC6 resulted in very low efficiency for the effluents of chemical

  2. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism TGFβ1 R25P Correlates with Acute Toxicity during Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J. Joshua; Wasserman, Isaac; Milgrom, Sarah A.; Chow, Oliver S.; Chen, Chin-Tung; Patil, Sujata; Goodman, Karyn A.; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To validate the finding of an association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and toxicity during chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in rectal cancer patients, in an independent population. Methods and Materials: The cohort consisted of 165 patients who received CRT for rectal cancer from 2006 to 2012. Prospectively recorded toxicity information, graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0, was retrieved from the medical record. Additionally, a subset of 52 patients recorded their gastrointestinal symptoms weekly during CRT, using the 7-item Bowel Problems Scale. Deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted from normal tissue in the proctectomy specimens and screened for 3 SNPs: XRCC1 R399Q, XPD K751Q, and TGFβ1 R25P. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression models were constructed. Results: The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy, and all patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Toxicities measured by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events were closely associated with patient-reported outcomes for the patients who completed the 7-item Bowel Problems Scale. Grade ≥3 toxicity occurred during CRT in 14 patients (8%). All 14 patients had either XRCC1 R399Q or TGFβ1 R25P polymorphisms. The TGFβ1 R25P polymorphism was significantly associated with grade ≥3 toxicity (odds ratio [OR] 3.47, P=.04) and, in patients who completed the Bowel Problems Scale, with grade ≥4 toxicity (OR 5.61, P=.02). The latter finding persisted in a multivariable logistic regression model controlling for ethnicity, age, and sex (adjusted OR 1.83, P=.02). Conclusions: We have validated the correlation between the TGFβ1 R25P SNP and acute toxicity during CRT in an independent cohort using both clinician- and patient-reported toxicity. The information from our study could be used as a basis to formulate a prospective trial testing the utility of this SNP as a biomarker of acute toxicity during neoadjuvant treatment in locally

  3. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism TGFβ1 R25P Correlates with Acute Toxicity during Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J. Joshua [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wasserman, Isaac [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Milgrom, Sarah A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Chow, Oliver S.; Chen, Chin-Tung [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Patil, Sujata [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Garcia-Aguilar, Julio, E-mail: garciaaj@mskcc.org [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To validate the finding of an association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and toxicity during chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in rectal cancer patients, in an independent population. Methods and Materials: The cohort consisted of 165 patients who received CRT for rectal cancer from 2006 to 2012. Prospectively recorded toxicity information, graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0, was retrieved from the medical record. Additionally, a subset of 52 patients recorded their gastrointestinal symptoms weekly during CRT, using the 7-item Bowel Problems Scale. Deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted from normal tissue in the proctectomy specimens and screened for 3 SNPs: XRCC1 R399Q, XPD K751Q, and TGFβ1 R25P. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression models were constructed. Results: The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy, and all patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Toxicities measured by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events were closely associated with patient-reported outcomes for the patients who completed the 7-item Bowel Problems Scale. Grade ≥3 toxicity occurred during CRT in 14 patients (8%). All 14 patients had either XRCC1 R399Q or TGFβ1 R25P polymorphisms. The TGFβ1 R25P polymorphism was significantly associated with grade ≥3 toxicity (odds ratio [OR] 3.47, P=.04) and, in patients who completed the Bowel Problems Scale, with grade ≥4 toxicity (OR 5.61, P=.02). The latter finding persisted in a multivariable logistic regression model controlling for ethnicity, age, and sex (adjusted OR 1.83, P=.02). Conclusions: We have validated the correlation between the TGFβ1 R25P SNP and acute toxicity during CRT in an independent cohort using both clinician- and patient-reported toxicity. The information from our study could be used as a basis to formulate a prospective trial testing the utility of this SNP as a biomarker of acute toxicity during neoadjuvant treatment in locally

  4. Dosimetric Coverage of the Prostate, Normal Tissue Sparing, and Acute Toxicity with High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Large Prostate Volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurposeTo evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes.Materials and MethodsOne hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38% unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 4.ResultsMedian follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3% patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17% patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p=0.04. There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity.ConclusionsDosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes.

  5. Dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for large prostate volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, George; Strom, Tobin J.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Mellon, Eric A.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Biagioli, Matthew C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: mcbiagioli@yahoo.com [Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Newnan, GA (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: to evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes. Materials and methods: one hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL) were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38%) unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4. Results: median follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3%) patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17%) patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p-0.04). There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity. Conclusions: dosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes. (author)

  6. Biomarkers study in rainbow trout exposed to industrially contaminated groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadjet Benchalgo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The spill of liquid industrial waste from chemical and petrochemical industries in Mercier lagoons located 20 km south of Montreal, Quebec, caused a major groundwater contamination by industrial contaminants. The aim of this study was to investigate the toxic effects of Mercier groundwater, following 4 and 14 days of exposure to graded concentrations from three wells at increasing distances 1.2, 2.7 and 5.4 km from the source of contamination. Rainbow trout were examined for several biomarkers of defense [ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD and gluthatione S-transferase (GST activities] and those of tissue damage [lipid peroxidation (LPO and DNA strand breaks]. The results showed that EROD activity was significantly enhanced in hepatic tissue at 1.2 and 5.4 km, whereas inhibition in activity was observed in group at 2.7 km. Therefore, GST activity was significantly increased at 3.1% concentration for the 2.7 km well. No change in LPO was observed. However, a significant induction of DNA strand breaks in liver was obtained at each distance. In conclusion, the data suggest that the release of these contaminants in groundwater leads to increased biotransformation for coplanar aromatic hydrocarbons and DNA damage in groundwater.

  7. Galvanizing industry: evaluation of exposure levels using biomonitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C.; Sabino, Claudia de V.S.; Amaral, Angela Maria [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Mattos, Silvania V. de M. [FUNED, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Div. de Bromatologia e Toxicologia; S. Filho, Serafim [Secretaria Municipal de Saude de Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Coordenacao de Saude do Trabalhador; Maia, Elene Cristina P. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    1999-11-01

    In Brazil, statistical surveys concerning occupational diseases refer to accidents and damages. The surveys do not refer to the occupational diseases developed through long exposures to hazardous work conditions, involving physical risk and toxic chemical substances. The Program of Medical Control of Occupational Health determines the Maximum Biological Levels Allowed and the Values of Normality References. But concerning metal and toxic inorganic, values of only few elements are established. In Belo Horizonte and surroundings areas, which is an important industrial centre in the country, there are different industries distributed over various areas. There are about 80 galvanizing industries which are responsible for the majority of the metal contamination hospitalities. A preliminary sampling was performed in order to conduct a survey of the exposures to elements related to occupational diseases in galvanizing industry. The preliminary results for toxic and non-toxic elements obtained using hair and fingernails as biomonitors are shown. The K{sub 0} parametric neutron activation analysis method was applied and the elements determined were: Ag, Al, Au, Cl, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, I, Mn, Na, Ti, V, Ta, and Zn. (author) 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.; e-mail: menezes at urano.cdtn.br

  8. Edible lipid nanoparticles: digestion, absorption, and potential toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClements, David Julian

    2013-10-01

    Food-grade nanoemulsions are being increasingly used in the food and beverage industry to encapsulate, protect, and deliver hydrophobic functional components, such as oil-soluble flavors, colors, preservatives, vitamins, and nutraceuticals. These nanoemulsions contain lipid nanoparticles (radius beverage industry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Biological-effective versus conventional dose volume histograms correlated with late genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer: a matched pair analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roeske John C

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine whether the dose-volume histograms (DVH's for the rectum and bladder constructed using biological-effective dose (BED-DVH's better correlate with late gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU toxicity after treatment with external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer than conventional DVH's (C-DVH's. Methods The charts of 190 patients treated with external beam radiotherapy with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were reviewed. Six patients (3.2% were found to have RTOG grade 3 GI toxicity, and similarly 6 patients (3.2% were found to have RTOG grade 3 GU toxicity. Average late C-DVH's and BED-DVH's of the bladder and rectum were computed for these patients as well as for matched-pair control patients. For each matched pair the following measures of normalized difference in the DVH's were computed: (a δAUC = (Area Under Curve [AUC] in grade 3 patient – AUC in grade 0 patient/(AUC in grade 0 patient and (b δV60 = (Percent volume receiving = 60 Gy [V60] in grade 3 patient – V60 in grade 0 patient/(V60 in grade 0 patient. Results As expected, the grade 3 curve is to the right of and above the grade 0 curve for all four sets of average DVH's – suggesting that both the C-DVH and the BED-DVH can be used for predicting late toxicity. δAUC was higher for the BED-DVH's than for the C-DVH's – 0.27 vs 0.23 (p = 0.036 for the rectum and 0.24 vs 0.20 (p = 0.065 for the bladder. δV60 was also higher for the BED-DVH's than for the C-DVH's – 2.73 vs 1.49 for the rectum (p = 0.021 and 1.64 vs 0.71 (p = 0.021 for the bladder. Conclusions When considering well-established dosimetric endpoints used in evaluating treatment plans, BED-DVH's for the rectum and bladder correlate better with late toxicity than C-DVH's and should be considered when attempting to minimize late GI and GU toxicity after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  10. High-grade acute organ toxicity and p16INK4A expression as positive prognostic factors in primary radio(chemo)therapy for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehrany, Narges; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Hess, Clemens F.; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Kitz, Julia; Li, Li; Kueffer, Stefan; Lorenzen, Stephan; Beissbarth, Tim; Burfeind, Peter; Reichardt, Holger M.; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Superior treatment response and survival for patients with human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive head and neck cancer (HNSCC) are documented in clinical studies. However, the relevance of high-grade acute organ toxicity (HGAOT), which has also been correlated with improved prognosis, has attracted scant attention in HPV-positive HNSCC patients. Hence we tested the hypothesis that both parameters, HPV and HGAOT, are positive prognostic factors in patients with HNSCC treated with definite radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RCT). Pretreatment tumor tissue and clinical records were available from 233 patients receiving definite RT (62 patients) or RCT (171 patients). HPV infection was analysed by means of HPV DNA detection or p16 INK4A expression; HGAOT was defined as the occurrence of acute organ toxicity >grade 2 according to the Common Toxicity Criteria. Both variables were correlated with overall survival (OS) using Cox proportional hazards regression. Positivity for HPV DNA (44 samples, 18.9 %) and p16 INK4A expression (102 samples, 43.8 %) were significantly correlated (p < 0.01), and HGAOT occurred in 77 (33 %) patients. Overall, the 5-year OS was 23 %; stratified for p16 INK4A expression and HGAOT, OS rates were 47 %, 42 %, 20 % and 10 % for patients with p16 INK4A expression and HGAOT, patients with HGAOT only, patients with p16 INK4A expression only, and patients without p16 INK4A expression or HGAOT, respectively. After multivariate testing p16 INK4A expression (p = 0.003) and HGAOT (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with OS. P16 INK4A expression and HGAOT are independent prognostic factors for OS of patients with HNSCC, whereas p16 INK4A expression is particularly important for patients without HGAOT. (orig.) [de

  11. Related regulation of quality control of industrial products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    This book introduce related regulation of quality control of industrial products, which includes regulations of industrial products quality control, enforcement ordinance of industrial products quality control, enforcement regulation of quality control of industrial products, designated items with industrial production quality indication, industrial production quality test, and industrial production quality test organization and management tips of factory quality by grade.

  12. Production of Food Grade Yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argyro Bekatorou

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts have been known to humans for thousands of years as they have been used in traditional fermentation processes like wine, beer and bread making. Today, yeasts are also used as alternative sources of high nutritional value proteins, enzymes and vitamins, and have numerous applications in the health food industry as food additives, conditioners and flavouring agents, for the production of microbiology media and extracts, as well as livestock feeds. Modern scientific advances allow the isolation, construction and industrial production of new yeast strains to satisfy the specific demands of the food industry. Types of commercial food grade yeasts, industrial production processes and raw materials are highlighted. Aspects of yeast metabolism, with respect to carbohydrate utilization, nutritional aspects and recent research advances are also discussed.

  13. INAA and AAS of different products from sugar cane industry in Pakistan. Toxic trace elements for nutritional safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waheed, S.; Rahman, S.; Gill, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) have been used to determine As, Br, Hg, Sb and Se in combination with atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) as a complementary technique for the quantification of Cd and Pb in jaggery, brown sugar, white sugar and molasses. All sugar cane products were collected from the local sugar cane industry of Pakistan. The highest concentration of these potentially toxic elements was quantified in molasses; however, molasses together with jaggery, brown sugar and white sugar contains trace amounts of all of these elements. Due to very low concentration of Cd it could only be detected in molasses. To evaluate the percentage contribution of these elements in the sugar cane products to the weekly recommended values, intakes on weekly consumption of 100 g of each item have also been calculated which follow the pattern Br>Se>Pb>Hg>As>Sb. The elevated Br contents may be attributed to the use of Br-containing chemicals for fumigation; however, these contents are well within the tolerance levels. The estimated weekly intake of all toxic elements is very low indicating that sugar cane products can be safely ingested as part of the diets. (author)

  14. Safty and acute toxicities of intraoperative electron radiotherapy for patients with abdominal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Yirui; Feng Qinfu; Li Minghui

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the safety and acute toxicities of intraoperative electron radiotherapy for patients with abdominal tumors. Methods: From May 2008 to August 2009, 52 patients with abdominal tumors were treated with intraoperative electron radiotherapy, including 14 patients with breast cancer,19 with pancreatic cancer, 3 with cervical cancer, 4 with ovarian cancer, 6 with sarcoma, and 6 with other tumors. Fifteen patients were with recurrent tumors. The intraoperative radiotherapy was performed using Mobetron mobile electron accelerator, with total dose of 9 - 18 Gy. In all, 29, 4 and 19 patients received complete resection, palliative resection and surgical exploration, respectively. The complications during the operations and within 6 months after operations were graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 (CTC 3.0). Results: The median duration of surgery was 190 minutes. Intraoperative complications were observed in 5 patients, including 3 with hemorrhage, 1 with hypotension,and 1 with hypoxaemia, all of which were treated conservatively. The median hospitalization time and time to take out stitches was 12 and 13 days, respectively. And the in-hospital mortality was 4% (2/52). Twenty-four patients suffered post-operative adverse events, including 3 postoperative infections. With a median follow-up time of 183 days, 20% of patients suffered from grade 3 to 5 adverse events, with hematological toxicities being the most common complication, followed by bellyache. Grade 1 and 2 toxicities which were definitely associated with intraoperative radiotherapy was 28% and 4%, respectively. None of grade 3 to 5 complications were proved to be caused by intraoperative radiotherapy. Conclusions: Intraoperative electron radiotherapy is well tolerable and could be widely used for patients with abdominal tumors, with a little longer time to take out stitches but without more morbidities and toxicities compared surgery alone. (authors)

  15. Carbon ion therapy for advanced sinonasal malignancies: feasibility and acute toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Alexandra D; Nikoghosyan, Anna V; Ecker, Swantje; Ellerbrock, Malte; Debus, Jürgen; Münter, Marc W

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate feasibility and toxicity of carbon ion therapy for treatment of sinonasal malignancies. First site of treatment failure in malignant tumours of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity is mostly in-field, local control hence calls for dose escalation which has so far been hampered by accompanying acute and late toxicity. Raster-scanned carbon ion therapy offers the advantage of sharp dose gradients promising increased dose application without increase of side-effects. Twenty-nine patients with various sinonasal malignancies were treated from 11/2009 to 08/2010. Accompanying toxicity was evaluated according to CTCAE v.4.0. Tumor response was assessed according to RECIST. Seventeen patients received treatment as definitive RT, 9 for local relapse, 2 for re-irradiation. All patients had T4 tumours (median CTV1 129.5 cc, CTV2 395.8 cc), mostly originating from the maxillary sinus. Median dose was 73 GyE mostly in mixed beam technique as IMRT plus carbon ion boost. Median follow- up was 5.1 months [range: 2.4 - 10.1 months]. There were 7 cases with grade 3 toxicity (mucositis, dysphagia) but no other higher grade acute reactions; 6 patients developed grade 2 conjunctivits, no case of early visual impairment. Apart from alterations of taste, all symptoms had resolved at 8 weeks post RT. Overall radiological response rate was 50% (CR and PR). Carbon ion therapy is feasible; despite high doses, acute reactions were not increased and generally resolved within 8 weeks post radiotherapy. Treatment response is encouraging though follow-up is too short to estimate control rates or evaluate potential late effects. Controlled trials are warranted

  16. High-dose-rate stereotactic body radiation therapy for postradiation therapy locally recurrent prostatic carcinoma: Preliminary prostate-specific antigen response, disease-free survival, and toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Donald B; Wurzer, James; Shirazi, Reza; Bridge, Stephen S; Law, Jonathan; Mardirossian, George

    2015-01-01

    Patients with locally recurrent adenocarcinoma of the prostate following radiation therapy (RT) present a challenging problem. We prospectively evaluated the use of "high-dose-rate-like" prostate stereotactic body RT (SBRT) salvage for this circumstance, evaluating prostate-specific antigen response, disease-free survival, and toxicity. Between February 2009 and March 2014, 29 patients with biopsy-proven recurrent locally prostate cancer >2 years post-RT were treated. Median prior RT dose was 73.8 Gy and median interval to SBRT salvage was 88 months. Median recurrence Gleason score was 7 (79% was ≥7). Pre-existing RT toxicity >grade 1 was a reason for exclusion. Magnetic resonance imaging-defined prostate volume including any suspected extraprostatic extension, comprising the planning target volume. A total of 34 Gy/5 fractions was given, delivering a heterogeneous, high-dose-rate-like dose-escalation pattern. Toxicities were assessed using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, criteria. Twenty-nine treated patients had a median 24-month follow-up (range, 3-60 months). A median pre-SBRT salvage baseline prostate-specific antigen level of 3.1 ng/mL decreased to 0.65 ng/mL and 0.16 ng/mL at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Actuarial 2-year biochemical disease-free survival measured 82%, with no local failures. Toxicity >grade 1 was limited to the genitourinary domain, with 18% grade 2 or higher and 7% grade 3 or higher. No gastrointestinal toxicity >grade 1 occurred. Two-year disease-free survival is encouraging, and the prostate-specific antigen response kinetic appears comparable with that seen in de novo patients treated with SBRT, albeit still a preliminary finding. Grade ≥2 genitourinary toxicity was occasionally seen with no obvious predictive factor. Noting that our only brachytherapy case was 1 of the 2 cases with ≥grade 3 genitourinary toxicity, caution is recommended treating these patients. SBRT salvage of post-RT local recurrence

  17. Emerging industrial processes for low grade rare earth mineral concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldenhoff, Karin; Ho, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Historically rare earth recovery has mainly been derived from the processing of monazite, bastnasite and xenotime containing ores amenable to beneficiation, yielding high grade mineral concentrates. A notable exception is the recovery of heavy rare earths from ionic clays in Southern China. Recently, projects are being proposed to treat a range of mineral concentrates which tend to be lower grade with wide ranging modal mineralogy for rare earths and associated gangue minerals. This has a significant impact on processing routes. This paper discusses processes proposed for emerging rare earth producers and how different projects have responded to particular challenges including: Control of phosphorous due to the presence of xenotime or monazite type minerals; Control of phosphorous due to the presence of rare earth containing apatite; Rare earth recovery from polymetallic ores; Control of radionuclides in rare earth processing, etc.

  18. Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Sauerheber

    2013-01-01

    The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity ...

  19. Evaluation of interobserver and interscale agreement in assessing late bowel toxicity after pelvic radiation in patients with carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinnachamy, A.N.; Krishnatry, R.; Mahantshetty, U.; Engineer, R.; Shrivastava, S.K.; Chopra, S.; Kannan, S.; Thomas, B.

    2013-01-01

    Lack of agreement and inconsistency in capturing late bowel toxicity may be a source of error while reporting trials with toxicity endpoints. Documenting baseline inconsistency while scoring toxicity questionnaires (Radio Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE)) may be worthwhile. The present study was conducted as a quality assurance measure prior to initiating a randomized trial (PARCER; NCT01279135) that evaluates the impact of image-guided radiation on bowel toxicity. From August 2010 to July 2011, patients with cervical cancer who underwent pelvic chemoradiation >6 months ago, with controlled disease and any bowel symptom at follow-up, were included. RTOG and CTCAE questionnaires were filled by two blinded observers. Interscale (RTOG vs CTCAE) and interobserver (observer A and B) agreement were evaluated with Spearman's correlation and kappa statistic. Fifty-five patients were included. Twelve patients with symptoms could not be graded by the RTOG scale. Of those graded as asymptomatic on RTOG, distension, vomiting, pain and nausea were identified as the most common symptoms. Amongst these, grade 1, 2 and 3 toxicity was observed in 6, 5 and 1 patient, respectively. The interscale correlation was moderate (Spearman's correlation ρ=0.56; P=0.001). High interobserver agreement (92%) was observed within the RTOG scale [kappa (κ) -0.94; 95% CI 0.77-1]. All disagreements were observed while scoring grade 1-2 toxicity. Among CTCAE, agreement was lower with modules such as distension, anorexia, nausea and constipation. High interobserver agreement was observed for both RTOG and most CTCAE subscales; most disagreements were for grade 1-2. Interscale agreement (RTOG and CTCAE) was moderate. Detailed patient interrogation or use of patient-reported-outcome scores while documenting the aforesaid subscales may be worthwhile. (author)

  20. Effect of a prostaglandin - given rectally for prevention of radiation-induced acute proctitis - on late rectal toxicity. Results of phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kertesz, Tereza; Herrmann, Markus K.A.; Christiansen, Hans; Hermann, Robert M.; Hess, Clemens F.; Hille, Andrea; Zapf, Antonia; Pradier, Olivier; Schmidberger, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: to assess the late effect of a prostaglandin, given rectally during irradiation, on late rectal toxicity. In the acute treatment setting no significant differences in reducing the incidence of acute proctitis symptoms in patients receiving misoprostol, however, significantly more rectal bleeding had been reported. Patients and methods: a total of 100 patients who had undergone radiotherapy for prostate cancer had been entered into this phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study with misoprostol or placebo suppositories. The toxicity was evaluated yearly after cessation of irradiation by the RTOG/LENT-SOMA scale. Results: the median follow-up was 50 months. 20 patients suffered from grade 1, four patients from grade 2 as well, and three patients only from grade 2 toxicity. Frequency, bleeding and urgency were the most commonly reported symptoms. In keeping with other studies and clinical experience, the symptoms peaked within the first 2 years with a median for grade 1 of 13 months and for grade 2 of 15 months. The presence of acute toxicity grade 2 showed a correlation with the development of any late toxicity (p = 0.03). Any acute rectal bleeding was significant correlated with any late rectal bleeding (p = 0.017). Conclusion: misoprostol given as once-daily suppository for prevention of acute radiation-induced proctitis does neither influence the incidence and severity of radiation-induced acute nor late rectal toxicity. Misoprostol has no negative impact on the incidence and severity of late rectal bleeding, in contrast to acute rectal bleeding. The routine clinical use of misoprostol suppositories cannot be recommended. (orig.)

  1. Effect of a prostaglandin - given rectally for prevention of radiation-induced acute proctitis - on late rectal toxicity. Results of phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kertesz, Tereza; Herrmann, Markus K.A.; Christiansen, Hans; Hermann, Robert M.; Hess, Clemens F.; Hille, Andrea [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. of Goettingen (Germany); Zapf, Antonia [Dept. of Medical Statistics, Univ. of Goettingen (Germany); Pradier, Olivier [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. of Brest (France); Schmidberger, Heinz [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. of Mainz (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    Background and purpose: to assess the late effect of a prostaglandin, given rectally during irradiation, on late rectal toxicity. In the acute treatment setting no significant differences in reducing the incidence of acute proctitis symptoms in patients receiving misoprostol, however, significantly more rectal bleeding had been reported. Patients and methods: a total of 100 patients who had undergone radiotherapy for prostate cancer had been entered into this phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study with misoprostol or placebo suppositories. The toxicity was evaluated yearly after cessation of irradiation by the RTOG/LENT-SOMA scale. Results: the median follow-up was 50 months. 20 patients suffered from grade 1, four patients from grade 2 as well, and three patients only from grade 2 toxicity. Frequency, bleeding and urgency were the most commonly reported symptoms. In keeping with other studies and clinical experience, the symptoms peaked within the first 2 years with a median for grade 1 of 13 months and for grade 2 of 15 months. The presence of acute toxicity grade 2 showed a correlation with the development of any late toxicity (p = 0.03). Any acute rectal bleeding was significant correlated with any late rectal bleeding (p = 0.017). Conclusion: misoprostol given as once-daily suppository for prevention of acute radiation-induced proctitis does neither influence the incidence and severity of radiation-induced acute nor late rectal toxicity. Misoprostol has no negative impact on the incidence and severity of late rectal bleeding, in contrast to acute rectal bleeding. The routine clinical use of misoprostol suppositories cannot be recommended. (orig.)

  2. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 antagonists block the noxious effects of toxic industrial isocyanates and tear gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessac, Bret F; Sivula, Michael; von Hehn, Christian A; Caceres, Ana I; Escalera, Jasmine; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2009-04-01

    The release of methyl isocyanate in Bhopal, India, caused the worst industrial accident in history. Exposures to industrial isocyanates induce lacrimation, pain, airway irritation, and edema. Similar responses are elicited by chemicals used as tear gases. Despite frequent exposures, the biological targets of isocyanates and tear gases in vivo have not been identified, precluding the development of effective countermeasures. We use Ca(2+) imaging and electrophysiology to show that the noxious effects of isocyanates and those of all major tear gas agents are caused by activation of Ca(2+) influx and membrane currents in mustard oil-sensitive sensory neurons. These responses are mediated by transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), an ion channel serving as a detector for reactive chemicals. In mice, genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of TRPA1 dramatically reduces isocyanate- and tear gas-induced nocifensive behavior after both ocular and cutaneous exposures. We conclude that isocyanates and tear gas agents target the same neuronal receptor, TRPA1. Treatment with TRPA1 antagonists may prevent and alleviate chemical irritation of the eyes, skin, and airways and reduce the adverse health effects of exposures to a wide range of toxic noxious chemicals.

  3. Toxicity Assessment for EPA's Hydraulic Fracturing Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains data used to develop multiple manuscripts on the toxicity of chemicals associated with the hydraulic fracturing industry. These manuscripts...

  4. Local Control and Toxicity in a Large Cohort of Central Lung Tumors Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modh, Ankit; Rimner, Andreas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Williams, Eric [Department of Medical Physics Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Foster, Amanda; Shah, Mihir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang [Department of Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Gelblum, Daphna Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Rosenzweig, Kenneth E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Yorke, Ellen D.; Jackson, Andrew [Department of Medical Physics Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wu, Abraham J., E-mail: wua@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in central lung tumors has been associated with higher rates of severe toxicity. We sought to evaluate toxicity and local control in a large cohort and to identify predictive dosimetric parameters. Methods and Materials: We identified patients who received SBRT for central tumors according to either of 2 definitions. Local failure (LF) was estimated using a competing risks model, and multivariate analysis (MVA) was used to assess factors associated with LF. We reviewed patient toxicity and applied Cox proportional hazard analysis and log-rank tests to assess whether dose-volume metrics of normal structures correlated with pulmonary toxicity. Results: One hundred twenty-five patients received SBRT for non-small cell lung cancer (n=103) or metastatic lesions (n=22), using intensity modulated radiation therapy. The most common dose was 45 Gy in 5 fractions. Median follow-up was 17.4 months. Incidence of toxicity ≥ grade 3 was 8.0%, including 5.6% pulmonary toxicity. Sixteen patients (12.8%) experienced esophageal toxicity ≥ grade 2, including 50% of patients in whom PTV overlapped the esophagus. There were 2 treatment-related deaths. Among patients receiving biologically effective dose (BED) ≥80 Gy (n=108), 2-year LF was 21%. On MVA, gross tumor volume (GTV) was significantly associated with LF. None of the studied dose-volume metrics of the lungs, heart, proximal bronchial tree (PBT), or 2 cm expansion of the PBT (“no-fly-zone” [NFZ]) correlated with pulmonary toxicity ≥grade 2. There were no differences in pulmonary toxicity between central tumors located inside the NFZ and those outside the NFZ but with planning target volume (PTV) intersecting the mediastinum. Conclusions: Using moderate doses, SBRT for central lung tumors achieves acceptable local control with low rates of severe toxicity. Dosimetric analysis showed no significant correlation between dose to the lungs, heart, or NFZ and

  5. Phase II study assessing the effectiveness of Biafine cream as a prophylactic agent for radiation-induced acute skin toxicity to the breast in women undergoing radiotherapy with concomitant CMF chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szumacher, Ewa; Wighton, Anne; Franssen, Edmee; Chow, Edward; Tsao, May; Ackerman, Ida; Andersson, Lourdes; Kim, John; Wojcicka, Anna; Ung, Yee; Sixel, Katharina; Hayter, Charles

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of Biafine cream in preventing Grade 2 acute radiation dermatitis, according to the National Cancer Institute of Canada skin radiation toxicity criteria in patients undergoing concomitant adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the breast. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients participated in this study. Patients were treated with a lumpectomy followed by concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the breast. Biafine cream was applied daily, starting on the first day and ending 2 weeks post-radiotherapy. Patients underwent weekly skin assessments throughout radiotherapy and at 2 and 4 weeks after treatment. Outcome measures were assessed using a Skin Assessment Questionnaire that was scored according to the National Cancer Institute of Canada skin radiation toxicity criteria and a self-administered questionnaire that evaluated skin symptoms. Results: The maximum skin toxicity observed during the course of treatment was as follows: less than Grade 2 toxicity, 15% (9 patients); Grade 2, 83% (50 patients); Grade 3, 2% (1 patient); Grade 4, 0% (0 patients). The majority of the radiation dermatitis was observed after 3 weeks of radiotherapy. Conclusion: The majority of patients who underwent concomitant chemo- and radiotherapy for breast cancer developed Grade 2 radiation dermatitis with the use of Biafine cream. However, no treatment delays or interruptions were observed because of skin toxicity

  6. Risk of Late Toxicity in Men Receiving Dose-Escalated Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Prostate Radiation Therapy: Results From a Randomized Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Karen E., E-mail: khoffman1@mdanderson.org; Voong, K. Ranh; Pugh, Thomas J.; Skinner, Heath; Levy, Lawrence B.; Takiar, Vinita; Choi, Seungtaek; Du, Weiliang; Frank, Steven J.; Johnson, Jennifer; Kanke, James; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Lee, Andrew K.; Mahmood, Usama; McGuire, Sean E.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2014-04-01

    Objective: To report late toxicity outcomes from a randomized trial comparing conventional and hypofractionated prostate radiation therapy and to identify dosimetric and clinical parameters associated with late toxicity after hypofractionated treatment. Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer were enrolled in a trial that randomized men to either conventionally fractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (CIMRT, 75.6 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) or to dose-escalated hypofractionated IMRT (HIMRT, 72 Gy in 2.4-Gy fractions). Late (≥90 days after completion of radiation therapy) genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were prospectively evaluated and scored according to modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: 101 men received CIMRT and 102 men received HIMRT. The median age was 68, and the median follow-up time was 6.0 years. Twenty-eight percent had low-risk, 71% had intermediate-risk, and 1% had high-risk disease. There was no difference in late GU toxicity in men treated with CIMRT and HIMRT. The actuarial 5-year grade ≥2 GU toxicity was 16.5% after CIMRT and 15.8% after HIMRT (P=.97). There was a nonsignificant numeric increase in late GI toxicity in men treated with HIMRT compared with men treated with CIMRT. The actuarial 5-year grade ≥2 GI toxicity was 5.1% after CIMRT and 10.0% after HIMRT (P=.11). In men receiving HIMRT, the proportion of rectum receiving 36.9 Gy, 46.2 Gy, 64.6 Gy, and 73.9 Gy was associated with the development of late GI toxicity (P<.05). The 5-year actuarial grade ≥2 GI toxicity was 27.3% in men with R64.6Gy ≥ 20% but only 6.0% in men with R64.6Gy < 20% (P=.016). Conclusions: Dose-escalated IMRT using a moderate hypofractionation regimen (72 Gy in 2.4-Gy fractions) can be delivered safely with limited grade 2 or 3 late toxicity. Minimizing the proportion of rectum that receives moderate and high dose decreases the risk of late rectal toxicity after this

  7. Risk of Late Toxicity in Men Receiving Dose-Escalated Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Prostate Radiation Therapy: Results From a Randomized Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, Karen E.; Voong, K. Ranh; Pugh, Thomas J.; Skinner, Heath; Levy, Lawrence B.; Takiar, Vinita; Choi, Seungtaek; Du, Weiliang; Frank, Steven J.; Johnson, Jennifer; Kanke, James; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Lee, Andrew K.; Mahmood, Usama; McGuire, Sean E.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To report late toxicity outcomes from a randomized trial comparing conventional and hypofractionated prostate radiation therapy and to identify dosimetric and clinical parameters associated with late toxicity after hypofractionated treatment. Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer were enrolled in a trial that randomized men to either conventionally fractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (CIMRT, 75.6 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) or to dose-escalated hypofractionated IMRT (HIMRT, 72 Gy in 2.4-Gy fractions). Late (≥90 days after completion of radiation therapy) genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were prospectively evaluated and scored according to modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: 101 men received CIMRT and 102 men received HIMRT. The median age was 68, and the median follow-up time was 6.0 years. Twenty-eight percent had low-risk, 71% had intermediate-risk, and 1% had high-risk disease. There was no difference in late GU toxicity in men treated with CIMRT and HIMRT. The actuarial 5-year grade ≥2 GU toxicity was 16.5% after CIMRT and 15.8% after HIMRT (P=.97). There was a nonsignificant numeric increase in late GI toxicity in men treated with HIMRT compared with men treated with CIMRT. The actuarial 5-year grade ≥2 GI toxicity was 5.1% after CIMRT and 10.0% after HIMRT (P=.11). In men receiving HIMRT, the proportion of rectum receiving 36.9 Gy, 46.2 Gy, 64.6 Gy, and 73.9 Gy was associated with the development of late GI toxicity (P<.05). The 5-year actuarial grade ≥2 GI toxicity was 27.3% in men with R64.6Gy ≥ 20% but only 6.0% in men with R64.6Gy < 20% (P=.016). Conclusions: Dose-escalated IMRT using a moderate hypofractionation regimen (72 Gy in 2.4-Gy fractions) can be delivered safely with limited grade 2 or 3 late toxicity. Minimizing the proportion of rectum that receives moderate and high dose decreases the risk of late rectal toxicity after this

  8. Large volume unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: acute toxicity and initial outcome results with rapid arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogliata Antonella

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report acute toxicity, initial outcome results and planning therapeutic parameters in radiation treatment of advanced lung cancer (stage III with volumetric modulated arcs using RapidArc (RA. Methods Twenty-four consecutive patients were treated with RA. All showed locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer with stage IIIA-IIIB and with large volumes (GTV:299 ± 175 cm3, PTV:818 ± 206 cm3. Dose prescription was 66Gy in 33 fractions to mean PTV. Delivery was performed with two partial arcs with a 6 MV photon beam. Results From a dosimetric point of view, RA allowed us to respect most planning objectives on target volumes and organs at risk. In particular: for GTV D1% = 105.6 ± 1.7%, D99% = 96.7 ± 1.8%, D5%-D95% = 6.3 ± 1.4%; contra-lateral lung mean dose resulted in 13.7 ± 3.9Gy, for spinal cord D1% = 39.5 ± 4.0Gy, for heart V45Gy = 9.0 ± 7.0Gy, for esophagus D1% = 67.4 ± 2.2Gy. Delivery time was 133 ± 7s. At three months partial remission > 50% was observed in 56% of patients. Acute toxicities at 3 months showed 91% with grade 1 and 9% with grade 2 esophageal toxicity; 18% presented grade 1 and 9% with grade 2 pneumonia; no grade 3 acute toxicity was observed. The short follow-up does not allow assessment of local control and progression free survival. Conclusions RA proved to be a safe and advantageous treatment modality for NSCLC with large volumes. Long term observation of patients is needed to assess outcome and late toxicity.

  9. Growth of eucalyptus rooted cuttings in toxic organic waste compost of textile industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila F. de Souza

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBiodegradation techniques may help contaminated organic wastes to become useful for plant production. The current study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of composting in the biodegradation of toxic residues from the textile industry and its use as substrate in saplings production. Cotton cloths contaminated with oil and grease, used in loom maintenance, were composted in a mixture with cattle manure. The composted material replaced coconut fiber in the substrate for the production of eucalyptus rooted cuttings: mixture of vermiculite, carbonized rice husk and coconut fiber in the ratio of 2:1:1 (v/v and using it as control. Thus, the amount of rice husks remained unchanged and the amount of vermiculite and compost varied. The compost proportion in the tested substrates were 0, 19, 37, 56 and 75%. The compost produced from textile wastes showed high nutrient levels and low levels of heavy metals. In general, the survival, growth and some growth indices of rooted cuttings produced on substrates with 19 and 37% compost were similar to those of rooted cuttings grown in commercial substrate. Composting is efficient and the material is useful for rooted cuttings production.

  10. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Reduces Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Patients Treated With Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Navesh K.; Li Tianyu; Chen, David Y.; Pollack, Alan; Horwitz, Eric M.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Androgen deprivation therapy (AD) has been shown to increase late Grade 2 or greater rectal toxicity when used concurrently with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has the potential to reduce toxicity by limiting the radiation dose received by the bowel and bladder. The present study compared the genitourinary and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in men treated with 3D-CRT+AD vs. IMRT+AD. Methods and Materials: Between July 1992 and July 2004, 293 men underwent 3D-CRT (n = 170) or IMRT (n = 123) with concurrent AD (<6 months, n = 123; ≥6 months, n = 170). The median radiation dose was 76 Gy for 3D-CRT (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements) and 76 Gy for IMRT (95% to the planning target volume). Toxicity was assessed by a patient symptom questionnaire that was completed at each visit and recorded using a Fox Chase Modified Late Effects Normal Tissue Task radiation morbidity scale. Results: The mean follow-up was 86 months (standard deviation, 29.3) for the 3D-CRT group and 40 months (standard deviation, 9.7) for the IMRT group. Acute GI toxicity (odds ratio, 4; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-11.7; p = .005) was significantly greater with 3D-CRT than with IMRT and was independent of the AD duration (i.e., <6 vs. ≥6 months). The interval to the development of late GI toxicity was significantly longer in the IMRT group. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimate for Grade 2 or greater GI toxicity was 20% for 3D-CRT and 8% for IMRT (p = .01). On multivariate analysis, Grade 2 or greater late GI toxicity (hazard ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-4.3; p = .04) was more prevalent in the 3D-CRT patients. Conclusion: Compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT significantly decreased the acute and late GI toxicity in patients treated with AD.

  11. Using S and Pb isotope ratios to trace leaching of toxic substances from an acid-impacted industrial-waste landfill (Pozdatky, Czech Republic)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, Martin; Pacherova, Petra; Erbanova, Lucie; Veron, Alain J.; Buzek, Frantisek; Jackova, Ivana; Paces, Tomas; Rukavickova, Lenka; Blaha, Vladimir; Holecek, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► S and Pb isotopes are useful tracers of polluted groundwater movement. ► Large ranges of found δ 34 S and 206 Pb/ 207 Pb ratios made source apportionment robust. ► δ 34 S values higher than 6.5 permil indicated contamination. ► Pb in stream sediment recorded landfill leaks, but was insensitive to air pollution. ► The front of polluted groundwater plume in fractured plutonic rocks spread unevenly. - Abstract: Slightly elevated concentrations of toxic species in waters sampled in the surroundings of a leaky landfill may be both a sign of an approaching contaminant plume, or a result of water–rock interaction. Isotopes can be instrumental in distinguishing between anthropogenic and geogenic species in groundwater. We studied sulfur and lead isotope ratios at an abandoned industrial-waste landfill, located in a densely populated part of Central Europe. Stable isotope variability in space and time was used to follow the movement of a groundwater plume, contaminated with toxic metals (Cd, Cr, Be), in fractured granitoids. Toxic metals had been mobilized from industrial waste by a strong pulse of sulfuric acid, also deposited in the landfill. Both tracers exhibited a wide range of values (δ 34 S between +2.6 and +18.9‰; 206 Pb/ 207 Pb between 1.16 and 1.39), which facilitated identification of mixing end-members, and made it possible to assess the sources of the studied species. In situ fractionations did not hinder source apportionment. Influx of contaminated groundwater was observed neither in irrigation wells in a nearby village, nor at distances greater than 300 m from the landfill. Combination of stable isotope tracers can be used as part of an early-warning system in landscapes affected by landfills.

  12. Acute toxicities of unrelated bone marrow versus peripheral blood stem cell donation: results of a prospective trial from the National Marrow Donor Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsipher, Michael A; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Logan, Brent R; Shaw, Bronwen E; Wingard, John R; Lazarus, Hillard M; Waller, Edmund K; Seftel, Matthew; Stroncek, David F; Lopez, Angela M; Maharaj, Dipnarine; Hematti, Peiman; O'Donnell, Paul V; Loren, Alison W; Leitman, Susan F; Anderlini, Paolo; Goldstein, Steven C; Levine, John E; Navarro, Willis H; Miller, John P; Confer, Dennis L

    2013-01-03

    Although peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) have replaced bone marrow (BM) as the most common unrelated donor progenitor cell product collected, a direct comparison of concurrent PBSC versus BM donation experiences has not been performed. We report a prospective study of 2726 BM and 6768 PBSC donors who underwent collection from 2004 to 2009. Pain and toxicities were assessed at baseline, during G-CSF administration, on the day of collection, within 48 hours of donation, and weekly until full recovery. Peak levels of pain and toxicities did not differ between the 2 donation processes for most donors. Among obese donors, PBSC donors were at increased risk of grade 2 to 4 pain as well as grade 2 to 4 toxicities during the pericollection period. In contrast, BM donors were more likely to experience grade 2 to 4 toxicities at 1 week and pain at 1 week and 1 month after the procedure. BM donors experienced slower recovery, with 3% still not fully recovered at 24 weeks, whereas 100% of PBSC donors had recovered. Other factors associated with toxicity included obesity, increasing age, and female sex. In summary, this study provides extensive detail regarding individualized risk patterns of PBSC versus BM donation toxicity, suggesting donor profiles that can be targeted with interventions to minimize toxicity.

  13. Predictive QSAR modelling of algal toxicity of ionic liquids and its interspecies correlation with Daphnia toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kunal; Das, Rudra Narayan; Popelier, Paul L A

    2015-05-01

    Predictive toxicology using chemometric tools can be very useful in order to fill the data gaps for ionic liquids (ILs) with limited available experimental toxicity information, in view of their growing industrial uses. Though originally promoted as green chemicals, ILs have now been shown to possess considerable toxicity against different ecological endpoints. Against this background, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models have been developed here for the toxicity of ILs against the green algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus using computed descriptors with definite physicochemical meaning. The final models emerged from E-state indices, extended topochemical atom (ETA) indices and quantum topological molecular similarity (QTMS) indices. The developed partial least squares models support the established mechanism of toxicity of ionic liquids in terms of a surfactant action of cations and chaotropic action of anions. The models have been developed within the guidelines of the Organization of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) for regulatory QSAR models, and they have been validated both internally and externally using multiple strategies and also tested for applicability domain. A preliminary attempt has also been made, for the first time, to develop interspecies quantitative toxicity-toxicity relationship (QTTR) models for the algal toxicity of ILs with Daphnia toxicity, which should be interesting while predicting toxicity of ILs for an endpoint when the data for the other are available.

  14. 76 FR 7841 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collections; Toxic Chemical Release Reporting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... agencies, and others to promote reductions in toxic chemical releases. Industrial facilities use the TRI... Activities; Proposed Collections; Toxic Chemical Release Reporting; Request for Comments on Proposed Renewal... the individual listed in the preceding FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section. Title: Toxic Chemical...

  15. Toxicity of carbon nanotubes: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Arul Prakash; Devasena, Thiyagarajan

    2018-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are widely used in the aerospace, automotive, and electronics industries because of their stability, enhanced metallic, and electrical properties. CNTs are also being investigated for biomedical applications such as drug delivery systems and biosensors. However, the toxic potential of CNTs was reported in various cell lines and animal models. The toxicity depends on diverse properties of the CNTs, such as length, aspect ratio, surface area, degree of aggregation, purity, concentration, and dose. In addition, CNTs and/or associated contaminants were well known for oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, pulmonary inflammation, fibrosis, and granuloma in lungs. The increased production of CNTs likely enhanced the possibility of its exposure in people. Studies on the toxicity of CNTs are mainly focused on the pulmonary effects after intratracheal administration, and only a few studies are reported about the toxicity of CNTs via other routes of exposure. So, it is essential to consider the chronic toxicity of CNTs before using them for various biomedical applications. This review focuses on the potential toxicities of CNTs.

  16. Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) of Belford Roxo industrial plant effluent and its contribution in water quality of downstream of Sarapui River, Iguacu River sub-basin, Baia da Guanabara Basin, RJ, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, Luiz Eduardo Botelho

    2006-01-01

    The quality of Belford Roxo Industrial Plant effluent and water from Sarapui River were evaluated with Daphnia similis, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Danio rerio acute and chronic toxicity tests. In association with the ecotoxicological monitoring, the Toxicity Identification Evaluation procedure were performed and the identification of the toxic compounds was possible. The Chloride ion was identified as the major toxic compound in the effluent with additional effects of Metals, Ammonium and Sulfide. For the Sarapui River, the compounds of Phosphorus and Nitrogen were identified as the major toxic compounds with addictive effects of Metals, Ammonium and Sulfide. Although the environmental impact estimation based on the effluent toxicity suggests a minor impact on the water quality of Sarapui River, this was already sufficiently contaminated to make impracticable the establishment of an aquatic community. The constant discharge of untreated sludge promotes the eutrophication of this water body and makes impossible the equilibrium of this ecosystem. (author)

  17. Temperature effects on the nitric acid oxidation of industrial grade multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Nadia F., E-mail: nadia@fisica.ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Martinez, Diego Stefani T., E-mail: diegostefani.br@gmail.com; Paula, Amauri J., E-mail: amaurijp@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Laboratorio de Quimica do Estado Solido (LQES), Instituto de Quimica (Brazil); Silveira, Jose V. [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Alves, Oswaldo L., E-mail: oalves@iqm.unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Laboratorio de Quimica do Estado Solido (LQES), Instituto de Quimica (Brazil); Souza Filho, Antonio G., E-mail: agsf@fisica.ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    In this study, we report an oxidative treatment of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by using nitric acid at different temperatures (25-175 Degree-Sign C). The analyzed materials have diameters varying from 10 to 40 nm and majority lengths between 3 and 6 {mu}m. The characterization results obtained by different techniques (e.g., field emission scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy, Braunauer, Emmet and Teller method, {zeta}-potential and confocal Raman spectroscopy) allowed us to access the effects of temperature treatment on the relevant physico-chemical properties of the MWCNTs samples studied in view of an integrated perspective to use these samples in a bio-toxicological context. Analytical microbalance measurements were used to access the purity of samples (metallic residue) after thermogravimetric analysis. Confocal Raman spectroscopy measurements were used to evaluate the density of structural defects created on the surface of the tubes due to the oxidation process by using 2D Raman image. Finally, we have demonstrated that temperature is an important parameter in the generation of oxidation debris (a byproduct which has not been properly taken into account in the literature) in the industrial grade MWCNTs studied after nitric acid purification and functionalization.

  18. In vivo dosimetry and acute toxicity in breast cancer patients undergoing intraoperative radiotherapy as boost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jason Joon Bock; Choi, Jin Hyun; Lee, Ik Jae; Park, Kwang Woo; Kim, Kang Pyo; Kim, Jun Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sung Gwe; Jeong, Joon [Dept. of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To report the results of a correlation analysis of skin dose assessed by in vivo dosimetry and the incidence of acute toxicity. This is a phase 2 trial evaluating the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a boost for breast cancer patients. Eligible patients were treated with IORT of 20 Gy followed by whole breast irradiation (WBI) of 46 Gy. A total of 55 patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 month after WBI were evaluated. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD) detected radiation dose delivered to the skin during IORT. Acute toxicity was recorded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0. Clinical parameters were correlated with seroma formation and maximum skin dose. Median follow-up after IORT was 25.9 weeks (range, 12.7 to 50.3 weeks). Prior to WBI, only one patient developed acute toxicity. Following WBI, 30 patients experienced grade 1 skin toxicity and three patients had grade 2 skin toxicity. Skin dose during IORT exceeded 5 Gy in two patients: with grade 2 complications around the surgical scar in one patient who received 8.42 Gy. Breast volume on preoperative images (p = 0.001), ratio of applicator diameter and breast volume (p = 0.002), and distance between skin and tumor (p = 0.003) showed significant correlations with maximum skin dose. IORT as a boost was well-tolerated among Korean women without severe acute complication. In vivo dosimetry with OSLD can help ensure safe delivery of IORT as a boost.

  19. Early sorafenib-induced toxicity is associated with drug exposure and UGTIA9 genetic polymorphism in patients with solid tumors: a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascaline Boudou-Rouquette

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identifying predictive biomarkers of drug response is of key importance to improve therapy management and drug selection in cancer therapy. To date, the influence of drug exposure and pharmacogenetic variants on sorafenib-induced toxicity remains poorly documented. The aim of this pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD study was to investigate the relationship between early toxicity and drug exposure or pharmacogenetic variants in unselected adult outpatients treated with single-agent sorafenib for advanced solid tumors. METHODS: Toxicity was recorded in 54 patients on days 15 and 30 after treatment initiation and sorafenib exposure was assessed in 51 patients. The influence of polymorphisms in CYP3A5, UGT1A9, ABCB1 and ABCG2 was examined in relation to sorafenib exposure and toxicity. Clinical characteristics, drug exposure and pharmacogenetic variants were tested univariately for association with toxicities. Candidate variables with p<0.1 were analyzed in a multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Gender was the sole parameter independently associated with sorafenib exposure (p = 0.0008. Multivariate analysis showed that increased cumulated sorafenib (AUC(cum was independently associated with any grade ≥ 3 toxicity (p = 0.037; UGT1A9 polymorphism (rs17868320 with grade ≥ 2 diarrhea (p = 0.015 and female gender with grade ≥ 2 hand-foot skin reaction (p = 0.018. Using ROC curve, the threshold AUC(cum value of 3,161 mg/L.h was associated with the highest risk to develop any grade ≥ 3 toxicity (p = 0.018. CONCLUSION: In this preliminary study, increased cumulated drug exposure and UGT1A9 polymorphism (rs17868320 identified patients at high risk for early sorafenib-induced severe toxicity. Further PK/PD studies on larger population are warranted to confirm these preliminary results.

  20. Toxicity of three selected pesticides (Alachlor, Atrazine and Diuron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lazhar Mhadhbi

    2012-06-26

    Jun 26, 2012 ... The present study aimed to evaluate acute toxicity tests for three selected ... Median lethal concentrations of the selected pesticides during a 48 h and 96 h exposure for .... Dunnett's post-hoc test, using the SPSS application, version 19.0. ..... to define the primary mode of toxic action for diverse industrial.

  1. 2006 Toronto smog report card : final grade C-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This annual report card evaluated the progress made by the City of Toronto toward reducing the environmental and health impacts of smog. The final grade for 2006 was a C-, the same as for 2005. The highest grade of B+ was issued in 2004. The report card evaluated City Council actions based on their clean air commitments. Although the summer of 2006 was one of the best on record, with only 11 smog days, the grade of C- was issued because the performance of the City's Air Quality Improvement record was poor. Toronto Environmental Alliance strongly recommended that important changes be made to improve air quality, transit and waste disposal. It recommended that the City should address the real causes of unclean air, which are motor vehicle exhaust and toxic pollution. This report card graded the performance on initiatives in the following six major areas: energy; transit; air quality plan; walking and biking; fleets and fuels; and, intergovernmental action. The report recommended that efforts should be made to reduce greenhouse gas emissions which cause global warming. refs., tabs., figs.

  2. Three-times-daily radiotherapy with induction chemotherapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Feasibility and toxicity study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalano, G.; Jereczek-Fossa, B.A.; Pas, T. de; Leon, M.E.; Cattani, F.; Spaggiari, L.; Veronesi, G.; Braud, F. de; Orecchia, R.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the feasibility and toxicity of three-times-daily radiotherapy (3tdRT), preceded by induction chemotherapy (iCT), in stage IIIA-IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and methods: iCT consisted of three cycles of cisplatin and gemcitabine. Surgery was considered for stage IIIA patients responsive to iCT; definitive or postoperative 3tdRT was planned. Doses of 54.4 Gy and 64.6 Gy in postoperative and definitive treatments, respectively, were delivered in three daily fractions. Results: from February 1998 to October 2000, 37 patients received 3tdRT as definitive (n = 18) or postoperative treatment (n = 19). Toxicity was limited to RTOG grade 2 (25 patients, 67.6%) and grade 3 (four patients, 10.8%) acute esophagitis; no grade 3 late esophagitis occurred. Late lung toxicity was represented by one grade 3 pneumonitis. No correlation emerged between acute esophageal toxicity and irradiated esophageal volume or disease- and treatment-related factors. A significant correlation was found for stage (IIIA vs. IIIB; p = 0.03) and a trend for the N-class (N2 vs. N3; p = 0.08). Conclusion: in this experience of 3tdRT preceded by iCT, the low toxicity profile confirmed the feasibility of this combination. The limited statistical power does not permit a definition of predictors for radiation-induced esophagitis incidence and severity; additional studies are required to clarify the impact of volumetric and dosimetric parameters. Failure patterns and survival results are warranted to confirm the efficacy of this approach in locally advanced NSCLC. (orig.)

  3. A Pilot Study of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy and Sunitinib in Previously Irradiated Patients With Recurrent High-Grade Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuthrick, Evan J.; Curran, Walter J.; Camphausen, Kevin; Lin, Alexander; Glass, Jon; Evans, James; Andrews, David W.; Axelrod, Rita; Shi, Wenyin; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Haacke, E. Mark; Hillman, Gilda G.; Dicker, Adam P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Angiogenic blockade with irradiation may enhance the therapeutic ratio of radiation therapy (RT) through vascular normalization. We sought to determine the safety and toxicity profile of continuous daily-dosed sunitinib when combined with hypofractionated stereotactic RT (fSRT) for recurrent high-grade gliomas (rHGG). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had malignant high-grade glioma that recurred or progressed after primary surgery and RT. All patients received a minimum of a 10-day course of fSRT, had World Health Organization performance status of 0 to 1, and a life expectancy of >3 months. During fSRT, sunitinib was administered at 37.5 mg daily. The primary endpoint was acute toxicity, and response was assessed via serial magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Eleven patients with rHGG were enrolled. The fSRT doses delivered ranged from 30 to 42 Gy in 2.5- to 3.75-Gy fractions. The median follow-up time was 40 months. Common acute toxicities included hematologic disorders, fatigue, hypertension, and elevated liver transaminases. Sunitinib and fSRT were well tolerated. One grade 4 mucositis toxicity occurred, and no grade 4 or 5 hypertensive events or intracerebral hemorrhages occurred. One patient had a nearly complete response, and 4 patients had stable disease for >9 months. Two patients (18%) remain alive and progression-free >3 years from enrollment. The 6-month progression-free survival was 45%. Conclusions: Sunitinib at a daily dose of 37.5 mg given concurrently with hypofractionated stereotactic reirradiation for rHGG yields acceptable toxicities and an encouraging 6-month progression-free survival

  4. A Pilot Study of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy and Sunitinib in Previously Irradiated Patients With Recurrent High-Grade Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuthrick, Evan J., E-mail: evan.wuthrick@osumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Camphausen, Kevin [Department of Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Lin, Alexander [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Glass, Jon; Evans, James; Andrews, David W. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Axelrod, Rita [Department of Medical Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Shi, Wenyin; Werner-Wasik, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Haacke, E. Mark [Department of Radiology, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Hillman, Gilda G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Angiogenic blockade with irradiation may enhance the therapeutic ratio of radiation therapy (RT) through vascular normalization. We sought to determine the safety and toxicity profile of continuous daily-dosed sunitinib when combined with hypofractionated stereotactic RT (fSRT) for recurrent high-grade gliomas (rHGG). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had malignant high-grade glioma that recurred or progressed after primary surgery and RT. All patients received a minimum of a 10-day course of fSRT, had World Health Organization performance status of 0 to 1, and a life expectancy of >3 months. During fSRT, sunitinib was administered at 37.5 mg daily. The primary endpoint was acute toxicity, and response was assessed via serial magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Eleven patients with rHGG were enrolled. The fSRT doses delivered ranged from 30 to 42 Gy in 2.5- to 3.75-Gy fractions. The median follow-up time was 40 months. Common acute toxicities included hematologic disorders, fatigue, hypertension, and elevated liver transaminases. Sunitinib and fSRT were well tolerated. One grade 4 mucositis toxicity occurred, and no grade 4 or 5 hypertensive events or intracerebral hemorrhages occurred. One patient had a nearly complete response, and 4 patients had stable disease for >9 months. Two patients (18%) remain alive and progression-free >3 years from enrollment. The 6-month progression-free survival was 45%. Conclusions: Sunitinib at a daily dose of 37.5 mg given concurrently with hypofractionated stereotactic reirradiation for rHGG yields acceptable toxicities and an encouraging 6-month progression-free survival.

  5. Late Rectal Toxicity on RTOG 94-06: Analysis Using a Mixture Lyman Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, Susan L.; Dong Lei; Bosch, Walter R.; Michalski, Jeff; Winter, Kathryn; Mohan, Radhe; Purdy, James A.; Kuban, Deborah; Lee, Andrew K.; Cheung, M. Rex; Thames, Howard D.; Cox, James D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the parameters of the Lyman normal-tissue complication probability model using censored time-to-event data for Grade ≥2 late rectal toxicity among patients treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 94-06, a dose-escalation trial designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: The Lyman normal-tissue complication probability model was fitted to data from 1,010 of the 1,084 patients accrued on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 94-06 using an approach that accounts for censored observations. Separate fits were obtained using dose-volume histograms for whole rectum and dose-wall histograms for rectal wall. Results: With a median follow-up of 7.2 years, the crude incidence of Grade ≥2 late rectal toxicity was 15% (n = 148). The parameters of the Lyman model fitted to dose-volume histograms data, with 95% profile-likelihood confidence intervals, were TD 50 = 79.1 Gy (75.3 Gy, 84.3 Gy), m = 0.146 (0.107, 0.225), and n = 0.077 (0.041, 0.156). The fit based on dose-wall histogram data was not significantly different. Patients with cardiovascular disease had a significantly higher incidence of late rectal toxicity (p = 0.015), corresponding to a dose-modifying factor of 5.3%. No significant association with late rectal toxicity was found for diabetes, hypertension, rectal volume, rectal length, neoadjuvant hormone therapy, or prescribed dose per fraction (1.8 Gy vs. 2 Gy). Conclusions: These results, based on a large cohort of patients from a multi-institutional trial, are expected to be widely representative of the ability of the Lyman model to describe the long-term risk of Grade ≥2 late rectal toxicity after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

  6. Where the chips fall: environmental health in the semiconductor industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepesiuk, R

    1999-09-01

    Three recent lawsuits are focusing public attention on the environmental and occupational health effects of the world's largest and fastest growing manufacturing sector-the $150 billion semiconductor industry. The suits allege that exposure to toxic chemicals in semiconductor manufacturing plants led to adverse health effects such as miscarriage and cancer among workers. To manufacture computer components, the semiconductor industry uses large amounts of hazardous chemicals including hydrochloric acid, toxic metals and gases, and volatile solvents. Little is known about the long-term health consequences of exposure to chemicals by semiconductor workers. According to industry critics, the semiconductor industry also adversely impacts the environment, causing groundwater and air pollution and generating toxic waste as a by-product of the semiconductor manufacturing process. In contrast, the U.S. Bureau of Statistics shows the semiconductor industry as having a worker illness rate of about one-third of the average of all manufacturers, and advocates defend the industry, pointing to recent research collaborations and product replacement as proof that semiconductor manufacturers adequately protect both their employees and the environment.

  7. 77 FR 13061 - Electronic Reporting of Toxics Release Inventory Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-05

    ...--Reporting Year SIC--Standard Industrial Code TRI--Toxics Release Inventory TRI-ME--TRI-Made Easy Desktop... EPA to ``publish a uniform toxic chemical release form for facilities covered'' by the TRI Program. 42... practicable. Similarly, EPA's Cross-Media Electronic Reporting Regulation (CROMERR) (40 CFR Part 3), published...

  8. The international electronics industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDou, J; Rohm, T

    1998-01-01

    High-technology microelectronics has a major presence in countries such as China, India, Indonesia, and Malaysia, now the third-largest manufacturer of semiconductor chips. The migration of European, Japanese, and American companies accommodates regional markets. Low wage rates and limited enforcement of environmental regulations in developing countries also serve as incentives for the dramatic global migration of this industry. The manufacture of microelectonics products is accompanied by a high incidence of occupational illnesses, which may reflect the widespread use of toxic materials. Metals, photoactive chemicals, solvents, acids, and toxic gases are used in a wide variety of combinations and workplace settings. The industry also presents problems of radiation exposure and various occupational stressors, including some unresolved ergonomic issues. The fast-paced changes of the technology underlying this industry, as well as the stringent security precautions, have added to the difficulty of instituting proper health and safety measures. Epidemiologic studies reveal an alarming increase in spontaneous abortions among cleanroom manufacturing workers; no definitive study has yet identified its cause. Other health issues, including occupational cancer, are yet to be studied. The microelectronics industry is a good example of an industry that is exported to many areas of the world before health and safety problems are properly addressed and resolved.

  9. Control of air toxics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livengood, C.D.

    1995-01-01

    For more than 10 years, Argonne National Laboratory has supported the US DOE's Flue Gas Cleanup Program objective by developing new or improved environmental controls for industries that use fossil fuels. Argonne's pollutant emissions research has ranged from experiments in the basic chemistry of pollution-control systems, through laboratory-scale process development and testing, to pilot-scale field tests of several technologies. The work on air toxics is currently divided into two components: Investigating measures to improve the removal of mercury in existing pollution-control systems applied to coal combustion; and, Developing sensors and control techniques for emissions found in the textile industry

  10. Influence of Fractionation Scheme and Tumor Location on Toxicities After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Large (≥5 cm) Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Multi-institutional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vivek; Shostrom, Valerie K; Zhen, Weining; Zhang, Mutian; Braunstein, Steve E; Holland, John; Hallemeier, Christopher L; Harkenrider, Matthew M; Iskhanian, Adrian; Jabbour, Salma K; Attia, Albert; Lee, Percy; Wang, Kyle; Decker, Roy H; McGarry, Ronald C; Simone, Charles B

    2017-03-15

    To describe the impact of fractionation scheme and tumor location on toxicities in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for ≥5-cm non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as part of a multi-institutional analysis. Patients with primary ≥5-cm N0 M0 NSCLC who underwent ≤5-fraction SBRT were examined across multiple high-volume SBRT centers. Collected data included clinical/treatment parameters; toxicities were prospectively assessed at each institution according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Patients treated daily were compared with those treated every other day (QOD)/other nondaily regimens. Stratification between central and peripheral tumors was also performed. Ninety-two patients from 12 institutions were evaluated (2004-2016), with median follow-up of 12 months. In total there were 23 (25%) and 6 (7%) grade ≥2 and grade ≥3 toxicities, respectively. Grades 2 and 3 pulmonary toxicities occurred in 9% and 4%, respectively; 1 patient treated daily experienced grade 5 radiation pneumonitis. Of the entire cohort, 46 patients underwent daily SBRT, and 46 received QOD (n=40)/other nondaily (n=6) regimens. Clinical/treatment parameters were similar between groups; the QOD/other group was more likely to receive 3-/4-fraction schemas. Patients treated QOD/other experienced significantly fewer grade ≥2 toxicities as compared with daily treatment (7% vs 43%, Plocation (P>.05). From this multi-institutional study, toxicity of SBRT for ≥5-cm lesions is acceptable, and daily treatment was associated with a higher rate of toxicities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prospective descriptive study of the toxicity of CAPOX plan in systemic treatment of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghazarian, M; Larranaga, J; Reyes, G; Heinzen, S; Ferrero, L; Lasalvia, E; Echague, P; Estevez, F; Citrin, E; Viola, A.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the incorporation of new cytostatic drugs to treat colorectal cancer (CRC) and adjuvant objective is to treat the disease or disseminated contributed to decrease the reoccurrence and increased overall patient survive and thus the advent of various toxicity profiles according to the scheme used. To describe the clinical and para clinical toxicity of one of the schemes more chemotherapy used for the treatment of RCC at the National Cancer Institute (INCA). METHODOLOGY: Longitudinal prospective study. An analysis was made after consideration of the direction of INCA medical records of 27 patients with CRC assisted at the service of such chemotherapy Institution in the June / 2008 - Dec / 2009. He had the free and informed consent of the patients to participate in the study, disguising personal data to protect your privacy. They are proceeded to complete the notebook data collection in order to determine the toxicity of CAPOX plan. Results: 27 patients, 11 females and 16 males were included with a 58 median age. In terms of tumor topography, 10 were right colon level 10 to level the left colon and 7 rectum level. 55.5% were stage III, stage IV 29.6% and 14.8% stage II. The 27 patients included CAPOX plan received the standard dose with a median cycles of 7. The clinical toxicities more frequent were: sensory neuropathy (66.6%), diarrhea (48.1%), hand-foot syndrome (44.4%), nausea (37%), Vomiting (29.6%), mucositis (11.1%) observed less frequently: conjunctival irritation, hyperpigmentation skin, pharynx larynx dysesthesia, alopecia, and fatigue stress angina. Concerning the haematological toxicity It emphasizes that all patients had a decrease in platelet count during treatment with 44.4% of grade 1 thrombocytopenia, was 62.9% of anemia, leucopenia and 33.3% to 37.0% of neutropenia. Single one patient had mild elevation of serum creatinine. Liver enzyme toxicity occurred in 37% TGO level - GGT, 29.6% in the TGP; 29.6% in the FA and 66.6% of patients

  12. Hypofractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy Using Concomitant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Boost Technique for Localized High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Acute Toxicity Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Tee S.; Cheung, Patrick; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Morton, Gerard; Sixel, Katharina E.; Pang, Geordi; Basran, Parminder; Zhang Liying; Tirona, Romeo; Szumacher, Ewa; Danjoux, Cyril; Choo, Richard; Thomas, Gillian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the acute toxicities of hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) using a concomitant intensity-modulated RT boost in conjunction with elective pelvic nodal irradiation for high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This report focused on 66 patients entered into this prospective Phase I study. The eligible patients had clinically localized prostate cancer with at least one of the following high-risk features (Stage T3, Gleason score ≥8, or prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL). Patients were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the pelvic lymph nodes using a conventional four-field technique. A concomitant intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost of 22.5 Gy in 25 fractions was delivered to the prostate. Thus, the prostate received 67.5 Gy in 25 fractions within 5 weeks. Next, the patients underwent 3 years of adjuvant androgen ablative therapy. Acute toxicities were assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, weekly during treatment and at 3 months after RT. Results: The median patient age was 71 years. The median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level and Gleason score was 18.7 ng/L and 8, respectively. Grade 1-2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were common during RT but most had settled at 3 months after treatment. Only 5 patients had acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity, in the form of urinary incontinence (n = 1), urinary frequency/urgency (n = 3), and urinary retention (n = 1). None of the patients developed Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal or Grade 4 or greater genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: The results of the present study have indicated that hypofractionated accelerated RT with a concomitant intensity-modulated RT boost and pelvic nodal irradiation is feasible with acceptable acute toxicity

  13. Ability of Cu2+-montmorillonite to accept an toxic pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janikova, V.; Jona, E.; Janik, R.; Pavlik, V.

    2015-01-01

    It is global problem that toxic pollutants are in the permanent contact to people through soil and water. Nowadays, it is important to eliminate these pollutants for future generations and to keep environment in the health condition. In relation to this article, aromatic organic compounds like benzene, phenol and aniline were chosen. These are used in various branches of industry, mainly in rubber industry or for production of dyes and in addition, phenol is commonly used in cosmetics or in food industry. Montmorillonite is clay mineral consisting of 2:1 sheets (tetrahedral:octahedral) and interlayer space where exchangeable cations and water molecules are present. Due to its structure, montmorillonite is able to accept some compounds or pollutants. This is the reason why it is mainly used as the covering material of radioactive waste in order to remove toxic pollutants. For investigation of toxic pollutants removing, XRD powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and thermal analysis were used. Our results show that Cu 2+ -montmorillonite is able to accept toxic benzene ring-based pollutants into interlayer. This mentioned ability can be proven on the basis of the investigation results relating to difference of interlayer distance, typical frequencies of -OH group or -NH 2 group, while these results were supplemented by thermal properties. (authors)

  14. Acute Esophagus Toxicity in Lung Cancer Patients After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwint, Margriet; Uyterlinde, Wilma; Nijkamp, Jasper; Chen, Chun; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Heuvel, Michel van den; Knegjens, Joost; Herk, Marcel van; Belderbos, José

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-effect relation between acute esophageal toxicity (AET) and the dose-volume parameters of the esophagus after intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: One hundred thirty-nine patients with inoperable NSCLC treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy were prospectively analyzed. The fractionation scheme was 66 Gy in 24 fractions. All patients received concurrently a daily dose of cisplatin (6 mg/m²). Maximum AET was scored according to Common Toxicity Criteria 3.0. Dose-volume parameters V5 to V70, D mean and D max of the esophagus were calculated. A logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the dose-effect relation between these parameters and grade ≥2 and grade ≥3 AET. The outcome was compared with the clinically used esophagus V35 prediction model for grade ≥2 after radical 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) treatment. Results: In our patient group, 9% did not experience AET, and 31% experienced grade 1 AET, 38% grade 2 AET, and 22% grade 3 AET. The incidence of grade 2 and grade 3 AET was not different from that in patients treated with CCRT using 3DCRT. The V50 turned out to be the most significant dosimetric predictor for grade ≥3 AET (P=.012). The derived V50 model was shown to predict grade ≥2 AET significantly better than the clinical V35 model (P<.001). Conclusions: For NSCLC patients treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy, the V50 was identified as most accurate predictor of grade ≥3 AET. There was no difference in the incidence of grade ≥2 AET between 3DCRT and IMRT in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  15. Preparation of high purification and food grade phosphoric acid from technical grade phosphoric acid by liquid-liquid detraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimoradi, M.; Borji, F.; Kishani, A.

    2002-01-01

    Pay attention to increasing consumption of high purification and food grade phosphoric acid in various industries and food industries and on in on hand and lack of preparation between production and distribution of this products its purification is so vital. In this article of liquid-liquid extraction method with normal hexane-mixture of ammonia and acetone-diisopropyl alcohol and normal butanol solvents and these determination of distribution coefficient each one with ph-me try titration we can evaluate effectiveness and sufficiency each one. Because of proper coefficient distribution and its local production of normal butanol solvent and low price is the best solvent. To phosphoric acid modifying coefficient distribution for extraction of phosphoric acid we can add a little value sulfuric acid to the mixture and to remove flouride impurity we add a little Na 2 O. After extraction stage extracted phosphoric acid in the normal strips by evaluating with distilled water and then by passing the carbon active bed and following passes of cationic resine column and concentrated with vacuum distillation. Conclusion of this article is produce of phosphoric acid 85% w/w and food grade from impure phosphoric acid 52% w/w with technical grade

  16. Continued Multicolumns Bioleaching for Low Grade Uranium Ore at a Certain Uranium Deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongxin Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioleaching has lots of advantages compared with traditional heap leaching. In industry, bioleaching of uranium is still facing many problems such as site space, high cost of production, and limited industrial facilities. In this paper, a continued column bioleaching system has been established for leaching a certain uranium ore which contains high fluoride. The analysis of chemical composition of ore shows that the grade of uranium is 0.208%, which is lower than that of other deposits. However, the fluoride content (1.8% of weight is greater than that of other deposits. This can be toxic for bacteria growth in bioleaching progress. In our continued multicolumns bioleaching experiment, the uranium recovery (89.5% of 4th column is greater than those of other columns in 120 days, as well as the acid consumption (33.6 g/kg. These results indicate that continued multicolumns bioleaching technology is suitable for leaching this type of ore. The uranium concentration of PLS can be effectively improved, where uranium recovery can be enhanced by the iron exchange system. Furthermore, this continued multicolumns bioleaching system can effectively utilize the remaining acid of PLS, which can reduce the sulfuric acid consumption. The cost of production of uranium can be reduced and this benefits the environment too.

  17. OS7.7 Feasibility and toxicity of concomitant radiochemotherapy with vincristine in adult patients with medulloblastoma - results from the NOA-07 trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, C.; Reimers, C.; Beier, D.; Pietsch, T.; Warmuth-Metz, M.; Bogdahn, U.; Kortmann, R.; Hau, P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Medulloblastoma is a tumor of the cerebellum that is rare in adults with an incidence of about 0.6 cases per million per year. In children the introduction of chemotherapy with cisplatin, lomustine and vincristine in combination with craniospinal radiotherapy led to a significant improvement of overall survival. In adults, this regimen was never prospectively investigated in a clinical trial. Methods. The NOA-07 trial is a prospective single arm Phase II study to evaluate toxicity of craniospinal irradiation (1.6 Gy/35.2 Gy, posterior fossa boost 1.8 Gy/55.0 Gy) in combination with vincristine (1.5 mg/m2 weekly, ceiling dose 2.0 mg) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with a maximum 8 of 6-weekly cycles of cisplatin (70 mg/m2, day 1), lomustine (75 mg/m2, day 1) and vincristine (1.5 g/m2, ceiling dose 2.0 mg, day 1, 8, 15) in adults with medulloblastoma. Here, we report on feasibility and toxicity of the concomitant radiochemotherapy. Results. 30 patients with medulloblastoma were recruited in 15 German centers. Radiotherapy was completed in all patients. Treatment interruptions occurred in 3/30 patients (toxicity related: 2, compliance: 1). Leukopenia was the major toxicity with grade 3 and 4 (CTC Version 3.0) occurring in 11 of 30 patients and 1 of 30 patients, respectively. Grade 3 to 4 thrombocytopenia occurred in 1 patient. Grade 3 to 4 infections occurred in 3 patients. Polyneuropathy due to vincristine was the most prevalent adverse event (Grade 1: 5, Grade 2: 4, Grade 3: 5 of 30 patients). Frequent but less severe toxicities involved sickness, dermatitis and alopecia. Conclusion. Concomitant radiochemotherapy with vincristine was feasible in adults with medulloblastoma. Leukopenia and polyneuropathy are major complications, pointing out that polyneuropathy occurs already early in treatment after application of only 1 to 6 doses in a substantial number of patients. Toxicity of the complete treatment protocol including

  18. Acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity of image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer using a daily water-filled endorectal balloon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deville Curtiland

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our purpose was to report acute gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU toxicity rates for prostate cancer patients undergoing image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT with a daily endorectal water-filled balloon (ERBH2O, and assess associations with planning parameters and pretreatment clinical characteristics. Methods The first 100 patients undergoing prostate and proximal seminal vesicle IG-IMRT with indexed-lumen 100 cc ERBH2O to 79.2 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions at our institution from 12/2008- 12/2010 were assessed. Pretreatment characteristics, organ-at-risk dose volume histograms, and maximum GU and GI toxicities (CTCAE 3.0 were evaluated. Logistic regression models evaluated univariate association between toxicities and dosimetric parameters, and uni- and multivariate association between toxicities and pretreatment characteristics. Results Mean age was 68 (range 51–88. Thirty-two, 49, and 19 patients were low, intermediate, and high-risk, respectively; 40 received concurrent androgen deprivation. No grade 3 or greater toxicities were recorded. Maximum GI toxicity was grade 0, 1, and 2 in 69%, 23%, and 8%, respectively. Infield (defined as 1 cm above/below the CTV rectal mean/median doses, D75, V30, and V40 and hemorrhoid history were associated with grade 2 GI toxicity (Ps  Conclusion Prostate IG-IMRT using a daily ERBH2O shows low rates of acute GI toxicity compared to previous reports of air-filled ERB IMRT when using stringent infield rectum constraints and comparable GU toxicities.

  19. National symposium on raw materials and energy management of mineral based industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-09-01

    Mineral Resources are very essential for industrialization and hence facilitating socioeconomic developments. Resources like coal, iron ore, Bauxite, chromite, limestone, ilmenite and many other ores and minerals are the raw materials for development of various thermal, metallurgical, chemical and refractory industries. The mineral resources are being harnessed from their respective mines and the mining industries have expanded rapidly to meet their growing demands of various 'mineral based industries. The energy and reductants required for these industries are met from both - coking and non coking coal. Nearly 70% of the energy requirement of India is met from coal. In recent years, with the increasing demand of metals, alloys, refractories and thermal energy, most of the high-grade ores and minerals have been consumed. Unfortunately most of the low grade ores and minerals are left at the mine sites as wastes. As a matter of fact, these low grade ores are much larger in quantities compared to the high grade ones. Therefore, it has been essential to mine and beneficiate the low grade ores which can be suitably-utilized in the respective industries. It has also been necessary to develop more efficient technology to utilize these raw materials more effectively producing minimum amount of wastes and also conserving the energy resources as far as possible. Time has come to develop environment friendly most suitable technology to utilize all types of low grade and complex ores and minerals in order to meet the requirements of rapidly expanding mineral based industries of India. Unless effective programmes are made in this regard and implement those in time, India is bound to face a disastrous situation both in industrial and economic sectors. The conference is organised keeping these in view to take a stock of new and economically viable processes for mining and beneficiating low and complex ores and minerals and utilizing these judiciously in the industries. Papers

  20. Toxicity of Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanfilippo, Nicholas J.; Mitchell, James; Grew, David; DeLacure, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the acute morbidity of high dose head and neck RT and CRT in patients with infected with HIV. Methods and Materials: All HIV-positive patients who underwent radiation therapy for head and neck cancer in our department between 2004 and 2008 were reviewed. Treatment related data were examined. All treatments were delivered with megavoltage photon beams or electron beams. Patients were evaluated by an attending radiation oncologist for toxicity and response on a weekly basis during therapy and monthly after treatment in a multidisciplinary clinic. Acute toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy and Oncology Group (RTOG) common toxicity criteria. Response to treatment was based on both physical exam as well as post-treatment imaging as indicated. Results: Thirteen patients who underwent RT with a diagnosis of HIV were identified. Median age was 53 years and median follow-up was 22 months. Twelve had squamous cell carcinoma and one had lymphoproliferative parotiditis. Median radiation dose was 66.4 Gy and median duration of treatment was 51 days. The median number of scheduled radiotherapy days missed was zero (range 0 to 7). One patient (8%) developed Grade 4 confluent moist desquamation. Eight patients (61%) developed Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusion: Based on our results, HIV-positive individuals appear to tolerate treatment for head and neck cancer, with toxicity similar to that in HIV-negative individuals.

  1. Evaluation of toxicity after periocular and intravitreal administration of carboplatin in rabbit eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisa Darsová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the extent of toxicity of focal carboplatin administration and to identify the dose limiting toxicity in rabbit eyes depending on administered concentrations. New Zealand white male rabbits (n = 18 were treated with 1 of 3 regimens: a single periocular injection of 15 mg of carboplatin (group I, a single periocular injection of 30 mg of carboplatin (group II and a single transcorneal intravitreal injection of 0.05 mg of carboplatin (group III. Ophthalmologic examinations and vitreous samplings were performed under dissociative anaesthesia at regular intervals during next 2 (groups I and III or 3 (group II weeks. Carboplatin concentrations in vitreous samples were assessed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. At the end of experiments, all rabbit eyes were obtained for histopathologic examination. Clinical and histological evidence of toxicity was graded into four grades according to anatomical structures of the rabbit eye. The dose limiting toxicity was reached in group II after periocular injection of 30 mg of carboplatin and in group III after intravitreal injection of 0.05 mg of carboplatin. No systemic toxicity was observed in any group. Focal carboplatin administration may decrease systemic exposure to this cytotoxic drug in the retinoblastoma treatment. This moreover suggests that focal carboplatin administration is a promising approach and challenge for advanced retinoblastoma chemotherapy.

  2. Toxicity of cetuximab versus cisplatin concurrent with radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell cancer (LAHNSCC).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed acute toxicity with cetuximab and radiotherapy, comparing it with a matched cisplatin group. The cetuximab group experienced significantly more toxicity--grade ≥3 oral mucositis (p=0.014), skin dermatitis (p=0.0004), ≥10% weight loss (p=0.03), and enteral feeding requirement (p=0.05). This finding of enhanced toxicity is similar to recent publications.

  3. Toxicity of nonylphenol diethoxylate in lab-scale anaerobic digesters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozkurt, Hande; Sanin, F. Dilek

    2014-01-01

    Nonylphenol compounds have high commercial, industrial and domestic uses owing to their surface active properties. In addition to their toxic, carcinogenic and persistent characteristics; they have drawn the attention of scientists lately due to their endocrine disrupting properties....... Their widespread use and disposal cause them to enter wastewater treatment systems at high concentrations. Since they are highly persistent and hydrophobic, they accumulate mostly on sludge.In this study using Anaerobic Toxicity Assay (ATA) tests, the toxicity of a model nonylphenol compound, nonylphenol...

  4. Expression of monellin in a food-grade delivery system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Yan, Da-zhong; Zhao, Sheng-jun

    2015-10-01

    Genetically modified (GM) foods have caused much controversy. Construction of a food-grade delivery system is a desirable technique with presumptive impact on industrial applications from the perspective of bio-safety. The aim of this study was to construct a food-grade delivery system for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to study the expression of monellin from the berries of the West African forest plant Dioscoreophyllum cumminsii in this system. A food-grade system for S. cerevisiae was constructed based on ribosomal DNA (rDNA)-mediated homologous recombination to enable high-copy-number integration of the expression cassette inserted into the rDNA locus. A copper resistance gene (CUP1) was used as the selection marker for yeast transformation. Because variants of transformants containing different copy numbers at the CUP1 locus can be readily selected after growth in the presence of elevated copper levels, we suggest that this system would prove useful in the generation of tandemly iterated gene clusters. Using this food-grade system, a single-chain monellin gene was heterologously expressed. The yield of monellin reached a maximum of 675 mg L(-1) . This system harbors exclusively S. cerevisiae DNA with no antibiotic resistance genes, and it should therefore be appropriate for safe use in the food industry. Monellin was shown to be expressed in this food-grade delivery system. To our knowledge, this is the first report so far on expression of monellin in a food-grade expression system in S. cerevisiae. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. A FLUORESCENCE-BASED SCREENING ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY GENOTOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The possibility of deliberate or accidental release of toxic chemicals in industrial, commercial or residential settings has indicated a need for rapid, cost-effective and versatile monitoring methods to prevent exposures to humans and ecosystems. Because many toxic industrial c...

  6. ROMI 3.1 Least-cost lumber grade mix solver using open source statistical software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca A. Buck; Urs Buehlmann; R. Edward. Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The least-cost lumber grade mix solution has been a topic of interest to both industry and academia for many years due to its potential to help wood processing operations reduce costs. A least-cost lumber grade mix solver is a rough mill decision support system that describes the lumber grade or grade mix needed to minimize raw material or total production cost (raw...

  7. Final Rule for Industrial Process Cooling Towers: Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact sheet concerning a final rule to reduce air toxics emissions from industrial process cooling towers. Air toxics are those pollutants known or suspected of causing cancer or other serious health effects.

  8. Role of Bioadsorbents in Reducing Toxic Metals

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Blessy Baby; Jaishankar, Monisha; Biju, Vinai George; Krishnamurthy Nideghatta Beeregowda

    2016-01-01

    Industrialization and urbanization have led to the release of increasing amounts of heavy metals into the environment. Metal ion contamination of drinking water and waste water is a serious ongoing problem especially with high toxic metals such as lead and cadmium and less toxic metals such as copper and zinc. Several biological materials have attracted many researchers and scientists as they offer both cheap and effective removal of heavy metals from waste water. Therefore it is urgent to st...

  9. Fate of chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals in landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L; Barlaz, Morton A; Knappe, Detlef R U; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2006-07-01

    One component of preparedness for a chemical attack is planning for the disposal of contaminated debris. To assess the feasibility of contaminated debris disposal in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills, the fate of selected chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) in MSW landfills was predicted with a mathematical model. Five blister agents [sulfur mustard (HD), nitrogen mustard (HN-2), lewisite (L), ethyldichloroarsine (ED), and phosgene oxime (CX)], eight nerve agents [tabun (GA), sarin (GB), soman (GD), GE, GF, VX, VG, and VM], one riot-control agent [CS], and two TICs [furan and carbon disulfide] were studied. The effects of both infiltration (climate) and contaminant biodegradability on fate predictions were assessed. Model results showed that hydrolysis and gas-phase advection were the principal fate pathways for CWAs and TICs, respectively. Apart from CX and the TICs, none of the investigated compounds was predicted to persist in a landfill for more than 5 years. Climate had little impact on CWA/TIC fate, and biodegradability was only important for compounds with long hydrolysis half-lives. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to assess the influence of uncertainty in model input parameters on CWA/TIC fate predictions. Correlation analyses showed that uncertainty in hydrolysis rate constants was the primary contributor to variance of CWA fate predictions, while uncertainty in the Henry's Law constant and landfill gas-production rate accounted for most of the variance of TIC fate predictions. CWA hydrolysates were more persistent than the parent CWAs, but limited information is available on abiotic or biotic transformation rates for these chemicals.

  10. New ceramics incorporated with industrial by-products as pore formers for sorption of toxic chromium from aqueous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domopoulou, Artemi

    2015-04-01

    The incorporation of secondary resources including various industrial wastes as pore-forming agents into clayey raw material mixtures for the development of tailored porous ceramic microstructures is currently of increasing interest. In the present research, sintered ceramic compacts were developed incorporated with industrial solid by-products as pore formers, and then used as new sorbents for chromium removal from aqueous media. The microstructures obtained were characterized through X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). Sorption potential of chromium from synthetic solutions on the porous ceramics was studied by static adsorption experiments as a function of the pore-former percentage in the ceramic matrix as well as the initial heavy metal (chromium) concentration, solution pH and temperature. Kinetic studies were conducted and adsorption isotherms of chromium were determined using the Langmuir equation. Preliminary experimental results concerning the adsorption characteristics of chromium on the ceramic materials produced appear encouraging for their possible beneficial use as new sorbents for the removal of toxic chromium from aqueous media. Keywords: sorbents, ceramics, industrial solid by-products, pore-former, chromium. Acknowledgements: This research has been co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund - ESF) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) - Research Funding Program ARCHIMEDES III: Investing in knowledge society through the European Social Fund.

  11. Evolution of camel CYP2E1 and its associated power of binding toxic industrial chemicals and drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandeel, Mahmoud; Altaher, Abdullah; Kitade, Yukio; Abdelaziz, Magdi; Alnazawi, Mohamed; Elshazli, Kamal

    2016-10-01

    Camels are raised in harsh desert environment for hundreds of years ago. By modernization of live and the growing industrial revolution in camels rearing areas, camels are exposed to considerable amount of chemicals, industrial waste, environmental pollutions and drugs. Furthermore, camels have unique gene evolution of some genes to withstand living in harsh environments. In this work, the camel cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) is compromised to detect its evolution rate and its power to bind with various chemicals, protoxins, procarcinogens, industrial toxins and drugs. In comparison with human CYP2E1, camel CYP2E1 more efficiently binds to small toxins as aniline, benzene, catechol, amides, butadiene, toluene and acrylamide. Larger compounds were more preferentially bound to the human CYP2E1 in comparison with camel CYP2E1. The binding of inhalant anesthetics was almost similar in both camel and human CYP2E1 coinciding with similar anesthetic effect as well as toxicity profiles. Furthermore, evolutionary analysis indicated the high evolution rate of camel CYP2E1 in comparison with human, farm and companion animals. The evolution rate of camel CYP2E1 was among the highest evolution rate in a subset of 57 different organisms. These results indicate rapid evolution and potent toxin binding power of camel CYP2E1. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Efficacy and toxicity of (chemo)radiotherapy for primary subglottic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, M.; Koike, I.; Odagiri, K.; Minagawa, Y.; Inoue, T. [Yokohama City Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Taguchi, T.; Nishimura, G.; Takahashi, M.; Komatsu, M.; Sano, D. [Yokohama City Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology

    2013-01-15

    Background and purpose: Primary subglottic cancer is a rare malignancy. We investigated the efficacy and toxicity of radiotherapy for subglottic cancer. Patients and methods: Nineteen patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the subglottis received radiotherapy, 14 of whom also underwent chemotherapy. Of the 19 patients, 15 received definitive radiotherapy to the gross tumors with total doses of 70-70.2 Gy in 35-39 fractions, and 4 underwent preoperative radiotherapy with total doses of 37.8-55.8 Gy in 21-31 fractions, followed by total laryngectomy. Results: Of the 19 patients, 5 developed local progression and 2 developed distant metastasis at the median follow-up period of 5 years. The 5-year local control and disease-free rates were 74 and 63%, respectively. Three patients died of tumor progression, and the 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 80 and 63%, respectively. Regarding acute toxicities, transient mucositis and dermatitis of grade 3 or lower were observed in all patients, but there were no late toxicities of grade 3 or higher. Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the subglottis. The use of chemotherapy together with radiotherapy may enhance treatment efficacy and contribute to larynx preservation through good local control. (orig.)

  13. Late toxicity of proton beam therapy for patients with the nasal cavity, para-nasal sinuses, or involving the skull base malignancy: importance of long-term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenda, Sadamoto; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Arahira, Satoko; Kohno, Ryosuke; Nishio, Teiji; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Tahara, Makoto; Hayashi, Ryuichi

    2015-01-01

    Although several reports have shown that proton beam therapy (PBT) offers promise for patients with skull base cancer, little is known about the frequency of late toxicity in clinical practice when PBT is used for these patients. Here, we conducted a retrospective analysis to clarify the late toxicity profile of PBT in patients with malignancies of the nasal cavity, para-nasal sinuses, or involving the skull base. Entry to this retrospective study was restricted to patients with (1) malignant tumors of the nasal cavity, para-nasal sinuses, or involving the skull base; (2) definitive or postoperative PBT (>50 GyE) from January 1999 through December 2008; and (3) more than 1 year of follow-up. Late toxicities were graded according to the common terminology criteria for adverse events v4.0 (CTCAE v4.0). From January 1999 through December 2008, 90 patients satisfied all criteria. Median observation period was 57.5 months (range, 12.4-162.7 months), median time to onset of grade 2 or greater late toxicity except cataract was 39.2 months (range, 2.7-99.8 months), and 3 patients had toxicities that occurred more than 5 years after PBT. Grade 3 late toxicities occurred in 17 patients (19%), with 19 events, and grade 4 late toxicities in 6 patients (7%), with 6 events (encephalomyelitis infection 2, optic nerve disorder 4). In conclusion, the late toxicity profile of PBT in patients with malignancy involving the nasal cavity, para-nasal sinuses, or skull base malignancy was partly clarified. Because late toxicity can still occur at 5 years after treatment, long-term follow-up is necessary. (author)

  14. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbonyl sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, J.M.; Hahn, F.F.; Barr, E.B. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a colorless gas, is a side product of industrial procedures sure as coal hydrogenation and gasification. It is structurally related to and is a metabolite of carbon disulfide. COS is metabolized in the body by carbonic anhydrase to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which is thought to be responsible for COS toxicity. No threshold limit value for COS has been established. Results of these studies indicate COS (with an LC{sub 50} of 590 ppm) is slightly less acutely toxic than H{sub 2}S (LC{sub 50} of 440 ppm).

  15. The interrelation between organophosphate toxicity and the epidemiology of depression and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaga, Kushik; Dharmani, Chandrabhan

    2007-01-01

    The literature on an association between organophosphate (OP) toxicity and depression or suicide is scarce. An interrelation exists among populations exposed to OPs, acute OP toxicity, neurobehavioral effects, depression, suicide, and fatality. Acute OP toxicity is characterized by the cholinergic syndrome with systemic and central nervous system effects. Organophosphate-induced neurobehavioral effects result in depression. A potential risk of depression and suicide exists in farm workers exposed to OPs. The sociodemographics of depression include age, gender, race, geographic region, social factors, economics, psychiatric disorders, medical conditions, and hereditary factors. Suicide is a major consequence of depression, with multiple sociodemographic risk factors. Developing countries have a higher incidence of OP toxicity, with limited information on the prevalence of depression. In these countries, the incidence of suicide is high, affecting more females. Suicide is more prevalent in rural areas, and in farming communities, commonly with ingestion of OPs. In industrialized countries, the incidence of OP toxicity is lower, but the prevalence of depression is higher. Suicide rates are lower in industrialized countries, affecting more males, the urban population, and farming communities. Other lethal methods of suicide, such as hanging, firearms, electrocution, and drug overdose are more common in industrialized countries. A potential risk of depression or suicide certainly exists from OP toxicity, largely depending on the epidemiology or sociodemographics of these disorders. Scientific evidence shows that the association between environmental toxicology and psychiatry has important public health implications.

  16. Body Composition as a Predictor of Toxicity in Patients Receiving Anthracycline and Taxane Based Chemotherapy for Early Stage Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shachar, Shlomit Strulov; Deal, Allison M.; Weinberg, Marc; Williams, Grant R.; Nyrop, Kirsten A.; Popuri, Karteek; Choi, Seul Ki; Muss, Hyman B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Poor body composition metrics (BCM) are associated with inferior cancer outcomes; however, in early breast cancer (EBC) there is a paucity of evidence regarding BCM’s impact on toxicities. This study investigates associations between BCM and treatment-related toxicity in EBC patients receiving anthracyclines-taxane based chemotherapy. Experimental Design Pretreatment computerized tomography (CT) images were evaluated for skeletal muscle area (SMA), density (SMD), and fat tissue at the 3rd lumbar vertebrae. Skeletal muscle index (SMI) (SMA/height2) and skeletal muscle gauge (SMG=SMI x SMD) were also calculated. Relative risks (RR) are reported for associations between body composition measures and toxicity outcomes, after adjustment for age and body surface area (BSA). Results BCM were calculated for 151 patients with EBC (median age 49, range 23 to 75). Fifty patients (33%) developed grade 3 or 4 toxicity, which was significantly higher in those with low SMI (RR=1.29, p=0.002), low SMG (RR=1.09, p=0.01), and low LBM (RR=1.48, p=.002). ROC analysis showed the SMG measure to be the best predictor of grade 3 and 4 toxicity. Dividing SMG into tertiles showed toxicity rates of 46%, and 22% for lowest versus highest tertile, respectively (p=0.005). After adjusting for age and BSA, low SMG (<1475 units) was significantly associated with hematological (RR=2.12, p=0.02), gastrointestinal grade 3–4 toxicities (RR=6.49, p=0.02), and hospitalizations (RR=1.91, p=0.05). Conclusions Poor BCM are significantly associated with increased treatment-related toxicities. Further studies are needed to investigate how these metrics can be used to more precisely dose chemotherapy to reduce treatment related toxicity while maintaining efficacy. PMID:28143874

  17. Handbook of acute toxicity of chemicals to fish and aquatic invertebrates : summaries of toxicity tests conducted at Columbia National Fisheries Research Laboratory, 1965-78

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. Waynon; Finley, Mack T.

    1980-01-01

    from the Columbia Laboratory and its field laboratories. It presents definitive acute toxicity data on 271 chemicals tested against a variety of freshwater invertebrates and fishes. The chemicals represent all major groups of pesticides, as well as numerous industrial chemicals. This compilation should serve as a useful database for the many agencies and organizations dealing with research and management programs concerned with the impact of chemicals on aquatic resources.The Columbia Laboratory has played a major role in developing currently used standard methodology for static acute toxicity testing. The use of standardized methodology greatly reduces variation in results. The data presented here have been carefully scrutinized to eliminate tests that failed to follow acceptable procedures. Handling of test organisms and procedures for static toxicity tests followed those described by Lennon and Walker (1964) and Macek and McAllister (1970), and conform well with those recommended by Brauhn and Schoettger (1975) and the Committee on Methods for Toxicity Tests with Aquatic Organisms (1975).The species of fish and invertebrates that were tested are listed in phylogenetic order in Tables 1 and 2. Fish were obtained from Federal and State hatcheries as either eggs or fry. Original stocks of invertebrates were collected and cultured from wild populations with no known source of contamination; these populations were replenished regularly. The invertebrates were cultured in the Laboratory by methods similar to those described by Sanders and Cope (1966).Test chemicals usually consisted of technical or analytical grade samples of known purity. Formulations of the chemicals were also tested when available. When purity of test chemicals was known, all calculated concentrations were based on percent active ingredients. Stock solutions were prepared immediately before each test, with commercial grade acetone as the carrier solvent. Occasionally, ethanol or dimethyl-formamide was

  18. Skin toxicity and quality of life in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer during first-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI treatment in a single-arm phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thaler, Josef; Köhne, Claus-Henning; Karthaus, Meinolf; Mineur, Laurent; Greil, Richard; Letocha, Henry; Hofheinz, Ralf; Fernebro, Eva; Gamelin, Erick; Baños, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Integument-related toxicities are common during epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted therapy. Panitumumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody targeting the EGFR that significantly improves progression-free survival when added to chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who have wild-type (WT) KRAS tumours. Primary efficacy and tolerability results from a phase II single-arm study of first-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer have been reported. Here we report additional descriptive tolerability and quality of life data from this trial. Integument-related toxicities and quality of life were analysed; toxicities were graded using modified National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria. Kaplan-Meier estimates of time to and duration of first integument-related toxicity were prepared. Quality of life was measured using EuroQoL EQ-5D and EORTC QLQ-C30. Best overall response was analysed by skin toxicity grade and baseline quality of life. Change in quality of life was analysed by skin toxicity severity. 154 patients were enrolled (WT KRAS n = 86; mutant KRAS n = 59); most (98%) experienced integument-related toxicities (most commonly rash [42%], dry skin [40%] and acne [36%]). Median time to first integument-related toxicity was 8 days; median duration was 334 days. Overall, proportionally more patients with grade 2+ skin toxicity responded (56%) compared with those with grade 0/1 (29%). Mean overall EQ-5D health state index scores (0.81 vs. 0.78), health rating scores (72.5 vs. 71.0) and QLQ-C30 global health status scores (65.8 vs. 66.7) were comparable at baseline vs. safety follow-up (8 weeks after completion), respectively and appeared unaffected by skin toxicity severity. First-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI has acceptable tolerability and appears to have little impact on quality of life, despite the high incidence of integument-related toxicity. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00508404

  19. Skin toxicity and quality of life in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer during first-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI treatment in a single-arm phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaler Josef

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integument-related toxicities are common during epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-targeted therapy. Panitumumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody targeting the EGFR that significantly improves progression-free survival when added to chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who have wild-type (WT KRAS tumours. Primary efficacy and tolerability results from a phase II single-arm study of first-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer have been reported. Here we report additional descriptive tolerability and quality of life data from this trial. Methods Integument-related toxicities and quality of life were analysed; toxicities were graded using modified National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria. Kaplan-Meier estimates of time to and duration of first integument-related toxicity were prepared. Quality of life was measured using EuroQoL EQ-5D and EORTC QLQ-C30. Best overall response was analysed by skin toxicity grade and baseline quality of life. Change in quality of life was analysed by skin toxicity severity. Results 154 patients were enrolled (WT KRAS n = 86; mutant KRAS n = 59; most (98% experienced integument-related toxicities (most commonly rash [42%], dry skin [40%] and acne [36%]. Median time to first integument-related toxicity was 8 days; median duration was 334 days. Overall, proportionally more patients with grade 2+ skin toxicity responded (56% compared with those with grade 0/1 (29%. Mean overall EQ-5D health state index scores (0.81 vs. 0.78, health rating scores (72.5 vs. 71.0 and QLQ-C30 global health status scores (65.8 vs. 66.7 were comparable at baseline vs. safety follow-up (8 weeks after completion, respectively and appeared unaffected by skin toxicity severity. Conclusions First-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI has acceptable tolerability and appears to have little impact on quality of life, despite the high incidence of integument

  20. In Vitro Models in BiocompatibilityAssessment for Biomedical-Grade Chitosan Derivatives in Wound Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Chin Keong

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the ultimate goals of wound healing research is to find effective healing techniques that utilize the regeneration of similar tissues. This involves the modification of various wound dressing biomaterials for proper wound management. The biopolymer chitosan (b-1,4-D-glucosamine has natural biocompatibility and biodegradability that render it suitable for wound management. By definition, a biocompatible biomaterial does not have toxic or injurious effects on biological systems. Chemical and physical modifications of chitosan influence its biocompatibility and biodegradability to an uncertain degree. Hence, the modified biomedical-grade of chitosan derivatives should be pre-examined in vitro in order to produce high-quality, biocompatible dressings. In vitro toxicity examinations are more favorable than those performed in vivo, as the results are more reproducible and predictive. In this paper, basic in vitro tools were used to evaluate cellular and molecular responses with regard to the biocompatibility of biomedical-grade chitosan. Three paramount experimental parameters of biocompatibility in vitro namely cytocompatibility, genotoxicity and skin pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, were generally reviewed for biomedical-grade chitosan as wound dressing.

  1. Amifostine as radioprotective agent for the rectal mucosa during irradiation of pelvic tumors. A phase II randomized study using various toxicity scales and rectosigmoidoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouvaris, J.; Antypas, C.; Kokakis, J.; Vlahos, L. [Radiology-Radiotherapy Dept., National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece); Kouloulias, V. [Radiology-Radiotherapy Dept., National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece); Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Inst. of Communication and Computer Systems, National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece); Malas, E. [Endoscopy-Gastroenterology Unit, Dept. of Surgical Oncology, Aretaieion Univ. Hospital, Athens (Greece); Michopoulos, S. [Dept. of Gastroenterology, Alexandra General Hospital of Athens (Greece); Matsopoulos, G. [Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Inst. of Communication and Computer Systems, National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece)

    2003-03-01

    Aim: To evaluate the cytoprotective effect of amifostine against radiation-induced acute toxicity to the rectal mucosa. Patients and Methods: 36 patients irradiated for prostate or gynecologic cancer were randomized to receive amifostine (n = 18, group A) or not (n = 18, group B). The radiation-induced acute rectal toxicity was evaluated by using three different toxicity scales: WHO scale, EORTC/RTOG toxicity criteria, and a modified toxicity scale based on the LENT-SOMA grading scale and the endoscopic terminology of the World Organization for Digestive Endoscopy. The objective measurements were coming from flexible rectosigmoidoscopy performed at baseline and 1-2 days after completion of the radiotherapy schedule. Anterior-posterior fields were used in the gynecologic patients while 3-D conformal 4-field technique was applied in the prostate cancer patients. The area under the curve (AUC) for dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum was also assessed during a 3-D treatment planning schedule, and no significant differences were assessed between the two groups, indicating a homogeneous dose-volume effect. Results: Amifostine was well tolerated. No grade 2 or higher WHO and EORTC/RTOG acute toxicity was noted in group A, while acute rectal toxicity ({>=} grade 1) was observed in 16/18 patients of group B versus 2/18 of group A (p < 0.001). The onset as well as the duration of acute rectal toxicity were significantly improved in group A (p = 0.002). Rectosigmoidoscopy revealed more severe rectal mucositis in noncytoprotected patients (group B), and modified LENT-SOMA overall mucositis grading score was significantly lower in group A (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Amifostine seems to have a significant cytoprotective efficacy in acute radiation-induced rectal mucositis in terms of symptomatic and objective endpoints. (orig.)

  2. Amifostine as radioprotective agent for the rectal mucosa during irradiation of pelvic tumors. A phase II randomized study using various toxicity scales and rectosigmoidoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouvaris, J.; Antypas, C.; Kokakis, J.; Vlahos, L.; Kouloulias, V.; Malas, E.; Michopoulos, S.; Matsopoulos, G.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the cytoprotective effect of amifostine against radiation-induced acute toxicity to the rectal mucosa. Patients and Methods: 36 patients irradiated for prostate or gynecologic cancer were randomized to receive amifostine (n = 18, group A) or not (n = 18, group B). The radiation-induced acute rectal toxicity was evaluated by using three different toxicity scales: WHO scale, EORTC/RTOG toxicity criteria, and a modified toxicity scale based on the LENT-SOMA grading scale and the endoscopic terminology of the World Organization for Digestive Endoscopy. The objective measurements were coming from flexible rectosigmoidoscopy performed at baseline and 1-2 days after completion of the radiotherapy schedule. Anterior-posterior fields were used in the gynecologic patients while 3-D conformal 4-field technique was applied in the prostate cancer patients. The area under the curve (AUC) for dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum was also assessed during a 3-D treatment planning schedule, and no significant differences were assessed between the two groups, indicating a homogeneous dose-volume effect. Results: Amifostine was well tolerated. No grade 2 or higher WHO and EORTC/RTOG acute toxicity was noted in group A, while acute rectal toxicity (≥ grade 1) was observed in 16/18 patients of group B versus 2/18 of group A (p < 0.001). The onset as well as the duration of acute rectal toxicity were significantly improved in group A (p = 0.002). Rectosigmoidoscopy revealed more severe rectal mucositis in noncytoprotected patients (group B), and modified LENT-SOMA overall mucositis grading score was significantly lower in group A (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Amifostine seems to have a significant cytoprotective efficacy in acute radiation-induced rectal mucositis in terms of symptomatic and objective endpoints. (orig.)

  3. Atmospheric toxic metals emission inventory and spatial characteristics from anthropogenic sources of Guangdong province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cher, S.; Menghua, L.; Xiao, X.; Yuqi, W.; Zhuangmin, Z.; Zhijiong, H.; Cheng, L.; Guanglin, J.; Zibing, Y.; Junyu, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric toxic metals (TMs) are part of particulate matters, and may create adverse effects on the environment and human health depending upon their bioavailability and toxicity. Localized emission inventory is fundamental for parsing of toxic metals to identify key sources in order to formulate efficient toxic metals control strategies. With the use of the latest municipal level environment statistical data, this study developed a bottom-up emission inventory of five toxic metals (Hg, As, Pb, Cd, Cr) from anthropogenic activities in Guangdong province for the year of 2014. Major atmospheric toxic metals sources including combustion sources (coal, oil, biomass, municipal solid waste) and industrial process sources (cement production, nonferrous metal smelting, iron and steel industry, battery and fluorescent lamp production) were investigated. Results showed that: (1) The total emissions of Hg, As, Pb, Cd, Cr in Guangdong province were 18.14, 32.59, 411.34, 13.13, 84.16 t, respectively. (2) Different pollutants have obvious characteristics of emission sources. For total Hg emission, 46% comes from combustion sources, of which 32% from coal combustion and 8% from MSW combustion. Other 54% comes from industrial processes, which dominated by the cement (19%), fluorescent lamp (18%) and battery production (13%). Of the total Hg emission, 69% is released as Hg0 , 29% as Hg2+ , and only 2% as Hgp due to strict particulate matters controls policies. For As emissions, coal combustion, nonferrous metal smelting and iron and steel industry contributed approximate 48%, 25% and 24%, respectively. Pb emissions primarily come from battery production (42%), iron and steel industry (21%) and on-road mobile gasoline combustion (17%). Cd and Cr emissions were dominated by nonferrous metal smelting (71%) and iron and steel industry (82%), respectively. (3) In term of the spatial distribution, emissions of atmospheric toxic metals are mainly concentrated in the central region of

  4. Development of nuclear grade stainless steels at KCSSL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandran, G.; Dhere, M.; Mahadik, A.; Hinge, N.M.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-01-01

    Kalyani Carpenter Special Steels Ltd is an alloy steel plant, where a variety of alloy steel grades are produced for automotive, defence, nuclear and aerospace applications. The plant has developed expertise in processing of several alloy steel grades of superior quality that meets stringent specifications. Primary steel is processed through a combination of electric arc furnace, ladle furnace and vacuum degassing where stringent control over dephosphorisation, desulphurization, deoxidation is effected to get a refined high quality steel. The molten steel is cast through continuous casting of slabs or ingot casting. In grades specific to nuclear application, the primary cast products are further subjected to electroslag remelting to achieve further freedom from inclusions and to achieve a favourable solidification grain structure, which ultimately improve the hot workability of the alloy steel. Appropriate choice of slag and operating parameters are needed for realising the required ingot quality. The present study would examine the processing and quality aspects of some important grades of steels used in nuclear industry namely ferritic 9Cr-1Mo steel, martensitic stainless steels 403, 410, precipitation hardenable 17-4 PH stainless steel and austenitic 321, 316LN stainless steel, which were made and supplied for applications to Indian nuclear industry. The expertise developed in processing the steels in terms of melting, heat treatment and their relationship to structural features and mechanical properties would be highlighted. (author)

  5. OVERVIEW OF HAZARDOUS/TOXIC WASTE INCINERATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effective hazardous/toxic waste disposal and safe dumpsite cleanup are two of EPA's major missions in the 1980s. Incineration has been recognized as a very efficient process to destroy the hazardous wastes generated by industry or by the dumpsite remediations. The paper provides ...

  6. T/P23, 24, 911 and 92: New grades for advanced coal-fired power plants-Properties and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaillant, J.C.; Vandenberghe, B.; Hahn, B.; Heuser, H.; Jochum, C.

    2008-01-01

    After the development of the well-known T/P91 grade in the early 1980s and the long industrial experiences since the early 1990s, it has been necessary to develop new steels to answer the demand of the powergen industry. New (ultra) super critical boilers require materials with advanced creep properties to reach severe steam parameters. For the 2.25% Cr family, grades 23 and 24 are now available to be used instead of the previous grade 22 with many technical and economical advantages. For the 9% Cr steels, new grades such as T/P911 and T/P92 have been developed with higher creep properties than T/P91. Thanks to its large industrial experience in these new grades, Vallourec and Mannesmann Tubes and Boehler Thyssen Schweisstechnik have now worldwide references of use with these new steel grades. In this paper, information on properties, behaviour and workability will be presented with a focus on ·elevated temperature properties and allowable stresses, ·oxidation and maximum service temperature and ·weldability procedures and recommendations

  7. Acute and sub-chronic toxicity studies of honokiol microemulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianqian; Li, Jianguo; Zhang, Wei; An, Quan; Wen, Jianhua; Wang, Aiping; Jin, Hongtao; Chen, Shizhong

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute and sub-chronic toxicity of honokiol microemulsion. In the acute toxicity tests, the mice were intravenously injected graded doses of honokiol microemulsion and were observed for toxic symptoms and mortality daily for 14 days. In the sub-chronic toxicity study, rats were injected honokiol microemulsion at doses of 100, 500, 2500 μg/kg body weight (BW) for 30 days. After 30 days treatment and 14 days recovery, the rats were sacrificed for hematological, biochemical and histological examination. In the acute toxicity tests, the estimated median lethal dosage (LD50) was 50.5mg/kg body weight in mice. In the sub-chronic toxicity tests, the non-toxic reaction dose was 500 μg/kg body weight. In each treatment group, degeneration or/and necrosis in vascular endothelial cells and structure change of vessel wall can be observed in the injection site (cauda vein) of a few animals while there were no changes in the vessels of other organs. The overall findings of this study indicate that the honokiol microemulsion is non-toxic up to 500 μg/kg body weight, and it has irritation to the vascular of the injection site which should be paid attention to in clinical medication. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Acute Toxicity After Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Compared to 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wortel, Ruud C.; Incrocci, Luca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pos, Floris J.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Witte, Marnix G.; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Herk, Marcel van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heemsbergen, Wilma D., E-mail: w.heemsbergen@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows significant dose reductions to organs at risk in prostate cancer patients. However, clinical data identifying the benefits of IG-IMRT in daily practice are scarce. The purpose of this study was to compare dose distributions to organs at risk and acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity levels of patients treated to 78 Gy with either IG-IMRT or 3D-CRT. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with 3D-CRT (n=215) and IG-IMRT (n=260) receiving 78 Gy in 39 fractions within 2 randomized trials were selected. Dose surface histograms of anorectum, anal canal, and bladder were calculated. Identical toxicity questionnaires were distributed at baseline, prior to fraction 20 and 30 and at 90 days after treatment. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade ≥1, ≥2, and ≥3 endpoints were derived directly from questionnaires. Univariate and multivariate binary logistic regression analyses were applied. Results: The median volumes receiving 5 to 75 Gy were significantly lower (all P<.001) with IG-IMRT for anorectum, anal canal, and bladder. The mean dose to the anorectum was 34.4 Gy versus 47.3 Gy (P<.001), 23.6 Gy versus 44.6 Gy for the anal canal (P<.001), and 33.1 Gy versus 43.2 Gy for the bladder (P<.001). Significantly lower grade ≥2 toxicity was observed for proctitis, stool frequency ≥6/day, and urinary frequency ≥12/day. IG-IMRT resulted in significantly lower overall RTOG grade ≥2 GI toxicity (29% vs 49%, respectively, P=.002) and overall GU grade ≥2 toxicity (38% vs 48%, respectively, P=.009). Conclusions: A clinically meaningful reduction in dose to organs at risk and acute toxicity levels was observed in IG-IMRT patients, as a result of improved technique and tighter margins. Therefore reduced late toxicity levels can be expected as well; additional research is needed to quantify such reductions.

  9. Toxicity assessment of molecularly targeted drugs incorporated into multiagent chemotherapy regimens for pediatric acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL): review from an international consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Terzah M; Sposto, Richard; Brown, Patrick; Reynolds, C Patrick; Hunger, Stephen P; Winick, Naomi J; Raetz, Elizabeth A; Carroll, William L; Arceci, Robert J; Borowitz, Michael J; Gaynon, Paul S; Gore, Lia; Jeha, Sima; Maurer, Barry J; Siegel, Stuart E; Biondi, Andrea; Kearns, Pamela R; Narendran, Aru; Silverman, Lewis B; Smith, Malcolm A; Zwaan, C Michel; Whitlock, James A

    2010-07-01

    One of the challenges of incorporating molecularly targeted drugs into multi-agent chemotherapy (backbone) regimens is defining dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of the targeted agent against the background of toxicities of the backbone regimen. An international panel of 22 pediatric acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) experts addressed this issue (www.ALLNA.org). Two major questions surrounding DLT assessment were explored: (1) how toxicities can be best defined, assessed, and attributed; and (2) how effective dosing of new agents incorporated into multi-agent ALL clinical trials can be safely established in the face of disease- and therapy-related systemic toxicities. The consensus DLT definition incorporates tolerance of resolving Grade 3 and some resolving Grade 4 toxicities with stringent safety monitoring. This functional DLT definition is being tested in two Children's Oncology Group (COG) ALL clinical trials. Copyright 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Industrial waste heat utilization for low temperature district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Hao; Xia, Jianjun; Zhu, Kan; Su, Yingbo; Jiang, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Large quantities of low grade waste heat are discharged into the environment, mostly via water evaporation, during industrial processes. Putting this industrial waste heat to productive use can reduce fossil fuel usage as well as CO 2 emissions and water dissipation. The purpose of this paper is to propose a holistic approach to the integrated and efficient utilization of low-grade industrial waste heat. Recovering industrial waste heat for use in district heating (DH) can increase the efficiency of the industrial sector and the DH system, in a cost-efficient way defined by the index of investment vs. carbon reduction (ICR). Furthermore, low temperature DH network greatly benefits the recovery rate of industrial waste heat. Based on data analysis and in-situ investigations, this paper discusses the potential for the implementation of such an approach in northern China, where conventional heat sources for DH are insufficient. The universal design approach to industrial-waste-heat based DH is proposed. Through a demonstration project, this approach is introduced in detail. This study finds three advantages to this approach: (1) improvement of the thermal energy efficiency of industrial factories; (2) more cost-efficient than the traditional heating mode; and (3) CO 2 and pollutant emission reduction as well as water conservation. -- Highlights: •We review situation of industrial waste heat recovery with a global perspective. •We present a way to analyze the potential to utilize industrial waste heat for DH. •Northern China has huge potential for using low-grade industrial waste heat for DH. •A demonstration project is introduced using the universal approach we propose. •It proves huge benefits for factories, heat-supply companies and the society

  11. Alternatives to Organic Solvents in Industrial Cleaning Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    To control chemical hazards in work places, substitution of harmful substances with less harmful or non-toxic products is now a method used in many countries and in many companies. It has previously been demonstrated that it is desirable and possible to use non-volatile, low-toxic vegetable...... cleaning agents in offset printing companies instead of volatile, toxic organic solvents. The present study is based on a project with the aim of defining other industrial processes, where organic solvents used for cleaning or degreasing can be replaced by non-volatile, low-toxic products, which are based...... on esters from fatty acids of vegetable origin (vegetable esters - VE).The study indicates that industrial cleaning/degreasing with organic solvents may be substituted with VEs on metal surfaces and on some coated surfaces, in manufacture of paints and inks, use of paints, use of inks (printing), metal...

  12. A review of acrylamide toxicity and its mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Zamani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Acrylamide (AA is an important industrial chemical agent that is mainly used in the production of polymers and copolymers. Recently it has been attention because of its production in the diet at high-temperature (>120 ºC processes such as cooking, frying, toasting, roasting or baking of high carbohydrate foods. According to high exposure to acrylamide, recognition of its toxic effect is necessary. Neurotoxicity, reproductive toxicity and immunotoxicity of AA were observed in several studies. There isn’t a clear mechanism that justifies this toxicity. In this study we reviewed the mechanisms of AA toxicity especially oxidative stress and apoptosis. AA can cause neurotoxicity, reproductive toxicity and genotoxicity on animal models. It showed neurotoxicity in human. We suggested the oxidative stress is the main factor for inducing of acrylamide toxicities. We advised that modifying of food processing methods can be as a good way for decreasing of AA production in foods.

  13. Late toxicity after conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Impact of previous surgery for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odrazka, K.; Dolezel, M.; Vanasek, J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively compare late toxicity of conventional-dose three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and high-dose intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. A total of 340 patients with T1-3 prostate cancer were treated with 3D-CRT (n=228) and IMRT (n=112). The median follow-up time was 5.9 years and 3.0 years, respectively. The prescription dose was 70 Gy for 3D-CRT and 78 Gy for IMRT. Late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were graded according to the Fox Chase modification of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force criteria. There was no difference between 3D-CRT and IMRT in the incidence of GI and GU toxicity at 3 years. On multivariate analysis, transurethral resection of prostate/open transvesical prostatectomy (TURP/TVPE) for benign prostatic hyperplasia, carried out before radiotherapy, significantly increased the risk of Grade ≥2 GU toxicity (risk ratio 1.88). Among patients who experienced TURP/TVPE, the 5-year actuarial likelihood of Grade 2-3 urinary incontinence was 23%, compared with 9% for those without prostate surgery (P=0.01). Tolerance of 3D-CRT and IMRT was similar, despite the use of high radiation dose with IMRT. Previous TURP/TVPE increased the risk of GU toxicity. (author)

  14. Factors of influence on acute skin toxicity of breast cancer patients treated with standard three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after breast conserving surgery (BCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Sfintizky, Andreas; Welzel, Grit; Simeonova, Anna; Sperk, Elena; Siebenlist, Kerstin; Mai, Sabine; Wenz, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    Standard 3D-CRT after BCS may cause skin toxicity with a wide range of intensity including acute effects like erythema or late effects. In order to reduce these side effects it is mandatory to identify potential factors of influence in breast cancer patients undergoing standard three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) of the breast and modern systemic therapy. Between 2006 and 2010 a total of 211 breast cancer patients (median age 52,4 years, range 24–77) after BCS consecutively treated in our institution with 3D-CRT (50 Gy whole breast photon radiotherapy followed by 16 Gy electron boost to the tumorbed) were evaluated with special focus on documented skin toxicity at the end of the 50 Gy-course. Standardized photodocumentation of the treated breast was done in each patient lying on the linac table with arms elevated. Skin toxicity was documented according to the common toxicity criteria (CTC)-score. Potential influencing factors were classified in three groups: patient-specific (smoking, age, breast size, body mass index = BMI, allergies), tumor-specific (tumorsize) and treatment-specific factors (antihormonal therapy with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors, chemotherapy). Uni- and multivariate statistical analyses were done using IBM SPSS version 19. After 50 Gy 3D-CRT to the whole breast 28.9% of all 211 patients had no erythema, 62.2% showed erythema grade 1 (G1) and 8.5% erythema grade 2. None of the patients had grade 3/4 (G3/4) erythema. In univariate analyses a significant influence or trend on the development of acute skin toxicities (erythema G0 versus G1 versus G2) was observed for larger breast volumes (p=0,004), smoking during radiation therapy (p=0,064) and absence of allergies (p=0,014) as well as larger tumorsize (p=0,009) and antihormonal therapy (p=0.005). Neither patient age, BMI nor choice of chemotherapy showed any significant effect on higher grade toxicity. In the multivariate analysis, factors associated with higher grade

  15. Grading standards, prepared by the Configuration Management Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cort, G.; Donahue, S.; Frank, J.; Perkins, B.; Wrye, J.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the grading methodology used by the organization to determine the required levels of configuration management for all controlled elements that are part of the nuclear facility and its operation. The goal is to have a flexible grading system that accurately reflects the overall operational environment. The grading methodology should identify which items, processes, and information should be incorporated into facility baselines as controlled elements; and specify the level of formality that should be applied to activities that employ or impact these controlled elements. Evaluation categories include the following: radiological damage to workers; toxicological damage to workers; industrial safety; environmental damage; property damage; facility availability; cost effect; reputation; and commitments

  16. In silico prediction of toxicity of non-congeneric industrial chemicals using ensemble learning based modeling approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Kunwar P., E-mail: kpsingh_52@yahoo.com; Gupta, Shikha

    2014-03-15

    Ensemble learning approach based decision treeboost (DTB) and decision tree forest (DTF) models are introduced in order to establish quantitative structure–toxicity relationship (QSTR) for the prediction of toxicity of 1450 diverse chemicals. Eight non-quantum mechanical molecular descriptors were derived. Structural diversity of the chemicals was evaluated using Tanimoto similarity index. Stochastic gradient boosting and bagging algorithms supplemented DTB and DTF models were constructed for classification and function optimization problems using the toxicity end-point in T. pyriformis. Special attention was drawn to prediction ability and robustness of the models, investigated both in external and 10-fold cross validation processes. In complete data, optimal DTB and DTF models rendered accuracies of 98.90%, 98.83% in two-category and 98.14%, 98.14% in four-category toxicity classifications. Both the models further yielded classification accuracies of 100% in external toxicity data of T. pyriformis. The constructed regression models (DTB and DTF) using five descriptors yielded correlation coefficients (R{sup 2}) of 0.945, 0.944 between the measured and predicted toxicities with mean squared errors (MSEs) of 0.059, and 0.064 in complete T. pyriformis data. The T. pyriformis regression models (DTB and DTF) applied to the external toxicity data sets yielded R{sup 2} and MSE values of 0.637, 0.655; 0.534, 0.507 (marine bacteria) and 0.741, 0.691; 0.155, 0.173 (algae). The results suggest for wide applicability of the inter-species models in predicting toxicity of new chemicals for regulatory purposes. These approaches provide useful strategy and robust tools in the screening of ecotoxicological risk or environmental hazard potential of chemicals. - Graphical abstract: Importance of input variables in DTB and DTF classification models for (a) two-category, and (b) four-category toxicity intervals in T. pyriformis data. Generalization and predictive abilities of the

  17. In silico prediction of toxicity of non-congeneric industrial chemicals using ensemble learning based modeling approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Kunwar P.; Gupta, Shikha

    2014-01-01

    Ensemble learning approach based decision treeboost (DTB) and decision tree forest (DTF) models are introduced in order to establish quantitative structure–toxicity relationship (QSTR) for the prediction of toxicity of 1450 diverse chemicals. Eight non-quantum mechanical molecular descriptors were derived. Structural diversity of the chemicals was evaluated using Tanimoto similarity index. Stochastic gradient boosting and bagging algorithms supplemented DTB and DTF models were constructed for classification and function optimization problems using the toxicity end-point in T. pyriformis. Special attention was drawn to prediction ability and robustness of the models, investigated both in external and 10-fold cross validation processes. In complete data, optimal DTB and DTF models rendered accuracies of 98.90%, 98.83% in two-category and 98.14%, 98.14% in four-category toxicity classifications. Both the models further yielded classification accuracies of 100% in external toxicity data of T. pyriformis. The constructed regression models (DTB and DTF) using five descriptors yielded correlation coefficients (R 2 ) of 0.945, 0.944 between the measured and predicted toxicities with mean squared errors (MSEs) of 0.059, and 0.064 in complete T. pyriformis data. The T. pyriformis regression models (DTB and DTF) applied to the external toxicity data sets yielded R 2 and MSE values of 0.637, 0.655; 0.534, 0.507 (marine bacteria) and 0.741, 0.691; 0.155, 0.173 (algae). The results suggest for wide applicability of the inter-species models in predicting toxicity of new chemicals for regulatory purposes. These approaches provide useful strategy and robust tools in the screening of ecotoxicological risk or environmental hazard potential of chemicals. - Graphical abstract: Importance of input variables in DTB and DTF classification models for (a) two-category, and (b) four-category toxicity intervals in T. pyriformis data. Generalization and predictive abilities of the

  18. New storm water regulations impact industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemar, C.

    1991-01-01

    In November 1990, new Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations aimed at governing the discharge of storm water from industrial facilities became effective. Because some industrial runoff contains toxics and other pollutants, the EPA considers storm water a major source of water contamination. The new regulations will have a profound impact on the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit requirements for industry. This paper summarizes the new storm water regulations, focusing on the requirements for industrial facilities. It also presents suggestions for compliance

  19. Optimization of electrocoagulation (EC) process for the purification of a real industrial wastewater from toxic metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatsios, Evangelos; Hahladakis, John N; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2015-05-01

    In the present work, the efficiency evaluation of electrocoagulation (EC) in removing toxic metals from a real industrial wastewater, collected from Aspropyrgos, Athens, Greece was investigated. Manganese (Mn), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) at respective concentrations of 5 mg/L, 5 mg/L and 10 mg/L were present in the wastewater (pH=6), originated from the wastes produced by EBO-PYRKAL munitions industry and Hellenic Petroleum Elefsis Refineries. The effect of operational parameters such as electrode combination and distance, applied current, initial pH and initial metal concentration, was studied. The results indicated that Cu and Zn were totally removed in all experiments, while Mn exhibited equally high removal percentages (approximately 90%). Decreasing the initial pH and increasing the distance between electrodes, resulted in a negative effect on the efficiency and energy consumption of the process. On the other hand, increasing the applied current, favored metal removal but resulted in a power consumption increase. Different initial concentrations did not affect metal removal efficiency. The optimal results, regarding both cost and EC efficiency, were obtained with a combination of iron electrodes, at 2 cm distance, at initial current of 0.1 A and pH=6. After 90 min of treatment, maximum removal percentages obtained were 89% for Mn, 100% for Cu and 100% for Zn, at an energy consumption of 2.55 kWh/m(3). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Patients on Anticoagulation Therapy: How Significant is the Bleeding Toxicity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Kevin S.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Liauw, Stanley L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the bleeding toxicity associated with external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer patients receiving anticoagulation (AC) therapy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 568 patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate who were treated with definitive external beam radiotherapy. Of these men, 79 were receiving AC therapy with either warfarin or clopidogrel. All patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Bleeding complications were recorded during treatment and subsequent follow-up visits. Results: With a median follow-up of 48 months, the 4-year actuarial risk of Grade 3 or worse bleeding toxicity was 15.5% for those receiving AC therapy compared with 3.6% among those not receiving AC (p < .0001). On multivariate analysis, AC therapy was the only significant factor associated with Grade 3 or worse bleeding (p < .0001). For patients taking AC therapy, the crude rate of bleeding was 39.2%. Multivariate analysis within the AC group demonstrated that a higher radiotherapy dose (p = .0408), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (p = 0.0136), and previous transurethral resection of the prostate (p = .0001) were associated with Grade 2 or worse bleeding toxicity. Androgen deprivation therapy was protective against bleeding, with borderline significance (p = 0.0599). Dose-volume histogram analysis revealed that Grade 3 or worse bleeding was minimized if the percentage of the rectum receiving ≥70 Gy was <10% or the rectum receiving ≥50 Gy was <50%. Conclusion: Patients taking AC therapy have a substantial risk of bleeding toxicity from external beam radiotherapy. In this setting, dose escalation or intensity-modulated radiotherapy should be used judiciously. With adherence to strict dose-volume histogram criteria and minimizing hotspots, the risk of severe bleeding might be reduced.

  1. Prospective Evaluation of Acute Toxicity and Quality of Life After IMRT and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Anal Canal and Perianal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kathy; Cummings, Bernard J.; Lindsay, Patricia; Skliarenko, Julia; Craig, Tim [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Le, Lisa W. [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brierley, James; Wong, Rebecca; Dinniwell, Robert; Bayley, Andrew J.; Dawson, Laura A.; Ringash, Jolie [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Krzyzanowska, Monika K.; Moore, Malcolm J.; Chen, Eric X. [Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Easson, Alexandra M. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kassam, Zahra; Cho, Charles [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kim, John, E-mail: John.Kim@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: A prospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate toxicity, quality of life (QOL), and clinical outcomes in patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for anal and perianal cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2008 to November 2010, patients with anal or perianal cancer treated with IMRT were eligible. Radiation dose was 27 Gy in 15 fractions to 36 Gy in 20 fractions for elective targets and 45 Gy in 25 fractions to 63 Gy in 35 fractions for gross targets using standardized, institutional guidelines, with no planned treatment breaks. The chemotherapy regimen was 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C. Toxicity was graded with the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. QOL was assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and CR29 questionnaires. Correlations between dosimetric parameters and both physician-graded toxicities and patient-reported outcomes were evaluated by polyserial correlation. Results: Fifty-eight patients were enrolled. The median follow-up time was 34 months; the median age was 56 years; 52% of patients were female; and 19% were human immunodeficiency virus—positive. Stage I, II, III, and IV disease was found in 9%, 57%, 26%, and 9% of patients, respectively. Twenty-six patients (45%) required a treatment break because of acute toxicity, mainly dermatitis (23/26). Acute grade 3 + toxicities included skin 46%, hematologic 38%, gastrointestinal 9%, and genitourinary 0. The 2-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), colostomy-free survival (CFS), and cumulative locoregional failure (LRF) rates were 90%, 77%, 84%, and 16%, respectively. The global QOL/health status, skin, defecation, and pain scores were significantly worse at the end of treatment than at baseline, but they returned to baseline 3 months after treatment. Social functioning and appetite scores were

  2. A risk-based classification scheme for genetically modified foods. II: Graded testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Eunice; Krewski, Daniel

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a graded approach to the testing of crop-derived genetically modified (GM) foods based on concern levels in a proposed risk-based classification scheme (RBCS) and currently available testing methods. A graded approach offers the potential for more efficient use of testing resources by focusing less on lower concern GM foods, and more on higher concern foods. In this proposed approach to graded testing, products that are classified as Level I would have met baseline testing requirements that are comparable to what is widely applied to premarket assessment of GM foods at present. In most cases, Level I products would require no further testing, or very limited confirmatory analyses. For products classified as Level II or higher, additional testing would be required, depending on the type of the substance, prior dietary history, estimated exposure level, prior knowledge of toxicity of the substance, and the nature of the concern related to unintended changes in the modified food. Level III testing applies only to the assessment of toxic and antinutritional effects from intended changes and is tailored to the nature of the substance in question. Since appropriate test methods are not currently available for all effects of concern, future research to strengthen the testing of GM foods is discussed.

  3. Nuclear industry - challenges in chemical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, S.; Sunder Rajan, N.S.; Balu, K.; Garg, R.K.; Murthy, L.G.K.; Ramani, M.P.S.; Rao, M.K.; Sadhukhan, H.K.; Venkat Raj, V.

    1978-01-01

    As chemical engineering processes and operations are closely involved in many areas of nuclear industry, the chemical engineer has a vital role to play in its growth and development. An account of the major achievements of the Indian chemical engineers in this field is given with view of impressing upon the faculty members of the Indian universities the need for taking appropriate steps to prepare chemical engineers suitable for nuclear industry. Some of the major achievements of the Indian chemical engineers in this field are : (1) separation of useful minerals from beach sand, (2) preparation of thorium nitrate of nuclear purity from monazite, (3) processing of zircon sand to obtain nuclear grade zirconium and its separation from hafnium to obtain zirconium metal sponge, (4) recovery of uranium from copper tailings, (5) economic recovery of nuclear grade uranium from low grade uranium ores found in India, (6) fuel reprocessing, (7) chemical processing of both low and high level radioactive wastes. (M.G.B.)

  4. Biological treatment of chemical industry wastewater having toxic components; Degradazione per via biologica di reflui a componenti tossiche prodotti da una industria farmaceutica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbricino, M.; Pepe, G. [Naples Univ. Federico 2., Naples (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Idraulica ed Ambientale Girolamo Ippolito; Scevola, D. [Novartis Farma SpA, Torre Annunziata, NA (Italy); Fiorillo, S. [Impianto di depurazione di Cuma, Napoli Ovest, Licola di Pozzuoli, NA (Italy)

    2001-09-01

    In order to understand the capacity of an existing biomass to front the variations of wastewater influent characteristics and to evaluate the possibility of toxic components removal using biological processes, it is single out the intervention required to obtain the envisage efficiency of the activated sludge phase, following the arrival of toxic components. Together with experimental results on pilot scale, the performance of the industrial treatment plant is presented too, showing the effectiveness of activated carbon dosage in the biological phase to preserve the efficiency of the process despite of influent wastewater toxicity. [Italian] Il lavoro presenta l'indagine sperimentale condotta per rilevare la capacita' di adattamento della biomassa dell'impianto di depurazione di una industria farmaceutica a seguito della variazione delle caratteristiche del liquame influente, e la possibilita' di degradazione, per via biologica, delle componenti tossiche presenti nel refluo. Attraverso prove in scala pilota vengono evidenziati gli effetti causati dall'arrivo di tali componenti su di un impianto di ossidazione a fanghi attivi a regime, e vengono individuati gli interventi da apportare per garantire il raggiungimento degli standard richiesti nell'effluente. I risultati ottenuti vengono estesi all'impianto a scala reale di cui vengono illustrati i rendimenti depurativi in termini di abbattimento del carico inquinante.

  5. From Russian weapons grade plutonium to MOX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braehler, G.; Kudriavtsev, E.G.; Seyve, C.

    1997-01-01

    The April 1996, G7 Moscow Summit on nuclear matters provided a political framework for one of the most current significant challenges: ensuring a consistent answer to the weapons grade fissile material disposition issue resulting from the disarmament effort engaged by both the USA and Russia. International technical assessments have showed that the transformation of Weapons grade Plutonium in MOX fuel is a very efficient, safe, non proliferant and economically effective solution. In this regard, COGEMA and SIEMENS, have set up a consistent technical program properly addressing incineration of weapons grade plutonium in MOX fuels. The leading point of this program would be the construction of a Weapons grade Plutonium dedicated MOX fabrication plant in Russia. Such a plant would be based on the COGEMA-SIEMENS industrial capabilities and experience. This facility would be operated by MINATOM which is the partner for COGEMA-SIEMENS. MINATOM is in charge of coordination of the activity of the Russian research and construction institutes. The project take in account international standards for non-proliferation, safety and waste management. France and Germany officials reasserted this position during their last bilateral summits held in Fribourg in February and in Dijon in June 1996. MINATOM and the whole Russian nuclear community have already expressed their interest to cooperate with COGEMA-SIEMENS in the MOX field. This follows governmental-level agreements signed in 1992 by French, German and Russian officials. For years, Russia has been dealing with research and development on MOX fabrication and utilization. So, the COGEMA-SIEMENS MOX proposal gives a realistic answer to the management of weapons grade plutonium with regard to the technical, industrial, cost and schedule factors. (author)

  6. Hypofractionated intensity-modulated arc therapy for lymph node metastasized prostate cancer: Early late toxicity and 3-year clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonteyne, Valérie; Lumen, Nicolaas; Ost, Piet; Van Praet, Charles; Vandecasteele, Katrien; De Gersem Ir, Werner; Villeirs, Geert; De Neve, Wilfried; Decaestecker, Karel; De Meerleer, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: For patients with N1 prostate cancer (PCa) aggressive local therapies can be advocated. We evaluated clinical outcome, gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) toxicity after intensity modulated arc radiotherapy (IMAT) + androgen deprivation (AD) for N1 PCa. Material and methods: Eighty patients with T1-4N1M0 PCa were treated with IMAT and 2–3 years of AD. A median dose of 69.3 Gy (normalized isoeffective dose at 2 Gy per fraction: 80 Gy [α/β = 3]) was prescribed in 25 fractions to the prostate. The pelvic lymph nodes received a minimal dose of 45 Gy. A simultaneous integrated boost to 72 Gy and 65 Gy was delivered to the intraprostatic lesion and/or pathologically enlarged lymph nodes, respectively. GI and GU toxicity was scored using the RTOG/RILIT and RTOG-SOMA/LENT-CTC toxicity scoring system respectively. Three-year actuarial risk of grade 2 and 3/4 GI–GU toxicity and biochemical and clinical relapse free survival (bRFS and cRFS) were calculated with Kaplan–Meier statistics. Results: Median follow-up was 36 months. Three-year actuarial risk for late grade 3 and 2 GI toxicity is 8% and 20%, respectively. Three-year actuarial risk for late grade 3–4 and 2 GU toxicity was 6% and 34%, respectively. Actuarial 3-year bRFS and cRFS was 81% and 89%, respectively. Actuarial 3-year bRFS and cRFS was, respectively 26% and 32% lower for patients with cN1 disease when compared to patients with cN0 disease. Conclusion: IMAT for N1 PCa offers good clinical outcome with moderate toxicity. Patients with cN1 disease have poorer outcome

  7. Virtual HDR CyberKnife SBRT for Localized Prostatic Carcinoma: 5-year Disease-free Survival and Toxicity Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Blake Fuller

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSEProstate stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT may substantially recapitulate the dose distribution of high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy, representing an externally delivered Virtual HDR treatment method. Herein we present 5-year outcomes from a cohort of consecutively treated Virtual HDR SBRT prostate cancer patients.METHODSSeventy-nine patients were treated from 2006 - 2009, 40 low-risk and 39 intermediate-risk, under IRB-approved clinical trial, to 38 Gy in 4 fractions. The planning target volume (PTV included prostate plus a 2-mm volume expansion in all directions, with selective use of a 5-mm prostate-to-PTV expansion and proximal seminal vesicle coverage in intermediate-risk patients, to better cover potential extraprostatic disease; rectal PTV margin reduced to zero in all cases. The prescription dose covered > 95% of the PTV (V100 >= 95%, with a minimum 150% PTV dose escalation to create HDR-like PTV dose distribution.RESULTSMedian pre-SBRT PSA level of 5.6 ng/mL decreased to 0.05 ng/mL 5 years out and 0.02 ng/mL 6 years out. At least one PSA bounce was seen in 55 patients (70% but only 3 of them subsequently relapsed, Biochemical-relapse-free survival was 100% and 92% for low-risk and intermediate-risk patients, respectively, by ASTRO definition (98% and 92% by Phoenix definition. Local relapse did not occur, distant metastasis-free survival was 100% and 95% by risk-group, and disease-specific survival was 100%. Acute and late grade 2 GU toxicity incidence was 10% and 9%, respectively; with 6% late grade 3 GU toxicity. Acute urinary retention did not occur. Acute and late grade 2 GI toxicity was 0% and 1%, respectively, with no grade 3 or higher toxicity. Of patients potent pre-SBRT, 65% remained so at 5 years.CONCLUSIONSVirtual HDR prostate SBRT creates a very low PSA nadir, a high rate of 5-year disease-free survival and an acceptable toxicity incidence, with results closely resembling those reported post-HDR brachytherapy.

  8. Dosimetric Factors and Toxicity in Highly Conformal Thoracic Reirradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkley, Michael S.; Hiniker, Susan M.; Chaudhuri, Aadel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Shultz, David Benjamin, E-mail: David.Shultz@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: We determined cumulative dose to critical structures, rates of toxicity, and outcomes following thoracic reirradiation. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed our institutional database for patients treated between 2008 and 2014, who received thoracic reirradiation with overlap of 25% prescribed isodose lines. Patients received courses of hyperfractionated (n=5), hypofractionated (n=5), conventionally fractionated (n=21), or stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (n=51). Doses to critical structures were converted to biologically effective dose, expressed as 2 Gy per fraction equivalent dose (EQD2; α/β = 2 for spinal cord; α/β = 3 for other critical structures). Results: We identified 82 courses (44 for retreatment) in 38 patients reirradiated at a median 16 months (range: 1-71 months) following initial RT. Median follow-up was 17 months (range: 3-57 months). Twelve- and 24-month overall survival rates were 79.6% and 57.3%, respectively. Eighteen patients received reirradiation for locoregionally recurrent non-small cell lung cancer with 12-month rates of local failure and regional recurrence and distant metastases rates of 13.5%, 8.1%, and 15.6%, respectively. Critical structures receiving ≥75 Gy EQD2 included spinal cord (1 cm{sup 3}; n=1), esophagus (1 cm{sup 3}; n=10), trachea (1 cm{sup 3}; n=11), heart (1 cm{sup 3}; n=9), aorta (1 cm{sup 3}; n=16), superior vena cava (1 cm{sup 3}; n=12), brachial plexus (0.2 cm{sup 3}; n=2), vagus nerve (0.2 cm{sup 3}; n=7), sympathetic trunk (0.2 cm{sup 3}; n=4), chest wall (30 cm{sup 3}; n=12), and proximal bronchial tree (1 cm{sup 3}; n=17). Cumulative dose-volume (D cm{sup 3}) toxicity following reirradiation data included esophagitis grade ≥2 (n=3, D1 cm{sup 3} range: 41.0-100.6 Gy), chest wall grade ≥2 (n=4; D30 cm{sup 3} range: 35.0-117.2 Gy), lung grade 2 (n=7; V20{sub combined-lung} range: 4.7%-21.7%), vocal cord paralysis (n=2; vagus nerve D0.2 cm{sup 3

  9. Economical solution for the industrial waste problem of Karachi industrial area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mubin, S.

    2005-01-01

    The increased rate of industrialization coupled with rapid urbanization in Pakistan has given rise to serious water pollution and environmental problems. A vast range of industries has been established in the country during the last twenty five years, including tanneries, fertilizers, textiles, refineries, chemicals, vegetable oils, paper am pulp, sugar and food. Little attention was paid towards a large scale release of wastewater from these industries. Presently wastewater produced from these industries has been considered a serious problem and research in being conducted to solve its associated problems. Recently, it has been realized that there is a significant threat of water borne diseases, degradation of fresh water quality, environmental depletion and soil deterioration from the effluent and toxic emission of industries. Being a developing country and having limited resources, it is hard to install treatment plants on the industrial effluent with every industry before discharging them into streams which are also creating disturbance in natural ecosystem. An effort has been made to solve wastewater problem by implementing statistical tools on data of Karachi industrial state, obtained from EPA JICA and PCRWR, Islamabad. (author)

  10. Acute toxicity and treatment interruption related to electron and photon craniospinal irradiation in pediatric patients treated at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Eric L.; Allen, Pamela; Wu, Catherine; Ater, Joann; Kuttesch, John; Maor, Moshe H.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of acute toxicity and treatment interruption associated with electron and photon craniospinal irradiation (CSI) in children treated with or without chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study involving a computerized search of the radiotherapy database at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center identified a total of 79 eligible patients ≤18 years old who had received electron (n=46) or photon (n=33) CSI from October 1980 to March 2000. Acute toxicity was graded according to the 1998 National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria. Chemotherapy sequencing was categorized as before or after CSI or no chemotherapy. The incidences of weight loss and skin toxicity were recorded and differences in treatment interruption and hematologic values with respect to modality used (electron vs. photon), age (≤6 or >6 years), and sequencing of chemotherapy were compared using chi-square tests. Results: The median age of the electron group was lower than that of the photon group (6.7 years and 11.7 years, respectively). The two groups were otherwise well matched in terms of median spinal dose (31.1 vs. 33.3 Gy), fraction size (1.57 vs. 1.63 Gy), and total treatment time (32.4 vs. 30.7 days). Only 2 patients in each group (photon and electron) had a treatment break (>3 days). The mean number of days interrupted was 0.94 (photon) and 1.1 (electron) (p=0.72). The electron and photon groups were well balanced in terms of receiving pre-CSI chemotherapy (37% vs. 41%, p=0.776). Chemotherapy given before radiotherapy vs. after or not at all was associated with an increased incidence of Grade 3-4 leukopenia (76% vs. 49%, p=0.02), thrombocytopenia (90% vs. 10%, p=0), and neutropenia (50% vs. 15%, p=0.005). A younger age was associated with Grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia (29% vs. 8.7%, p=0.034), and decreased hemoglobin (29% vs. 6.5%, p=0.014). The incidence of leukocyte depression of Grade 3-4 toxicity was 62% in the electron

  11. Weekly Carboplatin Reduces Toxicity During Synchronous Chemoradiotherapy for Merkel Cell Carcinoma of Skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, Michael; Walpole, Euan; Harvey, Jennifer; Dickie, Graeme; O'Brien, Peter; Keller, Jacqui; Tpcony, Lee; Rischin, Danny

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The toxicity of radiotherapy (RT) combined with weekly carboplatin and adjuvant carboplatin and etoposide was prospectively assessed in a group of patients with high-risk Stage I and II Merkel cell carcinoma of the skin. This regimen was compared with the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 96:07 study, which used identical eligibility criteria but carboplatin and etoposide every 3 weeks during RT. Patients and Methods: Patients were eligible if they had disease localized to the primary site and lymph nodes, with high-risk features. RT was delivered to the primary site and lymph nodes to a dose of 50 Gy and weekly carboplatin (area under the curve of 2) was given during RT. This was followed by three cycles of carboplatin and etoposide. A total of 18 patients were entered into the study, and their data were compared with the data from 53 patients entered into the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 96:07 study. Results: Involved lymph nodes (Stage II) were present in 14 patients (77%). Treatment was completed as planned in 16 patients. The weekly carboplatin dose was delivered in 17 patients, and 15 were able to complete all three cycles of adjuvant carboplatin and etoposide. Grade 3 and 4 neutrophil toxicity occurred in 7 patients, but no cases of febrile neutropenia developed. Compared with the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 96:07 protocol (19 of 53 cases of febrile neutropenia), the reduction in the febrile neutropenia rate (p = 0.003) and decrease in Grade 3 skin toxicity (p = 0.006) were highly statistically significant. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that weekly carboplatin at this dosage is a safe way to deliver synchronous chemotherapy during RT for MCC and results in a marked reduction of febrile neutropenia and Grade 3 skin toxicity compared with the three weekly regimen

  12. Risk Assessment of Potentially Toxic Elements (PTEs Pollution at a Rural Industrial Wasteland in an Abandoned Metallurgy Factory in North China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Sun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential toxic elements (PTEs pollution problems in many rural industrial wastelands have been observed to be conspicuous. Therefore, 40 top soil samples were collected from the wasteland of a typical rural metallurgy factory in Baoding, China. The total concentrations of six key PTEs were measured. The soil properties and speciation of the PTEs were also identified. Extremely high concentrations of As, Cd, Pb, and Zn were observed in the surface soils. Using the PTEs concentration in the top soils of the rural industrial wasteland, the following indices of pollution were calculated: the pollution load index (PLI, the geo-accumulation Index (Igeo, the risk assessment code (RAC, and the health risk assessment (HRA. The analysis of the PLI and Igeo indicated that site #1 was relatively clean, while sites #2 and #3 were heavily polluted. The results of the RAC showed that PTEs in top soils at sites #2 and #3 were significantly increased (p <  0.05 for Cd and Zn. The HRA indicated that both As and Pb presented non-carcinogenic risks to children and adults at sites #2 and #3. Our findings can be a reference for risk prevention of industrially abandoned land in rural China.

  13. Risk Assessment of Potentially Toxic Elements (PTEs) Pollution at a Rural Industrial Wasteland in an Abandoned Metallurgy Factory in North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zheng; Chen, Jiajun

    2018-01-06

    The potential toxic elements (PTEs) pollution problems in many rural industrial wastelands have been observed to be conspicuous. Therefore, 40 top soil samples were collected from the wasteland of a typical rural metallurgy factory in Baoding, China. The total concentrations of six key PTEs were measured. The soil properties and speciation of the PTEs were also identified. Extremely high concentrations of As, Cd, Pb, and Zn were observed in the surface soils. Using the PTEs concentration in the top soils of the rural industrial wasteland, the following indices of pollution were calculated: the pollution load index (PLI), the geo-accumulation Index (I geo ), the risk assessment code (RAC), and the health risk assessment (HRA). The analysis of the PLI and I geo indicated that site #1 was relatively clean, while sites #2 and #3 were heavily polluted. The results of the RAC showed that PTEs in top soils at sites #2 and #3 were significantly increased ( p <  0.05) for Cd and Zn. The HRA indicated that both As and Pb presented non-carcinogenic risks to children and adults at sites #2 and #3. Our findings can be a reference for risk prevention of industrially abandoned land in rural China.

  14. A Novel Method for Predicting Late Genitourinary Toxicity After Prostate Radiation Therapy and the Need for Age-Based Risk-Adapted Dose Constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Awad A.; Egleston, Brian; Alcantara, Pino; Li, Linna; Pollack, Alan; Horwitz, Eric M.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are no well-established normal tissue sparing dose–volume histogram (DVH) criteria that limit the risk of urinary toxicity from prostate radiation therapy (RT). The aim of this study was to determine which criteria predict late toxicity among various DVH parameters when contouring the entire solid bladder and its contents versus the bladder wall. The area under the histogram curve (AUHC) was also analyzed. Methods and Materials: From 1993 to 2000, 503 men with prostate cancer received 3-dimensional conformal RT (median follow-up time, 71 months). The whole bladder and the bladder wall were contoured in all patients. The primary endpoint was grade ≥2 genitourinary (GU) toxicity occurring ≥3 months after completion of RT. Cox regressions of time to grade ≥2 toxicity were estimated separately for the entire bladder and bladder wall. Concordance probability estimates (CPE) assessed model discriminative ability. Before training the models, an external random test group of 100 men was set aside for testing. Separate analyses were performed based on the mean age (≤ 68 vs >68 years). Results: Age, pretreatment urinary symptoms, mean dose (entire bladder and bladder wall), and AUHC (entire bladder and bladder wall) were significant (P 68 years. Conclusion: The AUHC method based on bladder wall volumes was superior for predicting late GU toxicity. Age >68 years was associated with late grade ≥2 GU toxicity, which suggests that risk-adapted dose constraints based on age should be explored

  15. The association between COX-2 polymorphisms and hematologic toxicity in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer treated with platinum-based chemotherapy.

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    Fei Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Overexpression of COX-2 is proved to contribute to tumor promotion and carcinogenesis through stimulating cell proliferation, inhibiting apoptosis and enhancing the invasiveness of cancer cells. Apoptosis-related molecules are potential predictive markers for survival and toxicity in platinum treatment. This study aimed at investigating the association between COX-2 polymorphisms and the occurrence of grade