WorldWideScience

Sample records for industrial arts student

  1. Industrial Arts Student Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, James D.

    1980-01-01

    A national survey attempted to identify (1) the number and size of student organizations in industrial arts, (2) the perceptions that principals and guidance personnel had of the student organizations, and (3) the activities offered to student organization members. (LRA)

  2. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-02-01

    In this teaching manual several activities are presented to introduce students to information on solar energy through classroom instruction. Wind power is also included. Instructions for constructing demonstration models for passive solar systems, photovoltaic cells, solar collectors and water heaters, and a bicycle wheel wind turbine are provided. (BCS)

  3. Robotics and Industrial Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmison, Glenn A.; And Others

    Robots are becoming increasingly common in American industry. By l990, they will revolutionize the way industry functions, replacing hundreds of workers and doing hot, dirty jobs better and more quickly than the workers could have done them. Robotics should be taught in high school industrial arts programs as a major curriculum component. The…

  4. Finance for Industrial Arts Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, La Verne; Pesce, Frank

    1980-01-01

    Among the purposes of this study were to determine (1) the numbers of industrial arts programs receiving federal funds by state or territory; (2) grade levels of federally funded courses; and (3) the number of programs that were receiving special funding for students with special needs. (LRA)

  5. New Concepts in Industrial Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Industrial Arts Association, Washington, DC.

    The 30th annual American Industrial Arts Association (AIAA) Convention was held in Minneapolis in 1968. Topics for the AIAA general session addresses were: (1) "A Fresh Look at Industrial Arts," (2) "New Curricular Concepts," (3) "Making Education Relevant," (4) "Industrial Arts in an Educational System for the Seventies," (5) "New Concepts in…

  6. OF ART STUDENTS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was made to investigate the effects of the use of computers by the Art students of the. Kwame Nkrumah ... vestigated included among others, the computer 's ability or otherwise to surpass humans in crea- ..... Digital Vision. Henry N.

  7. An Alternative for Industrial Arts: Communication Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, George R., Jr.; Ritz, John M.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a rationale for including the study of communication technology as a part of the general education process in industrial arts. Analyzes communication technology and suggests methods of implementing the technology in industrial arts. (CSS)

  8. Industrial Arts and Space Age Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Colleen P., Ed.

    The 33rd annual American Industrial Arts Association (AIAA) convention was held in Miami in 1971. Topics for the AIAA general session addresses were: (1) "Technology--and a Time of Crisis-II," and (2) "Goals, Accountability, and Action for the Industrial Arts." Twenty-four addresses from sessions of the American Council of Industrial Arts Teacher…

  9. Arte en la industria = Art in the industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Nuere

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen ¿Puede alcanzar un objeto industrial la categoría de obra de arte? En la sociedad actual se tiende a identificar la obra de arte como un objeto de alto valor económico, hasta el punto que el arte se considera como un rentable valor de inversión, y el mercantilismo que impregna el mundo en que vivimos desvirtúa lo que hoy realmente pueda considerarse arte. Abstract Can an industrial object reach the art category? In today's society we tend to identify the work of art as an object of high economic value, to the point that art is considered a profitable investment value, and commercialism that permeates the world we live in, really distorts today what can be considered art today.

  10. Dropping out of Vocational Education in the State of Kuwait: A Case Study of Industrial Arts Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Abdulmuhsen Ayedh; Almutairi, Yousef B.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to examine, in retrospect, trainees' perceptions of the reasons some of their peers dropped out of the vocational education at the Industrial Institute-Shuwaikh (IIS), Kuwait. Using the descriptive-analytical method, a reliable questionnaire was developed to achieve this purpose. Results show that: (a) the…

  11. The prevalence of dyslexia among art students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ulrika; Lundberg, Ingvar

    2002-01-01

    It is widely held opinion that dyslexia is associated with remarkably artistic creativity. Speculations on different brain structures and brain functions have been proposed as an explanation. Very few objective studies have been reported that confirm the conjectures on the relationship between dyslexia and artistic creativity. Two studies are reported on the prevalence of dyslexia among university students-one group of art students and one group of students from non-art disciplines. The admission to the art schools were extremely demanding, possibly implying that the students were genuinely talented, and that their choice of training did not reflect a compensation for failure in conventional academic fields. Art academy students reported significantly more signs of dyslexia than non-art university students. Objective testing showed that art students had significantly poorer phonological skills than non-art students. Thus, according to self-reports combined with objective testing, the incidence of dyslexia was far higher among art students.

  12. The Importance of Developmental Learning Theories to Industrial Arts Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Ronald G.

    1982-01-01

    This article synthesizes the relationship of human development and learning to industrial arts. It discusses developmental stages and tasks according to Havighurst, Piaget, and Erikson and how they each apply to industrial arts (CT)

  13. Missouri Industrial and Educational Graphic Arts Survey. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keseman, Charles E.

    The Missouri Industrial and Educational Graphic Arts (MIEGA) survey was done to determine the current status and trends of the graphic arts industry and graphic arts education in Missouri for use as the basis for the later development of secondary school graphic arts state curriculum guides. Data were collected through two status surveys in…

  14. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    An instructional aid is presented which integrates the subject of solar energy into the classroom study of industrial arts. This guide for teachers was produced in addition to the student activities book for industrial arts by the USDOE Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

  15. art@CMS students' exhibition in Centre des Arts, ECOLINT

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS Communications Group; Geneva, Switzerland; Vaso Sideri

    2015-01-01

    This video documents the outcome of a science and art workshop with the participation of high-school students from the International School of Geneva (ECOLINT). The project was implemented in the framework of art@CMS, an education and outreach programme of the CMS experiment at CERN. In the video, the students present their artworks during the opening of their exhibition at the Centre des Arts of ECOLINT in Geneva.

  16. Robotics in Industrial Arts. Final Narrative Report for the Exemplary Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascension Parish School Board, Donaldsonville, LA.

    To introduce students to the world of robotics and industrial automation, robotics was introduced to students enrolled in electronics classes in the industrial arts program at St. Amant High School (Louisiana). Three robots, three host microcomputers, and necessary software were purchased. The electronics instructor installed the three robots…

  17. The Potential for Meaning in Student Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnezda, Nicole M.

    2009-01-01

    At the end of the 20th century, dialogue in art education shifted the goals of art teaching from a primary focus on studio production to an aesthetics and culture driven curriculum. Discipline-Based Art Education and, more recently, Visual Culture Art Education (VCAE) have provided students with a rich background for intellectualizing about art…

  18. The Potential for Meaning in Student Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnezda, Nicole M.

    2009-01-01

    At the end of the 20th century, dialogue in art education shifted the goals of art teaching from a primary focus on studio production to an aesthetics and culture driven curriculum. Discipline-Based Art Education and, more recently, Visual Culture Art Education (VCAE) have provided students with a rich background for intellectualizing about art…

  19. Subjugated in the Creative Industries The Fine Arts in Singapore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    2011-01-01

    to economic value. Fine arts practices will not be as lucrative or popular as their counterparts in the other creative businesses; they will remain poor cousins in the creative industries. Essentially, the fine arts are being subjugated in the creative industries and the Singaporean art world is being changed....

  20. Artful Language: Academic Writing for the Art Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apps, Linda; Mamchur, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    The task of writing about the process of making and contextualising art can be overwhelming for some graduate students. While the challenge may be due in part to limited time and attention to the practice of writing, in a practice-based arts thesis there is a deeper issue: how the visual and written components are attended to in a manner that…

  1. Artful Language: Academic Writing for the Art Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apps, Linda; Mamchur, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    The task of writing about the process of making and contextualising art can be overwhelming for some graduate students. While the challenge may be due in part to limited time and attention to the practice of writing, in a practice-based arts thesis there is a deeper issue: how the visual and written components are attended to in a manner that…

  2. Industrial Communications Exploration. Practical Arts. Instructor's Manual. Competency-Based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeton, Martha; And Others

    This manual provides curriculum materials for implementing a career exploration class in industrial communications within a Practical Arts Education program for middle/junior high school students. Introductory materials include the program master sequence, a list of industrial communications occupations, and an overview of the competency-based…

  3. An Art Scholarship Program for Secondary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, David A. E.

    1982-01-01

    It is the intent of this program, sponsored by Berol Canada Inc., to provide an adequate visual arts scholarship program for Canadian secondary students, bringing attention to the importance of visual arts in education and providing support, encouragement, and opportunities for the artistic development of the nation's talented youth. (Author/LC)

  4. Changes in the Graphic Arts Industry in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Rene-Simon

    1992-01-01

    Major changes affecting Swiss graphic arts are photocomposition, replacement of letterpress with offset printing, scanners, and microcomputers and laser printers for desktop publishing. Effects on workers include monotony, alienation, and apprehension. Sex discrimination continues in the industry. (SK)

  5. Student impressions of an art therapy class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Desiree; Bradburn, Taylor Caitlin; Kelly, Amy; Manahan, Isabel; Merriman, Hannah; Metzinger, Faith; Moore, Heather

    2012-12-01

    Art therapy facilitates the expression of thoughts and feelings and thus may serve as a self-care strategy. This paper describes the implementation of an expressive art therapy class to teach self-care during a required sophomore level nursing wellness course and the outcomes of the class through the eyes of six students. While students were initially reluctant to engage in the activity, the shared stories revealed feelings of relaxation, empowerment, value clarification, and increased self-awareness. The implication for nursing education is that the integration of art therapy into curricula may serve as an effective strategy to teaching self-care and core professional values.

  6. Web-Based Student Art Galleries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, David

    2010-01-01

    Exhibition is an important part of the artistic process for students as well as professional artists, but finding enough good places to exhibit can be as difficult for student artists as for adult artists. Venues that are accessible, display art attractively, and provide adequate space for many artists are usually in short supply. There is an…

  7. Industrial Chemistry and the Liberal Arts Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Wayne L.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests reasons why courses in industrial chemistry are desirable, briefly outlines the course taught at Colby College (Maine) for the past four years, and points out some lessons learned from this experience. (Author/SK)

  8. Teaching Programming to Liberal Arts Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Bøgh; Bennedsen, Jens; Brandorff, Steffen

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present a new learning environment to be used in an introductory programming course for studentsthat are non-majors in computer science, more precisely formultimedia students with a liberal arts background. Media-oriented programming adds new requirements to thecraft of programming...... (e.g. aesthetic and communicative).We argue that multimedia students with a liberal arts background need programming competences because programmability is the defining characteristic of the computer medium.We compare programming with the creation of traditionalmedia products and identify two...... environment for an introductory programmingcourse for multimedia students.We have designed a learning environment called Lingoland with the new skills of media programming in mind thathopefully can help alleviate the problems we have experiencedin teaching programming to liberal arts students....

  9. Competing Values in the Culinary Arts and Hospitality Industry: Leadership Roles and Managerial Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Michael W.; Hughey, Aaron W.

    2011-01-01

    It is important that education and training programmes align with the needs of the professions they are designed to support. The culinary arts and hospitality industry is a vocational area that needs to be examined more closely to ensure that the skills and competencies taught are those that will actually be needed when students matriculate from…

  10. Competing Values in the Culinary Arts and Hospitality Industry: Leadership Roles and Managerial Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Michael W.; Hughey, Aaron W.

    2011-01-01

    It is important that education and training programmes align with the needs of the professions they are designed to support. The culinary arts and hospitality industry is a vocational area that needs to be examined more closely to ensure that the skills and competencies taught are those that will actually be needed when students matriculate from…

  11. Polish Industry and Art at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    On 17 October 2000 the second Polish industrial and technological exhibition opened at CERN. The first one was held five years ago and nine of the companies that were present then have come back again this year. Six of those companies were awarded contracts with CERN in 1995. Three Polish officials were present at the Opening Ceremony today: Mrs Malgorzata Kozlowska, Under-secretary of State in the State Committee for Scientific Research, Mr Henryk Ogryczak, Under-secretary of State in Ministry of Economy and Prof. Jerzy Niewodniczanski, President of National Atomic Energy Agency. Professor Luciano Maiani welcomed the Polish delegation to CERN and stressed the important contribution of Polish scientists and industrialists to the work of the laboratory. Director General Luciano Maiani (back left) and head of SPL division Karl-Heinz Kissler (back right) visit the Poland at CERN exhibition… The exhibition offers Polish companies the opportunity to establish professional contacts with CERN. Nineteen companies...

  12. Industrial Arts Curriculum Guide for Automated Machining in Metals Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985

    This curriculum guide is designed to be used for creating programs in automated machining education in Connecticut. The first sections of the guide are introductory, explaining the importance of computer-numerically controlled machines, describing the industrial arts scope and sequence for kindergarten through adult levels, describing the…

  13. Advanced Woodworking (Industrial Arts) Curriculum Guide. Bulletin 1752.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide contains materials for a 12-unit course in advanced woodworking for grades 11-12. It is intended for use by industrial arts teachers, supervisors, counselors, administrators, and teacher educators. A two-page course overview provides a brief course description; indicates target grade level, prerequisites, course goals, and…

  14. Teaching Graduate Students The Art of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snieder, Roel; Larner, Ken; Boyd, Tom

    2012-08-01

    Graduate students traditionally learn the trade of research by working under the supervision of an advisor, much as in the medieval practice of apprenticeship. In practice, however, this model generally falls short in teaching students the broad professional skills needed to be a well-rounded researcher. While a large majority of graduate students considers professional training to be of great relevance, most graduate programs focus exclusively on disciplinary training as opposed to skills such as written and oral communication, conflict resolution, leadership, performing literature searches, teamwork, ethics, and client-interaction. Over the past decade, we have developed and taught the graduate course "The Art of Science", which addresses such topics; we summarize the topics covered in the course here. In order to coordinate development of professional training, the Center for Professional Education has been founded at the Colorado School of Mines. After giving an overview of the Center's program, we sketch the challenges and opportunities in offering professional education to graduate students. Offering professional education helps create better-prepared graduates. We owe it to our students to provide them with such preparation.

  15. Trip Fuels Imagination of Art Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    THE colorful paintings exhibited at the China’s Art Gallery were done by the children’s painting class at the Beijing Children’s Palace. They project the innocence and joy of childhood. Little Artists Painting classes at the Children’s Palace started in 1987. To date nearly 1,000 primary school students have learned received basic painting skills. The teachers have developed a curriculum geared toward children aged 5-12. The children learn how to sketch, paint in watercolor and in oils. Many talented students have emerged from these classes to go on to win painting competitions at home and abyoad. Sun Enqi, 51, is a kind teacher who is serious about his work and has the kind of face that has been marked by the passing years. He has devoted his life to teaching children how to paint.

  16. Teaching Chaos to Art College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Ben

    2001-03-01

    This is a report of the author's teaching the basic concepts of chaos to students at Massachusetts College of Art. In order to bypass the students' aversion to mathematics stemming from earlier difficult experiences with mathematics, the course started with some symbolism which was totally unfamiliar to them: a Boolean system based on Brown's Laws of Form. This was then used to develop the mathematical ideas of duality and self-reference. After that was a general survey of the various areas of mathematics using Guillen's Bridges to Infinity. Chaos was then introduced using Gleick's Chaos, which provides a very engaging narrative, along with an introduction to the basic ideas. Two different strategies were used to introduce the mathematical ideas. First, making use of the students' visual orientation, sensitive dependence on initial conditions, fractional dimension, fractals, the Koch snowflake, self-similiarity, and statistical self-similiarity were covered pictorially. Second, so that the students could get a real feeling for the mathematics of chaos, they individually worked out a recurrence equation with varying seeds, using a hand-held calculator.

  17. "DEAR ROCK, WHAT'S YOUR DESTINY? Ancient and modern uses of rocks in industry, building and art."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennesi, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    The project is for students of first grade of secondary school. The activity is a game, virtual or real of associations between rock and soil samples with their uses in industry, building and art. The students, alone or in a team, have to form pairs having available various samples of rocks, soils and building materials as bags of cement, tiles.. They have images of colonnades, staircases of famous churches, cave paintings and colors. The project is multidisciplinary. During the activity, the teachers of art and technical education are involved with and the teacher of sciences. The game can be used as an introduction for the rocks' classification. The inquiry in team, is a good way to learn the several uses of mineral resources.

  18. Students' Perception of Industrial Internship Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renganathan, Sumathi; Karim, Zainal Ambri Bin Abdul; Li, Chong Su

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: An important aspect of an academic curriculum in higher learning institutions for technical disciplines is the industrial internship programme for students. The purpose of this paper is to investigate students' perception of the effectiveness of an industrial internship programme offered by a private technological university in Malaysia.…

  19. Teaching graduate students The Art of Being a Scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snieder, Roel

    2011-03-01

    Graduate education in the classroom traditionally focuses on disciplinary topics, with non-disciplinary skills only marginally discussed, if at all, between graduate student and adviser. Given the wide range of advisers with different types and quality of communication skill (or lack thereof), the professional coaching delivered to students often is restricted to just the technical aspects of research. Yet graduate students have a great need to receive professional training aimed at, among other things, helping their graduate career be more efficient, less frustrating and less needlessly time-consuming. We have addressed this gap in graduate education by developing the one-credit course ``The Art of Being a Scientist.'' This course covers a diverse range of topics of importance to being an effective and creative researcher. Topics covered include the following: What is science? Choosing a research topic, department, and adviser. The adviser and thesis committee. Making a work plan. Setting goals. Ethics of research. Using the scientific literature. Perfecting oral and written communication. Publishing papers and writing proposals. Managing time effectively. Planning a scientific career. Applying for jobs in academia or industry. In evaluations of the course, students invariably comment that they could have avoided significant problems in their graduate study and saved valuable time if they would have taken the course earlier on. This is an indication that the course not only useful for students, but also that it is best taken early in a their graduate career. The material covered in the course is captured in the book ``The Art of Being a Scientist: A Guide for Graduate Students and Their Mentors,'' published by Cambridge University Press; more information can be found at: www.mines.edu/~rsnieder/Art_of_Science.html From this website one can download a description of the curriculum used in the class, including homework exercises. Currently we are expanding of

  20. Entrepreneurship in Culinary Arts: The Costa Rica experience with university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Aguirre G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The tourism industry of Costa Rica represents 7.5% of GNP, 21% of total exports earning and of that contribution the food and beverages subsector represents 28%. The purpose of this research was to indentify, potential elements and obstacles in young university culinary arts students in Costa Rica, largest culinary arts students. The study was conducted among culinary arts students at the Universidad Interamericana de Costa Rica, the interviews conducted were 237 the entire enrollment of the culinary arts school. The findings indicate that .Absence of tradition, culture among the young students and need of family and peers supports appear to be relevant and a source of need by the group. Lack of general business and entrepreneurship training is recognize by both groups a weakness and as a need. Coaching and support for women entrepreneurs is very relevant in both theadministrative and technical aspects of the young students of culinary arts The consideration of this information is important if we are to create with culinary arts training , the new breed of professional chefs entrepreneurs needs for the industry expansion in the years to come in Costa Rica and the region

  1. perceptions of undergraduate construction students on industrial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    students' performance before and after undertaking IT. Students are of the ... IT is reported to improve job .... Table 2: Factors that motivate students to undergo industrial training. *The t-test ..... of Workplace Learning, 18 (1): 28-41. Moser, C. A ...

  2. Technology Education in Taiwan: A Transition from Industrial Arts to Living Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lung-Sheng Steven

    Secondary-level technology education in Taiwan is shifting its emphasis from industrial arts to living technology in an effort to overcome the following problems: industrial arts is seen as a subordinate subject; the public's perceptions are not aligned with the field; and industrial technology teachers have had to struggle with huge class sizes…

  3. International Students and Ambiguous Pedagogies within the UK Art School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This article will consider the tensions and opportunities provoked by the presence of a growing number of international students at UK art schools in which ambiguity operates as an implicit value within fine art pedagogies. Challenging assumptions of lack or deficit this article will ask how responding to this changing student body might require…

  4. Whole Brain Learning: The Fine Arts with Students at Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respress, Trinetia; Lutfi, Ghazwan

    2006-01-01

    Schools are searching for more effective strategies that will enable all students to thrive and succeed. Evidence indicates that the fine arts can provide a unique avenue for reaching challenging students with principles of brain-based learning. This article describes HEARTS, an after-school fine arts program which taps and develops the talents of…

  5. Workflow modeling in the graphic arts and printing industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuijn, Chris

    2003-12-01

    The last few years, a lot of effort has been spent on the standardization of the workflow in the graphic arts and printing industry. The main reasons for this standardization are two-fold: first of all, the need to represent all aspects of products, processes and resources in a uniform, digital framework and, secondly, the need to have different systems communicate with each other without having to implement dedicated drivers or protocols. Since many years, a number of organizations in the IT sector have been quite busy developing models and languages on the topic of workflow modeling. In addition to the more formal methods (such as, e.g., extended finite state machines, Petri Nets, Markov Chains etc.) introduced a number of decades ago, more pragmatic methods have been proposed quite recently. We hereby think in particular of the activities of the Workflow Management Coalition that resulted in an XML based Process Definition Language. Although one might be tempted to use the already established standards in the graphic environment, one should be well aware of the complexity and uniqueness of the graphic arts workflow. In this paper, we will show that it is quite hard though not impossible to model the graphic arts workflow using the already established workflow systems. After a brief summary of the graphic arts workflow requirements, we will show why the traditional models are less suitable to use. It will turn out that one of the main reasons for the incompatibility is that the graphic arts workflow is primarily resource driven; this means that the activation of processes depends on the status of different incoming resources. The fact that processes can start running with a partial availability of the input resources is a further complication that asks for additional knowledge on process level. In the second part of this paper, we will discuss in more detail the different software components that are available in any graphic enterprise. In the last part, we will

  6. Industrial Design in Education. Student Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micklus, C. Samuel

    Background, principles, and procedures of industrial design are presented in this student manual. Chapter I describes the emergence of industrial design as a profession and emphasizes specific designers and their contributions to the field. A twenty question objective test is included. Chapter II presents ten principles of well-designed products.…

  7. Effects of Art/Design Education on Meta-Esthetics Consciousness of Fine Arts Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataroglu, Eylem

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine the consciousness and sensitivity levels of Fine Arts students about the meta-esthetics as a consumer and producer and to determine the effects of the courses they took on their meta-esthetic consciousness. The research universe was composed of fine art faculties of the foundation universities…

  8. Effects of Art/Design Education on Meta-Esthetics Consciousness of Fine Arts Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataroglu, Eylem

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine the consciousness and sensitivity levels of Fine Arts students about the meta-esthetics as a consumer and producer and to determine the effects of the courses they took on their meta-esthetic consciousness. The research universe was composed of fine art faculties of the foundation universities…

  9. The Sensitive, Imaginative, Articulate Art Student and Conservative, Cool, Numerate Science Student: Individual Differences in Art and Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnham, Adrian; Crump, John

    2013-01-01

    In all 794 young people aged around 30 yrs completed three intelligence (Raven's Progressive matrices: GMA Numerical and GMA Verbal) and one personality inventory (16PF). They were all graduates and 173 were identified clearly as Arts graduates and 518 as Science students. There were various sex differences on all measures. All seven hypotheses…

  10. Liven up Your Student Dramatics with Commedia dell' Arte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Jonathan

    1980-01-01

    Suggests using the ancient Commedia dell' Arte technique of establishing characters and a plot and then allowing the actors to create their own play. Indicates that this improves student performances even in more traditional plays. (TJ)

  11. Liven up Your Student Dramatics with Commedia dell' Arte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Jonathan

    1980-01-01

    Suggests using the ancient Commedia dell' Arte technique of establishing characters and a plot and then allowing the actors to create their own play. Indicates that this improves student performances even in more traditional plays. (TJ)

  12. Collaborative Creativity in STEAM: Narratives of Art Education Students' Experiences in Transdisciplinary Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyotte, Kelly W.; Sochacka, Nicola W.; Costantino, Tracie E.; Kellam, Nadia N.; Walther, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Current efforts to promote STEAM (STEM + Arts) education focus predominantly on how partnering with the arts provides a range of benefits to STEM students. Here we take a different approach and focus on what art and art education students stand to gain from collaborating with STEM students. Drawing on a variety of student field texts, we present…

  13. On the Wall: Art Students Learn to Paint a Mural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasley, Paula

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the Mississippi University for Women's studio art course that teaches students the ins and outs of mural making from inception and design to application of the final glaze. While students in other courses may spend the semester working toward a final exam or paper, this four-and-a-half-week summer course…

  14. Creative Approaches to Information Literacy for Creative Arts Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, Leo; Grandal Montero, Gustavo; Jones, Abigail

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the information literacy requirements of art and design students, and how traditional approaches to information literacy education are not always appropriate for these particular students. The paper argues that different, creative, and innovative approaches to information literacy training need to be developed with the…

  15. Using Clinical Supervision Techniques with Student Art Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Frank D.

    1992-01-01

    Contends that the student teaching experience and the cooperating teacher are the most significant aspects of the teacher education process. Describes the features and the implementation of clinical supervision in art education. Concludes that cooperating teachers also benefit as a result of their experiences with student teachers. (CFR)

  16. Why Students Drop out of the Bachelor of Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestan, Kemran

    2016-01-01

    Attrition, which courses in the humanities and social sciences particularly suffer from, is a major problem for universities and students. This paper investigates the reasons students give for prematurely discontinuing studying the Bachelor of Arts. This is a qualitative study that thematically analyses semi-structured interviews. The sample…

  17. Why Students Drop out of the Bachelor of Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestan, Kemran

    2016-01-01

    Attrition, which courses in the humanities and social sciences particularly suffer from, is a major problem for universities and students. This paper investigates the reasons students give for prematurely discontinuing studying the Bachelor of Arts. This is a qualitative study that thematically analyses semi-structured interviews. The sample…

  18. Musical Palindromes for Liberal Arts Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Renesse, Christine

    2012-01-01

    This paper shows how to teach a mathematics for liberal arts class in an inquiry-based way using ideas from music to launch the mathematical activities. No musical knowledge is required to understand and teach the material. The main activity is analyzing the differences between two kinds of rhythmic palindromes. The content is mathematically…

  19. Every Student Succeeds Act and Arts Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn Bradley, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Dance educators will be pleased to know that there is new legislation at the federal level that supports arts education. Seven years after Congress was due to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (also known for eight + seven years as No Child Left Behind [NCLB]), the lawmakers, suddenly and surprisingly, came through with a new…

  20. Creative Approaches to Information Literacy for Creative Arts Students

    OpenAIRE

    Appleton, Leo; Grandal Montero, Gustavo; Jones, Abigail

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the information literacy requirements of art and design students, and how traditional approaches to information literacy education are not always appropriate for these particular students. The paper argues that different, creative, and innovative approaches to information literacy training need to be developed with the specific learning styles of this group of students in mind and that using a radical information literacy approach, incorporating the specific nature of the...

  1. Creative art and medical student development: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth K; Kittendorf, Anne L; Kumagai, Arno K

    2017-02-01

    Although many medical schools include arts-based activities in their curricula, empirical evidence is lacking regarding how the creation of art might impact medical students and their professional development. We used a qualitative research design in order to understand this process. We conducted and analysed interviews with 16 medical students who had created and presented original artwork in the context of a required narrative-based undergraduate medical education programme. Teams of students collaborated to create interpretive projects based on common themes arising from conversations with individuals with chronic illness and their families. Open-ended questions were utilised to explore the conceptualisation and presentation of the projects, the dynamics of teamwork and the meaning(s) they might have for the students' professional development. We identified themes using repeated contextual reading of the transcripts, which also enhanced accuracy of the interpretations and ensured saturation of themes. Several major themes and sub-themes were identified. The creation of art led to a sense of personal growth and development, including reflection on past life experiences, self-discovery and an awareness of art as a creative outlet. Students also reported an enhanced sense of community and the development of skills in collaboration. Lastly, students reflected on the human dimensions of illness and medical care and identified an enhanced awareness of the experience of those with illness. A programme involving the creation of art based on stories of illness encouraged students' explorations of conceptions of the self, family and society, as well as illness and medical care, while enhancing the development of a collaborative and patient-centred worldview. Creative art can be a novel educational tool to promote a reflective, humanistic medical practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  2. Reflecting on industry and student expectations for working in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reflecting on industry and student expectations for working in the tourism and ... staff within an industry that is intensely service-driven and customer-oriented. ... and Hospitality Management students of the Central University of Technology, ...

  3. Weeded Books Inspire Student Art Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    The rationale behind weeding books is to remove dated, obsolete, erroneous material and worn books in disrepair from the collection to make room for current titles. Students of Lakeview have discovered an innovative idea of creating an altered book from the weeded book by taking a hardcover book and changing the original cover by means of a…

  4. Researching Student Experiences of Digital Workshops in Art Gallery Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobbernagel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    In the development of methods to explore student views on creative learning processes using digital media, Q methodology and its applications offer a promising framework. The method addresses the complexity of subjective viewpoints by applying a technique and analysis that combine materials...... of activities in digital media workshops in a Danish museum of contemporary art. Data were collected from 85 students, who participated in three types of workshops, and the results show a typology of four distinct views regarding three interrelated aspects: (1) views on art, which entail students’ general...... attitudes about art; (2) use of digital media for the creation of audio or animated cartoon digital files; and (3) reflective thinking during and after the workshop....

  5. Student Attrition among Women at a Liberal Arts College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, John P.; Creswell, John W.

    1980-01-01

    A profile of exit prone students evolved from the application of a model of dropout among liberal arts college women. Findings indicate family responsibilities make women more likely to leave; college's perceived practical value makes women less likely to leave. (Author)

  6. Animating Fermi - A Collaboration Between Art Students and Astronomers

    CERN Document Server

    Arcadias, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate animation students at the Maryland Institute College of Art teamed up with scientists from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope to produce a set of animations on several astronomy topics. We describe the process and discuss the results, including educational benefits and the cross-cultural experience. These animations are freely available online.

  7. Serving the Needs of Performing Arts Students: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The intent of this case study was to gain insight into the information needs and research behaviors of upper-division performing arts students, and how to best address those needs. This article presents findings from focus group interviews of thirty music, dance, and theater majors at the University of Wyoming in Laramie. The data revealed several…

  8. Synesthesia and Creativity in Fine Arts Students: An Empirical Look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, George

    1989-01-01

    A study of 358 fine arts students at three large universities indicated that 23 percent experienced synesthesia in a spontaneous and consistent manner, and 49 percent reported no such experience. Results of comparative analysis are consistent with anecdotal reports that synesthetes are often successful in artistic fields, and possess high degrees…

  9. The Arts in Two Societies: Some Implications for Student Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schisgall, Jane

    1983-01-01

    Under Hitler, art and drama were controlled in order to serve propaganda purposes exclusively, while under the New Deal the United States succeeded in giving work to artists and writers without controlling their output. Suggests class activities to help students gain understanding of this era. (CS)

  10. Effects of Information and Communication Technology on Engagement and Art Production for Eighth-Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovin, Elizabeth; Lambeth, Dawn T.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore the impact of an online-learning component incorporating peer discussion groups on art achievement, digital literacy practice, student engagement, and student attitude of an eighth-grade visual arts classroom. Participants included 30 students in two 8th-grade art classes. Students in one class received…

  11. Enhancing Student Employability?: Current Practice and Student Experiences in HE Performing Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ralph

    2007-01-01

    PALATINE, the Higher Education Academy Subject Centre for Dance, Drama and Music, received dedicated HEFCE funding (2003-2004) to address issues surrounding graduate employability, particularly focusing on the distinctive features of the labour market in the performing arts and creative industries. In the world of the Arts, the job market is very…

  12. T & I--Graphic Arts, Silk Screen Printing. Kit No. 60. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, George

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on silk screen printing are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of trade and industry (graphic arts). (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

  13. Problem Based Learning - Linking Students and Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Flemming K.

    2006-01-01

    -oriented project work: students work in teams to solve externally defined problem areas in co-operation with businesses, organisations and public institutions. Project Organised Problem Based Learning (POPBL) has generated a high degree of cooperation with the society and private companies. There are all the time...... is essentially problem solving. The presentation looks into on campus POPBL and the Facilitated Work Based Learning (FBL) for continuing education. It also presents case examples of POPBL work.......WG2_G4 Problem based learning – linking students and industry: a case study from Aalborg, Denmark Flemming K. Flink ELITE Aalborg University In Aalborg University, Denmark, all study programmes are organised around inter-disciplinary project work in groups. Up to 50% of the study work is problem...

  14. Skills Planning for Industry Growth: A Case Study of the Katherine Arts Industry. Occasional Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    The findings of a cultural industries skills audit undertaken in 2008 in Katherine, Northern Territory, are explored. The case study focusses in particular on the practical challenges and implications of auditing skills in a diverse industry sector and considers the usefulness of such an audit in preparing an industry for predicted change. This…

  15. Industrial design students sweep international design competition in San Francisco

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Heather Riley

    2010-01-01

    Four teams of students from Virginia Tech's industrial design program in the School of Architecture + Design swept the five award categories at an international design competition that included professional industrial designs.

  16. Arts Voices: Middle School Students and the Relationships of the Arts to Their Motivation and Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorefield-Lang, Heather M.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the question "Does arts education have a relationship to eighth-grade rural middle school students' motivation and self-efficacy?" Student questionnaires, focus-group interviews, and follow-up interviews were data collection methods used with 92 eighth-grade middle school students. Strong emphasis was placed on gathering…

  17. PEDAGOGICAL SUPPORT OF GIFTED STUDENTS FROM CARPATHIAN MOUNTAIN AREAS BY MEANS OF FOLK ART CRAFTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Kozlovska

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper, presented at the Conference Plenary the possibilities of pedagogical support of gifted students from vocational schools, living in the mountainous areas of the Carpathians. Education of talented and gifted students requires pedagogical support. The specific conditions, in which Carpathian students live, require the development of pedagogical support of their abilities. New approaches to teaching science, which led to the selection of topics of this article are described. Gifted personalities differ from their peers by same criterias. The social aspect of the problem remains in the shadow: not to be ashamed of your talent and not to compare it with cliches. And goals of educators and psychologists have to be slightly different as is common. Widespread  Carpathian crafts include: embroidery, artistic textiles producing, carpet manufacture, carving, pottery, metalworking, fabric painting, knitting, lace, artistic weaving, artistic working of  leather, stones, bones and horns. Nowadays, some detachment of mountainous regions has significantly reduced due to new means of communication, including the Internet. The possibilities of colleges in mountainous regions still cannot reach the level of the colleges in capital. In Carpathian and Prykrpattya regions there is a number of vocational schools of art direction. During the execution of creative work in class industrial training necessary for students to comply with the rules of relationships form and decoration in various ways: decorative motif obeys the functional form, enriching it artistic and creative solutions, utilitarian function obeys the decorative motif Products, the form of the product can be extremely decorative, artistic and creative product solutions focused on practical value and decorative value of the product. Pedagogical support of gifted students from art colleges in the Carpathian region has extremely wide range of opportunities. The problem of finding and nurturing

  18. Art Animates: Ideas Inspired by a University-Sponsored Summer Arts Academy for Middle and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danker, Stephanie; French, Kelley

    2016-01-01

    Art can provide a vehicle for animating learning. Teachers bring ideas to life through curriculum, while artists realize their ideas through images, often translating between forms, media and spaces. This paper describes the context, content and format of a residential Summer Arts Academy for gifted and talented middle and high school students,…

  19. The Arts Tool Kit. Priority Academic Student Skills: Visual Art and General Music, Grades 1-12. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Gayla; Alexander, JoAnne C.; Bass, Elaine; Black, Paulette; Cesario, Robert; Clow, Jo Ellen; Dalton, Doug; Dedmon, Charla; Gabbard, Susan; Gabel, Barbara; Goree, Gary; Kyle, Nicholas; Martin, Rita; Merklin, Roxy; Riley, Patrick; Reed, John

    This kit is designed to help teachers throughout the state of Oklahoma implement the arts in the core curriculum. Suggestions are included for classroom activities that complement the arts competencies in the "Priority Academic Student Skills (PASS)." The kit is a collection of ideas to introduce or reinforce PASS. In the material is a…

  20. Curriculum Development for Enhancing the Art Aesthetic in Art Learning Substance for Grade 7 Students: Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisedsang, Dheerayut; Chookhampaeng, Chowwalit; Noiwangklang, Pitak

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research and development was to develop a curriculum for enhancing grade 7 students' aesthetic sense and substantial art learning. There were 2 phases of the study consisting of: (i) the study of basic information about art aesthetics, including the attributes, approaches, theories, problems, and needs, (ii) the development…

  1. Grammar School Students' Opinions on the Art Curriculum: An Estonian, Portuguese and Slovenian Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupancic, Tomaž; Köster, Annely; Torres de Eça, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the attitude of grammar school students towards the art curriculum. It first provides an overview of the characteristics of contemporary art education, with an emphasis on the postmodern art curriculum and on linking course content with students' interests. The study is based on the descriptive and causal non-experimental…

  2. Current Situation and Need for Improving English Writing of Art College Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He; Guanghui; Hua; Huimin

    2015-01-01

    <正>Art students are a special group of college students.Because of the particularity of their major and many social activities,art college students should deal with the contradiction between learning and social contacts.Otherwise it will cause a lot of stress,which eventually lead to negative psychological effects and influence their common cognition lesson.Art students have a unique personality characteristics and professional learning characteristics,such as

  3. Student, Home, and School Socio-Demographic Factors: Links to School, Home, and Community Arts Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Marianne; Martin, Andrew J.; Anderson, Michael; Gibson, Robyn; Liem, Gregory Arief D.; Sudmalis, David

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the role of student (e.g., age, language background, gender), home (e.g., parent/caregiver education), and school (e.g., school type, size) socio-demographic factors in students' school (e.g., in-school arts tuition, arts engagement), home (e.g., parent/caregiver-child arts interaction), and community (e.g., arts attendance,…

  4. Student, Home, and School Socio-Demographic Factors: Links to School, Home, and Community Arts Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Marianne; Martin, Andrew J.; Anderson, Michael; Gibson, Robyn; Liem, Gregory Arief D.; Sudmalis, David

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the role of student (e.g., age, language background, gender), home (e.g., parent/caregiver education), and school (e.g., school type, size) socio-demographic factors in students' school (e.g., in-school arts tuition, arts engagement), home (e.g., parent/caregiver-child arts interaction), and community (e.g., arts attendance,…

  5. Prevalence, knowledge, attitudes and practices towards body art in university students: body art as an indicator of risk taking behaviours?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enza Sidoti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Young people are attracted by body art and consider it as a way of being “different”. Body art (tattoos, piercing, etc. represents an important socio-cultural phenomenon which is not risk free for health. Existing literature, moreover, points out that deviant behaviours and unhealthy lifestyles are significantly associated with body art.

    Objective and methods: The research was aimed to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of university students towards body art, highlighting the association between body art and some demographic variables, deviant behaviours, unhealthy lifestyles, knowledge of health risks and medical complications potentially involved. Data came from a cross-sectional study conducted on a sample, selected at random, of 1.200 undergraduate university students, (570, human sciences; 630, scientific areas. The instrument for the survey was a 21 item multiple choice questionnaire. Data was codified and statistical analysis was computed through Epi-Info and Openstat software.

    Results: Students from a scientific background showed a higher rate of interest, (p<0.01 for the argument of body art. About one third of the surveyed individuals had at least one body art. Cultural choice and gender was associated with body art. Males, especially from the scientific area, were more attracted by temporary body art, while females preferred permanent tattoos. Students from humanistic backgrounds were associated with one body art and those from a scientific area with more than one (p<0.01. Unemployment, lack of partnership and family attitude towards body art, were positively associated with students’ body art. Body art was strictly associated with different unhealthy lifestyles, such as drug, alcohol and tobacco consumption, problem gambling and sexual activity before 18 years of age. A relevant part of students considered piercing and tattooing as

  6. Uneasy subjects: medical students' conflicts over the pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Kelly

    2014-08-01

    In this article I report on an investigation of the pharmaceutical industry's influence in medical education. Findings are based on fifty semi-structured interviews with medical students in the United States and Canada conducted between 2010 and 2013. Participant responses support the survey-based literature demonstrating that there is clear and pervasive influence of the pharmaceutical industry in medical education. They also challenge the theory that medical students feel entitled to industry gifts and uncritically accept industry presence. I investigate how medical students who are critical of the pharmaceutical industry negotiate its presence in the course of their medical education. Findings suggest that these participants do not simply absorb industry presence, but interpret it and respond in complex ways. Participants were uncomfortable with industry influence throughout their medical training and found multifaceted ways to resist. They struggled with power relations in medical training and the prevailing notion that industry presence is a normal part of medical education. I argue that this pervasive norm of industry presence is located in neoliberal structural transformations within and outside both education and medicine. The idea that industry presence is normal and inevitable represents a challenge for students who are critical of industry. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Using Animal Assisted Therapy with Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the Art Room Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenburg, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    This case study focused on the addition of a therapy dog in an Art I level class at a public high school level that included students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. The purpose of this study is to determine how Animal Assisted Therapy may benefit autism support students in the art classroom. The students participated in lessons that focused on…

  8. 3D Virtual Worlds as Art Media and Exhibition Arenas: Students' Responses and Challenges in Contemporary Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lilly

    2013-01-01

    3D virtual worlds (3D VWs) are considered one of the emerging learning spaces of the 21st century; however, few empirical studies have investigated educational applications and student learning aspects in art education. This study focused on students' responses to and challenges with 3D VWs in both aspects. The findings show that most…

  9. 3D Virtual Worlds as Art Media and Exhibition Arenas: Students' Responses and Challenges in Contemporary Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lilly

    2013-01-01

    3D virtual worlds (3D VWs) are considered one of the emerging learning spaces of the 21st century; however, few empirical studies have investigated educational applications and student learning aspects in art education. This study focused on students' responses to and challenges with 3D VWs in both aspects. The findings show that most participants…

  10. Fostering Student Engagement through a Multi-Day Industry Tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lorraine L.; Hartman, Cindy L.; Baldwin, Elizabeth D.

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement may be enhanced by providing educationally purposeful activities outside of the classroom. This study considers the influence of a multi-day industry tour on student engagement for undergraduates majoring in Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. Data were collected from students' reflections in journal entries focused on an…

  11. Using Industry Professionals in Undergraduate Teaching: Effects on Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentelli, Liesel

    2015-01-01

    Tutorials are a common complementary method of achieving student engagement with material covered in lectures, as students achieve deeper understanding by being involved in small group discussions. However, in an attempt to provide students with a taste of everything the industry has to offer, the Centre for Forensic Science at the University of…

  12. Fostering Student Engagement through a Multi-Day Industry Tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lorraine L.; Hartman, Cindy L.; Baldwin, Elizabeth D.

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement may be enhanced by providing educationally purposeful activities outside of the classroom. This study considers the influence of a multi-day industry tour on student engagement for undergraduates majoring in Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. Data were collected from students' reflections in journal entries focused on an…

  13. Self-regulated Learning Behavior of College Students of Art and Their Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cuixin

    This study focuses on the relationship between self-regulated learning behavior and their academic achievement of college students of art. The results show that for students of art, the involvements in self-efficacy, intrinsic value and cognitive strategies are closely tied to their performance in the examination. However, test anxiety, as a negative emotional factor is negatively correlated with academic performance. And among the five variables, self-efficacy has the strongest influence on students of art's academic performance.

  14. Artfulness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemi, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    a collage of previously published materials on Artfulness, in this journal targeted teachers for dysfunctional behaviour children.......a collage of previously published materials on Artfulness, in this journal targeted teachers for dysfunctional behaviour children....

  15. Artfulness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemi, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    a collage of previously published materials on Artfulness, in this journal targeted teachers for dysfunctional behaviour children.......a collage of previously published materials on Artfulness, in this journal targeted teachers for dysfunctional behaviour children....

  16. Perceptual flexibility is coupled with reduced executive inhibition in students of the visual arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Rebecca; Swinnen, Lena; Heeren, Sarah; Wagemans, Johan

    2017-06-28

    Artists often report that seeing familiar stimuli in novel and interesting ways plays a role in visual art creation. However, the attentional mechanisms which underpin this ability have yet to be fully investigated. More specifically, it is unclear whether the ability to reinterpret visual stimuli in novel and interesting ways is facilitated by endogenously generated switches of attention, and whether it is linked in turn to executive functions such as inhibition and response switching. To address this issue, the current study explored ambiguous figure reversal and executive function in a sample of undergraduate students studying arts and non-art subjects (N = 141). Art students showed more frequent perceptual reversals in an ambiguous figure task, both when viewing the stimulus passively and when eliciting perceptual reversals voluntarily, but showed no difference from non-art students when asked to actively maintain specific percepts. In addition, art students were worse than non-art students at inhibiting distracting flankers in an executive inhibition task. The findings suggest that art students can elicit endogenous shifts of attention more easily than non-art students but that this faculty is not directly associated with enhanced executive function. It is proposed that the signature of artistic skill may be increased perceptual flexibility accompanied by reduced cognitive inhibition; however, future research will be necessary to determine which particular subskills in the visual arts are linked to aspects of perception and executive function. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  17. Listen to my Picture: Art as a Survival Tool for Immigrant and Refugee Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunick, Lisa Lefler

    1999-01-01

    Addresses the social, emotional, and psychological needs of immigrant and refugee students and the use of art forms to communicate their feelings. Summarizes the identity crisis that immigrants and refugees experience. Considers art education as a helpful intervention. Discusses the characteristics of children's artwork and the art teacher's role.…

  18. Philosophy for Welders: Colleges Offer Innovative Humanities Curricula for Liberal Arts and Career Track Students Alike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Does America needs more welders and fewer philosophers? Community college humanities professors and administrators say it benefits all students, whether liberal arts or career track, to take courses in philosophy, history, political science, language arts, and other liberal arts subjects. And they're developing innovative humanities curricula to…

  19. A Call for Diversity: The Need to Recruit and Retain Ethnic Minority Students in Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awais, Yasmine J.; Yali, Ann Marie

    2013-01-01

    There is a clear need for greater diversity in the field of art therapy with particular attention to increasing the representation of students of color in art therapy training programs. However, little to no data exists on how art therapy programs are actively recruiting for diversity. Diversity in the classroom can offer novel perspectives on…

  20. A Call for Diversity: The Need to Recruit and Retain Ethnic Minority Students in Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awais, Yasmine J.; Yali, Ann Marie

    2013-01-01

    There is a clear need for greater diversity in the field of art therapy with particular attention to increasing the representation of students of color in art therapy training programs. However, little to no data exists on how art therapy programs are actively recruiting for diversity. Diversity in the classroom can offer novel perspectives on…

  1. Inside the Collaborative Inter-Arts Improvisatory Process: Tertiary Music Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Diana

    2012-01-01

    While research has explored aspects of inter-arts collaboration at professional and primary level, there is little on inter-arts collaboration in the tertiary environment. This article explores aspects of the learning of tertiary music students undertaking a short-term collaborative inter-arts improvisation project with dance and theater peers,…

  2. Student and Teacher Perceptions of Industrial Chemistry Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesner, Miri; Hofstein, Avi; Ben-Zvi, Ruth

    1997-01-01

    Describes a study conducted in Israel that focuses on how studying industrial-chemistry case studies affects students' perceptions of their learning environment and their interest in chemistry studies. Contains 18 references. (DDR)

  3. Developing Design and Management Skills for Senior Industrial Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanic, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    In Canadian engineering institutions, a significant design experience must occur in the final year of study. In the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems at the University of Windsor, unsolved, open ended projects sponsored by industrial partners from a variety of sectors are provided to the student teams in order for them to apply…

  4. Industrial Maintenance Technology (IM-TEC). Student Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusch, Gene E.

    This student manual explains an innovative strategy through which Bellingham Technical College's (Washington) evening Industrial Electrician and Millwright Apprenticeships were aggregated with workforce upgrade course offerings to form the college's first evening degree program in Industrial Maintenance Technology (IM-TEC). Section 1 contains a…

  5. Perceptions of visual art: the study of a private college, year 7 students and the visual art classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Mallory Jane

    2017-01-01

    Visual Art has been a part of Australian education for decades; however, in an increasingly globalized visual world where individuals are inundated with media images the need for students to develop the skills to deconstruct and reconstruct images has become vital. And yet the notions that Visual Art is simply a God-given gift, frill or busy-work activity remain prevalent within our society and the skills that are taught become optional for students at the end of their middle school years....

  6. Fostering creativity in nursing students: a blending of nursing and the arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavill, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    Integrating nursing and fine arts can evoke a more holistic view of clients as well as foster creativity in students. Presented is an overview of The Creative Project assignment that culminates with nursing students developing a creative self-expression of a clinical experience through the lens of liberal arts and nursing.

  7. Using Art-Based Chemistry Activities to Improve Students' Conceptual Understanding in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danipog, Dennis L.; Ferido, Marlene B.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of art-based chemistry activities (ABCA) on high school students' conceptual understanding in chemistry. The study used the pretest-posttest control group design. A total of 64 third-year high school students from two different chemistry classes participated in the study. One class was exposed to art-based…

  8. Using Art-Based Chemistry Activities to Improve Students' Conceptual Understanding in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danipog, Dennis L.; Ferido, Marlene B.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of art-based chemistry activities (ABCA) on high school students' conceptual understanding in chemistry. The study used the pretest-posttest control group design. A total of 64 third-year high school students from two different chemistry classes participated in the study. One class was exposed to art-based…

  9. "Object Lesson": Using Family Heirlooms to Engage Students in Art History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Marice

    2012-01-01

    This first written assignment of the semester for the author's undergraduate introductory art history class--an essay where students describe and reflect upon the significance of a family heirloom--is instrumental in meeting class objectives. The author's objectives in this class are for students: (1) to broaden their conception of what art is…

  10. The Effects of Perceived Peer Behavior and Visual Art Content on Students' Moral Action Confidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Ashley Kukula

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether observable peer behaviors and art unit content would positively influence moral confidence. The hypothesis was tested on 15 middle school students in a semi-rural school district in Central New York. Students completed questionnaires before and after participating in an art unit with pro-social…

  11. Improving Student Achievement in Language Arts through Implementation of Multiple Intelligences Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geimer, Mandy; Getz, Jennifer; Pochert, Terry; Pullam, Karen

    Student achievement has been low in language arts in Suburban Chicago, Illinois school districts. This action research project was designed to determine the effect of incorporating multiple intelligence strategies into the language arts curriculum. The targeted students were in the second, third, and fifth grades, in a western suburb of Chicago,…

  12. Process industries - graphic arts, paint, plastics, and textiles: all cousins under the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Frederick T.

    2002-06-01

    The origin and selection of colors in the process industries is different depending upon how the creative process is applied and what are the capabilities of the manufacturing process. The fashion industry (clothing) with its supplier of textiles is the leader of color innovation. Color may be introduced into textile products at several stages in the manufacturing process from fiber through yarn and finally into fabric. The paint industry is divided into two major applications: automotive and trades sales. Automotive colors are selected by stylists who are in the employ of the automobile manufacturers. Trade sales paint on the other hand can be decided by paint manufactureres or by invididuals who patronize custom mixing facilities. Plastics colors are for the most part decided by the industrial designers who include color as part of the design. Graphic Arts (painting) is a burgeoning industry that uses color in image reproduction and package design. Except for text, printed material in color today has become the norm rather than an exception.

  13. How Much English Language Arts and Mathematics Instruction Do Students Receive? Investigating Variation in Instructional Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Geoffrey; Corey, Douglas; DeMonte, Jenny; Harrison, Delena; Loewenberg Ball, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The amount of instruction students receive has long been viewed as a foundational educational resource. This article presents an analysis of the time students spend in elementary English language arts (ELA) and mathematics instruction. In mathematics, the average student received about 140 hr of instruction, but students in the top sixth of…

  14. Copyright and Industrial Design, How a Line Should be Drawn? Works of Applied Arts, its Protection in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Felipe Álvarez Amézquita

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available As works of applied arts have been situated normally at the grey area between copyright and industrial property, this article discusses three different approaches about how they should be protected. It particularly focuses on the case of industrial designs which might be considered as copyrighted works. Subject to the fulfilment of copyright criterions and particularly the requisites for works of art and for the work of applied arts, the article proposes that Colombian and Andean Communitarian Law should embrace the partial accumulation system of protection for such creations.

  15. Perceptions of Undergraduate Construction Students on Industrial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... have not made the expected impact on graduates to meet the expectations of the ... them to real work environment and increases their job prospects among others. Students' satisfaction level with their performance on personal attitude, ...

  16. Art, Meet Chemistry; Chemistry, Meet Art: Case Studies, Current Literature, and Instrumental Methods Combined to Create a Hands-On Experience for Nonmajors and Instrumental Analysis Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivens, Delana A.; Padgett, Clifford W.; Chase, Jeffery M.; Verges, Katie J.; Jamieson, Deborah S.

    2010-01-01

    Case studies and current literature are combined with spectroscopic analysis to provide a unique chemistry experience for art history students and to provide a unique inquiry-based laboratory experiment for analytical chemistry students. The XRF analysis method was used to demonstrate to nonscience majors (art history students) a powerful…

  17. COMPANY PERCEPTION ON THE EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS OF INDUSTRIAL TRAINING STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Nor Habibah Hassan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Employability is the main concern for students and universities. It is one of the objectives of Ministry of Higher Education (MOHE as to produce skilled, experienced and knowledgeable graduates to fulfil manpower needs with 75% of the graduates employed in their relevant fields within six months upon graduation. This study was conducted to review the company perception on the employability skills possess by Mechanical Engineering students in Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka who has undergone their industrial training program in respective company. Five elements of employment skills studied here are based on the generic student attributes (GSA established by MOHE i.e. communication skills, teamwork skills, critical thinking, work attitude and long life learning. It used to ensure the students will enrich themselves as a competent and comprehensive student after graduated. Questionnaire was prepared in three phases. Phase 1 and 2 are about the adaptability of students to their working environment and how the knowledge and experience in classroom being integrating into real life work experiences. Phase 3 is about the professionalism and work ethics among industrial training students. The result shows that most of the industrial supervisors agreed that industrial training program is one of the vital contributors to the employability skills.

  18. Attitudes of Teachers and Students towards Art and Design Curriculum: Implications for Vocational Education in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagah, M. O.; Indoshi, F. C.; Agak, J. O.

    2009-01-01

    Art and Design Curriculum taught in secondary schools in Kenya is intended not only to prepare learners for a vocation in Art and Design industry but also to complement literacy, scientific and factual subjects by awakening creativity in the individual. It is part of the government policy of diversification and vocationalization of the curriculum.…

  19. ARTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahadevan, Shankar; Virk, Kashif M.; Madsen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    . We present an abstract system-level modelling and simulation framework (ARTS) which allows for cross-layer modelling and analysis covering the application layer, middleware layer, and hardware layer. ARTS allows MPSoC designers to explore and analyze the network performance under different traffic...... and load conditions, consequences of different task mappings to processors (software or hardware) including memory and power usage, and effects of RTOS selection, including scheduling, synchronization and resource allocation policies. We present the application and platform models of ARTS as well...... as their implementation in SystemC. We present the usage of the ARTS framework as seen from platform developers’ point of view, where new components may be created and integrated into the framework, and from application designers’ point of view, where existing components are used to explore possible implementations...

  20. Investigating Art Objects through Collaborative Student Research Projects in an Undergraduate Chemistry and Art Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Gary; Haaf, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Inspired in part by Chemistry Collaborations, Workshops, and Community of Scholars workshops, the Chemistry and Art course offered at Ithaca College is team-taught by a chemist and an art historian, underscoring the complementary nature of the two disciplines. The course, populated primarily by nonscience majors, highlights the importance of using…

  1. A Service-Learning Project: Linking an Art Museum, Honors Students, and the Visual Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cempellin, Leda

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the structure, challenges, and outcomes of a service-learning project experimented by an art historian in an innovative special topics course Museum Experience, cross-listed with an Honors art appreciation course. The discussion includes: creating a new course content planned according to a multidisciplinary perspective…

  2. Art Educational Practices: Fostering Self-Control and Improving Focus for Students Coping with Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    This action research study served to help students suffering from anxiety or anxiety related issues by using Art as a means of improving focus and fostering self control. The student participants in this study were a group of 25 sophomore and junior high school students, both male and female, ranging between the ages of 15-17. The participants…

  3. CURRICULUM: A Chemical Engineering Course for Liberal Arts Students--Indigo: A World of Blues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piergiovanni, Polly R.

    2012-01-01

    Sophomore liberal arts and engineering students enrolled in a course to learn and practice some basic chemical engineering side by side. The course was developed around the theme of indigo dyeing, which has an interesting history, fascinating chemistry and is accessible to all students. The students participated in a variety of active learning…

  4. War and Peace in the Pictures Drawn by the Students of a Fine Arts High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify high school students' perception of war and peace. Therefore, the students were asked to draw pictures depicting war and peace. The study was conducted at a Fine Arts High School. This study is a qualitative research. According to the assessments made on the results of the study, the students drew pictures containing…

  5. CURRICULUM: A Chemical Engineering Course for Liberal Arts Students--Indigo: A World of Blues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piergiovanni, Polly R.

    2012-01-01

    Sophomore liberal arts and engineering students enrolled in a course to learn and practice some basic chemical engineering side by side. The course was developed around the theme of indigo dyeing, which has an interesting history, fascinating chemistry and is accessible to all students. The students participated in a variety of active learning…

  6. War and Peace in the Pictures Drawn by the Students of a Fine Arts High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify high school students' perception of war and peace. Therefore, the students were asked to draw pictures depicting war and peace. The study was conducted at a Fine Arts High School. This study is a qualitative research. According to the assessments made on the results of the study, the students drew pictures containing…

  7. Collaboration Between Art Teacher Students and Communication and Digital Media Students Promoting Subject Specific Didactics in Digital Visual Learning Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Skov, Kirsten

    at achieving the necessary competences to teach visual arts in school. This, however, challenges both student teachers as well as their lecturers in how to use digital media for doing artwork that goes beyond the well-known re-mediations (image processing or editing programs) of traditional media like painting......This paper presents research perspective on how the collaboration between communication designers and teacher trainers in visual arts facilitates the development of new forms of digital visual learning. Our discussion is based on an empirical project of developing a digital visual learning design....... Student art teachers and teacher trainers took part in the design process performed by communication students. The project took its point of the departure in the act of Danish teacher education where student teachers must be educated in the practical use of digital visual media for art practices aiming...

  8. Effects of academic-industry relations on the professional socialization graduate science students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleman, Margaret Ann Phillippi

    This study asks if there has been a change in graduate student socialization in the biological sciences given the increased commercialism of life sciences. Drawing on the work of Steven Brint (1994) and Sheila Slaughter and Larry Leslie (1997) and Sheila Slaughter and Gary Rhoades (2004), this study asks if graduate student socialization has shifted emphasis from the social and moral dimensions of work (social trustee professionalism) to the practical, technical, and commercial dimensions (expert professionalism). Building on the survey results of the Acadia Project (Swazey, Louis, & Anderson, 1994; Louis, Anderson & Rosenberg, 1995), this qualitative study uses interviews with 25 graduate science students at two A.A.U. research universities that have been heavily involved in academic-industry relations to see how the students were professionally socialized throughout their educational careers. The student configuration compares males and females, U.S. and international students, and those funded by the government versus those receiving at least partial support from industry. It uses critical professionalization theory as a framework. The study found that students' career goals and values were usually set before graduate school primarily by females in non-elite institutions, such as community colleges, women's and liberal arts colleges, and non-flagship state universities. Also, university science faculty tend to continue to socialize students---even those planning to go into industry---for the professoriate, as their prestige is based on placing proteges into other elite schools. U.S. females and most students going into academics or government labs had the values of social trustee professionals while those going into industry held those of expert professionals. The former were more likely to recognize situations involving conflicts of interest or commitment. Almost all the students were disillusioned by the grants and promotion and tenure systems. They feel both

  9. Theatre Arts Programs: Impact of Cognitive Development in Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lauren.

    2011-01-01

    As a result of the 2001 legislation, No Child Left Behind elementary schools across the United States focus has turned to testing and accountability often neglecting arts in education. Despite numerous studies of the benefits that the arts can have not only in the social-emotional development of students but in conjunction with the recent research…

  10. EFL Students' Perceptions of Social Issues in Famous Works of Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista Urrego, Lizmendy Zuhey; Parra Toro, Ingrid Judith

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative, descriptive, and interpretative research intervention case study of English as a foreign language students' construction of perceptions on social issues found in famous works of art. Participants in this study engaged in the practice of critical thinking as a strategy to appreciate art that expresses social…

  11. The Function of Art Students' Use of Studio Conversations in Relation to Their Artwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Lennart; Edstrom, Ann-Mari

    2011-01-01

    The investigation presented in this article is focused on studies within a practice based MFA program in visual art in Sweden. The analysis presented is based on two interviews each with nine art students: One interview during their first and one during their fourth year of study. The analysis focuses on the relation between two aspects of their…

  12. On Cultivating College Students' Humanistic Qualities in Western Fine Arts Appreciation Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Rong

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, western pragmatism has been prevalent on the campuses of Chinese universities. Its direct result is the emergence of such a trend in fine arts teaching which attaches high importance to the pragmatic side of the art learning and disregards fostering the humanistic qualities of the students. One of the most serious phenomena of…

  13. Guerrilla Art Action: Taking It to the Street with Teenage Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampaglia, Steven

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, author Steven Ciampaglia reflects on the creation of a guerilla art course he and a colleague designed to engage students in the process of creating contemporary art relevant to them outside the traditional classroom setting. He examines how reflecting on his teaching practices led him to rethink the key objectives and design…

  14. Guerrilla Art Action: Taking It to the Street with Teenage Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampaglia, Steven

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, author Steven Ciampaglia reflects on the creation of a guerilla art course he and a colleague designed to engage students in the process of creating contemporary art relevant to them outside the traditional classroom setting. He examines how reflecting on his teaching practices led him to rethink the key objectives and design…

  15. Dramatic Impact of Action Research of Arts-Based Teaching on At-Risk Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Kenzy, Patty; Underwood, Lucy; Severson, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This study was presented at the American Educational Research Association 2012 conference in Vancouver, Canada. The study explored how action research of arts-based teaching (ABT) impacted at-risk students in three urban public schools in southern California, USA. ABT was defined as using arts, music, drama, and dance in teaching other subjects. A…

  16. Connecting Inspiration with Information: Studio Art Students and Information Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Katie

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the partnership between the library and the studio art faculty at Oakland University that led to the integration of information literacy instruction into the studio art curriculum. The author outlines the importance of information literacy to artistic practice and student success, and discusses the program of instruction and…

  17. O PAPEL DA ARTE APRESENTADO POR HERBERT MARCUSE EM A IDEOLOGIA DA SOCIEDADE INDUSTRIAL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Benedito de Freitas Teodoro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo tem como finalidade analisar a perspectiva da arte como parte do aparato de dominação social, desenvolvida na obra A ideologia da sociedade industrial, de Herbert Marcuse. Para isso, utilizaremos como referência constante as teorias propostas pelos filósofos da Escola de Frankfurt, em especial Theodor W. Adorno e Max Horkheimer no que diz respeito, sobretudo, ao termo “indústria cultural”, cujo conceito aparece no capítulo homônimo de A dialética do esclarecimento. Apoiaremo-nos também na tese de doutorado de Imaculada Kangussu, intitulada Leis da liberdade: as relações entre Estética e Política na Filosofia de Herbert Marcuse, e, ainda, nas demais obras marcuseanas, com destaque para Eros e Civilização: uma interpretação filosófica do pensamento de Freud.

  18. Children employed in the performing arts, advertising and fashion industry: what legal protection do they have?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clin, Bénédicte; Ferrant, Ophélie; Marquignon, Marie-France; Letourneux, Marc

    2009-09-01

    Ill-treatment can sometimes take on an unfamiliar face. Particularly, this is the case for certain types of child employment. In France, as in most European countries, there are laws for protecting children and guaranteeing their right to schooling. Over and above the frequently observed apprenticeship contracts, obtained by eligible under 16 years, there is also the dispensatory case of children employed in the performing arts, advertising and the fashion industry. In France, legislators take the child's vulnerability into account when developing legislative and regulatory mechanisms, concerning the modalities of his/her professional activity, particularly in artistic fields and in fashion modelling. Since both may employ very young children, or even infants, one essential question ought to be raised: from a legal point of view, are these children sufficiently protected, with regard to the potential physical and psychological consequences of their particular professional activities?

  19. Exploring Student Engagement and Collaborative Learning in a Community-Based Module in Fine Art

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    John McGarrigle

    2013-01-01

    This article is based on masters research1 into student and civic engagement using a case study of an innovative Community Based Module in a Fine Art degree course (McGarrigle, 2009). 2 (Flyvbjerg, 2006...

  20. Dia de los Muertos: Images, Art, and Altar on display at Squires Student Center

    OpenAIRE

    Broughton, Sandra S.

    2008-01-01

    Dia de los Muertos: Images, Art, and Altar, an exhibition featuring photographs from Mexico, artifacts from the festival, and both traditional and contemporary altars, will be on display at the Perspective Gallery in Squires Student Center through Saturday, Nov. 8.

  1. Cognitive abilities of health and art college students a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlAbdulwahab, Sami S; Kachanathu, Shaji John; AlKhamees, Abdullah K

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The selection of a college major is a struggle that high school students undergo every year; however, there is a dearth of studies examining the role of cognitive ability tests as a tool for determining the aptitude of prospective students. Hence, the purpose of this study was to assess cognitive ability differences among students. [Subjects and Methods] A convenience sample of 60 college students (30 health science and 30 art students) with a mean age of 19 ± 1.6 years, voluntarily participated in this study. Cognitive ability was assessed using the self-administered Cognitive Assessment of Minnesota (CAM) scale under the supervision of a researcher. [Results] The findings indicated that there was a significant cognitive ability difference between health science and art students, especially in the cognitive components of knowledge, calculation, and thinking. However, the difference in the social cognitive component of both the health science and art students was not significant. [Conclusion] The results indicate that the health science students' cognitive abilities were better than those of the art students. This finding implies that it is important for high school graduates to undertake a cognitive ability assessment prior to choosing a subject major. Hence, it is recommended that cognitive scales should be included as an aptitude assessment tool for the decision-makers and prospective students to determine an appropriate career, since it might reduce the percentage of university drop-out ratio.

  2. submission of art studio-based assignments: students experience

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PUBLICATIONS1

    lenges is the teaching and understanding of art conceptualization, ideation and ... similar to the 3Ps approach of foreign language ... adults (Harriott and Ferrari, 1996). ... The assessment for many university courses ... submit for evaluation.

  3. A Randomized Controlled Study of Art Observation Training to Improve Medical Student Ophthalmology Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurwin, Jaclyn; Revere, Karen E; Niepold, Suzannah; Bassett, Barbara; Mitchell, Rebecca; Davidson, Stephanie; DeLisser, Horace; Binenbaum, Gil

    2017-08-03

    Observation and description are critical to the practice of medicine, and to ophthalmology in particular. However, medical education does not provide explicit training in these areas, and medical students are often criticized for deficiencies in these skills. We sought to evaluate the effects of formal observation training in the visual arts on the general and ophthalmologic observational skills of medical students. Randomized, single-masked, controlled trial. Thirty-six first-year medical students, randomized 1:1 into art-training and control groups. Students in the art-training group were taught by professional art educators at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, during 6 custom-designed, 1.5-hour art observation sessions over a 3-month period. All subjects completed pre- and posttesting, in which they described works of art, retinal pathology images, and external photographs of eye diseases. Grading of written descriptions for observational and descriptive abilities by reviewers using an a priori rubric and masked to group assignment and pretesting/posttesting status. Observational skills, as measured by description testing, improved significantly in the training group (mean change +19.1 points) compared with the control group (mean change -13.5 points), P = 0.001. There were significant improvements in the training vs. control group for each of the test subscores. In a poststudy questionnaire, students reported applying the skills they learned in the museum in clinically meaningful ways at medical school. Art observation training for first-year medical students can improve clinical ophthalmology observational skills. Principles from the field of visual arts, which is reputed to excel in teaching observation and descriptive abilities, can be successfully applied to medical training. Further studies can examine the impact of such training on clinical care. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. University-Industry Interaction: Reserach and Career Opportunities - Good for Industry, Faculty and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, John

    1997-03-01

    Industry sponsorship of research at universities is growing and becoming more important as funding resources change. In addition, re-engineering at industries has forced them to review how and what they sponsor at universities. Well thought out and understood "partnerships" between companies and universities can be good for everyone. Students receive scholarships, research opportunities, exposure to industry life and career/job opportunities. Faculty receive funds for their research, exposure to real-world problems, equipment, consulting opportunities and more. . Universities receive funds for research, scholarships, etc. In addition, there are opportunities for royalties and donations that help everyone. . The public gains trained students, research advances that lead to better and lower cost products, and economic growth. A concern faculty often express is that they would have to do "applied" and not leading edge research. It is true that industry will not fund "any" research; they want to support research that solves their current needs or could lead to break-throughs in products they can commercialize. Many industrial scientists counter academic concerns by stating that doing practical research can and usually is fundamental and discovery oriented. University-Industry collaboration research has been good for all and can continue to be so. Leading organizations such as the National Science Foundation and the Council on Competitiveness are stressing the need for collaborative partnerships. Universities are creating education programs that bring the basic sciences in contact with the applied world.

  5. Alcohol Industry Sponsorship of University Student Sports Clubs in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsky, Ilana; Noto, Ana Regina; Botéquio de Moraes, Maria Carolina; Lucas Dos Santos, Elaine; Sparks, Robert; O'Brien, Kerry

    2017-03-01

    The university sport environment represents an important target for alcohol industry marketing. This study investigated the nature of relationships between the alcohol industry and university student sports clubs (USSCs). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with board members from 60 active USSCs in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Interviews were transcribed and subjected to content analysis using NVivo10. All invited USSCs participated in the study. Most (n = 53; 88%) reported having signed contracts with the alcohol industry (breweries, in every case) to have their sports events and parties sponsored. The most common sponsorship arrangement involved the supply of discounted beer for sport and student events. T-shirts, beer freezers, and stereo systems were also frequently provided by the alcohol industry to support alcohol-related sports events. In addition, the alcohol industry event promoters helped market the events and products. In return, the USSCs agreed to exclusively sell the sponsors' brand of beer and/or order and sell a quota of beer at their events. Forty-nine interviewees (81%) reported agreements with alcohol companies whereby open bars (free alcohol events) would also be provided. Despite reporting a range of alcohol harms, participants did not perceive there to be a high risk of harm from the alcohol sponsorship arrangements. Most USSCs in São Paulo, Brazil, have formalized contracts with the alcohol industry that promote the marketing, sale, and consumption of alcohol at parties and university games. A critical review of the impacts of these practices and university policies on alcohol industry sponsorship that can take account of the role of such arrangements in student drinking is warranted.

  6. Art-making in a family medicine clerkship: how does it affect medical student empathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potash, Jordan S; Chen, Julie Y; Lam, Cindy L K; Chau, Vivian T W

    2014-11-28

    To provide patient-centred holistic care, doctors must possess good interpersonal and empathic skills. Medical schools traditionally adopt a skills-based approach to such training but creative engagement with the arts has also been effective. A novel arts-based approach may help medical students develop empathic understanding of patients and thus contribute to medical students' transformative process into compassionate doctors. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of an arts-making workshop on medical student empathy. This was a mixed-method quantitative-qualitative study. In the 2011-12 academic year, all 161 third year medical students at the University of Hong Kong were randomly allocated into either an arts-making workshop or a problem-solving workshop during the Family Medicine clerkship according to a centrally-set timetable. Students in the arts-making workshop wrote a poem, created artwork and completed a reflective essay while students in the conventional workshop problem-solved clinical cases and wrote a case commentary. All students who agreed to participate in the study completed a measure of empathy for medical students, the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) (student version), at the start and end of the clerkship. Quantitative data analysis: Paired t-test and repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare the change within and between groups respectively. Qualitative data analysis: Two researchers independently chose representational narratives based on criteria adapted from art therapy. The final 20 works were agreed upon by consensus and thematically analysed using a grounded theory approach. The level of empathy declined in both groups over time, but with no statistically significant differences between groups. For JSE items relating to emotional influence on medical decision making, participants in the arts-making workshop changed more than those in the problem-solving workshop. From the qualitative data, students perceived benefits in arts

  7. A Program for Introducing Information Literacy to Commercial Art and Design Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Walczak

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the process of developing and implementing a comprehensive, school-wide, and sustainable information literacy program at a commercial art and design school. The program requires that information literacy student learning outcomes be included in specific General Education and art and design courses across the curriculum. The results of this multi-year effort indicate that while the program is sound, teaching information literacy is an on-going effort requiring much more training of faculty and students. Best practices in information literacy in library science and art and design literature are reviewed

  8. An art therapy in-service program model for medical students and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rebecca Beers

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the author's experience implementing an art therapy in-service program into the training of medical students and residents in an urban hospital teaching facility. Emphasis is placed on specific aspects of planning and implementation, including formal and informal assessment, as well as methods of engaging medical students in art therapy experientials relevant to their experience as helping professionals. Benefits and challenges encountered throughout the process are also discussed. This paper is based on a presentation given at the 36th annual American Art Therapy Association conference.

  9. LANGUAGE NEEDS ANALYSIS FOR TAIWANESE ARTS STUDENTS: WHAT DO YOUNG ARTISTS NEED TO KNOW?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-chen Tseng, Ph.D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the language needs for the arts university students in Taiwan. In a time of globalization and technological revolutions, the arts majors need to learn English not only because it is the medium of teaching and learning, but also because it is the medium of attending international performances, conferences, concerts, and exhibitions. This paper seeks to determine what the students' needs for language courses are, especially in the training of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. The participants were eighty-three undergraduate students majoring in areas such as Fine Arts, Motion Pictures, Applied Drama & Theatre, Music, and Dance. The results show that the two main language skills in need of improvement were conversation and writing, because the large-sized English classes made it impossible for each student to practice speaking or writing. In addition to the required courses, the students wanted to be trained in speaking and listening skills.

  10. State of the art on alternative methods to animal testing from an industrial point of view: ready for regulation?

    OpenAIRE

    KRUL Cyrille; Ashton, Rachel; Roggen, Erwin; Fuchs, Horst; Gaca, Marianna; Hill, Erin; Poth, Albrecht; Wever, De, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Despite changing attitudes towards animal testing and current legislation to protect experimental animals, the rate of animal experiments seems to have changed little in recent years. On May 15–16, 2013, the In Vitro Testing Industrial Platform (IVTIP) held an open meeting to discuss the state of the art in alternative methods, how companies have, can, and will need to adapt and what drives and hinders regulatory acceptance and use. Several key messages arose from the meeting. First, industry...

  11. Students and teachers as developers of visual designs with AR for visual arts education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2017-01-01

    Students and teachers as developers of visual learning designs with AR for visual arts education. This paper reports from a project where communication students collaborated with art teacher educators and art student teachers about developing visual digital designs for learning which involved...... mobile technology and Augmented Reality (AR). The project exemplified a strategy for visual learning design where diverse stakeholders’ competences were involved throughout the design process. Visual arts education in Denmark is challenged by the national curricula’s requirement of integrating digital...... technology in visual learning processes. Since 1984, information technology has been mandatory in the school subject as well as in teacher education (ref.). Still, many digital resources such as Photoshop and Paint, offer remediating more traditional means for pictorial production, which give rise...

  12. Body-art practices among undergraduate medical university students in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chacha Emmanuel Chacha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Body-art practices are increasing among adolescents and young adults. Although substantial data are available in developed countries, little has been documented about body-art practices in developing countries. Objective: To determine the magnitude, types and reasons for practicing body-art practices among undergraduate medical University students in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducteed among undergraduate University students in Dar es Salaam involving 536 respondents from two Universities. We used a self-administered questionnaire to collect data. Analyses were based on summary measures and bivariate analyses. Results: While 7.5% of undergraduate students reported having tattoos, 20% reported having body puncturing or piercing. Body piercing is reported more among female university undergraduate students than their male counterparts. Reported main reasons for undergoing body-art include "a mark of beauty," 24%, "just wanted one," 18% and "a mark of femininity or masculinity," 17%. The majority (98% of students were aware that unsafe body-art practices may lead to contracting HIV and more than half (52% reported awareness of the risk of Hepatitis B infection. Conclusions: Despite high awareness of the potential risks involved in unsafe body arts that include tattoo and piercing, these practices are increasing among adolescents and young adults. There is need to have educational and counseling efforts so as to minimize associated health risks.

  13. Art Rounds: teaching interprofessional students visual thinking strategies at one school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klugman, Craig M; Peel, Jennifer; Beckmann-Mendez, Diana

    2011-10-01

    The Art Rounds program uses visual thinking strategies (VTS) to teach visual observation skills to medical and nursing students at the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio. This study's goal was to evaluate whether students' exposure to VTS would improve their physical observation skills, increase tolerance for ambiguity, and increase interest in learning communication skills. In January 2010, 32 students attended three, 90-minute sessions at which they observed and commented on three pieces of art in small groups led by museum educators. Pre and posttest evaluations included Geller and colleagues' version of Budner's Tolerance of Ambiguity Scale, the Communication Skills Attitudes Scale, and free responses to art and patient images. Statistical analyses compared pre and post time looking at images, number of words used to describe images, and number of observations made according to gender and discipline. Students significantly increased the amount of time they spent looking at art and patient images (P = .007), the number of words they used to describe art (P = .002) and patient images (P = .019), and the number of observations made of art (P = .000) and patient images (P = .001). Females increased the time spent observing significantly more than did males (P = .011). Students significantly increased their tolerance for ambiguity (P = .033) and positive views toward health care professional communication skills (P = .001). The authors speculate that these improved skills may help in patient care and interprofessional team interactions.

  14. Improving and streamlining the workflow in the graphic arts and printing industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuijn, Chris

    2003-01-01

    In order to survive in the economy of today, an ever-increasing productivity is required from all the partners participating in a specific business process. This is not different for the printing industry. One of the ways to remain profitable is, on one hand, to reduce costs by automation and aiming for large-scale projects and, on the other hand, to specialize and become an expert in the area in which one is active. One of the ways to realize these goals is by streamlining the communication of the different partners and focus on the core business. If we look at the graphic arts and printing industry, we can identify different important players that eventually help in the realization of printed material. For the printing company (as is the case for any other company), the most important player is the customer. This role can be adopted by many different players including publishers, companies, non-commercial institutions, private persons etc. Sometimes, the customer will be the content provider as well but this is not always the case. Often, the content is provided by other organizations such as design and prepress agencies, advertising companies etc. In most printing organizations, the customer has one contact person often referred to as the CSR (Customers Service Representative). Other people involved at the printing organization include the sales representatives, prepress operators, printing operators, postpress operators, planners, the logistics department, the financial department etc. In the first part of this article, we propose a solution that will improve the communication between all the different actors in the graphic arts and printing industry considerably and will optimize and streamline the overall workflow as well. This solution consists of an environment in which the customer can communicate with the CSR to ask for a quote based on a specific product intent; the CSR will then (after the approval from the customer's side) organize the work and brief

  15. How to use a blog to teach arts students science theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herriott, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The learning outcome was for students with an arts background to become familiar with the key concepts of natural science philosophy. These would then be of use in assessing empirical data, theory and designing experiments to test concepts. The students were able to remain engaged with the course...

  16. A School/Curricular Intervention Martial Arts Program for At-Risk Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanz, Jeffrey

    Statistics clearly demonstrate the need to assist students who may drop out of school or who may graduate with inadequate academic, social, and emotional skills. This paper describes efforts at one elementary school to address some of the needs of at-risk students. The program revolves around a structured martial arts class designed to develop…

  17. Students and Teachers as Developers of Visual Learning Designs with Augmented Reality for Visual Arts Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This paper reports on a project in which communication and digital media students collaborated with visual arts teacher students and their teacher trainer to develop visual digital designs for learning that involved Augmented Reality (AR) technology. The project exemplified a design...

  18. Painting with the Multiple Intelligences: Defining Student Success and Permanence in Art Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taspinar, Seyda Eraslan; Kaya, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objectives of the study are to determine the effect of teaching based on multiple intelligence theory (TBMIT) in visual arts class on student success and permanence. Experimental design is used in the study. Study group is composed of students at 8th grade in 2012-2013 educational term at Atatürk Secondary School in Igdir city centre. Experimental…

  19. Digital Portfolios in Action: Acknowledging Student Voice and Metacognitive Understanding in Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Patrick; Cronen, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Students need a genuine voice in the content, process, outcome, and assessment of their learning so they can take ownership of their education (Jaquith and Hathaway 2012). Digital art portfolios allow students to research, document, and reflect on the development and assessment of their learning. Unlike traditional portfolios, which typically…

  20. The Effect of the Time Management Art on Academic Achievement among High School Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zoubi, Maysoon

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at recognizing the effect of the Time Management Art on academic achievement among high school students in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. The researcher employed the descriptive-analytic research to achieve the purpose of the study where he chose a sample of (2000) high school female and male students as respondents to the…

  1. Understanding Instructor Nonverbal Immediacy, Verbal Immediacy, and Student Motivation at a Small Liberal Arts University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlich, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Instructor communication behaviors and student motivation to learn relationships were studied at a small liberal arts university. Specifically, relationships between instructor nonverbal immediacy, verbal immediacy behaviors and student motivation to learn were measured. Only instructor verbal immediacy behaviors had a significant linear…

  2. Mathematics for Gifted Students in an Arts- and Technology-Rich Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadanidis, George; Hughes, Janette; Cordy, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report on a study of a short-term mathematics program for grade 7-8 gifted students that integrated open-ended mathematics tasks with the arts (poetry and drama) and with technology. The program was offered partially online and partially in a classroom setting. The study sought to investigate (a) students' perceptions of their…

  3. How Can We Create the Conditions for Students' Freedom of Speech within Studies in Art?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Miranda

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates how the dynamics of students' voice can be productively brought into teaching situations. I have researched the conditions required for constructive freedom of speech, within art education. I explored the potential for vocal peer assessment and for students' ownership of their educational experiences, for the…

  4. An Exploration of Complimentary Factors in Career and Student Development in the Liberal Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Chad; Diambra, Joel F.; Gibbons, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    This study explored factors associated with both career and student development, and with persistence decisions. Findings revealed differences in which students perceived their abilities, responsibilities, adaptability, and connections between academics and vocation among those at a liberal arts college who intended to return to the institution…

  5. Analyzing the Subjective Consciousness of the Hearing-Impaired Students in Fine-Art Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Initiative plays an important role in special fine art education. Teachers should take into full consideration the profile of the hearing-impaired students. For better teaching achievement, it is the teachers who shoulder the responsibility to activate the subjective role and consciousness of the hearing-impaired students by arousing their sense…

  6. Literacy and Arts-Integrated Science Lessons Engage Urban Elementary Students in Exploring Environmental Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, P.; Elser, C. F.; Klein, J. L.; Rule, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive case study examined student attitudes, writing skills and content knowledge of urban fourth and fifth graders (6 males, 9 female) during a six-week literacy, thinking skill, and art-integrated environmental science unit. Pre- and post-test questions were used to address knowledge of environmental problems and student environmental…

  7. Artistic, Therapeutic, and Sexually Informed: A Five-Week Human Sexuality Course for Art Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzl, Einat S.

    2013-01-01

    This article is a case study of curriculum development and learning outcomes from a five-week human sexuality course for art therapy and marital and family therapy graduate students. First, course context and intentions are introduced. Second, the course format is presented briefly. Third, students' experiences are illustrated through…

  8. Art Therapy Programs with At-Risk Students in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varallo, Patrick A.

    2012-01-01

    Educating and meeting the multiple needs of students at risk of low academic achievement has been a growing concern for public schools in the United States. Many at-risk students require alternative school-based interventions. This study examined the operation, premise, and objectives of art therapy integrated in 14 school districts across the…

  9. Evaluating the Male and Female Students' Welcome of the Cultural-Art Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshaghian, Masomeh; Saadatmand, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the welcome of culture-art plans in the high schools of Khomeyni Shahr City from perspectives of the educational coaches and students in the 2013. The present study is a descriptive-survey research. The statistical population of this study includes the educational coaches and students participating in the…

  10. Art Therapy Programs with At-Risk Students in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varallo, Patrick A.

    2012-01-01

    Educating and meeting the multiple needs of students at risk of low academic achievement has been a growing concern for public schools in the United States. Many at-risk students require alternative school-based interventions. This study examined the operation, premise, and objectives of art therapy integrated in 14 school districts across the…

  11. Artistic, Therapeutic, and Sexually Informed: A Five-Week Human Sexuality Course for Art Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzl, Einat S.

    2013-01-01

    This article is a case study of curriculum development and learning outcomes from a five-week human sexuality course for art therapy and marital and family therapy graduate students. First, course context and intentions are introduced. Second, the course format is presented briefly. Third, students' experiences are illustrated through…

  12. How Can We Create the Conditions for Students' Freedom of Speech within Studies in Art?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Miranda

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates how the dynamics of students' voice can be productively brought into teaching situations. I have researched the conditions required for constructive freedom of speech, within art education. I explored the potential for vocal peer assessment and for students' ownership of their educational experiences, for the…

  13. ?Ffects of Using of Contemporary Art in High Education on Students Metacognitive Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delibaltova, Vasya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of the use of contemporary art in High Education on Students' Metacognitive Awareness from students' point of view after their involvement in specially designed activities. The learning context was created under the main thesis that metacognitive development can be supported by the creation of…

  14. Teaching for Art Criticism: Incorporating Feldman's Critical Analysis Learning Model in Students' Studio Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Maithreyi; Hanafi, Jaffri; Putih, Abu Talib

    2016-01-01

    This study adopted 30 first year graphic design students' artwork, with critical analysis using Feldman's model of art criticism. Data were analyzed quantitatively; descriptive statistical techniques were employed. The scores were viewed in the form of mean score and frequencies to determine students' performances in their critical ability.…

  15. The Relationship between Scholarships and Student Success: An Art and Design Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha M. Ganem

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of studies investigating financial predictors of student success in higher education focus on liberal art schools and have investigated a limited number of conditioning variables in analyses. This study adds to the literature by exploring financial predictors of student success through a unique sample of students from an art and design college and by considering a number of variable interactions. Institutional scholarships emerged as the strongest predictor of student persistence, progression, and timely graduation in all models explored. Standardized test scores interacted with scholarship dollars in unique ways. Findings suggest that high test scorers may be at risk in an art and design institution and that scholarship dollars may mitigate this risk.

  16. Using art in an intergenerational program to improve students' attitudes toward people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokon, Elizabeth; Li, Yue; Parajuli, Jyotsana

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the effects of participating in an intergenerational service learning program called Opening Mind through Arts (OMA) on college students' attitudes toward people with dementia. In this program, students were paired one-on-one with elders who have dementia to support the elders' creation of visual art projects. They met weekly for one semester. The Dementia Attitude Scale was administered at the beginning and end of the semester to measure changes in students' attitudes. The study included 156 students participating in OMA and assessed if their participation makes a difference in the degree of change in overall attitudes, knowledge, and comfort level toward people with dementia. Results revealed a significant improvement in students' overall attitudes, comfort level, and attitude toward people with dementia. The results highlight the importance of intergenerational service learning in improving college students' overall attitudes and increase their confidence and comfort working with people with dementia.

  17. Using Art to Teach Students Science Outdoors: How Creative Science Instruction Influences Observation, Question Formation, and Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Christina Schull

    Elementary education has become increasingly divided into subjects and focused on the demand for high math and reading scores. Consequently, teachers spend less time devoted to science and art instruction. However, teaching art and science is crucial to developing creative and rational thinking, especially for observation and questioning skills. In this study, third grade students attending an urban school in Portland, Oregon received instruction of an art strategy using observational and quantifying drawing techniques. This study examines, "Will an art strategy observing the local environment help students make observations and ask questions?" and "In what ways are student learning and perspectives of science affected by the art strategy?" The independent variable is the art strategy developed for this study. There are three dependent variables: quality of student observations, quality of questions, and themes on student learning and perspectives of science. I predicted students would develop strong observation and questioning skills and that students would find the strategy useful or have an increased interest in science. The art scores were high for relevance and detail, but not for text. There were significant correlations between art scores and questions. Interviews revealed three themes: observations create questions, drawing is helpful and challenging, and students connected to science. By examining science through art, students were engaged and created strong observations and questions. Teachers need to balance unstructured drawing time with scaffolding for optimal results. This study provides an integrated science and art strategy that teachers can use outdoors or adapt for the classroom.

  18. EXAMINATION OF NUMBERS OF STUDENTS APPLIED TO FINE ARTS HIGH SCHOOL: A PESSIMISTIC VIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahit AKSU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study, aiming to examine student quantities applied to Fine Arts high School according to various variables was implemented with General Scanning Technic among Scanning Model and documentary scanning from Descriptive Researches. When we examine applications made to Fine Arts High School Music Departments Special Talent Exams in 2014-2015 Semester we see that less than 30 applications were made to 45% of departments having 30 students quota and because significant numbers of students didn’t apply to necessitate making exams and nearly half of these departments couldn’t get qualified and quantified students and in general in talent exams 71% of Music Departments of Fine Arts High Schools couldn’t fill their student quotas, even in the second placement special talent exam made for 2014-2015 semester 22 GSL Music Departments couldn’t reach their student qouota and when examine this year’s applications to Music Departments of Fine Arts High Schools with the last year’s rate number of applications decreased between 3-70% and schools with such decrease were equal to 60% of study sampling. This situation gives important messages and implies that: success rate of students graduating from these schools will decrease year by year and this fact will reflect to higher education institutions giving professional music education.

  19. An Arts-Based Instructional Model for Student Creativity in Engineering Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Laduca

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the past twenty years, nearly all job growth in the United States has emerged from new companies and organizations with assumedly innovative products, services, and practices. Yet, the nurturing of student creative thinking and problem solving is infrequent in engineering education. Inherent to developing these creativity skills and attributes is the need to be exposed to difference — in people and environment. Engineering education rarely offers such opportunities. Additionally, engineering students are rarely presented opportunities to develop designs responding to real human problems. This paper puts forth a new instructional model to address these needs by utilizing arts processes and practices as catalysts for both creativity development in students and transdisciplinary collaboration on problems addressing deep human needs. This model is premised on the substantiated role of the arts in developing creativity and growing understanding of the human condition. This art-based instructional model was piloted as exploratory pedagogical research during the summers of 2015 and 2016 as a partnership between the Arts Nexus (IAN and the School of Engineering at the University of Dayton. In each year, this program supported twelve student interns from engineering, business, science, the arts, and the humanities to develop innovative technologies and services meeting client needs. Student growth in creative problem-solving and transdisciplinary collaboration, as well as the success of the completed innovation technology prototype were assessed by the project mentors and participating students via survey evaluations and narrative responses. The assessment results revealed substantial student growth in student creativity and transdisciplinary collaboration and a remarkably strong evaluation of the success of the students’ innovations. Also realized for all students was a transformation in their perception of their place in the world as

  20. The art of nursing. "Frank's story": student response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eydenberg, Kaitlyn

    2008-03-01

    The author of this article explores her definition of the art of nursing through a response to an interview by Dr. Kathryn Gramling with a patient named Frank. She determines that nursing, although it also requires technical skill and a strong knowledge base, becomes art when the practitioner adopts the caring skills of compassion, touching, and empathy. The poem Dr. Gramling wrote in response to her contact with Frank reinforces the definition created by the author. When some patients enter a hospital, they experience certain feelings, such as fear, uncertainty, and helplessness. They are placed in a strange setting and are not in the best of health, but each patient deals with sickness differently. Some may act frightened, while others may act impatient and uncooperative. Often, it is a nurse's duty to help ease a patient through this difficult transition. The way a nurse does this makes all the difference to a patient's stay at the hospital. A nurse's impact on the patient can affect the patient either positively or negatively. A nurse must go above and beyond the technical part of nursing in order to make nursing an art.

  1. Teaching ASTRO 101 Students the Art of Scientific Argumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleigh, Sharon P.; Slater, Stephanie; Slater, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Going beyond asking students to simply memorize facts about the universe, a longstanding challenge in teaching astronomy centers on successfully teaching students about the nature of science. As introductory astronomy survey courses, known widely as ASTRO 101, can sometimes be the last science course non-science majoring undergraduates take, many faculty hope to emphasize the scientific enterprise as a broad field in inquiry making valuable contributions to civilization as a whole, rather than as an isolated study of objects far from Earth. Scholars have long proposed that an understanding of the nature of science as a human endeavor requires explicit instruction. In other words, students successfully learning the facts of astronomy does not in any way ensure that students will learn anything about the nature of how astronomy is done. In a purposeful effort to improve students' understanding about the practices and discourse of astronomy, scholars working with the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education research are developing a suite of carefully designed instructional sequences—called Scientific Argumentation—focused on teaching students the differences between data and evidence, how to communicate and defend evidence-based conclusions, and how to be informed skeptics of scientific claims. Early results show students moving from naïve understandings of scientific practices to more informed understandings as well as demonstrating enhanced value for science in general as an worthwhile human endeavor with far reaching benefits.

  2. SAIT students develop tool for wind energy industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2009-01-15

    This article presented a newly developed tool to help the wind power industry select potential sites for wind farms. The Site Locator Management System (SLOMASS) was developed by 3 students in the GIS applied degree program at SAIT Polytechnic in Calgary, Alberta. The tool considers the many variables, both spatial and non-spatial, that should be considered when determining an optimum location for a wind farm. It processes several layers of information, such as wind patterns, transmission lines, bird and bat habitat, land use, land cover, hydrology and topography. The template created by the students can be applied to locations worldwide. The Bachelor of Applied Technology Geographic Information Systems program at SAIT Polytechnic focuses on digital cartography, database technology, remote sensing and project management for analyzing the past, monitoring the present and modelling the future. SLOMASS earned a student innovation award in 2008. 1 fig.

  3. Has the Art College Entry Portfolio Outlived Its Usefulness as a Method of Selecting Students in an Age of Relational, Collective and Collaborative Art Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Donal

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to invite focused discussion and critical debate about the instruments currently used to select students for art colleges in Europe and North America. At this time of significant expansion and diversification in practices of art making, we must ask if current selection instruments still work. What evidence is there…

  4. Formation of stress students in the process of notions of martial arts in high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uskov S.V.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Various aspects of the development of resistance to psychophysiological stress among students in the classroom arts. In the experiment involved 40 students (20 - boys, 20 girls. In the experiment, teaching methods and means of special psychological training in the martial arts. Disclosed the specifics of individual psycho-oriented methodology in the modern system of martial arts. The possibility of its use in physical education classes. It is noted that not all stress are barriers health, and only excessive. The most destructive are excessive psychogenic stresses caused by adverse of psychological factors. Psychogenic stress has a great destructive impact on health. It is a major cause of morbidity students. Recommended didactically well-designed prevention techniques.

  5. Balancing Risk? First Year Performing Arts Students' Experience of a Community Arts Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hains-Wesson, Rachael; Campbell, Angela

    2014-01-01

    This study examines participants' responses to first year students' street performances as a non-placement work-integrated learning (WIL) activity over a two year period. The purpose of the study was to determine: (1) community perception, (2) continuous improvement, and (3) future needs. Data was collected through surveying…

  6. The Class Critique: Get Beginning Art Students to Talk about Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overby, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Tired of hearing grumbling and moaning when it is time for critiques? It has been the author's experience that students do not do well in critiques because of two main things: (1) being shy about displaying their work; and (2) not knowing the right vocabulary to use to support their like (or dislike) of others' work. In this article, the author…

  7. Balancing Risk? First Year Performing Arts Students' Experience of a Community Arts Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hains-Wesson, Rachael; Campbell, Angela

    2014-01-01

    This study examines participants' responses to first year students' street performances as a non-placement work-integrated learning (WIL) activity over a two year period. The purpose of the study was to determine: (1) community perception, (2) continuous improvement, and (3) future needs. Data was collected through surveying participants'…

  8. [Empathy-building of physicians. Part III. Students exposure to literature, theatre, film and the arts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowska-Rudowicz, Elzbieta; Kładna, Aleksandra

    2010-11-01

    Literature, theatrical performances, films and the arts could be used to enhance empathy among students of medicine and residents. The use of these media enables them to learn how feelings are expressed. Through study of literature and the performing arts students can also gain new insights into their own emotional responses to illness and suffering as well as into the moral and ethical issues posed by medical practice. The objective of this paper is to describe ways in which literature, film, drama, and the arts are used in medical schools to enhance empathy in students of medicine. We also want to show the rational purpose for the inclusion of these media in medical school training. We searched PubMed, ProQuest, ERIC, MedLine, and Polish Medical Bibliography (Polska Bibliografia Lekarska) published from 1990 to the present--for studies that address use of literature, drama, film and the arts for teaching empathy to medical students. Analysis of papers reporting use of different forms of literary, artistic, and performing arts productions within the context of medical education indicates that exposure to these types of media, when used properly, may trigger attitude change, foster understanding of the illness experience and enhance empathy for the patients.

  9. The Teacher and The Student in the Art of The Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳红

    2006-01-01

    @@ How could we have a effective teaching? We, as teachers, always think about this question and always hope to have better experiences to supplement us. The art of teaching lies in the teaching of the teacher and the studying of the students. During this course, a teacher's quality will be regarded as an important factor in the art of teaching which we have to think over and discuss. Of course, the factors of students will be undoubtedly taken into consideration because of their significance. Here I would like to summarize the following points to improve our teaching effect.

  10. Teachers’Role in College English Teaching for Students Majored in Arts and Sports

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张霞

    2014-01-01

    With a view to keeping up with the new developments of the reform of college English teaching at present, college English teaching for students majored in arts and sports is also appealing to be improved further. And to deepen the teaching re-form, teachers, who are the mobile one of the most important factors in English teaching, should follow the principles of provid-ing different guidance for students majored in arts and sports and instructing them in accordance with their aptitude to meet the specific needs of individualized teaching. Thus they have to change their roles and can gain the inspiration from the following contents.

  11. Evolution of Industry Knowledge in the Public Domain: Prior Art Searching for Software Patents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinseok Park

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Searching prior art is a key part of the patent application and examination processes. A comprehensive prior art search gives the inventor ideas as to how he can improve or circumvent existing technology by providing up to date knowledge on the state of the art. It also enables the patent applicant to minimise the likelihood of an objection from the patent office. This article explores the characteristics of prior art associated with software patents, dealing with difficulties in searching prior art due to the lack of resources, and considers public contribution to the formation of prior art databases. It addresses the evolution of electronic prior art in line with technological development, and discusses laws and practices in the EPO, USPTO, and the JPO in relation to the validity of prior art resources on the Internet. This article also investigates the main features of searching sources and tools in the three patent offices as well as non-patent literature databases. Based on the analysis of various searching databases, it provides some strategies of efficient prior art searching that should be considered for software-related inventions.

  12. Making Student Learning Evidence Transparent: The State of the Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Natasha A.; Provezis, Staci J.

    2011-01-01

    This publication presents a series of studies that the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA) staff, led by Staci Provezis and Natasha Jankowski, conducted over the past couple of years. It may be the most comprehensive examination yet of institutional transparency in terms of student learning outcomes and the assessment…

  13. Student Retention and First-Year Programs: A Comparison of Students in Liberal Arts Colleges in the Mountain South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jeff S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between the retention rate and 9 first-year student programs at Liberal Arts Colleges in the Mountain South, a region in the southern Appalachian Mountains of the United States. Nine first-year programs were studied: Summer Bridge Programs, Preterm Orientation, Outdoor Adventure Orientation,…

  14. Geoscience Outreach Activity Using Art to Understand Imprint Fossils Engaging K-5 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    In order to engage students in grades 3 through 5 in the geosciences, a hands on science activity was developed and implemented using art as a mechanism to gain knowledge of imprint fossils. The desired learning outcomes of this activity were for students to understand imprint fossils formation and how these fossils can be used to learn about past organisms. For more advanced students, an additional learning outcome was to understand how fossils provide information about depositional environments. Five graduate and undergraduate student volunteers presented imprint fossils and used a game to connect the fossils with the corresponding organisms. Students then made their own imprint fossils using modeling clay, plants, and plastic dinosaur skeletons. Of the 212 participating students, 95% (201) of students completed the hands on activity successfully and reported a knowledge gain in the formation and significance of imprint fossils. The activity was adapted to accommodate a diverse student population across grade and ability levels. Classroom teachers reported incorporating students' art into further classroom learning and requested this activity to be repeated the following year by the outreach group.

  15. Controversy over Student's Art Exhibit at Yale Raises Issues of Academic Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robin

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the controversy surrounding a Yale University art student, Aliza Shvarts, who told the campus newspaper that she had repeatedly inseminated herself artificially and then induced abortions as part of her senior thesis. The controversy has created massive reverberations throughout academe, especially in the already hotly…

  16. Engagement and skill development in biology students through analysis of art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milkova, Liliana; Crossman, Colette; Wiles, Stephanie; Allen, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    An activity involving analysis of art in biology courses was designed with the goals of piquing undergraduates' curiosity, broadening the ways in which college students meaningfully engage with course content and concepts, and developing aspects of students' higher-level thinking skills, such as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. To meet these learning outcomes, the activity had three key components: preparatory readings, first-hand visual analysis of art during a visit to an art museum, and communication of the analysis. Following a presentation on the methodology of visual analysis, students worked in small groups to examine through the disciplinary lens of biology a selection of approximately 12 original artworks related in some manner to love. The groups then developed and presented for class members a mini-exhibition of several pieces addressing one of two questions: 1) whether portrayals of love in art align with the growing understanding of the biology of love or 2) whether the bodily experience of love is universal or, alternatively, is culturally influenced, as is the experience of depression. Evaluation of quantitative and qualitative assessment data revealed that the assignment engaged students, supported development of higher-level thinking skills, and prompted meaningful engagement with course material.

  17. Playful Mindfulness: How Singapore Adolescent Students Embody Meaning with School Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Koon Hwee

    2011-01-01

    Drawn from Merleau-Ponty's embodiment theory and Vygotsky's sociocultural learning theory as conceptual framework, this research investigated how Singapore adolescent students accrued and embodied meaning with school art. Combining the methods of microethnographic observations and phenomenological interviews to document the process of artistic…

  18. The Liberal Arts and Environmental Awareness: Exploring Endorsement of an Environmental Worldview in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rideout, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore student endorsement of an environmental worldview during the college years through a sampling of freshmen and seniors. Nine independent samples of freshman and senior class undergraduates (N = 779) were surveyed over a five year period in a small, independent liberal arts college. The survey instrument…

  19. Developing Values for Secondary School Students through the Study of Art Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulama, Maria Eliza; Iovu, Mihai-Bogdan; Ursu, Alexandru Marius Bodochi

    2011-01-01

    The paper begins with some issues related to aesthetics, aesthetic education, art and axiological education. The empirical research has the general assumption that secondary school students and youth have difficulties in selecting values. The objective of the research was three fold: to design, to organize and to carry learning activities from…

  20. The Effects of English/Language Arts Academic Vocabulary Alignment on Elementary Student Vocabulary Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Stacey Michelle

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide professional development in vocabulary instructional practices and analyze the impact on student achievement. This quasi-experimental study utilized the PLC to curriculum map English/Language Arts state academic vocabulary words in K-4 into each of the four nine-weeks. The first through fourth grade…

  1. Perfectionism, Achievement, and Affect in Children: A Comparison of Students from Gifted, Arts, and Regular Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stornelli, Deborah; Flett, Gordon L.; Hewitt, Paul L.

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined the association between dimensions of perfectionism and levels of academic achievement and affect in school-aged children. A sample of 223 students (90 boys, 133 girls) from regular, gifted, and arts programs completed measures of self-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism, perceived academic competence, and…

  2. Photo-Pictures and Dynamic Software or about the Motivation of the Art-Oriented Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chehlarova, Toni; Chehlarova, Koya

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with ideas about dynamic presentation of photo-pictures by means of dynamic software GeoGebra in order to motivate art students to get acquainted with some specific mathematical functions. The results of the experiment include deeper understanding of the functions' nature, search of new functions for dealing with a practical…

  3. It's a Wrap: Writing, Reading, and Art Projects for Developmental College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Kathleen A.; Stewart, Thomas C.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the visual arts as a means of helping remedial reading and writing students to "see" the process of writing. Discusses the use of clay sculpting to demonstrate free-writing techniques, Venn-mobiles to demonstrate compare/contrast techniques, and wraps (felt "tortillas" and fillings) to demonstrate summary writing. (Contains 10…

  4. The Creative Problem Solving Skills of Arts and Science Students--The Two Cultures Debate Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    Research, carried out mainly in the period between the 1960s and 1980s, reported significant differences in the thinking styles of science and arts students. At this time university and school teaching was highly specialised and concern was expressed in the ongoing "two cultures" debate (Snow, 1959).Considerable changes have taken place in the…

  5. Disabled Students in the Performing Arts--Are We Setting Them up to Succeed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, Susan Ann; Lindsay, Geoff; Neelands, Jonothan; Freakley, Vivien

    2011-01-01

    Professional training opportunities for students with physical and learning disabilities in the performing arts are conceived and developed in the context of government policy initiatives for inclusion and models of disability that aim to ensure that educational provision is of a kind which does not stigmatise individuals or devalue their…

  6. Curing paints in mechanical industry, state of the art, optimization; Cuisson de peinture dans l`industrie mecanique, etat de l`art, optimisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandon, B. [ERIC, (France)]|[CETIAT, Centre Technique des Industries Aerauliques et Thermiques, 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    1996-12-31

    The thermal polymerization of paints, or curing, in the mechanical industry sector, is facing increasing constraints due to new coating characteristics, environmental issues and economical competitiveness. The various curing technologies (hot air, infrared radiations) are reviewed and an extensive analysis of 20 curing plants is presented: assessment of the energy performances of the plant, determination of the curing cycles, and evaluation of the coating quality. An optimized solution has been derived for a typical plant, showing a reduction in cycle times due to a mixed convection-infrared oven, and its energy efficiency is discussed

  7. A program to interest medical students in Changhua, Taiwan in the incorporation of visual arts in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, K T; Lin, C C; Chang, L Y

    2011-12-01

    Visual arts have been used to facilitate the teaching of the United States Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies used in some countries. Some medical students may not appreciate the usefulness of incorporating arts in medical education. Therefore, arts programs that can interest medical students are necessary. We initiated and evaluated a visual arts program at the Changhua Christian Hospital in Changhua, Taiwan, with an aim to give the students a short review of visual arts and to interest them in the incorporation of arts in medicine. A total of 110 students in clerkship or internship participated in a visual arts program with emphasis on medicine-related visual arts. Content analysis of the data from the notes made by the instructor from direct observation of students; descriptions during discussions and the written feedback from students at the end of the program was used to evaluate the effect of the program. Anonymous questionnaires were also used for self-assessment of students. Qualitative analysis of the data revealed that the course was interesting to students. Themes emerged including its helpfulness to students in interpreting paintings, enhanced empathy, increased cultural awareness, enhanced observational skills, better team work, listening and communication skills and reduced stress. Ratings on the questionnaire showed similar results. Moreover, students had an increase in their confidence and desire to interpret paintings. The structured visual arts program, with emphasis on medicine-related visual arts and other humanities subjects, was able to attract the attention of medical students. It might be helpful to improve the required skills of ACGME competencies, but further studies are needed to support these conclusions.

  8. A descriptive qualitative study of student learning in a psychosocial nursing class infused with art, literature, music, and film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Alice; Curtis, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Nursing educators have long valued and supported the integration of liberal arts in professional nursing programs. This descriptive qualitative study explores the meanings students derive from the integration of liberal arts content into a psychosocial nursing class. Questionnaires, class observation, and focus group interviews revealed five themes: an interesting hook, a deeper level of understanding, developing self-understanding, developing empathy and increasing cultural awareness. Researchers suggest that integrating liberal arts into nursing education enhances student learning.

  9. Teaching English Language Arts to Francophone Program Students, Grades 3 to 9: Bridging the Francais and English Language Arts (ELA) Programs of Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Direction de l'education francaise.

    This document is the first in a 3-part collection titled "Teaching English Language Arts (ELA) to Francophone Program Students" to be used primarily by ELA teachers in their efforts to ensure that francophone program students build on their established French language skills when learning English. It is designed to show that a strong correlation…

  10. Exploring Science in the Studio: NSF-Funded Initiatives to Increase Scientific Literacy in Undergraduate Art and Design Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The project Exploring Science in the Studio at California College of the Arts (CCA), one of the oldest and most influential art and design schools in the country, pursues ways to enable undergraduate students to become scientifically literate problem-solvers in a variety of careers and to give content and context to their creative practices. The two main branches of this National Science Foundation-funded project are a series of courses called Science in the Studio (SitS) and the design of the Mobile Units for Science Exploration (MUSE) system, which allow instructors to bring science equipment directly into the studios. Ongoing since 2010, each fall semester a series of interdisciplinary SitS courses are offered in the college's principal areas of study (architecture, design, fine arts, humanities and sciences, and diversity studies) thematically linked by Earth and environmental science topics such as water, waste, and sustainability. Each course receives funding to embed guest scientists from other colleges and universities, industry, or agriculture directly into the studio courses. These scientists worked in tandem with the studio faculty and gave lectures, led field trips, conducted studio visits, and advised the students' creative endeavors, culminating in an annual SitS exhibition of student work. The MUSE system, of fillable carts and a storage and display unit, was designed by undergraduate students in a Furniture studio who explored, experimented, and researched various ways science materials and equipment are stored, collected, and displayed, for use in the current and future science and studio curricula at CCA. Sustainable practices and "smart design" underpinned all of the work completed in the studio. The materials selected for the new Science Collection at CCA include environmental monitoring equipment and test kits, a weather station, a stream table, a rock and fossil collection, and a vertebrate skull collection. The SitS courses and MUSE system

  11. Using Internet Videoconferencing to Connect Fashion Students with Apparel Industry Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Vera Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the efficacy, benefits and student perceptions of using Internet videoconferencing and a web camera to connect college and university fashion students with apparel industry professionals. A total of 70 college and university fashion students, three instructors, and three apparel industry professionals…

  12. DEVELOPING VALUES FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS THROUGH THE STUDY OF ART OBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eliza Dulamă

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper begins with some issues related to aesthetics, aesthetic education, art and axiological education. The empirical research has the general assumption that secondary school students and youth have difficulties in selecting values. The objective of the research was three fold: to design, to organize and to carry learning activities from which students shall acquire educational values through the study of art objects. The exploratory research was conducted on a sample of 50 students (25 in experimental group and 25 in control group. The content sample included fairy-tales and short stories (Beauty and the Beast; The money earned by Alexandru Mitru and artistic topics on several well-known art objects (The Endless Column, Table of Silence, The Gate of Kiss, Peleş castle, Voroneţ monastery, and St. Michael’s Cathedral from Cluj-Napoca. The tested hypothesis stated that if secondary school students are involved in learning contexts where they perceive, analyze and explain artistic objects then they develop aesthetic and ethic values. The learning context students were exposed to represents the independent variable and the outputs – the educational values themselves – represent the dependent variable. In order to test for the hypothesis we planned a formative didactic experiment. In order to test the hypothesis the pre-test/post-test design was used.

  13. The Awareness of Baba Nyonya Food amongst Culinary Arts Students in Management and Science University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad R. Albattat

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Baba Nyonya food is a wonderful combination of Malay and Chinese cuisine with influences from Indonesia, Thailand, India, Holland, Portugal and England. Nyonya food presents the unique identity which combined culture and heritage, adapting ingredients and recipes. The purpose of this study is to find out awareness among Culinary Art students in the Management and Science University (MSU, Shah Alam about Baba Nyonya food, and to identify the uniqueness of Baba Nyonya’s food. In this study, resource based theory has been exploited for developing conceptual research framework. Data collected using self–administered questionnaire among 110 respondents involving students of Culinary Arts through convenience sampling method. The data analysis has been conducted using frequency, descriptive statistic as well as Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS16. Results clarified that the culinary art students are aware about the uniqueness of Baba Nyonya food and the average ratio of students who know is overwhelming. The study concluded that the establishment of awareness among students about Baba Nyonya food is crucial related to the fact that Baba Nyonya food has been gradually forgotten.

  14. Effect of Visual Art School-Based Stroke Intervention for Middle School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ashleigh B; Montgomery, Chelsea M; Dillard, Wesley A; Morrill, Kenneth; Hoesli, Coral; Gillette, Wesley M; Johnson, Brandon K; Nathaniel, Thomas I

    2017-08-01

    Community stroke awareness initiatives have traditionally been used to expand knowledge of stroke signs and risk factors to high-risk adult populations. Here, we use a novel unfettered, visual art-based approach for an elementary school initiative to raise stroke awareness. Seventh graders in a middle school art class received stroke awareness training during the course of the 2015 to 2016 school year through their teacher in the visual arts class. In turn, they used this training to develop their own artistic interpretations of key stroke awareness concepts via project-based learning and then present their projects to raise awareness about stroke. We evaluated our predata and postdata to determine whether the visual art school-based stroke intervention was effective in both educating students about stroke and enabling them to effectively disseminate this information to parents and other adults in their community. The pretest evaluation indicates a fair or good knowledge about stroke, and no student indicated an "outstanding" or "excellent" knowledge. The posttest evaluation indicated a higher degree of stroke awareness because students were rated as having an "outstanding," "excellent," or "very good" performance especially in the ability to translate knowledge of stroke awareness lessons learned in their art class into a well-articulated stroke-related project and presentation. Pearson χ test reveals significant difference (P art teacher to lead the educational component in the intervention indicates that expertise in neurology or stroke is not necessary to facilitate understanding of stroke and highlights the importance of creativeness in stroke education for children.

  15. Diego Rivera Detroit Industry (1932-1933): North wall fresco, lower panel 5.398 m × 13.716 m. Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, USA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mike Mckiernan

    2009-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diego RiveraDetroit Industry (19321933) North wall fresco, lower panel 5.398 m 3 13.716 m. Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, USA. This massive mural .22 feet high...

  16. State of the level of physical preparedness of students of the Kiev National University of Culture and Art

    OpenAIRE

    Nataliya Batieieva

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: analysis of physical fitness of students of the Kyiv National University of Culture and Arts. Material and Methods: the study involved students I-st and II-nd courses of Kiev National University of Culture and Arts studying in institutions: "Film and Television", "hotel and restaurant business", "journalism and international relations." The total number of students was 136 persons aged 17–18 years, of which 107 girls and 29 boys. We used methods of theoretical analysis and synthesis ...

  17. Industrial Maintenance Series. Educational Resources for the Machine Tool Industry. Course Syllabi, Instructor's Handbook, [and] Student Laboratory Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas State Technical Coll. System, Waco.

    This package consists of course syllabi, an instructor's handbook, and a student laboratory manual for a 1-year vocational training program to prepare students for entry-level employment as industrial maintenance technicians. The program was developed through a modification of the DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) technique. The course syllabi…

  18. The applicability of a seminal professional development theory to creative arts therapies students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkibi, Hod

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to test the extent to which a seminal theory of the professional development of counsellors and therapists is applicable to the particular experiences of creative arts therapies graduate students who learn how to use the arts in psychotherapy. Nevertheless, readers may consider the results of the present study transferable to other healthcare disciplines. Questionnaires for each developmental phase were used for data collection, and analysis included data quantification, assessment of inter-rater agreement and theory derivation procedure. Results indicate that creative arts therapies students were concerned about translating theory into practice, learning how experienced therapists concretely function in practice, and reducing cognitive dissonance upon realization that their pre-training lay conceptions of helping were no longer valid. Stress and anxiety drove students to adopt easily mastered techniques that were implemented creatively in practicum. The results confirm that students who were older and had undergraduate human-service education and/or considerable life experience were less concerned about their suitability to the profession, were more acquainted with a professional working style and searched for their individual way of becoming therapists. Finally, recommendations for future research are suggested, and implications for practice are offered. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Eye Movements during Art Appreciation by Students Taking a Photo Creation Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Chiaki; Yokosawa, Kazuhiko; Okada, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have focused on the differences in the art appreciation process between individuals, and indicated that novice viewers of artworks, in comparison to experts, rarely consider the creation process of the artwork or how this may relate to style. However, behavioral changes in individuals after educational interventions have not been examined. Art education researchers claim that technical knowledge and creation experiences help novice viewers to pay attention to technical features of artwork. Therefore, an artistic photo creation course was designed and conducted to help students acquire techniques and procedural knowledge of photo creation. The present study verified whether students' viewing strategies during appreciation of photographs changed after the course. Twenty-one students participated in two sessions, viewing the same 12 photographs before and after the course. Based on the analysis of recorded eye movements, the results indicated that the students' perceptual exploration became more active with photographs containing recognizable subjects (i.e., humans and objects), and their global saccades increased when they viewed classic photography, one of the categories of photography covered in the course. Interview data after the course indicated that students became aware of the technical effects in photographs. These results suggest that students' viewing strategies may change following a course, as assessed by behavioral measures of eye movements. Further examination is needed to validate this approach to educational effect measurement.

  20. Arts, literature and reflective writing as educational strategies to promote narrative reasoning capabilities among physiotherapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caeiro, Carmen; Cruz, Eduardo Brazete; Pereira, Carla Mendes

    2014-11-01

    The use of arts, literature and reflective writing has becoming increasingly popular in health professionals education. However, research examining its contribution as an educational strategy to promote narrative reasoning capabilities is limited, particularly from the students' perspective. This study aimed to explore the final year physiotherapy students' perspectives about the contribution of arts, literature and reflective writing in facilitating narrative reasoning capabilities. Three focus group meetings using a semi-structured interview schedule were carried out to collect data. Focus group sessions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to conduct the study and analyze the transcripts. Three themes emerged: (1) developmental understanding of the patients' experiences; (2) developmental understanding about the self; and (3) embedding reflection in clinical practice. Students emphasized an increasing capability to be sensitive and vicariously experience the patient's experience. Through reflective writing, students reported they became more capable of thinking critically about their practice and learning needs for continuous professional development. Finally, students highlighted the contribution of these strategies in making reflection part of their practice. Final year physiotherapy students reported enhanced skills of narrative reasoning. The findings support the inclusion of these strategies within the undergraduate physiotherapy curricula.

  1. A Review of Wireless Sensor Technologies and Applications in Agriculture and Food Industry: State of the Art and Current Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Robla

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to review the technical and scientific state of the art of wireless sensor technologies and standards for wireless communications in the Agri-Food sector. These technologies are very promising in several fields such as environmental monitoring, precision agriculture, cold chain control or traceability. The paper focuses on WSN (Wireless Sensor Networks and RFID (Radio Frequency Identification, presenting the different systems available, recent developments and examples of applications, including ZigBee based WSN and passive, semi-passive and active RFID. Future trends of wireless communications in agriculture and food industry are also discussed.

  2. Psychological and autonomic effects of art making in college-aged students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmire, David A; Rankin, Nancy E; Gorham, Sarah R; Eggleston, Daniel T; French, Cecelia A; Lodge, Emily E; Kuns, Gavin C; Grimm, David R

    2016-09-01

    Anxiety disorders comprise the most common category of mental illness among US young adults. Art making might be one method to help reduce anxiety, but the few studies investigating this have used only subjective measures of anxiety. This study employed both subjective (self-reported state anxiety from the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) and objective (heart rate variability) measures to assess whether 30-minute periods of art making reduced anxiety in 47 first-year college students prior to their final examinations. Students participated in free-form painting, mandala coloring, clay modeling, and control sessions. Repeated-measures ANOVA with post hoc analysis revealed significantly greater pre- to post-session reductions in anxiety for all three types of art-making sessions than for the control session, as measured objectively. Measured subjectively, only free-form painting yielded a significant decrease in anxiety compared to the control session. Given the health benefits of anxiety reduction, further study is warranted to determine the duration of art making's anxiety-reducing effect.

  3. What Happened to Autonomy? Visual art practices in the creative industries Era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Dillen (Anna)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstractThis thesis concerns the autonomy of visual artists in an era of a booming creative economy and simultaneously declining governmental support for the arts and culture. The research is particularly directed toward the concept of autonomy. On the one hand, there is social autonomy, whi

  4. A pharmaceutical industry elective course on practice experience selection and fellowship pursuit by pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Rhea; Blustein, Leona; Morel, Diane; Davis, Lisa

    2014-08-15

    To design and implement 2 pharmaceutical industry elective courses and assess their impact on students' selection of advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) and pursuit of pharmaceutical industry fellowships. Two 2-credit-hour elective courses that explored careers within the prescription and nonprescription pharmaceutical drug industries were offered for second- and third-year pharmacy students in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degree program. The impact of the courses on pharmacy students' pursuit of a pharmaceutical industry fellowship was evaluated based on responses to annual graduating students' exit surveys. A greater percentage (17.9%) of students who had taken a pharmaceutical industry elective course pursued a pharmaceutical industry fellowship compared to all PharmD graduates (4.8%). Of the students who enrolled in pharmaceutical industry APPEs, 31% had taken 1 of the 2 elective courses. Exposure to a pharmaceutical industry elective course within a college or school of pharmacy curriculum may increase students' interest in pursuing pharmaceutical industry fellowships and enrolling in pharmaceutical industry APPEs.

  5. SURVEY OF PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS AMONG THE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS OF ARTS AND SCIENCE COLLEGES IN MANGALORE, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneesh Bhat

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND There is paucity of data related to the psychological and physical status of undergraduate college students in India. METHOD The sample consisted of 2708 undergraduate students of various arts and science colleges across the city of Mangalore, Karnataka. The study was approved by Nitte University Institutional Ethics Committee and permission was sought from the concerned colleges. Students were cross-sectionally assessed with a specially constructed semi-structured proforma and SRQ-20 (WHO, which was self-administered by the students after giving the students brief instructions. The score of 6 was taken as cut off for the SRQ screening purpose. The score of 6 and above indicates psychological morbidity and need for further detailed evaluation. RESULTS Of the 2708 participants who took part in the study, 64.1% (n=1736 were females and 35.9% (n=972 were males. The mean age of participants was 18.6±1.15 years. 75.6% students were staying at home. Nearly 7.6% of students were using alcohol or some other form of substances. Percentage of students with SRQ scores of 6 and above was 37.9%, which indicates that those many students were having psychological distress and needed further detailed evaluation psychiatrically. On SRQ individual item score, it was found that 42.8% had regular headaches, 43.3% always felt nervous, worried, and tense, 32.2% felt tired all the time. All these are somatic symptoms of depression in students. Alarming finding was 15.6% of students felt to end their life, which indicates suicidal risk among students and indirectly points towards the unnoticed depression among them. CONCLUSION Our results show that the psychiatric morbidity like depression, suicidal ideation, and somatic symptoms of psychiatric illness is very high among undergraduate college students and needs to be addressed very seriously at institutional level and also at policy level by educational department and colleges.

  6. Differences in Moral Judgment on Animal and Human Ethics Issues between University Students in Animal-Related, Human Medical and Arts Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrinder, Joy M; Ostini, Remo; Phillips, Clive J C

    2016-01-01

    Moral judgment in relation to animal ethics issues has rarely been investigated. Among the research that has been conducted, studies of veterinary students have shown greater use of reasoning based on universal principles for animal than human ethics issues. This study aimed to identify if this was unique to students of veterinary and other animal-related professions. The moral reasoning of first year students of veterinary medicine, veterinary technology, and production animal science was compared with that of students in non-animal related disciplines of human medicine and arts. All students (n = 531) completed a moral reasoning test, the VetDIT, with animal and human scenarios. When compared with reasoning on human ethics issues, the combined group of students evaluating animal ethics issues showed higher levels of Universal Principles reasoning, lower levels of Personal Interest reasoning and similar levels of Maintaining Norms reasoning. Arts students showed more personal interest reasoning than students in most animal-related programs on both animal and human ethics issues, and less norms-based reasoning on animal ethics issues. Medical students showed more norms-based reasoning on animal ethics issues than all of the animal-related groups. There were no differences in principled reasoning on animal ethics issues between program groups. This has implications for animal-related professions and education programs showing that students' preference for principled reasoning on animal ethics issues is not unique to animal-related disciplines, and highlighting the need to develop student (and professional) capacity to apply principled reasoning to address ethics issues in animal industries to reduce the risk of moral distress.

  7. The Awareness of Baba Nyonya Food amongst Culinary Arts Students in Management and Science University

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad R. Albattat; Liyana Asmara; Nur Aainaa Bakri; Nur Syazwani Norzaman

    2017-01-01

    Baba Nyonya food is a wonderful combination of Malay and Chinese cuisine with influences from Indonesia, Thailand, India, Holland, Portugal and England. Nyonya food presents the unique identity which combined culture and heritage, adapting ingredients and recipes. The purpose of this study is to find out awareness among Culinary Art students in the Management and Science University (MSU), Shah Alam about Baba Nyonya food, and to identify the uniqueness of Baba Nyonya’s food. In this study, re...

  8. Attitudes toward gay, lesbian, and bisexual persons among heterosexual liberal arts college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Donald W; Rosenberg, Pamela J

    2002-01-01

    This research focuses on attitudes toward homosexuals and homosexuality among 692 heterosexual students at six liberal arts colleges. Attitudes, assessed in a variety of ways, are examined in relation to students' Greek affiliation, sex role attitudes, religion and religiosity, and contact with and knowledge of gays, lesbians, and bisexuals. Results suggest that attributes predicting acceptance of gay, lesbian, and bisexual persons are female sex, liberal sex-role attitudes, lower religiosity as measured both by beliefs and by attendance, membership in more liberal Protestant denominations, attendance at colleges that do not have Greek letter social organizations, and having positive contacts with gay, lesbian, and/or bisexual persons.

  9. Broadening Student Learning Experiences via a Novel Cross-Disciplinary Art and Anatomy Education Program--A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, Caroline J.; Kleiner, Adina; Macaulay, Janet O.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored student learning and engagement in a novel cross-disciplinary education program, in particular whether medical students learning experiences can be enhanced through interaction and exchange of knowledge with students of varying disciplines. The program, entitled AnaRtomy, studies the historical relationship between art and…

  10. Poland at CERN, from 17 to 20 October 2000: Polish Industry and Art

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2000-01-01

    Photo 25: The Director General Luciano Maiani (back left) and head of SPL division Dr. Karl-Heinz Kissler (back right) visit the Poland at CERN exhibition... Photo 29: and the artistic exhibition of the works of Ryszard Otreba in the main building L. to.r.: Mr. Ryszard Otreba, Professor of the Krakow Academy of Fine Arts, Prof. Jerzy Niewodniczanski, President of National Atomic Energy Agency, Prof. Luciano Maiani and Dr. Karl-Heinz Kissler

  11. State of the Art in LP-WAN Solutions for Industrial IoT Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Iborra, Ramon; Cano, Maria-Dolores

    2016-05-17

    The emergence of low-cost connected devices is enabling a new wave of sensorization services. These services can be highly leveraged in industrial applications. However, the technologies employed so far for managing this kind of system do not fully cover the strict requirements of industrial networks, especially those regarding energy efficiency. In this article a novel paradigm, called Low-Power Wide Area Networking (LP-WAN), is explored. By means of a cellular-type architecture, LP-WAN-based solutions aim at fulfilling the reliability and efficiency challenges posed by long-term industrial networks. Thus, the most prominent LP-WAN solutions are reviewed, identifying and discussing the pros and cons of each of them. The focus is also on examining the current deployment state of these platforms in Spain. Although LP-WAN systems are at early stages of development, they represent a promising alternative for boosting future industrial IIoT (Industrial Internet of Things) networks and services.

  12. State of the Art in LP-WAN Solutions for Industrial IoT Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Sanchez-Iborra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of low-cost connected devices is enabling a new wave of sensorization services. These services can be highly leveraged in industrial applications. However, the technologies employed so far for managing this kind of system do not fully cover the strict requirements of industrial networks, especially those regarding energy efficiency. In this article a novel paradigm, called Low-Power Wide Area Networking (LP-WAN, is explored. By means of a cellular-type architecture, LP-WAN–based solutions aim at fulfilling the reliability and efficiency challenges posed by long-term industrial networks. Thus, the most prominent LP-WAN solutions are reviewed, identifying and discussing the pros and cons of each of them. The focus is also on examining the current deployment state of these platforms in Spain. Although LP-WAN systems are at early stages of development, they represent a promising alternative for boosting future industrial IIoT (Industrial Internet of Things networks and services.

  13. Necessity Is the Mother of Invention: Changing Power Dynamics between Teachers and Students in Wired Art Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    Since 2000, the impact of technologies on society has been critical, significant, and extensive. In this paper, the author explores art educators' perceptions and approaches to working with technology, in light of the emerging technology as a significant and increasingly prevalent art education tool, as a means of student communication, and as a…

  14. Thinking outside the Box: Psychological Needs of Art Students Compared with Traditional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greason, D. Paige Bentley; Glaser, Tom; Mroz, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Very little information exists regarding the mental health needs of student artists. This study compared psychological symptoms and diagnoses of college students in 3 conservatories (n = 607) with those of college students in traditional colleges and universities (n = 87,105). The study found no difference in psychological symptoms except for…

  15. Industrial-Strength Model-Based Testing - State of the Art and Current Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Peleska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available As of today, model-based testing (MBT is considered as leading-edge technology in industry. We sketch the different MBT variants that - according to our experience - are currently applied in practice, with special emphasis on the avionic, railway and automotive domains. The key factors for successful industrial-scale application of MBT are described, both from a scientific and a managerial point of view. With respect to the former view, we describe the techniques for automated test case, test data and test procedure generation for concurrent reactive real-time systems which are considered as the most important enablers for MBT in practice. With respect to the latter view, our experience with introducing MBT approaches in testing teams are sketched. Finally, the most challenging open scientific problems whose solutions are bound to improve the acceptance and effectiveness of MBT in industry are discussed.

  16. State-of-the-art of furnace recuperation in the primary metals industry: technical briefing report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, N.L.

    1983-08-01

    Existing and emerging recuperator technology is identified, as well as the technical and economic issues in applying such technology. An overview of recuperation and its relevance to the primary metals industry is presented. Design considerations, equipment, and energy and cost savings of five recuperator applications in the primary metals industry are examined. Three applications include a case history of a recent recuperator installation. A cost engineering analysis of recuperator technology is included to ensure that technically feasible engineering projects are also economically attractive business ventures. An overview of emerging recuperation technology is presented.

  17. A Comparison of Students' Outcomes in Two Classes: Business Administration Students vs Communication Arts Students Based on Self-Directed Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orawiwatnakul, Wiwat; Wichadee, Saovapa

    2011-01-01

    With research showing the benefits of self-directed learning, more activities are needed to provide learners opportunities for self-directed practice (Khomson, 1997; Lee, 1998; Phongnapharuk, 2007). A 12-week experimental study was performed with 80 EFL learners; one group contained 40 Communication Arts students and the other one consisted of 40…

  18. Dream job? Haaga campus students' perception of having a career in the hospitality industry

    OpenAIRE

    Holopainen, Anni

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to research the students of Haaga-Helia, Haaga campus, and their perception of having a career in the hospitality industry. Whether the students are willing to pursue a career within the industry after graduation and what might be the reasons behind their answers. The theoretical framework for the thesis consists of different factors affecting students’ and new graduates’ career choice. The hospitality industry and its job market in Finland is introduced as well a...

  19. Teaching Introductory Industrial/Organizational Psychology as a Liberal Arts Subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Richard

    Industrial/Organizational (I/O) psychology emphasizes the ways in which basic psychological science plays out in work and organizational life and is closely related to other disciplines. As such, it has a unique potential to help undergraduates think integratively. I/O psychologists deal with such topics as the role of tests in a diverse society,…

  20. The Art of Globalism, the Culture of Difference, the Industry of Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalder, Glenda

    This paper speaks in terms of "globalism" rather than "globalization," of a "culture of difference" rather than of cultural difference, of an "industry of knowledge" rather than of knowing. The paper first considers the argument that new communications technologies and systems are bringing cultures together…

  1. Teaching Java programming to media students with a liberal arts background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    During the last years we have developed a curriculum in Multimedia for students with a liberal arts background. In this curriculum we have had several different programming courses. These programming courses have had different problems – especially with the formalism in the courses. We thought we...... knew what the problem was: Lack of motivation. The students considered here consist of students to whom programming is not a primary interest and many are prejudicial against programming. We were mistaken, it was not a motivation problem. We designed a questionnaire to find the students’ attitude...... towards programming, and it is much more positive, but they expect that it is very difficult. We present the results of the questionnaire and interpretation of the different parts of the questionnaire leading to a new curriculum for the programming course and the criteria’s for its design given...

  2. Using the arts in teaching and learning: building student capacity for community-based work in health psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Elizabeth; Mulvey, Anne

    2008-03-01

    Perspectives have emerged within health psychology that focus on the social constitution of health and emphasize community development and social change strategies to reduce human suffering and improve quality of life. Education and training are needed to build student capacity in these areas. Our analysis, grounded in theoretical, empirical, and experiential evidences, suggests that the arts may play a leading role in building this student capacity for community research and action. Major themes are that the arts promote student understandings of the values, goals, and practices of community-based work and enable meaningful student roles in community-based partnerships. Narrative accounts of our use of creative writing, visual arts, poetry, film, and theater in classroom and community-based practice with students illustrate these themes.

  3. 武术产业区域化发展模式研究%Research on Regional Development Mode martial arts industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安海宾

    2016-01-01

    武术产业发展的区域化模式对武术运动的普及具有重要作用,为了深入探讨这一论题,运用文献资料、专家访谈、逻辑分析等方法,对武术产业区域化发展的现实条件和理论进行分析,并提出模式的发展脉络。结果认为:中国武术产业分布呈现出区域化非均衡状态,表现为武术消费、武术项目与武术文化资源区域的分布不均;中国武术产业区域化发展模式的基本构成包括武术产业区域发展方式、不同产业集群划分、非均衡资源配置以及中心城市循环经济武术产业集群,综合地发挥作用,共同实现武术产业区域化发展目的。%In order to study the Chinese martial arts industry regional development model, using the method of literature, logic analysis, on an objective basis and theoretical basis of Chinese martial arts industry to analyze regional development, regional development and build martial arts industry in the regional economy based on the theory mode. Concluded that: Chinese martial arts industry showing regional distribution of non-equilibrium state, the performance of martial arts spending, and the uneven distribution of Wushu Wushu Culture Resource area; the basic structure of Chinese martial arts industry development model of regionalization, including martial arts industry regional development, different cluster partition, configuration Unbalanced resources and martial arts center city recycling economy industrial clusters, integrated functioning together to achieve regional development purposes martial arts industry.

  4. Exploring Three Pedagogical Fantasies of Becoming-Teacher: A Lacanian and Deleuzo-Guattarian Approach to Unfolding the Identity (Re)Formation of Art Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetrick, Laura Jean

    2010-01-01

    This doctoral study concerns itself with the emergent identity formation of art student teachers: the knowledge and cultural systems [including TV and movies] through which art teaching identity conceives itself, and the ontological consequences [affects on art student teachers' collective and self (dis)identifications] that evolve from those…

  5. Industrial Provision of Practice Skills of Students Training Gastronomy Education (Case of Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarioglan, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of this study is to determine to what extent practice skills of students, training in gastronomy education, meet the expectations of food and beverage industry. In the study, 197 students training internship in 27 different firms of total 1540 students training in gastronomy education at higher education level in Turkey were reached by…

  6. Oral Communication Skills of Engineering Students of Pakistan in Perspective of Industrial Internships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inayatullah Kakepoto

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine impact of industrial internship training on oral communication skills of engineering students during this program. Fifty engineers from two engineering organizations participated in this study. Participants of this study had industrial internship training from different organizations. Purposive sampling method was used for data collection purpose. The results of the study revealed that industrial internship trainings contribute to develop oral communication skills of engineering students such as oral presentation skill, meeting skill, discussion skill, conversation skill, and project participation skill during this internship program. However, the results of this study are consistent with other literature review findings on industrial internship trainings for engineering students. Keywords: Industrial internship training, oral communication skills, engineering students

  7. Eye movements during art appreciation by students taking a photo creation course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiaki Ishiguro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have focused on the differences in the art appreciation process between individuals, and indicated that novice viewers of artworks, in comparison to experts, rarely consider the creation process of the artwork or how this may relate to style. However, behavioral changes in individuals after educational interventions have not been examined. Art education researchers claim that technical knowledge and creation experiences help novice viewers to pay attention to technical features of artwork. Therefore, an artistic photo creation course was designed and conducted to help students acquire techniques and procedural knowledge of photo creation. The present study verified whether students’ viewing strategies during appreciation of photographs changed after the course. Twenty-one students participated in two sessions, viewing the same 12 photographs before and after the course. Based on the analysis of recorded eye movements, the results indicated that the students’ perceptual exploration became more active with photographs containing recognizable subjects (i.e., humans and objects, and their global saccades increased when they viewed classic photography, one of the categories of photography covered in the course. Interview data after the course indicated that students became aware of the technical effects in photographs. These results suggest that students’ viewing strategies may change following a course, as assessed by behavioral measures of eye movements. Further examination is needed to validate this approach to educational effect measurement.

  8. State-of-The-Art and Applications of 3D Imaging Sensors in Industry, Cultural Heritage, Medicine, and Criminal Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansoni, Giovanna; Trebeschi, Marco; Docchio, Franco

    2009-01-01

    3D imaging sensors for the acquisition of three dimensional (3D) shapes have created, in recent years, a considerable degree of interest for a number of applications. The miniaturization and integration of the optical and electronic components used to build them have played a crucial role in the achievement of compactness, robustness and flexibility of the sensors. Today, several 3D sensors are available on the market, even in combination with other sensors in a “sensor fusion” approach. An importance equal to that of physical miniaturization has the portability of the measurements, via suitable interfaces, into software environments designed for their elaboration, e.g., CAD-CAM systems, virtual renders, and rapid prototyping tools. In this paper, following an overview of the state-of-art of 3D imaging sensors, a number of significant examples of their use are presented, with particular reference to industry, heritage, medicine, and criminal investigation applications. PMID:22389618

  9. Post-occupancy evaluation of a restored industrial building: A contemporary art and design gallery in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mundo-Hernández

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results obtained from a post-occupancy evaluation (POE study conducted in an old fabric building called “La Violeta”. This structure has been recently converted into a contemporary art gallery. La Violeta is located in Puebla City, Mexico. The building dates from the beginning of the 19th century; it was built and used as a textile factory until the first decades of the 20th century. This POE study aims to assess the new use of the building from the users׳ point of view. Methodology involves historical research of the building, analysis of the conversion strategy, walkthrough investigation, and a user survey. Questions regarding the re-utilization strategy used in the building and its current use are included in the survey, such as “How do people perceive the space regarding its functionality, accessibility, and comfort?” Although the re-utilization process destroyed several historic elements, the re-use of old industrial spaces that otherwise would be obsolete and disused seems pertinent. Developing small renovation projects as part of an integral and wider project seems feasible. Users perceive the building as comfortable but not properly advertised as an art gallery, and its location is difficult to find.

  10. Study on Shaolin Martial Arts Industry Development of Dengfeng City%登封市少林武术产业化发展研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王继辉

    2013-01-01

      少林武术在不断发展中已形成了一个文化产业体系,成为经济产业的一部分,带动了许多相关产业的发展。文章分析了少林武术文化发展中存在的不足与缺陷,要充分挖掘和利用登封少林武术自然资源,不断培育和扩大少林武术市场,规范武术市场,使少林武术产业向着健康、有序的方向发展。%  Shaolin martial art has become a cultural industry system in the development. It is one part of economic industry and lead many corresponding industries to develop. This paper discusses the shortcomings of Shaolin martial arts during its development. In order to explore and make use of the national resources of Shaolin martial arts, it needs to cultivate continually and enlarge Shaolin martial arts market, standardize martial arts market and make Shaolin martial arts to develop for health and order.

  11. Exploring Student Engagement and Collaborative Learning in a Community-Based Module in Fine Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John McGarrigle

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on masters research1 into student and civic engagement using a case study of an innovative Community Based Module in a Fine Art degree course (McGarrigle, 2009. 2 (Flyvbjerg, 2006 notes that contrary to some common misunderstandings around case study research, it is possible to use individual case study to test theory particularly in relation to falsification. The research presented here is based on student’s repsonses to Coates’ (2007 quantitative study of student engagement and attempts to test his engagement typology which identifies the terms passive, intense, independent or collaborative to apply to students’ approaches to online and general campus learning. In a participatory action research framework, low agreement was found between students (n=13 and lecturers (n=3 in assigning these terms to student postings to online discussion fora. This presents a challenge to the validity of such a narrow typology, and discussions with this student group suggested the addition of ‘adaptive’ as a valid student approach to the varied demands of third level learning. Further evidence from the case study found greater student collaboration in discussion fora when linked to practical course activity. Qualitative analysis of discussion threads using conversation analysis provided evidence for collaboration in deeper knowledge construction when supported by lecturers’ contributions. Collaborative approaches to learning may support learning within a social constructivist paradigm, though acknowledgement must be made of the context of an individualistic society where competition may present real or imagined barriers to student collaboration. An argument is made for Pedagogies for Community Engagement to promote these ways of learning to in order to develop active and engaged citizens of the future.

  12. STEAM: A National Study of the Integration of the Arts Into STEM Instruction and its Impact on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabalais, Mark E.

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between exposure to the arts and performance in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) subjects. STEAM, an integration of arts-based instruction into science and math related fields, is viewed as an alternative to traditional STEM academies. The literature briefly examines the current state of STEM programs and the deficiencies in graduate quality and quantity and the call from employers for a more innovative workforce. Advocates for STEAM argue for arts as a means to improve creativity, collaboration, risk-taking and exploration. Arguments against arts in STEM are grounded in political opinions concerning arts funding and logistical complications of implementing STEAM. However, some schools and STEM programs have embraced the STEAM premise and have begun to integrate arts into the traditional curriculum. The 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) dataset was utilized to determine a correlation between the number of arts credits earned and mathematics/science achievement. Results from the NAEP dataset indicated a correlation between the amount of arts credits and increased achievement scores in science and math. The same correlation was found when controlling for demographic factors such as gender, race, and socio-economic status (SES). Overall, the arts' greatest impact was on students identified as "at-risk" or underrepresented in STEM fields. Controlling for these variable groups, one can note the quantifiable differences in scores. Overall, findings of the study provide empirical support for the addition of arts in STEM.

  13. Comparative Effectiveness of Animated Drawings and Selected Instructional Strategies on Students' Performance in Creative Arts in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olugbenga, Aiyedun Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Creative Arts is a core and compulsory subject in Nigerian upper basic classes, but the students' performance over the years indicated high failure. Instructional strategies play a pivotal role in improving students' performance. Computer-based instructions such as animated drawings could be a possible solution. This research adopted the design…

  14. How Is No Child Left Behind Affecting Proficient and Advanced Students on the California STAR Test in English Language Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether students who enter high school in ninth grade and score proficient or advanced on their CST in English Language Arts remain proficient or advanced 2 years later in 11th grade. The effects of NCLB will be considered as a contributing factor to the difference in student scores. This study was…

  15. The Growing Reliance of Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology on Educational Agents for the Recruitment of International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legusov, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    The number of international students seeking educational opportunities at Ontario colleges of applied arts and technology (CAATs) has grown at an unprecedented rate in the past 10 years. It appears that as the number of the international college students has increased, colleges have also been relying more heavily on educational agents to recruit…

  16. A Learning Patterns Perspective on Student Learning in Higher Education: State of the Art and Moving Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermunt, Jan D.; Donche, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review the state of the art of research and theory development on student learning patterns in higher education and beyond. First, the learning patterns perspective and the theoretical framework are introduced. Second, research published since 2004 on student learning patterns is systematically identified and…

  17. Responses of Multi-Aged Music Students to Mid-20th-Century Art Music: A Replication and Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Clifford K.; Geringer, John M.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation replicates previous research into K-12 students' responses to mid-20th-century art music. The study extends that research to include undergraduates and graduates as well as an additional group of graduate students who had taken a 20th-century music class. Children's responses showed remarkable consistency and indicated that…

  18. The Nature of Beauty: The Arts in Greece, Rome and the Medieval Period. Program for Gifted Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garton, Harry A.; Woodbury, Virginia Garton

    One in a series of instructional units designed for gifted students, the booklet focuses on the arts in Greece, Rome, and the Medieval period. Narrative information on Greek pottery, sculpture, architecture, music, and dance is followed by lists of suggested activities for students and reference lists of texts and media. A similar unit on the…

  19. An Action Research on the Effects of Extrinsic Rewards on Motivation of Eighth Grade Language Arts Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejholec, Tod

    Data were collected for this action research to determine the value of an extrinsic reward as a self-management tool for motivating eighth grade language arts students. The sample was drawn from students at a school in the northwest suburbs of Chicago, Illinois. The school was one of two middle schools in the city. This convenience sample…

  20. A Different Perspective t o Fine Art High School Students i n Emotional Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Öznur TULUNAY ATEŞ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the emot ional intelligence of different high school students . To this end; EQ - NED and personal information form developed by the researcher were used to collect information about the variable in order to determine the emotional intelligence of the participating st udents to the research. In this study data were collected from a total of 439, 246 female and 193 male students through these scales . T he data were analyzed by using SPSS Windows 17.0 program . To evaluate the data , descriptive statistical methods (frequenc y, percentage, mean, standard deviation were used. Kruskal - Wallis H - test and Mann - Whitney U analysis test were usedas non - parametric hypothesis testing procedures. According to the r esearch results, the mean of the total score of emotional intelligence sho wed a significant difference in terms of school variables where the students study . In the study, EQ T, EQ 1, EQ 2 and EQ 3 scores of the students studying Fine Arts and Sports High School are found higher than the students studying in other high schools.

  1. Research on Path of Industrialization in Liaoning Folk Art%辽宁民间美术产业化的路径研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵迪

    2014-01-01

    Folk art is the trend of modern industrial development of cultural industries, and Liaoning which is the northeast old industrial base as its rich folk art resources, wide range, long history and craft superb skills. With the rapid development of China's commodity e-conomy, the industrial development of folk art has become an urgent demand of socio-economic and cultural development. This paper aims to analyze resource status Folk Art and Industrialization of Liaoning, folk art resources through the development process of industrial-ization in Liaoning Province bottlenecks encountered in the development path analysis to analyze Liaoning Folk Art industrialization. The purpose of this study is also the reason why this subject is located, hoping to make some of their modest industrial development of Liaon-ing Folk Art.%民间美术产业化是现代文化产业发展的大趋势,而辽宁作为东北的老工业基地,其民间美术资源丰富,门类齐全、历史悠久、技艺精湛。随着中国商品经济的快速发展,民间美术的产业化发展成为社会经济和文化发展的迫切需求。本文旨在对辽宁民间美术的资源状况和产业化发展现状进行分析,通过对辽宁省民间美术资源产业化发展过程中所遭遇的瓶颈的分析对辽宁民间美术的产业化进行发展路径的分析。这也是之所以研究此课题的目的所在,希望能为辽宁的民间美术的产业化发展尽一点自己的微薄之力。

  2. Graphic Arts/Offset Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoisington, James; Metcalf, Joseph

    This revised curriculum for graphic arts is designed to provide secondary and postsecondary students with entry-level skills and an understanding of current printing technology. It contains lesson plans based on entry-level competencies for offset lithography as identified by educators and industry representatives. The guide is divided into 15…

  3. State of the art on alternative methods to animal testing from an industrial point of view: ready for regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Rachel; De Wever, Bart; Fuchs, Horst W; Gaca, Marianna; Hill, Erin; Krul, Cyrille; Poth, Albrecht; Roggen, Erwin L

    2014-01-01

    Despite changing attitudes towards animal testing and current legislation to protect experimental animals, the rate of animal experiments seems to have changed little in recent years. On May 15-16, 2013, the In Vitro Testing Industrial Platform (IVTIP) held an open meeting to discuss the state of the art in alternative methods, how companies have, can, and will need to adapt and what drives and hinders regulatory acceptance and use. Several key messages arose from the meeting. First, industry and regulatory bodies should not wait for complete suites of alternative tests to become available, but should begin working with methods available right now (e.g., mining of existing animal data to direct future studies, implementation of alternative tests wherever scientifically valid rather than continuing to rely on animal tests) in non-animal and animal integrated strategies to reduce the numbers of animals tested. Sharing of information (communication), harmonization and standardization (coordination), commitment and collaboration are all required to improve the quality and speed of validation, acceptance, and implementation of tests. Finally, we consider how alternative methods can be used in research and development before formal implementation in regulations. Here we present the conclusions on what can be done already and suggest some solutions and strategies for the future.

  4. Student Privacy and Educational Data Mining: Perspectives from Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabourin, Jennifer; Kosturko, Lucy; FitzGerald, Clare; McQuiggan, Scott

    2015-01-01

    While the field of educational data mining (EDM) has generated many innovations for improving educational software and student learning, the mining of student data has recently come under a great deal of scrutiny. Many stakeholder groups, including public officials, media outlets, and parents, have voiced concern over the privacy of student data…

  5. THE FORMATION OF SPIRITUAL- AESTHETIC VALUES IN THE STUDENTS THROUGH ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana I. AVDEEVA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the problem of formation of spiritual and aesthetic values in the classroom «Russian culture». Special attention is paid to the application mapping method of artistic images of different kinds of art on the basis of similarity and differences between spiritual and aesthetic values in the classroom «Russian culture». Proposed a concrete way of the realization of the educational purpose – formation of spiritual and aesthetic values in the classroom «Russian culture» through the realization of artistic images, created by Russian masters, – the poets, painters, playwrights and composers. Dedicated historicism principle underlying the study of the course «Russian culture» in the process of formation of spiritual and aesthetic values of the students of the University. Specifics of formation of spiritual and aesthetic values of the students in the classroom «Russian culture» in applying the method of analysis of spiritual and aesthetic positions of the author. Reflects the integrative content of the course «Russian culture» that allows students to become partners of those complex processes, in which were born the various artistic picture of the world. The conclusion on the results of applying the mapping method of artistic images of different kinds of art on the basis of similarity and differences between spiritual and aesthetic values and the method of analysis of spiritual and aesthetic positions of the author in the process of formation of spiritual and aesthetic values of University students in the classroom «Russian culture». 

  6. Business Education Students' Evaluation of the Benefits and Challenges Confronting Student Industrial Works Experience Scheme in Edo and Delta States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olumese, H. A.; Ediagbonya, Kennedy

    2016-01-01

    This research paper specifically investigated Business Education students' evaluation of the benefits and challenges confronting Student Industrial Works Experience Scheme (SIWES) in Edo and Delta States. Two research questions were raised to guide the study and were answered descriptively. The descriptive survey research design was adopted for…

  7. NEW STUDY ABOUT STUDENTS PROFILE IN THE FIRST COURSE OF THE TECHNICAL INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Valea

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper assesses the results of a questionnaire answered by Industrial Engineering students specialized in Mechanics and Industrial Chemistry, who are taking their obligatory and first university course in Chemistry. The questionnaire has 30 multiple selection questions related to 4 significant areas (subject contents, methodology, faculty and student body. The study results were grouped in 12 significant blocks that report statistical results and/or results interpretation. The aim is to know, from the standpoint of the students, their habits and weakness as students.

  8. Online Mentoring for Biotechnology Graduate Students: An Industry-Academia Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rana; Gogos, Arhonda

    2013-01-01

    The Professional Science Master's Biotechnology program at the University of Maryland University College developed and implemented a novel online mentoring program to increase synergy with the biotechnology industry. In this program, Master's students are paired with mentors from the

  9. Microbial alkane production for jet fuel industry: motivation, state of the art and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Díaz, Lorena; Caballero, Antonio; Pérez-Hernández, Natalia; Segura, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Bio-jet fuel has attracted a lot of interest in recent years and has become a focus for aircraft and engine manufacturers, oil companies, governments and researchers. Given the global concern about environmental issues and the instability of oil market, bio-jet fuel has been identified as a promising way to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions from the aviation industry, while also promoting energy security. Although a number of bio-jet fuel sources have been approved for manufacture, their commercialization and entry into the market is still a far way away. In this review, we provide an overview of the drivers for intensified research into bio-jet fuel technologies, the type of chemical compounds found in bio-jet fuel preparations and the current state of related pre-commercial technologies. The biosynthesis of hydrocarbons is one of the most promising approaches for bio-jet fuel production, and thus we provide a detailed analysis of recent advances in the microbial biosynthesis of hydrocarbons (with a focus on alkanes). Finally, we explore the latest developments and their implications for the future of research into bio-jet fuel technologies.

  10. Forum: The Lecture and Student Learning. The Lost Art of Lecturing: Cultivating Student Listening and Notetaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Kevin R.; Hunt, Stephen K.

    2017-01-01

    As this forum's call for papers notes, lecture represents one of the more "controversial forms of instructional communication," yet remains a predominant instructional method in academia. Ironically, instructors face increasing pressure to abandon lecture at a time when these classes are popular and students readily enroll in lecture…

  11. Medical students' exposure to and attitudes about the pharmaceutical industry: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten E Austad

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between health professionals and the pharmaceutical industry has become a source of controversy. Physicians' attitudes towards the industry can form early in their careers, but little is known about this key stage of development.We performed a systematic review reported according to PRISMA guidelines to determine the frequency and nature of medical students' exposure to the drug industry, as well as students' attitudes concerning pharmaceutical policy issues. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and ERIC from the earliest available dates through May 2010, as well as bibliographies of selected studies. We sought original studies that reported quantitative or qualitative data about medical students' exposure to pharmaceutical marketing, their attitudes about marketing practices, relationships with industry, and related pharmaceutical policy issues. Studies were separated, where possible, into those that addressed preclinical versus clinical training, and were quality rated using a standard methodology. Thirty-two studies met inclusion criteria. We found that 40%-100% of medical students reported interacting with the pharmaceutical industry. A substantial proportion of students (13%-69% were reported as believing that gifts from industry influence prescribing. Eight studies reported a correlation between frequency of contact and favorable attitudes toward industry interactions. Students were more approving of gifts to physicians or medical students than to government officials. Certain attitudes appeared to change during medical school, though a time trend was not performed; for example, clinical students (53%-71% were more likely than preclinical students (29%-62% to report that promotional information helps educate about new drugs.Undergraduate medical education provides substantial contact with pharmaceutical marketing, and the extent of such contact is associated with positive attitudes about marketing and skepticism

  12. Connecting Learners: The Role of Biotechnology Programme in Preparing Students for the Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Saruan, Nadiah; Sagran, Avinash; Fadzil, Kamal Solhaimi; Razali, Zuliana; Ow Phui San, Rebecca; Somasundram, Chandran

    2015-01-01

    The recent growth of biotechnology requires a wide range of expertise within the industry. Education is the primary platform for students to gain information and knowledge on biotechnology. In Malaysia where biotechnology is relatively new, education programs and courses must be tailored to meet the demands of the industry. A combination of…

  13. Connecting Learners: The Role of Biotechnology Programme in Preparing Students for the Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Saruan, Nadiah; Sagran, Avinash; Fadzil, Kamal Solhaimi; Razali, Zuliana; Ow Phui San, Rebecca; Somasundram, Chandran

    2015-01-01

    The recent growth of biotechnology requires a wide range of expertise within the industry. Education is the primary platform for students to gain information and knowledge on biotechnology. In Malaysia where biotechnology is relatively new, education programs and courses must be tailored to meet the demands of the industry. A combination of…

  14. An Empirical Study of Industrial Engineering and Management Curriculum Reform in Fostering Students' Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Kuang; Jiang, Bernard C.; Hsu, Kuang-Yiao

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of a creativity-fostering program in industrial engineering and management (IE&M) curriculum reform. Fostering creativity in students has become a crucial issue in industrial engineering education. In a survey of previous studies, we found few on IE&M curriculum reform. In…

  15. An Empirical Study of Industrial Engineering and Management Curriculum Reform in Fostering Students' Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Kuang; Jiang, Bernard C.; Hsu, Kuang-Yiao

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of a creativity-fostering program in industrial engineering and management (IE&M) curriculum reform. Fostering creativity in students has become a crucial issue in industrial engineering education. In a survey of previous studies, we found few on IE&M curriculum reform. In…

  16. Exploring the Learning Problems and Resource Usage of Undergraduate Industrial Design Students in Design Studio Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenzhi

    2016-01-01

    Design is a powerful weapon for modern companies so it is important to have excellent designers in the industry. The purpose of this study is to explore the learning problems and the resources that students use to overcome problems in undergraduate industrial design studio courses. A survey with open-type questions was conducted to collect data.…

  17. An Empirical Study of Industrial Engineering and Management Curriculum Reform in Fostering Students' Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Kuang; Jiang, Bernard C.; Hsu, Kuang-Yiao

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of a creativity-fostering program in industrial engineering and management (IE&M) curriculum reform. Fostering creativity in students has become a crucial issue in industrial engineering education. In a survey of previous studies, we found few on IE&M curriculum reform. In particular, no…

  18. Exploring the Learning Problems and Resource Usage of Undergraduate Industrial Design Students in Design Studio Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenzhi

    2016-01-01

    Design is a powerful weapon for modern companies so it is important to have excellent designers in the industry. The purpose of this study is to explore the learning problems and the resources that students use to overcome problems in undergraduate industrial design studio courses. A survey with open-type questions was conducted to collect data.…

  19. Students as agents – connecting faculty with industry and creating collaborative projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lotte Bjerregaard

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative projects between partners in the building industry and students constitute important means for addressing more advanced parts of the CDIO Syllabus 4. In this paper an existing internship program is revised in order to enhance collaboration between industry and faculty...

  20. 艺术类与非艺术类大学生注意集中能力的差异研究%Study on the difference of focused attention between art and nor art majors college students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱俊卿; 骆芋竹

    2014-01-01

    为探讨艺术类与非艺术类大学生注意集中能力的差异,选取艺术类和非艺术类大学生各32名为被试,利用BD Ⅱ310型注意集中能力测定仪对他们的注意集中能力进行实验研究。结果显示:(1)不同专业大学生在成功时间上没有显著差异,艺术类大学生在脱靶次数上显著少于非艺术类大学生。(2)不同专业同性别的大学生在成功时间上不存在显著差异,在脱靶次数上艺术类男生显著少于非艺术类男生,艺术类女生显著多于非艺术类女生。(3)噪音干扰对被试的成功时间有显著影响,但对脱靶次数无显著影响。结论:艺术类大学生注意集中能力好于非艺术类,艺术类男生注意集中能力好于非艺术类,非艺术类女生注意集中能力好于艺术类。%To explore the differences of focused attention between art and nor art students ,64 art and non art students were tested by the BD Ⅱ 310 attention instruments .The results showed :(1) there was no significant difference between art and non art students in success time ,but non art students’ failure numbers were more than art students .(2) The suc-cess time of the same gender had no significant difference between different majors ,but male art students’ failure numbers were less than non art students while female art students’ failure numbers were more than non art students .(3) The noise had effect on success time ,but had no effect on failure numbers .So the following conclusions could be reached :Art students performed better than non art in focused attention ,art boys’ focused attention was better than non art while art girls’ fo-cused attention was worse than non art major girls’ .

  1. Export Earnings from the Overseas Student Industry: How Much?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birrell, Bob; Smith, T. Fred

    2010-01-01

    Education is regularly publicised as Australia's third-largest export behind coal and iron ore. Although it cannot be disputed that education is a major export, the published figures are inflated because of three broad factors. First, estimates of student expenditure on goods and services in Australia are based on students with different…

  2. Fundamental Research in Engineering Education. Student Learning in Industrially Situated Virtual Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koretsky, Milo D.; Kelly, Christine; Gummer, Edith

    2011-01-01

    The instructional design and the corresponding research on student learning of two virtual laboratories that provide an engineering task situated in an industrial context are described. In this problem-based learning environment, data are generated dynamically based on each student team's distinct choices of reactor parameters and measurements.…

  3. Introducing systems engineering to industrial design engineering students with hands-on experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnema, Gerrit Maarten; Lutters-Weustink, Ilanit F.; van Houten, Frederikus J.A.M.; Selvaraj, H.; Muthukumar, V.

    2005-01-01

    The article presents an innovative educational project to introduce systems engineering to third year students in industrial design engineering at the University of Twente. In a short period the students are confronted with new technology, namely sensors and actuators. They have to apply this

  4. The Academic English Language Needs of Industrial Design Students in UiTM Kedah, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzmi, Nor Aslah; Bidin, Samsiah; Ibrahim, Syazliyati; Jusoff, Kamaruzaman

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the academic English language lacks and needs of Industrial Design students in Universiti Teknologi MARA Kedah (UiTM). It highlights the lacks and needs for English for Academic Purposes in helping the students to succeed in the program through the usage of English language. The research tools used were in…

  5. Student Response to an Internet-Mediated Industrial Design Studio Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenzhi; You, Manlai

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate student attitudes towards and perceptions of using the Internet and information technology to mediate a design studio course and to propose guidelines and suggestions for developing Internet-mediated design studio courses. Two classes of third-year undergraduate industrial design students in two…

  6. Fundamental Research in Engineering Education. Student Learning in Industrially Situated Virtual Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koretsky, Milo D.; Kelly, Christine; Gummer, Edith

    2011-01-01

    The instructional design and the corresponding research on student learning of two virtual laboratories that provide an engineering task situated in an industrial context are described. In this problem-based learning environment, data are generated dynamically based on each student team's distinct choices of reactor parameters and measurements.…

  7. Student Response to an Internet-Mediated Industrial Design Studio Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenzhi; You, Manlai

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate student attitudes towards and perceptions of using the Internet and information technology to mediate a design studio course and to propose guidelines and suggestions for developing Internet-mediated design studio courses. Two classes of third-year undergraduate industrial design students in two…

  8. Introduction of the Scientific Method and Atomic Theory to Liberal Arts Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohman, James R.

    1998-12-01

    Liberal arts chemistry students often struggle with the application of the scientific method to problem solving in the sciences, in part because of insufficient concrete examples. These same students also tend to have significant difficulty in appreciating the value of weight ratios in chemistry, particularly in the establishment of the laws that led to the atomic theory. A simple classroom exercise utilizing net weights of envelopes containing varying numbers of BB's or paper clips can be used to illustrate and differentiate the steps of the scientific method: observation (with corrections) to get scientific facts, induction to arrive at laws, tentative explanation by hypothesis, experimentation to test the hypothesis, and final establishment of a scientific theory. Since the students participating in this exercise arrive at each of these steps on their own, there is greater appreciation and more effective internalization of the scientific method on their part. The exercise depends upon the discrete nature of the BB's or paper clips (i.e., on the fact that they are individual "particles" of similar properties, and so are useful analogies to atoms). Finally, since weight ratios are used to solve the problem posed by this exercise, it can be used to lead directly into the weight ratios summarized by the laws of constant composition (fixed proportions) and multiple proportions, which in turn lead to Dalton's atomic theory.

  9. Promoting the Wellbeing and Social Inclusion of Students through Visual Art at University: An Open Arts Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margrove, K. L.

    2015-01-01

    The proportion of students studying in higher education institutions who are experiencing mental health needs and social isolation is increasing. Innovative ways to improve wellbeing and social inclusion are urgently required, as the growing demands on student counselling services exceed capacity. Previous research in a variety of different…

  10. Promoting the Wellbeing and Social Inclusion of Students through Visual Art at University: An Open Arts Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margrove, K. L.

    2015-01-01

    The proportion of students studying in higher education institutions who are experiencing mental health needs and social isolation is increasing. Innovative ways to improve wellbeing and social inclusion are urgently required, as the growing demands on student counselling services exceed capacity. Previous research in a variety of different…

  11. State-of-The-Art and Applications of 3D Imaging Sensors in Industry, Cultural Heritage, Medicine, and Criminal Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Sansoni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D imaging sensors for the acquisition of three dimensional (3D shapes have created, in recent years, a considerable degree of interest for a number of applications. The miniaturization and integration of the optical and electronic components used to build them have played a crucial role in the achievement of compactness, robustness and flexibility of the sensors. Today, several 3D sensors are available on the market, even in combination with other sensors in a “sensor fusion” approach. An importance equal to that of physical miniaturization has the portability of the measurements, via suitable interfaces, into software environments designed for their elaboration, e.g., CAD-CAM systems, virtual renders, and rapid prototyping tools. In this paper, following an overview of the state-of-art of 3D imaging sensors, a number of significant examples of their use are presented, with particular reference to industry, heritage, medicine, and criminal investigation applications.

  12. The Significance of Positive Chinese Transfer in English Learning for Art Students and Its Pedagogical Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵继雪

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of language transfer has always been a central issue in the field of second language acquisition. Meanwhile, the role and status of mother tongue in the process of foreign language learning has been a controversial topic for both linguists and scholars as well. Normally divided into positive transfer and negative transfer, language transfer can be widely observed in the language teaching process during which the negative sides hinder the learning of new language while the positive sides facilitate the acquisition of new knowledge. In the specific context of China, language transfer mainly focuses on the transfer of learners’mother tongue-Chinese in English learning process. In this paper, the author mainly discusses the positive transfer of Chinese to those art students whose English competence is relatively poor taking its aim at figuring out a proper strategy for English teaching.

  13. Self-regulatory Behaviors and Approaches to Learning of Arts Students: A Comparison Between Professional Training and English Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Min-Chen; Chen, Chia-Cheng

    2016-11-17

    This study investigated the self-regulatory behaviors of arts students, namely memory strategy, goal-setting, self-evaluation, seeking assistance, environmental structuring, learning responsibility, and planning and organizing. We also explored approaches to learning, including deep approach (DA) and surface approach (SA), in a comparison between students' professional training and English learning. The participants consisted of 344 arts majors. The Academic Self-Regulation Questionnaire and the Revised Learning Process Questionnaire were adopted to examine students' self-regulatory behaviors and their approaches to learning. The results show that a positive and significant correlation was found in students' self-regulatory behaviors between professional training and English learning. The results indicated that increases in using self-regulatory behaviors in professional training were associated with increases in applying self-regulatory behaviors in learning English. Seeking assistance, self-evaluation, and planning and organizing were significant predictors for learning English. In addition, arts students used the deep approach more often than the surface approach in both their professional training and English learning. A positive correlation was found in DA, whereas a negative correlation was shown in SA between students' self-regulatory behaviors and their approaches to learning. Students with high self-regulation adopted a deep approach, and they applied the surface approach less in professional training and English learning. In addition, a SEM model confirmed that DA had a positive influence; however, SA had a negative influence on self-regulatory behaviors.

  14. Online and Hybrid Water Industry Courses for Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Chelsea

    2017-01-01

    The Water Quality Management Technology department at Red Rocks Community College in Denver, CO received a National Science Foundation grant and converted 24 courses from a face-to-face format to online and hybrid formats. The courses were converted to meet a growing employment need within the water industry. The online and hybrid options gave…

  15. Development of Art Appreciation in 11-14 Year-Old Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duh, Matjaž; Zupancic, Tomaž; Cagran, Branka

    2014-01-01

    Modern art curricula derive from the assumption that visual arts education can be of a high quality only if productive and receptive artistic activities are implemented. In art education practice, we are able to follow incentives for artistic expression but pay less attention to developing art appreciation that is based on developing as subtle…

  16. Development of Art Appreciation in 11-14 Year-Old Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duh, Matjaž; Zupancic, Tomaž; Cagran, Branka

    2014-01-01

    Modern art curricula derive from the assumption that visual arts education can be of a high quality only if productive and receptive artistic activities are implemented. In art education practice, we are able to follow incentives for artistic expression but pay less attention to developing art appreciation that is based on developing as subtle…

  17. The Effects of an Interdisciplinary Program on Secondary Art Students Participating in an Interdisciplinary Chemistry-Art Program and in an Art Only Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariuki, Patrick; Hopkins, Beth

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an interdisciplinary program on the secondary level. The sample consisted of 17 students enrolled in a high school advanced photography class. The students in the sample varied in their chemistry background. The sample was randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The…

  18. Scanner Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Joy; Murphy, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they incorporated environmental awareness into their art curriculum. Here, they describe a digital photography project in which their students used flatbed scanners as cameras. Their students composed their objects directly on the scanner. The lesson enabled students to realize that artists have voices…

  19. Perspectives of Student Teachers of Secondary Mathematics Education on Mathematics Teaching in Faculty of Arts and Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savaş BAŞTÜRK

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate fourth and fifth year Secondary School Mathematics student teachers’ opinions related to their content knowledge education in Faculty of Arts and Science. A questionnaire composed of one open-ended question was administered to 36 student teachers studying in Secondary School Mathematics Education in a state university in Istanbul. Data were analyzed and interpreted by using qualitative analysis methods. The findings of this study revealed that student teachers accused the education of Faculties of Arts and Science of being teacher-centred, having minimum interaction between teacher and student, and based on memorisation. Furthermore, this education is very theoretic and not in connection with their future professions. The only assessment criteria for measurement and evaluation of student’ performance is based on written exams.. Homework is superficial and given by few of the lecturers.

  20. El Real Conservatorio de Artes (1824-1850) : Orígenes y gestación de la ingeniería industrial moderna

    OpenAIRE

    Ramón Teijelo, Javier

    2002-01-01

    El "Conservatorio de Artes" tuvo un origen Ilustrado, emulando a su homónimo parisino, pero nació durante el absolutismo (1824), tras un frustrado intento afrancesado (1810). Absorbió al "Gabinete de Máquinas" y tuvo como primer director a López de Peñalver. Supuso un puente entre la Ilustración y la Ingeniería Industrial decimonónica, sobre todo, a partir de la institucionalización del envío de pensionados a la "École Centrale des Arts et Manufactures" parisina, con cuyo retorno consigue tra...

  1. Art Appreciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    Zhuo Dehui graduated from Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts in 1973 with a specialty in lacquer painting, and shortly thereafter began teaching at the school. Zhuo has conducted research and actively created decorative art for many decades, and has often led groups of students deep into the areas inhabited by minority nationalities, The two paintings shown here represent his impressions and depictions of

  2. The Promise of Andragogy and Experimental Learning to Improve Teaching of Nutrition Concepts to Culinary Arts Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulsalam, N.; Condrasky, M.; Bridges, W.; Havice, P.

    2017-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial compared the effectiveness of traditional lecture (C), face-to-face demonstration (DP), on-line lecture capture (OP), and the combination of the last two (OP+DP) to enhance culinary arts students' application skills related to sodium usage in food preparation. Objectives were to compare relative effectiveness of…

  3. Into Another "Semiotic Landscape": Evaluating Models of Multimodal Literacy Curricula for Canadian Art and Design University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Christina

    2009-01-01

    An art and design university is a particular kind of "semiotic landscape," comprised of teachers and students heavily invested in the difference that non-linguistic modes of expression make to meaning and human experience. Here both experienced and emerging creative practitioners experiment with the signifying possibilities of, for example, wood,…

  4. Using an Arts-Integrated Multimodal Approach to Promote English Learning: A Case Study of Two Taiwanese Junior College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsiao-Chien

    2014-01-01

    The theory of learning multimodality is receiving greater attention. Its application in language learning classes is also increasing in number. Since Chinese-speaking EFL learners are likely to be visual learners, as an instructor of Taiwanese EFL students, I have come to believe that arts integrated, multimodal projects help less confident and…

  5. Impact of the Twenty-First Century Afterschool Program on Student Achievement in Mathematics and Language Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venzen, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the academic impacts of the Twenty-First Century Community Learning Centers on students who participated in this program. The following research questions guided the study: (a) are there significant differences between the Criterion Reference Competency Test English Language Arts scores of…

  6. Value Added: Learning Communities, Experiential Process and Student Engagement in Life Long Learning in the Culinary Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Culinary Arts training at the associates level presents a set of challenges to the instructor. It has been my experience that as the work environment is changing, students face new challenges in the kitchen, including a new mix of skills, both technical and social in nature. In this piece, I reflect on a promising learning community model at our…

  7. The Role of Arts Participation in Students' Academic and Nonacademic Outcomes: A Longitudinal Study of School, Home, and Community Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J.; Mansour, Marianne; Anderson, Michael; Gibson, Robyn; Liem, Gregory A. D.; Sudmalis, David

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study draws on positive youth development frameworks and ecological models to examine the role of school-, home- and community-based arts participation in students' academic (e.g., motivation, engagement) and nonacademic (e.g., self-esteem, life satisfaction) outcomes. The study is based on 643 elementary and high school students…

  8. Examination of Strategies Fine Arts High School Students Use during the Practice and Learning of Instrumental Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uygun, Mehtap Aydiner; Kilinçer, Özlem

    2017-01-01

    Like every field of learning, it is important to use various strategies in instrumental music to learn it easily and permanently and to attain the skills to learn independently. This requires determining the strategies used by students studying instrument education. The purpose of this study was to examine the strategies fine arts high school…

  9. A Decade of Successful Research with Students at a Liberal Arts College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, S. D.; Denn, G. R.; Yochum, H. M.

    2002-12-01

    In the early 1990's, Sweet Briar College, a small liberal arts college for women in rural Virginia, began a program to encourage students to engage in research with faculty. Participation in both summer and academic year research on campus has grown significantly, and has had a very positive impact on science enrollments and opportunities for employment and graduate school. We present a chronology of changes implemented by the Department of Physics over the past ten years that has enabled students to engage in research in various fields with an emphasis on radio astronomy and laser spectroscopy. Both internal and external funding support have been essential to the success of this campus-wide initiative, in general, and to the Department of Physics research program, in particular. Current external support for research in radio astronomy at Sweet Briar is provided by Research Corporation, the Jeffress Memorial Trust, and the National Science Foundation. We discuss strategies for obtaining such support and for involving undergraduates in research.

  10. Does Coping With Music as an Art Reduce Anxiety and Depression Symptoms? A Comparison of Conservatoire and Other Faculty Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazan Karaoglu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Art is known to be a tool which provides relaxation and helps therapy especially in psychiatric diseases and in many other health problems. But the effect of art in artists is not known well. The aim of this study was to ascertain if there is a difference in anxiety and depression symptom scores between students of conservatoire and the other faculties. METHOD: In this study, anxiety and depression scores of volunteer students in conservatoire and other faculties were determined via a self administered questionnaire consisting of socio-demographic questions and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Percentages, chi-square, student-t test and one-way ANOVA tests were used in statistical analyses. RESULTS: Study population was composed of 171 students in the ages of 17–29 (mean=21.36±2.31 years and 89 (52% were female. Among 55 (32.2% conservatoire students and 116(67.8% other faculties’ students 104(60.8% were living in a hostel. Mean anxiety and depression scores were 7.21±3.37, 5.80±3.49 for conservatoire students and 7.56 ±3.62, 5.81±3.41 for the comparisons, respectively. There were symptoms above the cut– off levels for anxiety in 28 students (16.4% and for depression in 47 students (27.5% in the whole group. While anxiety and depression symptoms percentages were 18.2 %( n=10 and 15.5 %( n=18 in conservatoire students, that were 32.7 %( n=18 and 25.0 %( n=29 in other students. The difference was not statistically significant for both anxiety and depression symptoms (p>0.05. CONCLUSION: We found that dealing with music as an art didn’t made difference in anxiety and depression symptoms in this study population. Art is always accepted as a relaxation tool but individuals making art as a lesson, as a job or as a way to gain money can feel different. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(6.000: 465-472

  11. Teaching Fluid Mechanics for Undergraduate Students in Applied Industrial Biology: from Theory to Atypical Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Absi, Rafik; Dufour, Florence; Huet, Denis; Bennacer, Rachid; Absi, Tahar

    2011-01-01

    EBI is a further education establishment which provides education in applied industrial biology at level of MSc engineering degree. Fluid mechanics at EBI was considered by students as difficult who seemed somewhat unmotivated. In order to motivate them, we applied a new play-based pedagogy. Students were asked to draw inspiration from everyday life situations to find applications of fluid mechanics and to do experiments to verify and validate some theoretical results obtained in course. In this paper, we present an innovative teaching/learning pedagogy which includes the concept of learning through play and its implications in fluid mechanics for engineering. Examples of atypical experiments in fluid mechanics made by students are presented. Based on teaching evaluation by students, it is possible to know how students feel the course. The effectiveness of this approach to motivate students is presented through an analysis of students' teaching assessment. Learning through play proved a great success in fluid...

  12. Creating Art Appreciation Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidt, Ann H.

    1986-01-01

    The experiences of college students enrolled as majors in elementary education in designing art appreciation activities for use in elementary classrooms are described. The college students had no art background. (RM)

  13. Strengthening Attainment of Student Learning Outcomes during Work-Integrated Learning: A Collaborative Governance Framework across Academia, Industry and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Amanda; Trede, Franziska

    2017-01-01

    Graduate capability and employability are regarded as critical success factors for degree programs by universities, industry, and the students. Furthering work-based experiences for academic credit within degree programs is being increasingly explored to assist employability. Effective work-based experiences are reliant on good partnerships…

  14. Biocorrosion and biofouling of metals and alloys of industrial usage. Present state of the art at the beginning of the new millennium

    OpenAIRE

    Videla, H. A.

    2003-01-01

    An overview on the present state of the art on Biocorrosion and Biofouling of metals and alloys of industrial usage is offered on the basis of the experience gathered in our laboratory over 25 years of research. The key concepts to understand the main effects of microorganisms on metal decay are briefly discussed. New trends in monitoring and control strategies to mitigate biocorrosion and biofouling deleterious effects are also described. Several relevant cases of biocorrosion studied by our...

  15. Art Therapy Teaching as Performance Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    This viewpoint asserts that art therapy education is a form of performance art. By designing class sessions as performance artworks, art therapy educators can help their students become more fully immersed in their studies. This view also can be extended to conceptualizing each semester--and the entire art therapy curriculum--as a complex and…

  16. Art Therapy Teaching as Performance Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    This viewpoint asserts that art therapy education is a form of performance art. By designing class sessions as performance artworks, art therapy educators can help their students become more fully immersed in their studies. This view also can be extended to conceptualizing each semester--and the entire art therapy curriculum--as a complex and…

  17. Keeping up with Our Students: The Evolution of Technology and Standards in Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Ryan M.; Buffington, Melanie L.

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the standards of technology in the visual arts, arguing the standards function as de facto policy, the guidelines that shape what teachers teach. In this study, we investigate how art education standards approach technology as a teaching tool and artmaking medium, analyzing the current National Visual Arts Standards, the…

  18. Access to High School Arts Education: Why Student Participation Matters as Much as Course Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M. Kathleen; Singh, Priyanka; Klopfenstein, Kristin; Henry, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    There is renewed interest in the role of arts education in the curriculum of U.S. public schools not only because of the intrinsic value of the arts and its believed impact on achievement, but because cultivating creativity is thought to promote innovation and fuel economic growth. Still, we know little about basic access to arts education. Using…

  19. Meeting the Needs of Urban Students: Creative Arts Therapy in Jersey City Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Cindy Lou

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the history and development of the Jersey City Public Schools creative arts therapy program. Creative arts therapists contributed examples of their work throughout the district that provide a window into their respective school settings. Examples include technology-based art therapy, an extended school year program,…

  20. Alcohol industry sponsorship and hazardous drinking in UK university students who play sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kerry S; Ferris, Jason; Greenlees, Ian; Jowett, Sophia; Rhind, Daniel; Cook, Penny A; Kypri, Kypros

    2014-10-01

    To examine whether receipt of alcohol industry sponsorship is associated with problematic drinking in UK university students who play sport. University students (n = 2450) participating in sports were invited to complete a pen-and-paper questionnaire by research staff approaching them at sporting facilities and in university settings. Respondents were asked whether they, personally, their team and/or their club were currently in receipt of sponsorship (e.g. money, free or subsidized travel or sporting products) from an alcohol-related industry (e.g. bars, liquor stores, wholesalers), and whether they had solicited the sponsorship. Drinking was assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Questionnaires were completed by 2048 of those approached (response rate = 83%). Alcohol industry sponsorship was reported by 36% of the sample. After accounting for confounders (age, gender, disposable income and location) in multivariable models, receipt of alcohol sponsorship by a team (adjusted βadj  = 0.41, P = 0.013), club (βadj  = 0.73, P = 0.017), team and club (βadj  = 0.79, P = 0.002) and combinations of individual and team or club sponsorships (βadj  = 1.27, P 8). Respondents who sought out sponsorship were not at greater risk than respondents, or whose teams or clubs, had been approached by the alcohol industry. University students in the United Kingdom who play sport and who personally receive alcohol industry sponsorship or whose club or team receives alcohol industry sponsorship appear to have more problematic drinking behaviour than UK university students who play sport and receive no alcohol industry sponsorship. Policy to reduce or cease such sponsorship should be considered. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  1. 艺术师范生授课的艺术%Art Lectures by the Art Teacher Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李富贵

    2012-01-01

    讲课,关键是内容。内容精通,讲课没有大问题。其次是内容之间的逻辑关系清晰顺畅。最后是表达具体、优美。内容、逻辑关系、表达方式,就是讲课的三要素。学理、条理与文采,学科、逻辑与艺术,艺术师范生掌握了这几方面,就掌握了讲课。%The key point of giving a lecture is the content. If a teacher has a good understanding of content, he would give a good lecture. The second important point is the logical connection between the content. The third one is the expression. The expression need to be elegant and specific. The content, logical, connection and expression are the elements of giving a lecture. The three elements of the lecture are the content, logical relations and the means of expression. If a teacher has a good understanding of logical connection, an elegant expression and teaching art, he would give an excellent lecture.

  2. Arts-inspired students sync their assets to a nuts and bolts world: A career mentoring pilot progam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Lynn

    This research examined how students who are arts-inspired feel about their futures in a STEM-based work climate. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math are the nuts and bolts, and in education today, the only avenue touted for our country and our students' success in this 21st century economy. This can be disconcerting to those interested in other fields, like the arts. This study was guided by the following questions in an effort to understand if our artists and arts-inspired students realize their options and importance in this 21st century climate. The pilot study was designed to help improve the students' perception of their abilities or self-efficacy in the STEM areas by introducing STEM professionals as mentors who designed hands-on activities that simulate work in the STEM fields. Research Questions: 1. Do arts-inspired students have an interest in a STEM career area prior to participating in the career mentoring program? 2. Does participation in a STEM career mentoring program improve student's self-efficacy in STEM fields? 3. Does participation in STEM career mentoring program increase student's interest in pursuing STEM-related careers? Lent, Brown and Hackett's Social Cognitive Career Theory and Daniel Pink's, "A Whole New Mind: Why Left-Brainers Will Rule the Future" were used as the theoretical framework for this study. Seventeen African-American girls who were enrolled in the "I AM COMPLETE" summer program participated in the pilot study. Data was collected from the College Foundation of North Carolina Career Interest Explorer and the STEM Career Interest Survey, which served as a pre and post-test. This pilot offered limited support for the hypothesis, however, career mentoring and opportunities for young people to experience careers, especially in the STEM areas must continue to grow. The role that the arts play in this process is pivotal in galvanizing females and minorities to join these professions. It is the hope of this researcher that the

  3. Engineering, Support, and Management Services: Construction Industry Series: Preparation Level: Student Manual and Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Dept. of Occupational Education and Technology.

    The guide is an outline of training experiences designed to lead a student to at least entry-level proficiency in engineering, support, and management service jobs within the construction industry. Teaching units cover construction drafting, architectural drawing, engineering drafting, estimating, expediting and scheduling, surveying, testing and…

  4. Industrial Training of Construction Students: Perceptions of Training Organizations in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayarkwa, Joshua; Adinyira, Emmanuel; Osei-Asibey, Dickson

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The industrial training component in a university's curricula adds tremendous value to a degree programme by enhancing the employable skills of graduates. The purpose of this paper is to assess the perception of organisations that have trained construction students from the Department of Building Technology of the Kwame Nkrumah University…

  5. A Survey of Career Guidance Needs of Industrial Design Students in Taiwanese Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Ying; You, Manlai

    2010-01-01

    School pupils in Taiwan spend most of their time in studying and having examinations, and consequently many of them decide what major to study in universities rather hastily. Industrial design (ID) programs in universities nowadays recruit students from general and vocational senior high schools through a variety of channels. As a consequence, ID…

  6. A Method for User Centering Systematic Product Development Aimed at Industrial Design Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Denis A.

    2010-01-01

    Instead of limiting the introduction and stimulus for new concept creation to lists of specifications, industrial design students seem to prefer to be encouraged by ideas in context. A new method that specifically tackles human activity to foster the creation of user centered concepts of new products was developed and is presented in this article.…

  7. Industrial Training of Construction Students: Perceptions of Training Organizations in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayarkwa, Joshua; Adinyira, Emmanuel; Osei-Asibey, Dickson

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The industrial training component in a university's curricula adds tremendous value to a degree programme by enhancing the employable skills of graduates. The purpose of this paper is to assess the perception of organisations that have trained construction students from the Department of Building Technology of the Kwame Nkrumah University…

  8. A Comparative Analysis of Spatial Visualization Ability and Drafting Models for Industrial and Technology Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros; Jovanovic, Vukica; Jones, Mildred

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine significant positive effects among the use of three different types of drafting models, and to identify whether any differences exist towards promotion of spatial visualization ability for students in Industrial Technology and Technology Education courses. In particular, the study compared the use of…

  9. A Survey of Career Guidance Needs of Industrial Design Students in Taiwanese Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Ying; You, Manlai

    2010-01-01

    School pupils in Taiwan spend most of their time in studying and having examinations, and consequently many of them decide what major to study in universities rather hastily. Industrial design (ID) programs in universities nowadays recruit students from general and vocational senior high schools through a variety of channels. As a consequence, ID…

  10. Management strategies on the industrialization road of state-of-the-art technologies for e-waste recycling: the case study of electrostatic separation--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mianqiang; Li, Jia; Xu, Zhenming

    2013-02-01

    Electronic waste (e-waste) management is pressing as global production has increased significantly in the past few years and is rising continuously at a fast rate. Many countries are facing hazardous e-waste mountains, most of which are disposed of by backyard recyclers, creating serious threats to public health and ecosystems. Industrialization of state-of-the-art recycling technologies is imperative to enhance the comprehensive utilization of resources and to protect the environment. This article aims to provide an overview of management strategies solving the crucial problems during the process of industrialization. A typical case study of electrostatic separation for recycling waste printed circuit boards was discussed in terms of parameters optimization, materials flow control, noise assessment, risk assessment, economic evaluation and social benefits analysis. The comprehensive view provided by the review could be helpful to the progress of the e-waste recycling industry.

  11. The creative industries: conflict or collaboration? An analysis of the perspectives from which policymakers, art organizations and creative organizations in the creative industries are acting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijzink, Douwe; van den Hoogen, Quirijn; Gielen, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares and contrasts the instruments and values formulated in the creative industries policies of three peripheral municipalities of between 150,000 and 220,000 inhabitants in the Netherlands (Groningen, Arnhem and Eindhoven) with the needs of the creative industries itself. The needs

  12. Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  13. Analysis on Students' Thinking of Fine Arts in Middle School Fine Arts Teaching%学生美术思维在中学美术教学的分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏雨虹

    2015-01-01

    Fine arts education is an important means to cultivate students' thinking of fine arts, and its objective is to continuously improve students' aesthetic ability, and cultivate comprehensive talents with all-around development of moral, intellectual, physi-cal, aesthetics and labor education. The cultivation of students' thinking of fine arts is one of the important objectives of fine arts teaching, and meanwhile students' thinking of fine arts will en-hance the effect of fine arts teaching."Humanistic consciousness, observation ability, abstract reasoning ability and innovation a-bility" are important elements constituting students' fine arts thinking ability. Middle school students' humanistic conscious-ness is relatively weak and their observation and understanding abilities are poor, but their imagination and innovation abilities are relatively strong, so middle school fine arts teachers should make full use of the characteristics of middle school students in fine arts teaching, paying attention to the use of the rules of stu-dents' fine arts thinking, and expanding and cultivating their fine arts thinking ability.%美术教育是培养学生美术思维的重要手段,其目的在于不断提升学生的审美能力,培养“德、智、体、美、劳”全面发展的综合性人才。学生的美术思维的培养是美术教学的重要目标之一,但是同时学生的美术思维也会增强美术教学的效果。“人文意识、观察力、抽象理解能力以及创新能力”等是构成学生美术思维能力的重要因素,中学学生的特点在于人文意识比较薄弱,观察力以及理解能力欠缺,但是想象力和创新能力较强,中学教师在美术的教学活动中应该要充分抓住中学生的这一美术思维特点,在教学的过程中注意应用其美术思维的规律,同时又要在教学活动中拓宽并培养其美术思维能力。

  14. ¿Dónde se publican artículos de investigación docente relacionados con asignaturas de Ingeniería Industrial? (Where are published research articles related to university teaching of Industrial Engineering?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. Marin-Garcia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A la hora de realizar investigación o mejorar la práctica docente universitaria, no siempre es fácil encontrar fuentes de información que cumplan el requisito de ser publicaciones en revistas académicas, que hayan sometido al artículo a un proceso de  revisión ciega por pares. Pretendemos cubrir este hueco para el área de ingeniería industrial y proporcionar un listado de las revistas académicas que tienen en su línea editorial la publicación de artículos de investigación docente sobre asignaturas de titulaciones afines a la Ingeniería Industrial. (When conducting research or improving university teaching practice is not always easy to find sources that meet the requirement of publication in blind peer review academic journals. We intend to fill this gap for the area of industrial engineering and provide a list of academic journals that include research related to teaching Industrial Engineering in their focus/scope.

  15. Process of interiorization, authentication, internalization, as component psychological-educational mechanism of study of eastern martial arts among student youngsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobenko Å.V.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the theoretical questions of essence of component parts of psychological-educational mechanism of study of eastern martial arts among student youngsters. Short description of process of interiorization, authentication, internalization of personality is conducted. The questions of analysis acturelizied scientifically pedagogical and scientifically psychological literatures, which make it possible to consider and ground processes being integral part during study of the East culture. Important factor which determines stable interest of student youngsters people to the martial arts of the East is an attractiveness for them of modern man of cultural and historical traditions, in which the valued orientations are organically set up on the amalgation of physical and spiritual development of a man.

  16. 艺术生计算思维的培养%On the Cultivation of Art Students' Computational Thinking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王婷

    2016-01-01

    Computational thinking is the trend of the reform for computer general education in University. art students have their own way of sensible thinking, saying and doing everything. It is helpful to build up the computational thinking of art students and to improve their ability to solve problems by means of targeted curriculum group and flexible teaching methods.%计算思维是大学计算机通识教育的改革方向。艺术专业学生感性思维强,个性鲜明。有针对性的课程群构建和灵活的教学手段,有助于建立艺术生的计算思维,提升学生解决问题的能力。

  17. Industrialization

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lucy

    Second World era international system (1945-1990) may not have done any good to ... wedge between the capitalist and socialist blocs, not only blurred Third World .... Politics and the Stages of Economic Growth, Cambridge: Cambridge ... complex industries producing mainly for export, but also producing for local.

  18. The Relationship between Out-of-School-Suspension and English Language Arts Achievement of Students from Low Socio-Economic Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobban, Carol Janet

    2012-01-01

    Out-of-school suspension (OSS) links low academic achievement to at risk students. Middle school students in one low socioeconomic urban setting experience lower academic achievement and higher rates of OSS. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between students' English Language Arts (ELA) achievement and OSS. Glasser's…

  19. Applying Alternative Teaching Methods to Impart a Rounded, Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) Education: Students' Reflections on the Role of Magazines as Instructional Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sithole, Alec; Kibirige, Joachim; Mupinga, Davison M.; Chiyaka, Edward T.

    2016-01-01

    In a constantly and rapidly changing social world, students from all disciplines ought to attain a rounded education within the tradition of a "Liberal Arts and Sciences" (LAS) context. Students outside of the natural sciences must be encouraged to appreciate the place of those sciences in their lives. Conversely, students in the natural…

  20. The Relationship of Course Characteristics to Differential Performance of Martin Luther King Program and Other Students in Selected College of Liberal Arts Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Roberta A.; Hall, William V.

    1976-01-01

    College of Liberal Arts courses in which Martin Luther King Program (MLK) students registered from 1970 to 1972 were studied to explore the relationship of course characteristics to differences in performance between MLK and non-MLK students. Courses in which 15 or more MLK students received A through F grades were selected and divided into two…

  1. The Role of Arts-Related Information and Communication Technology Use in Problem Solving and Achievement: Findings from the Programme for International Student Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Gregory Arief D.; Martin, Andrew J.; Anderson, Michael; Gibson, Robyn; Sudmalis, David

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on the Programme for International Student Assessment 2003 data set comprising over 190,000 15-year-old students in 25 countries, the current study sought to examine the role of arts-related information and communication technology (ICT) use in students' problem-solving skill and science and mathematics achievement. Structural equation…

  2. Spirit of the Colleges, Voice of the People Students Share Pain, Hope Through Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Rebecca L.

    2005-01-01

    Tribal colleges and universities, in addition to providing our people with higher education, help to bridge the gap among cultures. The colleges sustain American Indian art forms through class and degree offerings that include traditional (shield making, drum making, arrow making, knapping, carving, masks, and pottery), contemporary (digital art,…

  3. Art History in Education: Students and Teachers Bridging Artworlds and Lifeworlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeon, Penny

    1994-01-01

    Examines the work of Jurgen Habermas and Arthur Danto and develops a conceptual structure that views art education as an interpretive and reflective network that bridges school and life experiences. Contends that visual arts contribute to the development of reflective capacities. (CFR)

  4. The "Night Owl" Learning Style of Art Students: Creativity and Daily Rhythm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sy-Chyi; Chern, Jin-Yuan

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the deep-rooted "night owl" image of art practitioners and calls for attention on a consideration of the time for learning in art. It has been recognised that the human body has its own internal timings and knowing the "time" pattern is important for better productivity in conducting creativity-related activities. This study…

  5. Art History in Education: Students and Teachers Bridging Artworlds and Lifeworlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeon, Penny

    1994-01-01

    Examines the work of Jurgen Habermas and Arthur Danto and develops a conceptual structure that views art education as an interpretive and reflective network that bridges school and life experiences. Contends that visual arts contribute to the development of reflective capacities. (CFR)

  6. National Survey Assessing Perceived Multicultural Competence in Art Therapy Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Multicultural competence is essential to contemporary art therapy practice. Current education standards require that culturally sound theories and practices be taught along with self-awareness, but there is little research on the effects of such training in art therapy. The current study examined data from the Multicultural Awareness, Knowledge,…

  7. Creating Meaningful Art Experiences with Assistive Technology for Students with Physical, Visual, Severe, and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Mari Beth; Cramer, Elizabeth Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Various levels of assistive technology can be used in the art classroom to provide a fulfilling artmaking experience for all levels of learners. The purpose of this article is to add to the body of knowledge by providing ideas generated from collaboration between the fields of special education and art education that the authors feel will benefit…

  8. National Survey Assessing Perceived Multicultural Competence in Art Therapy Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Multicultural competence is essential to contemporary art therapy practice. Current education standards require that culturally sound theories and practices be taught along with self-awareness, but there is little research on the effects of such training in art therapy. The current study examined data from the Multicultural Awareness, Knowledge,…

  9. Mozart to Michelangelo: Software to Hone Your Students' Fine Arts Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Russell

    2000-01-01

    Describes 15 art and music computer software products for classroom use. "Best bets" (mostly secondary level) include Clearvue Inc.'s Art of Seeing, Sunburst Technology's Curious George Paint & Print Studio, Inspiration Software's Inspiration 6.0, Harmonic Vision's Music Ace 2, and Coda Music Technology's PrintMusic! 2000 and SmartMusic Studio.…

  10. Critical Links: Learning in the Arts and Student Academic and Social Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deasy, Richard J., Ed.

    Two purposes of this compendium are: (1) to recommend to researchers and funders of research promising lines of inquiry and study suggested by recent, strong studies of the academic and social effects of learning in the arts; and (2) to provide designers of arts education curriculum and instruction with insights found in the research that suggest…

  11. Mozart to Michelangelo: Software to Hone Your Students' Fine Arts Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Russell

    2000-01-01

    Describes 15 art and music computer software products for classroom use. "Best bets" (mostly secondary level) include Clearvue Inc.'s Art of Seeing, Sunburst Technology's Curious George Paint & Print Studio, Inspiration Software's Inspiration 6.0, Harmonic Vision's Music Ace 2, and Coda Music Technology's PrintMusic! 2000 and SmartMusic Studio.…

  12. The analysis of the bipolarity features in students of arts and the students of technology [Analiza cech dwubiegunowości wśród studentów kierunków artystycznych oraz politechnicznych

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background. The aim of the research was to assess the prevalence of the bipolar spectrum features among students of a variety of faculties, by dividing them arbitrarily into ‘art’ or ‘technology’ cohorts.Material and methods. 120 subjects were examined, including 57 students of arts, and 63 students of technology. The tools used included a basic socio-demographic questionnaire and the Hirschfeld Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ).Results. The bipolar spectrum features (as identified by the MDQ...

  13. An Enquiry into Primary Student Teachers' Confidence, Feelings and Attitudes towards Teaching Arts and Crafts in Finland and Malta during Initial Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatt, Isabelle; Karppinen, Seija

    2014-01-01

    Arts and crafts are connected with a variety of emotions, and the prospect of teaching these subjects could be a source of other emotions, not necessarily positive. This study explores the feelings and attitudes of student teachers towards arts and crafts prior to any training within their degree course and examines any changes that occur…

  14. A Web-Based Peer-Assessment Approach to Improving Junior High School Students' Performance, Self-Efficacy and Motivation in Performing Arts Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Lu-Ho; Huang, Iwen; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a web-based peer-assessment approach is proposed for conducting performing arts activities. A peer-assessment system was implemented and applied to a junior high school performing arts course to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. A total of 163 junior high students were assigned to an experimental group and a…

  15. "Some Things in My House Have a Pulse and a Downbeat": The Role of Folk and Traditional Arts Instruction in Supporting Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer Wolf, Dennie; Holochwost, Steven J.; Bar-Zemer, Tal; Dargan, Amanda; Selhorst, Anika

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigated the association between participation in Nations in Neighborhoods (NiN), a program of folk and traditional arts instruction, and achievement in English language arts in a sample of low-income elementary school students, many of whom were recent immigrants and English language learners. The program drew on the core…

  16. Students' Pre-Departure Expectations and Post-Sojourn Observations in a Short-Term International Program Abroad on the Culture, Music, and Art of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekaney, Elisa Macedo

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the benefits of short-term international programs that concentrate specifically on the subject matter found in the fields of art and music. This article investigates a short-term international program that focuses on the culture, music, and art of Brazil. Findings show that students studying abroad enhance their world view…

  17. Art & Reading Puppets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severance, Kimberly Brown

    2012-01-01

    Every day, all around the country, art teachers are contending with large class sizes, shorter class periods, and varied student abilities. While the obvious solution might be to standardize, how can an art teacher meet the needs of the entire learning spectrum? How can an art teacher challenge the students who need challenging, while providing an…

  18. The Art of Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jill Harris

    2007-01-01

    Every year, the Parent-Teacher Association of Ferndale Elementary School in Atlanta, Georgia sponsors a fun road race for the students, teachers, families, and community. This annual event has inspired the author to develop the Running and Art project to show off her students' art and squeeze in a little art history, too. In this article, the…

  19. "I like Art Because..."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leishear, Christina Chiddo

    2012-01-01

    There is a lot of creative energy between students and their art materials. In this lesson, the author discusses materials an artist may use to create a work of art--paint, a paintbrush, a palette, crayons, markers, pastels, and so on. Each student sketched a picture of themselves holding some tools that can be used in art. The objectives of this…

  20. ¿Dónde se publican artículos de investigación docente relacionados con asignaturas de Ingeniería Industrial? (Where are published research articles related to university teaching of Industrial Engineering?)

    OpenAIRE

    Juan A. Marin-Garcia

    2011-01-01

    A la hora de realizar investigación o mejorar la práctica docente universitaria, no siempre es fácil encontrar fuentes de información que cumplan el requisito de ser publicaciones en revistas académicas, que hayan sometido al artículo a un proceso de revisión ciega por pares. Pretendemos cubrir este hueco para el área de ingeniería industrial y proporcionar un listado de las revistas académicas que tienen en su línea editorial la publicación de artículos de investigación docente sobre asigna...

  1. Lo artístico y lo industrial el la estética del cine una propuesta de investigación

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Vizcarra

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The present text is a protocol of research whose principal objective is to identity and explore those aesthetic elements where the artistic ^rw.y and the industrial forms converge in the cinematographic discourse of three woiks representative of the variant of science fiction called cyberpunk. The films selected as units of analysis are Blade Runner (1982 Dir. Ridley Scott, Nirvana (1996. Dir. Gabirele Salvatores, and The Matrix (1999. Dir. Hermanos Wachowski. The central questions that guide this project are the following: How do the values of the movie industry and film as an art interrelate in a sample of films representative of cyberpunk? How is the aesthetic dimension of the cinematographic discourse of cyberpunk constituted? And how is the aesthetic configured when conceived as a communicative strategy in this type of film?

  2. Keeping Up and Keeping It Together: Tertiary Arts Students Managing Health, Family and Self Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jennifer; Maher, JaneMaree; Brown, Kate

    2008-01-01

    Being a student in an Australian university involves more pressure, and makes more demands on that student and his or her support networks than ever before. The variety in the configurations of pressures, demands and responsibilities faced by students means that it is impossible to characterise a "standard" student. Qualitative research…

  3. Keeping Up and Keeping It Together: Tertiary Arts Students Managing Health, Family and Self Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jennifer; Maher, JaneMaree; Brown, Kate

    2008-01-01

    Being a student in an Australian university involves more pressure, and makes more demands on that student and his or her support networks than ever before. The variety in the configurations of pressures, demands and responsibilities faced by students means that it is impossible to characterise a "standard" student. Qualitative research…

  4. Competence assessment for vocational school students based on business and industry chamber to improve graduate entrepreneurship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsudi, Widodo, Joko; Margunani

    2017-03-01

    Vocational school's skill competence assessment is an important phase to complete learning process at vocational school. For vocational school this phase should be designed and implemented not only to measure learning objective target, but also to provide entrepreneurship experience for the graduates. Therefore competence assessment implementation should be done comprehensively in cooperation with Business and Industry Chamber. The implementation of skill competence aspect covering materials, methods, strategies, tools and assessors, need to be designed and optimized with respect to vocational school together with Business and Industry Chamber. This aims to measure the learning objective target and produce improved entrepreneurship graduates. 4M-S strategy in students' skill competence assessment could be done to ensure that the material, method, tool and assessor have been well designed and implemented in both institutions: vocational school and Business and Industry Chamber to improve entrepreneurship graduates.

  5. Derecho de autor y diseño industrial, ¿cómo dibujar una línea? La protección en Colombia de las obras de arte aplicado a la industria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Felipe Álvarez Amézquita

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available El artículo discute las tres diferentes aproximaciones que en el derecho comparado se han desarrollado para el caso de las obras de arte aplicado a la industria como una zona gris entre el derecho de autor y el derecho de propiedad industrial. Se enfoca únicamente en el caso del diseño industrial y su posible protección simultánea, a través del derecho de autor. Se propone que la legislación colombiana, junto con la normatividad comunitaria andina, debería acoger el sistema de acumulación parcial de protección del diseño industrial como obra protegida por el derecho de autor, siempre que tales diseños cumplan con los requisitos mínimos de protección del derecho de autor y particulares de las obras de arte y de arte aplicado.

  6. Connecting learners: The role of biotechnology programme in preparing students for the industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Saruan, Nadiah; Sagran, Avinash; Fadzil, Kamal Solhaimi; Razali, Zuliana; Ow Phui San, Rebecca; Somasundram, Chandran

    2015-01-01

    The recent growth of biotechnology requires a wide range of expertise within the industry. Education is the primary platform for students to gain information and knowledge on biotechnology. In Malaysia where biotechnology is relatively new, education programs and courses must be tailored to meet the demands of the industry. A combination of theoretical knowledge as well as practical and industrial training is essential to ensure graduates are prepared for their career in the fields of biotechnology. Results from this study show that university students lack literacy on biotechnology information and access to facilities provided by the universities. This may be a significant contributing factor to the lack of knowledge and information amongst graduates. Furthermore comparative analysis on the biotechnology program in Malaysian universities with that of other countries show the need to restructure the program by offering more specialized courses as well as soft skills and business subjects. This is to meet the demands of the related professionals as well as the various branches that exist in the biotechnology industry. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  7. Recovery Act: Develop a Modular Curriculum for Training University Students in Industry Standard CO{sub 2} Sequestration and Enhanced Oil Recovery Methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trentham, R. C.; Stoudt, E. L.

    2013-05-31

    CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery, Sequestration, & Monitoring Measuring & Verification are topics that are not typically covered in Geoscience, Land Management, and Petroleum Engineering curriculum. Students are not typically exposed to the level of training that would prepare them for CO{sub 2} reservoir and aquifer sequestration related projects when they begin assignments in industry. As a result, industry training, schools & conferences are essential training venues for new & experienced personnel working on CO{sub 2} projects for the first time. This project collected and/or generated industry level CO{sub 2} training to create modules which faculties can utilize as presentations, projects, field trips and site visits for undergrad and grad students and prepare them to "hit the ground running" & be contributing participants in CO{sub 2} projects with minimal additional training. In order to create the modules, UTPB/CEED utilized a variety of sources. Data & presentations from industry CO{sub 2} Flooding Schools & Conferences, Carbon Management Workshops, UTPB Classes, and other venues was tailored to provide introductory reservoir & aquifer training, state-of-the-art methodologies, field seminars and road logs, site visits, and case studies for students. After discussions with faculty at UTPB, Sul Ross, Midland College, other universities, and petroleum industry professionals, it was decided to base the module sets on a series of road logs from Midland to, and through, a number of Permian Basin CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) projects, CO{sub 2} Carbon Capture and Storage (CCUS) projects and outcrop equivalents of the formations where CO{sub 2} is being utilized or will be utilized, in EOR projects in the Permian Basin. Although road logs to and through these projects exist, none of them included CO{sub 2} specific information. Over 1400 miles of road logs were created, or revised specifically to highlight CO{sub 2} EOR projects. After testing a number of

  8. The knowledge in astronomy of the students of technology in industrial automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelzke, Marcos Rincon; Capasso Moraes, Ataliba

    2016-07-01

    This work is part of a research of the academic Masters in Science in Education at the Cruzeiro do Sul University, in Brazil. It seeks to present the results of the survey conducted among students of the technology course in industrial automation at the Federal Institute São Paulo at the Campus Cubatão. In the first step, the students' lack of knowledge to the related primary concepts of Astronomy turned out. Correcting these deficiencies found, external to the program content, a Basic Course in Astronomy, containing dialogued or expository lectures with the aid of audiovisual resources and access to textbooks. Analysed the responses of this second step, it was found that students had a significant improvement in learning.

  9. A Win-Win-Win Proposition -- Academia and Industry Working Together for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogswell, J.

    2011-12-01

    Both Academia and Industry have a vested interest in building a pipeline of students who are attracted to geoscience as a discipline; who invest in a solid academic geoscience foundation and who move on to fulfilling professional careers. Global society needs geoscientists to find the energy that drives our economic well-being, responsibly and safely; and to solve today's complex environmental concerns. The US Oil and Gas Industry directly employed around 17,300 geologists in 2008(1). As with the rest of the geoscience community, our industry is dealing with a bi-modal age distribution in our workforce, with many eligible to retire in the next five years. Academia and Industry have an urgent, collective, challenge to attract the best and brightest students to study geoscience and to bring promising graduates onboard and up to speed as quickly as possible ExxonMobil accomplishes this rapid acclimation to our industry by focusing on high quality on-boarding, mentoring, and training, as well as diversity in early career assignments. We have implemented a one week on-boarding workshop for our new hires that provides them with comprehensive industry as well as Corporate cultural and infrastructure information. We ensure that our new hires have dedicated mentors who are passionate about petroleum geology, passionate about the petroleum business, and passionate about teaching the next generation of "oil finders." Our new hires attend several "flagship" schools in their first 5 years, which are designed to provide the technical expertise needed in today's petroleum business. Finally, our global operations allow us to provide a rich diversity of early assignments, which enables our early career geoscientists to develop an appreciation of the breadth of our business. There is no sub-discipline of geoscience that is more or less successful transitioning into our business from Academia. The key, which we rely on Academia to provide, is a strong grounding in the fundamentals of

  10. Actuality and Problems in Art Industry Integrating with the Financial Market%艺术产业与金融对接的现状与问题分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    巫俊

    2016-01-01

    The integration between art industry and financial industry is a great way to promote the industrialization of art, and it is an important guarantee for the steady development of art industry in China and an inevitable trend for the future development of art industry. The art industry in China is in the early phase of development currently and en-counters a series of problems in the process of integrating with the financial industry, such as, problems in the external environment, problems of supply and demand, problems of the operation and personnel. And the solution of those prob-lems can pave the way for the development of art financial industry in our country.%艺术产业与金融业相结合是推动艺术产业化发展的重要途径,是促进我国艺术产业持续稳定发展的重要保障,是未来艺术产业发展的必然趋势。目前我国艺术产业正处于初期发展阶段,在与金融业对接发展和融合的过程中,面临一系列问题,主要有外部环境问题、供需问题、运作问题和人才问题,这些问题的解决能够为我国艺术金融产业发展铺平道路。

  11. Information technology industry certification's impact on undergraduate student perception of instructor effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, David L.

    The field of Computer Information Systems (CIS) or Information Technology (IT) is experiencing rapid change. A 2003 study analyzing the IT degree programs and those of competing disciplines at 10 post-secondary institutions concluded that information technology programs are perceived differently from information systems and computer science programs and are significantly less focused on both math and pure science subjects. In Information Technology programs, voluntary professional certifications, generally known in the Information Technology field as "IT" certifications, are used as indicators of professional skill. A descriptive study noting one subject group's responses to items that were nearly identical except for IT certification information was done to investigate undergraduate CIS/IT student perceptions of IT industry certified instructors. The subject group was comprised of undergraduate CIS/IT students from a regionally accredited private institution and a public institution. The methodology was descriptive, based on a previous model by Dr. McKillip, Professor of Psychology, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, utilizing a web-based survey instrument with a Likert scale, providing for voluntary anonymous responses outside the classroom over a ten day window. The results indicated that IT certification affected student perceptions of instructor effectiveness, teaching methodology, and student engagement in the class, and to a lesser degree, instructor technical qualifications. The implications suggest that additional research on this topic is merited. Although the study was not designed to examine the precise cause and effect, an important implication is that students may be motivated to attend classes taught by instructors they view as more confident and effective and that teachers with IT industry certification can better engage their students.

  12. Poetry Performances and Academic Identity Negotiations in the Literacy Experiences of Seventh Grade Language Arts Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ann Marie

    2010-01-01

    This case study explores seventh grade students' experiences with writing and performing poetry. Teacher and student interviews along with class observations provide insight into how the teacher and students viewed spoken word poetry and identity. The researcher recommends practices for the teaching of critical literacy using spoken word and…

  13. Entrepreneurship in Culinary Arts: The Costa Rica experience with university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Aguirre G.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available La industria del turismo de Costa Rica representa 7,5% de PNB, 21% de las exportaciones totales y de esa contribución el subsector de alimento y bebidas representa 28%. El propósito de esta investigación fue el de identifi car, elementos y obstáculos potenciales en jóvenes estudiantes de artes culinarias de universidades en Costa Rica. El estudio fue realizado entre estudiantes de artes culinarias en de la Universidad Interamericana de Costa Rica, las entrevistas realizadas fueron 237 todos los matriculados en artes culinarias. Ausencia de tradición, la falta de cultura empresarial entre los jóvenes estudiantes y la necesidad de apoyos de la familia y amigos parecen ser pertinente y una necesidad sentida por el grupo. La falta de instrucción general en negocio y la falta de iniciativa empresarial se reconoce por ambos grupos como una debilidad y necesidad. El "coaching" y el apoyo para mujeres empresarios es muy pertinente, en especial en los aspectos administrativos y técnicos en los jóvenes estudiantes de artes culinarias. La información generada por este estudio es importante si en verdad queremos entrenar con los programas en artes artes culinarias , la nueva casta de chef/empresarios necesarios para la expansión de la industria de la gastronomía en los próximos años para Costa Rica y la región.

  14. Analysis According to Certain Variables of Scientific Literacy among Gifted Students That Participate in Scientific Activities at Science and Art Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kömek, Emre; Yagiz, Dursun; Kurt, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze scientific literacy levels relevant to science and technology classes among gifted students that participate in scientific activities at science and art centers. This study investigated whether there was a significant difference in scientific literacy levels among gifted students according to the areas of…

  15. Vocabulary Instruction and Mexican-American Bilingual Students: How Two High School Teachers Integrate Multiple Strategies to Build Word Consciousness in English Language Arts Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Lasisi

    2015-01-01

    Despite the significance of vocabulary knowledge to student learning, limited studies have examined English language arts (ELA) teachers' skills and practices that may be effective for building word consciousness in high school Mexican-American bilingual students. The research objective of the present study is to examine how two high school ELA…

  16. The Squeezed Middle: An Exploration of Creativity, Conformity and Social Class on the Academic Achievement of Undergraduate Students within a UK Art School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, a wealth of UK government initiatives have provided opportunities for higher education institutions to increase student numbers by engaging more with defined groups of students who do not traditionally participate in post compulsory education. Within the creative arts subjects, the success of these politically sensitive…

  17. State of the art on alternative methods to animal testing from an industrial point of view: ready for regulation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cyrille Krul; Rachel Ashton; Erwin Roggen; Horst Fuchs; Marianna Gaca; Erin Hill; Albrecht Poth; Bart De Wever

    2014-01-01

    Despite changing attitudes towards animal testing and current legislation to protect experimental animals, the rate of animal experiments seems to have changed little in recent years. On May 15–16, 2013, the In Vitro Testing Industrial Platform (IVTIP) held an open meeting to discuss the state of

  18. State of the art on alternative methods to animal testing from an industrial point of view: ready for regulation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashton, Rachel; Fuchs, Horst; Wever, Bart De; Gaca, Marianna; Hill, Erin; Krul, Cyrille; Poth, Albrecht; Roggen, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Despite changing attitudes towards animal testing and current legislation to protect experimental animals, the rate of animal experiments seems to have changed little in recent years. On May 15–16, 2013, the In Vitro Testing Industrial Platform (IVTIP) held an open meeting to discuss the state of th

  19. State of the art on alternative methods to animal testing from an industrial point of view: ready for regulation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashton, R.; Wever, B. de; Fuchs, H.W.; Gaca, M.; Hill, E.; Krul, C.A.M.; Poth, A.; Roggen, E.L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite changing attitudes towards animal testing and current legislation to protect experimental animals, the rate of animal experiments seems to have changed little in recent years. On May 15–16, 2013, the In Vitro Testing Industrial Platform (IVTIP) held an open meeting to discuss the state of th

  20. 艺术院校大学生性心理健康状况调查%The sex psychology health status survey among art college students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻轲

    2015-01-01

    Objectives:To understand the mental health status of art college students,in order to provide basis for psychological health education in particular for reform and implementing of health education.Methods:481 college students were randomly selected and tested by Puberty Psycho Sexual Health Scale.The data were ana-lyzed by SPSS 17.0.Results:The art college students and non -art college students had significant differences in the sexual attitude.Non -art students were more positive and healthy in sexual value.Male and female students in art college had a very significant difference in sex attitude.Female students were more positive and active than male students.Conclusion:Health mentality of non -art college students is better than that of art college students.The psychological health of female students in art college is better than male students.%目的:了解艺术学院大学生性心理健康的现状,为心理健康教育特别是性健康教育的教学实施和改革提供依据。方法:随机抽取481名大学生,用青春期心理健康量表进行测试,SPSS17.0进行数据统计分析。结果:(1)艺术学院大学生和非艺术学院大学生在性观念和性态度上有显著性差异,非艺术类大学生在性价值观的表现上更积极和健康;(2)艺术学院大学生中男生和女生在性态度上有非常明显的差异性,女生比男生在对待性的问题的态度上更加正面和积极。结论:非艺术学院大学生的性心理健康状况优于艺术学院大学生,艺术学院的女生性心理健康状况好于男生。

  1. Careers in the Biotechnology Industry: What Do Our Students Do in the Industry and What Degrees and Training Are Necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahms, A. Stephen; Bourque, Janis

    2001-01-01

    Part of a series designed to facilitate better understanding of the biotechnology industry by the academic educational and research training sector, concentrates on careers in biotechnology. Discusses jobs that reflect the industry as a whole and can be extrapolated to the industry both nationally and internationally. (Author/MM)

  2. Using Mobile Device for Learning: From Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suki, Norazah Mohd; Suki, Norbayah Mohd

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to examine students' acceptance of mobile technology usage for learning. A questionnaire designed with five open-ended questions was distributed to 20 students from the Faculty of Industrial Art and Design Technology of Unisel (Universiti Industri Selangor), Malaysia. Results construes that students were not keen on m-learning…

  3. The analysis of the bipolarity features in students of arts and the students of technology [Analiza cech dwubiegunowości wśród studentów kierunków artystycznych oraz politechnicznych

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwek, Marcin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of the research was to assess the prevalence of the bipolar spectrum features among students of a variety of faculties, by dividing them arbitrarily into ‘art’ or ‘technology’ cohorts.Material and methods. 120 subjects were examined, including 57 students of arts, and 63 students of technology. The tools used included a basic socio-demographic questionnaire and the Hirschfeld Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ.Results. The bipolar spectrum features (as identified by the MDQ responses were significantly more prevalent among the students of arts, as compared to the students of technology (28.2% vs. 4.8%, p≤0.001; OR=7.8; CI 95%: 2.13–28.51; p≤0.01. Moreover, in comparisonto the students of technology, the students of arts were more likely to: 1 report mood patterns of intermittent ‘highs’ and ‘lows’ (49.1% vs. 15.9%, p≤0.0001; OR=5.11; CI 95%: 2.18–11.99; p≤0.001; 2 seek for psychiatric or psychological support (12.3% vs. 1.5%; p≤0.05; OR=5.2; CI 95%: 1.79–15.21; p≤0.01; 3 have a history of utilisation of psychotropic medications (31% vs. 7.9%, p≤0.001; OR = 8.7; CI 95%: 1.03–72.9; p≤0.05. They were also more likely to use psychoactive substances (other than alcohol.Conclusions. The considerable prevalence of the bipolarity features (as measured by the MDQ, combined with higher prevalence of intermittent periods of elevated or depressed mood, higher likelihood of seeking for psychiatric or psychological treatment, and higher prevalence of using psychoactive medications/substances in the cohort of the students of arts indicate a significant association between artistic talents and creativity, and the bipolar spectrum disorders.

  4. Bonding with the Nuclear Industry: A Technical Communication Professor and His Students Partner With Y-12 National Security Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Russel

    2016-01-01

    This article describes how a special kind of academe-industry collaboration--based on a joint appointment agreement between a university and an industry site--was set up, promoted, and experienced by a professor of technical communication and his student interns. To illustrate the nature and value of this kind of collaboration, the article…

  5. Positioning Industrial Design Students to Operate at the "Fuzzy Front End": Investigating a New Arena of University Design Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormald, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes pedagogic research to instigate, support and understand a significant change in the education of undergraduate industrial design students. Design educators at Loughborough University, UK, have proposed that it will be critical for future industrial designers to learn new knowledge and abilities which will enable them to…

  6. Positioning Industrial Design Students to Operate at the "Fuzzy Front End": Investigating a New Arena of University Design Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormald, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes pedagogic research to instigate, support and understand a significant change in the education of undergraduate industrial design students. Design educators at Loughborough University, UK, have proposed that it will be critical for future industrial designers to learn new knowledge and abilities which will enable them to…

  7. Joined up Thinking? A Review of the Impact of a Higher Education and Industry Partnership on Undergraduate Product Design Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurn, Karl M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide educators and potential industrial partners with an insight into students' perceptions of working with industry during their undergraduate studies, and to highlight, through comments from academic staff, the effect on their design outcomes. The paper focuses on a collaborative design activity conducted with…

  8. The Visual Aspects of Outreach and Marketing to Art + Design Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    At the Verman Kimbrough Memorial Library at Ringling College of Art + Design, librarians are constantly striving to communicate the library's role as the center of research on campus as well as ensuring they are staying current with users' needs. While the visual components of library marketing and outreach used at the institution are paramount…

  9. Differences in Meta-Aesthetic Consciousness in Students Taking Fine Arts, Design and Academy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataroglu, Eylem

    2016-01-01

    Meta-aesthetics is the aesthetic field relating to the images of products where the conversion value, separate from the product's function, takes part directly in its value. Meta-aesthetics is among the subjects that today's art and design world must address more sensitively. This study was based on a 2009 dissertation measuring university…

  10. Selling Students on the Character of Liberal Arts: A Benefit of Worldview Awareness in Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Ted

    2012-01-01

    Emile Durkheim, the sociologist and education professor, said that the personality developed by a form of literary study was contrary to genuinely Christian character. Provoked by this insight, the author explores whether a Christian university's reliance on classical liberal arts education might be working against its desires for the character of…

  11. A Brief Evaluation to Identify Level of Satisfaction of Art Therapy with Undergraduate Ukrainian Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lith, Theresa; Bullock, Lindsay; Horbal, Iryna; Lvov, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    A particular political and social mindset toward mental health support has impacted how and why people seek counseling and therapy in Ukraine. Although a relatively small and developing field, art therapy is beginning to provide a means for assisting cultural and identity development for young adult Ukrainians during a time of civil and political…

  12. Empowering Students through Creativity: Art Therapy in Miami-Dade County Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isis, Patricia D.; Bush, Janet; Siegel, Craig A.; Ventura, Yehoshua

    2010-01-01

    Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS) has been at the forefront of integrating art therapy in schools since 1979, helping children with emotional/behavioral disabilities become more receptive to academic involvement while maximizing their social and emotional potential. This article describes the history, development, current configuration,…

  13. Selling Students on the Character of Liberal Arts: A Benefit of Worldview Awareness in Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Ted

    2012-01-01

    Emile Durkheim, the sociologist and education professor, said that the personality developed by a form of literary study was contrary to genuinely Christian character. Provoked by this insight, the author explores whether a Christian university's reliance on classical liberal arts education might be working against its desires for the character of…

  14. Student Behavior in Art Classrooms: The Dynamics of Discipline. Teacher Resource Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Frank D.

    This handbook serves as a practical guide and reference manual for teachers on maintaining classroom discipline. Divided into three parts, part 1: "Understanding Discipline in Art Classrooms", the nature and complexity of discipline problems is examined. In part 2: "Preventing Discipline Problems," suggestions are given for management practices…

  15. Playing Games in Logic and Reasoning in Liberal Arts Mathematics and Getting Students' Work Published

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Laura A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes two classroom activities and a project that supplement a Liberal Arts Mathematics course's coverage of logic and reasoning. The first classroom activity introduces the writing of inductive and deductive arguments, and the second activity involves analyzing a guest speaker's arguments. The project consists of using logic and…

  16. Artful creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darsø, Lotte

    2013-01-01

    An introduction to the field of Arts-in-Business outlining 4 different approaches: 1) Art as decoration, 2) Art as intertainment, 3) Arts as instrumental, 4) Art as strategic......An introduction to the field of Arts-in-Business outlining 4 different approaches: 1) Art as decoration, 2) Art as intertainment, 3) Arts as instrumental, 4) Art as strategic...

  17. Putting Pow into Art Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Jay; Packer, Todd

    2004-01-01

    How would you like to put some "Pow!" into your art instruction? A lesson in comic books--history, design, story, and production--can make your classes come alive. The authors present a new approach to using comics to build artistic skills and involve students in art appreciation. Why Comics? Many art teachers have students who say, "I hate art!"…

  18. The art of strain improvement of industrial lactic acid bacteria without the use of recombinant DNA technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkx, Patrick M F; Janzen, Thomas; Sørensen, Kim I; Christensen, Jeffrey E; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Johansen, Eric

    2014-08-29

    The food industry is constantly striving to develop new products to fulfil the ever changing demands of consumers and the strict requirements of regulatory agencies. For foods based on microbial fermentation, this pushes the boundaries of microbial performance and requires the constant development of new starter cultures with novel properties. Since the use of ingredients in the food industry is tightly regulated and under close scrutiny by consumers, the use of recombinant DNA technology to improve microbial performance is currently not an option. As a result, the focus for improving strains for microbial fermentation is on classical strain improvement methods. Here we review the use of these techniques to improve the functionality of lactic acid bacteria starter cultures for application in industrial-scale food production. Methods will be described for improving the bacteriophage resistance of specific strains, improving their texture forming ability, increasing their tolerance to stress and modulating both the amount and identity of acids produced during fermentation. In addition, approaches to eliminating undesirable properties will be described. Techniques include random mutagenesis, directed evolution and dominant selection schemes.

  19. Student Teachers of Technology and Design: Can Short Periods of STEM-Related Industrial Placement Change Student Perceptions of Engineering and Technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Ken S.

    2012-01-01

    This is a report, on a small-scale case study, of a programme of short industrial placements (5 day block) for student teachers of technology and design in Northern Ireland. Such placements increase student awareness and understanding of the nature of Engineering and Technology and therefore better prepare them to teach these subjects, as integral…

  20. A Comparative Analysis of Preferred Learning and Teaching Styles for Engineering, Industrial, and Technology Education Students and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros; Fantz, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    In the spring semester of 2010, a materials process course was selected as a means to perform a preferred learning style research study. This course was selected because it contained three groups of students: technology education, engineering technology, and industrial technology. The researchers believed that the differences in the students'…

  1. How Student Written Communication Skills Benefit during Participation in an Industry-Sponsored Civil Engineering Capstone Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Ryan; Cross, Brad; Zhou, Jianpeng; Verbais, Chad

    2017-01-01

    Because many engineering programs use capstone design courses and value strong communication abilities, authors sought to identify how student written communication skills changed because of industry-sponsored capstone design projects. A student exit survey was collected at the end of the capstone design course during faculty-led projects and…

  2. Are Dual Enrollment Students College Ready? Evidence from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Brian P.; Taylor, Jason L.

    2015-01-01

    We examine whether dual enrolled students display greater levels of college readiness than nonparticipants. Advocates assert that dual enrollment improves students' college readiness, but despite these assertions, few researchers have evaluated this relationship. Moreover, researchers that do consider whether dual enrollment improves college…

  3. Practicum Learnings for Counseling and Art Therapy Students: The Shared and the Particular

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lith, Theresa; Voronin, Lorelei

    2016-01-01

    Practicum experience in counseling and therapy training can be an anxiety-inducing time as students begin to apply their acquired theoretical knowledge. On-site supervisors closely monitor students' development by making use of example-based involvements to provide valuable insights and learning opportunities. This paper examines the findings from…

  4. Exploring God: Using the Arts as a Way to Engage Secondary Students in Discussions about God

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reingold, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The article presents research from a practitioner research study conducted in a non-denominational Jewish secondary school. As part of the study, students created artistic works based on chapter 12 of the biblical book of Numbers. Four of the twelve student groups created works that directly engaged with their conceptions of God as represented in…

  5. Practicum Learnings for Counseling and Art Therapy Students: The Shared and the Particular

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lith, Theresa; Voronin, Lorelei

    2016-01-01

    Practicum experience in counseling and therapy training can be an anxiety-inducing time as students begin to apply their acquired theoretical knowledge. On-site supervisors closely monitor students' development by making use of example-based involvements to provide valuable insights and learning opportunities. This paper examines the findings from…

  6. Using a Behavior Modeling Approach to Teach Students the Art of Providing and Receiving Verbal Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritz, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    Using a behavior modeling approach, this study examined how students' perceived self-efficacy improved as they developed, delivered, and evaluated professional presentations. Using journal entries and a self-efficacy assessment, students' perceived self-efficacy increased as they learned to provide and receive verbal peer feedback, and to stage…

  7. Using a Behavior Modeling Approach to Teach Students the Art of Providing and Receiving Verbal Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritz, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    Using a behavior modeling approach, this study examined how students' perceived self-efficacy improved as they developed, delivered, and evaluated professional presentations. Using journal entries and a self-efficacy assessment, students' perceived self-efficacy increased as they learned to provide and receive verbal peer feedback, and to stage…

  8. "Bridging" Engineering & Art: An Outreach Approach for Middle and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiabanpour, Bahram; DesChamps-Benke, Nicole; Wilson, Thomas; Loerwald, Matthew; Gourgey, Hannah

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a novel outreach approach to high school and middle school students to familiarize them with engineering functions and methods. In this approach students participated in a seven-day summer research camp and learned many engineering skills and tools such as CAD solid modeling, finite element analysis, rapid prototyping,…

  9. Using Art Media during Prewriting: Helping Students with Dysgraphia Manage Idea Generation before Encoding Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Many students struggle with writing skills. This study focuses on three students (second and fourth grades) who were classified with a learning disability by their school. These children had writing goals and objectives (i.e., characteristics of having dysgraphia) included in their Individual Education Plan. In a single case design format, each…

  10. Study of Spiritual Intelligence and Adjustment Among Arts and Science College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, R Kalpana; Rajesh, Nakulan V; Devi, M Anisha

    2017-06-01

    A study to evaluate the relationship between the spiritual intelligence and adjustment among the college students was conducted on a sample of 250 students in six various colleges of Tuticorin district, Tamil Nadu, India. Gender, religion, community, major subject, educational qualification of father and mother, student locality, college type, father and mother's occupation and monthly family income (n = 11 variables) were chosen for the study. Test of significance for spiritual intelligence and adjustment was studied and found them nonsignificant except student locality, found to be significant. Two valid and reliable instruments were used to assess student's spiritual intelligence and adjustment. Correlation and Chi-square analysis using structural equation model were used to analyze these data. Correlation analysis showed significant relationship between the variables among the college students (n = 250). Chi-square analysis of association between adjustments of college students showed that most variables are nonsignificant unlike father's educational qualification and mother's occupation. The results disclosed the significant positive relationship with spiritual intelligence and adjustment among adolescents.

  11. Teaching communications skills to medical students: Introducing the fine art of medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Anjali; Gupta, Vineeta

    2015-08-01

    Like many other people based professions, communications skills are essential to medical practice also. Traditional medical teaching in India does not address communication skills which are most essential in dealing with patients. Communication skills can be taught to medical students to increase clinical competence. To teach basic communication and counseling skills to fourth-year undergraduate students to increase their clinical competence. A total of 48, fourth-year MBBS students participated in the study. They were given training in basic communication and counseling skills and taught the patient interview technique according to Calgary-Cambridge guide format. Improvement in communication was assessed by change in pre- and post-training multiple choice questions, clinical patient examination, and Standardized Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (SPSQ) scores. About 88% of the students in the sample were convinced of the importance of learning communication skills for effective practice. Almost 90% students were communicating better after training, as tested by improved SPSQ. As judged by Communication Skill Attitude Scale, student's positive attitude toward learning communication skill indicated that there is a necessity of communication skill training during undergraduate years. The ability to communicate effectively is a core competency for medical practitioners. Inculcating habits of good communications skill during formative years will help the medical students and future practitioners. Regular courses on effective communication should be included in the medical school curriculum.

  12. Personal growth initiative among Industrial Psychology students in a higher education institution in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelique de Jager-van Straaten

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Personal growth initiative (PGI is an important characteristic of workplace counsellors. Industrial and organisational (I-O psychologists often assist employees with counselling for work-related and personal problems, and therefore PGI is an important research topic for this profession.Research purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure the PGI of I-O psychology students in a higher education institution in South Africa, as well as to explore differences in PGI between demographic groups.Motivation: According to the scope of practice for psychologists, growth and development of employees form part of an I-O psychologist’s responsibilities. PGI is an important characteristic of I-O psychologists as it enables them to efficiently assist employees in growth and development processes.Research design, approach and method: A cross-sectional survey design was used. A purposive non-probability sample (N = 568 of I-O psychology students was taken from a higher education institution in South Africa. A biographical questionnaire and the personal growth initiative scale (PGIS were used as measuring instruments.Main findings: The results indicated that (1 the PGIS is a valid and reliable measure of PGI, (2 PGI is prevalent amongst I-O psychology students and (3 PGI differs between certain demographic groups.Practical implications: The findings of this study will assist in the future development of a training programme for I-O psychology students to equip them with the counselling skills they need to function in a counselling role.Contribution: This study contributes to knowledge regarding the importance of PGI for I-O psychology students. The study will also assist higher education institutes to adapt their training programmes in order to prepare I-O psychology students for their role as counsellors. More knowledge will also be provided with regard to the functioning of the PGIS.

  13. The psychological well-being manifesting among master’s students in Industrial and Organisational Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Cilliers

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Psychological well-being among master’s students is seen as a contributing factor towards having a meaningful, enjoyable and productive experience as a student.Research purpose: The purpose of this study was to provide a qualitative description of the psychological well-being experiences of first-year students in a part-time coursework master’s degree in Industrial and Organisational Psychology (IOP in order to foster an empathetic understanding of their experiences.Motivation for the study: The understanding of their master’s students’ psychological wellbeing experiences will assist university IOP departments in facilitating the appropriate psychological containment to students and the optimisation of their resilience towards meaningfully completing their first year and perhaps also their master’s degree.Research design, approach and method: Qualitative research was conducted within a hermeneutic interpretive stance. Data were gathered from a focus group with 10 conveniently chosen participants. Thematic content analysis provided eight themes, which were interpreted and linked to the literature on psychological well-being.Main findings: Student distress caused by job demands leads to languishing and feeling overwhelmed. In contrast, student eustress resulting from job resources leads to flourishing, consisting of self-efficacy, locus of control and optimism.Practical implications: University IOP departments can use the information towards understanding their master’s students’ psychological well-being experiences, which could assist in the students’ successful and timeous completion of their studies.Contribution: The study contributes to the literature on master’s students’ real negative and positive experiences and psychological well-being, which university departments often deny or dismiss as idiosyncratic.Keywords: positive organisational behaviour; job demands; job resources; multiple roles; support system

  14. 高校艺术生心理健康初探%A Preliminary Approach to College Art Students' Psy-chological Health

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白丽

    2013-01-01

    高校艺术生作为大学中的特殊群体,他们的心理健康越来越成为不可忽视的教育问题。本文针对高校艺术生心理健康的特点,研究了艺术生产生不健康心理的原因并提出了解决不健康心理问题的对策。%As a special group of college, psychological health of art students has become a problem of education can not be ig-nored. Aiming at the characteristics of psychological health of the college art students, this paper studied the reason in unhealthy psychology of art students,and the countermeasure of solving the problem is put forward.

  15. Exploration and practice of college physics experiment teaching for students of liberal arts%文科物理实验教学实践探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章羽; 钱锋; 戴玉蓉

    2012-01-01

    In 1996, the physics experiment course for students of liberal arts was opened in Southeast University, which is the rare one in colleges and universities opening college physics experiment for students of liberal arts. The college physics experiment for students of liberal arts teaching system has taken shape after many years of teaching practice. This paper introduces content of courses, teaching modes and the experiment examination.%东南大学是国内少数较早对文科各专业开设大学物理实验课程的学校之一,经过多年的教学实践改革,东南大学的文科物理实验教学体系已初步形成.该文从教学内容、教学模式及实验考核等方面进行了介绍和总结.

  16. Arts Opportunity Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principal, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The increasing focus on arts education during the past few years has brought much-needed attention to the benefits it affords to students of all ages. Past research has proved time and again that the arts support teaching and learning in numerous ways, and recommendations abound that schools should find ways to integrate the arts in classrooms.…

  17. Catalyst--The Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Edmund Burke

    1978-01-01

    Throughout European history, artists have celebrated the values of their patrons. Today, the schools are the largest employer of artists. To justify art education according to current Back-to-Basics values, art teachers should explain visual art as a language, which they can teach students to read and use. (SJL)

  18. Building the Interest of High School Students for Science--A PACT Ambassador Program to Investigate Soap Manufacturing and Industrial Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Matthew; Geary, Nicholas; Hagaman, Karen; Munson, Anne; Sabo, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Describes a program for bringing industrial applications of technology into high schools to enhance students' perceptions of the chemical industry and industrial careers in chemistry. Ambassadors from the Proctor and Gamble Company and Miami University--Middletown helped students work through a typical product-development cycle for fabricating…

  19. Locus of control and styles of coping with stress in students educated at Polish music and visual art schools – a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogaj Anna Antonina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on identifying differences in the locus of control and styles of coping with stress among young students who are artistically gifted within the fields of music and visual arts. The research group includes Polish students (n = 354 of both music and visual art schools who develop their artistic talents in schools placing particular emphasis on professional training of their artistic abilities and competences within the field of music or visual arts respectively. We make an assumption that different types of difficult situations experienced by youth educated at music and visual art schools may generate differences in dominating personal traits as well as in their sphere of emotions. The results of crosssectional research in 2013 confirm the assumption regarding differences among music and visual art school students both with regard to the source of the locus of control, understood as the personality variable, and dominating styles of coping with stress. Moreover, a positive correlation between the tendency towards internal locus of control and a task-oriented style of coping with stress in difficult situations has been observed in music school students.

  20. Biocorrosion and biofouling of metals and alloys of industrial usage. present state of the art at the beginning of the new millennium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Videla, H. A.

    2003-07-01

    An overview on the present state of the art on Biocorrosion and Biofouling of metals and alloys of industrial usage is offered on the basis of the experience gathered in our laboratory over 25 years of research. The key concepts to understand the main effects of microorganisms on metal decay are briefly discussed. new trends in monitoring and control strategies to mitigate biocorrosion and biofouling deleterious effects are also described. Several relevant cases of biocorrosion studied by our research group are successively described: i) biocorrosion of aluminum and its alloys by fungal contaminants of jet fuels; ii) Sulfate-reducing bacteria SRB induced corrosion of steel; iii) biocorrosion and biofouling interactions in the marine environment: iv) monitoring strategies for assessing biocorrosion in industrial water systems; v) microbial inhibition of corrosion; vi) use and limitations of electrochemical techniques for evaluating biocorrosion effects. The future perspective of the field is made considering the potential of innovative techniques in microscopy (environmental scanning electron microscopy, confocal scanning laser microscopy, atomic force microscopy), new spectroscopy techniques used for the study of corrosion products and biofilms (energy dispersion X-ray analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron microprobe analysis) and electrochemistry (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, electrochemical noise analysis. (Author) 53 refs.

  1. Walking, Talking Art Gallery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Sheila

    2002-01-01

    Discusses a project that aimed at educating the public about art by bringing art to the people. Explains that students selected their favorite artwork and made a t-shirt displaying their artwork. States that the students went into their community and also created a mural. (CMK)

  2. The Talking Art Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, Jacqui

    2009-01-01

    Every year, fourth graders at Sterling Morton Elementary School in Ohio present a talking art museum for the school and community. In this article, the author describes a lesson on art history which culminates in an activity showcasing all the students' finished paintings in gold frames. A student stands behind the painting and pokes his or her…

  3. Bringing Art to Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Eric

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the Art and Architecture program that involves K-12 students in the creation of public art. The program provides students with a sense of ownership through design and construction assignments created as part of an integrated curriculum, including mock bids and interpreting a floor plan into an elevation. Tips on how architects can start…

  4. Coherence in the Argumentative Essays of First Year College of Liberal Arts Students at De La Salle University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alphie G. Garing

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates five textual features of coherence in the students’ argumentative essays for text comprehensibility and overall writing quality. Specifically, it examines how comprehensible the students’ argumentative essays considering the following: focus, organization, cohesion, support and elaboration, and conventions; and the relationship between the textual features and the comprehensibility of the students’ argumentative essays. The data consists of 13 argumentative essays written in ENGLCOM class first year College of Liberal Arts students of De La Salle University. Two techniques were used to analyze the data. First, an analytic and holistic scorings using a four-point writing rubric were used to evaluate each of the textual features of coherence and comprehensibility, respectively. Second, correlation analysis was performed to determine the relationship between the coherence features and the comprehensibility of the students’ texts and between the comprehensibility of the students’ argumentative essays.

  5. Clinical Pharmacology Research Internships at the Interface between Academia and Industry: Students' Perceptions and Scientific Output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulooze, Sebastiaan C; Franson, Kari L; Cohen, Adam F; Rissmann, Robert

    2017-01-08

    The Centre for Human Drug Research (CHDR) is a non-profit clinical research institute at the interface between academia and the pharmaceutical industry. CHDR hosts a research internship programme for undergraduate (bio)medical students. The aim of this study was (i) to investigate the student perceptions of the undergraduate research internship and (ii) to quantify the scientific output related to these internships. We surveyed former interns at the CHDR from the year 2007 to 2014 and quantified their scientific output with a PubMed search. There was a response rate to the survey of 61%, with a good overall rating of the internships. Many students considered their internship at CHDR to be (much) more broad (55%) and with a (much) stricter planning (48%), compared to previous internships at academic research groups. In turn, there were many aspects reported to be similar to academic research internships such as focus on research methodology and 'outcome-drivenness'. Twenty-four per cent of the internships resulted in a co-authorship on papers published in peer-reviewed journals with an average impact factor of 3.3. In conclusion, with appropriate management and supervision, effective research electives are possible in the more commercial environment of a clinical research organization.

  6. English Language Arts Scores among Sixth Grade Students Enrolled on an Elementary versus Middle School Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, La-Trice

    2013-01-01

    A K-12 school district located in southern California was faced with overcrowding at 1of its middle schools for the 2011-2012 school year. This project study was designed to explore if an elementary or middle school campus was best in supporting students' academics while they were in transition to 6th grade middle school. Maslow's hierarchy of…

  7. Assessing Diversity Awareness in University Business Students at a Hispanic Serving Liberal Arts Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, Angelina I. T.; Scobey, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Globalization and shifts in demographics are creating highly diverse workplaces, and managers must understand the importance of managing a diverse workforce. Students taking business management courses at a 4-year private Hispanic serving institution were asked to voluntarily participate in a study in which the researchers sought to explore the…

  8. Teaching the Art of Negotiation: Improving Students' Negotiating Confidence and Perceptions of Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kimberly A.; Mesmer-Magnus, Jessica; Burns, Tina M.

    2008-01-01

    Negotiation classes are one way in which many of today's managers try to develop negotiation skills. Despite the popularity of such courses, relatively little research has assessed their effectiveness in improving trainee self-confidence and posttraining transfer. The results of 2 data collection efforts indicate that students in a typical…

  9. The Art of Negotiation: What the Twenty-First Century Business Student Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClendon, Bill; Burke, Debra D.; Willey, Lorrie

    2010-01-01

    Negotiation skills are vital for concluding international treaties on subjects ranging from arms agreements, and rights in outer space to trade agreements. Yet the importance of being able to negotiate effectively is not limited to international treaties or crises situations. Using negotiation exercises represents a student-centered approach to…

  10. Typing Contrasted with Handwriting in Language Arts Instruction for Moderately Mentally Retarded Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Mary Lynne

    1985-01-01

    Seven junior high age TMR students were instructed to recognize sight vocabulary words using handwriting or typing activities. Typing speed increased at an accelerated rate and accuracy in copying words by typing was consistently superior to copying by handwriting: typing activities were as effective as handwriting activities in promoting sight…

  11. Information-Seeking Behaviour on Internet: A Comparison between Arts and Science Undergraduate Students in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidian, Faranak; Seifi Maleki, A.M. Masoomeh

    2013-01-01

    The Internet has increasingly influenced the information-seeking behavior of students in higher education over the past few decades. The mass availability of information on the web has seen significant changes in the electronic information needs, information retrieval, and communication patterns (information seeking behavior) of university…

  12. You Better Recognize!: The Arts as Social Justice for African American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Mary Stone

    2011-01-01

    Social justice is a complex theory and practice that includes the equitable redistribution of resources and the recognition of culture. This is a report about the Tubman Theater Project, a culturally relevant drama program in which African American middle and high school students confronted racism and classism, as well as their unexamined…

  13. The Art of Negotiation: What the Twenty-First Century Business Student Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClendon, Bill; Burke, Debra D.; Willey, Lorrie

    2010-01-01

    Negotiation skills are vital for concluding international treaties on subjects ranging from arms agreements, and rights in outer space to trade agreements. Yet the importance of being able to negotiate effectively is not limited to international treaties or crises situations. Using negotiation exercises represents a student-centered approach to…

  14. Understanding How Participation in an After School Arts Program Affects Students in Their General Education Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacherieu, Dustin R.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this study was to answer the question: "When ethnically diverse fourth- and fifth-grade students participate in a ten-week musical program, are there any shifts in the following: academic performance, attitude towards school, social skills, self-esteem, public speaking ability, and/or school attendance?" This study was…

  15. Understanding "The Other" through Art: Fostering Narrative Imagination in Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Hee; Wiehe-Beck, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Teachers in many countries live the language of standards although it is confined to uniformity and standardization. In the United States, for example, teachers teach to what is now called the Common Core State Standards that focus on students' college and career readiness while falling short of developing good judgment and wisdom. In this…

  16. Teaching the Art of Negotiation: Improving Students' Negotiating Confidence and Perceptions of Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kimberly A.; Mesmer-Magnus, Jessica; Burns, Tina M.

    2008-01-01

    Negotiation classes are one way in which many of today's managers try to develop negotiation skills. Despite the popularity of such courses, relatively little research has assessed their effectiveness in improving trainee self-confidence and posttraining transfer. The results of 2 data collection efforts indicate that students in a typical…

  17. Inspired Spirals. Teaching Art with Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Guy

    2001-01-01

    Discusses spirals in nature, man-made objects, and art. Focuses on art that incorporates the spiral, including works by M. C. Escher and Frank Lloyd Wright, an African headdress, and a burial urn. Describes activities to help students make spirals of their own, such as constructing a coil clay pot. (CMK)

  18. PhD Students' Work Conditions and Study Environment in University- and Industry-Based PhD Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmos, A.; Kofoed, L. B.; Du, X. Y.

    2008-01-01

    During the last 10 years, new models of funding and training PhD students have been established in Denmark in order to integrate industry into the entire PhD education. Several programmes have been conducted where it is possible to co-finance PhD scholarships or to become an employee as an industrial PhD in a company. An important question is what…

  19. Learning in the context of community: The academic experiences of first-year arts and science students in a learning community program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Nancy

    2000-10-01

    This study explored the academic experiences of two groups of first-year students in university, one in the arts and one in the science, who participated in a residential-based learning community program. Using qualitative and critical analysis of in-depth student interviews conducted over a fall and winter semester, I constructed their world as implied from their stories and narratives. From this vantage point, I investigated how students as novice learners negotiated their role as learners; the belief systems they brought with them to minimize academic risk; their coping strategies in a 12 week semestered system; and the tacit theories they acquired within their day-to-day educational experiences. A number of themes emerged from the research: students intentionally minimizing faculty contact until they developed 'worthiness'; learning as 'teacher pleasing'; disciplinary learning differences between the arts and sciences students; and a grade orientation that influenced what and how students learned. Within the broader political, ideological, and cultural framework of the university, I identified student patterns of accommodation, resistance, silence and submission in negotiating their roles as learners. By critiquing the academic side of university life as students experienced it and lived it as a community of learners, I exposed the tensions, contradictions, and paradoxes that emerged. I revealed the points of disjuncture that came from competing discourses within the university for these students: the discourse of community, the discourse of collective harmony, and the discourse of the market place.

  20. Reading Habit of Students in Social Sciences and Arts: A Case Study of Rajshahi University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. M. Eamin Ali Akanda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reading is considered essential for the overall development of a human being. However, with the advent of modern digital technologies, especially the growing popularity of social networking on the web, mobile phones, televisions, and other means of entertainment, the reading habit of the general public, especially the younger generation, is undergoing a decline. This paper tries to assess the reading habit of the students of a leading public university in Bangladesh and identify the trends in their reading habit. Reading and other activities of the respondents have been analyzed to find out how reading habit is affected by various other elements. Based on the findings of a questionnaire-based survey, the paper also attempts to put forward recommendations for improving the reading habit of young students in particular and the larger cross-sections of people in general.

  1. INFORMATION-SEEKING BEHAVIOUR ON INTERNET: A comparison between Arts and Science Undergraduate Students in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faranak OMIDIAN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The demand of responsibilities among teachers has evolved not only in classroom management but also to the extent of promoting communication and interpersonal skills. Social media is integrated in schools and higher learning institutions for communication and reflection of learning which enhance teachers’ performance in leadership quality and effective teaching. This study was designed in a qualitative approach mainly to explore the extent of interest and enjoyment students experienced during an intensive ICT course. Blog was used as a medium for reflection during the class where students posted their creations of videos, posters and other ICT materials. The three needs investigated were namely autonomy, competence, and relatedness support. The researcher further examined on students’ awareness of the usefulness of the ICT skill they learned and how much they can use the blog for teaching and learning. Based on the Basic Psychological Needs Theory framework (BPNT, this study has adopted the direct observation, journal entry, and interviews as a triangulation approach.

  2. An Arts-Based Instructional Model for Student Creativity in Engineering Design

    OpenAIRE

    Brian Laduca; Adrienne Ausdenmoore; Jen Katz-Buonincontro; Kevin Patrick Hallinan; Karlos Marshall

    2017-01-01

    Over the past twenty years, nearly all job growth in the United States has emerged from new companies and organizations with assumedly innovative products, services, and practices. Yet, the nurturing of student creative thinking and problem solving is infrequent in engineering education. Inherent to developing these creativity skills and attributes is the need to be exposed to difference — in people and environment. Engineering education rarely offers such opportunities. Additionally, enginee...

  3. Reading Habit of Students in Social Sciences and Arts: A Case Study of Rajshahi University

    OpenAIRE

    A. K. M. Eamin Ali Akanda; Kazi Mostak Gausul Hoq; Nazmul Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Reading is considered essential for the overall development of a human being. However, with the advent of modern digital technologies, especially the growing popularity of social networking on the web, mobile phones, televisions, and other means of entertainment, the reading habit of the general public, especially the younger generation, is undergoing a decline. This paper tries to assess the reading habit of the students of a leading public university in Bangladesh and identify the trends in...

  4. Urban Field Experiences for Undergraduate Liberal Arts Students: Using Compromised Environments as Living Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAvoy, S. E.; Knee, K.

    2015-12-01

    While urban environments may lack the beauty of relatively pristine field sites, they can be used to deliver an effective demonstration of actual environmental damage. Students demanding applied field experiences from their undergraduate environmental science programs can be well served in urban settings. Here, we present strategies for integrating degraded urban systems into the undergraduate field experience. Urban locations provide an opportunity for a different type of local "field-work" than would otherwise be available. In the upper-level undergraduate Environmental Methods class, we relied on a National Park area located a 10-minute walk from campus for most field exercises. Activities included soil analysis, measuring stream flow and water quality parameters, dendrochronology, and aquatic microbe metabolism. In the non-majors class, we make use of our urban location to contrast water quality in parks and highly channelized urban streams. Students spend labs immersed in streams and wetlands heavily impacted by the urban runoff their city generates. Here we share lesson plans and budgets for field activities that can be completed during a class period of 2.5 hours with a $75 course fee, show how these activities help students gain quantitative competency.

  5. Exploring perinatal death with midwifery students' using a collaborative art project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Maebh; Quinn, Cathy; Bradshaw, Carmel; Noonan, Maria; Brett, Marie; Atkinson, Sandra; New, Christina

    2017-01-01

    To explore the influence of the Amulet artwork and exhibition on midwifery students' perceptions of caring for parents experiencing perinatal death. A descriptive qualitative design involving face-to-face semi-structured interviews following institutional ethical approval. A regional Maternity Hospital in Ireland which hosted the National Artwork and Exhibition exploring the hidden world of infant death. A purposive sample of six consenting post registration midwifery students who had attended the Amulet artwork and exhibition. Four core themes emerged and these were i) entering the mother's world and hearing her pain; ii) the journey of grief and connecting with the bereaved parent's unique experience; iii) facing the challenge of providing effective perinatal bereavement care; and iv) maintaining a journey of compassionate practice. Exposure to, and reflection on the Amulet artwork and exhibition increased students' awareness and insight into the non-linear nature of the grieving process, and to the importance of maintaining a journey of compassionate care for parents experiencing perinatal death. The findings suggest that the use of creative women-centered strategies promote affective learning in relation to perinatal death and so may be of use to educators and maternity care providers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The good field trip: How elementary students from diverse socio-economic backgrounds learn science, art, and technology at a museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martell, Sandra Toro

    The Good Field Trip is a study that uses an ethnographic approach to answer the question of what learning looks like during a field trip to a museum. The study uses the Contextual Model of Learning (Falk & Dierking, 2000) to investigate elementary students' personal, physical, and sociocultural contexts of learning as well as how time affects students' thoughts and feelings about the experience. The author accompanied a group of eight students on a three and a half day camp-like experience to a museum that promotes environmental stewardship and the integration of art, science, and technology use and learning. The author videotaped the students' conversations and experiences and interviewed students before, during, and after the trip. Analyses of the videotapes were supplemented with student documents, including comic books, journal notes, and reflective essays about the trip. Findings include that not all experiences are marked as science, art, and technology; technology use does not occur; art is presented in a more formalized manner than science, which is composed of observation and the acquisition of knowledge about plants and animals; and conversations and activities resemble traditional modes of learning in school settings.

  7. PLAYING RELATED HEALTH RISK´S AMONG STUDENTS AND TEACHERS OF MUSIC DEPARTMENT AT THE KOPER ART SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Plevnik

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The study of a musical instrument demands several hours of practicing on a daily basis as well as playing and performing. Consequently, the musician can be subjected to various health risks during his or her study process but also afterwards. Health problems depend on the individual physical and mental fitness, but also on the features and structure of the instrument as well as on the playing technique, which consists of repeated movements and mainly of static body position. Because of the possibility of chronic injuries, especially neuromuscular disorders but also others, it is important for the musician to regularly maintain his or her physical and mental fitness and movement performance by preventive and compensating activities and immediate action in case of pain or when noticing the first signs of medical problems or limitations. The study included 43 students (16.7 ± 1.5 year, 31 females and 12 males and 15 teachers (36.9 ± 8.8 years, 7 females and 8 males that attend and teach at the Music Department of The Koper Art School, which is a part of The Koper High School. The aim of the study was to recognize the risk factors in health status that occur as a consequence of playing a music instrument. A questionnaire consisting of 26 questions was used in the research. The results of the study showed that a half of the interviewed students practices every day but teachers practice less (p = 0.04. Therefore, teachers value the importance of physical (p = 0.013 and mental (p = 0.000 fitness more than students. Teachers also estimate their current physical and mental fitness to be higher (p = 0.003. 89.7 % of the respondents feel pain of discomfort during or after playing, out of these 95.3 % are students, and 73.3 % are teachers. These musicians state that they most frequently feel pain in the back and neck area and in the shoulders and wrists. 36.2 % of the musicians, 41.9 % of students and 20 % of teachers, affirmed to have had strains or pain

  8. The analysis of the characteristics and the management measures of art students%艺术类学生的特点及管理措施分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    匡婉嘉

    2014-01-01

    Along with the education reform pace gradually accelerate, art major has played a very important role in colleges and universities, as art students, their test are different with other students, naturally become a special group of people in the eyes. Because of the edification and infection of art, they have the different characteristics with other students. In this paper, the characteristics of art students to carry on the analysis, to explore the management measures.%随着教育改革的脚步逐渐加快,艺术类专业已经在各高校中占有十分重要的地位,作为艺术类的学生,他们的考试要求与其他学生不同,自然也就成为人们眼中的特殊群体。由于艺术的熏陶和感染,他们也具有与其他学生不同的特点。本文就艺术类学生的特点进行分析,探究其管理措施。

  9. Equipping Liberal Arts Students with Skills in Data Analytics: Drake University Partners with Regional Businesses to Offer New Programs in a Rapidly Growing Field. A BHEF Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Business-Higher Education Forum, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This case study examines how Business-Higher Education Forum (BHEF) member Drake University, a private university with a strong liberal arts tradition, is equipping its students to become data-enabled professionals. Through the collaboration of its business and higher education members, BHEF launched the National Higher Education and Workforce…

  10. Pilipino Kindergarten Language Arts--Identity. Teacher's Handbook [and] Teacher's Answer Key [and] Student Workbook=Sining ng Wika Pangkindergarten--Pagkakakilanlan. Hanbuk ng Guro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Los Angeles. National Dissemination and Assessment Center.

    As part of the Asian American Bilingual Center (AABC) Pilipino Language Arts Program, a curriculum suitable for students in kindergarten is presented. The program is geared both to the immigrant Filipino child and to the American-born Filipino child who learned to speak Pilipino at home, and includes kits that emphasize the AABC's major concepts:…

  11. Pilipino Kindergarten Language Arts--Interaction. Teacher's Handbook [and] Teacher's Answer Key [and] Student Workbook=Sining ng Wika Pangkindergarten--Pakikisalamuha. Hanbuk ng Guro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Los Angeles. National Dissemination and Assessment Center.

    As part of the Asian American Bilingual Center (AABC) Pilipino Language Arts Program, a curriculum suitable for students in kindergarten is presented. The program is geared both to the immigrant Filipino child and to the American-born Filipino child who learned to speak Pilipino at home, and includes kits that emphasize the AABC's major concepts:…

  12. Pilipino Kindergarten Language Arts--Needs. Teacher's Handbook [and] Teacher's Answer Key [and] Student Workbook=Sining ng Wika Pangkindergarten--Mga Pangangailangan. Hanbuk ng Guro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Los Angeles. National Dissemination and Assessment Center.

    As part of the Asian American Bilingual Center (AABC) Pilipino Language Arts Program, a curriculum suitable for students in kindergarten is presented. The program is geared both to the immigrant Filipino child and to the American-born Filipino child who learned to speak Pilipino at home, and includes kits that emphasize the AABC's major concepts:…

  13. Enhancement in evaluating small group work in courses with large number of students. Machine theory at industrial engineering degrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluïsa Jordi Nebot

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This article examines new tutoring evaluation methods to be adopted in the course, Machine Theory, in the Escola Tècnica Superior d’Enginyeria Industrial de Barcelona (ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya. These new methods have been developed in order to facilitate teaching staff work and include students in the evaluation process. Machine Theory is a required course with a large number of students. These students are divided into groups of three, and required to carry out a supervised work constituting 20% of their final mark. These new evaluation methods were proposed in response to the significant increase of students in spring semester of 2010-2011, and were pilot tested during fall semester of academic year 2011-2012, in the previous Industrial Engineering degree program. Pilot test results were highly satisfactory for students and teachers, alike, and met proposed educational objectives. For this reason, the new evaluation methodology was adopted in spring semester of 2011-2012, in the current bachelor’s degree program in Industrial Technology (Grau en Enginyeria en Tecnologies Industrials, GETI, where it has also achieved highly satisfactory results.

  14. ARTS: New Recognition for the Gifted in Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Al

    1981-01-01

    Describes the National Arts and Presidential Scholars Awards programs, ARTS (Arts Recognition and Talent Search), a competition open to high school students who are high achievers in the visual arts, dance, music, theater, and writing. Some award-winning artwork of 1981 illustrates the article. (Author/SJL)

  15. Folk Art in the Urban Artroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, Donalyn

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a rationale for integrating folk art in an urban K-12 art classroom to provide meaningful instruction for all students. The integration of folk art can provide a safe, nurturing environment for all students to learn by acknowledging the value of art in the community. It can prepare students for participation in a democratic…

  16. An Interdisciplinary Approach to Art Appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Sophia S. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Under the challenge of many post-modern theories and critics on art and art history, the boundaries and definition of art has becoming more diverse. Conventional art appreciation no longer covers all the debates and issues arising from the complex meaning of art in the modern world. Art education today must widen students' vision of…

  17. Analysis on Moral of the University Art Students: Case Study of Baoji University of Arts and Sciences%高校美术类大学生思想道德现状分析——以宝鸡文理学院为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑾

    2011-01-01

    With the popularization of higher education, the number of art students is increasing year by year in colleges and universities, the number of art students in Baoji University of Arts and Sciences is also growing. The moral and personal qualities have high demands when the art students undertake majored work in the future. So the article to Baoji University of Arts and Sciences students as objects, and analyzed art students moral status, and analyzed the factors which formed art students moral status, in order to facilitate the cultivation of fine arts students.%随着高等教育进入大众化阶段,普通高校艺术类学生数量逐年增多,宝鸡文理学院的美术类学生数量也在逐年增加.由于美术类大学生将来所从事的工作本身对从业人员的思想道德和人格素养都有很高的要求,因此文章以宝鸡文理学院美术类大学生为对象分析了美术类大学生的道德现状并对形成美术类大学生道德现状的因素做了分析,以利于对美术类大学生的培养.

  18. Day of Arts Philanthropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde Jørgensen, Ida

    For the Day of Arts Philanthropy I will reflect on the instrumentalisation of art support in Denmark based on the findings from my thesis work (Jørgensen, 2016) investigating the underlyinglegitimations and institutional logics of two of the most significant foundations supporting visual art......, in Denmark, the private New Carlsberg Foundation and public Danish Arts Foundation.Drawing inspiration from neo-institutional theory (Friedland & Alford, 1991) and French pragmatic sociology (Boltanski & Thévenot, 2006), the thesis identifies the most central logics of legitimationunderlying art support......; the industrial, market, inspired, family, renown, civic, projective, emotional and temporal. The most prominent and consistently invoked instrumentalisations identified are theprofessional (industrial), artistic (inspired) and civic purposes of art support. The thesis shows that the instrumentalisations invoked...

  19. Curriculums in Industrial Technology. Plastics Technology. Industrial Maintenance. Computer Numerical Control. Teacher's Manuals and Student Learning Guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Paso Community Coll., TX.

    Curriculum guides are provided for plastics technology, industrial maintenance, and computer numerical control. Each curriculum is divided into a number of courses. For each course these instructor materials are presented in the official course outline: course description, course objectives, unit titles, texts and materials, instructor resources,…

  20. The Study of Social Intelligence of Students Majoring in “Industrial and civil construction”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iatsevich Olga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article tackles the question of the interconnection between the components of social intelligence (the N. Hall test and the D. V. Lyusin questionnaire test Emln and self-presentation tactics (the S. Lee, B. Quigley scale. To win on the market of vacancies the graduates have to know how to present themselves and their own projects, and have high social intelligence. The survey of 147 Russian students of Tyumen Industrial university has shown that the subjects with high and low levels of emotional awareness tend to resort to intimidation and managing behavior and emotions as well as such assertive self-presentation tactics as entitlement and blasting. Students with a developed ability to manage their emotions more often than the others declare their virtues and past achievements. Examinees with low and with high ability to control their emotional states can be characterized by negative and critical evaluation of others. The authors emphasize the research prospects of individual human resources where social intelligence as one of the components of the behavioral control is seen as a predictor of various self-presentation tactics, protective and assertive in particular.

  1. Teaching ‘hardcore science’ to arts and design students: Reflections on the development of a basic programming course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidsel Karlsen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on the longitudinal development of a computer-programming course designed to meet the needs of students who enrolled in a specific higher education game development programme during the period of 2006 to 2010. The students came from three different arts and design-related strands of the programme, and had that in common that very few had taken advanced science classes as part of their upper-secondary education. This again meant that they were rather poorly equipped for learning computer programming, which they needed to master in order to tap into the full potential of the interactive and creative processes which their computers allowed for. Consequently, the programming course was designed in a way that allowed the students to practically engage in creating a computer game alongside being taught the actual programming skills, as well as the mathematics and physics needed in order to efficiently utilise those skills. A working hypothesis for the project was that if the responsible teachers were able to run the course in a way that cohered with the principles of problem-based learning, this would create an environment which would enhance the students’ motivation to learn basic programming as well as the operative and innovation skills needed for fulfilling the course requirements. In addition, ideas developed within the field of situated learning constituted theoretical points of departure for developing the course. The article describes the practical and theoretical points of departure for developing the programming course and reflects on the experiences made from running it. Summing up, the authors conclude that the why and how of teaching needs to be in line with students’ worlds in order for educational experiences to be considered as meaningful.

  2. Standards for Art Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Art Education Association, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The National Art Education Association (NAEA) is committed to ensuring student access to a highly qualified, certified visual arts educator in every K-12 public school across the United States, recognizing that effective arts instruction is a core component to a 21st-century education. "Standards for Art Teacher Preparation" represents the…

  3. Activist Art in Social Justice Pedagogy: Engaging Students in Glocal Issues through the Arts. Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education. Volume 403

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyerbach, Barbara, Ed.; Davis, R. Deborah, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Artists have always had a role in imagining a more socially just, inclusive world--many have devoted their lives to realizing this possibility. In a culture ever more embedded in performance and the visual, an examination of the role of the arts in multicultural teaching for social justice is timely. This book examines and critiques approaches to…

  4. 剪毛机支架体渗碳工艺的优化%The Optimum of Carburize Industrial Art on Shearing Machine Frame Foundation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吐尔逊·斯地克; 熊辉林

    2011-01-01

    By the shearing machine frame foundation with its material (number 08 steel), using solid-state carburize method, the carburize industrial art, organization and property have been studied in order to provide reasonable theoretical foundation for increasing resistance to wear of carburize layers. From test the optimal version has been reached in heating temperature of 950℃, insulated time of 4 h, catalyst proportion of 30%.%本文以剪毛机支架体材料08钢为研究对像,采用固体渗碳法,对渗碳的工艺,组织和性能进行研究,为提高渗碳层的耐磨性提供可靠的理论依据.通过试验得出加热温度为950℃,保温时间为6 h,催渗剂比例为30%的最优方案.

  5. Art History in 3-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Students often have a hard time equating time spent on art history as time well spent in the art room. Likewise, art teachers struggle with how to keep interest in their classrooms high when the subject turns to history. Some teachers show endless videos, with the students nodding sleepily along to the narrator. Others try to incorporate small…

  6. Arte Brasileno Erudito y Arte Brasileno Popular. (Brazilian Fine Art and Brazilian Popular Art)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Clarival Do Prado

    1969-01-01

    Class differences in Brazil explain the inequality between the art produced in the high strata of society and that originating in the economically inferior communities. Genuine expression of art degenerates for two reasons: the influence of modern industrial civilization and the tendency to satisfy the taste of the acquisitive group. (Author/MF)

  7. Arte Brasileno Erudito y Arte Brasileno Popular. (Brazilian Fine Art and Brazilian Popular Art)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Clarival Do Prado

    1969-01-01

    Class differences in Brazil explain the inequality between the art produced in the high strata of society and that originating in the economically inferior communities. Genuine expression of art degenerates for two reasons: the influence of modern industrial civilization and the tendency to satisfy the taste of the acquisitive group. (Author/MF)

  8. Beautiful Earth: Inspiring Native American students in Earth Science through Music, Art and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasanto, V.; Rock, J.; Hallowell, R.; Williams, K.; Angell, D.; Beautiful Earth

    2011-12-01

    The Beautiful Earth program, awarded by NASA's Competitive Opportunities in Education and Public Outreach for Earth and Space Science (EPOESS), is a live multi-media performance at partner science centers linked with hands-on workshops featuring Earth scientists and Native American experts. It aims to inspire, engage and educate diverse students in Earth science through an experience of viewing the Earth from space as one interconnected whole, as seen through the eyes of astronauts. The informal education program is an outgrowth of Kenji Williams' BELLA GAIA Living Atlas Experience (www.bellagaia.com) performed across the globe since 2008 and following the successful Earth Day education events in 2009 and 2010 with NASA's DLN (Digital Learning Network) http://tinyurl.com/2ckg2rh. Beautiful Earth takes a new approach to teaching, by combining live music and data visualizations, Earth Science with indigenous perspectives of the Earth, and hands-on interactive workshops. The program will utilize the emotionally inspiring multi-media show as a springboard to inspire participants to learn more about Earth systems and science. Native Earth Ways (NEW) will be the first module in a series of three "Beautiful Earth" experiences, that will launch the national tour at a presentation in October 2011 at the MOST science museum in collaboration with the Onandaga Nation School in Syracuse, New York. The NEW Module will include Native American experts to explain how they study and conserve the Earth in their own unique ways along with hands-on activities to convey the science which was seen in the show. In this first pilot run of the module, 110 K-12 students with faculty and family members of the Onandaga Nations School will take part. The goal of the program is to introduce Native American students to Earth Sciences and STEM careers, and encourage them to study these sciences and become responsible stewards of the Earth. The second workshop presented to participants will be the

  9. Arte precolombino, arte moderno y arte latinoamericano

    OpenAIRE

    Gamboa Hinestrosa, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    ¿Cuál es la vigencia del arte precolombino? ¿Qué ha aportado ala corriente del arte universal? ¿Qué se deben mutuamente arte modernoy arte precolombino? Estos planteamientos nos sirven para establecerla vigencia del arte precolombino en Latinoamérica, buscandoantecedentes desde los tiempos de la Conquista hasta nuestros días.

  10. Arte precolombino, arte moderno y arte latinoamericano

    OpenAIRE

    Gamboa Hinestrosa, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    ¿Cuál es la vigencia del arte precolombino? ¿Qué ha aportado ala corriente del arte universal? ¿Qué se deben mutuamente arte modernoy arte precolombino? Estos planteamientos nos sirven para establecerla vigencia del arte precolombino en Latinoamérica, buscandoantecedentes desde los tiempos de la Conquista hasta nuestros días.

  11. Moving Social Work Education Forward Through the Application of Neuroscientifically Informed Teaching Practice: A Case Study in Student Engagement Through Art and Multimodal Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Axlyn McLeod

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern advances in neuroscience suggest learning occurs through three basic cognition patterns. Higher-level multimodal learning occurs when learning activities contain multiple cognition patterns. This case study details an application of these concepts where fine art, journaling, practicum experiences, and in-class processing were fused to create an active and participatory method of engaging social work students in critical thinking as related to differential impacts of clinical decision-making. The learning activities are described and multimodal learning is explained, along with the findings of a focus group used to assess student feedback. Student experiences and the potential adaptations of this approach are also addressed. The tentative findings of this case study indicate positive learning experiences and suggest a need for further research to explore the opportunities associated with the use of multimodal and art-infused learning techniques in social work courses.

  12. 高校艺术专业学生管理工作浅析%Analysis of students management in Professional College of Art

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    房容

    2013-01-01

    高校艺术专业的学生的教育管理工作与一般专业的学生相比有显著的特殊性,为此在日常的工作中要重视分析艺术专业学生的思想行为特点,并针对这些特点开展有针对性的工作。%The education and management of college students art profession compared with general students have obvious particularity, therefore, should be paid to the analysis of thinking and behavior characteristics of art students in the daily work, and in the light of these features and carry out the work.

  13. Hangzhou Hosts Third National Collegiate Student Art Festival%全国第三届大学生艺术展演活动在杭州开幕

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鞠焕宗

    2012-01-01

    Hangzhou, the capital city of Zhejiang Province, hosted the 3rd National Collegiate Student Art Festival from February 7 through 13,2012. Thirty-one delegations representing provinces, municipalities and autonomous regions across the country spent the 6 days showing 172 programs in vocal art, musical instrument, dance, and theater. Also held during the 6-day gala were such events as an art exhibition and art education forum. This picture shows a performance staged by college students from Hebei Province at the opening ceremony of the art festival. (Text and photograph by Ju Huanzong)%2012年2月7日,以“青春·使命”为主题的全国第三届大学生艺术展演活动在杭州开幕。来自全国各省、市、自治区的31个代表团在6天的时间里参加声乐、器乐、舞蹈和戏剧4个项目共172个节目的现场展演。活动期间还举办了艺术作品展览、高校艺术教育论文报告会等,图为河北省代表团的大学生在开幕式上表演。

  14. What can an image tell? Challenges and benefits of using visual art as a research method to voice lived experiences of students and teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Alerby

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available As humans, we have the ability to use many forms of “language” to express our self and our experiences, where visual art, an image, is one. Accordingly, experiences can be described in many different ways. In this paper we describe the challenges and benefits of using visual art as a research method to voice lived experiences of students and teachers based on life-world phenomenology. We give three examples of the analysis of visual art works, such as photographs, lino prints, and drawings made by students and teachers, as a way to express their lived experiences of different phenomena. The conclusion is that there are limits with using visual art as the sole source of empirical data. We argue that such data has to be accompanied by oral or written comments to enhance credibility and rigor. A life-world phenomenological analysis of visual art and subsequent comments emphasizes openness and humility to participants’ experiences as well as an all-inclusive understanding of a phenomenon.

  15. ON INTEGRATED COURSE “SOCIAL AND SPEECH COMMUNICATIONS” FOR STUDENTS OF ART HIGHER EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Nicolaevna Klemenova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the experience in teaching the course “Social and Speech Communication”. As the result of training the students are to master the arsenal of means for effective communication, the base of which turns out to be linguistic communication and its bearer that is the language personality, get knowledge about complex processes of information exchange, discover the psychological peculiarities of verbal and non-verbal communication, learn how to communicate for solving professional and personal problems.The skill of fluent mastering all kinds of speech activity, the skill of correct and intellectual communication in various spheres and structures, the skill of speech event linguistic analysis including from the point of view of their esthetical value represent the unity of systemic and individual approach in the sphere of humanitarian training for future architects, designers and managers.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-7-43

  16. University/industry cooperative teaching laboratory for undergraduate education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leger, James R.

    2002-05-01

    An undergraduate optics laboratory sponsored by the National Science Foundation of the United States was established to foster a link between local industry and academia. A series of innovative experiments was developed utilizing high-speed data acquisition equipment and signal processing software to demonstrate the fundamentals of diffraction, fiber optics, and physical optics principles. The experiments were performed in two complementary settings. The university experiments concentrated on basic optical principles and experimental techniques. A parallel industrial component was provided by local industry. Students were invited to industrial research laboratories to work on real-life optical problems of current interest. The students were able to see the relevance between fundamental optical principles and real industrial problems, use state-of-the-art equipment, and experience working in an industrial laboratory. Feedback was also solicited from industry management regarding improvements to academic training of students for the work force.

  17. Enhancement in Evaluating Small Group Work in Courses with Large Number of Students. Machine Theory at Industrial Engineering Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordi Nebot, Lluïsa; Pàmies-Vilà, Rosa; Català Calderon, Pau; Puig-Ortiz, Joan

    2013-01-01

    This article examines new tutoring evaluation methods to be adopted in the course, Machine Theory, in the Escola Tècnica Superior d'Enginyeria Industrial de Barcelona (ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya). These new methods have been developed in order to facilitate teaching staff work and include students in the evaluation process.…

  18. Using Novel 2D Image Manipulation Methods to Aid Initial Concept Generation with Postgraduate Industrial Design Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurn, Karl; Storer, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide educators and industrial design professionals with an insight into the development of innovative design ideation images manipulation techniques and, highlight how these techniques could be used to not only improve student ideation skills, but also as design enablers for a broader range of professionals working…

  19. Using Novel 2D Image Manipulation Methods to Aid Initial Concept Generation with Postgraduate Industrial Design Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurn, Karl; Storer, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide educators and industrial design professionals with an insight into the development of innovative design ideation images manipulation techniques and, highlight how these techniques could be used to not only improve student ideation skills, but also as design enablers for a broader range of professionals working…

  20. Developing Research Skills for Undergraduate Business Students: Experiential Learning on Introduction to Personnel Administration and Industrial Relations Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Carmen I.; González, Cándida

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on research into developing research skills in human resources management of apprentices through experiential learning. The target groups were undergraduate business students registered in the Introduction to Personnel and Industrial Relations course. The research identified the appreciation level of importance and satisfaction…

  1. Talking about Money Is Taboo: Perceptions of Financial Planning Students and Implications for the Financial Planning Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsemgeest, Liezel

    2016-01-01

    Communication about money is a social, cultural and psychological taboo and yet it is essential in the financial planning industry, as a financial planner cannot be effective if all information is not disclosed. This article examines how financial planning students perceive communication about money, their willingness to talk about it and their…

  2. Instructional Activities to Develop Student Concept Learning and Problem-Solving Skills in Art Education: A Proposed Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Robert J.; Webster, Nancy Comstock

    The purposes of the paper are to discuss use of a concept formation model in art education and to suggest ways in which teachers might plan and develop art instructional activities consistent with the model. Based upon a social studies model designed along the lines of Robert Gagne's learning theory, the art education model utilizes rule, concept,…

  3. Art Students in Japan in the Republican Period:A List and Historical Analysis of the Oversea Students in the Art Schools--1923, 1925, 1927~1944%民国时期留日美术学生的名单汇集和史料分析--1923、1925、1927~1944年

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周一川

    2015-01-01

    Apart from the survey on the Tokyo School of Fine Arts and the Joshibi College of Art and Design, research on the Chinese art students in Japan during the Republican Period has almost been a blank. Based on the 18 volumes of oversea student rosters edited by the Sino-Japan Society (1927-1944), this article presents a list of the Chinese art students in various art schools in Tokyo in 1923, 1925 and 1927-1944. By analyzing these historical data, the article summarizes the distribution of the oversea art students, their education status and financial sources, as well as the tendencies and characteristics of the Chinese art students in the Republican Period.%民国时期留日美术学生的调查研究,除东京美术学校和女子美术学校之外,基本处于空白状态。本文主要使用日华学会的18册(1927-1944年)留学生名簿,制成了1923、1925及1927-1944年间在东京的各美术学校留学生名单,通过各名单理清了美术学校留学生的分布、在学状况以及留学经费的出处,分析了民国时期美术学生的就学动向和主要特征。

  4. The Changing Nature and Definitions of Industrial Design and Implications for Prospective Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goatman, Mike; Moody, Louise

    2014-01-01

    There are currently a wide range of Higher Education Industrial Design courses available in the UK. In the present era, a wider breadth of narrative has developed within the subject, and as a result the content of industrial design educational offerings varies considerably. The paper assesses the industry view of Industrial Design as a discipline…

  5. Jobs in Search of Workers. Preparing Students for Textile and Apparel Industry Jobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warfield, Carol L.; Barry, Mary E.

    1991-01-01

    At an Alabama conference, state administrators, textile and apparel industry representatives, and community, junior, and technical college faculty identified the skill needs of the industry, existing college programs, and ways for industry and education to cooperate in meeting the labor force development requirements of the industry. (SK)

  6. Employment Status and Problems of Art Students%美术类学生的就业现状及问题分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞彤辰

    2012-01-01

    At present, the art graduate employment problem is becoming more and more serious. In this article, from the graduates internal cause and external environment two aspects, try to explore art students' employment and development problems.%目前,美术类毕业生的就业问题越来越严峻,本文拟从学生内在原因和外在环境,试探讨美术类学生的就业、发展问题。

  7. 高校艺术类学生管理方式上的几点思考%Thoughts on college art class student management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许霓

    2012-01-01

      College art students’ individual, professional and training mode has its particularity, this requests us both to see the common also to differ in the management way, to find a road suitable for students of art development.%  高校艺术类学生个体、专业及培养模式具有其特殊性,这就要求我们在管理方式上既要看到共性也要有所区别,寻找一条适合艺术类学生成长、成人、成才之路。

  8. Connecting art and science: An interdisciplinary strategy and its impact on the affective domain of community college human anatomy students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Kevin

    Educational objectives are often described within the framework of a three-domain taxonomy: cognitive, affective and psychomotor. While most of the research on educational objectives has focused on the cognitive domain, the research that has been conducted on the affective domain, which speaks to emotions, attitudes, and values, has identified a number of positive outcomes. One approach to enhancing the affective domain is that of interdisciplinary education. Science education research in the realm of interdisciplinary education and affective outcomes is limited; especially research conducted on community college students of human anatomy. This project investigated the relationship between an interdisciplinary teaching strategy and the affective domain in science education by utilizing an interdisciplinary lecture in a human anatomy class. Subjects were anatomy students in a California community college who listened to a one-hour lecture describing the cultural, historical and scientific significance of selected pieces of art depicting human dissection in European medieval and Renaissance universities. The focus was on how these renderings represent the state of anatomy education during their respective eras. After listening to the lecture, subjects were administered a 35-question survey that was composed of 14 demographic questions and 21 Likert-style statements that asked respondents to rate the extent to which the intervention influenced their affective domain. Descriptive statistics were then used to determine which component of the affective domain was most influenced, and multiple regression analysis was used to examine the extent to which individual differences along the affective continuum were explained by select demographic measures such as gender, race/ethnicity, education level, and previous exposure to science courses. Results indicate that the interdisciplinary intervention had a positive impact on every component of the affective domain hierarchy

  9. Mini-portfolio on the Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lea J.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Seven articles offer ideas for teaching the arts. Topics include strategies for teaching "Romeo and Juliet," art projects geared to the needs of middle school students, a music listening club that involves parents, tips to help students write better, publishing student authors' work, an art project for at-risk students, and easing test-taking…

  10. Exploring the importance of soft and hard skills as perceived by IT internship students and industry: A gap analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Patacsil

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The research paper proposes a skills gap methodology that utilized the respondent experiences in the internship program to measure the importance of the Information Technology (IT skills gap as perceived by IT students and the industry. The questionnaires were formulated based on previous studies,  however,  was slightly modified, validated and pilot tested  to fit into the needs of the research.  Respondents  of this study were IT students enrolled in internship while industry respondents were the supervisors of the IT students in their respective company.  Internship IT students were selected since they have a strong background on the needs of the company based on their internship experience. The findings revealed that teamwork and communication skills are very important soft skills to be possessed by IT graduates  as perceived by the respondents.  Further, results reveal that there was no significant difference in the perception of the respondents in terms of the  importance of soft skills. However, this finding contradicts the results in the case of hard skills were in there was a big range of disagreement on the importance of hard skills.   IT students perceived that hard skills were very important while industry perceived hard skills were somewhat important. It is recognized that soft  skills are very important communication tool for a customer oriented industry and  that  it is essential to enhance the communication skills of IT students for their future employment. The study suggests that the university should target improvements of soft skills and specific personality development component in the curriculum.

  11. Train Students' Aesthetic Capacity in Middle School Art Teaching%中学美术教学中对学生审美能力的培养

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江艳华

    2014-01-01

    An important goal of teaching the art of teaching is to strengthen the cultivation of students' aesthetic ability, through the art of teaching so that students fully aware of the artistic and social life in the United States, and constantly improve students' ability to appreciate beauty is also very important. This article focuses on the art of teaching analysis of secondary education stage, the content should be how best to strengthen the ability of students to cultivate the aes-thetic aspects.%美术教学的一个重要教学目标就是要加强对学生审美能力的培养,通过美术教学让学生们充分感受到艺术以及社会生活中的美,不断提高学生对美的鉴赏能力也是非常重要的。本文重点分析在我国中学教育阶段的美术教学中,应该如何更好地加强对学生审美能力的培养等方面的内容。

  12. Does growing up with a physician influence the ethics of medical students' relationships with the pharmaceutical industry? The cases of the US and Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, Marta

    2017-08-10

    Medical schools have a major impact on future doctors' ethics and their attitudes towards cooperation with the pharmaceutical industry. From childhood, medical students who are related to a physician are exposed to the characteristics of a medical career and learn its professional ethics not only in school but also in the family setting. The present paper sought to answer the research question: 'How does growing up with a physician influence medical students' perceptions of conflicts of interest in their relationships with industry?' An anonymous questionnaire was completed by 451 medical students from four Philadelphia medical schools and 554 medical students from Warsaw Medical University during 2013. Medical schools in these two cities were chosen because they are both university cities with similar population sizes. Students who had and who did not have a family member working as a physician were compared using chi-square analysis. Data were analysed for each country separately. For both the US and Poland, there were statistically significant differences (p pharmaceutical industry. In both groups, this difference occurred for three important dimensions: students' relationship with the pharmaceutical industry; students' views on physicians' rights to cooperate with the pharmaceutical industry; trust in the pharmaceutical industry. In the US, students related to a doctor were characterized by more restrictive opinions on all three dimensions than other students (e.g., 27.8% of the former students vs. 31.4% of the latter students thought doctors had unrestricted rights to cooperate with the industry). However, the contrary was observed in Poland: students with a physician in the family had less strict views than their colleagues (e.g., 56.8% of the former vs. 39.7% of the latter thought that doctors should have unrestricted rights of cooperation). In Poland, a former communist country, physicians transmit a more liberal approach towards collaboration with the

  13. 高中艺体类学生和普通学生学习适应性的比较研究%Comparative Study on the Learning Adaptabilities between High School Students of Art and Sport and Ordinary Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓慧慧; 刘红

    2011-01-01

    目的为了探究高中艺体类学生和普通学生的学习适应性的差异,为高中学校的艺体类学生和普通学生的差异教学提供理论支持。方法使用问卷测量法,调查了400名在校高中生。结果中学生的学习适应性存在差异,总体上说,普通学生的均分最低,其次是艺术类学生,最后是体育类学生;艺体类学生和普通学生的学习适应性在学习态度和习惯、学习能力和学习方法三个分量表上存在差异。结论普通学生的学习适应性最好,其次是艺术类学生,最后是体育类学生。%0bjective: To explore the study compatible difference between the high school students of art and sport and the ordinary students in order to provide the theoretical support for the high schooFs difference teaching. Meth- ods: Questionnaire survey is used to investigate 400 students in the high school. Results: Difference exists in the learning adaptabilities of the middle - school students. Generally, ordinary students are the best, next is art students, then the sports students. Art and sport student' s study compatibilities are different from that of the ordinary students in study manner, custom, learning capability and study methods. Conclusions: Ordinary students' learning adapta- bility is the best, then the art students', and the sport students' is the last.

  14. Quartz Mountain/Oklahoma Summer Arts Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frates, Mary Y.; Madeja, Stanley S.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the Quartz Mountain Oklahoma Summer Arts Institute program. It is designed to nurture artistic talent and to provide intensive arts experiences in music, dance, theater, and the visual arts for talented students aged 14-18. (AM)

  15. Hip-Hop Pop Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Clarence, Sr.

    2011-01-01

    Art has a way of helping students better understand and appreciate the world around them, particularly the things that are most important to them. Hip hop is one of those generational genres that capture the attention of young students like few other things do. Drawing on this genre to get students to create art is an excellent way to demonstrate…

  16. Visual and Performing Arts 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, Esther

    2009-01-01

    For most students, classes in the arts are more than just a means of gathering credits, they are about getting involved in what the students like, at least for a period. They feel that the classes are a healthy escape, a time to recuperate and do what they do well. In the art classrooms, music studios, and video labs, students feel they are part…

  17. Visual and Performing Arts 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, Esther

    2009-01-01

    For most students, classes in the arts are more than just a means of gathering credits, they are about getting involved in what the students like, at least for a period. They feel that the classes are a healthy escape, a time to recuperate and do what they do well. In the art classrooms, music studios, and video labs, students feel they are part…

  18. Hip-Hop Pop Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Clarence, Sr.

    2011-01-01

    Art has a way of helping students better understand and appreciate the world around them, particularly the things that are most important to them. Hip hop is one of those generational genres that capture the attention of young students like few other things do. Drawing on this genre to get students to create art is an excellent way to demonstrate…

  19. Art Education Is Violent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavin, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    In an era that is rife with aggression and hostility, most art educators hold close to their hearts the belief that they, and their students, can contribute to making the world a better place. Through their acts as teachers and the daily work of art education, they often strive toward creating a space of "non-violence." For K-12…

  20. Art as Peace Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Art educators can "critique" senseless violence--mistreatment, exclusion, intimidation, bullying, violation, abuse, corruption, murder, and war--by unleashing the power of students' creativity. In this article, the author, sharing her philosophical context, discusses how art is preventative medicine with the power to transform the cycle…