WorldWideScience

Sample records for inductive plasma accelerator

  1. Design of a Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    The design and construction of a thruster that employs electrodeless plasma preionization and pulsed inductive acceleration is described. Preionization is achieved through an electron cyclotron resonance discharge that produces a weakly-ionized plasma at the face of a conical theta pinch-shaped inductive coil. The presence of the preionized plasma allows for current sheet formation at lower discharge voltages than those employed in other pulsed inductive accelerators that do not employ preionization. The location of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge is controlled through the design of the applied magnetic field in the thruster. Finite element analysis shows that there is an arrangement of permanent magnets that yields a small volume of resonant magnetic field at the coil face. Preionization in the resonant zone leads to current sheet formation at the coil face, which minimizes the initial inductance of the pulse circuit and maximizes the potential electrical efficiency of the accelerator. A magnet assembly was constructed around an inductive coil to provide structural support to the selected arrangement of neodymium magnets. Measured values of the resulting magnetic field compare favorably with the finite element model.

  2. Thrust Stand Measurements of the Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Emsellem, Gregory D.

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed inductive plasma thrusters [1-3] are spacecraft propulsion devices in which electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. This type of pulsed thruster is electrodeless, with a time-varying current in the coil interacting with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10-100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, pulsed inductive plasma thrusters require high pulse energies to inductively ionize propellant. The Microwave Assisted Dis- charge Inductive Plasma Accelerator (MAD-IPA), shown in Fig. 1, is a pulsed inductive plasma thruster that addressees this issue by partially ionizing propellant inside a conical inductive coil before the main current pulse via an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge. The ECR plasma is produced using microwaves and a static magnetic field from a set of permanent magnets arranged to create a thin resonance region along the inner surface of the coil, restricting plasma formation, and in turn current sheet formation, to a region where the magnetic coupling between the plasma and the theta-pinch coil is high. The use of a conical theta-pinch coil also serves to provide neutral propellant containment and plasma plume focusing that is improved relative to the more common planar geometry of the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT) [1, 2]. In this paper, we describe thrust stand measurements performed to characterize the performance (specific impulse, thrust efficiency) of the MAD-IPA thruster. Impulse data are obtained at various pulse energies, mass flow rates and inductive coil geometries. Dependencies on these experimental parameters are discussed in the context of the current sheet formation and electromagnetic plasma

  3. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry on the Thrust Efficiency of a Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Ashley; Polzin, Kurt; Emsellem, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed inductive plasma thrusters [1-3] are spacecraft propulsion devices in which electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. The thruster is electrodeless, with a time-varying current in the coil interacting with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10-100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, pulsed inductive plasma thrusters require high pulse energies to inductively ionize propellant. The Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator (MAD-IPA) [4, 5] is a pulsed inductive plasma thruster that addressees this issue by partially ionizing propellant inside a conical inductive coil via an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge. The ECR plasma is produced using microwaves and permanent magnets that are arranged to create a thin resonance region along the inner surface of the coil, restricting plasma formation, and in turn current sheet formation, to a region where the magnetic coupling between the plasma and the inductive coil is high. The use of a conical theta-pinch coil is under investigation. The conical geometry serves to provide neutral propellant containment and plasma plume focusing that is improved relative to the more common planar geometry of the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT) [2, 3], however a conical coil imparts a direct radial acceleration of the current sheet that serves to rapidly decouple the propellant from the coil, limiting the direct axial electromagnetic acceleration in favor of an indirect acceleration mechanism that requires significant heating of the propellant within the volume bounded by the current sheet. In this paper, we describe thrust stand measurements performed to characterize the performance

  4. Сonditions investigations of induction of the "steady" plasma ring in the electrodynamic accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Sakun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The numerical investigation of conditions of the "steady" plasma ring induction in the electrodynamic accelerator was made. The influence of a ring resistance on transition of the ring to "steady" state was determined. The dependence of the coefficient of electrical energy conversion into magnetic field energy on the number of inductor turns and the initial velocity of the ring was found out. The technical requirements to the electrodynamic accelerator by which possible the formation of "steady" plasma ring was obtained.

  5. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry and Current Sheet Trajectory of a Conical Theta Pinch Pulsed Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Bonds, Kevin W.; Emsellem, Gregory D.

    2011-01-01

    Results are presented demonstrating the e ect of inductive coil geometry and current sheet trajectory on the exhaust velocity of propellant in conical theta pinch pulsed induc- tive plasma accelerators. The electromagnetic coupling between the inductive coil of the accelerator and a plasma current sheet is simulated, substituting a conical copper frustum for the plasma. The variation of system inductance as a function of plasma position is obtained by displacing the simulated current sheet from the coil while measuring the total inductance of the coil. Four coils of differing geometries were employed, and the total inductance of each coil was measured as a function of the axial displacement of two sep- arate copper frusta both having the same cone angle and length as the coil but with one compressed to a smaller size relative to the coil. The measured relationship between total coil inductance and current sheet position closes a dynamical circuit model that is used to calculate the resulting current sheet velocity for various coil and current sheet con gura- tions. The results of this model, which neglects the pinching contribution to thrust, radial propellant con nement, and plume divergence, indicate that in a conical theta pinch ge- ometry current sheet pinching is detrimental to thruster performance, reducing the kinetic energy of the exhausting propellant by up to 50% (at the upper bound for the parameter range of the study). The decrease in exhaust velocity was larger for coils and simulated current sheets of smaller half cone angles. An upper bound for the pinching contribution to thrust is estimated for typical operating parameters. Measurements of coil inductance for three di erent current sheet pinching conditions are used to estimate the magnetic pressure as a function of current sheet radial compression. The gas-dynamic contribution to axial acceleration is also estimated and shown to not compensate for the decrease in axial electromagnetic acceleration

  6. Thrust Stand Measurements Using Alternative Propellants in the Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2011-01-01

    Storable propellants (for example water, ammonia, and hydrazine) are attractive for deep space propulsion due to their naturally high density at ambient interplanetary conditions, which obviates the need for a cryogenic/venting system. Water in particular is attractive due to its ease of handling and availability both terrestrially and extra-terrestrially. While many storable propellants are reactive and corrosive, a propulsion scheme where the propellant is insulated from vulnerable (e.g. metallic) sections of the assembly would be well-suited to process these otherwise incompatible propellants. Pulsed inductive plasma thrusters meet this criterion because they can be operated without direct propellant-electrode interaction. During operation of these devices, electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil creating a time-varying current in the coil that interacts with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10-100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, many pulsed inductive plasma thrusters require high pulse energies to inductively ionize propellant. The Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator (MAD-IPA) is a pulsed inductive plasma thruster that addressees this issue by partially ionizing propellant inside a conical inductive coil before the main current pulse via an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge. The ECR plasma is produced using microwaves and a static magnetic field from a set of permanent magnets arranged to create a thin resonance region along the inner surface of the coil, restricting plasma formation, and in turn current sheet formation, to a region where the magnetic coupling between the plasma and the theta

  7. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry on the Operating Characteristics of a Pulsed Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Kimberlin, Adam C.

    2012-01-01

    Operational characteristics of two separate inductive thrusters with coils of different cone angles are explored through thrust stand measurements and time-integrated, un- filtered photography. Trends in impulse bit measurements indicate that, in the present experimental configuration, the thruster with the inductive coil possessing a smaller cone angle produced larger values of thrust, in apparent contradiction to results of a previous thruster acceleration model. Areas of greater light intensity in photographs of thruster operation are assumed to qualitatively represent locations of increased current density. Light intensity is generally greater in images of the thruster with the smaller cone angle when compared to those of the thruster with the larger half cone angle for the same operating conditions. The intensity generally decreases in both thrusters for decreasing mass ow rate and capacitor voltage. The location of brightest light intensity shifts upstream for decreasing mass ow rate of propellant and downstream for decreasing applied voltage. Recognizing that there typically exists an optimum ratio of applied electric field to gas pressure with respect to breakdown efficiency, this result may indicate that the optimum ratio was not achieved uniformly over the coil face, leading to non-uniform and incomplete current sheet formation in violation of the model assumption of immediate formation where all the injected propellant is contained in a magnetically-impermeable current sheet.

  8. Improved plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  9. Measurement of the 135Cs half-life with accelerator mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, C. M.; Cornett, R. J.; Charles, C. R. J.; Zhao, X. L.; Kieser, W. E.

    2016-01-01

    The isotope 135Cs is quoted as having a half-life of 2.3 Myr. However, there are three published values ranging from 1.8 to 3 Myr. This research reviews previous measurements and reports a new measurement of the half-life using newly developed accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) techniques along with β and γ radiometric analysis. The half-life was determined to be (1.6 ±0.6 ) ×106 yr by AMS and (1.3 ±0.2 ) ×106 yr by ICPMS with 95% confidence. The two values agree with each other but differ from the accepted value by ˜40 % .

  10. Particle acceleration by plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Ogata, A

    2002-01-01

    Plasma acceleration is carried out by using potential of plasma wave. It is classified by generation method of plasma wave such as the laser wake-field acceleration and the beat wave acceleration. Other method using electron beam is named the plasma wake-field acceleration (or beam wake-field acceleration). In this paper, electron acceleration by laser wake-field in gas plasma, ion source by laser radiation of solid target and nanoion beam generation by one component of plasma in trap are explained. It is an applicable method that ions, which run out from the solid target irradiated by laser, are used as ion source of accelerator. The experimental system using 800 nm laser, 50 mJ pulse energy and 50 fs pulse width was studied. The laser intensity is 4x10 sup 1 sup 6 Wcm sup - sup 2 at the focus. The target film of metal and organic substance film was used. When laser irradiated Al target, two particles generated, in front and backward. It is new fact that the neutral particle was obtained in front, because it...

  11. Inductance of rf-wave-heated plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshi, E; Todo, Y

    2003-03-14

    The inductance of rf-wave-heated plasmas is derived. This inductance represents the inductance of fast electrons located in a plateau during their acceleration due to electric field or deceleration due to collisions and electric field. This inductance has been calculated for small electric fields from the two-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation as the flux crossing the surface of critical energy mv(2)(ph)/2 in the velocity space. The new expression may be important for radio-frequency current drive ramp-up, current drive efficiency, current profile control, and so on in tokamaks. This inductance may be incorporated into transport codes that study plasma heating by rf waves.

  12. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Carl B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  13. Plasma accelerator experiments in Yugoslavia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purić, J.; Astashynski, V. M.; Kuraica, M. M.; Dojčinovié, I. P.

    2002-12-01

    An overview is given of the results obtained in the Plasma Accelerator Experiments in Belgrade, using quasi-stationary high current plasma accelerators constructed within the framework of the Yugoslavia-Belarus Joint Project. So far, the following plasma accelerators have been realized: Magnetoplasma Compressor type (MPC); MPC Yu type; one stage Erosive Plasma Dynamic System (EPDS) and, in final stage of construction two stage Quasi-Stationary High Current Plasma Accelerator (QHPA).

  14. Cosmic Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, P

    2004-04-26

    Recently we proposed a new cosmic acceleration mechanism which was based on the wakefields excited by the Alfven shocks in a relativistically owing plasma. In this paper we include some omitted details, and show that there exists a threshold condition for transparency below which the accelerating particle is collision-free and suffers little energy loss in the plasma medium. The stochastic encounters of the random accelerating-decelerating phases results in a power-law energy spectrum: f({epsilon}) {proportional_to} 1/{epsilon}{sup 2}. As an example, we discuss the possible production of super-GZK ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) in the atmosphere of gamma ray bursts. The estimated event rate in our model agrees with that from UHECR observations.

  15. 2014 CERN Accelerator Schools: Plasma Wake Acceleration

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    A specialised school on Plasma Wake Acceleration will be held at CERN, Switzerland from 23-29 November, 2014.   This course will be of interest to staff and students in accelerator laboratories, university departments and companies working in or having an interest in the field of new acceleration techniques. Following introductory lectures on plasma and laser physics, the course will cover the different components of a plasma wake accelerator and plasma beam systems. An overview of the experimental studies, diagnostic tools and state of the art wake acceleration facilities, both present and planned, will complement the theoretical part. Topical seminars and a visit of CERN will complete the programme. Further information can be found at: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/PlasmaWake2014/CERN-advert.html http://indico.cern.ch/event/285444/

  16. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Thomas J.; Palmer, Byron A.; Hof, Douglas E.

    1990-01-01

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy.

  17. Plasma-heating by induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, K.; Thorpe, M. L.

    1969-01-01

    Induction-heated plasma torch operates with an input of 1 Mw of direct current of which 71 percent is transferred to the plasma and the remainder is consumed by electrical losses in the system. Continuous operation of the torch should be possible for as long as 5,000 hours.

  18. A Multibunch Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kallos, Efthymios; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Katsouleas, Thomas C; Kimura, Wayne D; Kusche, Karl; Muggli, Patric; Pavlishin, Igor; Pogorelsky, Igor; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Zhou, Feng

    2005-01-01

    We investigate a plasma wakefield acceleration scheme where a train of electron microbunches feeds into a high density plasma. When the microbunch train enters such a plasma that has a corresponding plasma wavelength equal to the microbunch separation distance, a strong wakefield is expected to be resonantly driven to an amplitude that is at least one order of magnitude higher than that using an unbunched beam. PIC simulations have been performed using the beamline parameters of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility operating in the configuration of the STELLA inverse free electron laser (IFEL) experiment. A 65 MeV electron beam is modulated by a 10.6 um CO2 laser beam via an IFEL interaction. This produces a train of ~90 microbunches separated by the laser wavelength. In this paper, we present both a simple theoretical treatment and simulation results that demonstrate promising results for the multibunch technique as a plasma-based accelerator.

  19. Thrust Stand Measurements of a Conical Pulsed Inductive Plasma Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Emsellem, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed inductive plasma thrusters [1-3] are spacecraft propulsion devices in which electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. The thruster is electrodeless, with a time-varying current in the coil interacting with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10-100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, pulsed inductive plasma thrusters can su er from both high pulse energy requirements imposed by the voltage demands of inductive propellant ionization, and low propellant utilization efficiencies. The Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator (MAD-IPA)[4], shown in Fig. 1 is a pulsed inductive plasma thruster that is able to operate at lower pulse energies by partially ionizing propellant with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge inside a conical inductive coil whose geometry serves to potentially increase propellant and plasma plume containment relative to at coil geometries. The ECR plasma is created with the use of permanent mag- nets arranged to produce a thin resonance region along the inner surface of the coil, restricting plasma formation and, in turn, current sheet formation to areas of high magnetic coupling to the driving coil.

  20. Supersonic induction plasma jet modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selezneva, S.E. E-mail: svetlana2@hermes.usherbS_Selezneva2@hermes.usherb; Boulos, M.I

    2001-06-01

    Numerical simulations have been applied to study the argon plasma flow downstream of the induction plasma torch. It is shown that by means of the convergent-divergent nozzle adjustment and chamber pressure reduction, a supersonic plasma jet can be obtained. We investigate the supersonic and a more traditional subsonic plasma jets impinging onto a normal substrate. Comparing to the subsonic jet, the supersonic one is narrower and much faster. Near-substrate velocity and temperature boundary layers are thinner, so the heat flux near the stagnation point is higher in the supersonic jet. The supersonic plasma jet is characterized by the electron overpopulation and the domination of the recombination over the dissociation, resulting into the heating of the electron gas. Because of these processes, the supersonic induction plasma permits to separate spatially different functions (dissociation and ionization, transport and deposition) and to optimize each of them. The considered configuration can be advantageous in some industrial applications, such as plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition of diamond and polymer-like films and in plasma spraying of nanoscaled powders.

  1. EDITORIAL: Laser and plasma accelerators Laser and plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Robert

    2009-02-01

    This special issue on laser and plasma accelerators illustrates the rapid advancement and diverse applications of laser and plasma accelerators. Plasma is an attractive medium for particle acceleration because of the high electric field it can sustain, with studies of acceleration processes remaining one of the most important areas of research in both laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. The rapid advance in laser and accelerator technology has led to the development of terawatt and petawatt laser systems with ultra-high intensities and short sub-picosecond pulses, which are used to generate wakefields in plasma. Recent successes include the demonstration by several groups in 2004 of quasi-monoenergetic electron beams by wakefields in the bubble regime with the GeV energy barrier being reached in 2006, and the energy doubling of the SLAC high-energy electron beam from 42 to 85 GeV. The electron beams generated by the laser plasma driven wakefields have good spatial quality with energies ranging from MeV to GeV. A unique feature is that they are ultra-short bunches with simulations showing that they can be as short as a few femtoseconds with low-energy spread, making these beams ideal for a variety of applications ranging from novel high-brightness radiation sources for medicine, material science and ultrafast time-resolved radiobiology or chemistry. Laser driven ion acceleration experiments have also made significant advances over the last few years with applications in laser fusion, nuclear physics and medicine. Attention is focused on the possibility of producing quasi-mono-energetic ions with energies ranging from hundreds of MeV to GeV per nucleon. New acceleration mechanisms are being studied, including ion acceleration from ultra-thin foils and direct laser acceleration. The application of wakefields or beat waves in other areas of science such as astrophysics and particle physics is beginning to take off, such as the study of cosmic accelerators considered

  2. Induction accelerator development for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reginato, L.L.

    1993-05-01

    For approximately a decade, the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at LBL has been exploring the use of induction accelerators with multiple beams as the driver for inertial fusion targets. Scaled experiments have investigated the transport of space charge dominated beams (SBTE), and the current amplification and transverse emittance control in induction linacs (MBE-4) with very encouraging results. In order to study many of the beam manipulations required by a driver and to further develop economically competitive technology, a proposal has been made in partnership with LLNL to build a 10 MeV accelerator and to conduct a series of experiments collectively called the Induction Linac System Experiments (ILSE). The major components critical to the ILSE accelerator are currently under development. We have constructed a full scale induction module and we have tested a number of amorphous magnetic materials developed by Allied Signal to establish an overall optimal design. The electric and magnetic quadrupoles critical to the transport and focusing of heavy ion beams are also under development The hardware is intended to be economically competitive for a driver without sacrificing any of the physics or performance requirements. This paper will concentrate on the recent developments and tests of the major components required by the ILSE accelerator.

  3. Induction accelerator development for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reginato, L.L.

    1993-05-01

    For approximately a decade, the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at LBL has been exploring the use of induction accelerators with multiple beams as the driver for inertial fusion targets. Scaled experiments have investigated the transport of space charge dominated beams (SBTE), and the current amplification and transverse emittance control in induction linacs (MBE-4) with very encouraging results. In order to study many of the beam manipulations required by a driver and to further develop economically competitive technology, a proposal has been made in partnership with LLNL to build a 10 MeV accelerator and to conduct a series of experiments collectively called the Induction Linac System Experiments (ILSE).The major components critical to the ILSE accelerator are currently under development. We have constructed a full scale induction module and we have tested a number of amorphous magnetic materials developed by Allied Signal to establish an overall optimal design. The electric and magnetic quadrupoles critical to the transport and focusing of heavy ion beams are also under development. The hardware is intended to be economically competitive for a driver without sacrificing any of the physics or performance requirements. This paper will concentrate on the recent developments and tests of the major components required by the ILSE accelerator.

  4. Environmental biomonitoring of essential and toxic elements in human scalp hair using accelerated microwave-assisted sample digestion and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumakli, Hope; Duncan, A'ja V; McDaniel, Kiara; Mehari, Tsdale F; Stephenson, Jamira; Maple, Lareisha; Crawford, Zaria; Macemore, Calvin L; Babyak, Carol M; Fakayode, Sayo O

    2017-05-01

    Human scalp hair samples were collected and used to assess exposure to toxic elements and essential elements in the state of North Carolina, USA using accelerated microwave assisted acid digestion and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The figures-of-merit of the ICP-OES were appropriate for elemental analysis in scalp hair with detection limits as low as 0.0001 mg/L for Cd, good linearity (R(2) > 0.9978), and percent recoveries that ranged from 96 to 106% for laboratory-fortified-blanks and 88-112% for sample spike recovery study. The concentrations of essential elements in scalp hair were larger than those of toxic elements, with Ca having the highest average concentration (3080 μg/g, s = 14,500, n = 194). Some of the maximum concentrations observed for As (65 μg/g), Ni (331 μg/g), Cd (2.96 μg/g), and Cr (84.6 μg/g) in individual samples were concerning, however. Samples were statistically analyzed to determine the influence of race, gender, smoking habits, or age on the elemental concentrations in scalp hair. Higher concentrations of essential elements were observed in the scalp hair of Caucasians, females, and non-smokers, and the differences were often significant at a 90% confidence level. Several pairs of essential elements, for example Ca-K, Ca-Mg, and Ca-Zn, were strongly correlated in Caucasian hair but uncorrelated in African-American hair. Similarly, essential elements were strongly correlated in female hair but weakly correlated in male hair. Toxic element pairs (As-Cd, As-Se, Pb-As, and Se-Cd) were strongly correlated in the hair of smokers but uncorrelated in that of non-smokers, suggesting that cigarette smoke is a common source of toxic elements in humans. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Note: A pulsed laser ion source for linear induction accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H., E-mail: bamboobbu@hotmail.com [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-106, Mianyang 621900 (China); School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, K.; Shen, Y.; Jiang, X.; Dong, P.; Liu, Y.; Wang, Y.; Chen, D.; Pan, H.; Wang, W.; Jiang, W.; Long, J.; Xia, L.; Shi, J.; Zhang, L.; Deng, J. [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-106, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2015-01-15

    We have developed a high-current laser ion source for induction accelerators. A copper target was irradiated by a frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG laser (266 nm) with relatively low intensities of 10{sup 8} W/cm{sup 2}. The laser-produced plasma supplied a large number of Cu{sup +} ions (∼10{sup 12} ions/pulse) during several microseconds. Emission spectra of the plasma were observed and the calculated electron temperature was about 1 eV. An induction voltage adder extracted high-current ion beams over 0.5 A/cm{sup 2} from a plasma-prefilled gap. The normalized beam emittance measured by a pepper-pot method was smaller than 1 π mm mrad.

  6. Technology development for high power induction accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1985-06-11

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability.

  7. Linear induction accelerator for heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keefe, D.

    1976-09-01

    There is considerable recent interest in the use of high energy (..gamma.. = 1.1), heavy (A greater than or equal to 100) ions to irradiate deuterium--tritium pellets in a reactor vessel to constitute a power source at the level of 1 GW or more. Various accelerator configurations involving storage rings have been suggested. A discussion is given of how the technology of Linear Induction Accelerators--well known to be matched to high current and short pulse length--may offer significant advantages for this application.

  8. Thrust Stand Measurements of a Conical Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2013-01-01

    Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (iPPT) spacecraft propulsion devices in which electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. The thruster is electrodeless, with a time-varying current in the coil interacting with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10 -- 100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, inductive pulsed plasma thrusters can suffer from both high pulse energy requirements imposed by the voltage demands of inductive propellant ionization, and low propellant utilization efficiencies. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, inductive pulsed plasma thrusters can suffer from both high pulse energy requirements imposed by the voltage demands of inductive propellant ionization, and low propellant utilization efficiencies. A conical coil geometry may offer higher propellant utilization efficiency over that of a at inductive coil, however an increase in propellant utilization may be met with a decrease in axial electromagnetic acceleration, and in turn, a decrease in the total axially-directed kinetic energy imparted to the propellant.

  9. Emittance Growth in Linear Induction Accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Ekdahl, Carl

    2017-01-01

    The Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrotest (DARHT) facility uses bremsstrahlung radiation source spots produced by the focused electron beams from two linear induction accelerators (LIAs) to radiograph large hydrodynamic experiments driven by high explosives. Radiographic resolution is determined by the size of the source spot, and beam emittance is the ultimate limitation to spot size. Some of the possible causes for the emittance growth in the DARHT LIA have been investigated using particle-in-ce...

  10. Laser-plasma booster for ion post acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoh D.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A remarkable ion energy increase is demonstrated for post acceleration by a laser-plasma booster. An intense short-pulse laser generates a strong current by high-energy electrons accelerated, when this intense short-pulse laser illuminates a plasma target. The strong electric current creates a strong magnetic field along the high-energy electron current in plasma. During the increase phase in the magnetic field, a longitudinal inductive electric field is induced for the forward ion acceleration by the Faraday law. Our 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate a remarkable increase in ion energy by several tens of MeV.

  11. Plasma acceleration using a radio frequency self-bias effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafalskyi, D.; Aanesland, A.

    2015-06-01

    In this work plasma acceleration using a RF self-bias effect is experimentally studied. The experiments are conducted using a novel plasma accelerator system, called Neptune, consisting of an inductively coupled plasma source and a RF-biased set of grids. The plasma accelerator can operate in a steady state mode, producing a plasma flow with separately controlled plasma flux and velocity without any magnetic configuration. The operating pressure at the source output is as low as 0.2 mTorr and can further be decreased. The ion and electron flows are investigated by measuring the ion and electron energy distribution functions both space resolved and with different orientations with respect to the flow direction. It is found that the flow of electrons from the source is highly anisotropic and directed along the ion flow and this global flow of accelerated plasma is well localized in the plasma transport chamber. The maximum flux is about 7.5.1015 ions s-1 m-2 (at standard conditions) on the axis and decreasing to almost zero at a radial distances of more than 15 cm from the flow axis. Varying the RF acceleration voltage in the range 20-350 V, the plasma flow velocity can be changed between 10 and 35 km/s. The system is prospective for different technology such as space propulsion and surface modification and also interesting for fundamental studies for space-related plasma simulations and investigation of the dynamo effect using accelerated rotating plasmas.

  12. CAS course on Plasma Wake Acceleration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Accelerator School

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) recently organised a specialised course on Plasma Wake Acceleration, held at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland, from 23 to 29 November 2014.    Following a number of introductory lectures on laser and plasma physics, as well as an overview of conventional accelerators and their limitations, the course covered a large number of aspects of plasma wake acceleration schemes: the creation of plasma by high power lasers or particle beams, a description of the plasma creation process through simulations and the characteristics of the accelerated particle beams, including results of the latest achievements. Lectures on beam diagnostics, the applications of plasma accelerated beams, and topical seminars completed the programme.  The course was very successful, with 109 students of 26 nationalities attending; most participants coming from European counties, but also from the US, Israel, India, South Korea, Russia and Ukraine. Feedback from the participants was...

  13. Investigation on laser accelerators. Plasma beat wave accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Akihiko; Miyamoto, Yasuaki; Hagiwara, Masayoshi; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Sudo, Osamu [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1998-04-01

    Laser accelerator technology has characteristics of high energy, compact, short pulse and high luminescence{center_dot}low emittance. This means potential many applications in wide ranges of fields as well as high energy and nuclear physics. High power short laser pulses are injected to a plasma in the typical example of laser accelerators. Large electric fields are induced in the plasma. Electrons in the plasma are accelerated with the ponderomotive force of the electric field. The principles of interaction on beat wave, wakefield accelerators, inverse free electron laser and inverse Cherenkov radiation are briefly introduced. The overview of plasma beat wave accelerator study is briefly described on the programs at Chalk River Laboratories(Canada), UCLA(USA), Osaka Univ. (Japan) and Ecole Polytechnique (France). Issues of the plasma beat wave accelerator are discussed from the viewpoint of application. Existing laser technologies of CO{sub 2}, YAG and YFL are available for the present day accelerator technology. An acceleration length of beat wave interaction is limited due to its phase condition. Ideas on multi-staged acceleration using the phasing plasma fiber are introduced. (Y. Tanaka)

  14. Emittance growth in linear induction accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Ekdahl, C A; Schulze, M E; Carlson, C A; Frayer, D K; Mostrum, C; Thoma, C H

    2014-01-01

    The Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrotest (DARHT) facility uses bremsstrahlung radiation source spots produced by the focused electron beams from two linear induction accelerators (LIAs) to radiograph large hydrodynamic experiments driven by high explosives. Radiographic resolution is determined by the size of the source spot, and beam emittance is the ultimate limitation to spot size. On the DARHT Axis-II LIA we measure an emittance higher than predicted by theoretical simulations, and even though this axis produces sub-millimeter source spots, we are exploring ways to improve the emittance. Some of the possible causes for the discrepancy have been investigated using particle-in-cell (PIC) codes, although most of these are discounted based on beam measurements. The most likely source of emittance growth is a mismatch of the beam to the magnetic transport, which can cause beam halo.

  15. Plasma Injection Schemes for Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    J. Faure

    2017-01-01

    Plasma injection schemes are crucial for producing high-quality electron beams in laser-plasma accelerators. This article introduces the general concepts of plasma injection. First, a Hamiltonian model for particle trapping and acceleration in plasma waves is introduced; ionization injection and colliding-pulse injection are described in the framework of this Hamiltonian model. We then proceed to consider injection in plasma density gradients.

  16. Plasma acceleration using a radio frequency self-bias effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafalskyi, D.; Aanesland, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas (CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Univ Paris-Sud), Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2015-06-15

    In this work plasma acceleration using a RF self-bias effect is experimentally studied. The experiments are conducted using a novel plasma accelerator system, called Neptune, consisting of an inductively coupled plasma source and a RF-biased set of grids. The plasma accelerator can operate in a steady state mode, producing a plasma flow with separately controlled plasma flux and velocity without any magnetic configuration. The operating pressure at the source output is as low as 0.2 mTorr and can further be decreased. The ion and electron flows are investigated by measuring the ion and electron energy distribution functions both space resolved and with different orientations with respect to the flow direction. It is found that the flow of electrons from the source is highly anisotropic and directed along the ion flow and this global flow of accelerated plasma is well localized in the plasma transport chamber. The maximum flux is about 7.5·10{sup 15} ions s{sup −1} m{sup −2} (at standard conditions) on the axis and decreasing to almost zero at a radial distances of more than 15 cm from the flow axis. Varying the RF acceleration voltage in the range 20–350 V, the plasma flow velocity can be changed between 10 and 35 km/s. The system is prospective for different technology such as space propulsion and surface modification and also interesting for fundamental studies for space-related plasma simulations and investigation of the dynamo effect using accelerated rotating plasmas.

  17. Unifying physics of accelerators, lasers and plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Seryi, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Unifying Physics of Accelerators, Lasers and Plasma introduces the physics of accelerators, lasers and plasma in tandem with the industrial methodology of inventiveness, a technique that teaches that similar problems and solutions appear again and again in seemingly dissimilar disciplines. This unique approach builds bridges and enhances connections between the three aforementioned areas of physics that are essential for developing the next generation of accelerators.

  18. Plasma production for electron acceleration by resonant plasma wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Croia, M.; Curcio, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G. P.; Filippi, F.; Ghigo, A.; Lollo, V.; Pella, S.; Pompili, R.; Romeo, S.; Ferrario, M.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is the most promising acceleration technique known nowadays, able to provide very high accelerating fields (10-100 GV/m), enabling acceleration of electrons to GeV energy in few centimeter. However, the quality of the electron bunches accelerated with this technique is still not comparable with that of conventional accelerators (large energy spread, low repetition rate, and large emittance); radiofrequency-based accelerators, in fact, are limited in accelerating field (10-100 MV/m) requiring therefore hundred of meters of distances to reach the GeV energies, but can provide very bright electron bunches. To combine high brightness electron bunches from conventional accelerators and high accelerating fields reachable with plasmas could be a good compromise allowing to further accelerate high brightness electron bunches coming from LINAC while preserving electron beam quality. Following the idea of plasma wave resonant excitation driven by a train of short bunches, we have started to study the requirements in terms of plasma for SPARC_LAB (Ferrario et al., 2013 [1]). In particular here we focus on hydrogen plasma discharge, and in particular on the theoretical and numerical estimates of the ionization process which are very useful to design the discharge circuit and to evaluate the current needed to be supplied to the gas in order to have full ionization. Eventually, the current supplied to the gas simulated will be compared to that measured experimentally.

  19. Plasma production for electron acceleration by resonant plasma wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anania, M.P., E-mail: maria.pia.anania@lnf.infn.it [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [University of Rome Tor Vergata - INFN, via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); INFN, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Croia, M.; Curcio, A. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); University of Rome La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.P. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Filippi, F. [University of Rome La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Ghigo, A.; Lollo, V.; Pella, S.; Pompili, R. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Romeo, S. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); University of Rome La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Ferrario, M. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is the most promising acceleration technique known nowadays, able to provide very high accelerating fields (10–100 GV/m), enabling acceleration of electrons to GeV energy in few centimeter. However, the quality of the electron bunches accelerated with this technique is still not comparable with that of conventional accelerators (large energy spread, low repetition rate, and large emittance); radiofrequency-based accelerators, in fact, are limited in accelerating field (10–100 MV/m) requiring therefore hundred of meters of distances to reach the GeV energies, but can provide very bright electron bunches. To combine high brightness electron bunches from conventional accelerators and high accelerating fields reachable with plasmas could be a good compromise allowing to further accelerate high brightness electron bunches coming from LINAC while preserving electron beam quality. Following the idea of plasma wave resonant excitation driven by a train of short bunches, we have started to study the requirements in terms of plasma for SPARC-LAB (Ferrario et al., 2013 [1]). In particular here we focus on hydrogen plasma discharge, and in particular on the theoretical and numerical estimates of the ionization process which are very useful to design the discharge circuit and to evaluate the current needed to be supplied to the gas in order to have full ionization. Eventually, the current supplied to the gas simulated will be compared to that measured experimentally.

  20. Acceleration of injected electrons by the plasma beat wave accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, C.; Clayton, C. E.; Marsh, K. A.; Dyson, A.; Everett, M.; Lal, A.; Leemans, W. P.; Williams, R.; Katsouleas, T.; Mori, W. B.

    1992-07-01

    In this paper we describe the recent work at UCLA on the acceleration of externally injected electrons by a relativistic plasma wave. A two frequency laser was used to excite a plasma wave over a narrow range of static gas pressures close to resonance. Electrons with energies up to our detection limit of 9.1 MeV were observed when 2.1 MeV electrons were injected in the plasma wave. No accelerated electrons above the detection threshold were observed when the laser was operated on a single frequency or when no electrons were injected. Experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions, and future prospects for the plasma beat wave accelerator are discussed.

  1. Plasma Channel Guided Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, C G

    2005-01-01

    High quality electron beams (several 109 electrons above 80 MeV energy with percent energy spread and low divergence) have been produced for the first time in a compact, high gradient, all-optical laser accelerator by extending the interaction distance using a pre-formed plasma density channel to guide the drive laser pulse. Laser-driven accelerators, in which particles are accelerated by the electric field of a plasma wave (wake) driven by the radiation pressure of an intense laser, have over the past decade demonstrated accelerating fields thousands of times greater than those achievable in conventional radio-frequency accelerators. This has spurred interest in them as compact next- generation sources of energetic electrons and radiation. To date, however, acceleration distances have been severely limited by the lack of a controllable method for extending the propagation distance of the focused laser pulse. The ensuing short acceleration distance resulted in low-energy beams with 100 percent electron energy...

  2. Tapered plasma channels to phase-lock accelerating and focusing forces in laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittershofer, W.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Gruner, F.J.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-05-17

    Tapered plasma channels are considered for controlling dephasing of a beam with respect to a plasma wave driven by a weakly-relativistic, short-pulse laser. Tapering allows for enhanced energy gain in a single laser plasma accelerator stage. Expressions are derived for the taper, or longitudinal plasma density variation, required to maintain a beam at a constant phase in the longitudinal and/or transverse fields of the plasma wave. In a plasma channel, the phase velocities of the longitudinal and transverse fields differ, and, hence, the required tapering differs. The length over which the tapered plasma density becomes singular is calculated. Linear plasma tapering as well as discontinuous plasma tapering, which moves beams to adjacent plasma wave buckets, are also considered. The energy gain of an accelerated electron in a tapered laser-plasma accelerator is calculated and the laser pulse length to optimize the energy gain is determined.

  3. Energy spread in plasma-based acceleration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reitsma, A.; Trines, R.; Goloviznin, V.

    2000-01-01

    Electron acceleration in a one-dimensional plasma wave has been simulated, with emphasis on minimizing the energy spread of an accelerated electron bunch, while keeping the mean energy gain at a reasonable level. Bunch length, beam loading, and the injection phase are tuned to reach this goal. The s

  4. New Trends in Induction Accelerator Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caporaso, G J

    2002-12-05

    Recent advances in solid-state modulators now permit the design of a new class of high current accelerators. These new accelerators will be able to operate in burst mode at frequencies of several MHz with unprecedented flexibility and precision in pulse format. These new modulators can drive accelerators to high average powers that far exceed those of any other technology and can be used to enable precision beam manipulations. New insulator technology combined with novel pulse forming lines and switching may enable the construction of a new type of high gradient, high current accelerator. Recent developments in these areas will be reviewed.

  5. Plasma Dark Current in Self-Ionized Plasma Wakefield Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oz, E.; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; /Southern California U.; Iverson, R.; Johnson, D.K.; Krejcik, P.; O' Connell, C.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; Clayton,; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA

    2006-01-30

    Evidence of particle trapping has been observed in a beam driven Plasma Wake Field Accelerator (PWFA) experiment, E164X, conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center by a collaboration which includes USC, UCLA and SLAC. Such trapping produces plasma dark current when the wakefield amplitude is above a threshold value and may place a limit on the maximum acceleration gradient in a PWFA. Trapping and dark current are enhanced when in an ionizing plasma, that is self-ionized by the beam. Here we present experimental results.

  6. The plasma physics of shock acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Frank C.; Ellison, Donald C.

    1991-01-01

    The history and theory of shock acceleration is reviewed, paying particular attention to theories of parallel shocks which include the backreaction of accelerated particles on the shock structure. The work that computer simulations, both plasma and Monte Carlo, are playing in revealing how thermal ions interact with shocks and how particle acceleration appears to be an inevitable and necessary part of the basic plasma physics that governs collisionless shocks is discussed. Some of the outstanding problems that still confront theorists and observers in this field are described.

  7. Optical plasma torch electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wittig

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel, flexible method of witness electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators is described. A quasistationary plasma region is ignited by a focused laser pulse prior to the arrival of the plasma wave. This localized, shapeable optical plasma torch causes a strong distortion of the plasma blowout during passage of the electron driver bunch, leading to collective alteration of plasma electron trajectories and to controlled injection. This optically steered injection is more flexible and faster when compared to hydrodynamically controlled gas density transition injection methods.

  8. Radio Frequencv Induction Plasma Spraying of Molybdenum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Xianliang(蒋显亮); Maher Boulos

    2003-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) induction plasma was used to make free-standing depositionof molybdenum (Mo). The phenomena of particle melting, flattening, and stacking were inves-tigated. The effect of process parameters such as plasma power, chamber pressure, and spraydistance on the phenomena mentioned above was studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)was used to analyze the plasma-processed powder, splats formed, and deposits obtained. Exper-imental results show that less Mo particles are spheroidized when compared to the number ofspheroidized tungsten (W) particles at the same powder feed rate under the same plasma spraycondition. Molten Mo particles can be sufficiently flattened on substrate. The influence of theprocess parameters on the flattening behavior is not significant. Mo deposit is not as dense as Wdeposit, due to the splash and low impact of molten Mo particles. Oxidation of the Mo powderwith a large particle size is not evident under the low pressure plasma spray.

  9. BBU design of linear induction accelerator cells for radiography application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, C.C.; Chen, Y.J.; Gaporaso, G.J.; Houck, T.L.; Molau, N.E.; Focklen, J.; Gregory, S.

    1997-05-06

    There is an ongoing effort to develop accelerating modules for high-current electron accelerators for advanced radiography application. Accelerating modules with low beam-cavity coupling impedances along with gap designs with acceptable field stresses comprise a set of fundamental design criteria. We examine improved cell designs which have been developed for accelerator application in several radiographic operating regimes. We evaluate interaction impedances, analyze the effects of beam structure coupling on beam dynamics (beam break-up instability and corkscrew motion). We also provide estimates of coupling through interesting new high-gradient insulators and evaluate their potential future application in induction cells.

  10. Radiative damping in plasma-based accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyukov, I. Yu.; Nerush, E. N.; Litvak, A. G.

    2012-11-01

    The electrons accelerated in a plasma-based accelerator undergo betatron oscillations and emit synchrotron radiation. The energy loss to synchrotron radiation may seriously affect electron acceleration. The electron dynamics under combined influence of the constant accelerating force and the classical radiation reaction force is studied. It is shown that electron acceleration cannot be limited by radiation reaction. If initially the accelerating force was stronger than the radiation reaction force, then the electron acceleration is unlimited. Otherwise the electron is decelerated by radiative damping up to a certain instant of time and then accelerated without limits. It is shown that regardless of the initial conditions the infinite-time asymptotic behavior of an electron is governed by a self-similar solution providing that the radiative damping becomes exactly equal to 2/3 of the accelerating force. The relative energy spread induced by the radiative damping decreases with time in the infinite-time limit. The multistage schemes operating in the asymptotic acceleration regime when electron dynamics is determined by the radiation reaction are discussed.

  11. Conception design of helium ion FFAG accelerator with induction accelerating cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Huan-Li; XU Yu-Cun; WANG Xiang-Qi; XU Hong-Liang

    2013-01-01

    In the recent decades of particle accelerator R&D area,the fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator has become a highlight for some advantages of its higher beam intensity and lower cost,although there are still some technical challenges.In this paper,the FFAG accelerator is adopted to accelerate a helium ion beam on the one hand for the study of helium embrittlement on fusion reactor envelope material and on the other hand for promoting the conception research and design of the FFAG accelerator and exploring the possibility of developing high power FFAG accelerators.The conventional period focusing unit of the helium ion FFAG accelerator and threedimensional model of the large aperture combinatorial magnet by OPERA-TOSCA are given.For low energy and low revolution frequency,induction acceleration is proposed to replace conventional radio frequency (RF) acceleration for the helium ion FFAG accelerator,which avoids the potential breakdown of the acceleration field caused by the wake field and improves the acceleration repetition frequency to gain higher beam intensity.The main parameters and three-dimensional model of induction cavity are given.Two special constraint waveforms are proposed to refrain from particle accelerating time slip (AT) caused by accelerating voltage drop of flat top and energy deviation.The particle longitudinal motion in two waveforms is simulated.

  12. Plasma-Pulse-Acceleration Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    W. Pucher, Testing a new Type of Circuit Breaker for HVDC , Direct Current, Feb. 1966, pp. 3 - 6 /10/ D. Kind, E. Marx, K. Mollenhoff, J. Salge... breakers /4, 5/, exploding wires /6/, plasma jet tubes /7/, and high pressure radiation sources /8/. In particular current limiting circuit breakers ...length, radius, shaping, material to be evaporated etc.). Here it is possible to transfer design criteria from current-limiting circuit breakers and

  13. Thyristor stack for pulsed inductive plasma generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, C; Jacoby, J; Schweizer, W; Wiechula, J

    2009-03-01

    A thyristor stack for pulsed inductive plasma generation has been developed and tested. The stack design includes a free wheeling diode assembly for current reversal. Triggering of the device is achieved by a high side biased, self supplied gate driver unit using gating energy derived from a local snubber network. The structure guarantees a hard firing gate pulse for the required high dI/dt application. A single fiber optic command is needed to achieve a simultaneous turn on of the thyristors. The stack assembly is used for switching a series resonant circuit with a ringing frequency of 30 kHz. In the prototype pulsed power system described here an inductive discharge has been generated with a pulse duration of 120 micros and a pulse energy of 50 J. A maximum power transfer efficiency of 84% and a peak power of 480 kW inside the discharge were achieved. System tests were performed with a purely inductive load and an inductively generated plasma acting as a load through transformer action at a voltage level of 4.1 kV, a peak current of 5 kA, and a current switching rate of 1 kA/micros.

  14. Hollow plasma channel for positron plasma wakefield acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. D. Kimura

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA has demonstrated the ability to produce very high gradients to accelerate electrons and positrons. In PWFA, a drive bunch of charged particles passes through a uniform plasma, thereby generating a wakefield that accelerates a witness bunch traveling behind the drive bunch. This process works well for electrons, but much less so for positrons due to the positive charge attracting rather than repealing the plasma electrons, which leads to reduced acceleration gradient, halo formation, and emittance growth. This problem can be alleviated by having the positron beam travel through a hollow plasma channel. Presented are modeling results for producing 10–100 cm long hollow plasma channels suitable for positron PWFA. These channels are created utilizing laser-induced gas breakdown in hydrogen gas. The results show that hollow channels with plasma densities of order 10^{16}  cm^{-3} and inner channel radii of order 20  μm are possible using currently available terawatt-level lasers. At these densities and radii, preliminary positron PWFA modeling indicates that longitudinal electric fields on axis can exceed 3  GV/m.

  15. Particle acceleration by ultra-intense laser-plasma interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Nakajima, K

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of particle acceleration by ultra-increase laser-plasma interaction is explained. Laser light can generate very high electric field by focusing with electromagnetic field matched phase with frequency. 1018 W/cm sup 2 laser light produce about 3 TV/m electric field. Many laser accelerators, which particle acceleration method satisfies phase matching particle and electric field, are proposed. In these accelerators, the Inverse Cherenkov Accelerator, Inverse FEL Accelerator and Laser-Plasma Accelerator are explained. Three laser-plasma acceleration mechanisms: Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator, Laser Wake-Field Accelerator (LWFA) and Self-Modulated LWFA, showed particle acceleration by experiments. By developing a high speed Z pinch capillary-plasma optical waveguide, 2.2 TW and 90 fs laser pulse could be propagated 2 cm at 40 mu m focusing radius in 1999. Dirac acceleration or ultra-relativistic ponderomotive acceleration mechanism can increase energy exponentially. (S.Y.)

  16. SLIM, Short-pulse Technology for High Gradient Induction Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arntz, Floyd; /Diversified Tech., Bedford; Kardo-Sysoev, A.; /Ioffe Phys. Tech. Inst.; Krasnykh, A.; /SLAC

    2008-12-16

    A novel short-pulse concept (SLIM) suited to a new generation of a high gradient induction particle accelerators is described herein. It applies advanced solid state semiconductor technology and modern microfabrication techniques to a coreless induction method of charged particle acceleration first proven on a macro scale in the 1960's. Because this approach avoids use of magnetic materials there is the prospect of such an accelerator working efficiently with accelerating pulses in the nanosecond range and, potentially, at megahertz pulse rates. The principal accelerator section is envisioned as a stack of coreless induction cells, the only active element within each being a single, extremely fast (subnanosecond) solid state opening switch: a Drift Step Recovery Diode (DSRD). Each coreless induction cell incorporates an electromagnetic pulse compressor in which inductive energy developed within a transmission-line feed structure over a period of tens of nanoseconds is diverted to the acceleration of the passing charge packet for a few nanoseconds by the abrupt opening of the DSRD switch. The duration of this accelerating output pulse--typically two-to-four nanoseconds--is precisely determined by a microfabricated pulse forming line connected to the cell. Because the accelerating pulse is only nanoseconds in duration, longitudinal accelerating gradients approaching 100 MeV per meter are believed to be achievable without inciting breakdown. Further benefits of this approach are that, (1) only a low voltage power supply is required to produce the high accelerating gradient, and, (2) since the DSRD switch is normally closed, voltage stress is limited to a few nanoseconds per period, hence the susceptibility to hostile environment conditions such as ionizing radiation, mismatch (e.g. in medical applications the peak beam current may be low), strong electromagnetic noise levels, etc is expected to be minimal. Finally, we observe the SLIM concept is not limited to

  17. Mechanisms of Plasma Acceleration in Coronal Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, N.; Reeves, K.; Savcheva, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    Jets are small explosions that occur frequently in the Sun possibly driven by the local reconfiguration of the magnetic field, or reconnection. There are two types of coronal jets: standard jets and blowout jets. The purpose of this project is to determine which mechanisms accelerate plasma in two different jets, one that occurred in January 17, 2015 at the disk of the sun and another in October 24, 2015 at the limb. Two possible acceleration mechanisms are chromospheric evaporation and magnetic acceleration. Using SDO/AIA, Hinode/XRT and IRIS data, we create height-time plots, and calculate the velocities of each wavelength for both jets. We calculate the potential magnetic field of the jet and the general region around it to gain a more detailed understanding of its structure, and determine if the jet is likely to be either a standard or blowout jet. Finally, we calculate the magnetic field strength for different heights along the jet spire, and use differential emission measures to calculate the plasma density. Once we have these two values, we calculate the Alfven speed. When analyzing our results we are looking for certain patterns in our velocities. If the plasma in a jet is accelerated by chromospheric evaporation, we expect the velocities to increase as function of temperature, which is what we observed in the October 24th jet. The magnetic models for this jet also show the Eiffel Tower shaped structure characteristic of standard jets, which tend to have plasma accelerated by this mechanism. On the other hand, if the acceleration mechanism were magnetic acceleration, we would expect the velocities to be similar regardless of temperature. For the January 17th jet, we saw that along the spire, the velocities where approximately 200 km/s in all wavelengths, but the velocities of hot plasma detected at the base were closer to the Alfven speed, which was estimated to be about 2,000 km/s. These observations suggest that the plasma in the January 17th jet is

  18. EIDOSCOPE: particle acceleration at plasma boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaivads, A.; Andersson, G.; Bale, S. D.; Cully, C. M.; De Keyser, J.; Fujimoto, M.; Grahn, S.; Haaland, S.; Ji, H.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Lazarian, A.; Lavraud, B.; Mann, I. R.; Nakamura, R.; Nakamura, T. K. M.; Narita, Y.; Retinò, A.; Sahraoui, F.; Schekochihin, A.; Schwartz, S. J.; Shinohara, I.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.

    2012-04-01

    We describe the mission concept of how ESA can make a major contribution to the Japanese Canadian multi-spacecraft mission SCOPE by adding one cost-effective spacecraft EIDO (Electron and Ion Dynamics Observatory), which has a comprehensive and optimized plasma payload to address the physics of particle acceleration. The combined mission EIDOSCOPE will distinguish amongst and quantify the governing processes of particle acceleration at several important plasma boundaries and their associated boundary layers: collisionless shocks, plasma jet fronts, thin current sheets and turbulent boundary layers. Particle acceleration and associated cross-scale coupling is one of the key outstanding topics to be addressed in the Plasma Universe. The very important science questions that only the combined EIDOSCOPE mission will be able to tackle are: 1) Quantitatively, what are the processes and efficiencies with which both electrons and ions are selectively injected and subsequently accelerated by collisionless shocks? 2) How does small-scale electron and ion acceleration at jet fronts due to kinetic processes couple simultaneously to large scale acceleration due to fluid (MHD) mechanisms? 3) How does multi-scale coupling govern acceleration mechanisms at electron, ion and fluid scales in thin current sheets? 4) How do particle acceleration processes inside turbulent boundary layers depend on turbulence properties at ion/electron scales? EIDO particle instruments are capable of resolving full 3D particle distribution functions in both thermal and suprathermal regimes and at high enough temporal resolution to resolve the relevant scales even in very dynamic plasma processes. The EIDO spin axis is designed to be sun-pointing, allowing EIDO to carry out the most sensitive electric field measurements ever accomplished in the outer magnetosphere. Combined with a nearby SCOPE Far Daughter satellite, EIDO will form a second pair (in addition to SCOPE Mother-Near Daughter) of closely

  19. Trojan horse underdense plasma photocathode acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karger, Oliver [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; DESY, FLA Arbeitsbereich Beschleunigerphysik, Hamburg (Germany); Koenigstein, Thomas; Pretzler, Georg [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik; Rosenzweig, James B. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Hidding, Bernhard [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; DESY, FLA Arbeitsbereich Beschleunigerphysik, Hamburg (Germany); California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2013-07-01

    Relativistic electron beams with small emittance and size are needed for advanced applications such as free electron lasers (FEL) and other coherent light sources in the X-ray regime. Present laser plasma acceleration schemes are hardly able to provide electron beams of sufficient quality on a stable level. The concept of underdense plasma photocathode acceleration uses a beam-driven plasma wave in a two component gas mixture consisting a low ionisation threshold medium (LIT) and a high ionisation threshold medium (HIT) and a low-energy laser pulse. Shapeable electron bunches with sub-fs-length and unprecedented normalized emittance down to 10{sup -9} m rad can be produced. Based on this method, laboratory-sized-experimental setups may enable performance much better than today's conventional coherent hard X-ray sources. The presentation discusses the basic concept, shows recent numero-analytical results and the R and D towards experimental realization.

  20. Inductive Measurement of Plasma Jet Electrical Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Matthew W.; Hawk, Clark W.; Litchford, Ron J.

    2005-01-01

    An inductive probing scheme, originally developed for shock tube studies, has been adapted to measure explosive plasma jet conductivities. In this method, the perturbation of an applied magnetic field by a plasma jet induces a voltage in a search coil, which, in turn, can be used to infer electrical conductivity through the inversion of a Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. A 1-inch diameter probe was designed and constructed, and calibration was accomplished by firing an aluminum slug through the probe using a light-gas gun. Exploratory laboratory experiments were carried out using plasma jets expelled from 15-gram high explosive shaped charges. Measured conductivities were in the range of 3 kS/m for unseeded octol charges and 20 kS/m for seeded octol charges containing 2% potassium carbonate by mass.

  1. Inductively coupled radio frequency methane plasma simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, K.; Farouk, B.; Vitello, P.

    2001-05-01

    A self-consistent two-dimensional radio frequency inductively coupled glow discharge model has been developed in cylindrical coordinates using a fluid model. The objective of the study is to provide insight into charged species dynamics and investigate their effects on plasma process for a methane discharge. The model includes continuity and energy equations for electrons and continuity, momentum and energy equations for positive and negative ions. An electromagnetic model that considers the electric field due to the space charge within the plasma and due to inductive power coupling is also incorporated. For an inductively coupled methane discharge we expect to find higher fluxes of ions and radicals to the cathode, and hence a higher deposition/etch rate for a high-density plasma. The independent control of ion energy to the cathode in an inductively coupled discharge will facilitate control on film deposition/etch rate and uniformity on the wafer. Swarm data as a function of the electron energy are provided as input to the model. The model predicts the electron density, ion density and their fluxes and energies to the cathode. The radical and neutral densities in the discharge are calculated using a gas phase chemistry model. The diamond-like-carbon thin-film deposition/etch rate is predicted using a surface chemistry model. The gas phase chemistry model considers the diffusion of radicals and neutrals along with creation and loss terms. The surface deposition/etching process involves adsorption-desorption, adsorption layer reaction, ion stitching, direct ion incorporation and carbon sputtering.

  2. Advanced test accelerator: a high-current induction linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, E.G.; Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1982-11-01

    The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) is a linear induction accelerator being built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The aim of the ATA, together with its associated physics program is the research and development necessary to resolve whether particle-beam propagation is possible. Since the accelerator is the tool needed to do the basic propagation experiment, many of its design parameters are specified by the physics. The accelerator parameters are: 50 MeV, 10 kA, 70 ns pulse width (FWHM), and a 1 kHz rep-rate during a ten-pulse burst. In addition, beam quality and pulse-to-pulse repeatability must be excellent. The unique features of the accelerator are the 10 kA beam and the 1 kHz burst frequency.

  3. Plasma Diagnostics and Plasma-Surface Interactions in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Titus, Monica Joy

    2010-01-01

    The semiconductor industry's continued trend of manufacturing device features on the nanometer scale requires increased plasma processing control and improved understanding of plasma characteristics and plasma-surface interactions. This dissertation presents a series of experimental results for focus studies conducted in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) system. First novel "on-wafer" diagnostic tools are characterized and related to plasma characteristics. Second, plasma-polymer interactio...

  4. Design of a plasma discharge circuit for particle wakefield acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Anania, M P; Cianchi, A; Di Giovenale, D; Ferrario, M; Flora, F; Gallerano, G P; Ghigo, A; Marocchino, A; Massimo, F; Mostacci, A; Mezi, L; Musumeci, P; Serio, M; 10.1016/j.nima.2013.10.053

    2014-01-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is the most promising acceleration technique known nowadays, able to provide very high accelerating fields (10-100 GV m^-1), enabling acceleration of electrons to GeV energy in few centimetres. However, the quality of the electron bunches accelerated with this technique is still not comparable with that of conventional accelerators; radiofrequency-based accelerators, in fact, are limited in the accelerating field (10-100 MV m^-1) requiring therefore kilometric distances to reach the GeV energies, but can provide very bright electron bunches. Combining high brightness electron bunches from conventional accelerators and high accelerating fields reachable with plasmas could be a good compromise accelerators and high accelerating fields reachable with plasmas could be a good compromise allowing to further accelerate high brightness electron bunches coming from LINAC while preserving electron beam quality. Following the idea of plasma wave resonant excitation driven by a train of shor...

  5. Staging of laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinke, S., E-mail: ssteinke@lbl.gov; Tilborg, J. van; Benedetti, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Daniels, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Swanson, K. K.; Shaw, B. H.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We present results of an experiment where two laser-plasma-accelerator stages are coupled at a short distance by a plasma mirror. Stable electron beams from the first stage were used to longitudinally probe the dark-current-free, quasi-linear wakefield excited by the laser of the second stage. Changing the arrival time of the electron beam with respect to the second stage laser pulse allowed reconstruction of the temporal wakefield structure, determination of the plasma density, and inference of the length of the electron beam. The first stage electron beam could be focused by an active plasma lens to a spot size smaller than the transverse wake size at the entrance of the second stage. This permitted electron beam trapping, verified by a 100 MeV energy gain.

  6. Ionized PVD with an Inductively Coupled Plasma Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, D. B.; Juliano, D. R.; Ruzic, D. N.

    1997-10-01

    Ionized physical vapor deposition (iPVD) is used to enhance the directionality of metal deposition. This is a potential solution to depositing into higher aspect-ratio trenches and vias for metal interconnects. A dc magnetron (Donated by Materials Research Corporation) is coupled with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) coil to increase the ionization of the sputtered metal atoms. This allows metal ions to be accelerated across the plasma sheath to a biased substrate and deposited normally. One coil design has a wider diameter than the substrate to reduce shadowing and flaking effects. Argon and neon working gases and aluminum and copper targets are investigated at varying pressures and power levels. Deposition rates and metal flux ionization fractions are measured with a quartz crystal microbalance and a multi-grid analyzer.

  7. Pulsed Electromagnetic Acceleration of Plasma: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Turchi, Peter J.; Markusic, Thomas E.; Cassibry, Jason T.; Sommer, James; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Much have been learned in the acceleration mechanisms involved in accelerating a plasma electromagnetically in the laboratory over the last 40 years since the early review by Winston Bostik of 1963, but the accumulated understanding is very much scattered throughout the literature. This literature extends back at least to the early sixties and includes Rosenbluth's snowplow model, discussions by Ralph Lovberg, Colgate's boundary-layer model of a current sheet, many papers from the activity at Columbia by Robert Gross and his colleagues, and the relevant, 1-D unsteady descriptions developed from the U. of Maryland theta-pinch studies. Recent progress on the understanding of the pulsed penetration of magnetic fields into collisionless or nearly collisionless plasmas are also be reviewed. Somewhat more recently, we have the two-dimensional, unsteady results in the collisional regime associated with so-called wall-instability in large radius pinch discharges and also in coaxial plasma guns (e.g., Plasma Flow Switch). Among other things, for example, we have the phenomenon of a high- density plasma discharge propagating in a cooaxial gun as an apparently straight sheet (vs paraboloid) because mass re-distribution (on a microsecond timescale) compensates for the 1/r- squared variation of magnetic pressure. We will attempt to collate some of this vast material and bring some coherence tc the development of the subject.

  8. Particle Acceleration and Plasma Heating in the Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Stepanov, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new mechanism of electron acceleration and plasma heating in the solar chromosphere, based on the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The instability develops at the chromospheric footpoints of a flare loop and deforms the local magnetic field. As a result, the electric current in the loop varies, and a resulting inductive electric field appears. A pulse of the induced electric field, together with the pulse of the electric current, propagates along the loop with the Alfvén velocity and begins to accelerate electrons up to an energy of about 1 MeV. Accelerated particles are thermalized in the dense layers of the chromosphere with the plasma density n ≈10^{14} - 10^{15} cm^{-3}, heating them to a temperature of about several million degrees. Joule dissipation of the electric current pulse heats the chromosphere at heights that correspond to densities n ≤10^{11} - 10^{13} cm^{-3}. Observations with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory indicate that chromospheric footpoints of coronal loops might be heated to coronal temperatures and that hot plasma might be injected upwards, which brightens ultra-fine loops from the photosphere to the base of the corona. Thereby, recent observations of the Sun and the model we propose stimulate a déjà vu - they are reminiscent of the concept of the chromospheric flare.

  9. A Microfabricated Inductively Coupled Plasma Excitation Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong-Qing; PU Yong-Ni; SUN Rong-Xia; TANG Yu-Jun; CHEN Wen-Jun; LOU Jian-Zhong; MA Wen

    2008-01-01

    A novel miniaturization of inductively coupled plasma(ICP)source based on printed circuit produced using micro-fabrication techniques is presented.The basic parameters of the novel ICP,including its radio frequency,power loss,size,and argon consumption are less than 1% of that for the case of atmospheric pressure ICP source.For example,at 100 Pa of argon gas pressure,the present ICP source can be ignited by using the rf power less than 3.5 W.Potential applications of the ICP is discussed.

  10. Axionic suppression of plasma wakefield acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, D. A.; Noble, A.; Walton, T. J.

    2016-09-01

    Contemporary attempts to explain the existence of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using plasma-based wakefield acceleration deliberately avoid non-standard model particle physics. However, such proposals exploit some of the most extreme environments in the Universe and it is conceivable that hypothetical particles outside the standard model have significant implications for the effectiveness of the acceleration process. Axions solve the strong CP problem and provide one of the most important candidates for cold dark matter, and their potential significance in the present context should not be overlooked. Our analysis of the field equations describing a plasma augmented with axions uncovers a dramatic axion-induced suppression of the energy gained by a test particle in the wakefield driven by a particle bunch, or an intense pulse of electromagnetic radiation, propagating at ultra-relativistic speeds within the strongest magnetic fields in the Universe.

  11. Shock acceleration in partially neutral plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Morlino, G; Blasi, P; Caprioli, D

    2010-01-01

    We present the non-linear theory of shock acceleration applied to SNRs expanding into partially neutral plasma. Using this theory we show how the Balmer lines detected from young SNRs can be used to test the efficiency of shocks in the production of cosmic rays. In particular we investigate the effect of charge-exchange between protons and neutral hydrogen occurring in the precursor formed ahead of the shock. In this precursor the CR pressure accelerate the ionized component of the plasma and a relative velocity between protons and neutral hydrogen is established. On the other hand the charge-exchange process tends to equilibrate ions and neutrals resulting in the heating of both components. We show that even when the shock converts only a few per cent of the total bulk kinetic energy into CRs, the heating is efficient enough to produce a detectable broadening of the narrow Balmer lines emitted by the neutral hydrogen.

  12. Photon Acceleration Based On Laser-Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    One dimensional electron density perturbation is derived by using the cold fluid equation, Possion's equation and the conti nuity equation. The perturbation is generated by a driving laser pulse propagating through a plasma. The upshifting of the frequency of a trailing pulse induced by density perturbation is studied by using optical metric. The results show that it is possible that the photon will gain energy from the wakefield when assuming photon's number to be conserved, i.e., the photon will be accelerated.

  13. Awakening the potential of plasma acceleration

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Civil engineering has begun for the new AWAKE experiment, which looks to push the boundaries of particle acceleration. This proof-of-principle experiment will harness the power of wakefields generated by proton beams in plasma cells, producing accelerator gradients hundreds of times higher than those used in current RF cavities.   Civil engineering works are currently ongoing at the AWAKE facility. As one of CERN's accelerator R&D experiments, the AWAKE project is rather unique. Like all of CERN's experiments, AWAKE is a collaborative endeavour with institutes and organisations participating around the world. "But unlike fixed-target experiments, where the users take over once CERN has delivered the facility, in AWAKE, the synchronised proton, electron and laser beams provided by CERN are an integral part of the experiment," explains Edda Gschwendtner, CERN AWAKE project leader. "So, of course, CERN's involvement in the project goes well...

  14. Simulations for Plasma and Laser Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Lehe, Rémi

    Computer simulations have had a profound impact on the design and understanding of past and present plasma acceleration experiments, and will be a key component for turning plasma accelerators from a promising technology into a mainstream scientific tool. In this article, we present an overview of the numerical techniques used with the most popular approaches to model plasma-based accelerators: electromagnetic particle-in-cell, quasistatic and ponderomotive guiding center. The material that is presented is intended to serve as an introduction to the basics of those approaches, and to advances (some of them very recent) that have pushed the state of the art, such as the optimal Lorentz-boosted frame, advanced laser envelope solvers and the elimination of numerical Cherenkov instability. The particle-in-cell method, which has broader interest and is more standardized, is presented in more depth. Additional topics that are cross-cutting, such as azimuthal Fourier decomposition or filtering, are also discussed, as well as potential challenges and remedies in the initialization of simulations and output of data. Examples of simulations using the techniques that are presented have been left out of this article for conciseness, and because simulation results are best understood when presented together, and contrasted with theoretical and/or experimental results, as in other articles of this volume.

  15. Acceleration of solar wind in polar coronal holes by induction heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertkov, A. D.; Shkrebets, A. E.; Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Soldatov, V. A.

    1995-01-01

    The universal induction heating mechanism supplying with the energy all the processes of coronal heating and the solar wind acceleration is developed. The observed relative 'trembling' of photospheric super-large scale magnetic fields with quasi-periods of 1-4 days amounts 30-40 percent in amplitude. The inductive electric field appears in the corona. The electric currents cause the Joule dissipation. The uneven heating leads to the solar wind acceleration. A model is suggested in which high-speed streams in space are caused by the combination of the enhanced inductive energy flux from the solar coronal active regions; the work against the regular magnetic field; losses from coronal emission. The consideration is made in terms of the dissipative solar wind theory with the finite electrical conductivity of plasma. The leakage of plasma and the energy flux across the magnetic field, caused by the induction heating processes, are taken into account. The polar coronal holes (and the mid-latitude ones) are indicators of energy transfer balance but not direct sources of high-speed streams in the solar wind.

  16. Accelerated simulation methods for plasma kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caflisch, Russel

    2016-11-01

    Collisional kinetics is a multiscale phenomenon due to the disparity between the continuum (fluid) and the collisional (particle) length scales. This paper describes a class of simulation methods for gases and plasmas, and acceleration techniques for improving their speed and accuracy. Starting from the Landau-Fokker-Planck equation for plasmas, the focus will be on a binary collision model that is solved using a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Acceleration of this method is achieved by coupling the particle method to a continuum fluid description. The velocity distribution function f is represented as a combination of a Maxwellian M (the thermal component) and a set of discrete particles fp (the kinetic component). For systems that are close to (local) equilibrium, this reduces the number N of simulated particles that are required to represent f for a given level of accuracy. We present two methods for exploiting this representation. In the first method, equilibration of particles in fp, as well as disequilibration of particles from M, due to the collision process, is represented by a thermalization/dethermalization step that employs an entropy criterion. Efficiency of the representation is greatly increased by inclusion of particles with negative weights. This significantly complicates the simulation, but the second method is a tractable approach for negatively weighted particles. The accelerated simulation method is compared with standard PIC-DSMC method for both spatially homogeneous problems such as a bump-on-tail and inhomogeneous problems such as nonlinear Landau damping.

  17. Proton acceleration from magnetized overdense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuri, Deep Kumar; Das, Nilakshi; Patel, Kartik

    2017-01-01

    Proton acceleration by an ultraintense short pulse circularly polarized laser from an overdense three dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell (PIC) 3D-PIC simulations. The axial magnetic field modifies the dielectric constant of the plasma, which causes a difference in the behaviour of ponderomotive force in case of left and right circularly polarized laser pulse. When the laser is right circularly polarized, the ponderomotive force gets enhanced due to cyclotron effects generating high energetic electrons, which, on reaching the target rear side accelerates the protons via target normal sheath acceleration process. On the other hand, in case of left circular polarization, the effects get reversed causing a suppression of the ponderomotive force at a short distance and lead towards a rise in the radiation pressure, which results in the effective formation of laser piston. Thus, the axial magnetic field enhances the effect of radiation pressure in case of left circularly polarized laser resulting in the generation of high energetic protons at the target front side. The transverse motion of protons get reduced as they gyrate around the axial magnetic field which increases the beam collimation to some extent. The optimum thickness of the overdense plasma target is found to be increased in the presence of an axial magnetic field.

  18. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Esarey, Eric H.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Leemans, Wim P.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Ben; Durant, Marc; Hamill, Paul; Messmer, Peter; Mullowney, Paul; Nieter, Chet; Paul, Kevin; Shasharina, Svetlana; Veitzer, Seth; Weber, Gunther; Rubel, Oliver; Ushizima, Daniela; Bethel, Wes; Wu, John

    2009-03-20

    Compared to conventional particle accelerators, plasmas can sustain accelerating fields that are thousands of times higher. To exploit this ability, massively parallel SciDAC particle simulations provide physical insight into the development of next-generation accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. These plasma-based accelerators offer a path to more compact, ultra-fast particle and radiation sources for probing the subatomic world, for studying new materials and new technologies, and for medical applications.

  19. Beam dynamics in a long-pulse linear induction accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekdahl, Carl [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abeyta, Epifanio O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragon, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Rita [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cook, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dalmas, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esquibel, Kevin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gallegos, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garnett, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harrison, James F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Jeffrey B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jacquez, Edward B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Cuistian, Brian T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Nicholas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nath, Subrato [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nielsen, Kurt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prichard, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rose, Chris R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Manolito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schauer, Martin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seitz, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulze, Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bender, Howard A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Broste, William B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carlson, Carl A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Frayer, Daniel K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Douglas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tom, C Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trainham, C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scarpetti, Raymond [LLNL; Genoni, Thomas [VOSS; Hughes, Thomas [VOSS; Toma, Carsten [VOSS

    2010-01-01

    The second axis of the Dual Axis Radiography of Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility produces up to four radiographs within an interval of 1.6 microseconds. It accomplishes this by slicing four micro-pulses out of a long 1.8-kA, 16.5-MeV electron beam pulse and focusing them onto a bremsstrahlung converter target. The long beam pulse is created by a dispenser cathode diode and accelerated by the unique DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator (LIA). Beam motion in the accelerator would be a problem for radiography. High frequency motion, such as from beam breakup instability, would blur the individual spots. Low frequency motion, such as produced by pulsed power variation, would produce spot to spot differences. In this article, we describe these sources of beam motion, and the measures we have taken to minimize it.

  20. Coronal Jet Plasma Properties and Acceleration Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Samaiyah; Reeves, Kathy; Savcheva, Antonia; Soto, Natalia

    2017-08-01

    Coronal jets are transient eruptions of plasma typically characterized by aprominent long spire and a bright base, and sometimes accompanied by a small filament. Jets are thought to be produced by magnetic reconnection when small-scale bipolar magnetic fields emerge into an overlying coronal field or move into a locally unipolar region. Coronal jets are commonly divided into two categories: standard jets and blowout jets, and are found in both quiet and active regions. The plasma properties of jets vary across type and location, therefore understanding the underlying acceleration mechanisms are difficult to pin down. In this work, we examine both blow-out and standard jets using high resolution multi-wavelength data. Although reconnection is commonly accepted as the primary acceleration mechanism, we also consider the contribution chromospheric evaporation to jet formation. We use seven coronal channels from SDO/AIA , Hinode/XRT Be-thin and IRIS slit-jaw data. In addition, we separate the Fe-XVIII line from the SDO/94Å channel. We calculate plasma properties including velocity, Alfven speed, and density as a function of wavelength and Differential Emission Measure (DEM). Finally, we explore the magnetic topology of the jets using Coronal Modeling System (CMS) to construct potential and non-linear force free models based on the flux rope insertion method.

  1. Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Sokollik, T.; Smith, A.; Rodgers, D.; Donahue, R.; Bryne, W.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. The sensitivity of the Lanex Fast decreased by 1percent per 100 MeV increase of the energy. The linear response of the screen against the charge was verified with charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm2 and 0.4 pC/ps/mm2, respectively. For electron beams from the laser plasma accelerator, a comprehensive study of charge diagnostics has been performed using a Lanex screen, an integrating current transformer, and an activation based measurement. The charge measured by each diagnostic was found to be within +/-10 percent.

  2. MHD simulations of Plasma Jets and Plasma-surface interactions in Coaxial Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Vivek; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2016-10-01

    Coaxial plasma accelerators belong to a class of electromagnetic acceleration devices which utilize a self-induced Lorentz force to accelerate magnetized thermal plasma to large velocities ( 40 Km/s). The plasma jet generated as a result, due to its high energy density, can be used to mimic the plasma-surface interactions at the walls of thermonuclear fusion reactors during an Edge Localized Mode (ELM) disruption event. We present the development of a Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation tool to describe the plasma acceleration and jet formation processes in coaxial plasma accelerators. The MHD model is used to study the plasma-surface impact interaction generated by the impingement of the jet on a target material plate. The study will characterize the extreme conditions generated on the target material surface by resolving the magnetized shock boundary layer interaction and the viscous/thermal diffusion effects. Additionally, since the plasma accelerator is operated in vacuum conditions, a novel plasma-vacuum interface tracking algorithm is developed to simulate the expansion of the high density plasma into a vacuum background in a physically consistent manner.

  3. Electron beam manipulation, injection and acceleration in plasma wakefield accelerators by optically generated plasma density spikes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittig, Georg; Karger, Oliver S.; Knetsch, Alexander [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Xi, Yunfeng; Deng, Aihua; Rosenzweig, James B. [Particle Beam Physics Laboratory, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Bruhwiler, David L. [RadiaSoft LLC, Boulder, CO 80304 (United States); RadiaBeam Technologies LLC (United States); Smith, Jonathan [Tech-X UK Ltd, Daresbury, Cheshire WA4 4FS (United Kingdom); Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, Dino A.; Manahan, Grace G. [Physics Department, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Hidding, Bernhard [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Physics Department, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    We discuss considerations regarding a novel and robust scheme for optically triggered electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators [1]. In this technique, a transversely propagating focused laser pulse ignites a quasi-stationary plasma column before the arrival of the plasma wake. This localized plasma density enhancement or optical “plasma torch” distorts the blowout during the arrival of the electron drive bunch and modifies the electron trajectories, resulting in controlled injection. By changing the gas density, and the laser pulse parameters such as beam waist and intensity, and by moving the focal point of the laser pulse, the shape of the plasma torch, and therefore the generated trailing beam, can be tuned easily. The proposed method is much more flexible and faster in generating gas density transitions when compared to hydrodynamics-based methods, and it accommodates experimentalists needs as it is a purely optical process and straightforward to implement.

  4. Electron beam manipulation, injection and acceleration in plasma wakefield accelerators by optically generated plasma density spikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig, Georg; Karger, Oliver S.; Knetsch, Alexander; Xi, Yunfeng; Deng, Aihua; Rosenzweig, James B.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Smith, Jonathan; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, Dino A.; Manahan, Grace G.; Hidding, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    We discuss considerations regarding a novel and robust scheme for optically triggered electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators [1]. In this technique, a transversely propagating focused laser pulse ignites a quasi-stationary plasma column before the arrival of the plasma wake. This localized plasma density enhancement or optical "plasma torch" distorts the blowout during the arrival of the electron drive bunch and modifies the electron trajectories, resulting in controlled injection. By changing the gas density, and the laser pulse parameters such as beam waist and intensity, and by moving the focal point of the laser pulse, the shape of the plasma torch, and therefore the generated trailing beam, can be tuned easily. The proposed method is much more flexible and faster in generating gas density transitions when compared to hydrodynamics-based methods, and it accommodates experimentalists needs as it is a purely optical process and straightforward to implement.

  5. Efficiency Versus Instability in Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, Valeri [Fermilab; Burov, Alexey [Fermilab; Nagaitsev, Sergei [Fermilab

    2017-01-05

    Plasma wake-field acceleration in a strongly nonlinear (a.k.a. the blowout) regime is one of the main candidates for future high-energy colliders. For this case, we derive a universal efficiency-instability relation, between the power efficiency and the key instability parameter of the witness bunch. We also show that in order to stabilize the witness bunch in a regime with high power efficiency, the bunch needs to have high energy spread, which is not presently compatible with collider-quality beam properties. It is unclear how such limitations could be overcome for high-luminosity linear colliders.

  6. Plasma wakefield acceleration at CLARA facility in Daresbury Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, G., E-mail: guoxing.xia@manchester.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Nie, Y. [Deutsche Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Mete, O.; Hanahoe, K. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Dover, M.; Wigram, M.; Wright, J.; Zhang, J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Smith, J. [Tech-X UK Corporation, Daresbury Innovation Centre, Warrington (United Kingdom); Pacey, T.; Li, Y. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. [The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    A plasma accelerator research station (PARS) has been proposed to study the key issues in electron driven plasma wakefield acceleration at CLARA facility in Daresbury Laboratory. In this paper, the quasi-nonlinear regime of beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration is analysed. The wakefield excited by various CLARA beam settings are simulated by using a 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) code. For a single drive beam, an accelerating gradient up to 3 GV/m can be achieved. For a two bunch acceleration scenario, simulation shows that a witness bunch can achieve a significant energy gain in a 10–50 cm long plasma cell.

  7. Progress toward a prototype recirculating ion induction accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Cable, M.D. [and others

    1996-06-01

    The U.S. Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) Program is developing the physics and technology of ion induction accelerators, with the goal of electric power production by means of heavy ion beam-driven inertial fusion (commonly called heavy ion fusion, or HIF). Such accelerators are the principal candidates for inertial fusion power production applications, because they are expected to enjoy high efficiency, inherently high pulse repetition frequency (power plants are expected to inject and burn several fusion targets per second), and high reliability. In addition (and in contrast with laser beams, which are focused with optical lenses) heavy-ion beams will be focused onto the target by magnetic fields, which cannot be damaged by target explosions. Laser beams are used in present-day and planned near-term facilities (such as LLNUs Nova and the National Ignition Facility, which is being designed) because they can focus beams onto very small, intensely illuminated spots for scaled experiments and because the laser technology is already available. An induction accelerator works by passing the beam through a series of accelerating modules, each of which applies an electromotive force to the beam as it goes by; effectively, the beam acts as the secondary winding of a series of efficient one-turn transformers. The authors present plans for and progress toward the development of a small (4.5-m-diam) prototype recirculator, which will accelerate singly charged potassium ions through 15 laps, increasing the ion energy from 80 to 320 keV and the beam current from 2 to 8 mA. Beam confinement and bending are effected with permanent-magnet quadrupoles and electric dipoles, respectively. The design is based on scaling laws and on extensive particle and fluid simulations of the behavior of the space charge-dominated beam.

  8. Beatwave acceleration in a plasma metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, A.; Alves, E. P.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2015-11-01

    These media can be engineered to produce negative indices of refraction, which support the propagation of unusual light waves. In addition, the interaction of these unusual light waves with charged particles in the medium can lead to unusual features like negative radiation pressure. It is well known that two counter propagating chirped lasers in a positive response medium can lead to energy transfer from the waves to the particles leading to its acceleration. In this work, we explore the combination of two co-propagating EM pulses which, under the right conditions, achieve the same results as the previous scheme, but now in a plasma metamaterial. Depending on the chosen frequency, one of the pulses can experience a positive response medium (n>0) and the other a negative one (n<0), leading to anti-parallel phase velocities. This setup is capable of creating a beat wave which enables the acceleration of charged particles via the radiation tension. Our results are supported by numerical simulations using meta-OSIRIS, which combines a solver to deal with dielectric and magnetic materials with arbitrary EM linear properties with the standard PIC algorithm. Our simulations addressing this new setup provide results consistent with the theoretical predictions. Work supported by the European Research Council (Accelerates ERC-2010-AdG 267841).

  9. Undulative induction electron accelerator for the waste and natural water purification systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kulish, Victor V; Gubanov, I V

    2001-01-01

    The project analysis of Undulative Induction Accelerator (EH - accelerator) for the waste and natural water purification systems is accomplished. It is shown that the use of the four-channel design of induction block and the standard set of auxiliary equipment (developed earlier for the Linear Induction Accelerators - LINACs) allow to construct commercially promising purification systems. A quality analysis of the accelerator is done and the optimal parameters are chosen taking into account the specific sphere of its usage.

  10. Application of Plasma Waveguides to High Energy Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milchberg, Howard [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This grant supported basic experimental, theoretical and computer simulation research into developing a compact, high pulse repetition rate laser accelerator using the direct laser acceleration mechanism in plasma-based slow wave structures.

  11. Summary Report of Working Group 6: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemans, Wim P.; Downer, Michael; Siders, Craig

    2006-07-01

    A summary is given of presentations and discussions in theLaser-Plasma Acceleration Working Group at the 2006 Advanced AcceleratorConcepts Workshop. Presentation highlights include: widespreadobservation of quasi-monoenergetic electrons; good agreement betweenmeasured and simulated beam properties; the first demonstration oflaser-plasma acceleration up to 1 GeV; single-shot visualization of laserwakefield structure; new methods for measuring<100 fs electronbunches; and new methods for "machining" laser-plasma acceleratorstructures. Discussion of future direction includes: developing a roadmapfor laser-plasma acceleration beyond 1 GeV; a debate over injection andguiding; benchmarking simulations with improved wake diagnostics;petawatt laser technology for future laser-plasmaaccelerators.

  12. Summary Report of Working Group 1: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Clayton, C.; Lu, W.; Thomas, A.G.R.

    2010-06-01

    Advances in and physics of the acceleration of particles using underdense plasma structures driven by lasers were the topics of presentations and discussions in Working Group 1 of the 2010 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop. Such accelerators have demonstrated gradients several orders beyond conventional machines, with quasi-monoenergetic beams at MeV-GeV energies, making them attractive candidates for next generation accelerators. Workshop discussions included advances in control over injection and laser propagation to further improve beam quality and stability, detailed diagnostics and physics models of the acceleration process, radiation generation as a source and diagnostic, and technological tools and upcoming facilities to extend the reach of laser-plasma accelerators.

  13. Centrifugal acceleration of plasma in pulsar magnetosphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R T Gangadhara; V Krishna

    2003-12-01

    We present a relativistic model for the centrifugal acceleration of plasma bunches and the coherent radio emission in pulsar magnetosphere. We find that rotation broadens the width of leading component compared to the width of trailing component. We explain this difference in the component widths using the nested cone emission geometry. We estimate the effect of pulsar spin on the Stokes parameters, and find that the inclination between the rotation and magnetic axes can introduce an asymmetry in the circular polarization of the conal components. We analyse the single pulse polarization data of PSR B0329+54 at 606 MHz, and find that in its conal components, one sense of circular polarization dominates in the leading component while the other sense dominates in the trailing component. Our simulation shows that changing the sign of the impact parameter changes the sense of circular polarization as well as the swing of polarization angle.

  14. Magnetic circuit for hall effect plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzella, David H. (Inventor); Jacobson, David T. (Inventor); Jankovsky, Robert S. (Inventor); Hofer, Richard (Inventor); Peterson, Peter (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A Hall effect plasma accelerator includes inner and outer electromagnets, circumferentially surrounding the inner electromagnet along a thruster centerline axis and separated therefrom, inner and outer magnetic conductors, in physical connection with their respective inner and outer electromagnets, with the inner magnetic conductor having a mostly circular shape and the outer magnetic conductor having a mostly annular shape, a discharge chamber, located between the inner and outer magnetic conductors, a magnetically conducting back plate, in magnetic contact with the inner and outer magnetic conductors, and a combined anode electrode/gaseous propellant distributor, located at a bottom portion of the discharge chamber. The inner and outer electromagnets, the inner and outer magnetic conductors and the magnetically conducting back plate form a magnetic circuit that produces a magnetic field that is largely axial and radially symmetric with respect to the thruster centerline.

  15. Staging and laser acceleration of ions in underdense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Antonio; Hafizi, Bahman; Helle, Michael; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Gordon, Daniel; Kaganovich, Dmitri; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Pogorelsky, Igor; Babzien, Markus; Miao, Chenlong; Dover, Nicholas; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Ettlinger, Oliver

    2017-03-01

    Accelerating ions from rest in a plasma requires extra considerations because of their heavy mass. Low phase velocity fields or quasi-electrostatic fields are often necessary, either by operating above or near the critical density or by applying other slow wave generating mechanisms. Solid targets have been a favorite and have generated many good results. High density gas targets have also been reported to produce energetic ions. It is interesting to consider acceleration of ions in laser-driven plasma configurations that will potentially allow continuous acceleration in multiple consecutive stages. The plasma will be derived from gaseous targets, producing plasma densities slightly below the critical plasma density (underdense) for the driving laser. Such a plasma is experimentally robust, being repeatable and relatively transparent to externally injected ions from a previous stage. When optimized, multiple stages of this underdense laser plasma acceleration mechanism can progressively accelerate the ions to a high final energy. For a light mass ion such as the proton, relativistic velocities could be reached, making it suitable for further acceleration by high phase velocity plasma accelerators to energies appropriate for High Energy Physics applications. Negatively charged ions such as antiprotons could be similarly accelerated in this multi-staged ion acceleration scheme.

  16. Beam-driven, Plasma-based Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Muggli, P

    2016-01-01

    We briefly give some of the characteristics of the beam-driven, plasma-based particle accelerator known as the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA). We also mention some of the major results that have been obtained since the birth of the concept. We focus on high-energy particle beams where possible.

  17. Beam-driven, Plasma-based Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Muggli, P.

    2016-01-01

    We briefly give some of the characteristics of the beam-driven, plasma-based particle accelerator known as the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA). We also mention some of the major results that have been obtained since the birth of the concept. We focus on high-energy particle beams where possible.

  18. Demonstration of the hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gessner, Spencer J.

    2016-09-17

    A plasma wakefield accelerator is a device that converts the energy of a relativistic particle beam into a large-amplitude wave in a plasma. The plasma wave, or wakefield, supports an enormous electricfield that is used to accelerate a trailing particle beam. The plasma wakefield accelerator can therefore be used as a transformer, transferring energy from a high-charge, low-energy particle beam into a high-energy, low-charge particle beam. This technique may lead to a new generation of ultra-compact, high-energy particle accelerators. The past decade has seen enormous progress in the field of plasma wakefield acceleration with experimental demonstrations of the acceleration of electron beams by several gigaelectron-volts. The acceleration of positron beams in plasma is more challenging, but also necessary for the creation of a high-energy electron-positron collider. Part of the challenge is that the plasma responds asymmetrically to electrons and positrons, leading to increased disruption of the positron beam. One solution to this problem, first proposed over twenty years ago, is to use a hollow channel plasma which symmetrizes the response of the plasma to beams of positive and negative charge, making it possible to accelerate positrons in plasma without disruption. In this thesis, we describe the theory relevant to our experiment and derive new results when needed. We discuss the development and implementation of special optical devices used to create long plasma channels. We demonstrate for the first time the generation of meter-scale plasma channels and the acceleration of positron beams therein.

  19. Recent advances in kicker pulser technology for linear induction accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y J; Cook, E; Davis, B; Dehope, W J; Yen, B

    1999-06-01

    Recent progress in the development and understanding of linear induction accelerator have produced machines with 10s of MeV of beam energy and multi-kiloampere currents. Near-term machines, such as DARHT-2, are envisioned with microsecond pulselengths. Fast beam kickers, based on cylindrical electromagnetic stripline structures, will permit effective use of these extremely high-energy beams in an increasing number of applications. In one application, radiography, kickers were an essential element in resolving temporal evolution of hydrodynamic events by cleaving out individual pulses from long, microsecond beams. Advanced schemes are envisioned where these individual pulses are redirected through varying length beam lines and suitably recombined for stereographic imaging or tomographic reconstruction. Recent advances in fast kickers and their pulsed power technology are described. Kicker pulsers based on both planar triode and all solid-state componentry are discussed and future development plans are presented.

  20. Training course on inductively coupled plasma spectrometry - Note

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.

    TRAINING COURSE ON INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA SPECTROMETRY In the present day geological, chemical, environmental and archaeological research activities, the Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Spectrometry is established as a cost-effective multi... research and educational institutions and the industry participated in the course. The participants were research students, teachers and professionals from the states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Gujarat, Maharashtra, Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Goa, Tamil...

  1. Multipurpose 5-MeV linear induction accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birx, D.L.; Hawkins, S.A.; Poor, S.E.; Reginato, L.L. Smith, M.W.

    1984-06-11

    Although linear induction accelerators (LIAs) are quite reliable by most standards, they are limited in repeating rate, average power, and reliability because the final stage of energy delivery is based on spark gap performance. In addition, they have a low duty factor of operation. To provide a higher burst rate and greater reliability, the researchers used new technology to develop a magnetic pulse compression scheme that eliminates all spark gaps and exceeds requirements. The paper describes the scheme. The magnetic drive system can be tailored to drive induction cells from a few kA to over 10 kA at 500 kV, with average beam power levels in the megawatts. This new 5-MeV, 2.5-kA LIA under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will be used for the development of high brightness sources and will provide a test bed for the new technology, which should lead to LIAs that surpass the radio frequency linacs for efficiency and reliability, as well as fit other industrial applications, such as sewage sterilization.

  2. Multipurpose 5-MeV linear induction accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birx, D. L.; Hawkins, S. A.; Poor, S. E.; Reginato, L. L.; Smith, M. W.

    1984-06-01

    Although linear induction accelerators (LIAs) are quite reliable by most standards, they are limited in repeating rate, average power, and reliability because the final stage of energy delivery is based on spark gap performance. In addition, they have a low duty factor of operation. To provide a higher burst rate and greater reliability, new technology was used to develop a magnetic pulse compression scheme that eliminates all spark gaps and exceeds requirements. The magnetic drive system are tailored to drive induction cells from a few kA to over 10 kA at 500 kV, with average beam power levels in the megawatts. This new 5-MeV, 2.5-kA LIA under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will be used for the development of high brightness sources and will provide a test bed for the new technology, which should lead to LIAs that surpass the radio frequency linacs for efficiency and reliability, as well as fit other industrial applications, such as sewage sterilization.

  3. Luminosity Limitations in Linear Colliders Based on Plasma Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Lebedev, Valeri; Nagaitsev, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    Particle acceleration in plasma creates a possibility of exceptionally high accelerating gradients and appears as a very attractive option for future linear electron-positron and/or photon-photon colliders. These high accelerating gradients were already demonstrated in a number of experiments. However, a linear collider requires exceptionally high beam brightness which still needs to be demonstrated. In this article we discuss major phenomena which limit the beam brightness of accelerated beam and, consequently, the collider luminosity.

  4. Probing electron acceleration and X-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, C; Corde, S; Brijesh, P; Lambert, G; Mangles, S P D; Bloom, M S; Kneip, S; Malka, V

    2013-01-01

    While laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated a strong potential in the acceleration of electrons up to giga-electronvolt energies, few experimental tools for studying the acceleration physics have been developed. In this paper, we demonstrate a method for probing the acceleration process. A second laser beam, propagating perpendicular to the main beam is focused in the gas jet few nanosecond before the main beam creates the accelerating plasma wave. This second beam is intense enough to ionize the gas and form a density depletion which will locally inhibit the acceleration. The position of the density depletion is scanned along the interaction length to probe the electron injection and acceleration, and the betatron X-ray emission. To illustrate the potential of the method, the variation of the injection position with the plasma density is studied.

  5. Tuning the DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator focusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekdahl, Carl A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-24

    Flash radiography of large hydrodynamic experiments driven by high explosives is a well-known diagnostic technique in use at many laboratories, and the Dual-Axis Radiography for Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos produces flash radiographs of large hydrodynamic experiments. Two linear induction accelerators (LIAs) make the bremsstrahlung radiographic source spots for orthogonal views of each test. The 2-kA, 20-MeV Axis-I LIA creates a single 60-ns radiography pulse. The 1.7-kA, 16.5-MeV Axis-II LIA creates up to four radiography pulses by kicking them out of a longer pulse that has a 1.6-{mu}s flattop. The Axis-II injector, LIA, kicker, and downstream transport (DST) to the bremsstrahlung converter are described. Adjusting the magnetic focusing and steering elements to optimize the electron-beam transport through an LIA is often called 'tuning.' As in all high-current LIAs, the focusing field is designed to be as close to that of the ideal continuous solenoid as physically possible. In ideal continuous solenoidal transport a smoothly varying beam size can easily be found for which radial forces balance, and the beam is said to be 'matched' to the focusing field. A 'mismatched' beam exhibits unwanted oscillations in size, which are a source of free energy that contributes to emittance growth. This is undesirable, because in the absence of beam-target effects, the radiographic spot size is proportional to the emittance. Tuning the Axis-II LIA is done in two steps. First, the solenoidal focusing elements are set to values designed to provide a matched beam with little or no envelope oscillations, and little or no beam-breakup (BBU) instability growth. Then, steering elements are adjusted to minimize the motion of the centroid of a well-centered beam at the LIA exit. This article only describes the design of the tune for the focusing solenoids. The DARHT Axis-II LIA was required to be re-tuned after installing an

  6. Spectroscopic measurements of plasma emission light for plasma-based acceleration experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, F.; Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced particle accelerators are based on the excitation of large amplitude plasma waves driven by either electron or laser beams. Future experiments scheduled at the SPARC_LAB test facility aim to demonstrate the acceleration of high brightness electron beams through the so-called resonant Plasma Wakefield Acceleration scheme in which a train of electron bunches (drivers) resonantly excites wakefields into a preformed hydrogen plasma; the last bunch (witness) injected at the proper accelerating phase gains energy from the wake. The quality of the accelerated beam depends strongly on plasma density and its distribution along the acceleration length. The measurements of plasma density of the order of 1016-1017 cm-3 can be performed with spectroscopic measurements of the plasma-emitted light. The measured density distribution for hydrogen filled capillary discharge with both Balmer alpha and Balmer beta lines and shot-to-shot variation are here reported.

  7. Limitations on plasma acceleration due to synchrotron losses

    CERN Document Server

    Barletta, W A; Bonifacio, R; De Salvo, L

    1999-01-01

    In this letter we consider the effect of synchrotron radiation losses due to the betatron motion of the electron beam in its self-induced magnetic field in a plasma accelerator taking into account the charge neutralization factor. The most favorable case is where the plasma density is smaller than the beam density. The contrary regime is strongly disfavored by the synchrotron radiation loss for beams with characteristics for TeV energies. In both cases we find that upon increasing the plasma density the synchrotron losses kill the acceleration process, so that there are limitations on the maximum allowable plasma density.

  8. Localized lower hybrid acceleration of ionospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, P. M.; Vago, J.; Chesney, S.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Lynch, K. A.; Pollock, C. J.; Moore, T. E.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the transverse acceleration of ions in localized regions of intense lower hybrid waves at altitudes near 1000 km in the auroral ionosphere are reported. The acceleration regions are thin filaments with dimensions across geomagnetic field lines of about 50-100 m corresponding to 5-10 thermal ion gyroradii or one hot ion gyroradius. Within the acceleration region lower hybrid waves reach peak-to-peak amplitudes of 100-300 mV/m and ions are accelerated transversely with characteristic energies of the order of 10 eV. These observations are consistent with theories of lower hybrid wave collapse.

  9. A plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using CLARA beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, G., E-mail: guoxing.xia@cockcroft.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Angal-Kalinin, D.; Clarke, J. [STFC/ASTeC, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Smith, J. [Tech-X UK Corporation, Daresbury Innovation Centre, Warrington (United Kingdom); Cormier-Michel, E. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); Jones, J.; Williams, P.H.; Mckenzie, J.W.; Militsyn, B.L. [STFC/ASTeC, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Hanahoe, K.; Mete, O. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Aimidula, A.; Welsch, C.P. [The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); The University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-11

    We propose a Plasma Accelerator Research Station (PARS) based at proposed FEL test facility CLARA (Compact Linear Accelerator for Research and Applications) at Daresbury Laboratory. The idea is to use the relativistic electron beam from CLARA, to investigate some key issues in electron beam transport and in electron beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration, e.g. high gradient plasma wakefield excitation driven by a relativistic electron bunch, two bunch experiment for CLARA beam energy doubling, high transformer ratio, long bunch self-modulation and some other advanced beam dynamics issues. This paper presents the feasibility studies of electron beam transport to meet the requirements for beam driven wakefield acceleration and presents the plasma wakefield simulation results based on CLARA beam parameters. Other possible experiments which can be conducted at the PARS beam line are also discussed.

  10. A plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using CLARA beam

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, G; Clarke, J; Smith, J; Cormier-Michel, E; Jones, J; Williams, P H; Mckenzie, J W; Militsyn, B L; Hanahoe, K; Mete, O; Aimidula, A; Welsch, C P

    2014-01-01

    We propose a Plasma Accelerator Research Station (PARS) based at proposed FEL test facility CLARA (Compact Linear Accelerator for Research and Applications) at Daresbury Laboratory. The idea is to use the relativistic electron beam from CLARA, to investigate some key issues in electron beam transport and in electron beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration, e.g. high gradient plasma wakefield excitation driven by a relativistic electron bunch, two bunch experiment for CLARA beam energy doubling, high transformer ratio, long bunch self-modulation and some other advanced beam dynamics issues. This paper presents the feasibility studies of electron beam transport to meet the requirements for beam driven wakefield acceleration and presents the plasma wakefield simulation results based on CLARA beam parameters. Other possible experiments which can be conducted at the PARS beam line are also discussed.

  11. PIC simulation of electron acceleration in an underdense plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Darvish Molla

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the interesting Laser-Plasma phenomena, when the laser power is high and ultra intense, is the generation of large amplitude plasma waves (Wakefield and electron acceleration. An intense electromagnetic laser pulse can create plasma oscillations through the action of the nonlinear pondermotive force. electrons trapped in the wake can be accelerated to high energies, more than 1 TW. Of the wide variety of methods for generating a regular electric field in plasmas with strong laser radiation, the most attractive one at the present time is the scheme of the Laser Wake Field Accelerator (LWFA. In this method, a strong Langmuir wave is excited in the plasma. In such a wave, electrons are trapped and can acquire relativistic energies, accelerated to high energies. In this paper the PIC simulation of wakefield generation and electron acceleration in an underdense plasma with a short ultra intense laser pulse is discussed. 2D electromagnetic PIC code is written by FORTRAN 90, are developed, and the propagation of different electromagnetic waves in vacuum and plasma is shown. Next, the accuracy of implementation of 2D electromagnetic code is verified, making it relativistic and simulating the generating of wakefield and electron acceleration in an underdense plasma. It is shown that when a symmetric electromagnetic pulse passes through the plasma, the longitudinal field generated in plasma, at the back of the pulse, is weaker than the one due to an asymmetric electromagnetic pulse, and thus the electrons acquire less energy. About the asymmetric pulse, when front part of the pulse has smaller time rise than the back part of the pulse, a stronger wakefield generates, in plasma, at the back of the pulse, and consequently the electrons acquire more energy. In an inverse case, when the rise time of the back part of the pulse is bigger in comparison with that of the back part, a weaker wakefield generates and this leads to the fact that the electrons

  12. "Super-acceleration" of ions in a stationary plasma discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardakov, Vladimir; Ivanov, Sergey; Kazantsev, Alexander; Strokin, Nikolay; Stupin, Aleksey

    2016-10-01

    We report on the detection of the acceleration effect of the bulk of ions in a stationary plasma E × B discharge to energies exceeding considerably the value equivalent to the discharge voltage. We determined the conditions necessary for the generation of high-energy ions, and ascertained the influence exerted on the value of the ion energies by pressure (flow rate) and the kind of plasma-producing gas, and by the value of discharge current. The possible acceleration mechanism is suggested.

  13. Plasma diagnostics and plasma-surface interactions in inductively coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Monica Joy

    The semiconductor industry's continued trend of manufacturing device features on the nanometer scale requires increased plasma processing control and improved understanding of plasma characteristics and plasma-surface interactions. This dissertation presents a series of experimental results for focus studies conducted in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) system. First novel "on-wafer" diagnostic tools are characterized and related to plasma characteristics. Second, plasma-polymer interactions are characterized as a function of plasma species and processing parameters. Complementary simulations accompany each focus study to supplement experimental findings. Wafer heating mechanisms in inductively coupled molecular gas plasmas are explored with PlasmaTemp(TM), a novel "on-wafer" diagnostic tool. Experimental wafer measurements are obtained with the PlasmaTemp(TM) wafer processed in argon (Ar) and argon-oxygen (Ar/O2) mixed plasmas. Wafer heating mechanisms were determined by combining the experimental measurements with a 3-dimensional heat transfer model of the wafer. Comparisons between pure Ar and Ar/O2 plasmas demonstrate that two additional wafer heating mechanisms can be important in molecular gas plasmas compared to atomic gas discharges. Thermal heat conduction from the neutral gas and O-atom recombination on wafer surface can contribute as much as 60% to wafer heating under conditions of low-energy ion bombardment in molecular plasmas. Measurements of a second novel "on-wafer" diagnostic sensor, the PlasmaVolt(TM), were tested and validated in the ICP system for Ar plasmas varying in power and pressure. Sensor measurements were interpreted with a numerical sheath simulation and comparison to scaling laws derived from the inhomogeneous sheath model. The study demonstrates sensor measurements are proportional to the RF-current through the sheath and the scaling is a function of sheath impedance. PlasmaVolt(TM) sensor measurements are proportional to the

  14. SU-8 etching in inductively coupled oxygen plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kristian Hagsted; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Jensen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    Structuring or removal of the epoxy based, photo sensitive polymer SU-8 by inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching (ICP-RIE) was investigated as a function of plasma chemistry, bias power, temperature, and pressure. In a pure oxygen plasma, surface accumulation of antimony from the photo......-initiator introduced severe roughness and reduced etch rate significantly. Addition of SF6 to the plasma chemistry reduced the antimony surface concentration with lower roughness and higher etch rate as an outcome. Furthermore the etch anisotropy could be tuned by controlling the bias power. Etch rates up to 800 nm...

  15. Design and Testing of a Small Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Adam K.; Eskridge, Richard H.; Dominguez, Alexandra; Polzin, Kurt A.; Riley, Daniel P.; Kimberlin, Adam C.

    2015-01-01

    The design and testing of a small inductive pulsed plasma thruster (IPPT), shown in Fig. 1 with all the major subsystems required for a thruster of this kind are described. Thrust measurements and imaging of the device operated in rep-rated mode are presented to quantify the performance envelope of the device. The small IPPT described in this paper was designed to serve as a test-bed for the pulsed gas-valves and solid-state switches required for a IPPTs. A modular design approach was used to permit future modifications and upgrades. The thruster consists of the following sub-systems: a) a multi-turn, spiral-wound acceleration coil (27 cm o.d., 10 cm i.d.) driven by a 10 microFarad capacitor and switched with a high-voltage thyristor, b) a fast pulsed gas-valve, and c.) a glow-discharge pre-ionizer (PI) circuit. The acceleration-coil circuit may be operated at voltages up to 4 kV (the thyristor limit is 4.5 kV). The device may be operated at rep-rates up to 30 Hz with the present gas-valve. Thrust measurements and imaging of the device operated in rep-rated mode will be presented. The pre-ionizer consists of a 0.3 microFarad capacitor charged to 4 kV and connected to two annular stainless-steel electrodes bounding the area of the coil-face. The 4 kV potential is held across them and when the gas is puffed in over the coil, the PI circuit is completed, and a plasma is formed. Even at the less than optimal base-pressure in the chamber (approximately 5 × 10(exp -4) torr), the PI held-off the applied voltage, and only discharged upon command. For a capacitor charge of 2 kV the peak coil current is 4.1 kA, and during this pulse a very bright discharge (much brighter than from the PI alone) was observed (see Fig. 2). Interestingly, for discharges at this charge voltage the PI was not required as the current rise rate, dI/dt, of the coil itself was sufficient to ionize the gas.

  16. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration of an Intense Positron Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, B

    2004-04-21

    The Plasma Wakefield Accelerator (PWFA) is an advanced accelerator concept which possess a high acceleration gradient and a long interaction length for accelerating both electrons and positrons. Although electron beam-plasma interactions have been extensively studied in connection with the PWFA, very little work has been done with respect to positron beam-plasma interactions. This dissertation addresses three issues relating to a positron beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator. These issues are (a) the suitability of employing a positron drive bunch to excite a wake; (b) the transverse stability of the drive bunch; and (c) the acceleration of positrons by the plasma wake that is driven by a positron bunch. These three issues are explored first through computer simulations and then through experiments. First, a theory is developed on the impulse response of plasma to a short drive beam which is valid for small perturbations to the plasma density. This is followed up with several particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations which study the experimental parameter (bunch length, charge, radius, and plasma density) range. Next, the experimental setup is described with an emphasis on the equipment used to measure the longitudinal energy variations of the positron beam. Then, the transverse dynamics of a positron beam in a plasma are described. Special attention is given to the way focusing, defocusing, and a tilted beam would appear to be energy variations as viewed on our diagnostics. Finally, the energy dynamics imparted on a 730 {micro}m long, 40 {micro}m radius, 28.5 GeV positron beam with 1.2 x 10{sup 10} particles in a 1.4 meter long 0-2 x 10{sup 14} e{sup -}/cm{sup 3} plasma is described. First the energy loss was measured as a function of plasma density and the measurements are compared to theory. Then, an energy gain of 79 {+-} 15 MeV is shown. This is the first demonstration of energy gain of a positron beam in a plasma and it is in good agreement with the predictions

  17. Physical limitations in ferromagnetic inductively coupled plasma sources

    CERN Document Server

    Bliokh, Yury P; Slutsker, Yakov Z

    2012-01-01

    The Ferromagnetic Inductively Coupled Plasma (FICP) source, which is a version of the common inductively coupled plasma sources, has a number of well known advantages such as high efficiency, high level of ionization, low minimal gas pressure, very low required driver frequency, and even a possibility to be driven by single current pulses. We present an experimental study of such an FICP source which showed that above a certain value of the driving pulse power the properties of this device changed rather drastically. Namely, the plasma became non-stationary and non-uniform contrary to the stationary and uniform plasmas typical for this kind of plasma sources. In this case the plasma appeared as a narrow dense spike which was short compared to the driving pulse. The local plasma density could exceed the neutral atoms density by a few orders of magnitude. When that happened, the afterglow plasma decay time after the end of the pulse was long compared to an ordinary case with no plasma spike. Experiments were pe...

  18. Plasma diagnostics in a pulsed accelerator used for material processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukeshov, A [Science Research Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 96a Tole bi str., 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2007-04-15

    Results of research work of a pulsed plasma accelerator, designed as diagnostic and material science stands in SRIETP are presented. We present results on the development of electric and magnetic probes used for measurement of plasma parameters. The physical properties and changes in structure of vanadium alloy, common quality carbon and stainless steels have been investigated as well.

  19. Staging optics considerations for a plasma wakefield acceleration linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstrøm, C.A., E-mail: c.a.lindstrom@fys.uio.no [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Oslo 0316 (Norway); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Adli, E. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Oslo 0316 (Norway); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Allen, J.M.; Delahaye, J.P.; Hogan, M.J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Joshi, C. [Department of Electrical Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Muggli, P. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, 80805 Munich (Germany); Raubenheimer, T.O.; Yakimenko, V. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration offers acceleration gradients of several GeV/m, ideal for a next-generation linear collider. The beam optics requirements between plasma cells include injection and extraction of drive beams, matching the main beam beta functions into the next cell, canceling dispersion as well as constraining bunch lengthening and chromaticity. To maintain a high effective acceleration gradient, this must be accomplished in the shortest distance possible. A working example is presented, using novel methods to correct chromaticity, as well as scaling laws for a high energy regime.

  20. A HIGH REPETITION PLASMA MIRROR FOR STAGED ELECTRON ACCELERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokollik, Thomas; Shiraishi, Satomi; Osterhoff, Jens; Evans, Eugene; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-22

    In order to build a compact, staged laser plasma accelerator the in-coupling of the laser beam to the different stages represents one of the key issues. To limit the spatial foot print and thus to realize a high overall acceleration gradient, a concept has to be found which realizes this in-coupling within a few centimeters. We present experiments on a tape-drive based plasma mirror which could be used to reflect the focused laser beam into the acceleration stage.

  1. Angular momentum evolution in laser-plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, C; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Bouteiller, M Le; Phuoc, K Ta; Davoine, X; Rax, J -M; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-01-01

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extend in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for non-planar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in laser- plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  2. Angular-momentum evolution in laser-plasma accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaury, C; Guillaume, E; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Le Bouteiller, M; Ta Phuoc, K; Davoine, X; Rax, J M; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-09-27

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extent in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for nonplanar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in a laser-plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in a laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular-momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular-momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  3. Angular-Momentum Evolution in Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, C; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Le Bouteiller, M; Ta Phuoc, K; Davoine, X; Rax, J M; Rousse, A; Malka, V; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.135002

    2013-01-01

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extent in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for nonplanar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in a laser-plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in a laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular-momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular-momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  4. Ion sampling and transport in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Paul B.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative accuracy and high sensitivity in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) depend on consistent and efficient extraction and transport of analyte ions from an inductively coupled plasma to a mass analyzer, where they are sorted and detected. In this review we examine the fundamental physical processes that control ion sampling and transport in ICP-MS and compare the results of theory and computerized models with experimental efforts to characterize the flow of ions through plasma mass spectrometers' vacuum interfaces. We trace the flow of ions from their generation in the plasma, into the sampling cone, through the supersonic expansion in the first vacuum stage, through the skimmer, and into the ion optics that deliver the ions to the mass analyzer. At each stage we consider idealized behavior and departures from ideal behavior that affect the performance of ICP-MS as an analytical tool.

  5. AWAKE: Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E

    2014-01-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is a promising alternative reaching accelerating fields a magnitude of up to 3 higher (GV/m) when compared to conventional RF acceleration. AWAKE, world’s first proton-driven plasma wakefield experiment, was launched at CERN to verify this concept. In this experiment proton bunches at 400 GeV/c will be extracted from the CERN SPS and sent to the plasma cell, where the proton beam drives the plasma wakefields and creates a large accelerating field. This large gradient of ~GV/m can be achieved by relying on the self-modulation instability (SMI) of the proton beam; when seeded by ionization through a short laser pulse, a train of micro-bunches with a period on the order of the plasma wavelength (~mm) develops, which can drive such a large amplitude wake from a long proton bunch (~12 cm). An electron beam will be injected into the plasma to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment is being installed at CERN in the former CNGS facility, which must be modified to mat...

  6. Dense plasma focus (DPF) accelerated non radio isotopic radiological source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusnak, Brian; Tang, Vincent

    2017-01-31

    A non-radio-isotopic radiological source using a dense plasma focus (DPF) to produce an intense z-pinch plasma from a gas, such as helium, and which accelerates charged particles, such as generated from the gas or injected from an external source, into a target positioned along an acceleration axis and of a type known to emit ionizing radiation when impinged by the type of accelerated charged particles. In a preferred embodiment, helium gas is used to produce a DPF-accelerated He2+ ion beam to a beryllium target, to produce neutron emission having a similar energy spectrum as a radio-isotopic AmBe neutron source. Furthermore, multiple DPFs may be stacked to provide staged acceleration of charged particles for enhancing energy, tunability, and control of the source.

  7. Simulation of density measurements in plasma wakefields using photo acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Sadler, James; Burrows, Philip N; Trines, Raoul; Holloway, James; Wing, Matthew; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter

    2015-01-01

    One obstacle in plasma accelerator development is the limitation of techniques to diagnose and measure plasma wakefield parameters. In this paper, we present a novel concept for the density measurement of a plasma wakefield using photon acceleration, supported by extensive particle in cell simulations of a laser pulse that copropagates with a wakefield. The technique can provide the perturbed electron density profile in the laser’s reference frame, averaged over the propagation length, to be accurate within 10%. We discuss the limitations that affect the measurement: small frequency changes, photon trapping, laser displacement, stimulated Raman scattering, and laser beam divergence. By considering these processes, one can determine the optimal parameters of the laser pulse and its propagation length. This new technique allows a characterization of the density perturbation within a plasma wakefield accelerator.

  8. High-efficiency acceleration of an electron beam in a plasma wakefield accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litos, M; Adli, E; An, W; Clarke, C I; Clayton, C E; Corde, S; Delahaye, J P; England, R J; Fisher, A S; Frederico, J; Gessner, S; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Muggli, P; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Walz, D; White, G; Wu, Z; Yakimenko, V; Yocky, G

    2014-11-06

    High-efficiency acceleration of charged particle beams at high gradients of energy gain per unit length is necessary to achieve an affordable and compact high-energy collider. The plasma wakefield accelerator is one concept being developed for this purpose. In plasma wakefield acceleration, a charge-density wake with high accelerating fields is driven by the passage of an ultra-relativistic bunch of charged particles (the drive bunch) through a plasma. If a second bunch of relativistic electrons (the trailing bunch) with sufficient charge follows in the wake of the drive bunch at an appropriate distance, it can be efficiently accelerated to high energy. Previous experiments using just a single 42-gigaelectronvolt drive bunch have accelerated electrons with a continuous energy spectrum and a maximum energy of up to 85 gigaelectronvolts from the tail of the same bunch in less than a metre of plasma. However, the total charge of these accelerated electrons was insufficient to extract a substantial amount of energy from the wake. Here we report high-efficiency acceleration of a discrete trailing bunch of electrons that contains sufficient charge to extract a substantial amount of energy from the high-gradient, nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator. Specifically, we show the acceleration of about 74 picocoulombs of charge contained in the core of the trailing bunch in an accelerating gradient of about 4.4 gigavolts per metre. These core particles gain about 1.6 gigaelectronvolts of energy per particle, with a final energy spread as low as 0.7 per cent (2.0 per cent on average), and an energy-transfer efficiency from the wake to the bunch that can exceed 30 per cent (17.7 per cent on average). This acceleration of a distinct bunch of electrons containing a substantial charge and having a small energy spread with both a high accelerating gradient and a high energy-transfer efficiency represents a milestone in the development of plasma wakefield acceleration into a

  9. Advanced Accelerators: Particle, Photon and Plasma Wave Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Ronald L. [Florida A & M University, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2017-06-29

    The overall objective of this project was to study the acceleration of electrons to very high energies over very short distances based on trapping slowly moving electrons in the fast moving potential wells of large amplitude plasma waves, which have relativistic phase velocities. These relativistic plasma waves, or wakefields, are the basis of table-top accelerators that have been shown to accelerate electrons to the same high energies as kilometer-length linear particle colliders operating using traditional decades-old acceleration techniques. The accelerating electrostatic fields of the relativistic plasma wave accelerators can be as large as GigaVolts/meter, and our goal was to study techniques for remotely measuring these large fields by injecting low energy probe electron beams across the plasma wave and measuring the beam’s deflection. Our method of study was via computer simulations, and these results suggested that the deflection of the probe electron beam was directly proportional to the amplitude of the plasma wave. This is the basis of a proposed diagnostic technique, and numerous studies were performed to determine the effects of changing the electron beam, plasma wave and laser beam parameters. Further simulation studies included copropagating laser beams with the relativistic plasma waves. New interesting results came out of these studies including the prediction that very small scale electron beam bunching occurs, and an anomalous line focusing of the electron beam occurs under certain conditions. These studies were summarized in the dissertation of a graduate student who obtained the Ph.D. in physics. This past research program has motivated ideas for further research to corroborate these results using particle-in-cell simulation tools which will help design a test-of-concept experiment in our laboratory and a scaled up version for testing at a major wakefield accelerator facility.

  10. Neutron Source from Laser Plasma Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xuejing; Shaw, Joseph; McCary, Eddie; Downer, Mike; Hegelich, Bjorn

    2016-10-01

    Laser driven electron beams and ion beams were utilized to produce neutron sources via different mechanism. On the Texas Petawatt laser, deuterized plastic, gold and DLC foil targets of varying thickness were shot with 150 J , 150 fs laser pulses at a peak intensity of 2 ×1021W /cm2 . Ions were accelerated by either target normal sheath acceleration or Breakout Afterburner acceleration. Neutrons were produced via the 9Be(d,n) and 9Be(p,n) reactions when accelerated ions impinged on a Beryllium converter as well as by deuteron breakup reactions. We observed 2 ×1010 neutron per shot in average, corresponding to 5 ×1018n /s . The efficiencies for different targets are comparable. In another experiment, 38fs , 0.3 J UT3 laser pulse interacted with mixed gas target. Electrons with energy 40MeV were produced via laser wakefield acceleration. Neutron flux of 2 ×106 per shot was generated through bremsstrahlung and subsequent photoneutron reactions on a Copper converter.

  11. Induction Acceleration of a Single RF Bunch in the KEK PS

    CERN Document Server

    Takayama, Ken; Arakida, Yoshio; Horioka, Kazuhiko; Igarashi, Susumu; Iwashita, Taiki; Kawasaki, Atsushi; Kishiro, Junichi; Kono, Tadaaki; Koseki, Kunio; Nakamura, Eiji; Sakuda, Makoto; Sato, Hikaru; Shiho, Makoto; Shimosaki, Yoshito; Shirakata, Masashi; Sueno, Tsuyoshi; Tokuchi, Akira; Torikai, Kota; Toyama, Takeshi; Wake, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Masao; Yamane, Isao

    2005-01-01

    A single bunch trapped in an RF bucket was accelerated by induction devices from 500 MeV to 8GeV beyond transition energy in the KEK-PS. This is the first demonstration of induction acceleration in a high energy circular ring. The acceleration was confirmed by measuring a temporal evolution of the RF phase through an entire acceleration.* Key devices in an induction acceleration system are an induction accelerating cavity capable of generating an induced voltage of 2kV/cell, a pulse modulator to drive the cavity (switching driver), and a DSP system to control gate signals for switching. Their remarkable characteristics are its repetition ratio of about 1MHz and duty factor of 50%. All devices have been newly developed at KEK so as to meet this requirement. The pulse modulator employing MOSFETs as switching elements is connected with the accelerating cavity through a long transmission cable in order to avoid a high-dose irradiation in the accelerator tunnel. The induction system has been running beyond more th...

  12. Application of Plasma Waveguides to High Energy Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milchberg, Howard M

    2013-03-30

    The eventual success of laser-plasma based acceleration schemes for high-energy particle physics will require the focusing and stable guiding of short intense laser pulses in reproducible plasma channels. For this goal to be realized, many scientific issues need to be addressed. These issues include an understanding of the basic physics of, and an exploration of various schemes for, plasma channel formation. In addition, the coupling of intense laser pulses to these channels and the stable propagation of pulses in the channels require study. Finally, new theoretical and computational tools need to be developed to aid in the design and analysis of experiments and future accelerators. Here we propose a 3-year renewal of our combined theoretical and experimental program on the applications of plasma waveguides to high-energy accelerators. During the past grant period we have made a number of significant advances in the science of laser-plasma based acceleration. We pioneered the development of clustered gases as a new highly efficient medium for plasma channel formation. Our contributions here include theoretical and experimental studies of the physics of cluster ionization, heating, explosion, and channel formation. We have demonstrated for the first time the generation of and guiding in a corrugated plasma waveguide. The fine structure demonstrated in these guides is only possible with cluster jet heating by lasers. The corrugated guide is a slow wave structure operable at arbitrarily high laser intensities, allowing direct laser acceleration, a process we have explored in detail with simulations. The development of these guides opens the possibility of direct laser acceleration, a true miniature analogue of the SLAC RF-based accelerator. Our theoretical studies during this period have also contributed to the further development of the simulation codes, Wake and QuickPIC, which can be used for both laser driven and beam driven plasma based acceleration schemes. We

  13. Accelerating Plasma Mirrors to Investigate Black Hole Information Loss Paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Pisin

    2015-01-01

    The question of whether Hawking evaporation violates unitarity, and therefore results in the loss of information, has been under hot debate ever since Hawking's seminal discovery. For an issue as fundamental as this, which hints on the conflict between general relativity and quantum field theory, so far the investigations remain theoretical since it is almost impossible to settle this paradox through direct astrophysical black hole observations. It is therefore highly desirable to identify possible laboratory tests for this purpose. Accelerating mirror has been invoked and analyzed as an analog black hole since 1970s. On the technical side, there has been the idea of relativistic plasma mirrors produced by ultra-intense lasers traversing a plasma that promise to provide novel properties. Here we point out that such plasma mirrors can accelerate drastically through the strong nonlinear coupling between the laser and the impinged plasma. By tailoring the plasma target with density gradient along the direction o...

  14. Construction of Larger Area Density-Uniform Plasma with Collisional Inductively Coupled Plasma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG Liang; LIU Wandong; BAI Xiaoyan; CHEN Zhipeng; WANG Huihui; LI LUO Chen; JI Liangliang; HU Bei

    2007-01-01

    The plasma density and electron temperature of a multi-source plasma system composed of several collisional inductively coupled plasma (ICP) cells were measured by a double-probe. The discharges of the ICP cells were shown to be independent of each other. Furthermore, the total plasma density at simultaneous multi-cell discharge was observed to be approximately equal to the summation of the plasma density when the cells discharge separately. Based on the linear summation phenomenon, it was shown that a larger area plasma with a uniform density and temperature profile could be constructed with multi-collisional ICP cells.

  15. Influence of pulse line switch inductance on output characteristics of high-current nanosecond accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashchenko, A. I.; Vintizenko, I. I.

    2016-06-01

    Various types of high-current nanosecond accelerators are simulated numerically using an equivalent circuit representation. The influence of pulse forming line switch inductance on the amplitude and waveform of output voltage and current pulses is analyzed.

  16. INDUCTION PLASMA REACTIVE DEPOSITION OF TUNGSTENCARBIDE FROM TUNGSTEN METAL POWDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.L. Jiang; M.I. Boulos

    2001-01-01

    Experimental results are reported on the primary carburization reaction between the tungsten powder and methane in the induction plasma, and the secondary carburization of the deposit on substrate at high temperature. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to examine the microstructures of starting tungsten powder, carburized powder, and deposit. X-ray diffraction analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis and microhardness measurement were used to characterize the structures and properties of the powder and the deposit. It is found that the primary carburization reaction in the induction plasma starts from the surface of tungsten particles when the particles are melted. Tungsten particles are partially carburized inside the reactive plasma. Complete carburization is achieved through the secondary carburization reaction of the deposit on substrate at high temperature.``

  17. First results of the plasma wakefield acceleration experiment at PITZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishilin, O.; Gross, M.; Brinkmann, R.; Engel, J.; Grüner, F.; Koss, G.; Krasilnikov, M.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Mehrling, T.; Osterhoff, J.; Pathak, G.; Philipp, S.; Renier, Y.; Richter, D.; Schroeder, C.; Schütze, R.; Stephan, F.

    2016-09-01

    The self-modulation instability of long particle beams was proposed as a new mechanism to produce driver beams for proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). The PWFA experiment at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ) was launched to experimentally demonstrate and study the self-modulation of long electron beams in plasma. Key aspects for the experiment are the very flexible photocathode laser system, a plasma cell and well-developed beam diagnostics. In this contribution we report about the plasma cell design, preparatory experiments and the results of the first PWFA experiment at PITZ.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation study of plasma jets and plasma-surface contact in coaxial plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Vivek; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2017-06-01

    Recent experiments by Loebner et al. [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 44, 1534 (2016)] studied the effect of a hypervelocity jet emanating from a coaxial plasma accelerator incident on target surfaces in an effort to mimic the transient loading created during edge localized mode disruption events in fusion plasmas. In this paper, we present a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical model to simulate plasma jet formation and plasma-surface contact in this coaxial plasma accelerator experiment. The MHD system of equations is spatially discretized using a cell-centered finite volume formulation. The temporal discretization is performed using a fully implicit backward Euler scheme and the resultant stiff system of nonlinear equations is solved using the Newton method. The numerical model is employed to obtain some key insights into the physical processes responsible for the generation of extreme stagnation conditions on the target surfaces. Simulations of the plume (without the target plate) are performed to isolate and study phenomena such as the magnetic pinch effect that is responsible for launching pressure pulses into the jet free stream. The simulations also yield insights into the incipient conditions responsible for producing the pinch, such as the formation of conductive channels. The jet-target impact studies indicate the existence of two distinct stages involved in the plasma-surface interaction. A fast transient stage characterized by a thin normal shock transitions into a pseudo-steady stage that exhibits an extended oblique shock structure. A quadratic scaling of the pinch and stagnation conditions with the total current discharged between the electrodes is in qualitative agreement with the results obtained in the experiments. This also illustrates the dominant contribution of the magnetic pressure term in determining the magnitude of the quantities of interest.

  19. Intense tera-hertz laser driven proton acceleration in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A.; Tibai, Z.; Hebling, J.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the acceleration of a proton beam driven by intense tera-hertz (THz) laser field from a near critical density hydrogen plasma. Two-dimension-in-space and three-dimension-in-velocity particle-in-cell simulation results show that a relatively long wavelength and an intense THz laser can be employed for proton acceleration to high energies from near critical density plasmas. We adopt here the electromagnetic field in a long wavelength (0.33 THz) regime in contrast to the optical and/or near infrared wavelength regime, which offers distinct advantages due to their long wavelength ( λ = 350 μ m ), such as the λ 2 scaling of the electron ponderomotive energy. Simulation study delineates the evolution of THz laser field in a near critical plasma reflecting the enhancement in the electric field of laser, which can be of high relevance for staged or post ion acceleration.

  20. Terahertz IFEL/FEL Microbunching for Plasma Beatwave Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Sung, Chieh; Joshi, Chandrashekhar; Musumeci, Pietro; Pellegrini, Claudio; Ralph, Joseph; Reiche, Sven; Rosenzweig, James E; Tochitsky, Sergei Ya

    2005-01-01

    In order to obtain monoenergetic acceleration of electrons, phase-locked injection using electron microbunches shorter than the accelerating structure is necessary. For a laser-driven plasma beatwave accelerator experiment, we propose to microbunch the electrons by interaction with terahertz (THz) radiation in an undulator via two mechanisms– free electron laser (FEL) and inverse free electron laser (IFEL). Since the high power FIR radiation will be generated via difference frequency mixing in GaAs by the same CO2 beatwave used to drive the plasma wave, electrons could be phase-locked and pre-bunched into a series of microbunches separated with the same periodicity. Here we examine the criteria for undulator design and present simulation results for both IFEL and FEL approaches. Using different CO2 laser lines, electrons can be microbunched with different periodicity 300 – 100 mm suitable for injection into plasma densities in the range 1016 – 1017 cm-3, respectively. The requiremen...

  1. Lasers techniques Improvement of classical accelerators by lasers. Laser accelerators with and without plasmas. Lasers accelerators in vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, Heinrich

    1991-01-01

    Of the unconventional accelerator techniques those including lasers are reported. After explaining the advances by lasers for classical accelerator techniques, as FELs and other methods for 100 GHz generation of GW pulses, a survey is given of far field and near field laser acceleration. Problems of the beat-wave accelerator are discussed and schemes for particle interaction in vacuum without plasma are elaborated. One scheme is the Boreham experiment and another is the acceleration of "standing" wave fields where charged particles are trapped in the intensity minima. Another scheme uses the relativistic acceleration by half waves where the now available petawatt-picosecond laser pulses should produce GeV electron pulses of high luminosity. Increase of these electron enrgies would need very large lasers in the future.

  2. Engineering method of calculation and choice of main parameters of the linear induction accelerator inductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В.Т. Чемерис

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available  There is a method of simplified calculation and design parameters choice elaborated in this article with corresponding basing for the induction system of electron-beam sterilizer on the base of linear induction accelerator taking into account the parameters of magnetic material for production of cores and parameters of pulsed voltage.

  3. Studying astrophysical particle acceleration with laser-driven plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-10-01

    The acceleration of non-thermal particles in plasmas is critical for our understanding of explosive astrophysical phenomena, from solar flares to gamma ray bursts. Particle acceleration is thought to be mediated by collisionless shocks and magnetic reconnection. The microphysics underlying these processes and their ability to efficiently convert flow and magnetic energy into non-thermal particles, however, is not yet fully understood. By performing for the first time ab initio 3D particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction of both magnetized and unmagnetized laser-driven plasmas, it is now possible to identify the optimal parameters for the study of particle acceleration in the laboratory relevant to astrophysical scenarios. It is predicted for the Omega and NIF laser conditions that significant non-thermal acceleration can occur during magnetic reconnection of laser-driven magnetized plasmas. Electrons are accelerated by the electric field near the X-points and trapped in contracting magnetic islands. This leads to a power-law tail extending to nearly a hundred times the thermal energy of the plasma and that contains a large fraction of the magnetic energy. The study of unmagnetized interpenetrating plasmas also reveals the possibility of forming collisionless shocks mediated by the Weibel instability on NIF. Under such conditions, both electrons and ions can be energized by scattering out of the Weibel-mediated turbulence. This also leads to power-law spectra that can be detected experimentally. The resulting experimental requirements to probe the microphysics of plasma particle acceleration will be discussed, paving the way for the first experiments of these important processes in the laboratory. As a result of these simulations and theoretical analysis, there are new experiments being planned on the Omega, NIF, and LCLS laser facilities to test these theoretical predictions. This work was supported by the SLAC LDRD program and DOE Office of Science, Fusion

  4. H-mode inductive coupling plasma for PVC surface treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croccolo, F.; Quintini, A.; Barni, R.; Ripamonti, M.; Malgaroli, A.; Riccardi, C.

    2009-08-01

    An inductively coupled plasma machine has been modified to be able to apply working powers in the order of 1 kW, thus switching to the real inductive H-mode. The plasma is generated by applying a 13.56 MHz radio-frequency to a λ/4 antenna outside the plasma chamber in low pressure conditions. The working gas is argon at pressure in the range from 10 to 100 Pa. With this high power source we have been able to perform plasma etching on a poly(vinyl-chloride) (PVC) film. In particular the effect of the plasma is the selective removal of hydrogen and chlorine from the sample surface. The action of the high power plasma on the sample has been proved to be much more effective than that of the low power one. Results similar to those obtained with the low power machine at about 300 W for 120 min, have been obtained with the high power source at about 600 W for 30 min. The superficial generation of a conductive layer of double C=C bonds was obtained. The samples have been investigated by means of ATR spectroscopy, FIB/SEM microscopy and micro-electrical measurements, which revealed the change in charge conductivity.

  5. Enhanced efficiency of plasma acceleration in the laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badziak, J.; Rosiński, M.; Jabłoński, S.; Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Parys, P.; Rączka, P.; Krousky, E.; Ullschmied, J.; Liska, R.; Kucharik, M.

    2015-01-01

    Among various methods for the acceleration of dense plasmas the mechanism called laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration (LICPA) is capable of achieving the highest energetic efficiency. In the LICPA scheme, a projectile placed in a cavity is accelerated along a guiding channel by the laser-induced thermal plasma pressure or by the radiation pressure of an intense laser radiation trapped in the cavity. This arrangement leads to a significant enhancement of the hydrodynamic or electromagnetic forces driving the projectile, relative to standard laser acceleration schemes. The aim of this paper is to review recent experimental and numerical works on LICPA with the emphasis on the acceleration of heavy plasma macroparticles and dense ion beams. The main experimental part concerns the research carried out at the kilojoule sub-nanosecond PALS laser facility in Prague. Our measurements performed at this facility, supported by advanced two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, have demonstrated that the LICPA accelerator working in the long-pulse hydrodynamic regime can be a highly efficient tool for the acceleration of heavy plasma macroparticles to hyper-velocities and the generation of ultra-high-pressure (>100 Mbar) shocks through the collision of the macroparticle with a solid target. The energetic efficiency of the macroparticle acceleration and the shock generation has been found to be significantly higher than that for other laser-based methods used so far. Using particle-in-cell simulations it is shown that the LICPA scheme is highly efficient also in the short-pulse high-intensity regime and, in particular, may be used for production of intense ion beams of multi-MeV to GeV ion energies with the energetic efficiency of tens of per cent, much higher than for conventional laser acceleration schemes.

  6. A Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration experiment at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    The AWAKE Collaboration has been formed in order to demonstrate protondriven plasma wakefield acceleration for the first time. This technology could lead to future colliders of high energy but of a much reduced length compared to proposed linear accelerators. The SPS proton beam in the CNGS facility will be injected into a 10m plasma cell where the long proton bunches will be modulated into significantly shorter micro-bunches. These micro-bunches will then initiate a strong wakefield in the plasma with peak fields above 1 GV/m that will be harnessed to accelerate a bunch of electrons from about 20MeV to the GeV scale within a few meters. The experimental program is based on detailed numerical simulations of beam and plasma interactions. The main accelerator components, the experimental area and infrastructure required as well as the plasma cell and the diagnostic equipment are discussed in detail. First protons to the experiment are expected at the end of 2016 and this will be followed by an initial 3–4 yea...

  7. Synthesis of semiconductor polymers by inductive plasma; Sintesis de polimeros semiconductores por plasmas inductivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, G.; Cruz, G.; Olayo, M.G. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Morales, J. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    When carrying out the synthesis of semiconductor polymers by plasma it is important to consider the electric arrangement of the discharge since this it influences in the distribution of the energy of the particles in the reactor. The main electric arrangements in those that are developed the brightness discharges of radio frequency are resistive, capacitive and inductive. In the Laboratory of Materials processing by plasma of the ININ its have been worked different synthesis of polymers with resistive arrangements with good results. In this work the results of the synthesis and characterization of poly aniline and chlorate polyethylene by inductive plasma are presented. (Author)

  8. First results of the plasma wakefield acceleration experiment at PITZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lishilin, O., E-mail: osip.lishilin@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Gross, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Brinkmann, R. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Engel, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Grüner, F. [Universität Hamburg, UHH, Hamburg (Germany); Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, CFEL, Hamburg (Germany); Koss, G.; Krasilnikov, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Mehrling, T.; Osterhoff, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Pathak, G.; Philipp, S.; Renier, Y. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Richter, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, HZB, Berlin (Germany); Schroeder, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, LBNL, Berkeley (United States); Schütze, R.; Stephan, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    The self-modulation instability of long particle beams was proposed as a new mechanism to produce driver beams for proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). The PWFA experiment at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ) was launched to experimentally demonstrate and study the self-modulation of long electron beams in plasma. Key aspects for the experiment are the very flexible photocathode laser system, a plasma cell and well-developed beam diagnostics. In this contribution we report about the plasma cell design, preparatory experiments and the results of the first PWFA experiment at PITZ. - Highlights: • A self-modulation mechanism for producing driver beams for PWFA is proposed. • A proof-of-principle experiment is launched at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY. • The self-modulation instability occurs in long particle beams passing through plasma. • A heat pipe oven and a laser are used to produce plasma.

  9. Synchrotron radiation from a curved plasma channel laser wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Palastro, J P; Hafizi, B; Chen, Y -H; Johnson, L A; Penano, J R; Helle, M H; Mamonau, A A

    2016-01-01

    A laser pulse guided in a curved plasma channel can excite wakefields that steer electrons along an arched trajectory. As the electrons are accelerated along the curved channel, they emit synchrotron radiation. We present simple analytical models and simulations examining laser pulse guiding, wakefield generation, electron steering, and synchrotron emission in curved plasma channels. For experimentally realizable parameters, a ~2 GeV electron emits 0.1 photons per cm with an average photon energy of multiple keV.

  10. A Concept for Directly Coupled Pulsed Electromagnetic Acceleration of Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y.C. Francis; Cassibry, Jason T.; Eskridge, Richard; Smith, James; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Plasma jets with high momentum flux density are required for a variety of applications in propulsion research. Methods of producing these plasma jets are being investigated at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental goal in the immediate future is to develop plasma accelerators which are capable of producing plasma jets with momentum flux density represented by velocities up to 200 km/s and ion density up to 10(exp 24) per cu m, with sufficient precision and reproducibility in their properties, and with sufficiently high efficiency. The jets must be sufficiently focused to allow them to be transported over several meters. A plasma accelerator concept is presented that might be able to meet these requirements. It is a self-switching, shaped coaxial pulsed plasma thruster, with focusing of the plasma flow by shaping muzzle current distribution as in plasma focus devices, and by mechanical tapering of the gun walls. Some 2-D MHD modeling in support of the conceptual design will be presented.

  11. AETHER: A simulation platform for inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turkoz, Emre, E-mail: emre.turkoz@boun.edu.tr; Celik, Murat

    2015-04-01

    An in-house code is developed to simulate the inductively coupled plasma (ICP). The model comprises the fluid, electromagnetic and transformer submodels. Fluid equations are solved to evaluate the plasma flow parameters, including the plasma and neutral densities, ion and neutral velocities, electron flux, electron temperature, and electric potential. The model relies on the ambipolar approximation and offers the evaluation of plasma parameters without solving the sheath region. The electromagnetic model handles the calculation of the electric and magnetic fields using the magnetic vector potential. The transformer model captures the effect of the matching circuit utilized in laboratory experiments for RF power deposition. The continuity and momentum equations are solved using finite volume method. The energy, electric potential, and magnetic vector potential equations are solved using finite difference method. The resulting linear systems of equations are solved with iterative solvers including Jacobi and GMRES. The code is written using the C++ programming language, it works in parallel and has graphical user interface. The model is applied to study ICP characteristics of a plasma confined within a cylindrical chamber with dielectric walls for two different power deposition cases. The results obtained from the developed model are verified using the plasma module of COMSOL Multiphysics. The model is also applied to a plasma source configuration, and it is demonstrated that there is an overall increase in the plasma potential when current is extracted from ICP with a biased wall electrode.

  12. Effects of driving frequency on properties of inductively coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godyak, Valery; Kolobov, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) can be maintained over a wide range of driving frequencies from 50 Hz up to GHz. In this paper, we analyze how the properties of ICP depend on driving frequency ω. With respect to the time of ion transport to the walls, τd and the electron energy relaxation time τɛ three operating regimes are distinguished. The quasi-static regime, ωτd > 1 and the intermediate dynamic regime, 1 /τd helical coil with the plasma current flowing outside the coil, Bc = 0 , while when the plasma current flows inside the coil, Bc ≠ 0 . We show that in the latter case, in the quasi-static regimes, electrons become magnetized over a significant part of the period that may strongly affect the plasma properties. Examples of ICP simulations in different frequency regimes will be demonstrated in this paper.

  13. Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster Model with Time-Evolution of Energy and State Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Sankaran, Kamesh

    2012-01-01

    A model for pulsed inductive plasma acceleration is presented that consists of a set of circuit equations coupled to both a one-dimensional equation of motion and an equation governing the partitioning of energy. The latter two equations are obtained for the plasma current sheet by treating it as a single element of finite volume and integrating the governing equations over that volume. The integrated terms are replaced where necessary by physically-equivalent quantities that are calculated through the solution of other parts of the governing equation set. The model improves upon previous one-dimensional performance models by permitting the time-evolution of the energy and state properties of the plasma, the latter allowing for the tailoring of the model to different gases that may be chosen as propellants. The time evolution of the various energy modes in the system and the associated plasma properties, calculated for argon propellant, are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the model. The model produces a result where efficiency is maximized at a given value of the electrodynamic scaling term known as the dynamic impedance parameter. Qualitatively and quantitatively, the model compares favorably with performance measured for two separate inductive pulsed plasma thrusters, with disagreements attributable to simplifying assumptions employed in the generation of the model solution.

  14. Dynamics of electron acceleration in laser-driven wakefields. Acceleration limits and asymmetric plasma waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, Antonia

    2011-12-16

    The experiments presented in this thesis study several aspects of electron acceleration in a laser-driven plasma wave. High-intensity lasers can efficiently drive a plasma wave that sustains electric fields on the order of 100 GV/m. Electrons that are trapped in this plasma wave can be accelerated to GeV-scale energies. As the accelerating fields in this scheme are 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than in conventional radio-frequency accelerators, the necessary acceleration distance can be reduced by the same factor, turning laser-wakefield acceleration (LWFA) into a promising compact, and potentially cheaper, alternative. However, laser-accelerated electron bunches have not yet reached the parameter standards of conventional accelerators. This work will help to gain better insight into the acceleration process and to optimize the electron bunch properties. The 25 fs, 1.8 J-pulses of the ATLAS laser at the Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics were focused into a steady-state flow gas cell. This very reproducible and turbulence-free gas target allows for stable acceleration of electron bunches. Thus the sensitivity of electron parameters to subtle changes of the experimental setup could be determined with meaningful statistics. At optimized experimental parameters, electron bunches of {approx}50 pC total charge were accelerated to energies up to 450 MeV with a divergence of {approx}2 mrad FWHM. As, in a new design of the gas cell, its length can be varied from 2 to 14 mm, the electron bunch energy could be evaluated after different acceleration distances, at two different electron densities. From this evolution important acceleration parameters could be extracted. At an electron density of 6.43. 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} the maximum electric field strength in the plasma wave was determined to be {approx}160 GV/m. The length after which the relativistic electrons outrun the accelerating phase of the electric field and are decelerated again, the so-called dephasing length

  15. Properties of Trapped Electron Bunches in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, Neil; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    Plasma-based accelerators use the propagation of a drive bunch through plasma to create large electric fields. Recent plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) experiments, carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), successfully doubled the energy for some of the 42 GeV drive bunch electrons in less than a meter; this feat would have required 3 km in the SLAC linac. This dissertation covers one phenomenon associated with the PWFA, electron trapping. Recently it was shown that PWFAs, operated in the nonlinear bubble regime, can trap electrons that are released by ionization inside the plasma wake and accelerate them to high energies. These trapped electrons occupy and can degrade the accelerating portion of the plasma wake, so it is important to understand their origins and how to remove them. Here, the onset of electron trapping is connected to the drive bunch properties. Additionally, the trapped electron bunches are observed with normalized transverse emittance divided by peak current, {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t}, below the level of 0.2 {micro}m/kA. A theoretical model of the trapped electron emittance, developed here, indicates that the emittance scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density in the non-linear 'bubble' regime of the PWFA. This model and simulations indicate that the observed values of {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t} result from multi-GeV trapped electron bunches with emittances of a few {micro}m and multi-kA peak currents. These properties make the trapped electrons a possible particle source for next generation light sources. This dissertation is organized as follows. The first chapter is an overview of the PWFA, which includes a review of the accelerating and focusing fields and a survey of the remaining issues for a plasma-based particle collider. Then, the second chapter examines the physics of electron trapping in the PWFA. The third chapter uses theory and simulations to analyze the properties of the trapped

  16. Bulk molybdenum field emitters by inductively coupled plasma etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ningli; Cole, Matthew T; Milne, William I; Chen, Jing

    2016-12-07

    In this work we report on the fabrication of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etched, diode-type, bulk molybdenum field emitter arrays. Emitter etching conditions as a function of etch mask geometry and process conditions were systematically investigated. For optimized uniformity, aspect ratios of >10 were achieved, with 25.5 nm-radius tips realised for masks consisting of aperture arrays some 4.45 μm in diameter and whose field electron emission performance has been herein assessed.

  17. Coherent phase space matching for staging plasma and traditional accelerator using longitudinally tailored plasma structure

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, X L; Zhang, C J; Li, F; Wan, Y; Hua, J F; Pai, C -H; Lu, W; Yu, P; An, W; Mori, W B; Joshi, C; Hogan, M J

    2014-01-01

    For the further development of plasma based accelerators, phase space matching between plasma acceleration stages and between plasma stages and traditional accelerator components becomes a very critical issue for high quality high energy acceleration and its applications in light sources and colliders. Without proper matching, catastrophic emittance growth in the presence of finite energy spread may occur when the beam propagating through different stages and components due to the drastic differences of transverse focusing strength. In this paper we propose to use longitudinally tailored plasma structures as phase space matching components to properly guide the beam through stages. Theoretical analysis and full 3-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are utilized to show clearly how these structures may work in four different scenarios. Very good agreements between theory and simulations are obtained.

  18. Challenges in plasma and laser wakefield accelerated beams diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cianchi, A., E-mail: alessandro.cianchi@roma2.infn.it [University of Rome Tor Vergata and INFN, V. della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Anania, M.P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G. [INFN-LNF - Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); Marchetti, B. [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Mostacci, A. [University of Rome La Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Pompili, R. [INFN-LNF - Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); Ronsivalle, C. [ENEA C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi,45 00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); Rossi, A.R.; Serafini, L. [INFN-Mi, Via Celoria, 16 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-08-21

    The new frontier in the particle beam accelerator is the so called plasma acceleration. Using the strong electric field inside a plasma it is possible to achieve accelerating gradients in the order of magnitude larger with respect to the actual technologies. Different schemes have been proposed and several already tested, producing beams of energy of several GeV. Mainly two approaches are followed: either the beam is directly produced by the interaction of a TW/PW class laser with a gas jet or a preexisting particle beam is accelerated in a plasma channel. In both cases a precise determination of the emerging beam parameters is mandatory for the fine tuning of the devices. The measurement of these parameters, in particular the emittance, is not trivial, mainly due to the large energy spread and to the tight focusing of these beams or to the background noise produced in the plasma channel. We show the problems related to the diagnostic of this kind of beams and the proposed or already realized solutions.

  19. Challenges in plasma and laser wakefield accelerated beams diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianchi, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G.; Marchetti, B.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Ronsivalle, C.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.

    2013-08-01

    The new frontier in the particle beam accelerator is the so called plasma acceleration. Using the strong electric field inside a plasma it is possible to achieve accelerating gradients in the order of magnitude larger with respect to the actual technologies. Different schemes have been proposed and several already tested, producing beams of energy of several GeV. Mainly two approaches are followed: either the beam is directly produced by the interaction of a TW/PW class laser with a gas jet or a preexisting particle beam is accelerated in a plasma channel. In both cases a precise determination of the emerging beam parameters is mandatory for the fine tuning of the devices. The measurement of these parameters, in particular the emittance, is not trivial, mainly due to the large energy spread and to the tight focusing of these beams or to the background noise produced in the plasma channel. We show the problems related to the diagnostic of this kind of beams and the proposed or already realized solutions.

  20. Beyond injection: Trojan horse underdense photocathode plasma wakefield acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidding, B.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Xi, Y.; O' Shea, B.; Andonian, G.; Schiller, D.; Barber, S.; Williams, O.; Pretzler, G.; Koenigstein, T.; Kleeschulte, F.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M.; Corde, S.; White, W. W.; Muggli, P.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Lotov, K. [Institut fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany) and Particle Beam Physics Laboratory, Department for Physics and Astronomy, UCLA (United States); Particle Beam Physics Laboratory, Department for Physics and Astronomy, UCLA (United States); Institut fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (United States); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, Colorado (United States) and 1348 Redwood Ave., Boulder, Colorado 80304 (United States); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation) and Novosibirsk State University, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-21

    An overview on the underlying principles of the hybrid plasma wakefield acceleration scheme dubbed 'Trojan Horse' acceleration is given. The concept is based on laser-controlled release of electrons directly into a particle-beam-driven plasma blowout, paving the way for controlled, shapeable electron bunches with ultralow emittance and ultrahigh brightness. Combining the virtues of a low-ionization-threshold underdense photocathode with the GV/m-scale electric fields of a practically dephasing-free beam-driven plasma blowout, this constitutes a 4th generation electron acceleration scheme. It is applicable as a beam brightness transformer for electron bunches from LWFA and PWFA systems alike. At FACET, the proof-of-concept experiment 'E-210: Trojan Horse Plasma Wakefield Acceleration' has recently been approved and is in preparation. At the same time, various LWFA facilities are currently considered to host experiments aiming at stabilizing and boosting the electron bunch output quality via a trojan horse afterburner stage. Since normalized emittance and brightness can be improved by many orders of magnitude, the scheme is an ideal candidate for light sources such as free-electron-lasers and those based on Thomson scattering and betatron radiation alike.

  1. Laser plasma wakefield acceleration gain enhancement by means of accelerating Bessel pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Parola, A.; Di Trapani, P.; Jedrkiewicz, O.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach to enhance the electron energy gain in standard laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using accelerating Bessel pulses with tunable group velocity so to avoid electron dephasing. We use in the numerical simulations a one-dimensional theoretical model in the linear regime, taking advantage of the "diffraction-free" properties of the localized Bessel beam and thus neglecting transverse effects during the acceleration process. With a multistage tailoring approach, we show a gain enhancement of more than 100 with electron energies that may reach the GeV range over distances shorter than 1 m.

  2. Mid-infrared lasers for energy frontier plasma accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Pogorelsky

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasma wake field accelerators driven with solid-state near-IR lasers have been considered as an alternative to conventional rf accelerators for next-generation TeV-class lepton colliders. Here, we extend this study to the mid-IR spectral domain covered by CO_{2} lasers. We conclude that the increase in the laser driver wavelength favors the regime of laser wake field acceleration with a low plasma density and high electric charge. This regime is the most beneficial for gamma colliders to be converted from lepton colliders via inverse Compton scattering. Selecting a laser wavelength to drive a Compton gamma source is essential for the design of such a machine. The revealed benefits from spectral diversification of laser drivers for future colliders and off-spring applications validate ongoing efforts in advancing the ultrafast CO_{2} laser technology.

  3. Laser-Plasma Acceleration with FLAME and ILIL Ultraintense Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Pathak

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development of radiation and electron sources based on laser-plasma acceleration for biomedical and nuclear applications, using both the table top TW laser at ILIL and the 220 TW FLAME laser system at LNF. We use the ILIL laser to produce wakefield electrons in a self-focusing dominated regime in a mm scale gas-jet to generate large, uniform beams of MeV electrons for electron radiography and radiobiology applications. This acceleration regime is described in detail and key parameters are given to establish reproducible and reliable operation of this source. We use the FLAME laser to drive laser-plasma acceleration in a cm-scale gas target to obtain stable production of >100 MeV range electrons to drive a Thomson scattering ɣ-ray source for nuclear applications.

  4. Orders of Fermi- and Plasma-Accelerations of Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, A

    2010-01-01

    The generic acceleration model for ultra high energy cosmic rays, which has been introduced in {\\tt 1006.5708 [astro-ph.HE]}, suggests various types of electromagnetic interactions between cosmic charged particles and the different types of the plasma fields, which are assumed to have general configurations, spatially and temporally. The well-known Fermi acceleration mechanisms are also included in the model. Meanwhile Fermi mechanisms in non-relativistic limit adhere first- and second-order of $\\beta$, the ratio of particle's velocity relative to the velocity of the stellar magnetic cloud, in the plasma field sector, $\\beta$ does not play any role, i.e. zero-order. In the relativistic limit, the orders of Fermi acceleration are only possible, when applying the corresponding conditions, either elastic scatterings or shock waves. Furthermore, it is found that the coefficients of $\\beta$ are functions of the initial and final velocities and the characteristic Larmor radius.

  5. Mid-infrared lasers for energy frontier plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Kimura, W. D.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma wake field accelerators driven with solid-state near-IR lasers have been considered as an alternative to conventional rf accelerators for next-generation TeV-class lepton colliders. Here, we extend this study to the mid-IR spectral domain covered by CO2 lasers. We conclude that the increase in the laser driver wavelength favors the regime of laser wake field acceleration with a low plasma density and high electric charge. This regime is the most beneficial for gamma colliders to be converted from lepton colliders via inverse Compton scattering. Selecting a laser wavelength to drive a Compton gamma source is essential for the design of such a machine. The revealed benefits from spectral diversification of laser drivers for future colliders and off-spring applications validate ongoing efforts in advancing the ultrafast CO2 laser technology.

  6. Consequences of photon beam excitation in an inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, E.R.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1998-12-31

    Plasma enhanced deposition and etching processes have been common in the semiconductor industry for some time. Generally the chemical systems are complex and consist of many different neutral and ionic species, only a subset of which are desired. Establishing process control is sometimes difficult, as changing most system parameters will not be selective in terms of which species they affect It may also be difficult to simultaneously optimize all process variables. In this paper, the authors present results from a numerical study of an Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) system which is excited by a photon beam. The Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM), modified to include the Monte Carlo Photon Beam (MCPB) module, is the simulation tool used in the study. The MCPB models the injection and propagation of a photon beam through a plasma processing reactor using a Monte Carlo simulation. Photon absorption in the plasma is described using a variable particle weighting method. Multiple photon species are allowed, and photon absorption cross sections for photolysis and ionization are input through a parser. Source rates for charged and neutral species, which result from photon absorption, are generated by the MCPB and used by the fluid module of the HPEM. They will present the results of a parametric study of the effects of an auxiliary photon source on species densities and plasma potential for a Cl{sub 2} etching plasma.

  7. Editorial: Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Chan; Malka, Victor

    2010-04-01

    The ability of short but intense laser pulses to generate high-energy electrons and ions from gaseous and solid targets has been well known since the early days of the laser fusion program. However, during the past decade there has been an explosion of experimental and theoretical activity in this area of laser-matter interaction, driven by the prospect of realizing table-top plasma accelerators for research, medical and industrial uses, and also relatively small and inexpensive plasma accelerators for high-energy physics at the frontier of particle physics. In this focus issue on laser- and beam-driven plasma accelerators, the latest advances in this field are described. Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators Contents Slow wave plasma structures for direct electron acceleration B D Layer, J P Palastro, A G York, T M Antonsen and H M Milchberg Cold injection for electron wakefield acceleration X Davoine, A Beck, A Lifschitz, V Malka and E Lefebvre Enhanced proton flux in the MeV range by defocused laser irradiation J S Green, D C Carroll, C Brenner, B Dromey, P S Foster, S Kar, Y T Li, K Markey, P McKenna, D Neely, A P L Robinson, M J V Streeter, M Tolley, C-G Wahlström, M H Xu and M Zepf Dose-dependent biological damage of tumour cells by laser-accelerated proton beams S D Kraft, C Richter, K Zeil, M Baumann, E Beyreuther, S Bock, M Bussmann, T E Cowan, Y Dammene, W Enghardt, U Helbig, L Karsch, T Kluge, L Laschinsky, E Lessmann, J Metzkes, D Naumburger, R Sauerbrey, M. Scḧrer, M Sobiella, J Woithe, U Schramm and J Pawelke The optimum plasma density for plasma wakefield excitation in the blowout regime W Lu, W An, M Zhou, C Joshi, C Huang and W B Mori Plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at FACET M J Hogan, T O Raubenheimer, A Seryi, P Muggli, T Katsouleas, C Huang, W Lu, W An, K A Marsh, W B Mori, C E Clayton and C Joshi Electron trapping and acceleration on a downward density ramp: a two-stage approach R M G M Trines, R Bingham, Z Najmudin

  8. Charged particle acceleration by induction electric field in Neptune magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasko, I. Y.; Malova, H. V.; Artemyev, A. V.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    The precession of the Neptune magnetic dipole leads to strong dynamics of the magnetosphere and results in continuous transformation from the “Earth-like” configuration to the “pole-on” one and vice versa. In the present work we use simple model of the Neptune magnetotail to investigate the influence of magnetotail topology transformation on particle acceleration and transport through the tail. Energy spectra are obtained for protons penetrating from the solar wind and heavier ions N+ from the Neptune ionosphere. We have found that protons and heavier ions are accelerated up to ∼330 keV and ∼150 keV, respectively. More particles are accelerated and leave the tail during transformations from the “pole-on” configuration to the “Earth-like” one than during inverse transformations. We have shown that the dusk-dawn convection field is responsible for particle leaving through the dawn flank. We briefly compare our results with Voyager-2 observations.

  9. EDITORIAL: Laser and Plasma Accelerators Workshop, Kardamyli, Greece, 2009 Laser and Plasma Accelerators Workshop, Kardamyli, Greece, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Bob; Muggli, Patric

    2011-01-01

    The Laser and Plasma Accelerators Workshop 2009 was part of a very successful series of international workshops which were conceived at the 1985 Laser Acceleration of Particles Workshop in Malibu, California. Since its inception, the workshop has been held in Asia and in Europe (Kardamyli, Kyoto, Presqu'ile de Giens, Portovenere, Taipei and the Azores). The purpose of the workshops is to bring together the most recent results in laser wakefield acceleration, plasma wakefield acceleration, laser-driven ion acceleration, and radiation generation produced by plasma-based accelerator beams. The 2009 workshop was held on 22-26 June in Kardamyli, Greece, and brought together over 80 participants. (http://cfp.ist.utl.pt/lpaw09/). The workshop involved five main themes: • Laser plasma electron acceleration (experiment/theory/simulation) • Computational methods • Plasma wakefield acceleration (experiment/theory/simulation) • Laser-driven ion acceleration • Radiation generation and application. All of these themes are covered in this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. The topic and application of plasma accelerators is one of the success stories in plasma physics, with laser wakefield acceleration of mono-energetic electrons to GeV energies, of ions to hundreds of MeV, and electron-beam-driven wakefield acceleration to 85 GeV. The accelerating electric field in the wake is of the order 1 GeV cm-1, or an accelerating gradient 1000 times greater than in conventional accelerators, possibly leading to an accelerator 1000 times smaller (and much more affordable) for the same energy. At the same time, the electron beams generated by laser wakefield accelerators have very good emittance with a correspondingly good energy spread of about a few percent. They also have the unique feature in being ultra-short in the femtosecond scale. This makes them attractive for a variety of applications, ranging from material science to ultra-fast time

  10. Neutrino-driven wakefield plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, L. A.; Serbeto, A.

    2003-08-01

    Processos envolvendo neutrinos são importantes em uma grande variedade de fenômenos astrofísicos, como as explosões de supernovas. Estes objetos, assim como os pulsares e as galáxias starburst, têm sido propostos como aceleradores cósmicos de partículas de altas energias. Neste trabalho, um modelo clássico de fluidos é utilizado para estudar a interação não-linear entre um feixe de neutrinos e um plasma não-colisional relativístico de pósitrons e elétrons na presença de um campo magnético. Durante a interação, uma onda híbrida superior de grande amplitude é excitada. Para parâmetros típicos de supernovas, verificamos que partículas carregadas "capturadas" por essa onda podem ser aceleradas a altas energias. Este resultado pode ser importante no estudo de mecanismos aceleradores de partículas em ambientes astrofísicos.

  11. Vacuum laser acceleration of relativistic electrons using plasma mirror injectors

    CERN Document Server

    Thévenet, M; Kahaly, S; Vincenti, H; Vernier, A; Quéré, F; Faure, J

    2015-01-01

    Accelerating particles to relativistic energies over very short distances using lasers has been a long standing goal in physics. Among the various schemes proposed for electrons, vacuum laser acceleration has attracted considerable interest and has been extensively studied theoretically because of its appealing simplicity: electrons interact with an intense laser field in vacuum and can be continuously accelerated, provided they remain at a given phase of the field until they escape the laser beam. But demonstrating this effect experimentally has proved extremely challenging, as it imposes stringent requirements on the conditions of injection of electrons in the laser field. Here, we solve this long-standing experimental problem for the first time by using a plasma mirror to inject electrons in an ultraintense laser field, and obtain clear evidence of vacuum laser acceleration. With the advent of PetaWatt class lasers, this scheme could provide a competitive source of very high charge (nC) and ultrashort rela...

  12. Experimental and numerical studies of neutral gas depletion in an inductively coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Masashi

    the neutral pressure is reduced due the balance of total pressure with plasma pressure (mainly electron pressure). Neutral gas heating is due to the elastic scattering and charge exchange collisions with ions, which are accelerated by the bulk plasma ambi-polar electrostatic field. The excellent agreement between experiment and simulation, and parametric study reveal that gas heating and pressure balance are the main mechanisms of gas depletion in an inductively coupled plasma. Coupling between plasma and neutral gas was observed by both experiment and simulation. The resulting gas depletion enhances the plasma transport to the surrounding wall, increases the particle loss, and decreases the plasma density.

  13. Diagnostic studies of ion beam formation in inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Jenee L. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation describes a variety of studies focused on the plasma and the ion beam in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The ability to use ICP-MS for measurements of trace elements in samples requires the analytes to be efficiently ionized. Updated ionization efficiency tables are discussed for ionization temperatures of 6500 K and 7000 K with an electron density of 1 x 1015 cm-3. These values are reflective of the current operating parameters of ICP-MS instruments. Calculations are also discussed for doubly charged (M2+) ion formation, neutral metal oxide (MO) ionization, and metal oxide (MO+) ion dissociation for similar plasma temperature values. Ionization efficiency results for neutral MO molecules in the ICP have not been reported previously.

  14. Induction plasma spheroidization of tungsten and molybdenum powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The melting, evaporation and oxidation behaviors as well as the solidification phenomena of tungsten and molybdenum in induction plasma were studied. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the morphology and the cross section of plasma-processed powders. X-ray diffraction was used to analyze the oxides formed on the particle surface of these two metals. The influence of spray chamber pressure on the spheroidization and oxidation phenomena was discussed. The results show that fewer Mo particles than W particles are spheroidized at the same powder feed rate under the same plasma spray condition although molybdenum has a lower melting point. A small fraction of tungsten is evaporized and condensed either on the surface of tungsten particles nearby or on the wall of spray chamber. Tungsten oxides were found in tungsten powder processed under soft vacuum condition. Extremely large grains form inside some spheroidized particles of tungsten powder.

  15. Progress In Plasma Accelerator Development for Dynamic Formation of Plasma Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Eskridge, Richard; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Lee, Michael; Cassibry, Jason T.; Griffin, Steven; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An experimental plasma accelerator for magnetic target fusion (MTF) applications under development at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is described. The accelerator is a coaxial pulsed plasma thruster (Figure 1). It has been tested experimentally and plasma jet velocities of approx.50 km/sec have been obtained. The plasma jet has been photographed with 10-ns exposure times to reveal a stable and repeatable plasma structure (Figure 2). Data for velocity profile information has been obtained using light pipes and magnetic probes embedded in the gun walls to record the plasma and current transit respectively at various barrel locations. Preliminary spatially resolved spectral data and magnetic field probe data are also presented. A high speed triggering system has been developed and tested as a means of reducing the gun "jitter". This jitter is being characterized and future work for second generation "ultra-low jitter" gun development is being identified.

  16. Plasma Accelerator Development for Dynamic Formation of Plasma Liners: A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Eskridge, Richard; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Lee, Michael; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An experimental plasma accelerator for magnetic target fusion (MTF) applications under development at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is described. The accelerator is a pulsed plasma thruster and has been tested experimentally and plasma jet velocities of approximately 50 km/sec have been obtained. The plasma jet structure has been photographed with 10 ns exposure times to reveal a stable and repeatable plasma structure. Data for velocity profile information has been obtained using light pipes embedded in the gun walls to record the plasma transit at various barrel locations. Preliminary spatially resolved spectral data and magnetic field probe data are also presented. A high speed triggering system has been developed and tested as a means of reducing the gun "jitter". This jitter is being characterized and future work for second generation "ultra-low jitter" gun development is being identified.

  17. Secondary electron emission from plasma processed accelerating cavity grade niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basovic, Milos

    Advances in the particle accelerator technology have enabled numerous fundamental discoveries in 20th century physics. Extensive interdisciplinary research has always supported further development of accelerator technology in efforts of reaching each new energy frontier. Accelerating cavities, which are used to transfer energy to accelerated charged particles, have been one of the main focuses of research and development in the particle accelerator field. Over the last fifty years, in the race to break energy barriers, there has been constant improvement of the maximum stable accelerating field achieved in accelerating cavities. Every increase in the maximum attainable accelerating fields allowed for higher energy upgrades of existing accelerators and more compact designs of new accelerators. Each new and improved technology was faced with ever emerging limiting factors. With the standard high accelerating gradients of more than 25 MV/m, free electrons inside the cavities get accelerated by the field, gaining enough energy to produce more electrons in their interactions with the walls of the cavity. The electron production is exponential and the electron energy transfer to the walls of a cavity can trigger detrimental processes, limiting the performance of the cavity. The root cause of the free electron number gain is a phenomenon called Secondary Electron Emission (SEE). Even though the phenomenon has been known and studied over a century, there are still no effective means of controlling it. The ratio between the electrons emitted from the surface and the impacting electrons is defined as the Secondary Electron Yield (SEY). A SEY ratio larger than 1 designates an increase in the total number of electrons. In the design of accelerator cavities, the goal is to reduce the SEY to be as low as possible using any form of surface manipulation. In this dissertation, an experimental setup was developed and used to study the SEY of various sample surfaces that were treated

  18. Secondary Electron Emission from Plasma Processed Accelerating Cavity Grade Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basovic, Milos [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the particle accelerator technology have enabled numerous fundamental discoveries in 20th century physics. Extensive interdisciplinary research has always supported further development of accelerator technology in efforts of reaching each new energy frontier. Accelerating cavities, which are used to transfer energy to accelerated charged particles, have been one of the main focuses of research and development in the particle accelerator field. Over the last fifty years, in the race to break energy barriers, there has been constant improvement of the maximum stable accelerating field achieved in accelerating cavities. Every increase in the maximum attainable accelerating fields allowed for higher energy upgrades of existing accelerators and more compact designs of new accelerators. Each new and improved technology was faced with ever emerging limiting factors. With the standard high accelerating gradients of more than 25 MV/m, free electrons inside the cavities get accelerated by the field, gaining enough energy to produce more electrons in their interactions with the walls of the cavity. The electron production is exponential and the electron energy transfer to the walls of a cavity can trigger detrimental processes, limiting the performance of the cavity. The root cause of the free electron number gain is a phenomenon called Secondary Electron Emission (SEE). Even though the phenomenon has been known and studied over a century, there are still no effective means of controlling it. The ratio between the electrons emitted from the surface and the impacting electrons is defined as the Secondary Electron Yield (SEY). A SEY ratio larger than 1 designates an increase in the total number of electrons. In the design of accelerator cavities, the goal is to reduce the SEY to be as low as possible using any form of surface manipulation. In this dissertation, an experimental setup was developed and used to study the SEY of various sample surfaces that were treated

  19. Particle acceleration in cosmic plasmas – paradigm change?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lytikov, Maxim [Purdue University; Guo, Fan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-07-21

    The presentation begins by considering the requirements on the acceleration mechanism. It is found that at least some particles in high-energy sources are accelerated by magnetic reconnection (and not by shocks). The two paradigms can be distinguished by the hardness of the spectra. Shocks typically produce spectra with p > 2 (relativistic shocks have p ~ 2.2); non-linear shocks & drift acceleration may give p < 2, e.g. p=1.5; B-field dissipation can give p = 1. Then collapse of stressed magnetic X-point in force-free plasma and collapse of a system of magnetic islands are taken up, including Island merger: forced reconnection. Spectra as functions of sigma are shown, and gamma ~ 109 is addressed. It is concluded that reconnection in magnetically-dominated plasma can proceed explosively, is an efficient means of particle acceleration, and is an important (perhaps dominant for some phenomena) mechanism of particle acceleration in high energy sources.

  20. Formation and Acceleration Physics on Plasma Injector 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    Plasma Injector 1 (PI-1) is a two stage coaxial Marshal gun with conical accelerator electrodes, similar in shape to the MARAUDER device, with power input of the same topology as the RACE device. The goal of PI-1 research is to produce a self-confined compact toroid with high-flux (200 mWb), high-density (3x10^16 cm-3) and moderate initial temperature (100 eV) to be used as the target plasma in a MTF reactor. PI-1 is 5 meters long and 1.9 m in diameter at the expansion region where a high aspect ratio (4.4) spheromak is formed with a minimum lambda of 9 m-1. The acceleration stage is 4 m long and tapers to an outer diameter of 40 cm. The capacitor banks store 0.5 MJ for formation and 1.13 MJ for acceleration. Power is delivered via 62 independently controlled switch modules. Several geometries for formation bias field, inner electrodes and target chamber have been tested, and trends in accelerator efficiency and target lifetime have been observed. Thomson scattering and ion Doppler spectroscopy show significant heating (>100 eV) as the CT is compressed in the conical accelerator. B-dot probes show magnetic field structure consistent with Grad-Shafranov models and MHD simulations, and CT axial length depends strongly on the lambda profile.

  1. Study on spatial distribution of plasma parameters in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Hee-Woon; Lee, Woohyun; Kim, Ji-Won; Whang, Ki-Woong, E-mail: kwhang@snu.ac.kr [Plasma Laboratory, Inter-University Semiconductor Research Center, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyuk [Samsung Electronics Co., Banwol-dong, Hwaseong 445-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Wanjae [Tokyo Electron Miyagi Ltd., Taiwa-cho, Kurokawa-gun, Miyagi 981-3629 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Spatial distributions of various plasma parameters such as plasma density, electron temperature, and radical density in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and a magnetized inductively coupled plasma (M-ICP) were investigated and compared. Electron temperature in between the rf window and the substrate holder of M-ICP was higher than that of ICP, whereas the one just above the substrate holder of M-ICP was similar to that of ICP when a weak (<8 G) magnetic field was employed. As a result, radical densities in M-ICP were higher than those in ICP and the etch rate of oxide in M-ICP was faster than that in ICP without severe electron charging in 90 nm high aspect ratio contact hole etch.

  2. Optimization of a train of bunches for plasma wakefield acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martorelli, Roberto

    2016-05-10

    Particle accelerators are a fundamental instrument for the understanding of fundamental mechanism in nature. The need of always higher energies for the particle beams requires a huge increase of the sizes of the accelerators using the actual technology. Moreover the highest energies are achieved nowadays by circular colliders, not perfectly suitable for acceleration of electrons and positrons due to the radiation losses. In order to overcome this problem a new branch of physics studying alternative technique for particle acceleration has been developed. Among the various alternatives a promising one is the plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA), in which a driver bunch interacts with a cold background plasma, exciting a plasma wave. The electric field of the plasma wave is then used for the acceleration of a second bunch. Such a mechanism allows to reach fields strength far beyond currently available, limited by the dielectric strength of the material. Among the different driver configurations, a promising one is the use of a modulated beam, namely a train of bunches, that provides a coherent interference among the electric fields generated by the single bunches. Such mechanism is subjected to a renewed interest in view of the forthcoming AWAKE experiment at CERN in which the long proton beam produced at the SPS facility is used as a driver. This possibility is achieved thanks to the onset of the self-modulation instability that modulates the long beam in a train of approximately 100 bunches. In order to accelerate the witness bunch to high energies is necessary on the other hand an efficient exchange of energy from the driver to the accelerated bunch, as well as a long duration of the driver so that can propagates for kilometers. This thesis deals with this two last aspects. The aim of this work is to provide an optimization for the modulated driver in order to improve specific features of the PWFA. This work shows the possibility to achieve an improved efficiency

  3. A plasma deflagration accelerator as a platform for laboratory astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Thomas C.; Loebner, Keith T. K.; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2017-06-01

    The replication of astrophysical flows in the laboratory is critical for isolating particular phenomena and dynamics that appear in complex, highly-coupled natural systems. In particular, plasma jets are observed in astrophysical contexts at a variety of scales, typically at high magnetic Reynolds number and driven by internal currents. In this paper, we present detailed measurements of the plasma parameters within deflagration-produced plasma jets, the scaling of these parameters against both machine operating conditions and the corresponding astrophysical phenomena. Using optical and spectroscopic diagnostics, including Schlieren cinematography, we demonstrate the production of current-driven plasma jets of ∼100 km/s and magnetic Reynolds numbers of ∼100, and discuss the dynamics of their acceleration into vacuum. The results of this study will contribute to the reproduction of various types of astrophysical jets in the laboratory and indicate the ability to further probe active research areas such as jet collimation, stability, and interaction.

  4. Initial Operation of the Miniaturized Inductively Heated Plasma Generator IPG6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dropmann, Michael; Herdrich, Georg; Laufer, Rene; Koch, Helmut; Gomringer, Chris; Cook, Mike; Schmoke, Jimmy; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2012-10-01

    In close collaboration between the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER) at Baylor University, Texas, and the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, two plasma wind tunnel facilities of similar type have been established using the inductively heated plasma source IPG6 which is based on proven IRS designs. The facility at Baylor University (IPG6-B) works at a frequency of 13.56 MHz and a maximum power of 15 kW. A vacuum pump of 160m^3/h in combination with a butterfly valve allows pressure control in a wide range. First experiments have been conducted with Air, O2 and N2 as working gases and volumetric flow rates of up to 14 L/min at pressures of a few 100 Pa, although pressures below 1 Pa are achievable at lower flow rates. The maximum tested electric power so far was 8 kW. Plasma powers and total pressures in the plasma jet have been obtained. In the near future the set up of additional diagnostics, the use of other gases (i.e. H2, He), and the integration of a dust particle accelerator are planned. The intended fields of research are basic investigation in thermo-chemistry and plasma radiation, space plasma environments and high heat fluxes e.g. in fusion devices or during atmospheric entry of spacecraft.

  5. Simultaneous induction acceleration and bunching in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Peter; Bazouin, G.; Lidia, S. M.; Roy, P. K.; Waldron, W. L.

    2009-11-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment uses a ramped, bipolar induction module waveform to compress the beam to nanosecond bunches for the study of warm dense matter (WDM). We have recently explored beam dynamics and possible beamline modifications required to simultaneously compress and accelerate the beam using a unipolar waveform. This has the advantage of a higher energy deposition in the target, and mimics beam manipulations in next-generation ion accelerators for WDM experiments. We report modeling and experimental results of this beam manipulation on the NDCX beamline with the new induction bunching module with approximately twice the volt-seconds.

  6. A "slingshot" laser-driven acceleration mechanism of plasma electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Fiore, Gaetano; Fedele, Renato

    2016-01-01

    We briefly report on the recently proposed [G. Fiore, R. Fedele, U. de Angelis, Phys. Plasmas 21 (2014), 113105], [G. Fiore, S. De Nicola, arXiv:1509.04656] electron acceleration mechanism named "slingshot effect": under suitable conditions the impact of an ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulse against the surface of a low-density plasma is expected to cause the expulsion of a bunch of superficial electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to that of the pulse propagation; this is due to the interplay of the huge ponderomotive force, huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation, and the finite size of the laser spot.

  7. Plasma Acceleration from RF Discharge in Dielectric Capillary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Dunaevsky; Y. Raitses; N. J. Fisch

    2005-08-09

    Plasma acceleration from rf discharge in dielectric capillary was demonstrated. Observed plasma flow had ion energies of approximately 100 eV and electron energies of approximately 20 eV. The discharge was powered by a MHz-range rf generator and fed by Ar. Experimental results indicate possible validity of assumptions about formation of a potential difference at the open end of the capillary and presence of hot electron fraction in the capillary discharge. Simplicity and small dimensions of the source are attractive for micro-propulsion applications.

  8. Investigation of toroidal acceleration and potential acceleration forces in EAST and J-TEXT plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Fudi; Pan, Xiayun; Cheng, Zhifeng; Chen, Jun; Cao, Guangming; Wang, Yuming; Han, Xiang; Li, Hao; Wu, Bin; Chen, Zhongyong; Bitter, Manfred; Hill, Kenneth; Rice, John; Morita, Shigeru; Li, Yadong; Zhuang, Ge; Ye, Minyou; Wan, Baonian; Shi, Yuejiang

    2014-01-01

    In order to produce intrinsic rotation, bulk plasmas must be collectively accelerated by the net force exerted on them, which results from both driving and damping forces. So, to study the possible mechanisms of intrinsic rotation generation, it is only needed to understand characteristics of driving and damping terms because the toroidal driving and damping forces induce net acceleration which generates intrinsic rotation. Experiments were performed on EAST and J-TEXT for ohmic plasmas with net counter- and co-current toroidal acceleration generated by density ramping up and ramping down. Additionally on EAST, net co-current toroidal acceleration was also formed by LHCD or ICRF. For the current experimental results, toroidal acceleration was between - 50 km/s^2 in counter-current direction and 70 km/s^2 in co-current direction. According to toroidal momentum equation, toroidal electric field (E\\-(\\g(f))), electron-ion toroidal friction, and toroidal viscous force etc. may play roles in the evolution of toroi...

  9. Laser fields in dynamically ionized plasma structures for coherent acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Luu-Thanh, Ph.; Pukhov, A.; Kostyukov, I.

    2015-01-01

    With the emergence of the CAN (Coherent Amplification Network) laser technology, a new scheme for direct particle acceleration in periodic plasma structures has been proposed. By using our full electromagnetic relativistic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code equipped with ionisation module, we simulate the laser fields dynamics in the periodic structures of different materials. We study how the dynamic ionization influences the field structure.

  10. A Review on Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramyalakshmi G

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy is routinely used in many diverse research fields such as earth, environmental, life and forensic sciences and in food, material, chemical, semiconductor and nuclear industries. The high ion density and the high temperature in a plasma provide an ideal atomizer and element ionizer for all types of samples and materials introduced by a specialised devices .outstanding properties such as high sensitivity, relative salt tolerance, compound-independent element response and highest quantitation accuracy lead to the unchallenged performance of ICPMS in efficiently detecting, identifying and reliably quantifying trace element. The increasing availability of relevant reference compounds and high separation selectively extend the molecular identification capability of ICPMS hyphenated to species – specific separation techniques

  11. Synthesis of titanium carbide by induction plasma reactive spray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xian-Liang(蒋显亮); M.Boulos

    2004-01-01

    A novel method capable of sufficient mixing of titanium powder and methane of carbon source was developed in the synthesis of titanium carbide by induction plasma reactive spray. X-ray diffraction analysis, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and microhardness test were used to characterize the spray-formed deposit.The experimental results show that both primary carburization of the titanium particles inside the plasma flame and secondary carburization of the growing deposit on high temperature substrate contribute to the forming of titanium carbide. The transitional phase of TiC1-x has the same crystal structure as TiC, but has a slightly low lattice constant. The deposit consists of fine grain structure and large grain structure. The fine grain structure, harder than large grain structure, shows grain boundary fracture.

  12. Scaling of induction-cell transverse impedance: effect on accelerator design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekdahl, Carl August [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-09

    The strength of the dangerous beam breakup (BBU) instability in linear induction accelerators (LIAs) is characterized by the transverse coupling impedance Z. This note addresses the dimensional scaling of Z, which is important when comparing new LIA designs to existing accelerators with known i BBU growth. Moreover, it is shown that the scaling of Z with the accelerating gap size relates BBU growth directly to high-voltage engineering considerations. It is proposed to firmly establish this scaling though a series of AMOS calculations.

  13. Characterization of the Inductively Heated Plasma Source IPG6-B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2014-10-01

    In close collaboration between the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER) at Baylor University, Texas, and the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, two plasma facilities have been established using the Inductively heated Plasma Generator 6 (IPG6). The facility at Baylor University (IPG6-B) works at a frequency of 13.56 MHz and a maximum power of 15 kW. A vacuum pump of 160 m3/h in combination with a butterfly valve allows pressure control over a wide range. Intended fields of research include basic investigation into thermo-chemistry and plasma radiation, space plasma environments and high heat fluxes e.g. those found in fusion devices or during atmospheric re-entry of spacecraft. After moving the IPG6-B facility to the Baylor Research and Innovation Collaborative (BRIC) it was placed back into operation during the summer of 2014. Initial characterization in the new lab, using a heat flux probe, Pitot probe and cavity calorimeter, has been conducted for Air, Argon and Helium. The results of this characterization are presented.

  14. Synthesis of Silicon Nanoparticles in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markosyan, Aram H.; Le Picard, Romain; Girshick, Steven L.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis of silicon nanoparticles (Si-NPs) is being investigated for their use in photo-emitting electronics, photovoltaics, and biotechnology. The ability to control the size and mono-disperse nature of Si-NPs is important to optimizing these applications. In this paper we discuss results from a computational investigation of Si-NP formation and growth in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor with the goal of achieving this control. We use a two dimensional numerical model where the algorithms for the kinetics of NP formation are self-consistently coupled with a plasma hydrodynamics simulation. The reactor modeled here resembles a GEC reference cell through which, for the base case, a mixture of Ar/SiH4 = 70/30 flows at 150 sccm at a pressure of 100 mTorr. In continuous wave mode, three coils located on top of the reactor deliver 150 W. The electric plasma potential confines negatively charged particles at the center of the discharge, increasing the residence time of negative NPs, which enables the NPs to potentially grow to large and controllable sizes of many to 100s nm. We discuss methods of controlling NP growth rates by varying the mole fraction and flow rate of SiH4, and using a pulsed plasma by varying the pulse period and duty cycle. Work supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and National Science Foundation.

  15. Plasma chemistry modeling for an inductively coupled plasma used for the growth of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao Ming; Bogaerts, Annemie, E-mail: annemie.bogaerts@ua.ac.be [Research group PLASMANT, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk-Antwerp (Belgium)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid model, called the hybrid plasma equipment model (HPEM), is used to describe the plasma chemistry in an inductively coupled plasma, operating in a gas mixture of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} with either H{sub 2} or NH{sub 3}, as typically used for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth. Two-dimensional profiles of power density, electron temperature and density, gas temperature, and densities of some plasma species are plotted and analyzed. Besides, the fluxes of the various plasma species towards the substrate (where the CNTs can be grown), as well as the decomposition rates of the feedstock gases (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}), are calculated as a function of the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} fraction in both gas mixtures.

  16. Chirp mitigation of plasma-accelerated beams using a modulated plasma density

    CERN Document Server

    Brinkmann, R; Dornmair, I; Assmann, R; Behrens, C; Floettmann, K; Grebenyuk, J; Gross, M; Jalas, S; Kirchen, M; Mehrling, T; de la Ossa, A Martinez; Osterhoff, J; Schmidt, B; Wacker, V; Maier, A R

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-based accelerators offer the possibility to drive future compact light sources and high-energy physics applications. Achieving good beam quality, especially a small beam energy spread, is still one of the major challenges. For stable transport, the beam is located in the focusing region of the wakefield which covers only the slope of the accelerating field. This, however, imprints a longitudinal energy correlation (chirp) along the bunch. Here, we propose an alternating focusing scheme in the plasma to mitigate the development of this chirp and thus maintain a small energy spread.

  17. Acceleration of compact toroid plasma rings for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, C.W.; Barr, W.L.; Eddleman, J.L.; Gee, M.; Hammer, J.H.; Ho, S.K.; Logan, B.G.; Meeker, D.J.; Mirin, A.A.; Nevins, W.M.

    1988-08-26

    We describe experimental results for a new type of collective accelerator based on magnetically confined compact torus (CT) plasma rings and discuss applications to both inertial and magnetic fusion. We have demonstrated the principle of CT acceleration in the RACE device with acceleration of 0.5 mg ring masses to 400 km/s and 0.02 mg ring masses to 1400 km/s at greater than or equal to30% efficiency. Scaling the CT accelerator to the multi-megajoule level could provide an efficient, economical driver for inertial fusion (ICF) or magnetically insulated inertial fusion. Efficient conversion to x-rays for driving hohlraum-type ICF targets has been modeled using a radiation-hydrodynamics code. At less demanding conditions than required for ICF, a CT accelerator can be applied to fueling and current drive in tokamaks. Fueling is accomplished by injecting CTs at the required rate to sustain the particle inventory and at a velocity sufficient to penetrate to the magnetic axis before CT dissolution. Current drive is a consequence of the magnetic helicity content of the CT, which is approximately conserved during reconnection of the CT fields with the tokamak. Major areas of uncertainty in CT fueling and current drive concern the mechanism by which CTs will stop in a tokamak plasma and the effects of the CT on energy confinement and magnetic stability. Bounds on the required CT injection velocity are obtained by considering drag due to emission of an Alfven-wave wake and rapid reconnection and tilting on the internal Alfven time scale of the CT. Preliminary results employing a 3-D, resistive MHD code show rapid tilting with the CT aligning its magnetic moment with the tokamak field. Requirements for an experimental test of CT injection and scenarios for fueling a reactor will also be discussed. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Generation of attosecond electron bunches in a laser-plasma accelerator using a plasma density upramp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weikum, M.K., E-mail: maria.weikum@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron (DESY), Bdg. 30b, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Li, F.Y. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Assmann, R.W. [Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron (DESY), Bdg. 30b, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Sheng, Z.M. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Laboratory for Laser Plasmas and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Jaroszynski, D. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    Attosecond electron bunches and attosecond radiation pulses enable the study of ultrafast dynamics of matter in an unprecedented regime. In this paper, the suitability for the experimental realization of a novel scheme producing sub-femtosecond duration electron bunches from laser-wakefield acceleration in plasma with self-injection in a plasma upramp profile has been investigated. While it has previously been predicted that this requires laser power above a few hundred terawatts typically, here we show that the scheme can be extended with reduced driving laser powers down to tens of terawatts, generating accelerated electron pulses with minimum length of around 166 attoseconds and picocoulombs charge. Using particle-in-cell simulations and theoretical models, the evolution of the accelerated electron bunch within the plasma as well as simple scalings of the bunch properties with initial laser and plasma parameters are presented. - Highlights: • LWFA with an upramp density profile can trap and accelerate sub-fs electron beams. • A reduction of the necessary threshold laser intensity by a factor 4 is presented. • Electron properties are tuned by varying initial laser and plasma parameters. • Simulations predict electron bunch lengths below 200 attoseconds with pC charge. • Strong bunch evolution effects and a large energy spread still need to be improved.

  19. Matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoshan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-07-07

    The inductively coupled plasma is an electrodeless discharge in a gas (usually Ar) at atmospheric pressure. Radio frequency energy generated by a RF power source is inductively coupled to the plasma gas through a water cooled load coil. In ICP-MS the "Fassel" TAX quartz torch commonly used in emission is mounted horizontally. The sample aerosol is introduced into the central flow, where the gas kinetic temperature is about 5000 K. The aerosol is vaporized, atomized, excited and ionized in the plasma, and the ions are subsequently extracted through two metal apertures (sampler and skimmer) into the mass spectrometer. In ICP-MS, the matrix effects, or non-spectroscopic interferences, can be defined as the type of interferences caused by dissolved concomitant salt ions in the solution. Matrix effects can be divided into two categories: (1) signal drift due to the deposition of solids on the sampling apertures; and/or (2) signal suppression or enhancement by the presence of the dissolved salts. The first category is now reasonably understood. The dissolved salts, especially refractory oxides, tend to deposit on the cool tip of the sampling cone. The clogging of the orifices reduces the ion flow into the ICP-MS, lowers the pressure in the first stage of ICP-MS, and enhances the level of metal oxide ions. Because the extent of the clogging increases with the time, the signal drifts down. Even at the very early stage of the development of ICP-MS, matrix effects had been observed. Houk et al. found out that the ICP-MS was not tolerant to solutions containing significant amounts of dissolved solids.

  20. A 3-dimensional model for inductively coupled plasma etching reactors: Coil generated plasma asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushner, M.J.; Collison, W.Z.; Grapperhaus, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1996-12-31

    Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) reactors are being developed as high plasma density, low gas pressure sources for etching and deposition of semiconductor materials. In this paper, the authors describe a 3-dimensional, time dependent model for ICP reactors whose intent is to provide an infrastructure to investigate asymmetries in plasma etching and deposition tools. The model is a 3-dimensional extension of a previously described 2-dimensional simulation called the Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM). HPEM-3D consists of an electromagnetics module (EMM), a Boltzmann-electron energy module (BEM) and a fluid-chemical kinetics simulation (FKS). The inductively coupled electromagnetic fields are produced by the EMM. Results from HPEM-3D will be discussed for reactors using etching (Cl{sub 2}, BCl{sub 3}) and non-etching (Ar, Ar/N{sub 2}) gas mixtures, and which have geometrical asymmetries such as wafer clamps and load-lock bays. The authors show how details in the design of the coil, such as the value of the termination capacitance or number of turns, lead to azimuthal variations in the inductive electric field.

  1. Atmospheric pressure plasma accelerates tail regeneration in tadpoles Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivie, A.; Martus, K.; Menon, J.

    2017-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma is a partially ionized gas composed of neutral and charged particles, including electrons and ions, as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, it is utilized as possible therapy in oncology, sterilization, skin diseases, wound healing and tissue regeneration. In this study we focused on effect of plasma exposure on tail regeneration of tadpoles, Xenopus leavis with special emphasis on role of ROS, antioxidant defenses and morphological features of the regenerate. When amputated region of the tail was exposed to the helium plasma it resulted in a faster rate of growth, elevated ROS and increase in antioxidant enzymes in the regenerate compared to that of untreated control. An increase in nitric oxide (free radical) as well as activity of nitric oxide synthase(s) were observed once the cells of the regeneration blastema - a mass of proliferating cells are ready for differentiation. Microscopically the cells of the regenerate of plasma treated tadpoles show altered morphology and characteristics of cellular hypoxia and oxidative stress. We summarize that plasma exposure accelerates the dynamics of wound healing and tail regeneration through its effects on cell proliferation and differentiation as well as angiogenesis mediated through ROS signaling.

  2. Laser-PlasmaWakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Mullowney, P.; Paul, K.; Cary, J.R.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    Laser-plasma collider designs point to staging of multiple accelerator stages at the 10 GeV level, which are to be developed on the upcoming BELLA laser, while Thomson Gamma source designs use GeV stages, both requiring efficiency and low emittance. Design and scaling of stages operating in the quasi-linear regime to address these needs are presented using simulations in the VORPAL framework. In addition to allowing symmetric acceleration of electrons and positrons, which is important for colliders, this regime has the property that the plasma wakefield is proportional to the transverse gradient of the laser intensity profile. We demonstrate use of higher order laser modes to tailor the laser pulse and hence the transverse focusing forces in the plasma. In particular, we show that by using higher order laser modes, we can reduce the focusing fields and hence increase the matched electron beam radius, which is important to increased charge and efficiency, while keeping the low bunch emittance required for applications.

  3. Ion Acceleration by Laser Plasma Interaction from Cryogenic Microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propp, Adrienne [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-08-16

    Processes that occur in extreme conditions, such as in the center of stars and large planets, can be simulated in the laboratory using facilities such as SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These facilities allow scientists to investigate the properties of matter by observing their interactions with high-power lasers. Ion acceleration from laser plasma interaction is gaining greater attention today due to its widespread potential applications, including proton beam cancer therapy and fast ignition for energy production. Typically, ion acceleration is achieved by focusing a high power laser on thin foil targets through a mechanism called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration. However, this mechanism is not ideal for creating the high-energy proton beams needed for future applications. Based on research and recent experiments, we hypothesized that a pure liquid cryogenic jet would be an ideal target for exploring new regimes of ion acceleration. Furthermore, it would provide a continuous, pure target, unlike metal foils which are consumed in the interaction and easily contaminated. In an effort to test this hypothesis, we used the 527 nm split beam, frequency-doubled TITAN laser at JLF. Data from the cryogenic jets was limited due to the flow of current up the jet into the nozzle during the interaction, heating the jet and damaging the orifice. However, we achieved a pure proton beam with evidence of a monoenergetic feature. Furthermore, data from gold and carbon wires showed surprising and interesting results. Preliminary analysis of data from two ion emission diagnostics, Thomson parabola spectrometers (TPs) and radio chromic films (RCFs), suggests that shockwave acceleration occurred rather than target normal sheath acceleration, the standard mechanism of ion acceleration. Upon completion of the experiment at TITAN, I researched the possibility of transforming our liquid cryogenic

  4. [Changes of plasma endocrine hormone in pilots under Coriolis acceleration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Y; Ji, G; Huang, Y; Sun, X; Dai, F

    1998-04-01

    Plasma endocrine hormones were studied in both 24 motion sickness (orthostatic intolerance) and healthy pilots. Coriolis acceleration of 3.75, 5.00 and 6.25 pi 2 cm/s2 were given with intervals of 3-4 min AT-II, insulin, cortisol, Aldosterone and gastrin were determined by radioimmunoassay. It was found that aldosterone, AT-II, gastrin increased with increase of coriolis acceleration in all pilots. (P < 0.05), but cortisol and insulin only increased in healthy pilots (P < 0.05). It suggests excitation of the autonomic nervous system might be insufficient in orthostatic intolerant pilots and that determination of endocrine hormones may be useful in the evaluation of autonomic nervous activities.

  5. Theory and measurements of emittance preservation in plasma wakefield acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederico, Joel

    2016-12-01

    In this dissertation, we examine the preservation and measurement of emittance in the plasma wakefield acceleration blowout regime. Plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) is a revolutionary approach to accelerating charged particles that has been demonstrated to have the potential for gradients orders of magnitude greater than traditional approaches. The application of PWFA to the design of a linear collider will make new high energy physics research possible, but the design parameters must first be shown to be competitive with traditional methods. Emittance preservation is necessary in the design of a linear collider in order to maximize luminosity. We examine the conditions necessary for circular symmetry in the PWFA blowout regime, and demonstrate that current proposals meet these bounds. We also present an application of beam lamentation which describes the process of beam parameter and emittance matching. We show that the emittance growth saturates as a consequence of energy spread in the beam. The initial beam parameters determine the amount of emittance growth, while the contribution of energy spread is negligible. We also present a model for ion motion in the presence of a beam that is much more dense than the plasma. By combining the model of ion motion and emittance growth, we find the emittance growth due to ion motion is minimal in the case of marginal ion motion. In addition, we present a simulation that validates the ion motion model, which is under further development to examine emittance growth of both marginal and pronounced ion motion. Finally, we present a proof-of-concept of an emittance measurement which may enable the analysis of emittance preservation in future PWFA experiments.

  6. Pulsed radiobiology with laser-driven plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulietti, Antonio; Grazia Andreassi, Maria; Greco, Carlo

    2011-05-01

    Recently, a high efficiency regime of acceleration in laser plasmas has been discovered, allowing table top equipment to deliver doses of interest for radiotherapy with electron bunches of suitable kinetic energy. In view of an R&D program aimed to the realization of an innovative class of accelerators for medical uses, a radiobiological validation is needed. At the present time, the biological effects of electron bunches from the laser-driven electron accelerator are largely unknown. In radiobiology and radiotherapy, it is known that the early spatial distribution of energy deposition following ionizing radiation interactions with DNA molecule is crucial for the prediction of damages at cellular or tissue levels and during the clinical responses to this irradiation. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the radio-biological effects obtained with electron bunches from a laser-driven electron accelerator compared with bunches coming from a IORT-dedicated medical Radio-frequency based linac's on human cells by the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay (CBMN). To this purpose a multidisciplinary team including radiotherapists, biologists, medical physicists, laser and plasma physicists is working at CNR Campus and University of Pisa. Dose on samples is delivered alternatively by the "laser-linac" operating at ILIL lab of Istituto Nazionale di Ottica and an RF-linac operating for IORT at Pisa S. Chiara Hospital. Experimental data are analyzed on the basis of suitable radiobiological models as well as with numerical simulation based on Monte Carlo codes. Possible collective effects are also considered in the case of ultrashort, ultradense bunches of ionizing radiation.

  7. Radial equilibrium of relativistic particle bunches in plasma wakefield accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Lotov, K V

    2016-01-01

    Drive particle beams in linear or weakly nonlinear regimes of the plasma wakefield accelerator quickly reach a radial equilibrium with the wakefield, which is described in detail for the first time. The equilibrium beam state and self-consistent wakefields are obtained by combining analytical relationships, numerical integration, and first-principle simulations. In the equilibrium state, the beam density is strongly peaked near the axis, the beam radius is constant along the beam, and longitudinal variation of the focusing strength is balanced by varying beam emittance. The transverse momentum distribution of beam particles depends on the observation radius and is neither separable, nor Gaussian.

  8. Stability study for matching in laser driven plasma acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, A.R., E-mail: andrea.rossi@mi.infn.it [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Anania, M.P. [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Bacci, A. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Belleveglia, M.; Bisesto, F.G.; Chiadroni, E. [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [Tor Vergata University, Physics Department, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Curcio, A.; Gallo, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M. [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Marocchino, A.; Massimo, F. [La Sapienza University, SBAI Department, via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy); Mostacci, A. [La Sapienza University, SBAI Department, via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy); INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Petrarca, M. [La Sapienza University, SBAI Department, via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy); Pompili, R. [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Serafini, L. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Tomassini, P. [University of Milan, Physics Department, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Vaccarezza, C. [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); and others

    2016-09-01

    In a recent paper [14], a scheme for inserting and extracting high brightness electron beams to/from a plasma based acceleration stage was presented and proved to be effective with an ideal bi-Gaussian beam, as could be delivered by a conventional photo-injector. In this paper, we extend that study, assessing the method stability against some jitters in the properties of the injected beam. We find that the effects of jitters in Twiss parameters are not symmetric in results; we find a promising configuration that yields better performances than the setting proposed in [14]. Moreover we show and interpret what happens when the beam charge profiles are modified.

  9. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlis, N. H.; Bakeman, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Gonsalves, T.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Plateau, G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Shiraishi, S.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    We present an overview of diagnostic techniques for measuring key parameters of electron bunches from Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). The diagnostics presented here were chosen because they highlight the unique advantages (e.g., diverse forms of electromagnetic emission) and difficulties (e.g., shot-to-shot variability) associated with LPAs. Non destructiveness and high resolution (in space and time and energy) are key attributes that enable the formation of a comprehensive suite of simultaneous diagnostics which are necessary for the full characterization of the ultrashort, but highly-variable electron bunches from LPAs.

  10. Quark-Gluon Plasma: from accelerator experiments to early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Rosnet, P

    2015-01-01

    In the Big Bang scenario, the early Universe is characterized by the {\\it particle era}, i.e. a Universe made of particles. This period connects both scales of fundamental physics: infinitesimally small and infinitely large. So, particle physics and in particular experimental programs at accelerators can bring valuable inputs for the understanding of the early Universe and its evolution. These proceedings discuss the impact of the Quantum ChromoDynamics phase transition experienced by the {\\it particle era} in the expanding Universe, which is connected to the study of the Quark-Gluon Plasma produced in heavy-ion physics experiments.

  11. 179th International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi" : Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Gizzi, L A; Faccini, R

    2012-01-01

    Impressive progress has been made in the field of laser-plasma acceleration in the last decade, with outstanding achievements from both experimental and theoretical viewpoints. Closely exploiting the development of ultra-intense, ultrashort pulse lasers, laser-plasma acceleration has developed rapidly, achieving accelerating gradients of the order of tens of GeV/m, and making the prospect of miniature accelerators a more realistic possibility. This book presents the lectures delivered at the Enrico Fermi International School of Physics and summer school: "Laser-Plasma Acceleration" , held in Varenna, Italy, in June 2011. The school provided an opportunity for young scientists to experience the best from the worlds of laser-plasma and accelerator physics, with intensive training and hands-on opportunities related to key aspects of laser-plasma acceleration. Subjects covered include: the secrets of lasers; the power of numerical simulations; beam dynamics; and the elusive world of laboratory plasmas. The object...

  12. Photon Acceleration of Laser-plasma Based on Compton Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Dong-shan; XIE Hong-jun

    2006-01-01

    The one-dimensional electron density disturbance is studied by using the inelastic collision model of the relativity electron and photon group, the relativity theory, the momentum equation and the continuity equation, which is generated by a driving laser pulse and scattered laser pulse propagating through a tenuous plasma, and the electron density disturbance is closely associated with the incident laser and scattering laser. The electron plasma wave(EPW)is formed by the propagation of the electron density disturbance. Owing to the action of EPW, the increasing of the frequency of the photons in the incident laser pulses that there is a distance with the driving laser pulses is studied by using optical metric. The results show that it is possible that the photon will gain higher energy from the EPW when photon number is decreased and one-photon Compton scattering enters, the photon will be accelerated.

  13. Collisionless shocks in space plasmas structure and accelerated particles

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, David

    2015-01-01

    Shock waves are an important feature of solar system plasmas, from the solar corona out to the edge of the heliosphere. This engaging introduction to collisionless shocks in space plasmas presents a comprehensive review of the physics governing different types of shocks and processes of particle acceleration, from fundamental principles to current research. Motivated by observations of planetary bow shocks, interplanetary shocks and the solar wind termination shock, it emphasises the physical theory underlying these shock waves. Readers will develop an understanding of the complex interplay between particle dynamics and the electric and magnetic fields that explains the observations of in situ spacecraft. Written by renowned experts in the field, this up-to-date text is the ideal companion for both graduate students new to heliospheric physics and researchers in astrophysics who wish to apply the lessons of solar system shocks to different astrophysical environments.

  14. Molecular Nitrogen Vibrational Temperature in an Inductively Coupled Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康正德; 蒲以康

    2002-01-01

    Using a technique applied previously to vibrationally excited molecular nitrogen (N*2) in the region of daytime and nighttime aurora, the emission intensity of the N2 second positive band system in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) has been analysed and the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules in the ICP is thus determined. The result shows that the vibrational temperature increases with the increase of the neutral gas pressure from 0.04Pa to 10Pa, then decreases with the further increase of the pressure from 10Pa to 100Pa. Also,this is explained by using the Boltzmann relation between the vibrational temperature and the concentration of the vibrationally excited N*2(X1∑+g ) molecules.

  15. Quantitative aspects of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulska, Ewa; Wagner, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Accurate determination of elements in various kinds of samples is essential for many areas, including environmental science, medicine, as well as industry. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a powerful tool enabling multi-elemental analysis of numerous matrices with high sensitivity and good precision. Various calibration approaches can be used to perform accurate quantitative measurements by ICP-MS. They include the use of pure standards, matrix-matched standards, or relevant certified reference materials, assuring traceability of the reported results. This review critically evaluates the advantages and limitations of different calibration approaches, which are used in quantitative analyses by ICP-MS. Examples of such analyses are provided. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  16. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry on the Operating Characteristics of an Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Kimberlin, Adam C.; Perdue, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    Operational characteristics of two separate inductive thrusters with conical theta pinch coils of different cone angles are explored through thrust stand measurements and time- integrated, unfiltered photography. Trends in impulse bit measurements indicate that, in the present experimental configuration, the thruster with the inductive coil possessing a smaller cone angle produced larger values of thrust, in apparent contradiction to results of a previous thruster acceleration model. Areas of greater light intensity in photographs of thruster operation are assumed to qualitatively represent locations of increased current density. Light intensity is generally greater in images of the thruster with the smaller cone angle when compared to those of the thruster with the larger half cone angle for the same operating conditions. The intensity generally decreases in both thrusters for decreasing mass flow rate and capacitor voltage. The location of brightest light intensity shifts upstream for decreasing mass flow rate of propellant and downstream for decreasing applied voltage. Recognizing that there typically exists an optimum ratio of applied electric field to gas pressure with respect to breakdown efficiency, this result may indicate that the optimum ratio was not achieved uniformly over the coil face, leading to non-uniform and incomplete current sheet formation in violation of the model assumption of immediate formation where all the injected propellant is contained in a magnetically-impermeable current sheet.

  17. Phosphorus doped graphene by inductively coupled plasma and triphenylphosphine treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dong-Wook, E-mail: shindong37@skku.edu; Kim, Tae Sung; Yoo, Ji-Beom, E-mail: jbyoo@skku.edu

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Substitution doping is a promising method for opening the energy band gap of graphene. • Substitution doping with phosphorus in the graphene lattice has numerous advantage such as high band gap, low formation energy, and high net charge density compared to nitrogen. • V{sub dirac} of Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and triphenylphosphine (TPP) treated graphene was −57 V, which provided clear evidence of n-type doping. • Substitutional doping of graphene with phosphorus is verified by the XPS spectra of P 2p core level and EELS mapping of phosphorus. • The chemical bonding between P and graphene is very stable for a long time in air (2 months). - Abstract: Graphene is considered a host material for various applications in next-generation electronic devices. However, despite its excellent properties, one of the most important issues to be solved as an electronic material is the creation of an energy band gap. Substitution doping is a promising method for opening the energy band gap of graphene. Herein, we demonstrate the substitutional doping of graphene with phosphorus using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and triphenylphosphine (TPP) treatments. The electrical transfer characteristics of the phosphorus doped graphene field effect transistor (GFET) have a V{sub dirac} of ∼ − 54 V. The chemical bonding between P and C was clearly observed in XPS spectra, and uniform distribution of phosphorus within graphene domains was confirmed by EELS mapping. The capability for substitutional doping of graphene with phosphorus can significantly promote the development of graphene based electronic devices.

  18. Acceleration of Microtuber Induction in Potato by Cytokinine and Photoperiod Adjustment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M F Alam; N Ahsan; M M Hossain; S Parvez; A M Swaraz; R Islam

    2003-01-01

    Protocol was developed for acceleration of microtuber induction in potato. It was observed that cytokinine (Kin), and both dark and light period had great influence on in vitro tuberization. Regarding concentration of Kin, 8 mg/l was found excellent for microtuber induction and formation under both dark and light conditions. Under continuous dark condition, higher percentage of explants (shoot) induced microtuber was observed than the short and long period of light conditions. For increasing the number and weight of microtuber product/explant, use of long photoperiod (16 h) is recommended.

  19. Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster Development and Testing at NASA-MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.

    2013-01-01

    THE inductive pulsed plasma thruster (IPPT) is an electrodeless space propulsion device where a capacitor is charged to an initial voltage and then discharged producing a high current pulse through a coil. The field produced by this pulse ionizes propellant, inductively driving current in a plasma located near the face of the coil. Once the plasma is formed it can be accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity by the electromagnetic Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the induced plasma current and the magnetic field produced by the current in the coil. In the present work, we present a summary of the IPPT research and development conducted at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). As a higher-power, still relatively low readiness level system, there are many issues associated with the eventual deployment and use of the IPPT as a primary propulsion system on spacecraft that remain to be addressed. The present program aimed to fabricate and test hardware to explore how these issues could be addressed. The following specific areas were addressed within the program and will be discussed within this paper. a) Conical theta-pinch IPPT geometry thruster configuration. b) Repetition-rate multi-kW thruster pulsing. c) Long-lifetime pulsed gas valve. d) Fast pulsed gas valve driver and controller. e) High-voltage, repetitive capacitor charging power processing unit. During the course of testing, a number of specific tests were conducted, including several that, to our knowledge, have either never been previously conducted (such as multi-KW repetition-rate operation) or have not been performed since the early 1990s (direct IPPT thrust measurements).2 Conical theta-pinch IPPT thrust stand measurements are presented in Fig. 1 while various time-integrated and time

  20. A study on plasma parameters in Ar/SF6 inductively coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung-Ju; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2017-01-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) gas or Ar/SF6 mixing gas is widely used in plasma processes. However, there are a little experimental studies with various external parameters such as gas pressure and mixing ratio. In this work, a study of the plasma parameters by changing the gas mixing ratio was done in an Ar/SF6 inductively coupled plasma from the measurement of the electron energy distribution function. At a low gas pressure, as the mixing ratio of SF6 gas increased at a fixed inductively coupled plasma (ICP) power, the electron density decreased and the electron temperature increased, while they were not changed drastically. At a high gas pressure, a remarkable increase in the electron temperature was observed with the decrease in the electron density. These variations are due to the electron loss reactions such as the electron attachment. It was also found that at a fixed ICP power, the negative ion creation with the diluted SF6 gas can change the discharge mode transition from an inductive mode to a capacitive mode at the high gas pressure. The electron attachment reactions remove the low energy electrons and change the mean electron energy towards higher energies with diluting SF6 gas at high pressure. The measured results were compared with the simplified global model, and the global model is in relatively good agreement with the measured plasma parameters except for the result in the case of the large portion of SF6 gas at the high pressure and the capacitive mode, which causes strong negative ion formation by the electron attachment reactions.

  1. Behavior of Excited Argon Atoms in Inductively Driven Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hebner, G A

    1999-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence has been used to measure the spatial distribution of the two lowest energy argon excited states, 1s sub 5 and 1s sub 4 , in inductively driven plasmas containing argon, chlorine and boron trichloride. The behavior of the two energy levels with plasma conditions was significantly different, probably because the 1s sub 5 level is metastable and the 1s sub 4 level is radiatively coupled to the ground state but is radiation trapped. The argon data is compared with a global model to identify the relative importance of processes such as electron collisional mixing and radiation trapping. The trends in the data suggest that both processes play a major role in determining the excited state density. At lower rfpower and pressure, excited state spatial distributions in pure argon were peaked in the center of the discharge, with an approximately Gaussian profile. However, for the highest rfpowers and pressures investigated, the spatial distributions tended to flatten in the center of the disch...

  2. Deposition of Nano-Scaled Coatings Using Inductively Coupled Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D H Jung; B Park; J J Lee

    2004-01-01

    Nano-scaled Ti-B-N coatings could be produced by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) assisted magnetron spurtering. The properties and microstructure of the coating can be changed drastically by applying ICP to conventional magnetron sputtering. In this work, an internal type rf ICP process is used. The core of this technology is the efficient production and control of self-depositing ions and reactive gas ions by an induced electric field. Ti-B-N coatings were prepared by using a TiB2 target and a gas mixture of N2 and Ar at 200 ℃ and a pressure of 60 mTorr. In addition to ICP, the effect of the substrate bias voltage on the structure and properties of the coating was investigated. By applying ICP and a bias voltage to the substrate the hardness of the Ti-B-N coating is increased by more than 75 GPa, as a result of enhanced ionization in the plasma. The Ti-B-N coating, which has the highest hardness, shows the best surface uniformity and a very dense structure with a grain size of 3 nm. This sample also shows a high crystallinity compared to the coating prepared using other deposition parameters.

  3. A novel laser ablation plasma thruster with electromagnetic acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Daixian; Wu, Jianjun; He, Zhen; Zhang, Hua

    2016-10-01

    A novel laser ablation plasma thruster accelerated by electromagnetic means was proposed and investigated. The discharge characteristics and thrust performance were tested with different charged energy, structural parameters and propellants. The thrust performance was proven to be improved by electromagnetic acceleration. In contrast with the pure laser propulsion mode, the thrust performance in electromagnetic acceleration modes was much better. The effects of electrodes distance and the off-axis distance between ceramic tube and cathode were tested, and it's found that there were optimal structural parameters for achieving optimal thrust performance. It's indicated that the impulse bit and specific impulse increased with increasing charged energy. In our experiments, the thrust performance of the thruster was optimal in large charged energy modes. With the charged energy 25 J and the use of metal aluminum, a maximal impulse bit of 600 μNs, a specific impulse of approximate 8000 s and thrust efficiency of about 90% were obtained. For the PTFE propellant, a maximal impulse bit of about 350 μNs, a specific impulse of about 2400 s, and thrust efficiency of about 16% were obtained. Besides, the metal aluminum was proven to be the better propellant than PTFE for the thruster.

  4. Wake potentials and impedances for the ATA (Advanced Test Accelerator) induction cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, G.D.

    1990-09-04

    The AMOS Wakefield Code is used to calculate the impedances of the induction cell used in the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) at Livermore. We present the wakefields and impedances for multipoles m = 0, 1 and 2. The ATA cell is calculated to have a maximum transverse impedance of approximately 1000 {Omega}/m at 875 MHz with a quality factor Q = 5. The sensitivity of the impedance spectra to modeling variations is discussed.

  5. Analytical and experimental investigation of the coaxial plasma gun for use as a particle accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriver, E. L.

    1972-01-01

    The coaxial plasma accelerator for use as a projectile accelerator is discussed. The accelerator is described physically and analytically by solution of circuit equations, and by solving for the magnetic pressures which are formed by the j cross B vector forces on the plasma. It is shown that the plasma density must be increased if the accelerator is to be used as a projectile accelerator. Three different approaches to increasing plasma density are discussed. When a magnetic field containment scheme was used to increase the plasma density, glass beads of 0.66 millimeter diameter were accelerated to 7 to 8 kilometers per second velocities. Glass beads of smaller diameter were accelerated to more than twice this velocity.

  6. Transient plasma potential in pulsed dual frequency inductively coupled plasmas and effect of substrate biasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Anurag; Yeom, Geun Young

    2016-09-01

    An electron emitting probe in saturated floating potential mode has been used to investigate the temporal evolution of plasma potential and the effect of substrate RF biasing on it for pulsed dual frequency (2 MHz/13.56 MHz) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. The low frequency power (P2MHz) has been pulsed at 1 KHz and a duty ratio of 50%, while high frequency power (P13.56MHz) has been used in continuous mode. The substrate has been biased with a separate bias power at (P12.56MHz) Argon has been used as a discharge gas. During the ICP power pulsing, three distinct regions in a typical plasma potential profile, have been identified as `initial overshoot', pulse `on-phase' and pulse `off-phase'. It has been found out that the RF biasing of the substrate significantly modulates the temporal evolution of the plasma potential. During the initial overshoot, plasma potential decreases with increasing RF biasing of the substrate, however it increases with increasing substrate biasing for pulse `on-phase' and `off-phase'. An interesting structure in plasma potential profile has also been observed when the substrate bias is applied and its evolution depends upon the magnitude of bias power. The reason of the evolution of this structure may be the ambipolar diffusion of electron and its dependence on bias power.

  7. Whittaker functions in beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration for a plasma with a parabolic density profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golian, Y.; Dorranian, D., E-mail: d.dorranian@gmail.com [Laser Laboratory, Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aslaninejad, M., E-mail: m.aslaninejad@ipm.ir [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Particles and Accelerators, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    A model for the interaction of charged particle beams and plasma for a linear wakefield generation in a parabolic plasma channel is presented. The density profile has the maximum on the axis. A Gaussian proton beam is employed to excite the plasma wakefield in the channel. We have built a thorough analytical model and solved the governing equations for the wakefield acceleration of a charged particle beam. The longitudinal and radial wakefields are expressed by Whittaker functions, and for certain parameters of plasma and the beam, their behaviours in longitudinal and radial directions are investigated. It is observed that the radial electric field generated by the bunch increases with the distance behind the bunch.

  8. Whittaker functions in beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration for a plasma with a parabolic density profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golian, Y.; Aslaninejad, M.; Dorranian, D.

    2016-01-01

    A model for the interaction of charged particle beams and plasma for a linear wakefield generation in a parabolic plasma channel is presented. The density profile has the maximum on the axis. A Gaussian proton beam is employed to excite the plasma wakefield in the channel. We have built a thorough analytical model and solved the governing equations for the wakefield acceleration of a charged particle beam. The longitudinal and radial wakefields are expressed by Whittaker functions, and for certain parameters of plasma and the beam, their behaviours in longitudinal and radial directions are investigated. It is observed that the radial electric field generated by the bunch increases with the distance behind the bunch.

  9. Construction of a Compact, Low-Inductance, 100 J Dense Plasma Focus for Yield Optimization Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Christopher; Povilus, Alex; Chapman, Steven; Falabella, Steve; Podpaly, Yuri; Shaw, Brian; Liu, Jason; Schmidt, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    A new 100 J mini dense plasma focus (DPF) is constructed to optimize neutron yields for a variety of plasma conditions and anode shapes. The device generates neutrons by leveraging instabilities that occur during a z-pinch in a plasma sheath to accelerate a beam of deuterium ions into a background deuterium gas target. The features that distinguish this miniDPF from previous 100 J devices are a compact, engineered electrode geometry and a low-impedance driver. The driving circuit inductance is minimized by mounting the capacitors close to the back of the anode and cathode yields. The anode can rapidly be changed out to test new designs. The neutron yield and 2D images of the visible light emission are compared to simulations with the hybrid kinetic code LSP which can directly simulate the device and anode designs. Initial studies of the sheath physics and neutron yields for a scaling of discharge voltages and neutral fill pressures are presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. The Experimental Study of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability using a Linear Induction Motor Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Nicholas; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2009-11-01

    The experiments to be presented utilize an incompressible system of two stratified miscible liquids of different densities that are accelerated in order to produce the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Three liquid combinations are used: isopropyl alcohol with water, a calcium nitrate solution or a lithium polytungstate solution, giving Atwood numbers of 0.11, 0.22 and 0.57, respectively. The acceleration required to drive the instability is produced by two high-speed linear induction motors mounted to an 8 m tall drop tower. The motors are mounted in parallel and have an effective acceleration length of 1.7 m and are each capable of producing 15 kN of thrust. The liquid system is contained within a square acrylic tank with inside dimensions 76 x76x184 mm. The tank is mounted to an aluminum plate, which is driven by the motors to create constant accelerations in the range of 1-20 g's, though the potential exists for higher accelerations. Also attached to the plate are a high-speed camera and an LED backlight to provide continuous video of the instability. In addition, an accelerometer is used to provide acceleration measurements during each experiment. Experimental image sequences will be presented which show the development of a random three-dimensional instability from an unforced initial perturbation. Measurements of the mixing zone width will be compared with traditional growth models.

  11. Serum/plasma methylmercury determination by isotope dilution gas chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Douglas C., E-mail: douglas.baxter@alsglobal.com [ALS Scandinavia AB, Aurorum 10, 977 75 Lulea (Sweden); Faarinen, Mikko [ALS Scandinavia AB, Aurorum 10, 977 75 Lulea (Sweden); Osterlund, Helene; Rodushkin, Ilia [ALS Scandinavia AB, Aurorum 10, 977 75 Lulea (Sweden); Division of Geosciences, Lulea University of Technology, 977 87 Lulea (Sweden); Christensen, Morten [ALS Scandinavia AB, Maskinvaegen 2, 183 53 Taeby (Sweden)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {center_dot} We determine methylmercury in serum and plasma using isotope dilution calibration. {center_dot} Separation by gas chromatography and detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. {center_dot} Data for 50 specimens provides first reference range for methylmercury in serum. {center_dot} Serum samples shown to be stable for 11 months in refrigerator. - Abstract: A method for the determination of methylmercury in plasma and serum samples was developed. The method uses isotope dilution with {sup 198}Hg-labeled methylmercury, extraction into dichloromethane, back-extraction into water, aqueous-phase ethylation, purge and trap collection, thermal desorption, separation by gas chromatography, and mercury isotope specific detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. By spiking 2 mL sample with 1.2 ng tracer, measurements in a concentration interval of (0.007-2.9) {mu}g L{sup -1} could be performed with uncertainty amplification factors <2. A limit of quantification of 0.03 {mu}g L{sup -1} was estimated at 10 times the standard deviation of concentrations measured in preparation blanks. Within- and between-run relative standard deviations were <10% at added concentration levels of 0.14 {mu}g L{sup -1}, 0.35 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 2.8 {mu}g L{sup -1}, with recoveries in the range 82-110%. Application of the method to 50 plasma/serum samples yielded a median (mean; range) concentration of methylmercury of 0.081 (0.091; <0.03-0.19) {mu}g L{sup -1}. This is the first time methylmercury has been directly measured in this kind of specimen, and is therefore the first estimate of a reference range.

  12. PROMETHEUS-A: A helicon plasma source for future wakefield accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttenschoen, Birger; Fahrenkamp, Nils; Grulke, Olaf [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    High density plasma sources are of interest for a wide range of applications like plasma-wall interaction studies, plasma thrusters for space propulsion, or future plasma wakefield particle accelerators. In this contribution, we present a high power helicon cell designed for the world's first proton-beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator experiment AWAKE. Using a modular concept with four antennas distributed along a one meter long, five centimeter diameter prototype module providing up to 35 kW of rf power to the plasma, accelerator relevant densities of 6 . 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} are transiently achieved and exceeded. These high density plasmas are characterized for the use with wakefield accelerators, considering density evolution and its reproducibility, plasma profiles and neutral gas inventory.

  13. Phase Space Dynamics of Ionization Injection in Plasma Based Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, X L; Li, F; Zhang, C J; Yan, L X; Du, Y C; Huang, W H; Chen, H B; Tang, C X; Lu, W; Yu, P; An, W; Mori, W B; Joshi, C

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of beam phase space in ionization-induced injection into plasma wakefields is studied using theory and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The injection process causes special longitudinal and transverse phase mixing leading initially to a rapid emittance growth followed by oscillation, decay, and eventual slow growth to saturation. An analytic theory for this evolution is presented that includes the effects of injection distance (time), acceleration distance, wakefield structure, and nonlinear space charge forces. Formulas for the emittance in the low and high space charge regimes are presented. The theory is verified through PIC simulations and a good agreement is obtained. This work shows how ultra-low emittance beams can be produced using ionization-induced injection.

  14. A New Scheme for High-Intensity Laser-Driven Electron Acceleration in a Plasma 2

    CERN Document Server

    Sadykova, S P; Samkharadze, T G

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new approach to high-intensity relativistic laser-driven electron acceleration in a plasma. Here, we demonstrate that a plasma wave generated by a stimulated forward-scattering of an incident laser pulse can be in the longest acceleration phase with injected relativistic beam electrons. This is why the plasma wave has the maximum amplification coefficient which is determined by the acceleration time and the breakdown (overturn) electric field in which the acceleration of the injected beam electrons occurs. We must note that for the longest acceleration phase the relativity of the injected beam electrons plays a crucial role in our scheme. We estimate qualitatively the acceleration parameters of relativistic electrons in the field of a plasma wave generated at the stimulated forward-scattering of a high-intensity laser pulse in a plasma.

  15. Complex image method for RF antenna-plasma inductive coupling calculation in planar geometry. Part I: basic concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howling, A. A.; Guittienne, Ph; Jacquier, R.; Furno, I.

    2015-12-01

    The coupling between an inductive source and the plasma determines the power transfer efficiency and the reflected impedance in the primary circuit. Usually, the plasma coupling is analysed by means of a transformer equivalent circuit, where the plasma inductance and resistance are estimated using a global plasma model. This paper shows that, for planar RF antennas, the mutual inductance between the plasma and the primary circuit can be calculated using partial inductances and the complex image method, where the plasma coupling is determined in terms of the plasma skin depth and the distance to the plasma. To introduce the basic concepts, the mutual inductance is calculated here for a linear conductor parallel to the plasma surface. In the accompanying paper part II Guittienne et al (2015 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 24 065015), impedance measurements on a RF resonant planar plasma source are modeled using an impedance matrix where the plasma-antenna mutual impedances are calculated using the complex image method presented here.

  16. Electron beam charge diagnostics for laser plasma accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nakamura

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs. First, a scintillating screen (Lanex was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160  pC/mm^{2} and 0.4  pC/(ps  mm^{2}, respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within ±8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  17. Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, David; Donahue, Rich; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-27

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). First, a scintillating screen (Lanex) was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT) for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/(ps mm{sup 2}), respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  18. Uranium quantification in semen by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Todor I; Ejnik, John W; Guandalini, Gustavo; Xu, Hanna; Hoover, Dennis; Anderson, Larry; Squibb, Katherine; McDiarmid, Melissa A; Centeno, Jose A

    2013-01-01

    In this study we report uranium analysis for human semen samples. Uranium quantification was performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. No additives, such as chymotrypsin or bovine serum albumin, were used for semen liquefaction, as they showed significant uranium content. For method validation we spiked 2g aliquots of pooled control semen at three different levels of uranium: low at 5 pg/g, medium at 50 pg/g, and high at 1000 pg/g. The detection limit was determined to be 0.8 pg/g uranium in human semen. The data reproduced within 1.4-7% RSD and spike recoveries were 97-100%. The uranium level of the unspiked, pooled control semen was 2.9 pg/g of semen (n=10). In addition six semen samples from a cohort of Veterans exposed to depleted uranium (DU) in the 1991 Gulf War were analyzed with no knowledge of their exposure history. Uranium levels in the Veterans' semen samples ranged from undetectable (<0.8 pg/g) to 3350 pg/g. This wide concentration range for uranium in semen is consistent with known differences in current DU body burdens in these individuals, some of whom have retained embedded DU fragments.

  19. Uranium quantification in semen by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Todor; Ejnik, John W.; Guandalini, Gustavo S.; Xu, Hanna; Hoover, Dennis; Anderson, Larry W.; Squibb, Katherine; McDiarmid, Melissa A.; Centeno, Jose A.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we report uranium analysis for human semen samples. Uranium quantification was performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. No additives, such as chymotrypsin or bovine serum albumin, were used for semen liquefaction, as they showed significant uranium content. For method validation we spiked 2 g aliquots of pooled control semen at three different levels of uranium: low at 5 pg/g, medium at 50 pg/g, and high at 1000 pg/g. The detection limit was determined to be 0.8 pg/g uranium in human semen. The data reproduced within 1.4–7% RSD and spike recoveries were 97–100%. The uranium level of the unspiked, pooled control semen was 2.9 pg/g of semen (n = 10). In addition six semen samples from a cohort of Veterans exposed to depleted uranium (DU) in the 1991 Gulf War were analyzed with no knowledge of their exposure history. Uranium levels in the Veterans’ semen samples ranged from undetectable (<0.8 pg/g) to 3350 pg/g. This wide concentration range for uranium in semen is consistent with known differences in current DU body burdens in these individuals, some of whom have retained embedded DU fragments.

  20. High-performance modeling of plasma-based acceleration and laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Blaclard, Guillaume; Godfrey, Brendan; Kirchen, Manuel; Lee, Patrick; Lehe, Remi; Lobet, Mathieu; Vincenti, Henri

    2016-10-01

    Large-scale numerical simulations are essential to the design of plasma-based accelerators and laser-plasma interations for ultra-high intensity (UHI) physics. The electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) approach is the method of choice for self-consistent simulations, as it is based on first principles, and captures all kinetic effects, and also scale favorably to many cores on supercomputers. The standard PIC algorithm relies on second-order finite-difference discretization of the Maxwell and Newton-Lorentz equations. We present here novel formulations, based on very high-order pseudo-spectral Maxwell solvers, which enable near-total elimination of the numerical Cherenkov instability and increased accuracy over the standard PIC method for standard laboratory frame and Lorentz boosted frame simulations. We also present the latest implementations in the PIC modules Warp-PICSAR and FBPIC on the Intel Xeon Phi and GPU architectures. Examples of applications will be given on the simulation of laser-plasma accelerators and high-harmonic generation with plasma mirrors. Work supported by US-DOE Contracts DE-AC02-05CH11231 and by the European Commission through the Marie Slowdoska-Curie fellowship PICSSAR Grant Number 624543. Used resources of NERSC.

  1. 3-D Simulations of Plasma Wakefield Acceleration with Non-Idealized Plasmas and Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Lee, S.; Muggli, P.; /Southern California U.; Mori, W.B.; Hemker, R.; Ren, C.; Huang, C.; Dodd, E.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Wang,; /UCLA; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.H.; O' Connell, C.; Raimondi, P.; Walz, D.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    3-D Particle-in-cell OSIRIS simulations of the current E-162 Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Experiment are presented in which a number of non-ideal conditions are modeled simultaneously. These include tilts on the beam in both planes, asymmetric beam emittance, beam energy spread and plasma inhomogeneities both longitudinally and transverse to the beam axis. The relative importance of the non-ideal conditions is discussed and a worst case estimate of the effect of these on energy gain is obtained. The simulation output is then propagated through the downstream optics, drift spaces and apertures leading to the experimental diagnostics to provide insight into the differences between actual beam conditions and what is measured. The work represents a milestone in the level of detail of simulation comparisons to plasma experiments.

  2. Particle-In-Cell Modeling of Plasma-Based Accelerators in Two and Three Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Hemker, Roy G

    2015-01-01

    In this dissertation, a fully object-oriented, fully relativistic, multi-dimensional Particle-In-Cell code was developed and applied to answer key questions in plasma-based accelerator research. The simulations increase the understanding of the processes in laser plasma and beam-plasma interaction, allow for comparison with experiments, and motivate the development of theoretical models. The simulations support the idea that the injection of electrons in a plasma wave by using a transversely propagating laser pulse is possible. The beam parameters of the injected electrons found in the simulations compare reasonably with beams produced by conventional methods and therefore laser injection is an interesting concept for future plasma-based accelerators. Simulations of the optical guiding of a laser wakefield driver in a parabolic plasma channel support the idea that electrons can be accelerated over distances much longer than the Rayleigh length in a channel. Simulations of plasma wakefield acceleration in the ...

  3. Evolution of plasma parameters in a He - N2/Ar magnetic pole enhanced inductive plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younus, Maria; Rehman, N. U.; Shafiq, M.; Zakaullah, M.; Abrar, M.

    2016-02-01

    A magnetic pole enhanced inductively coupled H e - N2/A r plasma is studied at low pressure, to monitor the effects of helium mixing on plasma parameters like electron number density (ne) , electron temperature (Te) , plasma potential (Vp ) , and electron energy probability functions (EEPFs). An RF compensated Langmuir probe is employed to measure these plasma parameters. It is noted that electron number density increases with increasing RF power and helium concentration in the mixture, while it decreases with increase in filling gas pressure. On the other hand, electron temperature shows an increasing trend with helium concentration in the mixture. At low RF powers and low helium concentration in the mixture, EEPFs show a "bi-Maxwellian" distribution with pressure. While at RF powers greater than 50 W and higher helium concentration in the mixture, EEPFs evolve into "Maxwellian" distribution. The variation of skin depth with RF power and helium concentration in the mixture, and its relation with EEPF are also studied. The effect of helium concentrations on the temperatures of two electron groups ( Tb u l k and Tt a i l ) in the "bi-Maxwellian" EEPFs is also observed. The temperature of low energy electron group ( Tb u l k) shows significant increase with helium addition, while the temperature of tail electrons ( Tt a i l) increases smoothly as compared to ( Tb u l k).

  4. Vacuum arc plasma thrusters with inductive energy storage driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A plasma thruster with a cylindrical inner and cylindrical outer electrode generates plasma particles from the application of energy stored in an inductor to a surface suitable for the formation of a plasma and expansion of plasma particles. The plasma production results in the generation of charged particles suitable for generating a reaction force, and the charged particles are guided by a magnetic field produced by the same inductor used to store the energy used to form the plasma.

  5. High-gradient plasma-wakefield acceleration with two subpicosecond electron bunches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallos, Efthymios; Katsouleas, Tom; Kimura, Wayne D; Kusche, Karl; Muggli, Patric; Pavlishin, Igor; Pogorelsky, Igor; Stolyarov, Daniil; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2008-02-22

    A plasma-wakefield experiment is presented where two 60 MeV subpicosecond electron bunches are sent into a plasma produced by a capillary discharge. Both bunches are shorter than the plasma wavelength, and the phase of the second bunch relative to the plasma wave is adjusted by tuning the plasma density. It is shown that the second bunch experiences a 150 MeV/m loaded accelerating gradient in the wakefield driven by the first bunch. This is the first experiment to directly demonstrate high-gradient, controlled acceleration of a short-pulse trailing electron bunch in a high-density plasma.

  6. Bulk plasma fragmentation in a C4F8 inductively coupled plasma: A hybrid modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shu-Xia; Zhang, Yu-Ru; Gao, Fei; Wang, You-Nian; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2015-06-01

    A hybrid model is used to investigate the fragmentation of C4F8 inductive discharges. Indeed, the resulting reactive species are crucial for the optimization of the Si-based etching process, since they determine the mechanisms of fluorination, polymerization, and sputtering. In this paper, we present the dissociation degree, the density ratio of F vs. CxFy (i.e., fluorocarbon (fc) neutrals), the neutral vs. positive ion density ratio, details on the neutral and ion components, and fractions of various fc neutrals (or ions) in the total fc neutral (or ion) density in a C4F8 inductively coupled plasma source, as well as the effect of pressure and power on these results. To analyze the fragmentation behavior, the electron density and temperature and electron energy probability function (EEPF) are investigated. Moreover, the main electron-impact generation sources for all considered neutrals and ions are determined from the complicated C4F8 reaction set used in the model. The C4F8 plasma fragmentation is explained, taking into account many factors, such as the EEPF characteristics, the dominance of primary and secondary processes, and the thresholds of dissociation and ionization. The simulation results are compared with experiments from literature, and reasonable agreement is obtained. Some discrepancies are observed, which can probably be attributed to the simplified polymer surface kinetics assumed in the model.

  7. Electromagnetic, complex image model of a large area RF resonant antenna as inductive plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guittienne, Ph; Jacquier, R.; Howling, A. A.; Furno, I.

    2017-03-01

    A large area antenna generates a plasma by both inductive and capacitive coupling; it is an electromagnetically coupled plasma source. In this work, experiments on a large area planar RF antenna source are interpreted in terms of a multi-conductor transmission line coupled to the plasma. This electromagnetic treatment includes mutual inductive coupling using the complex image method, and capacitive matrix coupling between all elements of the resonant network and the plasma. The model reproduces antenna input impedance measurements, with and without plasma, on a 1.2× 1.2 m2 antenna used for large area plasma processing. Analytic expressions are given, and results are obtained by computation of the matrix solution. This method could be used to design planar inductive sources in general, by applying the termination impedances appropriate to each antenna type.

  8. Pulsed, Inductively Generated, Streaming Plasma Ion Source for Heavy Ion Fusion Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven C. Glidden; Howard D Sanders; John B. Greenly; Daniel L. Dongwoo

    2006-04-28

    This report describes a compact, high current density, pulsed ion source, based on electrodeless, inductively driven gas breakdown, developed to meet the requirements on normalized emittance, current density, uniformity and pulse duration for an ion injector in a heavy-ion fusion driver. The plasma source produces >10 μs pulse of Argon plasma with ion current densities >100 mA/cm2 at 30 cm from the source and with strongly axially directed ion energy of about 80 eV, and sub-eV transverse temperature. The source has good reproducibility and spatial uniformity. Control of the current density during the pulse has been demonstrated with a novel modulator coil method which allows attenuation of the ion current density without significantly affecting the beam quality. This project was carried out in two phases. Phase 1 used source configurations adapted from light ion sources to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept. In Phase 2 the performance of the source was enhanced and quantified in greater detail, a modulator for controlling the pulse shape was developed, and experiments were conducted with the ions accelerated to >40 kV.

  9. Ion acceleration and plasma jet formation in ultra-thin foils undergoing expansion and relativistic transparency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, M.; Gray, R.J.; Powell, H.W.; MacLellan, D.A.; Gonzalez-Izquierdo, B. [SUPA Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Stockhausen, L.C. [Centro de Laseres Pulsados (CLPU), Parque Cientifico, Calle del Adaja, s/n. 37185 Villamayor, Salamanca (Spain); Hicks, G.S.; Dover, N.P. [The John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Rusby, D.R. [SUPA Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Carroll, D.C. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Padda, H. [SUPA Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Torres, R. [Centro de Laseres Pulsados (CLPU), Parque Cientifico, Calle del Adaja, s/n. 37185 Villamayor, Salamanca (Spain); Kar, S. [Centre for Plasma Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Clarke, R.J.; Musgrave, I.O. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Najmudin, Z. [The John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Borghesi, M. [Centre for Plasma Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Neely, D. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); McKenna, P., E-mail: paul.mckenna@strath.ac.uk [SUPA Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    At sufficiently high laser intensities, the rapid heating to relativistic velocities and resulting decompression of plasma electrons in an ultra-thin target foil can result in the target becoming relativistically transparent to the laser light during the interaction. Ion acceleration in this regime is strongly affected by the transition from an opaque to a relativistically transparent plasma. By spatially resolving the laser-accelerated proton beam at near-normal laser incidence and at an incidence angle of 30°, we identify characteristic features both experimentally and in particle-in-cell simulations which are consistent with the onset of three distinct ion acceleration mechanisms: sheath acceleration; radiation pressure acceleration; and transparency-enhanced acceleration. The latter mechanism occurs late in the interaction and is mediated by the formation of a plasma jet extending into the expanding ion population. The effect of laser incident angle on the plasma jet is explored.

  10. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I; Clayton, Chris E; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J P; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z; Hast, Carsten; Hogan, Mark J; Joshi, Chan; Lindstrøm, Carl A; Lipkowitz, Nate; Litos, Michael; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A; Mori, Warren B; O'Shea, Brendan; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Walz, Dieter; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yocky, Gerald

    2016-06-02

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. Here we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m(-1) is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations.

  11. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M.; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I.; Clayton, Chris E.; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z.; Hast, Carsten; Hogan, Mark J.; Joshi, Chan; Lindstrøm, Carl A.; Lipkowitz, Nate; Litos, Michael; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; O'Shea, Brendan; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Walz, Dieter; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yocky, Gerald

    2016-06-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. Here we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m-1 is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations.

  12. Design of a Linear Induction 1-MV Injector for the Relativisitic Two-Beam Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. E.; Henestroza, E.; Houck, T.; Lidia, S.; Reginato, L.; Vanecek, D.; Westenskow, G.; Yu, S.

    1997-05-01

    A Relativisitic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RTA) is envisioned as a RF power source upgrade of the Next Linear Collider. A prototype to study physics, engineering and costing issues is presently under construction at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The first half of the injector, a 1 MeV, 1.2 kA, 300 ns induction electron gun, has been built and is presently being tested. The design of the injector cells and pulsed power drive units will be presented. Preliminary test results of the power drive units will also be given.

  13. A 1.3GHz Inductive Output Tube for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Sobieradzki, Edward

    2005-01-01

    There is an increasing requirement for RF power sources in the L-band frequency range for operation in particle accelerators. The paper describes the development and presents test results of a new inductive output tube (IOT) for use at 1.3GHz. A target specificationof 16kW cw output power at an efficiency of 60% was set. The paper discusses progress to date having used an electron gun geometry that minimizes transit time effects in the cathode to grid gap.

  14. Electron acceleration mechanisms in the interaction of ultrashort lasers with underdense plasmas: Experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, J.; Lefebvre, E.; Malka, V.; Marques, J.-R.; Amiranoff, F.; Solodov, A.; Mora, P.

    2002-06-30

    An experiment investigating the production of relativistic electrons from the interaction of ultrashort multi-terawatt laser pulses with an underdense plasma is presented. Electrons were accelerated to tens of MeV and the maximum electron energy increased as the plasma density decreased. Simulations have been performed in order to model the experiment. They show a good agreement with the trends observed in the experiment and the spectra of accelerated electrons could be reproduced successfully. The simulations have been used to study the relative contribution of the different acceleration mechanisms: plasma wave acceleration, direct laser acceleration and stochastic heating. The results show that in low density case (1 percent of the critical density) acceleration by laser is dominant mechanism. The simulations at high density also suggest that direct laser acceleration is more efficient that stochastic heating.

  15. Downramp-assisted underdense photocathode electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Knetsch, Alexander; Wittig, Georg; Groth, Henning; Xi, Yunfeng; Deng, Aihua; Rosenzweig, James Benjamin; Bruhwiler, David Leslie; Smith, Johnathan; Jaroszynski, Dino Anthony; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Manahan, Grace Gloria; Xia, Guoxing; Jamison, Steven; Hidding, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that the requirements for high quality electron bunch generation and trapping from an underdense photocathode in plasma wakefield accelerators can be substantially relaxed through localizing it on a plasma density downramp. This depresses the phase velocity of the accelerating electric field until the generated electrons are in phase, allowing for trapping in shallow trapping potentials. As a consequence the underdense photocathode technique is applicable by a much larger number of accelerator facilities. Furthermore, dark current generation is effectively suppressed.

  16. Increasing the intensity of an induction accelerator and reduction of the beam breakup instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Coleman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A 7 cm cathode has been deployed for use on a 3.8 MV, 80 ns (FWHM Blumlein, to increase the extracted electron current from the nominal 1.7 to 2.9 kA. The intense relativistic electron bunch is accelerated and transported through a nested solenoid and ferrite induction core lattice consisting of 64 elements, exiting the accelerator with a nominal energy of 19.8 MeV. The principal objective of these experiments is to quantify the space-charge limitations on the beam quality, its coupling with the beam breakup (BBU instability, and provide an independent validation of the BBU theory in a higher current regime, I>2  kA. Time resolved centroid measurements indicate a reduction in BBU >10× with simply a 50% increase in the average B-field used to transport the beam through the accelerator. A qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results are presented, which include time resolved current density distributions, radial BBU amplitude relative to the calculated beam envelope, and frequency analyzed BBU amplitude with different accelerator lattice tunes.

  17. Serum/plasma methylmercury determination by isotope dilution gas chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Douglas C; Faarinen, Mikko; Österlund, Heléne; Rodushkin, Ilia; Christensen, Morten

    2011-09-01

    A method for the determination of methylmercury in plasma and serum samples was developed. The method uses isotope dilution with (198)Hg-labeled methylmercury, extraction into dichloromethane, back-extraction into water, aqueous-phase ethylation, purge and trap collection, thermal desorption, separation by gas chromatography, and mercury isotope specific detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. By spiking 2 mL sample with 1.2 ng tracer, measurements in a concentration interval of (0.007-2.9) μg L(-1) could be performed with uncertainty amplification factors levels of 0.14 μg L(-1), 0.35 μg L(-1) and 2.8 μg L(-1), with recoveries in the range 82-110%. Application of the method to 50 plasma/serum samples yielded a median (mean; range) concentration of methylmercury of 0.081 (0.091; methylmercury has been directly measured in this kind of specimen, and is therefore the first estimate of a reference range.

  18. Experimental demonstration of plasma-drag acceleration of a dust cloud to hypervelocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticoş, C M; Wang, Zhehui; Wurden, G A; Kline, J L; Montgomery, D S; Dorf, L A; Shukla, P K

    2008-04-18

    Simultaneous acceleration of hundreds of dust particles to hypervelocities by collimated plasma flows ejected from a coaxial gun is demonstrated. Graphite and diamond grains with radii between 5 and 30 microm, and flying at speeds up to 3.7 km/s, have been recorded with a high-speed camera. The observations agree well with a model for plasma-drag acceleration of microparticles much larger than the plasma screening length.

  19. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Hai-En; Shaw, Joseph; Li, Zhengyan; Arefiev, Alexey V; Zhang, Xi; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Khudik, V; Shvets, G; Downer, M C

    2014-01-01

    We present results of the first tunable Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the easily aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The LPA is driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses, and produces high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beams. A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit efficiently retro-reflects the LPA driving pulse with relativistic intensity into oncoming electrons to produce $2\\times10^{7}$ CBS x-ray photons per shot with 10-20 mrad angular divergence and 50 % (FWHM) energy spread without detectable bremsstrahlung background. The x-ray central energy is tuned from 75 KeV to 200 KeV by tuning the LPA e-beam central energy. Particle-in-cell simulations of the LPA, the drive pulse/PM interaction and CBS agree well with measurements.

  20. Cellular and molecular effects for mutation induction in normal human cells irradiated with accelerated neon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kato, Takeshi; Yatagai, Fumio; Watanabe, Masami

    2006-02-22

    We investigated the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of mutation induction on the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus in normal human fibroblast-like cells irradiated with accelerated neon-ion beams. The cells were irradiated with neon-ion beams at various LETs ranging from 63 to 335 keV/microm. Neon-ion beams were accelerated by the Riken Ring Cyclotron at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research in Japan. Mutation induction at the HPRT locus was detected to measure 6-thioguanine-resistant clones. The mutation spectrum of the deletion pattern of exons of mutants was analyzed using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The dose-response curves increased steeply up to 0.5 Gy and leveled off or decreased between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy, compared to the response to (137)Cs gamma-rays. The mutation frequency increased up to 105 keV/microm and then there was a downward trend with increasing LET values. The deletion pattern of exons was non-specific. About 75-100% of the mutants produced using LETs ranging from 63 to 335 keV/mum showed all or partial deletions of exons, while among gamma-ray-induced mutants 30% showed no deletions, 30% partial deletions and 40% complete deletions. These results suggested that the dose-response curves of neon-ion-induced mutations were dependent upon LET values, but the deletion pattern of DNA was not.

  1. Wakefield evolution and electron acceleration in interaction of frequency-chirped laser pulse with inhomogeneous plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei-Pandari, M.; Niknam, A. R.; Massudi, R.; Jahangiri, F.; Hassaninejad, H.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2017-02-01

    The nonlinear interaction of an ultra-short intense frequency-chirped laser pulse with an underdense plasma is studied. The effects of plasma inhomogeneity and laser parameters such as chirp, pulse duration, and intensity on plasma density and wakefield evolutions, and electron acceleration are examined. It is found that a properly chirped laser pulse could induce a stronger laser wakefield in an inhomogeneous plasma and result in higher electron acceleration energy. It is also shown that the wakefield amplitude is enhanced by increasing the slope of density in the inhomogeneous plasma.

  2. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Geddes, Cameron; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; van Mourik, Reinier; Leemans, Wim

    2010-02-20

    Characterization of the electron density in laser produced plasmas is presented using direct wavefront analysis of a probe laser beam. The performance of a laser-driven plasma-wakefield accelerator depends on the plasma wavelength, hence on the electron density. Density measurements using a conventional folded-wave interferometer and using a commercial wavefront sensor are compared for different regimes of the laser-plasma accelerator. It is shown that direct wavefront measurements agree with interferometric measurements and, because of the robustness of the compact commercial device, have greater phase sensitivity, straightforward analysis, improving shot-to-shot plasma-density diagnostics.

  3. Thin current sheets in collisionless plasma: Equilibrium structure, plasma instabilities, and particle acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelenyi, L. M.; Malova, H. V.; Artemyev, A. V.; Popov, V. Yu.; Petrukovich, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-02-15

    The review is devoted to plasma structures with an extremely small transverse size, namely, thin current sheets that have been discovered and investigated by spacecraft observations in the Earth's magnetotail in the last few decades. The formation of current sheets is attributed to complicated dynamic processes occurring in a collisionless space plasma during geomagnetic perturbations and near the magnetic reconnection regions. The models that describe thin current structures in the Earth's magnetotail are reviewed. They are based on the assumption of the quasi-adiabatic ion dynamics in a relatively weak magnetic field of the magnetotail neutral sheet, where the ions can become unmagnetized. It is shown that the ion distribution can be represented as a function of the integrals of particle motion-the total energy and quasi-adiabatic invariant. Various modifications of the initial equilibrium are considered that are obtained with allowance for the currents of magnetized electrons, the contribution of oxygen ions, the asymmetry of plasma sources, and the effects related to the non-Maxwellian particle distributions. The theoretical results are compared with the observational data from the Cluster spacecraft mission. Various plasma instabilities developing in thin current sheets are investigated. The evolution of the tearing mode is analyzed, and the parameter range in which the mode can grow are determined. The paradox of complete stabilization of the tearing mode in current sheets with a nonzero normal magnetic field component is thereby resolved based on the quasi-adiabatic model. It is shown that, over a wide range of current sheet parameters and the propagation directions of large-scale unstable waves, various modified drift instabilities-kink and sausage modes-can develop in the system. Based on the concept of a turbulent electromagnetic field excited as a result of the development and saturation of unstable waves, a mechanism for charged particle

  4. The SAT Protein of Porcine Parvovirus Accelerates Viral Spreading through Induction of Irreversible Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, István; Tóth, Renáta; Olasz, Ferenc; Tijssen, Peter; Zádori, Zoltán

    2017-08-15

    The SAT protein (SATp) of porcine parvovirus (PPV) accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and SAT deletion induces the slow-spreading phenotype. The in vitro comparison of the wild-type Kresse strain and its SAT knockout (SAT(-)) mutant revealed that prolonged cell integrity and late viral release are responsible for the slower spreading of the SAT(-) virus. During PPV infection, regardless of the presence or absence of SATp, the expression of downstream ER stress response proteins (Xbp1 and CHOP) was induced. However, in the absence of SATp, significant differences in the quantity and the localization of CHOP were detected, suggesting a role of SATp in the induction of irreversible ER stress in infected cells. The involvement of the induction of irreversible ER stress in porcine testis (PT) cell necrosis and viral egress was confirmed by treatment of infected cells by ER stress-inducing chemicals (MG132, dithiothreitol, and thapsigargin), which accelerated the egress and spreading of both the wild-type and the SAT(-) viruses. UV stress induction had no beneficial effect on PPV infection, underscoring the specificity of ER stress pathways in the process. However, induction of CHOP and its nuclear translocation cannot alone be responsible for the biological effect of SAT, since nuclear CHOP could not complement the lack of SAT in a coexpression experiment.IMPORTANCE SATp is encoded by an alternative open reading frame of the PPV genome. Earlier we showed that SATp of the attenuated PPV NADL-2 strain accumulates in the ER and accelerates virus release and spreading. Our present work revealed that slow spreading is a general feature of SAT(-) PPVs and is the consequence of prolonged cell integrity. PPV infection induced ER stress in infected cells regardless of the presence of SATp, as demonstrated by the morphological changes of the ER and expression of the stress response proteins Xbp1 and CHOP. However, the presence of SATp made the ER stress more severe

  5. Accelerating the clearance of mutant huntingtin protein aggregates through autophagy induction by europium hydroxide nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Li; Nethi, Susheel Kumar; Barui, Ayan Kumar; Lin, Jun; Zhou, Wei; Shen, Yi; Man, Na; Zhang, Yun-Jiao; Xu, Jing; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Wen, Long-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is one of the well-known pathways to accelerate the clearance of protein aggregates, which contributes to the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. Although there are numerous reports that demonstrate the induction of autophagy with small molecules including rapamycin, trehalose and lithium, however, there are few reports mentioning the clearance of aggregate-prone proteins through autophagy induction by nanoparticles. In the present article, we have demonstrated that europium hydroxide [Eu(III)(OH)3] nanorods can reduce huntingtin protein aggregation (EGFP-tagged huntingtin protein with 74 polyQ repeats), responsible for neurodegenerative diseases. Again, we have found that these nanorods induce authentic autophagy flux in different cell lines (Neuro 2a, PC12 and HeLa cells) through the expression of higher levels of characteristic autophagy marker protein LC3-II and degradation of selective autophagy substrate/cargo receptor p62/SQSTM1. Furthermore, depression of protein aggregation clearance through the autophagy blockade has also been observed by using specific inhibitors (wortmannin and chloroquine), indicating that autophagy is involved in the degradation of huntingtin protein aggregation. Since [Eu(III)(OH)3] nanorods can enhance the degradation of huntingtin protein aggregation via autophagy induction, we strongly believe that these nanorods would be useful for the development of therapeutic treatment strategies for various neurodegenerative diseases in near future using nanomedicine approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Electron acceleration in preformed plasma channels with terawatt CO{sub 2} laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1995-02-01

    Extended cylindrical plasma channels produced under gas breakdown by axicon-focused laser beams may be used as optical waveguides in laser-driven electron accelerators. Plasma channeling of the laser beams will help to maintain a high acceleration gradient over many Rayleigh lengths. In addition, the rarefied gas density channel produced after the optical gas breakdown, and followed by a plasma column expansion, reduces multiple scattering of the electron beam. A high-power picosecond C0{sub 2}laser operational at the ATF and being further upgraded to the 1 TW level is considered as the source for a plasma channel formation and as the laser accelerator driver. We show how various laser accelerator schemes including beat wave, wake field, and Inverse Cherenkov accelerator benefit from using a channeled short-pulse C0{sub 2}laser as a driver.

  7. Plasma Density Tapering for Laser Wakefield Acceleration of Electrons and Protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, A.; Gordon, D.; Helle, M.; Kaganovich, D.; Sprangle, P.; Hafizi, B.

    2010-11-01

    Extended acceleration in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator can be achieved by tailoring the phase velocity of the accelerating plasma wave, either through profiling of the density of the plasma or direct manipulation of the phase velocity. Laser wakefield acceleration has also reached a maturity that proton acceleration by wakefield could be entertained provided we begin with protons that are substantially relativistic, ˜1 GeV. Several plasma density tapering schemes are discussed. The first scheme is called "bucket jumping" where the plasma density is abruptly returned to the original density after a conventional tapering to move the accelerating particles to a neighboring wakefield period (bucket). The second scheme is designed to specifically accelerate low energy protons by generating a nonlinear wakefield in a plasma region with close to critical density. The third scheme creates a periodic variation in the phase velocity by beating two intense laser beams with laser frequency difference equal to the plasma frequency. Discussions and case examples with simulations are presented where substantial acceleration of electrons or protons could be obtained.

  8. An $ep$ collider based on proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Wing, M.; Mete, O.; Aimidula, A.; Welsch, C.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Mandry, S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent simulations have shown that a high-energy proton bunch can excite strong plasma wakefields and accelerate a bunch of electrons to the energy frontier in a single stage of acceleration. This scheme could lead to a future $ep$ collider using the LHC for the proton beam and a compact electron accelerator of length 170 m, producing electrons of energy up to 100 GeV. The parameters of such a collider are discussed as well as conceptual layouts within the CERN accelerator complex. The physics of plasma wakefield acceleration will also be introduced, with the AWAKE experiment, a proof of principle demonstration of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration, briefly reviewed, as well as the physics possibilities of such an $ep$ collider.

  9. Multi-gigaelectronvolt acceleration of positrons in a self-loaded plasma wakefield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corde, Sebastien [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Adli, E. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Univ. of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Allen, J. M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); An, W. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Clarke, C. I. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Delahaye, J. P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Frederico, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gessner, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Green, S. Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hogan, M. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Joshi, C. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lipkowitz, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Litos, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lu, W. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Marsh, K. A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mori, W. B. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Schmeltz, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Vafaei-Najafabadi, N. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Walz, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Yakimenko, V. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Yocky, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Clayton, C. E. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-08-26

    New accelerator concepts must be developed to make future particle colliders more compact and affordable. The Plasma Wakefield Accelerator (PWFA) is one such concept, where the electric field of a plasma wake excited by a charged-particle bunch is used to accelerate a trailing bunch of particles. To apply plasma acceleration to particle colliders, it is imperative that both the electrons and their antimatter counterpart, the positrons, are efficiently accelerated at high fields using plasmas1. While substantial progress has recently been reported on high-field, high-efficiency acceleration of electrons in a PWFA powered by an electron bunch 2, such an electron-driven wake is unsuitable for the acceleration and focusing of a positron bunch. Here we demonstrate a new regime of PWFA where particles in the front of a single positron bunch transfer their energy to a substantial number of those in the rear of the same bunch by exciting a wakefield in the plasma. In the process, the accelerating field is altered – self-loaded – so that about a billion positrons gain five gigaelectronvolts (GeV) of energy with a narrow energy spread in a distance of just 1.3 meters. They extract about 30% of the wake’s energy and form a spectrally distinct bunch with as low as a 1.8% r.m.s. energy spread. This demonstrated ability of positron-driven plasma wakes to efficiently accelerate a significant number of positrons with a small energy spread may overcome the long-standing challenge of positron acceleration in plasma-based accelerators.

  10. Improvement of Uniformity of Inductively Coupled Plasma with a Cone Spiral Antenna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lin-Sen; XU Xu; LIU Feng; ZHOU Qian-Hong; NIE Zong-Fu; LIANG Yi-Zi; LIANG Rong-Qing

    2008-01-01

    Uniformity of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) is improved with a cone spiral antenna in our experiment. Performance of the ICP with a new type of antenna is experimentally investigated, The results indicate that the uniformity of plasma density in the radial direction is obviously improved as compared to the ICP with a planar spiral antenna. Performance of ICP is analysed with the experimental results.

  11. Progress on laser plasma accelerator development using transverselyand longitudinally shaped plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemans, Wim P.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Toth, Cs.; Schroeder, C.B.; Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A.J.; Panasenko, D.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Plateau, G.R.; Lin, C.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Cary, J.R.

    2009-03-31

    A summary of progress at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is given on: (1) experiments on down-ramp injection; (2) experiments on acceleration in capillary discharge plasma channels; and (3) simulations of a staged laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). Control of trapping in a LWFA using plasma density down-ramps produced electron bunches with absolute longitudinal and transverse momentum spreads more than ten times lower than in previous experiments (0.17 and 0.02 MeV Ic FWHM, respectively) and with central momenta of 0.76 +- 0.02 MeV Ic, stable over a week of operation. Experiments were also carried out using a 40 TW laser interacting with a hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide. For a 15 mm long, 200 mu m diameter capillary, quasi-monoenergetic bunches up to 300 MeV were observed. By detuning discharge delay from optimum guiding performance, self-trapping was found to be stabilized. For a 33 mm long, 300 mu m capillary, a parameter regime with high energy bunches, up to 1 Ge V, was found. In this regime, peak electron energy was correlated with the amount of trapped charge. Simulations show that bunches produced on a down-ramn and iniected into a channel-guided LWFA can produce stable beams with 0.2 MeV Ic-class momentum spread at high energies.

  12. Energy Doubling of 42 GeV Electrons in a Meter-scale Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenfeld, Ian; Clayton, Christopher E.; Decker, Franz-Josef; Hogan, Mark J.; Huang, Chengkun; Ischebeck, Rasmus; Iverson, Richard; Joshi, Chandrashekhar; Katsouleas,; Kirby, Neil; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; Muggli, Patric; Oz, Erdem; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, Dieter; Zhou, Miaomiao; /SLAC /UCLA /Southern California U.

    2007-03-14

    The energy frontier of particle physics is several trillion electron volts, but colliders capable of reaching this regime (such as the Large Hadron Collider and the International Linear Collider) are costly and time-consuming to build; it is therefore important to explore new methods of accelerating particles to high energies. Plasma-based accelerators are particularly attractive because they are capable of producing accelerating fields that are orders of magnitude larger than those used in conventional colliders. In these accelerators, a drive beam (either laser or particle) produces a plasma wave (wakefield) that accelerates charged particles. The ultimate utility of plasma accelerators will depend on sustaining ultrahigh accelerating fields over a substantial length to achieve a significant energy gain. Here we show that an energy gain of more than 42 GeV is achieved in a plasma wakefield accelerator of 85 cm length, driven by a 42 GeV electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The results are in excellent agreement with the predictions of three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Most of the beam electrons lose energy to the plasma wave, but some electrons in the back of the same beam pulse are accelerated with a field of {approx} 52GV m{sup -1}. This effectively doubles their energy, producing the energy gain of the 3-km-long SLAC accelerator in less than a meter for a small fraction of the electrons in the injected bunch. This is an important step towards demonstrating the viability of plasma accelerators for high-energy physics applications.

  13. Correcting the beam centroid motion in an induction accelerator and reducing the beam breakup instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Coleman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Axial beam centroid and beam breakup (BBU measurements were conducted on an 80 ns FWHM, intense relativistic electron bunch with an injected energy of 3.8 MV and current of 2.9 kA. The intense relativistic electron bunch is accelerated and transported through a nested solenoid and ferrite induction core lattice consisting of 64 elements, exiting the accelerator with a nominal energy of 19.8 MeV. The principal objective of these experiments is to quantify the coupling of the beam centroid motion to the BBU instability and validate the theory of this coupling for the first time. Time resolved centroid measurements indicate a reduction in the BBU amplitude, ⟨ξ⟩, of 19% and a reduction in the BBU growth rate (Γ of 4% by reducing beam centroid misalignments ∼50% throughout the accelerator. An investigation into the contribution of the misaligned elements is made. An alignment algorithm is presented in addition to a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results which include axial beam centroid oscillations, BBU amplitude, and growth with different dipole steering.

  14. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    OpenAIRE

    Gschwendtner, E; Adli, E.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschon, B.; Butterworth, A.(CERN, Geneva, Switzerland); Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; AMORIM, L.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D; experiment at CERN and the world׳s first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of ...

  15. Positron acceleration in plasma bubble wakefield driven by an ultraintense laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Ya-Juan; Wan, Feng; Sang, Hai-Bo, E-mail: sanghb@bnu.edu.cn; Xie, Bai-Song [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, and College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The dynamics of positrons accelerating in electron-positron-ion plasma bubble fields driven by an ultraintense laser is investigated. The bubble wakefield is obtained theoretically when laser pulses are propagating in the electron-positron-ion plasma. To restrict the positrons transversely, an electron beam is injected. Acceleration regions and non-acceleration ones of positrons are obtained by the numerical simulation. It is found that the ponderomotive force causes the fluctuation of the positrons momenta, which results in the trapping of them at a lower ion density. The energy gaining of the accelerated positrons is demonstrated, which is helpful for practical applications.

  16. Effects of laser polarization on electrostatic shock ion acceleration in near-critical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Kuk; Kang, Teyoun; Hur, Min Sup

    2016-10-01

    Collisionless electrostatic shock ion acceleration has become a major regime of laser-driven ion acceleration owing to generation of quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from moderate parametric conditions of lasers and plasmas in comparison with target-normal-sheath-acceleration or radiation pressure acceleration. In order to construct the shock, plasma heating is an essential condition for satisfying Mach number condition 1.5 Weibel instability. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Program (NRF- 2013R1A1A2006353) and the Creative Allied Project (CAP-15-06-ETRI).

  17. Absolute vacuum ultraviolet flux in inductively coupled plasmas and chemical modifications of 193 nm photoresist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, M. J.; Nest, D.; Graves, D. B.

    2009-04-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons in plasma processing systems are known to alter surface chemistry and may damage gate dielectrics and photoresist. We characterize absolute VUV fluxes to surfaces exposed in an inductively coupled argon plasma, 1-50 mTorr, 25-400 W, using a calibrated VUV spectrometer. We also demonstrate an alternative method to estimate VUV fluence in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor using a chemical dosimeter-type monitor. We illustrate the technique with argon ICP and xenon lamp exposure experiments, comparing direct VUV measurements with measured chemical changes in 193 nm photoresist-covered Si wafers following VUV exposure.

  18. Modeling classical and quantum radiation from laser-plasma accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of models and the “Virtual Detector for Synchrotron Radiation” (vdsr code that accurately describe the production of synchrotron radiation are described. These models and code are valid in the classical and linear (single-scattering quantum regimes and are capable of describing radiation produced from laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs through a variety of mechanisms including betatron radiation, undulator radiation, and Thomson/Compton scattering. Previous models of classical synchrotron radiation, such as those typically used for undulator radiation, are inadequate in describing the radiation spectra from electrons undergoing small numbers of oscillations. This is due to an improper treatment of a mathematical evaluation at the end points of an integration that leads to an unphysical plateau in the radiation spectrum at high frequencies, the magnitude of which increases as the number of oscillation periods decreases. This is important for betatron radiation from LPAs, in which the betatron strength parameter is large but the number of betatron periods is small. The code vdsr allows the radiation to be calculated in this regime by full integration over each electron trajectory, including end-point effects, and this code is used to calculate betatron radiation for cases of experimental interest. Radiation from Thomson scattering and Compton scattering is also studied with vdsr. For Thomson scattering, radiation reaction is included by using the Sokolov method for the calculation of the electron dynamics. For Compton scattering, quantum recoil effects are considered in vdsr by using Monte Carlo methods. The quantum calculation has been benchmarked with the classical calculation in a classical regime.

  19. Scaling and design of high-energy laser plasma electron acceleration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuhisa Nakajima; Hyung Taek Kim; Tae Moon Jeong; Chang Hee Nam

    2015-01-01

    Recently there has been great progress in laser-driven plasma-based accelerators by exploiting high-power lasers,where electron beams can be accelerated to multi-GeV energy in a centimeter-scale plasma due to the laser wakefield acceleration mechanism. While, to date, worldwide research on laser plasma accelerators has been focused on the creation of compact particle and radiation sources for basic sciences, medical and industrial applications, there is great interest in applications for high-energy physics and astrophysics, exploring unprecedented high-energy frontier phenomena. In this context, we present an overview of experimental achievements in laser plasma acceleration from the perspective of the production of GeV-level electron beams, and deduce the scaling formulas capable of predicting experimental results self-consistently, taking into account the propagation of a relativistic laser pulse through plasma and the accelerating field reduction due to beam loading. Finally, we present design examples for 10-GeV-level laser plasma acceleration, which is expected in near-term experiments by means of petawatt-class lasers.

  20. High quality electron beam generation in a proton-driven hollow plasma wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yangmei; Lotov, Konstantin V; Sosedkin, Alexander P; Hanahoe, Kieran; Mete-Apsimon, Oznur

    2016-01-01

    Proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerators have numerically demonstrated substantially higher accelerating gradients compared to conventional accelerators and the viability of accelerating electrons to energy frontier in a single plasma stage. However, due to the intrinsic strong and radially varying transverse fields, the beam quality is still far from suitable for practical application in future colliders. Here we propose a new accelerating region which is free from both plasma electrons and ions in the proton-driven hollow plasma channel. The high quality electron beam is therefore generated with this scheme without transverse plasma fields. The results show that a 1 TeV proton driver can propagate and accelerate an electron beam to 0.62 TeV with correlated energy spread of 4.6% and well-preserved normalized emittance below 2.4 mm mrad in a single hollow plasma channel of 700 m. More importantly, the beam loading tolerance is significantly improved compared to the uniform plasma case. This high quality an...

  1. Plasma wakefield acceleration studies using the quasi-static code WAKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Neeraj [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Palastro, John [Icarus Research Inc., P.O. Box 30780, Bethesda, Maryland 20824-0780 (United States); Antonsen, T. M. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Mori, Warren B.; An, Weiming [University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The quasi-static code WAKE [P. Mora and T. Antonsen, Phys. Plasmas 4, 217 (1997)] is upgraded to model the propagation of an ultra-relativistic charged particle beam through a warm background plasma in plasma wakefield acceleration. The upgraded code is benchmarked against the full particle-in-cell code OSIRIS [Hemker et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top. Accel. Beams 3, 061301 (2000)] and the quasi-static code QuickPIC [Huang et al., J. Comput. Phys. 217, 658 (2006)]. The effect of non-zero plasma temperature on the peak accelerating electric field is studied for a two bunch electron beam driver with parameters corresponding to the plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams. It is shown that plasma temperature does not affect the energy gain and spread of the accelerated particles despite suppressing the peak accelerating electric field. The role of plasma temperature in improving the numerical convergence of the electric field with the grid resolution is discussed.

  2. Characterization of inductively coupled plasma generated by a quadruple antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafir, G.; Zolotukhin, D.; Godyak, V.; Shlapakovski, A.; Gleizer, S.; Slutsker, Ya; Gad, R.; Bernshtam, V.; Ralchenko, Yu; Krasik, Ya E.

    2017-02-01

    The results of the characterization of large-scale RF plasma for studying nonlinear interaction with a high-power (˜400 MW) short duration (˜0.8 ns) microwave (˜10 GHz) beam are presented. The plasma was generated inside a Pyrex tube 80 cm in length and 25 cm in diameter filled by either Ar or He gas at a pressure in the range 1.3-13 Pa using a 2 MHz RF generator with a matching system and a quadruple antenna. Good matching was obtained between the plasma parameters, which were determined using different methods including a movable Langmuir probe, microwave cut-off, interferometry, and optical emission spectroscopy. It was shown that, depending on the gas pressure and RF power delivered to the antenna, the plasma density and electron temperature can be controlled in the range 1 × 1010-5 × 1012 cm-3 and 1-3.5 eV, respectively. The plasma density was found to be uniform in terms of axial (˜60 cm) and radial (˜10 cm) dimensions. Further, it was also shown that the application of the quadruple antenna, with resonating capacitors inserted in its arms, decreases the capacitive coupling of the antenna and the plasma as well as the RF power loss along the antenna. These features make this plasma source suitable for microwave plasma wake field experiments.

  3. Addition of Arsenic Trioxide into Induction Regimens Could Not Accelerate Recovery of Abnormality of Coagulation and Fibrinolysis in Patients with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Zhang

    Full Text Available All-trans retinoic acid combined to anthracycline-based chemotherapy is the standard regimen of acute promyelocytic leukemia. The advent of arsenic trioxide has contributed to improve the anti-leukemic efficacy in acute promyelocytic leukemia. The objectives of the current study were to evaluate if dual induction by all-trans retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide could accelerate the recovery of abnormality of coagulation and fibrinolysis in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia.Retrospective analysis was performed in 103 newly-diagnosed patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. Hemostatic variables and the consumption of component blood were comparably analyzed among patients treated by different induction regimen with or without arsenic trioxide.Compared to patients with other subtypes of de novo acute myeloid leukemia, patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia had lower platelet counts and fibrinogen levels, significantly prolonged prothrombin time and elevated D-dimers (P<0.001. Acute promyelocytic leukemia patients with high or intermediate risk prognostic stratification presented lower initial fibrinogen level than that of low-risk group (P<0.05. After induction treatment, abnormal coagulation and fibrinolysis of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia was significantly improved before day 10. The recovery of abnormal hemostatic variables (platelet, prothrombin time, fibrinogen and D-dimer was not significantly accelerated after adding arsenic trioxide in induction regimens; and the consumption of transfused component blood (platelet and plasma did not dramatically change either. Acute promyelocytic leukemia patients with high or intermediate risk prognostic stratification had higher platelet transfusion demands than that of low-risk group (P<0.05.Unexpectedly, adding arsenic trioxide could not accelerate the recovery of abnormality of coagulation and fibrinolysis in acute promyelocytic leukemia patients who received all

  4. Trapped electron acceleration by a laser-driven relativistic plasma wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, M.; Lal, A.; Gordon, D.; Clayton, C. E.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.

    1994-04-01

    THE aim of new approaches for high-energy particle acceleration1 is to push the acceleration rate beyond the limit (~100 MeV m-1) imposed by radio-frequency breakdown in conventional accelerators. Relativistic plasma waves, having phase velocities very close to the speed of light, have been proposed2-6 as a means of accelerating charged particles, and this has recently been demonstrated7,8. Here we show that the charged particles can be trapped by relativistic plasma waves-a necessary condition for obtaining the maximum amount of energy theoretically possible for such schemes. In our experiments, plasma waves are excited in a hydrogen plasma by beats induced by two collinear laser beams, the difference in whose frequencies matches the plasma frequency. Electrons with an energy of 2 MeV are injected into the excited plasma, and the energy spectrum of the exiting electrons is analysed. We detect electrons with velocities exceeding that of the plasma wave, demonstrating that some electrons are 'trapped' by the wave potential and therefore move synchronously with the plasma wave. We observe a maximum energy gain of 28 MeV, corresponding to an acceleration rate of about 2.8 GeV m-1.

  5. Large area polycrystalline diamond films as high current photocathodes for linear induction accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurter, R.P.; Moir, D.C.; Devlin, D.J.; Springer, R.W.

    1997-08-01

    Investigations are underway at Los Alamos to develop a new generation of high current, low source temperature photo cathodes able to operate in vacuum environments with pressures above 10e-6 torr without poisoning or degradation of emission properties. Polycrystalline diamond films are emerging as the ideal material for these photocathodes. Robustness, high quantum efficiency and high thermal conductivity are fundamental necessary attributes that are found in diamond. The high electron/hole mobility in the boron doped diamond lattice and the ability to create a negative electron affinity surface through downward band bending allow for high current density emission with quantum efficiencies of 0.5% when illuminated by a ArF laser. We report the results to date toward the development of a four kiloampere photocathode with a source temperature below 5eV for the DARHT linear induction Accelerator

  6. Linear to non linear analysis for positron acceleration in plasma hollow channel wakefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Ligia Diana; An, Weiming; Mori, Warren B.; Vieira, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerators are promising candidates for future generation compact accelerators. The standard regime of operation, non-linear or blowout regime, is reached when a particle bunch space charge or laser pulse ponderomotive force radially expels plasma electrons forming a bucket of ions that defocus positron bunches, thus preventing their acceleration. To avoid defocusing, hollow plasma channels have been considered. The corresponding wakefields have been examined in the linear and non-linear excitation regimes for electrons. It is therefore important to extend the theory for positron acceleration, particularly in the nonlinear regime where the wakefields strongly differ. In this work we explore the wakefield structure, examine the differences between the electron and positron beam cases, and explore positron acceleration in nonlinear regimes. We support our findings with multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations performed with OSIRIS and quasi-3D and QuickPIC.

  7. Dense Plasma Focus Z-pinches for High Gradient Particle Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, V; Adams, M L; Rusnak, B

    2009-07-24

    The final Z-pinch stage of a Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) could be used as a simple, compact, and potentially rugged plasma-based high-gradient accelerator with fields at the 100 MV/m level. In this paper we review previously published experimental beam data that indicate the feasibility of such an DPF-based accelerator, qualitatively discuss the physical acceleration processes in terms of the induced voltages, and as a starting point examine the DPF acceleration potential by numerically applying a self-consistent DPF system model that includes the induced voltage from both macroscopic and instability driven plasma dynamics. Applications to the remote detection of high explosives and a multi-staged acceleration concept are briefly discussed.

  8. Ion flux and ion distribution function measurements in synchronously pulsed inductively coupled plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brihoum, Melisa; Cunge, Gilles; Darnon, Maxime; Joubert, Olivier [Laboratoire des Technologies de la Microelectronique CNRS, Grenoble Cedex 9, Isere 38054 (France); Gahan, David [Impedans Ltd., Dublin 17 (Ireland); Braithwaite, Nicholas St. J. [Department of Physical Sciences, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-15

    Changes in the ion flux and the time-averaged ion distribution functions are reported for pulsed, inductively coupled RF plasmas (ICPs) operated over a range of duty cycles. For helium and argon plasmas, the ion flux increases rapidly after the start of the RF pulse and after about 50 {mu}s reaches the same steady state value as that in continuous ICPs. Therefore, when the plasma is pulsed at 1 kHz, the ion flux during the pulse has a value that is almost independent of the duty cycle. By contrast, in molecular electronegative chlorine/chlorosilane plasmas, the ion flux during the pulse reaches a steady state value that depends strongly on the duty cycle. This is because both the plasma chemistry and the electronegativity depend on the duty cycle. As a result, the ion flux is 15 times smaller in a pulsed 10% duty cycle plasma than in the continuous wave (CW) plasma. The consequence is that for a given synchronous RF biasing of a wafer-chuck, the ion energy is much higher in the pulsed plasma than it is in the CW plasma of chlorine/chlorosilane. Under these conditions, the wafer is bombarded by a low flux of very energetic ions, very much as it would in a low density, capacitively coupled plasma. Therefore, one can extend the operating range of ICPs through synchronous pulsing of the inductive excitation and capacitive chuck-bias, offering new means by which to control plasma etching.

  9. Self-mapping the longitudinal field structure of a nonlinear plasma accelerator cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, C E; Adli, E; Allen, J; An, W; Clarke, C I; Corde, S; Frederico, J; Gessner, S; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Litos, M; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Xu, X; Yakimenko, V

    2016-08-16

    The preservation of emittance of the accelerating beam is the next challenge for plasma-based accelerators envisioned for future light sources and colliders. The field structure of a highly nonlinear plasma wake is potentially suitable for this purpose but has not been yet measured. Here we show that the longitudinal variation of the fields in a nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator cavity produced by a relativistic electron bunch can be mapped using the bunch itself as a probe. We find that, for much of the cavity that is devoid of plasma electrons, the transverse force is constant longitudinally to within ±3% (r.m.s.). Moreover, comparison of experimental data and simulations has resulted in mapping of the longitudinal electric field of the unloaded wake up to 83 GV m(-1) to a similar degree of accuracy. These results bode well for high-gradient, high-efficiency acceleration of electron bunches while preserving their emittance in such a cavity.

  10. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Adli, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P. N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A. A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K. V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V. A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Spitsyn, R. I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P. V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  11. Self-mapping the longitudinal field structure of a nonlinear plasma accelerator cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, C. E.; Adli, E.; Allen, J.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Corde, S.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Xu, X.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-08-01

    The preservation of emittance of the accelerating beam is the next challenge for plasma-based accelerators envisioned for future light sources and colliders. The field structure of a highly nonlinear plasma wake is potentially suitable for this purpose but has not been yet measured. Here we show that the longitudinal variation of the fields in a nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator cavity produced by a relativistic electron bunch can be mapped using the bunch itself as a probe. We find that, for much of the cavity that is devoid of plasma electrons, the transverse force is constant longitudinally to within +/-3% (r.m.s.). Moreover, comparison of experimental data and simulations has resulted in mapping of the longitudinal electric field of the unloaded wake up to 83 GV m-1 to a similar degree of accuracy. These results bode well for high-gradient, high-efficiency acceleration of electron bunches while preserving their emittance in such a cavity.

  12. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschwendtner, E. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Adli, E. [University of Oslo, Oslo 0316 (Norway); Amorim, L. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Apsimon, R. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Assmann, R. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Föhringer Ring 6, München 80805 (Germany); Bauche, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Berglyd Olsen, V.K. [University of Oslo, Oslo 0316 (Norway); Bernardini, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Bingham, R. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Biskup, B. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Czech Technical University, Zikova 1903/4, 166 36 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Bohl, T.; Bracco, C. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Burrows, P.N. [John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, Oxford (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD (United Kingdom); Burt, G. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Buttenschön, B. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, Greifswald 17491 (Germany); Butterworth, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Caldwell, A. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Föhringer Ring 6, München 80805 (Germany); Cascella, M. [UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  13. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V.K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschon, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A.A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Huther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K.V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V.A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Oz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z.M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A.P.; Spitsyn, R.I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P.V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C.P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected to sample the wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  14. Observation of ion acceleration and heating during collisionless magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jongsoo; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Myers, Clayton E

    2013-05-24

    The ion dynamics in a collisionless magnetic reconnection layer are studied in a laboratory plasma. The measured in-plane plasma potential profile, which is established by electrons accelerated around the electron diffusion region, shows a saddle-shaped structure that is wider and deeper towards the outflow direction. This potential structure ballistically accelerates ions near the separatrices toward the outflow direction. Ions are heated as they travel into the high-pressure downstream region.

  15. Quasi-phasematched acceleration of electrons in a density modulated plasma waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sung Jun

    Two quasi-phasematching schemes are proposed for efficient acceleration of electrons to relativistic energies using moderate intensity laser pulses. In the first scheme, Direct Laser Acceleration (DLA) in a corrugated plasma waveguide is proposed for acceleration of relativistic electrons with sub-terawatt laser systems, using the laser field directly as the accelerating field. The second scheme uses the fact that a plasma wakefield generated by an intense guided pulse in a corrugated plasma waveguide can accelerate relativistic electrons significantly beyond the well-known dephasing limit. In each case, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are used to validate the acceleration concept, demonstrating linear acceleration by either the phase matched laser field or phase-matched wakefield. In the phase matched wakefield case, theory and PIC simulations demonstrate a significant increase in energy gain compared to the standard laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) scheme. Corrugated plasma waveguides can be generated by the interaction between an ionizing laser pulse and an atomic cluster flow interrupted by an array of thin wires,. When the collisional mean free path of the clusters is greater than the wire diameter, shadows of the periodically located wires are imparted on the cluster flow, leading to the production of axially modulated plasma waveguides after laser heating of the flow. This occurs when the population ratio of clusters to monomers in the gas is high. At other limit, dominated by gas monomer flow, shock waves generated off the wires by the supersonic gas flow disrupts modulated waveguide generation. Lastly, we experimentally demonstrate LWFA with ionization injection in a N5+ plasma waveguide. It is first shown that the plasma waveguide is almost completely composed of He-like nitrogen (N5+). It is then shown that intense pulse channeling in the plasma waveguide drives stronger wakefields, while the ionization injection process is critical to lowering the

  16. Similarity for ultra-relativistic laser plasmas and the optimal acceleration regime

    CERN Document Server

    Pukhov, A

    2005-01-01

    A similarity theory is developed for ultra-relativistic laser-plasmas. It is shown that the most fundamental S-similarity is valid for both under- and overdense plasmas. Optimal scalings for laser wake field electron acceleration are obtained heuristically. The strong message of the present work is that the bubble acceleration regime [see Pukhov, Meyer-ter-Vehn, Appl. Phys. B, 74, 355 (2002)] satisfies these optimal scalings.

  17. Flow dynamics and magnetic induction in the von-Karman plasma experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Plihon, Nicolas; Palermo, Francesco; Morales, Jorge A; Bos, Wouter; Godeferd, Fabien S; Bourgoin, Mickaël; Pinton, Jean-François; Moulin, M; Aanesland, Ane

    2014-01-01

    The von-Karman plasma experiment is a novel versatile experimental device designed to explore the dynamics of basic magnetic induction processes and the dynamics of flows driven in weakly magnetized plasmas. A high-density plasma column (10^16 - 10^19 particles.m^-3) is created by two radio-frequency plasma sources located at each end of a 1 m long linear device. Flows are driven through JxB azimuthal torques created from independently controlled emissive cathodes. The device has been designed such that magnetic induction processes and turbulent plasma dynamics can be studied from a variety of time-averaged axisymmetric flows in a cylinder. MHD simulations implementing volume-penalization support the experimental development to design the most efficient flow-driving schemes and understand the flow dynamics. Preliminary experimental results show that a rotating motion of up to nearly 1 km/s is controlled by the JxB azimuthal torque.

  18. Induction core alloys for heavy-ion inertial fusion-energy accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur W. Molvik

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Induction core alloys are evaluated that are appropriate for heavy-ion induction accelerators to drive heavy-ion inertial fusion (HIF power plants. Parameters evaluated include the usable flux swing and the energy loss over a range of magnetization rates of ∼10^{5}–10^{7} T/s, corresponding to pulse durations of ∼20 to 0.2 μs, respectively. The usable flux swing, for minimum core losses, extends from near the reversed remanent field to about 80% of the saturation field. The usable flux swing is enhanced, with little increase in losses, by annealing the core after winding. Maintaining low energy loss at high magnetization rates requires insulation to block interlaminar eddy currents. To obtain annealed cores with a high ratio of remanent to saturation magnetic field, the insulation must withstand annealing temperatures and apply minimum mechanical stress to the core during cooldown. We find that commercially available insulating coatings for amorphous metals either break down near 10^{6} T/s (a factor of 10 below the requirement, or do not achieve the maximum remanent field and hence the usable flux swing after annealing. More satisfactory coatings are available for silicon steel and nanocrystalline alloys, which could have applications in HIF. Amorphous alloys are capable of meeting most HIF needs, especially with improved coatings.

  19. Track Structure and the Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, K.; Hada, M.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number, Z will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z. In this report we investigated how track structure effects induction of chromosomal aberration in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated iron, silicon, neon, or titanium ions and chromosome damage was assessed in using three color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced PCC samples collected a first cell division post irradiation. The LET values for these ions ranged from 30 to195 keV/micron. Of the particles studied, Neon ions have the highest biological effectiveness for induction of total chromosome damage, which is consistent with track structure model predictions. For complex-type exchanges 64 MeV/ u Neon and 450 MeV/u Iron were equally effective and induced the most complex damage. In addition we present data on chromosomes exchanges induced by six different energies of protons (5 MeV/u to 2.5 GeV/u). The linear dose response term was similar for all energies of protons suggesting that the effect of the higher LET at low proton energies is balanced by the production of nuclear secondaries from the high energy protons.

  20. Positron acceleration by plasma wake fields driven by a hollow electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Neeraj; Palastro, J P

    2014-01-01

    A scheme of wake field generation for positron acceleration using hollow or donut shaped electron driver beams is studied. An annular shaped, electron free region forms around a hollow driver beam creating a favorable region (longitudinal field is accelerating and transverse field is focusing and radially linear) for positron acceleration. Accelerating gradients of the order of 10 GV/m are produced by a hollow electron beam driver with FACET like parameters. The peak accelerating field increases linearly with the total charge in the beam driver while the axial size of the favorable region ($\\sim$ one plasma wavelength) remains approximately fixed. The radial size drops with the total charge but remains large enough for the placement of a witness positron beam. We simulate an efficient acceleration of a 23 GeV positron beam to 35.4 GeV with a maximum energy spread of 0.4\\% and very small emittance over a plasma length of 140 cm.

  1. Laser plasma acceleration of electrons with multi-PW laser beams in the frame of CILEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cros, B., E-mail: brigitte.cros@u-psud.fr [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Paradkar, B.S. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Davoine, X. [CEA DAM DIF, Arpajon F-91297 (France); Chancé, A. [CEA IRFU-SACM, Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Desforges, F.G. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Dobosz-Dufrénoy, S. [CEA DSM-IRAMIS-SPAM, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Delerue, N. [LAL, CNRS and Universit Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Ju, J.; Audet, T.L.; Maynard, G. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Lobet, M.; Gremillet, L. [CEA DAM DIF, Arpajon F-91297 (France); Mora, P. [CPhT, CNRS and Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Schwindling, J.; Delferrière, O. [CEA IRFU-SACM, Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Bruni, C.; Rimbault, C.; Vinatier, T. [LAL, CNRS and Universit Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Di Piazza, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Grech, M. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, Palaiseau (France); and others

    2014-03-11

    Laser plasma acceleration of electrons has progressed along with advances in laser technology. It is thus expected that the development in the near-future of multi-PW-class laser and facilities will enable a vast range of scientific opportunities for laser plasma acceleration research. On one hand, high peak powers can be used to explore the extremely high intensity regime of laser wakefield acceleration, producing for example large amounts of electrons in the GeV range or generating high energy photons. On the other hand, the available laser energy can be used in the quasi-linear regime to create accelerating fields in large volumes of plasma and study controlled acceleration in a plasma stage of externally injected relativistic particles, either electrons or positrons. In the frame of the Centre Interdisciplinaire de la Lumière EXtrême (CILEX), the Apollon-10P laser will deliver two beams at the 1 PW and 10 PW levels, in ultra-short (>15fs) pulses, to a target area dedicated to electron acceleration studies, such as the exploration of the non-linear regimes predicted theoretically, or multi-stage laser plasma acceleration.

  2. Laser plasma acceleration of electrons with multi-PW laser beams in the frame of CILEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, B.; Paradkar, B. S.; Davoine, X.; Chancé, A.; Desforges, F. G.; Dobosz-Dufrénoy, S.; Delerue, N.; Ju, J.; Audet, T. L.; Maynard, G.; Lobet, M.; Gremillet, L.; Mora, P.; Schwindling, J.; Delferrière, O.; Bruni, C.; Rimbault, C.; Vinatier, T.; Di Piazza, A.; Grech, M.; Riconda, C.; Marquès, J. R.; Beck, A.; Specka, A.; Martin, Ph.; Monot, P.; Normand, D.; Mathieu, F.; Audebert, P.; Amiranoff, F.

    2014-03-01

    Laser plasma acceleration of electrons has progressed along with advances in laser technology. It is thus expected that the development in the near-future of multi-PW-class laser and facilities will enable a vast range of scientific opportunities for laser plasma acceleration research. On one hand, high peak powers can be used to explore the extremely high intensity regime of laser wakefield acceleration, producing for example large amounts of electrons in the GeV range or generating high energy photons. On the other hand, the available laser energy can be used in the quasi-linear regime to create accelerating fields in large volumes of plasma and study controlled acceleration in a plasma stage of externally injected relativistic particles, either electrons or positrons. In the frame of the Centre Interdisciplinaire de la Lumière EXtrême (CILEX), the Apollon-10P laser will deliver two beams at the 1 PW and 10 PW levels, in ultra-short (> 15 fs) pulses, to a target area dedicated to electron acceleration studies, such as the exploration of the non-linear regimes predicted theoretically, or multi-stage laser plasma acceleration.

  3. Particle-in-cell simulations of tunneling ionization effects in plasma-based accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Bruhwiler, D L; Cary, J R; Esarey, E; Leemans, W; Giacone, R E

    2003-01-01

    Plasma-based accelerators can sustain accelerating gradients on the order of 100 GV/m. If the plasma is not fully ionized, fields of this magnitude will ionize neutral atoms via electron tunneling, which can completely change the dynamics of the plasma wake. Particle-in-cell simulations of a high-field plasma wakefield accelerator, using the OOPIC code, which includes field-induced tunneling ionization of neutral Li gas, show that the presence of even moderate neutral gas density significantly degrades the quality of the wakefield. The tunneling ionization model in OOPIC has been validated via a detailed comparison with experimental data from the l'OASIS laboratory. The properties of a wake generated directly from a neutral gas are studied, showing that one can recover the peak fields of the fully ionized plasma simulations, if the density of the electron drive bunch is increased such that the bunch rapidly ionized the gas.

  4. Feature-Based Analysis of Plasma-Based Particle Acceleration Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, Oliver [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Geddes, Cameron G. R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chen, Min [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cormier-Michel, Estelle [Tech-X Corp., Boulder, CO (United States); Bethel, E. Wes [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Plasma-based particle accelerators can produce and sustain thousands of times stronger acceleration fields than conventional particle accelerators, providing a potential solution to the problem of the growing size and cost of conventional particle accelerators. To facilitate scientific knowledge discovery from the ever growing collections of accelerator simulation data generated by accelerator physicists to investigate next-generation plasma-based particle accelerator designs, we describe a novel approach for automatic detection and classification of particle beams and beam substructures due to temporal differences in the acceleration process, here called acceleration features. The automatic feature detection in combination with a novel visualization tool for fast, intuitive, query-based exploration of acceleration features enables an effective top-down data exploration process, starting from a high-level, feature-based view down to the level of individual particles. We describe the application of our analysis in practice to analyze simulations of single pulse and dual and triple colliding pulse accelerator designs, and to study the formation and evolution of particle beams, to compare substructures of a beam and to investigate transverse particle loss.

  5. Determination of selenoprotein P in human plasma by solid phase extraction and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendahl, L.; Sidenius, U.; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2000-01-01

    measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) monitoring the Se-82 isotope. Linear response was observed in the concentration range 0.3-70.8 mu g/l selenium as selenoprotein P with a correlation coefficient of 0.9994. The precision expressed as relative standard deviation was better...

  6. Scheme for proton-driven plasma-wakefield acceleration of positively charged particles in a hollow plasma channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longqing Yi (易龙卿

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A new scheme for accelerating positively charged particles in a plasma-wakefield accelerator is proposed. If the proton drive beam propagates in a hollow plasma channel, and the beam radius is of order of the channel width, the space charge force of the driver causes charge separation at the channel wall, which helps to focus the positively charged witness bunch propagating along the beam axis. In the channel, the acceleration buckets for positively charged particles are much larger than in the blowout regime of the uniform plasma, and stable acceleration over long distances is possible. In addition, phasing of the witness with respect to the wave can be tuned by changing the radius of the channel to ensure the acceleration is optimal. Two-dimensional simulations suggest that, for proton drivers likely available in future, positively charged particles can be stably accelerated over 1 km with the average acceleration gradient of 1.3  GeV/m.

  7. Plasma wakefield acceleration studies using the quasi-static code WAKE

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Neeraj; Antonsen, T M; Mori, Warren B; An, Weiming

    2014-01-01

    The quasi-static code WAKE [P. Mora and T. Antonsen, Phys. Plasmas {\\bf 4}, 217(1997)] is upgraded to model the propagation of an ultra-relativistic charged particle beam through a warm background plasma in plasma wakefield acceleration. The upgraded code is benchmarked against the full particle-in-cell code OSIRIS [Hemker et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams {\\bf 3}, 061301(2000)] and the quasi-static code QuickPIC [Huang et al., J. Comp. Phys. {\\bf 217}, 658 (2006)]. The effect of non-zero plasma temperature on the peak accelerating electric field is studied for a two bunch electron beam driver with parameters corresponding to the plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at FACET. It is shown that plasma temperature does not affect the energy gain and spread of the accelerated particles despite suppressing the peak accelerating electric field. The role of plasma temperature in improving the numerical convergence of the electric field with the grid resolution is discussed.

  8. AIRIX: an induction accelerator facility developed at CEA for flash radiography in detonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavailler, Claude

    1999-06-01

    AIRIX is an induction linear accelerator which will be used for flash radiography in CEA/DAM. Designed to produce an X-ray dose of more than 500 Rads at 1 meter with an X-ray focal spot size diameter of less than 2 mm (LANL-CEA DAM definition), this facility consists in a 4 MeV/3.5 kA pulsed electron injector and 16 MeV induction accelerator powered by 32 high voltage generators. A prototype of this accelerator, called PIVAIR, has been studied and realized in CEA CESTA near Bordeaux. PIVAIR is a validation step for AIRIX at 8 MeV. It includes an injector (4 MeV, 3.5 kA, 60 ns) and 16 inductor cells supplied by 8 high voltage generators (250 kV, 70 ns). Two different technologies of induction cells have been tested (rexolite insulator or ferrite under vacuum). We have chosen ferrite under vacuum cells technology after comparison of results on beam transport and reliability tests. A focusing experiment at 7.2 MeV of the electron beam as been achieved during summer 1997. We have begun to produce X-rays in October 1997. A dose level of 50 Rad at 1 meter has been achieved with an X-ray spot size diameter of 3.5 to 4 mm (LANL-CEA DAM definition). Static flash radiography of very dense object have been achieved from November 97 until February 98. We have been able to test in situ new kinds of very high sensitive X- ray detectors and to check they had reached our very ambitious goals: (1) quantum efficiency at 5 MeV greater than 50% instead of 1% for luminous screens and film; (2) sensitivity less than 10 (mu) Rad (100 time more sensitive than radiographic luminous screens and films); (3) dynamic range greater than 100; (4) resolution less than 2 mm. We will present in this communication brand new kinds of detection systems, called high stopping power detectors, such as: (1) (gamma) camera with segmented thick crystal of BGO and MCP image intensifier; (2) multistep parallel plate avalanche chamber; (3) pixellized CdTe MeV photoconductor matrix. AIRIX accelerator is being

  9. Trans-Relativistic Particle Acceleration in Astrophysical Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Peter A.; Subramanian, P.

    2014-01-01

    Trans-relativistic particle acceleration due to Fermi interactions between charged particles and MHD waves helps to power the observed high-energy emission in AGN transients and solar flares. The trans-relativistic acceleration process is challenging to treat analytically due to the complicated momentum dependence of the momentum diffusion coefficient. For this reason, most existing analytical treatments of particle acceleration assume that the injected seed particles are already relativistic, and therefore they are not suited to study trans-relativistic acceleration. The lack of an analytical model has forced workers to rely on numerical simulations to obtain particle spectra describing the trans-relativistic case. In this work we present the first analytical solution to the global, trans-relativistic problem describing the acceleration of seed particles due to hard-sphere collisions with MHD waves. The new results include the exact solution for the steady-state Green's function resulting from the continual injection of monoenergetic seed particles with an arbitrary energy. We also introduce an approximate treatment of the trans-relativistic acceleration process based on a hybrid form for the momentum diffusion coefficient, given by the sum of the two asymptotic forms. We refer to this process as "quasi hard-sphere scattering." The main advantage of the hybrid approximation is that it allows the extension of the physical model to include (i) the effects of synchrotron and inverse-Compton losses and (ii) time dependence. The new analytical results can be used to model the trans-relativistic acceleration of particles in AGN and solar environments, and can also be used to compute the spectra of the associated synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission. Applications of both types are discussed. We highlight (i) relativistic ion acceleration in black hole accretion coronae, and (ii) the production of gyrosynchrotron microwave emission due to relativistic electron

  10. A comprehensive study of different gases in inductively coupled plasma torch operating at one atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punjabi, Sangeeta B. [Electrical Engineering Department, V. J.T.I, Matunga, Mumbai 400019 (India); Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Kalina, Santacruz(E) 400098 (India); Joshi, N. K. [Faculty of Engineering and technology, MITS, lakshmangarh, (Sikar), Rajasthan 332311 (India); Mangalvedekar, H. A.; Lande, B. K. [Electrical Engineering Department, V. J.T.I, Matunga, Mumbai 400019 (India); Das, A. K. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kothari, D. C. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Kalina, Santacruz(E) 400098 (India)

    2012-01-15

    A numerical study is done to understand the possible operating regimes of RF-ICP torch (3 MHz, 50 kW) using different gases for plasma formation at atmospheric pressure. A two dimensional numerical simulation of RF-ICP torch using argon, nitrogen, oxygen, and air as plasma gas has been investigated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software fluent{sup (c)}. The operating parameters varied here are central gas flow, sheath gas flow, RF-power dissipated in plasma, and plasma gas. The temperature contours, flow field, axial, and radial velocity profiles were investigated under different operating conditions. The plasma resistance, inductance of the torch, and the heat distribution for various plasma gases have also been investigated. The plasma impedance of ICP torch varies with different operating parameters and plays an important role for RF oscillator design and power coupling. These studies will be useful to decide the design criteria for ICP torches required for different material processing applications.

  11. Transient electromagnetic behaviour in inductive oxygen and argon-oxygen plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, A. R.; Herdrich, G.; Kim, M.; Dally, B.

    2016-12-01

    In order to develop inductive electric propulsion as a flexible, throttleable technology for future space operations, a greater understanding of discharge transitions within the inductive plasma generator discharge chamber is required. This paper presents a non-intrusive method to determine the conditions under which transitions between the capacitive, low inductive, and high inductive regimes occur with greater accuracy, as well as determining the proportion of a single discharge cycle the plasma spends in either capacitive or inductive regime. Such a method allows a more robust method of classification of inductive discharges than previously available and can be applied to numerous gases. This approach presents an advantage over previous methods which relied on strongly radiating or thermally reactive gases to exhibit certain behaviour (due to the restriction of classical diagnostics on such high power sources) before a transition could be confirmed. This paper presents results from the proposed method applied to a pure oxygen plasma as well as two combinations of argon and oxygen (at 1:1 and 3:2 Ar:O2 volumetric ratios) in order to assess the tunability of electromagnetic regime transitions through modifications of gas composition rather than mechanical alterations. Transitions to the higher inductive mode were observed for much lower input powers for the argon-oxygen blends, as was expected, allowing final discharge conditions to occupy the inductive regime for 94% and 85% of a single discharge cycle for the 3:2 and 1:1 Ar:O2 mixtures, respectively. Pure oxygen achieved a maximum inductive proportion of 71% by comparison.

  12. Discontinuity of mode transition and hysteresis in hydrogen inductively coupled plasma via a fluid model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐会静; 赵书霞; 高飞; 张钰如; 李雪春; 王友年

    2015-01-01

    A new type of two-dimensional self-consistent fluid model that couples an equivalent circuit module is used to in-vestigate the mode transition characteristics and hysteresis in hydrogen inductively coupled plasmas at different pressures, by varying the series capacitance of the matching box. The variations of the electron density, temperature, and the cir-cuit electrical properties are presented. As cycling the matching capacitance, at high pressure both the discontinuity and hysteresis appear for the plasma parameters and the transferred impedances of both the inductive and capacitive discharge components, while at low pressure only the discontinuity is seen. The simulations predict that the sheath plays a determi-native role on the presence of discontinuity and hysteresis at high pressure, by influencing the inductive coupling efficiency of applied power. Moreover, the values of the plasma transferred impedances at different pressures are compared, and the larger plasma inductance at low pressure due to less collision frequency, as analyzed, is the reason why the hysteresis is not seen at low pressure, even with a wider sheath. Besides, the behaviors of the coil voltage and current parameters during the mode transitions are investigated. They both increase (decrease) at the E to H (H to E) mode transition, indicating an improved (worsened) inductive power coupling efficiency.

  13. Discontinuity of mode transition and hysteresis in hydrogen inductively coupled plasma via a fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui-Jing; Zhao, Shu-Xia; Fei, Gao; Yu-Ru, Zhang; Xue-Chun, Li; You-Nian, Wang

    2015-11-01

    A new type of two-dimensional self-consistent fluid model that couples an equivalent circuit module is used to investigate the mode transition characteristics and hysteresis in hydrogen inductively coupled plasmas at different pressures, by varying the series capacitance of the matching box. The variations of the electron density, temperature, and the circuit electrical properties are presented. As cycling the matching capacitance, at high pressure both the discontinuity and hysteresis appear for the plasma parameters and the transferred impedances of both the inductive and capacitive discharge components, while at low pressure only the discontinuity is seen. The simulations predict that the sheath plays a determinative role on the presence of discontinuity and hysteresis at high pressure, by influencing the inductive coupling efficiency of applied power. Moreover, the values of the plasma transferred impedances at different pressures are compared, and the larger plasma inductance at low pressure due to less collision frequency, as analyzed, is the reason why the hysteresis is not seen at low pressure, even with a wider sheath. Besides, the behaviors of the coil voltage and current parameters during the mode transitions are investigated. They both increase (decrease) at the E to H (H to E) mode transition, indicating an improved (worsened) inductive power coupling efficiency. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175034, 11205025, 11305023, and 11075029).

  14. H$^{-}$ ion source for CERN's Linac4 accelerator: simulation, experimental validation and optimization of the hydrogen plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Mattei, Stefano; Lettry, Jacques

    2017-07-25

    Linac4 is the new negative hydrogen ion (H$^-$) linear accelerator of the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). Its ion source operates on the principle of Radio-Frequency Inductively Coupled Plasma (RF-ICP) and it is required to provide 50~mA of H$^-$ beam in pulses of 600~$\\mu$s with a repetition rate up to 2 Hz and within an RMS emittance of 0.25~$\\pi$~mm~mrad in order to fullfil the requirements of the accelerator. This thesis is dedicated to the characterization of the hydrogen plasma in the Linac4 H$^-$ ion source. We have developed a Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collision (PIC-MCC) code to simulate the RF-ICP heating mechanism and performed measurements to benchmark the fraction of the simulation outputs that can be experimentally accessed. The code solves self-consistently the interaction between the electromagnetic field generated by the RF coil and the resulting plasma response, including a kinetic description of charged and neutral species. A fully-implicit implementation allowed to si...

  15. Tuning of betatron radiation in laser-plasma accelerators via multimodal laser propagation through capillary waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, A.; Giulietti, D.; Petrarca, M.

    2017-02-01

    The betatron radiation from laser-plasma accelerated electrons in dielectric capillary waveguides is investigated. The multimode laser propagation is responsible for a modulated plasma wakefield structure, which affects the electron transverse dynamics, therefore influencing the betatron radiation spectra. Such a phenomenon can be exploited to tune the energy spectrum of the betatron radiation by controlling the excitation of the capillary modes.

  16. Application of poloidal beta and plasma internal inductance in determination of input power time of Damavand tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Ehsanallah; Sadeghi, Yahya; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood

    2016-10-01

    In this study, magnetic measurement of poloidal fields were used to determine poloidal beta and plasma internal inductance of Damavand tokamak combination of poloidal beta and plasma internal inductance (β _p+{l_i}/{2} ), known as Shafranov parameter, was obtained experimentally in terms of normal and tangential components of the magnetic field. Plasma internal inductance and poloidal beta were obtained using parametrization method based on analytical solution of Grad-Shafranov equation (GSE) and compared with parabolic-like profile of toroidal current density approach for determination of the plasma internal inductance. Finding evolution of β _p+{l_i}/{2} and plasma internal inductance. Finding poloidal beta (Shafranov parameter and internal inductance) and using energy balance equation, thermal energy and energy confinement were determined qualitatively in terms of poloidal beta during a regular discharge of Damavand tokamak.

  17. Optical transverse injection in laser-plasma acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehe, R; Lifschitz, A F; Davoine, X; Thaury, C; Malka, V

    2013-08-23

    Laser-wakefield acceleration constitutes a promising technology for future electron accelerators. A crucial step in such an accelerator is the injection of electrons into the wakefield, which will largely determine the properties of the extracted beam. We present here a new paradigm of colliding-pulse injection, which allows us to generate high-quality electron bunches having both a very low emittance (0.17 mm·mrad) and a low energy spread (2%), while retaining a high charge (~100 pC) and a short duration (3 fs). In this paradigm, the pulse collision provokes a transient expansion of the accelerating bubble, which then leads to transverse electron injection. This mechanism contrasts with previously observed optical injection mechanisms, which were essentially longitudinal. We also specify the range of parameters in which this new type of injection occurs and show that it is within reach of existing high-intensity laser facilities.

  18. Two-dimensional simulation of inductively coupled plasma based on COMSOL and comparison with experimental data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Jia; Ji Linhong; Wang Kesheng; Han Chuankun; Shi Yixiang

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional axisymmetric inductively coupled plasma (ICP) model,and its implementation in the COMSOL multiphysical software,is described.The simulations are compared with the experimental results of argon discharge from the gaseous electronics conference RF reference cell in the inductively coupled plasma mode.The general trends of the number density and temperature of electrons with radial scanning are approximately correct.Finally,we discuss the reasons why the comparisons are not in agreement,and then propose an improvement in the assumptions of the Maxwellian electron energy distribution function and reaction rate.

  19. Effect of process parameters on induction plasma reactive deposition of tungsten carbide from tungsten metal powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Tungsten carbide deposit was made directly from tungsten metal powder through the reaction with methane in radio frequency induction plasma. Effect of major process parameters on the induction plasma reactive deposition of tungsten carbide was studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, water displacement method, and microhardness test. The results show that methane flow rate, powder feed rate, particle size, reaction chamber pressure and deposition distance have significant influences on the phase composition, density, and microhardness of the deposit. Extra carbon is necessary to ensure the complete conversion of tungsten metal into the carbide.

  20. Electron beam dynamics in the long-pulse, high-current DARHT-II linear induction accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekdahl, Carl A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abeyta, Epifanio O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragon, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Rita [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cook, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dalmas, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esquibel, Kevin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gallegos, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garnett, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harrison, James F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Jeffrey B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jacquez, Edward B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccuistian, Brian T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Nicholas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nath, Subrato [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nielsen, Kurt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prichard, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowton, Lawrence [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Manolito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scarpetti, Raymond [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schauer, Martin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seitz, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulze, Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bender, Howard A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Broste, William B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carlson, Carl A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Frayer, Daniel K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Douglas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tom, C Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hughes, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anaya, Richard [LLNL; Caporaso, George [LLNL; Chambers, Frank [LLNL; Chen, Yu - Jiuan [LLNL; Falabella, Steve [LLNL; Guethlein, Gary [LLNL; Raymond, Brett [LLNL; Richardson, Roger [LLNL; Trainham, C [NSTEC/STL; Watson, Jim [LLNL; Weir, John [LLNL; Genoni, Thomas [VOSS; Toma, Carsten [VOSS

    2009-01-01

    The DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) now accelerates 2-kA electron beams to more than 17 MeV. This LIA is unique in that the accelerated current pulse width is greater than 2 microseconds. This pulse has a flat-top region where the final electron kinetic energy varies by less than 1% for more than 1.5 microseconds. The long risetime of the 6-cell injector current pulse is 0.5 {micro}s, which can be scraped off in a beam-head cleanup zone before entering the 68-cell main accelerator. We discuss our experience with tuning this novel accelerator; and present data for the resulting beam transport and dynamics. We also present beam stability data, and relate these to previous stability experiments at lower current and energy.

  1. Awakening acceleration: AWAKE’s plasma cell arrive

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Productions Service; Paola Catapano; Jacques Fichet; Paola Catapano

    2016-01-01

    Interview with Edda Gschwendtner, project leader of the AWAKE collaboration, on the day the AWAKE's plasma cell is transported from the surface hall were it was tested (EHN1 on CERN Prevessin) to the AWAKE tunnel in CERN's SPS decay tunnel. The Plasma Cell was built by the Max Planck Institute in Munich.

  2. Design of the plasma chamber and beam extraction system for SC ECRIS of RAON accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Choi, S.; Hong, I. S.

    2014-02-01

    The RAON accelerator is the heavy ion accelerator being built in Korea. It contains a 3rd generation SC ECRIS which uses 28 GHz/18 GHz microwave power to extract 12 puA uranium ion beams. A plasma chamber for that ECRIS is made of aluminum machined from bulk Al. That chamber contains cooling channels to remove dumped power and another access port for microwave introduction and plasma diagnostics. Beam extraction electrodes were designed considering the engineering issues and preliminary beam extraction analysis was done. That plasma chamber will be assembled with a cryostat, and beam extraction experiment will be done.

  3. Shaping the electron beams with submicrosecond pulse duration in sources and electron accelerators with plasma emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Gushenets, V I

    2001-01-01

    One studies the techniques in use to shape submicrosecond electron beams and the physical processes associated with extraction of electrons from plasma in plasma emitters. Plasma emitter base sources and accelerators enable to generate pulse beams with currents varying from tens of amperes up to 10 sup 3 A, with current densities up to several amperes per a square centimeter, with pulse duration constituting hundreds of nanoseconds and with high frequencies of repetition

  4. Electron acceleration in collisionless shocks and magnetic reconnection by laser-produced plasma ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehong; Spitkovksy, Anatoly; Fox, Will; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2016-10-01

    We perform particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless shocks and magnetic reconnection generated by ablated plasma expanding into a magnetized background plasma. We find: (1) The simulated proton radiography produces different morphology of the shock structure depending on the orientation of the magnetic field and can be used to identify a shock in the experiment. Electrons are accelerated by the whistler waves generated at oblique sites of the shock. (2) Forced collisionless magnetic reconnection is induced when the expanding plumes carry opposite magnetic polarities and interact with a background plasma. Electrons are accelerated at the reconnection X line and reveal a power-law distribution as the plasma beta is lowered, β = 0.08 . As the plasma beta is increased, β = 0.32 , the 1st order Fermi mechanism against the two plasma plumes contributes to the electron acceleration as well as the X line acceleration. Using 3-D simulations, we also explore the effect of 3-D instabilities (Weibel instability or drift-kink) on particle acceleration and magnetic field annihilation between the colliding magnetized plumes

  5. Synergistic Direct/Wakefield Acceleration of Plasma Electrons In the Plasma Bubble Regime Using Tailored Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvets, Gennady

    2016-10-01

    The integration of direct laser acceleration (DLA) and laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) is a new approach to plasma-based acceleration that confers several benefits over both schemes taken separately. Such integration requires a significant portion of the laser energy (e.g., a separate laser pulse) to trail the main bubble-producing laser pulse, and resonantly interact with the trapped accelerated electrons undergoing betatron motion inside the plasma bubble. I will demonstrate how electron dephasing from the accelerating wakefield, which is one of the key limitations of LWFA, is reduced by their growing undulating motion. Moreover, the distinct energy gains from wake and the laser pulse are compounding, thereby increasing the total energy gain. Even more significant increases of the overall acceleration can be obtained by moving away from single-frequency laser format toward combining mid-infrared laser pulses for plasma bubble generation with short-wavelength trailing pulses for DLA. Various injection mechanisms, such as ionization injection, external injection, self-injection, and their advantages will also be discussed. Translating these new concepts into specific experiments will take advantage of recent technological advances in synchronizing laser and electron beams, and using multiple beamlines for producing sophisticated laser pulse formats.

  6. Longitudinal instabilities affecting the moving critical layer laser-plasma ion accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, Aakash Ajit

    2014-01-01

    In this work we analyze the longitudinal instabilities of propagating acceleration structures that are driven by a relativistically intense laser at the moving plasma critical layer [1]. These instabilities affect the energy-spectra of the accelerated ion-beams in propagating critical layer acceleration schemes [2][3]. Specifically, using analytical theory and PIC simulations we look into three fundamental physical processes and their interplay that are crucial to the understanding of energy spectral control by making the laser-plasma ion accelerators stable. The interacting processes are (i) Doppler-shifted ponderomotive bunching [1][4] (ii) potential quenching by beam-loading [2] and (iii) two-stream instabilities. These phenomenon have been observed in simulations analyzing these acceleration processes [5][6][7]. From the preliminary models and results we present in this work, we can infer measures by which these instabilities can be controlled [8] for improving the energy-spread of the beams.

  7. Magnetowave Induced Plasma Wakefield Acceleration for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Feng-Yin; /Taiwan, Natl. Chiao Tung U. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Chen, Pisin; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Lin, Guey-Lin; /Taiwan, Natl. Chiao Tung U. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Noble, Robert; /SLAC; Sydora, Richard; /Alberta U.

    2009-10-17

    Magnetowave induced plasma wakefield acceleration (MPWA) in a relativistic astrophysical outflow has been proposed as a viable mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic particles to ultrahigh energies. Here we present simulation results that clearly demonstrate the viability of this mechanism for the first time. We invoke the high frequency and high speed whistler mode for the driving pulse. The plasma wakefield obtained in the simulations compares favorably with our newly developed relativistic theory of the MPWA. We show that, under appropriate conditions, the plasma wakefield maintains very high coherence and can sustain high-gradient acceleration over hundreds of plasma skin depths. Invoking active galactic nuclei as the site, we show that MPWA production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays beyond ZeV (10{sup 21} eV) is possible.

  8. Plasma acceleration by the interaction of parallel propagating Alfv\\'en waves

    CERN Document Server

    Mottez, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that two circularly polarised Alfv\\'en waves that propagate along the ambient magnetic field in an uniform plasma trigger non oscillating electromagnetic field components when they cross each other. The non-oscilliating field components can accelerate ions and electrons with great efficiency. This work is based on particle-in-cell (PIC) numerical simulations and on analytical non-linear computations. The analytical computations are done for two counter-propagating monochromatic waves. The simulations are done with monochromatic waves and with wave packets. The simulations show parallel electromagnetic fields consistent with the theory, and they show that the particle acceleration result in plasma cavities and, if the waves amplitudes are high enough, in ion beams. These acceleration processes could be relevant in space plasmas. For instance, they could be at work in the auroral zone and in the radiation belts of the Earth magnetosphere. In particular, they may explain the origin of the deep plasma...

  9. Multi-gigaelectronvolt acceleration of positrons in a self-loaded plasma wakefield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corde, S; Adli, E; Allen, J M; An, W; Clarke, C I; Clayton, C E; Delahaye, J P; Frederico, J; Gessner, S; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Lipkowitz, N; Litos, M; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Schmeltz, M; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Walz, D; Yakimenko, V; Yocky, G

    2015-08-27

    Electrical breakdown sets a limit on the kinetic energy that particles in a conventional radio-frequency accelerator can reach. New accelerator concepts must be developed to achieve higher energies and to make future particle colliders more compact and affordable. The plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) embodies one such concept, in which the electric field of a plasma wake excited by a bunch of charged particles (such as electrons) is used to accelerate a trailing bunch of particles. To apply plasma acceleration to electron-positron colliders, it is imperative that both the electrons and their antimatter counterpart, the positrons, are efficiently accelerated at high fields using plasmas. Although substantial progress has recently been reported on high-field, high-efficiency acceleration of electrons in a PWFA powered by an electron bunch, such an electron-driven wake is unsuitable for the acceleration and focusing of a positron bunch. Here we demonstrate a new regime of PWFAs where particles in the front of a single positron bunch transfer their energy to a substantial number of those in the rear of the same bunch by exciting a wakefield in the plasma. In the process, the accelerating field is altered--'self-loaded'--so that about a billion positrons gain five gigaelectronvolts of energy with a narrow energy spread over a distance of just 1.3 metres. They extract about 30 per cent of the wake's energy and form a spectrally distinct bunch with a root-mean-square energy spread as low as 1.8 per cent. This ability to transfer energy efficiently from the front to the rear within a single positron bunch makes the PWFA scheme very attractive as an energy booster to an electron-positron collider.

  10. Influence of External Magnetic Field on Anomalous Skin Effects in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Ming; WANG You-Nian

    2004-01-01

    @@ Using a one-dimensional slab model, we study the influence of the external static magnetic field on the anomalous skin effects in the inductively coupled plasma. The rf electromagnetic field in the plasma is determined by solving the linearized Boltzmann equation incorporating with the Maxwell equations. The numerical results show that,due to the existence of the external magnetic field, the anomalous skin effects are greatly enhanced and the number of regions with negative absorption is decreased.

  11. Plasma wakefield excitation by incoherent laser pulses: a path towards high-average power laser-plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetti, C; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2014-01-01

    In a laser plasma accelerator (LPA), a short and intense laser pulse propagating in a plasma drives a wakefield (a plasma wave with a relativistic phase velocity) that can sustain extremely large electric fields, enabling compact accelerating structures. Potential LPA applications include compact radiation sources and high energy linear colliders. We propose and study plasma wave excitation by an incoherent combination of a large number of low energy laser pulses (i.e., without constraining the pulse phases). We show that, in spite of the incoherent nature of electromagnetic fields within the volume occupied by the pulses, the excited wakefield is regular and its amplitude is comparable or equal to that obtained using a single, coherent pulse with the same energy. These results provide a path to the next generation of LPA-based applications, where incoherently combined multiple pulses may enable high repetition rate, high average power LPAs.

  12. Accelerated forward and inverse solutions to geomagnetic induction at the global scale (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J.; Kuvshinov, A. V.

    2013-12-01

    Mapping of the 3D variations in electrical conductivity of the Earth's upper mantle through global geomagnetic induction studies is currently of great interest. Conductivity mapping holds the promise of constraining variations in temperature, water content and presence of melt, as is complementary to seismology. While a number of forward solvers exist to simulate electromagnetic fields in a 3D conductive Earth model, the corresponding inverse problem, i.e., determination of the conductivity model from field measurements, has usually been approached as a standard optimization problem, i.e., minimizing a "cost function" designed to penalize data misfit as well as deviations from a hypothetical model incorporating "priors". This penalization of deviations from a prior model is often known as regularization. Results from this approach often critically depend on the regularization settings. While regularization is necessary to obtain model estimations that are physically sensible, excessive applications of regularization often lead to manipulated results that are, to a certain degree, manifestations of the researchers' personal preferences. Moreover, the optimization-regularization-based inverse approach is computationally expensive, making it even less practical to assess effects of different schemes of regularization experimentally. In this abstract, we propose a fast, efficient and more objective approach to the solution of the inverse problem of geomagnetic global induction. We first develop solution to the forward problem using an integral equation approach. Next we develop a linearized inversion of the forward problem based on the first Born approximation, and obtain a direct inverse solver with easily adjustable regularization settings. Finally, we develop a nonlinear inversion series based on the direct solver of the linearized problem. In contrast to the traditional optimization-based approach, the nonlinear series approach requires no forward problem solving

  13. Ion acceleration in non-equilibrium plasmas driven by fast drifting electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, G. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S.Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Di Bartolo, F., E-mail: fdibartolo@unime.it [Università di Messina, V.le F. Stagno D’Alcontres 31, 98166, Messina (Italy); Gambino, N. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per L’ingegneria, Viale A.Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Mascali, D. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Romano, F.P. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CNR-IBAM Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); Anzalone, A.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Di Giugno, R. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S.Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Lanaia, D. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Miracoli, R. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S.Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Serafino, T. [CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Tudisco, S. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy)

    2013-05-01

    We hereby present results on ion acceleration mechanisms in non equilibrium plasmas generated by microwaves or high intensity laser pulses. Experiments point out that in magnetized plasmas X–B conversion takes place for under resonance values of the magnetic field, i.e. an electromagnetic mode is converted into an electrostatic wave. The strong self-generated electric field, of the order of 10{sup 7} V/m, causes a E × B drift which accelerates both ions and electrons, as it is evident by localized sputtering in the plasma chamber. These fields are similar (in magnitude) to the ones obtainable in laser generated plasmas at intensity of 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}. In this latter case, we observe that the acceleration mechanism is driven by electrons drifting much faster than plasma bulk, thus generating an extremely strong electric field ∼10{sup 7} V/m. The two experiments confirm that ions acceleration at low energy is possible with table-top devices and following complementary techniques: i.e. by using microwave-driven (producing CW beams) plasmas, or non-equilibrium laser-driven plasmas (producing pulsed beams). Possible applications involve ion implantation, materials surface modifications, ion beam assisted lithography, etc.

  14. Energy loss of a high charge bunched electron beam in plasma: Simulations, scaling, and accelerating wakefields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Rosenzweig

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The energy loss and gain of a beam in the nonlinear, “blowout” regime of the plasma wakefield accelerator, which features ultrahigh accelerating fields, linear transverse focusing forces, and nonlinear plasma motion, has been asserted, through previous observations in simulations, to scale linearly with beam charge. Additionally, from a recent analysis by Barov et al., it has been concluded that for an infinitesimally short beam, the energy loss is indeed predicted to scale linearly with beam charge for arbitrarily large beam charge. This scaling is predicted to hold despite the onset of a relativistic, nonlinear response by the plasma, when the number of beam particles occupying a cubic plasma skin depth exceeds that of plasma electrons within the same volume. This paper is intended to explore the deviations from linear energy loss using 2D particle-in-cell simulations that arise in the case of experimentally relevant finite length beams. The peak accelerating field in the plasma wave excited behind the finite-length beam is also examined, with the artifact of wave spiking adding to the apparent persistence of linear scaling of the peak field amplitude into the nonlinear regime. At large enough normalized charge, the linear scaling of both decelerating and accelerating fields collapses, with serious consequences for plasma wave excitation efficiency. Using the results of parametric particle-in-cell studies, the implications of these results for observing severe deviations from linear scaling in present and planned experiments are discussed.

  15. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Bandyopadhyay, P

    2016-01-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current (DC) glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self excited dust acoustic waves and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust par...

  16. Plasma characteristics in inductively and capacitively coupled hybrid source using single RF power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwan-Yong; Lee, Moo-Young; Kim, Tae-Woo; Kim, Ju-Ho; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-09-01

    Parallel combined inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) using single RF generator was proposed to linear control of the plasma density with RF power. In the case of ICP, linear control of the plasma density is difficult because there is a density jump up due to E to H transition. Although the plasma density of CCP changes linearly with power, the density is lower than that of ICP due to high ion energy loss at the substrate. In our hybrid source, the single RF power generator was connected to electrode and antenna, and the variable capacitor was installed between the antenna and the power generator to control the current flowing through the antenna and the electrode. By adjusting the current ratio between the antenna and the electrode, linear characteristic of plasma density with RF power is achieved.

  17. Proposed inductive voltage adder based accelerator concepts for the second axis of DARHT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.; Johnson, D.L.; Boyes, J.D. [and others

    1997-06-01

    As participants in the Technology Options Study for the second axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic HydroTest (DARHT) facility located at Los Alamos National Laboratories, the authors have considered several accelerator concepts based on the Inductive Voltage Adder (IVA) technology that is being used successfully at Sandia on the SABRE and HERMES-III facilities. The challenging accelerator design requirements for the IVA approach include: {ge}12-MeV beam energy; {approximately}60-ns electrical pulse width; {le}40-kA electron beam current; {approximately}1-mm diameter e-beam; four pulses on the same axis or as close as possible to that axis; and an architecture that fits within the existing building envelope. To satisfy these requirements the IVA concepts take a modular approach. The basic idea is built upon a conservative design for eight ferromagnetically isolated 2-MV cavities that are driven by two 3 to 4-{Omega} water dielectric pulse forming lines (PFLs) synchronized with laser triggered gas switches. The 100-{Omega} vacuum magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) would taper to a needle cathode that produces the electron beam(s). After considering many concepts the authors narrowed their study to the following options: (A) Four independent single pulse drivers powering four single pulse diodes; (B) Four series adders with interleaved cavities feeding a common MITL and diode; (C) Four stages of series PFLs, isolated from each other by triggered spark gap switches, with single-point feeds to a common adder, MITL, and diode; and (D) Isolated PFLs with multiple-feeds to a common adder using spark gap switches in combination with saturable magnetic cores to isolate the non-energized lines. The authors will discuss these options in greater detail identifying the challenges and risks associated with each.

  18. Energy limitation of laser-plasma electron accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Cardenas, D E; Xu, J; Hofmann, L; Buck, A; Schmid, K; Sears, C M S; Rivas, D E; Shen, B; Veisz, L

    2015-01-01

    We report on systematic and high-precision measurements of dephasing, an effect that fundamentally limits the performance of laser wakefield accelerators. Utilizing shock-front injection, a technique providing stable, tunable and high-quality electron bunches, acceleration and deceleration of few-MeV quasi-monoenergetic beams were measured with sub-5-fs and 8-fs laser pulses. Typical density dependent electron energy evolution with 65-300 micrometers dephasing length and 6-20 MeV peak energy was observed and is well described with a simple model.

  19. Motion of the Plasma Critical Layer During Relativistic-electron Laser Interaction with Immobile and Comoving Ion Plasma for Ion Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, Aakash A

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the motion of the plasma critical layer by two different processes in the relativistic-electron laser-plasma interaction regime ($a_0>1$). The differences are highlighted when the critical layer ions are stationary in contrast to when they move with it. Controlling the speed of the plasma critical layer in this regime is essential for creating low-$\\beta$ traveling acceleration structures of sufficient laser-excited potential for laser ion accelerators (LIA). In Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration (RITA) scheme the heavy plasma-ions are fixed and only trace-density light-ions are accelerated. The relativistic critical layer and the acceleration structure move longitudinally forward by laser inducing transparency through apparent relativistic increase in electron mass. In the Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) scheme the whole plasma is longitudinally pushed forward under the action of the laser radiation pressure, possible only when plasma ions co-propagate with the laser front. I...

  20. Determination of Arsenic in Sinus Wash and Tap Water by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnell, Anna M.; Nahan, Keaton; Holloway, Dawone; Vonderheide, Anne P.

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is a toxic element to which humans are primarily exposed through food and water; it occurs as a result of human activities and naturally from the earth's crust. An experiment was developed for a senior level analytical laboratory utilizing an Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) for the analysis of arsenic in household…

  1. Determination of platinum in human subcellular microsamples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björn, Erik; Nygren, Yvonne; Nguyen, Tam T. T. N.

    2007-01-01

    A fast and robust method for the determination of platinum in human subcellular microsamples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was developed, characterized, and validated. Samples of isolated DNA and exosome fractions from human ovarian (2008) and melanoma (T289) cancer cell lines...

  2. Experimental, Theoretical and Computational Studies of Plasma-Based Concepts for Future High Energy Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Chan [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mori, W. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2013-10-21

    This is the final report on the DOE grant number DE-FG02-92ER40727 titled, “Experimental, Theoretical and Computational Studies of Plasma-Based Concepts for Future High Energy Accelerators.” During this grant period the UCLA program on Advanced Plasma Based Accelerators, headed by Professor C. Joshi has made many key scientific advances and trained a generation of students, many of whom have stayed in this research field and even started research programs of their own. In this final report however, we will focus on the last three years of the grant and report on the scientific progress made in each of the four tasks listed under this grant. Four tasks are focused on: Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Research at FACET, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, In House Research at UCLA’s Neptune and 20 TW Laser Laboratories, Laser-Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) in Self Guided Regime: Experiments at the Callisto Laser at LLNL, and Theory and Simulations. Major scientific results have been obtained in each of the four tasks described in this report. These have led to publications in the prestigious scientific journals, graduation and continued training of high quality Ph.D. level students and have kept the U.S. at the forefront of plasma-based accelerators research field.

  3. Plasma block acceleration via double targets driven by an ultraintense circularly polarized laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanxia; Wang, Jiaxiang; Qi, Xin; Li, Meng; Xing, Yifan; Yang, Lei; Zhu, Wenjun

    2017-03-01

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, plasma block acceleration via radiation pressure from an ultraintense circularly polarized laser pulse with intensity I ≈ 10 22 W / cm 2 is investigated based on a double-target scheme, in which the targets are composed of a pre-target with a relatively low plasma density and a main target with a high plasma density. It has been demonstrated that an appropriately selected pre-target can help to greatly enhance the charge separation field in the main target, which then leads to generation of a strongly accelerated and well directed plasma block with proton energy in GeV magnitude. This result can have potential applications in the plasma block ignition of proton-born fusion.

  4. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corde, S; Adli, E; Allen, J M; An, W; Clarke, C I; Clausse, B; Clayton, C E; Delahaye, J P; Frederico, J; Gessner, S; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Litos, M; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Walz, D; Yakimenko, V

    2016-06-17

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. Here we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ∼150 GV m(-1), over ∼20 cm. The results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources.

  5. High-Energy Ion Acceleration Mechanisms in a Dense Plasma Focus Z-Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, D. P.; Link, A.; Schmidt, A.; Welch, D.

    2016-10-01

    The compression of a Z-pinch plasma, specifically in a dense plasma focus (DPF), is known to accelerate high-energy electrons, ions and, if using fusion-reactant ions (e.g. D, T), neutrons. The acceleration of particles is known to coincide with the peak constriction of the pinch, however, the exact physical mechanism responsible for the acceleration remains an area of debate and uncertainty. Recent work has suggested that this acceleration is linked to the growth of an m =0 (sausage) instability that evacuates a region of low-density, highly-magnetized plasma and creates a strong (>MV/cm) electric field. Using the fully kinetic particle-in-cell code LSP in 2D-3V, we simulate the compression of a 2 MA, 35 kV DPF plasma and investigate in detail the formation of the electric field. The electric field is found to be predominantly in the axial direction and driven via charge-separation effects related to the resistivity of the kinetic plasma. The strong electric and magnetic fields are shown to induce non-Maxwellian distributions in both the ions and electrons and lead to the acceleration of high-energy tails. We compare the results in the kinetic simulations to assumptions of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Beam dynamics in resonant plasma wakefield acceleration at SPARC_LAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, S.; Anania, M. P.; Chiadroni, E.; Croia, M.; Ferrario, M.; Marocchino, A.; Pompili, R.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2016-09-01

    Strategies to mitigate the increase of witness emittance and energy spread in beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration are investigated. Starting from the proposed resonant wakefield acceleration scheme in quasi-non-linear regime that is going to be carried out at SPARC_LAB, we performed systematic scans of the parameters to be used for drivers. The analysis will show that one of the main requirements to preserve witness quality during the acceleration is to have accelerating and focusing fields that are very stable during all the accelerating length. The difference between the dynamics of the leading bunch and the trailing bunch is pointed out. The classical condition on bunch length kpσz =√{ 2 } seems to be an ideal condition for the first driver within long accelerating lengths. The other drivers show to follow different longitudinal matching conditions. In the end a new method for the investigation of the matching for the first driver is introduced.

  7. Monte Carlo simulations for 20 MV X-ray spectrum reconstruction of a linear induction accelerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yi; LI Qin; JIANG Xiao-Guo

    2012-01-01

    To study the spectrum reconstruction of the 20 MV X-ray generated by the Dragon-I linear induction accelerator,the Monte Carlo method is applied to simulate the attenuations of the X-ray in the attenuators of different thicknesses and thus provide the transmission data.As is known,the spectrum estimation from transmission data is an ill-conditioned problem.The method based on iterative perturbations is employed to derive the X-ray spectra,where initial guesses are used to start the process.This algorithm takes into account not only the minimization of the differences between the measured and the calculated transmissions but also the smoothness feature of the spectrum function.In this work,various filter materials are put to use as the attenuator,and the condition for an accurate and robust solution of the X-ray spectrum calculation is demonstrated.The influences of the scattering photons within different intervals of emergence angle on the X-ray spectrum reconstruction are also analyzed.

  8. Linear induction accelerators at the Los Alamos National Laboratory DARHT facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nath, Subrata [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-07

    The Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory consists of two linear induction accelerators at right angles to each other. The First Axis, operating since 1999, produces a nominal 20-MeV, 2-kA single beam-pulse with 60-nsec width. In contrast, the DARHT Second Axis, operating since 2008, produces up to four pulses in a variable pulse format by slicing micro-pulses out of a longer {approx}1.6-microseconds (flat-top) pulse of nominal beam-energy and -current of 17 MeV and 2 kA respectively. Bremsstrahlung x-rays, shining on a hydro-dynamical experimental device, are produced by focusing the electron beam-pulses onto a high-Z target. Variable pulse-formats allow for adjustment of the pulse-to-pulse doses to record a time sequence of x-ray images of the explosively driven imploding mock device. Herein, we present a sampling of the numerous physics and engineering aspects along with the current status of the fully operational dual axes capability. First successful simultaneous use of both the axes for a hydrodynamic experiment was achieved in 2009.

  9. Design study of electron cyclotron resonance-ion plasma accelerator for heavy ion cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, T., E-mail: ttinoue@juntendo.ac.jp; Sugimoto, S.; Sasai, K. [Graduate School of Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo 113–8421 (Japan); Hattori, T. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263–0024 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance-Ion Plasma Accelerator (ECR-IPAC) device, which theoretically can accelerate multiple charged ions to several hundred MeV with short acceleration length, has been proposed. The acceleration mechanism is based on the combination of two physical principles, plasma electron ion adiabatic ejection (PLEIADE) and Gyromagnetic Autoresonance (GYRAC). In this study, we have designed the proof of principle machine ECR-IPAC device and simulated the electromagnetic field distribution generating in the resonance cavity. ECR-IPAC device consisted of three parts, ECR ion source section, GYRAC section, and PLEIADE section. ECR ion source section and PLEIADE section were designed using several multi-turn solenoid coils and sextupole magnets, and GYRAC section was designed using 10 turns coil. The structure of ECR-IPAC device was the cylindrical shape, and the total length was 1024 mm and the maximum diameter was 580 mm. The magnetic field distribution, which maintains the stable acceleration of plasma, was generated on the acceleration center axis throughout three sections. In addition, the electric field for efficient acceleration of electrons was generated in the resonance cavity by supplying microwave of 2.45 GHz.

  10. Surface Modification of Nanometre Silicon Carbide Powder with Polystyrene by Inductively Coupled Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Gang; MENG Yuedong; ZHONG Shaofeng; LIU Feng; JIANG Zhongqing; SHU Xingsheng; REN Zhaoxing; WANG Xiangke

    2008-01-01

    An investigation was made into polystyrene (PS) grafted onto nanometre sili-con carbide (SIC) particles. In our experiment, the grafting polymerization reaction was in-duced by a radio frequency (RF) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) treatment of the nanome-tre powder. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectrum) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spec-troscopy) results reveal that PS is grafted onto the surface of silicon carbide powder. An analysis is presented on the effectiveness of this approach as a function of plasma operating variables including the plasma treating power, treating time, and grafting reaction temperature and time.

  11. Solid Carbon Produced in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch with a Titan Like Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Vacher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid carbon is deposited on the surfaces of an inductively coupled plasma torch operating with a Titan like atmosphere plasma gas. The frame of the initial research is the study of the radiative properties of plasma encountered around a spacecraft during its hypersonic entry in upper layers of planetary atmosphere. Deposition of carbon is observed not only on the quartz tube outside the inductor but also on the ceramic protection of the torch injector. Carbon exhibits two types of morphology more or less dense and it is analyzed by various analytic devices as MEB, SEM, TEM, EDS and Raman spectroscopy. The gathered carbon powder shows the presence of nanostructured particles.

  12. A theory of two-beam acceleration of charged particles in a plasma waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrovsky, A.O. [Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology (Ukraine)

    1993-11-01

    The progress made in recent years in the field of high-current relativistic electron beam (REB) generation has aroused a considerable interest in studying REB potentialities for charged particle acceleration with a high acceleration rate T = 100MeV/m. It was proposed, in particular, to employ high-current REB in two-beam acceleration schemes (TBA). In these schemes high current REB (driving beam) excites intense electromagnetic waves in the electrodynamic structure which, in their turn, accelerate particles of the other beam (driven beam). The TBA schemes can be divided into two groups. The first group includes the schemes, where the two beams (driving and driven) propagate in different electrodynamic structures coupled with each other through the waveguides which ensure the microwave power transmission to accelerate driven beam particles. The second group includes the TBA schemes, where the driving and driven beams propagate in one electrodynamic structure. The main aim of this work is to demonstrate by theory the possibility of realizing effectively the TBA scheme in the plasma waveguide. The physical model of the TBA scheme under study is formulated. A set of equations describing the excitation of RF fields by a high-current REB and the acceleration of driven beam electrons is also derived. Results are presented on the the linear theory of plasma wave amplification by the driving beam. The range of system parameters, at which the plasma-beam instability develops, is defined. Results of numerical simulation of the TBA scheme under study are also presented. The same section gives the description of the dynamics of accelerated particle bunching in the high-current REB-excited field. Estimates are given for the accelerating field intensities in the plasma and electron acceleration rates.

  13. Relationship between the discharge mode and the spatial oxygen plasma distribution in a large size ferrite inductively coupled plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jun [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); R and D Center for PSK-INC Corporation, Hwaseong-si 445-170 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hye Ju; Cho, Jeong Hee; Chae, Hee Sun [R and D Center for PSK-INC Corporation, Hwaseong-si 445-170 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Hwan [Department of Nanoscale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chin-Wook, E-mail: joykang@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    The electrical characteristics and the spatial distribution of oxygen plasma according to the number of turns in ferrite inductively coupled plasmas (ferrite ICPs) are investigated. Through a new ICP model, which includes the capacitive coupling and the power loss of the ferrite material with the conventional ICP model, the variation of the oxygen discharge characteristics depending on the number of turns is simply understood by the electrical measurement, such as the antenna voltages and the currents. As the number of the turns increases, the capacitive coupling dominantly affects the spatial plasma distribution. This capacitive coupling results in a center focused density profile along the radial direction. In spite of the same discharge conditions (discharge chamber, neutral gas, and pressure), the spatial plasma distribution over 450 mm has drastic changes by increasing number of the turns. In addition, the effect of the negative species to the density profile is compared with the argon discharge characteristics at the same discharge configuration.

  14. Letter of Intent for a Demonstration Experiment in Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Assmann, R; Bingham, R; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Delerue, N; Dias, F M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Elsen, E; Fartoukh, S; Ferreira, C M; Fonseca, R A; Geschonke, G; Goddard, B; Gruelke, O; Hessler, C; Hillenbrand, S; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jarozinsky, D; Jolly, S; Joshi, C; Kumar, N; Lu, W; Lopes, N; Kaur, M; Lotov, K; Malka, V; Meddahi, M; Mete, O; Mori, W B; Mueller, A; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Norreys, P; Osterhoff, J; Pozimski, J; Pukhov, A; Reimann, O; Roesler, S; Ruhl, H; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, B; Schmitt, H v d; Schoening, A; Seryi, A; Simon, F; Silva, L O; Tajima, T; Trines, R; Tueckmantel, T; Upadhyay, A; Vieira, J; Willi, O; Wing, M; Xia, G; Yakimenko, V; Yan, X; Zimmermann, F; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2011-01-01

    We propose an experiment on proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PDPWA) which could lead to a future TeV-scale e+- collider of much reduced length compared to conventional designs. Proton bunches are ideal drivers for high energy lepton accelerators, with the potential of reducing drastically the number of required driver stages. By using a plasma to modulate a long proton bunch, a strong plasma wave can be generated by a series of ‘micro-bunches’, so that an experimental program can start today with the existing proton beams. In this letter of intent, we propose a demonstration experiment using the existing CERN SPS beam. This project would be the first beam-driven wakefield acceleration experiment in Europe, and the first proton-driven plasma-wakefield acceleration experiment worldwide. We have set as an initial goal the demonstration of 1 GeV energy gain for electrons in 10 m of plasma. A proposal for reaching 100 GeV within 100 m of plasma will be developed using results from the initial roun...

  15. Controlled Electron Injection into Plasma Accelerators and SpaceCharge Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fubiani, Gwenael G.J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-09-01

    Plasma based accelerators are capable of producing electron sources which are ultra-compact (a few microns) and high energies (up to hundreds of MeVs) in much shorter distances than conventional accelerators. This is due to the large longitudinal electric field that can be excited without the limitation of breakdown as in RF structures.The characteristic scale length of the accelerating field is the plasma wavelength and for typical densities ranging from 1018 - 1019 cm-3, the accelerating fields and scale length can hence be on the order of 10-100GV/m and 10-40 μm, respectively. The production of quasimonoenergetic beams was recently obtained in a regime relying on self-trapping of background plasma electrons, using a single laser pulse for wakefield generation. In this dissertation, we study the controlled injection via the beating of two lasers (the pump laser pulse creating the plasma wave and a second beam being propagated in opposite direction) which induce a localized injection of background plasma electrons. The aim of this dissertation is to describe in detail the physics of optical injection using two lasers, the characteristics of the electron beams produced (the micrometer scale plasma wavelength can result in femtosecond and even attosecond bunches) as well as a concise estimate of the effects of space charge on the dynamics of an ultra-dense electron bunch with a large energy spread.

  16. Field-reversed bubble in deep plasma channels for high quality electron acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Pukhov, A; Tueckmantel, T; Thomas, J; Kostyukov, I Yu

    2014-01-01

    We study hollow plasma channels with smooth boundaries for laser-driven electron acceleration in the bubble regime. Contrary to the uniform plasma case, the laser forms no optical shock and no etching at the front. This increases the effective bubble phase velocity and energy gain. The longitudinal field has a plateau that allows for mono-energetic acceleration. We observe as low as 10^{-3} r.m.s. relative witness beam energy uncertainty in each cross-section and 0.3% total energy spread. By varying plasma density profile inside a deep channel, the bubble fields can be adjusted to balance the laser depletion and dephasing lengths. Bubble scaling laws for the deep channel are derived. Ultra-short pancake-like laser pulses lead to the highest energies of accelerated electrons per Joule of laser pulse energy.

  17. Magnetowave Induced Plasma Wakefield Acceleration for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Feng-Yin; Lin, Guey-Lin; Reil, Kevin; Sydora, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Magnetowave induced plasma wakefield acceleration (MPWA) in a relativistic astrophysical outflow has been proposed as a viable mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic particles to ultra high energies. Here we present simulation results that clearly demonstrate the viability of this mechanism for the first time. We invoke the high frequency and high speed whistler mode for the driving pulse. The plasma wakefield so induced validates precisely the theoretical prediction. We show that under appropriate conditions, the plasma wakefield maintains very high coherence and can sustain high-gradient acceleration over a macroscopic distance. Invoking gamma ray burst (GRB) as the source, we show that MPWA production of ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) beyond ZeV 10^21 eV is possible.

  18. Field-reversed bubble in deep plasma channels for high quality electron acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Pukhov, A; Tueckmantel, T; Thomas, J; Yu, I; Kostyukov, Yu

    2014-01-01

    We study hollow plasma channels with smooth boundaries for laser-driven electron acceleration in the bubble regime. Contrary to the uniform plasma case, the laser forms no optical shock and no etching at the front. This increases the effective bubble phase velocity and energy gain. The longitudinal field has a plateau that allows for mono-energetic acceleration. We observe as low as 10−3 r.m.s. relative witness beam energy uncertainty in each cross-section and 0.3% total energy spread. By varying plasma density profile inside a deep channel, the bubble fields can be adjusted to balance the laser depletion and dephasing lengths. Bubble scaling laws for the deep channel are derived. Ultra-short pancake-like laser pulses lead to the highest energies of accelerated electrons per Joule of laser pulse energy.

  19. Laser-plasma electron accelerator for all-optical inverse Compton X-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, K. [University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)], E-mail: koyama@nuclear.jp; Yamazaki, A.; Maekawa, A.; Uesaka, M. [University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Hosokai, T. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuda-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Miyashita, M. [Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Masuda, S.; Miura, E. [AIST, Tsukuba-central-2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2009-09-01

    Inverse Compton scattering has been gaining attention as a process for the generation of X/{gamma}-ray, since it produces tunable X/{gamma}-ray pulses with a small cone angle of radiation. A table-top tunable Compton X/{gamma}-ray source would be realized by replacing a radio frequency (rf) linac with a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA), which is one of the advanced accelerators. An empirical scaling law for the LWFA in the self-injection mode showed that the energy gain was inversely proportional to the plasma density. In order to effectively employ the LWFA as a Compton X/{gamma}-ray source, its stability must be improved. For this purpose, we are developing techniques for the injection of initial electrons by a localized wavebreaking at the density ramp of a plasma. The pointing stability and acceleration efficiency of the electron beam were significantly improved by applying an axial magnetic field to the plasma channel.

  20. Langmuir probe study of an inductively coupled magnetic-pole-enhanced helium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younus, Maria; Rehman, N. U.; Shafiq, M.; Naeem, M.; Zaka-ul-Islam, M.; Zakaullah, M.

    2017-03-01

    This study reports the effects of RF power and filling gas pressure variation on the plasma parameters, including the electron number density n e , electron temperature T e , plasma potential V p , skin depth δ, and electron energy probability functions (EEPFs) in a low-pressure inductively coupled helium plasma source with magnetic pole enhancement. An RF compensated Langmuir probe is used to measure these plasma parameters. It is observed that the electron number density increases with both the RF power and the filling gas pressure. Conversely, the electron temperature decreases with increasing RF power and gas pressure. It is also noted that, at low RF powers and gas pressures, the EEPFs are non-Maxwellian, while at RF powers of ≥50 W, they evolve into a Maxwellian distribution. The dependences of the skin depth and plasma potential on the RF power are also studied and show a decreasing trend.

  1. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Induced Etch Damage of GaN p-n Junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHUL,RANDY J.; ZHANG,LEI; BACA,ALBERT G.; WILLISON,CHRISTI LEE; HAN,JUNG; PEARTON,S.J.; REN,F.

    1999-11-03

    Plasma-induced etch damage can degrade the electrical and optical performance of III-V nitride electronic and photonic devices. We have investigated the etch-induced damage of an Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) etch system on the electrical performance of mesa-isolated GaN pn-junction diodes. GaN p-i-n mesa diodes were formed by Cl{sub 2}/BCl{sub 3}/Ar ICP etching under different plasma conditions. The reverse leakage current in the mesa diodes showed a strong relationship to chamber pressure, ion energy, and plasma flux. Plasma induced damage was minimized at moderate flux conditions ({le} 500 W), pressures {ge}2 mTorr, and at ion energies below approximately -275 V.

  2. Observation of longitudinal and transverse self-injections in laser-plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Corde, S; Lifschitz, A; Lambert, G; Phuoc, K Ta; Davoine, X; Lehe, R; Douillet, D; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators can produce high quality electron beams, up to giga-electronvolts in energy, from a centimeter scale device. The properties of the electron beams and the accelerator stability are largely determined by the injection stage of electrons into the accelerator. The simplest mechanism of injection is self-injection, in which the wakefield is strong enough to trap cold plasma electrons into the laser wake. The main drawback of this method is its lack of shot-to-shot stability. Here we present experimental and numerical results that demonstrate the existence of two different self-injection mechanisms. Transverse self-injection is shown to lead to low stability and poor quality electron beams, because of a strong dependence on the intensity profile of the laser pulse. In contrast, longitudinal injection, which is unambiguously observed for the first time, is shown to lead to much more stable acceleration and higher quality electron beams.

  3. Observation of longitudinal and transverse self-injections in laser-plasma accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corde, S; Thaury, C; Lifschitz, A; Lambert, G; Ta Phuoc, K; Davoine, X; Lehe, R; Douillet, D; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators can produce high-quality electron beams, up to giga electronvolts in energy, from a centimetre scale device. The properties of the electron beams and the accelerator stability are largely determined by the injection stage of electrons into the accelerator. The simplest mechanism of injection is self-injection, in which the wakefield is strong enough to trap cold plasma electrons into the laser wake. The main drawback of this method is its lack of shot-to-shot stability. Here we present experimental and numerical results that demonstrate the existence of two different self-injection mechanisms. Transverse self-injection is shown to lead to low stability and poor-quality electron beams, because of a strong dependence on the intensity profile of the laser pulse. In contrast, longitudinal injection, which is unambiguously observed for the first time, is shown to lead to much more stable acceleration and higher-quality electron beams.

  4. Mechanism and operation parameters of a plasma-driven micro-particle accelerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG JianGuo; FENG ChunHua; HAN dianWei; LI HongWei; CAI MingHui; LI XiaoYin; ZHANG ZhenLong; CHEN ZhaoFeng; WANG Long; YANG XuanZong

    2009-01-01

    There is a large amount of micro debris ranging between millimeters and micrometers in space, which has significant influence on the reliability and life of spacecrafts through long-duration integrated im-pacts and has to be considered in designing a vehicle's suitability to the space environment. In order to simulate the micro-impacts on exposed materials, a plasma-driven micro-particle accelerator was de-veloped. The major processes, including the acceleration, compression and ejection of plasmas, were modeled. By comparing the theoretical simulations with the experimental results, the acceleration mechanism was clarified. Moreover, through a series of experiments, the optimum operation range was investigated, and the acceleration ability was primarily determined.

  5. A compact laser-driven plasma accelerator for megaelectronvolt-energy neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeev, R.; Madhu Trivikram, T.; Rishad, K. P. M.; Narayanan, V.; Krishnakumar, E.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2013-03-01

    Tremendous strides have been made in charged-particle acceleration using intense, ultrashort laser pulses. Accelerating neutral atoms is an important complementary technology because such particles are unaffected by electric and magnetic fields and can thus penetrate deeper into a target than ions. However, compact laser-based accelerators for neutral atoms are limited at best to millielectronvolt energies. Here, we report the generation of megaelectronvolt-energy argon atoms from an optical-field-ionized dense nanocluster ensemble. Measurements reveal that nearly every laser-accelerated ion is converted to an energetic neutral atom as a result of highly efficient electron transfer from Rydberg excited clusters, within a sheath around the laser focus. This process, although optimal in nanoclusters, is generic and adaptable to most laser-produced plasmas. Such compact laser-driven energetic neutral atom sources could have applications in fast atom lithography for surface science and tokamak diagnostics in plasma technology.

  6. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scisciò, M.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Antici, P.

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  7. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scisciò, M.; Antici, P., E-mail: patrizio.antici@polytechnique.edu [INFN-RM1 and SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza,” Via Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); INRS-EMT, Université du Québec, 1650 Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L. [INFN-RM1 and SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza,” Via Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); Papaphilippou, Y. [CERN, CH 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-03-07

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  8. Simulations of the Acceleration of Externally Injected Electrons in a Plasma Excited in the Linear Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Delerue, Nicolas; Jenzer, Stéphane; Kazamias, Sophie; Lucas, Bruno; Maynard, Gilles; Pittman, Moana

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated numerically the coupling between a 10 \\si{MeV} electron bunch of high charge (\\SI{> 100}{pc}) with a laser generated accelerating plasma wave. Our results show that a high efficiency coupling can be achieved using a \\SI{50}{TW}, \\SI{100}{\\micro \\meter} wide laser beam, yielding accelerating field above \\SI{1}{ GV/m}. We propose an experiment where these predictions could be tested.

  9. Emittance Growth Due to Multiple Coulomb Scattering in a Linear Collider Based on Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Mete, Oznur; Xia, Guoxing; Labiche, Marc; Karamyshev, Oleg; Wei, Yelong; Welsch, Carsten; Wing, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Alternative acceleration technologies are currently under development for cost-effective, robust, compact and efficient solutions. One such technology is plasma wakefield acceleration, driven by either a charged particle or laser beam. However, the potential issues must be studied in detail. In this paper, the emittance growth of the witness beam through elastic scattering from gaseous media is derived. The model is compared with the numerical studies.

  10. Ion acceleration from intense laser-generated plasma: methods, diagnostics and possible applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrisi Lorenzo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many parameters of non-equilibrium plasma generated by high intensity and fast lasers depend on the pulse intensity and the laser wavelength. In conditions favourable for the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA regime the ion acceleration from the rear side of the target can be enhanced by increasing the thin foil absorbance through the use of nanoparticles and nanostructures promoting the surface plasmon resonance effect. In conditions favourable for the backward plasma acceleration (BPA regime, when thick targets are used, a special role is played by the laser focal position with respect to the target surface, a proper choice of which may result in induced self-focusing effects and non-linear acceleration enhancement. SiC detectors employed in the time-of-flight (TOF configuration and a Thomson parabola spectrometer permit on-line diagnostics of the ion streams emitted at high kinetic energies. The target composition and geometry, apart from the laser parameters and to the irradiation conditions, allow further control of the plasma characteristics and can be varied by using advanced targets to reach the maximum ion acceleration. Measurements using advanced targets with enhanced the laser absorption effect in thin films are presented. Applications of accelerated ions in the field of ion source, hadrontherapy and nuclear physics are discussed.

  11. Particle-in-Cell Codes for plasma-based particle acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Pukhov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Basic principles of particle-in-cell (PIC ) codes with the main application for plasma-based acceleration are discussed. The ab initio full electromagnetic relativistic PIC codes provide the most reliable description of plasmas. Their properties are considered in detail. Representing the most fundamental model, the full PIC codes are computationally expensive. The plasma-based acceler- ation is a multi-scale problem with very disparate scales. The smallest scale is the laser or plasma wavelength (from one to hundred microns) and the largest scale is the acceleration distance (from a few centimeters to meters or even kilometers). The Lorentz-boost technique allows to reduce the scale disparity at the costs of complicating the simulations and causing unphysical numerical instabilities in the code. Another possibility is to use the quasi-static approxi- mation where the disparate scales are separated analytically.

  12. Collisionless electrostatic shock formation and ion acceleration in intense laser interactions with near critical density plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, M; Li, Y T; Yuan, D W; Chen, M; Mulser, P; Sheng, Z M; Murakami, M; Yu, L L; Zheng, X L; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    Laser-driven collisonless electrostatic shock formation and the subsequent ion acceleration have been studied in near critical density plasmas. Particle-in-cell simulations show that both the speed of laser-driven collisionless electrostatic shock and the energies of shock-accelerated ions can be greatly enhanced due to fast laser propagation in near critical density plasmas. However, a response time longer than tens of laser wave cycles is required before the shock formation in a near critical density plasma, in contrast to the quick shock formation in a highly overdense target. More important, we find that some ions can be reflected by the collisionless shock even if the electrostatic potential jump across the shock is smaller than the ion kinetic energy in the shock frame, which seems against the conventional ion-reflection condition. These anomalous ion reflections are attributed to the strongly time-oscillating electric field accompanying laser-driven collisionless shock in a near critical density plasma...

  13. The influence of plasma density decreasement by pre-pulse on the laser wakefield acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Gong Dong

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the laser wakefield acceleration, the generation of electron beam is very sensitive to the plasma density. Not only the laser-wakefield interaction, but also the electron trapping and acceleration would be effected by the plasma density. However, the plasma density could be changed in the experiment by different reasons, which will result in the mismatch of parameters arranged initially. Forward Raman scattering spectrum demonstrated that the interaction density was decreased obviously in the experiment, which was verified by the pre-pulse conditions and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It was demonstrated that the plasma density was very important on the self-evolutions and energy coupling of laser pulse and wakefield, and eventually the energy spectrum of electron beam.

  14. Acceleration of Plasma Flows Due to Inverse Dynamo Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Mahajan, S M; Mikeladze, S V; Sigua, K I; Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Shatashvili, Nana L.; Mikeladze, Solomon V.; Sigua, Ketevan I.

    2005-01-01

    The "inverse-dynamo" mechanism - the amplification/generation of fast plasma flows by short scale (turbulent) magnetic fields via magneto-fluid coupling is recognized and explored. It is shown that large-scale magnetic fields and flows are generated simultaneously and proportionately from short scale fields and flows. The stronger the short-scale driver, the stronger are the large-scale products. Stellar and astrophysical applications are suggested.

  15. Particle physicist's dreams about PetaelectronVolt laser plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesztergombi, G. [KFKI-RMKI. 1525-H Budapest P.O.B. 49. (Hungary)

    2012-07-09

    Present day accelerators are working well in the multi TeV energy scale and one is expecting exciting results in the coming years. Conventional technologies, however, can offer only incremental (factor 2 or 3) increase in beam energies which does not follow the usual speed of progress in the frontiers of high energy physics. Laser plasma accelerators theoretically provide unique possibilities to achieve orders of magnitude increases entering the PetaelectronVolt (PeV) energy range. It will be discussed what kind of new perspectives could be opened for the physics at this new energy scale. What type of accelerators would be required?.

  16. Collider design issues based on proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, G., E-mail: guoxing.xia@manchester.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Mete, O. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Aimidula, A.; Welsch, C.P. [The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); The University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Chattopadhyay, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); The University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mandry, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Wing, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Deutsche Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-03-11

    Recent simulations have shown that a high-energy proton bunch can excite strong plasma wakefields and accelerate a bunch of electrons to the energy frontier in a single stage of acceleration. It therefore paves the way towards a compact future collider design using the proton beams from existing high-energy proton machines, e.g. Tevatron or the LHC. This paper addresses some key issues in designing a compact electron–positron linear collider and an electron–proton collider based on the existing CERN accelerator infrastructure.

  17. Collider design issues based on proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, G; Aimidula, A; Welsch, C; Chattopadhyay, S; Mandry, S; Wing, M

    2014-01-01

    Recent simulations have shown that a high-energy proton bunch can excite strong plasma wakefields and accelerate a bunch of electrons to the energy frontier in a single stage of acceleration. It therefore paves the way towards a compact future collider design using the proton beams from existing high-energy proton machines, e.g. Tevatron or the LHC. This paper addresses some key issues in designing a compact electron-positron linear collider and an electron-proton collider based on existing CERN accelerator infrastructure.

  18. Determination of trace elements in petroleum products by inductively coupled plasma techniques: A critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez, Raquel [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Food Sciences, P.O. Box 99, 03080, Alicante (Spain); Todolí, José Luis, E-mail: jose.todoli@ua.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Food Sciences, P.O. Box 99, 03080, Alicante (Spain); Lienemann, Charles-Philippe [IFP Energies Nouvelles, Rond-point de l' échangeur de Solaize, BP 3, F-69360 Solaize (France); Mermet, Jean-Michel [Spectroscopy Forever, 01390 Tramoyes (France)

    2013-10-01

    The fundamentals, applications and latter developments of petroleum products analysis through inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are revisited in the present bibliographic survey. Sample preparation procedures for the direct analysis of fuels by using liquid sample introduction systems are critically reviewed and compared. The most employed methods are sample dilution, emulsion or micro-emulsion preparation and sample decomposition. The first one is the most widely employed due to its simplicity. Once the sample has been prepared, an organic matrix is usually present. The performance of the sample introduction system (i.e., nebulizer and spray chamber) depends strongly upon the nature and properties of the solution finally obtained. Many different devices have been assayed and the obtained results are shown. Additionally, samples can be introduced into the plasma by using an electrothermal vaporization (ETV) device or a laser ablation system (LA). The recent results published in the literature showing the feasibility, advantages and drawbacks of latter alternatives are also described. Therefore, the main goal of the review is the discussion of the different approaches developed for the analysis of crude oil and its derivates by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) techniques. - Highlights: • Analysis of petroleum products by inductively coupled plasma techniques is revisited. • Fundamental studies are included together with reports dealing with applications. • Conventional and non-conventional sample introduction methods are considered. • Sample preparation methods are critically compared and described.

  19. Numerical Simulations of Low Pressure Inductively Coupled Plasmas in Geometrically Complex Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ben; Wu, Hanming; Krishnan, Anantha

    1996-10-01

    A two-dimensional fluid model has been developed for simulation of low pressure inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactors. The model obtains solutions for the plasma density, electron temperature, and electric field for the given operating conditions. The physical phenomena and processes such as ambipolar diffusion, thermal diffusion, quasi-neutrality, ionization, inductive Joule heating, and excitations are considered in the model. A significant feature of the model is its capability of handling complex geometries that are often encountered in industrial reactors. Complex reactor geometries are modeled by a body-fitted-coordinate (BFC) formulation. A series of numerical experiments have been conducted using the model to study effects of various parameters such as chamber pressure, size of the wafer, position of the inductive coil, and the power input into the plasma. Different reactor geometries such as the GEC ICP reference cell and the belljar reactor have been simulated. The results of the parametric experiments are presented to show certain systematic trends in performance parameters such as uniformity and processing rates. The ICP model has been coupled to a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code (capable of 3D simulations) that obtains the flow and pressure distribution inside the chamber. The ICP model will use pressure predictions (from the CFD model) to compute the local ionization rates. Chemical source/sink terms from the plasma dissociation model will be used by the CFD code to account for local reactant depletion effects.

  20. Plasma Processing of SRF Cavities for the next Generation Of Particle Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuskovic, Leposava

    2015-11-23

    The cost-effective production of high frequency accelerating fields are the foundation for the next generation of particle accelerators. The Ar/Cl2 plasma etching technology holds the promise to yield a major reduction in cavity preparation costs. Plasma-based dry niobium surface treatment provides an excellent opportunity to remove bulk niobium, eliminate surface imperfections, increase cavity quality factor, and bring accelerating fields to higher levels. At the same time, the developed technology will be more environmentally friendly than the hydrogen fluoride-based wet etching technology. Plasma etching of inner surfaces of standard multi-cell SRF cavities is the main goal of this research in order to eliminate contaminants, including niobium oxides, in the penetration depth region. Successful plasma processing of multi-cell cavities will establish this method as a viable technique in the quest for more efficient components of next generation particle accelerators. In this project the single-cell pill box cavity plasma etching system is developed and etching conditions are determined. An actual single cell SRF cavity (1497 MHz) is plasma etched based on the pill box cavity results. The first RF test of this plasma etched cavity at cryogenic temperature is obtained. The system can also be used for other surface modifications, including tailoring niobium surface properties, surface passivation or nitriding for better performance of SRF cavities. The results of this plasma processing technology may be applied to most of the current SRF cavity fabrication projects. In the course of this project it has been demonstrated that a capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharge can be successfully used for etching curved niobium surfaces, in particular the inner walls of SRF cavities. The results could also be applicable to the inner or concave surfaces of any 3D structure other than an SRF cavity.

  1. Direct acceleration of electrons by a CO2 laser in a curved plasma waveguide

    OpenAIRE

    Longqing Yi; Alexander Pukhov; Baifei Shen

    2016-01-01

    Laser plasma interaction with micro-engineered targets at relativistic intensities has been greatly promoted by recent progress in the high contrast lasers and the manufacture of advanced micro- and nano-structures. This opens new possibilities for the physics of laser-matter interaction. Here we propose a novel approach that leverages the advantages of high-pressure CO$_{2}$ laser, laser-waveguide interaction, as well as micro-engineered plasma structure to accelerate electrons to peak energ...

  2. Injection to rapid diffusive shock acceleration at perpendicular shocks in partially ionized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional hybrid simulation of a collisionless perpendicular shock in a partially ionized plasma for the first time. In this simulation, the shock velocity and the upstream ionization fraction are Vsh ~ 1333 km/s and fi ~ 0.5, that are typical values for isolated young supernova remnants in the interstellar medium. We confirm previous two-dimensional simulation results that downstream hydrogen atoms leak into the upstream region, they are accelerated by the pickup process in the upstream region, and large magnetic field fluctuations are generated both in the upstream and downstream regions. In addition, we find that the magnetic field fluctuations have three-dimensional structures and the leaking hydrogen atoms are injected to the diffusive shock acceleration at the perpendicular shock after the pickup process. The observed diffusive shock acceleration can be interpreted as the shock drift acceleration with scattering. Particles are accelerated to v ~ 100 Vsh ~ 0.3c within ~ 100 gyroperio...

  3. Ge post-acceleration from laser-generated plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrida, L.; Torrisi, L.; Calcagnile, L.; Rosinski, M.

    2010-11-01

    An Nd:YAG laser, 1064 nm wavelength, 9 ns pulse width, 300-900 mJ pulse energy and 10 10 W/cm 2 intensity is employed to ablate a solid Ge target placed in high vacuum. Ions are produced in vacuum and are emitted mainly along the normal to the target surface. The free ion expansion process occurs in a constant-potential chamber placed at 30 kV positive voltage with respect to the ground. The post-acceleration system permits to extract Ge ions with energy proportional to the charge state. Ion Energy Analyzer (IEA) is employed to measure the energy-to-charge ratio of the Ge ions without and with the use of the post-acceleration system. The ion energy distribution can be measured from time-of-flight measurements. Multi-energetic ion implantation has been performed on Silicon substrates. Ge depth profiles, measured through RBS analysis are in good agreement with IEA spectroscopy measurements.

  4. Ge post-acceleration from laser-generated plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuffrida, L., E-mail: lorenzogiuffrida@lns.infn.i [INFN-LNS di Catania, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy) and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Messina, Ctr. Papardo 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Torrisi, L. [INFN-LNS di Catania, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Messina, Ctr. Papardo 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Calcagnile, L. [CEDAD, Dip.to di Ing. dell' Innov., Universita di Lecce, Via Monteroni, 73100, Lecce (Italy); Rosinski, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, 23 Hery Str. 01-497 Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-11-11

    An Nd:YAG laser, 1064 nm wavelength, 9 ns pulse width, 300-900 mJ pulse energy and 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2} intensity is employed to ablate a solid Ge target placed in high vacuum. Ions are produced in vacuum and are emitted mainly along the normal to the target surface. The free ion expansion process occurs in a constant-potential chamber placed at 30 kV positive voltage with respect to the ground. The post-acceleration system permits to extract Ge ions with energy proportional to the charge state. Ion Energy Analyzer (IEA) is employed to measure the energy-to-charge ratio of the Ge ions without and with the use of the post-acceleration system. The ion energy distribution can be measured from time-of-flight measurements. Multi-energetic ion implantation has been performed on Silicon substrates. Ge depth profiles, measured through RBS analysis are in good agreement with IEA spectroscopy measurements.

  5. Transport line for a multi-staged laser-plasma acceleration: DACTOMUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chancé, Antoine; Delferrière, Olivier; Schwindling, Jérôme; Bruni, Christelle; Delerue, Nicolas; Specka, Arnd; Cros, Brgitte; Maynard, Gillies; Paradkar, Bhooshan S.; Mora, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Laser-plasma acceleration is one of the most promising techniques to reach very high acceleration gradients up to a few hundreds of GeV/m. In order to push this acceleration scheme in the domain of the very high energies, the CILEX project was launched with the laser APOLLON. One of the main topics of this project is to study multi-staged acceleration. It consists in generating and pre-accelerating electrons in a first laser-plasma stage, to transport them up to a second stage where the electrons are accelerated again thanks to another laser pulse. The DACTOMUS project, based on a collaboration CEA-IRFU, CEA-IRAMIS, LAL, LPGP, LULI and LLR, aims at the study and realization of such a transfer line between these two stages. Firstly, a prototype will be developed and tested by the groups of CEA-IRAMIS-SPAM, LPGP, and LULI on the UHI100 facility (CEA-SPAM). This collaboration must enable to realize the first acceleration stage. For the transport line prototype, the main difficulties are to realize a very compact and energy accepting line with diagnostics to characterize the electron beam. We will present here the optics of this line, its performances and the inserted diagnostics.

  6. Transport line for a multi-staged laser-plasma acceleration: DACTOMUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chancé, Antoine, E-mail: antoine.chance@cea.fr [CEA, IRFU, SACM, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Delferrière, Olivier; Schwindling, Jérôme [CEA, IRFU, SACM, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bruni, Christelle; Delerue, Nicolas [LAL, UMR9607, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Specka, Arnd [LLR, UMR7638, CNRS and Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Cros, Brgitte; Maynard, Gillies; Paradkar, Bhooshan S. [LPGP, UMR8578, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Mora, Patrick [CPhT, UMR7644, CNRS and Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France)

    2014-03-11

    Laser-plasma acceleration is one of the most promising techniques to reach very high acceleration gradients up to a few hundreds of GeV/m. In order to push this acceleration scheme in the domain of the very high energies, the CILEX project was launched with the laser APOLLON. One of the main topics of this project is to study multi-staged acceleration. It consists in generating and pre-accelerating electrons in a first laser-plasma stage, to transport them up to a second stage where the electrons are accelerated again thanks to another laser pulse. The DACTOMUS project, based on a collaboration CEA-IRFU, CEA-IRAMIS, LAL, LPGP, LULI and LLR, aims at the study and realization of such a transfer line between these two stages. Firstly, a prototype will be developed and tested by the groups of CEA-IRAMIS-SPAM, LPGP, and LULI on the UHI100 facility (CEA-SPAM). This collaboration must enable to realize the first acceleration stage. For the transport line prototype, the main difficulties are to realize a very compact and energy accepting line with diagnostics to characterize the electron beam. We will present here the optics of this line, its performances and the inserted diagnostics.

  7. Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: a path to the future of high-energy particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Buttenschön, B; Butterworth, A; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Cipiccia, S; Feldbaumer, E; Fonseca, R A; Goddard, B; Gross, M; Grulke, O; Gschwendtner, E; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jaroszynski, D; Jolly, S; Kempkes, P; Lopes, N; Lotov, K; Machacek, J; Mandry, S R; McKenzie, J W; Meddahi, M; Militsyn, B L; Moschuering, N; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Noakes, T C Q; Norreys, P A; Öz, E; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Pukhov, A; Rieger, K; Reimann, O; Ruhl, H; Shaposhnikova, E; Silva, L O; Sosedkin, A; Tarkeshian, R; Trines, R M G N; Tückmantel, T; Vieira, J; Vincke, H; Wing, M; Xia G , G

    2014-01-01

    New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN { the AWAKE experiment { has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

  8. Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: a path to the future of high-energy particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Buttenschon, B; Butterworth, A; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Cipiccia, S; Feldbaumer, E; Fonseca, R A; Goddard, B; Gross, M; Grulke, O; Gschwendtner, E; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jaroszynski, D; Jolly, S; Kempkes, P; Lopes, N; Lotov, K; Machacek, J; Mandry, S R; McKenzie, J W; Meddahi, M; Militsyn, B L; Moschuering, N; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Noakes, T C Q; Norreys, P A; Oz, E; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Pukhov, A; Rieger, K; Reimann, O; Ruhl, H; Shaposhnikova, E; Silva, L O; Sosedkin, A; Tarkeshian, R; Trines, R M G N; Tuckmantel, T; Vieira, J; Vincke, H; Wing, M; Xia, G

    2014-01-01

    New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN -- the AWAKE experiment -- has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

  9. Direct imaging of the dynamics of a laser-plasma accelerator operating in the bubble-regime

    CERN Document Server

    Sävert, A; Schnell, M; Cole, J M; Nicolai, M; Reuter, M; Schwab, M B; Möller, M; Poder, K; Jäckel, O; Paulus, G G; Spielmann, C; Najmudin, Z; Kaluza, M C

    2014-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators operating in the bubble-regime generate quasi-monoenergetic multi-gigaelectronvolt electron beams with femtosecond duration and micrometre size. These beams are produced by accelerating in laser-driven plasma waves in only centimetre distances. Hence they have the potential to be compact alternatives to conventional accelerators. However, since the plasma wave moves at ultra-relativistic speed making detailed observation extremely difficult, most of our current understanding has been gained from high-performance computer simulations. Here, we present experimental results from an ultra-fast optical imaging technique visualising for the first time the non-linear dynamics in a laser-plasma accelerator. By freezing the relativistic motion of the plasma wave, our measurements reveal insight of unprecedented detail. In particular, we observe the plasma wave's non-linear formation, breaking, and transformation into a single bubble for the first time. Understanding the acceleration dynamics ...

  10. Advanced beam dynamics and diagnostics concepts for laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dornmair, Irene

    2017-05-15

    Laser-Plasma Accelerators (LPAs) combine a multitude of unique features, which makes them very attractive as drivers for next generation brilliant light sources including compact X-ray free-electron lasers. They provide high accelerating gradients, thereby drastically shrinking the accelerator size, while at the same time the produced electron bunches are intrinsically as short as a few femtoseconds and carry high peak currents. LPA are subject of very active research, yet, the field currently faces the challenge of improving the beam quality, and achieving stable and well-controlled injection and acceleration. This thesis tackles this issue from three different sides. A novellongitudinal phase space diagnostics is proposed that employs the strong fields present in plasma wakefields to streak ultrashort electron bunches. This allows for a temporal resolution down to the attosecond range, enabling direct determination to the current profile and the slice energy spread, both crucial quantities for the performance of free-electron lasers. Furthermore, adiabatic matching sections at the plasma-vacuum boundary are investigated. These can drastically reduce the beam divergence and thereby relax the constraints on the subsequent beam optics. For externally injected beams, the matching sections could even provide the key technology that permits emittance conservation by increasing the matched beam size to a level achievable with currently available magnetic optics. Finally, a new method is studied that allows to modify the wakefield shape. To this end, the plasma density is periodically modulated. One possible application can be to remove the linearly correlated energy spread, or chirp, from the accelerated bunch, which is suspected of being responsible for the main part of the often large energy spread of plasma accelerated beams.

  11. Tunable Electron Multibunch Production in Plasma Wakefield Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Hidding, B; Wittig, G; Aniculaesei, C; Jaroszynski, D; McNeil, B W J; Campbell, L T; Islam, M R; Ersfeld, B; Sheng, Z -M; Xi, Y; Deng, A; Rosenzweig, J B; Andonian, G; Murokh, A; Hogan, M J; Bruhwiler, D L; Cormier, E

    2014-01-01

    Synchronized, independently tunable and focused $\\mu$J-class laser pulses are used to release multiple electron populations via photo-ionization inside an electron-beam driven plasma wave. By varying the laser foci in the laboratory frame and the position of the underdense photocathodes in the co-moving frame, the delays between the produced bunches and their energies are adjusted. The resulting multibunches have ultra-high quality and brightness, allowing for hitherto impossible bunch configurations such as spatially overlapping bunch populations with strictly separated energies, which opens up a new regime for light sources such as free-electron-lasers.

  12. Magnetic Nozzles for Plasma Thrusters: Acceleration, Thrust, and Detachment Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    was supported by Gobierno de España, ESP-2007-62694. Publisher Identifier S XXXX-XXXXXXX-X Simulation of plasma flows in divergent magnetic nozzles...Manuscript received ----- M. Merino and E. Ahedo are with the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain. Work was supported by Gobierno de España, ESP...tion thereon. Additional support came from the Gobierno de España (Project AYA-2010-16699). The authors thank Pro- fessor Martı́nez-Sánchez for his

  13. Ladder Climbing and Autoresonant Acceleration of Plasma Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2015-01-01

    Classical plasma waves are predicted to exhibit quantumlike ladder climbing, which is achieved by chirped modulations of the background density. An equivalence with the quantum particle in a box is identified and used to calculate the efficiency and the rate of this effect. In the limit of densely spaced spectrum, ladder climbing transforms into continuous autoresonance; plasmons may then be manipulated by chirped background modulations much like electrons are autoresonantly manipulated by chirped fields. Such ladder climbing and autoresonance effects are also predicted for other classical waves by means of a unifying Lagrangian theory.

  14. Laser plasma accelerator driven by a super-Gaussian pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermayr, Tobias; Petrovics, Stefan; Iqbal, Khalid; Klier, Constantin; Ruhl, Hartmut; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Deng, Aihua; Zhang, Xiaomei; Shen, Baifei; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan; Tajima, Toshiki; Tajima

    2012-08-01

    A laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) with a weak focusing force is considered to seek improved beam quality in LWFA. We employ super-Gaussian laser pulses to generate the wakefield and study the behavior of the electron beam dynamics and synchrotron radiation arising from the transverse betatron oscillations through analysis and computation. We note that the super-Gaussian wakefields radically reduce the betatron oscillations and make the electron orbits mainly ballistic over a single stage. This feature permits to obtain small emittance and thus high luminosity, while still benefitting from the low-density operation of LWFA (Nakajima et al. 2011 Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 14, 091301), such as the reduced radiation loss, less number of stages, less beam instabilities, and less required wall plug power than in higher density regimes.

  15. Turbulent acceleration and heating in toroidal magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbet, X.; Esteve, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Abiteboul, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance cedex (France); Smolyakov, A. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada)

    2013-07-15

    It is shown that turbulence is responsible for a source of momentum, which cannot be recast as a divergence of a momentum flux. This process is similar to turbulent heating, with similar properties. The sum over all species vanishes up to polarization contributions. Hence, toroidal momentum is transferred from species to species, mediated by turbulence. As for momentum flux, symmetry breaking is needed. Flow shear is investigated as a source of symmetry breaking, leading to a source of momentum proportional to the shear rate. Turbulent acceleration is significant for ion species. It is found that it is proportional to the charge number Z, while turbulent heating scales as Z{sup 2}/A, where A is the mass number. It is maximum in the edge, where the E × B flow shear rate and turbulence intensity are maximum. When both are large enough, the turbulent torque may overcome the collisional friction between impurities and main ions, thus leading to different toroidal velocities.

  16. Turbulent acceleration and heating in toroidal magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbet, X.; Esteve, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Abiteboul, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Smolyakov, A.

    2013-07-01

    It is shown that turbulence is responsible for a source of momentum, which cannot be recast as a divergence of a momentum flux. This process is similar to turbulent heating, with similar properties. The sum over all species vanishes up to polarization contributions. Hence, toroidal momentum is transferred from species to species, mediated by turbulence. As for momentum flux, symmetry breaking is needed. Flow shear is investigated as a source of symmetry breaking, leading to a source of momentum proportional to the shear rate. Turbulent acceleration is significant for ion species. It is found that it is proportional to the charge number Z, while turbulent heating scales as Z2/A, where A is the mass number. It is maximum in the edge, where the E × B flow shear rate and turbulence intensity are maximum. When both are large enough, the turbulent torque may overcome the collisional friction between impurities and main ions, thus leading to different toroidal velocities.

  17. Langmuir Probe Measurements in an Inductively Coupled Ar/CF4 Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. V. V. S.; Meyyappan, M.; Sharma, S. P.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Technological advancement in the microelectronics industry requires an understanding of the physical and chemical processes occurring in plasmas of fluorocarbon gases, such as carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) which is commonly used as an etchant, and their mixtures to optimize various operating parameters. In this paper we report data on electron number density (ne), electron temperature'(Te), electron energy distribution function (EEDF), mean electron energy, ion number density (ni), and plasma potential (Vp) measured by using Langmuir probe in an inductively coupled 13.56 MHz radio frequency plasmas generated in 50%Ar:50%CF4 mixture in the GEC cell. The probe data were recorded at various radial positions providing radial profiles of these plasma parameters at 10-50 mTorr pressures and 200 W and 300 W of RF power. Present measurements indicate that the electron and ion number densities increase with increase in pressure and power. Whereas the plasma potential and electron temperature decrease with increase in pressure, and they weakly depend on RF power. The radial profiles exhibit that the electron and ion number densities and the plasma potential peak at the center of the plasma with an exponential fall away from it, while the electron temperature has a minimum at the center and it increases steadily towards the electrode edge. The EEDFs have a characteristic drop near the low energy end at all pressures and pressures and their shapes represent non-Maxwellian plasma and exhibit more like Druyvesteyn energy distribution.v

  18. New Applications of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry in the Nuclear Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rob Henry; Dagmar Koller; Phil Marriott

    1998-12-31

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) complements the traditional methods of quantitation of radioactive isotopes. Because of the favorable ionization potential of most actinides and their daughter products, the argon plasma provides a rich, stable source of ions, which are introduced through a plasma-mass spectrometer interface into the mass spectrometer for isotopic separation. Samples are normally introduced in solution, although direct solids analysis has also been achieved using laser ablation of the sample into the argon plasma. Since 1983, improvements in ICP-MS sensitivity have resulted in correspondingly lower mass detection capability. This development has in turn expanded the number of isotopes accessible to measurement at the levels required in the nuclear industry.

  19. Cathode configuration influence on low-inductance vacuum spark plasma dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarantsev, S. A.; Dvoeglazov, Ya M.; Dodulad, E. I.; Raevsky, I. F.; Savjolov, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The results of studies of cathode configuration influence on high current low- inductance vacuum spark (HLVS) plasma dynamics are presented in this work. The research was carried out on “PION” installation using shadowgraphy method. Molecular nitrogen laser (λ = 337 nm) was used as a radiation source. It was determined that the HLVS behavior changes with the increase of number of discharges. In a fresh electrode system (less than 200 discharges) the dependence of constriction position on the discharge trigger position is observed during HLVS development. Also, high gradients of plasma density and secondary constrictions are observed. In a previously exploited electrode system (more than 300 discharges) HLVS behavior changes: plasma density gradients become less expressed, secondary constrictions disappear. In electrode systems with highly developed cathode surface plasma density gradient distribution pattern only slightly changes from discharge to discharge, e.g. the discharge becomes more stable.

  20. Langmuir Probe Measurements in an Inductively Coupled GEC Reference Cell Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, J. S.; Kim, J. S.; Cappelli, M. A.; Sharma, S. P.; Arnold, J. O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of electron number density, electron temperature, and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) using a compensated Langmuir probe have been performed on an inductively (transformer ) coupled Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) reference cell plasma. The plasma source is operated with CH4, CF4, or their mixtures with argon. The effect of independently driving the electrode supporting the wafer on the probe data is studied. In particular, we find that the plasma structure depends on the phase in addition to the magnitude of the power coupled to the electrode relative to that of the transformer coil. The Langmuir probe is translated in a plane parallel to the electrode to investigate the spatial structure of the plasma. The probe data is also compared with fluid model predictions.

  1. Mass spectroscopy of the ion flux produced during inductively coupled plasma nitriding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodko, D. V.; Kaziev, A. V.; Ageychenkov, D. G.; Meshcheryakova, E. A.; Pisarev, A. A.; Tumarkin, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    Ion fluxes on the surface of sample embedded in inductively coupled plasma have been studied in conditions typical for titanium alloy nitriding: total pressure 0.44 Pa, Ar/N2 = 70%/30%, and RF power 1500 W. The gas composition was independently monitored by the quadrupole analyser. The ion fluxes were sampled using a specially designed electrostatic extractor and then analysed with a magnetic sector mass-separator. The extractor design allowed us to apply a bias voltage to the plasma facing electrode thus imitating interaction of ions with the surface during the plasma processing. The ion fluxes of Ar+, {{{N}}}2{}+, and N+ on the surface were measured. The mass spectroscopy diagnostics unit is suitable for extensive ion content studies in the plasma technology facilities.

  2. Comparative changes in plasma protein concentration, hematocrit and plasma volume during exercise, bedrest and + Gz acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beaumont, W.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of experiments which indicate that under conditions of a constant red cell volume the proportional changes in hematocrit and plasma volume during exercise are never equal. On the basis of direct measurements and calculated changes of plasma volume it is concluded that during maximal exercise there is a small loss of protein from the plasma. It is clear that changes in content of blood constituents can only be evaluated correctly after determination of changes in plasma volume.

  3. Motion of the plasma critical layer during relativistic-electron laser interaction with immobile and comoving ion plasma for ion acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahai, Aakash A., E-mail: aakash.sahai@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    We analyze the motion of the plasma critical layer by two different processes in the relativistic-electron laser-plasma interaction regime (a{sub 0}>1). The differences are highlighted when the critical layer ions are stationary in contrast to when they move with it. Controlling the speed of the plasma critical layer in this regime is essential for creating low-β traveling acceleration structures of sufficient laser-excited potential for laser ion accelerators. In Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration (RITA) scheme, the heavy plasma-ions are fixed and only trace-density light-ions are accelerated. The relativistic critical layer and the acceleration structure move longitudinally forward by laser inducing transparency through apparent relativistic increase in electron mass. In the Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) scheme, the whole plasma is longitudinally pushed forward under the action of the laser radiation pressure, possible only when plasma ions co-propagate with the laser front. In RPA, the acceleration structure velocity critically depends upon plasma-ion mass in addition to the laser intensity and plasma density. In RITA, mass of the heavy immobile plasma-ions does not affect the speed of the critical layer. Inertia of the bared immobile ions in RITA excites the charge separation potential, whereas RPA is not possible when ions are stationary.

  4. Ultrahigh-gradient acceleration of injected eletrons by laser-excited relativistic electron plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, C. E.; Marsh, K. A.; Dyson, A.; Everett, M.; Lal, A.; Leemans, W. P.; Williams, R.; Joshi, C.

    1993-01-01

    High-gradient acceleration of externally injected 2.1-MeV electrons by a laser beat wave driven relativistic plasma wave has been demonstrated for the first time. Electrons with energies up to the detection limit of 9.1 MeV were detected when such a plasma wave was resonantly excited using a two-frequency laser. This implies a gradient of 0.7 GeV/m, corresponding to a plasma-wave amplitude of more than 8%. The electron signal was below detection threshold without injection or when the laser was operated on a single frequency.

  5. Local thermodynamic equilibrium modeling of ionization of impurities in argon inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serapinas, Petras, E-mail: serapinas@pfi.l [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, Vilnius University, A. Gostauto 12, 01108 Vilnius (Lithuania); Salkauskas, Julius; Ezerinskis, Zilvinas; Acus, Arturas [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, Vilnius University, A. Gostauto 12, 01108 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2010-01-15

    Essentially higher ionization degree of small concentrations of elements in inductively coupled plasma in comparison to the ionization of pure elements is emphasized. This conclusion is used to determine the relative dependence of the sensitivity of the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer on the atomic mass. The possibility of evaluation of the ionization temperature and electron density from mass spectrometric signals is proposed. Temperatures about 7000 K and 8000 K were obtained from the ionization ratio dependences on ionization potentials. Electron densities of the order of magnitude 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}, in excess to the local thermodynamic equilibrium values, follow from the application of the Saha equation to the measurement results and indicate the recombining character of the plasma in the mass spectrometer measurement region. Effects due to additional ionization from matrix were discussed. The effect is largest on minor abundant ionization state components. Matrix effect is restricted to some temperature interval, which depends on the whole matrix composition and the plasma state. The results show that the local thermodynamic equilibrium modeling, if adequately matching the sample composition, can be useful as a quantitative basis for both description of the plasma state and indication of the character of the nonequilibrium effects.

  6. Equivalent circuit effects on mode transitions in H{sub 2} inductively coupled plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hui-Jing; Zhao, Shu-Xia, E-mail: zhaonie@dlut.edu.cn; Zhang, Yu-Ru; Gao, Fei; Li, Xue-Chun; Wang, You-Nian [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion, and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2015-04-15

    It is well known experimentally that the circuit matching network plays an important role in the mode transition behavior of inductively coupled plasmas. To date, however, there have been no reports of numerical models being used to study the role of the matching circuit in the transition process. In this paper, a new two-dimensional self-consistent fluid model that couples the components of an equivalent circuit module is developed to investigate the effects of the equivalent circuit on the mode transition characteristics of an inductively coupled, hydrogen plasma. The equivalent circuit consists of a current source, impedance matching network, reactor impedance, and plasma transferred impedance. The nonlinear coupling of the external circuit with the internal plasma is investigated by adjusting the matching capacitance at a fixed input current. The electron density and temperature as well as the electromagnetic fields all change suddenly, and the E to H mode transition occurs abruptly at a certain matching capacitance as the impedance matching of the external circuit is varied. We also analyze the fields and the plasma characteristics during the transition process, especially for the case of the capacitive E mode.

  7. Electron energy probability function and L-p similarity in low pressure inductively coupled bounded plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Sanghamitro; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2015-01-01

    Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations are carried out to investigate the effect of discharge length (L) and pressure (p) on Electron Energy Probability Function (EEPF) in a low pressure radio frequency (rf) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) at 13.56 MHz. It is found that for both cases of varying L (0.1–0.5 m) and p (1–10 mTorr), the EEPF is a bi-Maxwellian with a step in the bounded direction (x) and non-Maxwellian with a hot tail in the symmetric unbounded directions (y, z). The plasma space po...

  8. Fast-acting calorimeter measures heat output of plasma gun accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dethlefson, R.; Larson, A. V.; Liebing, L.

    1967-01-01

    Calorimeter measures the exhaust energy from a shot of a pulsed plasma gun accelerator. It has a fast response time and requires only one measurement to determine the total energy. It uses a long ribbon of copper foil wound around a glass frame to form a reentrant cavity.

  9. Broadband Single-Shot Electron Spectrometer for GeV-Class Laser Plasma Based Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K.; Wan, W.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Syversrud, D.; Wallig, J.; Leemans, W.P.

    2008-05-01

    Laser-plasma-based accelerators can provide electrons over a broad energy range and/or with large momentum spread. The electron beam energy distribution can be controlled via accurate control of laser and plasma properties, and beams with energies ranging from'0.5 to 1000 MeV have been observed. Measuring these energy distributions in a single shot requires the use of a diagnostic with large momentum acceptance and, ideally, sufficient resolution to accurately measure energy spread in the case of narrow energy spread. Such a broadband single-shot electron magnetic spectrometer for GeV-class laser-plasma-based accelerators has been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. A detailed description of the hardware and the design concept is presented, as well as a performance evaluation of the spectrometer. The spectrometer covered electron beam energies raging from 0.01 to 1.1 GeV in a single shot, and enabled the simultaneous measurement of the laser properties at the exit of the accelerator through the use of a sufficiently large pole gap. Based on measured field maps and 3rd-order transport analysis, a few percent-level resolution and determination of the absolute energy were achieved over the entire energy range. Laser-plasma-based accelerator experiments demonstrated the capability of the spectrometer as a diagnostic and its suitability for such a broadband electron source.

  10. Ionospheric electron acceleration by electromagnetic waves near regions of plasma resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalon, Elena

    1989-03-01

    Electron acceleration by electromagnetic fields propagating in the inhomogeneous ionospheric plasma is investigated. It is found that high-amplitude short wavelength electrostatic waves are generated by the incident electromagnetic fields that penetrate the radio window. These waves can very efficiently transfer their energy to the electrons if the incident frequency is near the second harmonic of the cyclotron frequency.

  11. Hall MHD Stability and Turbulence in Magnetically Accelerated Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. R. Strauss

    2012-11-27

    The object of the research was to develop theory and carry out simulations of the Z pinch and plasma opening switch (POS), and compare with experimental results. In the case of the Z pinch, there was experimental evidence of ion kinetic energy greatly in excess of the ion thermal energy. It was thought that this was perhaps due to fine scale turbulence. The simulations showed that the ion energy was predominantly laminar, not turbulent. Preliminary studies of a new Z pinch experiment with an axial magnetic field were carried out. The axial magnetic is relevant to magneto - inertial fusion. These studies indicate the axial magnetic field makes the Z pinch more turbulent. Results were also obtained on Hall magnetohydrodynamic instability of the POS.

  12. Penning neon plasma laser pumped by a compact accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derzhiev, V.I.; Zhidkov, A.G.; Koval' , A.V.; Skakun, V.S.; Tarasenko, V.F.

    1988-01-01

    A study is made of the emission characteristics of a neon laser (wavelengths, 585.3, 724.5, and 703.2 nm) in the afterglow (50-120 ns) of a plasma generated by a short (less than 10 ns) electron beam pulse (20-100 A/sq cm) during the longitudinal and transverse pumping of dense (0.5-3 atm) He-Ne-Ar(Kr) and Ne-H2 mixtures. It is shown experimentally that preheating has a negative effect on the lasing characteristics. The relaxation kinetics of the He-Ne-Ar mixture and the emission characteristics of the neon yellow line are calculated; the results are in good agreement with measured lasing characteristics. 7 references.

  13. Colliding ionization injection in a beam driven plasma accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, Y; Li, F; Wu, Y P; Hua, J F; Pai, C -H; Lu, W; Joshi, C; Mori, W B; Gu, Y Q

    2015-01-01

    The proposal of generating high quality electron bunches via ionization injection triggered by an counter propagating laser pulse inside a beam driven plasma wake is examined via two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that electron bunches obtained using this technique can have extremely small slice energy spread, because each slice is mainly composed of electrons ionized at the same time. Another remarkable advantage is that the injection distance is changeable. A bunch with normalized emittance of 3.3 nm, slice energy spread of 15 keV and brightness of 7.2 A m$^{-2}$ rad$^{-2}$ is obtained with an optimal injection length which is achieved by adjusting the launch time of the drive beam or by changing the laser focal position. This makes the scheme a promising approach to generate high quality electron bunches for the fifth generation light source.

  14. Inductive inhibition of cold-plasma stabilization of curvature-driven modes in finite-length plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guest, G.E.; Miller, R.L.; Caponi, M.Z.

    1986-08-01

    A modified quasistatic theory that incorporates inductive effects in earlier electrostatic models connects the conventional electrostatic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pictures of line tying by cold plasma. The modified theory predicts that curvature-driven flute modes in mirror-confined plasmas can be stabilized by moderate concentrations of cold plasma if the beta of the hot, mirror-confined plasma is less than a critical value. The maximum stable beta for an idealized stratified model of a hot-ion plasma, separated from conducting end walls by cold plasma, is given approximately by ..beta../sub crit/approx. =(4R-italic/sub p-italic/R-italic/sub c-italic//L-italic/sub h-italic/L-italic/sub c-italic/) x (..omega../sup 2//sub p-italic//sub e-italic//sub (cold)// (k-italic/sup 2//sub perpendicular/c-italic/sup 2/+..omega../sup 2//sub p-italic//sub e-italic//sub (cold)/)). For ..omega../sup 2//sub p-italic//sub e-italic//sub (cold)/ <plasmas if the hot-plasma beta exceeds a limiting value estimated to be ..pi../sup 2/R-italic/sub p-italic/R-italic/sub c-italic//L-italic/sup 2/.

  15. Development and Validation of an Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) Method for Quantitative Analysis of Platinum in Plasma, Urine, and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ti; Cai, Shuang; Forrest, Wai Chee; Mohr, Eva; Yang, Qiuhong; Forrest, M Laird

    2016-09-01

    Cisplatin, a platinum chemotherapeutic, is one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agents for many solid tumors. In this work, we developed and validated an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method for quantitative determination of platinum levels in rat urine, plasma, and tissue matrices including liver, brain, lungs, kidney, muscle, heart, spleen, bladder, and lymph nodes. The tissues were processed using a microwave accelerated reaction system (MARS) system prior to analysis on an Agilent 7500 ICP-MS. According to the Food and Drug Administration guidance for industry, bioanalytical validation parameters of the method, such as selectivity, accuracy, precision, recovery, and stability were evaluated in rat biological samples. Our data suggested that the method was selective for platinum without interferences caused by other presenting elements, and the lower limit of quantification was 0.5 ppb. The accuracy and precision of the method were within 15% variation and the recoveries of platinum for all tissue matrices examined were determined to be 85-115% of the theoretical values. The stability of the platinum-containing solutions, including calibration standards, stock solutions, and processed samples in rat biological matrices was investigated. Results indicated that the samples were stable after three cycles of freeze-thaw and for up to three months. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Optical Measurements of Dense Hypervelocity Plasmoids from Coaxial and Railgun Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Brockington, Samuel; Witherspoon, Douglas; Elton, Ray

    2009-11-01

    High velocity dense plasma jets are under continued experimental development for fusion applications including refueling, disruption mitigation, momentum injection/rotation drive, and magnetized target fusion. We present measurements taken on the plasmoids produced by a half-scale coaxial plasmoid accelerator, a full scale coaxial plasmoid accelerator, and a novel minirailgun accelerator. The data presented includes spectroscopic measurements of velocity and density, two point interferometric measurements of line integrated density and velocity, and fast framing camera imaging. Results from these measurements are in agreement with each other and with time of flight measurements taken using photodiodes, as well as total plasmoid momentum measurements taken using a ballistic pendulum technique. Plasma density is greater than 5 x10^15 cm-3, and velocities range up to 100 km/s, with a small component in some cases exceeding 120 km/s.

  17. High quality electron bunch generation with CO2-laser plasma accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, L G; Xu, J C; Ji, L L; Zhang, X M; Wang, W P; Zhao, X Y; Yi, L Q; Yu, Y H; Shi, Y; Xu, T J; Xu, Z Z

    2014-01-01

    CO2 laser-driven electron acceleration is demonstrated with particle-in-cell simulation in low-density plasma. An intense CO2 laser pulse with long wavelength excites wakefield. The bubble behind it has a broad space to sustain a large amount of electrons before reaching its charge saturation limit. A transversely propagating inject pulse is used to induce and control the ambient electron injection. The accelerated electron bunch with total charge up to 10 nC and the average charge per energy interval of more than 0.6 nC/MeV are obtained. Plasma-based electron acceleration driven by intense CO2 laser provides a new potential way to generate high-charge electron bunch with low energy spread, which has broad applications, especially for X-ray generation by table-top FEL and bremsstrahlung.

  18. A Tightly Coupled Non-Equilibrium Magneto-Hydrodynamic Model for Inductively Coupled RF Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-29

    effects are described based on a hybrid State-to-State (StS) approach. A multi-temperature formulation is used to account for thermal non-equilibrium...for Inductively Coupled Radio-Frequency (RF) Plasmas. Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) effects are described based on a hybrid State-to-State...usually obtained through quantum chemistry calculations51–56 or through phenomenological models providing a simplified descrip- tion of the kinetic

  19. Imaging gold nanoparticles in mouse liver by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Qing; Wang, Zheng; Mo, Jiamei; Zhang, Guoxia; Chen, Yirui; Huang, Chuchu

    2017-01-01

    Imaging the size distribution of metal nanoparticles (NPs) in a tissue has important implications in terms of evaluating NP toxicity. Microscopy techniques used to image tissue NPs are limited by complicated sample preparation or poor resolution. In this study, we developed a laser ablation (LA) system coupled to single-particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SP-ICP-MS) for quantitative imaging of gold (G)NPs in tissue samples. In this system, GNPs were ablated but did not disi...

  20. Physics of Phase Space Matching for Staging Plasma and Traditional Accelerator Components Using Longitudinally Tailored Plasma Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X L; Hua, J F; Wu, Y P; Zhang, C J; Li, F; Wan, Y; Pai, C-H; Lu, W; An, W; Yu, P; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Mori, W B

    2016-03-25

    Phase space matching between two plasma-based accelerator (PBA) stages and between a PBA and a traditional accelerator component is a critical issue for emittance preservation. The drastic differences of the transverse focusing strengths as the beam propagates between stages and components may lead to a catastrophic emittance growth even when there is a small energy spread. We propose using the linear focusing forces from nonlinear wakes in longitudinally tailored plasma density profiles to control phase space matching between sections with negligible emittance growth. Several profiles are considered and theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations show how these structures may work in four different scenarios. Good agreement between theory and simulation is obtained, and it is found that the adiabatic approximation misses important physics even for long profiles.

  1. Induction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprogøe, Jonas; Elkjaer, Bente

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how induction of newcomers can be understood as both organizational renewal and the maintenance of status quo, and to develop ways of describing this in terms of learning.......The purpose of this paper is to explore how induction of newcomers can be understood as both organizational renewal and the maintenance of status quo, and to develop ways of describing this in terms of learning....

  2. Collisionless shocks and particle acceleration in laser-driven laboratory plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiuza, Frederico

    2012-10-01

    Collisionless shocks are pervasive in space and astrophysical plasmas, from the Earth's bow shock to Gamma Ray Bursters; however, the microphysics underlying shock formation and particle acceleration in these distant sites is not yet fully understood. Mimicking these extreme conditions in laboratory is a grand challenge that would allow for a better understanding of the physical processes involved. Using ab initio multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, shock formation and particle acceleration are investigated for realistic laboratory conditions associated with the interaction of intense lasers with high-energy-density plasmas. Weibel-instability-mediated shocks are shown to be driven by the interaction of an ultraintense laser with overcritical plasmas. In this piston regime, the laser generates a relativistic flow that is Weibel unstable. The strong Weibel magnetic fields deflect the incoming flow, compressing it, and forming a shock. The resulting shock structure is consistent with previous simulations of relativistic astrophysical shocks, demonstrating for the first time the possibility of recreating these structures in laboratory. As the laser intensity is decreased and near-critical density plasmas are used, electron heating dominates over radiation pressure and electrostatic shocks can be formed. The electric field associated with the shock front can reflect ions from the background accelerating them to high energies. It is shown that high quality 200 MeV proton beams, required for tumor therapy, can be generated by using an exponentially decaying plasma profile to control competing accelerating fields. These results pave the way for the experimental exploration of space and astrophysical relevant shocks and particle acceleration with current laser systems.

  3. Density bunching effects in a laser-driven, near-critical density plasma for ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettlinger, Oliver; Sahai, Aakash; Hicks, George; Ditter, Emma-Jane; Dover, Nicholas; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Helle, Michael; Gordon, Daniel; Ting, Antonio; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Pogorelsky, Igor; Babzien, Marcus; Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2016-10-01

    We present work investigating the interaction of relativistic laser pulses with near-critical density gas targets exhibiting pre-plasma scale lengths of several laser wavelengths. Analytical and computational modelling suggest that the interaction dynamics in a low-Z plasma is a direct result of induced density bunching up to the critical surface. In fact, these bunches can themselves become overcritical and experience significant radiation pressure, accelerating ions to higher energies compared to an ``idealised'' plasma slab target. This work will be used to help explain the observation of ion energies exceeding those predicted by radiation pressure driven hole-boring in recent experiments using the TW CO2 laser at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  4. Radiative damping and electron beam dynamics in plasma-based accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, P; Schroeder, C B; Shadwick, B A; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2006-08-01

    The effects of radiation reaction on electron beam dynamics are studied in the context of plasma-based accelerators. Electrons accelerated in a plasma channel undergo transverse betatron oscillations due to strong focusing forces. These oscillations lead to emission by the electrons of synchrotron radiation, with a corresponding energy loss that affects the beam properties. An analytical model for the single particle orbits and beam moments including the classical radiation reaction force is derived and compared to the results of a particle transport code. Since the betatron amplitude depends on the initial transverse position of the electron, the resulting radiation can increase the relative energy spread of the beam to significant levels (e.g., several percent). This effect can be diminished by matching the beam into the channel, which could require micron sized beam radii for typical values of the beam emittance and plasma density.

  5. Radiative damping and electron beam dynamics in plasma-based accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, P.; Schroeder, C. B.; Shadwick, B. A.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2006-08-01

    The effects of radiation reaction on electron beam dynamics are studied in the context of plasma-based accelerators. Electrons accelerated in a plasma channel undergo transverse betatron oscillations due to strong focusing forces. These oscillations lead to emission by the electrons of synchrotron radiation, with a corresponding energy loss that affects the beam properties. An analytical model for the single particle orbits and beam moments including the classical radiation reaction force is derived and compared to the results of a particle transport code. Since the betatron amplitude depends on the initial transverse position of the electron, the resulting radiation can increase the relative energy spread of the beam to significant levels (e.g., several percent). This effect can be diminished by matching the beam into the channel, which could require micron sized beam radii for typical values of the beam emittance and plasma density.

  6. Stochastic heating and acceleration of electrons in colliding laser fields in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Z-M; Mima, K; Sentoku, Y; Jovanović, M S; Taguchi, T; Zhang, J; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, J

    2002-02-01

    We propose a mechanism that leads to efficient acceleration of electrons in plasma by two counterpropagating laser pulses. It is triggered by stochastic motion of electrons when the laser fields exceed some threshold amplitudes, as found in single-electron dynamics. It is further confirmed in particle-in-cell simulations. In vacuum or tenuous plasma, electron acceleration in the case with two colliding laser pulses can be much more efficient than with one laser pulse only. In plasma at moderate densities, such as a few percent of the critical density, the amplitude of the Raman-backscattered wave is high enough to serve as the second counterpropagating pulse to trigger the electron stochastic motion. As a result, even with one intense laser pulse only, electrons can be heated up to a temperature much higher than the corresponding laser ponderomotive potential.

  7. Effect of the laser wavefront in a laser-plasma accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Beaurepaire, B; Bocoum, M; Böhle, F; Jullien, A; Rousseau, J-P; Lefrou, T; Douillet, D; Iaquaniello, G; Lopez-Martens, R; Lifschitz, A; Faure, J

    2015-01-01

    A high repetition rate electron source was generated by tightly focusing kHz, few-mJ laser pulses into an underdense plasma. This high intensity laser-plasma interaction led to stable electron beams over several hours but with strikingly complex transverse distributions even for good quality laser focal spots. Analysis of the experimental data, along with results of PIC simulations demonstrate the role of the laser wavefront on the acceleration of electrons. Distortions of the laser wavefront cause spatial inhomogeneities in the out-of-focus laser distribution and consequently, the laser pulse drives an inhomogenous transverse wakefield whose focusing/defocusing properties affect the electron distribution. These findings explain the experimental results and suggest the possibility of controlling the electron spatial distribution in laser-plasma accelerators by tailoring the laser wavefront.

  8. Current-driven plasma acceleration versus current-driven energy dissipation. I - Wave stability theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.; Choueiri, E. Y.

    1990-01-01

    The dominant unstable electrostatic wave modes of an electromagnetically accelerated plasma are investigated. The study is the first part of a three-phase program aimed at characterizing the current-driven turbulent dissipation degrading the efficiency of Lorentz force plasma accelerators such as the MPD thruster. The analysis uses a kinetic theory that includes magnetic and thermal effects as well as those of an electron current transverse to the magnetic field and collisions, thus combining all the features of previous models. Analytical and numerical solutions allow a detailed description of threshold criteria, finite growth behavior, destabilization mechanisms and maximized-growth characteristics of the dominant unstable modes. The lower hybrid current-driven instability is implicated as dominant and was found to preserve its character in the collisional plasma regime.

  9. On-line elemental analysis of fossil fuel process streams by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chisholm, W.P.

    1995-06-01

    METC is continuing development of a real-time, multi-element plasma based spectrometer system for application to high temperature and high pressure fossil fuel process streams. Two versions are under consideration for development. One is an Inductively Coupled Plasma system that has been described previously, and the other is a high power microwave system. The ICP torch operates on a mixture of argon and helium with a conventional annular swirl flow plasma gas, no auxiliary gas, and a conventional sample stream injection through the base of the plasma plume. A new, demountable torch design comprising three ceramic sections allows bolts passing the length of the torch to compress a double O-ring seal. This improves the reliability of the torch. The microwave system will use the same data acquisition and reduction components as the ICP system; only the plasma source itself is different. It will operate with a 750-Watt, 2.45 gigahertz microwave generator. The plasma discharge will be contained within a narrow quartz tube one quarter wavelength from a shorted waveguide termination. The plasma source will be observed via fiber optics and a battery of computer controlled monochromators. To extract more information from the raw spectral data, a neural net computer program is being developed. This program will calculate analyte concentrations from data that includes analyte and interferant spectral emission intensity. Matrix effects and spectral overlaps can be treated more effectively by this method than by conventional spectral analysis.

  10. Inductively Driven, 3D Liner Compression of a Magnetized Plasma to Megabar Energy Densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slough, John [MSNW LLC, Redmond, WA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    To take advantage of the smaller scale, higher density regime of fusion an efficient method for achieving the compressional heating required to reach fusion gain conditions must be found. What is proposed is a more flexible metallic liner compression scheme that minimizes the kinetic energy required to reach fusion. It is believed that it is possible to accomplish this at sub-megajoule energies. This however will require operation at very small scale. To have a realistic hope of inexpensive, repetitive operation, it is essential to have the liner kinetic energy under a megajoule which allows for the survivability of the vacuum and power systems. At small scale the implosion speed must be reasonably fast to maintain the magnetized plasma (FRC) equilibrium during compression. For limited liner kinetic energy, it becomes clear that the thinnest liner imploded to the smallest radius consistent with the requirements for FRC equilibrium lifetime is desired. The proposed work is directed toward accomplishing this goal. Typically an axial (Z) current is employed for liner compression. There are however several advantages to using a θ-pinch coil. With the θ-pinch the liner currents are inductively driven which greatly simplifies the apparatus and vacuum system, and avoids difficulties with the post implosion vacuum integrity. With fractional flux leakage, the foil liner automatically provides for the seed axial compression field. To achieve it with optimal switching techniques, and at an accelerated pace however will require additional funding. This extra expense is well justified as the compression technique that will be enabled by this funding is unique in the ability to implode individual segments of the liner at different times. This is highly advantageous as the liner can be imploded in a manner that maximizes the energy transfer to the FRC. Production of shaped liner implosions for additional axial compression can thus be readily accomplished with the modified power

  11. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies of living systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luong, Elise [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-05-10

    This dissertation focuses on the development of methods for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies in living systems using inductively coupled plasma single and dual quadrupole mass spectrometers. Sub-nanogram per gram levels of molybdenum (Mo) from human blood plasma are isolated by the use of anion exchange alumina microcolumns. Million-fold more concentrated spectral and matrix interferences such as sodium, chloride, sulfate, phosphate, etc. in the blood constituents are removed from the analyte. The recovery of Mo from the alumina column is 82 ± 5% (n = 5). Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS) is utilized for the quantitative ultra-trace concentration determination of Mo in bovine and human blood samples. The average Mo concentration in reference bovine serum determined by this method is 10.2 ± 0.4 ng/g, while the certified value is 11.5 ± 1.1 ng/g (95% confidence interval). The Mo concentration of one pool of human blood plasma from two healthy male donors is 0.5 ± 0.1 ng/g. The inductively coupled plasma twin quadrupole mass spectrometer (ICP-TQMS) is used to measure the carbon isotope ratio from non-volatile organic compounds and bio-organic molecules to assess the ability as an alternative analytical method to gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-combustion-IRMS). Trytophan, myoglobin, and β-cyclodextrin are chosen for the study, initial observation of spectral interference of 13C+ with 12C 1H+ comes from the incomplete dissociation of myoglobin and/or β-cyclodextrin.

  12. Colliding ionization injection in a plasma wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Y.; Zhang, C. J.; Li, F.; Wu, Y. P.; Hua, J. F.; Pai, C.-H.; Lu, W.; Gu, Y. Q.; Xu, X. L.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W. B.

    2016-03-01

    A new scheme of generating high quality electron bunches via ionization injection triggered by an counter propagating laser pulse inside a beam driven plasma wake is proposed and examined via two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This scheme has two major advantages: first, the injection distance is easily tunable by varying the launching time or the focal position of the laser pulse; second, the electrons in each injected slice are released at nearly the same time. Both factors can significantly reduce the phase space mixing during the ionization injection process (Xu et al 2014 Phys. Rev. Lett. 112 035003, Xu et al 2014 Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.: Accel. Beams 17 061301, Li et al 2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 015003), leading to very small energy spreads (˜10 keV for slice,˜100 keV for the whole bunch) and very small normalized emittance (˜few nm). As an example, a 4.5 fs 0.4 pC electron bunch with normalized emittance of 3.3 nm, slice energy spread of 13 keV, absolute energy spread of 80 keV, and a brightness of 7.2× {{10}18} A m-2rad-2 is obtained under realistic conditions. This scheme may have potential applications for future compact coherent light sources.

  13. Non-inductive Plasma Start-up and Current Ramp-up in NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, R.; Jarboe, T. R.; Jardin, S. C.; Kessel, C. E.; Mueller, D.; Nelson, B. A.; Poli, F.; Taylor, G.; NSTX Research Team; Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Team

    2013-10-01

    Results from NSTX Transient Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) experiments have demonstrated generation of 300 kA start-up currents, and when these discharges were coupled to induction they attained 1 MA of plasma current consuming 65% of the inductive flux of standard inductive-only discharges in NSTX. The NSTX-U device, which is now under construction at PPPL, will have numerous improvements to enhance transient CHI start-up. These are: (1) factor of two increase in toroidal field, (2) more than 2.5 times the injector flux, (3) increased CHI voltage, (4) full lithium coverage to reduce low-Z impurities and (5) 1 MW ECH system for increasing the electron temperature of CHI discharges to allow direct coupling to NBI current drive using a new second more tangential neutral beam system. In support of NSTX-U objectives for full non-inductive start-up and current ramp-up, the TSC code has been used for a full discharge simulation in which a transient CHI discharge is used as the front end of the non-inductive current ramp-up simulation. This work supported by U.S. DOE Contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-FG02-99ER54519 AM08.

  14. 3D printing of gas jet nozzles for laser-plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döpp, A.; Guillaume, E.; Thaury, C.; Gautier, J.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Malka, V.

    2016-07-01

    Recent results on laser wakefield acceleration in tailored plasma channels have underlined the importance of controlling the density profile of the gas target. In particular, it was reported that the appropriate density tailoring can result in improved injection, acceleration, and collimation of laser-accelerated electron beams. To achieve such profiles, innovative target designs are required. For this purpose, we have reviewed the usage of additive layer manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, in order to produce gas jet nozzles. Notably we have compared the performance of two industry standard techniques, namely, selective laser sintering (SLS) and stereolithography (SLA). Furthermore we have used the common fused deposition modeling to reproduce basic gas jet designs and used SLA and SLS for more sophisticated nozzle designs. The nozzles are characterized interferometrically and used for electron acceleration experiments with the Salle Jaune terawatt laser at Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée.

  15. 3D printing of gas jet nozzles for laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Döpp, A.; Guillaume, E.; Thaury, C.; Gautier, J.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Malka, V. [LOA, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS, École Polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 828 Boulevard des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2016-07-15

    Recent results on laser wakefield acceleration in tailored plasma channels have underlined the importance of controlling the density profile of the gas target. In particular, it was reported that the appropriate density tailoring can result in improved injection, acceleration, and collimation of laser-accelerated electron beams. To achieve such profiles, innovative target designs are required. For this purpose, we have reviewed the usage of additive layer manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, in order to produce gas jet nozzles. Notably we have compared the performance of two industry standard techniques, namely, selective laser sintering (SLS) and stereolithography (SLA). Furthermore we have used the common fused deposition modeling to reproduce basic gas jet designs and used SLA and SLS for more sophisticated nozzle designs. The nozzles are characterized interferometrically and used for electron acceleration experiments with the SALLE JAUNE terawatt laser at Laboratoire d’Optique Appliquée.

  16. 3D printing of gas jet nozzles for laser-plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Döpp, A; Thaury, C; Gautier, J; Phuoc, K Ta; Malka, V

    2016-01-01

    Recent results on laser wakefield acceleration in tailored plasma channels have underlined the importance of controlling the density profile of the gas target. In particular it was reported that appropriate density tailoring can result in improved injection, acceleration and collimation of laser-accelerated electron beams. To achieve such profiles innovative target designs are required. For this purpose we have reviewed the usage of additive layer manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, in order to produce gas jet nozzles. Notably we have compared the performance of two industry standard techniques, namely selective laser sintering (SLS) and stereolithography (SLA). Furthermore we have used the common fused deposition modeling (FDM) to reproduce basic gas jet designs and used SLA and SLS for more sophisticated nozzle designs. The nozzles are characterized interferometrically and used for electron acceleration experiments with the Salle Jaune terawatt laser at Laboratoire d'Optique Appliqu\\'ee.

  17. Proton acceleration using doped Argon plasma density gradient interacting with relativistic CO2 -laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Aakash; Ettlinger, Oliver; Hicks, George; Ditter, Emma-Jane; Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2016-10-01

    We investigate proton and light-ion acceleration driven by the interaction of relativistic CO2 laser pulses with overdense Argon or other heavy-ion gas targets doped with lighter-ion species. Optically shaping the gas targets allows tuning of the pre-plasma scale-length from a few to several laser wavelengths, allowing the laser to efficiently drive a propagating snowplow through the bunching in the electron density. Preliminary PIC-based modeling shows that the lighter-ion species is accelerated even without any significant motion of the heavier ions which is a signature of the Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration mechanism. Some outlines of possible experiments at the TW CO2 laser at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented.

  18. Plasma exchange for induction and cyclosporine A for maintenance of remission in Wegener's granulomatosis--a clinical randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szpirt, Wladimir M; Heaf, James G; Petersen, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    The use of plasma exchange (PE) for induction treatment of anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV), including Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), is still controversial. The use of PE in AAV is not commonly accepted in patients with a plasma creatinine......The use of plasma exchange (PE) for induction treatment of anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV), including Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), is still controversial. The use of PE in AAV is not commonly accepted in patients with a plasma creatinine...

  19. Analysis of cobalt, tantalum, titanium, vanadium and chromium in tungsten carbide by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Archer, M

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) was used to measure the concentrations of cobalt, tantalum, titanium, vanadium and chromium in solutions of tungsten carbide. The main advantage of the method described here lies...

  20. Inductively driven surface-plasma negative ion source for N-NBI use (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belchenko, Yu., E-mail: belchenko@inp.nsk.su; Abdrashitov, G.; Deichuli, P.; Ivanov, A.; Gorbovsky, A.; Kondakov, A.; Sanin, A.; Sotnikov, O.; Shikhovtsev, I. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    The long-pulse surface-plasma source prototype is developed at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics for negative-ion based neutral beam injector use. The essential source features are (1) an active temperature control of the ion-optical system electrodes by circulation of hot thermal fluid through the channels, drilled in the electrode bodies, (2) the concaved transverse magnetic field in the extraction and acceleration gaps, preventing the electrons trapping and avalanching, and (3) the directed cesium deposition via distribution tubes adjacent to the plasma grid periphery. The long term effect of cesium was obtained just with the single cesium deposition. The high voltage strength of ion-optical system electrodes was improved with actively heated electrodes. A stable H{sup −} beam with a current ∼1 A and energy 90 keV was routinely extracted and accelerated.

  1. Characterization of stationary and pulsed inductively coupled RF discharges for plasma sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, T.; Osiac, M.; O'Connell, D.; Kadetov, V. A.; Czarnetzki, U.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Halfmann, H.; Awakowicz, P.

    2005-05-01

    Sterilization of bio-medical materials using radio frequency (RF) excited inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) has been investigated. A double ICP has been developed and studied for homogenous treatment of three-dimensional objects. Sterilization is achieved through a combination of ultraviolet light, ion bombardment and radical treatment. For temperature sensitive materials, the process temperature is a crucial parameter. Pulsing of the plasma reduces the time average heat strain and also provides additional control of the various sterilization mechanisms. Certain aspects of pulsed plasmas are, however, not yet fully understood. Phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy and time resolved ion energy analysis illustrate that a pulsed ICP ignites capacitively before reaching a stable inductive mode. Time resolved investigations of the post-discharge, after switching off the RF power, show that the plasma boundary sheath in front of a substrate does not fully collapse for the case of hydrogen discharges. This is explained by electron heating through super-elastic collisions with vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules.

  2. Plasma analysis of inductively coupled impulse sputtering of Cu, Ti and Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, D. A. L.; Aranda Gonzalvo, Y.; Ehiasarian, A. P.

    2017-06-01

    Inductively coupled impulse sputtering (ICIS) is a new development in the field of highly ionised pulsed PVD processes. For ICIS the plasma is generated by an internal inductive coil, replacing the need for a magnetron. To understand the plasma properties, measurements of the current and voltage waveforms at the cathode were conducted. The ion energy distribution functions (IEDFs) were measured by energy resolved MS and plasma chemistry was analysed by OES and then compared to a model. The target was operated in pulsed DC mode and the coil was energised by pulsed RF power, with a duty cycle of 7.5%. At a constant pressure (14 Pa) the set peak RF power was varied from 1000-4000 W. The DC voltage to the target was kept constant at 1900 V. OES measurements have shown a monotonic increase in intensity with increasing power. Excitation and ionisation processes were single step for ICIS of Ti and Ni and multi-step for Cu. The latter exhibited an unexpectedly steep rise in ionisation efficiency with power. The IEDFs measured by MS show the material- and time-dependant plasma potential in the range of 10-30 eV, ideal for increased surface mobility without inducing lattice defects. A lower intensity peak, of high energetic ions, is visible at 170 eV during the pulse.

  3. Experimental Characterization of a Plasma Deflagration Accelerator for Simulating Fusion Wall Response to Disruption Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Thomas; Loebner, Keith; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the suitability of a pulsed deflagration accelerator to simulate the interaction of edge-localized modes with plasma first wall materials is investigated. Experimental measurements derived from a suite of diagnostics are presented that focus on the both the properties of the plasma jet and the manner in which such jets couple with material interfaces. Detailed measurements of the thermodynamic plasma state variables within the jet are presented using a quadruple Langmuir probe operating in current-saturation mode. This data in conjunction with spectroscopic measurements of H α Stark broadening via a fast-framing, intensified CCD camera provide spatial and temporal measurements of how the plasma density and temperature scale as a function of input energy. Using these measurements, estimates for the energy flux associated with the deflagration accelerator are found to be completely tunable over a range spanning 150 MW m-2 - 30 GW m-2. The plasma-material interface is investigated using tungsten tokens exposed to the plasma plume under variable conditions. Visualizations of resulting shock structures are achieved through Schlieren cinematography and energy transfer dynamics are discussed by presenting temperature measurements of exposed materials. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Stewardship Science Academic Program in addition to the National Defense Science Engineering Graduate Fellowship.

  4. Acceleration of energetic electrons by waves in inhomogeneous solar wind plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, C.; Volokitin, A.

    2017-04-01

    The paper studies the influence of the background plasma density fluctuations on the dynamics of the Langmuir turbulence generated by electron beams, for parameters typical for solar type III beams and plasmas near 1 AU. A self-consistent Hamiltonian model based on the Zakharov and the Newton equations is used, which presents several advantages compared to the Vlasov approach. Beams generating Langmuir turbulence can be accelerated as a result of wave transformation effects or/and decay cascade processes; in both cases, the beam-driven Langmuir waves transfer part of their energy to waves of smaller wavenumbers, which can be reabsorbed later on by beam particles of higher velocities. As a consequence, beams can conserve a large part of their initial kinetic energy while propagating and radiating wave turbulence over long distances in inhomogeneous plasmas. Beam particles can also be accelerated in quasi-homogeneous plasmas due to the second cascade of wave decay, the wave transformation processes being very weak in this case. The net gains and losses of energy of a beam and the wave turbulence it radiates are calculated as a function of the average level of plasma density fluctuations and the beam parameters. The results obtained provide relevant information on the mechanism of energy reabsorption by beams radiating Langmuir turbulence in solar wind plasmas.

  5. Plasma sterilization of Geobacillus Stearothermophilus by O{mathsf2}:N{mathsf2} RF inductively coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylián, O.; Sasaki, T.; Rossi, F.

    2006-05-01

    The aim of this work is to identify the main process responsible for sterilization of Geobacillus Stearothermophilus spores in O{2}:N{2} RF inductively coupled plasma. In order to meet this objective the sterilization efficiencies of discharges in mixtures differing in the initial O{2}/N{2} ratios are compared with plasma properties and with scanning electron microscopy images of treated spores. According to the obtained results it can be concluded that under our experimental conditions the time needed to reach complete sterilization is more related to O atom density than UV radiation intensity, i.e. complete sterilization is not related only to DNA damage as in UV sterilization but more likely to the etching of the spore.

  6. Sapphire capillaries for laser-driven wakefield acceleration in plasma. Fs-laser micromachining and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwinkendorf, Jan-Patrick

    2012-08-15

    Plasma wakefields are a promising approach for the acceleration of electrons with ultrahigh (10 to 100 GV/m) electric fields. Nowadays, high-intensity laser pulses are routinely utilized to excite these large-amplitude plasma waves. However, several detrimental effects such as laser diffraction, electron-wake dephasing and laser depletion may terminate the acceleration process. Two of these phenomena can be mitigated or avoided by the application of capillary waveguides, e.g. fabricated out of sapphire for longevity. Capillaries may compensate for laser diffraction like a fiber and allow for the creation of tapered gas-density profiles working against the dephasing between the accelerating wave and the particles. Additionally, they offer the possibility of controlled particle injection. This thesis is reporting on the set up of a laser for fs-micromachining of capillaries of almost arbitrary shapes and a test stand for density-profile characterization. These devices will permit the creation of tailored gas-density profiles for controlled electron injection and acceleration inside plasma.

  7. Double layer formation in the expanding region of an inductively coupled electronegative plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Plihon, N; Chabert, P

    2015-01-01

    Double-layers (DLs) were observed in the expanding region of an inductively coupled plasma with $\\text{Ar}/\\text{SF}\\_6$ gas mixtures. No DL was observed in pure argon or $\\text{SF}\\_6$ fractions below few percent. They exist over a wide range of power and pressure although they are only stable for a small window of electronegativity (typically between 8\\% and 13\\% of $\\text{SF}\\_6$ at 1mTorr), becoming unstable at higher electronegativity. They seem to be formed at the boundary between the source tube and the diffusion chamber and act as an internal boundary (the amplitude being roughly 1.5$\\frac{kT\\_e}{e}$)between a high electron density, high electron temperature, low electronegativity plasma upstream (in the source), and a low electron density, low electron temperature, high electronegativity plasma downstream.

  8. Nonlinear electromagnetic fields in 0.5 MHz inductively coupled plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrikov, K.N.; Tsakadze, E.L.; Xu, S.

    2003-01-01

    Radial profiles of magnetic fields in the electrostatic (E) and electromagnetic (H) modes of low-frequency (similar to500 kHz) inductively coupled plasmas have been measured using miniature magnetic probes. In the low-power (similar to170 W) E-mode, the magnetic field pattern is purely linear......, with the fundamental frequency harmonics only. After transition to higher-power (similar to1130 W) H-mode, the second-harmonic nonlinear azimuthal magnetic field B-phi(2omega) that is in 4-6 times larger than the fundamental frequency component B-phi(omega), has been observed. A simplified plasma fluid model...... explaining the generation of the second harmonics of the azimuthal magnetic field in the plasma source is proposed. The nonlinear second harmonic poloidal (r-z) rf current generating the azimuthal magnetic field B-phi(2omega) is attributed to nonlinear interactions between the fundamental frequency radial...

  9. Inductively Coupling Plasma (ICP) Treatment of Propylene (PP) Surface and Adhesion Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yenchun; Fu, Yenpei

    2009-12-01

    Study on increasing the roughness of the polymer substrate surface to enhance the adhesion with the copper layer in an inductively coupling plasma (ICP) process was carried out. The microstructure of the polymer substrate surfaces, which were exposed to different kinds of plasma treatment, was identified by scanning electron microscopy(SEM) analysis, peel strength of the copper coating and water surface contact angle. The adhesion of the substrate was largely enhanced by plasma treatment and the copper deposited coating reached a value of 7.68 kgf/m in verifying the adhesion of the copper coating with polymer material. The quality of the line/space 50/50 μm produced in the laboratory was examined by the pressure cooker test and proved to meet the requirement.

  10. Measurement of neutral gas temperature in a 13.56 MHz inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayapalan, Kanesh K.; Chin, Oi Hoong [Plasma Technology Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Measuring the temperature of neutrals in inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) is important as heating of neutral particles will influence plasma characteristics such as the spatial distributions of plasma density and electron temperature. Neutral gas temperatures were deduced using a non-invasive technique that combines gas actinometry, optical emission spectroscopy and simulation which is described here. Argon gas temperature in a 13.56 MHz ICP were found to fall within the range of 500 − 800 K for input power of 140 − 200 W and pressure of 0.05 − 0.2 mbar. Comparing spectrometers with 0.2 nm and 0.5 nm resolution, improved fitting sensitivity was observed for the 0.2 nm resolution.

  11. Three-dimensional discharge simulation of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    More and more importance has been attached to inductively coupled plasma (ICP) in semiconductor manufacture. For a deep understanding of the plasma discharge process in the etching reactor, this study made a three-dimensional simulation on the Ar plasma discharge process with the commercial software CFD-ACE, which is according to the real experiment conditions and data supplied by North Microelec-tronic Corporation. The error of the simulation results is in the range of ±20% with credibility. The numerical results show that the three-dimentional spatial distribu-tion of electron density is reduced from the chamber center to the wall. The distri-bution of electron density, electron temperature and power deposition is related to the shape and placement of the coil.

  12. Jovian Plasmas Torus Interaction with Europa. Plasma Wake Structure and Effect of Inductive Magnetic Field: 3D Hybrid Kinetic Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J F.; Paterson, W. R.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.; Simpson, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The hybrid kinetic model supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the Europa moon-magnetosphere system with respect to a variable upstream magnetic field and flux or density distributions of plasma and energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical for improving the interpretation of the existing Europa flyby measurements from the Galileo Orbiter mission, and for planning flyby and orbital measurements (including the surface and atmospheric compositions) for future missions. The simulations are based on recent models of the atmosphere of Europa (Cassidy et al., 2007; Shematovich et al., 2005). In contrast to previous approaches with MHD simulations, the hybrid model allows us to fully take into account the finite gyroradius effect and electron pressure, and to correctly estimate the ion velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field (assuming an initial Maxwellian velocity distribution for upstream background ions). Photoionization, electron-impact ionization, charge exchange and collisions between the ions and neutrals are also included in our model. We consider the models with Oþ þ and Sþ þ background plasma, and various betas for background ions and electrons, and pickup electrons. The majority of O2 atmosphere is thermal with an extended non-thermal population (Cassidy et al., 2007). In this paper, we discuss two tasks: (1) the plasma wake structure dependence on the parameters of the upstream plasma and Europa's atmosphere (model I, cases (a) and (b) with a homogeneous Jovian magnetosphere field, an inductive magnetic dipole and high oceanic shell conductivity); and (2) estimation of the possible effect of an induced magnetic field arising from oceanic shell conductivity. This effect was estimated based on the difference between the observed and modeled magnetic fields (model II, case (c) with an inhomogeneous Jovian magnetosphere field, an inductive

  13. 9 GeV Energy Gain in a Beam-Driven Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Litos, M; Allen, J M; An, W; Clarke, C I; Corde, S; Clayton, C E; Frederico, J; Gessner, S J; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Schmeltz, M; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Yakimenko, V

    2015-01-01

    An electron beam has gained a maximum energy of 9 GeV per particle in a 1.3 m-long electron beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator. The amount of charge accelerated in the spectral peak was 28.3 pC, and the root-mean-square energy spread was 5.0%. The mean accelerated charge and energy gain per particle of the 215 shot data set was 115 pC and 5.3 GeV, respectively, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 4.0 GeV/m at the spectral peak. The mean energy spread of the data set was 5.1%. These results are consistent with the extrapolation of the previously reported energy gain results using a shorter, 36 cm-long plasma source to within 10%, evincing a non-evolving wake structure that can propagate distances of over a meter in length. Wake-loading effects were evident in the data through strong dependencies observed between various spectral properties and the amount of accelerated charge.

  14. Longitudinal Ion Acceleration from High-Intensity Laser Interactions with Underdense Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Willingale, L; Nilson, P M; Clarke, R J; Dangor, A E; Kaluza, M C; Karsch, S; Lancaster, K L; Mori, W B; Schreiber, J; Thomas, A G R; Wei, M S; Krushelnick, K; Najmudin, Z

    2007-01-01

    Longitudinal ion acceleration from high-intensity (I ~ 10^20 Wcm^-2) laser interactions with helium gas jet targets (n_e ~ 0.04 n_c) have been observed. The ion beam has a maximum energy for He^2+ of approximately 40 MeV and was directional along the laser propagation path, with the highest energy ions being collimated to a cone of less than 10 degrees. 2D particle-in-cell simulations have been used to investigate the acceleration mechanism. The time varying magnetic field associated with the fast electron current provides a contribution to the accelerating electric field as well as providing a collimating field for the ions. A strong correlation between the plasma density and the ion acceleration was found. A short plasma scale-length at the vacuum interface was observed to be beneficial for the maximum ion energies, but the collimation appears to be improved with longer scale-lengths due to enhanced magnetic fields in the ramp acceleration region.

  15. Langmuir Probe Distortions and Probe Compensation in an Inductively Coupled Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, J. S.; Cappelli, M. A.; Kim, J. S.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, S. P.

    1999-01-01

    In many RF discharges, Langmuir probe measurements are usually made against a background of sinusoidal (and not so sinusoidal) fluctuations in the plasma parameters such as the plasma potential (Vp), the electron number density (ne), and the electron temperature (Te). The compensation of sinusoidal fluctuations in Vp has been extensively studied and is relatively well understood. Less attention has been paid to the possible distortions introduced by small fluctuations in plasma density and/or plasma temperature, which may arise in the sheath and pre-sheath regions of RF discharges. Here, we present the results of a model simulation of probe characteristics subject to fluctuations in both Vp and ne. The modeling of probe distortion due to possible fluctuations in Te is less straightforward. A comparison is presented of calculations with experimental measurements using a compensated and uncompensated Langmuir probe in an inductively coupled GEC reference cell plasma, operating on Ar and Ar/CF4 mixtures. The plasma parameters determined from the compensated probe characteristics are compared to previous measurements of others made in similar discharges, and to our own measurements of the average electron density derived from electrical impedance measurements.

  16. Generation of high quality electron beams via ionization injection in a plasma wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Joshi, Chan; E217 SLAC Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Ionization injection in a beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator has been used to generate electron beams with over 30 GeV of energy in a 130 cm of lithium plasma. The experiments were performed using the 3 nC, 20.35 GeV electron beam at the FACET facility of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory as the driver of the wakefield. The ionization of helium atoms in the up ramp of a lithium plasma were injected into the wake and over the length of acceleration maintained an emittance on the order of 30 mm-mrad, which was an order of magnitude smaller than the drive beam, albeit with an energy spread of 10-20%. The process of ionization injection occurs due to an increase in the electric field of the drive beam as it pinches through its betatron oscillations. Thus, this energy spread is attributed to the injection region encompassing multiple betatron oscillations. In this poster, we will present evidence through OSIRIS simulations of producing an injected beam with percent level energy spread and low emittance by designing the plasma parameters appropriately, such that the ionization injection occurs over a very limited distance of one betatron cycle. Work at UCLA was supported by the NSF Grant Number PHY-1415386 and DOE Grant Number DE-SC0010064. Work at SLAC was supported by DOE contract number DE-AC02-76SF00515. Simulations used the Hoffman cluster at UCLA.

  17. Human amniotic membrane, best healing accelerator, and the choice of bone induction for vestibuloplasty technique (an animal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahad Khoshzaban

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad H Samandari1, Shahriar Adibi2, Ahad Khoshzaban3, Sara Aghazadeh5, Parviz Dihimi4, Siamak S Torbaghan6, Saeed H Keshel5, Zohreh Shahabi71Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dentistry Faculty, 2Dental Research of Torabinejad Research Centre, 3Iranian Tissue Bank Research and Preparation Centre, Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex, 4Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Dentistry Faculty, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran; 5Stem Cells Preparation Unit, Eye Research Center, Farabi Hospital, 6Department of Pathology, Imam Khomeini Medical Centre, 7BMT Center, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IranObjective: To investigate the effects of amniotic membrane (AM in bone induction and wound healing after vestibuloplasty surgery on animal samples while receptacle proteins such as growth factors were considered as accelerators for wound healing and bone induction after these operations.Material and methods: Ten adult dogs (5 females, 5 males; race, Iranian mixed; weight, 44 pounds were included, which underwent surgery for transplantation on mandible and maxillary. AM was used for promoting bone induction and healing.Results: The tissue samples were obtained after 2, 8, and 12 weeks for histology survey. No significant differences were observed between male and female or left and right jaws. AM decreased fibrinoleukocytic exudates and inflammation in the experimental group, had significant effects on bone formation, considerably improves wound healing, and gives rise to bone induction (P < 0.0001.Conclusions: Our study findings indicate that the AM is a suitable cover for different injuries and acellular AM has the potential for rapid improvement and bone induction. The AM contains collagen, laminin, and fibronectin, which provide an appropriate substrate for bone induction. This substrate promoted bone induction and might contribute to induction of the progenitor cells and/or stem

  18. Controlling VUV photon fluxes in pulsed inductively coupled Ar/Cl2 plasmas and potential applications in plasma etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Peng; Kushner, Mark J.

    2017-02-01

    UV/VUV photon fluxes in plasma materials processing have a variety of effects ranging from producing damage to stimulating synergistic reactions. Although in plasma etching processes, the rate and quality of the feature are typically controlled by the characteristics of the ion flux, to truly optimize these ion and photon driven processes, it is desirable to control the relative fluxes of ions and photons to the wafer. In prior works, it was determined that the ratio of VUV photon to ion fluxes to the substrate in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) sustained in rare gases can be controlled by combinations of pressure and pulse power, while the spectrum of these VUV photons can be tuned by adding additional rare gases to the plasma. In this work, VUV photon and ion fluxes are computationally investigated for Ar/Cl2 ICPs as used in etching of silicon. We found that while the overall ratio of VUV photon flux to ion flux are controlled by pressure and pulse power, by varying the fraction of Cl2 in the mixture, both the ratio of VUV to ion fluxes and the spectrum of VUV photons can be tuned. It was also found that the intensity of VUV emission from Cl(3p 44s) can be independently tuned by controlling wall surface conditions. With this ability to control ratios of ion to photon fluxes, photon stimulated processes, as observed in halogen etching of Si, can be tuned to optimize the shape of the etched features.

  19. Enhanced Proton Acceleration by an Ultrashort Laser Interaction with Structured Dynamic Plasma Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Zigler, A; Botton, M; Nahum, E; Schleifer, E; Baspaly, A; Pomerantz, Y; Abicht, F; Branzel, J; Priebe, G; Steinke, S; Andreev, A; Schnuerer, M; Sandner, W; Gordon, D; Sprangle, P; Ledingham, K W D

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a notably enhanced acceleration of protons to high energy by relatively modest ultrashort laser pulses and structured dynamical plasma targets. Realized by special deposition of snow targets on sapphire substrates and using carefully planned pre-pulses, high proton yield emitted in a narrow solid angle with energy above 21MeV were detected from a 5TW laser. Our simulations predict that using the proposed scheme protons can be accelerated to energies above 150MeV by 100TW laser systems.

  20. Electron acceleration in an ion channel by a magnetized plasma wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kargarian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the acceleration of an electron in the interaction with a plasma wave and a magnetized ion-channel is analyzed. The electron dynamics is studied treated employing complete three-dimensional Lorentz force equations. A relativistic three dimensional single particle code is used to obtain the electron-trajectories. The results of numerical calculation show that the electrons can be accelerated in the magnetized channel. Furthermore, the electron energy gain with axial magnetic field is compared to that without axial magnetic field.

  1. Let dependence of cell death, mutation induction and chromatin damage in human cells irradiated with accelerated carbon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, M.; Watanabe, M.; Kanai, T.; Kase, Y.; Yatagai, F.; Kato, T.; Matsubara, S.

    We investigated the LET dependence of cell death, mutation induction and chromatin break induction in human embryo (HE) cells irradiated by accelerated carbon-ion beams. The results showed that cell death, mutation induction and induction of non-rejoining chromatin breaks detected by the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique had the same LET dependence. Carbon ions of 110 to 124keV/mum were the most effective at all endpoints. However, the number of initially induced chromatin breaks was independent of LET. About 10 to 15 chromatin breaks per Gy per cell were induced in the LET range of 22 to 230 keV/mum. The deletion pattern of exons in the HPRT locus, analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), was LET-specific. Almost all the mutants induced by 124 keV/mum carbon-ion beams showed deletion of the entire gene, while all mutants induced by 230keV/mum carbon-ion beams showed no deletion. These results suggest that the difference in the density distribution of carbon-ion track and secondary electron with various LET is responsible for the LET dependency of biological effects.

  2. A research-based strategy for inductively accelerating vocabulary acquisition of at-risk students in Grade 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitale, Michael R.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the acceleration of vocabulary growth through a multi-part instructional strategy for engendering the inductive, semantic word-family oriented acquisition of vocabulary from context, a difficult task for elementary students. Implemented on a school-wide basis in grade 4 over an 8-week period, the intervention was a four-part enhancement to each of six regular basal reading stories that focused on 17 semantic word families associated with selected words in the stories. Results showed a. that experimental students inductively generated greater numbers of words with similar meanings that could be substituted for novel words in 3-sentence story-context passages and to word-family pairs; and; b. that Title 1 experimental students displayed greater achievement than comparable Title I controls on the ITBS Vocabulary Subtest.

  3. Bright gamma-rays from betatron resonance acceleration in near critical density plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, B; Wu, D; Liu, J; Chen, C E; Yan, X Q; He, X T

    2013-01-01

    We show that electron betatron resonance acceleration by an ultra-intense ultra-short laser pulse in a near critical density plasma works as a high-brightness gamma-ray source. Compared with laser plasma X-ray sources in under-dense plasma, near critical density plasma provides three benefits for electron radiation: more radiation electrons, larger transverse amplitude, and higher betatron oscillation frequency. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that, by using a 7.4J laser pulse, 8.3mJ radiation with critical photon energy 1MeV is emitted. The critical photon energy $E_c$ increases with the incident laser energy %faster than a linear relation. $W_I$ as $E_c \\propto W_I^{1.5}$, and the corresponding photon number is proportional to $W_I$. A simple analytical synchrotron-like radiation model is built, which can explain the simulation results.

  4. Bulk plasma fragmentation in a C{sub 4}F{sub 8} inductively coupled plasma: A hybrid modeling study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Shu-Xia; Zhang, Yu-Ru [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Research Group PLASMANT, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerp (Belgium); Gao, Fei; Wang, You-Nian [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Bogaerts, Annemie [Research Group PLASMANT, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2015-06-28

    A hybrid model is used to investigate the fragmentation of C{sub 4}F{sub 8} inductive discharges. Indeed, the resulting reactive species are crucial for the optimization of the Si-based etching process, since they determine the mechanisms of fluorination, polymerization, and sputtering. In this paper, we present the dissociation degree, the density ratio of F vs. C{sub x}F{sub y} (i.e., fluorocarbon (fc) neutrals), the neutral vs. positive ion density ratio, details on the neutral and ion components, and fractions of various fc neutrals (or ions) in the total fc neutral (or ion) density in a C{sub 4}F{sub 8} inductively coupled plasma source, as well as the effect of pressure and power on these results. To analyze the fragmentation behavior, the electron density and temperature and electron energy probability function (EEPF) are investigated. Moreover, the main electron-impact generation sources for all considered neutrals and ions are determined from the complicated C{sub 4}F{sub 8} reaction set used in the model. The C{sub 4}F{sub 8} plasma fragmentation is explained, taking into account many factors, such as the EEPF characteristics, the dominance of primary and secondary processes, and the thresholds of dissociation and ionization. The simulation results are compared with experiments from literature, and reasonable agreement is obtained. Some discrepancies are observed, which can probably be attributed to the simplified polymer surface kinetics assumed in the model.

  5. An argon–nitrogen–hydrogen mixed-gas plasma as a robust ionization source for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makonnen, Yoseif; Beauchemin, Diane, E-mail: diane.beauchemin@chem.queensu.ca

    2014-09-01

    Multivariate optimization of an argon–nitrogen–hydrogen mixed-gas plasma for minimum matrix effects, while maintaining analyte sensitivity as much as possible, was carried out in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In the presence of 0.1 M Na, the 33.9 ± 3.9% (n = 13 elements) analyte signal suppression on average observed in an all-argon plasma was alleviated with the optimized mixed-gas plasma, the average being − 4.0 ± 8.8%, with enhancement in several cases. An addition of 2.3% v/v N{sub 2} in the outer plasma gas, and 0.50% v/v H{sub 2} to the central channel, as a sheath around the nebulizer gas flow, was sufficient for this drastic increase in robustness. It also reduced the background from ArO{sup +} and Ar{sub 2}{sup +} as well as oxide levels by over an order of magnitude. On the other hand, the background from NO{sup +} and ArN{sup +} increased by up to an order of magnitude while the levels of doubly-charged ions increased to 7% (versus 2.7% in an argon plasma optimized for sensitivity). Furthermore, detection limits were generally degraded by 5 to 15 fold when using the mixed-gas plasma versus the argon plasma for matrix-free solution (although they were better for several elements in 0.1 M Na). Nonetheless, the drastically increased robustness allowed the direct quantitative multielement analysis of certified ore reference materials, as well as the determination of Mo and Cd in seawater, without using any matrix-matching or internal standardization. - Highlights: • Addition of N{sub 2} to the plasma gas and H{sub 2} as a sheath gas results in a very robust ICP. • ArO{sup +} and Ar{sub 2}{sup +} background and oxide levels are reduced by over an order of magnitude. • Multielement analysis of rock digests is possible with a simple external calibration. • No internal standardization or matrix-matching is required for accurate analysis. • Cd and Mo were accurately determined in undiluted seawater.

  6. Operational characteristics and non-inductive plasmas on NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Dennis

    2016-10-01

    Start-up and ramp-up of NSTX-U plasmas with nearly full solenoid pre-charge required higher loop voltage than on NSTX in agreement with modeling. NSTX-U has operated with a plasma current (Ip) of 0.65 MA at a toroidal field (BT) of 0.63 T for 2s in L-Mode. These plasmas allowed for the initial investigation of error field correction which found a difference between correction during Ip flattop and during ramp-up. Plasma control using feedback on the X-Point locations or the X-point height and outer strike point locations is routinely used. Because an ST does not have a single coil set that controls the inner gap, it was challenging to control the time at which the plasma diverted. A novel approach was used to trade off accuracy on the outer plasma shape to achieve a reproducible inner gap. These control tools allowed study of ELMy H-mode operation at Ip = 1 MA with boronized walls. A major long-term goal for NSTX-U is totally non-inductive operation. The plan calls for initiating the plasma with coaxial helicity injection (CHI) heatied by ECH, then current drive and heating by HHFW and NBI. CHI will be used in the new geometry to demonstrate results comparable to NSTX and provide information to inform plans to upgrade the available voltage from 1.65 to 2 kV next year. Low Ip plasmas will be used to study the dependence of current drive on neutral beam voltage and injection angle. Work Supported by U.S.D.O.E. Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  7. US-Japan IEC Workshop on Small Plasma and Accelerator Neutron Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miley, George H. [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering

    2007-05-25

    This report lays out the agenda for the entire workshop and then lists the abstracts for all 29 presentations. All of these presentations cover small plasma and accelerator neutron sources. A few of the presentations include: Comments about IEC History and Future Directions; Characteristics in Pulse Operation of IEC Device with Confronting Two Plasma Sources; Overview of the University of Wisconsin-Madison IEC Program; Improving IEC Particle Confinement Times Using Multiple Grids; Integral Transport Approach for Molecular Ion Processes in IEC Devices; A Counter Stream Beam D-D Neutron Generator; Low Pressure IECF Operation Using Differentially-Pumped Ion Sources, and more.

  8. Electron Acceleration by a Bichromatic Chirped Laser Pulse in Underdense Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Pocsai, Mihály András; Varró, Sándor

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical study of laser and plasma based electron acceleration is presented. An effective model has been used, in which the presence of an underdense plasma has been taken account via its index of refraction $n_{m}$. In the confines of this model, the basic phenomena can be studied by numerically solving the classical relativistic equations of motion. The key idea of this paper is the application of chirped, bichromatic laser fields. We investigated the advantages and disadvantages of mixing the second harmonic to the original $\\lambda = 800 \\, \\mathrm{nm}$ wavelength pulse. We performed calculations both for plane wave and Gaussian pulses.

  9. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-20

    The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

  10. Accelerator Studies on a possible Experiment on Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefields at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R W; Fartoukh, S; Geschonke, G; Goddard, B; Hessler, C; Hillenbrand, S; Meddahi, M; Roesler, S; Zimmermann, F; Caldwell, A; Muggli, P; Xia, G

    2011-01-01

    There has been a proposal by Caldwell et al to use proton beams as drivers for high energy linear colliders. An experimental test with CERN’s proton beams is being studied. Such a test requires a transfer line for transporting the beam to the experiment, a focusing section for beam delivery into the plasma, the plasma cell and a downstream diagnostics and dump section. The work done at CERN towards the conceptual layout and design of such a test area is presented. A possible development of such a test area into a CERN test facility for high-gradient acceleration experiments is discussed.

  11. Wire number doubling in plasma-shell regime increases z-accelerator x-ray power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Spielman, R.B.; Chandler, G.A. [and others

    1997-11-01

    Doubling the number of tungsten wires from 120 to 240, keeping the mass fixed, increased the radiated x-ray power relative to the electrical power at the insulator stack of the z accelerator by (40{+-}20)% for 8.75- and 20-mm-radii z-pinch wire arrays. Radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic calculations suggest that the arrays were operating in the {open_quotes}plasma shell{close_quotes} regime, where the plasmas generated by the individual wires merge prior to the inward implosion of the entire array.

  12. Case Studies in Space Charge and Plasma Acceleration of Charged Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Bazzani, A; Londrillo, P; Sinigardi, S; Turchetti, G

    2014-01-01

    Plasma acceleration with electron or proton driver beams is a challenging opportunity for high energy physics. An energy doubling experiment with electron drivers was successfully performed at SLAC and a key experiment AWAKE with proton drivers is on schedule at CERN. Simulations play an important role in choosing the best experimental conditions and in interpreting the results. The Vlasov equation is the theoretical tool to describe the interaction of a driver particle beam or a driver laser pulse with a plasma. Collective effects, such as tune shift and mismatch instabilities, appear in high intensity standard accelerators and are described by the Poisson-Vlasov equation. In the paper we review the Vlasov equation in electrostatic and fully electromagnetic case. The general framework of variational principles is used to derive the equation, the local form of the balance equations and related conservation laws. In the electrostatic case we remind the analytic Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (K-V) model and we propo...

  13. Direct acceleration of electrons by a CO2 laser in a curved plasma waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Longqing; Shen, Baifei

    2016-01-01

    Laser plasma interaction with micro-engineered targets at relativistic intensities has been greatly promoted by recent progress in the high contrast lasers and the manufacture of advanced micro- and nano-structures. This opens new possibilities for the physics of laser-matter interaction. Here we propose a novel approach that leverages the advantages of high-pressure CO 2 laser, laser-waveguide interaction, as well as micro-engineered plasma structure to accelerate electrons to peak energy greater than 1 GeV with narrow slice energy spread (~1%) and high overall efficiency. The acceleration gradient is 26 GV/m for a 1.3 TW CO2 laser system. The micro-bunching of a long electron beam leads to the generation of a chain of ultrashort electron bunches with the duration roughly equal to half-laser-cycle. These results open a way for developing a compact and economic electron source for diverse applications.

  14. Direct acceleration of electrons by a CO$_{2}$ laser in a curved plasma waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Longqing; Shen, Baifei

    2016-01-01

    Laser plasma interaction with micro-engineered targets at relativistic intensities has been greatly promoted by recent progress in the high contrast lasers and the manufacture of advanced micro- and nano-structures. This opens new possibilities for the physics of laser-matter interaction. Here we propose a novel approach that leverages the advantages of high-pressure CO$_{2}$ laser, laser-waveguide interaction, as well as micro-engineered plasma structure to accelerate electrons to peak energy greater than 1 GeV with narrow slice energy spread ($\\sim1\\%$) and high overall efficiency. The acceleration gradient is 26 GV/m for a 1.3 TW CO$_{2}$ laser system. The micro-bunching of a long electron beam leads to the generation of a chain of ultrashort electron bunches with the duration roughly equal to half-laser-cycle. These results open a way for developing a compact and economic electron source for diverse applications.

  15. Brilliant GeV electron beam with narrow energy spread generated by a laser plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ronghao; Lu, Haiyang; Shou, Yinren; Lin, Chen; Zhuo, Hongbin; Chen, Chia-erh; Yan, Xueqing

    2016-09-01

    The production of GeV electron beam with narrow energy spread and high brightness is investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. A controlled electron injection scheme and a method for phase-space manipulation in a laser plasma accelerator are found to be essential. The injection is triggered by the evolution of two copropagating laser pulses near a sharp vacuum-plasma transition. The collection volume is well confined and the injected bunch is isolated in phase space. By tuning the parameters of the laser pulses, the parameters of the injected electron bunch, such as the bunch length, energy spread, emittance and charge, can be adjusted. Manipulating the phase-space rotation with the rephasing technique, the injected electron bunch can be accelerated to GeV level while keeping relative energy spread below 0.5% and transverse emittance below 1.0 μ m . The results present a very promising way to drive coherent x-ray sources.

  16. Matching sub-fs electron bunches for laser-driven plasma acceleration at SINBAD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J., E-mail: jun.zhu@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Universität Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Assmann, R.W.; Dorda, U.; Marchetti, B. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    We present theoretical and numerical studies of matching sub-femtosecond space-charge-dominated electron bunch into the Laser-plasma Wake Field Accelerator (LWFA) foreseen at the SINBAD facility. The longitudinal space-charge (SC) effect induced growths of the energy spread and longitudinal phase-space chirp are major issues in the matching section, which will result in bunch elongation, emittance growth and spot size dilution. In addition, the transverse SC effect would lead to a mismatch of the beam optics if it were not compensated for. Start-to-end simulations and preliminary optimizations were carried out in order to understand the achievable beam parameters at the entrance of the plasma accelerator.

  17. The effect of external magnetic field on plasma acceleration in electromagnetic railgun channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobashev, S. V.; Zhukov, B. G.; Kurakin, R. O.; Ponyaev, S. A.; Reznikov, B. I.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the effect of an external magnetic field on the dynamics of a free plasma piston (PP) accelerated without solid striker armature in an electromagnetic railgun channel filled with various gases (argon or helium). It is established that, as the applied magnetic field grows, the velocity of a shock wave generated by PP in the channel increases. The experimental results are compared to a theoretical model that takes into account the gas pressure force behind the shock wave and the drag force that arises when erosion mass entering the channel is partly entrained by the accelerated plasma. The results of model calculations are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. The discrepancy somewhat increases with the applied field, but the maximum deviation still does not exceed 20%.

  18. On the ions acceleration via collisionless magnetic reconnection in laboratory plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzola, E.; Curreli, D.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2016-11-01

    This work presents an analysis of the ion outflow from magnetic reconnection throughout fully kinetic simulations with typical laboratory plasma values. A symmetric initial configuration for the density and magnetic field is considered across the current sheet. After analyzing the behavior of a set of nine simulations with a reduced mass ratio and with a permuted value of three initial electron temperatures and magnetic field intensity, the best ion acceleration scenario is further studied with a realistic mass ratio in terms of the ion dynamics and energy budget. Interestingly, a series of shock wave structures are observed in the outflow, resembling the shock discontinuities found in recent magnetohydrodynamic simulations. An analysis of the ion outflow at several distances from the reconnection point is presented, in light of possible laboratory applications. The analysis suggests that magnetic reconnection could be used as a tool for plasma acceleration, with applications ranging from electric propulsion to production of ion thermal beams.

  19. Modeling beam-driven and laser-driven plasma Wakefield accelerators with XOOPIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2000-06-01

    We present 2-D particle-in-cell simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approximately} 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approximately} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications to XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  20. Particle-in-cell simulations of plasma accelerators and electron-neutral collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo E.; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2001-10-01

    We present 2-D simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented particle-in-cell code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approx}10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approx}10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory and fluid simulations. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications of XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling relativistic electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  1. On the ions acceleration via collisionless magnetic reconnection in laboratory plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Cazzola, Emanuele; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of the ion outflow from magnetic reconnection throughout fully kinetic simulations with typical laboratory plasmas values. A symmetric initial configuration for the density and magnetic field is considered across the current sheet. After analyzing the behavior of a set of nine simulations with a reduced mass ratio and with a permuted value of three initial electron temperature and magnetic field intensity, the best ion acceleration scenario is further studied with a realistic mass ratio in terms of the ion dynamics and energy budget. Interestingly, a series of shock waves structures are observed in the outflow, resembling the shock discontinuities found in recent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. An analysis of the ion outflow at several distances from the reconnection point is presented, in light of possible laboratory applications. The analysis suggests that magnetic reconnection could be used as a tool for plasma acceleration, with applications ranging from electric prop...

  2. A control-oriented self-consistent model of an inductively-coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keville, Bernard; Turner, Miles

    2009-10-01

    An essential first step in the design of real time control algorithms for plasma processes is to determine dynamical relationships between actuator quantities such as gas flow rate set points and plasma states such electron density. An ideal first principles-based, control-oriented model should exhibit the simplicity and computational requirements of an empirical model and, in addition, despite sacrificing first principles detail, capture enough of the essential physics and chemistry of the process in order to provide reasonably accurate qualitative predictions. This presentation describes a control-oriented model of a cylindrical low pressure planar inductive discharge with a stove top antenna. The model consists of equivalent circuit coupled to a global model of the plasma chemistry to produce a self-consistent zero-dimensional model of the discharge. The non-local plasma conductivity and the fields in the plasma are determined from the wave equation and the two-term solution of the Boltzmann equation. Expressions for the antenna impedance and the parameters of the transformer equivalent circuit in terms of the isotropic electron distribution and the geometry of the chamber are presented.

  3. Methods for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, George C. Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2010-08-03

    A method for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). ICP-AES analysis is performed across a plurality of selected locations in the plasma on an unknown sample, collecting the light intensity at one or more selected wavelengths of one or more sought-for analytes, creating a first dataset. The first dataset is then calibrated with a calibration dataset creating a calibrated first dataset curve. If the calibrated first dataset curve has a variability along the location within the plasma for a selected wavelength, errors are present. Plasma-related errors are then corrected by diluting the unknown sample and performing the same ICP-AES analysis on the diluted unknown sample creating a calibrated second dataset curve (accounting for the dilution) for the one or more sought-for analytes. The cross-over point of the calibrated dataset curves yields the corrected value (free from plasma related errors) for each sought-for analyte.

  4. Computational hydrodynamics and optical performance of inductively-coupled plasma adaptive lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortazavi, M.; Urzay, J., E-mail: jurzay@stanford.edu; Mani, A. [Center for Turbulence Research, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-3024 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This study addresses the optical performance of a plasma adaptive lens for aero-optical applications by using both axisymmetric and three-dimensional numerical simulations. Plasma adaptive lenses are based on the effects of free electrons on the phase velocity of incident light, which, in theory, can be used as a phase-conjugation mechanism. A closed cylindrical chamber filled with Argon plasma is used as a model lens into which a beam of light is launched. The plasma is sustained by applying a radio-frequency electric current through a coil that envelops the chamber. Four different operating conditions, ranging from low to high powers and induction frequencies, are employed in the simulations. The numerical simulations reveal complex hydrodynamic phenomena related to buoyant and electromagnetic laminar transport, which generate, respectively, large recirculating cells and wall-normal compression stresses in the form of local stagnation-point flows. In the axisymmetric simulations, the plasma motion is coupled with near-wall axial striations in the electron-density field, some of which propagate in the form of low-frequency traveling disturbances adjacent to vortical quadrupoles that are reminiscent of Taylor-Görtler flow structures in centrifugally unstable flows. Although the refractive-index fields obtained from axisymmetric simulations lead to smooth beam wavefronts, they are found to be unstable to azimuthal disturbances in three of the four three-dimensional cases considered. The azimuthal striations are optically detrimental, since they produce high-order angular aberrations that account for most of the beam wavefront error. A fourth case is computed at high input power and high induction frequency, which displays the best optical properties among all the three-dimensional simulations considered. In particular, the increase in induction frequency prevents local thermalization and leads to an axisymmetric distribution of electrons even after introduction of

  5. Characterization of transmission line effects and ion-ion plasma formation in an inductively coupled plasma etch reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khater, Marwan H.

    2000-10-01

    The plasma and processing uniformity are greatly affected by the gas flow distribution and the source geometry in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etch reactors. However, a reasonably uniform source design, along with uniform gas distribution, does not always guarantee uniform plasma, because transmission line (i.e. standing wave) effects also impact its performance. In this work, we demonstrate that the gas flow distribution can have a major impact on both the plasma density profiles and etch rate uniformity at low pressures where one might expect diffusion to make gas flow distribution less important. We also present an ICP source design with a geometry that enables better control over the field profiles azimuthal symmetry despite transmission line effects. B-dot probe measurements of the free space electromagnetic fields for the new source and a comparably dimensioned standard planar coil showed improved azimuthal symmetry for the new source. We have also developed a three-dimensional electromagnetic model for ICP sources that accounts for current variations along the source length due to standing wave effects. The electromagnetic field profiles obtained from the model showed good agreement with the measured field profiles. Langmuir probe measurements showed that the new ICP source generated high density (1011--1012 cm-3) plasmas at low pressures with significantly improved azimuthal symmetry of power deposition and plasma generation. In addition, polysilicon etch rate profiles on 150 mm wafers also showed improved azimuthal symmetry and uniformity with the new ICP source. The new source was then used to investigate chlorine discharge properties and their spatial profiles in continuous wave (CW) and pulsed operation. Time-resolved Langmuir probe measurements showed that electron-free or "ion-ion" chlorine plasma forms during the afterglow (i.e. power-off) due to electron attachment. Such electron-free plasma can provide both positive and negative ion fluxes to a

  6. Evolution of plasma parameters in an Ar-N2/He inductive plasma source with magnetic pole enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, Younus; N, U. Rehman; M, Shafiq; M, Naeem; M, Zaka-Ul-Islam; M, Zakaullah

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic pole enhanced inductively coupled plasmas (MaPE-ICPs) are a promising source for plasma-based etching and have a wide range of material processing applications. In the present study Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy were used to monitor the evolution of plasma parameters in a MaPE-ICP Ar-N2/He mixture plasma. Electron density ({n}{{e}}) and temperature ({T}{{e}}), excitation temperature ({T}{{exc}}), plasma potential ({V}{{p}}), skin depth (δ ) and the evolution of the electron energy probability function (EEPF) are reported as a function of radiofrequency (RF) power, pressure and argon concentration in the mixture. It is observed that {n}{{e}} increases while {T}{{e}} decreases with increase in RF power and argon concentration in the mixture. The emission intensity of the argon line at 750.4 nm is also used to monitor the variation of the ‘high-energy tail’ of the EEPF with RF power and gas pressure. The EEPF has a ‘bi-Maxwellian’ distribution at low RF powers and higher pressure in a pure {{{N}}}2 discharge. However, it evolves into a ‘Maxwellian’ distribution at RF powers greater than 70 W for pure {{{N}}}2, and at 50 W for higher argon concentrations in the mixture. The effect of argon concentration on the temperatures of two electron groups in the ‘bi-Maxwellian’ EEPF is examined. The temperature of the low-energy electron group {T}{{L}} shows a decreasing trend with argon addition until the ‘thermalization’ of the two temperatures occurs, while the temperature of high-energy electrons {T}{{H}} decreases continuously.

  7. Enhancement of wave and acceleration of electron in plasma in the external field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the enhancement of Langmuir and ion-acoustic wave and the acceleration of the electron in collisionless plasma.in the presence of an external transverse field.Based on hydrodynamic equations,an equation formulizing the parametric instability was derived.Furthermore,the formula for ponderomotive force and the expression that describes the electron acceleration were obtained.The results show that Langmuir and ion-acoustic wave are enhanced and the charged particles can be accelerated by the coupling of wave-wave.In addition,it can be concluded that ponderomotive force,due to the coupling of the external field(pump)to the Langmuir wave(ion-acoustic wave),is the driving force to excite the parametric instability and comprises the high- and low-frequency components.

  8. The Project PLASMONX for Plasma Acceleration Experiments and a Thomson X-Ray Source at SPARC

    CERN Document Server

    Serafini, Luca; Alessandria, Franco; Bacci, Alberto; Baldeschi, Walter; Barbini, Alessandro; Bellaveglia, Marco; Bertolucci, Sergio; Biagini, Maria; Boni, Roberto; Bonifacio, Rodolfo; Boscolo, Ilario; Boscolo, Manuela; Bottigli, Ubaldo; Broggi, Francesco; Castellano, Michele; Cecchetti, Carlo A; Cialdi, Simone; Clozza, Alberto; De Martinis, Carlo; Di Pirro, Giampiero; Drago, Alessandro; Esposito, Adolfo; Ferrario, Massimo; Ficcadenti, L; Filippetto, Daniele; Fusco, Valeria; Galimberti, Marco; Gallo, Alessandro; Gatti, Giancarlo; Ghigo, Andrea; Giove, Dario; Giulietti, Antonio; Giulietti, Danilo; Gizzi, Leonida A; Golosio, Bruno; Guiducci, Susanna; Incurvati, Maurizio; Köster, Petra; Labate, Luca; Ligi, Carlo; Marcellini, Fabio; Maroli, Cesare; Mauri, Marco; Migliorati, Mauro; Mostacci, Andrea; Oliva, Pier N; Palumbo, Luigi; Pellegrino, Luigi; Petrillo, Vittoria; Piovella, Nicola; Poggiu, Angela; Pozzoli, Roberto; Preger, Miro; Ricci, Ruggero; Rome, Massimiliano; Rossi, Antonella; Sanelli, Claudio; Serio, Mario; Sgamma, Francesco; Spataro, Bruno; Stecchi, Alessandro; Stella, Angelo; Stumbo, Simone; Tazzioli, Franco; Tommasini, Paolo; Vaccarezza, Cristina; Vescovi, Mario; Vicario, Carlo

    2005-01-01

    We present the status of the activity on the project PLASMONX, which foresees the installation of a multi-TW Ti:Sa laser system at the CNR-ILIL laboratory to conduct plasma acceleration experiments and the construction of an additional beam line at SPARC to develop a Thomson X-ray source at INFN-LNF. After pursuing self-injection experiments at ILIL, when the electron beam at SPARC will be available the SPARC laser system will be upgraded to TW power level in order to conduct either external injection plasma acceleration experiments and ultra-bright X-ray pulse generation with the Thomson source. Results of numerical simulations modeling the interaction of the SPARC electron beam and the counter-propagating laser beam are presented with detailed discussion of the monochromatic X-ray beam spectra generated by Compton backscattering: X-ray energies are tunable in the range 20 to 1000 keV, with pulse duration from 30 fs to 20 ps. Preliminary simulations of plasma acceleration with self-injection are illustrated,...

  9. The effect of longitudinal density gradient on electron plasma wake field acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Tsiklauri, David

    2016-01-01

    3-, 2- and 1-dimensional, particle-in-cell, fully electromagnetic simulations of electron plasma wake field acceleration in the blow out regime are presented. Earlier results are extended by (i) studying the effect of longitudinal density gradient; (ii) avoiding use of co-moving simulation box; (iii) inclusion of ion motion; and (iv) studying fully electromagnetic plasma wake fields. It is established that injecting driving and trailing electron bunches into a positive density gradient of ten-fold increasing density over 10 cm long Lithium vapor plasma, results in spatially more compact and three times larger, compared to the uniform density case, electric fields (-6.4 x 10^{10} V/m), leading to acceleration of the trailing bunch up to 24.4 GeV (starting from initial 20.4 GeV), with an energy transfer efficiencies from leading to trailing bunch of 75 percent. In the uniform density case -2.5 x 10^{10} V/m wake is created leading to acceleration of the trailing bunch up to 22.4 GeV, with an energy transfer eff...

  10. Proton acceleration by a relativistic laser frequency-chirp driven plasma snowplow

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, Aakash A; Bingham, R A; Tsung, F S; Tableman, A R; Tzoufras, M; Mori, W B

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the use of a relativistic laser pulse with a controlled frequency chirp incident on a rising plasma density gradient to drive an acceleration structure for proton and light-ion acceleration. The Chirp Induced Transparency Acceleration (ChITA) scheme is described with an analytical model of the velocity of the snowplow at critical density on a pre-formed rising plasma density gradient that is driven by a positive-chirp in the frequency of a relativistic laser pulse. The velocity of the ChITA-snowplow is shown to depend upon rate of rise of the frequency of the relativistic laser pulse represented by $\\frac{\\epsilon_0}{\\theta}$ where, $\\epsilon_0 = \\frac{\\Delta\\omega_0}{\\omega_0}$ and chirping spatial scale-length, $\\theta$, the normalized magnetic vector potential of the laser pulse $a_0$ and the plasma density gradient scale-length, $\\alpha$. We observe using 1-D OSIRIS simulations the formation and forward propagation of ChITA-snowplow, being continuously pushed by the chirping laser at a velocity...

  11. Measurement of Neutrons Produced by Beam-Target Interactions via a Coaxial Plasma Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauble, Scott; Poehlmann, Flavio; Rieker, Gregory; Cappelli, Mark

    2011-10-01

    This poster presents a method to measure neutron yield from a coaxial plasma accelerator. Stored electrical energies between 1 and 19 kJ are discharged within a few microseconds across the electrodes of the coaxial gun, accelerating deuterium gas samples to plasma beam energies well beyond the keV energy range. The focus of this study is to examine the interaction of the plasma beam with a deuterated target by designing and fabricating a detector to measure neutron yield. Given the strong electromagnetic pulse associated with our accelerator, indirect measurement of neutrons via threshold-dependent nuclear activation serves as both a reliable and definitive indicator of high-energy particles for our application. Upon bombardment with neutrons, discs or stacks of metal foils placed near the deuterated target undergo nuclear activation reactions, yielding gamma-emitting isotopes whose decay is measured by a scintillation detector system. By collecting gamma ray spectra over time and considering nuclear cross sections, the magnitude of the original neutron pulse is inferred.

  12. Effect of Plasma Density on Proton Acceleration in a Rectangular Waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hitendra K. Malik

    2004-01-01

    Analytical studies are made for the proton acceleration during its motion in the fields of the fundamental mode excited by a high-intensity microwave in a rectangular waveguide, when the proton is injected along the propagating direction of the mode. The trajectory of the proton is calculated and the expressions are obtained for the energy gain and acceleration gradient together with the effects of plasma density, microwave frequency and waveguide width. Energy gain of 181 keV is attained by a 50 keV proton in a 0.015m ×0.020 m evacuated waveguide when 0.5times 10[10] W/m2 microwave intensity is used. However, this gain increases to 1387 keV when the waveguide is filled with a plasma having a density of 1.0 × 10 19 m-3. Higher acceleration gradients are achieved when the proton is injected with a higher initial energy and also when the microwave intensity increases. The effects of the microwave frequency and width of the waveguide are found to decrease the acceleration gradient.

  13. Enhanced ion acceleration in the transition regime from opaque to transparent plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rohini; Fiuza, Frederico; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2016-10-01

    Using Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations, we investigate ion acceleration in high-intensity laser-plasma interactions in for targets that become laser transparent to the laser during the interaction process. A theoretical model is developed to derive an optimal target electron areal density `n.L' as a function of laser normalized intensity and the pulse duration in the laser transparent regime. A large schematic parametric scan for a wide range of target electron density (n) and thickness (L) is performed and shown to be consistent with analytical prediction. Our simulations show that iIon acceleration in optimal conditions relies on the re-heating of the expanding sheath electrons by the laser and enhancing enhancement of the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) electric field after the plasma becomes transparent to the laser light. This enhanced TNSA field decays slower compared to conventional TNSA resulting in significantly higher proton energies. Our results open the way to the exploration of optimized ion acceleration in the transparency regime, not only with nm-scale foils but also with recently developed micron-scale hydrogen jets. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science (FWP 100182).

  14. Plasma characterization of the superconducting proton linear accelerator plasma generator using a 2 MHz compensated Langmuir probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitzer, C; Kronberger, M; Lettry, J; Sanchez-Arias, J; Störi, H

    2012-02-01

    The CERN study for a superconducting proton Linac (SPL) investigates the design of a pulsed 5 GeV Linac operating at 50 Hz. As a first step towards a future SPL H(-) volume ion source, a plasma generator capable of operating at Linac4 or nominal SPL settings has been developed and operated at a dedicated test stand. The hydrogen plasma is heated by an inductively coupled RF discharge e(-) and ions are confined by a magnetic multipole cusp field similar to the currently commissioned Linac4 H(-) ion source. Time-resolved measurements of the plasma potential, temperature, and electron energy distribution function obtained by means of a RF compensated Langmuir probe along the axis of the plasma generator are presented. The influence of the main tuning parameters, such as RF power and frequency and the timing scheme is discussed with the aim to correlate them to optimum H(-) ion beam parameters measured on an ion source test stand. The effects of hydrogen injection settings which allow operation at 50 Hz repetition rate are discussed.

  15. Nonthermal Particle Acceleration in 3D Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection in Pair Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Gregory R.; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.

    2017-07-01

    As a fundamental process converting magnetic to plasma energy in high-energy astrophysical plasmas, relativistic magnetic reconnection is a leading explanation for the acceleration of particles to the ultrarelativistic energies that are necessary to power nonthermal emission (especially X-rays and gamma-rays) in pulsar magnetospheres and pulsar wind nebulae, coronae and jets of accreting black holes, and gamma-ray bursts. An important objective of plasma astrophysics is therefore the characterization of nonthermal particle acceleration (NTPA) effected by reconnection. Reconnection-powered NTPA has been demonstrated over a wide range of physical conditions using large 2D kinetic simulations. However, its robustness in realistic 3D reconnection—in particular, whether the 3D relativistic drift-kink instability (RDKI) disrupts NTPA—has not been systematically investigated, although pioneering 3D simulations have observed NTPA in isolated cases. Here, we present the first comprehensive study of NTPA in 3D relativistic reconnection in collisionless electron-positron plasmas, characterizing NTPA as the strength of 3D effects is varied systematically via the length in the third dimension and the strength of the guide magnetic field. We find that, while the RDKI prominently perturbs 3D reconnecting current sheets, it does not suppress particle acceleration, even for zero guide field; fully 3D reconnection robustly and efficiently produces nonthermal power-law particle spectra closely resembling those obtained in 2D. This finding provides strong support for reconnection as the key mechanism powering high-energy flares in various astrophysical systems. We also show that strong guide fields significantly inhibit NTPA, slowing reconnection and limiting the energy available for plasma energization, yielding steeper and shorter power-law spectra.

  16. Inductively Coupled Plasma and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Etching of InGaAlP Compound Semiconductor System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abernathy, C.R.; Hobson, W.S.; Hong, J.; Lambers, E.S.; Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-11-04

    Current and future generations of sophisticated compound semiconductor devices require the ability for submicron scale patterning. The situation is being complicated since some of the new devices are based on a wider diversity of materials to be etched. Conventional IUE (Reactive Ion Etching) has been prevalent across the industry so far, but has limitations for materials with high bond strengths or multiple elements. IrI this paper, we suggest high density plasmas such as ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) and ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma), for the etching of ternary compound semiconductors (InGaP, AIInP, AlGaP) which are employed for electronic devices like heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) or high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), and photonic devices such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers. High density plasma sources, opeiating at lower pressure, are expected to meet target goals determined in terms of etch rate, surface morphology, surface stoichiometry, selectivity, etc. The etching mechanisms, which are described in this paper, can also be applied to other III-V (GaAs-based, InP-based) as well as III-Nitride since the InGaAIP system shares many of the same properties.

  17. Optimized condition for etching fused-silica phase gratings with inductively coupled plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shunquan; Zhou, Changhe; Ru, Huayi; Zhang, Yanyan

    2005-07-20

    Polymer deposition is a serious problem associated with the etching of fused silica by use of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) technology, and it usually prevents further etching. We report an optimized etching condition under which no polymer deposition will occur for etching fused silica with ICP technology. Under the optimized etching condition, surfaces of the fabricated fused silica gratings are smooth and clean. Etch rate of fused silica is relatively high, and it demonstrates a linear relation between etched depth and working time. Results of the diffraction of gratings fabricated under the optimized etching condition match theoretical results well.

  18. Analysis of tree leaves, bark and wood by sequential inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, A. A.

    The analysis of extracts from tree leaf, bark and wood samples for Ca, Mg, K, Na, P, Mn, Fe, Al, B, Cu and Zn by inductively coupled argon plasma sequential emission spectrometry is described. Recovery percentages for simulated tree extracts and for spiked tree samples are presented together with typical analysis values for a leaf and a wood sample. The choice of analytical line for each element is discussed and spectral interferences, not listed in the ICP tables of Boumans, of Cu on the 214.9 nm line of P and of Fe on the 249.7 nm line of B are noted.

  19. Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical-Emission Spectroscopy Determination of Major and Minor Elements in Vinegar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu AKPINAR-BAYIZIT

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study characterizes the mineral content of vinegar samples. The concentrations of Na, K, Ca, Mg and P (major elements as well as Fe, Mn, Sn, Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd (minor elements were determined in 35 commercial vinegar samples using inductively coupled plasma optical-emission spectrometry (ICP-OES. The elements with the highest concentrations were K, Na, Ca, Mg and P. The concentrations of heavy metals in the vinegar samples, including Cd, Ni, Sn and Pb, were not considered a health risk.

  20. [Determination of total sulfur in coal by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong-yan; Zhang, Yuan-li

    2002-02-01

    A direct method was reported for the determination of total sulfur in coal by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The dissolution conditions of coal samples as well as interference conditions of hydrochloric acid and matrix were studied. The recommended method not only proved to be simple and rapid than traditional gravimetric method but show satisfying precision and accuracy as well. The results of samples are as same as gravimetry. The recoveries are more than 96%, and the relative standard deviation of six samples are less than 3%.