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Sample records for inducing intestinal lesions

  1. Exacerbation of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small intestinal lesions by antisecretory drugs in rats: the role of intestinal motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hiroshi; Amagase, Kikuko; Takeuchi, Koji

    2012-11-01

    Antisecretory drugs such as histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2-RAs) and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly used for the treatment of gastric and duodenal ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, the effects of these drugs on NSAID-induced small intestinal ulcers are not fully understood. The effects of H2-RAs and PPIs on NSAID-induced gastrointestinal lesions and small intestinal motility were examined in rats. Male Wistar rats (180-220 g) were used. Indomethacin (10 mg/kg) was administered orally in fasted or fed rats, and gastrointestinal lesions were examined 24 h after indomethacin administration. Intestinal motility was measured by using a balloon method under urethane anesthesia. Indomethacin produced multiple lesions in the gastric corpus in fasted rats and in the small intestine in fed rats: 1) H2-RAs (cimetidine, ranitidine, and famotidine) and PPIs (omeprazole, lansoprazole, and rabeprazole) markedly inhibited the formation of gastric lesions. 2) The drugs, except for lansoprazole, increased intestinal lesions. 3) H2-RAs augmented the increase in intestinal motility caused by indomethacin, and the effects of H2-RAs on motility and intestinal lesions were markedly inhibited by atropine. 4) Lansoprazole inhibited the formation of intestinal lesions, and the effect was prevented by both pharmacological ablation of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons and pretreatment with N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, a selective inhibitor of nitric-oxide synthesis. The results suggest that: 1) inhibition of acid secretion by antisecretory drugs may exacerbate NSAID-induced intestinal lesions, 2) H2-RAs further aggravate lesions by increasing intestinal motility via the activation of cholinergic pathways, and 3) lansoprazole protects the intestinal mucosa against NSAID-related ulcerative stimuli.

  2. Natural Outbreak of BVDV-1d-Induced Mucosal Disease Lacking Intestinal Lesions.

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    Bianchi, M V; Konradt, G; de Souza, S O; Bassuino, D M; Silveira, S; Mósena, A C S; Canal, C W; Pavarini, S P; Driemeier, D

    2017-03-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) belongs to the Pestivirus genus, which is further divided into subgenotypes (1a-1u and 2a-c). When persistent infection occurs, the calf will be immunotolerant to BVDV and possibly develop mucosal disease. This study describes an outbreak of BVDV-1d-induced mucosal disease lacking intestinal lesions. Eleven calves presented with anorexia, sialorrhea, lameness, recumbency, and death. Three calves were necropsied, showing ulceration of the interdigital skin and the oral and nasal mucosa; linear ulcers in the tongue, esophagus, and rumen; and rounded ulcers in the abomasum. Microscopically, mucosa and skin had superficial necrosis, with single-cell necrosis and vacuolation in epithelial cells, and severe parakeratosis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed BVDV antigen in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells in skin and mucosa. All 11 dead calves were positive upon reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the detection of Pestivirus along with another 11 live calves from the herd, which were positive again by RT-PCR and IHC after a 4-week interval. Sequencing of the 5' untranslated region and N-terminal protease showed that viruses from these 22 calves were homologous and of subgenotype BVDV-1d. Cytopathic BVDV was isolated from 8 of 11 dead calves, but only noncytopathic BVDV was isolated from the 11 live animals. The findings indicate that this was an outbreak of mucosal disease caused by BVDV-1d, with high morbidity, and lesions restricted to the upper alimentary system and skin and absent from intestine. Thus, the epidemiological and pathological features in this form of mucosal disease may be similar to vesicular diseases, including foot and mouth disease.

  3. Oral and nasal administration of chicken type Ⅱ collagen suppresses adjuvant arthritis in rats with intestinal lesions induced by meloxicam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Qiu Zheng; Wei Wei; Yu-Xian Shen; Min Dai; Li-Hua Liu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the curative effects of oral and nasal administration of chicken type Ⅱ collagen (CⅡ) on adjuvant arthritis (AA) in rats with meloxicam-induced intestinal lesions.METHODS: AA model in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with or without intestinal lesions induced by meloxicam was established and those rats were divided randomly into six groups which included AA model, AA model+meloxicam,AA model+oral CⅡ, AA model+nasal CⅡ, AA model+meloxicam+oral CⅡ and AA model+meloxicam+nasal CⅡ (n = 12). Rats was treated with meloxicam intragastrically for 7 d from d 14 after immunization with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), and then treated with chicken CⅡ intragastrically or nasally for 7 d. Histological changes of right hind knees were examined. Hind paw secondary swelling and intestinal lesions were evaluated. Synoviocyte proliferation was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H tetrazolium bromide (MTT)method. Activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and diamine oxidase (DAO) from supernatants of intestinal homogenates were assayed by spectrophotometric analysis.RESULTS: Intragastrical administration of meloxicam (1.5 mg/kg) induced multiple intestinal lesions in AA rats.There was a significant decrease of intestinal DAO activities in AA+meloxicam group (P<0.01) and AA model group (P<0.01) compared with normal group. DAO activities of intestinal homogenates in AA+meloxicam group were significantly less than those in AA rats (P<0.01). There was a significant increase of intestinal MPO activities in AA+meloxicam group compared with normal control (P<0.01). Oral or nasal administration of CⅡ (20 μg/kg)could suppress the secondary hind paw swelling(P<0.05for oral CⅡ; P<0.01 for nasal CⅡ), synoviocyte proliferation (P<0.01) and histopathological degradation in AA rats, but they had no significant effects on DAO and MPO changes.However, oral administration of CⅡ (20 μg/kg) showed the limited efficacy on arthritis

  4. Protection by Short-Chain Fatty Acids against 1-β-d-Arabinofuranosylcytosine-Induced Intestinal Lesions in Germfree Mice†

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Mariana Gontijo; Bambirra,Eduardo Alves; NICOLI,Jacques Robert; Cara, Denise Carmona; VIEIRA,Enio Cardillo; Alvarez-Leite,Jacqueline

    1999-01-01

    In germfree mice, the administration of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) protected the intestinal mucosa from damage produced by 1-β-d-arabinofuranosylcytosine (Ara-C). Animals receiving SCFA and Ara-C had intestinal morphologies closer to normal than the control animals, which had severe intestinal lesions. We concluded that orally administrated SCFA reduce intestinal lesions, improving the mucosa pattern of the small intestine and colon.

  5. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli induce attaching and effacing lesions and hemorrhagic colitis in human and bovine intestinal xenograft models

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    Lilach Golan

    2011-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC O157:H7 is an important cause of diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans worldwide. The two major virulence determinants of EHEC are the Shiga toxins (Stx and the type III secretion system (T3SS, including the injected effectors. Lack of a good model system hinders the study of EHEC virulence. Here, we investigated whether bovine and human intestinal xenografts in SCID mice can be useful for studying EHEC and host tissue interactions. Fully developed, germ-free human and bovine small intestine and colon were established by subcutaneous transplantation of human and bovine fetal gut into SCID mice. Xenografts were allowed to develop for 3–4 months and thereafter were infected by direct intraluminal inoculation of Stx-negative derivatives of EHEC O157:H7, strain EDL933. The small intestine and colon xenografts closely mimicked the respective native tissues. Upon infection, EHEC induced formation of typical attaching and effacing lesions and tissue damage that resembled hemorrhagic colitis in colon xenografts. By contrast, xenografts infected with an EHEC mutant deficient in T3SS remained undamaged. Furthermore, EHEC did not attach to or damage the epithelium of small intestinal tissue, and these xenografts remained intact. EHEC damaged the colon in a T3SS-dependent manner, and this model is therefore useful for studying the molecular details of EHEC interactions with live human and bovine intestinal tissue. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Stx and gut microflora are not essential for EHEC virulence in the human gut.

  6. The intestinal lesion of autistic spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jass, Jeremy R

    2005-08-01

    This editorial briefly reviews the significance of lymphoid nodular hyperplasia in the intestinal tract of children with autistic spectrum disorder. The distinction between physiological and pathological lymphoid hyperplasia of the intestinal tract is of importance in the context of a possible causative link with autism. A primary intestinal lesion may occur as part of the broad spectrum of immunological disorders to which autistic children are prone. This could result in increased intestinal permeability to peptides of dietary origin which may then lead to disruption of neuroregulatory mechanisms required for normal brain development. Alternatively, there could be a primary defect in the translocation and processing of factors derived from the intestinal lumen. These possibilities deserve further investigation and should not be lost in the fog of the controversy regarding the role of measles/mumps/rubella vaccination in the aetiology of autistic spectrum disorder.

  7. Evidence for immunosurveillance in intestinal premalignant lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, M; Lindberg, K; Karlén, P; Ost, A; Thörn, M; Winqvist, O; Eberhardson, M

    2010-05-01

    The immunosurveillance theory argues that the immune system recognizes tumour-specific antigens expressed by transformed cells, which results in the destruction of cancer precursors before they become clinically manifest. As a model for the development of cancer, we set out to study premalignant lesions and immune responses in sentinel lymph nodes from patients with long-standing ulcerative colitis and progression of mucosal dysplasia. Mesenteric lymph nodes draining dysplastic and normal intestinal segments were identified by sentinel node technique during surgery in 13 patients with ulcerative colitis who were subjected to colectomy because of intestinal dysplasia. T cells were extracted from the lymph nodes and analysed by flow cytometry, and lymphocyte proliferation assays were set up in the presence of extracts from dysplastic and normal intestinal mucosa. Increase in CD4/CD8 ratio was observed in sentinel lymph nodes draining dysplastic epithelium compared to normal mucosa. The increase in CD4(+) T cells in relation to CD8(+) T cells correlated with the degree of dysplasia reflected by a significant increase in the ratio against low-grade dysplasia compared to indefinite dysplastic lesions. The T-cell response was specific to antigens from dysplastic epithelial lining as seen in proliferation assays. The observation suggests an important surveillance role for the immune system against premalignant intestinal lesions in patients with long-standing ulcerative colitis.

  8. The Protective Effects of Curcumin on Experimental Acute Liver Lesion Induced by Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion through Inhibiting the Pathway of NF-κB in a Rat Model

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    Zhe Fan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In this study, we investigated the protective effect and mechanism of curcumin on a rat model of intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R, which induces an acute liver lesion. Methods. Curcumin was injected into rats in the curcumin groups through left femoral vein. The same volume of vehicle (0.9% normal saline was injected into sham and I/R groups. Blood and liver tissue were gathered for serological and histopathological determination. Results. Intestinal I/R led to severe liver injury manifested as a significant increase in serum AST and ALT levels; all of those were reduced by treatment with curcumin. Simultaneously, the activity of SOD in liver decreased after intestinal I/R, which was increased by curcumin treatment. On the other hand, curcumin reduced MPO activity of liver tissue, as well as serum IL-6 and TNF-α levels observably. This is in parallel with the decreased level of liver intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB expression. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that curcumin treatment attenuates liver lesion induced by intestinal I/R, attributable to the antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effect via inhibition of the NF-κB pathway.

  9. Radio-induced brain lesions

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    Gorgan Mircea Radu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Radiotherapy, an important tool in multimodal oncologic treatment, can cause radio-induced brain lesion development after a long period of time following irradiation.

  10. [Natural history of intestinal lesions in inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaugerie, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    Crohn's disease may involve any part of the digestive tract from mouth to anus, but affects mainly the distal ileum and the,colon. At diagnosis, perianal lesions are observed in 20% of the cases. During the disease course, strictures develop in the majority of patients with ileal disease, while penetrating lesions (fistulas and abscesses) develop in half of the patients. Only one third of patients with colonic involvement will develop structuring or penetrating lesions. Intestinal lesions of ulcerative colitis involve constantly the rectum and may extend continuously throughout the colon. At diagnosis, lesions involve the rectum, the left colon and most of the colon in similar proportions. Subsequent extension of the lesions over 20 years is observed in half of the patients. In Crohn's disease, 40%-50% of the patients require intestinal resection at 10 years. The risk of colectomy in ulcerative colitis is about 1% per year Dysplasia and cancer may complicate longstanding extensive colonic lesions in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Malignant transformation of chronic inflammatory lesions may also occur in patients with longstanding lesions of the small bowel in Crohn's disease.

  11. Effect of long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy and healing effect of irsogladine on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small-intestinal lesions in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Yuichi; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Ota, Kazuhiro; Harada, Satoshi; Edogawa, Shoko; Narabayashi, Ken; Nouda, Sadaharu; Okada, Toshihiko; Kakimoto, Kazuki; Kuramoto, Takanori; Inoue, Takuya; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2015-07-01

    This study assessed time-course changes of the small intestinal lesions during long-term treatment with diclofenac sodium plus omeprazole and the effects of irsogladine on such lesions. Thirty two healthy volunteers were treated with diclofenac sodium (75 mg/day) plus omeprazole (10 mg/day) for 6 weeks, with irsogladine (4 mg/day) added from weeks 6 to 10 (Group A) or with diclofenac sodium plus irsogladine for 6 weeks (Group B). Five volunteers received diclofenac sodium plus omeprazole for 10 weeks (Group C). Subjects underwent capsule endoscopy at each time. In Group A, the number of lesions remarkably increased at week 2, but the worse was not found at week 6 compared with week 2, whereas no exacerbation of lesions was observed in Group B. Additional treatment with irsogladine from weeks 6 to 10 in Group A significantly decreased the number of lesions at weeks 10 compared with Group C. In Group C, no significant change in lesions was observed since weeks 2. In conclusions, a PPI did not prevent the occurrence of small intestinal damage. However such lesions were not aggravated since weeks 2. These suggested mucosal adaptation may occur in the small intestine. Irsogladine was effective in both preventing and healing such lesions.

  12. [Segmental ischemic lesions of the mesenteric small intestine].

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    Maurano, A; Cirillo, L C; de Lutio di Castelguidone, E; Fondacaro, R

    1987-01-01

    Segmental ischemic disease consists of segmental infarctions and ischemic stenoses. Vasculitis (LES, polyarteritis nodosa, Schönlein-Henoch syndrome), thrombosis, arteriosclerotic changes, mechanical obstructions (adhesions, hernia, volvulus, traumas), hemorrhagic disorders are the most common causes of these intestinal lesions. The authors report their experience achieved during three years on 428 small bowel examinations; among these, 197 were double contrast enemas. Ten patients showed roentgenographic features referred to vascular diseases: 1 LES, 1 Schönlein-Henoch syndrome, 3 polyarteritis nodosa, 5 spontaneous hemorrhagic disorders or due to treatment with anticoagulants. The authors, after a review of the radiological findings, emphasize the high sensitivity and low specificity of double contrast small bowel enema. Furthermore they underline the usefulness of this method in demonstrating and monitoring intestinal pathologic changes.

  13. Radiation-induced intestinal inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meritxell Mollà; Julián Panés

    2007-01-01

    Radiation induces an important inflammatory response in the irradiated organs, characterized by leukocyte infiltration and vascular changes that are the main limiting factor in the application of this therapeutic modality for the treatment of cancer. Recently, a considerable investigative effort has been directed at determining the molecular mechanisms by which radiation induces leukocyte recruitment, in order to create strategies to prevent intestinal inflammatory damage. In these review, we consider current available evidence on the factors governing the process of leukocyte recruitment in irradiated organs, mainly derived from experimental studies, with special attention to adhesion molecules, and their value as therapeutic targets.

  14. Retrospective Comparison of Gastrosplenic Entrapment of the Small Intestine to Other Strangulating Small Intestinal Lesions in Adult Horses.

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    Bergren, Amanda L; Credille, Brent C; Epstein, Kira L; Giguère, Steeve

    2015-07-01

    To compare clinical data of horses with entrapment of the small intestine by the gastrosplenic ligament (ESIGL) to clinical data of horses with other strangulating small intestinal lesions. Retrospective case series. Medical records (January 2001-December 2011) of horses that had exploratory celiotomy for acute abdominal pain associated with strangulating small intestinal lesions were reviewed. Signalment, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic variables, surgical findings and surgical procedures performed, postoperative data and short-term survival were recorded. Clinical findings included excessive nasogastric reflux and abnormal abdominal fluid. Horses with ESIGL were significantly more likely to require intestinal resection and anastomosis and produced significantly less reflux postoperatively than horses with other strangulating small intestinal obstructions. Geldings were significantly more likely to develop ESIGL than mares or stallions. Quarter Horse or Quarter Horse type breeds were predisposed to ESIGL. Survival to hospital discharge in horses with ESIGL (16/22; 72.7%) was significantly higher than that of horses with other strangulating small intestinal obstructions (92/183; 50%). ESIGL was more prevalent in this population of horses evaluated for acute abdominal pain than in previous studies, accounting for 10.7% of all horses with strangulating small intestinal lesions. Geldings and Quarter Horse or Quarter Horse related breeds are predisposed to this condition. The prognosis for survival to hospital discharge was fair to good. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  15. Chemically induced mouse models of intestinal inflammation.

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    Wirtz, Stefan; Neufert, Clemens; Weigmann, Benno; Neurath, Markus F

    2007-01-01

    Animal models of intestinal inflammation are indispensable for our understanding of the pathogenesis of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease in humans. Here, we provide protocols for establishing murine 2,4,6-trinitro benzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-, oxazolone- and both acute and chronic dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis, the most widely used chemically induced models of intestinal inflammation. In the former two models, colitis is induced by intrarectal administration of the covalently reactive reagents TNBS/oxazolone, which are believed to induce a T-cell-mediated response against hapten-modified autologous proteins/luminal antigens. In the DSS model, mice are subjected several days to drinking water supplemented with DSS, which seems to be directly toxic to colonic epithelial cells of the basal crypts. The procedures for the hapten models of colitis and acute DSS colitis can be accomplished in about 2 weeks but the protocol for chronic DSS colitis takes about 2 months.

  16. Benign Lesions in Mucosa Adjacent to Intestinal-Type Sinonasal Adenocarcinoma

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    Blanca Vivanco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure to wood dust is a strong risk factor for the development of intestinal-type sinonasal adenocarcinoma (ITAC; however, knowledge on possible precursor lesions or biomarkers is limited. Fifty-one samples of tumor-adjacent mucosa and 19 control samples of mucosa from the unaffected fossa of ITAC patients were evaluated for histological changes and p53 protein expression. Mild dysplasia was observed in 14%, cuboidal metaplasia in 57%, intestinal metaplasia in 8%, squamous metaplasia in 24%, and cylindrocellular hyperplasia in 53% of cases. P53 immunopositivity was generally weak occurring most frequently in squamous metaplasia. Wood dust etiology did not appear of influence on the histological changes, but p53 showed a tendency for higher positivity. Dysplasia adjacent to tumor was indicative of subsequent development of recurrence. In conclusion, precursor lesions do occur in mucosa adjacent to ITAC. This is clinically important, because it may justify the screening of high-risk individuals such as woodworkers.

  17. Intestinal lesions are associated with altered intestinal microbiome and are more frequent in children and young adults with cystic fibrosis and cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flass, Thomas; Tong, Suhong; Frank, Daniel N; Wagner, Brandie D; Robertson, Charles E; Kotter, Cassandra Vogel; Sokol, Ronald J; Zemanick, Edith; Accurso, Frank; Hoffenberg, Edward J; Narkewicz, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Cirrhosis (CIR) occurs in 5-7% of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We hypothesized that alterations in intestinal function in CF contribute to the development of CIR. Determine the frequency of macroscopic intestinal lesions, intestinal inflammation, intestinal permeability and characterize fecal microbiome in CF CIR subjects and CF subjects with no liver disease (CFnoLIV). 11 subjects with CFCIR (6 M, 12.8 yrs ± 3.8) and 19 matched with CFnoLIV (10 M, 12.6 yrs ± 3.4) underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, intestinal permeability testing by urinary lactulose: mannitol excretion ratio, fecal calprotectin determination and fecal microbiome characterization. CFCIR and CFnoLIV did not differ in key demographics or CF complications. CFCIR had higher GGT (59±51 U/L vs 17±4 p = 0.02) and lower platelet count (187±126 vs 283±60 p = 0.04) and weight (-0.86 ± 1.0 vs 0.30 ± 0.9 p = 0.002) z scores. CFCIR had more severe intestinal mucosal lesions on capsule endoscopy (score ≥4, 4/11 vs 0/19 p = 0.01). Fecal calprotectin was similar between CFCIR and CFnoLIV (166 μg/g ±175 vs 136 ± 193 p = 0.58, nl Bacteroides were decreased in relative abundance in CFCIR and were associated with lower capsule endoscopy score whereas Clostridium were more abundant in CFCIR and associated with higher capsule endoscopy score. CFCIR is associated with increased intestinal mucosal lesions, slower small bowel transit time and alterations in fecal microbiome. Abnormal intestinal permeability and elevated fecal calprotectin are common in all CF subjects. Disturbances in intestinal function in CF combined with changes in the microbiome may contribute to the development of hepatic fibrosis and intestinal lesions.

  18. Kinetics of appearance of intestinal lesions in mice mono-associated with a lethal or non-lethal strain of Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castex, F; Jouvert, S; Bastide, M; Corthier, G

    1994-02-01

    The kinetics of the appearance of intestinal lesions induced by orogastric inoculation of gnotobiotic mice with a lethal strain of Clostridium difficile (VPI) that produced toxins A and B in vivo and in vitro was studied and compared with the lesions induced by non-lethal C. difficile strain 786 that produced toxins A and B in vitro but only toxin B in measurable amounts in vivo. Different portions of the intestine were removed 12, 20, 26 and 30 h after inoculation and studied by scanning electronmicroscopy. The remaining portions were homogenised for enumeration of C. difficile and quantification of toxin A by enzyme immunoassay and toxin B by cytotoxicity. The results showed that, following inoculation: (i) measurable amounts of both toxins were necessary to produce lesions; (ii) with strain VPI, the caecum and the colon were rapidly impaired and completely destroyed after 1 day, whereas the small intestine was damaged to a lesser extent; (iii) C. difficile strain 786 did not cause mucosal damage but induced mucus-like or serum-like secretion and morphological changes in the caecal enterocytes only.

  19. Perfil inmunohistoquímico de los adenocarcinomas nasosinusales de tipo intestinal y lesiones premalignas

    OpenAIRE

    Vivanco Allende, Blanca

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: Los adenocarcinomas nasosinusales tipo intestinal (ITAC) son tumores primarios malignos de la cavidad nasal y los senos paranasales fuertemente relacionados con la exposición al polvo de madera. Se presentan con una clínica anodina, se diagnostican en estadios tardíos y muestran una supervivencia del 50% a los 5 años. Se han realizado varios estudios de expresión inmunohistoquímica (IHQ) con limitado número de casos. Aún no se ha demostrado la existencia de claras lesiones precu...

  20. Chemically induced intestinal damage models in zebrafish larvae.

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    Oehlers, Stefan H; Flores, Maria Vega; Hall, Christopher J; Okuda, Kazuhide S; Sison, John Oliver; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S

    2013-06-01

    Several intestinal damage models have been developed using zebrafish, with the aim of recapitulating aspects of human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These experimentally induced inflammation models have utilized immersion exposure to an array of colitogenic agents (including live bacteria, bacterial products, and chemicals) to induce varying severity of inflammation. This technical report describes methods used to generate two chemically induced intestinal damage models using either dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) or trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Methods to monitor intestinal damage and inflammatory processes, and chemical-genetic methods to manipulate the host response to injury are also described.

  1. New Neonatal Porcine Diarrhea Syndrome in Denmark Characterization of the intestinal lesions and identification of the etiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonach, Beata Renata; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Boye, Mette

    , an animal model of NNPDS has been established. This model can provide basis for future studies on the pathogenesis of this new syndrome.The results of the histopathological investigation performed on 51 diarrheic and 50 non-diarrheic piglets showed that 63% of the diarrheic piglets developed villus atrophy...... was shown by FISH investigation.In order to provide basis for further studies on the pathogenesis of the syndrome, an animal model of NNPDS has been established (Manuscript IV). Eleven litters of newborn piglets were orally challenged with intestinal tissue homogenate derived from four diarrheic field herds...... with the filtrate deprived of bacteria of three case homogenates developed diarrhea. This indicates that NNPDS is of a bacterial, rather than a viral nature. The course of experimentally induced diarrhea differed in severity of the symptoms and histological lesions depending on the inoculum used in the experiment...

  2. Effects of ceftriaxone-induced intestinal dysbacteriosis on dendritic cells of small intestine in mice.

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    Li, Ming; Li, Weihua; Wen, Shu; Liu, Yinhui; Tang, Li

    2013-08-01

    Intestinal microflora plays a pivotal role in the development of the innate immune system and is essential in shaping adaptive immunity. Dysbacteriosis of intestinal microflora induces altered immune responses and results in disease susceptibility. Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen-presenting cells, have gained increasing attention because they connect innate and adaptive immunity. They generate both immunity in response to stimulation by pathogenic bacteria and immune tolerance in the presence of commensal bacteria. However, few studies have examined the effects of intestinal dysbacteriosis on DCs. In this study, changes of DCs in the small intestine of mice under the condition of dysbacteriosis induced by ceftriaxone sodium were investigated. It was found that intragastric administration of ceftriaxone sodium caused severe dysteriosis in mice. Compared with controls, numbers of DCs in mice with dysbacteriosis increased significantly (P = 0.0001). However, the maturity and antigen-presenting ability of DCs were greatly reduced. In addition, there was a significant difference in secretion of IL-10 and IL-12 between DCs from mice with dysbacteriosis and controls. To conclude, ceftriaxone-induced intestinal dysbacteriosis strongly affected the numbers and functions of DCs. The present data suggest that intestinal microflora plays an important role in inducing and maintaining the functions of DCs and thus is essential for the connection between innate and adaptive immune responses.

  3. Liver injury from ampicillin-induced intestinal microbiota distresses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    characterize changes in intestinal microbiota induced by ..... and Management of Laboratory and Other Research. Animals ... Antibiotics on Colonization Resistance. Infect. Immun ... Saunders Company, Philadelphia;1986; p 1845. 20. Knothe ...

  4. Intestinal lesions are associated with altered intestinal microbiome and are more frequent in children and young adults with cystic fibrosis and cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Flass

    Full Text Available Cirrhosis (CIR occurs in 5-7% of cystic fibrosis (CF patients. We hypothesized that alterations in intestinal function in CF contribute to the development of CIR.Determine the frequency of macroscopic intestinal lesions, intestinal inflammation, intestinal permeability and characterize fecal microbiome in CF CIR subjects and CF subjects with no liver disease (CFnoLIV.11 subjects with CFCIR (6 M, 12.8 yrs ± 3.8 and 19 matched with CFnoLIV (10 M, 12.6 yrs ± 3.4 underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, intestinal permeability testing by urinary lactulose: mannitol excretion ratio, fecal calprotectin determination and fecal microbiome characterization.CFCIR and CFnoLIV did not differ in key demographics or CF complications. CFCIR had higher GGT (59±51 U/L vs 17±4 p = 0.02 and lower platelet count (187±126 vs 283±60 p = 0.04 and weight (-0.86 ± 1.0 vs 0.30 ± 0.9 p = 0.002 z scores. CFCIR had more severe intestinal mucosal lesions on capsule endoscopy (score ≥4, 4/11 vs 0/19 p = 0.01. Fecal calprotectin was similar between CFCIR and CFnoLIV (166 μg/g ±175 vs 136 ± 193 p = 0.58, nl <120. Lactulose:mannitol ratio was elevated in 27/28 subjects and was slightly lower in CFCIR vs CFnoLIV (0.08±0.02 vs 0.11±0.05, p = 0.04, nl ≤0.03. Small bowel transit time was longer in CFCIR vs CFnoLIV (195±42 min vs 167±68 p<0.001, nl 274 ± 41. Bacteroides were decreased in relative abundance in CFCIR and were associated with lower capsule endoscopy score whereas Clostridium were more abundant in CFCIR and associated with higher capsule endoscopy score.CFCIR is associated with increased intestinal mucosal lesions, slower small bowel transit time and alterations in fecal microbiome. Abnormal intestinal permeability and elevated fecal calprotectin are common in all CF subjects. Disturbances in intestinal function in CF combined with changes in the microbiome may contribute to the development of hepatic fibrosis and intestinal lesions.

  5. Bovine colostrum improves intestinal function following formula-induced gut inflammation in preterm pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støy, Ann Cathrine Findal; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Thymann, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    , abundance and location of bacteria, and inflammation markers were investigated. Results NEC severity and interleukins (IL)-1β and -8 protein concentrations were lower, while villus height, galactose absorption, and brush-border enzyme activities were increased in the distal small intestine in COLOS......Background & aims Only few hours of formula feeding may induce proinflammatory responses and predispose to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm pigs. We hypothesized that bovine colostrum, rich in bioactive factors, would improve intestinal function in preterm pigs following an initial...... exposure to formula feeding after some days of total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Methods After receiving TPN for 2 days, preterm pigs were fed formula (FORM, n = 14), bovine colostrum (COLOS, n = 6), or formula (6 h) followed by bovine colostrum (FCOLOS, n = 14). Intestinal lesions, function, and structure...

  6. Associations between intestinal lesions and detection of Clostridium perfringens type A or beta-2 toxin in neonatal piglets with diarrhoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Hanne; Jonach, Beata Renata; Kokotovic, Branko

    Objective: To evaluate associations between gross and histopathological lesions and the presence of Clostridium perfringens type A (CpA) and beta-2 toxin in piglets from 4 herds with outbreaks of diarrhoea. Methods: Pathological examinations on 51 diarrhoeic piglets aged 3-7 days were carried out....... CpA was cultured and typed by PCR. A Clostridium perfringens spp targeted probe was used for flourescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and detection of beta-2 toxin in intestinal contents was performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: Piglets without intestinal lesions had...

  7. Nasogastric tube syndrome induced by an indwelling long intestinal tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Naoki; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Nagai, Kentaro; Yamada, Keiichi; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2016-04-21

    The nasogastric tube (NGT) has become a frequently used device to alleviate gastrointestinal symptoms. Nasogastric tube syndrome (NTS) is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening complication of an indwelling NGT. NTS is characterized by acute upper airway obstruction due to bilateral vocal cord paralysis. We report a case of a 76-year-old man with NTS, induced by an indwelling long intestinal tube. He was admitted to our hospital for treatment of sigmoid colon cancer. He underwent sigmoidectomy to release a bowel obstruction, and had a long intestinal tube inserted to decompress the intestinal tract. He presented acute dyspnea following prolonged intestinal intubation, and bronchoscopy showed bilateral vocal cord paralysis. The NGT was removed immediately, and tracheotomy was performed. The patient was finally discharged in a fully recovered state. NTS be considered in patients complaining of acute upper airway obstruction, not only with a NGT inserted but also with a long intestinal tube.

  8. Latest concepts on the association between nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small intestinal injury and intestinal bacterial flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Shunji; Sakamoto, Choitsu

    2013-10-01

    Luminal bacteria, one of the main aggressive factors of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), induce small intestinal mucosal injury. Because most bacteria invading from the mouth are eliminated by the highly acidic gastric environment, the upper small intestine contains relatively low numbers of microorganisms. With decreased peristalsis, decreased acidity, and lower oxidation-reduction potential, the ileum maintains a more diverse microflora and a higher bacterial population. As NSAID-induced small intestinal ulcerations tend to localize in the small intestinal distal part, as viewed by capsule endoscopy, the ulcers are in contact with a large amount of luminal bacteria. Recently, it was reported that proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) exacerbate NSAID-induced small intestinal injury in rats. The study showed that PPIs impair the ability to disinfect due to the PPI-induced low acidic gastric environment, and this resulted in transubstantiation of intestinal flora which exacerbated NSAID-induced small intestinal injury. If it is true that PPIs exacerbate small intestinal injury, the methods of preventing NSAID-induced gastroduodenal injury to defend PPI-induced small intestinal injury should be reconsidered. Following several studies, there may be a possibility that probiotics and prebiotics are useful treatments for the prevention of NSAID-induced small intestinal injury. A method of determining bacterial flora maintenance including alteration of the environment and the administration of various drugs is required.

  9. Precision cut intestinal slices are an appropriate ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A. M.; van der Bij, Hendrik A.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used therapeutic agents, however, they are associated with a high prevalence of intestinal side effects. In this investigation, rat precision cut intestinal slices (PCIS) were evaluated as an ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal to

  10. Management of NSAID/aspirin-induced small intestinal damage by GI-sparing NSAIDs, anti-ulcer drugs and food constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, H; Takeuchi, K

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in endoscopic techniques such as capsule endoscopy have revealed that aspirin and other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) often cause mucosal lesions not only in the upper gastrointestinal tract, but also in the small intestine in humans. Gastric and duodenal lesions caused by NSAIDs can be treated with anti-secretory agents such as proton pump inhibitors or histamine H2-receptor antagonists; however, these drugs are ineffective in treating NSAID-induced lesions in the small intestine. Furthermore, there are few effective agents for the treatment of small intestinal lesions. Therefore, identification of effective therapies for the treatment of NSAID/aspirin-induced small intestinal lesions remains an urgent priority. In the present review, we focus on novel pharmacological treatments to prevent or reduce NSAID-induced intestinal lesions, i.e., 1) GI-sparing NSAIDs (NO- or H2S-NSAIDs, NSAIDs mixed with phosphatidylcholine); 2) anti-ulcer drugs such as mucosal protective agents (misoprostol, rebamipide, teprenone, etc.) and anti-secretory agents (lansoprazole, etc.); 3) antibiotics (metronidazole) and probiotics (Lactobacillus sp.); and 4) food constituents (lactoferrin and soluble dietary fibers). We surveyed data from clinical trials evaluating these novel treatments. Also reviewed herein were the pros and cons of the novel protective methods from the standpoint of safety, efficacy, convenience, and cost.

  11. Irradiation induced injury reduces energy metabolism in small intestine of Tibet minipigs.

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    Yu-Jue Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The radiation-induced energy metabolism dysfunction related to injury and radiation doses is largely elusive. The purpose of this study is to investigate the early response of energy metabolism in small intestinal tissue and its correlation with pathologic lesion after total body X-ray irradiation (TBI in Tibet minipigs. METHODS AND RESULTS: 30 Tibet minipigs were assigned into 6 groups including 5 experimental groups and one control group with 6 animals each group. The minipigs in these experimental groups were subjected to a TBI of 2, 5, 8, 11, and 14 Gy, respectively. Small intestine tissues were collected at 24 h following X-ray exposure and analyzed by histology and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. DNA contents in this tissue were also examined. Irradiation causes pathologic lesions and mitochondrial abnormalities. The Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA content-corrected and uncorrected adenosine-triphosphate (ATP and total adenine nucleotides (TAN were significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner by 2-8 Gy exposure, and no further reduction was observed over 8 Gy. CONCLUSION: TBI induced injury is highly dependent on the irradiation dosage in small intestine and inversely correlates with the energy metabolism, with its reduction potentially indicating the severity of injury.

  12. Intestinal helminth coinfection is associated with mucosal lesions and poor response to therapy in American tegumentary leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeredo-Coutinho, Rilza Beatriz G; Pimentel, Maria Inês; Zanini, Graziela Maria; Madeira, Maria F; Cataldo, Jamyra Iglesias; Schubach, Armando O; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira; de Mello, Cintia Xavier; Mendonça, Sergio C F

    2016-02-01

    The most severe clinical form of American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) due to Leishmania braziliensis is mucosal leishmaniasis (ML), characterized by destructive lesions in the facial mucosa. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 109 ATL patients from Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, where ATL is caused by L. braziliensis, to evaluate the influence of intestinal parasite coinfections in the clinical course of ATL. Parasitological stool examination (PSE) was performed with samples from all patients by the sedimentation, Kato-Katz and Baermann-Moraes methods. The diagnosis of ATL was made from lesion biopsies by direct observation of amastigotes in Giemsa-stained imprints, isolation of Leishmania promastigotes or histopathological examination. All patients were treated with meglumine antimoniate. Patients with positive PSE had a frequency of mucosal lesions significantly higher than those with negative PSE (pAscaris lumbricoides (p<0.05), but not for protozoan infections. Patients with intestinal parasites had poor response to therapy (therapeutic failure or relapse) significantly more frequently than the patients with negative stool examination (p<0.005). A similar difference (p<0.005) was observed between patients with positive and negative results for intestinal helminths, but not for intestinal protozoa. Patients with positive PSE took significantly longer to heal than those with negative PSE (p<0.005). A similar difference was observed for intestinal helminth infections (p<0.005), but not for protozoan infections. Our results indicate a deleterious influence of intestinal helminth infections in the clinical course of ATL and evidence for the first time an association between ML and these coinfections, particularly with nematodes and A. lumbricoides.

  13. Campylobacter-induced interleukin-8 responses in human intestinal epithelial cells and primary intestinal chick cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrmann, Erika; Berndt, Angela; Hänel, Ingrid; Köhler, Heike

    2007-09-20

    Campylobacter (C.) jejuni and C. coli can cause gastrointestinal disorders in humans characterized by acute inflammation. Inflammatory signals are initiated during interaction between these pathogens and human intestinal cells, but nothing is known about the stimulation of avian intestinal cells by Campylobacter. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) as a proinflammatory chemokine plays an important role in mobilizing cellular defence mechanism. IL-8 mRNA expression in both human intestinal cells (INT 407) and primary intestinal chick cells (PIC) was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The secretion of IL-8 protein by INT407 was measured using ELISA. Although C. jejuni and C. coli are considered to be harmless commensals in the gut of birds, the avian Campylobacter isolates investigated were able to induce the proinflammatory IL-8 in PIC as well as in INT407. In an in vitro system, C. jejuni as well as C. coli were able to induce IL-8 mRNA in PIC. Relation between the virulence properties like toxin production, the ability to invade and to survive in Caco-2 cells and the level of IL-8 mRNA produced by INT 407 and PIC after infection with Campylobacter strains was also investigated.

  14. Review of Atrophic Gastritis and Intestinal Metaplasia as a Premalignant Lesion of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yo Han; Kim, Nayoung

    2015-01-01

    Atrophic gastritis (AG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) are the main precursor lesions of gastric cancer as the incidence of gastric cancer increases in the gastric mucosa involved with AG and IM. The prevalence of AG and IM vary depending on countries, even it represents diverse results in the same nation. Usually AG is antecedent of IM but the etiologies of AG and IM are not always the same. The sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic methods to detect AG and IM are different. Furthermore, the management strategy of AG and IM has not been established, yet. Helicobacter pylori infection has been proved as the most important cause of AG and IM. Thus the eradication of H. pylori is very important to prevent the progression to gastric cancer which is still placed in the high rank in morbidity and mortality among cancers. However, the reversibility of AG and IM by eradication of H. pylori which was assumed to be certain by meta-analysis is; however, controversial now. Therefore, the understanding and early diagnosis of AG and IM are very important, especially, in high incidence area of gastric cancer such as Republic of Korea. PMID:25853101

  15. Brachyspira pilosicoli-induced avian intestinal spirochaetosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline I. Le Roy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Avian intestinal spirochaetosis (AIS is a common disease occurring in poultry that can be caused by Brachyspira pilosicoli, a Gram-negative bacterium of the order Spirochaetes. During AIS, this opportunistic pathogen colonises the lower gastrointestinal (GI tract of poultry (principally, the ileum, caeca, and colon, which can cause symptoms such as diarrhoea, reduced growth rate, and reduced egg production and quality. Due to the large increase of bacterial resistance to antibiotic treatment, the European Union banned in 2006 the prophylactic use of antibiotics as growth promoters in livestock. Consequently, the number of outbreaks of AIS has dramatically increased in the UK resulting in significant economic losses. This review summarises the current knowledge about AIS infection caused by B. pilosicoli and discusses various treatments and prevention strategies to control AIS.

  16. Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients.

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG A-905 treatment reduces intestinal damage in a murine model of irinotecan-induced mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, R W; Pedroso, S H S P; Vieira, A T; Moreira, L M C; França, C S; Cartelle, C T; Arantes, R M E; Generoso, S V; Cardoso, V N; Neves, M J; Nicoli, J R; Martins, F S

    2016-09-01

    Indigenous microbiota plays a crucial role in the development of several intestinal diseases, including mucositis. Gastrointestinal mucositis is a major and serious side effect of cancer therapy, and there is no effective therapy for this clinical condition. However, some probiotics have been shown to attenuate such conditions. To evaluate the effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG A-905 (Sc-905), a potential probiotic yeast, we investigated whether pre- or post-treatment with viable or inactivated Sc-905 could prevent weight loss and intestinal lesions, and maintain integrity of the mucosal barrier in a mucositis model induced by irinotecan in mice. Only post-treatment with viable Sc-905 was able to protect mice against the damage caused by chemotherapy, reducing the weight loss, increase of intestinal permeability and jejunal lesions (villous shortening). Besides, this treatment reduced oxidative stress, prevented the decrease of goblet cells and stimulated the replication of cells in the intestinal crypts of mice with experimental mucositis. In conclusion, Sc-905 protects animals against irinotecan-induced mucositis when administered as a post-treatment with viable cells, and this effect seems to be related with the reduction of oxidative stress and preservation of intestinal mucosa.

  18. Dietary squid ink polysaccharide induces goblet cells to protect small intestine from chemotherapy induced injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Tao; Cao, Lu; Xue, Changhu; Tang, Qing-Juan

    2015-03-01

    Gastrointestinal mucositis induced by chemotherapy is associated with alterations of intestinal barrier function due to the potential damage induced by anti-cancer drugs on the epithelial cells. Goblet cells, an important epithelial lining in the intestine, contribute to innate immunity by secreting mucin glycoproteins. Employing a mouse model of chemotherapy induced intestinal mucosal immunity injury by cyclophosphamide, we demonstrated for the first time that polysaccharide from the ink of Ommastrephes bartramii (OBP) enhanced Cyto18, which is a mucin expression in goblet cells. The up-regulation of mucins by OBP relied on the augmented quantity of goblet cells, but not on the changes in the ultrastructure of endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Our results may have important implications for enhanced immunopotentiation function of functional OBP on intestinal mucosal immunity against intestinal disorders involving inflammation and infection.

  19. Laminar lesions in horses with systemic oxidative stress, committed by experimentally induced or naturally occurring gastrointestinal disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Luciane M. Laskoski; Rosangela Locatelli-Dittrich; Sousa,Renato S.; Juliana S Brum; Cristo,Thierry G.; Fabiano Montiani-Ferreira; Olair C. Beltrame; Carlos A.A. Valadão

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Laminitis in horses can be associated with lesions in multiple organs secondary to sepsis. Twenty-one horses suffering from gastrointestinal disorders were used in the experiment; 7 horses with experimentally induced endotoxemia and intestinal ischaemia, and 14 horses suffering from naturally occurring colic syndrome. Tissue samples of lungs, liver, heart, brain, cerebellum and hoof laminar tissue were collected for histopathological and oxidative stress evaluation using nitrotyrosi...

  20. Endothelial binding of beta toxin to small intestinal mucosal endothelial cells in early stages of experimentally induced Clostridium perfringens type C enteritis in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, V L; Martel, A; Pasmans, F; Van Immerseel, F; Posthaus, H

    2013-07-01

    Beta toxin (CPB) is known to be an essential virulence factor in the development of lesions of Clostridium perfringens type C enteritis in different animal species. Its target cells and exact mechanism of toxicity have not yet been clearly defined. Here, we evaluate the suitability of a neonatal piglet jejunal loop model to investigate early lesions of C. perfringens type C enteritis. Immunohistochemically, CPB was detected at microvascular endothelial cells in intestinal villi during early and advanced stages of lesions induced by C. perfringens type C. This was first associated with capillary dilatation and subsequently with widespread hemorrhage in affected intestinal segments. CPB was, however, not demonstrated on intestinal epithelial cells. This indicates a tropism of CPB toward endothelial cells and suggests that CPB-induced endothelial damage plays an important role in the early stages of C. perfringens type C enteritis in pigs.

  1. Photothermal lesions in soft tissue induced by optical fiber microheaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel-Domínguez, Reinher; Moreno-Álvarez, Paola; Hautefeuille, Mathieu; Chavarría, Anahí; Hernández-Cordero, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Photothermal therapy has shown to be a promising technique for local treatment of tumors. However, the main challenge for this technique is the availability of localized heat sources to minimize thermal damage in the surrounding healthy tissue. In this work, we demonstrate the use of optical fiber microheaters for inducing thermal lesions in soft tissue. The proposed devices incorporate carbon nanotubes or gold nanolayers on the tips of optical fibers for enhanced photothermal effects and heating of ex vivo biological tissues. We report preliminary results of small size photothermal lesions induced on mice liver tissues. The morphology of the resulting lesions shows that optical fiber microheaters may render useful for delivering highly localized heat for photothermal therapy.

  2. Intestinal microbiota modulates gluten-induced immunopathology in humanized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galipeau, Heather J; McCarville, Justin L; Huebener, Sina; Litwin, Owen; Meisel, Marlies; Jabri, Bana; Sanz, Yolanda; Murray, Joseph A; Jordana, Manel; Alaedini, Armin; Chirdo, Fernando G; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The recent increase in CD incidence suggests that additional environmental factors, such as intestinal microbiota alterations, are involved in its pathogenesis. However, there is no direct evidence of modulation of gluten-induced immunopathology by the microbiota. We investigated whether specific microbiota compositions influence immune responses to gluten in mice expressing the human DQ8 gene, which confers moderate CD genetic susceptibility. Germ-free mice, clean specific-pathogen-free (SPF) mice colonized with a microbiota devoid of opportunistic pathogens and Proteobacteria, and conventional SPF mice that harbor a complex microbiota that includes opportunistic pathogens were used. Clean SPF mice had attenuated responses to gluten compared to germ-free and conventional SPF mice. Germ-free mice developed increased intraepithelial lymphocytes, markers of intraepithelial lymphocyte cytotoxicity, gliadin-specific antibodies, and a proinflammatory gliadin-specific T-cell response. Antibiotic treatment, leading to Proteobacteria expansion, further enhanced gluten-induced immunopathology in conventional SPF mice. Protection against gluten-induced immunopathology in clean SPF mice was reversed after supplementation with a member of the Proteobacteria phylum, an enteroadherent Escherichia coli isolated from a CD patient. The intestinal microbiota can both positively and negatively modulate gluten-induced immunopathology in mice. In subjects with moderate genetic susceptibility, intestinal microbiota changes may be a factor that increases CD risk.

  3. Prevention by lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, of indomethacin -induced small intestinal ulceration in rats through induction of heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Y; Amagase, K; Kato, S; Tokioka, S; Murano, M; Kakimoto, K; Nishio, H; Umegaki, E; Takeuchi, K; Higuchi, K

    2010-06-01

    The effect of lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), on indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulceration was examined in rats, particularly in relation to heme oxygenase (HO)-1. The animals were administered indomethacin (10 mg/kg, p.o.) and killed 24 h later. Lansoprazole (30-100 mg/kg, p.o.) and omeprazole (30-100 mg/kg, p.o.) were given 30 min before the administration of indomethacin, while tin-protoporphyrin IX (SnPP: 30 mg/kg, i.v.), an inhibitor of HO-1, was injected 10 min before indomethacin or lansoprazole. Indomethacin produced hemorrhagic lesions in the small intestine, accompanied with an increase of mucosal invasion of enterobacteria, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the mucosa. Pretreatment with lansoprazole dose- dependently reduced the severity of the indomethacin-induced intestinal lesions, with suppression of the increased MPO activity, while omeprazole had no effect. Pretreatment with SnPP significantly exacerbated these intestinal lesions and almost totally abolished the protective effect of lansoprazole. The up-regulation of iNOS mRNA expression following indomethacin was suppressed by lansoprazole in a SnPP-inhibitable manner, although the enhanced enterobacterial invasion remained unaffected. The amount of HO-1 protein in the intestinal mucosa was significantly increased by lansoprazole but not by omeprazole. Prior administration of carbon monoxide (CO)-releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2; 10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced the severity of these lesions and the enhancement of mucosal iNOS mRNA expression induced in the small intestine by indomethacin. These results suggest that lansoprazole prevents indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulceration, and this effect is associated with inhibition of iNOS expression, through up-regulation of HO-1/CO production in the mucosa.

  4. Rosiglitazone attenuates pulmonary fibrosis and radiation-induced intestinal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangoni, M.; Gerini, C.; Sottili, M.; Cassani, S.; Stefania, G.; Biti, G. [Radiotherapy Unit, Clinical Physiopathology Department, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Castiglione, F. [Department of Human Pathology and Oncology, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Vanzi, E.; Bottoncetti, A.; Pupi, A. [Nuclear Medicine Unit, Clinical Physiopathology Department, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.-The aim of the study was to evaluate radioprotective effect of rosiglitazone (RGZ) on a murine model of late pulmonary damage and of acute intestinal damage. Methods.- Lung fibrosis: C57 mice were treated with the radiomimetic agent bleomycin, with or without rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg/day). To obtain an independent qualitative and quantitative measure for lung fibrosis we used high resolution CT, performed twice a week during the entire observation period. Hounsfield Units (HU) of section slides from the upper and lower lung region were determined. On day 31 lungs were collected for histological analysis. Acute intestinal damage: mice underwent 12 Gy total body irradiation with or without rosiglitazone. Mice were sacrificed 24 or 72 h after total body irradiation and ileum and colon were collected. Results.- Lung fibrosis: after bleomycin treatment, mice showed typical CT features of lung fibrosis, including irregular septal thickening and patchy peripheral reticular abnormalities. Accordingly, HU lung density was dramatically increased. Rosiglitazone markedly attenuated the radiological signs of fibrosis and strongly inhibited HU lung density increase (60% inhibition at the end of the observation period). Histological analysis revealed that in bleomycin-treated mice, fibrosis involved 50-55% of pulmonary parenchyma and caused an alteration of the alveolar structures in 10% of parenchyma, while in rosiglitazone-treated mice, fibrosis involved only 20-25% of pulmonary parenchyma, without alterations of the alveolar structures. Acute intestinal damage: 24 h after 12 Gy of total body irradiation intestinal mucosa showed villi shortening, mucosal thickness and crypt necrotic changes. Rosiglitazone showed a histological improvement of tissue structure, with villi and crypts normalization and oedema reduction. Conclusion.- These results demonstrate that rosiglitazone displays a protective effect on pulmonary fibrosis and radiation-induced

  5. Quercetin Reverses Rat Liver Preneoplastic Lesions Induced by Chemical Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Carrasco-Torres

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Quercetin is a flavonoid widely studied as a chemopreventive agent in different types of cancer. Previously, we reported that quercetin has a chemopreventive effect on the liver-induced preneoplastic lesions in rats. Here, we evaluated if quercetin was able not only to prevent but also to reverse rat liver preneoplastic lesions. We used the modified resistant hepatocyte model (MRHM to evaluate this possibility. Treatment with quercetin was used 15 days after the induction of preneoplastic lesions. We found that quercetin reverses the number of preneoplastic lesions and their areas. Our results showed that quercetin downregulates the expression of EGFR and modulates this signaling pathway in spite of the activated status of EGFR as detected by the upregulation of this receptor, with respect to that observed in control rats. Besides, quercetin affects the phosphorylation status of Src-1, STAT5, and Sp-1. The better status of the liver after the treatment with quercetin could also be confirmed by the recovery in the expression of IGF-1. In conclusion, we suggest that quercetin reversed preneoplastic lesions by EGFR modulation and the activation state of Src, STAT5, and Sp1, so as the basal IGF-1.

  6. Endodontic periapical lesion-induced mental nerve paresthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Elham Shadmehr; Neda Shekarchizade

    2015-01-01

    Paresthesia is a burning or prickling sensation or partial numbness, resulting from neural injury. The symptoms can vary from mild neurosensory dysfunction to total loss of sensation in the innervated area. Only a few cases have described apical periodontitis to be the etiological factor of impaired sensation in the area innervated by the inferior alveolar and mental nerves. The aim of the present paper is to report a case of periapical lesion-induced paresthesia in the innervation area of th...

  7. Dysbiosis-induced intestinal inflammation activates TNFRI and mediates alcoholic liver disease in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Stärkel, Peter; Turner, Jerrold R.; Ho, Samuel B.; Schnabl, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction is an important contributor to alcoholic liver disease. Translocated microbial products trigger an inflammatory response in the liver and contribute to steatohepatitis. Our aim was to investigate mechanisms of barrier disruption following chronic alcohol feeding. A Lieber-DeCarli model was used to induce intestinal dysbiosis, increased intestinal permeability and liver disease in mice. Alcohol feeding for 8 weeks induced intestinal inflammation in the jejunum, which is characterized by an increased number of TNFα producing monocytes and macrophages. These findings were confirmed in duodenal biopsies from patients with chronic alcohol abuse. Intestinal decontamination with non-absorbable antibiotics restored eubiosis, decreased intestinal inflammation and permeability, and reduced alcoholic liver disease in mice. TNF-receptor I (TNFRI) mutant mice were protected from intestinal barrier dysfunction and alcoholic liver disease. To investigate whether TNFRI on intestinal epithelial cells mediates intestinal barrier dysfunction and alcoholic liver disease, we used TNFRI mutant mice carrying a conditional gain-of-function allele for this receptor. Reactivation of TNFRI on intestinal epithelial cells resulted in increased intestinal permeability and liver disease that is similar to wild type mice after alcohol feeding, suggesting that enteric TNFRI promotes intestinal barrier dysfunction. Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) is a downstream target of TNFα and was phosphorylated in intestinal epithelial cells following alcohol administration. Using MLCK deficient mice, we further demonstrate a partial contribution of MLCK to intestinal barrier dysfunction and liver disease following chronic alcohol feeding. In conclusion, dysbiosis-induced intestinal inflammation and TNFRI signaling on intestinal epithelial cells are mediating a disruption of the intestinal barrier. Therefore, intestinal TNFRI is a crucial mediator of alcoholic liver disease

  8. Emu Oil Combined with Lyprinol™ Reduces Small Intestinal Damage in a Rat Model of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashtoub, Suzanne; Lampton, Lorrinne S; Eden, Georgina L; Cheah, Ker Y; Lymn, Kerry A; Bajic, Juliana E; Howarth, Gordon S

    2016-10-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is characterized by inflammation and ulcerating lesions lining the alimentary tract. Emu Oil and Lyprinol™ have independently demonstrated their therapeutic potential in intestinal inflammatory disorders, including mucositis. We investigated Emu Oil and Lyprinol™ in combination for their further potential to alleviate chemotherapy-induced mucositis in rats. Rats were gavaged with (1 ml) water, Olive Oil, Emu Oil + Olive Oil, Lyprinol™ + Olive Oil or Emu Oil + Lyprinol™ from Days 0 to 7, injected with saline (control) or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) on Day 5 and euthanized on Day 8. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity (indicative of acute inflammation), histological severity scores, and intestinal architecture were quantified. Myeloperoxidase activity was significantly increased in the jejunum and ileum following 5-FU, compared to saline controls. Both Olive Oil and Emu Oil + Lyprinol™ significantly reduced jejunal MPO levels (1.8-fold and 1.7-fold, respectively), whereas only Emu Oil + Lyprinol™ significantly decreased ileal MPO levels, relative to 5-FU controls. All oil treatments decreased histological severity scores in the jejunum and ileum, and normalized crypt depth in the mid small intestine, relative to 5-FU controls. Emu Oil combined with Lyprinol™ partially reduced acute small intestinal inflammation. Isolating bioactive constituents of these naturally sourced oils could provide a more targeted strategy to protect against intestinal mucositis.

  9. Hormone induced changes in lactase glycosylation in developing rat intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit Kaur; Mahmood, Safrun; Mahmood, Akhtar

    2008-11-01

    Lactase exists in both soluble and membrane-bound forms in suckling rat intestine. The distribution of lactase and its glycosylated isoforms in response to thyroxine or cortisone administration has been studied in suckling rats. 75% of lactase activity was detected, associated with brush borders, compared to 24% in the soluble fraction of 8-day-old rats. Thyroxine treatment enhanced soluble lactase activity to 34%, whereas particulate fraction was reduced to 67% compared to controls. Cortisone administration reduced soluble lactase activity from 24% in controls to 12% with a concomitant increase in membrane-bound activity to 89%. Western blot analysis revealed lactase signal, corresponding to 220 kDa in both the soluble and membrane fractions, which corroborated the enzyme activity data. The elution pattern of papain solubilized lactase from agarose-Wheat Germ agglutinin, or Concanavalin A or Jacalin agglutinin columns was different in the suckling and adult rat intestines. Also the elution profile of lactase activity from agarose-lectin columns was modulated in cortisone, thyroxine, and insulin injected pups, which suggests differences in glycosylated isoforms of lactase under these conditions. These findings suggest the role of these hormones in inducing changes in lactase glycosylation during postnatal development of intestine, which may contribute to adult-type hypolactasia in rats.

  10. Regulatory effect of heat shock protein 70 in stress-induced rat intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevie Struiksma

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychological stress is one of the factors associated with many human diseases; the mechanisms need to be further understood. Methods: Rats were subjected to chronic water avoid stress. Intestinal epithelial heat shock protein (HSP 70 was evaluated. The intestinal epithelial permeability was examined with Ussing chamber technique. Results: HSP70 was detected in normal intestinal epithelial cells. Psychological stress decreased HSP70 in the intestinal epithelial cells that correlated with the stress-induced intestinal epithelial hyperpermeability. Pretreatment with HSP70 abrogated stress-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. Conclusions: Chronic stress inhibits HSP70 activity in rat intestinal epithelial layer that is associated with intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction, which can be prevented by pretreatment with HSP70 protein.

  11. Intestinal lesions in pediatric Crohn disease: comparative detectability among pulse sequences at MR enterography

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    Sohn, Beomseok; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung [Severance Children' s Hospital, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Hong [Severance Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyung Hwa [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    Variable sequences can be used in MR enterography, and no consensus exists for the best protocol in children with Crohn disease. To compare the lesion detectability of various MR enterography sequences and to correlate the findings of these sequences with the Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index (PCDAI) in children with Crohn disease. Children with clinically or pathologically confirmed Crohn disease underwent MR enterography, including a single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence, motility imaging (coronal 2-D balanced fast field echo), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and dynamic contrast enhancement imaging (including arterial, portal and delayed phases). The lesion detectability of each sequence was graded 0-2 for each involved bowel segment. The lesion detectability and PCDAI result on different sequences were compared using the weighted least squares method and Student's t-test, respectively. Fifteen children (11 boys, 4 girls, mean age 13.7 ± 1.4 years) with a total of 41 lesions were included in this study. All lesions detected in more than two sequences were visible on the single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence. The relative lesion detection rate was 78.1% on motility imaging, 90.2% on DWI, and 92.7% on arterial, 95.1% on portal and 95.1% on delayed phase imaging. Compared to the SSFSE sequence, motility imaging (P < 0.001) and DWI (P = 0.039) demonstrated lower detectability. The mean PCDAI result in the detected lesions was statistically higher only on dynamic enhancement imaging (P < 0.001). All MR enterography sequences were found to have relatively high lesion detectability in children with Crohn disease, while motility imaging showed the lowest lesion detectability. Lesions detected on dynamic enhancement imaging showed a higher PCDAI result, which suggests that this sequence is specific for active inflammation. (orig.)

  12. Proton pump inhibitors are not the key for therapying non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-induced small intestinal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuo; Chao, Guan-qun; Lu, Bin

    2013-10-01

    The ability of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to injure the small intestine has been well established in humans and animals. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are frequently prescribed to reduce gastric and duodenal injury caused in high-risk patients taking NSAIDs. However, scarce information is available concerning the effects of PPIs on intestinal damage induced by NSAIDs, and the suppression of gastric acid secretion by PPIs is hard to provide any protection against the damage caused by NSAIDs in the small intestine. The present study was designed to examine the effects of intragastric treatment of two PPIs widely used in clinical practice, namely omeprazole and pantoprazole, on the intestinal damage induced by administration of diclofenac in rat. Male SD rats were treated with omeprazole or pantoprazole for 9 days, with concomitant treatment with anti-inflammatory doses of diclofenac on the final 5 days. The anatomical lesion, villous height, the thickness, and the section area of small intestine were quantitatively analyzed. The change of ultrastructural organization was observed. Endotoxin level in blood was measured by photometry. Epidermal growth factor was observed by immunohistochemistry. Omeprazole and pantoprazole didn't decrease the macroscopic and histologic damage induced by diclofenac in the rat's small intestine. In the two PPI groups, villous height was (89.6 ± 11.8 and 92.6 ± 19.3 μm) lower than which of the control group (P thickness became thinning, and the section area became small. LPS levels in the portal blood of omeprazole and pantoprazole were (4.36 ± 1.26 and 4.25 ± 1.17 EU/ml), significantly higher than in controls (P small intestine from the damage induced by diclofenac in the conscious rat. PPIs cannot repair NSAID-induced intestinal damage at least in part because of significant lesion in mechanical barrier function and reduction in epidermal growth factor.

  13. Beneficial Effects of Combining Computed Tomography Enteroclysis/Enterography with Capsule Endoscopy for Screening Tumor Lesions in the Small Intestine

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    Hiroaki Shibata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare the efficacy of using computed tomography enteroclysis/enterography (CTE, capsule endoscopy (CE, and CTE with CE for diagnosing tumor lesions in the small intestine. Materials and Methods. We included 98 patients who underwent CE during the observation period and were subjected to CTE at our hospital from April 2008 to May 2014. Results. CTE had a significantly higher sensitivity than CE (84.6% versus 46.2%, P=0.039, but there were no significant differences in specificity, positive or negative predictive values, or diagnostic accuracy rates. The sensitivity of CTE/CE was 100%, again significantly higher than that of CE P=0.002. The difference in specificity between CTE/CE and CE was not significant, but there were significant differences in positive predictive values (100% for CTE/CE versus 66.7% for CE, P=0.012, negative predictive values (100% versus 92.1%, P=0.008, and diagnostic accuracy rate (100% versus 89.8%, P=0.001. The diagnostic accuracy rate was also significantly higher in CTE/CE versus CTE (100% versus 95.9%, P=0.043. Conclusion. Our findings suggested that a combination of CTE and CE was useful for screening tumor lesions in the small intestine. This trial is registered with number UMIN000016154.

  14. Rebamipide ameliorates radiation-induced intestinal injury in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Sehwan; Jang, Hyo-Sun; Myung, Hyun-Wook; Myung, Jae Kyung; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Min-Jung; Lee, Seung Bum; Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Sun-Joo; Jin, Young-Woo; Lee, Seung-Sook; Park, Sunhoo

    2017-08-15

    Radiation-induced enteritis is a major side effect in cancer patients undergoing abdominopelvic radiotherapy. Radiation exposure produces an uncontrolled inflammatory cascade and epithelial cell loss leading to impaired epithelial barrier function. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of rebamipide on regeneration of the intestinal epithelia after radiation injury. The abdomens of C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 13Gy of irradiation (IR) and then the mice were treated with rebamipide. Upon IR, intestinal epithelia were destroyed structurally at the microscopic level and bacterial translocation was increased. The intestinal damage reached a maximum level on day 6 post-IR and intestinal regeneration occurred thereafter. We found that rebamipide significantly ameliorated radiation-induced intestinal injury. In mice treated with rebamipide after IR, intestinal barrier function recovered and expression of the tight junction components of the intestinal barrier were upregulated. Rebamipide administration reduced radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) were significantly reduced upon rebamipide administration. Intestinal cell proliferation and β-catenin expression also increased upon rebamipide administration. These data demonstrate that rebamipide reverses impairment of the intestinal barrier by increasing intestinal cell proliferation and attenuating the inflammatory response by inhibiting MMP9 and proinflammatory cytokine expression in a murine model of radiation-induced enteritis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Food-grade TiO2 impairs intestinal and systemic immune homeostasis, initiates preneoplastic lesions and promotes aberrant crypt development in the rat colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettini, Sarah; Boutet-Robinet, Elisa; Cartier, Christel; Coméra, Christine; Gaultier, Eric; Dupuy, Jacques; Naud, Nathalie; Taché, Sylviane; Grysan, Patrick; Reguer, Solenn; Thieriet, Nathalie; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Thiaudière, Dominique; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Carrière, Marie; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Pierre, Fabrice H.; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Houdeau, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Food-grade titanium dioxide (TiO2) containing a nanoscale particle fraction (TiO2-NPs) is approved as a white pigment (E171 in Europe) in common foodstuffs, including confectionary. There are growing concerns that daily oral TiO2-NP intake is associated with an increased risk of chronic intestinal inflammation and carcinogenesis. In rats orally exposed for one week to E171 at human relevant levels, titanium was detected in the immune cells of Peyer’s patches (PP) as observed with the TiO2-NP model NM-105. Dendritic cell frequency increased in PP regardless of the TiO2 treatment, while regulatory T cells involved in dampening inflammatory responses decreased with E171 only, an effect still observed after 100 days of treatment. In all TiO2-treated rats, stimulation of immune cells isolated from PP showed a decrease in Thelper (Th)-1 IFN-γ secretion, while splenic Th1/Th17 inflammatory responses sharply increased. E171 or NM-105 for one week did not initiate intestinal inflammation, while a 100-day E171 treatment promoted colon microinflammation and initiated preneoplastic lesions while also fostering the growth of aberrant crypt foci in a chemically induced carcinogenesis model. These data should be considered for risk assessments of the susceptibility to Th17-driven autoimmune diseases and to colorectal cancer in humans exposed to TiO2 from dietary sources. PMID:28106049

  16. Intestinal lesions in pediatric Crohn disease: comparative detectability among pulse sequences at MR enterography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Beomseok; Kim, Myung-Joon; Koh, Hong; Han, Kyung Hwa; Lee, Mi-Jung

    2014-07-01

    Variable sequences can be used in MR enterography, and no consensus exists for the best protocol in children with Crohn disease. To compare the lesion detectability of various MR enterography sequences and to correlate the findings of these sequences with the Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index (PCDAI) in children with Crohn disease. Children with clinically or pathologically confirmed Crohn disease underwent MR enterography, including a single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence, motility imaging (coronal 2-D balanced fast field echo), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and dynamic contrast enhancement imaging (including arterial, portal and delayed phases). The lesion detectability of each sequence was graded 0-2 for each involved bowel segment. The lesion detectability and PCDAI result on different sequences were compared using the weighted least squares method and Student's t-test, respectively. Fifteen children (11 boys, 4 girls, mean age 13.7 ± 1.4 years) with a total of 41 lesions were included in this study. All lesions detected in more than two sequences were visible on the single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence. The relative lesion detection rate was 78.1% on motility imaging, 90.2% on DWI, and 92.7% on arterial, 95.1% on portal and 95.1% on delayed phase imaging. Compared to the SSFSE sequence, motility imaging (P Crohn disease, while motility imaging showed the lowest lesion detectability. Lesions detected on dynamic enhancement imaging showed a higher PCDAI result, which suggests that this sequence is specific for active inflammation.

  17. Role of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathway on methotrexate-induced intestinal mucositis in rodents

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    Siqueira Francisco JWS

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methotrexate treatment has been associated to intestinal epithelial damage. Studies have suggested an important role of nitric oxide in such injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO, specifically iNOS on the pathogenesis of methotrexate (MTX-induced intestinal mucositis. Methods Intestinal mucositis was carried out by three subcutaneous MTX injections (2.5 mg/kg in Wistar rats and in inducible nitric oxide synthase knock-out (iNOS-/- and wild-type (iNOS+/+ mice. Rats were treated intraperitoneally with the NOS inhibitors aminoguanidine (AG; 10 mg/Kg or L-NAME (20 mg/Kg, one hour before MTX injection and daily until sacrifice, on the fifth day. The jejunum was harvested to investigate the expression of Ki67, iNOS and nitrotyrosine by immunohistochemistry and cell death by TUNEL. The neutrophil activity by myeloperoxidase (MPO assay was performed in the three small intestine segments. Results AG and L-NAME significantly reduced villus and crypt damages, inflammatory alterations, cell death, MPO activity, and nitrotyrosine immunostaining due to MTX challenge. The treatment with AG, but not L-NAME, prevented the inhibitory effect of MTX on cell proliferation. MTX induced increased expression of iNOS detected by immunohistochemistry. MTX did not cause significant inflammation in the iNOS-/- mice. Conclusion These results suggest an important role of NO, via activation of iNOS, in the pathogenesis of intestinal mucositis.

  18. Does kainic acid induce partial brain lesion in an invertebrate model: sepia officinalis? Comparison with electrolytic lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graindorge, Nicolas; Jozet-Alves, Christelle; Chichery, Raymond; Dickel, Ludovic; Bellanger, Cécile

    2008-10-31

    The present study investigates the feasibility of excitotoxic lesions in the cuttlefish in the mapping of brain functions in Cephalopods. Adult animals were injected locally with a neurotoxin, kainic acid. The brain region receiving the neurotoxin was the vertical lobe, a key brain structure for learning and memory processes. Brain damage induced by these injections was evaluated using different histological stainings: hematoxilin-eosin, Fink-Heimer and DAPI. The results were compared with histological changes after electrolytic lesion of the vertical lobe. Neurodegeneration was revealed in and around the injection site: an intense area of proliferative cells, degenerating terminal axon ramifications and cell death. In comparison with electrolytic lesion, excitotoxic lesion displays important advantages, since fibres of passage are not destroyed by kainic acid injection, which induces only a restricted lesion and so is an appropriate method of investigating the role of the vertical lobe or other brain regions in a Cephalopod model, Sepia officinalis.

  19. Endodontic periapical lesion-induced mental nerve paresthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Shadmehr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paresthesia is a burning or prickling sensation or partial numbness, resulting from neural injury. The symptoms can vary from mild neurosensory dysfunction to total loss of sensation in the innervated area. Only a few cases have described apical periodontitis to be the etiological factor of impaired sensation in the area innervated by the inferior alveolar and mental nerves. The aim of the present paper is to report a case of periapical lesion-induced paresthesia in the innervation area of the mental nerve, which was successfully treated with endodontic retreatment.

  20. Endodontic periapical lesion-induced mental nerve paresthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadmehr, Elham; Shekarchizade, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Paresthesia is a burning or prickling sensation or partial numbness, resulting from neural injury. The symptoms can vary from mild neurosensory dysfunction to total loss of sensation in the innervated area. Only a few cases have described apical periodontitis to be the etiological factor of impaired sensation in the area innervated by the inferior alveolar and mental nerves. The aim of the present paper is to report a case of periapical lesion-induced paresthesia in the innervation area of the mental nerve, which was successfully treated with endodontic retreatment.

  1. Ethanol induces rotational behavior in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverman, P.B.

    1987-03-09

    Mice with unilateal striatal lesions created by 6-hydroxydopamine (6HDA) injection were screened for rotational (circling) behavior in response to injection of amphetamine and apomorphine. Those that rotated ipsilaterally in response to amphetamine and contralaterally in response to apomorphine were subsequently challenged with 1 to 3 g/kg (i.p.) ethanol. Surprisingly, ethanol induced dose related contralateral (apomorphine-like) rotation which, despite gross intoxication, was quite marked in most animals. No significant correlation was found between the number of turns made following ethanol and made after apomorphine or amphetamine. 14 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  2. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-induced small intestinal injury and probiotic agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mario Guslandi

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal bacteria play a role in the development of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID)-induced small intestinal injury.Agents such as probiotics,able t omodify the gut ecology,might theoretically be useful in preventing small intestinal damage induced by NSAIDs.The clinical studies available so far do suggest that some probiotic agents can be effective in this respect.

  3. Role of intestinal bacteria in gliadin-induced changes in intestinal mucosa: study in germ-free rats.

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    Jana Cinova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Celiac disease (CD is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the small intestine that is induced by dietary wheat gluten proteins (gliadins in genetically predisposed individuals. The overgrowth of potentially pathogenic bacteria and infections has been suggested to contribute to CD pathogenesis. We aimed to study the effects of gliadin and various intestinal bacterial strains on mucosal barrier integrity, gliadin translocation, and cytokine production. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Changes in gut mucosa were assessed in the intestinal loops of inbred Wistar-AVN rats that were reared under germ-free conditions in the presence of various intestinal bacteria (enterobacteria and bifidobacteria isolated from CD patients and healthy children, respectively and CD-triggering agents (gliadin and IFN-γ by histology, scanning electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and a rat cytokine antibody array. Adhesion of the bacterial strains to the IEC-6 rat cell line was evaluated in vitro. Gliadin fragments alone or together with the proinflammatory cytokine interferon (IFN-γ significantly decreased the number of goblet cells in the small intestine; this effect was more pronounced in the presence of Escherichia coli CBL2 and Shigella CBD8. Shigella CBD8 and IFN-γ induced the highest mucin secretion and greatest impairment in tight junctions and, consequently, translocation of gliadin fragments into the lamina propria. Shigella CBD8 and E. coli CBL2 strongly adhered to IEC-6 epithelial cells. The number of goblet cells in small intestine increased by the simultaneous incubation of Bifidobacterium bifidum IATA-ES2 with gliadin, IFN-γ and enterobacteria. B. bifidum IATA-ES2 also enhanced the production of chemotactic factors and inhibitors of metalloproteinases, which can contribute to gut mucosal protection. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the composition of the intestinal microbiota affects the permeability of the intestinal mucosa

  4. Bacillus subtilis PB6 improves intestinal health of broiler chickens challenged with Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Sathishkumar; Thangavel, Gokila; Kurian, Hannah; Mani, Ravichandran; Mukkalil, Rajalekshmi; Chirakkal, Haridasan

    2013-02-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is an enterotoxemic disease caused by Clostridium perfringens that results in significant economic losses, averaging damage of $0.05 per bird. The present study investigated the influence of a dietary supplement, Bacillus subtilis PB6, on performance, intestinal health, and gut integrity against C. perfringens-induced NE in broiler birds. Bacillus subtilis PB6 (ATCC-PTA 6737) is a natural strain isolated from healthy chicken gut that has been shown in in vitro to produce antimicrobial substances with broad activity against various strains of Campylobacter and Clostridium species. The animal study was conducted on broiler chickens (Cobb 400) for the period of 35 d using a completely randomized design. The experimental design included 3 treatments groups. Each treatment group contained 6 replicates, 3 male and 3 female, with 12 birds in each replicate. The 3 treatment groups were an uninfected control, an infected control, and an infected group supplemented with B. subtilis PB6 at 500 g/t of feed, containing 5 × 10(11) cfu/kg. Necrotic enteritis was induced in the broiler birds via oral inoculation of 30,000 oocysts of mixed strains of Eimeria species on d 14 followed by C. perfringens (10(8) cfu/mL) on d 19 through 21 of trial. The birds were analyzed for BW gain, mortality, feed conversion ratio (FCR), intestinal lesion score, intestinal C. perfringens counts, and villus histomorphometry. The infected control group showed markedly thickened mucosa, hemorrhages, intestinal lesions, and ballooning of intestine. The supplementation of B. subtilis PB6 reduced the FCR (P < 0.05) and intestinal C. perfringens counts significantly (P < 0.05) compared with the infected control group. It was also observed that B. subtilis PB6 improved villi length by 10.88 and 30.46% (P < 0.05) compared with uninfected and infected control groups, respectively. The group supplemented with B. subtilis PB6 significantly (P < 0.05) increased the villi length to crypt

  5. Comparison of flunixin meglumine and meloxicam for post operative management of horses with strangulating small intestinal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, R J; Taylor, A H; Knowles, E J; Wilford, S; Linnenkohl, W; Mair, T S; Johns, I C

    2014-07-01

    Ex vivo evidence suggests that cyclo-oxygenase (COX) 2-preferential inhibitor nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as meloxicam, have a less detrimental effect on intestinal healing than flunixin meglumine (FM). Whether this translates to a beneficial effect in horses with naturally occurring strangulating small intestinal (SSI) lesions is unknown. To compare the clinical outcome of horses with naturally occurring SSI lesions treated with meloxicam or FM. Randomised prospective study. Cases presenting to the Royal Veterinary College Equine Referral Hospital and Bell Equine Veterinary Clinic during 2010 and 2011 in which an SSI lesion was identified at exploratory laparotomy were eligible for inclusion. Horses received either 1.1 mg/kg bwt FM or 0.6 mg/kg bwt meloxicam i.v. q. 12 h. Clinical outcomes and clinical and laboratory parameters associated with endotoxaemia were compared between groups. Sixty cases were enrolled, 32 horses received FM and 28 received meloxicam. There was no difference in signalment, physical examination or surgical factors between groups. The overall survival to discharge was 81%; there was no difference in survival (P = 0.14) or incidence of post operative ileus (P = 0.25) between groups. There was no significant difference between the plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) concentrations at 0 h (P = 0.18) or 48 h (P = 0.60); however, there was a significant difference between neutrophil count at 48 h (P<0.05) and at 96 h (P<0.01) with significantly greater cell numbers in horses receiving meloxicam compared with FM. Blinded pain score evaluation showed that more horses receiving meloxicam showed gross signs of pain than those treated with FM (P = 0.04). Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug choice did not affect major clinical outcomes in horses with SSI lesions but had some effects on signs of pain. This study provides no evidence to recommend one NSAID treatment above another based on survival or the incidence of

  6. Oxymatrine improves intestinal epithelial barrier function involving NF-κB-mediated signaling pathway in CCl4-induced cirrhotic rats.

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    Jian-Bo Wen

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic cirrhosis and its complications such as gastrointestinal injury and hepatic encephalopathy. To date, there is no cure for cirrhosis-associated intestinal mucosal lesion and ulcer. This study aimed to investigate the effect of oxymatrine on intestinal epithelial barrier function and the underlying mechanism in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4-induced cirrhotic rats. Thirty CCl4-induced cirrhotic rats were randomly divided into treatment group, which received oxymatrine treatment (63 mg/kg, and non-treatment group, which received the same dose of 5% glucose solution (vehicle. The blank group (n = 10 healthy rats received no treatment. Terminal ileal samples were collected for histopathological examination. The expression level of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB p65 in ileal tissue was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The gene and protein expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin 6 (IL-6 in ileal tissues were analyzed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, respectively. Additionally, plasma endotoxin level was determined. In comparison to the blank group, a significant alteration in the morphology of intestinal mucosal villi in the non-treatment group was observed. The intestinal mucosal villi were atrophic, shorter, and fractured, and inflammatory cells were infiltrated into the lamina propria and muscular layer. Besides, serious swell of villi and loose structure of mucous membrane were observed. Oxymatrine reversed the CCl4-induced histological changes and restored intestinal barrier integrity. Moreover, oxymatrine reduced the protein expression level of NF-κB p65, TNF-α, and IL-6, which were elevated in the vehicle-treated group. In addition, the serum endotoxin level was significantly decreased after oxymatrine treatment in

  7. Critical role of intestinal epithelial cell-derived IL-25 in enteric nematode infection-induced changes in intestinal function

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current study investigated the mechanism of immune regulation of IL-25 and the contribution of IL-25 to nematode infection-induced alterations in intestinal smooth muscle and epithelial cell function. Mice were infected with an enteric nematode or injected with IL-25 or IL-13. In vitro smooth m...

  8. Serosal zinc attenuate serotonin and vasoactive intestinal peptide induced secretion in piglet small intestinal epithelium in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Dorthe; Sehested, Jakob; Feng, Z

    2008-01-01

    This study addressed the mechanisms by which dietary zinc affects diarrhoea and aimed to study possible interactions between zinc status and the presence of zinc in vitro on secretagogue-induced secretion from piglet intestinal epithelium in Ussing chambers....

  9. Diphenylamine-induced renal lesions in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, F; Fella, A; Pota, A

    1978-01-01

    Chronic intoxication with diphenylamine (DPA), which causes a cystic kidney disease in the rat and the guinea-pig, caused degeneration of the renal tubular epithelium in the chicken. This was similar to but much more serious than that preceding the formation of cysts in the rodents, but did not actually result in cyst formation, probably because of the high mortality rate observed in the birds even at this early stage. In the chicken until now it had been possible to obtain a pattern of renal cysts only with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) which also induce the "chick oedema" syndrome. The renal lesions due to DPA in the chicken were similar to those produced by PCB, but were not accompanied by oedema, which suggests that "chick oedema" caused by PCB is not due to renal insufficiency. The differences in the renal lesions noted in the various animal species give credit to the hypothesis that DPA may have two effects on the tubular epitelium, one stimulating cell proliferation and one leading to degeneration. Cysts may be formed only in those species in which there is cell proliferation.

  10. Protective effect of Holothurian intestine against indomethacin induced gastric mucosal damage in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyu; Qiao, Xuejing; Zhang, Cuiping; Gao, Hua; Niu, Qinghui; Wu, Tong; Zhang, Qi; Tian, Zibin

    2017-06-01

    Our study aimed to investigate the protective effects of Holothurian intestines (HI) on NSAIDs-induced gastric mucosal damage and the possible mechanism. At first, 60 male Wistar rats were induced of gastric lesions with indomethacin (IDM, 30 mg kg-1). The rats were pretreated for 15 consecutive days with saline, sucralfate, or HI (0.4 g kg-1d-1, 0.8 g kg-1d-1 and 1.6 g kg-1d-1) prior to IDM treatment, followed by evaluations of macroscopic damage and microscopic features; and investigation of the levels of inflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress parameters, gastric mucosal prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and total hexosamine in tissues. The expression of COX-1 and COX-2 mRNA in the gastric tissue were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Pathological gastric ulcer indexes, levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-17, TNF-α) and lipid peroxidation were significantly decreased in HI-treated groups, whereas the levels of protective factors (TGF-β, GSH, SOD activity and PGE2) were significantly elevated especially in the group with HI 1.6 g kg-1d-1 ( P < 0.05). Furthermore, the expression of COX-2 mRNA decreased significantly in HI groups ( P < 0.05). The study investigates that holothurian intestines may act as a kind of marine medicine which have protective effect on IDM-induced gastric ulcer, which could be a dietary preventive agent for the prevention of gastric damage.

  11. Role of Metabolism by Intestinal Bacteria in Arbutin-Induced Suppression of Lymphoproliferative Response in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi Jeong; Ha, Hyun Woo; Kim, Ghee Hwan; Lee, Sang Kyu; Ahn, Young Tae; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon

    2012-01-01

    Role of metabolism by intestinal bacteria in arbutin-induced immunotoxicity was investigated in splenocyte cultures. Following an incubation of arbutin with 5 different intestinal bacteria for 24 hr, its aglycone hydroquinone could be produced and detected in the bacterial culture media with different amounts. Toxic effects of activated arbutin by intestinal bacteria on lymphoproliferative response were tested in splenocyte cultures from normal mice. Lipopolysaccharide and concanavalin A were used as mitogens for B- and T-cells, respectively. When bacteria cultured medium with arbutin was treated into the splenocytes for 3 days, the medium cultured with bacteria producing large amounts of hydroquinone induced suppression of lymphoproliferative responses, indicating that metabolic activation by intestinal bacteria might be required in arbutin-induced toxicity. The results indicated that the present testing system might be applied for determining the possible role of metabolism by intestinal bacteria in certain chemical-induced immunotoxicity in animal cell cultures. PMID:24116295

  12. Laminar lesions in horses with systemic oxidative stress, committed by experimentally induced or naturally occurring gastrointestinal disorders

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    Luciane M. Laskoski

    Full Text Available Abstract: Laminitis in horses can be associated with lesions in multiple organs secondary to sepsis. Twenty-one horses suffering from gastrointestinal disorders were used in the experiment; 7 horses with experimentally induced endotoxemia and intestinal ischaemia, and 14 horses suffering from naturally occurring colic syndrome. Tissue samples of lungs, liver, heart, brain, cerebellum and hoof laminar tissue were collected for histopathological and oxidative stress evaluation using nitrotyrosine and superoxide dismutase (SOD2 immunostaining. The horses were divided into two groups: the non-oxidative lesions group (NOLG, with 7 horses showing weak immunostaining in lungs, liver and kidney, and the oxidative lesions group (OLG, with 14 horses showing immunostaining indicating systemic oxidative stress in multiple organs. The horses from OLG showed increase of laminar lesions and SOD2 immunostaining in multiple organs when compared to the horses from the NOLG. No differences were found ln regard to laminar immunostaining by nitrotyrosine and SOD2 between experimental groups. It was concluded that systemic oxidative stress can be associated with the development of laminar lesions, and that the laminar tissue does not respond to oxidative stress with increase of SOD as occurs in other organs.

  13. Lubiprostone prevents nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small intestinal damage by suppressing the expression of inflammatory mediators via EP4 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shusaku; Kurata, Naoto; Yamaguchi, Aya; Amagase, Kikuko; Takeuchi, Koji

    2014-06-01

    Lubiprostone, a bicyclic fatty acid derived from prostaglandin E1, has been used to treat chronic constipation and irritable bowel syndrome, and its mechanism of action has been attributed to the stimulation of intestinal fluid secretion via the activation of the chloride channel protein 2/cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (ClC-2/CFTR) chloride channels. We examined the effects of lubiprostone on indomethacin-induced enteropathy and investigated the functional mechanisms involved, including its relationship with the EP4 receptor subtype. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered indomethacin (10 mg/kg p.o.) and killed 24 hours later to examine the hemorrhagic lesions that developed in the small intestine. Lubiprostone (0.01-1 mg/kg) was administered orally twice 30 minutes before and 9 h after the indomethacin treatment. Indomethacin markedly damaged the small intestine, accompanied by intestinal hypermotility, a decrease in mucus and fluid secretion, and an increase in enterobacterial invasion as well as the up-regulation of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) mRNAs. Lubiprostone significantly reduced the severity of these lesions, with the concomitant suppression of the functional changes. The effects of lubiprostone on the intestinal lesions and functional alterations were significantly abrogated by the coadministration of AE3-208 [4-(4-cyano-2-(2-(4-fluoronaphthalen-1-yl)propionylamino)phenyl)butyric acid], a selective EP4 antagonist, but not by CFTR(inh)-172, a CFTR inhibitor. These results suggest that lubiprostone may prevent indomethacin-induced enteropathy via an EP4 receptor-dependent mechanism. This effect may be functionally associated with the inhibition of intestinal hypermotility and increase in mucus/fluid secretion, resulting in the suppression of bacterial invasion and iNOS/TNFα expression, which are major pathogenic events in enteropathy. The direct activation of CFTR/ClC-2 chloride channels is not

  14. The role of ER stress response on ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells

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    Lee, Eun Sang; Kim, Kwang Seok; Woo, Sang Keun; Lee, Yong Jin; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Lee, Yoon Jin; Kang, Seong Man; Lim, Young Bin [Laboratory of Radiation Effect, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathologic factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury. However, mechanism involved in ionizing radiation (IR)-induced apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is triggered by perturbation of the ER functions, leading to the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive signaling cascade aimed at restoring ER homeostasis by facilitating the degradation of misfolded proteins and expanding the protein folding capacity of the cell. Recently, IR has also been shown to induce ER stress, thereby activating the UPR signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, we report the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhance IR-induced caspase3 activation. Knockdown of xbp1 or atf6 with siRNA leads to inhibition of IR-induced caspase3 activation. Taken together, our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our findings could contribute to the development of new strategies based on modulating ER stress responses to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  15. A novel and robust conditioning lesion induced by ethidium bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Edmund R; Ishiko, Nao; Tolentino, Kristine; Doherty, Ernest; Rodriguez, Maria J; Calcutt, Nigel A; Zou, Yimin

    2015-03-01

    Molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the peripheral conditioning lesion remain unsolved. We show here that injection of a chemical demyelinating agent, ethidium bromide, into the sciatic nerve induces a similar set of regeneration-associated genes and promotes a 2.7-fold greater extent of sensory axon regeneration in the spinal cord than sciatic nerve crush. We found that more severe peripheral demyelination correlates with more severe functional and electrophysiological deficits, but more robust central regeneration. Ethidium bromide injection does not activate macrophages at the demyelinated sciatic nerve site, as observed after nerve crush, but briefly activates macrophages in the dorsal root ganglion. This study provides a new method for investigating the underlying mechanisms of the conditioning response and suggests that loss of the peripheral myelin may be a major signal to change the intrinsic growth state of adult sensory neurons and promote regeneration.

  16. Paneth cell marker expression in intestinal villi and colon crypts characterizes dietary induced risk for mouse sporadic intestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Donghai; Peregrina, Karina; Dhima, Elena; Lin, Elaine Y; Mariadason, John M; Augenlicht, Leonard H

    2011-06-21

    Nutritional and genetic risk factors for intestinal tumors are additive on mouse tumor phenotype, establishing that diet and genetic factors impact risk by distinct combinatorial mechanisms. In a mouse model of dietary-induced sporadic small and large intestinal cancer in WT mice in which tumor etiology, lag, incidence, and frequency reflect >90% of intestinal cancer in Western societies, dietary-induced risk altered gene expression profiles predominantly in villus cells of the histologically normal mucosa, in contrast to targeting of crypt cells by inheritance of an Apc(1638N) allele or homozygous inactivation of p21(Waf1/cip1), and profiles induced by each risk factor were distinct at the gene or functional group level. The dietary-induced changes in villus cells encompassed ectopic expression of Paneth cell markers (a lineage normally confined to the bottom of small intestinal crypts), elevated expression of the Wnt receptor Fzd5 and of EphB2 (genes necessary for Paneth cell differentiation and localization to the crypt bottom), and increased Wnt signaling in villus cells. Ectopic elevation of these markers was also present in the colon crypts, which are also sites of sporadic tumors in the nutritional model. Elevating dietary vitamin D(3) and calcium, which prevents tumor development, abrogated these changes in the villus and colon cells. Thus, common intestinal cancer driven by diet involves mechanisms of tumor development distinct from those mechanisms that cause tumors induced by the rare inheritance of a mutant adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) allele. This is fundamental for understanding how common sporadic tumors arise and in evaluating relative risk in the population.

  17. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans induces Th17 cells in atherosclerotic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ru; Hashizume-Takizawa, Tomomi; Du, Yuan; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko

    2015-04-01

    Th17 cells have been linked to the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. However, the role of Th17 cells and IL-17 in atherosclerosis remains poorly understood. We previously reported that Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) bacteremia accelerated atherosclerosis accompanied by inflammation in apolipoprotein E-deficient spontaneously hyperlipidemic (Apoe(shl)) mice. In this study, we investigated whether Aa promotes the Th17 inducing pathway in Aa-challenged Apoe(shl) mice. Mice were intravenously injected with live Aa HK1651 or vehicles. Time-course analysis of splenic IL-17(+)CD4(+) cell frequencies, the proximal aorta lesion area, serum IL-17, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-1β levels, the mRNA expression of Th17-related molecules such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL17RA, STAT3, IL-21, IL-23, TGF-β and RORγt, Th17-related microRNA levels and the levels of AIM-2, Mincle and NLRP3 were examined. Challenge with Aa time dependently induced tropism of Th17 cells in the spleen and increase in atheromatous lesions in the aortic sinus of Apoe(shl) mice. Serum IL-17, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-1β levels were significantly enhanced by Aa. The gene expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17RA, IL-21, IL-23, TGF-β, STAT3, RORγt, AIM-2, Mincle and NLRP3 was also time dependently stimulated in the aorta of Aa-challenged mice. Furthermore, Aa challenge significantly increased the expression of miR-146b and miR-155 in the aorta. Based on the results, it seems that Aa stimulates Th17 induction that affects the progression of Aa-accelerated atherosclerosis.

  18. Protective mechanisms of thymoquinone on methotrexate-induced intestinal toxicity in rats

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    Azza A El-Sheikh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal toxicity is a serious side effect in methotrexate (MTX chemotherapy. Objective: To investigate the mechanisms by which the anticancer drug MTX-induced intestinal damage could be prevented by thymoquinone (TQ, an active ingredient of Nigella sativa. Materials and Methods: TQ was given orally for 10 days, and MTX toxicity was induced at the end of day 3 of the experiment, with or without TQ pretreatment. Results: MTX caused intestinal damage, represented by distortion in normal intestinal histological structure, with significant oxidative stress, exhibited as decrease in reduced glutathione concentration and catalase activity, along with significant increase in malondialdehyde level compared to control group. MTX also caused nitrosative stress evident by increased intestinal nitric oxide (NO level, with up-regulation of inducible NO synthase expression shown in immunohistochemical staining. Furthermore, MTX caused inflammatory effects as evident by up-regulation of intestinal necrosis factor-kappa beta and cyclooxygenase-2 expressions, which were confirmed by increased intestinal tumor necrosis factor-alpha level via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, MTX caused apoptotic effect, as it up-regulated intestinal caspase 3 expression. Concomitant TQ significantly reversed the MTX-induced intestinal toxic effects by reversing intestinal microscopic damage, as well as significantly improving oxidative/nitrosative stress, inflammatory and apoptotic markers tested compared to MTX alone. Conclusion: TQ may possess beneficial intestinal protective effects as an adjuvant co-drug against MTX intestinal toxicity during cancer chemotherapy. TQ protection is conferred via antioxidant, anti-nitrosative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic mechanisms.

  19. Dopamine D₂-receptor antagonists ameliorate indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulceration in mice by activating α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Masashi; Kawahara, Ryoji; Hashimura, Hiroshi; Yamanaka, Naoki; Iimori, Maho; Amagase, Kikuko; Kato, Shinichi; Takeuchi, Koji

    2011-01-01

    We have reported that nicotine and the specific α7AChR agonist ameliorate indomethacin-induced intestinal lesions in mice by activating α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChR). Dopamine D₂-receptor antagonists, such as domperidone and metoclopramide, enhance the release of ACh from vagal efferent nerves. The present study examined the effects of domperidone and metoclopramide on indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulceration in mice, focusing on the α7AChR. Male C57BL/6 mice were administered indomethacin (10 mg/kg, s.c.) and sacrificed 24 h later. Domperidone (0.1-10 mg/kg) and metoclopramide (0.03-0.3 mg/kg) were administered i.p. twice, at 0.5 h before and 8 h after indomethacin treatment, while methyllycaconitine (a selective antagonist of α7nAChR, 30 mg/kg) was administered twice, at 0.5 h before each domperidone treatment. Indomethacin caused severe hemorrhagic lesions in the small intestine, mostly to the jejunum and ileum, with a concomitant increase in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Domperidone suppressed the severity of lesions and the increase in MPO activity at low doses (0.1-3 mg/kg), but not at a high dose (10 mg/kg). Similar effects were also observed by metoclopramide. The protective effects of domperidone and metoclopramide were totally abolished by prior administration of methyllycaconitine. Indomethacin treatment markedly enhanced inducible nitric oxide synthase and chemokine mRNA expression in the small intestine, but these responses were all significantly attenuated by either domperidone or metoclopramide. These findings suggest that dopamine D₂-receptor antagonists ameliorate indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulceration through the activation of endogenous anti-inflammatory pathways mediated by α7nAChR.

  20. Oxazolone-Induced Intestinal Inflammation in Adult Zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugman, Sylvia; Nieuwenhuis, EES

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish are an excellent model for the study of intestinal immunity. The availability of several transgenic reporter fish for different innate and adaptive immune cells and the high homology in terms of gut function and morphology enables in depth analysis of the process of intestinal inflammation

  1. Oxazolone-induced intestinal inflammation in adult zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugman, Sylvia; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E.S.

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish are an excellent model for the study of intestinal immunity. The availability of several transgenic reporter fish for different innate and adaptive immune cells and the high homology in terms of gut function and morphology enables in depth analysis of the process of intestinal inflammat

  2. Oxazolone-induced intestinal inflammation in adult zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugman, Sylvia; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E.S.

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish are an excellent model for the study of intestinal immunity. The availability of several transgenic reporter fish for different innate and adaptive immune cells and the high homology in terms of gut function and morphology enables in depth analysis of the process of intestinal

  3. Oxazolone-Induced Intestinal Inflammation in Adult Zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugman, Sylvia; Nieuwenhuis, EES

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish are an excellent model for the study of intestinal immunity. The availability of several transgenic reporter fish for different innate and adaptive immune cells and the high homology in terms of gut function and morphology enables in depth analysis of the process of intestinal

  4. Novel fluorescence molecular imaging of chemotherapy-induced intestinal apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Galit; Shirvan, Anat; Grimberg, Hagit; Reshef, Ayelet; Yogev-Falach, Merav; Cohen, Avi; Ziv, Ilan

    2009-09-01

    Chemotherapy-induced enteropathy (CIE) is one of the most serious complications of anticancer therapy, and tools for its early detection and monitoring are highly needed. We report on a novel fluorescence method for detection of CIE, based on molecular imaging of the related apoptotic process. The method comprises systemic intravenous administration of the ApoSense fluorescent biomarker (N,N'-didansyl-L-cystine DDC) in vivo and subsequent fluorescence imaging of the intestinal mucosa. In the reported proof-of-concept studies, mice were treated with either taxol+cyclophosphamide or doxil. DDC was administered in vivo at various time points after drug administration, and tracer uptake by ileum tissue was subsequently evaluated by ex vivo fluorescent microscopy. Chemotherapy caused marked and selective uptake of DDC in ileal epithelial cells, in correlation with other hallmarks of apoptosis (i.e., DNA fragmentation and Annexin-V binding). Induction of DDC uptake occurred early after chemotherapy, and its temporal profile was parallel to that of the apoptotic process, as assessed histologically. DDC may therefore serve as a useful tool for detection of CIE. Future potential integration of this method with fluorescent endoscopic techniques, or development of radio-labeled derivatives of DDC for emission tomography, may advance early diagnosis and monitoring of this severe adverse effect of chemotherapy.

  5. Prophylactic Ozone Administration Reduces Intestinal Mucosa Injury Induced by Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion in the Rat

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    Ozkan Onal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury is associated with mucosal damage and has a high rate of mortality. Various beneficial effects of ozone have been shown. The aim of the present study was to show the effects of ozone in ischemia reperfusion model in intestine. Material and Method. Twenty eight Wistar rats were randomized into four groups with seven rats in each group. Control group was administered serum physiologic (SF intraperitoneally (ip for five days. Ozone group was administered 1 mg/kg ozone ip for five days. Ischemia Reperfusion (IR group underwent superior mesenteric artery occlusion for one hour and then reperfusion for two hours. Ozone + IR group was administered 1 mg/kg ozone ip for five days and at sixth day IR model was applied. Rats were anesthetized with ketamine∖xyzlazine and their intracardiac blood was drawn completely and they were sacrificed. Intestinal tissue samples were examined under light microscope. Levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathioneperoxidase (GSH-Px, malondyaldehide (MDA, and protein carbonyl (PCO were analyzed in tissue samples. Total oxidant status (TOS, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC were analyzed in blood samples. Data were evaluated statistically by Kruskal Wallis test. Results. In the ozone administered group, degree of intestinal injury was not different from the control group. IR caused an increase in intestinal injury score. The intestinal epithelium maintained its integrity and decrease in intestinal injury score was detected in Ozone + IR group. SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT values were high in ozone group and low in IR. TOS parameter was highest in the IR group and the TAC parameter was highest in the ozone group and lowest in the IR group. Conclusion. In the present study, IR model caused an increase in intestinal injury.In the present study, ozone administration had an effect improving IR associated tissue injury. In the present study, ozone therapy

  6. Chronic inflammation, apoptosis and (pre-)malignant lesions in the gastro-intestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woude, CJ; Kleibeuker, JH; Jansen, PLM; Moshage, H

    2004-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions are characterized by activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB), resulting in the expression of NF-kappaB-regulated, inflammation-related genes, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2). Expression of these ge

  7. Mthfd1 is a modifier of chemically induced intestinal carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, Amanda J; Perry, Cheryll A; McEntee, Michael F; Lin, David M; Stover, Patrick J

    2011-03-01

    The causal metabolic pathways underlying associations between folate and risk for colorectal cancer (CRC) have yet to be established. Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism is required for the de novo synthesis of purines, thymidylate and methionine. Methionine is converted to S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), the major one-carbon donor for cellular methylation reactions. Impairments in folate metabolism can modify DNA synthesis, genomic stability and gene expression, characteristics associated with tumorigenesis. The Mthfd1 gene product, C1-tetrahydrofolate synthase, is a trifunctional enzyme that generates one-carbon substituted tetrahydrofolate cofactors for one-carbon metabolism. In this study, we use Mthfd1(gt/+) mice, which demonstrate a 50% reduction in C1-tetrahydrofolate synthase, to determine its influence on tumor development in two mouse models of intestinal cancer, crosses between Mthfd1(gt/+) and Apc(min)(/+) mice and azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon cancer in Mthfd1(gt/+) mice. Mthfd1 hemizygosity did not affect colon tumor incidence, number or load in Apc(min/+) mice. However, Mthfd1 deficiency increased tumor incidence 2.5-fold, tumor number 3.5-fold and tumor load 2-fold in AOM-treated mice. DNA uracil content in the colon was lower in Mthfd1(gt/+) mice, indicating that thymidylate biosynthesis capacity does not play a significant role in AOM-induced colon tumorigenesis. Mthfd1 deficiency-modified cellular methylation potential, as indicated by the AdoMet: S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio and gene expression profiles, suggesting that changes in the transcriptome and/or decreased de novo purine biosynthesis and associated mutability cause cellular transformation in the AOM CRC model. This study emphasizes the impact and complexity of gene-nutrient interactions with respect to the relationships among folate metabolism and colon cancer initiation and progression.

  8. Surgical treatment of radiation induced injuries of the intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, E.H.; Symmonds, R.E.

    1981-12-01

    In the patient who has received high dose irradiation of the pelvis and abdomen, all abdominopelvic operations should be avoided, unless it is absolutely essential. Persisting obstruction, hemorrhage, intestinal perforation with peritonitis and with abscess and fistula formation are valid indications for surgical intervention. Ninety-three patients have been operated upon for these complications after irradiation. Some anastomotic dehiscence occurred in ten patients. Six operative deaths occurred. Of the 93 patients, 65 were managed by means of complete resection of the involved segment of intestine, followed by restoration of intestinal continuity by means of an end-to-end anastomosis. This is the treatment of choice when the involved area can be safely resected. In the absence of actual intestinal necrosis and when segments of strictured small intestine are adherent deep in the pelvis, and intestinal bypass procedure may represent the treatment of choice. This was accomplished in 20 patients, two of whom eventually required a second operation for resection of the bypassed segment of intestine.

  9. The changing pattern of upper gastro-intestinal lesions in southern Saudi Arabia: An endoscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Humayed Sulieman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Dyspepsia is a common gastrointestinal disorder and is the most common indication for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE. In recent years, it has been observed in several centers that there is a change in the causes of dyspepsia as revealed by UGIE. Our main objectives were: (1 To study the pattern of upper gastrointestinal pathology in patients with dyspepsia undergoing upper endoscopy; (2 Compare that with the pattern seen 10-15 years earlier in different areas of KSA. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study of all UGI endoscopies performed at Aseer Central Hospital, Abha, Southern Saudi Arabia during the years 2005-2007 on patients above 13 years of age. Patients who underwent UGIE for reasons other than dyspepsia were excluded. The analysis was performed using the SPSS 14 statistical package. Results: A total of 1,607 patients underwent UGI endoscopy during the three-year study period (age range, 15-100. There were 907 males (56.4% and 700 female (43.6%. Normal findings were reported on 215 patients (14% and the majority had gastritis (676 = 42%, of whom 344 had gastritis with ulcer disease. Moreover, 242 patients (15% had gastro-esophageal reflux (GERD, with or without esophagitis or hiatus hernia. Also, a total of 243 patients had duodenal ulcer (DU (15% while only 12 had gastric ulcer (0.7%. Discussion and Conclusion: There is clear change in the frequency of UGIE lesions detected recently compared to a decade ago with an increasing prevalence of reflux esophagitis and hiatus hernia. This could be attributed to changes in lifestyle and dietary habits such as more consumption of fat and fast food, increased prevalence of obesity, and smoking. These problems should be addressed in order to minimize the serious complications of esophageal diseases.

  10. Precision-cut intestinal slices as an in vitro model to predict NSAID induced intestinal toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; van der Bijl, Henk; Groothuis, Geny; de Graaf, Inge

    2013-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with high prevalence of gastro-intestinal side-effects. In vivo studies suggest that uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation is an important cause of the toxicity and that the toxicity is aggravated by enterohepatic circulation. Precision

  11. Basal forebrain cholinergic input is not essential for lesion-induced plasticity in mature auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamke, Marc R; Brown, Mel; Irvine, Dexter R F

    2005-11-23

    The putative role of the basal forebrain cholinergic system in mediating lesion-induced plasticity in topographic cortical representations was investigated. Cholinergic immunolesions were combined with unilateral restricted cochlear lesions in adult cats, demonstrating the consequence of cholinergic depletion on lesion-induced plasticity in primary auditory cortex (AI). Immunolesions almost eliminated the cholinergic input to AI, while cochlear lesions produced broad high-frequency hearing losses. The results demonstrate that the near elimination of cholinergic input does not disrupt reorganization of the tonotopic representation of the lesioned (contralateral) cochlea in AI and does not affect the normal representation of the unlesioned (ipsilateral) cochlea. It is concluded that cholinergic basal forebrain input to AI is not essential for the occurrence of lesion-induced plasticity in AI.

  12. Alteration of the Microbiota and Virulence Gene Expression in E. coli O157:H7 in Pig Ligated Intestine with and without AE Lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianfang Liu

    Full Text Available Previously we found that E. coli O157:H7 inoculated into ligated pig intestine formed attaching and effacing (AE lesions in some pigs but not in others. The present study evaluated changes in the microbial community and in virulence gene expression in E. coli O157:H7 in ligated pig intestine in which the bacteria formed AE lesions or failed to form AE lesions.The intestinal microbiota was assessed by RNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analysis. The DGGE banding patterns showed distinct differences involving two bands which had increased intensity specifically in AE-negative pigs (AE- bands and several bands which were more abundant in AE-positive pigs. Sequence analysis revealed that the two AE- bands belonged to Veillonella caviae, a species with probiotic properties, and Bacteroides sp. Concurrent with the differences in microbiota, gene expression analysis by quantitative PCR showed that, compared with AE negative pigs, E. coli O157:H7 in AE positive pigs had upregulated genes for putative adhesins, non-LEE encoded nleA and quorum sensing qseF, acid resistance gene ureD, and genes from the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE.The present study demonstrated that AE-positive pigs had reduced activities or populations of Veillonella caviae and Bacterioides sp. compared with AE-negative pigs. Further studies are required to understand how the microbiota was changed and the role of these organisms in the control of E. coli O157:H7.

  13. [Effect of electroacupuncture on inflammatory injury induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jia-Rui; Shi, Xian; Hu, Sen; Zhong, Yu-Xian; Liu, Wei-Wei; Zhao, Ying

    2012-07-01

    To observe the protective effect of electroacupuncture (EA) at "Zusanli" (ST 36) on inflammatory injury induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) in rats. Forty-eight Wistar rats were randomly divided into a sham injury group, a model group, an EA group and a sham EA group, 12 rats in each group. Intestinal I/R rat models were established by method of clamping with occlusion of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) for 45 min followed by reperfusion. The EA group was treated with EA (2.5 mA, 2 Hz/100 Hz, 0.5 h) at "Zusanli" (ST 36) 30 min before reperfusion, and at the same time, the sham EA group was treated with fast insertion at two non-meridian acupoints on skin surface (2 cm horizontally away from linea alba abdominis and about 5 cm paralleled to cartilago ensiformis downward). No interventions were added on the sham injury group and the model group. The degree of pathological injury in intestines, water rate of intestines, diamine oxidase (DAO) activity and intestinal mucosal blood flow (IMBF) were examined at 1 h and 3 h after reperfusion. At 1 h and 3 h after reperfusion, the intestinal pathological injury in EA group was significantly attenuated compared with that in model group, and the intestinal water rate of (74.00 +/- 2.11)% and (78.78 +/- 0.80)% in EA group were significantly lower than (80.69 +/- 1.66)% and (83.17 +/- 2.08)% in model group (both P 0.05). Electroacupuncture can not only reduce the inflammatory injury induced by intestinal IR but also increase intestinal blood supply so as to protect the intestine function.

  14. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, J.; Jiang, Y. [Southern Medical University, Nanfang Hospital, Department of Anesthesia, Guangzhou, China, Department of Anesthesia, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Tang, Y.; Chen, B. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China); Sun, X. [Laboratory of Traditional Chinese Medicine Syndrome, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Su, L.; Liu, Z. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China)

    2013-06-25

    Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries.

  15. Lansoprazole ameliorates intestinal mucosal damage induced by ischemia-reperfusion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi Ichikawa; Toshikazu Yoshikawa; Norimasa Yoshida; Tomohisa Takagi; Naoya Tomatsuri; Kazuhiro Katada; Yutaka Isozaki; Kazuhiko Uchiyama; Yuji Naito; Takeshi Okanoue

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the protective effect of lansoprazole on ischemia and reperfusion (I/R)-induced rat intestinal mucosal injury in vivo.METHODS: Intestinal damage was induced by clamping both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk for 30 min followed by reperfusion in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Lansoprazole was given to rats intraperitoneally 1 h before vascular clamping.RESULTS: Both the intraluminal hemoglobin and protein levels, as indices of mucosal damage, significantly increased in I/R-groups comparion with those of shamoperation groups. These increases in intraluminal hemoglobin and protein levels were significantly inhibited by the treatment with lansoprazole at a dose of 1 mg/kg. Small intestine exposed to I/R resulted in mucosal inflammation that was characterized by significant increases in thiobarbituric acidreactive substances (TBARS), tissue-associated myeloperoxidase activity (MPO), and mucosal content of rat cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1).These increases in TBARS, MPO activities and CINC-1 content in the intestinal mucosa after I/R were all inhibited by pretreatment with lansoprazole at a dose of 1 mg/kg.Furthermore, the CINC-1 mRNA expression was increased during intestinal I/R, and this increase in mRNA expression was inhibited by treatment with lansoprazole.CONCLUSION: Lansoprazole inhibits lipid peroxidation and reduces development of intestinal mucosal inflammation induced by I/R in rats, suggesting that lansoprazole may have a therapeutic potential for I/R injury.

  16. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6 was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS. In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries.

  17. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tang

    Full Text Available Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6 was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS. In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries.

  18. CD10 down expression in follicular lymphoma correlates with gastrointestinal lesion involving the stomach and large intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Nobuhiko; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Miyata-Takata, Tomoko; Sato, Yasuharu; Tari, Akira; Gion, Yuka; Noujima-Harada, Mai; Taniguchi, Kohei; Tabata, Tetsuya; Nagakita, Keina; Omote, Shizuma; Takahata, Hiroyuki; Iwamuro, Masaya; Okada, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Yanai, Hiroyuki; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2016-11-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) shows co-expression of B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) and CD10, whereas downexpression of CD10 is occasionally experienced in gastrointestinal (GI) FL with unknown significance. Gastrointestinal FL is a rare variant of FL, and its similarity with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma was reported. We investigated the clinicopathological and genetic features of CD10 downexpressed (CD10(down) ) GI-FL. The diagnosis of CD10(down) FL was carried out with a combination of pathological and molecular analyses. The incidence of CD10(down) GI-FL was shown in 35/172 (20.3%) cases, which was more frequent than nodal FL (3.5%, P stomach or large intestine (P = 0.015), and additionally showed the downexpression of BCL6 (P < 0.001). The follicular dendritic cell meshwork often showed a duodenal pattern in the CD10(down) group (P = 0.12). Furthermore, a lymphoepithelial lesion was observed in 5/12 (40%) gastric FL cases, which indicated caution in the differentiation of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Molecular analyses were undertaken in seven cases of CD10(down) GI-FL, and an identical clone was found between CD10(down) follicles and CD10(+) BCL2(+) neoplastic follicles. In the diagnosis of cases with CD10(down) BCL2(+) follicles, careful examination with molecular studies should be carried out. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  19. Tumor Necrosis Factor Induces Developmental Stage-Dependent Structural Changes in the Immature Small Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn S. Brown

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Premature infants are commonly subject to intestinal inflammation. Since the human small intestine does not reach maturity until term gestation, premature infants have a unique challenge, as either acute or chronic inflammation may alter the normal development of the intestinal tract. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF has been shown to acutely alter goblet cell numbers and villus length in adult mice. In this study we tested the effects of TNF on villus architecture and epithelial cells at different stages of development of the immature small intestine. Methods. To examine the effects of TNF-induced inflammation, we injected acute, brief, or chronic exposures of TNF in neonatal and juvenile mice. Results. TNF induced significant villus blunting through a TNF receptor-1 (TNFR1 mediated mechanism, leading to loss of villus area. This response to TNFR1 signaling was altered during intestinal development, despite constant TNFR1 protein expression. Acute TNF-mediated signaling also significantly decreased Paneth cells. Conclusions. Taken together, the morphologic changes caused by TNF provide insight as to the effects of inflammation on the developing intestinal tract. Additionally, they suggest a mechanism which, coupled with an immature immune system, may help to explain the unique susceptibility of the immature intestine to inflammatory diseases such as NEC.

  20. Rebamipide suppresses diclofenac-induced intestinal permeability via mitochondrial protection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Lei; Mei, Qiao; Xu, Jian-Ming; Liu, Xiao-Chang; Hu, Jing; Jin, Juan; Yao, Qiang; Chen, Mo-Li

    2012-03-14

    To investigate the protective effect and mechanism of rebamipide on small intestinal permeability induced by diclofenac in mice. Diclofenac (2.5 mg/kg) was administered once daily for 3 d orally. A control group received the vehicle by gavage. Rebamipide (100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg, 400 mg/kg) was administered intragastrically once a day for 3 d 4 h after diclofenac administration. Intestinal permeability was evaluated by Evans blue and the FITC-dextran method. The ultrastructure of the mucosal barrier was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Mitochondrial function including mitochondrial swelling, mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-reduced (NADH) levels, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and ATPase activities were measured. Small intestinal mucosa was collected for assessment of malondialdehyde (MDA) content and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Compared with the control group, intestinal permeability was significantly increased in the diclofenac group, which was accompanied by broken tight junctions, and significant increases in MDA content and MPO activity. Rebamipide significantly reduced intestinal permeability, improved inter-cellular tight junctions, and was associated with decreases in intestinal MDA content and MPO activity. At the mitochondrial level, rebamipide increased SDH and ATPase activities, NADH level and decreased mitochondrial swelling. Increased intestinal permeability induced by diclofenac can be attenuated by rebamipide, which partially contributed to the protection of mitochondrial function.

  1. Rebamipide suppresses diclofenac-induced intestinal permeability via mitochondrial protection in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Diao; Qiao Mei; Jian-Ming Xu; Xiao-Chang Liu; Jing Hu; Juan Jin; Qiang Yao

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the protective effect and mechanism of rebamipide on small intestinal permeability induced by diclofenac in mice.METHODS:Diclofenac (2.5 mg/kg) was administered once daily for 3 d orally.A control group received the vehicle by gavage.Rebamipide (100 mg/kg,200 mg/kg,400 mg/kg) was administered intragastrically once a day for 3 d 4 h after diclofenac administration.Intestinal permeability was evaluated by Evans blue and the FITC-dextran method.The ultrastructure of the mucosal barrier was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).Mitochondrial function including mitochondrial swelling,mitochondrial membrane potential,mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-reduced (NADH) levels,succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and ATPase activities were measured.Small intestinal mucosa was collected for assessment of malondialdehyde (MDA) content and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity.RESULTS:Compared with the control group,intestinal permeability was significantly increased in the diclofenac group,which was accompanied by broken tight junctions,and significant increases in MDA content and MPO activity.Rebamipide significantly reduced intestinal permeability,improved inter-cellular tight junctions,and was associated with decreases in intestinal MDA content and MPO activity.At the mitochondrial level,rebamipide increased SDH and ATPase activities,NADH level and decreased mitochondrial swelling.CONCLUSION:Increased intestinal permeability induced by diclofenac can be attenuated by rebamipide,which partially contributed to the protection of mitochondrial function.

  2. Sulforaphane protects liver injury induced by intestinal ischemia reperfusion through Nrf2-ARE pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of sulforaphane (SFN) on regulation of NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2)-antiox-idant response element (ARE) pathway in liver injury induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). METHODS: Rats were divided randomly into four ex-perimental groups: control, SFN control, intestinal I/R and SFN pretreatment groups (n = 8 in each group). The intestinal I/R model was established by clamping the superior mesenteric artery for 1 h and 2 h reperfu-sion. In the SFN pretreatment group, s...

  3. Amelioration of Chemotherapy-Induced Intestinal Mucositis by Orally Administered Probiotics in a Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Yan Yeung; Wai-Tao Chan; Chun-Bin Jiang; Mei-Lien Cheng; Chia-Yuan Liu; Szu-Wen Chang; Jen-Shiu Chiang Chiau; Hung-Chang Lee

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Intestinal mucositis is a frequently encountered side effect in oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. No well-established or up to date therapeutic strategies are available. To study a novel way to alleviate mucositis, we investigate the effects and safety of probiotic supplementation in ameliorating 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. Methods Seventy-two mice were injected saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) intraperitoneally daily. Mice were either orall...

  4. Effects of growth hormone plus a hyperproteic diet on methotrexate-induced injury in rat intestines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, M; Gomez-de-Segura, I A; Vázquez, I; López, J M; de Guevara, C L; De-Miguel, E

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether growth hormone treatment reduces injury to the intestinal mucosa induced by methotrexate (MTX). Wistar rats with intestinal injury induced by methotrexate were treated with daily growth hormone, beginning 3 days before MTX treatment until 3 or 4 days after MTX administration. The rats were killed at 3 or 7 days post-MTX administration. The rats were fed with either a normoproteic diet or a hyperproteic diet. Body weight, mortality, bacterial translocation, intestinal morphometry, proliferation and apoptosis and blood somatostatin and IGF-1 were determined. Combined administration of growth hormone and a hyperproteic diet reduces MTX-induced mortality. This effect was accompanied by increased cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis within the crypt. Morphometric data showed complete recovery of the mucosa by day 7 post-MTX administration. These results indicate a synergistic protective action of growth hormone combined with a hyperproteic diet to MTX-induced injury.

  5. Different effects of short- and long-chained fructans on large intestinal physiology and carcinogen-induced aberrant crypt foci in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Morten; Molck, Anne-Marie; Jacobsen, Bodil Lund

    2002-01-01

    -type fructan on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the rat colon. In addition, the present study investigated the influence of chain length, dietary level (5% or 15%), and duration of feeding (5 or 10 wk) on the following intestinal parameters supposed to be involved......Inulin-type fructans, which are nondigestible carbohydrates, have been shown to modulate the number of induced preneoplastic lesions in the colon as well as the colonic microflora in laboratory animals. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of a short- and long-chained inulin...

  6. Partridge embryo pathology in relation to gentamicin-induced lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Tavakkoli

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the macroscopic and microscopic lesions of various dosages of gentamicin in the partridge embryo. Methods: Fertile chukar partridge eggs were allocated into four groups. Group 1: salineinjected group whose individuals were administered by sterile physiological saline solution of 0.2 mL/egg inserted into yolk sac. Groups 2, 3 and 4 whose individuals were similarly administered by gentamicin sulfate at a dosage of 80 mg/kg egg-weight once, twice and three times, respectively. Results: Results showed that the embryos were congested and stunted in the gentamicininjected groups. Defects in feet, wings and feather development were accompanied by microscopic lesions in brain, meninges, heart, lungs, liver and kidneys. Histopathological lesions were noticed as edema, undeveloped tissues, necrosis and degeneration in the affected organs. Conclusions: Based on acquired results, it is concluded that gentamicin at above-described dosages causes toxicopathological effects to the partridge embryo in a dose dependent manner.

  7. Effect of antioxidant supplementation on digestive enzymes in radiation induced intestinal damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Mumtaz; Nanda, Neha; Bhatia, Alka; Akhtar, Reyhan; Mahmood, Safrun

    2013-12-01

    Intestinal mucosa, a rapidly proliferating tissue, is highly sensitive to radiation and undergoes apoptosis as a consequence of over generation of oxidative free radicals and the lack of the antioxidants. Thus the present study was designed to investigate the intestinal damage induced by radiation and to study if supplementation of the diet with antioxidant vitamins could ameliorate the intestinal damage and its digestive activity, as determined by the expression of various border enzymes. Swiss Albino rats (150-200 g body weight) were divided into six groups. Group I: Control untreated; Group II: Irradiated; Group III: Irradiated + vitamin A; Group IV: Irradiated + vitamin C; Group V: Irradiated + vitamin E; and Group VI: Irradiated + lycopene. Animals were exposed to whole body γ-radiation from (60)Co at the rate of 8 Gy for 15 min/rat. Intestinal morphology and changes in various digestive enzymes together with, DNA damage was studied in six groups and each group consisted of 18 animals. The gastrointestinal toxicity resulted in malabsorption, diarrhoea, weight loss, loss of appetite, abdominal haemorrhage and hair loss. The activities of sucrase and alkaline phosphatase were elevated and those of lactase, leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase or tranferase (γ-GTP) were markedly reduced. Antioxidant vitamin A, C or E supplementations prevented changes in brush border enzyme activities as compared to lycopene administration in rat intestine by radiation exposure. Intestinal histology showed that the vitamin supplementation to irradiated rats minimized the intestinal damage in rats. These findings suggest that the epithelial lining of the intestine is highly sensitive to radiation exposure and supplementation of antioxidant vitamins is helpful in minimizing the intestinal damage and supplementation by vitamin E was most potent in ameliorating the intestinal aberrations.

  8. Rebamipide inhibits indomethacin-induced small intestinal injury: possible involvement of intestinal microbiota modulation by upregulation of α-defensin 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Toshio; Otani, Koji; Nadatani, Yuji; Ohkawa, Fumikazu; Sogawa, Mitsue; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Shiba, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Kenji; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Koji; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2013-03-15

    Enterobacteria play important roles in the pathophysiology of small intestinal injuries induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We investigated the effects of rebamipide, a gastrointestinal mucoprotective drug, on indomethacin-induced small intestinal injuries, intestinal microbiota, and expression levels of α-defensin 5, which is a Paneth cell-specific antimicrobial peptide and is important for the regulation of intestinal microbiota. Indomethacin (10mg/kg) was orally administered to mice after oral administration of rebamipide (100 or 300 mg/kg) or vehicle for 1 week, and the small intestinal injuries were assessed. After oral administration of rebamipide, the small intestinal contents were subjected to terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis to assess the intestinal microbiota composition. Further, the expression levels of mRNA and protein for α-defensin 5 in the ileal tissue were determined by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting analysis, respectively. Rebamipide inhibited indomethacin-induced small intestinal injuries and T-RFLP analysis showed that rebamipide increased the percentage of Lactobacillales and decreased the percentage of Bacteroides and Clostridium than that in vehicle-treated controls. The mice that were treated with rebamipide showed an increase in α-defensin 5 mRNA expression and protein levels in the ileal tissue compared to vehicle-treated control mice. Indomethacin reduced expression of α-defensin 5 mRNA in ileal tissue, while rebamipide reversed expression of α-defensin 5 mRNA. In conclusion, our study results suggest that rebamipide inhibits indomethacin-induced small intestinal injuries, possibly by modulating microbiota in the small intestine by upregulation of α-defensin 5. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Preventative Effects of Sodium Alginate on Indomethacin-induced Small-intestinal Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horibe, Sayo; Tanahashi, Toshihito; Kawauchi, Shoji; Mizuno, Shigeto; Rikitake, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic technologies have revealed that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause serious mucosal injury in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract (including the small intestine). A drug to treat NSAID-induced small-intestinal injury (SII) is lacking. Sodium alginate is a soluble dietary fiber extracted from brown seaweed and its solution has been used as a hemostatic agent to treat gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastric ulcers. Whether sodium alginate has therapeutic effects on NSAID-induced SII and its mechanism of action are not known. Here, we investigated if administration of two forms (high-molecular-weight (HMW) and low-molecular-weight (LMW)) of sodium alginate could ameliorate indomethacin-induced SII. Pretreatment with HMW sodium alginate or LMW sodium alginate before indomethacin administration improved ulceration and the resultant intestinal shortening was associated with reduced histological severity of mucosal injury and ameliorated mRNA expression of inflammation-related molecules in the small intestine. We found that mRNAs of secretory Muc2 and membrane-associated Muc1, Muc3 and Muc4 were expressed in the small intestine. mRNA expression of Muc1-4 was increased in indomethacin-induced SII, and these increases were prevented by sodium alginate. Thus, administration of sodium alginate could be a therapeutic approach to prevent indomethacin-induced SII.

  10. [The up-to-date methods of management of NSAIDs-induced injuries of small intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkach, S M; Balabantseva, H P; Levchenko, A R

    2014-01-01

    In the article the incidence, pathogenesis, clinical featuries, diagnostic, prevention and treatment of NSAIDs-induced injuries of small intestine are presented. The different strategies of management of NSAID-induced enteropathy, such as use of PPI, COX-2-inhibitors, prostaglandins, antibiotics and probiotics, new combination of NSAIDs with phosphatidylcholine, NO or H2S, food supplements and other drugs are discussed.

  11. Cinnamon Extract Improves TNF-a Induced Overproduction of Intestinal ApolipoproteinB-48 Lipoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    TNF-alpha stimulates the overproduction of intestinal apolipoproteins. We evaluated whether a water extract of cinnamon (Cinnulin PF®) improved the dyslipidemia induced by TNF-alpha in Triton WR-1339 treated hamsters, and whether Cinnulin PF® inhibits the TNF-alpha-induced over the secretion of apoB...

  12. Anti-inflammatory activity and gastric lesions induced by zinc-tenoxicam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Jorge Willian L; Santos, Luiz Henrique; Nothenberg, Michael S; Coelho, Márcio M; Oga, Seizi; Tagliati, Carlos A

    2003-06-01

    Oral administration of tenoxicam or zinc-tenoxicam complex inhibited to a similar extent carrageenin-induced paw oedema and granulomatous tissue formation in rats as well as the acetic acid induced writhing response in mice. Gastric lesions induced by oral administration of zinc-tenoxicam were reduced in number and severity when compared with those induced by tenoxicam or the co-administration of tenoxicam and zinc acetate. However, after intraperitoneal administration, both zinc-tenoxicam and tenoxicam plus zinc acetate induced a reduced number of gastric lesions as compared with tenoxicam.

  13. The role of intestinal microbiota in the development and severity of chemotherapy-induced mucositis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel J van Vliet

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Mucositis, also referred to as mucosal barrier injury, is one of the most debilitating side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment. Clinically, mucositis is associated with pain, bacteremia, and malnutrition. Furthermore, mucositis is a frequent reason to postpone chemotherapy treatment, ultimately leading towards a higher mortality in cancer patients. According to the model introduced by Sonis, both inflammation and apoptosis of the mucosal barrier result in its discontinuity, thereby promoting bacterial translocation. According to this five-phase model, the intestinal microbiota plays no role in the pathophysiology of mucositis. However, research has implicated a prominent role for the commensal intestinal microbiota in the development of several inflammatory diseases like inflammatory bowel disease, pouchitis, and radiotherapy-induced diarrhea. Furthermore, chemotherapeutics have a detrimental effect on the intestinal microbial composition (strongly decreasing the numbers of anaerobic bacteria, coinciding in time with the development of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. We hypothesize that the commensal intestinal microbiota might play a pivotal role in chemotherapy-induced mucositis. In this review, we propose and discuss five pathways in the development of mucositis that are potentially influenced by the commensal intestinal microbiota: 1 the inflammatory process and oxidative stress, 2 intestinal permeability, 3 the composition of the mucus layer, 4 the resistance to harmful stimuli and epithelial repair mechanisms, and 5 the activation and release of immune effector molecules. Via these pathways, the commensal intestinal microbiota might influence all phases in the Sonis model of the pathogenesis of mucositis. Further research is needed to show the clinical relevance of restoring dysbiosis, thereby possibly decreasing the degree of intestinal mucositis.

  14. Oculogyric Crisis Associated with Disulfiram-Induced Pallidonigral Lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hyeok; Lyoo, Chul Hyoung; Lee, Jin Goo; Lee, Myung Sik

    2009-01-01

    We report a man who developed oculogyric crisis one month after disulfiram intoxication. Brain MRI showed lesions involving bilateral globus pallidus and left substantia nigra. In our patient, neuronal discharges from pathologically reorganized basal ganglia circuit to the mid-brain ocular motor center might lead to tonic deviation of the eyes. PMID:24868355

  15. Oculogyric Crisis Associated with Disulfiram-Induced Pallidonigral Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hyeok Lee

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a man who developed oculogyric crisis one month after disulfiram intoxication. Brain MRI showed lesions involving bilateral globus pallidus and left substantia nigra. In our patient, neuronal discharges from pathologically reorganized basal ganglia circuit to the mid-brain ocular motor center might lead to tonic deviation of the eyes.

  16. Ultrasound imaging and evaluation of lesion induced by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Hui; WAN Mingxi; JIANG Yifeng; WANG Supin

    2006-01-01

    The present study was to investigate the differential imaging method for detecting HIFU (High Intensity Focused Ultrasound)-induced lesions and the estimation of variation of attenuation for lesion evaluation with log spectral difference algorithm. Experiment results of bovine muscle and liver in vitro were acquired. Several algorithms for lesion detection - Absolute Difference (AD), Sum Absolute Differences (SAD) and Sum Squared Differences (SSD) - were analyzed with several window sizes and threshold values. Then three attenuation parameters were compared to evaluate the degree of tissue damage. It was found that variation of the mean attenuation △(α) was an effective parameter to evaluate lesions.

  17. Prognosis of surgically treated radiation-induced damage to the intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahnson, S.; Westerborn, O. (Orebro Medical Center Hospital, Orebro (Sweden)); Gerdin, B. (Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala (Sweden))

    1992-10-01

    A series of 88 patients operated on during 24 years for radiation-induced damage (RID) to the intestinal tract were retrospectively reviewed and clinical and surgical factors were related to the ultimate prognosis by multivariate analysis. The first operation was performed on the small intestine in 47 patients, the large intestine in 32 patients or both in nine patients. Postoperative complications occurred in 35 patients (40%), with fatal outcome in 12 (13%). Thirty-one patients (35%) required further surgery and altogether 19 patients (22%) ultimately died from RID. Negative prognostic factors after the first operation were post-operative intestinal leak (P < 0.05) and operation for fistula or perforation (P < 0.01). The outcome after the last operation was negatively influenced by intestinal leak (P < 0.001) by the choice of bypass as operative procedure (P < 0.01) and by operation for fistula or perforation (P < 0.01). In addition, 43% of the patients in whom the disease had progressed between two explorations died from RID. Thus, the severity of the RID as diagnosed at laparotomy, and progression of the disease between two subsequent explorations were related to the prognosis. Care should be taken to avoid intestinal leak. Resections should be preferred to bypass of injured intestine whenever possible. (author).

  18. K-ras mutations and mucin profile in preneoplastic lesions and colon tumors induced in rats by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femia, Angelo Pietro; Tarquini, Elena; Salvadori, Maddalena; Ferri, Stefania; Giannini, Augusto; Dolara, Piero; Caderni, Giovanna

    2008-01-01

    K-ras and mucin profile variations, associated with intestinal carcinogenesis, were studied in the preneoplastic lesions, mucin-depleted foci (MDF) and aberrant crypt foci (ACF), and in colonic tumors induced in rats by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). The frequency of lesions with K-ras mutations was 23% (3/13), 5.5% (1/18) and 100% (14/14) in MDF, tumors and ACF, respectively. Two of three MDF mutated in K-ras also carried a missense mutation in Apc. We also tested the expression of MUC2, a mucin abundantly expressed in normal colon and M1/MUCA5C, up-regulated in colon carcinogenesis, using immunohistochemistry. MDF and tumors showed a dramatic reduction in the expression of MUC2, whereas ACF showed only a slight reduction. The expression of M1/MUC5AC was almost absent in normal mucosa, but was increased in all the lesions (MDF, tumors and ACF). The expression of the intestinal trefoil factor (ITF), a marker of goblet cell lineage, was reduced in MDF and tumors compared to normal mucosa but not in ACF. In conclusion, although K-ras mutations are present in all ACF, they are less frequent in MDF and tumors; M1/MUC5AC is a marker associated with all preneoplastic events while the reduction of MUC2 and ITF expression is selectively associated with more advanced lesions such as MDF and tumors. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Protective effect of vitamin E against ethanol-induced small intestine damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirpoor, Alireza; Barmaki, Hanieh; Khadem Ansari, Mohamadhasan; Lkhanizadeh, BehrouzI; Barmaki, Haleh

    2016-03-01

    The role of oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction has been reported in various ethanol-induced complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethanol-induced structural alteration, oxidative stress, and inflammatory reaction on the small intestine of rats, and plausible protective effect of vitamin E to determine whether it inhibits the abnormality induced by ethanol in the small intestine. Twenty-four male wistar rats were divided into three groups, namely: Control, ethanol, and vitamin E treated ethanol groups. After six weeks of treatment, the small intestine length, villus height, crypt depth and muscular layer thickness, oxidative stress, and inflammatory parameters showed significant changes in the ethanol treated group compared to the control group. Vitamin E consumption along with ethanol ameliorated structural alteration of the small intestine and reduced the elevated amount of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers such as protein carbonyl, OX-LDL, IL-6, Hcy, and TNF-α. Furthermore, their total antioxidant capacity was increased significantly compared to that of the ethanol group. These findings indicate that ethanol induces the small intestine abnormality by oxidative and inflammatory stress, and that these effects can be alleviated by using vitamin E as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory molecule.

  20. Characterization of the parasite-induced lesions in the posterior segment of the eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagwa Mostafa El-Sayed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular lesions are frequently associated with different parasitic infections. The classes of infection include protozoa, nematodes, cestodes, and ectoparasites. Ocular parasitic infections can manifest in any part of the eye; the disease manifestations are frequently characterized as either posterior or anterior eye disease. Parasite-induced lesions may be due to damage directly caused by the parasite, indirect pathology caused by toxic products or the immune response initiated by infectious parasitism. This review characterized the parasite-induced lesions in the posterior segment of the eye. Prompt diagnosis and early treatment of these lesions can reduce ocular morbidity. The method of the literature search was conducted on PubMed, Elsevier Scopus database, and Google Scholar with no limitation on the year of publication databases. It was limited to English articles published for ocular lesions in clinical studies and was focused on parasitic infections of the eye.

  1. Dunnione ameliorates cisplatin-induced small intestinal damage by modulating NAD{sup +} metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandit, Arpana; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Su-Bin; Khadka, Dipendra; Lee, SeungHoon [Center for Metabolic Function Regulation & Department of Microbiology, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Hyeok; Yang, Sei-Hoon; Cho, Eun-Young [Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Kang-Beom [Department of Oriental Medical Physiology, School of Oriental Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Tae Hwan [PAEAN Biotechnology, 160 Techno-2 Street, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-500 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil [Center for Metabolic Function Regulation & Department of Microbiology, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); So, Hong-Seob, E-mail: jeanso@wku.ac.kr [Center for Metabolic Function Regulation & Department of Microbiology, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-27

    Although cisplatin is a widely used anticancer drug for the treatment of a variety of tumors, its use is critically limited because of adverse effects such as ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity, neuropathy, and gastrointestinal damage. Cisplatin treatment increases oxidative stress biomarkers in the small intestine, which may induce apoptosis of epithelial cells and thereby elicit damage to the small intestine. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) is a cofactor for various enzymes associated with cellular homeostasis. In the present study, we demonstrated that the hyper-activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is closely associated with the depletion of NAD{sup +} in the small intestine after cisplatin treatment, which results in downregulation of sirtuin1 (SIRT1) activity. Furthermore, a decrease in SIRT1 activity was found to play an important role in cisplatin-mediated small intestinal damage through nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 activation, facilitated by its acetylation increase. However, use of dunnione as a strong substrate for the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) enzyme led to an increase in intracellular NAD{sup +} levels and prevented the cisplatin-induced small intestinal damage correlating with the modulation of PARP-1, SIRT1, and NF-κB. These results suggest that direct modulation of cellular NAD{sup +} levels by pharmacological NQO1 substrates could be a promising therapeutic approach for protecting against cisplatin-induced small intestinal damage. - Highlights: • NAD{sup +} acts as a cofactor for numerous enzymes including Sirtuins and PARP. • Up-regulation of SIRT1 could attenuate the cisplatin-induced intestinal damage. • Modulation of the cellular NAD{sup +} could be a promising therapeutic approach.

  2. Competence-induced type VI secretion might foster intestinal colonization by Vibrio cholerae: Intestinal interbacterial killing by competence-induced V. cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokesch, Melanie

    2015-11-01

    The human pathogen Vibrio cholerae exhibits two distinct lifestyles: one in the aquatic environment where it often associates with chitinous surfaces and the other as the causative agent of the disease cholera. While much of the research on V. cholerae has focused on the host-pathogen interaction, knowledge about the environmental lifestyle of the pathogen remains limited. We recently showed that the polymer chitin, which is extremely abundant in aquatic environments, induces natural competence as a mode of horizontal gene transfer and that this competence regulon also includes the type VI secretion system (T6SS), a molecular killing device. Here, I discuss the putative consequences that chitin-induced T6SS activation could have on intestinal colonization and how the transmission route might influence disease outcome. Moreover, I propose that common infant animal models for cholera might not sufficiently take into account T6SS-mediated interbacterial warfare between V. cholerae and the intestinal microbiota.

  3. Pathology of BHA- and BHT-induced lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moch, R W

    1986-01-01

    The pathology lesions from three studies, two with butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and one with butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), are reviewed. When BHA was fed at 0.5 and 2.0% of the diet to F344 rats for two years, there was an increase in epithelial hyperplasia of the forestomach at both treatment levels. Papilloma and squamous-cell carcinoma of the forestomach were increased at the 2.0% level. When BHA was fed to beagle dogs at 1.0 and 1.3% of the diet for 180 days, no lesions/tumours of the distal oesophagus or stomach could be identified either at gross necropsy or by light or electron microscopy. The BHT was fed to Wistar rats at 0, 25, 100 and 250 mg/kg body weight. At the highest dose there was an increase in the number of rats with hepatocellular adenoma and with hepatocellular carcinoma.

  4. HGF Gene Modification in Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury by Modulating Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wang

    Full Text Available Effective therapeutic strategies to address intestinal complications after radiation exposure are currently lacking. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which display the ability to repair the injured intestine, have been considered as delivery vehicles for repair genes. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF-gene-modified MSCs on radiation-induced intestinal injury (RIII.Female 6- to 8-week-old mice were radiated locally at the abdomen with a single 13-Gy dose of radiation and then treated with saline control, Ad-HGF or Ad-Null-modified MSCs therapy. The transient engraftment of human MSCs was detected via real-time PCR and immunostaining. The therapeutic effects of non- and HGF-modified MSCs were evaluated via FACS to determine the lymphocyte immunophenotypes; via ELISA to measure cytokine expression; via immunostaining to determine tight junction protein expression; via PCNA staining to examine intestinal epithelial cell proliferation; and via TUNEL staining to detect intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis.The histopathological recovery of the radiation-injured intestine was significantly enhanced following non- or HGF-modified MSCs treatment. Importantly, the radiation-induced immunophenotypic disorders of the mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches were attenuated in both MSCs-treated groups. Treatment with HGF-modified MSCs reduced the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the tight junction protein ZO-1, and promoted the proliferation and reduced the apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells.Treatment of RIII with HGF-gene-modified MSCs reduces local inflammation and promotes the recovery of small intestinal histopathology in a mouse model. These findings might provide an effective therapeutic strategy for RIII.

  5. Oral Administration of Surface-Deacetylated Chitin Nanofibers and Chitosan Inhibit 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Intestinal Mucositis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Ryo; Azuma, Kazuo; Izawa, Hironori; Morimoto, Minoru; Ochi, Kosuke; Tsuka, Takeshi; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Osaki, Tomohiro; Ito, Norihiko; Okamoto, Yoshiharu; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Ifuku, Shinsuke

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the prophylactic effects of orally administered surface-deacetylated chitin nanofibers (SDACNFs) and chitosan against 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal mucositis, which is a common side effect of 5-FU chemotherapy. SDACNFs and chitosan abolished histological abnormalities associated with intestinal mucositis and suppressed hypoproliferation and apoptosis of intestinal crypt cells. These results indicate that SDACNF and chitosan are useful agents for preventing mucositis induced by anti-cancer drugs. PMID:28134832

  6. Hypoxia-inducible factor plays a gut-injurious role in intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Kolenkode B; Colorado, Iriana; Reino, Diego; Palange, David; Lu, Qi; Qin, Xiaofa; Abungu, Billy; Watkins, Anthony; Caputo, Francis J; Xu, Da-Zhong; Semenza, Gregg L; Deitch, Edwin A; Feinman, Rena

    2011-05-01

    Gut injury and loss of normal intestinal barrier function are key elements in the paradigm of gut-origin systemic inflammatory response syndrome, acute lung injury, and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). As hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) is a critical determinant of the physiological and pathophysiological response to hypoxia and ischemia, we asked whether HIF-1 plays a proximal role in the induction of gut injury and subsequent lung injury. Using partially HIF-1α-deficient mice in an isolated superior mesenteric artery occlusion (SMAO) intestinal ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury model (45 min SMAO followed by 3 h of reperfusion), we showed a direct relationship between HIF-1 activation and intestinal I/R injury. Specifically, partial HIF-1α deficiency attenuated SMAO-induced increases in intestinal permeability, lipid peroxidation, mucosal caspase-3 activity, and IL-1β mRNA levels. Furthermore, partial HIF-1α deficiency prevented the induction of ileal mucosal inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein levels after SMAO and iNOS deficiency ameliorated SMAO-induced villus injury. Resistance to SMAO-induced gut injury was also associated with resistance to lung injury, as reflected by decreased levels of myeloperoxidase, IL-6 and IL-10 in the lungs of HIF-1α(+/-) mice. In contrast, a short duration of SMAO (15 min) followed by 3 h of reperfusion neither induced mucosal HIF-1α protein levels nor caused significant gut and lung injury in wild-type or HIF-1α(+/-) mice. This study indicates that intestinal HIF-1 activation is a proximal regulator of I/R-induced gut mucosal injury and gut-induced lung injury. However, the duration and severity of the gut I/R insult dictate whether HIF-1 plays a gut-protective or deleterious role.

  7. Irinotecan-induced mucositis manifesting as diarrhoea corresponds with an amended intestinal flora and mucin profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Andrea M; Gibson, Rachel J; Bowen, Joanne M; Logan, Richard M; Ashton, Kimberly; Yeoh, Ann S J; Al-Dasooqi, Noor; Keefe, Dorothy M K

    2009-10-01

    Chemotherapy-induced diarrhoea is a major oncological problem, caused by the cytotoxic effects of cancer chemotherapy. Irinotecan is linked with severe mucositis and diarrhoea, the mechanisms of which remain poorly understood. Bacterial beta-glucuronidase is thought to be involved in the metabolism of irinotecan, implicating the intestinal flora. Intestinal mucins may also be implicated in the development of chemotherapy-induced diarrhoea. Rats were treated with 200 mg/kg of irinotecan and killed at 96, 120 and 144 h. The rats were monitored for diarrhoea. Pathology and immunohistochemical staining was performed. The samples were cultured and faecal DNA was analysed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Severe diarrhoea was observed from 72 to 96 h. A decrease in body mass was also observed after treatment. Significant changes in goblet cell numbers (both complete and cavitated cells) were observed in the small and large intestines. Changes in MUC gene expression were observed in the small intestine only. Modifications were observed to the intestinal flora profile, especially Escherichia coli, and an increase in the expression of beta-glucuronidase was detected. In conclusion, irinotecan-induced diarrhoea may be caused by an increase in some beta-glucuronidase-producing bacteria, especially E. coli, exacerbating the toxicity of active metabolites. Accelerated mucous secretion and mucin release may also contribute to the delayed onset of diarrhoea.

  8. Glucose induces intestinal human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 to prevent neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoshima, Naoya; Fujie, Yoshiko; Itoh, Tomoo; Tukey, Robert H; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2014-09-11

    Inadequate calorie intake or starvation has been suggested as a cause of neonatal jaundice, which can further cause permanent brain damage, kernicterus. This study experimentally investigated whether additional glucose treatments induce the bilirubin-metabolizing enzyme--UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1--to prevent the onset of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Neonatal humanized UGT1 (hUGT1) mice physiologically develop jaundice. In this study, UGT1A1 expression levels were determined in the liver and small intestine of neonatal hUGT1 mice that were orally treated with glucose. In the hUGT1 mice, glucose induced UGT1A1 in the small intestine, while it did not affect the expression of UGT1A1 in the liver. UGT1A1 was also induced in the human intestinal Caco-2 cells when the cells were cultured in the presence of glucose. Luciferase assays demonstrated that not only the proximal region (-1300/-7) of the UGT1A1 promoter, but also distal region (-6500/-4050) were responsible for the induction of UGT1A1 in the intestinal cells. Adequate calorie intake would lead to the sufficient expression of UGT1A1 in the small intestine to reduce serum bilirubin levels. Supplemental treatment of newborns with glucose solution can be a convenient and efficient method to treat neonatal jaundice while allowing continuous breastfeeding.

  9. Intestinal upregulation of melanin-concentrating hormone in TNBS-induced enterocolitis in adult zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda M Geiger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH, an evolutionarily conserved appetite-regulating neuropeptide, has been recently implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Expression of MCH is upregulated in inflamed intestinal mucosa in humans with colitis and MCH-deficient mice treated with trinitrobenzene-sulfonic acid (TNBS develop an attenuated form of colitis compared to wild type animals. Zebrafish have emerged as a new animal model of IBD, although the majority of the reported studies concern zebrafish larvae. Regulation MCH expression in the adult zebrafish intestine remains unknown. METHODS: In the present study we induced enterocolitis in adult zebrafish by intrarectal administration of TNBS. Follow-up included survival analysis, histological assessment of changes in intestinal architecture, and assessment of intestinal infiltration by myeloperoxidase positive cells and cytokine transcript levels. RESULTS: Treatment with TNBS dose-dependently reduced fish survival. This response required the presence of an intact microbiome, since fish pre-treated with vancomycin developed less severe enterocolitis. At 6 hours post-challenge, we detected a significant influx of myeloperoxidase positive cells in the intestine and upregulation of both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Most importantly, and in analogy to human IBD and TNBS-induced mouse experimental colitis, we found increased intestinal expression of MCH and its receptor in TNBS-treated zebrafish. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together these findings not only establish a model of chemically-induced experimental enterocolitis in adult zebrafish, but point to effects of MCH in intestinal inflammation that are conserved across species.

  10. Brain Fos expression and intestinal motor alterations during nematode-induced inflammation in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castex, N; Fioramonti, J; Ducos de Lahitte, J; Luffau, G; More, J; Bueno, L

    1998-01-01

    Brain-gut interactions and intestinal motility were studied during pulmonary and jejunal inflammation induced by Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. Jejunal electromyographic activity was continuously recorded from day 1 before to day 28 after infection. Expression of c-fos was assessed in the brain by immunohistochemistry, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was determined in lung and intestine on days 1,7,14, 21, and 28 postinfection. The cyclic intestinal motor pattern was replaced by an irregular activity from day 4, corresponding to larvae migration to the intestine, to day 14. c-fos was expressed in the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPB) on day 1 (lung stage of N. brasiliensis) and in the medial part of the NTS, the LPB, and locus ceruleus on day 7. Pulmonary and intestinal MPO activity was increased from days 1 to 21 postinfection. During N. brasiliensis infection, c-fos expression indicates that specific and different brain nuclei are activated at the onset of pulmonary and intestinal inflammation, which is associated with motor disorders.

  11. Armodafinil-induced wakefulness in animals with ventrolateral preoptic lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vetrivelan R

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ramalingam Vetrivelan, Clifford B Saper, Patrick M Fuller Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Armodafinil is the pharmacologically active R-enantiomer of modafinil, a widely prescribed wake-promoting agent used to treat several sleep-related disorders including excessive daytime sleepiness associated with narcolepsy, shift work sleep disorder, and obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome. Remarkably, however, the neuronal circuitry through which modafinil exerts its wake-promoting effects remains unresolved. In the present study, we sought to determine if the wake-promoting effects of armodafinil are mediated, at least in part, by inhibiting the sleep-promoting neurons of the ventrolateral preoptic (VLPO nucleus. To do so, we measured changes in waking following intraperitoneal administration of armodafinil (200 mg/kg or the psychostimulant methamphetamine (1 mg/kg in rats with cell-body specific lesion of the VLPO. Rats with histologically confirmed lesions of the VLPO demonstrated a sustained increase in wakefulness at baseline, but the increase in wakefulness following administration of both armodafinil and methamphetamine was similar to that of intact animals. These data suggest that armodafinil increases wakefulness by mechanisms that extend beyond inhibition of VLPO neurons. Keywords: EEG, sleep, orexin-saporin, methamphetamine

  12. Armodafinil-induced wakefulness in animals with ventrolateral preoptic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrivelan, Ramalingam; Saper, Clifford B; Fuller, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Armodafinil is the pharmacologically active R-enantiomer of modafinil, a widely prescribed wake-promoting agent used to treat several sleep-related disorders including excessive daytime sleepiness associated with narcolepsy, shift work sleep disorder, and obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome. Remarkably, however, the neuronal circuitry through which modafinil exerts its wake-promoting effects remains unresolved. In the present study, we sought to determine if the wake-promoting effects of armodafinil are mediated, at least in part, by inhibiting the sleep-promoting neurons of the ventrolateral preoptic (VLPO) nucleus. To do so, we measured changes in waking following intraperitoneal administration of armodafinil (200 mg/kg) or the psychostimulant methamphetamine (1 mg/kg) in rats with cell-body specific lesion of the VLPO. Rats with histologically confirmed lesions of the VLPO demonstrated a sustained increase in wakefulness at baseline, but the increase in wakefulness following administration of both armodafinil and methamphetamine was similar to that of intact animals. These data suggest that armodafinil increases wakefulness by mechanisms that extend beyond inhibition of VLPO neurons.

  13. Effect of coccidia challenge and natural betaine supplementation on performance, nutrient utilization, and intestinal lesion scores of broiler chickens fed suboptimal level of dietary methionine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerah, A M; Ravindran, V

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present experiment was to examine the effect of coccidia challenge and natural betaine supplementation on performance, nutrient utilization, and intestinal lesion scores of broiler chickens fed suboptimal level of dietary methionine. The experimental design was a 2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments evaluating two levels of betaine supplementation (0 and 960 g betaine/t of feed) without or with coccidia challenge. Each treatment was fed to 8 cages of 8 male broilers (Ross 308) for 1 to 21d. On d 14, birds in the 2 challenged groups received mixed inocula of Eimeria species from a recent field isolate, containing approximately 180,000 E. acervulina, 6,000 E. maxima, and 18,000 E. tenella oocysts. At 21d, digesta from the terminal ileum was collected for the determination of dry matter, energy, nitrogen, amino acids, starch, fat, and ash digestibilities. Lesion scores in the different segments of the small intestine were also measured on d 21. Performance and nutrient digestibility data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA. Lesion score data were analyzed using Pearson chi-square test to identify significant differences between treatments. Orthogonal polynomial contrasts were used to assess the significance of linear or quadratic models to describe the response in the dependent variable to total lesion scores. Coccidia challenge reduced (PBetaine supplementation had no effect (P>0.05) on the weight gain or feed intake, but lowered (P0.05) between coccidia challenge and betaine supplementation was observed for performance parameters. Betaine supplementation increased (Pbetaine supplementation and coccidia challenge. The main effect of coccidia challenge reduced (PBetaine supplementation improved (Pbetaine supplementation reduced (Pbetaine supplementation reduced the impact of coccidia challenge and positively affected nutrient digestibility and the feed conversion ratio.

  14. Spontaneous and Dosing Route-related Lung Lesions in Beagle Dogs from Oral Gavage and Inhalation Toxicity Studies: Differentiation from Compound-induced Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaratirwa, Sydney; Garcia, Begonya; Isobe, Kaori; Petterino, Claudio; Bradley, Alys

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to characterize lung microscopic lesions in control beagle dogs from inhalation and oral gavage toxicity studies, to determine differences associated with the route of administration, and to discuss distinguishing features from compound-induced lung lesions. Samples from 138 control dogs from oral gavage studies and 124 control dogs from inhalation (vehicle control) studies were evaluated microscopically. There was no significant sex-related difference in the incidence of all lesions. Perivascular mononuclear cell infiltration, centriacinar mixed cell infiltration, bronchopneumonia, subpleural septal fibrosis, and alveolar macrophage accumulation were the most common lesions. Aspiration pneumonia was more common in dogs from gavage studies, suggesting reflux after gavage dosing or accidental administration of test formulation as possible causes. Centriacinar mixed cell infiltration was more common in dogs from inhalation studies, suggesting mild irritation by the vehicles used. Vascular lesions, which included pulmonary arteriopathy and smooth muscle mineralization, were observed in a few animals. Some of the spontaneous lesions are similar to lesions induced by test compounds. Compared to spontaneous lesions, compound-induced lesions tend to be multifocal or diffuse, follow a pattern of distribution (e.g., centriacinar, perivascular, and interstitial), show a dose response in the incidence and severity, and may show cell-specific toxicity.

  15. Mucosal injury induced by ischemia and reperfusion in the piglet intestine: Influences of age and feeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crissinger, K.D.; Granger, D.N. (Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, Shreveport (USA))

    1989-10-01

    The pathogenesis of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis is unknown, but enteral alimentation, infectious agents, and mesenteric ischemia have been frequently invoked as primary initiators of the disease. To define the vulnerability of the intestinal mucosa to ischemia and reperfusion in the developing piglet, we evaluated changes in mucosal permeability using plasma-to-lumen clearance of chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in the ileum of anesthetized 1-day-, 3-day-, 2-wk-, and 1-mo-old piglets as a function of (a) duration of intestinal ischemia (20, 40, or 60 min of total superior mesenteric artery occlusion), (b) feeding status (fasted or nursed), and (c) composition of luminal perfusate (balanced salt solution vs. predigested cow milk-based formula). Baseline chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid clearance was not significantly altered by ischemia, irrespective of duration, or feeding in all age groups. However, clearances were significantly elevated during reperfusion after 1 h of total intestinal ischemia in all age groups, whether fasted or fed. Reperfusion-induced increases in clearance did not differ among age groups when the bowel lumen was perfused with a balanced salt solution. However, luminal perfusion with formula resulted in higher clearances in 1-day-old piglets compared with all older animals. Thus, the neonatal intestine appears to be more vulnerable to mucosal injury induced by ischemia and reperfusion in the presence of formula than the intestine of older animals.

  16. Bovine colostrum improves intestinal function following formula-induced gut inflammation in preterm pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Only few hours of formula feeding may induce proinflammatory responses and predispose to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm pigs. We hypothesized that bovine colostrum, rich in bioactive factors, would improve intestinal function in preterm pigs following an initial exposure to formula feedi...

  17. Intestinal handling-induced mast cell activation and inflammation in human postoperative ileus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    The, F. O.; Bennink, R. J.; Ankum, W. M.; Buist, M. R.; Busch, O. R. C.; Gouma, D. J.; Van der Heide, S.; van den Wijngaard, R. M.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.; de Jonge, Wouter J.

    Background: Murine postoperative ileus results from intestinal inflammation triggered by manipulation-induced mast cell activation. As its extent depends on the degree of handling and subsequent inflammation, it is hypothesised that the faster recovery after minimal invasive surgery results from

  18. Intestinal handling-induced mast cell activation and inflammation in human postoperative ileus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    The, F. O.; Bennink, R. J.; Ankum, W. M.; Buist, M. R.; Busch, O. R. C.; Gouma, D. J.; Van der Heide, S.; van den Wijngaard, R. M.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.; de Jonge, Wouter J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Murine postoperative ileus results from intestinal inflammation triggered by manipulation-induced mast cell activation. As its extent depends on the degree of handling and subsequent inflammation, it is hypothesised that the faster recovery after minimal invasive surgery results from dec

  19. Rhubarb extract partially improves mucosal integrity in chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajic, Juliana E; Eden, Georgina L; Lampton, Lorrinne S; Cheah, Ker Y; Lymn, Kerry A; Pei, Jinxin V; Yool, Andrea J; Howarth, Gordon S

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of orally gavaged aqueous rhubarb extract (RE) on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal mucositis in rats. METHODS Female Dark Agouti rats (n = 8/group) were gavaged daily (1 mL) with water, high-dose RE (HDR; 200 mg/kg) or low-dose RE (LDR; 20mg/kg) for eight days. Intestinal mucositis was induced (day 5) with 5-FU (150 mg/kg) via intraperitoneal injection. Intestinal tissue samples were collected for myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and histological examination. Xenopus oocytes expressing aquaporin 4 water channels were prepared to examine the effect of aqueous RE on cell volume, indicating a potential mechanism responsible for modulating net fluid absorption and secretion in the gastrointestinal tract. Statistical significance was assumed at P < 0.05 by one-way ANOVA. RESULTS Bodyweight was significantly reduced in rats administered 5-FU compared to healthy controls (P < 0.01). Rats administered 5-FU significantly increased intestinal MPO levels (≥ 307%; P < 0.001), compared to healthy controls. However, LDR attenuated this effect in 5-FU treated rats, significantly decreasing ileal MPO activity (by 45%; P < 0.05), as compared to 5-FU controls. 5-FU significantly reduced intestinal mucosal thickness (by ≥ 29% P < 0.001) as compared to healthy controls. LDR significantly increased ileal mucosal thickness in 5-FU treated rats (19%; P < 0.05) relative to 5-FU controls. In xenopus oocytes expressing AQP4 water channels, RE selectively blocked water influx into the cell, induced by a decrease in external osmotic pressure. As water efflux was unaltered by the presence of extracellular RE, the directional flow of water across the epithelial barrier, in the presence of extracellular RE, indicated that RE may alleviate water loss across the epithelial barrier and promote intestinal health in chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis. CONCLUSION In summary, low dose RE improves selected parameters of mucosal integrity and reduces ileal

  20. Axonal lesion-induced microglial proliferation and microglial cluster formation in the mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dissing-Olesen, L; Ladeby, R; Nielsen, Helle Hvilsted;

    2007-01-01

    Microglia are innate immune cells and form the first line of defense of the CNS. Proliferation is a key event in the activation of microglia in acute pathology, and has been extensively characterized in rats, but not in mice. In this study we investigated axonal-lesion-induced microglial...... proliferation and surface antigen expression in C57BL/6 mice. Transection of the entorhino-dentate perforant path projection results in an anterograde axonal and a dense terminal degeneration that induces a region-specific activation of microglia in the dentate gyrus. Time-course analysis showed activation...... and the proliferation marker bromodeoxyuridine, injected 1 h prior to perfusion, showed that lesion-reactive microglia accounted for the vast majority of proliferating cells. Microglia proliferated as soon as 24 h after lesion and 25% of all microglial cells were proliferating 3 days post-lesion. Immunofluorescence...

  1. H-NST induces LEE expression and the formation of attaching and effacing lesions in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Levine

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC and enterohemorrhagic E. coli are important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. These enteric pathogens contain a type III secretion system (T3SS responsible for the attaching and effacing (A/E lesion phenotype. The T3SS is encoded by the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE pathogenicity island. The H-NS-mediated repression of LEE expression is counteracted by Ler, the major activator of virulence gene expression in A/E pathogens. A regulator present in EPEC, H-NST, positively affects expression of H-NS regulon members in E. coli K-12, although the effect of H-NST on LEE expression and virulence of A/E pathogens has yet-to-be determined.We examine the effect of H-NST on LEE expression and A/E lesion formation on intestinal epithelial cells. We find that H-NST positively affects the levels of LEE-encoded proteins independently of ler and induces A/E lesion formation. We demonstrate H-NST binding to regulatory regions of LEE1 and LEE3, the first report of DNA-binding by H-NST. We characterize H-NST mutants substituted at conserved residues including Ala16 and residues Arg60 and Arg63, which are part of a potential DNA-binding domain. The single mutants A16V, A16L, R60Q and the double mutant R60Q/R63Q exhibit a decreased effect on LEE expression and A/E lesion formation. DNA mobility shift assays reveal that these residues are important for H-NST to bind regulatory LEE DNA targets. H-NST positively affects Ler binding to LEE DNA in the presence of H-NS, and thereby potentially helps Ler displace H-NS bound to DNA.H-NST induces LEE expression and A/E lesion formation likely by counteracting H-NS-mediated repression. We demonstrate that H-NST binds to DNA and identify arginine residues that are functionally important for DNA-binding. Our study suggests that H-NST provides an additional means for A/E pathogens to alleviate repression of virulence gene expression by H-NS to promote virulence capabilities.

  2. Herpes simplex virus type 1 ribonucleotide reductase null mutants induce lesions in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, S R; Kik, N A; Birch, G M; Chiego, D J; Shipman, C

    1989-12-01

    Two herpes simplex virus type 1 ribonucleotide reductase null mutants, hrR3 and ICP6 delta, produced cutaneous lesions in guinea pigs as severe as those of wild-type strains. The lesions induced by hrR3 resulted from in vivo replication of the mutant virus, suggesting that this virus-encoded enzyme is nonessential for virus replication in guinea pigs.

  3. An inguinal mass with local vascular lesions induced by a lymphatic filaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hameed, Ahmed A; Dura, Wieslaw T; Alkhalife, Ibrahim S

    2004-08-01

    A 47-year-old Indian male presented with an inguinal mass clinically suspicious as a tumor. Histological examination of the excised mass demonstrated tissue reaction to degenerating intravascular adult filarial worms. The worms have been identified as a lymphatic filariae, most probably Wuchereria bancrofti. The case report underscores the need to maintain suspicion of genitourinary filarial lesions in non-endemic areas and describes atypical vascular lesions induced by lymphatic filariae.

  4. Intestinal alkalization as a possible preventive mechanism in irinotecan (CPT-11)-induced diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Tadashi; Ha, Linan; Arimori, Kazuhiko; Latham, Patricia; Kobayashi, Kunihiko; Ceryak, Susan; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Bouscarel, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of irinotecan (CPT-11), a DNA topoisomerase inhibitor, is often limited by the induction of severe late-onset diarrhea. This prodrug and its active metabolite, 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (SN-38), have a labile alpha-hydroxy-lactone ring that undergoes pH-dependent reversible hydrolysis. At physiological pH and higher, equilibrium favors the less toxic carboxylate form, whereas at acidic pH, the more potent lactone form is favored. We have reported previously that the initial uptake rate of CPT-11 and SN-38 by intestinal cells was significantly different between the respective lactone and carboxylate form. Results from the present study in HT-29 cells further demonstrate the correlation between the CPT-11/SN-38 initial uptake rate and the induced toxicity, cell cycle alteration, apoptosis, and colony-forming efficiency. The exposure of HT-29 cells to SN-38 for a limited period of time (carboxylate resulted in a reduced cellular toxicity, we postulated that the CPT-11-induced diarrhea was preventable by influencing the equilibrium toward the carboxylate form and, thus, reducing its intestinal uptake. In the golden Syrian hamster model, p.o. sodium bicarbonate supplementation (5 mg/ml in drinking water) led to alkalization of the intestinal contents. In addition, this alkalization resulted in the reduction of the histopathological damage to the mucosa of the small and large intestine, as well as a 20% reduction of the intestinal SN-38 lactone concentration of animals receiving CPT-11 (20-50 mg/kg x 7 days). Taken together, these results from in vitro and in vivo studies support intestinal alkalization by sodium bicarbonate supplementation as a preventive mechanism against CPT-11-induced diarrhea. In addition, this provides a strong rationale for the usage of this measure as an adjunct to CPT-11 treatment.

  5. Rebamipide attenuates 5-Fluorouracil-induced small intestinal mucositis in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Jin Hyun; Moon, Won; Park, Jongha; Park, Seun Ja; Song, Geun Am; Han, Seung Hee; Lee, Jong Hun

    2015-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal mucositis is one of the most common morbidities in chemotherapy and involves the reactive oxygen species (ROS) system, apoptosis, and inflammatory cytokines. Rebamipide exerts a mucosal-protective effect, mediated through several mechanisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of rebamipide in 5-FU-induced mouse small-intestinal mucositis. BALB/c mice were assigned randomly to four groups; (1) control group (n=10; receiving saline orally for 6 d), (2) rebamipide group (n=10; 150 mg/kg rebamipide for 6 d orally), (3) 5-FU group (n=10; 30 mg/kg 5-FU for 5 d, intraperitoneally (i.p.)), and (4) rebamipide +5-FU group (n=10; 150 mg/kg rebamipide for 6 d orally and 30 mg/kg 5-FU for 5 d, i.p.). Body weights and diarrhea scales were assessed. At day 5, the mice were sacrificed. Small intestinal tissue was used for: (1) hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining for determination of small intestinal villi height, (2) terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, (3) immunohistochemistry for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), F4/80, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, (4) measurement of serum and tissue GSH levels, and (5) measurement of serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels. Rebamipide attenuated the severity of mucosal injury reflected by body weight changes, degrees of diarrhea, and heights of villi. Rebamipide reduced the expression of iNOS and TGF-β1, apoptosis, macrophage accumulation, serum TNF-α levels, and prevented reductions in serum and tissue glutathione (GSH) levels by 5-FU administration. These results suggest that rebamipide promotes several mechanisms of mucosal protection and attenuated the 5-FU-induced mucosal injury. In conclusion, administration of rebamipide may have significant protective effects against 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis.

  6. Somatostatin does not attenuate intestinal injury in dextran sodium sulphate-induced subacute colitis

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    J. D. van Bergeijk

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available From several in vitro and in vivo studies involvement of som atostatin (SMS in intestinal inflammation emerge. Acute colitis induced in rats is attenuated by the long-acting SMS analogue octreotide. We studied the potential beneficial effect of SMS on non-acute experimental colitis. BALB/c mice received either saline, SMS-14 (36 or 120 μg daily or octreotide (3 μg daily subcutaneously delivered by implant osmotic pumps. A non-acute colitis was induced by administration of dextran sodium sulphate (DSS 10% in drinking water during 7 days. DSS evoked a mild, superficial pancolitis, most characterized by mucosal ulceration and submucosal influx of neutrophils. Neither SMS-14 nor octreotide reduced mucosal inflammatory score or macroscopical disease activity, although reduction of intestinal levels of interleukin1 β (IL-1 β, IL-6 and IL-10 during DSS was augmented both by SMS and octreotide. A slight increase of neutrophil influx was seen during SMS administration in animals not exposed to DSS. In conclusion, SMS or its long-acting analogue did not reduce intestinal inflammation in non-acute DSS-induced colitis. According to the cytokine profile observed, SMS-14 and octreotide further diminished the reduction of intestinal macrophage and Th2 lymphocyte activity.

  7. Inflammation and disintegration of intestinal villi in an experimental model for Vibrio parahaemolyticus-induced diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Jennifer M; Rui, Haopeng; Zhou, Xiaohui; Iida, Tetsuya; Kodoma, Toshio; Ito, Susuma; Davis, Brigid M; Bronson, Roderick T; Waldor, Matthew K

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a leading cause of seafood-borne gastroenteritis in many parts of the world, but there is limited knowledge of the pathogenesis of V. parahaemolyticus-induced diarrhea. The absence of an oral infection-based small animal model to study V. parahaemolyticus intestinal colonization and disease has constrained analyses of the course of infection and the factors that mediate it. Here, we demonstrate that infant rabbits oro-gastrically inoculated with V. parahaemolyticus develop severe diarrhea and enteritis, the main clinical and pathologic manifestations of disease in infected individuals. The pathogen principally colonizes the distal small intestine, and this colonization is dependent upon type III secretion system 2. The distal small intestine is also the major site of V. parahaemolyticus-induced tissue damage, reduced epithelial barrier function, and inflammation, suggesting that disease in this region of the gastrointestinal tract accounts for most of the diarrhea that accompanies V. parahaemolyticus infection. Infection appears to proceed through a characteristic sequence of steps that includes remarkable elongation of microvilli and the formation of V. parahaemolyticus-filled cavities within the epithelial surface, and culminates in villus disruption. Both depletion of epithelial cell cytoplasm and epithelial cell extrusion contribute to formation of the cavities in the epithelial surface. V. parahaemolyticus also induces proliferation of epithelial cells and recruitment of inflammatory cells, both of which occur before wide-spread damage to the epithelium is evident. Collectively, our findings suggest that V. parahaemolyticus damages the host intestine and elicits disease via previously undescribed processes and mechanisms.

  8. Generation of a tightly regulated doxycycline-inducible model for studying mouse intestinal biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Sabrina; Franken, Patrick; van Veelen, Wendy; Blonden, Lau; Raghoebir, Lalini; Beverloo, Berna; van Drunen, Ellen; Kuipers, Ernst J; Rottier, Robbert; Fodde, Riccardo; Smits, Ron

    2009-01-01

    To develop a sensitive and inducible system to study intestinal biology, we generated a transgenic mouse model expressing the reverse tetracycline transactivator rtTA2-M2 under control of the 12.4 kb murine Villin promoter. The newly generated Villin-rtTA2-M2 mice were then bred with the previously developed tetO-HIST1H2BJ/GFP model to assess inducibility and tissue-specificity. Expression of the histone H2B-GFP fusion protein was observed exclusively upon doxycycline induction and was uniformly distributed throughout the intestinal epithelium. The Villin-rtTA2-M2 was also found to drive transgene expression in the developing mouse intestine. Furthermore, we could detect transgene expression in the proximal tubules of the kidney and in a population of alleged gastric progenitor cells. By administering different concentrations of doxycycline, we show that the Villin-rtTA2-M2 system drives transgene expression in a dosage-dependent fashion. Thus, we have generated a novel doxycycline-inducible mouse model, providing a valuable tool to study the effect of different gene dosages on intestinal physiology and pathology.

  9. Rebamipide Promotes the Regeneration of Aspirin-Induced Small-Intestine Mucosal Injury through Accumulation of β-Catenin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lai

    Full Text Available The effect of rebamipide on repairing intestinal mucosal damage induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and its mechanism remain unclear. In this study, we sought to explore the mechanism whereby rebamipide could promote the regeneration of aspirin-induced intestinal mucosal damage.BALB/c mice were administered aspirin (200 mg/kg/d for 5 days to induce acute small intestinal injury (SII. Subsequently, SII mice were treated with rebamipide (320 mg/kg/d for 5 days. The structure of intestinal barrier was observed with transmission electron microscope, and Zo-1 and occludin expressions were detected. The proliferative index was indicated by the percentage of proliferating cell nuclear antigen positive cells. The prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 levels in the small intestine tissues were measured by an enzyme immunoassay. The mRNA and protein expression levels of cyclooxygenase (COX and β-catenin signal were detected in the small intestine using quantitative PCR and Western blot, respectively.COX expression was significantly down-regulated in aspirin induced SII (P < 0.05. In SII mice treated with rebamipide, histopathological findings of aspirin-induced intestinal inflammation were significantly milder and tight junctions between intestinal epithelial cells were improved significantly. The proliferative index increased after rebamipide treatment when compared with that in the control mice. The expressions of COX-2, β-catenin, and c-myc and the PGE2 concentrations in small intestinal tissues were significantly increased in mice with rebamipide treatments (P < 0.05.Rebamipide administration in aspirin-induced SII mice could improve the intestinal barrier structure and promote the regeneration of small intestinal epithelial injury through up-regulating COX-2 expression and the accumulation of β-catenin.

  10. Rebamipide Promotes the Regeneration of Aspirin-Induced Small-Intestine Mucosal Injury through Accumulation of β-Catenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yu; Zhong, Wa; Yu, Tao; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Li, Jie-Yao; Ouyang, Hui; Shan, Ti-Dong; Yang, Hong-Sheng; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2015-01-01

    The effect of rebamipide on repairing intestinal mucosal damage induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and its mechanism remain unclear. In this study, we sought to explore the mechanism whereby rebamipide could promote the regeneration of aspirin-induced intestinal mucosal damage. BALB/c mice were administered aspirin (200 mg/kg/d) for 5 days to induce acute small intestinal injury (SII). Subsequently, SII mice were treated with rebamipide (320 mg/kg/d) for 5 days. The structure of intestinal barrier was observed with transmission electron microscope, and Zo-1 and occludin expressions were detected. The proliferative index was indicated by the percentage of proliferating cell nuclear antigen positive cells. The prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels in the small intestine tissues were measured by an enzyme immunoassay. The mRNA and protein expression levels of cyclooxygenase (COX) and β-catenin signal were detected in the small intestine using quantitative PCR and Western blot, respectively. COX expression was significantly down-regulated in aspirin induced SII (P rebamipide, histopathological findings of aspirin-induced intestinal inflammation were significantly milder and tight junctions between intestinal epithelial cells were improved significantly. The proliferative index increased after rebamipide treatment when compared with that in the control mice. The expressions of COX-2, β-catenin, and c-myc and the PGE2 concentrations in small intestinal tissues were significantly increased in mice with rebamipide treatments (P Rebamipide administration in aspirin-induced SII mice could improve the intestinal barrier structure and promote the regeneration of small intestinal epithelial injury through up-regulating COX-2 expression and the accumulation of β-catenin.

  11. DNA lesions, inducible DNA repair, and cell division: Three key factors in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, B.N.; Shigenaga, M.K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Gold, L.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    DNA lesions that escape repair have a certain probability of giving rise to mutations when the cell divides. Endogenous DNA damage is high: 10{sup 6} oxidative lesions are present per rat cell. An exogenous mutagen produces an increment in lesions over the background rate of endogenous lesions. The effectiveness of a particular lesion depends on whether it is excised by a DNA repair system and the probability that it gives rise to a mutation when the cell divides. When the cell divides, an unrepaired DNA lesion has a certain probability of giving rise to a mutation. Thus, an important factor in the mutagenic effect of an exogenous agent whether it is genotoxic or non-genotoxic, is the increment it causes over the background cell division rate (mitogenesis) in cells that appear to matter most in cancer, the stem cells, which are not on their way to being discarded. Increasing their cell division rate increases by high doses of chemicals. If both the rate of DNA lesions and cell division are increased, then there will be a multiplicative effect on mutagenesis (and carcinogenesis), for example, by high doses of a mutagen that also increases mitogenesis through cell killing. The defense system against reactive electrophilic mutagens, such as the glutathione transferases, are also almost all inducible and buffer cells against increments in active forms of chemicals that can cause DNA lesions. A variety of DNA repair defense systems, almost all inducible, buffer the cell against any increment in DNA lesions. Therefore, the effect of a particular chemical insult depends on the level of each defense, which in turn depends on the past history of exposure. Exogenous agents can influence the induction and effectiveness of these defenses. Defenses can be partially disabled by lack of particular micronutrients in the diet (e.g., antioxidants).

  12. Colonoscopy does not induce small intestinal bacterial overgrowth

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    Ioana Gabriela Moraru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO is associated with gastrointestinal pathology and colonoscopy. This endoscopic investigation could cause changes in gut flora including the occurrence of SIBO. We looked in this study for the effect of colonoscopy (preparation and intubation on the occurrence of SIBO. Materials and Methods: Prospective study including thirty patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS diagnosed according to Rome III criteria. Two groups were designed: Twenty IBS patients that performed colonoscopy (G1 and ten IBS patients (G2 not referred to colonoscopy. All patients have been tested for the presence of SIBO using glucose hydrogen breath tests (GHBT at the beginning of the study, on day 1. G1 patients have also been tested before colonoscopy (day 2 and 1 week after (day 9. G2 patients performed GHBT on day 1 and on day 9. Results: The peak value of expired H2 was assessed, and the mean value was calculated. There were no significant statistical differences between the mean H2 values in the 2 groups of patients on day 1. The mean level of H2 significantly decreased after preparing for colonoscopy in G1 patients (P < 0.0001. There were no significant statistical differences between the mean levels of H2 on day 2 versus day 9 in G1 patients (P = 0.176. The mean level of H2 1 week after performing colonoscopy (7.65 ppm is higher than that obtained after preparing for it (6.3 ppm, but no statistical significance. Patients from G2 showed no statistical differences between the mean levels of H2 on day 1 versus day 9 (P = 0.6132. Patients in G1 had a significantly lower mean H2 level versus G2 patients on day 9. Conclusions: Colonoscopy does not produce SIBO. Preparing for colonoscopy influences the level of expired H2, it reduces the number of intestinal bacteria, probably trough a mechanic effect or by inflating air during the procedure. Performing GHBT too soon after colonoscopy might result in false

  13. Interaction of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium with Intestinal Organoids Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbester, Jessica L; Goulding, David; Vallier, Ludovic; Hannan, Nicholas; Hale, Christine; Pickard, Derek; Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Dougan, Gordon

    2015-07-01

    The intestinal mucosa forms the first line of defense against infections mediated by enteric pathogens such as salmonellae. Here we exploited intestinal "organoids" (iHOs) generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) to explore the interaction of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium with iHOs. Imaging and RNA sequencing were used to analyze these interactions, and clear changes in transcriptional signatures were detected, including altered patterns of cytokine expression after the exposure of iHOs to bacteria. S. Typhimurium microinjected into the lumen of iHOs was able to invade the epithelial barrier, with many bacteria residing within Salmonella-containing vacuoles. An S. Typhimurium invA mutant defective in the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 invasion apparatus was less capable of invading the iHO epithelium. Hence, we provide evidence that hIPSC-derived organoids are a promising model of the intestinal epithelium for assessing interactions with enteric pathogens.

  14. Introducing enteral feeding induces intestinal subclinical inflammation and respective chromatin changes in preterm pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willems, Rhea; Krych, Lukasz; Rybicki, Verena;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze how enteral food introduction affects intestinal gene regulation and chromatin structure in preterm pigs. MATERIALS & METHODS: Preterm pigs were fed parenteral nutrition plus/minus slowly increasing volumes of enteral nutrition. Intestinal gene-expression and chromatin structure...... were analyzed 5 days after birth. RESULTS: Enteral feeding led to differential upregulation of inflammatory and pattern recognition receptor genes, including IL8 (median: 5.8, 95% CI: 3.9-7.8 for formula; median: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.3-3.3 for colostrum) and TLR4 (median: 3.7, 95% CI: 2.6-4.8 for formula...... stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (median: 7.0; interquartile range: 5.63-8.85) compared with naive cells (median 4.2; interquartile range: 2.45-6.33; p = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Enteral feeding, particular with formula, induces subclinical inflammation in the premature intestine and more open chromatin...

  15. The role of endogenous nitric oxide and platelet-activating factor in hypoxia-induced intestinal injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, M S; Hedlund, E; Hill, N; MacKendrick, W

    1994-02-01

    Nitric oxide is an endothelium-derived relaxing factor that promotes capillary integrity, inhibits leukocyte adherence and activation, and scavenges oxygen radicals. Because these effects are important in experimental intestinal injury, we studied the role of NO inhibition on hypoxia-induced bowel necrosis in the rat and investigated the interaction between platelet-activating factor (PAF) and NO in this model. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with either hypoxia, NO synthase inhibition (NG-methyl-L-arginine [LNMA] or NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester [L-NAME]), hypoxia+LNMA, hypoxia+LNMA+NO donors, or hypoxia+LNMA+PAF receptor inhibition. Evaluations included blood pressure, superior mesenteric artery blood flow, arterial blood gases, histological intestinal injury, intestinal myeloperoxidase activity, and intestinal PAF activity. We found that hypoxia alone for 90 minutes (10% O2, partial O2 pressure = 45 mm Hg) or LNMA alone had no detrimental effects. However, hypoxia+LNMA together caused hypotension, metabolic acidosis, intestinal injury, increased intestinal myeloperoxidase activity, and elevated intestinal PAF concentrations that were prevented by exogenous L-arginine. Furthermore, the hypotension and intestinal injury was prevented by PAF receptor blockade. We conclude that endogenous NO protects the intestine from hypoxia-induced inflammation and injury, and the balance between local PAF and NO modulates the outcome of hypoxia-stressed intestine.

  16. Ukrain (NSC 631570) ameliorates intestinal ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute lung injury by reducing oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocak, Cengiz; Kocak, Fatma Emel; Akcilar, Raziye; Akcilar, Aydin; Savran, Bircan; Zeren, Sezgin; Bayhan, Zulfu; Bayat, Zeynep

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) causes severe destruction in remote organs. Lung damage is a frequently seen complication after intestinal I/R. Ukrain (NSC 631570) is a synthetic thiophosphate derivative of alkaloids from the extract of the celandine (Chelidonium majus L.) plant. We investigated the effect of Ukrain in animals with lung injury induced by intestinal I/R. Adult male Spraque-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: control, Ukrain, I/R, I/R with Ukrain. Before intestinal I/R was induced, Ukrain was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 7.0 mg/body weight. After 1 h ischemia and 2 h reperfusion period, lung tissues were excised. Tissue levels of total oxidative status (TOS), total antioxidant status (TAS) were measured and oxidative stress indices (OSI) were calculated. Lung tissues were also examined histopathologically. TOS and OSI levels markedly increased and TAS levels decreased in the I/R group compared to the control group (P < 0.05). TOS and OSI levels markedly decreased and TAS levels increased in the I/R with Ukrain group compared with the group subjected to IR only (P < 0.05). Severe hemorrhage, alveolar septal thickening, and leukocyte infiltration were observed in the I/R group. In the I/R with Ukrain group, morphologic changes occurring as a result of lung damage attenuated and histopathological scores reduced compared to the I/R group (P < 0.05). Our results suggest that Ukrain pretreatment could reduce lung injury induced by intestinal I/R induced via anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. PMID:26773189

  17. Ukrain (NSC 631570 ameliorates intestinal ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute lung injury by reducing oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Kocak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R causes severe destruction in remote organs. Lung damage is a frequently seen complication after intestinal I/R. Ukrain (NSC 631570 is a synthetic thiophosphate derivative of alkaloids from the extract of the celandine (Chelidonium majus L. plant. We investigated the effect of Ukrain in animals with lung injury induced by intestinal I/R. Adult male Spraque-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: control, Ukrain, I/R, I/R with Ukrain. Before intestinal I/R was induced, Ukrain was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 7.0 mg/body weight. After 1 h ischemia and 2 h reperfusion period, lung tissues were excised. Tissue levels of total oxidative status (TOS, total antioxidant status (TAS were measured and oxidative stress indices (OSI were calculated. Lung tissues were also examined histopathologically. TOS and OSI levels markedly increased and TAS levels decreased in the I/R group compared to the control group (P < 0.05. TOS and OSI levels markedly decreased and TAS levels increased in the I/R with Ukrain group compared with the group subjected to IR only (P < 0.05. Severe hemorrhage, alveolar septal thickening, and leukocyte infiltration were observed  in the I/R group. In the I/R with Ukrain group, morphologic changes occurring as a result of lung damage attenuated and histopathological scores reduced compared to the I/R group (P < 0.05. Our results suggest that Ukrain pretreatment could reduce lung injury induced by intestinal I/R induced via anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. 

  18. Protective Effect of Wheat Peptides Against Small Intestinal Damage Induced by Non-Steroidal Anti-Inlfammatory Drugs in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Hong; PAN Xing-chang; WANG Shao-kang; YANG Li-gang; SUN Gui-ju

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inlfammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were able to produce tissue damage and oxidative stress in animal models of small intestinal damage. In this study, the putative protective effect of wheat peptides was evaluated in a NSAID-induced small intestinal damage model in rats, different doses of wheat peptides or distilled water were administered daily by intragastric administration for 30 d until small intestinal damage was caused. Before sacriifcing, NSAIDs (aspirin and indomethacin) or physiological saline were infused into the digestive tract twice. Wheat peptides administration reduced edema and small intestinal damage, and signiifcantly decreased the level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in mucous membrane of small intestine. Oxidative stress was signiifcantly increased after NSAID infusion and was reduced by wheat peptides. Wheat peptides increased glutathione peroxidase(GSH-Px) activity in mucous membrane of small intestine. µ-Opioid receptor mRNA expression decreased more signiifcantly in wheat peptides treated rats than in the model control group. Overall, the results suggest that non-steroidal anti-inlfammatory drugs induced small intestinal damage in rats and wheat peptides administration may be an effective tool for protecting small intestinal tissue against NSAID-induced small intestinal damage and oxidative stress.

  19. Significance of chymase-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-9 activation on indomethacin-induced small intestinal damages in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Kazuki; Takai, Shinji; Murano, Mitsuyuki; Ishida, Kumi; Yoda, Yukiko; Inoue, Takuya; Jin, Denan; Umegaki, Eiji; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2010-02-01

    The side effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) include gastrointestinal damage not only in the stomach but also in the small intestine. Chymase converts promatrix metalloproteinase-9 to matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, which plays an important role in NSAID-induced gastric damage, but it has been unclear whether chymase-dependent MMP-9 activation is involved in the NSAID-induced small intestinal damage. To clarify the involvement of chymase-dependent MMP-9 activation on NSAID-induced small intestinal damage, the effect of a chymase inhibitor, 2-[4-(5-fluoro-3-methylbenzo[b]thiophen-2-yl)sulfonamido-3-methanesulfonylphenyl] thiazole-4-carboxylic acid (TY-51469), on indomethacin-induced small intestinal damage in rats was evaluated. Until 6 h after oral administration of indomethacin in rats, intestinal MMP-9 activity was unchanged compared with normal rats, but significant increases in MMP-9 activity were observed 12 and 24 h after indomethacin administration. Significant increases in the small intestinal damage score were also observed 12 and 24 h after indomethacin administration. In the extract from the small intestine 24 h after indomethacin administration, the MMP-9 activation was significantly attenuated by TY-51469. Intraperitoneal injection of TY-51469 (10 mg/kg) 3 h before indomethacin administration significantly attenuated the MMP-9 activity in the small intestine compared with placebo treatment. Myeloperoxidase activity, which indicates accumulation of neutrophils, was significantly increased in the small intestine in the placebo-treated rats, but its activity was significantly attenuated by TY-51469 treatment. The area of small intestinal damage was also significantly ameliorated by TY-51469 treatment. These findings suggest that chymase-dependent MMP-9 activation has a significant role in indomethacin-induced small intestinal damage in rats.

  20. Detection of HPV-induced cervical (pre) neoplastic lesions: a tissue microarray (TMA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, Mohammad; Boniver, Jacques; Delvenne, Philippe

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a panel of biomarkers in the characterization of human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced cervical lesions. Management of these lesions depends on their histologic confirmation. Misinterpretation especially for benign mimics results in a significant diagnostic disagreement. For these reasons, a continuous effort is still needed to discover surrogate markers, which could support the final diagnosis. Archival biopsies of normal ectocervical and endocervical tissues, squamous metaplasia, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma in situ, and adenocarcinoma were retrieved to perform a tissue microarray (TMA). A panel of markers was tested on the TMA obtained slides by in situ hybridization (HPV DNA) and immunohistochemistry (p16, involucrin, Ki-67, and HPV L1 proteins). The sensitivity to detect high-risk HPV DNA increased with lesion's severity. In situ hybridization signals suggesting integrated viral physical status predominated in CIN II/III, squamous cell carcinoma, and glandular (pre) neoplastic lesions. The p16 and Ki-67 protein expression increased from CIN I to CIN III and to infiltrative lesions. Involucrin positivity was better appreciated in well-differentiated diagnostic entities (ectocervix, mature metaplasia, and CIN I). HPV L1 antibody detected the viral capsid protein in a low proportion of CIN I and II. In conclusion, using a panel of cervical biomarkers improves the final reporting of various HPV-induced epithelial lesions. Carefully constructed TMA with single spots of 1-mm diameter are powerful tools, which have a high reliability in representing full tissue sections.

  1. Histological evaluation of the presence of bacteria in induced periapical lesions in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, R E; Ardjmand, K

    1992-05-01

    In endodontic periapical lesions, both presence and location of bacteria are controversial. Various experimental techniques have produced differing results perhaps related to potential artifacts such as contamination during specimen recovery. Our objective was to examine for bacteria in uncontaminated, undisturbed periapical lesions in an animal model. Pulp necrosis was induced by exposing molars in nonhuman primates and closing the exposure after 1 week with amalgam. Lesions developed at 18 apices. After 7 months, block sections including tooth and surrounding tissues were removed, processed histologically, and Gram stained. Bacteria, primarily Gram positive, were consistently identified in necrotic tissue in canals. Two canals demonstrated bacterial masses to the apical foramen. No bacterial colonies, only intracellular microorganisms, were seen periapically. Inflammatory lesions seemed to resist the spread of bacteria, confining them to the canal space. Bacterial masses at the apical foramen could contaminate periapical tissues during surgery or extraction and give a false positive upon microbiological sampling.

  2. Apomorphine-induced biphasic circling behaviour in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. A pharmacological kindling phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, D M

    1983-06-01

    Factors governing the development of apomorphine-induced biphasic circling behaviour in rats having unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the substantia nigra were investigated. It was found that a post-lesion time of at least 2--3 weeks and the repeated exposure to apomorphine were essential for its development. Optimal results were obtained when animals received weekly apomorphine, 0.05 mg/kg sc, in post-lesion weeks 6, 7 and 8. Pretreatment with haloperidol, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg ip 1 h beforehand in post-lesion week 9, converted the biphasic response into an enhanced, uniphasic one. The findings suggest that the development of the biphasic response to apomorphine is a multi-factorial process representing a pharmacological kindling phenomenon.

  3. Ultrastructural Study of Moniliformin Induced Lesions of Myocardium in Rats and Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhaoDeyu; FengQl; 等

    1993-01-01

    Effects of moliliformin on the ultrastructure of the myocardium of mice and rats were studies.Mice were given moniliformin orally at a dose of 29.46mg·kg-1 the LD50.One h after dosing,lesions of the mitochondria of the myocardial cells were found which became more severe in 2 and 3 h.Ultrastructrual olesions were also observed in the myofibrils and sarcolemma.Rats were given moniliformin orally at the dosage of 6mg·kg-1 once daily for 56d.Lesions of mitochondria and myofibrils were relatively mild.In the myocardiac specimens taken from the 21d post-toxin administration,lesions of the sarcolemma became more obvious.These moniliformin-induced lesions were simillar to the ultrastructural changes in the myocardium of patients with Keshan disease.Our findings indicate that there may be a close and important relationship between moniliformin intoxication and Keshan disease.

  4. Campylobacter jejuni induces transcytosis of commensal bacteria across the intestinal epithelium through M-like cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalischuk Lisa D

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent epidemiological analyses have implicated acute Campylobacter enteritis as a factor that may incite or exacerbate inflammatory bowel disease (IBD in susceptible individuals. We have demonstrated previously that C. jejuni disrupts the intestinal barrier function by rapidly inducing epithelial translocation of non-invasive commensal bacteria via a transcellular lipid raft-mediated mechanism ('transcytosis'. To further characterize this mechanism, the aim of this current study was to elucidate whether C. jejuni utilizes M cells to facilitate transcytosis of commensal intestinal bacteria. Results C. jejuni induced translocation of non-invasive E. coli across confluent Caco-2 epithelial monolayers in the absence of disrupted transepithelial electrical resistance or increased permeability to a 3 kDa dextran probe. C. jejuni-infected monolayers displayed increased numbers of cells expressing the M cell-specific marker, galectin-9, reduced numbers of enterocytes that stained with the absorptive enterocyte marker, Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1, and reduced activities of enzymes typically associated with absorptive enterocytes (namely alkaline phosphatase, lactase, and sucrase. Furthermore, in Campylobacter-infected monolayers, E. coli were observed to be internalized specifically within epithelial cells displaying M-like cell characteristics. Conclusion These data indicate that C. jejuni may utilize M cells to promote transcytosis of non-invasive bacteria across the intact intestinal epithelial barrier. This mechanism may contribute to the inflammatory immune responses against commensal intestinal bacteria commonly observed in IBD patients.

  5. Orally delivered β-glucans aggravate dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinsbroek, Sigrid E M; Williams, David L; Welting, Olaf; Meijer, Sybren L; Gordon, Siamon; de Jonge, Wouter J

    2015-12-01

    β-Glucans have beneficial health effects due to their immune modulatory properties. Oral administration of β-glucans affects tumour growth, microbial infection, sepsis, and wound healing. We hypothesized that pre-treatment with orally delivered soluble and particulate β-glucans could ameliorate the development of aggravate dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) induced intestinal inflammation. To study this, mice were orally pre-treated with β-glucans for 14 days. We tested curdlan (a particulate β-(1,3)-glucan), glucan phosphate (a soluble β-(1,3)-glucan), and zymosan (a particle made from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which contains around 55% β-glucans). Weight loss, colon weight, and feces score did not differ between β-glucan and vehicle treated groups. However, histology scores indicated that β-glucan-treated mice had increased inflammation at a microscopic level suggesting that β-glucan treatment worsened intestinal inflammation. Furthermore, curdlan and zymosan treatment led to increased colonic levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, compared to vehicle. Glucan phosphate treatment did not significantly affect cytokine and chemokine levels. These data suggest that particulate and soluble β-glucans differentially affect the intestinal immune responses. However, no significant differences in other clinical colitis scores between soluble and particulate β-glucans were found in this study. In summary, β-glucans aggravate the course of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced intestinal inflammation at the level of the mucosa.

  6. Effect of zinc acexamate on gastric lesions induced by aspirin: a morphological study.

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    Bravo, L; Escolar, G; Navarro, C; Fontarnau, R; Bulbena, O

    1990-11-06

    The morphology of gastric lesions induced by aspirin in the rat and their modification by pretreatment with zinc acexamate (100 mg/kg) were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The influence of mucosal levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on the development of these lesions was also investigated. High (200 mg/kg) or low (50 mg/kg) doses of aspirin inhibited PGE2 production similarly, but the morphology of these lesions differed considerably. While gross exfoliation of extensive areas of gastric mucosa was observed after 200 mg/kg aspirin, only ultrastructural lesions of surface epithelial cells were present after 50 mg/kg aspirin. Regardless of the dose of aspirin administered, pretreatment with zinc acexamate raised PGE2 levels and increased the presence of mucus. Our results showed that after zinc acexamate, the development of deep erosions appearing with high doses of aspirin was prevented and the ultrastructural lesions induced by low doses of aspirin were not observed. The fact that zinc acexamate did not modify the anti-inflammatory action of aspirin in the carrageenin-induced oedema model suggests that the protective effect of zinc acexamate is exerted locally on the gastric mucosa.

  7. Balsalazine decreases intestinal mucosal permeability of dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-chang LIU; Qiao MEI; Jian-ming XU; Jing HU

    2009-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the effect of balsalazine treatment on intestinal mucosal permeability in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis and to determine the mechanism of the balsalazine-induced changes.Methods:Experimental colitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by the administration of 5% DSS.Balsalazine was administered intragastrically at doses of 42,141,and 423 mg/kg.The disease activity index (DAI) score was evaluated and colon tissue was collected for the assessment of histological changes.The amount of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the colon was determined,along with the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO),superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px).Mucosa from the small intestine was collected to determine the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-Y.The mucosa was ultrastructurally examined with transmission electron microscopy and intestinal permeability was assayed using Evans blue.Results:Balsalazine was found to reduce the DAI score and the histological index (HI) score,decrease the MDA content and the activity of MPO,and increase the activity of SOD and GSH-Px in colitis mice.At the same time,balsalazine ameliorated microvillus and tight junction structure,resulting in a decrease in the amount of Evans blue permeating into the intestinal wall and the levels of TNF-α and IFN-Y in colitis mice.Conclusion:In colitis mice,the anti-colitis effect of balsalazine results in a decrease in intestinal mucosal permeability.The mechanism of this effect is partly associated with balsalazine's antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects.

  8. Amelioration of Chemotherapy-Induced Intestinal Mucositis by Orally Administered Probiotics in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chun-Bin; Cheng, Mei-Lien; Liu, Chia-Yuan; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chiang Chiau, Jen-Shiu; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Intestinal mucositis is a frequently encountered side effect in oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. No well-established or up to date therapeutic strategies are available. To study a novel way to alleviate mucositis, we investigate the effects and safety of probiotic supplementation in ameliorating 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. Methods Seventy-two mice were injected saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) intraperitoneally daily. Mice were either orally administrated daily saline, probiotic suspension of Lactobacillus casei variety rhamnosus (Lcr35) or Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum (LaBi). Diarrhea score, pro-inflammatory cytokines serum levels, intestinal villus height and crypt depth and total RNA from tissue were assessed. Samples of blood, liver and spleen tissues were assessed for translocation. Results Marked diarrhea developed in the 5-FU groups but was attenuated after oral Lcr35 and LaBi administrations. Diarrhea scores decreased significantly from 2.64 to 1.45 and 0.80, respectively (Pprobiotics administration. We also found TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA expressions were up-regulated in intestinal mucositis tissues following 5-FU treatment (TNF-α: 4.35 vs. 1.18, IL-1β: 2.29 vs. 1.07, IL-6: 1.49 vs. 1.02) and that probiotics treatment suppressed this up-regulation (Pprobiotics Lcr35 and LaBi can ameliorate chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. This suggests probiotics may serve as an alternative therapeutic strategy for the prevention or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in the future. PMID:26406888

  9. Co-micronized palmitoylethanolamide/polydatin treatment causes endometriotic lesion regression in a rodent model of surgically-induced endometriosis

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    Rosanna Di Paola

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a chronic, painful disease characterized by the presence of endometrial glands and stroma outside the uterine cavity. Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA, an endogenous fatty acid amide, has anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. PEA lacks free radical scavenging activity, unlike polydatin (PLD, a natural precursor of resveratrol. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of orally administered co-micronized PEA/polydatin (m(PEA/PLD in an autologous rat model of surgically-induced endometriosis. Endometriosis was induced in female Wistar albino rats by auto-transplantation of uterine squares (implants into the intestinal mesentery and peritoneal cavity. Rats were distributed into one control group and one treatment group (10 animals each: m(PEA/PLD 10 mg/kg/day. At 28 days after surgery the relative volume of the endometrioma was determined. Endometrial-like tissue was confirmed by histology: Masson trichrome and toluidine blue were used to detect fibrosis and mast cells, respectively. The treated group displayed a smaller cyst diameter, with improved fibrosis score and mast cell number decrease. m(PEA/PLD administration decreased angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor, nerve growth factor, intercellular adhesion molecule, matrix metalloproteinase 9 expression and lymphocyte accumulation. m(PEA/PLD treatment also reduced peroxynitrite formation, (poly-ADPribose polymerase activation, IkBα phosphorylation and nuclear facor-kB traslocation in the nucleus. Our results suggested that m(PEA/PLD may be of use to inhibit development of endometriotic lesions in rats.

  10. Co-micronized Palmitoylethanolamide/Polydatin Treatment Causes Endometriotic Lesion Regression in a Rodent Model of Surgically Induced Endometriosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paola, Rosanna; Fusco, Roberta; Gugliandolo, Enrico; Crupi, Rosalia; Evangelista, Maurizio; Granese, Roberta; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic, painful disease characterized by the presence of endometrial glands and stroma outside the uterine cavity. Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), an endogenous fatty acid amide, has anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. PEA lacks free radical scavenging activity, unlike polydatin (PLD), a natural precursor of resveratrol. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of orally administered co-micronized PEA/polydatin [m(PEA/PLD)] in an autologous rat model of surgically induced endometriosis. Endometriosis was induced in female Wistar albino rats by auto-transplantation of uterine squares (implants) into the intestinal mesentery and peritoneal cavity. Rats were distributed into one control group and one treatment group (10 animals each): m(PEA/PLD) 10 mg/kg/day. At 28 days after surgery the relative volume of the endometrioma was determined. Endometrial-like tissue was confirmed by histology: Masson trichrome and toluidine blue were used to detect fibrosis and mast cells, respectively. The treated group displayed a smaller cyst diameter, with improved fibrosis score and mast cell number decrease. m(PEA/PLD) administration decreased angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor), nerve growth factor, intercellular adhesion molecule, matrix metalloproteinase 9 expression, and lymphocyte accumulation. m(PEA/PLD) treatment also reduced peroxynitrite formation, (poly-ADP)ribose polymerase activation, IkBα phosphorylation and nuclear facor-kB traslocation in the nucleus. Our results suggested that m(PEA/PLD) may be of use to inhibit development of endometriotic lesions in rats. PMID:27790149

  11. Combination therapy with telmisartan and parecoxib induces regression of endometriotic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenicu, Anca; Gu, Yuan; Körbel, Christina; Menger, Michael D; Laschke, Matthias W

    2017-08-01

    Telmisartan suppresses the development of endometriotic lesions. However, the drug also up-regulates the expression of COX-2, which has been suggested to promote the progression of endometriosis. Accordingly, in the present study we analysed whether a combination therapy with telmisartan and a COX-2 inhibitor may be more effective in the treatment of endometriotic lesions than the application of telmisartan alone. Endometriotic lesions were induced in the peritoneal cavity of C57BL/6 mice, which were treated daily with an i.p. injection of telmisartan (10 mg·kg(-1) ), parecoxib (5 mg·kg(-1) ), a combination of telmisartan and parecoxib or vehicle. Therapeutic effects on lesion survival, growth, vascularization, innervation and protein expression were studied over 4 weeks by high-resolution ultrasound imaging as well as immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses. Telmisartan-treated lesions exhibited a significantly reduced lesion volume when compared with vehicle-treated controls and parecoxib-treated lesions. This inhibitory effect of telmisartan was even more pronounced when it was used in combination with parecoxib. The combination therapy resulted in a reduced microvessel density as well as lower numbers of proliferating Ki67-positive cells and higher numbers of apoptotic cleaved caspase-3-positive stromal cells within the lesions. This was associated with a lower expression of COX-2, MMP-9 and p-Akt/Akt when compared with controls. The application of the two drugs further inhibited the ingrowth of nerve fibres into the lesions. Combination therapy with telmisartan and a COX-2 inhibitor represents a novel, effective pharmacological strategy for the treatment of endometriosis. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. Chemotherapy induced intestinal mucositis; from bench to bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A.E. Koning, de (Barbara)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPart 1 focuses primarily on the pathophysiology of mucositis, in order to gain more insight different experimental mouse models were used. Chapter 2 describes mucositis induced by high dose doxorubicin (DOX)- treatment. DOX is a frequently used cytostatic drug in childhood cancer,

  13. Chemotherapy induced intestinal mucositis; from bench to bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A.E. Koning, de (Barbara)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPart 1 focuses primarily on the pathophysiology of mucositis, in order to gain more insight different experimental mouse models were used. Chapter 2 describes mucositis induced by high dose doxorubicin (DOX)- treatment. DOX is a frequently used cytostatic drug in childhood cancer,

  14. Exogenous HIV-1 Nef upsets the IFN-γ-induced impairment of human intestinal epithelial integrity.

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    Maria Giovanna Quaranta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mucosal tissues play a central role in the transmission of HIV-1 infection as well as in the pathogenesis of AIDS. Despite several clinical studies reported intestinal dysfunction during HIV infection, the mechanisms underlying HIV-induced impairments of mucosal epithelial barrier are still unclear. It has been postulated that HIV-1 alters enterocytic function and HIV-1 proteins have been detected in several cell types of the intestinal mucosa. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of the accessory HIV-1 Nef protein on human epithelial cell line. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used unstimulated or IFN-γ-stimulated Caco-2 cells, as a model for homeostatic and inflamed gastrointestinal tracts, respectively. We investigated the effect of exogenous recombinant Nef on monolayer integrity analyzing its uptake, transepithelial electrical resistance, permeability to FITC-dextran and the expression of tight junction proteins. Moreover, we measured the induction of proinflammatory mediators. Exogenous Nef was taken up by Caco-2 cells, increased intestinal epithelial permeability and upset the IFN-γ-induced reduction of transepithelial resistance, interfering with tight junction protein expression. Moreover, Nef inhibited IFN-γ-induced apoptosis and up-regulated TNF-α, IL-6 and MIP-3α production by Caco-2 cells while down-regulated IL-10 production. The simultaneous exposure of Caco-2 cells to Nef and IFN-γ did not affect cytokine secretion respect to untreated cells. Finally, we found that Nef counteracted the IFN-γ induced arachidonic acid cascade. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that exogenous Nef, perturbing the IFN-γ-induced impairment of intestinal epithelial cells, could prolong cell survival, thus allowing for accumulation of viral particles. Our results may improve the understanding of AIDS pathogenesis, supporting the discovery of new therapeutic interventions.

  15. Changes in the Mucus Barrier during Cisplatin-Induced Intestinal Mucositis in Rats

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    Hajime Yamamoto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Gastrointestinal mucositis is a frequent complication of antineoplastic chemotherapy, but the effects of chemotherapy on mucosal defense mechanisms remain poorly understood. We studied the effects of cisplatin on mucin, one of the principal defense factors of the gastrointestinal mucosa, and evaluated the efficacy of two different types of H2-receptor antagonists against cisplatin-induced mucositis. Methods. Cisplatin (6 mg/kg was administered intravenously to rats (day 0. The rats were sacrificed 1, 3, 7, and 11 days after treatment, and their stomach, jejunum, ileum, and colon were removed. Immunoreactivity of the mucosa was compared with the use of anti-mucin monoclonal antibody. To evaluate the efficacy of H2-receptor antagonists, either famotidine (3 mg/kg or lafutidine (30 mg/kg was given orally once daily on days 0, 1, and 2. Histological and biochemical findings were compared among the groups to assess effects on cisplatin-induced injury. Results. Cisplatin significantly altered the immunoreactivity and content of mucin in the small intestinal mucosa, especially in the ileum. Lafutidine protected against cisplatin-induced mucosal injury and attenuated decreased mucin accumulation. Conclusion. Cisplatin appears to alter the mucus barrier function in the intestinal mucosa. Lafutidine might effectively prevent chemotherapy-induced mucositis by activating intestinal mucus cells.

  16. Chlamydia Psittaci Strains from Broiler Chickens Induce Histopathological Lesions and Mortality in SPF Chickens

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    Yin Lizi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A detailed study on histopathological lesions induced by two C. psittaci outer membrane protein A (ompA genotype B strains (10/423 and 10/525 and one genotype D strain (10/298 in experimentally infected (aerosol specific pathogen free (SPF chickens was performed. The strains were derived from Belgian and French commercially raised broilers with pneumonia. Both genotype B and D strains induced conjunctivitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, tracheitis, bronchitis, pneumonitis, airsacculitis, splenitis, hepatitis, nephritis, and enteritis in sequentially (days 2 to 34 post infection euthanized chickens. Inflammation of the ovaries was only observed in genotype D infected chickens. Overall, the genotype D strain caused more severe gross and histopathological lesions and mortality (54.5% early upon infection. The genotype D strain seemed to replicate faster as severity of the lesions increased more quickly. C. psittaci is a primary pathogen in chickens, and efficient monitoring and control of this emerging zoonotic pathogen is urgently needed.

  17. Diet-Derived Short Chain Fatty Acids Stimulate Intestinal Epithelial Cells To Induce Mucosal Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goverse, Gera; Molenaar, Rosalie; Macia, Laurence; Tan, Jian; Erkelens, Martje N; Konijn, Tanja; Knippenberg, Marlene; Cook, Emma C L; Hanekamp, Diana; Veldhoen, Marc; Hartog, Anita; Roeselers, Guus; Mackay, Charles R; Mebius, Reina E

    2017-03-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is continuously exposed to many environmental factors that influence intestinal epithelial cells and the underlying mucosal immune system. In this article, we demonstrate that dietary fiber and short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) induced the expression of the vitamin A-converting enzyme RALDH1 in intestinal epithelial cells in vivo and in vitro, respectively. Furthermore, our data showed that the expression levels of RALDH1 in small intestinal epithelial cells correlated with the activity of vitamin A-converting enzymes in mesenteric lymph node dendritic cells, along with increased numbers of intestinal regulatory T cells and a higher production of luminal IgA. Moreover, we show that the consumption of dietary fiber can alter the composition of SCFA-producing microbiota and SCFA production in the small intestines. In conclusion, our data illustrate that dietary adjustments affect small intestinal epithelial cells and can be used to modulate the mucosal immune system.

  18. Hyperthermia induces injury to the intestinal mucosa in the mouse: evidence for an oxidative stress mechanism.

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    Oliver, S R; Phillips, N A; Novosad, V L; Bakos, M P; Talbert, E E; Clanton, T L

    2012-04-01

    Loss of the intestinal barrier is critical to the clinical course of heat illness, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that conditions characteristic of mild heatstroke in mice are associated with injury to the epithelial lining of the intestinal tract and comprise a critical component of barrier dysfunction. Anesthetized mice were gavaged with 4 kDa FITC-dextran (FD-4) and exposed to increasing core temperatures, briefly reaching 42.4°C, followed by 30 min recovery. Arterial samples were collected to measure FD-4 concentration in plasma (in vivo gastrointestinal permeability). The small intestines were then removed to measure histological evidence of injury. Hyperthermia resulted in a ≈2.5-fold elevation in plasma FD-4 and was always associated with significant histological evidence of injury to the epithelial lining compared with matched controls, particularly in the duodenum. When isolated intestinal segments from control animals were exposed to ≥41.5°C, marked increases in permeability were observed within 60 min. These changes were associated with release of lactate dehydrogenase, evidence of protein oxidation via carbonyl formation and histological damage. Coincubation with N-acetylcysteine protected in vitro permeability during hyperthermia and reduced histological damage and protein oxidation. Chelation of intracellular Ca(2+) to block tight junction opening during 41.5°C exposure failed to reduce the permeability of in vitro segments. The results demonstrate that hyperthermia exposure in mouse intestine, at temperatures at or below those necessary to induce mild heatstroke, cause rapid and substantial injury to the intestinal lining that may be attributed, in part, to oxidative stress.

  19. Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion induces bronchial hyperreactivity and increases serum TNF-alpha in rats

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    Arruda Marcio Jose Cristiano de

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Intestinal or hepatic ischemia/reperfusion induces acute lung injury in animal models of multiple organ failure. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF- alpha is involved in the underlying inflammatory mechanism of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although the inflammatory cascade leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome has been extensively investigated, the mechanical components of acute respiratory distress syndrome are not fully understood. Our hypothesis is that splanchnic ischemia/reperfusion increases airway reactivity and serum TNF-alpha levels. OBJECTIVE: To assess bronchial smooth muscle reactivity under methacholine stimulation, and to measure serum TNF-alpha levels following intestinal and/or hepatic ischemia/reperfusion in rats. METHOD: Rats were subjected to 45 minutes of intestinal ischemia, or 20 minutes of hepatic ischemia, or to both (double ischemia, or sham procedures (control, followed by 120 minutes of reperfusion. The animals were then sacrificed, and the bronchial response to increasing methacholine molar concentrations (10-7 to 3 x 10-4 was evaluated in an ex-vivo bronchial muscle preparation. Serum TNF-alpha was determined by the L929-cell bioassay. RESULTS: Bronchial response (g/100 mg tissue showed increased reactivity to increasing methacholine concentrations in the intestinal ischemia and double ischemia groups, but not in the hepatic ischemia group. Similarly, serum TNF-alpha (pg/mL concentration was increased in the intestinal ischemia and double ischemia groups, but not in the hepatic ischemia group. CONCLUSION: Intestinal ischemia, either isolated or associated with hepatic ischemia, increased bronchial smooth muscle reactivity, suggesting a possible role for bronchial constriction in respiratory dysfunction following splanchnic ischemia/reperfusion. This increase occurred in concomitance with serum TNF-alpha increase, but whether the increase in TNF-alpha caused this bronchial contractility remains

  20. Increased sensitivity of DNA damage response-deficient cells to stimulated microgravity-induced DNA lesions.

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    Nan Li

    Full Text Available Microgravity is a major stress factor that astronauts have to face in space. In the past, the effects of microgravity on genomic DNA damage were studied, and it seems that the effect on genomic DNA depends on cell types and the length of exposure time to microgravity or simulated microgravity (SMG. In this study we used mouse embryonic stem (MES and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF cells to assess the effects of SMG on DNA lesions. To acquire the insight into potential mechanisms by which cells resist and/or adapt to SMG, we also included Rad9-deleted MES and Mdc1-deleted MEF cells in addition to wild type cells in this study. We observed significant SMG-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in Rad9-/- MES and Mdc1-/- MEF cells but not in their corresponding wild type cells. A similar pattern of DNA single strand break or modifications was also observed in Rad9-/- MES. As the exposure to SMG was prolonged, Rad9-/- MES cells adapted to the SMG disturbance by reducing the induced DNA lesions. The induced DNA lesions in Rad9-/- MES were due to SMG-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS. Interestingly, Mdc1-/- MEF cells were only partially adapted to the SMG disturbance. That is, the induced DNA lesions were reduced over time, but did not return to the control level while ROS returned to a control level. In addition, ROS was only partially responsible for the induced DNA lesions in Mdc1-/- MEF cells. Taken together, these data suggest that SMG is a weak genomic DNA stress and can aggravate genomic instability in cells with DNA damage response (DDR defects.

  1. DNA Lesions Induced by Replication Stress Trigger Mitotic Aberration and Tetraploidy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijima, Yosuke; Yoshioka, Ken-ichi; Yoshioka, Yoshiko; Shinohe, Keitaro; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Unno, Junya; Takagi, Masatoshi; Goto, Hidemasa; Inagaki, Masaki; Mizutani, Shuki; Teraoka, Hirobumi

    2010-01-01

    During tumorigenesis, cells acquire immortality in association with the development of genomic instability. However, it is still elusive how genomic instability spontaneously generates during the process of tumorigenesis. Here, we show that precancerous DNA lesions induced by oncogene acceleration, which induce situations identical to the initial stages of cancer development, trigger tetraploidy/aneuploidy generation in association with mitotic aberration. Although oncogene acceleration primarily induces DNA replication stress and the resulting lesions in the S phase, these lesions are carried over into the M phase and cause cytokinesis failure and genomic instability. Unlike directly induced DNA double-strand breaks, DNA replication stress-associated lesions are cryptogenic and pass through cell-cycle checkpoints due to limited and ineffective activation of checkpoint factors. Furthermore, since damaged M-phase cells still progress in mitotic steps, these cells result in chromosomal mis-segregation, cytokinesis failure and the resulting tetraploidy generation. Thus, our results reveal a process of genomic instability generation triggered by precancerous DNA replication stress. PMID:20098673

  2. DNA lesions induced by replication stress trigger mitotic aberration and tetraploidy development.

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    Yosuke Ichijima

    Full Text Available During tumorigenesis, cells acquire immortality in association with the development of genomic instability. However, it is still elusive how genomic instability spontaneously generates during the process of tumorigenesis. Here, we show that precancerous DNA lesions induced by oncogene acceleration, which induce situations identical to the initial stages of cancer development, trigger tetraploidy/aneuploidy generation in association with mitotic aberration. Although oncogene acceleration primarily induces DNA replication stress and the resulting lesions in the S phase, these lesions are carried over into the M phase and cause cytokinesis failure and genomic instability. Unlike directly induced DNA double-strand breaks, DNA replication stress-associated lesions are cryptogenic and pass through cell-cycle checkpoints due to limited and ineffective activation of checkpoint factors. Furthermore, since damaged M-phase cells still progress in mitotic steps, these cells result in chromosomal mis-segregation, cytokinesis failure and the resulting tetraploidy generation. Thus, our results reveal a process of genomic instability generation triggered by precancerous DNA replication stress.

  3. Nakagami imaging for detecting thermal lesions induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound in tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound induces focalized tissue coagulation by increasing the tissue temperature in a tight focal region. Several methods have been proposed to monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Currently, ultrasound imaging techniques that are clinically used for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment are standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging, ultrasound temperature estimation, and elastography-based methods. On the contrary, the efficacy of two-dimensional Nakagami parametric imaging based on the distribution of the ultrasound backscattered signals to quantify properties of soft tissue has recently been evaluated. In this study, ultrasound radio frequency echo signals from ex vivo tissue samples were acquired before and after high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures and then their Nakagami parameter and scaling parameter of Nakagami distribution were estimated. These parameters were used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Also, the effects of changing the acoustic power of the high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer on the Nakagami parameters were studied. The results obtained suggest that the Nakagami distribution's scaling and Nakagami parameters can effectively be used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in tissue ex vivo. These parameters can also be used to understand the degree of change in tissue caused by high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures, which could be interpreted as a measure of degree of variability in scatterer concentration in various parts of the high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion.

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in pancreatic lesions induced in the rat by azaserine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, C.J.T.; Weger, R.A. de; Blokland, W.T.M. van; Seifert-Bock, I.; Kobrin, M.S.; Korc, M.; Woutersen, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, the expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was investigated in putative preneoplastic and neoplastic acinar cell lesions induced in the rat pancreas by azaserine, using Northern blotting, in situ hybridisation (ISH) and immunohistochemistry. EGFR protein leve

  5. Genetic and Diet-Induced Obesity Increased Intestinal Tumorigenesis in the Double Mutant Mouse Model Multiple Intestinal Neoplasia X Obese via Disturbed Glucose Regulation and Inflammation

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    Ha Thi Ngo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied how spontaneous or carcinogen-induced intestinal tumorigenesis was affected by genetic or diet-induced obesity in C57BL/6J-ApcMin/+ X C57BL/6J-Lepob/+ mice. Obesity was induced by the obese (ob mutation in the lep gene coding for the hormone leptin, or by a 45% fat diet. The effects of obesity were examined on spontaneous intestinal tumors caused by the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc gene and on tumors induced by the dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP. F1 ob/ob (homozygous mutated mice had increased body weight (bw and number of spontaneous and PhIP-induced small intestinal tumors (in ApcMin/+ mice, versus ob/wt (heterozygous mutated and wt/wt mice (homozygous wild-type. A 45% fat diet exacerbated bw and spontaneous tumor numbers versus 10% fat, but not PhIP-induced tumors. Except for bw, ob/wt and wt/wt were not significantly different. The obesity caused hyperglucosemia and insulinemia in ob/ob mice. A 45% fat diet further increased glucose, but not insulin. Inflammation was seen as increased TNFα levels in ob/ob mice. Thus the results implicate disturbed glucose regulation and inflammation as mechanisms involved in the association between obesity and intestinal tumorigenesis. Ob/ob mice had shorter lifespan than ob/wt and wt/wt mice.

  6. Prolonged antibiotic treatment induces a diabetogenic intestinal microbiome that accelerates diabetes in NOD mice.

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    Brown, Kirsty; Godovannyi, Artem; Ma, Caixia; Zhang, YiQun; Ahmadi-Vand, Zahra; Dai, Chaunbin; Gorzelak, Monika A; Chan, YeeKwan; Chan, Justin M; Lochner, Arion; Dutz, Jan P; Vallance, Bruce A; Gibson, Deanna L

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating evidence supports that the intestinal microbiome is involved in Type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis through the gut-pancreas nexus. Our aim was to determine whether the intestinal microbiota in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model played a role in T1D through the gut. To examine the effect of the intestinal microbiota on T1D onset, we manipulated gut microbes by: (1) the fecal transplantation between non-obese diabetic (NOD) and resistant (NOR) mice and (2) the oral antibiotic and probiotic treatment of NOD mice. We monitored diabetes onset, quantified CD4+T cells in the Peyer's patches, profiled the microbiome and measured fecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). The gut microbiota from NOD mice harbored more pathobionts and fewer beneficial microbes in comparison with NOR mice. Fecal transplantation of NOD microbes induced insulitis in NOR hosts suggesting that the NOD microbiome is diabetogenic. Moreover, antibiotic exposure accelerated diabetes onset in NOD mice accompanied by increased T-helper type 1 (Th1) and reduced Th17 cells in the intestinal lymphoid tissues. The diabetogenic microbiome was characterized by a metagenome altered in several metabolic gene clusters. Furthermore, diabetes susceptibility correlated with reduced fecal SCFAs. In an attempt to correct the diabetogenic microbiome, we administered VLS#3 probiotics to NOD mice but found that VSL#3 colonized the intestine poorly and did not delay diabetes. We conclude that NOD mice harbor gut microbes that induce diabetes and that their diabetogenic microbiome can be amplified early in life through antibiotic exposure. Protective microbes like VSL#3 are insufficient to overcome the effects of a diabetogenic microbiome.

  7. Environmental particulate matter induces murine intestinal inflammatory responses and alters the gut microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Kish

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Particulate matter (PM is a key pollutant in ambient air that has been associated with negative health conditions in urban environments. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of orally administered PM on the gut microbiome and immune function under normal and inflammatory conditions. METHODS: Wild-type 129/SvEv mice were gavaged with Ottawa urban PM10 (EHC-93 for 7-14 days and mucosal gene expression analyzed using Ingenuity Pathways software. Intestinal permeability was measured by lactulose/mannitol excretion in urine. At sacrifice, segments of small and large intestine were cultured and cytokine secretion measured. Splenocytes were isolated and incubated with PM10 for measurement of proliferation. Long-term effects of exposure (35 days on intestinal cytokine expression were measured in wild-type and IL-10 deficient (IL-10(-/- mice. Microbial composition of stool samples was assessed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. Short chain fatty acids were measured in caecum. RESULTS: Short-term treatment of wild-type mice with PM10 altered immune gene expression, enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in the small intestine, increased gut permeability, and induced hyporesponsiveness in splenocytes. Long-term treatment of wild-type and IL-10(-/- mice increased pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the colon and altered short chain fatty acid concentrations and microbial composition. IL-10(-/- mice had increased disease as evidenced by enhanced histological damage. CONCLUSIONS: Ingestion of airborne particulate matter alters the gut microbiome and induces acute and chronic inflammatory responses in the intestine.

  8. Intestinal glucuronidation protects against chemotherapy-induced toxicity by irinotecan (CPT-11).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shujuan; Yueh, Mei-Fei; Bigo, Cyril; Barbier, Olivier; Wang, Kepeng; Karin, Michael; Nguyen, Nghia; Tukey, Robert H

    2013-11-19

    Camptothecin (CPT)-11 (irinotecan) has been used widely for cancer treatment, particularly metastatic colorectal cancer. However, up to 40% of treated patients suffer from severe late diarrhea, which prevents CPT-11 dose intensification and efficacy. CPT-11 is a prodrug that is hydrolyzed by hepatic and intestinal carboxylesterase to form SN-38, which in turn is detoxified primarily through UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1)-catalyzed glucuronidation. To better understand the mechanism associated with toxicity, we generated tissue-specific Ugt1 locus conditional knockout mouse models and examined the role of glucuronidation in protecting against irinotecan-induced toxicity. We targeted the deletion of the Ugt1 locus and the Ugt1a1 gene specifically in the liver (Ugt1(ΔHep)) and the intestine (Ugt1(ΔGI)). Control (Ugt1(F/F)), Ugt1(ΔHep), and Ugt1(ΔGI) adult male mice were treated with different concentrations of CPT-11 daily for four consecutive days. Toxicities were evaluated with regard to tissue glucuronidation potential. CPT-11-treated Ugt1(ΔHep) mice showed a similar lethality rate to the CPT-11-treated Ugt1(F/F) mice. However, Ugt1(ΔGI) mice were highly susceptible to CPT-11-induced diarrhea, developing severe and lethal mucositis at much lower CPT-11 doses, a result of the proliferative cell loss and inflammation in the intestinal tract. Comparative expression levels of UGT1A1 in intestinal tumors and normal surrounding tissue are dramatically different, providing for the opportunity to improve therapy by differential gene regulation. Intestinal expression of the UGT1A proteins is critical toward the detoxification of SN-38, whereas induction of the UGT1A1 gene may serve to limit toxicity and improve the efficacy associated with CPT-11 treatment.

  9. Effect of glutathione on gastric mucosal lesion induced by restraint water-immersion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Li Wan; Chang Liu Wang

    2000-01-01

    AIM To determine the effect of glutathione (GSH) on stress gastric mucosal lesion.METHODS The stress gastric mucosal lesion as produced by restraint water-immersion in rats and gastricmucosal lesion, gastric mucosal GSH content, gastric acid secretion and gastric barrier mucus secretion wereexamined. We also observed the effect of GSH on gastric mucosal lesion and the effect of N-ethylmaleimine(NEM) and indomethacin on GSH protection. Comparisons between two groups were made using the Students t test.RESULTS GSH (100 and 200 mg/kg) intraperitoneally protected against stress gastric mucosal lesion(P0.05). The preinjection of NEM (10 mg/kg, sc.), a sulfhydryl-blocking reagent, or indomethacin(5 mg/kg, im.), a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, had no effect on protection of GSH (P>0.05). GSH(100mg/kg) significantly increased secretion of gastric barrier mucus (P0.05).CONCLUSION GSH can inhibit the formation of gastric mucosal lesions induced by restraint water-immersion. The protective effect of GSH was due, in part, to promoting the secretion of gastric barriermucus, but not to suppress the gastric acid secretion. The protection effect of GSH has no relation withgastric mucosal GSH and PGs.

  10. A protective effect of melatonin on intestinal permeability is induced by diclofenac via regulation of mitochondrial function in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiao MEI; Lei DIAO; Jian-ming XU; Xiao-chang LIU; Juan JIN

    2011-01-01

    Aim:This study investigated the effect of intragastrically administered melatonin on intestinal mucosal permeability induced by diclofenac in mice.Methods:Intestinal mucosal permeability was induced in mice by intragastric administration of diclofenac(2.5 mg/kg).Melatonin was given intragastrically(10 mg/kg)once per day for 3 d after diclofenac administration.The small intestine was examined macroscopically and microscopically for pathologic jnjury to the iritestinal mucosa.Intestinal mucosal permeability was evaluated by Evans blue and FITC-dextran methods.Mitochondrial functionaI parameters.including mitochondrial membrane potential.mitochondrial ATPase and succinate dehydrogenase(SDH)activity,were assessed.The malondiaIdehyde(MDA)and myeloperoxidase (MPO)levels were determined from small intestinal mucosal homogenates.Results:As compared with control mice.the permeability,pathologic score, MDA and MPO levels and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were increased significantly by diclofenac treatment,and a broadened junctional complex and enlarged intercellular space were observed by transmission electron microscopy(TEM).Melatonin treatment significantly reduced the intestinal mucosal permeability.pathologic score,MDA,and MPO levels and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa.By TEM, the small intestine villus morphology and intercellular spaces were nearly normal in melatonin-treated mice.At the level of the mitochondria, melatonin treatment significantly restored the activities of ATPase and SDH.Conclusion:The intestinal damage and increased intestinal permeability induced by diclofenac in mice was limited by melatonin:moreover, melatonin preserved several aspects of mitochondrial function.

  11. Evidence for an adenoma-carcinoma sequence in dimethylhydrazine-induced neoplasms of rat intestinal epithelium.

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Carcinogen-induced primary intestinal adenocarcinomas serve as a useful animal model for human colonic adenocarcinomas. Although striking similarities between this model and the human disease state exist, there are also troublesome discrepancies-a major one being the reported lack of an adenoma-carcinoma sequence in the experimental model. However, the original morphologic descriptions of these experimental neoplasms predated the development of presently accepted morphologic criteria that hav...

  12. EP4 agonist alleviates indomethacin-induced gastric lesions and promotes chronic gastric ulcer healing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Liang Jiang; Wha Bin Im; Yariv Donde; Larry A Wheeler

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate EP4-selective agonist effect on indomethacin-induced gastric lesions and on the spontaneous healing of chronic gastric ulcers. METHODS: In a mouse model of gastric bleeding with high dose of indomethacin (20 mg/kg), an EP4-selective agonist was administered orally. Stomach lesions and gastric mucous regeneration were monitored. In a mouse model of chronic gastric ulcer induced by acetic acid, EP4 agonist effect on the healing of chronic gastric ulcer was evaluated in the presence or absence of low dose indomethacin (3 mg/kg). In cultured human gastric mucous cells, EP4 agonist effect on indomethacininduced apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. RESULTS: The EP4-selective agonist reduced high dose indomethacin-induced acute hemorrhagic damage and promoted mucous epithelial regeneration. Low-dose indomethacin aggravated ulcer bleeding and inflammation, and delayed the healing of the established chronic gastric ulcer. The EP4 agonist, when applied locally, not only offset indomethacin-induced gastric bleeding and inflammation, but also accelerated ulcer healing. In the absence of indomethacin, the EP4 agonist even accelerated chronic gastric ulcer healing and suppressed inflammatory cell infiltration in the granulation tissue. In vitro , the EP4 agonist protected human gastric mucous cells from indomethacin-induced apoptosis. CONCLUSION: EP4-selective agonist may prevent indomethacin-induced gastric lesions and promote healing of existing and indomethacin-aggravated gastric ulcers, via promoting proliferation and survival of mucous epithelial cells.

  13. Combined compared to dissociated oral and intestinal sucrose stimuli induce different brain hedonic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouard, Caroline; Meunier-Salaün, Marie-Christine; Meurice, Paul; Malbert, Charles-Henri; Val-Laillet, David

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of brain networks contributing to the processing of oral and/or intestinal sugar signals in a relevant animal model might help to understand the neural mechanisms related to the control of food intake in humans and suggest potential causes for impaired eating behaviors. This study aimed at comparing the brain responses triggered by oral and/or intestinal sucrose sensing in pigs. Seven animals underwent brain single photon emission computed tomography (99mTc-HMPAO) further to oral stimulation with neutral or sucrose artificial saliva paired with saline or sucrose infusion in the duodenum, the proximal part of the intestine. Oral and/or duodenal sucrose sensing induced differential cerebral blood flow changes in brain regions known to be involved in memory, reward processes and hedonic (i.e., pleasure) evaluation of sensory stimuli, including the dorsal striatum, prefrontal cortex, cingulate cortex, insular cortex, hippocampus, and parahippocampal cortex. Sucrose duodenal infusion only and combined sucrose stimulation induced similar activity patterns in the putamen, ventral anterior cingulate cortex and hippocampus. Some brain deactivations in the prefrontal and insular cortices were only detected in the presence of oral sucrose stimulation. Finally, activation of the right insular cortex was only induced by combined oral and duodenal sucrose stimulation, while specific activity patterns were detected in the hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex with oral sucrose dissociated from caloric load. This study sheds new light on the brain hedonic responses to sugar and has potential implications to unravel the neuropsychological mechanisms underlying food pleasure and motivation. PMID:25147536

  14. Protective effects of Rheum tanguticum polysaccharide against hydrogen peroxide-induced intestinal epithelial cell injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-Na Liu; Qi-Bing Mei; Li Liu; Feng Zhang; Zhen-Guo Liu; Zhi-Peng Wang; Ru-Tao Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To describe the effect of Rheum tanguticum polysaccharide (RTP) on hydrogen peroxide-induced human intestinal epithelial cell injury.METHODS: Hydrogen peroxide (100 μmol/L) was introduced to induce human intestinal epithelial cell injury.Cells were pretreated with RTP (30,100,300 μg/mL) for 24 h before exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Cell viability was detected by MTr assay and morphological observation.Acridine orange staining and flow cytometry were performed to assess cell apoptosis. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, production of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured by spectrophotometry with corresponding assay kits.RESULTS: Following exposure to H2O2, a marked decrease in cell survival and SOD activity, increased production of MDA, LDH leakage and cell apoptosis were found.Pretreatment of the cells with RTP could significantly elevate cell survival, SOD activity and decrease the level of MDA, LDH activity and cell apoptosis.CONCLUSION: RTP may have cytoprotective and antioxidant effects against H2O2-induced intestinal epithelial cell injury by inhibiting cell apoptosis and necrosis. This might be one of the possible mechanisms of RTP for the treatment of ulcerative colitis in rats.

  15. Conjugated linoleic acid protects against gliadin-induced depletion of intestinal defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamo, Paolo; Gogliettino, Marta; Palmieri, Gianna; Cocca, Ennio; Maurano, Francesco; Stefanile, Rosita; Balestrieri, Marco; Mazzarella, Giuseppe; David, Chella; Rossi, Mauro

    2011-09-01

    The involvement of oxidative stress in gluten-induced toxicity has been evidenced in vitro and in clinical studies but has never been examined in vivo. We recently demonstrated the protective activity of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), which functions by the activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor2 (Nrf2), a key transcription factor for the synthesis of antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes (phase 2). Here, we evaluate the involvement of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor2 in gliadin-mediated toxicity in human Caco-2 intestinal cells and in gliadin-sensitive human leukocyte antigen-DQ8 transgenic mice (DQ8) and the protective activity of CLA. Gliadin effects in differentiated Caco-2 cells and in DQ8 mice, fed with a gliadin-containing diet with or without CLA supplementation, were evaluated by combining enzymatic, immunochemical, immunohistochemical, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) assays. Gliadin toxicity was accompanied by downregulation of phase 2 and elevates proteasome-acylpeptide hydrolase activities in vitro and in vivo. Notably, gliadin was unable to generate severe oxidative stress extent or pathological consequences in DQ8 mice intestine comparable to those found in celiac patients and the alterations produced were hampered by CLA. The beneficial effects of CLA against the depletion of crucial intestinal cytoprotective defenses indicates a novel nutritional approach for the treatment of intestinal disease associated with altered redox homeostasis. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Effect of zinc treatment on intestinal motility in experimentally induced diarrhea in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniyi, O S; Akomolafe, R O; Ojabo, C O; Eru, E U; Olaleye, S B

    2014-06-19

    Zinc supplementation is a critical new intervention for treating diarrheal episodes in children. Recent studies suggest that administration of zinc along with new low osmolarity oral rehydration solutions / salts (ORS) can reduce the duration and severity of diarrheal episodes for up to three months. Several mechanisms of action of zinc has been proposed, however there is dearth of information about the effect of zinc on intestinal motility during diarrhea. Male albino Wistar rats (80-100g) were used. The effect of different doses of zinc sulphate (25, 50, 100, 150 mg/Kg) on the number of wet faeces was investigated. Intestinal motility during castor oil induced diarrhea was assessed using activated charcoal meal and the mechanisms of action of zinc sulphate on motility were investigated. The effective dose of zinc sulphate (100mg/Kg) significantly reduced (p< 0.001) the number of wet faeces (3.0 ± 0.00) compared with control (6.8 ± 0.25) during diarrhea. This antidiarrheal effect of zinc was abolished by propranolol and nifedipine. Zinc sulphate significantly reduced (p< 0.05) intestinal transit time (60.7 ± 7.13%) compared with control (85.7 ± 2.35%). It is concluded that zinc sulphate reduces the frequency of wet faeces output and intestinal motility during diarrhea via activation of β adrenergic receptor and L-type Ca2+ channel.

  17. Activation of Intestinal Human Pregnane X Receptor Protects against Azoxymethane/Dextran Sulfate Sodium–Induced Colon Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Jie; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Nagaoka, Kenjiro; Okamoto, Minoru; Qu, Aijuan; Tanaka, Naoki; Kimura, Shioko; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    The role of intestinal human pregnane X receptor (PXR) in colon cancer was determined through investigation of the chemopreventive role of rifaximin, a specific agonist of intestinal human PXR, toward azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)–induced colon cancer. Rifaximin treatment significantly decreased the number of colon tumors induced by AOM/DSS treatment in PXR-humanized mice, but not wild-type or Pxr-null mice. Additionally, rifaximin treatment markedly increased the survival r...

  18. Heat shock protein 70-dependent protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ying; Naito, Yuji; Handa, Osamu; Hayashi, Natsuko; Kuki, Aiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Tanimura, Yuko; Morita, Mayuko; Adachi, Satoko; Fukui, Akifumi; Hirata, Ikuhiro; Kishimoto, Etsuko; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-11-01

    Protection of the small intestine from mucosal injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including acetylsalicylic acid is a critical issue in the field of gastroenterology. Polaprezinc an anti-ulcer drug, consisting of zinc and L-carnosine, provides gastric mucosal protection against various irritants. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of the RIE1 rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Confluent rat intestinal epithelial cells were incubated with 70 µM polaprezinc for 24 h, and then stimulated with or without 15 mM acetylsalicylic acid for a further 15 h. Subsequent cellular viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced cell death was also qualified by fluorescent microscopy of Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide. Heat shock proteins 70 protein expression after adding polaprezinc or acetylsalicylic acid was assessed by western blotting. To investigate the role of Heat shock protein 70, Heat shock protein 70-specific small interfering RNA was applied. Cell viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining and apoptosis was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We found that acetylsalicylic acid significantly induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Polaprezinc significantly suppressed acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells at its late phase. At the same time, polaprezinc increased Heat shock protein 70 expressions of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a time-dependent manner. However, in Heat shock protein 70-silenced rat intestinal epithelial cells, polaprezinc could not suppress acetylsalicylic acid -induced apoptosis at its late phase. We conclude that polaprezinc-increased Heat shock protein 70 expression might be an important mechanism by which polaprezinc suppresses acetylsalicylic

  19. Polymer fraction of Aloe vera exhibits a protective activity on ethanol-induced gastric lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul-Hong; Nam, Dong-Yoon; Son, Hyeong-U; Lee, Si-Rim; Lee, Hyun-Jin; Heo, Jin-Chul; Cha, Tae-Yang; Baek, Jin-Hong; Lee, Sang-Han

    2011-04-01

    For centuries, Aloe has been used as a herbal plant remedy against skin disorders, diabetes, and for its cardiac stimulatory activity. Here, we examined the gastroprotective effects of an Aloe vera polymer fraction (Avpf; molecular weight cut-off ≥50 kDa; 150 mg/kg body weight, p.o.) on an ethanol-induced gastric lesion mouse model. Mice pre-treated with Avpf had significantly fewer gastric lesions than their respective controls. To further examine the potential mechanism underlying this effect, we used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to examine nitric oxide synthase and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)mRNA expression on tissues from gastric lesions. Our results revealed that the mRNA expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) were each reduced by ~50% in Avpf-treated mice vs. the controls, whereas, the mRNA expression levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase remained unchanged. MMP-9, an index for gastric lesions, also alleviated the ethanol-treated gastric ulceration during Avpf treatment. These findings collectively suggest that Avpf significantly protects the gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced gastric damage, at least in part, by decreasing mRNA expression levels of not only iNOS and nNOS, but also MMP-9.

  20. High fructose intake fails to induce symptomatic adaptation but may induce intestinal carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra Heilpern

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fructose has several interactions in man, including intolerance and promotion of some diseases. However, fructose in fruits and in prebiotics may be associated with benefits. Adaptation to regular fructose ingestion as defined for lactose could support a beneficial rather than a deleterious effect. This study was undertaken to evaluate symptomatic response and potential underlying mechanisms of fecal bacterial change and breath hydrogen response to short term regular fructose supplementation. Forty-five participants were recruited for a 3 day recall diet questionnaire and a 50 g fructose challenge. Breath hydrogen was measured for 4.5 hrs and symptoms were recorded. Thirty-eight subjects provided stool samples for analysis by selective culture of 4 groups of bacteria, including bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. Intolerant subjects returned a second time 15 days later. Ten of these served as controls and 16 received 30 g fructose twice a day. Ten of the latter returned 27 days later, after stopping fructose for a third challenge test. Student’s paired, unpaired t-tests and Pearson correlations were used. Significance was accepted at P<0.05. After fructose rechallenge there were no significant reductions in symptoms scores in volunteers in either the fructose supplemented or non supplemented groups. However, total breath hydrogen was reduced between test 1 and test 2 (P=0.03 or test 3 (P=0.04 in the group given fructose then discontinued, compared with controls. There were no statistically significant changes in bacterial numbers between test 2 and 1. This study shows that regular consumption of high dose fructose does not follow the lactose model of adaptation. Observed changes in hydrogen breath tests raise the possibility that intestinal carriers of fructose may be induced potentially aggravating medical problems attributed to fructose.

  1. Inflammation and disintegration of intestinal villi in an experimental model for Vibrio parahaemolyticus-induced diarrhea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Ritchie

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a leading cause of seafood-borne gastroenteritis in many parts of the world, but there is limited knowledge of the pathogenesis of V. parahaemolyticus-induced diarrhea. The absence of an oral infection-based small animal model to study V. parahaemolyticus intestinal colonization and disease has constrained analyses of the course of infection and the factors that mediate it. Here, we demonstrate that infant rabbits oro-gastrically inoculated with V. parahaemolyticus develop severe diarrhea and enteritis, the main clinical and pathologic manifestations of disease in infected individuals. The pathogen principally colonizes the distal small intestine, and this colonization is dependent upon type III secretion system 2. The distal small intestine is also the major site of V. parahaemolyticus-induced tissue damage, reduced epithelial barrier function, and inflammation, suggesting that disease in this region of the gastrointestinal tract accounts for most of the diarrhea that accompanies V. parahaemolyticus infection. Infection appears to proceed through a characteristic sequence of steps that includes remarkable elongation of microvilli and the formation of V. parahaemolyticus-filled cavities within the epithelial surface, and culminates in villus disruption. Both depletion of epithelial cell cytoplasm and epithelial cell extrusion contribute to formation of the cavities in the epithelial surface. V. parahaemolyticus also induces proliferation of epithelial cells and recruitment of inflammatory cells, both of which occur before wide-spread damage to the epithelium is evident. Collectively, our findings suggest that V. parahaemolyticus damages the host intestine and elicits disease via previously undescribed processes and mechanisms.

  2. Do lesions of the enteric nervous system occur following intestinal ischemia/reperfusion? Ocorrem lesões do sistema nervoso entérico após isquemia/reperfusão intestinal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glauber Kazuo Linhares

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate tissue lesions, especially those of the intestinal innervation, in an excluded jejunal loop subjected to ischemia and reperfusion in rats. METHODS: To evaluate the role of ischemia and reperfusion lesions in an excluded intestinal loop, four groups of 20 rats were set up: control group (GCEI7 and three experimental groups (GIREI7, GIREI14 and GIREI28. They were all subjected to exclusion of an intestinal segment of six centimeters in length, at a distance of 10 centimeters from the Treitz angle. The 60 animals in the three experimental groups were additionally subjected to ischemia of the vascular pedicle for 30 minutes. The control group and the experimental group GIREI7 were evaluated on the 7th day after the operation. The groups GIREI14 and GIREI28 (which also underwent ischemia were utilized to evaluate the evolution of the lesion over time, on the 14th and 28th days after the operation, respectively. From the intestinal excluded loop, we take one ring of 0,5 cm distal and proximal, that were fixed in formaline 10% solution in order to do histological (HE and immuno-hystochemial (PS-100 evaluation (enteric nervous system. The distal loop was exteriorized in stoma and the proximal part closed with polipropilene 6-0. RESULTS: It was observed a decrease in the number of ganglionic cells in the myenteric plexus in the group subjected to ischemia and reperfusion (GIREI7, in relation to the control group (GCEI7 at the 7th post-operative day (Mann-Whitney test: p = 0.0173 *. Comparing the numbers of ganglionic cells in the myenteric plexus before and after jejunal loop exclusion GCEI7 - (Wilcoxon test: p = 0.0577. GIREI7 - Comparing the numbers of ganglionic cells in the myenteric plexus before and after ischemia (*p = 0.0399. Comparing the percentage variations in ganglionic cells in the myenteric plexus on the 7th, 14th and 28th days after the procedure, in the groups GIREI7, GIREI14 and GIREI28, it was observed that there

  3. The influence of septal lesions on sodium and water retention induced by Walker 256 tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Guimarães

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In the course of studies on the effects of septal area lesions on neuroimmunomodulation and Walker 256 tumor development, it was observed that tumor-induced sodium and water retention was less marked in lesioned than in non-lesioned rats. In the present study possible mechanisms involved in this phenomenon were investigated. The experiments were performed in septal-lesioned (LW; N = 15 and sham-operated (SW; N = 7 8-week-old male Wistar rats, which received multifocal simultaneous subcutaneous (sc inoculations of Walker 256 tumor cells about 30 days after the stereotaxic surgery. Control groups (no tumor, sham-operated food-restricted (SFR, N = 7 and lesioned food-restricted (LFR, N = 10 were subjected to a feeding pattern similar to that observed in tumor-bearing animals. Multifocal inoculation of Walker 256 tumor rapidly induces anorexia, which is paradoxically accompanied by an increase in body weight, as a result of renal Na+ and fluid retention. These effects of the tumor were also seen in LW rats, although the rise in fractional sodium balance during the early clinical period was significantly smaller than in SW rats (day 4: SW = 47.6 ± 6.4% and LW = 13.8 ± 5.2%; day 5: SW = 57.5 ± 3.5% and LW = 25.7 ± 4.8%; day 6: SW = 54.4 ± 3.8% and LW = 32.1 ± 4.4%; P<0.05, suggesting a temporary reduction in tumor-induced sodium retention. In contrast, urine output was significantly reduced in SW rats and increased in LW rats (LW up to -0.85 and SW up to 4.5 ml/100 g body weight, with no change in osmolar excretion. These temporary changes in the tumor's effects on LW rats may reflect a "reversal" of the secondary central antidiuretic response induced by the tumor (from antidiuretic to diuretic.

  4. Dietary antigens limit mucosal immunity by inducing regulatory T cells in the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Soon; Hong, Sung-Wook; Han, Daehee; Yi, Jaeu; Jung, Jisun; Yang, Bo-Gie; Lee, Jun Young; Lee, Minji; Surh, Charles D

    2016-02-19

    Dietary antigens are normally rendered nonimmunogenic through a poorly understood "oral tolerance" mechanism that involves immunosuppressive regulatory T (Treg) cells, especially Treg cells induced from conventional T cells in the periphery (pTreg cells). Although orally introducing nominal protein antigens is known to induce such pTreg cells, whether a typical diet induces a population of pTreg cells under normal conditions thus far has been unknown. By using germ-free mice raised and bred on an elemental diet devoid of dietary antigens, we demonstrated that under normal conditions, the vast majority of the small intestinal pTreg cells are induced by dietary antigens from solid foods. Moreover, these pTreg cells have a limited life span, are distinguishable from microbiota-induced pTreg cells, and repress underlying strong immunity to ingested protein antigens.

  5. Differences in the location and activity of intestinal Crohn's disease lesions between adult and paediatric patients detected with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maccioni, Francesca; Carrozzo, Federica; Pino, Anna Rosaria; Staltari, Ilaria; Ansari, Najwa Al; Marini, Mario [Rome University, Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Policlinico Umberto I Hospital, Rome (Italy); Viola, Franca; Di Nardo, Giovanni; Cucchiara, Salvatore [Rome University, Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Gastroenterology and Liver Unit Policlinico Umberto I Hospital, Rome (Italy); Vestri, Annarita [Rome University, Department of Statistical Sciences, Policlinico Umberto I Hospital, Roma (Italy); Signore, Alberto [Rome University, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Faculty Medicine and Psychology, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, S. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    To prospectively compare paediatric patients (PP) and adult patients (AP) affected by Crohn's disease (CD) in terms of the location and activity of intestinal lesions. Forty-three children (mean age 15 years) and 43 adults (mean age 48 years) with proven CD underwent magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) to localise lesions and detect their activity in 9 segments of the small and large bowel. The results were analysed on a per patient and per segment basis. Ileo-colonoscopy was performed in all patients. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Involvement of terminal ileum was significantly different in the two groups: observed in 100 % of AP (43/43) versus 58 % (23/43) of PP (P < 0.0001). Conversely, the colon was diseased in 84 % of PP versus 64 % of AP. In particular, left colonic segments were significantly more involved in PP (descending colon 53 % versus 21 %, P < 0.01; rectum 67 % versus 23 %, P < 0.0001; sigmoid colon 56 % versus 37 %, not significant), whereas caecal involvement was equal in both groups. In children the maximal disease activity was found in left colonic segments, whereas in adults it was in the terminal ileum. MRE detected significant differences between the two populations, showing a more extensive and severe involvement of the left colon in children but the distal ileum in adults. (orig.)

  6. Intestine-specific Mttp deletion decreases mortality and prevents sepsis-induced intestinal injury in a murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Dominguez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The small intestine plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of sepsis and has been referred to as the "motor" of the systemic inflammatory response. One proposed mechanism is that toxic gut-derived lipid factors, transported in mesenteric lymph, induce systemic injury and distant organ failure. However, the pathways involved are yet to be defined and the role of intestinal chylomicron assembly and secretion in transporting these lipid factors is unknown. Here we studied the outcome of sepsis in mice with conditional, intestine-specific deletion of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (Mttp-IKO, which exhibit a block in chylomicron assembly together with lipid malabsorption. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mttp-IKO mice and controls underwent intratracheal injection with either Pseudomonas aeruginosa or sterile saline. Mttp-IKO mice exhibited decreased seven-day mortality, with 0/20 (0% dying compared to 5/17 (29% control mice (p<0.05. This survival advantage in Mttp-IKO mice, however, was not associated with improvements in pulmonary bacterial clearance or neutrophil infiltration. Rather, Mttp-IKO mice exhibited protection against sepsis-associated decreases in villus length and intestinal proliferation and were also protected against increased intestinal apoptosis, both central features in control septic mice. Serum IL-6 levels, a major predictor of mortality in human and mouse models of sepsis, were elevated 8-fold in septic control mice but remained unaltered in septic Mttp-IKO mice. Serum high density lipoprotein (HDL levels were reduced in septic control mice but were increased in septic Mttp-IKO mice. The decreased levels of HDL were associated with decreased hepatic expression of apolipoprotein A1 in septic control mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies suggest that strategies directed at blocking intestinal chylomicron secretion may attenuate the progression and improve the outcome of sepsis through effects

  7. Intestine-specific Disruption of Hypoxia-inducible Factor (HIF)-2α Improves Anemia in Sickle Cell Disease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nupur; Xie, Liwei; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K.; Campbell, Andrew; Rivella, Stefano; Shah, Yatrik M.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is caused by genetic defects in the β-globin chain. SCD is a frequently inherited blood disorder, and sickle cell anemia is a common type of hemoglobinopathy. During anemia, the hypoxic response via the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α is highly activated in the intestine and is essential in iron absorption. Intestinal disruption of HIF-2α protects against tissue iron accumulation in iron overload anemias. However, the role of intestinal HIF-2α in regulating anemia in SCD is currently not known. Here we show that in mouse models of SCD, disruption of intestinal HIF-2α significantly decreased tissue iron accumulation. This was attributed to a decrease in intestinal iron absorptive genes, which were highly induced in a mouse model of SCD. Interestingly, disruption of intestinal HIF-2α led to a robust improvement in anemia with an increase in RBC, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. This was attributed to improvement in RBC survival, hemolysis, and insufficient erythropoiesis, which is evident from a significant decrease in serum bilirubin, reticulocyte counts, and serum erythropoietin following intestinal HIF-2α disruption. These data suggest that targeting intestinal HIF-2α has a significant therapeutic potential in SCD pathophysiology. PMID:26296885

  8. Intestine-specific Disruption of Hypoxia-inducible Factor (HIF)-2α Improves Anemia in Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nupur; Xie, Liwei; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K; Campbell, Andrew; Rivella, Stefano; Shah, Yatrik M

    2015-09-25

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is caused by genetic defects in the β-globin chain. SCD is a frequently inherited blood disorder, and sickle cell anemia is a common type of hemoglobinopathy. During anemia, the hypoxic response via the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α is highly activated in the intestine and is essential in iron absorption. Intestinal disruption of HIF-2α protects against tissue iron accumulation in iron overload anemias. However, the role of intestinal HIF-2α in regulating anemia in SCD is currently not known. Here we show that in mouse models of SCD, disruption of intestinal HIF-2α significantly decreased tissue iron accumulation. This was attributed to a decrease in intestinal iron absorptive genes, which were highly induced in a mouse model of SCD. Interestingly, disruption of intestinal HIF-2α led to a robust improvement in anemia with an increase in RBC, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. This was attributed to improvement in RBC survival, hemolysis, and insufficient erythropoiesis, which is evident from a significant decrease in serum bilirubin, reticulocyte counts, and serum erythropoietin following intestinal HIF-2α disruption. These data suggest that targeting intestinal HIF-2α has a significant therapeutic potential in SCD pathophysiology.

  9. Voltage dependent potassium channel remodeling in murine intestinal smooth muscle hypertrophy induced by partial obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hai Liu

    Full Text Available Partial obstruction of the small intestine causes obvious hypertrophy of smooth muscle cells and motility disorder in the bowel proximate to the obstruction. To identify electric remodeling of hypertrophic smooth muscles in partially obstructed murine small intestine, the patch-clamp and intracellular microelectrode recording methods were used to identify the possible electric remodeling and Western blot, immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation were utilized to examine the channel protein expression and phosphorylation level changes in this research. After 14 days of obstruction, partial obstruction caused obvious smooth muscle hypertrophy in the proximally located intestine. The slow waves of intestinal smooth muscles in the dilated region were significantly suppressed, their amplitude and frequency were reduced, whilst the resting membrane potentials were depolarized compared with normal and sham animals. The current density of voltage dependent potassium channel (KV was significantly decreased in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cells and the voltage sensitivity of KV activation was altered. The sensitivity of KV currents (IKV to TEA, a nonselective potassium channel blocker, increased significantly, but the sensitivity of IKv to 4-AP, a KV blocker, stays the same. The protein levels of KV4.3 and KV2.2 were up-regulated in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cell membrane. The serine and threonine phosphorylation levels of KV4.3 and KV2.2 were significantly increased in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cells. Thus this study represents the first identification of KV channel remodeling in murine small intestinal smooth muscle hypertrophy induced by partial obstruction. The enhanced phosphorylations of KV4.3 and KV2.2 may be involved in this process.

  10. Voltage dependent potassium channel remodeling in murine intestinal smooth muscle hypertrophy induced by partial obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong-Hai; Huang, Xu; Guo, Xin; Meng, Xiang-Min; Wu, Yi-Song; Lu, Hong-Li; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Kim, Young-chul; Xu, Wen-Xie

    2014-01-01

    Partial obstruction of the small intestine causes obvious hypertrophy of smooth muscle cells and motility disorder in the bowel proximate to the obstruction. To identify electric remodeling of hypertrophic smooth muscles in partially obstructed murine small intestine, the patch-clamp and intracellular microelectrode recording methods were used to identify the possible electric remodeling and Western blot, immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation were utilized to examine the channel protein expression and phosphorylation level changes in this research. After 14 days of obstruction, partial obstruction caused obvious smooth muscle hypertrophy in the proximally located intestine. The slow waves of intestinal smooth muscles in the dilated region were significantly suppressed, their amplitude and frequency were reduced, whilst the resting membrane potentials were depolarized compared with normal and sham animals. The current density of voltage dependent potassium channel (KV) was significantly decreased in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cells and the voltage sensitivity of KV activation was altered. The sensitivity of KV currents (IKV) to TEA, a nonselective potassium channel blocker, increased significantly, but the sensitivity of IKv to 4-AP, a KV blocker, stays the same. The protein levels of KV4.3 and KV2.2 were up-regulated in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cell membrane. The serine and threonine phosphorylation levels of KV4.3 and KV2.2 were significantly increased in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cells. Thus this study represents the first identification of KV channel remodeling in murine small intestinal smooth muscle hypertrophy induced by partial obstruction. The enhanced phosphorylations of KV4.3 and KV2.2 may be involved in this process.

  11. Intestinal motility disorder induced by free radicals: a new model mimicking oxidative stress in gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Ilaria; Campolongo, Patrizia; Valeri, Pacifico; Romanelli, Luca; Palmery, Maura

    2002-12-01

    Literature data suggest that the inflamed intestine may be subjected to a considerable oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to simulate the oxidative stress in the gastrointestinal tract and to explore its effect on intestinal motility. This was attained by treating isolated segments from the rabbit jejunum and from the guinea pig ileum with 2,2'-Azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (ABAP), which generates peroxyl radicals by thermal decomposition. Treatment of intestinal segments with ABAP reduced the muscarinic cholinergic response to acetylcholine in both preparations and induced a dose-dependent inhibition of the spontaneous contractions in the jejunum, also in the presence of tetrodotoxin. ABAP was found to inhibit the contractile response induced by BaCl(2) in guinea pig ileum preparations. This effect was not dose-dependent and it was reversed by Bay-K 8644, which activates voltage operated L-type calcium channels. The rapid and reversible effects of ABAP suggest that it might directly affect L-type calcium channels before lipoperoxidation induction. In conclusion, the results of the present study show that ABAP could be a useful tool to simulate early contractility dysfunctions mediated by oxidative stress.

  12. Inducible Foxp3+ regulatory T-cell development by a commensal bacterium of the intestinal microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, June L.; Mazmanian, Sarkis K.

    2010-01-01

    To maintain intestinal health, the immune system must faithfully respond to antigens from pathogenic microbes while limiting reactions to self-molecules. The gastrointestinal tract represents a unique challenge to the immune system, as it is permanently colonized by a diverse amalgam of bacterial phylotypes producing multitudes of foreign microbial products. Evidence from human and animal studies indicates that inflammatory bowel disease results from uncontrolled inflammation to the intestinal microbiota. However, molecular mechanisms that actively promote mucosal tolerance to the microbiota remain unknown. We report herein that a prominent human commensal, Bacteroides fragilis, directs the development of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) with a unique “inducible” genetic signature. Monocolonization of germ-free animals with B. fragilis increases the suppressive capacity of Tregs and induces anti-inflammatory cytokine production exclusively from Foxp3+ T cells in the gut. We show that the immunomodulatory molecule, polysaccharide A (PSA), of B. fragilis mediates the conversion of CD4+ T cells into Foxp3+ Treg cells that produce IL-10 during commensal colonization. Functional Foxp3+ Treg cells are also produced by PSA during intestinal inflammation, and Toll-like receptor 2 signaling is required for both Treg induction and IL-10 expression. Most significantly, we show that PSA is not only able to prevent, but also cure experimental colitis in animals. Our results therefore demonstrate that B. fragilis co-opts the Treg lineage differentiation pathway in the gut to actively induce mucosal tolerance. PMID:20566854

  13. [Somatic pain sensitivity under indometacin induced gastric and small intestinal injury in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iarushkina, N I; Bagaeva, T R; Filaretova, L P

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to study the effect of indometacin (IM) induced gastrointestinal injury on somatic pain sensitivity in awake rats. IM was administered at the ulcerogenic dose (35 mg/kg, s. c.) to fasted (24 h) and fed rats. Somatic pain sensitivity was evaluated using a tail flick test. Latency time was measured under conditions of the formation of gastric erosion (1 - 4 h after IM injection) as well as small intestinal injury (24, 48 and 72 h after IM injection). IM administration caused the gastric erosion formation only in fasted rats (4 h after the administration) and the small intestinal injury in both fasted and fed rats (24, 48, 72 h after the administration). Indomethacin-caused gastric and small intestinal injury resulted in an increase in tail flick latency. We did not observe any changes in tail flick latency in IM-treated rats without significant gastrointestinal injury. The gastrointestinal injury was accompanied by signs of chronic stress: long-lasting increase in corticosterone blood level, adrenal hypertrophy, thymus involution, and loss of body weight. Thus, the IM-induced gastrointestinal injury formation resulted in somatic pain inhibition in awake rats.

  14. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Ming Li; Hong Zhou; Qian Cai; Guang-Xia Xiao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells.METHODS: Hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of human intestinal epithelial cell line SW-480 was established. Cell apoptosis was determined by Annexin-V and PI doublestained flow cytometry and DNA gel electrophoresis.Morphological changes were examined with light and electron microscopy. For other observations, mitochondrial function,cytochrome c release, mitochondrial translocation and membrane potential were determined simultaneously.RESULTS: Percentage of apoptotic cells induced with 400μ mol/L hydrogen peroxide increased significantly at I h or 3h after stimulation and recovered rapidly. Meanwhile percentage of apoptotic cells induced with 4 mmol/L hydrogen peroxide increased with time. In accordance with these changes, we observed decreased mitochondrial function in 400 μmol/L H2O2-stimualted cells at 1 h or 3 h and in 4 mmol/L H2O2-stimualted cells at times examined.Correspondingly, swelling cristae and vacuole-like mitochondria were noted. Release of cytochrome c,decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial translocation were also found to be the early signs of apoptosis.CONCLUSION: Dysfunctional mitochondria play a role in the apoptosis of SW-480 cell line induced by hydrogen peroxide.

  15. Modeling of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced lesions in the presence of cavitation bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavrier; Chapelon; Gelet; Cathignol

    2000-07-01

    The classical "Bio Heat Transfer Equation (BHTE)" model is adapted to take into account the effects of oscillating microbubbles that occur naturally in the tissue during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. First, the Gilmore-Akulichev model is used to quantify the acoustic pressure scattered by microbubbles submitted to HIFU. Because this scattered pressure is not monochromatic, the concept of harmonic attenuation is introduced and a global attenuation coefficient is estimated for bubble-filled tissues. The first results show that this global attenuation coefficient varies significantly with respect to several parameters such as the frequency and the density of microbubbles in the medium, but also with respect to the incident acoustic pressure which thus becomes a transcendental function. Under these conditions, a layer-by-layer modeling, in the direction of propagation, is proposed to calculate the ultrasonic beam. Finally, the BHTE is solved and the HIFU-induced lesions are estimated by the calculation of the thermal dose. Using this model, it can be observed first that, when the firing power increases, the lesion develops clearly in the direction of the transducer, with a shape agreeing with in vivo experimentation. Next, it is observed that the lesion can be significantly modified in size and position, if an interface (skin or inner wall) is simulated as a zone with multiple cavitation nuclei. With a firing power increase, it is also shown how a secondary lesion can appear at the interface and how, beyond a certain threshold, this lesion develops at the main lesion expense. Finally, a better in-depth homogeneity of lesions is observed when the acoustic frequency of HIFU is increased.

  16. Regression of human papillomavirus intraepithelial lesions is induced by MVA E2 therapeutic vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Ricardo; López-Contreras, Mario; Rosales, Carlos; Magallanes-Molina, Jose-Roberto; Gonzalez-Vergara, Roberto; Arroyo-Cazarez, Jose Martin; Ricardez-Arenas, Antonio; Del Follo-Valencia, Armando; Padilla-Arriaga, Santiago; Guerrero, Miriam Veronica; Pirez, Miguel Angel; Arellano-Fiore, Claudia; Villarreal, Freddy

    2014-12-01

    Human papilloma viruses can induce warts, condylomas, and other intraepithelial cervical lesions that can progress to cancer. Cervical cancer is a serious problem in developing countries because early detection is difficult, and thus proper early treatment is many times missing. In this phase III clinical trial, we evaluated the potential use of MVA E2 recombinant vaccinia virus to treat intraepithelial lesions associated with papillomavirus infection. A total of 1176 female and 180 male patients with intraepithelial lesions were studied. They were injected with 10(7) MVA E2 virus particles directly into their uterus, urethra, vulva, or anus. Patients were monitored by colposcopy and cytology. Immune response was determined by measuring the antibody titer against MVA E2 virus and by analyzing the cytotoxic activity against cancer cells bearing papillomavirus DNA. Papillomavirus was determined by the Hybrid Capture method or by polymerase chain reaction analysis. By histology, 1051 (89.3%) female patients showed complete elimination of lesions after treatment with MVA E2. In 28 (2.4%) female patients, the lesion was reduced to CIN 1. Another 97 (8.3%) female patients presented isolated koilocytes after treatment. In men, all lesions were completely eliminated. All MVA E2-treated patients developed antibodies against the MVA E2 vaccine and generated a specific cytotoxic response against papilloma-transformed cells. Papillomavirus DNA was not detected after treatment in 83% of total patients treated. MVA E2 did not generate any apparent side effects. These data suggest that therapeutic vaccination with MVA E2 vaccine is an excellent candidate to stimulate the immune system and generate regression in intraepithelial lesions when applied locally.

  17. Regression of Human Papillomavirus Intraepithelial Lesions Is Induced by MVA E2 Therapeutic Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Contreras, Mario; Rosales, Carlos; Magallanes-Molina, Jose-Roberto; Gonzalez-Vergara, Roberto; Arroyo-Cazarez, Jose Martin; Ricardez-Arenas, Antonio; del Follo-Valencia, Armando; Padilla-Arriaga, Santiago; Guerrero, Miriam Veronica; Pirez, Miguel Angel; Arellano-Fiore, Claudia; Villarreal, Freddy

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Human papilloma viruses can induce warts, condylomas, and other intraepithelial cervical lesions that can progress to cancer. Cervical cancer is a serious problem in developing countries because early detection is difficult, and thus proper early treatment is many times missing. In this phase III clinical trial, we evaluated the potential use of MVA E2 recombinant vaccinia virus to treat intraepithelial lesions associated with papillomavirus infection. A total of 1176 female and 180 male patients with intraepithelial lesions were studied. They were injected with 107 MVA E2 virus particles directly into their uterus, urethra, vulva, or anus. Patients were monitored by colposcopy and cytology. Immune response was determined by measuring the antibody titer against MVA E2 virus and by analyzing the cytotoxic activity against cancer cells bearing papillomavirus DNA. Papillomavirus was determined by the Hybrid Capture method or by polymerase chain reaction analysis. By histology, 1051 (89.3%) female patients showed complete elimination of lesions after treatment with MVA E2. In 28 (2.4%) female patients, the lesion was reduced to CIN 1. Another 97 (8.3%) female patients presented isolated koilocytes after treatment. In men, all lesions were completely eliminated. All MVA E2–treated patients developed antibodies against the MVA E2 vaccine and generated a specific cytotoxic response against papilloma-transformed cells. Papillomavirus DNA was not detected after treatment in 83% of total patients treated. MVA E2 did not generate any apparent side effects. These data suggest that therapeutic vaccination with MVA E2 vaccine is an excellent candidate to stimulate the immune system and generate regression in intraepithelial lesions when applied locally. PMID:25275724

  18. The Role of Probiotics in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Autophagy in Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chaoqun; Ding, Zhen; Shi, Huiying; Qian, Wei; Hou, Xiaohua; Lin, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of autophagy has been associated with loss of intestinal homeostasis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria is known to be a major initiator of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) autophagy. Although probiotics have been recognized to be involved in many therapeutic properties and participate in host defense responses, the molecular mechanisms by which probiotics exert these positive effects remain unknown. This study assessed the effect of probiotics on LPS-induced physical barrier dysfunction and the underlying mechanism of probiotic action in IECs with a focus on autophagy. A LPS-induced autophagic model was established in rat IEC18 cells wherein cells were treated with culture medium supernatants of Bifidobacteria following LPS intervention at indicated times. Autophagosomes in IEC18 cells were visualized by confocal microscopy after transfection with a tandem GFP-mCherry-LC3 construct and also by transmission electron microscopy. Autophagy-associated protein levels were analyzed by western blot and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) was measured using an epithelial voltohmmeter. Probiotic treatment could effectively inhibit LPS-induced autophagy, as evidenced by the decreased ratio of microtubule-associated light chain 3 (LC3)-II/LC3-I, fewer autophagic vacuoles, and reduced punctate distribution of GFP-mCherry-LC3. In addition, probiotics prevented chloroquine (CQ) inhibition of autophagic flux and autophagolysosomal fusion as indicated by a failure to recruit LAMP1 and cathepsin D to lysosomes. Interestingly, ATG16L1 knockdown did not inhibit the effect of probiotics on LPS-induced autophagy. Furthermore, the diminished barrier function could be prevented by probiotics. We provide evidence that autophagy mediation by probiotics may be involved in enteroprotection against LPS-induced intestinal epithelial toxicity, and could serve as a novel mechanism through which probiotics promote and maintain gut homeostasis. © 2016 The

  19. Vagal afferents are essential for maximal resection-induced intestinal adaptive growth in orally fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David W; Liu, Xiaowen; Holst, Jens J; Raybould, Helen E; Ney, Denise M

    2006-11-01

    Small bowel resection stimulates intestinal adaptive growth by a neuroendocrine process thought to involve both sympathetic and parasympathetic innervation and enterotrophic hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2). We investigated whether capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferent neurons are essential for maximal resection-induced intestinal growth. Rats received systemic or perivagal capsaicin or ganglionectomy before 70% midjejunoileal resection or transection and were fed orally or by total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for 7 days after surgery. Growth of residual bowel was assessed by changes in mucosal mass, protein, DNA, and histology. Both systemic and perivagal capsaicin significantly attenuated by 48-100% resection-induced increases in ileal mucosal mass, protein, and DNA in rats fed orally. Villus height was significantly reduced in resected rats given capsaicin compared with vehicle. Sucrase specific activity in jejunal mucosa was not significantly different; ileal mucosal sucrase specific activity was significantly increased by resection in capsaicin-treated rats. Capsaicin did not alter the 57% increase in ileal proglucagon mRNA or the 150% increase in plasma concentration of bioactive GLP-2 resulting from resection in orally fed rats. Ablation of spinal/splanchnic innervation by ganglionectomy failed to attenuate resection-induced adaptive growth. In TPN rats, capsaicin did not attenuate resection-induced mucosal growth. We conclude that vagal afferents are not essential for GLP-2 secretion when the ileum has direct contact with luminal nutrients after resection. In summary, vagal afferent neurons are essential for maximal resection-induced intestinal adaptation through a mechanism that appears to involve stimulation by luminal nutrients.

  20. Numerical modelling of tooth enamel subsurface lesion formation induced by dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, O; van Turnhout, A G; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Picioreanu, C

    2014-01-01

    Using a one-dimensional mathematical model that couples tooth demineralisation and remineralisation with metabolic processes occurring in the dental plaque, two mechanisms for subsurface lesion formation were evaluated. It was found that a subsurface lesion can develop only as the result of alternating periods of demineralisation (acid attack during sugar consumption) and remineralisation (resting period) in tooth enamel with uniform mineral composition. It was also shown that a minimum plaque thickness that can induce an enamel lesion exists. The subsurface lesion formation can also be explained by assuming the existence of a fluoride-containing layer at the tooth surface that decreases enamel solubility. A nearly constant thickness of the surface layer was obtained with both proposed mechanisms. Sensitivity analysis showed that surface layer formation is strongly dependent on the length of remineralisation and demineralisation cycles. The restoration period is very important and the numerical simulations support the observation that often consumption of sugars is a key factor in caries formation. The calculated profiles of mineral content in enamel are similar to those observed experimentally. Most probably, both studied mechanisms interact in vivo in the process of caries development, but the simplest explanation for subsurface lesion formation remains the alternation between demineralisation and remineralisation cycles without any pre-imposed gradients.

  1. Protection of carbon monoxide intraperitoneal administration from rat intestine injury induced by lipopolysaccharide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shao-hua; MA Ke; XU Bing; XU Xin-rong

    2010-01-01

    Background Treatment with inhaled carbon monoxide (CO) has been shown to ameliorate intestinal injury in experimental animals induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or ischemia-reperfusion. We hypothesized that CO intraperitoneal administration (i.p.) might provide similar protection to inhaled gas. This study aimed to investigate the effects of continuous 2 L/min of 250 ppm CO i.p. on rat intestine injury induced by LPS and to try to develop a more practical means of delivering the gas.Methods A total of 72 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups: control group, CO i.p. group, LPS group and LPS+CO i.p. group. One hour after intravenously received 5 mg/kg LPS, the rats in LPS group and LPS+CO i.p. group were exposed to room air and 2 L/min of 250 ppm CO i.p., respectively, and the rats of control group and CO i.p. group intravenously received an equal volume of 0.9% NaClI and 1 hour later, were exposed to room air and 2 L/min of 250 ppm CO i.p., respectively. One, 3 and 6 hour of each group after treated with room air or CO i.p., the animals (n=6 for each time point) were sacrificed and intestinal tissues were collected for determinating the levels of platelet activator factor (PAF) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) with enzyme-lined immunosorbent assays. The maleic dialdehyde (MDA) content and the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were determined with a chemical method. The phosphorylated p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) expression was assayed with Western blotting and the cell apoptotic rate with flow cytometery. The arterial oxygenation was measured by blood gas analysis, and the pathology determined by light microscope.Results After treatment with 2 L/min of 250 ppm CO i.p., the increase of PAF, ICAM-1, MDA, MPO, and cell apoptotic rate induced by LPS was markedly reduced (P<0.05 or 0.01), and accompanied by ameliorating intestine injury. Western blotting showed that these effects of CO i.p. were mediated by p38 MAPK

  2. Influence of stressor-induced nervous system activation on the intestinal microbiota and the importance for immunomodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    The body is colonized by a vast population of genetically diverse microbes, the majority of which reside within the intestines to comprise the intestinal microbiota. During periods of homeostasis, these microbes reside within stable climax communities, but exposure to physical, physiological, as well as psychological stressors can significantly impact the structure of the intestinal microbiota. This has been demonstrated in humans and laboratory animals, with the most consistent finding being a reduction in the abundance of bacteria in the genus Lactobacillus. Whether stressor exposure also changes the function of the microbiota, has not been as highly studied. The studies presented in this review suggest that stressor-induced disruption of the intestinal microbiota leads to increased susceptibility to enteric infection and overproduction of inflammatory mediators that can induce behavioral abnormalities, such as anxiety-like behavior. Studies involving germfree mice also demonstrate that the microbiota are necessary for stressor-induced increases in innate immunity to occur. Exposing mice to a social stressor enhances splenic macrophage microbicidal activity, but this effect fails to occur in germfree mice. These studies suggest a paradigm in which stressor exposure alters homeostatic interactions between the intestinal microbiota and mucosal immune system and leads to the translocation of pathogenic, and/or commensal, microbes from the lumen of the intestines to the interior of the body where they trigger systemic inflammatory responses and anxiety-like behavior. Restoring homeostasis in the intestines, either by removing the microbiota or by administering probiotic microorganisms, can ameliorate the stressor effects.

  3. Claudin-3 expression in radiation-exposed rat models: A potential marker for radiation-induced intestinal barrier failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Sehwan; Lee, Jong-geol; Bae, Chang-hwan; Lee, Seung Bum [National Radiation Emergency Medical Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Sun-Joo [Laboratory of Experimental Pathology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung-Sook [National Radiation Emergency Medical Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Pathology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sunhoo, E-mail: sunhoo@kcch.re.kr [National Radiation Emergency Medical Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Pathology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Irradiation increased intestinal bacterial translocation, accompanied by claudin protein expression in rats. • Neurotensin decreased the bacterial translocation and restored claudin-3 expression. • Claudin-3 can be used as a marker in evaluating radiation induced intestinal injury. - Abstract: The molecular events leading to radiation-induced intestinal barrier failure are not well known. The influence of the expression of claudin proteins in the presence and absence of neurotensin was investigated in radiation-exposed rat intestinal epithelium. Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, irradiation, and irradiation + neurotensin groups, and bacterial translocation to the mesenteric lymph node and expression of claudins were determined. Irradiation led to intestinal barrier failure as demonstrated by significant bacterial translocation. In irradiated terminal ilea, expression of claudin-3 and claudin-4 was significantly decreased, and claudin-2 expression was increased. Administration of neurotensin significantly reduced bacterial translocation and restored the structure of the villi as seen by histologic examination. Among the three subtype of claudins, only claudin-3 expression was restored. These results suggest that the therapeutic effect of neurotensin on the disruption of the intestinal barrier is associated with claudin-3 alteration and that claudin-3 could be used as a marker in evaluating radiation-induced intestinal injury.

  4. A Review of Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Gastrointestinal Injury: Focus on Prevention of Small Intestinal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunji Fujimori

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Capsule endoscopy and balloon endoscopy, advanced modalities that allow full investigation of the entire small intestine, have revealed that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs can cause a variety of abnormalities in the small intestine. Recently, several reports show that traditional NSAIDs (tNSAIDs and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA can induce small intestinal injuries. These reports have shown that the preventive effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs does not extend to the small intestine, suggesting that concomitant therapy may be required to prevent small intestinal side effects associated with tNSAID/ASA use. Recently, several randomized controlled trials used capsule endoscopy to evaluate the preventive effect of mucoprotective drugs against tNSAID/ASA-induced small intestinal injury. These studies show that misoprostol and rebamipide reduce the number and types of tNSAID-induced small intestinal mucosal injuries. However, those studies were limited to a small number of subjects and tested short-term tNSAID/ ASA treatment. Therefore, further extensive studies are clearly required to ascertain the beneficial effect of these drugs.

  5. Neuronal and intestinal protein kinase d isoforms mediate Na+ (salt taste)-induced learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ya; Ren, Min; Feng, Hui; Chen, Lu; Altun, Zeynep F; Rubin, Charles S

    2009-08-11

    Ubiquitously expressed protein kinase D (PKD) isoforms are poised to disseminate signals carried by diacylglycerol (DAG). However, the in vivo regulation and functions of PKDs are poorly understood. We show that the Caenorhabditis elegans gene, dkf-2, encodes not just DKF-2A, but also a second previously unknown isoform, DKF-2B. Whereas DKF-2A is present mainly in intestine, we show that DKF-2B is found in neurons. Characterization of dkf-2 null mutants and transgenic animals expressing DKF-2B, DKF-2A, or both isoforms revealed that PKDs couple DAG signals to regulation of sodium ion (Na+)-induced learning. EGL-8 (a phospholipase Cbeta4 homolog) and TPA-1 (a protein kinase Cdelta homolog) are upstream regulators of DKF-2 isoforms in vivo. Thus, pathways containing EGL-8-TPA-1-DKF-2 enable learning and behavioral plasticity by receiving, transmitting, and cooperatively integrating environmental signals targeted to both neurons and intestine.

  6. Transgenic Expression of Human Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor LPA2 in Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cells Induces Intestinal Dysplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiro Yoshida

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA acts on LPA2 receptor to mediate multiple pathological effects that are associated with tumorigenesis. The absence of LPA2 attenuates tumor progression in rodent models of colorectal cancer, but whether overexpression of LPA2 alone can lead to malignant transformation in the intestinal tract has not been studied. In this study, we expressed human LPA2 in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs under control of the villin promoter. Less than 4% of F1-generation mice had germline transmission of transgenic (TG human LPA2; as such only 3 F1 mice out of 72 genotyped had TG expression. These TG mice appeared anemic with hematochezia and died shortly after birth. TG mice were smaller in size compared with the wild type mouse of the same age and sex. Morphological analysis showed that TG LPA2 colon had hyper-proliferation of IECs resulting in increased colonic crypt depth. Surprisingly, TG small intestine had villus blunting and decreased IEC proliferation and dysplasia. In both intestine and colon, TG expression of LPA2 compromised the terminal epithelial differentiation, consistent with epithelial dysplasia. Furthermore, we showed that epithelial dysplasia was observed in founder mouse intestine, correlating LPA2 overexpression with epithelial dysplasia. The current study demonstrates that overexpression of LPA2 alone can lead to intestinal dysplasia.

  7. PATHOLOGICAL TISSUE LESIONS INDUCED BY CHRONIC CADMIUM INTOXICATION IN SILVER CRUCIAN CARP CARASSIUS AURATUS GIBELIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NICULA MARIOARA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to describe the histopathological effects of chronic cadmium intoxication on liver, gill, kidney, intestine and striated muscle in silver crucian carp Carassius auratus gibelio. 25 immature 1+-year-old crucian carp were obtained from a private fishfarm and acclimated to laboratory conditions. After a 21 days exposure to a sublethal cadmium concentration (1.625 ppm from a Cd (CH3COO2 x2H2O stock solution, liver, gill, kidney, small intestine and striated muscle were sampled and processed for histological examination. Histopathological alterations induced by studied heavy metal in the tissues of silver crucian carp specimenes were: nephrocite hypertrophic processes, distruction of intercellular jonctions, stratification of epitelium and congestions both in renal glomerulis and in interstitium; hyalinizations, congestions of blood vassels and vacuolations associated with lipid accumulation at the hepatic level; into intestinal mucosa revealed rich leucocyte infiltrates, with numerous leucocytes situated intraepithelial; branchial lamelles with disordered aspect and multilayered epithelium, vascular ectasias and leucocyte infiltrates into subepithelial connective tissue at the gill level; miolisis processes in peripheral muscular fibers manifested by contractile apparatus alteration on large areas.

  8. Selenium protects against ischemia-reperfusion- induced gastric lesions in rats

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    Mobarok Ali Abu Taib

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that selenium afforded protection against ethanol and stress-induced gastric lesions in rats. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of selenium on ischemia-reperfusion-induced gastric injuries in which rats were subjected to 30 minutes of ischemia in the presence of 100 mM HCI and a reperfusion for 60 minutes duration. Intraluminal bleeding was assessed macroscopically and gastric lesions were graded microscopically under an inverted microscope. Nonprotein sulphydryl levels were measured spectrophotometrically. The severity of gastric lesions, intraluminal bleeding as well as the depletion of nonprotein sulphydryls during the reperfusion periods was significantly different from that of control. Pretreatment with selenium (0.125-2.0 mg/kg, intraperitoneally 30 minutes before the ischemia-reperfusion, dose-dependently attenuated the gastric lesions, reduced the severity of intraluminal bleeding and prevented the depletion of nonprotein sulphydryls in the stomach. These results suggest that the gastric protection effect of selenium may be due to its antioxidant properties. Furthermore, endogenous nonprotein sulphydryls may play a significant role in the protective mechanisms of selenium.

  9. A new murine model of stress-induced complex atherosclerotic lesions

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    Amir H. Najafi

    2013-03-01

    The primary purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ApoE−/− mice, when subjected to chronic stress, exhibit lesions characteristic of human vulnerable plaque and, if so, to determine the time course of such changes. We found that the lesions were remarkably similar to human vulnerable plaque, and that the time course of lesion progression raised interesting insights into the process of plaque development. Lard-fed mixed-background ApoE−/− mice exposed to chronic stress develop lesions with large necrotic core, thin fibrous cap and a high degree of inflammation. Neovascularization and intraplaque hemorrhage are observed in over 80% of stressed animals at 20 weeks of age. Previously described models report a prevalence of only 13% for neovascularization observed at a much later time point, between 36 and 60 weeks of age. Thus, our new stress-induced model of advanced atherosclerotic plaque provides an improvement over what is currently available. This model offers a tool to further investigate progression of plaque phenotype to a more vulnerable phenotype in humans. Our findings also suggest a possible use of this stress-induced model to determine whether therapeutic interventions have effects not only on plaque burden, but also, and importantly, on plaque vulnerability.

  10. Effects of Ginger (Zingiberaceae on Diabetes Mellitus Induced Changes in the Small Intestine of Rat

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    M Karimipour

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Diabetes mellitus is the most common endocrine disorder and causes gastrointestinal complications .The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ginger on the small intestine of diabetic rats. Materials & Methods: This experimental study was done in the anatomy department of Uremia Medical University in 1385. 24 adult male rats, weighing 250±20 gr were randomly selected and divided into 3 following groups: control, diabetic (induced by 60mg/kg STZ and treatment groups. The treatment group was given ginger powder (5% of their consumed food weight during day/night period. After 8 weeks, all rats were anaesthetized and their small intestines were removed and measured for their weight and length. For histological assessment, samples from each part of duodenum, jejunum and ileum was fixed in 10% formalin and slides with hematoxilin & eosin staining were prepared. Villi length, crypt depth and muscular layer thickness were assessed by graticule eye piece of light microscope. Statistical analysis, one- way analysis of variance and Tukey’s SPSS software was used for data analysis. Results: The results showed that mean of intestinal length and weight, villi length and muscular layer thickness in all three parts and crypts depth in duodenum and jejunum in diabetic group increased significantly in comparison with control and treatment groups, but there was no significant difference between control and treatment groups. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate that ginger as an antioxidant, through decreasing oxidative stress, can prevent pathologic alterations induced by diabetes in small intestine.

  11. Signaling pathways induced by serine proteases to increase intestinal epithelial barrier function.

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    Lahey, Kelcie A; Ronaghan, Natalie J; Shang, Judie; Dion, Sébastien P; Désilets, Antoine; Leduc, Richard; MacNaughton, Wallace K

    2017-01-01

    Changes in barrier function of the gastrointestinal tract are thought to contribute to the inflammatory bowel diseases Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Previous work in our lab demonstrated that apical exposure of intestinal epithelial cell lines to serine proteases results in an increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). However, the underlying mechanisms governing this response are unclear. We aimed to determine the requirement for proteolytic activity, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation, and downstream intracellular signaling in initiating and maintaining enhanced barrier function following protease treatment using a canine intestinal epithelial cell line (SCBN). We also examined the role of phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain on the serine protease-induced increase in TER through. It was found that proteolytic activity of the serine proteases trypsin and matriptase is required to initiate and maintain the protease-mediated increase in TER. We also show that MMP-independent EGFR activation is essential to the sustained phase of the protease response, and that Src kinases may mediate EGFR transactivation. PI3-K and ERK1/2 signaling were important in reaching a maximal increase in TER following protease stimulation; however, their upstream activators are yet to be determined. CK2 inhibition prevented the increase in TER induced by serine proteases. The bradykinin B(2) receptor was not involved in the change in TER in response to serine proteases, and no change in phosphorylation of MLC was observed after trypsin or matriptase treatment. Taken together, our data show a requirement for ongoing proteolytic activity, EGFR transactivation, as well as downstream PI3-K, ERK1/2, and CK2 signaling in protease-mediated barrier enhancement of intestinal epithelial cells. The pathways mediating enhanced barrier function by proteases may be novel therapeutic targets for intestinal disorders characterized by disrupted epithelial

  12. Effect of electroacupunture on gastric mucosal intestinal trefoil factor gene expression of stress-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Ping Li; Jie Yan; Shou-Xiang Yi; Xiao-Rong Chang; Ya-Ping Lin; Zong-Bao Yang; Ai Huang; Rong Hu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate electroacupunture(EA) at the acupoints of Stomach Meridian of Foot-Yangming(SMFY),Gallbladder Meridian of Foot-Yangming(SMFY) on gastric mucosal intestinal trefoil factor (ITF) gene expression detection in stress-induced rats with gastric mucosal lesion, and to explore the regulatory mechanism and significance of EA-related gastric mucosal protective effect.METHODS: Forty rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: Blank group, Model group, Model group+EA at acupoints of SMFY group("SMFY group"), and Model group+EA at acupoints of GMFY group(GMFY group).All rats (except blank group) were made model by water immersion and restraint stress (WRS). Then the gastric mucosa tissue in each rat was taken off after assessment of gastric mucosal lesion index(GUI), and the expression of ITF mRNA of the tissues was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) method.RESULTS: Compared with Model group(54.3 ± 1.34),the GUI value in SMFY group (31±2.21) decreased significantly(P 0.05), in SMFY group(0.76± 0.01)with an extremely obvious difference (P<0.01), furthermore the expression in SMFY group was significantly higher than in GMFY group (P< 0.01).CONCLUSION: The gastric mucosal protective effect by EA at the acupoints of SMFY and GMFY was related to the expression variance of ITF, indicating certain meridian specificity exists. It could be one proof for the TCM theory "Relative particularity between SMFY and stomach".

  13. Traditional Herbal Medicine, Rikkunshito, Induces HSP60 and Enhances Cytoprotection of Small Intestinal Mucosal Cells as a Nontoxic Chaperone Inducer

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    Kumiko Tamaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing incidence of small intestinal ulcers associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs has become a topic with recent advances of endoscopic technology. However, the pathogenesis and therapy are not fully understood. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of Rikkunshito (TJ-43, a traditional herbal medicine, on expression of HSP60 and cytoprotective ability in small intestinal cell line (IEC-6. Effect of TJ-43 on HSP60 expression in IEC-6 cells was evaluated by immunoblot analysis. The effect of TJ-43 on cytoprotective abilities of IEC-6 cells against hydrogen peroxide or indomethacin was studied by MTT assay, LDH-release assay, caspase-8 activity, and TUNEL. HSP60 was significantly induced by TJ-43. Cell necrosis and apoptosis were significantly suppressed in IEC-6 cells pretreated by TJ-43 with overexpression of HSP60. Our results suggested that HSP60 induced by TJ-43 might play an important role in protecting small intestinal epithelial cells from apoptosis and necrosis in vitro.

  14. Oxidized low density lipoprotein induced caspase-1 mediated pyroptotic cell death in macrophages: implication in lesion instability?

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    Jing Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophage death in advanced lesion has been confirmed to play an important role in plaque instability. However, the mechanism underlying lesion macrophage death still remains largely unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Immunohistochemistry showed that caspase-1 activated in advanced lesion and co-located with macrophages and TUNEL positive reaction. In in-vitro experiments showed that ox-LDL induced caspase-1 activation and this activation was required for ox-LDL induced macrophages lysis, IL-1β and IL-18 production as well as DNA fragmentation. Mechanism experiments showed that CD36 and NLRP3/caspase-1/pathway involved in ox-LDL induced macrophage pyroptosis. CONCLUSION: Our study here identified a novel cell death, pyroptosis in ox-LDL induced human macrophage, which may be implicated in lesion macrophages death and play an important role in lesion instability.

  15. Local Treatment with Lactate Prevents Intestinal Inflammation in the TNBS-Induced Colitis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraporda, Carolina; Romanin, David E.; Bengoa, Ana A.; Errea, Agustina J.; Cayet, Delphine; Foligné, Benoit; Sirard, Jean-Claude; Garrote, Graciela L.; Abraham, Analía G.; Rumbo, Martín

    2016-01-01

    Lactate has long been considered as a metabolic by-product of cells. Recently, this view has been changed by the observation that lactate can act as a signaling molecule and regulates critical functions of the immune system. We previously identified lactate as the component responsible for the modulation of innate immune epithelial response of fermented milk supernatants in vitro. We have also shown that lactate downregulates proinflammatory responses of macrophages and dendritic cells. So far, in vivo effects of lactate on intestinal inflammation have not been reported. We evaluated the effect of intrarectal administration of lactate in a murine model of colitis induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). The increase in lactate concentration in colon promoted protective effects against TNBS-induced colitis preventing histopathological damage, as well as bacterial translocation and rise of IL-6 levels in serum. Using intestinal epithelial reporter cells, we found that flagellin treatment induced reporter gene expression, which was abrogated by lactate treatment as well as by glycolysis inhibitors. Furthermore, lactate treatment modulated glucose uptake, indicating that high levels of extracellular lactate can impair metabolic reprograming induced by proinflammatory activation. These results suggest that lactate could be a potential beneficial microbiota metabolite and may constitute an overlooked effector with modulatory properties. PMID:28082985

  16. Bovine lactoferrin decreases cholera-toxin-induced intestinal fluid accumulation in mice by ganglioside interaction.

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    Fulton P Rivera

    Full Text Available Secretory diarrhea caused by cholera toxin (CT is initiated by binding of CT's B subunit (CTB to GM1-ganglioside on the surface of intestinal cells. Lactoferrin, a breast milk glycoprotein, has shown protective effect against several enteropathogens. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of bovine-lactoferrin (bLF on CT-induced intestinal fluid accumulation in mice, and the interaction between bLF and CT/CTB with the GM1-ganglioside receptor. Fluid accumulation induced by CT was evaluated in the mouse ileal loop model using 56 BALB/c mice, with and without bLF added before, after or at the same time of CT administration. The effect of bLF in the interaction of CT and CTB with GM1-ganglioside was evaluated by a GM1-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. bLF decreased CT-induced fluid accumulation in the ileal loop of mice. The greatest effect was when bLF was added before CT (median, 0.066 vs. 0.166 g/cm, with and without bLF respectively, p<0.01. We conclude that bLF decreases binding of CT and CTB to GM1-ganglioside, suggesting that bLF suppresses CT-induced fluid accumulation by blocking the binding of CTB to GM1-ganglioside. bLF may be effective as adjunctive therapy for treatment of cholera diarrhea.

  17. Bovine Lactoferrin Decreases Cholera-Toxin-Induced Intestinal Fluid Accumulation in Mice by Ganglioside Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Fulton P.; Medina, Anicia M.; Bezada, Sandra; Valencia, Roberto; Bernal, María; Meza, Rina; Maves, Ryan C.; Ochoa, Theresa J.

    2013-01-01

    Secretory diarrhea caused by cholera toxin (CT) is initiated by binding of CT’s B subunit (CTB) to GM1-ganglioside on the surface of intestinal cells. Lactoferrin, a breast milk glycoprotein, has shown protective effect against several enteropathogens. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of bovine-lactoferrin (bLF) on CT-induced intestinal fluid accumulation in mice, and the interaction between bLF and CT/CTB with the GM1-ganglioside receptor. Fluid accumulation induced by CT was evaluated in the mouse ileal loop model using 56 BALB/c mice, with and without bLF added before, after or at the same time of CT administration. The effect of bLF in the interaction of CT and CTB with GM1-ganglioside was evaluated by a GM1-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. bLF decreased CT-induced fluid accumulation in the ileal loop of mice. The greatest effect was when bLF was added before CT (median, 0.066 vs. 0.166 g/cm, with and without bLF respectively, p<0.01). We conclude that bLF decreases binding of CT and CTB to GM1-ganglioside, suggesting that bLF suppresses CT-induced fluid accumulation by blocking the binding of CTB to GM1-ganglioside. bLF may be effective as adjunctive therapy for treatment of cholera diarrhea. PMID:23580005

  18. Fluconazole induced herpes labialis-like lesions in an adult male

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    Harish C. Goel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluconazole is a bistriazole commonly prescribed for thetreatment of various fungal infections caused by yeasts and dermatophytes. However, there have been several reports of rare Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs like Fixed Dose Eruption (FDE, Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis and Stevens Johnson Syndrome following oral administration of fluconazole. We report a rare case of fluconazole induced oral mucosal lesions, mimicking herpes labialis, in a 34 year old male patient receiving oral fluconazole for the treatment of allergic fungal sinusitis.

  19. Bipolar radiofrequency-induced thermofusion of intestinal anastomoses--feasibility of a new anastomosis technique in porcine and rat colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmer, Christoph; Winter, Hanno; Kröger, Matthias; Nagel, Alexandra; Jaenicke, Annika; Lauster, Roland; Kraft, Marc; Buhr, Heinz J; Ritz, Jörg-Peter

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, vessel sealing has become a well-established method in surgical practice for sealing and transecting vessels. Since this technology depends on the fusion of collagen fibers abundantly present in the intestinal wall, it should also be possible to create intestinal anastomoses by thermofusion. Bipolar radiofrequency-induced thermofusion of intestinal tissue may replace traditionally used staples or sutures in the future. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of fusing intestinal tissue ex vivo by bipolar radiofrequency-induced thermofusion. An experimental setup for temperature-controlled bipolar radiofrequency-induced thermofusion of porcine (n = 30) and rat (n = 18) intestinal tissue was developed. Colon samples were harvested and then anastomosed, altering compressive pressure to examine its influence on anastomotic bursting pressure during radiofrequency-induced anastomotic fusion. For comparison, mechanical stapler anastomoses of porcine colonic samples and conventional suturing of rat colonic samples identical to those used for fusion experiments were prepared, and burst pressure was measured. All thermofused colonic anastomoses were primarily tight and leakage proof. For porcine colonic samples, an optimal interval of compressive pressure (1,125 mN/mm(2)) with respect to a high amount of burst pressure (41 mmHg) was detected. The mean bursting pressure for mechanical stapler anastomosis was 60.7 mmHg and did not differ from the thermofusion (p = 0.15). Furthermore, the mean bursting pressure for thermofusion of rat colonic samples was up to 69.5 mmHg for a compressive pressure of 140 mN/mm(2). These results confirm the feasibility to create experimental intestinal anastomoses using bipolar radiofrequency-induced thermofusion. The stability of the induced thermofusion showed no differences when compared to that of conventional anastomoses. Bipolar radiofrequency-induced thermofusion of intestinal tissue

  20. Lactobacillus acidophilus alleviates platelet-activating factor-induced inflammatory responses in human intestinal epithelial cells.

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    Alip Borthakur

    Full Text Available Probiotics have been used as alternative prevention and therapy modalities in intestinal inflammatory disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC. Pathophysiology of IBD and NEC includes the production of diverse lipid mediators, including platelet-activating factor (PAF that mediate inflammatory responses in the disease. PAF is known to activate NF-κB, however, the mechanisms of PAF-induced inflammation are not fully defined. We have recently described a novel PAF-triggered pathway of NF-κB activation and IL-8 production in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs, requiring the pivotal role of the adaptor protein Bcl10 and its interactions with CARMA3 and MALT1. The current studies examined the potential role of the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus in reversing the PAF-induced, Bcl10-dependent NF-κB activation and IL-8 production in IECs. PAF treatment (5 µM×24 h of NCM460 and Caco-2 cells significantly increased nuclear p65 NF-κB levels and IL-8 secretion (2-3-fold, P<0.05, compared to control, which were blocked by pretreatment of the cells for 6 h with L. acidophilus (LA or its culture supernatant (CS, followed by continued treatments with PAF for 24 h. LA-CS also attenuated PAF-induced increase in Bcl10 mRNA and protein levels and Bcl10 promoter activity. LA-CS did not alter PAF-induced interaction of Bcl10 with CARMA3, but attenuated Bcl10 interaction with MALT1 and also PAF-induced ubiquitination of IKKγ. Efficacy of bacteria-free CS of LA in counteracting PAF-induced inflammatory cascade suggests that soluble factor(s in the CS of LA mediate these effects. These results define a novel mechanism by which probiotics counteract PAF-induced inflammation in IECs.

  1. Role of Nuclear Factor kappaB in Intestine Injury Induced by Hepatic Ischemia Reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈俊华; 王国斌

    2004-01-01

    Summary: The role of nuclear factor kappaB in intestine injury induced by hepatic ischemia reperfusion was investigated. Eighteen male Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups randomly: sham operation group (group A), hepatic ischemia reperfusion group (group B) and hepatic ischemia reperfusion plus pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) group (group C). The rats in group A were only subjected to laparotomy, those in group B underwent partial hepatic ischemia reperfusion (ischemia for 1 h and reperfusion for 2 h) and those in group C underwent the same procedure as that of group B but received PDTC 200 mg/kg i.v. before and after ischemia. After reperfusion, tissues of jejunum and venous blood were obtained for measurement of TNF-α, MDA and MPO. The levels of TNF-α in jejunum and venous blood, the levels of MPO in jejunum in group B were significantly higher than those in group A and group C (P<0.05). There was no significant different in the levels of MDA between group B and group C. The severity of histological intestinal injury in group B and group C was similar. Hepatic ischemia reperfusion caused intestine injury, NF-kappaB may play an important role in this course and the targeting of upstream components of the inflammatory response, such as NF-kappaB, may have important therapeutic applications.

  2. Diet-Induced Dysbiosis of the Intestinal Microbiota and the Effects on Immunity and Disease

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    Deanna L. Gibson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal (GI microbiota is the collection of microbes which reside in the GI tract and represents the largest source of non-self antigens in the human body. The GI tract functions as a major immunological organ as it must maintain tolerance to commensal and dietary antigens while remaining responsive to pathogenic stimuli. If this balance is disrupted, inappropriate inflammatory processes can result, leading to host cell damage and/or autoimmunity. Evidence suggests that the composition of the intestinal microbiota can influence susceptibility to chronic disease of the intestinal tract including ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome, as well as more systemic diseases such as obesity, type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, a considerable shift in diet has coincided with increased incidence of many of these inflammatory diseases. It was originally believed that the composition of the intestinal microbiota was relatively stable from early childhood; however, recent evidence suggests that diet can cause dysbiosis, an alteration in the composition of the microbiota, which could lead to aberrant immune responses. The role of the microbiota and the potential for diet-induced dysbiosis in inflammatory conditions of the GI tract and systemic diseases will be discussed.

  3. Changes in serum cytokine levels, hepatic and intestinal morphology in aflatoxin B1-induced injury: modulatory roles of melatonin and flavonoid-rich fractions from Chromolena odorata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinrinmade, Fadeyemi Joseph; Akinrinde, Akinleye Stephen; Amid, Adetayo

    2016-05-01

    Aflatoxins are known to produce chronic carcinogenic, mutagenic, and teratogenic effects, as well as acute inflammatory effects, especially in the gastrointestinal tract. The potentials of the flavonoid-rich extract from Chromolena odorata (FCO) and melatonin (a standard anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory agent) against aflatoxin B1 (AFB1)-induced alterations in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and morphology of liver and small intestines were evaluated in this study. We utilized Wistar albino rats (200-230 g) randomly divided into five groups made up of group A, control rats; group B, rats given AFB1 (2.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) twice on days 5 and 7; rats in groups C, D, and E were treated with melatonin (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) or oral doses of FCO1 (50 mg/kg) and FCO2 (100 mg/kg) for 7 days, respectively, along with AFB1 injection on days 5 and 7. Serum levels of interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were determined using commercial ELISA kits and histopathological evaluation of the liver, duodenum, and ileum were also carried out. We observed significant elevation (p Melatonin and FCO2 produced considerable protection of hepatic tissues, although melatonin was not quite effective in protecting the intestinal lesions. Our findings suggest a modulation of cytokine expression that may, in part, be responsible for the abilities of C. odorata or melatonin in amelioration of hepatic and intestinal lesions associated with aflatoxin B1 injury.

  4. Exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) prevents chemotherapy-induced mucositis in rat small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kissow, Hannelouise; Viby, Niels-Erik; Hartmann, Bolette

    2012-01-01

    in the intestine. We aimed to investigate the role of GLP-2 in experimental chemotherapy-induced mucositis. METHODS STUDY 1: Rats were given a single injection with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and killed in groups of five each day for 5 days. Blood samples were analysed for GLP-2 concentrations. The intestine...... was analysed for weight loss, morphometric estimates and proliferation. Study 2 Rats were treated with GLP-2 or control vehicle 2 days before a single injection of 5-FU or saline. The treatments continued until kill 2 days after. The intestine was investigated for influx of myeloperoxidase (MPO)-positive cells...

  5. Amiodarone-induced exudative bullous lesion and hepatotoxicity in a patient with ventricular tachycardia

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    Ahmet Karakurt

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Amiodarone is a potent, iodine rich, highly lipophilic class III antiarrhythmic drug widely used for the management of both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias. It tends to concentrate in tissues including fat, lung, liver cornea and skin. Several side effects have been reported in patients taking amiodarone. The mechanisms of amiodarone-induced side effects are poorly understood. Accumulation of amiodarone in tissues and organs has been suggested as a possible mechanism. The most frequent dermatologic side effects are photosensitivity, skin discoloration and erythema. This article presents the case of a patient who developed amiodarone-induced bullous skin lesions and hepatotoxicity.

  6. Permanent lesion in rostral ventromedial medulla potentiates swim stress-induced analgesia in formalin test

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    Ali Shamsizadeh

    2014-03-01

    Results: In the unstressed rats, permanent lesion of the RVM by R-SKF38393 decreased formalin-induced nociceptive behaviors in phase 1, while in stressed rats, injection of R-SKF38393 into the RVM potentiated swim stress-induced antinociception in phase 1 and interphase, phase 2A of formalin test. Furthermore, R-SKF38393 had pronociceptive effects in phase2B whereas injections of R-SKF38393 resulted in significant difference in nociceptive bahaviours in all phases of formalin test (P

  7. Opiate-induced constipation related to activation of small intestine opioid μ2-receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wency Chen; Hsien-Hui Chung; Juei-Tang Cheng

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the role of opioid μ-receptor subtype in opiate-induced constipation (OIC).METHODS:The effect of loperamide on intestinal transit was investigated in mice.Ileum strips were isolated from 12-wk-old male BALB/c mice for identification of isometric tension.The ileum strips were precontracted with 1 μmol/L acetylcholine (ACh).Then,decrease in muscle tone (relaxation) was characterized after cumulative administration of 0.1-10 μmol/k loperamide into the organ bath,for a concentration-dependent study.Specific blockers or antagonists were used for pretreatment to compare the changes in loperamide-induced relaxation.RESULTS:In addition to the delay in intestinal transit,loperamide produced a marked relaxation in isolated ileum precontracted with ACh,in a dose-dependent manner.This relaxation was abolished by cyprodime,a selective opioid μ-receptor antagonist,but not modified by naloxonazine at a dose sufficient to block opioid μ-1 receptors.Also,treatment with opioid μ-1 receptor agonist failed to modify the muscle tone.Moreover,the relaxation by loperamide was attenuated by glibenclamide at a dose sufficient to block ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels,and by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor,but was enhanced by an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase for cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP).CONCLUSION:Loperamide induces intestinal relaxation by activation of opioid μ-2 receptors via the cAMPPKA pathway to open KATP channels,relates to OIC.

  8. Stereotactic laser induced thermotherapy (LITT): a novel treatment for brain lesions regrowing after radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Reveron, Juan; Tomasiewicz, Hilarie C; Shetty, Anil; Amankulor, Nduka M; Chiang, Veronica L

    2013-07-01

    Since the inception of radiosurgery, the management of brain metastases has become a common problem for neurosurgeons. Although the use of stereotactic radiosurgery and/or whole brain radiation therapy serves to control the majority of disease burden, patients who survive longer than 6-8 months sometimes face the problem of symptomatic radiographically regrowing lesions with few treatment options. Here we investigate the feasibility of use of MRI-guided stereotactic laser induced thermotherapy (LITT) as a novel treatment option for these lesions. Six patients who had previously undergone gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases were selected. All patients had an initial favorable response to radiosurgery but subsequently developed regrowth of at least one lesion associated with recurrent edema and progressive neurological symptoms requiring ongoing steroids for symptom control. All lesions were evaluated for craniotomy, but were deemed unresectable due to deep location or patient's comorbidities. Stereotactic biopsies were performed prior to the thermotherapy procedure in all cases. LITT was performed using the Visualase system and follow-up MRI imaging was used to determine treatment response. In all six patients biopsy results were negative for tumor and consistent with adverse radiation effects also known as radiation necrosis. Patients tolerated the procedure well and were discharged from the hospital within 48 h of the procedure. In 4/6 cases there was durable improvement of neurological symptoms until death. In all cases steroids were weaned off within 2 months. One patient died from systemic causes related to his cancer a month after the procedure. One patient had regrowth of the lesion 3 months after the procedure and required re-initiation of steroids and standard craniotomy for surgical resection. There were no complications directly related to the thermocoagulation procedure. Stereotactic laser induced thermotherapy is a feasible

  9. Saponin-containing subfractions of soybean molasses induce enteritis in the distal intestine of Atlantic salmon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, D.; Uran, P.; Arnous, Anis

    2007-01-01

    The current work aimed at tracing the causative components for soybean-induced enteritis in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). Soybean molasses was subjected to phase separation using n-butanol. Three subfractions were obtained as follows: butanol phase, precipitate, and water phase. The biochemical...... composition of soybean molasses and the obtained subfractions were analyzed in detail: Protein, fat, and ash were quantified according to standard methods. Sucrose, raffinose, and stachyose were quantified using high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. Soyasaponins were quantified using reverse...... intestinal morphology. The causative components for soybean-induced enteritis withstand butanol treatment and prolonged heating at 70 degrees C. Sucrose, raffinose, stachyose, nor soybean proteins larger than 10 kDa induce enteritis alone. Soyasaponins, or components that follow the same solubility pattern...

  10. Cannabinoid-induced autophagy regulates suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 in intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koay, Luan C; Rigby, Rachael J; Wright, Karen L

    2014-07-15

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involved in homeostatic and regulated cellular protein recycling and degradation via the lysosomal degradation pathway. Emerging data associate impaired autophagy, increased activity in the endocannabinoid system, and upregulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3) protein expression during intestinal inflammation. We have investigated whether these three processes are linked. By assessing the impact of the phytocannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD), the synthetic cannabinoid arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA), and the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA) on autophagosome formation, we explored whether these actions were responsible for cyclic SOCS3 protein levels. Our findings show that all three cannabinoids induce autophagy in a dose-dependent manner in fully differentiated Caco-2 cells, a model of mature intestinal epithelium. ACEA and AEA induced canonical autophagy, which was cannabinoid type 1 receptor-mediated. In contrast, CBD was able to bypass the cannabinoid type 1 receptor and the canonical pathway to induce autophagy, albeit to a lesser extent. Functionally, all three cannabinoids reduced SOCS3 protein expression, which was reversed by blocking early and late autophagy. In conclusion, the regulatory protein SOCS3 is regulated by autophagy, and cannabinoids play a role in this process, which could be important when therapeutic applications for the cannabinoids in inflammatory conditions are considered.

  11. Involvement of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in nicotine-induced relaxation of the rat gastric fundus

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Nicotine-induced relaxation and release of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)- and peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI)-like immunoreactivity (LI) were measured in longitudinal muscle strips from the rat gastric fundus.Under non-cholinergic conditions (0.3 μM atropine), nicotine (3–300 μM) produced concentration-dependent relaxations of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (3 μM)-precontracted strips. Under non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) conditions (0.3 μM atropine+1 μM phentolamine+1 μM nadolol...

  12. Effects of intracerebroventricular injection of histamine on memory deficits induced by hippocampal lesions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, C; Chen, Z; Nakamura, S; Sugimoto, Y

    1997-05-01

    The influence of bilateral hippocampal lesions on active avoidance response was studied in rats, as well as the effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of histamine on memory deficits caused by hippocampectomy. Retardation of learning acquisition was produced by lesioning of the bilateral dorsal hippocampus in active avoidance response. Memory retention was also impaired by hippocampectomy. Although locomotor activity and rearing behavior measured by open-field test increased after hippocampal lesions, there was no relation between impairment of learning and increase in exploratory behavior. I.c.v. injection of histamine and i.p. injection of histidine resulted in an improvement of memory deficits (not only learning acquisition but also memory retrieval) induced by hippocampal lesions in rats. Histamine contents of the hippocampus and hypothalamus decreased after hippocampectomy, and a decrease in histamine contents of both areas was restored by histamine (i.c.v.) and histidine (i.p.) injection. In addition, a close relationship was found between decrease in response latency of avoidance response and an increase in histamine content of the hippocampus and hypothalamus after histamine injection.

  13. Photochemically induced cystic lesion in the rat spinal cord. I. Behavioral and morphological analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, T.; Prado, R.; Watson, B.D.; Gonzalez-Carvajal, M.; Holets, V.R. (Univ. of Miami, FL (USA))

    1990-08-01

    The present study describes the production of a spinal cord lesion which is initiated by vascular occlusion resulting from the interaction between the photosensitizing dye erythrosin B and an argon laser beam. The lesion has characteristics similar to those of the central cavity thought to lead to the production of post-traumatic syringomyelia (PTS) in humans. The present study examines the behavioral and morphological characteristics of this injury over a 28-day period. Histological analysis revealed a cavity extending from the dorsal horns to lamina VIII, with some lateral and ventral pathways being spared. The cavity volume reached a maximum 7 days after lesion induction. Behavioral changes were assessed using six different tests of motor and reflex function (motor function, climbing, waterbath, inclined plane, withdrawal to pain, and withdrawal to extension). Lesioned animals exhibited flaccid paralysis for 3-5 days, which resolved afterward. The photochemically induced cavity should provide a reproducible model for examining the effects of cystic spinal cord injury on locomotor and reflex function.

  14. Endotoxin induced chorioamnionitis prevents intestinal development during gestation in fetal sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim G A M Wolfs

    Full Text Available Chorioamnionitis is the most significant source of prenatal inflammation and preterm delivery. Prematurity and prenatal inflammation are associated with compromised postnatal developmental outcomes, of the intestinal immune defence, gut barrier function and the vascular system. We developed a sheep model to study how the antenatal development of the gut was affected by gestation and/or by endotoxin induced chorioamnionitis.Chorioamnionitis was induced at different gestational ages (GA. Animals were sacrificed at low GA after 2d or 14d exposure to chorioamnionitis. Long term effects of 30d exposure to chorioamnionitis were studied in near term animals after induction of chorioamnionitis. The cellular distribution of tight junction protein ZO-1 was shown to be underdeveloped at low GA whereas endotoxin induced chorioamnionitis prevented the maturation of tight junctions during later gestation. Endotoxin induced chorioamnionitis did not induce an early (2d inflammatory response in the gut in preterm animals. However, 14d after endotoxin administration preterm animals had increased numbers of T-lymphocytes, myeloperoxidase-positive cells and gammadelta T-cells which lasted till 30d after induction of chorioamnionitis in then near term animals. At early GA, low intestinal TLR-4 and MD-2 mRNA levels were detected which were further down regulated during endotoxin-induced chorioamnionitis. Predisposition to organ injury by ischemia was assessed by the vascular function of third-generation mesenteric arteries. Endotoxin-exposed animals of low GA had increased contractile response to the thromboxane A2 mimetic U46619 and reduced endothelium-dependent relaxation in responses to acetylcholine. The administration of a nitric oxide (NO donor completely restored endothelial dysfunction suggesting reduced NO bioavailability which was not due to low expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.Our results indicate that the distribution of the tight

  15. Double balloon endoscopy in diagnosis of ulcerative lesions in small intestine%双气囊内镜检查对小肠溃疡病变的诊断研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    智发朝; 白杨; 徐智民; 肖冰; 姜泊; 岳辉

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the use of double balloon endoscopy(DBE) in diagnosis of ulcerative lesions in small intestine.Methods Data of patients diagnosed as small intestinal ulcer under DBE during September 2003 and December 2007 at Nanfang Hospital were analyzed retrospectively.Results Ulcer in small intestine was detected by DBE in a total of 62 patients,including 48 males and 14 females,aging from 10 to 71 years old( mean 43.9 yr).The main clinical manifestations consisted of small intestinal hemorrhage(38/62,61.3%),abdominal pain(16/62,25.8%),abdominal distention(5/62,8.1%),loss of weight(2/62,3.2%),and diarrhea(1/62,1.6%).The ulcers were diagnosed endoscopically as Crohn's disease(CD) in 53 cases(85.5%),drug induced lesions in 4(6.5%),nonspecific chronic inflammation in 2(3.2%),lymphoma in 2(3.2%) and tuberculosis in 1(1.6%).They were all microscopically diagnosed as chronic inflammation.Of the 62 patients,32(51.6%) underwent surgery.In 30 cases of CD diagnosed by DBE,22 were confirmed by post-surgery pathology(malignant cells were found in 3),while in the other 8 cases,4 were diagnosed as lymphoma,3 as Behcet's disease and 1 as tuberculosis.Meanwhile,the 1 case of tuberculosis and 1 lymphoma diagnosed by DBE were confirmed as CD after operation.The overall accurate diagnosis rate of small intestinal ulcerative lesions by DBE was 68.8%(22/32).Conclusion DBE is valuable in diagnosis of ulcerative lesions in small intestine,but surgery should be included into consideration to confirm the diagnosis when necessary.%目的 研究双气囊内镜(DBE)检查对小肠溃疡病变的诊断价值.方法 统计2003年9月到2007年12月广州南方医院DBE检查发现的小肠单纯溃疡而内镜活检显示为"小肠溃疡"或"慢性炎症"者的资料.结果 符合以上条件者62例,其中男48例,女14例,年龄10~71岁,平均43.9岁.临床主诉为消化道出血38例(61.3%)、腹痛16例(25.8%)、腹胀5例(8.1%)、消瘦2例(3.2%)、腹泻1例(1.6%).DBE

  16. Early Changes in Microbial Colonization Selectively Modulate Intestinal Enzymes, but Not Inducible Heat Shock Proteins in Young Adult Swine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnal, M.E.; Zhang, J.; Messori, S.; Bosi, P.; Smidt, H.; Lallès, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic diseases and obesity are developing worldwide in a context of plethoric intake of high energy diets. The intestine may play a pivotal role due to diet-induced alterations in microbiota composition and increased permeability to bacterial lipopolysaccharide inducing metabolic inflammation. E

  17. Celiac Anti-Type 2 Transglutaminase Antibodies Induce Phosphoproteome Modification in Intestinal Epithelial Caco-2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marabotti, Anna; Lepretti, Marilena; Salzano, Anna Maria; Scaloni, Andrea; Vitale, Monica; Zambrano, Nicola; Sblattero, Daniele; Esposito, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Background Celiac disease is an inflammatory condition of the small intestine that affects genetically predisposed individuals after dietary wheat gliadin ingestion. Type 2-transglutaminase (TG2) activity seems to be responsible for a strong autoimmune response in celiac disease, TG2 being the main autoantigen. Several studies support the concept that celiac anti-TG2 antibodies may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our recent findings on the ability of anti-TG2 antibodies to induce a rapid intracellular mobilization of calcium ions, as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, suggest that they potentially act as signaling molecules. In line with this concept, we have investigated whether anti-TG2 antibodies can induce phosphoproteome modification in an intestinal epithelial cell line. Methods and Principal Findings We studied phosphoproteome modification in Caco-2 cells treated with recombinant celiac anti-TG2 antibodies. We performed a two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by specific staining of phosphoproteins and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially phosphorylated proteins. Of 14 identified proteins (excluding two uncharacterized proteins), three were hypophosphorylated and nine were hyperphosphorylated. Bioinformatics analyses confirmed the presence of phosphorylation sites in all the identified proteins and highlighted their involvement in several fundamental biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, cell stress response, cytoskeletal organization and apoptosis. Conclusions Identification of differentially phosphorylated proteins downstream of TG2-antibody stimulation suggests that in Caco-2 cells these antibodies perturb cell homeostasis by behaving as signaling molecules. We hypothesize that anti-TG2 autoantibodies may destabilize the integrity of the intestinal mucosa in celiac individuals, thus contributing to celiac disease establishment and progression. Since several proteins here identified in this study

  18. Celiac anti-type 2 transglutaminase antibodies induce phosphoproteome modification in intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetana Paolella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is an inflammatory condition of the small intestine that affects genetically predisposed individuals after dietary wheat gliadin ingestion. Type 2-transglutaminase (TG2 activity seems to be responsible for a strong autoimmune response in celiac disease, TG2 being the main autoantigen. Several studies support the concept that celiac anti-TG2 antibodies may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our recent findings on the ability of anti-TG2 antibodies to induce a rapid intracellular mobilization of calcium ions, as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, suggest that they potentially act as signaling molecules. In line with this concept, we have investigated whether anti-TG2 antibodies can induce phosphoproteome modification in an intestinal epithelial cell line. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied phosphoproteome modification in Caco-2 cells treated with recombinant celiac anti-TG2 antibodies. We performed a two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by specific staining of phosphoproteins and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially phosphorylated proteins. Of 14 identified proteins (excluding two uncharacterized proteins, three were hypophosphorylated and nine were hyperphosphorylated. Bioinformatics analyses confirmed the presence of phosphorylation sites in all the identified proteins and highlighted their involvement in several fundamental biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, cell stress response, cytoskeletal organization and apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: Identification of differentially phosphorylated proteins downstream of TG2-antibody stimulation suggests that in Caco-2 cells these antibodies perturb cell homeostasis by behaving as signaling molecules. We hypothesize that anti-TG2 autoantibodies may destabilize the integrity of the intestinal mucosa in celiac individuals, thus contributing to celiac disease establishment and progression. Since several proteins here

  19. Chronic low vitamin intake potentiates cisplatin-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis in WNIN rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bodiga Vijayalakshmi; Boindala Sesikeran; Putcha Udaykumar; Subramaniam Kalyanasundaram; Manchala Raghunath

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate if cisplatin alters vitamin status and if VR modulates cisplatin induced intestinal apoptosis and oxidative stress in Wistar/NIN (WNIN) male rats.METHODS: Weanling, WNIN male rats (n = 12 per group) received adlibitum for 17 wk: control diet (20%protein) or the same with 50% vitamin restriction. They were then sub-divided into two groups of six rats each and administered cisplatin (2.61 mg/kg bodyweight)once a week for three wk or PBS (vehicle control).Intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) apoptosis was monitored by morphometry, Annexin-V binding, M30 cytodeath assay and DNA fragmentation. Structural and functional integrity of the villus were assessed by villus height /crypt depth ratio and activities of alkaline phosphatase,lys, ala-dipeptidyl amino-peptidase, respectively. To assess the probable mechanism(s) of altered apoptosis,oxidative stress parameters, caspase-3 activity, and expression of Bcl-2 and Bax were determined.RESULTS: Cisplatin per se decreased plasma vitamin levels and they were the lowest in VR animals treated with cisplatin. As expected VR increased only villus apoptosis, whereas cisplatin increased stem cell apoptosis in the crypt. However, cisplatin treatment of VR rats increased apoptosis both in villus and crypt regions and was associated with higher levels of TBARS,protein carbonyls and caspase-3 activity, but lower GSH concentrations. VR induced decrease in Bcl-2 expression was further lowered by cisplatin. Bax expression,unaffected by VR was increased on cisplatin treatment.Mucosal functional integrity was severely compromised in cisplatin treated VR-rats.CONCLUSION: Low intake of vitamins increases the sensitivity of rats to cisplatin and promotes intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis.

  20. Interleukin-10 modified dendritic cells induce allo-hyporesponsiveness and prolong small intestine allograft survival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Zhu; Ming-Fa Wei; Fang Liu; Hui-Fen Shi; Guo Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether TL-10-transduced dendritic cells (DCs) could induce tolerogenicity and prolong allograft survival in rat intestinal transplantation.METHODS: Spleen-derived DCs were prepared and genetically modified by hTL-10 gene. The level of IL-10 expression was quantitated by ELTSA. DC function was assessed by MTT in mixed leukocyte reaction. Allogeneic T-cell apoptosis was examined by flow cytometric analysis. Seven days before heterotopic intestinal transplantation, 2x106 donor-derived IL-10-DC were injected intravenously, then transplantation was performed between SD donor and Wistar recipient.RESULTS: Compared with untransduced DC, IL-10-DC could suppress allogeneic mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR). The inhibitory effect was the most striking with the stimulator/effector (S/F) ratio of 1:10. The inhibition rate was 33.25 %,41.19 % (P<0.01) and 22.92 % with the S/E ratio of 1:1,1:10 and 1:50 respectively. At 48 hours and 72 hours by flow cytometry counting, apoptotic T cells responded to IL-10-DC in MLR were 13.8 % and 30.1%, while untransduced group did not undergo significant apoptosis (P<0.05). IL-10-DC pretreated recipients had a moderate survival prolongation with a mean allograft survival of 19.8 days (P<0.01),compared with 7.3±2.4 days in control group and 8.3±2.9days in untransduced DC group. Rejection occurred in the control group within three days. The difference between untreated DC group and control group was not significant.CONCLUSION: IL-10-DC can induce allogenic T-cell hyporesponsiveness in vitro and apoptosis may be involved in it. IL-10-DC pretreatment can prolong intestinal allograft survival in the recipient.

  1. Capsaicin-induced corneal lesions in mice and the effects of chemical sympathectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, T; Izumi, K; Fujita, S; Koja, T; Sorimachi, M; Ohba, N; Fukuda, T

    1987-11-01

    Effects of chemical sympathectomy on corneal changes induced in mice by a s.c. injection of capsaicin were investigated. Pretreatment with a s.c. injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) on the 1st and 2nd postnatal day or on the 14th and 15th postnatal day led to a marked suppression of the capsaicin-induced corneal lesions. This suppressive effect also was evident in case of administration after capsaicin treatment. Intraventricular injection of 6-OHDA had a slight, transient effect. DSP4 [N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine], another potent substance used for sympathetic denervation, had a suppressive effect similar to that of 6-OHDA. The concentration of capsaicin in tissues of the head was unaltered with 6-OHDA. The content of substance P (SP) in the ocular anterior segments was decreased, dose-dependently, with capsaicin administration. Neonatal administration of 6-OHDA decreased the rate of capsaicin-induced reduction of SP. However, this effect of 6-OHDA was too slight to explain the suppression of the corneal lesions, as the intensity score of lesions with a large dose of capsaicin after 6-OHDA was lower than that with a small dose of capsaicin without 6-OHDA, whereas SP content in the former was still much lower than that in the latter. On the other hand, the content of norepinephrine in the ocular tissues was decreased in the presence of 6-OHDA but not capsaicin. These results suggest that the corneal changes induced by capsaicin are largely inhibited by a decreased activity in the peripheral sympathetic system.

  2. Slit2 overexpression results in increased microvessel density and lesion size in mice with induced endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sun-Wei; Zheng, Yu; Lu, Yuan; Liu, Xishi; Geng, Jian-Guo

    2013-03-01

    We recently reported that Slit/Roundabout (ROBO) 1 pathway may be a constituent biomarker for recurrence of endometriosis, likely through promoting angiogenesis. In this study, we sought to determine as whether Slit2 overexpression can facilitate angiogenesis, increase lesion size, and induce hyperalgesia in mice with induced endometriosis. We used 30 Slit2 transgenic (S) and 29 wild-type (W) mice and cross-transplanted endometrial fragments from S to W (group SW) and vice versa (group WS), and also within the S and W (groups SS and WW, respectively), into the peritoneal cavity, inducing endometriosis. We also performed a sham surgery within both S and W mice (groups Sm and Wm, respectively). The size of the ectopic implants, microvessel density (MVD) and immunoreactivity to ROBO1, and vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) in ectopic and eutopic endometrium, along with hotplate and tail-flick tests in all mice, were then evaluated. We found that the induction of endometriosis resulted in generalized hyperalgesia, which was unaffected by Slit2 overexpression. Slit2 overexpression did increase the lesion size significantly and correlated positively with the MVD in ectopic and eutopic endometrium. Slit2 expression levels appear to correlate with the MVD, but not with VEGF immunoreactivity, in ectopic endometrium. Consequently, we conclude that Slit2 may play an important role in angiogenesis in endometriosis. The increased angiogenesis, as measured by MVD, but not VEGF immunoreactivity, likely resulted in increased lesion size in induced endometriosis. Thus, SLIT2/ROBO1 pathway may be a potential therapeutic target for treating endometriosis.

  3. Evaluation of the chemical model of vestibular lesions induced by arsanilate in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignaux, G. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); Chabbert, C.; Gaboyard-Niay, S.; Travo, C. [INSERM U1051, Institut des Neurosciences de Montpellier, Montpellier, F-34090,France (France); Machado, M.L. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); Denise, P. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); CHRU Caen, Explorations Fonctionnelles, Caen, F-14000 (France); Comoz, F. [CHRU Caen, Laboratoire d' anatomopathologie, Caen, F-14000 (France); Hitier, M. [CHRU Caen, Service d' Otorhinolaryngologie, Caen, F-14000,France (France); Landemore, G. [CHRU Caen, Laboratoire d' anatomopathologie, Caen, F-14000 (France); Philoxène, B. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); CHRU Caen, Explorations Fonctionnelles, Caen, F-14000 (France); Besnard, S., E-mail: besnard-s@phycog.org [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); CHRU Caen, Explorations Fonctionnelles, Caen, F-14000 (France)

    2012-01-01

    Several animal models of vestibular deficits that mimic the human pathology phenotype have previously been developed to correlate the degree of vestibular injury to cognate vestibular deficits in a time-dependent manner. Sodium arsanilate is one of the most commonly used substances for chemical vestibular lesioning, but it is not well described in the literature. In the present study, we used histological and functional approaches to conduct a detailed exploration of the model of vestibular lesions induced by transtympanic injection of sodium arsanilate in rats. The arsanilate-induced damage was restricted to the vestibular sensory organs without affecting the external ear, the oropharynx, or Scarpa's ganglion. This finding strongly supports the absence of diffusion of arsanilate into the external ear or Eustachian tubes, or through the eighth cranial nerve sheath leading to the brainstem. One of the striking observations of the present study is the complete restructuring of the sensory epithelia into a non sensory epithelial monolayer observed at 3 months after arsanilate application. This atrophy resembles the monolayer epithelia observed postmortem in the vestibular epithelia of patients with a history of lesioned vestibular deficits such as labyrinthectomy, antibiotic treatment, vestibular neuritis, or Ménière's disease. In cases of Ménière's disease, aminoglycosides, and platinum-based chemotherapy, vestibular hair cells are destroyed, regardless of the physiopathological process, as reproduced with the arsanilate model of vestibular lesion. These observations, together with those presented in this study of arsanilate vestibular toxicity, suggest that this atrophy process relies on a common mechanism of degeneration of the sensory epithelia.

  4. Alanyl-glutamine attenuates 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.V. Araújo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein E (APOE=gene, apoE=protein is a known factor regulating the inflammatory response that may have regenerative effects during tissue recovery from injury. We investigated whether apoE deficiency reduces the healing effect of alanyl-glutamine (Ala-Gln treatment, a recognized gut-trophic nutrient, during tissue recovery after 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. APOE-knockout (APOE-/- and wild-type (APOE+/+ C57BL6J male and female mice (N=86 were given either Ala-Gln (100 mM or phosphate buffered saline (PBS by gavage 3 days before and 5 days after a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU challenge (450 mg/kg, via intraperitoneal injection. Mouse body weight was monitored daily. The 5-FU cytotoxic effect was evaluated by leukometry. Intestinal villus height, villus/crypt ratio, and villin expression were monitored to assess recovery of the intestinal absorptive surface area. Crypt length, mitotic, apoptotic, and necrotic crypt indexes, and quantitative real-time PCR for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 intestinal mRNA transcripts were used to evaluate intestinal epithelial cell turnover. 5-FU challenge caused significant weight loss and leukopenia (P<0.001 in both mouse strains, which was not improved by Ala-Gln. Villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, and reduced villus/crypt ratio (P<0.05 were found in all 5-FU-challenged mice but not in PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus/crypt ratio, crypt length and mitotic index in all challenged mice, compared with PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus height only in APOE-/- mice. Crypt cell apoptosis and necrotic scores were increased in all mice challenged by 5-FU, compared with untreated controls. Those scores were significantly lower in Ala-Gln-treated APOE+/+ mice than in controls. Bcl-2 and IGF-1 mRNA transcripts were reduced only in the APOE-/--challenged mice. Altogether our findings suggest APOE-independent Ala-Gln regenerative effects after 5-FU challenge.

  5. Alanyl-glutamine attenuates 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araújo, C.V. [Laboratório da Biologia da Cicatrização, Ontogenia e Nutrição de Tecidos, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Lazzarotto, C.R. [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular e do Desenvolvimento, Universidade de Fortaleza, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Aquino, C.C.; Figueiredo, I.L.; Costa, T.B.; Oliveira Alves, L.A. de [Laboratório da Biologia da Cicatrização, Ontogenia e Nutrição de Tecidos, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Ribeiro, R.A. [Laboratório da Inflamação e Câncer, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Bertolini, L.R. [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular e do Desenvolvimento, Universidade de Fortaleza, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Lima, A.A.M. [Laboratório de Doenças Infecciosas, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Brito, G.A.C. [Laboratório da Inflamação e Câncer, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Oriá, R.B. [Laboratório da Biologia da Cicatrização, Ontogenia e Nutrição de Tecidos, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2015-04-28

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE=gene, apoE=protein) is a known factor regulating the inflammatory response that may have regenerative effects during tissue recovery from injury. We investigated whether apoE deficiency reduces the healing effect of alanyl-glutamine (Ala-Gln) treatment, a recognized gut-trophic nutrient, during tissue recovery after 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. APOE-knockout (APOE{sup -/-}) and wild-type (APOE{sup +/+}) C57BL6J male and female mice (N=86) were given either Ala-Gln (100 mM) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) by gavage 3 days before and 5 days after a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) challenge (450 mg/kg, via intraperitoneal injection). Mouse body weight was monitored daily. The 5-FU cytotoxic effect was evaluated by leukometry. Intestinal villus height, villus/crypt ratio, and villin expression were monitored to assess recovery of the intestinal absorptive surface area. Crypt length, mitotic, apoptotic, and necrotic crypt indexes, and quantitative real-time PCR for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) intestinal mRNA transcripts were used to evaluate intestinal epithelial cell turnover. 5-FU challenge caused significant weight loss and leukopenia (P<0.001) in both mouse strains, which was not improved by Ala-Gln. Villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, and reduced villus/crypt ratio (P<0.05) were found in all 5-FU-challenged mice but not in PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus/crypt ratio, crypt length and mitotic index in all challenged mice, compared with PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus height only in APOE{sup -/-} mice. Crypt cell apoptosis and necrotic scores were increased in all mice challenged by 5-FU, compared with untreated controls. Those scores were significantly lower in Ala-Gln-treated APOE{sup +/+} mice than in controls. Bcl-2 and IGF-1 mRNA transcripts were reduced only in the APOE{sup -/-}-challenged mice. Altogether our findings suggest APOE-independent Ala-Gln regenerative effects after 5-FU

  6. Activation of NF-κB and apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells induced by hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建明; 周红; 蔡黔; 肖光夏

    2002-01-01

    In vitro model of hydrogen peroxide induced apoptosis of SW-480 cells was used to investigate the role of NF-κB in the pathogenesis of reactive oxygen species induced apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells. Methods: Ultra-structural changes were observed.Apoptosis of SW-480 cell line was determined by Annexin-V and PI double-stained flow cytometry. Nuclear translocation of NF-κB was determined by anti-NF-κB polyclonal antibody and EB double-staining. NF-κB activity was studied by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. RTPCR was performed to study expression of NF-κB mRNA. Results: Hydrogen peroxide led to apoptosis of SW-480 cells, condensed or semilunar chromatin even apoptotic bodies could be observed. Nuclear translocation of NF-κB,increase of NF-κB activity and expression of NF-κB mRNA were found simultaneously. Conclusions: Early activation of NF-κ B may be one of the mechanisms of apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells by reactive oxygen species.

  7. MDR1 is Related to Intestinal Epithelial Injury Induced by Acetylsalicylic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munehiro Kugai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Although the cytotoxicity of aspirin against the intestinal epithelium is a major clinical problem, little is known about its pathogenesis. We assessed the involvement of Multi Drug Resistance (MDR 1 in intestinal epithelial cell injury caused by aspirin using MDR1 gene-transfected Caco2 cells. Methods: Caco2 cells were treated with various concentrations of aspirin for 24 h. After treatment of Caco2 cells with verapamil, a specific inhibitor of MDR1, we assessed the extent of cell injury using a WST-8 assay at 24 h after aspirin-stimulation. We performed the same procedure in MDR1 gene-transfected Caco2 cells. To determine the function of MDR1 in the metabolism of aspirin, flux study was performed using 14C-labeled aspirin. Results: The level of aspirin-induced cell injury was higher in verapamil-treated Caco2 cells than in control cells and was less serious in MDR1-transfected Caco2 cells than in control vector-transfected cells. The efflux of 14C-labeled aspirin was higher in verapamil-treated Caco2 cells than in control cells. Conclusion: These data suggest that aspirin effux occurs through the MDR1 transporter and that the MDR1 transporter is involved in the pathogenesis of aspirin-induced cell injury.

  8. A2 noradrenergic lesions prevent renal sympathoinhibition induced by hypernatremia in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Rodrigues Pedrino

    Full Text Available Renal vasodilation and sympathoinhibition are recognized responses induced by hypernatremia, but the central neural pathways underlying such responses are not yet entirely understood. Several findings suggest that A2 noradrenergic neurons, which are found in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS, play a role in the pathways that contribute to body fluid homeostasis and cardiovascular regulation. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of selective lesions of A2 neurons on the renal vasodilation and sympathoinhibition induced by hypertonic saline (HS infusion. Male Wistar rats (280-350 g received an injection into the NTS of anti-dopamine-beta-hydroxylase-saporin (A2 lesion; 6.3 ng in 60 nl; n = 6 or free saporin (sham; 1.3 ng in 60 nl; n = 7. Two weeks later, the rats were anesthetized (urethane 1.2 g⋅kg(-1 b.wt., i.v. and the blood pressure, renal blood flow (RBF, renal vascular conductance (RVC and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA were recorded. In sham rats, the HS infusion (3 M NaCl, 1.8 ml⋅kg(-1 b.wt., i.v. induced transient hypertension (peak at 10 min after HS; 9±2.7 mmHg and increases in the RBF and RVC (141±7.9% and 140±7.9% of baseline at 60 min after HS, respectively. HS infusion also decreased the RSNA (-45±5.0% at 10 min after HS throughout the experimental period. In the A2-lesioned rats, the HS infusion induced transient hypertension (6±1.4 mmHg at 10 min after HS, as well as increased RBF and RVC (133±5.2% and 134±6.9% of baseline at 60 min after HS, respectively. However, in these rats, the HS failed to reduce the RSNA (115±3.1% at 10 min after HS. The extent of the catecholaminergic lesions was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. These results suggest that A2 noradrenergic neurons are components of the neural pathways regulating the composition of the extracellular fluid compartment and are selectively involved in hypernatremia-induced sympathoinhibition.

  9. Drug-induced acute esophageal lesions and use of ciprofloxacin Lesiones esofágicas agudas inducidas por drogas y uso de ciprofloxacino

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    V.M. Santos

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 95-year-old woman who had acute esophageal lesions while being treated with oral ciprofloxacin for an acute cystitis. On day 2 of treatment, she reported retroesternal pain with a globus sensation, and presented hematemesis and melena. There was no history of gastric or esophageal disturbances. An upper digestive endoscopy showed bleeding lesions on the middle third of the esophagus. Ciprofloxacin was discontinued and a proton pump inhibitor was administered. One week later, the endoscopic aspect of the esophagus was normal. Only two cases of ciprofloxacin-induced esophageal lesions have been reported previously. A short review of this kind of esophageal injuries is presented, focusing on the main risk factors and preventive measures.Presentamos el caso de una mujer de 95 años con lesiones agudas del esófago que tomaba ciprofloxacino por cistitis aguda. La paciente refería dolor y sensación de cuerpo estraño retroesternal asociados con hematemesis y melena, después del segundo día de tratamiento. No había antecedentes personales de trastornos gástricos o esofágicos. La endoscopia digestiva objetivó lesiones sangrantes en el tercio medio del esófago. El uso de ciprofloxacino fue suspendido y se utilizó un inhibidor de la bomba de protones. Una semana más tarde, el aspecto endoscópico del esófago fue considerado normal. Dos únicos casos de lesiones esofágicas inducidas por ciprofloxacino han sido previamente publicados. Se presenta una revisión breve acerca de este tipo de lesiones del esófago, con énfasis a los principales factores de riesgo y medidas de prevención.

  10. Saccharomyces cerevisiae decreases inflammatory responses induced by F4+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, Galliano; Meurens, François; Berri, Mustapha; Chevaleyre, Claire; Melo, Sandrine; Auclair, Eric; Salmon, Henri

    2011-05-15

    Probiotic yeasts may provide protection against intestinal inflammation induced by enteric pathogens. In piglets, infection with F4+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) leads to inflammation, diarrhea and intestinal damage. In this study, we investigated whether the yeast strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc, strain CNCM I-3856) and S. cerevisiae variety boulardii (Sb, strain CNCM I-3799) decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in intestinal epithelial IPI-2I cells cultured with F4+ ETEC. Results showed that viable Sc inhibited the ETEC-induced TNF-α gene expression whereas Sb did not. In contrast, killed Sc failed to inhibit the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. This inhibition was dependent on secreted soluble factors. Sc culture supernatant decreased the TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, CXCL2 and CCL20 ETEC-induced mRNA. Furthermore, Sc culture supernatant filtrated fraction yeast strains onto inflammation.

  11. Synbiotics reduce ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and inflammation by improving intestinal permeability and microbiota in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Wan-Chun; Huang, Ya-Li; Chen, Ya-Ling; Peng, Hsiang-Chi; Liao, Wei-Hsiang; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Chen, Jiun-Rong; Yang, Suh-Ching

    2015-05-01

    Clinical and animal experiments indicated that gut-derived endotoxin and imbalanced intestinal microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). In this study, we investigated whether synbiotic supplementation could improve ALD in rats by altering the intestinal microbial composition and improving the intestinal integrity. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups according to plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities and subjected to either a normal liquid diet (C), a normal liquid diet with synbiotic supplementation (C + S), an ethanol liquid diet (E), or an ethanol liquid diet with synbiotic supplementation (E + S) for 12 weeks. Results revealed that the ethanol-fed group showed increases in plasma AST and ALT activities, the endotoxin level, the hepatic triglyceride (TG) level, and hepatic tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 levels, and a decrease in the hepatic IL-10 level. Ethanol-feeding also contributed to increased intestinal permeability and decreased fecal bifidobacteria and lactobacilli amounts. However, synbiotic supplementation effectively attenuated the plasma endotoxin, hepatic TG and TNF-α levels, and increased the hepatic IL-10 level. Furthermore, synbiotic supplementation protected the rats against ethanol-induced hyperpermeability of the intestine, and significantly increased amounts of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the feces. This study demonstrated that synbiotics possess a novel hepatoprotective function by improving the intestinal permeability and microbiota in rats with ethanol-induced liver injury.

  12. Phosphoproteome Analysis Reveals the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Deoxynivalenol-Induced Intestinal Toxicity in IPEC-J2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Qi; Wang, Song-Bo; Wang, Rui-Guo; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Pei-Long; Su, Xiao-Ou

    2016-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a widespread trichothecene mycotoxin that commonly contaminates cereal crops and has various toxic effects in animals and humans. DON primarily targets the gastrointestinal tract, the first barrier against ingested food contaminants. In this study, an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based phosphoproteomic approach was employed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying DON-mediated intestinal toxicity in porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) exposed to 20 μM DON for 60 min. There were 4153 unique phosphopeptides, representing 389 phosphorylation sites, detected in 1821 phosphoproteins. We found that 289 phosphopeptides corresponding to 255 phosphoproteins were differentially phosphorylated in response to DON. Comprehensive Gene Ontology (GO) analysis combined with Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment revealed that, in addition to previously well-characterized mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, DON exposure altered phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) and Janus kinase/signal transducer, and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathways. These pathways are involved in a wide range of biological processes, including apoptosis, the intestinal barrier, intestinal inflammation, and the intestinal absorption of glucose. DON-induced changes are likely to contribute to the intestinal dysfunction. Overall, identification of relevant signaling pathways yielded new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying DON-induced intestinal toxicity, and might help in the development of improved mechanism-based risk assessments in animals and humans. PMID:27669298

  13. Phosphoproteome Analysis Reveals the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Deoxynivalenol-Induced Intestinal Toxicity in IPEC-J2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Qi Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON is a widespread trichothecene mycotoxin that commonly contaminates cereal crops and has various toxic effects in animals and humans. DON primarily targets the gastrointestinal tract, the first barrier against ingested food contaminants. In this study, an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ-based phosphoproteomic approach was employed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying DON-mediated intestinal toxicity in porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2 exposed to 20 μM DON for 60 min. There were 4153 unique phosphopeptides, representing 389 phosphorylation sites, detected in 1821 phosphoproteins. We found that 289 phosphopeptides corresponding to 255 phosphoproteins were differentially phosphorylated in response to DON. Comprehensive Gene Ontology (GO analysis combined with Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway enrichment revealed that, in addition to previously well-characterized mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling, DON exposure altered phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt and Janus kinase/signal transducer, and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT pathways. These pathways are involved in a wide range of biological processes, including apoptosis, the intestinal barrier, intestinal inflammation, and the intestinal absorption of glucose. DON-induced changes are likely to contribute to the intestinal dysfunction. Overall, identification of relevant signaling pathways yielded new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying DON-induced intestinal toxicity, and might help in the development of improved mechanism-based risk assessments in animals and humans.

  14. Giardia duodenalis Surface Cysteine Proteases Induce Cleavage of the Intestinal Epithelial Cytoskeletal Protein Villin via Myosin Light Chain Kinase.

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    Amol Bhargava

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis infections are among the most common causes of waterborne diarrhoeal disease worldwide. At the height of infection, G. duodenalis trophozoites induce multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells that contribute to the development of diarrhoeal disease. To date, our understanding of pathophysiological processes in giardiasis remains incompletely understood. The present study reveals a previously unappreciated role for G. duodenalis cathepsin cysteine proteases in intestinal epithelial pathophysiological processes that occur during giardiasis. Experiments first established that Giardia trophozoites indeed produce cathepsin B and L in strain-dependent fashion. Co-incubation of G. duodenalis with human enterocytes enhanced cathepsin production by Assemblage A (NF and S2 isolates trophozoites, but not when epithelial cells were exposed to Assemblage B (GSM isolate trophozoites. Direct contact between G. duodenalis parasites and human intestinal epithelial monolayers resulted in the degradation and redistribution of the intestinal epithelial cytoskeletal protein villin; these effects were abolished when parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases were inhibited. Interestingly, inhibition of parasite proteases did not prevent degradation of the intestinal tight junction-associated protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1, suggesting that G. duodenalis induces multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells. Finally, this study demonstrates that G. duodenalis-mediated disruption of villin is, at least, in part dependent on activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK. Taken together, this study indicates a novel role for parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases in the pathophysiology of G. duodenalis infections.

  15. Pacific oyster-derived polysaccharides attenuate allergen-induced intestinal inflammation in a murine model of food allergy

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    Chiung-Hsiang Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oyster-derived polysaccharides (OPS have been shown to modulate the T helper (Th1/Th2 immunobalance toward the Th1-dominant direction in antigen-primed splenocytes. In the present study, we hypothesized that OPS might attenuate intestinal inflammation associated with food allergy, a Th2-dominant immune disorder. BALB/c mice were sensitized twice with ovalbumin (OVA absorbed to alum and then repeatedly challenged with intragastric OVA to induce intestinal allergic responses. The mice were administered by gavage with OPS and/or vehicle (distilled water once/d during the two sensitization phases, and once every other day during the challenge phase. Administration with OPS attenuated OVA challenge-elicited diarrhea, and the infiltration of mast cells in the intestine. OPS demonstrated a protective effect on the reduced ratio of villus length over crypt depth of the intestine in allergic mice. Furthermore, OPS administration markedly attenuated the intestinal expression of the Th2 signature cytokine interleukin-4 (IL-4. Collectively, these results demonstrated the in vivo antiallergic activity of OPS, which is associated with the suppression of allergen-induced intestinal Th2 responses and mast cell activation.

  16. Role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and inducible nitric oxide synthase in intestinal injury in neonatal rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui LU; Bing Zhu; Xin-Dong Xue

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the dynamic change and role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in neonatal rat with intestinal injury and to define whether necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is associated with the levels of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the mucosa of the affected intestine tissue.METHODS: Wistar rats less than 24 h in age received an intraperitoneal injection with 5 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Ileum tissues were collected at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h following LPS challenge for histological evaluation of NEC and for measurements of nNOS and iNOS. The correlation between the degree of intestinal injury and levels of NOS was determined.RESULTS: The LPS-injected pups showed a significant increase in injury scores versus the control. The expression of nNOS protein and mRNA was diminished after LPS injection. There was a negative significant correlation between the nNOS protein and the grade of median intestinal injury within 24 h. The expression of iNOS protein and mRNA was significantly increased in the peak of intestinal injury.CONCLUSION: nNOS and iNOS play different roles in LPS-induced intestinal injury. Caution should be exerted concerning potential therapeutic uses of NOS inhibitors in NEC.

  17. The Critical Role of Membrane Cholesterol in Salmonella-Induced Autophagy in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

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    Fu-Chen Huang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It was previously observed that plasma membrane cholesterol plays a critical role in the Salmonella-induced phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent (PI3K-dependent anti-inflammatory response in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs. The PI3K/Akt pathway is associated with autophagy which has emerged as a critical mechanism of host defense against several intracellular bacterial pathogens. Plasma membrane contributes directly to the formation of early Atg16L1-positive autophagosome precursors. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the role of plasma membrane cholesterol on the Salmonella-induced autophagy in IECs. By using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MBCD, it was demonstrated that disruption of membrane cholesterol by MBCD enhanced NOD2 and Atg16L1 proteins expression in membrane, and autophagic LC3II proteins expression and LC3 punctae in Salmonella-infected Caco-2 cells, which was counteracted by Atg16L1 siRNA. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2 siRNA enhanced the Salmonella-induced activation of Akt in Caco-2 cells. However, inhibitors of Akt or extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK had no significant effect on Salmonella-induced autophagy Beclin 1 or LC3 proteins expression. In conclusion, our study suggests that cholesterol accumulation in the plasma membrane at the entry site of Salmonella results in the formation of Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV and decreased autophagy. Our results offer mechanistic insights on the critical role of membrane cholesterol in the pathogenesis of Salmonella infection in intestinal epithelial cells and the therapeutic potential of its antagonists.

  18. Serotonin and cholecystokinin mediate nutrient-induced segmentation in guinea pig small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Melina; Chambers, Jordan D; Gwynne, Rachel M; Bornstein, Joel C

    2013-04-15

    Segmentation is an important process in nutrient mixing and absorption; however, the mechanisms underlying this motility pattern are poorly understood. Segmentation can be induced by luminal perfusion of fatty acid in guinea pig small intestine in vitro and mimicked by the serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (300 nM) and by cholecystokinin (CCK). Serotonergic and CCK-related mechanisms underlying nutrient-induced segmentation were investigated using selective 5-HT and CCK receptor antagonists on isolated segments of small intestine luminally perfused with 1 mM decanoic acid. Motility patterns were analyzed using video imaging and spatiotemporal maps. Segmenting activity mediated by decanoic acid was depressed following luminal application of the 5-HT receptor antagonists granisetron (5-HT(3), 1 μM) and SB-207266 (5-HT(4), 10 nM) and the CCK receptor antagonists devazepide (CCK-1, 300 nM) and L-365260 (CCK-2, 300 nM), but these antagonists did not further depress segmentation when combined. The P2 receptor antagonist pyridoxal phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonate (10 μM) had no effect on activity. Serosal application of 5-HT antagonists had little effect on segmentation in the duodenum but reduced activity in the jejunum when granisetron and SB-207266 were applied together. These results reveal that 5-HT(3) and 5-HT(4) receptors, as well as CCK-1 and CCK-2 receptors, are critical in regulating decanoic acid-induced segmentation. Computational simulation indicated that these data are consistent with decanoic acid activating two pathways in the mucosa that converge within the enteric neural circuitry, while contraction-induced release of 5-HT from the mucosa provides feedback into the neural circuit to set the time course of the overall contractile activity.

  19. Protective effects of cannabidiol on lesion-induced intervertebral disc degeneration.

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    João W Silveira

    Full Text Available Disc degeneration is a multifactorial process that involves hypoxia, inflammation, neoinnervation, accelerated catabolism, and reduction in water and glycosaminoglycan content. Cannabidiol is the main non-psychotropic component of the Cannabis sativa with protective and anti-inflammatory properties. However, possible therapeutic effects of cannabidiol on intervertebral disc degeneration have not been investigated yet. The present study investigated the effects of cannabidiol intradiscal injection in the coccygeal intervertebral disc degeneration induced by the needle puncture model using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and histological analyses. Disc injury was induced in the tail of male Wistar rats via a single needle puncture. The discs selected for injury were punctured percutaneously using a 21-gauge needle. MRI and histological evaluation were employed to assess the results. The effects of intradiscal injection of cannabidiol (30, 60 or 120 nmol injected immediately after lesion were analyzed acutely (2 days by MRI. The experimental group that received cannabidiol 120 nmol was resubmitted to MRI examination and then to histological analyses 15 days after lesion/cannabidiol injection. The needle puncture produced a significant disc injury detected both by MRI and histological analyses. Cannabidiol significantly attenuated the effects of disc injury induced by the needle puncture. Considering that cannabidiol presents an extremely safe profile and is currently being used clinically, these results suggest that this compound could be useful in the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  20. Protective effects of cannabidiol on lesion-induced intervertebral disc degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, João W; Issy, Ana Carolina; Castania, Vitor A; Salmon, Carlos E G; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H; Guimarães, Francisco S; Defino, Helton L A; Del Bel, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Disc degeneration is a multifactorial process that involves hypoxia, inflammation, neoinnervation, accelerated catabolism, and reduction in water and glycosaminoglycan content. Cannabidiol is the main non-psychotropic component of the Cannabis sativa with protective and anti-inflammatory properties. However, possible therapeutic effects of cannabidiol on intervertebral disc degeneration have not been investigated yet. The present study investigated the effects of cannabidiol intradiscal injection in the coccygeal intervertebral disc degeneration induced by the needle puncture model using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological analyses. Disc injury was induced in the tail of male Wistar rats via a single needle puncture. The discs selected for injury were punctured percutaneously using a 21-gauge needle. MRI and histological evaluation were employed to assess the results. The effects of intradiscal injection of cannabidiol (30, 60 or 120 nmol) injected immediately after lesion were analyzed acutely (2 days) by MRI. The experimental group that received cannabidiol 120 nmol was resubmitted to MRI examination and then to histological analyses 15 days after lesion/cannabidiol injection. The needle puncture produced a significant disc injury detected both by MRI and histological analyses. Cannabidiol significantly attenuated the effects of disc injury induced by the needle puncture. Considering that cannabidiol presents an extremely safe profile and is currently being used clinically, these results suggest that this compound could be useful in the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  1. Plant stanols induce intestinal tumor formation by up-regulating Wnt and EGFR signaling in Apc Min mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marttinen, Maija; Päivärinta, Essi; Storvik, Markus; Huikko, Laura; Luoma-Halkola, Heli; Piironen, Vieno; Pajari, Anne-Maria; Mutanen, Marja

    2013-01-01

    The rate of APC mutations in the intestine increases in middle-age. At the same period of life, plant sterol and stanol enriched functional foods are introduced to diet to lower blood cholesterol. This study examined the effect of plant stanol enriched diet on intestinal adenoma formation in the Apc(Min) mouse. Apc(Min) mice were fed 0.8% plant stanol diet or control diet for nine weeks. Cholesterol, plant sterols and plant stanols were analyzed from the caecum content and the intestinal mucosa. Levels of β-catenin, cyclin D1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) were measured from the intestinal mucosa by Western blotting. Gene expression was determined from the intestinal mucosa using Affymetrix and the data were analyzed for enriched categories and pathways. Plant stanols induced adenoma formation in the small intestine, however, the adenoma size was not affected. We saw increased levels of nuclear β-catenin, phosphorylated β-catenin (Ser675 and Ser552), nuclear cyclin D1, total and phosphorylated EGFR and phosphorylated ERK1/2 in the intestinal mucosa after plant stanol feeding. The Affymetrix data demonstrate that several enzymes of cholesterol synthesis pathway were up-regulated, although the cholesterol level in the intestinal mucosa was not altered. We show that plant stanols induce adenoma formation by activating Wnt and EGFR signaling. EGFR signaling seems to have promoted β-catenin phosphorylation and its translocation into the nucleus, where the expression of cyclin D1 was increased. Up-regulated cholesterol synthesis may partly explain the increased EGFR signaling in the plant stanol-fed mice.

  2. Topical photosan-mediated photodynamic therapy for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch early cancer lesions: an in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yih-Chih; Chang, Walter Hong-Shong; Chang, Junn-Liang; Liu, Kuang-Ting; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Liu, Chung-Ji; Chen, Chih-Ping

    2011-03-01

    Oral cancer has becomes the most prominent cancer disease in recent years in Taiwan. The reason is the betel nut chewing habit combing with smoking and alcohol-drinking lifestyle of people results in oral cancer becomes the fastest growth incident cancer amongst other major cancer diseases. In previous studies showed that photosan, haematoporphyrin derivative (HPD), has demonstrated effective PDT results on human head and neck disease studies. To avoid the systemic phototoxic effect of photosan, this study was designed to use a topical photosan-mediated PDT for treatment of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch cancerous lesions. DMBA was applied to one of the buccal pouches of hamsters thrice a week for 10 to 12 weeks. Cancerous lesions were induced and proven by histological examination. These DMBA-induced cancerous lesions were used for testing the efficacy of topical photosan-mediated PDT. Before PDT, fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine when photosan reached its peak level in the lesional epithelial cells after topical application of photosan gel. We found that photosan reached its peak level in cancerous lesions about 13.5 min after topical application of photosan gel. The cancerous lesions in hamsters were then treated with topical photosan-mediated PDT (fluence rate: 600 mW/cm2; light exposure dose 200 J/cm2) using the portable Lumacare 635 nm fiber-guided light device. Visual examination demonstrated that topical photosan-mediated PDT was an applicable treatment modality for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch cancerous lesions.

  3. Combination therapies in adjuvant with topical ALA-mediated photodynamic therapy for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch premalignant lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deng-Fu; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2012-03-01

    In Taiwan, oral cancer has becomes the fastest growth male cancer disease due to the betel nut chewing habit combing with smoking and alcohol-drinking lifestyle of people. In order to eliminate the systemic phototoxic effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), this study was designed to use a topical ALA-mediated PDT for treatment of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions. DMBA was applied to one of the buccal pouches of hamsters thrice a week for 10 to 12 weeks. Cancerous lesions were induced and proven by histological examination. These DMBA-induced cancerous lesions were used for testing the efficacy of topical ALA-mediated PDT. Before PDT, fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine when ALA reached its peak level in the lesional epithelial cells after topical application of ALA gel. We found that ALA reached its peak level in precancerous lesions about 2.5 hrs after topical application of ALA gel. The cancerous lesions in hamsters were then treated with topical ALA -mediated PDT with light exposure dose of 150 J/cm2 using LED 635 nm fiber-guided light device. Visual examination demonstrated that adjuvant topical ALA -mediated PDT group has shown better therapeutic results in compared to those of non-adjuvant topical ALA-mediated PDT group for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions.

  4. Lutein Induces Autophagy via Beclin-1 Upregulation in IEC-6 Rat Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Jen; Lin, Ji-Fan; Hsiao, Chien-Yu; Chang, Hsun-Hao; Li, Hsin-Ju; Chang, Hsun-Hsien; Lee, Gon-Ann; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Lutein is a carotenoid with anti-oxidant properties. Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved catabolic cellular pathway for coping with stress conditions, is responsive to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and degrades damaged organelles. We previously demonstrated that lutein can induce anti-oxidant enzymes to relieve methotrexate-induced ROS stress. We therefore hypothesized that lutein, which activates ROS-scavenging enzymes, can also induce autophagy for cell survival. In this study, we demonstrated that lutein treatment attenuated the reduction in cell viability caused by H2O2. Lutein dose-dependently induced the processing of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-II, an autophagy marker protein, and accumulation of LC3-positive puncta in rat intestinal IEC-6 cells. Furthermore, (a) direct observation of autophagosome formation through transmission electron microscopy, (b) upregulation of autophagy-related genes including ATG4A, ATG5, ATG7, ATG12, and beclin-1 (BENC1), and (c) increased BECN1/Bcl-2 ratio confirmed the induction of autophagy by lutein. The results revealed that bafilomycin-A1-induced inhibition of autophagy reduced cell viability and increased apoptosis in lutein-treated cells, indicating a protective role of lutein-induced autophagy. Lutein treatment also activated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p-38, but had no effects on the induction of extracellular signal-related kinase or inhibition of mTOR; however, the inhibition of activated AMPK, JNK, or p-38 did not attenuate lutein-induced autophagy. Finally, increased BECN1 expression levels were detected in lutein-treated cells, and BECN1 knockdown abolished autophagy induction. These results suggest that lutein-induced autophagy was mediated by the upregulation of BECN1 in IEC-6 cells. We are the first to demonstrate that lutein induces autophagy. Elevated autophagy in lutein-treated IEC-6 cells may have a protective role

  5. Effects of Tang Mai Kang Capsule on Angioneurotic Lesions in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李华; 王军; 高丽君; 郭永成

    2004-01-01

    The effects of Tang Mai Kang Capsule (糖脉康胶囊) on blood sugar level, gangrene of the tail-tip, pain threshold and learning and memory abilities were investigated in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. The results showed that Tang Mai Kang Capsule could significantly decrease blood sugar level and incidence rate of gangrene of the tail-tip, increase pain threshold, and strengthen learning and memory abilities, suggesting that Tang Mai Kang Capsule functions to decrease blood sugar level and improve the complicated angioneurotic lesions of diabetes.

  6. Coriander alleviates 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced contact dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gunhyuk; Kim, Hyo Geun; Lim, Soonmin; Lee, Wonil; Sim, Yeomoon; Oh, Myung Sook

    2014-08-01

    Contact dermatitis (CD) is a pattern of inflammatory responses in the skin that occurs through contact with external factors. The clinical picture is a polymorphic pattern of skin inflammation characterized by a wide range of clinical features, including itching, redness, scaling, and erythema. Coriandrum sativum L. (CS), commonly known as coriander, is a member of the Apiaceae family and is cultivated throughout the world for its nutritional and culinary values. Linoleic acid and linolenic acid in CS have various pharmacological activities. However, no study of the inhibitory effects of CS on CD has been reported. In this study, we demonstrated the protective effect of CS against 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced CD-like skin lesions. CS, at doses of 0.5-1%, applied to the dorsal skin inhibited the development of CD-like skin lesions. Moreover, the Th2-mediated inflammatory cytokines, immunoglobulin E, tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-4, and IL-13, were significantly reduced. In addition, CS increased the levels of total glutathione and heme oxygenase-1 protein. Thus, CS can inhibit the development of CD-like skin lesions in mice by regulating immune mediators and may be an effective alternative therapy for contact diseases.

  7. [Effective prevention of indomethacin-induced gastroduodenal mucosal lesions with roxatidine acetate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammann, H G; Wolf, N; Burkhardt, F

    1995-08-01

    In this randomized single-blind cross-over study the gastroduodenal damaging effect of indometacin 75 mg bid alone and in combination with roxatidine acetate (CAS 78628-28-1, Roxit) 75 mg nocte or 75 mg bid was evaluated in 12 healthy male volunteers. Prior to the start of the three therapeutic periods subjects underwent endoscopic examination to exclude gastroduodenal mucosa lesions. On days 7 and 14 of therapy 2 h after the application of the last indometacin dose subjects underwent endoscopy again. The 7- and 14-days administration of indometacin 75 mg bid, indometacin 75 mg bid plus roxatidine 75 mg nocte and indometacin 75 mg bid plus roxatidine 75 mg bid led to gastroduodenal mucosa lesion scores of 1.67 +/- 0.40 and 2.00 +/- 0.35, 1.33 +/- 0.28 and 1.50 +/- 0.29, 0.42 +/- 0.23 and 1.00 +/- 0.33 (mean +/- SEM), respectively. These differences were statistically significant when comparing indometacin 75 mg bid versus indometacin 75 mg bid plus roxatidine 75 mg bid (p roxatidine acetate represents an effective alternative in the prophylaxis of NSAID-induced gastroduodenal mucosa lesions.

  8. Protective effect of ginsenoside Re on acute gastric mucosal lesion induced by compound 48/80

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sena Lee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The protective effect of ginsenoside Re, isolated from ginseng berry, against acute gastric mucosal lesions was examined in rats with a single intraperitoneal injection of compound 48/80 (C48/80. Ginsenoside Re (20 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg was orally administered 0.5 h prior to C48/80 treatment. Ginsenoside Re dose-dependently prevented gastric mucosal lesion development 3 h after C48/80 treatment. Increases in the activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO; an index of neutrophil infiltration and xanthine oxidase (XO and the content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS; an index of lipid peroxidation and decreases in the contents of hexosamine (a marker of gastric mucus and adherent mucus, which occurred in gastric mucosal tissues after C48/80 treatment, were significantly attenuated by ginsenoside Re. The elevation of Bax expression and the decrease in Bcl2 expression after C48/80 treatment were also attenuated by ginsenoside Re. Ginsenoside Re significantly attenuated all these changes 3 h after C48/80 treatment. These results indicate that orally administered ginsenoside Re protects against C48/80-induced acute gastric mucosal lesions in rats, possibly through its stimulatory action on gastric mucus synthesis and secretion, its inhibitory action on neutrophil infiltration, and enhanced lipid peroxidation in the gastric mucosal tissue.

  9. Behavioural alterations relevant to developmental brain disorders in mice with neonatally induced ventral hippocampal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naert, Arne; Gantois, Ilse; Laeremans, Annelies; Vreysen, Samme; Van den Bergh, Gert; Arckens, Lut; Callaerts-Vegh, Zsuzsanna; D'Hooge, Rudi

    2013-05-01

    Neonatal lesioning of the ventral hippocampus (vHc) in rats has served as a useful heuristic animal model to elucidate neurodevelopmental mechanisms of schizophrenia (SCZ). In the current study we have established that this procedure can be applied to model SCZ symptomatology in mice. Neonatal mice (postnatal day 6) were anaesthetised by hypothermia and electrolytic lesions of the vHc were induced. We observed locomotor hyperactivity at prepubertal and adult age and hypersensitivity to amphetamine. Furthermore, working memory deficits were observed in Y-maze (spontaneous alternation) and T-maze (exploration of a novel arm) test protocols. Decreased anxious behaviour in the elevated plus maze and increased sociability were also observed. These changes were dependent on lesion size. No differences were observed in prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex, latent inhibition, spatial memory (Morris water maze), problem solving capacities (syringe puzzle) and ability to discriminate between different unfamiliar mice. The presented findings might further help to identify neurobiological mechanisms of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  10. Spontaneous and bolus-induced motility in the chronically obstructed guinea-pig small intestine in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storkholm, Jan Henrik; Zhao, Jingbo; Villadsen, Gerda E; Gregersen, Hans

    2008-02-01

    Partial obstruction of the small intestine results in dysmotility and morphometric changes proximal to the site of obstruction. However, our understanding of the relation between the morphometric remodeling and change in the motility pattern during chronic obstruction is sparse. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of partial chronic intestinal obstruction on motility, morphology, and collagen content proximal and distal to the site of obstruction. Twenty guinea-pigs with partial intestinal obstruction and eight sham-operated controls lived for four weeks. Spontaneous and bolus-induced motility was recorded in isolated intestinal segments proximal and distal to the site of obstruction using a perfused low-compliance pressure-measuring system in vitro. After the motility experiments, the specimens were fixed at 2 kPa luminal distension pressure and sampled for histomorphometric determination of luminal radius, layer thickness, and wall thickness. Total wall collagen was also determined. The area under the curve (AUC) of spontaneous contractions and the amplitude, frequency, and AUC for the bolus-induced motility were higher in the proximal segments of the banded animals compared to distal segments and to the intestinal segments in the control animals (P thickness ratio was lowest in the proximal segments of the obstructed animals (P thickness ratio showed a strong association (r = 0.97 for control, and r = 0.99 for obstruction, P thickness ratio and bolus-induced motility.

  11. Mucoadhesive formulation of Bidens pilosa L. (Asteraceae reduces intestinal injury from 5-fluorouracil-induced mucositis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Marcelino de Ávila

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal mucositis induced during cancer treatment is considered a serious dose-limiting side effect of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Frequently, interruption of the cancer treatment due to this pathology leads to a reduction in cure rates, increase of treatment costs and decrease life quality of the patient. Natural products such as Bidens pilosa L. (Asteraceae, represent a potential alternative for the treatment of mucositis given its anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, B. pilosa glycolic extract was formulated (BPF with poloxamer, a mucoadhesive copolymer, was used for treatment of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU-induced mucositis in mice. As expected, animals only treated with 5-FU (200 mg/kg presented marked weight loss, reduction of intestinal villi, crypts and muscular layer, which was associated with severe disruption of crypts, edema, inflammatory infiltrate and vacuolization in the intestinal tissue, as compared to the control group and healthy animals only treated with BPF. On the other hand, the treatment of intestinal mucositis-bearing mice with BPF (75, 100 or 125 mg/kg managed to mitigate clinical and pathologic changes, noticeably at 100 mg/kg. This dose led to the restoration of intestinal proliferative activity through increasing Ki-67 levels; modulated the expression of Bax, Bcl2 and p53 apoptotic markers protecting intestinal cells from cell death. Moreover, this treatment regulated lipid peroxidation and inflammatory infiltration. No acute toxic effects were observed with this formulation. This work demonstrated that BPF was safe and effective against 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in mice. Additional studies are already in progress to further characterize the mechanisms involved in the protective effects of this technological formulation toward the development of a new medicine for the prevention and treatment of intestinal injury in patients undergoing chemotherapy/radiotherapy.

  12. Expression analysis of cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway genes in the intestinal mucosal layer of necrotic enteritis-induced chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengaraj, Deivendran; Truong, Anh Duc; Lee, Sung-Hyen; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Hong, Yeong Ho

    2016-02-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is a serious problem to the poultry farms, which report NE outbreaks more than once per year, as a result of the inappropriate use of antibiotics in the feed. The NE affected bird die rapidly as a result of various pathophysiological complications in the intestine and immune system. Also, several studies have reported that the genes exclusively related to intestine and immune functions are significantly altered in response to NE. In this study, NE was induced in two genetically disparate chicken lines that are resistant (line 6.3) and sensitive (line 7.2) to avian leukosis and Marek's disease. The intestinal mucosal layer was collected from NE-induced and control chickens, and subjected to RNA-sequencing analysis. The involvement of differentially expressed genes in the intestinal mucosal layer of line 6.3 and 7.2 with the immune system-related pathways was investigated. Among the identified immune system-related pathways, a candidate pathway known as chicken cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway (CDS pathway) was selected for further investigation. RNA-sequencing and pathway analysis identified a total of 21 genes that were involved in CDS pathway and differentially expressed in the intestinal mucosal layer of lines 6.3 and 7.2. The expression of CDS pathway genes was further confirmed by real-time qPCR. In the results, a majority of the CDS pathway genes were significantly altered in the NE-induced intestinal mucosal layer from lines 6.3 and 7.2. In conclusion, our study indicate that NE seriously affects several genes involved in innate immune defense and foreign DNA sensing mechanisms in the chicken intestinal mucosal layer. Identifying the immune genes affected by NE could be an important evidence for the protective immune response to NE-causative pathogens.

  13. Retinal lesions induce fast intrinsic cortical plasticity in adult mouse visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolders, Katrien; Vreysen, Samme; Laramée, Marie-Eve; Cuyvers, Annemie; Hu, Tjing-Tjing; Van Brussel, Leen; Eysel, Ulf T; Nys, Julie; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2016-09-01

    Neuronal activity plays an important role in the development and structural-functional maintenance of the brain as well as in its life-long plastic response to changes in sensory stimulation. We characterized the impact of unilateral 15° laser lesions in the temporal lower visual field of the retina, on visually driven neuronal activity in the afferent visual pathway of adult mice using in situ hybridization for the activity reporter gene zif268. In the first days post-lesion, we detected a discrete zone of reduced zif268 expression in the contralateral hemisphere, spanning the border between the monocular segment of the primary visual cortex (V1) with extrastriate visual area V2M. We could not detect a clear lesion projection zone (LPZ) in areas lateral to V1 whereas medial to V2M, agranular and granular retrosplenial cortex showed decreased zif268 levels over their full extent. All affected areas displayed a return to normal zif268 levels, and this was faster in higher order visual areas than in V1. The lesion did, however, induce a permanent LPZ in the retinorecipient layers of the superior colliculus. We identified a retinotopy-based intrinsic capacity of adult mouse visual cortex to recover from restricted vision loss, with recovery speed reflecting the areal cortical magnification factor. Our observations predict incomplete visual field representations for areas lateral to V1 vs. lack of retinotopic organization for areas medial to V2M. The validation of this mouse model paves the way for future interrogations of cortical region- and cell-type-specific contributions to functional recovery, up to microcircuit level.

  14. IgA production in the large intestine is modulated by a different mechanism than in the small intestine: Bacteroides acidifaciens promotes IgA production in the large intestine by inducing germinal center formation and increasing the number of IgA+ B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Hosono, Akira; Oyama, Akihito; Tsuda, Masato; Suzuki, Ami; Hachimura, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Momose, Yoshika; Itoh, Kikuji; Hirayama, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Kyoko; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2013-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that intestinal commensal bacteria induce immunoglobulin (Ig) A production by promoting the development of gut-associated lymphoid tissues in the small intestine. However, the precise mechanism whereby these bacteria modulate IgA production in the large intestine, which harbors the majority of intestinal commensals, is poorly understood. In addition, it is not known which commensal bacteria induce IgA production in the small intestine and which induce production in the large intestine. To address these issues, we generated gnotobiotic mice mono-associated with different murine commensal bacteria by inoculating germ-free (GF) mice with Lactobacillus johnsonii or Bacteroides acidifaciens. In GF mice, IgA production was barely detectable in the small intestine and was not detected in the large intestine. Interestingly, total IgA secretion in the large intestinal mucosa of B. acidifaciens mono-associated (BA) mice was significantly greater than that of GF and L. johnsonii mono-associated (LJ) mice. However, there was no difference in total IgA production in the small intestine of GF, LJ and BA mice. In addition, in the large intestine of BA mice, the expression of IgA(+) cells and germinal center formation were more remarkable than in GF and LJ mice. Furthermore, B. acidifaciens-specific IgA was detected in the large intestine of BA mice. These results suggest that the production of IgA in the large intestine may be modulated by a different mechanism than that in the small intestine, and that B. acidifaciens is one of the predominant bacteria responsible for promoting IgA production in the large intestine.

  15. Role of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in paclitaxel-induced intestinal barrier breakdown and bacterial translocation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chi; XU Yang-guang; DUAN Xue-ning; LIU Yin-hua; ZHAO Jian-xin; XU Ling; YE Jing-ming

    2011-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy causes breakdown of the intestinal barrier, which may lead to bacterial translocation. Paclitaxel, an anti-tubulin agent, has many side effects; however, its effect on the intestinal barrier is unknown. Previous studies show that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) plays an important role in modulating intestinal barrier function, but these studies are not conclusive. Here, we investigated the effects of paclitaxel on the intestinal barrier, and whether G-CSF could prevent paclitaxel-induced bacterial translocation.Methods Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: control group, paclitaxel group and paclitaxel + G-CSF group. Intestinal permeability was measured by the urinary excretion rates of lactulose and mannitol administered by gavage. The mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen and liver were aseptically harvested for bacterial culture. Endotoxin levels and white blood cell (WBC) counts were measured and bacterial quantification performed using relative real-time PCR. Jejunum samples were also obtained for histological observation. Intestinal apoptosis was evaluated using a fragmented DNA assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP)-biotin nick end-labeling staining. One-way analysis of variance and Fisher's exact test were used to compare differences between groups.Results Paclitaxel induced apoptosis in 12.5% of jejunum villus cells, which was reduced to 3.8% by G-CSF treatment. Apoptosis in the control group was 0.6%. Paclitaxel treatment also resulted in villus atrophy, increased intestinal permeability and a reduction in the WBC count. G-CSF treatment resulted in increased villus height and returned WBC counts to normal levels. No bacterial translocation was detected in the control group, whereas 6/8,8/8, and 8/8 rats in the paclitaxel group were culture-positive in the liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes, respectively. Bacterial translocation was

  16. Alteration of the Intestinal Environment by Lubiprostone Is Associated with Amelioration of Adenine-Induced CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Eikan; Fukuda, Shinji; Shima, Hisato; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Akiyama, Yasutoshi; Takeuchi, Yoichi; Fukuda, Noriko N; Suzuki, Takehiro; Suzuki, Chitose; Yuri, Akinori; Kikuchi, Koichi; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Ito, Sadayoshi; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Abe, Takaaki

    2015-08-01

    The accumulation of uremic toxins is involved in the progression of CKD. Various uremic toxins are derived from gut microbiota, and an imbalance of gut microbiota or dysbiosis is related to renal failure. However, the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the relationship between the gut microbiota and renal failure are still obscure. Using an adenine-induced renal failure mouse model, we evaluated the effects of the ClC-2 chloride channel activator lubiprostone (commonly used for the treatment of constipation) on CKD. Oral administration of lubiprostone (500 µg/kg per day) changed the fecal and intestinal properties in mice with renal failure. Additionally, lubiprostone treatment reduced the elevated BUN and protected against tubulointerstitial damage, renal fibrosis, and inflammation. Gut microbiome analysis of 16S rRNA genes in the renal failure mice showed that lubiprostone treatment altered their microbial composition, especially the recovery of the levels of the Lactobacillaceae family and Prevotella genus, which were significantly reduced in the renal failure mice. Furthermore, capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry-based metabolome analysis showed that lubiprostone treatment decreased the plasma level of uremic toxins, such as indoxyl sulfate and hippurate, which are derived from gut microbiota, and a more recently discovered uremic toxin, trans-aconitate. These results suggest that lubiprostone ameliorates the progression of CKD and the accumulation of uremic toxins by improving the gut microbiota and intestinal environment.

  17. Nivalenol induces oxidative stress and increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effect in intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Regno, Marisanta; Adesso, Simona; Popolo, Ada [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Quaroni, Andrea [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cornell University, Veterinary Research Tower, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853–6401 (United States); Autore, Giuseppina [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Severino, Lorella [Department of Pathology and Animal Health, Division of Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Naples “Federico II”, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Marzocco, Stefania, E-mail: smarzocco@unisa.it [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy)

    2015-06-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites often found as contaminants in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide, and the consumption of food or feed contaminated by mycotoxins represents a major risk for human and animal health. Reactive oxygen species are normal products of cellular metabolism. However, disproportionate generation of reactive oxygen species poses a serious problem to bodily homeostasis and causes oxidative tissue damage. In this study we analyzed the effect of two trichothecenes mycotoxins: nivalenol and deoxynivalenol, alone and in combination, on oxidative stress in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Our results indicate the pro-oxidant nivalenol effect in IEC-6, the stronger pro-oxidant effect of nivalenol when compared to deoxynivalenol and, interestingly, that nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidative effects. Mechanistic studies indicate that the observed effects were mediated by NADPH oxidase, calcium homeostasis alteration, NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways activation and by iNOS and nitrotyrosine formation. The toxicological interaction by nivalenol and deoxynivalenol reported in this study in IEC-6, points out the importance of the toxic effect of these mycotoxins, mostly in combination, further highlighting the risk assessment process of these toxins that are of growing concern. - Highlights: • Nivalenol induces oxidative stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). • Nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effects in IECs. • Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol trigger antioxidant response IECs. • These results indicate the importance of mycotoxins co-contamination.

  18. Protective Capacity of Resveratrol, a Natural Polyphenolic Compound, against Deoxynivalenol-Induced Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction and Bacterial Translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Ka-Ho; Wan, Murphy Lam Yim; El-Nezami, Hani; Wang, Mingfu

    2016-05-16

    Contamination of food/feedstuffs by mycotoxins is a serious problem worldwide, causing severe economic losses and serious health problems in animals/humans. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a major mycotoxin contaminant and is known to impair intestinal barrier function. Grapes and red wine are rich in polyphenols, such as resveratrol (RES), which has striking antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. RES is a food-derived component; therefore, it may be simultaneously present with DON in the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to explore in vitro protective effects of RES against DON-induced intestinal damage. The results showed that RES could protect DON-induced bacteria translocation because of enhanced of intestinal barrier function by restoring the DON-induced decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and increase in paracellular permeability. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that RES protects against DON-induced barrier dysfunction by promoting the assembly of claudin-4 in the tight junction complex. This is probably mediated through modulation of IL-6 and IL-8 secretion via mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathways. Our results imply that RES can protect against DON-induced intestinal damage and that RES may be used as a novel dietary intervention strategy to reduce DON toxicity in animals/humans.

  19. Short-Chain Fatty Acids Activate AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Ameliorate Ethanol-Induced Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eamin, E.E.; Masclee, A.A.; Dekker, J.; Pieters, H.J.; Jonkers, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) have been shown to promote intestinal barrier function, but their protective effects against ethanol-induced intestinal injury and underlying mechanisms remain essentially unknown. The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of SCFAs on ethanol-induced barrier d

  20. Migration of antigen-presenting B cells from peripheral to mucosal lymphoid tissues may induce intestinal antigen-specific IgA following parenteral immunization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coffin, SE; Clark, SL; Bos, NA; Brubaker, JO; Offit, PA

    1999-01-01

    Parenterally administered immunizations have long been used to induce protection from mucosal pathogens such as Bordetella pertussis and influenza virus. We previously found that i.m. inoculation of mice with the intestinal pathogen, rotavirus, induced virus-specific Ab production by intestinal lymp

  1. 5-Fluorouracil induced intestinal mucositis via nuclear factor-κB activation by transcriptomic analysis and in vivo bioluminescence imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Ta Chang

    Full Text Available 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU is a commonly used drug for the treatment of malignant cancers. However, approximately 80% of patients undergoing 5-FU treatment suffer from gastrointestinal mucositis. The aim of this report was to identify the drug target for the 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis was established by intraperitoneally administering mice with 100 mg/kg 5-FU. Network analysis of gene expression profile and bioluminescent imaging were applied to identify the critical molecule associated with 5-FU-induced mucositis. Our data showed that 5-FU induced inflammation in the small intestine, characterized by the increased intestinal wall thickness and crypt length, the decreased villus height, and the increased myeloperoxidase activity in tissues and proinflammatory cytokine production in sera. Network analysis of 5-FU-affected genes by transcriptomic tool showed that the expression of genes was regulated by nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB, and NF-κB was the central molecule in the 5-FU-regulated biological network. NF-κB activity was activated by 5-FU in the intestine, which was judged by in vivo bioluminescence imaging and immunohistochemical staining. However, 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA inhibited 5-FU-induced NF-κB activation and proinflammatory cytokine production. Moreover, 5-FU-induced histological changes were improved by 5-ASA. In conclusion, our findings suggested that NF-κB was the critical molecule associated with the pathogenesis of 5-FU-induced mucositis, and inhibition of NF-κB activity ameliorated the mucosal damage caused by 5-FU.

  2. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of dental lesions: diagnostic and therapeutic monitoring tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Ekaterina; Uzunov, Tzonko; Penev, Dimitar; Genova, Tsanislava; Avramov, Latchezar

    2016-01-01

    The carious decay develops a tiny area of demineralization on the enamel, which could be detected by element analytic techniques such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). That demineralization can quickly turn into a large lesion inside the tooth, it is often discovered too late to prevent the kind of decay that leads to cavities. The same optical LIBS detection approach could be used for monitoring of the caries removal using laser ablation or drilling techniques. For LIBS measurements we applied LIBS 2500Plus (Ocean Optics Inc., Dunedin, USA) system, which consists of seven spectrometric channels, covering spectral region from 200 to 980 nm, which optical resolution 0,05 nm, the spectrometers are connected with sample fiber bundle for 7-channels spectral system to the chamber for solid and liquid samples, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, at 1 064 nm, with energy per pulse - 40 mJ, which is applied to induce plasma in the samples. LIBS spectra were obtained after single shot of the laser in the region of pathology. Samples investigated by LIBS are extracted teeth from patients, with periodontal problems on different stage of carious lesions, and their LIBS spectra are compared with the LIBS signals obtained from normal enamel and dentine tissues to receive complete picture of the carious lesion development. The major line of our investigations is related to the development of a methodology for real-time optical feedback control during selective ablation of tooth tissues using LIBS. Tooth structures, with and without pathological changes, are compared and their LIBS element analysis is used to differentiate major changes, which occur during tooth carious process and growth.

  3. Antagonism of quercetin against tremor induced by unilateral striatal lesion of 6-OHDA in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xin; Yuan, Xia; Du, Li-Da; He, Guo-Rong; Du, Guan-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid present in many plants, is reported to be effective in models of neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-tremor effects of quercetin in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of Parkinson's disease. In rats, quercetin had no effect on apomorphine-induced rotations, but it could significantly attenuate muscle tremor of 6-OHDA lesioned rats. Interestingly, quercetin could decrease the burst frequency in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These results suggest that quercetin may have a protective effect on models to mimic muscle tremors of Parkinson's disease. This effect of quercetin may be associated with serotonergic system, but further study is needed.

  4. Impact of the Consumption of Tea Polyphenols on Early Atherosclerotic Lesion Formation and Intestinal Bifidobacteria in High-Fat-Fed ApoE−/− Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhen-Lin; Zeng, Ben-Hua; Wang, Wei; Li, Gui-Hua; Wu, Fei; Wang, Li; Zhong, Qing-Ping; Wei, Hong; Fang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the effect of dietary polyphenols on the intestinal microbiota and the possible associations between this effect and the development of some cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis (AS). However, limited information is available on how these polyphenols affect the gut microbiota and AS development. This study was designed to evaluate the modulation of dietary tea polyphenols (TPs) on intestinal Bifidobacteria (IB) and its correlation with AS development in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE−/−) mice. Fifty C57BL/6 ApoE−/− mice were randomized into one of the five treatment groups (n = 10/group): control group fed normal diet (CK); a group fed a high-fat diet (HFD); and the other three groups fed the same HFD supplemented with TPs in drinking water for 16 weeks. The total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were decreased significantly (P < 0.05) after TP interference. In addition, the TP diet also decreased the plaque area/lumen area (PA/LA) ratios (P < 0.01) in the TP diet group. Interestingly, copies of IB in the gut of ApoE−/− mice were notably increased with TP interference. This increase was dose dependent (P < 0.01) and negatively correlated with the PA/LA ratio (P < 0.05). We conclude that TPs could promote the proliferation of the IB, which is partially responsible for the reduction of AS plaque induced by HFD. PMID:28066771

  5. L -sulpiride, at antidepressant dosage, prevents conditioned-fear stress-induced gastric lesions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, A; De Pol A; Poggioli, R; Cavazzuti, E; Arletti, R; Bertolini, A; Vergoni, A V

    2000-08-01

    It has been previously shown that long-term treatment with low doses of l-sulpiride is highly effective in rat models of depression and of anticipatory anxiety/panic behavior. The present study was aimed at investigating whether the same treatment can prevent the ulcerogenic effect of repeated inescapable stresses. In adult rats, the repeated (7 consecutive days) exposure to an uncontrollable stressful condition (inescapable 2.5 mA scrambled shock for 60 s) produced the development of gastric lesions (multiple punctiform telangiectasias in all rats, with superficial erosions or more severe ulcerations in 10 out 13 rats; score 4.67 +/- 0.44). l-sulpiride, intraperitoneally injected once a day at an antidepressant dose level (4 mg kg(-1) per day), starting 21 days before the beginning of the 7-day sequence of inescapable punishments ( = 28 daily treatments), almost completely prevented the stress-induced gastric injury (score 1.67 +/- 0.29; Psulpiride prevents the development of gastric lesions induced by chronic exposure to uncontrollable stress.

  6. Methotrexate-induced nitrosative stress may play a critical role in small intestinal damage in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolli, Viswa Kalyan; Abraham, Premila [Christian Medical College, Department of Biochemistry, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Rabi, Suganthy [Christian Medical College, Department of Anatomy, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2008-10-15

    Methotrexate (MTX), a structural analogue of folic acid, is widely used as a chemotherapeutic agent for leukemia and other malignancies. One of the major toxic effects of MTX is intestinal injury and enterocolitis.The mechanism of gastrointestinal toxicity of methotrexate has not been investigated completely. Therefore cancer chemotherapy has to be accompanied by symptomatic therapy such as antibiotics and anti-diarrheal drugs. It is important to investigate the mechanism by which methotrexate induces intestinal damage in order to perform cancer chemotherapy effectively by preventing the side effects. This study aimed at investigating whether nitrosative stress plays a role in methotrexate induced small intestinal damage using a rat model. Adult male rats were administered methotrexate at the dose of 7 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneally for 3 consecutive days and sacrificed 12 or 24 h after the final dose of methotrexate. Vehicle treated rats served as control. The intestinal tissue was used for light microscopic studies and markers of nitrosative stress including tissue nitrite level and nitrotyrosine. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, a marker of neutrophil infiltration was also measured in intestinal homogenates. The villi were damaged at 12 h and the damage progressed and became severe at 24 h after the final dose of MTX. Biochemically, tissue nitrate was elevated fivefold at 12 h and fourfold at 24 h after the final dose of MTX as compared with control. Nitrotyrosine, measured immunohistochemically was detected in all the parts of the small intestine. Duodenum stained the most for nitrotyrosine, followed by ileum and then jejunum. The staining for nitrotyrosine was more intense at 24 h as compared with 12 h after the final dose of methotrexate. There was marked neutrophil infiltration as evidenced by increase in MPO activity in the small intestines. In conclusion, the results of the present study reveal that nitrosative stress may play a critical role in

  7. Matrix metalloproteinase 9-induced increase in intestinal epithelial tight junction permeability contributes to the severity of experimental DSS colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nighot, Prashant; Al-Sadi, Rana; Rawat, Manmeet; Guo, Shuhong; Watterson, D Martin; Ma, Thomas

    2015-12-15

    Recent studies have implicated a pathogenic role for matrix metalloproteinases 9 (MMP-9) in inflammatory bowel disease. Although loss of epithelial barrier function has been shown to be a key pathogenic factor for the development of intestinal inflammation, the role of MMP-9 in intestinal barrier function remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of MMP-9 in intestinal barrier function and intestinal inflammation. Wild-type (WT) and MMP-9(-/-) mice were subjected to experimental dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis by administration of 3% DSS in drinking water for 7 days. The mouse colonic permeability was measured in vivo by recycling perfusion of the entire colon using fluorescently labeled dextran. The DSS-induced increase in the colonic permeability was accompanied by an increase in intestinal epithelial cell MMP-9 expression in WT mice. The DSS-induced increase in intestinal permeability and the severity of DSS colitis was found to be attenuated in MMP-9(-/-) mice. The colonic protein expression of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and phospho-MLC was found to be significantly increased after DSS administration in WT mice but not in MMP-9(-/-) mice. The DSS-induced increase in colonic permeability and colonic inflammation was attenuated in MLCK(-/-) mice and MLCK inhibitor ML-7-treated WT mice. The DSS-induced increase in colonic surface epithelial cell MLCK mRNA was abolished in MMP-9(-/-) mice. Lastly, increased MMP-9 protein expression was detected within the colonic surface epithelial cells in ulcerative colitis cases. These data suggest a role of MMP-9 in modulation of colonic epithelial permeability and inflammation via MLCK.

  8. Early changes in microbial colonization selectively modulate intestinal enzymes, but not inducible heat shock proteins in young adult Swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Edith Arnal

    Full Text Available Metabolic diseases and obesity are developing worldwide in a context of plethoric intake of high energy diets. The intestine may play a pivotal role due to diet-induced alterations in microbiota composition and increased permeability to bacterial lipopolysaccharide inducing metabolic inflammation. Early programming of metabolic disorders appearing in later life is also suspected, but data on the intestine are lacking. Therefore, we hypothesized that early disturbances in microbial colonization have short- and long-lasting consequences on selected intestinal components including key digestive enzymes and protective inducible heat shock proteins (HSP. The hypothesis was tested in swine offspring born to control mothers (n = 12 or mothers treated with the antibiotic amoxicillin around parturition (n = 11, and slaughtered serially at 14, 28 and 42 days of age to assess short-term effects. To evaluate long-term consequences, young adult offspring from the same litters were offered a normal or a fat-enriched diet for 4 weeks between 140 and 169 days of age and were then slaughtered. Amoxicillin treatment transiently modified both mother and offspring microbiota. This was associated with early but transient reduction in ileal alkaline phosphatase, HSP70 (but not HSP27 and crypt depth, suggesting a milder or delayed intestinal response to bacteria in offspring born to antibiotic-treated mothers. More importantly, we disclosed long-term consequences of this treatment on jejunal alkaline phosphatase (reduced and jejunal and ileal dipeptidylpeptidase IV (increased and decreased, respectively of offspring born to antibiotic-treated dams. Significant interactions between early antibiotic treatment and later diet were observed for jejunal alkaline phosphatase and sucrase. By contrast, inducible HSPs were not affected. In conclusion, our data suggest that early changes in bacterial colonization not only modulate intestinal architecture and function transiently

  9. Matrix metalloproteinase 9-induced increase in intestinal epithelial tight junction permeability contributes to the severity of experimental DSS colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nighot, Prashant; Al-Sadi, Rana; Guo, Shuhong; Watterson, D. Martin; Ma, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated a pathogenic role for matrix metalloproteinases 9 (MMP-9) in inflammatory bowel disease. Although loss of epithelial barrier function has been shown to be a key pathogenic factor for the development of intestinal inflammation, the role of MMP-9 in intestinal barrier function remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of MMP-9 in intestinal barrier function and intestinal inflammation. Wild-type (WT) and MMP-9−/− mice were subjected to experimental dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis by administration of 3% DSS in drinking water for 7 days. The mouse colonic permeability was measured in vivo by recycling perfusion of the entire colon using fluorescently labeled dextran. The DSS-induced increase in the colonic permeability was accompanied by an increase in intestinal epithelial cell MMP-9 expression in WT mice. The DSS-induced increase in intestinal permeability and the severity of DSS colitis was found to be attenuated in MMP-9−/− mice. The colonic protein expression of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and phospho-MLC was found to be significantly increased after DSS administration in WT mice but not in MMP-9−/− mice. The DSS-induced increase in colonic permeability and colonic inflammation was attenuated in MLCK−/− mice and MLCK inhibitor ML-7-treated WT mice. The DSS-induced increase in colonic surface epithelial cell MLCK mRNA was abolished in MMP-9−/− mice. Lastly, increased MMP-9 protein expression was detected within the colonic surface epithelial cells in ulcerative colitis cases. These data suggest a role of MMP-9 in modulation of colonic epithelial permeability and inflammation via MLCK. PMID:26514773

  10. The Effect of Acupuncture and Electro-acupuncture at ST41 on Intestinal Hypomotility Induced with Loperamide in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sang-mi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of acpuncture and electro-acupuncture of low(EA(L and high(EA(H frequency at Haegye(ST41 on intestinal hypomotility induced with loperamide in rats. Methods : We made suppressed state of intestinal motility with loperamide in rats and carried out needle retention acupuncture, low frequency electro-acupuncture and high frequency electro-acupuncture at ST41 in rats devided into pre-treatment group and post-treatment group. We fed charcoal to them after the treatment and measured the travel rate of charcoal in the gastrointestinal track to analyze which treatment is more effective in state of intestinal hypomotility. Results : None of acupuncture, EA(L and EA(H at ST41 had significant influences on intestinal motility of rat in normal state. Needle retention at ST41 did not significantly increase intestinal motility suppressed with loperamide in rats. Pre-treatment of EA(L and EA(H at ST41 significantly increased intestinal motility suppressed with loperamide in rats. Post-treatment of EA(L and EA(H at ST41 did not have significant influences on intestinal motility of rat in normal state. Conclusions : These results suggest that treatment of EA(L and EA(H at ST41 may be effective on gastric disorders such as intestinal hypomotility and its effect had more prevention than cure. Further study is necessary to know more effects of ST41 and electro-acupuncture of low and high frequency.

  11. Heart lesions associated with anabolic steroid abuse: comparison of post-mortem findings in athletes and norethandrolone-induced lesions in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanton, Laurent; Belhani, Dalila; Vaillant, Fanny; Tabib, Alain; Gomez, Ludovic; Descotes, Jacques; Dehina, Leila; Bui-Xuan, Bernard; Malicier, Daniel; Timour, Quadiri

    2009-07-01

    Among 15,000 forensic post-mortem examinations performed on the coroner's order over a 24-year period (January 1981-December 2004) in the area of Lyon, France (population: 2,000,000), 2250 cases of unexpected cardiac sudden death were identified retrospectively according to WHO criteria. Of these, 108 occurred during recreational sport and 12 occurred in athletes. In the latter category, a history of anabolic steroid abuse was found in 6 cases, whereas pre-existing ordinary cardiac lesions were observed in the 6 remaining cases. To shed light on the possible role of anabolic steroids in the induction of cardiac lesions, an experimental study was conducted in rabbits that were treated orally with norethandrolone 8mg/kg/day for 60 days, and sacrificed at day 90. The histopathological examination of the heart from treated animals showed coronary thrombosis associated with left ventricle hypertrophy in 3 cases, and lesions analogous to toxic or adrenergic myocarditis in all other treated animals. These findings were very similar to those observed after cardiac sudden death in the 6 athletes with a history of anabolic steroid abuse. In addition, elevated caspase-3 activity in the heart of treated rabbits as compared to controls suggests that apoptosis is involved in the induction of norethandrolone-induced cardiac lesions. These results confirm the cardiotoxic potential of anabolic steroid abuse.

  12. Glucagon-like peptide-2 induces rapid digestive adaptation following intestinal resection in preterm neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a frequent complication after intestinal resection in infants suffering from intestinal disease. We tested whether treatment with the intestinotrophic hormone glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases intestinal volume and function in the period immediately following in...

  13. Intestinal microbiome analyses identify melanoma patients at risk for checkpoint-blockade-induced colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubin, Krista; Callahan, Margaret K; Ren, Boyu; Khanin, Raya; Viale, Agnes; Ling, Lilan; No, Daniel; Gobourne, Asia; Littmann, Eric; Huttenhower, Curtis; Pamer, Eric G; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2016-02-02

    The composition of the intestinal microbiota influences the development of inflammatory disorders. However, associating inflammatory diseases with specific microbial members of the microbiota is challenging, because clinically detectable inflammation and its treatment can alter the microbiota's composition. Immunologic checkpoint blockade with ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) signalling, is associated with new-onset, immune-mediated colitis. Here we conduct a prospective study of patients with metastatic melanoma undergoing ipilimumab treatment and correlate the pre-inflammation faecal microbiota and microbiome composition with subsequent colitis development. We demonstrate that increased representation of bacteria belonging to the Bacteroidetes phylum is correlated with resistance to the development of checkpoint-blockade-induced colitis. Furthermore, a paucity of genetic pathways involved in polyamine transport and B vitamin biosynthesis is associated with an increased risk of colitis. Identification of these biomarkers may enable interventions to reduce the risk of inflammatory complications following cancer immunotherapy.

  14. Introducing enteral feeding induces intestinal subclinical inflammation and respective chromatin changes in preterm pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willems, Rhea; Krych, Lukasz; Rybicki, Verena

    2015-01-01

    stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (median: 7.0; interquartile range: 5.63-8.85) compared with naive cells (median 4.2; interquartile range: 2.45-6.33; p = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Enteral feeding, particular with formula, induces subclinical inflammation in the premature intestine and more open chromatin...... were analyzed 5 days after birth. RESULTS: Enteral feeding led to differential upregulation of inflammatory and pattern recognition receptor genes, including IL8 (median: 5.8, 95% CI: 3.9-7.8 for formula; median: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.3-3.3 for colostrum) and TLR4 (median: 3.7, 95% CI: 2.6-4.8 for formula...

  15. Vagal afferent neurons in high fat diet-induced obesity; intestinal microflora, gut inflammation and cholecystokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lartigue, Guillaume; de La Serre, Claire Barbier; Raybould, Helen E

    2011-11-30

    The vagal afferent pathway is the major neural pathway by which information about ingested nutrients reaches the CNS and influences both GI function and feeding behavior. Vagal afferent neurons (VAN) express receptors for many of the regulatory peptides and molecules released from the intestinal wall, pancreas, and adipocytes that influence GI function, glucose homeostasis, and regulate food intake and body weight. As such, they play a critical role in both physiology and pathophysiology, such as obesity, where there is evidence that vagal afferent function is altered. This review will summarize recent findings on changes in vagal afferent function in response to ingestion of high fat diets and explore the hypothesis that changes in gut microbiota and integrity of the epithelium may not only be important in inducing these changes but may be the initial events that lead to dysregulation of food intake and body weight in response to high fat, high energy diets.

  16. Effects of crystalloids and colloids on liver and intestine microcirculation and function in cecal ligation and puncture induced septic rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Septic acute liver and intestinal failure is associated with a high mortality. We therefore investigated the influence of volume resuscitation with different crystalloid or colloid solutions on liver and intestine injury and microcirculation in septic rodents. Methods Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in 77 male rats. Animals were treated with different crystalloids (NaCl 0.9% (NaCl), Ringer’s acetate (RA)) or colloids (Gelafundin 4% (Gel), 6% HES 130/0.4 (HES)). After 24 h animals were re-anesthetized and intestinal (n = 6/group) and liver microcirculation (n = 6/group) were obtained using intravital microscopy, as well as macrohemodynamic parameters were measured. Blood assays and organs were harvested to determine organ function and injury. Results HES improved liver microcirculation, cardiac index and DO2-I, but significantly increased IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α levels and resulted in a mortality rate of 33%. Gel infused animals revealed significant reduction of liver and intestine microcirculation with severe side effects on coagulation (significantly increased PTT and INR, decreased haemoglobin and platelet count). Furthermore Gel showed severe hypoglycemia, acidosis and significantly increased ALT and IL-6 with a lethality of 29%. RA exhibited no derangements in liver microcirculation when compared to sham and HES. RA showed no intestinal microcirculation disturbance compared to sham, but significantly improved the number of intestinal capillaries with flow compared to HES. All RA treated animals survided and showed no severe side effects on coagulation, liver, macrohemodynamic or metabolic state. Conclusions Gelatine 4% revealed devastated hepatic and intestinal microcirculation and severe side effects in CLP induced septic rats, whereas the balanced crystalloid solution showed stabilization of macro- and microhemodynamics with improved survival. HES improved liver microcirculation, but exhibited significantly

  17. Thyroid Hormone-Induced Activation of Notch Signaling is Required for Adult Intestinal Stem Cell Development During Xenopus Laevis Metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasebe, Takashi; Fujimoto, Kenta; Kajita, Mitsuko; Fu, Liezhen; Shi, Yun-Bo; Ishizuya-Oka, Atsuko

    2016-11-21

    In Xenopus laevis intestine during metamorphosis, the larval epithelial cells are removed by apoptosis, and the adult epithelial stem (AE) cells appear concomitantly. They proliferate and differentiate to form the adult epithelium (Ep). Thyroid hormone (TH) is well established to trigger this remodeling by regulating the expression of various genes including Notch receptor. To study the role of Notch signaling, we have analyzed the expression of its components, including the ligands (DLL and Jag), receptor (Notch), and targets (Hairy), in the metamorphosing intestine by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization or immunohistochemistry. We show that they are up-regulated during both natural and TH-induced metamorphosis in a tissue-specific manner. Particularly, Hairy1 is specifically expressed in the AE cells. Moreover, up-regulation of Hairy1 and Hairy2b by TH was prevented by treating tadpoles with a γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI), which inhibits Notch signaling. More importantly, TH-induced up-regulation of LGR5, an adult intestinal stem cell marker, was suppressed by GSI treatment. Our results suggest that Notch signaling plays a role in stem cell development by regulating the expression of Hairy genes during intestinal remodeling. Furthermore, we show with organ culture experiments that prolonged exposure of tadpole intestine to TH plus GSI leads to hyperplasia of secretory cells and reduction of absorptive cells. Our findings here thus provide evidence for evolutionarily conserved role of Notch signaling in intestinal cell fate determination but more importantly reveal, for the first time, an important role of Notch pathway in the formation of adult intestinal stem cells during vertebrate development. Stem Cells 2016.

  18. Impact of dextran sulphate sodium-induced colitis on the intestinal transport of the colon carcinogen PhIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicken, Petra; von Keutz, Anne; Willenberg, Ina; Ostermann, Annika I; Schebb, Nils Helge; Giovannini, Samoa; Kershaw, Olivia; Breves, Gerhard; Steinberg, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in Western countries. Chronic intestinal diseases such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, in which the intestinal barrier is massively disturbed, significantly raise the risk of developing a colorectal tumour. 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is a genotoxic heterocyclic aromatic amine that is formed after strongly heating fish and meat. In this study, the hypothesis that PhIP uptake in the gut is increased during chronic colitis was tested. Chronic colitis was induced by oral administration of dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) to Fischer 344 rats. The transport of PhIP in eight different rat intestinal segments was examined in Ussing chambers. The tissues were incubated with 10 µM PhIP for 90 min, and the concentration of PhIP was determined in the mucosal and serosal compartments of the Ussing chambers as well as in the clamped tissues by LC-MS. Although chronic colitis was clearly induced in the rats, no differences in the intestinal transport of PhIP were observed between control and DSS-treated animals. The hypothesis that in the course of chronic colitis more PhIP is taken up by the intestinal epithelium, thereby increasing the risk of developing colorectal cancer, could not be confirmed in the present report.

  19. Platelet-activating factor induces TLR4 expression in intestinal epithelial cells: implication for the pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Soliman

    Full Text Available Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in neonatal intensive care units, however its pathogenesis is not completely understood. We have previously shown that platelet activating factor (PAF, bacteria and TLR4 are all important factors in the development of NEC. Given that Toll-like receptors (TLRs are expressed at low levels in enterocytes of the mature gastrointestinal tract, but were shown to be aberrantly over-expressed in enterocytes in experimental NEC, we examined the regulation of TLR4 expression and signaling by PAF in intestinal epithelial cells using human and mouse in vitro cell lines, and the ex vivo rat intestinal loop model. In intestinal epithelial cell (IEC lines, PAF stimulation yielded upregulation of both TLR4 mRNA and protein expression and led to increased IL-8 secretion following stimulation with LPS (in an otherwise LPS minimally responsive cell line. PAF stimulation resulted in increased human TLR4 promoter activation in a dose dependent manner. Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis showed PAF induced STAT3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation in IEC, and PAF-induced TLR4 expression was inhibited by STAT3 and NFκB Inhibitors. Our findings provide evidence for a mechanism by which PAF augments inflammation in the intestinal epithelium through abnormal TLR4 upregulation, thereby contributing to the intestinal injury of NEC.

  20. A gene expression programme induced by bovine colostrum whey promotes growth and wound-healing processes in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, M; Pouliot, Y; Gauthier, S; Boutin, Y; Lessard, M

    2014-01-01

    Bovine colostrum is well known for its beneficial properties on health and development. It contains a wide variety of bioactive ingredients that are known to promote a number of cellular processes. Therefore the use of colostrum whey as a feed additive to promote intestinal health has been proposed, yet little is known about mechanisms implicated in its beneficial properties on intestinal epithelial cells. In the present paper, casein were removed from bovine colostrum and the remaining liquid, rich in bioactive compounds, was evaluated for its capacity to modulate cellular processes in porcine intestinal epithelial cell line IPEC-J2 and human colon adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2/15. First, we verified the effect of colostrum whey and cheese whey on processes involved in intestinal wound healing, including cell proliferation, attachment, morphology and migration. Our results showed that colostrum whey promoted proliferation and migration, and decreased specifically the attachment of Caco-2/15 cells on the culture dish. On the other hand, cheese whey induced proliferation and morphological changes in IPEC-J2 cells, but failed to induce migration. The gene expression profile of IPEC-J2 cells following colostrum whey treatment was evaluated by microarray analysis. Results revealed that the expression of a significant number of genes involved in cell migration, adhesion and proliferation was indeed affected in colostrum whey-treated cells. In conclusion, colostrum specific bioactive content could be beneficial for intestinal epithelial cell homoeostasis by controlling biological processes implicated in wound healing through a precise gene expression programme.

  1. Absence of intestinal microbiota does not protect mice from diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleissner, Christine K; Huebel, Nora; Abd El-Bary, Mohamed Mostafa; Loh, Gunnar; Klaus, Susanne; Blaut, Michael

    2010-09-01

    The gut microbiota has been implicated in host nutrient absorption and energy homeostasis. We studied the influence of different diets on body composition in germ-free (GF) and conventional (CV) mice. GF and CV male adult C3H mice were fed ad libitum a semi-synthetic low-fat diet (LFD; carbohydrate-protein-fat ratio: 41:42:17; 19.8 kJ/g), a high-fat diet (HFD; 41:16:43; 21.4 kJ/g) or a commercial Western diet (WD; 41:19:41; 21.5 kJ/g). There was no difference in body weight gain between GF and CV mice on the LFD. On the HFD, GF mice gained more body weight and body fat than CV mice, and had lower energy expenditure. GF mice on the WD gained significantly less body fat than GF mice on the HFD. GF mice on both HFD and WD showed increased intestinal mRNA expression of fasting-induced adipose factor/angiopoietin-like protein 4 (Fiaf/Angptl4), but they showed no major changes in circulating Fiaf/Angptl4 compared with CV mice. The faecal microbiota composition of the CV mice differed between diets: the proportion of Firmicutes increased on both HFD and WD at the expense of the Bacteroidetes. This increase in the Firmicutes was mainly due to the proliferation of one family within this phylum: the Erysipelotrichaceae. We conclude that the absence of gut microbiota does not provide a general protection from diet-induced obesity, that intestinal production of Fiaf/Angptl4 does not play a causal role in gut microbiota-mediated effects on fat storage and that diet composition affects gut microbial composition to larger extent than previously thought.

  2. Heat stress impairs performance parameters, induces intestinal injury, and decreases macrophage activity in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteiro-Filho, W M; Ribeiro, A; Ferraz-de-Paula, V; Pinheiro, M L; Sakai, M; Sá, L R M; Ferreira, A J P; Palermo-Neto, J

    2010-09-01

    Studies on environmental consequences of stress on animal production have grown substantially in the last few years for economic and animal welfare reasons. Physiological, hormonal, and immunological deficits as well as increases in animals' susceptibility to diseases have been reported after different stressors in broiler chickens. The aim of the current experiment is to describe the effects of 2 different heat stressors (31 +/- 1 and 36 +/- 1 degrees C/10 h per d) applied to broiler chickens from d 35 to 42 of life on the corticosterone serum levels, performance parameters, intestinal histology, and peritoneal macrophage activity, correlating and discussing the obtained data under a neuroimmune perspective. In our study, we demonstrated that heat stress (31 +/- 1 and 36 +/- 1 degrees C) increased the corticosterone serum levels and decreased BW gain and food intake. Only chickens submitted to 36 +/- 1 degrees C, however, presented a decrease in feed conversion and increased mortality. We also showed a decrease of bursa of Fabricius (31 +/- 1 and 36 +/- 1 degrees C), thymus (36 +/- 1 degrees C), and spleen (36 +/- 1 degrees C) relative weights and of macrophage basal (31 +/- 1 and 36 +/- 1 degrees C) and Staphylococcus aureus-induced oxidative burst (31 +/- 1 degrees C). Finally, mild multifocal acute enteritis characterized by an increased presence of lymphocytes and plasmocytes within the jejunum's lamina propria was also observed. The stress-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation was taken as responsible for the negative effects observed on the chickens' performance and immune function and also the changes of the intestinal mucosa. The present obtained data corroborate with others in the field of neuroimmunomodulation and open new avenues for the improvement of broiler chicken welfare and production performance.

  3. Multiple NSAID-induced hits injure the small intestine: underlying mechanisms and novel strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelsterli, Urs A; Redinbo, Matthew R; Saitta, Kyle S

    2013-02-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause serious gastrointestinal (GI) injury including jejunal/ileal mucosal ulceration, bleeding, and even perforation in susceptible patients. The underlying mechanisms are largely unknown, but they are distinct from those related to gastric injury. Based on recent insights from experimental models, including genetics and pharmacology in rodents typically exposed to diclofenac, indomethacin, or naproxen, we propose a multiple-hit pathogenesis of NSAID enteropathy. The multiple hits start with an initial pharmacokinetic determinant caused by vectorial hepatobiliary excretion and delivery of glucuronidated NSAID or oxidative metabolite conjugates to the distal small intestinal lumen, where bacterial β-glucuronidase produces critical aglycones. The released aglycones are then taken up by enterocytes and further metabolized by intestinal cytochrome P450s to potentially reactive intermediates. The "first hit" is caused by the NSAID and/or oxidative metabolites that induce severe endoplasmic reticulum stress or mitochondrial stress and lead to cell death. The "second hit" is created by the significant subsequent inflammatory response that would follow such a first-hit injury. Based on these putative mechanisms, strategies have been developed to protect the enterocytes from being exposed to the parent NSAID and/or oxidative metabolites. Among these, a novel strategy already demonstrated in a murine model is the selective disruption of bacteria-specific β-glucuronidases with a novel small molecule inhibitor that does not harm the bacteria and that alleviates NSAID-induced enteropathy. Such mechanism-based strategies require further investigation but provide potential avenues for the alleviation of the GI toxicity caused by multiple NSAID hits.

  4. Cytotoxicity and metabolic stress induced by acetaldehyde in human intestinal LS174T goblet-like cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elamin, E.; Masclee, A.; Troost, F.; Dekker, J.; Jonkers, D.

    2014-01-01

    There is compelling evidence indicating that ethanol and its oxidative metabolite acetaldehyde can disrupt intestinal barrier function. Apart from the tight junctions, mucins secreted by goblet cells provide an effective barrier. Ethanol has been shown to induce goblet cell injury associated with

  5. The role of nitric oxide and oxidative stress in intestinal damage induced by selenium deficiency in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiao; Yao, Haidong; Gao, Xuejiao; Zhang, Ziwei; Wang, Jiu-Feng; Xu, Shi-Wen

    2015-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an essential messenger molecule and is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. Although NO has important biological functions in mammals, its role in the mechanism that occurs after intestinal injuries in chickens remains unknown. The objective of the present study was to investigate the real role of NO and oxidative stress in the intestinal injuries of chickens induced by selenium (Se) deficiency. A total 150 chickens were randomly divided into the following two groups: a low-Se group (L group, fed a Se-deficient diet containing 0.020 mg/kg Se) and a control group (C group, fed a commercial diet containing 0.2 mg/kg Se). The activities and mRNA levels of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), the production of glutathione (GSH) and NO, and the protein and mRNA levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were examined in the intestinal tissues (duodenum, jejunum, and rectum) at 15, 25, 35, 45, and 55 days. Methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) levels were also detected by assay kits. Then, the morphologies of the tissues were observed under the microscope after hematoxylin and eosin staining (H&E staining). The results showed that Se deficiency induced higher inflammatory damage and MDA levels (P chickens and that low levels of GSH-Px and high contents of NO may exert a major role in the injury of the intestinal tract induced by Se deficiency.

  6. Cytotoxicity and metabolic stress induced by acetaldehyde in human intestinal LS174T goblet-like cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elamin, E.; Masclee, A.; Troost, F.; Dekker, J.; Jonkers, D.

    2014-01-01

    There is compelling evidence indicating that ethanol and its oxidative metabolite acetaldehyde can disrupt intestinal barrier function. Apart from the tight junctions, mucins secreted by goblet cells provide an effective barrier. Ethanol has been shown to induce goblet cell injury associated with al

  7. Evolutionary Developments in Interpreting the Gluten-Induced Mucosal Celiac Lesion: An Archimedian Heuristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Michael N.; Heal, Calvin J.

    2017-01-01

    The evolving history of the small intestinal biopsy and its interpretation—and misinterpretations—are described in this paper. Certain interpretative errors in the technical approaches to histological assessment are highlighted—even though we may never be rid of them. For example, mucosal “flattening” does not reduce individual villi to their cores, as still seems to be widely believed. Neither is the mucosa undergoing an atrophic process—since it can recover structurally. Rather, the intestinal mucosa manifests a vast hypertrophic response resulting in the formation of large plateaus formed from partially reduced villi and their amalgamation with the now increased height and width of the inter-villous ridges: this is associated with considerable increases in crypt volumes. Sections through mosaic plateaus gives an erroneous impression of the presence of stunted, flat-topped villi which continues to encourage both the continued use of irrelevant “atrophy” terminologies and a marked failure to perceive what random sections through mosaic plateaus actually look like. While reviewing the extensive 40+ year literature on mucosal analysis, we extracted data on intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) counts from 607 biopsies, and applied receiver-operating characteristic (ROC)-curve analysis. From that perspective, it appears that counting IEL/100 enterocyte nuclei in routine haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) sections provides the most useful discriminator of celiac mucosae at histological level, with an effective cut-off of 27 IEL, and offering a very high sensitivity with few false negatives. ROC-curve analysis also revealed the somewhat lesser accuracies of either CD3+ or γδ+ IEL counts. Current official guidelines seem to be somewhat inadequate in clearly defining the spectrum of gluten-induced mucosal pathologies and how they could be optimally interpreted, as well as in promoting the ideal manner for physicians and pathologists to interact in interpreting

  8. Rebeccamycin Attenuates TNF-α-Induced Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction by Inhibiting Myosin Light Chain Kinase Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Watari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Although proinflammatory cytokine–induced disruption of intestinal epithelial barrier integrity is associated with intestinal inflammatory disease, effective treatment for barrier dysfunction is lacking. Previously, we demonstrated that rebeccamycin alleviates epithelial barrier dysfunction induced by inflammatory cytokines in Caco-2 cell monolayers; however, the underlying mechanism remained unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which rebeccamycin protects the epithelial barrier function of Caco-2 cells exposed to TNF-α. Methods: To confirm the epithelial barrier function of Caco-2 cell monolayers, transepithelial electrical resistance (TER and paracellular permeability were measured. Production levels and localization of tight junction (TJ proteins were analyzed by immunoblot and immunofluorescence, respectively. Phosphorylated myosin light chain (pMLC and MLC kinase (MLCK mRNA expression levels were determined by immunoblot and quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. Results: Rebeccamycin attenuated the TNF-α-induced reduction in TER and increase in paracellular permeability. Rebeccamycin increased claudin-5 expression, but not claudin-1, -2, -4, occludin or ZO-1 expression, and prevented the TNF-α-induced changes in ZO-1 and occludin localization. Rebeccamycin suppressed the TNF-α-induced increase in MLCK mRNA expression, thus suppressing MLC phosphorylation. The rebeccamycin-mediated reduction in MLCK production and protection of epithelial barrier function were alleviated by Chk1 inhibition. Conclusion: Rebeccamycin attenuates TNF-α-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial barrier integrity by inducing claudin-5 expression and suppressing MLCK production via Chk1 activation.

  9. Rebeccamycin Attenuates TNF-α-Induced Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction by Inhibiting Myosin Light Chain Kinase Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Akihiro; Sakamoto, Yuta; Hisaie, Kota; Iwamoto, Kazuki; Fueta, Miho; Yagi, Kiyohito; Kondoh, Masuo

    2017-01-01

    Although proinflammatory cytokine-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial barrier integrity is associated with intestinal inflammatory disease, effective treatment for barrier dysfunction is lacking. Previously, we demonstrated that rebeccamycin alleviates epithelial barrier dysfunction induced by inflammatory cytokines in Caco-2 cell monolayers; however, the underlying mechanism remained unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which rebeccamycin protects the epithelial barrier function of Caco-2 cells exposed to TNF-α. To confirm the epithelial barrier function of Caco-2 cell monolayers, transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and paracellular permeability were measured. Production levels and localization of tight junction (TJ) proteins were analyzed by immunoblot and immunofluorescence, respectively. Phosphorylated myosin light chain (pMLC) and MLC kinase (MLCK) mRNA expression levels were determined by immunoblot and quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. Rebeccamycin attenuated the TNF-α-induced reduction in TER and increase in paracellular permeability. Rebeccamycin increased claudin-5 expression, but not claudin-1, -2, -4, occludin or ZO-1 expression, and prevented the TNF-α-induced changes in ZO-1 and occludin localization. Rebeccamycin suppressed the TNF-α-induced increase in MLCK mRNA expression, thus suppressing MLC phosphorylation. The rebeccamycin-mediated reduction in MLCK production and protection of epithelial barrier function were alleviated by Chk1 inhibition. Rebeccamycin attenuates TNF-α-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial barrier integrity by inducing claudin-5 expression and suppressing MLCK production via Chk1 activation. © 2017 The Author(s)Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Glucagon-like peptide-2 induces rapid digestive adaptation following intestinal resection in preterm neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Andreas; Thymann, Thomas; Lund, Pernille;

    2013-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a frequent complication after intestinal resection in infants suffering from intestinal disease. We tested whether treatment with the intestinotrophic hormone glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases intestinal volume and function in the period immediately following...... and protein contents and increased total protein synthesis rate in SBS+GLP-2 vs. SBS pigs (+100%, P fluid and macronutrients. GLP-2 treatment may...... be a promising therapy to enhance intestinal adaptation and improve digestive function in preterm infants with jejunostomy following intestinal resection....

  11. Ascorbic Acid may Exacerbate Aspirin-Induced Increase in Intestinal Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira, Ivana R; Kruger, Marlena C; Hurst, Roger D; Lentle, Roger G

    2015-09-01

    Ascorbic acid in combination with aspirin has been used to prevent aspirin-induced oxidative GI damage. We aimed to determine whether ascorbic acid reduces or prevents aspirin-induced changes in intestinal permeability over a 6-hr period using saccharidic probes mannitol and lactulose. The effects of administration of 600 mg aspirin alone, 500 mg ascorbic acid alone and simultaneous dosage of both agents were compared in a cross-over study in 28 healthy female volunteers. These effects were also compared with that of a placebo. The ability of ascorbic acid to mitigate the effects of aspirin when administered either half an hour before or after dosage with aspirin was also assessed in 19 healthy female volunteers. The excretion of lactulose over the 6-hr period was augmented after consumption of either aspirin or ascorbic acid compared with that after consumption of placebo. Dosage with ascorbic acid alone augmented the excretion of lactulose more than did aspirin alone. Simultaneous dosage with both agents augmented the excretion of lactulose in an additive manner. The timing of dosage with ascorbic acid in relation to that with aspirin had no significant effect on the excretion of the two sugars. These findings indicate that ascorbic acid does not prevent aspirin-induced increase in gut permeability rather that both agents augment it to a similar extent. The additive effect on simultaneous dosage with both agents in augmenting the absorption of lactulose suggests that each influences paracellular permeability by different pathways.

  12. Nephroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of aqueous extract of Melissa officinalis L. on acetaminophen-induced and pleurisy-induced lesions in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Pereira Müzell

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the bioactive properties of an aqueous extract of M. officinalis for its anti-inflammatory activity and its protection against hepatic and renal lesions induced by acetaminophen (APAP. Animals pre-treated with the crude extract in pleurisy induced by carrageenan showed a reduction in the amounts of exudate, in the numbers of leukocytes and polymorphonuclear cells. Intragastric administration of the extract for seven days prior to the APAP-induced lesion showed no protective effect on the liver. The treatment with the extract induced an increase of serum aspartate aminotransferase, indicating a rise of toxicity. Contrarily, the same treatment reduced the APAP induced lesion in kidney, with respect to ν-glutamyltransferase. The results suggested that the extract was not hepatoprotective and could lead to an increase in the lesions induced by the APAP. On the other hand, the extract was nephroprotective against the lesions induced by the APAP and showed an anti-inflammatory effect on pleurisy carrageenan-induced.

  13. Accuracy of non-enhanced MRI to monitor histological lesion size during laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremer, Christoph; Kreft, Gerald [Department of Clinical Radiology, University of Muenster (Germany); Filler, Timm [Institute for Anatomy, University of Muenster (Germany); Reimer, Peter [Zentralinstitut fuer Bildgebende Diagnostik, Staedtisches Klinikum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of non-enhanced MRI using a T1-weighted 2D turbo fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence during laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) to determine histological lesion size of laser-induced hepatic lesions. The LITT was performed on pig liver samples at various power settings and durations. For MR monitoring during and after LITT a T1-weighted 2D turbo-FLASH sequence was applied. Lesions seen by MRI during and after LITT were correlated with histological lesion size. Histologically, a core zone of complete tissue ablation close to the tip of the applicator could be differentiated from an adjacent transitional zone showing incomplete necrosis. Magnetic resonance imaging right at the end of LITT (i.e., with maximum heating effects) grossly overestimated the core zone but accurately described the transitional zone. Magnetic resonance imaging after cooling of the tissue (therefore showing structural as opposed to thermal changes) exactly depicted the core zone of complete tissue ablation. Non-enhanced MRI using a T1-weighted 2D turbo FLASH sequence strongly overestimates the histological lesion size during LITT; however, structural changes of the tissue seen after cooling accurately define lesion size in LITT. For clinical purposes the lesion geometry seen during MR monitoring should therefore well extend the tumor margins. (orig.)

  14. Topical photosan-mediated photodynamic therapy for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch premaligant lesions: an in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yih-Chih; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Chen, Jian Wen; Chen, Ying-Ru; Lee, Jeng-Woei

    2010-02-01

    One of the best strategies to prevent the occurrence of oral cancer is to eliminate oral precancers and block their further malignant transformation. Previous studies showed that photosan-mediated photodynamic therapy (photosan-PDT) is very effective for human head and neck cancers. To avoid the systemic photodynamic toxicity of photosan, this study was designed to use a topical photosan-PDT for treatment of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions. Twelve 10-week-old male Syrian golden hamsters were used in this study. DMBA was applied to the left buccal pouches thrice a week for 8 to 10 weeks and mineral oil was painted on the right buccal pouches thrice a week for 8 to 10 weeks as the normal controls. Six hamsters were euthanized for tissue harvest. Precancerous lesions of moderate to severe dysplasia were consistently induced and proven by histological examination. These induced precancerous lesions in the remaining 6 hamsters were used for testing the efficacy of topical photosan-PDT. Before PDT, fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine when protoporphyrine IX (PpIX) reached its peak level in the lesional epithelial cells after topical application of photosan-gel. We found that PpIX reached its peak level in precancerous lesions about 13.5 min after topical application of photosan-gel. The precancerous lesions in 4 hamsters were treated with topical photosan-PDT using the 635-nm LED light once or twice a week. Complete regression of the precancerous lesions was found after 2-4 PDT treatments by visual and histological examination. Our findings indicate that topical photosan-PDT is a very effective treatment modality for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions.

  15. Neurotoxic lesion of the rostral perirhinal cortex blocks stress-induced exploratory behavioral changes in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Klaus, Brigitte

    2009-03-01

    Exposure to stress leads to adaptive responses including both behavioral and physiological changes. This process is induced by the activation of multiple brain regions. The present study examined the role of the rostral perirhinal cortex (rPRh) in behavioral changes following electrical foot shock-induced stress. The rPRh of rats was lesioned bilaterally by local microinjections of 10 microg N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) before foot shocks (0.7 mA, 1 s). The effects of these lesions on foot shock-induced changes in exploratory behaviors were tested in the open field (4 h, 48 h, 72 h, and 14 days after foot shocks) and the light-dark box (7 days after foot shocks). Foot-shocked and sham-lesioned rats showed several well known behavioral changes in the open field (e.g., immobility, reduction of exploratory activity) most marked at 48 h after foot shocks, and the light-dark box (e.g., reduction of time spent and activity in the lit compartment). All these stress-induced behavioral changes were blocked by neurotoxic lesions of the rPRh. Furthermore, rPRh lesions did not affect behavior in the open field and the light-dark box in unstressed rats. Taken together, these data indicate that the rPRh is involved in neurophysiological mechanisms that mediate changes induced by foot-shock stress in exploratory behaviors which indicate unconditioned fear or anxiety.

  16. Prickly pear cactus (Opuntia ficus indica var. saboten) protects against stress-induced acute gastric lesions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Hyun; Jeon, Byung Ju; Kim, Dae Hyun; Kim, Tae Il; Lee, Hee Kyoung; Han, Dae Seob; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Tae Bum; Kim, Jung Wha; Sung, Sang Hyun

    2012-11-01

    The protective activity of prickly pear cactus (Opuntia ficus indica var. saboten) fruit juice and its main constituent, betanin, were evaluated against stress-induced acute gastric lesions in rats. After 6 h of water immersion restraint stress (WIRS), gastric mucosal lesions with bleeding were induced in Sprague-Dawley rats. Pretreatment of a lyophilized powder containing O. ficus indica var. saboten fruit juice and maltodextrin (OFSM) and betanin significantly reduced stress lesions (800-1600 mg/kg). Both OFSM and betanin effectively prevented the decrease in gastric mucus content as detected by alcian blue staining. In addition, OFSM significantly suppressed WIRS-induced increases in the level of gastric mucosal tumor necrosis factor-α and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Betanin alone was only effective in decreasing MPO. These results revealed the protective activity of OFSM against stress-induced acute gastric lesions and that betanin may contribute to OFSM's gastric protective activity, at least in part. When OFSM and betanin were taken together, OFSM exerted gastroprotective activity against stress-induced gastric lesions by maintaining gastric mucus, which might be related to the attenuation of MPO-mediated damage and proinflammatory cytokine production.

  17. Prickly Pear Cactus (Opuntia ficus indica var. saboten) Protects Against Stress-Induced Acute Gastric Lesions in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Hyun; Jeon, Byung Ju; Kim, Dae Hyun; Kim, Tae Il; Lee, Hee Kyoung; Han, Dae Seob; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Tae Bum; Kim, Jung Wha

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The protective activity of prickly pear cactus (Opuntia ficus indica var. saboten) fruit juice and its main constituent, betanin, were evaluated against stress-induced acute gastric lesions in rats. After 6 h of water immersion restraint stress (WIRS), gastric mucosal lesions with bleeding were induced in Sprague–Dawley rats. Pretreatment of a lyophilized powder containing O. ficus indica var. saboten fruit juice and maltodextrin (OFSM) and betanin significantly reduced stress lesions (800–1600 mg/kg). Both OFSM and betanin effectively prevented the decrease in gastric mucus content as detected by alcian blue staining. In addition, OFSM significantly suppressed WIRS-induced increases in the level of gastric mucosal tumor necrosis factor-α and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Betanin alone was only effective in decreasing MPO. These results revealed the protective activity of OFSM against stress-induced acute gastric lesions and that betanin may contribute to OFSM's gastric protective activity, at least in part. When OFSM and betanin were taken together, OFSM exerted gastroprotective activity against stress-induced gastric lesions by maintaining gastric mucus, which might be related to the attenuation of MPO-mediated damage and proinflammatory cytokine production. PMID:23062184

  18. Sinomenine induces the generation of intestinal Treg cells and attenuates arthritis via activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Bei; Yuan, Xusheng; Dou, Yannong; Wu, Xin; Wang, Yuhui; Xia, Yufeng; Dai, Yue

    2016-10-01

    Sinomenine (SIN), an anti-arthritis drug, has previously been proven to exert immunomodulatory activity in rats by inducing intestinal regulatory T-cells (Treg cells). Here, we assessed the effect of SIN on the generation and function of Treg cells in autoimmune arthritis, and the underlying mechanisms in view of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). The proportions of Treg cells and IL-17-producing T-cells (Th17 cells) differentiated from naive T-cells were analyzed by flow cytometric analysis. The AhR agonistic effect of SIN was tested by analyzing the activation of downstream signaling pathways and target genes. The dependence of intestinal Treg cell induction and arthritis alleviation by SIN on AhR activation was confirmed in a mouse collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. SIN promoted the differentiation and function of intestinal Treg cells in vitro. It induced the expression and activity of AhR target gene, promoted AhR/Hsp90 dissociation and AhR nuclear translocation, induced XRE reporter activity, and facilitated AhR/XRE binding in vitro, displaying the potential to be an agonist of AhR. In CIA mice, SIN induced the generation of intestinal Treg cells, and facilitated the immunosuppressive function of these Treg cells as shown by an adoptive transfer test. In addition, the induction of intestinal Treg cells and the anti-arthritic effect of SIN in CIA mice could be largely diminished by the AhR antagonist resveratrol. SIN attenuates arthritis by promoting the generation and function of Treg cells in an AhR-dependent manner.

  19. TLR-independent anti-inflammatory function of intestinal epithelial TRAF6 signalling prevents DSS-induced colitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlantis, Katerina; Polykratis, Apostolos; Welz, Patrick-Simon; van Loo, Geert; Pasparakis, Manolis; Wullaert, Andy

    2016-06-01

    The gut microbiota modulates host susceptibility to intestinal inflammation, but the cell types and the signalling pathways orchestrating this bacterial regulation of intestinal homeostasis remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated the function of intestinal epithelial toll-like receptor (TLR) responses in the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced mouse model of colitis. We applied an in vivo genetic approach allowing intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-specific deletion of the critical TLR signalling adaptors, MyD88 and/or TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), as well as the downstream ubiquitin ligase TRAF6 in order to reveal the IEC-intrinsic function of these TLR signalling molecules during DSS colitis. Mice lacking TRAF6 in IECs showed exacerbated DSS-induced inflammatory responses that ensued in the development of chronic colon inflammation. Antibiotic pretreatment abolished the increased DSS susceptibility of these mice, showing that epithelial TRAF6 signalling pathways prevent the gut microbiota from driving excessive colitis. However, in contrast to epithelial TRAF6 deletion, blocking epithelial TLR signalling by simultaneous deletion of MyD88 and TRIF specifically in IECs did not affect DSS-induced colitis severity. This in vivo functional comparison between TRAF6 and MyD88/TRIF deletion in IECs shows that the colitis-protecting effects of epithelial TRAF6 signalling are not triggered by TLRs. Intestinal epithelial TRAF6-dependent but MyD88/TRIF-independent and, thus, TLR-independent signalling pathways are critical for preventing propagation of DSS-induced colon inflammation by the gut microbiota. Moreover, our experiments using mice with dual MyD88/TRIF deletion in IECs unequivocally show that the gut microbiota trigger non-epithelial TLRs rather than epithelial TLRs to restrict DSS colitis severity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Immunohistological comparison of granulated cell proteins in induced immediate urticarial dermographism and delayed pressure urticaria lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, M T; Peterson, E A; Kobza-Black, A; English, J S; Dover, J S; Murphy, G M; Bhogal, B; Greaves, M W; Winkelmann, R K; Leiferman, K M

    1995-12-01

    Urticarial dermographism and delayed pressure urticaria are two forms of physical urticaria which are well defined clinically and histologically. Previous studies have shown eosinophil granule protein deposition in urticarial reactions, including chronic urticaria, solar urticaria and delayed pressure urticaria. To evaluate and compare the involvement of granulated inflammatory cells in urticarial dermographism and delayed pressure urticaria, we studied sequential biopsies of induced lesions of urticarial dermographism and delayed pressure urticaria by indirect immunofluorescence, to detect eosinophil granule major basic protein (MBP) and neutrophil granule elastase. Biopsies from dermographic lesions at time 0, 5 min, 15 min, 2 h and 24 h, showed few infiltrating eosinophils, with minimal extracellular MBP deposition, and a few infiltrating neutrophils, with minimal neutrophil elastase deposition, throughout the evolution of the lesions. Sequential biopsies of delayed pressure urticaria at time 0, 20 min, 6, 12 and 24 h, showed eosinophil infiltration with extensive MBP deposition beginning at 20 min, and neutrophil infiltration with variable elastase deposition beginning at 20 min. Control tissue specimens from normal volunteers showed neutrophil infiltration and slight degranulation, but no eosinophil infiltration or degranulation. Comparison of urticarial dermographism with delayed pressure urticaria showed marked differences in the patterns of infiltration. Delayed pressure urticaria, with eosinophil and neutrophil degranulation, was strikingly similar to the IgE-mediated late phase reaction. In contrast, eosinophil and neutrophil involvement in urticarial dermographism was minimal. Considering the extent of eosinophil granule protein deposition and the biological activities of the eosinophil granule proteins, the findings in delayed pressure urticaria point to an important pathophysiological role of eosinophils in the disease.

  1. Nystagmus induced by high frequency vibrations of the skull in total unilateral peripheral vestibular lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Georges; Perrin, Philippe; Schmerber, Sebastien

    2008-03-01

    The skull vibration-induced nystagmus test (SVINT) is a useful complementary test to the caloric test, which evaluates very low frequencies, and the head shaking test (HST), which explores medium range frequencies. These three tests are fully correlated in total unilateral vestibular lesions (tUVL) with a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 94% for the SVINT. The results of the interference of the SVINT with the cold caloric test on the intact ear suggest that different vestibular sensory cells are involved in these two tests. The stimulus location optimization suggests that vibrations directly stimulate the inner ear on the intact side. The aim of this study was to establish the effectiveness of a rapid, non-invasive test used to detect vestibular asymmetry at 30, 60 and 100 Hz stimulation in tUVL. The high frequency vibration test applied to the skull using the SVINT was compared to the results of HST and caloric test in 134 patients and 95 normal subjects: 131 patients had a total unilateral vestibular dysfunction and 3 had a bilateral total lesion (tBVL). The effects of stimulus frequency, topography and head position were studied using a video-nystagmograph. In tUVL, the SVINT always revealed a lesional nystagmus beating toward the healthy side at all frequencies. The mastoid site was more efficient than the cervical and vertex sites (p0.005). The mean skull vibratory nystagmus (SVN) slow phase velocity (SPV) is 10.7 degrees (SD =7.5; n=20). Mastoid stimulation efficiency was not correlated with the side of stimulation. SVN SPV was correlated with the total caloric efficiency on the healthy ear (p=0.03). The interference of the SVINT during the cold caloric test on the intact ear demonstrated a reversal of the caloric nystagmus at each application of the vibrator. In tBVL, SVINT revealed no nystagmus.

  2. High-frequency skull vibration-induced nystagmus test in partial vestibular lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Georges; Karkas, Alexandre; Perrin, Philippe; Chahine, Karim; Schmerber, Sébastien

    2011-10-01

    To establish the effectiveness of the skull vibration-induced nystagmus test (SVINT) as a rapid high-frequency stimulation test, in the evaluation of partial unilateral vestibular lesions (pUVL). SVINT (30, 60, and 100 Hz), caloric, and head-shaking tests were performed in 99 patients with pUVL. These results were compared with those in 9 patients with symmetrical partial bilateral labyrinthine malformations, 131 patients with total unilateral vestibular lesions (tUVL), and 95 control subjects. A skull vibratory nystagmus (SVN) was found in 75% of patients with pUVL and 98% with tUVL. In pUVL: SVINT revealed asymmetric responses in 20% of patients where other tests were normal; SVN direction at 100 Hz was opposite to the head-shaking nystagmus direction in 30% and opposite to SVN at 30 Hz in 10% of cases. At 100 Hz, SVN beat toward the safe side in 91% of cases; SVN values at 60 and 100 Hz were higher than those at 30 Hz (p < 0.005). SVN was found in unilateral superior canal dehiscences. Partial bilateral labyrinthine malformations revealed no nystagmus. SVINT complements head-shaking and caloric tests in multifrequency assessment of patients with pUVL, as a global vestibular test. In contrast with tUVL results, SVINT does not always indicate the side of partial lesions, neither does it locate their level on the vestibulo-ocular pathway. This test is useful to reveal a vestibular asymmetry as a bedside examination test and may be used as a "vestibular Weber."

  3. Human Papillomavirus-Induced Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions in Vulvar Lichen Planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regauer, Sigrid; Eberz, Barbara; Reich, Olaf

    2016-10-01

    Approximately 50% of vulvar cancers arise after transforming infections with human papilloma virus (HPV) via the precursor squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL). Lichen planus (LP)-associated vulvar cancers are typically HPV negative and arise via the precursor differentiated vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (d-VIN). An index case of vulvar high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (H-SIL) in an LP patient prompted this 12-year retrospective analysis about frequency of HPV-induced SIL in 785 biopsies of 584 patients with vulvar LP. All SIL were analyzed for p53 and p16 overexpression and for presence of DNA of 32 HPV subtypes. Nine (1.6%) of 584 women with papular (3) and mucosal "erosive" LP (6) presented with H-SIL (7) and low-grade SIL (2). All SILs harbored HPV16-DNA and showed p16-overexpression. Concomitant immune suppression included T-suppressor lymphocyte deficit (1), systemic (1), and topical (2) cortisone therapy. H-SILs regressed spontaneously (1) or after imiquimod therapy (3). Three women with erosive LP discontinued imiquimod because of side effects and had laser destruction (1), skinning vulvectomy (1), and surgery (1) for definitive treatment. Two women have recurrent vulvar SILs, and 1 woman progressed to invasive SCC. In the same patient population, 16 of 584 women had a d-VIN, and 9 of 16 with progression to SCC. H-SILs in vulvar LP are rare and may occur in the setting of risk factors. If clinical suspicion arises, biopsy and histological examination assist in correct etiologic classification of a precancerous lesion and subsequent therapy decisions. The minimal risk for H-SIL development in vulvar LP patients should not preclude therapy of LP.

  4. Penicillamine-induced elastosis perforans serpiginosa with abnormal "lumpy-bumpy" elastic fibers in lesional and non-lesional skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna S Khatu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Four types of elastosis perforans serpiginosa (EPS have been described in literature: 1 idiopathic EPS, 2 reactive perforating elastosis associated with connective tissue disorders, 3 in some instances of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE, disease-specific calcified elastic tissue is extruded, producing a clinical picture indistinguishable from other types, may also be seen in patients undergoing hemodialysis and 4 EPS induced by long-term treatment with D-penicillamine is observed in patients suffering from Wilson′s disease. Long term D-penicillamine therapy causes an alteration in the dermal elastic tissue. D-penicillamine induced EPS has a distinctive histopathologic feature - serrated appearance of elastic fibers due to perpendicular budding from their surface giving a "lumpy-bumpy" look. D-penicillamine induced elastic fiber alteration may not always manifest clinically as EPS. We report a case of D-penicillamine induced widespread alteration in skin elastic tissue with distinct histopathologic features.

  5. Penicillamine-induced elastosis perforans serpiginosa with abnormal "lumpy-bumpy" elastic fibers in lesional and non-lesional skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatu, Swapna S; Dhurat, Rachita S; Nayak, Chitra S; Pereira, Rickson R; Kagne, Rucha B

    2011-01-01

    Four types of elastosis perforans serpiginosa (EPS) have been described in literature: 1) idiopathic EPS, 2) reactive perforating elastosis associated with connective tissue disorders, 3) in some instances of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), disease-specific calcified elastic tissue is extruded, producing a clinical picture indistinguishable from other types, may also be seen in patients undergoing hemodialysis and 4) EPS induced by long-term treatment with D-penicillamine is observed in patients suffering from Wilson's disease. Long term D-penicillamine therapy causes an alteration in the dermal elastic tissue. D-penicillamine induced EPS has a distinctive histopathologic feature - serrated appearance of elastic fibers due to perpendicular budding from their surface giving a "lumpy-bumpy" look. D-penicillamine induced elastic fiber alteration may not always manifest clinically as EPS. We report a case of D-penicillamine induced widespread alteration in skin elastic tissue with distinct histopathologic features.

  6. Acute and chronic respiratory lesions induced by sulfur mustard in guinea pigs: Role of tachykinins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvet, J.H.; Trouiller, G.; Harf, A.

    1993-05-13

    We investigated in anesthetized guinea pigs the involvement of tachykinins in respiratory alterations after an airway intoxication by sulfur mustard (SM). Early lesions were evaluated after 5h. Respiratory system resistance (R) and compliance were measured by the occlusion method and airway microvascular permeability by measuring the Evans Blue dye concentration in the trachea and main bronchi. Two groups of animals were studied treated with capsaicin (which induces a tachykinin depletion) or by its vehicle. Capsaicin pretreatment had no effect on the measured parameters. We also measured 14 J after the intoxication tracheal epithelium neutral endopeptidase (NEP) (the main enzyme which degrades tachykinins). In addition bronchial responsiveness to exogenous substance P was studied in two groups of animals intoxicated with SM or not. Tracheal epithelium NEP activity was decreased from 0.448 + or 0.027 nmol.min- 1.mg protein- 1 in controls to 0. 182 + or 0.038 in intoxicated animals. Response to substance P was greater in intoxicated animals with R=2.98 + or - 1.57 cmH20.MI-1.s versus 0.35 + or 0.02 in controls, after 5.10-5 M aerosolized substance P These results suggest tachykinins are not preponderant in the early stage lesions but that bronchial hyperactivity is present at recovery, related to epithelium NEP depletion.

  7. Resistance to adenovirally induced hyperleptinemia in rats. Comparison of ventromedial hypothalamic lesions and mutated leptin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, K; Shimabukuro, M; Chen, G; Wang, M Y; Lee, Y; Kalra, P S; Dube, M G; Kalra, S P; Newgard, C B; Unger, R H

    1998-01-01

    Leptin regulates appetite and body weight via hypothalamic targets, but it can act directly on cultured pancreatic islets to regulate their fat metabolism. To obtain in vivo evidence that leptin may act peripherally as well as centrally, we compared the effect of adenovirally induced hyperleptinemia on food intake, body weight, and islet fat content in ventromedial hypothalamic-lesioned (VMHL) rats, sham-lesioned (SL) controls, and Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats in which the leptin receptor is mutated. Infusion with recombinant adenovirus containing the rat leptin cDNA increased plasma leptin by approximately 20 ng/ml in VMHL and ZDF rats but had no effect on their food intake, body weight, or fat tissue weight. Caloric matching of hyperphagic VMHL rats to SL controls did not reduce their resistance to hyperleptinemia. Whereas prediabetic ZDF rats had a fourfold elevation in islet fat, in VMHL rats islet fat was normal and none of them became diabetic. Isolated islets from ZDF rats were completely resistant to the lipopenic action of leptin, while VMHL islets exhibited 50% of the normal response; caloric matching of VMHL rats to SL controls increased leptin responsiveness of their islets to 92% of controls. We conclude that leptin regulation of adipocyte fat requires an intact VMH but that islet fat content is regulated independently of the VMH. PMID:9710441

  8. Epigenome-wide DNA methylation changes with development of arsenic-induced skin lesions in Bangladesh: a case-control follow-up study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Studies have found an association between aberrant DNA methylation and arsenic-induced skin lesions. Yet, little is known about DNA methylation changes over time in people who develop arsenic-induced skin lesions. We sought to investigate epigenome-wide changes of DNA methylation in people who developed arsenic-induced skin lesions in a ten year period. In 2009–2011, we conducted a follow-up study of 900 skin lesion cases and 900 controls and identified 10 people who developed skin lesions si...

  9. Role of murine intestinal interleukin-1 receptor 1-expressing lymphoid tissue inducer-like cells in Salmonella infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent L Chen

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-1 signaling plays a critical role in intestinal immunology. Here, we report that the major population of intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes expressing IL-1 receptor 1 (IL-1R1 is the lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi-like cell, a type of innate lymphoid cell. These cells are significant producers of IL-22, and this IL-22 production depends on IL-1R1 signaling. LTi-like cells are required for defense against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Moreover, colonic LTi-like cell numbers depend on the presence of the intestinal microbiota. LTi-like cells require IL-1R1 for production of protective cytokines and confer protection in infectious colitis, and their cell numbers in the colon depend upon having a microbiome.

  10. The intestinal microbiota determines the colitis-inducing potential of T-bet-deficient Th cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Jakob; Durek, Pawel; Kühl, Anja A; Schattenberg, Florian; Maschmeyer, Patrick; Siracusa, Francesco; Lehmann, Katrin; Westendorf, Kerstin; Weber, Melanie; Riedel, René; Müller, Susann; Radbruch, Andreas; Chang, Hyun-Dong

    2017-09-06

    Conflicting evidence has been provided as to whether induction of intestinal inflammation by adoptive transfer of naïve T cells into Rag(-/-) mice requires expression of the transcription factor T-bet by the T cells. Here, we formally show that the intestinal microbiota composition of the Rag(-/-) recipient determines whether or not T-bet-deficient Th cells can induce colitis and we have resolved the differences of the two microbiomes, permissive or non-permissive to T-bet-independent colitis. Our data highlight the dominance of the microbiota over particular T cell differentiation programs in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Protein kinase C δ signaling is required for dietary prebiotic-induced strengthening of intestinal epithelial barrier function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Richard Y.; Abdullah, Majd; Määttänen, Pekka; Pilar, Ana Victoria C.; Scruten, Erin; Johnson-Henry, Kathene C.; Napper, Scott; O’Brien, Catherine; Jones, Nicola L.; Sherman, Philip M.

    2017-01-01

    Prebiotics are non-digestible oligosaccharides that promote the growth of beneficial gut microbes, but it is unclear whether they also have direct effects on the intestinal mucosal barrier. Here we demonstrate two commercial prebiotics, inulin and short-chain fructo-oligosaccharide (scFOS), when applied onto intestinal epithelia in the absence of microbes, directly promote barrier integrity to prevent pathogen-induced barrier disruptions. We further show that these effects involve the induction of select tight junction (TJ) proteins through a protein kinase C (PKC) δ-dependent mechanism. These results suggest that in the absence of microbiota, prebiotics can directly exert barrier protective effects by activating host cell signaling in the intestinal epithelium, which represents a novel alternative mechanism of action of prebiotics. PMID:28098206

  12. Night workers with circadian misalignment are susceptible to alcohol-induced intestinal hyperpermeability with social drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Garth R; Gorenz, Annika; Shaikh, Maliha; Desai, Vishal; Kaminsky, Thomas; Van Den Berg, Jolice; Murphy, Terrence; Raeisi, Shohreh; Fogg, Louis; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Forsyth, Christopher; Turek, Fred; Burgess, Helen J; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Alcohol-induced intestinal hyperpermeability (AIHP) is a known risk factor for alcoholic liver disease (ALD), but only 20-30% of heavy alcoholics develop AIHP and ALD. The hypothesis of this study is that circadian misalignment would promote AIHP. We studied two groups of healthy subjects on a stable work schedule for 3 mo [day workers (DW) and night workers (NW)]. Subjects underwent two circadian phase assessments with sugar challenge to access intestinal permeability between which they drank 0.5 g/kg alcohol daily for 7 days. Sleep architecture by actigraphy did not differ at baseline or after alcohol between either group. After alcohol, the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) in the DW group did not change significantly, but in the NW group there was a significant 2-h phase delay. Both the NW and DW groups had no change in small bowel permeability with alcohol, but only in the NW group was there an increase in colonic and whole gut permeability. A lower area under the curve of melatonin inversely correlated with increased colonic permeability. Alcohol also altered peripheral clock gene amplitude of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in CLOCK, BMAL, PER1, CRY1, and CRY2 in both groups, and inflammatory markers lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, LPS, and IL-6 had an elevated mesor at baseline in NW vs. DW and became arrhythmic with alcohol consumption. Together, our data suggest that central circadian misalignment is a previously unappreciated risk factor for AIHP and that night workers may be at increased risk for developing liver injury with alcohol consumption.

  13. Systematic review: exercise-induced gastrointestinal syndrome-implications for health and intestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, R J S; Snipe, R M J; Kitic, C M; Gibson, P R

    2017-08-01

    "Exercise-induced gastrointestinal syndrome" refers to disturbances of gastrointestinal integrity and function that are common features of strenuous exercise. To systematically review the literature to establish the impact of acute exercise on markers of gastrointestinal integrity and function in healthy populations and those with chronic gastrointestinal conditions. Search literature using five databases (PubMed, EBSCO, Web of Science, SPORTSdiscus, and Ovid Medline) to review publications that focused on the impact of acute exercise on markers of gastrointestinal injury, permeability, endotoxaemia, motility and malabsorption in healthy populations and populations with gastrointestinal diseases/disorders. As exercise intensity and duration increases, there is considerable evidence for increases in indices of intestinal injury, permeability and endotoxaemia, together with impairment of gastric emptying, slowing of small intestinal transit and malabsorption. The addition of heat stress and running mode appears to exacerbate these markers of gastrointestinal disturbance. Exercise stress of ≥2 hours at 60% VO2max appears to be the threshold whereby significant gastrointestinal perturbations manifest, irrespective of fitness status. Gastrointestinal symptoms, referable to upper- and lower-gastrointestinal tract, are common and a limiting factor in prolonged strenuous exercise. While there is evidence for health benefits of moderate exercise in patients with inflammatory bowel disease or functional gastrointestinal disorders, the safety of more strenuous exercise has not been established. Strenuous exercise has a major reversible impact on gastrointestinal integrity and function of healthy populations. The safety and health implications of prolonged strenuous exercise in patients with chronic gastrointestinal diseases/disorders, while hypothetically worrying, has not been elucidated and requires further investigation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Pistacia lentiscus resin regulates intestinal damage and inflammation in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioxari, Aristea; Kaliora, Andriana C; Papalois, Apostolos; Agrogiannis, George; Triantafillidis, John K; Andrikopoulos, Nikolaos K

    2011-11-01

    Mastic (Pistacia lentiscus) of the Anacardiaceae family has exhibited anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties in patients with Crohn's disease. This study was based on the hypothesis that mastic inhibits intestinal damage in inflammatory bowel disease, regulating inflammation and oxidative stress in intestinal epithelium. Four different dosages of P. lentiscus powder in the form of powder were administered orally to trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitic rats. Eighty-four male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to seven groups: A, control; B, colitic; C-F, colitic rats daily supplemented with P. lentiscus powder at (C) 50 mg/kg, (D) 100 mg/kg, (E) 200 mg/kg, and (F) 300 mg/kg of body weight; and G, colitic rats treated daily with cortisone (25 μg/kg of body weight). Colonic damage was assessed microscopically. The cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and IL-10 and malonaldehyde were measured in colonic specimens. Results were expressed as mean ± SE values. Histological amelioration of colitis (P≤.001) and significant differences in colonic indices occurred after 3 days of treatment. Daily administration of 100 mg of P. lentiscus powder/kg of body weight decreased all inflammatory cytokines (P≤.05), whereas 50 mg of P. lentiscus powder/kg of body weight and cortisone treatment reduced only ICAM-1 (P≤.05 and P≤.01, respectively). Malonaldehyde was significantly suppressed in all treated groups (P≤.01). IL-10 remained unchanged. Cytokines and malonaldehyde remained unaltered after 6 days of treatment. Thus P. lentiscus powder could possibly have a therapeutic role in Crohn's disease, regulating oxidant/antioxidant balance and modulating inflammation.

  15. A dual drug sensitive L. major induces protection without lesion in C57BL/6 mice.

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    Noushin Davoudi

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is a major health problem in some endemic areas and yet, no vaccine is available against any form of the disease. Historically, leishmanization (LZ which is an inoculation of individual with live Leishmania, is the most effective control measure at least against cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL. Due to various reasons, LZ is not used today. Several live attenuated Leishmania have been developed but their use is limited. Previously, we developed a transgenic strain of L. major that harbors two suicide genes tk and cd genes (lmtkcd+/+ for use as a challenge strain in vaccine studies. These genes render the parasite susceptible to Ganciclovir (GCV and 5-flurocytosine (5-FC. The dual drug sensitive strain of L. major was developed using gene targeting technology using a modified Herpes Simplex Virus thymidine kinase gene (hsv-tk sensitive to Ganciclovir antibiotic and Saccharomyces cerevisae cytosine deaminase gene (cd sensitive to 5-flurocytosine that were stably introduced into L. major chromosome. BALB/c mice inoculated with lmtkcd+/+ developed lesions which upon treatment with GCV and 5-FC completely healed. In the current study, the transgenic lmtkcd+/+strain was assessed as a live vaccine model to determine the time necessary to develop a protective immune response. C57BL/6 mice were inoculated with the transgenic lmtkcd+/+strain, and treated at the time of inoculation (day 0 or at day 8 after inoculation. Immunized animals were challenged with wild-type L. major, and complete protection was induced in mice that were treated at day 8. The results show that in contrast to leishmanization, in group of mice inoculated with a dual sensitive L. major development and persistence of lesion is not necessary to induce Th1 response and protection.

  16. The genotoxic effects of DNA lesions induced by artificial UV-radiation and sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, André Passaglia; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2010-06-01

    Solar radiation sustains and affects all life forms on Earth. The increase in solar UV-radiation at environmental levels, due to depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, highlights serious issues of social concern. This becomes still more dramatic in tropical and subtropical regions where radiation-intensity is still higher. Thus, there is the need to evaluate the harmful effects of solar UV-radiation on the DNA molecule as a basis for assessing the risks involved for human health, biological productivity and ecosystems. In order to evaluate the profile of DNA damage induced by this form of radiation and its genotoxic effects, plasmid DNA samples were exposed to artificial-UV lamps and directly to sunlight. The induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photoproducts (CPDs) and oxidative DNA damage in these molecules were evaluated by means of specific DNA repair enzymes. On the other hand, the biological effects of such lesions were determined through the analysis of the DNA inactivation rate and mutation frequency, after replication of the damaged pCMUT vector in an Escherichia coliMBL50 strain. The results indicated the induction of a significant number of CPDs after exposure to increasing doses of UVC, UVB, UVA radiation and sunlight. Interestingly, these photoproducts are those lesions that better correlate with plasmid inactivation as well as mutagenesis, and the oxidative DNA damages induced present very low correlation with these effects. The results indicated that DNA photoproducts play the main role in the induction of genotoxic effects by artificial UV-radiation sources and sunlight.

  17. Fructose-induced increases in expression of intestinal fructolytic and gluconeogenic genes are regulated by GLUT5 and KHK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chirag; Douard, Veronique; Yu, Shiyan; Tharabenjasin, Phuntila; Gao, Nan; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2015-09-01

    Marked increases in fructose consumption have been tightly linked to metabolic diseases. One-third of ingested fructose is metabolized in the small intestine, but the underlying mechanisms regulating expression of fructose-metabolizing enzymes are not known. We used genetic mouse models to test the hypothesis that fructose absorption via glucose transporter protein, member 5 (GLUT5), metabolism via ketohexokinase (KHK), as well as GLUT5 trafficking to the apical membrane via the Ras-related protein in brain 11a (Rab11a)-dependent endosomes are required for the regulation of intestinal fructolytic and gluconeogenic enzymes. Fructose feeding increased the intestinal mRNA and protein expression of these enzymes in the small intestine of adult wild-type (WT) mice compared with those gavage fed with lysine or glucose. Fructose did not increase expression of these enzymes in the GLUT5 knockout (KO) mice. Blocking intracellular fructose metabolism by KHK ablation also prevented fructose-induced upregulation. Glycolytic hexokinase I expression was similar between WT and GLUT5- or KHK-KO mice and did not vary with feeding solution. Gavage feeding with the fructose-specific metabolite glyceraldehyde did not increase enzyme expression, suggesting that signaling occurs before the hydrolysis of fructose to three-carbon compounds. Impeding GLUT5 trafficking to the apical membrane using intestinal epithelial cell-specific Rab11a-KO mice impaired fructose-induced upregulation. KHK expression was uniformly distributed along the villus but was localized mainly in the basal region of the cytosol of enterocytes. The feedforward upregulation of fructolytic and gluconeogenic enzymes specifically requires GLUT5 and KHK and may proactively enhance the intestine's ability to process anticipated increases in dietary fructose concentrations. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Fructose-induced increases in expression of intestinal fructolytic and gluconeogenic genes are regulated by GLUT5 and KHK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chirag; Douard, Veronique; Yu, Shiyan; Tharabenjasin, Phuntila; Gao, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Marked increases in fructose consumption have been tightly linked to metabolic diseases. One-third of ingested fructose is metabolized in the small intestine, but the underlying mechanisms regulating expression of fructose-metabolizing enzymes are not known. We used genetic mouse models to test the hypothesis that fructose absorption via glucose transporter protein, member 5 (GLUT5), metabolism via ketohexokinase (KHK), as well as GLUT5 trafficking to the apical membrane via the Ras-related protein in brain 11a (Rab11a)-dependent endosomes are required for the regulation of intestinal fructolytic and gluconeogenic enzymes. Fructose feeding increased the intestinal mRNA and protein expression of these enzymes in the small intestine of adult wild-type (WT) mice compared with those gavage fed with lysine or glucose. Fructose did not increase expression of these enzymes in the GLUT5 knockout (KO) mice. Blocking intracellular fructose metabolism by KHK ablation also prevented fructose-induced upregulation. Glycolytic hexokinase I expression was similar between WT and GLUT5- or KHK-KO mice and did not vary with feeding solution. Gavage feeding with the fructose-specific metabolite glyceraldehyde did not increase enzyme expression, suggesting that signaling occurs before the hydrolysis of fructose to three-carbon compounds. Impeding GLUT5 trafficking to the apical membrane using intestinal epithelial cell-specific Rab11a-KO mice impaired fructose-induced upregulation. KHK expression was uniformly distributed along the villus but was localized mainly in the basal region of the cytosol of enterocytes. The feedforward upregulation of fructolytic and gluconeogenic enzymes specifically requires GLUT5 and KHK and may proactively enhance the intestine's ability to process anticipated increases in dietary fructose concentrations. PMID:26084694

  19. Feasibility of Using Ultrasonic Nakagami Imaging for Monitoring Microwave-Induced Thermal Lesion in Ex Vivo Porcine Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Siyuan; Han, Yuqiang; Zhu, Xingguang; Shang, Shaoqiang; Huang, Guojing; Zhang, Lei; Niu, Gang; Wang, Supin; He, Xijing; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-02-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasonic Nakagami imaging to evaluate thermal lesions induced by microwave ablation (MWA) in ex vivo porcine liver was explored. Dynamic changes in echo amplitudes and Nakagami parameters in the region of the MWA-induced thermal lesion, as well as the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between the MWA-induced thermal lesion and the surrounding normal tissue, were calculated simultaneously during the MWA procedure. After MWA exposure, a bright hyper-echoic region appeared in ultrasonic B-mode and Nakagami parameter images as an indicator of the thermal lesion. Mean values of the Nakagami parameter in the thermal lesion region increased to 0.58, 0.71 and 0.91 after 1, 3 and 5 min of MVA. There were no significant differences in envelope amplitudes in the thermal lesion region among ultrasonic B-mode images obtained after different durations of MWA. Unlike ultrasonic B-mode images, Nakagami images were less affected by the shadow effect in monitoring of MWA exposure, and a fairly complete hyper-echoic region was observed in the Nakagami image. The mean value of the Nakagami parameter increased from approximately 0.47 to 0.82 during MWA exposure. At the end of the postablation stage, the mean value of the Nakagami parameter decreased to 0.55 and was higher than that before MWA exposure. CNR values calculated for Nakagami parameter images increased from 0.13 to approximately 0.61 during MWA and then decreased to 0.26 at the end of the post-ablation stage. The corresponding CNR values calculated for ultrasonic B-mode images were 0.24, 0.42 and 0.17. This preliminary study on ex vivo porcine liver suggested that Nakagami imaging have potential use in evaluating the formation of MWA-induced thermal lesions. Further in vivo studies are needed to evaluate the potential application.

  20. Morphological study of gastric lesions developing in the rat under several damaging conditions: modifications induced by pretreatment with zinc acexamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, M L; Escolar, G; Navarro, C; Fontarnau, R; Bulbena, O

    1992-09-01

    Lesions developing in the gastric mucosa of the rat after exposure to different gastric damaging agents (100 mg/kg aspirin, and 70% or 100% ethanol) were assessed by scanning electron microscopy. The severity of the lesions was quantified according to morphological criteria. Modifications in the severity of these lesions induced by pretreatment with zinc acexamate were also analyzed. The scanning electron microscope revealed that with the exception of absolute ethanol, which caused distinctive morphological features, lesions found under the different experimental agents shared a common pattern of progression. Ultrastructural lesions on surface epithelial cells preceded further alterations of parietal cells. After the integrity of the epithelial cells was lost, detachment of the parietal cells occurred, probably, through peptic digestion of the connections between cells and their extracellular matrices. Pretreatment of animals with zinc acexamate increased the presence of mucus on the gastric surface and significantly prevented the progression of lesions towards the severest stages. Ultrastructural damage of surface epithelial cells was not influenced by this treatment, but detachment of damaged cells was clearly diminished. These data confirm the protective effect of zinc acexamate against gastric aggressions. Moreover, our studies confirm the notion that mucus secretion and maintenance of continuity on the gastric lumen by surface epithelial cells is of critical importance in preventing the gastric damage induced in these experimental models.

  1. Free cholesterol-induced cytotoxicity a possible contributing factor to macrophage foam cell necrosis in advanced atherosclerotic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabas, I

    1997-10-01

    A major characteristic of advanced atherosclerotic lesions is the necrotic, or lipid, core, which likely plays an important role in the clinical progression of these lesions. Recent data suggest that the necrotic core forms primarily as a consequence of macrophage foam cell necrosis. Lesional macrophages initially accumulate mostly cholesteryl esters, but macrophages in advanced lesions contain large amounts of unesterified, or free, cholesterol (FC). Although there are many theories as to why macrophage foam cells die in advanced lesions, the fact that a high FC:phospholipid (PL) ratio in cellular membranes can be toxic to cells suggests that FC-induced cytotoxicity may contribute to foam cell necrosis. The mechanism of FC cytotoxicity can be explained by disturbances in membrane protein function as a result of "stiffening" of the bilayer and by formation of intracellular FC crystals that can cause physical damage to cellular organelles. Macrophages appear to respond to FC loading by a fascinating adaptive response, namely the induction of PL biosynthesis, which initially keeps the cellular FC:PL ratio below toxic levels. Studies with cultured macrophages have demonstrated that a failure of this adaptive response leads to FC-induced foam cell cytotoxicity and necrosis, and thus a similar series of events in advanced atherosclerotic lesions could provide an explanation for the development of the necrotic core. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7: 256-263). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  2. Dietary vitamin D3 deficiency alters intestinal mucosal defense and increases susceptibility to Citrobacter rodentium-induced colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryz, Natasha R; Lochner, Arion; Bhullar, Kirandeep; Ma, Caixia; Huang, Tina; Bhinder, Ganive; Bosman, Else; Wu, Xiujuan; Innis, Sheila M; Jacobson, Kevan; Vallance, Bruce A

    2015-11-01

    Vitamin D deficiency affects more that 1 billion people worldwide. Although thought to increase risk of bacterial infections, the importance of vitamin D on host defense against intestinal bacterial pathogens is currently unclear since injection of the active form of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D3, increased susceptibility to the enteric bacterial pathogen Citrobacter rodentium by suppressing key immune/inflammatory factors. To further characterize the role of vitamin D during bacteria-induced colitis, we fed weanling mice either vitamin D3-deficient or vitamin D3-sufficient diets for 5 wk and then challenged them with C. rodentium. Vitamin D3-deficient mice lost significantly more body weight, carried higher C. rodentium burdens, and developed worsened histological damage. Vitamin D3-deficient mice also suffered greater bacterial translocation to extra-intestinal tissues, including mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Intestinal tissues of infected vitamin D3-deficient mice displayed increased inflammatory cell infiltrates as well as significantly higher gene transcript levels of inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, TGF-β, IL-17A, and IL-17F as well as the antimicrobial peptide REG3γ. Notably, these exaggerated inflammatory responses accelerated the loss of commensal microbes and were associated with an impaired ability to detoxify bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Overall, these studies show that dietary-induced vitamin D deficiency exacerbates intestinal inflammatory responses to infection, also impairing host defense.

  3. Alteration of intestinal dysbiosis by fecal microbiota transplantation does not induce remission in patients with chronic active ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kump, Patrizia K; Gröchenig, Hans-Peter; Lackner, Stefan; Trajanoski, Slave; Reicht, Gerhard; Hoffmann, K Martin; Deutschmann, Andrea; Wenzl, Heimo H; Petritsch, Wolfgang; Krejs, Guenter J; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Högenauer, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    In patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), alterations of the intestinal microbiota, termed dysbiosis, have been postulated to contribute to intestinal inflammation. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been used as effective therapy for recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis also caused by dysbiosis. The aims of the present study were to investigate if patients with UC benefit from FMT and if dysbiosis can be reversed. Six patients with chronic active UC nonresponsive to standard medical therapy were treated with FMT by colonoscopic administration. Changes in the colonic microbiota were assessed by 16S rDNA-based microbial community profiling using high-throughput pyrosequencing from mucosal and stool samples. All patients experienced short-term clinical improvement within the first 2 weeks after FMT. However, none of the patients achieved clinical remission. Microbiota profiling showed differences in the modification of the intestinal microbiota between individual patients after FMT. In 3 patients, the colonic microbiota changed toward the donor microbiota; however, this did not correlate with clinical response. On phylum level, there was a significant reduction of Proteobacteria and an increase in Bacteroidetes after FMT. FMT by a single colonoscopic donor stool application is not effective in inducing remission in chronic active therapy-refractory UC. Changes in the composition of the intestinal microbiota were significant and resulted in a partial improvement of UC-associated dysbiosis. The results suggest that dysbiosis in UC is at least in part a secondary phenomenon induced by inflammation and diarrhea rather than being causative for inflammation in this disease.

  4. An orally active Cannabis extract with high content in cannabidiol attenuates chemical induced intestinal inflammation and hypermotility in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Pagano

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Anecdotal and scientific evidence suggests that Cannabis use may be beneficial in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients. Here, we have investigated the effect of a standardized Cannabis sativa extract with high content of cannabidiol (CBD, here named CBD BDS for CBD botanical drug substance, on mucosal inflammation and hypermotility in mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Colitis was induced in mice by intracolonic administration of dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS. Motility was evaluated in the experimental model of intestinal hypermotility induced by irritant croton oil. CBD BDS or pure CBD were given - either intraperitoneally or by oral gavage - after the inflammatory insult (curative protocol. The amounts of CBD in the colon, brain and liver after the oral treatments were measured by HPLC coupled to ion trap-time of flight mass spectrometry. CBD BDS, both when given intraperitoneally and by oral gavage, decreased the extent of the damage (as revealed by the decrease in the colon weight/length ratio and myeloperoxidase activity in the DNBS model of colitis. It also reduced intestinal hypermotility (at doses lower than those required to affect transit in healthy mice in the croton oil model of intestinal hypermotility. Under the same experimental conditions, pure CBD did not ameliorate colitis while it normalized croton oil-induced hypermotility when given intraperitoneally (in a dose-related fashion or orally (only at one dose. In conclusion, CBD BDS, given after the inflammatory insult, attenuates injury and motility in intestinal models of inflammation. These findings sustain the rationale of combining CBD with other minor Cannabis constituents and support the clinical development of CBD BDS for IBD treatment.

  5. Involvement of transient receptor potential melastatin type 7 channels on Poncirus fructus-induced depolarizations of pacemaking activity in interstitial cells of Cajal from murine small intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Joo Kim

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: These results suggest that the PTE-induced depolarization of pacemaking activity occurs in a G-protein-, phospholipase C-, and 1,4,5-inositol triphosphate-dependent manner via TRPM7 channels in cultured ICCs from murine small intestine, which indicates that ICCs are PTE targets and that their interactions affect intestinal motility.

  6. Total Body Irradiation in the "Hematopoietic" Dose Range Induces Substantial Intestinal Injury in Non-Human Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junru; Shao, Lijian; Hendrickson, Howard P; Liu, Liya; Chang, Jianhui; Luo, Yi; Seng, John; Pouliot, Mylene; Authier, Simon; Zhou, Daohong; Allaben, William; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The non-human primate has been a useful model for studies of human acute radiation syndrome (ARS). However, to date structural changes in various parts of the intestine after total body irradiation (TBI) have not been systematically studied in this model. Here we report on our current study of TBI-induced intestinal structural injury in the non-human primate after doses typically associated with hematopoietic ARS. Twenty-four non-human primates were divided into three groups: sham-irradiated control group; and total body cobalt-60 (60Co) 6.7 Gy gamma-irradiated group; and total body 60Co 7.4 Gy gamma-irradiated group. After animals were euthanized at day 4, 7 and 12 postirradiation, sections of small intestine (duodenum, proximal jejunum, distal jejunum and ileum) were collected and fixed in 10% formalin. The intestinal mucosal surface length, villus height and crypt depths were assessed by computer-assisted image analysis. Plasma citrulline levels were determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Total bone marrow cells were counted and hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow were analyzed by flow cytometer. Histopathologically, all segments exhibited conspicuous disappearance of plicae circulares and prominent atrophy of crypts and villi. Intestinal mucosal surface length was significantly decreased in all intestinal segments on day 4, 7 and 12 after irradiation (P 0.05). Crypt depth was also significantly reduced in all segments on day 4, 7 and 12 after irradiation (P irradiation, consistent with intestinal mucosal injury. Both 6.7 and 7.4 Gy TBI reduced total number of bone marrow cells. And further analysis showed that the number and function of CD45(+)CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitors in bone marrow decreased significantly. In summary, TBI in the hematopoietic ARS dose range induces substantial intestinal injury in all segments of the small bowel. These findings underscore the importance of maintaining the

  7. Chronic pramipexole treatment induces compulsive behavior in rats with 6-OHDA lesions of the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardou, D; Reyrolle, L; Chassain, C; Durif, F

    2017-08-14

    Dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) reduces motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD), but also induces impulsive-compulsive behavior (ICB) in up to 25% of PD patients. These non-motor side effects of DRT generally follow a gradual transition from impulsive to compulsive-like-i.e. repetitive, compelled, and non-pleasurable-behavior. Here, we investigated the effect of chronic pramipexole (PPX) treatment on the onset of compulsive-like behavior, measured via the post-training signal attenuation (PTSA) procedure, in rats with dopaminergic lesions. Accordingly, we aimed to mimic chronic DRT in a PD context, and obtain data on the brain regions that potentially sustain this type of compulsive behavior pattern in rats. We observed that the lesion or treatment alone did not induce compulsive lever pressing in rats. However, rats with lesions of the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area as well as with chronic PPX treatment developed strong compulsive lever-pressing behavior, as measured via PTSA. Furthermore, when chronic PPX treatment was discontinued before the PTSA test, the lesioned rats showed the same level of compulsive behavior as sham-operated rats. In fact, lesioned, treated, and compulsive-like rats showed significantly higher Fos expression in the orbitofrontal cortex and dorsal striatum. Thus, chronic PPX treatment in PD rats induced a strong compulsive-like behavior. Furthermore, Fos expression mapping suggests that the behavior was sustained via the activation of the orbitofrontal cortex and dorsal striatum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Protective Effect of Repeatedly Preadministered Brazilian Propolis Ethanol Extract against Stress-Induced Gastric Mucosal Lesions in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Nakamura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to clarify the protective effect of Brazilian propolis ethanol extract (BPEE against stress-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats. The protective effect of BPEE against gastric mucosal lesions in male Wistar rats exposed to water-immersion restraint stress (WIRS for 6 h was compared between its repeated preadministration (50 mg/kg/day, 7 days and its single preadministration (50 mg/kg. The repeated BPEE preadministration attenuated WIRS-induced gastric mucosal lesions and gastric mucosal oxidative stress more largely than the single BPEE preadministration. In addition, the repeated BPEE preadministration attenuated neutrophil infiltration in the gastric mucosa of rats exposed to WIRS. The protective effect of the repeated preadministration of BPEE against WIRS-induced gastric mucosal lesions was similar to that of a single preadministration of vitamin E (250 mg/kg in terms of the extent and manner of protection. From these findings, it is concluded that BPEE preadministered in a repeated manner protects against gastric mucosal lesions in rats exposed to WIRS more effectively than BPEE preadministered in a single manner possibly through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions.

  9. Comparsion of light dose on topical ALA-mediated photodynamic therapy for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch premalignant lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deng-Fu; Tseng, Meng-Ke; Liu, Chung-Ji; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2012-03-01

    Oral cancer has becomes the most prominent male cancer disease due to the local betel nut chewing habit combing with smoking and alcohol-drinking lifestyle. In order to minimize the systemic phototoxic effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), this study was designed to use a topical ALA-mediated PDT for treatment of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch cancerous lesions. DMBA was applied to one of the buccal pouches of hamsters thrice a week for 8 to 10 weeks. Precancerous lesions were induced and proven by histological examination. These DMBA-induced cancerous lesions were used for testing the efficacy of topical ALA -mediated PDT. We found that ALA reached its peak level in cancerous lesions about 2.5 hrs after topical application of ALA gel. The precancerous lesions in hamsters were then treated with topical ALA -mediated PDT with light exposure dose of 75 and 100 J/cm2 using LED 635 nm Wonderlight device. It is suggesting that optimization of the given light dose is critical to the success of PDT results.

  10. Differences in the morphine-induced inhibition of small and large intestinal transit: Involvement of central and peripheral μ-opioid receptors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Umemoto, Hiroyuki; Mori, Tomohisa; Akatsu, Ryuya; Saito, Shinichiro; Tashima, Kimihito; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Kato, Shinichi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Horie, Syunji

    2016-01-15

    Constipation is the most common side effect of morphine. Morphine acts centrally and on peripheral sites within the enteric nervous system. There are a few comprehensive studies on morphine-induced constipation in the small and large intestine by the activation of central and peripheral μ-opioid receptors. We investigated the differences in the inhibition of the small and large intestinal transit in normal and morphine-tolerant mice. Morphine reduced the geometric center in the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran assay and prolonged the bead expulsion time in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of morphine were blocked by μ-opioid antagonist β-funaltrexamine, but not by δ- and κ-opioid antagonists. The peripheral opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone methiodide, partially blocked morphine's effect in the small intestine and completely blocked its effect in the large intestine. The intracerebroventricular administration of naloxone significantly reversed the delay of small intestinal transit but did not affect morphine-induced inhibition of large intestinal transit. Naloxone methiodide completely reversed the inhibition of large intestinal transit in normal and morphine-tolerant mice. Naloxone methiodide partially reversed the morphine-induced inhibition of small intestinal transit in normal mice but completely reversed the effects of morphine in tolerant mice. Chronic treatment with morphine results in tolerance to its inhibitory effect on field-stimulated contraction in the isolated small intestine but not in the large intestine. These results suggest that peripheral and central opioid receptors are involved in morphine-induced constipation in the small and large intestine during the early stage of treatment, but the peripheral receptors mainly regulate constipation during long-term morphine treatment.

  11. Gastroprotective effects of CoQ10 on ethanol-induced acute gastric lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaya, K; Barut, F; Hanci, V; Can, M; Comert, M; Ucan, H B; Cakmak, G K; Irkorucu, O; Tascilar, O; Emre, A U

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is frequently associated with gastric mucosal lesions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of Coenzyme-Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on the ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in a rat model. Sixty-four female wistar albino rats were randomly divided into 8 groups (n = 8). Studies were performed in ethanol induced gastric ulcer model in Wistar albino rats. Famotidine at a dose of 5 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg and CoQ10 at a single dose of 10 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg for 7 days were administered as pretreatment. All the rats in study groups received 2 ml/kg ethanol 95 % intragastrically, 30 minutes after pretreatment. Four hour after ethanol administration, all rats were sacrificed and their stomachs were removed under ketamin anaesthesia. Gastric protection was evaluated by measuring the ulcer index, MDA concentrations, and histopathological studies. Rats pretreated either with famotidine or CoQ10 had significantly diminished gastric mucosal damage which was assessed with gross and microscopic analysis (p < 0.00625). MDA levels were significantly lower in famotidine 20 mg/kg and CoQ10 pretreatment for 7 days group (p < 0.00625).

  12. Solcoseryl in prevention of stress-induced gastric lesions and healing of chronic ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konturek, S J; Drozdowicz, D; Pytko-Polonczyk, J; Brzozowski, T; Bielański, W

    1991-03-01

    Solcoseryl, a deproteinized extract of calf blood, protects the gastric mucosa against various topical irritants and enhances the healing of chronic gastric ulcerations but the mechanisms of these effects have been little studied. This study was designed to elucidate the active principle in Solcoseryl and to determine the role of prostaglandins (PG) and polyamines in the antiulcer properties of this agent. Using both, the radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay, EGF-like material was detected in Solcoseryl preparation. Solcoseryl given s.c. prevented the formation of stress-induced gastric lesions and this was accompanied by an increase in the generation of PGE2 in the gastric mucosa. Similar effects were obtained with EGF. Pretreatment with indomethacin, to suppress mucosal generation of prostaglandins (PG), greatly augmented stress-induced gastric ulcerations and antagonized the protection exerted by both Solcoseryl and EGF. Solcoseryl, like EGF, enhanced the healing of chronic gastro-duodenal ulcerations. This effect was abolished by the pretreatment with difluoromethylornithine, an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of polyamines. The healing effects of Solcoseryl and EGF was also reduced by prednisolone which decreased the angiogenesis in the granulation tissue in the ulcer area. These results indicate that Solcoseryl 1. contains EGF-like material, 2. displays the protective and ulcer healing effects similar to those of EGF and involving both PG and polyamines and 3. acts via similar mechanism as does EGF.

  13. Sunitinib Improves Some Clinical Aspects and Reverts DMBA-Induced Hyperplasic Lesions in Hamster Buccal Pouch

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Fernanda Lopes; Oliveira, Mariana; Nunes, Marianne Brochado; Serafim, Lucas Horstmann; Azambuja, Alan Arrieira; Braga, Luisa Maria G. de M.; Saur, Lisiani; de Souza, Maria Antonieta Lopes; Xavier, Léder Leal

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a public health problem. The hamster buccal pouch model is ideal for analyzing the development of OSCC. This research analysed the effects of sunitinib (tyrosine kinase inhibitor) in precancerous lesions induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) in this model. Thirty-four male hamsters, divided into six groups: control—C (n = 7), acetone—A (n = 12), carbamide peroxide—CP (n = 5 ), acetone and CP—A+CP (n = 8), 1% DMBA in acetone and CP—DA+CP (n = 6), and 1% DMBA in acetone and CP and 4-week treatment with sunitinib—DA+CP+S (n = 7). The aspects evaluated were anatomopathological features (peribuccal area, paws, nose, and fur), histological sections of the hamster buccal pouches (qualitatively analyzed), epithelium thickness, and the rete ridge density (estimated). Sunitinib was unable to attenuate the decrease in weight gain induced by DMBA; no increase in volume was detected in the pouch and/or ulceration, observed in 43% of the animals in the DA+CP group. DA+CP groups presented a significant increase in rete ridge density compared to the control groups (P < 0.01) which was reverted by sunitinib in the DA+CP+S group. Sunitinib seems to have important benefits in early stage carcinogenesis and may be useful in chemoprevention. PMID:24693453

  14. Dietary zinc deficiency predisposes mice to the development of preneoplastic lesions in chemically-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romualdo, Guilherme Ribeiro; Goto, Renata Leme; Henrique Fernandes, Ana Angélica; Cogliati, Bruno; Barbisan, Luis Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Although there is a concomitance of zinc deficiency and high incidence/mortality for hepatocellular carcinoma in certain human populations, there are no experimental studies investigating the modifying effects of zinc on hepatocarcinogenesis. Thus, we evaluated whether dietary zinc deficiency or supplementation alter the development of hepatocellular preneoplastic lesions (PNL). Therefore, neonatal male Balb/C mice were submitted to a diethylnitrosamine/2-acetylaminefluorene-induced hepatocarcinogenesis model. Moreover, mice were fed adequate (35 mg/kg diet), deficient (3 mg/kg) or supplemented (180 mg/kg) zinc diets. Mice were euthanized at 12 (early time-point) or 24 weeks (late time-point) after introducing the diets. At the early time-point, zinc deficiency decreased Nrf2 protein expression and GSH levels while increased p65 and p53 protein expression and the number of PNL/area. At the late time-point, zinc deficiency also decreased GSH levels while increased liver genotoxicity, cell proliferation into PNL and PNL size. In contrast, zinc supplementation increased antioxidant defense at both time-points but not altered PNL development. Our findings are the first to suggest that zinc deficiency predisposes mice to the PNL development in chemically-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. The decrease of Nrf2/GSH pathway and increase of liver genotoxicity, as well as the increase of p65/cell proliferation, are potential mechanisms to this zinc deficiency-mediated effect.

  15. Activation of Intestinal Human Pregnane X Receptor Protects against Azoxymethane/Dextran Sulfate Sodium–Induced Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Nagaoka, Kenjiro; Okamoto, Minoru; Qu, Aijuan; Tanaka, Naoki; Kimura, Shioko

    2014-01-01

    The role of intestinal human pregnane X receptor (PXR) in colon cancer was determined through investigation of the chemopreventive role of rifaximin, a specific agonist of intestinal human PXR, toward azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)–induced colon cancer. Rifaximin treatment significantly decreased the number of colon tumors induced by AOM/DSS treatment in PXR-humanized mice, but not wild-type or Pxr-null mice. Additionally, rifaximin treatment markedly increased the survival rate of PXR-humanized mice, but not wild-type or Pxr-null mice. These data indicated a human PXR–dependent therapeutic chemoprevention of rifaximin toward AOM/DSS-induced colon cancer. Nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells–mediated inflammatory signaling was upregulated in AOM/DSS-treated mice, and inhibited by rifaximin in PXR-humanized mice. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were also modulated by rifaximin treatment in the AOM/DSS model. In vitro cell-based assays further revealed that rifaximin regulated cell apoptosis and cell cycle in a human PXR-dependent manner. These results suggested that specific activation of intestinal human PXR exhibited a chemopreventive role toward AOM/DSS-induced colon cancer by mediating anti-inflammation, antiproliferation, and proapoptotic events. PMID:25277138

  16. Activation of intestinal human pregnane X receptor protects against azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium-induced colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Nagaoka, Kenjiro; Okamoto, Minoru; Qu, Aijuan; Tanaka, Naoki; Kimura, Shioko; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2014-12-01

    The role of intestinal human pregnane X receptor (PXR) in colon cancer was determined through investigation of the chemopreventive role of rifaximin, a specific agonist of intestinal human PXR, toward azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colon cancer. Rifaximin treatment significantly decreased the number of colon tumors induced by AOM/DSS treatment in PXR-humanized mice, but not wild-type or Pxr-null mice. Additionally, rifaximin treatment markedly increased the survival rate of PXR-humanized mice, but not wild-type or Pxr-null mice. These data indicated a human PXR-dependent therapeutic chemoprevention of rifaximin toward AOM/DSS-induced colon cancer. Nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells-mediated inflammatory signaling was upregulated in AOM/DSS-treated mice, and inhibited by rifaximin in PXR-humanized mice. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were also modulated by rifaximin treatment in the AOM/DSS model. In vitro cell-based assays further revealed that rifaximin regulated cell apoptosis and cell cycle in a human PXR-dependent manner. These results suggested that specific activation of intestinal human PXR exhibited a chemopreventive role toward AOM/DSS-induced colon cancer by mediating anti-inflammation, antiproliferation, and proapoptotic events.

  17. L- and D-lactate as biomarkers of arterial-induced intestinal ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Casper; Mortensen, Frank V; Erlandsen, Erland J

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia is difficult to diagnose, and search for new biomarkers has led to interest in D-lactate, which arises from bacterial fermentation in the gastrointestinal tract.......Intestinal ischemia is difficult to diagnose, and search for new biomarkers has led to interest in D-lactate, which arises from bacterial fermentation in the gastrointestinal tract....

  18. Seizure-induced brain lesions: A wide spectrum of variably reversible MRI abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cianfoni, A., E-mail: acianfoni@hotmail.com [Neuroradiology, Neurocenter of Italian Switzerland–Ospedale regionale Lugano, Via Tesserete 46, Lugano, 6900, CH (Switzerland); Caulo, M., E-mail: caulo@unich.it [Department of Neuroscience and Imaging, University of Chieti, Via dei Vestini 33, 6610 Chieti. Italy (Italy); Cerase, A., E-mail: alfonsocerase@gmail.com [Unit of Neuroimaging and Neurointervention NINT, Department of Neurological and Sensorineural Sciences, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Policlinico “Santa Maria alle Scotte”, V.le Bracci 16, Siena (Italy); Della Marca, G., E-mail: dellamarca@rm.unicatt.it [Neurology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Falcone, C., E-mail: carlo_falc@libero.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Di Lella, G.M., E-mail: gdilella@rm.unicatt.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Gaudino, S., E-mail: sgaudino@sirm.org [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Edwards, J., E-mail: edwardjc@musc.edu [Neuroscience Dept., Medical University of South Carolina, 96J Lucas st, 29425, Charleston, SC (United States); Colosimo, C., E-mail: colosimo@rm.unicatt.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy)

    2013-11-01

    Introduction MRI abnormalities in the postictal period might represent the effect of the seizure activity, rather than its structural cause. Material and Methods Retrospective review of clinical and neuroimaging charts of 26 patients diagnosed with seizure-related MR-signal changes. All patients underwent brain-MRI (1.5-Tesla, standard pre- and post-contrast brain imaging, including DWI-ADC in 19/26) within 7 days from a seizure and at least one follow-up MRI, showing partial or complete reversibility of the MR-signal changes. Extensive clinical work-up and follow-up, ranging from 3 months to 5 years, ruled out infection or other possible causes of brain damage. Seizure-induced brain-MRI abnormalities remained a diagnosis of exclusion. Site, characteristics and reversibility of MRI changes, and association with characteristics of seizures were determined. Results MRI showed unilateral (13/26) and bilateral abnormalities, with high (24/26) and low (2/26) T2-signal, leptomeningeal contrast-enhancement (2/26), restricted diffusion (9/19). Location of abnormality was cortical/subcortical, basal ganglia, white matter, corpus callosum, cerebellum. Hippocampus was involved in 10/26 patients. Reversibility of MRI changes was complete in 15, and with residual gliosis or focal atrophy in 11 patients. Reversibility was noted between 15 and 150 days (average, 62 days). Partial simple and complex seizures were associated with hippocampal involvement (p = 0.015), status epilepticus with incomplete reversibility of MRI abnormalities (p = 0.041). Conclusions Seizure or epileptic status can induce transient, variably reversible MRI brain abnormalities. Partial seizures are frequently associated with hippocampal involvement and status epilepticus with incompletely reversible lesions. These seizure-induced MRI abnormalities pose a broad differential diagnosis; increased awareness may reduce the risk of misdiagnosis and unnecessary intervention.

  19. Quantification of the mutagenic potency and repair of glycidol-induced DNA lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasa, Jenny; Vare, Daniel; Motwani, Hitesh V; Jenssen, Dag; Törnqvist, Margareta

    2016-07-01

    Glycidol (Gly) is an electrophilic low-molecular weight epoxide that is classified by IARC as probably carcinogenic to humans. Humans might be exposed to Gly from food, e.g. refined vegetable oils, where Gly has been found as a food process contaminant. It is therefore important to investigate and quantify the genotoxicity of Gly as a primary step towards cancer risk assessment of the human exposure. Here, quantification of the mutagenic potency expressed per dose (AUC: area under the concentration-time curve) of Gly has been performed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, using the HPRT assay. The dose of Gly was estimated in the cell exposure medium by trapping Gly with a strong nucleophile, cob(I)alamin, to form stable cobalamin adducts for analysis by LC-MS/MS. Gly was stable in the exposure medium during the time for cell treatment, and thus the dose in vitro is the initial concentration×cell treatment time. Gly induced mutations in the hprt-gene at a rate of 0.08±0.01 mutations/10(5) cells/mMh. Through comparison with the effect of ionizing radiation in the same system a relative mutagenic potency of 9.5rad-eq./mMh was obtained, which could be used for comparison of genotoxicity of chemicals and between test systems and also in procedures for quantitative cancer risk assessment. Gly was shown to induce strand breaks, that were repaired by base excision repair. Furthermore, Gly-induced lesions, present during replication, were found to delay the replication fork elongation. From experiments with repair deficient cells, homologous recombination repair and the ERCC1-XPF complex were indicated to be recruited to support in the repair of the damage related to the stalled replication elongation. The type of DNA damage responsible for the mutagenic effect of Gly could not be concluded from the present study.

  20. Sulfated polysaccharide from the marine algae Hypnea musciformis inhibits TNBS-induced intestinal damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    V Brito, Tarcisio; Barros, Francisco C N; Silva, Renan O; Dias Júnior, Genilson J; C Júnior, José Simião; Franco, Álvaro X; Soares, Pedro M G; Chaves, Luciano S; Abreu, Clara M W S; de Paula, Regina C M; Souza, Marcellus H L P; Freitas, Ana Lúcia P; R Barbosa, André Luiz

    2016-10-20

    Sulfated polysaccharides extracted from seaweed have important pharmacological properties. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize the sulfated polysaccharide (PLS) from the algae Hypnea musciformis and evaluate its protective effect in colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid in rats. The sulfated polysaccharide possess a high molecular mass (1.24×10(5)gmol(-1)) and is composed of a κ-carrageenan, as depicted by FT-IR and NMR spectroscopic data. PLS was administered orally (10, 30, and 60mg/kg, p.o.) for three days, starting before TNBS (trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid) instillation (day 1). The rats were killed on day three, the portion of distal colon (5cm) was excised and evaluated macroscopic scores and wet weight. Then, samples of the intestinal were used for histological evaluation and quantification of glutathione, malonyldialdehyde acid, myeloperoxidase, nitrate/nitrite and cytokines. Our results demonstrate that PLS reduced the colitis and all analyzed biochemical parameters. Thus, we concluded that the PLS extracted from the marine algae H. musciformis reduced the colitis in animal model and may have an important promising application in the inflammatory bowel diseases.

  1. Gut microbiota, intestinal permeability, obesity-induced inflammation, and liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Thomas H; DiBaise, John K; McClain, Craig J

    2011-09-01

    Obesity and its metabolic complications are major health problems in the United States and worldwide, and increasing evidence implicates the microbiota in these important health issues. Indeed, it appears that the microbiota function much like a metabolic "organ," influencing nutrient acquisition, energy homeostasis, and, ultimately, the control of body weight. Moreover, alterations in gut microbiota, increased intestinal permeability, and metabolic endotoxemia likely play a role in the development of a chronic low-grade inflammatory state in the host that contributes to the development of obesity and associated chronic metabolic diseases such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Supporting these concepts are the observations that increased gut permeability, low-grade endotoxemia, and fatty liver are observed in animal models of obesity caused by either high-fat or high-fructose feeding. Consistent with these observations, germ-free mice are protected from obesity and many forms of liver injury. Last, many agents that affect gut flora/permeability, such as probiotics/prebiotics, also appear to affect obesity and certain forms of liver injury in animal model systems. Here the authors review the role of the gut microbiota and metabolic endotoxemia-induced inflammation in the development of obesity and liver injury, with special reference to the intensive care unit setting.

  2. Electroacupuncture Inhibits Inflammation Reaction by Upregulating Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide in Rats with Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Feng He

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture is emerging as an alternative therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this beneficial effect of acupuncture has not been fully understood. Here, we demonstrated that electroacupuncture at acupoints Zusanli (ST36, Xuanzhong (GB39; and Shenshu (BL23 markedly decreased the paw swelling and the histologic scores of inflammation in the synovial tissue, and reduced the body weight loss in an adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model. However, the electrical stimulation at nonacupoint did not produce any beneficial effects against the experimental arthritis. Most interestingly, the electroacupuncture treatment resulted in an enhanced immunostaining for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, a potent anti-inflammatory neuropeptide, in the synovial tissue. Moreover, the VIP-immunostaining intensity was significantly negatively correlated with the scores of inflammation in the synovial tissue (r=−0.483, P=.0026. In conclusion, these findings suggest that electroacupuncture may offer therapeutic benefits for the treatment of RA, at least partially through the induction of VIP expression.

  3. The role of thymus-dependent T cells in hexachlorobenzene-induced inflammatory skin and lung lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, CCPPC; Bloksma, N; Klatter, FA; Rozing, J; Vos, JG; van Dijk, JE

    1999-01-01

    The involvement of thymus-dependent T cells in the inflammatory skin and lung lesions and spleen effects induced by hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was investigated by using genetically athymic and euthymic WAG/Rij rats and Brown Norway (BN) rats with or without depletion of T cells by adult thymectomy, let

  4. In vivo photo-detection of chemically induced premalignant lesions and squamous cell carcinoma of the rat palatal mucosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, JM; Speelman, OC; vanLeengoed, HLLM; Nikkels, PGJ; Roodenburg, JLN; Witjes, MJH; Vermey, A

    1997-01-01

    Photo-detection using in vivo fluorescence was studied for different stages of chemically induced premalignant lesions and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the Wistar rat palatal mucosa. It was found that the epithelial dysplasia (numerically expressed in the epithelial atypia index (EAI)) of the ra

  5. Grape seed extract protects IEC-6 cells from chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity and improves parameters of small intestinal mucositis in rats with experimentally-induced mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Ker Y; Howarth, Gordon S; Yazbeck, Roger; Wright, Tessa H; Whitford, Eleanor J; Payne, Caroline; Butler, Ross N; Bastian, Susan E P

    2009-02-01

    Mucositis is a common side-effect of high-dose chemotherapy regimens. Grape seed extract (GSE) represents a rich source of proanthocyanidins with the potential to decrease oxidative damage and inflammation within the gastrointestinal tract. We evaluated GSE for its capacity to decrease the severity of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in vitro and in vivo. In vitro: GSE was administered to IEC-6 intestinal epithelial cells prior to damage induced by 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). Cell viability was determined by neutral red assay. In vivo: Female Dark Agouti rats (130-180 g) were gavaged with 1 ml GSE (400 mg/kg) daily (day 3-11) and received 5-FU (150 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection on day nine to induce mucositis. Rats were sacrificed at day 12 and intestinal tissues collected for myeloperoxidase and sucrase activity assays and histological analyses. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way ANOVA. GSE prevented the decrease in IEC-6 cell viability induced by 5-FU (p < 0.01). Compared with 5-FU controls, GSE significantly reduced myeloperoxidase activity by 86% and 27% in the proximal jejunum (p < 0.001) and distal ileum (p < 0.05) respectively; decreased qualitative histological scores of damage (p < 0.05) in the proximal jejunum; increased villus height in the proximal jejunum (17%; p < 0.05) and distal ileum (50%; p < 0.01), and attenuated the 5-FU-induced reduction of mucosal thickness by 16% in the jejunum (p < 0.05) and 45% in the ileum (p < 0.01). GSE partially protected IEC-6 cells from 5-FU-induced cytotoxicity and ameliorated intestinal damage induced by 5-FU in rats. GSE may represent a promising prophylactic adjunct to conventional chemotherapy for preventing intestinal mucositis.

  6. Nippostrongylus-induced intestinal hypercontractility requires IL-4 receptor alpha-responsiveness by T cells in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Schmidt

    Full Text Available Gut-dwelling helminthes induce potent IL-4 and IL-13 dominated type 2 T helper cell (T(H2 immune responses, with IL-13 production being essential for Nippostrongylus brasiliensis expulsion. This T(H2 response results in intestinal inflammation associated with local infiltration by T cells and macrophages. The resulting increased IL-4/IL-13 intestinal milieu drives goblet cell hyperplasia, alternative macrophage activation and smooth muscle cell hypercontraction. In this study we investigated how IL-4-promoted T cells contributed to the parasite induced effects in the intestine. This was achieved using pan T cell-specific IL-4 receptor alpha-deficient mice (iLck(creIL-4Rα(-/lox and IL-4Rα-responsive control mice. Global IL-4Rα(-/- mice showed, as expected, impaired type 2 immunity to N. brasiliensis. Infected T cell-specific IL-4Rα-deficient mice showed comparable worm expulsion, goblet cell hyperplasia and IgE responses to control mice. However, impaired IL-4-promoted T(H2 cells in T cell-specific IL-4Rα deficient mice led to strikingly reduced IL-4 production by mesenteric lymph node CD4(+ T cells and reduced intestinal IL-4 and IL-13 levels, compared to control mice. This reduced IL-4/IL-13 response was associated with an impaired IL-4/IL-13-mediated smooth muscle cell hypercontractility, similar to that seen in global IL-4Rα(-/- mice. These results demonstrate that IL-4-promoted T cell responses are not required for the resolution of a primary N. brasiliensis infection. However, they do contribute significantly to an important physiological manifestation of helminth infection; namely intestinal smooth muscle cell-driven hypercontractility.

  7. Soybean β-conglycinin induces inflammation and oxidation and causes dysfunction of intestinal digestion and absorption in fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Xiu Zhang

    Full Text Available β-Conglycinin has been identified as one of the major feed allergens. However, studies of β-conglycinin on fish are scarce. This study investigated the effects of β-conglycinin on the growth, digestive and absorptive ability, inflammatory response, oxidative status and gene expression of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian in vivo and their enterocytes in vitro. The results indicated that the specific growth rate (SGR, feed intake, and feed efficiency were reduced by β-conglycinin. In addition, activities of trypsin, chymotrypsin, lipase, creatine kinase, Na(+,K(+-ATPase and alkaline phosphatase in the intestine showed similar tendencies. The protein content of the hepatopancreas and intestines, and the weight and length of the intestines were all reduced by β-conglycinin. β-Conglycinin increased lipid and protein oxidation in the detected tissues and cells. However, β-conglycinin decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione-S-transferase (GST, glutathione peroxidase (GPx and glutathione reductase (GR activities and glutathione (GSH content in the intestine and enterocytes. Similar antioxidant activity in the hepatopancreas was observed, except for GST. The expression of target of rapamycin (TOR gene was reduced by β-conglycinin. Furthermore, mRNA levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β genes were increased by β-conglycinin. However, β-conglycinin increased CuZnSOD, MnSOD, CAT, and GPx1b gene expression. In conclusion, this study indicates that β-conglycinin induces inflammation and oxidation, and causes dysfunction of intestinal digestion and absorption in fish, and finally reduces fish growth. The results of this study provide some information to the mechanism of β-conglycinin-induced negative effects.

  8. Soybean β-conglycinin induces inflammation and oxidation and causes dysfunction of intestinal digestion and absorption in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Xiu; Guo, Lin-Ying; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Liu, Yang; Hu, Kai; Jiang, Jun; Li, Shu-Hong; Tang, Ling; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2013-01-01

    β-Conglycinin has been identified as one of the major feed allergens. However, studies of β-conglycinin on fish are scarce. This study investigated the effects of β-conglycinin on the growth, digestive and absorptive ability, inflammatory response, oxidative status and gene expression of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian) in vivo and their enterocytes in vitro. The results indicated that the specific growth rate (SGR), feed intake, and feed efficiency were reduced by β-conglycinin. In addition, activities of trypsin, chymotrypsin, lipase, creatine kinase, Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and alkaline phosphatase in the intestine showed similar tendencies. The protein content of the hepatopancreas and intestines, and the weight and length of the intestines were all reduced by β-conglycinin. β-Conglycinin increased lipid and protein oxidation in the detected tissues and cells. However, β-conglycinin decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities and glutathione (GSH) content in the intestine and enterocytes. Similar antioxidant activity in the hepatopancreas was observed, except for GST. The expression of target of rapamycin (TOR) gene was reduced by β-conglycinin. Furthermore, mRNA levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) genes were increased by β-conglycinin. However, β-conglycinin increased CuZnSOD, MnSOD, CAT, and GPx1b gene expression. In conclusion, this study indicates that β-conglycinin induces inflammation and oxidation, and causes dysfunction of intestinal digestion and absorption in fish, and finally reduces fish growth. The results of this study provide some information to the mechanism of β-conglycinin-induced negative effects.

  9. Goat milk with and without increased concentrations of lysozyme improves repair of intestinal cell damage induced by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Eunice B

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC causes diarrhea, malnutrition and poor growth in children. Human breast milk decreases disease-causing bacteria by supplying nutrients and antimicrobial factors such as lysozyme. Goat milk with and without human lysozyme (HLZ may improve the repair of intestinal barrier function damage induced by EAEC. This work investigates the effect of the milks on intestinal barrier function repair, bacterial adherence in Caco-2 and HEp-2 cells, intestinal cell proliferation, migration, viability and apoptosis in IEC-6 cells in the absence or presence of EAEC. Methods Rat intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6, ATCC, Rockville, MD were used for proliferation, migration and viability assays and human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2, ATCC, Rockville, MD and human larynx carcinoma (HEp-2, ATCC, Rockville, MD cells were used for bacterial adhesion assays. Goats expressing HLZ in their milk were generated and express HLZ in milk at concentration of 270 μg/ml . Cells were incubated with pasteurized milk from either transgenic goats expressing HLZ or non-transgenic control goats in the presence and absence of EAEC strain 042 (O44:H18. Results Cellular proliferation was significantly greater in the presence of both HLZ transgenic and control goat milk compared to cells with no milk. Cellular migration was significantly decreased in the presence of EAEC alone but was restored in the presence of milk. Milk from HLZ transgenic goats had significantly more migration compared to control milk. Both milks significantly reduced EAEC adhesion to Caco-2 cells and transgenic milk resulted in less colonization than control milk using a HEp-2 assay. Both milks had significantly increased cellular viability as well as less apoptosis in both the absence and presence of EAEC. Conclusions These data demonstrated that goat milk is able to repair intestinal barrier function damage induced by EAEC and that goat milk with a higher

  10. Deregulated Lipid Sensing by Intestinal CD36 in Diet-Induced Hyperinsulinemic Obese Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Buttet

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome (MetS greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and is generally associated with abnormally elevated postprandial triglyceride levels. We evaluated intestinal synthesis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL in a mouse model of the MetS obtained by feeding a palm oil-rich high fat diet (HFD. By contrast to control mice, MetS mice secreted two populations of TRL. If the smaller size population represented 44% of total particles in the beginning of intestinal lipid absorption in MetS mice, it accounted for only 17% after 4 h due to the secretion of larger size TRL. The MetS mice displayed accentuated postprandial hypertriglyceridemia up to 3 h due to a defective TRL clearance. These alterations reflected a delay in lipid induction of genes for key proteins of TRL formation (MTP, L-FABP and blood clearance (ApoC2. These abnormalities associated with blunted lipid sensing by CD36, which is normally required to optimize jejunal formation of large TRL. In MetS mice CD36 was not downregulated by lipid in contrast to control mice. Treatment of controls with the proteosomal inhibitor MG132, which prevented CD36 downregulation, resulted in blunted lipid-induction of MTP, L-FABP and ApoC2 gene expression, as in MetS mice. Absence of CD36 sensing was due to the hyperinsulinemia in MetS mice. Acute insulin treatment of controls before lipid administration abolished CD36 downregulation, lipid-induction of TRL genes and reduced postprandial triglycerides (TG, while streptozotocin-treatment of MetS mice restored lipid-induced CD36 degradation and TG secretion. In vitro, insulin treatment abolished CD36-mediated up-regulation of MTP in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, HFD treatment impairs TRL formation in early stage of lipid absorption via insulin-mediated inhibition of CD36 lipid sensing. This impairment results in production of smaller TRL that are cleared slowly from the circulation, which might contribute to the

  11. Deregulated Lipid Sensing by Intestinal CD36 in Diet-Induced Hyperinsulinemic Obese Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttet, Marjorie; Poirier, Hélène; Traynard, Véronique; Gaire, Kévin; Tran, Thi Thu Trang; Sundaresan, Sinju; Besnard, Philippe; Abumrad, Nada A; Niot, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and is generally associated with abnormally elevated postprandial triglyceride levels. We evaluated intestinal synthesis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) in a mouse model of the MetS obtained by feeding a palm oil-rich high fat diet (HFD). By contrast to control mice, MetS mice secreted two populations of TRL. If the smaller size population represented 44% of total particles in the beginning of intestinal lipid absorption in MetS mice, it accounted for only 17% after 4 h due to the secretion of larger size TRL. The MetS mice displayed accentuated postprandial hypertriglyceridemia up to 3 h due to a defective TRL clearance. These alterations reflected a delay in lipid induction of genes for key proteins of TRL formation (MTP, L-FABP) and blood clearance (ApoC2). These abnormalities associated with blunted lipid sensing by CD36, which is normally required to optimize jejunal formation of large TRL. In MetS mice CD36 was not downregulated by lipid in contrast to control mice. Treatment of controls with the proteosomal inhibitor MG132, which prevented CD36 downregulation, resulted in blunted lipid-induction of MTP, L-FABP and ApoC2 gene expression, as in MetS mice. Absence of CD36 sensing was due to the hyperinsulinemia in MetS mice. Acute insulin treatment of controls before lipid administration abolished CD36 downregulation, lipid-induction of TRL genes and reduced postprandial triglycerides (TG), while streptozotocin-treatment of MetS mice restored lipid-induced CD36 degradation and TG secretion. In vitro, insulin treatment abolished CD36-mediated up-regulation of MTP in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, HFD treatment impairs TRL formation in early stage of lipid absorption via insulin-mediated inhibition of CD36 lipid sensing. This impairment results in production of smaller TRL that are cleared slowly from the circulation, which might contribute to the reported

  12. Deregulated Lipid Sensing by Intestinal CD36 in Diet-Induced Hyperinsulinemic Obese Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttet, Marjorie; Poirier, Hélène; Traynard, Véronique; Gaire, Kévin; Tran, Thi Thu Trang; Sundaresan, Sinju; Besnard, Philippe; Abumrad, Nada A.; Niot, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and is generally associated with abnormally elevated postprandial triglyceride levels. We evaluated intestinal synthesis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) in a mouse model of the MetS obtained by feeding a palm oil-rich high fat diet (HFD). By contrast to control mice, MetS mice secreted two populations of TRL. If the smaller size population represented 44% of total particles in the beginning of intestinal lipid absorption in MetS mice, it accounted for only 17% after 4 h due to the secretion of larger size TRL. The MetS mice displayed accentuated postprandial hypertriglyceridemia up to 3 h due to a defective TRL clearance. These alterations reflected a delay in lipid induction of genes for key proteins of TRL formation (MTP, L-FABP) and blood clearance (ApoC2). These abnormalities associated with blunted lipid sensing by CD36, which is normally required to optimize jejunal formation of large TRL. In MetS mice CD36 was not downregulated by lipid in contrast to control mice. Treatment of controls with the proteosomal inhibitor MG132, which prevented CD36 downregulation, resulted in blunted lipid-induction of MTP, L-FABP and ApoC2 gene expression, as in MetS mice. Absence of CD36 sensing was due to the hyperinsulinemia in MetS mice. Acute insulin treatment of controls before lipid administration abolished CD36 downregulation, lipid-induction of TRL genes and reduced postprandial triglycerides (TG), while streptozotocin-treatment of MetS mice restored lipid-induced CD36 degradation and TG secretion. In vitro, insulin treatment abolished CD36-mediated up-regulation of MTP in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, HFD treatment impairs TRL formation in early stage of lipid absorption via insulin-mediated inhibition of CD36 lipid sensing. This impairment results in production of smaller TRL that are cleared slowly from the circulation, which might contribute to the reported

  13. Rapid reversal of human intestinal ischemia-reperfusion induced damage by shedding of injured enterocytes and reepithelialisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joep P M Derikx

    . At the same time, M30 immunoreactivity was absent in intact epithelial lining. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first human study to clarify intestinal IR induced cell damage and repair and its direct consequences. It reveals a unique, endogenous clearing mechanism for injured enterocytes: rapid detachment of damaged apoptotic enterocytes into the lumen. This process is followed by repair of the epithelial continuity within an hour, resulting in a normal epithelial lining.

  14. Biphasic effects of histamine on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions: Studies with betahistine, dimaprit, (R). alpha. -methylhistamine and nizatidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, R.E.; Palitzsch, K.D.; Szabo, S. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States))

    1991-03-15

    In elucidating further the role that histamine (H) may play in gastroprotection against hemorrhagic mucosal lesions (HML) induced by ethanol (E), fasted S-D rats were treated with subcutaneous (s.c.) H 10, 15, 20 and 30 min before intragastric (i.g.) 100% E or H-agonists betahistine (H1) or dimaprit (H2) i.g. 30 min. before 75% E. All animals were killed 1 hr after E, HML were measured with stereomicrosopic planimetry and expressed as % of glandular stomach. The H2 antagonist nizatidine did not influence the extent of HML. As a follow up to previously reported nizatidine blockade of H2-induced gastroprotection against 75% E, nizatidine + H1 or nizatidine + H3 agonist (R){alpha}-methylhistamine was also tested. The H2 antagonist nizatidine abolished the gastroprotection by H3 but did not influence the H1-induced reduction of HML. H injected s.c. showed a dose- and time-dependent biphasic effect on E-induced gastric mucosal lesions. Both H1- and H2-agonists injected s.c. reduced the E-induced damage. Nizatidine alone failed to influence mucosal lesions, blocked gastroprotection induced by H2 or H3, but not by H1 agonists.

  15. Role of TFF in healing of stress-induced gastric lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Nan Nie; Hai-Chen Sun; Zhao-Shen Li; Xiao-Ming Qian; Xue-Hao Wu; Shi-Yu Yang; Wen-Jie Tang; Bao-Hua Xu; Fang Huang; Xin Lin; Dong-Yan Sun

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To determine the changes of pS2 and ITF of TFF expression in gastric mucosa and the effect on ulcer healing of pS2, ITF to Water-immersion and restraint stress (WRS)in rats.METHODS: Wistar rats were exposed to single or repeated WRS for 4 h every other day for up to 6 days. Gastric mucosal blood flow (GMBF) was measured by LDF-3 flowmeter and the extent of gastric mucosal lesions were evaluated grossly and histologically. Expression of pS2 and ITF mRNA was determined by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was used to further detect the expression of pS2 and ITF.RESULTS: WRS applied once produced numerous gastric mucosal erosions, but the number of these lesions gradually declined and GMBF restored at 2, 4, 8 h after stress. The area of gastric mucosal lesion was reduced by 64.9 % and GMBF was increased by 89.8 % at 8 h. The healing of stress-induced ulcerations was accompanied by increased expression of pS2 (0.51±0.14 vs0.77±0.11, P<0.01) and ITF (0.022±0.001 vs 0.177±0.010, P<0.01). The results were demonstrated further by immunohistochemistry of pS2(0.95±0.11 vs1.41±0.04, P<0.01) and ITF (0.134±0.001 vs 0.253±0.01,P<0.01). With repeated WRS, adaptation to this WRS developed, the area of gastric mucosal lesions was reduced by 22.0 % after four consecutive WRS. This adaptation to WRS was accompanied by increased GMBF (being increased by 94.2 %), active cell proliferation in the neck region of gastric glands, and increased expression of pS2 (0.37±0.02 vs 0.77±0.01, P<0.01) and ITF (0.040±0.001 vs0.372±0.010, P<0.01). The result was demonstrated further by immunohistochemistry of pS2 (0.55±0.04 vs 2.46±0.08, P<0.01) and ITF (0.134±0.001 vs0.354±0.070,P<0.01).CONCLUSION: TFF may not only participate in the early phase of epithelial repair known as restitution(maked by increased cell migration),but also play an important role in the subsequent, protracted phase of glandular renewal(made by cell proliferation).

  16. Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters Induce Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction via a Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Mechanism in a Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elamin, Elhaseen; Masclee, Ad; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; van IJzendoorn, Sven; Troost, Freddy; Pieters, Harm-Jan; Dekker, Jan; Jonkers, Daisy

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims: Evidence is accumulating that ethanol and its oxidative metabolite, acetaldehyde, can disrupt intestinal epithelial integrity, an important factor contributing to ethanol-induced liver injury. However, ethanol can also be metabolized non-oxidatively generating phosphatidylethanol

  17. Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters Induce Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction via a Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Mechanism in a Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elamin, E.; Masclee, A.A.M.; Juuti-Uusitalo, K.; IJzendoorn, van S.; Troost, F.; Pieters, H.J.; Dekker, J.; Jonkers, D.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims: Evidence is accumulating that ethanol and its oxidative metabolite, acetaldehyde, can disrupt intestinal epithelial integrity, an important factor contributing to ethanol-induced liver injury. However, ethanol can also be metabolized non-oxidatively generating phosphatidyletha

  18. Deoxynivanelol and Fumonisin, Alone or in Combination, Induce Changes on Intestinal Junction Complexes and in E-Cadherin Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Basso

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Fusariotoxins such as fumonisin B1 (FB1 and deoxynivalenol (DON cause deleterious effects on the intestine of pigs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of these mycotoxins, alone and in combination, on jejunal explants from piglets, using histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural assays. Five 24-day old pigs were used for sampling the explants. Forty-eight explants were sampled from each animal. Explants were incubated for 4 hours in culture medium and medium containing FB1 (100 µM, DON (10 µM and both mycotoxins (100 µM FB1 plus 10 µM DON. Exposure to all treatments induced a significant decrease in the normal intestinal morphology and in the number of goblet cells, which were more severe in explants exposed to DON and both mycotoxins. A significant reduction in villus height occurred in groups treated with DON and with co-contamination. Expression of E-cadherin was significantly reduced in explants exposed to FB1 (40%, DON (93% and FB1 plus DON (100%. The ultrastructural assay showed increased intercellular spaces and no junction complexes on enterocytes exposed to mycotoxins. The present data indicate that FB1 and DON induce changes in cell junction complexes that could contribute to increase paracellular permeability. The ex vivo model was adequate for assessing intestinal toxicity induced by exposure of isolated or associated concentrations of 100 µM of FB1 and 10 µM of DON.

  19. Intestinal Insulin Signaling Encodes Two Different Molecular Mechanisms for the Shortened Longevity Induced by Graphene Oxide in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunli; Yang, Ruilong; Rui, Qi; Wang, Dayong

    2016-04-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been shown to cause multiple toxicities in various organisms. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for GO-induced shortened longevity are still unclear. We employed Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the possible involvement of insulin signaling pathway in the control of GO toxicity and its underlying molecular mechanisms. Mutation of daf-2, age-1, akt-1, or akt-2 gene induced a resistant property of nematodes to GO toxicity, while mutation of daf-16 gene led to a susceptible property of nematodes to GO toxicity, suggesting that GO may dysregulate the functions of DAF-2/IGF-1 receptor, AGE-1, AKT-1 and AKT-2-mediated kinase cascade, and DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor. Genetic interaction analysis suggested the involvement of signaling cascade of DAF-2-AGE-1-AKT-1/2-DAF-16 in the control of GO toxicity on longevity. Moreover, intestinal RNA interference (RNAi) analysis demonstrated that GO reduced longevity by affecting the functions of signaling cascade of DAF-2-AGE-1-AKT-1/2-DAF-16 in the intestine. DAF-16 could also regulate GO toxicity on longevity by functioning upstream of SOD-3, which encodes an antioxidation system that prevents the accumulation of oxidative stress. Therefore, intestinal insulin signaling may encode two different molecular mechanisms responsible for the GO toxicity in inducing the shortened longevity. Our results highlight the key role of insulin signaling pathway in the control of GO toxicity in organisms.

  20. Depletion of brain histamine produces regionally selective protection against thiamine deficiency-induced lesions in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlais, Philip J; McRee, Robert Carter; Nalwalk, Julia A; Hough, Lindsay B

    2002-09-01

    Breakdown of the blood brain barrier and the subsequent accumulation of free radicals, lactate, and glutamate appear to be the immediate causes of thiamine deficiency (TD)-induced damage to thalamus. The mechanisms triggering these events are unknown but recent evidence suggests an important role of histamine. We therefore studied the effects of histamine depletion on thalamic lesions in the pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficient (PTD) rat. Chronic intracerebroventricular (i.c.v., 7 days) infusion of alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (FMH), combined with bilateral ibotenate destruction of the histamine-containing neurons in the tuberomammillary (TM) nucleus and bolus i.c.v. infusion of 48/80, a potent mast cell degranulating agent, was used to deplete brain histamine levels. PTD rats receiving combined FMH + 48/80 + TM lesions developed acute neurological symptoms, including spontaneous seizures, approximately 1 day earlier than PTD rats treated with i.c.v. infusion of vehicle and sham lesions of the TM. When examined 1 week after restoration of thiamine, the PTD vehicle + sham lesion animals contained severe neuronal loss and gliosis in midline, intralaminar, ventral, lateral, and posterior nuclei. PTD animals treated with FMH + 48/80 + TM lesions had little evidence of neuronal loss or microglial proliferation in thalamus except in the gelatinosus and anteroventral nuclei, in which there was complete neuronal loss. These data demonstrate a significant and regionally selective role of histamine in the development of thalamic lesions in a rat model of Wernicke's encephalopathy. Furthermore, these data suggest either a dissociation between seizures and thalamic lesions or a significant role of histamine in seizure-related damage to the thalamus.

  1. Histological and biochemical analysis of mechanical and thermal bioeffects in boiling histotripsy lesions induced by high intensity focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yak-Nam; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Bailey, Michael; Hwang, Joo Ha; Khokhlova, Vera

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that shockwave heating and millisecond boiling in high-intensity focused ultrasound fields can result in mechanical fractionation or emulsification of tissue, termed boiling histotripsy. Visual observations of the change in color and contents indicated that the degree of thermal damage in the emulsified lesions can be controlled by varying the parameters of the exposure. The goal of this work was to examine thermal and mechanical effects in boiling histotripsy lesions using histologic and biochemical analysis. The lesions were induced in ex vivo bovine heart and liver using a 2-MHz single-element transducer operating at duty factors of 0.005-0.01, pulse durations of 5-500 ms and in situ shock amplitude of 73 MPa. Mechanical and thermal damage to tissue was evaluated histologically using conventional staining techniques (hematoxylin and eosin, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-diaphorase). Thermal effects were quantified by measuring denaturation of salt soluble proteins in the treated region. According to histologic analysis, the lesions that visually appeared as a liquid contained no cellular structures larger than a cell nucleus and had a sharp border of one to two cells. Both histologic and protein analysis showed that lesions obtained with short pulses (thermal damage. Increasing the pulse duration resulted in an increase in thermal damage. However, both protein analysis and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-diaphorase staining showed less denaturation than visually observed as whitening of tissue. The number of high-intensity focused ultrasound pulses delivered per exposure did not change the lesion shape or the degree of thermal denaturation, whereas the size of the lesion showed a saturating behavior suggesting optimal exposure duration. This study confirmed that boiling histotripsy offers an effective, predictable way to non-invasively fractionate tissue into sub-cellular fragments with or without inducing thermal damage.

  2. Protective effect of an herbal preparation (HemoHIM) on radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Lee, Hae June; Kim, Joong Sun; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Jong Choon; Park, Hae-Ran; Jung, Uhee; Jang, Jong Sik; Jo, Sung Kee

    2009-12-01

    The protective properties of an herbal preparation (HemoHIM) against intestinal damage were examined by evaluating its effects on jejunal crypt survival, morphological changes, and apoptosis in gamma-irradiated mice. The mice were whole-body irradiated with 12 Gy for the examination of jejunal crypt survival and any morphological changes and with 2 Gy for the detection of apoptosis and Ki-67 labeling. Irradiation was conducted using (60)Co gamma-rays. HemoHIM treatment was administered intraperitonially at a dosage of 50 mg/kg of body weight at 36 and 12 hours pre-irradiation and 30 minutes post-irradiation or orally at a dosage of 250 mg/kg of body weight/day for 7 or 11 days before necropsy. The HemoHIM-treated group displayed a significant increase in survival of jejunal crypts, when compared to the irradiation controls. HemoHIM treatment decreased intestinal morphological changes such as crypt depth, villus height, mucosal length, and basal lamina length of 10 enterocytes after irradiation. Furthermore, the administration of HemoHIM protected intestinal cells from irradiation-induced apoptosis. These results suggested that HemoHIM may be therapeutically useful to reduce intestinal injury following irradiation.

  3. Differential effects of unilateral lesions in the medial amygdala on spontaneous and induced ovulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, M A; Dominguez, R

    1995-01-01

    The possible existence of asymmetry in the control of ovulation by the medial amygdala was explored. Unilateral lesions of the medial amygdala were performed on each day of the estrous cycle. The estral index diminished in almost all animals with a lesion in the right side of medial amygdala. Lesions of the right medial amygdala, when performed on diestrus-1, resulted in a significant decrease in the number of rats ovulating compared to controls (4/8 vs. 8/8, p rats with lesions of the right medial amygdala. However, sequential injections of PMSG-hCG did result in ovulation by all members of a group of lesioned animals. In this last condition a significant decrease in the number of ova shed by the right ovary was found compared to animals in the lesion-only condition (1.5 +/- 0.5 vs. 6.0 +/- 1.5, p cycle.

  4. Topical efficacy of dimercapto-chelating agents against lewisite-induced skin lesions in SKH-1 hairless mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouret, Stéphane, E-mail: stephane.mouret@irba.fr [Département de Toxicologie et Risques Chimiques, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des Armées, 24 avenue Maquis du Grésivaudan, 38700 La Tronche (France); Wartelle, Julien; Emorine, Sandy; Bertoni, Marine; Nguon, Nina; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile [Département de Toxicologie et Risques Chimiques, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des Armées, 24 avenue Maquis du Grésivaudan, 38700 La Tronche (France); Dorandeu, Frédéric [Département de Toxicologie et Risques Chimiques, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des Armées, 24 avenue Maquis du Grésivaudan, 38700 La Tronche (France); Ecole du Val-de-Grâce, 1 place Alphonse Laveran, Paris (France); Boudry, Isabelle [Département de Toxicologie et Risques Chimiques, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des Armées, 24 avenue Maquis du Grésivaudan, 38700 La Tronche (France)

    2013-10-15

    Lewisite is a potent chemical warfare arsenical vesicant that can cause severe skin lesions. Today, lewisite exposure remains possible during demilitarization of old ammunitions and as a result of deliberate use. Although its cutaneous toxicity is not fully elucidated, a specific antidote exists, the British anti-lewisite (BAL, dimercaprol) but it is not without untoward effects. Analogs of BAL, less toxic, have been developed such as meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and have been employed for the treatment of heavy metal poisoning. However, efficacy of DMSA against lewisite-induced skin lesions remains to be determined in comparison with BAL. We have thus evaluated in this study the therapeutic efficacy of BAL and DMSA in two administration modes against skin lesions induced by lewisite vapor on SKH-1 hairless mice. Our data demonstrate a strong protective efficacy of topical application of dimercapto-chelating agents in contrast to a subcutaneous administration 1 h after lewisite exposure, with attenuation of wound size, necrosis and impairment of skin barrier function. The histological evaluation also confirms the efficacy of topical application by showing that treatments were effective in reversing lewisite-induced neutrophil infiltration. This protective effect was associated with an epidermal hyperplasia. However, for all the parameters studied, BAL was more effective than DMSA in reducing lewisite-induced skin injury. Together, these findings support the use of a topical form of dimercaprol-chelating agent against lewisite-induced skin lesion within the first hour after exposure to increase the therapeutic management and that BAL, despite its side-effects, should not be abandoned. - Highlights: • Topically applied dimercapto-chelating agents reduce lewisite-induced skin damage. • One topical application of BAL or DMSA is sufficient to reverse lewisite effects. • Topical BAL is more effective than DMSA to counteract lewisite-induced skin damage.

  5. Surgical therapy of radiation-induced lesions of the colon and rectum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miholic, J.; Schwarz, C.; Moeschl, P.

    1988-06-01

    Thirty-six operations for late sequelae of radiotherapy were carried out in 31 patients from 1971 to 1986. The most frequent indications for surgery were stricture (58 percent) and fistula (29 percent). In the first 8 year period from 1971 through 1978, 13 of 14 operations were diversions (colostomy or by-pass). From 1979 through 1986, a more aggressive approach prevailed. Only 32 percent of the operations were diversions. This more aggressive strategy was accompanied by a decrease of the postoperative mortality rate from 21 percent through 1978 to 0 in the later period. The overall complication rate was 23 percent. Complications were relatively more frequent after two-layer sutured or stapled anastomoses and after resection or fistula closure without temporary colostomy. We conclude that in radiation-induced colonic and rectal lesions, diversion should be performed in patients with unproved cure of disease or tumor persistence. Resection and fistula closure can be carried out safely, and a temporary colostomy is strongly recommended.

  6. Pharmacological treatments inhibiting levodopa-induced dyskinesias in MPTP-lesioned monkeys: brain glutamate biochemical correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eMorin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Antiglutamatergic drugs can relieve Parkinson’s disease (PD symptoms and decrease L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID. This review reports relevant studies investigating glutamate receptor subtypes in relation to motor complications in PD patients and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP-lesioned monkeys. Antagonists of the ionotropic glutamate receptors, such as NMDA and AMPA receptors, display antidyskinetic activity in PD patients and animal models such as the MPTP monkey. Metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5 receptor antagonists were shown to reduce the severity of LID in PD patients as well as in already dyskinetic non-human primates and to prevent the development of LID in de novo treatments in non-human primates. An increase in striatal post-synaptic NMDA, AMPA and mGlu5 receptors is documented in PD patients and MPTP monkeys with LID. This increase can be prevented in MPTP monkeys with the addition of a specific glutamate receptor antagonist to the L-DOPA treatment and also with drugs of various pharmacological specificities suggesting multiple receptor interactions. This is yet to be well documented for presynaptic mGlu4 and mGlu2/3 and offers additional new promising avenues.

  7. Experimentally Induced Pulpal Lesion and Substance P Expression: Effect of Ketoprofen—A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Marco Abbate

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate substance P (SP and the effect of ketoprofen administration, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, on SP in the pulp of upper third molars with experimentally induced pulpal lesion. Materials and Methods. A sample of 20 young systemically healthy adults of both sexes, nonsmokers, with a healthy upper third molar to extract for orthodontic purposes, was selected. Prior to the procedure, an inflammatory process was generated by mechanical exposure of the pulp. After 15 minutes, the pulp was collected using a sterile barbed broach. SP levels were determined by using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay (ELISA kit. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups: group 1 received a dose of ketoprofen 30 minutes prior to the experimental procedure. The subjects of group 2 did not receive any kind of drug administration. The patients were asked to complete a diary on the postoperative pain. Results. No statistically significant difference could be detected in SP expression between the two groups. In group 1, pain manifestation was significantly delayed in comparison with group 2. Conclusions. Preventive administration of ketoprofen did not significantly affect the pulpal levels of SP but resulted in a significantly postponed manifestation of pain after extraction.

  8. Regeneration of dopaminergic neurons after 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesion in planarian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Kaneyasu; Inoue, Takeshi; Yoshimoto, Kanji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2011-12-01

    Planarians have robust regenerative ability dependent on X-ray-sensitive pluripotent stem cells, called neoblasts. Here, we report that planarians can regenerate dopaminergic neurons after selective degeneration of these neurons caused by treatment with a dopaminergic neurotoxin (6-hydroxydopamine; 6-OHDA). This suggests that planarians have a system to sense the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and to recruit stem cells to produce dopaminergic neurons to recover brain morphology and function. We confirmed that X-ray-irradiated planarians do not regenerate brain dopaminergic neurons after 6-OHDA-induced lesioning, suggesting that newly generated dopaminergic neurons are indeed derived from pluripotent stem cells. However, we found that the majority of regenerated dopaminergic neurons were 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-negative cells. Therefore, we carefully analyzed when proliferating stem cells became committed to become dopaminergic neurons during regeneration by a combination of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine pulse-chase experiments, immunostaining/in situ hybridization, and 5-fluorouracil treatment. The results strongly suggested that G(2) -phase stem cells become committed to dopaminergic neurons in the mesenchymal space around the brain, after migration from the trunk region following S-phase. These new findings obtained from planarian regeneration provide hints about how to conduct cell-transplantation therapy for future regenerative medicine. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  9. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce the development of preneoplasic lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Henriques,Viviana Teixeira; Dias,Cristina Maria Ganns Chaves; Sylvia do Carmo Castro FRANCESCHINI; Sabarense,Céphora Maria; Neuza Maria Brunoro COSTA; Leite,Jacqueline Isaura Alvarez; Peluzio,Maria do Carmo Gouveia

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anticancer potential of dietary omega-3 supplementation to reduce induced intestinal preneoplastic lesions in Wistar rats. METHODS: A total of 58 11-week-old male Wistar rats (Rattus norvergicus, albinus variety, Rodentia) were distributed into two groups: a control group (n=25) and an omega-3-treated group (n=28). Aberrant crypt foci were induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine. Tissue incorporation of the supplemented omega-3 fatty acids was...

  10. Learning tasks as a possible treatment for DNA lesions induced by oxidative stress in hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DragoCrneci; Radu Silaghi-Dumitrescu

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in conditions ranging from cardiovascular dysfunc-tion, arthritis, cancer, to aging and age-related disorders. The organism developed several path-ways to counteract these effects, with base excision repair being responsible for repairing one of the major base lesions (8-oxoG) in al organisms. Epidemiological evidence suggests that cognitive stimulation makes the brain more resilient to damage or degeneration. Recent studies have linked enriched environment to reduction of oxidative stressin neurons of mice with Alzheimer’s dis-ease-like disease, but given its complexity it is not clear what specific aspect of enriched environ-ment has therapeutic effects. Studies from molecular biology have shown that the protein p300, which is a transcription co-activator required for consolidation of memories during specific learning tasks, is at the same time involved in DNA replication and repair, playing a central role in the long-patch pathway of base excision repair. Based on the evidence, we propose that learning tasks such as novel object recognition could be tested as possible methods of base excision repair faci-litation, hence inducing DNA repair in the hippocampal neurons. If this method proves to be effective, it could be the start for designing similar tasks for humans, as a behavioral therapeutic complement to the classical drug-based therapy in treating neurodegenerative disorders. This review presents the current status of therapeutic methods used in treating neurodegenerative diseases induced by reactive oxygen species and proposes a new approach based on existing data.

  11. A prospective study assessing the efficacy of abdominal computed tomography scan without bowel preparation in diagnosing intestinal wall and luminal lesions in patients presenting to the emergency room with abdominal complaints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michal Mizrahi; Yoav Mintz; Avraham Rivkind; David Kisselgoff; Eugene Libson; Mayer Brezis; Eran Goldin; Oren Shibolet

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the positive predictive value of abdominal non-prepared computed tomography (CT) for diagnosing intestinal lumen or wall lesions in patients presenting to the emergency room (ER) with abdominal complaints.METHODS: For 1-year we prospectively evaluated all ER patients hospitalized after abdominal CT scan detected either intraluminal or intestinal wall lesions. These patients underwent colonoscopy serving as gold standard. Patients with prior abdominal pathology or CT findings of appendicitis or diverticulitis were excluded.RESULTS: Five hundred and sixty-eight abdominopelvic CT scans were performed in the ER, 96 had positive colonic findings. Sixty-two patients were excluded, 46 because of diverticulitis or appendicitis, 16 because of prior abdominal pathology. Of the remaining 34 patients, 14 did not undergo colonoscopy during hospitalization.Twenty eligible patients were included in the study. The positive predictive value of the CT scans performed in the ER was calculated to be 45% (95% CI 25-67).CONCLUSION: CT findings correlated with colonoscopic findings only in approximately half of the cases. Relying on non-prepared CT scan findings in planning patient management and colonoscopy may lead to unnecessary diagnostic work-ups.

  12. Experimentally induced intestinal metaplasia in Wistar rats by x-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, H.

    1978-11-01

    The gastric region of 5-week-old female Wistar rats was irradiated daily with 500 rad of x-ray up to a total of six times. Goblet cells and marker enzymes of the small intestine, such as lactase, trehalase, and maltase, appeared in the pyloric region of the glandular stomach of the rats from the 1st week after final irradiation. Intestinal type crypt without Paneth cells was observed from the 8th week. Sucrase activity appeared from the 26th week. Intestinal metaplasia with Paneth cells appeared from the 71st week. The number of goblet cells, intestinal type crypts, and Paneth cells increased with age. Gastric adenocarcinoma did not develop after irradiation.

  13. Hyperthermia induces injury to the intestinal mucosa in the mouse: evidence for an oxidative stress mechanism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oliver, S R; Phillips, N A; Novosad, V L; Bakos, M P; Talbert, E E; Clanton, T L

    2012-01-01

    .... We tested the hypothesis that conditions characteristic of mild heatstroke in mice are associated with injury to the epithelial lining of the intestinal tract and comprise a critical component of barrier dysfunction...

  14. Modifying Effects of Fungal and Herb Metabolites on Azoxymethane‐induced Intestinal Carcinogenesis in Rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yoshimi, Naoki; Wang, Aijin; Morishita, Yukio; Tanaka, Takuji; Sugie, Shigeyuki; Kawai, Kiyoshi; Yamahara, Joji; Mori, Hideki

    1992-01-01

    Modifying effects of a fungal product, flavoglaucin, and four plant‐derived chemicals, shikonin, gingerol, oleanolic acid and paeoniflorin, on intestinal carcinogenesis were examined in a rat model using azoxymethane (AOM...

  15. Rosiglitazone improves intestinal lipoprotein overproduction in the fat-fed Syrian Golden hamster, an animal model of nutritionally-induced insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Nathalie; Naples, Mark; Uffelman, Kristine; Szeto, Linda; Adeli, Khosrow; Lewis, Gary F

    2004-06-01

    We have recently shown that the fructose-fed Syrian Golden hamster, a non-diabetic animal model of nutritionally-induced insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia, is characterized by intestinal lipoprotein overproduction. In order to determine whether intestinal lipoprotein overproduction is specific to fructose feeding or applies generally to other models of insulin resistance, we studied intestinal lipoprotein production and the response to insulin sensitization in the high fat-fed Syrian Golden hamster. Syrian Golden Hamsters were fed either (1). chow (CHOW), (2). 60% fat (FAT) or (3). 60% fat with rosiglitazone, 20 micromol/kg per day (FAT + RSG) for 5 weeks. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp studies confirmed that FAT is a good model of insulin resistance and rosiglitazone treatment resulted in a significant improvement in insulin sensitivity. In addition, there was a significant approx. two- to four-fold increase in intestinal apoB48 particle production in FAT. Rosiglitazone treatment resulted in partial normalization of apoB48-containing intestinal lipoprotein secretion. In summary: (1). the fat-fed Syrian Golden Hamster is a good model of nutritionally-induced insulin resistance, (2). intestinal overproduction of lipoproteins appear to contribute to the hypertriglyceridemia of insulin resistance in this animal model and (3). insulin sensitization with rosiglitazone ameliorates intestinal apoB48 particle overproduction in the fat-fed Syrian Golden Hamster. These data further support the link between insulin resistance and intestinal lipoprotein overproduction.

  16. Antibiotic-Induced Perturbations of the Intestinal Microbiota Alter Host Susceptibility to Enteric Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sekirov, Inna; Tam, Nicola M.; Jogova, Maria; Robertson, Marilyn L.; Li, Yuling; Lupp, Claudia; Finlay, B. Brett

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota comprises microbial communities that reside in the gastrointestinal tract and are critical to normal host physiology. Understanding the microbiota's role in host response to invading pathogens will further advance our knowledge of host-microbe interactions. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was used as a model enteric pathogen to investigate the effect of intestinal microbiota perturbation on host susceptibility to infection. Antibiotics were used to perturb the in...

  17. EXERCISE-INDUCED SYMPATHETIC FFA MOBILIZATION IN VMH-LESIONED RATS IS NORMALIZED BY FASTING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balkan, B.; Dijk, G. van; Strubbe, J.H.; Bruggink, J.E.; Steffens, A.B.

    This study investigates whether reduced sympathetic responses during physical exercise in ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH)-lesioned obese rats are the direct result of damage to hypothalamic circuits or a secondary effect of the altered metabolism in obesity. Obese, VMH-lesioned rats and lean

  18. EXERCISE-INDUCED SYMPATHETIC FFA MOBILIZATION IN VMH-LESIONED RATS IS NORMALIZED BY FASTING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balkan, B.; Dijk, G. van; Strubbe, J.H.; Bruggink, J.E.; Steffens, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    This study investigates whether reduced sympathetic responses during physical exercise in ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH)-lesioned obese rats are the direct result of damage to hypothalamic circuits or a secondary effect of the altered metabolism in obesity. Obese, VMH-lesioned rats and lean control

  19. Cutting edge: Multiple sclerosis-like lesions induced by effector CD8 T cells recognizing a sequestered antigen on oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Amit; Bauer, Jan; Scheikl, Tanja; Zappulla, Jacques; Audebert, Marc; Desbois, Sabine; Waisman, Ari; Lassmann, Hans; Liblau, Roland S; Mars, Lennart T

    2008-08-01

    CD8 T cells are emerging as important players in multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis, although their direct contribution to tissue damage is still debated. To assess whether autoreactive CD8 T cells can contribute to the pronounced loss of oligodendrocytes observed in MS plaques, we generated mice in which the model Ag influenza hemagglutinin is selectively expressed in oligodendrocytes. Transfer of preactivated hemagglutinin-specific CD8 T cells led to inflammatory lesions in the optic nerve, spinal cord, and brain. These lesions, associating CD8 T cell infiltration with focal loss of oligodendrocytes, demyelination, and microglia activation, were very reminiscent of active MS lesions. Thus, our study demonstrates the potential of CD8 T cells to induce oligodendrocyte lysis in vivo as a likely consequence of direct Ag-recognition. These results provide new insights with regard to CNS tissue damage mediated by CD8 T cells and for understanding the role of CD8 T cells in MS.

  20. Lipoteichoic Acid of Probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum Attenuates Poly I:C-Induced IL-8 Production in Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Whun Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics in livestock feed supplements are considered a replacement for antibiotics that enhance gastrointestinal immunity. Although bacterial cell wall components have been proposed to be associated with probiotic function, little evidence demonstrates that they are responsible for probiotic functions in livestock. The present study demonstrated that lipoteichoic acid (LTA of Lactobacillus plantarum (Lp.LTA confers anti-inflammatory responses in porcine intestinal epithelial cell line, IPEC-J2. A synthetic analog of viral double-stranded RNA, poly I:C, dose-dependently induced IL-8 production at the mRNA and protein levels in IPEC-J2 cells. Lp.LTA, but not lipoprotein or peptidoglycan from L. plantarum, exclusively suppressed poly I:C-induced IL-8 production. Compared with LTAs from other probiotic Lactobacillus strains including L. delbrueckii, L. sakei, and L. rhamnosus GG, Lp.LTA had higher potential to suppress poly I:C-induced IL-8 production. Dealanylated or deacylated Lp.LTA did not suppress poly I:C-induced IL-8 production, suggesting that D-alanine and lipid moieties in the Lp.LTA structure were responsible for the inhibition. Furthermore, Lp.LTA attenuated the phosphorylation of ERK and p38 kinase as well as the activation of NF-κB, resulting in decreased IL-8 production. Taken together, these results suggest that Lp.LTA acts as an effector molecule to inhibit viral pathogen-induced inflammatory responses in porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

  1. Interleukin-17 induces an atypical M2-like macrophage subpopulation that regulates intestinal inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Nishikawa

    Full Text Available Interleukin 17 (IL-17 is a pleiotropic cytokine that acts on both immune and non-immune cells and is generally implicated in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Although IL-17 as well as their source, mainly but not limited to Th17 cells, is also abundant in the inflamed intestine, the role of IL-17 in inflammatory bowel disease remains controversial. In the present study, by using IL-17 knockout (KO mice, we investigated the role of IL-17 in colitis, with special focus on the macrophage subpopulations. Here we show that IL-17KO mice had increased susceptibility to DSS-induced colitis which was associated with decrease in expression of mRNAs implicated in M2 and/or wound healing macrophages, such as IL-10, IL-1 receptor antagonist, arginase 1, cyclooxygenase 2, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Lamina propria leukocytes from inflamed colon of IL-17KO mice contained fewer CD11b+Ly6C+MHC Class II+ macrophages, which were derived, at least partly, from blood monocytes, as compared to those of WT mice. FACS-purified CD11b+ cells from WT mice, which were more abundant in Ly6C+MHC Class II+ cells, expressed increased levels of genes associated M2/wound healing macrophages and also M1/proinflammatory macrophages. Depletion of this population by topical administration of clodronate-liposome in the colon of WT mice resulted in the exacerbation of colitis. These results demonstrate that IL-17 confers protection against the development of severe colitis through the induction of an atypical M2-like macrophage subpopulation. Our findings reveal a previously unappreciated mechanism by which IL-17 exerts a protective function in colitis.

  2. Rapid reversal of human intestinal ischemia-reperfusion induced damage by shedding of injured enterocytes and reepithelialisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derikx, Joep P M; Matthijsen, Robert A; de Bruïne, Adriaan P; van Bijnen, Annemarie A; Heineman, Erik; van Dam, Ronald M; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Buurman, Wim A

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) is a phenomenon related to physiological conditions (e.g. exercise, stress) and to pathophysiological events (e.g. acute mesenteric ischemia, aortic surgery). Although intestinal IR has been studied extensively in animals, results remain inconclusive and data on human intestinal IR are scarce. Therefore, an experimental harmless model for human intestinal IR was developed, enabling us to clarify the sequelae of human intestinal IR for the first time. In 30 patients undergoing pancreatico-duodenectomy we took advantage of the fact that in this procedure a variable length of jejunum is removed. Isolated jejunum (5 cm) was subjected to 30 minutes ischemia followed by reperfusion. Intestinal Fatty Acid Binding Protein (I-FABP) arteriovenous concentration differences across the bowel segment were measured before and after ischemia to assess epithelial cell damage. Tissue sections were collected after ischemia and at 25, 60 and 120 minutes reperfusion and stained with H&E, and for I-FABP and the apoptosis marker M30. Bonferroni's test was used to compare I-FABP differences. Mean (SEM) arteriovenous concentration gradients of I-FABP across the jejunum revealed rapidly developing epithelial cell damage. I-FABP release significantly increased from 290 (46) pg/ml before ischemia towards 3,997 (554) pg/ml immediately after ischemia (pintestinal epithelial lining was microscopically normal, while subepithelial spaces appeared at the villus tip. However, after 25 minutes reperfusion, enterocyte M30 immunostaining was observed at the villus tip accompanied by shedding of mature enterocytes into the lumen and loss of I-FABP staining. Interestingly, within 60 minutes reperfusion the epithelial barrier resealed, while debris of apoptotic, shedded epithelial cells was observed in the lumen. At the same time, M30 immunoreactivity was absent in intact epithelial lining. This is the first human study to clarify intestinal IR induced cell damage and

  3. The role of inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in teeth periapical lesions immunopathogenesis caused by Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Yuanita

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periapical lesions, are characterized by an immune response to the invading bacteria consequences periapical bone destruction. In root canal treatment failure was found Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis as most species. iNOS found an important role in protection against infection, plays vital roles in fighting pathogens and contributing to disease pathology. Purpose: This study was to observed the role of iNOS in teeth periapical lessions immunopathogenesis caused by E. faecalis. Methods: The randomized post-only control group design used in this study, This study used 24 Wistar rats, were divided into three groups (each group consisted of 8 rats, as negative controls group is a normal teeth, in the positive controls group was made by drilling the upper right first molar to penetrate the dental pulp and was induced with 10µl BHI-b then filled with Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC and the treatment group, after drilling the teeth, then inoculated with E. faecalis ATCC 29212 106 CFU into 10µl BHI-b then filled with GIC to prevent contamination. It takes 21 days to get periapical lesions and rat were sacrificed, and then the expression of iNOS was measured. Results: Statistical analysis using ANOVA found a significant differenced between control and treatment groups (p<0.05. Conclusion: This study concluded that iNOS role in teeth periapical lesions immunopathogenesis caused by E. faecalis.Latar belakang: Lesi periapikal merupakan hasil suatu respon imun untuk melawan invasi bakteri yang mengakibatkan destruksi tulang periapikal. Pada perawatan saluran akar yang mengalami kegagalan ditemukan Enterococcus faecalis sebagai spesies terbanyak. iNOS berperan penting untuk proteksi terhadap bakteri, mempunyai peran yang vital untuk melawan patogen dan berkonstribusi secara patologik untuk menyebabkan suatu penyakit. Tujuan: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengobservasi peran iNOS secara imunohistokimia pada lesi periapikal tikus Wistar. Metode

  4. Measurements of HIFU-induced Lesions in BSA Gel Phantoms for HIFU Treatment of Varicose Veins of Lower Extremity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushijima, Hiroyuki; Senoo, Naohiko; Suzuki, Jun; Ichiyanagi, Mitsuhisa; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Deguchi, Juno; Takagi, Shu; Miyata, Tetsuro; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2011-09-01

    HIFU treatment has been developed for various diseases because of its minimal invasiveness, and we are now developing a HIFU treatment for varicose veins of the lower extremity. Previous studies have succeeded in occluding rabbit's veins with HIFU, but the success rate was low (about 10%). Failures were mainly caused by skin burns. When the heating lesion comes close to skin, the absorbed ultrasound energy may cause skin burns. Therefore, it is necessary to study the relationships between HIFU lesions and skin burns to improve the success rate. To visualize heating lesions from HIFU, we used tissue-mimicking BSA gel phantoms. We tried various concentrations of BSA in gels, and determined 14% BSA as the most suitable for phantoms for experiments. The attenuation coefficient of the gel was 0.73 dB/cm, and the denaturation temperature was 70 °C. We put the BSA gel phantom in a water tank in which the temperature was kept at 39 °C, and used HIFU exposures at various intensities and irradiation times. After irradiation, we measured the sizes and positions of HIFU-induced lesions, and the results indicate that the sizes of lesion become larger when the intensitiy rises or irradiation time becomes longer. Furthermore, when the intensity rises and irradiation time becomes longer, the heating lesions move closer to upper surface of the gel, which means skin easily gets burned. Thus we have investigated relationships between HIFU parameters and heated lesions that can be used for further research into HIFU treatment of varicose veins of the lower extremity.

  5. Intestinal Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some generally recognized patterns. Symptoms of acute intestinal ischemia Signs and symptoms of acute intestinal ischemia typically ... confusion in older adults Symptoms of chronic intestinal ischemia Signs and symptoms of chronic intestinal ischemia can ...

  6. Manipulation of the HIF–Vegf pathway rescues methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-induced vascular lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonventre, Josephine A., E-mail: josephine.bonventre@oregonstate.edu [Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Joint Graduate Program in Toxicology, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, 76 Lipman Dr., New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States); Oregon State University, Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, 1011 Agricultural and Life Sciences Bldg, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Kung, Tiffany S., E-mail: tiffany.kung@rutgers.edu [Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Joint Graduate Program in Toxicology, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, 76 Lipman Dr., New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States); White, Lori A., E-mail: lawhite@aesop.rutgers.edu [Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Joint Graduate Program in Toxicology, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, 76 Lipman Dr., New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States); Cooper, Keith R., E-mail: cooper@aesop.rutgers.edu [Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Joint Graduate Program in Toxicology, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, 76 Lipman Dr., New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) has been shown to be specifically anti-angiogenic in piscine and mammalian model systems at concentrations that appear non-toxic in other organ systems. The mechanism by which MTBE targets developing vascular structures is unknown. A global transcriptome analysis of zebrafish embryos developmentally exposed to 0.00625–5 mM MTBE suggested that hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-regulated pathways were affected. HIF-driven angiogenesis via vascular endothelial growth factor (vegf) is essential to the developing vasculature of an embryo. Three rescue studies were designed to rescue MTBE-induced vascular lesions: pooled blood in the common cardinal vein (CCV), cranial hemorrhages (CH), and abnormal intersegmental vessels (ISV), and test the hypothesis that MTBE toxicity was HIF–Vegf dependent. First, zebrafish vegf-a over-expression via plasmid injection, resulted in significantly fewer CH and ISV lesions, 46 and 35% respectively, in embryos exposed to 10 mM MTBE. Then HIF degradation was inhibited in two ways. Chemical rescue by N-oxaloylglycine significantly reduced CCV and CH lesions by 30 and 32% in 10 mM exposed embryos, and ISV lesions were reduced 24% in 5 mM exposed zebrafish. Finally, a morpholino designed to knock-down ubiquitin associated von Hippel–Lindau protein, significantly reduced CCV lesions by 35% in 10 mM exposed embryos. In addition, expression of some angiogenesis related genes altered by MTBE exposure were rescued. These studies demonstrated that MTBE vascular toxicity is mediated by a down regulation of HIF–Vegf driven angiogenesis. The selective toxicity of MTBE toward developing vasculature makes it a potentially useful chemical in the designing of new drugs or in elucidating roles for specific angiogenic proteins in future studies of vascular development. - Highlights: • Global gene expression of MTBE exposed zebrafish suggested altered HIF1 signaling. • Over expression of zebrafish vegf-a rescues MTBE-induced

  7. Topical efficacy of dimercapto-chelating agents against lewisite-induced skin lesions in SKH-1 hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouret, Stéphane; Wartelle, Julien; Emorine, Sandy; Bertoni, Marine; Nguon, Nina; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile; Dorandeu, Frédéric; Boudry, Isabelle

    2013-10-15

    Lewisite is a potent chemical warfare arsenical vesicant that can cause severe skin lesions. Today, lewisite exposure remains possible during demilitarization of old ammunitions and as a result of deliberate use. Although its cutaneous toxicity is not fully elucidated, a specific antidote exists, the British anti-lewisite (BAL, dimercaprol) but it is not without untoward effects. Analogs of BAL, less toxic, have been developed such as meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and have been employed for the treatment of heavy metal poisoning. However, efficacy of DMSA against lewisite-induced skin lesions remains to be determined in comparison with BAL. We have thus evaluated in this study the therapeutic efficacy of BAL and DMSA in two administration modes against skin lesions induced by lewisite vapor on SKH-1 hairless mice. Our data demonstrate a strong protective efficacy of topical application of dimercapto-chelating agents in contrast to a subcutaneous administration 1h after lewisite exposure, with attenuation of wound size, necrosis and impairment of skin barrier function. The histological evaluation also confirms the efficacy of topical application by showing that treatments were effective in reversing lewisite-induced neutrophil infiltration. This protective effect was associated with an epidermal hyperplasia. However, for all the parameters studied, BAL was more effective than DMSA in reducing lewisite-induced skin injury. Together, these findings support the use of a topical form of dimercaprol-chelating agent against lewisite-induced skin lesion within the first hour after exposure to increase the therapeutic management and that BAL, despite its side-effects, should not be abandoned.

  8. Impact of whey proteins on the systemic and local intestinal level of mice with diet induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiątecka, D; Złotkowska, D; Markiewicz, L H; Szyc, A M; Wróblewska, B

    2017-04-19

    Obesity is a serious public health problem and being multifactorial is difficult to tackle. Since the intestinal ecosystem's homeostasis is, at least partially, diet-dependent, its modulation may be triggered by food components that are designed to exert a modulatory action leading to a health-promoting effect. Milk whey proteins, are considered as such promising factors since they influence satiation as well as body weight and constitute the source of biologically active peptides which may modulate health status locally and systemically. This way, whey proteins are associated with obesity. Therefore, this paper is aimed at the estimation of the impact of whey proteins using a commercially available whey protein isolate on the physiological response of mice with diet-induced obesity. The physiological response was evaluated on the local-intestinal level, scrutinizing intestinal microbiota as one of the important factors in obesity and on the systemic level, analyzing the response of the organism. Whey proteins brought about the decrease of the fat mass with a simultaneous increase of the lean mass of animals with diet induced obesity, which is a promising, health-promoting effect. Whey proteins also proved to act beneficially helping restore the number of beneficial bifidobacteria in obese animals and decreasing the calorie intake and fat mass as well as the LDL level. Overall, supplementation of the high fat diet with whey proteins acted locally by restoration of the intestinal ecosystem, thus preventing dysbiosis and its effects and also acted systemically by strengthening the organism increasing the lean mass and thus hindering obesity-related detrimental effects.

  9. Bile acid binding resin prevents fat accumulation through intestinal microbiota in high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumoto, Yukie; Irie, Junichiro; Iwabu, Kaho; Tagawa, Hirotsune; Itoh, Arata; Kato, Mari; Kobayashi, Nana; Tanaka, Kumiko; Kikuchi, Rieko; Fujita, Masataka; Nakajima, Yuya; Morimoto, Kohkichi; Sugizaki, Taichi; Yamada, Satoru; Kawai, Toshihide; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Oike, Yuichi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    Bile acid binding resin (BAR) absorbs intestinal bile acids, and improves obesity and metabolic disorders, but the precise mechanism remains to be clarified. Recent findings reveal that obesity is associated with skewed intestinal microbiota. Thus, we investigated the effect of BAR on intestinal microbiota and the role of microbiota in the prevention of obesity in high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice. Male Balb/c mice were fed a low-fat diet (LFD), high-fat diet (HFD), or HFD with BAR (HFD+BAR), and then metabolic parameters, caecal microbiota, and metabolites were investigated. The same interventions were conducted in germ-free and antibiotic-treated mice. The frequency of Clostridium leptum subgroup was higher in both HFD-fed and HFD+BAR-fed mice than in LFD-fed mice. The frequency of Bacteroides-Prevotella group was lower in HFD-fed mice than in LFD-fed mice, but the frequency was higher in HFD+BAR-fed mice than in HFD-fed mice. Caecal propionate was lower in HFD-fed mice than in LFD-fed mice, and higher in HFD+BAR-fed mice than in HFD-fed mice. HFD+BAR-fed mice showed lower adiposity than HFD-fed mice, and the reduction was not observed in germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice. Colonized germ-free mice showed a reduction in adiposity by BAR administration. Energy expenditure was lower in HFD-fed mice and higher in HFD+BAR-fed mice, but the increments induced by administration of BAR were not observed in antibiotic-treated mice. Modulation of intestinal microbiota by BAR could be a novel therapeutic approach for obesity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. L. plantarum prevents Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli-induced tight junction proteins changes in intestinal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Xiaomin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is increasingly recognized that Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum has the ability to protect against Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC-induced damage of the epithelial monolayer barrier function by preventing changes in host cell morphology, attaching/effacing (A/E lesion formation, monolayer resistance, and macromolecular permeability. However, the cellular mechanism involved in this protective effect still remained to be clarified. Methods This study was to investigate the effect of L. plantarum on the changes of Caco-2 cells responding to Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC, the permeability of cell monolayer and the transmissivity of dextran, and the distribution and expression of the tight junction (TJ proteins, such as Claudin-1, Occludin, JAM-1 and ZO-1 were examined when infected with EIEC or adhesived of L. plantarum after infection by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, the cytoskeleton protein F-actin were observed with FITC-phalloidin. Results This study demonstrated that the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER step down and dextran integrated intensity (DII step up with time after infected with EIEC, but after treating with L. plantarum, the changes of TER and DII were improved as compared with EIEC group. L. plantarum prevented the damage of expression and rearrangement of Claudin-1, Occludin, JAM-1 and ZO-1 proteins induced by EIEC, and could ameliorate the injury of cytoskeleton protein F-actin infected with EIEC. Conclusion L. plantarum exerted a protective effect against the damage to integrity of Caco-2 monolayer cells and the structure and distribution of TJ proteins by EIEC infection.

  11. Assessment of exercise-induced minor muscle lesions: the accuracy of Cyriax's diagnosis by selective tension paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, M E; Conner-Kerr, T; Chamness, M; Chenier, T C; Kelly, R R; Hodge, T

    1996-09-01

    The Cyriax selective tension assessment paradigm is commonly used by clinicians for the diagnosis of soft tissue lesions; however, studies have not demonstrated that it is a valid method. The purpose of this study was to examine the construct validity of the active motion, passive motion, resisted movement, and palpation components of the Cyriax selective tension diagnosis paradigm in subjects with an exercise-induced minor hamstring muscle lesion. Nine female subjects with a mean age of 23.6 years (SD = 4.7) and a mass of 57.3 kg (SD = 10.7) performed two sets of 20 maximal eccentric isokinetic knee flexor contractions designed to induce a minor muscle lesion of the hamstrings. Active range of motion, passive range of motion, knee extension end-feel pain relative to resistance sequence, knee flexor isometric strength, pain perception during knee flexor resisted movement testing, and palpation pain of the hamstrings were assessed at 0, 5, 2, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours postexercise and compared with Cyriax's hypothesized selective tension paradigm results. Consistent with Cyriax's paradigm, passive range of motion remained unchanged, and perceived pain of the hamstrings increased with resistance testing at 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours postexercise when compared with baseline. In addition, palpation pain of the hamstrings was significantly elevated at 48 and 72 hours after exercise (p Cyriax's paradigm, active range of motion was significantly reduced over time (p Cyriax, when a minor muscle lesion is tested, it should be strong and painful; however, none of the postexercise time frames exhibited results that were strong and painful. This study suggests that the validity of using Cyriax's selective tension testing for the diagnosis of exercise-induced minor muscle lesions is questionable.

  12. Acrylamide-induced prenatal programming of intestine structure in guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewska, E; Dobrowolski, P; Puzio, I; Prost, L; Kurlak, P; Sawczuk, P; Badzian, B; Hulas-Stasiak, M; Kostro, K

    2014-02-01

    Potential effects of prenatal administration of acrylamide (ACR) on postnatal development of the small intestine were not examined experimentally yet. The aim of this study was to establish changes of morphological parameters of the small intestine damaged by prenatal action of ACR in guinea pigs. The 3 mg/kg body weight of ACR was given in drinking water every day during the last 35 days of the pregnancy in guinea pigs. The histomorphometry of the duodenum and jejunum was determined. Immunohistochemical staining with anti cadherin antibody was performed. Maternal treatment with ACR led to the decrease of the expression of cadherin in the epithelium. Maternal ACR treatment increased the number of total, divided and inactive crypt, and the number of damaged villi in the duodenum and jejunum of newborn guinea pigs. The thickness of myenteron and submucosa, mucosa fractal dimension and the depth of crypts in the duodenum were increased by ACR. Additionally, in offspring born by mothers administered with ACR the decrease of villi epithelium thickness and active crypt number was observed. Moreover, ACR decreased goblet cells and inact villi number in the duodenum, mucosa thickness and crypts width in the jejunum. Intestine absorptive surface was affected by ACR in the jejunum as well. Results of measurements showed that maternal ACR treatment had negative influence on small intestine histomorphometry. ACR acting prenatally influenced small intestine nervous plexuses that became enlarged by 2.5 times compared with the control group. In conclusion, our results showed the negative impact of maternal ACR treatment on histological structure, integrity and innervation of small intestine wall as well as on absorptive function of small intestine mucosa.

  13. Rapamycin-Resistant mTOR Activity Is Required for Sensory Axon Regeneration Induced by a Conditioning Lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weitao; Lu, Na; Ding, Yue; Wang, Yuan; Chan, Leung Ting; Wang, Xu; Gao, Xin; Jiang, Songshan; Liu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity is a critical determinant of the intrinsic regenerative ability of mature neurons in the adult central nervous system (CNS). However, whether its action also applies to peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons after injury remains elusive. To address this issue unambiguously, we used genetic approaches to determine the role of mTOR signaling in sensory axon regeneration in mice. We showed that deleting mTOR in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons suppressed the axon regeneration induced by conditioning lesions. To establish whether the impact of mTOR on axon regeneration results from functions of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) or 2 (mTORC2), two distinct kinase complexes, we ablated either Raptor or Rictor in DRG neurons. We found that suppressing mTORC1 signaling dramatically decreased the conditioning lesion effect. In addition, an injury to the peripheral branch boosts mTOR activity in DRG neurons that cannot be completely inhibited by rapamycin, a widely used mTOR-specific inhibitor. Unexpectedly, examining several conditioning lesion-induced pro-regenerative pathways revealed that Raptor deletion but not rapamycin suppressed Stat3 activity in neurons. Therefore, our results demonstrate that crosstalk between mTOR and Stat3 signaling mediates the conditioning lesion effect and provide genetic evidence that rapamycin-resistant mTOR activity contributes to the intrinsic axon growth capacity in adult sensory neurons after injury.

  14. Plasma cholesterol-induced lesion networks activated before regression of early, mature, and advanced atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkegren, Johan L M; Hägg, Sara; Talukdar, Husain A; Foroughi Asl, Hassan; Jain, Rajeev K; Cedergren, Cecilia; Shang, Ming-Mei; Rossignoli, Aránzazu; Takolander, Rabbe; Melander, Olle; Hamsten, Anders; Michoel, Tom; Skogsberg, Josefin

    2014-02-01

    Plasma cholesterol lowering (PCL) slows and sometimes prevents progression of atherosclerosis and may even lead to regression. Little is known about how molecular processes in the atherosclerotic arterial wall respond to PCL and modify responses to atherosclerosis regression. We studied atherosclerosis regression and global gene expression responses to PCL (≥80%) and to atherosclerosis regression itself in early, mature, and advanced lesions. In atherosclerotic aortic wall from Ldlr(-/-)Apob (100/100) Mttp (flox/flox)Mx1-Cre mice, atherosclerosis regressed after PCL regardless of lesion stage. However, near-complete regression was observed only in mice with early lesions; mice with mature and advanced lesions were left with regression-resistant, relatively unstable plaque remnants. Atherosclerosis genes responding to PCL before regression, unlike those responding to the regression itself, were enriched in inherited risk for coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, indicating causality. Inference of transcription factor (TF) regulatory networks of these PCL-responsive gene sets revealed largely different networks in early, mature, and advanced lesions. In early lesions, PPARG was identified as a specific master regulator of the PCL-responsive atherosclerosis TF-regulatory network, whereas in mature and advanced lesions, the specific master regulators were MLL5 and SRSF10/XRN2, respectively. In a THP-1 foam cell model of atherosclerosis regression, siRNA targeting of these master regulators activated the time-point-specific TF-regulatory networks and altered the accumulation of cholesterol esters. We conclude that PCL leads to complete atherosclerosis regression only in mice with early lesions. Identified master regulators and related PCL-responsive TF-regulatory networks will be interesting targets to enhance PCL-mediated regression of mature and advanced atherosclerotic lesions.

  15. Plasma Cholesterol–Induced Lesion Networks Activated before Regression of Early, Mature, and Advanced Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkegren, Johan L. M.; Hägg, Sara; Jain, Rajeev K.; Cedergren, Cecilia; Shang, Ming-Mei; Rossignoli, Aránzazu; Takolander, Rabbe; Melander, Olle; Hamsten, Anders; Michoel, Tom; Skogsberg, Josefin

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cholesterol lowering (PCL) slows and sometimes prevents progression of atherosclerosis and may even lead to regression. Little is known about how molecular processes in the atherosclerotic arterial wall respond to PCL and modify responses to atherosclerosis regression. We studied atherosclerosis regression and global gene expression responses to PCL (≥80%) and to atherosclerosis regression itself in early, mature, and advanced lesions. In atherosclerotic aortic wall from Ldlr−/−Apob 100/100 Mttp flox/floxMx1-Cre mice, atherosclerosis regressed after PCL regardless of lesion stage. However, near-complete regression was observed only in mice with early lesions; mice with mature and advanced lesions were left with regression-resistant, relatively unstable plaque remnants. Atherosclerosis genes responding to PCL before regression, unlike those responding to the regression itself, were enriched in inherited risk for coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, indicating causality. Inference of transcription factor (TF) regulatory networks of these PCL-responsive gene sets revealed largely different networks in early, mature, and advanced lesions. In early lesions, PPARG was identified as a specific master regulator of the PCL-responsive atherosclerosis TF-regulatory network, whereas in mature and advanced lesions, the specific master regulators were MLL5 and SRSF10/XRN2, respectively. In a THP-1 foam cell model of atherosclerosis regression, siRNA targeting of these master regulators activated the time-point-specific TF-regulatory networks and altered the accumulation of cholesterol esters. We conclude that PCL leads to complete atherosclerosis regression only in mice with early lesions. Identified master regulators and related PCL-responsive TF-regulatory networks will be interesting targets to enhance PCL-mediated regression of mature and advanced atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:24586211

  16. Plasma cholesterol-induced lesion networks activated before regression of early, mature, and advanced atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan L M Björkegren

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cholesterol lowering (PCL slows and sometimes prevents progression of atherosclerosis and may even lead to regression. Little is known about how molecular processes in the atherosclerotic arterial wall respond to PCL and modify responses to atherosclerosis regression. We studied atherosclerosis regression and global gene expression responses to PCL (≥80% and to atherosclerosis regression itself in early, mature, and advanced lesions. In atherosclerotic aortic wall from Ldlr(-/-Apob (100/100 Mttp (flox/floxMx1-Cre mice, atherosclerosis regressed after PCL regardless of lesion stage. However, near-complete regression was observed only in mice with early lesions; mice with mature and advanced lesions were left with regression-resistant, relatively unstable plaque remnants. Atherosclerosis genes responding to PCL before regression, unlike those responding to the regression itself, were enriched in inherited risk for coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, indicating causality. Inference of transcription factor (TF regulatory networks of these PCL-responsive gene sets revealed largely different networks in early, mature, and advanced lesions. In early lesions, PPARG was identified as a specific master regulator of the PCL-responsive atherosclerosis TF-regulatory network, whereas in mature and advanced lesions, the specific master regulators were MLL5 and SRSF10/XRN2, respectively. In a THP-1 foam cell model of atherosclerosis regression, siRNA targeting of these master regulators activated the time-point-specific TF-regulatory networks and altered the accumulation of cholesterol esters. We conclude that PCL leads to complete atherosclerosis regression only in mice with early lesions. Identified master regulators and related PCL-responsive TF-regulatory networks will be interesting targets to enhance PCL-mediated regression of mature and advanced atherosclerotic lesions.

  17. Indication of the radiofrequency induced lesion size by pre-ablation measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stagegaard, Niels; Petersen, Helen Høgh; Chen, Xu;

    2005-01-01

    for assessing these factors prior to ablation may indicate the