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Sample records for induces systemic resistance

  1. Systemic resistance induced by rhizosphere bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.C. van; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Nonpathogenic rhizobacteria can induce a systemic resistance in plants that is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR) has been demonstrated against fungi, bacteria, and viruses in Arabidopsis, bean,

  2. Bacterial Gibberellins Induce Systemic Resistance of Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. FEKLISTOVA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is generally agreed today that some rhizosphere bacteria can ensure induced systemic resistance to pathogens. In this paper we tested the ability of gibberellins produced by rhizosphere non-pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aurantiaca to induce systemic resistance to alternariosis agent – Alternaria brassicicola – in oilseed rape plants.Oilseed rape (Brássica nápus is one of the most promising oil-bearing croppers. It allows improving the supply of population with vegetable oil, animal and poultry industries with high quality vegetable protein. It is used for biofuel production as well.Gibberellin preparation was isolated from liquid culture of strain Pseudomonas aurantiaca grown in 250 mL of M9 medium (48 h, 28 °C under darkroom conditions. Gibberellins were extracted according procedure described by Tien et al. (1979. Gibberellins concentration in the medium was determined by fluorometric method.Elicitor activity of bacterial metabolites – gibberellins – was analyzed in model system of artificial inoculation of oilseed rape germs with phytopathogenic fungi Alternaria brassicicola. The elicitor action efficiency was evaluated on the 15th day of oilseed rape cultivation based on the percentage of leaf surface covered by necrotic lesions.Gibberellins were shown to induce systemic resistance resulted in decreasing of oil seed plants   vulnerability by 52.7%.It is known that under the unfavorable conditions plants synthesis the reactive oxygen intermediates   which activate destructive processes. One of the first organism reactions to stress action is the change of the lipid peroxidation level. It was shown that treatment of the soil with gibberellins resulted in decreasing of the lipid peroxidation level twofold.Gibberellins were shown to have a similar effect on permeability of cell membranes for free nucleotides. The permeability of cell membranes in leaves decreased 2.8-fold at room temperature. We suggest that gibberellins

  3. Foliar application of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) inducers for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nbuensanteai

    2013-08-14

    Aug 14, 2013 ... induced by chitosan and BTH were involved in defense mechanism, reflecting the strong direct positive effect that chitosan ... to control plant diseases based on the systemic acquired resistance ... salicylic acid (SA) as a signal molecule and is associated ... treated plants for SAR relating chemical analyses.

  4. Transcriptomics and knockout mutant analysis of rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, B.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    A classic example of induced resistance is triggered after infection by a necrotizing pathogen, rendering uninfected,distal parts more resistant to subsequent pathogen attack, and is often referred to as systemic acquired resistance (SAR). A phenotypically comparable type of induced resistance is

  5. Identification of genes involved in rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Léon-Kloosterziel, K.M.; Verhagen, B.W.M.; Keurentjes, J.J.B.; Loon, L.C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Different forms of biologically induced disease resistance have been identified in plants. Following attack by a necrotizing pathogen systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is induced, leading to a broad-spectrum disease resistance that is associated with an increase in salicylic acid (SA) levels

  6. BDP-30, a systemic resistance inducer from Boerhaavia diffusa L ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-01-11

    Jan 11, 2015 ... exogenous application of chemicals such as salicylic acid or its synthetic ...... be able to induce a mobile signal that takes effect both at site of application, and ... thesis of its gene and expression in Escherichia coli. J. Biol.

  7. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra, E-mail: jmartyn@partners.org [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [{sup 3}H]glucose and 2-deoxy[{sup 14}C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats.

  8. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [ 3 H]glucose and 2-deoxy[ 14 C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats

  9. Induced systemic resistance in cucumber and Arabidopsis thaliana by the combination of Trichoderma harzianum Tr6 and Pseudomonas sp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alizadeh, H.; Behboudi, K.; Amadzadeh, M.; Javan-Nikkhah, M.; Zamioudis, C; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Bakker, P.A.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Trichoderma species and fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. have been reported to induce systemic resistance in plants. In this study the effectiveness of a combination of these biological control agents on the efficacy of induced resistance was investigated in cucumber and the model plant Arabidopsis

  10. Deciphering the hormonal signalling network behind the systemic resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum in tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Medina, Ainhoa; Fernández, Iván; Sánchez-Guzmán, María J.; Jung, Sabine C.; Pascual, Jose A.; Pozo, María J.

    2013-01-01

    Root colonization by selected Trichoderma isolates can activate in the plant a systemic defense response that is effective against a broad-spectrum of plant pathogens. Diverse plant hormones play pivotal roles in the regulation of the defense signaling network that leads to the induction of systemic resistance triggered by beneficial organisms [induced systemic resistance (ISR)]. Among them, jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) signaling pathways are generally essential for ISR. However, Trichoderma ISR (TISR) is believed to involve a wider variety of signaling routes, interconnected in a complex network of cross-communicating hormone pathways. Using tomato as a model, an integrative analysis of the main mechanisms involved in the systemic resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum against the necrotrophic leaf pathogen Botrytis cinerea was performed. Root colonization by T. harzianum rendered the leaves more resistant to B. cinerea independently of major effects on plant nutrition. The analysis of disease development in shoots of tomato mutant lines impaired in the synthesis of the key defense-related hormones JA, ET, salicylic acid (SA), and abscisic acid (ABA), and the peptide prosystemin (PS) evidenced the requirement of intact JA, SA, and ABA signaling pathways for a functional TISR. Expression analysis of several hormone-related marker genes point to the role of priming for enhanced JA-dependent defense responses upon pathogen infection. Together, our results indicate that although TISR induced in tomato against necrotrophs is mainly based on boosted JA-dependent responses, the pathways regulated by the plant hormones SA- and ABA are also required for successful TISR development. PMID:23805146

  11. Coconut Oil Aggravates Pressure Overload-Induced Cardiomyopathy without Inducing Obesity, Systemic Insulin Resistance, or Cardiac Steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuramu, Ilayaraja; Amin, Ruhul; Postnov, Andrey; Mishra, Mudit; Jacobs, Frank; Gheysens, Olivier; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; De Geest, Bart

    2017-07-18

    Studies evaluating the effects of high-saturated fat diets on cardiac function are most often confounded by diet-induced obesity and by systemic insulin resistance. We evaluated whether coconut oil, containing C12:0 and C14:0 as main fatty acids, aggravates pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) in C57BL/6 mice. Mortality rate after TAC was higher ( p coconut oil diet-fed mice than in standard chow-fed mice (hazard ratio 2.32, 95% confidence interval 1.16 to 4.64) during eight weeks of follow-up. The effects of coconut oil on cardiac remodeling occurred in the absence of weight gain and of systemic insulin resistance. Wet lung weight was 1.76-fold ( p coconut oil mice than in standard chow mice. Myocardial capillary density ( p coconut oil mice than in standard chow mice. Myocardial glucose uptake was 1.86-fold ( p coconut oil mice and was accompanied by higher myocardial pyruvate dehydrogenase levels and higher acetyl-CoA carboxylase levels. The coconut oil diet increased oxidative stress. Myocardial triglycerides and free fatty acids were lower ( p coconut oil mice. In conclusion, coconut oil aggravates pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy.

  12. Root-Expressed Maize Lipoxygenase 3 Negatively Regulates Induced Systemic Resistance to Colletotrichum graminicola in Shoots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasie eConstantino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that disruption of a maize root-expressed 9-lipoxygenase (9-LOX gene, ZmLOX3, results in dramatic increase in resistance to diverse leaf and stalk pathogens. Despite evident economic significance of these findings, the mechanism behind this increased resistance remained elusive. In this study, we show that increased resistance of the lox3-4 mutants is due to constitutive activation of induced systemic resistance (ISR signaling. We showed that ZmLOX3 lacked expression in leaves in response to anthracnose leaf blight pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola, but was expressed constitutively in the roots, thus prompting our hypothesis: the roots of lox3-4 mutants are the source of increased resistance in leaves. Supporting this hypothesis, treatment of wild-type plants (WT with xylem sap of lox3-4 mutant induced resistance to C. graminicola to the levels comparable to those observed in lox3-4 mutant. Moreover, treating mutants with the sap collected from WT plants partially restored the susceptibility to C. graminicola. lox3-4 mutants showed primed defense responses upon infection, which included earlier and greater induction of defense-related PAL and GST genes compared to WT. In addition to the greater expression of the octadecanoid pathway genes, lox3-4 mutant responded earlier and with a greater accumulation of H2O2 in response to C. graminicola infection or treatment with alamethicin. These findings suggest that lox3-4 mutants display constitutive ISR-like signaling. In support of this idea, root colonization by Trichoderma virens strain GV29-8 induced the same level of disease resistance in WT as the treatment with the mutant sap, but had no additional resistance effect in lox3-4 mutant. While treatment with T. virens GV29 strongly and rapidly suppressed ZmLOX3 expression in hydroponically grown WT roots, T. virens Δsml mutant, which is deficient in ISR induction, was unable to suppress expression of ZmLOX3, thus

  13. Deciphering the hormonal signalling network behind the systemic resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainhoa eMartinez-Medina

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Root colonization by selected Trichoderma isolates can activate in the plant a systemic defence response that is effective against a broad spectrum of plant pathogens. Diverse plant hormones play pivotal roles in the regulation of the defence signalling network that leads to the induction of systemic resistance triggered by beneficial organisms (ISR. Among them, jasmonic acid (JA and ethylene (ET signalling pathways are generally essential for ISR. However, Trichoderma ISR (TISR is believed to involve a wider variety of signalling routes, interconnected in a complex network of cross-communicating hormone pathways. Using tomato as a model, an integrative analysis of the main mechanisms involved in the systemic resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum against the necrotrophic leaf pathogen Botrytis cinerea was performed. Root colonization by T. harzianum rendered the leaves more resistant to B. cinerea independently of major effects on plant nutrition. The analysis of disease development in shoots of tomato mutant lines impaired in the synthesis of the key defence related hormones JA, ET, salicylic acid (SA and abscisic acid (ABA and the peptide prosystemin (PS evidenced the requirement of intact JA, SA and ABA signalling pathways for a functional TISR. Expression analysis of several hormone related marker genes point to the role of priming for enhanced JA-dependent defence responses upon pathogen infection. Together, our results indicate that although TISR induced in tomato against the necrotrophs is mainly based on boosted JA-dependent responses, the pathways regulated by the plant hormones SA- and ABA are also required for successful TISR development

  14. Coconut Oil Aggravates Pressure Overload-Induced Cardiomyopathy without Inducing Obesity, Systemic Insulin Resistance, or Cardiac Steatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilayaraja Muthuramu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies evaluating the effects of high-saturated fat diets on cardiac function are most often confounded by diet-induced obesity and by systemic insulin resistance. We evaluated whether coconut oil, containing C12:0 and C14:0 as main fatty acids, aggravates pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC in C57BL/6 mice. Mortality rate after TAC was higher (p < 0.05 in 0.2% cholesterol 10% coconut oil diet-fed mice than in standard chow-fed mice (hazard ratio 2.32, 95% confidence interval 1.16 to 4.64 during eight weeks of follow-up. The effects of coconut oil on cardiac remodeling occurred in the absence of weight gain and of systemic insulin resistance. Wet lung weight was 1.76-fold (p < 0.01 higher in coconut oil mice than in standard chow mice. Myocardial capillary density (p < 0.001 was decreased, interstitial fibrosis was 1.88-fold (p < 0.001 higher, and systolic and diastolic function was worse in coconut oil mice than in standard chow mice. Myocardial glucose uptake was 1.86-fold (p < 0.001 higher in coconut oil mice and was accompanied by higher myocardial pyruvate dehydrogenase levels and higher acetyl-CoA carboxylase levels. The coconut oil diet increased oxidative stress. Myocardial triglycerides and free fatty acids were lower (p < 0.05 in coconut oil mice. In conclusion, coconut oil aggravates pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy.

  15. Biocontrol agent Bacillus amyloliquefaciens LJ02 induces systemic resistance against cucurbits powdery mildew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunlong; Gu, Yilin; Li, Juan; Xu, Mingzhu; Wei, Qing; Wang, Yuanhong

    2015-01-01

    Powdery mildew is a fungal disease found in a wide range of plants and can significantly reduce crop yields. Bacterial strain LJ02 is a biocontrol agent (BCA) isolated from a greenhouse in Tianjin, China. In combination of morphological, physiological, biochemical and phylogenetic analyses, strain LJ02 was classified as a new member of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. Greenhouse trials showed that LJ02 fermentation broth (LJ02FB) can effectively diminish the occurrence of cucurbits powdery mildew. When treated with LJ02FB, cucumber seedlings produced significantly elevated production of superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase as compared to that of the control. We further confirmed that the production of free salicylic acid (SA) and expression of one pathogenesis-related (PR) gene PR-1 in cucumber leaves were markedly elevated after treating with LJ02FB, suggesting that SA-mediated defense response was stimulated. Moreover, LJ02FB-treated cucumber leaves could secrete resistance-related substances into rhizosphere that inhibit the germination of fungi spores and the growth of pathogens. Finally, we separated bacterium and its fermented substances to test their respective effects and found that both components have SA-inducing activity and bacterium plays major roles. Altogether, we identified a BCA against powdery mildew and its mode of action by inducing systemic resistance such as SA signaling pathway.

  16. Induced systemic resistance against Botrytis cinerea by Micromonospora strains isolated from root nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar eMartínez-Hidalgo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Micromonospora is a Gram positive bacterium that can be isolated from nitrogen fixing nodules from healthy leguminous plants, where they could be beneficial to the plant. Their plant growth promoting activity in legume and non-legume plants has been previously demonstrated. The present study explores the ability of Micromonospora strains to control fungal pathogens and to stimulate plant immunity. Micromonospora strains isolated from surface sterilized nodules of alfalfa showed in vitro antifungal activity against several pathogenic fungi. Moreover, root inoculation of tomato plants with these Micromonospora strains effectively reduced leaf infection by the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, despite spatial separation between both microorganisms. This induced systemic resistance, confirmed in different tomato cultivars, is long lasting. Gene expression analyses evidenced that Micromonospora stimulates the plant capacity to activate defense mechanisms upon pathogen attack. The defensive response of tomato plants inoculated with Micromonospora spp. differs from that of non-inoculated plants, showing a stronger induction of jasmonate-regulated defenses when the plant is challenged with a pathogen. The hypothesis of jasmonates playing a key role in this defense priming effect was confirmed using defense-impaired tomato mutants, since the JA-deficient line def1 was unable to display a long term induced resistance upon Micromonospora spp. inoculation.In conclusion, nodule isolated Micromonospora strains should be considered excellent candidates as biocontrol agents as they combine both direct antifungal activity against plant pathogens and the ability to prime plant immunity.

  17. Trichoderma harzianum T-22 induces systemic resistance in tomato infected by Cucumber mosaic virus

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    Antonella Vitti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the induction of plant defenses against viruses using biocontrol agents is essential for developing new strategies against these pathogens, given the ineffectiveness of chemical treatments. The ability of Trichoderma harzianum, strain T-22 (T22 to control Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV in Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme plants and the changes in the physiology of tomato treated/infected with T22/CMV were examined. Plant growth-promoting effects, photosynthetic performance, reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging enzymes, and phytohormones were investigated. T22 improved tomato growth in terms of plant height and improved photosynthesis, total chlorophyll content and plant gas exchange. In contrast, CMV induced a negative effect on dry matter accumulation and inhibited the photosynthetic capacity. The analysis of plant hormones demonstrated that treating with T22 before or simultaneously to CMV infection, led to a systemic resistance by jasmonic acid/ethylene and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Conversely, systemic resistance was abscissic acid-dependent when T22 treatment was administered after the CMV infection. In conclusion, the data reported here indicate that the T22-based strategy may be the most effective measure against CMV.

  18. Induced resistance: an enhancement of basal resistance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M. de; Robben, C.; Pelt, J.A. van; Loon, L.C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Upon primary pathogen attack, plants activate resistance mechanisms at the site of infection. Besides this so-called basal resistance, plants have also the ability to enhance their defensive capacity against future pathogen attack. There are at least two types of biologically induced resistance.

  19. Muscular and systemic correlates of resistance training-induced muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Cameron J; Churchward-Venne, Tyler A; Bellamy, Leeann; Parise, Gianni; Baker, Steven K; Phillips, Stuart M

    2013-01-01

    To determine relationships between post-exercise changes in systemic [testosterone, growth hormone (GH), insulin like grow factor 1 (IGF-1) and interleukin 6 (IL-6)], or intramuscular [skeletal muscle androgen receptor (AR) protein content and p70S6K phosphorylation status] factors in a moderately-sized cohort of young men exhibiting divergent resistance training-mediated muscle hypertrophy. Twenty three adult males completed 4 sessions•wk⁻¹ of resistance training for 16 wk. Muscle biopsies were obtained before and after the training period and acutely 1 and 5 h after the first training session. Serum hormones and cytokines were measured immediately, 15, 30 and 60 minutes following the first and last training sessions of the study. Mean fiber area increased by 20% (range: -7 to 80%; P<0.001). Protein content of the AR was unchanged with training (fold change = 1.17 ± 0.61; P=0.19); however, there was a significant correlation between the changes in AR content and fiber area (r=0.60, P=0.023). Phosphorylation of p70S6K was elevated 5 hours following exercise, which was correlated with gains in mean fiber area (r=0.54, P=0.007). There was no relationship between the magnitude of the pre- or post-training exercise-induced changes in free testosterone, GH, or IGF-1 concentration and muscle fiber hypertrophy; however, the magnitude of the post exercise IL-6 response was correlated with muscle hypertrophy (r=0.48, P=0.019). Post-exercise increases in circulating hormones are not related to hypertrophy following training. Exercise-induced changes in IL-6 correlated with hypertrophy, but the mechanism for the role of IL-6 in hypertrophy is not known. Acute increases, in p70S6K phosphorylation and changes in muscle AR protein content correlated with muscle hypertrophy implicating intramuscular rather than systemic processes in mediating hypertrophy.

  20. Differential effectiveness of Serratia plymuthica IC1270-induced systemic resistance against hemibiotrophic and necrotrophic leaf pathogens in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Höfte Monica M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Induced resistance is a state of enhanced defensive capacity developed by a plant reacting to specific biotic or chemical stimuli. Over the years, several forms of induced resistance have been characterized, including systemic acquired resistance, which is induced upon localized infection by an avirulent necrotizing pathogen, and induced systemic resistance (ISR, which is elicited by selected strains of nonpathogenic rhizobacteria. However, contrary to the relative wealth of information on inducible defense responses in dicotyledoneous plants, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying induced resistance phenomena in cereal crops is still in its infancy. Using a combined cytomolecular and pharmacological approach, we analyzed the host defense mechanisms associated with the establishment of ISR in rice by the rhizobacterium Serratia plymuthica IC1270. Results In a standardized soil-based assay, root treatment with IC1270 rendered foliar tissues more resistant to the hemibiotrophic pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, causal agent of the devastating rice blast disease. Analysis of the cytological and biochemical alterations associated with restriction of fungal growth in IC1270-induced plants revealed that IC1270 primes rice for enhanced attacker-induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and autofluorescent phenolic compounds in and near epidermal cells displaying dense cytoplasmic granulation. Similar, yet more abundant, phenotypes of hypersensitively dying cells in the vicinity of fungal hyphae were evident in a gene-for-gene interaction with an avirulent M. oryzae strain, suggesting that IC1270-inducible ISR and R protein conditioned effector-triggered immunity (ETI target similar defense mechanisms. Yet, this IC1270-inducible ISR response seems to act as a double-edged sword within the rice defense network as induced plants displayed an increased vulnerability to the necrotrophic pathogens Rhizoctonia

  1. Iron-regulated metabolites of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374 : Their role in induced systemic resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djavaheri, M.

    2007-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374r effectively suppresses fusarium wilt in radish by induced systemic resistance (ISR). In radish, WCS374r-mediated ISR depends partly on iron-regulated metabolites. Under iron-limiting conditions, P. fluorescens WCS374r produces

  2. Muscular and systemic correlates of resistance training-induced muscle hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron J Mitchell

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine relationships between post-exercise changes in systemic [testosterone, growth hormone (GH, insulin like grow factor 1 (IGF-1 and interleukin 6 (IL-6], or intramuscular [skeletal muscle androgen receptor (AR protein content and p70S6K phosphorylation status] factors in a moderately-sized cohort of young men exhibiting divergent resistance training-mediated muscle hypertrophy. METHODS: Twenty three adult males completed 4 sessions•wk⁻¹ of resistance training for 16 wk. Muscle biopsies were obtained before and after the training period and acutely 1 and 5 h after the first training session. Serum hormones and cytokines were measured immediately, 15, 30 and 60 minutes following the first and last training sessions of the study. RESULTS: Mean fiber area increased by 20% (range: -7 to 80%; P<0.001. Protein content of the AR was unchanged with training (fold change = 1.17 ± 0.61; P=0.19; however, there was a significant correlation between the changes in AR content and fiber area (r=0.60, P=0.023. Phosphorylation of p70S6K was elevated 5 hours following exercise, which was correlated with gains in mean fiber area (r=0.54, P=0.007. There was no relationship between the magnitude of the pre- or post-training exercise-induced changes in free testosterone, GH, or IGF-1 concentration and muscle fiber hypertrophy; however, the magnitude of the post exercise IL-6 response was correlated with muscle hypertrophy (r=0.48, P=0.019. CONCLUSION: Post-exercise increases in circulating hormones are not related to hypertrophy following training. Exercise-induced changes in IL-6 correlated with hypertrophy, but the mechanism for the role of IL-6 in hypertrophy is not known. Acute increases, in p70S6K phosphorylation and changes in muscle AR protein content correlated with muscle hypertrophy implicating intramuscular rather than systemic processes in mediating hypertrophy.

  3. Muscular and Systemic Correlates of Resistance Training-Induced Muscle Hypertrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Cameron J.; Churchward-Venne, Tyler A.; Bellamy, Leeann; Parise, Gianni; Baker, Steven K.; Phillips, Stuart M.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine relationships between post-exercise changes in systemic [testosterone, growth hormone (GH), insulin like grow factor 1 (IGF-1) and interleukin 6 (IL-6)], or intramuscular [skeletal muscle androgen receptor (AR) protein content and p70S6K phosphorylation status] factors in a moderately-sized cohort of young men exhibiting divergent resistance training-mediated muscle hypertrophy. METHODS: Twenty three adult males completed 4 sessions•wk⁻¹ of resistance training for 16 wk....

  4. Detecting the Hormonal Pathways in Oilseed Rape behind Induced Systemic Resistance by Trichoderma harzianum TH12 to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkooranee, Jawadayn Talib; Aledan, Tamarah Raad; Ali, Ali Kadhim; Lu, Guangyuan; Zhang, Xuekun; Wu, Jiangsheng; Fu, Chunhua; Li, Maoteng

    2017-01-01

    Plants have the ability to resist pathogen attack after infection or treatment with biotic and abiotic elicitors. In oilseed rape plant Brassica napus AACC and in the artificially synthesized Raphanus alboglabra RRCC, the root-colonizing Trichoderma harzianum TH12 fungus triggers induced systemic resistance (ISR), and its culture filtrate (CF) triggers a systemic acquired resistance (SAR) response against infection by the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid/ethylene (JA/ET) are plant hormone signals that play important roles in the regulation of ISR and SAR. In this study, at six different time points (1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 days post-infection [dpi]), six resistance genes were used as markers of signaling pathways: JA/ET signaling used AOC3, PDF1.2 and ERF2 genes, while PR-1, TGA5 and TGA6 genes were used as markers of SA signaling. The results of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) showed that AOC3, PDF1.2 and ERF2 expression levels in infected leaves of AACC and RRCC increase at 1 and 2 dpi with S. sclerotiorum or inoculation with TH12. PR-1, TGA5 and TGA6 expression levels increased at 8 and 10 dpi in infected leaves. PR-1, TGA5 and TGA6 expression levels increased early in plants treated with CF in both of the healthy genotypes. Furthermore, induction of SA- and JA/ET-dependent defense decreased disease symptoms in infected leaves at different times. The results suggest that the RRCC genotype exhibits resistance to disease and that the ability of TH12 and its CF to induce systemic resistance in susceptible and resistant oilseed rape genotypes exists. In addition, the results indicate for the first time that in RRCC the SA signaling pathway is involved in resistance to necrotrophic pathogens.

  5. Induced systemic resistance in cucumber and Arabidopsis thaliana by the combination of Trichoderma harzianum Tr6 and Pseudomonas sp. Ps14

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alizadeh, H.; Behboudi, K.; Ahmadzadeh, M.; Javan-Nikkhah, M.; Zamioudis, C.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Bakker, P.A.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Trichoderma species and fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. have been reported to induce systemic resistance in plants. In this study the effectiveness of a combination of these biological control agents on the efficacy of induced resistance was investigated in cucumber and the model plant Arabidopsis

  6. Rhizosphere-associated Pseudomonas induce systemic resistance to herbivores at the cost of susceptibility to bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Cara H; Wiesmann, Christina L; Shapiro, Lori R; Melnyk, Ryan A; O'Sullivan, Lucy R; Khorasani, Sophie; Xiao, Li; Han, Jiatong; Bush, Jenifer; Carrillo, Juli; Pierce, Naomi E; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2017-10-31

    Plant-associated soil microbes are important mediators of plant defence responses to diverse above-ground pathogen and insect challengers. For example, closely related strains of beneficial rhizosphere Pseudomonas spp. can induce systemic resistance (ISR), systemic susceptibility (ISS) or neither against the bacterial foliar pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pto DC3000). Using a model system composed of root-associated Pseudomonas spp. strains, the foliar pathogen Pto DC3000 and the herbivore Trichoplusia ni (cabbage looper), we found that rhizosphere-associated Pseudomonas spp. that induce either ISS and ISR against Pto DC3000 all increased resistance to herbivory by T. ni. We found that resistance to T. ni and resistance to Pto DC3000 are quantitative metrics of the jasmonic acid (JA)/salicylic acid (SA) trade-off and distinct strains of rhizosphere-associated Pseudomonas spp. have distinct effects on the JA/SA trade-off. Using genetic analysis and transcriptional profiling, we provide evidence that treatment of Arabidopsis with Pseudomonas sp. CH267, which induces ISS against bacterial pathogens, tips the JA/SA trade-off towards JA-dependent defences against herbivores at the cost of a subset of SA-mediated defences against bacterial pathogens. In contrast, treatment of Arabidopsis with the ISR strain Pseudomonas sp. WCS417 disrupts JA/SA antagonism and simultaneously primes plants for both JA- and SA-mediated defences. Our findings show that ISS against the bacterial foliar pathogens triggered by Pseudomonas sp. CH267, which is a seemingly deleterious phenotype, may in fact be an adaptive consequence of increased resistance to herbivory. Our work shows that pleiotropic effects of microbiome modulation of plant defences are important to consider when using microbes to modify plant traits in agriculture. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Large 3D resistivity and induced polarization acquisition using the Fullwaver system: towards an adapted processing methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truffert, Catherine; Leite, Orlando; Gance, Julien; Texier, Benoît; Bernard, Jean

    2017-04-01

    Driven by needs in the mineral exploration market for ever faster and ever easier set-up of large 3D resistivity and induced polarization, autonomous and cableless recorded systems come to the forefront. Opposite to the traditional centralized acquisition, this new system permits a complete random distribution of receivers on the survey area allowing to obtain a real 3D imaging. This work presents the results of a 3 km2 large experiment up to 600m of depth performed with a new type of autonomous distributed receivers: the I&V-Fullwaver. With such system, all usual drawbacks induced by long cable set up over large 3D areas - time consuming, lack of accessibility, heavy weight, electromagnetic induction, etc. - disappear. The V-Fullwavers record the entire time series of voltage on two perpendicular axes, for a good determination of the data quality although I-Fullwaver records injected current simultaneously. For this survey, despite good assessment of each individual signal quality, on each channel of the set of Fullwaver systems, a significant number of negative apparent resistivity and chargeability remains present in the dataset (around 15%). These values are commonly not taken into account in the inversion software although they may be due to complex geological structure of interest (e.g. linked to the presence of sulfides in the earth). Taking into account that such distributed recording system aims to restitute the best 3D resistivity and IP tomography, how can 3D inversion be improved? In this work, we present the dataset, the processing chain and quality control of a large 3D survey. We show that the quality of the data selected is good enough to include it into the inversion processing. We propose a second way of processing based on the modulus of the apparent resistivity that stabilizes the inversion. We then discuss the results of both processing. We conclude that an effort could be made on the inclusion of negative apparent resistivity in the inversion

  8. Systemic resistance and lipoxygenase-related defence response induced in tomato by Pseudomonas putida strain BTP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dommes Jacques

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies showed the ability of Pseudomonas putida strain BTP1 to promote induced systemic resistance (ISR in different host plants. Since ISR is long-lasting and not conducive for development of resistance of the targeted pathogen, this phenomenon can take part of disease control strategies. However, in spite of the numerous examples of ISR induced by PGPR in plants, only a few biochemical studies have associated the protective effect with specific host metabolic changes. Results In this study, we showed the protective effect of this bacterium in tomato against Botrytis cinerea. Following treatment by P. putida BTP1, analyses of acid-hydrolyzed leaf extracts showed an accumulation of antifungal material after pathogen infection. The fungitoxic compounds thus mainly accumulate as conjugates from which active aglycones may be liberated through the activity of hydrolytic enzymes. These results suggest that strain BTP1 can elicit systemic phytoalexin accumulation in tomato as one defence mechanism. On another hand, we have shown that key enzymes of the lipoxygenase pathway are stimulated in plants treated with the bacteria as compared with control plants. Interestingly, this stimulation is observed only after pathogen challenge in agreement with the priming concept almost invariably associated with the ISR phenomenon. Conclusion Through the demonstration of phytoalexin accumulation and LOX pathway stimulation in tomato, this work provides new insights into the diversity of defence mechanisms that are inducible by non-pathogenic bacteria in the context of ISR.

  9. Root inoculation with Pseudomonas putida KT2440 induces transcriptional and metabolic changes and systemic resistance in maize plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal ePlanchamp

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas putida KT2440 (KT2440 rhizobacteria colonize a wide range of plants. They have been extensively studied for their capacity to adhere to maize seeds, to tolerate toxic secondary metabolites produced by maize roots and to be attracted by maize roots. However, the response of maize plants to KT2440 colonization has not been investigated yet. Maize roots were inoculated with KT2440 and the local (roots and systemic (leaves early plant responses were investigated. The colonization behavior of KT2440 following application to maize seedlings was investigated and transcriptional analysis of stress- and defense-related genes as well as metabolite profiling of local and systemic maize tissues of KT2440-inoculated were performed. The local and systemic responses differed and more pronounced changes were observed in roots compared to leaves. Early in the interaction roots responded via jasmonic acid- and abscisic acid-dependent signaling. Interestingly, during later steps, the salicylic acid pathway was suppressed. Metabolite profiling revealed the importance of plant phospholipids in KT2440-maize interactions. An additional important maize secondary metabolite, a form of benzoxazinone, was also found to be differently abundant in roots three days after KT2440 inoculation. However, the transcriptional and metabolic changes observed in bacterized plants early during the interaction were minor and became even less pronounced with time, indicating an accommodation state of the plant to the presence of KT2440. Since the maize plants reacted to the presence of KT2440 in the rhizosphere, we also investigated the ability of these bacteria to trigger induced systemic resistance (ISR against the maize anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum graminicola. The observed resistance was expressed as strongly reduced leaf necrosis and fungal development in infected bacterized plants compared to non-bacterized controls, showing the potential of KT2440 to act as

  10. Endurance and Resistance Training Affect High Fat Diet-Induced Increase of Ceramides, Inflammasome Expression, and Systemic Inflammation in Mice

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    Cornelia Mardare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to investigate the effects of differentiated exercise regimes on high fat-induced metabolic and inflammatory pathways. Mice were fed a standard diet (ST or a high fat diet (HFD and subjected to regular endurance training (ET or resistance training (RT. After 10 weeks body weight, glucose tolerance, fatty acids (FAs, circulating ceramides, cytokines, and immunological mediators were determined. The HFD induced a significant increase in body weight and a disturbed glucose tolerance (p<0.05. An increase of plasma FA, ceramides, and inflammatory mediators in adipose tissue and serum was found (p<0.05. Both endurance and resistance training decreased body weight (p<0.05 and reduced serum ceramides (p<0.005. While RT attenuated the increase of NLRP-3 (RT expression in adipose tissue, ET was effective in reducing TNF-α and IL-18 expression. Furthermore, ET reduced levels of MIP-1γ, while RT decreased levels of IL-18, MIP-1γ, Timp-1, and CD40 in serum (p<0.001, respectively. Although both exercise regimes improved glucose tolerance (p<0.001, ET was more effective than RT. These results suggest that exercise improves HFD-induced complications possibly through a reduction of ceramides, the reduction of inflammasome activation in adipose tissues, and a systemic downregulation of inflammatory cytokines.

  11. Lipopolysaccharides of Rhizobium etli strain G12 act in potato roots as an inducing agent of systemic resistance to infection by the cyst nematode Globodera pallida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, M; Rudolph, K; Schröder, I; Hoffmann-Hergarten, S; Hallmann, J; Sikora, R A

    2000-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that living and heat-killed cells of the rhizobacterium Rhizobium etli strain G12 induce in potato roots systemic resistance to infection by the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida. To better understand the mechanisms of induced resistance, we focused on identifying the inducing agent. Since heat-stable bacterial surface carbohydrates such as exopolysaccharides (EPS) and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are essential for recognition in the symbiotic interaction between Rhizobium and legumes, their role in the R. etli-potato interaction was studied. EPS and LPS were extracted from bacterial cultures, applied to potato roots, and tested for activity as an inducer of plant resistance to the plant-parasitic nematode. Whereas EPS did not affect G. pallida infection, LPS reduced nematode infection significantly in concentrations as low as 1 and 0.1 mg ml(-1). Split-root experiments, guaranteeing a spatial separation of inducing agent and challenging pathogen, showed that soil treatments of one half of the root system with LPS resulted in a highly significant (up to 37%) systemic induced reduction of G. pallida infection of potato roots in the other half. The results clearly showed that LPS of R. etli G12 act as the inducing agent of systemic resistance in potato roots.

  12. Bacterial antagonists of fungal pathogens also control root-knot nematodes by induced systemic resistance of tomato plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Adam

    Full Text Available The potential of bacterial antagonists of fungal pathogens to control the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita was investigated under greenhouse conditions. Treatment of tomato seeds with several strains significantly reduced the numbers of galls and egg masses compared with the untreated control. Best performed Bacillus subtilis isolates Sb4-23, Mc5-Re2, and Mc2-Re2, which were further studied for their mode of action with regard to direct effects by bacterial metabolites or repellents, and plant mediated effects. Drenching of soil with culture supernatants significantly reduced the number of egg masses produced by M. incognita on tomato by up to 62% compared to the control without culture supernatant. Repellence of juveniles by the antagonists was shown in a linked twin-pot set-up, where a majority of juveniles penetrated roots on the side without inoculated antagonists. All tested biocontrol strains induced systemic resistance against M. incognita in tomato, as revealed in a split-root system where the bacteria and the nematodes were inoculated at spatially separated roots of the same plant. This reduced the production of egg masses by up to 51%, while inoculation of bacteria and nematodes in the same pot had only a minor additive effect on suppression of M. incognita compared to induced systemic resistance alone. Therefore, the plant mediated effect was the major reason for antagonism rather than direct mechanisms. In conclusion, the bacteria known for their antagonistic potential against fungal pathogens also suppressed M. incognita. Such "multi-purpose" bacteria might provide new options for control strategies, especially with respect to nematode-fungus disease complexes that cause synergistic yield losses.

  13. Bacterial antagonists of fungal pathogens also control root-knot nematodes by induced systemic resistance of tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Mohamed; Heuer, Holger; Hallmann, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The potential of bacterial antagonists of fungal pathogens to control the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita was investigated under greenhouse conditions. Treatment of tomato seeds with several strains significantly reduced the numbers of galls and egg masses compared with the untreated control. Best performed Bacillus subtilis isolates Sb4-23, Mc5-Re2, and Mc2-Re2, which were further studied for their mode of action with regard to direct effects by bacterial metabolites or repellents, and plant mediated effects. Drenching of soil with culture supernatants significantly reduced the number of egg masses produced by M. incognita on tomato by up to 62% compared to the control without culture supernatant. Repellence of juveniles by the antagonists was shown in a linked twin-pot set-up, where a majority of juveniles penetrated roots on the side without inoculated antagonists. All tested biocontrol strains induced systemic resistance against M. incognita in tomato, as revealed in a split-root system where the bacteria and the nematodes were inoculated at spatially separated roots of the same plant. This reduced the production of egg masses by up to 51%, while inoculation of bacteria and nematodes in the same pot had only a minor additive effect on suppression of M. incognita compared to induced systemic resistance alone. Therefore, the plant mediated effect was the major reason for antagonism rather than direct mechanisms. In conclusion, the bacteria known for their antagonistic potential against fungal pathogens also suppressed M. incognita. Such "multi-purpose" bacteria might provide new options for control strategies, especially with respect to nematode-fungus disease complexes that cause synergistic yield losses.

  14. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  15. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneijber, M.C.J.; van Heerde, M.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Plotz, F.; Markhorst, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  16. Assessing clogging development in infiltration-percolation systems for wastewater treatment by electrical resistivity and induced polarisation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapias, Josefina C.; Himi, Mahjoub; Lovera, Raúl; de la Rocha, Angelica; Foch, Montserrat; Salvadó, Humbert; Casas, Albert

    2013-04-01

    Infiltration-percolation is a low technology process used to treat primary and secondary effluents. It consists in the intermittent application of sewage on buried sand filters where the infiltrated water percolates through unsaturated porous medium. The advantages over conventional mechanical sanitation systems are: low energy requirements, operation and maintenance that may be conducted by unskilled staff, and low sludge production because their simplicity and low operation costs. Nevertheless, clogging is a major operational and maintenance issue associated with the use of infiltration-percolation systems for wastewater treatment, and can ultimately limit the lifetime of the system. The clogging development causes decrease of hydraulic conductivity, reduced oxygen supply and further leads to a rapid decrease of the treatment performance. For this reason it is essential to assess in advance the evolution of clogging process and detect potential failures in the system. The preliminary results of this research conducted at the Hostalets de Pierola wastewater treatment plant (near Barcelona, Spain) show that electrical resistivity and induced polarisation geophysical methods can be very useful for delineating the clogging expansion. Then, this non-destructive metodology can help take the preventive measures for enlarge the lifetime of the treatment system.

  17. SABP2, a methyl salicylate esterase is required for the systemic acquired resistance induced by acibenzolar-S-methyl in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Diwaker; Jiang, Yu-Lin; Kumar, Dhirendra

    2010-08-04

    Tobacco SABP2, a 29kDa protein catalyzes the conversion of methyl salicylic acid (MeSA) into salicylic acid (SA) to induce SAR. Pretreatment of plants with acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM), a functional analog of salicylic acid induces systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Data presented in this paper suggest that SABP2 catalyzes the conversion of ASM into acibenzolar to induce SAR. Transgenic SABP2-silenced tobacco plants when treated with ASM, fail to express PR-1 proteins and do not induce robust SAR expression. When treated with acibenzolar, full SAR is induced in SABP2-silenced plants. These results show that functional SABP2 is required for ASM-mediated induction of resistance. Copyright (c) 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The design and partial analysis of RNAseIII anti-PVS antisense complex system to induce plant resistance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušek, Jaroslav; Schubert, J.; Kuchař, M.; Dědič, P.; Ptáček, J.; Vrba, Lukáš; Lichtenstein, C. P.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 33, - (2001), s. 381-394 ISSN 0323-5408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/96/1308; GA MZe(CZ) EP9111; GA MŠk ME 463 Grant - others:NAZV(CZ) EP9111 Program:EP Keywords : Plant genetic * induced resistance Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  19. Assessment of root-associated paenibacillus polymyxa groups on growth promotion and induced systemic resistance in pepper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phi, Quyet-Tien; Park, Yu-Mi; Seul, Keyung-Jo; Ryu, Choong-Min; Park, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Guk; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2010-12-01

    Twenty-nine P. polymyxa strains isolated from rhizospheres of various crops were clustered into five genotypic groups on the basis of BOX-PCR analysis. The characteristics of several plant growth-promoting factors among the isolates revealed the distinct attributes in each allocated group. Under gnotobiotic conditions, inoculation of pepper roots with P. polymyxa isolates significantly increased the biomass in 17 of total 29 treated plants with untreated plants. Experiments on induced systemic resistance (ISR) against bacterial spot pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria in pepper by P. polymyxa strains were conducted and only one isolate (KNUC265) was selected. Further studies into ISR mediation by the KNUC265 strain against the soft-rot pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora in tobacco demonstrated that the tobacco seedlings exposed to either bacterial volatiles or diffusible metabolites exhibited a reduction in disease severity. In conclusion, ISR and plant growth promotion triggered by P. polymyxa isolates were systemically investigated on pepper for the first time. The P. polymyxa KNUC265 strain, which elicited both ISR and plant growth promotion, could be potentially used in improving the yield of pepper and possibly of other crops.

  20. Mechanics based model for predicting structure-induced rolling resistance (SRR) of the tire-pavement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakiba, Maryam; Ozer, Hasan; Ziyadi, Mojtaba; Al-Qadi, Imad L.

    2016-11-01

    The structure-induced rolling resistance of pavements, and its impact on vehicle fuel consumption, is investigated in this study. The structural response of pavement causes additional rolling resistance and fuel consumption of vehicles through deformation of pavement and various dissipation mechanisms associated with inelastic material properties and damping. Accurate and computationally efficient models are required to capture these mechanisms and obtain realistic estimates of changes in vehicle fuel consumption. Two mechanistic-based approaches are currently used to calculate vehicle fuel consumption as related to structural rolling resistance: dissipation-induced and deflection-induced methods. The deflection-induced approach is adopted in this study, and realistic representation of pavement-vehicle interactions (PVIs) is incorporated. In addition to considering viscoelastic behavior of asphalt concrete layers, the realistic representation of PVIs in this study includes non-uniform three-dimensional tire contact stresses and dynamic analysis in pavement simulations. The effects of analysis type, tire contact stresses, pavement viscoelastic properties, pavement damping coefficients, vehicle speed, and pavement temperature are then investigated.

  1. The Multifarious PGPR Serratia marcescens CDP-13 Augments Induced Systemic Resistance and Enhanced Salinity Tolerance of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnish Prakash Singh

    Full Text Available The present study demonstrates the plant growth promoting (PGP potential of a bacterial isolate CDP-13 isolated from 'Capparis decidua' plant, and its ability to protect plants from the deleterious effect of biotic and abiotic stressors. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolate was identified as Serratia marcescens. Among the PGP traits, the isolate was found to be positive for ACC deaminase activity, phosphate solubilization, production of siderophore, indole acetic acid production, nitrogen fixation, and ammonia production. CDP-13 showed growth at an increased salt (NaCl concentration of up to 6%, indicating its potential to survive and associate with plants growing in saline soil. The inoculation of S. marcescens enhanced the growth of wheat plant under salinity stress (150-200 mM. It significantly reduced inhibition of plant growth (15 to 85% caused by salt stressors. Application of CDP-13 also modulated concentration (20 to 75% of different osmoprotectants (proline, malondialdehyde, total soluble sugar, total protein content, and indole acetic acid in plants suggesting its role in enabling plants to tolerate salt stressors. In addition, bacterial inoculation also reduced the disease severity caused by fungal infection, which illustrated its ability to confer induced systemic resistance (ISR in host plants. Treatment of wheat plants with the test organism caused alteration in anti-oxidative enzymes activities (Superoxide dismutase, Catalase, and Peroxidase under various salinity levels, and therefore minimizes the salinity-induced oxidative damages to the plants. Colonization efficiency of strain CDP-13 was confirmed by CFU count, epi-fluorescence microscopy, and ERIC-PCR-based DNA fingerprinting approach. Hence, the study indicates that bacterium CDP-13 enhances plant growth, and has potential for the amelioration of salinity stress in wheat plants. Likewise, the results also provide insights into biotechnological approaches to

  2. Cellulase from Trichoderma harzianum interacts with roots and triggers induced systemic resistance to foliar disease in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanakumar, Kandasamy; Fan, Lili; Fu, Kehe; Yu, Chuanjin; Wang, Meng; Xia, Hai; Sun, Jianan; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Trichoderma harzianum is well known to exhibit induced systemic resistance (ISR) to Curvularia leaf spot. We previously reported that a C6 zinc finger protein (Thc6) is responsible for a major contribution to the ISR to the leaf disease, but the types of effectors and the signals mediated by Thc6 from Trichoderma are unclear. In this work, we demonstrated that two hydrolases, Thph1 and Thph2, from T. harzianum were regulated by Thc6. Furthermore, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) study revealed that Thc6 regulated mRNA expression by binding to GGCTAA and GGCTAAA in the promoters of the Thph1 and Thph2 genes, respectively. Moreover, the Thph1 and Thph2 proteins triggered the transient production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and elevated the free cytosolic calcium levels in maize leaf. Furthermore, the genes related to the jasmonate/ethylene signaling pathway were up-regulated in the wild-type maize strain. However, the ΔThph1- or ΔThph2-deletion mutants could not activate the immune defense-related genes in maize to protect against leaf disease. Therefore, we conclude that functional Thph1 and Thph2 may be required in T. harzianum to activate ISR in maize. PMID:27830829

  3. Cellulase from Trichoderma harzianum interacts with roots and triggers induced systemic resistance to foliar disease in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanakumar, Kandasamy; Fan, Lili; Fu, Kehe; Yu, Chuanjin; Wang, Meng; Xia, Hai; Sun, Jianan; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2016-11-10

    Trichoderma harzianum is well known to exhibit induced systemic resistance (ISR) to Curvularia leaf spot. We previously reported that a C6 zinc finger protein (Thc6) is responsible for a major contribution to the ISR to the leaf disease, but the types of effectors and the signals mediated by Thc6 from Trichoderma are unclear. In this work, we demonstrated that two hydrolases, Thph1 and Thph2, from T. harzianum were regulated by Thc6. Furthermore, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) study revealed that Thc6 regulated mRNA expression by binding to GGCTAA and GGCTAAA in the promoters of the Thph1 and Thph2 genes, respectively. Moreover, the Thph1 and Thph2 proteins triggered the transient production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and elevated the free cytosolic calcium levels in maize leaf. Furthermore, the genes related to the jasmonate/ethylene signaling pathway were up-regulated in the wild-type maize strain. However, the ΔThph1- or ΔThph2-deletion mutants could not activate the immune defense-related genes in maize to protect against leaf disease. Therefore, we conclude that functional Thph1 and Thph2 may be required in T. harzianum to activate ISR in maize.

  4. Induced disease resistance signaling in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, B.W.M.; Loon, L.C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    To protect themselves from disease, plants have evolved sophisticated inducible defense mechanisms in which the signal molecules salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene often play crucial roles. Elucidation of signaling pathways controlling induced disease resistance is a major objective in

  5. Systemic resistance induced by volatile organic compounds emitted by plant growth-promoting fungi in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hushna Ara Naznin

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOC were extracted and identified from plant growth-promoting fungi (PGPF, Phoma sp., Cladosporium sp. and Ampelomyces sp., using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Among the three VOC extracted, two VOC blends (emitted from Ampelomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp. significantly reduced disease severity in Arabidopsis plants against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst. Subsequently, m-cresol and methyl benzoate (MeBA were identified as major active volatile compounds from Ampelomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp., respectively, and found to elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR against the pathogen. Molecular signaling for disease suppression by the VOC were investigated by treating different mutants and transgenic Arabidopsis plants impaired in salicylic acid (SA or Jasmonic acid (JA/ethylene (ET signaling pathways with m-cresol and MeBA followed by challenge inoculation with Pst. Results show that the level of protection was significantly lower when JA/ET-impaired mutants were treated with MeBA, and in SA-, and JA/ET-disrupted mutants after m-cresol treatment, indicating the involvement of these signal transduction pathways in the ISR primed by the volatiles. Analysis of defense-related genes by real-time qRT-PCR showed that both the SA-and JA-signaling pathways combine in the m-cresol signaling of ISR, whereas MeBA is mainly involved in the JA-signaling pathway with partial recruitment of SA-signals. The ET-signaling pathway was not employed in ISR by the volatiles. Therefore, this study identified two novel volatile components capable of eliciting ISR that may be promising candidates in biological control strategy to protect plants from diseases.

  6. Activation of Pathogenesis-related Genes by the Rhizobacterium, Bacillus sp. JS, Which Induces Systemic Resistance in Tobacco Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Seong; Lee, Jeongeun; Lee, Chan-Hui; Woo, Su Young; Kang, Hoduck; Seo, Sang-Gyu; Kim, Sun-Hyung

    2015-06-01

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are known to confer disease resistance to plants. Bacillus sp. JS demonstrated antifungal activities against five fungal pathogens in in vitro assays. To verify whether the volatiles of Bacillus sp. JS confer disease resistance, tobacco leaves pre-treated with the volatiles were damaged by the fungal pathogen, Rhizoctonia solani and oomycete Phytophthora nicotianae. Pre-treated tobacco leaves had smaller lesion than the control plant leaves. In pathogenesis-related (PR) gene expression analysis, volatiles of Bacillus sp. JS caused the up-regulation of PR-2 encoding β-1,3-glucanase and acidic PR-3 encoding chitinase. Expression of acidic PR-4 encoding chitinase and acidic PR-9 encoding peroxidase increased gradually after exposure of the volatiles to Bacillus sp. JS. Basic PR-14 encoding lipid transfer protein was also increased. However, PR-1 genes, as markers of salicylic acid (SA) induced resistance, were not expressed. These results suggested that the volatiles of Bacillus sp. JS confer disease resistance against fungal and oomycete pathogens through PR genes expression.

  7. Resistance and sheet resistance measurements using electron beam induced current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwinski, A.; Pluska, M.; Ratajczak, J.; Szerling, A.; KaPtcki, J.

    2006-01-01

    A method for measurement of spatially uniform or nonuniform resistance in layers and strips, based on electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique, is described. High electron beam currents are used so that the overall resistance of the measurement circuit affects the EBIC signal. During the evaluation, the electron beam is scanned along the measured object, whose load resistance varies with the distance. The variation is compensated by an adjustable resistance within an external circuit. The method has been experimentally deployed for sheet resistance determination of buried regions of lateral confinements in semiconductor laser heterostructures manufactured by molecular beam epitaxy

  8. Linking aboveground and belowground inducible plant resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    Induced resistance of plants against pests and diseases via plant defense responses is well documented and can occur aboveground, in the leaves, and belowground in the roots. A number of recent studies have shown that soil-borne pests can also induce plant resistance aboveground and vice versa.

  9. The effect of synthetic inducers of systemic resistance in inhibiting grey mold development on geranium and poinsettia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Floryszak-Wieczorek

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Several chemical activators of resistance were tested to evaluate their efficiency in restricting development caused by Botryotinia fuckeliana (Botrytis cinerea on geranium and poinsettia leaves. The used signal pathway inducers of salicylic acid, such as DL-â-aminobutyric acid (BABA, g-aminobutyric acid (GABA and benzothiadiazole (BTH, at the applied rates markedly inhibited the development of grey mould in the both plant species. The mentioned inducers showed no toxic or restricting effect on the fungus growth and development under in vitro conditions. Only methyl jasmonate (Me-JA, a potential activator of independent signal transduction pathway, at the applied quantities (O,1-1,0 mg·ml-1, noticeably enhanced the disease spot development probably through stimulation of ethylene synthesis in plant. Me-JA added to medium with B.cinerea showed a strong antifungal action, whereas ethylene significantly stimulated mycelium growth in the in vitro cultures.

  10. The Epiphytic Fungus Pseudozyma aphidis Induces Jasmonic Acid- and Salicylic Acid/Nonexpressor of PR1-Independent Local and Systemic Resistance1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxdorf, Kobi; Rahat, Ido; Gafni, Aviva; Levy, Maggie

    2013-01-01

    Pseudozyma spp. are yeast-like fungi, classified in the Ustilaginales, which are mostly epiphytic or saprophytic and are not pathogenic to plants. Several Pseudozyma species have been reported to exhibit biological activity against powdery mildews. However, previous studies have reported that Pseudozyma aphidis, which can colonize plant surfaces, is not associated with the ‎‎collapse of powdery ‎mildew colonies. In this report, we describe a novel P. aphidis strain and study its interactions with its plant host and the plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea. This isolate was found to secrete extracellular metabolites that inhibit various fungal pathogens in vitro and significantly reduce B. cinerea infection in vivo. Moreover, P. aphidis sensitized Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants’ defense machinery via local and systemic induction of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 (PR1) and PLANT DEFENSIN1.2 (PDF1.2) expression. P. aphidis also reduced B. cinerea infection, locally and systemically, in Arabidopsis mutants impaired in jasmonic acid (JA) or salicylic acid (SA) signaling. Thus, in addition to direct inhibition, P. aphidis may inhibit B. cinerea infection via induced resistance in a manner independent of SA, JA, and Nonexpressor of PR1 (NPR1). P. aphidis primed the plant defense machinery and induced stronger activation of PDF1.2 after B. cinerea infection. Finally, P. aphidis fully or partially reconstituted PR1 and PDF1.2 expression in npr1-1 mutant and in plants with the SA hydroxylase NahG transgene, but not in a jasmonate resistant1-1 mutant, after B. cinerea infection, suggesting that P. aphidis can bypass the SA/NPR1, but not JA, pathway to activate PR genes. Thus, either partial gene activation is sufficient to induce resistance, or the resistance is not directed solely through PR1 and PDF1.2 but probably through other pathogen-resistance genes or pathways as well. PMID:23388119

  11. The epiphytic fungus Pseudozyma aphidis induces jasmonic acid- and salicylic acid/nonexpressor of PR1-independent local and systemic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxdorf, Kobi; Rahat, Ido; Gafni, Aviva; Levy, Maggie

    2013-04-01

    Pseudozyma spp. are yeast-like fungi, classified in the Ustilaginales, which are mostly epiphytic or saprophytic and are not pathogenic to plants. Several Pseudozyma species have been reported to exhibit biological activity against powdery mildews. However, previous studies have reported that Pseudozyma aphidis, which can colonize plant surfaces, is not associated with the collapse of powdery mildew colonies. In this report, we describe a novel P. aphidis strain and study its interactions with its plant host and the plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea. This isolate was found to secrete extracellular metabolites that inhibit various fungal pathogens in vitro and significantly reduce B. cinerea infection in vivo. Moreover, P. aphidis sensitized Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants' defense machinery via local and systemic induction of pathogenesis-related1 (PR1) and plant defensin1.2 (PDF1.2) expression. P. aphidis also reduced B. cinerea infection, locally and systemically, in Arabidopsis mutants impaired in jasmonic acid (JA) or salicylic acid (SA) signaling. Thus, in addition to direct inhibition, P. aphidis may inhibit B. cinerea infection via induced resistance in a manner independent of SA, JA, and Nonexpressor of PR1 (NPR1). P. aphidis primed the plant defense machinery and induced stronger activation of PDF1.2 after B. cinerea infection. Finally, P. aphidis fully or partially reconstituted PR1 and PDF1.2 expression in npr1-1 mutant and in plants with the SA hydroxylase NahG transgene, but not in a jasmonate resistant1-1 mutant, after B. cinerea infection, suggesting that P. aphidis can bypass the SA/NPR1, but not JA, pathway to activate PR genes. Thus, either partial gene activation is sufficient to induce resistance, or the resistance is not directed solely through PR1 and PDF1.2 but probably through other pathogen-resistance genes or pathways as well.

  12. Dysfunction of serotoninergic and dopaminergic neuronal systems in the antidepressant-resistant impairment of social behaviors induced by social defeat stress exposure as juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Sho; Miyake, Yuriko; Yoshimi, Akira; Mouri, Akihiro; Hida, Hirotake; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Ozaki, Norio; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Noda, Yukihiro

    2018-03-29

    Extensive studies have been performed on the role of monoaminergic neuronal systems in rodents exposed to social defeat stress as adults. In the present study, we investigated the role of monoaminergic neuronal systems in the impairment of social behaviors induced by social defeat stress exposure as juveniles. Juvenile, male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to social defeat stress for 10 consecutive days. From 1 day after the last stress exposure, desipramine, sertraline, and aripiprazole, were administered for 15 days. Social behaviors were assessed at 1 and 15 days after the last stress exposure. Monoamine turnover was determined in specific regions of the brain in the mice exposed to the stress. Stress exposure as juveniles induced the impairment of social behaviors in adolescent mice. In mice that showed the impairment of social behaviors, turnover of the serotonin and dopamine, but not noradrenaline was decreased in specific brain regions. Acute and repeated administration of desipramine, sertraline, and aripiprazole failed to attenuate the impairment of social behaviors, whereas repeated administration of a combination of sertraline and aripiprazole showed additive attenuating effects. These findings suggest that social defeat stress exposure as juveniles induces the treatment-resistant impairment of social behaviors in adolescents through dysfunction in the serotoninergic and dopaminergic neuronal systems. The combination of sertraline and aripiprazole may be used as a new treatment strategy for treatment-resistant stress-related psychiatric disorders in adolescents with adverse juvenile experiences.

  13. Inducible Clindamycin Resistance in Staphylococcus Species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afridi, F. I.; Zeb, M.; Farooqi, B. J.; Murtaza, G.; Hussain, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus species by phenotypic D-test. Study Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Ziauddin University Hospital, Karachi, from July to December 2011. Methodology: Consecutive clinical isolates of Staphylococcus species were collected and identified by conventional microbiological techniques. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing and inducible clindamycin resistance was carried out by performing D-test using CLSI criteria. Methicillin resistance was detected by using Cefoxitin disk as a surrogate marker. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS version-17. Results: A total of 667 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus species were obtained during the study period. In these isolates, 177 (26.5%) were Staphylococcus aureus, and 490 (73.5%) were coagulase negative Staphylococci. The total frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance among isolates of Staphylococcus species was 120/667 (18%). Frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance among coagulase negative Staphylococci group and Staphylococcus aureus group were 18.57% and 16.38% respectively. Median age of patients in D-test positive group was 19.5 (1 - 54) years. Conclusion: The frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance among Staphylococcus species may differ in different hospital setup. Clinical microbiology laboratories should implement testing simple and effective D-test on all Staphylococcus species. D-test positive isolates should be reported clindamycin resistant to decrease treatment failure. (author)

  14. Induced mutations for soybean rust resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smutkupt, S.; Wongpiyasatid, A.; Lamseejan, S.

    1983-01-01

    Soybean mutation experiments for inducing rust resistance in the cultivars G 8375, Wakashima mutant number 10, Taichung N, S.J.2, S.J.4, BM 50, BM 98, G 8377, G 8586 and G 8587 have been carried out since 1979. Six pods from each of 4438 control and 43,907 M 1 plants were randomly harvested. M 2 seeds of each cultivar of different doses were bulked (M 2 bulk). In addition, 270 good M 1 plants were selected and threshed singly (M 2 single). M 2 -bulk and M 2 -single seeds were advanced to M 3 . Both, M 3 -bulk and M 3 -single plants, together with the remaining M 2 -bulk seeds were screened for rust resistance in the rainy season of 1980 in Nong Hoi Valley (altitude about 1000 m above sea level) and at Mae Joe Station, both in Chiang Mai Province (latitude 18 deg. 31'-19 deg. N). Based on the IWGSR rating system, soybean plants with slow growth of rust were selected from both locations. The results were as follows: Six plants were selected from a total of 2802 control plants, and 115 from a total of 28,834 M 2 and M 3 plants. Further evaluation of these selections for rust resistance will be carried out in the rainy season of 1981 in Nong Hoi Valley, Chiang Mai. (author)

  15. Ghrelin- and GH-induced insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Esben Thyssen; Krag, Morten B; Poulsen, Morten M

    2013-01-01

    Supraphysiological levels of ghrelin and GH induce insulin resistance. Serum levels of retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) correlate inversely with insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes. We aimed to determine whether ghrelin and GH affect RBP4 levels in human subjects.......Supraphysiological levels of ghrelin and GH induce insulin resistance. Serum levels of retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) correlate inversely with insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes. We aimed to determine whether ghrelin and GH affect RBP4 levels in human subjects....

  16. Renin-angiotensin system blockers protect pancreatic islets against diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliete Dalla Corte Frantz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The associations between obesity, hypertension and diabetes are well established, and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS may provide a link among them. The effect of RAS inhibition on type 2 diabetes is still unclear; however, RAS seems to play an important role in the regulation of the pancreas and glucose intolerance of mice fed high-fat (HF diet. METHODS: C57BL/6 mice fed a HF diet (8 weeks were treated with aliskiren (50 mg/kg/day, enalapril (30 mg/kg/day or losartan (10 mg/kg/day for 6 weeks, and the protective effects were extensively compared among groups by morphometry, stereological tools, immunostaining, Western blotting and hormonal analysis. RESULTS: All RAS inhibitors significantly attenuated the increased blood pressure in mice fed a HF diet. Treatment with enalapril, but not aliskiren or losartan, significantly attenuated body mass (BM gain, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, improved the alpha and beta cell mass and prevented the reduction of plasma adiponectin. Furthermore, enalapril treatment improved the protein expression of the pancreatic islet Pdx1, GLUT2, ACE2 and Mas receptors. Losartan treatment showed the greatest AT2R expression. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that ACE inhibition with enalapril attenuated several of the deleterious effects of the HF diet. In summary, enalapril appears to be responsible for the normalization of islet morphology and function, of alpha and beta cell mass and of Pdx1 and GLUT2 expression. These protective effects of enalapril were attributed, primarily, to the reduction in body mass gain and food intake and the enhancement of the ACE2/Ang (1-7 /Mas receptor axis and adiponectin levels.

  17. Bacillus cereus AR156 primes induced systemic resistance by suppressing miR825/825* and activating defense-related genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Dongdong; Xia, Jing; Jiang, Chunhao; Qi, Beibei; Ling, Xiaoyu; Lin, Siyuan; Zhang, Weixiong; Guo, Jianhua; Jin, Hailing; Zhao, Hongwei

    2016-04-01

    Small RNAs play an important role in plant immune responses. However, their regulatory function in induced systemic resistance (ISR) is nascent. Bacillus cereus AR156 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that induces ISR in Arabidopsis against bacterial infection. Here, by comparing small RNA profiles of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000-infected Arabidopsis with and without AR156 pretreatment, we identified a group of Arabidopsis microRNAs (miRNAs) that are differentially regulated by AR156 pretreatment. miR825 and miR825* are two miRNA generated from a single miRNA gene. Northern blot analysis indicated that they were significantly downregulated in Pst DC3000-infected plants pretreated with AR156, in contrast to the plants without AR156 pretreatment. miR825 targets two ubiquitin-protein ligases, while miR825* targets toll-interleukin-like receptor (TIR)-nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) type resistance (R) genes. The expression of these target genes negatively correlated with the expression of miR825 and miR825*. Moreover, transgenic plants showing reduced expression of miR825 and miR825* displayed enhanced resistance to Pst DC3000 infection, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing miR825 and miR825* were more susceptible. Taken together, our data indicates that Bacillus cereus AR156 pretreatment primes ISR to Pst infection by suppressing miR825 and miR825* and activating the defense related genes they targeted. © 2015 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  18. Induced resistance to rust disease in lentil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Amitava; Singh, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    Considerable yield reduction in lentil is due to rust caused by Uromyces fabae. So far the sources of resistance to rust are available in the small seeded background. There is a need to develop rust resistant/tolerant bold seeded cultivars. Mutations were induced by gamma rays (10 and 15 kR) for incorporating resistance to rust in K-75(Mallika), a high yielding bold seeded, but rust susceptible cultivar at Pantnagar which is the hot spot for this disease. Dry seeds (300) were irradiated for each treatment. In M 1 generation, individual plants from each treatment were selfed and harvested separately which constituted the M 2 generation. In M 2 individual plant progenies were scored following a rating scale of 1 (Free) to 9(highly susceptible). At 15 kR dose, 8 plants were resistant (score 3.0) and 14 plants were tolerant (score 5.0) to rust, while in control and 10 kR populations, all plants were susceptible or highly susceptible having score of 7 or 9, respectively. The M 2 plants segregated in ratio of 1 resistant: 3 susceptible. The progenies of resistant/tolerant M 2 plants were bred true in the M 3 generation suggesting that the resistance to rust is controlled by one recessive gene. (author)

  19. Elicitin-induced distal systemic resistance in plants is mediated through the protein-protein interactions influenced by selected lysine residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana eUhlíková

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Elicitins are a family of small proteins with sterol-binding activity that are secreted by Phytophthora and Pythium spp. classified as oomycete PAMPs. Although alfa- and beta-elicitins bind with the same affinity to one high affinity binding site on the plasma membrane, beta-elicitins (possessing 6-7 lysine residues are generally 50- to 100-fold more active at inducing distal HR and systemic resistance than the alfa-isoforms (with only 1-3 lysine residues.To examine the role of lysine residues in elicitin biological activity, we employed site-directed mutagenesis to prepare a series of beta-elicitin cryptogein variants with mutations on specific lysine residues. In contrast to direct infiltration of protein into leaves, application to the stem revealed a rough correlation between protein’s charge and biological activity, resulting in protection against Phytophthora parasitica. A detailed analysis of proteins’ movement in plants showed no substantial differences in distribution through phloem indicating differences in consequent apoplastic or symplastic transport. In this process, an important role of homodimer formation together with the ability to form a heterodimer with potential partner represented by endogenous plants LTPs is suggested. Our work demonstrates a key role of selected lysine residues in these interactions and stresses the importance of processes preceding elicitin recognition responsible for induction of distal systemic resistance.

  20. Differential effectiveness of salicylate-dependent and jasmonate/ethylene-dependent induced resistance in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ton, J.; Pelt, J.A. van; Loon, L.C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene (ET) are each involved in the regulation of basal resistance against different pathogens. These three signals play important roles in induced resistance as well. SA is a key regulator of pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR),

  1. Role of riboflavin and thiamine in induced resistance against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of two inducer chemicals, that is, riboflavin (B2) and thiamine (B1) on the induction of systemic resistance in soybean against charcoal rot disease as well as biochemical changes associated with these treatments in soybean plants was investigated. Under greenhouse condition, the dose effect of 0.1 to 15 mM ...

  2. Resistive-wall Wake Effect in the Beam Delivery System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J.R.; Jefferson Lab; Wu, Juhao; Raubenheimer, T.O.; SLAC; Wang, Jiunn-Ming; BNL, NSLS

    2005-01-01

    General formulae for resistive-wall induced beam dilution are presented and then applied to the final beam delivery system of linear colliders. Criteria for the design of final beam delivery systems are discussed

  3. Fluxon induced resistance and field emission

    CERN Document Server

    Calatroni, Sergio; Darriulat, Pierre; Peck, M A; Valente, A M; Van't Hof, C A

    2000-01-01

    The surface resistance of superconducting niobium films induced by the presence of trapped magnetic flux, presumably in the form of a pinned fluxon lattice, is shown to be modified by the presence of a field emitting impurity or defect. The modification takes the form of an additional surface resistance proportional to the density of the fluxon lattice and increasing linearly with the amplitude of the microwave above a threshold significantly lower than the field emission threshold. Such an effect, precursor of electron emission, is observed here for the first time in a study using radiofrequency cavities operated at their fundamental 1.5 GHz frequency. The measured properties of the additional surface resistance severely constrain possible explanations of the observed effect.

  4. Induced thermal resistance in the mouse ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, M.P.; Coultas, P.G.; Field, S.B.

    1979-01-01

    The mouse ear (pinna) was used to investigate the effect of two hyperthermic treatments. Heating was by immersion in hot water at 43.5 0 C. A single treatment of about 50 minutes was required to cause necrosis in 50% of the ears treated. When heat treatment was given in two equal fractions the total heating time had to be increased if the interval between fractions was greater than four hours. By 24 hours a total treatment of about 100 minutes was required, indicating almost complete recovery from the first heating. Priming treatments at 43.5 0 C induced thermal resistance to a second heat treatment at 43.5 0 C. Maximum resistance was observed one day after a 20 minute priming and two days after a 40 minute priming, when the heating time had to be increased to 120 minutes, an increase by a factor of 2.4. Shorter priming treatments induced less resistance, the minimum heating time to produce an effect being two minutes. In all cases the effect decreased during the next four to five days. These results indicate that the reduced response of tissues to fractionated hyperthermia is due both to the repair of sublethal heat damage and induction of thermal resistance. (author)

  5. The Root Hair Specific SYP123 Regulates the Localization of Cell Wall Components and Contributes to Rizhobacterial Priming of Induced Systemic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Rodriguez-Furlán

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Root hairs are important for nutrient and water uptake and are also critically involved the interaction with soil inhabiting microbiota. Root hairs are tubular-shaped outgrowths that emerge from trichoblasts. This polarized elongation is maintained and regulated by a robust mechanism involving the endomembrane secretory and endocytic system. Members of the syntaxin family of SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor in plants (SYP, have been implicated in regulation of the fusion of vesicles with the target membranes in both exocytic and endocytic pathways. One member of this family, SYP123, is expressed specifically in the root hairs and accumulated in the growing tip region. This study shows evidence of the SYP123 role in polarized trafficking using knockout insertional mutant plants. We were able to observe defects in the deposition of cell wall proline rich protein PRP3 and cell wall polysaccharides. In a complementary strategy, similar results were obtained using a plant expressing a dominant negative soluble version of SYP123 (SP2 fragment lacking the transmembrane domain. The evidence presented indicates that SYP123 is also regulating PRP3 protein distribution by recycling by endocytosis. We also present evidence that indicates that SYP123 is necessary for the response of roots to plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR in order to trigger trigger induced systemic response (ISR. Plants with a defective SYP123 function were unable to mount a systemic acquired resistance (SAR in response to bacterial pathogen infection and induced systemic resistance (ISR upon interaction with rhizobacteria. These results indicated that SYP123 was involved in the polarized localization of protein and polysaccharides in growing root hairs and that this activity also contributed to the establishment of effective plant defense responses. Root hairs represent very plastic structures were many biotic and abiotic factors

  6. Induced mutations for resistance to leaf rust in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borojevic, K.

    1983-01-01

    Problems related to the induction of mutations for disease resistance were investigated under several aspects, using the wheat/leaf rust system. Previously selected mutant lines, tested in M 11 and M 13 , were found to differ with regard to infection type and disease severity from the original varieties. To verify the induced-mutation origin, these mutants were examined further using test crosses with carriers of known genes for leaf rust resistance and electrophoresis. A separate experiment to induce mutations for leaf rust resistance in the wheat varieties Sava, Aurora and Siete Cerros, using gamma rays, fast neutrons and EMS, yielded mutants with different disease reaction in the varieties Sava and Aurora at a frequency of about 1x10 - 3 per M 1 plant progenies. (author)

  7. B-periodic oscillations in the Hall-resistance induced by a dc-current-bias under combined microwave-excitation and dc-current bias in the GaAs/AlGaAs 2D system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han-Chun; Reichl, C; Wegscheider, W; Mani, R G

    2018-05-18

    We report the observation of dc-current-bias-induced B-periodic Hall resistance oscillations and Hall plateaus in the GaAs/AlGaAs 2D system under combined microwave radiation- and dc bias excitation at liquid helium temperatures. The Hall resistance oscillations and plateaus appear together with concomitant oscillations also in the diagonal magnetoresistance. The periods of Hall and diagonal resistance oscillations are nearly identical, and source power (P) dependent measurements demonstrate sub-linear relationship of the oscillation amplitude with P over the span 0 < P ≤ 20 mW.

  8. Induced mutation for tungro resistance in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, R.; Yumol, R.R.; Taura, S.

    2001-01-01

    Tungro is the most serious virus disease of rice in South and Southeast Asia. It is a composite disease of two kinds of viruses, rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) and rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV). Damage to the plant is mostly caused by RTBV, while RTSV acts to facilitate RTBV acquisition and transmission by insect vector. Both viruses are transmitted mainly by green leafhopper (GLH). Resistance to GLH is common in rice germplasm but extremely rare for the two viruses. To induce mutations for tungro resistance, a susceptible variety IR22 was treated with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNH) following the procedure of Satoh and Omura. The panicles of rice variety 'IR22' were soaked in 1 mM MNH solution for 45 minutes at 16 to 18 hours after flowering. Two thousand six hundred and forty fertile M 1 plants were produced. From these plants M 2 lines with 10 or more seedlings were planted in the field to evaluate their reaction against tungro under natural conditions in the 1990 dry season on the IRRI central research farm, Los Banos, the Philippines. Of these, 124 M 2 lines were selected by visual evaluation. Five plants were harvested individually from each selected line. A bulk was also made from all the remaining plants in the line. In the M 3 generation, each family consisted of five sister lines and one bulked line. One line (M 3 -723) showed no tungro symptoms and its related bulk segregated for resistance but all other M 3 lines from the same family were susceptible to tungro. The resistant line, M 3 -723, showed low infection with RTBV and RTSV when leaves were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to diagnose tungro infection. All M 4 lines from M 3 -723 showed uniform resistance in the field. They were not infected with RTBV and were resistant to RTSV infection

  9. Impurity induced resistivity upturns in underdoped cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Nabyendu, E-mail: nabyendudas@gmail.com; Singh, Navinder

    2016-01-28

    Impurity induced low temperature upturns in both the ab-plane and the c-axis dc-resistivities of cuprates in the pseudogap state have been observed in experiments. We provide an explanation of this phenomenon by incorporating impurity scattering of the charge carriers within a phenomenological model proposed by Yang, Rice and Zhang. The scattering between charge carriers and the impurity atom is considered within the lowest order Born approximation. Resistivity is calculated within Kubo formula using the impurity renormalized spectral functions. Using physical parameters for cuprates, we describe qualitative features of the upturn phenomena and its doping evolution that coincides with the experimental findings. We stress that this effect is largely due to the strong electronic correlations.

  10. Impurity induced resistivity upturns in underdoped cuprates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Nabyendu; Singh, Navinder

    2016-01-01

    Impurity induced low temperature upturns in both the ab-plane and the c-axis dc-resistivities of cuprates in the pseudogap state have been observed in experiments. We provide an explanation of this phenomenon by incorporating impurity scattering of the charge carriers within a phenomenological model proposed by Yang, Rice and Zhang. The scattering between charge carriers and the impurity atom is considered within the lowest order Born approximation. Resistivity is calculated within Kubo formula using the impurity renormalized spectral functions. Using physical parameters for cuprates, we describe qualitative features of the upturn phenomena and its doping evolution that coincides with the experimental findings. We stress that this effect is largely due to the strong electronic correlations.

  11. The Magnolia Bioactive Constituent 4-O-Methylhonokiol Protects against High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity and Systemic Insulin Resistance in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguo Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is caused by a combination of both genetic and environmental risks. Disruption in energy balance is one of these risk factors. In the present study, the preventive effect on high-fat diet- (HFD- induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice by Magnolia bioactive constituent 4-O-methylhonokiol (MH was compared with Magnolia officinalis extract BL153. C57BL/6J mice were fed by normal diet or by HFD with gavage-administered vehicle, BL153, low-dose MH, and high-dose MH simultaneously for 24 weeks, respectively. Either MH or BL153 slightly inhibited body-weight gain of mice by HFD feeding although the food intake had no obvious difference. Body fat mass and the epididymal white adipose tissue weight were also mildly decreased by MH or BL153. Moreover, MH significantly lowered HFD-induced plasma triglyceride, cholesterol levels and activity of alanine transaminase (ALT, liver weight and hepatic triglyceride level, and ameliorated hepatic steatosis. BL153 only significantly reduced ALT and liver triglyceride level. Concurrently, low-dose MH improved HFD-induced hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Furthermore, the infiltration of mast cells in adipose tissue was decreased in MH or in BL153 treatment. These results suggested that Magnolia bioactive constituent MH might exhibit potential benefits for HFD-induced obesity by improvement of lipid metabolism and insulin resistance.

  12. The Chemistry of Plant–Microbe Interactions in the Rhizosphere and the Potential for Metabolomics to Reveal Signaling Related to Defense Priming and Induced Systemic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhlongo, Msizi I.; Piater, Lizelle A.; Madala, Ntakadzeni E.; Labuschagne, Nico; Dubery, Ian A.

    2018-01-01

    Plant roots communicate with microbes in a sophisticated manner through chemical communication within the rhizosphere, thereby leading to biofilm formation of beneficial microbes and, in the case of plant growth-promoting rhizomicrobes/-bacteria (PGPR), resulting in priming of defense, or induced resistance in the plant host. The knowledge of plant–plant and plant–microbe interactions have been greatly extended over recent years; however, the chemical communication leading to priming is far from being well understood. Furthermore, linkage between below- and above-ground plant physiological processes adds to the complexity. In metabolomics studies, the main aim is to profile and annotate all exo- and endo-metabolites in a biological system that drive and participate in physiological processes. Recent advances in this field has enabled researchers to analyze 100s of compounds in one sample over a short time period. Here, from a metabolomics viewpoint, we review the interactions within the rhizosphere and subsequent above-ground ‘signalomics’, and emphasize the contributions that mass spectrometric-based metabolomic approaches can bring to the study of plant-beneficial – and priming events. PMID:29479360

  13. Understanding The Resistance to Health Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    David Ackah; Angelito E Alvarado; Heru Santoso Wahito Nugroho; Sanglar Polnok; Wiwin Martiningsih

    2017-01-01

    User resistance is users’ opposition to system implementation. Resistance often occurs as a result of a mismatch between management goals and employee preferences. There are two types of resistance to health iformation system namely active resistance and passive resistance. The manifestation of active resistance are being critical,  blaming/accusing, blocking, fault finding, sabotaging, undermining, ridiculing, intimidating/threatening, starting rumors, appealing to fear, manipulating arguing...

  14. Radiation-resistant control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cable, T.C.; Jones, S.

    1995-01-01

    REMOTEC has developed a open-quotes radiation resistanceclose quotes control system under a U.S. Department of Energy Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract with assistance from the University of Florida. The SBIR goal was to develop a radiation resistant mobile robot from the ANDROS family of hazardous duty mobile robots that REMOTEC manufactures. See Refs. 1 and 2 for additional SBIR results. The control system, as well as the entire ANDROS robot, was redesigned, where necessary, to withstand radiation doses in excess of 10 6 rad. Those components of the robot that could not be purchased as open-quotes radiation hardenedclose quotes were tested under standard operating conditions for determination of their open-quotes radiation resistance.close quotes The entire ANDROS robot was then assembled with these new components and tested to > 10 6 rad

  15. Impact resistant battery enclosure systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Waterloo; Feng, Yuezhong; Chen, Weinong Wayne; Siegmund, Thomas Heinrich

    2017-10-31

    Battery enclosure arrangements for a vehicular battery system. The arrangements, capable of impact resistance include plurality of battery cells and a plurality of kinetic energy absorbing elements. The arrangements further include a frame configured to encase the plurality of the kinetic energy absorbing elements and the battery cells. In some arrangements the frame and/or the kinetic energy absorbing elements can be made of topologically interlocked materials.

  16. Evaluation of hydrogen-Induced cracking resistance of the In625 laser coating system on a C-Mn steel substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Braz Trindade

    Full Text Available Abstract The corrosion of C-Mn steels in the presence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S represents a significant challenge to oil production and natural gas treatment facilities. The failure mechanism induced by hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC in a Inconel 625 coating / C-Mn steel has not been extensively investigated in the past. In the present work, an API 5CT steel was coated with In625 alloy using laser cladding and the HIC resistance of different regions, such as the coating surface, the substrate and HAZ, were evaluated. SEM observations illustrated that all HIC cracks were formed at the hard HAZ after 96h of exposure. No HIC cracks were observed in the substrate and the In625 coating after the same exposure duration. Pitting was recorded in the substrate caused by non-metallic inclusion dissolving.

  17. Acibenzolar-S-methyl induces lettuce resistance against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... contributing to the enhancement of plant resistance. The effect was comparable with copper treatment. As a marker of resistance, PR protein activity chitinase showed remarkable increase, depending on decreasing bacterial growth in planta. Key words: Acibenzolar-S-methyl, induced resistance, Xanthomonas campestris ...

  18. Next-generation systemic acquired resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Estrella; Bruce, Toby J A; Roberts, Michael R; Flors, Victor; Ton, Jurriaan

    2012-02-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a plant immune response to pathogen attack. Recent evidence suggests that plant immunity involves regulation by chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation. We investigated whether SAR can be inherited epigenetically following disease pressure by Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 (PstDC3000). Compared to progeny from control-treated Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; C(1)), progeny from PstDC3000-inoculated Arabidopsis (P(1)) were primed to activate salicylic acid (SA)-inducible defense genes and were more resistant to the (hemi)biotrophic pathogens Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis and PstDC3000. This transgenerational SAR was sustained over one stress-free generation, indicating an epigenetic basis of the phenomenon. Furthermore, P(1) progeny displayed reduced responsiveness of jasmonic acid (JA)-inducible genes and enhanced susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola. This shift in SA- and JA-dependent gene responsiveness was not associated with changes in corresponding hormone levels. Instead, chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that SA-inducible promoters of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENE1, WRKY6, and WRKY53 in P(1) plants are enriched with acetylated histone H3 at lysine 9, a chromatin mark associated with a permissive state of transcription. Conversely, the JA-inducible promoter of PLANT DEFENSIN1.2 showed increased H3 triple methylation at lysine 27, a mark related to repressed gene transcription. P(1) progeny from the defense regulatory mutant non expressor of PR1 (npr1)-1 failed to develop transgenerational defense phenotypes, demonstrating a critical role for NPR1 in expression of transgenerational SAR. Furthermore, the drm1drm2cmt3 mutant that is affected in non-CpG DNA methylation mimicked the transgenerational SAR phenotype. Since PstDC3000 induces DNA hypomethylation in Arabidopsis, our results suggest that transgenerational SAR is transmitted by hypomethylated genes that direct priming

  19. Temperature-induced viral resistance in Emiliania huxleyi (Prymnesiophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, B Jacob; DiTullio, Giacomo R; Cyronak, Tyler J; Fulton, James M; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S; Bidle, Kay D

    2014-01-01

    Annual Emiliania huxleyi blooms (along with other coccolithophorid species) play important roles in the global carbon and sulfur cycles. E. huxleyi blooms are routinely terminated by large, host-specific dsDNA viruses, (Emiliania huxleyi Viruses; EhVs), making these host-virus interactions a driving force behind their potential impact on global biogeochemical cycles. Given projected increases in sea surface temperature due to climate change, it is imperative to understand the effects of temperature on E. huxleyi's susceptibility to viral infection and its production of climatically active dimethylated sulfur species (DSS). Here we demonstrate that a 3°C increase in temperature induces EhV-resistant phenotypes in three E. huxleyi strains and that successful virus infection impacts DSS pool sizes. We also examined cellular polar lipids, given their documented roles in regulating host-virus interactions in this system, and propose that alterations to membrane-bound surface receptors are responsible for the observed temperature-induced resistance. Our findings have potential implications for global biogeochemical cycles in a warming climate and for deciphering the particular mechanism(s) by which some E. huxleyi strains exhibit viral resistance.

  20. Dragon (RGMb) induces oxaliplatin resistance in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ying; Huang, Xiao-Xiao; Chen, Guo-Bin; Wang, Ying; Zhi, Qiang; Liu, Yuan-Sheng; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Li-Fen; Yang, Bing; Xiao, Chuan-Xing; Xing, Hui-Qin; Ren, Jian-Lin; Xia, Yin; Guleng, Bayasi

    2016-07-26

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers and a major cause of cancer mortality. Chemotherapy resistance remains a major challenge for treating advanced CRC. Therefore, the identification of targets that induce drug resistance is a priority for the development of novel agents to overcome resistance. Dragon (also known as RGMb) is a member of the repulsive guidance molecule (RGM) family. We previously showed that Dragon expression increases with CRC progression in human patients. In the present study, we found that Dragon inhibited apoptosis and increased viability of CMT93 and HCT116 cells in the presence of oxaliplatin. Dragon induced resistance of xenograft tumor to oxaliplatinin treatment in mice. Mechanistically, Dragon inhibited oxaliplatin-induced JNK and p38 MAPK activation, and caspase-3 and PARP cleavages. Our results indicate that Dragon may be a novel target that induces drug resistance in CRC.

  1. Carboxylesterase-mediated insecticide resistance: Quantitative increase induces broader metabolic resistance than qualitative change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Feng; Li, Mei-Xia; Chang, Hai-Jing; Mao, Yun; Zhang, Han-Ying; Lu, Li-Xia; Yan, Shuai-Guo; Lang, Ming-Lin; Liu, Li; Qiao, Chuan-Ling

    2015-06-01

    Carboxylesterases are mainly involved in the mediation of metabolic resistance of many insects to organophosphate (OP) insecticides. Carboxylesterases underwent two divergent evolutionary events: (1) quantitative mechanism characterized by the overproduction of carboxylesterase protein; and (2) qualitative mechanism caused by changes in enzymatic properties because of mutation from glycine/alanine to aspartate at the 151 site (G/A151D) or from tryptophan to leucine at the 271 site (W271L), following the numbering of Drosophila melanogaster AChE. Qualitative mechanism has been observed in few species. However, whether this carboxylesterase mutation mechanism is prevalent in insects remains unclear. In this study, wild-type, G/A151D and W271L mutant carboxylesterases from Culex pipiens and Aphis gossypii were subjected to germline transformation and then transferred to D. melanogaster. These germlines were ubiquitously expressed as induced by tub-Gal4. In carboxylesterase activity assay, the introduced mutant carboxylesterase did not enhance the overall carboxylesterase activity of flies. This result indicated that G/A151D or W271L mutation disrupted the original activities of the enzyme. Less than 1.5-fold OP resistance was only observed in flies expressing A. gossypii mutant carboxylesterases compared with those expressing A. gossypii wild-type carboxylesterase. However, transgenic flies universally showed low resistance to OP insecticides compared with non-transgenic flies. The flies expressing A. gossypii W271L mutant esterase exhibited 1.5-fold resistance to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide compared with non-transgenic flies. The present transgenic Drosophila system potentially showed that a quantitative increase in carboxylesterases induced broader resistance of insects to insecticides than a qualitative change. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Induced mutation for disease resistance in legumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravo, A.

    1984-01-01

    Mutation breeding has been used for developing genotypes that may contain resistance to: a) A necrotic strain of common mosaic virus, in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.); b) Soil fungi causing root rots in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.); c) The fungus Uromyces fabae that causes rust in lentil plants (Lens culinaria). Seeds of these three species were treated with gamma rays in doses of 1,000, 3,000, 6,000, and 9,000 rads. Treated materials and controls were grown during 1979. Chickpea M2 plants were grown in a naturally infested soil with soil-borne fungi. Lentil plants were sprayed with a suspension of spores of the rust fungus. Common bean M2 plants were sprayed with a solution containing virus particles. Ninety-three symptomless chickpea plants were identified in the M2 population. For lentil there were 47 symptomless plants and for common bean, 244 M2 plants with minor virus damage. Eight M3 progenies of chickpea, originated from symptomless M2 plants, had a high rate of survival and showed none or very little damage by root rots. In addition, some morphological changes were detected in other M3 chickpea progenies. Two progenies had larger leaflets, as compared to the control plants and those of other progenies. One progeny showed a more erect growth habit. These new traits have been attributed to genetic changes induced by the radiation treatments. By contrast to these promising results with chickpea no progress has been detected in the plant populations of common bean and lentil. (author)

  3. Induced multiple disease resistance in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borojevic, K.; Worland, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: The existence of genes suppressing resistance to leaf rust, stem rust and yellow rust in hexaploid wheat has been suggested. If such genes are deleted or inactivated, a more resistant variety may be obtained. In mutant lines of the wheat variety San Pastore, selected after treatment with 20,000 rad of gamma-rays, resistance to leaf rust, yellow rust, stem rust, and to some extent to Erysiphe graminis was determined. The mutants responded to infection by producing necrotic flecks in the presence of high level of disease inoculum. Similar flecks develop under stress condition. It is likely that the mother variety San Pastore carries genes for resistance which are masked by suppressor genes. Irradiation inactivates suppressors so that resistance genes which were previously masked are expressed. The first results of monosomic analysis indicate that chromosomes of groups 4 and 5 or possibly 7 may be critical for expression of resistance in the mutant lines. (author)

  4. Abiotic stresses affect Trichoderma harzianum T39-induced resistance to downy mildew in grapevine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatti, Benedetta; Perazzolli, Michele; Gessler, Cesare; Pertot, Ilaria

    2013-12-01

    Enhancement of plant defense through the application of resistance inducers seems a promising alternative to chemical fungicides for controlling crop diseases but the efficacy can be affected by abiotic factors in the field. Plants respond to abiotic stresses with hormonal signals that may interfere with the mechanisms of induced systemic resistance (ISR) to pathogens. In this study, we exposed grapevines to heat, drought, or both to investigate the effects of abiotic stresses on grapevine resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum T39 (T39) to downy mildew. Whereas the efficacy of T39-induced resistance was not affected by exposure to heat or drought, it was significantly reduced by combined abiotic stresses. Decrease of leaf water potential and upregulation of heat-stress markers confirmed that plants reacted to abiotic stresses. Basal expression of defense-related genes and their upregulation during T39-induced resistance were attenuated by abiotic stresses, in agreement with the reduced efficacy of T39. The evidence reported here suggests that exposure of crops to abiotic stress should be carefully considered to optimize the use of resistance inducers, especially in view of future global climate changes. Expression analysis of ISR marker genes could be helpful to identify when plants are responding to abiotic stresses, in order to optimize treatments with resistance inducers in field.

  5. PEDF-induced alteration of metabolism leading to insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnagarin, Revathy; Dharmarajan, Arunasalam M; Dass, Crispin R

    2015-02-05

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is an anti-angiogenic, immunomodulatory, and neurotrophic serine protease inhibitor protein. PEDF is evolving as a novel metabolic regulatory protein that plays a causal role in insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is the central pathogenesis of metabolic disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovarian disease, and metabolic syndrome, and PEDF is associated with them. The current evidence suggests that PEDF administration to animals induces insulin resistance, whereas neutralisation improves insulin sensitivity. Inflammation, lipolytic free fatty acid mobilisation, and mitochondrial dysfunction are the proposed mechanism of PEDF-mediated insulin resistance. This review summarises the probable mechanisms adopted by PEDF to induce insulin resistance, and identifies PEDF as a potential therapeutic target in ameliorating insulin resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Induced resistance and gene expression in wheat against leaf rust ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uvp

    2013-05-15

    May 15, 2013 ... 2Department of Soil, Crop and Climate Sciences, University of the Free State, P.O Box ... Key words: Wheat leaf rust, induced resistance, priming, gene ..... transformation: susceptibility of transgenic Nicotiana sylvestris plants.

  7. nitrosoguanidine-induced cadmium resistant mutants of Aspergillus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    nitrosoguanidine-induced cadmium resistant mutants of. Aspergillus niger. SAMAR ... gens and UV irradiation to study transportation of cad- mium ion through cell ..... Rowley W S 1993 Yeast bZib proteins mediate pleiotropic drug and metal ...

  8. Xylitol prevents NEFA-induced insulin resistance in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, P.; Kehlenbrink, S.; Hu, M.; Zhang, K.; Gutierrez-Juarez, R.; Koppaka, S.; El-Maghrabi, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Increased NEFA levels, characteristic of type 2 diabetes mellitus, contribute to skeletal muscle insulin resistance. While NEFA-induced insulin resistance was formerly attributed to decreased glycolysis, it is likely that glucose transport is the rate-limiting defect. Recently, the plant-derived sugar alcohol xylitol has been shown to have favourable metabolic effects in various animal models. Furthermore, its derivative xylulose 5-phosphate may prevent NEFA-induced suppression of glycolysis. We therefore examined whether and how xylitol might prevent NEFA-induced insulin resistance. Methods We examined the ability of xylitol to prevent NEFA-induced insulin resistance. Sustained ~1.5-fold elevations in NEFA levels were induced with Intralipid/heparin infusions during 5 h euglycaemic–hyperinsulinaemic clamp studies in 24 conscious non-diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats, with or without infusion of xylitol. Results Intralipid infusion reduced peripheral glucose uptake by ~25%, predominantly through suppression of glycogen synthesis. Co-infusion of xylitol prevented the NEFA-induced decreases in both glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis. Although glycolysis was increased by xylitol infusion alone, there was minimal NEFA-induced suppression of glycolysis, which was not affected by co-infusion of xylitol. Conclusions/interpretation We conclude that xylitol prevented NEFA-induced insulin resistance, with favourable effects on glycogen synthesis accompanying the improved insulin-mediated glucose uptake. This suggests that this pentose sweetener has beneficial insulin-sensitising effects. PMID:22460760

  9. Insulin Resistance Induced by Short term Fructose Feeding may not ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fructose feeding causes insulin resistance and invariably Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (NIDDM) in rats and genetically predisposed humans. The effect of insulin resistance induced by short term fructose feeding on fertility in female rats was investigated using the following parameters: oestrous phase and ...

  10. Macrophage-secreted factors induce adipocyte inflammation and insulin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Paska A.; Menge, Christopher; Reaven, Peter D.

    2006-01-01

    Macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue increases with obesity, a condition associated with low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance. We investigated the direct effects of macrophage-secreted factors on adipocyte inflammation and insulin resistance. 3T3-L1 adipocytes incubated with media conditioned by RAW264.7 macrophages (RAW-CM) showed dramatically increased transcription of several inflammation-related genes, greater nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity, and enhanced binding of U937 monocytes. All of these effects were prevented by co-incubation with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate, an NF-κB inhibitor. Adipocytes incubated with RAW-CM also released more non-esterified fatty acids and this increased lipolysis was not suppressed by insulin. In addition, RAW-CM treatment decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes. Taken together, these results indicate that macrophage-secreted factors induce inflammatory responses and reduce insulin responsiveness in adipocytes. These effects of macrophage-secreted factors on adipocytes may contribute significantly to the systemic inflammation and insulin resistance associated with obesity

  11. Understanding The Resistance to Health Information Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ackah

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available User resistance is users’ opposition to system implementation. Resistance often occurs as a result of a mismatch between management goals and employee preferences. There are two types of resistance to health iformation system namely active resistance and passive resistance. The manifestation of active resistance are being critical,  blaming/accusing, blocking, fault finding, sabotaging, undermining, ridiculing, intimidating/threatening, starting rumors, appealing to fear, manipulating arguing, using facts selectively, distorting facts and  raising objections. The manifestation of passive resistance are agreeing verbally but not following through, failing to implement change, procrastinating/dragging feet, feigning ignorance, withholding information, suggestions, help or support, and standing by and allowing the change to fail.

  12. Latitudinal Gradients in Induced and Constitutive Resistance against Herbivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstett, Daniel N; Chen, Wen; Johnson, Marc T J

    2016-08-01

    Plants are hypothesized to evolve increased defense against herbivores at lower latitudes, but an increasing number of studies report evidence that contradicts this hypothesis. Few studies have examined the evolution of constitutive and induced resistance along latitudinal gradients. When induction is not considered, underlying patterns of latitudinal clines in resistance can be obscured because plant resistance represents a combination of induced and constitutive resistance, which may show contrasting patterns with latitude. Here, we asked if there are latitudinal gradients in constitutive versus induced resistance by using genotypes of Oenothera biennis (Onagraceae) sampled along an 18° latitudinal gradient. We conducted two bioassay experiments to compare the resistance of plant genotypes against one generalist (Spodoptera exigua) and one specialist (Acanthoscelidius acephalus) herbivore. These insects were assayed on: i) undamaged control plants, ii) plants that had been induced with jasmonic acid, and iii) plants induced with herbivore damage. Additionally, we examined latitudinal gradients of constitutive and induced chemical resistance by measuring the concentrations of total phenolics, the concentration of oxidized phenolics, and the percentage of phenolics that were oxidized. Spodoptera exigua showed lower performance on plants from lower latitudes, whereas A. acephalus showed no latitudinal pattern. Constitutive total phenolics were greater in plants from lower latitudes, but induced plants showed higher total phenolics at higher latitudes. Oxidative activity was greatest at higher latitudes regardless of induction. Overall, both latitude and induction have an impact on different metrics of plant resistance to herbivory. Further studies should consider the effect of induction and herbivore specialization more explicitly, which may help to resolve the controversy in latitudinal gradients in herbivory and defense.

  13. Differential basal and exercise-induced IGF-I system responses to resistance vs. calisthenic-based military readiness training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nindl, Bradley C; Alemany, Joseph A; Rarick, Kevin R; Eagle, Shawn R; Darnell, Mathew E; Allison, Katelyn F; Harman, Everett A

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to: 1) evaluate differential responses of the IGF-I system to either a calisthenic- or resistance exercise-based program and 2) determine if this chronic training altered the IGF-I system during an acute resistance exercise protocol. Thirty-two volunteers were randomly assigned into a resistance exercise-based training (RT) group (n=15, 27±5y, 174±6cm, 81±12kg) or a calisthenic-based training group (CT) (n=17, 29±5y, 179±8cm, 85±10kg) and all underwent 8weeks of exercise training (1.5h/d, 5d/wk). Basal blood was sampled pre- (Week 0), mid- (Week 4) and post-training (Week 8) and assayed for IGF-I system analytes. An acute resistance exercise protocol (AREP) was conducted preand post-training consisting of 6 sets of 10 repetitions in the squat with two minutes of rest in between sets and the IGF-I system analytes measured. A repeated measures ANOVA (p≤0.05) was used for statistical analysis. No interaction or within-subject effects were observed for basal total IGF-I, free IGF-I, or IGFBP-1. IGFBP-2 (pre; 578.6±295.7post-training; 14.3±1.9μg/mL; p=0.01). An interaction was observed for the RT group as IGFBP-3 increased from pre to mid (3462.4±216.4 vs. 3962.2±227.9ng/mL), but was not significant at the post-training time point (3770.3±228.7ng/mL). AREP caused all analytes except free IGF-I (40% decrease) to increase (17-27%; p=0.001) during exercise, returning to baseline concentration into recovery. Post-training, bioavailable IGF-I recovered more rapidly post-exercise. 8wks of chronic physical training resulted in increased basal IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3, decreased ALS, increased pre-AREP free IGF-I and a more rapid free IGF-I recovery post-AREP. While total IGF-I was insensitive to chronic physical training, changes were observed with circulating IGFBPs and bioavailable IGF-I. To glean the most robust information on the effects of exercise training, studies must move beyond relying solely on total IGF-I measures and should

  14. Induced mutations for disease resistance in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerny, J.; Hanis, M.; Hanisova, A.; Knytl, V.; Sasek, A.

    1983-01-01

    Mutation induction has been used over a period of 20 years to obtain mutants of wheat with improved disease resistance. 34 wheat cultivars have been treated with X-rays, gamma rays, thermal neutrons or EMS. A great number of mutants were selected. Their mutational origin was verified by electrophoretic analysis of gliadin spectra. Resistances have been confirmed over several generations. None of the mutants have been released yet for commercial cultivation because of shortcomings in yield or susceptibility to other diseases. The use of mutants in cross-breeding is considered. (author)

  15. Neutrophils are resistant to Yersinia YopJ/P-induced apoptosis and are protected from ROS-mediated cell death by the type III secretion system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin L Spinner

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The human innate immune system relies on the coordinated activity of macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils or PMNs for defense against bacterial pathogens. Yersinia spp. subvert the innate immune response to cause disease in humans. In particular, the Yersinia outer protein YopJ (Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis and YopP (Y. enterocolitica rapidly induce apoptosis in murine macrophages and dendritic cells. However, the effects of Yersinia Yop J/P on neutrophil fate are not clearly defined.In this study, we utilized wild-type and mutant strains of Yersinia to test the contribution of YopJ and YopP on induction of apoptosis in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM and neutrophils. Whereas YopJ and YopP similarly induced apoptosis in HMDMs, interaction of human neutrophils with virulence plasmid-containing Yersinia did not result in PMN caspase activation, release of LDH, or loss of membrane integrity greater than PMN controls. In contrast, interaction of human PMNs with the virulence plasmid-deficient Y. pestis strain KIM6 resulted in increased surface exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS and cell death. PMN reactive oxygen species (ROS production was inhibited in a virulence plasmid-dependent but YopJ/YopP-independent manner. Following phagocytic interaction with Y. pestis strain KIM6, inhibition of PMN ROS production with diphenyleneiodonium chloride resulted in a reduction of PMN cell death similar to that induced by the virulence plasmid-containing strain Y. pestis KIM5.Our findings showed that Yersinia YopJ and/or YopP did not induce pronounced apoptosis in human neutrophils. Furthermore, robust PMN ROS production in response to virulence plasmid-deficient Yersinia was associated with increased PMN cell death, suggesting that Yersinia inhibition of PMN ROS production plays a role in evasion of the human innate immune response in part by limiting PMN apoptosis.

  16. Insulin resistance induced by antiretroviral drugs: Current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has improved the prognosis of patients with AIDS, but it has also increased the incidence of various metabolic disorders, in particular insulin resistance accompanied by dyslipidaemia, hyperglycaemia and lipodystrophy. This is often accompanied by frank type 2 ...

  17. Induced lodging resistance in upland rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arumugam Pillai, M.; Subramanian, M.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Seeds of two short duration but tall upland rice varieties ''PMK 1'' and ''Poongar'', susceptible to lodging, were subjected to mutation breeding in 1988-1989. Dry seeds of these two varieties were treated with 20, 25 and 30 krad of gamma rays and soaked seeds were treated with 40, 50 and 60 mM concentration of EMS. In M 2 generation lodging was measured and a correlation study was made between the angle of lodging and various characters like plant height, length of lower internode, productive tiller number, culm diameter and panicle weight. The angle to which the main tiller can be bent before lodging on the 25th day after flowering was measured by using a protractor. Those plants which lodged at an angle beyond 30 deg. from the vertical plane were classified as lodging. From 60,000 M 2 plants, 78 lodging resistant semi-dwarf mutants and 5 dwarf mutants were selected. As expected, there was generally a negative correlation between internode length and lodging resistance and a positive correlation of culm diameter with lodging resistance. For plant height and tiller numbers, correlations were not so clear. (author)

  18. Microwave-Induced Magneto-Oscillations and Signatures of Zero-Resistance States in Phonon-Drag Voltage in Two-Dimensional Electron Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, A D; Momtaz, Z S; Gusev, G M; Raichev, O E; Bakarov, A K

    2015-11-13

    We observe the phonon-drag voltage oscillations correlating with the resistance oscillations under microwave irradiation in a two-dimensional electron gas in perpendicular magnetic field. This phenomenon is explained by the influence of dissipative resistivity modified by microwaves on the phonon-drag voltage perpendicular to the phonon flux. When the lowest-order resistance minima evolve into zero-resistance states, the phonon-drag voltage demonstrates sharp features suggesting that current domains associated with these states can exist in the absence of external dc driving.

  19. Induced Seismicity Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S. R.; Jarpe, S.; Harben, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many seismological aspects associated with monitoring of permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations. Many of these include monitoring underground gas migration through detailed tomographic studies of rock properties, integrity of the cap rock and micro seismicity with time. These types of studies require expensive deployments of surface and borehole sensors in the vicinity of the CO2 injection wells. Another problem that may exist in CO2 sequestration fields is the potential for damaging induced seismicity associated with fluid injection into the geologic reservoir. Seismic hazard monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields requires a seismic network over a spatially larger region possibly having stations in remote settings. Expensive observatory-grade seismic systems are not necessary for seismic hazard deployments or small-scale tomographic studies. Hazard monitoring requires accurate location of induced seismicity to magnitude levels only slightly less than that which can be felt at the surface (e.g. magnitude 1), and the frequencies of interest for tomographic analysis are ~1 Hz and greater. We have developed a seismo/acoustic smart sensor system that can achieve the goals necessary for induced seismicity monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields. The unit is inexpensive, lightweight, easy to deploy, can operate remotely under harsh conditions and features 9 channels of recording (currently 3C 4.5 Hz geophone, MEMS accelerometer and microphone). An on-board processor allows for satellite transmission of parameter data to a processing center. Continuous or event-detected data is kept on two removable flash SD cards of up to 64+ Gbytes each. If available, data can be transmitted via cell phone modem or picked up via site visits. Low-power consumption allows for autonomous operation using only a 10 watt solar panel and a gel-cell battery. The system has been successfully tested for long-term (> 6 months) remote operations over a wide range

  20. A critical role for Arabidopsis MILDEW RESISTANCE LOCUS O2 in systemic acquired resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruner, Katrin; Zeier, Tatyana; Aretz, Christina; Zeier, Jürgen

    2018-04-16

    Members of the MILDEW RESISTANCE LOCUS O (MLO) gene family confer susceptibility to powdery mildews in different plant species, and their existence therefore seems to be disadvantageous for the plant. We recognized that expression of the Arabidopsis MLO2 gene is induced after inoculation with the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, promoted by salicylic acid (SA) signaling, and systemically enhanced in the foliage of plants exhibiting systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Importantly, distinct mlo2 mutant lines were unable to systemically increase resistance to bacterial infection after inoculation with P. syringae, indicating that the function of MLO2 is necessary for biologically-induced SAR in Arabidopsis. Our data also suggest that the close homolog MLO6 has a supportive but less critical role in SAR. In contrast to SAR, basal resistance to bacterial infection was not affected in mlo2. Remarkably, SAR-defective mlo2 mutants were still competent in systemically increasing the levels of the SAR-activating metabolites pipecolic acid (Pip) and SA after inoculation, and to enhance SAR-related gene expression in distal plant parts. Furthermore, although MLO2 was not required for SA- or Pip-inducible defense gene expression, it was essential for the proper induction of disease resistance by both SAR signals. We conclude that MLO2 acts as a critical downstream component in the execution of SAR to bacterial infection, being required for the translation of elevated defense responses into disease resistance. Moreover, our data suggest a function for MLO2 in the activation of plant defense priming during a P. syringae challenge. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Induced resistance in tomato by SAR activators during predisposing salinity stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Francis Pye

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant activators are chemicals that induce disease resistance. The phytohormone salicylic acid (SA is a crucial signal for systemic acquired resistance (SAR, and SA-mediated resistance is a target of several commercial plant activators, including Actigard (1,2,3-benzothiadiazole-7-thiocarboxylic acid-s-methyl-ester, BTH and Tiadinil (N-(3-chloro-4-methylphenyl-4-methyl-1,2,3-thiadiazole-5-carboxamide, TDL. BTH and TDL were examined for their impact on abscisic acid (ABA-mediated, salt-induced disease predisposition in tomato seedlings. A brief episode of salt stress to roots significantly increased the severity of disease caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst and Phytophthora capsici relative to non-stressed plants. Root treatment with TDL induced resistance to Pst in leaves and provided protection in both non-stressed and salt-stressed seedlings in WT and highly susceptible NahG plants. Non-stressed and salt-stressed ABA-deficient sitiens mutants were highly resistant to Pst. Neither TDL nor BTH induced resistance to root infection by P. capsici, nor did they moderate the salt-induced increment in disease severity. Root treatment with these plant activators increased the levels of ABA in roots and shoots similar to levels observed in salt-stressed plants. The results indicate that SAR activators can protect tomato plants from bacterial speck disease under predisposing salt stress, and suggest that some SA-mediated defense responses function sufficiently in plants with elevated levels of ABA.

  2. Monoterpenes Support Systemic Acquired Resistance within and between Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedlmeier, Marlies; Ghirardo, Andrea; Wenig, Marion; Knappe, Claudia; Koch, Kerstin; Georgii, Elisabeth; Dey, Sanjukta; Parker, Jane E; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Vlot, A Corina

    2017-06-01

    This study investigates the role of volatile organic compounds in systemic acquired resistance (SAR), a salicylic acid (SA)-associated, broad-spectrum immune response in systemic, healthy tissues of locally infected plants. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry analyses of SAR-related emissions of wild-type and non-SAR-signal-producing mutant plants associated SAR with monoterpene emissions. Headspace exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana to a mixture of the bicyclic monoterpenes α-pinene and β-pinene induced defense, accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and expression of SA- and SAR-related genes, including the SAR regulatory AZELAIC ACID INDUCED1 ( AZI1 ) gene and three of its paralogs. Pinene-induced resistance was dependent on SA biosynthesis and signaling and on AZI1 Arabidopsis geranylgeranyl reductase1 mutants with reduced monoterpene biosynthesis were SAR-defective but mounted normal local resistance and methyl salicylate-induced defense responses, suggesting that monoterpenes act in parallel with SA The volatile emissions from SAR signal-emitting plants induced defense in neighboring plants, and this was associated with the presence of α-pinene, β-pinene, and camphene in the emissions of the "sender" plants. Our data suggest that monoterpenes, particularly pinenes, promote SAR, acting through ROS and AZI1 , and likely function as infochemicals in plant-to-plant signaling, thus allowing defense signal propagation between neighboring plants. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  3. X-ray-induced mutants resistant to 8-azaguanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carver, J.H.; Dewey, W.C.; Hopwood, L.E.

    1976-01-01

    Asynchronous Chinese hamster ovary cells were irradiated and colony survival in Alpha MEM medium with dialyzed serum was determined with or without 15 μg/ml 8-Azaguanine (AG). Data indicated that a reproducible assay for the system was dependent upon controlling cell density at least two days prior to induction as well as throughout the expression period. Generally, spontaneous and radiation-induced mutant frequencies decreased when cell densities exceeded a critical density of 3-6 x 10 4 cells/cm 2 . Infrequently, the critical density was exceeded by a factor of two with no observed decrease, possibly correlated with a longer cell doubling time. Drug depletion artifacts can occur because of drug degradation, or because wild-type cells utilize the drug or produce conditions which reduce uptake of the drug. Thus, as the effective drug concentration is lowered, the observed mutant frequency increases because a spectrum of mutants resistant to only low concentrations can now survive. In fact, refeeding with AG at intervals during the incubation period lowered spontaneous and radiation-induced frequencies approx. 5-fold. Therefore, to standardize conditions, cells were trypsinized at the end of the expression time and replated at a constant cell number for mutant selection by AG. Over two generations of growth during the expression period were required for optimal manifestation of induced mutants, and when densities were kept below 4 x 10 4 cells/cm 2 at all times, observed mutant frequencies did not change significantly over a period between 80 and 140 h post-induction (over 4 generations for irradiated cells and over 6 generations for controls). Previous reports of observed mutant frequencies decreasing beyond three generations may be due to cell interaction prior to mutant selection

  4. Induced mutations of rust resistance genes in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntosh, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Induced mutations are being used as a tool to study genes for resistance in wheat. It was found that Pm1 can be separated from Lr20 and Sr15, but these two react like a single pleiotropic gene. Mutants were further examined in crosses and backmutations have been attempted. (author)

  5. Assessing the oseltamivir-induced resistance risk and implications for influenza infection control strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh NH

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nan-Hung Hsieh,1 Yi-Jun Lin,2 Ying-Fei Yang,2 Chung-Min Liao2 1Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA; 2Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan Background: Oseltamivir-resistant mutants with higher drug resistance rates and low transmission fitness costs have not accounted for influenza (subtype viruses. Predicting the impacts of neuraminidase inhibitor therapy on infection rates and transmission of drug-resistant viral strains requires further investigation.Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the potential risk of oseltamivir-induced resistance for influenza A (H1N1 and A (H3N2 viruses.Materials and methods: An immune-response-based virus dynamic model was used to best fit the oseltamivir-resistant A (H1N1 and A (H3N2 infection data. A probabilistic risk assessment model was developed by incorporating branching process-derived probability distribution of resistance to estimate oseltamivir-induced resistance risk.Results: Mutation rate and sensitive strain number were key determinants in assessing resistance risk. By increasing immune response, antiviral efficacy, and fitness cost, the spread of resistant strains for A (H1N1 and A (H3N2 were greatly decreased. Probability of resistance depends most strongly on the sensitive strain number described by a Poisson model. Risk of oseltamivir-induced resistance increased with increasing the mutation rate for A (H1N1 only. The ≥50% of resistance risk induced by A (H1N1 and A (H3N2 sensitive infected cells were 0.4 (95% CI: 0.28–0.43 and 0.95 (95% CI 0.93–0.99 at a mutation rate of 10−6, respectively. Antiviral drugs must be administrated within 1–1.5 days for A (H1N1 and 2–2.5 days for A (H3N2 virus infections to limit viral production.Conclusion: Probabilistic risk assessment of antiviral drug-induced

  6. Cross-resistance to radiation in human squamous cell carcinoma cells with induced cisplatin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Keiichi

    1998-01-01

    Accumulated evidence indicates that drug resistance is induced in tumor cells treated with a variety of anti-cancer drugs and that there is a possibility of cross-resistance to ionizing radiation associated with induced drug resistance. Most in vitro studies have shown inconsistent results on cross-resistance probably because of different cell lines used and protocols for drug induction. In this study, TE3 human squamous cell carcinoma cell line was treated with a 4-day cycle of cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II); CDDP) at a concentration yielding 10% cell survival. The treatment was repeated up to 3 cycles. After treatment, cells were tested for CDDP and X-ray sensitivity. One cycle of CDDP treatment induced CDDP resistance with a factor of 1.41 and 2 cycles of the treatment with a factor of 1.86. The resistance factor reached a plateau at 3 cycles of treatment. For analyzing the correlation of CDDP and X-ray resistance, 30 clones from both untreated and 3-cycle treated cells were isolated and analyzed for CDDP and X-ray sensitivity. The sensitivity was expressed as the concentration of drug or dose of X-ray required to reduce the cell survival to x% (Dx). The correlation coefficient of clones with 3-cycle treatment between CDDP and X-ray sensitivity increased gradually by increasing the end point of Dx from D 10 to D 90 , resulting in significant correlation at D 90 . The result suggested that there is a certain common repair-related mechanism affecting both CDDP and X-ray resistance in CDDP-treated cells. (author)

  7. Flurbiprofen ameliorates glucose deprivation-induced leptin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Hosoi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Leptin resistance is one of the mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of obesity. The present study showed that glucose deprivation inhibited leptin-induced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5 in neuronal cells. Flurbiprofen reversed glucose deprivation-mediated attenuation of STAT3, but not STAT5 activation, in leptin-treated cells. Glucose deprivation increased C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP and glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78 induction, indicating the activation of unfolded protein responses (UPR. Flurbiprofen did not affect the glucose deprivation-induced activation of UPR, but did attenuate the glucose deprivation-mediated induction of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK phosphorylation. Flurbiprofen may ameliorate glucose deprivation-induced leptin resistance in neuronal cells.

  8. Use of some chemical inducers to improve wheat resistance to Puccinia striiformis f. Sp. Tritici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Maaroof Emad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of DL-β-aminobutyric acid (BABA, benzothiadiazole (BTH, indoleacetic acid (IAA and salicylic acid (SA on induced systemic resistance was investigated in moderately susceptible and susceptible wheat genotypes Tamuz-2 and AL-8/70 against Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici. Resistance was characterized by reduced infection of yellow rust disease (Yrd. Changes in peroxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activities and in total phenolic compound content demonstrated that the resistance to Puccinia striiformis can be induced by BABA, BTH, IAA and SA in these two wheat genotypes. Further studies are needed before a practical method using many analogue compounds, such as potassium phosphate and biotic agent for Yrd resistance in wheat is developed.

  9. Resistance switching induced by electric fields in manganite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villafuerte, M; Juarez, G; Duhalde, S; Golmar, F; Degreef, C L; Heluani, S P

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the polarity-dependent Electric Pulses Induced Resistive (EPIR) switching phenomenon in thin films driven by electric pulses. Thin films of 0.5 Ca 0.5 MnO 3 (manganite) were deposited by PLD on Si substrate. The transport properties at the interface between the film and metallic electrode are characterized in order to study the resistance switching. Sample thermal treatment and electrical field history are important to be considered for get reproducible EPIR effect. Carriers trapping at the interfaces are considered as a possible explanation of our results

  10. Treating methamphetamine-induced resistant psychosis with clozapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddigh, Ruohollah; Keshavarz-Akhlaghi, Amir-Abbas; Shariati, Behnam

    2014-01-01

    Background. Methamphetamine-induced psychosis (MIP) in Iran has turned into a serious issue in terms of health and treatment, lacking any obvious treatment methods for its resistant cases. Aims of Case Report. In the present study, a number of two cases of treatment of MIP with clozapine, which were resistant to the treatment with other antipsychotics, have been reported. Both cases completely responded to the treatment in only 2 weeks and no signs of psychosis relapse were seen in an 8-9 follow-up. Conclusion. Because of its particular pharmacologic features, clozapine may be effective in treating MIP.

  11. Fire Resistant Aircraft Hydraulic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    Chemical Division "Fluorinert" FC-48 - Fluorinated Hydrocarbon "Fluorinert" FC-70 - Fluorinated Hydrocarbon Montedison S. p. A. "Fomblin" Z-04...forming substances such as varnish which could seize a spool valve or other small-clearance sliding surfaces. The test setup is pictorially described in...breakdown products such as solid particles, gels, and sludge’can plug system filters and even small fluid passages, nozzles, and orifices. Varnish -like

  12. User resistance to information system implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Robert H.; Grimshaw, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Users often resist information system implementations and it has been established that this can cause an implementation to fail. In this paper, the user attitudes that can cause resistance are examined using an established attitude change theory from social and cognitive psychology: the Elaboration......-ranging study are presented that, in addition to supporting this argument, identifies and classifies 19 new heuristics and peripheral influences (in addition to the nine already known) that commonly, and adversely, affect user attitudes and responses to new information system implementations....

  13. Proliferation resistance assessment of nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The first part of the present paper describes the basic assessment procedure that is adopted in the analysis of the three generic nuclear systems. Once-through, fast breeder, and thermal recycle systems are then treated in Sections II, III, and IV, respectively. In each of these sections, a reference system is examined, possible technical and institutional improvements are considered, and alternative system types are indicated. Section V then discusses the relative proliferation resistance of the three generic systems. Although this paper emphasizes the analysis and comparison of individual fuel cycle alternatives, Section V indicates briefly how these analyses then have to be considered in a broader context where systems coexist

  14. Deformation-induced martensite and resistance to cavitation erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richman, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    Exposure to cavitating liquids can induce surface transformation in metastable alloys, notably the 18Cr-8Ni class of stainless steels. The question of whether such transformation contributes to erosion resistance has not been resolved. To address that issue, two metastable stainless steels (Types 301 and 304L) and a near-equiatomic NiTi alloy were subjected to cavitation. Magnetic measurements during and after cavitation erosion indicate that substantial reversion of deformation-induced martensite occurs in the highly deformed surface layers of the stainless steels. Thus, cyclic formation and reversion of martensite is deduced to be a non-trivial energy-adsorption mechanism in those steels. The extreme case of cyclic induction and essentially complete reversion of martensite is illustrated by superelastic NiTi, which is extraordinarily resistant to cavitation damage. (orig.)

  15. Proliferation resistance assessment of nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The paper focuses on examining the degree to which nuclear systems could be used to acquire nuclear weapons material. It establishes a framework for proliferation resistance assessment and illustrates its applicability through an analysis of reference systems for once-through cycles, breeder cycles and thermal recycle. On a more tentative basis, the approach is applied to various alternative technical and institutional measures. This paper was also submitted to Working Groups 5 and 8

  16. Inflammation-induced microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W.; Barrett, Eugene J.; Cao, Wenhong

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and vascular insulin resistance usually coexist and chronic inflammation engenders both. In the present study, we investigate the temporal relationship between vascular insulin resistance and metabolic insulin resistance. We assessed insulin responses in all arterial segments, including aorta, distal saphenous artery and the microvasculature, as well as the metabolic insulin responses in muscle in rats fed on a high-fat diet (HFD) for various durations ranging from 3 days to 4 weeks with or without sodium salicylate treatment. Compared with controls, HFD feeding significantly blunted insulin-mediated Akt (protein kinase B) and eNOS [endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase] phosphorylation in aorta in 1 week, blunted vasodilatory response in small resistance vessel in 4 weeks and microvascular recruitment in as early as 3 days. Insulin-stimulated whole body glucose disposal did not begin to progressively decrease until after 1 week. Salicylate treatment fully inhibited vascular inflammation, prevented microvascular insulin resistance and significantly improved muscle metabolic responses to insulin. We conclude that microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance and inflammation plays an essential role in this process. Our data suggest microvascular insulin resistance contributes to the development of metabolic insulin resistance in muscle and muscle microvasculature is a potential therapeutic target in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its related complications. PMID:26265791

  17. Use of gamma radiation for inducing rust resistance in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smutkupt, Sumit; Wongpiyasatid, Arunee; Lamseejan, Siranut; Naritoom, Kruik

    1982-01-01

    Experiments on induced mutations for rust resistance in 11 soybean cultivars were started in the rainy season of 1979. M 1 seeds were grown at Farm Suwan, Pak Chong, Nakorn Rajchasima Province. Six plods from each of 4,438 control and 43,907 M 1 plants were randomly harvested. M 2 seeds of each cultivar of different doses were bulked. In addition, 270 good M 1 plants were selected and threshed singly. M 2 -bulk and M 2 -single seeds were advanced to M 3 . Both of M 3 -bulk and M 3 -single plants together with M 2 -bulk plants derived from remnant M 2 seeds were screened for rust resistance in the rainy season of 1980. The IWGSR rust rating system was used. Based on the slow growth of rust reaction on the plant (323,333) compared with the average IWGSR rust rating notation of the rates (343) in the same row, 121 plants were selected. Among them, six were selected from a total of 2802 control plants, and 115 from a total of 28,834 M 2 and M 3 plants. Seeds of each selection harvested. Only 88 lines of M 4 and M 5 were available for further rust evaluation in the rainy season of 1981. The results were as follows: At 77 days after planting, 82 selected lines were rated 333, 323 in comparison with 87 out of 137 rows of control S.J.1, S.J.2, S.J.4 and T.K.5 were rated 343. At 86 days after planting, most of the selections reached the diseased level 343. However, six lines which were derived from G8586 were still rated 333. In addition, a plant with slow growth of rust (323) from Taichung N No. 81-1-032 was selected. The six selected lines having characteristics of slow growth of rust reaction on the plants will be further tested. The high yielding selections among 82 selected lines having low percentage of shrivelled seeds will be used for further yield evaluation in the rainy season of 1982

  18. RESISTENCIA SISTÉMICA ADQUIRIDA MEDIADA POR EL ÁCIDO SALICÍLICO RESISTÊNCIA SISTÊMICA ADQUIRIDA MEDIADA POR O ÁCIDO SALICÍLICO SYSTEMIC ACQUIRED RESISTANCE INDUCED BY SALICYLIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUZ NELLY DIAZ-PUENTES

    2012-12-01

    , poderiam ser responsáveis pela indução de RSA no tecido sistêmico. Durante RSA há uma estreita interação entre o AS, o AJ, as auxinas, o etileno e as proteínas NPR1 e PR1. Esta revisão descreve o que mais recentemente se conhece sobre a sinalização molecular para induzir RSA através do AS.Systemic Acquired Resistance (SAR confers long-lasting protection against a secondary infection by biotrophic, necrotrophic and hemibiotrophic pathogens. SAR is a two steps process. Firstly, the plant recognizes the pathogen and induces a local plant response through a signal cascade that ends in an intracellular Salicylic Acid (SA accumulation. This accumulation induces an increase in Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS and expression of pathogenesis related (pr genes. Secondly, this local response induces a long distant resistance to pathogens in uninfected tissue. It has been postulated that molecules such as Methyl Salicylate (MeSa, some MAPKs and Nitric Oxide (NO, among others, could be responsible for the induction of SAR in the systemic tissue. During SAR there is a big interaction among SA, JA, auxins, ethylene and NPR1 and PR1 proteins. This review describes the last understanding about the molecular signalling to induce SAR trough SA.

  19. Proliferation resistance assessment of thermal recycle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    This paper examines the major proliferation aspects of thermal recycle systems and the extent to which technical or institutional measures could increase the difficulty or detectability of misuse of the system by would-be proliferators. It does this by examining the various activities necessary to acquire weapons-usable material using a series of assessment factors; resources required, time required, detectability. It is concluded that resistance to proliferation could be improved substantially by collecting reprocessing, conversion and fuel fabrication plants under multi national control and instituting new measures to protect fresh MOX fuel. Resistance to theft at sub-national level could be improved by co-location of sensitive facilities high levels of physical protection at plants and during transportation and possibly by adding a radiation barrier to MOX prior to shipment

  20. Traumatic brain injury and obesity induce persistent central insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karelina, Kate; Sarac, Benjamin; Freeman, Lindsey M; Gaier, Kristopher R; Weil, Zachary M

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced impairments in cerebral energy metabolism impede tissue repair and contribute to delayed functional recovery. Moreover, the transient alteration in brain glucose utilization corresponds to a period of increased vulnerability to the negative effects of a subsequent TBI. In order to better understand the factors contributing to TBI-induced central metabolic dysfunction, we examined the effect of single and repeated TBIs on brain insulin signalling. Here we show that TBI induced acute brain insulin resistance, which resolved within 7 days following a single injury but persisted until 28 days following repeated injuries. Obesity, which causes brain insulin resistance and neuroinflammation, exacerbated the consequences of TBI. Obese mice that underwent a TBI exhibited a prolonged reduction of Akt (also known as protein kinase B) signalling, exacerbated neuroinflammation (microglial activation), learning and memory deficits, and anxiety-like behaviours. Taken together, the transient changes in brain insulin sensitivity following TBI suggest a reduced capacity of the injured brain to respond to the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory actions of insulin and Akt signalling, and thus may be a contributing factor for the damaging neuroinflammation and long-lasting deficits that occur following TBI. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Galectin-1-Induced Autophagy Facilitates Cisplatin Resistance of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chi Su

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common cancers in Taiwan. Although chemotherapy is the primary treatment for HCC patients, drug resistance often leads to clinical failure. Galectin-1 is a beta-galactoside binding lectin which is up-regulated in HCC patients and promotes tumor growth by mediating cancer cell adhesion, migration and proliferation, but its role in chemoresistance of HCC is poorly understood. In this study we found that galectin-1 is able to lead to chemoresistance against cisplatin treatment, and subsequent inhibition has reversed the effect of cell death in HCC cells. Moreover, galectin-1 was found to induce autophagic flux in HCC cells. Inhibition of autophagy by inhibitors or knockdown of Atg5 cancels galectin-1-induced cisplatin resistance in HCC cells. Increase of mitophagy triggered by galectin-1 was found to reduce the mitochondrial potential loss and apoptosis induced by cisplatin treatment. Finally, using an in situ hepatoma mouse model, we clearly demonstrated that inhibition of galectin-1 by thiodigalactoside could significantly augment the anti-HCC effect of cisplatin. Taken together, our findings offer a new insight into the chemoresistance galectin-1 causes against cisplatin treatment, and points to a potential approach to improve the efficacy of cisplatin in the treatment of HCC patients.

  2. Mildew resistant and less lodging wheat mutants induced in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naghedi-Ahmadi, I.

    1989-01-01

    ''Tabassi'' is a lodging and mildew susceptible cultivar. To induce mutations, seeds were gamma irradiated (50 to 150 Gy) in 1982 and selection for lodging resistance was carried out in M 2 . During field experiments with the mutant lines in 1985/86 there has been a heavy mildew epidemic under which mutant 63-5-I (derived from 50 Gy treatment) exhibited considerable resistance and as a consequence, higher yield. The control was 100% infected, the mutant only 40%. The mutant yielded 31% more grain, 7.5% less straw and 4.5% more protein than the control. Lodging of 63-5-I was only 60% in an experiment under rainfed conditions in the same season, resulting in a relative yield increase of about 11%. In 1986/87 there was no mildew epidemic and the mutant yielded the same as ''Tabassi''

  3. Involvement of steatosis-induced glucagon resistance in hyperglucagonaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suppli, Malte P; Lund, Asger; Bagger, Jonatan I

    2016-01-01

    diabetes per se - is the main driver behind fasting hyperglucagonaemia. We hypothesise that in the majority of type 2 diabetic individuals hepatic sensitivity to glucagon is compromised due to hepatic steatosis, and that this provides a feedback mechanism acting at the level of pancreatic alpha cells...... recognised to play a significant role in type 2 diabetic pathophysiology. However, the mechanisms underlying disturbances in the regulation of glucagon remain unclear. Glucagon constitutes the primary stimulus for hepatic glucose production and, thus, upholds adequate blood glucose levels during fasting......, leading to elevated levels of glucagon. Here we present our hypothesis and propose a way to test it. If our hypothesis holds true, hepatic glucagon resistance would constitute a parallel to the obesity-induced insulin resistance in muscle and liver tissue, and underpin a central role for glucagon...

  4. Cultured hypothalamic neurons are resistant to inflammation and insulin resistance induced by saturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sun Ju; Kim, Francis; Schwartz, Michael W; Wisse, Brent E

    2010-06-01

    Hypothalamic inflammation induced by high-fat feeding causes insulin and leptin resistance and contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity. Since in vitro exposure to saturated fatty acids causes inflammation and insulin resistance in many cultured cell types, we determined how cultured hypothalamic neurons respond to this stimulus. Two murine hypothalamic neuronal cell cultures, N43/5 and GT1-7, were exposed to escalating concentrations of saturated fatty acids for up to 24 h. Harvested cells were evaluated for activation of inflammation by gene expression and protein content. Insulin-treated cells were evaluated for induction of markers of insulin receptor signaling (p-IRS, p-Akt). In both hypothalamic cell lines, inflammation was induced by prototypical inflammatory mediators LPS and TNFalpha, as judged by induction of IkappaBalpha (3- to 5-fold) and IL-6 (3- to 7-fold) mRNA and p-IkappaBalpha protein, and TNFalpha pretreatment reduced insulin-mediated p-Akt activation by 30% (P fatty acid (100, 250, or 500 microM for neurons, whereas they did in control muscle and endothelial cell lines. Despite the lack of evidence of inflammatory signaling, saturated fatty acid exposure in cultured hypothalamic neurons causes endoplasmic reticulum stress, induces mitogen-activated protein kinase, and causes apoptotic cell death with prolonged exposure. We conclude that saturated fatty acid exposure does not induce inflammatory signaling or insulin resistance in cultured hypothalamic neurons. Therefore, hypothalamic neuronal inflammation in the setting of DIO may involve an indirect mechanism mediated by saturated fatty acids on nonneuronal cells.

  5. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α induces multidrug resistance protein in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Y

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Yingqian Lv, Shan Zhao, Jinzhu Han, Likang Zheng, Zixin Yang, Li Zhao Department of Oncology, The Second Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Multidrug resistance is the major cause of chemotherapy failure in many solid tumors, including colon cancer. Hypoxic environment is a feature for all solid tumors and is important for the development of tumor resistance to chemotherapy. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α is the key transcription factor that mediates cellular response to hypoxia. HIF-1α has been shown to play an important role in tumor resistance; however, the mechanism is still not fully understood. Here, we found that HIF-1α and the drug resistance-associated gene multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1 were induced by treatment of colon cancer cells with the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride. Inhibition of HIF-1α by RNA interference and dominant-negative protein can significantly reduce the induction of MRP1 by hypoxia. Bioinformatics analysis showed that a hypoxia response element is located at -378 to -373 bp upstream of the transcription start site of MRP1 gene. Luciferase reporter assay combined with mutation analysis confirmed that this element is essential for hypoxia-mediated activation of MRP gene. Furthermore, RNA interference revealed that HIF-1α is necessary for this hypoxia-driven activation of MRP1 promoter. Importantly, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that HIF-1α could directly bind to this HRE site in vivo. Together, these data suggest that MRP1 is a downstream target gene of HIF-1α, which provides a potential novel mechanism for HIF-1α-mediated drug resistance in colon cancer and maybe other solid tumors as well. Keywords: hypoxia, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, multidrug resistance associated protein, transcriptional regulation, chemotherapy tolerance

  6. Lifestyle-induced metabolic inflexibility and accelerated ageing syndrome: insulin resistance, friend or foe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell Jimmy D

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The metabolic syndrome may have its origins in thriftiness, insulin resistance and one of the most ancient of all signalling systems, redox. Thriftiness results from an evolutionarily-driven propensity to minimise energy expenditure. This has to be balanced with the need to resist the oxidative stress from cellular signalling and pathogen resistance, giving rise to something we call 'redox-thriftiness'. This is based on the notion that mitochondria may be able to both amplify membrane-derived redox growth signals as well as negatively regulate them, resulting in an increased ATP/ROS ratio. We suggest that 'redox-thriftiness' leads to insulin resistance, which has the effect of both protecting the individual cell from excessive growth/inflammatory stress, while ensuring energy is channelled to the brain, the immune system, and for storage. We also suggest that fine tuning of redox-thriftiness is achieved by hormetic (mild stress signals that stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and resistance to oxidative stress, which improves metabolic flexibility. However, in a non-hormetic environment with excessive calories, the protective nature of this system may lead to escalating insulin resistance and rising oxidative stress due to metabolic inflexibility and mitochondrial overload. Thus, the mitochondrially-associated resistance to oxidative stress (and metabolic flexibility may determine insulin resistance. Genetically and environmentally determined mitochondrial function may define a 'tipping point' where protective insulin resistance tips over to inflammatory insulin resistance. Many hormetic factors may induce mild mitochondrial stress and biogenesis, including exercise, fasting, temperature extremes, unsaturated fats, polyphenols, alcohol, and even metformin and statins. Without hormesis, a proposed redox-thriftiness tipping point might lead to a feed forward insulin resistance cycle in the presence of excess calories. We therefore suggest

  7. Role of PTEN in TNFα induced insulin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulger, David A.; Conley, Jermaine; Conner, Spencer H.; Majumdar, Gipsy; Solomon, Solomon S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: PTEN may play a reversible role in TNFα induced insulin resistance, which has been linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance (IR). Methods: Western blots for PTEN and p-Akt were performed on H-411E liver cells incubated with insulin, TNFα, and in selected experiments VO-OHpic vanadium complex in the presence and absence of PTEN siRNA. Total PTEN was compared to β-actin loading control and p-Akt was compared to total Akt. Results: Western blot and Real Time RT-PCR experiments showed increased PTEN after TNFα treatment (p = 0.04); slightly decreased PTEN after insulin treatment; and slightly increased PTEN after insulin + TNFα treatment. PTEN siRNA markedly inhibited the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN (p < 0.01) without significantly changing the p-Akt levels. The vanadium complex, exhibiting insulin-like effects, also significantly prevented the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN. Combining insulin and VO-OHpic was additive, providing both proof of concept and insight into mechanism. Discussion: The PTEN increase due to TNFα treatment was reversible by both PTEN siRNA knockdown and VO-OHpic treatment. Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential new therapeutic target for reducing IR in Type 2 DM. - Highlights: • TNFα treatment induced a significant increase in PTEN in H-411E liver cells. • PTEN siRNA knockdown prevented this effect. • VO-OHpic (vanadium complex) treatment, like insulin, decreased PTEN protein levels. • Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential therapeutic target in DM Type 2

  8. Role of PTEN in TNFα induced insulin resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulger, David A. [Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Medicine and Research Services, Veterans Association Medical Center, Memphis, TN 38104 (United States); Wellcome Trust Medical Research Council Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Disease, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Conley, Jermaine [Medicine and Research Services, Veterans Association Medical Center, Memphis, TN 38104 (United States); Conner, Spencer H.; Majumdar, Gipsy [Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Medicine and Research Services, Veterans Association Medical Center, Memphis, TN 38104 (United States); Solomon, Solomon S., E-mail: ssolomon@uthsc.edu [Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Medicine and Research Services, Veterans Association Medical Center, Memphis, TN 38104 (United States)

    2015-06-05

    Aims/hypothesis: PTEN may play a reversible role in TNFα induced insulin resistance, which has been linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance (IR). Methods: Western blots for PTEN and p-Akt were performed on H-411E liver cells incubated with insulin, TNFα, and in selected experiments VO-OHpic vanadium complex in the presence and absence of PTEN siRNA. Total PTEN was compared to β-actin loading control and p-Akt was compared to total Akt. Results: Western blot and Real Time RT-PCR experiments showed increased PTEN after TNFα treatment (p = 0.04); slightly decreased PTEN after insulin treatment; and slightly increased PTEN after insulin + TNFα treatment. PTEN siRNA markedly inhibited the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN (p < 0.01) without significantly changing the p-Akt levels. The vanadium complex, exhibiting insulin-like effects, also significantly prevented the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN. Combining insulin and VO-OHpic was additive, providing both proof of concept and insight into mechanism. Discussion: The PTEN increase due to TNFα treatment was reversible by both PTEN siRNA knockdown and VO-OHpic treatment. Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential new therapeutic target for reducing IR in Type 2 DM. - Highlights: • TNFα treatment induced a significant increase in PTEN in H-411E liver cells. • PTEN siRNA knockdown prevented this effect. • VO-OHpic (vanadium complex) treatment, like insulin, decreased PTEN protein levels. • Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential therapeutic target in DM Type 2.

  9. Monomeric tartrate resistant acid phosphatase induces insulin sensitive obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernilla Lång

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with macrophage infiltration of adipose tissue, which may link adipose inflammation to insulin resistance. However, the impact of inflammatory cells in the pathophysiology of obesity remains unclear. Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP is an enzyme expressed by subsets of macrophages and osteoclasts that exists either as an enzymatically inactive monomer or as an active, proteolytically processed dimer.Using mice over expressing TRAP, we show that over-expression of monomeric, but not the dimeric form in adipose tissue leads to early onset spontaneous hyperplastic obesity i.e. many small fat cells. In vitro, recombinant monomeric, but not proteolytically processed TRAP induced proliferation and differentiation of mouse and human adipocyte precursor cells. In humans, monomeric TRAP was highly expressed in the adipose tissue of obese individuals. In both the mouse model and in the obese humans the source of TRAP in adipose tissue was macrophages. In addition, the obese TRAP over expressing mice exhibited signs of a low-grade inflammatory reaction in adipose tissue without evidence of abnormal adipocyte lipolysis, lipogenesis or insulin sensitivity.Monomeric TRAP, most likely secreted from adipose tissue macrophages, induces hyperplastic obesity with normal adipocyte lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

  10. Heterogeneity in induced thermal resistance of rat tumor cell clones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasovic, S.P.; Rosenblatt, P.L.; Heitzman, D.

    1983-01-01

    Four 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma clones were examined for their survival response to heating under conditions that induced transient thermal resistance (thermotolerance). Clones MTC and MTF7 were isolated from the subcutaneous locally growing tumor, whereas clones MTLn2 and MTLn3 were derived from spontaneous lung metastases. There was heterogeneity among these clones in thermotolerance induced by either fractionated 45 0 C or continuous 42 0 C heating, but the order of sensitivity was not necessarily the same. The clones developed thermal resistance at different rates and to different degrees within the same time intervals. There was heterogeneity between clones isolated from within either the primary site or metastatic lesions. However, clones derived from metastatic foci did not intrinsically acquire more or less thermotolerance to fractionated 45 0 C or continuous 42 0 C heating than did clones from the primary tumor. Further, there was no apparent relationship between any phenotypic properties that conferred more or less thermotolerance in vitro and any phenotypic properties that conferred enhanced metastatic success of these same clones by spontaneous (subcutaneous) or experimental (intravenous) routes in vivo. These tumor clones also differ in their karyotype, metastatic potential, cell surface features, sensitivity to x-irradiation and drugs, and ability to repair sublethal radiation damage. These results provide further credence to the concept that inherent heterogeneity within tumors may be as important in therapeutic success as other known modifiers of outcome such as site and treatment heterogeneity

  11. The use of the multiple-gradient array for geoelectrical resistivity and induced polarization imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizebeokhai, Ahzegbobor P.; Oyeyemi, Kehinde D.

    2014-12-01

    The use of most conventional electrode configurations in electrical resistivity survey is often time consuming and labour intensive, especially when using manual data acquisition systems. Often, data acquisition teams tend to reduce data density so as to speed up field operation thereby reducing the survey cost; but this could significantly degrade the quality and resolution of the inverse models. In the present work, the potential of using the multiple-gradient array, a non-conventional electrode configuration, for practical cost effective and rapid subsurface resistivity and induced polarization mapping was evaluated. The array was used to conduct 2D resistivity and time-domain induced polarization imaging along two traverses in a study site at Ota, southwestern Nigeria. The subsurface was characterised and the main aquifer delineated using the inverse resistivity and chargeability images obtained. The performance of the multiple-gradient array was evaluated by correlating the 2D resistivity and chargeability images with those of the conventional Wenner array as well as the result of some soundings conducted along the same traverses using Schlumberger array. The multiple-gradient array has been found to have the advantage of measurement logistics and improved image resolution over the Wenner array.

  12. Induced resistance to the antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin B in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, Orjan; Haukland, Hanne H; Jenssen, Håvard; Krämer, Manuela; Sandvik, Kjersti; Ulvatne, Hilde; Vorland, Lars H

    2005-06-20

    This study was designed to investigate inducible intrinsic resistance against lactoferricin B in Staphylococcus aureus. Serial passage of seven S. aureus strains in medium with increasing concentrations of peptide resulted in an induced resistance at various levels in all strains. The induced resistance was unstable and decreased relatively rapidly during passages in peptide free medium but the minimum inhibitory concentration remained elevated after thirty passages. Cross-resistance to penicillin G and low-level cross-resistance to the antimicrobial peptides indolicidin and Ala(8,13,18)-magainin-II amide [corrected] was observed. No cross-resistance was observed to the human cathelicidin LL-37. In conclusion, this study shows that S. aureus has intrinsic resistance mechanisms against antimicrobial peptides that can be induced upon exposure, and that this may confer low-level cross-resistance to other antimicrobial peptides.

  13. Pre-cold stress increases acid stress resistance and induces amino ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pre-cold stress increases acid stress resistance and induces amino acid homeostasis in Lactococcus lactis NZ9000. ... Purpose: To investigate the effects of pre-cold stress treatments on subsequent acid stress resistance ... from 32 Countries:.

  14. Design of online testing system of material radiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Junsheng; He Shengping; Gao Xinjun

    2014-01-01

    The capability of radiation resistance is important for some material used in some specifically engineering fields. It is the same principal applied in all existing test system that compares the performance parameter after radiation to evaluate material radiation resistance. A kind of new technique on test system of material radiation resistance is put forward in this paper. Experimentation shows that the online test system for material radiation resistance works well and has an extending application outlook. (authors)

  15. Herbivore-induced resistance against microbial pathogens in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de M.; Zaanen, van W.; Koornneef, A.; Korzelius, J.P.; Dicke, M.; Loon, van L.C.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Caterpillars of the herbivore Pieris rapae stimulate the production of jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and trigger a defense response that affects insect performance on systemic tissues. To investigate the spectrum of effectiveness of P. rapae-induced

  16. Herbivore-induced resistance against microbial pathogens in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M. de; Zaanen, W. van; Koornneef, A.; Korzelius, J.P.; Dicke, M.; Loon, L.C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Caterpillars of the herbivore Pieris rapae stimulate the production of jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and trigger a defense response that affects insect performance on systemic tissues. To investigate the sspectrum of effectiveness of P. rapae-induced

  17. Informed herbivore movement and interplant communication determine the effects of induced resistance in an individual-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Ilan N; Ellner, Stephen P; Kessler, André; Morrell, Kimberly A

    2015-09-01

    1. Plant induced resistance to herbivory affects the spatial distribution of herbivores, as well as their performance. In recent years, theories regarding the benefit to plants of induced resistance have shifted from ideas of optimal resource allocation towards a more eclectic set of theories that consider spatial and temporal plant variability and the spatial distribution of herbivores among plants. However, consensus is lacking on whether induced resistance causes increased herbivore aggregation or increased evenness, as both trends have been experimentally documented. 2. We created a spatial individual-based model that can describe many plant-herbivore systems with induced resistance, in order to analyse how different aspects of induced resistance might affect herbivore distribution, and the total damage to a plant population, during a growing season. 3. We analyse the specific effects on herbivore aggregation of informed herbivore movement (preferential movement to less-damaged plants) and of information transfer between plants about herbivore attacks, in order to identify mechanisms driving both aggregation and evenness. We also investigate how the resulting herbivore distributions affect the total damage to plants and aggregation of damage. 4. Even, random and aggregated herbivore distributions can all occur in our model with induced resistance. Highest levels of aggregation occurred in the models with informed herbivore movement, and the most even distributions occurred when the average number of herbivores per plant was low. With constitutive resistance, only random distributions occur. Damage to plants was spatially correlated, unless plants recover very quickly from damage; herbivore spatial autocorrelation was always weak. 5. Our model and results provide a simple explanation for the apparent conflict between experimental results, indicating that both increased aggregation and increased evenness of herbivores can result from induced resistance. We

  18. The effect of spin induced magnetization on Jeans instability of viscous and resistive quantum plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Prerana; Chhajlani, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of spin induced magnetization and electrical resistivity incorporating the viscosity of the medium is examined on the Jeans instability of quantum magnetoplasma. Formulation of the system is done by using the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model. The analysis of the problem is carried out by normal mode analysis theory. The general dispersion relation is derived from set of perturbed equations to analyse the growth rate and condition of self-gravitational Jeans instability. To discuss the influence of resistivity, magnetization, and viscosity parameters on Jeans instability, the general dispersion relation is reduced for both transverse and longitudinal mode of propagations. In the case of transverse propagation, the gravitating mode is found to be affected by the viscosity, magnetization, resistivity, and magnetic field strength whereas Jeans criterion of instability is modified by the magnetization and quantum parameter. In the longitudinal mode of propagation, the gravitating mode is found to be modified due to the viscosity and quantum correction in which the Jeans condition of instability is influenced only by quantum parameter. The other non-gravitating Alfven mode in this direction is affected by finite electrical resistivity, spin induced magnetization, and viscosity. The numerical study for the growth rate of Jeans instability is carried out for both in the transverse and longitudinal direction of propagation to the magnetic field. The effect of various parameters on the growth rate of Jeans instability in quantum plasma is analysed

  19. Molecular Detection of Inducible Clindamycin Resistance among Staphylococcal Strains Isolated from Hospital Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadiyeh Abdollahi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B (MLSB antimicrobial agents are used in the treatment of staphylococcal infections. They prevent the microbial protein synthesis system through binding to 23 S rRNA. The aim of this study was to apply molecular methods to detect inducible clindamycin resistance genes among staphylococcal strains isolated from clinical specimens.   Methods : Two hundred staphylococcus strains were isolated from nose and throat swabs of patients in Toohid and Besat hospitals in Sanandaj . Antimicrobial susceptibilities of isolates were determined using disc diffusion method, agar screen test and D-Test. A multiplex PCR was performed using primers specific for erm (A, B, C, TR genes.   Results: Out of 200 isolates, 18.5 % were MRSA and 32% were MRCNS (methicillin resistant coagulase negative staphylococci. Of 80 erythromycin resistant isolates, 48 were coagulase negative and 32 were S. aureus. Among the 48 coagulase negative staphylococci (CONS isolates, 11.63% expressed the MLSB-inducible phenotypes. Using PCR, the frequency of different genes in the collection of isolates were as follows: ermA 5.41 % , erm B 5.41 % , and erm C 3.13%. The ermTR gene was negative in all isolates. Among the 32 S. aureus isolates, 9.38% expressed the MLSB-nducible phenotype. Using PCR, these isolates harbored erm A (2.22%, ermB (2.22%, ermC (2.22% and ermTR (2.22% .   Conclusion: This is the first study to show the rate of inducible clindamycin clinical isolates of staphylococci harboring erm genes in Sananadaj. It also demonstrated the frequency of erm genes was higher among CONS isolates than S. aureus. This data suggested the transfer of resistance gene from nonpathogenic to pathogenic strains is likely to happen. Therefore, screening and control of these resistance genes is recommended at clinical laboratories.

  20. Treatment of amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis resistant to conventional therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nišić Tanja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Amiodarone as an antiarrhythmic medication is necessary in the prevention and treatment of malignant ventricular arrhythmias, however, it can induce thyroid dysfunction. Thyroid dysfunction may be either hypothyroidism or thyrotoxicosis, however, 50% of patients who have used amiodarone are euthyroid. Case report: A 27-year-old female patient, hospitalized at the Clinic for Endocrinology due to type 2 amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis. The patient had previously received amiodarone for two years. At age 25, the patient was diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy (EF 25%, EDD/ESD 56-57/47 mm with mild Ebstein’s anomaly, WPW Sy and recorded episodes of non-sustained VT. In order to reduce the risk of sudden death and prevent malignant ventricular arrhythmias, ICD-VR was implanted and amiodarone was prescribed. Treatment with propylthiouracil (PTU and dexamethasone was initiated after thyrotoxicosis was diagnosed. Three weeks after the introduction of PTU, hepatotoxicity was registered, thus the medication was discontinued. Thyrozol, which regulates the hepatotoxicity parameters, was introduced. Sodium perchlorate and glucocorticoid (per os, IV and intrathyroidal therapy was introduced. The treatment had lasted for fifty days and laboratory signs of thyrotoxicosis were still present, which is why a total of eight plasmapheresis sessions were performed. Each plasmapheresis resulted in a significant decrease in FT4 and a slight decrease in FT3. After seventy two days of treatment, an optimal hormonal status of the thyroid gland was established and total thyroidectomy was performed. Conclusion: Patient was treated for amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT type 2, which was resistant to conventional therapy for a long period of time. Successful treatment was achieved by applying plasmapheresis although the effect of perchlorate and glucocorticoids application cannot be disregarded.

  1. Downy mildew resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum T39 in susceptible grapevines partially mimics transcriptional changes of resistant genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Downy mildew, caused by Plasmopara viticola, is one of the most severe diseases of grapevine and is commonly controlled by fungicide treatments. The beneficial microorganism Trichoderma harzianum T39 (T39) can induce resistance to downy mildew, although the molecular events associated with this process have not yet been elucidated in grapevine. A next generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) approach was used to study global transcriptional changes associated with resistance induced by T39 in Vitis vinifera Pinot Noir leaves. The long-term aim was to develop strategies to optimize the use of this agent for downy mildew control. Results More than 14.8 million paired-end reads were obtained for each biological replicate of T39-treated and control leaf samples collected before and 24 h after P. viticola inoculation. RNA-Seq analysis resulted in the identification of 7,024 differentially expressed genes, highlighting the complex transcriptional reprogramming of grapevine leaves during resistance induction and in response to pathogen inoculation. Our data show that T39 has a dual effect: it directly modulates genes related to the microbial recognition machinery, and it enhances the expression of defence-related processes after pathogen inoculation. Whereas several genes were commonly affected by P. viticola in control and T39-treated plants, opposing modulation of genes related to responses to stress and protein metabolism was found. T39-induced resistance partially inhibited some disease-related processes and specifically activated defence responses after P. viticola inoculation, causing a significant reduction of downy mildew symptoms. Conclusions The global transcriptional analysis revealed that defence processes known to be implicated in the reaction of resistant genotypes to downy mildew were partially activated by T39-induced resistance in susceptible grapevines. Genes identified in this work are an important source of markers for selecting novel

  2. Different Proteomics of Ca2+ on SA-induced Resistance to Botrytis cinerea in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to comprehensively study the effects of Ca2+ on the SA-induced resistance Botrytis cinerea in tomato through proteomics analysis. A proteomic approach was used to uncover the inducible proteins of tomato in the susceptible tomato cultivars ‘L402’ against Botrytis cinerea after salicylic acid (SA and a combination treatment of CaCl2 and SA. The results showed that the use of combination treatment of CaCl2 and SA significantly enhanced tomato resistance against Botrytis cinerea. In total, 46 differentially expressed protein spots from 2-DE gel maps were detected, of which 41 were identified by mass spectrometry. All the identified proteins were categorized into eight groups according to their putative functions: defense response (14.00%, antioxidative protein (9.75%, photosynthesis (24.39%, molecular chaperone (4.88%, energy (17.01%, metabolism (21.95%, protein synthesis (4.88% and signal transduction (0.2%. Of the proteins in the eight function groups, the effect of stress/defense and reactive oxygen species on Ca2+-regulated SA-induced resistance may be the most important one in induced resistance by RT-PCR. The expression level of pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs and chitinase was upregulated by a combination treatment of CaCl2 and SA. The characterization of these proteins greatly helped to reveal the induced proteins involved in the regulation of Ca2+ on SA-induced resistance to Botrytis cinerea. In the combination treatment of CaCl2 and SA, the defense response and antioxidative protein were clearly upregulated much more than SA alone or the control treatment by the method of proteomics and RT-PCR. The present findings suggest that susceptible tomato cultivars treated by the combination treatment of CaCl2 and SA might possess a more sensitive SA signaling system or effective pathway than SA treatment alone. In addition, results indicated that SA could coordinate other cellular activities linked with photosynthesis and

  3. Apparent resistivity and spectral induced polarization in the submarine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HERCULES DE SOUZA

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Relatively few investigations have employed electrical methods in the submarine environment, which may be promising for mineral deposits or threatened by environmental problems. We have measured the electric field using both disk and bar electrodes in the sea water at three different levels: sea surface, seven meters deep, and sea bottom at a depth of ten meters, employing a 2 m spacing dipole-dipole array with 7 array spacings of investigation, and 13 values of frequencies at steps of (2N hertz, N = -2, -1, 0, 1, 2,.....10. The measurement allowed the analysis of the electric field as a function of frequency and spacing, and of the spectral induced polarization. Modelling and interpretation of the apparent resistivity yielded a good fit with previous drilling data. Analysis of the spectrum of the complex apparent resistivity and the comparison with equivalent circuits, provided information about the grain size, the mineral composition and the major induced polarization phenomenon occurring below the sea. Therefore the result of the present research show the feasibility of measuring the variation of seawater resistivity in situ, as well as the resistivity of sea bottom sediments.Relativamente poucas investigações têm empregado métodos elétricos no ambiente submarino, o qual pode ser promissor para depósitos minerais ou ameaçado por problemas ambientais. Nós medimos o campo elétrico usando eletrodos em forma de disco e de barra na água do mar, em três níveis distintos: superfície, sete metros de profundidade, e fundo do mar a dez metros de profundidade, empregando um dispositivo dipolo-dipolo com 2m de afastamento, 7 níveis de investigação e 13 valores de freqüência a intervalos de (2N hertz, N = -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, ... 10. A medida permitiu a análise do campo elétrico como uma função de freqüência e afastamento, e da polarização induzida espectral. A modelagem e a interpretação da resistividade aparente se ajustaram bem

  4. Field-induced resistance switching at metal/perovskite manganese oxide interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkubo, I.; Tsubouchi, K.; Harada, T.; Kumigashira, H.; Itaka, K.; Matsumoto, Y.; Ohnishi, T.; Lippmaa, M.; Koinuma, H.; Oshima, M.

    2008-01-01

    Planar type metal/insulator/metal structures composed of an epitaxial perovskite manganese oxide layer and various metal electrodes were prepared for electric-field-induced resistance switching. Only the electrode pairs including Al show good resistance switching and the switching ratio reaches its maximum of 1000. This resistance switching occurs around the interface between Al electrodes and epitaxial perovskite manganese oxide thin films

  5. Induced resistance in plants and the role of pathogenesis-related proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.C. van

    1997-01-01

    The nature of induced resistance Resistance, according to Agrios (1988) is the ability of an organism to exclude or overcome, completely or in some degree, the effect of a pathogen or other damaging factor. Disease resistance in plants is manifested by limited symptoms, reflecting the

  6. Growth hormone-induced insulin resistance in human subjects involves reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, B.; Vendelbo, M.H.; Nielsen, Thomas Svava

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance induced by growth hormone (GH) is linked to promotion of lipolysis by unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that suppression of the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase in the active form (PDHa) underlies GH-induced insulin resistance similar to what is observed during fasting....

  7. Autophagy is induced by resistance exercise in young men but unfolded protein response is induced regardless of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentilä, Jaakko; Ahtiainen, Juha P; Paulsen, Gøran; Raastad, Truls; Häkkinen, Keijo; Mero, Antti A; Hulmi, Juha J

    2018-04-02

    Autophagy and unfolded protein response (UPR) appear to be important for skeletal muscle homeostasis and may be altered by exercise. Our aim was to investigate the effects of resistance exercise and training on indicators of UPR and autophagy in healthy untrained young men (n = 12, 27 ± 4 years) and older men (n = 8, 61 ± 6 years) as well as in resistance-trained individuals (n = 15, 25 ± 5 years). Indicators of autophagy and UPR were investigated from the muscle biopsies after a single resistance exercise bout and after 21 weeks of resistance training. Lipidated LC3II as an indicator of autophagosome content increased at 48 hours post resistance exercise (P resistance-training period (P resistance exercise in untrained young and older men (P resistance-training period regardless of age. UPR was unchanged within the first few hours after the resistance exercise bout regardless of the training status. Changes in autophagy and UPR ER indicators did not correlate with a resistance-training-induced increase in muscle strength and size. Autophagosome content is increased by resistance training in young previously untrained men, but this response may be blunted by aging. However, unfolded protein response is induced by an unaccustomed resistance exercise bout in a delayed manner regardless of age. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. The involvement of topoisomerases and DNA polymerase I in the mechanism of induced thermal and radiation resistance in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boreham, D.R.; Trivedi, A.; Weinberger, P.; Mitchel, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Either an ionizing radiation exposure or a heat shock is capable of inducing both thermal tolerance and radiation resistance in yeast. Yeast mutants, deficient in topoisomerase I, in topoisomerase II, or in DNA polymerase I, were used to investigate the mechanism of these inducible resistances. The absence of either or both topoisomerase activities did not prevent induction of either heat or radiation resistance. However, if both topoisomerase I and II activities were absent, the sensitivity of yeast to become thermally tolerant (in response to a heat stress) was markedly increased. The absence of only topoisomerase I activity (top1) resulted in the constitutive expression of increased radiation resistance equivalent to that induced by a heat shock in wild-type cells, and the topoisomerase I-deficient cells were not further inducible by heat. This heat-inducible component of radiation resistance (or its equivalent constitutive expression in top1 cells) was, in turn, only a portion of the full response inducible by radiation. The absence of polymerase I activity had no detectable effect on either response. Our results indicate that the actual systems that confer resistance to heat or radiation are independent of either topoisomerase activity or DNA polymerase function, but suggest that topoisomerases may have a regulatory role during the signaling of these mechanisms. The results of our experiments imply that maintenance of correct DNA topology prevents induction of the heat-shock response, and that heat-shock induction of a component of the full radiation resistance in yeast may be the consequence of topoisomerase I inactivation

  9. Development of resistance to serotonin-induced itch in bile duct ligated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Haddadi, Nazgol-Sadat; Foroutan, Arash; Azimi, Ehsan; Elmariah, Sarina; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2017-06-01

    Cholestatic itch can be severe and significantly impair the quality of life of patients. The serotonin system is implicated in cholestatic itch; however, the pruritogenic properties of serotonin have not been evaluated in cholestatic mice. Here, we investigated the serotonin-induced itch in cholestatic mice which was induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). Serotonin, sertraline or saline were administered intradermally to the rostral back area in BDL and sham operated (SHAM) mice, and the scratching behaviour was videotaped for 1 hour. Bile duct ligated mice had significantly increased scratching responses to saline injection on the seventh day after surgery. Additionally, serotonin or sertraline significantly induced scratching behaviour in BDL mice compared to saline at day 7 after surgery, while it did not induce itch at day 5. The scratching behaviour induced by serotonin or sertraline was significantly less in BDL mice compared to SHAM mice. Likewise, the locomotor activity of BDL or SHAM mice was not significantly different from unoperated (UNOP) mice on the fifth and seventh day, suggesting that the scratching behaviour was not affected by motor dysfunctions. Our data suggest that despite the potentiation of evoked itch, a resistance to serotonin-induced itch is developed in cholestatic mice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Anaesthesia generates neuronal insulin resistance by inducing hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutherland Calum

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaesthesia is commonly employed prior to surgical investigations and to permit icv injections in rodents. Indeed it is standard practise in many studies examining the subsequent actions of hormones and growth factors on the brain. Recent evidence that the basal activity of specific intracellular signalling proteins can be affected by anaesthesia prompted us to examine the effect of anaesthesia not only on the basal activity but also the insulin sensitivity of the major insulin signalling pathways. Results We find that urethane- and ketamine-induced anaesthesia results in rapid activation of the phosphatidylinositol (PI 3-kinase-protein kinase B (PKB signalling pathway in the brain, increases tau phosphorylation while at the same time reducing basal activity of the Ras-ERK pathway. Subsequent injection of insulin does not alter the activity of either the PI 3-kinase or ERK signalling pathways, indicating a degree of neuronal molecular insulin resistance. However, if body temperature is maintained during anaesthesia then there is no alteration in the basal activity of these signalling molecules. Subsequent response of both pathways to insulin injection is restored. Conclusion The data is consistent with a hypothermia related alteration in neuronal signalling following anaesthesia, and emphasises the importance of maintaining the body temperature of rodents when monitoring insulin (or growth factor/neurotrophic agent action in the brain of anesthetised rodents.

  11. High sugar-induced insulin resistance in Drosophila relies on the lipocalin Neural Lazarillo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Y Pasco

    Full Text Available In multicellular organisms, insulin/IGF signaling (IIS plays a central role in matching energy needs with uptake and storage, participating in functions as diverse as metabolic homeostasis, growth, reproduction and ageing. In mammals, this pleiotropy of action relies in part on a dichotomy of action of insulin, IGF-I and their respective membrane-bound receptors. In organisms with simpler IIS, this functional separation is questionable. In Drosophila IIS consists of several insulin-like peptides called Dilps, activating a unique membrane receptor and its downstream signaling cascade. During larval development, IIS is involved in metabolic homeostasis and growth. We have used feeding conditions (high sugar diet, HSD that induce an important change in metabolic homeostasis to monitor possible effects on growth. Unexpectedly we observed that HSD-fed animals exhibited severe growth inhibition as a consequence of peripheral Dilp resistance. Dilp-resistant animals present several metabolic disorders similar to those observed in type II diabetes (T2D patients. By exploring the molecular mechanisms involved in Drosophila Dilp resistance, we found a major role for the lipocalin Neural Lazarillo (NLaz, a target of JNK signaling. NLaz expression is strongly increased upon HSD and animals heterozygous for an NLaz null mutation are fully protected from HSD-induced Dilp resistance. NLaz is a secreted protein homologous to the Retinol-Binding Protein 4 involved in the onset of T2D in human and mice. These results indicate that insulin resistance shares common molecular mechanisms in flies and human and that Drosophila could emerge as a powerful genetic system to study some aspects of this complex syndrome.

  12. Subinhibitory concentrations of imipenem induce increased resistance to methicillin and imipenem in vitro in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Forbes, B A; McClatchey, K D; Schaberg, D R

    1984-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant (MR) Staphylococcus aureus that was susceptible to less than 0.75 micrograms of imipenem per ml demonstrated inducible resistance. MR S. aureus preincubated with 0.05 microgram of imipenem per ml grew in medium with an imipenem concentration of 32 micrograms/ml, and methicillin MICs increased 20-fold. Non-MR S. aureus exhibited no induction. Preincubation with methicillin produced no effect. Induction appeared to be a unique interaction of imipenem with MR S. aureus.

  13. Field Trials of the Multi-Source Approach for Resistivity and Induced Polarization Data Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBrecque, D. J.; Morelli, G.; Fischanger, F.; Lamoureux, P.; Brigham, R.

    2013-12-01

    Implementing systems of distributed receivers and transmitters for resistivity and induced polarization data is an almost inevitable result of the availability of wireless data communication modules and GPS modules offering precise timing and instrument locations. Such systems have a number of advantages; for example, they can be deployed around obstacles such as rivers, canyons, or mountains which would be difficult with traditional 'hard-wired' systems. However, deploying a system of identical, small, battery powered, transceivers, each capable of injecting a known current and measuring the induced potential has an additional and less obvious advantage in that multiple units can inject current simultaneously. The original purpose for using multiple simultaneous current sources (multi-source) was to increase signal levels. In traditional systems, to double the received signal you inject twice the current which requires you to apply twice the voltage and thus four times the power. Alternatively, one approach to increasing signal levels for large-scale surveys collected using small, battery powered transceivers is it to allow multiple units to transmit in parallel. In theory, using four 400 watt transmitters on separate, parallel dipoles yields roughly the same signal as a single 6400 watt transmitter. Furthermore, implementing the multi-source approach creates the opportunity to apply more complex current flow patterns than simple, parallel dipoles. For a perfect, noise-free system, multi-sources adds no new information to a data set that contains a comprehensive set of data collected using single sources. However, for realistic, noisy systems, it appears that multi-source data can substantially impact survey results. In preliminary model studies, the multi-source data produced such startling improvements in subsurface images that even the authors questioned their veracity. Between December of 2012 and July of 2013, we completed multi-source surveys at five sites

  14. Curcumin-induced Activation of the Nrf2 Antioxidant System Attenuates Paraquat-induced InsuIin Resistance%姜黄素激活Nrf2抗氧化系统缓解百草枯诱导的胰岛素抵抗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨含艳; 展平; 任丽伟; 于志文

    2015-01-01

    phosphorylation.Curcumin also significantly reduced muscular MDA level, promoting the Nrf2 translocation into nucleus , along with the enhanced expression of quinine oxi-doreductase1 (NQO-1).Curcumin also increased IкBαcontent.Conclusion Curcumin enhances the function of endog-enous Nrf2 system and insulin signaling to against PQ-induced oxidative stress and inflammation which may be the mechanisms of curcumin to attenuate insulin resistance .

  15. Curcumin-induced Activation of the Nrf2 Antioxidant System Attenuates Paraquat-induced InsuIin Resistance%姜黄素激活Nrf2抗氧化系统缓解百草枯诱导的胰岛素抵抗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨含艳; 展平; 任丽伟; 于志文

    2015-01-01

    muscular MDA level,promoted the Nrf2 translocation in-to nucleus, enhanced expression of quinine oxidoreductase1 ( NQO-1 ) .Curcumin also increased IкBαcontent.CONCLUSION Curcumin enhances the function of endogenous Nrf2 system and insulin signaling to against PQ-induced oxidative stress and inflammation which may be the mechanisms of curcumin to attenuate insulin resistance.

  16. Identifying clinically relevant drug resistance genes in drug-induced resistant cancer cell lines and post-chemotherapy tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Mengsha; Zheng, Weicheng; Lu, Xingrong; Ao, Lu; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Cai, Hao; Li, Mengyao; Yan, Haidan; Guo, You; Chi, Pan; Guo, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Until recently, few molecular signatures of drug resistance identified in drug-induced resistant cancer cell models can be translated into clinical practice. Here, we defined differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between pre-chemotherapy colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue samples of non-responders and responders for 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based therapy as clinically relevant drug resistance genes (CRG5-FU/L-OHP). Taking CRG5-FU/L-OHP as reference, we evaluated the clinical relevance of several types of genes derived from HCT116 CRC cells with resistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin, respectively. The results revealed that DEGs between parental and resistant cells, when both were treated with the corresponding drug for a certain time, were significantly consistent with the CRG5-FU/L-OHP as well as the DEGs between the post-chemotherapy CRC specimens of responders and non-responders. This study suggests a novel strategy to extract clinically relevant drug resistance genes from both drug-induced resistant cell models and post-chemotherapy cancer tissue specimens.

  17. Resistance to RadLV-induced leukemia: non-participation of splenic natural killer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St-Pierre, Y.; Hugo, P.; Lemieux, S.; Lussier, G.; Potworowski, E.F.

    1988-01-01

    The phenotypic expression of genetically determined resistance to radiation leukemia virus (RadLV)-induced leukemia in mice has been shown to reside in the bone marrow. Because the bone marrow contains precursors of natural killer (NK) cells, known to play a role in retrovirally induced infections, and because these cells have been suggested as participating in resistance to radiation-induced leukemia, it was pertinent to establish whether their levels differed in strains of mice susceptible and resistant to leukemia. We therefore tested splenic NK cell levels in C57BL/Ka (susceptible) and B10.A(5R) (resistant) mice before viral inoculation, immediately after viral inoculation, and throughout the preleukemic period and showed that they were not different. This indicates that splenic NK cell levels have no bearing on the resistance to RadLV-induced leukemia and that other immune or non-immune mechanisms must be sought

  18. Advances in induced resistance by natural compounds: towards new options for woody crop protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Llorens

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The activation of defensive responses of plants is a promising tool for controlling pests in conventional agriculture. Over the last few years, several compounds have been studied to protect crops from pests, without displaying direct toxicity for pathogenic organisms. These compounds have the ability to induce a priming state on the plants that results in resistance (or tolerance against subsequent infection by a pathogen. In terms of molecular response, induced plant defense involves a broad number of physical and biochemical changes such as callose deposition or phenolic compounds, activation of salicylic and/or jasmonic acid pathways or synthesis of defense-related enzymes. Despite the large number of studies performed to ascertain the physiological and biochemical basis of induced resistance, only a few resistance-activating compounds have been studied as a real alternative to classic means of control and the studies geared towards incorporating induced resistance into disease management programs are relatively rare. The incorporation of natural resistance inducer in pest management programs of woody crops, alone or in combination with classical methods, could be a reliable method for reducing the amount of chemical residues in the environment. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of induced resistance in woody crops, focusing on the mode of action of compounds authorized for conventional agriculture. We conclude by discussing the environmental and economic advantages of applying resistance inducers to conventional agriculture with special emphasis on natural compounds.

  19. Elicitation of Induced Resistance against Pectobacterium carotovorum and Pseudomonas syringae by Specific Individual Compounds Derived from Native Korean Plant Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choong-Min Ryu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants have developed general and specific defense mechanisms for protection against various enemies. Among the general defenses, induced resistance has distinct characteristics, such as broad-spectrum resistance and long-lasting effectiveness. This study evaluated over 500 specific chemical compounds derived from native Korean plant species to determine whether they triggered induced resistance against Pectobacterium carotovorum supsp. carotovorum (Pcc in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst in Arabidopsis thaliana. To select target compound(s with direct and indirect (volatile effects, a new Petri-dish-based in vitro disease assay system with four compartments was developed. The screening assay showed that capsaicin, fisetin hydrate, jaceosidin, and farnesiferol A reduced the disease severity significantly in tobacco. Of these four compounds, capsaicin and jaceosidin induced resistance against Pcc and Pst, which depended on both salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA signaling, using Arabidopsis transgenic and mutant lines, including npr1 and NahG for SA signaling and jar1 for JA signaling. The upregulation of the PR2 and PDF1.2 genes after Pst challenge with capsaicin pre-treatment indicated that SA and JA signaling were primed. These results demonstrate that capsaicin and jaceosidin can be effective triggers of strong induced resistance against both necrotrophic and biotrophic plant pathogens.

  20. Three-dimensional induced polarization data inversion for complex resistivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Commer, M.; Newman, G.A.; Williams, K.H.; Hubbard, S.S.

    2011-03-15

    The conductive and capacitive material properties of the subsurface can be quantified through the frequency-dependent complex resistivity. However, the routine three-dimensional (3D) interpretation of voluminous induced polarization (IP) data sets still poses a challenge due to large computational demands and solution nonuniqueness. We have developed a flexible methodology for 3D (spectral) IP data inversion. Our inversion algorithm is adapted from a frequency-domain electromagnetic (EM) inversion method primarily developed for large-scale hydrocarbon and geothermal energy exploration purposes. The method has proven to be efficient by implementing the nonlinear conjugate gradient method with hierarchical parallelism and by using an optimal finite-difference forward modeling mesh design scheme. The method allows for a large range of survey scales, providing a tool for both exploration and environmental applications. We experimented with an image focusing technique to improve the poor depth resolution of surface data sets with small survey spreads. The algorithm's underlying forward modeling operator properly accounts for EM coupling effects; thus, traditionally used EM coupling correction procedures are not needed. The methodology was applied to both synthetic and field data. We tested the benefit of directly inverting EM coupling contaminated data using a synthetic large-scale exploration data set. Afterward, we further tested the monitoring capability of our method by inverting time-lapse data from an environmental remediation experiment near Rifle, Colorado. Similar trends observed in both our solution and another 2D inversion were in accordance with previous findings about the IP effects due to subsurface microbial activity.

  1. 2-deoxy-D-glucose-induced metabolic stress enhances resistance to Listeria monocytogenes infection in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. S.; Bates, R. A.; Koebel, D. A.; Fuchs, B. B.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to different forms of psychological and physiological stress can elicit a host stress response, which alters normal parameters of neuroendocrine homeostasis. The present study evaluated the influence of the metabolic stressor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG; a glucose analog, which when administered to rodents, induces acute periods of metabolic stress) on the capacity of mice to resist infection with the facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Female BDF1 mice were injected with 2-DG (500 mg/kg b. wt.) once every 48 h prior to, concurrent with, or after the onset of a sublethal dose of virulent L. monocytogenes. Kinetics of bacterial growth in mice were not altered if 2-DG was applied concurrently or after the start of the infection. In contrast, mice exposed to 2-DG prior to infection demonstrated an enhanced resistance to the listeria challenge. The enhanced bacterial clearance in vivo could not be explained by 2-DG exerting a toxic effect on the listeria, based on the results of two experiments. First, 2-DG did not inhibit listeria replication in trypticase soy broth. Second, replication of L. monocytogenes was not inhibited in bone marrow-derived macrophage cultures exposed to 2-DG. Production of neopterin and lysozyme, indicators of macrophage activation, were enhanced following exposure to 2-DG, which correlated with the increased resistance to L. monocytogenes. These results support the contention that the host response to 2-DG-induced metabolic stress can influence the capacity of the immune system to resist infection by certain classes of microbial pathogens.

  2. Puncture resistance of Type B transport systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, H.J.; Cheresh, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    This report describes a recent attempt to develop a test method for use in screening materials and for evaluating the effects of certain parameters, for example section stiffness, on container penetration resistance. In addition, it illustrates the application of this procedure to the selection of a sheet steel for a transuranic waste (TRUPACT) container. The test consists of penetrating a specimen, normally 0.6 m square, with a punch (tup) attached to a falling weight and recording and analyzing the force-time history to determine the energy absorption during the impact event. The test as developed simulates certain aspects of the 10CFR71 drop test in order to provide a means of comparing, for example, the penetrating resistance of various steels, this resistance being defined as the energy required to initiate fracture in the specimen. In summary, this examination suggests that it should be possible to develop a laboratory test to rank and select materials for maximum puncture resistance. Although the initial results appear promising, more effort will be required before this procedure can be routinely applied to examining the various factors which control the puncture resistance of these materials. These results do, nonetheless, show that high-strength, low-alloy steels do offer significant advantages over mild steel for container penetration protection. Indeed, one of these steels, NAX-80, is presently considered as a prime candidate for the TRUPACT container being developed at Sandia National Laboratories

  3. Induced mutations in cucumber for resistance to nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udalov, V.B.; Prikhod'ko, V.F.

    1989-01-01

    Full text: Seeds were treated with EI and selection was carried out over 5 years. In the susceptible cv. ''M15'' treated with 0.05% EI for 21 h 7.6% of plants were found resistant, 72% only slightly susceptible. Mutants were used in crosses and hybrids showed 57-89% resistance over 6 generations. (author)

  4. Studies on induced resistance to blast in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mingxian

    1985-01-01

    Eleven rice varieties were treated with 60 Co gamma ray, laser and other mutagens. 154 mutants with different characters were developed. 154 mutants and their parents have been inoculated with blast (Piricularia oryzae) races. It was found that the mutants of disease-resistance could be produced. The disease-resistant mutants with various better cheracters were selected. The frequencies of mutation in disease-resistance are different with different parental varieties. After inoculation with 13 blast physiological races, the results showed that the spectrum of resistance of mutants, other characters were changed, when one character was changed. In order to get a veriety with higher yield and disease-resistance, it is important to take account of other economic charaters

  5. 76 FR 16795 - The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System Strategic Plan 2011-2015; Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ...] The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System Strategic Plan 2011-2015; Request for Comments..., FDA requested comments on a document for the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System....fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/SafetyHealth/AntimicrobialResistance/NationalAntimicrobialResistance...

  6. Resistance to ursodeoxycholic acid-induced growth arrest can also result in resistance to deoxycholic acid-induced apoptosis and increased tumorgenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, Ashley A; Akare, Sandeep; Qi, Wenqing; Herzer, Pascal; Jean-Louis, Samira; Feldman, Rebecca A; Martinez, Jesse D

    2006-01-01

    There is a large body of evidence which suggests that bile acids increase the risk of colon cancer and act as tumor promoters, however, the mechanism(s) of bile acids mediated tumorigenesis is not clear. Previously we showed that deoxycholic acid (DCA), a tumorogenic bile acid, and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a putative chemopreventive agent, exhibited distinct biological effects, yet appeared to act on some of the same signaling molecules. The present study was carried out to determine whether there is overlap in signaling pathways activated by tumorogenic bile acid DCA and chemopreventive bile acid UDCA. To determine whether there was an overlap in activation of signaling pathways by DCA and UDCA, we mutagenized HCT116 cells and then isolated cell lines resistant to UDCA induced growth arrest. These lines were then tested for their response to DCA induced apoptosis. We found that a majority of the cell lines resistant to UDCA-induced growth arrest were also resistant to DCA-induced apoptosis, implying an overlap in DCA and UDCA mediated signaling. Moreover, the cell lines which were the most resistant to DCA-induced apoptosis also exhibited a greater capacity for anchorage independent growth. We conclude that UDCA and DCA have overlapping signaling activities and that disregulation of these pathways can lead to a more advanced neoplastic phenotype

  7. Cetuximab-Induced MET Activation Acts as a Novel Resistance Mechanism in Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Song

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant MET expression and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF signaling are implicated in promoting resistance to targeted agents; however, the induced MET activation by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors mediating resistance to targeted therapy remains elusive. In this study, we identified that cetuximab-induced MET activation contributed to cetuximab resistance in Caco-2 colon cancer cells. MET inhibition or knockdown sensitized Caco-2 cells to cetuximab-mediated growth inhibition. Additionally, SRC activation promoted cetuximab resistance by interacting with MET. Pretreatment with SRC inhibitors abolished cetuximab-mediated MET activation and rendered Caco-2 cells sensitive to cetuximab. Notably, cetuximab induced MET/SRC/EGFR complex formation. MET inhibitor or SRC inhibitor suppressed phosphorylation of MET and SRC in the complex, and MET inhibitor singly led to disruption of complex formation. These results implicate alternative targeting of MET or SRC as rational strategies for reversing cetuximab resistance in colon cancer.

  8. Surface Resistance Measurements and Estimate of the Beam-Induced Resistive Wall Heating of the LHC Dipole Beam Screen

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Ruggiero, F; Tan, J

    1999-01-01

    An estimate of the resistive losses in the LHC beam screen is given from cold surface resistance measurements using the shielded pair technique, with particular emphasis on the effect of a high magnetic field. Two different copper coating methods, namely electro-deposition and co-lamination, have been evaluated. Experimental data are compared with theories including the anomalous skin effect and the magneto-resistance effect. It is shown whether the theory underestimates or not the losses depends strongly on the RRR value, on the magnetic field and on the surface characteristics. In the pessimistic case and for nominal machine parameters, the estimated beam-induced resistive wall heating can be as large as 260 mW/m for two circulating beams.

  9. Linkage mapping of candidate genes for induce resistance and growth promotion by trichoderma koningiopsis (th003) in tomato solanum lycopersicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simbaqueba, Jaime; Cotes, Alba Marina; Barrero, Luz Stella

    2011-01-01

    Induced systemic resistance (ISR) is a mechanism by which plants enhance defenses against any stress condition. ISR and growth promotion are enhanced when tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is inoculated with several strains of Trichoderma ssp. this study aims to genetically map tomato candidate genes involved in ISR and growth promotion induced by the Colombian native isolate Trichoderma koningiopsis th003. Forty-nine candidate genes previously identified on tomato plants treated with th003 and T. hamatum T382 strains were evaluated for polymorphisms and 16 of them were integrated on the highly saturated genetic linkage map named TOMATO EXPEN 2000. The location of six unigenes was similar to the location of resistance gene analogs (RGAS), defense related ests and resistance QTLs previously reported, suggesting new possible candidates for these quantitative trait loci (QTL) regions. The candidate gene-markers may be used for future ISR or growth promotion assisted selection in tomato.

  10. Current-induced forces: a new mechanism to induce negative differential resistance and current-switching effect in molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lei; Fu, Hua-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Current-induced forces can excite molecules, polymers and other low-dimensional materials, which in turn leads to an effective gate voltage through Holstein interaction. Here, by taking a short asymmetric DNA junction as an example, and using the Langevin approach, we find that when suppression of charge transport by the effective gate voltage surpasses the current increase from an elevated voltage bias, the current-voltage (I-V) curves display strong negative differential resistance (NDR) and perfect current-switching characteristics. The asymmetric DNA chain differs in mechanical stability under inverse voltages and the I-V curve is asymmetric about inverse biases, which can be used to understand recent transport experiments on DNA chains, and meanwhile provides a new strategy to realize NDR in molecular junctions and other low-dimensional quantum systems.

  11. Current-induced forces: a new mechanism to induce negative differential resistance and current-switching effect in molecular junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Lei; Fu, Hua-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Current-induced forces can excite molecules, polymers and other low-dimensional materials, which in turn leads to an effective gate voltage through Holstein interaction. Here, by taking a short asymmetric DNA junction as an example, and using the Langevin approach, we find that when suppression of charge transport by the effective gate voltage surpasses the current increase from an elevated voltage bias, the current-voltage (I–V) curves display strong negative differential resistance (NDR) and perfect current-switching characteristics. The asymmetric DNA chain differs in mechanical stability under inverse voltages and the I–V curve is asymmetric about inverse biases, which can be used to understand recent transport experiments on DNA chains, and meanwhile provides a new strategy to realize NDR in molecular junctions and other low-dimensional quantum systems. (paper)

  12. Induced mutations for resistance to powdery mildew in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xueyu

    1990-01-01

    The most serious diseases of wheat in the Yangtze River Valley in China are powdery mildew and scab. Breeding for disease resistance either using conventional methods or through mutation breeding is the best way of controlling these diseases. Mutation breeding may be valuable in obtaining genotypes with resistance or tolerance, or for breaking undesirable linkages involving existing genes for disease resistance. The following commercial varieties were used: Yangmai 3, Ningmai 3 and Ningmai 6. They are high-yielding varieties, but susceptible to powdery mildew. Seeds of these cultivars were treated with gamma-rays. The material was screened in the seedling stage in M 2 in the greenhouse and under field conditions in M 3 -M 4 and later generations. The seedlings were inoculated with a spore suspension of the powdery mildew fungus. The most resistant mutant selected from variety Ningmai 3 was the line 34080 with resistance to races 4, 16 and 20. According to the number of progenies in M 2 , the mutation frequency was 1.2x10 -4 . The other two mutants (34157, 34158) were screened from variety Yangmai 3. Mutant 34157 showed a stable resistance to races 4, 16 and 20; mutant 34158 was resistant to races 4 and 20 but susceptible to race 16. Tracing them back to M 2 progeny, the mutation frequency was 1.0x10 -4 . From electrophoretic analysis of mildew resistant mutant lines of wheat we found that the zymogram of peroxidase in resistant lines 34080 and 34157 was different from their parents and that these lines do not have band 3A

  13. Hypoxia-induced cytotoxic drug resistance in osteosarcoma is independent of HIF-1Alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Adamski

    Full Text Available Survival rates from childhood cancer have improved dramatically in the last 40 years, such that over 80% of children are now cured. However in certain subgroups, including metastatic osteosarcoma, survival has remained stubbornly poor, despite dose intensive multi-agent chemotherapy regimens, and new therapeutic approaches are needed. Hypoxia is common in adult solid tumours and is associated with treatment resistance and poorer outcome. Hypoxia induces chemotherapy resistance in paediatric tumours including neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma, in vitro, and this drug resistance is dependent on the oxygen-regulated transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1. In this study the effects of hypoxia on the response of the osteosarcoma cell lines 791T, HOS and U2OS to the clinically relevant cytotoxics cisplatin, doxorubicin and etoposide were evaluated. Significant hypoxia-induced resistance to all three agents was seen in all three cell lines and hypoxia significantly reduced drug-induced apoptosis. Hypoxia also attenuated drug-induced activation of p53 in the p53 wild-type U2OS osteosarcoma cells. Drug resistance was not induced by HIF-1α stabilisation in normoxia by cobalt chloride nor reversed by the suppression of HIF-1α in hypoxia by shRNAi, siRNA, dominant negative HIF or inhibition with the small molecule NSC-134754, strongly suggesting that hypoxia-induced drug resistance in osteosarcoma cells is independent of HIF-1α. Inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K pathway using the inhibitor PI-103 did not reverse hypoxia-induced drug resistance, suggesting the hypoxic activation of Akt in osteosarcoma cells does not play a significant role in hypoxia-induced drug resistance. Targeting hypoxia is an exciting prospect to improve current anti-cancer therapy and combat drug resistance. Significant hypoxia-induced drug resistance in osteosarcoma cells highlights the potential importance of hypoxia as a target

  14. Stem and stripe rust resistance in wheat induced by gamma rays and thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorda, E.A.

    1977-01-01

    Attempts were made to produce rust-resistant mutants in wheat cultivars. Seeds of G-38290 and G-58383 (T. aestivum), Methoni and Ilectra (T. durum) varieties were irradiated with different doses of γ-rays (3.5, 5, 8, 11, 15 and 21 krad) and thermal neutrons (1.7, 4, 5.5, 7.5, 10.5 and 12.5x10 12 ) and the M 1 plants were grown under isolation in the field. The objective was mainly to induce stripe, leaf and stem rust resistance in G-38290, Methoni and Ilectra varieties and leaf rust resistance in G-58383. Mutations for rust resistance were detected by using the ''chimera method'' under natural and artificial field epiphytotic conditions in M 2 and successive generations. The mutants detected were tested for resistance to a broad spectrum of available races. Mutants resistant or moderately resistant to stripe and stem rusts but not to leaf rust, were selected from G-38290. From the other three varieties tested no rust-resistant mutants were detected. The frequency of resistant mutants obtained increased with increased γ-ray dose-rate, but not with increased thermal neutron doses. Some mutants proved to be resistant or moderately resistant to both rusts and others to one of them. Twenty of these mutants were evaluated for yield from M 5 to M 8 . Some of them have reached the final stage of regional yield trials and one, induced by thermal neutrons, was released this year. (author)

  15. Alternaria resistance of Brassicae campestris L. improved by induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, M.L.; Rahman, A.

    1989-01-01

    Full text: Seeds of 'YS 52', a cultivar susceptible to Alternaria brassicae (Berk.) Sacc., were exposed to gamma rays (30-90 kR). Eight more resistant mutants were selected in M3 and subjected to further field evaluation. The best mutant '17-5-83' appeared resistant and gave 44% higher yield than the parent, mutant '70-7-82' was found to be moderately resistant and gave a yield 21% higher than the parent. The yield increases seem to be connected with plant architecture changes. (author)

  16. Failure of Elevating Calcium Induces Oxidative Stress Tolerance and Imparts Cisplatin Resistance in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Liwei; Wang, Hongjun; Wang, Chunyan; Su, Jing; Xie, Qi; Xu, Lu; Yu, Yang; Liu, Shibing; Li, Songyan; Xu, Ye; Li, Zhixin

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug, used for the treatment of malignant ovarian cancer, but acquired resistance limits its application. There is therefore an overwhelming need to understand the mechanism of cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer, that is, ovarian cancer cells are insensitive to cisplatin treatment. Here, we show that failure of elevating calcium and oxidative stress tolerance play key roles in cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cell lines. Cisplatin induce...

  17. Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0163 TITLE: Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer ...Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Feng Yang, Ph.D. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER E-Mail: fyang@bcm.edu...W81XWH-13-1-0163 " Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer " Introduction AR signaling

  18. Hepatocyte Toll-like receptor 4 regulates obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is a hallmark of obesity and thought to contribute to the development of obesity-related insulin resistance. Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4) is a key mediator of pro-inflammatory responses. Mice lacking Tlr4s are protected from diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammat...

  19. Induced mutations to develop sources of resistance to rice blast, Pyricularia grisea Sacc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa-Victoria, F.J.

    2001-01-01

    Rice blast caused by Pyricularia grisea is the most important disease limiting yields worldwide. The pathogen has many virulent forms or pathotypes, hence durable blast resistance is lacking. Studies on strategy to develop durable blast resistance based on defining the genetic structure of the population, using DNA-fingerprinting, and virulence diversity are described. This strategy is leading to the identification of resistance genes/sources against all isolates within a genetic family of the pathogen. Combinations of genes showing complementary resistance to different genetic families of the fungus exclude any compatible interaction with a blast isolate. Identification of complementary resistance genes is based on detecting those virulence factors whose combinations in individual isolates within the pathogen population have a frequency near zero. Identifying and combining resistance genes to which combinations of corresponding virulence genes are absent in the pathogen population should confer more durable resistance than that previously obtained. The use of induced mutations in the development of resistance was limited, since in most cases single gene changes were responsible for the induced resistance against all the pathogen population. The main objective here is to develop many mutants, each with a gene resistant to just one or a few families of the blast pathogen; and crossing them can accumulate the different resistance genes. A total of 201 Latin American commercial cultivars, including Cuban, Brazilian and Venezuelan were analyzed with different genetic families of the blast pathogen to identify potential sources of resistance to blast and identify complementary resistance sources. Characterization of the resistance of 37 mutants of the Colombian rice cultivar Oryzica 1 was conducted in collaboration with the INEA in Colombia. Results suggested that mutations for resistance to genetic families to which Oryzica 1 is susceptible were induced, although one

  20. Induced mutations in beans and peas for resistance to rust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadl, F.A.M.

    1983-01-01

    Gamma rays and ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS) were applied in a mutation-induction programme for rust resistance in bean and pea. Bean and pea seeds were pre-soaked 2 hours before irradiation with 9, 10 and 12 krad. For chemical mutagen treatments bean and pea seeds were pre-soaked for 8 hours and treated with 0.5 and 1.5% EMS for four hours. M 2 seeds of beans and peas were planted in 1979. Resistant M 2 plants were selected for their rust resistance and other morphological characters. M 3 seeds of selected plants were planted in 1980. In 1980 more seeds of the same varieties of beans and peas were treated with 0.1 and 0.3% EMS with the aim to produce rust-resistant mutants. Seed germination was reduced by gamma rays or EMS. Dwarf, malformed and abnormal plants were noticed. Some resistant M 2 plants selected gave high grain yields. Some were different in morphological characters. In the M 3 of selected plants various other mutant characters appeared, such as different height of plants, early and late flowering, resistance to powdery mildew in peas, altered grain yield, thickness of stem, pod shape and flower colour. (author)

  1. 14 CFR 29.952 - Fuel system crash resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.952 Fuel system... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system crash resistance. 29.952... of fuel fires to occupants following an otherwise survivable impact (crash landing), the fuel systems...

  2. 14 CFR 27.952 - Fuel system crash resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.952 Fuel system... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system crash resistance. 27.952... of fuel fires to occupants following an otherwise survivable impact (crash landing), the fuel systems...

  3. Development of a CB Resistant Durable, Flexible Hydration System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hall, Peyton W; Zeller, Frank T; Bulluck, John W; Dingus, Michael L

    2002-01-01

    A durable, flexible hydration system resistant to contamination by contact with VX, GD, and HD chemical agents, as well as damage by the decontaminants sodium hypochlorite and DS-2 is being developed for aviator use...

  4. A Study of Transport Airplane Crash-Resistant Fuel Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robertson, S

    2002-01-01

    ...), of transport airplane crash-resistant fuel system (CRFS). The report covers the historical studies related to aircraft crash fires and fuel containment concepts undertaken by the FAA, NASA, and the U.S...

  5. Sensor histidine kinase is a β-lactam receptor and induces resistance to β-lactam antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lu; Wang, Qiyao; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Minjun; Khan, Mazhar I.; Zhou, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria can produce β-lactamases, enzymes that destroy β-lactam antibiotics and thereby resist these potent antibiotics that target cell wall synthesis. Production of β-lactamases is often controlled by β-lactam-induced perturbations in the cell wall. Here, we have identified a new mechanism controlling β-lactamase production. We found a signaling system in which a membrane-associated histidine kinase directly binds β-lactams, triggering the expression of a β-lactamase and resistance to β-la...

  6. Induced mutations for disease resistance in wheat and barley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanis, M.; Hanisova, A.; Knytl, V.; Cerny, J.; Benc, S.

    1977-01-01

    The induction of mutations in cultivars of wheat (Triticum aestivum), barley (Hordeum vulgare), and field beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) has been part of the breeding programme at the Plant Breeding Station at Stupice since 1960. A total of 26 cultivars or selections of winter wheat, 4 cultivars or selections of spring wheat, 2 cultivars of field beans, and 43 selections of spring barley have been treated since 1960. A total of 140 mutant lines of wheat and 37 mutant lines of barley with improved disease resistance of a race-specific type have been obtained. Several mutation programme derived cultivars have been registered in Czechoslovakia (''Diamant'', ''Ametyst'', ''Favorit'', ''Hana'', ''Rapid'', and ''Atlas'' in barley, and ''Alfa'' in field beans), but none of them is a mutation for disease resistance. A series of mutants have been used in crossing programmes. Approaches to improve the efficiency of mutation breeding for disease resistance are suggested. (author)

  7. Application of Various Lasers to Laser Trimming Resistance System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ji-feng

    2007-01-01

    Though the laser trimming resistance has been an old laser machining industry for over 30 years, the development of technology brings new alternative lasers which can be used for the traditional machining. The paper describes application of various lasers to laser trimming resistance system including early traditional krypton arc lamp pumped Nd:YAG to laser, modern popular diode pumped solid state laser and the present advanced harmonic diode pumped solid state laser. Using the new alternative lasers in the laser trimming resistance system can dramatically improve the yields and equipment performance.

  8. Induced mutations for disease resistance in wheat and field beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Hak, T.M.; Kamel, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    Wheat disease in Egypt is reviewed and results of mutation breeding by γ irradiation for disease resistance in wheat and field beans are described. Wheat mutants of the variety Giza 155 resistant to leaf rust, Giza 156 resistant to both leaf and yellow rusts, and Tosson with a reasonable level of combined resistance to the three rusts in addition to mutants of the tetraploid variety Dakar 52 with a good level of stem and yellow rust resistance are required. Their seeds were subjected to 10, 15 and 20 krad. Of 3000-3700 M 2 plants from each variety and dosage, 22 plants from both Giza 155 and Giza 156, although susceptible, showed a lower level of disease development. In 1975, M 3 families of these selected plants and 6000 plants from bulked material were grown from each variety and dosage at two locations. Simultaneously, an additional population consisting of 3000 mutagen-treated seeds was grown to have a reasonable chance of detecting mutants; 2 heads from each plant were harvested. These will be grown next season (1976) to make a population of 25,000-30,000 M 2 plants and screened to composite cultures of specific rusts. Vicia faba seeds of field bean varieties Giza 1, Giza 2 and Rebaya 40, equally susceptible to rust and chocolate spot, were subjected to 3, 5 and 7 krad of 60 Co gamma radiation and 800 M 1 plants were grown in 1972 per variety and dose. Up to this later growing season (M 3 ) no resistance was detected in M 3 plank

  9. Induced mutations for rust resistance in bread wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawhney, R.N.

    1989-01-01

    Full text: Seeds of variety ''Lalbahadur'' were treated with 0.04% NMH. M 2 plants were inoculated with a mixture of pathotypes of each of the 3 Puccinia species (P. graminis, P. recondita, P. striiformis). Plants with simultaneous resistance to all 3 rusts were selected. Repeated testing in subsequent generations confirmed the resistance. The mutant lines are morphologically similar to the parent cultivar and therefore could be used as components of a multiline variety. Comparison of variety pattern against the Indian pathotypes of rusts suggests that the mutant genes are different from the ones known already in bread wheat. (author)

  10. SoK: Making Sense of Censorship Resistance Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khattak Sheharbano

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of countries implement Internet censorship at different scales and for a variety of reasons. Several censorship resistance systems (CRSs have emerged to help bypass such blocks. The diversity of the censor’s attack landscape has led to an arms race, leading to a dramatic speed of evolution of CRSs. The inherent complexity of CRSs and the breadth of work in this area makes it hard to contextualize the censor’s capabilities and censorship resistance strategies. To address these challenges, we conducted a comprehensive survey of CRSs-deployed tools as well as those discussed in academic literature-to systematize censorship resistance systems by their threat model and corresponding defenses. To this end, we first sketch a comprehensive attack model to set out the censor’s capabilities, coupled with discussion on the scope of censorship, and the dynamics that influence the censor’s decision. Next, we present an evaluation framework to systematize censorship resistance systems by their security, privacy, performance and deployability properties, and show how these systems map to the attack model. We do this for each of the functional phases that we identify for censorship resistance systems: communication establishment, which involves distribution and retrieval of information necessary for a client to join the censorship resistance system; and conversation, where actual exchange of information takes place. Our evaluation leads us to identify gaps in the literature, question the assumptions at play, and explore possible mitigations.

  11. Ensemble Classifiers for Predicting HIV-1 Resistance from Three Rule-Based Genotypic Resistance Interpretation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo, Letícia M; Nobre, Flavio F

    2017-08-30

    Resistance to antiretrovirals (ARVs) is a major problem faced by HIV-infected individuals. Different rule-based algorithms were developed to infer HIV-1 susceptibility to antiretrovirals from genotypic data. However, there is discordance between them, resulting in difficulties for clinical decisions about which treatment to use. Here, we developed ensemble classifiers integrating three interpretation algorithms: Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le SIDA (ANRS), Rega, and the genotypic resistance interpretation system from Stanford HIV Drug Resistance Database (HIVdb). Three approaches were applied to develop a classifier with a single resistance profile: stacked generalization, a simple plurality vote scheme and the selection of the interpretation system with the best performance. The strategies were compared with the Friedman's test and the performance of the classifiers was evaluated using the F-measure, sensitivity and specificity values. We found that the three strategies had similar performances for the selected antiretrovirals. For some cases, the stacking technique with naïve Bayes as the learning algorithm showed a statistically superior F-measure. This study demonstrates that ensemble classifiers can be an alternative tool for clinical decision-making since they provide a single resistance profile from the most commonly used resistance interpretation systems.

  12. Induced mutations for horizontal resistance. A model study using leaf rust resistance in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, V.L.; Sawhney, R.N.; Kumar, R.

    1983-01-01

    A mutant with seemingly non-specific resistance to leaf rust was obtained some time ago from the wheat variety Kharchia Local treated with NMH. This mutant is being studied genetically and in its disease reaction by laboratories in Australia, Canada and India in co-operation. The mutant showed a dominant inheritance of resistance in F 1 , but different segregation in F 2 and F 3 . This peculiar genetic behaviour has so far not been explained. (author)

  13. Circumvention of camptothecin-induced resistance during the adaptive cellular stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiligada, Ekaterini; Papamichael, Konstantinos; Vovou, Ioanna; Delitheos, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Camptothecin-11 (CPT-11) induces the adaptive stress response in yeast, conferring resistance via not fully characterized mechanisms. This study aimed at exploring, pharmacologically, the mechanisms underlying the CPT-11-induced resistance in yeast. Post-logarithmic yeast cultures were submitted to heat shock following preconditioning with suramin and with CPT-11, either alone or in combination with suramin, cycloheximide, sodium molybdate, okadaic acid, or verapamil. The stress response was evaluated by determining cell viability after heat shock. Preconditioning with CPT-11 or suramin conferred thermotolerance to yeast cells. Co-administration of CPT-11 with suramin, cycloheximide or okadaic acid reversed the CPT-11-induced thermotolerant phenotype, while sodium molybdate and verapamil had no effect on CPT-11-induced resistance. The antagonistic effect of the thermotolerance-inducers and the possible contribution of topoisomerase II activity and post-translational modifications mediated by the phosphatases PP1/2A in CPT-11-induced resistance may have important implications on the acquisition of resistance to stress in eukaryotic cells.

  14. Alloxan-induced and Insulin-resistant Diabetes Mellitus affect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance on semen parameters, histology of reproductive organs and serum concentrations of testosterone and luteinizing hormone (LH). Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 180 - 200g were made diabetic by intravenous injection of ...

  15. Acibenzolar-S-methyl induces lettuce resistance against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-24

    Aug 24, 2011 ... Acibenzolar-S-methyl (Benzo [1,2,3] thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid-S-methyl ester, ASM; Bion 50 WG) was found to ... compounds are frequently used, they have hazardous effect on ... resistance (SAR) is characterized by a reduction in the number of ... cellular defence responses such as synthesis of patho-.

  16. Induced resistance against the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, by β-aminobutyric acid in citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Siddharth; Meyer, Wendy L; Stelinski, Lukasz L

    2013-10-01

    β-Aminobutyric acid (BABA) is known to induce resistance to microbial pathogens, nematodes and insects in several host plant/pest systems. The present study was undertaken to determine whether a similar effect of BABA occurred against the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, in citrus. A 25 mM drench application of BABA significantly reduced the number of eggs/plant as compared with a water control, whereas 200 and 100 mM applications of BABA reduced the numbers of nymphs/plant and adults/plants, respectively. A 5 mM foliar application of BABA significantly reduced the number of adults but not eggs or nymphs when compared with a water control treatment. In addition, leaf-dip bioassays using various concentrations (25–500 mM) of BABA indicated no direct toxic effect on 2nd and 5th instar nymphs or adult D. citri. BABA-treated plants were characterized by significantly lower levels of iron, magnesium, phosphorus, sodium, sulfur and zinc as compared with control plants. The expression level of the PR-2 gene (β-1,3-glucanase) in BABA-treated plants that were also damaged by D. citri adult feeding was significantly higher than in plants exposed to BABA, D. citri feeding alone or control plants. Our results indicate the potential for using BABA as a systemic acquired resistance management tool for D. citri.

  17. Effect of resistance feedback on spin torque-induced switching of nanomagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzon, Samir; Webb, Richard A.; Covington, Mark; Kaka, Shehzaad; Crawford, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    In large magnetoresistance devices spin torque-induced changes in resistance can produce GHz current and voltage oscillations which can affect magnetization reversal. In addition, capacitive shunting in large resistance devices can further reduce the current, adversely affecting spin torque switching. Here, we simultaneously solve the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with spin torque and the transmission line telegrapher's equations to study the effects of resistance feedback and capacitance on magnetization reversal of both spin valves and magnetic tunnel junctions. While for spin valves parallel (P) to anti-parallel (AP) switching is adversely affected by the resistance feedback due to saturation of the spin torque, in low resistance magnetic tunnel junctions P-AP switching is enhanced. We study the effect of resistance feedback on the switching time of magnetic tunnel junctions, and show that magnetization switching is only affected by capacitive shunting in the pF range.

  18. Tomato progeny inherit resistance to the nematode Meloidogyne javanica linked to plant growth induced by the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma atroviride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Hugo Agripino de; Araújo Filho, Jerônimo Vieira de; Freitas, Leandro Grassi de; Castillo, Pablo; Rubio, María Belén; Hermosa, Rosa; Monte, Enrique

    2017-01-10

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN) are major crop pathogens worldwide. Trichoderma genus fungi are recognized biocontrol agents and a direct activity of Trichoderma atroviride (Ta) against the RKN Meloidogyne javanica (Mj), in terms of 42% reduction of number of galls (NG), 60% of number of egg masses and 90% of number of adult nematodes inside the roots, has been observed in tomato grown under greenhouse conditions. An in vivo split-root designed experiment served to demonstrate that Ta induces systemic resistance towards Mj, without the need for the organisms to be in direct contact, and significantly reduces NG (20%) and adult nematodes inside tomato roots (87%). The first generation (F1) of Ta-primed tomato plants inherited resistance to RKN; although, the induction of defenses occurred through different mechanisms, and in varying degrees, depending on the Ta-Mj interaction. Plant growth promotion induced by Ta was inherited without compromising the level of resistance to Mj, as the progeny of Ta-primed plants displayed increased size and resistance to Mj without fitness costs. Gene expression results from the defense inductions in the offspring of Ta-primed plants, suggested that an auxin-induced reactive oxygen species production promoted by Ta may act as a major defense strategy during plant growth.

  19. Uranium deposit interpretation based on resistivity and induced polarization data in Rabau hulu sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwi Haryanto; Bambang Soetopo; Adhika Junara Karunianto; Supriyanto

    2015-01-01

    Rabau Hulu area, Kalan, Kalimantan Barat is a potential area of uranium that has been explored in detail by various methods. Methods of resistivity and induced polarization can be applied in the exploration of uranium deposits in which its mineralization associated with sulphide minerals. Processing, analysis, and interpretation of resistivity and induced polarization data conducted in order to identify the distribution of uranium deposits and lithology of the rocks in the study area. Uranium deposits in the area Rabau Hulu is generally associated with sulphides, tourmaline and contained in favorable rocks. Symptoms of uranium mineralization encountered in other forms of irregular and uneven consists of uraninite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, molybdenite, and ilmenite minerals. Data acquisition using dipole-dipole configuration in an area of approximately 36 hectares, 46 lines along ± 425 m. Acquisition of induced polarization frequency domain data which the same points and lines with resistivity data. Data processing produces resistivity and metal factor values and subsequently made two-dimensional section. Determination of resistivity and induced polarization are done by correlated boreholes data with the results of data processing. Resistivity of uranium deposits zone worth less than 2,000 Ωm and the value of metal factor greater than 90 mho/m. Uranium deposit zone is expanding along with the depth. Uranium deposits distribution trending Southwestern-Northeast and shaped lens. (author)

  20. Lipid-induced insulin resistance does not impair insulin access to skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, Joyce M.; Castro, Ana Valeria B.; Broussard, Josiane L.; Ionut, Viorica; Bergman, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated plasma free fatty acids (FFA) induce insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Previously, we have shown that experimental insulin resistance induced by lipid infusion prevents the dispersion of insulin through the muscle, and we hypothesized that this would lead to an impairment of insulin moving from the plasma to the muscle interstitium. Thus, we infused lipid into our anesthetized canine model and measured the appearance of insulin in the lymph as a means to sample muscle interstitium under hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp conditions. Although lipid infusion lowered the glucose infusion rate and induced both peripheral and hepatic insulin resistance, we were unable to detect an impairment of insulin access to the lymph. Interestingly, despite a significant, 10-fold increase in plasma FFA, we detected little to no increase in free fatty acids or triglycerides in the lymph after lipid infusion. Thus, we conclude that experimental insulin resistance induced by lipid infusion does not reduce insulin access to skeletal muscle under clamp conditions. This would suggest that the peripheral insulin resistance is likely due to reduced cellular sensitivity to insulin in this model, and yet we did not detect a change in the tissue microenvironment that could contribute to cellular insulin resistance. PMID:25852002

  1. In Utero Estrogen Exposure Increases Antiestrogen Resistance by Inducing EMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    currently unclear. Our recent preclinical study found that maternal exposure to excess estrogens during pregnancy increases the risk that AE resistance in...References: 1. Hilakivi-Clarke L, Clarke R, Onojafe I, Raygada M, Cho E, Lippman M. A maternal diet high in n-6-polyunsaturated fats alters mammary...the rate of obesity in this country (high fat diets resulting in elevated circulating estrogen levels), the prevelance of bisphenol A in our drinking

  2. Go-6976 Reverses Hyperglycemia-Induced Insulin Resistance Independently of cPKC Inhibition in Adipocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Katherine A.; Hegyi, Krisztina; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Buse, Maria G.; Sethi, Jaswinder K.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia induces insulin resistance by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. One model of hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance involves chronic preincubation of adipocytes in the presence of high glucose and low insulin concentrations. We have previously shown that the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) plays a partial role in the development of insulin resistance in this model. Here, we demonstrate that treatment with Go-6976, a widely used “specific” inhibitor of cPKCs, alleviates hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance. However, the effects of mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin and Go-6976 were not additive and only rapamycin restored impaired insulin-stimulated AKT activation. Although, PKCα, (but not –β) was abundantly expressed in these adipocytes, our studies indicate cPKCs do not play a major role in causing insulin-resistance in this model. There was no evidence of changes in the expression or phosphorylation of PKCα, and PKCα knock-down did not prevent the reduction of insulin-stimulated glucose transport. This was also consistent with lack of IRS-1 phosphorylation on Ser-24 in hyperglycemia-induced insulin-resistant adipocytes. Treatment with Go-6976 did inhibit a component of the mTORC1 pathway, as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein. Raptor knock-down enhanced the effect of insulin on glucose transport in insulin resistant adipocytes. Go-6976 had the same effect in control cells, but was ineffective in cells with Raptor knock-down. Taken together these findings suggest that Go-6976 exerts its effect in alleviating hyperglycemia-induced insulin-resistance independently of cPKC inhibition and may target components of the mTORC1 signaling pathway. PMID:25330241

  3. Induced topological pressure for topological dynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Zhitao; Chen, Ercai

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, inspired by the article [J. Jaerisch et al., Stochastics Dyn. 14, 1350016, pp. 1-30 (2014)], we introduce the induced topological pressure for a topological dynamical system. In particular, we prove a variational principle for the induced topological pressure

  4. A specialist root herbivore reduces plant resistance and uses an induced plant volatile to aggregate in a density dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Leaf-herbivore attack often triggers induced resistance in plants. However, certain specialist herbivores can also take advantage of the induced metabolic changes. In some cases, they even manipulate plant resistance, leading to a phenomenon called induced susceptibility. Compared to above-ground...

  5. Resveratrol improves high-fat diet induced insulin resistance by rebalancing subsarcolemmal mitochondrial oxidation and antioxidantion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haohao, Zhang; Guijun, Qin; Juan, Zheng; Wen, Kong; Lulu, Chen

    2015-03-01

    Although resveratrol (RES) is thought to be a key regulator of insulin sensitivity in rodents, the exact mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. Therefore, we sought to investigate how RES affects skeletal muscle oxidative and antioxidant levels of subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondrial populations in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance (IR) rats. Systemic and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity together with expressions of several genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and skeletal muscle SIRT1, SIRT3 protein levels were studied in rats fed a normal diet, a HFD, and a HFD with intervention of RES for 8 weeks. Oxidative stress levels and antioxidant enzyme activities were assessed in SS and IMF mitochondria. HFD fed rats exhibited obvious systemic and skeletal muscle IR as well as decreased SIRT1 and SIRT3 expressions, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and mitochondrial biogenesis (p diet induced IR, increased SIRT1 and SIRT3 expressions, mtDNA, and mitochondrial biogenesis (p competence in HFD rats.

  6. Dynamic chemical communication between plants and bacteria through airborne signals: induced resistance by bacterial volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Mohamed A; Zhang, Huiming; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2013-07-01

    Certain plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR) and plant growth promotion in the absence of physical contact with plants via volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. In this article, we review the recent progess made by research into the interactions between PGPR VOCs and plants, focusing on VOC emission by PGPR strains in plants. Particular attention is given to the mechanisms by which these bacterial VOCs elicit ISR. We provide an overview of recent progress in the elucidation of PGPR VOC interactions from studies utilizing transcriptome, metabolome, and proteome analyses. By monitoring defense gene expression patterns, performing 2-dimensional electrophoresis, and studying defense signaling null mutants, salicylic acid and ethylene have been found to be key players in plant signaling pathways involved in the ISR response. Bacterial VOCs also confer induced systemic tolerance to abiotic stresses, such as drought and heavy metals. A review of current analytical approaches for PGPR volatile profiling is also provided with needed future developments emphasized. To assess potential utilization of PGPR VOCs for crop plants, volatile suspensions have been applied to pepper and cucumber roots and found to be effective at protecting plants against plant pathogens and insect pests in the field. Taken together, these studies provide further insight into the biological and ecological potential of PGPR VOCs for enhancing plant self-immunity and/or adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses in modern agriculture.

  7. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 negatively regulates systemic acquired resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, M.; Brodersen, P.; Naested, H.

    2000-01-01

    Transposon inactivation of Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 produced the mpk4 mutant exhibiting constitutive systemic acquired resistance (SAR) including elevated salicylic acid (SA) revels, increased resistance to virulent pathogens, and constitutive pathogenesis-related gene expression shown by Northern...... of NPR1. PDF1.2 and THI2.1 gene induction by jasmonate was blocked in mpk4 expressing NahG, suggesting that MPK4 is required for jasmonic acid-responsive gene expression....

  8. Assessing the User Resistance to Recommender Systems in Exhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Chulmo Koo; Namho Chung; Juyeon Ham

    2017-01-01

    Under the paradigm shift toward smart tourism, the exhibition industry is making efforts to introduce innovative technologies that can provide more diverse and valuable experiences to attendees. However, various new information technologies have failed in a market in practice due to the user’s resistance against it. Since innovative technology, such as booth recommender systems (BRS), is changing, creating uncertainty among consumers, consumer’s resistance to innovative technology can be cons...

  9. Fatty acid 16:4(n-3) stimulates a GPR120-induced signaling cascade in splenic macrophages to promote chemotherapy resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houthuijzen, Julia M; Oosterom, Ilse; Hudson, Brian D

    2017-01-01

    Although chemotherapy is designed to eradicate tumor cells, it also has significant effects on normal tissues. The platinum-induced fatty acid 16:4(n-3) (hexadeca-4,7,10,13-tetraenoic acid) induces systemic resistance to a broad range of DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics. We show that 16:4(n-3) exerts....... M., Peeper, D. S., Jafari Sadatmand, S., Roodhart, J. M. L., van de Lest, C. H. A., Ulven, T., Ishihara, K., Milligan, G., Voest, E. E. Fatty acid 16:4(n-3) stimulates a GPR120-induced signaling cascade in splenic macrophages to promote chemotherapy resistance....

  10. Induction of Systemic acquired resistance in Mungbean against Mungbean Yellow Mosaic Begomovirus by the exogenous application of Salicylic acid and Benzothiadiazole.

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Farooq; Naila Ilyas; Kaleem Kakar; Iltaf Khan; Abdul Saboor; Nabeela Ilyas; Shoaib Khan; Abdul Qayum; Naqeeb Ullah; Muhammad Bakhtiar

    2018-01-01

    Abstract— The diseases caused by bipartite Begomoviruses have emerged as overwhelming problem in various cropping systems of Pakistan. The study was conducted to evaluate the potential of induced resistance in mungbean to Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) disease. In this work, resistance to MYMV infection was induced in mungbean plants by activating the Salicylic acid (SA) pathway using SA and Benzothiadiazole (BTH) as treatments. The resistance was characterized by evaluating symptom appe...

  11. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Endothelial Cells in Insulin Resistance and Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcamo-Orive, Ivan; Huang, Ngan F; Quertermous, Thomas; Knowles, Joshua W

    2017-11-01

    Insulin resistance leads to a number of metabolic and cellular abnormalities including endothelial dysfunction that increase the risk of vascular disease. Although it has been particularly challenging to study the genetic determinants that predispose to abnormal function of the endothelium in insulin-resistant states, the possibility of deriving endothelial cells from induced pluripotent stem cells generated from individuals with detailed clinical phenotyping, including accurate measurements of insulin resistance accompanied by multilevel omic data (eg, genetic and genomic characterization), has opened new avenues to study this relationship. Unfortunately, several technical barriers have hampered these efforts. In the present review, we summarize the current status of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells for modeling endothelial dysfunction associated with insulin resistance and discuss the challenges to overcoming these limitations. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. The expression of R genes in genetic and induced resistance to potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis (Wollenweber, 1923) Behrens, 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrova, V V; Matveeva, E M; Zinovieva, S V

    2015-01-01

    The characteristics of expression of two genes, H1 and Gro1-4, which determine the resistance to the sedentary parasitic nematode Globodera rostochiensis (Wollenweber, 1923) Behrens, 1975, in the resistant (Krepysh) and susceptible (Nevskii) potato cultivars was studied under a short-term exposure to low temperatures. Such treatment of susceptible plants at the early stages of ontogeny led to the activation of expression of H1 and Gro1-4 genes in roots and the H1 gene in leaves. The transcriptional activity of R genes was detected not only in roots but also in leaves (i.e., in tissue remote from the site of direct injury by the nematode) in the case of both genetic and induced resistance, indicating the development of a systemic defense response of plants to infection.

  13. When a Plant Resistance Inducer Leaves the Lab for the Field: Integrating ASM into Routine Apple Protection Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marolleau, Brice; Gaucher, Matthieu; Heintz, Christelle; Degrave, Alexandre; Warneys, Romain; Orain, Gilles; Lemarquand, Arnaud; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle

    2017-01-01

    Plant resistance inducers, also called elicitors, could be useful to reduce the use of pesticides. However, their performance in controlling diseases in the field remains unsatisfactory due to lack of specific knowledge of how they can integrate crop protection practices. In this work, we focused on apple crop and acibenzolar- S -methyl (ASM), a well-known SAR (systemic acquired resistance) inducer of numerous plant species. We provide a protocol for orchard-effective control of apple scab due to the ascomycete fungus Venturia inaequalis , by applying ASM in combination with a light integrated pest management program. Besides we pave the way for future optimization levers by demonstrating in controlled conditions (i) the high influence of apple genotypes, (ii) the ability of ASM to prime defenses in newly formed leaves, (iii) the positive effect of repeated elicitor applications, (iv) the additive effect of a thinning fruit agent.

  14. The effect of inter-set rest intervals on resistance exercise-induced muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henselmans, Menno; Schoenfeld, Brad J

    2014-12-01

    Due to a scarcity of longitudinal trials directly measuring changes in muscle girth, previous recommendations for inter-set rest intervals in resistance training programs designed to stimulate muscular hypertrophy were primarily based on the post-exercise endocrinological response and other mechanisms theoretically related to muscle growth. New research regarding the effects of inter-set rest interval manipulation on resistance training-induced muscular hypertrophy is reviewed here to evaluate current practices and provide directions for future research. Of the studies measuring long-term muscle hypertrophy in groups employing different rest intervals, none have found superior muscle growth in the shorter compared with the longer rest interval group and one study has found the opposite. Rest intervals less than 1 minute can result in acute increases in serum growth hormone levels and these rest intervals also decrease the serum testosterone to cortisol ratio. Long-term adaptations may abate the post-exercise endocrinological response and the relationship between the transient change in hormonal production and chronic muscular hypertrophy is highly contentious and appears to be weak. The relationship between the rest interval-mediated effect on immune system response, muscle damage, metabolic stress, or energy production capacity and muscle hypertrophy is still ambiguous and largely theoretical. In conclusion, the literature does not support the hypothesis that training for muscle hypertrophy requires shorter rest intervals than training for strength development or that predetermined rest intervals are preferable to auto-regulated rest periods in this regard.

  15. SOCS-1 deficiency does not prevent diet-induced insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emanuelli, Brice; Macotela, Yazmin; Boucher, Jérémie

    2008-01-01

    Obesity is associated with inflammation and increased expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins, which inhibit cytokine and insulin signaling. Thus, reducing SOCS expression could prevent the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance. Using SOCS-1 knockout mice, we...... investigated the contribution of SOCS-1 in the development of insulin resistance induced by a high-fat diet (HFD). SOCS-1 knockout mice on HFD gained 70% more weight, displayed a 2.3-fold increase in epididymal fat pads mass and increased hepatic lipid content. This was accompanied by increased mRNA expression...... of leptin and the macrophage marker CD68 in white adipose tissue and of SREBP1c and FAS in liver. HFD also induced hyperglycemia in SOCS-1 deficient mice with impairment of glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Thus, despite the role of SOCS proteins in obesity-related insulin resistance, SOCS-1 deficiency...

  16. GLUT4 and glycogen synthase are key players in bed rest-induced insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biensø, Rasmus Sjørup; Jørgensen, Stine Ringholm; Kiilerich, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms behind physical inactivity-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, 12 young, healthy male subjects completed 7 days of bed rest with vastus lateralis muscle biopsies obtained before and after. In six of the subjects, muscle biopsies were taken from both...... than before bed rest. This bed rest-induced insulin resistance occurred together with reduced muscle GLUT4, hexokinase II, protein kinase B/Akt1, and Akt2 protein level, and a tendency for reduced 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity. The ability of insulin to phosphorylate Akt and activate....... The present findings demonstrate that physical inactivity-induced insulin resistance in muscle is associated with lower content/activity of key proteins in glucose transport/phosphorylation and storage....

  17. Novel and Reversible Mechanisms of Smoking-Induced Insulin Resistance in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman, Bryan C.; Perreault, Leigh; Hunerdosse, Devon; Kerege, Anna; Playdon, Mary; Samek, Ali M.; Eckel, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is the most common cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in the United States, in part because it is an independent risk factor for the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, mechanisms responsible for smoking-induced insulin resistance are unclear. In this study, we found smokers were less insulin sensitive compared with controls, which increased after either 1 or 2 weeks of smoking cessation. Improvements in insulin sensitivity after smoking cessation...

  18. 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 regulates glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan, Stuart A

    2009-11-01

    Glucocorticoid excess is characterized by increased adiposity, skeletal myopathy, and insulin resistance, but the precise molecular mechanisms are unknown. Within skeletal muscle, 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) converts cortisone (11-dehydrocorticosterone in rodents) to active cortisol (corticosterone in rodents). We aimed to determine the mechanisms underpinning glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle and indentify how 11beta-HSD1 inhibitors improve insulin sensitivity.

  19. 76 FR 37356 - 2011 Scientific Meeting of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ... animal and retail sampling methods for the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS... Web site at http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/SafetyHealth/AntimicrobialResistance/National...] 2011 Scientific Meeting of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System; Public Meeting...

  20. Effects of vitamin D on insulin resistance and myosteatosis in diet-induced obese mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Benetti

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies pointed out to a strong association between vitamin D deficiency and type 2 diabetes prevalence. However, the role of vitamin D supplementation in the skeletal muscle, a tissue that play a crucial role in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis, has been scarcely investigated so far. On this basis, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of vitamin D supplementation in a murine model of diet-induced insulin resistance with particular attention to the effects evoked on the skeletal muscle. Male C57BL/6J mice (n = 40 were fed with a control or a High Fat-High Sugar (HFHS diet for 4 months. Subsets of animals were treated for 2 months with vitamin D (7 μg·kg-1, i.p. three times/week. HFHS diet induced body weight increase, hyperglycemia and impaired glucose tolerance. HFHS animals showed an impaired insulin signaling and a marked fat accumulation in the skeletal muscle. Vitamin D reduced body weight and improved systemic glucose tolerance. In addition, vitamin D restored the impaired muscle insulin signaling and reverted myosteatosis evoked by the diet. These effects were associated to decreased activation of NF-κB and lower levels of TNF-alpha. Consistently, a significantly decreased activation of the SCAP/SREBP lipogenic pathway and lower levels of CML protein adducts and RAGE expression were observed in skeletal muscle of animals treated with vitamin D. Collectively, these data indicate that vitamin D-induced selective inhibition of signaling pathways (including NF-κB, SCAP/SREBP and CML/RAGE cascades within the skeletal muscle significantly contributed to the beneficial effects of vitamin D supplementation against diet-induced metabolic derangements.

  1. Vitamin C deficiency aggravates tumor necrosis factor α-induced insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Zhou; Xiao-Hui, Wu; Xi-Mei, Wu; Chao-Chun, Zou

    2018-06-15

    Chronic low-grade inflammation plays a major role in the development of insulin resistance. The potential role and underlying mechanism of vitamin C, an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent, was investigated in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced insulin resistance. Gulonolactone oxidase knockout (Gulo -/- ) mice genetically unable to synthesize vitamin C were used to induce insulin resistance by continuously pumping small doses of TNF-α for seven days, and human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2 cells) were used to induce insulin resistance by treatment with TNF-α. Vitamin C deficiency aggravated TNF-α-induced insulin resistance in Gulo -/- mice, resulting in worse glucose tolerance test (GTT) results, higher fasting plasma insulin level, and the inactivation of the protein kinase B (AKT)/glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) pathway in the liver. Vitamin C deficiency also worsened liver lipid accumulation and inflammation in TNF-α-treated Gulo -/- mice. In HepG2 cells, vitamin C reversed the TNF-α-induced reduction of glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, which were mediated by increasing GLUT2 levels and the activation of the insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1)/AKT/GSK3β pathway. Furthermore, vitamin C inhibited the TNF-α-induced activation of not only the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs), but also nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling. Taken together, vitamin C is essential for preventing and improving insulin resistance, and the supplementing with vitamin C may be an effective therapeutic intervention for metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A human model of dietary saturated fatty acid induced insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koska, Juraj; Ozias, Marlies K; Deer, James; Kurtz, Julie; Salbe, Arline D; Harman, S Mitchell; Reaven, Peter D

    2016-11-01

    Increased consumption of high-fat diets is associated with the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Current models to study the mechanisms of high-fat diet-induced IR in humans are limited by their long duration or low efficacy. In the present study we developed and characterized an acute dietary model of saturated fatty acid-enriched diet induced insulin resistance. High caloric diets enriched with saturated fatty acids (SFA) or carbohydrates (CARB) were evaluated in subjects with normal and impaired glucose tolerance (NGT or IGT). Both diets were compared to a standard eucaloric American Heart Association (AHA) control diet in a series of crossover studies. Whole body insulin resistance was estimated as steady state plasma glucose (SSPG) concentrations during the last 30min of a 3-h insulin suppression test. SSPG was increased after a 24-h SFA diet (by 83±74% vs. control, n=38) in the entire cohort, which was comprised of participants with NGT (92±82%, n=22) or IGT (65±55%, n=16) (all pinsulin resistance in both NGT and IGT subjects. Insulin resistance persisted overnight after the last SFA meal and was attenuated by one day of a healthy diet. This model offers opportunities for identifying early mechanisms and potential treatments of dietary saturated fat induced insulin resistance. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. High-Intensity Interval Training Attenuates Insulin Resistance Induced by Sleep Deprivation in Healthy Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Jorge F T; Dáttilo, Murilo; de Mello, Marco T; Tufik, Sergio; Antunes, Hanna K M

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Sleep deprivation can impair several physiological systems and recently, new evidence has pointed to the relationship between a lack of sleep and carbohydrate metabolism, consequently resulting in insulin resistance. To minimize this effect, High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) is emerging as a potential strategy. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of HIIT on insulin resistance induced by sleep deprivation. Method: Eleven healthy male volunteers were recruited, aged 18-35 years, who declared taking 7-8 h sleep per night. All volunteers were submitted to four different conditions: a single night of regular sleep (RS condition), 24 h of total sleep deprivation ( SD condition), HIIT training followed by regular sleep (HIIT+RS condition), and HIIT training followed by 24 h of total sleep deprivation (HIIT+ SD condition). They performed six training sessions over 2 weeks and each session consisted of 8-12 × 60 s intervals at 100% of peak power output. In each experimental condition, tests for glucose, insulin, cortisol, free fatty acids, and insulin sensitivity, measured by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), were performed. Results: Sleep deprivation increased glycaemia and insulin levels, as well as the area under the curve. Furthermore, an increase in free fatty acids concentrations and basal metabolism was observed. There were no differences in the concentrations of cortisol. However, HIIT before 24 h of sleep deprivation attenuated the increase of glucose, insulin, and free fatty acids. Conclusion: Twenty-four hours of sleep deprivation resulted in acute insulin resistance. However, HIIT is an effective strategy to minimize the deleterious effects promoted by this condition.

  4. High-Intensity Interval Training Attenuates Insulin Resistance Induced by Sleep Deprivation in Healthy Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge F. T. de Souza

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sleep deprivation can impair several physiological systems and recently, new evidence has pointed to the relationship between a lack of sleep and carbohydrate metabolism, consequently resulting in insulin resistance. To minimize this effect, High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT is emerging as a potential strategy.Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of HIIT on insulin resistance induced by sleep deprivation.Method: Eleven healthy male volunteers were recruited, aged 18–35 years, who declared taking 7–8 h sleep per night. All volunteers were submitted to four different conditions: a single night of regular sleep (RS condition, 24 h of total sleep deprivation (SD condition, HIIT training followed by regular sleep (HIIT+RS condition, and HIIT training followed by 24 h of total sleep deprivation (HIIT+SD condition. They performed six training sessions over 2 weeks and each session consisted of 8–12 × 60 s intervals at 100% of peak power output. In each experimental condition, tests for glucose, insulin, cortisol, free fatty acids, and insulin sensitivity, measured by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, were performed.Results: Sleep deprivation increased glycaemia and insulin levels, as well as the area under the curve. Furthermore, an increase in free fatty acids concentrations and basal metabolism was observed. There were no differences in the concentrations of cortisol. However, HIIT before 24 h of sleep deprivation attenuated the increase of glucose, insulin, and free fatty acids.Conclusion: Twenty-four hours of sleep deprivation resulted in acute insulin resistance. However, HIIT is an effective strategy to minimize the deleterious effects promoted by this condition.

  5. High-Intensity Interval Training Attenuates Insulin Resistance Induced by Sleep Deprivation in Healthy Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Jorge F. T.; Dáttilo, Murilo; de Mello, Marco T.; Tufik, Sergio; Antunes, Hanna K. M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Sleep deprivation can impair several physiological systems and recently, new evidence has pointed to the relationship between a lack of sleep and carbohydrate metabolism, consequently resulting in insulin resistance. To minimize this effect, High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) is emerging as a potential strategy. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of HIIT on insulin resistance induced by sleep deprivation. Method: Eleven healthy male volunteers were recruited, aged 18–35 years, who declared taking 7–8 h sleep per night. All volunteers were submitted to four different conditions: a single night of regular sleep (RS condition), 24 h of total sleep deprivation (SD condition), HIIT training followed by regular sleep (HIIT+RS condition), and HIIT training followed by 24 h of total sleep deprivation (HIIT+SD condition). They performed six training sessions over 2 weeks and each session consisted of 8–12 × 60 s intervals at 100% of peak power output. In each experimental condition, tests for glucose, insulin, cortisol, free fatty acids, and insulin sensitivity, measured by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), were performed. Results: Sleep deprivation increased glycaemia and insulin levels, as well as the area under the curve. Furthermore, an increase in free fatty acids concentrations and basal metabolism was observed. There were no differences in the concentrations of cortisol. However, HIIT before 24 h of sleep deprivation attenuated the increase of glucose, insulin, and free fatty acids. Conclusion: Twenty-four hours of sleep deprivation resulted in acute insulin resistance. However, HIIT is an effective strategy to minimize the deleterious effects promoted by this condition. PMID:29270126

  6. Blast resistance of space-induced variants derived from rice cultivar Hanghui 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingxin; Yang Qiyun; Zhu Xiaoyuan; Wang Hui; Zeng Liexian; Liu Yongzhu; Guo Tao; Chen Zhiqiang

    2010-01-01

    To screen the resistance lines to rice blast, the blast resistance of SP 3 and SP 4 progenies derived from rice variety Hanghui 7 were evaluated after satellite flight, and the genomic DNA polymorphism of the resistant variants selected from SP 3 was compared with the wild type by microsatellite markers. The results indicated that the SP 3 Variant line H24, which was selected from the 250 space-induced lines ( SP 3 ) with excellent agronomic and economical characters, showed resistance segregation (119R : 108S) against blast isolate GD3286. It was demonstrated that the resistance of H24 might be controlled by two dominant and complementary resistance genes. The resistance of H24 was still segregated in SP 4 , but the resistance spectrum of H24 was 84. 4% in SP 5 , much higher than the wild type, 40. 6%, and H24 especially showed resistant against some blast isolates of broad pathogenic spectrum or specialized pathogenicity; further more, the DNA polymorphism wasn't detected between H24 and its wild type by 229 SSR (simple sequence repeat) markers covering the rice genome equally. (authors)

  7. Bias voltage induced resistance switching effect in single-molecule magnets' tunneling junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengzhong; Jiang, Liang

    2014-09-12

    An electric-pulse-induced reversible resistance change effect in a molecular magnetic tunneling junction, consisting of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) sandwiched in one nonmagnetic and one ferromagnetic electrode, is theoretically investigated. By applying a time-varying bias voltage, the SMM's spin orientation can be manipulated with large bias voltage pulses. Moreover, the different magnetic configuration at high-resistance/low-resistance states can be 'read out' by utilizing relative low bias voltage. This device scheme can be implemented with current technologies (Khajetoorians et al 2013 Science 339 55) and has potential application in molecular spintronics and high-density nonvolatile memory devices.

  8. Bias voltage induced resistance switching effect in single-molecule magnets’ tunneling junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengzhong; Jiang, Liang

    2014-09-01

    An electric-pulse-induced reversible resistance change effect in a molecular magnetic tunneling junction, consisting of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) sandwiched in one nonmagnetic and one ferromagnetic electrode, is theoretically investigated. By applying a time-varying bias voltage, the SMM's spin orientation can be manipulated with large bias voltage pulses. Moreover, the different magnetic configuration at high-resistance/low-resistance states can be ‘read out’ by utilizing relative low bias voltage. This device scheme can be implemented with current technologies (Khajetoorians et al 2013 Science 339 55) and has potential application in molecular spintronics and high-density nonvolatile memory devices.

  9. Induced resistance to hydrogen peroxide, UV and gamma radiation in bacillus species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashandy, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    The catalase activity produced in four bacillus spp.(bacillus cereus, B. laterosporus, B. pumilus and B. subtilis (Escherichia coli was used for comparison) was measured and the sensitivity of these bacteria to hydrogen peroxide was tested. Bacillus spp. had higher resistance to hydrogen peroxide than E. coil. cultures of bacillus spp . When pretreated with sublethal level of hydrogen peroxide, became relatively resistant to the lethal effects of hydrogen than untreated control cultures. These pretreated cells were also resistant to lethality mediated by UV light and gamma radiation. The obtained results suggest that bacillus spp. Possess inducible defense mechanism (s) against the deleterious effects of oxidants and /or ionizing radiation

  10. Evolution of high yielding chickpea varieties, having improved plant type and disease resistance, through induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq, M.; Hussan, M.; Haq, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    The breeding programme on the use of induced mutations, in chickpea for genetic variability for better plant type, grain yield and disease resistance has been started. The chickpea mutant variety is one of the leading varieties being extensively grown throughout Pakistan and has played its role in stabilizing the chickpea production in the country. Four chickpea varieties were treated, each with two dosed of gamma rays. The main purpose of the mutagenic treatment of these varieties/cultivars, was induce multiple resistance. (A.B.)

  11. Different Proteomics of Ca2+ on SA-induced Resistance to Botrytis cinerea in Tomato

    OpenAIRE

    Linlin Li; Peng Guo; Hua Jin; Tianlai Li

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to comprehensively study the effects of Ca2+ on the SA-induced resistance Botrytis cinerea in tomato through proteomics analysis. A proteomic approach was used to uncover the inducible proteins of tomato in the susceptible tomato cultivars ‘L402’ against Botrytis cinerea after salicylic acid (SA) and a combination treatment of CaCl2 and SA. The results showed that the use of combination treatment of CaCl2 and SA significantly enhanced tomato resistance against Botrytis cinerea...

  12. Progress toward overcoming hypoxia-induced resistance to solid tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakashev, Sergey V; Reginato, Mauricio J

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic tumors are associated with poor clinical outcome for multiple types of human cancer. This may be due, in part, to hypoxic cancer cells being resistant to anticancer therapy, including radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Hypoxia inducible factor 1, a major regulator of cellular response to hypoxia, regulates the expression of genes that are involved in multiple aspects of cancer biology, including cell survival, proliferation, metabolism, invasion, and angiogenesis. Here, we review multiple pathways regulated by hypoxia/hypoxia inducible factor 1 in cancer cells and discuss the latest advancements in overcoming hypoxia-mediated tumor resistance

  13. Melatonin Modulates Neuronal Cell Death Induced by Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress under Insulin Resistance Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juhyun; Kim, Oh Yoen

    2017-06-10

    Insulin resistance (IR) is an important stress factor in the central nervous system, thereby aggravating neuropathogenesis and triggering cognitive decline. Melatonin, which is an antioxidant phytochemical and synthesized by the pineal gland, has multiple functions in cellular responses such as apoptosis and survival against stress. This study investigated whether melatonin modulates the signaling of neuronal cell death induced by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress under IR condition using SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Apoptosis cell death signaling markers (cleaved Poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP), p53, and Bax) and ER stress markers (phosphorylated eIF2α (p-eIF2α), ATF4, CHOP, p-IRE1 , and spliced XBP1 (sXBP1)) were measured using reverse transcription-PCR, quantitative PCR, and western blottings. Immunofluorescence staining was also performed for p-ASK1 and p-IRE1 . The mRNA or protein expressions of cell death signaling markers and ER stress markers were increased under IR condition, but significantly attenuated by melatonin treatment. Insulin-induced activation of ASK1 ( p-ASK1 ) was also dose dependently attenuated by melatonin treatment. The regulatory effect of melatonin on neuronal cells under IR condition was associated with ASK1 signaling. In conclusion, the result suggested that melatonin may alleviate ER stress under IR condition, thereby regulating neuronal cell death signaling.

  14. Resistance to antitumor chemotherapy due to bounded-noise-induced transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onofrio, Alberto; Gandolfi, Alberto

    2010-12-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is a landmark of solid tumor development, but it is also directly relevant to chemotherapy. Indeed, the density and quality of neovessels may influence the effectiveness of therapies based on blood-born agents. In this paper, first we define a deterministic model of antiproliferative chemotherapy in which the drug efficacy is a unimodal function of vessel density, and then we show that under constant continuous infusion therapy the tumor-vessel system may be multistable. However, the actual drug concentration profiles are affected by bounded even if possibly large fluctuations. Through numerical simulations, we show that the tumor volume may undergo transitions to the higher equilibrium value induced by the bounded noise. In case of periodically delivered boli-based chemotherapy, we model the fluctuations due to time variability of both the drug clearance rate and the distribution volume, as well as those due to irregularities in drug delivery. We observed noise-induced transitions also in case of periodic delivering. By applying a time dense scheduling with constant average delivered drug (metronomic scheduling), we observed an easier suppression of the transitions. Finally, we propose to interpret the above phenomena as an unexpected non-genetic kind of resistance to chemotherapy.

  15. TNFα-Induced Mucin 4 Expression Elicits Trastuzumab Resistance in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercogliano, María F; De Martino, Mara; Venturutti, Leandro; Rivas, Martín A; Proietti, Cecilia J; Inurrigarro, Gloria; Frahm, Isabel; Allemand, Daniel H; Deza, Ernesto Gil; Ares, Sandra; Gercovich, Felipe G; Guzmán, Pablo; Roa, Juan C; Elizalde, Patricia V; Schillaci, Roxana

    2017-02-01

    Although trastuzumab administration improved the outcome of HER2-positive breast cancer patients, resistance events hamper its clinical benefits. We demonstrated that TNFα stimulation in vitro induces trastuzumab resistance in HER2-positive breast cancer cell lines. Here, we explored the mechanism of TNFα-induced trastuzumab resistance and the therapeutic strategies to overcome it. Trastuzumab-sensitive breast cancer cells, genetically engineered to stably overexpress TNFα, and de novo trastuzumab-resistant tumors, were used to evaluate trastuzumab response and TNFα-blocking antibodies effectiveness respectively. Immunohistochemistry and antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC), together with siRNA strategy, were used to explore TNFα influence on the expression and function of its downstream target, mucin 4 (MUC4). The clinical relevance of MUC4 expression was studied in a cohort of 78 HER2-positive breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant trastuzumab. TNFα overexpression turned trastuzumab-sensitive cells and tumors into resistant ones. Histopathologic findings revealed mucin foci in TNFα-producing tumors. TNFα induced upregulation of MUC4 that reduced trastuzumab binding to its epitope and impaired ADCC. Silencing MUC4 enhanced trastuzumab binding, increased ADCC, and overcame trastuzumab and trastuzumab-emtansine antiproliferative effects in TNFα-overexpressing cells. Accordingly, administration of TNFα-blocking antibodies downregulated MUC4 and sensitized de novo trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer cells and tumors to trastuzumab. In HER2-positive breast cancer samples, MUC4 expression was found to be an independent predictor of poor disease-free survival (P = 0.008). We identified TNFα-induced MUC4 expression as a novel trastuzumab resistance mechanism. We propose MUC4 expression as a predictive biomarker of trastuzumab efficacy and a guide to combination therapy of TNFα-blocking antibodies with trastuzumab. Clin Cancer Res; 23(3); 636-48.

  16. Flaxseed Oil Alleviates Chronic HFD-Induced Insulin Resistance through Remodeling Lipid Homeostasis in Obese Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Tang, Yuhan; Liu, Peiyi; Xiao, Lin; Liu, Liegang; Shen, Ruiling; Deng, Qianchun; Yao, Ping

    2017-11-08

    Emerging evidence suggests that higher circulating long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3PUFA) levels were intimately associated with lower prevalence of obesity and insulin resistance. However, the understanding of bioactivity and potential mechanism of α-linolenic acid-rich flaxseed oil (ALA-FO) against insulin resistance was still limited. This study evaluated the effect of FO on high-fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance in C57BL/6J mice focused on adipose tissue lipolysis. Mice after HFD feeding for 16 weeks (60% fat-derived calories) exhibited systemic insulin resistance, which was greatly attenuated by medium dose of FO (M-FO), paralleling with differential accumulation of ALA and its n-3 derivatives across serum lipid fractions. Moreover, M-FO was sufficient to effectively block the metabolic activation of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), thereby improving adipose tissue insulin signaling. Importantly, suppression of hypoxia-inducible factors HIF-1α and HIF-2α were involved in FO-mediated modulation of adipose tissue lipolysis, accompanied by specific reconstitution of n-3PUFA within adipose tissue lipid fractions.

  17. Control system of power supply for resistance welding machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Світлана Костянтинівна Поднебенна

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the existing methods of heat energy stabilizing, which are realized in thyristor power supplies for resistance welding machines. The advantages and features of thyristor power supplies have been described. A control system of power supply for resistance welding machine with stabilization of heat energy in a welding spot has been developed. Measurements are performed in primary winding of a welding transformer. Weld spot heating energy is calculated as the difference between the energy, consumed from the mains, and the energy losses in the primary and secondary circuits of the welding transformer as well as the energy losses in the transformer core. Algorithms of digital signal processing of the developed control system are described in the article. All measurements and calculations are preformed automatically in real-time. Input signals to the control system are: transformer primary voltage and current, temperature of the welding circuit. The designed control system ensures control of the welding heat energy and is not influenced by the supply voltage and impedance changes caused by insertion of the ferromagnetic mass in the welding circuit, the temperature change during the welding process. The developed control system for resistance welding machine makes it possible to improve the quality of welded joints, increase the efficiency of the resistance welding machine

  18. Pathophysiology of Resistant Hypertension: The Role of Sympathetic Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas Tsioufis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistant hypertension (RH is a powerful risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Among the characteristics of patients with RH, obesity, obstructive sleep apnea, and aldosterone excess are covering a great area of the mosaic of RH phenotype. Increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS activity is present in all these underlying conditions, supporting its crucial role in the pathophysiology of antihypertensive treatment resistance. Current clinical and experimental knowledge points towards an impact of several factors on SNS activation, namely, insulin resistance, adipokines, endothelial dysfunction, cyclic intermittent hypoxaemia, aldosterone effects on central nervous system, chemoreceptors, and baroreceptors dysregulation. The further investigation and understanding of the mechanisms leading to SNS activation could reveal novel therapeutic targets and expand our treatment options in the challenging management of RH.

  19. Silvicultural Attempts to Induce Browse Resistance in Conifer Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce A. Kimball

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A multiyear study was conducted to determine if soil amendment combined with topical application of elemental sulfur could be employed to reduce deer browse damage to four conifer species. Fertilizer and sulfur were applied to conifer seedlings at seven sites near Corvallis, OR. Growth and browse damage data were collected for all seedlings over a period of 17 months. Additionally, foliar concentrations of monoterpenes and simple carbohydrates were assessed in western redcedar (Thuja plicata seedlings over a period of three years. Fertilization and sulfur treatments had a moderate impact on growth and no influence on browse damage or the chemical responses. Over the course of the study, browse damage diminished while foliar monoterpene concentrations increased in redcedar. It appears that silvicultural manipulation via sulfur application and/or soil amendment cannot accelerate or alter the ontogenetical changes that may naturally defend seedlings against mammalian herbivores. In a brief trial with captive deer, redcedar browse resistance was influenced by seedling maturation, but not monoterpene content. Other maturation effects may yield significant browse protection to young seedlings.

  20. Chemical products induce resistance to Xanthomonas perforans in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Terumi Itako

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial spot of tomato, caused by Xanthomonas spp., is a very important disease, especially in the hot and humid periods of the year. The chemical control of the disease has not been very effective for a number of reasons. This study aimed to evaluate, under greenhouse conditions, the efficacy of leaf-spraying chemicals (acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM (0.025 g.L−1, fluazinam (0.25 g.L−1, pyraclostrobin (0.08 g.L−1, pyraclostrobin + methiran (0.02 g.L−1 + 2.2 g.L−1, copper oxychloride (1.50 g.L−1, mancozeb + copper oxychloride (0.88 g.L−1 + 0.60 g.L−1, and oxytetracycline (0.40 g.L−1 on control of bacterial spot. Tomatoes Santa Clara and Gisele cultivars were pulverized 3 days before inoculation with Xanthomonas perforans. The production of enzymes associated with resistance induction (peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, β-1,3-glucanase, and protease was quantified from leaf samples collected 24 hours before and 24 hours after chemical spraying and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 days after bacterial inoculation. All products tested controlled bacterial spot, but only ASM, pyraclostrobin, and pyraclostrobin + metiram increased the production of peroxidase in the leaves of the two tomato cultivars, and increased the production of polyphenol oxidase and β-1,3-glucanase in the Santa Clara cultivar.

  1. Chemical products induce resistance to Xanthomonas perforans in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itako, Adriana Terumi; Tolentino Júnior, João Batista; Silva Júnior, Tadeu Antônio Fernandes da; Soman, José Marcelo; Maringoni, Antonio Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial spot of tomato, caused by Xanthomonas spp., is a very important disease, especially in the hot and humid periods of the year. The chemical control of the disease has not been very effective for a number of reasons. This study aimed to evaluate, under greenhouse conditions, the efficacy of leaf-spraying chemicals (acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM) (0.025 g.L(-1)), fluazinam (0.25 g.L(-1)), pyraclostrobin (0.08 g.L(-1)), pyraclostrobin + methiran (0.02 g.L(-1) + 2.2 g.L(-1)), copper oxychloride (1.50 g.L(-1)), mancozeb + copper oxychloride (0.88 g.L(-1) + 0.60 g.L(-1)), and oxytetracycline (0.40 g.L(-1))) on control of bacterial spot. Tomatoes Santa Clara and Gisele cultivars were pulverized 3 days before inoculation with Xanthomonas perforans. The production of enzymes associated with resistance induction (peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, β-1,3-glucanase, and protease) was quantified from leaf samples collected 24 hours before and 24 hours after chemical spraying and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 days after bacterial inoculation. All products tested controlled bacterial spot, but only ASM, pyraclostrobin, and pyraclostrobin + metiram increased the production of peroxidase in the leaves of the two tomato cultivars, and increased the production of polyphenol oxidase and β-1,3-glucanase in the Santa Clara cultivar.

  2. Systems biology analysis of mitogen activated protein kinase inhibitor resistance in malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecena, Helma; Tveit, Daniel; Wang, Zi; Farhat, Ahmed; Panchal, Parvita; Liu, Jing; Singh, Simar J; Sanghera, Amandeep; Bainiwal, Ajay; Teo, Shuan Y; Meyskens, Frank L; Liu-Smith, Feng; Filipp, Fabian V

    2018-04-04

    Kinase inhibition in the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is a standard therapy for cancer patients with activating BRAF mutations. However, the anti-tumorigenic effect and clinical benefit are only transient, and tumors are prone to treatment resistance and relapse. To elucidate mechanistic insights into drug resistance, we have established an in vitro cellular model of MAPK inhibitor resistance in malignant melanoma. The cellular model evolved in response to clinical dosage of the BRAF inhibitor, vemurafenib, PLX4032. We conducted transcriptomic expression profiling using RNA-Seq and RT-qPCR arrays. Pathways of melanogenesis, MAPK signaling, cell cycle, and metabolism were significantly enriched among the set of differentially expressed genes of vemurafenib-resistant cells vs control. The underlying mechanism of treatment resistance and pathway rewiring was uncovered to be based on non-genomic adaptation and validated in two distinct melanoma models, SK-MEL-28 and A375. Both cell lines have activating BRAF mutations and display metastatic potential. Downregulation of dual specific phosphatases, tumor suppressors, and negative MAPK regulators reengages mitogenic signaling. Upregulation of growth factors, cytokines, and cognate receptors triggers signaling pathways circumventing BRAF blockage. Further, changes in amino acid and one-carbon metabolism support cellular proliferation despite MAPK inhibitor treatment. In addition, treatment-resistant cells upregulate pigmentation and melanogenesis, pathways which partially overlap with MAPK signaling. Upstream regulator analysis discovered significant perturbation in oncogenic forkhead box and hypoxia inducible factor family transcription factors. The established cellular models offer mechanistic insight into cellular changes and therapeutic targets under inhibitor resistance in malignant melanoma. At a systems biology level, the MAPK pathway undergoes major rewiring while acquiring inhibitor resistance

  3. The role of autophagy in THP-1 macrophages resistance to HIV- vpr-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hua-ying, E-mail: zhouhuaying_2004@126.com; Zheng, Yu-huang; He, Yan; Chen, Zi; He, Bo

    2017-02-01

    Macrophages are resistant to cell death and are one of HIV reservoirs. HIV viral protein Vpr has the potential to promote infection of and survival of macrophages, which could be a highly significant factor in the development and/or maintenance of macrophage viral reservoirs. However, the impact of vpr on macrophages resistance to apoptosis is yet to be comprehended. Autophagy is a cell survival mechanism under stress state. In this study, we investigated whether autophagy is involved in macrophages resistant to vpr-induced apoptosis. Using the THP1 macrophages, we studied the interconnection between macrophages resistance to apoptosis and autophagy. We found that vpr is able to trigger autophagy in transfected THP-1 macrophages confirmed by electron microscopy (EM) and western blot analysis, and inhibition of autophagy with 3MA increased vpr-induced apoptosis. The results indicate that autophagy may be responsible for maintenance of macrophage HIV reservoirs. - Highlights: • HIV Vpr is able to trigger autophagy in transfected THP-1 macrophages. • Autophagy inhibition increases vpr-transfected THP1-macrophages apoptosis. • Autophagy is involved in THP-1 macrophages resistant to vpr-induced apoptosis.

  4. Technical features to enhance proliferation resistance of nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    It is generally accepted that proliferation resistance is an essential issue for the continued development and sustainability of nuclear energy. Several comprehensive assessment activities on the proliferation resistance of the nuclear fuel cycle have previously been completed, notably the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE) carried out under the auspices of the IAEA, and the Non-proliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) review carried out by the USA. There have been, however, relatively few comprehensive treatments of the issue following these efforts in the 1970s. However, interest in and concern about this issue have increased recently, particularly because of greater interest in innovative nuclear fuel cycles and systems. In 2000, the IAEA initiated the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) and the US Department of Energy initiated the Generation IV International Forum (GIF). These projects are aimed at the selection and development of concepts of innovative nuclear energy systems and fuel cycles. Proliferation resistance is one of the fundamental considerations for both projects. In this context, the IAEA in 2001 initiated a study entitled 'Technical Aspects of Increasing Proliferation Resistance of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle'. This task is not intended as an effort to assess the merits of a particular fuel cycle system for the future, but to describe a qualitative framework for an examination of the proliferation resistance provided by the intrinsic features of an innovative nuclear energy system and fuel cycle. This task also seeks to provide a high level survey of a variety of innovative nuclear energy systems and fuel cycles with respect to that framework. The concept of proliferation resistance is considered in terms of intrinsic features and extrinsic measures. The intrinsic features, sometimes referred to as the physical/technical aspects, are those features that result from the

  5. Unaltered Prion Pathogenesis in a Mouse Model of High-Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caihong Zhu

    Full Text Available Epidemiological, clinical, and experimental animal studies suggest a strong correlation between insulin resistance and Alzheimer's disease. In fact, type-2 diabetes is considered an important risk factor of developing Alzheimer's disease. In addition, impaired insulin signaling in the Alzheimer's disease brain may promote Aβ production, impair Aβ clearance and induce tau hyperphosphorylation, thereby leading to deterioration of the disease. The pathological prion protein, PrPSc, deposits in the form of extracellular aggregates and leads to dementia, raising the question as to whether prion pathogenesis may also be affected by insulin resistance. We therefore established high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance in tga20 mice, which overexpress the prion protein. We then inoculated the insulin-resistant mice with prions. We found that insulin resistance in tga20 mice did not affect prion disease progression, PrPSc deposition, astrogliosis or microglial activation, and had no effect on survival. Our study demonstrates that in a mouse model, insulin resistance does not significantly contribute to prion pathogenesis.

  6. Carcinogen-induced mdr overexpression is associated with xenobiotic resistance in rat preneoplastic liver nodules and hepatocellular carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, C R; Ivy, S P; Rushmore, T; Lee, G; Koo, P; Goldsmith, M E; Myers, C E; Farber, E; Cowan, K H

    1987-11-01

    We have previously reported the isolation of a human breast cancer cell line resistant to doxorubicin (adriamycin; AdrR MCF-7 cells) that has also developed the phenotype of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR in this cell line is associated with increased expression of mdr (P glycoprotein) gene sequences. The development of MDR in AdrR MCF-7 cells is also associated with changes in the expression of several phase I and phase II drug-detoxifying enzymes. These changes are remarkably similar to those associated with development of xenobiotic resistance in rat hyperplastic liver nodules, a well-studied model system of chemical carcinogenesis. Using an mdr-encoded cDNA sequence isolated from AdrR MCF-7 cells, we have examined the expression of mdr sequences in rat livers under a variety of experimental conditions. The expression of mdr increased 3-fold in regenerating liver. It was also elevated (3- to 12-fold) in several different samples of rat hyperplastic nodules and in four of five hepatomas that developed in this system. This suggests that overexpression of mdr, a gene previously associated with resistance to antineoplastic agents, may also be involved in the development of resistance to xenobiotics in rat hyperplastic nodules. In addition, although the acute administration of 2-acetylaminofluorene induced an 8-fold increase in hepatic mdr-encoded RNA, performance of a partial hepatectomy either before or after administration of 2-acetylaminofluorene resulted in a greater than 80-fold increase in mdr gene expression over that in normal untreated livers. This represents an important in vivo model system in which to study the acute regulation of this drug resistance gene.

  7. A dual resistance gene system prevents infection by three distinct pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narusaka, Mari; Kubo, Yasuyuki; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Iwabuchi, Masaki; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2009-10-01

    Colletotrichum higginsianum causes typical anthracnose lesions on the leaves, petioles, and stems of cruciferous plants. Inoculation of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia leaves with C. higginsianum results in fungal growth and disease symptoms reminiscent of those induced in other cruciferous plants. We performed map-based cloning and natural variation analysis of 19 A. thaliana ecotypes to identify a dominant resistance locus against C. higginsianum. We found that the A. thaliana RCH2 (for recognition of C. higginsianum) locus encodes two NB-LRR proteins, both of which are required for resistance to C. higginsianum in the A. thaliana ecotype Ws-0. Both proteins are well-characterized R proteins involved in resistance against bacterial pathogens; RRS1 (resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum 1) confers resistance to strain Rs1000 of R. solanacearum and RPS4 to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 expressing avrRps4 (Pst-avrRps4). Furthermore, we found that both RRS1-Ws and RPS4-Ws genes are required for resistance to Pst-avrRps4 and to Rs1002 R. solanacearum. We therefore demonstrate that a pair of neighboring genes, RRS1-Ws and RPS4-Ws, function cooperatively as a dual R-gene system against at least three distinct pathogens.

  8. Ghrelin- and GH-induced insulin resistance: no association with retinol-binding protein-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Esben Thyssen; Krag, Morten B; Poulsen, Morten M

    2013-01-01

    Supraphysiological levels of ghrelin and GH induce insulin resistance. Serum levels of retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) correlate inversely with insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes. We aimed to determine whether ghrelin and GH affect RBP4 levels in human subjects....

  9. Induced disease resistance of satsuma mandarings against penicillium digitatum by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Rae Dong

    2017-01-01

    Gamma irradiation, which is a type of ionizing radiation, can be used as a fruit inducible factor. In the present study, the effects of gamma irradiation on the resistance of mandarin fruits against Penicillium digitatum, the causal agent of postharvest green mold disease, were investigated. Pretreatment of a low dose of gamma irradiation effectively reduced the disease incidence and lesion diameter of mandarin fruits inoculated with P. digatatum during storage for 14 d. Interestingly, exposed to 400 Gy of gamma irradiation significantly maintained firmness and stimulated the synthesis of defense-related enzymes, (e.g., β-1,3-glucanase, phenylalanine, peroxidase, and polyphenol oxidase) and pathogenesis-related (PR) genes (e.g., PR-1 and PR-2). Therefore, the gamma irradiation-induced resistance against P. digatatum involves both changes of phenolic compounds and the induction of expression of defense-related genes. In addition, scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed that induced disease resistance by gamma irradiation signifcantly inhibits the growth of P. digatatum in mandarin fruits. These results suggest that the exposure of gamma irradiation is a potential methods for inducing the disease resistance of fruit to postharvest fungal pathogens and for extending the postharvest life of mandarin fruit

  10. Bio-based resistance inducers for sustainable plant protection against pathogens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burketová, Lenka; Trdá, Lucie; Ott, P.G.; Valentová, O.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 6 (2015), s. 994-1004 ISSN 0734-9750 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14056 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Induced resistance * Elicitor * Chitosan Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection Impact factor: 9.848, year: 2015

  11. Model of parameters controlling resistance of pipeline steels to hydrogen-induced cracking

    KAUST Repository

    Traidia, Abderrazak; El-Sherik, A. M.; Duval, Sé bastien; Lubineau, Gilles; El Yagoubi, Jalal

    2014-01-01

    NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 standard provides test conditions and acceptance criteria to evaluate the resistance of carbon and low-alloy steels to hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC). The second option proposed by this standard offers a large flexibility

  12. Continuous administration of an elemental diet induces insulin resistance in neonatal pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    We previously showed that total parenteral nutrition (TPN) compared to intermittent enteral feeding of a milk-based formula induces insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in neonatal pigs. We hypothesized that intravenous (IV) feeding rather than the nature of the diet (elemental vs polymeric) or ...

  13. Induced disease resistance of satsuma mandarings against penicillium digitatum by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Rae Dong [Dept. of Applied Biology, Institute of Environmentally Friendly Agriculture, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Gamma irradiation, which is a type of ionizing radiation, can be used as a fruit inducible factor. In the present study, the effects of gamma irradiation on the resistance of mandarin fruits against Penicillium digitatum, the causal agent of postharvest green mold disease, were investigated. Pretreatment of a low dose of gamma irradiation effectively reduced the disease incidence and lesion diameter of mandarin fruits inoculated with P. digatatum during storage for 14 d. Interestingly, exposed to 400 Gy of gamma irradiation significantly maintained firmness and stimulated the synthesis of defense-related enzymes, (e.g., β-1,3-glucanase, phenylalanine, peroxidase, and polyphenol oxidase) and pathogenesis-related (PR) genes (e.g., PR-1 and PR-2). Therefore, the gamma irradiation-induced resistance against P. digatatum involves both changes of phenolic compounds and the induction of expression of defense-related genes. In addition, scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed that induced disease resistance by gamma irradiation signifcantly inhibits the growth of P. digatatum in mandarin fruits. These results suggest that the exposure of gamma irradiation is a potential methods for inducing the disease resistance of fruit to postharvest fungal pathogens and for extending the postharvest life of mandarin fruit.

  14. Genetic disassociation of autoimmunity and resistance to costimulation blockade-induced transplantation tolerance in nonobese diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Todd; Markees, Thomas G; Serreze, David V; Pierce, Melissa A; Marron, Michele P; Wicker, Linda S; Peterson, Laurence B; Shultz, Leonard D; Mordes, John P; Rossini, Aldo A; Greiner, Dale L

    2003-07-01

    Curing type 1 diabetes by islet transplantation requires overcoming both allorejection and recurrent autoimmunity. This has been achieved with systemic immunosuppression, but tolerance induction would be preferable. Most islet allotransplant tolerance induction protocols have been tested in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, and most have failed. Failure has been attributed to the underlying autoimmunity, assuming that autoimmunity and resistance to transplantation tolerance have a common basis. Out of concern that NOD biology could be misleading in this regard, we tested the hypothesis that autoimmunity and resistance to transplantation tolerance in NOD mice are distinct phenotypes. Unexpectedly, we observed that (NOD x C57BL/6)F(1) mice, which have no diabetes, nonetheless resist prolongation of skin allografts by costimulation blockade. Further analyses revealed that the F(1) mice shared the dendritic cell maturation defects and abnormal CD4(+) T cell responses of the NOD but had lost its defects in macrophage maturation and NK cell activity. We conclude that resistance to allograft tolerance induction in the NOD mouse is not a direct consequence of overt autoimmunity and that autoimmunity and resistance to costimulation blockade-induced transplantation tolerance phenotypes in NOD mice can be dissociated genetically. The outcomes of tolerance induction protocols tested in NOD mice may not accurately predict outcomes in human subjects.

  15. Induction of Systemic Resistance against Insect Herbivores in Plants by Beneficial Soil Microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Harun-Or Rashid

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil microorganisms with growth-promoting activities in plants, including rhizobacteria and rhizofungi, can improve plant health in a variety of different ways. These beneficial microbes may confer broad-spectrum resistance to insect herbivores. Here, we provide evidence that beneficial microbes modulate plant defenses against insect herbivores. Beneficial soil microorganisms can regulate hormone signaling including the jasmonic acid, ethylene and salicylic acid pathways, thereby leading to gene expression, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, plant defensive proteins and different enzymes and volatile compounds, that may induce defenses against leaf-chewing as well as phloem-feeding insects. In this review, we discuss how beneficial microbes trigger induced systemic resistance against insects by promoting plant growth and highlight changes in plant molecular mechanisms and biochemical profiles.

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction precedes depression of AMPK/AKT signaling in insulin resistance induced by high glucose in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yunhua; Liu, Jing; Shi, Le; Tang, Ying; Gao, Dan; Long, Jiangang; Liu, Jiankang

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated brain insulin signaling impairment and mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetes. Hyperinsulinemia and hyperlipidemia arising from diabetes have been linked to neuronal insulin resistance, and hyperglycemia induces peripheral sensory neuronal impairment and mitochondrial dysfunction. However, how brain glucose at diabetic conditions elicits cortical neuronal insulin signaling impairment and mitochondrial dysfunction remains unknown. In the present study, we cultured primary cortical neurons with high glucose levels and investigated the neuronal mitochondrial function and insulin response. We found that mitochondrial function was declined in presence of 10 mmol/L glucose, prior to the depression of AKT signaling in primary cortical neurons. We further demonstrated that the cerebral cortex of db/db mice exhibited both insulin resistance and loss of mitochondrial complex components. Moreover, we found that adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inactivation is involved in high glucose-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance in primary cortical neurons and neuroblastoma cells, as well as in cerebral cortex of db/db mice, and all these impairments can be rescued by mitochondrial activator, resveratrol. Taken together, our results extend the finding that high glucose (≥10 mmol/L) comparable to diabetic brain extracellular glucose level leads to neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction and resultant insulin resistance, and targeting mitochondria-AMPK signaling might be a promising strategy to protect against diabetes-related neuronal impairment in central nerves system. We found that high glucose (≥10 mmol/L), comparable to diabetic brain extracellular glucose level, leads to neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction and resultant insulin resistance in an AMPK-dependent manner, and targeting mitochondria-AMPK signaling might be a promising strategy to protect against diabetes-related neuronal impairment in central

  17. Effect of Glucocorticoid-Induced Insulin Resistance on Follicle Development and Ovulation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackbart, Katherine S.; Cunha, Pauline M.; Meyer, Rudelle K.; Wiltbank, Milo C.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is characterized by hyperandrogenemia, polycystic ovaries, and menstrual disturbance and a clear association with insulin resistance. This research evaluated whether induction of insulin resistance, using dexamethasone (DEX), in a monovular animal model, the cow, could produce an ovarian phenotype similar to PCOS. In all of these experiments, DEX induced insulin resistance in cows as shown by increased glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance). Experiment 1: DEX induced anovulation (zero of five DEX vs. four of four control cows ovulated) and decreased circulating estradiol (E2). Experiment 2: Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) was administered to determine pituitary and follicular responses during insulin resistance. GnRH induced a luteinizing hormone (LH) surge and ovulation in both DEX (seven of seven) and control (seven of seven) cows. Experiment 3: E2 was administered to determine hypothalamic responsiveness after induction of an E2 surge in DEX (eight of eight) and control (eight of eight) cows. An LH surge was induced in control (eight of eight) but not DEX (zero of eight) cows. All control (eight of eight) but only two of eight DEX cows ovulated within 60 h of E2 administration. Experiment 4: Short-term DEX was initiated 24 h after induced luteal regression to determine if DEX could acutely block ovulation before peak insulin resistance was induced, similar to progesterone (P4). All control (five of five), no P4-treated (zero of six), and 50% of DEX-treated (three of six) cows ovulated by 96 h after luteal regression. All anovular cows had reduced circulating E2. These data are consistent with DEX creating a lesion in hypothalamic positive feedback to E2 without altering pituitary responsiveness to GnRH or ovulatory responsiveness of follicles to LH. It remains to be determined if the considerable insulin resistance and the reduced follicular E2 production induced by DEX

  18. Arrester Resistive Current Measuring System Based on Heterogeneous Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun Hua; Li, Zai Lin; Yuan, Feng; Hou Pan, Feng; Guo, Zhan Nan; Han, Yue

    2018-03-01

    Metal Oxide Arrester (MOA) suffers from aging and poor insulation due to long-term impulse voltage and environmental impact, and the value and variation tendency of resistive current can reflect the health conditions of MOA. The common wired MOA detection need to use long cables, which is complicated to operate, and that wireless measurement methods are facing the problems of poor data synchronization and instability. Therefore a novel synchronous measurement system of arrester current resistive based on heterogeneous network is proposed, which simplifies the calculation process and improves synchronization, accuracy and stability and of the measuring system. This system combines LoRa wireless network, high speed wireless personal area network and the process layer communication, and realizes the detection of arrester working condition. Field test data shows that the system has the characteristics of high accuracy, strong anti-interference ability and good synchronization, which plays an important role in ensuring the stable operation of the power grid.

  19. Behavioral evidence for local reduction of aphid-induced resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prado, E.; Tjallingii, W.F.

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-five aphids of three different species, Brevicoryne brassicae L, Myzus persicae Schulzer, and Rhopalosiphum padi L(Hemiptera: Aphididae) were each allowed to infest leaves of a young plant of their respective host plant species for 4 days, except that the oldest expanded leaf (the `systemic¿

  20. Hypoxia-induced resistance to doxorubicin and methotrexate in human melanoma cell lines in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, K; Rofstad, E K

    1994-07-15

    Rodent cell lines can develop resistance to doxorubicin and methotrexate during hypoxic stress. This has so far not been observed in human tumor cell lines. The purpose of our communication is to show that doxorubicin and methotrexate resistance can also develop in human melanoma cells during exposure to hypoxia. Four cell lines (BEX-c, COX-c, SAX-c, WIX-c) have been studied. Cells were exposed to hypoxia (O2 concentration WIX-c. BEX-c and SAX-c were sensitive to methotrexate without hypoxia pre-treatment, whereas COX-c and WIX-c were resistant initially. Hypoxia-induced drug resistance was present immediately after reoxygenation and tended to decrease with time but remained statistically significant even 42 hr after reoxygenation.

  1. Pomegranate seed oil, a rich source of punicic acid, prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroegrijk, Irene O. C. M.; van Diepen, Janna A.; van den Berg, Sjoerd; Westbroek, Irene; Keizer, Hiskias; Gambelli, Luisa; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Zondag, Gerben C. M.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Havekes, Louis M.; Voshol, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Pomegranate seed oil has been shown to protect against diet induced obesity and insulin resistance. To characterize the metabolic effects of punicic acid on high fat diet induced obesity and insulin resistance. High-fat diet or high-fat diet with 1% Pomegranate seed oil (PUA) was fed for 12weeks to

  2. Pomegranate seed oil, a rich source of punicic acid, prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroegrijk, I.O.; Diepen, J.A. van; Berg, S.; Westbroek, I.; Keizer, H.; Gambelli, L.; Hontecillas, R.; Bassaganya-Riera, J.; Zondag, G.C.; Romijn, J.A.; Havekes, L.M.; Voshol, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pomegranate seed oil has been shown to protect against diet induced obesity and insulin resistance. OBJECTIVE: To characterize the metabolic effects of punicic acid on high fat diet induced obesity and insulin resistance. DESIGN: High-fat diet or high-fat diet with 1% Pomegranate seed

  3. Generation and characterization of tribenuron-methyl herbicide-resistant rapeseed (Brasscia napus) for hybrid seed production using chemically induced male sterility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haitao; Li, Juanjuan; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Jing; Yi, Licong; Liu, Chao; Wu, Jiangsheng; King, Graham J; Liu, Kede

    2015-01-01

    Identification and molecular analysis of four tribenuron-methyl resistant mutants in Brassica napus , which would be very useful in hybrid production using a Chemically induced male sterility system. Chemically induced male sterility (CIMS) systems dependent on chemical hybridization agents (CHAs) like tribenuron-methyl (TBM) represent an important approach for practical utilization of heterosis in rapeseed. However, when spraying the female parents with TBM to induce male sterility the male parents must be protected with a shield to avoid injury to the stamens, which would otherwise complicate the seed production protocol and increase the cost of hybrid seed production. Here we report the first proposed application of a herbicide-resistant cultivar in hybrid production, using a CIMS system based on identifying four TBM-resistant mutants in Brassica napus. Genetic analysis indicated that the TBM resistance was controlled by a single dominant nuclear gene. An in vitro enzyme activity assay for acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) suggested that the herbicide resistance is caused by a gain-of-function mutation in a copy of AHAS genes. Comparative sequencing of the mutants and wild type BnaA.AHAS.a coding sequences identified a C-to-T transition at either position 535 or 536 from the translation start site, which resulted in a substitution of proline with serine or leucine at position 197 according to the Arabidopsis thaliana protein sequence. An allele-specific dCAPS marker developed from the C536T variation co-segregated with the herbicide resistance. Transgenic A. thaliana plants expressing BnaA.ahas3.a conferred herbicide resistance, which confirmed that the P197 substitution in BnaA.AHAS.a was responsible for the herbicide resistance. Moreover, the TBM-resistant lines maintain normal male fertility under TBM treatment and can be of practical value in hybrid seed production using CIMS.

  4. Salicylic acid and jasmonic acid are essential for systemic resistance against tobacco mosaic virus in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Xi, De-Hui; Yuan, Shu; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2014-06-01

    Systemic resistance is induced by pathogens and confers protection against a broad range of pathogens. Recent studies have indicated that salicylic acid (SA) derivative methyl salicylate (MeSA) serves as a long-distance phloem-mobile systemic resistance signal in tobacco, Arabidopsis, and potato. However, other experiments indicate that jasmonic acid (JA) is a critical mobile signal. Here, we present evidence suggesting both MeSA and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) are essential for systemic resistance against Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), possibly acting as the initiating signals for systemic resistance. Foliar application of JA followed by SA triggered the strongest systemic resistance against TMV. Furthermore, we use a virus-induced gene-silencing-based genetics approach to investigate the function of JA and SA biosynthesis or signaling genes in systemic response against TMV infection. Silencing of SA or JA biosynthetic and signaling genes in Nicotiana benthamiana plants increased susceptibility to TMV. Genetic experiments also proved the irreplaceable roles of MeSA and MeJA in systemic resistance response. Systemic resistance was compromised when SA methyl transferase or JA carboxyl methyltransferase, which are required for MeSA and MeJA formation, respectively, were silenced. Moreover, high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis indicated that JA and MeJA accumulated in phloem exudates of leaves at early stages and SA and MeSA accumulated at later stages, after TMV infection. Our data also indicated that JA and MeJA could regulate MeSA and SA production. Taken together, our results demonstrate that (Me)JA and (Me)SA are required for systemic resistance response against TMV.

  5. Acute and long-term administration of palmitoylcarnitine induces muscle-specific insulin resistance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepinsh, Edgars; Makrecka-Kuka, Marina; Makarova, Elina; Volska, Kristine; Vilks, Karlis; Sevostjanovs, Eduards; Antone, Unigunde; Kuka, Janis; Vilskersts, Reinis; Lola, Daina; Loza, Einars; Grinberga, Solveiga; Dambrova, Maija

    2017-09-10

    Acylcarnitine accumulation has been linked to perturbations in energy metabolism pathways. In this study, we demonstrate that long-chain (LC) acylcarnitines are active metabolites involved in the regulation of glucose metabolism in vivo. Single-dose administration of palmitoylcarnitine (PC) in fed mice induced marked insulin insensitivity, decreased glucose uptake in muscles, and elevated blood glucose levels. Increase in the content of LC acylcarnitine induced insulin resistance by impairing Akt phosphorylation at Ser473. The long-term administration of PC using slow-release osmotic minipumps induced marked hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance, suggesting that the permanent accumulation of LC acylcarnitines can accelerate the progression of insulin resistance. The decrease of acylcarnitine content significantly improved glucose tolerance in a mouse model of diet-induced glucose intolerance. In conclusion, we show that the physiological increase in content of acylcarnitines ensures the transition from a fed to fasted state in order to limit glucose metabolism in the fasted state. In the fed state, the inability of insulin to inhibit LC acylcarnitine production induces disturbances in glucose uptake and metabolism. The reduction of acylcarnitine content could be an effective strategy to improve insulin sensitivity. © 2017 BioFactors, 43(5):718-730, 2017. © 2017 The Authors BioFactors published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  6. Tetradecylthioacetic acid prevents high fat diet induced adiposity and insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lise; Guerre-Millo, Michéle; Flindt, Esben N

    2002-01-01

    Tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) is a non-beta-oxidizable fatty acid analog, which potently regulates lipid homeostasis. Here we evaluate the ability of TTA to prevent diet-induced and genetically determined adiposity and insulin resistance. In Wistar rats fed a high fat diet, TTA administration...... completely prevented diet-induced insulin resistance and adiposity. In genetically obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats TTA treatment reduced the epididymal adipose tissue mass and improved insulin sensitivity. All three rodent peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) subtypes were activated by TTA...... that a TTA-induced increase in hepatic fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis drains fatty acids from blood and extrahepatic tissues and that this contributes significantly to the beneficial effects of TTA on fat mass accumulation and peripheral insulin sensitivity....

  7. Nicotine induces resistance to chemotherapy by modulating mitochondrial signaling in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingmei; Kamdar, Opal; Le, Wei; Rosen, Glenn D; Upadhyay, Daya

    2009-02-01

    Continued smoking causes tumor progression and resistance to therapy in lung cancer. Carcinogens possess the ability to block apoptosis, and thus may induce development of cancers and resistance to therapy. Tobacco carcinogens have been studied widely; however, little is known about the agents that inhibit apoptosis, such as nicotine. We determine whether mitochondrial signaling mediates antiapoptotic effects of nicotine in lung cancer. A549 cells were exposed to nicotine (1 muM) followed by cisplatin (35 muM) plus etoposide (20 muM) for 24 hours. We found that nicotine prevented chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, improved cell survival, and caused modest increases in DNA synthesis. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt prevented the antiapoptotic effects of nicotine and decreased chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. Small interfering RNA MAPK kinase-1 blocked antiapoptotic effects of nicotine, whereas small interfering RNA MAPK kinase-2 blocked chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. Nicotine prevented chemotherapy-induced reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and caspase-9 activation. Antiapoptotic effects of nicotine were blocked by mitochondrial anion channel inhibitor, 4,4'diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'disulfonic acid. Chemotherapy enhanced translocation of proapoptotic Bax to the mitochondria, whereas nicotine blocked these effects. Nicotine up-regulated Akt-mediated antiapoptotic X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein and phosphorylated proapoptotic Bcl2-antagonist of cell death. The A549-rho0 cells, which lack mitochondrial DNA, demonstrated partial resistance to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, but blocked the antiapoptotic effects of nicotine. Accordingly, we provide evidence that nicotine modulates mitochondrial signaling and inhibits chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in lung cancer. The mitochondrial regulation of nicotine imposes an important mechanism that can critically impair the treatment of lung cancer, because many cancer

  8. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase-1B Mediates Sleep Fragmentation-Induced Insulin Resistance and Visceral Adipose Tissue Inflammation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozal, David; Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Qiao, Zhuanghong; Akbarpour, Mahzad; Maccari, Rosanna; Ottanà, Rosaria

    2017-09-01

    Sleep fragmentation (SF) is highly prevalent and has emerged as an important contributing factor to obesity and metabolic syndrome. We hypothesized that SF-induced increases in protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP-1B) expression and activity underlie increased food intake, inflammation, and leptin and insulin resistance. Wild-type (WT) and ObR-PTP-1b-/- mice (Tg) were exposed to SF and control sleep (SC), and food intake was monitored. WT mice received a PTP-1B inhibitor (RO-7d; Tx) or vehicle (Veh). Upon completion of exposures, systemic insulin and leptin sensitivity tests were performed as well as assessment of visceral white adipose tissue (vWAT) insulin receptor sensitivity and macrophages (ATM) polarity. SF increased food intake in either untreated or Veh-treated WT mice. Leptin-induced hypothalamic STAT3 phosphorylation was decreased, PTP-1B activity was increased, and reduced insulin sensitivity emerged both systemic and in vWAT, with the latter displaying proinflammatory ATM polarity changes. All of the SF-induced effects were abrogated following PTP-1B inhibitor treatment and in Tg mice. SF induces increased food intake, reduced leptin signaling in hypothalamus, systemic insulin resistance, and reduced vWAT insulin sensitivity and inflammation that are mediated by increased PTP-1B activity. Thus, PTP-1B may represent a viable therapeutic target in the context of SF-induced weight gain and metabolic dysfunction. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Loss of Hepatic Mitochondrial Long-Chain Fatty Acid Oxidation Confers Resistance to Diet-Induced Obesity and Glucose Intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieun; Choi, Joseph; Selen Alpergin, Ebru S; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas; Scafidi, Susanna; Riddle, Ryan C; Wolfgang, Michael J

    2017-07-18

    The liver has a large capacity for mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation, which is critical for systemic metabolic adaptations such as gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis. To understand the role of hepatic fatty acid oxidation in response to a chronic high-fat diet (HFD), we generated mice with a liver-specific deficiency of mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation (Cpt2 L-/- mice). Paradoxically, Cpt2 L-/- mice were resistant to HFD-induced obesity and glucose intolerance with an absence of liver damage, although they exhibited serum dyslipidemia, hepatic oxidative stress, and systemic carnitine deficiency. Feeding an HFD induced hepatokines in mice, with a loss of hepatic fatty acid oxidation that enhanced systemic energy expenditure and suppressed adiposity. Additionally, the suppression in hepatic gluconeogenesis was sufficient to improve HFD-induced glucose intolerance. These data show that inhibiting hepatic fatty acid oxidation results in a systemic hormetic response that protects mice from HFD-induced obesity and glucose intolerance. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Loss of Hepatic Mitochondrial Long-Chain Fatty Acid Oxidation Confers Resistance to Diet-Induced Obesity and Glucose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Lee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The liver has a large capacity for mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation, which is critical for systemic metabolic adaptations such as gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis. To understand the role of hepatic fatty acid oxidation in response to a chronic high-fat diet (HFD, we generated mice with a liver-specific deficiency of mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation (Cpt2L−/− mice. Paradoxically, Cpt2L−/− mice were resistant to HFD-induced obesity and glucose intolerance with an absence of liver damage, although they exhibited serum dyslipidemia, hepatic oxidative stress, and systemic carnitine deficiency. Feeding an HFD induced hepatokines in mice, with a loss of hepatic fatty acid oxidation that enhanced systemic energy expenditure and suppressed adiposity. Additionally, the suppression in hepatic gluconeogenesis was sufficient to improve HFD-induced glucose intolerance. These data show that inhibiting hepatic fatty acid oxidation results in a systemic hormetic response that protects mice from HFD-induced obesity and glucose intolerance.

  11. Targeted Overexpression of Inducible 6-Phosphofructo-2-kinase in Adipose Tissue Increases Fat Deposition but Protects against Diet-induced Insulin Resistance and Inflammatory Responses*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yuqing; Guo, Xin; Li, Honggui; Xu, Hang; Halim, Vera; Zhang, Weiyu; Wang, Huan; Fan, Yang-Yi; Ong, Kuok Teong; Woo, Shih-Lung; Chapkin, Robert S.; Mashek, Douglas G.; Chen, Yanming; Dong, Hui; Lu, Fuer; Wei, Lai; Wu, Chaodong

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates the dissociation of fat deposition, the inflammatory response, and insulin resistance in the development of obesity-related metabolic diseases. As a regulatory enzyme of glycolysis, inducible 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase (iPFK2, encoded by PFKFB3) protects against diet-induced adipose tissue inflammatory response and systemic insulin resistance independently of adiposity. Using aP2-PFKFB3 transgenic (Tg) mice, we explored the ability of targeted adipocyte PFKFB3/iPFK2 overexpression to modulate diet-induced inflammatory responses and insulin resistance arising from fat deposition in both adipose and liver tissues. Compared with wild-type littermates (controls) on a high fat diet (HFD), Tg mice exhibited increased adiposity, decreased adipose inflammatory response, and improved insulin sensitivity. In a parallel pattern, HFD-fed Tg mice showed increased hepatic steatosis, decreased liver inflammatory response, and improved liver insulin sensitivity compared with controls. In both adipose and liver tissues, increased fat deposition was associated with lipid profile alterations characterized by an increase in palmitoleate. Additionally, plasma lipid profiles also displayed an increase in palmitoleate in HFD-Tg mice compared with controls. In cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes, overexpression of PFKFB3/iPFK2 recapitulated metabolic and inflammatory changes observed in adipose tissue of Tg mice. Upon treatment with conditioned medium from iPFK2-overexpressing adipocytes, mouse primary hepatocytes displayed metabolic and inflammatory responses that were similar to those observed in livers of Tg mice. Together, these data demonstrate a unique role for PFKFB3/iPFK2 in adipocytes with regard to diet-induced inflammatory responses in both adipose and liver tissues. PMID:22556414

  12. Suppression of Ghrelin Exacerbates HFCS-Induced Adiposity and Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaojun; Lin, Ligen; Yue, Jing; Wu, Chia-Shan; Guo, Cathy A; Wang, Ruitao; Yu, Kai-Jiang; Devaraj, Sridevi; Murano, Peter; Chen, Zheng; Sun, Yuxiang

    2017-06-19

    High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is widely used as sweetener in processed foods and soft drinks in the United States, largely substituting sucrose (SUC). The orexigenic hormone ghrelin promotes obesity and insulin resistance; ghrelin responds differently to HFCS and SUC ingestion. Here we investigated the roles of ghrelin in HFCS- and SUC-induced adiposity and insulin resistance. To mimic soft drinks, 10-week-old male wild-type (WT) and ghrelin knockout ( Ghrelin -/- ) mice were subjected to ad lib. regular chow diet supplemented with either water (RD), 8% HFCS (HFCS), or 10% sucrose (SUC). We found that SUC-feeding induced more robust increases in body weight and body fat than HFCS-feeding. Comparing to SUC-fed mice, HFCS-fed mice showed lower body weight but higher circulating glucose and insulin levels. Interestingly, we also found that ghrelin deletion exacerbates HFCS-induced adiposity and inflammation in adipose tissues, as well as whole-body insulin resistance. Our findings suggest that HFCS and SUC have differential effects on lipid metabolism: while sucrose promotes obesogenesis, HFCS primarily enhances inflammation and insulin resistance, and ghrelin confers protective effects for these metabolic dysfunctions.

  13. Suppression of Ghrelin Exacerbates HFCS-Induced Adiposity and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Ma

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available High fructose corn syrup (HFCS is widely used as sweetener in processed foods and soft drinks in the United States, largely substituting sucrose (SUC. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin promotes obesity and insulin resistance; ghrelin responds differently to HFCS and SUC ingestion. Here we investigated the roles of ghrelin in HFCS- and SUC-induced adiposity and insulin resistance. To mimic soft drinks, 10-week-old male wild-type (WT and ghrelin knockout (Ghrelin−/− mice were subjected to ad lib. regular chow diet supplemented with either water (RD, 8% HFCS (HFCS, or 10% sucrose (SUC. We found that SUC-feeding induced more robust increases in body weight and body fat than HFCS-feeding. Comparing to SUC-fed mice, HFCS-fed mice showed lower body weight but higher circulating glucose and insulin levels. Interestingly, we also found that ghrelin deletion exacerbates HFCS-induced adiposity and inflammation in adipose tissues, as well as whole-body insulin resistance. Our findings suggest that HFCS and SUC have differential effects on lipid metabolism: while sucrose promotes obesogenesis, HFCS primarily enhances inflammation and insulin resistance, and ghrelin confers protective effects for these metabolic dysfunctions.

  14. Nuclear technique for inducing new genetical sources of powdery mildew resistant mutants of wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Jinguo; Hu Xiaoyuan; Fan Qingxia; Wang Linqing; Hong Jisong

    1996-01-01

    Three varieties of winter wheat were treated with γ-rays, electron-beams, NaN 3 , EMS with various doses and intermittent irradiation of γ-rays respectively. 16 pure varieties and 12 hybrids were irradiated by γ-rays with appropriate doses (250∼300 Gy) for inducing mutation resistant to powdery mildew in winter wheat. γ-rays, electron-beams, NaN 3 and EMS were effective mutagens for inducing powdery mildew resistant mutants. The latter two were more effective than the former. It showed that the appropriate doses were as follows: γ-rays 300∼350 Gy, electron-beams 100∼200 Gy, NaN 3 1∼3 mmol/L, EMS about 0.3%. It also showed that the intermittent irradiation of γ-rays was more effective than the continuous irradiation for inducing powdery mildew resistant mutants. Irradiating hybrids were more effective materials than pure varieties for this purpose. 86 mutants with resistance to powdery mildew were obtained

  15. Edible Bird’s Nest Prevents High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Edible bird’s nest (EBN is used traditionally in many parts of Asia to improve wellbeing, but there are limited studies on its efficacy. We explored the potential use of EBN for prevention of high fat diet- (HFD- induced insulin resistance in rats. HFD was given to rats with or without simvastatin or EBN for 12 weeks. During the intervention period, weight measurements were recorded weekly. Blood samples were collected at the end of the intervention and oral glucose tolerance test conducted, after which the rats were sacrificed and their liver and adipose tissues collected for further studies. Serum adiponectin, leptin, F2-isoprostane, insulin, and lipid profile were estimated, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance computed. Effects of the different interventions on transcriptional regulation of insulin signaling genes were also evaluated. The results showed that HFD worsened metabolic indices and induced insulin resistance partly through transcriptional regulation of the insulin signaling genes. Additionally, simvastatin was able to prevent hypercholesterolemia but promoted insulin resistance similar to HFD. EBN, on the other hand, prevented the worsening of metabolic indices and transcriptional changes in insulin signaling genes due to HFD. The results suggest that EBN may be used as functional food to prevent insulin resistance.

  16. X-ray irradiation induced reversible resistance change in Pt/TiO2/Pt cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Seo Hyoung; Kim, Jungho; Phatak, Charudatta; D'Aquila, Kenneth; Kim, Seong Keun; Kim, Jiyoon; Song, Seul Ji; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Eastman, Jeffrey A; Freeland, John W; Hong, Seungbum

    2014-02-25

    The interaction between X-rays and matter is an intriguing topic for both fundamental science and possible applications. In particular, synchrotron-based brilliant X-ray beams have been used as a powerful diagnostic tool to unveil nanoscale phenomena in functional materials. However, it has not been widely investigated how functional materials respond to the brilliant X-rays. Here, we report the X-ray-induced reversible resistance change in 40-nm-thick TiO2 films sandwiched by Pt top and bottom electrodes, and propose the physical mechanism behind the emergent phenomenon. Our findings indicate that there exists a photovoltaic-like effect, which modulates the resistance reversibly by a few orders of magnitude, depending on the intensity of impinging X-rays. We found that this effect, combined with the X-ray irradiation induced phase transition confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, triggers a nonvolatile reversible resistance change. Understanding X-ray-controlled reversible resistance changes can provide possibilities to control initial resistance states of functional materials, which could be useful for future information and energy storage devices.

  17. Co nanoparticles induced resistive switching and magnetism for the electrochemically deposited polypyrrole composite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zedong; Gao, Min; Yu, Lina; Lu, Liying; Xu, Xiaoguang; Jiang, Yong

    2014-10-22

    The resistive switching behavior of Co-nanoparticle-dispersed polypyrrole (PPy) composite films is studied. A novel design method for resistive random access memory (ReRAM) is proposed. The conducting polymer films with metal nanocrystal (NC)-dispersed carbon chains induce the spontaneous oxidization of the conducting polymer at the surface. The resistive switching behavior is achieved by an electric field controlling the oxygen ion mobility between the metal electrode and the conducting polymer film to realize the mutual transition between intrinsic conduction (low resistive state) and oxidized layer conduction (high resistive state). Furthermore, the formation process of intrinsic conductive paths can be effectively controlled in the conducting polymer ReRAM using metal NCs in films because the inner metal NCs induce electric field lines converging around them and the intensity of the electric field at the tip of NCs can greatly exceed that of the other region. Metal NCs can also bring new characteristics for ReRAM, such as magnetism by dispersing magnetic metal NCs in polymer, to obtain multifunctional electronic devices or meet some special purpose in future applications. Our works will enrich the application fields of the electromagnetic PPy composite films and present a novel material for ReRAM devices.

  18. Antimicrobial resistance: A global emerging threat to public health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Maurizio; Ranucci, Elena; Romagnoli, Paola; Giaccone, Valerio

    2017-09-02

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) became in the last two decades a global threat to public health systems in the world. Since the antibiotic era, with the discovery of the first antibiotics that provided consistent health benefits to human medicine, the misuse and abuse of antimicrobials in veterinary and human medicine have accelerated the growing worldwide phenomenon of AMR. This article presents an extensive overview of the epidemiology of AMR, with a focus on the link between food producing-animals and humans and on the legal framework and policies currently implemented at the EU level and globally. The ways of responding to the AMR challenges foresee an array of measures that include: designing more effective preventive measures at farm level to reduce the use of antimicrobials; development of novel antimicrobials; strengthening of AMR surveillance system in animal and human populations; better knowledge of the ecology of resistant bacteria and resistant genes; increased awareness of stakeholders on the prudent use of antibiotics in animal productions and clinical arena; and the public health and environmental consequences of AMR. Based on the global nature of AMR and considering that bacterial resistance does not recognize barriers and can spread to people and the environment, the article ends with specific recommendations structured around a holistic approach and targeted to different stakeholders.

  19. Polychlorinated biphenyls exposure-induced insulin resistance is mediated by lipid droplet enlargement through Fsp27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Young; Kwon, Woo Young; Kim, Yeon A; Oh, Yoo Jin; Yoo, Seung Hee; Lee, Mi Hwa; Bae, Ju Yong; Kim, Jong-Min; Yoo, Young Hyun

    2017-06-01

    Although epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) lead to insulin resistance, the mechanism underlying PCBs-induced insulin resistance has remained unsolved. In this study, we examined in vitro and in vivo effects of PCB-118 (dioxin-like PCB) and PCB-138 (non-dioxin-like PCB) on adipocyte differentiation, lipid droplet growth, and insulin action. 3T3-L1 adipocytes were incubated with PCB-118 or PCB-138 during adipocyte differentiation. For in vivo studies, C57BL/6 mice were administered PCB-118 or PCB-138 (37.5 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection and we examined adiposity and whole-body insulin action. PCB-118 and PCB-138 significantly promoted adipocyte differentiation and increased the lipid droplet (LD) size in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In mice, both PCBs increased adipose mass and adipocyte size. Furthermore, both PCBs induced insulin resistance in vitro and in vivo. Expression of fat-specific protein 27 (Fsp27), which is localized to LD contact sites, was increased in PCB-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes and mice. Depletion of Fsp27 by siRNA resulted in the inhibition of LD enlargement and attenuation of insulin resistance in PCB-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. An anti-diabetic drug, metformin, attenuated insulin resistance in PCB-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes through the reduced expression of Fsp27 protein and LD size. This study suggests that PCB exposure-induced insulin resistance is mediated by LD enlargement through Fsp27.

  20. Genipin-induced inhibition of uncoupling protein-2 sensitizes drug-resistant cancer cells to cytotoxic agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J Mailloux

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2 is known to suppress mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS production and is employed by drug-resistant cancer cells to mitigate oxidative stress. Using the drug-sensitive HL-60 cells and the drug-resistant MX2 subline as model systems, we show that genipin, a UCP2 inhibitor, sensitizes drug-resistant cells to cytotoxic agents. Increased MX2 cell death was observed upon co-treatment with genipin and different doses of menadione, doxorubicin, and epirubicin. DCFH-DA fluorimetry revealed that the increase in MX2 cell death was accompanied by enhanced cellular ROS levels. The drug-induced increase in ROS was linked to genipin-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial proton leak. State 4 and resting cellular respiratory rates were higher in the MX2 cells in comparison to the HL-60 cells, and the increased respiration was readily suppressed by genipin in the MX2 cells. UCP2 accounted for a remarkable 37% of the resting cellular oxygen consumption indicating that the MX2 cells are functionally reliant on this protein. Higher amounts of UCP2 protein were detected in the MX2 versus the HL-60 mitochondria. The observed effects of genipin were absent in the HL-60 cells pointing to the selectivity of this natural product for drug-resistant cells. The specificity of genipin for UCP2 was confirmed using CHO cells stably expressing UCP2 in which genipin induced an ∼22% decrease in state 4 respiration. These effects were absent in empty vector CHO cells expressing no UCP2. Thus, the chemical inhibition of UCP2 with genipin sensitizes multidrug-resistant cancer cells to cytotoxic agents.

  1. Resveratrol attenuates intermittent hypoxia-induced macrophage migration to visceral white adipose tissue and insulin resistance in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, Alba; Zhang, Shelley X L; Almendros, Isaac; Wang, Yang; Peris, Eduard; Qiao, Zhuanhong; Gozal, David

    2015-02-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia during sleep (IH), as occurs in sleep apnea, promotes systemic insulin resistance. Resveratrol (Resv) has been reported to ameliorate high-fat diet-induced obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance. To examine the effect of Resv on IH-induced metabolic dysfunction, male mice were subjected to IH or room air conditions for 8 weeks and treated with either Resv or vehicle (Veh). Fasting plasma levels of glucose, insulin, and leptin were obtained, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index levels were calculated, and insulin sensitivity tests (phosphorylated AKT [also known as protein kinase B]/total AKT) were performed in 2 visceral white adipose tissue (VWAT) depots (epididymal [Epi] and mesenteric [Mes]) along with flow cytometry assessments for VWAT macrophages and phenotypes (M1 and M2). IH-Veh and IH-Resv mice showed initial reductions in food intake with later recovery, with resultant lower body weights after 8 weeks but with IH-Resv showing better increases in body weight vs IH-Veh. IH-Veh and IH-Resv mice exhibited lower fasting glucose levels, but only IH-Veh had increased homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index vs all 3 other groups. Leptin levels were preserved in IH-Veh but were significantly lower in IH-Resv. Reduced VWAT phosphorylated-AKT/AKT responses to insulin emerged in both Mes and Epi in IH-Veh but normalized in IH-Resv. Increases total macrophage counts and in M1 to M2 ratios occurred in IH-Veh Mes and Epi compared all other 3 groups. Thus, Resv ameliorates food intake and weight gain during IH exposures and markedly attenuates VWAT inflammation and insulin resistance, thereby providing a potentially useful adjunctive therapy for metabolic morbidity in the context of sleep apnea.

  2. Mechanisms of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia-induced intestinal epithelial apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Erin E; Jung, Enjae; Breed, Elise; Dominguez, Jessica A; Liang, Zhe; Clark, Andrew T; Dunne, W Michael; Burd, Eileen M; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2012-07-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia-induced sepsis is a common cause of morbidity in the intensive care unit. Although pneumonia is initiated in the lungs, extrapulmonary manifestations occur commonly. In light of the key role the intestine plays in the pathophysiology of sepsis, we sought to determine whether MRSA pneumonia induces intestinal injury. FVB/N mice were subjected to MRSA or sham pneumonia and killed 24 h later. Septic animals had a marked increase in intestinal epithelial apoptosis by both hematoxylin-eosin and active caspase 3 staining. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus-induced intestinal apoptosis was associated with an increase in the expression of the proapoptotic proteins Bid and Bax and the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL in the mitochondrial pathway. In the receptor-mediated pathway, MRSA pneumonia induced an increase in Fas ligand but decreased protein levels of Fas, FADD, pFADD, TNF-R1, and TRADD. To assess the functional significance of these changes, MRSA pneumonia was induced in mice with genetic manipulations in proteins in either the mitochondrial or receptor-mediated pathways. Both Bid-/- mice and animals with intestine-specific overexpression of Bcl-2 had decreased intestinal apoptosis compared with wild-type animals. In contrast, Fas ligand-/- mice had no alterations in apoptosis. To determine if these findings were organism-specific, similar experiments were performed in mice subjected to Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Pseudomonas aeruginosa induced gut apoptosis, but unlike MRSA, this was associated with increased Bcl-2 and TNF-R1 and decreased Fas. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus pneumonia thus induces organism-specific changes in intestinal apoptosis via changes in both the mitochondrial and receptor-mediated pathways, although the former may be more functionally significant.

  3. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer enhances host resistance against pseudomonas aeruginosa infection through MAPK signaling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yongwei; Chen, Lu; Wang, Chunxia; Chen, Jianshe; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Hu, Yue; Niu, Xiaobin; Pei, Dongxu; He, Zhiqiang; Bi, Yongyi

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the role of extra-cellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) in the drug resistance of the pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). The BALB/c mice were transfected with PA, then the mice were infected with the siRNA of EMMPRIN to silence the EMMPRIN gene. The EMMPRIN mRNA and protein were detected by using RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. In order to examine the function of EMMPRIN in drug resistance of PA, the BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were treated with EMMPRIN s...

  4. Assessing the User Resistance to Recommender Systems in Exhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chulmo Koo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Under the paradigm shift toward smart tourism, the exhibition industry is making efforts to introduce innovative technologies that can provide more diverse and valuable experiences to attendees. However, various new information technologies have failed in a market in practice due to the user’s resistance against it. Since innovative technology, such as booth recommender systems (BRS, is changing, creating uncertainty among consumers, consumer’s resistance to innovative technology can be considered a normal reaction. Therefore, it is important for a company to understand the psychological aspect of the consumer’s resistance and make measures to overcome the resistance. Accordingly, based on the model of Kim and Kankanhalli (2009, by applying the perceived value, the technology acceptance model, and the status quo bias theory, this study focused on the importance of self-efficacy and technical support in the context of using BRS. To do this purpose, a total of 455 survey data that was collected from “Korea franchise exhibition” attendees were used to analyze the proposed model. Structural equation modeling was applied for data analysis. The result shows that perceived value was affected by relative advantage and switching cost, also switching cost reduced the perceived value. However, self-efficacy reduced the switching cost, thereby decreasing the resistance of exhibition attendees. In addition, technical support increased the relative advantage switching cost and the perceived value. Exhibition attendee’s resistance was significantly negatively affected by perceived value, and positively affected by switching cost. The results will provide balanced viewpoints between the relative advantage and switching cost for exhibition marketers, helping to strengthen the competitiveness in terms of sustainable tourism of exhibition.

  5. Reversal of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance by inducible genetic ablation of GRK2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vila-Bedmar, Rocio; Cruces-Sande, Marta; Lucas, Elisa; Willemen, Hanneke L D M; Heijnen, Cobi J; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Mayor, Federico; Murga, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a common feature of obesity and predisposes individuals to various prevalent pathological conditions. G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) integrates several signal transduction pathways and is emerging as a

  6. Effects of Php Gene-Associated versus Induced Resistance to Tobacco Cyst Nematode in Flue-Cured Tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Charles S.; Eisenback, Jon D.

    2009-01-01

    Effects of the systemic acquired resistance (SAR)-inducing compound acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM) and the plant-growth promoting rhizobacterial mixture Bacillus subtilis A13 and B. amyloliquefaciens IN937a (GB99+GB122) were assessed on the reproduction of a tobacco cyst nematode (TCN- Globodera tabacum solanacearum) under greenhouse conditions. Two sets of two independent experiments were conducted, each involving soil or root sampling. Soil sample experiments included flue-cured tobacco cultivars with (Php+: NC71 and NC102) and without (Php-: K326 and K346) a gene (Php) suppressing TCN parasitism. Root sample experiments examined TCN root parasitism of NC71 and K326. Cultivars possessing the Php gene (Php+) were compared with Php- cultivars to assess the effects of resistance mediated via Php gene vs. induced resistance to TCN. GB99+GB122 consistently reduced nematode reproductive ratio on both Php+ and Php- cultivars, but similar effects of ASM across Php- cultivars were less consistent. In addition, ASM application resulted in leaf yellowing and reduced root weight. GB99+GB122 consistently reduced nematode development in roots of both Php+ and Php- cultivars, while similar effects of ASM were frequently less consistent. The results of this study indicate that GB99+GB122 consistently reduced TCN reproduction in all flue-cured tobacco cultivars tested, while the effects of ASM were only consistent in Php+ cultivars. Under most circumstances, GB99+GB122 suppressed nematode reproduction more consistently than ASM compared to the untreated control. PMID:22736824

  7. Evidence against the existence of specific Schistosoma mansoni subpopulations which are resistant to irradiated vaccine-induced immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, F.A.; Hieny, S.; Sher, A.

    1985-01-01

    When mice are immunized with irradiated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae a proportion of the subsequent cercarial challenge always escapes killing and matures to egg-laying adults. This report investigates the possibility that incomplete immunity in this system is governed by a genetically-determined insusceptibility of a particular schistosome subpopulation. To do this the authors tested whether more immunoresistant schistosomes would develop following successive passages of progeny of the resistant worms through immunized mice. Mice were immunized with 500 50 Krad-irradiated cercariae, and challenged with normal cercariae when immunity was at its peak. After five successive passages through snails and immune mice, progeny of those parasites which escaped immune killing were no more refractory to vaccine-induced resistance than the original stock maintained in nonimmune mice. Additionally, the passaged isolates did not differ from the original stock in their ability to induce protection following irradiation. The results indicate that with this model of acquired resistance incomplete immunity is unlikely to be due to a subpopulation of the parasites possessing a genetically-determined insusceptibility to killing

  8. High-fat diet induces hepatic insulin resistance and impairment of synaptic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Liu

    Full Text Available High-fat diet (HFD-induced obesity is associated with insulin resistance, which may affect brain synaptic plasticity through impairment of insulin-sensitive processes underlying neuronal survival, learning, and memory. The experimental model consisted of 3 month-old C57BL/6J mice fed either a normal chow diet (control group or a HFD (60% of calorie from fat; HFD group for 12 weeks. This model was characterized as a function of time in terms of body weight, fasting blood glucose and insulin levels, HOMA-IR values, and plasma triglycerides. IRS-1/Akt pathway was assessed in primary hepatocytes and brain homogenates. The effect of HFD in brain was assessed by electrophysiology, input/output responses and long-term potentiation. HFD-fed mice exhibited a significant increase in body weight, higher fasting glucose- and insulin levels in plasma, lower glucose tolerance, and higher HOMA-IR values. In liver, HFD elicited (a a significant decrease of insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1 phosphorylation on Tyr608 and increase of Ser307 phosphorylation, indicative of IRS-1 inactivation; (b these changes were accompanied by inflammatory responses in terms of increases in the expression of NFκB and iNOS and activation of the MAP kinases p38 and JNK; (c primary hepatocytes from mice fed a HFD showed decreased cellular oxygen consumption rates (indicative of mitochondrial functional impairment; this can be ascribed partly to a decreased expression of PGC1α and mitochondrial biogenesis. In brain, HFD feeding elicited (a an inactivation of the IRS-1 and, consequentially, (b a decreased expression and plasma membrane localization of the insulin-sensitive neuronal glucose transporters GLUT3/GLUT4; (c a suppression of the ERK/CREB pathway, and (d a substantial decrease in long-term potentiation in the CA1 region of hippocampus (indicative of impaired synaptic plasticity. It may be surmised that 12 weeks fed with HFD induce a systemic insulin resistance that impacts

  9. Noise-Induced Riddling in Chaotic Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Y.; Grebogi, C.

    1996-01-01

    Recent works have considered the situation of riddling where, when a chaotic attractor lying in an invariant subspace is transversely stable, the basin of the attractor can be riddled with holes that belong to the basin of another attractor. We show that riddling can be induced by arbitrarily small random noise even if the attractor is transversely unstable, and we obtain universal scaling laws for noise-induced riddling. Our results imply that the phenomenon of riddling can be more prevalent than expected before, as noise is practically inevitable in dynamical systems. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  10. Staphylococcal phenotypes induced by naturally occurring and synthetic membrane-interactive polyphenolic β-lactam resistance modifiers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Palacios

    Full Text Available Galloyl catechins, in particular (--epicatechin gallate (ECg, have the capacity to abrogate β-lactam resistance in methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; they also prevent biofilm formation, reduce the secretion of a large proportion of the exoproteome and induce profound changes to cell morphology. Current evidence suggests that these reversible phenotypic traits result from their intercalation into the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. We have endeavoured to potentiate the capacity of ECg to modify the MRSA phenotype by stepwise removal of hydroxyl groups from the B-ring pharmacophore and the A:C fused ring system of the naturally occurring molecule. ECg binds rapidly to the membrane, inducing up-regulation of genes responsible for protection against cell wall stress and maintenance of membrane integrity and function. Studies with artificial membranes modelled on the lipid composition of the staphylococcal bilayer indicated that ECg adopts a position deep within the lipid palisade, eliciting major alterations in the thermotropic behaviour of the bilayer. The non-galloylated homolog (--epicatechin enhanced ECg-mediated effects by facilitating entry of ECg molecules into the membrane. ECg analogs with unnatural B-ring hydroxylation patterns induced higher levels of gene expression and more profound changes to MRSA membrane fluidity than ECg but adopted a more superficial location within the bilayer. ECg possessed a high affinity for the positively charged staphylococcal membrane and induced changes to the biophysical properties of the bilayer that are likely to account for its capacity to disperse the cell wall biosynthetic machinery responsible for β-lactam resistance. The ability to enhance these properties by chemical modification of ECg raises the possibility that more potent analogs could be developed for clinical evaluation.

  11. Beyond Predation: The Zoophytophagous Predator Macrolophus pygmaeus Induces Tomato Resistance against Spider Mites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L Pappas

    Full Text Available Many predatory insects that prey on herbivores also feed on the plant, but it is unknown whether plants affect the performance of herbivores by responding to this phytophagy with defence induction. We investigate whether the prior presence of the omnivorous predator Macrolophus pygmaeus (Rambur on tomato plants affects plant resistance against two different herbivore species. Besides plant-mediated effects of M. pygmaeus on herbivore performance, we examined whether a plant defence trait that is known to be inducible by herbivory, proteinase inhibitors (PI, may also be activated in response to the interactions of this predator with the tomato plant. We show that exposing tomato plants to the omnivorous predator M. pygmaeus reduced performance of a subsequently infesting herbivore, the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch, but not of the greenhouse whitefly Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood. The spider-mite infested tomato plants experience a lower herbivore load, i.e., number of eggs deposited and individuals present, when previously exposed to the zoophytophagous predator. This effect is not restricted to the exposed leaf and persists on exposed plants for at least two weeks after the removal of the predators. The decreased performance of spider mites as a result of prior exposure of the plant to M. pygmaeus is accompanied by a locally and systemically increased accumulation of transcripts and activity of proteinase inhibitors that are known to be involved in plant defence. Our results demonstrate that zoophytophagous predators can induce plant defence responses and reduce herbivore performance. Hence, the suppression of populations of certain herbivores via consumption may be strengthened by the induction of plant defences by zoophytophagous predators.

  12. RESISTENCIA SISTÉMICA ADQUIRIDA MEDIADA POR EL ÁCIDO SALICÍLICO RESISTÊNCIA SISTÊMICA ADQUIRIDA MEDIADA POR O ÁCIDO SALICÍLICO SYSTEMIC ACQUIRED RESISTANCE INDUCED BY SALICYLIC ACID

    OpenAIRE

    LUZ NELLY DIAZ-PUENTES

    2012-01-01

    La Resistencia Sistémica Adquirida (RSA) protege a la planta de una infección secundaria por patógenos biotróficos, necrotróficos y hemibiotróficos. La inducción de RSA ocurre en dos etapas, en una primera la planta reconoce el patógeno e induce las respuestas locales de defensa a través de cascadas de señalización que conllevan a la acumulación intracelular de Ácido Salicílico (AS). Esta acumulación induce el aumento de los niveles de Especies Reactivas del Oxígeno (ERO) y expresión de genes...

  13. Antimicrobial resistance, heavy metal resistance and integron content in bacteria isolated from a South African tilapia aquaculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenia, Hafizah Y; Jacobs, Anelet

    2017-11-21

    Antibacterial compounds and metals co-select for antimicrobial resistance when bacteria harbour resistance genes towards both types of compounds, facilitating the proliferation and evolution of antimicrobial and heavy metal resistance. Antimicrobial and heavy metal resistance indices of 42 Gram-negative bacteria from a tilapia aquaculture system were determined to identify possible correlations between these phenotypes. Agar dilution assays were carried out to determine susceptibility to cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, chromate and zinc, while susceptibility to 21 antimicrobial agents was investigated by disk diffusion assays. Presence of merA, the mercury resistance gene, was determined by dot-blot hybridizations and PCR. Association of mercury resistance with integrons and transposon Tn21 was also investigated by PCR. Isolates displayed a high frequency of antimicrobial (erythromycin: 100%; ampicillin: 85%; trimethoprim: 78%) and heavy metal (Zn2+: 95%; Cd2+: 91%) resistance. No correlation was established between heavy metal and multiple antibiotic resistance indices. Significant positive correlations were observed between heavy metal resistance profiles, indices, Cu2+ and Cr3+ resistance with erythromycin resistance. Significant positive correlations were observed between merA (24%)/Tn21 (24%) presence and heavy metal resistance profiles and indices; however, significant negative correlations were obtained between integron-associated qacE∆1 (43%) and sulI (26%) gene presence and heavy metal resistance indices. Heavy metal and antimicrobial agents co-select for resistance, with fish-associated, resistant bacteria demonstrating simultaneous heavy metal resistance. Thus, care should be taken when using anti-fouling heavy metals as feed additives in aquaculture facilities.

  14. Inducible clindamycin and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a tertiary care hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, R P; Shrestha, S; Barakoti, A; Amatya, R

    2017-07-11

    Staphylococcus aureus, an important nosocomial pathogen, is frequently associated with infections in human. The management of the infections by it especially methicillin resistant ones is often difficult because methicillin resistant S. aureus is usually resistant to multiple antibiotics. Macrolide-lincosamide streptogramin B family of antibiotics is commonly used to treat such infections as an alternative to vancomycin. This study was conducted over the period of one and half year from November 2013-April 2015 in Microbiology laboratory of Nepal Medical College and Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal to find the incidence of different phenotypes of MLS B resistance among S. aureus from clinical samples and their association with methicillin resistance. Two hundred seventy isolates of S. aureus were included in the study. Methicillin resistance was detected by cefoxitin disc diffusion method and inducible clindamycin resistance by erythromycin and clindamycin disc approximation test (D-test). Of the 270 clinical isolates of S. aureus, 25.1% (68/270) were MRSA. Erythromycin and clindamycin resistance was seen in 54.4% (147/270) and 41.8% (113/270) isolates respectively. Resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin were higher in MRSA as compared to MSSA (erythromycin-resistance: 88.2% Vs 39.1% and clindamycin-resistance: 79.4% Vs 41.8%). The overall prevalence of i MLS B and c MLS B phenotype was 11.48% (31/270) and 29.25% (79/270) respectively. Both i MLS B and c MLS B phenotypes predominated in MRSA strains. Detection rate of MRSA in our study shows the necessity to improve in healthcare practices and to formulate new policy for the control of MRSA infections. Clindamycin resistance in the form of i MLS B and c MLS B especially among MRSA emphasizes the need of D-test to be performed routinely in our set up while using clindamycin as an alternative choice to anti-staphylococcal antibiotics like vancomycin and linezolid in the treatment of staphylococcal infections.

  15. Inflammation relates to resistance training-induced hypertrophy in elderly patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norheim, Kristoffer L.; Cullum, Christopher K.; Andersen, Jesper L.

    2017-01-01

    on the relationship between systemic inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) and changes in muscle mass, as well as the influence of resistance training upon muscle mass. Method: Unilateral leg press resistance exercise was conducted daily during the hospital period. Outcomes included changes in whole body...... although our findings are potentially affected by changes in hydration status. Resistance training during hospitalization increases skeletal muscle mass, and patients with high levels of systemic inflammation demonstrate less ability to increase or preserve muscle mass in response to resistance training...... = 84.8 T 1.9 yr, mean T SE). Lean mass at the midthigh region of the trained leg increased by 2.4% T 1.1% (P G 0.05) after the intervention period. There was a negative association between changes in midthigh lean mass of the trained leg and CRP (rs = j0.53, P G 0.05). Leg extension power increased...

  16. Periodontitis induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis drives periodontal microbiota dysbiosis and insulin resistance via an impaired adaptive immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco-Baque, Vincent; Garidou, Lucile; Pomié, Céline; Escoula, Quentin; Loubieres, Pascale; Le Gall-David, Sandrine; Lemaitre, Mathieu; Nicolas, Simon; Klopp, Pascale; Waget, Aurélie; Azalbert, Vincent; Colom, André; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Kemoun, Philippe; Serino, Matteo; Burcelin, Rémy

    2017-05-01

    To identify a causal mechanism responsible for the enhancement of insulin resistance and hyperglycaemia following periodontitis in mice fed a fat-enriched diet. We set-up a unique animal model of periodontitis in C57Bl/6 female mice by infecting the periodontal tissue with specific and alive pathogens like Porphyromonas gingivalis ( Pg ), Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia . The mice were then fed with a diabetogenic/non-obesogenic fat-enriched diet for up to 3 months. Alveolar bone loss, periodontal microbiota dysbiosis and features of glucose metabolism were quantified. Eventually, adoptive transfer of cervical (regional) and systemic immune cells was performed to demonstrate the causal role of the cervical immune system. Periodontitis induced a periodontal microbiota dysbiosis without mainly affecting gut microbiota. The disease concomitantly impacted on the regional and systemic immune response impairing glucose metabolism. The transfer of cervical lymph-node cells from infected mice to naive recipients guarded against periodontitis-aggravated metabolic disease. A treatment with inactivated Pg prior to the periodontal infection induced specific antibodies against Pg and protected the mouse from periodontitis-induced dysmetabolism. Finally, a 1-month subcutaneous chronic infusion of low rates of lipopolysaccharides from Pg mimicked the impact of periodontitis on immune and metabolic parameters. We identified that insulin resistance in the high-fat fed mouse is enhanced by pathogen-induced periodontitis. This is caused by an adaptive immune response specifically directed against pathogens and associated with a periodontal dysbiosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Molecular and biochemical characterization of an induced mutation conferring imidazolinone resistance in sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Carlos A; Bulos, Mariano; Echarte, Mariel; Whitt, Sherry R; Ascenzi, Robert

    2008-12-01

    A partially dominant nuclear gene conferring resistance to the imidazolinone herbicides was previously identified in the cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) line CLHA-Plus developed by seed mutagenesis. The objective of this study was to characterize this resistant gene at the phenotypic, biochemical and molecular levels. CLHA-Plus showed a complete susceptibility to sulfonylureas (metsulfuron, tribenuron and chlorsulfuron) but, on the other hand, it showed a complete resistance to imidazolinones (imazamox, imazapyr and imazapic) at two rates of herbicide application. This pattern was in close association with the AHAS-inhibition kinetics of protein extracts of CLHA-Plus challenged with different doses of imazamox and chlorsulfuron. Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence comparisons between resistant and susceptible lines indicated that the imidazolinone-resistant AHAS of CLHA-Plus has a threonine codon (ACG) at position 122 (relative to the Arabidopsis thaliana AHAS sequence), whereas the herbicide-susceptible enzyme from BTK47 has an alanine residue (GCG) at this position. Since the resistance genes to AHAS-inhibiting herbicides so far characterized in sunflower code for the catalytic (large) subunit of AHAS, we propose to redesignate the wild type allele as ahasl1 and the incomplete dominant resistant alleles as Ahasl1-1 (previously Imr1 or Ar ( pur )), Ahasl1-2 (previously Ar ( kan )) and Ahasl1-3 (for the allele present in CLHA-Plus). The higher tolerance level to imidazolinones and the lack of cross-resistance to other AHAS-inhibiting herbicides of Ahasl1-3 indicate that this induced mutation can be used to develop commercial hybrids with superior levels of tolerance and, at the same time, to assist weed management where control of weedy common sunflower is necessary.

  18. Resistive switching in mixed conductors : Ag2S as a model system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales Masis, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Resistive switching memories have gained an increased interest due to the possibilities for downscaling of memory devices down to a few nanometers. These memories consist of a resistive material sandwiched between two metal electrodes, and applying a voltage between them induces resistance

  19. Photo-induced current transient spectroscopy for high-resistivity neutron-transmutation-doped silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Yutaka; Inoue, Yajiro; Usami, Akira

    1987-01-01

    Defects in high-resistivity neutron-transmutation-doped (NTD) silicon prior to annealing were studied by photo-induced current transient spectroscopy (PICTS). The thermal-neutron fluence was 9.5 x 10 17 cm -2 to give a resistivity of about 30 Ω after annealing, and the fast-neutron fluence was 9.5 x 10 16 cm -2 . Four traps with thermal emission activation energies of 0.15, 0.41. 0.47 and 0.50 eV were observed in NTD silicon. A trap with the thermal emission activation energy of 0.15 eV was considered to correspond to the divacancy. Although the clustered nature of the defects was observed, PICTS measurements suggest that the material state of high-resistivity NTD silicon is still crystalline and not amorphous. (author)

  20. Fluxon induced surface resistance and field emission in niobium films at 1.5 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuti, Cristoforo; Darriulat, Pierre; Peck, M A; Valente, A M; Van't Hof, C A

    2001-01-01

    The surface resistance of superconducting niobium films induced by the presence of trapped magnetic flux, presumably in the form of a pinned fluxon lattice, is shown to be modified by the presence of a field emitting impurity or defect. The modification takes the form of an additional surface resistance proportional to the density of the fluxon lattice and increasing linearly with the amplitude of the microwave above a threshold significantly lower than the field emission threshold. Such an effect, a precursor of electron emission, is observed for the first time in a study using radiofrequency cavities operating at their fundamental 1.5 GHz frequency. The measured properties of the additional surface resistance severely constrain possible explanations of the observed effect. (23 refs).

  1. Evaluation of induced mutants of wheat for resistance to fungal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga B, P.; Fuentes P, R.; Andrade S, N.; Seeman F, P.

    1990-01-01

    Evaluation of induced mutants of wheat for resistance to fungal diseases. Seeds of spring wheat cultivars Austral and Huenufen were exposed to gamma radiation in doses of 0.10 and 0.25 KGy with the objective of producing genotypes resistant to the main fungal diseases, with a high protein content and grain yield, for the southern region of Chile (39 sup(o)-44 sup(o) Latitude south). The selection process and evaluation up to the generation M sub(8) has made possible to identify mutants with a higher protein content and grain yield. Progress made in improving resistance to Puccinia striiformis and tolerance to Septoria spp., has also been important. Some selected mutants, conditioned to their future performance, could be directly used as commercial varieties and other mutants, on crosses with regionally adapted cultivars. (author)

  2. Studies on productivity lodge resistance of radiation induced mutants of syrian local durum wheat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elfares, A M; Ghazal, H M [Dep. of Radiation Agriculture, Syrian Atomic Energy Commision, Damascus, P.O. Box 6091, (Syrian Arab Republic)

    1995-10-01

    The aim of the research was to induce mutations characterized by lodging resistant and high yielding ability in two syrian local durum wheat land races. This research was carried out at two periods during 1983-1987 and from 1991-1993. At the first period, Kernels of Hourani and Senatore Cappelle were treated with 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 K rad of gamma rays at the Laboratory of the commission of Syrian Atomic Energy to induce mutations. The treated Kernels were planted in 1983/1984 season. After that, selection were practicised on plants which characterized by good performance and lodging resistant. During the successive seasons, screening were made on mutant lines to keep out only lines which show adaptability to intensive cultivation. Second period includes testing of selected lines at two govern orates of syria (Raqqa and Aleppo) during three successive seasons; 1991/1992 and 1992/1993 under intensive cultivation conditions (fertilization, irrigation, stands, etc.).

  3. INDUCING RESISTANCE IN COTTON AGAINST COLLETOTRICHUM GOSSYPII VAR. CEPHALOSPORIOIDES WITH ESSENTIAL OILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. T. Santos

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the potential of essential oils of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis, baccharis (Baccharis trimera, lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus, basil (Ocimum basilicum and eucalyptus (Corymbia citriodora in inducing resistance in cotton plants against C. gossypii var. cephalosporioides. The inductive effect of the essential oils was evaluated in plants growing in pots in the environment, which were treated with 1% essential oil at 47 days of age. 24 hours after elicitor treatment the plants were inoculated with a suspension of 1.5 x 105 conidia mL-1 of C. gossypii var. cephalosporioides. Five evaluations were performed disease and calculated the area under the disease progress curve. All essential oils showed potential for inducing resistance against cotton C. gossypii var. cephalosporioides.

  4. Imidacloprid does not induce Cyp genes involved in insecticide resistance of a mutant Drosophila melanogaster line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalajdzic, Predrag; Markaki, Maria; Oehler, Stefan; Savakis, Charalambos

    2013-10-01

    Certain xenobiotics have the capacity to induce the expression of genes involved in various biological phenomena, including insecticide resistance. The induction potential of different chemicals, among them different insecticides, has been documented for a number of insect species. In this study, we have analyzed the induction potential of Imidacloprid, a widely used member of the neonicotinoid insecticide family. Genes Cyp6g1 and Cyp6a2, known to be involved in the resistance of mutant Drosophila melanogaster line MiT[W⁻]3R2 to Imidacloprid and DDT were included in the analyzed sample. We find that Imidacloprid does not induce expression of the analyzed genes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. High Uric Acid Induces Insulin Resistance in Cardiomyocytes In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhi

    Full Text Available Clinical studies have shown hyperuricemia strongly associated with insulin resistance as well as cardiovascular disease. Direct evidence of how high uric acid (HUA affects insulin resistance in cardiomyocytes, but the pathological mechanism of HUA associated with cardiovascular disease remains to be clarified. We aimed to examine the effect of HUA on insulin sensitivity in cardiomyocytes and on insulin resistance in hyperuricemic mouse model. We exposed primary cardiomyocytes and a rat cardiomyocyte cell line, H9c2 cardiomyocytes, to HUA, then quantified glucose uptake with a fluorescent glucose analog, 2-NBDG, after insulin challenge and detected reactive oxygen species (ROS production. Western blot analysis was used to examine the levels of insulin receptor (IR, phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1, Ser307 and phospho-Akt (Ser473. We monitored the impact of HUA on insulin resistance, insulin signaling and IR, phospho-IRS1 (Ser307 and phospho-Akt levels in myocardial tissue of an acute hyperuricemia mouse model established by potassium oxonate treatment. HUA inhibited insulin-induced glucose uptake in H9c2 and primary cardiomyocytes. It increased ROS production; pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, a ROS scavenger, reversed HUA-inhibited glucose uptake induced by insulin. HUA exposure directly increased the phospho-IRS1 (Ser307 response to insulin and inhibited that of phospho-Akt in H9C2 cardiomyocytes, which was blocked by NAC. Furthermore, the acute hyperuricemic mice model showed impaired glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance accompanied by increased phospho-IRS1 (Ser307 and inhibited phospho-Akt response to insulin in myocardial tissues. HUA inhibited insulin signaling and induced insulin resistance in cardiomyocytes in vitro and in vivo, which is a novel potential mechanism of hyperuricemic-related cardiovascular disease.

  6. Transcriptome Analysis of Capsicum Chlorosis Virus-Induced Hypersensitive Resistance Response in Bell Capsicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widana Gamage, Shirani M K; McGrath, Desmond J; Persley, Denis M; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2016-01-01

    Capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV) is an emerging pathogen of capsicum, tomato and peanut crops in Australia and South-East Asia. Commercial capsicum cultivars with CaCV resistance are not yet available, but CaCV resistance identified in Capsicum chinense is being introgressed into commercial Bell capsicum. However, our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms leading to the resistance response to CaCV infection is limited. Therefore, transcriptome and expression profiling data provide an important resource to better understand CaCV resistance mechanisms. We assembled capsicum transcriptomes and analysed gene expression using Illumina HiSeq platform combined with a tag-based digital gene expression system. Total RNA extracted from CaCV/mock inoculated CaCV resistant (R) and susceptible (S) capsicum at the time point when R line showed a strong hypersensitive response to CaCV infection was used in transcriptome assembly. Gene expression profiles of R and S capsicum in CaCV- and buffer-inoculated conditions were compared. None of the genes were differentially expressed (DE) between R and S cultivars when mock-inoculated, while 2484 genes were DE when inoculated with CaCV. Functional classification revealed that the most highly up-regulated DE genes in R capsicum included pathogenesis-related genes, cell death-associated genes, genes associated with hormone-mediated signalling pathways and genes encoding enzymes involved in synthesis of defense-related secondary metabolites. We selected 15 genes to confirm DE expression levels by real-time quantitative PCR. DE transcript profiling data provided comprehensive gene expression information to gain an understanding of the underlying CaCV resistance mechanisms. Further, we identified candidate CaCV resistance genes in the CaCV-resistant C. annuum x C. chinense breeding line. This knowledge will be useful in future for fine mapping of the CaCV resistance locus and potential genetic engineering of resistance into Ca

  7. Carbon-Starvation Induces Cross-Resistance to Thermal, Acid, and Oxidative Stress in Serratia marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Joseph R.; Kline, La’Kesha C.; Kenyon, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The broad host-range pathogen Serratia marcescens survives in diverse host and non-host environments, often enduring conditions in which the concentration of essential nutrients is growth-limiting. In such environments, carbon and energy source starvation (carbon-starvation) is one of the most common forms of stress encountered by S. marcescens. Related members of the family Enterobacteriaceae are known to undergo substantial changes in gene expression and physiology in response to the specific stress of carbon-starvation, enabling non-spore-forming cells to survive periods of prolonged starvation and exposure to other forms of stress (i.e., starvation-induced cross-resistance). To determine if carbon-starvation also results in elevated levels of cross-resistance in S. marcescens, both log-phase and carbon-starved cultures, depleted of glucose before the onset of high cell-density stationary-phase, were grown in minimal media at either 30 °C or 37 °C and were then challenged for resistance to high temperature (50 °C), low pH (pH 2.8), and oxidative stress (15 mM H2O2). In general, carbon-starved cells exhibited a higher level of resistance to thermal stress, acid stress, and oxidative stress compared to log-phase cells. The extent of carbon-starvation-induced cross-resistance was dependent on incubation temperature and on the particular strain of S. marcescens. In addition, strain- and temperature-dependent variations in long-term starvation survival were also observed. The enhanced stress-resistance of starved S. marcescens cells could be an important factor in their survival and persistence in many non-host environments and within certain host microenvironments where the availability of carbon sources is suboptimal for growth. PMID:27682115

  8. Carbon-Starvation Induces Cross-Resistance to Thermal, Acid, and Oxidative Stress in Serratia marcescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R. Pittman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The broad host-range pathogen Serratia marcescens survives in diverse host and non-host environments, often enduring conditions in which the concentration of essential nutrients is growth-limiting. In such environments, carbon and energy source starvation (carbon-starvation is one of the most common forms of stress encountered by S. marcescens. Related members of the family Enterobacteriaceae are known to undergo substantial changes in gene expression and physiology in response to the specific stress of carbon-starvation, enabling non-spore-forming cells to survive periods of prolonged starvation and exposure to other forms of stress (i.e., starvation-induced cross-resistance. To determine if carbon-starvation also results in elevated levels of cross-resistance in S. marcescens, both log-phase and carbon-starved cultures, depleted of glucose before the onset of high cell-density stationary-phase, were grown in minimal media at either 30 °C or 37 °C and were then challenged for resistance to high temperature (50 °C, low pH (pH 2.8, and oxidative stress (15 mM H2O2. In general, carbon-starved cells exhibited a higher level of resistance to thermal stress, acid stress, and oxidative stress compared to log-phase cells. The extent of carbon-starvation-induced cross-resistance was dependent on incubation temperature and on the particular strain of S. marcescens. In addition, strain- and temperature-dependent variations in long-term starvation survival were also observed. The enhanced stress-resistance of starved S. marcescens cells could be an important factor in their survival and persistence in many non-host environments and within certain host microenvironments where the availability of carbon sources is suboptimal for growth.

  9. Glycerol-3-phosphate metabolism in wheat contributes to systemic acquired resistance against Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuheng Yang

    Full Text Available Glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P is a proposed regulator of plant defense signaling in basal resistance and systemic acquired resistance (SAR. The GLY1-encoded glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH and GLI1-encoded glycerol kinase (GK are two key enzymes involved in the G3P biosynthesis in plants. However, their physiological importance in wheat defense against pathogens remains unclear. In this study, quantification analysis revealed that G3P levels were significantly induced in wheat leaves challenged by the avirulent Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst race CYR23. The transcriptional levels of TaGLY1 and TaGLI1 were likewise significantly induced by avirulent Pst infection. Furthermore, knocking down TaGLY1 and TaGLI1 individually or simultaneously with barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing (BSMV-VIGS inhibited G3P accumulation and compromised the resistance in the wheat cultivar Suwon 11, whereas the accumulation of salicylic acid (SA and the expression of the SA-induced marker gene TaPR1 in plant leaves were altered significantly after gene silencing. These results suggested that G3P contributes to wheat systemic acquired resistance (SAR against stripe rust, and provided evidence that the G3P function as a signaling molecule is conserved in dicots and monocots. Meanwhile, the simultaneous co-silencing of multiple genes by the VIGS system proved to be a powerful tool for multi-gene functional analysis in plants.

  10. Long-term characterization of the diet-induced obese and diet-resistant rat model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas Nygaard; Hansen, Gitte; Paulsen, Sarah Juel

    2010-01-01

    , namely the selectively bred diet-induced obese (DIO) and diet-resistant (DR) rat strains. We show that they constitute useful models of the human obesity syndrome. DIO and DR rats were fed either a high-energy (HE) or a standard chow (Chow) diet from weaning to 9 months of age. Metabolic characterization......, the results underscore the effectiveness of GLP-1 mimetics both as anti-diabetes and anti-obesity agents....

  11. Influence of resistivity on energetic trapped particle-induced internal kink modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biglari, H.; Chen, L.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of resistivity on energetic trapped particle-induced internal kink modes, dubbed ''fishbones'' in the literature, is explored. A general dispersion relation, which recovers the ideal theory in its appropriate limit, is derived and analyzed. An important implication of the theory for present generation fusion devices such as the Joint European Torus [Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research (IAEA, London, 1984), Vol I, p.11] is that they will be stable to fishbone activity

  12. Nanohybrid systems of non-ionic surfactant inserting liposomes loading paclitaxel for reversal of multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiufeng; Gao, Yu; Chen, Lingli; Zhang, Zhiwen; Deng, Yihui; Li, Yaping

    2012-01-17

    Three new nanohybrid systems of non-ionic surfactant inserting liposomes loading paclitaxel (PTX) (NLPs) were prepared to overcome multidrug resistance (MDR) in PTX-resistance human lung cancer cell line. Three non-ionic surfactants, Solutol HS 15 (HS-15), pluronic F68 (PF-68) and cremophor EL (CrEL) were inserted into liposomes by film hydration method to form NLPs with an average size of around 110, 180 and 110 nm, respectively. There was an obvious increase of rhodamin 123 (Rh123) accumulation in A549/T cells after treated with nanohybrid systems loading Rh123 (NLRs) when compared with free Rh123 or liposomes loading Rh123 without surfactants (LRs), which indicated the significant inhibition effects of NLRs on drug efflux. The P-gp detection and ATP determination demonstrated that BNLs could not only interfere P-gp expression on the membrane of drug resistant cells, but also decrease ATP level in the cells. The cytotoxicity of NLPs against A549/T cells was higher than PTX loaded liposomes without surfactants (LPs), and the best result was achieved after treated with NLPs2. The apoptotic assay and the cell cycle analysis showed that NLPs could induce more apoptotic cells in drug resistant cells when compared with LPs. These results suggested that NLPs could overcome MDR by combination of drug delivery, P-gp inhibition and ATP depletion, and showed potential for treatment of MDR. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Host-Induced Silencing of Pathogenicity Genes Enhances Resistance to Fusarium oxysporum Wilt in Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Poonam; Jyoti, Poonam; Kapoor, Priya; Sharma, Vandana; Shanmugam, V; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2017-08-01

    This study presents a novel approach of controlling vascular wilt in tomato by RNAi expression directed to pathogenicity genes of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Vascular wilt of tomato caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici leads to qualitative and quantitative loss of the crop. Limitation in the existing control measures necessitates the development of alternative strategies to increase resistance in the plants against pathogens. Recent findings paved way to RNAi, as a promising method for silencing of pathogenicity genes in fungus and provided effective resistance against fungal pathogens. Here, two important pathogenicity genes FOW2, a Zn(II)2Cys6 family putative transcription regulator, and chsV, a putative myosin motor and a chitin synthase domain, were used for host-induced gene silencing through hairpinRNA cassettes of these genes against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. HairpinRNAs were assembled in appropriate binary vectors and transformed into tomato plant targeting FOW2 and chsV genes, for two highly pathogenic strains of Fusarium oxysporum viz. TOFOL-IHBT and TOFOL-IVRI. Transgenic tomatoes were analyzed for possible attainment of resistance in transgenic lines against fungal infection. Eight transgenic lines expressing hairpinRNA cassettes showed trivial disease symptoms after 6-8 weeks of infection. Hence, the host-induced posttranscriptional gene silencing of pathogenicity genes in transgenic tomato plants has enhanced their resistance to vascular wilt disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum.

  14. Transient, heat-induced thermal resistance in the small intestine of mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hume, S.P.; Marigold, J.C.L.

    1980-01-01

    Heat-induced thermal resistance has been investigated in mouse jejunum by assaying crypt survival 24 h after treatment. Hyperthermia was achieved by immersing an exteriorized loop of intestine in a bath of Krebs-Ringer solution. Two approaches have been used. In the first, thermal survival curves were obtained following single hyperthermal treatments at temperatures in the range 42 to 44 0 C. Transient thermal resistance, inducted by a plateau in the crypt survival curve, developed during heating at temperatures around 42.5 0 C after 60 to 80 min. In the second series of experiments, a priming heat treatment (40.0, 41.0, 41.5, or 42.0 0 C for 60 min) was followed at varying intervals by a test treatment at 43.0 0 C. A transient resistance to the second treatment was induced, the extent and time of development being dependent upon the priming treatment. Crypt survival curves for thermally resistant intestine showed an increase in thermal D 0 and a decrease in n compared with curves from previously unheated intestine

  15. Odontella aurita-enriched diet prevents high fat diet-induced liver insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, Hamza; Benomar, Yacir; Haimeur, Adil; Messaouri, Hafida; Meskini, Nadia; Taouis, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial effect of polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acid (w-3 FA) consumption regarding cardiovascular diseases, insulin resistance and inflammation has been widely reported. Fish oil is considered as the main source of commercialized w-3 FAs, and other alternative sources have been reported such as linseed or microalgae. However, despite numerous reports, the underlying mechanisms of action of w-3 FAs on insulin resistance are still not clearly established, especially those from microalgae. Here, we report that Odontella aurita, a microalga rich in w-3 FAs eicosapentaenoic acid, prevents high fat diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammation in the liver of Wistar rats. Indeed, a high fat diet (HFD) increased plasma insulin levels associated with the impairment of insulin receptor signaling and the up-regulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expressions. Importantly, Odontella aurita-enriched HFD (HFOA) reduces body weight and plasma insulin levels and maintains normal insulin receptor expression and responsiveness. Furthermore, HFOA decreased TLR4 expression, JNK/p38 phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory factors. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that diet supplementation with whole Ondontella aurita overcomes HFD-induced insulin resistance through the inhibition of TLR4/JNK/p38 MAP kinase signaling pathways. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  16. The tobacco smoke component acrolein induces glucocorticoid resistant gene expression via inhibition of histone deacetylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Matthew J; Haenen, Guido R M M; Bouwman, Freek G; van der Vliet, Albert; Bast, Aalt

    2016-01-05

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the leading cause of cigarette smoke-related death worldwide. Acrolein, a crucial reactive electrophile found in cigarette smoke mimics many of the toxic effects of cigarette smoke-exposure in the lung. In macrophages, cigarette smoke is known to hinder histone deacetylases (HDACs), glucocorticoid-regulated enzymes that play an important role in the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid resistant inflammation, a common feature of COPD. Thus, we hypothesize that acrolein plays a role in COPD-associated glucocorticoid resistance. To examine the role of acrolein on glucocorticoid resistance, U937 monocytes, differentiated with PMA to macrophage-like cells were treated with acrolein for 0.5h followed by stimulation with hydrocortisone for 8h, or treated simultaneously with LPS and hydrocortisone for 8h without acrolein. GSH and nuclear HDAC activity were measured, or gene expression was analyzed by qPCR. Acrolein-mediated TNFα gene expression was not suppressed by hydrocortisone whereas LPS-induced TNFα expression was suppressed. Acrolein also significantly inhibited nuclear HDAC activity in macrophage-like cells. Incubation of recombinant HDAC2 with acrolein led to the formation of an HDAC2-acrolein adduct identified by mass spectrometry. Therefore, these results suggest that acrolein-induced inflammatory gene expression is resistant to suppression by the endogenous glucocorticoid, hydrocortisone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. High intensity aerobic exercise training improves chronic intermittent hypoxia-induced insulin resistance without basal autophagy modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Marion; Assense, Allan; Rondon, Aurélie; Thomas, Amandine; Dubouchaud, Hervé; Freyssenet, Damien; Benoit, Henri; Castells, Josiane; Flore, Patrice

    2017-03-03

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases (insulin resistance: IR). Autophagy is involved in the pathophysiology of IR and high intensity training (HIT) has recently emerged as a potential therapy. We aimed to confirm IH-induced IR in a tissue-dependent way and to explore the preventive effect of HIT on IR-induced by IH. Thirty Swiss 129 male mice were randomly assigned to Normoxia (N), Intermittent Hypoxia (IH: 21-5% FiO 2 , 30 s cycle, 8 h/day) or IH associated with high intensity training (IH HIT). After 8 days of HIT (2*24 min, 50 to 90% of Maximal Aerobic Speed or MAS on a treadmill) mice underwent 14 days IH or N. We found that IH induced IR, characterized by a greater glycemia, an impaired insulin sensitivity and lower AKT phosphorylation in adipose tissue and liver. Nevertheless, MAS and AKT phosphorylation were greater in muscle after IH. IH associated with HIT induced better systemic insulin sensitivity and AKT phosphorylation in liver. Autophagy markers were not altered in both conditions. These findings suggest that HIT could represent a preventive strategy to limit IH-induced IR without change of basal autophagy.

  18. Analysis of Clonostachys rosea-induced resistance to tomato gray mold disease in tomato leaves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Dalcantara Ongouya Mouekouba

    Full Text Available Tomato gray mold disease, caused by Botrytis cinerea, is a serious disease in tomato. Clonostachys rosea is an antagonistic microorganism to B. cinerea. To investigate the induced resistance mechanism of C. rosea, we examined the effects of these microorganisms on tomato leaves, along with changes in the activities of three defense enzymes (PAL, PPO, GST, second messengers (NO, H2O2, O2(- and phytohormones (IAA, ABA, GA3, ZT, MeJA, SA and C2H4. Compared to the control, all treatments induced higher levels of PAL, PPO and GST activity in tomato leaves and increased NO, SA and GA3 levels. The expression of WRKY and MAPK, two important transcription factors in plant disease resistance, was upregulated in C. rosea- and C. rosea plus B. cinerea-treated samples. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis showed that two abundant proteins were present in the C. rosea plus B. cinerea-treated samples but not in the other samples. These proteins were determined (by mass spectrum analysis to be LEXYL2 (β-xylosidase and ATP synthase CF1 alpha subunit. Therefore, C. rosea plus B. cinerea treatment induces gray mold resistance in tomato. This study provides a basis for elucidating the mechanism of C. rosea as a biocontrol agent.

  19. Celastrol Protects against Antimycin A-Induced Insulin Resistance in Human Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Hafizi Abu Bakar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation are widely accepted as key hallmarks of obesity-induced skeletal muscle insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the functional roles of an anti-inflammatory compound, celastrol, in mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance induced by antimycin A (AMA in human skeletal muscle cells. We found that celastrol treatment improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake activity of AMA-treated cells, apparently via PI3K/Akt pathways, with significant enhancement of mitochondrial activities. Furthermore, celastrol prevented increased levels of cellular oxidative damage where the production of several pro-inflammatory cytokines in cultures cells was greatly reduced. Celastrol significantly increased protein phosphorylation of insulin signaling cascades with amplified expression of AMPK protein and attenuated NF-κB and PKC θ activation in human skeletal muscle treated with AMA. The improvement of insulin signaling pathways by celastrol was also accompanied by augmented GLUT4 protein expression. Taken together, these results suggest that celastrol may be advocated for use as a potential therapeutic molecule to protect against mitochondrial dysfunction-induced insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle cells.

  20. IFN-gamma-inducible Irga6 mediates host resistance against Chlamydia trachomatis via autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munir A Al-Zeer

    Full Text Available Chlamydial infection of the host cell induces Gamma interferon (IFNgamma, a central immunoprotector for humans and mice. The primary defense against Chlamydia infection in the mouse involves the IFNgamma-inducible family of IRG proteins; however, the precise mechanisms mediating the pathogen's elimination are unknown. In this study, we identify Irga6 as an important resistance factor against C. trachomatis, but not C. muridarum, infection in IFNgamma-stimulated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. We show that Irga6, Irgd, Irgm2 and Irgm3 accumulate at bacterial inclusions in MEFs upon stimulation with IFNgamma, whereas Irgb6 colocalized in the presence or absence of the cytokine. This accumulation triggers a rerouting of bacterial inclusions to autophagosomes that subsequently fuse to lysosomes for elimination. Autophagy-deficient Atg5-/- MEFs and lysosomal acidification impaired cells surrender to infection. Irgm2, Irgm3 and Irgd still localize to inclusions in IFNgamma-induced Atg5-/- cells, but Irga6 localization is disrupted indicating its pivotal role in pathogen resistance. Irga6-deficient (Irga6-/- MEFs, in which chlamydial growth is enhanced, do not respond to IFNgamma even though Irgb6, Irgd, Irgm2 and Irgm3 still localize to inclusions. Taken together, we identify Irga6 as a necessary factor in conferring host resistance by remodelling a classically nonfusogenic intracellular pathogen to stimulate fusion with autophagosomes, thereby rerouting the intruder to the lysosomal compartment for destruction.

  1. Drought and flooding have distinct effects on herbivore-induced responses and resistance in Solanum dulcamara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duy; D'Agostino, Nunzio; Tytgat, Tom O G; Sun, Pulu; Lortzing, Tobias; Visser, Eric J W; Cristescu, Simona M; Steppuhn, Anke; Mariani, Celestina; van Dam, Nicole M; Rieu, Ivo

    2016-07-01

    In the field, biotic and abiotic stresses frequently co-occur. As a consequence, common molecular signalling pathways governing adaptive responses to individual stresses can interact, resulting in compromised phenotypes. How plant signalling pathways interact under combined stresses is poorly understood. To assess this, we studied the consequence of drought and soil flooding on resistance of Solanum dulcamara to Spodoptera exigua and their effects on hormonal and transcriptomic profiles. The results showed that S. exigua larvae performed less well on drought-stressed plants than on well-watered and flooded plants. Both drought and insect feeding increased abscisic acid and jasmonic acid (JA) levels, whereas flooding did not induce JA accumulation. RNA sequencing analyses corroborated this pattern: drought and herbivory induced many biological processes that were repressed by flooding. When applied in combination, drought and herbivory had an additive effect on specific processes involved in secondary metabolism and defence responses, including protease inhibitor activity. In conclusion, drought and flooding have distinct effects on herbivore-induced responses and resistance. Especially, the interaction between abscisic acid and JA signalling may be important to optimize plant responses to combined drought and insect herbivory, making drought-stressed plants more resistant to insects than well-watered and flooded plants. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Effects of fatigue induced damage on the longitudinal fracture resistance of cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Lloyd; Codrington, John; Parkinson, Ian

    2014-07-01

    As a composite material, cortical bone accumulates fatigue microdamage through the repetitive loading of everyday activity (e.g. walking). The accumulation of fatigue microdamage is thought to contribute to the occurrence of fragility fractures in older people. Therefore it is beneficial to understand the relationship between microcrack accumulation and the fracture resistance of cortical bone. Twenty longitudinally orientated compact tension fracture specimens were machined from a single bovine femur, ten specimens were assigned to both the control and fatigue damaged groups. The damaged group underwent a fatigue loading protocol to induce microdamage which was assessed via fluorescent microscopy. Following fatigue loading, non-linear fracture resistance tests were undertaken on both the control and damaged groups using the J-integral method. The interaction of the crack path with the fatigue induced damage and inherent toughening mechanisms were then observed using fluorescent microscopy. The results of this study show that fatigue induced damage reduces the initiation toughness of cortical bone and the growth toughness within the damage zone by three distinct mechanisms of fatigue-fracture interaction. Further analysis of the J-integral fracture resistance showed both the elastic and plastic component were reduced in the damaged group. For the elastic component this was attributed to a decreased number of ligament bridges in the crack wake while for the plastic component this was attributed to the presence of pre-existing fatigue microcracks preventing energy absorption by the formation of new microcracks.

  3. Systems-level analysis of Escherichia coli response to silver nanoparticles: the roles of anaerobic respiration in microbial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Huamao; Lo, Tat-Ming; Sitompul, Johnner; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2012-08-10

    Despite extensive use of silver nanoparticles for antimicrobial applications, cellular mechanisms underlying microbial response to silver nanoparticles remain to be further elucidated at the systems level. Here, we report systems-level response of Escherichia coli to silver nanoparticles using transcriptome-based biochemical and phenotype assays. Notably, we provided the evidence that anaerobic respiration is induced upon exposure to silver nanoparticles. Further we showed that anaerobic respiration-related regulators and enzymes play an important role in E. coli resistance to silver nanoparticles. In particular, our results suggest that arcA is essential for resistance against silver NPs and the deletion of fnr, fdnH and narH significantly increases the resistance. We envision that this study offers novel insights into modes of antimicrobial action of silver nanoparticles, and cellular mechanisms contributing to the development of microbial resistance to silver nanoparticles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Structure of syncytia induced by Heterodera schachtii Schmidt in roots of susceptible and resistant radish (Raphanus sativus L., var. oleiformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Grymaszewska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of syncytia induced by Heterodera schachtii Schmidt in roots of susceptible Raphanus sativus L. cv. "Siletina" and resistant radish cv. "Pegletta" was investigated. In the radish cultivar "Siletina" the syncytia most often appeared in the elongation zone of lateral roots. They were initiated in the procambium and pericycle but also included the parenchyma cells of vascular cylinder. In the susceptible cultivar "Siletina" the cells forming the female's syncytia were subject to hypertrophy. Their cytoplasmic density increased. The cytoplasm contained numerous organella. The proliferation of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum took place. Branched cell wall ingrowths were formed next to the vessels. In the male's syncytia the cells were only slightly increased. Their protoplasts contained few organelles. The cell wall ingrowths were poorly developed. In the syncytia of the resistant cultivar "Pegletta" there was only a slight increase of the cell volume. A well developed system of rough endoplasmic reticulum was observed in the protoplast. Distended ER cisterns contained fine fibrillar material. Material of similar structure also appeared in numerous small vacuoles. In resistant plants only some, not numerous, syncytia spreading in procambium fully developed and functioned long enough for the parasite females to mature. At an advanced stage of infection a well developed system of a rough ER was observed also in those syncytia and numerous vacuoles appeared.

  5. Induction of Systemic Resistance against Aphids by Endophytic Bacillus velezensis YC7010 via Expressing PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Md Harun-Or-; Khan, Ajmal; Hossain, Mohammad T; Chung, Young R

    2017-01-01

    Aphids are the most destructive insect pests. They suck the sap and transmit plant viruses, causing widespread yield loss of many crops. A multifunctional endophytic bacterial strain Bacillus velezensis YC7010 has been found to induce systemic resistance against bacterial and fungal pathogens of rice. However, its activity against insects attack and underlying cellular and molecular defense mechanisms are not elucidated yet. Here, we show that root drenching of Arabidopsis seedlings with B. velezensis YC7010 can induce systemic resistance against green peach aphid (GPA), Myzus persicae . Treatment of bacterial suspension of B. velezensis YC7010 at 2 × 10 7 CFU/ml to Arabidopsis rhizosphere induced higher accumulation of hydrogen peroxide, cell death, and callose deposition in leaves compared to untreated plants at 6 days after infestation of GPA. Salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylene, and abscisic acid were not required to confer defense against GPA in Arabidopsis plants treated by B. velezensis YC7010. Bacterial treatment with B. velezensis YC7010 significantly reduced settling, feeding and reproduction of GPA on Arabidopsis leaves via strongly expressing senescence-promoting gene PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 ( PAD4 ) while suppressing BOTRYTIS-INDUCED KINASE1 ( BIK1 ). These results indicate that B. velezensis YC7010-induced systemic resistance to the GPA is a hypersensitive response mainly dependent on higher expression of PAD4 with suppression of BIK1 , resulting in more accumulation of hydrogen peroxide, cell death, and callose deposition in Arabidopsis .

  6. Induction of Systemic Resistance against Aphids by Endophytic Bacillus velezensis YC7010 via Expressing PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Md. Harun-Or-; Khan, Ajmal; Hossain, Mohammad T.; Chung, Young R.

    2017-01-01

    Aphids are the most destructive insect pests. They suck the sap and transmit plant viruses, causing widespread yield loss of many crops. A multifunctional endophytic bacterial strain Bacillus velezensis YC7010 has been found to induce systemic resistance against bacterial and fungal pathogens of rice. However, its activity against insects attack and underlying cellular and molecular defense mechanisms are not elucidated yet. Here, we show that root drenching of Arabidopsis seedlings with B. velezensis YC7010 can induce systemic resistance against green peach aphid (GPA), Myzus persicae. Treatment of bacterial suspension of B. velezensis YC7010 at 2 × 107 CFU/ml to Arabidopsis rhizosphere induced higher accumulation of hydrogen peroxide, cell death, and callose deposition in leaves compared to untreated plants at 6 days after infestation of GPA. Salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylene, and abscisic acid were not required to confer defense against GPA in Arabidopsis plants treated by B. velezensis YC7010. Bacterial treatment with B. velezensis YC7010 significantly reduced settling, feeding and reproduction of GPA on Arabidopsis leaves via strongly expressing senescence-promoting gene PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4) while suppressing BOTRYTIS-INDUCED KINASE1 (BIK1). These results indicate that B. velezensis YC7010-induced systemic resistance to the GPA is a hypersensitive response mainly dependent on higher expression of PAD4 with suppression of BIK1, resulting in more accumulation of hydrogen peroxide, cell death, and callose deposition in Arabidopsis. PMID:28261260

  7. Inhibition of IGF1-R overcomes IGFBP7-induced chemotherapy resistance in T-ALL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartram, Isabelle; Erben, Ulrike; Ortiz-Tanchez, Jutta; Blunert, Katja; Schlee, Cornelia; Neumann, Martin; Heesch, Sandra; Baldus, Claudia D.

    2015-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a genetically heterogeneous disease with the need for treatment optimization. Previously, high expression of Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP7), a member of the IGF system, was identified as negative prognostic factor in adult T-ALL patients. Since aberrant IGFBP7 expression was observed in a variety of neoplasia and was relevant for prognosis in T-ALL, we investigated the functional role of IGFBP7 in Jurkat and Molt-4 cells as in vitro models for T-ALL. Jurkat and Molt-4 cells were stably transfected with an IGFBP7 over-expression vector or the empty vector as control. Proliferation of the cells was assessed by WST-1 assays and cell cycle status was measured by flow-cytometry after BrDU/7-AAD staining. The effect of IGFBP7 over-expression on sensitivity to cytostatic drugs was determined in AnnexinV/7-AAD assays. IGF1-R protein expression was measured by Western Blot and flow-cytometric analysis. IGF1-R associated gene expression profiles were generated from microarray gene expression data of 86 T-ALL patients from the Microarrays Innovations in Leukemia (MILE) multicenter study. IGFBP7-transfected Jurkat cells proliferated less, leading to a longer survival in a nutrient–limited environment. Both IGFBP7-transfected Jurkat and Molt-4 cells showed an arrest in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase. Furthermore, Jurkat IGFBP7-transfected cells were resistant to vincristine and asparaginase treatment. Surface expression and whole protein measurement of IGF1-R protein expression showed a reduced abundance of the receptor after IGFBP7 transfection in Jurkat cells. Interestingly, combination of the IGF1-R inhibitor NPV-AEW541 restored sensitivity to vincristine in IGFBP7-transfected cells. Additionally, IGF1-R associated GEP revealed an up-regulation of important drivers of T-ALL pathogenesis and regulators of chemo-resistance and apoptosis such as NOTCH1, BCL-2, PRKCI, and TP53. This study revealed a

  8. MEHODOLOGY FOR PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE FOR ADVANCE NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YUE, M.; CHANG, L.Y.; BARI, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Technology Goals for Generation IV nuclear energy systems highlight Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PRandPP) as one of the four goal areas for Generation 1V nuclear technology. Accordingly, an evaluation methodology is being developed by a PRandPP Experts Group. This paper presents a possible approach, which is based on Markov modeling, to the evaluation methodology for Generation IV nuclear energy systems being developed for PRandPP. Using the Markov model, a variety of proliferation scenarios can be constructed and the proliferation resistance measures can be quantified, particularly the probability of detection. To model the system with increased fidelity, the Markov model is further developed to incorporate multiple safeguards approaches in this paper. The approach to the determination of the associated parameters is presented. Evaluations of diversion scenarios for an example sodium fast reactor (ESFR) energy system are used to illustrate the methodology. The Markov model is particularly useful because it can provide the probability density function of the time it takes for the effort to be detected at a specific stage of the proliferation effort

  9. Infection dynamics of vancomycin and inducible clindamycin resistant Enterococcus faecalis in an Indian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasmita Dubey

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To do surveillance for vancomycin and inducible clindamycin resistance of Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis, a Gram-positive bacterium in a teaching hospital. Methods: E. faecalis strains isolated from clinical samples were screened for vancomycin and inducible clindamycin resistance, i.e., D-test positivity, using vancomycin screen agar and blood agar plates, respectively. For the D-test screening, erythromycin resistant (Er-r and clindamycin sensitive (Cd-s strain were used. Results: Of 265 isolated E. faecalis strains, 159 (60% were vancomycin resistant Enterococcus (VRE and 106 were vancomycin sensitive Enterococcus (VSE. Of 265 strains, 42 were constitutively resistant to clindamycin and erythromycin and of 148 Er-r and Cd-s strains, 87 (32.83% had D-test positivity, while the rest 61 strains were D-test negatives. D-test results examined with 6 hospital factors as bivalents, only 2 factors, the VSE/VRE and the presence/absence of prior antibiotic use > 90 days bivalent were statistically significant. A VRE strain with D-test positivity would be picked up 0.570 2 times more frequently than a strain with VSE and D-test positivity. Also, patients with prior antibiotic use > 90 days had 3.737 5 times more chance of picking up D-test positive strains than patients without any prior antibiotic use. Resistance pattern of E. faecalis strains to individual 14 antibiotics were recorded; the maximum values of resistance were against ampicillin 10 μg/disc and linezolid 30 μg/disc. Student’s t-test for hospital acquired and community acquired data revealed that drug resistant strains were equally prevalent in both sources. Conclusions: Prevalence of 60% VRE in both hospital and adjoining community creates consternation. In total 87 (32.83% strains had D-test positivity; patients who had used antibiotics within the last 90 days have got an ample chance of picking of D-test positive E. faecalis. D-test protocol should be followed with

  10. Characterization of Taurine Transporting Systems During Acquirement of Resistance to Platinum(II)-based, Chemotherapeutic Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Belinda Halling

    Although, cisplatin is one of the most effective broad-spectrum anticancer drugs, prolonged cisplatin treatment often results in development of chemoresistance and subsequent therapeutic failure. Dysregulation of the taurine transporting systems i.e., the taurine transporter (TauT) and volume....... Cisplatin resistance correlates with a reduction in the volume regulated anion current and taurine release mediated by VRACs, as well as an improved cellular accumulation of taurine through TauT. In human ovarian A2780 cancer cells, for instance, cisplatin resistance is associated with an absent swelling......-induced taurine release and inability to volume regulate. The dismissed taurine release was due to an almost absent leucin-rich-repeat containing 8A (LRRC8A) total protein expression. LRRC8A is an important component of VRACs. Cellular taurine contributes to the intracellular pool of organic osmolytes. Moreover...

  11. Low resistivity Pt interconnects developed by electron beam assisted deposition using novel gas injector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, R J; Romano-Rodriguez, A; O'Regan, C; Holmes, J D; Petkov, N; Thrompenaars, P; Mulder, J J L

    2012-01-01

    Electron beam-induced deposition (EBID) is a direct write process where an electron beam locally decomposes a precursor gas leaving behind non-volatile deposits. It is a fast and relatively in-expensive method designed to develop conductive (metal) or isolating (oxide) nanostructures. Unfortunately the EBID process results in deposition of metal nanostructures with relatively high resistivity because the gas precursors employed are hydrocarbon based. We have developed deposition protocols using novel gas-injector system (GIS) with a carbon free Pt precursor. Interconnect type structures were deposited on preformed metal architectures. The obtained structures were analysed by cross-sectional TEM and their electrical properties were analysed ex-situ using four point probe electrical tests. The results suggest that both the structural and electrical characteristics differ significantly from those of Pt interconnects deposited by conventional hydrocarbon based precursors, and show great promise for the development of low resistivity electrical contacts.

  12. Newer systems for bacterial resistances to toxic heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, S; Ji, G

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids contain specific genes for resistances to toxic heavy metal ions including Ag+, AsO2-, AsO4(3-), Cd2+, Co2+, CrO4(2-), Cu2+, Hg2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Sb3+, and Zn2+. Recent progress with plasmid copper-resistance systems in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas syringae show a system of four gene products, an inner membrane protein (PcoD), an outer membrane protein (PcoB), and two periplasmic Cu(2+)-binding proteins (PcoA and PcoC). Synthesis of this system is governed by two regulatory proteins (the membrane sensor PcoS and the soluble responder PcoR, probably a DNA-binding protein), homologous to other bacterial two-component regulatory systems. Chromosomally encoded Cu2+ P-type ATPases have recently been recognized in Enterococcus hirae and these are closely homologous to the bacterial cadmium efflux ATPase and the human copper-deficiency disease Menkes gene product. The Cd(2+)-efflux ATPase of gram-positive bacteria is a large P-type ATPase, homologous to the muscle Ca2+ ATPase and the Na+/K+ ATPases of animals. The arsenic-resistance system of gram-negative bacteria functions as an oxyanion efflux ATPase for arsenite and presumably antimonite. However, the structure of the arsenic ATPase is fundamentally different from that of P-type ATPases. The absence of the arsA gene (for the ATPase subunit) in gram-positive bacteria raises questions of energy-coupling for arsenite efflux. The ArsC protein product of the arsenic-resistance operons of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria is an intracellular enzyme that reduces arsenate [As(V)] to arsenite [As(III)], the substrate for the transport pump. Newly studied cation efflux systems for Cd2+, Zn2+, and Co2+ (Czc) or Co2+ and Ni2+ resistance (Cnr) lack ATPase motifs in their predicted polypeptide sequences. Therefore, not all plasmid-resistance systems that function through toxic ion efflux are ATPases. The first well-defined bacterial metallothionein was found in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus

  13. Effect of vitamin D on stress-induced hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, N; Khalili, H; Mohammadi, M; Abdollahi, A; Ala, S

    2016-05-01

    Effects of vitamin D supplementation on the glycaemic indices and insulin resistance in diabetic and non-diabetic patients were studied. In this study, effects of vitamin D supplementation on stress-induced hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance were evaluated in non-diabetic surgical critically ill patients. Adult surgical patients with stress-induced hyperglycaemia within the first 24 h of admission to the ICU were recruited. The patients randomly assigned to receive either vitamin D or placebo. Patients in the vitamin D group received a single dose of 600,000 IU vitamin D3 as intramuscular injection at time of recruitment. Besides demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients, plasma glucose, insulin, 25(OH) D and adiponectin levels were measured at the time of ICU admission and day 7. Homoeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and homestasis model assessment adiponectin (HOMA-AD) ratio were considered at the times of assessment. Comparing with the baseline, plasma 25(OH) D level significantly increased in the subjects who received vitamin D (p = 0.04). Improvement in fasting plasma glucose levels was detected in day 7 of the study compared with the baseline status in both groups. HOMA-IR showed a decrement pattern in vitamin D group (p = 0.09). Fasting plasma adiponectin levels increased significantly in the vitamin D group (p = 0.007), but not in the placebo group (p = 0.38). Finally, changes in HOMA-AD ratio were not significant in the both groups. Vitamin D supplementation showed positive effect on plasma adiponectin level, as a biomarker of insulin sensitivity in surgical critically ill patients with stress-induced hyperglycaemia. However, effects of vitamin D supplementation on HOMA-IR and HOMA-AD as indicators of insulin resistance were not significant. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. [Molecular mechanism for ET-1-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horinouchi, Takahiro; Mazaki, Yuichi; Terada, Koji; Miwa, Soichi

    2018-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a condition where the sensitivity to insulin of the tissues expressing insulin receptor (InsR) is decreased due to a functional disturbance of InsR-mediated intracellular signaling. Insulin promotes the entry of glucose into the tissues and skeletal muscle is the most important tissue responsible for the insulin's action of decreasing blood glucose levels. Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor and pro-inflammatory peptide, induces insulin resistance through a direct action on skeletal muscle. However, the signaling pathways of ET-1-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle remain unclear. Here we show molecular mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of ET-1 on insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake in myotubes of rat L6 skeletal muscle cell line. mRNA expression levels of differentiation marker genes, MyoD and myogenin, were increased during L6 myoblasts differentiation into myotubes. Some of myotubes possessed the ability to spontaneously contract. In myotubes, insulin promoted Akt phosphorylation at Thr 308 and Ser 473 , and [ 3 H]-labelled 2-deoxy-D-glucose ([ 3 H]2-DG) uptake. The insulin-facilitated Akt phosphorylation and [ 3 H]2-DG uptake were inhibited by ET-1. The inhibitory effect of ET-1 was counteracted by blockade of ET type A receptor (ET A R), inhibition of G q/11 protein, and siRNA knockdown of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). The exogenously overexpressed GRK2 directly bound to endogenous Akt and their association was facilitated by ET-1. In summary, activation of ET A R with ET-1 inhibits insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation and [ 3 H]2-DG uptake in a G q/11 protein- and GRK2-dependent manner in skeletal muscle. These findings indicate that ET A R and GRK2 are potential targets for insulin resistance.

  15. IL6 induces TAM resistance via kinase-specific phosphorylation of ERα in OVCA cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Niu, Xiu Long; Guo, Xiao Qin; Yang, Jing; Li, Ling; Qu, Ye; Xiu Hu, Cun; Mao, Li Qun; Wang, Dan

    2015-06-01

    About 40-60% of ovarian cancer (OVCA) cases express ERα, but only a small proportion of patients respond clinically to anti-estrogen treatment with estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist tamoxifen (TAM). The mechanism of TAM resistance in the course of OVCA progression remains unclear. However, IL6 plays a critical role in the development and progression of OVCA. Our recent results indicated that IL6 secreted by OVCA cells may promote the resistance of these cells to TAM via ER isoforms and steroid hormone receptor coactivator-1. Here we demonstrate that both exogenous (a relatively short period of treatment with recombinant IL6) and endogenous IL6 (generated as a result of transfection with a plasmid encoding sense IL6) increases expression of pERα-Ser118 and pERα-Ser167 in non-IL6-expressing A2780 cells, while deleting endogenous IL6 expression in IL6-overexpressing CAOV-3 cells (by transfection with a plasmid encoding antisense IL6) reduces expression of pERα-Ser118 and pERα-Ser167, indicating that IL6-induced TAM resistance may also be associated with increased expression of pERα-Ser118 and pERα-Ser167 in OVCA cells. Results of further investigation indicate that IL6 phosphorylates ERα at Ser118 and Ser167 by triggering activation of MEK/ERK and phosphotidylinositol 3 kinase/Akt signaling, respectively, to activate the ER pathway and thereby induce OVCA cells resistance to TAM. These results indicate that IL6 secreted by OVCA cells may also contribute to the refractoriness of these cells to TAM via the crosstalk between ER and IL6-mediated intracellular signal transduction cascades. Overexpression of IL6 not only plays an important role in OVCA progression but also promotes TAM resistance. Our results indicate that TAM-IL6-targeted adjunctive therapy may lead to a more effective intervention than TAM alone. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  16. Peripheral nervous system insulin resistance in ob/ob mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A reduction in peripheral nervous system (PNS) insulin signaling is a proposed mechanism that may contribute to sensory neuron dysfunction and diabetic neuropathy. Neuronal insulin resistance is associated with several neurological disorders and recent evidence has indicated that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in primary culture display altered insulin signaling, yet in vivo results are lacking. Here, experiments were performed to test the hypothesis that the PNS of insulin-resistant mice displays altered insulin signal transduction in vivo. For these studies, nondiabetic control and type 2 diabetic ob/ob mice were challenged with an intrathecal injection of insulin or insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and downstream signaling was evaluated in the DRG and sciatic nerve using Western blot analysis. Results The results indicate that insulin signaling abnormalities documented in other “insulin sensitive” tissues (i.e. muscle, fat, liver) of ob/ob mice are also present in the PNS. A robust increase in Akt activation was observed with insulin and IGF-1 stimulation in nondiabetic mice in both the sciatic nerve and DRG; however this response was blunted in both tissues from ob/ob mice. The results also suggest that upregulated JNK activation and reduced insulin receptor expression could be contributory mechanisms of PNS insulin resistance within sensory neurons. Conclusions These findings contribute to the growing body of evidence that alterations in insulin signaling occur in the PNS and may be a key factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:24252636

  17. Susceptibility to radiation-induced mammary carcinoma in genetically resistant Copenhagen rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Kenji; Nitta, Yumiko; Gould, M.N.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to compare the cellular basis of mammary cancer induction by a chemical carcinogen with induction by ionizing radiation in three strains of rats (inbred that have different genetic susceptibilities: COP rats, F344 rats, and WF rats). Rats were given a single intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg MNU/kg body weight as a mammary-tumor-inducing chemical carcinogen and were irradiated with a 3.0 Gy dose of 60 Co gamma rays at a dose rate of 26.58±1.19 cGy/min. The rats were inspected weekly, and they were killed and necropsied whenever palpable tumors were detected or they became moribund. The histopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics of the mammary tumors were investigated. A transplantation experiment using selected primary mammary tumors that developed in COP rats exposed to gamma rays was also performed to investigate the transplantability of mammary tumors induced by ionizing radiation. The sensitivity of the WF and F344 rats and the resistance of the COP rats to mammary carcinoma induction by the chemical carcinogen MNU was confirmed. In contrast to the chemical carcinogens, no difference in susceptibility to radiation induction of mammary carcinomas was detected among the three strains of rats, and immunohistochemical examination indicated that the radiation-induced carcinomas consisted of more highly differentiated cells than the MNU-induced cancers. The results of the experiment appear to support the hypothesis that differentiated mammary gland tissue is more resistant to chemical carcinogens than to cancer induction by radiation. The authors conclude that radiation-induced cancers in rats may develop via different pathways or from different cell populations than chemically induced cancers. (K.H.)

  18. Susceptibility to radiation-induced mammary carcinoma in genetically resistant Copenhagen rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, Kenji; Nitta, Yumiko [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine; Gould, M.N.

    2000-07-01

    The objective of this experiment was to compare the cellular basis of mammary cancer induction by a chemical carcinogen with induction by ionizing radiation in three strains of rats (inbred that have different genetic susceptibilities: COP rats, F344 rats, and WF rats). Rats were given a single intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg MNU/kg body weight as a mammary-tumor-inducing chemical carcinogen and were irradiated with a 3.0 Gy dose of {sup 60} Co gamma rays at a dose rate of 26.58{+-}1.19 cGy/min. The rats were inspected weekly, and they were killed and necropsied whenever palpable tumors were detected or they became moribund. The histopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics of the mammary tumors were investigated. A transplantation experiment using selected primary mammary tumors that developed in COP rats exposed to gamma rays was also performed to investigate the transplantability of mammary tumors induced by ionizing radiation. The sensitivity of the WF and F344 rats and the resistance of the COP rats to mammary carcinoma induction by the chemical carcinogen MNU was confirmed. In contrast to the chemical carcinogens, no difference in susceptibility to radiation induction of mammary carcinomas was detected among the three strains of rats, and immunohistochemical examination indicated that the radiation-induced carcinomas consisted of more highly differentiated cells than the MNU-induced cancers. The results of the experiment appear to support the hypothesis that differentiated mammary gland tissue is more resistant to chemical carcinogens than to cancer induction by radiation. The authors conclude that radiation-induced cancers in rats may develop via different pathways or from different cell populations than chemically induced cancers. (K.H.)

  19. Mapping geological structures in bedrock via large-scale direct current resistivity and time-domain induced polarization tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Matteo; Olsson, Per-Ivar; Johansson, Sara

    2017-01-01

    -current resistivity distribution of the subsoil and the phase of the complex conductivity using a constant-phase angle model. The joint interpretation of electrical resistivity and induced-polarization models leads to a better understanding of complex three-dimensional subsoil geometries. The results have been......An investigation of geological conditions is always a key point for planning infrastructure constructions. Bedrock surface and rock quality must be estimated carefully in the designing process of infrastructures. A large direct-current resistivity and time-domain induced-polarization survey has......, there are northwest-trending Permian dolerite dykes that are less deformed. Four 2D direct-current resistivity and time-domain induced-polarization profiles of about 1-km length have been carefully pre-processed to retrieve time-domain induced polarization responses and inverted to obtain the direct...

  20. Induced seismicity associated with enhanced geothermal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majer, Ernest; Majer, Ernest L.; Baria, Roy; Stark, Mitch; Oates, Stephen; Bommer, Julian; Smith, Bill; Asanuma, Hiroshi

    2006-09-26

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) offer the potential to significantly add to the world energy inventory. As with any development of new technology, some aspects of the technology has been accepted by the general public, but some have not yet been accepted and await further clarification before such acceptance is possible. One of the issues associated with EGS is the role of microseismicity during the creation of the underground reservoir and the subsequent extraction of the energy. The primary objectives of this white paper are to present an up-to-date review of the state of knowledge about induced seismicity during the creation and operation of enhanced geothermal systems, and to point out the gaps in knowledge that if addressed will allow an improved understanding of the mechanisms generating the events as well as serve as a basis to develop successful protocols for monitoring and addressing community issues associated with such induced seismicity. The information was collected though literature searches as well as convening three workshops to gather information from a wide audience. Although microseismicity has been associated with the development of production and injection operations in a variety of geothermal regions, there have been no or few adverse physical effects on the operations or on surrounding communities. Still, there is public concern over the possible amount and magnitude of the seismicity associated with current and future EGS operations. It is pointed out that microseismicity has been successfully dealt with in a variety of non-geothermal as well as geothermal environments. Several case histories are also presented to illustrate a variety of technical and public acceptance issues. It is concluded that EGS Induced seismicity need not pose any threat to the development of geothermal resources if community issues are properly handled. In fact, induced seismicity provides benefits because it can be used as a monitoring tool to understand the

  1. Large resistivity modulation in mixed-phase metallic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeonbae; Liu, Z Q; Heron, J T; Clarkson, J D; Hong, J; Ko, C; Biegalski, M D; Aschauer, U; Hsu, S L; Nowakowski, M E; Wu, J; Christen, H M; Salahuddin, S; Bokor, J B; Spaldin, N A; Schlom, D G; Ramesh, R

    2015-01-07

    In numerous systems, giant physical responses have been discovered when two phases coexist; for example, near a phase transition. An intermetallic FeRh system undergoes a first-order antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic transition above room temperature and shows two-phase coexistence near the transition. Here we have investigated the effect of an electric field to FeRh/PMN-PT heterostructures and report 8% change in the electrical resistivity of FeRh films. Such a 'giant' electroresistance (GER) response is striking in metallic systems, in which external electric fields are screened, and thus only weakly influence the carrier concentrations and mobilities. We show that our FeRh films comprise coexisting ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases with different resistivities and the origin of the GER effect is the strain-mediated change in their relative proportions. The observed behaviour is reminiscent of colossal magnetoresistance in perovskite manganites and illustrates the role of mixed-phase coexistence in achieving large changes in physical properties with low-energy external perturbation.

  2. Integrated Thermal Protection Systems and Heat Resistant Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichon, Thierry; Lacoste, Marc; Glass, David E.

    2006-01-01

    In the early stages of NASA's Exploration Initiative, Snecma Propulsion Solide was funded under the Exploration Systems Research & Technology program to develop integrated thermal protection systems and heat resistant structures for reentry vehicles. Due to changes within NASA's Exploration Initiative, this task was cancelled early. This presentation provides an overview of the work that was accomplished prior to cancellation. The Snecma team chose an Apollo-type capsule as the reference vehicle for the work. They began with the design of a ceramic aft heatshield (CAS) utilizing C/SiC panels as the capsule heatshield, a C/SiC deployable decelerator and several ablators. They additionally developed a health monitoring system, high temperature structures testing, and the insulation characterization. Though the task was pre-maturely cancelled, a significant quantity of work was accomplished.

  3. A Prototype System for Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Tomographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Luongo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A prototype system for time-lapse acquisition of 2D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT and time domain reflectometry (TDR measurements was installed in a test site affected by a landslide in Basilicata region (southern Italy. The aim of the system is to monitor in real-time the rainwater infiltration into the soil and obtain information about the variation of the water content in the first layers of the subsoil and the possible influence of this variation on landslide activity. A rain gauge placed in the test site gives information on the rainfall intensity and frequency and suggests the acquisition time interval. The installed system and the preliminary results are presented in this paper.

  4. Phytohormone Signaling of the Resistance to Plum pox virus (PPV, Sharka Disease Induced by Almond (Prunus dulcis (Miller Webb Grafting to Peach (P. persica L. Batsch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Nikbakht Dehkordi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Plum pox virus (PPV, sharka is a limiting factor for peach production, and no natural sources of resistance have been described. Recent studies, however, have demonstrated that grafting the almond cultivar “Garrigues” onto the “GF305” peach infected with Dideron-type (PPV-D isolates progressively reduces disease symptoms and virus accumulation. Furthermore, grafting “Garrigues” onto “GF305” prior to PPV-D inoculation has been found to completely prevent virus infection, showing that resistance is constitutive and not induced by the virus. To unravel the phytohormone signaling of this mechanism, we analyzed the following phytohormones belonging to the principal hormone classes: the growth-related phytohormones cytokinin trans-zeatin (tZ and the gibberellins GA3 and GA4; and the stress-related phytohormones ethylene acid precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC, abscisic acid (ABA, salicylic acid (SA, and jasmonic acid (JA. PPV inoculation produced a significant increase in GA3 and ABA in peach, and these imbalances were related to the presence of chlorosis symptoms. However, grafting “Garrigues” almond onto the PPV-inoculated “GF305” peach produced the opposite effect, reducing GA3 and ABA contents in parallel to the elimination of symptoms. Our results showed the significant implication of SA in this induced resistance in peach with an additional effect on tZ and JA concentrations. This SA-induced resistance based in the decrease in symptoms seems to be different from Systemic Acquired Resistance (SAR and Induced Systemic Resistance (ISR, which are based in other reactions producing necrosis. Further studies are necessary, however, to validate these results against PPV-D isolates in the more aggressive Marcus-type (PPV-M isolates.

  5. Phytohormone Signaling of the Resistance to Plum pox virus (PPV, Sharka Disease) Induced by Almond (Prunus dulcis (Miller) Webb) Grafting to Peach (P. persica L. Batsch).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehkordi, Azam Nikbakht; Rubio, Manuel; Babaeian, Nadali; Albacete, Alfonso; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro

    2018-05-03

    Plum pox virus (PPV, sharka) is a limiting factor for peach production, and no natural sources of resistance have been described. Recent studies, however, have demonstrated that grafting the almond cultivar "Garrigues" onto the "GF305" peach infected with Dideron-type (PPV-D) isolates progressively reduces disease symptoms and virus accumulation. Furthermore, grafting "Garrigues" onto "GF305" prior to PPV-D inoculation has been found to completely prevent virus infection, showing that resistance is constitutive and not induced by the virus. To unravel the phytohormone signaling of this mechanism, we analyzed the following phytohormones belonging to the principal hormone classes: the growth-related phytohormones cytokinin trans-zeatin (tZ) and the gibberellins GA₃ and GA₄; and the stress-related phytohormones ethylene acid precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA), and jasmonic acid (JA). PPV inoculation produced a significant increase in GA₃ and ABA in peach, and these imbalances were related to the presence of chlorosis symptoms. However, grafting "Garrigues" almond onto the PPV-inoculated "GF305" peach produced the opposite effect, reducing GA₃ and ABA contents in parallel to the elimination of symptoms. Our results showed the significant implication of SA in this induced resistance in peach with an additional effect on tZ and JA concentrations. This SA-induced resistance based in the decrease in symptoms seems to be different from Systemic Acquired Resistance (SAR) and Induced Systemic Resistance (ISR), which are based in other reactions producing necrosis. Further studies are necessary, however, to validate these results against PPV-D isolates in the more aggressive Marcus-type (PPV-M) isolates.

  6. The necrotic signal induced by mycophenolic acid overcomes apoptosis-resistance in tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwendaline Guidicelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The amount of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH, a pivotal enzyme for the biosynthesis of the guanosine tri-phosphate (GTP, is frequently increased in tumor cells. The anti-viral agent ribavirin and the immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid (MPA are potent inhibitors of IMPDH. We recently showed that IMPDH inhibition led to a necrotic signal requiring the activation of Cdc42. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein, we strengthened the essential role played by this small GTPase in the necrotic signal by silencing Cdc42 and by the ectopic expression of a constitutive active mutant of Cdc42. Since resistance to apoptosis is an essential step for the tumorigenesis process, we next examined the effect of the MPA-mediated necrotic signal on different tumor cells demonstrating various mechanisms of resistance to apoptosis (Bcl2-, HSP70-, Lyn-, BCR-ABL-overexpressing cells. All tested cells remained sensitive to MPA-mediated necrotic signal. Furthermore, inhibition of IMPDH activity in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia cells was significantly more efficient at eliminating malignant cells than apoptotic inducers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings indicate that necrosis and apoptosis are split signals that share few if any common hub of signaling. In addition, the necrotic signaling pathway induced by depletion of the cellular amount of GTP/GDP would be of great interest to eliminate apoptotic-resistant tumor cells.

  7. Tribbles 3 Mediates Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Ho-Jin; Toyoda, Taro; Didesch, Michelle M.; Lee, Min-Young; Sleeman, Mark W.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Musi, Nicolas; Hirshman, Michael F.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) stress has been linked to insulin resistance in multiple tissues but the role of ER stress in skeletal muscle has not been explored. ER stress has also been reported to increase tribbles 3 (TRB3) expression in multiple cell lines. Here, we report that high fat feeding in mice, and obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans significantly increases TRB3 and ER stress markers in skeletal muscle. Overexpression of TRB3 in C2C12 myotubes and mouse tibialis anterior muscles significantly impairs insulin signaling. Incubation of C2C12 cells and mouse skeletal muscle with ER stressors thapsigargin and tunicamycin increases TRB3 and impairs insulin signaling and glucose uptake, effects reversed in cells overexpressing RNAi for TRB3 and in muscles from TRB3 knockout mice. Furthermore, TRB3 knockout mice are protected from high fat diet-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. These data demonstrate that TRB3 mediates ER stress-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. PMID:23695665

  8. Arginine- and Polyamine-Induced Lactic Acid Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Gong

    Full Text Available Microbe-derived lactic acid protects women from pathogens in their genital tract. The purpose of this study was to determine lactic acid susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and identify potential acid resistance mechanisms present in this pathogen. Tested in vitro, lactic acid killed all 10 gonococcal strains analyzed in a low pH-dependent manner. Full inactivation occurred at pH 4.5. At low pH, lactic acid treatment resulted in the entry of the DNA-binding fluorochrome propidium iodide into the microbial cells, suggesting that hydrogen ions from lactic acid compromise the integrity of the bacterial cell wall/membrane. Most likely, hydrogen ions also inactivate intracellular proteins since arginine rendered significant protection against lactic acid presumably through action of the gonococcal arginine decarboxylase, an enzyme located in the bacterial cytoplasm. Surprisingly, arginine also lessened lactic acid-mediated cell wall/membrane disruption. This effect is probably mediated by agmatine, a triamine product of arginine decarboxylase, since agmatine demonstrated a stronger protective effect on GC than arginine at equal molar concentration. In addition to agmatine, diamines cadaverine and putrescine, which are generated by bacterial vaginosis-associated microbes, also induced significant resistance to lactic acid-mediated GC killing and cell wall/membrane disruption. These findings suggest that the arginine-rich semen protects gonococci through both neutralization-dependent and independent mechanisms, whereas polyamine-induced acid resistance contributes to the increased risk of gonorrhea in women with bacterial vaginosis.

  9. Isolation of Mycorrhizal Rhizoctonia as resistance inducer of Dendrobium macrophyllum to drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soelistijono, R.; Daryanti; Handayani, M. T.

    2018-03-01

    One of the obstacles encountered in the cultivation of orchids Dendrobium macrophyllum is difficult to cultivate in areas with high drought due to the slow absorption of nutrients. Based on previous research, the mycorrhizal binucleate Rhizoctonia (BNR) has the ability to increase the resistance of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) to drought, but it has never been tried on orchid Dendrobium macrophyllum. The objectives of this study was to isolate resistance inducer organisms by induced resistance techniques on orchids against drought. It is expected that the administration of mycorrhizal Rhizoctonia can increase the absorption of nutrients in D. macrophyllum which is exposed to high water stress. Each treatment consisted of 3 replications of 3 potted plants. The characterization of mycorrhizal Rhizoctonia isolate from D. macrophyllum root from Surakarta, Kopeng, Magelang, and Yogyakarta did not different morphologically. Character equations are in colony color, cell length and number of cores, while character differences are present in cell width and all isolates are capable of forming a peloton structure.

  10. Transit through the flea vector induces a pretransmission innate immunity resistance phenotype in Yersinia pestis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka Vadyvaloo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis, the agent of plague, is transmitted to mammals by infected fleas. Y. pestis exhibits a distinct life stage in the flea, where it grows in the form of a cohesive biofilm that promotes transmission. After transmission, the temperature shift to 37 degrees C induces many known virulence factors of Y. pestis that confer resistance to innate immunity. These factors are not produced in the low-temperature environment of the flea, however, suggesting that Y. pestis is vulnerable to the initial encounter with innate immune cells at the flea bite site. In this study, we used whole-genome microarrays to compare the Y. pestis in vivo transcriptome in infective fleas to in vitro transcriptomes in temperature-matched biofilm and planktonic cultures, and to the previously characterized in vivo gene expression profile in the rat bubo. In addition to genes involved in metabolic adaptation to the flea gut and biofilm formation, several genes with known or predicted roles in resistance to innate immunity and pathogenicity in the mammal were upregulated in the flea. Y. pestis from infected fleas were more resistant to phagocytosis by macrophages than in vitro-grown bacteria, in part attributable to a cluster of insecticidal-like toxin genes that were highly expressed only in the flea. Our results suggest that transit through the flea vector induces a phenotype that enhances survival and dissemination of Y. pestis after transmission to the mammalian host.

  11. Dietary supplementation with Agaricus blazei murill extract prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Mylène; Philippe, Erwann; Everard, Amandine; Kassis, Nadim; Rouch, Claude; Denom, Jessica; Takeda, Yorihiko; Uchiyama, Shoji; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Cani, Patrice D; Migrenne, Stéphanie; Magnan, Christophe

    2013-03-01

    Dietary supplement may potentially help to fight obesity and other metabolic disorders such as insulin-resistance and low-grade inflammation. The present study aimed to test whether supplementation with Agaricus blazei murill (ABM) extract could have an effect on diet-induced obesity in rats. Wistar rats were fed with control diet (CD) or high-fat diet (HF) and either with or without supplemented ABM for 20 weeks. HF diet-induced body weight gain and increased fat mass compared to CD. In addition HF-fed rats developed hyperleptinemia and insulinemia as well as insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. In HF-fed rats, visceral adipose tissue also expressed biomarkers of inflammation. ABM supplementation in HF rats had a protective effect against body weight gain and all study related disorders. This was not due to decreased food intake which remained significantly higher in HF rats whether supplemented with ABM or not compared to control. There was also no change in gut microbiota composition in HF supplemented with ABM. Interestingly, ABM supplementation induced an increase in both energy expenditure and locomotor activity which could partially explain its protective effect against diet-induced obesity. In addition a decrease in pancreatic lipase activity is also observed in jejunum of ABM-treated rats suggesting a decrease in lipid absorption. Taken together these data highlight a role for ABM to prevent body weight gain and related disorders in peripheral targets independently of effect in food intake in central nervous system. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  12. Imaging and modeling of acute pressure-induced changes of collagen and elastin microarchitectures in pig and human resistance arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Leurgans, Thomas M; Spronck, Bart; Heusinkveld, Maarten H G; Thorsted, Bjarne; Rosenstand, Kristoffer; Nissen, Inger; Hansen, Ulla M; Brewer, Jonathan R; Bagatolli, Luis A; Rasmussen, Lars M; Irmukhamedov, Akhmadjon; Reesink, Koen D; De Mey, Jo G R

    2017-07-01

    The impact of disease-related changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) on the mechanical properties of human resistance arteries largely remains to be established. Resistance arteries from both pig and human parietal pericardium (PRA) display a different ECM microarchitecture compared with frequently used rodent mesenteric arteries. We hypothesized that the biaxial mechanics of PRA mirror pressure-induced changes in the ECM microarchitecture. This was tested using isolated pig PRA as a model system, integrating vital imaging, pressure myography, and mathematical modeling. Collagenase and elastase digestions were applied to evaluate the load-bearing roles of collagen and elastin, respectively. The incremental elastic modulus linearly related to the straightness of adventitial collagen fibers circumferentially and longitudinally (both R 2 ≥ 0.99), whereas there was a nonlinear relationship to the internal elastic lamina elastin fiber branching angles. Mathematical modeling suggested a collagen recruitment strain (means ± SE) of 1.1 ± 0.2 circumferentially and 0.20 ± 0.01 longitudinally, corresponding to a pressure of ~40 mmHg, a finding supported by the vital imaging. The integrated method was tested on human PRA to confirm its validity. These showed limited circumferential distensibility and elongation and a collagen recruitment strain of 0.8 ± 0.1 circumferentially and 0.06 ± 0.02 longitudinally, reached at a distending pressure below 20 mmHg. This was confirmed by vital imaging showing negligible microarchitectural changes of elastin and collagen upon pressurization. In conclusion, we show here, for the first time in resistance arteries, a quantitative relationship between pressure-induced changes in the extracellular matrix and the arterial wall mechanics. The strength of the integrated methods invites for future detailed studies of microvascular pathologies. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first study to quantitatively relate pressure-induced

  13. Human LT-alpha-mediated resistance to autoimmune diabetes is induced in NOD, but not NOD-scid, mice and abrogated by IL-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaguchi, S; Satoh, J; Takahashi, K; Sakata, Y; Nakazawa, T; Miyazaki, J; Toyota, T

    2001-01-01

    Systemic administration of human lymphotoxin-alpha (hLT-alpha) made NOD mice resistant not only to spontaneous autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus but also to cyclophosphamide (CY)-induced diabetes and diabetes transfer by diabetic NOD spleen cells (triple resistance). In this study we analyzed the mechanisms of hLT-alpha-induced resistance, focusing on (1) hLT-alpha-induced resistance in the pancreatic beta cell, (2) CY-resistant suppressor cells, (3) suppression of induction or function of effector cells for beta cell destruction, or (4) others. To examine the first possibility in vitro, a NOD-derived beta cell line (MIN6N) was pretreated with hLT-alpha and then mixed with diabetic NOD spleen cells and MIN6N cell viability was measured. Treatment with hLT-alpha did not protect MIN6N cells but rather enhanced cytotoxicity. Next NOD-scid mice were pretreated with hLT-alpha and then transferred with diabetic NOD spleen. All the recipients developed diabetes. These results excluded the first possibility. The second possibility was also excluded by a cotransfer experiment, in which diabetic NOD spleen cells were cotransferred to NOD-scid mice with nontreated or hLT-alpha-treated nondiabetic NOD spleens. There was no significant difference in diabetes incidence between the two groups. To observe the third possibility, spleen cells of hLT-alpha-treated triple-resistant NOD mice were transferred to NOD-scid mice. Diabetes developed in the recipients, although the onset of diabetes was slightly delayed. Finally, hLT-alpha-treated triple-resistant NOD mice developed diabetes 1 week after daily IL-12 treatment. In summary, hLT-alpha administration made NOD mice resistant to effector cells for beta cell destruction. This resistance was induced in NOD, but not in NOD-scid, mice, indicating that lymphocytes were obligatory for the resistance. However, it was not mediated by transferable suppressor cells. Because effector cells were present in hLT-alpha-treated NOD spleen and

  14. Riboflavin-Induced Disease Resistance Requires the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases 3 and 6 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Shengjun; Xu, Huilian

    2016-01-01

    As a resistance elicitor, riboflavin (vitamin B2) protects plants against a wide range of pathogens. At molecular biological levels, it is important to elucidate the signaling pathways underlying the disease resistance induced by riboflavin. Here, riboflavin was tested to induce resistance against virulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000) in Arabidopsis. Results showed that riboflavin induced disease resistance based on MAPK-dependent priming for the expression of PR1 gene. Riboflavin induced transient expression of PR1 gene. However, following Pst DC3000 inoculation, riboflavin potentiated stronger PR1 gene transcription. Further was suggested that the transcript levels of mitogen-activated protein kinases, MPK3 and MPK6, were primed under riboflavin. Upon infection by Pst DC3000, these two enzymes were more strongly activated. The elevated activation of both MPK3 and MPK6 was responsible for enhanced defense gene expression and resistance after riboflavin treatment. Moreover, riboflavin significantly reduced the transcript levels of MPK3 and MPK6 by application of AsA and BAPTA, an H2O2 scavenger and a calcium (Ca2+) scavenger, respectively. In conclusion, MPK3 and MPK6 were responsible for riboflavin-induced resistance, and played an important role in H2O2- and Ca2+-related signaling pathways, and this study could provide a new insight into the mechanistic study of riboflavin-induced defense responses.

  15. Resistive Switching and Voltage Induced Modulation of Tunneling Magnetoresistance in Nanosized Perpendicular Organic Spin Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Georg; Goeckeritz, Robert; Homonnay, Nico; Mueller, Alexander; Fuhrmann, Bodo

    Resistive switching has already been reported in organic spin valves (OSV), however, its origin is still unclear. We have fabricated nanosized OSV based on La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/Alq3/Co. These devices show fully reversible resistive switching of up to five orders of magnitude. The magnetoresistance (MR) is modulated during the switching process from negative (-70%) to positive values (+23%). The results are reminiscent of experiments claiming magnetoelectric coupling in LSMO based tunneling structures using ferroelectric barriers. By analyzing the I/V characteristics of the devices we can show that transport is dominated by tunneling through pinholes. The resistive switching is caused by voltage induced creation and motion of oxygen vacancies at the LSMO surface, however, the resulting tunnel barrier is complemented by a second adjacent barrier in the organic semiconductor. Our model shows that the barrier in the organic material is constant, causing the initial MR while the barrier in the LMSO can be modulated by the voltage resulting in the resistive switching and the modulation of the MR as the coupling to the states in the LSMO changes. A switching caused by LSMO only is also supported by the fact that replacing ALQ3 by H2PC yields almost identical results. Supported by the DFG in the SFB762.

  16. Ginsenoside Re Ameliorates Brain Insulin Resistance and Cognitive Dysfunction in High Fat Diet-Induced C57BL/6 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Min; Park, Chang Hyeon; Park, Seon Kyeong; Seung, Tae Wan; Kang, Jin Yong; Ha, Jeong Su; Lee, Du Sang; Lee, Uk; Kim, Dae-Ok; Heo, Ho Jin

    2017-04-05

    The ameliorating effects of ginsenoside Re (G Re) on high fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance in C57BL/6 mice were investigated to assess its physiological function. In the results of behavioral tests, G Re improved cognitive dysfunction in diabetic mice using Y-maze, passive avoidance, and Morris water maze tests. G Re also significantly recovered hyperglycemia and fasting blood glucose level. In the results of serum analysis, G Re decreased triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TCHO), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC), glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) and increased the ratio of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC). G Re regulated acetylcholine (ACh), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and oxidized glutathione (GSH)/total GSH by regulating the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) pathway. These findings suggest that G Re could be used to improve HFD-induced insulin resistance condition by ameliorating hyperglycemia via protecting the cholinergic and antioxidant systems in the mouse brains.

  17. Radiation induced peroxidation in model lipid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlan, K.Z.B.H.M.

    1981-08-01

    In the studies of radiation induced lipid peroxidation, lecithin-liposomes and aqueous micellar solutions of sodium linoleate (or linoleic acid) have been used as models of lipid membrane systems. The liposomes and aqueous linoleate micelles were irradiated in the presence of O 2 and N 2 O/O 2 (80/20 v/v). The peroxidation was initiated using gamma radiation from 60 Co radiation source and was monitored by measuring the increase in absorbance of conjugated diene at 232 nm and by the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) test. The oxidation products were also identified by GLC and GLC-MS analysis. (author)

  18. Roles of the Chemokine System in Development of Obesity, Insulin Resistance, and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Longbiao; Herlea-Pana, Oana; Heuser-Baker, Janet; Chen, Yitong; Barlic-Dicen, Jana

    2014-01-01

    The escalating epidemic of obesity has increased the incidence of obesity-induced complications to historically high levels. Adipose tissue is a dynamic energy depot, which stores energy and mobilizes it during nutrient deficiency. Excess nutrient intake resulting in adipose tissue expansion triggers lipid release and aberrant adipokine, cytokine and chemokine production, and signaling that ultimately lead to adipose tissue inflammation, a hallmark of obesity. This low-grade chronic inflammation is thought to link obesity to insulin resistance and the associated comorbidities of metabolic syndrome such as dyslipidemia and hypertension, which increase risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we focus on and discuss members of the chemokine system for which there is clear evidence of participation in the development of obesity and obesity-induced pathologies. PMID:24741577

  19. Roles of the Chemokine System in Development of Obesity, Insulin Resistance, and Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longbiao Yao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The escalating epidemic of obesity has increased the incidence of obesity-induced complications to historically high levels. Adipose tissue is a dynamic energy depot, which stores energy and mobilizes it during nutrient deficiency. Excess nutrient intake resulting in adipose tissue expansion triggers lipid release and aberrant adipokine, cytokine and chemokine production, and signaling that ultimately lead to adipose tissue inflammation, a hallmark of obesity. This low-grade chronic inflammation is thought to link obesity to insulin resistance and the associated comorbidities of metabolic syndrome such as dyslipidemia and hypertension, which increase risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we focus on and discuss members of the chemokine system for which there is clear evidence of participation in the development of obesity and obesity-induced pathologies.

  20. Pharmacological TLR4 Inhibition Protects against Acute and Chronic Fat-Induced Insulin Resistance in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Liang, Hanyu; Farese, Robert V; Li, Ji; Musi, Nicolas; Hussey, Sophie E

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether pharmacological TLR4 inhibition protects against acute and chronic fat-induced insulin resistance in rats. For the acute experiment, rats received a TLR4 inhibitor [TAK-242 or E5564 (2x5 mg/kg i.v. bolus)] or vehicle, and an 8-h Intralipid (20%, 8.5 mg/kg/min) or saline infusion, followed by a two-step hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. For the chronic experiment, rats were subcutaneously implanted with a slow-release pellet of TAK-242 (1.5 mg/d) or placebo. Rats then received a high fat diet (HFD) or a low fat control diet (LFD) for 10 weeks, followed by a two-step insulin clamp. Acute experiment; the lipid-induced reduction (18%) in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (Rd) was attenuated by TAK-242 and E5564 (the effect of E5564 was more robust), suggesting improved peripheral insulin action. Insulin was able to suppress hepatic glucose production (HGP) in saline- but not lipid-treated rats. TAK-242, but not E5564, partially restored this effect, suggesting improved HGP. Chronic experiment; insulin-stimulated Rd was reduced ~30% by the HFD, but completely restored by TAK-242. Insulin could not suppress HGP in rats fed a HFD and TAK-242 had no effect on HGP. Pharmacological TLR4 inhibition provides partial protection against acute and chronic fat-induced insulin resistance in vivo.

  1. Loss of Smad4 in colorectal cancer induces resistance to 5-fluorouracil through activating Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B; Zhang, B; Chen, X; Bae, S; Singh, K; Washington, M K; Datta, P K

    2014-02-18

    Higher frequency of Smad4 inactivation or loss of expression is observed in metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC) leading to unfavourable survival and contributes to chemoresistance. However, the molecular mechanism of how Smad4 regulates chemosensitivity of CRC is unknown. We evaluated how the loss of Smad4 in CRC enhanced chemoresistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) using two CRC cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Immunoblotting with cell and tumour lysates and immunohistochemical analyses with tissue microarray were performed. Knockdown or loss of Smad4 induced tumorigenicity, migration, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, and 5-FU resistance. Smad4 expression in mouse tumours regulated cell-cycle regulatory proteins leading to Rb phosphorylation. Loss of Smad4 activated Akt pathway that resulted in upregulation of anti-apoptotic proteins, Bcl-2 and Bcl-w, and Survivin. Suppression of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway by LY294002 restored chemosensitivity of Smad4-deficient cells to 5-FU. Vascular endothelial growth factor-induced angiogenesis in Smad4-deficient cells might also lead to chemoresistance. Low levels of Smad4 expression in CRC tissues correlated with higher levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-w and with poor overall survival as observed in immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays. Loss of Smad4 in CRC patients induces resistance to 5-FU-based therapy through activation of Akt pathway and inhibitors of this pathway may sensitise these patients to 5-FU.

  2. Induced mutation aiming at obtaining lodging resistance in wheat C V.Omid(Triticum Aestivum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majd, F.; Rezazadeh, M.; Ghohari, A.

    1993-01-01

    Mutation breeding has been an important part breeding research for solving some of the existing problems related to wheat. A locally adopted wheat cultivar 'Omid' which is a traditionally tall wheat mostly cultivated in regions with a continental climate and is susceptible to lodging was chosen as research material. The nuclear research department for agriculture of Atomic Energy Organization of Iran initiated a mutation breeding program for creating genetic variability in wheat using this local cultivar. Seeds of this variety was irradiated with gamma radiation (50-150 Gy) to induce short straw mutants with greater lodging resistance and yield potential. from a total of about 20000 irradiated seeds 1500 plants showing promising agronomic character were isolated as potential mutants. Following progeny tests and selection 18 mutants lines entered preliminary yield trail. Further field trails at different locations gave two promising lines which are characterized by higher yield, lodging resistance and early maturity. (author). 3 tabs

  3. Improved resistance of chemically-modified nanocellulose against thermally-induced depolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustin, Melissa B; Nakatsubo, Fumiaki; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2017-05-15

    The study demonstrated the improvement in the resistance of nanocellulose against thermally-induced depolymerization by esterification with benzoyl (BNZ) and pivaloyl (PIV). The change in the degree of polymerization (DP) and molecular weight distribution (MWD) after thermal treatment in nitrogen and in air was investigated using viscometry and gel permeation chromatography. BNZ and PIV nanocellulose esters without α-hydrogens gave higher DP and narrower MWD than pure bacterial cellulose; and the acetyl and myristoyl esters, which possess α-hydrogens. Results also showed that when depolymerization is suppressed, thermal discoloration is also reduced. Resistance against depolymerization inhibits the formation of reducing ends which can be active sites for thermal discoloration. Finally, the findings suggest that benzoylation and pivaloylation can be an excellent modification technique to improve the thermal stability of nanocellulose. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Generation of Newly Discovered Resistance Gene mcr-1 Knockout in Escherichia coli Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lichang; He, Tao; Zhang, Lili; Pang, Maoda; Zhang, Qiaoyan; Zhou, Yan; Bao, Hongduo; Wang, Ran

    2017-07-28

    The mcr-1 gene is a new "superbug" gene discoverd in China in 2016 that makes bacteria highly resistant to the last-resort class of antibiotics. The mcr-1 gene raised serious concern about its possible global dissemination and spread. Here, we report a potential anti-resistant strategy using the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated approach that can efficiently induce mcr-1 gene knockout in Escherichia coli . Our findings suggested that using the CRISPR/Cas9 system to knock out the resistance gene mcr-1 might be a potential anti-resistant strategy. Bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide-27 could help deliver plasmid pCas::mcr targeting specific DNA sequences of the mcr-1 gene into microbial populations.

  5. Application of Glycerol for Induced Powdery Mildew Resistance in Triticum aestivum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinghui; Song, Na; Zhao, Chuanzhi; Li, Feng; Geng, Miaomiao; Wang, Yuhui; Liu, Wanhui; Xie, Chaojie; Sun, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) and oleic acid (18:1) are two important signal molecules associated with plant resistance to fungi. In this article, we provide evidence that a 3% glycerol spray application 1-2 days before powdery mildew infection and subsequent applications once every 4 days was sufficient to stimulate the plant defense responses without causing any significant damage to wheat leaves. We found that G3P and oleic acid levels were markedly induced by powdery mildew infection. In addition, TaGLI1 (encoding a glycerol kinase) and TaSSI2 (encoding a stearoylacyl carrier protein fatty acid desaturase), two genes associated with the glycerol and fatty acid (FA) pathways, respectively, were induced by powdery mildew infection, and their promoter regions contain some fungal response elements. Moreover, exogenous application of glycerol increased the G3P level and decreased the level of oleic acid (18:1). Glycerol application induced the expression of pathogenesis-related ( PR ) genes ( TaPR-1, TaPR-2, TaPR-3, TaPR-4 , and TaPR-5 ), induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) before powdery mildew infection, and induced salicylic acid (SA) accumulation in wheat leaves. Further, we sprayed glycerol in a wheat field and found that it significantly ( p powdery mildew disease and lessened disease-associated kernel weight loss, all without causing any noticeable degradation in wheat seed quality.

  6. Vorinostat-induced autophagy switches from a death-promoting to a cytoprotective signal to drive acquired resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupéré-Richer, D; Kinal, M; Ménasché, V; Nielsen, T H; Del Rincon, S; Pettersson, F; Miller, W H

    2013-02-07

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have shown promising activity against hematological malignancies in clinical trials and have led to the approval of vorinostat for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. However, de novo or acquired resistance to HDACi therapy is inevitable, and their molecular mechanisms are still unclear. To gain insight into HDACi resistance, we developed vorinostat-resistant clones from the hematological cell lines U937 and SUDHL6. Although cross-resistant to some but not all HDACi, the resistant cell lines exhibit dramatically increased sensitivity toward chloroquine, an inhibitor of autophagy. Consistent with this, resistant cells growing in vorinostat show increased autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy in vorinostat-resistant U937 cells by knockdown of Beclin-1 or Lamp-2 (lysosome-associated membrane protein 2) restores sensitivity to vorinostat. Interestingly, autophagy is also activated in parental U937 cells by de novo treatment with vorinostat. However, in contrast to the resistant cells, inhibition of autophagy decreases sensitivity to vorinostat. These results indicate that autophagy can switch from a proapoptotic signal to a prosurvival function driving acquired resistance. Moreover, inducers of autophagy (such as mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors) synergize with vorinostat to induce cell death in parental cells, whereas the resistant cells remain insensitive. These data highlight the complexity of the design of combination strategies using modulators of autophagy and HDACi for the treatment of hematological malignancies.

  7. The nitrogen availability interferes with mycorrhiza-induced resistance against Botrytis cinerea in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Sanchez-Bel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mycorrhizal plants are generally quite efficient in coping with environmental challenges. It has been shown that the symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF can confer resistance against root and foliar pathogens, although the molecular mechanisms underlying such mycorrhiza-induced resistance (MIR are poorly understood. Tomato plants colonized with the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis display enhanced resistance against the necrotrophic foliar pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Leaves from arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM plants develop smaller necrotic lesions, mirrored also by a reduced levels of fungal biomass. A plethora of metabolic changes takes place in AMF colonized plants upon infection. Certain changes located in the oxylipin pathway indicate that several intermediaries are over-accumulated in the AM upon infection. AM plants react by accumulating higher levels of the vitamins folic acid and riboflavin, indolic derivatives and phenolic compounds such as ferulic acid and chlorogenic acid. Transcriptional analysis support the key role played by the LOX pathway in the shoots associated with MIR against B. cinerea.Interestingly, plants that have suffered a short period of nitrogen starvation appear to react by reprogramming their metabolic and genetic responses by prioritizing abiotic stress tolerance. Consequently, plants subjected to a transient nitrogen depletion become more susceptible to B. cinerea. Under these experimental conditions, MIR is severely affected although still functional. Many metabolic and transcriptional responses which are accumulated or activated by MIR such NRT2 transcript induction and OPDA and most Trp and indolic derivatives accumulation during MIR were repressed or reduced when tomato plants were depleted of N for 48 h prior infection. These results highlight the beneficial roles of AMF in crop protection by promoting induced resistance not only under optimal nutritional conditions but also buffering the susceptibility

  8. Diet-induced obesity causes ghrelin resistance in reward processing tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockie, Sarah H; Dinan, Tara; Lawrence, Andrew J; Spencer, Sarah J; Andrews, Zane B

    2015-12-01

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) causes ghrelin resistance in hypothalamic Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons. However, ghrelin promotes feeding through actions at both the hypothalamus and mesolimbic dopamine reward pathways. Therefore, we hypothesized that DIO would also establish ghrelin resistance in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a major site of dopaminergic cell bodies important in reward processing. We observed reduced sucrose and saccharin consumption in Ghrelin KO vs Ghrelin WT mice. Moreover, DIO reduced saccharin consumption relative to chow-fed controls. These data suggest that the deletion of ghrelin and high fat diet both cause anhedonia. To assess if these are causally related, we tested whether DIO caused ghrelin resistance in a classic model of drug reward, conditioned place preference (CPP). Chow or high fat diet (HFD) mice were conditioned with ghrelin (1mg/kg in 10ml/kg ip) in the presence or absence of food in the conditioning chamber. We observed a CPP to ghrelin in chow-fed mice but not in HFD-fed mice. HFD-fed mice still showed a CPP for cocaine (20mg/kg), indicating that they maintained the ability to develop conditioned behaviour. The absence of food availability during ghrelin conditioning sessions induced a conditioned place aversion, an effect that was still present in both chow and HFD mice. Bilateral intra-VTA ghrelin injection (0.33μg/μl in 0.5μl) robustly increased feeding in both chow-fed and high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice; however, this was correlated with body weight only in the chow-fed mice. Our results suggest that DIO causes ghrelin resistance albeit not directly in the VTA. We suggest there is impaired ghrelin sensitivity in upstream pathways regulating reward pathways, highlighting a functional role for ghrelin linking appropriate metabolic sensing with reward processing. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Curcumin induces apoptosis and protective autophagy in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells through iron chelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang C

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Chunguang Yang,1,* Xueyou Ma,1,* Zhihua Wang,1 Xing Zeng,1 Zhiquan Hu,1 Zhangqun Ye,1 Guanxin Shen2 1Department of Urology, Tongji Hospital, 2Department of Immunology, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Curcumin induces apoptosis and autophagy in different cancer cells. Moreover, chemical and biological experiments have evidenced that curcumin is a biologically active iron chelator and induces cytotoxicity through iron chelation. We thus hypothesized that curcumin may induce apoptosis and autophagy in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC cells through its iron-chelating properties.Materials and methods: CRPC cells were loaded with curcumin alone or in combination with ferric ammonium citrate (FAC. Cytotoxicity was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labeling (TUNEL assay and caspase activity. Autophagy status was analyzed by the detection of autophagosomes and light chain 3-II (LC3-II using transmission electron microscopy and Western blot. Iron-binding activity of curcumin was assessed by spectrophotometry and MTT assay. The expression levels of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1 and iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1 were examined by Western blot.Results: Curcumin induced apoptosis and autophagy in CRPC cells. Combining curcumin with autophagy inhibitors (3-methyladenine [3-MA] synergized the apoptotic effect of curcumin. Moreover, curcumin bound to FAC at a ratio of ~1:1, as assessed by spectrophotometry and MTT assay. Apoptosis and autophagy induced by curcumin were counteracted by equal amounts of FAC. At apoptosis- and autophagy-inducing concentrations, curcumin enhanced the expression levels of TfR1 and IRP1, indicative of iron deprivation induced by curcumin

  10. Induction of systemic resistance in plants by biochar, a soil-applied carbon sequestering agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, Yigal; David, Dalia Rav; Harel, Yael Meller; Borenshtein, Menahem; Kalifa, Hananel Ben; Silber, Avner; Graber, Ellen R

    2010-09-01

    Biochar is the solid coproduct of biomass pyrolysis, a technique used for carbon-negative production of second-generation biofuels. The biochar can be applied as a soil amendment, where it permanently sequesters carbon from the atmosphere as well as improves soil tilth, nutrient retention, and crop productivity. In addition to its other benefits in soil, we found that soil-applied biochar induces systemic resistance to the foliar fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea (gray mold) and Leveillula taurica (powdery mildew) on pepper and tomato and to the broad mite pest (Polyphagotarsonemus latus Banks) on pepper. Levels of 1 to 5% biochar in a soil and a coconut fiber-tuff potting medium were found to be significantly effective at suppressing both diseases in leaves of different ages. In long-term tests (105 days), pepper powdery mildew was significantly less severe in the biochar-treated plants than in the plants from the unamended controls although, during the final 25 days, the rate of disease development in the treatments and controls was similar. Possible biochar-related elicitors of systemic induced resistance are discussed.

  11. Severe hypoxia induces chemo-resistance in clinical cervical tumors through MVP over-expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Pedro C; Lloret, Marta; Clavo, Bernardino; Apolinario, Rosa M; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Bordón, Elisa; Fontes, Fausto; Rey, Agustín

    2009-08-06

    Oxygen molecule modulates tumour response to radiotherapy. Higher radiation doses are required under hypoxic conditions to induce cell death. Hypoxia may inhibit the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair through down regulating Ku70/80 expression. Hypoxia induces drug resistance in clinical tumours, although the mechanism is not clearly elucidated. Vaults are ribonucleoprotein particles with a hollow barrel-like structure composed of three proteins: major vault protein (MVP), vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and telomerase associated protein-1 and small untranslated RNA. Over-expression of MVP has been associated with chemotherapy resistance. Also, it has been related to poor outcome in patients treated with radiotherapy alone. The aim of the present study was to assess the relation of Major Vault Protein expression and tumor hypoxia in clinical cervical tumors. MVP, p53 and angiogenesis, together with tumor oxygenation, were determined in forty-three consecutive patients suffering from localized cervix carcinoma. High MVP expression was related to severe hypoxia compared to low MVP expressing tumors (p = 0.022). Tumors over-expressing MVP also showed increased angiogenesis (p = 0.003). Besides it, in this study we show for the first time that severe tumor hypoxia is associated with high MVP expression in clinical cervical tumors. Up-regulation of MVP by hypoxia is of critical relevance as chemotherapy is currently a standard treatment for those patients. From our results it could be suggested that hypoxia not only induces increased genetic instability, oncogenic properties and metastatization, but through the correlation observed with MVP expression, another pathway of chemo and radiation resistance could be developed.

  12. Severe hypoxia induces chemo-resistance in clinical cervical tumors through MVP over-expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, Pedro C; Lloret, Marta; Clavo, Bernardino; Apolinario, Rosa M; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Bordón, Elisa; Fontes, Fausto; Rey, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen molecule modulates tumour response to radiotherapy. Higher radiation doses are required under hypoxic conditions to induce cell death. Hypoxia may inhibit the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair through down regulating Ku70/80 expression. Hypoxia induces drug resistance in clinical tumours, although the mechanism is not clearly elucidated. Vaults are ribonucleoprotein particles with a hollow barrel-like structure composed of three proteins: major vault protein (MVP), vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and telomerase associated protein-1 and small untranslated RNA. Over-expression of MVP has been associated with chemotherapy resistance. Also, it has been related to poor outcome in patients treated with radiotherapy alone. The aim of the present study was to assess the relation of Major Vault Protein expression and tumor hypoxia in clinical cervical tumors. MVP, p53 and angiogenesis, together with tumor oxygenation, were determined in forty-three consecutive patients suffering from localized cervix carcinoma. High MVP expression was related to severe hypoxia compared to low MVP expressing tumors (p = 0.022). Tumors over-expressing MVP also showed increased angiogenesis (p = 0.003). Besides it, in this study we show for the first time that severe tumor hypoxia is associated with high MVP expression in clinical cervical tumors. Up-regulation of MVP by hypoxia is of critical relevance as chemotherapy is currently a standard treatment for those patients. From our results it could be suggested that hypoxia not only induces increased genetic instability, oncogenic properties and metastatization, but through the correlation observed with MVP expression, another pathway of chemo and radiation resistance could be developed

  13. Obestatin regulates adipocyte function and protects against diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Riccarda; Gallo, Davide; Luque, Raul M; Baragli, Alessandra; Scarlatti, Francesca; Grande, Cristina; Gesmundo, Iacopo; Córdoba-Chacón, Jose; Bergandi, Loredana; Settanni, Fabio; Togliatto, Gabriele; Volante, Marco; Garetto, Stefano; Annunziata, Marta; Chanclón, Belén; Gargantini, Eleonora; Rocchietto, Stefano; Matera, Lina; Datta, Giacomo; Morino, Mario; Brizzi, Maria Felice; Ong, Huy; Camussi, Giovanni; Castaño, Justo P; Papotti, Mauro; Ghigo, Ezio

    2012-08-01

    The metabolic actions of the ghrelin gene-derived peptide obestatin are still unclear. We investigated obestatin effects in vitro, on adipocyte function, and in vivo, on insulin resistance and inflammation in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Obestatin effects on apoptosis, differentiation, lipolysis, and glucose uptake were determined in vitro in mouse 3T3-L1 and in human subcutaneous (hSC) and omental (hOM) adipocytes. In vivo, the influence of obestatin on glucose metabolism was assessed in mice fed an HFD for 8 wk. 3T3-L1, hSC, and hOM preadipocytes and adipocytes secreted obestatin and showed specific binding for the hormone. Obestatin prevented apoptosis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes by increasing phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 signaling. In both mice and human adipocytes, obestatin inhibited isoproterenol-induced lipolysis, promoted AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, induced adiponectin, and reduced leptin secretion. Obestatin also enhanced glucose uptake in either the absence or presence of insulin, promoted GLUT4 translocation, and increased Akt phosphorylation and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) protein expression. Inhibition of SIRT1 by small interfering RNA reduced obestatin-induced glucose uptake. In HFD-fed mice, obestatin reduced insulin resistance, increased insulin secretion from pancreatic islets, and reduced adipocyte apoptosis and inflammation in metabolic tissues. These results provide evidence of a novel role for obestatin in adipocyte function and glucose metabolism and suggest potential therapeutic perspectives in insulin resistance and metabolic dysfunctions.

  14. Direct current (DC) resistivity and Induced Polarization (IP) monitoring of active layer dynamics at high temporal resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, J.; Fiandaca, G.; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    With permafrost thawing and changes in active layer dynamics induced by climate change, interactions between biogeochemical and thermal processes in the ground are of great importance. Here, active layer dynamics have been monitored using direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP...... the soil freezing as a strong increase in resistivity. While the freezing horizon generally moves deeper with time, some variations in the freezing depth are observed along the profile. Comparison with depth-specific soil temperature indicates an exponential relationship between resistivity and below...

  15. Direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP) monitoring of active layer dynamics at high temporal resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, Joseph; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Christiansen, Anders V.

    2015-01-01

    With permafrost thawing and changes in active layer dynamics induced by climate change, interactions between biogeochemical and thermal processes in the ground are of great importance. Here, active layer dynamics have been monitored using direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP...... in resistivity. While the freezing horizon generally moves deeper with time, some variations in the freezing depth are observed along the profile. Comparison with depth-specific soil temperature indicates an exponential relationship between resistivity and below-freezing temperature. Time-lapse inversions...

  16. Resistance to diet-induced obesity and associated metabolic perturbations in haploinsufficient monocarboxylate transporter 1 mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Lengacher Sylvain; Nehiri-Sitayeb Touria; Steiner Nadia; Carneiro Lionel; Favrod Céline; Preitner Frédéric; Thorens Bernard; Stehle Jean-Christophe; Dix Laure; Pralong François; Magistretti Pierre J; Pellerin Luc

    2013-01-01

    The monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1 or SLC16A1) is a carrier of short-chain fatty acids, ketone bodies, and lactate in several tissues. Genetically modified C57BL/6J mice were produced by targeted disruption of the mct1 gene in order to understand the role of this transporter in energy homeostasis. Null mutation was embryonically lethal, but MCT1(+/-) mice developed normally. However, when fed high fat diet (HFD), MCT1(+/-) mice displayed resistance to development of diet-induced obesity ...

  17. Attempts to induce mutations for resistance of wheat to mildew, stem rust and leaf rust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiraly, Z.; Barabas, Z.

    1983-01-01

    Research carried out between 1971 and 1981 is summarized. Attempts to find induced mutants with full resistance to pathotype mixtures of the three pathogens were not successful. Reasons are discussed. Studies on wheat lines tolerant to stem rust infection led to the conclusion that this disease reaction may be often accompanied by a reduced number of infection sites and a longer lag period resulting in reduced spore production. Various selection methods have been evaluated. Selecting for the multigenic 'non race specific' way is promising. (author)

  18. Passive measurement of flux nucleation in the current-induced resistive state of type I superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selig, K.P.; Chimenti, D.E.; Huebener, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    Flux-tube nucleation rates have been measured in the current-induced resistive state of type I superconducting In films between 1.5 and 2.0 K by a completely passive technique. Indication of periodic nucleation is observed only in narrow regions of sample voltage drop, whose position is a sensitive function of temperature. Frequency bandwidth measurements of the nucleation rate yield a spectral purity of one part in 10 4 within the narrow regions where an experimental signal can be detected. (orig.) [de

  19. Understanding the molecular mechanism(s) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) induced interferon resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qashqari, Hanadi; Al-Mars, Amany; Chaudhary, Adeel; Abuzenadah, Adel; Damanhouri, Ghazi; Alqahtani, Mohammed; Mahmoud, Maged; El Sayed Zaki, Maysaa; Fatima, Kaneez; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2013-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the foremost causes of chronic liver disease affecting over 300 million globally. HCV contains a positive-stranded RNA of ~9600 nt and is surrounded by the 5' and 3'untranslated regions (UTR). The only successful treatment regimen includes interferon (IFN) and ribavirin. Like many other viruses, HCV has also evolved various mechanisms to circumvent the IFN response by blocking (1) downstream signaling actions via STAT1, STAT2, IRF9 and JAK-STAT pathways and (2) repertoire of IFN Stimulatory Genes (ISGs). Several studies have identified complex host demographic and genetic factors as well as viral genetic heterogeneity associated with outcomes of IFN therapy. The genetic predispositions of over 2000 ISGS may render the patients to become resistant, thus identification of such parameters within a subset of population are necessary for management corollary. The ability of various HCV genotypes to diminish IFN antiviral responses plays critical role in the establishment of chronic infection at the acute stage of infection, thus highlighting importance of the resistance in HCV treated groups. The recently defined role of viral protein such as C, E2, NS3/NS4 and NS5A proteins in inducing the IFN resistance are discussed in this article. How the viral and host genetic composition and epistatic connectivity among polymorphic genomic sites synchronizes the evolutionary IFN resistance trend remains under investigation. However, these signals may have the potential to be employed for accurate prediction of therapeutic outcomes. In this review article, we accentuate the significance of host and viral components in IFN resistance with the aim to determine the successful outcome in patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Src mediates cigarette smoke-induced resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in NSCLC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filosto, Simone; Baston, David S; Chung, Samuel; Becker, Cathleen R; Goldkorn, Tzipora

    2013-08-01

    The EGF receptor (EGFR) is a proto-oncogene commonly dysregulated in several cancers including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and, thus, is targeted for treatment using tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) such as erlotinib. However, despite the efficacy observed in patients with NSCLC harboring oncogenic variants of the EGFR, general ineffectiveness of TKIs in patients with NSCLC who are current and former smokers necessitates identification of novel mechanisms to overcome this phenomenon. Previously, we showed that NSCLC cells harboring either wild-type (WT) EGFR or oncogenic mutant (MT) L858R EGFR become resistant to the effects of TKIs when exposed to cigarette smoke, evidenced by their autophosphorylation and prolonged downstream signaling. Here, we present Src as a target mediating cigarette smoke-induced resistance to TKIs in both WT EGFR- and L858R MT EGFR-expressing NSCLC cells. First, we show that cigarette smoke exposure of A549 cells leads to time-dependent activation of Src, which then abnormally binds to the WT EGFR causing TKI resistance, contrasting previous observations of constitutive binding between inactive Src and TKI-sensitive L858R MT EGFR. Next, we show that Src inhibition restores TKI sensitivity in cigarette smoke-exposed NSCLC cells, preventing EGFR autophosphorylation in the presence of erlotinib. Furthermore, we show that overexpression of a dominant-negative Src (Y527F/K295R) restores TKI sensitivity to A549 exposed to cigarette smoke. Importantly, the TKI resistance that emerges even in cigarette smoke-exposed L858R EGFR-expressing NSCLC cells could be eliminated with Src inhibition. Together, these findings offer new rationale for using Src inhibitors for treating TKI-resistant NSCLC commonly observed in smokers.

  1. Skeletal Muscle TRIB3 Mediates Glucose Toxicity in Diabetes and High- Fat Diet–Induced Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mengrui; Kim, Teayoun; Jariwala, Ravi H.; Garvey, W. John; Luo, Nanlan; Kang, Minsung; Ma, Elizabeth; Tian, Ling; Steverson, Dennis; Yang, Qinglin; Fu, Yuchang

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, we used muscle-specific TRIB3 overexpressing (MOE) and knockout (MKO) mice to determine whether TRIB3 mediates glucose-induced insulin resistance in diabetes and whether alterations in TRIB3 expression as a function of nutrient availability have a regulatory role in metabolism. In streptozotocin diabetic mice, TRIB3 MOE exacerbated, whereas MKO prevented, glucose-induced insulin resistance and impaired glucose oxidation and defects in insulin signal transduction compared with wild-type (WT) mice, indicating that glucose-induced insulin resistance was dependent on TRIB3. In response to a high-fat diet, TRIB3 MOE mice exhibited greater weight gain and worse insulin resistance in vivo compared with WT mice, coupled with decreased AKT phosphorylation, increased inflammation and oxidative stress, and upregulation of lipid metabolic genes coupled with downregulation of glucose metabolic genes in skeletal muscle. These effects were prevented in the TRIB3 MKO mice relative to WT mice. In conclusion, TRIB3 has a pathophysiological role in diabetes and a physiological role in metabolism. Glucose-induced insulin resistance and insulin resistance due to diet-induced obesity both depend on muscle TRIB3. Under physiological conditions, muscle TRIB3 also influences energy expenditure and substrate metabolism, indicating that the decrease and increase in muscle TRIB3 under fasting and nutrient excess, respectively, are critical for metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27207527

  2. Down-regulation of HSP27 sensitizes TRAIL-resistant tumor cell to TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhuang, Hongqin; Jiang, Weiwei; Cheng, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has recently emerged as a cancer therapeutic agent because it preferentially induces apoptosis in human cancer over normal cells. Most tumor cells, including lung cancer cell line A549, unfortunately, are resistant to TRAIL tre...

  3. Effect of gender on lipid-induced insulin resistance in obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, Bodil; Hellgren, Lars; Vadset, T.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: In obese subjects, chronically elevated plasma concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) exert a marked risk to contract insulin resistance and subsequently type 2 diabetes. When NEFA is acutely increased due to i.v. infusion of lipid, glucose disposal during...... a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp is reduced. This effect has been explained by a NEFA-induced decrease in skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity caused by accumulation of the lipid intermediates Such as ceramide and diacylglycerol in the myocytes. However, neither the lipid-induced reduction of glucose disposal nor...... the clamp was similar in females and males (46+/-10 and 60+/-4%,, respectively, NS). However, whole-body insulin sensitivity as well as non-oxidative glucose disposal was higher in obese females compared with obese males both during lipid and saline infusion (P...

  4. Flurbiprofen ameliorated obesity by attenuating leptin resistance induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, Toru; Yamaguchi, Rie; Noji, Kikuko; Matsuo, Suguru; Baba, Sachiko; Toyoda, Keisuke; Suezawa, Takahiro; Kayano, Takaaki; Tanaka, Shinpei; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2014-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, caused by the accumulation of unfolded proteins, is involved in the development of obesity. We demonstrated that flurbiprofen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), exhibited chaperone activity, which reduced protein aggregation and alleviated ER stress-induced leptin resistance, characterized by insensitivity to the actions of the anti-obesity hormone leptin. This result was further supported by flurbiprofen attenuating high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice. The other NSAIDs tested did not exhibit such effects, which suggested that this anti-obesity action is mediated independent of NSAIDs. Using ferriteglycidyl methacrylate beads, we identified aldehyde dehydrogenase as the target of flurbiprofen, but not of the other NSAIDs. These results suggest that flurbiprofen may have unique pharmacological properties that reduce the accumulation of unfolded proteins and may represent a new class of drug for the fundamental treatment of obesity.

  5. Mouse dendritic cells pulsed with capsular polysaccharide induce resistance to lethal pneumococcal challenge: roles of T cells and B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noam Cohen

    Full Text Available Mice are exceedingly sensitive to intra-peritoneal (IP challenge with some virulent pneumococci (LD50 = 1 bacterium. To investigate how peripheral contact with bacterial capsular polysaccharide (PS antigen can induce resistance, we pulsed bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDC of C57BL/6 mice with type 4 or type 3 PS, injected the BMDC intra-foot pad (IFP and challenged the mice IP with supra-lethal doses of pneumococci. We examined the responses of T cells and B cells in the draining popliteal lymph node and measured the effects on the bacteria in the peritoneum and blood. We now report that: 1 The PS co-localized with MHC molecules on the BMDC surface; 2 PS-specific T and B cell proliferation and IFNγ secretion was detected in the draining popliteal lymph nodes on day 4; 3 Type-specific resistance to lethal IP challenge was manifested only after day 5; 4 Type-specific IgM and IgG antibodies were detected in the sera of only some of the mice, but B cells were essential for resistance; 5 Control mice vaccinated with a single injection of soluble PS did not develop a response in the draining popliteal lymph node and were not protected; 6 Mice injected with unpulsed BMDC also did not resist challenge: In unprotected mice, pneumococci entered the blood shortly after IP inoculation and multiplied exponentially in both blood and peritoneum killing the mice within 20 hours. Mice vaccinated with PS-pulsed BMDC trapped the bacteria in the peritoneum. The trapped bacteria proliferated exponentially IP, but died suddenly at 18-20 hours. Thus, a single injection of PS antigen associated with intact BMDC is a more effective vaccine than the soluble PS alone. This model system provides a platform for studying novel aspects of PS-targeted vaccination.

  6. Hypothalamic CaMKKβ mediates glucagon anorectic effect and its diet-induced resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones, Mar; Al-Massadi, Omar; Gallego, Rosalía; Fernø, Johan; Diéguez, Carlos; López, Miguel; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Objective Glucagon receptor antagonists and humanized glucagon antibodies are currently studied as promising therapies for obesity and type II diabetes. Among its variety of actions, glucagon reduces food intake, but the molecular mechanisms mediating this effect as well as glucagon resistance are totally unknown. Methods Glucagon and adenoviral vectors were administered in specific hypothalamic nuclei of lean and diet-induced obese rats. The expression of neuropeptides controlling food intake was performed by in situ hybridization. The regulation of factors of the glucagon signaling pathway was assessed by western blot. Results The central injection of glucagon decreased feeding through a hypothalamic pathway involving protein kinase A (PKA)/Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ)/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent mechanism. More specifically, the central injection of glucagon increases PKA activity and reduces protein levels of CaMKKβ and its downstream target phosphorylated AMPK in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). Consistently, central glucagon significantly decreased AgRP expression. Inhibition of PKA and genetic activation of AMPK in the ARC blocked glucagon-induced anorexia in lean rats. Genetic down-regulation of glucagon receptors in the ARC stimulates fasting-induced hyperphagia. Although glucagon was unable to decrease food intake in DIO rats, glucagon sensitivity was restored after inactivation of CaMKKβ, specifically in the ARC. Thus, glucagon decreases food intake acutely via PKA/CaMKKβ/AMPK dependent pathways in the ARC, and CaMKKβ mediates its obesity-induced hypothalamic resistance. Conclusions This work reveals the molecular underpinnings by which glucagon controls feeding that may lead to a better understanding of disease states linked to anorexia and cachexia. PMID:26909312

  7. Assessment of proliferation resistance of thermal recycle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    An assessment is made of the proliferation resistance of thermal recycle systems. The safeguards aspects are not addressed. Three routes to the acquisition of materials for nuclear weapons are addressed namely; a deliberate political decision by a government involving the use of dedicated facilities, a deliberate political decision by government involving abuse of nuclear fuel cycle facilities and theft by a subnational group. The most sensitive parts of the reference fuel cycle and the alternative technical measures are examined to judge their relative sensitivity. This is done by examining the difference forms in which plutonium can exist in the fuel cycle. The role which different institutional arrangements can play is also evaluated. From this comparative assessment it is concluded that, taking into account the qualitative nature of the assessment, the different stages of development of the various fuel cycles, the various realizations possible in respect of the deployment of facilities within individual countries and the evolutionary nature of the technical and institutional improvements foreseeable no fuel cycle can be made completely free from abuse. Furthermore it appears that following progressive introduction of features that will improve proliferation resistance there will not be significant differences between the various fuel cycles when compared at the point in time when they are introduced into widespread use. Provided such features are developed and implemented there is no reason on proliferation grounds to prefer one cycle to another

  8. Radiation resistance characteristics of optical communication system for single mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohe, Masamoto; Chigusa, Yoshiki; Kyodo, Tomohisa; Tanaka, Gohtaro; Watanabe, Hajime; Okamoto, Shin-ichi; Yamamoto, Takao.

    1988-01-01

    Optical communication has been utilized also for nuclear power stations and fuel reporocessing plants. As the sufficient safety countermeasures are required there, the amount of information becomes enormous, therefore, optical communication, by which the required space is expected to be reduced, becomes more important. Also in the application to submarine cables, attention must be paid to the radiation resistance as there are the effects of potassium contained in large amount in seawater and uranium deposits in sea bottom. Therefore, the reliability of the components of optical communication systems against radiation becomes a problem. In this study, single mode optical fibers and transmission and receipt modules were selected, and high dose rate irradiation supposing the case of using in a cell and low dose rate, long time irradiation supposing the case of submarine cables were carried out to evaluate the radiation resistance characteristics. The fibers tested were SiO 2 core/F-SiO 2 clad type and GeO 2 -SiO 2 core/SiO 2 clad type. The characteristics of increasing loss in irradiation and restoration after irradiation of the former type were superior to those of the latter type. The output of a receipt module was normal during irradiation, and the output power of a transmission module decreases, but other problems did not arise. (K.I.)

  9. Hibiscus sabdariffa calyx palliates insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and oxidative rout in fructose-induced metabolic syndrome rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiboye, Taofeek O; Raji, Hikmat O; Adeleye, Abdulwasiu O; Adigun, Nurudeen S; Giwa, Oluwayemisi B; Ojewuyi, Oluwayemisi B; Oladiji, Adenike T

    2016-03-30

    The effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa calyx extract was evaluated in high-fructose-induced metabolic syndrome rats. Insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and oxidative rout were induced in rats using high-fructose diet. High-fructose diet-fed rats were administered 100 and 200 mg kg(-1) body weight of H. sabdariffa extract for 3 weeks, starting from week 7 of high-fructose diet treatment. High-fructose diet significantly (P Hibiscus extract. Overall, aqueous extract of H. sabdariffa palliates insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and oxidative rout in high-fructose-induced metabolic syndrome rats. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Coffee induces breast cancer resistance protein expression in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isshiki, Marina; Umezawa, Kazuo; Tamura, Hiroomi

    2011-01-01

    Coffee is a beverage that is consumed world-wide on a daily basis and is known to induce a series of metabolic and pharmacological effects, especially in the digestive tract. However, little is known concerning the effects of coffee on transporters in the gastrointestinal tract. To elucidate the effect of coffee on intestinal transporters, we investigated its effect on expression of the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in a human colorectal cancer cell line, Caco-2. Coffee induced BCRP gene expression in Caco-2 cells in a coffee-dose dependent manner. Coffee treatment of Caco-2 cells also increased the level of BCRP protein, which corresponded to induction of gene expression, and also increased cellular efflux activity, as judged by Hoechst33342 accumulation. None of the major constituents of coffee tested could induce BCRP gene expression. The constituent of coffee that mediated this induction was extractable with ethyl acetate and was produced during the roasting process. Dehydromethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ), an inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, inhibited coffee-mediated induction of BCRP gene expression, suggesting involvement of NF-κB in this induction. Our data suggest that daily consumption of coffee might induce BCRP expression in the gastrointestinal tract and may affect the bioavailability of BCRP substrates.

  11. The Efficacy of Dandelion Root Extract in Inducing Apoptosis in Drug-Resistant Human Melanoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Chatterjee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Notoriously chemoresistant melanoma has become the most prevalent form of cancer for the 25–29 North American age demographic. Standard treatment after early detection involves surgical excision (recurrence is possible, and metastatic melanoma is refractory to immuno-, radio-, and most harmful chemotherapies. Various natural compounds have shown efficacy in killing different cancers, albeit not always specifically. In this study, we show that dandelion root extract (DRE specifically and effectively induces apoptosis in human melanoma cells without inducing toxicity in noncancerous cells. Characteristic apoptotic morphology of nuclear condensation and phosphatidylserine flipping to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane of A375 human melanoma cells was observed within 48 hours. DRE-induced apoptosis activates caspase-8 in A375 cells early on, demonstrating employment of an extrinsic apoptotic pathway to kill A375 cells. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS generated from DRE-treated isolated mitochondria indicates that natural compounds in DRE can also directly target mitochondria. Interestingly, the relatively resistant G361 human melanoma cell line responded to DRE when combined with the metabolism interfering antitype II diabetic drug metformin. Therefore, treatment with this common, yet potent extract of natural compounds has proven novel in specifically inducing apoptosis in chemoresistant melanoma, without toxicity to healthy cells.

  12. Cdk2-Null Mice Are Resistant to ErbB-2-Induced Mammary Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipankar Ray

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of targeting G1 cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs in breast cancer treatments is supported by the fact that the genetic ablation of Cdk4 had minimal impacts on normal cell proliferation in majority of cell types, resulting in near-normal mouse development, whereas such loss of Cdk4 completely abrogated ErbB-2/neu-induced mammary tumorigenesis in mice. In most human breast cancer tissues, another G1-regulatory CDK, CDK2, is also hyperactivated by various mechanisms and is believed to be an important therapeutic target. In this report, we provide genetic evidence that CDK2 is essential for proliferation and oncogenesis of murine mammary epithelial cells. We observed that 87% of Cdk2-null mice were protected from ErbB-2-induced mammary tumorigenesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts isolated from Cdk2-null mouse showed resistance to various oncogene-induced transformation. Previously, we have reported that hemizygous loss of Cdc25A, the major activator of CDK2, can also protect mice from ErbB-2-induced mammary tumorigenesis [Cancer Res (2007 67(14: 6605–11]. Thus, we propose that CDC25A-CDK2 pathway is critical for the oncogenic action of ErbB-2 in mammary epithelial cells, in a manner similar to Cyclin D1/CDK4 pathway.

  13. Curcumin reverses the depressive-like behavior and insulin resistance induced by chronic mild stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ji-Duo; Wei, Yu; Li, Yu-Jie; Qiao, Jing-Yi; Li, Yu-Cheng

    2017-08-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that patients with depression have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance has been identified as the key mechanism linking depression and diabetes. The present study established a rat model of depression complicated by insulin resistance using a 12-week exposure to chronic mild stress (CMS) and investigated the therapeutic effects of curcumin. Sucrose intake tests were used to evaluate depressive-like behaviors, and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) and intraperitoneal insulin tolerance tests (IPITT) were performed to evaluate insulin sensitivity. Serum parameters were detected using commercial kits. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to examine mRNA expression. CMS rats exhibited reduced sucrose consumption, increased serum glucose, insulin, triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA), glucagon, leptin, and corticosterone levels, as well as impaired insulin sensitivity. Curcumin upregulated the phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and protein kinase B (Akt) in the liver, enhanced insulin sensitivity, and reversed the metabolic abnormalities and depressive-like behaviors mentioned above. Moreover, curcumin increased the hepatic glycogen content by inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β and prevented gluconeogenesis by inhibiting phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase). These results suggest that curcumin not only exerted antidepressant-like effects, but also reversed the insulin resistance and metabolic abnormalities induced by CMS. These data may provide evidence to support the potential use of curcumin against depression and/or metabolic disorders.

  14. Imipenem Treatment Induces Expression of Important Genes and Phenotypes in a Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhabaan, Ghulam Nasser; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Cerqueira, Gustavo Maia; Al-Haroni, Mohammed; Pang, Sui Ping; Hassan, Hamimah

    2015-12-14

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a notorious multidrug-resistant pathogen, and development of novel control measures is of the utmost importance. Understanding the factors that play a role in drug resistance may contribute to the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Pili are essential for A. baumannii adherence to and biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces as well as virulence. In the present study, we found that biofilm formation was significantly induced in an imipenem-resistant (Imp(r)) strain treated with a subinhibitory concentration of antibiotic compared to that in an untreated control and an imipenem-susceptible (Imp(s)) isolate. Using microarray and quantitative PCR analyses, we observed that several genes responsible for the synthesis of type IV pili were significantly upregulated in the Imp(r) but not in the Imp(s) isolate. Notably, this finding is corroborated by an increase in the motility of the Imp(r) strain. Our results suggest that the ability to overproduce colonization factors in response to imipenem treatment confers biological advantage to A. baumannii and may contribute to clinical success. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Resistance to reinfection in rats induced by irradiated metacercariae of Clonorchis sinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Shi Quan

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available A study was made to observe the association between the resistance to reinfection induced by irradiated metacercariae (MC of Clonorchis sinensis and antigen specific Th1- and Th2-type cytokine productions in rats. Rats were infected with 20 MC of C. sinensis, previously exposed to a single dose of gamma irradiation, which varied from 0 to 100 Gy. All of them, single dose of 12 Gy showed higher IgG antibody titer with lowest worm recovery. Thus, 50 MC were used to challenge infection in rats previously infected with 20 MC irradiated at 12 Gy and the highest resistance to challenge infection was observed. The results of lymphocyte proliferation with specific antigen, ES Ag were shown no difference of proliferative responses as compared with primary and challenge infection at 12 Gy irradiation dose. In the case of cytokines production were observed that interferon (IFN-gamma and interlukin (IL-2 were significantly enhanced, while IL-4 and IL-10 was almost unchanged to make comparison between primary and secondary infection at 12 Gy irradiation dose. In conclusion, the single dose of 12 Gy could be adopted for induction of the highest resistance to challenge infection. Up-regulation of Th1 type cytokines, IFN-gamma and IL-2 may be affected to develop vaccine by irradiated MC.

  16. Electric-field-induced extremely large change in resistance in graphene ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu

    2018-01-01

    A colossal magnetoresistance (˜100×10^3% ) and an extremely large magnetoresistance (˜1×10^6% ) have been previously explored in manganite perovskites and Dirac materials, respectively. However, the requirement of an extremely strong magnetic field (and an extremely low temperature) makes them not applicable for realistic devices. In this work, we propose a device that can generate even larger changes in resistance in a zero-magnetic field and at a high temperature. The device is composed of graphene under two strips of yttrium iron garnet (YIG), where two gate voltages are applied to cancel the heavy charge doping in the YIG-induced half-metallic ferromagnets. By calculations using the Landauer-Büttiker formalism, we demonstrate that, when a proper gate voltage is applied on the free ferromagnet, changes in resistance up to 305×10^6% (16×10^3% ) can be achieved at the liquid helium (nitrogen) temperature and in a zero magnetic field. We attribute such a remarkable effect to a gate-induced full-polarization reversal in the free ferromagnet, which results in a metal-state to insulator-state transition in the device. We also find that the proposed effect can be realized in devices using other magnetic insulators, such as EuO and EuS. Our work should be helpful for developing a realistic switching device that is energy saving and CMOS-technology compatible.

  17. Resistance training controls arterial blood pressure in rats with L-NAME- induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Ayslan Jorge Santos de; Santos, Anne Carolline Veríssimo dos; Souza, Karine dos Santos; Aires, Marlúcia Bastos; Santana-Filho, Valter Joviniano; Fioretto, Emerson Ticona; Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana

    2013-04-01

    Arterial hypertension is a multifactorial chronic condition caused by either congenital or acquired factors. To evaluate the effects of Resistance Training (RT) on arterial pressure, and on vascular reactivity and morphology, of L-NAME-treated hypertensive rats. Male Wistar rats (200 - 250 g) were allocated into Sedentary Normotensive (SN), Sedentary Hypertensive (SH) and Trained Hypertensive (TH) groups. Hypertension was induced by adding L-NAME (40 mg/Kg) to the drinking water for four weeks. Arterial pressure was evaluated before and after RT. RT was performed using 50% of 1RM, 3 sets of 10 repetitions, 3 times per week for four weeks. Vascular reactivity was measured in rat mesenteric artery rings by concentration-response curves to sodium nitroprusside (SNP); phenylephrine (PHE) was also used for histological and stereological analysis. Resistance training inhibited the increase in mean and diastolic arterial pressures. Significant reduction was observed in Rmax (maximal response) and pD2 (potency) of PHE between SH and TH groups. Arteries demonstrated normal intima, media and adventitia layers in all groups. Stereological analysis demonstrated no significant difference in luminal, tunica media, and total areas of arteries in the SH and TH groups when compared to the SN group. Wall-to-lumen ratio of SH arteries was significantly different compared to SN arteries (parteries. RT was able to prevent an increase in blood pressure under the conditions in this study. This appears to involve a vasoconstrictor regulation mechanism and maintenance of luminal diameter in L-NAME induced hypertensive rats.

  18. PGBR extract ameliorates TNF-α induced insulin resistance in hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Chih Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-germinated brown rice (PGBR could ameliorate metabolic syndrome, however, not much research estimates the effect of PGBR extract on insulin resistance. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of PGBR extract in TNF-α induced insulin resistance. HepG2 cells, hepatocytes, were cultured in DMEM medium and added with 5 μM insulin or with insulin and 30 ng/ml TNF-α or with insulin, TNF-α and PGBR extract (50, 100, 300 μg/ml. The glucose levels of the medium were decreased by insulin, demonstrating insulin promoted glucose uptake into cell. However, TNF-α inhibited glucose uptake into cells treated with insulin. Moreover, insulin increased the protein expressions of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-α (PI3K-α, serine/threonine kinase PI3K-linked protein kinase B (Akt/PKB, glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2, glucokinase (GCK, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPAR-α and PPAR-γ. TNF-α activated p65 and MAPKs (JNK1/2 and ERK1/2 which worsened the expressions of AMPK, IRS-1, PI3K-α, Akt/PKB, GLUT-2, GCK, glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3, PPAR-α and PPAR-γ. Once this relationship was established, we added PGBR extract to cell with insulin and TNF-α. We found glucose levels of medium were lowered and that the protein expressions of AMPK, IRS-1, PI3K-α, Akt/PKB, GLUT-2, GCK, GSK-3, PPAR-α, PPAR-γ and p65, JNK1/2 were also recovered. In conclusion, this study found that TNF-α inhibited insulin stimulated glucose uptake and aggravated related proteins expressions, suggesting that it might cause insulin resistance. PGBR extract was found to ameliorate this TNF-α induced insulin resistance, suggesting that it might be used in the future to help control insulin resistance.

  19. Laser-induced change of electrical resistivity of metals and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Ryszard; Kostrubiec, Franciszek; Tomczyk, Mariusz; Walczak, Maria

    2005-01-01

    Applying of laser alloying for modification of electrical resistivity of metals with significant importance in electrical and electronic engineering and utilization of this method for producing passive elements of electric circuit have been presented. The alloyed metals were obtained by means of laser beams with different wave length and various mode of working (cw or pulse), by different methods for the supplying of alloying elements. It was possible to form alloyed layers of metals forming different types of metallurgical systems: with full (Cu-Au, Cu-Ni) or partial solubility (Mo-Ni, W-Ni, Cu-Al, Ag-Sn), insoluble (Mo-Au and Cu-Cr) and immiscible (Ag-Ni and Ni-Au) metals, with metallic as well as non-metallic additions (oxide). It has been shown as well that it is possible to achieve resistive elements modified in whole cross section, in a single technological process. The results of systematic investigations into the resistivity of alloyed metals in the temperature range of 77-450 K have been presented. The alloyed layers, obtained, were characterised by a range of resistivity from 2.8 x 10-8 Ωm (Cu-Cr) to 128 x 10-8 Ωm (W-Ni). The microstructure and composition of alloyed layers were examined by means of SEM-microscopy and EDX analyser. In selected cases it was shown how results of investigations could be utilized for modification of surface layer of contact materials or to optimize the resistance of laser welded joints. In addition the results of investigations of new developed microtechnology -- producing micro-areas with extremely high resistivity -- have been presented.

  20. Impact of Microbiota on Resistance to Ocular Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Induced Keratitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abirami Kugadas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The existence of the ocular microbiota has been reported but functional analyses to evaluate its significance in regulating ocular immunity are currently lacking. We compared the relative contribution of eye and gut commensals in regulating the ocular susceptibility to Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced keratitis. We find that in health, the presence of microbiota strengthened the ocular innate immune barrier by significantly increasing the concentrations of immune effectors in the tear film, including secretory IgA and complement proteins. Consistent with this view, Swiss Webster (SW mice that are typically resistant to P. aeruginosa-induced keratitis become susceptible due to the lack of microbiota. This was exemplified by increased corneal bacterial burden and elevated pathology of the germ free (GF mice when compared to the conventionally maintained SW mice. The protective immunity was found to be dependent on both eye and gut microbiota with the eye microbiota having a moderate, but significant impact on the resistance to infection. These events were IL-1ß-dependent as corneal IL-1ß levels were decreased in the infected GF and antibiotic-treated mice when compared to the SPF controls, and neutralization of IL-1ß increased the ocular bacterial burden in the SPF mice. Monocolonizing GF mice with Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus sp. isolated from the conjunctival swabs was sufficient to restore resistance to infection. Cumulatively, these data underline a previously unappreciated role for microbiota in regulating susceptibility to ocular keratitis. We predict that these results will have significant implications for contact lens wearers, where alterations in the ocular commensal communities may render the ocular surface vulnerable to infections.

  1. Angiotensin II receptor blocker ameliorates stress-induced adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoharu Hayashi

    Full Text Available A strong causal link exists between psychological stress and insulin resistance as well with hypertension. Meanwhile, stress-related responses play critical roles in glucose metabolism in hypertensive patients. As clinical trials suggest that angiotensin-receptor blocker delays the onset of diabetes in hypertensive patients, we investigated the effects of irbesartan on stress-induced adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to 2-week intermittent restraint stress and orally treated with vehicle, 3 and 10 mg/kg/day irbesartan. The plasma concentrations of lipid and proinflammatory cytokines [Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6] were assessed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Monocyte/macrophage accumulation in inguinal white adipose tissue (WAT was observed with CD11b-positive cell counts and mRNA expressions of CD68 and F4/80 using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR methods respectively. The mRNA levels of angiotensinogen, proinflammatory cytokines shown above, and adiponectin in WAT were also assessed with RT-PCR method. Glucose metabolism was assessed by glucose tolerance tests (GTTs and insulin tolerance tests, and mRNA expression of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1 and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 in WAT. Restraint stress increased monocyte accumulation, plasma free fatty acids, expression of angiotensinogen and proinflammatory cytokines including MCP-1, and reduced adiponectin. Irbesartan reduced stress-induced monocyte accumulation in WAT in a dose dependent manner. Irbesartan treatment also suppressed induction of adipose angiotensinogen and proinflammatory cytokines in WAT and blood, and reversed changes in adiponectin expression. Notably, irbesartan suppressed stress-induced reduction in adipose tissue weight and free fatty acid release, and improved insulin tolerance with restoration of IRS-1 and GLUT4 mRNA expressions in WAT. The results

  2. Induction of Systemic Resistance against Aphids by Endophytic Bacillus velezensis YC7010 via Expressing PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Rashid, Md. Harun-Or-; Khan, Ajmal; Hossain, Mohammad T.; Chung, Young R.

    2017-01-01

    Aphids are the most destructive insect pests. They suck the sap and transmit plant viruses, causing widespread yield loss of many crops. A multifunctional endophytic bacterial strain Bacillus velezensis YC7010 has been found to induce systemic resistance against bacterial and fungal pathogens of rice. However, its activity against insects attack and underlying cellular and molecular defense mechanisms are not elucidated yet. Here, we show that root drenching of Arabidopsis seedlings with B. v...

  3. Ion beam induced fluorescence imaging in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettiol, Andrew A.; Mi, Zhaohong; Vanga, Sudheer Kumar; Chen, Ce-belle; Tao, Ye; Watt, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Imaging fluorescence generated by MeV ions in biological systems such as cells and tissue sections requires a high resolution beam (<100 nm), a sensitive detection system and a fluorescent probe that has a high quantum efficiency and low bleaching rate. For cutting edge applications in bioimaging, the fluorescence imaging technique needs to break the optical diffraction limit allowing for sub-cellular structure to be visualized, leading to a better understanding of cellular function. In a nuclear microprobe this resolution requirement can be readily achieved utilizing low beam current techniques such as Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM). In recent times, we have been able to extend this capability to fluorescence imaging through the development of a new high efficiency fluorescence detection system, and through the use of new novel fluorescent probes that are resistant to ion beam damage (bleaching). In this paper we demonstrate ion beam induced fluorescence imaging in several biological samples, highlighting the advantages and challenges associated with using this technique

  4. Deficiency in plasmacytoid dendritic cells and type I interferon signalling prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Tine D; Schmidt-Christensen, Anja; Nilsson, Julia; Fransén-Pettersson, Nina; Hansen, Lisbeth; Holmberg, Dan

    2017-10-01

    Obesity is associated with glucose intolerance and insulin resistance and is closely linked to the increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes. In mouse models of diet-induced obesity (DIO) and type 2 diabetes, an increased fat intake results in adipose tissue expansion and the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. The innate immune system not only plays a crucial role in obesity-associated chronic low-grade inflammation but it is also proposed to play a role in modulating energy metabolism. However, little is known about how the modulation of metabolism by the immune system may promote increased adiposity in the early stages of increased dietary intake. Here we aimed to define the role of type I IFNs in DIO and insulin resistance. Mice lacking the receptor for IFN-α (IFNAR -/- ) and deficient in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) (B6.E2-2 fl/fl .Itgax-cre) were fed a diet with a high fat content or normal chow. The mice were analysed in vivo and in vitro using cellular, biochemical and molecular approaches. We found that the development of obesity was inhibited by an inability to respond to type I IFNs. Furthermore, the development of obesity and insulin resistance in this model was associated with pDC recruitment to the fatty tissues and liver of obese mice (a 4.3-fold and 2.7-fold increase, respectively). Finally, we demonstrated that the depletion of pDCs protects mice from DIO and from developing obesity-associated metabolic complications. Our results provide genetic evidence that pDCs, via type I IFNs, regulate energy metabolism and promote the development of obesity.

  5. Surface resistance of superconductors - examples from Nb - O systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, F.

    1988-01-01

    The observed surface resistance of most superconductors can be written as the sum of two terms. R/sub obs/ = R/sub BCS/ + R/sub res/. This paper is divided into three sections. The first section describes the BCS theory of surface resistance in terms of a simplified two-fluid model. The second section describes several possible causes of residual resistance including normal conducting materials, tunneling across cracks in the surface, and direct generation of phonons by the RF electric field. The last section describes recent experiments having to do with the effects of oxide layers on surface resistance. Layers grown in pure oxygen at room temperature were found to have little or no effect, but if these layers are heated to temperatures near 300 0 C, they can alter both the BCS resistance and the residual resistance. Heated oxide layers also increased the dependence of the residual resistance on ambient magnetic field. 31 references, 13 figures, 3 tables

  6. Bcl-2 silencing attenuates hypoxia-induced apoptosis resistance in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yongmei; Jiang, Zhen; Zeng, Zhen; Liu, Yujing; Gu, Yuchun; Ji, Yingying; Zhao, Yupeng; Li, Yingchuan

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disorder that ultimately causes heart failure. While the underlying causes of this condition are not well understood, previous studies suggest that the anti-apoptotic nature of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) in hypoxic environments contributes to PAH pathogenesis. In this study, we focus on the contribution of Bcl-2 and hypoxia response element (HRE) to apoptosis-resistant endothelial cells and investigate the mechanism. PMVECs obtained from either normal rats or apoptosis-resistant PMVECs obtained from PAH rats were transduced with recombinant lentiviral vectors carrying either Bcl-2-shRNA or HRE combined Bcl-2-shRNA, and then cultured these cells for 24 h under hypoxic (5% O2) or normoxic (21% O2) conditions. In normal PMVECs, Bcl-2-shRNA or HRE combined with Bcl-2-shRNA transduction successfully decreased Bcl-2 expression, while increasing apoptosis as well as caspase-3 and P53 expression in a normoxic environment. In a hypoxic environment, the effects of Bcl-2-shRNA treatment on cell apoptosis, and on Bcl-2, caspase-3, P53 expression were significantly suppressed. Conversely, HRE activation combined with Bcl-2-shRNA transduction markedly enhanced cell apoptosis and upregulated caspase-3 and P53 expression, while decreasing Bcl-2 expression. Furthermore, in apoptosis-resistant PMVECs, HRE-mediated Bcl-2 silencing effectively enhanced cell apoptosis and caspase-3 activity. The apoptosis rate was significantly depressed when Lv-HRE-Bcl-2-shRNA was combined with Lv-P53-shRNA or Lv-caspase3-shRNA transduction in a hypoxic environment. These results suggest that HRE-mediated Bcl-2 inhibition can effectively attenuate hypoxia-induced apoptosis resistance in PMVECs by downregulating Bcl-2 expression and upregulating caspase-3 and P53 expression. This study therefore reveals critical insight into potential therapeutic targets for treating PAH.

  7. New Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection of Inducible and Acquired Clarithromycin Resistance in the Mycobacterium abscessus Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shallom, Shamira J; Moura, Natalia S; Olivier, Kenneth N; Sampaio, Elizabeth P; Holland, Steven M; Zelazny, Adrian M

    2015-11-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium abscessus group (MAG) cause lung, soft tissue, and disseminated infections. The oral macrolides clarithromycin and azithromycin are commonly used for treatment. MAG can display clarithromycin resistance through the inducible erm(41) gene or via acquired mutations in the rrl (23S rRNA) gene. Strains harboring a truncation or a T28C substitution in erm(41) lose the inducible resistance trait. Phenotypic detection of clarithromycin resistance requires extended incubation (14 days), highlighting the need for faster methods to detect resistance. Two real-time PCR-based assays were developed to assess inducible and acquired clarithromycin resistance and tested on a total of 90 clinical and reference strains. A SYBR green assay was designed to distinguish between a full-length and truncated erm(41) gene by temperature shift in melting curve analysis. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele discrimination assays were developed to distinguish T or C at position 28 of erm(41) and 23S rRNA rrl gene mutations at position 2058 and/or 2059. Truncated and full-size erm(41) genes were detected in 21/90 and 69/90 strains, respectively, with 64/69 displaying T at nucleotide position 28 and 5/69 containing C at that position. Fifteen isolates showed rrl mutations conferring clarithromycin resistance, including A2058G (11 isolates), A2058C (3 isolates), and A2059G (1 isolate). Targeted sequencing and phenotypic assessment of resistance concurred with molecular assay results. Interestingly, we also noted cooccurring strains harboring an active erm(41), inactive erm(41), and/or acquired mutational resistance, as well as slowly growing MAG strains and also strains displaying an inducible resistance phenotype within 5 days, long before the recommended 14-day extended incubation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Modeling and inversion Matlab algorithms for resistivity, induced polarization and seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoulis, M.; Revil, A.; Minsley, B. J.; Werkema, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    M. Karaoulis (1), D.D. Werkema (3), A. Revil (1,2), A., B. Minsley (4), (1) Colorado School of Mines, Dept. of Geophysics, Golden, CO, USA. (2) ISTerre, CNRS, UMR 5559, Université de Savoie, Equipe Volcan, Le Bourget du Lac, France. (3) U.S. EPA, ORD, NERL, ESD, CMB, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA . (4) USGS, Federal Center, Lakewood, 10, 80225-0046, CO. Abstract We propose 2D and 3D forward modeling and inversion package for DC resistivity, time domain induced polarization (IP), frequency-domain IP, and seismic refraction data. For the resistivity and IP case, discretization is based on rectangular cells, where each cell has as unknown resistivity in the case of DC modelling, resistivity and chargeability in the time domain IP modelling, and complex resistivity in the spectral IP modelling. The governing partial-differential equations are solved with the finite element method, which can be applied to both real and complex variables that are solved for. For the seismic case, forward modeling is based on solving the eikonal equation using a second-order fast marching method. The wavepaths are materialized by Fresnel volumes rather than by conventional rays. This approach accounts for complicated velocity models and is advantageous because it considers frequency effects on the velocity resolution. The inversion can accommodate data at a single time step, or as a time-lapse dataset if the geophysical data are gathered for monitoring purposes. The aim of time-lapse inversion is to find the change in the velocities or resistivities of each model cell as a function of time. Different time-lapse algorithms can be applied such as independent inversion, difference inversion, 4D inversion, and 4D active time constraint inversion. The forward algorithms are benchmarked against analytical solutions and inversion results are compared with existing ones. The algorithms are packaged as Matlab codes with a simple Graphical User Interface. Although the code is parallelized for multi

  9. Triggering the adaptive immune system with commensal gut bacteria protects against insulin resistance and dysglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Pomié

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To demonstrate that glycemia and insulin resistance are controlled by a mechanism involving the adaptive immune system and gut microbiota crosstalk. Methods: We triggered the immune system with microbial extracts specifically from the intestinal ileum contents of HFD-diabetic mice by the process of immunization. 35 days later, immunized mice were fed a HFD for up to two months in order to challenge the development of metabolic features. The immune responses were quantified. Eventually, adoptive transfer of immune cells from the microbiota-immunized mice to naïve mice was performed to demonstrate the causality of the microbiota-stimulated adaptive immune system on the development of metabolic disease. The gut microbiota of the immunized HFD-fed mice was characterized in order to demonstrate whether the manipulation of the microbiota to immune system interaction reverses the causal deleterious effect of gut microbiota dysbiosis on metabolic disease. Results: Subcutaneous injection (immunization procedure of ileum microbial extracts prevented hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in a dose-dependent manner in response to a HFD. The immunization enhanced the proliferation of CD4 and CD8 T cells in lymphoid organs, also increased cytokine production and antibody secretion. As a mechanism explaining the metabolic improvement, the immunization procedure reversed gut microbiota dysbiosis. Finally, adoptive transfer of immune cells from immunized mice improved metabolic features in response to HFD. Conclusions: Glycemia and insulin sensitivity can be regulated by triggering the adaptive immunity to microbiota interaction. This reduces the gut microbiota dysbiosis induced by a fat-enriched diet. Keywords: Gut microbiota and metabolic diseases, Immunity, Insulin resistance

  10. Intrinsic mechanism of estradiol-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells resistant to estrogen deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Joan S; Meeke, Kathleen; Osipo, Clodia; Ross, Eric A; Kidawi, Noman; Li, Tianyu; Bell, Eric; Chandel, Navdeep S; Jordan, V Craig

    2005-12-07

    We previously developed an estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer cell line (MCF-7:5C) that is resistant to long-term estrogen deprivation and undergoes rapid and complete apoptosis in the presence of physiologic concentrations of 17beta-estradiol. Here, we investigated the role of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in this process. Apoptosis in MCF-7:5C cells treated with estradiol, fulvestrant, or vehicle (control) was investigated by annexin V-propidium iodide double staining and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Apoptosis was also analyzed in MCF-7:5C cells transiently transfected with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to apoptotic pathway components. Expression of apoptotic pathway intermediates was measured by western blot analysis. Mitochondrial transmembrane potential (psim) was determined by rhodamine-123 retention assay. Mitochondrial pathway activity was determined by cytochrome c release and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein. Tumorigenesis was studied in ovariectomized athymic mice that were injected with MCF-7:5C cells. Differences between the treatment groups and control group were determined by two-sample t test or one-factor analysis of variance. All statistical tests were two-sided. MCF-7:5C cells treated with estradiol underwent apoptosis and showed increased expression of proapoptotic proteins, decreased psim, enhanced cytochrome c release, and PARP cleavage compared with cells treated with fulvestrant or vehicle. Blockade of Bax, Bim, and p53 mRNA expression by siRNA reduced estradiol-induced apoptosis relative to control by 76% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 73% to 79%, P estradiol-induced apoptosis in long-term estrogen-deprived breast cancer cells. Physiologic concentrations of estradiol could potentially be used to induce apoptosis and tumor regression in tumors that have developed resistance to aromatase inhibitors.

  11. Magnetic field induced enhancement of resistance in polycrystalline ZrTe5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Prakash; Bera, Sumit; Patidar, Manju Mishra; Singh, Durgesh; Mishra, A. K.; Krishnan, M.; Gangrade, M.; Deshpande, U. P.; Venkatesh, R.; Ganesan, V.

    2018-04-01

    Transport properties of the polycrystalline ZrTe5 showing a considerable positive Magneto-Resistance (MR) in the intermediate temperatures has been reported. Substantial shift of peak temperature by approximately 65 K with an applied magnetic field of 13.5 Tesla has been observed. Magneto resistance of this polycrystalline sample (˜100%) is comparable with its single crystalline counterpart reported in literature. The peak intensity scales with peak temperature and obeys reasonably the Dionne relationship that is a clear indication of polaron mediated conduction in this system. Magneto Resistance (MR) in this system is attributed to the two carrier polaronic conduction model similar to the Holstein's approach. The results are further complemented with the Peak shift in magnetic field expected for a system having a fraction of localized carrier density. This observation places this famous thermoelectric material that displays a topological Dirac to Weyl transition in magnetic field in to the family of materials that have potential technological applications in the liquid nitrogen temperature range viz. 85-150 K.

  12. Screening of gamma radiation-induced pathogen resistance rice lines against Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Chan Ju; Lee, Ha Yeon; Kim, Woong Bom; Ahmad, Raza; Moon, Jae Sun; Kwon, Suk Yoon [Korea Research Institute of Beoscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    Bacterial blight is one of the most serious diseases of rice (Oryza sativa L.), and it has been known that Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes this disease symptom. To develop resistance rice cultivars against Xoo, 3,000 lines of M{sub 3}, which were irradiated with gamma ray, were tested by 'scissor-dip method' primarily, and 191 putative resistant lines were selected. In M{sub 4} generation, these lines were screened again with various ways such as measuring of symptom of bacterial blight in leaf, number of tiller, fresh weight, and phenotypic segregation ratio in next generation. Finally, six resistance lines were selected. RT-PCR analysis revealed that these lines displayed high level of R-genes such as Xa21, Pi36, and Pi-ta. These results indicate that mutations by gamma ray cause disruptions of regulatory signal transduction systems of these R-genes. Furthermore, these selected mutants could be useful for the development of rice cultivar resistant to Xoo.

  13. MicroRNA-21 induces 5-fluorouracil resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells by regulating PTEN and PDCD4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Xueju; Wang, Weibin; Wang, Lanlan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xian; Chen, Mingtai; Wang, Fang; Yu, Jia; Ma, Yanni; Sun, Guotao

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer patients are often resistant to chemotherapy treatment, which results in poor prognosis. The objective of this study was to delineate the mechanism by which miR-21 induces drug resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in human pancreatic cancer cells (PATU8988 and PANC-1). We report that PATU8988 cells resistant to 5-FU express high levels of miR-21 in comparison to sensitive primary PATU8988 cells. Suppression of miR-21 expression in 5-Fu-resistant PATU8988 cells can alleviate its 5-FU resistance. Meanwhile, lentiviral vector-mediated overexpression of miR-21 not only conferred resistance to 5-FU but also promoted proliferation, migration, and invasion of PATU8988 and PANC-1 cells. The proresistance effects of miR-21 were attributed to the attenuated expression of tumor suppressor genes, including PTEN and PDCD4. Overexpression of PTEN and PDCD4 antagonized miR-21-induced resistance to 5-FU and migration activity. Our work demonstrates that miR-21 can confer drug resistance to 5-FU in pancreatic cancer cells by regulating the expression of tumor suppressor genes, as the target genes of miR-21, PTEN and PDCD4 can rescue 5-FU sensitivity and the phenotypic characteristics disrupted by miR-21

  14. Zinc blocks SOS-induced antibiotic resistance via inhibition of RecA in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, Bryan E; Escobar, Jillian F; Bair, Kirsten L; Sutton, Mark D; Crane, John K

    2017-01-01

    Zinc inhibits the virulence of diarrheagenic E. coli by inducing the envelope stress response and inhibiting the SOS response. The SOS response is triggered by damage to bacterial DNA. In Shiga-toxigenic E. coli, the SOS response strongly induces the production of Shiga toxins (Stx) and of the bacteriophages that encode the Stx genes. In E. coli, induction of the SOS response is accompanied by a higher mutation rate, called the mutator response, caused by a shift to error-prone DNA polymerases when DNA damage is too severe to be repaired by canonical DNA polymerases. Since zinc inhibited the other aspects of the SOS response, we hypothesized that zinc would also inhibit the mutator response, also known as hypermutation. We explored various different experimental paradigms to induce hypermutation triggered by the SOS response, and found that hypermutation was induced not just by classical inducers such as mitomycin C and the quinolone antibiotics, but also by antiviral drugs such as zidovudine and anti-cancer drugs such as 5-fluorouracil, 6-mercaptopurine, and azacytidine. Zinc salts inhibited the SOS response and the hypermutator phenomenon in E. coli as well as in Klebsiella pneumoniae, and was more effective in inhibiting the SOS response than other metals. We then attempted to determine the mechanism by which zinc, applied externally in the medium, inhibits hypermutation. Our results show that zinc interferes with the actions of RecA, and protects LexA from RecA-mediated cleavage, an early step in initiation of the SOS response. The SOS response may play a role in the development of antibiotic resistance and the effect of zinc suggests ways to prevent it.

  15. Zinc blocks SOS-induced antibiotic resistance via inhibition of RecA in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan E Bunnell

    Full Text Available Zinc inhibits the virulence of diarrheagenic E. coli by inducing the envelope stress response and inhibiting the SOS response. The SOS response is triggered by damage to bacterial DNA. In Shiga-toxigenic E. coli, the SOS response strongly induces the production of Shiga toxins (Stx and of the bacteriophages that encode the Stx genes. In E. coli, induction of the SOS response is accompanied by a higher mutation rate, called the mutator response, caused by a shift to error-prone DNA polymerases when DNA damage is too severe to be repaired by canonical DNA polymerases. Since zinc inhibited the other aspects of the SOS response, we hypothesized that zinc would also inhibit the mutator response, also known as hypermutation. We explored various different experimental paradigms to induce hypermutation triggered by the SOS response, and found that hypermutation was induced not just by classical inducers such as mitomycin C and the quinolone antibiotics, but also by antiviral drugs such as zidovudine and anti-cancer drugs such as 5-fluorouracil, 6-mercaptopurine, and azacytidine. Zinc salts inhibited the SOS response and the hypermutator phenomenon in E. coli as well as in Klebsiella pneumoniae, and was more effective in inhibiting the SOS response than other metals. We then attempted to determine the mechanism by which zinc, applied externally in the medium, inhibits hypermutation. Our results show that zinc interferes with the actions of RecA, and protects LexA from RecA-mediated cleavage, an early step in initiation of the SOS response. The SOS response may play a role in the development of antibiotic resistance and the effect of zinc suggests ways to prevent it.

  16. Silymarin ameliorates fructose induced insulin resistance syndrome by reducing de novo hepatic lipogenesis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Prem; Singh, Vishal; Jain, Manish; Rana, Minakshi; Khanna, Vivek; Barthwal, Manoj Kumar; Dikshit, Madhu

    2014-03-15

    High dietary fructose causes insulin resistance syndrome (IRS), primarily due to simultaneous induction of genes involved in glucose, lipid and mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. The present study evaluates effect of a hepatoprotective agent, silymarin (SYM) on fructose-induced metabolic abnormalities in the rat and also assessed the associated thrombotic complications. Wistar rats were kept on high fructose (HFr) diet throughout the 12-week study duration (9 weeks of HFr feeding and subsequently 3 weeks of HFr plus SYM oral administration [once daily]). SYM treatment significantly reduced the HFr diet-induced increase expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC)-1α/β, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α, forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1), sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1c, liver X receptor (LXR)-β, fatty acid synthase (FAS) and PPARγ genes in rat liver. SYM also reduced HFr diet mediated increase in plasma triglycerides (TG), non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), uric acid, malondialdehyde (MDA), total nitrite and pro-inflammatory cytokines (C-reactive protein [CRP], interleukin-6 [IL-6], interferon-gamma [IFN-γ] and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]) levels. Moreover, SYM ameliorated HFr diet induced reduction in glucose utilization and endothelial dysfunction. Additionally, SYM significantly reduced platelet activation (adhesion and aggregation), prolonged ferric chloride-induced blood vessel occlusion time and protected against exacerbated myocardial ischemia reperfusion (MI-RP) injury. SYM treatment prevented HFr induced mRNA expression of hepatic PGC-1α/β and also its target transcription factors which was accompanied with recovery in insulin sensitivity and reduced propensity towards thrombotic complications and aggravated MI-RP injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of Osthol Induces a Resistance Response Against Powdery Mildew in Pumpkin Leave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Jian Fan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Plants can defend themselves against fungal infection by natural means inducedby biotic and abiotic elicitors. Osthol is a natural compound extracted from dried fruits ofCnidii Monnieri Fructus. In this study, it has been shown to not only be a fungicide withacceptable curative properties (control efficacy of 68.72, but it also showed a significantprophylactic effect (with control efficacy of 77.36 against pumpkin powdery mildew at aconcentration of 100 μg·mL-1. In pumpkin leaves with/or without inoculation ofSphaerotheca fuliginea, osthol treatment induced the accumulation of chitinase andperoxidase and enhanced the transcription of chitinase gene in non-inoculated leaves. Thepotentiation of phenylalanine amonia-lyase activity in leaves by osthol application andfollowing inoculation was absent in that with inoculation or osthol treatment, indicatingthat induced PAL in osthol-pretreated plants was inoculation-mediated. In conclusion, thisnatural compound could induce resistance response in the plant against powdery mildew.

  18. Markov Networks of Collateral Resistance: National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System Surveillance Results from Escherichia coli Isolates, 2004-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Love

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Surveillance of antimicrobial resistance (AMR is an important component of public health. Antimicrobial drug use generates selective pressure that may lead to resistance against to the administered drug, and may also select for collateral resistances to other drugs. Analysis of AMR surveillance data has focused on resistance to individual drugs but joint distributions of resistance in bacterial populations are infrequently analyzed and reported. New methods are needed to characterize and communicate joint resistance distributions. Markov networks are a class of graphical models that define connections, or edges, between pairs of variables with non-zero partial correlations and are used here to describe AMR resistance relationships. The graphical least absolute shrinkage and selection operator is used to estimate sparse Markov networks from AMR surveillance data. The method is demonstrated using a subset of Escherichia coli isolates collected by the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System between 2004 and 2012 which included AMR results for 16 drugs from 14418 isolates. Of the 119 possible unique edges, 33 unique edges were identified at least once during the study period and graphical density ranged from 16.2% to 24.8%. Two frequent dense subgraphs were noted, one containing the five β-lactam drugs and the other containing both sulfonamides, three aminoglycosides, and tetracycline. Density did not appear to change over time (p = 0.71. Unweighted modularity did not appear to change over time (p = 0.18, but a significant decreasing trend was noted in the modularity of the weighted networks (p < 0.005 indicating relationships between drugs of different classes tended to increase in strength and frequency over time compared to relationships between drugs of the same class. The current method provides a novel method to study the joint resistance distribution, but additional work is required to unite the underlying biological and genetic

  19. ''Positive'' and ''negative'' electric-pulse-induced reversible resistance switching effect in Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Chen, L.D.; Li, X.M.; Shang, D.S.; Wu, Z.H.

    2007-01-01

    ''Negative'' electric-pulse-induced reversible resistance (EPIR) switching phenomenon was found in In/PCMO/Pt sandwich, in which the high resistance can be written with positive voltage pulses, and the low resistance can be reset using negative voltage pulses (the positive voltage direction is defined as going from the top electrode to the bottom electrode). This is just the opposite from the ''positive'' EPIR effect in Ag/PCMO/Pt sandwich, in which the high resistance can be written only with negative voltage pulses, and the low resistance can be reset using positive voltage pulses. The I-V hysteresis curves of In/PCMO/Pt and Ag/PCMO/Pt sandwiches also show opposite directions, i.e., counterclockwise and clockwise under a negative voltage region for indium and Ag electrode systems, respectively. C-V characteristics show that the barrier does not exist in Ag/PCMO/Pt sandwich, while In/PCMO/Pt sandwich exhibits an obvious Schottky-like barrier. We suggest that in the negative EPIR behavior in In/PCMO/Pt structure, the resistance states are mainly controlled changing the Schottky-like barrier at the interface with the weak effect of carrier trapping process, while the positive EPIR behavior in Ag/PCMO/Pt sandwich mainly depends on the carrier trapping process at the interface. (orig.)

  20. Indomethacin treatment prevents high fat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance but not glucose intolerance in C57BL/6J Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjære, Even; Aune, Ulrike Liisberg; Røen, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Chronic low grade inflammation is closely linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance. To examine how administration of the anti-inflammatory compound indomethacin, a general cyclooxygenase inhibitor, affected obesity development and insulin sensitivity, we fed obesity-prone male C57BL/6J mice...... a high fat/high sucrose (HF/HS) diet or a regular diet supplemented or not with indomethacin (±INDO) for 7 weeks. Development of obesity, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance was monitored, and the effect of indomethacin on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) was measured in vivo...... and in vitro using MIN6 β-cells. We found that supplementation with indomethacin prevented HF/HS-induced obesity and diet-induced changes in systemic insulin sensitivity. Thus, HF/HS+INDO-fed mice remained insulin-sensitive. However, mice fed HF/HS+INDO exhibited pronounced glucose intolerance. Hepatic glucose...

  1. Induced resistance in tomato fruit by γ-aminobutyric acid for the control of alternaria rot caused by Alternaria alternata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiali; Sun, Cui; Zhang, Yangyang; Fu, Da; Zheng, Xiaodong; Yu, Ting

    2017-04-15

    The study investigated the effect of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on the control of alternaria rot in tomato fruit and the possible mechanism involved. Our results showed exogenous GABA could stimulate remarkable resistance to the alternaria rot, while it had no direct antifungal activity against Alternaria alternata. Moreover, the activities of antioxidant enzymes, including peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase, along with the expression of these corresponding genes, were significantly induced in the GABA treatment. The obtained data suggested GABA induced resistance against the necrotrophic pathogen A. alternata, at least in part by activating antioxidant enzymes, restricting the levels of cell death caused by reactive oxygen species. Meanwhile, the key enzyme genes of GABA shunt, GABA transaminase and succinic-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, were found up-regulated in the GABA treatment. The activation of the GABA shunt might play a vital role in the resistance mechanism underpinning GABA-induced plant immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Plasmid-Mediated Resistance to Thrombin-Induced Platelet Microbicidal Protein in Staphylococci: Role of the qacA Locus

    OpenAIRE

    Kupferwasser, Leon Iri; Skurray, Ronald A.; Brown, Melissa H.; Firth, Neville; Yeaman, Michael R.; Bayer, Arnold S.

    1999-01-01

    Thrombin-induced platelet microbicidal protein 1 (tPMP-1) is a small, cationic peptide released from rabbit platelets following thrombin stimulation. In vitro resistance to this peptide among strains of Staphylococcus aureus correlates with the survival advantage of such strains at sites of endothelial damage in humans as well as in experimental endovascular infections. The mechanisms involved in the phenotypic resistance of S. aureus to tPMP-1 are not fully delineated. The plasmid-encoded st...

  3. Insulin resistance induced by physical inactivity is associated with multiple transcriptional changes in skeletal muscle in young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alibegovic, A C; Sonne, M P; Højbjerre, L

    2010-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a risk factor for insulin resistance. We examined the effect of 9 days of bed rest on basal and insulin-stimulated expression of genes potentially involved in insulin action by applying hypothesis-generating microarray in parallel with candidate gene real-time PCR approaches...... contribute to the development of insulin resistance induced by bed rest. Lack of complete normalization of changes after 4 wk of retraining underscores the importance of maintaining a minimum of daily physical activity....

  4. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) Ameliorates Chronic Alcohol Ingestion-Induced Myocardial Insulin Resistance and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shi-Yan; Gilbert, Sara A.B.; Li, Qun; Ren, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Chronic alcohol intake leads to insulin resistance and alcoholic cardiomyopathy, which appears to be a result of the complex interaction between genes and environment. This study was designed to examine the impact of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) transgenic overexpression on alcohol-induced insulin resistance and myocardial injury. ALDH2 transgenic mice were produced using chicken β-actin promoter. Wild-type FVB and ALDH2 mice were fed a 4% alcohol or control diet for 12 wks. Cell shorteni...

  5. The Possibility of Inducing Resistance in Tomato against Rhizoctonia solani and some of its Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nikraftar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum is one of the most important crops worldwide, which suffers from several destructive diseases. Rhizoctonia solani is a necrotrophic fungus which is known as the causal agent of tomato damping-off, seed rot, root and crown rot diseases. Control of this phytopathogenic fungus is very difficult due to its long-term survival in the soil, high level of genetic diversity in R. solani populations and the lake of complete resistance in plants to the pathogen. Although partial genetic resistance to Rhizoctonia diseases has been reported, no major gene responsible for resistance has been found so far. Most of the traditional cultivars, planted in tomato-growing areas, are susceptible to Rhizoctonia diseases. Therefore, an intensive use of other crop protection methods such as an application of chemicals or biological agent which are capable of activating plant defense responses seems to be necessary to suppress the disease damage in tomato fields. The growing concern on negative environmental effects of fungicides and the appearance of fungicide- resistant pathogens led to increased research interest in the alternative protection methods. Among these novel disease management strategies, induced resistance (IR has emerged as a potential supplement in plant protection trials. Materials and Methods: The cultivar CH Falat was used as a susceptible tomato genotype to R. solani. The seeds were surface sterilized with 1% sodium hypochlorite for 1min, rinsed 3 times with sterile distilled water and incubated for 5 days on a wet sterile filter paper in Petri dishes. Germinated seeds were each sown in plastic pots filled with autoclaved commercial potting soil and kept in greenhouse conditions. The tomato leaves were treated with various concentrations of thiamine, pyridoxine, and homoserine lactones and inoculated with the pathogen. Disease symptoms were evaluated at 5 days post-inoculation (dpi and the most effective

  6. CRISPR/Cas9 Editing of Murine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Engineering Inflammation-Resistant Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunger, Jonathan M; Zutshi, Ananya; Willard, Vincent P; Gersbach, Charles A; Guilak, Farshid

    2017-05-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) are found in elevated levels in diseased or injured tissues and promote rapid tissue degradation while preventing stem cell differentiation. This study was undertaken to engineer inflammation-resistant murine induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) through deletion of the IL-1 signaling pathway and to demonstrate the utility of these cells for engineering replacements for diseased or damaged tissues. Targeted deletion of the IL-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) gene in murine iPSCs was achieved using the RNA-guided, site-specific clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 genome engineering system. Clonal cell populations with homozygous and heterozygous deletions were isolated, and loss of receptor expression and cytokine signaling was confirmed by flow cytometry and transcriptional reporter assays, respectively. Cartilage was engineered from edited iPSCs and tested for its ability to resist IL-1-mediated degradation in gene expression, histologic, and biomechanical assays after a 3-day treatment with 1 ng/ml of IL-1α. Three of 41 clones isolated possessed the IL-1RI +/- genotype. Four clones possessed the IL-1RI -/- genotype, and flow cytometry confirmed loss of IL-1RI on the surface of these cells, which led to an absence of NF-κB transcription activation after IL-1α treatment. Cartilage engineered from homozygous null clones was resistant to cytokine-mediated tissue degradation. In contrast, cartilage derived from wild-type and heterozygous clones exhibited significant degradative responses, highlighting the need for complete IL-1 blockade. This work demonstrates proof-of-concept of the ability to engineer custom-designed stem cells that are immune to proinflammatory cytokines (i.e., IL-1) as a potential cell source for cartilage tissue engineering. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  7. Resistance to diet-induced adiposity in cannabinoid receptor-1 deficient mice is not due to impaired adipocyte function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oosterveer Maaike H

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overactivity and/or dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS contribute to development of obesity. In vitro studies indicate a regulatory role for the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 in adipocyte function and CB1-receptor deficient (CB1-/- mice are resistant to high fat diet-induced obesity. Whether this phenotype of CB1-/- mice is related to altered fat metabolism in adipose tissue is unknown. Methods We evaluated adipose tissue differentiation/proliferation markers and quantified lipogenic and lipolytic activities in fat tissues of CB1-/- and CB1+/+ mice fed a high-fat (HF or a high-fat/fish oil (HF/FO diet as compared to animals receiving a low-fat chow diet. Comparison between HF diet and HF/FO diet allowed to investigate the influence of dietary fat quality on adipose tissue biology in relation to CB1 functioning. Results The adiposity-resistant phenotype of the CB1-/- mice was characterized by reduced fat mass and adipocyte size in HF and HF/FO-fed CB1-/- mice in parallel to a significant increase in energy expenditure as compared to CB1+/+ mice. The expression levels of adipocyte differentiation and proliferation markers were however maintained in these animals. Consistent with unaltered lipogenic gene expression, the fatty acid synthesis rates in adipose tissues from CB1-/- and CB1+/+ mice were unchanged. Whole-body and adipose-specific lipoprotein lipase (LPL activities were also not altered in CB1-/- mice. Conclusions These findings indicate that protection against diet-induced adiposity in CB1-deficient mice is not related to changes in adipocyte function per se, but rather results from increased energy dissipation by oxidative and non-oxidative pathways.

  8. Induced resistance to Helicoverpa armigera through exogenous application of jasmonic acid and salicylic acid in groundnut, Arachis hypogaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    War, Abdul Rashid; Paulraj, Michael Gabriel; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu; Sharma, Hari Chand

    2015-01-01

    Induced resistance to Helicoverpa armigera through exogenous application of jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) was studied in groundnut genotypes (ICGV 86699, ICGV 86031, ICG 2271 and ICG 1697) with different levels of resistance to insects and the susceptible check JL 24 under greenhouse conditions. Activities of oxidative enzymes and the amounts of secondary metabolites and proteins were quantified at 6 days after JA and SA application/insect infestation. Data were also recorded on plant damage and H. armigera larval weights and survival. Higher levels of enzymatic activities and amounts of secondary metabolites were observed in the insect-resistant genotypes pretreated with JA and then infested with H. armigera than in JL 24. The insect-resistant genotypes suffered lower insect damage and resulted in poor survival and lower weights of H. armigera larvae than JL 24. In some cases, JA and SA showed similar effects. JA and SA induced the activity of antioxidative enzymes in groundnut plants against H. armigera, and reduced its growth and development. However, induced response to application of JA was greater than to SA, and resulted in reduced plant damage, and larval weights and survival, suggesting that induced resistance can be used as a component of pest management in groundnut. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Adiponectin protects palmitic acid induced endothelial inflammation and insulin resistance via regulating ROS/IKKβ pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenwen; Wu, Chuanhong; Li, Shaojing; Chen, Xiuping

    2016-12-01

    Endothelial inflammation and insulin resistance (IR) has been closely associated with endothelial dysfunction. Adiponectin (APN), an adipocyte-secreted hormone from adipose tissues, showed cardioprotective effects. Here, the protective effect of APN on palmitic acid (PA)-induced endothelial inflammation and IR was investigated. Cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with PA without or without APN pretreatment. The expression of inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, adhesion molecule ICAM-1 were determined by western blotting, ELISA, and real-time PCR. The protein expression and protein-protein interaction were determined by western blotting and immunoprecipitation. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) production were monitored with fluorescence probes. PA-induced secretion of TNF-α, IL-6, and expression of ICAM-1 at protein and mRNA levels, which was significantly inhibited by APN. PA treatment caused increase of ROS generation, NOX2, p-IKKβ, p-IκBα, p-p65 expression, and p-IκBα-IKKβ interaction, which were all partly reversed by APN. ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and NF-κB inhibitor PDTC showed similar effect on PA-induced secretion of TNF-α, IL-6, and expression of ICAM-1. Furthermore, APN and NAC pretreatment restored PA-induced increase of p-IRS-1(S307), decrease of p-IRS-1(Tyr). In addition, insulin-triggered expression of p-IRS-1(Tyr), p-PI3K, p-AKT, p-eNOS and NO generation were inhibited by PA, which were also restored by both APN and NAC. These results suggested that APN ameliorated endothelial inflammation and IR through ROS/IKKβ pathway. This study shed new insights into the mechanisms of APN's cardiovascular protective effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mice lacking mPGES-1 are resistant to lithium-induced polyuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhanjun; Wang, Haiping; Yang, Tianxin

    2009-12-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 activity is required for the development of lithium-induced polyuria. However, the involvement of a specific, terminal prostaglandin (PG) isomerase has not been evaluated. The present study was undertaken to assess lithium-induced polyuria in mice deficient in microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1). A 2-wk administration of LiCl (4 mmol.kg(-1).day(-1) ip) in mPGES-1 +/+ mice led to a marked polyuria with hyposmotic urine. This was associated with elevated renal mPGES-1 protein expression and increased urine PGE(2) excretion. In contrast, mPGES-1 -/- mice were largely resistant to lithium-induced polyuria and a urine concentrating defect, accompanied by nearly complete blockade of high urine PGE(2) and cAMP output. Immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, and quantitative (q) RT-PCR consistently detected a significant decrease in aquaporin-2 (AQP2) protein expression in both the renal cortex and medulla of lithium-treated +/+ mice. This decrease was significantly attenuated in the -/- mice. qRT-PCR detected similar patterns of changes in AQP2 mRNA in the medulla but not in the cortex. Similarly, the total protein abundance of the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) in the medulla but not in the cortex of the +/+ mice was significantly reduced by lithium treatment. In contrast, the dowregulation of renal medullary NKCC2 expression was significantly attenuated in the -/- mice. We conclude that mPGES-1-derived PGE(2) mediates lithium-induced polyuria likely via inhibition of AQP2 and NKCC2 expression.

  11. Resistance to asbestos-induced apoptosis with continuous exposure to crocidolite on a human T cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Megumi [Department of Biofunctional Chemistry, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 1-1-1 Tsushima-Naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Yamamoto, Shoko [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Chen, Ying [Division of Pneumoconiosis, School of Public Health, China Medical University, 92 North 2nd, Heping District, Shenyang 110001 (China); Kumagai-Takei, Naoko [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Hayashi, Hiroaki [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Department of Dermatology, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Hatayama, Tamayo; Miyahara, Naomi; Katoh, Minako [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Hiratsuka, Juni-ichi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumitsu [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Otsuki, Takemi, E-mail: takemi@med.kawasaki-m.ac.jp [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    We have been investigating the immunological effects of asbestos. The establishment of a low-dose and continuously exposed human T cell line, HTLV-1 immortalized MT-2, to chrysotile (CB) revealed reduction of CXCR3 chemokine receptor and production of IFN-{gamma} that caused a decline of tumor immunity. These effects were coupled with upregulation of IL-10, TGF-{beta}, and BCL-2 in asbestos-exposed patients. To observe the immunological effects of crocidolite (CR) on human T cells, a trial to establish a low-dose and continuously exposed model was conducted and compared with a previously reported CB-exposed model (MT-2CB). Transient exposure of MT-2 original cells to CB or CR induced a similar level of apoptosis and growth inhibition. The establishment of a continuously exposed subline to CR (MT-2CR) revealed resistance against CR-induced apoptosis and upregulation of the BCL-2/BAX ratio similar to that recorded for MT-2CB. Both sublines showed reduced production of IFN-{gamma}, TNF-{alpha}, and IL-6 with increased IL-10. cDNA microarray with network/pathway analyses focusing on transcription factors revealed that many similar factors related to cell proliferation were involved following continuous exposure to asbestos in both MT-2CB and MT-2CR. These results indicate that both CB and CR fibers affect human T cells with similar degrees even though the carcinogenic activity of these substances differs due to their chemical and physical forms. Trials to identify early detection markers for asbestos exposure or the occurrence of asbestos-inducing malignancies using these findings may lead to the development of clinical tools for asbestos-related diseases and chemoprevention that modifies the reduced tumor immunity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of effects of chrysotile and crocidolite on human T cell was done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both fibers caused apoptosis of T cells by transient exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells

  12. Mono- and Digalactosyldiacylglycerol Lipids Function Nonredundantly to Regulate Systemic Acquired Resistance in Plants

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    Qing-ming Gao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The plant galactolipids monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG have been linked to the anti-inflammatory and cancer benefits of a green leafy vegetable diet in humans due to their ability to regulate the levels of free radicals like nitric oxide (NO. Here, we show that DGDG contributes to plant NO as well as salicylic acid biosynthesis and is required for the induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR. In contrast, MGDG regulates the biosynthesis of the SAR signals azelaic acid (AzA and glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P that function downstream of NO. Interestingly, DGDG is also required for AzA-induced SAR, but MGDG is not. Notably, transgenic expression of a bacterial glucosyltransferase is unable to restore SAR in dgd1 plants even though it does rescue their morphological and fatty acid phenotypes. These results suggest that MGDG and DGDG are required at distinct steps and function exclusively in their individual roles during the induction of SAR. : The galactolipids monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG constitute ∼80% of total membrane lipids in plants. Gao et al. now show that these galactolipids function nonredundantly to regulate systemic acquired resistance (SAR. Furthermore, they show that the terminal galactose on the α-galactose-β-galactose head group of DGDG is critical for SAR.

  13. High-fat diet induced insulin resistance in pregnant rats through pancreatic pax6 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Liu, Yunyun; Wang, Hongkun; Xu, Xianming

    2015-01-01

    To explore the changes in pancreas islet function of pregnant rats after consumption of high-fat diet and the underlying mechanism. Thirty pregnant Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: high-fat diet group and normal control group. Twenty days after gestation, fasting blood glucose concentration (FBG) and fasting serum insulin concentration (FINS) were measured. Then, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and insulin release test (IRT) were performed. Finally, all the rats were sacrificed and pancreas were harvested. Insulin sensitivity index (ISI) and insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) were calculated according to FBG and FINS. RT-PCR and Real-time PCR were performed to study the expression of paired box 6 transcription factor (Pax6) and its target genes in pancreatic tissues. The body weight was significantly increased in the high-fat diet group compared with that of normal control rats (Pinsulin concentration between the two groups. OGTT and IRT were abnormal in the high-fat diet group. The high-fat diet rats were more prone to impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. The level of the expression of Pax6 transcription factor and its target genes in pancreas, such as pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor-1 (Pdx1), v-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A (MafA) and glucose transporter 2 (Glut2) were decreased significantly compared with those of normal control group. High-fat diet feeding during pregnancy may induce insulin resistance in maternal rats by inhibiting pancreatic Pax6 and its target genes expression.

  14. Resistance exercise induces region-specific adaptations in anterior pituitary gland structure and function in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, William J; Flanagan, Shawn D; Volek, Jeff S; Nindl, Bradley C; Vingren, Jakob L; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Comstock, Brett A; Hooper, David R; Szivak, Tunde K; Looney, David P; Maresh, Carl M; Hymer, Wesley C

    2013-12-01

    The anterior pituitary gland (AP) increases growth hormone (GH) secretion in response to resistance exercise (RE), but the nature of AP adaptations to RE is unknown. To that end, we examined the effects of RE on regional AP somatotroph GH release, structure, and relative quantity. Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of four groups: 1) no training or acute exercise (NT-NEX); 2) no training with acute exercise (NT-EX); 3) resistance training without acute exercise (RT-NEX); 4) resistance training with acute exercise (RT-EX). RE incorporated 10, 1 m-weighted ladder climbs at an 85° angle. RT groups trained 3 days/wk for 7 wk, progressively. After death, trunk blood was collected, and each AP was divided into quadrants (ventral-dorsal and left-right). We measured: 1) trunk plasma GH; 2) somatotroph GH release; 3) somatotroph size; 4) somatotroph secretory content; and 5) percent of AP cells identified as somatotrophs. Trunk GH differed by group (NT-NEX, 8.9 ± 2.4 μg/l; RT-NEX, 9.2 ± 3.5 μg/l; NT-EX, 15.6 ± 3.4 μg/l; RT-EX, 23.4 ± 4.6 μg/l). RT-EX demonstrated greater somatotroph GH release than all other groups, predominantly in ventral regions (P pituitary gland. RE training appears to induce dynamic adaptations in somatotroph structure and function.

  15. Resistivity and Induced Polarization Imaging at a Hydrocarbon Contaminated Site in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustra, A.; Elis, V.; Hiodo, F.; Bondioli, A.; Miura, G.

    2012-12-01

    An area contaminated by accidental BTEX spills was investigated with resistivity and induced polarization methods. The main objective in this study was to relate the geophysical signature of the area with zones that were possibly undergoing microbial degradation of the contaminants. The spills took place over a decade ago; however, the exact location of these spills is unknown, as well as the amount of contaminant that was released into the subsurface. DC-resistivity identified a high contrast between the background (rho up to 2000 ohm.m) and a relatively conductive zone (rho 30 mV/V). Normalized chargeability is enhanced in this anomaly zone (mn > 0.1). Soil samples collected in the area were submitted to direct bacterial count, clay content estimation, X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. The electrical properties of each samples was also measured. The samples collected from the "background" (high resistivity zone) presented total bacterial amounts much smaller (dozens of colony forming units) than the samples from the conductive zone (millions of colony forming units). This observation could lead us to interpret that the zone of higher bacteria amount is undergoing biodegradation that would explain the increased conductivity at that portion of the subsurface. However, the geophysical properties observed at this zone could also be related to the clay content distribution throughout the surveyed area (concentrations up to 30%). Moreover, despite the fact that more microbes were found in the area, SEM images did not find any biodegradation typical feature of the grains, which are for example, mineral corrosion and dissolution or even biomineralization. This study is still undergoing and we are searching for more evidence of biodegradation in the samples. This study shows the limitation of the use of geophysical methods to access contaminant presence and/or biodegradation zones when the exact location of the contamination is unknown.

  16. Purity and resistivity improvements for electron-beam-induced deposition of Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulders, J.J.L. [FEI Company, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of platinum is used by many researchers. Its main application is the formation of a protective layer and the ''welding material'' for making a TEM lamella with a focused ion beam thinning process. For this application, the actual composition of the deposition is less relevant, and in practice, both the mechanical strength and the conductivity are sufficient. Another important application is the creation of an electrical connection to nanoscale structures such as nano-wires and graphene. To serve as an electrical contact, the resistivity of the Pt deposited structure has to be sufficiently low. Using the commonly used precursor MeCpPtMe{sub 3} for deposition, the resistivity as created by the basic process is 10{sup +5}-10{sup +6} higher than the value for bulk Pt, which is 10.6 μΩ cm. The reason for this is the high abundance of carbon in the deposition. To improve the deposition process, much attention has been given by the research community to parameter optimization, to ex situ or in situ removal of carbon by anneal steps, to prevention of carbon deposition by use of a carbon-free precursor, to electron beam irradiation under a high flux of oxygen and to the combination with other techniques such as atomic layer deposition (ALD). In the latter technique, the EBID structures are used as a 1-nm-thick seed layer only, while the ALD is used to selectively add pure Pt. These techniques have resulted in a low resistivity, today approaching the 10-150 μΩ cm, while the size and shape of the structure are preserved. Therefore, now, the technique is ready for application in the field of contacting nano-wires. (orig.)

  17. Berberine improves insulin resistance induced by high fat diet in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Libin; Yang Ying; Shang Wenbin; Li Fengying; Tang Jinfeng; Wang Xiao; Liu Shangquan; Yuan Guoyue; Chen Mingdao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of berberine on insulin resistance induced by high fat diet in rats. Methods: Normal male SD rats (8 weeks old) were divided into two groups taking either normal chow (NC, n=9) or high fat diet (HF, n=20). After fourteen weeks, HF rats were divided into two groups. Ten rats continued to take high fat diet. Another ten rats took additional berberine gavage (HF+B, 150mg/kg weight once a day). Six weeks later, oral glucose tolerance test and insulin tolerance test were performed for estimating insulin sensitivity. Results: The body weight, liver weight and epididyaml fat pads weight of HF group were significantly higher than those of HF+B group and NC group (all P<0.01). Fasting plasma glucose, insulin and plasma glucose, insulin 2h after taking glucose in HF+B rats were significantly lower than those in HF rats (all P<0.01). Plasma glucose and insulin levels at all time points in HF rats were significantly higher than those in NC rats. Homa-IR of HF group was markedly higher than that of HF+B group (P<0.01). The glucose-lowering effects after the administration of insuin (0.5u/kg intrapenitoneally) at all time points in HF+B rats were stronger than those in HF rats with 23% and 7% reduction at 15min respectively. Conclusion: Long term high fat diet resulted in insulin resistance. Berberine was able to reverse insulin resistance through promoting peripheral tissue up taking of glucose and decreasing insulin, which would be quite ideal for the intervention of IGT. (authors)

  18. A novel radiation-induced p53 mutation is not implicated in radiation resistance via a dominant-negative effect.

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    Yunguang Sun

    Full Text Available Understanding the mutations that confer radiation resistance is crucial to developing mechanisms to subvert this resistance. Here we describe the creation of a radiation resistant cell line and characterization of a novel p53 mutation. Treatment with 20 Gy radiation was used to induce mutations in the H460 lung cancer cell line; radiation resistance was confirmed by clonogenic assay. Limited sequencing was performed on the resistant cells created and compared to the parent cell line, leading to the identification of a novel mutation (del at the end of the DNA binding domain of p53. Levels of p53, phospho-p53, p21, total caspase 3 and cleaved caspase 3 in radiation resistant cells and the radiation susceptible (parent line were compared, all of which were found to be similar. These patterns held true after analysis of p53 overexpression in H460 cells; however, H1299 cells transfected with mutant p53 did not express p21, whereas those given WT p53 produced a significant amount, as expected. A luciferase assay demonstrated the inability of mutant p53 to bind its consensus elements. An MTS assay using H460 and H1299 cells transfected with WT or mutant p53 showed that the novel mutation did not improve cell survival. In summary, functional characterization of a radiation-induced p53 mutation in the H460 lung cancer cell line does not implicate it in the development of radiation resistance.

  19. Reduced expression of bax in small cell lung cancer cells is not sufficient to induce cisplatin-resistance

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    Biagosch J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Resistance to cisplatin in the course of chemotherapy contributes to the poor prognosis of small cell lung cancer (SCLC. B cell lymphoma-2 is the founding member of a large family of proteins that either promote or inhibit apoptosis. We aimed at investigating if the pro-apoptotic members Bad, Bax, Bim and Bid are involved in cisplatin-resistance. Cisplatin-resistance in the SCLC cell line H1339 was induced by repetitive exposure to cisplatin. Protein expression was quantified by Western Blot and immuno-fluorescence analysis. Protein expression was altered using siRNA interference. Four "cycles" of 0.5 μg/ml cisplatin led to partial cisplatin-resistance in H1339 cells. The expression of Bad, Bim and Bid was comparable in naïve and resistant cells while the expression of Bax was reduced in the resistant clone. But, reducing Bax expression in naïve cells did not lead to altered cisplatin sensitivity neither in H1339 nor in H187 SCLC cells. We conclude that the reduced Bax expression after exposure to cisplatin is not sufficient to induce cis-platin-resistance in SCLC cells.

  20. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial bioenergetics and morphology in high fat diet induced obesity and insulin resistance: focus on dietary fat source

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    Rosalba ePutti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that skeletal muscle mitochondria play a key role in high fat diet induced insulin resistance. Two opposite views are debated on mechanisms by which mitochondrial function could be involved in skeletal muscle insulin resistance. In one theory, mitochondrial dysfunction is suggested to cause intramyocellular lipid accumulation leading to insulin resistance. In the second theory, excess fuel within mitochondria in the absence of increased energy demand stimulates mitochondrial oxidant production and emission, ultimately leading to the development of insulin resistance. Noteworthy, mitochondrial bioenergetics is strictly associated with the maintenance of normal mitochondrial morphology by maintaining the balance between the fusion and fission processes. A shift towards mitochondrial fission with reduction of fusion protein, mainly mitofusin 2, has been associated with reduced insulin sensitivity and inflammation in obesity and insulin resistance development. However, dietary fat source during chronic overfeeding differently affects mitochondrial morphology. Saturated fatty acids induce skeletal muscle insulin resistance and inflammation associated with fission phenotype, whereas ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids improve skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity and inflammation, associated with a shift toward mitochondrial fusion phenotype. The present minireview focuses on mitochondrial bioenergetics and morphology in skeletal muscle insulin resistance, with particular attention to the effect of different dietary fat sources on skeletal muscle mitochondria morphology and fusion/fission balance.

  1. Resistance exercise-induced fluid shifts: change in active muscle size and plasma volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Convertino, V. A.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the reduction in plasma volume (PV) induced by resistance exercise reflects fluid loss to the extravascular space and subsequently selective increase in cross-sectional area (CSA) of active but not inactive skeletal muscle. We compared changes in active and inactive muscle CSA and PV after barbell squat exercise. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify muscle involvement in exercise and to determine CSA of muscle groups or individual muscles [vasti (VS), adductor (Add), hamstring (Ham), and rectus femoris (RF)]. Muscle involvement in exercise was determined using exercise-induced contrast shift in spin-spin relaxation time (T2)-weighted MR images immediately postexercise. Alterations in muscle size were based on the mean CSA of individual slices. Hematocrit, hemoglobin, and Evans blue dye were used to estimate changes in PV. Muscle CSA and PV data were obtained preexercise and immediately postexercise and 15 and 45 min thereafter. A hierarchy of muscle involvement in exercise was found such that VS > Add > Ham > RF, with the Ham and RF showing essentially no involvement. CSA of the VS and Add muscle groups were increased 10 and 5%, respectively, immediately after exercise in each thigh with no changes in Ham and RF CSA. PV was decreased 22% immediately following exercise. The absolute loss of PV was correlated (r2 = 0.75) with absolute increase in muscle CSA immediately postexercise, supporting the notion that increased muscle size after resistance exercise reflects primarily fluid movement from the vascular space into active but not inactive muscle.

  2. Resistance of human erythrocytes containing elevated levels of vitamin E to radiation-induced hemolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Human erythrocytes were isolated from the blood of healthy donors and then incubated in the presence of suspensions of alpha-tocopherol for 30 min at 37 degrees C. Unabsorbed tocopherol was removed by centrifugation using several washes of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline. Washed erythrocytes were resuspended to 0.05%. Hct and exposed to hemolyzing doses of 60 Co gamma radiation, and hemolysis was monitored continuously by light scattering at 700 nm in a recording spectrophotometer. The extent of hemolysis with time was sigmoid and data analysis was carried out on the time taken for 50% hemolysis to occur (t50%). The vitamin E content of erythrocytes was significantly elevated by the incubation procedure and resulted in the cells exhibiting a significantly increased resistance to hemolysis as reflected by the extended t50% values. Oral supplementation of 500 IU of vitamin E per day to eight normal human subjects for a period of 16 days also resulted in their washed erythrocytes exhibiting a significant increase in resistance to radiation-induced hemolysis. When comparing vitamin E incubated cells with control cells, both the dose-reducing factor (DRF) and the time for 50% hemolysis quotient (Qt50%) were observed to increase with increasing radiation dose

  3. Reversion of pH-induced physiological drug resistance: a novel function of copolymeric nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutian Li

    Full Text Available AIMS: The extracellular pH of cancer cells is lower than the intracellular pH. Weakly basic anticancer drugs will be protonated extracellularly and display a decreased intracellular concentration. In this study, we show that copolymeric nanoparticles (NPs are able to overcome this "pH-induced physiological drug resistance" (PIPDR by delivering drugs to the cancer cells via endocytosis rather than passive diffussion. MATERIALS AND METHODS: As a model nanoparticle, Tetradrine (Tet, Pka 7.80 was incorporated into mPEG-PCL. The effectiveness of free Tet and Tet-NPs were compared at different extracellular pHs (pH values 6.8 and 7.4, respectively by MTT assay, morphological observation and apoptotic analysis in vitro and on a murine model by tumor volume measurement, PET-CT scanning and side effect evaluation in vivo. RESULTS: The cytotoxicity of free Tet decreased prominently (P<0.05 when the extracellular pH decreased from 7.4 to 6.8. Meanwhile, the cytotoxicity of Tet-NPs was not significantly influenced by reduced pH. In vivo experiment also revealed that Tet-NPs reversed PIPDR more effectively than other existing methods and with much less side effects. CONCLUSION: The reversion of PIPDR is a new discovered mechanism of copolymeric NPs. This study emphasized the importance of cancer microenvironmental factors in anticancer drug resistance and revealed the superiority of nanoscale drug carrier from a different aspect.

  4. Flux nucleation in the current-induced resistive state of a constricted type I superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selig, K.P.; Huebener, R.P.

    1981-01-01

    The current-induced resistive state in a constricted type I superconductor is characterized by a train of flux tubes traversing the sample perpendicular to the direction of the applied current following its nucleation at the sample edge. The temporal structure of the nucleation process can be investigated by attempting to synchronize this process with small periodic current pulses superimposed on the direct bias current. The resistive dc voltage is then to be measured as a function of the pulse parameters such as frequency and width. We have performed such experiments at 4.2 K on constricted Pb films of 6--8 μm thickness and 100 μm width. Simultaneously with the electrical measurements the dynamic behavior of the flux tubes was directly observed using a stroboscopic magnetooptical method for magnetic flux detection. Our electrical measurements clearly show how the size of the nucleated flux tubes varies with the direct bias current and the nucleation frequency. The positive wall energy in the Pb films results in a lower limit for this size as expected. The influence of the preceding flux tubes still existing within the constriction upon the flux nucleation process is revealed in detail. All observations can be understood from a consideration of the energy balance during the flux nucleation process

  5. Temperature induced complementary switching in titanium oxide resistive random access memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, D., E-mail: dpanda@nist.edu [Department of Electronics Engineering, National Institute of Science and Technology, Berhampur, Odisha 761008 (India); Department of Electronics Engineering and Institute of Electronics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Simanjuntak, F. M.; Tseng, T.-Y. [Department of Electronics Engineering and Institute of Electronics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

    2016-07-15

    On the way towards high memory density and computer performance, a considerable development in energy efficiency represents the foremost aspiration in future information technology. Complementary resistive switch consists of two antiserial resistive switching memory (RRAM) elements and allows for the construction of large passive crossbar arrays by solving the sneak path problem in combination with a drastic reduction of the power consumption. Here we present a titanium oxide based complementary RRAM (CRRAM) device with Pt top and TiN bottom electrode. A subsequent post metal annealing at 400°C induces CRRAM. Forming voltage of 4.3 V is required for this device to initiate switching process. The same device also exhibiting bipolar switching at lower compliance current, Ic <50 μA. The CRRAM device have high reliabilities. Formation of intermediate titanium oxi-nitride layer is confirmed from the cross-sectional HRTEM analysis. The origin of complementary switching mechanism have been discussed with AES, HRTEM analysis and schematic diagram. This paper provides valuable data along with analysis on the origin of CRRAM for the application in nanoscale devices.

  6. Deepure Tea Improves High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Na Deng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was to explore the protective effects of Deepure tea against insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis and elucidate the potential underlying molecular mechanisms. C57BL/6 mice were fed with a high fat diet (HFD for 8 weeks to induce the metabolic syndrome. In the Deepure tea group, HFD mice were administrated with Deepure tea at 160 mg/kg/day by gavage for 14 days. The mice in HFD group received water in the same way over the same period. The age-matched C57BL/6 mice fed with standard chow were used as normal control. Compared to the mice in HFD group, mice that received Deepure tea showed significantly reduced plasma insulin and improved insulin sensitivity. Deepure tea increased the expression of insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS-2, which plays an important role in hepatic insulin signaling pathway. Deepure tea also led to a decrease in hepatic fatty acid synthesis and lipid accumulation, which were mediated by the downregulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c, fatty acid synthesis (FAS, and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC proteins that are involved in liver lipogenesis. These results suggest that Deepure tea may be effective for protecting against insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis via modulating IRS-2 and downstream signaling SREBP-1c, FAS, and ACC.

  7. Superoxide anion radicals induce IGF-1 resistance through concomitant activation of PTP1B and PTEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Karmveer; Maity, Pallab; Krug, Linda; Meyer, Patrick; Treiber, Nicolai; Lucas, Tanja; Basu, Abhijit; Kochanek, Stefan; Wlaschek, Meinhard; Geiger, Hartmut; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved IGF-1 signalling pathway is associated with longevity, metabolism, tissue homeostasis, and cancer progression. Its regulation relies on the delicate balance between activating kinases and suppressing phosphatases and is still not very well understood. We report here that IGF-1 signalling in vitro and in a murine ageing model in vivo is suppressed in response to accumulation of superoxide anions () in mitochondria, either by chemical inhibition of complex I or by genetic silencing of -dismutating mitochondrial Sod2. The -dependent suppression of IGF-1 signalling resulted in decreased proliferation of murine dermal fibroblasts, affected translation initiation factors and suppressed the expression of α1(I), α1(III), and α2(I) collagen, the hallmarks of skin ageing. Enhanced led to activation of the phosphatases PTP1B and PTEN, which via dephosphorylation of the IGF-1 receptor and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate dampened IGF-1 signalling. Genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of PTP1B and PTEN abrogated -induced IGF-1 resistance and rescued the ageing skin phenotype. We thus identify previously unreported signature events with , PTP1B, and PTEN as promising targets for drug development to prevent IGF-1 resistance-related pathologies. PMID:25520316

  8. Pre-existing differences and diet-induced alterations in striatal dopamine systems of obesity-prone rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollbrecht, Peter J; Mabrouk, Omar S; Nelson, Andrew D; Kennedy, Robert T; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between pre-existing differences in mesolimbic function and neuroadaptations induced by consumption of fatty, sugary foods are thought to contribute to human obesity. This study examined basal and cocaine-induced changes in striatal neurotransmitter levels without diet manipulation and D2 /D3 dopamine receptor-mediated transmission prior to and after consumption of "junk-foods" in obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Microdialysis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to determine basal and cocaine-induced changes in neurotransmitter levels in real time with cocaine-induced locomotor activity. Sensitivity to the D2 /D3 dopamine receptor agonist quinpirole was examined before and after restricted junk-food exposure. Selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats were used. Cocaine-induced locomotion was greater in obesity-prone rats versus obesity-resistant rats prior to diet manipulation. Basal and cocaine-induced increases in dopamine and serotonin levels did not differ. Obesity-prone rats were more sensitive to the D2 receptor-mediated effects of quinpirole, and junk-food produced modest alterations in quinpirole sensitivity in obesity-resistant rats. These data show that mesolimbic systems differ prior to diet manipulation in susceptible versus resistant rats, and that consumption of fatty, sugary foods produce different neuroadaptations in these populations. These differences may contribute to enhanced food craving and an inability to limit food intake in susceptible individuals. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  9. National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System: Two Decades of Advancing Public Health Through Integrated Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Beth E; Tate, Heather; Plumblee, Jodie R; Dessai, Uday; Whichard, Jean M; Thacker, Eileen L; Hale, Kis Robertson; Wilson, Wanda; Friedman, Cindy R; Griffin, Patricia M; McDermott, Patrick F

    2017-10-01

    Drug-resistant bacterial infections pose a serious and growing public health threat globally. In this review, we describe the role of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) in providing data that help address the resistance problem and show how such a program can have broad positive impacts on public health. NARMS was formed two decades ago to help assess the consequences to human health arising from the use of antimicrobial drugs in food animal production in the United States. A collaboration among the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the United States Department of Agriculture, and state and local health departments, NARMS uses an integrated "One Health" approach to monitor antimicrobial resistance in enteric bacteria from humans, retail meat, and food animals. NARMS has adapted to changing needs and threats by expanding surveillance catchment areas, examining new isolate sources, adding bacteria, adjusting sampling schemes, and modifying antimicrobial agents tested. NARMS data are not only essential for ensuring that antimicrobial drugs approved for food animals are used in ways that are safe for human health but they also help address broader food safety priorities. NARMS surveillance, applied research studies, and outbreak isolate testing provide data on the emergence of drug-resistant enteric bacteria; genetic mechanisms underlying resistance; movement of bacterial populations among humans, food, and food animals; and sources and outcomes of resistant and susceptible infections. These data can be used to guide and evaluate the impact of science-based policies, regulatory actions, antimicrobial stewardship initiatives, and other public health efforts aimed at preserving drug effectiveness, improving patient outcomes, and preventing infections. Many improvements have been made to NARMS over time and the program will continue to adapt to address emerging resistance threats, changes in

  10. Induced resistance by cresotic acid (3-hydroxy-4-methyl methylbenzoic acid) against wilt disease of melon and cotton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, H.; Li, Z.; Zhang, D.; Li, W.; Tang, W.

    2004-01-01

    Cresotic acid (3-hydroxy-4-methylbenzoic acid) was proved be active in controlling wilt diseases of melon and cotton plants grown in the house. Soil drench with 200-1000 ppm cresotic acid induced 62-77 %, 69-79 % and 50-60 % protection against Fusarium oxysporum f.sp melonis (FOM) in melon, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp vasinfectum (FOV) and Verticillium dahliae in cotton, respectively. Since no inhibitory effect of cresotic acid on mycelial growth of these three fungual pathogens was observed in vitro, it is suggested that control of these wilt diseases with cresotic acid resulted from induced resistance. Cresotic acid induced resistance in melon plants not only against race 0, race 1, race 2 and race 1,2, but also against a mixture of these four races of FOM, suggesting a non-race- specific resistance. Level of induced resistance by cresotic acid against FOM depended on inoculum pressure applied to melon plants. At 25 day after inoculation with FOM, percentage protection induced by cresotic acid under low inoculum pressure retained a level of 51 %, while under high inoculum pressure percentage protection decreased to only 10 %. High concentrations of cresotic acid significantly reduced plant growth. Reduction in fresh weight of melon (36-51%) and cotton (42-71%) was obtained with 500-1000 ppm cresotic acid, while only less than 8% reduction occurred with 100-200 ppm. (author)

  11. Increased systemic vascular resistance in neonates with pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstein, J M; Goetzman, B W; Riemenschneider, T A; Wennberg, R P

    1979-11-01

    The time necessary for aortic diastolic pressure to decrease to 50 percent of an initially selected value after dissipation of the dicrotic notch (T 1/2) was determined in newborn infants with and without pulmonary hypertension. The mean T 1/2 was 671 +/- 167 msec in seven infants with clinical evidence of pulmonary hypertension and documented right to left ductus arteriosus shunting; 849 +/- 243 msec in nine infants with clinical evidence of pulmonary hypertension but no documented right to left ductus arteriosus shunting; and 457 +/- 66 msec in eight infants with hyaline membrane disease and no clinical evidence of pulmonary hypertension or a patent ductus arteriosus. The mean T 1/2 values in the former two groups were significantly different from that in the group with no pulmonary hypertension (P less than 0.01). An evaluation of factors affecting T 1/2 leads to the conclusion that the patients with pulmonary hypertension had increased systemic vascular resistance as well. This finding has important diagnostic, etiologic and therapeutic implications.

  12. High-fat diet-induced changes in liver thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase as a novel feature of insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijun Qin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-fat diet (HFD can induce oxidative stress. Thioredoxin (Trx and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR are critical antioxidant proteins but how they are affected by HFD remains unclear. Using HFD-induced insulin-resistant mouse model, we show here that liver Trx and TrxR are significantly decreased, but, remarkably, the degree of their S-acylation is increased after consuming HFD. These HFD-induced changes in Trx/TrxR may reflect abnormalities of lipid metabolism and insulin signaling transduction. HFD-driven accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal is another potential mechanism behind inactivation and decreased expression of Trx/TrxR. Thus, we propose HFD-induced impairment of liver Trx/TrxR as major contributor to oxidative stress and as a novel feature of insulin resistance.

  13. Using tensorial electrical resistivity survey to locate fault systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro Santos, Fernando A; Plancha, João P; Marques, Jorge; Perea, Hector; Cabral, João; Massoud, Usama

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the use of the tensorial resistivity method for fault orientation and macroanisotropy characterization. The rotational properties of the apparent resistivity tensor are presented using 3D synthetic models representing structures with a dominant direction of low resistivity and vertical discontinuities. It is demonstrated that polar diagrams of the elements of the tensor are effective in delineating those structures. As the apparent resistivity tensor shows great inefficacy in investigating the depth of the structures, it is advised to accomplish tensorial surveys with the application of other geophysical methods. An experimental example, including tensorial, dipole–dipole and time domain surveys, is presented to illustrate the potentiality of the method. The dipole–dipole model shows high-resistivity contrasts which were interpreted as corresponding to faults crossing the area. The results from the time domain electromagnetic (TEM) sounding show high-resistivity values till depths of 40–60 m at the north part of the area. In the southern part of the survey area the soundings show an upper layer with low-resistivity values (around 30 Ω m) followed by a more resistive bedrock (resistivity >100 Ω m) at a depth ranging from 15 to 30 m. The soundings in the central part of the survey area show more variability. A thin conductive overburden is followed by a more resistive layer with resistivity in the range of 80–1800 Ω m. The north and south limits of the central part of the area as revealed by TEM survey are roughly E–W oriented and coincident with the north fault scarp and the southernmost fault detected by the dipole–dipole survey. The pattern of the polar diagrams calculated from tensorial resistivity data clearly indicates the presence of a contact between two blocks at south of the survey area with the low-resistivity block located southwards. The presence of other two faults is not so clear from the polar diagram patterns, but

  14. Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Adipokine-Induced Inflammation and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep eGoktas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Over a third of the US population is obese and at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and other metabolic disorders. Obesity is considered a chronic low grade inflammatory condition that is primarily attributed to expansion and inflammation of adipose tissues. Indeed, adipocytes produce and secrete numerous proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines known as adipokines. When the balance of these adipokines is shifted towards higher production of proinflammatory factors, local inflammation within adipose tissues and subsequently systemic inflammation occur. These adipokines including leptin, visfatin, resistin, apelin, vaspin, and retinol binding protein-4 can regulate inflammatory responses and contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes. These effects are mediated by key inflammatory signaling molecules including activated serine kinases such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and serine kinases inhibitor κB kinase (IKK and insulin signaling molecules including insulin receptor substrates, protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt, and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB. Bariatric surgery can decrease body weight and improve insulin resistance in morbidly obese subjects. However, despite reports suggesting reduced inflammation and weight-independent effects of bariatric surgery on glucose metabolism, mechanisms behind such improvements are not yet well understood. This review article focuses on some of these novel adipokines and discusses their changes after bariatric surgery and their relationship to insulin resistance, fat mass, inflammation, and glucose homeostasis.

  15. The platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase gene derived from Trichoderma harzianum induces maize resistance to Curvularia lunata through the jasmonic acid signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chuanjin; Fan, Lili; Gao, Jinxin; Wang, Meng; Wu, Qiong; Tang, Jun; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) derived from Trichoderma harzianum was upregulated by the interaction of T. harzianum with maize roots or the foliar pathogen Curvularia lunata. PAF-AH was associated with chitinase and cellulase expressions, but especially with chitinase, because its activity in the KO40 transformant (PAF-AH disruption transformant) was lower, compared with the wild-type strain T28. The result demonstrated that the colonization of maize roots by T. harzianum induced systemic protection of leaves inoculated with C. lunata. Such protection was associated with the expression of inducible jasmonic acid pathway-related genes. Moreover, the data from liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed that the concentration of jasmonic acid in maize leaves was associated with the expression level of defense-related genes, suggesting that PAF-AH induced resistance to the foliar pathogen. Our findings showed that PAF-AH had an important function in inducing systemic resistance to maize leaf spot pathogen.

  16. Ameliorative effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids against palmitic acid-induced insulin resistance in L6 skeletal muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawada Keisuke

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatty acid-induced insulin resistance and impaired glucose uptake activity in muscle cells are fundamental events in the development of type 2 diabetes and hyperglycemia. There is an increasing demand for compounds including drugs and functional foods that can prevent myocellular insulin resistance. Methods In this study, we established a high-throughput assay to screen for compounds that can improve myocellular insulin resistance, which was based on a previously reported non-radioisotope 2-deoxyglucose (2DG uptake assay. Insulin-resistant muscle cells were prepared by treating rat L6 skeletal muscle cells with 750 μM palmitic acid for 14 h. Using the established assay, the impacts of several fatty acids on myocellular insulin resistance were determined. Results In normal L6 cells, treatment with saturated palmitic or stearic acid alone decreased 2DG uptake, whereas unsaturated fatty acids did not. Moreover, co-treatment with oleic acid canceled the palmitic acid-induced decrease in 2DG uptake activity. Using the developed assay with palmitic acid-induced insulin-resistant L6 cells, we determined the effects of other unsaturated fatty acids. We found that arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids improved palmitic acid-decreased 2DG uptake at lower concentrations than the other unsaturated fatty acids, including oleic acid, as 10 μM arachidonic acid showed similar effects to 750 μM oleic acid. Conclusions We have found that polyunsaturated fatty acids, in particular arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids prevent palmitic acid-induced myocellular insulin resistance.

  17. Resistance against Schistosoma mansoni induced by highly irradiated infections: studies on species specificity of immunization and attempts to transfer resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickle, Q.D.; Andrews, B.J.; Doenhoff, M.J.; Ford, M.J.; Taylor, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    Significant levels of resistance against Schistosoma mansoni challenge were developed by mice exposed to highly irradiated (20 krad.) cercariae of the homologous species (53-67%), whereas vaccination with S. bovis, S. haematobium or S. japonicum failed to confer significant levels of resistance (-5-12%), thus confirming the specificity of the immunizing procedure. Attempts to transfer resistance to naive recipients by injection of serum and of spleen or lymph node cells from donor mice vaccinated with highly irradiated cercariae were largely unsuccessful. However, significant levels of resistance could be transferred to mice by injection of serum from rabbits exposed to irradiated cercariae. Comparable levels of resistance were conferred by injection of serum at the time of challenge (34-69%) or 5-6 days later (31-56%). In contrast, sera from rabbits injected with soluble egg antigen or homogenized cercariae failed to confer protection upon recipient mice. Sera from vaccinated mice, vaccinated rabbits and antigen-injected rabbits all caused cell adherence to skin-transformed schistosomula but neither the level of adherence nor the serum titre correlated with the ability to confer protection to mice. (author)

  18. Radiation Resistance of the U(Al, Si)3 Alloy: Ion-Induced Disordering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, Gili; Horak, Pavel; Vacik, Jiri; Mykytenko, Natalia; Rafailov, Gennady; Dahan, Itzchak; Fuks, David; Kiv, Arik

    2018-01-01

    During the exploitation of nuclear reactors, various U-Al based ternary intermetallides are formed in the fuel-cladding interaction layer. Structure and physical properties of these intermetallides determine the radiation resistance of cladding and, ultimately, the reliability and lifetime of the nuclear reactor. In current research, U(Al, Si)3 composition was studied as a potential constituent of an interaction layer. Phase content of the alloy of an interest was ordered U(Al, Si)3, structure of which was reported earlier, and pure Al (constituting less than 20 vol % of the alloy). This alloy was investigated prior and after the irradiation performed by Ar ions at 30 keV. The irradiation was performed on the transmission electron microscopy (TEM, JEOL, Japan) samples, characterized before and after the irradiation process. Irradiation induced disorder accompanied by stress relief. Furthermore, it was found that there is a dose threshold for disordering of the crystalline matter in the irradiated region. Irradiation at doses equal or higher than this threshold resulted in almost solely disordered phase. Using the program “Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter” (SRIM), the parameters of penetration of Ar ions into the irradiated samples were estimated. Based on these estimations, the dose threshold for ion-induced disordering of the studied material was assessed. PMID:29393870

  19. A study on the improvement of radiation-induced oxidation resistance for polypropylene and PVC materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, K. Z.; Jeong, K. S.; Cho, S. H.; Cho, Y. H.; Seok, H. C.

    2002-01-01

    The object of this project is to improve the stability and the economics by reducing the radiation-induced oxidation as a factor of degradation of polymer materials used under the radiation environment. In order to attain the objective of this study and to check the effect of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating on the anti-oxidation reaction, polymer specimens such as Polyproplyene, PVC coating DLC thin layer were exposed to high level gamma radiation, and their irradiation effects were investigated. A plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method was adopted in fabricating a DLC thin film on the polymer specimens, which were irradiated with the non-DLC film deposited specimens under the gamma radiation emitted from Co-60 source from 1 x 10 5 to 1 x 10 8 rads exposure. According to the characterization of irradiated specimens from the elapsed time of minimum 4 hours to a maximum of 105 days after the irradiation, the DLC deposition on the polymer surface was revealed to contribute to the improvement on the resistance of the radiation-induced oxidation in this study

  20. Using and development of multi adversity resistance system in cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Durmuş ÇETİN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic approach in plant breeding, make it possible to show the full genetic potential of plant. This methods also protect the health of plant growth over the period, by increasing resistance to diseases and pests is expected to provide. For this purpose, by Bird in 1963, with the name of multi adversity resistance has been initiated in cotton breeding and for many years as a result of the work carried out important varieties and germplasm have been developed. Nowadays, those using for varieties resistant to stress factors such as heat and drought are evaluated. And successful results are obtained.

  1. Development of a bioassay system for investigating insulin resistance factors of pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausman, D.B.; Singh, R.; Martin, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    To determine if late-term pregnant serum and/or placenta could induce insulin resistance in normal adipose cells, the authors have developed an insulin sensitive bioassay system. Cells isolated from epididymal fat pads of 250-275 g Sprague Dawley rats are preincubated for 3 hours at 37 0 in media 199 and serum or placental extract. The cells are washed free of serum and tested for metabolic activity in a 2 hour incubation which measures the conversion of U- 14 C-glucose to 14 CO 2 and to 14 C-triglyceride fatty acids under basal and insulin stimulated conditions. Maximal insulin responsiveness (350-450% basal for CO 2 and 1400-1700% basal for fatty acids) is achieved using Worthington Type II collagenase and a 45-60 minute digestion period for cell isolations and Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer containing 0.5 mM glucose, 2% Armour bovine serum albumin (CRG-7), 1000 μU/ml insulin and 110,000 to 120,000 cells in the 2 hour incubations. Using this bioasssay system the authors have found that insulin responsiveness, in terms of glucose conversion to fatty acids, is unchanged when cells are preincubated with 5% control pig serum but reduced following preincubation with late pregnant (110 day) pig serum. In future experiments the authors hope to further characterize the factor(s) in pregnant serum responsible for inducing this metabolic effect

  2. Main agronomic traits and resistance to rice blast of space-induced mutant lines of Zhong-er-ruan-zhan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Wuming; Wang Hui; Liu Yongzhu; Guo Tao; Chen Zhiqiang; Yang Qiyun; Zhu Xiaoyuan

    2012-01-01

    The main agronomic traits and resistance to rice blast of 34 space-induced lines from an elite rice cultivar, Zhong-er-ruan-zhan were evaluated at their SP 4 . The resistance to blast of the mutant lines had been tested by two blast isolates previously. It was found that the mutant lines showed significant difference in plant height, effective panicles, panicle length and grains per panicle etc. from their parent. The range of variation in 1000-grain weight the largest, followed by the seed-setting rate, and that of effective panicles was the least among all the traits. Except for the line Z34, 33 mutant lines had broader resistance spectra than the wild-type based on the test with 38 different blast isolates, and all the 33 lines were also resistant to the panicle blast in the field. The result confirmed that selection for resistant to blast in lower generations was reliable. Taking account of agronomic traits and blast resistance, promising lines with resistance to blast and good agronomic characters could be selected from those mutant lines. Therefore, the elite rice germplasm with enhanced disease resistance can be produced. (authors)

  3. Signaling requirements for Erwinia amylovora-induced disease resistance, callose deposition, and cell growth in the nonhost Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of the fire blight disease in some plants of the Rosaceae family. The nonhost plant Arabidopsis serves as a powerful system to dissect mechanisms of resistance to E. amylovora. Although not yet known to mount gene-for-gene resistance to E. amylovora, we found ...

  4. The Batten disease gene CLN3 confers resistance to endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by tunicamycin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Dan, E-mail: danw@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Medical Genetics, Peking University Health Science Center, No 38 Xueyuan Road, Haidian district, Beijing 100191 (China); Liu, Jing; Wu, Baiyan [Department of Medical Genetics, Peking University Health Science Center, No 38 Xueyuan Road, Haidian district, Beijing 100191 (China); Tu, Bo; Zhu, Weiguo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Peking University Health Science Center, No 38 Xueyuan Road, Haidian district, Beijing 100191 (China); Luo, Jianyuan, E-mail: jluo@som.umaryland.edu [Department of Medical Genetics, Peking University Health Science Center, No 38 Xueyuan Road, Haidian district, Beijing 100191 (China); Department of Medical and Research Technology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore 21201 (United States)

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • The work reveals a protective properties of CLN3 towards TM-induced apoptosis. • CLN3 regulates expression of the GRP78 and the CHOP in response to the ER stress. • CLN3 plays a specific role in the ERS response. - Abstract: Mutations in CLN3 gene cause juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL or Batten disease), an early-onset neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by the accumulation of ceroid lipofuscin within lysosomes. The function of the CLN3 protein remains unclear and is presumed to be related to Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. To investigate the function of CLN3 in the ER stress signaling pathway, we measured proliferation and apoptosis in cells transfected with normal and mutant CLN3 after treatment with the ER stress inducer tunicamycin (TM). We found that overexpression of CLN3 was sufficient in conferring increased resistance to ER stress. Wild-type CLN3 protected cells from TM-induced apoptosis and increased cell proliferation. Overexpression of wild-type CLN3 enhanced expression of the ER chaperone protein, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), and reduced expression of the proapoptotic protein CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP). In contrast, overexpression of mutant CLN3 or siRNA knockdown of CLN3 produced the opposite effect. Together, our data suggest that the lack of CLN3 function in cells leads to a failure of management in the response to ER stress and this may be the key deficit in JNCL that causes neuronal degeneration.

  5. Eosinophil Resistance to Glucocorticoid-Induced Apoptosis is Mediated by the Transcription Factor NFIL3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazdrak, Konrad; Moon, Young; Straub, Christof; Stafford, Susan; Kurosky, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The mainstay of asthma therapy, glucocorticoids (GCs) exert their therapeutic effects through the inhibition of inflammatory signaling and induction of eosinophil apoptosis. However, laboratory and clinical observations of GC-resistant asthma suggest that GCs' effects on eosinophil viability may depend on the state of eosinophil activation. In the present study we demonstrate that eosinophils stimulated with IL-5 show impaired prop-aptoptotic response to GCs. We sought to determine the contribution of GC-mediated transactivating (TA) and transrepressing (TR) pathways in modulation of activated eosinophils' response to GC by comparing their response to the selective GC receptor (GR) agonist Compound A (CpdA) devoid of TA activity to that upon treatment with Dexamethasone (Dex). IL-5-activated eosinophils showed contrasting responses to CpdA and Dex, as IL-5-treated eosinophils showed no increase in apoptosis compared to cells treated with Dex alone, while CpdA elicited an apoptotic response regardless of IL-5 stimulation. Proteomic analysis revealed that both Nuclear Factor IL-3 (NFIL3) and Map Kinase Phosphatase 1 (MKP1) were inducible by IL-5 and enhanced by Dex; however, CpdA had no effect on NFIL3 and MKP1 expression. We found that inhibiting NFIL3 with specific siRNA or by blocking the IL-5-inducible Pim-1 kinase abrogated the protective effect of IL-5 on Dex-induced apoptosis, indicating crosstalk between IL-5 anti-apoptotic pathways and GR-mediated TA signaling occurring via the NFIL3 molecule. Collectively, these results indicate that 1) GCs' TA pathway may support eosinophil viability in IL-5-stimulated cells through synergistic upregulation of NFIL3; and 2) functional inhibition of IL-5 signaling (anti-Pim1) or the use of selective GR agonists that don't upregulate NFIL3 may be effective strategies for the restoring pro-apoptotic effect of GCs on IL-5-activated eosinophils. PMID:26880402

  6. Resveratrol prevents high-fructose corn syrup-induced vascular insulin resistance and dysfunction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babacanoglu, C; Yildirim, N; Sadi, G; Pektas, M B; Akar, F

    2013-10-01

    Dietary intake of fructose and sucrose can cause development of metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. The consequences of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), a commonly consumed form of fructose and glucose, have poorly been examined. Therefore, in this study, we investigated whether HFCS intake (10% and 20% beverages for 12 weeks) impacts vascular reactivity to insulin and endothelin-1 in conjunction with insulin receptor substrate-1(IRS-1), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) mRNA/proteins levels in aorta of rats. At challenge, we tested the effectiveness of resveratrol (28-30 mg/kg body weight/day) on outcomes of HFCS feeding. HFCS (20%) diet feeding increased plasma triglyceride, VLDL, cholesterol, insulin and glucose levels, but not body weights of rats. Impaired nitric oxide-mediated relaxation to insulin (10⁻⁹ to 3×10⁻⁶ M), and enhanced contraction to endothelin-1 (10⁻¹¹ to 10⁻⁸ M) were associated with decreased expression of IRS-1 and eNOS mRNA and protein, but increased expression of iNOS, in aortas of rats fed with HFCS. Resveratrol supplementation restored many features of HFCS-induced disturbances, probably by regulating eNOS and iNOS production. In conclusion, dietary HFCS causes vascular insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction through attenuating IRS-1 and eNOS expressions as well as increasing iNOS in rats. Resveratrol has capability to recover HFCS-induced disturbances. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Batten disease gene CLN3 confers resistance to endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by tunicamycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Dan; Liu, Jing; Wu, Baiyan; Tu, Bo; Zhu, Weiguo; Luo, Jianyuan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The work reveals a protective properties of CLN3 towards TM-induced apoptosis. • CLN3 regulates expression of the GRP78 and the CHOP in response to the ER stress. • CLN3 plays a specific role in the ERS response. - Abstract: Mutations in CLN3 gene cause juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL or Batten disease), an early-onset neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by the accumulation of ceroid lipofuscin within lysosomes. The function of the CLN3 protein remains unclear and is presumed to be related to Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. To investigate the function of CLN3 in the ER stress signaling pathway, we measured proliferation and apoptosis in cells transfected with normal and mutant CLN3 after treatment with the ER stress inducer tunicamycin (TM). We found that overexpression of CLN3 was sufficient in conferring increased resistance to ER stress. Wild-type CLN3 protected cells from TM-induced apoptosis and increased cell proliferation. Overexpression of wild-type CLN3 enhanced expression of the ER chaperone protein, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), and reduced expression of the proapoptotic protein CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP). In contrast, overexpression of mutant CLN3 or siRNA knockdown of CLN3 produced the opposite effect. Together, our data suggest that the lack of CLN3 function in cells leads to a failure of management in the response to ER stress and this may be the key deficit in JNCL that causes neuronal degeneration

  8. Plasmid-mediated resistance to thrombin-induced platelet microbicidal protein in staphylococci: role of the qacA locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupferwasser, L I; Skurray, R A; Brown, M H; Firth, N; Yeaman, M R; Bayer, A S

    1999-10-01

    Thrombin-induced platelet microbicidal protein 1 (tPMP-1) is a small, cationic peptide released from rabbit platelets following thrombin stimulation. In vitro resistance to this peptide among strains of Staphylococcus aureus correlates with the survival advantage of such strains at sites of endothelial damage in humans as well as in experimental endovascular infections. The mechanisms involved in the phenotypic resistance of S. aureus to tPMP-1 are not fully delineated. The plasmid-encoded staphylococcal gene qacA mediates multidrug resistance to multiple organic cations via a proton motive force-dependent efflux pump. We studied whether the qacA gene might also confer resistance to cationic tPMP-1. Staphylococcal plasmids encoding qacA were found to confer resistance to tPMP-1 in an otherwise susceptible parental strain. Deletions which removed the region containing the qacA gene in the S. aureus multiresistance plasmid pSK1 abolished tPMP-1 resistance. Resistance to tPMP-1 in the qacA-bearing strains was inoculum independent but peptide concentration dependent, with the level of resistance decreasing at higher peptide concentrations for a given inoculum. There was no apparent cross-resistance in qacA-bearing strains to other endogenous cationic antimicrobial peptides which are structurally distinct from tPMP-1, including human neutrophil defensin 1, protamine, or the staphylococcal lantibiotics pep5 and nisin. These data demonstrate that the staphylococcal multidrug resistance gene qacA also mediates in vitro resistance to cationic tPMP-1.

  9. Effect of Iron Availability on Induction of Systemic Resistance to Fusarium Wilt of Chickpea by Pseudomonas spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Ratul; Srivastava, Alok K; Singh, Kiran; Arora, Dilip K; Lee, Min-Woong

    2005-03-01

    Selected isolates of Pseudomonas fluorescens (Pf4-92 and PfRsC5) and P. aeruginosa (PaRsG18 and PaRsG27) were examined for growth promotion and induced systemic resistance against Fusarium wilt of chickpea. Significant increase in plant height was observed in Pseudomonas treated plants. However, plant growth was inhibited when isolates of Pseudomonas were used in combination with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri (FocRs1). It was also observed that the Pseudomonas spp. was colonized in root of chickpea and significantly suppressed the disease in greenhouse condition. Rock wool bioassay technique was used to study the effect of iron availability on the induction of systemic resistance to Fusarium wilt of chickpea mediated by the Pseudomonas spp. All the isolates of Pseudomonas spp. showed greater disease control in the induced systemic resistance (ISR) bioassay when iron availability in the nutrient solution was low. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated that all the bacterial isolates produced more salicylic acid (SA) at low iron (10µM EDDHA) than high iron availability (10µFe(3+) EDDHA). Except PaRsG27, all the three isolates produced more pseudobactin at low iron than high iron availability.

  10. Hederagenin Induces Apoptosis in Cisplatin-Resistant Head and Neck Cancer Cells by Inhibiting the Nrf2-ARE Antioxidant Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Hye; Baek, Seungho; Shin, Daiha; Lee, Jaewang; Roh, Jong-Lyel

    2017-01-01

    Acquired resistance to cisplatin is the most common reason for the failure of cisplatin chemotherapy. Hederagenin, triterpenoids extracted from ivy leaves, exhibits antitumor activity in various types of cancer. However, the therapeutic potential of hederagenin in head and neck cancer (HNC) has remained unclear. Therefore, we examined the effects of hederagenin in cisplatin-resistant HNC cells and characterized its molecular mechanisms of action in this context. We evaluated the effects of hederagenin treatment on cell viability, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione levels, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δ Ψ m), and protein and mRNA expression in HNC cells. The antitumor effect of hederagenin in mouse tumor xenograft models was also analyzed. Hederagenin selectively induced cell death in both cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant HNC cells by promoting changes in Δ Ψ m and inducing apoptosis. Hederagenin inhibited the Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway and activated p53 in HNC cells, thereby enhancing ROS production and promoting glutathione depletion. These effects were reversed by the antioxidant trolox. Hederagenin activated intrinsic apoptotic pathways via cleaved PARP, cleaved caspase-3, and Bax. The selective inhibitory effects of hederagenin were confirmed in cisplatin-resistant HNC xenograft models. These data suggest that hederagenin induces cell death in resistant HNC cells via the Nrf2-ARE antioxidant pathway.

  11. Hederagenin Induces Apoptosis in Cisplatin-Resistant Head and Neck Cancer Cells by Inhibiting the Nrf2-ARE Antioxidant Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Hye Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired resistance to cisplatin is the most common reason for the failure of cisplatin chemotherapy. Hederagenin, triterpenoids extracted from ivy leaves, exhibits antitumor activity in various types of cancer. However, the therapeutic potential of hederagenin in head and neck cancer (HNC has remained unclear. Therefore, we examined the effects of hederagenin in cisplatin-resistant HNC cells and characterized its molecular mechanisms of action in this context. We evaluated the effects of hederagenin treatment on cell viability, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS production, glutathione levels, mitocho