WorldWideScience

Sample records for induced particle emission

  1. Particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, D.D.

    1991-08-01

    The accelerator based ion beam technique of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) is discussed in some detail. This report pulls together all major reviews and references over the last ten years and reports on PIXE in vacuum and using external beams. The advantages, limitations, costs and types of studies that may be undertaken using an accelerator based ion beam technique such as PIXE, are also discussed. 25 refs., 7 tabs., 40 figs

  2. Applications of particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akselsson, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    In Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analysis samples are bombarded by protons or α-particles of a few MeV/u. The induced characteristic x-rays are detected with a x-ray detector e.g. a Si(Li)-detector. The energies of the x-ray peaks are characteristic for the elements in the samples and the intensities of the x-ray transitions are proportional to the abundances of the elements. The research area which first attracted those of us working with PIXE was the study of sources, transport and deposition of airborne particulates. Sources, transport, wet deposition, other applications where PIXE is already known to be competitive are trace elemental analysis of water below the ppb-level and analyses requiring a space resolution of 1-10μ. However, there is still much to do for physicists in developing the full potential of low-energy accelerators as analytical tools in multidisciplinary teams. (JIW)

  3. 14th International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission ("PIXE 2015")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyłowicz, Wojciech Józef; Pineda-Vargas, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B contains the proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission ("PIXE 2015") that was held in Somerset West (South Africa) from 25th February to 3rd March 2015.

  4. Stimulated-emission effects in particle creation near black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wald, R.M.

    1976-01-01

    It has recently been shown that if a black hole is formed by gravitational collapse, spontaneous particle creation will occur and a thermal spectrum of all species of particles will be emitted to infinity if the quantum matter was initially in the vacuum state. In this paper we investigate the stimulated-emission effects which occur if particles are present initially. We show in general that for a Hermitian scalar field in an external potential or in curved, asymptotically flat spacetime, stimulated-emission effects can occur precisely in those modes for which there is spontaneous particle creation from the vacuum. For the case of a Schwarzschild black hole, this result appears paradoxical, since spontaneous emission occurs at late times but there is no classical analog of stimulated emission at late times. The resolution of this paradox is that in order to induce emission of particles which emerge at late times one must send in particles at early times, so that they reach the black hole very near the instant of its formation. However, enormous energy is required of these incoming particles in order to stimulate emission of particles which emerge at late times. Thus, for a Schwarzschild black hole, even if particles are initially present (with limited energy) they will induce emission only at early times; at late times one will see only the spontaneously emitted blackbody thermal radiation. For the case of a Kerr black hole stimulated emission can be induced by particles sent in at late times with the appropriate frequencies and angular dependence. If the number of incoming particles is large, this quantum stimulated emission just gives the classical superradiant scattering

  5. An optimised set-up for total reflection particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, J.A. van; Vis, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    MeV proton beams at small angles of incidence (0-35 mrad) are used to analyse trace elements on flat surfaces such as Si wafers or quartz substrates. In these experiments, the particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) signal is used in a new optimized set-up. This set-up is constructed in such a way that the X-ray detector can reach very large solid angles, larger than 1 sr. Use of these large detector solid angles, combined with the reduction of bremsstrahlung background, affords limits of detection (LOD) of the order of 10 10 at cm -2 using total reflection particle induced X-ray emission (TPIXE). The LODs from earlier TPIXE measurements in a non-optimized set-up are used to estimate LODs in the new TPIXE set-up. Si wafers with low surface concentrations of V, Ni, Cu and Ag are used as standards to calibrate the LODs found with this set-up. The metal concentrations are determined by total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF). The TPIXE measurements are compared with TXRF measurements on the same wafers. (Author)

  6. Characterization of nuclear physics targets using Rutherford backscattering and particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubehn, T.; Wozniak, G.J.; Phair, L.; Moretto, L.G.; Yu, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering and particle induced X-ray emission have been utilized to precisely characterize targets used in nuclear fission experiments. The method allows for a fast and non-destructive determination of target thickness, homogeneity and element composition. (orig.)

  7. Qualitative analysis of a powdered diamond sample by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabida, C.; Annegarn, H.J.; Renan, M.J.; Sellschop, J.P.F.

    The main purpose of this analysis was to determine whether nickel is present in diamond powder as a trace element. Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) showed unambiguously that nickel was present. Due to the convenience of PIXE in multielemental analysis, the investigations also include a number of other trace elements in the sample

  8. Ion-induced emission of charged particles from solid hydrogen and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgesen, P.; Schou, J.; Sorensen, H.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the emission of both positive and negative particles from solid hydrogen and deuterium for normal incidence of H + , H + 2 , H + 3 , D 2 H + , D + 3 and He + ions up to 10 keV. For positive particles the emission coefficient increased with increasing energy of incidence to reach a value of 0.08 per atom for 10 keV H + onto hydrogen. Apparently the positive particles are sputtered ones. The negative particles emitted are predominantly electrons. The emission coefficient per incident atom as a function of the velocity of the incident particle agress fairly well with results published earlier for incidence of hydrogen and deuterium ions. However, systematic differences of up to 10% are now observed between the coefficients for the different types of ions. (orig.)

  9. Particle induced X-ray emission and complementary nuclear methods for trace element determination; Plenary lecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, S A.E. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    1992-03-01

    In this review the state-of-the-art of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) methods for the determination of trace elements is described. The developmental work has mostly been carried out in nuclear physics laboratories, where accelerators are available, but now the increased interest has led to the establishment of other dedicated PIXE facilities. The reason for this interest is the versatility, high sensitivity and multi-element capability of PIXE analysis. A further very important advantage is that PIXE can be combined with the microbeam technique, which makes elemental mapping with a spatial resolution of about 1 {mu}m possible. As a technique, PIXE can also be combined with other nuclear reactions such as elastic scattering and particle-induced gamma emission, so that light elements can be determined. The usefulness of PIXE is illustrated by a number of typical applications in biology, medicine, geology, air pollution research, archaeology and the arts. (author).

  10. Particle induced X-ray emission for quantitative trace-element analysis using the Eindhoven cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivits, H.

    1980-01-01

    Development of a multi-elemental trace analysis technique using PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission), was started almost five years ago at the Eindhoven University of Technology, in the Cyclotron Applications Group of the Physics Department. The aim of the work presented is to improve the quantitative aspects of trace-element analysis with PIXE, as well as versatility, speed and simplicity. (Auth.)

  11. The quantitative determination of trace elements in giant unicellular plants by particle-induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarrete-Dominguez, V.R.; Yoshihara, K.; Tanaka, N.

    1982-01-01

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) was applied for the determination of trace elements in biologically interesting materials, giant unicellular plants. It was found that the PIXE method had advantages in multi-element trace analysis of a single cell of the sample plant. (author)

  12. Pre-equilibrium complex particle emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bĕták, E.

    2002-01-01

    Semi-classical (phenomenological) pre-equilibrium emission of clusters of nucleons (complex particles) such as deuterons, tritons, helions and α particles from reactions induced by light projectiles (nucleons to α’s) is addressed. The main attention is given to the hard components in the emission energetic spectra, which play an increasing role at incident energies above 20 MeV, and are currently attributed to a presence of some kind of pre-equilibrium processes. In addition, the mechanisms of cluster reactions show special features such as the competition between pickup and knockout processes and the contributions of several successive steps in the reaction. The main frame used here to illustrate the processes and interplays of the competing mechanisms of pre-equilibrium cluster formation and emission, namely the coalescence, pick-up and knock-out, is the pre-equilibrium exciton model. It obviously contains the process of clusterization itself as its organic part. The most important case of complex particles with the largest amount of experimental data is that of alpha emission, which therefore naturally attracts most of the attention and where the widest range of possible mechanisms is available on the market. The loosely bound ejectiles, on the other side, are usually not able to demonstrate all features of the whole spectrum of contributing mechanisms, but they are nevertheless an important link between the nucleon emission and the cluster one.

  13. Fluorine determination in human and animal bones by particle-induced gamma-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastri, Chaturvedula S.; Hoffmann, Peter; Ortner, Hugo M.; Iyengar, Venkatesh; Blondiaux, Gilbert; Tessier, Yves; Petri, Hermann; Aras, Namik K.; Zaichick, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    Fluorine was determined in the iliac crest bones of patients and in ribs collected from postmortem investigations by particle-induced gamma-ray emission based on the 19 F(p,pγ) 19 F reaction, using 20/2.5 MeV protons. The results indicate that for 68% of the human samples the F concentration is in the range 500-1999 μg g -1 . For comparison purposes fluorine was also determined in some animal bones; in some animal tissues lateral profiles of fluorine were measured. (abstract)

  14. α particle induced scintillation in dense gaseous argon: emission spectra and temporal behavior of its ionic component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, M.J.; Klein, G.

    1980-01-01

    The scintillation induced by α particles in dense gaseous argon (above 1 atm) has been studied. The electric field dependence of the scintillation, shows that the second continuum (centred around 1270A) stems from the neutral as well as from the ionic species, initially created by the impinging particle. Intensity decay curves and emission spectra of these neutral excitation and ionic components were determined. Time constants suggest that the recombination mechanism is responsible for a delayed formation of the second continuum states, 1 Σ + sub(u) and 3 Σ + sub(u). The third continuum of the emission spectra, which spreads at longer wavelengths, from 1600A to 2800A, is field independent

  15. Development of a Reference Database for Particle Induced Gamma Ray Emission (PIGE) Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-09-01

    Ion beam analysis techniques are non-destructive analytical techniques used to identify the composition and structure of surface layers of materials. The applications of these techniques span environmental control, cultural heritage and conservation, materials and fusion technologies. The particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) spectroscopy technique in particular, is a powerful tool for detecting light elements in certain depths of surface layers. This publication describes the coordinated effort to measure and compile cross section data relevant to PIGE analysis and make these data available to the community of practice through a comprehensive online database.

  16. Particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) measurement of the Cd content in animal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Huong Quynh; Demeter, I.; Hollos-Nagy, K.; Szoekefalvi-Nagy, Z.

    1989-12-01

    Particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) measurements were performed on thin samples prepared from different rabbit tissues, using 3 MeV proton beam for inducing x-rays from the animal tissues. This method is very sensitive and very small amounts of trace elements can be detected. Cadmium, one of the most toxic elements which can be concentrated in animal and human tissues due to environmental pollution, was detected with a limit of 0.7 ppm. The trace element concentrations obtained by PIXE were compared to those measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. PIXE method is proposed for routine analysis at the Veterinary and Food Investigating Service, Budapest, Hungary. (D.Gy.) 6 refs.; 3 figs

  17. Light charged particle emission in heavy-ion reactions – What have ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    coincidence with gamma rays, fission products, evaporation residues have yielded interesting results which bring out the influence of nuclear structure, nuclear mean field and dynamics on the emission of these particles. Keywords. Light charged particles; heavy-ion induced reactions; particle spectra and angular distri-.

  18. Isoprene in poplar emissions: effects on new particle formation and OH concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Andres, S.; Bachner, M.; Behnke, K.; Broch, S.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Kleist, E.; Mentel, T. F.; Rubach, F.; Springer, M.; Steitz, B.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Schnitzler, J.-P.; Wildt, J.

    2012-01-01

    Stress-induced volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from transgenic Grey poplar modified in isoprene emission potential were used for the investigation of photochemical secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. In poplar, acute ozone stress induces the emission of a wide array of VOCs dominated by sesquiterpenes and aromatic VOCs. Constitutive light-dependent emission of isoprene ranged between 66 nmol m-2 s-1 in non-transgenic controls (wild type WT) and nearly zero (plants (line RA22), respectively. Nucleation rates of up to 3600 cm-3 s-1 were observed in our experiments. In the presence of isoprene new particle formation was suppressed compared to non-isoprene containing VOC mixtures. Compared to isoprene/monoterpene systems emitted from other plants the suppression of nucleation by isoprene was less effective for the VOC mixture emitted from stressed poplar. This is explained by the observed high efficiency of new particle formation for emissions from stressed poplar. Direct measurements of OH in the reaction chamber revealed that the steady state concentration of OH is lower in the presence of isoprene than in the absence of isoprene, supporting the hypothesis that isoprenes' suppressing effect on nucleation is related to radical chemistry. In order to test whether isoprene contributes to SOA mass formation, fully deuterated isoprene (C5D8) was added to the stress-induced emission profile of an isoprene free poplar mutant. Mass spectral analysis showed that, despite the isoprene-induced suppression of particle formation, fractions of deuterated isoprene were incorporated into the SOA. A fractional mass yield of 2.3% of isoprene was observed. Future emission changes due to land use and climate change may therefore affect both gas phase oxidation capacity and new particle number formation.

  19. Ion induced x-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, D.D.; Clayton, E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE). Its use as a tool for multi-element non-destructive trace element analysis of small samples is addressed. Concepts and details needed for the construction of a PIXE system are offered

  20. Isoprene in poplar emissions: effects on new particle formation and OH concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kiendler-Scharr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress-induced volatile organic compound (VOC emissions from transgenic Grey poplar modified in isoprene emission potential were used for the investigation of photochemical secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation. In poplar, acute ozone stress induces the emission of a wide array of VOCs dominated by sesquiterpenes and aromatic VOCs. Constitutive light-dependent emission of isoprene ranged between 66 nmol m−2 s−1 in non-transgenic controls (wild type WT and nearly zero (<0.5 nmol m−2 s−1 in isoprene emission-repressed plants (line RA22, respectively. Nucleation rates of up to 3600 cm−3 s−1 were observed in our experiments. In the presence of isoprene new particle formation was suppressed compared to non-isoprene containing VOC mixtures. Compared to isoprene/monoterpene systems emitted from other plants the suppression of nucleation by isoprene was less effective for the VOC mixture emitted from stressed poplar. This is explained by the observed high efficiency of new particle formation for emissions from stressed poplar. Direct measurements of OH in the reaction chamber revealed that the steady state concentration of OH is lower in the presence of isoprene than in the absence of isoprene, supporting the hypothesis that isoprenes' suppressing effect on nucleation is related to radical chemistry. In order to test whether isoprene contributes to SOA mass formation, fully deuterated isoprene (C5D8 was added to the stress-induced emission profile of an isoprene free poplar mutant. Mass spectral analysis showed that, despite the isoprene-induced suppression of particle formation, fractions of deuterated isoprene were incorporated into the SOA. A fractional mass yield of 2.3% of isoprene was observed. Future emission changes due to land use and climate change may therefore affect both gas phase oxidation capacity and new particle number formation.

  1. Photon emission produced by particle-surface collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, C.W.; Tolk, N.H.

    1976-02-01

    Visible, ultraviolet, and infrared optical emission results from low-energy (20 eV-10 keV) particle-surface collisions. Several distinct kinds of collision induced optical radiation are discussed which provide fundamental information on particle-solid collision processes. Line radiation arises from excited states of sputtered surface constituents and backscattered beam particles. This radiation uniquely identifies the quantum state of sputtered or reflected particles, provides a method for identifying neutral atoms sputtered from the surface, and serves as the basis for a sensitive surface analysis technique. Broadband radiation from the bulk of the solid is attributed to the transfer of projectile energy to the electrons in the solid. Continuum emission observed well in front of transition metal targets is believed to arise from excited atom clusters (diatomic, triatomic, etc.) ejected from the solid in the sputtering process. Application of sputtered atom optical radiation for surface and depth profile analysis is demonstrated for the case of submonolayer quantities of chromium on silicon and aluminum implanted in SiO 2

  2. Development of a Reference Database for Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitriou, P., E-mail: P.Dimitriou@iaea.org [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramerstrasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Becker, H.-W. [Ruhr Universität Bochum, Gebäude NT05/130, Postfach 102148, Bochum 44721 (Germany); Bogdanović-Radović, I. [Department of Experimental Physics, Institute Rudjer Boskovic, Bijenicka Cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Chiari, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 Firenze (Italy); Goncharov, A. [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, National Science Center, Akademicheskaya Str.1, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Jesus, A.P. [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Portugal); Kakuee, O. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, End of North Karegar Ave., PO Box 14395-836, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kiss, A.Z. [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), Bem ter 18/c, PO Box 51, 4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Lagoyannis, A. [National Center of Scientific Research “Demokritos”, Agia Paraskevi, P.O. Box 60228, 15310 Athens (Greece); Räisänen, J. [Division of Materials Physics, Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, PO Box 43, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Strivay, D. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Atomique et de Spectroscopie, Universite de Liège, Sart Tilman, B15 4000 Liège (Belgium); Zucchiatti, A. [Centro de Micro Análisis de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Faraday 3, Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2016-03-15

    Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) is a powerful analytical technique that exploits the interactions of rapid charged particles with nuclei located near a sample surface to determine the composition and structure of the surface regions of solids by measurement of characteristic prompt γ rays. The potential for depth profiling of this technique has long been recognized, however, the implementation has been limited owing to insufficient knowledge of the physical data and lack of suitable user-friendly computer codes for the applications. Although a considerable body of published data exists in the nuclear physics literature for nuclear reaction cross sections with γ rays in the exit channel, there is no up-to-date, comprehensive compilation specifically dedicated to IBA applications. A number of PIGE cross-section data had already been uploaded to the Ion Beam Analysis Nuclear Data Library (IBANDL) ( (http://www-nds.iaea.org/ibandl)) by members of the IBA community by 2011, however a preliminary survey of this body of unevaluated experimental data has revealed numerous discrepancies beyond the uncertainty limits reported by the authors. Using the resources and coordination provided by the IAEA, a concerted effort to improve the situation was made within the Coordinated Research Project on the Development of a Reference Database for PIGE spectroscopy, from 2011 to 2015. The aim of the CRP was to create a data library for Ion Beam Analysis that contains reliable and usable data on charged particle γ-ray emission cross sections that would be made freely available to the user community. As the CRP has reached its completion, we shall present its main achievements, including the results of nuclear cross-section evaluations and the development of a computer code that will become available to the public allowing for the implementation of a standardless PIGE technique.

  3. Continental anthropogenic primary particle number emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasonen, Pauli; Kupiainen, Kaarle; Klimont, Zbigniew; Visschedijk, Antoon; Denier van der Gon, Hugo A. C.; Amann, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particle number concentrations impact our climate and health in ways different from those of aerosol mass concentrations. However, the global, current and future anthropogenic particle number emissions and their size distributions are so far poorly known. In this article, we present the implementation of particle number emission factors and the related size distributions in the GAINS (Greenhouse Gas-Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies) model. This implementation allows for global estimates of particle number emissions under different future scenarios, consistent with emissions of other pollutants and greenhouse gases. In addition to determining the general particulate number emissions, we also describe a method to estimate the number size distributions of the emitted black carbon particles. The first results show that the sources dominating the particle number emissions are different to those dominating the mass emissions. The major global number source is road traffic, followed by residential combustion of biofuels and coal (especially in China, India and Africa), coke production (Russia and China), and industrial combustion and processes. The size distributions of emitted particles differ across the world, depending on the main sources: in regions dominated by traffic and industry, the number size distribution of emissions peaks in diameters range from 20 to 50 nm, whereas in regions with intensive biofuel combustion and/or agricultural waste burning, the emissions of particles with diameters around 100 nm are dominant. In the baseline (current legislation) scenario, the particle number emissions in Europe, Northern and Southern Americas, Australia, and China decrease until 2030, whereas especially for India, a strong increase is estimated. The results of this study provide input for modelling of the future changes in aerosol-cloud interactions as well as particle number related adverse health effects, e.g. in response to tightening

  4. Continental anthropogenic primary particle number emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Paasonen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosol particle number concentrations impact our climate and health in ways different from those of aerosol mass concentrations. However, the global, current and future anthropogenic particle number emissions and their size distributions are so far poorly known. In this article, we present the implementation of particle number emission factors and the related size distributions in the GAINS (Greenhouse Gas–Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies model. This implementation allows for global estimates of particle number emissions under different future scenarios, consistent with emissions of other pollutants and greenhouse gases. In addition to determining the general particulate number emissions, we also describe a method to estimate the number size distributions of the emitted black carbon particles. The first results show that the sources dominating the particle number emissions are different to those dominating the mass emissions. The major global number source is road traffic, followed by residential combustion of biofuels and coal (especially in China, India and Africa, coke production (Russia and China, and industrial combustion and processes. The size distributions of emitted particles differ across the world, depending on the main sources: in regions dominated by traffic and industry, the number size distribution of emissions peaks in diameters range from 20 to 50 nm, whereas in regions with intensive biofuel combustion and/or agricultural waste burning, the emissions of particles with diameters around 100 nm are dominant. In the baseline (current legislation scenario, the particle number emissions in Europe, Northern and Southern Americas, Australia, and China decrease until 2030, whereas especially for India, a strong increase is estimated. The results of this study provide input for modelling of the future changes in aerosol–cloud interactions as well as particle number related adverse health effects, e.g. in response

  5. Mechanism of 238U disintegration induced by relativistic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronenko, L.N.; Zhdanov, A.A.; Kravtsov, A.V.; Solyakin, G.E.

    2002-01-01

    In heavy-nucleus disintegration induced by a relativistic projectile particle, the production of collinear massive fragments accompanied by numerous charged particles and neutrons is explained in terms of the mechanism of projectile-momentum compensation due to the emission of a particle whose mass is greater than the projectile mass

  6. Development of a PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) analysis device using an extracted proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidi, A.

    1989-01-01

    The experimental device described allows the extention of the PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) method to the analysis, by means of proton beams, of solid or liquid samples, which can not be analyzed under vacuum conditions. The homogeneity of the surfaces to be analysed and elements (in the atmosphere) which absorb X-rays must be taken into account. Liquid samples do not need special care. The results show that: at high energies, the extracted beam sensibility is of the same order of magnitude as those obtained under vacuum; at low energies, the performance under vacuum conditions is better. The particles energy losses, at the exit membrane and in the outer atmosphere, decrease the X-rays production efficiency [fr

  7. Various light particles emissions accompaning light heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billerey, R.

    1981-01-01

    In this work we have investigated light particles emission accompanying heavy-ion induced reactions. The experiments were performed at the isochronous cyclotron of the I.S.N. de Grenoble and we got in and out of plane correlations between solid state and gazeous detectors. In 14 N (100 MeV) + 27 Al we have chosen, light particles emitted in coincidence with deep inelastic fragments or evaporation residues have been measured. Likewise we observed the correlations between fragments and fragments. The particularities we found between protons and alpha emissions are to be assigned to differences in separation energies, but their relative energies and angular momenta have also a significant part [fr

  8. Particle induced X-ray emission: a valuable tool for the analysis of metalpoint drawings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duval, A.; Guicharnaud, H.; Dran, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    For several years, we carry out a research on metalpoint drawings, a graphic technique mainly employed by European artists during the 15th and 16th centuries. As a non-destructive and very sensitive analytical technique is required, particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis with an external beam has been used for this purpose. More than 70 artworks drawn by Italian, Flemish and German artists have been analysed, including leadpoint and silverpoint drawings. Following a short description of the metalpoint technique, the results are compared with the recipes written by Cennino Cennini at the beginning of the 15th century and specific examples are presented

  9. Determination of impurities in silicon nitride by particle induced x-ray emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, Yoshiko; Saito, Kazuo; Niwa, Hiroaki; Ishizuka, Toshio; Miyagawa, Soji

    1985-01-01

    A method is presented for quantitative particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of impurities in the thick samples of silicon nitride. In the analysis of ceramic materials such as silicon nitride, chemical treatments are required to prepare thin enough samples. However, the chemical treatments are undesirable for the PIXE analysis, because another complications are brought about. Our method does not need any chemical treatments and thick samples can be subjected to the measurements. The determination of impurities were made by on-line use of a personal computer in which standard X-ray intensity data were stored. The method and procedures are as follows: After subtracting a buckground spectrum from an observed PIXE spectrum, the resultant peaks are assigned to individual elements. Then, in order to determine the contents of the impurities, the intensity of each peak is compared with a Gaussian curve which is generated from the standard X-ray intensity data. The latter data were determined theoretically. The results were in satisfactory agreement with those obtained by ICP emission spectrometry. (author)

  10. Particle induced x-ray emission studies of some Indian medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomita Devi, K.; Nandakumar Sarma, H.; Kumar, Sanjiv

    2007-01-01

    Medicinal herbs have been used from antiquity by humanity. This paper discusses the elemental composition and concentration of ten Indian medicinal plants investigated by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique. The accuracy and precision of the technique were assured by analyzing three Certified Standard Reference Materials -cabbage- (GBW 08504, China), wheat flour (NIST-8436) and bovine liver (NIST-1577b). The element K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn were found to be present in all the samples in varying concentrations. No toxic heavy metals such as As, Pb and Hg were detected in the studied plants. The range of the elemental concentrations in dry weight has been found to vary from 4.69x10 4 mg/kg to 1.81 mg/kg in the plants. The results also show that these plants contain elements of vital importance in man's metabolism and that are needed for growth and developments, prevention and heating of diseases. (author)

  11. Quantification of arsenic in activated carbon using particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Nirbhay N.; Maheswaran, Saravanamuthu; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Ngo, Huu H.; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuth

    2006-01-01

    To date, the trace elemental analysis of solids with inhomogeneous internal structure has been limited, particularly in the case of adsorbents. High-energy ion beam based particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) is an ideal analytical tool suitable for simultaneous quantification of trace elements with high accuracy. In this study, PIXE was used to quantify arsenic in the adsorbents, granular activated carbon (GAC) and powder activated carbon (PAC). Pelletized and unmodified GAC and PAC samples were analyzed along with powder samples deposited on thin teflon filters. These sample preparation methods resulted in samples of various thicknesses and densities. PIXE measurements taken from these samples were compared to results from neutron activation analysis (NAA) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). There is a good agreement between the values from the NAA and pelletized PIXE measurements and some AAS measurements

  12. Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) Approach for the Quantification of Thin Al Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younes, G; Zahraman, K; Nsouli, B; Soueidan, M; Ferro, G

    2008-01-01

    Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) has been used as a fast and non-destructive technique for sensitive characterization of ultra thin Al films deposited by evaporation onto Si substrate. In this work the PIXE technique was optimized, using proton beam at different energies and different angles of incidence, for the characterization of ultra thin Al films (few nanometers) deposited onto Si substrate. The PIXE results showed that a proton beam of 300 keV under tilting angle of 80 degree permits an accurate determination of Al with high sensitivity within few minutes of acquisition time and a LOD of less than 0.2 nm. The LOD versus energy and tilting angle will be presented and discussed. (author)

  13. Forensic analysis of tempered sheet glass by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jisonna, L.J. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 (United States); DeYoung, P.A., E-mail: deyoung@hope.ed [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 (United States); Ferens, J.; Hall, C.; Lunderberg, J.M.; Mears, P. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 (United States); Padilla, D. [Department of Physics, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-1233 (United States); Peaslee, G.F. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 (United States); Sampson, R. [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: {yields} PIXE was found to give the same results for trace elements in glass as ICP. {yields} PIXE can non-destructively determine trace element concentrations in auto glass. {yields} Measured Ca, Fe, Ti, Mn, and Sr in auto glass with PIXE. -- Abstract: The elemental concentrations of five trace elements in tempered sheet glass fragments were determined using particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectrometry. The trace element concentrations for calcium, iron, manganese, strontium, and titanium are compared to those obtained by inductively-coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) following complete digestion by hydrofluoric acid. For these five elements, the absolute concentrations obtained by both methods are shown to agree well over a wide range of concentrations. The limits of detection for trace elements are typically lower for the ICP-AES method. However, we show that the concentrations of these five elements can be accurately measured by the PIXE method. Since PIXE is an entirely non-destructive method, there exists a niche for this technique to be used as a complement to the more sensitive ICP-AES technique in the forensic analysis of sheet glass.

  14. Particle emissions from compressed natural gas engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristovski, Z.D.; Morawska, L.; Hitchins, J.; Thomas, S.; Greenaway, C.; Gilbert, D.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements conducted to determine particle and gas emissions from two large compressed natural gas (CNG) spark ignition (SI) engines. Particle size distributions in the range from 0.01-30 μm, and gas composition were measured for five power settings of the engines: 35, 50, 65, 80 and 100% of full power. Particle emissions in the size range between 0.5 and 30 μm, measured by the aerodynamic particle sizer (APS), were very low at a level below two particles cm -3 . These concentrations were comparable with average ambient concentration, and were not considered in the succeeding analysis. Both engines produce significant amounts of particles in the size range between 0.015 and 0.7 μm, measured by the scanning mobility particle size (SMPS). Maximum number of concentrations of about 1 x 10 7 particles cm -3 were very similar for both engines. The CMDs were in the range between 0.020 and 0.060 μm. The observed levels of particulate emission are in terms of number of the same order as emissions from heavy duty diesel engines (Morawska et al., Environ. Sci. Tech. 32, 2033-2042). On the other hand, emissions of CO and NO x of 5.53 and 3.33 g k W h -1 , respectively, for one of the tested engines, were considerably lower than set by the standards. According to the specifications for the gas emissions, provided by the US EPA (US EPA, 1997), this engine can be considered as a 'low-emission' engine, although emissions of submicrometer particles are of the same order as heavy-duty vehicles. (Author)

  15. The fine particle emissions of energy production in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlstroem, M.

    1998-01-01

    The main purpose of this master's thesis was to define the fine particle (PM2.5, diameter under 2,5 μm) emissions of the energy production and to compare the calculated emission factors between different energy production concepts. The purpose was also to define what is known about fine particle emissions and what should still be studied/measured. The purpose was also to compare briefly the fine particle emissions of energy production and vehicle traffic, and their correlations to the fine particle concentrations of urban air. In the theory part of this work a literature survey was made about fine particles in energy production, especially how they form and how they are separated from the flue gas. In addition, the health effects caused by fine particles, and different measuring instruments were presented briefly. In the experimental part of this work, the aim was to find out the fine particle emissions of different energy production processes by calculating specific emission factors (mg/MJ fuel ) from powerplants' annual total particulate matter emissions (t/a), which were obtained from VAHTI-database system maintained by the Finnish Environmental Institute, and by evaluating the share of fine particles from total emissions with the help of existing measurement results. Only those energy production processes which produce significantly direct emissions of solid particles have been treated (pulverised combustion and oil burners from burner combustion, fluidized bed combustion processes, grate boilers, recovery boilers and diesel engines). The processes have been classified according to boiler type, size category, main fuel and also according to dust separation devices. To be able to compare different energy production processes, shared specific emission factor have been calculated for the similar subprocesses. The fine particle emissions depend strongest on the boiler size category and dust separation devices used. Spent fuel or combustion technique does not have

  16. Correction of Doppler broadening of {gamma}-ray lines induced by particle emission in heavy-ion induced fusion-evaporation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyberg, J; Seweryniak, D; Fahlander, C; Insua-Cao, P [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Sciences; Johnson, A; Cederwall, B [Manne Siegbahn Inst. of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden); Adamides, E; Piiparinen, M [National Centre for Scientific Research, Ag. Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Atac, A; Norlin, L O [Niels Bohr Inst., Copenhagen (Denmark); Ideguchi, E; Mitarai, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Julin, R; Juutinen, S; Tormanen, S; Virtanen, A [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Karczmarczyk, W; Kownacki, J [Warsaw Univ. (Poland); Schubart, R [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany)

    1992-08-01

    The effect of particle emission on the peak shape of {gamma}-ray lines have been investigated using the NORDBALL detector system. By detecting neutrons, protons and {alpha} particles emitted in the {sup 32}S (95 MeV) + {sup 27}Al reaction, the energy and direction of emission of the residual nuclei could be determined and subsequently used for an event-by -event Doppler correction of the detected {gamma} rays. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations were performed to study how the different Doppler phenomena influence the peak shape and in particular which particle detector properties are important for the Doppler correction. (author). 2 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  17. Particle-induced X-ray emission: thick-target analysis of inorganic materials in the determination of light elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Arantegui, J.; Castillo, J.R.; Querre, G.

    1994-01-01

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been applied to the analysis of inorganic materials to determine some elements with Z < 27: Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn and Fe, in thick-target analysis. A PIXE method has been developed for the analysis of geological materials, ceramics and pottery. Work has been carried out with an ion beam analytical system, using a low particle beam energy. Relative sensitivity, detection limits, reproducibility and accuracy of the method were calculated based on the analysis of geological standard materials (river sediments, argillaceous limestone, basalt, diorite and granite). Analysis using PIXE offers a number of advantages, such as short analysis time, multi-elemental and nondestructive determinations, and the results are similar to those obtained with other instrumental techniques of analysis. (Author)

  18. Emission of complex particles from highly excited nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadioli, E.

    1984-01-01

    A great deal of work has been made to investigated experimentally and predict theoretically the continuous spectra of composite particles produced in reactions induced by nucleons with energy ranging from a few to several ten MeV. Some recent results in the field are summarized. In particular the exciton coalescence-pickup model and the exciton knock-on model, in the case of alpha emission, are reviewed and discussed

  19. Detection of halogenated flame retardants in polyurethane foam by particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maley, Adam M.; Falk, Kyle A.; Hoover, Luke; Earlywine, Elly B.; Seymour, Michael D.; DeYoung, Paul A.; Blum, Arlene; Stapleton, Heather M.; Peaslee, Graham F.

    2015-01-01

    A novel application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been developed to detect the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardant chemicals in polyurethane foams. Traditional Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC–MS) methods for the detection and identification of halogenated flame retardants in foams require extensive sample preparation and data acquisition time. The elemental analysis of the halogens in polyurethane foam performed by PIXE offers the opportunity to identify the presence of halogenated flame retardants in a fraction of the time and sample preparation cost. Through comparative GC–MS and PIXE analysis of 215 foam samples, excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained. These results suggest that PIXE could be an ideal rapid screening method for the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardants in polyurethane foams

  20. Detection of halogenated flame retardants in polyurethane foam by particle induced X-ray emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maley, Adam M.; Falk, Kyle A.; Hoover, Luke; Earlywine, Elly B.; Seymour, Michael D. [Department of Chemistry, Hope College, 35 E. 12th Street, Holland, MI 49423 (United States); DeYoung, Paul A. [Department of Physics, Hope College, 27 Graves Place, Holland, MI 49423 (United States); Blum, Arlene [Green Science Policy Institute, Box 5455, Berkeley, CA 94705 (United States); Stapleton, Heather M. [Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, LSRC Box 90328, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Peaslee, Graham F., E-mail: peaslee@hope.edu [Department of Chemistry, Hope College, 35 E. 12th Street, Holland, MI 49423 (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A novel application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been developed to detect the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardant chemicals in polyurethane foams. Traditional Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC–MS) methods for the detection and identification of halogenated flame retardants in foams require extensive sample preparation and data acquisition time. The elemental analysis of the halogens in polyurethane foam performed by PIXE offers the opportunity to identify the presence of halogenated flame retardants in a fraction of the time and sample preparation cost. Through comparative GC–MS and PIXE analysis of 215 foam samples, excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained. These results suggest that PIXE could be an ideal rapid screening method for the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardants in polyurethane foams.

  1. Particle number emissions of gasoline hybrid electric vehicles; Partikelanzahl-Emission bei Hybridfahrzeugen mit Ottomotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Scott [Horiba Instruments Inc., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV) are commonly reputed to be environmentally friendly. Different studies show that this assumption raises some questions in terms of particle number emissions. Against the background that upcoming emission standards will not only limit particle matter emissions but also particle number emissions for gasoline engines, the exhaust behaviour of downsized gasoline engines used in HEV should be investigated more extensively. A Horiba study compares the particle number emissions of a gasoline vehicle to those of a gasoline powered HEV. (orig.)

  2. Particle Emissions from Domestic Gas Cookers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Livbjerg, Hans; Wagner, Ayten Yilmaz

    2010-01-01

    The authors experimentally studied the formation of submicron particles from a domestic gas cooker in a compartment free from external particle sources. The effects of fuel (methane, natural gas, odorant-free natural gas), primary aeration, flow rate, and fuel sulphur content on particle emissions...... of the emitted particles were found to have a mean value of about 7 nm for partially premixed flames, increasing to ∼10 nm for nonpremixed flames. The quantity of primary air had a strong impact on the particle emissions, showing a minimum at a primary aeration level of 60-65%. Presence of sulphur in small...... quantities may enhance particle formation under some conditions, but results were not conclusive....

  3. Applications of particle induced X-ray emission analysis to ambient aerosol studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lannefors, H.

    1982-01-01

    The characteristics of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analysis in conjunction with different ambient aerosol samplers have been studied. Correction factors have been calculated for homogeneous and inhomogeneous rural and urban aerosol samples. The Nuclepore two stage filter sampler provided the most useful combination of the resolution and particle size fractionation in urban, rural and remote environments. The PIXE-analysis technique in combination with different samplers was employed in aerosol composition studies in rural and remote environments. Particular emphasis was laid on studies of aerosol long range transport. Based on air mass trajectory analysis and aerosol composition measurements the foreign contribution in southern Sweden was estimated to be 70 - 80% for S and Pb but only 30 - 50% for V and Ni. The spatial and temporal extension of a long range transport episode was studied using high time resolution continuous filter samplers in a network in southern Sweden. The variation in the concentration levels of sulphur agreed well with changes in the air mass history. Arctic summer elemental concentration levels as measured during the Swedish YMER-80 icebreaker expedition were typically one order of magnitude lower than Arctic winter levels. The combination of chemical information, optical properties and size distribution data supports the hypothesis of long range transport of air pollution into the Arctic especially during the winter. This takes place during the winter season because the Polar front is further south making conditions for long range transport up to the Arctic more favourable. (Auth.)

  4. Emission of high-energy charged particles at 00 in Ne-induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borcea, C.; Gierlik, E.; Kalinin, A.M.; Kalpakchieva, R.; Oganessia, Yu.Ts.; Pawlat, T.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.E.; Ryakhlyuk, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    Inclusive energy spectra have been measured for light charged particles emitted in the bombardment of 232 Th, 181 Ta, sup(nat)Ti and 12 C targets by 22 Ne ions at 178 MeV and sup(nat)Ti target by 20 Ne ions at 196 MeV. The reaction products were analysed and detected by means of a ΔE-E telescope placed in the focal plane of a magnetic spectrometer located at an angle of 0 deg with respect to the beam direction. In all the reactions studied light charged particles with an energy close to the respective calculated kinematic limit for a two-body exit channel are produced with relatively great probability. The results obtained make it possible to draw some conclusions about the reaction mechanism involving the emission of light charged particles

  5. Timescale of particle emission using nuclear interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardouin, D.; Goujdami, D.; Guilbault, F.; Lebrun, C.; Erazmus, B.; Dabrowski, H.; Durand, D.; Lautridou, P.; Boisgard, R.; Quebert, J.; Carjan, N.

    1989-01-01

    A review of meson and baryon correlations at various energies is presented. An attempt, to focus on possible lifetime effects contained in existing data,is made. Data at 94 and 44 MeV/u, where experimental conditions are chosen, trying to study the lifetime of light particle emission using two particle correlations, are discussed. The temperature of a thermalized system is obtained, using the relative population of cluster excited states. It is shown that either quantum statistical fluctuations or Coulomb interactions play an important role in the trends of the correlation-functions at very low relative momenta. In the case of 1 60 and Ar induced reactions on heavy targets, a lifetime of the order of 10 -21 seconds is estimated. Temperature measurements for Ar + Ag system show that part of the excitation energy is not converted into thermal energy

  6. Cement analysis by particle-induced prompt photon spectrometry: comparison of the effect of different charged particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gihwala, D.; Peisach, M.

    1985-01-01

    Standard cements were analysed by particle-induced prompt photon spectrometry (PIPPS) using 4,75-MeV protons, 5-MeV 4 He+ ions, and 2-MeV deuterons. Precision and sensitivity attainable were compared. Protons and alpha-particles were comparable for the determination of F, Na, Mg and Si. Protons were preferred for P and Ca, and alpha-particles for the direct determination of O. Sources of interference are discussed with particular reference to delayed gamma-ray emission from deuteron bombardment

  7. Boron analysis for neutron capture therapy using particle-induced gamma-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Kei; Yamamoto, Yohei; Okamoto, Emiko; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Fumiyo; Matsumura, Akira; Yamada, Naoto; Kitamura, Akane; Koka, Masashi; Satoh, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    The neutron source of BNCT is currently changing from reactor to accelerator, but peripheral facilities such as a dose-planning system and blood boron analysis have still not been established. To evaluate the potential application of particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) for boron measurement in clinical boron neutron capture therapy, boronophenylalanine dissolved within a cell culture medium was measured using PIGE. PIGE detected 18 μgB/mL f-BPA in the culture medium, and all measurements of any given sample were taken within 20 min. Two hours of f-BPA exposure was required to create a boron distribution image. However, even though boron remained in the cells, the boron on the cell membrane could not be distinguished from the boron in the cytoplasm. - Highlights: • PIGE was evaluated for measuring blood boron concentration during clinical BNCT. • PIGE detected 18 μgB/mL f-BPA in culture medium. • All measurements of any given sample were taken within 20 min. • Two hours of f-BPA exposure is required to create boron distribution image by PIGE. • Boron on the cell membrane could not be distinguished from boron in the cytoplasm.

  8. Ion induced optical emission for surface and depth profile analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, C.W.

    1977-01-01

    Low-energy ion bombardment of solid surfaces results in the emission of infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiation produced by inelastic ion-solid collision processes. The emitted optical radiation provides important insight into low-energy particle-solid interactions and provides the basis for an analysis technique which can be used for surface and depth profile analysis with high sensitivity. The different kinds of collision induced optical radiation emitted as a result of low-energy particle-solid collisions are reviewed. Line radiation arising from excited states of sputtered atoms or molecules is shown to provide the basis for surface and depth profile analysis. The spectral characteristics of this type of radiation are discussed and applications of the ion induced optical emission technique are presented. These applications include measurements of ion implant profiles, detection sensitivities for submonolayer quantities of impurities on elemental surfaces, and the detection of elemental impurities on complex organic substrates

  9. Charged particle induced energy dispersive X-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, S.A.E.

    1979-01-01

    This review article deals with the X-ray emission induced by heavy, charged particles and the use of this process as an analytical method (PIXE). The physical processes involved, X-ray emission and the various reactions contributing to the background, are described in some detail. The sensitivity is calculated theoretically and the results compared with practical experience. A discussion is given on how the sensitivity can be optimized. The experimental arrangements are described and the various technical problems discussed. The analytical procedure, especially the sample preparation, is described in considerable detail. A number of typical practical applications are discussed. (author)

  10. Trace element determination in tomato puree using particle induced X-ray emission and Rutherford backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero-Davila, E.; Miranda, J.

    2004-01-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) were used to determine the concentrations of trace elements in samples of 12 tomato puree brands sold in the Mexican market. While RBS offered information about the main elements present in the matrix, PIXE gave results on trace elements. As a whole, data for 17 elements (C, N, O, Na, Mg, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn) were obtained. To evaluate the results, a comparison with brands from USA, Japan, Colombia, and Chile was carried out, using tomato purees produced following the domestic technology recipe. Additionally, the results were considered in the light of the Codex Alimentarius and the Mexican standard. It was found that all of the brands fall within the limits established by these standards, being of the same order of magnitude as the foreign brands. (author)

  11. Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepeis, Neil E.; Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.; Sextro, Richard G.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2002-07-07

    Because size is a major controlling factor for indoor airborne particle behavior, human particle exposure assessments will benefit from improved knowledge of size-specific particle emissions. We report a method of inferring size-specific mass emission factors for indoor sources that makes use of an indoor aerosol dynamics model, measured particle concentration time series data, and an optimization routine. This approach provides--in addition to estimates of the emissions size distribution and integrated emission factors--estimates of deposition rate, an enhanced understanding of particle dynamics, and information about model performance. We applied the method to size-specific environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) particle concentrations measured every minute with an 8-channel optical particle counter (PMS-LASAIR; 0.1-2+ micrometer diameters) and every 10 or 30 min with a 34-channel differential mobility particle sizer (TSI-DMPS; 0.01-1+ micrometer diameters) after a single cigarette or cigar was machine-smoked inside a low air-exchange-rate 20 m{sup 3} chamber. The aerosol dynamics model provided good fits to observed concentrations when using optimized values of mass emission rate and deposition rate for each particle size range as input. Small discrepancies observed in the first 1-2 hours after smoking are likely due to the effect of particle evaporation, a process neglected by the model. Size-specific ETS particle emission factors were fit with log-normal distributions, yielding an average mass median diameter of 0.2 micrometers and an average geometric standard deviation of 2.3 with no systematic differences between cigars and cigarettes. The equivalent total particle emission rate, obtained integrating each size distribution, was 0.2-0.7 mg/min for cigars and 0.7-0.9 mg/min for cigarettes.

  12. Emissions of soot particles from heat generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubov, V. K.; Popov, A. N.; Popova, E. I.

    2017-11-01

    «Soot carbon» or «Soot» - incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition particulate carbon product of hydrocarbons consisting of particles of various shapes and sizes. Soot particles are harmful substances Class 2 and like a dust dispersed by wind for thousands of kilometers. Soot have more powerful negative factor than carbon dioxide. Therefore, more strict requirements on ecological and economical performance for energy facilities at Arctic areas have to be developed to protect fragile Arctic ecosystems and global climate change from degradation and destruction. Quantity of soot particles in the flue gases of energy facilities is a criterion of effectiveness for organization of the burning process. Some of heat generators do not provide the required energy and environmental efficiency which results in irrational use of energy resources and acute pollution of environment. The paper summarizes the results of experimental study of solid particles emission from wide range of capacity boilers burning different organic fuels (natural gas, fuel oil, coal and biofuels). Special attention is paid to environmental and energy performance of the biofuels combustion. Emissions of soot particles PM2.5 are listed. Structure, composition and dimensions of entrained particles with the use of electronic scanning microscope Zeiss SIGMA VP were also studied. The results reveal an impact of several factors on soot particles emission.

  13. Pre-scission particle and gamma-ray emission in heavy-ion induced fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, J.O.

    1989-02-01

    An introduction is given to the physics of the equilibrium transition model and of dissipative nuclear dynamics. Experimental data on pre-scission particle and gamma-ray emission and their interpretation are reviewed. They appear to indicate overdamped motion of the nuclear fluid. A time scale for compound-nucleus fission of about 30x10 -21 sec or greater is indicated, whilst that for quasi- or fast-fission is somewhat shorter. 99 refs., 28 figs

  14. Modeling of Particle Emission During Dry Orthogonal Cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khettabi, Riad; Songmene, Victor; Zaghbani, Imed; Masounave, Jacques

    2010-08-01

    Because of the risks associated with exposure to metallic particles, efforts are being put into controlling and reducing them during the metal working process. Recent studies by the authors involved in this project have presented the effects of cutting speeds, workpiece material, and tool geometry on particle emission during dry machining; the authors have also proposed a new parameter, named the dust unit ( D u), for use in evaluating the quantity of particle emissions relative to the quantity of chips produced during a machining operation. In this study, a model for predicting the particle emission (dust unit) during orthogonal turning is proposed. This model, which is based on the energy approach combined with the microfriction and the plastic deformation of the material, takes into account the tool geometry, the properties of the worked material, the cutting conditions, and the chip segmentation. The model is validated using experimental results obtained during the orthogonal turning of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, AISI 1018, AISI 4140 steels, and grey cast iron. A good agreement was found with experimental results. This model can help in designing strategies for reducing particle emission during machining processes, at the source.

  15. Analysis of charged particle induced reactions for beam monitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surendra Babu, K. [IOP, Academia Sinica, Taipe, Taiwan (China); Lee, Young-Ouk [Nuclear Data Evaluation Laboratory, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Mukherjee, S., E-mail: smukherjee_msuphy@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390 002 (India)

    2012-07-15

    The reaction cross sections for different residual nuclides produced in the charged particle (p, d, {sup 3}He and {alpha}) induced reactions were calculated and compared with the existing experimental data which are important for beam monitoring and medical diagnostic applications. A detailed literature compilation and comparison were made on the available data sets for the above reactions. These calculations were carried out using the statistical model code TALYS up to 100 MeV, which contains Kalbach's latest systematic for the emission of complex particles and complex particle-induced reactions. All optical model calculations were performed by ECIS-03, which is built into TALYS. The level density, optical model potential parameters were adjusted to get the better description of experimental data. Various pre-equilibrium models were used in the present calculations with default parameters.

  16. Improvement in limit of detection in particle induced X-ray emission by means of rise time and pulse shape discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, Tibor E-mail: tibpapp@netscape.nettibpapp@yahoo.ca; Lakatos, Tamas; Nejedly, Zdenek; Campbell, John L

    2002-04-01

    A digital signal processor, based upon high-rate sampling of the preamplifier output, and equipped with rise time and pulse shape discrimination, has been tested in three situations. This processor provided significant improvement of particle induced X-ray emission and X-ray fluorescence detection limits over the state of the art analog processors, depending on the energy and intensity distribution of the X-ray spectra. Additionally it had a superior performance when measurements were performed in an environment of large electronic noise and in large nuclear background environment. It has also improved the reduction of several artifacts in X-ray spectra.

  17. Detection of special nuclear material from delayed neutron emission induced by a dual-particle monoenergetic source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, M. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I., E-mail: ijov@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2016-06-27

    Detection of unique signatures of special nuclear materials is critical for their interdiction in a variety of nuclear security and nonproliferation scenarios. We report on the observation of delayed neutrons from fission of uranium induced in dual-particle active interrogation based on the {sup 11}B(d,n γ){sup 12}C nuclear reaction. Majority of the fissions are attributed to fast fission induced by the incident quasi-monoenergetic neutrons. A Li-doped glass–polymer composite scintillation neutron detector, which displays excellent neutron/γ discrimination at low energies, was used in the measurements, along with a recoil-based liquid scintillation detector. Time-dependent buildup and decay of delayed neutron emission from {sup 238}U were measured between the interrogating beam pulses and after the interrogating beam was turned off, respectively. Characteristic buildup and decay time profiles were compared to the common parametrization into six delayed neutron groups, finding a good agreement between the measurement and nuclear data. This method is promising for detecting fissile and fissionable materials in cargo scanning applications and can be readily integrated with transmission radiography using low-energy nuclear reaction sources.

  18. Particle emission induced by the interaction of highly charged slow Xe-ions with a SiO2 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiwietz, G.; Skogvall, B.; Schneider, D.; Clark, M.; DeWitt, D.; McDonald, J.

    1991-01-01

    Sputtering of surface atoms by low energy (a few keV) heavy ions is a commonly used technique in material science and applied physics. In general, sputtering occurs via nuclear energy transfer processes and is determined mainly by the atom-atom interaction potentials. In the energy range of interest these potentials depend only slightly on the charge state of one collision partner if the other is neutral. The development of new ion-sources, however, allows for the use of ions with charged states of q > 50. For these highly charged ions it is conceivable that electronic processes come into play as well. If, for example, the density of charged surface atoms exceeds a certain limit, then particle emission can occur via the electrostatic repulsion of target atoms, the so-called Coulomb explosion. Indications for such electronic effects have been found in a few investigations of ion-induced sputtering Si (q q+ ). However, the order of magnitude of this effect is not clear until now. In this work we present preliminary data on sputtering, ion backscattering, electron and photon emission from SiO 2 surface induced by incident Xe ions of very high charge states (q=30--50). The experiment was performed at the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using a time-of-flight (TOF) ion analyzer-system from the Hahn-Meitner-Institute, Berlin

  19. Positron emission zone plate holography for particle tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundogdu, O. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: o.gundogdu@surrey.ac.uk

    2006-01-15

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) is a powerful non-invasive technique that has been used extensively for tracking a single particle. In this paper, we present a study of zone plate holography method in order to track multiple particles, mainly two particles. The main aim is to use as small number of events as possible in the order to make it possible to track particles in fast moving industrial systems. A zone plate with 100% focal efficiency is simulated and applied to the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) data for multiple particle tracking. A simple trajectory code was employed to explore the effects of the nature of the experimental trajectories. A computer holographic reconstruction code that simulates optical reconstruction was developed. The different aspects of the particle location, particle activity ratios for enabling tagging of particles and zone plate and hologram locations are investigated. The effect of the shot noise is investigated and the limitations of the zone plate holography are reported.

  20. Positron emission zone plate holography for particle tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundogdu, O.

    2006-01-01

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) is a powerful non-invasive technique that has been used extensively for tracking a single particle. In this paper, we present a study of zone plate holography method in order to track multiple particles, mainly two particles. The main aim is to use as small number of events as possible in the order to make it possible to track particles in fast moving industrial systems. A zone plate with 100% focal efficiency is simulated and applied to the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) data for multiple particle tracking. A simple trajectory code was employed to explore the effects of the nature of the experimental trajectories. A computer holographic reconstruction code that simulates optical reconstruction was developed. The different aspects of the particle location, particle activity ratios for enabling tagging of particles and zone plate and hologram locations are investigated. The effect of the shot noise is investigated and the limitations of the zone plate holography are reported

  1. Gaseous and particle emissions from an ethanol fumigated compression ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surawski, Nicholas C.; Ristovski, Zoran D.; Brown, Richard J.; Situ, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ethanol fumigation system fitted on a direct injection compression ignition engine. ► Ethanol substitutions up to 40% (by energy) were achieved. ► Gaseous and particle emissions were measured at intermediate speed. ► PM and NO emissions significantly reduced, whilst CO and HC increased. ► The number of particles emitted generally higher with ethanol fumigation. - Abstract: A 4-cylinder Ford 2701C test engine was used in this study to explore the impact of ethanol fumigation on gaseous and particle emission concentrations. The fumigation technique delivered vaporised ethanol into the intake manifold of the engine, using an injector, a pump and pressure regulator, a heat exchanger for vaporising ethanol and a separate fuel tank and lines. Gaseous (Nitric oxide (NO), Carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbons (HC)) and particulate emissions (particle mass (PM 2.5 ) and particle number) testing was conducted at intermediate speed (1700 rpm) using 4 load settings with ethanol substitution percentages ranging from 10% to 40% (by energy). With ethanol fumigation, NO and PM 2.5 emissions were reduced, whereas CO and HC emissions increased considerably and particle number emissions increased at most test settings. It was found that ethanol fumigation reduced the excess air factor for the engine and this led to increased emissions of CO and HC, but decreased emissions of NO. PM 2.5 emissions were reduced with ethanol fumigation, as ethanol has a very low “sooting” tendency. This is due to the higher hydrogen-to-carbon ratio of this fuel, and also because ethanol does not contain aromatics, both of which are known soot precursors. The use of a diesel oxidation catalyst (as an after-treatment device) is recommended to achieve a reduction in the four pollutants that are currently regulated for compression ignition engines. The increase in particle number emissions with ethanol fumigation was due to the formation of volatile (organic) particles

  2. Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission Spectroscopy Over a Broad Range of Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, Hannah; Wilkinson, John; Tighe, Meghanne; McLallen, Walter; McGuire, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    Ion beam analysis is a common application of nuclear physics that allows elemental and isotopic information about materials to be determined from accelerated light ion beams One of the best know ion beam analysis techniques is Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) spectroscopy, which can be used ex vacuo to identify the elements of interest in almost any solid target. The energies of the gamma-rays emitted by excited nuclei will be unique to each element and depend on its nuclear structure. For the most sensitivity, the accelerated ions should exceed the Coulomb barrier of the target, but many isotopes are known to be accessible to PIGE even below the Coulomb barrier. To explore the sensitivity of PIGE across the periodic table, PIGE measurements were made on elements with Z = 5, 9, 11-15, 17, 19-35, 37, 42, 44-48, 53, 56, 60, 62, 73, and 74 using 3.4 MeV protons. These measurements will be compared with literature values and be used as a basis for comparison with higher-energy proton beams available at the University of Notre Dame's St. Andre accelerator when it comes online this Fall. The beam normalization technique of using atmospheric argon and its 1459 keV gamma-ray to better estimate the integrated beam on target will also be discussed. Funded by the NSF REU program and the University of Notre Dame.

  3. Increased sensitivity in thick-target particle induced X-ray emission analyses using dry ashing for preconcentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lill, J.-O.; Harju, L.; Saarela, K.-E.; Lindroos, A.; Heselius, S.-J.

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivity in thick-target particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analyses of biological materials can be enhanced by dry ashing. The gain depends mainly on the mass reduction factor and the composition of the residual ash. The enhancement factor was 7 for the certified reference material Pine Needles and the limits of detection (LODs) were below 0.2 μg/g for Zn, Cu, Rb and Sr. When ashing biological materials with low ash contents such as wood of pine or spruce (0.3% of dry weight) and honey (0.1% of wet weight) the gain was far greater. The LODs for these materials were 30 ng/g for wood and below 10 ng/g for honey. In addition, the ashed samples were more homogenous and more resistant to changes during the irradiation than the original biological samples. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  4. Ion desorption induced by charged particle beams: mechanisms and mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, E.F. da; Schweikert, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    Surface analysis, through desorption, induced by fast particles, is presented and discussed. The stopping of projectils is essentially made by collisions with the target electrons. The desorbed particles are generally emmited with kinetic energy from 0.1 to 20 eV. Mass, charge, velocity and emission angle give information about the surface components, its structure as well as beam-solid interaction processes. Time-of-flight mass spectroscopy of desorbed ions, determine the mass of organic macromolecules and biomolecules. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  5. Iron solubility related to particle sulfur content in source emission and ambient fine particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, M; Ingall, E D; Lai, B; Shafer, M M; Hays, M D; Liu, Z G; Russell, A G; Weber, R J

    2012-06-19

    The chemical factors influencing iron solubility (soluble iron/total iron) were investigated in source emission (e.g., biomass burning, coal fly ash, mineral dust, and mobile exhaust) and ambient (Atlanta, GA) fine particles (PM2.5). Chemical properties (speciation and mixing state) of iron-containing particles were characterized using X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and micro-X-ray fluorescence measurements. Bulk iron solubility (soluble iron/total iron) of the samples was quantified by leaching experiments. Major differences were observed in iron solubility in source emission samples, ranging from low solubility (iron solubility did not correspond to silicon content or Fe(II) content. However, source emission and ambient samples with high iron solubility corresponded to the sulfur content observed in single particles. A similar correspondence between bulk iron solubility and bulk sulfate content in a series of Atlanta PM2.5 fine particle samples (N = 358) further supported this trend. In addition, results of linear combination fitting experiments show the presence of iron sulfates in several high iron solubility source emission and ambient PM2.5 samples. These results suggest that the sulfate content (related to the presence of iron sulfates and/or acid-processing mechanisms by H(2)SO(4)) of iron-containing particles is an important proxy for iron solubility.

  6. Individual metal-bearing particles in a regional haze caused by firecracker and firework emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Weijun [Environment Research Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); State Key of Laboratory of Atmospheric Boundary Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); Shi, Zongbo [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Yan, Chao; Yang, Lingxiao; Dong, Can; Wang, Wenxing [Environment Research Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Intensive firecracker/firework displays during Chinese New Year (CNY) release fine particles and gaseous pollutants into the atmosphere, which may lead to serious air pollution. We monitored ambient PM{sub 2.5} and black carbon (BC) concentrations at a regional background site in the Yellow River Delta region during the CNY in 2011. Our monitoring data and MOUDI images showed that there was a haze event during the CNY. Daily average PM{sub 2.5} concentration reached 183 μg m{sup −3} during the CNY, which was six times higher than that before and after the CNY. Similarly, the black carbon (BC) concentrations were elevated during the CNY. In order to confirm whether the firecracker/firework related emission is the main source of the haze particles, we further analyzed the morphology and chemical composition of individual airborne particles collected before, during and after the CNY by using transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (TEM/EDS). We found that sulfate and organic-rich particles were dominant in the atmosphere before and after the CNY. In contrast, K-rich sulfates and other metal (e.g., Ba-rich, Al-rich, Mg-rich, and Fe-rich) particles were much more abundant than ammoniated sulfate particles during the CNY. These data suggest that it was the aerosol particles from the firecracker/firework emissions that induced the regional haze episode during the CNY. In individual organic and K-rich particles, we often found more than two types of nano-metal particles. These metal-bearing particles also contained abundant S but not Cl. In contrast, fresh metal-bearing particles from firecrackers generated in the laboratory contained abundant Cl with minor amounts of S. This indicates that the firecracker/firework emissions during the CNY significantly changed the atmospheric transformation pathway of SO{sub 2} to sulfate. - Highlights: ► TEM was used to observe the aged individual particles from firecrackers

  7. Individual metal-bearing particles in a regional haze caused by firecracker and firework emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Weijun; Shi, Zongbo; Yan, Chao; Yang, Lingxiao; Dong, Can; Wang, Wenxing

    2013-01-01

    Intensive firecracker/firework displays during Chinese New Year (CNY) release fine particles and gaseous pollutants into the atmosphere, which may lead to serious air pollution. We monitored ambient PM 2.5 and black carbon (BC) concentrations at a regional background site in the Yellow River Delta region during the CNY in 2011. Our monitoring data and MOUDI images showed that there was a haze event during the CNY. Daily average PM 2.5 concentration reached 183 μg m −3 during the CNY, which was six times higher than that before and after the CNY. Similarly, the black carbon (BC) concentrations were elevated during the CNY. In order to confirm whether the firecracker/firework related emission is the main source of the haze particles, we further analyzed the morphology and chemical composition of individual airborne particles collected before, during and after the CNY by using transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (TEM/EDS). We found that sulfate and organic-rich particles were dominant in the atmosphere before and after the CNY. In contrast, K-rich sulfates and other metal (e.g., Ba-rich, Al-rich, Mg-rich, and Fe-rich) particles were much more abundant than ammoniated sulfate particles during the CNY. These data suggest that it was the aerosol particles from the firecracker/firework emissions that induced the regional haze episode during the CNY. In individual organic and K-rich particles, we often found more than two types of nano-metal particles. These metal-bearing particles also contained abundant S but not Cl. In contrast, fresh metal-bearing particles from firecrackers generated in the laboratory contained abundant Cl with minor amounts of S. This indicates that the firecracker/firework emissions during the CNY significantly changed the atmospheric transformation pathway of SO 2 to sulfate. - Highlights: ► TEM was used to observe the aged individual particles from firecrackers/fireworks during the Chinese New

  8. The Particle Number Emission Characteristics of the Diesel Engine with a Catalytic Diesel Particle Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jia Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their adverse health effects and their abundance in urban areas, diesel exhaust ultrafine particles caused by the aftertreatment devices have been of great concern in the past years. An experiment of particles number emissions was carried out on a high-pressure, common rail diesel engine with catalytic diesel particle filter (CDPF to investigate the impact of CDPF on the number emission characteristics of particles. The results indicated that the conversion rates of CDPF is over 97%. The size distributions of particles are bimodal lognormal distributions downstream CDPF at 1400 r/min and 2300 r/min. CDPF has a lower conversion rates on the nucleation mode particles. The geometric number mean diameters of particles downstream CDPF is smaller than that upstream CDPF.

  9. Particle emission in the hydrodynamical description of relativistic nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, F.; Hama, Y.; Kodama, T.

    1994-09-01

    Continuous particle emission during the whole expansion of thermalized matter is studied and a new formula for the observed transverse mass spectrum is derived. In some limit, the usual emission at freeze out scenario (Cooper-Frye formula) may be recovered. In a simplified description of expansion, it is shown that continuous particle emission can lead to a sizable curvature in the pion transverse mass spectrum and parallel slopes for the various particles. These results are compared to experimental data. (author). 26 refs, 3 figs

  10. Dynamical decay of nuclei at high temperature: competition between particle emission and fission decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delagrange, H.; Gregoire, C.; Scheuter, F.; Abe, Y.

    1985-06-01

    A generalized diffusion equation is propounded to follow the time evolution of an excited nucleus towards fission including along the particle decay. This theoretical model is built in order to try to analyse the anomalous behaviour of particle emission observed in many experimental data for heavy-ion induced reactions. Some calculations for the systems 194 Hg, 170 Yb and 248 Cf are presented. A possible extension of this generalized formalism is suggested to deal more consistently with the experimental data. 52 refs. 10 figs.

  11. Physical characterization of the fine particle emissions from commercial aircraft engines during the Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (APEX) 1-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, John S.; Dong, Yuanji; Williams, D. Craig; Logan, Russell

    2010-06-01

    The fine particulate matter (PM) emissions from nine commercial aircraft engine models were determined by plume sampling during the three field campaigns of the Aircraft Particle Emissions Experiment (APEX). Ground-based measurements were made primarily at 30 m behind the engine for PM mass and number concentration, particle size distribution, and total volatile matter using both time-integrated and continuous sampling techniques. The experimental results showed a PM mass emission index (EI) ranging from 10 to 550 mg kg -1 fuel depending on engine type and test parameters as well as a characteristic U-shaped curve of the mass EI with increasing fuel flow for the turbofan engines tested. Also, the Teflon filter sampling indicated that ˜40-80% of the total PM mass on a test-average basis was comprised of volatile matter (sulfur and organics) for most engines sampled. The number EIs, on the other hand, varied from ˜10 15 to 10 17 particles kg -1 fuel with the turbofan engines exhibiting a logarithmic decay with increasing fuel flow. Finally, the particle size distributions of the emissions exhibited a single primary mode that were lognormally distributed with a minor accumulation mode also observed at higher powers for all engines tested. The geometric (number) mean particle diameter ranged from 9.4 to 37 nm and the geometric standard deviation ranged from 1.3 to 2.3 depending on engine type, fuel flow, and test conditions.

  12. PAH, BTEX, carbonyl compound, black-carbon, NO2 and ultrafine particle dynamometer bench emissions for Euro 4 and Euro 5 diesel and gasoline passenger cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Cédric; Liu, Yao; Tassel, Patrick; Perret, Pascal; Chaumond, Agnès; André, Michel

    2016-09-01

    Although implementing Diesel particulate filters (DPF) and other novel aftertreatment technologies makes it possible to achieve significant reductions in particle mass emissions, it may induce the release of ultrafine particles and emissions of many other unregulated compounds. This paper focuses on (i) ultrafine particles, black carbon, BTEX, PAH, carbonyl compounds, and NO2 emissions from Euro 4 and Euro 5 Diesel and gasoline passenger cars, (ii) the influence of driving conditions (e.g., cold start, urban, rural and motorway conditions), and (iii) the impact of additive and catalysed DPF devices on vehicle emissions. Chassis dynamometer tests were conducted on four Euro 5 vehicles and two Euro 4 vehicles: gasoline vehicles with and without direct injection system and Diesel vehicles equipped with additive and catalysed particulate filters. The results showed that compared to hot-start cycles, cold-start urban cycles increased all pollutant emissions by a factor of two. The sole exception was NO2, which was reduced by a factor of 1.3-6. Particulate and black carbon emissions from the gasoline engines were significantly higher than those from the Diesel engines equipped with DPF. Moreover, the catalysed DPF emitted about 3-10 times more carbonyl compounds and particles than additive DPF, respectively, during urban driving cycles, while the additive DPF vehicles emitted 2 and 5 times more BTEX and carbonyl compounds during motorway driving cycles. Regarding particle number distribution, the motorway driving cycle induced the emission of particles smaller in diameter (mode at 15 nm) than the urban cold-start cycle (mode at 80-100 nm). The results showed a clear positive correlation between particle, black carbon, and BTEX emissions, and a negative correlation between particles and NO2.

  13. Measurement of double differential cross sections of charged particle emission reactions by incident DT neutrons. Correction for energy loss of charged particle in sample materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Hiroyuki; Terada, Yasuaki; Murata, Isao; Takahashi, Akito

    2000-01-01

    In the measurement of charged particle emission spectrum induced by neutrons, correcting the energy loss of charged particle in sample materials becomes a very important inverse problem. To deal with this inverse problem, we have applied the Bayesian unfolding method to correct the energy loss, and tested the performance of the method. Although this method is very simple, it was confirmed from the test that the performance was not inferior to other methods at all, and therefore the method could be a powerful tool for charged particle spectrum measurement. (author)

  14. Summary report of the first research coordination meeting on development of a reference database for particle-induced gamma ray emission (PIGE) spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abriola, D.; Pedro de Jesus, A.

    2011-07-01

    The First Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Development of a Reference Database for Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) Spectroscopy' was held at the IAEA, Vienna, from 16-20 May 2011. A summary of the participants' presentations is given as well as background information, objectives and recommendations concerning approach and methodology. The extension of the IBANDL database format to include PIGE data was discussed. The different tasks to achieve the CRP objectives were assigned to participants. A list of priority measurements was produced and the individual sets of measurements assigned to participants. (author)

  15. [Particle emission characteristics of diesel bus fueled with bio-diesel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Di-Ming; Chen, Feng; Hu, Zhi-Yuan; Tan, Pi-Qiang; Hu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    With the use of the Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer (EEPS), a study on the characteristics of particle emissions was carried out on a China-IV diesel bus fueled with blends of 5% , 10% , 20% , 50% bio-diesel transformed from restaurant waste oil and China-IV diesel (marked separately by BD5, BD10, BD20, BD50), pure bio-diesel (BD100) and pure diesel (BD0). The results indicated that particulate number (PN) and mass (PM) emissions of bio-diesel blends increased with the increase in bus speed and acceleration; with increasing bio-diesel content, particulate emissions displayed a relevant declining trend. In different speed ranges, the size distribution of particulate number emissions (PNSD) was bimodal; in different acceleration ranges, PNSD showed a gradual transition from bimodal shape to unimodal when bus operation was switched from decelerating to accelerating status. Bio-diesel blends with higher mixture ratios showed significant reduction in PN emissions for accumulated modes, and the particulate number emission peaks moved towards smaller sizes; but little change was obtained in PN emissions for nuclei modes; reduction also occurred in particle geometric diameter (Dg).

  16. Therapeutic application of metallic nanoparticles combined with particle-induced x-ray emission effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong-Ki; Seo, Seung-Jun [Biomedical Engineering and Radiology, School of Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu 705-034 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki-Hong [Department of Optometry and Visual Sciences, Catholic University of Daegu, Kyungsan 712-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-Jeong [Applied Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyungpuk National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Myung-Hwan; Kim, Kye-Ryung [Proton Engineering Frontier Project, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Tae-Keun, E-mail: jkkim@cu.ac.kr [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-22

    Metallic nanoparticles (MNP) are able to release localized x-rays when activated with a high energy proton beam by the particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) effect. The exploitation of this phenomenon in the therapeutic irradiation of tumors has been investigated. PIXE-based x-ray emission directed at CT26 tumor cells in vitro, when administered with either gold (average diameter 2 and 13 nm) or iron (average diameter 14 nm) nanoparticles (GNP or SNP), increased with MNP solution concentration over the range of 0.1-2 mg ml{sup -1}. With irradiation by a 45 MeV proton therapy (PT) beam, higher concentrations had a decreased cell survival fraction. An in vivo study in CT26 mouse tumor models with tumor regression assay demonstrated significant tumor dose enhancement, thought to be a result of the PIXE effect when compared to conventional PT without MNP (radiation-only group) using a 45 MeV proton beam (p < 0.02). Those receiving GNP or SNP injection doses of 300 mg kg{sup -1} body weight before proton beam therapy demonstrated 90% or 75% tumor volume reduction (TVR) in 20 days post-PT while the radiation-only group showed only 18% TVR and re-growth of tumor volume after 20 days. Higher complete tumor regression (CTR) was observed in 14-24 days after a single treatment of PT with an average rate of 33-65% for those receiving MNP compared with 25% for the radiation-only group. A lower bound of therapeutic effective MNP concentration range, in vivo, was estimated as 30-79 {mu}g g{sup -1} tissue for both gold and iron nanoparticles. The tumor dose enhancement may compensate for an increase in entrance dose associated with conventional PT when treating large, solid tumors with a spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) technique. The use of a combined high energy Bragg peak PT with PIXE generated by MNP, or PIXE alone, may result in new treatment options for infiltrative metastatic tumors and other diffuse inflammatory diseases.

  17. Probing Atmospheric Electric Fields through Radio Emission from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Olaf; Trinh, Gia; Buitink, Stijn; Corstanje, Arthur; Ebert, Ute; Enriquez, Emilio; Falcke, Heino; Hoerandel, Joerg; Nelles, Anna; Schellart, Pim; Rachen, Joerg; Rutjes, Casper; ter Veen, Sander; Rossetto, Laura; Thoudam, Satyendra

    2016-01-01

    Energetic cosmic rays impinging on the atmosphere create a particle avalanche called an extensive air shower. In the leading plasma of this shower electric currents are induced that generate coherent radio wave emission that has been detected with LOFAR, a large and dense array of simple radio

  18. L X-ray emission induced by heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajek, M. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Banaś, D., E-mail: d.banas@ujk.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Semaniak, J. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Fijał-Kirejczyk, I. [The Institute of Atomic Energy, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Jaskóła, M.; Czarnacki, W.; Korman, A. [The National Centre for Nuclear Research, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Kretschmer, W. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Mukoyama, T. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Trautmann, D. [Institut für Physik, Universität Basel, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-11-15

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique is usually applied using typically 1 MeV to 3 MeV protons or helium ions, for which the ion-atom interaction is dominated by the single ionization process. For heavier ions the multiple ionization plays an increasingly important role and this process can influence substantially both the X-ray spectra and atomic decay rates. Additionally, the subshell coupling effects are important for the L- and M-shells ionized by heavy ions. Here we discuss the main features of the X-ray emission induced by heavy ions which are important for PIXE applications, namely, the effects of X-ray line shifts and broadening, vacancy rearrangement and change of the fluorescence and Coster–Kronig yields in multiple ionized atoms. These effects are illustrated here by the results of the measurements of L X-ray emission from heavy atoms bombarded by 6 MeV to 36 MeV Si ions, which were reported earlier. The strong L-subshell coupling effects are observed, in particular L{sub 2}-subshell, which can be accounted for within the coupling subshell model (CSM) developed within the semiclassical approximation. Finally, the prospects to use heavy ions in PIXE analysis are discussed.

  19. Changes in the surface electronic states of semiconductor fine particles induced by high energy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaki, Tetsuya; Asai, Keisuke; Ishigure, Kenkichi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Shibata, Hiromi

    1997-03-01

    The changes in the surface electronic states of Q-sized semiconductor particles in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films, induced by high energy ion irradiation, were examined by observation of ion induced emission and photoluminescence (PL). Various emission bands attributed to different defect sites in the band gap were observed at the initial irradiation stage. As the dose increased, the emissions via the trapping sites decreased in intensity while the band-edge emission developed. This suggests that the ion irradiation would remove almost all the trapping sites in the band gap. The low energy emissions, which show a multiexponential decay, were due to a donor-acceptor recombination between the deeply trapped carriers. It was found that the processes of formation, reaction, and stabilization of the trapping sites would predominantly occur under the photooxidizing conditions. (author)

  20. Summary Report of the 3rd Research Coordination Meeting on Development of a Reference Database for Particle-Induced Gamma ray Emission (PIGE) Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitriou, P.; Pedro de Jesus, A.

    2014-05-01

    The Third Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on “Development of a Reference Database for Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) Spectroscopy” was held at the IAEA, Vienna, from 7 to 11 April 2014. Participants reviewed the progress made since the previous RCM and agreed upon the work that remains to be done by the end of the CRP. The contents of the final Technical Document were discussed and individual chapters were assigned. The summaries of participants’ presentations as well as the technical discussions and the list of assigned tasks are included in this report. (author)

  1. Light absorption by primary particle emissions from a lignite burning plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, T.C.; Bussemer, M.; Wehner, B.; Keller, S.; Charlson, R.J.; Heintzenberg, J.

    1999-01-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols from the burning of fossil fuels contribute to climate forcing by both scattering and absorbing solar radiation, and estimates of climate forcing by light-absorbing primary particles have recently been published. While the mass and optical properties of emissions are needed for these studies, the available measurements do not characterize the low-technology burning that is thought to contribute a large fraction of light-absorbing material to the global budget. The authors have measured characteristics of particulate matter (PM) emitted from a small, low-technology lignite-burning plant. The PM emission factor is comparable to those used to calculate emission inventories of light-absorbing particles. However, the fine fraction, the absorbing fraction, and the absorption efficiency of the emissions are substantially below assumptions that have been made in inventories of black carbon emissions and calculations of climate forcing. The measurements suggest that nonblack, light-absorbing particles are emitted from low-technology coal burning. As the burning rate increases, the emitted absorption cross-section decreases, and the wavelength dependence of absorption becomes closer to that of black particles

  2. Size-resolved particle emission factors for individual ships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Åsa M.; Westerlund, Jonathan; Hallquist, Mattias

    2011-07-01

    In these experiments size-resolved emission factors for particle number (EFPN) and mass (EFPM) have been determined for 734 individual ship passages for real-world dilution. The method used is an extractive sampling method of the passing ship plumes where particle number/mass and CO2 were measured with high time resolution (1 Hz). The measurements were conducted on a small island located in the entrance to the port of Gothenburg (N57.6849, E11.838), the largest harbor in Scandinavia. This is an emission control area (ECA) and in close vicinity to populated areas. The average EFPN and EFPM were 2.55 ± 0.11 × 1016 (kg fuel)-1 and 2050 ± 110 mg (kg fuel)-1, respectively. The determined EF for ships with multiple passages showed a great reproducibility. Size-resolved EFPN were peaking at small particle sizes ˜35 nm. Smaller particle sizes and hence less mass were observed by a gas turbine equipped ship compared to diesel engine equipped ships. On average 36 to 46% of the emitted particles by number were non-volatile and 24% by mass (EFPN 1.16 ± 0.19 × 1016 [kg fuel]-1 and EFPM 488 ± 73 mg [kg fuel]-1, respectively). This study shows a great potential to gain large data-sets regarding ship emission determining parameters that can improve current dispersion modeling for health assessments on local and regional scales. The global contributions of total and non-volatile particle mass from shipping using this extensive data-set from an ECA were estimated to be at least 0.80 Tgy-1 and 0.19 Tgy-1.

  3. Particle Emissions from Biomass Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szpila, Aneta; Bohgard, Mats [Lund Inst. of Technology (Sweden). Div. of Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology; Strand, Michael; Lillieblad, Lena; Sanati, Mehri [Vaexjoe Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Bioenergy Technology; Pagels, Joakim; Rissler, Jenny; Swietlicki, Erik; Gharibi, Arash [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Physics

    2003-05-01

    particle number concentration increased slightly with increasing load, at the same time the fine mode particles became smaller. This was probably caused by different degree of particle coagulation as the residence time in the boiler was changed. The mean diameter during combustion of forest residue was around 100 nm compared to 70-80 nm for dry wood and pellets, while the total number was close to constant. This explains the differences in mass concentration found in the impactor measurements. The concentrations of CO and THC was highest for the dry wood fuel, the PAH concentration was highest for pellets combustion in boiler 4, however this boiler was poorly tuned at the time of measurement. The PAH concentration was 5 times higher during combustion of dry wood compared to forest residue. The concentration of CO, THC and PAH varied to a great extend. The high concentrations were measured in boilers running at a low load. The concentration of particle organic carbon was less than 15% of PMI for all fuels. However we used heated primary dilution, which inhibits the condensation of organic components into, the particle phase. A significant fraction of the emitted organic carbon may condense to the particle phase during dilution after the stack or after being oxidized in the atmosphere. We also measured elemental carbon in the particle phase. The contribution to PM1 was as high as 25-30% during pellets combustion at low load and 8% at low load during combustion of dry wood. In all other cases the EC-concentration was less than 3% of PMI. PIXE and lon-chromatography confirmed that alkali-salts were the dominant chemical species. PIXE analysis revealed that emitted amounts of heavy metals such as Zn, Cd and Pb are strongly dependent on the type of the fuel used. Forest residues gave high emissions of Zn, Cd and Pb, while pellets gave very high emissions of Cd and Zn. The fuel with the lowest emissions of heavy metals was dry wood. This again could be related to ash content in

  4. Composition of Renaissance paint layers: simultaneous particle induced X-ray emission and backscattering spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Viguerie, L; Beck, L; Salomon, J; Pichon, L; Walter, Ph

    2009-10-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE) is now routinely used in the field of cultural heritage. Various setups have been developed to investigate the elemental composition of wood/canvas paintings or of cross-section samples. However, it is not possible to obtain information concerning the quantity of organic binder. Backscattering spectrometry (BS) can be a useful complementary method to overcome this limitation. In the case of paint layers, PIXE brings the elemental composition (major elements to traces) and the BS spectrum can give access to the proportion of pigment and binder. With the use of 3 MeV protons for PIXE and BS simultaneously, it was possible to perform quantitative analysis including C and O for which the non-Rutherford cross sections are intense. Furthermore, with the use of the same conditions for PIXE and BS, the experiment time and the potential damage by the ion beam were reduced. The results obtained with the external beam of the Accélérateur Grand Louvre pour l'Analyse Elementaire (AGLAE) facility on various test painting samples and on cross sections from Italian Renaissance masterpieces are shown. Simultaneous combination of PIXE and BS leads to a complete characterization of the paint layers: elemental composition and proportion of the organic binder have been determined and thus provide useful information about ancient oil painting recipes.

  5. Phenomenological model for non-equilibrium deuteron emission in nucleon induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broeders, C.H.M.; Konobeyev, A.Yu.

    2005-01-01

    A new approach is proposed for the calculation of non-equilibrium deuteron energy distributions in nuclear reactions induced by nucleons of intermediate energies. It combines the model of the nucleon pick-up, the coalescence and the deuteron knock-out. Emission and absorption rates for excited particles are described by the pre-equilibrium hybrid model. The model of Sato, Iwamoto, Harada is used to describe the nucleon pick-up and the coalescence of nucleons from the exciton configurations starting from (2p, 1h). The model of deuteron knock-out is formulated taking into account the Pauli principle for the nucleon-deuteron interaction inside a nucleus. The contribution of the direct nucleon pick-up is described phenomenologically. The multiple pre-equilibrium emission of particles is taken into account. The calculated deuteron energy distributions are compared with experimental data from 12 C to 209 Bi. (orig.)

  6. Consistent interpretation of neutron-induced charged-particle emission in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermsdorf, D.

    1982-06-01

    Users requesting gas production cross sections for Silicon will be confronted with serious discrepancies taking evaluated data as well as experimental ones. To clarify the accuracies achieved at present in experiments and evaluations in this paper an intercomparison of different evaluated nuclear data files has been carried out resulting in recommendations for improvements of these files. The analysis of the experimental data base also shows contradictory measurements or in most cases a lack of data. So an interpretation of reliable measured data in terms of nuclear reaction theories has been done using statistical and direct reaction mechanism models. This study results in a consistent and comprehensive evaluated data set for neutron-induced charged-particle production in Silicon which will be incorporated in file 2015 of the SOKRATOR library. (author)

  7. On particle emission in the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maedler, P.

    1984-01-01

    Investigations of fast particle emission in the time-dependent Hartree-Fock mean-field approximation (TDHF) have been performed for one-dimensional slab collisions. For a fixed target mass number and incident velocity the total yields of PEP exhibit pronounced srtructures as a function of the pro ectile mass number, which strongly correcate with the binding energy of the last nucleon in the projectnle. This is in explicit disagreement with experiment. The conclusion has been drawn that the Fermi-jet mechanism cannot be responsible for most of the fast particles observed in experiment, even if quantum diffraction is taken into account (as in TDHF). After PEP emission large amplitude density oscillations, which are the only possible modes in the slab geometry, are found to be damped by further particle emission

  8. Positron Emission Tomography Particle tracking using cluster analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundogdu, O.

    2004-01-01

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking was successfully used in a wide range of industrial applications. This technique primarily uses a single positron emitting tracer particle. However, using multiple particles would provide more comparative information about the physical processes taking place in a system such as mixing or fluidised beds. In this paper, a unique method that enables us to track more than one particle is presented. This method is based on the midpoint of the closest distance between two trajectories or coincidence vectors. The technique presented in this paper employs a clustering method

  9. Positron Emission Tomography Particle tracking using cluster analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundogdu, O. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: o.gundogdu@surrey.ac.uk

    2004-12-01

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking was successfully used in a wide range of industrial applications. This technique primarily uses a single positron emitting tracer particle. However, using multiple particles would provide more comparative information about the physical processes taking place in a system such as mixing or fluidised beds. In this paper, a unique method that enables us to track more than one particle is presented. This method is based on the midpoint of the closest distance between two trajectories or coincidence vectors. The technique presented in this paper employs a clustering method.

  10. [Air Dielectric Barrier Discharge Emission Spectrum Measurement and Particle Analysis of Discharge Process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shuang-yan; Jin, Xing; Zhang, Peng

    2016-02-01

    The emission spectrum detection and diagnosis is one of the most common methods of application to the plasma. It provides wealth of information of the chemical and physical process of the plasma. The analysis of discharge plasma dynamic behavior plays an important role in the study of gas discharge mechanism and application. An air dielectric discharge spectrum measuring device was designed and the emission spectrum data was measured under the experimental condition. The plasma particles evolution was analyzed from the emission spectrum. The numerical calculation model was established and the density equation, energy transfer equation and the Boltzmann equation was coupled to analyze the change of the particle density to explain the emission spectrum characteristics. The results are that the particle density is growing with the increasing of reduced electric field. The particle density is one or two orders of magnitude difference for the same particle at the same moment for the reduced electric field of 40, 60 or 80 Td. A lot of N₂ (A³), N₂ (A³) and N₂ (C³) particles are generated by the electric field excitation. However, it transforms quickly due to the higher energy level. The transformation returns to the balance after the discharge of 10⁻⁶ s. The emission spectrometer measured in the experiments is mostly generated by the transition of excited nitrogen. The peak concentration of O₂ (A¹), O₂ (B¹) and O₂ (A³ ∑⁺u) is not low compared to the excited nitrogen molecules. These particles energy is relatively low and the transition spectral is longer. The spectrometer does not capture the oxygen emission spectrum. And the peak concentration of O particles is small, so the transition emission spectrum is weak. The calculation results of the stabled model can well explain the emission spectrum data.

  11. Environmental aspects of ion-induced x-ray emission by infinitely thick targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Rinsvelt, H.A.; Dunnam, F.E.; Russell, J.P.; Bolch, W.E.

    1974-01-01

    Elemental analysis through proton and alpha particle induced x-ray emission by infinitely thick samples of environmental interest was found to be feasible. A quantization technique using internal standards and the optimization of the beam energy for optimal sensitivity were investigated. The average limit of detection ranges from about 0.1 ppM for calcium to 1 ppM for strontium

  12. Size-resolved particle number emission patterns under real-world driving conditions using positive matrix factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Sáez, Aida; Viana, Mar; Barrios, Carmen C; Rubio, Jose R; Amato, Fulvio; Pujadas, Manuel; Querol, Xavier

    2012-10-16

    A novel on-board system was tested to characterize size-resolved particle number emission patterns under real-world driving conditions, running in a EURO4 diesel vehicle and in a typical urban circuit in Madrid (Spain). Emission profiles were determined as a function of driving conditions. Source apportionment by Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was carried out to interpret the real-world driving conditions. Three emission patterns were identified: (F1) cruise conditions, with medium-high speeds, contributing in this circuit with 60% of total particle number and a particle size distribution dominated by particles >52 nm and around 60 nm; (F2) transient conditions, stop-and-go conditions at medium-high speed, contributing with 25% of the particle number and mainly emitting particles in the nucleation mode; and (F3) creep-idle conditions, representing traffic congestion and frequent idling periods, contributing with 14% to the total particle number and with particles in the nucleation mode (emissions depending on particle size and driving conditions. Differences between real-world emission patterns and regulatory cycles (NEDC) are also presented, which evidence that detecting particle number emissions real-world driving conditions.

  13. Optimization of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for coal powder analysis with different particle flow diameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Shunchun, E-mail: epscyao@scut.edu.cn [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510640 (China); State Key Laboratory of Pulsed Power Laser Technology, Electronic Engineering Institute, Hefei 230037 (China); Xu, Jialong; Dong, Xuan; Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Jianping [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510640 (China); Lu, Jidong, E-mail: jdlu@scut.edu.cn [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510640 (China)

    2015-08-01

    The on-line measurement of coal is extremely useful for emission control and combustion process optimization in coal-fired plant. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was employed to directly analyze coal particle flow. A set of tapered tubes were proposed for beam-focusing the coal particle flow to different diameters. For optimizing the measurement of coal particle flow, the characteristics of laser-induced plasma, including optical breakdown, the relative standard deviation of repeated measurement, partial breakdown spectra ratio and line intensity, were carefully analyzed. The comparison of the plasma characteristics among coal particle flow with different diameters showed that air breakdown and the random change in plasma position relative to the collection optics could significantly influence on the line intensity and the reproducibility of measurement. It is demonstrated that the tapered tube with a diameter of 5.5 mm was particularly useful to enrich the coal particles in laser focus spot as well as to reduce the influence of air breakdown and random changes of plasma in the experiment. - Highlights: • Tapered tube was designed for beam-focusing the coal particle flow as well as enriching the particles in laser focus spot. • The characteristics of laser-induced plasma of coal particle flow were investigated carefully. • An appropriate diameter of coal particle flow was proven to benefit for improving the performance of LIBS measurement.

  14. Improved field emission performance of carbon nanotube by introducing copper metallic particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yiren

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To improve the field emission performance of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, a simple and low-cost method was adopted in this article. We introduced copper particles for decorating the CNTs so as to form copper particle-CNT composites. The composites were fabricated by electrophoretic deposition technique which produced copper metallic particles localized on the outer wall of CNTs and deposited them onto indium tin oxide (ITO electrode. The results showed that the conductivity increased from 10-5 to 4 × 10-5 S while the turn-on field was reduced from 3.4 to 2.2 V/μm. Moreover, the field emission current tended to be undiminished after continuous emission for 24 h. The reasons were summarized that introducing copper metallic particles to decorate CNTs could increase the surface roughness of the CNTs which was beneficial to field emission, restrain field emission current from saturating when the applied electric field was above the critical field. In addition, it could also improve the electrical contact by increasing the contact area between CNT and ITO electrode that was beneficial to the electron transport and avoided instable electron emission caused by thermal injury of CNTs.

  15. Particle Morphology From Wood-Burning Cook Stoves Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, O.; Carabali, G.; Castro, T.; Torres, R.; Ruiz, L. G.; Molina, L. T.; Saavedra, I.

    2013-12-01

    Emissions from three wood-burning cook stoves were sampled to collect particles. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) copper grids were placed on the last two stages of an 8-stage MOUDI cascade impactor (d50= 0.32, and 0.18 μm). Samples were obtained on two heating stages of cooking, the first is a quick heating process to boil 1 liter of water, and the second is to keep the water at 90 C. Absorption coefficient, scattering coefficients, and particles concentration (0.01 - 2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter) were measured simultaneously using an absorption photometer (operated at 550 nm), a portable integrating nephelometer (at 530 nm), and a condensation particle counter connected to a chamber to dilute the wood stoves emissions. Transmission electron micrographic images of soot particles were acquired at different magnifications using a High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM) JEOL HRTEM 4000EX operating at 200 kV, equipped with a GATAN digital micrograph system for image acquisition. The morphology of soot particles was analyzed calculating the border-based fractal dimension (Df). Particles sampled on the first heating stage exhibit complex shapes with high values of Df, which are present as aggregates formed by carbon ceno-spheres. The presence of high numbers of carbon ceno-spheres can be attributed to pyrolysis, thermal degradation, and others processes prior to combustion. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to determine the elemental composition of particles. EDS analysis in particles with d50= 0.18 μm showed a higher content of carbonaceous material and relevant amounts of Si, S and K.

  16. Visible laser induced positive ion emissions from NaCl nanoparticles prepared by droplet rapid drying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Mao-Xu; Guo, Deng-Zhu; Xing, Ying-Jie; Zhang, Geng-Min

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► NaCl nanoparticles were firstly prepared by heat induced explosion on silicon wafer. ► We found that laser induced ion emissions from NaCl nanoparticles are more prominent. ► We found that water adsorption can efficiently enhance laser induced ion emissions. ► The ultra-photothermal effect in NaCl nanoparticles was observed and explained. - Abstract: A novel convenient way for the formation of sodium chloride (NaCl) nanoparticles on silicon wafer is proposed by using a droplet rapid drying method. The laser induced positive ion emissions from NaCl nanoparticles with and without water treatment is demonstrated by using a laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer, with laser intensity well below the plasma formation threshold. It is found that the positive ion emissions from NaCl nanoparticles are obviously higher than that from microsize NaCl particles under soft 532 nm laser irradiations, and water adsorption can efficiently enhance the ion emissions from NaCl nanoparticles. The initial kinetic energies of the emitted ions are estimated as 16–17 eV. The synergy of the ultra-thermal effect in nanomaterials, the defect-mediated multiphoton processes, and the existence of intermediate states in NaCl-water interfaces are suggested as the mechanisms.

  17. A new setup for the investigation of swift heavy ion induced particle emission and surface modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinerzhagen, F.; Breuer, L.; Bukowska, H.; Herder, M.; Schleberger, M.; Wucher, A. [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Duisburg-Essen and Cenide, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Bender, M.; Severin, D. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Lebius, H. [CIMAP (CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-UCN), 14070 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

    2016-01-15

    The irradiation with fast ions with kinetic energies of >10 MeV leads to the deposition of a high amount of energy along their trajectory (up to several ten keV/nm). The energy is mainly transferred to the electronic subsystem and induces different secondary processes of excitations, which result in significant material modifications. A new setup to study these ion induced effects on surfaces will be described in this paper. The setup combines a variable irradiation chamber with different techniques of surface characterizations like scanning probe microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion, and neutral mass spectrometry, as well as low energy electron diffraction under ultra high vacuum conditions, and is mounted at a beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) of the GSI facility in Darmstadt, Germany. Here, samples can be irradiated with high-energy ions with a total kinetic energy up to several GeVs under different angles of incidence. Our setup enables the preparation and in situ analysis of different types of sample systems ranging from metals to insulators. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry enables us to study the chemical composition of the surface, while scanning probe microscopy allows a detailed view into the local electrical and morphological conditions of the sample surface down to atomic scales. With the new setup, particle emission during irradiation as well as persistent modifications of the surface after irradiation can thus be studied. We present first data obtained with the new setup, including a novel measuring protocol for time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the GSI UNILAC accelerator.

  18. Beta delayed particle emission in light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riisager, K.; Gabelmann, H.

    1991-01-01

    A short discussion of theoretical treatments of beta delayed particle emission is followed by a presentation of data on the newly found beta delayed deuteron decay of 6 He. This decay cannot be described properly with existing theories. (author) 8 refs.; 3 figs

  19. The influence of design and fuel parameters on the particle emissions from wood pellets combustion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiinikka, Henrik; Gebart, Rikard [Energy Technology Centre, Piteaa (Sweden)

    2005-02-01

    Combustion of solid biomass under fixed bed conditions is a common technique to generate heat and power in both small and large scale grate furnaces (domestic boilers, stoves, district heating plants). Unfortunately, combustion of biomass will generate particle emissions containing both large fly ash particles and fine particles that consist of fly ash and soot. The large fly ash particles have been produced from fusion of non-volatile ash-forming species in burning char particle. The inorganic fine particles have been produced from nucleation of volatilised ash elements (K, Na, S, Cl and Zn). If the combustion is incomplete, soot particles are also produced from secondary reaction of tar. The particles in the fine fraction grows by coagulation and coalescence to a particle diameter around 0.1 pm. Since the smallest particles are very hard to collect in ordinary cleaning devices they contribute to the ambient air pollution. Furthermore, fine airborne particles have been correlated to adverse effects on the human health. It is therefore essential to minimize particle formation from the combustion process and thereby reduce the emissions of particulates to the ambient air. The aim with this project is to study particle emissions from small scale combustion of wood pellets and to investigate the impact of different operating, construction and fuel parameters on the amount and characteristic of the combustion generated particles. To address these issues, experiments were carried out in a 10 kW updraft fired wood pellets reactor that has been custom designed for systematic investigations of particle emissions. In the flue gas stack, particle emissions were sampled on a filter. The particle mass and number size distributions were analysed by a low pressure cascade impactor and a SMPS (Scanning Electron Mobility Particle Sizer). The results showed that the temperature and the flow pattern in the combustion zone affect the particle emissions. Increasing combustion

  20. Morphology and Optical Properties of Black-Carbon Particles Relevant to Engine Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen, H. A.; Bambha, R.; Dansson, M. A.; Schrader, P. E.

    2013-12-01

    Black-carbon particles are believed to have a large influence on climate through direct radiative forcing, reduction of surface albedo of snow and ice in the cryosphere, and interaction with clouds. The optical properties and morphology of atmospheric particles containing black carbon are uncertain, and characterization of black carbon resulting from engines emissions is needed. Refractory black-carbon particles found in the atmosphere are often coated with unburned fuel, sulfuric acid, water, ash, and other combustion by-products and atmospheric constituents. Coatings can alter the optical and physical properties of the particles and therefore change their optical properties and cloud interactions. Details of particle morphology and coating state can also have important effects on the interpretation of optical diagnostics. A more complete understanding of how coatings affect extinction, absorption, and incandescence measurements is needed before these techniques can be applied reliably to a wide range of particles. We have investigated the effects of coatings on the optical and physical properties of combustion-generated black-carbon particles using a range of standard particle diagnostics, extinction, and time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (LII) measurements. Particles were generated in a co-flow diffusion flame, extracted, cooled, and coated with oleic acid. The diffusion flame produces highly dendritic soot aggregates with similar properties to those produced in diesel engines, diffusion flames, and most natural combustion processes. A thermodenuder was used to remove the coating. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used to monitor aggregate sizes; a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA) was used to measure coating mass fractions, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to characterize particle morphologies. The results demonstrate important differences in optical measurements between coated and uncoated particles.

  1. Geometry and dynamics of particle emission from strongly deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleshin, V.P.

    1995-01-01

    By using our semiclassical approach to particle evaporation from deformed nuclei, we analyze the heuristic models of particle emission from deformed nuclei which are used in the codes GANES, ALICE, and EVAP. The calculations revealed that the heuristic models are reasonable for particle energy spectra but fail, at large deformations, to describe the angular distributions

  2. K-shell X-ray production cross sections of Ni induced by protons, alpha-particles, and He{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertol, A.P.L. [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Hinrichs, R. [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Geociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vasconcellos, M.A.Z., E-mail: marcos@if.ufrgs.br [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    The proton, alpha-particle, and He{sup +} induced X-ray emissions of Ni were measured on mono-elemental thin films in order to obtain the K-shell X-ray production cross section in the energy range of 0.7–2.0 MeV for protons, 4.0–6.5 MeV for alpha-particles, and 3.0–4.0 MeV for He{sup +}. The proton-induced X-ray production cross section for Ni agreed well with the theoretical values, endorsing the quality of the measurements. The X-ray production cross section induced with alpha-particles is in good agreement with ECPSSR theory in the complete range of energies, while for He{sup +} that quantity is systematically below. K{sub β}/K{sub α} ratios were evaluated and compared with experimental and theoretical values.

  3. Particle emission rates during electrostatic spray deposition of TiO2 nanoparticle-based photoactive coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Antti J; Jensen, Alexander C Ø; Kling, Kirsten I; Kling, Jens; Budtz, Hans Christian; Koponen, Ismo K; Tuinman, Ilse; Hussein, Tareq; Jensen, Keld A; Nørgaard, Asger; Levin, Marcus

    2018-01-05

    Here, we studied the particle release rate during Electrostatic spray deposition of anatase-(TiO 2 )-based photoactive coating onto tiles and wallpaper using a commercially available electrostatic spray device. Spraying was performed in a 20.3m 3 test chamber while measuring concentrations of 5.6nm to 31μm-size particles and volatile organic compounds (VOC), as well as particle deposition onto room surfaces and on the spray gun user hand. The particle emission and deposition rates were quantified using aerosol mass balance modelling. The geometric mean particle number emission rate was 1.9×10 10 s -1 and the mean mass emission rate was 381μgs -1 . The respirable mass emission-rate was 65% lower than observed for the entire measured size-range. The mass emission rates were linearly scalable (±ca. 20%) to the process duration. The particle deposition rates were up to 15h -1 for deposited particles consisted of mainly TiO 2 , TiO 2 mixed with Cl and/or Ag, TiO 2 particles coated with carbon, and Ag particles with size ranging from 60nm to ca. 5μm. As expected, no significant VOC emissions were observed as a result of spraying. Finally, we provide recommendations for exposure model parameterization. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Enhanced emission of non-compound light particles in the reaction plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, M.B.

    1984-01-01

    In an experiment performed at the K500 cyclotron at Michigan State University, light particles in coincidence with two fission fragments for 14 N induced reactions on 197 Au at 420 MeV incident energy have been measured. The fission fragments were detected with two large area position sensitive parallel plate avalanche detectors. Light particle telescopes consisting of silicon-ΔE and Nal-E detectors were placed both in and out of the plane defined by the centers of the two fission detectors and the beam axis. The momentum transferred to the composite system was determined by measuring the folding angle between the two outgoing fission fragments. Unlike observations with more fissile targets, however, transfer and inelastic reactions characterized by small linear momentum transfers contribute negligibly to the fission cross section for reactions on the 197 Au target. For events which lead to fission, the most probable linear momentum transfer corresponded to about 85% of the beam momentum. This is similar to the most probable momentum transfer observed for fusion-like reactions on 238 U at the same beam energy. Much of the missing momentum is carried away by non-equilibrium light particle emission

  5. PIXE in 1980: Summary of the second international conference on particle induced x-ray emission and its analytical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akselsson, K.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Second International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and its analytical applications was held in Lund, Sweden, June 9-12, 1980. About a hundred papers were presented, including seven invited talks (PIXE and particle scattering, microbeam analysis, applications to aerosols and biological samples). The main impression left by the conference was that both the PIXE method and its applications are in a phase of fast development. Considerable effort has successfully been devoted to optimizing the basic PIXE technique. Also the great advantage of simultaneously getting information about lighter elements and sample mass was reported to have been successfully employed in routine analyses. PIXE, which was initially considered to be a method mainly for thin samples, has also been shown to be competitive for a variety of thick samples. Data from aerosol studies was presented. With the PIXE-method, it is feasible to perform series of measurements over a long period of time, many samples in parallel and/or samples from sites of poor accessibility. However, the advantages of PIXE may be further exploited in aerosol investigations and some promising lines of sampler development were reported. Sample preparation techniques are crucial for applications to biological samples and several laboratories are engaged in such developmental work. However, it was also evident that PIXE is already giving significant contributions to research in biology and medicine

  6. Fano-induced spontaneous emission enhancement of molecule placed in a cluster of asymmetrically-arranged metallic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Khai Q., E-mail: khai.lequang@hoasen.edu.vn [Faculty of Science and Technology, Hoa Sen University, Ho Chi Minh (Viet Nam); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Duluth, MN 55812 (United States); Bai, Jing [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Duluth, MN 55812 (United States); Nguyen, H.P.T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrate that plasmonic Fano resonance significantly boosts spontaneous emission rate of a single emitter, e.g. atom, molecule and quantum dot, over a moderately broad emission spectrum. An emission enhancement of up to 140 times compared to the system with no external inclusion at tunable frequencies is achieved, providing a new complementary enhancement mechanism. Fano resonance is induced in clusters of four asymmetric-arranged nanoparticles with ultra-small inter-particle gaps. It is shown to play a dominant role in light-emitting enhancement, mediated by combined localized surface plasmon resonances.

  7. Exhaust particle and NOx emission performance of an SCR heavy duty truck operating in real-world conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saari, Sampo; Karjalainen, Panu; Ntziachristos, Leonidas; Pirjola, Liisa; Matilainen, Pekka; Keskinen, Jorma; Rönkkö, Topi

    2016-02-01

    Particle and NOx emissions of an SCR equipped HDD truck were studied in real-world driving conditions using the "Sniffer" mobile laboratory. Real-time CO2 measurement enables emission factor calculation for NOx and particles. In this study, we compared three different emission factor calculation methods and characterised their suitability for real-world chasing experiments. The particle number emission was bimodal and dominated by the nucleation mode particles (diameter below 23 nm) having emission factor up to 1 × 1015 #/kgfuel whereas emission factor for soot (diameter above 23 nm that is consistent with the PMP standard) was typically 1 × 1014 #/kgfuel. The effect of thermodenuder on the exhaust particles indicated that the nucleation particles consisted mainly of volatile compounds, but sometimes there also existed a non-volatile core. The nucleation mode particles are not controlled by current regulations in Europe. However, these particles consistently form under atmospheric dilution in the plume of the truck and constitute a health risk for the human population that is exposed to those. Average NOx emission was 3.55 g/kWh during the test, whereas the Euro IV emission limit over transient testing is 3.5 g NOx/kWh. The on-road emission performance of the vehicle was very close to the expected levels, confirming the successful operation of the SCR system of the tested vehicle. Heavy driving conditions such as uphill driving increased both the NOx and particle number emission factors whereas the emission factor for soot particle number remains rather constant.

  8. Proton induced X-ray emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Rashiduzzman

    1976-09-01

    The developments in proton induced X-ray emission analysis are reviewed. Techniques for analyzing thick and thin samples of different origin are described. Discussions on the application of proton induced X-ray emission analysis in different fields, comparison of the sensitivity of this method with other analytical techniques, its limitations and possible improvements are presented

  9. Dilution effects on ultrafine particle emissions from Euro 5 and Euro 6 diesel and gasoline vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Cédric; Liu, Yao; Martinet, Simon; D'Anna, Barbara; Valiente, Alvaro Martinez; Boreave, Antoinette; R'Mili, Badr; Tassel, Patrick; Perret, Pascal; André, Michel

    2017-11-01

    Dilution and temperature used during sampling of vehicle exhaust can modify particle number concentration and size distribution. Two experiments were performed on a chassis dynamometer to assess exhaust dilution and temperature on particle number and particle size distribution for Euro 5 and Euro 6 vehicles. In the first experiment, the effects of dilution (ratio from 8 to 4 000) and temperature (ranging from 50 °C to 150 °C) on particle quantification were investigated directly from tailpipe for a diesel and a gasoline Euro 5 vehicles. In the second experiment, particle emissions from Euro 6 diesel and gasoline vehicles directly sampled from the tailpipe were compared to the constant volume sampling (CVS) measurements under similar sampling conditions. Low primary dilutions (3-5) induced an increase in particle number concentration by a factor of 2 compared to high primary dilutions (12-20). Low dilution temperatures (50 °C) induced 1.4-3 times higher particle number concentration than high dilution temperatures (150 °C). For the Euro 6 gasoline vehicle with direct injection, constant volume sampling (CVS) particle number concentrations were higher than after the tailpipe by a factor of 6, 80 and 22 for Artemis urban, road and motorway, respectively. For the same vehicle, particle size distribution measured after the tailpipe was centred on 10 nm, and particles were smaller than the ones measured after CVS that was centred between 50 nm and 70 nm. The high particle concentration (≈106 #/cm3) and the growth of diameter, measured in the CVS, highlighted aerosol transformations, such as nucleation, condensation and coagulation occurring in the sampling system and this might have biased the particle measurements.

  10. Late-time particle emission from laser-produced graphite plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Polek, M. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    We report a late-time ''fireworks-like'' particle emission from laser-produced graphite plasma during its evolution. Plasmas were produced using graphite targets excited with 1064 nm Nd: yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser in vacuum. The time evolution of graphite plasma was investigated using fast gated imaging and visible emission spectroscopy. The emission dynamics of plasma is rapidly changing with time and the delayed firework-like emission from the graphite target followed a black-body curve. Our studies indicated that such firework-like emission is strongly depended on target material properties and explained due to material spallation caused by overheating the trapped gases through thermal diffusion along the layer structures of graphite.

  11. Late-time particle emission from laser-produced graphite plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Polek, M.

    2011-01-01

    We report a late-time ''fireworks-like'' particle emission from laser-produced graphite plasma during its evolution. Plasmas were produced using graphite targets excited with 1064 nm Nd: yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser in vacuum. The time evolution of graphite plasma was investigated using fast gated imaging and visible emission spectroscopy. The emission dynamics of plasma is rapidly changing with time and the delayed firework-like emission from the graphite target followed a black-body curve. Our studies indicated that such firework-like emission is strongly depended on target material properties and explained due to material spallation caused by overheating the trapped gases through thermal diffusion along the layer structures of graphite.

  12. Acoustic emission during the compaction of brittle UO2 particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegron, Lise

    2014-01-01

    One of the options considered for recycling minor actinides is to incorporate about 10% to UO 2 matrix. The presence of open pores interconnected within this fuel should allow the evacuation of helium and fission gases to prevent swelling of the pellet and ultimately its interaction with the fuel clad surrounding it. Implementation of minor actinides requires working in shielded cell, reducing their retention and outlawing additions of organic products. The use of fragmentable particles of several hundred micrometers seems a good solution to control the microstructure of the green compacts and thus control the open porosity after sintering. The goal of this study is to monitor the compaction of brittle UO 2 particles by acoustic emission and to link the particle characteristics to the open porosity obtained after the compact sintering. The signals acquired during tensile strength tests on individual granules and compacts show that the acoustic emission allows the detection of the mechanism of fragmentation and enables identification of a characteristic waveform of this fragmentation. The influences of compaction stress, of the initial particle size distribution and of the internal cohesion of the granules, on the mechanical strength of the compact and on the microstructure and open porosity of the sintered pellets, are analyzed. By its ability to identify the range of fragmentation of the granules during compaction, acoustic emission appears as a promising technique for monitoring the compaction of brittle particles in the manufacture of a controlled porosity fuel. (author) [fr

  13. Pre-equilibrium gamma emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Sudip

    1993-01-01

    Together with the direct reaction and the compound nuclear emissions the pre-equilibrium (PEQ) or pre-compound processes give a fairly complete picture of nuclear reactions induced by light ions at energies of some tens of MeV. PEQ particle emissions covering the higher energy continuum spectra have been investigated in detail both experimentally and theoretically. In contrast, very little work has been done on PEQ γ- emissions. The reason is that in spite of extensive work done on PEQ particle emissions, the mechanism is not yet fully understood. Also, the PEQ γ-emission cross-sections (∼ micro barns) are very small compared to the PEQ particle emission cross-sections (∼ milli barns). Yet apart from the academic interest the understanding of PEQ γ-emissions is important for applied fusion research etc. In this paper the PEQ γ-emissions is discussed and the work done in this field is reviewed. (author). 14 refs

  14. A memory particle model in study of pre-equilibrium emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao rongzhi

    1989-01-01

    Exciton of a composite system at high energy is divided into two subsystems which consist of memory particle m and non-memory particle r. After introducing α n , the collision factor of m-particle in state n, the coupled master equitions of the occupation probability of state-angle of m-particle and r-particle are established. The expression of state density, taking into account the distinqushability between m-particle and r-particle, and the formulas of the rate of β-particle emission of m-system and r-system in state n are also given. The calculation results show that the fit with experimental data is improved conspicuously and is much better than that obtained from the generalized exciton model

  15. Monte Carlo calculation of secondary electron emission from carbon-surface by obliquely incident particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohya, Kaoru; Kawata, Jun; Mori, Ichiro

    1990-01-01

    Incidence angle dependences of secondary electron emission from a carbon surface by low energy electron and hydrogen atom are calculated using Monte Carlo simulations on the kinetic emission model. The calculation shows very small increase or rather decrease of the secondary electron yield with oblique incidence. It is explained in terms of not only multiple elastic collisions of incident particles with the carbon atoms but also small penetration depth of the particles comparable with the escape depth of secondary electrons. In addition, the two types of secondary electron emission are distinguished by using the secondary electron yield statistics; one is the emission due to trapped particles in the carbon, and the other is that due to backscattered particles. The high-yield component of the statistics on oblique incidence is more suppressed than those on normal incidence. (author)

  16. Radiative forcing from particle emissions by future supersonic aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pitari

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work we focus on the direct radiative forcing (RF of black carbon (BC and sulphuric acid particles emitted by future supersonic aircraft, as well as on the ozone RF due to changes produced by emissions of both gas species (NOx, H2O and aerosol particles capable of affecting stratospheric ozone chemistry. Heterogeneous chemical reactions on the surface of sulphuric acid stratospheric particles (SSA-SAD are the main link between ozone chemistry and supersonic aircraft emissions of sulphur precursors (SO2 and particles (H2O–H2SO4. Photochemical O3 changes are compared from four independent 3-D atmosphere-chemistry models (ACMs, using as input the perturbation of SSA-SAD calculated in the University of L'Aquila model, which includes on-line a microphysics code for aerosol formation and growth. The ACMs in this study use aircraft emission scenarios for the year 2050 developed by AIRBUS as a part of the EU project SCENIC, assessing options for fleet size, engine technology (NOx emission index, Mach number, range and cruising altitude. From our baseline modeling simulation, the impact of supersonic aircraft on sulphuric acid aerosol and BC mass burdens is 53 and 1.5 μg/m2, respectively, with a direct RF of −11.4 and 4.6 mW/m2 (net RF=−6.8 mW/m2. This paper discusses the similarities and differences amongst the participating models in terms of changes to O3 precursors due to aircraft emissions (NOx, HOx,Clx,Brx and the stratospheric ozone sensitivity to them. In the baseline case, the calculated global ozone change is −0.4 ±0.3 DU, with a net radiative forcing (IR+UV of −2.5± 2 mW/m2. The fraction of this O3-RF attributable to SSA-SAD changes is, however, highly variable among the models, depending on the NOx removal

  17. Particle and gaseous emissions from individual diesel and CNG buses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Å. M. Hallquist

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study size-resolved particle and gaseous emissions from 28 individual diesel-fuelled and 7 compressed natural gas (CNG-fuelled buses, selected from an in-use bus fleet, were characterised for real-world dilution scenarios. The method used was based on using CO2 as a tracer of exhaust gas dilution. The particles were sampled by using an extractive sampling method and analysed with high time resolution instrumentation EEPS (10 Hz and CO2 with a non-dispersive infrared gas analyser (LI-840, LI-COR Inc. 1 Hz. The gaseous constituents (CO, HC and NO were measured by using a remote sensing device (AccuScan RSD 3000, Environmental System Products Inc.. Nitrogen oxides, NOx, were estimated from NO by using default NO2/NOx ratios from the road vehicle emission model HBEFA3.1. The buses studied were diesel-fuelled Euro III–V and CNG-fuelled Enhanced Environmentally Friendly Vehicles (EEVs with different after-treatment, including selective catalytic reduction (SCR, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR and with and without diesel particulate filter (DPF. The primary driving mode applied in this study was accelerating mode. However, regarding the particle emissions also a constant speed mode was analysed. The investigated CNG buses emitted on average a higher number of particles but less mass compared to the diesel-fuelled buses. Emission factors for number of particles (EFPN were EFPN, DPF = 4.4 ± 3.5 × 1014, EFPN, no DPF = 2.1 ± 1.0 × 1015 and EFPN, CNG = 7.8 ± 5.7 ×1015 kg fuel−1. In the accelerating mode, size-resolved emission factors (EFs showed unimodal number size distributions with peak diameters of 70–90 nm and 10 nm for diesel and CNG buses, respectively. For the constant speed mode, bimodal average number size distributions were obtained for the diesel buses with peak modes of ~10 nm and ~60 nm. Emission factors for NOx expressed as NO2 equivalents for the diesel buses were on average 27 ± 7 g (kg fuel−1 and for the CNG buses 41

  18. The ir emission features: Emission from PAH (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons) molecules and amorphous carbon particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allamandola, L.J.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.; Barker, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    PAHs can have several forms in the interstellar medium. To assess the importance of each requires the availability of a collection of high quality, complete mid-ir interstellar emission spectra, a collection of laboratory spectra of PAH samples prepared under realistic conditions and a firm understanding of the microscopic emission mechanism. Given what we currently know about PAHs, the spectroscopic data suggests that there are at least two components which contribute to the interstellar emission spectrum: free molecule sized PAHs producing the narrow features and amorphous carbon particles (which are primarily made up of an irregular ''lattice'' of PAHs) contributing to the broad underlying components. An exact treatment of the ir fluorescence from highly vibrationally excited large molecules shows that species containing between 20 and 30 carbon atoms are responsible for the narrow features, although the spectra match more closely with the spectra of amorphous carbon particles. Since little is known about the spectroscopic properties of free PAHs and PAH clusters, much laboratory work is called for in conjunction with an observational program which focuses on the spatial characteristics of the spectra. In this way the distribution and evolution of carbon from molecule to particle can be traced. 38 refs., 9 figs.

  19. The ir emission features: Emission from PAH [Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons] molecules and amorphous carbon particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allamandola, L.J.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.; Barker, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    PAHs can have several forms in the interstellar medium. To assess the importance of each requires the availability of a collection of high quality, complete mid-ir interstellar emission spectra, a collection of laboratory spectra of PAH samples prepared under realistic conditions and a firm understanding of the microscopic emission mechanism. Given what we currently know about PAHs, the spectroscopic data suggests that there are at least two components which contribute to the interstellar emission spectrum: free molecule sized PAHs producing the narrow features and amorphous carbon particles (which are primarily made up of an irregular ''lattice'' of PAHs) contributing to the broad underlying components. An exact treatment of the ir fluorescence from highly vibrationally excited large molecules shows that species containing between 20 and 30 carbon atoms are responsible for the narrow features, although the spectra match more closely with the spectra of amorphous carbon particles. Since little is known about the spectroscopic properties of free PAHs and PAH clusters, much laboratory work is called for in conjunction with an observational program which focuses on the spatial characteristics of the spectra. In this way the distribution and evolution of carbon from molecule to particle can be traced. 38 refs., 9 figs

  20. Flow induced crystallisation of penetrable particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scacchi, Alberto; Brader, Joseph M.

    2018-03-01

    For a system of Brownian particles interacting via a soft exponential potential we investigate the interaction between equilibrium crystallisation and spatially varying shear flow. For thermodynamic state points within the liquid part of the phase diagram, but close to the crystallisation phase boundary, we observe that imposing a Poiseuille flow can induce nonequilibrium crystalline ordering in regions of low shear gradient. The physical mechanism responsible for this phenomenon is shear-induced particle migration, which causes particles to drift preferentially towards the center of the flow channel, thus increasing the local density in the channel center. The method employed is classical dynamical density functional theory.

  1. Test Method for High β Particle Emission Rate of 63Ni Source Plate

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG Li-feng

    2015-01-01

    For the problem of measurement difficulties of β particle emission rate of Ni-63 source plate used for Ni-63 betavoltaic battery, a relative test method of scintillation current method was erected according to the measurement principle of scintillation detector.β particle emission rate of homemade Ni-63 source plate was tested by the method, and the test results were analysed and evaluated, it was initially thought that scintillation current method was a feasible way of testing β particle emi...

  2. A method for measuring particle number emissions from vehicles driving on the road.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, J P; Harrison, R M; Evans, D E; Alam, A; Barnes, C; Carter, G

    2002-01-01

    Earlier research has demonstrated that the conditions of dilution of engine exhaust gases profoundly influence the size distribution and total number of particles emitted. Since real world dilution conditions are variable and therefore difficult to simulate, this research has sought to develop and validate a method for measuring particle number emissions from vehicles driving past on a road. This has been achieved successfully using carbon dioxide as a tracer of exhaust gas dilution. By subsequent adjustment of data to a constant dilution factor, it is possible to compare emissions from different vehicles using different technologies and fuels based upon real world emission data. Whilst further optimisation of the technique, especially in terms of matching the instrument response times is desirable, the measurements offer useful insights into emissions from gasoline and diesel vehicles, and the substantial proportion of particles emitted in the 3-7 nanometre size range.

  3. Developing Particle Emission Inventories Using Remote Sensing (PEIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chia-Hsi; Coull, Brent A.; Schwartz, Joel; Lyapustin, Alexei I.; Di, Qian; Koutrakis, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Information regarding the magnitude and distribution of PM(sub 2.5) emissions is crucial in establishing effective PM regulations and assessing the associated risk to human health and the ecosystem. At present, emission data is obtained from measured or estimated emission factors of various source types. Collecting such information for every known source is costly and time consuming. For this reason, emission inventories are reported periodically and unknown or smaller sources are often omitted or aggregated at large spatial scale. To address these limitations, we have developed and evaluated a novel method that uses remote sensing data to construct spatially-resolved emission inventories for PM(sub 2.5). This approach enables us to account for all sources within a fixed area, which renders source classification unnecessary. We applied this method to predict emissions in the northeast United States during the period of 2002-2013 using high- resolution 1 km x 1 km Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). Emission estimates moderately agreed with the EPA National Emission Inventory (R(sup2) = 0.66 approx. 0.71, CV = 17.7 approx. 20%). Predicted emissions are found to correlate with land use parameters suggesting that our method can capture emissions from land use-related sources. In addition, we distinguished small-scale intra-urban variation in emissions reflecting distribution of metropolitan sources. In essence, this study demonstrates the great potential of remote sensing data to predict particle source emissions cost-effectively.

  4. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation and Emission from Relativistic Jets and Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hartmann, D. H.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Mizunno, Y.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    We performed numerical simulations of particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and emission from shocks in order to understand the observed emission from relativistic jets and supernova remnants. The investigation involves the study of collisionless shocks, where the Weibel instability is responsible for particle acceleration as well as magnetic field generation. A 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell (RPIC) code has been used to investigate the shock processes in electron-positron plasmas. The evolution of theWeibe1 instability and its associated magnetic field generation and particle acceleration are studied with two different jet velocities (0 = 2,5 - slow, fast) corresponding to either outflows in supernova remnants or relativistic jets, such as those found in AGNs and microquasars. Slow jets have intrinsically different structures in both the generated magnetic fields and the accelerated particle spectrum. In particular, the jet head has a very weak magnetic field and the ambient electrons are strongly accelerated and dragged by the jet particles. The simulation results exhibit jitter radiation from inhomogeneous magnetic fields, generated by the Weibel instability, which has different spectral properties than standard synchrotron emission in a homogeneous magnetic field.

  5. Comprehensive Characterization Of Ultrafine Particulate Emission From 2007 Diesel Engines: PM Size Distribution, Loading And Indidividual Particle Size And Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenyuk, A.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, L. A.; Imre, D.; Shimpi, S.; Warey, A.

    2006-12-01

    The strong absorption of solar radiation by black carbon (BC) impacts the atmospheric radiative balance in a complex and significant manner. One of the most important sources of BC is vehicular emissions, of which diesel represents a significant fraction. To address this issue the EPA has issues new stringent regulations that will be in effect in 2007, limiting the amount of particulate mass that can be emitted by diesel engines. The new engines are equipped with aftertreatments that reduce PM emissions to the point, where filter measurements are subject to significant artifacts and characterization by other techniques presents new challenges. We will present the results of the multidisciplinary study conducted at the Cummins Technical Center in which a suite of instruments was deployed to yield comprehensive, temporally resolved information on the diesel exhaust particle loadings and properties in real-time: Particle size distributions were measured by Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer (EEPS) and Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). Total particle diameter concentration was obtained using Electrical Aerosol Detector (EAD). Laser Induced Incandescence and photoacoustic techniques were used to monitor the PM soot content. Single Particle Laser Ablation Time-of- flight Mass Spectrometer (SPLAT) provided the aerodynamic diameter and chemical composition of individual diesel exhaust particles. Measurements were conducted on a number of heavy duty diesel engines operated under variety of operating conditions, including FTP transient cycles, ramped-modal cycles and steady states runs. We have also characterized PM emissions during diesel particulate filter regeneration cycles. We will present a comparison of PM characteristics observed during identical cycles, but with and without the use of aftertreatment. A total of approximately 100,000 individual particles were sized and their composition characterized by SPLAT. The aerodynamic size distributions of the characterized

  6. Induced γ emission for nuclear isomer long-lived

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Tianli; Hao Fanhua

    2007-06-01

    It is pointed that the induced 7 emission for long lived isomer 178m2 Hf by low energy X rays has been a topic subject in the nuclear field recently. The background and development status are described. A principle for T ray transitions induced by X rays and the theoretical about magnificent induced emission have been related. In addition, the possible method of 178m2 Hf produce has been introduced also. Although the argument has existed for the experimental results of induced 7 emission, it can push forward in solving energy crisis and in future military field after controlling effectively the releasing of high excited energy for isomer. (authors)

  7. Emission of high-energy, light particles from intermediate-energy heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.B.; Auble, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    One of the early surprises in examining reaction products from heavy ion reactions at 10 MeV/nucleon and above was the large yield of light particles emitted and the high energies to which the spectra of these particles extended. The interpretation of the origin of the high energy light ions has evolved from a picture of projectile excitation and subsequent evaporation to one of pre-equilibrium (or nonequilibrium) emission. The time scale for particle emission has thus moved from one that occurs following the initial collision to one that occurs at the very early stages of the collision. Research at ORNL on this phenomenon is reviewed

  8. A feature point identification method for positron emission particle tracking with multiple tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggins, Cody, E-mail: cwiggin2@vols.utk.edu [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 1408 Circle Drive, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Santos, Roque [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Nuclear Engineering (United States); Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Departamento de Ciencias Nucleares (Ecuador); Ruggles, Arthur [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Nuclear Engineering (United States)

    2017-01-21

    A novel detection algorithm for Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) with multiple tracers based on optical feature point identification (FPI) methods is presented. This new method, the FPI method, is compared to a previous multiple PEPT method via analyses of experimental and simulated data. The FPI method outperforms the older method in cases of large particle numbers and fine time resolution. Simulated data show the FPI method to be capable of identifying 100 particles at 0.5 mm average spatial error. Detection error is seen to vary with the inverse square root of the number of lines of response (LORs) used for detection and increases as particle separation decreases. - Highlights: • A new approach to positron emission particle tracking is presented. • Using optical feature point identification analogs, multiple particle tracking is achieved. • Method is compared to previous multiple particle method. • Accuracy and applicability of method is explored.

  9. Time-resolved analysis of particle emissions from residential biomass combustion - Emissions of refractory black carbon, PAHs and organic tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Ingeborg E.; Eriksson, Axel C.; Lindgren, Robert; Martinsson, Johan; Nyström, Robin; Nordin, Erik Z.; Sadiktsis, Ioannis; Boman, Christoffer; Nøjgaard, Jacob K.; Pagels, Joakim

    2017-09-01

    Time-resolved particle emissions from a conventional wood stove were investigated with aerosol mass spectrometry to provide links between combustion conditions, emission factors, mixing state of refractory black carbon and implications for organic tracer methods. The addition of a new batch of fuel results in low temperature pyrolysis as the fuel heats up, resulting in strong, short-lived, variable emission peaks of organic aerosol-containing markers of anhydrous sugars, such as levoglucosan (fragment at m/z 60). Flaming combustion results in emissions dominated by refractory black carbon co-emitted with minor fractions of organic aerosol and markers of anhydrous sugars. Full cycle emissions are an external mixture of larger organic aerosol-dominated and smaller thinly coated refractory black carbon particles. A very high burn rate results in increased full cycle mass emission factors of 66, 2.7, 2.8 and 1.3 for particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, refractory black carbon, total organic aerosol and m/z 60, respectively, compared to nominal burn rate. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are primarily associated with refractory black carbon-containing particles. We hypothesize that at very high burn rates, the central parts of the combustion zone become air starved, leading to a locally reduced combustion temperature that reduces the conversion rates from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to refractory black carbon. This facilitates a strong increase of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emissions. At nominal burn rates, full cycle emissions based on m/z 60 correlate well with organic aerosol, refractory black carbon and particulate matter. However, at higher burn rates, m/z 60 does not correlate with increased emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, refractory black carbon and organic aerosol in the flaming phase. The new knowledge can be used to advance source apportionment studies, reduce emissions of genotoxic compounds and model the climate impacts of

  10. A PEMS study of the emissions of gaseous pollutants and ultrafine particles from gasoline- and diesel-fueled vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng; Lou, Diming; Hu, Zhiyuan; Feng, Qian; Chen, Yiran; Chen, Changhong; Tan, Piqiang; Yao, Di

    2013-10-01

    On-road emission measurements of gasoline- and diesel-fueled vehicles were conducted by a portable emission measurement system (PEMS) in Shanghai, China. Horiba OBS 2200 and TSI EEPS 3090 were employed to detect gaseous and ultrafine particle emissions during the tests. The driving-based emission factors of gaseous pollutants and particle mass and number were obtained on various road types. The average NOx emission factors of the diesel bus, diesel car, and gasoline car were 8.86, 0.68, and 0.17 g km-1, all of which were in excess of their emission limits. The particle number emission factors were 7.06 × 1014, 6.08 × 1014, and 1.57 × 1014 km-1, generally higher than the results for similar vehicle types reported in the previous studies. The size distributions of the particles emitted from the diesel vehicles were mainly concentrated in the accumulation mode, while those emitted from the gasoline car were mainly distributed in the nucleation mode. Both gaseous and particle emission rates exhibit significant correlations with the change in vehicle speed and power demand. The lowest emission rates for each vehicle type were produced during idling. The highest emission rates for each vehicle type were generally found in high-VSP bins. The particle number emission rates of the gasoline car show the strongest growth trend with increasing VSP and speed. The particle number emission for the gasoline car increased by 3 orders of magnitude from idling to the highest VSP and driving speed conditions. High engine power caused by aggressive driving or heavy loads is the main contributor to high emissions for these vehicles in real-world situations.

  11. [Analysis on oil fume particles in catering industry cooking emission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, De-Sheng; Kuang, Yuan-Cheng; Liu, Xin; Dai, Fei-Hong

    2012-06-01

    By measuring the particulate matter of oil fume which is over 10 microm or below 10 microm separately and using microradiography and Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI), it is found out the distributing characteristic of oil fume particles in catering industry cooking emission. The result shows that the diameter of the oil fume particles which was sedimentated in the kitchen is between 10-400 microm, the concentration peak value is between 10-100 microm. The diameter of oil fume aerosol is mostly smaller than 1 microm, while the concentration peak value is between 0.063-0.109 microm. In addition, the mass concentration peak value is between 6.560-9.990 microm. Through the analysis to the physical characteristics of oil fume from catering industry cooking emissions, the eigenvalue of the oil fume has been found and the feature matter for monitoring the oil fume has been discovered to provide a reasonable standard for controlling and monitoring the catering industry cooking emission.

  12. Particle-gamma and particle-particle correlations in nuclear reactions using Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshback model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Toshihiko [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Talou, Patrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Watanabe, Takehito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chadwick, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for particle and {gamma}-ray emissions from an excited nucleus based on the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory are performed to obtain correlated information between emitted particles and {gamma}-rays. We calculate neutron induced reactions on {sup 51}V to demonstrate unique advantages of the Monte Carlo method. which are the correlated {gamma}-rays in the neutron radiative capture reaction, the neutron and {gamma}-ray correlation, and the particle-particle correlations at higher energies. It is shown that properties in nuclear reactions that are difficult to study with a deterministic method can be obtained with the Monte Carlo simulations.

  13. Trace metal analysis in sea grasses from Mexican Caribbean Coast by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis, C.; Issac O, K.; Martinez, A.; Lavoisier, E.; Martinez, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    The growing urban and tourist activity in the Mexican Caribbean coasts has resulted in an increase of chemical substances, metals in particular, discharged to the coastal waters. In order to reach an adequate management and conservation of these marine ecosystems it is necessary to perform an inventory of the actual conditions that reflect the vulnerability and the level of damage. Sea-grasses are considered good biological indicators of heavy metal contamination in marine systems. The goal of this preliminary work is to evaluate the concentrations of trace metals such as Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, and Pb in Thalassia testudinum, a very common sea-grass in the Mexican Caribbean Sea. Samples were collected from several locations in the coasts of the Yucatan Peninsula: Holbox, Blanquizal and Punta Allen, areas virtually uninfluenced by anthropogenic activities. Trace elements in different part plants were determined by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). This is a very suitable technique since it offers a fast, accurate and multi-element analysis. Also, the analysis by PIXE can be performed directly on powdered leaves without a laborious sample preparation. The trace metal concentration determined in sea-grasses growing in Caribbean generally fall in the range of the lowest valuables reported for sea grasses from the Gulf of Mexico. The results indicate that the studied areas do not present contamination by heavy metals. (Author)

  14. A model for particle emission from a fissioning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milek, B.; Reif, R.; Revai, J.

    1987-04-01

    The differential emission probability for a neutron emitted in a binary fission process due to non-adiabatic effects in the coupling of the single particle degrees of freedom to the accelerated relative motion of the fragments is investigated wihtin a model, which represents each nucleus by a non-deformed one-term separable potential. The derivation of measurable quantities from the asymptotic solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for the single particle wave function is examined. Numerical calculations were performed for parameter values, which correspond to 252 Cf(sf). The calculated energy spectra and angular distributions of the emitted particles are presented in dependence on the mass asymmetry. (author)

  15. Neutron-induced particle production in the cumulative and noncumulative regions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashnik, S.G.

    1992-01-01

    The first systematic measurements of neutron-induced inclusive production of protons, deuterons, tritons and charged pions on carbon, copper, and bismuth in the bombarding energy range of 300-580 MeV and in the angular interval from 51 deg to 165 deg have been analyzed in the framework of the cascade-exciton model. The role of single-particle scattering, the effects of rescattering, the pre-equilibrium emission and 'coalescence' mechanism in particle production in the cumulative (i.e., kinematically - forbidden for quasi-free intranuclear projectile-nucleon collisions) and noncumulative regions are discussed. A week sensitivity of the inclusive distributions to the specific reaction mechanisms and a need of correlation and polarization measurements are noted. 27 refs.; 12 figs.; 1 tab

  16. The pick-up mechanism in composite particle emission processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingshang; Yan Shiwei; Wang Cuilan

    1992-01-01

    The pick-up mechanism has been included in the exciton model for the light composite particle emissions. Based on the cluster phase space integration method the formation probabilities of α,d,t, 3 He are obtained. The calculation results of (n,t) cross sections indicate that this theoretical method can reproduce the experimental data nicely. For triton emissions in pre-equilibrium reaction processes, the semi-direct reactions are the dominant terms which are just omitted in the previous model calculation

  17. The influence of laser-particle interaction in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, Helmut; Loper, Kristofer H.; Hahn, David W.; Niemax, Kay

    2011-01-01

    Particles produced by previous laser shots may have significant influence on the analytical signal in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma (LA-ICP) spectrometry if they remain close to the position of laser sampling. The effects of these particles on the laser-induced breakdown event are demonstrated in several ways. LIBS-experiments were conducted in an ablation cell at atmospheric conditions in argon or air applying a dual-pulse arrangement with orthogonal pre-pulse, i.e., plasma breakdown in a gas generated by a focussed laser beam parallel and close to the sample surface followed by a delayed crossing laser pulse in orthogonal direction which actually ablates material from the sample and produces the LIBS plasma. The optical emission of the LIBS plasma as well as the absorption of the pre-pulse laser was measured. In the presence of particles in the focus of the pre-pulse laser, the plasma breakdown is affected and more energy of the pre-pulse laser is absorbed than without particles. As a result, the analyte line emission from the LIBS plasma of the second laser is enhanced. It is assumed that the enhancement is not only due to an increase of mass ablated by the second laser but also to better atomization and excitation conditions favored by a reduced gas density in the pre-pulse plasma. Higher laser pulse frequencies increase the probability of particle-laser interaction and, therefore, reduce the shot-to-shot line intensity variation as compared to lower particle loadings in the cell. Additional experiments using an aerosol chamber were performed to further quantify the laser absorption by the plasma in dependence on time both with and without the presence of particles. The overall implication of laser-particle interactions for LIBS and LA-ICP-MS/OES are discussed.

  18. The influence of laser-particle interaction in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Helmut; Loper, Kristofer H.; Hahn, David W.; Niemax, Kay

    2011-02-01

    Particles produced by previous laser shots may have significant influence on the analytical signal in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma (LA-ICP) spectrometry if they remain close to the position of laser sampling. The effects of these particles on the laser-induced breakdown event are demonstrated in several ways. LIBS-experiments were conducted in an ablation cell at atmospheric conditions in argon or air applying a dual-pulse arrangement with orthogonal pre-pulse, i.e., plasma breakdown in a gas generated by a focussed laser beam parallel and close to the sample surface followed by a delayed crossing laser pulse in orthogonal direction which actually ablates material from the sample and produces the LIBS plasma. The optical emission of the LIBS plasma as well as the absorption of the pre-pulse laser was measured. In the presence of particles in the focus of the pre-pulse laser, the plasma breakdown is affected and more energy of the pre-pulse laser is absorbed than without particles. As a result, the analyte line emission from the LIBS plasma of the second laser is enhanced. It is assumed that the enhancement is not only due to an increase of mass ablated by the second laser but also to better atomization and excitation conditions favored by a reduced gas density in the pre-pulse plasma. Higher laser pulse frequencies increase the probability of particle-laser interaction and, therefore, reduce the shot-to-shot line intensity variation as compared to lower particle loadings in the cell. Additional experiments using an aerosol chamber were performed to further quantify the laser absorption by the plasma in dependence on time both with and without the presence of particles. The overall implication of laser-particle interactions for LIBS and LA-ICP-MS/OES are discussed.

  19. Light-particle emission and heavy residues from nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caplar, R.; Hoelbling, S.; Gentner, R.; Lassen, L.; Oberstedt, A.

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the interrelation between light-particle multiplicities and mass resp. charge distributions of heavy residues from complete and incomplete fusion of heavy ions. We have shown that a simple statistical model provides the possibility of quantitatively correlating heavy-residue distributions and corresponding light-particle multiplicities both at the Coulomb barrier and at higher energies where preequilibrium emission occurs. (author). 8 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  20. Challenges and Approaches for Developing Ultrafine Particle Emission Inventories for Motor Vehicle and Bus Fleets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane U. Keogh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Motor vehicles in urban areas are the main source of ultrafine particles (diameters < 0.1 µm. Ultrafine particles are generally measured in terms of particle number because they have little mass and are prolific in terms of their numbers. These sized particles are of particular interest because of their ability to enter deep into the human respiratory system and contribute to negative health effects. Currently ultrafine particles are neither regularly monitored nor regulated by ambient air quality standards. Motor vehicle and bus fleet inventories, epidemiological studies and studies of the chemical composition of ultrafine particles are urgently needed to inform scientific debate and guide development of air quality standards and regulation to control this important pollution source. This article discusses some of the many challenges associated with modelling and quantifying ultrafine particle concentrations and emission rates for developing inventories and microscale modelling of motor vehicles and buses, including the challenge of understanding and quantifying secondary particle formation. Recommendations are made concerning the application of particle emission factors in developing ultrafine particle inventories for motor vehicle fleets. The article presents a précis of the first published inventory of ultrafine particles (particle number developed for the urban South-East Queensland motor vehicle and bus fleet in Australia, and comments on the applicability of the comprehensive set of average particle emission factors used in this inventory, for developing ultrafine particle (particle number and particle mass inventories in other developed countries.

  1. Dirac Particles Emission from An Elliptical Black Hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuant Tiandho

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the general theory of relativiy, a black hole is defined as a region of spacetime with super-strong gravitational effects and there is nothing can escape from it. So in the classical theory of relativity, it is safe to say that black hole is a "dead" thermodynamical object. However, by using quantum mechanics theory, Hawking has shown that a black hole may emit particles. In this paper, calculation of temperature of an elliptical black hole when emitting the Dirac particles was presented. By using the complexpath method, radiation can be described as emission process in the tunneling pictures. According to relationship between probability of outgoing particle with the spectrum of black body radiation for fermion particles, temperature of the elliptical black hole can be obtained and it depend on the azimuthal angle. This result also showed that condition on the surface of elliptical black hole is not in thermal equilibrium.

  2. Solar energetic particles and radio burst emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miteva Rositsa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a statistical study on the observed solar radio burst emission associated with the origin of in situ detected solar energetic particles. Several proton event catalogs in the period 1996–2016 are used. At the time of appearance of the particle origin (flare and coronal mass ejection we identified radio burst signatures of types II, III and IV by inspecting dynamic radio spectral plots. The information from observatory reports is also accounted for during the analysis. The occurrence of solar radio burst signatures is evaluated within selected wavelength ranges during the solar cycle 23 and the ongoing 24. Finally, we present the burst occurrence trends with respect to the intensity of the proton events and the location of their solar origin.

  3. Housing and sustainable development: perspectives offered by thermal solar energy. Particle emissions: prospective investigation of primary particle emissions in France by 2030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brignon, J.M.; Cauret, L.; Sambat, S.

    2004-09-01

    This publication proposes two investigation reports. A first study proposes a prospective analysis of the housing 'stock' in France and the evolution of global energy consumptions and CO 2 emissions by the housing sector, a prospective study of space heating and hot water needs by defining reference scenarios as well as a target scenario for heating consumption (based on the factor 4 of reduction of emissions by 2050), and an assessment of the contribution of the thermal solar energy applied to winter comfort under the form of direct solar floors and passive solar contributions, and applied to hot water by 2050. The contribution of the thermal solar energy is studied within its regulatory context. An analysis of urban forms is also performed to assess the potential of integration of renewable energy solutions in the existing housing stock, and thus to assess the morphological limits of an attempt of generalized solarization of roofs. The second study proposes a detailed identification and assessment of the various sources of primary particles (combustion, industrial processes, mineral extraction and processing, road transport, waste processing and elimination, agriculture, natural sources, forest fires), providing more precise results and methodological complements for some sources. It also proposes a prospective assessment of emissions and identifies the main factors of particle concentrations in urban environment

  4. Ultrafine particle emissions by in-use diesel buses of various generations at low-load regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, L.; Baibikov, V.; Comte, P.; Czerwinski, J.; Mayer, A.; Veinblat, M.; Zimmerli, Y.

    2015-04-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFP) are major contributors to air pollution due to their easy gas-like penetration into the human organism, causing adverse health effects. This study analyzes UFP emissions by buses of different technologies (from Euro II till Euro V EEV - Enhanced Environmentally-friendly Vehicle) at low-load regimes. Additionally, the emission-reduction potential of retrofitting with a diesel particle filter (DPF) is demonstrated. A comparison of the measured, engine-out, particle number concentrations (PNC) for buses of different technological generations shows that no substantial reduction of engine-out emissions at low-load operating modes is observed for newer bus generations. Retrofitting the in-use urban and interurban buses of Euro II till Euro IV technologies by the VERT-certified DPF confirmed its high efficiency in reduction of UFP emissions. Particle-count filtration efficiency values of the retrofit DPF were found to be extremely high - greater than 99.8%, similar to that of the OEM filter in the Euro V bus.

  5. Investigation of granular impact using positron emission particle tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy O.

    2015-04-01

    We present results from an experimental study of granular impact using a combination of high-speed video and positron emission particle tracking (PEPT). The PEPT technique exploits the annihilation of photons from positron decay to determine the position of tracer particles either inside a small granular bed or attached to the object which impacts the bed. We use dense spheres as impactors and the granular beds are comprised of glass beads which are fluidised to achieve a range of different initial packing states. For the first time, we have simultaneously investigated both the trajectory of the sphere, the motion of particles in a 3-D granular bed and particles which jump into the resultant jet, which arises from the collapse of the cavity formed by the impacting sphere.

  6. Simultaneous quantification of Li, Ti and O in Lithium titanate by particle induced gamma-ray emission using 8 MeV proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chhillar, Sumit; Acharya, R.; Tripathi, R.; Sodaye, S.; Sudarshan, K.; Pujari, P.K.; Rout, P.C.; Mukherjee, S.K.

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous quantification of Li, Ti and O in lithium titanate (Li 2 TiO 3 ) is difficult by particle induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) using low energy (∼4 MeV) proton beam. PIGE method using 8 MeV proton beam at BARC-TIFR pelletron facility was standardized for compositional characterization of sol-gel synthesized Li 2 TiO 3 by determining concentrations of Li, Ti and O simultaneously. Thick targets of samples, synthetic samples and standards were prepared in graphite matrix. Beam current variation was normalized by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) using a thin gold foil. The gamma-rays of 478, 981 and 6129 keV were measured from 7 Li(p, p'γ) 7 Li, 48 Ti(p, p'γ) 48 Ti and 16 O(p, p'γ) 16 O nuclear reactions for quantification of Li, Ti and O, respectively. The method was validated by determining concentrations of Li, TI and O in a synthetic sample. (author)

  7. Airborne emission measurements of SO2, NOx and particles from individual ships using sniffer technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecken, J.; Mellqvist, J.; Salo, K.; Ekholm, J.; Jalkanen, J.-P.

    2013-12-01

    A dedicated system for airborne ship emission measurements of SO2, NOx and particles has been developed and used from several small aircrafts. The system has been adapted for fast response measurements at 1 Hz and the use of several of the instruments is unique. The uncertainty of the given data is about 20.3% for SO2 and 23.8% for NOx emission factors. Multiple measurements of 158 ships measured from the air on the Baltic and North Sea during 2011 and 2012 show emission factors of 18.8 ± 6.5 g kgfuel-1, 66.6 ± 23.4 g kgfuel-1, and 1.8 ± 1.3 × 1016 particles kgfuel-1 for SO2, NOx and particle number respectively. The particle size distributions were measured for particle diameters between 15 and 560 nm. The mean sizes of the particles are between 50 and 62 nm dependent on the distance to the source and the number size distribution is mono-modal. Concerning the sulfur fuel content 85% of the ships comply with the IMO limits. The sulfur emission has decreased compared to earlier measurements from 2007 to 2009. The presented method can be implemented for regular ship compliance monitoring.

  8. Improved Simulation of the Pre-equilibrium Triton Emission in Nuclear Reactions Induced by Nucleons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konobeyev, A. Yu.; Fischer, U.; Pereslavtsev, P. E.; Blann, M.

    2014-04-01

    A new approach is proposed for the calculation of non-equilibrium triton energy distributions in nuclear reactions induced by nucleons of intermediate energies. It combines models describing the nucleon pick-up, the coalescence and the triton knock-out processes. Emission and absorption rates for excited particles are represented by the pre-equilibrium hybrid model. The model of Sato, Iwamoto, Harada is used to describe the nucleon pick-up and the coalescence of nucleons from exciton configurations starting from (2p,1h) states. The contribution of the direct nucleon pick-up is described phenomenologically. Multiple pre-equilibrium emission of tritons is accounted for. The calculated triton energy distributions are compared with available experimental data.

  9. Activation cross-section data for -particle-induced nuclear reactions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B M ALI

    2018-02-20

    particle-induced nuclear reactions on natural vanadium up to 20 MeV. It should be mentioned that this study represents a part of (a supplement) systematical study of charged particles-induced nuclear reactions. Earlier studies were.

  10. Entrance channel dependent light-charged particle emission of the 156Er compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, J.F.; Bierman, J.D.; Kelly, M.P.; Sonzogni, A.A.; Vandenbosch, R.; van Schagen, J.P.S.

    1996-01-01

    Light-charged particle decay from the 156 Er compound nucleus, populated by 12 C+ 144 Sm and 60 Ni+ 96 Zr at the same excitation energy, were measured in coincidence with the evaporation residues. The high energy slope of charged particle spectra for the 60 Ni-induced reaction is steeper than for the 12 C-induced reaction. Model calculations including particle evaporation during compound nucleus formation result in good agreement with the data. This suggests that the difference in the charged particle spectra between the two entrance channels is due to a longer formation time in the 60 Ni-induced reaction. 14 refs., 3 figs

  11. Influence of complex particle emission on properties of giant dipole resonance of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Wanxin; Jin Genming

    2003-01-01

    The possible reasons for the discrepancy between calculation results based on the statistical evaporation model and experimental data of giant dipole resonance of very hot nuclei are discussed. Both of simulations with the standard CASCADE code and the code coupling complex particle emission are carried out. It is shown that the complex particle emission affects the properties of giant dipole resonance of very hot nuclei

  12. Measurement of secondary particle production induced by particle therapy ion beams impinging on a PMMA target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toppi M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Particle therapy is a technique that uses accelerated charged ions for cancer treatment and combines a high irradiation precision with a high biological effectiveness in killing tumor cells [1]. Informations about the secondary particles emitted in the interaction of an ion beam with the patient during a treatment can be of great interest in order to monitor the dose deposition. For this purpose an experiment at the HIT (Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center beam facility has been performed in order to measure fluxes and emission profiles of secondary particles produced in the interaction of therapeutic beams with a PMMA target. In this contribution some preliminary results about the emission profiles and the energy spectra of the detected secondaries will be presented.

  13. Solar energetic particles and radio burst emission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miteva, R.; Samwel, S. W.; Krupař, Vratislav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7 (2017), č. článku A37. ISSN 2115-7251 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ17-06818Y Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : solar energetic particles * solar radio burst emission * solar cycle Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.446, year: 2016 https://www.swsc-journal.org/ articles /swsc/abs/2017/01/swsc170028/swsc170028.html

  14. Geraniin suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and ameliorates wear particle-induced osteolysis in mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Fei; Zhai, Zanjing; Jiang, Chuan; Liu, Xuqiang; Li, Haowei; Qu, Xinhua [Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Orthopedic Implant, Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Ouyang, Zhengxiao [Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Orthopedic Implant, Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Department of Orthopaedics, Hunan Provincial Tumor Hospital and Tumor Hospital of Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410013 (China); Fan, Qiming; Tang, Tingting [Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Orthopedic Implant, Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Qin, An, E-mail: dr.qinan@gmail.com [Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Orthopedic Implant, Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Gu, Dongyun, E-mail: dongyungu@gmail.com [Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Orthopedic Implant, Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Engineering Research Center of Digital Medicine and Clinical Translation, Ministry of Education of PR China (China); School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening remains the most common complication that limits the longevity of prostheses. Wear particle-induced osteoclastogenesis is known to be responsible for extensive bone erosion that leads to prosthesis failure. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption may serve as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that geraniin, an active natural compound derived from Geranium thunbergii, ameliorated particle-induced osteolysis in a Ti particle-induced mouse calvaria model in vivo. We also investigated the mechanism by which geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclasts. Geraniin inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent manner, evidenced by reduced osteoclast formation and suppressed osteoclast specific gene expression. Specially, geraniin inhibited actin ring formation and bone resorption in vitro. Further molecular investigation demonstrated geraniin impaired osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of the RANKL-induced NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways, as well as suppressed the expression of key osteoclast transcriptional factors NFATc1 and c-Fos. Collectively, our data suggested that geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclast differentiation in vitro and suppresses Ti particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. Geraniin is therefore a potential natural compound for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis in prostheses failure. - Highlights: • Geraniin suppresses osteoclasts formation and function in vitro. • Geraniin impairs RANKL-induced nuclear factor-κB and ERK signaling pathway. • Geraniin suppresses osteolysis in vivo. • Geraniin may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases.

  15. Synergistic effects in radiation-induced particle ejection from solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Noriaki

    1990-01-01

    A description is given on radiation-induced particle ejection from solid surfaces, emphasizing synergistic effects arising from multi-species particle irradiation and from irradiation under complex environments. First, it is pointed out that synergisms can be treated by introducing the effects of material modification on radiation-induced particle ejection. As examples of the effects of surface modification on the sputtering induced by elastic encounters, sputtering of alloys and chemical sputtering of graphite are briefly discussed. Then the particle ejection induced by electronic encounters is explained emphasizing the difference in the behaviors from materials to materials. The possible synergistic effects of electronic and elastic encounters are also described. Lastly, we point out the importance of understanding the elementary processes of material-particle interaction and of developing computer codes describing material behaviors under irradiation. (author)

  16. Influence of suspended particles on the emission of organophosphate flame retardant from insulation boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarov, Borislav; Swinnen, Rudi; Poelmans, David; Spruyt, Maarten; Goelen, Eddy; Covaci, Adrian; Stranger, Marianne

    2016-09-01

    The influence of the presence of the so-called seed particles on the emission rate of Tris (1-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP) from polyisocyanurate (PIR) insulation boards was investigated in this study. Two Field and Laboratory Emission Test cells (FLEC) were placed on the surface of the same PIR board and respectively supplied with clean air (reference FLEC) and air containing laboratory-generated soot particles (test FLEC). The behavior of the area-specific emission rates (SER A ) over a time period of 10 days was studied by measuring the total (gas + particles) concentrations of TCIPP at the exhaust of each FLEC. The estimated SER A of TCIPP from the PIR board at the quasi-static equilibrium were found to be 0.82 μg m(-2) h(-1) in the absence of seed particles, while the addition of soot particles led to SER A of 2.16 μg m(-2) h(-1). This indicates an increase of the SER A of TCIPP from the PIR board with a factor of 3 in the presence of soot particles. The TCIPP partition coefficient to soot particles at the quasi-static equilibrium was 0.022 ± 0.012 m(3) μg(-1). In the next step, the influence of real-life particles on TCIPP emission rates was investigated by supplying the test FLEC with air from a professional kitchen where mainly frying and baking activities took place. Similar to the reference FLEC outcomes, SER A was also found to increase in this real-life experiment over a time period of 20 days by a factor 3 in the presence of particles generated during cooking activities. The median value of estimated particle-gas coefficient for this test was 0.062 ± 0.037 m(3) μg(-1).

  17. General decay law for emission of charged particles and exotic cluster radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, Basudeb; Paira, Ramkrishna; Rath, Biswanath

    2013-01-01

    For the emission of charged particles from metastable nuclei, a general decay formula is developed based on the basic phenomenon of resonances occurring in quantum scattering process under Coulomb-nuclear potential. It relates the half-lives of monopole radioactive decays with the Q-values of the outgoing elements in different angular momentum states as well as the masses and charges of the nuclei involved in the decay. The relation is found to be a generalization of the Geiger–Nuttall law in α radioactivity and it explains well all known emission of charged particles including clusters, alpha and proton carrying angular momenta

  18. Biophoton emission induced by heat shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiro Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Ultraweak biophoton emission originates from the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS that are produced in mitochondria as by-products of cellular respiration. In healthy cells, the concentration of ROS is minimized by a system of biological antioxidants. However, heat shock changes the equilibrium between oxidative stress and antioxidant activity, that is, a rapid rise in temperature induces biophoton emission from ROS. Although the rate and intensity of biophoton emission was observed to increase in response to elevated temperatures, pretreatment at lower high temperatures inhibited photon emission at higher temperatures. Biophoton measurements are useful for observing and evaluating heat shock.

  19. Comparison Between Weisskopf and Thomas-Fermi Model for Particle Emission Widths from Hot Deformed Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surowiec, Aa.; Pomorski, K.; Schmitt, Ch.; Bartel, J.

    2002-01-01

    The emission widths Γ n and Γ p for emission of neutrons and protons are calculated within the Thomas-Fermi model, which we have recently developed, and are compared with those obtained in the usual Weisskopf approach for the case of zero angular momentum. Both methods yield quite similar results at small deformations, but rather important differences are observed for very deformed shapes, in particular for charged particles. A possible generalization of the model for emission of α-particles is also discussed. (author)

  20. Particle Emission and Charging Effects Induced by Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-15

    molecular nitrogen for both the initial bursts and those that follow in the next 0.1-100 ;is. Thus, the "after-emission" is not due to phosphorescence of...copious emitter of atomic Na and both I atomic and molecular oxygen. The phF, EE, and PIE from the two glasses share a number of properties. This work...appear in J. Vac. Sci. Tech. Electron Emision from Ahrasion of Polymers: In Section XV we examine previously claimed 3 detection of electrons during

  1. Impact of vehicular emissions on the formation of fine particles in the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area: a numerical study with the WRF-Chem model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vara-Vela

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to evaluate the impact of vehicular emissions on the formation of fine particles (PM2.5;  ≤  2.5 µm in diameter in the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA in Brazil, where ethanol is used intensively as a fuel in road vehicles. The Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry (WRF-Chem model, which simulates feedbacks between meteorological variables and chemical species, is used as a photochemical modelling tool to describe the physico-chemical processes leading to the evolution of number and mass size distribution of particles through gas-to-particle conversion. A vehicular emission model based on statistical information of vehicular activity is applied to simulate vehicular emissions over the studied area. The simulation has been performed for a 1-month period (7 August–6 September 2012 to cover the availability of experimental data from the NUANCE-SPS (Narrowing the Uncertainties on Aerosol and Climate Changes in Sao Paulo State project that aims to characterize emissions of atmospheric aerosols in the SPMA. The availability of experimental measurements of atmospheric aerosols and the application of the WRF-Chem model made it possible to represent some of the most important properties of fine particles in the SPMA such as the mass size distribution and chemical composition, besides allowing us to evaluate its formation potential through the gas-to-particle conversion processes. Results show that the emission of primary gases, mostly from vehicles, led to a production of secondary particles between 20 and 30 % in relation to the total mass concentration of PM2.5 in the downtown SPMA. Each of PM2.5 and primary natural aerosol (dust and sea salt contributed with 40–50 % of the total PM10 (i.e. those  ≤  10 µm in diameter concentration. Over 40 % of the formation of fine particles, by mass, was due to the emission of hydrocarbons, mainly aromatics. Furthermore, an increase in the

  2. Impact of vehicular emissions on the formation of fine particles in the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area: a numerical study with the WRF-Chem model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vara-Vela, A.; Andrade, M. F.; Kumar, P.; Ynoue, R. Y.; Muñoz, A. G.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the impact of vehicular emissions on the formation of fine particles (PM2.5; ≤ 2.5 µm in diameter) in the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA) in Brazil, where ethanol is used intensively as a fuel in road vehicles. The Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model, which simulates feedbacks between meteorological variables and chemical species, is used as a photochemical modelling tool to describe the physico-chemical processes leading to the evolution of number and mass size distribution of particles through gas-to-particle conversion. A vehicular emission model based on statistical information of vehicular activity is applied to simulate vehicular emissions over the studied area. The simulation has been performed for a 1-month period (7 August-6 September 2012) to cover the availability of experimental data from the NUANCE-SPS (Narrowing the Uncertainties on Aerosol and Climate Changes in Sao Paulo State) project that aims to characterize emissions of atmospheric aerosols in the SPMA. The availability of experimental measurements of atmospheric aerosols and the application of the WRF-Chem model made it possible to represent some of the most important properties of fine particles in the SPMA such as the mass size distribution and chemical composition, besides allowing us to evaluate its formation potential through the gas-to-particle conversion processes. Results show that the emission of primary gases, mostly from vehicles, led to a production of secondary particles between 20 and 30 % in relation to the total mass concentration of PM2.5 in the downtown SPMA. Each of PM2.5 and primary natural aerosol (dust and sea salt) contributed with 40-50 % of the total PM10 (i.e. those ≤ 10 µm in diameter) concentration. Over 40 % of the formation of fine particles, by mass, was due to the emission of hydrocarbons, mainly aromatics. Furthermore, an increase in the number of small particles impaired the

  3. Elemental and mineralogical study of earth-based pigments using particle induced X-ray emission and X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nel, P.; Lynch, P.A.; Laird, J.S.; Casey, H.M.; Goodall, L.J.; Ryan, C.G.; Sloggett, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    Artwork and precious artefacts demand non-destructive analytical methodologies for art authentication, attribution and provenance assessment. However, structural and chemical characterisation represents a challenging problem with existing analytical techniques. A recent authentication case based on an Australian Aboriginal artwork, indicate there is substantial benefit in the ability of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), coupled with dynamic analysis (DA) to characterise pigments through trace element analysis. However, this information alone is insufficient for characterising the mineralogical residence of trace elements. For this reason a combined methodology based on PIXE and X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been performed to explore the benefits of a more comprehensive data set. Many Aboriginal paintings and artefacts are predominantly earth pigment based. This makes these cultural heritage materials an ideal case study for testing the above combined methodological approach on earth-based pigments. Samples of synthetic and naturally occurring earth-based pigments were obtained from a range of sources, which include Indigenous communities within Australia's Kimberley region. PIXE analyses using a 3 MeV focussed proton beam at the CSIRO nuclear microprobe, as well as laboratory-based XRD was carried out on the above samples. Elemental signature spectra as well as mineralogical data were used to assess issues regarding synthetic and naturally occurring earth pigments with the ultimate aim of establishing provenance.

  4. Particle and VOC emission factor measurements for anthropogenic sources in West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Keita

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available A number of campaigns have been carried out to establish the emission factors of pollutants from fuel combustion in West Africa, as part of work package 2 (Air Pollution and Health of the DACCIWA (Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions in West Africa FP7 program. Emission sources considered here include wood (hevea and iroko and charcoal burning, charcoal making, open trash burning, and vehicle emissions, including trucks, cars, buses and two-wheeled vehicles. Emission factors of total particulate matter (TPM, elemental carbon (EC, primary organic carbon (OC and volatile organic compounds (VOCs have been established. In addition, emission factor measurements were performed in combustion chambers in order to reproduce field burning conditions for a tropical hardwood (hevea, and obtain particulate emission factors by size (PM0.25, PM1, PM2.5 and PM10. Particle samples were collected on quartz fiber filters and analyzed using gravimetric method for TPM and thermal methods for EC and OC. The emission factors of 58 VOC species were determined using offline sampling on a sorbent tube. Emission factor results for two species of tropical hardwood burning of EC, OC and TPM are 0.98 ± 0.46 g kg−1 of fuel burned (g kg−1, 11.05 ± 4.55 and 41.12 ± 24.62 g kg−1, respectively. For traffic sources, the highest emission factors among particulate species are found for the two-wheeled vehicles with two-stroke engines (2.74 g kg−1 fuel for EC, 65.11 g kg−1 fuel for OC and 496 g kg−1 fuel for TPM. The largest VOC emissions are observed for two-stroke two-wheeled vehicles, which are up to 3 times higher than emissions from light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles. Isoprene and monoterpenes, which are usually associated with biogenic emissions, are present in almost all anthropogenic sources investigated during this work and could be as significant as aromatic emissions in wood burning (1 g kg−1 fuel. EC is

  5. Aging induced changes on NEXAFS fingerprints in individual combustion particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Zelenay

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Soot particles can significantly influence the Earth's climate by absorbing and scattering solar radiation as well as by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. However, despite their environmental (as well as economic and political importance, the way these properties are affected by atmospheric processing of the combustion exhaust gases is still a subject of discussion. In this work, individual soot particles emitted from two different vehicles, a EURO 2 transporter, a EURO 3 passenger car, and a wood stove were investigated on a single-particle basis. The emitted exhaust, including the particulate and the gas phase, was processed in a smog chamber with artificial solar radiation. Single particle specimens of both unprocessed and aged soot were characterized using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS and scanning electron microscopy. Comparison of NEXAFS spectra from the unprocessed particles and those resulting from exhaust photooxidation in the chamber revealed changes in the carbon functional group content. For the wood stove emissions, these changes were minor, related to the relatively mild oxidation conditions. For the EURO 2 transporter emissions, the most apparent change was that of carboxylic carbon from oxidized organic compounds condensing on the primary soot particles. For the EURO 3 car emissions oxidation of primary soot particles upon photochemical aging has likely contributed as well. Overall, the changes in the NEXAFS fingerprints were in qualitative agreement with data from an aerosol mass spectrometer. Furthermore, by taking full advantage of our in situ microreactor concept, we show that the soot particles from all three combustion sources changed their ability to take up water under humid conditions upon photochemical aging of the exhaust. Due to the selectivity and sensitivity of the NEXAFS technique for the water mass, also small amounts of water taken up into the internal voids of agglomerated

  6. African Anthropogenic Emissions Inventories for gases and particles from 1990 to 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liousse, Catherine; Keita, Sekou; N'Datchoch Touré, Evelyne 1; Doumbia, Thierno; Yoboué, Véronique; Assamoi, Eric; Haslett, Sophie; Roblou, Laurent; Léon, Jean-François; Galy-Lacaux, Corinne; Akpo, Aristide; Coe, Hugh

    2017-04-01

    Presently, there is one African regional inventory dealing with biofuel and fossil fuel emissions (Liousse et al., 2014) and only global emission inventories including Africa. Developing a regional inventory for gases and particles is not an easy task: the DACCIWA project has allowed to organize a framework suitable for this development through regrouping several investigators. The aim is to set an African database on fuel consumption and new emission factor measurements and to include other sources of pollution than biofuel and fossil fuel such as flaring and waste burning yet not negligible in Africa. The inclusion of these sources in the new inventory and also new emissions factor measurements will reduce the uncertainties on anthropogenic emissions in Africa. This work will present the first version of African fossil fuel (FF), biofuel (BF), gas flaring and waste burning emission inventories for the 1990-2016 period for the major atmospheric compounds (gases and particles) provides up to date emission fields at 0.125° x 0.125° spatial resolution and yearly temporal resolution that can be used to model atmospheric composition and impacts over West Africa. New emission factor measurements on ground and in combustion chambers will be discussed. Temporal variability of emissions from 1990 to 2016 will be scrutinized. In parallel, uncertainties on existing biomass burning emission inventories will be presented. New emission inventories based on MODIS burnt area products and AMMABB methodology have been developed for the period 2000-2012. They will be compared with GFED and GFAS products. Finally, tests on these inventories in Regional Climate Model (RegCM) at African scale will be presented for different years.

  7. Airborne emission measurements of SO2 , NOx and particles from individual ships using a sniffer technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecken, J.; Mellqvist, J.; Salo, K.; Ekholm, J.; Jalkanen, J.-P.

    2014-07-01

    A dedicated system for airborne ship emission measurements of SO2, NOx and particles has been developed and used from several small aircraft. The system has been adapted for fast response measurements at 1 Hz, and the use of several of the instruments is unique. The uncertainty of the given data is about 20% for SO2 and 24% for NOx emission factors. The mean values with one standard deviation for multiple measurements of 158 ships measured from the air on the Baltic and North Sea during 2011 and 2012 show emission factors of 18.8 ± 6.5 g kg-1 fuel , 66.6 ± 23.4 g kg-1 fuel and 1.8 ± 1.3 1016 particles kg-1 fuel for SO2, NOx and particle number, respectively. The particle size distributions were measured for particle diameters between 15 and 560 nm. The mean sizes of the particles are between 45 and 54 nm dependent on the distance to the source, and the number size distribution is monomodal. Concerning the sulfur fuel content, around 85% of the monitored ships comply with the International Maritime Organization (IMO) limits. The reduction of the sulfur emission control area (SECA) limit from 1.5 to 1% in 2010 appears to have contributed to reduction of sulfur emissions that were measured in earlier studies from 2007 to 2009. The presented method can be implemented for regular ship compliance monitoring.

  8. Emissions and measure analysis of fine particles 2000-2020; Emissionen und Massnahmenanalyse Feinstaub 2000-2020

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joerss, Wolfram; Handke, Volker [Institut fuer Zukunftsstudien und Technologiebewertung gGmbH (IZT), Berlin (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    With this study, the Federal Environmental Agency's emission inventory on total suspended particles and the fine fractions PM{sub 1}0 and PM{sub 2}.5 was updated. On that basis, a reference scenario was developed for anthropogenic emissions of particulate matter up to the years 2010, 2015 and 2020. In addition, potential additional emission reduction measures were systematically collected and quantified. At the source groups which contribute most strongly to the emissions there are clear differences between the fine fractions and in the course of time. In particular, with the total fine the emission freight is very broadly distributed over many source groups. With PM{sub 2}.5, the emissions are more strongly concentrated on a limited number of source groups. The decrease of the emissions in the years between 2000 and 2020 in the reference scenario takes place in source groups with high portions of PM{sub 2}.5 of the emissions of total fine particles.

  9. Emissions and measure analysis of fine particles 2000-2020; Emissionen und Massnahmenanalyse Feinstaub 2000-2020

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joerss, Wolfram; Handke, Volker [Institut fuer Zukunftsstudien und Technologiebewertung gGmbH (IZT), Berlin (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    With this study, the Federal Environmental Agency's emission inventory on total suspended particles and the fine fractions PM{sub 1}0 and PM{sub 2}.5 was updated. On that basis, a reference scenario was developed for anthropogenic emissions of particulate matter up to the years 2010, 2015 and 2020. In addition, potential additional emission reduction measures were systematically collected and quantified. At the source groups which contribute most strongly to the emissions there are clear differences between the fine fractions and in the course of time. In particular, with the total fine the emission freight is very broadly distributed over many source groups. With PM{sub 2}.5, the emissions are more strongly concentrated on a limited number of source groups. The decrease of the emissions in the years between 2000 and 2020 in the reference scenario takes place in source groups with high portions of PM{sub 2}.5 of the emissions of total fine particles.

  10. Description of light charged particle emission in ternary fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, A. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Kuklin, S. N.; Scheid, W.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the motion of three fragments starting from the scission point of ternary system. In the alpha-accompanied ternary fission the initial conditions are not the free parameters and determined by minimization of potential energy at scission point. In the trajectory calculations the angular distribution and mean value of the kinetic energy of the alpha-particles are well described in the spontaneous ternary fission of 252 Cf. In the Be- and C-accompanied ternary fission we found that the emission of the third particle occurs from one of the heavy fragments after their separation. (authors)

  11. Particle and carbon dioxide emissions from passenger vehicles operating on unleaded petrol and LPG fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristovski, Z.D.; Jayaratne, E.R.; Morawska, L.; Ayoko, G.A.; Lim, M.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the particle and carbon dioxide emissions from a fleet of six dedicated liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) powered and five unleaded petrol (ULP) powered new Ford Falcon Forte passenger vehicles was carried out on a chassis dynamometer at four different vehicle speeds-0 (idle), 40, 60, 80 and 100 km h -1 . Emission factors and their relative values between the two fuel types together with a statistical significance for any difference were estimated for each parameter. In general, LPG was found to be a 'cleaner' fuel, although in most cases, the differences were not statistically significant owing to the large variations between emissions from different vehicles. The particle number emission factors ranged from 10 11 to 10 13 km -1 and was over 70% less with LPG compared to ULP. Corresponding differences in particle mass emission factor between the two fuels were small and ranged from the order of 10 μg km -1 at 40 to about 1000 μg km -1 at 100 km h -1 . The count median particle diameter (CMD) ranged from 20 to 35 nm and was larger with LPG than with ULP in all modes except the idle mode. Carbon dioxide emission factors ranged from about 300 to 400 g km -1 at 40 km h -1 , falling with increasing speed to about 200 g km -1 at 100 km h -1 . At all speeds, the values were 10% to 18% greater with ULP than with LPG

  12. Aerosol particle mixing state, refractory particle number size distributions and emission factors in a polluted urban environment: Case study of Metro Manila, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecorius, Simonas; Madueño, Leizel; Vallar, Edgar; Alas, Honey; Betito, Grace; Birmili, Wolfram; Cambaliza, Maria Obiminda; Catipay, Grethyl; Gonzaga-Cayetano, Mylene; Galvez, Maria Cecilia; Lorenzo, Genie; Müller, Thomas; Simpas, James B.; Tamayo, Everlyn Gayle; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2017-12-01

    studies reported such high number concentration of ultrafine refractory particles under ambient conditions. Inverse modeling of emission factors of refractory particle number size distributions revealed that diesel-fed public utility Jeepneys, commonly used for public transportation, are responsible for 94% of total roadside emitted refractory particle mass. The observed results showed that the majority of urban pollution in Metro Manila is dominated by carbonaceous aerosol. This suggests that PM10 or PM2.5 metrics do not fully describe possible health related effects in this kind of urban environments. Extremely high concentrations of ultrafine particles have been and will continue to induce adverse health related effects, because of their potential toxicity. We imply that in megacities, where the major fraction of particulates originates from the transport sector, PM10 or PM2.5 mass concentration should be complemented by legislative measurements of equivalent black carbon mass concentration.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of particle-induced bit upsets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Frédéric; Touboul, Antoine; Vaillé, Jean-Roch; Boch, Jérôme; Saigné, Frédéric

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the issue of radiation-induced failures in electronic devices by developing a Monte Carlo tool called MC-Oracle. It is able to transport the particles in device, to calculate the energy deposited in the sensitive region of the device and to calculate the transient current induced by the primary particle and the secondary particles produced during nuclear reactions. We compare our simulation results with SRAM experiments irradiated with neutrons, protons and ions. The agreement is very good and shows that it is possible to predict the soft error rate (SER) for a given device in a given environment.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of particle-induced bit upsets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrobel Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the issue of radiation-induced failures in electronic devices by developing a Monte Carlo tool called MC-Oracle. It is able to transport the particles in device, to calculate the energy deposited in the sensitive region of the device and to calculate the transient current induced by the primary particle and the secondary particles produced during nuclear reactions. We compare our simulation results with SRAM experiments irradiated with neutrons, protons and ions. The agreement is very good and shows that it is possible to predict the soft error rate (SER for a given device in a given environment.

  15. Diesel passenger car PM emissions: From Euro 1 to Euro 4 with particle filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzamkiozis, Theodoros; Ntziachristos, Leonidas; Samaras, Zissis

    2010-03-01

    This paper examines the impact of the emission control and fuel technology development on the emissions of gaseous and, in particular, PM pollutants from diesel passenger cars. Three cars in five configurations in total were measured, and covered the range from Euro 1 to Euro 4 standards. The emission control ranged from no aftertreatment in the Euro 1 case, an oxidation catalyst in Euro 2, two oxidation catalysts and exhaust gas recirculation in Euro 3 and Euro 4, while a catalyzed diesel particle filter (DPF) fitted in the Euro 4 car led to a Euro 4 + DPF configuration. Both certification test and real-world driving cycles were employed. The results showed that CO and HC emissions were much lower than the emission standard over the hot-start real-world cycles. However, vehicle technologies from Euro 2 to Euro 4 exceeded the NOx and PM emission levels over at least one real-world cycle. The NOx emission level reached up to 3.6 times the certification level in case of the Euro 4 car. PM were up to 40% and 60% higher than certification level for the Euro 2 and Euro 3 cars, while the Euro 4 car emitted close or slightly below the certification level over the real-world driving cycles. PM mass reductions from Euro 1 to Euro 4 were associated with a relevant decrease in the total particle number, in particular over the certification test. This was not followed by a respective reduction in the solid particle number which remained rather constant between the four technologies at 0.86 × 10 14 km -1 (coefficient of variation 9%). As a result, the ratio of solid vs. total particle number ranged from ˜50% in Euro 1-100% in Euro 4. A significant reduction of more than three orders of magnitude in solid particle number is achieved with the introduction of the DPF. However, the potential for nucleation mode formation at high speed from the DPF car is an issue that needs to be considered in the over all assessment of its environmental benefit. Finally, comparison of the

  16. Urban stress-induced biogenic VOC emissions and SOA-forming potentials in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ghirardo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Trees can significantly impact the urban air chemistry by the uptake and emission of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs, which are involved in ozone and particle formation. Here we present the emission potentials of "constitutive" (cBVOCs and "stress-induced" BVOCs (sBVOCs from the dominant broadleaf woody plant species in the megacity of Beijing. Based on the municipal tree census and cuvette BVOC measurements on leaf level, we built an inventory of BVOC emissions, and assessed the potential impact of BVOCs on secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation in 2005 and 2010, i.e., before and after realizing the large tree-planting program for the 2008 Olympic Games. We found that sBVOCs, such as fatty acid derivatives, benzenoids, and sesquiterpenes, constituted a significant fraction ( ∼  40 % of the total annual BVOC emissions, and we estimated that the overall annual BVOC budget may have doubled from  ∼  4.8  ×  109 g C year−1 in 2005 to  ∼  10.3  ×  109 g C year−1 in 2010 due to the increase in urban greening, while at the same time the emission of anthropogenic VOCs (AVOCs decreased by 24 %. Based on the BVOC emission assessment, we estimated the biological impact on SOA mass formation potential in Beijing. Constitutive and stress-induced BVOCs might produce similar amounts of secondary aerosol in Beijing. However, the main contributors of SOA-mass formations originated from anthropogenic sources (> 90 %. This study demonstrates the general importance to include sBVOCs when studying BVOC emissions. Although the main problems regarding air quality in Beijing still originate from anthropogenic activities, the present survey suggests that in urban plantation programs, the selection of low-emitting plant species has some potential beneficial effects on urban air quality.

  17. UV-induced carbon monoxide emission from living vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dan; Albert, Kristian Rost; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard

    2013-01-01

    The global burden of carbon monoxide (CO) is rather uncertain. In this paper we address the potential for UV-induced CO emission by living terrestrial vegetation surfaces. Real-time measurements of CO concentrations were made with a cavity enhanced laser spectrometer connected in closed loop...... to either an ecosystem chamber or a plant-leaf scale chamber. Leaves of all examined plant species exhibited emission of CO in response to artificial UV-radiation as well as the UV-component of natural solar radiation. The UV-induced rate of CO emission exhibited a rather low dependence on temperature......, indicating an abiotic process. The emission of CO in response to the UV-component of natural solar radiation was also evident at the ecosystem scale....

  18. Particle number and particulate mass emissions of heavy duty vehicles in real operating conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymaniak Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the issue of PM emissions from HDV vehicles. The theoretical part discusses the problem of emission of this toxic compound in terms of particle structure taking into account the mass and dimensions of PM. Next, the methodology of the research and the results of the measurements performed under the conditions of actual operation were presented. The test drive routes were chosen in accordance with the operational purpose of the selected test vehicles. Two heavy vehicles were used for the study: a tractor with trailer and an eighteen meter long city bus. The test vehicles complied with the Euro V standard, with the second vehicle additionally complying with the EEV standard and being equipped with a DPF. The analysis of the research results was performed in the aspect of determining the operating time densities of vehicles and their drive systems as well as defining their emission characteristics and ecological indicators. PM and PN emissions were measured in the tests and particle size distribution was determined. It was shown that the exhaust gas after treatment system used in the city bus had a positive influence on the ecological indicators and had contributed to the reduction of PN emissions for heavier particles.

  19. Airborne particle emission of a commercial 3D printer: the effect of filament material and printing temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabile, L; Scungio, M; Buonanno, G; Arpino, F; Ficco, G

    2017-03-01

    The knowledge of exposure to the airborne particle emitted from three-dimensional (3D) printing activities is becoming a crucial issue due to the relevant spreading of such devices in recent years. To this end, a low-cost desktop 3D printer based on fused deposition modeling (FDM) principle was used. Particle number, alveolar-deposited surface area, and mass concentrations were measured continuously during printing processes to evaluate particle emission rates (ERs) and factors. Particle number distribution measurements were also performed to characterize the size of the emitted particles. Ten different materials and different extrusion temperatures were considered in the survey. Results showed that all the investigated materials emit particles in the ultrafine range (with a mode in the 10-30-nm range), whereas no emission of super-micron particles was detected for all the materials under investigation. The emission was affected strongly by the extrusion temperature. In fact, the ERs increase as the extrusion temperature increases. Emission rates up to 1×10 12  particles min -1 were calculated. Such high ERs were estimated to cause large alveolar surface area dose in workers when 3D activities run. In fact, a 40-min-long 3D printing was found to cause doses up to 200 mm 2 . © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Influence of firebed temperature on inorganic particle emissions in a residential wood pellet boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrig, Matthias; Jaeger, Dirk; Pelz, Stefan K.; Weissinger, Alexander; Groll, Andreas; Thorwarth, Harald; Haslinger, Walter

    2016-07-01

    The temperature-dependent release of inorganic elements is the first step of the main formation pathway of particle emissions in automatically fired biomass burners. To investigate this step, a residential pellet boiler with an underfeed-burner was equipped with a direct firebed cooling. This test setup enabled decreased firebed temperatures without affecting further parameters like air flow rates or oxygen content in the firebed. A reduction of particle emissions in PM1-fraction at activated firebed cooling was found by impactor measurement and by optical particle counter. The affected particles were found in the size range boiler ash showed no statistically significant differences due to the firebed cooling. Therefore, our results indicate that the direct firebed cooling influenced the release of potassium (K) without affecting other chemical reactions.

  1. Effects of fresh lubricant oils on particle emissions emitted by a modern gasoline direct injection passenger car.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirjola, Liisa; Karjalainen, Panu; Heikkilä, Juha; Saari, Sampo; Tzamkiozis, Theodoros; Ntziachristos, Leonidas; Kulmala, Kari; Keskinen, Jorma; Rönkkö, Topi

    2015-03-17

    Particle emissions from a modern turbocharged gasoline direct injection passenger car equipped with a three-way catalyst and an exhaust gas recirculation system were studied while the vehicle was running on low-sulfur gasoline and, consecutively, with five different lubrication oils. Exhaust particle number concentration, size distribution, and volatility were determined both at laboratory and on-road conditions. The results indicated that the choice of lubricant affected particle emissions both during the cold start and warm driving cycles. However, the contribution of engine oil depended on driving conditions being higher during acceleration and steady state driving than during deceleration. The highest emission factors were found with two oils that had the highest metal content. The results indicate that a 10% decrease in the Zn content of engine oils is linked with an 11-13% decrease to the nonvolatile particle number emissions in steady driving conditions and a 5% decrease over the New European Driving Cycle. The effect of lubricant on volatile particles was even higher, on the order of 20%.

  2. Particle emission from polymer-doped water ice matrices induced by non-linear absorption of laser light at 1064 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purice, A.; Schou, Jørgen; Dinescu, M.

    2006-01-01

    Emission of PEG (polyethylene glycol) molecules and ions from an ice target induced by laser irradiation in the infrared (IR) regime at 1064 nm was studied. Matrices of 1 wt% PEG flash-frozen solutions were used for polymer deposition with MAPLE (matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation). Even...

  3. Ethanol emission from loose corn silage and exposed silage particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Montes, Felipe; Rotz, C. Alan; Mitloehner, Frank

    2010-11-01

    Silage on dairy farms has been identified as a major source of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. However, rates of VOC emission from silage are not accurately known. In this work, we measured ethanol (a dominant silage VOC) emission from loose corn silage and exposed corn silage particles using wind tunnel systems. Flux of ethanol was highest immediately after exposing loose silage samples to moving air (as high as 220 g m -2 h -1) and declined by as much as 76-fold over 12 h as ethanol was depleted from samples. Emission rate and cumulative 12 h emission increased with temperature, silage permeability, exposed surface area, and air velocity over silage samples. These responses suggest that VOC emission from silage on farms is sensitive to climate and management practices. Ethanol emission rates from loose silage were generally higher than previous estimates of total VOC emission rates from silage and mixed feed. For 15 cm deep loose samples, mean cumulative emission was as high as 170 g m -2 (80% of initial ethanol mass) after 12 h of exposure to an air velocity of 5 m s -1. Emission rates measured with an emission isolation flux chamber were lower than rates measured in a wind tunnel and in an open setting. Results show that the US EPA emission isolation flux chamber method is not appropriate for estimating VOC emission rates from silage in the field.

  4. Evaluation of methods for the physical characterization of the fine particle emissions from two residential wood combustion appliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, John S.; Kariher, Peter H.; Dong, Yuanji

    The fine particle emissions from a U. S. certified non-catalytic wood stove and a zero-clearance fireplace burning Quercus rubra L. (northern red oak) and Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas fir) cordwood each at two different moisture levels were determined. Emission testing was performed using both time-integrated and continuous instrumentation for total particle mass, particle number, particle size distribution, and fixed combustion gases using an atmospheric wind tunnel, full-flow laboratory dilution tunnel, and dilution stack sampler with a comparison made between the three dilution systems and two sampling filter types. The total mass emission factors (EFs) for all dilution systems and filter media are extremely variable ranging from fireplace emissions burning wet oak averaged 11 g kg -1. A substantial number of ultrafine particles in the accumulation size range were also observed during all tests as determined by an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI) and Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer. The PM-2.5 (particles ≤2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter) fractions determined from the ELPI electrometer data ranged from 93 to 98% (mass) depending on appliance type as reported previously by Hays et al. (Aerosol Science, 34, 1061, 2003).

  5. Climate effects of a hypothetical regional nuclear war: Sensitivity to emission duration and particle composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Lindvall, Jenny; Ekman, Annica M. L.; Svensson, Gunilla

    2016-11-01

    Here, we use a coupled atmospheric-ocean-aerosol model to investigate the plume development and climate effects of the smoke generated by fires following a regional nuclear war between emerging third-world nuclear powers. We simulate a standard scenario where 5 Tg of black carbon (BC) is emitted over 1 day in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere. However, it is likely that the emissions from the fires ignited by bomb detonations include a substantial amount of particulate organic matter (POM) and that they last more than 1 day. We therefore test the sensitivity of the aerosol plume and climate system to the BC/POM ratio (1:3, 1:9) and to the emission length (1 day, 1 week, 1 month). We find that in general, an emission length of 1 month substantially reduces the cooling compared to the 1-day case, whereas taking into account POM emissions notably increases the cooling and the reduction of precipitation associated with the nuclear war during the first year following the detonation. Accounting for POM emissions increases the particle size in the short-emission-length scenarios (1 day/1 week), reducing the residence time of the injected particle. While the initial cooling is more intense when including POM emission, the long-lasting effects, while still large, may be less extreme compared to the BC-only case. Our study highlights that the emission altitude reached by the plume is sensitive to both the particle type emitted by the fires and the emission duration. Consequently, the climate effects of a nuclear war are strongly dependent on these parameters.

  6. Alpha-particle emission probabilities in the decay of 239Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Torano, E.; Acena, M.L.; Bortels, G.; Mouchel, D.

    1993-01-01

    The alpha-particle emission probabilities (P α ) of 239 Pu have been measured using material of highest enrichment and radiochemical purity, thin sources produced by vacuum sublimation, and high-resolution α spectroscopy with ion-implanted Si detectors (PIPS). The results for the major emissions are P α0.07 =0.7077±0.0014, P α13 =0.1711±0.0014 and P α51 =0.1194±0.0007, which for the P α0.07 is about 3.6% lower than the recent evaluated value in the literature. (orig.)

  7. Particle and NO{sub x} Emissions from a HVO-Fueled Diesel Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Happonen, M.

    2012-10-15

    Concerns about oil price, the strengthening climate change and traffic related health effects are all reasons which have promoted the research of renewable fuels. One renewable fuel candidate is diesel consisting of hydrotreated vegetable oils (HVO). The fuel is essentially paraffinic, has high cetane number (>80) and contains practically no oxygen, aromatics or sulphur. Furthermore, HVO fuel can be produced from various feedstocks including palm, soybean and rapeseed oils as well as animal fats. HVO has also been observed to reduce all regulated engine exhaust emissions compared to conventional diesel fuel. In this thesis, the effect of HVO fuel on engine exhaust emissions has been studied further. The thesis is roughly divided into two parts. The first part explores the emission reductions associated with the fuel and studies techniques which could be applied to achieve further emission reductions. One of the studied techniques was adjusting engine settings to better suit HVO fuel. The settings chosen for adjustments were injection pressure, injection timing, the amount of EGR and the timing of inlet valve closing (with constant inlet air mass flow, i.e. Miller timing). The engine adjustments were also successfully targeted to reduce either NO{sub x} or particulate emissions or both. The other applied emission reduction technique was the addition of oxygenate to HVO fuel. The chosen oxygenate was di-n-pentyl ether (DNPE), and tested fuel blend included 20 wt-% DNPE and 80 wt-% HVO. Thus, the oxygen content of the resulting blend was 2 wt-%. Reductions of over 25 % were observed in particulate emissions with the blend compared to pure HVO while NOx emissions altered under 5 %. On the second part of this thesis, the effect of the studied fuels on chosen surface properties of exhaust particles were studied using tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) techniques and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The studied surface properties were oxidizability and

  8. Electromagnetic scattering and emission by a fixed multi-particle object in local thermal equilibrium: General formalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I

    2017-10-01

    The majority of previous studies of the interaction of individual particles and multi-particle groups with electromagnetic field have focused on either elastic scattering in the presence of an external field or self-emission of electromagnetic radiation. In this paper we apply semi-classical fluctuational electrodynamics to address the ubiquitous scenario wherein a fixed particle or a fixed multi-particle group is exposed to an external quasi-polychromatic electromagnetic field as well as thermally emits its own electromagnetic radiation. We summarize the main relevant axioms of fluctuational electrodynamics, formulate in maximally rigorous mathematical terms the general scattering-emission problem for a fixed object, and derive such fundamental corollaries as the scattering-emission volume integral equation, the Lippmann-Schwinger equation for the dyadic transition operator, the multi-particle scattering-emission equations, and the far-field limit. We show that in the framework of fluctuational electrodynamics, the computation of the self-emitted component of the total field is completely separated from that of the elastically scattered field. The same is true of the computation of the emitted and elastically scattered components of quadratic/bilinear forms in the total electromagnetic field. These results pave the way to the practical computation of relevant optical observables.

  9. Emission temperatures from the decay of particle-unstable complex nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, T.K.

    1990-01-01

    Relative populations of particle-unstable states were measured for complex fragments emitted in the reaction 14 N + Ag at E/A = 35 MeV by using a position sensitive high resolution hodoscope. Experimental population probabilities of particle-unstable states were extracted by fitting the coincidence spectra of the decay products by an appropriate R-matrix or Breit-Wigner formalism. According to thermal models, the populations of excited states at freezeout are expected to follow a Boltzmann distribution weighted by the emission temperature of the system. Tests of this freezeout assumption were made by comparing the experimental population to the predictions of statistical calculations. Extensive statistical calculation which include the effect of sequential feeding from heavier particle unstable nuclei were performed to estimate the population probabilities and the ratios of population probabilities indicate emission temperatures of about 3-4 MeV. But a detailed comparison for individual fragments for a calculation with T em = 4 MeV reveals that about half of the measured population probabilities and one third of the ratios of the population probabilities differ significantly from the predictions of statistical calculations. Calculations which include rotational effects could not satisfactorily account for this discrepancy. These results suggest a possible breakdown of the assumption of local thermal equilibrium at freezeout

  10. Impact of aftertreatment devices and driving conditions on unregulated emissions for Euro 5 vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    LIU, Yao; LOUIS, Cédric; GORIAUX, Mathieu; CHAUMOND, Agnès; TASSEL, Patrick; PERRET, Pascal; ANDRE, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Road traffic is a major contributor of air pollution in urban areas and particularly passenger cars. To reduce regulated emissions, new aftertreatment devices and new technologies were developed (catalysed or additived Diesel particle filter, direct injected gasoline vehicle...). These new technologies induce modifications of unregulated emissions (VOC, BTEX, PAH, NO2, black carbon, metals, ultrafine particles). Unregulated pollutants might induce many health effects regarding their toxicity ...

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Particle Ration Induced Apoptosis in Lymphocyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yufang

    Space radiation, composed of high-energy charged nuclei (HZE particles) and protons, has been previously shown to severely impact immune homeostasis in mice. To determine the molecular mechanisms that mediate acute lymphocyte depletion following exposure to HZE particle radiation mice were exposed to particle radiation beams at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We found that mice given whole body 5 6Fe particle irradiation (1GeV /n) had dose-dependent losses in total lymphocyte numbers in the spleen and thymus (using 200, 100 and 50 cGy), with thymocytes being more sensitive than splenocytes. All phenotypic subsets were reduced in number. In general, T cells and B cells were equally sensitive, while CD8+ T cells were more senstive than CD4+ T cells. In the thymus, immature CD4+CD8+ double-positive thymocytes were exquisitely sensitive to radiation-induced losses, single-positive CD4 or CD8 cells were less sensitive, and the least mature double negative cells were resistant. Irradiation of mice deficient in genes encoding essential apoptosis-inducing proteins revealed that the mechanism of lymphocyte depletion is independent of Fas ligand and TRAIL (TNF-ralated apoptosis-inducing ligand), in contrast to γ-radiation-induced lymphocyte losses which require the Fas-FasL pathway. Using inhibitors in vitro, lymphocyte apoptosis induced by HZE particle radiation was found to be caspase dependent, and not involve nitric oxide or oxygen free radicals.

  12. Discussion of the origin of secondary photon and secondary ion emission during energetic particle irradiation of solids. I. The collision cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.B.; Gruen, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    Secondary photon and secondary ion emission during energetic particle irradiation of solid surfaces is assumed to arise due to excitation and de-excitation of sputtered particles originating from a collision cascade induced by the incident projectile. The excitation is postulated to occur by two alternative mechanisms: path (a), where excitation occurs at or very near the surface of the solid due to atom--atom or atom--electron collisions; and path (b), where excitation occurs as the sputtered particle leaves the solid, but is still under its influence so that electron exchange processes are permitted. Once the excited and/or ionized sputtered particle is formed nonradiative de-excitation processes are then included in the discussion which allow the excited and/or ionized particle to be de-excited and/or neutralized. The result of these nonradiative de-excitation processes is shown to provide a possible channel for the formation of new excited ''daughters'' by the de-excitation of the initial excited ''parent''. Depending on the initial excitation probability of the parent the new excited daughters are shown to contribute to various energy regions of the excited and/or ionized secondary particle energy distribution. A mathematical formalism is developed based on the neutral sputtered atom energy and velocity distributions assuming a collision cascade origin for these sputtered particles. By including various models for the excitation probability, and the survival probability for excited particles once formed to not undergo nonradiative de-excitation the resulting energy and velocity distributions of the sputtered excited and/or ionized secondary particles are calculated. These distributions are found to be a function of the emission angle depending on the model assumed for the initial excitation. From this formalism the total excited secondary particle yield may be calculated

  13. Support vector machine to predict diesel engine performance and emission parameters fueled with nano-particles additive to diesel fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, M.; Najafi, G.; Ghobadian, B.; Mamat, R.; Noor, M. M.; Moosavian, A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies the use of adaptive Support Vector Machine (SVM) to predict the performance parameters and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine operating on nanodiesel blended fuels. In order to predict the engine parameters, the whole experimental data were randomly divided into training and testing data. For SVM modelling, different values for radial basis function (RBF) kernel width and penalty parameters (C) were considered and the optimum values were then found. The results demonstrate that SVM is capable of predicting the diesel engine performance and emissions. In the experimental step, Carbon nano tubes (CNT) (40, 80 and 120 ppm) and nano silver particles (40, 80 and 120 ppm) with nanostructure were prepared and added as additive to the diesel fuel. Six cylinders, four-stroke diesel engine was fuelled with these new blended fuels and operated at different engine speeds. Experimental test results indicated the fact that adding nano particles to diesel fuel, increased diesel engine power and torque output. For nano-diesel it was found that the brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) was decreased compared to the net diesel fuel. The results proved that with increase of nano particles concentrations (from 40 ppm to 120 ppm) in diesel fuel, CO2 emission increased. CO emission in diesel fuel with nano-particles was lower significantly compared to pure diesel fuel. UHC emission with silver nano-diesel blended fuel decreased while with fuels that contains CNT nano particles increased. The trend of NOx emission was inverse compared to the UHC emission. With adding nano particles to the blended fuels, NOx increased compared to the net diesel fuel. The tests revealed that silver & CNT nano particles can be used as additive in diesel fuel to improve complete combustion of the fuel and reduce the exhaust emissions significantly.

  14. Alpha-particle emission probabilities of ²³⁶U obtained by alpha spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouli, M; Pommé, S; Jobbágy, V; Van Ammel, R; Paepen, J; Stroh, H; Benedik, L

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry was performed with an ion-implanted silicon detector in vacuum on a homogeneously electrodeposited (236)U source. The source was measured at different solid angles subtended by the detector, varying between 0.8% and 2.4% of 4π sr, to assess the influence of coincidental detection of alpha-particles and conversion electrons on the measured alpha-particle emission probabilities. Additional measurements were performed using a bending magnet to eliminate conversion electrons, the results of which coincide with normal measurements extrapolated to an infinitely small solid angle. The measured alpha emission probabilities for the three main peaks - 74.20 (5)%, 25.68 (5)% and 0.123 (5)%, respectively - are consistent with literature data, but their precision has been improved by at least one order of magnitude in this work. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Neutron-Induced Charged Particle Studies at LANSCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Young; Haight, Robert C.

    2014-09-01

    Direct measurements on neutron-induced charged particle reactions are of interest for nuclear astrophysics and applied nuclear energy. LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Science Center) produces neutrons in energy of thermal to several hundreds MeV. There has been an effort at LANSCE to upgrade neutron-induced charged particle detection technique, which follows on (n,z) measurements made previously here and will have improved capabilities including larger solid angles, higher efficiency, and better signal to background ratios. For studying cross sections of low-energy neutron induced alpha reactions, Frisch-gridded ionization chamber is designed with segmented anodes for improving signal-to-noise ratio near reaction thresholds. Since double-differential cross sections on (n,p) and (n,a) reactions up to tens of MeV provide important information on deducing nuclear level density, the ionization chamber will be coupled with silicon strip detectors (DSSD) in order to stop energetic charged particles. In this paper, we will present the status of this development including the progress on detector design, calibrations and Monte Carlo simulations. This work is funded by the US Department of Energy - Los Alamos National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  16. Multielement proton-induced x-ray emission analysis of Bangladeshi tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadi, D.A.; Ali, M.; Biswas, S.K.; Islam, M.M.; Khan, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    The concentration of 12 different elements in cigarette tobacco of different brands, commercially made in Bangladesh, was determined using the proton particle-induced x-ray emission (proton PIXE) method. In all the present experiments, proton beams of 2.0 MeV (on the target in air) and about 30 nA current were used for characteristic x-ray excitation. The concentration of the elements (K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb and Sr) was determined by comparison with a calibration obtained from the NBS orchard leaf standard SRM 1571. The results have been compared with available data on some foreign brands of tobacco and the probable reasons for the difference in the contents of some of the elements found in the Bangladeshi brands are discussed. (author)

  17. Toxicological properties of emission particles from heavy duty engines powered by conventional and bio-based diesel fuels and compressed natural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalava, Pasi I; Aakko-Saksa, Päivi; Murtonen, Timo; Happo, Mikko S; Markkanen, Ari; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Hakulinen, Pasi; Hillamo, Risto; Mäki-Paakkanen, Jorma; Salonen, Raimo O; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2012-09-29

    One of the major areas for increasing the use of renewable energy is in traffic fuels e.g. bio-based fuels in diesel engines especially in commuter traffic. Exhaust emissions from fossil diesel fuelled engines are known to cause adverse effects on human health, but there is very limited information available on how the new renewable fuels may change the harmfulness of the emissions, especially particles (PM). We evaluated the PM emissions from a heavy-duty EURO IV diesel engine powered by three different fuels; the toxicological properties of the emitted PM were investigated. Conventional diesel fuel (EN590) and two biodiesels were used - rapeseed methyl ester (RME, EN14214) and hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) either as such or as 30% blends with EN590. EN590 and 100% HVO were also operated with or without an oxidative catalyst (DOC + POC). A bus powered by compressed natural gas (CNG) was included for comparison with the liquid fuels. However, the results from CNG powered bus cannot be directly compared to the other situations in this study. High volume PM samples were collected on PTFE filters from a constant volume dilution tunnel. The PM mass emission with HVO was smaller and with RME larger than that with EN590, but both biofuels produced lower PAH contents in emission PM. The DOC + POC catalyst greatly reduced the PM emission and PAH content in PM with both HVO and EN590. Dose-dependent TNFα and MIP-2 responses to all PM samples were mostly at the low or moderate level after 24-hour exposure in a mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Emission PM from situations with the smallest mass emissions (HVO + cat and CNG) displayed the strongest potency in MIP-2 production. The catalyst slightly decreased the PM-induced TNFα responses and somewhat increased the MIP-2 responses with HVO fuel. Emission PM with EN590 and with 30% HVO blended in EN590 induced the strongest genotoxic responses, which were significantly greater than those with EN590

  18. Particles and emissions from a diesel engine equipped with a humid air motor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nord, Kent; Zurita, Grover; Tingvall, Bror; Haupt, Dan [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden). Div. of Environmental Technology

    2002-02-01

    A system for reduction of NO{sub x}, humid air motor system (HAM), has been connected to an eleven liters diesel engine. Earlier studies have demonstrated the system's capacity to lower NO{sub x}-emissions from diesel engines. The present study is directed to investigate their influence of the system on the emissions of particles, aldehydes and noise while at the same time monitoring essential engine parameters, water consumption and verifying the NO{sub x} reducing ability. The system has been tested under the various conditions stated in 13-mode cycle ECE R-49. Additional tests have been necessary for sampling and measurements of particles and noise. The results show that HAM caused a large reduction of the NO{sub x} emissions while the engine performance was almost unaffected. Average reduction of NO{sub x} during the different modes of ECE R-49 was 51,1%. The reduction was directly related to the humidity of the inlet air and a further reduction can be anticipated with higher humidity. Samples have also been taken for acetaldehydes and formaldehyde. The results suggest a large reduction of aldehydes, in the range of 78 to 100%, when using HAM. Unfortunately it cannot be excluded that the results obtained are a result of a combination of high air humidity and the sampling technique used. The influence of the system on the emission of hydrocarbons was negligible while a moderate increase in the emission of carbon monoxide was noticed. No confident relationship between air humidity and the observed effects could be detected. Particle number concentrations and size distribution have also been measured. The measurements showed that the particle number concentrations was usually increased when HAM was coupled to the engine. The increase in particle number concentration, observed in five out of six running modes, varied between 46 and 148%. There was no trend indicating a shift in mean particle diameter when using HAM. Noise level and cylinder pressure have also

  19. In-situ studies on volatile jet exhaust particle emissions - impacts of fuel sulfur content and environmental conditions on nuclei-mode aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, F.; Baumann, R.; Petzold, A.; Busen, R.; Schulte, P.; Fiebig, M. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Brock, C.A. [Denver Univ., CO (United States). Dept. of Engineering

    2000-02-01

    In-situ measurements of ultrafine aerosol particle emissions were performed at cruise altitudes behind the DLR ATTAS research jet (RR M45H M501 engines) and a B737-300 aircraft (CFM56-3B1 engines). Measurements were made 0.15-20 seconds after emission as the source aircraft burned fuel with sulfur contents (FSC) of 2.6, 56 or 118 mg kg{sup -1}. Particle size distributions of from 3 to 60 nm diameter were determined using CN-counters with varying lower size detection limits. Volatile particle concentrations in the aircraft plumes strongly increased as diameter decreased toward the sizes of large molecular clusters, illustrating that apparent particle emissions are extremely sensitive to the smallest particle size detectable by the instrument used. Environmental conditions and plume age alone could influence the number of detected ultrafine (volatile) aerosols within an order of magnitude, as well. The observed volatile particle emissions decreased nonlinearly as FSC decreased to 60 mg kg{sup -1}, reaching minimum values of about 2 x 10{sup 17} kg{sup -1} and 2 x 10{sup 16} kg{sup -1} for particles >3 nm and >5 nm, respectively. Volatile particle emissions did not change significantly as FSCs were further reduced below 60 mg kg{sup -1}. Volatile particle emissions did not differ significantly between the two studied engine types. In contrast, soot particle emissions from the modern CFM56-3B1 engines were 4-5 times less (4 x 10{sup 14} kg{sup -1}) than from the older RR M45H M501 engines (1.8 x 10{sup 15} kg{sup -1}). Contrail processing has been identified as an efficient sink/quenching parameter for ultrafine particles and reduces the remaining interstitial aerosol by factors 2-10 depending on particle size.

  20. Contribution to depth profiling by particle induced X-ray emission application to the study of zinc diffusion in AgZn alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frontier, J.P.

    1987-08-01

    A contribution of the study of the capacities of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (P.I.X.E.) for depth profiling, in the range of 1 to 10 micrometers and over, is presented here. It is shown that, in a non destructuve way, the concentration profile of a given element can be obtained, in principle, by deconvoluting the X-ray yields of this element, measured in a set of experiments in which the energy of the impinging protons, hence their range, is systematically varied. Direct deconvolution procedure, which leads to the inversion of an ill-conditionned matrix is unsuitable. So we generalized the iterative procedure previously used by Vegh to solve a similar problem. Alternatively we also used a fitting procedure of several parameters which gave us somewhat better than those of the iterative procedure. Both algorithms where applied to a set of X-ray yields induced by protons of energy between 0.45 to 2 MeV, corresponding to the first 6 micrometers of various depletion profiles of zinc in an initially homogeneous Ag-3 at % Zn annealed under vacuum. For investigation of deeper layers, a sectionning technique which consists in analysing thin film hydroxide targets by specific chemistry of tiny turning, was developped with success. Cross-reference of all the obtained profiles was made with electron microprobe determination on transverse section, and with the predictions of the theory of atomic diffusion. In addition, the possibilities of increasing the depth resolution by developping techniques either of controled sanding of the surface, or analysis of the sample is discussed [fr

  1. Solid Particle Number Emission Factors of Euro VI Heavy-Duty Vehicles on the Road and in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giechaskiel, Barouch

    2018-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM), and in particular ultrafine particles, have a negative impact on human health. The contribution of vehicle PM emissions to air pollution is typically quantified with emission inventories, which need vehicle emission factors as input. Heavy-duty vehicles, although they represent a small percentage of the vehicle population in nearly every major country, contribute the majority of the on-road PM emissions. However, the published data of modern heavy-duty vehicle emissions are scarce, and for the newest Euro VI technologies, almost non-existent. The main objective of this paper is to present Solid Particle Number (SPN) emission factors from Euro VI heavy-duty vehicles using diesel, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), or Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). Urban, rural and motorway (highway) emissions were determined on the road at various European cities using SPN Portable Emission Measurement Systems (PEMS). Additional tests on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer showed that the solid sub-23 nm fraction, which is not covered at the moment in the European regulation, is high, especially for CNG engines. The significant contribution of regeneration events and the effect of ambient temperature and engine cold-start on particle emissions were also discussed. PMID:29425174

  2. Solid Particle Number Emission Factors of Euro VI Heavy-Duty Vehicles on the Road and in the Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barouch Giechaskiel

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Particulate matter (PM, and in particular ultrafine particles, have a negative impact on human health. The contribution of vehicle PM emissions to air pollution is typically quantified with emission inventories, which need vehicle emission factors as input. Heavy-duty vehicles, although they represent a small percentage of the vehicle population in nearly every major country, contribute the majority of the on-road PM emissions. However, the published data of modern heavy-duty vehicle emissions are scarce, and for the newest Euro VI technologies, almost non-existent. The main objective of this paper is to present Solid Particle Number (SPN emission factors from Euro VI heavy-duty vehicles using diesel, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG, or Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG. Urban, rural and motorway (highway emissions were determined on the road at various European cities using SPN Portable Emission Measurement Systems (PEMS. Additional tests on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer showed that the solid sub-23 nm fraction, which is not covered at the moment in the European regulation, is high, especially for CNG engines. The significant contribution of regeneration events and the effect of ambient temperature and engine cold-start on particle emissions were also discussed.

  3. Solid Particle Number Emission Factors of Euro VI Heavy-Duty Vehicles on the Road and in the Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giechaskiel, Barouch

    2018-02-09

    Particulate matter (PM), and in particular ultrafine particles, have a negative impact on human health. The contribution of vehicle PM emissions to air pollution is typically quantified with emission inventories, which need vehicle emission factors as input. Heavy-duty vehicles, although they represent a small percentage of the vehicle population in nearly every major country, contribute the majority of the on-road PM emissions. However, the published data of modern heavy-duty vehicle emissions are scarce, and for the newest Euro VI technologies, almost non-existent. The main objective of this paper is to present Solid Particle Number (SPN) emission factors from Euro VI heavy-duty vehicles using diesel, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), or Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). Urban, rural and motorway (highway) emissions were determined on the road at various European cities using SPN Portable Emission Measurement Systems (PEMS). Additional tests on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer showed that the solid sub-23 nm fraction, which is not covered at the moment in the European regulation, is high, especially for CNG engines. The significant contribution of regeneration events and the effect of ambient temperature and engine cold-start on particle emissions were also discussed.

  4. An experimental study of electron transfer and emission during particle-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, C.T.

    2000-09-01

    A new coincidence technique has been developed and used to study the secondary electron emission that arises during the interaction of ions with surfaces. This coincidence technique allows the secondary electron emission statistics due to the impact of singly, doubly and multiply charged ions on surfaces to be measured in coincidence with reflected particles, in specific charge states and with specific post-collision trajectories. This system has been used to study the impact of 8 keV H + ions on polycrystalline copper and aluminium targets. Under these conditions the potential emission contribution is negligible and the electron emission is almost entirely due to kinetic emission processes. The sub-surface contribution to the observed electron emission has been isolated using two newly developed models. These models provide valuable information about the depth and amount of surface penetration and on the probability for subsequent electron transport to the surface. The impact of 2 - 100 keV Xe q+ (q = 1 - 10) ions on polycrystalline copper has also been studied using this system. From the subsequent data the potential and kinetic contributions to secondary electron emission have been separated using a previously established model for potential emission. The resulting kinetic emission yield increases with increasing ion impact energy, consistent with current concepts on quasimolecular ionisation. For ions impacting at large incident angles evidence for sub-surface emission has also been observed. The degree of penetration increases with ion impact energy, consistent with current concepts on this effect. The formation of H - ions from incident H + ions has also been studied by measuring the secondary electron emission statistics in coincidence with reflected particles in specific final charge states. This preliminary data is consistent with a two-step process of Auger neutralisation followed by resonant electron capture to the affinity level. However this mechanism

  5. Helium burning: a further measurement of the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission of 16 Na

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, Moshe

    1997-01-01

    The 12 C (α,γ) 16 O is a key (but still unknown) reaction in helium burning. Several attempts to constrain the p-wave S-factor at Helium burning temperatures (200 M K) using the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission of 16 N have been made. However, some discrepancy exists between the spectra measured at Settle and that of TRIUMF. We have improved our previous study of the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission of 16 N by improving our statistical sample (by more than a factor of 5), improving the energy resolution of the experiment (by 20%), and in understanding our line shape, deduced from measured quantities. Our newly measured spectrum of the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission of 16 N is consistent with the Seattle ('95) data, as well as an earlier experiment performed at Mains ('71) and is not consistent with the TRIUMF ('94) data. (author)

  6. Aerosol vertical distribution, new particle formation, and jet aircraft particle emissions in the free troposhere and tropopause region; Vertikalverteilung und Neubildungsprozesse des Aerosols und partikelfoermige Flugzeugemissionen in der freien Troposphaere und Tropopausenregion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, F P

    2000-07-01

    A contribution to the understanding of natural and anthropogenously induced particle formation as well as aerosol physical transformation processes within the free troposphere (FT) is introduced. Documentation and interpretation of empirical data relevant with respect to possible climatologic impact of anthropogenous aerosol emissions into the atmosphere is presented. The first section describes new technique for high spatial resolution measurements of ultrafine aerosol particles by condensation nucleus counters (CNCs), a necessary prerequisite for the observation of natural particle formation and jet aircraft emissions. The second section illustrates vertical distribution and variability ranges of the aerosol in the FT and the tropopause region (TP). Typical microphysical states of the atmospheric aerosol within the Northern Hemisphere are documented by means of systematic measurements during more than 60 flight missions. Simple mathematical parameterizations of the aerosol vertical distribution and aerosol size distributions are developed. Important aerosol sources within the FT are localized and possible aerosol formation processes are discussed. The third section is focussed on jet-engine particle emissions within the FT and TP. A unique inflight experiment for detection of extremely high concentrations (>10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}) of extremely small (donw to <3 nm) aerosols inside the exhaust plumes of several jet aircraft is described. Particle emission indices and emission-controlling parameters are deduced. Most important topic is the impact of fuel sulfur content of kerosine on number, size and chemical composition of jet particle emissions. Generalized results are parameterized in form of lognormal aerosol particle size distributions. (orig.) [German] Ein Beitrag zum Verstaendnis natuerlicher und anthropogen induzierter Aerosolneubildung sowie physikalischer Aerosolumwandlung in der freien Troposphaere wird vorgestellt. Empirisch gewonnenes Datenmaterial wird

  7. Real-world emission factors of fine and ultrafine aerosol particles for different traffic situations in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, David; Weingartner, Ernest; Ordónez, Carlos; Gehrig, Robert; Hill, Matz; Buchmann, Brigitte; Baltensperger, Urs

    2005-11-01

    Extended field measurements of particle number (size distribution of particle diameters, D, in the range between 18 nm and 10 microm), surface area concentrations, and PM1 and PM10 mass concentrations were performed in Switzerland to determine traffic emissions using a comprehensive set of instruments. Measurements took place at roads with representative traffic regimes: at the kerbside of a motorway (120 km h(-1)), a highway (80-100 km h(-1)), and in an urban area with stop-and-go traffic (0-50 km h(-1)) regulated by light signals. Mean diurnal variations showed that the highest pollutant concentrations were during the morning rush hours, especially of the number density in the nanoparticle size range (D real-life" emission factors were derived using NOx concentrations to calculate dilution factors. Particle number and volume emission factors of different size ranges (18-50 nm, 18-100 nm, and 18-300 nm) were derived for the total vehicle fleet and separated into a light-duty (LDV) and a heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) contribution. The total particle number emissions per vehicle were found to be about 11.7-13.5 x 10(14) particles km(-1) for constant speed (80-120 km h(-1) and 3.9 x 10(14) particles km(-1) for urban driving conditions. LDVs showed higher emission factors at constant high speed than under urban disturbed traffic flow. In contrast, HDVs emitted more air pollutants during deceleration and acceleration processes in stop-and-go traffic than with constant speed of about 80 km h(-1). On average, one HDV emits a 10-30 times higher amount of particulate air pollutants (in terms of both number and volume) than one LDV.

  8. Surgical Space Suits Increase Particle and Microbiological Emission Rates in a Simulated Surgical Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaysegaran, Praveen; Knibbs, Luke D; Morawska, Lidia; Crawford, Ross W

    2018-05-01

    The role of space suits in the prevention of orthopedic prosthetic joint infection remains unclear. Recent evidence suggests that space suits may in fact contribute to increased infection rates, with bioaerosol emissions from space suits identified as a potential cause. This study aimed to compare the particle and microbiological emission rates (PER and MER) of space suits and standard surgical clothing. A comparison of emission rates between space suits and standard surgical clothing was performed in a simulated surgical environment during 5 separate experiments. Particle counts were analyzed with 2 separate particle counters capable of detecting particles between 0.1 and 20 μm. An Andersen impactor was used to sample bacteria, with culture counts performed at 24 and 48 hours. Four experiments consistently showed statistically significant increases in both PER and MER when space suits are used compared with standard surgical clothing. One experiment showed inconsistent results, with a trend toward increases in both PER and MER when space suits are used compared with standard surgical clothing. Space suits cause increased PER and MER compared with standard surgical clothing. This finding provides mechanistic evidence to support the increased prosthetic joint infection rates observed in clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sn-doped polyhedral In2O3 particles: Synthesis, characterization, and origins of luminous emission in wide visible range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yunqing; Chen Yiqing

    2012-01-01

    Sn-doped octahedronal and tetrakaidecahedronal In 2 O 3 particles were successfully synthesized by simple thermal evaporation of indium grains using SnO as dopant. Structural characterization results demonstrated that the Sn-doped tetrakaidecahedronal In 2 O 3 particle had additional six {001} crystal surfaces compared with the octahedronal one. The luminous properties of both samples were characterized by photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. A broad visible luminous emission around 570 nm was observed. Studies revealed that the emission consisted of three peaks of 511 nm, 564 nm, and 622 nm, which were attributed to radioactive recombination centers such as single ionized oxygen vacancy, indium interstitial, and antisite oxygen, respectively. We believe that the Sn donor level plays an important role in the visible luminous emission. - Graphical abstract: With more oxygen vacancies and tin doping. ITO particles can exhibit a better CL performance. Sn donor level near the conduction band edge plays an important role in luminous emission in wide visible range. Highlights: ► Polyhedral ITO particles synthesized by thermal evaporation using SnO as dopant. ► Broad visible luminous emission around 570 nm. ► Sn donor level plays an important role in the visible emission. ► ITO particles with more oxygen vacancies have better CL performance in visible range.

  10. UV-induced carbon monoxide emission from sand and living vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dan; Albert, Kristian Rost; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard

    2012-01-01

    The global burden of carbon monoxide, CO, is rather uncertain. In this paper we address the potential of UV-induced CO emission by terrestrial surfaces. Real-time measurements of [CO] were made with a cavity enhanced laser connected in closed loop to either an ecosystem chamber or a leaf scale...... chamber. Sand and leaves of all examined plant species exhibited emission of CO in response to artificial UV-radiation and the UV-component of natural solar radiation. The UV-induced rate of CO emission exhibited a rather low dependence on temperature, indicating an abiotic process. The emission of CO...... in response to the UV-component of natural solar radiation was also evident at the ecosystem scale. When scaled to the global level, the UV-induced emission of CO by the major types of terrestrial surfaces, living leaves and soil (here represented by sand), amounts up to 28 Tg yr−1. This source has...

  11. Test particle modeling of wave-induced energetic electron precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, H.C.; Inan, U.S.

    1985-01-01

    A test particle computer model of the precipitation of radiation belt electrons is extended to compute the dynamic energy spectrum of transient electron fluxes induced by short-duration VLF wave packets traveling along the geomagnetic field lines. The model is adapted to estimate the count rate and associated spectrum of precipitated electrons that would be observed by satellite-based particle detectors with given geometric factor and orientation with respect to the magnetic field. A constant-frequency wave pulse and a lightning-induced whistler wave packet are used as examples of the stimulating wave signals. The effects of asymmetry of particle mirror heights in the two hemispheres and the atmospheric backscatter of loss cone particles on the computed precipitated fluxes are discussed

  12. A new global particle swarm optimization for the economic emission dispatch with or without transmission losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Dexuan; Li, Steven; Li, Zongyan; Kong, Xiangyong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A new global particle swarm optimization (NGPSO) is proposed. • NGPSO has strong convergence and desirable accuracy. • NGPSO is used to handle the economic emission dispatch with or without transmission losses. • The equality constraint can be satisfied by solving a quadratic equation. • The inequality constraints can be satisfied by using penalty function method. - Abstract: A new global particle swarm optimization (NGPSO) algorithm is proposed to solve the economic emission dispatch (EED) problems in this paper. NGPSO is different from the traditional particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm in two aspects. First, NGPSO uses a new position updating equation which relies on the global best particle to guide the searching activities of all particles. Second, it uses the randomization based on the uniform distribution to slightly disturb the flight trajectories of particles during the late evolutionary process. The two steps enable NGPSO to effectively execute a number of global searches, and thus they increase the chance of exploring promising solution space, and reduce the probabilities of getting trapped into local optima for all particles. On the other hand, the two objective functions of EED are normalized separately according to all candidate solutions, and then they are incorporated into one single objective function. The transformation steps are very helpful in eliminating the difference caused by the different dimensions of the two functions, and thus they strike a balance between the fuel cost and emission. In addition, a simple and common penalty function method is employed to facilitate the satisfactions of EED’s constraints. Based on these improvements in PSO, objective functions and constraints handling, high-quality solutions can be obtained for EED problems. Five examples are chosen to testify the performance of three improved PSOs on solving EED problems with or without transmission losses. Experimental results show that

  13. Simultaneous coastal measurements of ozone deposition fluxes and iodine-mediated particle emission fluxes with subsequent CCN formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Whitehead

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the first observations of simultaneous ozone deposition fluxes and ultrafine particle emission fluxes over an extensive infra-littoral zone. Fluxes were measured by the eddy covariance technique at the Station Biologique de Roscoff, on the coast of Brittany, north-west France. This site overlooks a very wide (3 km littoral zone controlled by very deep tides (9.6 m exposing extensive macroalgae beds available for significant iodine mediated photochemical production of ultrafine particles. The aspect at the Station Biologique de Roscoff provides an extensive and relatively flat, uniform fetch within which micrometeorological techniques may be utilized to study links between ozone deposition to macroalgae (and sea water and ultrafine particle production.

    Ozone deposition to seawater at high tide was significantly slower (vd[O3]=0.302±0.095 mm s−1 than low tidal deposition. A statistically significant difference in the deposition velocities to macroalgae at low tide was observed between night time (vd[O3]=1.00±0.10 mm s−1 and daytime (vd[O3]=2.05±0.16 mm s−1 when ultrafine particle formation results in apparent particle emission. Very high emission fluxes of ultrafine particles were observed during daytime periods at low tides ranging from 50 000 particles cm−2 s−1 to greater than 200 000 particles cm−2 s−1 during some of the lowest tides. These emission fluxes exhibited a significant relationship with particle number concentrations comparable with previous observations at another location. Apparent particle growth rates were estimated to be in the range 17–150 nm h−1 for particles in the size range 3–10 nm. Under certain conditions, particle growth may be inferred to continue to greater than 120 nm over tens

  14. Transient particle emission measurement with optical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez, Vicente; Luján, José M.; Serrano, José R.; Pla, Benjamín

    2008-06-01

    Particulate matter is responsible for some respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. In addition, it is one of the most important pollutants of high-speed direct injection (HSDI) passenger car engines. Current legislation requires particulate dilution tunnels for particulate matter measuring. However for development work, dilution tunnels are expensive and sometimes not useful since they are not able to quantify real-time particulate emissions during transient operation. In this study, the use of a continuous measurement opacimeter and a fast response HFID is proven to be a good alternative to obtain instantaneous particle mass emissions during transient operation (due to particulate matter consisting mainly of soot and SOF). Some methods and correlations available from literature, but developed for steady conditions, are evaluated during transient operation by comparing with mini-tunnel measurements during the entire MVEG-A transient cycle. A new correlation was also derived from this evaluation. Results for soot and SOF (obtained from the new correlation proposed) are compared with soot and SOF captured with particulate filters, which have been separated by means of an SOF extraction method. Finally, as an example of ECU design strategies using these sort of correlations, the EGR valve opening is optimized during transient operation. The optimization is performed while simultaneously taking into account instantaneous fuel consumption, particulate emissions (calculated with the proposed correlation) and other regulated engine pollutants.

  15. Effects of a catalytic volatile particle remover (VPR) on the particulate matter emissions from a direct injection spark ignition engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fan; Chen, Longfei; Stone, Richard

    2011-10-15

    Emissions of fine particles have been shown to have a large impact on the atmospheric environment and human health. Researchers have shown that gasoline engines, especially direct injection spark ignition (DISI) engines, tend to emit large amounts of small size particles compared to diesel engines fitted with diesel particulate filters (DPFs). As a result, the particle number emissions of DISI engines will be restricted by the forthcoming EU6 legislation. The particulate emission level of DISI engines means that they could face some challenges in meeting the EU6 requirement. This paper is an experimental study on the size-resolved particle number emissions from a spray guided DISI engine and the performance of a catalytic volatile particle remover (VPR), as the EU legislation seeks to exclude volatile particles. The performance of the catalytic VPR was evaluated by varying its temperature and the exhaust residence time. The effect of the catalytic VPR acting as an oxidation catalyst on particle emissions was also tested. The results show that the catalytic VPR led to a marked reduction in the number of particles, especially the smaller size (nucleation mode) particles. The catalytic VPR is essentially an oxidation catalyst, and when post three-way catalyst (TWC) exhaust was introduced to the catalytic VPR, the performance of the catalytic VPR was not affected much by the use of additional air, i.e., no significant oxidation of the PM was observed.

  16. Charged particle emission effects on the characteristics of glow discharges with oscillating electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Nikulin, S P

    2001-01-01

    One discusses the effect of selection of charged particles on conditions to maintain and the characteristics of a glow discharge with oscillating electrons. It is shown that there is a pressure dependent optimal level of ion selection when the energy efficiency of ion source reaches its maximum value. It is determined that departure of fast ionizing electrons affects negatively the discharge maintenance wile emission of slow plasma electrons may promote maintenance of a discharge high current shape. It is shown that high efficient electron emission without violation of a discharge stability may take place in a magnetic field due to different nature of spatial distributions of fast and slow particles in discharges with electron oscillation

  17. Characteristics of SME biodiesel-fueled diesel particle emissions and the kinetics of oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Heejung; Kittelson, David B; Zachariah, Michael R

    2006-08-15

    Biodiesel is one of the most promising alternative diesel fuels. As diesel emission regulations have become more stringent, the diesel particulate filter (DPF) has become an essential part of the aftertreatment system. Knowledge of kinetics of exhaust particle oxidation for alternative diesel fuels is useful in estimating the change in regeneration behavior of a DPF with such fuels. This study examines the characteristics of diesel particulate emissions as well as kinetics of particle oxidation using a 1996 John Deere T04045TF250 off-highway engine and 100% soy methyl ester (SME) biodiesel (B100) as fuel. Compared to standard D2 fuel, this B100 reduced particle size, number, and volume in the accumulation mode where most of the particle mass is found. At 75% load, number decreased by 38%, DGN decreased from 80 to 62 nm, and volume decreased by 82%. Part of this decrease is likely associated with the fact that the particles were more easily oxidized. Arrhenius parameters for the biodiesel fuel showed a 2-3times greater frequency factor and approximately 6 times higher oxidation rate compared to regular diesel fuel in the range of 700-825 degrees C. The faster oxidation kinetics should facilitate regeneration when used with a DPF.

  18. A pyrene-benzthiazolium conjugate portraying aggregation induced emission, a ratiometric detection and live cell visualization of HSO_3"−

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diwan, Uzra; Kumar, Virendra; Mishra, Rakesh K.; Rana, Nishant Kumar; Koch, Biplob; Singh, Manish Kumar; Upadhyay, K.K.

    2016-01-01

    The present study deals with the photophysical property of a pyrene-benzthiazolium conjugate R1, as a strong intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) probe exhibiting long wavelength emission in the red region. Unlike traditional planar polyaromatic hydrocarbons whose aggregation generally quenches the light emission, the pyrene based R1 was found to display aggregation-induced emission (AIE) property along with simultaneous increase in its quantum yield upon increasing the water content of the medium. The R1 exhibits high specificity towards HSO_3"−/SO_3"2"− by interrupting its own ICT producing there upon a large ratiometric blue shift of ∼220 nm in its emission spectrum. The lowest detection limit for the above measurement was found to be 8.90 × 10"−"8 M. The fluorescent detection of HSO_3"− was also demonstrated excellently by test paper strip and silica coated TLC plate incorporating R1. The live cell imaging of HSO_3"− through R1 in HeLa cells was studied using fluorescence microscopic studies. The particle size and morphological features of R1 and R1-HSO_3"− aggregates in aqueous solution were characterized by DLS along with SEM analysis.- Highlights: • A pyrene-benzthiazolium conjugate probe (R1) itself showed interesting phenomenon of an aggregation-induced emission (AIE). • R1 emits in the red channel and effectively utilized as a colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent sensor for HSO_3"−. • The nano-dimensional spherical particles of R1 got enlarged upon its interaction with the HSO_3"−. • R1 can efficiently stain HSO_3"− in live cells and can be used for the on-spot detection of the same.

  19. Inducing Lift on Spherical Particles by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard N.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Gravity induced sedimentation of suspensions is a serious drawback to many materials and biotechnology processes, a factor that can, in principle, be overcome by utilizing an opposing Lorentz body force. In this work we demonstrate the utility of employing a traveling magnetic field (TMF) to induce a lifting force on particles dispersed in the fluid. Theoretically, a model has been developed to ascertain the net force, induced by TMF, acting on a spherical body as a function of the fluid medium's electrical conductivity and other parameters. Experimentally, the model is compared to optical observations of particle motion in the presence of TMF.

  20. Simulating emission and chemical evolution of coarse sea-salt particles in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model

    OpenAIRE

    J. T. Kelly; P. V. Bhave; C. G. Nolte; U. Shankar; K. M. Foley

    2009-01-01

    Chemical processing of sea-salt particles in coastal environments significantly impacts concentrations of particle components and gas-phase species and has implications for human exposure to particulate matter and nitrogen deposition to sensitive ecosystems. Emission of sea-salt particles from the coastal surf zone is known to be elevated compared to that from the open ocean. Despite the importance of sea-salt emissions and chemical processing, the US EPA's Community Multiscale Air Quality (C...

  1. Particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response may be the causal link between particle inhalation and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saber, Anne T.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Jackson, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of ambient and workplace particulate air pollution is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. One proposed mechanism for this association is that pulmonary inflammation induces a hepatic acute phase response, which increases risk of cardiovascular disease. Induction...... epidemiological studies. In this review, we present and review emerging evidence that inhalation of particles (e.g., air diesel exhaust particles and nanoparticles) induces a pulmonary acute phase response, and propose that this induction constitutes the causal link between particle inhalation and risk...

  2. Experimental studies on particle emissions from cruising ship, their characteristic properties, transformation and atmospheric lifetime in the marine boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, A.; Hasselbach, J.; Lauer, P.; Baumann, R.; Franke, K.; Gurk, C.; Schlager, H.; Weingartner, E.

    2008-05-01

    Particle emissions from ship engines and their atmospheric transformation in the marine boundary layer (MBL) were investigated in engine test bed studies and in airborne measurements of expanding ship plumes. During the test rig studies, detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical properties were measured in the exhaust gas of a serial MAN B&W seven-cylinder four-stroke marine diesel engine under various load conditions. The emission studies were complemented by airborne aerosol transformation studies in the plume of a large container ship in the English Channel using the DLR aircraft Falcon 20 E-5. Observations from emission studies and plume studies combined with a Gaussian plume dispersion model yield a consistent picture of particle transformation processes from emission to atmospheric processing during plume expansion. Particulate matter emission indices obtained from plume measurements are 8.8±1.0×1015(kg fuel)-1 by number for non-volatile particles and 174±43 mg (kg fuel)-1 by mass for Black Carbon (BC). Values determined for test rig conditions between 85 and 110% engine load are of similar magnitude. For the total particle number including volatile compounds no emission index can be derived since the volatile aerosol fraction is subject to rapid transformation processes in the plume. Ship exhaust particles occur in the size range Dp<0.3 μm, showing a bi-modal structure. The combustion particle mode is centred at modal diameters of 0.05 μm for raw emissions to 0.10 μm at a plume age of 1 h. The smaller-sized volatile particle mode is centred at Dp≤0.02 μm. From the decay of ship exhaust particle number concentrations in an expanding plume, a maximum plume life time of approx. 24 h is estimated for a well-mixed marine boundary layer.

  3. Positron emission particle tracking in pulsatile flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Nitant; Ruggles, Arthur [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wiggins, Cody [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) is increasingly used to understand the flow characteristics in complex systems. This research utilizes PEPT to measure pulsatile flow of frequency 2.1 Hz in an elastic Masterkleer PVC tube of 19 mm inner diameter and 3.2 mm wall thickness. Anion exchange resin beads are labeled with {sup 18}F and delivered to a pump driven flow loop with motorized ball valve used to develop the pulsatile flow. Data are collected in the tube with circular cross section, and measurements are also collected with a section of the tube pinched. Nominal flow velocities are near 1 m/s and Reynolds numbers near 20,000. Many thousand PEPT particle traces are collected and synchronized with the flow pulsation. These Lagrangian data are presented as a series of 20 still frames depicting the 3-D velocity field present during each phase of the flow pulsation. Pressure data are also collected to resolve the pressure wave front moving through the open elastic tube at velocity 15.2 m/s. (orig.)

  4. Neutron-induced charged-particle emission studies below 100 MeV at WNR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haight, R.C.; Lee, T.M.; Sterbenz, S.M. [and others

    1994-07-01

    Charged-particles produced by neutron bombardment of selected targets with Z=5 through 53 have been studied for neutron energies from 1 MeV to about 100 MeV using the spallation neutron source at WNR/LAMPF. Particle detection with energy measurement and particle identification is accomplished by two-element {Delta}E-E counters, three-element {Delta}E{sub l}-{Delta}E{sub 2}-E counters or with pulse-shape discrimination using scintillators directly in the neutron beam. The experimental techniques for these measurements are described and comparisons made among the different approaches. This presentation introduces five papers contributed to this conference.

  5. Neutron-induced charged-particle emission studies below 100 MeV at WNR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haight, R.C.; Lee, T.M.; Sterbenz, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Charged-particles produced by neutron bombardment of selected targets with Z=5 through 53 have been studied for neutron energies from 1 MeV to about 100 MeV using the spallation neutron source at WNR/LAMPF. Particle detection with energy measurement and particle identification is accomplished by two-element ΔE-E counters, three-element ΔE l -ΔE 2 -E counters or with pulse-shape discrimination using scintillators directly in the neutron beam. The experimental techniques for these measurements are described and comparisons made among the different approaches. This presentation introduces five papers contributed to this conference

  6. The ammonium nitrate particle equivalent of NOx emissions for wintertime conditions in Central California's San Joaquin Valley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockwell, W.R.; Watson, J.G.; Robinson, N.F.; Sylte, W.W.

    2000-01-01

    A new method has been developed to assess the aerosol particle formation reactivity of nitrogen oxide (NO x ) emissions. The method involves using a photochemical box model with gas-phase photochemistry, aerosol production and deposition to calculate the ammonium nitrate particle equivalent of NO x emissions. The yields of ammonium nitrate particles used in the box model were determined from parametric simulations made with an equilibrium model that calculated the fraction of nitric acid that reacts to produce ammonium nitrate from the temperature, relative humidity and ammonium-to-nitrate ratios. For the wintertime conditions of emissions and meteorology in the San Joaquin Valley of central California, approximately 80% of the moles of nitric acid produced was found to be in the particulate nitrate phase and about 33% of the moles of emitted NO x was converted to particulate nitrate. The particle equivalent of NO x emissions was found to be on the order of 0.6 g of ammonium nitrate for each gram of NO x emitted (the mass of NO x calculated as NO 2 ). This estimate is in reasonable agreement with an analysis of field measurements made in central California. (author)

  7. THE EFFECT OF TURBULENCE INTERMITTENCE ON THE EMISSION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES BY CORONAL AND INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocharov, Leon; Laitinen, Timo; Vainio, Rami

    2013-01-01

    Major solar energetic particle events are associated with shock waves in solar corona and solar wind. Fast scattering of charged particles by plasma turbulence near the shock wave increases the efficiency of the particle acceleration in the shock, but prevents particles from escaping ahead of the shock. However, the turbulence energy levels in neighboring magnetic tubes of solar wind may differ from each other by more than one order of magnitude. We present the first theoretical study of accelerated particle emission from an oblique shock wave propagating through an intermittent turbulence background that consists of both highly turbulent magnetic tubes, where particles are accelerated, and quiet tubes, via which the accelerated particles can escape to the non-shocked solar wind. The modeling results imply that the presence of the fast transport channels penetrating the shock and cross-field transport of accelerated particles to those channels may play a key role in high-energy particle emission from distant shocks and can explain the prompt onset of major solar energetic particle events observed near the Earth's orbit

  8. THE EFFECT OF TURBULENCE INTERMITTENCE ON THE EMISSION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES BY CORONAL AND INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocharov, Leon [Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory (Oulu Unit), P.O. Box 3000, University of Oulu, FI-90014 Oulu (Finland); Laitinen, Timo [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Vainio, Rami [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 64, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-11-20

    Major solar energetic particle events are associated with shock waves in solar corona and solar wind. Fast scattering of charged particles by plasma turbulence near the shock wave increases the efficiency of the particle acceleration in the shock, but prevents particles from escaping ahead of the shock. However, the turbulence energy levels in neighboring magnetic tubes of solar wind may differ from each other by more than one order of magnitude. We present the first theoretical study of accelerated particle emission from an oblique shock wave propagating through an intermittent turbulence background that consists of both highly turbulent magnetic tubes, where particles are accelerated, and quiet tubes, via which the accelerated particles can escape to the non-shocked solar wind. The modeling results imply that the presence of the fast transport channels penetrating the shock and cross-field transport of accelerated particles to those channels may play a key role in high-energy particle emission from distant shocks and can explain the prompt onset of major solar energetic particle events observed near the Earth's orbit.

  9. Characterization of particle bound organic carbon from diesel vehicles equipped with advanced emission control technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakbin, Payam; Ning, Zhi; Schauer, James J; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2009-07-01

    A chassis dynamometer study was carried out by the University of Southern California in collaboration with the Air Resources Board (CARB) to investigate the physical, chemical, and toxicological characteristics of diesel emissions of particulate matter (PM) from heavy-duty vehicles. These heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDV) were equipped with advanced emission control technologies, designed to meet CARB retrofit regulations. A HDDV without any emission control devices was used as the baseline vehicle. Three advanced emission control technologies; continuously regenerating technology (CRT), zeolite- and vanadium-based selective catalytic reduction technologies (Z-SCRT and V-SCRT), were tested under transient (UDDS) (1) and cruise (80 kmph) driving cycles to simulate real-world driving conditions. This paper focuses on the characterization of the particle bound organic species from the vehicle exhaust. Physical and chemical properties of PM emissions have been reported by Biswas et al. Atmos. Environ. 2008, 42, 5622-5634) and Hu et al. (Atmos. Environ. 2008, submitted) Significant reductions in the emission factors (microg/mile) of particle bound organic compounds were observed in HDDV equipped with advanced emission control technologies. V-SCRT and Z-SCRT effectively reduced PAHs, hopanes and steranes, n-alkanes and acids by more than 99%, and often to levels below detection limits for both cruise and UDDS cycles. The CRT technology also showed similar reductions with SCRT for medium and high molecular weight PAHs, acids, but with slightly lower removal efficiencies for other organic compounds. Ratios of particle bound organics-to-OC mass (microg/g) from the baseline exhaust were compared with their respective ratios in diesel fuel and lubricating oil, which revealed that hopanes and steranes originate from lubricating oil, whereas PAHs can either form during the combustion process or originate from diesel fuel itself. With the introduction of emission control

  10. Aerosol and NOx emission factors and submicron particle number size distributions in two road tunnels with different traffic regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Imhof

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of aerosol particle number size distributions (18–700 nm, mass concentrations (PM2.5 and PM10 and NOx were performed in the Plabutsch tunnel, Austria, and in the Kingsway tunnel, United Kingdom. These two tunnels show different characteristics regarding the roadway gradient, the composition of the vehicle fleet and the traffic frequency. The submicron particle size distributions contained a soot mode in the diameter range D=80–100 nm and a nucleation mode in the range of D=20–40 nm. In the Kingsway tunnel with a significantly lower particle number and volume concentration level than in the Plabutsch tunnel, a clear diurnal variation of nucleation and soot mode particles correlated to the traffic density was observed. In the Plabutsch tunnel, soot mode particles also revealed a diurnal variation, whereas no substantial variation was found for the nucleation mode particles. During the night a higher number concentration of nucleation mode particles were measured than soot mode particles and vice versa during the day. In this tunnel with very high soot emissions during daytime due to the heavy-duty vehicle (HDV share of 18% and another 40% of diesel driven light-duty vehicles (LDV semivolatile species condense on the pre-existing soot surface area rather than forming new particles by homogeneous nucleation. With the low concentration of soot mode particles in the Kingsway tunnel, also the nucleation mode particles exhibit a diurnal variation. From the measured parameters real-world traffic emission factors were estimated for the whole vehicle fleet as well as differentiated into the two categories LDV and HDV. In the particle size range D=18–700 nm, each vehicle of the mixed fleet emits (1.50±0.08×1014 particles km-1 (Plabutsch and (1.26±0.10×1014 particles km-1 (Kingsway, while particle volume emission factors of 0.209±0.008 cm3 km-1 and 0.036±0.004 cm3 km-1, respectively, were obtained. PM1 emission factors of 104±4 mg

  11. Energetic Charged Particle Emission from Hydrogen-Loaded pd and ti Cathodes and its Enhancement by He-4 Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, A. G.; Miley, G. H.; Lipson, A. G.; Lyakhov, B. F.; Roussetski, A. S.

    2006-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate reproducible emissions of energetic alphas and protons appearing in an energy range where both cosmic ray interference and possible alpha emissions from contamination (e.g., radon) is assumed to be negligible. We also show that He4 doping of Pd and Ti cathodes leads to a significant enhancement of the energetic charged particles emission (ECPE). This measurement of the emissions of energetic (MeV) particles, in a region of low background interference plus their enhancement by He4 doping provides very strong support for the existence of LENR processes in the crystalline lattice of deuterated metals.

  12. Energetic charged particle emission from hydrogen-loaded Pd and Ti cathodes and its enhancement by He-4 implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipson, A.G.; Miley, G.H.; Lipson, A.G.; Lyakhov, B.F.; Roussetski, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate reproducible emissions of energetic alphas and protons appearing in an energy range where both cosmic ray interference and possible alpha emissions from contamination (e.g., radon) is assumed to be negligible. We also show that, 4 He doping of Pd and Ti cathodes leads to a significant enhancement of the energetic charged particles emission (ECPE). This measurement of the emissions of energetic (MeV) particles, in a region of low background interference plus their enhancement by 4 He doping provides very strong support for the existence of LENR processes in the crystalline lattice of deuterated metals. (authors)

  13. Investigation of p,π+- charged particle correlations in π-C interactions at 5 GeV/c with emission of a particle in the backward direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budagov, Yu.A.; Bayaramov, A.A.; Dzhelepov, V.P.; Dvornik, A.M.; Efremov, A.V.; Flyagin, V.B.; Lomakin, Yu.F.; Valkar, S.; Volodko, A.G.

    1976-01-01

    The π-C interactions at 5 GeV/c are studied. Angle correlation between two charged particles when a particle is emitted to the backward hemisphere has been investigated. Noticeable correlation appears if the angle between the two particles is 180 deg (lab.s.). It follows from this behaviour that the backward emission of a particle is due to the hard collision mechanism

  14. Influence of ionic parameters on Auger emission by aluminium, induced by medium energy ions (2 to 5 keV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celier, Dominique

    1987-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of excitation collision mechanisms of metal atoms under irradiation by electrons with energy lower than or equal to 5 keV. After having outlined why this energy range is interesting, and indicated the different aluminium single crystals used in this study, the author describes the main involved emission phenomena related to the series of collisions due to emissions of different particles (electrons, photons, neutral or ionized atoms, backscattered primary ions). In the second part, the author recalls the characteristics of an Auger emission induced by ionic bombardment. Then, he presents the experimental installation which has been calibrated in order to allow the comparison of spectra induced under irradiations with different characteristics. Experimental results are reported and discussed. The cascade of binary shocks has also been examined. The scattering integral has been computed for several simple cases of collision, and allowed the definition of different conditions of excitation and ejection of excited atoms, depending on the fact that the ionizing shock is asymmetric or symmetric [fr

  15. Determination of time- and size-dependent fine particle emission with varied oil heating in an experimental kitchen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuangde; Gao, Jiajia; He, Yiqing; Cao, Liuxu; Li, Ang; Mo, Shengpeng; Chen, Yunfa; Cao, Yaqun

    2017-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) from cooking has caused seriously indoor air pollutant and aroused risk to human health. It is urged to get deep knowledge of their spatial-temporal distribution of source emission characteristics, especially ultrafine particles (UFP<100nm) and accumulation mode particles (AMP 100-665nm). Four commercial cooking oils are auto dipped water to simulate cooking fume under heating to 265°C to investigate PM emission and decay features between 0.03 and 10μm size dimension by electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI) without ventilation. Rapeseed and sunflower produced high PM 2.5 around 6.1mg/m 3 , in comparison with those of soybean and corn (5.87 and 4.65mg/m 3 , respectively) at peak emission time between 340 and 460sec since heating oil, but with the same level of particle numbers 6-9×10 5 /cm 3 . Mean values of PM 1.0 /PM 2.5 and PM 2.5 /PM 10 at peak emission time are around 0.51-0.66 and 0.23-0.29. After 15min naturally deposition, decay rates of PM 1.0 , PM 2.5 and PM 10 are 13.3%-29.8%, 20.1%-33.9% and 41.2%-54.7%, which manifest that PM 1.0 is quite hard to decay than larger particles, PM 2.5 and PM 10 . The majority of the particle emission locates at 43nm with the largest decay rate at 75%, and shifts to a larger size between 137 and 655nm after 15min decay. The decay rates of the particles are sensitive to the oil type. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Dynamical aspects of particle emission in binary dissipative collisions -effects on hot-nuclei formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eudes, Ph.; Basrak, Z.; Sebille, F.

    1997-01-01

    Characteristics of charged-particle emission in heavy-ion reactions have been studied in the framework of the semiclassical Landau-Vlasov approach for the 40 Ar + 27 Al collisions at 65 MeV/u. The reaction mechanism is dominated by binary dissipative collisions. After an abundant prompt emission coming from the overlapping region between the target and the projectile, two excited nuclei, the quasi-target and the quasi-projectile, emerge from the collision. To shed some light on the role played by dynamical effects, light-charged particle observables, which are currently used as an experimental signature a of hot equilibrated nucleus, have been carefully investigated. (K.A.)

  17. Comprehensive Laser-induced Incandescence (LII) modeling for soot particle sizing

    KAUST Repository

    Lisanti, Joel

    2015-03-30

    To evaluate the current state of the art in LII particle sizing, a comprehensive model for predicting the temporal incandescent response of combustion-generated soot to absorption of a pulsed laser is presented. The model incorporates particle heating through laser absorption, thermal annealing, and oxidation at the surface as well as cooling through sublimation and photodesorption, radiation, conduction and thermionic emission. Thermodynamic properties and the thermal accommodation coefficient utilized in the model are temperature dependent. In addition, where appropriate properties are also phase dependent, thereby accounting for annealing effects during laser heating and particle cooling.

  18. Size-resolved particle number emission patterns under real-world driving conditions using positive matrix factorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domínguez-Sáez, A.; Viana, M.; Barrios, C.C.; Rubio, J.R.; Amato, F.; Pujadas, M.; Querol, X.

    2012-01-01

    A novel on-board system was tested to characterize size-resolved particle number emission patterns under real-world driving conditions, running in a EURO4 diesel vehicle and in a typical urban circuit in Madrid (Spain). Emission profiles were determined as a function of driving conditions. Source

  19. A novel field measurement method for determining fine particle and gas emissions from residential wood combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissari, Jarkko; Hytönen, Kati; Lyyränen, Jussi; Jokiniemi, Jorma

    Emission data from residential wood combustion are usually obtained on test stands in the laboratory but these measurements do not correspond to the operational conditions in the field because of the technological boundary conditions (e.g. testing protocol, environmental and draught conditions). The field measurements take into account the habitual practice of the operators and provide the more reliable results needed for emission inventories. In this study, a workable and compact method for measuring emissions from residential wood combustion in winter conditions was developed. The emissions for fine particle, gaseous and PAH compounds as well as particle composition in real operational conditions were measured from seven different appliances. The measurement technique worked well and was evidently suitable for winter conditions. It was easy and fast to use, and no construction scaffold was needed. The dilution of the sample with the combination of a porous tube diluter and an ejector diluter was well suited to field measurement. The results indicate that the emissions of total volatile organic carbon (TVOC) (17 g kg -1 (of dry wood burned)), carbon monoxide (CO) (120 g kg -1) and fine particle mass (PM 1) (2.7 g kg -1) from the sauna stove were higher than in the other measured appliances. In the masonry heaters, baking oven and stove, the emissions were 2.9-9 g kg -1 TVOC, 28-68 g kg -1 CO and 0.6-1.6 g kg -1 PM 1. The emission of 12 PAHs (PAH 12) from the sauna stove was 164 mg kg -1 and consisted mainly of PAHs with four benzene rings in their structure. PAH 12 emission from other appliances was, on average, 21 mg kg -1 and was dominated by 2-ring PAHs. These results indicate that despite the non-optimal operational practices in the field, the emissions did not differ markedly from the laboratory measurements.

  20. Proton-induced X-ray emission analysis of marine particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, W.C.; Mitchum, G.T.

    1981-01-01

    We report a methodology used to analyze suspended marine particulates by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Water samples from an estuary in Brazil were filtered soon after collection onto pre-weighed Nuclepore filters, washed with deionized water, dried to constant weight and analyzed as thin targets. Because of the relatively high mass loadings (0.1-1.0 mg/cm 2 ) on the filters, proton bombardment times of a few minutes were adequate for maintaining good counting statistics. Precision and accuary were determined by replicate analysis and intercomparison to geochemical standards. Suspensions of standards in deionized water were filtered dried, weighed and analyzed in a similar fashion as our samples of marine particulates. Net X-ray intensities were related to mass by calibration against pure elemental standards. Initial experiments showed systematically low concentrations for all elements determined by PIXE relative to known values. Further experiments verified that this systematic errors was due to an uneven distribution of mass on the surface of the filters. Improvements in the filtration technique have eliminated the topographic effect on our samples and the PIXE resultes were substantially improved. Variations in matrix and particle size of the samples analyzed did not cause any measureable analytical effect. PIXE thus seems well suited for providing rapid, multi-element data on samples of marine particulates if suitable precautions are made during the sample preparation process. (orig.)

  1. Experimental studies on particle emissions from cruising ship, their characteristic properties, transformation and atmospheric lifetime in the marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Petzold

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Particle emissions from ship engines and their atmospheric transformation in the marine boundary layer (MBL were investigated in engine test bed studies and in airborne measurements of expanding ship plumes. During the test rig studies, detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical properties were measured in the exhaust gas of a serial MAN B&W seven-cylinder four-stroke marine diesel engine under various load conditions. The emission studies were complemented by airborne aerosol transformation studies in the plume of a large container ship in the English Channel using the DLR aircraft Falcon 20 E-5. Observations from emission studies and plume studies combined with a Gaussian plume dispersion model yield a consistent picture of particle transformation processes from emission to atmospheric processing during plume expansion. Particulate matter emission indices obtained from plume measurements are 8.8±1.0×1015(kg fuel−1 by number for non-volatile particles and 174±43 mg (kg fuel−1 by mass for Black Carbon (BC. Values determined for test rig conditions between 85 and 110% engine load are of similar magnitude. For the total particle number including volatile compounds no emission index can be derived since the volatile aerosol fraction is subject to rapid transformation processes in the plume. Ship exhaust particles occur in the size range Dp<0.3 μm, showing a bi-modal structure. The combustion particle mode is centred at modal diameters of 0.05 μm for raw emissions to 0.10 μm at a plume age of 1 h. The smaller-sized volatile particle mode is centred at Dp≤0.02 μm. From the decay of ship exhaust particle number concentrations in an expanding plume, a maximum plume life time of approx. 24 h is estimated for a well-mixed marine boundary layer.

  2. VIPEN - Vehicle induced particulate emissions from non-exhaust sources; Katupoelypaeaestoejen ajoneuvomittaukset. VIPEN-projekti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupiainen, K.; Tervahattu, H. [Nordic Envicon Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Pirjola, L.; Perhoniemi, P. [Stadia Helsinki Polytechnic, Helsinki (Finland); Vesala, H. [VTT Processes, Espoo (Finland)

    2006-10-15

    In the VIPEN-project the measurement set up of the mobile laboratory Sniffer (see project LIPIKA) was extended to include on-line measurements of non-exhaust particles. The test measurements showed that the system is a good tool for studying emissions of respirable particles from street surface. Valuable information about emission levels in different situations has been gathered. So far Sniffer has measured spring-time road dust in Helsinki on a route set in urban environment. PM levels in Helsinki were observed to decline towards beginning of May. Hot spot street sections with higher emission levels could be identified. Also the effect of studded tires and road sanding has been studied in Nokia. Both studs and traction sanding increased emission levels. Emission levels from studs varied with stud design and amount of studs per tire. The direct emission increase from traction sanding was larger than from studded tires but the levels started to decline immediately after dispersion as passing traffic swept the material aside. (orig.)

  3. Element analysis of the eutardigrades Richtersius coronifer and Milnesium cf. asiaticum using Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotta Nilsson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Semi-terrestrial tardigrades are well-known for their tolerance to a variety of environmental extremes, including desiccation, freezing and radiation. Despite several attempts to reveal the genetic and molecular mechanisms behind the resilience of tardigrades, it is still unknown how these animals are able to maintain the integrity of their cellular components under severe stress. Quantitative or qualitative changes in molecular compounds (e.g., carbohydrates, proteins are expected, and have been the main line of research towards understanding the tolerance of tardigrades. In radiation tolerant bacteria, a tolerance mechanism based on manganese has been proposed. We evaluate this hypothesis in tardigrades and provide the first data on element composition in desiccated and non-desiccated specimens of two eutardigrade species, Richtersius coronifer and Milnesium cf. asiaticum. A focused 2 MeV proton microbeam was utilised to determine the elemental content, distributions and concentrations, using the ion beam analytical technique particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE. The presence of six elements – phosphorus, sulphur, chlorine, potassium, calcium and iron – were confirmed in all tardigrade specimens, at levels up to a few mg g–1. However, manganese was found in less than 10% of the analysed specimens, and in low amounts, thus our study provides no evidence for the manganese hypothesis. We also show that the distributions and/or concentrations of some elements differ between the two species as well as between the dehydrated and hydrated state. In particular, very low levels of iron were found in dehydrated M. cf. asiaticum. Our analysis shows that the PIXE technique is a useful tool for investigating questions on the distribution of elements both in dehydrated and hydrated tardigrades.

  4. Energetic charged particle emission from hydrogen-loaded Pd and Ti cathodes and its enhancement by He-4 implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipson, A.G.; Miley, G.H. [University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign, lL (United States); Lipson, A.G.; Lyakhov, B.F. [lnstitute of Physical Chemistry, The Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Roussetski, A.S. [P. N. Lebedev Physics Institute, The Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate reproducible emissions of energetic alphas and protons appearing in an energy range where both cosmic ray interference and possible alpha emissions from contamination (e.g., radon) is assumed to be negligible. We also show that, {sup 4}He doping of Pd and Ti cathodes leads to a significant enhancement of the energetic charged particles emission (ECPE). This measurement of the emissions of energetic (MeV) particles, in a region of low background interference plus their enhancement by {sup 4}He doping provides very strong support for the existence of LENR processes in the crystalline lattice of deuterated metals. (authors)

  5. Passing particle toroidal precession induced by electric field in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, V. V.; Ilgisonis, V. I.; Sorokina, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of a rotation of passing particles in a tokamak with radial electric field are calculated. The expression for time-averaged toroidal velocity of the passing particle induced by the electric field is derived. The electric-field-induced additive to the toroidal velocity of the passing particle appears to be much smaller than the velocity of the electric drift calculated for the poloidal magnetic field typical for the trapped particle. This quantity can even have the different sign depending on the azimuthal position of the particle starting point. The unified approach for the calculation of the bounce period and of the time-averaged toroidal velocity of both trapped and passing particles in the whole volume of plasma column is presented. The results are obtained analytically and are confirmed by 3D numerical calculations of the trajectories of charged particles

  6. Passing particle toroidal precession induced by electric field in a tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, V. V. [Peoples' Friendship University of Russia, Ordzhonikidze St. 3, Moscow 117198 (Russian Federation); Ilgisonis, V. I.; Sorokina, E. A. [Peoples' Friendship University of Russia, Ordzhonikidze St. 3, Moscow 117198 (Russian Federation); NRC “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Sq. 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    Characteristics of a rotation of passing particles in a tokamak with radial electric field are calculated. The expression for time-averaged toroidal velocity of the passing particle induced by the electric field is derived. The electric-field-induced additive to the toroidal velocity of the passing particle appears to be much smaller than the velocity of the electric drift calculated for the poloidal magnetic field typical for the trapped particle. This quantity can even have the different sign depending on the azimuthal position of the particle starting point. The unified approach for the calculation of the bounce period and of the time-averaged toroidal velocity of both trapped and passing particles in the whole volume of plasma column is presented. The results are obtained analytically and are confirmed by 3D numerical calculations of the trajectories of charged particles.

  7. Explaining global surface aerosol number concentrations in terms of primary emissions and particle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, D. V.; Carslaw, K. S.; Merikanto, J.; Mann, G. W.; Reddington, C. L.; Pickering, S.; Ogren, J. A.; Andrews, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, E.; Boy, M.; Kulmala, M.; Laakso, L.; Lihavainen, H.; Kivekäs, N.; Komppula, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Kouvarakis, G.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Dowd, C.; Birmili, W.; Wiedensohler, A.; Weller, R.; Gras, J.; Laj, P.; Sellegri, K.; Bonn, B.; Krejci, R.; Laaksonen, A.; Hamed, A.; Minikin, A.; Harrison, R. M.; Talbot, R.; Sun, J.

    2010-05-01

    We synthesised observations of total particle number (CN) concentration from 36 sites around the world. We found that annual mean CN concentrations are typically 300-2000 cm-3 in the marine boundary layer and free troposphere (FT) and 1000-10 000 cm-3 in the continental boundary layer (BL). Many sites exhibit pronounced seasonality with summer time concentrations a factor of 2-10 greater than wintertime concentrations. We used these CN observations to evaluate primary and secondary sources of particle number in a global aerosol microphysics model. We found that emissions of primary particles can reasonably reproduce the spatial pattern of observed CN concentration (R2=0.46) but fail to explain the observed seasonal cycle (R2=0.1). The modeled CN concentration in the FT was biased low (normalised mean bias, NMB=-88%) unless a secondary source of particles was included, for example from binary homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid and water (NMB=-25%). Simulated CN concentrations in the continental BL were also biased low (NMB=-74%) unless the number emission of anthropogenic primary particles was increased or a mechanism that results in particle formation in the BL was included. We ran a number of simulations where we included an empirical BL nucleation mechanism either using the activation-type mechanism (nucleation rate, J, proportional to gas-phase sulfuric acid concentration to the power one) or kinetic-type mechanism (J proportional to sulfuric acid to the power two) with a range of nucleation coefficients. We found that the seasonal CN cycle observed at continental BL sites was better simulated by BL particle formation (R2=0.3) than by increasing the number emission from primary anthropogenic sources (R2=0.18). The nucleation constants that resulted in best overall match between model and observed CN concentrations were consistent with values derived in previous studies from detailed case studies at individual sites. In our model, kinetic and activation

  8. Ion induced electron emission statistics under Agm- cluster bombardment of Ag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuers, A.; Penning, R.; Wucher, A.

    2018-05-01

    The electron emission from a polycrystalline silver surface under bombardment with Agm- cluster ions (m = 1, 2, 3) is investigated in terms of ion induced kinetic excitation. The electron yield γ is determined directly by a current measurement method on the one hand and implicitly by the analysis of the electron emission statistics on the other hand. Successful measurements of the electron emission spectra ensure a deeper understanding of the ion induced kinetic electron emission process, with particular emphasis on the effect of the projectile cluster size to the yield as well as to emission statistics. The results allow a quantitative comparison to computer simulations performed for silver atoms and clusters impinging onto a silver surface.

  9. Aerosol nucleation induced by a high energy particle beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    2011-01-01

    We have studied sulfuric acid aerosol nucleation in an atmospheric pressure reaction chamber using a 580 MeV electron beam to ionize the volume of the reaction chamber. We find a clear contribution from ion-induced nucleation and consider this to be the first unambiguous observation of the ion......-effect on aerosol nucleation using a particle beam under conditions that resemble the Earth's atmosphere. By comparison with ionization using a gamma source we further show that the nature of the ionizing particles is not important for the ion-induced component of the nucleation. This implies that inexpensive...... ionization sources - as opposed to expensive accelerator beams - can be used for investigations of ion-induced nucleation....

  10. Emissions from carpet combustion in a pilot-scale rotary kiln: comparison with coal and particle-board combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephanie Lucero Konopa; James A. Mulholland; Matthew J. Realff; Paul M. Lemieux [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2008-08-15

    The use of post-consumer carpet as a potential fuel substitute in cement kilns and other high-temperature processes is being considered to address the problem of huge volumes of carpet waste and the opportunity of waste-to-energy recovery. Carpet represents a high volume waste stream, provides high energy value, and contains other recoverable materials for the production of cement. This research studied the emission characteristics of burning 0.46-kg charges of chopped nylon carpet squares, pulverized coal, and particle-board pellets in a pilot-scale natural gas-fired rotary kiln. Carpet was tested with different amounts of water added. Emissions of oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitric oxide (NO), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), and total hydrocarbons and temperatures were continuously monitored. It was found that carpet burned faster and more completely than coal and particle board, with a rapid volatile release that resulted in large and variable transient emission peaks. NO emissions from carpet combustion ranged from 0.06 to 0.15 g/MJ and were inversely related to CO emissions. Carpet combustion yielded higher NO emissions than coal and particleboard combustion, consistent with its higher nitrogen content. S{sub 2} emissions were highest for coal combustion, consistent with its higher sulfur content than carpet or particle board. Adding water to carpet slowed its burn time and reduced variability in the emission transients, reducing the CO peak but increasing NO emissions. Results of this study indicate that carpet waste can be used as an effective alternative fuel, with the caveats that it might be necessary to wet carpet or chop it finely to avoid excessive transient puff emissions due to its high volatility compared with other solid fuels, and that controlled mixing of combustion air might be used to control NO emissions from nylon carpet. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF ACCELERATED PARTICLES ESCAPING A SUPERNOVA REMNANT IN A MOLECULAR CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Bykov, Andrei M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a model of gamma-ray emission from core-collapse supernovae (SNe) originating from the explosions of massive young stars. The fast forward shock of the supernova remnant (SNR) can accelerate particles by diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in a cavern blown by a strong, pre-SN stellar wind. As a fundamental part of nonlinear DSA, some fraction of the accelerated particles escape the shock and interact with a surrounding massive dense shell producing hard photon emission. To calculate this emission, we have developed a new Monte Carlo technique for propagating the cosmic rays (CRs) produced by the forward shock of the SNR, into the dense, external material. This technique is incorporated in a hydrodynamic model of an evolving SNR which includes the nonlinear feedback of CRs on the SNR evolution, the production of escaping CRs along with those that remain trapped within the remnant, and the broadband emission of radiation from trapped and escaping CRs. While our combined CR-hydro-escape model is quite general and applies to both core collapse and thermonuclear SNe, the parameters we choose for our discussion here are more typical of SNRs from very massive stars whose emission spectra differ somewhat from those produced by lower mass progenitors directly interacting with a molecular cloud.

  12. [Emission characteristics of fine particles from grate firing boilers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Xiao; Zhao, Xiu-Juan; Li, Xing-Hua; Wei, Wei; Hao, Ji-Ming

    2009-04-15

    Grate firing boilers are the main type of Chinese industrial boilers, which accounts for 85% of the industrial boilers and is one of the most important emission sources of primary air pollutants in China. In this study, five boilers in three cities were selected and tested to measure the emission characteristics of PM2.5, and gaseous pollutants were applied by a compact dilution sampling system, which was developed for this field study. Results showed that particles mass size distributions for the five industrial boilers presented single peak or double peak, former peaks near 0.14 microm and the later peaks after 1.0 microm; the cyclone dust remover and wet scrubber dust remover had effective removal efficiencies not only to PM2.5, but also to PM1.0; and under the condition of same control techniques, grate firing boiler with high capacity has less PM2.5 emission than the boiler with low capacity. In the PM2.5 collected from flue gases, SO4(2-) was the most abundant ion, accounted for 20%-40% of the PM2.5; and C was the most abundant element (7.5%-31.8%), followed by S (8.4%-18.7%). Carbon balance method was applied to calculate the emission factors of these pollutants. The emission factors of PM2.5, NO, and SO2 were in the range of 0.046-0.486 g x kg(-1), 1.63-2.47 g x kg(-1), 1.35-9.95 g x kg(-1) respectively. The results are useful for the emission inventory development of industrial boilers and the source analysis of PM2.5 in atmospheric environment.

  13. Optically induced rotation of Rayleigh particles by vortex beams with different states of polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Manman; Yan, Shaohui; Yao, Baoli; Liang, Yansheng; Lei, Ming; Yang, Yanlong

    2016-01-01

    Optical vortex beams carry optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) and can induce an orbital motion of trapped particles in optical trapping. We show that the state of polarization (SOP) of vortex beams will affect the details of this optically induced orbital motion to some extent. Numerical results demonstrate that focusing the vortex beams with circular, radial or azimuthal polarizations can induce a uniform orbital motion on a trapped Rayleigh particle, while in the focal field of the vortex beam with linear polarization the particle experiences a non-uniform orbital motion. Among the formers, the vortex beam with circular polarization induces a maximum optical torque on the particle. Furthermore, by varying the topological charge of the vortex beams, the vortex beam with circular polarization gives rise to an optimum torque superior to those given by the other three vortex beams. These facts suggest that the circularly polarized vortex beam is more suitable for rotating particles. - Highlights: • States of polarization of vortex beams affect the optically induced orbital motion of particles. • The dependences of the force and orbital torque on the topological charge, the size and the absorptivity of particles were calculated. • Focused vortex beams with circular, radial or azimuthal polarizations induce a uniform orbital motion on particles. • Particles experience a non-uniform orbital motion in the focused linearly polarized vortex beam. • The circularly polarized vortex beam is a superior candidate for rotating particles.

  14. Influence of Magnolol on the bystander effect induced by alpha-particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, T.P.W.; Law, Y.L. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Tse, A.K.W.; Fong, W.F. [Research and Development Division, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Baptist University Road, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)], E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk

    2010-04-15

    In this work, the influence of Magnolol on the bystander effect in alpha-particle irradiated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was examined. The bystander effect was studied through medium transfer experiments. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was performed to quantify the chromosome damage induced by alpha-particle irradiation. Our results showed that the alpha-particle induced micronuclei (MN) frequencies were suppressed with the presence of Magnolol.

  15. Take-off engine particle emission indices for in-service aircraft at Los Angeles International Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Richard H.; Shook, Michael A.; Ziemba, Luke D.; Digangi, Joshua P.; Winstead, Edward L.; Rauch, Bastian; Jurkat, Tina; Thornhill, Kenneth L.; Crosbie, Ewan C.; Robinson, Claire; Shingler, Taylor J.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2017-12-01

    We present ground-based, advected aircraft engine emissions from flights taking off at Los Angeles International Airport. 275 discrete engine take-off plumes were observed on 18 and 25 May 2014 at a distance of 400 m downwind of the runway. CO2 measurements are used to convert the aerosol data into plume-average emissions indices that are suitable for modelling aircraft emissions. Total and non-volatile particle number EIs are of order 1016-1017 kg-1 and 1014-1016 kg-1, respectively. Black-carbon-equivalent particle mass EIs vary between 175-941 mg kg-1 (except for the GE GEnx engines at 46 mg kg-1). Aircraft tail numbers recorded for each take-off event are used to incorporate aircraft- and engine-specific parameters into the data set. Data acquisition and processing follow standard methods for quality assurance. A unique aspect of the data set is the mapping of aerosol concentration time series to integrated plume EIs, aircraft and engine specifications, and manufacturer-reported engine emissions certifications. The integrated data enable future studies seeking to understand and model aircraft emissions and their impact on air quality.

  16. Take-off engine particle emission indices for in-service aircraft at Los Angeles International Airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Richard H; Shook, Michael A; Ziemba, Luke D; DiGangi, Joshua P; Winstead, Edward L; Rauch, Bastian; Jurkat, Tina; Thornhill, Kenneth L; Crosbie, Ewan C; Robinson, Claire; Shingler, Taylor J; Anderson, Bruce E

    2017-12-19

    We present ground-based, advected aircraft engine emissions from flights taking off at Los Angeles International Airport. 275 discrete engine take-off plumes were observed on 18 and 25 May 2014 at a distance of 400 m downwind of the runway. CO 2 measurements are used to convert the aerosol data into plume-average emissions indices that are suitable for modelling aircraft emissions. Total and non-volatile particle number EIs are of order 10 16 -10 17 kg -1 and 10 14 -10 16 kg -1 , respectively. Black-carbon-equivalent particle mass EIs vary between 175-941 mg kg -1 (except for the GE GEnx engines at 46 mg kg -1 ). Aircraft tail numbers recorded for each take-off event are used to incorporate aircraft- and engine-specific parameters into the data set. Data acquisition and processing follow standard methods for quality assurance. A unique aspect of the data set is the mapping of aerosol concentration time series to integrated plume EIs, aircraft and engine specifications, and manufacturer-reported engine emissions certifications. The integrated data enable future studies seeking to understand and model aircraft emissions and their impact on air quality.

  17. Different particle determinants induce apoptosis and cytokine release in primary alveolar macrophage cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarze Per E

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particles are known to induce both cytokine release (MIP-2, TNF-α, a reduction in cell viability and an increased apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. To examine whether these responses are triggered by the same particle determinants, alveolar macrophages were exposed in vitro to mineral particles of different physical-chemical properties. Results The crystalline particles of the different stone types mylonite, gabbro, basalt, feldspar, quartz, hornfels and fine grain syenite porphyr (porphyr, with a relatively equal size distribution (≤ 10 μm, but different chemical/mineral composition, all induced low and relatively similar levels of apoptosis. In contrast, mylonite and gabbro induced a marked MIP-2 response compared to the other particles. For particles of smaller size, quartz (≤ 2 μm seemed to induce a somewhat stronger apoptotic response than even smaller quartz (≤ 0.5 μm and larger quartz (≤ 10 μm in relation to surface area, and was more potent than hornfels and porphyr (≤ 2 μm. The reduction in cell viability induced by quartz of the different sizes was roughly similar when adjusted to surface area. With respect to cytokines, the release was more marked after exposure to quartz ≤ 0.5 μm than to quartz ≤ 2 μm and ≤ 10 μm. Furthermore, hornfels (≤ 2 μm was more potent than the corresponding hornfels (≤ 10 μm and quartz (≤ 2 μm to induce cytokine responses. Pre-treatment of hornfels and quartz particles ≤ 2 μm with aluminium lactate, to diminish the surface reactivity, did significantly reduce the MIP-2 response to hornfels. In contrast, the apoptotic responses to the particles were not affected. Conclusion These results indicate that different determinants of mineral/stone particles are critical for inducing cytokine responses, reduction in cell viability and apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. The data suggest that the particle surface reactivity was critical for cytokine responses

  18. Tumor necrosis factor is not required for particle-induced genotoxicity and pulmonary inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saber, Anne T.; Bornholdt, Jette; Dybdahl, Marianne; Sharma, Anoop K.; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Haakan [National Institute of Occupational Health, Copenhagen (Denmark); Loft, Steffen [Copenhagen University, Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2005-03-01

    Particle-induced carcinogenicity is not well understood, but might involve inflammation. The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is considered to be an important mediator in inflammation. We investigated its role in particle-induced inflammation and DNA damage in mice with and without TNF signaling. TNF-/- mice and TNF+/+ mice were exposed by inhalation to 20 mg m{sup -3} carbon black (CB), 20 mg m{sup -3} diesel exhaust particles (DEP), or filtered air for 90 min on each of four consecutive days. DEP, but not CB particles, induced infiltration of neutrophilic granulocutes into the lung lining fluid (by the cellular fraction in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid), and both particle types induced interleukin-6 mRNA in the lung tissue. Surprisingly, TNF-/- mice were intact in these inflammatory responses. There were more DNA strand breaks in the BAL cells of DEP-exposed TNF-/- mice and CB-exposed mice compared with the air-exposed mice. Thus, the CB-induced DNA damage in BAL-cells was independent of neutrophil infiltration. The data indicate that an inflammatory response was not a prerequisite for DNA damage, and TNF was not required for the induction of inflammation by DEP and CB particles. (orig.)

  19. Reduction of particle emissions from light duty vehicles and from taxies; Reduktion af partikelelemissioner fra varebiler og taxier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Johan; Henriques, M.; Weibel, T.G. [TetraPlan A/S (Denmark)

    2006-11-03

    This project, 'Reduction of particle emissions from light duty vehicles and from taxies', analyses different strategies to reduce the particle emission, their effect for particle emissions, and the resulting cost for the society and for the companies. The project describes the EU regulation of emissions, the possibilities of reducing the emissions via special requirements in environmental zones and the Danish taxation of light duty vehicles. Further, the project includes interviews with owners of light duty vehicles and taxies and also with Danish producers of particle filters. The strategies analysed in the scenarios include: 1) Promotion of particle filters; 2) Shift from diesel to gasoline and; 3) Downsizing. The effects for particle emissions and for mortality are described. Further, the costs and benefits for the society and the cost for the companies are evaluated. The effects of the scenarios are analysed, both for initiatives implemented at a national level and for implementation in an environmental zone in the municipality of Copenhagen. The main results are that the socioeconomic benefits in the year 2012 are greater than the costs, if taxis and light duty vehicles have filters installed and if they are driving in the Copenhagen area. For light duty vehicles it is only profitable, if the prices of the filters fall to the price level that is expected in the future in the study. Further, the analysis shows that for light duty vehicles and taxies driving all over the country, the socioeconomic benefits achieved by installing particle filters are too small to cover the costs. The analysis shows that it is also profitable socio-economically to change from diesel to petrol for light duty vehicles and for taxies (except taxies driving nationally). The analysis is based on the producer prices including the general net tax level, while the specific taxes are not included. From the point of view of the companies it is not profitable to change to petrol

  20. A pyrene-benzthiazolium conjugate portraying aggregation induced emission, a ratiometric detection and live cell visualization of HSO{sub 3}{sup −}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diwan, Uzra; Kumar, Virendra [Department of Chemistry (Centre of Advanced Study), Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh 221005 (India); Mishra, Rakesh K. [Photosciences and Photonics, Chemical Sciences and Technology Division, CSIR–National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram 695019 (India); Rana, Nishant Kumar; Koch, Biplob; Singh, Manish Kumar [Department of Zoology (Centre of Advanced Study), Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Upadhyay, K.K., E-mail: drkaushalbhu@yahoo.co.in [Department of Chemistry (Centre of Advanced Study), Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh 221005 (India)

    2016-07-27

    The present study deals with the photophysical property of a pyrene-benzthiazolium conjugate R1, as a strong intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) probe exhibiting long wavelength emission in the red region. Unlike traditional planar polyaromatic hydrocarbons whose aggregation generally quenches the light emission, the pyrene based R1 was found to display aggregation-induced emission (AIE) property along with simultaneous increase in its quantum yield upon increasing the water content of the medium. The R1 exhibits high specificity towards HSO{sub 3}{sup −}/SO{sub 3}{sup 2−} by interrupting its own ICT producing there upon a large ratiometric blue shift of ∼220 nm in its emission spectrum. The lowest detection limit for the above measurement was found to be 8.90 × 10{sup −8} M. The fluorescent detection of HSO{sub 3}{sup −} was also demonstrated excellently by test paper strip and silica coated TLC plate incorporating R1. The live cell imaging of HSO{sub 3}{sup −} through R1 in HeLa cells was studied using fluorescence microscopic studies. The particle size and morphological features of R1 and R1-HSO{sub 3}{sup −} aggregates in aqueous solution were characterized by DLS along with SEM analysis.- Highlights: • A pyrene-benzthiazolium conjugate probe (R1) itself showed interesting phenomenon of an aggregation-induced emission (AIE). • R1 emits in the red channel and effectively utilized as a colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent sensor for HSO{sub 3}{sup −}. • The nano-dimensional spherical particles of R1 got enlarged upon its interaction with the HSO{sub 3}{sup −}. • R1 can efficiently stain HSO{sub 3}{sup −} in live cells and can be used for the on-spot detection of the same.

  1. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Compression-after-Impact Test of Nano-Particles-Coated CFRP Damaged by Simulated Lightning Strikes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Je Ha; Kwon, Oh Yang; Seo, Seong Wook [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Nanoparticles-coated and impact-damaged carbon-fiber reinforced plastics(CFRP) laminates were tested under compression-after-impact(CAI) mode and the propagation of damage due to compressive loading has been monitored by acoustic emission(AE). The impact damage was induced not by mechanical loading but by a simulated lightning strike. CFRP laminates were made of carbon prepregs prepared by coating of conductive nano-particles directly on the fibers and the coupons were subjected to simulated lightning strikes with a high voltage/current impulse of 10{approx}40 kA within a few microseconds. The effects of nano-particles coating and the degree of damage induced by the simulated lightning strikes on the AE activities were examined, and the relationship between the compressive residual strength and AE behavior has been evaluated in terms of AE event counts and the onset of AE activity with the compressive loading. The degree of impact damage was also measured in terns of damage area by using ultrasonic C-scan images. From the results assessed during the CAI tests of damaged CFRP showed that AE monitoring appeared to be very useful to differentiate the degree of damage hence the mechanical integrity of composite structures damaged by lightning strikes

  2. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Compression-after-Impact Test of Nano-Particles-Coated CFRP Damaged by Simulated Lightning Strikes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Je Ha; Kwon, Oh Yang; Seo, Seong Wook

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles-coated and impact-damaged carbon-fiber reinforced plastics(CFRP) laminates were tested under compression-after-impact(CAI) mode and the propagation of damage due to compressive loading has been monitored by acoustic emission(AE). The impact damage was induced not by mechanical loading but by a simulated lightning strike. CFRP laminates were made of carbon prepregs prepared by coating of conductive nano-particles directly on the fibers and the coupons were subjected to simulated lightning strikes with a high voltage/current impulse of 10∼40 kA within a few microseconds. The effects of nano-particles coating and the degree of damage induced by the simulated lightning strikes on the AE activities were examined, and the relationship between the compressive residual strength and AE behavior has been evaluated in terms of AE event counts and the onset of AE activity with the compressive loading. The degree of impact damage was also measured in terns of damage area by using ultrasonic C-scan images. From the results assessed during the CAI tests of damaged CFRP showed that AE monitoring appeared to be very useful to differentiate the degree of damage hence the mechanical integrity of composite structures damaged by lightning strikes

  3. Indoor emission, dispersion and exposure of total particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun; Jian, Yating; Cao, Changsheng; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Xu

    2015-11-01

    Cooking processes highly contribute to indoor polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pollution. High molecular weight and potentially carcinogenic PAHs are generally found attached to small particles, i.e., particulate phase PAHs (PPAHs). Due to the fact that indoor particle dynamics have been clear, describing the indoor dynamics of cooking-generated PPAHs within a specific time span is possible. This paper attempted to quantify the dynamic emission rate, simultaneous spatial dispersion and individual exposure of PPAHs using a cooking source. Experiments were conducted in a real-scale kitchen chamber to elucidate the time-resolved emission and effect of edible oil temperature and mass. Numerical simulations based on indoor particle dynamics were performed to obtain the spatial dispersion and individual inhalation intake of PPAHs under different emission and ventilation conditions. The present work examined the preheating cooking stage, at which edible oil is heated up to beyond its smoke point. The dynamic emission rate peak point occurred much earlier than the oil heating temperature. The total PPAH emission ranged from 2258 to 6578 ng upon heating 40-85 g of edible oil. The overall intake fraction by an individual within a period of 10 min, including 3 min for heating and 7 min for natural cooling, was generally ∼1/10,000. An important outcome of this work was that the overall intake fraction could be represented by multiplying the range hood escape efficiency by the inhalation-to-ventilation rate ratio, which would be no greater than the same ratio. The methodology and results of this work were extendible for the number-based assessment of PPAHs. This work is expected to help us understand the health risks due to inhalation exposure to cooking-generated PPAHs in the kitchen.

  4. Eddy covariance measurements and parameterisation of traffic related particle emissions in an urban environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Mårtensson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban aerosol sources are important due to the health effects of particles and their potential impact on climate. Our aim has been to quantify and parameterise the urban aerosol source number flux F (particles m−2 s−1, in order to help improve how this source is represented in air quality and climate models. We applied an aerosol eddy covariance flux system 118.0 m above the city of Stockholm. This allowed us to measure the aerosol number flux for particles with diameters >11 nm. Upward source fluxes dominated completely over deposition fluxes in the collected dataset. Therefore, the measured fluxes were regarded as a good approximation of the aerosol surface sources. Upward fluxes were parameterised using a traffic activity (TA database, which is based on traffic intensity measurements. The footprint (area on the surface from which sources and sinks affect flux measurements, located at one point in space of the eddy system covered road and building construction areas, forests and residential areas, as well as roads with high traffic density and smaller streets. We found pronounced diurnal cycles in the particle flux data, which were well correlated with the diurnal cycles in traffic activities, strongly supporting the conclusion that the major part of the aerosol fluxes was due to traffic emissions. The emission factor for the fleet mix in the measurement area EFfm=1.4±0.1×1014 veh−1 km−1 was deduced. This agrees fairly well with other studies, although this study has an advantage of representing the actual effective emission from a mixed vehicle fleet. Emission from other sources, not traffic related, account for a F0=15±18×106 m−2 s−1. The urban aerosol source flux can then be written as F=EFfmTA+F0. In a second attempt to find a parameterisation, the friction velocity U* normalised with the average friction velocity has been included, F=EF . This parameterisation results in a somewhat reduced emission factor, 1.3×1014 veh

  5. Particle correlation based measurement of the mean time between the deuteron and proton emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghisalberti, C.; Lebrun, C.; Sezac, L.; Ardouin, D.; Erazmus, B.; Eudes, P.; Ghuilbault, F.; Lautridou, P.; Rahmani, J.A.; Reposeur, T.; Chbihi, A.; Galin, J.; Guerreau, D.; Morjean, M.; Peghaire, A.; Lednicky, R.; Pluta, J.; Quebert, J.; Siemssen, R.

    1997-01-01

    Proton-deuteron correlations at small relative momenta have been measured with the reaction 208 Pb + 93 Nb at 29 MeV per nucleon at GANIL using the ORION neutron calorimeter. By selecting the proton-deuteron pairs according to the angle between their relative velocity and the pair center of mass velocity of the emitting source one can determine the average value of the time delay between the emission of these particles. The results reported in this paper for the first time at GANIL energies agree with the values published before in the literature i.e. 600 and 1500 fm/c for deuteron and proton emission times, respectively, as obtained in the reactions Ar + Ag at E/A = 17 MeV. At higher energies measurements with a B.U.U. calorimeter recording the collisions 14 N + 27 Al at E/A = 75 MeV show that in this case the proton emission begins at 15 fm/c and decreases slowly in time, while the deuterons are emitted at 50 fm/c and present a steep falling. This result agrees with a negative average value of d - t p >. Thus, the method presented in this report for determining the order of emission is of great interest for checking the theoretical description of the particle emission all the way in the collision dynamical process

  6. Emissions from Ethanol-Gasoline Blends: A Single Particle Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H. McMurry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to its agricultural origin and function as a fuel oxygenate, ethanol is being promoted as an alternative biomass-based fuel for use in spark ignition engines, with mandates for its use at state and regional levels. While it has been established that the addition of ethanol to a fuel reduces the particulate mass concentration in the exhaust, little attention has been paid to changes in the physicochemical properties of the emitted particles. In this work, a dynamometer-mounted GM Quad-4 spark ignition engine run without aftertreatment at 1,500 RPM and 100% load was used with four different fuel blends, containing 0, 20, 40 and 85 percent ethanol in gasoline. This allowed the effects of the fuel composition to be isolated from other effects. Instrumentation employed included two Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometers covering different size ranges for analysis of single particle composition, an Aethalometer for black carbon, a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer for particle size distributions, a Photoelectric Aerosol Sensor for particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH species and gravimetric filter measurements for particulate mass concentrations. It was found that, under the conditions investigated here, additional ethanol content in the fuel changes the particle size distribution, especially in the accumulation mode, and decreases the black carbon and total particulate mass concentrations. The molecular weight distribution of the PAHs was found to decrease with added ethanol. However, PAHs produced from higher ethanol-content fuels are associated with NO2− (m/z—46 in the single-particle mass spectra, indicating the presence of nitro-PAHs. Compounds associated with the gasoline (e.g., sulfur-containing species are diminished due to dilution as ethanol is added to the fuel relative to those associated with the lubricating oil (e.g., calcium, zinc, phosphate in the single particle spectra. These changes have potential

  7. Probiotics protect mice from CoCrMo particles-induced osteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Z

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Zhenheng Wang,* Kaiwen Xue,* Maosheng Bai, Zhantao Deng, Jingjing Gan, Gang Zhou, Hongbo Qian,* Nirong Bao, Jianning Zhao Department of Orthopaedics, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Wear particle-induced inflammatory osteolysis is the primary cause of aseptic loosening, which is the most common reason for total hip arthroplasty (THA failure in the med- and long term. Recent studies have suggested an important role of gut microbiota (GM in modulating the host metabolism and immune system, leading to alterations in bone mass. Probiotic bacteria administered in adequate amounts can alter the composition of GM and confer health benefits to the host. Given the inflammatory osteolysis that occurs in wear debris-induced prosthesis loosening, we examined whether the probiotic Lactobacillus casei could reduce osteolysis in a mouse calvarial resorption model. In this study, L. casei markedly protected mice from CoCrMo particles (CoPs-induced osteolysis. Osteoclast gene markers and the number of osteoclasts were significantly decreased in L. casei-treated mice. Probiotic treatment decreased the M1-like macrophage phenotype indicated by downregulation of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-6 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and increased the M2-like macrophage phenotype indicated by upregulation of IL-4, IL-10 and arginase. Collectively, these results indicated that the L. casei treatment modulated the immune status and suppressed wear particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. Thus, probiotic treatment may represent a potential preventive and therapeutic approach to reduced wear debris-induced osteolysis. Keywords: wear particles, gut microbiota, nanotoxicity, macrophage polarization, inflammatory cytokines, aseptic loosening

  8. The future of airborne sulfur-containing particles in the absence of fossil fuel sulfur dioxide emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perraud, Véronique; Horne, Jeremy R; Martinez, Andrew S; Kalinowski, Jaroslaw; Meinardi, Simone; Dawson, Matthew L; Wingen, Lisa M; Dabdub, Donald; Blake, Donald R; Gerber, R Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2015-11-03

    Sulfuric acid (H2SO4), formed from oxidation of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted during fossil fuel combustion, is a major precursor of new airborne particles, which have well-documented detrimental effects on health, air quality, and climate. Another precursor is methanesulfonic acid (MSA), produced simultaneously with SO2 during the atmospheric oxidation of organosulfur compounds (OSCs), such as dimethyl sulfide. In the present work, a multidisciplinary approach is used to examine how contributions of H2SO4 and MSA to particle formation will change in a large coastal urban area as anthropogenic fossil fuel emissions of SO2 decline. The 3-dimensional University of California Irvine-California Institute of Technology airshed model is used to compare atmospheric concentrations of gas phase MSA, H2SO4, and SO2 under current emissions of fossil fuel-associated SO2 and a best-case futuristic scenario with zero fossil fuel sulfur emissions. Model additions include results from (i) quantum chemical calculations that clarify the previously uncertain gas phase mechanism of formation of MSA and (ii) a combination of published and experimental estimates of OSC emissions, such as those from marine, agricultural, and urban processes, which include pet waste and human breath. Results show that in the zero anthropogenic SO2 emissions case, particle formation potential from H2SO4 will drop by about two orders of magnitude compared with the current situation. However, particles will continue to be generated from the oxidation of natural and anthropogenic sources of OSCs, with contributions from MSA and H2SO4 of a similar order of magnitude. This could be particularly important in agricultural areas where there are significant sources of OSCs.

  9. Enhancement of single particle rare earth doped NaYF4: Yb, Er emission with a gold shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ling; Green, Kory; Hallen, Hans; Lim, Shuang Fang

    2015-01-01

    Upconversion of infrared light to visible light has important implications for bioimaging. However, the small absorption cross-section of rare earth dopants has limited the efficiency of these anti-Stokes nanomaterials. We present enhanced excitation absorption and single particle fluorescent emission of sodium yttrium fluoride, NaYF 4 : Yb, Er based upconverting nanoparticles coated with a gold nanoshell through surface plasmon resonance. The single gold-shell coated nanoparticles show enhanced absorption in the near infrared, enhanced total emission intensity, and increased green relative to red emission. We also show differences in enhancement between single and aggregated gold shell nanoparticles. The surface plasmon resonance of the gold-shell coated nanoparticle is shown to be dependent on the shell thickness. In contrast to other reported results, our single particle experimental observations are corroborated by finite element calculations that show where the green/red emission enhancement occurs, and what portion of the enhancement is due to electromagnetic effects. We find that the excitation enhancement and green/red emission ratio enhancement occurs at the corners and edges of the doped emissive core. (paper)

  10. Material analysis with the aid of particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadler, E.

    1984-12-01

    Material analysis are discussed on the basis of PIXE and Rutherford scattering spectroscopy. Various problems including cross-section changes, energy changes, count rate and deadtime, background, escape peaks and perturbations and overlap are discussed in relation to PIXE, while the influence of the energy loss of the projectile, the mass of the projectile, the cinematic factor, projectile energy, the scattering angle and the solid angle are discussed in terms of Rutherford scattering spectroscopy. X-ray production theory and x-ray detectors are also briefly discussed. The effect of elastically scattered protons on the energy resolution of the x-ray detector is discussed. The application of PIXE and Rutherford scattering spectroscopy to the analysis of air particle samples, and to the determination of the efficiency of the filters used for the collection of air-particle samples is also discussed

  11. Explaining global surface aerosol number concentrations in terms of primary emissions and particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Spracklen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We synthesised observations of total particle number (CN concentration from 36 sites around the world. We found that annual mean CN concentrations are typically 300–2000 cm−3 in the marine boundary layer and free troposphere (FT and 1000–10 000 cm−3 in the continental boundary layer (BL. Many sites exhibit pronounced seasonality with summer time concentrations a factor of 2–10 greater than wintertime concentrations. We used these CN observations to evaluate primary and secondary sources of particle number in a global aerosol microphysics model. We found that emissions of primary particles can reasonably reproduce the spatial pattern of observed CN concentration (R2=0.46 but fail to explain the observed seasonal cycle (R2=0.1. The modeled CN concentration in the FT was biased low (normalised mean bias, NMB=−88% unless a secondary source of particles was included, for example from binary homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid and water (NMB=−25%. Simulated CN concentrations in the continental BL were also biased low (NMB=−74% unless the number emission of anthropogenic primary particles was increased or a mechanism that results in particle formation in the BL was included. We ran a number of simulations where we included an empirical BL nucleation mechanism either using the activation-type mechanism (nucleation rate, J, proportional to gas-phase sulfuric acid concentration to the power one or kinetic-type mechanism (J proportional to sulfuric acid to the power two with a range of nucleation coefficients. We found that the seasonal CN cycle observed at continental BL sites was better simulated by BL particle formation (R2=0.3 than by increasing the number emission from primary anthropogenic sources (R2=0.18. The nucleation constants that resulted in best overall match between model and observed CN concentrations were

  12. Effects of aromatics, olefins and distillation temperatures (T50 & T90) on particle mass and number emissions from gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Rencheng; Hu, Jingnan; Bao, Xiaofeng; He, Liqiang; Zu, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Abstratct: Fuel quality is among the primary reasons for severe vehicle pollution. A limited understanding of the effects of gasoline properties on modern vehicle emissions is one obstacle for the establishment of stricter fuel standards in China. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of aromatic and olefin contents and T50 and T90 (defined as the 50%v and 90%v distillation temperatures) on tailpipe emissions from gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicles compliant with China 4 standards. Both gaseous and particle emissions using different types of gasoline were measured. Changing aromatic and olefin contents had relatively small impacts on fuel consumption. Compared with olefins and T90, the regulated gaseous emissions were impacted more by aromatics and T50. Evident decreases of the particle mass (PM) and particle number (PN) emissions were noticed when the aromatic content and T90 decreased. Reducing the olefin content slightly decreased the PM emissions and increased the PN emissions. With decreasing T50, the PM emissions increased and the PN emissions slightly decreased. These results suggest that aromatic content and T90 should be decreased to reduce particle emissions from GDI vehicles. The information presented in this study provides some suggestions for how to improve gasoline quality in China. - Highlights: • Effect of aromatics, olefins, T50 and T90 on GDI vehicle emissions was investigated. • Aromatics and olefins had little impact on fuel consumption and CO 2 emissions. • Reducing the aromatic content and T90 significantly decreased PM and PN emissions. • Changing the olefin content and T50 had a minor impact on particle emissions. • Thresholds of aromatics and T90 should be tightened in future gasoline regulations.

  13. Antitumor bystander effect induced by radiation-inducible target gene therapy combined with α particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hui; Jin Chufeng; Wu Yican; Ge Shenfang; Wu Lijun; FDS Team

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the bystander effect of the tumor and normal cells surrounding the target region caused by radiation-inducible target gene therapy combined with α-particle irradiation. The receptor tumor cell A549 and normal cell MRC-5 were co-cultured with the donor cells irradiated to 0.5 Gy or the non-irradiated donor cells, and their survival and apoptosis fractions were evaluated. The results showed that the combined treatment of Ad-ET and particle irradiation could induce synergistic antitumor effect on A549 tumor cell, and the survival fraction of receptor cells co-cultured with the irradiated cells decreased by 6%, compared with receptor cells co-cultured with non-irradiated cells, and the apoptosis fraction increased in the same circumstance, but no difference was observed with the normal cells. This study demonstrates that Ad-ET combined with α-particle irradiation can significantly cause the bystander effect on neighboring tumor cells by inhibiting cell growth and inducing apoptosis, without obvious toxicity to normal cells. This suggests that combining radiation-inducible TRAIL gene therapy and irradiation may improve tumor treatment efficacy by specifically targeting tumor cells and even involving the neighboring tumor cells. (authors)

  14. Characterizing and Quantifying Emissions and Transport of Fugitive Dust Emissions Due to Department of Defense Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-19

    response to shear stress (τ, N m-2) induced by the PI-SWERL®, the viscosity of the fluid exerts a torque (N m-1) that eventually balances with τ. The...Engelbrecht et al. (2012) from CCSEM measurements, report that these silicate mineral particles are largely coated by a veneer of clay minerals and fine...content does not, by itself, contribute to the high emissions observed at YTC. The presence of high clay content can constrain the emissions by

  15. Particle unstable excited states in /sup 9/Be influence of beta recoil and width on delayed particle spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Nyman, G H; Jonson, B; Kratz, K L; Larsson, P O; Mattsson, S; Ziegert, W

    1981-01-01

    The light nucleus /sup 9/Be has been studied through the emission of beta-delayed neutrons and alpha particles from /sup 9/Li. The activity is produced at the ISOLDE facility in fragmentation reactions induced either by 600 MeV proton or 910 MeV /sup 3/He beams from the CERN Synchro-cyclotron. After mass separation neutron spectra are recorded using /sup 3/He-filled proportional counters, while surface barrier detectors are used for the spectroscopy of alpha particles. Effects on the spectrum shape induced by recoil and polarization phenomena as well as large widths of the intermediate states are discussed. (14 refs).

  16. Particles from wood smoke and traffic induce differential pro-inflammatory response patterns in co-cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocbach, Anette; Herseth, Jan Inge; Lag, Marit; Refsnes, Magne; Schwarze, Per E.

    2008-01-01

    The inflammatory potential of particles from wood smoke and traffic has not been well elucidated. In this study, a contact co-culture of monocytes and pneumocytes was exposed to 10-40 μg/cm 2 of particles from wood smoke and traffic for 12, 40 and 64 h to determine their influence on pro-inflammatory cytokine release (TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, IL-8) and viability. To investigate the role of organic constituents in cytokine release the response to particles, their organic extracts and the washed particles were compared. Antagonists were used to investigate source-dependent differences in intercellular signalling (TNF-α, IL-1). The cytotoxicity was low after exposure to particles from both sources. However, wood smoke, and to a lesser degree traffic-derived particles, induced a reduction in cell number, which was associated with the organic fraction. The release of pro-inflammatory cytokines was similar for both sources after 12 h, but traffic induced a greater release than wood smoke particles with increasing exposure time. The organic fraction accounted for the majority of the cytokine release induced by wood smoke, whereas the washed traffic particles induced a stronger response than the corresponding organic extract. TNF-α and IL-1 antagonists reduced the release of IL-8 induced by particles from both sources. In contrast, the IL-6 release was only reduced by the IL-1 antagonist during exposure to traffic-derived particles. In summary, particles from wood smoke and traffic induced differential pro-inflammatory response patterns with respect to cytokine release and cell number. Moreover, the influence of the organic particle fraction and intercellular signalling on the pro-inflammatory response seemed to be source-dependent

  17. Spontaneous photon emission from a non-relativistic free charged particle in collapse models: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassi, A.; Donadi, S.

    2014-01-01

    We study the photon emission rate of a non-relativistic charged particle interacting with an external classical noise through its position. Both the particle and the electromagnetic field are quantized. Under only the dipole approximation, the equations of motion can be solved exactly for a free particle, or a particle bounded by an harmonic potential. The physical quantity we will be interested in is the spectrum of the radiation emitted by the particle, due to the interaction with the noise. We will highlight several properties of the spectrum and clarify some issues appearing in the literature, regarding the exact mathematical formula of a spectrum for a free particle.

  18. Simulating emission and chemical evolution of coarse sea-salt particles in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Kelly

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical processing of sea-salt particles in coastal environments significantly impacts concentrations of particle components and gas-phase species and has implications for human exposure to particulate matter and nitrogen deposition to sensitive ecosystems. Emission of sea-salt particles from the coastal surf zone is known to be elevated compared to that from the open ocean. Despite the importance of sea-salt emissions and chemical processing, the US EPA's Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model has traditionally treated coarse sea-salt particles as chemically inert and has not accounted for enhanced surf-zone emissions. In this article, updates to CMAQ are described that enhance sea-salt emissions from the coastal surf zone and allow dynamic transfer of HNO3, H2SO4, HCl, and NH3 between coarse particles and the gas phase. Predictions of updated CMAQ models and the previous release version, CMAQv4.6, are evaluated using observations from three coastal sites during the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE in Tampa, FL in May 2002. Model updates improve predictions of NO3, SO42−, NH4+, Na+, and Cl concentrations at these sites with only a 8% increase in run time. In particular, the chemically interactive coarse particle mode dramatically improves predictions of nitrate concentration and size distributions as well as the fraction of total nitrate in the particle phase. Also, the surf-zone emission parameterization improves predictions of total sodium and chloride concentration. Results of a separate study indicate that the model updates reduce the mean absolute error of nitrate predictions at coastal CASTNET and SEARCH sites in the eastern US. Although the new model features improve performance relative to CMAQv4.6, some persistent differences exist between observations and predictions

  19. Coal emissions adverse human health effects associated with ultrafine/nano-particles role and resultant engineering controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marcos L S; Navarro, Orlando G; Crissien, Tito J; Tutikian, Bernardo F; da Boit, Kátia; Teixeira, Elba C; Cabello, Juan J; Agudelo-Castañeda, Dayana M; Silva, Luis F O

    2017-10-01

    There are multiple elements which enable coal geochemistry: (1) boiler and pollution control system design parameters, (2) temperature of flue gas at collection point, (3) feed coal and also other fuels like petroleum coke, tires and biomass geochemistry and (4) fuel feed particle size distribution homogeneity distribution, maintenance of pulverisers, etc. Even though there is a large number of hazardous element pollutants in the coal-processing industry, investigations on micrometer and nanometer-sized particles including their aqueous colloids formation reactions and their behaviour entering the environment are relatively few in numbers. X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/ (Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) EDS/ (selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM)/EDS and granulometric distribution analysis were used as an integrated characterization techniques tool box to determine both geochemistry and nanomineralogy for coal fly ashes (CFAs) from Brazil´s largest coal power plant. Ultrafine/nano-particles size distribution from coal combustion emissions was estimated during the tests. In addition the iron and silicon content was determined as 54.6% of the total 390 different particles observed by electron bean, results aimed that these two particles represent major minerals in the environment particles normally. These data may help in future investigations to asses human health actions related with nano-particles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Geophysical applicability of aerosol size distribution measurements using cascade impactors and proton induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Grieken, R.E.; Johansson, T.B.; Akselsson, K.R.; Winchester, J.W.; Nelson, J.W.; Chapman, K.R.

    1976-01-01

    Proton Induced X-ray Emission, (PIXE), is capable of high precision analysis for trace element components of aerosol particle size fractions sampled by cascade impactor. A statistical evaluation of data quality has been carried out in order to distinguish between analytical uncertainties in the PIXE procedure, errors caused by cascade impactor performance and by other factors in the sampling procedure, and geophysical causes of differences in composition and particle size distributions of the elements in aerosols. Replicate analyses and simultaneous samplings taken in north Florida and St. Louis have been used for the data evaluation. In addition to the analytical error the sampling procedure contributes an error of approximately 10% to be added quadratically. The resulting precision is sufficient to evaluate the data in geophysical terms. This is illustrated by means of sample sets taken simultaneously in an urban, forest and coastal environment of the same region. (author)

  1. Experimental investigation of particle emissions under different EGR ratios on a diesel engine fueled by blends of diesel/gasoline/n-butanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Haozhong; Liu, Qingsheng; Wang, Qingxin; Zhou, Chengzhong; Mo, Chunlan; Wang, Xueqiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of EGR and blend fuels on particulate emission were studied in CI engine. • EGR ⩽ 20%, gasoline or n-butanol increases total particulate number concentration. • EGR ⩾ 30%, gasoline or n-butanol reduces total particulate number concentration. • As EGR ratio increased, the particulate mass concentrations of four fuels increased. • Gasoline or n-butanol increases the ratio of sub-25 nm particles number concentration. - Abstract: The particle emission characteristics of a high-pressure common-rail engine under different EGR conditions were investigated, using pure diesel (D100), diesel/gasoline (with a volume ratio of 70:30, D70G30), diesel/n-butanol (with a volume ratio of 70:30, D70B30) and diesel/gasoline/n-butanol (with a volume ratio of 70:15:15, D70G15B15) for combustion. Our results show that, with increasing EGR ratios, the in-cylinder pressure peak decreases and the heat release is delayed for the combustion of each fuel. At an EGR ratio of 30%, the combustion pressure peaks of D70G30, D70B30, D70G15B15 and D100 have similar values; with an EGR ratio of 40%, the combustion pressure peaks and release rate peaks of D70G30 and D70G15B15 are both lower with respect to D100. For small and medium EGR ratios (⩽20%), after the addition of gasoline and/or n-butanol to the fuel, the total particle number concentration (TPNC) increases, while both the soot emissions and the average geometric size of particles decrease. At large EGR ratios (30% and 40%), the TPNC of D70B30, D70G15B15 and D70G20 compared to D100 are reduced by a maximum amount of 74.7%, 66.7% and 28.6%, respectively. As the EGR ratio increases, the total particle mass concentration increases gradually for all four fuels. Blending gasoline or/and n-butanol into diesel induces an increase in the number concentration of sub-25 nm particles (PN25) which may be harmful in terms of health. However, the PN25 decreases with increasing the EGR ratio for all the tested fuels

  2. Preparing poly (caprolactone) micro-particles through solvent-induced phase separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaoqiang; Kanjwal, Muzafar Ahmed; Stephansen, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Poly (caprolactone) (PCL) particles with the size distribution from 1 to 100 μm were prepared through solvent-induced phase separation, in which polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA) was used as the matrix-forming polymer to stabilize PCL particles. The cloud point data of PCL-acetone-water was determined...

  3. Battery condenser system particulate emission factors for cotton gins: Particle size distribution characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of total particulate stack sampling and particle size analyses. In 2013, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or e...

  4. Light particle and gamma ray emission measurements in heavy-ion reactions. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitt, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a position-sensitive neutron detector and a data acquisition system at HHIRF for studying light particle emission in heavy ion reactions is described. Results are presented and discussed for the reactions 12 C + 158 Gd, 13 C + 157 Gd, and 20 Ne + 150 Nd

  5. Use of GSR particle analysis program on an analytical SEM to identify sources of emission of airborne particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Y.C.; Trumper, J.; Bostrom, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: High concentrations of airborne particles, in particular PM 10 (particulate matter 10 , but has been little used in Australia for airborne particulates. Two sets of 15 mm PM 10 samples were collected in March and April 2000 from two sites in Brisbane, one within a suburb and one next to an arterial road. The particles were collected directly onto double-sided carbon tapes with a cascade impactor attached to a high-volume PM 10 sampler. The carbon tapes were analysed in a JEOL 840 SEM equipped with a Be-window energy-dispersive X-ray detector and Moran Scientific microanalysis system. An automated Gun Shot Residue (GSR) program was used together with backscattered electron imaging to characterise and analyse individual particulates. About 6,000 particles in total were analysed for each set of impactor samples. Due to limitations of useful pixel size, only particles larger than about 0.5 μm could be analysed. The size, shape and estimated elemental composition (from Na to Pb) of the particles were subjected to non-hierarchical cluster analysis and the characteristics of the clusters were related to their possible sources of emission. Both samples resulted in similar particle clusters. The particles could be classified into three main categories non-spherical (58% of the total number of analysed particles, shape factor >1 1), spherical (15%) and 'carbonaceous' (27%, ie with unexplained % of elemental mass >75%). Non-spherical particles were mainly sea salt and soil particles, and a small amount of iron, lead and mineral dust. The spherical particles were mainly sea salt particles and flyash, and a small amount of iron, lead and secondary sulphate dust. The carbonaceous particles included carbon material mixed with secondary aerosols, roadside dust, sea salt or industrial dust. The arterial road sample also contained more roadside dust and less secondary aerosols than the suburb sample. Current limitations with this method are the minimum particle size

  6. Theoretical model of Orion gamma emission: acceleration, propagation and interaction of energetic particles in the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parizot, Etienne

    1997-01-01

    This research thesis reports the development of a general model for the study of the propagation and interaction of energetic particles (cosmic rays, and so on) in the interstellar medium (ISM). The first part addresses the development of theoretical and numerical tools. The author presents cosmic rays and energetic particles, presents and describes the various processes related to high-energy particles (matter ionisation, synchrotron and Bremsstrahlung radiation, Compton scattering, nuclear processes), addresses the transport and acceleration of energetic particles (plasmas, magnetic fields and energetic particles, elements of kinetic theory, transport and acceleration of energetic particles), and describes the general model of production of γ nuclear lines and of secondary nuclei. The second part addresses the gamma signature of a massive star in a dense medium: presentation and description of massive stars and of the circumstellar medium, life, death and gamma resurrection of a massive star at the heart of a cloud. The third part addresses the case of the gamma emission by Orion, and more particularly presents a theoretical model of this emission. Some generalities and perspectives (theoretical as well as observational) are then stated [fr

  7. Handbook on simultaneous x-ray and γ-ray ion beam methods for fine particle analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, D.D.

    2000-01-01

    Sampling, measurement, characterisation and source appointment of fine atmospheric particles has become increasingly important in recent times. This is due in part to the realisation that the fine particle pollution caused by anthropogenic activities plays a key role in certain aspects of human health, pollution transport and global climate change. This publication discusses accelerator based ion beam analysis (IBA) methods of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and particle induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) as applied to aerosol analysis. These techniques are sensitive, multielemental, mainly non-destructive, require no sample preparation, have short analysis times and can be used to analyse hundreds of filter samples a day in batch processing with minimum operator interaction. The aspects discussed in the publication include: the basics of the techniques; spectrum analysis; system calibration and blank subtraction; quantification; sensitivity; measurement errors

  8. Study of secondary electron emission from thin carbon targets with swift charged particles: heavy ions, hydrogen ions; Etude experimentale de l`emission electronique secondaire de cibles minces de carbone sous l`impact de projectiles rapides: ions lourds, ions hydrogene (atomiques, moleculaires ou sous forme d`agregats)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billebaud, A

    1995-07-12

    The main subject of this work is the study of electron emission from the two surfaces of thin solid targets bombarded with swift charged particles. The slowing down of swift ions in matter is mainly due to inelastic interaction with target electrons (ionization, excitation): the energy transfer to target electrons is responsible for the secondary electron emission process. The phenomenological and theoretical descriptions of this phenomena are the subject of the first chapter. We focused on secondary electron emission induced by different kind of projectiles on thin carbon foils. In chapter two we describe hydrogen cluster induced electron emission measurement between 40 and 120 keV/proton. These projectiles, composed of several atoms, allowed us to study and highlight collective effects of the electron emission process. We extended our study of electron emission to molecular (H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +}) and composite (H{sup -}, H{sup 0}) projectiles at higher energies (<= 2 MeV): we have designed an experimental set-up devoted to electron emission statistics measurements which allowed us to study, among others things, the role of projectile electrons in secondary electron emission. This experiment is described in the third chapter. Finally, the fourth chapter describes new measurements of electron emission induced by energetic (13 MeV/u) and highly charged argon ion provided by the medium energy beam line (SME) of GANIL (Caen), which have been analyzed in the framework of a semi-empirical model of secondary electron emission. This set of experiments brings new results on composite projectile interaction with matter, and on the consequences of high energy deposition in solids. (author).

  9. A study of complex particle emission in the pre-equilibrium statistical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Rongzhi; Wu Guohua

    1986-01-01

    A concept of the quasi-composite system in the process of the pre-equilibrium emission is presented in this paper. On the basis of the principle of detailed balance, the existence of the factor, [γ β ω(π β , 0, ν β , 0, E-U)g π,ν ], has been proved with an account of the distinguishabllity between protons and neutrons. A formula for the rate of the complex particle emission in the pre-equilibrium process can be obtained. The theoretical calculation results fit the experimental data quite well, especially in the high energy part of the energy spectrum the agreement are much better than ever before

  10. Fluxon induced resistance and field emission

    CERN Document Server

    Calatroni, Sergio; Darriulat, Pierre; Peck, M A; Valente, A M; Van't Hof, C A

    2000-01-01

    The surface resistance of superconducting niobium films induced by the presence of trapped magnetic flux, presumably in the form of a pinned fluxon lattice, is shown to be modified by the presence of a field emitting impurity or defect. The modification takes the form of an additional surface resistance proportional to the density of the fluxon lattice and increasing linearly with the amplitude of the microwave above a threshold significantly lower than the field emission threshold. Such an effect, precursor of electron emission, is observed here for the first time in a study using radiofrequency cavities operated at their fundamental 1.5 GHz frequency. The measured properties of the additional surface resistance severely constrain possible explanations of the observed effect.

  11. Subway particles are more genotoxic than street particles and induce oxidative stress in cultured human lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Hanna L; Nilsson, Lennart; Möller, Lennart

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an association between airborne particles and a wide range of adverse health effects. The mechanisms behind these effects include oxidative stress and inflammation. Even though traffic gives rise to high levels of particles in the urban air, people are exposed to even higher levels in the subway. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding how particles from different urban subenvironments differ in toxicity. The main aim of the present study was to compare the ability of particles from a subway station and a nearby very busy urban street, respectively, to damage DNA and to induce oxidative stress. Cultured human lung cells (A549) were exposed to particles, DNA damage was analyzed using single cell gel electrophoresis (the comet assay), and the ability to induce oxidative stress was measured as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) formation in lung cell DNA. We found that the subway particles were approximately eight times more genotoxic and four times more likely to cause oxidative stress in the lung cells. When the particles, water extracts from the particles, or particles treated with the metal chelator deferoxamine mesylate were incubated with 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG) and 8-oxodG was analyzed, we found that the oxidative capacity of the subway particles was due to redox active solid metals. Furthermore, analysis of the atomic composition showed that the subway particles to a dominating degree (atomic %) consisted of iron, mainly in the form of magnetite (Fe3O4). By using electron microscopy, the interaction between the particles and the lung cells was shown. The in vitro reactivity of the subway particles in combination with the high particle levels in subway systems give cause of concern due to the high number of people that are exposed to subway particles on a daily basis. To what extent the subway particles cause health effects in humans needs to be further evaluated.

  12. Simulation of diffusion-induced stress using reconstructed electrodes particle structures generated by micro/nano-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Cheolwoong; Yan Bo; Yin Leilei; Zhu Likun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The microstructure of LIB electrodes was obtained by X-ray micro/nano-CT. ► We studied diffusion-induced stresses based on realistic 3D microstructures. ► Stresses depend on geometric characteristics of electrode particle. ► Stresses in a real particle are much higher than those in a spherical particle. - Abstract: Lithium ion batteries experience diffusion-induced stresses during charge and discharge processes which can cause electrode failure in the form of fracture. Previous diffusion-induced stress models and simulations are mainly based on simple active material particle structures, such as spheres and ellipsoids. However, the simple structure model cannot reveal the stress development in a real complex lithium ion battery electrode. In this paper, we studied the diffusion-induced stresses numerically based on a realistic morphology of reconstructed particles during the lithium ion intercalation process. The morphology of negative and positive active materials of a lithium ion battery was determined using X-ray micro/nano computed tomography technology. Diffusion-induced stresses were simulated at different C rates under galvonostatic conditions and compared with spherical particles. The simulation results show that the intercalation stresses of particles depend on their geometric characteristics. The highest von Mises stress and Tresca stress in a real particle are several times higher than the stresses in a spherical particle with the same volume.

  13. Electron emission from solids induced by swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Guoqing

    2000-01-01

    The recent progresses in experimental and theoretical studies of the collision between swift heavy ion and solids as well as electron emission induced by swift heavy ion in solids were briefly reviewed. Three models, Coulomb explosion, thermal spike and repulsive long-lived states, for interpreting the atomic displacements stimulated by the electronic energy loss were discussed. The experimental setup and methods for measuring the electron emission from solids were described. The signification deviation from a proportionality between total electron emission yields and electronic stopping power was found. Auger-electron and convoy-electron spectra are thought to be a probe for investigating the microscopic production mechanisms of the electronic irradiation-damage. Electron temperature and track potential at the center of nuclear tracks in C and polypropylene foils induced by 5 MeV/u heavy ions, which are related to the electronic excitation density in metals and insulators respectively, were extracted by measuring the high resolution electron spectra

  14. Catapult mechanism for fast particle emission in fission and heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maedler, P.

    1984-01-01

    The fission processes of slabs of nuclear matter is modelled in the Hartree-Fock time dependence approximation by adding an initial collective velocity field to the static self-consistent solution. In dependence on its amplitude either large amplitude density oscillations are excited or fission occurs. The final disintegration of the slab proceeds on a time scale 10 -22 s and is characterized by a sharp peak in the actual velocity field in the region of the ''snatching'' inner low density tails. A characteristic time later a low density lump correlated with a peak in the velocity field energies in front of the fragments. These particles are called ''catapult particles''. Recent experimental results possibly provide evidence for catapult neutrons in low-energy fission. The significance of the catapult mechanism for fast particle emission in the exit channel of heavy ion reactions is discussed

  15. Vortex-Breakdown-Induced Particle Capture in Branching Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, Jesse T; Fani, Andrea; Chen, Kevin K; Shin, Sangwoo; Gallaire, François; Stone, Howard A

    2016-08-19

    We show experimentally that a flow-induced, Reynolds number-dependent particle-capture mechanism in branching junctions can be enhanced or eliminated by varying the junction angle. In addition, numerical simulations are used to show that the features responsible for this capture have the signatures of classical vortex breakdown, including an approach flow aligned with the vortex axis and a pocket of subcriticality. We show how these recirculation regions originate and evolve and suggest a physical mechanism for their formation. Furthermore, comparing experiments and numerical simulations, the presence of vortex breakdown is found to be an excellent predictor of particle capture. These results inform the design of systems in which suspended particle accumulation can be eliminated or maximized.

  16. Aggregation-induced emission: phenomenon, mechanism and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yuning; Lam, Jacky W Y; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2009-08-07

    It is textbook knowledge that chromophore aggregation generally quenches light emission. In this feature article, we give an account on how we observed an opposite phenomenon termed aggregation-induced emission (AIE) and identified the restriction of intramolecular rotation as a main cause for the AIE effect. Based on the mechanistic understanding, we developed a series of new fluorescent and phosphorescent AIE systems with emission colours covering the entire visible spectral region and luminescence quantum yields up to unity. We explored high-tech applications of the AIE luminogens as, for example, fluorescence sensors (for explosive, ion, pH, temperature, viscosity, pressure, etc.), biological probes (for protein, DNA, RNA, sugar, phospholipid, etc.), immunoassay markers, PAGE visualization agents, polarized light emitters, monitors for layer-by-layer assembly, reporters for micelle formation, multistimuli-responsive nanomaterials, and active layers in the fabrication of organic light-emitting diodes.

  17. Proton-Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis of Crematorium Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Salina; Nadareski, Benjamin; Yoskowitz, Joshua; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2014-09-01

    There has been considerable debate in recent years about possible mercury emissions from crematoria due to amalgam tooth restorations. We have performed a proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of aerosol and soil samples taken near the Vale Cemetery Crematorium in Schenectady, NY, to address this concern. The aerosol samples were collected on the roof of the crematorium using a nine-stage, cascade impactor that separates the particulate matter by aerodynamic diameter and deposits it onto thin Kapton foils. The soil samples were collected at several different distances from the crematorium and compressed into pellets with a hydraulic press. The Kapton foils containing the aerosol samples and the soil pellets were bombarded with 2.2-MeV protons from the 1.1-MV tandem Pelletron accelerator in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. We measured significant concentrations of sulfur, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, and iron, but essentially no mercury in the aerosol samples. The lower limit of detection for airborne mercury in this experiment was approximately 0.2 ng / m3. The PIXE analysis of the soil samples showed the presence of elements commonly found in soil (Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe), but no trace of mercury. There has been considerable debate in recent years about possible mercury emissions from crematoria due to amalgam tooth restorations. We have performed a proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of aerosol and soil samples taken near the Vale Cemetery Crematorium in Schenectady, NY, to address this concern. The aerosol samples were collected on the roof of the crematorium using a nine-stage, cascade impactor that separates the particulate matter by aerodynamic diameter and deposits it onto thin Kapton foils. The soil samples were collected at several different distances from the crematorium and compressed into pellets with a hydraulic press. The Kapton foils containing the aerosol samples and the soil pellets were bombarded with 2.2-Me

  18. African Anthropogenic Combustion Emissions: Estimate of Regional Mortality Attributable to Fine Particle Concentrations in 2030

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liousse, C.; Roblou, L.; Assamoi, E.; Criqui, P.; Galy-Lacaux, C.; Rosset, R.

    2014-12-01

    Fossil fuel (traffic, industries) and biofuel (domestic fires) emissions of gases and particles in Africa are expected to significantly increase in the near future, particularly due to rapid growth of African cities and megacities. In this study, we will present the most recent developments of African combustion emission inventories, including African specificities. Indeed, a regional fossil fuel and biofuel inventory for gases and particulates described in Liousse et al. (2014) has been developed for Africa at a resolution of 0.25° x 0.25° for the years 2005 and 2030. For 2005, the original database of Junker and Liousse (2008) was used after modification for updated regional fuel consumption and emission factors. Two prospective inventories for 2030 are derived based on Prospective Outlook on Long-term Energy Systems (POLES) model (Criqui, 2001). The first is a reference scenario (2030ref) with no emission controls and the second is for a "clean" scenario (2030ccc*) including Kyoto policy and African specific emission control. This inventory predicts very large increases of pollutant emissions in 2030 (e.g. contributing to 50% of global anthropogenic organic particles), if no emission regulations are implemented. These inventories have been introduced in RegCM4 model. In this paper we will focus on aerosol modelled concentrations in 2005, 2030ref and 2030ccc*. Spatial distribution of aerosol concentrations will be presented with a zoom at a few urban and rural sites. Finally mortality rates (respiratory, cardiovascular) caused by anthropogenic PM2.5 increase from 2005 to 2030, calculated following Lelieveld et al. (2013), will be shown for each scenarios. To conclude, this paper will discuss the effectiveness of scenarios to reduce emissions, aerosol concentrations and mortality rates, underlining the need for further measurements scheduled in the frame of the new DACCIWA (Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions) program.

  19. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation and Emission from Relativistic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Mizuno, Yosuke; Fishman, G. Jerry; Hartmann, D. H.

    2006-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), supernova remnants, and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet, rather than by the scattering of particles back and forth across the shock as in Fermi acceleration. Shock acceleration' is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different spectral properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. We will review recent PIC simulations of relativistic jets and try to make a connection with observations.

  20. Analysis of propeller-induced ground vortices by particle image velocimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Y.; Sciacchitano, A.; Veldhuis, L.L.M.; Eitelberg, G.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: The interaction between a propeller and its self-induced vortices originating on the ground is investigated in a scaled experiment. The velocity distribution in the flow field in two different planes containing the self-induced vortices is measured by particle image velocimetry (PIV).

  1. Traffic generated non-exhaust particulate emissions from concrete pavement: A mass and particle size study for two-wheelers and small cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aatmeeyata; Kaul, D. S.; Sharma, Mukesh

    This study aimed to understand the non-exhaust (NE) emission of particles from wear of summer tire and concrete pavement, especially for two wheelers and small cars. A fully enclosed laboratory-scale model was fabricated to simulate road tire interaction with a facility to collect particles in different sizes. A road was cast using the M-45 concrete mixture and the centrifugal casting method. It was observed that emission of large particle non exhaust emission (LPNE) as well as PM 10 and PM 2.5 increased with increasing load. The LPNE was 3.5 mg tire -1 km -1 for a two wheeler and 6.4 mg tire -1 km -1 for a small car. The LPNE can lead to water pollution through water run-off from the roads. The contribution of the PM 10 and PM 2.5 was smaller compared to the LPNE particles (less than 0.1%). About 32 percent of particle mass of PM 10 was present below 1 μm. The number as well as mass size distribution for PM 10 was observed to be bi-modal with peaks at 0.3 μm and 4-5 μm. The NE emissions did not show any significant trend with change in tire pressure.

  2. Epstein–Barr virus particles induce centrosome amplification and chromosomal instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumilov, Anatoliy; Tsai, Ming-Han; Schlosser, Yvonne T.; Kratz, Anne-Sophie; Bernhardt, Katharina; Fink, Susanne; Mizani, Tuba; Lin, Xiaochen; Jauch, Anna; Mautner, Josef; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Feederle, Regina; Hoffmann, Ingrid; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Infections with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) are associated with cancer development, and EBV lytic replication (the process that generates virus progeny) is a strong risk factor for some cancer types. Here we report that EBV infection of B-lymphocytes (in vitro and in a mouse model) leads to an increased rate of centrosome amplification, associated with chromosomal instability. This effect can be reproduced with virus-like particles devoid of EBV DNA, but not with defective virus-like particles that cannot infect host cells. Viral protein BNRF1 induces centrosome amplification, and BNRF1-deficient viruses largely lose this property. These findings identify a new mechanism by which EBV particles can induce chromosomal instability without establishing a chronic infection, thereby conferring a risk for development of tumours that do not necessarily carry the viral genome. PMID:28186092

  3. Size-segregated emissions and metal content of vehicle-emitted particles as a function of mileage: Implications to population exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golokhvast, Kirill S.; Chernyshev, Valery V.; Chaika, Vladimir V.; Ugay, Sergey M.; Zelinskaya, Elena V.; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M.; Karakitsios, Spyros P.; Sarigiannis, Denis A.

    2015-01-01

    The study aims at investigating the characteristics (size distribution, active surface and metal content) of particles emitted by cars as a function of mileage using a novel methodology for characterizing particulate emissions captured by Exhaust Gas Suspension (EGS). EGS was obtained by passing the exhaust gases through a container of deionized water. EGS analysis was performed using laser granulometry, electron scanning microscopy, and high resolution mass spectrometry. Implications of the differences in key features of the emitted particles on population exposure were investigated using numerical simulation for estimating size-segregated PM deposition across human respiratory tract (HRT). It was found that vehicle mileage, age and the respective emissions class have almost no effect on the size distribution of the exhaust gas particulate released into the environment; about half of the examined vehicles with low mileage were found to release particles of aerodynamic diameter above 10 μm. The exhaust gas particulate detected in the EGS of all cars can be classified into three major size classes: (1) 0.1–5 µm – soot and ash particles, metals (Au, Pt, Pd, Ir); (2) 10–30 µm – metal (Cr, Fe, Cu, Zr, Ni) and ash particles; (3) 400–1,000 µm – metal (Fe, Cr, Pb) and ash particles. Newer vehicles with low mileage are substantial sources of soot and metal particles with median diameter of 200 nm with a higher surface area (up to 89,871.16 cm 2 /cm 3 ). These tend to deposit in the lower part of the human respiratory tract. - Highlights: • Car mileage has virtually no effect on the size of the solid particles released. • Newer diesel vehicles emit particles of lower aerodynamic diameter. • Particle active surface emitted by newer vehicles is on average 3 times higher. • Real-life emissions were translated into actual internal PM exposure.

  4. Size-segregated emissions and metal content of vehicle-emitted particles as a function of mileage: Implications to population exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golokhvast, Kirill S.; Chernyshev, Valery V.; Chaika, Vladimir V.; Ugay, Sergey M. [Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Zelinskaya, Elena V. [National Research Irkutsk State Technical University, Irkutsk (Russian Federation); Tsatsakis, Aristidis M. [University of Crete, Medical School, Department of Toxicology and Forensic Science, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Karakitsios, Spyros P. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Chemical Engineering, Thessaloniki (Greece); Sarigiannis, Denis A., E-mail: denis@eng.auth.gr [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Chemical Engineering, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2015-10-15

    The study aims at investigating the characteristics (size distribution, active surface and metal content) of particles emitted by cars as a function of mileage using a novel methodology for characterizing particulate emissions captured by Exhaust Gas Suspension (EGS). EGS was obtained by passing the exhaust gases through a container of deionized water. EGS analysis was performed using laser granulometry, electron scanning microscopy, and high resolution mass spectrometry. Implications of the differences in key features of the emitted particles on population exposure were investigated using numerical simulation for estimating size-segregated PM deposition across human respiratory tract (HRT). It was found that vehicle mileage, age and the respective emissions class have almost no effect on the size distribution of the exhaust gas particulate released into the environment; about half of the examined vehicles with low mileage were found to release particles of aerodynamic diameter above 10 μm. The exhaust gas particulate detected in the EGS of all cars can be classified into three major size classes: (1) 0.1–5 µm – soot and ash particles, metals (Au, Pt, Pd, Ir); (2) 10–30 µm – metal (Cr, Fe, Cu, Zr, Ni) and ash particles; (3) 400–1,000 µm – metal (Fe, Cr, Pb) and ash particles. Newer vehicles with low mileage are substantial sources of soot and metal particles with median diameter of 200 nm with a higher surface area (up to 89,871.16 cm{sup 2}/cm{sup 3}). These tend to deposit in the lower part of the human respiratory tract. - Highlights: • Car mileage has virtually no effect on the size of the solid particles released. • Newer diesel vehicles emit particles of lower aerodynamic diameter. • Particle active surface emitted by newer vehicles is on average 3 times higher. • Real-life emissions were translated into actual internal PM exposure.

  5. Wood burning stoves and small boilers - particle emissions and reduction initiatives; Braendeovne og smae kedler - partikelemissioner og reduktionstiltag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illerup, J B; Capral Henriksen, T; Lundhede, T [Danmarks Miljoeundersoegelser, Aarhus Universitet, Aarhus (Denmark); Breugel, C van; Zoellner Jensen, N [Miljoestyrelsen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2007-06-15

    Pollution from burning wood in private households, and the environmental and health consequences of this is determined in practice by a complicated interaction between a number of factors, including firing habits, fuel, type of stove/boiler, chimney and location of the chimney in relation to the surroundings. This report maps out the technologies used today for burning wood in private households, how these technologies contribute to particle emissions and which technologies may potentially reduce emissions of particles from burning wood in households in Denmark. Moreover, the possible emissions reductions and the financial costs incurred by consumers from different initiatives have been estimated. This report does not deal with possible initiatives for improvement of firing habits, fuel quality and chimneys. (au)

  6. Fireplace and woodstove fine particle emissions from combustion of western Mediterranean wood types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Célia; Gonçalves, Cátia; Fernandes, Ana Patrícia; Tarelho, Luís; Pio, Casimiro

    2011-08-01

    Wood from seven species of trees grown in the Portuguese forest ( Pinus pinaster, Eucalyptus globulus, Quercus suber, Acacia longifolia, Quercus faginea, Olea europea and Quercus ilex rotundifolia), and briquettes produced from forest biomass waste were burned in a fireplace and in a woodstove to determine the chemical composition of fine particle (PM 2.5) emissions. Samples were analysed for organic and elemental carbon (OC/EC), water soluble ions (Na +, NH 4+, K +, Mg 2+, Ca 2+, Cl -, NO 3- and SO 42-) and 67 elements. The PM 2.5 emission factors (g kg - 1 fuel burned, dry basis) were in the ranges 9.9-20.2 and 4.2-16.3, respectively, for the fireplace and the woodstove. Organic carbon contributed to about 50% of the fine particle mass in the emissions from every wood species studied in both burning appliances. The carbonaceous component of PM 2.5 was dominated by organic carbon, accounting for more than 85% of the total carbon (TC): OC/TC ranged from 0.85 to 0.96 (avg. 0.92) for the fireplace and from 0.86 to 0.97 (avg. 0.93) for the woodstove. The water-soluble ions accounted for 0.64 to 11.3% of the PM 2.5 mass emitted from the fireplace, whereas mass fractions between 0.53 and 13.6% were obtained for the woodstove. The golden wattle wood smoke showed a much higher ionic content than the emissions from the other wood types. Trace elements represented 0.4 to 2.5% and 0.2 to 2.2% of the PM 2.5 mass emitted, respectively, from the fireplace and the woodstove, which corresponded to average total emissions of 132 ± 77.3 mg kg - 1 and 93.4 ± 60.8 mg kg - 1 of wood burned. Among these, K, Pb, Al, Mn and Sr were present in all samples. From the emission profiles of the individual experiments, composite wood combustion profiles are suggested with the aid of a cluster analysis.

  7. Formation of secondary organic aerosol coating on black carbon particles near vehicular emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alex K. Y.; Chen, Chia-Li; Liu, Jun; Price, Derek J.; Betha, Raghu; Russell, Lynn M.; Zhang, Xiaolu; Cappa, Christopher D.

    2017-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) emitted from incomplete combustion can result in significant impacts on air quality and climate. Understanding the mixing state of ambient BC and the chemical characteristics of its associated coatings is particularly important to evaluate BC fate and environmental impacts. In this study, we investigate the formation of organic coatings on BC particles in an urban environment (Fontana, California) under hot and dry conditions using a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS). The SP-AMS was operated in a configuration that can exclusively detect refractory BC (rBC) particles and their coatings. Using the -log(NOx / NOy) ratio as a proxy for photochemical age of air masses, substantial formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) coatings on rBC particles was observed due to active photochemistry in the afternoon, whereas primary organic aerosol (POA) components were strongly associated with rBC from fresh vehicular emissions in the morning rush hours. There is also evidence that cooking-related organic aerosols were externally mixed from rBC. Positive matrix factorization and elemental analysis illustrate that most of the observed SOA coatings were freshly formed, providing an opportunity to examine SOA coating formation on rBCs near vehicular emissions. Approximately 7-20 wt % of secondary organic and inorganic species were estimated to be internally mixed with rBC on average, implying that rBC is unlikely the major condensation sink of SOA in this study. Comparison of our results to a co-located standard high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) measurement suggests that at least a portion of SOA materials condensed on rBC surfaces were chemically different from oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) particles that were externally mixed with rBC, although they could both be generated from local photochemistry.

  8. Development of an on-line exposure system to determine freshly produced diesel engine emission-induced cellular effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostingh, Gertie J; Papaioannou, Eleni; Chasapidis, Leonidas; Akritidis, Theofylaktos; Konstandopoulos, Athanasios G; Duschl, Albert

    2013-09-01

    Diesel engine emission particle filters are often placed at exhaust outlets to remove particles from the exhaust. The use of filters results in the exposure to a reduced number of nanometer-sized particles, which might be more harmful than the exposure to a larger number of micrometer-sized particles. An in vitro exposure system was established to expose human alveolar epithelial cells to freshly generated exhaust. Computer simulations were used to determine the optimal flow characteristics and ensure equal exposure conditions for each well of a 6-well plate. A selective particle size sampler was used to continuously deliver diesel soot particles with different particle size distributions to cells in culture. To determine, whether the system could be used for cellular assays, alterations in cytokine production and cell viability of human alveolar A549 cells were determined after 3h on-line exposure followed by a 21-h conventional incubation period. Data indicated that complete diesel engine emission slightly affected pre-stimulated cells, but naive cells were not affected. The fractions containing large or small particles never affected the cells. The experimental set-up allowed a reliable exposure of the cells to the complete exhaust fraction or to the fractions containing either large or small diesel engine emission particles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. UV-induced N2O emission from plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, Dan; Albert, Kristian R.; Mikkelsen, Teis N.; Ambus, Per

    2014-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important long-lived greenhouse gas and precursor of stratospheric ozone-depleting mono-nitrogen oxides. The atmospheric concentration of N2O is persistently increasing; however, large uncertainties are associated with the distinct source strengths. Here we investigate for the first time N2O emission from terrestrial vegetation in response to natural solar ultra violet radiation. We conducted field site measurements to investigate N2O atmosphere exchange from grass vegetation exposed to solar irradiance with and without UV-screening. Further laboratory tests were conducted with a range of species to study the controls and possible loci of UV-induced N2O emission from plants. Plants released N2O in response to natural sunlight at rates of c. 20-50 nmol m-2h-1, mostly due to the UV component. The emission response to UV-A is of the same magnitude as that to UV-B. Therefore, UV-A is more important than UV-B given the natural UV-spectrum at Earth's surface. Plants also emitted N2O in darkness, although at reduced rates. The emission rate is temperature dependent with a rather high activation energy indicative for an abiotic process. The prevailing zone for the N2O formation appears to be at the very surface of leaves. However, only c. 26% of the UV-induced N2O appears to originate from plant-N. Further, the process is dependent on atmospheric oxygen concentration. Our work demonstrates that ecosystem emission of the important greenhouse gas, N2O, may be up to c. 30% higher than hitherto assumed.

  10. Lateral Tension-Induced Penetration of Particles into a Liposome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Shigyou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available It is important that we understand the mechanism of the penetration of particles into a living cell to achieve advances in bionanotechnology, such as for treatment, visualization within a cell, and genetic modification. Although there have been many studies on the application of functional particles to cells, the basic mechanism of penetration across a biological membrane is still poorly understood. Here we used a model membrane system to demonstrate that lateral membrane tension drives particle penetration across a lipid bilayer. After the application of osmotic pressure, fully wrapped particles on a liposome surface were found to enter the liposome. We discuss the mechanism of the tension-induced penetration in terms of narrow constriction of the membrane at the neck part. The present findings are expected to provide insight into the application of particles to biological systems.

  11. Emission from small dust particles in diffuse and molecular cloud medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.P.; Desert, X.

    1990-01-01

    Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) observations of the whole galaxy has shown that long wavelength emission (100 and 60 micron bands) can be explained by thermal emission from big grains (approx 0.1 micron) radiating at their equilibrium temperature when heated by the InterStellar Radiation Field (ISRF). This conclusion has been confirmed by continuum sub-millimeter observations of the galactic plane made by the EMILIE experiment at 870 microns (Pajot et al. 1986). Nevertheless, shorter wavelength observations like 12 and 25 micron IRAS bands, show an emission from the galactic plane in excess with the long wavelength measurements which can only be explained by a much hotter particles population. Because dust at equilibrium cannot easily reach high temperatures required to explain this excess, this component is thought to be composed of very small dust grains or big molecules encompassing thermal fluctuations. Researchers present here a numerical model that computes emission, from Near Infrared Radiation (NIR) to Sub-mm wavelengths, from a non-homogeneous spherical cloud heated by the ISRF. This model fully takes into account the heating of dust by multi-photon processes and back-heating of dust in the Visual/Infrared Radiation (VIS-IR) so that it is likely to describe correctly emission from molecular clouds up to large A sub v and emission from dust experiencing temperature fluctuations. The dust is a three component mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, very small grains, and classical big grains with independent size distributions (cut-off and power law index) and abundances

  12. Multiplicity of pre-scission charged particle emission by a statistical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuse, Takehiro

    1996-01-01

    With introducing the limitation (E cut-off ) not to excite all statistically permitted scission parts in the phase integral at the scission point, we try to reproduce the multiplicity of pre-scission charged particle emission of 86 Kr (E lab =890 MeV)+ 27 Al by the cascade calculation of the extended Hauser-Feshbach method (EHM). The physical image is explained from a point of view of the life time for the statistical model of the compound nuclei. When E cut-off parameter is bout 80 MeV, the cross section of scission and the loss of pre-scission charged particle seemed to be reproduced. The average pre-scission time is about 1.7 x 10 -20 sec. The essential problem of the life time of compound nuclei is explained. (S.Y.)

  13. Dual neutral particle induced transmutation in CINDER2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, W.J., E-mail: wjmarti@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Oliveira, C.R.E. de; Hecht, A.A. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2014-12-11

    Although nuclear transmutation methods for fission have existed for decades, the focus has been on neutron-induced reactions. Recent novel concepts have sought to use both neutrons and photons for purposes such as active interrogation of cargo to detect the smuggling of highly enriched uranium, a concept that would require modeling the transmutation caused by both incident particles. As photonuclear transmutation has yet to be modeled alongside neutron-induced transmutation in a production code, new methods need to be developed. The CINDER2008 nuclear transmutation code from Los Alamos National Laboratory is extended from neutron applications to dual neutral particle applications, allowing both neutron- and photon-induced reactions for this modeling with a focus on fission. Following standard reaction modeling, the induced fission reaction is understood as a two-part reaction, with an entrance channel to the excited compound nucleus, and an exit channel from the excited compound nucleus to the fission fragmentation. Because photofission yield data—the exit channel from the compound nucleus—are sparse, neutron fission yield data are used in this work. With a different compound nucleus and excitation, the translation to the excited compound state is modified, as appropriate. A verification and validation of these methods and data has been performed. This has shown that the translation of neutron-induced fission product yield sets, and their use in photonuclear applications, is appropriate, and that the code has been extended correctly. - Highlights: • The CINDER2008 transmutation code was modified to include photon-induced transmutation tracking. • A photonuclear interaction library was created to allow CINDER2008 to track photonuclear interactions. • Photofission product yield data sets were created using fission physics similarities with neutron-induced fission.

  14. Particle emissions from ventilation equipment: health hazards, measurement and product development; Ilmanvaihtolaitteiden hiukkaspaeaestoet: terveyshaitat, mittaaminen ja tuotekehitys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tossavainen, A.; Tuovila, H.; Riala, R.; Harju, R.; Tuomi, T.; Voutilainen, R. [Tyoeterv.l, Helsinki (Finland); Laamanen, J.; Ismo Heimonen, I.; Kovanen, K. [VTT, Espoo (Finland)

    2006-10-15

    The project aimed to develop the design, structure and materials of ventilation equipment for the improvement of indoor air quality in office- type buildings. Particle emissions from commercial sound silencers were measured by laboratory tests. In ten buildings, the dust and fibre levels were surveyed in relation to the product design and operation. Direct-reading particle counters and filter sampling methods combined with optical and electron microscopy analyses were the main methods in these surveys. Nasal lavage was used for the estimation of inhalation exposure to coarse man-made mineral fibres. Technical criteria were drafted for the design and testing of fibre emissions from various ventilation equipment. (orig.)

  15. Modeling particle emission and power flow in pulsed-power driven, nonuniform transmission lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichelle Bruner

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed-power driven x-ray radiographic systems are being developed to operate at higher power in an effort to increase source brightness and penetration power. Essential to the design of these systems is a thorough understanding of electron power flow in the transmission line that couples the pulsed-power driver to the load. In this paper, analytic theory and fully relativistic particle-in-cell simulations are used to model power flow in several experimental transmission-line geometries fielded on Sandia National Laboratories’ upgraded Radiographic Integrated Test Stand [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 28, 1653 (2000ITPSBD0093-381310.1109/27.901250]. Good agreement with measured electrical currents is demonstrated on a shot-by-shot basis for simulations which include detailed models accounting for space-charge-limited electron emission, surface heating, and stimulated particle emission. Resonant cavity modes related to the transmission-line impedance transitions are also shown to be excited by electron power flow. These modes can drive oscillations in the output power of the system, degrading radiographic resolution.

  16. The rotationally induced quadrupole pair field in the particle-rotor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almberger, J.

    1980-04-01

    A formalism is developed which makes it possible to consider the influence of the rotationally induced quadrupole pair field and corresponding quasi-particle residual interactions within the particle-rotor model. The Y 21 pair field renormalizes both the Coriolis and the recoil interactions. (Auth.)

  17. Induced absorption and stimulated emission in a driven two-level atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavroyannis, C.

    1992-01-01

    We have considered the induced processes that occur in a driven two-level atom, where a laser photon is absorbed and emitted by the ground and by the excited states of the atom, respectively. In the low-intensity limit of the laser field, the induced spectra arising when a laser photon is absorbed by the ground state of the atom consist of two peaks describing induced absorption and stimulated-emission processes, respectively, where the former prevails over the latter. Asymmetry of the spectral lines occurs at off-resonance and its extent depends on the detuning of the laser field. The physical. process where a laser photon is emitted by the excited state is the reverse of that arising from the absorption of a laser photon by the ground state of the atom. The former differs from the latter in that the emission of a laser photon by the excited state occurs in the low frequency regime and that the stimulated-emission process prevails over that of the induced absorption. In this case, amplification of ultrashort pulses is likely to occur without the need of population inversion between the optical transitions. The computed spectra are graphically presented and discussed. (author)

  18. Verification of nuclear data for DT neutron induced charged-particle emission reaction of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, K.; Murata, I.; Ochiai, K.; Kubota, N.; Miyamaru, H.; Takagi, S.; Shido, S.; Konno, C.; Nishitani, T.

    2007-01-01

    Double-differential cross-section (DDX) for emitted charged particles is necessary to estimate material damage, gas production and nuclear heating in a fusion reactor. Detailed measurements of the cross-sections for beryllium, carbon and fluorine, which are among the composition materials of expected fusion blankets and first walls, were carried out with a charged-particle spectrometer using a pencil-beam DT neutron source. As verification of the cross-sections evaluated in three nuclear libraries (JENDL-3.3, ENDF/B-VI and JEFF-3.1), our measured data were compared with the data evaluated in the libraries. From the comparison, the following problems were pointed out: Beryllium: Remarkable differences in energy and angular distribution for α-particles were observed between the measured data and the libraries. The estimated total cross-section for α-particle production well agreed with the libraries. Carbon: There was a discrepancy of about 20% between JENDL-3.3 and ENDF/B-VI (JEFF-3.1) for α-particle production cross-section, and no DDX for α-particles is given in the libraries. Our obtained total cross-section for α-particle production was rather consistent with ENDF/B-VI (JEFF-3.1), and the value evaluated in JENDL-3.3 seemed too large. Fluorine: The remarkable differences for DDX of protons and α-particles were observed between the obtained result and JENDL-3.3, although detailed DDX was stored only in JENDL. The obtained total cross-sections mostly supported the evaluation of ENDF/B-VI (JEFF-3.1)

  19. Investigating the Origins of Two Extreme Solar Particle Events: Proton Source Profile and Associated Electromagnetic Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocharov, Leon; Usoskin, Ilya [Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory/Oulu Unit, University of Oulu, P.O.B. 3000, Oulu FI-90014 (Finland); Pohjolainen, Silja [Tuorla Observatory, University of Turku, Piikkiö FI-21500 (Finland); Mishev, Alexander [Space Climate Research Unit, University of Oulu, Oulu FI-90014 (Finland); Reiner, Mike J. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC, and NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Lee, Jeongwoo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Laitinen, Timo [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Didkovsky, Leonid V. [University of Southern California Space Sciences Center, 835 Bloom Walk, Los Angeles CA 90089 (United States); Pizzo, Victor J. [NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Kim, Roksoon; Cho, Kyung-Suk [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Klassen, Andreas [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universität, Kiel D-24118 (Germany); Karlicky, Marian [Astronomical Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Fričova 258, Ondřejov 251 65 (Czech Republic); Gary, Dale E. [Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Valtonen, Eino; Vainio, Rami [Space Research Laboratory, University of Turku, Turku FI-20014 (Finland)

    2017-04-20

    We analyze the high-energy particle emission from the Sun in two extreme solar particle events in which protons are accelerated to relativistic energies and can cause a significant signal even in the ground-based particle detectors. Analysis of a relativistic proton event is based on modeling of the particle transport and interaction, from a near-Sun source through the solar wind and the Earth’s magnetosphere and atmosphere to a detector on the ground. This allows us to deduce the time profile of the proton source at the Sun and compare it with observed electromagnetic emissions. The 1998 May 2 event is associated with a flare and a coronal mass ejection (CME), which were well observed by the Nançay Radioheliograph, thus the images of the radio sources are available. For the 2003 November 2 event, the low corona images of the CME liftoff obtained at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory are available. Those complementary data sets are analyzed jointly with the broadband dynamic radio spectra, EUV images, and other data available for both events. We find a common scenario for both eruptions, including the flare’s dual impulsive phase, the CME-launch-associated decimetric-continuum burst, and the late, low-frequency type III radio bursts at the time of the relativistic proton injection into the interplanetary medium. The analysis supports the idea that the two considered events start with emission of relativistic protons previously accelerated during the flare and CME launch, then trapped in large-scale magnetic loops and later released by the expanding CME.

  20. Ab-initio Pulsar Magnetosphere: Particle Acceleration in Oblique Rotators and High-energy Emission Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippov, Alexander A.; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2018-03-01

    We perform global particle-in-cell simulations of pulsar magnetospheres, including pair production, ion extraction from the surface, frame-dragging corrections, and high-energy photon emission and propagation. In the case of oblique rotators, the effects of general relativity increase the fraction of the open field lines that support active pair discharge. We find that the plasma density and particle energy flux in the pulsar wind are highly non-uniform with latitude. A significant fraction of the outgoing particle energy flux is carried by energetic ions, which are extracted from the stellar surface. Their energies may extend up to a large fraction of the open field line voltage, making them interesting candidates for ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. We show that pulsar gamma-ray radiation is dominated by synchrotron emission, produced by particles that are energized by relativistic magnetic reconnection close to the Y-point and in the equatorial current sheet. In most cases, the calculated light curves contain two strong peaks, which is in general agreement with Fermi observations. The radiative efficiency decreases with increasing pulsar inclination and increasing efficiency of pair production in the current sheet, which explains the observed scatter in L γ versus \\dot{E}. We find that the high-frequency cutoff in the spectra is regulated by the pair-loading of the current sheet. Our findings lay the foundation for quantitative interpretation of Fermi observations of gamma-ray pulsars.

  1. Temperature and burning history affect emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosol particles from tropical peatland fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwata, Mikinori; Kai, Fuu Ming; Yang, Liudongqing; Itoh, Masayuki; Gunawan, Haris; Harvey, Charles F.

    2017-01-01

    Tropical peatland burning in Asia has been intensifying over the last decades, emitting huge amounts of gas species and aerosol particles. Both laboratory and field studies have been conducted to investigate emission from peat burning, yet a significant variability in data still exists. We conducted a series of experiments to characterize the gas and particulate matter emitted during burning of a peat sample from Sumatra in Indonesia. Heating temperature of peat was found to regulate the ratio of CH4 to CO2 in emissions (ΔCH4/ΔCO2) as well as the chemical composition of particulate matter. The ΔCH4/ΔCO2 ratio was larger for higher temperatures, meaning that CH4 emission is more pronounced at these conditions. Mass spectrometric analysis of organic components indicated that aerosol particles emitted at higher temperatures had more unsaturated bonds and ring structures than that emitted from cooler fires. The result was consistently confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. In addition, CH4 emitted by burning charcoal, which is derived from previously burned peat, was lower by at least an order of magnitude than that from fresh peat. These results highlight the importance of both fire history and heating temperature for the composition of tropical peat-fire emissions. They suggest that remote sensing technologies that map fire histories and temperatures could provide improved estimates of emissions.

  2. Ultrafine particle emission characteristics of diesel engine by on-board and test bench measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng; Lou, Diming; Hu, Zhiyuan; Tan, Piqiang; Yao, Di; Hu, Wei; Li, Peng; Ren, Jin; Chen, Changhong

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the emission characteristics of ultrafine particles based on test bench and on-board measurements. The bench test results showed the ultrafine particle number concentration of the diesel engine to be in the range of (0.56-8.35) x 10(8) cm(-3). The on-board measurement results illustrated that the ultrafine particles were strongly correlated with changes in real-world driving cycles. The particle number concentration was down to 2.0 x 10(6) cm(-3) and 2.7 x 10(7) cm(-3) under decelerating and idling operations and as high as 5.0 x 10(8) cm(-3) under accelerating operation. It was also indicated that the particle number measured by the two methods increased with the growth of engine load at each engine speed in both cases. The particle number presented a "U" shaped distribution with changing speed at high engine load conditions, which implies that the particle number will reach its lowest level at medium engine speeds. The particle sizes of both measurements showed single mode distributions. The peak of particle size was located at about 50-80 nm in the accumulation mode particle range. Nucleation mode particles will significantly increase at low engine load operations like idling and decelerating caused by the high concentration of unburned organic compounds.

  3. Controlled ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption using passive acoustic emissions monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas D Arvanitis

    Full Text Available The ability of ultrasonically-induced oscillations of circulating microbubbles to permeabilize vascular barriers such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB holds great promise for noninvasive targeted drug delivery. A major issue has been a lack of control over the procedure to ensure both safe and effective treatment. Here, we evaluated the use of passively-recorded acoustic emissions as a means to achieve this control. An acoustic emissions monitoring system was constructed and integrated into a clinical transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound system. Recordings were analyzed using a spectroscopic method that isolates the acoustic emissions caused by the microbubbles during sonication. This analysis characterized and quantified harmonic oscillations that occur when the BBB is disrupted, and broadband emissions that occur when tissue damage occurs. After validating the system's performance in pilot studies that explored a wide range of exposure levels, the measurements were used to control the ultrasound exposure level during transcranial sonications at 104 volumes over 22 weekly sessions in four macaques. We found that increasing the exposure level until a large harmonic emissions signal was observed was an effective means to ensure BBB disruption without broadband emissions. We had a success rate of 96% in inducing BBB disruption as measured by in contrast-enhanced MRI, and we detected broadband emissions in less than 0.2% of the applied bursts. The magnitude of the harmonic emissions signals was significantly (P<0.001 larger for sonications where BBB disruption was detected, and it correlated with BBB permeabilization as indicated by the magnitude of the MRI signal enhancement after MRI contrast administration (R(2 = 0.78. Overall, the results indicate that harmonic emissions can be a used to control focused ultrasound-induced BBB disruption. These results are promising for clinical translation of this technology.

  4. Alpha Particles Induce Autophagy in Multiple Myeloma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin, Jean-Baptiste; Gouard, Sébastien; Ménager, Jérémie; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Guilloux, Yannick; Chérel, Michel; Davodeau, François; Gaschet, Joëlle

    2015-01-01

    Radiation emitted by the radionuclides in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) approaches induce direct killing of the targeted cells as well as indirect killing through the bystander effect. Our research group is dedicated to the development of α-RIT, i.e., RIT using α-particles especially for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). γ-irradiation and β-irradiation have been shown to trigger apoptosis in tumor cells. Cell death mode induced by (213)Bi α-irradiation appears more controversial. We therefore decided to investigate the effects of (213)Bi on MM cell radiobiology, notably cell death mechanisms as well as tumor cell immunogenicity after irradiation. Murine 5T33 and human LP-1 MM cell lines were used to study the effects of such α-particles. We first examined the effects of (213)Bi on proliferation rate, double-strand DNA breaks, cell cycle, and cell death. Then, we investigated autophagy after (213)Bi irradiation. Finally, a coculture of dendritic cells (DCs) with irradiated tumor cells or their culture media was performed to test whether it would induce DC activation. We showed that (213)Bi induces DNA double-strand breaks, cell cycle arrest, and autophagy in both cell lines, but we detected only slight levels of early apoptosis within the 120 h following irradiation in 5T33 and LP-1. Inhibition of autophagy prevented (213)Bi-induced inhibition of proliferation in LP-1 suggesting that this mechanism is involved in cell death after irradiation. We then assessed the immunogenicity of irradiated cells and found that irradiated LP-1 can activate DC through the secretion of soluble factor(s); however, no increase in membrane or extracellular expression of danger-associated molecular patterns was observed after irradiation. This study demonstrates that (213)Bi induces mainly necrosis in MM cells, low levels of apoptosis, and autophagy that might be involved in tumor cell death.

  5. Delayed Proton Emission in the A=70 Region, a Strobe for Level Density and Particle Width

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The delayed particle emission, which is a characteristic signature of the most exotic nuclei decay, provides a wide variety of spectroscopic information among which level density, and gives in some cases access to selected microscopic structures. In regard to these two aspects the $\\beta^+$-EC delayed proton emission in the A=70 neutron deficient mass region is of special interest to be investigated. Indeed, in this area located close to the proton drip line and along the N=Z line, the delayed proton emission constitutes an access to level density in the Q$_{EC}$-S$_p$ window of the emitting nucleus. Moreover, the unbound states populated by the EC process are expected to exhibit lifetimes in the vicinity of the K electronic shell filling time ($\\tau\\!\\sim\\!2\\times10^{-16}$s) and so the particle widths can be reached via proton X-ray coincidence measurements (PXCT). From theoretical approaches strongly deformed low-spin proton unbound levels which may be populated in the T$_Z$ = 1/2 precursors decay are predi...

  6. The effects of particle size distribution and induced unpinning during grain growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.S.; Rickman, J.M.; Harmer, M.P.; Holm, E.A.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of a second-phase particle size distribution on grain boundary pinning was studied using a Monte Carlo simulation technique. Simulations were run using a constant number density of both whisker and rhombohedral particles, and the effect of size distribution was studied by varying the standard deviation of the distribution around a constant mean particle size. The results of present simulations indicate that, in accordance with the stereological assumption of the topological pinning model, changes in distribution width had no effect on the pinned grain size. The effect of induced unpinning of particles on microstructure was also studied. In contrast to predictions of the topological pinning model, a power law dependence of pinned grain size on particle size was observed at T=0.0. Based on this, a systematic deviation to the stereological predictions of the topological pinning model is observed. The results of simulations at higher temperatures indicate an increasing power law dependence of pinned grain size on particle size, with the slopes of the power law dependencies fitting an Arrhenius relation. The effect of induced unpinning of particles was also studied in order to obtain a correlation between particle/boundary concentration and equilibrium grain size. The results of simulations containing a constant number density of monosized rhombohedral particles suggest a strong power law correlation between the two parameters. copyright 1996 Materials Research Society

  7. Time dependent emission line profiles in the radially streaming particle model of Seyfert galaxy nuclei and quasi-stellar objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, R.

    1974-01-01

    The radially-streaming particle model for broad quasar and Seyfert galaxy emission features is modified to include sources of time dependence. The results are suggestive of reported observations of multiple components, variability, and transient features in the wings of Seyfert and quasi-stellar emission lines.

  8. α-cluster model for the multiple emission of particles in the reaction 90Zr (e, α)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guevara, Y.M.; Garcia, C.; Hoyos, O.E.R.; Rodriguez, T. E.; Arruda-Neto, J.D.T.

    2011-01-01

    We present a methodology based on the model of photoabsorption by a cluster N- α for a better understanding of the puzzling steady increase behavior of the 90 Zr (e, α) yield obtained experimentally in the energy range of the giant dipole resonance (RDG) and the quasi-deuteron (QD).The calculation takes into account the emission of protons, neutrons and alpha particles in the framework of the reaction (which was used for the Intranuclear Cascade model (MCMC)). The statistical decay of the compound nucleus is described by Monte Carlo techniques in terms of competition between evaporation of particles (p, n, d, α, 3 He t) and nuclear fission, but for our specific case (the reaction and + Zr 90 in an energy range between 20 and 140 MeV) the fission channel does not have a high probability of occurrence. The results reproduce quite successfully the experimental data, suggesting that pre-equilibrium emission of alpha particles are essential for the interpretation of this exotic increase of the cross sections. (Author)

  9. Characterization of Delayed-Particle Emission Signatures for Pyroprocessing. Part 1: ABTR Fuel Assembly.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durkee, Jr., Joe W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-19

    A three-part study is conducted using the MCNP6 Monte Carlo radiation-transport code to calculate delayed-neutron (DN) and delayed-gamma (DG) emission signatures for nondestructive assay (NDA) metal-fuel pyroprocessing. In Part 1, MCNP6 is used to produce irradiation-induced used nuclear fuel (UNF) isotopic inventories for an Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) preconceptual design fuel assembly (FA) model. The initial fuel inventory consists of uranium mixed with light-water-reactor transuranic (TRU) waste and 10 wt% zirconium (U-LWR-SFTRU-10%Zr). To facilitate understanding, parametric evaluation is done using models for 3% and 5% initial 235U a% enrichments, burnups of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, …, 120 GWd/MTIHM, and 3-, 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30- year cooling times. Detailed delayed-particle radioisotope source terms for the irradiate FA are created using BAMF-DRT and SOURCES3A. Using simulation tallies, DG activity ratios (DGARs) are developed for 134Cs/137Cs 134Cs/154Eu, and 154Eu/137Cs markers as a function of (1) burnup and (2) actinide mass, including elemental uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium. Spectral-integrated DN emission is also tallied. The study reveals a rich assortment of DGAR behavior as a function of DGAR type, enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. Similarly, DN emission plots show variation as a function of burnup and of actinide mass. Sensitivity of DGAR and DN signatures to initial 235U enrichment, burnup, and cooling time is evident. Comparisons of the ABTR radiation signatures and radiation signatures previously reported for a generic Westinghouse oxide-fuel assembly indicate that there are pronounced differences in the ABTR and Westinghouse oxide-fuel DN and DG signatures. These differences are largely attributable to the initial TRU inventory in the ABTR fuel. The actinide and nonactinide inventories for the

  10. Quantum 1/f noise in non-degerate semiconductors and emission statistics of alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kousik, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    Charged particle scattering is accompanied by the emission of soft photons. Handel's theory of 1/f noise, based on the infrared divergent coupling of the system to the electromagnetic field or other elementary excitations, states that the current associated with a beam of scattered particles will exhibit 1/f noise. The fraction of the particles scattered with an energy loss epsilon to soft photon emission is proportional to 1/epsilon and herein lies the origin of the quantum theory of 1/f noise. The 1/f noise caused by mobility fluctuations in semiconductors is related to the scattering cross section fluctuation given by Handel's theory, through the relaxation time. Chapters Two through Five of this dissertation presents the results of the detailed calculation of mobility fluctuation 1/f noise and Hooge parameter in nondegenerate semiconductors. Numerical results are given for silicon and gallium arsenide. Data obtained from extensive measurements on counting techniques for alpha-particles radioactive decay from a source containing 94 Pu 239 , 95 Am 241 and 96 Cm 244 are presented in Chapters Six and Seven of this dissertation. These data show that the statistics are non-Poissonian for large counting times (of the order of 1000 minutes) contrary to the popular belief that alpha-decay is an example of Poissonian statistics. Measurements of the Allan variance indicated the presence of a slow Lorentzian flicker noise and 1/f noise and the magnitude of the noise for large counting times is considerably larger than that predicted by Poissonian statistics

  11. The effect of dynamic operating conditions on nano-particle emissions from a light-duty diesel engine applicable to prime and auxiliary machines on marine vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyungmin Lee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the nano-sized particle emission characteristics from a small turbocharged common rail diesel engine applicable to prime and auxiliary machines on marine vessels. The experiments were conducted under dynamic engine operating conditions, such as steady-state, cold start, and transient conditions. The particle number and size distributions were analyzed with a high resolution PM analyzer. The diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC had an insignificant effect on the reduction in particle number, but particle number emissions were drastically reduced by 3 to 4 orders of magnitude downstream of the diesel particulate filter (DPF at various steady conditions. Under high speed and load conditions, the particle filtering efficiency was decreased by the partial combustion of trapped particles inside the DPF because of the high exhaust temperature caused by the increased particle number concentration. Retarded fuel injection timing and higher EGR rates led to increased particle number emissions. As the temperature inside the DPF increased from 25 °C to 300 °C, the peak particle number level was reduced by 70% compared to cold start conditions. High levels of nucleation mode particle generation were found in the deceleration phases during the transient tests.

  12. Particle emissions from ventilation equipment: health hazards, measurement and product development; Ilmanvaihtolaitteiden hiukkaspaeaestoet: terveyshaitat, mittaaminen ja tuotekehitys - ILMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tossavainen, A.; Paananen, H.; Riala, R.; Tuomi, T.; Voutilainen, R. [Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki (Finland); Heimonen, I.; Kovanen, K. [VTT Building and Transport, Espoo (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    The project will develop the design, structure and materials of ventilation equipment for the improvement of indoor air quality in office-type buildings. Particle emissions from commercial products are measured by laboratory tests. In ten buildings, the dust and fibre levels will be surveyed in relation to the design and operation of the ventilation equipment. Direct-reading particle counters and filter sampling method combined with optical and electron microscopy analyses are the main methods in these surveys. Nasal lavage is used for the estimation of inhalation exposure to coarse man-made mineral fibres. Technical criteria will be drafted for the design and testing of fibre emissions from various ventilation equipment. (orig.)

  13. Influence of particle size distribution on the analysis of pellets of plant materials by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustinelli Arantes de Carvalho, Gabriel; Santos Jr, Dário; Silva Gomes, Marcos da; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; Guerra, Marcelo Braga Bueno; Krug, Francisco José

    2015-01-01

    Pellets of sieved plant materials (150, 106, 75, 53 and 20 μm sieve apertures) were prepared and analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), and the results for Ca, K, Mg, P, B and Mn were discussed as a function of particle size distribution. This parameter is of key importance for appropriate test sample presentation in the form of pressed pellets for quantitative analysis by LIBS. Experiments were carried out with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm, and a spectrometer with Echelle optics and an intensified charge-coupled device. Results indicated that smaller particles yielded up to 50% emission signal intensities' enhancement and attained better measurements' precision (site-to-site variation). Moreover, matrix effects were reduced by analyzing pellets prepared from < 75 μm sieved fractions (mean particle size = 32 μm; d 95 = 102 μm) and by using a 50 J cm −2 laser fluence (220 mJ per pulse; 750 μm laser spot size). The preparation of pellets from laboratory samples with monomodal particle size distributions, where most particles were smaller than 100 μm, was decisive for improving analyte micro-homogeneity within the test samples and for attaining lower coefficients of variation of measurements, typically lower than 10% (n = 10 sites per pellet; 20 laser pulses per site). - Highlights: • First systematic study on the effects of particle size distribution. • Most appropriate particle sizes for pellet preparation depend on laser fluence. • Data can be used for sampling strategies aiming at LIBS analysis of plant materials

  14. Influence of particle size distribution on the analysis of pellets of plant materials by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustinelli Arantes de Carvalho, Gabriel [NAPTISA Research Support Center “Technology and Innovation for a Sustainable Agriculture”, Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Santos Jr, Dário [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Prof. Artur Riedel, 275, 09972-270 Diadema, SP (Brazil); Silva Gomes, Marcos da; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; Guerra, Marcelo Braga Bueno [NAPTISA Research Support Center “Technology and Innovation for a Sustainable Agriculture”, Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Krug, Francisco José, E-mail: fjkrug@cena.usp.br [NAPTISA Research Support Center “Technology and Innovation for a Sustainable Agriculture”, Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-01

    Pellets of sieved plant materials (150, 106, 75, 53 and 20 μm sieve apertures) were prepared and analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), and the results for Ca, K, Mg, P, B and Mn were discussed as a function of particle size distribution. This parameter is of key importance for appropriate test sample presentation in the form of pressed pellets for quantitative analysis by LIBS. Experiments were carried out with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm, and a spectrometer with Echelle optics and an intensified charge-coupled device. Results indicated that smaller particles yielded up to 50% emission signal intensities' enhancement and attained better measurements' precision (site-to-site variation). Moreover, matrix effects were reduced by analyzing pellets prepared from < 75 μm sieved fractions (mean particle size = 32 μm; d{sub 95} = 102 μm) and by using a 50 J cm{sup −2} laser fluence (220 mJ per pulse; 750 μm laser spot size). The preparation of pellets from laboratory samples with monomodal particle size distributions, where most particles were smaller than 100 μm, was decisive for improving analyte micro-homogeneity within the test samples and for attaining lower coefficients of variation of measurements, typically lower than 10% (n = 10 sites per pellet; 20 laser pulses per site). - Highlights: • First systematic study on the effects of particle size distribution. • Most appropriate particle sizes for pellet preparation depend on laser fluence. • Data can be used for sampling strategies aiming at LIBS analysis of plant materials.

  15. Multicolor tunable emission induced by Cu ion doping of perovskite zirconate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.J. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y.S., E-mail: ylee@ssu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, H.-J. [Department of Physics, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    We report on a multicolor tunable emission induced by Cu ion doping of perovskite zirconate SrZrO{sub 3} with a fairly large bandgap (5.6 eV). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of our samples revealed the existence of two mixed valence states of the doped Cu ions, +1 and +2, with a ratio of 3:1. In photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy the absorption structures of the 3d states in monovalent Cu{sup +} and divalent Cu{sup 2+} were identified near 5 eV and 3.5 eV, respectively. Interestingly, in relation to the valence states of the Cu ions, the emission spectra depended strongly on the photo-excitation energy (E{sub ex}). For E{sub ex}<3.8 eV (UVA) two orange and green emissions were observed with the involvement of the Cu{sup 2+} state. For E{sub ex}>3.8 eV (UVB/UVC), however, the Cu{sup +} state, instead of the Cu{sup 2+} state, was dominant in the emission process, causing the visible emission to be turned into violet. Our results were indicative of the complementary role of the different Cu-ion valence states in a wide range of visible emission with respect to E{sub ex}. - Highlights: • Visible emission induced by the Cu doping of SrZrO3. • Tunable colors from orange to violet with respect to the photo-excitation energy. • Multicolor emission should be related to the mixed valence states of the doped Cu ions.

  16. Compaction of a Bed of Fragmentable Particles and Associated Acoustic Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegron, L.; Sornay, P.; Favretto-Cristini, N.

    2013-06-01

    The nuclear fuel of light water power reactors are manufactured by powder metallurgy. This is also the method that is used for the production of fuels containing minor actinides that have high activity and long life. Given their radiotoxicity, it is necessary to simplify the manufacturing process to the maximum, limiting dissemination and retention of matter. In addition, the fuel must have a mostly open porosity. Implementation of particles of a few hundred micrometers and controlled cohesion could meet this dual objective. However, it should be ensured that the mechanical strength of compacts before sintering is sufficient without adding binder. The phenomena that occur during the manufacture of compact are thus analyzed and quantified. It is shown that only a portion of the particles breaks upon application of a stress up to 600 MPa and it is possible to detect this fragmentation by acoustic emission (AE). (authors)

  17. 4-Nitrophenol, 1-nitropyrene, and 9-nitroanthracene emissions in exhaust particles from diesel vehicles with different exhaust gas treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Satoshi; Fushimi, Akihiro; Sato, Kei; Fujitani, Yuji; Yamada, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    The dependence of nitro-organic compound emissions in automotive exhaust particles on the type of aftertreatment used was investigated. Three diesel vehicles with different aftertreatment systems (an oxidation catalyst, vehicle-DOC; a particulate matter and NOx reduction system, vehicle-DPNR; and a urea-based selective catalytic reduction system, vehicle-SCR) and a gasoline car with a three-way catalyst were tested. Nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs) and nitrophenols in the particles emitted were analyzed by thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The secondary production of nitro-organic compounds on the filters used to collect particles and the adsorption of gaseous nitro-organic compounds by the filters were evaluated. Emissions of 1-nitropyrene, 9-nitroanthracene, and 4-nitrophenol in the diesel exhaust particles were then quantified. The NOx reduction process in vehicle-DPNR appeared to remove nitro-hydrocarbons efficiently but not to remove nitro-oxygenated hydrocarbons efficiently. The nitro-PAH emission factors were lower for vehicle-DOC when it was not fitted with a catalyst than when it was fitted with a catalyst. The 4-nitrophenol emission factors were also lower for vehicle-DOC with a catalyst than vehicle-DOC without a catalyst, suggesting that the oxidation catalyst was a source of both nitro-PAHs and 4-nitrophenol. The time-resolved aerosol mass spectrometry data suggested that nitro-organic compounds are mainly produced when an engine is working under load. The presence of 4-nitrophenol in the particles was not confirmed statistically because of interference from gaseous 4-nitrophenol. Systematic errors in the estimated amounts of gaseous 1-nitropyrene and 9-nitroanthracene adsorbed onto the filters and the estimated amounts of volatile nitro-organic compounds that evaporated during sampling and during post-sampling conditioning could not be excluded. An analytical method

  18. Laser induced broad band anti-Stokes white emission from LiYbF4 nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. Marciniak; R. Tomala; M. Stefanski; D. Hreniak; W. Strek

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic properties of tetragonal LiYbF4 nanocrystals under high dense NIR excitation at vacuum condition were in-vestigated. White, broad band emission covering whole visible part of the spectrum from LiYbF4 nanocrystals was observed. Its in-tensity strongly depended on the excitation power, excitation wavelength and ambient pressure. Temperature of the nanocrystals un-der 975 nm excitation was determined as a function of excitation power. Strong photo-induced current was observed from LiYbF4 pallet. The emission kinetic was analyzed. The mechanism of the anti-Stokes white emission was discussed in terms of the la-ser-induced charge transfer emission from Yb2+ states.

  19. Application of X-ray emission techniques for monitoring environmental pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernasconi, G.; Danesi, P.R.; Dargie, M.; Haselberger, N.; Markowicz, A.; Tajani, A.

    1997-01-01

    X-ray emission techniques are versatile and powerful methods used for multielement non-destructive analysis. They include X-ray fluorescence (XRF), particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), scanning electron microscopy combined with X-ray spectrometry and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Since many years the IAEA has utilised and promoted these techniques for the analysis of environmental, biological and geological samples. In this paper recent progress at our laboratory in selected aspects related to the application of X-ray emission techniques is briefly overviewed. (authors)

  20. Photochemical production of aerosols from real plant emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Th. F. Mentel

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC which on oxidation form secondary organic aerosols (SOA can couple the vegetation with the atmosphere and climate. Particle formation from tree emissions was investigated in a new setup: a plant chamber coupled to a reaction chamber for oxidizing the plant emissions and for forming SOA. Emissions from the boreal tree species birch, pine, and spruce were studied. In addition, α-pinene was used as reference compound. Under the employed experimental conditions, OH radicals were essential for inducing new particle formation, although O3 (≤80 ppb was always present and a fraction of the monoterpenes and the sesquiterpenes reacted with ozone before OH was generated. Formation rates of 3 nm particles were linearly related to the VOC carbon mixing ratios, as were the maximum observed volume and the condensational growth rates. For all trees, the threshold of new particle formation was lower than for α-pinene. It was lowest for birch which emitted the largest fraction of oxygenated VOC (OVOC, suggesting that OVOC may play a role in the nucleation process. Incremental mass yields were ≈5% for pine, spruce and α-pinene, and ≈10% for birch. α-Pinene was a good model compound to describe the yield and the growth of SOA particles from coniferous emissions. The mass fractional yields agreed well with observations for boreal forests. Despite the somewhat enhanced VOC and OH concentrations our results may be up-scaled to eco-system level. Using the mass fractional yields observed for the tree emissions and weighting them with the abundance of the respective trees in boreal forests SOA mass concentration calculations agree within 6% with field observations. For a future VOC increase of 50% we predict a particle mass increase due to SOA of 19% assuming today's mass contribution of pre-existing aerosol and oxidant levels.

  1. Toll-like receptors-2 and 4 are overexpressed in an experimental model of particle-induced osteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Roberto D; Nich, Christophe; Zwingenberger, Stefan; Li, Chenguang; Swank, Katherine R; Gibon, Emmanuel; Rao, Allison J; Yao, Zhenyu; Goodman, Stuart B

    2014-09-01

    Aseptic loosening secondary to particle-associated periprosthetic osteolysis remains a major cause of failure of total joint replacements (TJR) in the mid- and long term. As sentinels of the innate immune system, macrophages are central to the recognition and initiation of the inflammatory cascade, which results in the activation of bone resorbing osteoclasts. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns and danger-associated molecular patterns. Experimentally, polymethylmethacrylate and polyethylene (PE) particles have been shown to activate macrophages via the TLR pathway. The specific TLRs involved in PE particle-induced osteolysis remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that TLR-2, -4, and -9 mediated responses play a critical role in the development of PE wear particle-induced osteolysis in the murine calvarium model. To test this hypothesis, we first demonstrated that PE particles caused observable osteolysis, visible by microCT and bone histomorphometry when the particles were applied to the calvarium of C57BL/6 mice. The number of TRAP positive osteoclasts was significantly greater in the PE-treated group when compared to the control group without particles. Finally, using immunohistochemistry, TLR-2 and TLR-4 were highly expressed in PE particle-induced osteolytic lesions, whereas TLR-9 was downregulated. TLR-2 and -4 may represent novel therapeutic targets for prevention of wear particle-induced osteolysis and accompanying TJR failure. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The emission of Gamma Ray Bursts as a test-bed for modified gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Capozziello

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The extreme physical conditions of Gamma Ray Bursts can constitute a useful observational laboratory to test theories of gravity where very high curvature regimes are involved. Here we propose a sort of curvature engine capable, in principle, of explaining the huge energy emission of Gamma Ray Bursts. Specifically, we investigate the emission of radiation by charged particles non-minimally coupled to the gravitational background where higher order curvature invariants are present. The coupling gives rise to an additional force inducing a non-geodesic motion of particles. This fact allows a strong emission of radiation by gravitationally accelerated particles. As we will show with some specific model, the energy emission is of the same order of magnitude of that characterizing the Gamma Ray Burst physics. Alternatively, strong curvature regimes can be considered as a natural mechanism for the generation of highly energetic astrophysical events. Possible applications to cosmology are discussed.

  3. Splitting of photoluminescent emission from nitrogen–vacancy centers in diamond induced by ion-damage-induced stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivero, P; Bosia, F; Fairchild, B A; Gibson, B C; Greentree, A D; Spizzirri, P; Prawer, S

    2013-01-01

    We report a systematic investigation on the spectral splitting of negatively charged, nitrogen–vacancy (NV − ) photoluminescent emission in single-crystal diamond induced by strain engineering. The stress fields arise from MeV ion-induced conversion of diamond to amorphous and graphitic material in regions proximal to the centers of interest. In low-nitrogen sectors of a high-pressure–high-temperature diamond, clearly distinguishable spectral components in the NV − emission develop over a range of ∼4.8 THz corresponding to distinct alignment of sub-ensembles which were mapped with micron spatial resolution. This method provides opportunities for the creation and selection of aligned NV − centers for ensemble quantum information protocols. (paper)

  4. Investigation of energetic particle induced geodesic acoustic mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneller, Mirjam; Fu, Guoyong; Chavdarovski, Ilija; Wang, Weixing; Lauber, Philipp; Lu, Zhixin

    2017-10-01

    Energetic particles are ubiquitous in present and future tokamaks due to heating systems and fusion reactions. Anisotropy in the distribution function of the energetic particle population is able to excite oscillations from the continuous spectrum of geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs), which cannot be driven by plasma pressure gradients due to their toroidally and nearly poloidally symmetric structures. These oscillations are known as energetic particle-induced geodesic acoustic modes (EGAMs) [G.Y. Fu'08] and have been observed in recent experiments [R. Nazikian'08]. EGAMs are particularly attractive in the framework of turbulence regulation, since they lead to an oscillatory radial electric shear which can potentially saturate the turbulence. For the presented work, the nonlinear gyrokinetic, electrostatic, particle-in-cell code GTS [W.X. Wang'06] has been extended to include an energetic particle population following either bump-on-tail Maxwellian or slowing-down [Stix'76] distribution function. With this new tool, we study growth rate, frequency and mode structure of the EGAM in an ASDEX Upgrade-like scenario. A detailed understanding of EGAM excitation reveals essential for future studies of EGAM interaction with micro-turbulence. Funded by the Max Planck Princeton Research Center. Computational resources of MPCDF and NERSC are greatefully acknowledged.

  5. Particle filtering based structural assessment with acoustic emission sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wuzhao; Abdelrahman, Marwa; Zhang, Bin; Ziehl, Paul

    2017-02-01

    Nuclear structures are designed to withstand severe loading events under various stresses. Over time, aging of structural systems constructed with concrete and steel will occur. This deterioration may reduce service life of nuclear facilities and/or lead to unnecessary or untimely repairs. Therefore, online monitoring of structures in nuclear power plants and waste storage has drawn significant attention in recent years. Of many existing non-destructive evaluation and structural monitoring approaches, acoustic emission is promising for assessment of structural damage because it is non-intrusive and is sensitive to corrosion and crack growth in reinforced concrete elements. To provide a rapid, actionable, and graphical means for interpretation Intensity Analysis plots have been developed. This approach provides a means for classification of damage. Since the acoustic emission measurement is only an indirect indicator of structural damage, potentially corrupted by non-genuine data, it is more suitable to estimate the states of corrosion and cracking in a Bayesian estimation framework. In this paper, we will utilize the accelerated corrosion data from a specimen at the University of South Carolina to develop a particle filtering-based diagnosis and prognosis algorithm. Promising features of the proposed algorithm are described in terms of corrosion state estimation and prediction of degradation over time to a predefined threshold.

  6. Dimerization of eosin on nanostructured gold surfaces: Size regime dependence of the small metallic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sujit Kumar; Pal, Anjali; Nath, Sudip; Kundu, Subrata; Panigrahi, Sudipa; Pal, Tarasankar

    2005-08-01

    Gold nanoparticles of variable sizes have been exploited to study their influence on the absorption and emission spectral characteristics of eosin, a fluorescent dye. It has been found that smaller particles of gold stimulate J-aggregation of eosin on the surface of metal particles whereas larger particles cannot induce any kind of aggregation amongst the dye molecules. The size regime dependence of the gold nanoparticles has been attributed to the intercluster interactions induced by the dye molecules for smaller gold nanoparticles and consequently, close packing of the dye molecules around the gold surface engenders intermolecular interactions amongst the dye molecules leading to dimerization.

  7. Dust Emission Induced By Friction Modifications At Tool Chip Interface In Dry Machining In MMCp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kremer, Arnaud; El Mansori, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between dust emission and tribological conditions at the tool-chip interface when machining Metal Matrix composite reinforced with particles (MMCp) in dry mode. Machining generates aerosols that can easily be inhaled by workers. Aerosols may be composed of oil mist, tool material or alloying elements of workpiece material. Bar turning tests were conducted on a 2009 aluminum alloy reinforced with different level of Silicon Carbide particles (15, 25 and 35% of SiCp). Variety of PCD tools and nanostructured diamond coatings were used to analyze their performances on air pollution. A spectrometer was used to detect airborne aerosol particles in the size range between 0.3μm to 20 μm and to sort them in 15 size channels in real time. It was used to compare the effects of test parameters on dust emission. Observations of tool face and chip morphology reveal the importance of friction phenomena. It was demonstrated that level of friction modifies chip curvature and dust emission. The increase of level of reinforcement increase the chip segmentation and decrease the contact length and friction area. A ''running in'' phenomenon with important dust emission appeared with PCD tool due to the tool rake face flatness. In addition dust generation is more sensitive to edge integrity than power consumption.

  8. Dust Emission Induced By Friction Modifications At Tool Chip Interface In Dry Machining In MMCp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Arnaud; El Mansori, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between dust emission and tribological conditions at the tool-chip interface when machining Metal Matrix composite reinforced with particles (MMCp) in dry mode. Machining generates aerosols that can easily be inhaled by workers. Aerosols may be composed of oil mist, tool material or alloying elements of workpiece material. Bar turning tests were conducted on a 2009 aluminum alloy reinforced with different level of Silicon Carbide particles (15, 25 and 35% of SiCp). Variety of PCD tools and nanostructured diamond coatings were used to analyze their performances on air pollution. A spectrometer was used to detect airborne aerosol particles in the size range between 0.3μm to 20 μm and to sort them in 15 size channels in real time. It was used to compare the effects of test parameters on dust emission. Observations of tool face and chip morphology reveal the importance of friction phenomena. It was demonstrated that level of friction modifies chip curvature and dust emission. The increase of level of reinforcement increase the chip segmentation and decrease the contact length and friction area. A "running in" phenomenon with important dust emission appeared with PCD tool due to the tool rake face flatness. In addition dust generation is more sensitive to edge integrity than power consumption.

  9. Effects of Particle Filters and Selective Catalytic Reduction on In-Use Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preble, C.; Cados, T.; Harley, R.; Kirchstetter, T.

    2016-12-01

    Heavy-duty diesel trucks (HDDT) are a major source of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and black carbon (BC) in urban environments, contributing to persistent ozone and particulate matter air quality problems. Diesel particle filters (DPFs) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems that target PM and NOx emissions, respectively, have recently become standard equipment on new HDDT. DPFs can also be installed on older engines as a retrofit device. Previous work has shown that DPF and SCR systems can reduce NOx and BC emissions by up to 70% and 90%, respectively, compared to modern trucks without these after-treatment controls (Preble et al., ES&T 2015). DPFs can have the undesirable side-effect of increasing ultrafine particle (UFP) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) emissions. While SCR systems can partially mitigate DPF-related NO2 increases, these systems can emit nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. We report new results from a study of HDDT emissions conducted in fall 2015 at the Port of Oakland and Caldecott Tunnel in California's San Francisco Bay Area. We report pollutant emission factors (g kg-1) for emitted NOx, NO2, BC, PM2.5, UFP, and N2O on a truck-by-truck basis. Using a roadside license plate recognition system, we categorize each truck by its engine model year and installed after-treatment controls. From this, we develop emissions profiles for trucks with and without DPF and SCR. We evaluate the effectiveness of these devices as a function of their age to determine whether degradation is an issue. We also compare the emission profiles of trucks traveling at low speeds along a level, arterial road en route to the port and at high speeds up a 4% grade highway approaching the tunnel. Given the climate impacts of BC and N2O, we also examine the global warming potential of emissions from trucks with and without DPF and SCR.

  10. HONO and Inorganic Fine Particle Composition in Typical Monsoon Region with Intensive Anthropogenic Emission: In-situ Observations and Source Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y.; Nie, W.; Ding, A.; Huang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Yangtze River Delta (YRD) is one of the most typical monsoon area with probably the most largest population intensity in the world. With sharply economic development and the large anthropogenic emissions, fine particle pollution have been one of the major air quality problem and may further have impact on the climate system. Though a lot of control policy (sulfur emission have been decreasing from 2007) have been conducted in the region, studies showed the sulfate in fine particles still take major fraction as the nitrate from nitrogen oxides increased significantly. In this study, the role of inorganic chemical compositions in fine particles was investigated with two years in-situ observation. Sulfate and Nitrate contribute to fine particle mass equally in general, but sulfate contributes more during summer and nitrate played more important role in winter. Using lagrangian dispersion backward modeling and source contribution clustering method, the impact of airmass coming from different source region (industrial, dust, biogenic emissions, etc) on fine particle inorganic compositions were discussed. Furthermore, we found two unique cases showing in-situ implications for sulfate formation by nitrogen dioxide oxidation mechanisms. It was showed that the mixing of anthropogenic pollutants with long-range transported mineral dust and biomass burning plume would enhance the sulfate formation by different chemistry mechanisms. This study focus on the complex aspects of fine particle formation in airmasses from different source regions: . It highlights the effect of NOx in enhancing the atmospheric oxidization capacity and indicates a potentially very important impact of increasing NOx on air pollution formation and regional climate change in East Asia.

  11. Alpha-particles induce autophagy in multiple myeloma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joelle Marcelle Gaschet

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Radiations emitted by the radionuclides in radioimmunotherapy (RIT approaches induce direct killing of the targeted cells as well as indirect killing through bystander effect. Our research group is dedicated to the development of α-RIT, i.e RIT using α-particles especially for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM. γ-irradiation and β-irradiation have been shown to trigger apoptosis in tumor cells. Cell death mode induced by 213Bi α-irradiation appears more controversial. We therefore decided to investigate the effects of 213Bi on MM cell radiobiology, notably cell death mechanisms as well as tumor cell immunogenicity after irradiation.Methods: Murine 5T33 and human LP-1 multiple myeloma (MM cell lines were used to study the effects of such α-particles. We first examined the effects of 213Bi on proliferation rate, double strand DNA breaks, cell cycle and cell death. Then, we investigated autophagy after 213Bi irradiation. Finally, a co-culture of dendritic cells (DC with irradiated tumour cells or their culture media was performed to test whether it would induce DC activation.Results: We showed that 213Bi induces DNA double strand breaks, cell cycle arrest and autophagy in both cell lines but we detected only slight levels of early apoptosis within the 120 hours following irradiation in 5T33 and LP-1. Inhibition of autophagy prevented 213Bi induced inhibition of proliferation in LP-1 suggesting that this mechanism is involved in cell death after irradiation. We then assessed the immunogenicity of irradiated cells and found that irradiated LP-1 can activate DC through the secretion of soluble factor(s, however no increase in membrane or extracellular expression of danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPs was observed after irradiation.Conclusion: This study demonstrates that 213Bi induces mainly necrosis in MM cells, low levels of apoptosis and also autophagy that might be involved in tumor cell death.

  12. Photoinduced current and emission induced by current in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 86; Issue 3. Photoinduced current and emission induced by current in a nanowire transistor: Temperature dependence. Darehdor Mahvash Arabi Shahtahmassebi Nasser. Regular Volume 86 Issue 3 March 2016 pp ...

  13. Light particle and gamma ray emission measurements in heavy ion reactions. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitt, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of neutron and charged particle emission in heavy ion reactions using the facilities at the HHIRF and the new computer facilities at Georgia State are briefly described. A progress report for 1982 to 1983 is combined with a proposal for work to be performed during 1983 to 1984. Present activities and immediate plans for a run already approved by the Program Advisory Committee of the HHIRF are discussed

  14. IN VIVO EVIDENCE OF FREE RADICAL FORMATION IN THE RAT LUNG AFTER EXPOSURE TO AN EMISSION SOURCE AIR POLLUTION PARTICLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to air pollution particles can be associated with increased human morbidity and mortality. The mechanism(s) of lung injury remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that lung exposure to oil fly ash (an emission source air pollution particle) causes in vivo free radical ...

  15. Experimental investigations of the influence from different operating conditions on the particle emissions from a small-scale pellets combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiinikka, Henrik; Gebart, Rikard

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine how different design parameters in an idealised small-scale combustor affect the emission of particulates in the flue gas and to provide insight that can be used for design optimisation. The design parameters are the primary air factor, the total air factor and the magnitude of swirling flow in the combustion chamber. Particles from the reactor were collected from two different sampling lines, one located in the combustion zone, just above the fuel bed, and the other in the flue stack after the reactor. The measurements show that this burner gives very low emissions of particulates and CO in the flue gas. Furthermore, the concentration of particles in the flue gas is uncoupled to the concentration of particles immediately above the fuel bed, probably as a result of a well-designed secondary air supply. The variable that had the strongest effect on the total particulate emission from the combustor was the total air factor. In order to understand the qualitative differences in the flow nature between different operating conditions, CFD simulations of the flow field were also performed

  16. Light particle emission as a probe of reaction mechanism and nuclear excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreau, D.

    1989-01-01

    The central part of these lectures will be dealing with the problem of energy dissipation. A good understanding of the mechanisms for the dissipation requires to study both peripheral and central collisions or, in other words, to look at the impact paramenter dependence. This should also provide valuable information on the time scale. In order to probe the reaction mechanism and nuclear excitation, one of the most powerful tool is unquestionably the observation of light particle emission, including neutrons and charged particles. Several examples will be discussed related to peripheral collisions (the fate of transfer reactions, the excitation energy generation, the production of projectile-like fragments) as well as inner collisions for which extensive studies have demonstrated the strength of intermediate energy heavy ions for the production of very hot nuclei and detailed study of their decay properties

  17. Measurement of particle emission in automobil exhaust - application of continuous radiometric aerosol measurement to the emission of diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasenbrink, A.; Georgi, B.

    1989-01-01

    The well-known method of measuring continuously dust by β-absorption is transferred to the problem of particle emission in automobile exhaust. With two similar dust-monitors FH62 having different sampling air flow rates and two low-pressure impactors the reliability of radiometric mass determination was verified. First static experiments with diesel soot showed the necessity of a dilution system, a new mass calibration with regard to the changed β-absorptivity and a quicker calculation of concentration for realtime measurements. (orig.) [de

  18. On the unification of aircraft ultrafine particle emission data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B.; Busen, R. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Turco, R.P.; Yu Fangqun [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Danilin, M.Y.; Weisenstein, D.K. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Miake-Lye, R.C. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    To predict the environmental impacts of future commercial aviation, intensive studies have been launched to measure the properties and effects of aircraft emissions. These observations have revealed an extremely wide variance with respect to the number and sizes of the particles produced in the exhaust plumes. Aircraft aerosol ultimately contributes to the population of cloud-forming nuclei, and may lead to significant global radiative and chemical perturbations. In this paper, recent discoveries are coordinated and unified in the form of a physically consistent plume aerosol model that explains most of the observational variance. Using this new approach, it is now practical to carry out reliable global atmospheric simulations of aircraft effects, as demonstrated by a novel assessment of the perturbation of the stratospheric aerosol layer by a supersonic aircraft fleet. (orig.)

  19. Rubrene analogues with the aggregation-induced emission enhancement behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Sørensen, Jakob Kryger; Fu, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    In the light of the principle of aggregation-induced emission enhancement (AIEE), the rubrene analogue with orange light-emitting properties is designed and synthesized by substituting the phenyl side groups of rubrene with thienyl groups. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on...

  20. Composite-particle emission in the reaction p+Au at 2.5 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letourneau, A.; Bohm, A.; Galin, J.; Lott, B.; Peghaire, A. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Enke, M.; Herbach, C.M.; Hilscher, D.; Jahnke, U.; Tishchenko, V. [Hahn Meitner Institute, Berlin (Germany); Filges, D.; Goldenbaum, F.; Neef, R.D.; Nunighoff, K.; Paul, N.; Sterzenbach, G. [Institut fur Kernphysik, Julich (Germany); Pienkowski, L. [Warsaw Universitaire, Heavy Ion Lab. (Poland); Toke, J.; Schroder, U. [Rochester, University, New York (United States)

    2002-06-01

    The emission of composite-particles is studied in the reaction p+Au at E{sub p} = 2.5 GeV, in addition to neutrons and protons. Most particle energy spectra feature an evaporation spectrum superimposed on an exponential high-energy, non-statistical component. Comparisons are first made with the predictions by a two-stage hybrid reaction model, where an intra-nuclear cascade (INC) simulation is followed by a statistical evaporation process. The high-energy proton component is identified as product of the fast pre-equilibrium INC, since it is rather well reproduced by the INCL2.0 intra-nuclear cascade calculations simulating the first reaction stage. The low-energy spectral components are well understood in terms of sequential particle evaporation from the hot nuclear target remnants of the fast INC. Evaporation is modeled using the statistical code GEMINI. Implementation of a simple coalescence model in the INC code can provide a reasonable description of the multiplicities of high-energy composite particles such as {sup 2-3}H and {sup 3}He. However, this is done at the expense of {sup 1}H which then fails to reproduce the experimental energy spectra. (authors)

  1. Spatiotemporal kinetics of γ-H2AX protein on charged particles induced DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, H., E-mail: hniu@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chang, H.C. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Cho, I.C. [Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University and Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, C.H. [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Liu, C.S. [Cancer Center of Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chou, W.T. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages, and these complex damages have higher ability to cause the cell death or cell carcinogenesis. • In this study, we used γ-H2AX protein to investigate the spatiotemporal kinetics of DNA double strand breaks in particle irradiated HeLa cells. • The HeLa cells were irradiated by 400 keV alpha-particles in four different dosages. • The result shows that a good linear relationship can be observed between foci number and radiation dose. • The data shows that the dissolution rate of γ-H2AX foci agree with the two components DNA repairing model, and it was decreasing as the radiation dose increased. • These results suggest that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages and causing the retardation of DNA repair. - Abstract: In several researches, it has been demonstrated that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages. These complex damages have higher ability to cause the cell death or cell carcinogenesis. For this reason, clarifying the DNA repair mechanism after charged particle irradiation plays an important role in the development of charged particle therapy and space exploration. Unfortunately, the detail spatiotemporal kinetic of DNA damage repair is still unclear. In this study, we used γ-H2AX protein to investigate the spatiotemporal kinetics of DNA double strand breaks in alpha-particle irradiated HeLa cells. The result shows that the intensity of γ-H2AX foci increased gradually, and reached to its maximum at 30 min after irradiation. A good linear relationship can be observed between foci intensity and radiation dose. After 30 min, the γ-H2AX foci intensity was decreased with time passed, but remained a large portion (∼50%) at 48 h passed. The data show that the dissolution rate of γ-H2AX foci agreed with two components DNA repairing model. These results suggest that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages and causing the retardation of DNA

  2. Effect of flow characteristics on ultrafine particle emissions from range hoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Li-Ching; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2013-08-01

    In order to understand the physical mechanisms of the production of nanometer-sized particulate generated from cooking oils, the ventilation of kitchen hoods was studied by determining the particle concentration, particle size distribution, particle dimensions, and hood's flow characteristics under several cooking scenarios. This research varied the temperature of the frying operation on one cooking operation, with three kinds of commercial cooking oils including soybean oil, olive oil, and sunflower oil. The variations of particle concentration and size distributions with the elevated cooking oil temperatures were presented. The particle concentration increases as a function of temperature. For oil temperatures ranging between 180°C and 210°C, a 5°C increase in temperature increased the number concentration of ultrafine particles by 20-50%. The maximum concentration of ultrafine particles was found to be approximately 6 × 10(6) particles per cm(3) at 260°C. Flow visualization techniques and particle distribution measurement were performed for two types of hood designs, a wall-mounted range hood and an island hood, at a suction flow rate of 15 m(3) min(-1). The flow visualization results showed that different configurations of kitchen hoods induce different aerodynamic characteristics. By comparing the results of flow visualizations and nanoparticle measurements, it was found that the areas with large-scale turbulent vortices are more prone to dispersion of ultrafine particle leakage because of the complex interaction between the shear layers and the suction movement that results from turbulent dispersion. We conclude that the evolution of ultrafine particle concentration fluctuations is strongly affected by the location of the hood, which can alter the aerodynamic features. We suggest that there is a correlation between flow characteristics and amount of contaminant leakage. This provides a comprehensive strategy to evaluate the effectiveness of kitchen hoods

  3. Study of luminous emissions associated to electron emissions in radiofrequency cavities; Etude des emissions lumineuses associees aux emissions electroniques dans les cavites hyperfrequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maissa, S

    1996-11-26

    This study investigates luminous emissions simultaneously to electron emissions and examines their features in order to better understand the field electron emission phenomenon. A RF cavity, operating at room temperature and in pulsed mode, joined to a sophisticated experimental apparatus has been especially developed. The electron and luminous emissions are investigated on cleaned or with metallic, graphitic and dielectric particles contaminated RF surfaces in order to study their influence on these phenomena. During the surface processing, unstable luminous spots glowing during one RF pulse are detected. Their apparition is promoted in the vicinity of the metallic particles or scratches. Two hypotheses could explain their origin: the presence of micro-plasmas associated to electronic explosive emission during processing or the thermal radiation of the melted metal during this emission. Stable luminous spots glowing during several RF pulses are also detected and appear to increase on RF surfaces contaminated with dielectric particles, leading to strong and explosive luminous emissions. Two interpretations are considered: the initiation of surface breakdowns on the dielectric particles or the heating by the RF field at temperatures sufficiently intense to provoke their thermal radiation then their explosion. Finally a superconducting cavity has been adapted to observe luminous spots, which differ from the former ones bu their star shape and could be associated to micro-plasmas, revealed by the starbursts observed on superconducting cavity walls. (author) 102 refs.

  4. Secondary aerosol formation from stress-induced biogenic emissions and possible climate feedbacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Th. F. Mentel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols impact climate by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and by acting as ice and cloud condensation nuclei. Biogenic secondary organic aerosols (BSOAs comprise an important component of atmospheric aerosols. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs emitted by vegetation are the source of BSOAs. Pathogens and insect attacks, heat waves and droughts can induce stress to plants that may impact their BVOC emissions, and hence the yield and type of formed BSOAs, and possibly their climatic effects. This raises questions of whether stress-induced changes in BSOA formation may attenuate or amplify effects of climate change. In this study we assess the potential impact of stress-induced BVOC emissions on BSOA formation for tree species typical for mixed deciduous and Boreal Eurasian forests. We studied the photochemical BSOA formation for plants infested by aphids in a laboratory setup under well-controlled conditions and applied in addition heat and drought stress. The results indicate that stress conditions substantially modify BSOA formation and yield. Stress-induced emissions of sesquiterpenes, methyl salicylate, and C17-BVOCs increase BSOA yields. Mixtures including these compounds exhibit BSOA yields between 17 and 33%, significantly higher than mixtures containing mainly monoterpenes (4–6% yield. Green leaf volatiles suppress SOA formation, presumably by scavenging OH, similar to isoprene. By classifying emission types, stressors and BSOA formation potential, we discuss possible climatic feedbacks regarding aerosol effects. We conclude that stress situations for plants due to climate change should be considered in climate–vegetation feedback mechanisms.

  5. A facility for low energy charged particle induced reaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilaithong, T.; Singkarat, S.; Yu, L.D.; Intarasiri, S.; Tippawan, U.

    2000-01-01

    In Chiang Mai, a highly stable low energy ion accelerator (0 - 350 kV) facility is being established. A subnano-second pulsing system will be incorporated into the beam transport line. The detecting system will consist of a time-of-flight charged particle spectrometer and a high resolution gamma-ray system. The new facility will be used in the studies of low energy heavy ion backscattering and charged particle induced cross section measurement in the interests of material characterization and nucleosynthesis. (author)

  6. Electron emission from tungsten surface induced by neon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhongfeng; Zeng, Lixia; Zhao, Yongtao; Cheng, Rui; Zhang, Xiaoan; Ren, Jieru; Zhou, Xianming; Wang, Xing; Lei, Yu; Li, Yongfeng; Yu, Yang; Liu, Xueliang; Xiao, Guoqing; Li, Fuli

    2014-04-01

    The electron emission from W surface induced by Neq+ has been measured. For the same charge state, the electron yield gradually increases with the projectile velocity. Meanwhile, the effect of the potential energy of projectile has been found obviously. Our results give the critical condition for "trampoline effect".

  7. Characterization of Inherent Particles and Mechanism of Thermal Stress Induced Particle Formation in HSV-2 Viral Vaccine Candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lillian; Kirkitadze, Marina; Bhandal, Kamaljit; Roque, Cristopher; Yang, Eric; Carpick, Bruce; Rahman, Nausheen

    2017-11-10

    Vaccine formulations may contain visible and/or subvisible particles, which can vary in both size and morphology. Extrinsic particles, which are particles not part of the product such as foreign contaminants, are generally considered undesirable and should be eliminated or controlled in injectable products. However, biological products, in particular vaccines, may also contain particles that are inherent to the product. Here we focus on the characterization of visible and subvisible particles in a live, replication-deficient viral vaccine candidate against HSV genital herpes in an early developmental stage. HSV-2 viral vaccine was characterized using a panel of analytical methods, including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Western blot, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), micro-flow imaging (MFI), dynamic light scattering (DLS), right angle light scattering (RALS), and intrinsic fluorescence. Particles in HSV-2 vaccine typically ranged from hundreds of nanometers to hundreds of micrometers in size and were determined to be inherent to the product. The infectious titer did not correlate with any trend in subvisible particle concentration and size distribution as shown by DLS, MFI, and TEM under stressed conditions. This suggested that particle changes in the submicron range were related to HSV-2 virion structure and had direct impact on biological activity. It was also observed that subvisible and visible particles could induce aggregation in the viral product. The temperature induced aggregation was observed by RALS, intrinsic fluorescence, and DLS. The increase of subvisible particle size with temperature could be fitted to a two-step thermokinetic model. Visible and subvisible particles were found to be inherent to the HSV-2 viral vaccine product. The mechanism of protein aggregation was discussed and a two

  8. Toxicogenomic analysis of the particle dose- and size-response relationship of silica particles-induced toxicity in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xiaoyan; Jin Tingting; Jin Yachao; Wu Leihong; Hu Bin; Tian Yu; Fan Xiaohui

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between particle size and toxicity of silica particles (SP) with diameters of 30, 70, and 300 nm, which is essential to the safe design and application of SP. Data obtained from histopathological examinations suggested that SP of these sizes can all induce acute inflammation in the liver. In vivo imaging showed that intravenously administrated SP are mainly present in the liver, spleen and intestinal tract. Interestingly, in gene expression analysis, the cellular response pathways activated in the liver are predominantly conserved independently of particle dose when the same size SP are administered or are conserved independently of particle size, surface area and particle number when nano- or submicro-sized SP are administered at their toxic doses. Meanwhile, integrated analysis of transcriptomics, previous metabonomics and conventional toxicological results support the view that SP can result in inflammatory and oxidative stress, generate mitochondrial dysfunction, and eventually cause hepatocyte necrosis by neutrophil-mediated liver injury. (paper)

  9. Emission of light charged particles from fragments produced on fission of uranium nuclei by 153 MeV protons and 1700 MeV negative pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belovitzky, G.E.; Shteingrad, O.M.

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the emission of light charged particles (LCP) with Z = 1, 2 from fragments produced in fission of uranium nuclei by 153 MeV protons and 1700 MeV negative pions was studied. It was found that LCP accompanying the fission by pions are emitted from non-accelerated fragments immediately after the fission, whereas in the case of 153 MeV protons, the LCP are emitted from the accelerated heavy fragments. The number of LCP emitted in the course of pion-induced fission is 0.7 per fission event, which exceeds by a factor of 30 the corresponding number for 153 MeV protons [ru

  10. Energy spectra and asymmetry of charged particle emission in the muon minus capture by nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balandin, M.P.; Grebenyuk, V.M.; Sinov, V.G.; Konin, A.D.

    1978-01-01

    Energy spectra of separated-by-mass single-charged particles at the capture of 130 MeV negative muons by carbon, oxygen, magnesium and sulphur have been measured. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical calculations at the assumption of preequilibrium decay of collective states described by the hydrodynamical model. The measurement of asymmetry of charged particle emission in sulphur and megnesium was carried out by hte method of muon spin precession in a magnetic field. Theoretical curves describe correctly the exponential spectra character, but the yields obtained are 2-3 times less than the experimental results

  11. [Size distribution of particle and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in particle emissions from simulated emission sources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hai-Huan; Tian, Na; Shang, Hui-Bin; Zhang, Bin; Ye, Su-Fen; Chen, Xiao-Qiu; Wu, Shui-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Particles from cooking lampblack, biomass and plastics burning smoke, gasoline vehicular exhausts and gasoline generator exhausts were prepared in a resuspension test chamber and collected using a cascade MOUDI impactor. A total of 18 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) associated with particles were analyzed by GC-MS. The results showed that there were two peaks in the range of 0.44-1.0 microm and 2.5-10 microm for cooking lampblack, and only one peak in the range of 0.44-1.0 microm for straw and wood burning smoke. But there were no clear peak for plastics burning smoke. The peak for gasoline vehicular exhausts was found in the range of 2.5-10 microm due to the influence of water vapor associated with particles, while the particles from gasoline generator exhausts were mainly in the range of lampblack and gasoline vehicular exhausts. The peak in the range of 0.44-1.0 microm became more and more apparent with the increase of PAHs molecular weight. The fraction of PAH on particles less than 1.0 microm to that on the total particles increased along with PAH's molecular weight. Phenanthrene was the dominant compound for cooking lampblack and combustion smoke, while gasoline vehicular exhausts and generator exhausts were characterized with significantly high levels of naphthalene and benzo[g, h, i] perylene, respectively. The distribution of source characteristic ratios indicated that PAHs from cooking lampblack and biomass burning were close and they were different from those of vehicular exhausts and generator exhausts.

  12. Components of Particle Emissions from Light-Duty Spark-Ignition Vehicles with Varying Aromatic Content and Octane Rating in Gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Daniel Z; Vu, Diep; Durbin, Thomas D; Karavalakis, Georgios; Asa-Awuku, Akua

    2015-09-01

    Typical gasoline consists of varying concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons and octane ratings. However, their impacts on particulate matter (PM) such as black carbon (BC) and water-soluble and insoluble particle compositions are not well-defined. This study tests seven 2012 model year vehicles, which include one port fuel injection (PFI) configured hybrid vehicle, one PFI vehicle, and six gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicles. Each vehicle was driven on the Unified transient testing cycle (UC) using four different fuels. Three fuels had a constant octane rating of 87 with varied aromatic concentrations at 15%, 25%, and 35%. A fourth fuel with higher octane rating, 91, contained 35% aromatics. BC, PM mass, surface tension, and water-soluble organic mass (WSOM) fractions were measured. The water-insoluble mass (WIM) fraction of the vehicle emissions was estimated. Increasing fuel aromatic content increases BC emission factors (EFs) of transient cycles. BC concentrations were higher for the GDI vehicles than the PFI and hybrid vehicles, suggesting a potential climate impact for increased GDI vehicle production. Vehicle steady-state testing showed that the hygroscopicity of PM emissions at high speeds (70 mph; κ > 1) are much larger than emissions at low speeds (30 mph; κ < 0.1). Iso-paraffin content in the fuels was correlated to the decrease in WSOM emissions. Both aromatic content and vehicle speed increase the amount of hygroscopic material found in particle emissions.

  13. Quantitative patterns between plant volatile emissions induced by biotic stresses and the degree of damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ülo eNiinemets

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Plants have to cope with a plethora of biotic stresses such as herbivory and pathogen attacks throughout their life cycle. The biotic stresses typically trigger rapid emissions of volatile products of lipoxygenase pathway (LOX products, various C6 aldehydes, alcohols and derivatives, also called green leaf volatiles associated with oxidative burst. Further a variety of defense pathways is activated, leading to induction of synthesis and emission of a complex blend of volatiles, often including methyl salicylate, indole, mono-, homo- and sesquiterpenes. The airborne volatiles are involved in systemic responses leading to elicitation of emissions from non-damaged plant parts. For several abiotic stresses, it has been demonstrated that volatile emissions are quantitatively related to the stress dose. The biotic impacts under natural conditions vary in severity from mild to severe, but it is unclear whether volatile emissions also scale with the severity of biotic stresses in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, biotic impacts are typically recurrent, but it is poorly understood how direct stress-triggered and systemic emission responses are silenced during periods intervening sequential stress events. Here we review the information on induced emissions elicited in response to biotic attacks, and argue that biotic stress severity vs. emission rate relationships should follow principally the same dose-response relationships as previously demonstrated for several abiotic stresses. Analysis of several case studies investigating the elicitation of emissions in response to chewing herbivores, aphids, rust fungi, powdery mildew and Botrytis, suggests that induced emissions do respond to stress severity in dose-dependent manner. Bi-phasic emission kinetics of several induced volatiles have been demonstrated in these experiments, suggesting that next to immediate stress-triggered emissions, biotic stress elicited emissions typically have a secondary

  14. Erratum: Erratum to: Thermodynamic implications of the gravitationally induced particle creation scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Subhajit; Mondal, Anindita

    2018-04-01

    We would like to rectify an error regarding the validity of the first law of thermodynamics (FLT) on the apparent horizon of a spatially flat Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) universe for the gravitationally induced particle creation scenario with constant specific entropy and an arbitrary particle creation rate (see Sect. 3.1 of original article)

  15. Effects of fibre-form nanostructures on particle emissions from a tungsten surface in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, S.; Miyamoto, T.; Ohno, N.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of fibre-form nanostructure of a tungsten surface on both electron emission and sputtering in helium/argon plasmas are represented. Generally, a nano-fibre forest, the so-called ‘fuzz’, made of tungsten with helium gas inside is found to have the tendency of suppressing the particle emission substantially. The electron emission comes from the impact of high-energy primary electrons. In addition, a deeply biased tungsten target, which inhibits the influx of even energetic primary electrons, seems to produce an electron emission, and it may be suppressed on the way to nanostructure formation on the surface of the W target. Such an emission process is discussed here. The sputtering yield of the He-damaged tungsten surface with the fibre-form nanostructure depends on the surface morphology while the sputtering itself changes the surface morphology, so that the time evolutions of sputtering yield from the W surface with an originally well-developed nanostructure are found to show a minimum in sputtering yield, which is about a half for the fresh nanostructured tungsten and roughly one-fifth of the yield for the original flat normal tungsten surface. The surface morphology at that time is, for the first time, made clear with field emission scanning electron microscopy observation. The physical mechanism for the appearance of such a minimum in sputtering yield is discussed. (paper)

  16. Soot, unburned carbon and ultrafine particle emissions from air- and oxy-coal flames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, W.J.; Yu, Dunxi; Wendt, J.O.L.

    2010-01-01

    Oxy-coal combustion is one possible solution for the mitigation of greenhouse gases. In this process coal is burned in oxygen, rather than air, and the temperatures in the boiler are mitigated by recycling flue gases, so that the inlet mixture may contain either 27 % O 2 to match adiabatic flame temperatures, or 32 % O 2 to match gaseous radiation heat fluxes in the combustion chamber. However, a major issue for heat transfer from coal combustion is the radiative heat transmission from soot. For this research, air and oxy coal firing were compared regarding the emission of soot. A 100 kW down-fired laboratory combustor was used to determine effects of switching from air to oxy-firing on soot, unburned carbon and ultrafine particle emissions from practical pulverized coal flames. Of interest here were potential chemical effects of substitution of the N 2 in air by CO 2 in practical pulverized coal flames. The oxy-coal configuration investigated used once-through CO 2 , simulating cleaned flue gas recycle with all contaminants and water removed. Three coals were each burned in: a) air, b) 27 % O 2 / 73 % CO 2 , c) 32 % O 2 / 68 % CO 2 . Tests were conducted at (nominally) 3 %, 2 %, 1 % and 0 % O 2 in the exhaust (dry basis). For each condition, particulate samples were iso kinetically withdrawn far from the radiant zone, and analyzed using a photoacoustic analyzer (PA) for black carbon, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) for ultrafine particles, and a total sample loss on ignition (LOI) method for unburned carbon in ash. Data suggest that at low stoichiometric ratios, ultrafine particles consist primarily of black carbon, which, for the bituminous coal, is produced in lesser amounts under oxy-fired conditions than under the air-fired condition, even when adiabatic flame temperatures are matched. However, significant changes in mineral matter vaporization were not observed unless the flames were hotter. These and other results are interpreted in the light of

  17. Total Particle Number Emissions from Modern Diesel, Natural Gas, and Hybrid Heavy-Duty Vehicles During On-Road Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianyang; Quiros, David C; Thiruvengadam, Arvind; Pradhan, Saroj; Hu, Shaohua; Huai, Tao; Lee, Eon S; Zhu, Yifang

    2017-06-20

    Particle emissions from heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) have significant environmental and public health impacts. This study measured total particle number emission factors (PNEFs) from six newly certified HDVs powered by diesel and compressed natural gas totaling over 6800 miles of on-road operation in California. Distance-, fuel- and work-based PNEFs were calculated for each vehicle. Distance-based PNEFs of vehicles equipped with original equipment manufacturer (OEM) diesel particulate filters (DPFs) in this study have decreased by 355-3200 times compared to a previous retrofit DPF dynamometer study. Fuel-based PNEFs were consistent with previous studies measuring plume exhaust in the ambient air. Meanwhile, on-road PNEF shows route and technology dependence. For vehicles with OEM DPFs and Selective Catalytic Reduction Systems, PNEFs under highway driving (i.e., 3.34 × 10 12 to 2.29 × 10 13 particles/mile) were larger than those measured on urban and drayage routes (i.e., 5.06 × 10 11 to 1.31 × 10 13 particles/mile). This is likely because a significant amount of nucleation mode volatile particles were formed when the DPF outlet temperature reached a critical value, usually over 310 °C, which was commonly achieved when vehicle speed sustained over 45 mph. A model year 2013 diesel HDV produced approximately 10 times higher PNEFs during DPF active regeneration events than nonactive regeneration.

  18. Radial diffusion of toroidally trapped particles induced by lower hybrid and fast waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krlin, L.

    1992-10-01

    The interaction of RF field with toroidally trapped particles (bananas) can cause their intrinsic stochastically diffusion both in the configuration and velocity space. In RF heating and/or current drive regimes, RF field can interact with plasma particles and with thermonuclear alpha particles. The aim of this contribution is to give some analytical estimates of induced radial diffusion of alphas and of ions. (author)

  19. A genetically-based latitudinal cline in the emission of herbivore-induced plant volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wason, Elizabeth L; Agrawal, Anurag A; Hunter, Mark D

    2013-08-01

    The existence of predictable latitudinal variation in plant defense against herbivores remains controversial. A prevailing view holds that higher levels of plant defense evolve at low latitudes compared to high latitudes as an adaptive plant response to higher herbivore pressure on low-latitude plants. To date, this prediction has not been examined with respect to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that many plants emit, often thus attracting the natural enemies of herbivores. Here, we compared genetically-based constitutive and herbivore-induced aboveground vegetative VOC emissions from plants originating across a gradient of more than 10° of latitude (>1,500 km). We collected headspace VOCs from Asclepias syriaca (common milkweed) originating from 20 populations across its natural range and grown in a common garden near the range center. Feeding by specialist Danaus plexippus (monarch) larvae induced VOCs, and field environmental conditions (temperature, light, and humidity) also influenced emissions. Monarch damage increased plant VOC concentrations and altered VOC blends. We found that genetically-based induced VOC emissions varied with the latitude of plant population origin, although the pattern followed the reverse of that predicted-induced VOC concentration increased with increasing latitude. This pattern appeared to be driven by a greater induction of sesquiterpenoids at higher latitudes. In contrast, constitutive VOC emission did not vary systematically with latitude, and the induction of green leafy volatiles declined with latitude. Our results do not support the prevailing view that plant defense is greater at lower than at higher latitudes. That the pattern holds only for herbivore-induced VOC emission, and not constitutive emission, suggests that latitudinal variation in VOCs is not a simple adaptive response to climatic factors.

  20. Parametric studies of contrail ice particle formation in jet regime using microphysical parcel modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-W. Wong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Condensation trails (contrails formed from water vapor emissions behind aircraft engines are the most uncertain components of the aviation impacts on climate change. To gain improved knowledge of contrail and contrail-induced cirrus cloud formation, understanding of contrail ice particle formation immediately after aircraft engines is needed. Despite many efforts spent in modeling the microphysics of ice crystal formation in jet regime (with a plume age <5 s, systematic understanding of parametric effects of variables affecting contrail ice particle formation is still limited. In this work, we apply a microphysical parcel modeling approach to study contrail ice particle formation in near-field aircraft plumes up to 1000 m downstream of an aircraft engine in the soot-rich regime (soot number emission index >1×1015 (kg-fuel−1 at cruise. The effects of dilution history, ion-mediated nucleation, ambient relative humidity, fuel sulfur contents, and initial soot emissions were investigated. Our simulation results suggest that ice particles are mainly formed by water condensation on emitted soot particles. The growth of ice coated soot particles is driven by water vapor emissions in the first 1000 m and by ambient relative humidity afterwards. The presence of chemi-ions does not significantly contribute to the formation of ice particles in the soot-rich regime, and the effect of fuel sulfur contents is small over the range typical of standard jet fuels. The initial properties of soot emissions play the most critical role, and our calculations suggest that higher number concentration and smaller size of contrail particle nuclei may be able to effectively suppress the formation of contrail ice particles. Further modeling and experimental studies are needed to verify if our findings can provide a possible approach for contrail mitigation.

  1. Long-term changes in amphetamine-induced reinforcement and aversion in rats following exposure to 56Fe particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    Exposing rats to heavy particles produces alterations in the functioning of dopaminergic neurons and in the behaviors that depend upon the integrity of the dopaminergic system. Two of these dopamine-dependent behaviors include amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measure using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measured using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced aversion, measured using the conditioned taste aversion. Previous research has shown that exposing rats to 1.0 Gy of 1GeV/n 56Fe particles produced a disruption of an amphetamine-induced taste aversion 3 days following exposure, but produced an apparent enhancement of the aversion 112 days following exposure. The present experiments were designed to provide a further evaluation of these results by examining taste aversion learning 154 days following exposure to 1.0Gy 56Fe particles and to establish the convergent validity of the taste aversion results by looking at the effects of exposure on the establishment of an amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference 3, 7, and 16 weeks following irradiation. The taste aversion results failed to confirm the apparent enhancement of the amphetamine-induced CTA observed in the prior experiment. However, exposure to 56Fe particles prevented the acquisition of amphetamine-induced place preference at all three-time intervals. The results are interpreted as indicating that exposure to heavy particles can produce long-term changes in behavioral functioning.

  2. Emission of Gas and Al2O3 Smoke in Gas-Al Particle Deflagration: Experiments and Emission Modeling for Explosive Fireballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranc-Darbord, Isabelle; Baudin, Gérard; Genetier, Marc; Ramel, David; Vasseur, Pierre; Legrand, Julien; Pina, Vincent

    2018-03-01

    Emission of gas and Al2O3 smoke within the deflagration of H2{-}O2-{N2{-}CO2}-Al particles has been studied in a closed combustion chamber at pressures of up to 18 bar and at gas temperatures of up to 3700 K. Measurements of radiance intensity were taken using a five wavelength pyrometer (0.660 μ m, 0.850 μ m, 1.083 μ m, 1.260 μ m, 1.481 μ m) and a grating spectrometer in the range (4.10 μ m to 4.30 μ m). In order to characterize the aluminum oxide smoke size and temperature, an inversion method has been developed based on the radiation transfer equation and using pyrometer measurements and thermochemical calculations of Al2O3 smoke volume fractions. Temperatures in combustion gas have been determined using a method based on the assumed blackbody head of the 4.26 μ m CO2 emission line and on its spectral shift with pressure and temperature. For validation purpose, this method has been applied to measurements obtained when calibrated alumina particles are injected in a combustion chamber prior to gaseous deflagrations. This mathematical inversion method was developed to investigate explosive fireballs.

  3. Neuroprotective effect of curcumin-loaded lactoferrin nano particles against rotenone induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollimpelli, V Satish; Kumar, Prashant; Kumari, Sonali; Kondapi, Anand K

    2016-05-01

    Curcumin is known to have neuroprotective role and possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory activities. Rotenone, a flavonoid induced neurotoxicity in dopaminergic cells is being widely studied in Parkinson's Disease (PD) research. In the present study, curcumin loaded lactoferrin nano particles prepared by sol-oil chemistry were used to protect dopaminergic cell line SK-N-SH against rotenone induced neurotoxicity. These curcumin loaded nano particles were of 43-60 nm diameter size and around 100 nm hydrodynamic size as assessed by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis respectively. The encapsulation efficiency was 61.3% ± 2.4%. Cellular uptake of curcumin through these nano particles was confirmed by confocal imaging and spectrofluorimetric analysis. The curcumin loaded lactoferrin nanoparticles showed greater intracellular drug uptake, sustained retention and greater neuroprotection than soluble counterpart. Neuroprotective activity was characterized through viability assays and by estimating ROS levels. Furthermore rotenone induced PD like features were characterized by decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase expression and increase in α-synuclein expression. Taken together curcumin loaded lactoferrin nanoparticles could be a promising drug delivery strategy against neurotoxicity in dopaminergic neurons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Integrated inventory-based carbon accounting for energy-induced emissions in Chongming eco-island of Shanghai, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qingqing; Guo Ru; Li Fengting; Xia Bingbin

    2012-01-01

    The majority of the total carbon emissions in China are energy induced. A clear understanding of energy-induced carbon emissions is therefore necessary for local communities to develop a better carbon emissions management system. We develop an integrated inventory method for energy-induced carbon emissions accounting in local Chinese communities. The method combines scope and sectoral analyses on the basis of local statistical features. As an outcome four core findings are presented: (1) From 2000 to 2009, the energy-induced carbon emissions of Chongming rapidly increased from 1.75 to 4.90 million tons, with the annual growth rate of 12.12%. (2) Emissions from manufacturing, construction, and household sectors accounted for 84.44%; manufacturing is the biggest emitting sector. (3) Carbon emissions from imported electricity reached a historic high of 22.51% in 2009, indicating the necessity of taking the imported carbon emissions into consideration. (4) In 2008, the per capita carbon emissions of Chongming were lower than that of the United States and Shanghai, but higher than that of the global average. Three strategic approaches are proposed: to optimize industrial structure and improve efficiency, reinforce carbon management for the household sector, and enhance carbon statistics. - Highlights: ► The use of natural gas in the large-sized industrial and commercial sectors is shown. ► This study estimates the market potential and characterizes the energy consumption. ► It makes a selection of technological alternatives for the use of natural gas. ► The residual oil and diesel consumption decline over time by the natural gas use. ► In 2017, the cogeneration could provide 7.7% of total electricity demand in Peru.

  5. Instantaneous wave emission model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruer, W.L.

    1970-12-01

    A useful treatment of electrostatic wave emission by fast particles in a plasma is given. First, the potential due to a fast particle is expressed as a simple integration over the particle orbit; several interesting results readily follow. The potential in the wake of an accelerating particle is shown to be essentially that produced through local excitation of the plasma by the particle free-streaming about its instantaneous orbit. Application is made to one dimension, and it is shown that the wave emission and adsorption synchronize to the instantaneous velocity distribution function. Guided by these calculations, we then formulate a test particle model for computing the instantaneous wave emission by fast particles in a Vlasov plasma. This model lends itself to physical interpretation and provides a direct approach to many problems. By adopting a Fokker-Planck description for the particle dynamics, we calculate the broadening of the wave-particle resonance due to velocity diffusion and drag

  6. Electron emission from tungsten surface induced by neon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zhongfeng; Zeng, Lixia; Zhao, Yongtao; Liu, Xueliang; Xiao, Guoqing; Li, Fuli; Cheng, Rui; Zhang, Xiaoan; Ren, Jieru; Zhou, Xianming; Wang, Xing; Lei, Yu; Li, Yongfeng; Yu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The electron emission from W surface induced by Ne q+ has been measured. For the same charge state, the electron yield gradually increases with the projectile velocity. Meanwhile, the effect of the potential energy of projectile has been found obviously. Our results give the critical condition for ''trampoline effect''

  7. Nuclear reactions induced by high-energy alpha particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear reactions induced by high energy protons and heavier ions are included. Fundamental data needed in the shielding, dosimetry, and radiobiology of high energy particles produced by accelerators were generated, along with data on cosmic ray interaction with matter. The mechanism of high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions is also examined, especially for light target nuclei of mass number comparable to that of biological tissue.

  8. Vibrational emission analysis of the CN molecules in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-Bravo, Ángel; Delgado, Tomás; Lucena, Patricia; Laserna, J. Javier, E-mail: laserna@uma.es

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of organic materials is based on the analysis of atomic and ionic emission lines and on a few molecular bands, the most important being the CN violet system and the C{sub 2} Swan system. This paper is focused in molecular emission of LIBS plasmas based on the CN (B{sup 2}Σ–X{sup 2}Σ) band, one of the strongest emissions appearing in all carbon materials when analyzed in air atmosphere. An analysis of this band with sufficient spectral resolution provides a great deal of information on the molecule, which has revealed that valuable information can be obtained from the plume chemistry and dynamics affecting the excitation mechanisms of the molecules. The vibrational emission of this molecular band has been investigated to establish the dependence of this emission on the molecular structure of the materials. The paper shows that excitation/emission phenomena of molecular species observed in the plume depend strongly on the time interval selected and on the irradiance deposited on the sample surface. Precise time resolved LIBS measurements are needed for the observation of distinctive CN emission. For the organic compounds studied, larger differences in the behavior of the vibrational emission occur at early stages after plasma ignition. Since molecular emission is generally more complex than that involving atomic emission, local plasma conditions as well as plume chemistry may induce changes in vibrational emission of molecules. As a consequence, alterations in the distribution of the emissions occur in terms of relative intensities, being sensitive to the molecular structure of every single material. - Highlights: • Vibrational emission of CN species in laser-induced plasmas has been investigated. • Distribution of vibrational emission of CN has been found to be time dependent. • Laser irradiance affects the vibrational distribution of the CN molecules. • Plume chemistry controls the excitation mechanisms of CN

  9. Reduced Ultrafine Particle Concentration in Urban Air: Changes in Nucleation and Anthropogenic Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Provat K; Robinson, Ellis S; Shah, Rishabh U; Zimmerman, Naomi; Apte, Joshua S; Robinson, Allen L; Presto, Albert A

    2018-06-19

    Nucleation is an important source of ambient ultrafine particles (UFP). We present observational evidence of the changes in the frequency and intensity of nucleation events in urban air by analyzing long-term particle size distribution measurements at an urban background site in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania during 2001-2002 and 2016-2017. We find that both frequency and intensity of nucleation events have been reduced by 40-50% over the past 15 years, resulting in a 70% reduction in UFP concentrations from nucleation. On average, the particle growth rates are 30% slower than 15 years ago. We attribute these changes to dramatic reductions in SO 2 (more than 90%) and other pollutant concentrations. Overall, UFP concentrations in Pittsburgh have been reduced by ∼48% in the past 15 years, with a ∼70% reduction in nucleation, ∼27% in weekday local sources (e.g., weekday traffic), and 49% in the regional background. Our results highlight that a reduction in anthropogenic emissions can considerably reduce nucleation events and UFP concentrations in a polluted urban environment.

  10. Report of the workshop on 'light particle-induced reactions'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The study meeting on light particle (mass number = 3 - 11)-induced reation was held for three days from December 5 to 7, 1991 at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. This book records the report based on the lectures presented at the meeting. In the new facility of the RCNP, the experiment on the nuclear reaction using 400 MeV polarized protons and 200 MeV polarized deuterons is about to begin. When the acceleration of polarized He-3 beam which is being developed at present becomes feasible, by combining it with the high resolution spectrometer GRAND RAIDEN, it is expected that the unique, high accuracy research using the polarized He-3 having intermediate energy (540 MeV) becomes possible. At this time, by focusing attention to what new physics is developed by the nuclear reaction induced by the composite particles having the intermediate energy of mass number 3 - 11, this study meeting was planned and held. As the results, 29 lectures collected in this book were to cover wide fields, and active discussion was carried out. (K.I.)

  11. Exciton model and quantum molecular dynamics in inclusive nucleon-induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, Riccardo; Pomp, Stephan; Watanabe, Yukinobu

    2011-01-01

    We compared inclusive nucleon-induced reactions with two-component exciton model calculations and Kalbach systematics; these successfully describe the production of protons, whereas fail to reproduce the emission of composite particles, generally overestimating it. We show that the Kalbach phenomenological model needs to be revised for energies above 90 MeV; agreement improves introducing a new energy dependence for direct-like mechanisms described by the Kalbach model. Our revised model calculations suggest multiple preequilibrium emission of light charged particles. We have also compared recent neutron-induced data with quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) calculations complemented by the surface coalescence model (SCM); we observed that the SCM improves the predictive power of QMD. (author)

  12. Averaged currents induced by alpha particles in an InSb compound semiconductor detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Ikuo; Hishiki, Shigeomi; Kogetsu, Yoshitaka; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Katagiri, Masaki

    2008-01-01

    Very fast pulses due to alpha particle incidence were observed by an undoped-type InSb Schottky detector. This InSb detector was operated without applying bias voltage and its depletion layer thickness was less than the range of alpha particles. The averaged current induced by alpha particles was analyzed as a function of operating temperature and was shown to be proportional to the Hall mobility of InSb. (author)

  13. Reducing field emission in the superconducting rf cavities for the next generation of particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, Q.S.; Hartung, W.; Leibovich, A.; Kirchgessner, J.; Moffat, D.; Padamsee, H.; Rubin, D.; Sears, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on field emission, which is an obstacle to reaching the higher fields called for in future applications of superconducting radio frequency cavities to particle accelerators. The authors used heat treatment up to 1500 degrees C in an ultra-high vacuum furnace, along with processing of cavities and temperature mapping, to suppress field emission and analyze emitter properties. In 27 tests of 1-cell 1500 MHz fired accelerating cavities, on the average the accelerating field E acc increased to 24 MV/m (H pk = 1250 Oe) from 13 MV/m with chemical treatment alone; the highest E acc reached was 30.5 MV/m

  14. Charged-particle magnetic-quadrupole spectrometer for neutron induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haight, R.C.; Grimes, S.M.; Tuckey, B.J.; Anderson, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    A spectrometer has been developed for measuring the charged particle production cross sections and spectra in neutron-induced reactions. The spectrometer consists of a magnetic quadrupole doublet which focuses the charged particles onto a silicon surface barrier detector telescope which is 2 meters or more from the irradiated sample. Collimators, shielding, and the large source-to-detector distance reduce the background enough to use the spectrometer with a 14-MeV neutron source producing 4 . 10 12 n/s. The spectrometer has been used in investigations of proton, deuteron, and alpha particle production by 14-MeV neutrons incident on various materials. Protons with energies as low as 1.1 MeV have been measured. The good resolution of the detectors has also made possible an improved measurement of the neutron- neutron scattering length from the 0 0 proton spectrum from deuteron breakup by 14-MeV neutrons

  15. Fireworks induced particle pollution: A spatio-temporal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M.; Singh, R. K.; Murari, V.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, R. S.; Banerjee, T.

    2016-11-01

    Diwali-specific firework induced particle pollution was measured in terms of aerosol mass loading, type, optical properties and vertical distribution. Entire nation exhibited an increase in particulate concentrations specifically in Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). Aerosol surface mass loading at middle IGP revealed an increase of 56-121% during festival days in comparison to their background concentrations. Space-borne measurements (Aqua and Terra-MODIS) typically identified IGP with moderate to high AOD (0.3-0.8) during pre-festive days which transmutes to very high AOD (0.4-1.8) during Diwali-day with accumulation of aerosol fine mode fractions (0.3-1.0). Most of the aerosol surface monitoring stations exhibited increase in PM2.5 especially on Diwali-day while PM10 exhibited increase on subsequent days. Elemental compositions strongly support K, Ba, Sr, Cd, S and P to be considered as firework tracers. The upper and middle IGP revealed dominance of absorbing aerosols (OMI-AI: 0.80-1.40) while CALIPSO altitude-orbit-cross-section profiles established the presence of polluted dust which eventually modified with association of smoke and polluted continental during extreme fireworks. Diwali-specific these observations have implications on associating fireworks induced particle pollution and human health while inclusion of these observations should improve regional air quality model.

  16. Relation between aerosol sources and meteorological parameters for inhalable atmospheric particles in Sao Paulo City, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Fatima; Orsini, Celso; Maenhaut, Willy

    Stacked filter units were used to collect atmospheric particles in separate coarse and fine fractions at the Sao Paulo University Campus during the winter of 1989. The samples were analysed by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and the data were subjected to an absolute principal component analysis (APCA). Five sources were identified for the fine particles: industrial emissions, which accounted for 13% of the fine mass; emissions from residual oil and diesel, explaining 41%; resuspended soil dust, with 28%; and emissions of Cu and of Mg, together with 18%. For the coarse particles, four sources were identified: soil dust, accounting for 59% of the coarse mass; industrial emissions, with 19%; oil burning, with 8%; and sea salt aerosol, with 14% of the coarse mass. A data set with various meteorological parameters was also subjected to APCA, and a correlation analysis was performed between the meteorological "absolute principal component scores" (APCS) and the APCS from the fine and coarse particle data sets. The soil dust sources for the fine and coarse aerosol were highly correlated with each other and were anticorrelated with the sea breeze component. The industrial components in the fine and coarse size fractions were also highly positively correlated. Furthermore, the industrial component was related with the northeasterly wind direction and, to a lesser extent, with the sea breeze component.

  17. Time-space distribution of laser-induced plasma parameters and its influence on emission spectra of the laser plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov-Pavlov, E.A.; Katsalap, K.Yu.; Stepanov, K.L.; Stankevich, Yu.A.

    2008-01-01

    A physical model is developed accounting for dynamics and radiation of plasma plumes induced by nanosecond laser pulses on surface of solid samples. The model has been applied to simulate emission spectra of the laser erosion plasma at the elemental analysis of metals using single- and double-pulse excitation modes. Dynamics of the sample heating and expansion of the erosion products are accounted for by the thermal conductivity and gas dynamic equations, respectively, supposing axial symmetry. Using the resulting time-space distributions of the plasma parameters, emission spectra of the laser plumes are evaluated by solving the radiation transfer equation. Particle concentration in consecutive ionization stages is described by the Saha equation in the Debye approximation. The population of excited levels is determined according to Boltzmann distribution. Local characteristics determining spectral emission and absorption coefficients are obtained point-by-point along an observation line. Voigt spectral line profiles are considered with main broadening mechanisms taken into account. The plasma dynamics and plume emission spectra have been studied experimentally and by the model. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm wavelength has been used to irradiate Al sample with the pulses of 15 ns and 50 mJ duration and energy, respectively. It has resulted in maximum power density of 0.8 MW/cm 2 on the sample surface. The laser plume emission spectra have been recorded at a side-on observation. Problems of the spectra contrast and of the elemental analysis efficiency are considered relying on a comparative study of the measurement and simulation results at the both excitation modes

  18. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Infrared Emission From Inorganic and Organic Substances

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, C.S; Brown, E; Hommerich, U; Trivedi, S. B; Snyder, A. P; Samuels, A. C

    2006-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been established as a powerful method for identifying trace elemental contaminants by analyzing the atomic spectral emission lines that result subsequent to plasmas generated by laser power...

  19. Effects of bluff-body burner and coal particle size on NOx emissions and burnout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, L.S.; Cheng, J.F.; Zeng, H.C. [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). National Coal Combustion Lab.

    1999-12-01

    Investigations on air staging have been carried out using various coals with different degrees of fineness and a variety of burners with a 92.9 kw h{sup -1} tunnel furnace burning pulverized coal. It has been observed that using the bluff-body burner can reduce both the unburned carbon in fly ash and NOx emissions in the case of air staging. The experimental results show that air-staging combustion has a more remarkable effect on NOx reduction for higher-volatile coal than for lower-volatile coal. The results also show that there is a strong influence of coal particle size on NOx emissions and unburned carbon in the fly ash in the case of air staging. 13 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Photon hormesis deactivates alpha-particle induced bystander effects between zebrafish embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, C.Y.P.; Cheng, S.H.; Yu, K.N.

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, we studied the effects of low-dose X-ray photons on the alpha-particle induced bystander effects between embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio. The effects on the naive whole embryos were studied through quantification of apoptotic signals (amounts of cells undergoing apoptosis) at 24 h post fertilization (hpf) using vital dye acridine orange staining, followed by counting the stained cells under a fluorescent microscope. We report data showing that embryos at 5 hpf subjected to a 4.4 mGy alpha-particle irradiation could release a stress signal into the medium, which could induce bystander effect in partnered naive embryos sharing the same medium. We also report that the bystander effect was deactivated when the irradiated embryos were subjected to a concomitant irradiation of 10 or 14 mGy of X-rays, but no such deactivation was achieved if the concomitant X-ray dose dropped to 2.5 or 5 mGy. In the present study, the significant drop in the amount of apoptotic signals on the embryos having received 4.4 mGy alpha particles together X-rays irradiation from 2.5 or 5 mGy to 10 or 14 mGy, together with the deactivation of RIBE with concomitant irradiation of 10 or 14 mGy of X-rays supported the participation of photon hormesis with an onset dose between 5 and 10 mGy, which might lead to removal of aberrant cells through early apoptosis or induction of high-fidelity DNA repair. As we found that photons and alpha particles could have opposite biological effects when these were simultaneously irradiated onto living organisms, these ionizing radiations could be viewed as two different environmental stressors, and the resultant effects could be regarded as multiple stressor effects. The present work presented the first study on a multiple stressor effect which occurred on bystander organisms. In other words, this was a non-targeted multiple stressor effect. The photon hormesis could also explain some failed attempts to observe neutron-induced bystander

  1. Necrosis of HepG2 cancer cells induced by the vibration of magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Biran [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée (LPMC), CNRS UMR 7336, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice (France); Institut de Chimie de Nice, UMR 7272, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, 28 Avenue de Valrose, F-06100 Nice (France); Bienvenu, Céline [Institut de Chimie de Nice, UMR 7272, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, 28 Avenue de Valrose, F-06100 Nice (France); Mendez-Garza, Juan; Lançon, Pascal; Madeira, Alexandra [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée (LPMC), CNRS UMR 7336, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice (France); Vierling, Pierre [Institut de Chimie de Nice, UMR 7272, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, 28 Avenue de Valrose, F-06100 Nice (France); Di Giorgio, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.di-giorgio@unice.fr [Institut de Chimie de Nice, UMR 7272, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, 28 Avenue de Valrose, F-06100 Nice (France); Bossis, Georges, E-mail: bossis@unice.fr [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée (LPMC), CNRS UMR 7336, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice (France)

    2013-10-15

    Experiments of magnetolysis, i.e., destruction of cells induced with magnetic particles (MPs) submitted to the application of a magnetic field, were conducted on HepG2 cancer cells. We herein demonstrate the usefulness of combining anisotropic MPs with an alternative magnetic field in magnetolysis. Thus, the application of an alternative magnetic field of low frequency (a few Hertz) in the presence of anisotropic, submicronic particles allowed the destruction of cancer cells “in vitro”. We also show that a constant magnetic field is far less efficient than an oscillating one. Moreover, we demonstrate that, at equal particle volume, it is much more efficient to utilize spindle shaped particles rather than spherical ones. In order to get deeper insight into the mechanism of magnetolysis experiments, we performed a study by AFM, which strongly supports that the magnetic field induces the formation of clusters of particles becoming then large enough todamage cell membranes. - Highlights: • Magnetic force was applied on cancer cells through magnetic particles. • The penetration depth was predicted, both for spherical and ellipsoidal particles. • Alternative force was shown to damage the cells contrary to static force. • The effect of indentation of magnetic particles was compared to the one of AFM tips. • The damage was attributed to the formation of clusters of particles.

  2. Electrically induced spontaneous emission in open electronic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rulin; Zhang, Yu; Yam, Chiyung; Computation Algorithms Division (CSRC) Team; Theoretical; Computational Chemistry (HKU) Collaboration

    A quantum mechanical approach is formulated for simulation of electroluminescence process in open electronic system. Based on nonequilibrium Green's function quantum transport equations and combining with photon-electron interaction, this method is used to describe electrically induced spontaneous emission caused by electron-hole recombination. The accuracy and reliability of simulation depends critically on correct description of the electronic band structure and the electron occupancy in the system. In this work, instead of considering electron-hole recombination in discrete states in the previous work, we take continuous states into account to simulate the spontaneous emission in open electronic system, and discover that the polarization of emitted photon is closely related to its propagation direction. Numerical studies have been performed to silicon nanowire-based P-N junction with different bias voltage.

  3. Emission spectrum and relaxation kinetics of SO2 induced by 266 nm laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guiyin; Zhang, Lianshui; Jin, Yidong

    2010-09-15

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) emission spectrum of SO(2) in the range of 270.0-470.0 nm has been obtained with the quadruple harmonic output (266 nm) of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser as excitation source. The spectrum is composed of a continuous envelope in the short wavelength side, while it shows the character of banded structure superimposed on a continuous one in the long wavelength region. Fluorescence emission from the hybrid states of A(1)A(2)+B(1)B(1) and X(1)A(1)+B(1)B(1) forms the continuous envelope and phosphorescence emission from the triplet state a(3)B(1) forms the banded progression. It is also found that direct emission from laser excited states is very weak. The primary portion of the emission is from the energy levels populated by collision relaxation or collision induced intersystem crossing process. The harmonic frequencies and inharmonic coefficients of the symmetric stretching vibration and the bending vibration of X(1)A(1) state are derived from the ascription of the phosphorescence progression. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Flow induced particle migration in fresh concrete: Theoretical frame, numerical simulations and experimental results on model fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangenberg, J.; Roussel, N.; Hattel, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe and compare the various physical phenomena which potentially lead to flow induced particle migration in concrete. We show that, in the case of industrial casting of concrete, gravity induced particle migration dominates all other potential sources of heterogeneities ind...

  5. PIXE analysis of atmospheric aerosol and hydrometeor particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groeneveld, K.O.; Hofmann, D.; Georgii, H.W.

    1993-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol and hydrometeor particles act decisively on our weather, climate and thereby on all living conditions on Earth. Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis has been demonstrated to be an extremely valuable tool for quantitative and qualitative elemental analysis of aerosol particles and hydrometeors. Reliability and detection limits of PIXE are determined, including comparison with other techniques. Aerosol particles are collected on a global scale in ground stations, or by ships and by planes. Correlation between wind direction and elemental composition of atmospheric aerosols, elemental particle size distributions of the tropospheric aerosol, aerosol elemental composition in particle size fractions in the case of long range transport, transport pathways of pollution aerosol, and trace element content precipitation are discussed. Hydrometeors were studied in the form of rain, snow, fog, dew and frost. The time dependence of the melting process of snow was studied in detail, in particular the washout phenomena of impurity ions. (orig.)

  6. Alpha-particles induce preneoplastic transformation of rat tracheal epithelial cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, D.G.; Seiler, F.A.; Shyr, L.-J.; Griffith, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    To characterize the potential role of high-l.e.t. radiation in respiratory carcinogenesis, the cytotoxic and transforming potency of 5.5 MeV α-particles from electroplated sources of 238 Pu were determined using primary cultures of rat tracheal epithelial cells. RBE for cell killing by α-particles versus X-rays varied with dose, and ranged between 4 and 1.5 for α doses in the range 0.2-4 Gy. At equally toxic doses (relative survival 0.18-0.2), all three agents induced similar frequencies of preneoplastic transformation. For preneoplastic transformation induced by doses of α- and X-radiations giving 80 per cent toxicity, an α RBE of 2.4 was derived. The similar RBEs for cell killing and for preneoplastic transformation suggest an association between the type or degree of radiation-induced damage responsible for both cell killing and cell transformation. (author)

  7. Time evolution and emission factors of aerosol particles from day and night time savannah fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakkari, Ville; Beukes, Johan Paul; Tiitta, Petri; Venter, Andrew; Jaars, Kerneels; Josipovic, Miroslav; van Zyl, Pieter; Kulmala, Markku; Laakso, Lauri

    2013-04-01

    The largest uncertainties in the current global climate models originate from aerosol particle effects (IPCC, 2007) and at the same time aerosol particles also pose a threat to human health (Pope and Dockery, 2006). In southern Africa wild fires and prescribed burning are one of the most important sources of aerosol particles, especially during the dry season from June to September (e.g. Swap et al., 2003; Vakkari et al., 2012). The aerosol particle emissions from savannah fires in southern Africa have been studied in several intensive campaigns such as SAFARI 1992 and 2000 (Swap et al., 2003). However, all previous measurements have been carried out during the daytime, whereas most of the prescribed fires in southern Africa are lit up only after sunset. Furthermore, the previous campaigns followed the plume evolution for up to one hour after emission only. In this study, combining remote sensing fire observations to ground-based long-term measurements of aerosol particle and trace gas properties at the Welgegund measurement station (www.welgegund.org), we have been able to follow the time evolution of savannah fire plumes up to several hours in the atmosphere. For the first time the aerosol particle size distribution measurements in savannah fire plumes cover both day and night time plumes and also the ultrafine size range below 100 nm. During the period from May 20th 2010 to April 15th 2012 altogether 61 savannah fire plumes were observed at Welgegund. The evolution of the aerosol size distribution remained rapid for at least five hours after the fire: during this period the growth rate of the aerosol particle count mean diameter (size range 12 to 840 nm) was 24 nm h-1 for daytime plumes and 8 nm h-1 for night time plumes. The difference in the day and night time growth rate shows that photochemical reactions significantly increase the condensable vapour concentration in the plume. Furthermore, the condensable vapour concentration was found to affect both the

  8. Study of luminous emissions associated to electron emissions in radiofrequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maissa, S.

    1996-01-01

    This study investigates luminous emissions simultaneously to electron emissions and examines their features in order to better understand the field electron emission phenomenon. A RF cavity, operating at room temperature and in pulsed mode, joined to a sophisticated experimental apparatus has been especially developed. The electron and luminous emissions are investigated on cleaned or with metallic, graphitic and dielectric particles contaminated RF surfaces in order to study their influence on these phenomena. During the surface processing, unstable luminous spots glowing during one RF pulse are detected. Their apparition is promoted in the vicinity of the metallic particles or scratches. Two hypotheses could explain their origin: the presence of micro-plasmas associated to electronic explosive emission during processing or the thermal radiation of the melted metal during this emission. Stable luminous spots glowing during several RF pulses are also detected and appear to increase on RF surfaces contaminated with dielectric particles, leading to strong and explosive luminous emissions. Two interpretations are considered: the initiation of surface breakdowns on the dielectric particles or the heating by the RF field at temperatures sufficiently intense to provoke their thermal radiation then their explosion. Finally a superconducting cavity has been adapted to observe luminous spots, which differ from the former ones bu their star shape and could be associated to micro-plasmas, revealed by the starbursts observed on superconducting cavity walls. (author)

  9. Towards meso -Ester BODIPYs with Aggregation-Induced Emission Properties: The Effect of Substitution Positions

    KAUST Repository

    Chua, Ming Hui

    2015-06-17

    Three meso-ester boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dyes have been synthesized and functionalized with aggregation-induced emission (AIE)-active tetraphenylethene or triphenylethene moieties. It was found that functionalizing at the different positions of the BODIPY core resulted in the final dye having different emission properties in response to aggregation: from aggregation-induced quenching (ACQ) to being AIE active. X-ray crystallographic analysis was thus performed to provide an explanation for these differences. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Towards meso -Ester BODIPYs with Aggregation-Induced Emission Properties: The Effect of Substitution Positions

    KAUST Repository

    Chua, Ming Hui; Ni, Yong; Garai, Monalisa; Zheng, Bin; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Xu, Qing Hua; Xu, Jianwei; Wu, Jishan

    2015-01-01

    Three meso-ester boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dyes have been synthesized and functionalized with aggregation-induced emission (AIE)-active tetraphenylethene or triphenylethene moieties. It was found that functionalizing at the different positions of the BODIPY core resulted in the final dye having different emission properties in response to aggregation: from aggregation-induced quenching (ACQ) to being AIE active. X-ray crystallographic analysis was thus performed to provide an explanation for these differences. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Spontaneous and light-induced photon emission from intact brains of chick embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锦珠; 于文斗; 孙彤

    1997-01-01

    Photon emission (PE) and light-induced photon emission(LPE) of intact brains isolated from chick embryos have been measured by using the single photon counting device. Experimental results showed that the intensi-ty level of photon emission was detected to be higher from intact brain than from the medium in which the brain was immerged during measuring, and the emission intensity was related to the developmental stages, the healthy situation of the measured embryos, and the freshness of isolated brains as well. After white light illumination, a short-life de-layed emission from intact brains was observed, and its relaxation behavior followed a hyperbolic rather than an expo-nential law. According to the hypothesis of biophoton emission originating from a delocalized coherent electromagnetic field and Frohlich’s idea of coherent long-range interactions in biological systems, discussions were made on the signifi-cance of photon emission in studying cell communication, biological regulation, living system’

  12. Ion induced high energy electron emission from copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruano, G.; Ferron, J.

    2008-01-01

    We present measurements of secondary electron emission from Cu induced by low energy bombardment (1-5 keV) of noble gas (He + , Ne + and Ar + ) and Li + ions. We identify different potential and kinetic mechanisms and find the presence of high energetic secondary electrons for a couple of ion-target combinations. In order to understand the presence of these fast electrons we need to consider the Fermi shuttle mechanism and the different ion neutralization efficiencies.

  13. Particle-in-cell simulation of x-ray wakefield acceleration and betatron radiation in nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Though wakefield acceleration in crystal channels has been previously proposed, x-ray wakefield acceleration has only recently become a realistic possibility since the invention of the single-cycled optical laser compression technique. We investigate the acceleration due to a wakefield induced by a coherent, ultrashort x-ray pulse guided by a nanoscale channel inside a solid material. By two-dimensional particle-in-cell computer simulations, we show that an acceleration gradient of TeV/cm is attainable. This is about 3 orders of magnitude stronger than that of the conventional plasma-based wakefield accelerations, which implies the possibility of an extremely compact scheme to attain ultrahigh energies. In addition to particle acceleration, this scheme can also induce the emission of high energy photons at ∼O(10–100  MeV. Our simulations confirm such high energy photon emissions, which is in contrast with that induced by the optical laser driven wakefield scheme. In addition to this, the significantly improved emittance of the energetic electrons has been discussed.

  14. Hard X-ray Emission and Efficient Particle Acceleration by Supernova Remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vink, Jacco

    2009-01-01

    I discuss the non-thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants. Over the last decade it has become clear from both X-ray and γ-ray observations that young supernovae accelerate particles up to 100 TeV. In soft X-rays the accelerated >10 TeV electrons produce synchrotron radiation, coming from narrow filaments located at the shock fronts. The width of these filaments shows that the magnetic fields are relatively high, thus providing evidence for magnetic field amplification.The synchrotron radiation of several remnants is known to extend into the hard X-ray regime. In particular Cas A, has a spectrum that appears as a power law up to almost 100 TeV. This is very surprising, as a steepening is expected going from the soft to the hard X-ray band. The spectrum is likely a result of many superimposed individual spectra, each steepening at different energies. This implies considerable spatial variation in hard X-rays, an obvious target for Simbol-X. The variations will be important to infer local shock acceleration properties, but also magnetic field fluctuations may cause spatial and temporal variations.Finally, I draw the attention to super bubbles and supernovae as sources of cosmic rays. As such they may be sources of hard X-ray emission. In particular, supernovae exploding inside the dense red supergiants winds of their progenitors ares promising candidates for hard X-ray emission.

  15. Hard X-ray Emission and Efficient Particle Acceleration by Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Jacco

    2009-05-01

    I discuss the non-thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants. Over the last decade it has become clear from both X-ray and γ-ray observations that young supernovae accelerate particles up to 100 TeV. In soft X-rays the accelerated >10 TeV electrons produce synchrotron radiation, coming from narrow filaments located at the shock fronts. The width of these filaments shows that the magnetic fields are relatively high, thus providing evidence for magnetic field amplification. The synchrotron radiation of several remnants is known to extend into the hard X-ray regime. In particular Cas A, has a spectrum that appears as a power law up to almost 100 TeV. This is very surprising, as a steepening is expected going from the soft to the hard X-ray band. The spectrum is likely a result of many superimposed individual spectra, each steepening at different energies. This implies considerable spatial variation in hard X-rays, an obvious target for Simbol-X. The variations will be important to infer local shock acceleration properties, but also magnetic field fluctuations may cause spatial and temporal variations. Finally, I draw the attention to super bubbles and supernovae as sources of cosmic rays. As such they may be sources of hard X-ray emission. In particular, supernovae exploding inside the dense red supergiants winds of their progenitors ares promising candidates for hard X-ray emission.

  16. Time-Resolved Emission Spectroscopic Study of Laser-Induced Steel Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M. L.; Pulhani, A. K.; Suri, B. M.; Gupta, G. P.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-induced steel plasma is generated by focusing a Q-switched Nd:YAG visible laser (532 nm wavelength) with an irradiance of ∼ 1 × 10 9 W/cm 2 on a steel sample in air at atmospheric pressure. An Echelle spectrograph coupled with a gateable intensified charge-coupled detector is used to record the plasma emissions. Using time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of the plasma emissions, the temperature and electron number density of the steel plasma are determined for many times of the detector delay. The validity of the assumption by the spectroscopic methods that the laser-induced plasma (LIP) is optically thin and is also in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) has been evaluated for many delay times. From the temporal evolution of the intensity ratio of two Fe I lines and matching it with its theoretical value, the delay times where the plasma is optically thin and is also in LTE are found to be 800 ns, 900 ns and 1000 ns.

  17. Multipion correlations induced by isospin conservation of coherent emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangadharan, Dhevan

    2016-01-01

    Recent measurements have revealed a significant suppression of multipion Bose–Einstein correlations in heavy-ion collisions at the LHC. The suppression may be explained by postulating coherent pion emission. Typically, the suppression of Bose–Einstein correlations due to coherence is taken into account with the coherent state formalism in quantum optics. However, since charged pion correlations are most often measured, the additional constraint of isospin conservation, which is absent in quantum optics, needs to be taken into account. As a consequence, correlations emerge between pions of opposite charge. A calculation of the correlations induced by isospin conservation of coherent emission is made for two, three- and four-pion correlation functions and compared to the data from the LHC.

  18. Trends of light particle spectra observed in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awes, T.C.; Poggi, G.; Saini, S.; Gelbke, C.K.; Legrain, R.; Westfall, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    The emission of energetic light particles (p,d,t) has been studied for 16 O induced reactions on Al, Zr and Au targets at the incident energies of 140, 215 and 310 MeV. The light-particle energy spectra have been analyzed in terms of a moving thermal source. The apparent temperatures exhibit a systematic variation as a function of the incident energy per nucleon above the Coulomb barrier. The observed trend can be extrapolated in a smooth fashion to temperatures obtained in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. (orig.)

  19. Variability in the primary emissions and secondary gas and particle formation from vehicles using bioethanol mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramsch, E; Papapostolou, V; Reyes, F; Vásquez, Y; Castillo, M; Oyola, P; López, G; Cádiz, A; Ferguson, S; Wolfson, M; Lawrence, J; Koutrakis, P

    2018-04-01

    Bioethanol for use in vehicles is becoming a substantial part of global energy infrastructure because it is renewable and some emissions are reduced. Carbon monoxide (CO) emissions and total hydrocarbons (THC) are reduced, but there is still controversy regarding emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x ), aldehydes, and ethanol; this may be a concern because all these compounds are precursors of ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The amount of emissions depends on the ethanol content, but it also may depend on the engine quality and ethanol origin. Thus, a photochemical chamber was used to study secondary gas and aerosol formation from two flex-fueled vehicles using different ethanol blends in gasoline. One vehicle and the fuel used were made in the United States, and the others were made in Brazil. Primary emissions of THC, CO, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) from both vehicles decreased as the amount of ethanol in gasoline increased. NO x emissions in the U.S. and Brazilian cars decreased with ethanol content. However, emissions of THC, CO, and NO x from the Brazilian car were markedly higher than those from the U.S. car, showing high variability between vehicle technologies. In the Brazilian car, formation of secondary nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) and ozone (O 3 ) was lower for higher ethanol content in the fuel. In the U.S. car, NO 2 and O 3 had a small increase. Secondary particle (particulate matter [PM]) formation in the chamber decreased for both vehicles as the fraction of ethanol in fuel increased, consistent with previous studies. Secondary to primary PM ratios for pure gasoline is 11, also consistent with previous studies. In addition, the time required to form secondary PM is longer for higher ethanol blends. These results indicate that using higher ethanol blends may have a positive impact on air quality. The use of bioethanol can significantly reduce petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. Given the extent of

  20. Rare particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, W.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) to search for hypothetical particles and known particles of rare processes is discussed. The hypothetical particles considered include fractionally charged particles, anomalously heavy isotopes, and superheavy elements. The known particles produced in rare processes discussed include doubly-charged negative ions, counting neutrino-produced atoms in detectors for solar neutrino detection, and the spontaneous emission of 14 C from 223 Ra. 35 references

  1. Particle creation phenomenology, Dirac sea and the induced Weyl and Einstein-dilaton gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezin, V.A.; Dokuchaev, V.I.; Eroshenko, Yu.N., E-mail: berezin@inr.ac.ru, E-mail: dokuchaev@inr.ac.ru, E-mail: eroshenko@inr.ac.ru [Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary Prospect 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-01

    We constructed the conformally invariant model for scalar particle creation induced by strong gravitational fields. Starting from the 'usual' hydrodynamical description of the particle motion written in the Eulerian coordinates we substituted the particle number conservation law (which enters the formalism) by 'the particle creation law', proportional to the square of the Weyl tensor (following the famous result by Ya.B. Zel'dovich and A.A. Starobinsky). Then, demanding the conformal invariance of the whole dynamical system, we have got both the (Weyl)-conformal gravity and the Einstein-Hilbert gravity action integral with dilaton field. Thus, we obtained something like the induced gravity suggested first by A.D. Sakharov. It is shown that the resulting system is self-consistent. We considered also the vacuum equations. It is shown that, beside the 'empty vacuum', there may exist the 'dynamical vacuum', which is nothing more but the Dirac sea. The latter is described by the unexpectedly elegant equation which includes both the Bach and Einstein tensors and the cosmological terms.

  2. Ultrafine titanium dioxide particles in the absence of photoactivation can induce oxidative damage to human bronchial epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurr, J.-R.; Wang, Alexander S.S.; Chen, C.-H.; Jan, K.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    Ultrafine titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) particles have been shown to exhibit strong cytotoxicity when exposed to UVA radiation, but are regarded as a biocompatible material in the absence of photoactivation. In contrast to this concept, the present results indicate that anatase-sized (10 and 20 nm) TiO 2 particles in the absence of photoactivation induced oxidative DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, and micronuclei formation, and increased hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide production in BEAS-2B cells, a human bronchial epithelial cell line. However, the treatment with anatase-sized (200 and >200 nm) particles did not induce oxidative stress in the absence of light irradiation; it seems that the smaller the particle, the easier it is for the particle to induce oxidative damage. The photocatalytic activity of the anatase form of TiO 2 was reported to be higher than that of the rutile form. In contrast to this notion, the present results indicate that rutile-sized 200 nm particles induced hydrogen peroxide and oxidative DNA damage in the absence of light but the anatase-sized 200 nm particles did not. In total darkness, a slightly higher level of oxidative DNA damage was also detected with treatment using an anatase-rutile mixture than with treatment using either the anatase or rutile forms alone. These results suggest that intratracheal instillation of ultrafine TiO 2 particles may cause an inflammatory response

  3. [Ultrafine particle number concentration and size distribution of vehicle exhaust ultrafine particles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ye-qiang; Chen, Qiu-fang; Sun, Zai; Cai, Zhi-liang; Yang, Wen-jun

    2014-09-01

    Ultrafine particle (UFP) number concentrations obtained from three different vehicles were measured using fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS) and automobile exhaust gas analyzer. UFP number concentration and size distribution were studied at different idle driving speeds. The results showed that at a low idle speed of 800 rmin-1 , the emission particle number concentration was the lowest and showed a increasing trend with the increase of idle speed. The majority of exhaust particles were in Nuclear mode and Aitken mode. The peak sizes were dominated by 10 nm and 50 nm. Particle number concentration showed a significantly sharp increase during the vehicle acceleration process, and was then kept stable when the speed was stable. In the range of 0. 4 m axial distance from the end of the exhaust pipe, the particle number concentration decayed rapidly after dilution, but it was not obvious in the range of 0. 4-1 m. The number concentration was larger than the background concentration. Concentration of exhaust emissions such as CO, HC and NO showed a reducing trend with the increase of idle speed,which was in contrast to the emission trend of particle number concentration.

  4. Proton-induced X-ray emission analysis of Jordanian cigarettes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallak, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    Proton-induced X-ray emission spectroscopy was applied to determine the concentration of 11 elements in cigaretta tobacco of four brands commercially made in Jordan, and one foreign brand. The results are expressed in absolute amount per cigarette. Cigarette wrapping paper and cigarette smoke were also anlayzed. The significance of some of the elements found in the samples are discussed. (author)

  5. Particle transport model sensitivity on wave-induced processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staneva, Joanna; Ricker, Marcel; Krüger, Oliver; Breivik, Oyvind; Stanev, Emil; Schrum, Corinna

    2017-04-01

    Different effects of wind waves on the hydrodynamics in the North Sea are investigated using a coupled wave (WAM) and circulation (NEMO) model system. The terms accounting for the wave-current interaction are: the Stokes-Coriolis force, the sea-state dependent momentum and energy flux. The role of the different Stokes drift parameterizations is investigated using a particle-drift model. Those particles can be considered as simple representations of either oil fractions, or fish larvae. In the ocean circulation models the momentum flux from the atmosphere, which is related to the wind speed, is passed directly to the ocean and this is controlled by the drag coefficient. However, in the real ocean, the waves play also the role of a reservoir for momentum and energy because different amounts of the momentum flux from the atmosphere is taken up by the waves. In the coupled model system the momentum transferred into the ocean model is estimated as the fraction of the total flux that goes directly to the currents plus the momentum lost from wave dissipation. Additionally, we demonstrate that the wave-induced Stokes-Coriolis force leads to a deflection of the current. During the extreme events the Stokes velocity is comparable in magnitude to the current velocity. The resulting wave-induced drift is crucial for the transport of particles in the upper ocean. The performed sensitivity analyses demonstrate that the model skill depends on the chosen processes. The results are validated using surface drifters, ADCP, HF radar data and other in-situ measurements in different regions of the North Sea with a focus on the coastal areas. The using of a coupled model system reveals that the newly introduced wave effects are important for the drift-model performance, especially during extremes. Those effects cannot be neglected by search and rescue, oil-spill, transport of biological material, or larva drift modelling.

  6. Pre-equilibrium emission and nuclear level densities in neutron induced reactions on Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivascu, M.; Avrigeanu, M.; Ivascu, I.; Avrigeanu, V.

    1989-01-01

    The experimentally well known (n,p), (n,α) and (n,2n) reaction excitation functions, from threshold to 20 MeV incident energy, and neutron, proton and alpha-particle emission spectra at 14.8 MeV from Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes are calculated in the frame of a generalized Geometry-Dependent-Hybrid pre-equilibrium emission model, including angular momentum and parity conservation and alpha-particle emission, and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Use of a consistent statistical model parameter set enables the validation of the pre-equilibrium emission model. Moreover, an enhanced pre-equilibrium emission from higher spin composite system states, associated with higher incident orbital momenta, has been evidenced. Higher orbital momenta involved also in the emergent channels of this process are suggested by calculations of the residual nuclei level populations. Finally, the unitary account of the (n, p) and (n, 2n) reaction excitation functions for Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes has allowed the proper establishment of the limits of the transition excitation range between the two different nuclear level density models used at medium and higher excitation energies, respectively. (author). 83 refs, 15 figs

  7. Effects of Temperature and Residence Time on the Emissions of PIC and Fine Particles during Fixed Bed Combustion of Conifer Stemwood Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boman, Christoffer; Lindmark, Fredrik; Oehman, Marcus; Nordin, Anders [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry; Pettersson, Esbjoern [Energy Technology Centre, Piteaa (Sweden); Westerholm, Roger [Stockholm Univ., Arrhenius Laboratory (Sweden). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry

    2006-07-15

    The use of wood fuel Pellets has proved to be well suited for the small-scale market enabling controlled and efficient combustion with low emission of products of incomplete combustion (PIC). Still a potential for further emission reduction exists and a thorough understanding of the influence of combustion conditions on the emission characteristics of air pollutants like PAH and particulate matter (PM) is important. The objective was to determine the effects of temperature and residence time on the emission performance and characteristics with focus on hydrocarbons and PM during combustion of conifer stemwood Pellets in a laboratory fixed bed reactor (<5 kW). Temperature and residence time after the bed section were varied according to statistical experimental designs (650-970 deg C and 0.5-3.5 s) with the emission responses; CO, organic gaseous carbon, NO, 20 VOC compounds, 43 PAH compounds, PM{sub tot}, fine particle mass/count median diameter (MMD and CMD) and number concentration. Temperature was negatively correlated with the emissions of all studied PIC with limited effects of residence time. The PM{sub tot} emissions of 15-20 mg/MJ was in all cases dominated by fine (<1 {mu}m) particles of K, Na, S, Cl, C, O and Zn. Increased residence time resulted in increased fine particle sizes (i.e. MMD and CMD) and decreased number concentrations. The importance of high temperature (>850 deg C) in the bed zone with intensive, air rich and well mixed isothermal conditions for 0.5-1.0 s in the post combustion zone was illustrated for wood Pellets combustion with almost a total depletion of all studied PIC. The results emphasize the need for further verification studies and technology development work.

  8. Monoterpene and herbivore-induced emissions from cabbage plants grown at elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorinen, Terhi; Reddy, G. V. P.; Nerg, Anne-Marja; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    The warming of the lower atmosphere due to elevating CO 2 concentration may increase volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from plants. Also, direct effects of elevated CO 2 on plant secondary metabolism are expected to lead to increased VOC emissions due to allocation of excess carbon on secondary metabolites, of which many are volatile. We investigated how growing at doubled ambient CO 2 concentration affects emissions from cabbage plants ( Brassica oleracea subsp. capitata) damaged by either the leaf-chewing larvae of crucifer specialist diamondback moth ( Plutella xylostella L.) or generalist Egyptian cotton leafworm ( Spodoptera littoralis (Boisduval)). The emission from cabbage cv. Lennox grown in both CO 2 concentrations, consisted mainly of monoterpenes (sabinene, limonene, α-thujene, 1,8-cineole, β-pinene, myrcene, α-pinene and γ-terpinene). ( Z)-3-Hexenyl acetate, sesquiterpene ( E, E)- α-farnesene and homoterpene ( E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene (DMNT) were emitted mainly from herbivore-damaged plants. Plants grown at 720 μmol mol -1 of CO 2 had significantly lower total monoterpene emissions per shoot dry weight than plants grown at 360 μmol mol -1 of CO 2, while damage by both herbivores significantly increased the total monoterpene emissions compared to intact plants. ( Z)-3-Hexenyl acetate, ( E, E)- α-farnesene and DMNT emissions per shoot dry weight were not affected by the growth at elevated CO 2. The emission of DMNT was significantly enhanced from plants damaged by the specialist P. xylostella compared to the plants damaged by the generalist S. littoralis. The relative proportions of total monoterpenes and total herbivore-induced compounds of total VOCs did not change due to the growth at elevated CO 2, while insect damage increased significantly the proportion of induced compounds. The results suggest that VOC emissions that are induced by the leaf-chewing herbivores will not be influenced by elevated CO 2 concentration.

  9. Studying effects of Magnolol on alpha-particle induced bystander effects using PADC-film based dishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, T.P.W. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Tse, A.K.W.; Fong, W.F. [Research and Development Division, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Baptist University Road, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.h [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2009-10-15

    Radiation-induced bystander effect refers to the biological response found in cells (called bystander cells) which are not irradiated directly by ionizing radiation but are next to cells irradiated directly by ionizing radiation. In the present paper, the effects of Magnolol, an extract from the bark of Magnolia officinalis which is used as a traditional Chinese medicine, were studied on alpha-particle induced bystander effects. In our experiments, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were cultured in PADC-film based dishes and were irradiated with low fluences of alpha particles passing through the PADC films. The precise number of cells traversed or missed by alpha particles could be determined by studying the alpha-particle tracks developed on the PADC films upon subsequent chemical etching. TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) assay was employed to analyze the biological response of bystander cells in terms of DNA strand breaks. With the pretreatment of Magnolol, the DNA strand breaks in bystander cells were reduced, which showed that the alpha-particle induced bystander effects were suppressed with the presence of Magnolol. Since Magnolol is an antioxidant which can scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), our results give support to that ROS play a role in the bystander signal transmission in our experiments.

  10. Studying effects of Magnolol on alpha-particle induced bystander effects using PADC-film based dishes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, T.P.W.; Tse, A.K.W.; Fong, W.F.; Yu, K.N.

    2009-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect refers to the biological response found in cells (called bystander cells) which are not irradiated directly by ionizing radiation but are next to cells irradiated directly by ionizing radiation. In the present paper, the effects of Magnolol, an extract from the bark of Magnolia officinalis which is used as a traditional Chinese medicine, were studied on alpha-particle induced bystander effects. In our experiments, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were cultured in PADC-film based dishes and were irradiated with low fluences of alpha particles passing through the PADC films. The precise number of cells traversed or missed by alpha particles could be determined by studying the alpha-particle tracks developed on the PADC films upon subsequent chemical etching. TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) assay was employed to analyze the biological response of bystander cells in terms of DNA strand breaks. With the pretreatment of Magnolol, the DNA strand breaks in bystander cells were reduced, which showed that the alpha-particle induced bystander effects were suppressed with the presence of Magnolol. Since Magnolol is an antioxidant which can scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), our results give support to that ROS play a role in the bystander signal transmission in our experiments.

  11. Chemical characterzation of fine particle emissions from the fireplace combustion of woods grown in the Southern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Philip M; Cass, Glen R; Simoneit, Bernd R T

    2002-04-01

    The fireplace combustion of wood is a significant and largely unregulated source of fine particle pollution in the United States. Source apportionment techniques that use particulate organic compounds as tracers have been successful in determining the contribution of wood smoke to ambient fine particle levels in specific areas in California. To apply these techniques to the rest of the United States, the differences in emissions profiles between different wood smoke sources and fuel types should be resolved. To this end, a series of fireplace source tests was conducted on six fuel wood species found in the Southern United States to determine fine particulate emission factors for total mass, ionic and elemental species, elemental and organic carbon, and over 250 individual organic compounds. The wood species tested, chosen for their high abundance and availability in the Southern U.S. region, were yellow poplar, white ash, sweetgum, mockernut hickory, loblolly pine, and slash pine. The differences in the emissions of compounds such as substituted phenols and resin acids help to distinguish between the smoke from hardwood and softwood combustion. Levoglucosan, a cellulose pyrolysis product which may serve as a tracer for wood smoke in general, was quantified in the emissions from all the wood species burned. The furofuran lignan, yangambin, which was emitted in significant quantities from yellow poplar combustion and not detected in any of the other North American wood smokes, is a potential species-specific molecular tracer which may be useful in qualitatively identifying particulate emissions from a specific geographical area where yellow poplar is being burned.

  12. Suppression of Kasha's rule as a mechanism for fluorescent molecular rotors and aggregation-induced emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hai; Cousins, Morgan E.; Horak, Erik H.; Wakefield, Audrey; Liptak, Matthew D.; Aprahamian, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Although there are some proposed explanations for aggregation-induced emission, a phenomenon with applications that range from biosensors to organic light-emitting diodes, current understanding of the quantum-mechanical origin of this photophysical behaviour is limited. To address this issue, we assessed the emission properties of a series of BF2-hydrazone-based dyes as a function of solvent viscosity. These molecules turned out to be highly efficient fluorescent molecular rotors. This property, in addition to them being aggregation-induced emission luminogens, enabled us to probe deeper into their emission mechanism. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations and experimental results showed that the emission is not from the S1 state, as predicted from Kasha's rule, but from a higher energy (>S1) state. Furthermore, we found that suppression of internal conversion to the dark S1 state by restricting the rotor rotation enhances fluorescence, which leads to the proposal that suppression of Kasha's rule is the photophysical mechanism responsible for emission in both viscous solution and the solid state.

  13. Polyhexamethylene guanidine phosphate aerosol particles induce pulmonary inflammatory and fibrotic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha Ryong; Lee, Kyuhong; Park, Chang We; Song, Jeong Ah; Shin, Da Young; Park, Yong Joo; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2016-03-01

    Polyhexamethylene guanidine (PHMG) phosphate was used as a disinfectant for the prevention of microorganism growth in humidifiers, without recognizing that a change of exposure route might cause significant health effects. Epidemiological studies reported that the use of humidifier disinfectant containing PHMG-phosphate can provoke pulmonary fibrosis. However, the pulmonary toxicity of PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles is unknown yet. This study aimed to elucidate the toxicological relationship between PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles and pulmonary fibrosis. An in vivo nose-only exposure system and an in vitro air-liquid interface (ALI) co-culture model were applied to confirm whether PHMG-phosphate induces inflammatory and fibrotic responses in the respiratory tract. Seven-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles for 3 weeks and recovered for 3 weeks in a nose-only exposure chamber. In addition, three human lung cells (Calu-3, differentiated THP-1 and HMC-1 cells) were cultured at ALI condition for 12 days and were treated with PHMG-phosphate at set concentrations and times. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, airway barrier injuries and inflammatory and fibrotic responses were evaluated in vivo and in vitro. The rats exposed to PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles in nanometer size showed pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis including inflammatory cytokines and fibronectin mRNA increase, as well as histopathological changes. In addition, PHMG-phosphate triggered the ROS generation, airway barrier injuries and inflammatory responses in a bronchial ALI co-culture model. Those results demonstrated that PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles cause pulmonary inflammatory and fibrotic responses. All features of fibrogenesis by PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles closely resembled the pathology of fibrosis that was reported in epidemiological studies. Finally, we expected that PHMG-phosphate infiltrated into the lungs in the form of

  14. Stopping power and polarization induced in a plasma by a fast charged particle in circular motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villo-Perez, Isidro [Departamento de Electronica, Tecnologia de las Computadoras y Proyectos, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Cartagena (Spain); Arista, Nestor R. [Division Colisiones Atomicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Bariloche (Argentina); Garcia-Molina, Rafael [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia (Spain)

    2002-03-28

    We describe the perturbation induced in a plasma by a charged particle in circular motion, analysing in detail the evolution of the induced charge, the electrostatic potential and the energy loss of the particle. We describe the initial transitory behaviour and the different ways in which convergence to final stationary solutions may be obtained depending on the basic parameters of the problem. The results for the stopping power show a resonant behaviour which may give place to large stopping enhancement values as compared with the case of particles in straight-line motion with the same linear velocity. The results also explain a resonant effect recently obtained for particles in circular motion in magnetized plasmas. (author)

  15. Ion induced high energy electron emission from copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruano, G. [Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Universidad Nacional del Litoral Gueemes 3450 CC 91, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)], E-mail: gdruano@ceride.gov.ar; Ferron, J. [Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Universidad Nacional del Litoral Gueemes 3450 CC 91, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina); Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Universidad Nacional del Litoral Gueemes 3450 CC 91, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2008-11-15

    We present measurements of secondary electron emission from Cu induced by low energy bombardment (1-5 keV) of noble gas (He{sup +}, Ne{sup +} and Ar{sup +}) and Li{sup +} ions. We identify different potential and kinetic mechanisms and find the presence of high energetic secondary electrons for a couple of ion-target combinations. In order to understand the presence of these fast electrons we need to consider the Fermi shuttle mechanism and the different ion neutralization efficiencies.

  16. An experimental investigation on the properties of laser-induced plasma emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Xiaoshuan; Li Chunyan; Ji Xuehan; Feng Eryin; Cui Zhifeng

    2004-01-01

    The authors have measured the time-resolved emission spectra produced by Nd: YAG laser induced Al plasma with different kinds of buffer gas (He, Ar, N 2 and Air). The dependence of emission spectra line intensity and Stark broadening on the time delay, kinds and pressure of buffer gas are studied. The results show that the atomic emission line intensity reaches maximum at 3 μs time delay, the Stark broadening increases with increasing the pressure of buffer gas, and decreases with increasing time delay. The Stark broadening in Ar buffer gas is largest among the four different kinds of buffer gas. (author)

  17. Estimation of the sizes of hot nuclear systems from particle-particle large angle kinematical correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Ville, J.L.; Bizard, G.; Durand, D.; Jin, G.M.; Rosato, E.

    1990-06-01

    Light fragment emission, when triggered by large transverse momentum protons shows specific kinematical correlations due to recoil effects of the excited emitting source. Such effects have been observed in azimuthal angular distributions of He-particles produced in collisions induced by 94 MeV/u 16 0 ions on Al, Ni and Au targets. A model calculation assuming a two-stage mechanism (formation and sequential decay of a hot source) gives a good description of these whole data. From this succesfull confrontation, it is possible to estimate the size of the emitting system

  18. Standoff laser-induced thermal emission of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán-Freyle, Nataly Y.; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Figueroa-Navedo, Amanda; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2013-05-01

    A laser mediated methodology for remote thermal excitation of analytes followed by standoff IR detection is proposed. The goal of this study was to determine the feasibility of using laser induced thermal emission (LITE) from vibrationally excited explosives residues deposited on surfaces to detect explosives remotely. Telescope based FT-IR spectral measurements were carried out to examine substrates containing trace amounts of threat compounds used in explosive devices. The highly energetic materials (HEM) used were PETN, TATP, RDX, TNT, DNT and ammonium nitrate with concentrations from 5 to 200 μg/cm2. Target substrates of various thicknesses were remotely heated using a high power CO2 laser, and their mid-infrared (MIR) thermally stimulated emission spectra were recorded. The telescope was configured from reflective optical elements in order to minimize emission losses in the MIR frequencies and to provide optimum overall performance. Spectral replicas were acquired at a distance of 4 m with an FT-IR interferometer at 4 cm- 1 resolution and 10 scans. Laser power was varied from 4-36 W at radiation exposure times of 10, 20, 30 and 60 s. CO2 laser powers were adjusted to improve the detection and identification of the HEM samples. The advantages of increasing the thermal emission were easily observed in the results. Signal intensities were proportional to the thickness of the coated surface (a function of the surface concentration), as well as the laser power and laser exposure time. For samples of RDX and PETN, varying the power and time of induction of the laser, the calculated low limit of detections were 2 and 1 μg/cm2, respectively.

  19. Combined particle emission reduction and heat recovery from combustion exhaust-A novel approach for small wood-fired appliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messerer, A.; Schmatloch, V.; Poeschl, U.; Niessner, R.

    2007-01-01

    Replacing fossil fuels by renewable sources of energy is one approach to address the problem of global warming due to anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Wood combustion can help to replace fuel oil or gas. It is advisable, however, to use modern technology for combustion and exhaust gas after-treatment in order to achieve best efficiency and avoid air quality problems due to high emission levels often related to small scale wood combustion. In this study, simultaneous combustion particle deposition and heat recovery from the exhaust of two commercially available wood-fired appliances has been investigated. The experiments were performed with a miniature pipe bundle heat exchanger operating in the exhaust gas lines of a fully automated pellet burner or a closed fireplace. The system has been characterised for a wide range of aerosol inlet temperatures (135-295 deg. C) and flow velocities (0.13-1.0ms -1 ), and particle deposition efficiencies up to 95% have been achieved. Deposition was dominated by thermophoresis and diffusion and increased with the average temperature difference and retention time in the heat exchanger. The aerosols from the two different appliances exhibited different deposition characteristics, which can be attributed to enhanced deposition of the nucleation mode particles generated in the closed fire place. The measured deposition efficiencies can be described by simple linear parameterisations derived from laboratory studies. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of thermophoretic particle removal from biomass burning flue gas and support the development of modified heat exchanger systems with enhanced capability for simultaneous heat recovery and particle deposition

  20. Black carbon aerosol properties measured by a single particle soot photometer in emissions from biomass burning in the laboratory and field

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. R. McMeeking; J. W. Taylor; A. P. Sullivan; M. J. Flynn; S. K. Akagi; C. M. Carrico; J. L. Collett; E. Fortner; T. B. Onasch; S. M. Kreidenweis; R. J. Yokelson; C. Hennigan; A. L. Robinson; H. Coe

    2010-01-01

    We present SP2 observations of BC mass, size distributions and mixing state in emissions from laboratory and field biomass fires in California, USA. Biomass burning is the primary global black carbon (BC) source, but understanding of the amount emitted and its physical properties at and following emission are limited. The single particle soot photometer (SP2) uses a...

  1. Production of slow particle in 1.7 AGeV 84Kr induced emulsion interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huiling; Zhang Donghai; Li Xueqin; Jia Huiming

    2008-01-01

    The production of slow particle in 1.7 AGeV 84 Kr induced emulsion interaction was studied. The experimental results show that the average multiplicity of black, grey and heavily ionized track particle increases with the increase of impact centrality and target size. The average multiplicity of grey track particle and heavily ionized track particle increases with the increase of the number of black track particle. The average multiplicity of heavily ionized track particle increases with the increase of the number of grey track particle, but average multiplicity of black track particle increases with the increase of the number of grey track particle and then saturated. The average multiplicity of grey track particle increases with the increase of the number of heavily ionized track particle, but average multiplicity of black track particle increases with the increase of the number of heavily ionized track particle and then saturated. Those experimental results can be well explained by using the nuclear impact geometry model. (authors)

  2. Ozone exposure triggers the emission of herbivore-induced plant volatiles, but does not disturb tritrophic signalling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuorinen, Terhi; Nerg, Anne-Marja; Holopainen, Jarmo K

    2004-09-01

    We evaluated the similarities between ozone-induced and mite-induced emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from lima beans, and tested the response of the natural enemies of herbivores to these emissions using trophic system of two-spotted spider mites and predatory mites. The acute ozone-exposure and spider mite-infestation induced the emission of two homoterpenes, (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene and (E,E)-4,8,12-trimethyl-1,3,7,11-tridecatetraene, and (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate. Only plants with spider mite-infestation emitted the monoterpene (E)-{beta}-ocimene. Predatory mites were equally attracted to ozone-exposed and unexposed plants, but discriminated between spider mite-infested and uninfested plants, when both were exposed to ozone. The similarities between ozone and herbivore-induced VOCs suggest that plant defence against phytotoxic ozone and the production of VOCs for attraction of the natural enemies of herbivores may have adaptive coevolution. However, the expected elevated ozone concentrations in future may not disturb tritrophic signalling, unless herbivore-induced VOCs are lost in the process of aerosol formation.

  3. Ozone exposure triggers the emission of herbivore-induced plant volatiles, but does not disturb tritrophic signalling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuorinen, Terhi; Nerg, Anne-Marja; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the similarities between ozone-induced and mite-induced emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from lima beans, and tested the response of the natural enemies of herbivores to these emissions using trophic system of two-spotted spider mites and predatory mites. The acute ozone-exposure and spider mite-infestation induced the emission of two homoterpenes, (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene and (E,E)-4,8,12-trimethyl-1,3,7,11-tridecatetraene, and (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate. Only plants with spider mite-infestation emitted the monoterpene (E)-β-ocimene. Predatory mites were equally attracted to ozone-exposed and unexposed plants, but discriminated between spider mite-infested and uninfested plants, when both were exposed to ozone. The similarities between ozone and herbivore-induced VOCs suggest that plant defence against phytotoxic ozone and the production of VOCs for attraction of the natural enemies of herbivores may have adaptive coevolution. However, the expected elevated ozone concentrations in future may not disturb tritrophic signalling, unless herbivore-induced VOCs are lost in the process of aerosol formation

  4. SUBMICRON PARTICLES EMISSION CONTROL BY ELECTROSTATIC AGGLOMERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Krupa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to develop a device for more effective treatment of flue gases from submicron particles emitted by power plants burning bituminous coal and by this way the reduction of environment pollution. Electrostatic processes were employed to this goal, as the most effective solution. The solutions hitherto applied in electrostatic precipitation techniques were designed for large particles, typically with sizes> 5 µm, which are easily removed by the action of electrostatic force on the electrically charged particles. In submicron size range (0.1-1 µm the collection efficiency of an ESP is minimal, because of the low value of electric charge on such particles. In order to avoid problems with the removal of submicron particles of fly ash from the flue gases electrostatic agglomeration has been used. In this process, by applying an alternating electric field, larger charged particles (> 1 µm oscillate, and the particles "collect" smaller uncharged particles. In the developed agglomerator with alternating electric field, the charging of particles and the coagulation takes place in one stage that greatly simplified the construction of the device, compared to other solutions. The scope of this study included measurements of fractional collection efficiency of particles in the system comprising of agglomerator and ESP for PM1 and PM2.5 ranges, in device made in pilot scale. The collection efficiency for PM2.5 was greater than 90% and PM1 slightly dropped below 90%. The mass collection efficiency for PM2.5 was greater than 95%. The agglomerator stage increases the collection efficiency for PM1 at a level of 5-10%.

  5. Proceedings of the First International Induced Gamma Emission Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, I.I.; Ur, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    The proceedings of the First International Induced Gamma Emission Workshop held on August 16-20, 1997 in Predeal, Romania contain 40 communications. These are bunched in the following 7 sections: 1. Opening session (8 papers); 2. Theory and Modelling (7 papers); 3. Pump Mechanisms (6 papers); 4. Pump Sources (3 papers); 5. Collective Effects (8 papers); 6. Nuclear Isomers (3 papers); 7. Moessbauer Effect (5 papers)

  6. Pulse laser induced change in thermal radiation from a single spherical particle on thermally bad conducting surface : an analytical solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moksin, M.M.; Grozescu, V.I.; Yunus, W.M.M.; Azmi, B.Z.; Talib, Z.A.; Wahab, Z.A.

    1996-01-01

    A relatively simple analytical expression was derived that provided a description of the radius and thermal properties of a single particle from the change in grey body radiation emission subsequent to pulse laser heating of the particle

  7. Determination of the shapes and sizes of the regions in which in hadron-nucleus collisions reactions leading to the nucleon emission, particle production, and fragment evaporation occur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Shapes and sizes of the regions in target-nuclei in which reactions leading to the nucleon emission, particle production and fragment evaporation occur are determined. The region of nucleon emission is of cylindrical shape, with the diameter as large as two nucleon diameters, centered on the incident hadron course. The reactions leading to the particle production happen predominantly along the incident hadron course in nuclear matter. The fragment evaporation goes from the surface layer of the part of the target-nucleus damaged in nucleon emission process

  8. Redox-Triggered Bonding-Induced Emission of Thiol-Functionalized Gold Nanoclusters for Luminescence Turn-On Detection of Molecular Oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Hang; Feng, Hui; Zhao, Mengting; Zhao, Meizhi; Chen, Jianrong; Qian, Zhaosheng

    2017-11-22

    Most optical sensors for molecular oxygen were developed based on the quenching effect of the luminescence of oxygen-sensitive probes; however, the signal turn-off mode of these probes is undesirable to quantify and visualize molecular oxygen. Herein, we report a novel luminescence turn-on detection strategy for molecular oxygen via the specific oxygen-triggered bonding-induced emission of thiol-functionalized gold nanoclusters. Thiol-functionalized gold nanoclusters were prepared by a facile one-step synthesis, and as-prepared gold nanoclusters possess significant aggregation-induced emission (AIE) property. It is the first time to discover the oxygen-triggered bonding-induced emission (BIE) behavior of gold nanoclusters, which results in disulfide-linked covalent bonding assemblies with intensely red luminescence. This specific redox-triggered BIE is capable of quantitatively detecting dissolved oxygen in aqueous solution in a light-up manner, and trace amount of dissolved oxygen at ppb level is achieved based on this detection method. A facile and convenient test strip for oxygen detection was also developed to monitor molecular oxygen in a gas matrix. Covalent bonding-induced emission is proven to be a more efficient way to attain high brightness of AIEgens than a physical aggregation-induced emission process, and provides a more convenient and desirable detection method for molecular oxygen than the previous sensors.

  9. Origin of Spectral Band Patterns in the Cosmic Unidentified Infrared Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvaro Galué, Héctor; Díaz Leines, Grisell

    2017-10-01

    The cosmic unidentified infrared emission (UIE) band phenomenon is generally considered as indicative of free-flying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules in space. However, a coherent explanation of emission spectral band patterns depending on astrophysical source is yet to be resolved under this attribution. Meanwhile astronomers have restored the alternative origin as due to amorphous carbon particles, but assigning spectral patterns to specific structural elements of particles is equally challenging. Here we report a physical principle in which inclusion of nonplanar structural defects in aromatic core molecular structures (π domains) induces spectral patterns typical of the phenomenon. We show that defects in model π domains modulate the electronic-vibration coupling that activates the delocalized π -electron contribution to aromatic vibrational modes. The modulation naturally disperses C =C stretch modes in band patterns that readily resemble the UIE bands in the elusive 6 - 9 μ m range. The electron-vibration interaction mechanics governing the defect-induced band patterns underscores the importance of π delocalization in the emergence of UIE bands. We discuss the global UIE band regularity of this range as compatible with an emission from the delocalized s p2 phase, as π domains, confined in disordered carbon mixed-phase aggregates.

  10. Functional Polymer Opals and Porous Materials by Shear-Induced Assembly of Tailor-Made Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallei, Markus

    2018-02-01

    Photonic band-gap materials attract enormous attention as potential candidates for a steadily increasing variety of applications. Based on the preparation of easily scalable monodisperse colloids, such optically attractive photonic materials can be prepared by an inexpensive and convenient bottom-up process. Artificial polymer opals can be prepared by shear-induced assembly of core/shell particles, yielding reversibly stretch-tunable materials with intriguing structural colors. This feature article highlights recent developments of core/shell particle design and shear-induced opal formation with focus on the combination of hard and soft materials as well as crosslinking strategies. Structure formation of opal materials relies on both the tailored core/shell architecture and the parameters for polymer processing. The emphasis of this feature article is on elucidating the particle design and incorporation of addressable moieties, i.e., stimuli-responsive polymers as well as elaborated crosslinking strategies for the preparation of smart (inverse) opal films, inorganic/organic opals, and ceramic precursors by shear-induced ordering. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Investigation of electrically-active deep levels in single-crystalline diamond by particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kada, W., E-mail: kada.wataru@gunma-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Kambayashi, Y.; Ando, Y. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Onoda, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Umezawa, H.; Mokuno, Y. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Shikata, S. [Kwansei Gakuin Univ., 2-1, Gakuen, Mita, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Makino, T.; Koka, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Hanaizumi, O. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2016-04-01

    To investigate electrically-active deep levels in high-resistivity single-crystalline diamond, particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy (QTS) techniques were performed using 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 9 MeV carbon focused microprobes. For unintentionally-doped (UID) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, deep levels with activation energies of 0.35 eV and 0.43 eV were detected which correspond to the activation energy of boron acceptors in diamond. The results suggested that alpha particle and heavy ion induced QTS techniques are the promising candidate for in-situ investigation of deep levels in high-resistivity semiconductors.

  12. Evaluation of solid particle number and black carbon for very low particulate matter emissions standards in light-duty vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, M-C Oliver; Shields, J Erin

    2017-06-01

    To reliably measure at the low particulate matter (PM) levels needed to meet California's Low Emission Vehicle (LEV III) 3- and 1-mg/mile particulate matter (PM) standards, various approaches other than gravimetric measurement have been suggested for testing purposes. In this work, a feasibility study of solid particle number (SPN, d50 = 23 nm) and black carbon (BC) as alternatives to gravimetric PM mass was conducted, based on the relationship of these two metrics to gravimetric PM mass, as well as the variability of each of these metrics. More than 150 Federal Test Procedure (FTP-75) or Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (US06) tests were conducted on 46 light-duty vehicles, including port-fuel-injected and direct-injected gasoline vehicles, as well as several light-duty diesel vehicles equipped with diesel particle filters (LDD/DPF). For FTP tests, emission variability of gravimetric PM mass was found to be slightly less than that of either SPN or BC, whereas the opposite was observed for US06 tests. Emission variability of PM mass for LDD/DPF was higher than that of both SPN and BC, primarily because of higher PM mass measurement uncertainties (background and precision) near or below 0.1 mg/mile. While strong correlations were observed from both SPN and BC to PM mass, the slopes are dependent on engine technologies and driving cycles, and the proportionality between the metrics can vary over the course of the test. Replacement of the LEV III PM mass emission standard with one other measurement metric may imperil the effectiveness of emission reduction, as a correlation-based relationship may evolve over future technologies for meeting stringent greenhouse standards. Solid particle number and black carbon were suggested in place of PM mass for the California LEV III 1-mg/mile FTP standard. Their equivalence, proportionality, and emission variability in comparison to PM mass, based on a large light-duty vehicle fleet examined, are dependent on engine

  13. Laser-heated emissive plasma probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrittwieser, Roman; Ionita, Codrina; Balan, Petru; Gstrein, Ramona; Grulke, Olaf; Windisch, Thomas; Brandt, Christian; Klinger, Thomas; Madani, Ramin; Amarandei, George; Sarma, Arun K

    2008-08-01

    Emissive probes are standard tools in laboratory plasmas for the direct determination of the plasma potential. Usually they consist of a loop of refractory wire heated by an electric current until sufficient electron emission. Recently emissive probes were used also for measuring the radial fluctuation-induced particle flux and other essential parameters of edge turbulence in magnetized toroidal hot plasmas [R. Schrittwieser et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 055004 (2008)]. We have developed and investigated various types of emissive probes, which were heated by a focused infrared laser beam. Such a probe has several advantages: higher probe temperature without evaporation or melting and thus higher emissivity and longer lifetime, no deformation of the probe in a magnetic field, no potential drop along the probe wire, and faster time response. The probes are heated by an infrared diode laser with 808 nm wavelength and an output power up to 50 W. One probe was mounted together with the lens system on a radially movable probe shaft, and radial profiles of the plasma potential and of its oscillations were measured in a linear helicon discharge.

  14. Laser-heated emissive plasma probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrittwieser, Roman; Ionita, Codrina; Balan, Petru; Gstrein, Ramona; Grulke, Olaf; Windisch, Thomas; Brandt, Christian; Klinger, Thomas; Madani, Ramin; Amarandei, George; Sarma, Arun K.

    2008-01-01

    Emissive probes are standard tools in laboratory plasmas for the direct determination of the plasma potential. Usually they consist of a loop of refractory wire heated by an electric current until sufficient electron emission. Recently emissive probes were used also for measuring the radial fluctuation-induced particle flux and other essential parameters of edge turbulence in magnetized toroidal hot plasmas [R. Schrittwieser et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 055004 (2008)]. We have developed and investigated various types of emissive probes, which were heated by a focused infrared laser beam. Such a probe has several advantages: higher probe temperature without evaporation or melting and thus higher emissivity and longer lifetime, no deformation of the probe in a magnetic field, no potential drop along the probe wire, and faster time response. The probes are heated by an infrared diode laser with 808 nm wavelength and an output power up to 50 W. One probe was mounted together with the lens system on a radially movable probe shaft, and radial profiles of the plasma potential and of its oscillations were measured in a linear helicon discharge

  15. Laser-heated emissive plasma probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrittwieser, Roman; Ionita, Codrina; Balan, Petru; Gstrein, Ramona; Grulke, Olaf; Windisch, Thomas; Brandt, Christian; Klinger, Thomas; Madani, Ramin; Amarandei, George; Sarma, Arun K.

    2008-08-01

    Emissive probes are standard tools in laboratory plasmas for the direct determination of the plasma potential. Usually they consist of a loop of refractory wire heated by an electric current until sufficient electron emission. Recently emissive probes were used also for measuring the radial fluctuation-induced particle flux and other essential parameters of edge turbulence in magnetized toroidal hot plasmas [R. Schrittwieser et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 055004 (2008)]. We have developed and investigated various types of emissive probes, which were heated by a focused infrared laser beam. Such a probe has several advantages: higher probe temperature without evaporation or melting and thus higher emissivity and longer lifetime, no deformation of the probe in a magnetic field, no potential drop along the probe wire, and faster time response. The probes are heated by an infrared diode laser with 808nm wavelength and an output power up to 50W. One probe was mounted together with the lens system on a radially movable probe shaft, and radial profiles of the plasma potential and of its oscillations were measured in a linear helicon discharge.

  16. Prevention of wear particle-induced osteolysis by a novel V-ATPase inhibitor saliphenylhalamide through inhibition of osteoclast bone resorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Qin

    Full Text Available Wear particle-induced peri-implant loosening (Aseptic prosthetic loosening is one of the most common causes of total joint arthroplasty. It is well established that extensive bone destruction (osteolysis by osteoclasts is responsible for wear particle-induced peri-implant loosening. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption should prevent wear particle induced osteolysis and may serve as a potential therapeutic avenue for prosthetic loosening. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that saliphenylhalamide, a new V-ATPase inhibitor attenuates wear particle-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model. In vitro biochemical and morphological assays revealed that the inhibition of osteolysis is partially attributed to a disruption in osteoclast acidification and polarization, both a prerequisite for osteoclast bone resorption. Interestingly, the V-ATPase inhibitor also impaired osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of RANKL-induced NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways. In conclusion, we showed that saliphenylhalamide affected multiple physiological processes including osteoclast differentiation, acidification and polarization, leading to inhibition of osteoclast bone resorption in vitro and wear particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. The results of the study provide proof that the new generation V-ATPase inhibitors, such as saliphenylhalamide, are potential anti-resorptive agents for treatment of peri-implant osteolysis.

  17. Emissions of nitrogen oxides from road traffic - regulations, emissions and effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoedin, Aake; Pihl-Karlsson, Gunilla; Johansson, Manne; Forsberg, Bertil; Erlandsson, Lennart

    2004-10-01

    The report is a review that aims to improve the basis for additional measures against the road traffic emissions of, in particular, NO x . An important question in the context is whether health effects of NO 2 should serve as a norm for the actions for emission reductions of NO x , or if the environmental effects of NO x -emissions in the form of acidification, eutrophication and ozone should play this role. WHO notes, in its latest review of health effect research, that one cannot demonstrate that NO 2 alone has any direct effects in concentrations at the current whole-year mean norm (40 μg/m 3 ). Such health effects that has been demonstrated in epidemiologic studies at these concentrations are caused by other traffic related emissions (e. g. particles) for which NO 2 constitutes a good indicator. WHO indicates the need for additional sharpening of the norms for ozone and particles. In this context, it is important to note that emissions of NO x on a regional scale contributes to formation of ozone as well as particles. Therefore there exist reasons to decrease the emissions of NO x in order to reach future recommended values for ozone and particles emissions. In the evaluations that will be done during 2004-2005 of the so called Goeteborg protocol, the EU's Ceiling Directives and the CAFE-programme, it is expected that new emissions objective for NO x will be suggested for 2015-2020, to cope with health and environment objectives in Europe. The report shows that that development that currently happens within the vehicle industry, for engines and exhaust emission control system are pursued to meet future exhaust requirement in the USA gives good conditions for the road traffic sector to contribute to that these objectives will reached

  18. Shear-induced particle migration in suspensions of rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondy, L.A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)); Brenner, H. (Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)); Altobelli, S.A. (The Lovelace Institutes, 2425 Ridgecrest Drive, S. E., Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States)); Abbott, J.R.; Graham, A.L. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

    1994-03-01

    Shear-induced migration of particles occurs in suspensions of neutrally buoyant spheres in Newtonian fluids undergoing shear in the annular space between two rotating, coaxial cylinders (a wide-gap Couette), even when the suspension is in creeping flow. Previous studies have shown that the rate of migration of spherical particles from the high-shear-rate region near the inner (rotating) cylinder to the low-shear-rate region near the outer (stationary) cylinder increases rapidly with increasing sphere size. To determine the effect of particle shape, the migration of rods suspended in Newtonian fluids was recently measured. The behavior of several suspensions was studied. Each suspension contained well-characterized, uniform rods with aspect ratios ranging from 2 to 18 at either 0.30 or 0.40 volume fraction. At the same volume fraction of solids, the steady-state, radial concentration profiles for rods were independent of aspect ratio and were indistinguishable from those obtained from suspended spheres. Only minor differences near the walls (attributable to the finite size of the rods relative to the curvature of the walls) appeared to differentiate the profiles. Data taken during the transition from a well-mixed suspension to the final steady state show that the rate of migration increased as the volume of the individual rods increased.

  19. Obsidian hydration profiles measured by sputter-induced optical emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsong, I S; Houser, C A; Yusef, N A; Messier, R F; White, W B; Michels, J W

    1978-07-28

    The variation of concentrations of hydrogen, sodium, potassium, lithium, calcium, magnesium, silicon, and aluminum as a function of depth in the hydration layer of obsidian artifacts has been determined by sputter-induced optical emission. The surface hydration is accompanied by dealkalization, and there is a buildup of alkaline earths, calcium and magnesium in the outermost layers. These results have clarified the phenomena underlying the obsidian hydration dating technique.

  20. On novel mechanisms of slow ion induced electron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eder, H.

    2000-09-01

    The present work has contributed in new ways to the field of slow ion induced electron emission. First, measurements of the total electron yield γ for impact of slow singly and multiply charged ions on atomically clean polycrystalline gold and graphite have been made. The respective yields were determined by current measurements and measurements of the electron number statistics. A new mechanism for kinetic emission (KE) below the so called 'classical threshold' was found and discussed. For a given ion species and impact velocity a slight decrease of the yields was found for ion charge state q = 1 toward 3, but no significant differences in KE yields for higher q values. Comparison of the results from gold and graphite showed overall similar behavior, but for C+ a relatively strong difference was observed and ascribed to more effective electron promotion in the C-C- than in the C-Au system. Secondly, for the very specific system H0 on LiF we investigated single electron excitation processes under grazing incidence conditions. In this way long-range interactions of hydrogen atoms with the ionic crystal surface could be probed. Position- and velocity-dependent electron production rates were found which indicate that an electron promotion mechanism is responsible for the observed electron emission. Thirdly, in order to investigate the importance of plasmon excitation and -decay in slow ion induced electron emission, measurements of electron energy distributions from impact of singly and doubly charged ions on poly- and monocrystalline aluminum surfaces were performed. From the results we conclude that direct plasmon excitation by slow ions occurs due to the potential energy of the projectile in a quasi-resonant fashion. The highest relative plasmon intensities were found for impact of 5 keV Ne+ on Al(111) with 5 % of the total yield. For impact of H + and H 2 + characteristical differences were observed for Al(111) and polycrystalline aluminum. We show that

  1. Particle filters on light diesel vehicles - a socio-economic analysis on the introduction of particle filters; Partikelfiltre pae lette dieselkoeretoejer - en samfundsoekonomisk analyse af fremskyndelse af partikelfiltre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohl, M.; Larsen, Thommy; Carlsen, Kirsten; Mulvad Jeppesen, L.

    2006-09-15

    Emission of particles into the atmosphere is one of the biggest air pollution problems of our times. The emission of particles causes severe health problems such as respiratory and circulatory diseases, lung cancer, asthma, bronchitis and even causes premature deaths. The emission of particles comes from a number of different sources, where traffic is a considerable contributor. The effects of particle emissions from the traffic on the population are substantial, as the emission comes from mobile sources which create a high local pollution in city areas and in consequence high exposure of the local population. Exhaust particle emissions come mainly from diesel engines, and the introduction of particle filters would have a considerable impact on particle emissions. Vehicle emissions regulation is controlled by the EU. The coming emission regulation, EURO 5, is expected to be put into effect by the beginning of 2010. The current suggestions for the EURO 5 restrictions on particles are set so strict that they will be impossible to fulfil without a particle filter. This report performs a socio-economic analysis on the introduction of particle filters on all light vehicles (<3,500 kg). The analysis assumes that all newly registered diesel powered cars and vans should have a factory installed particle filter from the beginning of 2007. This thereby gives a period of three years before implementation of the EURO 5. (au)

  2. Theoretical estimation of proton induced X-ray emission yield of the trace elements present in the lung and breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manjunatha, H.C.; Sowmya, N.

    2013-01-01

    X-rays may be produced following the excitation of target atoms induced by an energetic incident ion beam of protons. Proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis has been used for many years for the determination of elemental composition of materials using X-rays. Recent interest in the proton induced X-ray emission cross section has arisen due to their importance in the rapidly expanding field of PIXE analysis. One of the steps in the analysis is to fit the measured X-ray spectrum with theoretical spectrum. The theoretical cross section and yields are essential for the evaluation of spectrum. We have theoretically evaluated the PIXE cross sections for trace elements in the lung and breast cancer tissues such as Cl, K, Ca,Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, P, S, Sr, Hg and Pb. The estimated cross section is used in the evaluation of Proton induced X-ray emission spectrum for the given trace elements.We have also evaluated the Proton induced X-ray emission yields in the thin and thick target of the given trace elements. The evaluated Proton induced X-ray emission cross-section, spectrum and yields are graphically represented. Some of these values are also tabulated. Proton induced X-ray emission cross sections and a yield for the given trace elements varies with the energy. PIXE yield depends on a real density and does not on thickness of the target. (author)

  3. PIXE analysis of U and Pu from hot particles: K-lines vs L-lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiménez-Ramos, M.C.; García López, J.; Eriksson, M.

    2012-01-01

    . (2007) [1] and Jiménez-Ramos et al. (2010) [2], radioactive particles from aircraft accidents in Palomares and Thule have been characterized. Using micro-Proton Induced X-ray Emission (μ-PIXE) and confocal X-ray fluorescence microprobe (μ-XRF), the L-lines of the main components in these particles, U......-lines present not overlapping between the main peaks in the spectra and the X-ray absorption in the sample is much lower than for L-lines....

  4. An improved quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization method for short-term combined economic emission hydrothermal scheduling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Songfeng; Sun, Chengfu; Lu, Zhengding [School of Computer Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2010-03-15

    This paper presents a modified quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO) for short-term combined economic emission scheduling (CEES) of hydrothermal power systems with several equality and inequality constraints. The hydrothermal scheduling is formulated as a bi-objective problem: (i) minimizing fuel cost and (ii) minimizing pollutant emission. The bi-objective problem is converted into a single objective one by price penalty factor. The proposed method, denoted as QPSO-DM, combines the QPSO algorithm with differential mutation operation to enhance the global search ability. In this study, heuristic strategies are proposed to handle the equality constraints especially water dynamic balance constraints and active power balance constraints. A feasibility-based selection technique is also employed to meet the reservoir storage volumes constraints. To show the efficiency of the proposed method, different case studies are carried out and QPSO-DM is compared with the differential evolution (DE), the particle swarm optimization (PSO) with same heuristic strategies in terms of the solution quality, robustness and convergence property. The simulation results show that the proposed method is capable of yielding higher-quality solutions stably and efficiently in the short-term hydrothermal scheduling than any other tested optimization algorithms. (author)