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Sample records for induced mutation technique

  1. Development of radiation-induced mutation techniques and functional genomics studies

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    Kim, Dong Sub; Kang, Si Yong; Kim, Jin Baek [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2012-01-15

    This project has been performed to develop plant genetic resources using radiation (gamma-rays, ion-beam, space environments), to conduct functional genomics studies with mutant resources, and to develop new radiation plant breeding techniques using various radiation sources during 3 years. In the first section, we developed flower genetic resources, functional crop resources, and bio-industrial plant resources. In the second section, we cloned several mutated genes and studied mechanisms of gene expression and genetic diversity of mutations induced by gamma-rays. In the third section, we developed new plant breeding techniques using gamma-phytotron, heavy ion-beam, and space environments. Based on these results, a total of 8 cultivars containing Chrysanthemum, Hibiscus, kenaf, rice, and soybean were applied for plant variety protection (PVP) and a total of 4 cultivars were registered for PVP. Also, license agreement for the dwarf type Hibiscus mutant 'Ggoma' was conducted with Supro co. and the manufacturing technology for natural antioxidant pear-grape vinegar was transferred into Enzenic co. Also, 8 gene sequences, such as F3'H and LDOX genes associated with flower color in Chrysanthemum and EPSPS gene from Korean lawn grass, were registered in the database of National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). In the future study, we will develop new radiation mutation breeding techniques through the mutation spectrum induced by various radiation sources, the studies for mechanism of the cellular response to radiation, and the comparative{center_dot}structural{center_dot}functional genomics studies for useful traits.

  2. Utilization of induced mutation techniques in rice improvement in the Philippines

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    Asencion, A.B.; Santos, I.S.; Barrida, A.C.; Medina, F.I.S. III [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Atomic Research Center (Philippines)

    2001-03-01

    Rice is one of the most important food crops in the Philippines, as such, efforts have been made consistently to improve the varieties released to the farmers for planting. Both conventional and induced mutation techniques were utilized to solve some of the problems. Varieties with improved qualities, resistance to pests and diseases, reduced height, early maturity and non-photoperiod sensitive were developed using either physical or chemical mutagen. Other methods were also tried to enhance variability like combination of gamma irradiation and biotechnology. Irradiation of F1 seeds was also initiated including the use of mutants in crosses to transfer their improved mutated characters. Promising selections were already tested and six lines from the F1 irradiation out-yielded both C4-63G and IR 1561-288-3, their parents. (author)

  3. Improvement of traditional local rice varieties through induced mutations using nuclear techniques

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    Pham Van Ro; Do Huu At [Cuu Long Delta Rice Research Institute (Viet Nam)

    2001-03-01

    'Improvement of local rice varieties for high yield, resistance to disease and insect pests (brown plant hopper and rice blast) and export quality through induced mutations for the Mekong Delta' started in 1993. After six years, it showed effecting on the field in the MD as well as at the south of Vietnam. TNDB-100 manifest very wide adaptation and yield stable variety. THDB is suitable for deepwater rice region, coastal area, where rice cultivation effected by acid sulphate and salinity conditions. Both varieties are good example for the method. Thank to good Co-operation from extension center from provinces, hundred classes of extension were organized to recommend to the farmers. And thank to the strongly supporting from IAEA so that nearly 400,000 ha of TNDB-100 occupied at the south of Vietnam as well as nearly 15,000 ha of THDB grown in the coastal as well as rainfed lowland rice areas at the South of Vietnam. To continue the rice improvement by this technique, seeds of six traditional local varieties were exposed under different dose of gamma rays to create new mutants. At present day hundred improved breeding lines were selected, a dozen of uniform lines were isolated and entranced the yield trail as well as regional testing program. From these improved varieties would be selected to contribute to the rice cultivation at the south of Vietnam in the next years. (author)

  4. Mutation breedings in ornamental plants. Technique used for radiation induced mutant in begonia, chrysanthemum, aberia and winter daphne

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    Matsubara, Hisao

    1984-03-01

    Several methods of obtaining somatic mutant plants by el-ray irradiation on pieces of tissues as in vitro adventitious bud technique or small cutting methods with repeated pruning are described. The irradiation to the adventitious buds in the small pieces of organ cultured in vitro and to the small cuttings are employed. Culture beds of agar or of Japanese Kanuma soil were used in vitro culture. In these experiments, Japanese Kanuma soil bed in in vitro culture worked well for root development and transplant of the induced mutants. Combination with in vitro culture and repeated pruning technique were used for isolation and fixation of solid somatic mutant from small sectorial mutation induced by irradiation. This method was successful for begonia, chrysanthemum, aberia and winter daphne. These data indicates that most of the induced mutant plants were non-chimeric, while a few others were chimeric. Among the new varieties, ''Gin-Sei'', ''Ryoku-Ha'', ''Big-Cross'', ''Kaede-Iron'', ''Mei-Fu-Hana-Tsukubane-Utsugi'' and ''Daphne-el-3'' are non-chimeric, and ''Mini-Mini-Iron'' and ''Orange-Iron'' are chimeric. Moreover, these new varieties have remarkably differed in size and in color pattern from original variety. From the experimental results of somatic mutation, it is indicated that plant tissue culture have enormous potential in radiation breeding and in rapid propagation of the somatic mutant. (author).

  5. Mutations induced in plant breeding

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    Barriga B, P. (Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia. Inst. de Produccion y Sanidad Vegetal)

    1984-10-01

    The most significant aspects of the use of ionizing radiations in plant breeding are reviewed. Aspects such as basic principles of mutation, expression and selection in obtention of mutants, methods for using induced mutations and sucess achieved with this methodology in plant breeding are reviewed. Results obtained in a program of induced mutation on wheat for high content of protein and lysine at the Universidad Austral de Chile are presented.

  6. Mutations induced by ultraviolet light

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    Pfeifer, Gerd P. [Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States)]. E-mail: gpfeifer@coh.org; You, Young-Hyun [Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Besaratinia, Ahmad [Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States)

    2005-04-01

    The different ultraviolet (UV) wavelength components, UVA (320-400 nm), UVB (280-320 nm), and UVC (200-280 nm), have distinct mutagenic properties. A hallmark of UVC and UVB mutagenesis is the high frequency of transition mutations at dipyrimidine sequences containing cytosine. In human skin cancers, about 35% of all mutations in the p53 gene are transitions at dipyrimidines within the sequence 5'-TCG and 5'-CCG, and these are localized at several mutational hotspots. Since 5'-CG sequences are methylated along the p53 coding sequence in human cells, these mutations may be derived from sunlight-induced pyrimidine dimers forming at sequences that contain 5-methylcytosine. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) form preferentially at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine when cells are irradiated with UVB or sunlight. In order to define the contribution of 5-methylcytosine to sunlight-induced mutations, the lacI and cII transgenes in mouse fibroblasts were used as mutational targets. After 254 nm UVC irradiation, only 6-9% of the base substitutions were at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine. However, 24-32% of the solar light-induced mutations were at dipyrimidines that contain 5-methylcytosine and most of these mutations were transitions. Thus, CPDs forming preferentially at dipyrimidines with 5-methylcytosine are responsible for a considerable fraction of the mutations induced by sunlight in mammalian cells. Using mouse cell lines harboring photoproduct-specific photolyases and mutational reporter genes, we showed that CPDs (rather than 6-4 photoproducts or other lesions) are responsible for the great majority of UVB-induced mutations. An important component of UVB mutagenesis is the deamination of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine within CPDs. The mutational specificity of long-wave UVA (340-400 nm) is distinct from that of the shorter wavelength UV and is characterized mainly by G to T transversions presumably arising through mechanisms

  7. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

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    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developed by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far.

  8. A Fast Determination of DNA Mutation Induced by Ultraviolet Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LuFeng; LiuLili; ZhangXiaofang; WuYutian

    2001-01-01

    Electrophoresis, chromatography, immunoassay, sequencing and other time consuming ap-proaches have been developed to determine DNA base mismatching, oxidative lesion or strand breaks. Sometimes,however, only qualitative information is enough to decide whether mutation has happened to DNA and its extent.Convolution spectrometry (CS), a new technique to discover ultrafme difference on ultraviolet (UV) absorption ofdifferent substances, is originally employed to find out any subtle mutation of DNA induced by UV radiation. Muta-tive DNA is compared with ego criteria based on the spectra of the former DNA, any difference is quantitatively ex-pressed by dispersion (5). Visible changes cannot be observed on second -derivative spectra until the mutation gets 5up to 11.48%. Dimethyl sulfoxide is an intensifier of UV 254 nm induced DNA mutation and protector at 365 nm,which is simply confirmed by increasing and decreasing 5. Every convolution procedure takes less than 1 min. Convolution spectrometry provides a fast, simple, sensitive and inexpensive alternative to determine DNA mutation, andto screen anti-mutational medicines.

  9. Radiation induced dynamic mutations and transgenerational effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Ohtsura

    2006-01-01

    Many studies have confirmed that radiation can induce genomic instability in whole body systems. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying induced genomic instability are not known at present, this interesting phenomenon could be the manifestation of a cellular fail-safe system in which fidelity of repair and replication is down-regulated to tolerate DNA damage. Two features of genomic instability namely, delayed mutation and untargeted mutation, require two mechanisms of ;damage memory' and ;damage sensing, signal transduction and execution' to induce mutations at a non damaged-site. In this report, the phenomenon of transgenerational genomic instability and possible mechanisms are discussed using mouse data collected in our laboratory as the main bases.

  10. A Novel Technique to Detect EGFR Mutations in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanbin Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene mutations occur in multiple human cancers; therefore, the detection of EGFR mutations could lead to early cancer diagnosis. This study describes a novel EGFR mutation detection technique. Compared to direct DNA sequencing detection methods, this method is based on allele-specific amplification (ASA, recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA, peptide nucleic acid (PNA, and SYBR Green I (SYBR, referred to as the AS-RPA-PNA-SYBR (ARPS system. The principle of this technique is based on three continuous steps: ASA or ASA combined with PNA to prevent non-target sequence amplification (even single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs, the rapid amplification advantage of RPA, and appropriate SYBR Green I detection (the samples harboring EGFR mutations show a green signal. Using this method, the EGFR 19Del(2 mutation was detected in 5 min, while the EGFR L858R mutation was detected in 10 min. In this study, the detection of EGFR mutations in clinical samples using the ARPS system was compatible with that determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and DNA sequencing methods. Thus, this newly developed methodology that uses the ARPS system with appropriate primer sets is a rapid, reliable, and practical way to assess EGFR mutations in clinical samples.

  11. Induced mutations and marker assisted breeding in soybean

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    Chotechuen, Somsong [Prachinburi Rice Research Center, Prachinburi (Thailand); Srisombun, Somsak [Department of Agriculture, Field Crops Research Institute, Bangkok (Thailand); Lamseejan, Siranut [Kasetsart Univ., Department of Applied Radiation and Isotopes, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2002-02-01

    Soybean is one of the important crops in Thailand. Constraints to soybean production include low yield potential, susceptibility to diseases and insects, and non-adoption of appropriate management practices. Mutation induction has been used to improve soybean yield and resistance to major diseases such as rust, purple seed, crinkle leaf, anthracnose and green seed. This paper reviews previous work and achievements of induced mutations in soybean. Successful examples are the release of a soybean variety, Doi Kham, and the development of a mutant CM 60-10kr-71; both are resistant to rust disease. The paper also gives example of the use of soybean SSR markers to identify QTL associated with pod shattering, and emphasizes the integration of mutation techniques and marker assisted selection for soybean improvement. (author)

  12. Mutation Sampling Technique for the Generation of Structural Test Data

    CERN Document Server

    Scholive, M; Robach, C; Flottes, M L; Rouzeyre, B

    2011-01-01

    Our goal is to produce validation data that can be used as an efficient (pre) test set for structural stuck-at faults. In this paper, we detail an original test-oriented mutation sampling technique used for generating such data and we present a first evaluation on these validation data with regard to a structural test.

  13. Heavy ion induced mutation in arabidopsis

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    Tano, Shigemitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Heavy ions, He, C, Ar and Ne were irradiated to the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana for inducing the new mutants. In the irradiated generation (M{sub 1}), germination and survival rate were observed to estimate the relative biological effectiveness in relation to the LET including the inactivation cross section. Mutation frequencies were compared by using three kinds of genetic loci after irradiation with C ions and electrons. Several interesting new mutants were selected in the selfed progenies of heavy ion irradiated seeds. (author)

  14. Dominant cataract mutations and specific-locus mutations in mice induced by radiation or ethylnitrosourea

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    Ehling, U.H.; Favor, J.; Kratochvilova, J.; Neuhaeuser-Klaus, A. (Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung m.b.H. Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Genetik)

    1982-01-01

    In a combined experiment, dominant cataract mutations and specific-locus mutations were scored in the same offspring. In radiation experiments, a total of 15 dominant cataract and 38 specific-locus mutations was scored in 29396 offspring. In experiments with ethylnitrosourea (ENU), a total of 12 dominant cataracts and 54 specific-locus mutations was observed in 12712 offspring. The control frequency for dominant cataracts was 0 in 9954 offspring and for specific-locus mutations 11 in 169955 offspring. The two characteristic features of radiation-induced specific-locus mutations - the augmenting effect of dose fractionation and the quantitative differences in the mutation rates between spermatogonial and post-spermatogonial stages - can also be demonstrated for the induction of dominant cataracts. The dominant cataract mutations recovered can be categorized into 7 phenotypic classes. The only noteworthy difference observed between the radiation- and ENU-induced mutations recovered was that, of the 2 radiation-induced total lens opacities, both were associated with an iris anomaly and microphthalmia whereas the ENU-induced total opacities were not.

  15. Development of plant mutation techniques using ion beam

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    Kang, Si Yong; Park, In Sook; Song, Hi Sup; Kim, Dong Sub; Kim, Soo Yeon

    2006-06-15

    It has been reported that ion beam with high liner energy transfer (LET) show relative high biological effectiveness (RBE) and more effective for induced plant mutation than low LET radiation i.e., X-rays, gamma rays and electrons. This study was conducted to induce mutation of in vitro cultured orchid and Chrysanthemum using proton beam of the MC-50 cyclotron (50 MeV) at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science. In vitro cultured stems of chrysanthemum(cv. Migok) and protocom-like bodies(PLBs) of Dendrobium orchid (cv. Kingianum) placed in the plastic petridish (5.5cm in diameter) with agar medium were irradiated by the proton beam with various dose ranges of 10, 25, 50, 100 Gy under the condition of 5nA beam current. Those irradiated plants were transferred to subculture media and then investigated growth characteristics. Shoot growth of chrysanthemum and orchid was decreased by increase of irradiation dose. In particular, new shoot formation was hardly founded over 50Gy in chrysanthemum and 100 Gy in orchid. Some leaf mutants were observed at the 25 Gy and 50 Gy irradiated PLBs of the orchid. The dry seeds of hot pepper, rapeseed, rice and perilla also were irradiated with proton beam of MC-50 cyclotron and then measured germination rate and early growth of M1 plants compared with gamma ray irradiation.

  16. Chlorambucil effectively induces deletion mutations in mouse germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, L B; Hunsicker, P R; Cacheiro, N L; Bangham, J W; Russell, W L; Shelby, M D

    1989-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent chlorambucil was found to be more effective than x-rays or any chemical investigated to date in inducing high yields of mouse germ-line mutations that appear to be deletions or other structural changes. Induction of mutations involving seven specific loci was studied after exposures of various male germ-cell stages to chlorambucil at 10-25 mg/kg. A total of 60,750 offspring was scored. Mutation rates in spermatogonial stem cells were not significantly increased over control values; this negative result is not attributable to selective elimination of mutant cells. Mutations were, however, clearly induced in treated post-stem-cell stages, among which marked variations in mutational response were found. Maximum yield occurred after exposure of early spermatids, with approximately 1% of all offspring carrying a specific-locus mutation in the 10 mg/kg group. The stage-response pattern for chlorambucil differs from that of all other chemicals investigated to date in the specific-locus test. Thus far, all but one of the tested mutations induced by chlorambucil in post-stem-cell stages have been proved deletions or other structural changes by genetic, cytogenetic, and/or molecular criteria. Deletion mutations have recently been useful for molecular mapping and for structure-function correlations of genomic regions. For generating presumed large-lesion germ-line mutations at highest frequencies, chlorambucil may be the mutagen of choice. Images PMID:2726748

  17. Chlorambucil effectively induces deletion mutations in mouse germ cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L.B.; Hunsicker, P.R.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.; Bangham, J.W.; Russell, W.L.; Shelby, M.D. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (USA))

    1989-05-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent chlorambucil was found to be more effective than x-rays or any chemical investigated to data in inducing high yields of mouse germ-line mutations that appear to be deletions or other structural changes. Induction of mutations involving seven specific loci was studied after exposures of various male germ-cell stages to chlorambucil at 10-25 mg/kg. A total of 60,750 offspring was scored. Mutation rates in spermatogonial stem cells were not significantly increased over control values; this negative result is not attributable to selective elimination of mutant cells. Mutations were, however, clearly induced in treated post-stem-cell stages, among which marked variations in mutational response were found. Maximum yield occurred after exposure of early spermatids, with {approx} 1% of all offspring carrying a specific-locus mutation in the 10 mg/kg group. The stage-response pattern for chlorambucil differs from that of all other chemicals investigated to date in the specific-locus test. Thus far, all but one of the tested mutations induced by chlorambucil in post-stem-cell stages have been proved deletions or other structural changes by genetic, cytogenetic, and/or molecular criteria. Deletion mutations have recently been useful for molecular mapping and for structure-function correlations of genomic regions. For generating presumed large-lesion germline mutations at highest frequencies, chlorambucil may be the mutagen of choice.

  18. Personalized prediction of EGFR mutation-induced drug resistance in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Debby D.; Weiqiang Zhou; Hong Yan; Maria Wong; Victor Lee

    2013-01-01

    EGFR mutation-induced drug resistance has significantly impaired the potency of small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer treatment. Computational approaches can provide powerful and efficient techniques in the investigation of drug resistance. In our work, the EGFR mutation feature is characterized by the energy components of binding free energy (concerning the mutant-inhibitor complex), and we combine it with specific personal features for 168 clinical subjects to construct a...

  19. Particle-induced chromosome aberrations and mutations: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    This overview will focus on progress in chromosome and mutation studies achieved by the application of new techniques. Furthermore, recent relevant data on longterm genetic effects of densely ionizing radiation will be summarized. (orig./MG)

  20. Mathematical Modeling of the Induced Mutation Process in Bacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Oleg V.; Krasavin, Evgeny A.; Parkhomenko, Alexander Yu.

    2010-01-01

    A mathematical model of the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation-induced mutation process in bacterial cells Escherichia coli is developed. Using mathematical approaches, the whole chain of events is tracked from a cell exposure to the damaging factor to mutation formation in the DNA chain. An account of the key special features of the regulation of this genetic network allows predicting the effects induced by the cell exposure to certain UV energy fluence.

  1. [UV-induced DNA mutation of peach aphid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Erxia; Guo, Jianwen; Zhao, Huiyan

    2006-07-01

    By using PCR technique and microsatellite marks, this paper studied the DNA polymorphism of peach aphid (Myzus persicae) under UV-radiation. The fragments of three primers were amplified, and the gene diversity and the rate of loci polymorphisms of their genomic DNA, which could reflect the damage degree of DNA after UV-radiation, were measured. The results revealed that after treated with different radiation intensity (15, 30, 45 W) and duration (2, 4, 6 h) , the UV-induced DNA mutations were genetic and could be delivered to F2 generation. The mutations depended on the interaction of radiation intensity and duration. Variance analysis on the gene diversity and the rate of loci polymorphisms showed that there existed a significant difference between UV-treated and control groups, except the rate of loci polymorphisms under 2 h radiation. The average value of the control was higher than that of 2 h radiation treatment. According to the cluster analysis of the genetic distance, the aphids were divided into three groups, i. e., control group, 2 h (15, 30 W) treatment group, and the other, which was consistent with the result of variance analysis.

  2. ENU-induced phenovariance in mice: inferences from 587 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Carrie N

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present a compendium of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU-induced mouse mutations, identified in our laboratory over a period of 10 years either on the basis of phenotype or whole genome and/or whole exome sequencing, and archived in the Mutagenetix database. Our purpose is threefold: 1 to formally describe many point mutations, including those that were not previously disclosed in peer-reviewed publications; 2 to assess the characteristics of these mutations; and 3 to estimate the likelihood that a missense mutation induced by ENU will create a detectable phenotype. Findings In the context of an ENU mutagenesis program for C57BL/6J mice, a total of 185 phenotypes were tracked to mutations in 129 genes. In addition, 402 incidental mutations were identified and predicted to affect 390 genes. As previously reported, ENU shows strand asymmetry in its induction of mutations, particularly favoring T to A rather than A to T in the sense strand of coding regions and splice junctions. Some amino acid substitutions are far more likely to be damaging than others, and some are far more likely to be observed. Indeed, from among a total of 494 non-synonymous coding mutations, ENU was observed to create only 114 of the 182 possible amino acid substitutions that single base changes can achieve. Based on differences in overt null allele frequencies observed in phenotypic vs. non-phenotypic mutation sets, we infer that ENU-induced missense mutations create detectable phenotype only about 1 in 4.7 times. While the remaining mutations may not be functionally neutral, they are, on average, beneath the limits of detection of the phenotypic assays we applied. Conclusions Collectively, these mutations add to our understanding of the chemical specificity of ENU, the types of amino acid substitutions it creates, and its efficiency in causing phenovariance. Our data support the validity of computational algorithms for the prediction of damage caused by

  3. Inducible repair system in Haemophilus influenzae unaccompanied by mutation. [uv

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notani, N.K.; Setlow, J.K.

    1980-07-01

    Weigle reactivation of ultraviolet-irradiated HPlc1 phage was observed after ultraviolet or mitomycin C treatment of Haemophilus influenzae cells. The amount of reactivation was considerably increased when the treated cells were incubated in growth medium before infection. The presence of chloramphenicol during this incubation abolished the reactivation. No mutation of this phage accompanied the reactivation. When cells were treated so as to produce a maximal reactivation of phage, neither reactivation nor mutation of cells was observed. It is concluded that H. influenzae has an inducible repair system that is not accompanied by mutation.

  4. DNA damage and mutations induced by arachidonic acid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Punnajit; Sadre-Bazzaz, Kianoush; Shurter, Jesse; Sarasin, Alain; Termini, John

    2003-12-30

    Endogenous cellular oxidation of omega6-polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) has long been recognized as a contributing factor in the development of various cancers. The accrual of DNA damage as a result of reaction with free radical and electrophilic aldehyde products of lipid peroxidation is believed to be involved; however, the genotoxic and mutation-inducing potential of specific membrane PUFAs remains poorly defined. In the present study we have examined the ability of peroxidizing arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4omega6) to induce DNA strand breaks, base modifications, and mutations. The time-dependent induction of single-strand breaks and oxidative base modifications by AA in genomic DNA was quantified using denaturing glyoxal gel electrophoresis. Mutation spectra were determined in XP-G fibroblasts and a repair-proficient line corrected for this defect by c-DNA complementation (XP-G(+)). Mutation frequencies were elevated from approximately 5- to 30-fold over the background following reaction of DNA with AA for various times. The XPG gene product was found to be involved in the suppression of mutations after extended reaction of DNA with AA. Arachidonic acid-induced base substitutions were consistent with the presence of both oxidized and aldehyde base adducts in DNA. The frequency of multiple-base substitutions induced by AA was significantly reduced upon correction for the XPG defect (14% vs 2%, P = 0.0015). Evidence is also presented which suggests that the induced frequency of multiple mutations is lesion dependent. These results are compared to published data for mutations stimulated by alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes identified as products of lipid peroxidation.

  5. Hepatitis C virus induces a mutator phenotype: enhanced mutations of immunoglobulin and protooncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Keigo; Cheng, Kevin T-N; Sung, Vicky M-H; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Lindsay, Karen L; Levine, Alexandra M; Lai, Ming-Yang; Lai, Michael M C

    2004-03-23

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a nonretroviral oncogenic RNA virus, which is frequently associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and B cell lymphoma. We demonstrated here that acute and chronic HCV infection caused a 5- to 10-fold increase in mutation frequency in Ig heavy chain, BCL-6, p53, and beta-catenin genes of in vitro HCV-infected B cell lines and HCV-associated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, lymphomas, and HCCs. The nucleotide-substitution pattern of p53 and beta-catenin was different from that of Ig heavy chain in HCV-infected cells, suggesting two different mechanisms of mutation. In addition, the mutated protooncogenes were amplified in HCV-associated lymphomas and HCCs, but not in lymphomas of nonviral origin or HBV-associated HCC. HCV induced error-prone DNA polymerase zeta, polymerase iota, and activation-induced cytidine deaminase, which together, contributed to the enhancement of mutation frequency, as demonstrated by the RNA interference experiments. These results indicate that HCV induces a mutator phenotype and may transform cells by a hit-and-run mechanism. This finding provides a mechanism of oncogenesis for an RNA virus.

  6. Precise excision of transposons and point mutations induced by chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina OYu; Mirskaya, E E; Andreeva, I V; Skavronskaya, A G

    1992-11-01

    The ability of 23 chemicals (carcinogens and non-carcinogens) to induce precise excision of Tn10 and point mutations was studied in experiments with a single strain. The mutation assay was shown to detect a wider spectrum of genotoxic agents than the assay of Tn10 precise excision. The latter was induced only by potent SOS mutagens, which is in accordance with data on the SOS dependence of the induction of precise excision of Tn10. The precise excision assay as an additional test contributing to the knowledge of particular features of the action of a tested mutagen is discussed. The induction of precise excision of Tn10 by pyrene (and its failure to induce point mutations in this strain) demonstrates the value of using the transposon excision assay in cases of 'problem' mutagens.

  7. Long QT syndrome mutation detection by SNaPshot technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, Jeanett; Schumann, Stefanie; Nastainczyk, Marina; Husser-Bollmann, Daniela; Lessig, Rüdiger

    2012-11-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac disorder with an abnormality of cardiac rhythm associated with sudden death especially in younger, apparently healthy individuals. If there is no clear cause of death detectable during comprehensive coroner's inquest (autopsy-negative cases), you have to consider LQTS and other heritable arrhythmia syndromes. A molecular genetic screening regarding mutations in associated genes can help to ensure the cause of death and to protect affected family members. Genetic testing of LQTS, currently performed mainly by sequencing, is still very expensive and time consuming. With this study we present a rapid and reasonable method for the simultaneously screening of some of the most common mutations associated with LQTS, focused on the KCNQ1 and KCNH2 genes. With the method of SNaPshot minisequencing, a total of 58 mutations were analyzed in four multiplex assays which were successfully established and optimized. The comparison with samples previously analyzed by direct sequencing showed concordance. Furthermore, autopsy-negative cases were tested but no mutations could be observed in any of the specimen. The presented method is well suitable for LQTS mutation screening. An enhancement to further mutations and population-based investigations regarding mutation frequencies should be the aim of prospective studies.

  8. Inflammation-Induced Cell Proliferation Potentiates DNA Damage-Induced Mutations In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, Orsolya; Gong, Guanyu; Olipitz, Werner; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations are a critical driver of cancer initiation. While extensive studies have focused on exposure-induced mutations, few studies have explored the importance of tissue physiology as a modulator of mutation susceptibility in vivo. Of particular interest is inflammation, a known cancer risk factor relevant to chronic inflammatory diseases and pathogen-induced inflammation. Here, we used the fluorescent yellow direct repeat (FYDR) mice that harbor a reporter to detect misalignments during homologous recombination (HR), an important class of mutations. FYDR mice were exposed to cerulein, a potent inducer of pancreatic inflammation. We show that inflammation induces DSBs (γH2AX foci) and that several days later there is an increase in cell proliferation. While isolated bouts of inflammation did not induce HR, overlap between inflammation-induced DNA damage and inflammation-induced cell proliferation induced HR significantly. To study exogenously-induced DNA damage, animals were exposed to methylnitrosourea, a model alkylating agent that creates DNA lesions relevant to both environmental exposures and cancer chemotherapy. We found that exposure to alkylation damage induces HR, and importantly, that inflammation-induced cell proliferation and alkylation induce HR in a synergistic fashion. Taken together, these results show that, during an acute bout of inflammation, there is a kinetic barrier separating DNA damage from cell proliferation that protects against mutations, and that inflammation-induced cell proliferation greatly potentiates exposure-induced mutations. These studies demonstrate a fundamental mechanism by which inflammation can act synergistically with DNA damage to induce mutations that drive cancer and cancer recurrence. PMID:25647331

  9. Sucrose and IQ induced mutations in rat colon by independent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Max; Hald, M. T.; Autrup, H.

    2004-01-01

    Sucrose-rich diets have repeatedly been observed to have co-carcinogenic actions in colon and liver of rats and to increase the number of 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) induced aberrant crypt foci in rat colon. To investigate a possible interaction between sucrose and IQ...... on the genotoxicity in rat liver and colon, we gave Big Blue rats(TM) a diet containing sucrose (0%, 3.45% or 13.4% w/w) and/or IQ (70 ppm) for a period of 3 weeks. Sucrose and IQ increased the mutation frequency in the colon. The effect of combined treatments with IQ and sucrose on the mutation frequencies...... was additive indicating that sucrose and IQ act independently. This was supported by the mutation spectra where sucrose expands the background mutations in the colon, whereas IQ, in other studies, more specifically has induced G:C --> T:A transversions. In the liver IQ increased the mutation frequency, whereas...

  10. Recent trends on crop genetic improvement using mutation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Siyong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    The radiation breeding technology has been significantly achieved on creation of mutation genetic resources of plants for commercial cultivation and genomic study since 1920s. According to the FAO-IAEA Mutant Variety Database, more than 2600 varieties have been released in the world. Induction of mutations with radiation has been the most frequently used by sources of X-ray and gamma ray, but in recent Japanese scientist have been used the heavy ion beam as a new radiation sources. And China has been made remarkable outcomes in the mutant creation using new space breeding technology since 1990s. In Korea, more about 40 varieties have been developed by using the mutation breeding method since the mid-1960s. Most of the released mutant varieties in Korea were food and oil seed crops, especially for improving agronomic traits such as yield, lodging tolerance, maturity, and functional compounds. Currently the mutation breeding program in Korea has assigned more resources to develop high functional crops and ornamental plants. These functional and ornamental plants are ideal systems for a mutation breeding. A research program for the development of potential varieties of flowering and ornamental crops as rose, chrysanthemum, lily, carnation, orchids, and wild flowers was started with financial support from the Bio green 21 project of Korean government. The potential outcomes from the program will be new highly valued-added varieties which will provide greater money gains to Korean farmers and lots of valued mutants used for a gene isolation of interest and reverse genetics or functional genomic. Scientific interest in mutation breeding has drastically be ed focused to the field of functional genomic. Scientific interest in mutation breeding has drastically be ed focused to the field of functional genomic after a completion of genome sequencing of some model plant species. A direct approach of discovering the function of a novel gene is to use a mutant which has altered

  11. Utilization of {gamma}-irradiation technique on plant mutation breeding and plant growth regulation in Tokyo Metropolitan Isotope Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suda, Hirokatsu [Tokyo Metropolitan Isotope Research Center (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    During about 30-years, we have developed {gamma}-irradiation technique and breeding back pruning method for the study of mutation breeding of ornamental plants. As a result, we have made a wide variety of new mutant lines in chrysanthemum, narcissus, begonia rex, begonia iron cross, winter daphne, zelkova, sweet-scented oleander, abelia, kobus, and have obtained 7 plant patents. By the use of {gamma}-irradiation to plant mutation breeding, we often observed that plants irradiated by low dose of {gamma}-rays showed superior or inferior growth than the of non-irradiated plants. Now, we established the irradiation conditions of {gamma}-rays for mutation breeding and growth of regulation in narcissus, tulip, Enkianthus perulatus Schneid., komatsuna, moyashi, african violet. In most cases, irradiation dose rate is suggested to be a more important factor to induce plant growth regulators than irradiation dose. (author)

  12. Aminoglycoside induced ototoxicity associated with mitochondrial DNA mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Foster II

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the risk of permanent ototoxic effects, aminoglycosides remain commonly utilized antibiotics worldwide due to low cost and efficiency in treating severe infections. Over the last two decades, mitochondrial mutations have been shown to enhance the likelihood of ototoxic injury. In particular the 1555A>G mutation in the mitochondrial gene MTRNR1 has been strongly associated with the onset of aminoglycoside-induced deafness; though pinning down the exact mechanism of action has thus far been elusive. Clinically aminoglycoside-induced deafness has been characterized by variation in the degree of hearing loss, which has prompted an investigation into genetic modifiers. To date, several putative mutations have been categorized as contributing factors to the onset of deafness with no single variation being sufficient to bring about hearing loss. Meanwhile current methods to mitigate the risk of ototoxic injury are in various stages of development. Efforts to alter the molecular structure of aminoglycosides have shown a potential path to reducing ototoxicity while preserving antibacterial properties, but these drugs are not clinically available. On the other hand, application of preemptive audiometry provides the most readily available method to both monitor and reduce the extent of aminoglycoside-induced deafness.

  13. Mutations induced in a shuttle vector plasmid exposed to monofunctionally activated mitomycin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccubbin, A E; Mudipalli, A; Nadadur, S S; Ersing, N; Gurtoo, H L

    1997-01-01

    Reductive activation of mitomycin C leads to its covalent binding to DNA, forming monoadducts and cross-links. The cytotoxicity of mitomycin C has been attributed to cross-link formation, whereas monoadducts are assumed to cause mutagenicity. We have developed a 32P-postlabeling technique to measure mitomycin C DNA adducts. Using this technique, we have measured monoadduct formation in the shuttle vector plasmid pSP189 and have determined mutations induced by monoadduct formation. The shuttle vector plasmid was incubated with mitomycin C under conditions favoring monofunctional activation of mitomycin C. The plasmid was then replicated in human Ad293 cells, rescued in bacteria, and analyzed for mutations in the supF tRNA gene sequence of pSP189. One major mitomycin C/DNA adduct was observed by 32P-postlabeling and was characterized as a monoadduct of guanine. When pSP189 was exposed to monofunctionally activated mitomycin C, increases in adduct levels and mutation frequency were found to be related to mitomycin C concentration. The majority of the mutations involved single bases, with base substitutions making up 59.1% of the total mutations observed. Of the base substitutions, 67.2% were transversions and 32.8% were transitions, with nearly 80% of all base substitutions involving G:C base pairs. Deletions, either as single bases or large deletions, also involved G:C base pairs the majority of the time. The observed bias of mutations at G:C and the formation of a mitomycin C/DNA monoadduct involving guanine suggests that monoadduct formation may be responsible for the mutations.

  14. A PCR based protocol for detecting indel mutations induced by TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Yu

    Full Text Available Genome editing techniques such as the zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcription activator-like effecter nucleases (TALENs and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated (Cas system Cas9 can induce efficient DNA double strand breaks (DSBs at the target genomic sequence and result in indel mutations by the error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ DNA repair system. Several methods including sequence specific endonuclease assay, T7E1 assay and high resolution melting curve assay (HRM etc have been developed to detect the efficiency of the induced mutations. However, these assays have some limitations in that they either require specific sequences in the target sites or are unable to generate sequencing-ready mutant DNA fragments or unable to distinguish induced mutations from natural nucleotide polymorphism. Here, we developed a simple PCR-based protocol for detecting indel mutations induced by TALEN and Cas9 in zebrafish. We designed 2 pairs of primers for each target locus, with one putative amplicon extending beyond the putative indel site and the other overlapping it. With these primers, we performed a qPCR assay to efficiently detect the frequencies of newly induced mutations, which was accompanied with a T-vector-based colony analysis to generate single-copy mutant fragment clones for subsequent DNA sequencing. Thus, our work has provided a very simple, efficient and fast assay for detecting induced mutations, which we anticipate will be widely used in the area of genome editing.

  15. The nature of mutations induced by replication–transcription collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, T Sabari; Wastuwidyaningtyas, Brigitta D; Dong, Yuexin; Lewis, Sarah A; Wang, Jue D

    2016-07-01

    The DNA replication and transcription machineries share a common DNA template and thus can collide with each other co-directionally or head-on. Replication–transcription collisions can cause replication fork arrest, premature transcription termination, DNA breaks, and recombination intermediates threatening genome integrity. Collisions may also trigger mutations, which are major contributors to genetic disease and evolution. However, the nature and mechanisms of collision-induced mutagenesis remain poorly understood. Here we reveal the genetic consequences of replication–transcription collisions in actively dividing bacteria to be two classes of mutations: duplications/deletions and base substitutions in promoters. Both signatures are highly deleterious but are distinct from the previously well-characterized base substitutions in the coding sequence. Duplications/deletions are probably caused by replication stalling events that are triggered by collisions; their distribution patterns are consistent with where the fork first encounters a transcription complex upon entering a transcription unit. Promoter substitutions result mostly from head-on collisions and frequently occur at a nucleotide that is conserved in promoters recognized by the major σ factor in bacteria. This substitution is generated via adenine deamination on the template strand in the promoter open complex, as a consequence of head-on replication perturbing transcription initiation. We conclude that replication–transcription collisions induce distinct mutation signatures by antagonizing replication and transcription, not only in coding sequences but also in gene regulatory elements.

  16. Vacuum-induced Mutations In Bacillus Subtilis Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakata, N.; Maeda, M.; Hieda, K.

    During irradiation experiments with vacuum-UV radiation using synchrotron sources, we made unexpected observation that Bacillus subtilis spores of several recombination-deficient strains lost colony-forming ability by the exposure to high vacuum alone. Since this suggested the possible injury in spore DNA, we looked for mutation induction using the spores of strains HA101 (wild-type repair capability) and TKJ6312 (excision and spore repair deficient) that did not lose survivability. It was found that the frequency of nalidixic-acid resistant mutation increased several times in both of these strains by the exposure to high vacuum (10e-4 Pa after 24 hours). The analysis of sequence changes in gyrA gene showed that the majority of mutations carried a unique allele (gyrA12) of tandem double-base substitutions from CA to TT. The observation has been extended to rifampicin resistant mutations, the majority of that carried substitutions from CA to TT or AT in rpoB gene. On the other hand, when the spores of strains PS578 and PS2319 (obtained from P. Setlow) that are defective in a group of small acidic proteins (alpha/beta-type SASP) were similarly treated, none of the mutants analyzed carried such changes. This suggests that the unique mutations might be induced by the interaction of small acidic proteins with spore DNA under forced dehydration. The results indicate that extreme vacuum causes severe damage in spore DNA, and provide additional constraint to the long-term survival of bacterial spores in the space environment.

  17. Status of biotechnology with emphasis on molecular techniques for mutation breeding in the Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapade, A.G.; Nazarea, T.Y.; Veluz, A.M.S.; Marbella, L.J.; Nato, A.Q.; Coloma, C.B. Jr.; Asencion, A.B. [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Commonwealth Avenue, Quezon (Philippines)

    2002-02-01

    This paper summarizes the status of biotechnology with emphasis on molecular techniques for plant breeding in the Philippines. Several molecular and in-vitro culture techniques are integrated in plant breeding for crop improvement at PNRI, UPLB, IRRI and PhilRice. At IRRI, PCR techniques, RFLP and RAPD, PCR techniques, RFLP and RAPD were developed to establish high density molecular maps, determine breadth and diversity of germplasm and characterize alien introgression. The molecular maps have identified DNA sequence of resistance genes of HYVs and NPTs to abiotic and biotic stresses, the major achievement is the development of high density molecular maps in rice with at least 2000 markers. The biotechnology program at PhilRice for varietal improvement includes: (1) utilization of molecular marker technology such gene mapping of desired traits in rice, analysis of genetic relationships of germplasm materials and breeding lines through DNA fingerprinting and genetic diversity studies and development and application of marker aided selection for disease resistance (RTD and BLB); (2) application of in-vitro techniques in the development of lines with tolerance to adverse conditions; (3) molecular cloning of important genes for RTD resistance; (4) genetic transformation for male sterility and resistance to sheath blight and stem borers; and (5) transfer of disease resistance from wild species to cultivated varieties. In IPB, molecular markers:microsatellites or SSR, AFLP and RGA are being used for mapping and diversity studies in coconut, mango, banana, mungbean, corn and tomato. Mutation breeding at PNRI using gamma radiation has resulted in the development of crop varieties with desirable traits. The use of AFLP coupled to PCR is being used to study polymorphism in plant variants of radiation-induced mutants of rice, pineapple and ornamentals. (author)

  18. Induced Mutations Unleash the Potentials of Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikelu Mba

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The options for increasing food production by at least 70% over the next four decades so as to keep pace with a rapidly increasing human population are bedeviled by erratic climatic conditions, depleted arable lands, dwindling water resources and by the significant environmental and health costs for increasing the use of agrochemicals. Enhanced productivities through “smart” crop varieties that yield more with fewer inputs is a viable option. However, the genetic similarities amongst crop varieties—which render entire cropping systems vulnerable to the same stresses—coupled with unvarying parental materials limit the possibilities for uncovering novel alleles of genes and, hence, assembling new gene combinations to break yield plateaux and enhance resilience. Induced mutation unmasks novel alleles that are harnessed to breed superior crop varieties. The historical antecedents, theoretical and practical considerations, and the successes of induced mutations in crop improvement are reviewed along with how induced mutagenesis underpins plant functional genomics. The roles of cell and molecular biology techniques in enhancing the efficiencies for the induction, detection and deployment of mutation events are also reviewed. Also, the integration of phenomics into induced mutagenesis and the use of pre-breeding for facilitating the incorporation of mutants into crop improvement are advocated.

  19. Nucleic acid template and the risk of a PCR-Induced HIV-1 drug resistance mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vici Varghese

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The HIV-1 nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI-resistance mutation, K65R confers intermediate to high-level resistance to the NRTIs abacavir, didanosine, emtricitabine, lamivudine, and tenofovir; and low-level resistance to stavudine. Several lines of evidence suggest that K65R is more common in HIV-1 subtype C than subtype B viruses. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS and clonal dideoxynucleotide sequencing of plasma virus samples to assess the prevalence of minority K65R variants in subtype B and C viruses from untreated individuals. Although UDPS of plasma samples from 18 subtype C and 27 subtype B viruses showed that a higher proportion of subtype C viruses contain K65R (1.04% vs. 0.25%; p1.5% of UDPS reads. We therefore performed UDPS on clones and site-directed mutants containing subtype B- and C-specific patterns of silent mutations in the conserved KKK motif encompassing RT codons 64 to 66 and found that subtype-specific nucleotide differences were responsible for increased PCR-induced K65R mutation in subtype C viruses. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the RT KKK nucleotide template in subtype C viruses can lead to the spurious detection of K65R by highly sensitive PCR-dependent sequencing techniques. However, the study is also consistent with the subtype C nucleotide template being inherently responsible for increased polymerization-induced K65R mutations in vivo.

  20. Solar-UV-signature mutation prefers TCG to CCG: extrapolative consideration from UVA1-induced mutation spectra in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehata, Hironobu; Kumagai, Jun; Ono, Tetsuya; Morita, Akimichi

    2013-08-01

    UVA1 exerts its genotoxicity on mammalian skin by producing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in DNA and preferentially inducing solar-UV-signature mutations, C → T base substitution mutations at methylated CpG-associated dipyrimidine (Py-mCpG) sites, as demonstrated previously using a 364 nm laser as a UVA1 source and lacZ-transgenic mice that utilize the transgene as a mutational reporter. In the present study, we confirmed that a broadband UVA1 source induced the same mutation profiles in mouse epidermis as the UVA1 laser, generalizing the previous result from a single 364 nm to a wider wavelength range of UVA1 (340-400 nm). Combined with our previous data on the mutation spectra induced in mouse epidermis by UVB, UVA2 and solar UVR, we proved that the solar-UV-signature mutation is commonly observed in the wavelength range from UVB to UVA, and found that UVA1 induces this mutation more preferentially than the other shorter wavelength ranges. This finding indicates that the solar-UV-signature mutation-causing CPDs, which are known to prefer Py-mCpG sites, could be produced with the energy provided by the longer wavelength region of UVR, suggesting a photochemical reaction through the excitation of pyrimidine bases to energy states that can be accomplished by absorption of even low-energy UVR. On the other hand, the lower proportions of solar-UV-signature mutations observed in the mutation spectra for UVB and solar UVR indicate that the direct photochemical reaction through excited singlet state of pyrimidine bases, which can be accomplished only by high-energy UVR, is also involved in the mutation induction at those shorter wavelengths of UVR. We also found that the solar-UV signature prefers 5'-TCG-3' to 5'-CCG-3' as mutational target sites, consistent with the fact that UVA induces CPDs selectively at thymine-containing dipyrimidine sites and that solar UVR induces them preferably at Py-mCpG sites. However, the mutation spectrum in human p53 gene from non

  1. The analysis of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene mutations by sequencing and ARMS techniques in Turkish patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umit Luleyap

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Phenylketonuria is an autosomal recessive deficiency of the hepatic enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. With this study, detection of the most frequent phenylalanine hydroxylase gene mutations in Turkish population is aimed. Material and Methods: 23 unrelated phenylketonuria patients (46 alleles who are living in Cukurova region, Turkey were investigated.First, all exons were screened by using DHPLC method then the direct sequencing technique and ARMS methods were used to analyze mutation suspected samples. Results: IVS10-11g and #61614;a splicing mutation in 27 alleles (58.7%, R261Q mutation in 7 alleles (15.2% and E178G, P281L, R243X, R243Q, R408W, Y386C mutations, all in a frequency of 2/46 (4.3% is found. Conclusion: The arginine amino acid, accounting for 68.4% of changes in exon sites 7 and 12, where R243X, R243Q, R261Q and R408W mutations occur, is thought to be important for amino acid changes in phenylalanine hydroxylase gene among phenylketonuria patients in Cukurova region. Single-base mutations like IVS10-11g and #61614;a and P281L could be detected with an accuracy of 100% by the use of specifically designed primers by authors according to ARMS technique and it is relatively cheaper and requesting less technical equipment. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(4.000: 702-708

  2. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Contributes to Pancreatic Tumorigenesis by Inducing Tumor-Related Gene Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawai, Yugo; Kodama, Yuzo; Shimizu, Takahiro; Ota, Yuji; Maruno, Takahisa; Eso, Yuji; Kurita, Akira; Shiokawa, Masahiro; Tsuji, Yoshihisa; Uza, Norimitsu; Matsumoto, Yuko; Masui, Toshihiko; Uemoto, Shinji; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2015-08-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) develops via an accumulation of various gene mutations. The mechanism underlying the mutations in PDAC development, however, is not fully understood. Recent insight into the close association between the mutation pattern of various cancers and specific mutagens led us to investigate the possible involvement of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a DNA editing enzyme, in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Our immunohistochemical findings revealed AID protein expression in human acinar ductal metaplasia, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and PDAC. Both the amount and intensity of the AID protein expression increased with the progression from precancerous to cancerous lesions in human PDAC tissues. To further assess the significance of ectopic epithelial AID expression in pancreatic tumorigenesis, we analyzed the phenotype of AID transgenic (AID Tg) mice. Consistent with our hypothesis that AID is involved in the mechanism of the mutations underlying pancreatic tumorigenesis, we found precancerous lesions developing in the pancreas of AID Tg mice. Using deep sequencing, we also detected Kras and c-Myc mutations in our analysis of the whole pancreas of AID Tg mice. In addition, Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of Kras, c-Myc, and Smad4 mutations, with the typical mutational footprint of AID in precancerous lesions in AID Tg mice separated by laser capture microdissection. Taken together, our findings suggest that AID contributes to the development of pancreatic precancerous lesions by inducing tumor-related gene mutations. Our new mouse model without intentional manipulation of specific tumor-related genes provides a powerful system for analyzing the mutations involved in PDAC.

  3. [The quantitative testing of V617F mutation in gen JAK2 using pyrosequencing technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaeva, E A; Mironov, K O; Dribnokhodova, T E; Subbotina, E E; Bashmakova; Ol'hovskiĭ, I A; Shipulin, G A

    2014-11-01

    The somatic mutation V617F in gen JAK2 is a frequent cause of chronic myeloprolific diseases not conditioned by BCR/ABL mutation. The quantitative testing of relative percentage of mutant allele can be used in establishing severity of disease and its prognosis and in prescription of remedy inhibiting activity of JAK2. To quantitatively test mutation the pyrosequencing technique was applied. The developed technique permits detecting and quantitatively, testing percentage of mutation fraction since 7%. The "gray zone" is presented by samples with percentage of mutant allele from 4% to 7%. The dependence of expected percentage of mutant fraction in analyzed sample from observed value of signal is described by equation of line with regression coefficients y = - 0.97, x = -1.32 and at that measurement uncertainty consists ± 0.7. The developed technique is approved officially on clinical material from 192 patients with main forms of myeloprolific diseases not conditioned by BCR/ABL mutation. It was detected 64 samples with mautant fraction percentage from 13% to 91%. The developed technique permits implementing monitoring of therapy of myeloprolific diseases and facilitates to optimize tactics of treatment.

  4. Molecular characterization of microbial mutations induced by ion beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichida, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510 (Japan); Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)], E-mail: ichida@riken.jp; Matsuyama, Tomoki [Cellular Biochemistry Laboratory, Discovery Research Institute, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ryuto, Hiromichi [Accelerator Operation Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hayashi, Yoriko [Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Fukunishi, Nobuhisa [Accelerator Operation Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Abe, Tomoko [Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Koba, Takato [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510 (Japan)

    2008-03-01

    A positive selection system for gene disruption using a sucrose-sensitive transgenic rhizobium was established and used for the molecular characterization of mutations induced by ion beam irradiations. Single nucleotide substitutions, insertions, and deletions were found to occur in the sucrose sensitivity gene, sacB, when the reporter line was irradiated with highly accelerated carbon and iron ion beams. In all of the insertion lines, fragments of essentially the same sequence and of approximately 1188 bp in size were identified in the sacB regions. In the deletion lines, iron ions showed a tendency to induce larger deletions than carbon ions, suggesting that higher LET beams cause larger deletions. We found also that ion beams, particularly 'heavier' ion beams, can produce single gene disruptions and may present an effective alternative to transgenic approaches.

  5. KRAS mutation: comparison of testing methods and tissue sampling techniques in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Wilbur A; Haney, Jerry; Sugita, Michio; Bemis, Lynne; Jimeno, Antonio; Messersmith, Wells A

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of colon carcinoma with the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody Cetuximab is reported to be ineffective in KRAS-mutant tumors. Mutation testing techniques have therefore become an urgent concern. We have compared three methods for detecting KRAS mutations in 59 cases of colon carcinoma: 1) high resolution melting, 2) the amplification refractory mutation system using a bifunctional self-probing primer (ARMS/Scorpion, ARMS/S), and 3) direct sequencing. We also evaluated the effects of the methods of sectioning and coring of paraffin blocks to obtain tumor DNA on assay sensitivity and specificity. The most sensitive and specific combination of block sampling and mutational analysis was ARMS/S performed on DNA derived from 1-mm paraffin cores. This combination of tissue sampling and testing method detected KRAS mutations in 46% of colon tumors. Four samples were positive by ARMS/S, but initially negative by direct sequencing. Cloned DNA samples were retested by direct sequencing, and in all four cases KRAS mutations were identified in the DNA. In six cases, high resolution melting abnormalities could not be confirmed as specific mutations either by ARMS/S or direct sequencing. We conclude that coring of the paraffin blocks and testing by ARMS/S is a sensitive, specific, and efficient method for KRAS testing.

  6. Mutations induced by dacarbazine activated with cytochrome P-450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudipalli, A; Nadadur, S S; Maccubbin, A E; Gurtoo, H L

    1995-03-01

    The mutagenicity of the antitumor drug dacarbazine (DTIC) is due to alkylation of cellular DNA by metabolites resulting from the metabolism of this drug by the mixed function oxidase system. In the present study, we used an in vitro shuttle vector assay to study the base and sequence specificity of mutagenesis by DTIC. The shuttle vector plasmid pSP189 was treated with DTIC (1-2.5 mM) in vitro in a reconstituted cytochrome P-450 system at 37 degrees C for either 30 or 60 min. SupF tRNA gene insert contained in the plasmid was sequenced after replication of the drug-treated plasmid in human Ad 293 cells followed by amplification in indicator bacteria. Mutagenesis of DTIC in this system was dependent upon the presence of the cytochrome P-450 reconstituted system and NADPH. Mutations induced by DTIC included single base substitutions (35%), single base deletions (30.5%), single base insertions (19.4%) and large deletions (13.8%). Among the substitutions, transversions and transitions were in the ratio of 1:0.7. Base pairs 108 and 127 in the SupF tRNA of the pSP189 were identified as mutational hot spots.

  7. DNA sequence analysis of X-ray induced Adh null mutations in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, J.; Fossett, N.G.; Arbour-Reily, P.; McDaniel, M.; Tucker, A.; Chang, S.H.; Lee, W.R. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The mutational spectrum for 28 X-ray induced mutations and 2 spontaneous mutations, previously determined by genetic and cytogenetic methods, consisted of 20 multilocus deficiencies (19 induced and 1 spontaneous) and 10 intragenic mutations (9 induced and 1 spontaneous). One of the X-ray induced intragenic mutations was lost, and another was determined to be a recombinant with the allele used in the recovery scheme. The DNA sequence of two X-ray induced intragenic mutations has been published. This paper reports the results of DNA sequence analysis of the remaining intragenic mutations and a summary of the X-ray induced mutational spectrum. The combination of DNA sequence analysis with genetic complementation analysis shows a continuous distribution in size of deletions rather than two different types of mutations consisting of deletions and point mutations'. Sequencing is shown to be essential for detecting intragenic deletions. Of particular importance for future studies is the observation that all of the intragenic deletions consist of a direct repeat adjacent to the breakpoint with one of the repeats deleted.

  8. Identification of pathways controlling DNA damage induced mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, Ewa T; O'Neill, Bryan M; Gil-Lamaignere, Cristina; Chin, Jodie K; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2008-05-01

    Mutation in response to most types of DNA damage is thought to be mediated by the error-prone sub-branch of post-replication repair and the associated translesion synthesis polymerases. To further understand the mutagenic response to DNA damage, we screened a collection of 4848 haploid gene deletion strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for decreased damage-induced mutation of the CAN1 gene. Through extensive quantitative validation of the strains identified by the screen, we identified ten genes, which included error-prone post-replication repair genes known to be involved in induced mutation, as well as two additional genes, FYV6 and RNR4. We demonstrate that FYV6 and RNR4 are epistatic with respect to induced mutation, and that they function, at least partially, independently of post-replication repair. This pathway of induced mutation appears to be mediated by an increase in dNTP levels that facilitates lesion bypass by the replicative polymerase Pol delta, and it is as important as error-prone post-replication repair in the case of UV- and MMS-induced mutation, but solely responsible for EMS-induced mutation. We show that Rnr4/Pol delta-induced mutation is efficiently inhibited by hydroxyurea, a small molecule inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, suggesting that if similar pathways exist in human cells, intervention in some forms of mutation may be possible.

  9. DNMT3A GENE POINT MUTATIONS DETECTION IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA PATIENTS USING SEQUENCING TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vinogradov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to estimate the frequency of DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 point mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients (pts using target automatic sequencing technique.Material and Methods. Bone marrow and peripheral blood samples were obtained from 34 AML pts aged 21 to 64, who were treated in Sverdlovsk Regional Hematological Centre (Ekaterinburg during the period 2012–2014. Distribution of the pts according to FAB-classification was as follows: AML M0 – 3, M1 – 1, M2 – 12, M3 – 3, M4 – 10, M5 – 2, M6 – 1, M7 – 1, blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm – 1. Total RNA was extracted from leukemic cells and subjected to reverse transcription. DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 were amplified by PCR. Detection of mutations in DNMT3A gene was performed by direct sequencing. Sequencing was realized using an automatic genetic analyzer ABI Prism 310.Results. The average frequency of functionally significant point mutations in DNMT3A gene exons 18– 26 among the treated AML pts was 5.9%. They were detected in morphological subgroups M2 and M4(according to WHO classification. The average frequency of DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 point mutations among the AML M2 and M4 pts without chromosomal aberrations and TP53 gene point mutations was 14.3%. In both cases there were samples in which DNMT3A gene mutations were accompanied by molecular lesions of NPM1, KRAS and WT1 genes. AML pts with DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 point mutations characterized by poor response to standard chemotherapeutic regimens and unfavorable prognosis.

  10. A rapid method for detection of five known mutations associated with aminoglycoside-induced deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greinwald John H

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background South Africa has one of the highest incidences of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB in the world. Concomitantly, aminoglycosides are commonly used in this country as a treatment against MDR-TB. To date, at least five mutations are known to confer susceptibility to aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. The aim of the present study was to develop a rapid screening method to determine whether these mutations are present in the South African population. Methods A multiplex method using the SNaPshot technique was used to screen for five mutations in the MT-RNR1 gene: A1555G, C1494T, T1095C, 961delT+C(n and A827G. A total of 204 South African control samples, comprising 98 Mixed ancestry and 106 Black individuals were screened for the presence of the five mutations. Results A robust, cost-effective method was developed that detected the presence of all five sequence variants simultaneously. In this pilot study, the A1555G mutation was identified at a frequency of 0.9% in the Black control samples. The 961delT+C(n variant was present in 6.6% of the Black controls and 2% of the Mixed ancestry controls. The T1095C, C1494T and A827G variants were not identified in any of the study participants. Conclusion The frequency of 0.9% for the A1555G mutation in the Black population in South Africa is of concern given the high incidence of MDR-TB in this particular ethnic group. Future larger studies are warranted to determine the true frequencies of the aminoglycoside deafness mutations in the general South African population. The high frequencies of the 961delT+C(n variant observed in the controls suggest that this change is a common non-pathogenic polymorphism. This genetic method facilitates the identification of individuals at high risk of developing hearing loss prior to the start of aminoglycoside therapy. This is important in a low-resource country like South Africa where, despite their adverse side-effects, aminoglycosides will

  11. Specificity of mutations induced by carbon ions in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matuo, Youichirou [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nishijima, Shigehiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Hase, Yoshihiro [Radiation-Applied Biology Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Watanuki-machi 1233, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Sakamoto, Ayako [Radiation-Applied Biology Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Watanuki-machi 1233, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Tanaka, Atsushi [Radiation-Applied Biology Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Watanuki-machi 1233, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Shimizu, Kikuo [Radioisotope Research Center, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-4, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)]. E-mail: shimizu@rirc.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-01

    To investigate the nature of mutations induced by accelerated ions in eukaryotic cells, the effects of carbon-ion irradiation were compared with those of {gamma}-ray irradiation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mutational effect and specificity of carbon-ion beams were studied in the URA3 gene of the yeast. Our experiments showed that the carbon ions generated more than 10 times the number of mutations induced by {gamma}-rays, and that the types of base changes induced by carbon ions include transversions (68.7%), transitions (13.7%) and deletions/insertions (17.6%). The transversions were mainly G:C {sup {yields}} T:A, and all the transitions were G:C {sup {yields}} A:T. In comparison with the surrounding sequence context of mutational base sites, the C residues in the 5'-AC(A/T)-3' sequence were found to be easily changed. Large deletions and duplications were not observed, whereas ion-induced mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana were mainly short deletions and rearrangements. The remarkable feature of yeast mutations induced by carbon ions was that the mutation sites were localized near the linker regions of nucleosomes, whereas mutations induced by {gamma}-ray irradiation were located uniformly throughout the gene.

  12. TP53 mutations predict decitabine-induced complete responses in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Kang; Zhao, You-Shan; Xu, Feng; Guo, Juan; Zhang, Zheng; He, Qi; Wu, Dong; Wu, Ling-Yun; Su, Ji-Ying; Song, Lu-Xi; Xiao, Chao; Li, Xiao

    2017-02-01

    To identify the molecular signatures that predict responses to decitabine (DAC), we examined baseline gene mutations (28 target genes) in 109 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients at diagnosis. We determined that TP53 mutations predicted complete response (CR), as 10 of 15 patients (66·7%) who possessed TP53 mutations achieved a CR. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that TP53 mutations are the only molecular signatures predictive of a CR to DAC in MDS. Among the ten patients with TP53 mutations who achieved a CR, nine presented with complex karyotypes due to abnormalities involving chromosome 5 and/or chromosome 7, and eight possessed monosomies. Although TP53 mutations were associated with a higher frequency of CRs, they were not associated with improved survival. Poor outcomes were attributed to early relapses and transformation to acute myeloid leukaemia after CR. Post-DAC therapy patient gene mutation profiles showed that most CR patients exhibited fewer gene mutations after achieving a CR. It seems that suppression of these gene mutations was facilitated by DAC, resulting in a CR. In summary, TP53 mutations might predict decitabine-induced complete responses in patients with MDS. DAC-induced responses may result from partial suppression of malignant clones containing mutated TP53 genes.

  13. Development of herbicide resistant crops through induced mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rizwan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Herbicide resistance is an innate characteristic of crop plants. It enables them to survive and propagate even in the presence of lethal doses of herbicides in the surroundings. Genetic tolerance in crops towards herbicides may have several benefits. It may increases safety margins between weed and crop sensitivity and also expands applicability of a particular herbicide. Besides, it can also lower the operating cost for weed control as compared to manual weeding and crop rotation which is normally prohibited by herbicide persistence. Herbicide resistant crops are developed through transformation of a plant with either native or mutant resistant genes, seed mutagenesis, plant cell or tissue culture and through other traditional plant breeding techniques. Seed mutagenesis is a non-transgenic approach, which is found to be most economical and perfect approach. Moreover, all commercial herbicide tolerant crops were derived from single nucleotide substitution of genes and trait can be incorporated into elite varieties because of incomplete dominance and non-pleiotropic effect of the alleles of all commercial herbicide tolerant mutations.

  14. Insight on Mutation-Induced Resistance from Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Native and Mutated CSF-1R and KIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva Figueiredo Celestino Gomes, Priscila; Chauvot De Beauchêne, Isaure; Panel, Nicolas; Lopez, Sophie; De Sepulveda, Paulo; Geraldo Pascutti, Pedro; Solary, Eric; Tchertanov, Luba

    2016-01-01

    The receptors tyrosine kinases (RTKs) for the colony stimulating factor-1, CSF-1R, and for the stem cell factor, SCFR or KIT, are important mediators of signal transduction. The abnormal function of these receptors, promoted by gain-of-function mutations, leads to their constitutive activation, associated with cancer or other proliferative diseases. A secondary effect of the mutations is the alteration of receptors’ sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, compromising effectiveness of these molecules in clinical treatment. In particular, the mutation V560G in KIT increases its sensitivity to Imatinib, while the D816V in KIT, and D802V in CSF-1R, triggers resistance to the drug. We analyzed the Imatinib binding affinity to the native and mutated KIT (mutations V560G, S628N and D816V) and CSF-1R (mutation D802V) by using molecular dynamics simulations and energy calculations of Imatinib•target complexes. Further, we evaluated the sensitivity of the studied KIT receptors to Imatinib by measuring the inhibition of KIT phosphorylation. Our study showed that (i) the binding free energy of Imatinib to the targets is highly correlated with their experimentally measured sensitivity; (ii) the electrostatic interactions are a decisive factor affecting the binding energy; (iii) the most deleterious impact to the Imatinib sensitivity is promoted by D802V (CSF-1R) and D816V (KIT) mutations; (iv) the role of the juxtamembrane region, JMR, in the imatinib binding is accessory. These findings contribute to a better description of the mutation-induced effects alternating the targets sensitivity to Imatinib. PMID:27467080

  15. The effect of induced mutations on quantitative traits in Arabidopsis thaliana: Natural versus artificial conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Frank W; Fenster, Charles B

    2016-12-01

    Mutations are the ultimate source of all genetic variations. New mutations are expected to affect quantitative traits differently depending on the extent to which traits contribute to fitness and the environment in which they are tested. The dogma is that the preponderance of mutations affecting fitness will be skewed toward deleterious while their effects on nonfitness traits will be bidirectionally distributed. There are mixed views on the role of stress in modulating these effects. We quantify mutation effects by inducing mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia accession) using the chemical ethylmethane sulfonate. We measured the effects of new mutations relative to a premutation founder for fitness components under both natural (field) and artificial (growth room) conditions. Additionally, we measured three other quantitative traits, not expected to contribute directly to fitness, under artificial conditions. We found that induced mutations were equally as likely to increase as decrease a trait when that trait was not closely related to fitness (traits that were neither survivorship nor reproduction). We also found that new mutations were more likely to decrease fitness or fitness-related traits under more stressful field conditions than under relatively benign artificial conditions. In the benign condition, the effect of new mutations on fitness components was similar to traits not as closely related to fitness. These results highlight the importance of measuring the effects of new mutations on fitness and other traits under a range of conditions.

  16. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2α Mutation-Related Paragangliomas Classify as Discrete Pseudohypoxic Subcluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M.J. Fliedner (Stephanie); U. Shankavaram (Uma); Marzouca, G. (Geena); Elkahloun, A. (Abdel); Jochmanova, I. (Ivana); Daerr, R. (Roland); Linehan, W.M. (W. Marston); H.J. Timmers (Henri); A.S. Tischler (Arthur); K. Papaspyrou (Konstantinos); Brieger, J. (Jürgen); R.R. de Krijger (Ronald); Breza, J. (Jan); Eisenhofer, G. (Graeme); Zhuang, Z. (Zhengping); Lehnert, H. (Hendrik); K. Pacak (Karel)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractRecently, activating mutations of the hypoxia-inducible factor 2α gene (HIF2A/EPAS1) have been recognized to predispose to multiple paragangliomas (PGLs) and duodenal somatostatinomas associated with polycythemia, and ocular abnormalities. Previously, mutations in the SDHA/B/C/D, SDHAF2,

  17. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2alpha Mutation-Related Paragangliomas Classify as Discrete Pseudohypoxic Subcluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fliedner, S.M.; Shankavaram, U.; Marzouca, G.; Elkahloun, A.; Jochmanova, I.; Daerr, R.; Linehan, W.M.; Timmers, H.J.; Tischler, A.S.; Papaspyrou, K.; Brieger, J.; Krijger, R. de; Breza, J.; Eisenhofer, G.; Zhuang, Z.; Lehnert, H.; Pacak, K.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, activating mutations of the hypoxia-inducible factor 2alpha gene (HIF2A/EPAS1) have been recognized to predispose to multiple paragangliomas (PGLs) and duodenal somatostatinomas associated with polycythemia, and ocular abnormalities. Previously, mutations in the SDHA/B/C/D, SDHAF2, VHL,

  18. Induced mutations in yeast cell populations adapting to an unforeseen challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lindsay S; Wei, Wu; Stolovicki, Elad; Benbenishty, Tamar; Wilkening, Stefan; Steinmetz, Lars M; Braun, Erez; David, Lior

    2014-01-01

    The modern evolutionary synthesis assumes that mutations occur at random, independently of the environment in which they confer an advantage. However, there are indications that cells facing challenging conditions can adapt rapidly, utilizing processes beyond selection of pre-existing genetic variation. Here, we show that a strong regulatory challenge can induce mutations in many independent yeast cells, in the absence of general mutagenesis. Whole genome sequencing of cell lineages reveals a repertoire of independent mutations within a single lineage that arose only after the cells were exposed to the challenging environment, while other cells in the same lineage adapted without any mutation in their genomes. Thus, our experiments uncovered multiple alternative routes for heritable adaptation that were all induced in the same lineage during a short time period. Our results demonstrate the existence of adaptation mechanisms beyond random mutation, suggesting a tight connection between physiological and genetic processes.

  19. Implementation of two high through-put techniques in a novel application: detecting point mutations in large EMS mutated plant populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Loo Eibertus N

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The establishment of mutant populations together with the strategies for targeted mutation detection has been applied successfully to a large number of organisms including many species in the plant kingdom. Considerable efforts have been invested into research on tomato as a model for berry-fruit plants. With the progress of the tomato sequencing project, reverse genetics becomes an obvious and achievable goal. Results Here we describe the treatment of Solanum lycopersicum seeds with 1% EMS and the development of a new mutated tomato population. To increase targeted mutant detection throughput an automated seed DNA extraction has been combined with novel mutation detection platforms for TILLING in plants. We have adapted two techniques used in human genetic diagnostics: Conformation Sensitive Capillary Electrophoresis (CSCE and High Resolution DNA Melting Analysis (HRM to mutation screening in DNA pools. Classical TILLING involves critical and time consuming steps such as endonuclease digestion reactions and gel electrophoresis runs. Using CSCE or HRM, the only step required is a simple PCR before either capillary electrophoresis or DNA melting curve analysis. Here we describe the development of a mutant tomato population, the setting up of two polymorphism detection platforms for plants and the results of the first screens as mutation density in the populations and estimation of the false-positives rate when using HRM to screen DNA pools. Conclusion These results demonstrate that CSCE and HRM are fast, affordable and sensitive techniques for mutation detection in DNA pools and therefore allow the rapid identification of new allelic variants in a mutant population. Results from the first screens indicate that the mutagen treatment has been effective with an average mutation detection rate per diploid genome of 1.36 mutation/kb/1000 lines.

  20. Cellular and deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss – A common hereditary deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C Wingard

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss due to mutations in the connexin gene family which encodes gap junctional proteins is a common form of hereditary deafness. In particular, connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2 mutations are responsible for ~50% of nonsyndromic hearing loss, which is the highest incidence of genetic disease. In the clinic, Cx26 mutations cause various auditory phenotypes ranging from profound congenital deafness at birth to mild, progressive hearing loss in late childhood. Recent experiments demonstrate that congenital deafness mainly results from cochlear developmental disorders rather than hair cell degeneration and endocochlear potential (EP reduction, while late-onset hearing loss results from reduction of active cochlear amplification, even though cochlear hair cells have no connexin expression. Moreover, new experiments further demonstrate that the hypothesized K+-recycling disruption is not a principal deafness mechanism for connexin deficiency induced hearing loss. Additionally, there is no clear relationship between specific changes in connexin (channel functions and the phenotypes of mutation-induced hearing loss. Cx30, Cx29, Cx31, and Cx43 mutations can also cause hearing loss with distinct pathological changes in the cochlea. These new studies provide invaluable information about deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss and also provide important information for developing new protective and therapeutic strategies for this common deafness. However, the detailed cellular mechanisms underlying these pathological changes and pathogeneses of specific-mutation induced hearing loss remain unclear. Finally, little information is available for humans. Further studies to address these deficiencies are urgently required.

  1. Target cell APOBEC3C can induce limited G-to-A mutation in HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaoula Bourara

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The evolutionary success of primate lentiviruses reflects their high capacity to mutate and adapt to new host species, immune responses within individual hosts, and, in recent years, antiviral drugs. APOBEC3G (A3G and APOBEC3F (A3F are host cell DNA-editing enzymes that induce extensive HIV-1 mutation that severely attenuates viral replication. The HIV-1 virion infectivity factor (Vif, expressed in vivo, counteracts the antiviral activity of A3G and A3F by inducing their degradation. Other APOBECs may contribute more to viral diversity by inducing less extensive mutations allowing viral replication to persist. Here we show that in APOBEC3C (A3C-expressing cells infected with the patient-derived HIV-1 molecular clones 210WW, 210WM, 210MW, and 210MM, and the lab-adapted molecular clone LAI, viral G-to-A mutations were detected in the presence of Vif expression. Mutations occurred primarily in the GA context and were relatively infrequent, thereby allowing for spreading infection. The mutations were absent in cells lacking A3C but were induced after transient expression of A3C in the infected target cell. Inhibiting endogenous A3C by RNA interference in Magi cells prevented the viral mutations. Thus, A3C is necessary and sufficient for G-to-A mutations in some HIV-1 strains. A3C-induced mutations occur at levels that allow replication to persist and may therefore contribute to viral diversity. Developing drugs that inhibit A3C may be a novel strategy for delaying viral escape from immune or antiretroviral inhibition.

  2. Target Cell APOBEC3C Can Induce Limited G-to-A Mutation in HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourara, Khaoula; Liegler, Teri J; Grant, Robert M

    2007-01-01

    The evolutionary success of primate lentiviruses reflects their high capacity to mutate and adapt to new host species, immune responses within individual hosts, and, in recent years, antiviral drugs. APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3F (A3F) are host cell DNA-editing enzymes that induce extensive HIV-1 mutation that severely attenuates viral replication. The HIV-1 virion infectivity factor (Vif), expressed in vivo, counteracts the antiviral activity of A3G and A3F by inducing their degradation. Other APOBECs may contribute more to viral diversity by inducing less extensive mutations allowing viral replication to persist. Here we show that in APOBEC3C (A3C)-expressing cells infected with the patient-derived HIV-1 molecular clones 210WW, 210WM, 210MW, and 210MM, and the lab-adapted molecular clone LAI, viral G-to-A mutations were detected in the presence of Vif expression. Mutations occurred primarily in the GA context and were relatively infrequent, thereby allowing for spreading infection. The mutations were absent in cells lacking A3C but were induced after transient expression of A3C in the infected target cell. Inhibiting endogenous A3C by RNA interference in Magi cells prevented the viral mutations. Thus, A3C is necessary and sufficient for G-to-A mutations in some HIV-1 strains. A3C-induced mutations occur at levels that allow replication to persist and may therefore contribute to viral diversity. Developing drugs that inhibit A3C may be a novel strategy for delaying viral escape from immune or antiretroviral inhibition. PMID:17967058

  3. BILHARZIA INDUCED PATHOLOGIES AND TECHNIQUES OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-07-07

    Jul 7, 2010 ... include various radiographic techniques isotope ... E. I. Odongo-Aginya, Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine Gulu ... after treatment there was reversibility of pathological conditions introduced by the.

  4. Heteroplasmy Levels of Mitochondrial 12S rRNA A1555G Mutation in Pedigrees with Aminoglycoside-Induced and Non-Syndromic Hearing Loss as Detected Using SNaPshot Technique%线粒体12SrRNAA1555G突变耳聋家系的异质率研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱玉华; 翟所强; 戴朴

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study heteroplasmy levels and inheritance patterns of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA A1555G mutation in a K-11 pedigree with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss using the SNaPshot technique. Methods Comprehensive history and physical examination were obtained, including history of aminoglycoside use and genetic factors related to the hearing impairment among the pedigree members. Age-appropriate audiological tests were performed and the PTA calculated. Genomic DNA was isolated from whole blood and the level of heteroplasmy in peripheral blood leuko-cytes was determined using SNaPshot technology. Results There were four generations in this K-11 pedigree. Deafness was the only clinical phenotype. The onset age and extent of hearing loss were different among maternal members. The average het-eroplasmy rate of this K-11 pedigree was 87.99%(ranging from 82.32%to 94.65%), and the average heteroplasmy rates of generations II to IV were 88.27%, 86.78%, and 90.31%, respectively. Conclusion There are random shifts in the heteroplasmy level between mothers and offspring with the A1555G mutation in K-11 pedigrees. However, there seems a trend of gradual increase over generations.%目的:利用SNaPshot技术检测线粒体12S rRNA A1555G异质性突变耳聋家系(K-11)母系成员的突变异质率,探讨家系中异质率的分布状况和遗传规律。方法通过家系调查,对线粒体12S rRNA A1555G异质性突变耳聋家系母系成员进行全身系统检查及临床听力学检测;提取基因组和线粒体DNA,针对12S rRNA A1555G突变,设计SnaPshot引物和探针,并对K-11家系母系成员进行异质率检测,分析K-11家系母系成员突变异质率的分布特点和遗传规律。结果 K-11家系共四代,耳聋是此家系的唯一临床表型,家系母系耳聋成员的听力下降时间、程度和听力曲线类型具有明显的个体差异;家系中每位家系母系成员的12S rRNA A1555G突变

  5. Genome-wide survey of artificial mutations induced by ethyl methanesulfonate and gamma rays in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Hirakawa, Hideki; Nunome, Tsukasa; Tabata, Satoshi; Isobe, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide mutations induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and gamma irradiation in the tomato Micro-Tom genome were identified by a whole-genome shotgun sequencing analysis to estimate the spectrum and distribution of whole-genome DNA mutations and the frequency of deleterious mutations. A total of ~370 Gb of paired-end reads for four EMS-induced mutants and three gamma-ray-irradiated lines as well as a wild-type line were obtained by next-generation sequencing technology. Using bioinformatics analyses, we identified 5920 induced single nucleotide variations and insertion/deletion (indel) mutations. The predominant mutations in the EMS mutants were C/G to T/A transitions, while in the gamma-ray mutants, C/G to T/A transitions, A/T to T/A transversions, A/T to G/C transitions and deletion mutations were equally common. Biases in the base composition flanking mutations differed between the mutagenesis types. Regarding the effects of the mutations on gene function, >90% of the mutations were located in intergenic regions, and only 0.2% were deleterious. In addition, we detected 1,140,687 spontaneous single nucleotide polymorphisms and indel polymorphisms in wild-type Micro-Tom lines. We also found copy number variation, deletions and insertions of chromosomal segments in both the mutant and wild-type lines. The results provide helpful information not only for mutation research, but also for mutant screening methodology with reverse-genetic approaches.

  6. 27. Molecular spectra of acrylamide-induced mutation at hprt locus in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 and NB4. cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘胜学; 曹佳; 杨梦苏; 方志俊; 安辉

    2001-01-01

    The genotoxicity of acrylamide was investigated by methods of single cell clone culturing, two-way screening count, multiplex PCR amplification and electrophoresis technique. Acrylamide only showed clear mutagenesis until dose raised 700 mg*L-1 in HL-60 cells. The most frequent spontaneous mutation were point mutation (≥90.0%) and acrylamide-induced mutation mainly included partial deletion and point mutation (respectively 40.0%~66.7%/33.3%~60.0%). Total gene deletion wasn't discovered in both of cells. There were deletion mutation in all exons of hprt gene(except 7/8 exon), and toward the 3' end of the hprt gene. The most frequent acrylamide-induced mutation were point mutation and single exon deletion (93.3%/86.1%). There were not clear difference in both of cells. The results suggest that the spectra of spontaneous and acrylamide-induced mutants were different. and the smaller changes in genetic structure have something to do with mechanism.

  7. Mutator suppression and escape from replication error-induced extinction in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan J Herr

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cells rely on a network of conserved pathways to govern DNA replication fidelity. Loss of polymerase proofreading or mismatch repair elevates spontaneous mutation and facilitates cellular adaptation. However, double mutants are inviable, suggesting that extreme mutation rates exceed an error threshold. Here we combine alleles that affect DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ proofreading and mismatch repair to define the maximal error rate in haploid yeast and to characterize genetic suppressors of mutator phenotypes. We show that populations tolerate mutation rates 1,000-fold above wild-type levels but collapse when the rate exceeds 10⁻³ inactivating mutations per gene per cell division. Variants that escape this error-induced extinction (eex rapidly emerge from mutator clones. One-third of the escape mutants result from second-site changes in Pol δ that suppress the proofreading-deficient phenotype, while two-thirds are extragenic. The structural locations of the Pol δ changes suggest multiple antimutator mechanisms. Our studies reveal the transient nature of eukaryotic mutators and show that mutator phenotypes are readily suppressed by genetic adaptation. This has implications for the role of mutator phenotypes in cancer.

  8. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF RADIATION-INDUCED MUTATION IN EXON 7/8 OF RAT HPRT GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任晓庆; 黄定九; 黄钢; 王利民

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the radiation dose and the HPRT gene locus mutation in rat smooth muscle cells, and provide the molecular basis for prevention of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA).MethodsThe smooth muscle cells cultured in vitro were irradiated by radionuclide 188Re in different doses. HPRT gene mutation colonies were selected and isolated by 6 thioguanine. Analysis of mutation in exon 7/8 of HPRT gene were accomplished by polymerase chain reaction and single strand conformation polymorphism.ResultsThe HPRT gene mutation frequency of rat smooth muscle cells that were irradiated by radionuclide 188Re ranged from 5.5×10-6 to 13×10-6. Of 91 HPRT gene mutation colonies, 13(14.3%) contained exon 7/8 deletion and 15(16.5%) had point mutation. The exon 7/8 mutation frequency was 30.8%. There were significant relationships between radiation dose and mutation frequency of HPRT gene and exon 7/8.ConclusionThe DNA damage and gene mutation induced by radiation has positive relationship with radiation dose, and is a basis of proliferation inhibition and apoptosis of smooth muscle cells.

  9. Ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy linked to OPA1 mutation and mitochondrial toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillet, Virginie; Chevrollier, Arnaud; Cassereau, Julien; Letournel, Franck; Gueguen, Naïg; Richard, Laurence; Desquiret, Valérie; Verny, Christophe; Procaccio, Vincent; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Reynier, Pascal; Bonneau, Dominique

    2010-03-01

    Ethambutol (EMB), widely used in the treatment of tuberculosis, has been reported to cause Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in patients carrying mitochondrial DNA mutations. We study the effect of EMB on mitochondrial metabolism in fibroblasts from controls and from a man carrying an OPA1 mutation, in whom the drug induced the development of autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA). EMB produced a mitochondrial coupling defect together with a 25% reduction in complex IV activity. EMB induced the formation of vacuoles associated with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased fragmentation of the mitochondrial network. Mitochondrial genetic variations may therefore be predisposing factors in EMB-induced ocular injury.

  10. Optimization of crop productivity in tomato using induced mutations in the florigen pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soon Ju; Jiang, Ke; Tal, Lior; Yichie, Yoav; Gar, Oron; Zamir, Dani; Eshed, Yuval; Lippman, Zachary B

    2014-12-01

    Naturally occurring genetic variation in the universal florigen flowering pathway has produced major advancements in crop domestication. However, variants that can maximize crop yields may not exist in natural populations. Here we show that tomato productivity can be fine-tuned and optimized by exploiting combinations of selected mutations in multiple florigen pathway components. By screening for chemically induced mutations that suppress the bushy, determinate growth habit of field tomatoes, we isolated a new weak allele of the florigen gene SINGLE FLOWER TRUSS (SFT) and two mutations affecting a bZIP transcription factor component of the 'florigen activation complex' (ref. 11). By combining heterozygous mutations, we pinpointed an optimal balance of flowering signals, resulting in a new partially determinate architecture that translated to maximum yields. We propose that harnessing mutations in the florigen pathway to customize plant architecture and flower production offers a broad toolkit to boost crop productivity.

  11. Inducible repair system in Haemophilus influenzae unaccompanied by mutation.

    OpenAIRE

    Notani, N. K.; Setlow, J K

    1980-01-01

    Weigle reactivation of ultraviolet-irradiated HPlc1 phage was observed after ultraviolet or mitomycin C treatment of Haemophilus influenzae cells. The amount of reactivation was considerably increased when the treated cells were incubated in growth medium before infection. The presence of chloramphenicol during this incubation abolished the reactivation. No mutation of this phage accompanied the reactivation. When cells were treated so as to produce a maximal reactivation of phage, neither re...

  12. The role of induced mutation in conversion of photoperiod dependence in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurakhmonov, Ibrokhim Y; Kushanov, Fakhriddin N; Djaniqulov, Fayzulla; Buriev, Zabardast T; Pepper, Alan E; Fayzieva, Nilufar; Mavlonov, Gafurjon T; Saha, Sukumar; Jenkins, Jonnie N; Abdukarimov, Abdusattor

    2007-01-01

    Wild cotton germplasm resources are largely underutilized because of photoperiod-dependent flowering of "exotic" cottons. The objectives of this work were to explore the genome-wide effect of induced mutation in photoperiod-converted induced cotton mutants, estimating the genetic change between mutant and wild-type cottons using simple sequence repeats (SSRs) as well as understand the pattern of SSR mutation in induced mutagenesis. Three groups of photoperiod-converted radiomutants ((32)P) including their wild-type parental lines, A- and D-genome diploids, and typically grown cotton cultivars were screened with 250 cotton SSR primer pairs. Forty SSRs revealed the same SSR mutation profile in, at least, 2 independent mutant lines that were different from the original wild types. Induced mutagenesis both increased and decreased the allele sizes of SSRs in mutants with the higher mutation rate in SSRs containing dinucleotide motifs. Genetic distance obtained based on 141 informative SSR alleles ranged from 0.09 to 0.60 in all studied cotton genotypes. Genetic distance within all photoperiod-converted induced mutants was in a 0.09-0.25 range. The genetic distance among photoperiod-converted mutants and their originals ranged from 0.28 to 0.50, revealing significant modification of mutants from their original wild types. Typical Gossypium hirsutum cultivar, Namangan-77, revealed mutational pattern similar to induced radiomutants in 40 mutated SSR loci, implying possible pressure to these SSR loci not only in radiomutagenesis but also during common breeding process. Outcomes of the research should be useful in understanding the photoperiod-related mutations, and markers might help in mapping photoperiodic flowering genes in cotton.

  13. Myostatin gene mutated mice induced with tale nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fangfang; Sun, Ruilin; Chen, Hongyan; Fei, Jian; Lu, Daru

    2015-01-01

    Myostain gene (MSTN) is expressed primarily in skeletal muscle, and negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass; it has been suggested that mice with MSTN inhibition have reduced adiposity and improved insulin sensitivity. Therefore, it is important to establish a fast and effective gene editing method. In this report, we established the myostatin mutated-mouse model by microinjection of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) mRNA within the mouse fertilized oocytes and achieved high rates of mutagenesis of the mouse MSTN in C57BL/6J. Six of 45 born mice carried target mutations and we appointed one as the parental mating with wild mouse to produce the F1 and backcross to produce the F2 generation. All the mutations of the mice were examined quickly and efficiently by high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRMA) and then verified by direct sequencing. We obtained the homozygous of the F2 generation which transmitted the mutant alleles to the progeny with 100% efficiency. Mutant mice exhibited increases in muscle mass comparable to those observed in wild-type mice. Therefore, combining TALEN-mediated gene targeting with HRMA technology is a superior method of constructing genetically modified mice through microinjection in the mouse fertilized oocytes with high efficiency and short time of selection.

  14. Genetic and molecular analysis of chlorambucil-induced germ-line mutations in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinchik, E.M.; Bangham, J.W.; Hunsicker, P.R.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.; Russell, L.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Kwon, B.S. (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis (USA)); Jackson, I.J. (Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (England))

    1990-02-01

    Eighteen variants recovered from specific locus mutation rate experiments involving the mutagen chlorambucil were subjected to several genetic and molecular analyses. Most mutations were found to be homozygous lethal. Because lethality is often presumptive evidence for multilocus-deletion events, 10 mutations were analyzed by Southern blot analysis with probes at, or closely linked to, several of the specific locus test markers, namely, albino (c), brown (b), and dilute (d). All eight mutations (two c; three b; two d; and one dilute-short ear (Df(d se))) that arose in post-spermatogonial germ cells were deleted for DNA sequences. No evidence for deletion of two d-se region probes was obtained for the remaining two d mutations that arose in stem-cell spermatogonia. Six of the primary mutants also produced low litter sizes (semisterility). Karyotypic analysis has, to date, confirmed the presence of reciprocal translocations in four of the six. The high frequency of deletions and translocations among the mutations induced in post-spermatogonial stages by chlorambucil, combined with its overall high efficiency in inducing mutations in these stages, should make chlorambucil mutagenesis useful for generating experimentally valuable germ-line deletions throughout the mouse genome.

  15. Novel allelic mutations in murine Serca2 induce differential development of squamous cell tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toki, Hideaki; Minowa, Osamu; Inoue, Maki; Motegi, Hiromi; Karashima, Yuko; Ikeda, Ami [Team for Advanced Development and Evaluation of Human Disease Models, Riken BioResource Center (BRC), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kaneda, Hideki [Technology and Development Team for Mouse Phenotype Analysis, Riken BRC, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sakuraba, Yoshiyuki [Mutagenesis and Genomics Team, Riken BRC, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Saiki, Yuriko [Department of Molecular Pathology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Wakana, Shigeharu [Technology and Development Team for Mouse Phenotype Analysis, Riken BRC, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Suzuki, Hiroshi [Department of Biochemistry, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, Hokkaido (Japan); Gondo, Yoichi [Mutagenesis and Genomics Team, Riken BRC, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Shiroishi, Toshihiko [Mammalian Genetics Laboratory, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, Shizuoka (Japan); Noda, Tetsuo, E-mail: tnoda@jfcr.or.jp [Team for Advanced Development and Evaluation of Human Disease Models, Riken BioResource Center (BRC), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Cell Biology, Cancer Institute, The Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-08-05

    Dominant mutations in the Serca2 gene, which encodes sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase, predispose mice to gastrointestinal epithelial carcinoma [1–4] and humans to Darier disease (DD) [14–17]. In this study, we generated mice harboring N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced allelic mutations in Serca2: three missense mutations and one nonsense mutation. Mice harboring these Serca2 mutations developed tumors that were categorized as either early onset squamous cell tumors (SCT), with development similar to null-type knockout mice [2,4] (aggressive form; M682, M814), or late onset tumors (mild form; M1049, M1162). Molecular analysis showed no aberration in Serca2 mRNA or protein expression levels in normal esophageal cells of any of the four mutant heterozygotes. There was no loss of heterozygosity at the Serca2 locus in the squamous cell carcinomas in any of the four lines. The effect of each mutation on Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activity was predicted using atomic-structure models and accumulated mutated protein studies, suggesting that putative complete loss of Serca2 enzymatic activity may lead to early tumor onset, whereas mutations in which Serca2 retains residual enzymatic activity result in late onset. We propose that impaired Serca2 gene product activity has a long-term effect on squamous cell carcinogenesis from onset to the final carcinoma stage through an as-yet unrecognized but common regulatory pathway. -- Highlights: •Novel mutations in murine Serca2 caused early onset or late onset of tumorigenesis. •They also caused higher or lower incidence of Darier Disease phenotype. •3D structure model suggested the former mutations led to severer defect on ATPase. •Driver gene mutations via long-range effect on Ca2+ distributions are suggested.

  16. Mutational History of a Human Cell Lineage from Somatic to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foad J Rouhani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of replicating the genetic code is fundamental. DNA repair mechanisms protect the fidelity of the genome ensuring a low error rate between generations. This sustains the similarity of individuals whilst providing a repertoire of variants for evolution. The mutation rate in the human genome has recently been measured to be 50-70 de novo single nucleotide variants (SNVs between generations. During development mutations accumulate in somatic cells so that an organism is a mosaic. However, variation within a tissue and between tissues has not been analysed. By reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, their genomes and the associated mutational history are captured. By sequencing the genomes of polyclonal and monoclonal somatic cells and derived iPSCs we have determined the mutation rates and show how the patterns change from a somatic lineage in vivo through to iPSCs. Somatic cells have a mutation rate of 14 SNVs per cell per generation while iPSCs exhibited a ten-fold lower rate. Analyses of mutational signatures suggested that deamination of methylated cytosine may be the major mutagenic source in vivo, whilst oxidative DNA damage becomes dominant in vitro. Our results provide insights for better understanding of mutational processes and lineage relationships between human somatic cells. Furthermore it provides a foundation for interpretation of elevated mutation rates and patterns in cancer.

  17. Mutational History of a Human Cell Lineage from Somatic to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foad J Rouhani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of replicating the genetic code is fundamental. DNA repair mechanisms protect the fidelity of the genome ensuring a low error rate between generations. This sustains the similarity of individuals whilst providing a repertoire of variants for evolution. The mutation rate in the human genome has recently been measured to be 50-70 de novo single nucleotide variants (SNVs between generations. During development mutations accumulate in somatic cells so that an organism is a mosaic. However, variation within a tissue and between tissues has not been analysed. By reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, their genomes and the associated mutational history are captured. By sequencing the genomes of polyclonal and monoclonal somatic cells and derived iPSCs we have determined the mutation rates and show how the patterns change from a somatic lineage in vivo through to iPSCs. Somatic cells have a mutation rate of 14 SNVs per cell per generation while iPSCs exhibited a ten-fold lower rate. Analyses of mutational signatures suggested that deamination of methylated cytosine may be the major mutagenic source in vivo, whilst oxidative DNA damage becomes dominant in vitro. Our results provide insights for better understanding of mutational processes and lineage relationships between human somatic cells. Furthermore it provides a foundation for interpretation of elevated mutation rates and patterns in cancer.

  18. Mutations induced by monofunctional and bifunctional phosphoramide mustards in supF tRNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudipalli, A; Maccubbin, A E; Nadadur, S S; Struck, R F; Gurtoo, H L

    1997-11-19

    The relative mutagenicity, nature of the mutations and the sequence specificity of mutations induced by the bifunctional alkylating agent, phosphoramide mustard (PM) and a monofunctional derivative, dechloroethyl phosphoramide mustard (dePM), were analyzed by the Ames test and by an in vitro shuttle vector mutagenesis assay. Both PM and dePM increased the mutation frequency above background in either assay. However, on an equimolar basis, dePM was less mutagenic than PM. In the in vitro shuttle vector mutagenesis assay, sequencing demonstrated that about 40% of the mutant plasmids contained more than one mutation in the supF tRNA gene segment of the plasmid. About 70% of the mutations observed in dePM-treated plasmids were single base substitutions with A:T and G:C base pairs being mutated at equivalent rates. In contrast, only about 50% of the mutations observed in PM-treated plasmids were single base substitutions, 80% of which involved G:C base pairs. Single base deletions and insertions were found in approximately equal proportions with both compounds; however, these lesions were in greater abundance in PM-treated plasmids. Putative hot-spots for mutation in the supF tRNA gene included base pairs at position 102 and 110 for PM and positions 170 and 171 for dePM.

  19. Acetazolamide-responsive exercise-induced episodic ataxia associated with a novel homozygous DARS2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synofzik, Matthis; Schicks, Julia; Lindig, Tobias; Biskup, Saskia; Schmidt, Thorsten; Hansel, Jochen; Lehmann-Horn, Frank; Schöls, Ludger

    2011-10-01

    Leukoencephalopathy with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and brain lactate elevation (LBSL) was recently shown to be caused by mutations in the DARS2 gene, encoding a mitochondrial aspartyl-tRNA synthetase. So far, affected individuals were invariably compound heterozygous for two mutations in DARS2, and drug treatments have remained elusive. Prospective 2-year follow-up of the natural history of the main presenting symptoms in a homozygous DARS2 mutation carrier, followed by a 60 day treatment with acetazolamide in two different doses and with two random treatment interruptions. The patient presented with exercise-induced paroxysmal gait ataxia and areflexia as an atypical phenotype associated with a novel homozygous DARS2 mutation. These features showed an excellent dose-dependent, sustained treatment response to a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. Pathogenic mutations in episodic ataxia genes were excluded, thus making it highly unlikely that this phenotype was because of episodic ataxia as a second disorder besides LBSL. This case demonstrates that DARS2 mutation homozygosity is not lethal, as suggested earlier, but compatible with a rather benign disease course. More importantly, it extends the phenotypic spectrum of LBSL and reveals that at least some DARS2-associated phenotypic features might be readily treatable. However, future observations of paroxsymal ataxia and, possibly, areflexia in other DARS2-mutated patients are warranted to further corroborate our finding that DARS2 mutations can lead to a paroxsymal ataxia phenotype.

  20. Laser induced fluorescence technique for environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkin, Andrei B.; Felizardo, Rui; Gameiro, Carla; Matos, Ana R.; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the development of laser induced fluorescence sensors and their application in the evaluation of water pollution and physiological status of higher plants and algae. The sensors were built on the basis of reliable and robust solid-state Nd:YAG lasers. They demonstrated good efficiency in: i) detecting and characterizing oil spills and dissolved organic matter; ii) evaluating the impact of stress on higher plants (cork oak, maritime pine, and genetically modified Arabidopsis); iii) tracking biomass changes in intertidal microphytobenthos; and iv) mapping macroalgal communities in the Tagus Estuary.

  1. Inducing mutations in the mouse genome with the chemical mutagen ethylnitrosourea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M.G. Massironi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available When compared to other model organisms whose genome is sequenced, the number of mutations identified in the mouse appears extremely reduced and this situation seriously hampers our understanding of mammalian gene function(s. Another important consequence of this shortage is that a majority of human genetic diseases still await an animal model. To improve the situation, two strategies are currently used: the first makes use of embryonic stem cells, in which one can induce knockout mutations almost at will; the second consists of a genome-wide random chemical mutagenesis, followed by screening for mutant phenotypes and subsequent identification of the genetic alteration(s. Several projects are now in progress making use of one or the other of these strategies. Here, we report an original effort where we mutagenized BALB/c males, with the mutagen ethylnitrosourea. Offspring of these males were screened for dominant mutations and a three-generation breeding protocol was set to recover recessive mutations. Eleven mutations were identified (one dominant and ten recessives. Three of these mutations are new alleles (Otop1mlh, Foxn1sepe and probably rodador at loci where mutations have already been reported, while 4 are new and original alleles (carc, eqlb, frqz, and Sacc. This result indicates that the mouse genome, as expected, is far from being saturated with mutations. More mutations would certainly be discovered using more sophisticated phenotyping protocols. Seven of the 11 new mutant alleles induced in our experiment have been localized on the genetic map as a first step towards positional cloning.

  2. Most ultraviolet irradiation induced mutations in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans are chromosomal rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, H.I.; Rosenbluth, R.E.; Baillie, D.L. (Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC (Canada). Department of Biological Sciences, Institute of Molecular Biology)

    1991-07-01

    In this study the utility of 254-nm ultraviolet light (UV) as a magnetic tool in C.elegans is determined. It is demonstrated that irradiation of adult hermaphrodites provides a simple method for the induction of heritable chromosomal rearrangements. A screening protocol was employed that identifies either recessive lethal mutations in the 40 map unit region balanced by the translocation eT1(III;V), or unc-36(III) duplications. Mutations were recovered in 3% of the chromosomes screened after a dose of 120 J/m{sup 2}. This rate resembles that for 1500 R {gamma}-ray-induced mutations selected in a similar manner. The mutations were classified either as lethals (mapping to Linkage Group (LG)III or LGV) or as putative unc-36 duplications. In contrast to the majority of UV-induced mutations analysed in micro-organisms, a large fraction of the C.elegans UV-induced mutations were found to be not simple intragenic lesions, but deficiencies for more than one adjacent gene or more complex events. Preliminary evidence for this conclusion came from the high frequency of mutations that had a dominant effect causing reduced numbers of adult progeny. Subsequently 6 out of 9 analysed LGV mutations were found to be deficiencies. Other specific rearrangements also identified were: one translocation, sT5(II;III), and two unc-36 duplications, sDp8 and sDp9. It was concluded that UV irradiation can easily be used as an additional tool for the analysis of C.elegans chromosomes, and that C.elegans should prove to be a useful organism in which to study the mechanisms whereby UV acts as a mutagen in cells of complex eukaryotes. (author). 46 refs.; 5 figs.; 4 tabs.

  3. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkan, A.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

  4. Cellular and Deafness Mechanisms Underlying Connexin Mutation-Induced Hearing Loss - A Common Hereditary Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingard, Jeffrey C; Zhao, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss due to mutations in the connexin gene family, which encodes gap junctional proteins, is a common form of hereditary deafness. In particular, connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2) mutations are responsible for ~50% of non-syndromic hearing loss, which is the highest incidence of genetic disease. In the clinic, Cx26 mutations cause various auditory phenotypes ranging from profound congenital deafness at birth to mild, progressive hearing loss in late childhood. Recent experiments demonstrate that congenital deafness mainly results from cochlear developmental disorders rather than hair cell degeneration and endocochlear potential reduction, while late-onset hearing loss results from reduction of active cochlear amplification, even though cochlear hair cells have no connexin expression. However, there is no apparent, demonstrable relationship between specific changes in connexin (channel) functions and the phenotypes of mutation-induced hearing loss. Moreover, new experiments further demonstrate that the hypothesized K(+)-recycling disruption is not a principal deafness mechanism for connexin deficiency induced hearing loss. Cx30 (GJB6), Cx29 (GJC3), Cx31 (GJB3), and Cx43 (GJA1) mutations can also cause hearing loss with distinct pathological changes in the cochlea. These new studies provide invaluable information about deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation-induced hearing loss and also provide important information for developing new protective and therapeutic strategies for this common deafness. However, the detailed cellular mechanisms underlying these pathological changes remain unclear. Also, little is known about specific mutation-induced pathological changes in vivo and little information is available for humans. Such further studies are urgently required.

  5. A Novel SCN5A Mutation Associated with Drug Induced Brugada Type ECG

    OpenAIRE

    Isik, Turker; Takeru, Makiyama; Matteo, Vatta; Hideki, Itoh; Takeshi, Ueyama; Akihiko, Shimizu; Tomohiko, Ai; Minoru, Horie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Class IC antiarrhythmic agents may induce acquired forms of Brugada Syndrome. We have identified a novel mutation in SCN5A, the gene that encodes the α-subunit of the human cardiac sodium channel (hNav1.5), in a patient who exhibited Brugada- type ECG changes during pharmacotherapy of atrial arrhythmias. Objective: To assess whether the novel mutation p.V1328M can cause drug induced Brugada Syndrome. Methods: Administration of pilsicainide, a class IC antiarrhythmic agent, caused ...

  6. Spectrum of Glycidyl Methacrylate—induced Mutation in Plasmid—Escherichia coli System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAOHui-Lan; ZuoJin; 等

    1994-01-01

    In order to characterize the spectrum of mutation induced by glycidyl methacrylate(GMA),the plasmid pBR322 was modified with this mutagen in vitro.transfected into appropriate Escherichia coli host HB101.The mutants were then screned and defined by DNA sequencing.Sequence analysis reveals that GMA induces two classes of mutations:deletion of the mono-,di-or tetra-base or the insertion of mono-or di-base.Both types of muations,with about 10% frequency,occur predominantly at C.G runs and at 5'-CNCCN-3' sequence,which are hotspots for GMA damage and may cause frameshift muation.

  7. Break-Induced Replication Is a Source of Mutation Clusters Underlying Kataegis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia J. Sakofsky

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clusters of simultaneous multiple mutations can be a source of rapid change during carcinogenesis and evolution. Such mutation clusters have been recently shown to originate from DNA damage within long single-stranded DNA (ssDNA formed at resected double-strand breaks and dysfunctional replication forks. Here, we identify double-strand break (DSB-induced replication (BIR as another powerful source of mutation clusters that formed in nearly half of wild-type yeast cells undergoing BIR in the presence of alkylating damage. Clustered mutations were primarily formed along the track of DNA synthesis and were frequently associated with additional breakage and rearrangements. Moreover, the base specificity, strand coordination, and strand bias of the mutation spectrum were consistent with mutations arising from damage in persistent ssDNA stretches within unconventional replication intermediates. Altogether, these features closely resemble kataegic events in cancers, suggesting that replication intermediates during BIR may be the most prominent source of mutation clusters across species.

  8. Mutation analysis of tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 3 gene in Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzel, Barbara-Magdalena; Gerth, Melanie; Chen, Yuan; Wünsche, Elisa; Facklam, Tina; Beck, James F; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Petersen, Iver

    2017-03-01

    Survival and proliferation of Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells, the malignant cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL), are dependent on constitutive activation of nuclear factor kB (NF-κB). A20, encoded by TNF alpha-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3), one of the inhibitors of NF-kB, was found to be inactivated by deletions and/or point mutations in CHL. TNFAIP3 mutations were examined in 37 patients with CHL by using PCR and direct sequencing. In addition, protein expression of A20 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) status of HL samples was determined by EBV EBER chromogenic in situ hybridization (ISH). We identified 8 mutation positive cases in a collective of 37 investigated cases (22%). Mutations were most frequent in the nodular sclerosis subtype. Our results revealed the tendency that cases harboring A20 mutations were negative for A20 staining. None of A20 mutation-positive CHL cases showed EBV infection. Our study confirms the involvement of the TNFAIP3 tumor suppressor gene in CHL. A20 may represent a suppressor of human lymphoma and provide a critical molecular link between chronic inflammation and cancer. None of A20 mutation-positive CHL cases showed EBV infection. This fact suggests complementing functions of TNFAIP3 inactivation and EBV infection in CHL pathogenesis and may represent an interesting point of further investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Obtaining induced mutations of drought tolerance in sorghum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeman, S.; Razzak, M.T. [National Atomic Energy Agency, Batan (Indonesia). Center for Application of Isotopes and Radiation; Nakanishi, Tomoko M. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences

    2003-01-01

    Since sorghum plant (Sorghum bicolor L.) has a big potential to be cultivated in Indonesia especially in drought-prone areas, improvement of sorghum had been carried out through mutation breeding methods. The seeds of the sorghum plant was irradiated by gamma rays emitted from cobalt-60 source. The total dose was 0.4 kGy. Through selection process in the M2 generation, a number of promising mutant lines of sorghum have been obtained and registered in the M3 generation. In the M4, a number of 100 mutant lines were tested against drought in Gunung Kidul District during the dry season in 2000. Results of the test showed that mutant line DU/20/Psj/1, DU/20/Psj/4, DU/20/Psj/24, JA/30/Cty/21, ET/40/Psj/4 and DU/20/Psj/10 had relatively high grain yield compared to the control variety. (author)

  10. Analysis of human transforming growth factor β-induced gene mutation in corneal dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杨; 孙旭光; 任慧媛; 董冰; 王智群; 孙秀英

    2004-01-01

    Background Corneal dystrophy is a group of inherited blinding diseases of the cornea. This study was to identify the mutations of the keratoepithelin (KE) gene for proper diagnosis of corneal dystrophy. Methods Three families with corneal dystrophy were analysed. Thirteen individuals at risk for corneal dystrophy in family A, the proband and her son in family B, and the proband in family C were examined after their blood samples were obtained. Mutation screening of human transforming growth factor β-induced gene (BIGH3 gene) was performed. Results Five individuals in family A were found by clinical evaluation to be affected with granular corneal dystrophy and carried the BIGH3 mutation W555R. However, both probands in families B and C, also diagnosed with granular corneal dystrophy, harboured the BIGH3 mutation R124H. Conclusion Molecular genetic analysis can improve accurate diagnosis of corneal dystrophy.

  11. Denoising time-domain induced polarisation data using wavelet techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Ravin N.; Cull, James P.

    2016-05-01

    Time-domain induced polarisation (TDIP) methods are routinely used for near-surface evaluations in quasi-urban environments harbouring networks of buried civil infrastructure. A conventional technique for improving signal to noise ratio in such environments is by using analogue or digital low-pass filtering followed by stacking and rectification. However, this induces large distortions in the processed data. In this study, we have conducted the first application of wavelet based denoising techniques for processing raw TDIP data. Our investigation included laboratory and field measurements to better understand the advantages and limitations of this technique. It was found that distortions arising from conventional filtering can be significantly avoided with the use of wavelet based denoising techniques. With recent advances in full-waveform acquisition and analysis, incorporation of wavelet denoising techniques can further enhance surveying capabilities. In this work, we present the rationale for utilising wavelet denoising methods and discuss some important implications, which can positively influence TDIP methods.

  12. Efforts to accelerate domestication of winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC.) by means of induced mutations and tissue culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klu, G.Y.P.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis describes mutation breeding and tissue culture techniques developed for accelerated domestication of winged bean ( Psophocarpustetragonolobus (L.) DC.). The tissue culture techniques, which are the first steps towards genetic transformation of the crop, include: (1) direct adventitious s

  13. Nucleophosmin mutation analysis in acute myeloid leukaemia: Immunohistochemistry as a surrogate for molecular techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Chopra; Sushant Soni; Haraprasad Pati; Dev Kumar; Rahul Diwedi; Deepak Verma; Garima Vishwakama; Sameer Bakhshi; Suman Kumar; Ajay Gogia; Rajive Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Mutation of nucleophosmin (NPM1) gene in the absence of FLT3-ITD (FMS related tyrosine kinase 3 - internal tandem duplications) mutation carries a good prognosis in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). NPM1, a multifunctional nucleolar phosphoprotein that shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm, gets trapped in the cytoplasm when mutated. Immunohistochemical (IHC) demonstration of its aberrant cytoplasmic location (NPMc+) has been suggested as a simple...

  14. Somatic mutations in stilbene estrogen-induced Syrian hamster kidney tumors identified by DNA fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Deodutta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Kidney tumors from stilbene estrogen (diethylstilbestrol-treated Syrian hamsters were screened for somatic genetic alterations by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain-reaction (RAPD-PCR fingerprinting. Fingerprints from tumor tissue were generated by single arbitrary primers and compared with fingerprints for normal tissue from the same animal, as well as normal and tumor tissues from different animals. Sixty one of the arbitrary primers amplified 365 loci that contain approximately 476 kbp of the hamster genome. Among these amplified DNA fragments, 44 loci exhibited either qualitative or quantitative differences between the tumor tissues and normal kidney tissues. RAPD-PCR loci showing decreased and increased intensities in tumor tissue DNA relative to control DNA indicate that loci have undergone allelic losses and gains, respectively, in the stilbene estrogen-induced tumor cell genome. The presence or absence of the amplified DNA fragments indicate homozygous insertions or deletions in the kidney tumor DNA compared to the age-matched normal kidney tissue DNA. Seven of 44 mutated loci also were present in the kidney tissues adjacent to tumors (free of macroscopic tumors. The presence of mutated loci in uninvolved (non-tumor surrounding tissue adjacent to tumors from stilbene estrogen-treated hamsters suggests that these mutations occurred in the early stages of carcinogenesis. The cloning and sequencing of RAPD amplified loci revealed that one mutated locus had significant sequence similarity with the hamster Cyp1A1 gene. The results show the ability of RAPD-PCR to detect and isolate, in a single step, DNA sequences representing genetic alterations in stilbene estrogen-induced cancer cells, including losses of heterozygosity, and homozygous deletion and insertion mutations. RAPD-PCR provides an alternative molecular approach for studying cancer cytogenetics in stilbene estrogen-induced tumors in humans and experimental

  15. Multiplex Chromosomal Exome Sequencing Accelerates Identification of ENU-Induced Mutations in the Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Miao; Mondal, Kajari; Patel, Viren; Horner, Vanessa L; Long, Alyssa B; Cutler, David J; Caspary, Tamara; Zwick, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Forward genetic screens in Mus musculus have proved powerfully informative by revealing unsuspected mechanisms governing basic biological processes. This approach uses potent chemical mutagens, such as N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), to randomly induce mutations in mice, which are then bred and phenotypically screened to identify lines that disrupt a specific biological process of interest. Although identifying a mutation using the rich resources of mouse genetics is straightforward, it is unfortunately neither fast nor cheap. Here we show that detecting newly induced causal variants in a forward genetic screen can be accelerated dramatically using a methodology that combines multiplex chromosome-specific exome capture, next-generation sequencing, rapid mapping, sequence annotation, and variation filtering. The key innovation of our method is multiplex capture and sequence that allows the simultaneous survey of both mutant, parental, and background strains in a single experiment. By comparing variants identified in mutant offspring with those found in dbSNP, the unmutagenized background strains, and parental lines, induced causative mutations can be distinguished immediately from preexisting variation or experimental artifact. Here we demonstrate this approach to find the causative mutations induced in four novel ENU lines identified from a recent ENU screen. In all four cases, after applying our method, we found six or fewer putative mutations (and sometimes only a single one). Determining the causative variant was then easily achieved through standard segregation approaches. We have developed this process into a community resource that will speed up individual labs' ability to identify the genetic lesion in mutant mouse lines; all of our reagents and software tools are open source and available to the broader scientific community.

  16. Inflammation, gene mutation and photoimmunosuppression in response to UVR-induced oxidative damage contributes to photocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Gary M

    2005-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression in the skin. These biological changes are responsible for photocarcinogenesis. UV radiation in sunlight is divided into two wavebands, UVB and UVA, both of which contribute to these biological changes, and therefore probably to skin cancer in humans and animal models. Oxidative damage caused by UV contributes to inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression. This article reviews evidence for the hypothesis that UV oxidative damage to these processes contributes to photocarcinogenesis. UVA makes a larger impact on oxidative stress in the skin than UVB by inducing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which damage DNA, protein and lipids and which also lead to NAD+ depletion, and therefore energy loss from the cell. Lipid peroxidation induces prostaglandin production that in association with UV-induced nitric oxide production causes inflammation. Inflammation drives benign human solar keratosis (SK) to undergo malignant conversion into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) probably because the inflammatory cells produce reactive oxygen species, thus increasing oxidative damage to DNA and the immune system. Reactive oxygen or nitrogen appears to cause the increase in mutational burden as SK progress into SCC in humans. UVA is particularly important in causing immunosuppression in both humans and mice, and UV lipid peroxidation induced prostaglandin production and UV activation of nitric oxide synthase is important mediators of this event. Other immunosuppressive events are likely to be initiated by UV oxidative stress. Antioxidants have also been shown to reduce photocarcinogenesis. While most of this evidence comes from studies in mice, there is supporting evidence in humans that UV-induced oxidative damage contributes to inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression. Available evidence implicates oxidative damage as an important contributor to sunlight-induced carcinogenesis in humans.

  17. Inflammation, gene mutation and photoimmunosuppression in response to UVR-induced oxidative damage contributes to photocarcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halliday, Gary M. [Dermatology Research Laboratories, Division of Medicine, Melanoma and Skin Cancer Research Institute, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital at the University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)]. E-mail: garyh@med.usyd.edu.au

    2005-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression in the skin. These biological changes are responsible for photocarcinogenesis. UV radiation in sunlight is divided into two wavebands, UVB and UVA, both of which contribute to these biological changes, and therefore probably to skin cancer in humans and animal models. Oxidative damage caused by UV contributes to inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression. This article reviews evidence for the hypothesis that UV oxidative damage to these processes contributes to photocarcinogenesis. UVA makes a larger impact on oxidative stress in the skin than UVB by inducing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which damage DNA, protein and lipids and which also lead to NAD+ depletion, and therefore energy loss from the cell. Lipid peroxidation induces prostaglandin production that in association with UV-induced nitric oxide production causes inflammation. Inflammation drives benign human solar keratosis (SK) to undergo malignant conversion into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) probably because the inflammatory cells produce reactive oxygen species, thus increasing oxidative damage to DNA and the immune system. Reactive oxygen or nitrogen appears to cause the increase in mutational burden as SK progress into SCC in humans. UVA is particularly important in causing immunosuppression in both humans and mice, and UV lipid peroxidation induced prostaglandin production and UV activation of nitric oxide synthase is important mediators of this event. Other immunosuppressive events are likely to be initiated by UV oxidative stress. Antioxidants have also been shown to reduce photocarcinogenesis. While most of this evidence comes from studies in mice, there is supporting evidence in humans that UV-induced oxidative damage contributes to inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression. Available evidence implicates oxidative damage as an important contributor to sunlight-induced carcinogenesis in humans.

  18. Herpesvirus telomerase RNA (vTR) with a mutated template sequence abrogates herpesvirus-induced lymphomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufer, Benedikt B; Arndt, Sina; Trapp, Sascha; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Jarosinski, Keith W

    2011-10-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and telomerase RNA (TR) represent the enzymatically active components of telomerase. In the complex, TR provides the template for the addition of telomeric repeats to telomeres, a protective structure at the end of linear chromosomes. Human TR with a mutation in the template region has been previously shown to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells in vitro. In this report, we examined the effects of a mutation in the template of a virus encoded TR (vTR) on herpesvirus-induced tumorigenesis in vivo. For this purpose, we used the oncogenic avian herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV) as a natural virus-host model for lymphomagenesis. We generated recombinant MDV in which the vTR template sequence was mutated from AATCCCAATC to ATATATATAT (vAU5) by two-step Red-mediated mutagenesis. Recombinant viruses harboring the template mutation replicated with kinetics comparable to parental and revertant viruses in vitro. However, mutation of the vTR template sequence completely abrogated virus-induced tumor formation in vivo, although the virus was able to undergo low-level lytic replication. To confirm that the absence of tumors was dependent on the presence of mutant vTR in the telomerase complex, a second mutation was introduced in vAU5 that targeted the P6.1 stem loop, a conserved region essential for vTR-TERT interaction. Absence of vTR-AU5 from the telomerase complex restored virus-induced lymphoma formation. To test if the attenuated vAU5 could be used as an effective vaccine against MDV, we performed vaccination-challenge studies and determined that vaccination with vAU5 completely protected chickens from lethal challenge with highly virulent MDV. Taken together, our results demonstrate 1) that mutation of the vTR template sequence can completely abrogate virus-induced tumorigenesis, likely by the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, and 2) that this strategy could be used to generate novel vaccine candidates against virus-induced

  19. Herpesvirus telomerase RNA (vTR with a mutated template sequence abrogates herpesvirus-induced lymphomagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt B Kaufer

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT and telomerase RNA (TR represent the enzymatically active components of telomerase. In the complex, TR provides the template for the addition of telomeric repeats to telomeres, a protective structure at the end of linear chromosomes. Human TR with a mutation in the template region has been previously shown to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells in vitro. In this report, we examined the effects of a mutation in the template of a virus encoded TR (vTR on herpesvirus-induced tumorigenesis in vivo. For this purpose, we used the oncogenic avian herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV as a natural virus-host model for lymphomagenesis. We generated recombinant MDV in which the vTR template sequence was mutated from AATCCCAATC to ATATATATAT (vAU5 by two-step Red-mediated mutagenesis. Recombinant viruses harboring the template mutation replicated with kinetics comparable to parental and revertant viruses in vitro. However, mutation of the vTR template sequence completely abrogated virus-induced tumor formation in vivo, although the virus was able to undergo low-level lytic replication. To confirm that the absence of tumors was dependent on the presence of mutant vTR in the telomerase complex, a second mutation was introduced in vAU5 that targeted the P6.1 stem loop, a conserved region essential for vTR-TERT interaction. Absence of vTR-AU5 from the telomerase complex restored virus-induced lymphoma formation. To test if the attenuated vAU5 could be used as an effective vaccine against MDV, we performed vaccination-challenge studies and determined that vaccination with vAU5 completely protected chickens from lethal challenge with highly virulent MDV. Taken together, our results demonstrate 1 that mutation of the vTR template sequence can completely abrogate virus-induced tumorigenesis, likely by the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, and 2 that this strategy could be used to generate novel vaccine candidates

  20. Gene Mutation as Biomarker of Radiation Induced Cell Injury and Genomic Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Syaifudin

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling and its mutation has become one of the most widely used approaches to identify genes and their functions in the context of identify and categorize genes to be used as radiation effect markers including cell and tissue sensitivities. Ionizing radiation produces genetic damage and changes in gene expression that may lead to cancer due to specific protein that controlling cell proliferation altered the function, its expression or both. P53 protein encoded by p53 gene plays an important role in protecting cell by inducing growth arrest and or cell suicide (apoptosis after deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA damage induced by mutagen such as ionizing radiation. The mutant and thereby dysfunctional of this gene was found in more than 50% of various human cancers, but it is as yet unclear how p53 mutations lead to neoplastic development. Wild-type p53 has been postulated to play a role in DNA repair, suggesting that expression of mutant forms of p53 might alter cellular resistance to the DNA damage caused by radiation. Moreover, p53 is thought to function as a cell cycle checkpoint after irradiation, also suggesting that mutant p53 might change the cellular proliferative response to radiation. p53 mutations affect the cellular response to DNA damage, either by increasing DNA repair processes or, possibly, by increasing cellular tolerance to DNA damage. The association of p53 mutations with increased radioresistance suggests that alterations in the p53 gene might lead to oncogenic transformation. Current attractive model of carcinogenesis also showed that p53 gene is the major target of radiation. The majority of p53 mutations found so far is single base pairchanges (point mutations, which result in amino acid substitutionsor truncated forms of the P53 protein, and are widely distributedthroughout the evolutionarily conserved regions of the gene. Examination of p53 mutations in human cancer also shows an association between particular

  1. Point Mutations in Centromeric Histone Induce Post-zygotic Incompatibility and Uniparental Inheritance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundaram Kuppu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The centromeric histone 3 variant (CENH3, aka CENP-A is essential for the segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis and meiosis. To better define CENH3 functional constraints, we complemented a null allele in Arabidopsis with a variety of mutant alleles, each inducing a single amino acid change in conserved residues of the histone fold domain. Many of these transgenic missense lines displayed wild-type growth and fertility on self-pollination, but exhibited frequent post-zygotic death and uniparental inheritance when crossed with wild-type plants. The failure of centromeres marked by these missense mutation in the histone fold domain of CENH3 reproduces the genome elimination syndromes described with chimeric CENH3 and CENH3 from diverged species. Additionally, evidence that a single point mutation is sufficient to generate a haploid inducer provide a simple one-step method for the identification of non-transgenic haploid inducers in existing mutagenized collections of crop species. As proof of the extreme simplicity of this approach to create haploid-inducing lines, we performed an in silico search for previously identified point mutations in CENH3 and identified an Arabidopsis line carrying the A86V substitution within the histone fold domain. This A87V non-transgenic line, while fully fertile on self-pollination, produced postzygotic death and uniparental haploids when crossed to wild type.

  2. Point Mutations in Centromeric Histone Induce Post-zygotic Incompatibility and Uniparental Inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppu, Sundaram; Tan, Ek Han; Nguyen, Hanh; Rodgers, Andrea; Comai, Luca; Chan, Simon W L; Britt, Anne B

    2015-09-01

    The centromeric histone 3 variant (CENH3, aka CENP-A) is essential for the segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis and meiosis. To better define CENH3 functional constraints, we complemented a null allele in Arabidopsis with a variety of mutant alleles, each inducing a single amino acid change in conserved residues of the histone fold domain. Many of these transgenic missense lines displayed wild-type growth and fertility on self-pollination, but exhibited frequent post-zygotic death and uniparental inheritance when crossed with wild-type plants. The failure of centromeres marked by these missense mutation in the histone fold domain of CENH3 reproduces the genome elimination syndromes described with chimeric CENH3 and CENH3 from diverged species. Additionally, evidence that a single point mutation is sufficient to generate a haploid inducer provide a simple one-step method for the identification of non-transgenic haploid inducers in existing mutagenized collections of crop species. As proof of the extreme simplicity of this approach to create haploid-inducing lines, we performed an in silico search for previously identified point mutations in CENH3 and identified an Arabidopsis line carrying the A86V substitution within the histone fold domain. This A87V non-transgenic line, while fully fertile on self-pollination, produced postzygotic death and uniparental haploids when crossed to wild type.

  3. Mutational spectra of Salmonella typhimurium revertants induced by chlorohydroxyfuranones, byproducts of chlorine disinfection of drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knasmüller, S; Zöhrer, E; Kronberg, L; Kundi, M; Franzén, R; Schulte-Hermann, R

    1996-03-01

    The base substitution specificities of 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX), 3-chloro-4-(chloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (CMCF), 3,4-dichloro-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MCA), and chloromalonaldehyde (CMA), a putative breakdown product of MCA, were examined in the hisG46 gene and in the hisG428 gene of Salmonella typhimurium using allele specific oligonucleotide hybridization. Although the compounds are structurally closely related, they induced substantially different mutation spectra: MCA and CMA caused primarily GC-->AT transitions in the hisG46 allele (target sequence CCC), in particular, at the second position of the codon in strain TA100. In TA100 the mutation spectrum of MCA was similar to that of CMA. The mutational specificity of MCA can be explained as a consequence of misincorporation opposite to cyclic etheno adducts identical to those formed by the carcinogen vinyl chloride. The spectra induced by MX and CMCF in TA100 were almost identical but distinctively different from the spectra of MCA and CMA. Both compounds induced primarily GC-->TA transversions, in particular, at the second position of the codon, and to a lesser extent in the first position of the codon. An identical site bias is induced by carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic amines as a consequence of formation of (noncyclic) guanosine adducts. In hisG428 (target sequence TAA) MX induced again primarily GC-->TA transversions in Tyr tRNA genes (supC/M) and, to a lesser extent, intragenic AT-->TA transversions (TAA-->AAA). The possible involvement of guanosine and adenosine adducts in the mutational specificity of MX is addressed.

  4. Deficiency of the DNA repair protein nibrin increases the basal but not the radiation induced mutation frequency in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessendorf, Petra [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany); Vijg, Jan [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Michael F. Price Center, 1301 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Nussenzweig, André [Laboratory of Genome Integrity, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, 37 Convent Drive, Room 1106, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Digweed, Martin, E-mail: martin.digweed@charite.de [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • lacZ mutant frequencies measured in vivo in mouse models of radiosensitive Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome. • Spontaneous mutation frequencies are increased in lymphatic tissue due to Nbn mutation. • Single base transitions, not deletions, dominate the mutation spectrum. • Radiation induced mutation frequencies are not increased due to Nbn mutation. - Abstract: Nibrin (NBN) is a member of a DNA repair complex together with MRE11 and RAD50. The complex is associated particularly with the repair of DNA double strand breaks and with the regulation of cell cycle check points. Hypomorphic mutation of components of the complex leads to human disorders characterised by radiosensitivity and increased tumour occurrence, particularly of the lymphatic system. We have examined here the relationship between DNA damage, mutation frequency and mutation spectrum in vitro and in vivo in mouse models carrying NBN mutations and a lacZ reporter plasmid. We find that NBN mutation leads to increased spontaneous DNA damage in fibroblasts in vitro and high basal mutation rates in lymphatic tissue of mice in vivo. The characteristic mutation spectrum is dominated by single base transitions rather than the deletions and complex rearrangements expected after abortive repair of DNA double strand breaks. We conclude that in the absence of wild type nibrin, the repair of spontaneous errors, presumably arising during DNA replication, makes a major contribution to the basal mutation rate. This applies also to cells heterozygous for an NBN null mutation. Mutation frequencies after irradiation in vivo were not increased in mice with nibrin mutations as might have been expected considering the radiosensitivity of NBS patient cells in vitro. Evidently apoptosis is efficient, even in the absence of wild type nibrin.

  5. Spontaneous and induced chromosomal damage and mutations in Bloom Syndrome mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanping; Heddle, John A

    2004-10-04

    Bloom Syndrome (BS) is characterized by both cancer and genomic instability, including chromosomal aberrations, sister chromosome exchanges, and mutations. Since BS heterozygotes are much more frequent than homozygotes, the issue of the sensitivity of heterozygotes to cancer is an important one. This and many other questions concerning the effects of BLM (the gene responsible for the BS) are more easily studied in mice than in humans. To gain insight into genomic instability associated with loss of function of BLM, which codes for a DNA helicase, we compared frequencies of micronuclei, somatic mutations, and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in Blmtm3Brd homozygous, heterozygous, and wild-type mice carrying a cII transgenic reporter gene. It should be noted that the Blmtm3Brd is inserted into the endogenous locus with a partial duplication of the gene, so some function of the locus may be retained. The cII reporter gene was introduced from the Big Blue mouse by crossing them with Blmtm3Brd mice. All measurements were made on F2 mice from this cross. The reticulocytes of Blmtm3Brd homozygous mice had more micronuclei than heterozygous or wild-type mice (4.5, 2.7, and 2.5 per thousand, respectively; P 0.05). Mutation measurements were also made on mice that had been treated with ethyl-nitrosourea (ENU) because Bloom Syndrome cells are sensitive to ethylating agents. The ENU-induced mutation frequency in Blmtm3Brd homozygous, heterozygous, and wild mice were 54 x 10(-5), 35 x 10(-5), and 25 x 10(-5) mutants/plaques, respectively. ENU induced more mutations in Blmtm3Brd homozygous mice than in wild-type mice (P Bloom Syndrome except that they have normal frequencies of spontaneous mutation. The fact that these mice have elevated rates of both cancer and chromosomal aberrations (as shown by more micronuclei and LOH) but normal rates of spontaneous mutation, shows the greater importance of chromosomal events than mutations in the origin of their cancers.

  6. Mutations in BALB mitochondrial DNA induce CCL20 up-regulation promoting tumorigenic phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sligh, James [Department of Medicine—Dermatology Division, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Janda, Jaroslav [University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Jandova, Jana, E-mail: jjandova@email.arizona.edu [Department of Medicine—Dermatology Division, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Alterations in mitochondrial DNA are commonly found in various human cancers. • Mutations in BALB mitochondrial DNA induce up-regulation of chemokine CCL20. • Increased growth and motility of mtBALB cells is associated with CCL20 levels. • mtDNA changes in BALB induce in vivo tumor growth through CCL20 up-regulation. • Mutations in mitochondrial DNA play important roles in keratinocyte neoplasia. - Abstract: mtDNA mutations are common in human cancers and are thought to contribute to the process of neoplasia. We examined the role of mtDNA mutations in skin cancer by generating fibroblast cybrids harboring a mutation in the gene encoding the mitochondrial tRNA for arginine. This somatic mutation (9821insA) was previously reported in UV-induced hyperkeratotic skin tumors in hairless mice and confers specific tumorigenic phenotypes to mutant cybrids. Microarray analysis revealed and RT-PCR along with Western blot analysis confirmed the up-regulation of CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 in mtBALB haplotype containing the mt-Tr 9821insA allele compared to wild type mtB6 haplotype. Based on reported role of CCL20 in cancer progression we examined whether the hyper-proliferation and enhanced motility of mtBALB haplotype would be associated with CCL20 levels. Treatment of both genotypes with recombinant CCL20 (rmCCL20) resulted in enhanced growth and motility of mtB6 cybrids. Furthermore, the acquired somatic alteration increased the in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids through the up-regulation of CCL20 since neutralizing antibody significantly decreased in vivo tumor growth of these cells; and tumors from anti-CCL20 treated mice injected with mtBALB cybrids showed significantly decreased CCL20 levels. When rmCCL20 or mtBALB cybrids were used as chemotactic stimuli, mtB6 cybrids showed increased motility while anti-CCL20 antibody decreased the migration and in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids. Moreover, the inhibitors of MAPK signaling and NF

  7. Intersex (ix) mutations of Drosophila melanogaster cause nonrandom cell death in genital disc and can induce tumours in genitals in response to decapentaplegic (dppdisk) mutations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. N. chatterjee; P. Chatterjee; S. Kuthe; M. Acharyya-Ari; R. Chatterjee

    2015-06-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the intersex (ix) is a terminally positioned gene in somatic sex determination hierarchy and function with the female specific product of double sex (DSXF) to implement female sexual differentiation. The null phenotype of ix is to transform diplo-X individuals into intersexes while leaving haplo-X animals unaffected. This study on the effect of different intersex mutations on genital disc development provides the following major results: (i) similar range of a characteristic array of morphological structures (from almost double sex terminalia to extreme reduction of terminal appendages) was displayed by the terminalia of XX ix1/ix1, XX ix2/ix2 and XX ix5/ix5 individuals; (ii) an increased number of apoptotic cells were found to occur in a localized manner in mature third instar larval genital discs of ix individuals; (iii) ix mutations can induce high frequency of neoplastic tumours in genitals in the presence of decapentaplegic (dppdisk) mutations; and (iv) heteroallelic combinations of dppdisk mutations can also induce tumours in intersex genitals with variable expressivity. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that: (i) loss of function of ix causes massive cell death in both male and female genital primordia of genital discs, resulting phenotype mimicking in male and female characteristics in genitals; and (ii) at the discs, the apoptotic cells persist as ‘undead’ cells that can induce oncogenic transformation in the neighbouring disc cells when dpp signalling is blocked or reduced by dppdisk mutations.

  8. X-ray-induced bystander responses reduce spontaneous mutations in V79 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Katsumi; Matsumoto, Hideki; Usami, Noriko; Tomita, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    The potential for carcinogenic risks is increased by radiation-induced bystander responses; these responses are the biological effects in unirradiated cells that receive signals from the neighboring irradiated cells. Bystander responses have attracted attention in modern radiobiology because they are characterized by non-linear responses to low-dose radiation. We used a synchrotron X-ray microbeam irradiation system developed at the Photon Factory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK, and showed that nitric oxide (NO)-mediated bystander cell death increased biphasically in a dose-dependent manner. Here, we irradiated five cell nuclei using 10 × 10 µm2 5.35 keV X-ray beams and then measured the mutation frequency at the hypoxanthine-guanosine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus in bystander cells. The mutation frequency with the null radiation dose was 2.6 × 10–5 (background level), and the frequency decreased to 5.3 × 10–6 with a dose of approximately 1 Gy (absorbed dose in the nucleus of irradiated cells). At high doses, the mutation frequency returned to the background level. A similar biphasic dose-response effect was observed for bystander cell death. Furthermore, we found that incubation with 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO), a specific scavenger of NO, suppressed not only the biphasic increase in bystander cell death but also the biphasic reduction in mutation frequency of bystander cells. These results indicate that the increase in bystander cell death involves mechanisms that suppress mutagenesis. This study has thus shown that radiation-induced bystander responses could affect processes that protect the cell against naturally occurring alterations such as mutations. PMID:23660275

  9. TAL effector nucleases induce mutations at a pre-selected location in the genome of primary barley transformants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Toni; Holm, Preben Bach; Starker, Colby G

    2013-01-01

    . Analysis of the resulting transformants showed that TALEN-induced double strand breaks led to the introduction of short deletions at the target site. Additional analysis revealed that each barley transformant contained a range of different mutations, indicating that mutations occurred independently...

  10. X-ray-induced mutations in Escherichia coli K-12 strains with altered DNA polymerase I activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Yuki; Kawata, Masakado; Komura, Jun-ichiro; Ono, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2003-07-25

    Spectra of ionizing radiation mutagenesis were determined by sequencing X-ray-induced endogenous tonB gene mutations in Escherichia coli polA strains. We used two polA alleles, the polA1 mutation, defective for Klenow domain, and the polA107 mutation, defective for flap domain. We demonstrated that irradiation of 75 and 50 Gy X-rays could induce 3.8- and 2.6-fold more of tonB mutation in polA1 and polA107 strains, respectively, than spontaneous level. The radiation induced spectrum of 51 tonB mutations in polA1 and 51 in polA107 indicated that minus frameshift, A:T{yields}T:A transversion and G:C{yields}T:A transversion were the types of mutations increased. Previously, we have reported essentially the same X-ray-induced tonB mutation spectra in the wild-type strain. These results indicate that (1) X-rays can induce minus frameshift, A:T{yields}T:A transversion and G:C{yields}T:A transversion in E. coli and (2) presence or absence of polymerase I (PolI) of E. coli does not have any effects on the process of X-ray mutagenesis.

  11. Src mutation induces acquired lapatinib resistance in ERBB2-amplified human gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Sang Hong

    Full Text Available ERBB2-directed therapy is now a routine component of therapy for ERBB2-amplified metastatic gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas. However, there is little knowledge of the mechanisms by which these tumors develop acquired resistance to ERBB2 inhibition. To investigate this question we sought to characterize cell line models of ERBB2-amplified gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma with acquired resistance to ERBB2 inhibition. We generated lapatinib-resistant (LR subclones from an initially lapatinib-sensitive ERBB2-amplified esophageal adenocarcinoma cell line, OE19. We subsequently performed genomic characterization and functional analyses of resistant subclones with acquired lapatinib resistance. We identified a novel, acquired SrcE527K mutation in a subset of LR OE19 subclones. Cells with this mutant allele harbour increased Src phosphorylation. Genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of Src resensitized these subclones to lapatinib. Biochemically, Src mutations could activate both the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen activated protein kinase pathways in the lapatinib-treated LR OE19 cells. Ectopic expression of SrcE527K mutation also was sufficient to induce lapatinib resistance in drug-naïve cells. These results indicate that pathologic activation of Src is a potential mechanism of acquired resistance to ERBB2 inhibition in ERBB2-amplified gastroesophageal cancer. Although Src mutation has not been described in primary tumor samples, we propose that the Src hyperactivation should be investigated in the settings of acquired resistance to ERBB2 inhibition in esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma.

  12. Repeat induced point mutation in two asexual fungi, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braumann, Ilka; van den Berg, Marco; Kempken, Frank

    2008-05-01

    Repeat induced point mutation (RIP) is a gene silencing mechanism present in fungal genomes. During RIP, duplicated sequences are efficiently and irreversibly mutated by transitions from C:G to T:A. For the first time, we have identified traces of RIP in transposable elements of Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum, two biotechnologically relevant fungi. We found that RIP in P. chrysogenum has affected a large set of sequences, which also contain other mutations. On the other hand, RIP in A. niger is limited to only few sequences, but literally all mutations are RIP-like. Surprisingly, RIP occurred only in transposon sequences that have disrupted open reading frames in A. niger, a phenomenon not yet reported for other fungi. In both fungal species, we identified two sequences with strong sequence similarity to Neurospora crassa RID. RID is a putative DNA methyltransferase and the only known enzyme involved in the RIP process. Our findings suggest that both A. niger and P. chrysogenum either had a sexual past or have a sexual potential. These findings have important implications for future strain development of these fungi.

  13. Stability Test For Sorghum Mutant Lines Derived From Induced Mutations with Gamma-Ray Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Human

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sorghum breeding program had been conducted at the Center for the Application of Isotopes and Radiation Technology, BATAN. Plant genetic variability was increased through induced mutations using gamma-ray irradiation. Through selection process in successive generations, some promising mutant lines had been identified to have good agronomic characteristics with high grain yield. These breeding lines were tested in multi location trials and information of the genotypic stability was obtained to meet the requirements for officially varietal release by the Ministry of Agriculture. A total of 11 sorghum lines and varieties consisting of 8 mutant lines derived from induced mutations (B-100, B-95, B-92, B-83, B-76, B-75, B-69 and Zh-30 and 3 control varieties (Durra, UPCA-S1 and Mandau were included in the experiment. All materials were grown in 10 agro-ecologically different locations namely Gunungkidul, Bantul, Citayam, Garut, Lampung, Bogor, Anyer, Karawaci, Cianjur and Subang. In each location, the local adaptability test was conducted by randomized block design with 3 replications. Data of grain yield was used for evaluating genotypic stability using AMMI approach. Results revealed that sorghum mutation breeding had generated 3 mutant lines (B-100, B-76 and Zh-30 exhibiting grain yield significantly higher than the control varieties. These mutant lines were genetically stable in all locations so that they would be recommended for official release as new sorghum varieties to the Ministry of Agriculture

  14. Uncovering the profile of mutations of transforming growth factor beta-induced gene in Chinese corneal dystrophy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dan Hao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To uncover the mutations profile of transforming growth factor beta-induced (TGFBI gene in Chinese corneal dystrophy patients and further investigate the characteristics of genotype-phenotype correlations. METHODS: Forty-two subjects (6 unrelated families including 15 patients and 8 unaffected members, and 19 sporadic patients of Chinese origin were subjected to phenotypic and genotypic characterization. The corneal phenotypes of patients were documented by slit lamp photography. Mutation screening of the coding regions of TGFBI was performed by direct sequencing. RESULTS: We detected four corneal dystrophy types. The most frequent phenotypes were granular corneal dystrophy (GCD (including 3 families and 8 sporadic patients and lattice corneal dystrophy (LCD (including 2 families and 9 sporadic patients. The next phenotypes were corneal dystrophy of Bowman layer (CDB (1 family and 1 sporadic patient and epithelial basement membrane dystrophy (EBMD (1 sporadic patient. Six distinct mutations responsible for TGFBI corneal dystrophies were identified in 30 individuals with corneal dystrophies. Those were, p.R124H mutation in 1 family and 2 sporadic patients with GCD, p.R555W mutation in 2 families and 3 sporadic patients with GCD, p.R124C mutation in 2 families and 7 sporadic patients with LCD, p.A620D mutation in 1 sporadic patient with LCD, p.H626R mutation in 1 sporadic patient with LCD, and p.R555Q in 1 family and 1 sporadic patient with CDB. No mutation was detected in the remaining 3 atypical GCD patients and 1 EBMD patient. CONCLUSION: GCD and LCD are the most frequent phenotypes in Chinese population. R555W was the most common mutation for GCD; R124C was the most common mutation for LCD. Our findings extend the mutational spectrum of TFGBI, and this is the extensively delineated TGFBI mutation profile associated with the various corneal dystrophies in the Chinese population.

  15. P63 null mutation protects mouse oocytes from radio-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livera, G.; Petre-Lazar, B.; Guerquin, M.J.; Trautmann, E.; Coffigny, H.; Habert, R. [CEA, DSV/DRR/SEGG/LDRG, Unit Gametogenesis et Genotoxic, F-92265 Fontenay Aux Roses (France); Univ Paris 07 Denis Diderot, UFR Biol, UMR S 566, F-92265 Fontenay Aux Roses (France); INSERM, U566, F-92265 Fontenay Aux Roses (France)

    2008-07-01

    Female fertility in mammals is determined by the pool of primordial follicles and low doses of radiation induce a major loss of primordial follicles in the ovary. We investigated the expression of p53 and its homologues, p63 and p73, in the normal and irradiated neonatal ovary. p63 was the only member of the p53 family detected in oocyte nucleus. No p63 transcripts or protein were detected in the early foetal ovary. p63 production began in late pachytene-stage oocytes and peaked in diplotene oocytes in mice and humans. The production of p63 was correlated with meiotic DNA double-strand break repair. Only trans-activation (TA) isoforms were present in the ovary, with TAp63 alpha by far the most abundant in terms of mRNA and protein levels. Complete p63 null mutation did not affect normal ovary development. Irradiation rapidly triggered p63 phosphorylation. p63 null mutation prevented the cleavage of caspases-9 and -3 and the follicle loss induced by ionizing radiation. Thus, our results evidence that irradiation-induced depletion of the primordial follicle pool results from the activation of p63 in quiescent oocytes. (authors)

  16. Study of ion beam induced depolymerization using positron annihilation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puglisi, O. E-mail: opuglisi@dipchi.unict.it; Fragala, M.E.; Lynn, K.G.; Petkov, M.; Weber, M.; Somoza, A.; Dupasquier, A.; Quasso, F

    2001-04-01

    Ion beam induced depolymerization of polymers is a special class of ion beam induced chemical reaction which gives rise to catastrophic 'unzipping' of macromolecules with production of large amounts of the monomer, of the order of many hundreds monomer molecules per each macromolecule. The possible modification of the density at microscopic level prompted us to undertake a study of this effect utilizing positron annihilation techniques in Poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) before and after bombardment with He{sup +} 300 keV ions at 200 deg. C. Preliminary results shown here indicate that before bombardment there is a reproducible dependence of nano-hole distribution on the sample history. Moreover at 200 deg. C we do not detect formation of new cavities as a consequence of the strong depolymerization that occurs under the ion beam. The possible correlation of these findings with transport properties of PMMA at temperature higher than the glass transition temperature will be discussed.

  17. Genome-wide mutation avalanches induced in diploid yeast cells by a base analog or an APOBEC deaminase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artem G Lada

    Full Text Available Genetic information should be accurately transmitted from cell to cell; conversely, the adaptation in evolution and disease is fueled by mutations. In the case of cancer development, multiple genetic changes happen in somatic diploid cells. Most classic studies of the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis have been performed in haploids. We demonstrate that the parameters of the mutation process are different in diploid cell populations. The genomes of drug-resistant mutants induced in yeast diploids by base analog 6-hydroxylaminopurine (HAP or AID/APOBEC cytosine deaminase PmCDA1 from lamprey carried a stunning load of thousands of unselected mutations. Haploid mutants contained almost an order of magnitude fewer mutations. To explain this, we propose that the distribution of induced mutation rates in the cell population is uneven. The mutants in diploids with coincidental mutations in the two copies of the reporter gene arise from a fraction of cells that are transiently hypersensitive to the mutagenic action of a given mutagen. The progeny of such cells were never recovered in haploids due to the lethality caused by the inactivation of single-copy essential genes in cells with too many induced mutations. In diploid cells, the progeny of hypersensitive cells survived, but their genomes were saturated by heterozygous mutations. The reason for the hypermutability of cells could be transient faults of the mutation prevention pathways, like sanitization of nucleotide pools for HAP or an elevated expression of the PmCDA1 gene or the temporary inability of the destruction of the deaminase. The hypothesis on spikes of mutability may explain the sudden acquisition of multiple mutational changes during evolution and carcinogenesis.

  18. Genetic and molecular analyses of UV radiation-induced mutations in the fem-3 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, P.S.; De Wilde, D.; Dwarakanath, V.N. [Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth, TX (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1995-06-01

    The utility of a new target gene (fem-3) is described for investigating the molecular nature of mutagenesis in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. As a principal attribute, this system allows for the selection, maintenance and molecular analysis of any type of mutation that disrupts the gene, including deletions. In this study, 86 mutant strains were isolated, of which 79 proved to have mutations in fem-3. Twenty of these originally tested as homozygous inviable. Homozygous inviability was expected, as Stewart and coworkers had previously observed that, unlike in other organisms, most UV radiation-induced mutations in C. elegans are chromosomal rearrangements of deficiencies (Mutat. Res 249, 37-54, 1991). However, additional data, including Southern blot analyses on 49 of the strains, indicated that most of the UV radiation-induced fem-3 mutations were not deficiencies, as originally inferred from their homozygous inviability. Instead, the lethals were most likely ``coincident mutations`` in linked, essential genes that were concomitantly induced. As such, they were lost owing to genetic recombination during stock maintenance. As in mammalian cells, yeast and bacteria, the frequency of coincident mutations was much higher than would be predicted by chance. (Author).

  19. Modeling the induced mutation process in bacterial cells with defects in excision repair system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugay, A. N.; Vasilyeva, M. A.; Krasavin, E. A.; Parkhomenko, A. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    A mathematical model of the UV-induced mutation process in Escherichia coli cells with defects in the uvrA and polA genes has been developed. The model describes in detail the reaction kinetics for the excision repair system. The number of mismatches as a result of translesion synthesis is calculated for both wild-type and mutant cells. The effect of temporal modulation of the number of single-stranded DNA during postreplication repair has been predicted. A comparison of effectiveness of different repair systems has been conducted.

  20. Target DNA sequence directly regulates the frequency of activation-induced deaminase-dependent mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhangguo; Viboolsittiseri, Sawanee S; O'Connor, Brian P; Wang, Jing H

    2012-10-15

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) catalyses class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) in B lymphocytes to enhance Ab diversity. CSR involves breaking and rejoining highly repetitive switch (S) regions in the IgH (Igh) locus. S regions appear to be preferential targets of AID. To determine whether S region sequence per se, independent of Igh cis regulatory elements, can influence AID targeting efficiency and mutation frequency, we established a knock-in mouse model by inserting a core Sγ1 region into the first intron of proto-oncogene Bcl6, which is a non-Ig target of SHM. We found that the mutation frequency of the inserted Sγ1 region was dramatically higher than that of the adjacent Bcl6 endogenous sequence. Mechanistically, S region-enhanced SHM was associated with increased recruitment of AID and RNA polymerase II, together with Spt5, albeit to a lesser extent. Our studies demonstrate that target DNA sequences influence mutation frequency via regulating AID recruitment. We propose that the nucleotide sequence preference may serve as an additional layer of AID regulation by restricting its mutagenic activity to specific sequences despite the observation that AID has the potential to access the genome widely.

  1. Vincristine-induced central neurotoxicity in a collie homozygous for the ABCB1Δ mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, L; Bryan, J N; Mealey, K L; Chen, A

    2012-03-01

    A six-year-old, neutered, female collie was presented to an oncology specialty service after developing tetraparesis and self-mutilation that progressively worsened while receiving chemotherapy for lymphoma. Neurologic examination revealed ataxia, paresis and diminished conscious proprioception in all limbs with entire spinal reflexes. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spinal cord was normal. Electromyography of the limbs ruled out a vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis and cerebrospinal fluid and serum testing for Neospora and Toxoplasma were normal. Results of MDR1 genotyping revealed that the dog was homozygous for the ABCB1-1Δ (MDR1) mutation. This clinical presentation strongly resembled the effects seen from inadvertent intrathecal administration of vincristine in humans. Dogs that are homozygous for the ABCB1-1Δ (MDR1) mutation should not receive standard dosages of chemotherapy drugs known to be eliminated by P-glycoprotein, the gene product of ABCB1. Testing for this mutation is strongly recommended before chemotherapy initiation for at-risk breeds.

  2. Inactivation and inducible oncogenic mutation of p53 in gene targeted pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Leuchs

    Full Text Available Mutation of the tumor suppressor p53 plays a major role in human carcinogenesis. Here we describe gene-targeted porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and live pigs carrying a latent TP53(R167H mutant allele, orthologous to oncogenic human mutant TP53(R175H and mouse Trp53(R172H, that can be activated by Cre recombination. MSCs carrying the latent TP53(R167H mutant allele were analyzed in vitro. Homozygous cells were p53 deficient, and on continued culture exhibited more rapid proliferation, anchorage independent growth, and resistance to the apoptosis-inducing chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin, all characteristic of cellular transformation. Cre mediated recombination activated the latent TP53(R167H allele as predicted, and in homozygous cells expressed mutant p53-R167H protein at a level ten-fold greater than wild-type MSCs, consistent with the elevated levels found in human cancer cells. Gene targeted MSCs were used for nuclear transfer and fifteen viable piglets were produced carrying the latent TP53(R167H mutant allele in heterozygous form. These animals will allow study of p53 deficiency and expression of mutant p53-R167H to model human germline, or spontaneous somatic p53 mutation. This work represents the first inactivation and mutation of the gatekeeper tumor suppressor gene TP53 in a non-rodent mammal.

  3. Heterodimeric TALENs induce targeted heritable mutations in the crustacean Daphnia magna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Naitou

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs are artificial nucleases harboring a customizable DNA-binding domain and a FokI nuclease domain. The high specificity of the DNA-binding domain and the ease of design have enabled researchers to use TALENs for targeted mutagenesis in various organisms. Here, we report the development of TALEN-dependent targeted gene disruption in the crustacean Daphnia magna, the emerging model for ecological and toxicological genomics. First, a reporter transgene DsRed2 (EF1α-1::DsRed2 was targeted. Using the Golden Gate method with a GoldyTALEN scaffold, we constructed homodimeric and heterodimeric TALENs containing wild-type and ELD/KKR FokI domains. mRNAs that coded for either the customized homodimeric or heterodimeric TALENs were injected into one-cell-stage embryos. The high mortality of embryos injected with homodimeric TALEN mRNAs prevented us from detecting mutations. In contrast, embryos injected with heterodimeric TALEN mRNAs survived and 78%–87% of the adults lost DsRed2 fluorescence in a large portion of cells throughout the body. In addition, these adults produced non-fluorescent progenies, all of which carried mutations at the dsRed2 locus. We also tested heterodimeric TALENs targeted for the endogenous eyeless gene and found that biallelic mutations could be transmitted through germ line cells at a rate of up to 22%. Both somatic and heritable mutagenesis efficiencies of TALENs were higher than those of the CRISPR/Cas9 system that we recently developed. These results suggest that the TALEN system may efficiently induce heritable mutations into the target genes, which will further contribute to the progress of functional genomics in D. magna.

  4. Heterodimeric TALENs induce targeted heritable mutations in the crustacean Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naitou, Akiko; Kato, Yasuhiko; Nakanishi, Takashi; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Hajime

    2015-02-13

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are artificial nucleases harboring a customizable DNA-binding domain and a FokI nuclease domain. The high specificity of the DNA-binding domain and the ease of design have enabled researchers to use TALENs for targeted mutagenesis in various organisms. Here, we report the development of TALEN-dependent targeted gene disruption in the crustacean Daphnia magna, the emerging model for ecological and toxicological genomics. First, a reporter transgene DsRed2 (EF1α-1::DsRed2) was targeted. Using the Golden Gate method with a GoldyTALEN scaffold, we constructed homodimeric and heterodimeric TALENs containing wild-type and ELD/KKR FokI domains. mRNAs that coded for either the customized homodimeric or heterodimeric TALENs were injected into one-cell-stage embryos. The high mortality of embryos injected with homodimeric TALEN mRNAs prevented us from detecting mutations. In contrast, embryos injected with heterodimeric TALEN mRNAs survived and 78%-87% of the adults lost DsRed2 fluorescence in a large portion of cells throughout the body. In addition, these adults produced non-fluorescent progenies, all of which carried mutations at the dsRed2 locus. We also tested heterodimeric TALENs targeted for the endogenous eyeless gene and found that biallelic mutations could be transmitted through germ line cells at a rate of up to 22%. Both somatic and heritable mutagenesis efficiencies of TALENs were higher than those of the CRISPR/Cas9 system that we recently developed. These results suggest that the TALEN system may efficiently induce heritable mutations into the target genes, which will further contribute to the progress of functional genomics in D. magna.

  5. Use of an in vitro adventitious bud technique for mutation breeding of Begonia x hiemalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roest, S.; van Berkel, M.A.E.; Bokelmann, G.S.; Broertjes, C. (Instituut voor Toepassing van Atoomenergie in de Landbouw, Wageningen (Netherlands))

    1981-06-01

    An in vitro propagation of two genotypes of Begonia x hiemalis was achieved through adventitious shoot formation on (sub) cultured leaf-disc explants and subsequent transplantation to soil of explant-parts with adventitious shoots. After irradiation of detached leaves with different doses of X-rays and two cycles of adventitious shoot formation on in vitro (sub) cultured leaf-disc explants, plantlets were produced. About 30% of these plants was mutated with respect to e.g. the colour, size and form of the leaves and flowers. The great majority of the mutants (98.5%) proved to be solid (non-chimeric).

  6. [Identification of mutations associated with coronary artery lesion susceptibility in Kawasaki disease by targeted enrichment of genomic region sequencing technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, D Y; Song, S R; Xie, L J; Qiu, F; Yang, J; Xiao, T T; Huang, M

    2017-07-02

    Objective: To screen and identify the mutations in Kawasaki disease by targeted enrichment of genomic region sequencing technique and investigate susceptibility genes associated with coronary artery lesion. Method: This was a case-control study.A total of 114 patients diagnosed as Kawasaki disease treated in Shanghai Children's Hospital between December 2015 and November 2016 were studied and another 45 healthy children who were physically examined in outpatient department were enrolled as control group. Patients were divided into two groups based on the results of echocardiogram. Peripheral venous blood was obtained from patients and controls. Genomic DNA was extracted. SeqCap EZ Choice libraries were prepared by targeted enrichment of genomic region technology. Then the libraries were sequenced to identify susceptibility genes associated with coronary artery lesion in patients diagnosed as Kawasaki disease.Susceptible genes were identified by Burden test, Pearson chi-square test or Fisher's exact probability test. Result: There was statistically significant difference in TNFRSF11B(rs2073618)G>C(p.N3K)mutation and GG/GC/CC genotype between Kawasaki disease group and control group(χ(2)=15.52, P=0.00). There was statistically significant difference in TNFRSF13B(rs34562254)C>T(p.P251L)mutation(χ(2)=10.40, P=0.01)and LEFTY1(rs360057)T>G(p.D322A)mutation(χ(2)=8.505, P=0.01)between patients with coronary artery lesions and those without. Conclusion: Targeted enrichment of genomic region sequencing technology can be used to do primary screening for the susceptible genes associated with coronary artery lesions in Chinese Kawasaki patients and may provide theoretical basis for larger sample investigation of risk prediction score standard in Kawasaki disease.

  7. Familial manganese-induced neurotoxicity due to mutations in SLC30A10 or SLC39A14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra

    2017-08-05

    Over the last few years, two rare, familial diseases that lead to the onset of manganese (Mn)-induced neurotoxicity have been discovered. Loss-of-function mutations in SLC30A10, a Mn efflux transporter, or SLC39A14, a Mn influx transporter, increase Mn levels in blood and brain, and induce severe neurotoxicity. The discoveries of these genetic diseases have transformed our understanding of Mn homeostasis, detoxification, and neurotoxicity. Current knowledge about the mechanisms by which mutations in these transporters alter Mn homeostasis to induce human disease is reviewed here. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Afatinib induces apoptosis in NSCLC without EGFR mutation through Elk-1-mediated suppression of CIP2A

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, Ting-Ting; Wang, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Yen-Lin; Lai, Chih-Cheng; Chang, Fang-Yu; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Chao, Chung-Hao H.; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Huang, Yuh-Chin T.; Yu, Chong-Jen; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Afatinib has anti-tumor effect in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation. We found afatinib can also induce apoptosis in NSCLC cells without EGFR mutation through CIP2A pathway. Four NSCLC cell lines (H358 H441 H460 and A549) were treated with afatinib to determine their sensitivity to afatinib-induced cell death and apoptosis. The effects of CIP2A on afatinib-induced apoptosis were confirmed by overexpression and knockdown of CIP2A express...

  9. The Relationship between Neutralization Techniques and Induced Abortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalateh Sadati, Ahmad; Tabei, Seyed Ziaaddin; Salehzadeh, Hamzeh; Rahnavard, Farnaz; Namavar Jahromi, Bahia; Hemmati, Soroor

    2014-01-01

    Background: Induced abortion is not only a serious threat for women’s health, but also a controversial topic for its ethical and moral problems. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between neutralization techniques and attempting to commit abortion in married women with unintended pregnancy. Methods: After in-depth interviews with some women who had attempted abortion, neutralization themes were gathered. Next, to analyze the data quantitatively, a questionnaire was created including demographic and psychosocial variables specifically related to neutralization. The participants were divided into two groups (abortion and control) of unintended pregnancy and were then compared. Results: Analysis of psychosocial variables revealed a significant difference in the two groups at neutralization, showing that neutralization in the control group (56.97±10.24) was higher than that in the abortion group (44.19±12.44). To evaluate the findings more accurately, we examined the causal factors behind the behaviors of the abortion group. Binary logistic regression showed that among psychosocial factors, neutralization significantly affected abortion (95% CI=1.07-1.35). Conclusion: Despite the network of many factors affecting induced abortion, neutralization plays an important role in reinforcing the tendency to attempt abortion. Furthermore, the decline of religious beliefs, as a result of the secular context of the modern world, seems to have an important role in neutralizing induced abortion. PMID:25349851

  10. The Relationship between Neutralization Techniques and Induced Abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalateh Sadati, Ahmad; Tabei, Seyed Ziaaddin; Salehzadeh, Hamzeh; Rahnavard, Farnaz; Namavar Jahromi, Bahia; Hemmati, Soroor

    2014-04-01

    Induced abortion is not only a serious threat for women's health, but also a controversial topic for its ethical and moral problems. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between neutralization techniques and attempting to commit abortion in married women with unintended pregnancy. After in-depth interviews with some women who had attempted abortion, neutralization themes were gathered. Next, to analyze the data quantitatively, a questionnaire was created including demographic and psychosocial variables specifically related to neutralization. The participants were divided into two groups (abortion and control) of unintended pregnancy and were then compared. Analysis of psychosocial variables revealed a significant difference in the two groups at neutralization, showing that neutralization in the control group (56.97±10.24) was higher than that in the abortion group (44.19±12.44). To evaluate the findings more accurately, we examined the causal factors behind the behaviors of the abortion group. Binary logistic regression showed that among psychosocial factors, neutralization significantly affected abortion (95% CI=1.07-1.35). Despite the network of many factors affecting induced abortion, neutralization plays an important role in reinforcing the tendency to attempt abortion. Furthermore, the decline of religious beliefs, as a result of the secular context of the modern world, seems to have an important role in neutralizing induced abortion.

  11. Laser-induced backside wet cleaning technique for glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Tsu-Shien; Tsai, Chwan-Huei

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the laser-induced backside wet cleaning techniques for glass substrates. Two kinds of laser cleaning techniques are proposed in this study. The first involves applying an Nd:YAG laser to the backside of the substrate which is submerged in water. A metal plate is placed below the glass substrate. Most of the laser energy will be absorbed by the metal plate. The metal then vaporizes the water and generates a turbulent bubble flow. The bubble flow removes the alumina particles from the surface of the glass substrate. The second involves using a CO2 laser to generate turbulent bubble flow to remove the particles. Both methods were successfully demonstrated for the removal of submicron particles of 0.5 μm in size. The phenomena of bubble generation and diffusion are presented in the paper. Because the laser is applied to the backside of the substrate, the damage due to the laser heat can be significantly reduced. The quality and efficient of the backside processing is better than those of the front side processing. The proposed techniques have great potential to provide an improved solution for glass cleaning.

  12. A comparison of mutations induced by accelerated iron particles versus those induced by low earth orbit space radiation in the FEM-3 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, P. S.; Hlavacek, A.; Wilde, H.; Lewicki, D.; Schubert, W.; Kern, R. G.; Kazarians, G. A.; Benton, E. V.; Benton, E. R.; Nelson, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The fem-3 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans was employed to determine the mutation frequency as well as the nature of mutations induced by low earth orbit space radiation ambient to Space Shuttle flight STS-76. Recovered mutations were compared to those induced by accelerated iron ions generated by the AGS synchrotron accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory. For logistical reasons, dauer larvae were prepared at TCU, transported to either Kennedy Space Center or Brookhaven National Laboratory, flown in space or irradiated, returned to TCU and screened for mutants. A total of 25 fem-3 mutants were recovered after the shuttle flight and yielded a mutation frequency of 2.1x10(-5), roughly 3.3-fold higher than the spontaneous rate of 6.3x10(-6). Four of the mutations were homozygous inviable, suggesting that they were large deletions encompassing fem-3 as well as neighboring, essential genes. Southern blot analyses revealed that one of the 25 contained a polymorphism in fem-3, further evidence that space radiation can induce deletions. While no polymorphisms were detected among the iron ion-induced mutations, three of the 15 mutants were homozygous inviable, which is in keeping with previous observations that high LET iron particles generate deficiencies. These data provide evidence, albeit indirect, that an important mutagenic component of ambient space radiation is high LET charged particles such as iron ions.

  13. Reduced Tyk2 gene expression in β-cells due to natural mutation determines susceptibility to virus-induced diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Izumi, Kenichi; Mine, Keiichiro; Inoue, Yoshitaka; Teshima, Miho; Ogawa, Shuichiro; Kai, Yuji; Kurafuji, Toshinobu; Hirakawa, Kanako; Miyakawa, Daiki; Ikeda, Haruka; Inada, Akari; Hara, Manami; Yamada, Hisakata; Akashi, Koichi; Niho, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that viruses play an important role in the development of diabetes. Although the diabetogenic encephalomyocarditis strain D virus induces diabetes in restricted lines of inbred mice, the susceptibility genes to virus-induced diabetes have not been identified. We report here that novel Tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2) gene mutations are present in virus-induced diabetes-sensitive SJL and SWR mice. Mice carrying the mutant Tyk2 gene on the virus-resistant C57BL/6 backgrou...

  14. The dioxin TCDD protects against aflatoxin-induced mutation in female rats, but not in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, A S; Oda, Y; Stuart, G R; Holcroft, J; de Boer, J G

    2004-07-11

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an environmental contaminant and a potent carcinogen in laboratory rodents. When combined with other environmental toxins, it has been shown to increase the (geno)toxicity of some compounds. In this study, the effect of TCDD on the mutagenicity of aflatoxin-B1 (AFB1) was examined in the rat liver using a lacI transgenic rodent mutation assay. AFB1 induces GC-->TA transversions. Since TCDD is known to have a differential effect in male and female rodents, both sexes were studied. The data showed that a 6-week pre-exposure to TCDD had no significant effect on the frequency of aflatoxin-induced mutation in the liver of male rats. However, the TCDD treatment completely prevented the aflatoxin-induced transversion mutations in female animals.

  15. Nickel may contribute to EGFR mutation and synergistically promotes tumor invasion in EGFR-mutated lung cancer via nickel-induced microRNA-21 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Yu-Hu; Liou, Saou-Hsing; Wong, Ruey-Hong; Chen, Chih-Yi; Lee, Huei

    2015-08-19

    We recently reported that nickel accumulation in lung tissues may be associated with an increased in p53 mutation risk via reduced DNA repair activity. Here, we hypothesized that nickel accumulation in lung tissues could contribute to EGFR mutations in never-smokers with lung cancer. We enrolled 76 never-smoking patients to evaluate nickel level in adjacent normal lung tissues by ICP-MS. The prevalence of EGFR mutations was significantly higher in the high-nickel subgroup than in the low-nickel subgroup. Intriguingly, the OR for the occurrence of EGFR mutations in female, adenocarcinoma, and female adenocarcinoma patients was higher than that of all patients. Mechanistically, SPRY2 and RECK expressions were decreased by nickel-induced miR-21 via activation of the EGFR/NF-κB signaling pathway, which promoted invasiveness in lung cancer cells, and particularly in the cells with EGFR L858R expression vector transfection. The patients' nickel levels were associated with miR-21 expression levels. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed poorer overall survival (OS) and shorter relapse free survival (RFS) in the high-nickel subgroup than in low-nickel subgroup. The high-nickel/high-miR-21 subgroup had shorter OS and RFS periods when compared to the low-nickel/low-miR-21 subgroup. Our findings support previous epidemiological studies indicating that nickel exposure may not only contribute to cancer incidence but also promote tumor invasion in lung cancer.

  16. Two rare human mitofusin 2 mutations alter mitochondrial dynamics and induce retinal and cardiac pathology in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H Eschenbacher

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial fusion is essential to organelle homeostasis and organ health. Inexplicably, loss of function mutations of mitofusin 2 (Mfn2 specifically affect neurological tissue, causing Charcot Marie Tooth syndrome (CMT and atypical optic atrophy. As CMT-linked Mfn2 mutations are predominantly within the GTPase domain, we postulated that Mfn2 mutations in other functional domains might affect non-neurological tissues. Here, we defined in vitro and in vivo consequences of rare human mutations in the poorly characterized Mfn2 HR1 domain. Human exome sequencing data identified 4 rare non-synonymous Mfn2 HR1 domain mutations, two bioinformatically predicted as damaging. Recombinant expression of these (Mfn2 M393I and R400Q in Mfn2-null murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs revealed incomplete rescue of characteristic mitochondrial fragmentation, compared to wild-type human Mfn2 (hMfn2; Mfn2 400Q uniquely induced mitochondrial fragmentation in normal MEFs. To compare Mfn2 mutation effects in neurological and non-neurological tissues in vivo, hMfn2 and the two mutants were expressed in Drosophila eyes or heart tubes made deficient in endogenous fly mitofusin (dMfn through organ-specific RNAi expression. The two mutants induced similar Drosophila eye phenotypes: small eyes and an inability to rescue the eye pathology induced by suppression of dMfn. In contrast, Mfn2 400Q induced more severe cardiomyocyte mitochondrial fragmentation and cardiac phenotypes than Mfn2 393I, including heart tube dilation, depressed fractional shortening, and progressively impaired negative geotaxis. These data reveal a central functional role for Mfn2 HR1 domains, describe organ-specific effects of two Mfn2 HR1 mutations, and strongly support prospective studies of Mfn2 400Q in heritable human heart disease of unknown genetic etiology.

  17. PKA regulatory subunit 1A inactivating mutation induces serotonin signaling in primary pigmented nodular adrenal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bram, Zakariae; Louiset, Estelle; Ragazzon, Bruno; Renouf, Sylvie; Wils, Julien; Duparc, Céline; Boutelet, Isabelle; Rizk-Rabin, Marthe; Libé, Rossella; Young, Jacques; Carson, Dennis; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Szarek, Eva; Martinez, Antoine; Stratakis, Constantine A; Bertherat, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Hervé

    2016-09-22

    Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) is a rare cause of ACTH-independent hypercortisolism. The disease is primarily caused by germline mutations of the protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunit 1A (PRKAR1A) gene, which induces constitutive activation of PKA in adrenocortical cells. Hypercortisolism is thought to result from PKA hyperactivity, but PPNAD tissues exhibit features of neuroendocrine differentiation, which may lead to stimulation of steroidogenesis by abnormally expressed neurotransmitters. We hypothesized that serotonin (5-HT) may participate in the pathophysiology of PPNAD-associated hypercortisolism. We show that PPNAD tissues overexpress the 5-HT synthesizing enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase type 2 (Tph2) and the serotonin receptors types 4, 6, and 7, leading to formation of an illicit stimulatory serotonergic loop whose pharmacological inhibition in vitro decreases cortisol production. In the human PPNAD cell line CAR47, the PKA inhibitor H-89 decreases 5-HT4 and 5-HT7 receptor expression. Moreover, in the human adrenocortical cell line H295R, inhibition of PRKAR1A expression increases the expression of Tph2 and 5-HT4/6/7 receptors, an effect that is blocked by H-89. These findings show that the serotonergic process observed in PPNAD tissues results from PKA activation by PRKAR1A mutations. They also suggest that Tph inhibitors may represent efficient treatments of hypercortisolism in patients with PPNAD.

  18. PKA regulatory subunit 1A inactivating mutation induces serotonin signaling in primary pigmented nodular adrenal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bram, Zakariae; Louiset, Estelle; Renouf, Sylvie; Duparc, Céline; Boutelet, Isabelle; Rizk-Rabin, Marthe; Libé, Rossella; Young, Jacques; Carson, Dennis; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Szarek, Eva; Martinez, Antoine; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Bertherat, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) is a rare cause of ACTH-independent hypercortisolism. The disease is primarily caused by germline mutations of the protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunit 1A (PRKAR1A) gene, which induces constitutive activation of PKA in adrenocortical cells. Hypercortisolism is thought to result from PKA hyperactivity, but PPNAD tissues exhibit features of neuroendocrine differentiation, which may lead to stimulation of steroidogenesis by abnormally expressed neurotransmitters. We hypothesized that serotonin (5-HT) may participate in the pathophysiology of PPNAD-associated hypercortisolism. We show that PPNAD tissues overexpress the 5-HT synthesizing enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase type 2 (Tph2) and the serotonin receptors types 4, 6, and 7, leading to formation of an illicit stimulatory serotonergic loop whose pharmacological inhibition in vitro decreases cortisol production. In the human PPNAD cell line CAR47, the PKA inhibitor H-89 decreases 5-HT4 and 5-HT7 receptor expression. Moreover, in the human adrenocortical cell line H295R, inhibition of PRKAR1A expression increases the expression of Tph2 and 5-HT4/6/7 receptors, an effect that is blocked by H-89. These findings show that the serotonergic process observed in PPNAD tissues results from PKA activation by PRKAR1A mutations. They also suggest that Tph inhibitors may represent efficient treatments of hypercortisolism in patients with PPNAD. PMID:27699247

  19. Study on mutation induced effect of gamma ray and DES on black bean phaseolus vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Thi Dinh; Pham Le Ha; Nguyen Van Toan; Le Xuan Tham [Nuclear Research Institute, Radiobiology Department, Dalat (Viet Nam)

    2001-03-01

    The study on mutation induced effect of gamma ray and DES on black bean Phaseolus vulgaris was carried out at Radiobiology Department, Nuclear Research Institute of Dalat. Dry seeds of variety No.1847 - Bonita - Cuba in set of 13 black bean varieties were irradiated with gamma ray from {sup 60}Co source at dose range from 150 Gy to 350 Gy and treated with DES at concentration from 0.1% to 0.3% in 2 hours for experiments in laboratory. The doses of 200, 250, 300 Gy and concentration of 0.2% DES in 2 hours were selected to treat dry seeds for experiments on the field. In populations of M{sub 1} generation, the height, number of branches and fruits per plant, number of seeds per fruit were decreased with increasing of irradiation doses. In populations of M{sub 2} generation, individual variants in leaf shape, chlorophyll, short stem, dwarf, early maturity, flowering in very short time were obtained and selected in all treatment cases. Mutation frequency at dose of 300 Gy was higher than that in other treatment cases, but ratio of sterility is also largest. The mutant lines of early maturity and short stem with flowering in very short time are promised materials for further studies. (author)

  20. Magnetic separation and antibiotics selection enable enrichment of cells with ZFN/TALEN-induced mutations.

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    Hyojin Kim

    Full Text Available The ability to enrich cells with targeted mutations greatly facilitates the process of using engineered nucleases, including zinc-finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases, to construct such cells. We previously used surrogate reporters to enrich cells containing nuclease-induced mutations via flow cytometry. This method is, however, limited by the availability of flow cytometers. Furthermore, sorted cells occasionally fail to form colonies after exposure to a strong laser and hydrostatic pressure. Here we describe two different types of novel reporters that enable mutant cell enrichment without the use of flow cytometers. We designed reporters that express H-2K(k, a surface antigen, and the hygromycin resistance protein (Hygro(R, respectively, when insertions or deletions are generated at the target sequences by the activity of engineered nucleases. After cotransfection of these reporters and the engineered nuclease-encoding plasmids, H-2K(k- and Hygro(R-expressing cells were isolated using magnetic separation and hygromycin treatment, respectively. We found that mutant cells were drastically enriched in the isolated cells, suggesting that these two reporters enable efficient enrichment of mutants. We propose that these two reporters will greatly facilitate the use of engineered nucleases in a wider range of biomedical research.

  1. Rice improvement through radiation-induced mutation for cultivation in South Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do Khac Thinh; Hung Phi Oanh; Nguyen Thi Cuc; Nguyen Ngoc Quynh [Institute of Agricultural Science of South Vietnam, Ho Chi Minh (Viet Nam)

    2001-03-01

    For past years, rice varieties cultivated in South Vietnam originated from domestic hybridisation or from IRRI. Rice mutation breeding has been initiated for recent years. To meet the requirement of rice production diversification in different agro-ecological areas and rice genetic resources, from 1993 Institute of Agricultural Science of South Vietnam has carried out rice improvement by induced mutation of radiation. The mutagen was gamma rays of {sup 60}Co. The goal is to create inherited variations, which cannot be obtained from other breeding methods, specially important characters of rice varieties (high tolerance to acid sulfate soil, lodging resistance combined with early maturity), which were difficult to gain by hybridisation. With {sup 60}Co gamma rays, doses of 10-20 krad, dose rate of 280 krad/h, dry and germinated seeds of introduced and local rice varieties (IR 64, IR 9729, IR 50404, IR 59606, Jasmine 85, Nang Huong, Tam Xoan) were irradiated. The irradiated seeds were immediately sown within 24 and 94 hrs for wet seeds and dry seeds after treatment, respectively. Population of 10,000-15,000 plants were established and evaluated by IRRI evaluation standard from M2-M7 generations. 365 lines, varieties were selected with better behaviours than original varieties as lodging resistance, earliness, potential yield, leaf characters, tolerant ability to adverse conditions etc. Some good varieties (VND95-19, VND95-20) have been approved as leading national varieties and released for large-scale production in South Vietnam. (author)

  2. bfb, a novel ENU-induced blebs mutant resulting from a missense mutation in Fras1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry A Miller

    Full Text Available Fras1 is an extracellular matrix associated protein with essential roles in adhesion of epithelia and mesenchyme during early embryonic development. The adhesive function of Fras1 is achieved through interaction with a group of related proteins, Frem 1-3, and a cytoplasmic adaptor protein Grip1. Mutation of each of these proteins results in characteristic epithelial blistering and have therefore become known as "blebs" proteins. Human Fraser syndrome presents with a similar phenotype and the blebs mice have been instrumental in identification of the genetic basis of Fraser syndrome. We have identified a new ENU-induced blebs allele resulting from a novel missense mutation in Fras1. The resulting mouse strain, blood filled blisters (bfb, presents with a classic blebs phenotype but does not exhibit embryonic lethality typical of other blebs mutants and in addition, we report novel palate and sternal defects. Analysis of the bfb phenotype confirms the presence of epithelial-mesenchymal adhesion defects but also supports the emerging role of blebs proteins in regulating signalling during organogenesis. The bfb strain provides new opportunities to investigate the role of Fras1 in development.

  3. Improvement of penicillin G acylase expression in Escherichia coli through UV induced mutations

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    Rubina Arshad

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We used ultraviolet (UV radiation to induce mutation in three locally isolated strains of Escherichia coli. Different dilutions of bacterial cultures were exposed to UV lamp of 254 nm wavelength for different time intervals at varied distances ranging from 5 to 210 sec and 5 to 100 cm. Viable colonies were screened for mutants with an increased production of penicillin G acylase (PGA and a reduced production of β-lactamase, which are the desired properties of PGA producing industrial strains. A survival curve was made to get optimum exposure time and distance. The survival percentage for each exposure period was calculated and 1-5% survival was found useful for obtaining mutants with desired change. Screening for PGA and β-lactamase constitutive and/or deficient mutants was made by Serratia marcescens overlay test. A total of 100 survivors were selected of which 49% expressed PGA activity higher than the parent strain. Frequency of β-lactamase constitutive and deficient mutants was 48 and 52%, respectively. The best hyper-producing mutant (BDCS-N-M74, with almost negligible expression of β-lactamase, exhibited three-fold (22.5 mg 6-APA h-1 mg-1 wet cells increase in PGA activity compared with that in the parent strain (6.7 mg 6-APA h-1 mg-1 wet cells. The results indicated the successful induction of UV mediated mutation in E. coli for PGA hyper-producing mutants lacking β-lactamase activity.

  4. Ribosomal protein mutations induce autophagy through S6 kinase inhibition of the insulin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry F Heijnen

    Full Text Available Mutations affecting the ribosome lead to several diseases known as ribosomopathies, with phenotypes that include growth defects, cytopenia, and bone marrow failure. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA, for example, is a pure red cell aplasia linked to the mutation of ribosomal protein (RP genes. Here we show the knock-down of the DBA-linked RPS19 gene induces the cellular self-digestion process of autophagy, a pathway critical for proper hematopoiesis. We also observe an increase of autophagy in cells derived from DBA patients, in CD34+ erythrocyte progenitor cells with RPS19 knock down, in the red blood cells of zebrafish embryos with RP-deficiency, and in cells from patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS. The loss of RPs in all these models results in a marked increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation that we find is triggered by an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS. We show that this increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation inhibits the insulin pathway and AKT phosphorylation activity through a mechanism reminiscent of insulin resistance. While stimulating RP-deficient cells with insulin reduces autophagy, antioxidant treatment reduces S6 kinase phosphorylation, autophagy, and stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor. Our data suggest that RP loss promotes the aberrant activation of both S6 kinase and p53 by increasing intracellular ROS levels. The deregulation of these signaling pathways is likely playing a major role in the pathophysiology of ribosomopathies.

  5. A triple-helix forming oligonucleotide targeting genomic DNA fails to induce mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshat, Reshat; Priestley, Catherine C; Gooderham, Nigel J

    2012-11-01

    Purine tracts in duplex DNA can bind oligonucleotide strands in a sequence specific manner to form triple-helix structures. Triple-helix forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) targeting supFG1 constructs have previously been shown to be mutagenic raising safety concerns for oligonucleotide-based pharmaceuticals. We have engineered a TFO, TFO27, to target the genomic Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus to define the mutagenic potential of such structures at genomic DNA. We report that TFO27 was resistant to nuclease degradation and readily binds to its target motif in a cell free system. Contrary to previous studies using the supFG1 reporter construct, TFO27 failed to induce mutation within the genomic HPRT locus. We suggest that it is possible that previous reports of triplex-mediated mutation using the supFG1 reporter construct could be confounded by DNA quadruplex formation. Although the present study indicates that a TFO targeting a genomic locus lacks mutagenic activity, it is unclear if this finding can be generalised to all TFOs and their targets. For the present, we suggest that it is prudent to avoid large purine stretches in oligonucleotide pharmaceutical design to minimise concern regarding off-target genotoxicity.

  6. Attempts to induce mutations in Haemophilus influenzae with the base analogues 5-bromodeoxyuridine and 2-aminopurine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimball, R.F.; Perdue, S.W.

    1977-01-01

    Attempts were made to induce mutations in Haemophilus influenzae with the base analogues 5-bromodeoxyuridine and 2-aminopurine. These attempts were unsuccessful. Incorporation studies with BrdUrd showed, in agreement with earlier studies on Escherichia coli, that BrdUrd was discriminated against when dThd was also present but was incorporated to essentially the same extent as dThd when only BrdUrd was present. In this latter case, strands fully substituted with BrdUrd were produced, but survival data suggest that bacteria deriving their DNA by replication on such fully substituted templates were inviable. However, bacteria with about 20% of the thymine substituted with bromouracil were usually viable. No mutations could be detected in the descendants of such bacteria. The reasons for this are discussed and it is concluded that in all probability the replication system in species rarely if ever treats incorporated bromouracil as anything except a thymine analogue. The alternative possibility, that the negative results are a consequence of the absence of the reclex (SOS) error-prone repair system in this species, is considered much less likely.

  7. Ribosomal protein mutations induce autophagy through S6 kinase inhibition of the insulin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry F Heijnen

    Full Text Available Mutations affecting the ribosome lead to several diseases known as ribosomopathies, with phenotypes that include growth defects, cytopenia, and bone marrow failure. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA, for example, is a pure red cell aplasia linked to the mutation of ribosomal protein (RP genes. Here we show the knock-down of the DBA-linked RPS19 gene induces the cellular self-digestion process of autophagy, a pathway critical for proper hematopoiesis. We also observe an increase of autophagy in cells derived from DBA patients, in CD34+ erythrocyte progenitor cells with RPS19 knock down, in the red blood cells of zebrafish embryos with RP-deficiency, and in cells from patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS. The loss of RPs in all these models results in a marked increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation that we find is triggered by an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS. We show that this increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation inhibits the insulin pathway and AKT phosphorylation activity through a mechanism reminiscent of insulin resistance. While stimulating RP-deficient cells with insulin reduces autophagy, antioxidant treatment reduces S6 kinase phosphorylation, autophagy, and stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor. Our data suggest that RP loss promotes the aberrant activation of both S6 kinase and p53 by increasing intracellular ROS levels. The deregulation of these signaling pathways is likely playing a major role in the pathophysiology of ribosomopathies.

  8. Generation of the SCN1A epilepsy mutation in hiPS cells using the TALEN technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wanjuan; Liu, Jingxin; Zhang, Longmei; Xu, Huijuan; Guo, Xiaogang; Deng, Sihao; Liu, Lipeng; Yu, Daiguan; Chen, Yonglong; Li, Zhiyuan

    2014-06-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) can be used to understand the pathological mechanisms of human disease. These cells are a promising source for cell-replacement therapy. However, such studies require genetically defined conditions. Such genetic manipulations can be performed using the novel Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), which generate site-specific double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) with high efficiency and precision. Combining the TALEN and iPSC methods, we developed two iPS cell lines by generating the point mutation A5768G in the SCN1A gene, which encodes the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.1 α subunit. The engineered iPSC maintained pluripotency and successfully differentiated into neurons with normal functional characteristics. The two cell lines differ exclusively at the epilepsy-susceptibility variant. The ability to robustly introduce disease-causing point mutations in normal hiPS cell lines can be used to generate a human cell model for studying epileptic mechanisms and for drug screening.

  9. A novel radiation-induced p53 mutation is not implicated in radiation resistance via a dominant-negative effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunguang Sun

    Full Text Available Understanding the mutations that confer radiation resistance is crucial to developing mechanisms to subvert this resistance. Here we describe the creation of a radiation resistant cell line and characterization of a novel p53 mutation. Treatment with 20 Gy radiation was used to induce mutations in the H460 lung cancer cell line; radiation resistance was confirmed by clonogenic assay. Limited sequencing was performed on the resistant cells created and compared to the parent cell line, leading to the identification of a novel mutation (del at the end of the DNA binding domain of p53. Levels of p53, phospho-p53, p21, total caspase 3 and cleaved caspase 3 in radiation resistant cells and the radiation susceptible (parent line were compared, all of which were found to be similar. These patterns held true after analysis of p53 overexpression in H460 cells; however, H1299 cells transfected with mutant p53 did not express p21, whereas those given WT p53 produced a significant amount, as expected. A luciferase assay demonstrated the inability of mutant p53 to bind its consensus elements. An MTS assay using H460 and H1299 cells transfected with WT or mutant p53 showed that the novel mutation did not improve cell survival. In summary, functional characterization of a radiation-induced p53 mutation in the H460 lung cancer cell line does not implicate it in the development of radiation resistance.

  10. No effect of high fat diet-induced obesity on spontaneous reporter gene mutations in gpt delta mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasu, Shinji; Ishii, Yuji; Matsushita, Kohei; Kuroda, Ken; Kijima, Aki; Kodama, Yukio; Ogawa, Kumiko; Umemura, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    A large number of epidemiological studies have demonstrated that obesity is a risk factor for several human cancers. Several animal studies using rodents with diet-induced or genetic obesity have also demonstrated that obesity can promote tumor development. However, the effects of obesity on the early stages of carcinogenesis, and especially on the spontaneous occurrence of somatic gene mutations, remain unclear. To investigate the effects of obesity on the rate of spontaneous gene mutations, we performed reporter gene mutation assays in liver, kidney, and colon, organs in which obesity appears to be associated with cancer development on the basis of epidemiological or animal studies, in mice with high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Six-week-old male and female C57BL/6 gpt delta mice were fed HFD or standard diet (STD) for 13 or 26 weeks. At the end of the experiments, reporter gene mutation assays of liver, kidney, and colon were performed. Final body weights and serum leptin levels of male and female mice fed HFD for 13 or 26 weeks were significantly increased compared with corresponding STD-fed groups. Reporter gene mutation assays of liver, kidney, and colon revealed that there were no significant differences in gpt or Spi- mutant frequencies between STD- and HFD-fed mice in either the 13-week or 26-week groups. These results indicate that HFD treatment and consequent obesity does not appear to influence the spontaneous occurrence of somatic gene mutations.

  11. Imidacloprid and Thiamethoxam Induced Mutations in Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (ITS2) of Anopheles stephensi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhinder, Preety; Chaudhry, Asha; Barna, Bhupinder; Kaur, Satvinderjeet

    2012-05-01

    The present article deals with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genotoxicity evaluation of neonicotinoid pesticides, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam, by using the genome of a mosquito Anopheles stephensi taken as an experimental model. After treatment of the second instar larvae with LC(20) of the pesticides for 24 h, the induced nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) of freshly hatched unfed control and treated individuals was studied from the sequence alignment data and the mutations in the form of insertion, deletion and substitution of bases were recorded. Measurable differences, indicative of the genetic damage due to imidacloprid and thiamethoxam were observed when ITS2 sequences of control and treated individuals were compared. It was found that imidacloprid-treated individual had 8 deletions, 29 insertions, 18 transitions and 33 transversions, whereas thiamethoxam-treated individual had 10 deletions, 8 insertions, 47 transitions and 68 transversions.

  12. Induced Mutation on Jatropha (Jatropha Curcas L. for Improvement of Agronomic Characters Variability

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    Ita Dwimahyani

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Induced mutation can be used for improving quality in term of seed production, oil content in seed and early maturity of Jatropha with the aim for bio_diesel in Indonesia. The doses of 10, 15,20, and 25 Gy of gamma applied to cuttings was able to increase genetic variability in vegetatively propagated plants of Jatropha at M1V1 (mutant-vegetative-1 generation. Selection for desirable trait will be done at M1 V2 (mutant-1 and vegetative-2 generation untill homogenous plants obtained. Gamma rays at dose of 20 to 25 Gy damaged several genes controlling growth and development on Jatropha which was shown by dwarf and poor plant growth compared to control (plant without irradiation. Irradiation with the dose of 10 Gy raised genetic variability on plant development which was identified with early maturity, 100 seeds weight was 30% over control, and the number of branch growth was good

  13. The use of induced mutation combined with crossing in high quality rice breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do Huu At; Bui Huy Thuy; Nguyen Van Bich; Tran Duy Quy [Agricultural Genetics Institute, Division of Genetics and Hybrid Rice Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Nguyen Minh Cong [Hanoi No. 1 Teacher Training Univ., Department of Genetics (Viet Nam)

    2001-03-01

    The high quality rice varieties: Tam thom mutant rice Var., DT17 rice Var, DT21 glutinous rice Var were formed by induced mutation combined with crossing. Tam thom mutant rice Var. lost photosensitivity, could be planted 2 crops/year. DT17 rice Var with high yielding capacity, suitable for growth on lowland in summer crop, is replacing step-by-step Moctuyen rice Var. in North Vietnam. DT21 glutinous rice Var. could be planted 2 crops/year and had short growth duration, average yield was 4.0-4.5 tons/ha. These three ones had good quality, soft and scent cooked rice, suitable for customers and export requirements. Tam thom mutant rice Var. DT17 rice Var., DT21 and glutinous rice Var. were adopted for regional production by Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development and allowed to be in trial production. (author)

  14. Next-Gen Sequencing-Based Mapping and Identification of Ethyl Methanesulfonate-Induced Mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Millet, Yves; Ausubel, Frederick M; Borowsky, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Forward genetic analysis using ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis has proven to be a powerful tool in biological research, but identification and cloning of causal mutations by conventional genetic mapping approaches is a painstaking process. Recent advances in next-gen sequencing have greatly invigorated the process of identifying EMS-induced mutations corresponding to a specific phenotype in model genetic hosts, including the plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Next-gen sequencing of bulked F2 mutant recombinants produces a wealth of high-resolution genetic data, provides enhanced delimitation of the genomic location of mutations, and greatly reduces hands-on time while maintaining high accuracy and reproducibility. In this unit, a detailed procedure to simultaneously map and identify EMS mutations in Arabidopsis is described.

  15. Molecular analysis of THH-induced mutations at HPRT locus in human promyelocytic leukemia cells with multiplex polymerase chain reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Sheng-xue; CAO Jia; AN Hui

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the genotoxicity and antitumor activity of a Chinese medicinal herb, Tripterygium Hypoglaucum (Level) Hutch (THH). Methods: The genotoxicity and antitumor activity of TH-H were investigated in human promyelocytic leukemia cells on the mutation of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene by using single cell clone culture, two-way screening counting, multiplex PCR amplification and gel electrophoresis. Results: The results showed that different mutant spectra existed between the spontaneous mutation and induced mutation by THH. Only 7. 7% (1/13) of spontaneous mutants showed deletion mutations, whereas the induced mutants included 46.6% (27/58) deletions. Mapping of all intragenic deletion breakpoints showed a random distribution in all 9 exons, but toward the 3'-end of the HPRT gene. Deletion of exon 1 only appeared when whole gene was deleted. Deletions of exon 7/8 and 9 often showed linkage deletions (71.4%). Conclusion: THH can induce the mutation, mainly deletions, of HPRT gene in human promyelocytic leukemia cells.

  16. Recombination-independent recognition of DNA homology for repeat-induced point mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladyshev, Eugene; Kleckner, Nancy

    2017-06-01

    Numerous cytogenetic observations have shown that homologous chromosomes (or individual chromosomal loci) can engage in specific pairing interactions in the apparent absence of DNA breakage and recombination, suggesting that canonical recombination-mediated mechanisms may not be the only option for sensing DNA/DNA homology. One proposed mechanism for such recombination-independent homology recognition involves direct contacts between intact double-stranded DNA molecules. The strongest in vivo evidence for the existence of such a mechanism is provided by the phenomena of homology-directed DNA modifications in fungi, known as repeat-induced point mutation (RIP, discovered in Neurospora crassa) and methylation-induced premeiotically (MIP, discovered in Ascobolus immersus). In principle, Neurospora RIP can detect the presence of gene-sized DNA duplications irrespectively of their origin, underlying nucleotide sequence, coding capacity or relative, as well as absolute positions in the genome. Once detected, both sequence copies are altered by numerous cytosine-to-thymine (C-to-T) mutations that extend specifically over the duplicated region. We have recently shown that Neurospora RIP does not require MEI-3, the only RecA/Rad51 protein in this organism, consistent with a recombination-independent mechanism. Using an ultra-sensitive assay for RIP mutation, we have defined additional features of this process. We have shown that RIP can detect short islands of homology of only three base-pairs as long as many such islands are arrayed with a periodicity of 11 or 12 base-pairs along a pair of DNA molecules. While the presence of perfect homology is advantageous, it is not required: chromosomal segments with overall sequence identity of only 35-36 % can still be recognized by RIP. Importantly, in order for this process to work efficiently, participating DNA molecules must be able to co-align along their lengths. Based on these findings, we have proposed a model, in which

  17. Evidence that in xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells, which lack DNA polymerase eta, DNA polymerase iota causes the very high frequency and unique spectrum of UV-induced mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Woodgate, Roger; McManus, Terrence P; Mead, Samantha; McCormick, J Justin; Maher, Veronica M

    2007-04-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV) patients have normal DNA excision repair, yet are predisposed to develop sunlight-induced cancer. They exhibit a 25-fold higher than normal frequency of UV-induced mutations and very unusual kinds (spectrum), mainly transversions. The primary defect in XPV cells is the lack of functional DNA polymerase (Pol) eta, the translesion synthesis DNA polymerase that readily inserts adenine nucleotides opposite photoproducts involving thymine. The high frequency and striking difference in kinds of UV-induced mutations in XPV cells strongly suggest that, in the absence of Pol eta, an abnormally error-prone polymerase substitutes. In vitro replication studies of Pol iota show that it replicates past 5'T-T3' and 5'T-U3' cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, incorporating G or T nucleotides opposite the 3' nucleotide. To test the hypothesis that Pol iota causes the high frequency and abnormal spectrum of UV-induced mutations in XPV cells, we identified an unlimited lifespan XPV cell line expressing two forms of Pol iota, whose frequency of UV-induced mutations is twice that of XPV cells expressing one form. We eliminated expression of one form and compared the parental cells and derivatives for the frequency and kinds of UV-induced mutations. All exhibited similar sensitivity to the cytotoxicity of UV((254 nm)), and the kinds of mutations induced were identical, but the frequency of mutations induced in the derivatives was reduced to UV-induced mutations, and ultimately their malignant transformation.

  18. 紫外线致DNA突变的快速测定研究%A Fast Determination of DNA Mutation Induced by Ultraviolet Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆峰; 刘荔荔; 张晓芳; 吴玉田

    2001-01-01

    Electrophoresis, chromatography, immunoassay, sequencing and other time consuming approaches have been developed to determine DNA base mismatching, oxidative lesion or strand breaks. Sometimes,however, only qualitative information is enough to decide whether mutation has happened to DNA and its extent.Convolution spectrometry (CS), a new technique to discover ultrafine difference on ultraviolet (UV) absorption of different substances, is originally employed to find out any subtle mutation of DNA induced by UV radiation. Mutative DNA is compared with ego criteria based on the spectra of the former DNA, any difference is quantitatively expressed by dispersion (δ). Visible changes cannot be observed on second -derivative spectra until the mutation gets δup to 11.48%. Dimethyl sulfoxide is an intensifier of UV 254 nm induced DNA mutation and protector at 365 nm,which is simply confirmed by increasing and decreasing δ. Every convolution procedure takes less than 1 min. Convolution spectrometry provides a fast, simple, sensitive and inexpensive alternative to determine DNA mutation, and to screen anti-mutational medicines.%毛细管电泳、变性色谱、免疫吸附、DNA测序方法等已广泛用于DNA碱基错配、氧化缺失、链断裂等变化的检测,但有时如进行药物筛选时,只需定性地检测DNA是否变化或变化程度.本文采用褶合光谱法定性地检测紫外线致DNA变化程度,将突变后DNA的褶合光谱与未变异前DNA自身标准比较,并以差谱值δ量化地表示突变程度.当褶合光谱δ高达11.48%时,才能从二阶导数光谱上发现差异,表明方法的灵敏度远远高于前者.加入DMSO后,溶液在254nm照射时,δ升高,表现为DNA变异诱导剂;溶液在365 nm照射时,δ降低,表现为DNA变异保护剂.褶合光谱法快速、简便、灵敏、经济,可以作为检测DNA突变、筛选抗突变药物的一种新型方法.

  19. Simple methods for generating and detecting locus-specific mutations induced with TALENs in the zebrafish genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Dahlem

    Full Text Available The zebrafish is a powerful experimental system for uncovering gene function in vertebrate organisms. Nevertheless, studies in the zebrafish have been limited by the approaches available for eliminating gene function. Here we present simple and efficient methods for inducing, detecting, and recovering mutations at virtually any locus in the zebrafish. Briefly, double-strand DNA breaks are induced at a locus of interest by synthetic nucleases, called TALENs. Subsequent host repair of the DNA lesions leads to the generation of insertion and deletion mutations at the targeted locus. To detect the induced DNA sequence alterations at targeted loci, genomes are examined using High Resolution Melt Analysis, an efficient and sensitive method for detecting the presence of newly arising sequence polymorphisms. As the DNA binding specificity of a TALEN is determined by a custom designed array of DNA recognition modules, each of which interacts with a single target nucleotide, TALENs with very high target sequence specificities can be easily generated. Using freely accessible reagents and Web-based software, and a very simple cloning strategy, a TALEN that uniquely recognizes a specific pre-determined locus in the zebrafish genome can be generated within days. Here we develop and test the activity of four TALENs directed at different target genes. Using the experimental approach described here, every embryo injected with RNA encoding a TALEN will acquire targeted mutations. Multiple independently arising mutations are produced in each growing embryo, and up to 50% of the host genomes may acquire a targeted mutation. Upon reaching adulthood, approximately 90% of these animals transmit targeted mutations to their progeny. Results presented here indicate the TALENs are highly sequence-specific and produce minimal off-target effects. In all, it takes about two weeks to create a target-specific TALEN and generate growing embryos that harbor an array of germ line

  20. Comparative study of the antimutagenic properties of vitamins C and E against mutation induced by norfloxacin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Myriam Arriaga; Sánchez, Roberto Rivera; Pérez, Nancy Jannet Ruíz; Navarrete, Jaime Sánchez; Paz, Rocío Flores; Montoya-Estrada, Araceli; Gómez, Juan José Hicks

    2008-01-01

    Background Norfloxacin like other fluoroquinolones, is known to be mutagenic for Salmonella typhimurium TA102 strain. This mutagenic effect is due to free oxygen radicals (ROS), because it is inhibited by antioxidants such as β-carotene and naturally occurring antioxidants of Roheo discolor and other plants. The aim of this work was to evaluate combination therapy with norfloxacin and vitamins C and E, to reduce the possible genotoxic risk associated with fluoroquinolones. Method The antimutagenicity of α-tocoferol (Vitamin E) and ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) against norfloxacin-induced mutation was evaluated on S. typhimurium TA102, using the aroclor-1254-induced S9 rat liver homogenate. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) a measure of the bactericidal effect of norfloxacin, was obtained in vitro by the plate dilution method. Results Vitamin E (0.5 mg per Petri dish) induced a statistically significant reduction (P norfloxacin, whereas Vitamin C (1 mg per Petri dish) had no such effect. Neither of these vitamins altered the MIC for norfloxacin against 25 uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli. Conclusion These results suggest that Vitamin E is a potent antimutagen that would be worthwhile being used in conjunction with fluoroquinolone treatment. The minimal antimutagenic effect of Vitamin C observed under these experimental conditions may have been because Vitamin C in the Ames test induces a Fenton reaction, and if divalent cations are present, it can act as a pro-oxidant rather than an antioxidant. Ascorbic acid should be further evaluated in the presence of different divalent cations concentrations. PMID:18267022

  1. Comparative analysis of charged particle-induced autosomal mutations in murine cells and tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, Stacey; Turker, Mitchell; Dan, Cristian; Kwoh, Ely

    exposed to 2 Gy of Fe ions. Mutant spectra were analyzed via PCR using a series of heterozygous markers along mouse chromosome 8. Cytotoxicity assays were performed immediately after Fe ion exposure of cells from two primary clones. Cells irradiated in vitro demonstrated a dose-dependent decrement in cloning efficiency with no evidence of a shoulder. The results demonstrate the two clones behave similarly (unpaired t-test, p>0.3) with a D0 of 84.3 cGy for the combined data set. Mutation data were obtained using cells from one of the primary clones. In three experiments, we observed a linear dose-response for Aprt mutation with an induced mutant frzction of 1.06 x 10-3 /Gy. Kidney epithelial cells irradiated in vivo and incubated for 2-4 months in situ prior to harvest also showed an exponential reduction of cloning efficiency. Cells harvested 8-10 months postirradiation showed evidence of recovery for doses up to 1.5 Gy, but there was no improvement in cloning efficiency for kidney cells exposed to 2 Gy Fe ions in vivo evaluated at the late time point. Results for Aprt mutation induction in vivo indicated considerable inter-animal variation within each dose group (0, 1.0, 1.5 and 2 Gy). Fe ion exposures were mutagenic to the kidney, even at the lowest dose (p<0.01). A comparison of the mutant frequency results at the two harvest times indicates that the dose response did not vary with incubation time in vivo. Analysis of the pooled data from the 2-4 months harvests and the 8-10 month harvests indicated an increase in mutant frequency of 1.49 fold per Gy (p=0.01, CI 1.11-2.01). Molecular analysis of Aprtdeficient cells collected after a 2 Gy exposure to Fe ions in vitro showed an increased proportion of mutants arising via interstitial deletion or mitotic recombination, with an indication of an increase in chromosome loss. Similar results have been obtained for Aprt mutants isolated from mice exposed to 2 Gy of Fe ions, as compared with mutants collected from sham

  2. Absence of p53 gene mutations in mice colon pre-cancerous stage induced by o-nitrotoluene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahed A Hussien

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: The results from the present study indicate that point mutations in the p53 gene, in the coding region (exons 5-8 and outside it (exons 10, 11, are not involved in the development of the colon precancerous stage induced by o-nt in mice.

  3. Absence of missense mutations in activated c-myc genes in avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, M.; Hayward, W.S.

    1988-06-01

    The authors determined the nucleotide sequences of two independent DNA clones which contained the activated c-myc genes from avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas. Neither of these c-myce genes contained missense mutations. This strongly supports the notion that the c-myc photo-oncogene in avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas can be oncogenically activated by altered expression of the gene without a change in the primary structure of the gene product.

  4. UV-induced mutations in epidermal cells of mice defective in DNA polymerase η and/or ι.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanao, Rie; Yokoi, Masayuki; Ohkumo, Tsuyoshi; Sakurai, Yasutaka; Dotsu, Kantaro; Kura, Shinobu; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2015-05-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XP-V) is a human rare inherited recessive disease, predisposed to sunlight-induced skin cancer, which is caused by deficiency in DNA polymerase η (Polη). Polη catalyzes accurate translesion synthesis (TLS) past pyrimidine dimers, the most prominent UV-induced lesions. DNA polymerase ι (Polι) is a paralog of Polη that has been suggested to participate in TLS past UV-induced lesions, but its function in vivo remains uncertain. We have previously reported that Polη-deficient and Polη/Polι double-deficient mice showed increased susceptibility to UV-induced carcinogenesis. Here, we investigated UV-induced mutation frequencies and spectra in the epidermal cells of Polη- and/or Polι-deficient mice. While Polη-deficient mice showed significantly higher UV-induced mutation frequencies than wild-type mice, Polι deficiency did not influence the frequencies in the presence of Polη. Interestingly, the frequencies in Polη/Polι double-deficient mice were statistically lower than those in Polη-deficient mice, although they were still higher than those of wild-type mice. Sequence analysis revealed that most of the UV-induced mutations in Polη-deficient and Polη/Polι double-deficient mice were base substitutions at dipyrimidine sites. An increase in UV-induced mutations at both G:C and A:T pairs associated with Polη deficiency suggests that Polη contributes to accurate TLS past both thymine- and cytosine-containing dimers in vivo. A significant decrease in G:C to A:T transition in Polη/Polι double-deficient mice when compared with Polη-deficient mice suggests that Polι is involved in error-prone TLS past cytosine-containing dimers when Polη is inactivated.

  5. Conformational changes induced by the A21G Flemish mutation in the amyloid precursor protein lead to increased Aβ production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tzu-Chun; Hu, Yi; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; El Haylani, Laetitia; Decock, Marie; Van Hees, Joanne; Fu, Ziao; Octave, Jean-Noel; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Smith, Steven O

    2014-03-04

    Proteolysis of the β C-terminal fragment (β-CTF) of the amyloid precursor protein generates the Aβ peptides associated with Alzheimer's disease. Familial mutations in the β-CTF, such as the A21G Flemish mutation, can increase Aβ secretion. We establish how the Flemish mutation alters the structure of C55, the first 55 residues of the β-CTF, using FTIR and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We show that the A21G mutation reduces β sheet structure of C55 from Leu17 to Ala21, an inhibitory region near the site of the mutation, and increases α-helical structure from Gly25 to Gly29, in a region near the membrane surface and thought to interact with cholesterol. Cholesterol also increases Aβ peptide secretion, and we show that the incorporation of cholesterol into model membranes enhances the structural changes induced by the Flemish mutant, suggesting a common link between familial mutations and the cellular environment.

  6. Single point mutation in tick-borne encephalitis virus prM protein induces a reduction of virus particle secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Kentarou; Konno, Akihiro; Goto, Akiko; Nio, Junko; Obara, Mayumi; Ueki, Tomotaka; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Takashima, Ikuo

    2004-10-01

    Flaviviruses are assembled to bud into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are secreted through the vesicle transport pathway. Virus envelope proteins play important roles in this process. In this study, the effect of mutations in the envelope proteins of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus on secretion of virus-like particles (VLPs), using a recombinant plasmid expression system was analysed. It was found that a single point mutation at position 63 in prM induces a reduction in secretion of VLPs. The mutation in prM did not affect the folding of the envelope proteins, and chaperone-like activity of prM was maintained. As observed by immunofluorescence microscopy, viral envelope proteins with the mutation in prM were scarce in the Golgi complex, and accumulated in the ER. Electron microscopic analysis of cells expressing the mutated prM revealed that many tubular structures were present in the lumen. The insertion of the prM mutation at aa 63 into the viral genome reduced the production of infectious virus particles. This data suggest that prM plays a crucial role in the virus budding process.

  7. STAT3 mutations identified in human hematologic neoplasms induce myeloid malignancies in a mouse bone marrow transplantation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couronné, Lucile; Scourzic, Laurianne; Pilati, Camilla; Valle, Véronique Della; Duffourd, Yannis; Solary, Eric; Vainchenker, William; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Damm, Frederik; Stern, Marc-Henri; Gaulard, Philippe; Lamant, Laurence; Delabesse, Eric; Merle-Beral, Hélène; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Fontenay, Michaëla; Tilly, Hervé; Bastard, Christian; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Bernard, Olivier A.; Mercher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    STAT3 protein phosphorylation is a frequent event in various hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. Acquired STAT3 mutations have been recently identified in 40% of patients with T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia, a rare T-cell disorder. In this study, we investigated the mutational status of STAT3 in a large series of patients with lymphoid and myeloid diseases. STAT3 mutations were identified in 1.6% (4 of 258) of patients with T-cell neoplasms, in 2.5% (2 of 79) of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma but in no other B-cell lymphoma patients (0 of 104) or patients with myeloid malignancies (0 of 96). Functional in vitro assays indicated that the STAT3Y640F mutation leads to a constitutive phosphorylation of the protein. STA21, a STAT3 small molecule inhibitor, inhibited the proliferation of two distinct STAT3 mutated cell lines. Using a mouse bone marrow transplantation assay, we observed that STAT3Y640F expression leads to the development of myeloproliferative neoplasms with expansion of either myeloid cells or megakaryocytes. Together, these data indicate that the STAT3Y640F mutation leads to constitutive activation of STAT3, induces malignant hematopoiesis in vivo, and may represent a novel therapeutic target in some lymphoid malignancies. PMID:23872306

  8. Radiation-induced mutation at tandem repeat DNA Loci in the mouse germline: spectra and doubling doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrova, Yuri E

    2005-02-01

    The spectra and dose response for mutations at expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci in the germline of male mice acutely exposed to low-LET X or gamma rays at pre-meiotic stages of spermatogenesis were compared in five strains of laboratory mice. Most mutation events involved the gain or loss of a relatively small number of repeat units, and the distributions of length changes were indistinguishable between the exposed and control males. Overall, a significant bias toward gains of repeats was detected, with approximately 60% of mutants showing gains. The values for ESTR mutation induction did not differ substantially between strains. The highest values of doubling dose were obtained for two genetically related strains, BALB/c and C.B17 (mean value 0.98 Gy). The estimates of doubling dose for three other strains (CBA/H, C57BL/6 x CBA/H F1 and 129SVJ x C57BL/6) were lower, with a mean value of 0.44 Gy. The dose response for ESTR mutation across all five strains was very close to that for the specific loci (Russell 7-locus test). The mechanisms of ESTR mutation induction and applications of this system for monitoring radiation-induced mutation in the mouse germline are discussed.

  9. Loss-of-function mutations within the IL-2 inducible kinase ITK in patients with EBV-associated lymphoproliferative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linka, R M; Risse, S L; Bienemann, K; Werner, M; Linka, Y; Krux, F; Synaeve, C; Deenen, R; Ginzel, S; Dvorsky, R; Gombert, M; Halenius, A; Hartig, R; Helminen, M; Fischer, A; Stepensky, P; Vettenranta, K; Köhrer, K; Ahmadian, M R; Laws, H-J; Fleckenstein, B; Jumaa, H; Latour, S; Schraven, B; Borkhardt, A

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was the appraisal of the clinical and functional consequences of germline mutations within the gene for the IL-2 inducible T-cell kinase, ITK. Among patients with Epstein-Barr virus-driven lymphoproliferative disorders (EBV-LPD), negative for mutations in SH2D1A and XIAP (n=46), we identified two patients with R29H or D500T,F501L,M503X mutations, respectively. Human wild-type (wt) ITK, but none of the mutants, was able to rescue defective calcium flux in murine Itk(-/-) T cells. Pulse-chase experiments showed that ITK mutations lead to varying reductions of protein half-life from 25 to 69% as compared with wt ITK (107 min). The pleckstrin homology domain of wt ITK binds most prominently to phosphatidylinositol monophosphates (PI(3)P, PI(4)P, PI(5)P) and to lesser extend to its double or triple phosphorylated derivates (PIP2, PIP3), interactions which were dramatically reduced in the patient with the ITK(R29H) mutant. ITK mutations are distributed over the entire protein and include missense, nonsense and indel mutations, reminiscent of the situation in its sister kinase in B cells, Bruton's tyrosine kinase.

  10. Chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea in patients with breast cancer with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Adriana; Finch, Amy; Lubinski, Jan; Byrski, Tomasz; Ghadirian, Parviz; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Lynch, Henry T; Ainsworth, Peter J; Neuhausen, Susan L; Greenblatt, Ellen; Singer, Christian; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2013-11-01

    To determine the likelihood of long-term amenorrhea after treatment with chemotherapy in women with breast cancer who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. We conducted a multicenter survey of 1,954 young women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation who were treated for breast cancer. We included premenopausal women who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 26 and 47 years of age. We determined the age of onset of amenorrhea after breast cancer for women who were and were not treated with chemotherapy, alone or with tamoxifen. We considered chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea to have occurred when the patient experienced ≥ 2 years of amenorrhea, commencing within 2 years of initiating chemotherapy, with no resumption of menses. Of the 1,426 women who received chemotherapy, 35% experienced long-term amenorrhea. Of the 528 women who did not receive chemotherapy, 5.3% developed long-term amenorrhea. The probabilities of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea were 7.2% for women diagnosed before age 30 years, 33% for women age 31 to 44 years, and 79% for women diagnosed after age 45 years (P trend < .001). The probability of induced amenorrhea was higher for women who received tamoxifen than for those who did not (52% v 29%; P < .001). Age at treatment and use of tamoxifen are important predictors of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea in women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. The risk of induced long-term amenorrhea does not seem to be greater among mutation carriers than among women who do not carry a mutation.

  11. An induced mutation in tomato eIF4E leads to immunity to two potyviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Piron

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The characterization of natural recessive resistance genes and Arabidopsis virus-resistant mutants have implicated translation initiation factors of the eIF4E and eIF4G families as susceptibility factors required for virus infection and resistance function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate further the role of translation initiation factors in virus resistance we set up a TILLING platform in tomato, cloned genes encoding for translation initiation factors eIF4E and eIF4G and screened for induced mutations that lead to virus resistance. A splicing mutant of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor, S.l_eIF4E1 G1485A, was identified and characterized with respect to cap binding activity and resistance spectrum. Molecular analysis of the transcript of the mutant form showed that both the second and the third exons were miss-spliced, leading to a truncated mRNA. The resulting truncated eIF4E1 protein is also impaired in cap-binding activity. The mutant line had no growth defect, likely because of functional redundancy with others eIF4E isoforms. When infected with different potyviruses, the mutant line was immune to two strains of Potato virus Y and Pepper mottle virus and susceptible to Tobacco each virus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Mutation analysis of translation initiation factors shows that translation initiation factors of the eIF4E family are determinants of plant susceptibility to RNA viruses and viruses have adopted strategies to use different isoforms. This work also demonstrates the effectiveness of TILLING as a reverse genetics tool to improve crop species. We have also developed a complete tool that can be used for both forward and reverse genetics in tomato, for both basic science and crop improvement. By opening it to the community, we hope to fulfill the expectations of both crop breeders and scientists who are using tomato as their model of study.

  12. Insertional mutation of marA vitiates inducible multiple antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Choleraesuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbetts, Robert J; Lin, Tsang Long; Wu, Ching Ching

    2005-08-30

    marA has been shown to mediate a multiple antimicrobial resistance (MAR) phenotype following induction in some members of the Enterobacteriaceae. When Salmonella Choleraesuis was exposed to inducing agents they displayed higher minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) to multiple antimicrobial agents and an increase in marA expression as determined by northern hybridization analysis. The objective of the present study was to determine if mutation of marA vitiated multiple antimicrobial resistance inducibility in S. Choleraesuis. A loss-of-function mutation of marA in a single S. Choleraesuis isolate was created by insertion of the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene cassette within marA using double homologous recombination. This mutation was complemented with an expression plasmid possessing marA under the control of an IPTG-inducible promoter. Mutation and complementation of marA was verified using polymerase chain reaction, Northern hybridization, and Western blotting assays. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of tetracycline, chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, and rifampin were determined against induced and uninduced wildtype, marA-disrupted and marA-complemented strains using a microbroth dilution assay. Minimum inhibitory concentrations against induced wildtype and marA-complemented strains increased four- to eight-fold for all antimicrobials tested when compared to the uninduced strains while the MICs of the induced marA-disrupted mutant remained the same. However, this increase was abrogated when the cells were grown in the presence of the efflux pump inhibitor compound EPI phe-arg-naphthylamide. The results indicate that a functional marA is solely required for an inducible multiple antimicrobial resistance phenotype in S. Choleraesuis.

  13. Efficient Generation of Gene-Modified Pigs Harboring Precise Orthologous Human Mutation via CRISPR/Cas9-Induced Homology-Directed Repair in Zygotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoyang; Wang, Lulu; Du, Yinan; Xie, Fei; Li, Liang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Chuanhong; Wang, Shiqiang; Zhang, Shibing; Huang, Xingxu; Wang, Yong; Wei, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Precise genetic mutation of model animals is highly valuable for functional investigation of human mutations. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9)-induced homology-directed repair (HDR) is usually used for precise genetic mutation, being limited by the relatively low efficiency compared with that of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Although inhibition of NHEJ was shown to enhance HDR-derived mutation, in this work, without inhibition of NHEJ, we first generated gene-modified pigs harboring precise orthologous human mutation (Sox10 c.A325>T) via CRISPR/Cas9-induced HDR in zygotes using single-strand oligo DNA (ssODN) as template with an efficiency as high as 80%, indicating that pig zygotes exhibited high activities of HDR relative to NHEJ and were highly amendable to genetic mutation via CIRSPR/Cas9-induced HDR. Besides, we found a higher concentration of ssODN remarkably reduced HDR-derived mutation in pig zygotes, suggesting a possible balance for optimal HDR-derived mutation in zygotes between the excessive accessibility to HDR templates and the activities of HDR relative to NHEJ which appeared to be negatively correlated to ssODN concentration. In addition, the HDR-derived mutation, as well as those from NHEJ, extensively integrated into various tissues including gonad of founder pig without detected off-targeting, suggesting CRISPR/Cas9-induced HDR in zygotes is a reliable approach for precise genetic mutation in pigs.

  14. Single point mutation in tick-borne encephalitis virus prM protein induces a reduction of virus particle secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshii, Kentarou; Konno, Akihiro; Goto, Akiko; Nio, Junko; Obara, Mayumi; Ueki, Tomotaka; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Takashima, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    Flaviviruses are assembled to bud into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are secreted through the vesicle transport pathway. Virus envelope proteins play important roles in this process. In this study, the effect of mutations in the envelope proteins of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus on secretion of virus-like particles (VLPs), using a recombinant plasmid expression system was analysed. It was found that a single point mutation at position 63 in prM induces a reduction in s...

  15. Human APOBEC3 induced mutation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 contributes to adaptation and evolution in natural infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Young Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human APOBEC3 proteins are cytidine deaminases that contribute broadly to innate immunity through the control of exogenous retrovirus replication and endogenous retroelement retrotransposition. As an intrinsic antiretroviral defense mechanism, APOBEC3 proteins induce extensive guanosine-to-adenosine (G-to-A mutagenesis and inhibit synthesis of nascent human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1 cDNA. Human APOBEC3 proteins have additionally been proposed to induce infrequent, potentially non-lethal G-to-A mutations that make subtle contributions to sequence diversification of the viral genome and adaptation though acquisition of beneficial mutations. Using single-cycle HIV-1 infections in culture and highly parallel DNA sequencing, we defined trinucleotide contexts of the edited sites for APOBEC3D, APOBEC3F, APOBEC3G, and APOBEC3H. We then compared these APOBEC3 editing contexts with the patterns of G-to-A mutations in HIV-1 DNA in cells obtained sequentially from ten patients with primary HIV-1 infection. Viral substitutions were highest in the preferred trinucleotide contexts of the edited sites for the APOBEC3 deaminases. Consistent with the effects of immune selection, amino acid changes accumulated at the APOBEC3 editing contexts located within human leukocyte antigen (HLA-appropriate epitopes that are known or predicted to enable peptide binding. Thus, APOBEC3 activity may induce mutations that influence the genetic diversity and adaptation of the HIV-1 population in natural infection.

  16. Afatinib induces apoptosis in NSCLC without EGFR mutation through Elk-1-mediated suppression of CIP2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ting-Ting; Wang, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Yen-Lin; Lai, Chih-Cheng; Chang, Fang-Yu; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Chao, Chung-Hao H; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Huang, Yuh-Chin T; Yu, Chong-Jen; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2015-02-10

    Afatinib has anti-tumor effect in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation. We found afatinib can also induce apoptosis in NSCLC cells without EGFR mutation through CIP2A pathway. Four NSCLC cell lines (H358 H441 H460 and A549) were treated with afatinib to determine their sensitivity to afatinib-induced cell death and apoptosis. The effects of CIP2A on afatinib-induced apoptosis were confirmed by overexpression and knockdown of CIP2A expression in the sensitive and resistant cells, respectively. Reduction of Elk-1 binding to the CIP2A promoter and suppression of CIP2A transcription were analyzed. In vivo efficacy of afatinib against H358 and H460 xenografts tumors were also determined in nude mice. Afatinib induced significant cell death and apoptosis in H358 and H441 cells, but not in H460 or A549 cells. The apoptotic effect of afatinib in sensitive cells was associated with downregulation of CIP2A, promotion of PP2A activity and decrease in AKT phosphorylation. Afatinib suppressed CIP2A at the gene transcription level by reducing the promoter binding activity of Elk-1. Clinical samples showed that higher CIP2A expression predicted a poor prognosis and Elk-1 and CIP2A expressions were highly correlated. In conclusion, afatinib induces apoptosis in NSCLC without EGFR mutations through Elk-1/CIP2A/PP2A/AKT pathway.

  17. NanoTIO2 (UV-Titan) does not induce ESTR mutations in the germline of prenatally exposed female mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anne Mette Zenner; Shipley, Thomas; Hougaard, Karin Sørig

    2012-01-01

    Particulate air pollution has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Animal studies have shown that inhalation of air particulates induces mutations in the male germline. Expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci in mice are sensitive markers of mutagenic effects...... on male germ cells resulting from environmental exposures; however, female germ cells have received little attention. Oocytes may be vulnerable during stages of active cell division (e.g., during fetal development). Accordingly, an increase in germline ESTR mutations in female mice prenatally exposed...... exposed by whole-body inhalation to the nanoTiO2 UV-Titan L181 (~42.4 mg UV-Titan/m3) or filtered clean air on gestation days (GD) 8–18. Female C57BL/6 F1 offspring were raised to maturity and mated with unexposed CBA males. The F2 descendents were collected and ESTR germline mutation rates...

  18. TP53 disruptive mutations lead to head and neck cancer treatment failure through inhibition of radiation-induced senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Heath D; Sandulache, Vlad C; Ow, Thomas J; Meyn, Raymond E; Yordy, John S; Beadle, Beth M; Fitzgerald, Alison L; Giri, Uma; Ang, K Kian; Myers, Jeffrey N

    2012-01-01

    Mortality of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is primarily driven by tumor cell radioresistance leading to locoregional recurrence (LRR). In this study, we use a classification of TP53 mutation (disruptive vs. nondisruptive) and examine impact on clinical outcomes and radiation sensitivity. Seventy-four patients with HNSCC treated with surgery and postoperative radiation and 38 HNSCC cell lines were assembled; for each, TP53 was sequenced and the in vitro radioresistance measured using clonogenic assays. p53 protein expression was inhibited using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and overexpressed using a retrovirus. Radiation-induced apoptosis, mitotic cell death, senescence, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays were carried out. The effect of the drug metformin on overcoming mutant p53-associated radiation resistance was examined in vitro as well as in vivo, using an orthotopic xenograft model. Mutant TP53 alone was not predictive of LRR; however, disruptive TP53 mutation strongly predicted LRR (P = 0.03). Cell lines with disruptive mutations were significantly more radioresistant (P disruptive TP53 mutations significantly decreased radiation-induced senescence, as measured by SA-β-gal staining, p21 expression, and release of ROS. The mitochondrial agent metformin potentiated the effects of radiation in the presence of a disruptive TP53 mutation partially via senescence. Examination of our patient cohort showed that LRR was decreased in patients taking metformin. Disruptive TP53 mutations in HNSCC tumors predicts for LRR, because of increased radioresistance via the inhibition of senescence. Metformin can serve as a radiosensitizer for HNSCC with disruptive TP53, presaging the possibility of personalizing HNSCC treatment. © 2011 AACR.

  19. Induced mutations in tomato SlExp1 alter cell wall metabolism and delay fruit softening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoia, Silvia; Boualem, Adnane; Marcel, Fabien; Troadec, Christelle; Quemener, Bernard; Cellini, Francesco; Petrozza, Angelo; Vigouroux, Jacqueline; Lahaye, Marc; Carriero, Filomena; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid

    2016-01-01

    Fruit ripening and softening are key traits for many fleshy fruit. Since cell walls play a key role in the softening process, expansins have been investigated to control fruit over ripening and deterioration. In tomato, expression of Expansin 1 gene, SlExp1, during fruit ripening was associated with fruit softening. To engineer tomato plants with long shelf life, we screened for mutant plants impaired in SlExp1 function. Characterization of two induced mutations, Slexp1-6_W211S, and Slexp1-7_Q213Stop, showed that SlExp1 loss of function leads to enhanced fruit firmness and delayed fruit ripening. Analysis of cell wall polysaccharide composition of Slexp1-7_Q213Stop mutant pointed out significant differences for uronic acid, neutral sugar and total sugar contents. Hemicelluloses chemistry analysis by endo-β-1,4-d-glucanase hydrolysis and MALDI-TOF spectrometry revealed that xyloglucan structures were affected in the fruit pericarp of Slexp1-7_Q213Stop mutant. Altogether, these results demonstrated that SlExp1 loss of function mutants yield firmer and late ripening fruits through modification of hemicellulose structure. These SlExp1 mutants represent good tools for breeding long shelf life tomato lines with contrasted fruit texture as well as for the understanding of the cell wall polysaccharide assembly dynamics in fleshy fruits.

  20. Keratin gene mutations influence the keratinocyte response to DNA damage and cytokine induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupancic, Tina; Sersa, Gregor; Törmä, Hans; Lane, Ellen Birgitte; Herrmann, Harald; Komel, Radovan; Liovic, Mirjana

    2017-06-24

    The keratin filament cytoskeleton is vital to the normal function of epithelial cells. It provides structural support and regulates different aspects of cell metabolism. Mutations in keratins 5 and 14 cause a skin fragility disorder, epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS). Patients with severe EBS have an increased cumulative risk for basal cell carcinoma. In this study, we tested how keratin 5 and 14 mutant EBS patient-derived keratinocytes behave in the face of two different types of stressors that are able to induce cell death: ionizing radiation and cytokines TNF-α and TRAIL. The data point out to a substantial difference between how normal and keratin mutant keratinocytes deal with such stresses. When case of DNA damage, the ATM/Chk2-pathway is one of the two main tracks that can prevent the progression of mitosis and so allow repair. This was altered in all investigated keratin mutants with a particular down-regulation of the activated form of checkpoint kinase 2 (pChk2). Keratin mutants also appear less sensitive than normal cells to treatment with TNF-α or TRAIL, and this may be linked to the up-regulation of two pro-survival proteins, Bcl-2 and FLIP. Such changes are likely to have a profound effect on mutant keratinocytes ability to survive and withstand stress, and in theory this may be also a contributing factor to cell transformation.

  1. Point mutations induced by 1,2-epoxy-3-butene N1 deoxyinosine adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, D A; Kowalczyk, A; Ward, J B; Harris, C M; Harris, T M; Lloyd, R S

    2001-01-01

    The National Toxicology Program has recently classified 1,3-butadiene (BD) as a human carcinogen. BD is metabolized to the intermediates 1,2-epoxy-3-butene (EB), 1,2:3,4-diepoxybutane (DEB), and 1,2-dihydroxy-3,4-epoxybutane. All three metabolites have been implicated in producing specific types of DNA damage and as genotoxic agents in mice, rat, and human cells. This study has focused on EB-induced N1 deoxyinosine lesions that are formed by deamination of deoxyadenosine following reaction of the epoxide at the N(1) position. The R and S stereoisomers of this lesion were incorporated site-specifically within the context of an 11-mer oligodeoxynucleotide, incorporated into M13mp7L2 single-stranded DNA, and transfected into E. coli. Both stereoisomers modestly reduced plaque-forming ability, indicating that neither lesion presents a base modification that cannot be bypassed. The resulting plaques were assessed for point mutations using differential hybridization and DNA sequence analyses. The overall mutagenic spectrum revealed that the N1 adducts were highly mutagenic (approximately 90% per replication cycle), causing a predominance of A --> G transitions.

  2. Resistance to adenovirally induced hyperleptinemia in rats. Comparison of ventromedial hypothalamic lesions and mutated leptin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, K; Shimabukuro, M; Chen, G; Wang, M Y; Lee, Y; Kalra, P S; Dube, M G; Kalra, S P; Newgard, C B; Unger, R H

    1998-01-01

    Leptin regulates appetite and body weight via hypothalamic targets, but it can act directly on cultured pancreatic islets to regulate their fat metabolism. To obtain in vivo evidence that leptin may act peripherally as well as centrally, we compared the effect of adenovirally induced hyperleptinemia on food intake, body weight, and islet fat content in ventromedial hypothalamic-lesioned (VMHL) rats, sham-lesioned (SL) controls, and Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats in which the leptin receptor is mutated. Infusion with recombinant adenovirus containing the rat leptin cDNA increased plasma leptin by approximately 20 ng/ml in VMHL and ZDF rats but had no effect on their food intake, body weight, or fat tissue weight. Caloric matching of hyperphagic VMHL rats to SL controls did not reduce their resistance to hyperleptinemia. Whereas prediabetic ZDF rats had a fourfold elevation in islet fat, in VMHL rats islet fat was normal and none of them became diabetic. Isolated islets from ZDF rats were completely resistant to the lipopenic action of leptin, while VMHL islets exhibited 50% of the normal response; caloric matching of VMHL rats to SL controls increased leptin responsiveness of their islets to 92% of controls. We conclude that leptin regulation of adipocyte fat requires an intact VMH but that islet fat content is regulated independently of the VMH. PMID:9710441

  3. The carcinogenic air pollutant 3-nitrobenzanthrone induces GC to TA transversion mutations in human p53 sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    vom Brocke, Jochen; Krais, Annette; Whibley, Catherine; Hollstein, Monica C; Schmeiser, Heinz H

    2009-01-01

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a potent mutagen and a suspected human carcinogen present in particulate matter of diesel exhaust and ambient air pollution. Employing an assay with human p53 knock-in (Hupki) murine embryonic fibroblasts (HUFs), we examined p53 mutations induced by 3-NBA and its active metabolite, N-hydroxy-3-aminobenzanthrone (N-OH-3-ABA). Twenty-nine immortalized cultures (cell lines) from 89 HUF primary cultures exposed at passage 1 for 5 days to 2 microM 3-NBA harboured 22 different mutations in the human DNA-binding domain sequence of the Hupki p53 tumour suppressor gene. The most frequently observed mutation was GC to TA transversion (46%), corroborating previous mutation studies with 3-NBA, and consistent with the presence of persistent 3-NBA-guanosine adducts found in DNA of exposed rodents. Six of the transversions found solely in 3-NBA-treated HUFs have not been detected thus far in untreated HUFs, but have been found repeatedly in human lung tumours. (32)P-post-labelling adduct analysis of DNA from HUF cells treated with 2 microM 3-NBA for 5 days showed a pattern similar to that found in vivo, indicating the metabolic competence of HUF cells to metabolize 3-NBA to electrophilic intermediates. Total DNA binding was 160 +/- 56 per 10(7) normal nucleotides with N(2)-guanosine being the major adduct. In contrast, identical treatment with N-OH-3-ABA resulted in a 100-fold lower level of specific DNA adducts and no carcinogen-specific mutation pattern in the Hupki assay. This indicates that the level of DNA adduct formation by the mutagen is critical to obtain specific mutation spectra in the assay. Our results are consistent with previous experiments in Muta Mouse and are compatible with the possibility that diesel exhaust exposure contributes to mutation load in humans and to lung cancer risk.

  4. Identification of an mtDNA mutation hot spot in UV-induced mouse skin tumors producing altered cellular biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandova, Jana; Eshaghian, Alex; Shi, Mingjian; Li, Meiling; King, Lloyd E; Janda, Jaroslav; Sligh, James E

    2012-02-01

    There is increasing awareness of the role of mtDNA alterations in the development of cancer, as mtDNA point mutations are found at high frequency in a variety of human tumors. To determine the biological effects of mtDNA mutations in UV-induced skin tumors, hairless mice were irradiated to produce tumors, and the tumor mtDNAs were screened for single-nucleotide changes using temperature gradient capillary electrophoresis (TGCE), followed by direct sequencing. A mutation hot spot (9821insA) in the mitochondrially encoded tRNA arginine (mt-Tr) locus (tRNA(Arg)) was discovered in approximately one-third of premalignant and malignant skin tumors. To determine the functional relevance of this particular mutation in vitro, cybrid cell lines containing different mt-Tr (tRNA(Arg)) alleles were generated. The resulting cybrid cell lines contained the same nuclear genotype and differed only in their mtDNAs. The biochemical analysis of the cybrids revealed that the mutant haplotype is associated with diminished levels of complex I protein (CI), resulting in lower levels of baseline oxygen consumption and lower cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. We hypothesize that this specific mtDNA mutation alters cellular biochemistry, supporting the development of keratinocyte neoplasia.

  5. Ribosomal protein mutations induce autophagy through S6 kinase inhibition of the insulin pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnen, Harry F; van Wijk, Richard; Pereboom, Tamara C; Goos, Yvonne J; Seinen, Cor W; van Oirschot, Brigitte A; van Dooren, Rowie; Gastou, Marc; Giles, Rachel H; van Solinge, Wouter; Kuijpers, Taco W; Gazda, Hanna T; Bierings, Marc B; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W

    2014-01-01

    Mutations affecting the ribosome lead to several diseases known as ribosomopathies, with phenotypes that include growth defects, cytopenia, and bone marrow failure. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), for example, is a pure red cell aplasia linked to the mutation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes. Here we

  6. Ribosomal protein mutations induce autophagy through S6 kinase inhibition of the insulin pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnen, Harry F; van Wijk, Richard; Pereboom, Tamara C; Goos, Yvonne J; Seinen, Cor W; van Oirschot, Brigitte A; van Dooren, Rowie; Gastou, Marc; Giles, Rachel H; van Solinge, Wouter; Kuijpers, Taco W; Gazda, Hanna T; Bierings, Marc B; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W

    2014-01-01

    Mutations affecting the ribosome lead to several diseases known as ribosomopathies, with phenotypes that include growth defects, cytopenia, and bone marrow failure. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), for example, is a pure red cell aplasia linked to the mutation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes. Here we

  7. Tbc1d1 mutation in lean mouse strain confers leanness and protects from diet-induced obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chadt, Alexandra; Leicht, Katja; Deshmukh, Atul;

    2008-01-01

    We previously identified Nob1 as a quantitative trait locus for high-fat diet-induced obesity and diabetes in genome-wide scans of outcross populations of obese and lean mouse strains. Additional crossbreeding experiments indicated that Nob1 represents an obesity suppressor from the lean Swiss Jim...... and reduced glucose uptake in isolated skeletal muscle. Our data strongly suggest that mutation of Tbc1d1 suppresses high-fat diet-induced obesity by increasing lipid use in skeletal muscle....... Lambert (SJL) strain. Here we identify a SJL-specific mutation in the Tbc1d1 gene that results in a truncated protein lacking the TBC Rab-GTPase-activating protein domain. TBC1D1, which has been recently linked to human obesity, is related to the insulin signaling protein AS160 and is predominantly...

  8. Internet-induced marketing techniques: Critical factors of viral marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Woerndl, M; Papagiannidis, S; Bourlakis, M. A.; Li, F.

    2008-01-01

    The rapid diffusion of the Internet and the emergence of various social constructs facilitated by Internet technologies are changing the drivers that define how marketing techniques are developed and refined. This paper identifies critical factors for viral marketing, an Internet-based ‘word-of-mouth’ marketing technique. Based on existing knowledge, five types of viral marketing factors that may critically influence the success of viral marketing campaigns are identified. These factors are t...

  9. Oncogenic CARD11 mutations induce hyperactive signaling by disrupting autoinhibition by the PKC-responsive inhibitory domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamason, Rebecca L; McCully, Ryan R; Lew, Stefanie M; Pomerantz, Joel L

    2010-09-28

    The regulated activation of NF-κB by antigen receptor signaling is required for normal B and T lymphocyte activation during the adaptive immune response. Dysregulated NF-κB activation is associated with several types of lymphoma, including diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). During normal antigen receptor signaling, the multidomain scaffold protein CARD11 undergoes a transition from a closed, inactive state to an open, active conformation that recruits several signaling proteins into a complex, leading to IKK kinase activation. This transition is regulated by the CARD11 inhibitory domain (ID), which participates in intramolecular interactions that prevent cofactor binding to CARD11 prior to signaling, but which is neutralized after receptor engagement by phosphorylation. Several oncogenic CARD11 mutations have been identified in DLBCL that enhance activity and that are mostly found in the coiled-coil domain. However, the mechanisms by which these mutations cause CARD11 hyperactivity and spontaneous NF-κB activation are poorly understood. In this report, we provide several lines of evidence that oncogenic mutations F123I and L225LI induce CARD11 hyperactivity by disrupting autoinhibition by the CARD11 ID. These mutations disrupt ID-mediated intramolecular interactions and ID-dependent inhibition and bypass the requirement for ID phosphorylation during T cell receptor signaling. Intriguingly, these mutations selectively enhance the apparent affinity of CARD11 for Bcl10, but not for other signaling proteins that are recruited to CARD11 in an ID-dependent manner during normal antigen receptor signaling. Our results establish a mechanism that explains how DLBCL-associated mutations in CARD11 can initiate spontaneous, receptor-independent activation of NF-κB.

  10. Ataluren (PTC124) induces cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein expression and activity in children with nonsense mutation cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Boeck, Kris De; Casimir, Georges J; Vermeulen, François; Leal, Teresinha; Mogenet, Agnès; Roussel, Delphine; Fritsch, Janine; Hanssens, Laurence; Hirawat, Samit; Miller, Nilsen L; Constantine, Scott; Reha, Allen; Ajayi, Temitayo; Elfring, Gary L; Miller, Langdon L

    2010-11-15

    Nonsense (premature stop codon) mutations in mRNA for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cause cystic fibrosis (CF) in approximately 10% of patients. Ataluren (PTC124) is an oral drug that permits ribosomes to readthrough premature stop codons in mRNA to produce functional protein. To evaluate ataluren activity, safety, and pharmacokinetics in children with nonsense mutation CF. Patients were assessed in two 28-day cycles, comprising 14 days on and 14 days off ataluren. Patients took ataluren three times per day (morning, midday, and evening) with randomization to the order of receiving a lower dose (4, 4, and 8 mg/kg) and a higher dose (10, 10, and 20 mg/kg) in the two cycles. The study enrolled 30 patients (16 male and 14 female, ages 6 through 18 yr) with a nonsense mutation in at least one allele of the CFTR gene, a classical CF phenotype, and abnormal baseline nasal epithelial chloride transport. Ataluren induced a nasal chloride transport response (at least a -5-mV improvement) or hyperpolarization (value more electrically negative than -5 mV) in 50% and 47% of patients, respectively, with more hyperpolarizations at the higher dose. Improvements were seen in seven of nine nonsense mutation genotypes represented. Ataluren significantly increased the proportion of nasal epithelial cells expressing apical full-length CFTR protein. Adverse events and laboratory abnormalities were infrequent and usually mild. Ataluren pharmacokinetics were similar to those in adults. In children with nonsense mutation CF, ataluren can induce functional CFTR production and is well tolerated.

  11. Molecular structural analysis of HPRT mutations induced by thermal and epithermal neutrons in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinashi, Y; Sakurai, Y; Masunaga, S; Suzuki, M; Takagaki, M; Akaboshi, M; Ono, K

    2000-09-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were exposed to thermal and epithermal neutrons, and the occurrence of mutations at the HPRT locus was investigated. The Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR), which has been improved for use in neutron capture therapy, was the neutron source. Neutron energy spectra ranging from nearly pure thermal to epithermal can be chosen using the spectrum shifters and thermal neutron filters. To determine mutant frequency and cell survival, cells were irradiated with thermal and epithermal neutrons under three conditions: thermal neutron mode, mixed mode with thermal and epithermal neutrons, and epithermal neutron mode. The mutagenicity was different among the three irradiation modes, with the epithermal neutrons showing a mutation frequency about 5-fold that of the thermal neutrons and about 1.5-fold that of the mixed mode. In the thermal neutron and mixed mode, boron did not significantly increase the frequency of the mutants at the same dose. Therefore, the effect of boron as used in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is quantitatively minimal in terms of mutation induction. Over 300 independent neutron-induced mutant clones were isolated from 12 experiments. The molecular structure of HPRT mutations was determined by analysis of all nine exons by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. In the thermal neutron and mixed modes, total and partial deletions were dominant and the fraction of total deletions was increased in the presence of boron. In the epithermal neutron mode, more than half of the mutations observed were total deletions. Our results suggest that there are clear differences between thermal and epithermal neutron beams in their mutagenicity and in the structural pattern of the mutants that they induce. Mapping of deletion breakpoints of 173 partial-deletion mutants showed that regions of introns 3-4, 7/8-9 and 9-0 are sensitive to the induction of mutants by neutron irradiation.

  12. Complete Spectrum of CRISPR/Cas9-induced Mutations on HBV cccDNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Christoph; Sohn, Ji A

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes chronic infections that cannot yet be cured. The virus persists in infected hepatocytes, because covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), the template for the transcription of viral RNAs, is stable in nondividing cells. Antiviral therapies with nucleoside analogues inhibit HBV DNA synthesis in capsids in the cytoplasm of infected hepatocytes, but do not destroy nuclear cccDNA. Because over 200 million people are still infected, a cure for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) has become one of the major challenges in antiviral therapy. As a first step toward the development of curative therapies, we previously demonstrated that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to functionally inactivate cccDNA derived from infectious HBV. Moreover, some evidence suggests that certain cytokines might induce an APOBEC-mediated cascade leading to the destruction of cccDNA. In this report we investigated whether a combination of the two mechanisms could act synergistically to inactivate cccDNA. Using next generation sequencing (NGS), we determined the complete spectrum of mutations in cccDNA following Cas9 cleavage and repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). We found that over 90% of HBV DNA was cleaved by Cas9. In addition our results showed that editing of HBV DNA after Cas9 cleavage is at least 15,000 times more efficient that APOBEC-mediated cytosine deamination following treatment of infected cells with interferon alpha (IFNα). We also found that a previously used method to detect cytosine deaminated DNA, termed 3D-PCR, overestimates the amount and frequency of edited HBV DNA. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is so far the best method to functionally inactivate HBV cccDNA and provide a cure for CHB. PMID:27203444

  13. Jitter suppression techniques for mechanical cryocooler-induced disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, D. W.; Kirkconnell, C. S.; Fleischman, G. L.; Sunada, W. H.

    2008-08-01

    Closed-cycle mechanical cryogenic refrigerators, or cryocoolers, are an enabling technology for next generation infrared (IR) sensors. Passive cryoradiators and stored cryogen systems have been used successfully in the past, but the increased cooling requirements for emerging systems cannot practically be met with these passive techniques. Modern systems are employing much larger focal plane arrays that dissipate more energy and have higher parasitic thermal loads than in the past. Additional "on chip" FPA data processing capability, such as time delay and integration (TDI) and analog-to-digital conversion (ADC), is further driving up the heat loads. While loads are going up, temperatures are going down. The desire to operate at long wave infrared (LWIR) wavelengths (>9 microns) for a broader range of remote sensing missions is driving the need for 35-40 K refrigeration, significantly colder than past systems that operated at shorter wavelengths. Unfortunately, the use of a mechanical rather than passive cryocooler introduces an additional jitter source that must be properly mitigated. Techniques include the use of inherently low vibration cryocoolers, closedloop active vibration cancellation servo systems, damping struts, soft mounts, or a combination of these techniques. Implementation of these techniques within a proper system engineering context is presented.

  14. A novel activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) mutation in Brazilian patients with hyper-IgM type 2 syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caratão, Nadine; Cortesão, Catarina S; Reis, Pedro H; Freitas, Raquel F; Jacob, Cristina M A; Pastorino, Antonio C; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda; Barreto, Vasco M

    2013-08-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a DNA editing protein that plays an essential role in three major events of immunoglobulin (Ig) diversification: somatic hypermutation, class switch recombination and Ig gene conversion. Mutations in the AID gene (AICDA) have been found in patients with autosomal recessive Hyper-IgM (HIGM) syndrome type 2. Here, two 9- and 14-year-old Brazilian sisters, from a consanguineous family, were diagnosed with HIGM2 syndrome. Sequencing analysis of the exons from AICDA revealed that both patients are homozygous for a single C to G transversion in the third position of codon 15, which replaces a conserved Phenylalanine with a Leucine. To our knowledge, this is a new AICDA mutation found in HIGM2 patients. Functional studies confirm that the homologous murine mutation leads to a dysfunctional protein with diminished intrinsic cytidine deaminase activity and is unable to rescue CSR when introduced in Aicda(-/-)stimulated murine B cells. We briefly discuss the relevance of AICDA mutations found in patients for the biology of this molecule.

  15. Somatic mutation in larvae of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, induced by heavy ion irradiation to diapause eggs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotani, Eiji; Furusawa, Toshiharu [Kyoto Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Faculty of Textile Science; Nagaoka, Shunji [Fujita Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan). School of Health Sciences] [and others

    2002-12-01

    In order to investigate whether eggs of the black-striped strain (P{sup S}) of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, represent an appropriate model for estimating the biological effect of cosmic radiation, radiosensitivity of the eggs against X-rays and heavy ion particles was examined as ground-based experiments. The exposure of diapause eggs to X-rays or heavy ion particles resulted in somatic mutations appearing as a white spot on the black integument during larval stage. Irradiation of non-diapause eggs with X-rays demonstrated a significant difference in frequency of the mutation between fractionated and single administration doses, but no difference was observed in diapause eggs. Incidence of the mutation as induced by carbon ion beams for 15-day old eggs was higher for eggs that had been kept at 15 deg C than those kept at 25 deg C. Neon beam irradiation of diapause eggs displayed dose- and linear energy transfer (LET)-dependent effects, causing a maximal rate of the mutation at 150 keV/{mu}m. These results confirm that B. mori eggs represent valid models for estimating the biological effects of cosmic radiation. (author)

  16. Mutation Induced Extinction in Finite Populations: Lethal Mutagenesis and Lethal Isolation

    OpenAIRE

    C Scott Wylie; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2012-01-01

    Reproduction is inherently risky, in part because genomic replication can introduce new mutations that are usually deleterious toward fitness. This risk is especially severe for organisms whose genomes replicate “semi-conservatively,” e.g. viruses and bacteria, where no master copy of the genome is preserved. Lethal mutagenesis refers to extinction of populations due to an unbearably high mutation rate (U), and is important both theoretically and clinically, where drugs can extinguish pathoge...

  17. From minisatellites and genes: When do germinal mutations occur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohrenweiser, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Utilization of molecular techniques has provided insight into the molecular techniques has provided insight into the molecular techniques has provided insight into the molecular character and origins of spontaneous and induced germinal mutations. Review of the variants and disease loci suggests differences among loci in the frequency of nucleotide substitutions and more complex events. Mechanistic features associated with the alterations in DNA structure are observed in each variant class. The spectrum of mutations identified reflects the gene structure and the selective pressure generating disease phenotypes, and the techniques employed to screen for variation. Locus specificity in spectra has the potential to compromise estimates of increases in germinal gene mutation rates. Recent studies have identified mosaicism, rather than de novo mutation, as the explanation for the non-traditional pattern of inheritance of disease in some families. Mosaicism is a concern for studies of induced mutation rates as it reflects embryonic exposure of the parent of the proband. This is in contrast to the {open_quotes}normal expectation{close_quotes} that induced mutations result from parental exposure to genotoxins in the environment. Observations suggest that the germ cell stage sensitivity may reflect interaction of the mutagen and the loci screened. The mosaicism and germ cell stage issues, in conjunction with incomplete ascertainment of mutational events, increase the complexity of efforts to estimate induced germinal mutation rates and associated health consequences in populations exposed to genotoxic agents.

  18. A test technique for measuring lightning-induced voltages on aircraft electrical circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walko, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    The development of a test technique used for the measurement of lightning-induced voltages in the electrical circuits of a complete aircraft is described. The resultant technique utilizes a portable device known as a transient analyzer capable of generating unidirectional current impulses similar to lightning current surges, but at a lower current level. A linear relationship between the magnitude of lightning current and the magnitude of induced voltage permitted the scaling up of measured induced values to full threat levels. The test technique was found to be practical when used on a complete aircraft.

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF ENU-INDUCED MUTATIONS IN RED BLOOD CELL STRUCTURAL PROTEINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Kildey

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Murine models with modified gene function as a result of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutagenesis have been used to study phenotypes resulting from genetic change. This study investigated genetic factors associated with red blood cell (RBC physiology and structural integrity that may impact on blood component storage and transfusion outcome. Forward and reverse genetic approaches were employed with pedigrees of ENU-treated mice using a homozygous recessive breeding strategy. In a “forward genetic” approach, pedigree selection was based upon identification of an altered phenotype followed by exome sequencing to identify a causative mutation. In a second strategy, a “reverse genetic” approach based on selection of pedigrees with mutations in genes of interest was utilised and, following breeding to homozygosity, phenotype assessed. Thirty-three pedigrees were screened by the forward genetic approach. One pedigree demonstrated reticulocytosis, microcytic anaemia and thrombocytosis. Exome sequencing revealed a novel single nucleotide variation (SNV in Ank1 encoding the RBC structural protein ankyrin-1 and the pedigree was designated Ank1EX34. The reticulocytosis and microcytic anaemia observed in the Ank1EX34 pedigree were similar to clinical features of hereditary spherocytosis in humans. For the reverse genetic approach three pedigrees with different point mutations in Spnb1 encoding RBC protein spectrin-1β, and one pedigree with a mutation in Epb4.1, encoding band 4.1 were selected for study. When bred to homozygosity two of the spectrin-1β pedigrees (a, b demonstrated increased RBC count, haemoglobin (Hb and haematocrit (HCT. The third Spnb1 mutation (spectrin-1β c and mutation in Epb4.1 (band 4.1 did not significantly affect the haematological phenotype, despite these two mutations having a PolyPhen score predicting the mutation may be damaging. Exome sequencing allows rapid identification of causative mutations and development of

  20. Relationship of p53 Mutations to Epidermal Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis in Human UV-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine G. Einspahr

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Human skin is continually subjected to UV-irradiation with the p53 gene playing a pivotal role in repair of UV-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Consequently, p53 alterations are early events in human UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. We studied 13 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC, 16 actinic keratoses (AK, 13 samples adjacent to an AK (chronically sun-damaged, and 14 normal-appearing skin samples for p53 mutation, p53 immunostaining (IHC, apoptosis (in situ TUNEL and morphology, and proliferation (PCNA. The frequency of p53 mutation increased from 14% in normal skin, to 38.5% in sun-damaged skin, 63% in AK, and 54% in SCC. p53 IHC increased similarly. Apoptosis (TUNEL increased from 0.06 ± 0.02%, to 0.1 ± 0.2, 0.3 ± 0.3, and 0.4 ± 0.3 in normal skin, sun-damaged skin, AK, and SCC, respectively. Apoptosis was strongly correlated with proliferation (i.e., TUNEL and PCNA, r = 0.7, P < 0.0001, and proliferation was significantly increased in the progression from normal skin to SCC. Bax was significantly increased in SCC compared to AK. These data imply that apoptosis in samples with a high frequency of p53 mutation may not necessarily be p53-dependent. We suggest that there is a mechanism for apoptosis in response to increased cellular proliferation that is p53-independent.

  1. Molecular nature of mutations induced by high-LET irradiation with argon and carbon ions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Tomonari; Kazama, Yusuke [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Innovation Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ohbu, Sumie; Shirakawa, Yuki; Liu Yang; Kambara, Tadashi; Fukunishi, Nobuhisa [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Abe, Tomoko, E-mail: tomoabe@riken.jp [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Innovation Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    Linear energy transfer (LET) is an important parameter to be considered in heavy-ion mutagenesis. However, in plants, no quantitative data are available on the molecular nature of the mutations induced with high-LET radiation above 101-124 keV {mu}m{sup -1}. In this study, we irradiated dry seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana with Ar and C ions with an LET of 290 keV {mu}m{sup -1}. We analyzed the DNA alterations caused by the higher-LET radiation. Mutants were identified from the M{sub 2} pools. In total, 14 and 13 mutated genes, including bin2, egy1, gl1, gl2, hy1, hy3-5, ttg1, and var2, were identified in the plants derived from Ar- and C-ions irradiation, respectively. In the mutants from both irradiations, deletion was the most frequent type of mutation; 13 of the 14 mutated genes from the Ar ion-irradiated plants and 11 of the 13 mutated genes from the C ion-irradiated plants harbored deletions. Analysis of junction regions generated by the 2 types of irradiation suggested that alternative non-homologous end-joining was the predominant pathway of repair of break points. Among the deletions, the proportion of large deletions (>100 bp) was about 54% for Ar-ion irradiation and about 64% for C-ion irradiation. Both current results and previously reported data revealed that the proportions of the large deletions induced by 290-keV {mu}m{sup -1} radiations were higher than those of the large deletions induced by lower-LET radiations (6% for 22.5-30.0 keV {mu}m{sup -1} and 27% for 101-124 keV {mu}m{sup -1}). Therefore, the 290 keV {mu}m{sup -1} heavy-ion beams can effectively induce large deletions and will prove useful as novel mutagens for plant breeding and analysis of gene functions, particularly tandemly arrayed genes.

  2. Protective effect of curcumin and chlorophyllin against DNA mutation induced by cyclophosphamide or benzo[a]pyrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, M.A.; Elbehairy, A.M.; Ghoneim, M.A.; Amer, H.A. [Cairo Univ., Giza (Egypt). Biochemistry Dept. and Biotechnology Center

    2007-03-15

    The current study was carried out to evaluate the potency of curcumin and chlorophyllin as natural antioxidants to reduce the oxidative stress markers induced by cyclophosphamide (CP) and benzo[a]pyrene [B(a)P] which were used as free radical inducers. For this purpose, 126 male albino rats were used. The animals were assigned into 4 main groups: negative control group; oxidant-treated group (subdivided into two subgroups: cyclophosphamide- treated group and benzo[a]pyrene-treated group); curcumin-treated group; and chlorophyllin-treated group. Liver samples were collected after two days post the oxidant inoculation and at the end of the experimental period (10 weeks). These samples were examined for determination of liver microsomal malondialdehyde (MDA), DNA fragmentation, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and 8-hydroxy deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) concentration. Both CP and B(a)P caused increments in DNA fragmentation percentages, liver microsomal MDA, concentration of 8-OHdG and induced point mutation. Treatment of rats with either curcumin or chlorophyllin revealed lower DNA fragmentation percentages, liver microsomal MDA concentration, concentration of 8-OHdG and prevented induction of mutations, i. e., reversed the oxidative stress induced by CP and B(a)P and proved that they were capable of protecting rats against the oxidative damage evoked by these oxidants. (orig.)

  3. Protective effect of curcumin and chlorophyllin against DNA mutation induced by cyclophosphamide or benzo[a]pyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Marwa A; Elbehairy, Adel M; Ghoneim, Magdy A; Amer, Hassan A

    2007-01-01

    The current study was carried out to evaluate the potency of curcumin and chlorophyllin as natural antioxidants to reduce the oxidative stress markers induced by cyclophosphamide (CP) and benzo[a]pyrene [B(a)P] which were used as free radical inducers. For this purpose, 126 male albino rats were used. The animals were assigned into 4 main groups: negative control group; oxidant-treated group (subdivided into two subgroups: cyclophosphamide-treated group and benzo[a]pyrene-treated group); curcumin-treated group; and chlorophyllin-treated group. Liver samples were collected after two days post the oxidant inoculation and at the end of the experimental period (10 weeks). These samples were examined for determination of liver microsomal malondialdehyde (MDA), DNA fragmentation, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and 8-hydroxy deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) concentration. Both CP and B(a)P caused increments in DNA fragmentation percentages, liver microsomal MDA, concentration of 8-OHdG and induced point mutation. Treatment of rats with either curcumin or chlorophyllin revealed lower DNA fragmentation percentages, liver microsomal MDA concentration, concentration of 8-OHdG and prevented induction of mutations, i.e., reversed the oxidative stress induced by CP and B(a)P and proved that they were capable of protecting rats against the oxidative damage evoked by these oxidants.

  4. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs derived from cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX patient's fibroblasts carrying a R395S mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Höflinger

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs were generated from dermal fibroblasts from a 60-year-old cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX patient, carrying a homozygous mutation c. [1183C>A]; p. R395S in CYP27A1. Episomal plasmids encoding the pluripotency genes OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, L-MYC and LIN28 were introduced via electroporation. The generated line iPS-CTX-R395S has no sign of plasmid integration or chromosomal aberration and retained the mutation site in CYP27A1. Furthermore, iPSCs express pluripotency markers and are able to differentiate in all germ layers in vitro. The generated line may be a useful tool for disease modelling of CTX.

  5. TAL effector nucleases induce mutations at a pre-selected location in the genome of primary barley transformants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Toni; Holm, Preben Bach; Starker, Colby G; Christian, Michelle; Voytas, Daniel F; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Holme, Inger Bæksted

    2013-10-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) enable targeted mutagenesis in a variety of organisms. The primary advantage of TALENs over other sequence-specific nucleases, namely zinc finger nucleases and meganucleases, lies in their ease of assembly, reliability of function, and their broad targeting range. Here we report the assembly of several TALENs for a specific genomic locus in barley. The cleavage activity of individual TALENs was first tested in vivo using a yeast-based, single-strand annealing assay. The most efficient TALEN was then selected for barley transformation. Analysis of the resulting transformants showed that TALEN-induced double strand breaks led to the introduction of short deletions at the target site. Additional analysis revealed that each barley transformant contained a range of different mutations, indicating that mutations occurred independently in different cells.

  6. NanoTIO2 (UV-Titan does not induce ESTR mutations in the germline of prenatally exposed female mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boisen Anne Mette

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particulate air pollution has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Animal studies have shown that inhalation of air particulates induces mutations in the male germline. Expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR loci in mice are sensitive markers of mutagenic effects on male germ cells resulting from environmental exposures; however, female germ cells have received little attention. Oocytes may be vulnerable during stages of active cell division (e.g., during fetal development. Accordingly, an increase in germline ESTR mutations in female mice prenatally exposed to radiation has previously been reported. Here we investigate the effects of nanoparticles on the female germline. Since pulmonary exposure to nanosized titanium dioxide (nanoTiO2 produces a long-lasting inflammatory response in mice, it was chosen for the present study. Findings Pregnant C57BL/6 mice were exposed by whole-body inhalation to the nanoTiO2 UV-Titan L181 (~42.4 mg UV-Titan/m3 or filtered clean air on gestation days (GD 8–18. Female C57BL/6 F1 offspring were raised to maturity and mated with unexposed CBA males. The F2 descendents were collected and ESTR germline mutation rates in this generation were estimated from full pedigrees (mother, father, offspring of F1 female mice (192 UV-Titan-exposed F2 offspring and 164 F2 controls. ESTR mutation rates of 0.029 (maternal allele and 0.047 (paternal allele in UV-Titan-exposed F2 offspring were not statistically different from those of F2 controls: 0.037 (maternal allele and 0.061 (paternal allele. Conclusions We found no evidence for increased ESTR mutation rates in F1 females exposed in utero to UV-Titan nanoparticles from GD8-18 relative to control females.

  7. Reduced ciliary polycystin-2 in induced pluripotent stem cells from polycystic kidney disease patients with PKD1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Benjamin S; Lam, Albert Q; Sundsbak, Jamie L; Iatrino, Rossella; Su, Xuefeng; Koon, Sarah J; Wu, Maoqing; Daheron, Laurence; Harris, Peter C; Zhou, Jing; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2013-10-01

    Heterozygous mutations in PKD1 or PKD2, which encode polycystin-1 (PC1) and polycystin-2 (PC2), respectively, cause autosomal dominant PKD (ADPKD), whereas mutations in PKHD1, which encodes fibrocystin/polyductin (FPC), cause autosomal recessive PKD (ARPKD). However, the relationship between these proteins and the pathogenesis of PKD remains unclear. To model PKD in human cells, we established induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines from fibroblasts of three ADPKD and two ARPKD patients. Genetic sequencing revealed unique heterozygous mutations in PKD1 of the parental ADPKD fibroblasts but no pathogenic mutations in PKD2. Undifferentiated PKD iPS cells, control iPS cells, and embryonic stem cells elaborated primary cilia and expressed PC1, PC2, and FPC at similar levels, and PKD and control iPS cells exhibited comparable rates of proliferation, apoptosis, and ciliogenesis. However, ADPKD iPS cells as well as somatic epithelial cells and hepatoblasts/biliary precursors differentiated from these cells expressed lower levels of PC2 at the cilium. Additional sequencing confirmed the retention of PKD1 heterozygous mutations in iPS cell lines from two patients but identified possible loss of heterozygosity in iPS cell lines from one patient. Furthermore, ectopic expression of wild-type PC1 in ADPKD iPS-derived hepatoblasts rescued ciliary PC2 protein expression levels, and overexpression of PC1 but not a carboxy-terminal truncation mutant increased ciliary PC2 expression levels in mouse kidney cells. Taken together, these results suggest that PC1 regulates ciliary PC2 protein expression levels and support the use of PKD iPS cells for investigating disease pathophysiology.

  8. Codon 64 of K-ras gene mutation pattern in hepatocellular carcinomas induced by bleomycin and 1-nitropyrene in A/J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Feng; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Takayama, Koichi; Pei, Xin-Hai; Inoue, Koji; Harada, Taishi; Izumi, Miiru; Hara, Nobuyuki

    2003-01-01

    Bleomycin is a radiomimetic antitumor agent with unique genotoxic properties. 1-nitropyrene is an environmental mutagen and carcinogen that undergoes both oxidative and reductive metabolism. In the present study, hepatocellular carcinomas were induced in male A/J mice by the intraperitoneal injection of bleomycin (120 mg/kg) followed by the intraperitoneal administration of 1-nitropyrene (total dose: 1,575 mg/kg). In order to understand the mechanism by which these two compounds induce hepatocellular carcinomas, the incidence and spectrum of mutations in the K-ras proto-oncogene in these hepatocellular carcinomas were analyzed. The hepatocellular carcinomas were induced by the administration of bleomycin and 1-nitropyrene were evaluated for point mutations in exon 1 and exon 2 of the K-ras gene by the polymerase chain reaction and a sequencing analysis. No mutation was found in the hotspots regions of the K-ras gene codon 12, 13, or 61. However, the codon 64 of the K-ras gene mutation was identified in 10 of 10 (100%) hepatocellular carcinomas. All mutations showed the same pattern, which was TAC-CAC transition. Codon 64 of the K-ras gene mutation may thus play an important role in the induction of hepatocellular carcinomas by bleomycin in the existence of 1-nitropyrene. As far as we know, this is the first report of a codon 64 mutation in the K-ras gene in a chemically induced tumor.

  9. Development of Sorghum Tolerant to Acid Soil Using Induced Mutation with Gamma Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Human

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Water scarcity still becomes a problem in some dryland agricultural areas in Indonesia. Development of dryland farming system may be focused on crops that are required less water such as sorghum. Sorghum is a cereal crop that is usually grown under hot and dry condition and it is ideal for Indonesia. Sorghum is a good source of food, animal feed and raw material for ethanol. Indonesia is currently looking for alternative renewable energy resources and sorghum is regarded as one of the promising source of bioethanol as bioenergy. Unfortunately, most agricultural land in western part of the country particularly in Sumatera and Kalimantan is dryland and dominated by acid soil. The main constraint of crop production in acid soil is deficiency and Al toxicity. Therefore, development of sorghum cultivation in dryland farming system requires a variety which is tolerant to such conditions. Sorghum breeding for acid soil tolerance had been conducted at PATIR-BATAN by using induced mutations with gamma irradiation. The breeding objective was to search for sorghum genotypes tolerant to acid soil condition and with regard to sorghum use for bioethanol production. A number of 66 breeding materials, including the mutants, had been screened for acid soil tolerance on land with soil pH of 4.2 and 39% Al saturation in Lampung Province. Ten sorghum genotypes had been identified as high yielding in the acid soil condition. The mutant lines GH-ZB-41-07, YT30-39-07, B-76 and B-92 had grain yield higher (>4.5 t/ha than the control plants (Durra, Mandau and Numbu. Sorghum mutants ZH30-29-07, ZH30-30-07 and ZH30-35-07 were promising for grain-base bioethanol production with ethanol yield exceeded 2,000 l/ha. Meanwhile, the sweet sorghum mutants ZH30-35-07, ZH30-30-07 and ZH30-29-07 had brix content of 11.59, 11.95 and 10.50%, respectively. These mutant lines are promising to be developed further in sorghum breeding since they are highly tolerant to acid soils.

  10. Disruption of Transcriptional Coactivator Sub1 Leads to Genome-Wide Re-distribution of Clustered Mutations Induced by APOBEC in Active Yeast Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lada, Artem G; Kliver, Sergei F; Dhar, Alok; Polev, Dmitrii E; Masharsky, Alexey E; Rogozin, Igor B; Pavlov, Youri I

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in genomes of species are frequently distributed non-randomly, resulting in mutation clusters, including recently discovered kataegis in tumors. DNA editing deaminases play the prominent role in the etiology of these mutations. To gain insight into the enigmatic mechanisms of localized hypermutagenesis that lead to cluster formation, we analyzed the mutational single nucleotide variations (SNV) data obtained by whole-genome sequencing of drug-resistant mutants induced in yeast diploids by AID/APOBEC deaminase and base analog 6-HAP. Deaminase from sea lamprey, PmCDA1, induced robust clusters, while 6-HAP induced a few weak ones. We found that PmCDA1, AID, and APOBEC1 deaminases preferentially mutate the beginning of the actively transcribed genes. Inactivation of transcription initiation factor Sub1 strongly reduced deaminase-induced can1 mutation frequency, but, surprisingly, did not decrease the total SNV load in genomes. However, the SNVs in the genomes of the sub1 clones were re-distributed, and the effect of mutation clustering in the regions of transcription initiation was even more pronounced. At the same time, the mutation density in the protein-coding regions was reduced, resulting in the decrease of phenotypically detected mutants. We propose that the induction of clustered mutations by deaminases involves: a) the exposure of ssDNA strands during transcription and loss of protection of ssDNA due to the depletion of ssDNA-binding proteins, such as Sub1, and b) attainment of conditions favorable for APOBEC action in subpopulation of cells, leading to enzymatic deamination within the currently expressed genes. This model is applicable to both the initial and the later stages of oncogenic transformation and explains variations in the distribution of mutations and kataegis events in different tumor cells.

  11. Internet-induced marketing techniques: Critical factors of viral marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woerndl, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid diffusion of the Internet and the emergence of various social constructs facilitated by Internet technologies are changing the drivers that define how marketing techniques are developed and refined. This paper identifies critical factors for viral marketing, an Internet-based ‘word-of-mouth’ marketing technique. Based on existing knowledge, five types of viral marketing factors that may critically influence the success of viral marketing campaigns are identified. These factors are the overall structure of the campaign, the characteristics of the product or service, the content of the message, the characteristics of the diffusion and, the peer-to-peer information conduit. The paper discusses three examples of viral marketing campaigns and identifies the specific factors in each case that influence its success. The paper concludes with a viral marketing typology differentiating between viral marketing communications, unintended viral marketing and commercial viral marketing. This is still a rapidly evolving area and further research is clearly needed to monitor new developments and make sense of the radical changes these developments bring to the market.

  12. A sucrose-rich diet induces mutations in the rat colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Lars O.; Daneshvar, Bahram; Vogel, Ulla

    2002-01-01

    affecting the overall energy and carbohydrate intake. We observed a dose-dependent increase in the mutation frequency at the cII site in the colonic mucosa with increased sucrose levels, reaching a 129% increase at the highest dose level. This would indicate a direct or indirect genotoxic effect...... of a sucrose-rich diet. No significant increase in mutations was observed in the liver. To seek an explanation for this finding, a variety of parameters were examined representing different mechanisms, including increased oxidative stress, changes in oxidative defense, effects on DNA repair, or changes...

  13. Low-energy (30 keV) carbon ion induced mutation spectrum in the LacZ{alpha} gene of M13mp18 double-stranded DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Quan; Zhang Gang; Du Yanhua; Zhao Yong; Qiu Guanying

    2003-07-25

    Double-stranded M13mp18 DNA was irradiated with 30 keV carbon ions in dry state under vacuum to investigate the low-energy heavy ion induced mutation spectra. When the irradiated DNA was used to transfect Escherichia coli JM105, 3.6-5.7-fold increases in mutation frequency were observed, in contrast to the spontaneous group. Sequences of the 92 induced mutants showed that the carbon ions in this study could induce an interesting mutation spectrum in the lacZ{alpha} gene. One-base mutations (96.8%) and base pair substitutions (56.4%) were predominant, most of which involved G:C base pairs (90.6%), especially G:C {yields} T:A transversions (49.6%) and G:C {yields} A:T transitions (39.6%). This is similar to the spectra induced by {gamma}-rays in the same ds M13, wild type E. coli system. We also found a considerable amount of carbon ion induced one-base deletion (38.5%) and the mutation sites distribution on the target lacZ{alpha} gene was obviously non-random. We compared this study with previous data employing {gamma}-rays to discuss the possible causes of the mutation spectrum.

  14. Evolution of metastasis revealed by mutational landscapes of chemically induced skin cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreery, Melissa Q; Halliwill, Kyle D; Chin, Douglas; Delrosario, Reyno; Hirst, Gillian; Vuong, Peter; Jen, Kuang-Yu; Hewinson, James; Adams, David J; Balmain, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Human tumors show a high level of genetic heterogeneity, but the processes that influence the timing and route of metastatic dissemination of the subclones are unknown. Here we have used whole-exome sequencing of 103 matched benign, malignant and metastatic skin tumors from genetically heterogeneous mice to demonstrate that most metastases disseminate synchronously from the primary tumor, supporting parallel rather than linear evolution as the predominant model of metastasis. Shared mutations between primary carcinomas and their matched metastases have the distinct A-to-T signature of the initiating carcinogen dimethylbenzanthracene, but non-shared mutations are primarily G-to-T, a signature associated with oxidative stress. The existence of carcinomas that either did or did not metastasize in the same host animal suggests that there are tumor-intrinsic factors that influence metastatic seeding. We also demonstrate the importance of germline polymorphisms in determining allele-specific mutations, and we identify somatic genetic alterations that are specifically related to initiation of carcinogenesis by Hras or Kras mutations. Mouse tumors that mimic the genetic heterogeneity of human cancers can aid our understanding of the clonal evolution of metastasis and provide a realistic model for the testing of novel therapies. PMID:26523969

  15. An RNA Aptamer Inhibits a Mutation-Induced Inactivating Misfolding of a Serpin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jeppe B; Andersen, Lisbeth M; Dupont, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    to a more stable state during reaction with the target protease. However, the metastable state also makes serpins vulnerable to mutations, resulting in disease caused by inactive and misfolded monomeric or polymeric forms ("serpinopathy"). Misfolding can occur either intracellularly (type-I serpinopathies...

  16. A hypomorphic mutation in Lpin1 induces progressively improving neuropathy and lipodystrophy in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mul, J.D.; Nadra, K.; Jagalur, N.B.; Nijman, I.J.; Toonen, P.W.; Medard, J.J.; Gres, S.; de Bruin, A.; Han, G.S.; Brouwers, J.F.; Carman, G.M.; Saulnier-Blache, J.S.; Meijer, D.; Chrast, R.; Cuppen, E.

    2011-01-01

    The Lpin1 gene encodes the phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP1) enzyme Lipin 1, which plays a critical role in lipid metabolism. In this study we describe the identification and characterization of a rat model with a mutated Lpin1 gene (Lpin1(1Hubr)), generated by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis.

  17. Radiation-Induced Germ Cell Mutations-Their Detection and Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-30

    ABSTRACT (Continued) sources chosen for this study are thought to be the most efficient for mutation induction, the values obtained may describe the...FIELD COMMAND DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY ATTN FCP/FCPF BOLLING AFB ATTN: AF/ SGPT INTERSERVICE NUCLEAR WEAPONS SCHOOL ATTN: HQ USAF/SGES ATTN. RH U S AIR

  18. Application of Two- and Four-Mutation Carcinogenesis Models to UV induced Skin Tumours in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema LB; Leenhouts HP; LSO

    1995-01-01

    Dit rapport bevat de resultaten van de analyse van de incidentie van huidtumoren bij muizen na blootstelling aan ultra-violette straling (UV). Twee soorten modellen, gebaseerd op het meerstadiumkarakter van het carcinogenese proces, werden gebruikt om de incidentie te beschrijven: een twee-mutat

  19. Mutation induced extinction in finite populations: lethal mutagenesis and lethal isolation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Scott Wylie

    Full Text Available Reproduction is inherently risky, in part because genomic replication can introduce new mutations that are usually deleterious toward fitness. This risk is especially severe for organisms whose genomes replicate "semi-conservatively," e.g. viruses and bacteria, where no master copy of the genome is preserved. Lethal mutagenesis refers to extinction of populations due to an unbearably high mutation rate (U, and is important both theoretically and clinically, where drugs can extinguish pathogens by increasing their mutation rate. Previous theoretical models of lethal mutagenesis assume infinite population size (N. However, in addition to high U, small N can accelerate extinction by strengthening genetic drift and relaxing selection. Here, we examine how the time until extinction depends jointly on N and U. We first analytically compute the mean time until extinction (τ in a simplistic model where all mutations are either lethal or neutral. The solution motivates the definition of two distinct regimes: a survival phase and an extinction phase, which differ dramatically in both how τ scales with N and in the coefficient of variation in time until extinction. Next, we perform stochastic population-genetics simulations on a realistic fitness landscape that both (i features an epistatic distribution of fitness effects that agrees with experimental data on viruses and (ii is based on the biophysics of protein folding. More specifically, we assume that mutations inflict fitness penalties proportional to the extent that they unfold proteins. We find that decreasing N can cause phase transition-like behavior from survival to extinction, which motivates the concept of "lethal isolation." Furthermore, we find that lethal mutagenesis and lethal isolation interact synergistically, which may have clinical implications for treating infections. Broadly, we conclude that stably folded proteins are only possible in ecological settings that support sufficiently

  20. Proteomic analysis of the low mutation rate of diploid male gametes induced by colchicine in Ginkgo biloba L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Yang

    Full Text Available Colchicine treatment of G. biloba microsporocytes results in a low mutation rate in the diploid (2n male gamete. The mutation rate is significantly lower as compared to other tree species and impedes the breeding of new economic varieties. Proteomic analysis was done to identify the proteins that influence the process of 2n gamete formation in G. biloba. The microsporangia of G. biloba were treated with colchicine solution for 48 h and the proteins were analyzed using 2-D gel electrophoresis and compared to protein profiles of untreated microsporangia. A total of 66 proteins showed difference in expression levels. Twenty-seven of these proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. Among the 27 proteins, 14 were found to be up-regulated and the rest 13 were down-regulated. The identified proteins belonged to five different functional classes: ATP generation, transport and carbohydrate metabolism; protein metabolism; ROS scavenging and detoxifying enzymes; cell wall remodeling and metabolism; transcription, cell cycle and signal transduction. The identification of these differentially expressed proteins and their function could help in analysing the mechanism of lower mutation rate of diploid male gamete when the microsporangium of G. biloba was induced by colchicine.

  1. Seamless correction of the sickle cell disease mutation of the HBB gene in human induced pluripotent stem cells using TALENs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ning; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-05-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common human genetic disease which is caused by a single mutation of human β-globin (HBB) gene. The lack of long-term treatment makes the development of reliable cell and gene therapies highly desirable. Disease-specific patient-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have great potential for developing novel cell and gene therapies. With the disease-causing mutations corrected in situ, patient-derived hiPSCs can restore normal cell functions and serve as a renewable autologous cell source for the treatment of genetic disorders. Here we successfully utilized transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), a recently emerged novel genome editing tool, to correct the SCD mutation in patient-derived hiPSCs. The TALENs we have engineered are highly specific and generate minimal off-target effects. In combination with piggyBac transposon, TALEN-mediated gene targeting leaves no residual ectopic sequences at the site of correction and the corrected hiPSCs retain full pluripotency and a normal karyotype. Our study demonstrates an important first step of using TALENs for the treatment of genetic diseases such as SCD, which represents a significant advance toward hiPSC-based cell and gene therapies.

  2. Sp1 regulates Raf/MEK/ERK-induced p21(CIP1) transcription in TP53-mutated cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkhanis, Mansi; Park, Jong-In

    2015-03-01

    We previously reported that the upregulation of mortalin, an Hsp70 family chaperone, is important for B-Raf(V600E) tumor cells to bypass p21(CIP1) expression, which is activated as a tumor-suppressive mechanism in response to aberrant MEK/ERK activation (Wu et al., 2013). Interestingly, mortalin depletion induced p21(CIP1) transcription not only in wild-type TP53 but also in TP53-mutated B-Raf(V600E) cancer cells, suggesting the presence of an additional mechanism for p21(CIP1) regulation. In the present study, using luciferase reporter truncation analysis in a TP53-mutated B-Raf(V600E) cancer cell line, SK-MEL28, we identified a proximal p21(CIP1) promoter region responsive to mortalin depletion. Interestingly, when Sp1-like cis-elements in this promoter region were mutagenized, the p21(CIP1) promoter luciferase reporter was no longer responsive to mortalin depletion. Consistent with this, our ChIP analysis revealed that mortalin knockdown could induce Sp1 binding to p21(CIP1) promoter in a MEK/ERK-dependent manner. Moreover, RNA interference of Sp1 substantially attenuated p21(CIP1) expression induced by mortalin depletion in SK-MEL28 cells. Consistent with this observation in SK-MEL28 cells, Sp1 was necessary for the tamoxifen-regulated ∆Raf-1:ER to induce p21(CIP1) transcription in U251 cells, in which TP53 is mutated. However, in contrast, Sp1 was not necessary for ∆Raf-1:ER to induce p21(CIP1) transcription in LNCaP cells, in which TP53 is wild type. These data suggest that Sp1 may address TP53-independent p21(CIP1) transcription in Raf/MEK/ERK-activated cancer cells and that its requirement in Raf/MEK/ERK-induced p21(CIP1) transcription is subject to TP53 status.

  3. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α polymorphisms and TSC1/2 mutations are complementary in head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikitakis Nikolaos G

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms or mutations in hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1alpha that increases its activity and stability under normoxia have recently been identified. Likewise, disruption of the TSC1/TSC2 complex through loss of TSC1 or TSC2 has been shown to result in abnormal accumulation of HIF-1α. Here, we investigate the novel polymorphisms in exon 12, that approximate the oxygen-dependent degradation domain of HIF-1alpha in five cell lines and 28 patients with oral squamous carcinomas. Moreover, we assess for the presence of polymorphisms and mutations in TSC1 and TSC2, to ascertain if dysregulation of such might complement HIF-1alpha expression. Results Denaturing high pressure liquid chromatography (DHPLC analysis on PCR fragments in exon 12 of HIF-1alpha from 28 patients with OSCC revealed that 6 of 28 patients had mismatched heteroduplex patterns. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes and direct sequencing showed that in 5 of the six cases these changes represented polymorphisms while, one case was a somatic mutation. Analyses of TSC1 and TSC2 revealed heteroduplexes in exons: TSC1 exon 17; TSC2 exons 36,40, and 41. The relative levels of HIF-1alpha were significantly greater for tumors possessing a HIF-1alpha polymorphism or mutation within exon 12, whereas tumors possessing a deletion or polymorphism in TSC1/TSC2 displayed a trend for higher levels of HIF-1alpha. Western blot analyses for HIF-1alpha, TSC1 and TSC2 in five SCC cell lines revealed high levels of HIF-1alpha in SCC cells possessing TSC1 and/or TSC2 mutations. Wild-type TSC2 cells targeted with siRNA to TSC2 exhibited increased levels of HIF-1alpha. Transfection of a HIF-1alpha mutant produced higher levels of HIF-1alpha in TSC1/TSC2 mutant cell lines than in wild type cells. TSC1/TSC2 mutant cell lines administered Rapamycin blocked S6 phorphorylation and diminished the levels of HIF-1alpha to those observed in cell lines with wild

  4. Hypercholesterolemia Induced by a PCSK9 Gain-of-Function Mutation Augments Angiotensin II-Induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in C57BL/6 Mice-Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong; Howatt, Deborah A; Balakrishnan, Anju; Graham, Mark J; Mullick, Adam E; Daugherty, Alan

    2016-09-01

    Gain-of-function mutations of PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) lead to hypercholesterolemia. This study was to determine whether infection of normocholesterolemic mice with an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector expressing a gain-of-function mutation of mouse PCSK9 increased angiotensin II (AngII)-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms. In an initial study, male C57BL/6 mice were injected intraperitoneally with either an empty vector or PCSK9 gain-of-function mutation (D377Y). AAV at 3 doses and fed a saturated fat-enriched diet for 6 weeks. Two weeks after AAV injection, mice were infused with AngII for 4 weeks. Plasma PCSK9 concentrations were increased dose dependently in mice injected with AAV containing PCSK9D377Y mutation and positively associated with elevations of plasma cholesterol concentrations. Infection with intermediate and high doses of PCSK9D377Y.AAV led to equivalent increases of maximal width of abdominal aortas in C57BL/6 mice infused with AngII. Therefore, the intermediate dose was used in subsequent experiments. We then determined effects of PCSK9D377Y.AAV infection on 5 normolipidemic mouse strains, demonstrating that C57BL/6 mice were the most susceptible to this AAV infection. PCSK9D377Y.AAV infected male C57BL/6 mice were also compared with age-matched male low-density lipoprotein receptor(-/-) mice. Although plasma cholesterol concentrations were lower in mice infected with PCSK9D377Y.AAV, these mice had equivalent abdominal aortic aneurysmal formation, compared to low-density lipoprotein receptor(-/-) mice. In a separate study, reduced plasma PCSK9 concentrations by PCSK9 antisense oligonucleotides in male low-density lipoprotein receptor(-/-) mice did not influence AngII-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms. AAV-mediated infection with a mouse PCSK9 gain-of-function mutation is a rapid, easy, and efficient approach for inducing hypercholesterolemia and promoting abdominal aortic aneurysms in C57BL/6 mice infused with Ang

  5. Functional and cellular characterization of human Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1 mutations associated with Smith-Magenis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmona-Mora Paulina

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smith-Magenis Syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome in which the dosage sensitive gene has been identified: the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1. Little is known about the function of human RAI1. Results We generated the full-length cDNA of the wild type protein and five mutated forms: RAI1-HA 2687delC, RAI1-HA 3103delC, RAI1 R960X, RAI1-HA Q1562R, and RAI1-HA S1808N. Four of them have been previously associated with SMS clinical phenotype. Molecular weight, subcellular localization and transcription factor activity of the wild type and mutant forms were studied by western blot, immunofluorescence and luciferase assays respectively. The wild type protein and the two missense mutations presented a higher molecular weight than expected, localized to the nucleus and activated transcription of a reporter gene. The frameshift mutations generated a truncated polypeptide with transcription factor activity but abnormal subcellular localization, and the same was true for the 1-960aa N-terminal half of RAI1. Two different C-terminal halves of the RAI1 protein (1038aa-end and 1229aa-end were able to localize into the nucleus but had no transactivation activity. Conclusion Our results indicate that transcription factor activity and subcellular localization signals reside in two separate domains of the protein and both are essential for the correct functionality of RAI1. The pathogenic outcome of some of the mutated forms can be explained by the dissociation of these two domains.

  6. Physiological Expression of AMPKγ2RG Mutation Causes Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome and Induces Kidney Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Mudgett, John; Bou-About, Ghina; Champy, Marie-France; Jacobs, Hugues; Monassier, Laurent; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Sorg, Tania; Herault, Yann; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Lu, Ku; Feng, Wen; Wang, Hongwu; Ma, Li-Jun; Askew, Roger; Erion, Mark D; Kelley, David E; Myers, Robert W; Li, Cai; Guan, Hong-Ping

    2016-11-04

    Mutations of the AMP-activated kinase gamma 2 subunit (AMPKγ2), N488I (AMPKγ2(NI)) and R531G (AMPKγ2(RG)), are associated with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome, a cardiac disorder characterized by ventricular pre-excitation in humans. Cardiac-specific transgenic overexpression of human AMPKγ2(NI) or AMPKγ2(RG) leads to constitutive AMPK activation and the WPW phenotype in mice. However, overexpression of these mutant proteins also caused profound, non-physiological increase in cardiac glycogen, which might abnormally alter the true phenotype. To investigate whether physiological levels of AMPKγ2(NI) or AMPKγ2(RG) mutation cause WPW syndrome and metabolic changes in other organs, we generated two knock-in mouse lines on the C57BL/6N background harboring mutations of human AMPKγ2(NI) and AMPKγ2(RG), respectively. Similar to the reported phenotypes of mice overexpressing AMPKγ2(NI) or AMPKγ2(RG) in the heart, both lines developed WPW syndrome and cardiac hypertrophy; however, these effects were independent of cardiac glycogen accumulation. Compared with AMPKγ2(WT) mice, AMPKγ2(NI) and AMPKγ2(RG) mice exhibited reduced body weight, fat mass, and liver steatosis when fed with a high fat diet (HFD). Surprisingly, AMPKγ2(RG) but not AMPKγ2(NI) mice fed with an HFD exhibited severe kidney injury characterized by glycogen accumulation, inflammation, apoptosis, cyst formation, and impaired renal function. These results demonstrate that expression of AMPKγ2(NI) and AMPKγ2(RG) mutations at physiological levels can induce beneficial metabolic effects but that this is accompanied by WPW syndrome. Our data also reveal an unexpected effect of AMPKγ2(RG) in the kidney, linking lifelong constitutive activation of AMPK to a potential risk for kidney dysfunction in the context of an HFD. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. C-kit mutation screening in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia: adaptation of a Giemsa-stained bone-marrow smear DNA extraction technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, E L; Davidson, K; Smith, M A; Inman, L; Marriott, S A; Smith, J G; Pallister, C J

    2001-01-01

    The scarcity of viable tissue samples for leukaemia research is widely recognised and currently restrictive. Archival bone-marrow smears present a valuable resource that can be exploited easily for mutational analysis. Here, a modified technique to extract DNA is described, and used subsequently for mutation/polymorphism screening of the stem-cell factor receptor proto-oncogene c-kit in 23 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The selected method was straightforward and used bone-marrow material scraped from periodic acid-Schiff, sudan black B and May-Grünwald/Giemsa-stained preparations, and treated initially with proteinase K prepared in digestion buffer to digest all proteinaceous matter. Following incubation, saturated sodium chloride was added and DNA extracted from the supernatant by phenol/chloroform/isoamyl alcohol treatment. Retrieved DNA was precipitated with ethanol at -20 degrees C overnight, washed with 95% ethanol, air-dried, resuspended using purite water and stored at -20 degrees C prior to use in mutational analysis. The extraction method described was compared with a commercial reagent for combined DNA, RNA and protein isolation using cryopreserved cells from 20 patients with AML. The quality of extracted DNA isolated by the two methods was comparable by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) techniques. Bone-marrow biopsies are performed regularly on each AML patient to monitor the disease; therefore, an extraction method using this resource could liberate a valuable source of DNA for study (e.g. molecular investigations, including mutation/polymorphism screening etc.). This would allow fresh and programme-frozen cells to be reserved for those investigations requiring intact, viable cells. The use of archived bone-marrow smears would permit vast increase in the scope for retrospective testing and large-scale analyses.

  8. A modified TILLING approach to detect induced mutations in tetraploid and hexaploid wheat

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    Tsai Helen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wheat (Triticum ssp. is an important food source for humans in many regions around the world. However, the ability to understand and modify gene function for crop improvement is hindered by the lack of available genomic resources. TILLING is a powerful reverse genetics approach that combines chemical mutagenesis with a high-throughput screen for mutations. Wheat is specially well-suited for TILLING due to the high mutation densities tolerated by polyploids, which allow for very efficient screens. Despite this, few TILLING populations are currently available. In addition, current TILLING screening protocols require high-throughput genotyping platforms, limiting their use. Results We developed mutant populations of pasta and common wheat and organized them for TILLING. To simplify and decrease costs, we developed a non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel set-up that uses ethidium bromide to detect fragments generated by crude celery juice extract digestion of heteroduplexes. This detection method had similar sensitivity as traditional LI-COR screens, suggesting that it represents a valid alternative. We developed genome-specific primers to circumvent the presence of multiple homoeologous copies of our target genes. Each mutant library was characterized by TILLING multiple genes, revealing high mutation densities in both the hexaploid (~1/38 kb and tetraploid (~1/51 kb populations for 50% GC targets. These mutation frequencies predict that screening 1,536 lines for an effective target region of 1.3 kb with 50% GC content will result in ~52 hexaploid and ~39 tetraploid mutant alleles. This implies a high probability of obtaining knock-out alleles (P = 0.91 for hexaploid, P = 0.84 for tetraploid, in addition to multiple missense mutations. In total, we identified over 275 novel alleles in eleven targeted gene/genome combinations in hexaploid and tetraploid wheat and have validated the presence of a subset of them in our seed stock

  9. Detecting drug resistant genetic mutation among pneumoconiosis patients complicated with tuberculosis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis L-forms application of PCR-SSCP technique in Huainan mining district

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Lu; Shan Jiang; Song Ye; Chaopin Li

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between drug resistant genetic mutation and drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis L-form, discuss the internal relationship between drug resistances and drug-resistant related genes and explore the value of PCRSSCP to clinical application. Methods: A total of 52 clinically isolated strains of tuberculosis L-form were collected among 97pneumoconiosis patients complicated with tuberculosis. The gene mutations of katG, rpoB and rpsL were detected by PCR-SSCP,and the results were compared with those analyzed by traditional antimicrobial susceptibility test(AST). Results: The gene mutation rates of katG, rpoB and rpsL by PCR-SSCP were respectively 57.70% (30/52), 65.38% (32/52) and 40.38% (21/52). The rate of reversion was 78.85%(41/52) and the result of drug-resistant genes was invariable. The results of AST showed that there were 40 (76.92%) multi-drug resistant strains in 52 clinically isolated strains. The number for three-drug resistant strain was 21(40.38%) and that of two-drug resistant was 19(36.54%), but only 12 (23.08%) strains were one drug resistant. The rate of total drug-resistance was 100%, but there were 15 strains of allied mutation of three genes, 16 of two mutations and 6 of only one by PCR-SSCP. The coincidences were respectively 71.43%, 84.12% and 50.00%. Then there was no significant difference between the allied mutations of multi-drug resistant gene and the mutations of only one drug resistant gene (P > 0.05). Conclusion: PCRSSCP technique has a higher sensibility and specificity to detect the genes of katG, rpoB and rpsL in tuberculosis L-form among pneumoconiosis complicated with tuberculosis,and the detecting rate of two drug resistant strains and three drug resistant strains was higher. The combined application of PCR-SSCP and AST has advantages at earlier diagnosis and guidance of clinical medications.

  10. MUTATION OF p53 GENE IN TRANSFORMED RAT TRACHEAL EPITHELIAL CELLS INDUCED BY RADIATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵永良; 吴德昌; 刘国廉; 项晓琼

    1998-01-01

    The highly conserved domain (exon 5-8) of p53 gene in transformed rat tracheal epithelial (RTE) cells was analyzed by means of polymerase chain reaction and single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP). The result showed that single strand of exon 8 gene had mobility shift in polyacrylamide nondenaturing gel. DNA sequencing proved the mutation was G→C transversion at condon 265.

  11. Insights into the mutation-induced HHH syndrome from modeling human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Fang Wang

    Full Text Available Human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1 is reported in coupling with the hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH syndrome, which is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. For in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanism of the disease, it is crucially important to acquire the 3D structure of human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1. Since no such structure is available in the current protein structure database, we have developed it via computational approaches based on the recent NMR structure of human mitochondrial uncoupling protein (Berardi MJ, Chou JJ, et al. Nature 2011, 476:109-113. Subsequently, we docked the ligand L-ornithine into the computational structure to search for the favorable binding mode. It was observed that the binding interaction for the most favorable binding mode is featured by six remarkable hydrogen bonds between the receptor and ligand, and that the most favorable binding mode shared the same ligand-binding site with most of the homologous mitochondrial carriers from different organisms, implying that the ligand-binding sites are quite conservative in the mitochondrial carriers family although their sequences similarity is very low with 20% or so. Moreover, according to our structural analysis, the relationship between the disease-causing mutations of human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1 and the HHH syndrome can be classified into the following three categories: (i the mutation occurs in the pseudo-repeat regions so as to change the region of the protein closer to the mitochondrial matrix; (ii the mutation is directly affecting the substrate binding pocket so as to reduce the substrate binding affinity; (iii the mutation is located in the structural region closer to the intermembrane space that can significantly break the salt bridge networks of the protein. These findings may provide useful insights for in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanism of the HHH syndrome and

  12. Insights into the mutation-induced HHH syndrome from modeling human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Fang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1 is reported in coupling with the hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome, which is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. For in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanism of the disease, it is crucially important to acquire the 3D structure of human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1. Since no such structure is available in the current protein structure database, we have developed it via computational approaches based on the recent NMR structure of human mitochondrial uncoupling protein (Berardi MJ, Chou JJ, et al. Nature 2011, 476:109-113). Subsequently, we docked the ligand L-ornithine into the computational structure to search for the favorable binding mode. It was observed that the binding interaction for the most favorable binding mode is featured by six remarkable hydrogen bonds between the receptor and ligand, and that the most favorable binding mode shared the same ligand-binding site with most of the homologous mitochondrial carriers from different organisms, implying that the ligand-binding sites are quite conservative in the mitochondrial carriers family although their sequences similarity is very low with 20% or so. Moreover, according to our structural analysis, the relationship between the disease-causing mutations of human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1 and the HHH syndrome can be classified into the following three categories: (i) the mutation occurs in the pseudo-repeat regions so as to change the region of the protein closer to the mitochondrial matrix; (ii) the mutation is directly affecting the substrate binding pocket so as to reduce the substrate binding affinity; (iii) the mutation is located in the structural region closer to the intermembrane space that can significantly break the salt bridge networks of the protein. These findings may provide useful insights for in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanism of the HHH syndrome and developing effective

  13. Dependence of mutation spectrum on physiological state of Pen. Chrysogenum cells. Auxotrophic mutants induced with UV rays at various stages of DNA replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharova, G.M.; Bartoshevich, Yu.Eh.; Lebed, Eh.S.; Domracheva, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of UV-rays on non-activated and activated conidia of penicillin producers Pen, chryrogenum, strain 39, has been studied. It has been established that 2 doses of UV-rays - 4000 and 6000 erg/mm/sup 2/ - induce in non-activated conidia approximately equal quantity of mutations with broken synthesis of amino acids and nitrous bases of nucleic acids. The spectrum of auxotrophic mutations induced during the DNA replication changes depending on the mutagen dose and replication stage. No distinct periodicity in the mutation yield has been observed. Schemes of the induction of mutations during the DNA replication under the effect of both doses of UV-rays have been made.

  14. Induced Mutations for Improved Lycopene, Total Antioxidant Properties and Other Quality Factors in Wild Tomato (Solanum pimpinellifolium L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel K. Quartey

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to determine biochemical changes in (5 gamma radiation induced variant lines of wild tomato after mutation induction. Five gamma radiation-induced variant lines of wild tomato (Solanum pimpinellifolium L., selected in the M3 generation following mutagenic treatment of seeds using three doses (150, 300 and 450 Gy, respectively of gamma radiation from a Co-60 gamma source, were analysed for their lycopene content, total antioxidant properties, total and soluble solids as well as pH. Fruits of variant line BV-21 (deep red fruits recorded higher lycopene contents of 146.1 mg/kg on fresh weight basis and 156.7 mg/kg on dry weight basis compared to 136 and 152 mg/kg, respectively for the control. They also recorded higher total antioxidant properties compared to the control. Fruits of variant line BV-40 (yellow fruits recorded higher total solids of 17.9% and the lowest pH value of 4.17 compared to 12.8% and 4.36 for fruits from unirradiated plants. The highest amounts of total soluble solids (7% were contained in fruits harvested from variant lines BV-27 (light red fruits and BV-23 (deep red fruits as against 5.6% for fruits from control plants. The study indicates that wild tomato has immense nutritional properties which can be further improved through mutation breeding.

  15. A Molecular Modeling Study of the Hydroxyflutamide Resistance Mechanism Induced by Androgen Receptor Mutations

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    Hong-Li Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyflutamide (HF, an active metabolite of the first generation antiandrogen flutamide, was used in clinic to treat prostate cancer targeting androgen receptor (AR. However, a drug resistance problem appears after about one year’s treatment. AR T877A is the first mutation that was found to cause a resistance problem. Then W741C_T877A and F876L_T877A mutations were also reported to cause resistance to HF, while W741C and F876L single mutations cannot. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD simulations combined with the molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA method have been carried out to analyze the interaction mechanism between HF and wild-type (WT/mutant ARs. The obtained results indicate that AR helix 12 (H12 plays a pivotal role in the resistance of HF. It can affect the coactivator binding site at the activation function 2 domain (AF2, surrounded by H3, H4, and H12. When H12 closes to the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD like a lid, the coactivator binding site can be formed to promote transcription. However, once H12 is opened to expose LBD, the coactivator binding site will be distorted, leading to invalid transcription. Moreover, per-residue free energy decomposition analyses indicate that N705, T877, and M895 are vital residues in the agonist/antagonist mechanism of HF.

  16. In Vivo Spectrum of UVC-induced Mutation in Mouse Skin Epidermis May Reflect the Cytosine Deamination Propensity of Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehata, Hironobu; Mori, Toshio; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    Although ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has a genotoxicity for inducing skin cancers, the skin may tolerate UVC component because the epidermal layer prevents this short wavelength range from passing through. Here, UVC genotoxicity for mouse skin was evaluated in terms of DNA damage formation and mutagenicity. UVC induced UVR photolesions and mutations remarkably in the epidermis but poorly in the dermis, confirming the barrier ability of the epidermis against shorter UVR wavelengths. Moreover, the epidermis itself responded to UVC mutagenicity with mutation induction suppression, which suppressed the mutant frequencies to a remarkably low, constant level regardless of UVC dose. The mutation spectrum observed in UVC-exposed epidermis showed a predominance of UV-signature mutation, which occurred frequently in 5'-TCG-3', 5'-TCA-3' and 5'-CCA-3' contexts. Especially, for the former two contexts, the mutations recurred at several sites with more remarkable recurrences at the 5'-TCG-3' sites. Comparison of the UVC mutation spectrum with those observed in longer UVR wavelength ranges led us to a mechanism that explains why the sequence context preference of UV-signature mutation changes according to the wavelength, which is based on the difference in the mCpG preference of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation among UVR ranges and the sequence context-dependent cytosine deamination propensity of CPD.

  17. Site-specific analysis of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in nucleotide excision repair-proficient and -deficient hamster cells: Lack of correlation with mutational spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G., E-mail: vreeswijk@lumc.nl [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Einthovenweg 20, P.O. Box 9600, Postzone S4-P, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Department of Human Genetics, Center for Human and Clinical Genetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Building 2, Postzone S-04, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Meijers, Caro M.; Giphart-Gassler, Micheline; Vrieling, Harry; Zeeland, Albert A. van; Mullenders, Leon H.F.; Loenen, Wil A.M. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Einthovenweg 20, P.O. Box 9600, Postzone S4-P, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands)

    2009-04-26

    Irradiation of cells with UVC light induces two types of mutagenic DNA photoproducts, i.e. cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PP). To investigate the relationship between the frequency of UV-induced photolesions at specific sites and their ability to induce mutations, we quantified CPD formation at the nucleotide level along exons 3 and 8 of the hprt gene using ligation-mediated PCR, and determined the mutational spectrum of 132 UV-induced hprt mutants in the AA8 hamster cell line and of 165 mutants in its nucleotide excision repair-defective derivative UV5. In AA8 cells, transversions predominated with a strong strand bias towards thymine-containing photolesions in the non-transcribed strand. As hamster AA8 cells are proficient in global genome repair of 6-4PP but selectively repair CPD from the transcribed strand of active genes, most mutations probably resulted from erroneous bypass of CPD in the non-transcribed strand. However, the relative incidence of CPD and the positions where mutations most frequently arose do not correlate. In fact some major damage sites hardly gave rise to the formation of mutations. In the repair-defective UV5 cells, mutations were almost exclusively C > T transitions caused by photoproducts at PyC sites in the transcribed strand. Even though CPD were formed at high frequencies at some TT sites in UV5, these photoproducts did not contribute to mutation induction at all. We conclude that, even in the absence of repair, large variations in the level of induction of CPD at different sites throughout the two exons do not correspond to frequencies of mutation induction.

  18. Site-specific analysis of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in nucleotide excision repair-proficient and -deficient hamster cells: Lack of correlation with mutational spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreeswijk, Maaike P G; Meijers, Caro M; Giphart-Gassler, Micheline; Vrieling, Harry; van Zeeland, Albert A; Mullenders, Leon H F; Loenen, Wil A M

    2009-04-26

    Irradiation of cells with UVC light induces two types of mutagenic DNA photoproducts, i.e. cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4 PP). To investigate the relationship between the frequency of UV-induced photolesions at specific sites and their ability to induce mutations, we quantified CPD formation at the nucleotide level along exons 3 and 8 of the hprt gene using ligation-mediated PCR, and determined the mutational spectrum of 132 UV-induced hprt mutants in the AA8 hamster cell line and of 165 mutants in its nucleotide excision repair-defective derivative UV5. In AA8 cells, transversions predominated with a strong strand bias towards thymine-containing photolesions in the non-transcribed strand. As hamster AA8 cells are proficient in global genome repair of 6-4 PP but selectively repair CPD from the transcribed strand of active genes, most mutations probably resulted from erroneous bypass of CPD in the non-transcribed strand. However, the relative incidence of CPD and the positions where mutations most frequently arose do not correlate. In fact some major damage sites hardly gave rise to the formation of mutations. In the repair-defective UV5 cells, mutations were almost exclusively C>T transitions caused by photoproducts at PyC sites in the transcribed strand. Even though CPD were formed at high frequencies at some TT sites in UV5, these photoproducts did not contribute to mutation induction at all. We conclude that, even in the absence of repair, large variations in the level of induction of CPD at different sites throughout the two exons do not correspond to frequencies of mutation induction.

  19. Generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell line from a patient with hereditary multiple endocrine neoplasia 2A (MEN2A syndrome with RET mutation

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    J. Hadoux

    2016-07-01

    Currently, there is no satisfactory animal model recapitulating all the features of the disease especially at the level of stem cells. We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from a patient with RET mutation at codon 634 who developed pheochromocytoma and MTC. RETC634Y-mutated cells were reprogrammed by non-integrative viral transduction. These iPSCs had normal karyotype, harboured the RETC634Y mutation and expressed pluripotency hallmarks as well as RET. A comprehensive pathological assessment of teratoma was performed after injection in immunodeficient mice.

  20. A Prospective Treatment Option for Lysosomal Storage Diseases: CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing Technology for Mutation Correction in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Chloe L. Christensen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ease of design, relatively low cost and a multitude of gene-altering capabilities have all led to the adoption of the sophisticated and yet simple gene editing system: clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9. The CRISPR/Cas9 system holds promise for the correction of deleterious mutations by taking advantage of the homology directed repair pathway and by supplying a correction template to the affected patient’s cells. Currently, this technique is being applied in vitro in human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs to correct a variety of severe genetic diseases, but has not as of yet been used in iPSCs derived from patients affected with a lysosomal storage disease (LSD. If adopted into clinical practice, corrected iPSCs derived from cells that originate from the patient themselves could be used for therapeutic amelioration of LSD symptoms without the risks associated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation. CRISPR/Cas9 editing in a patient’s cells would overcome the costly, lifelong process associated with currently available treatment methods, including enzyme replacement and substrate reduction therapies. In this review, the overall utility of the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technique for treatment of genetic diseases, the potential for the treatment of LSDs and methods currently employed to increase the efficiency of this re-engineered biological system will be discussed.

  1. Application of Phase-Field Techniques to Hydraulically- and Deformation-Induced Fracture.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culp, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, Nathan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schweizer, Laura [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Phase-field techniques provide an alternative approach to fracture problems which mitigate some of the computational expense associated with tracking the crack interface and the coalescence of individual fractures. The technique is extended to apply to hydraulically driven fracture such as would occur during fracking or CO2 sequestration. Additionally, the technique is applied to a stainless steel specimen used in the Sandia Fracture Challenge. It was found that the phase-field model performs very well, at least qualitatively, in both deformation-induced fracture and hydraulically-induced fracture, though spurious hourglassing modes were observed during coupled hydralically-induced fracture. Future work would include performing additional quantitative benchmark tests and updating the model as needed.

  2. Proportionality between variances in gene expression induced by noise and mutation: consequence of evolutionary robustness

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    Kaneko Kunihiko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Characterization of robustness and plasticity of phenotypes is a basic issue in evolutionary and developmental biology. The robustness and plasticity are concerned with changeability of a biological system against external perturbations. The perturbations are either genetic, i.e., due to mutations in genes in the population, or epigenetic, i.e., due to noise during development or environmental variations. Thus, the variances of phenotypes due to genetic and epigenetic perturbations provide quantitative measures for such changeability during evolution and development, respectively. Results Using numerical models simulating the evolutionary changes in the gene regulation network required to achieve a particular expression pattern, we first confirmed that gene expression dynamics robust to mutation evolved in the presence of a sufficient level of transcriptional noise. Under such conditions, the two types of variances in the gene expression levels, i.e. those due to mutations to the gene regulation network and those due to noise in gene expression dynamics were found to be proportional over a number of genes. The fraction of such genes with a common proportionality coefficient increased with an increase in the robustness of the evolved network. This proportionality was generally confirmed, also under the presence of environmental fluctuations and sexual recombination in diploids, and was explained from an evolutionary robustness hypothesis, in which an evolved robust system suppresses the so-called error catastrophe - the destabilization of the single-peaked distribution in gene expression levels. Experimental evidences for the proportionality of the variances over genes are also discussed. Conclusions The proportionality between the genetic and epigenetic variances of phenotypes implies the correlation between the robustness (or plasticity against genetic changes and against noise in development, and also suggests that

  3. Aging-Induced Stem Cell Mutations as Drivers for Disease and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Peter D.; Jasper, Heinrich; Rudolph, K. Lenhard

    2015-01-01

    Aging is characterized by a decrease in genome integrity, impaired organ maintenance, and an increased risk of cancer, which coincide with clonal dominance of expanded mutant stem and progenitor cell populations in aging tissues, such as the intestinal epithelium, the hematopoietic system, and the male germline. Here we discuss possible explanations for age-associated increases in the initiation and/or progression of mutant stem/progenitor clones and highlight the roles of stem cell quiescence, replication-associated DNA damage, telomere shortening, epigenetic alterations, and metabolic challenges as determinants of stem cell mutations and clonal dominance in aging. PMID:26046760

  4. Antimutagenic effect of essential oil of sage (Salvia officinalis L. and its fractions against UV-induced mutations in bacterial and yeast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević-Vukčević Jelena B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition of spontaneous and UV-induced mutations by essential oil (EO of sage (Salvia officinalis L. and its fractions F1-F5 containing different proportions of mono- and sesquiterpenes was studied with the Salmonella/microsome, E. coli K12, and S. cerevisiae D7 reversion assays. The EO, F1, and F2 exhibited antimutagenic potential against UV-induced mutations in all tests. Fractions F3 and F4 produced a toxic, mutagenic, or antimutagenic response, depend­ing on the test organism used. Reduction of spontaneous and UV-induced mutations by F5 was detected only in permeable strains of E. coli. The obtained results demonstrate antimutagenic activity of volatile sage terpenes and recommend them for further antimutagenesis and anticarcinogenesis studies.

  5. 7-(1-Methyl-3-Pyrrolyl--4,6-Dinitrobenzofuroxan Reduces the Frequency of Antibiotic Resistance Mutations Induced by Ciprofloxacin in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Chistyakov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate biological properties of the novel nitrobenzoxadiazole derivative 7-(1-methyl-3-pyrrolyl--4,6-dinitrobenzofuroxan. Materials and Methods: We used a bioluminescent test based on a set of lux-biosensors, which are genetically modified E.coli strains able to react on different types of factors that can induce an SOS-response with light emission. The spontaneous and induced mutation frequencies of antibiotic resistance in E. coli were determined by methods of classical genetics of microorganisms. Results: 7-(1-methyl-3-pyrrolyl--4,6-dinitrobenzofuroxan demonstrated inhibition of SOS-response in a biosensor model system and significantly reduced the frequency of spontaneous mutations and mutations induced by ciprofloxacin of antibiotic resistance. Conclusion: Based on our data, we can recommend using compound-1 as a starting point for the development of drugs that block mutagenesis associated with the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  6. Mutation of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 induces glioma cell proliferation via nuclear factor-κB activation in a hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoliang; Sai, Ke; Gong, Fanghe; Yang, Qunying; Chen, Furong; Lin, Jian

    2014-05-01

    Recently, mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 gene, which specifically occur in the majority of low-grade and secondary high-grade gliomas, have drawn particular attention of neuro-oncologists. Mutations of the IDH1 gene have been proposed to have significant roles in the tumorigenesis, progression and prognosis of gliomas. However, the molecular mechanism of the role of IDH1 mutants in gliomagenesis remains to be elucidated. The present study, showed that forced expression of an IDH1 mutant, of which the 132th amino acid residue arginine is substituted by histidine (IDH1R132H), promoted cell proliferation in cultured cells, while wild-type IDH1 overexpression had no effect on cell proliferation. Consistent with previous studies, it was also observed that expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1-α) was upregulated in IDH1R132H expressing cells with the induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. However, knockdown of VEGF via small RNA interference had no significant influence on the cell proliferation induced by overexpression of IDH1R132H, implying that another signaling pathway may be involved. Next, forced expression of IDH1R132H was found to activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), since the inhibitory IκB protein (IκBα) was highly phosphorylated and the NF-κB p65 subunit was translocated into the nucleus. Notably, knockdown of HIF1-α significantly blocked NF-κB activation, which was induced by the overexpression of IDH1 mutants. In addition, expression of IDH1 mutants markedly induced the NF-κB target gene expression, including cyclin D1 and E and c-myc, which were involved in the regulation of cell proliferation. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that the IDH1 mutant activated NF-κB in a HIF1-α‑dependent manner and was involved in the regulation of cell proliferation.

  7. TP53 mutations induced by BPDE in Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null human TP53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse embryo fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucab, Jill E; van Steeg, Harry; Luijten, Mirjam; Schmeiser, Heinz H; White, Paul A; Phillips, David H; Arlt, Volker M

    2015-03-01

    Somatic mutations in the tumour suppressor gene TP53 occur in more than 50% of human tumours; in some instances exposure to environmental carcinogens can be linked to characteristic mutational signatures. The Hupki (human TP53 knock-in) mouse embryo fibroblast (HUF) immortalization assay (HIMA) is a useful model for studying the impact of environmental carcinogens on TP53 mutagenesis. In an effort to increase the frequency of TP53-mutated clones achievable in the HIMA, we generated nucleotide excision repair (NER)-deficient HUFs by crossing the Hupki mouse with an Xpa-knockout (Xpa-Null) mouse. We hypothesized that carcinogen-induced DNA adducts would persist in the TP53 sequence of Xpa-Null HUFs leading to an increased propensity for mismatched base pairing and mutation during replication of adducted DNA. We found that Xpa-Null Hupki mice, and HUFs derived from them, were more sensitive to the environmental carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) than their wild-type (Xpa-WT) counterparts. Following treatment with the reactive metabolite of BaP, benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null HUF cultures were subjected to the HIMA. A significant increase in TP53 mutations on the transcribed strand was detected in Xpa-Null HUFs compared to Xpa-WT HUFs, but the TP53-mutant frequency overall was not significantly different between the two genotypes. BPDE induced mutations primarily at G:C base pairs, with approximately half occurring at CpG sites, and the predominant mutation type was G:C>T:A in both Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null cells. Further, several of the TP53 mutation hotspots identified in smokers' lung cancer were mutated by BPDE in HUFs (codons 157, 158, 245, 248, 249, 273). Therefore, the pattern and spectrum of BPDE-induced TP53 mutations in the HIMA are consistent with TP53 mutations detected in lung tumours of smokers. While Xpa-Null HUFs exhibited increased sensitivity to BPDE-induced damage on the transcribed strand, NER-deficiency did not enhance TP53

  8. SCN5A mutation in patients with Brugada electrocardiographic pattern induced by fever

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞建华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between SCN5A,SCN1b,SCN3b and GPD1L genotypes and the risk of malignant arrhythmia in patients with Brugada electrocardiographic pattern induced by fever.Methods The clinical data and peripheral blood of patients with Brugada electrocardiographic pattern induced by fever were

  9. Oncogenic AKT1(E17K) mutation induces mammary hyperplasia but prevents HER2-driven tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Maria L; Lien, Evan C; Toker, Alex

    2016-04-05

    One of the most frequently deregulated signaling pathways in breast cancer is the PI 3-K/Akt cascade. Genetic lesions are commonly found in PIK3CA, PTEN, and AKT, which lead to excessive and constitutive activation of Akt and downstream signaling that results in uncontrolled proliferation and increased cellular survival. One such genetic lesion is the somatic AKT1(E17K) mutation, which has been identified in 4-8% of breast cancer patients. To determine how this mutation contributes to mammary tumorigenesis, we constructed a genetically engineered mouse model that conditionally expresses human AKT1(E17K) in the mammary epithelium. Although AKT1(E17K) is only weakly constitutively active and does not promote proliferation in vitro, it is capable of escaping negative feedback inhibition to exhibit sustained signaling dynamics in vitro. Consistently, both virgin and multiparous AKT1(E17K) mice develop mammary gland hyperplasia that do not progress to carcinoma. This hyperplasia is accompanied by increased estrogen receptor expression, although exposure of the mice to estrogen does not promote tumor development. Moreover, AKT1(E17K) prevents HER2-driven mammary tumor formation, in part through negative feedback inhibition of RTK signaling. Analysis of TCGA breast cancer data revealed that the mRNA expression, total protein levels, and phosphorylation of various RTKs are decreased in human tumors harboring AKT1(E17K).

  10. Spontaneous mutation 7B-1 in tomato impairs blue light-induced stomatal opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavinka, Jan; Nauš, Jan; Fellner, Martin

    2013-08-01

    It was reported earlier that 7B-1 mutant in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), an ABA overproducer, is defective in blue light (BL) signaling leading to BL-specific resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses. In this work, we examine responses of stomata to blue, red and white lights, fusicoccin, anion channel blockers (anthracene-9-carboxylic acid; 9-AC and niflumic acid; NIF) and ABA. Our results showed that the aperture of 7B-1 stomata does not increase in BL, suggesting that 7B-1 mutation impairs an element of BL signaling pathway involved in stomatal opening. Similar stomatal responses of 7B-1 and wild type (WT) to fusicoccin or 9-AC points out that activity of H(+)-ATPase and 9-AC-sensitive anion channels per se is not likely affected by the mutation. Since 9-AC restored stomatal opening of 7B-1 in BL, it seems that 9-AC and BL could block similar type of anion channels. The stomata of both genotypes did not respond to NIF neither in darkness nor in any light conditions tested. In light, 9-AC but not NIF restored stomatal opening inhibited by ABA in WT and 7B-1. We suggest that in comparison to WT, the activity of S-type anion channels in 7B-1 is more promoted by increased ABA content, and less reduced by BL, because of the mutant resistance to BL.

  11. Radiation-induced mutations in sweet cherry (Prunus avium L. ) cvs Napoleon and Bing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saamin, S.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were conducted using gamma radiation to determine radiosensitivities of main and accessory buds, to increase the proportion of mutant tissue, and to determine the type of damage and mode of recovery in irradiated shoot spices of sweet cherry cvs Napoleon and Bin. Survival, growth, and the types of mutations of V/sub 1/ (primary) shoots and V/sub 2/ plants were observed. LD/sub 50/ values, based on survival of forced buds were about 5kR for both acute and fractionated irradiation in air, 5.5kR for acute exposure in water, and 6kR for fractionated dose in water. 0.39-0.69 accessory buds/site on non-irradiated Napoleon had forced after 30 days in the glasshouse. In the Bing field experiment with main buds, the LD/sub 50/ for both acute and fractionated irradiation in air was 3.5kR. In water, the LD/sub 50/ was 5kR for acute treatment and 6.5kR for fractionated dose. The overall mutation frequency in Napoleon V/sub 2/ shoots derived from main buds was 7.6%: 0.04% growth-reduced mutants, 0.4% total leaf mutants, and7.1% partial leaf mutants.

  12. APPLICATION OF METAL RESISTANT BACTERIA BY MUTATIONAL ENHANCMENT TECHNIQUE FOR BIOREMEDIATION OF COPPER AND ZINC FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Shakibaie ، A. Khosravan ، A. Frahmand ، S. Zare

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this research, using mutation in the metal resistant bacteria, the bioremediation of the copper and zinc from copper factory effluents was investigated. Wastewater effluents from flocculation and rolling mill sections of a factory in the city of Kerman were collected and used for further experiments. 20 strains of Pseudomonas spp. were isolated from soil and effluents surrounding factory and identified by microbiological methods. Minimum inhibitory concentrations for copper (Cu and zinc (Zn were determined by agar dilution method. Those strains that exhibited highest minimum inhibitory concentrations values to the metals (5mM were subjected to 400-3200 mg/L concentrations of the three mutagenic agents, acriflavine, acridine orange and ethidium bromide. After determination of subinhibitory concentrations, the minimum inhibitory concentrations values for copper and zinc metal ions were again determined, which showed more than 10 fold increase in minimum inhibitory concentrations value (10 mM for Cu and 20 mM for Zn with P≤0.05. The atomic absorption spectroscopy of dried biomass obtained from resistant strains after exposure to mutagenic agents revealed that strains 13 accumulate the highest amount of intracellular copper (0.35% Cu/mg dried biomass and strain 10 showed highest accumulation of zinc (0.3% Zn/mg dried biomass respectively with P≤0.05. From above results it was concluded that the treatment of industrial waste containing heavy metals by artificially mutated bacteria may be appropriate solution for effluent disposal problems.

  13. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction analysis of UV-A- and UV-B-induced delayed and early mutations in V79 Chinese hamster cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahle, Jostein; Noordhuis, Paul; Stokke, Trond; Svendsrud, Debbie Hege; Kvam, Egil

    2005-01-01

    We previously reported that approximately 10% of V79 Chinese hamster fibroblast populations clonally derived from single cells immediately after irradiation with either ultraviolet B (UV-B, 290-320 nm, mainly 311 nm) or ultraviolet A (UV-A, 320-400 nm, mainly 350-390 nm) radiation exhibit genomic instability. The instability is revealed by relatively high mutation frequencies in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) gene up to 23 cell generations after irradiation. These delayed mutant clones exhibited higher levels of oxidative stress than normal cells. Therefore, persistently increased oxidative stress has been proposed as a mechanism for UV-induced genomic instability. This study investigates whether this mechanism is reflected in the deletion spectrum of delayed mutant clones. Eighty-eight percent of the delayed mutant clones derived from UV-A-irradiated populations were found to have total deletion of the hprt gene. Correspondingly, 81% of UV-A-induced early mutations (i.e. detected shortly after irradiation) also had total deletions. Among delayed UV-B-induced mutant clones, 23% had total deletions and 8% had deletion of one exon, whereas all early UV-B events were either point mutations or small deletions or insertions. In conclusion, the multiplex polymerase chain reaction deletion screen showed that there were explicit differences in the occurrence of large gene alterations between early and delayed mutations induced by UV-B radiation. For UV-A radiation the deletion spectra were similar for delayed and early mutations. UV-A radiation is, in contrast to UV-B radiation, only weakly absorbed by DNA and probably induces mutation almost solely via production of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, the present results support the hypothesis that persistent increase in oxidative stress is involved in the mechanism of UV-induced genomic instability.

  14. Precise Correction of Disease Mutations in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived From Patients With Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Soeren; Farruggio, Alfonso P; Srifa, Waracharee; Day, John W; Calos, Michele P

    2016-04-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophies types 2B (LGMD2B) and 2D (LGMD2D) are degenerative muscle diseases caused by mutations in the dysferlin and alpha-sarcoglycan genes, respectively. Using patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), we corrected the dysferlin nonsense mutation c.5713C>T; p.R1905X and the most common alpha-sarcoglycan mutation, missense c.229C>T; p.R77C, by single-stranded oligonucleotide-mediated gene editing, using the CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing system to enhance the frequency of homology-directed repair. We demonstrated seamless, allele-specific correction at efficiencies of 0.7-1.5%. As an alternative, we also carried out precise gene addition strategies for correction of the LGMD2B iPSC by integration of wild-type dysferlin cDNA into the H11 safe harbor locus on chromosome 22, using dual integrase cassette exchange (DICE) or TALEN-assisted homologous recombination for insertion precise (THRIP). These methods employed TALENs and homologous recombination, and DICE also utilized site-specific recombinases. With DICE and THRIP, we obtained targeting efficiencies after selection of ~20%. We purified iPSC corrected by all methods and verified rescue of appropriate levels of dysferlin and alpha-sarcoglycan protein expression and correct localization, as shown by immunoblot and immunocytochemistry. In summary, we demonstrate for the first time precise correction of LGMD iPSC and validation of expression, opening the possibility of cell therapy utilizing these corrected iPSC.

  15. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from an Alzheimer's disease patient carrying a L150P mutation in PSEN-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tubsuwan, Alisa; Pires, Carlota; Rasmussen, Mikkel A.

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were generated from skin fibroblasts isolated from a 58-year old male with a L150P mutation in the presenilin 1 (PSEN-1) gene, which is responsible for the majority of familial cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The iPSC swere established by co-electroporati......Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were generated from skin fibroblasts isolated from a 58-year old male with a L150P mutation in the presenilin 1 (PSEN-1) gene, which is responsible for the majority of familial cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The iPSC swere established by co...

  16. Functional analysis of the ABCs of eye color in Helicoverpa armigera with CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sher Afzal; Reichelt, Michael; Heckel, David G.

    2017-01-01

    Many insect pigments are localized in subcellular pigment granules, and transport of pigment precursors from the cytoplasm is accomplished by ABC proteins. Drosophila melanogaster has three half-transporter genes (white, scarlet, and brown, all affecting eye pigments) and Bombyx mori has a fourth (ok). The White, Brown, Scarlet and Ok proteins each have one transmembrane and one cytoplasmic domain and they heterodimerize to form functional transporters with different substrate specificities. We used CRISPR/Cas9 to create somatic and germ-line knockout mutations of these four genes in the noctuid moth Helicoverpa armigera. Somatic knockouts of white block pigmentation of the egg, first instar larva and adult eye, but germ-line knockouts of white are recessive lethal in the embryo. Knockouts of scarlet are viable and produce pigmentless first instar larvae and yellow adult eyes lacking xanthommatin. Knockouts of brown show no phenotypic effects on viability or pigmentation. Knockouts of ok are viable and produce translucent larval cuticle and black eyes. CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations are a useful tool for analyzing how essential and non-essential genes interact to produce the diversity of insect pigmentation patterns found in nature. PMID:28053351

  17. A novel ENU-induced ankyrin-1 mutation impairs parasite invasion and increases erythrocyte clearance during malaria infection in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hong Ming; Bauer, Denis C.; Lelliott, Patrick M.; Greth, Andreas; McMorran, Brendan J.; Foote, Simon J.; Burgio, Gaetan

    2016-01-01

    Genetic defects in various red blood cell (RBC) cytoskeletal proteins have been long associated with changes in susceptibility towards malaria infection. In particular, while ankyrin (Ank-1) mutations account for approximately 50% of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) cases, an association with malaria is not well-established, and conflicting evidence has been reported. We describe a novel N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced ankyrin mutation MRI61689 that gives rise to two different ankyrin transcripts: one with an introduced splice acceptor site resulting a frameshift, the other with a skipped exon. Ank-1(MRI61689/+) mice exhibit an HS-like phenotype including reduction in mean corpuscular volume (MCV), increased osmotic fragility and reduced RBC deformability. They were also found to be resistant to rodent malaria Plasmodium chabaudi infection. Parasites in Ank-1(MRI61689/+) erythrocytes grew normally, but red cells showed resistance to merozoite invasion. Uninfected Ank-1(MRI61689/+) erythrocytes were also more likely to be cleared from circulation during infection; the “bystander effect”. This increased clearance is a novel resistance mechanism which was not observed in previous ankyrin mouse models. We propose that this bystander effect is due to reduced deformability of Ank-1(MRI61689/+) erythrocytes. This paper highlights the complex roles ankyrin plays in mediating malaria resistance. PMID:27848995

  18. Epigenetic Characterization of the FMR1 Promoter in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Human Fibroblasts Carrying an Unmethylated Full Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Esch, Celine E.F.; Ghazvini, Mehrnaz; Loos, Friedemann; Schelling-Kazaryan, Nune; Widagdo, W.; Munshi, Shashini T.; van der Wal, Erik; Douben, Hannie; Gunhanlar, Nilhan; Kushner, Steven A.; Pijnappel, W.W.M. Pim; de Vrij, Femke M.S.; Geijsen, Niels; Gribnau, Joost; Willemsen, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Summary Silencing of the FMR1 gene leads to fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability. To study the epigenetic modifications of the FMR1 gene during silencing in time, we used fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of an unmethylated full mutation (uFM) individual with normal intelligence. The uFM fibroblast line carried an unmethylated FMR1 promoter region and expressed normal to slightly increased FMR1 mRNA levels. The FMR1 expression in the uFM line corresponds with the increased H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation in combination with a reduced H3K9 methylation. After reprogramming, the FMR1 promoter region was methylated in all uFM iPSC clones. Two clones were analyzed further and showed a lack of FMR1 expression, whereas the presence of specific histone modifications also indicated a repressed FMR1 promoter. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that the standard reprogramming procedure leads to epigenetic silencing of the fully mutated FMR1 gene. PMID:25358783

  19. Epigenetic Characterization of the FMR1 Promoter in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Human Fibroblasts Carrying an Unmethylated Full Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine E.F. de Esch

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Silencing of the FMR1 gene leads to fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability. To study the epigenetic modifications of the FMR1 gene during silencing in time, we used fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs of an unmethylated full mutation (uFM individual with normal intelligence. The uFM fibroblast line carried an unmethylated FMR1 promoter region and expressed normal to slightly increased FMR1 mRNA levels. The FMR1 expression in the uFM line corresponds with the increased H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation in combination with a reduced H3K9 methylation. After reprogramming, the FMR1 promoter region was methylated in all uFM iPSC clones. Two clones were analyzed further and showed a lack of FMR1 expression, whereas the presence of specific histone modifications also indicated a repressed FMR1 promoter. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that the standard reprogramming procedure leads to epigenetic silencing of the fully mutated FMR1 gene.

  20. Gain-of-function mutations of Ptpn11 (Shp2) cause aberrant mitosis and increase susceptibility to DNA damage-induced malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; Zheng, Hong; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Siying; Meyerson, Howard J; Yang, Wentian; Neel, Benjamin G; Qu, Cheng-Kui

    2016-01-26

    Gain-of-function (GOF) mutations of protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 11 Ptpn11 (Shp2), a protein tyrosine phosphatase implicated in multiple cell signaling pathways, are associated with childhood leukemias and solid tumors. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we report that Ptpn11 GOF mutations disturb mitosis and cytokinesis, causing chromosomal instability and greatly increased susceptibility to DNA damage-induced malignancies. We find that Shp2 is distributed to the kinetochore, centrosome, spindle midzone, and midbody, all of which are known to play critical roles in chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts with Ptpn11 GOF mutations show a compromised mitotic checkpoint. Centrosome amplification and aberrant mitosis with misaligned or lagging chromosomes are significantly increased in Ptpn11-mutated mouse and patient cells. Abnormal cytokinesis is also markedly increased in these cells. Further mechanistic analyses reveal that GOF mutant Shp2 hyperactivates the Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) kinase by enhancing c-Src kinase-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of Plk1. This study provides novel insights into the tumorigenesis associated with Ptpn11 GOF mutations and cautions that DNA-damaging treatments in Noonan syndrome patients with germ-line Ptpn11 GOF mutations could increase the risk of therapy-induced malignancies.

  1. [Malignant transformation of human fibroblasts by neutrons and by gamma radiation: Relationship to mutations induced

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    A brief overview if provided of selected reports presented at the International Symposium on Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation- and Chemical Carcinogen-Induced Cell Transformation held at Mackinac Island, Michigan on September 19-23, 1993.

  2. A sucrose-rich diet induces mutations in the rat colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, L.O.; Daneshvar, B.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte

    2002-01-01

    conclude that an oxidative mechanism for this effect of sucrose is unlikely. This is the first demonstration of a genotoxic action of increased dietary sucrose in vivo. Both sucrose intake and colon cancer rates are high in the Western world, and our present results call for an examination of a possible......A sucrose-rich diet has repeatedly been observed to have cocarcinogenic actions in the colon and liver of rats and to increase the number of aberrant crypt foci in rat colon. To investigate whether sucrose-rich diets might directly increase the genotoxic response in the rat colon or liver, we have...... of a sucrose-rich diet. No significant increase in mutations was observed in the liver. To seek an explanation for this finding, a variety of parameters were examined representing different mechanisms, including increased oxidative stress, changes in oxidative defense, effects on DNA repair, or changes...

  3. A sucrose-rich diet induces mutations in the rat colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Lars O.; Daneshvar, Bahram; Vogel, Ulla

    2002-01-01

    added sucrose to the diet of Big Blue rats, a strain of Fischer rats carrying 40 copies of the lambda-phage on chromosome 4. Dietary sucrose was provided to the rats for 3 weeks at four dose levels including the background level in the purified diet [3.4% (control), 6.9%, 13.8%, or 34.5%] without...... or in blood plasma. We conclude that a sucrose-rich diet directly or indirectly increases the mutation frequency in rat colon in a dose-dependent manner and concomitantly decreases the level of background DNA adducts, without a direct effect on the expression of major DNA repair enzyme systems. We also...

  4. Mutational analysis of VAMP domains implicated in Ca2+-induced insulin exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzi, R; Sadoul, K; Meda, P; Kelly, R B; Halban, P A; Wollheim, C B

    1996-01-01

    Vesicle-associated membrane protein-2 (VAMP-2) and cellubrevin are associated with the membrane of insulin-containing secretory granules and of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing synaptic-like vesicles of pancreatic beta-cells. We found that a point mutation in VAMP-2 preventing targeting to synaptic vesicles also impairs the localization on insulin-containing secretory granules, suggesting a similar requirement for vesicular targeting. Tetanus toxin (TeTx) treatment of permeabilized HIT-T15 cells leads to the proteolytic cleavage of VAMP-2 and cellubrevin and causes the inhibition of Ca2+-triggered insulin exocytosis. Transient transfection of HIT-T15 cells with VAMP-1, VAMP-2 or cellubrevin made resistant to the proteolytic action of TeTx by amino acid replacements in the cleavage site restored Ca2+-stimulated secretion. Wild-type VAMP-2, wild-type cellubrevin or a mutant of VAMP-2 resistant to TeTx but not targeted to secretory granules were unable to rescue Ca2+-evoked insulin release. The transmembrane domain and the N-terminal region of VAMP-2 were not essential for the recovery of stimulated exocytosis, but deletions preventing the binding to SNAP-25 and/or to syntaxin I rendered the protein inactive in the reconstitution assay. Mutations of putative phosphorylation sites or of negatively charged amino acids in the SNARE motif recognized by clostridial toxins had no effect on the ability of VAMP-2 to mediate Ca2+-triggered secretion. We conclude that: (i) both VAMP-2 and cellubrevin can participate in the exocytosis of insulin; (ii) the interaction of VAMP-2 with syntaxin and SNAP-25 is required for docking and/or fusion of secretory granules with the plasma membrane; and (iii) the phosphorylation of VAMP-2 is not essential for Ca2+-stimulated insulin exocytosis. Images PMID:9003771

  5. Modulatory effects of Tabebuia impetiginosa (Lamiales, Bignoniaceae) on doxorubicin-induced somatic mutation and recombination in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Neila C; de Rezende, Alexandre A A; da Silva, Regildo M G; Guterres, Zaira R; Graf, Ulrich; Kerr, Warwick E; Spanó, Mário A

    2009-04-01

    The wing Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test (SMART) in D. melanogaster was used to study genotoxicity of the medicinal plant Tabebuia impetiginosa. Lapachol (naphthoquinone) and β-lapachone (quinone) are the two main chemical constituents of T. impetiginosa. These compounds have several biological properties. They induce apoptosis by generating oxygen-reactive species, thereby inhibiting topoisomerases (I and II) or inducing other enzymes dependent on NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, thus affecting cell cycle checkpoints. The SMART was used in the standard (ST) version, which has normal levels of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, to check the direct action of this compound, and in the high bioactivation (HB) version, which has a high constitutive level of CYP enzymes, to check for indirect action in three different T. impetiginosa concentrations (10%, 20% or 40% w/w). It was observed that T. impetiginosa alone did not modify the spontaneous frequencies of mutant spots in either cross. The negative results observed prompted us to study this phytotherapeuticum in association with the reference mutagen doxorubicin (DXR). In co-treated series, T. impetiginosa was toxic in both crosses at higher concentration, whereas in the HB cross, it induced a considerable potentiating effect (from ~24.0 to ~95.0%) on DXR genotoxity. Therefore, further research is needed to determine the possible risks associated with the exposure of living organisms to this complex mixture.

  6. Modulatory effects of Tabebuia impetiginosa (Lamiales, Bignoniaceae on doxorubicin-induced somatic mutation and recombination in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neila C. de Sousa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The wing Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test (SMART in D. melanogaster was used to study genotoxicity of the medicinal plant Tabebuia impetiginosa. Lapachol (naphthoquinone and β-lapachone (quinone are the two main chemical constituents of T. impetiginosa. These compounds have several biological properties. They induce apoptosis by generating oxygen-reactive species, thereby inhibiting topoisomerases (I and II or inducing other enzymes dependent on NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase 1, thus affecting cell cycle checkpoints. The SMART was used in the standard (ST version, which has normal levels of cytochrome P450 (CYP enzymes, to check the direct action of this compound, and in the high bioactivation (HB version, which has a high constitutive level of CYP enzymes, to check for indirect action in three different T. impetiginosa concentrations (10%, 20% or 40% w/w. It was observed that T. impetiginosa alone did not modify the spontaneous frequencies of mutant spots in either cross. The negative results observed prompted us to study this phytotherapeuticum in association with the reference mutagen doxorubicin (DXR. In co-treated series, T. impetiginosa was toxic in both crosses at higher concentration, whereas in the HB cross, it induced a considerable potentiating effect (from ~24.0 to ~95.0% on DXR genotoxity. Therefore, further research is needed to determine the possible risks associated with the exposure of living organisms to this complex mixture.

  7. Pharmacological coal tar induces G:C to T:A transversion mutations in the skin of Muta{trademark} mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, U.; Thein, N.; Moller, P.; Wallin, H. [National Institute of Occupational Health, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2001-07-01

    Coal tar is a by-product of the distillation of coal. It consists of a complex chemical mixture of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons, with high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzo(a)pyrene. It has previously been shown that single painting on skin of mice increases the mutation frequency 16 times in murine epidermis cells. Here, the mutations by DNA sequencing are determined. Coal tar was found to primarily induce G:C to T:A transversions and one-base pair deletions of G:C base pairs. More than half of the mutations were at CpG sites. The mutational spectrum is in agreement with that of benzo(a)pyrene and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures.

  8. AN IMAGE-ANALYSIS TECHNIQUE FOR DETECTION OF RADIATION-INDUCED DNA FRAGMENTATION AFTER CHEF ELECTROPHORESIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROSEMANN, M; KANON, B; KONINGS, AWT; KAMPINGA, HH

    1993-01-01

    CHEF-electrophoresis was used as a technique to detect radiation-induced DNA breakage with special emphasis to biological relevant X-ray doses (0-10 Gy). Fluorescence detection of DNA-fragments using a sensitive image analysis system was directly compared with conventional scintillation counting of

  9. Insights from molecular dynamics simulations: structural basis for the V567D mutation-induced instability of zebrafish alpha-dystroglycan and comparison with the murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Pirolli

    Full Text Available A missense amino acid mutation of valine to aspartic acid in 567 position of alpha-dystroglycan (DG, identified in dag1-mutated zebrafish, results in a reduced transcription and a complete absence of the protein. Lacking experimental structural data for zebrafish DG domains, the detailed mechanism for the observed mutation-induced destabilization of the DG complex and membrane damage, remained unclear. With the aim to contribute to a better clarification of the structure-function relationships featuring the DG complex, three-dimensional structural models of wild-type and mutant (V567D C-terminal domain of alpha-DG from zebrafish were constructed by a template-based modelling approach. We then ran extensive molecular dynamics (MD simulations to reveal the structural and dynamic properties of the C-terminal domain and to evaluate the effect of the single mutation on alpha-DG stability. A comparative study has been also carried out on our previously generated model of murine alpha-DG C-terminal domain including the I591D mutation, which is topologically equivalent to the V567D mutation found in zebrafish. Trajectories from MD simulations were analyzed in detail, revealing extensive structural disorder involving multiple beta-strands in the mutated variant of the zebrafish protein whereas local effects have been detected in the murine protein. A biochemical analysis of the murine alpha-DG mutant I591D confirmed a pronounced instability of the protein. Taken together, the computational and biochemical analysis suggest that the V567D/I591D mutation, belonging to the G beta-strand, plays a key role in inducing a destabilization of the alpha-DG C-terminal Ig-like domain that could possibly affect and propagate to the entire DG complex. The structural features herein identified may be of crucial help to understand the molecular basis of primary dystroglycanopathies.

  10. Application of time reversal mirror technique in microwave-induced thermo-acoustic tomography system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Microwave-induced thermo-acoustic tomography (MITAT) is a promising technique with great potential in biomedical imaging. It has both the high contrast of the microwave imaging and the high resolution of the ultrasound imaging. In this paper, the proportional relationship between the absorbed microwave energy distribution and the induced ultrasound source distribution is derived. Further, the time reversal mirror (TRM) technique based on the pseudo-spectral time domain (PSTD) method is applied to MITAT system. The simulation results show that high contrast and resolution can be achieved by the TRM technique based on PSTD method even for the received signals with very low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the model parameter with random fluctuation.

  11. Diabetes (db/db mutation-induced endometrial epithelial lipoapoptosis: Ultrastructural and cytochemical analysis of reproductive tract atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garris David R

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diabetes (db/db mutation in C57BL/KsJ mice promotes a progressive cytolipidemia within the endometrial epithelial (EE layer of the female reproductive tract which results in premature cellular and organ atrophy. The current studies focus on the ultrastructural and cytochemical changes which promote nuclear apoptosis and cytostructural disruption following the expression of endometrial hypercytolipidemia which promotes diabetes-associated organoinvolution and manifest infertility. Methods Control (normal:+/+ and diabetes (db/db genotype groups were prepared for high resolution light microscopic analysis of cytolipidemia and nuclear apoptosis (TUNEL-labeled 3'-DNA fragmentation indices and compared to the transmission electron (TEM microscopic analysis of endometrial tissue samples collected from 8–16 week-old groups. Results Compared to controls, db/db mutation expression induced a dramatic increase in EE cytolipid vacuole volume and density within the epithelial endometrial layer. TEM analysis revealed that cytolipid vacuole accumulations initially aggregated at the baso-polar regions of UEE cells in response to the systemic hyperglycemic/hypertriglyceridemic conditions which characterized the (db/db groups. Progressive cytoplasmic movement of the lipid pools into perinuclear compartments of affected EE cells induced nuclear isolation from organelles that were displaced towards peripheral cytoplasmic compartments. Cytochemical analysis of lipid vacuole accumulations indicated attraction towards, and incorporation within, the nuclear envelope of hyperlipidemic cells. Co-localization of nuclear apoptotic 3'-DNA fragments within identified hyperlipidemic EE cells was coincident with the cytochemical and ultrastructural identification of lipid penetration through the nuclear envelope in db/db mutants. Conclusion These results are the first cytochemical indication that the metabolic disturbances in db/db mutants which

  12. Chemical inducible promoter used to obtain transgenic plants with a silent marker and organisms and cells and methods of using same for screening for mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Jianru (New York, NY); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY)

    2007-06-12

    Disclosed is a chemically inducible promoter for transforming plants or plant cells with genes which are regulatable by adding the plants or cells to a medium containing an inducer or by removing them from such medium. The promoter is inducible by a glucocorticoid, estrogen or inducer not endogenous to plants. Such promoters may be used with any plant genes that can promote shoot regeneration and development to induce shoot formation in the presence of a glucocorticoid, estrogen or inducer. The promoter may be used with antibiotic or herbicide resistance genes or other genes which are regulatable by the presence or absence of a given inducer. Also presented are organisms or cells comprising a gene wherein the natural promoter of the gene is disrupted and the gene is placed under the control of a transgenic inducible promoter. These organisms and cells and their progeny are useful for screening for conditional gain of function and loss of function mutations.

  13. MUTATIONS IN THE VHL GENE FRIOM POTASSIUM BROMATE-INDUCED RAT CLEAR CELL RENAL TUMORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potassium bromate (KBrO3) is a rat renal carcinogen and a major drinking water disinfection by-product in water disinfected with ozone. Clear cell renal tumors, the most common form of human renal epithelial neoplasm, are rare in animals but are inducible by KBrO3 in F344 rats. ...

  14. The Effect of Dose Rate on the Frequency of Specific-Locus Mutations Induced in Mouse Spermatogonia is Restricted to Larger Lesions; a Retrospective Analysis of Historical Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Liane B [ORNL; Hunsicker, Patricia R [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    A series of 19 large-scale germ-cell mutagenesis experiments conducted several decades ago led to the conclusion that low-LET radiation delivered to mouse spermatogonia at dose rates of 0.8 R/min and below induced only about one-third as many specific-locus mutations as did single, acute exposures at 24 R/min and above. A two-hit origin of the mutations was deemed unlikely in view of the then prevailing evidence for the small size of genetic lesions in spermatogonia. Instead, the dose-rate effect was hypothesized to be the result of a repair system that exists in spermatogonia, but not in more mature male reproductive cells. More recent genetic and molecular studies on the marker genes have identified the phenotypes associated with specific states of the mutant chromosomes, and it is now possible retrospectively to classify individual past mutations as "large lesions" or "other lesions". The mutation-frequency difference between high and low dose rates is restricted to the large lesion mutations, for which the dose-curve slopes differ by a factor exceeding 3.4. For other lesion mutations, there is essentially no difference between the slopes for protracted and acute irradiations; induced other lesions frequencies per unit dose remain similar for dose rates ranging over more than 7 orders of magnitude. For large lesions, these values rise sharply at dose rates >0.8 R/min, though they remain similar within the whole range of protracted doses, failing to provide evidence for a threshold dose rate. The downward bend at high doses that had been noted for X-ray-induced specific-locus mutations as a whole and ascribed to a positive correlation between spermatogonial death and mutation load is now found to be restricted to large lesion mutations. There is a marked difference between the mutation spectra (distributions among the seven loci) for large lesions and other lesions. Within each class, however, the spectra are similar for acute and protracted irradiation.

  15. Genetic and chemical characterization of an EMS induced mutation in Cucumis melo CRTISO gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galpaz, Navot; Burger, Yosi; Lavee, Tamar; Tzuri, Galil; Sherman, Amir; Melamed, Tal; Eshed, Ravit; Meir, Ayala; Portnoy, Vitaly; Bar, Einat; Shimoni-Shor, Einav; Feder, Ari; Saar, Yuval; Saar, Uzi; Baumkoler, Fabian; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Schaffer, Arthur A; Katzir, Nurit; Tadmor, Yaakov

    2013-11-15

    In order to broaden the available genetic variation of melon, we developed an ethyl methanesulfonate mutation library in an orange-flesh 'Charentais' type melon line that accumulates β-carotene. One mutagenized M2 family segregated for a novel recessive trait, a yellow-orange fruit flesh ('yofI'). HPLC analysis revealed that 'yofI' accumulates pro-lycopene (tetra-cis-lycopene) as its major fruit pigment. The altered carotenoid composition of 'yofI' is associated with a significant change of the fruit aroma since cleavage of β-carotene yields different apocarotenoids than the cleavage of pro-lycopene. Normally, pro-lycopene is further isomerized by CRTISO (carotenoid isomerase) to yield all-trans-lycopene, which is further cyclized to β-carotene in melon fruit. Cloning and sequencing of 'yofI' CRTISO identified two mRNA sequences which lead to truncated forms of CRTISO. Sequencing of the genomic CRTISO identified an A-T transversion in 'yofI' which leads to a premature STOP codon. The early carotenoid pathway genes were up regulated in yofI fruit causing accumulation of other intermediates such as phytoene and ζ-carotene. Total carotenoid levels are only slightly increased in the mutant. Mutants accumulating pro-lycopene have been reported in both tomato and watermelon fruits, however, this is the first report of a non-lycopene accumulating fruit showing this phenomenon.

  16. Improvement of strain Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH190 for tannase production by induced mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakipour-Molkabadi, E; Hamidi-Esfahani, Z; Sahari, M A; Azizi, M H

    2013-11-01

    In the search for an efficient producer of tannase, Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH190 was subjected to mutagenesis using heat treatment and strain EZ-ZH290 was isolated. The maximum tannase in this mutant strain was 4.32 U/mL with an incubation period of 84 h as compared to wild strain EZ-ZH190 where the incubation period was 96 h with a maximum enzyme activity of 4.33 U/mL. Also, the Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH290 tannase had a maximum activity at 40 °C and pH 5.5. Then, the spores of strain EZ-ZH290 were subjected to γ irradiation mutagenesis and strain EZ-ZH390 was isolated. Strain EZ-ZH390 exhibited higher tannase activity (7.66 U/mL) than the parent strain EZ-ZH290. It was also found that Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH390 tannase had an optimum activity at 35 °C and a broad pH profile with an optimum at pH 5.5. The tannase pH stability of Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH390 and its maximum production of tannase followed the same trend for five generations confirming the occurrence of stable mutant. This paper is shown that γ irradiation can mutate the Penicillium sp. leading to increase the tannase production.

  17. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated activation by transcription- and topoisomerase I-induced DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordet, Olivier; Redon, Christophe E; Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Smith, Susan; Solier, Stéphanie; Douarre, Céline; Conti, Chiara; Nakamura, Asako J; Das, Benu B; Nicolas, Estelle; Kohn, Kurt W; Bonner, William M; Pommier, Yves

    2009-08-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), the deficiency of which causes a severe neurodegenerative disease, is a crucial mediator for the DNA damage response (DDR). As neurons have high rates of transcription that require topoisomerase I (TOP1), we investigated whether TOP1 cleavage complexes (TOP1cc)-which are potent transcription-blocking lesions-also produce transcription-dependent DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) with ATM activation. We show the induction of DSBs and DDR activation in post-mitotic primary neurons and lymphocytes treated with camptothecin, with the induction of nuclear DDR foci containing activated ATM, gamma-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX), activated CHK2 (checkpoint kinase 2), MDC1 (mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1) and 53BP1 (p53 binding protein 1). The DSB-ATM-DDR pathway was suppressed by inhibiting transcription and gamma-H2AX signals were reduced by RNase H1 transfection, which removes transcription-mediated R-loops. Thus, we propose that Top1cc produce transcription arrests with R-loop formation and generate DSBs that activate ATM in post-mitotic cells.

  18. B-Myb Induces APOBEC3B Expression Leading to Somatic Mutation in Multiple Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Wei-Ting; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Hu, Ling-Yueh; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Shen, Chen-Yang

    2017-01-01

    The key signature of cancer genomes is the accumulation of DNA mutations, the most abundant of which is the cytosine-to-thymine (C-to-T) transition that results from cytosine deamination. Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database has demonstrated that this transition is caused mainly by upregulation of the cytosine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B), but the mechanism has not been completely characterized. We found that B-Myb (encoded by MYBL2) binds the A3B promoter, causing transactivation, and this is responsible for the C-to-T transitions and DNA hypermutation in breast cancer cells. Analysis of TCGA database yielded similar results, supporting that MYBL2 and A3B are upregulated and putatively promote C-to-T transitions in multiple cancer types. Moreover, blockade of EGF receptor with afatinib attenuated B-Myb–A3B signaling, suggesting a clinically relevant means of suppressing mutagenesis. Our results suggest that B-Myb–A3B contributes to DNA damage and could be targeted by inhibiting EGF receptor. PMID:28276478

  19. A sucrose-rich diet induces mutations in the rat colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, L.O.; Daneshvar, B.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte

    2002-01-01

    in the background levels of DNA adducts. Sucrose did not increase the number of DNA strand breaks or oxidized bases assessed as endonuclease III-sensitive sites or 8-oxodeoxyguanosine in colon or liver. DNA repair capacity as determined by expression of the rERCC1 or rOGG1 genes was not increased in colon or liver...... added sucrose to the diet of Big Blue rats, a strain of Fischer rats carrying 40 copies of the lambda-phage on chromosome 4. Dietary sucrose was provided to the rats for 3 weeks at four dose levels including the background level in the purified diet [3.4% (control), 6.9%, 13.8%, or 34.5%] without...... of a sucrose-rich diet. No significant increase in mutations was observed in the liver. To seek an explanation for this finding, a variety of parameters were examined representing different mechanisms, including increased oxidative stress, changes in oxidative defense, effects on DNA repair, or changes...

  20. A single amino acid mutation in SNAP-25 induces anxiety-related behavior in mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakazu Kataoka

    Full Text Available Synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25 is a presynaptic protein essential for neurotransmitter release. Previously, we demonstrate that protein kinase C (PKC phosphorylates Ser(187 of SNAP-25, and enhances neurotransmitter release by recruiting secretory vesicles near to the plasma membrane. As PKC is abundant in the brain and SNAP-25 is essential for synaptic transmission, SNAP-25 phosphorylation is likely to play a crucial role in the central nervous system. We therefore generated a mutant mouse, substituting Ser(187 of SNAP-25 with Ala using "knock-in" technology. The most striking effect of the mutation was observed in their behavior. The homozygous mutant mice froze readily in response to environmental change, and showed strong anxiety-related behavior in general activity and light and dark preference tests. In addition, the mutant mice sometimes exhibited spontaneously occurring convulsive seizures. Microdialysis measurements revealed that serotonin and dopamine release were markedly reduced in amygdala. These results clearly indicate that PKC-dependent SNAP-25 phosphorylation plays a critical role in the regulation of emotional behavior as well as the suppression of epileptic seizures, and the lack of enhancement of monoamine release is one of the possible mechanisms underlying these defects.

  1. A missense mutation in CHS1, a TIR-NB protein, induces chilling sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuancong; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Shuhua

    2013-08-01

    Low temperature is an environmental factor that affects plant growth and development and plant-pathogen interactions. How temperature regulates plant defense responses is not well understood. In this study, we characterized chilling-sensitive mutant 1 (chs1), and functionally analyzed the role of the CHS1 gene in plant responses to chilling stress. The chs1 mutant displayed a chilling-sensitive phenotype, and also displayed defense-associated phenotypes, including extensive cell death, the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and salicylic acid, and an increased expression of PR genes: these phenotypes indicated that the mutation in chs1 activates the defense responses under chilling stress. A map-based cloning analysis revealed that CHS1 encodes a TIR-NB-type protein. The chilling sensitivity of chs1 was fully rescued by pad4 and eds1, but not by ndr1. The overexpression of the TIR and NB domains can suppress the chs1-conferred phenotypes. Interestingly, the stability of the CHS1 protein was positively regulated by low temperatures independently of the 26S proteasome pathway. This study revealed the role of a TIR-NB-type gene in plant growth and cell death under chilling stress, and suggests that temperature modulates the stability of the TIR-NB protein in Arabidopsis.

  2. Enhancement of Phenol Biodegradation by Pseudochrobactrum sp. through Ultraviolet-Induced Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Mao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The phenol-degrading efficiency of Pseudochrobactrum sp. was enhanced by ultraviolet (UV irradiation. First, a bacterial strain, Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1, was isolated from the activated sludge in a coking plant. It was subjected to mutation by UV radiation for 120 s and a mutant strain with higher phenol-degrading efficiency, Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1-UV, was selected. The mutant strain XF1-UV was capable of degrading 1800 mg/L phenol completely within 48 h and had higher tolerance to hydrogen ion concentration and temperature variation than the wild type. Haldane’s kinetic model was used to fit the exponential growth data and the following kinetic parameters were obtained: μmax = 0.092 h−1, Ks = 22.517 mg/L, and Ki = 1126.725 mg/L for XF1, whereas μmax = 0.110 h−1, Ks = 23.934 mg/L, and Ki = 1579.134 mg/L for XF1-UV. Both XF1 and XF1-UV degraded phenol through the ortho-pathway; but the phenol hydroxylase activity of XF1-UV1 was higher than that of XF1, therefore, the mutant strain biodegraded phenol faster. Taken together, our results suggest that Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1-UV could be a promising candidate for bioremediation of phenol-containing wastewaters.

  3. Enhancement of phenol biodegradation by Pseudochrobactrum sp. through ultraviolet-induced mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhen; Yu, Chenyang; Xin, Lingling

    2015-04-01

    The phenol-degrading efficiency of Pseudochrobactrum sp. was enhanced by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. First, a bacterial strain, Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1, was isolated from the activated sludge in a coking plant. It was subjected to mutation by UV radiation for 120 s and a mutant strain with higher phenol-degrading efficiency, Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1-UV, was selected. The mutant strain XF1-UV was capable of degrading 1800 mg/L phenol completely within 48 h and had higher tolerance to hydrogen ion concentration and temperature variation than the wild type. Haldane's kinetic model was used to fit the exponential growth data and the following kinetic parameters were obtained: μmax = 0.092 h-1, Ks = 22.517 mg/L, and Ki = 1126.725 mg/L for XF1, whereas μmax = 0.110 h-1, Ks = 23.934 mg/L, and Ki = 1579.134 mg/L for XF1-UV. Both XF1 and XF1-UV degraded phenol through the ortho-pathway; but the phenol hydroxylase activity of XF1-UV1 was higher than that of XF1, therefore, the mutant strain biodegraded phenol faster. Taken together, our results suggest that Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1-UV could be a promising candidate for bioremediation of phenol-containing wastewaters.

  4. Generation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell line via CRISPR-Cas9 mediated integration of a site-specific heterozygous mutation in CHMP2B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yu; Schmid, Benjamin; Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup;

    2016-01-01

    have generated an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line of a healthy individual and inserted the CHMP2B IVS5AS G-C gene mutation into one of the alleles, resulting in aberrant splicing. This human iPSC line provides an ideal model to study CHMP2B-dependent phenotypes of FTD3....

  5. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from a patient with frontotemporal dementia caused by a R406W mutation in microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel A.; Hjermind, Lena E.; Hasholt, Lis F.

    2016-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts were obtained from a 59-year-old woman diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia. The disease is caused by a R406W mutation in microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT). Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were established by electroporation with episomal plasmids containing hOCT4...

  6. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from a patient with frontotemporal dementia caused by a P301L mutation in microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel A.; Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Hasholt, Lis Frydenreich

    2016-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts were obtained froma 57-year-old woman diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia. The diseaseis caused by a P301L mutation in microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT). Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were established by electroporation with episomal plasmids containing hOCT4, h...

  7. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from an Alzheimer's disease patient carrying an A79V mutation in PSEN1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Tong; Pires, Carlota; Nielsen, Troels T.

    2016-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts were obtained from a 48-year-old presymptomatic woman carrying a A79V mutation in the presenilin 1 gene (PSEN1), causing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs) were derived via transfection with episomal vectors carrying hOCT4, hSOX2, hKLF2, hL-MYC, hLIN28...

  8. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from an Alzheimer's disease patient carrying a L150P mutation in PSEN-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tubsuwan, Alisa; Pires, Carlota; Rasmussen, Mikkel A.;

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were generated from skin fibroblasts isolated from a 58-year old male with a L150P mutation in the presenilin 1 (PSEN-1) gene, which is responsible for the majority of familial cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The iPSC swere established by co-electroporation...

  9. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from an Alzheimer's disease patient carrying a M146I mutation in PSEN1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Tong; Pires, Carlota; Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup

    2016-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts were obtained from a 46-year-old symptomatic man carrying a M146I mutation in the presenilin 1 gene (PSEN1), responsible for causing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were derived via transfection with episomal vectors carrying hOCT4, hSOX2, hKLF2, ...

  10. Characteristics of commercially recommending sesame mutant cultivars through induced mutations by different sources of radiation and chemical in the Republic of Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Churl Whan [National Crop Experiment Station, Sodundong Suwon (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    The sesame acreage in Korea has grown 2.5 times in the last two decades as the result of recommending sesame mutant cultivars and polyethylene mulch technique newly developed since 1978. The mutation was induced by X-ray irradiation at 200 Gy yielding a variety named 'Ahnsankkae' known for early ripeness, white color of seed coat, tolerance for diseases. 'Suwon 128' is a dwarf mutant bred through sodium azide and known for strong lodging resistance, dense and lower first capsule set and dense planting adaptability toward mechanized culture against typhoon. Seven mutant recommending cultivars of sesame are compared with respect to their qualitative and quantitative characteristics based on passport data regarding different mutagen sources of radiations and chemicals published by Committee New Recommending Cultivars on the Crops. Breeding sources are summarized: 5 out of 7 sources are through radiation (X-rays, {gamma}-rays, and neutrons) and the rest 2 through chemicals. Their growth characteristics such as flowering date, maturing date, plant height, length-capsule bearing stem, disease and lodging resistance, oil content, and yield ability are also presented. (S. Ohno)

  11. Mutations of the epigenetics-modifying gene (DNMT3a, TET2, IDH1/2) at diagnosis may induce FLT3-ITD at relapse in de novo acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakita, S; Yamaguchi, H; Omori, I; Terada, K; Ueda, T; Manabe, E; Kurosawa, S; Iida, S; Ibaraki, T; Sato, Y; Todoroki, T; Hirakawa, T; Ryotokuji, T; Arai, K; Kitano, T; Mitamura, Y; Kosaka, F; Dan, K; Inokuchi, K

    2013-04-01

    Gene mutations were found in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and their importance has been noted. To clarify the importance and stability of mutations, we examined gene mutations in paired samples at diagnosis and relapse of 34 adult AML patients. Five acquired gene mutations were detected at relapse. Of the 45 gene mutations at diagnosis, 11 of them were lost at relapse. The acquired mutations at relapse were all class I mutations as Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) and rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (RAS) mutations. The disappeared mutations at relapse were 3 of 11 internal tandem duplications of FLT3 (FLT3-ITD) (27.3%), 3 of 3 FLT3 tyrosine kinase domain (FLT3-TKD) (100%), 3 of 13 Nucleophosmin 1 (23.1%) and 2 of 5 CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-α (40%) mutations. However, epigenetics-modifying gene (DNMT3a, TET2 and IDH1/2) mutations had no change between diagnosis and relapse samples, and may become minimal residual disease marker. The frequency of FLT3-ITD at relapse in patients with DNMT3a mutation at diagnosis is significantly higher than those in patients without them (P=0.001). Moreover, the high frequency of FLT3-ITD at relapse is also seen in AML cases that initially present with any epigenetics-modifying gene mutations (Pgene mutations may cause genetic instability and induce FLT3-ITD, leading to resistance to therapy and relapse.

  12. Transcription-induced mutational strand bias and its effect on substitution rates in human genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugal, Carina F; von Grünberg, Hans-Hennig; Peifer, Martin

    2009-01-01

    If substitution rates are not the same on the two complementary DNA strands, a substitution is considered strand asymmetric. Such substitutional strand asymmetries are determined here for the three most frequent types of substitution on the human genome (C --> T, A --> G, and G --> T). Substitution rate differences between both strands are estimated for 4,590 human genes by aligning all repeats occurring within the introns with their ancestral consensus sequences. For 1,630 of these genes, both coding strand and noncoding strand rates could be compared with rates in gene-flanking regions. All three rates considered are found to be on average higher on the coding strand and lower on the transcribed strand in comparison to their values in the gene-flanking regions. This finding points to the simultaneous action of rate-increasing effects on the coding strand--such as increased adenine and cytosine deamination--and transcription-coupled repair as a rate-reducing effect on the transcribed strand. The common behavior of the three rates leads to strong correlations of the rate asymmetries: Whenever one rate is strand biased, the other two rates are likely to show the same bias. Furthermore, we determine all three rate asymmetries as a function of time: the A --> G and G --> T rate asymmetries are both found to be constant in time, whereas the C --> T rate asymmetry shows a pronounced time dependence, an observation that explains the difference between our results and those of an earlier work by Green et al. (2003. Transcription-associated mutational asymmetry in mammalian evolution. Nat Genet. 33:514-517.). Finally, we show that in addition to transcription also the replication process biases the substitution rates in genes.

  13. Molecular analysis of two mouse dilute locus deletion mutations: Spontaneous dilute lethal20J and radiation-induced dilute prenatal lethal Aa2 alleles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, M.C.; Seperack, P.K.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A. (National Cancer Institute-Frederick Cancer Research Facility, MD (USA))

    1990-02-01

    The dilute (d) coat color locus of mouse chromosome 9 has been identified by more than 200 spontaneous and mutagen-induced recessive mutations. With the advent of molecular probes for this locus, the molecular lesion associated with different dilute alleles can be recognized and precisely defined. In this study, two dilute mutations, dilute-lethal20J (dl20J) and dilute prenatal lethal Aa2, have been examined. Using a dilute locus genomic probe in Southern blot analysis, we detected unique restriction fragments in dl20J and Aa2 DNA. Subsequent analysis of these fragments showed that they represented deletion breakpoint fusion fragments. DNA sequence analysis of each mutation-associated deletion breakpoint fusion fragment suggests that both genomic deletions were generated by nonhomologous recombination events. The spontaneous dl20J mutation is caused by an interstitial deletion that removes a single coding exon of the dilute gene. The correlation between this discrete deletion and the expression of all dilute-associated phenotypes in dl20J homozygotes defines the dl20J mutation as a functional null allele of the dilute gene. The radiation-induced Aa2 allele is a multilocus deletion that, by complementation analysis, affects both the dilute locus and the proximal prenatal lethal-3 (pl-3) functional unit. Molecular analysis of the Aa2 deletion breakpoint fusion fragment has provided access to a previously undefined gene proximal to d. Initial characterization of this new gene suggests that it may represent the genetically defined pl-3 functional unit.

  14. Activating PIK3CA Mutations Induce an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) Paracrine Signaling Axis in Basal-like Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Christian D; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Hoshino, Daisuke; Formisano, Luigi; Hanker, Ariella B; Gatza, Michael L; Morrison, Meghan M; Moore, Preston D; Whitwell, Corbin A; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Stricker, Thomas; Bhola, Neil E; Silva, Grace O; Patel, Premal; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M; Levin, Maren; Horiates, Marina; Palma, Norma A; Wang, Kai; Stephens, Philip J; Perou, Charles M; Weaver, Alissa M; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A; Chang, Jenny C; Park, Ben Ho; Liebler, Daniel C; Cook, Rebecca S; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the p110α catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) have been shown to transform human mammary epithelial cells (MECs). These mutations are present in all breast cancer subtypes, including basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we identified 72 protein expression changes in human basal-like MECs with knock-in E545K or H1047R PIK3CA mutations versus isogenic MECs with wild-type PIK3CA. Several of these were secreted proteins, cell surface receptors or ECM interacting molecules and were required for growth of PIK3CA mutant cells as well as adjacent cells with wild-type PIK3CA. The proteins identified by MS were enriched among human BLBC cell lines and pointed to a PI3K-dependent amphiregulin/EGFR/ERK signaling axis that is activated in BLBC. Proteins induced by PIK3CA mutations correlated with EGFR signaling and reduced relapse-free survival in BLBC. Treatment with EGFR inhibitors reduced growth of PIK3CA mutant BLBC cell lines and murine mammary tumors driven by a PIK3CA mutant transgene, all together suggesting that PIK3CA mutations promote tumor growth in part by inducing protein changes that activate EGFR. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Activating PIK3CA Mutations Induce an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) Paracrine Signaling Axis in Basal-like Breast Cancer*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Christian D.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Hoshino, Daisuke; Formisano, Luigi; Hanker, Ariella B.; Gatza, Michael L.; Morrison, Meghan M.; Moore, Preston D.; Whitwell, Corbin A.; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Stricker, Thomas; Bhola, Neil E.; Silva, Grace O.; Patel, Premal; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M.; Levin, Maren; Horiates, Marina; Palma, Norma A.; Wang, Kai; Stephens, Philip J.; Perou, Charles M.; Weaver, Alissa M.; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A.; Chang, Jenny C.; Park, Ben Ho; Liebler, Daniel C.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the p110α catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) have been shown to transform human mammary epithelial cells (MECs). These mutations are present in all breast cancer subtypes, including basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we identified 72 protein expression changes in human basal-like MECs with knock-in E545K or H1047R PIK3CA mutations versus isogenic MECs with wild-type PIK3CA. Several of these were secreted proteins, cell surface receptors or ECM interacting molecules and were required for growth of PIK3CA mutant cells as well as adjacent cells with wild-type PIK3CA. The proteins identified by MS were enriched among human BLBC cell lines and pointed to a PI3K-dependent amphiregulin/EGFR/ERK signaling axis that is activated in BLBC. Proteins induced by PIK3CA mutations correlated with EGFR signaling and reduced relapse-free survival in BLBC. Treatment with EGFR inhibitors reduced growth of PIK3CA mutant BLBC cell lines and murine mammary tumors driven by a PIK3CA mutant transgene, all together suggesting that PIK3CA mutations promote tumor growth in part by inducing protein changes that activate EGFR. PMID:25953087

  16. Subquivers of mutation-acyclic quivers are mutation-acyclic

    CERN Document Server

    Warkentin, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Quiver mutation plays a crucial role in the definition of cluster algebras by Fomin and Zelevinsky. It induces an equivalence relation on the set of all quivers without loops and two-cycles. A quiver is called mutation-acyclic if it is mutation-equivalent to an acyclic quiver. The aim of this note is to show that full subquivers of mutation-acyclic quivers are mutation-acyclic.

  17. Thermodynamic analysis of cavity creating mutations in an engineered leucine zipper and energetics of glycerol-induced coiled coil stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, E; Jelesarov, I

    2000-04-18

    Protein stability in vitro can be influenced either by introduction of mutations or by changes in the chemical composition of the solvent. Recently, we have characterized the thermodynamic stability and the rate of folding of the engineered dimeric leucine zipper A(2), which has a strengthened hydrophobic core [Dürr, E., Jelesarov, I., and Bosshard, H. R. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 870-880]. Here we report on the energetic consequences of a cavity introduced by Leu/Ala substitution at the tightly packed dimeric interface and how addition of 30% glycerol affects the folding thermodynamics of A(2) and the cavity mutants. Folding could be described by a two-state transition from two unfolded monomers to a coiled coil dimer. Removal of six methylene groups by Leu/Ala substitutions destabilized the dimeric coiled coil by 25 kJ mol(-1) at pH 3.5 and 25 degrees C in aqueous buffer. Destabilization was purely entropic at around room temperature and became increasingly enthalpic at elevated temperatures. Mutations were accompanied by a decrease of the unfolding heat capacity by 0.5 kJ K(-1) mol(-1). Addition of 30% glycerol increased the free energy of folding of A(2) and the cavity mutants by 5-10 kJ mol(-1) and lowered the unfolding heat capacity by 25% for A(2) and by 50% for the Leu/Ala mutants. The origin of the stabilizing effect of glycerol varied with temperature. Stabilization of the parent leucine zipper A(2) was enthalpic with an unfavorable entropic component between 0 and 100 degrees C. In the case of cavity mutants, glycerol induced enthalpic stabilization below 50 degrees C and entropic stabilization above 50 degrees C. The effect of glycerol could not be accounted for solely by the enthalpy and entropy of transfer or protein surface from water to glycerol/water mixture. We propose that in the presence of glycerol the folded coiled coil dimer is better packed and displays less intramolecular fluctuations, leading to enhanced enthalpic interactions and to an

  18. Growth characteristics and Ha-ras mutations of cell cultures isolated from chemically induced mouse liver tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrick, M S; Rumsby, P C; Wright, V; Phillimore, H E; Butler, W H; Evans, J G

    1994-09-01

    Cells have been isolated from liver tumours that have arisen in control C3H/He mice, in mice given 10 micrograms diethylnitrosamine (DEN) during the neonatal period or in mice given a diet containing phenobarbitone (PB) to allow a daily intake of 85 mg/kg/day. The cells were grown to the 8 degrees subculture when their growth characteristics were investigated in monolayer culture and following suspension in soft agar and on transplantation into nude mice. In addition, DNA was isolated from the cultures and from tumours that grew in nude mice and analysed for mutations at codon 61 of the Ha-ras oncogene. All cells derived from DEN-induced hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) demonstrated a lack of density inhibition of growth in monolayer culture, grew in soft agar and formed tumours in nude mice with an average mean latency of 29 days. Three of the seven lines showed mutations in Ha-ras: two were CAA-->AAA transversions and one showed a CAA-->CTA transversion. In contrast, cells isolated from eosinophilic nodules in mice given PB showed inhibition of growth at confluence, did not grow in soft agar and only four of eight formed tumours in nude mice with a mean average latent period of 181 days. Cells grown from HCC in mice given PB showed a lack of density inhibition of growth, however, they did not grow in soft agar nor did they form tumours in nude mice. A single spontaneous HCC from a control mouse showed a similar growth pattern to HCC cells isolated from mice given PB. Cells from a basophilic nodule, taken from a control untreated mouse grew vigorously in culture and in soft agar and formed tumours in nude mice with a latency of 6 days. None of the cells isolated from control mice or from mice given PB showed evidence of mutations at codon 61 of Ha-ras. These data confirm that there are fundamental differences in the biology of cells grown from tumours that develop in mice under different treatment regimes. These studies also demonstrate the utility of cell culture

  19. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences. (ERB)

  20. Hypokalemia-induced long QT syndrome with an underlying novel missense mutation in S4-S5 linker of KCNQ1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, T; Shimizu, W; Kamakura, S; Horie, M

    2000-09-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is caused by mutations in at least five genes coding for cardiac potassium or sodium channels that regulate the duration of ventricular action potentials. Acquired LQTS often is associated with drugs or metabolic abnormalities. A 47-year-old woman who presented with marked QT prolongation (QTc = 620 msec(1/2)) and repeated episodes of torsades de pointes associated with hypokalemia (2.6 mEq/L) was screened for mutations in LQTS genes using polymerase chain reaction/single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR/SSCP). We identified a novel missense mutation in the intracellular linker of S4-S5 domains of KCNQ1, resulting in an amino acid substitution of cysteine for arginine at position 259 (R259C). Whole cell, patch clamp experiments were conducted on COS7 cells transfected with wild-type and/or R259C KCNQ1 with or without KCNE1. Functional analyses of the mutant KCNQ1 subunit on COS7 cells revealed its functional channels in the homozygous state, producing a significantly smaller current than the KCNQ1 channels and a less severe dominant-negative effect on I(Ks). The novel KCNQ1 mutation R259C is the molecular basis for I(Ks) dysfunction underlying an apparently sporadic case of hypokalemia-induced LQTS, consistent with a mild mutation likely to disclose the clinical manifestation of LQTS in a context of severe hypokalemia. Our findings suggest that gene carriers with such mild mutations might not be so rare as commonly expected in patients with acquired LQTS, and stress the importance of mutational analysis for detecting either "silent" forms of congenital LQTS or de novo mutations.

  1. Expression of human AID in yeast induces mutations in context similar to the context of somatic hypermutation at G-C pairs in immunoglobulin genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunkel Thomas A

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibody genes are diversified by somatic hypermutation (SHM, gene conversion and class-switch recombination. All three processes are initiated by the activation-induced deaminase (AID. According to a DNA deamination model of SHM, AID converts cytosine to uracil in DNA sequences. The initial deamination of cytosine leads to mutation and recombination in pathways involving replication, DNA mismatch repair and possibly base excision repair. The DNA sequence context of mutation hotspots at G-C pairs during SHM is DGYW/WRCH (G-C is a hotspot position, R = A/G, Y = T/C, W = A/T, D = A/G/T. Results To investigate the mechanisms of AID-induced mutagenesis in a model system, we studied the genetic consequences of AID expression in yeast. We constructed a yeast vector with an artificially synthesized human AID gene insert using codons common to highly expressed yeast genes. We found that expression of the artificial hAIDSc gene was moderately mutagenic in a wild-type strain and highly mutagenic in an ung1 uracil-DNA glycosylase-deficient strain. A majority of mutations were at G-C pairs. In the ung1 strain, C-G to T-A transitions were found almost exclusively, while a mixture of transitions with 12% transversions was characteristic in the wild-type strain. In the ung1 strain mutations that could have originated from deamination of the transcribed stand were found more frequently. In the wild-type strain, the strand bias was reversed. DGYW/WRCH motifs were preferential sites of mutations. Conclusion The results are consistent with the hypothesis that AID-mediated deamination of DNA is a major cause of mutations at G-C base pairs in immunoglobulin genes during SHM. The sequence contexts of mutations in yeast induced by AID and those of somatic mutations at G-C pairs in immunoglobulin genes are significantly similar. This indicates that the intrinsic substrate specificity of AID itself is a primary determinant of mutational hotspots at G

  2. Detecting salt deposition on a wind turbine blade using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiesh Kumar, V.; Vasa, Nilesh J.; Sarathi, R.

    2013-07-01

    The study of pollution performance on a wind turbine blade due to lightning is important, as it can cause major damage to wind turbine blades. In the present work, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) technique is used to understand the influence of pollutant deposited on a wind turbine blade in an off-shore environment. A methodical experimental study was carried out by adopting IEC 60507 standards, and it was observed that the lightning discharge propagates at the interface between the pollutant and the glass fiber reinforced plastic (Material used in manufacturing of wind turbine blades). In addition, as a diagnostic condition monitoring technique, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is proposed and demonstrated to rank the severity of pollutant on the wind turbine blades from a remote area. Optical emission spectra observed during surface discharge process induced by lightning impulse voltage is in agreement with the spectra observed during LIBS.

  3. Generation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell line via CRISPR-Cas9 mediated integration of a site-specific homozygous mutation in CHMP2B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal dementia (FTD is an early onset neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in several genes cause familial FTD and one of them is charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B on chromosome 3 (FTD3, a component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III. We have generated an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line of a healthy individual and inserted the CHMP2B IVS5AS G-C gene mutation into both alleles, resulting in aberrant splicing. This human iPSC line provides an ideal model to study CHMP2B-dependent phenotypes of FTD3.

  4. Derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells from a familial Alzheimer's disease patient carrying the L282F mutation in presenilin 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poon, Anna Fong-Yee; Li, Tong; Pires, Carlota

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in presenilin 1 (PSEN1) lead to the most aggressive form of familial Alzheimer's disease (AD). Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) derived from AD patients can be differentiated and used for disease modeling. Here, we derived hiPSC from skin fibroblasts obtained from an AD...... patient carrying a L282F mutation in PSEN1. We transfected skin fibroblasts with episomal iPSC reprogramming vectors targeting human OCT4, SOX2, L-MYC, KLF4, NANOG, LIN28, and short hairpin RNA against TP53. Our hiPSC line, L282F-hiPSC, displayed typical stem cell characteristics with consistent...

  5. Translesion DNA polymerases Pol , Pol , Pol , Pol and Rev1 are not essential for repeat-induced point mutation in Neurospora crassa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranjan Tamuli; C Ravindran; Durgadas P Kasbekar

    2006-12-01

    Pol , Pol , Pol , Pol and Rev1 are specialized DNA polymerases that are able to synthesize DNA across a damaged template. DNA synthesis by such translesion polymerases can be mutagenic due to the miscoding nature of most damaged nucleotides. In fact, many mutational and hypermutational processes in systems ranging from yeast to mammals have been traced to the activity of such polymerases. We show however, that the translesion polymerases are dispensable for repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) in Neurospora crassa. Additionally, we demonstrate that the upr-1 gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of Pol , is a highly polymorphic locus in Neurospora.

  6. Measurement of initial absorption of fused silica at 193nm using laser induced deflection technique (LID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönfeld, Dörte; Klett, Ursula; Mühlig, Christian; Thomas, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    The ongoing development in microlithography towards further miniaturization of structures creates a strong demand for lens material with nearly ideal optical properties. Beside the highly demanding requirements on homogeneity and stress induced birefringence (SIB), low absorption is a key factor. Even a small absorption is associated with a temperature increase and results in thermally induced local variations of refractive index and SIB. This could affect the achievable resolution of the lithographic process. The total absorption of the material is composed of initial absorption and of absorption induced during irradiation. Thus, the optimization of both improves the lifetime of the material. In principal, it is possible to measure transmission and scattering with a suitable spectrometer assembly and calculate absorption from them. However, owing to the influence of sample surfaces and errors of measurement, these methods usually do not provide satisfactory results for highly light-transmissive fused silica. Therefore, it is most desirable to find a technique that is capable of directly measuring absorption coefficients in the range of (1...10)•10 -4 cm -1 (base 10) directly. We report our first results for fused silica achieved with the LID technique. Besides a fused silica grade designed for 193 nm applications, grades with higher absorption at 193 nm were measured to test the LID technique. A special focus was set on the possibility of measuring initial absorption without the influence of degradation effects.

  7. Bystander effect-induced mutagenicity in HPRT locus of CHO cells following BNCT neutron irradiation: Characteristics of point mutations by sequence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinashi, Yuko [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka (Japan)], E-mail: kinashi@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    To investigate bystander mutagenic effects induced by alpha particles during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), we mixed cells that were electroporated with borocaptate sodium (BSH), which led to the accumulation of {sup 10}B inside the cells, with cells that did not contain the boron compound. BSH-containing cells were irradiated with {alpha} particles produced by the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction, whereas cells without boron were only affected by the {sup 1}H(n,{gamma}){sup 2}H and {sup 14}N(n,{rho}){sup 14}C reactions. The frequency of mutations induced in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus was examined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells irradiated with neutrons (Kyoto University Research Reactor: 5 MW). Neutron irradiation of 1:1 mixtures of cells with and without BSH resulted in a survival fraction of 0.1, and the cells that did not contain BSH made up 99.4% of the surviving cell population. Using multiplex polymerase chain reactions (PCRs), molecular structural analysis indicated that most of the mutations induced by the bystander effect were point mutations and that the frequencies of total and partial deletions induced by the bystander effect were lower than those resulting from the {alpha} particles produced by the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction or the neutron beam from the {sup 1}H(n,{gamma}){sup 2}H and {sup 14}N(n,{rho}){sup 14}C reactions. The types of point mutations induced by the BNCT bystander effect were analyzed by cloning and sequencing methods. These mutations were comprised of 65.5% base substitutions, 27.5% deletions, and 7.0% insertions. Sequence analysis of base substitutions showed that transversions and transitions occurred in 64.7% and 35.3% of cases, respectively. G:C{yields}T:A transversion induced by 8-oxo-guanine in DNA occurred in 5.9% of base substitution mutants in the BNCT bystander group. The characteristic mutations seen in this group, induced by BNCT {alpha} particles

  8. Strain induced anomalous red shift in mesoscopic iron oxide prepared by a novel technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T N Narayanan; D Sakthi Kumar; Yasuhiko Yoshida; M R Anantharaman

    2008-10-01

    Nano magnetic oxides are promising candidates for high density magnetic storage and other applications. Nonspherical mesoscopic iron oxide particles are also candidate materials for studying the shape, size and strain induced modifications of various physical properties viz. optical, magnetic and structural. Spherical and nonspherical iron oxides having an aspect ratio, ∼2, are synthesized by employing starch and ethylene glycol and starch and water, respectively by a novel technique. Their optical, structural, thermal and magnetic properties are evaluated. A red shift of 0.24 eV is observed in the case of nonspherical particles when compared to spherical ones. The red shift is attributed to strain induced changes in internal pressure inside the elongated iron oxide particles. Pressure induced effects are due to the increased overlap of wave functions. Magnetic measurements reveal that particles are superparamagnetic. The marked increase in coercivity in the case of elongated particles is a clear evidence for shape induced anisotropy. The decreased specific saturation magnetization of the samples is explained on the basis of weight percentage of starch, a nonmagnetic component and is verified by TGA and FTIR studies. This technique can be modified for tailoring the aspect ratio and these particles are promising candidates for drug delivery and contrast enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging.

  9. Characterization of hard coatings produced by laser cladding using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela, J.A.; Amado, J.M.; Tobar, M.J.; Mateo, M.P.; Yañez, A.; Nicolas, G., E-mail: gines@udc.es

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Chemical mapping and profiling by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of coatings produced by laser cladding. • Production of laser clads using tungsten carbide (WC) and nickel based matrix (NiCrBSi) powders. • Calibration by LIBS of hardfacing alloys with different WC concentrations. - Abstract: Protective coatings with a high abrasive wear resistance can be obtained from powders by laser cladding technique, in order to extend the service life of some industrial components. In this work, laser clad layers of self-fluxing NiCrBSi alloy powder mixed with WC powder have been produced on stainless steel substrates of austenitic type (AISI 304) in a first step and then chemically characterized by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. With the suitable laser processing parameters (mainly output power, beam scan speed and flow rate) and powders mixture proportions between WC ceramics and NiCrBSi alloys, dense pore free layers have been obtained on single tracks and on large areas with overlapped tracks. The results achieved by LIBS technique and applied for the first time to the analysis of laser clads provided the chemical composition of the tungsten carbides in metal alloy matrix. Different measurement modes (multiple point analyses, depth profiles and chemical maps) have been employed, demonstrating the usefulness of LIBS technique for the characterization of laser clads based on hardfacing alloys. The behavior of hardness can be explained by LIBS maps which evidenced the partial dilution of some WC spheres in the coating.

  10. Study of laser-induced plasma shock waves by the probe beam deflection technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Qian; Jian Lu; Xiaowu Ni

    2009-01-01

    Laser probe beam deflection technique is used for the analysis of laser-induced plasma shock waves in air and distilled water.The temporal and spatial variations of the parameters on shock fronts are studied as funotions of focal lens position and laser energy.The influences of the characteristics of media are investigated on the well-designed experimental setup.It is found that the shock wave in distilled water attenuates to an acoustic wave faster than in air under the same laser energy.Good agreement is obtained between our experimental results and those attained with other techniques.This technique is versatile,economic,and simple to implement,being a pronmising diagnostic tool for pulsed laser processing.

  11. Paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia, writer's cramp, migraine with aura and absence epilepsy in twin brothers with a novel SLC2A1 missense mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbizu, Aintzane; Cuenca-León, Ester; Raspall-Chaure, Miquel; Gratacòs, Margarida; Conill, Joan; Redecillas, Susana; Roig-Quilis, Manuel; Macaya, Alfons

    2010-08-15

    We report two monochorionic twins that progressively developed, between ages 5 and 10, a combination of episodic neurological disorders including paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia, migraine without or with aura, absence seizures and writer's cramp. CSF/serum glucose ratio was moderately decreased in both patients. Mutational analysis of SLC2A1 gene identified a de novo heterozygous missense mutation in exon 4. This novel mutation has been previously showed to disrupt glucose transport in vitro. Both patients showed immediate and near-complete response to ketogenic diet. This clinical observation suggests that a high index of suspicion for GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is warranted in evaluating patients with multiple neurological paroxysmal events.

  12. Local image variance of 7 Tesla SWI is a new technique for preoperative characterization of diffusely infiltrating gliomas: correlation with tumour grade and IDH1 mutational status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabner, Guenther [Medical University of Vienna, High Field Magnetic Resonance Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumours Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Carinthia University of Applied Sciences, Department of Health Sciences and Social Work, Klagenfurt am Woerthersee (Austria); Kiesel, Barbara; Millesi, Matthias; Wurzer, Ayguel; Knosp, Engelbert; Wolfsberger, Stefan; Widhalm, Georg [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumours Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Neurosurgery, Vienna (Austria); Woehrer, Adelheid [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumours Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Institute of Neurology, Vienna (Austria); Goed, Sabine [Medical University of Vienna, High Field Magnetic Resonance Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Mallouhi, Ammar [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumours Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Marosi, Christine; Preusser, Matthias [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumours Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Internal Medicine I, Vienna (Austria); Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, High Field Magnetic Resonance Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumours Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria)

    2017-04-15

    To investigate the value of local image variance (LIV) as a new technique for quantification of hypointense microvascular susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) structures at 7 Tesla for preoperative glioma characterization. Adult patients with neuroradiologically suspected diffusely infiltrating gliomas were prospectively recruited and 7 Tesla SWI was performed in addition to standard imaging. After tumour segmentation, quantification of intratumoural SWI hypointensities was conducted by the SWI-LIV technique. Following surgery, the histopathological tumour grade and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1)-R132H mutational status was determined and SWI-LIV values were compared between low-grade gliomas (LGG) and high-grade gliomas (HGG), IDH1-R132H negative and positive tumours, as well as gliomas with significant and non-significant contrast-enhancement (CE) on MRI. In 30 patients, 9 LGG and 21 HGG were diagnosed. The calculation of SWI-LIV values was feasible in all tumours. Significantly higher mean SWI-LIV values were found in HGG compared to LGG (92.7 versus 30.8; p < 0.0001), IDH1-R132H negative compared to IDH1-R132H positive gliomas (109.9 versus 38.3; p < 0.0001) and tumours with significant CE compared to non-significant CE (120.1 versus 39.0; p < 0.0001). Our data indicate that 7 Tesla SWI-LIV might improve preoperative characterization of diffusely infiltrating gliomas and thus optimize patient management by quantification of hypointense microvascular structures. (orig.)

  13. Breeding of high biomass and lipid producing Desmodesmus sp. by Ethylmethane sulfonate-induced mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; He, Meilin; Zou, Shanmei; Fei, Cong; Yan, Yongquan; Zheng, Shiyan; Rajper, Aftab Ahmed; Wang, Changhai

    2016-05-01

    To improve the biomass yield and lipid productivity, two desert microalgae, Desmodesmus sp. S81 and G41 were induced mutagenesis by Ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS), and obtained two potential mutants, Desmodesmus sp. S5 and G3 from the mutagenic clones for their greatly promoted biomass and lipid production. The results showed that the biomass yield, lipid content and lipid productivity of the mutant strains S5 and G3 were 778.10mg·L(-1), 48.41% and 19.83mg·L(-1)·d(-1), 739.52mg·L(-1), 46.01%, and 17.92mg·L(-1)·d(-1), respectively, which presented the increment of 45.50%, 8.00% and 74.24%, 20.67%, 10.35% and 55.77% than those of S81 and G41. Comparing with the wild strains, the mutants showed reduced PUFAs and glycol lipids, elevated MUFAs and neutral lipids contents, which were appropriate for biodiesel production.

  14. Epistatic participation of REV1 and REV3 in the formation of UV-induced frameshift mutations in cell cycle-arrested yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidenreich, Erich [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: erich.heidenreich@meduniwien.ac.at; Eisler, Herfried [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Steinboeck, Ferdinand [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-29

    Mutations arising in times of cell cycle arrest may provide a selective advantage for unicellular organisms adapting to environmental changes. For multicellular organisms, however, they may pose a serious threat, in that such mutations in somatic cells contribute to carcinogenesis and ageing. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae presents a convenient model system for studying the incidence and the mechanisms of stationary-phase mutation in a eukaryotic organism. Having studied the emergence of frameshift mutants after several days of starvation-induced cell cycle arrest, we previously reported that all (potentially error-prone) translesion synthesis (TLS) enzymes identified in S. cerevisiae did not contribute to the basal level of spontaneous stationary-phase mutations. However, we observed that an increased frequency of stationary-phase frameshift mutations, brought about by a defective nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway or by UV irradiation, was dependent on Rev3p, the catalytic subunit of the TLS polymerase zeta (Pol {zeta}). Employing the same two conditions, we now examined the effect of deletions of the genes coding for polymerase eta (Pol {eta}) (RAD30) and Rev1p (REV1). In a NER-deficient strain background, the increased incidence of stationary-phase mutations was only moderately influenced by a lack of Pol {eta} but completely reduced to wild type level by a knockout of the REV1 gene. UV-induced stationary-phase mutations were abundant in wild type and rad30{delta} strains, but substantially reduced in a rev1{delta} as well as a rev3{delta} strain. The similarity of the rev1{delta} and the rev3{delta} phenotype and an epistatic relationship evident from experiments with a double-deficient strain suggests a participation of Rev1p and Rev3p in the same mutagenic pathway. Based on these results, we propose that the response of cell cycle-arrested cells to an excess of exo- or endogenously induced DNA damage includes a novel replication

  15. Energetics of discrete selectivity bands and mutation-induced transitions in the calcium-sodium ion channels family

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufman, I; Tindjong, R; McClintock, P V E; Eisenberg, R S

    2013-01-01

    We use Brownian dynamics simulations to study the permeation properties of a generic electrostatic model of a biological ion channel as a function of the fixed charge Q_f at its selectivity filter. We reconcile the recently-discovered discrete calcium conduction bands M0 (Q_f=1e), M1 (3e), M2 (5e) with the set of sodium conduction bands L0 (0.5-0.7e), L1 (1.5-2e) thereby obtaining a completed pattern of conduction and selectivity bands v Q_f for the sodium-calcium channels family. An increase of Q_f leads to an increase of calcium selectivity: L0 (sodium selective, non-blocking channel) -> M0 (non-selective channel) -> L1 (sodium selective channel with divalent block) -> M1 (calcium selective channel exhibiting the anomalous mole fraction effect). We create a consistent identification scheme where the L1 band is identified with the eukaryotic (DEKA) sodium channel, and L0 (speculatively) with the bacterial NaChBac channel. The scheme created is able to account for the experimentally observed mutation-induced ...

  16. An Acquired HER2 T798I Gatekeeper Mutation Induces Resistance to Neratinib in a Patient with HER2 Mutant-Driven Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanker, Ariella B; Red Brewer, Monica; Sheehan, Jonathan H; Koch, James P; Sliwoski, Gregory R; Nagy, Rebecca; Lanman, Richard; Berger, Michael F; Hyman, David M; Solit, David B; He, Jie; Miller, Vincent; Cutler, Richard E; Lalani, Alshad S; Cross, Darren; Lovly, Christine M; Meiler, Jens; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2017-03-08

    We report a HER2T798I gatekeeper mutation in a patient with HER2L869R-mutant breast cancer with acquired resistance to neratinib. Laboratory studies suggested that HER2L869R is a neratinib-sensitive, gain-of-function mutation that upon dimerization with mutant HER3E928G, also present in the breast cancer, amplifies HER2 signaling. The patient was treated with neratinib and exhibited a sustained partial response. Upon clinical progression, HER2T798I was detected in plasma tumor cell-free DNA. Structural modeling of this acquired mutation suggested that the increased bulk of isoleucine in HER2T798I reduces neratinib binding. Neratinib blocked HER2-mediated signaling and growth in cells expressing HER2L869R but not HER2L869R/T798I. In contrast, afatinib and the osimertinib metabolite AZ5104 strongly suppressed HER2L869R/T798I-induced signaling and cell growth. Acquisition of HER2T798I upon development of resistance to neratinib in a breast cancer with an initial activating HER2 mutation suggests HER2L869R is a driver mutation. HER2T798I-mediated neratinib resistance may be overcome by other irreversible HER2 inhibitors like afatinib.

  17. Mutation-induced quisqualic acid and ibotenic acid affinity at the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4: ligand selectivity results from a synergy of several amino acid residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermit, Mette B; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2004-01-01

    resides. In this study, we have identified four non-conserved amino acid residues that are essential for differentiating mGluR1 from mGluR4. Our approach has been to increase the affinity of the classic mGluR1 agonists, quisqualic acid and ibotenic acid, at mGluR4 by making various point mutations...... that mimicked mGluR1 residues. Based on ligand docking to homology models, the non-conserved residues, Lys-74, Glu-287, Ser-313, and Lys-317, were chosen for the mutational studies and all of the mutations proved capable of partially or completely restoring the affinities of the ligands. In particular......, the mutations K74Y and K317R induced dramatic triple-order-of-magnitude increases in the affinity of ibotenic acid at mGluR4, making the affinity equivalent to that of mGluR1. Furthermore, the affinity of quisqualic acid at mGluR4 was increased to the same level as mGluR1 by the two double mutations, K74Y/K317R...

  18. Local image variance of 7 Tesla SWI is a new technique for preoperative characterization of diffusely infiltrating gliomas: correlation with tumour grade and IDH1 mutational status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabner, Günther; Kiesel, Barbara; Wöhrer, Adelheid; Millesi, Matthias; Wurzer, Aygül; Göd, Sabine; Mallouhi, Ammar; Knosp, Engelbert; Marosi, Christine; Trattnig, Siegfried; Wolfsberger, Stefan; Preusser, Matthias; Widhalm, Georg

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the value of local image variance (LIV) as a new technique for quantification of hypointense microvascular susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) structures at 7 Tesla for preoperative glioma characterization. Adult patients with neuroradiologically suspected diffusely infiltrating gliomas were prospectively recruited and 7 Tesla SWI was performed in addition to standard imaging. After tumour segmentation, quantification of intratumoural SWI hypointensities was conducted by the SWI-LIV technique. Following surgery, the histopathological tumour grade and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1)-R132H mutational status was determined and SWI-LIV values were compared between low-grade gliomas (LGG) and high-grade gliomas (HGG), IDH1-R132H negative and positive tumours, as well as gliomas with significant and non-significant contrast-enhancement (CE) on MRI. In 30 patients, 9 LGG and 21 HGG were diagnosed. The calculation of SWI-LIV values was feasible in all tumours. Significantly higher mean SWI-LIV values were found in HGG compared to LGG (92.7 versus 30.8; p Tesla SWI-LIV might improve preoperative characterization of diffusely infiltrating gliomas and thus optimize patient management by quantification of hypointense microvascular structures. • 7 Tesla local image variance helps to quantify hypointense susceptibility-weighted imaging structures. • SWI-LIV is significantly increased in high-grade and IDH1-R132H negative gliomas. • SWI-LIV is a promising technique for improved preoperative glioma characterization. • Preoperative management of diffusely infiltrating gliomas will be optimized.

  19. L-3-n-Butylphthalide Protects HSPB8 K141N Mutation-Induced Oxidative Stress by Modulating the Mitochondrial Apoptotic and Nrf2 Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dong Yang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease (CMT, also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, is the most common inherited peripheral nerve disorder. Missense mutations, such as K141N, in the small heat shock protein HSPB8 are known to cause distal hereditary motor neuropathy 2A (dHMN2A or Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2L (CMT2L. However, of critical clinical significance, very few specific therapies for this disease exist. In the present study, we investigated the impact of mutant K141N HSPB8 on mitochondrial distribution and function in a cellular model of CMT2L. Our results indicate that K141N HSPB8 induced mitochondrial aggregation and caused increased oxidative stress injury. As an extraction from Chinese celery Apium graveolens Linn seeds, L-3-n-Butylphthalide (NBP, has been reported to exert many neuroprotective effects, we interrogated whether NBP could elicit a protective effect on the cell injury typically caused by HSPB8 K141N mutations. We found NBP could reverse the pathological processes induced by HSPB8 K141N mutation via an antioxidant effect, modulation of the Bax/Bcl-2 mitochondrial apoptotic and Nrf2 pathways. We propose a novel function of HSPB8, highlighting the consequence of the K141N pathogenic mutation. Furthermore, we suggest NBP may have promising therapeutic potential in the treatment of CMT2L.

  20. Non-homologous end joining dependency of {gamma}-irradiation-induced adaptive frameshift mutation formation in cell cycle-arrested yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidenreich, Erich [Institute of Cancer Research, Division of Molecular Genetics, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: erich.heidenreich@meduniwien.ac.at; Eisler, Herfried [Institute of Cancer Research, Division of Molecular Genetics, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2004-11-22

    There is a strong selective pressure favoring adaptive mutations which relieve proliferation-limiting adverse living conditions. Due to their importance for evolution and pathogenesis, we are interested in the mechanisms responsible for the formation of such adaptive, gain-of-fitness mutations in stationary-phase cells. During previous studies on the occurrence of spontaneous reversions of an auxotrophy-causing frameshift allele in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we noticed that about 50% of the adaptive reversions depended on a functional non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here, we show that the occasional NHEJ component Pol4, which is the yeast ortholog of mammalian DNA polymerase lambda, is not required for adaptive mutagenesis. An artificially imposed excess of DSBs by {gamma}-irradiation resulted in a dramatic increase in the incidence of adaptive, cell cycle arrest-releasing frameshift reversions. By the use of DNA ligase IV-deficient strains we detected that the majority of the {gamma}-induced adaptive mutations were also dependent on a functional NHEJ pathway. This suggests that the same mutagenic NHEJ mechanism acts on spontaneously arising as well as on ionizing radiation-induced DSBs. Inaccuracy of the NHEJ repair pathway may extensively contribute to the incidence of frameshift mutations in resting (non-dividing) eukaryotic cells, and thus act as a driving force in tumor development.

  1. Visualization of ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles using the synchrotron x-ray Analyzer Based Imaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadifar, Zahra; Belev, George; Izadifar, Mohammad; Izadifar, Zohreh; Chapman, Dean

    2014-12-07

    Observing cavitation bubbles deep within tissue is very difficult. The development of a method for probing cavitation, irrespective of its location in tissues, would improve the efficiency and application of ultrasound in the clinic. A synchrotron x-ray imaging technique, which is capable of detecting cavitation bubbles induced in water by a sonochemistry system, is reported here; this could possibly be extended to the study of therapeutic ultrasound in tissues. The two different x-ray imaging techniques of Analyzer Based Imaging (ABI) and phase contrast imaging (PCI) were examined in order to detect ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles. Cavitation was not observed by PCI, however it was detectable with ABI. Acoustic cavitation was imaged at six different acoustic power levels and six different locations through the acoustic beam in water at a fixed power level. The results indicate the potential utility of this technique for cavitation studies in tissues, but it is time consuming. This may be improved by optimizing the imaging method.

  2. Retigabine, a Kv7.2/Kv7.3-Channel Opener, Attenuates Drug-Induced Seizures in Knock-In Mice Harboring Kcnq2 Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Yukiko; Tomonoh, Yuko; Deshimaru, Masanobu; Zhang, Bo; Uchida, Taku; Ishii, Atsushi; Hirose, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    The hetero-tetrameric voltage-gated potassium channel Kv7.2/Kv7.3, which is encoded by KCNQ2 and KCNQ3, plays an important role in limiting network excitability in the neonatal brain. Kv7.2/Kv7.3 dysfunction resulting from KCNQ2 mutations predominantly causes self-limited or benign epilepsy in neonates, but also causes early onset epileptic encephalopathy. Retigabine (RTG), a Kv7.2/ Kv7.3-channel opener, seems to be a rational antiepileptic drug for epilepsies caused by KCNQ2 mutations. We therefore evaluated the effects of RTG on seizures in two strains of knock-in mice harboring different Kcnq2 mutations, in comparison to the effects of phenobarbital (PB), which is the first-line antiepileptic drug for seizures in neonates. The subjects were heterozygous knock-in mice (Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+) bearing the Y284C or A306T Kcnq2 mutation, respectively, and their wild-type (WT) littermates, at 63-100 days of age. Seizures induced by intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (KA, 12mg/kg) were recorded using a video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring system. Effects of RTG on KA-induced seizures of both strains of knock-in mice were assessed using seizure scores from a modified Racine's scale and compared with those of PB. The number and total duration of spike bursts on EEG and behaviors monitored by video recording were also used to evaluate the effects of RTG and PB. Both Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ mice showed significantly more KA-induced seizures than WT mice. RTG significantly attenuated KA-induced seizure activities in both Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ mice, and more markedly than PB. This is the first reported evidence of RTG ameliorating KA-induced seizures in knock-in mice bearing mutations of Kcnq2, with more marked effects than those observed with PB. RTG or other Kv7.2-channel openers may be considered as first-line antiepileptic treatments for epilepsies resulting from KCNQ2 mutations.

  3. Retigabine, a Kv7.2/Kv7.3-Channel Opener, Attenuates Drug-Induced Seizures in Knock-In Mice Harboring Kcnq2 Mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko Ihara

    Full Text Available The hetero-tetrameric voltage-gated potassium channel Kv7.2/Kv7.3, which is encoded by KCNQ2 and KCNQ3, plays an important role in limiting network excitability in the neonatal brain. Kv7.2/Kv7.3 dysfunction resulting from KCNQ2 mutations predominantly causes self-limited or benign epilepsy in neonates, but also causes early onset epileptic encephalopathy. Retigabine (RTG, a Kv7.2/ Kv7.3-channel opener, seems to be a rational antiepileptic drug for epilepsies caused by KCNQ2 mutations. We therefore evaluated the effects of RTG on seizures in two strains of knock-in mice harboring different Kcnq2 mutations, in comparison to the effects of phenobarbital (PB, which is the first-line antiepileptic drug for seizures in neonates. The subjects were heterozygous knock-in mice (Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ bearing the Y284C or A306T Kcnq2 mutation, respectively, and their wild-type (WT littermates, at 63-100 days of age. Seizures induced by intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (KA, 12mg/kg were recorded using a video-electroencephalography (EEG monitoring system. Effects of RTG on KA-induced seizures of both strains of knock-in mice were assessed using seizure scores from a modified Racine's scale and compared with those of PB. The number and total duration of spike bursts on EEG and behaviors monitored by video recording were also used to evaluate the effects of RTG and PB. Both Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ mice showed significantly more KA-induced seizures than WT mice. RTG significantly attenuated KA-induced seizure activities in both Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ mice, and more markedly than PB. This is the first reported evidence of RTG ameliorating KA-induced seizures in knock-in mice bearing mutations of Kcnq2, with more marked effects than those observed with PB. RTG or other Kv7.2-channel openers may be considered as first-line antiepileptic treatments for epilepsies resulting from KCNQ2 mutations.

  4. Somatic mutation and recombination induced with reactor thermal neutrons in Drosophila melanogaster; Mutacion y recombinacion somaticas inducidas con neutrones termicos de reactor en Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambrano A, F.; Guzman R, J.; Paredes G, L.; Delfin L, A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The SMART test of Drosophila melanogaster was used to quantify the effect over the somatic mutation and recombination induced by thermal and fast neutrons at the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the ININ at the power of 300 k W for times of 30, 60 and 120 minutes with total equivalent doses respectively of 20.8, 41.6 and 83.2 Sv. A linear relation between the radiation equivalent dose and the frequency of the genetic effects such as mutation and recombination was observed. The obtained results allow to conclude that SMART is a sensitive system to the induced damage by neutrons, so this can be used for studying its biological effects. (Author)

  5. Identification and glycerol-induced correction of misfolding mutations in the X-linked mental retardation gene CASK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie E W LaConte

    Full Text Available The overwhelming amount of available genomic sequence variation information demands a streamlined approach to examine known pathogenic mutations of any given protein. Here we seek to outline a strategy to easily classify pathogenic missense mutations that cause protein misfolding and are thus good candidates for chaperone-based therapeutic strategies, using previously identified mutations in the gene CASK. We applied a battery of bioinformatics algorithms designed to predict potential impact on protein structure to five pathogenic missense mutations in the protein CASK that have been shown to underlie pathologies ranging from X-linked mental retardation to autism spectrum disorder. A successful classification of the mutations as damaging was not consistently achieved despite the known pathogenicity. In addition to the bioinformatics analyses, we performed molecular modeling and phylogenetic comparisons. Finally, we developed a simple high-throughput imaging assay to measure the misfolding propensity of the CASK mutants in situ. Our data suggests that a phylogenetic analysis may be a robust method for predicting structurally damaging mutations in CASK. Mutations in two evolutionarily invariant residues (Y728C and W919R exhibited a strong propensity to misfold and form visible aggregates in the cytosolic milieu. The remaining mutations (R28L, Y268H, and P396S showed no evidence of aggregation and maintained their interactions with known CASK binding partners liprin-α3 Mint-1, and Veli, indicating an intact structure. Intriguingly, the protein aggregation caused by the Y728C and W919R mutations was reversed by treating the cells with a chemical chaperone (glycerol, providing a possible therapeutic strategy for treating structural mutations in CASK in the future.

  6. Antagonistic effects of ethyl methanesulfonate and maleic hydrazide in inducing somatic mutations in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia clone BNL 4430

    OpenAIRE

    市川, 定夫

    1998-01-01

    Mutagenic interaction between ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS; a monofunctional alkylating agent) and maleic hydrazide (MH; a promutagen activated into a mutagen in plants highly likely by peroxidase) was studied in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia clone BNL 4430, a blue/pink heterozygote. Since EMS has been shown to act synergistically with X rays in inducing mutations, and mutagenic synergisms have also been observed between X rays and MH by exposing to X rays before MH treatments, EMS and MH w...

  7. Note: A novel technique for analysis of aqueous solutions by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusak, D A; Anthony, T P; Bell, Z T

    2015-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates typically consist of gold or silver nanoparticles deposited on a non-conductive substrate. In Raman spectroscopy, the nanoparticles produce an enhancement of the electromagnetic field which, in turn, leads to greater electronic excitation of molecules in the local environment. Here, we show that these same surfaces can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio obtained in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of aqueous solutions. In this case, the SERS substrates not only lower breakdown thresholds and lead to more efficient plasma initiation but also provide an appropriately wettable surface for the deposition of the liquid. We refer to this technique as surface-enhanced laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  8. Induced modifications on algae photosynthetic activity monitored by pump-and-probe technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbini, R.; Colao, F.; Fantoni, R.; Palucci, A.; Ribezzo, S. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dip. Innovazione; Tarzillo, G.; Carlozzi, P.; Pelosi, E. [CNR, Florence (Italy). Centro Studi Microorganismi Autotrofi

    1995-12-01

    The lidar fluorosensor system available at ENEA Frascati has been used for a series of laboratory measurements on brackish-water and marine phytoplankton grown in laboratory with the proper saline solution. The system, already used to measure the laser induced fluorescence spectra of different algae species and their detection limits, has been upgraded with a short pulse Nd:YAG laser and rearranged to test a new technique based on laser pump and probe excitation. Results of this new technique for remote monitoring of the in-vivo photosynthetic activity will be presented, as measured during a field campaign carried out in Florence during the Autumn 1993, where the effects of an actinic saturating light and different chemicals have also been checked.

  9. Average OH density in alternating current dielectric barrier discharge by laser-induced fluorescence technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongliang; Feng, Chunlei; Gao, Liang; Ding, Hongbin

    2015-10-01

    The average OH density in atmospheric He-H2O(0.4%) needle-plate dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) was measured by the asynchronous laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique and the fluctuation of OH radical density was measured simultaneously to prove that the average OH density can be obtained by the asynchronous LIF technique. The evolution of the average OH density in four different discharge patterns, namely, negative barrier corona discharge, glow discharge, multi glow discharge, and streamer discharge, was studied, and it was found that the average OH density has an observable increase from corona discharge to streamer discharge. The main mechanism of OH production in the four different discharge patterns was analyzed. It was shown that the main mechanism of OH production in negative barrier corona discharge is electron direct collision dissociation, whereas in the other three discharge patterns the He metastable Penning ionization is the main process.

  10. Comparison of fluorescence-based techniques for the quantification of particle-induced hydroxyl radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohn Corey A

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species including hydroxyl radicals can cause oxidative stress and mutations. Inhaled particulate matter can trigger formation of hydroxyl radicals, which have been implicated as one of the causes of particulate-induced lung disease. The extreme reactivity of hydroxyl radicals presents challenges to their detection and quantification. Here, three fluorescein derivatives [aminophenyl fluorescamine (APF, amplex ultrared, and dichlorofluorescein (DCFH] and two radical species, proxyl fluorescamine and tempo-9-ac have been compared for their usefulness to measure hydroxyl radicals generated in two different systems: a solution containing ferrous iron and a suspension of pyrite particles. Results APF, amplex ultrared, and DCFH react similarly to the presence of hydroxyl radicals. Proxyl fluorescamine and tempo-9-ac do not react with hydroxyl radicals directly, which reduces their sensitivity. Since both DCFH and amplex ultrared will react with reactive oxygen species other than hydroxyl radicals and another highly reactive species, peroxynitite, they lack specificity. Conclusion The most useful probe evaluated here for hydroxyl radicals formed from cell-free particle suspensions is APF due to its sensitivity and selectivity.

  11. An Alzheimer Disease-linked Rare Mutation Potentiates Netrin Receptor Uncoordinated-5C-induced Signaling That Merges with Amyloid β Precursor Protein Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yuichi; Toyama, Yuka; Kusakari, Shinya; Nawa, Mikiro; Matsuoka, Masaaki

    2016-06-03

    A missense mutation (T835M) in the uncoordinated-5C (UNC5C) netrin receptor gene increases the risk of late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) and also the vulnerability of neurons harboring the mutation to various insults. The molecular mechanisms underlying T835M-UNC5C-induced death remain to be elucidated. In this study, we show that overexpression of wild-type UNC5C causes low-grade death, which is intensified by an AD-linked mutation T835M. An AD-linked survival factor, calmodulin-like skin protein (CLSP), and a natural ligand of UNC5C, netrin1, inhibit this death. T835M-UNC5C-induced neuronal cell death is mediated by an intracellular death-signaling cascade, consisting of death-associated protein kinase 1/protein kinase D/apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)/JNK/NADPH oxidase/caspases, which merges at ASK1 with a death-signaling cascade, mediated by amyloid β precursor protein (APP). Notably, netrin1 also binds to APP and partially inhibits the death-signaling cascade, induced by APP. These results may provide new insight into the amyloid β-independent pathomechanism of AD.

  12. An Alzheimer's Disease-Relevant Presenilin-1 Mutation Augments Amyloid-Beta-Induced Oligodendrocyte Dysfunction%An Alzheimer's Disease-Relevant Presenilin-1Mutation Augments Amyloid-Beta-Induced Oligodendrocyte Dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAYA K. DESAI; BRENDAN J. GUERCIO; WADE C. NARROW; AND WILLIAM J. BOWERS

    2011-01-01

    研究表明,家族性阿尔茨海默病(FAD)患者处于无症状或临床前阶段时,脑白质即出现病理改变.此种改变在髓鞘破坏及阿尔茨海默病(AD)病理生理中的作用有待进一步研究阐明.笔者前期研究证实,三重转基因AD小鼠(人淀粉前体蛋白基因的Swedish突变,早老素-1 M146V (PS1M146V)敲入突变及tauP301L突变)表现出类似FAD患者的髓鞘破坏,Aβ1-42促进了白质病变.本研究离体实验证实,PS1M146V变异导致小鼠少突胶质前体细胞在分化过程中易出现类似Aβ1-42诱导的变化.PS1M146V的表达损伤少突胶质前体细胞的功能并影响髓鞘碱性蛋白的分布,暴露于Aβ1-42加重此影响.由PS1M146V及 Aβ1-42导致的髓鞘破坏及髓鞘碱性蛋白在亚细胞结构中的误定位可被TWS119(糖原合成激酶(GSK)-3β抑制剂)抑制,提示GSK-3β激酶活动在此病理过程中有重要作用.综上所述,本研究有助于增加对AD早期无症状阶段,由PS1M146V及 Aβ1-42导致少突胶质细胞功能异常及髓鞘损伤的机制的理解,并提供了针对少突胶质细胞预防AD相关白质病变的新的治疗靶点.%White matter pathology has been documented in the brains of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD)-afflicted individuals during presymptomatic and preclinical stages of AD. How these defects in myelination integrity arise and what roles they may play in AD pathophysiology have yet to be fully elucidated. We previously demonstrated that triple-transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice, which harbor the human amyloid precursor Swedish mutation, presenilin-1 M146V (PS1M146V) knock-in mutation, and tauP301L mutation, exhibit myelin abnormalities analogous to FAD patients and that Aβ1-42 contributes to these white matter deficits. Herein, we demonstrate that the PS1M146V mutation predisposes mouse oligodendrocyte precursor (mOP) cells to Aβ1 42-induced alterations in cell differentiation in vitro. Furthermore, PS1M146V expression compromised m

  13. Expression of R132H mutational IDH1 in human U87 glioblastoma cells affects the SREBP1a pathway and induces cellular proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian; Cui, Gang; Chen, Ming; Xu, Qinian; Wang, Xiuyun; Zhou, Dai; Lv, Shengxiang; Fu, Linshan; Wang, Zhong; Zuo, Jianling

    2013-05-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1a (SREBP1a) is a member of the SREBP family of transcription factors, which mainly controls homeostasis of lipids. SREBP1a can also activate the transcription of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) by binding to its promoter region. IDH1 mutations, especially R132H mutation of IDH1, are a common feature of a major subset of human gliomas. There are few data available on the relationship between mutational IDH1 expression and SREBP1a pathway. In this study, we investigated cellular effects and SREBP1a pathway alterations caused by R132H mutational IDH1 expression in U87 cells. Two glioma cell lines, stably expressing mutational (U87/R132H) or wild type (U87/wt) IDH1, were established. A cell line, stably transfected with pcDNA3.1(+) (U87/vector), was generated as a control. Click-iT EdU assay, sulforhodamine B assay, and wound healing assay respectively showed that the expression of R132H induced cellular proliferation, cell growth, and cell migration. Western blot revealed that SREBP1 was increased in U87/R132H compared with that in U87/wt. Elevated SREBP1a and several its target genes, but not SREBP1c, were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction in U87/R132H. All these findings indicated that R132H mutational IDH1 is involved in the regulation of proliferation, growth, and migration of glioma cells. These effects may partially be mediated by SREBP1a pathway.

  14. DNA damage-processing in E. coli: on-going protein synthesis is required for fixation of UV-induced lethality and mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Amanda; Raymer, Jenny; Bockrath, R

    2002-10-01

    UV irradiation of E. coli produces photoproducts in the DNA genome. In consequence, some bacteria lose viability (colony-forming ability) or remain viable as mutant cells. However, the end-points of viability inactivation (lethality) or mutation are determined by cellular processes that act on the UV-damaged DNA. We have investigated the in vivo time course for processes that deal with cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) which can be specifically removed by photoreactivation (PR). At different times during post-UV incubation, samples were challenged with PR and assayed for viability or mutation. We used excision-defective E. coli B/r cells and worked under yellow light to avoid background PR. During post-UV incubation (0-100min) in fully supplemented defined medium, inactivation and mutation were initially significantly reversed by PR but the extent of this reversal decreased during continued incubation defining "fixation" of lethality or mutation, respectively. In contrast, if protein synthesis was restricted during the post-UV incubation, no fixation developed. When chloramphenicol was added to inhibit protein synthesis after 30min of supplemented post-UV incubation, at a time sufficient for expression of UV-induced protein(s), fixation of lethality or mutation was still annulled (no change in the effectiveness of PR developed). Lethality fixation did progress when protein synthesis was restricted and the cells were incubated in the presence of puromycin or were either clpP or clpX defective. We discuss these and related results to suggest (1) on-going protein synthesis is required in the fixation process for lethality and mutation to sustain an effective level of a hypothetical protein sensitive to ClpXP proteolysis and (2) this protein plays a critical role in the process leading to exchange between Pol III activity and alternative polymerase activities required as each cell deals with damage in template DNA.

  15. Kv3.3 channels harbouring a mutation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 alter excitability and induce cell death in cultured cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Tomohiko; Matsuzaki, Yasunori; Sekino, Yuko; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum plays crucial roles in controlling sensorimotor functions. The neural output from the cerebellar cortex is transmitted solely by Purkinje cells (PCs), whose impairment causes cerebellar ataxia. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13) is an autosomal dominant disease, and SCA13 patients exhibit cerebellar atrophy and cerebellar symptoms. Recent studies have shown that missense mutations in the voltage-gated K(+) channel Kv3.3 are responsible for SCA13. In the rodent brain, Kv3.3 mRNAs are expressed most strongly in PCs, suggesting that the mutations severely affect PCs in SCA13 patients. Nevertheless, how these mutations affect the function of Kv3.3 in PCs and, consequently, the morphology and neuronal excitability of PCs remains unclear. To address these questions, we used lentiviral vectors to express mutant mouse Kv3.3 (mKv3.3) channels harbouring an R424H missense mutation, which corresponds to the R423H mutation in the Kv3.3 channels of SCA13 patients, in mouse cerebellar cultures. The R424H mutant-expressing PCs showed decreased outward current density, broadened action potentials and elevated basal [Ca(2+)]i compared with PCs expressing wild-type mKv3.3 subunits or those expressing green fluorescent protein alone. Moreover, expression of R424H mutant subunits induced impaired dendrite development and cell death selectively in PCs, both of which were rescued by blocking P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels in the culture conditions. We therefore concluded that expression of R424H mutant subunits in PCs markedly affects the function of endogenous Kv3 channels, neuronal excitability and, eventually, basal [Ca(2+)]i, leading to cell death. These results suggest that PCs in SCA13 patients also exhibit similar defects in PC excitability and induced cell death, which may explain the pathology of SCA13.

  16. Whole-tree agarwood-inducing technique: an efficient novel technique for producing high-quality agarwood in cultivated Aquilaria sinensis trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyang; Chen, Huaiqiong; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Wei, Jianhe; Meng, Hui; Chen, Weiping; Feng, Jindong; Gan, Bingchun; Chen, Xuyu; Gao, Zhihui; Huang, Junqin; Chen, Bo; Chen, Hongjiang

    2013-03-07

    Agarwood is the fragrant resin-infused wood derived from the wounded trees of Aquilaria species. It is a valuable non-timber forest product used in fragrances and as medicine. Reforestation for Aquilaria trees in combination with artificial agarwood-inducing methods serves as a way to supply agarwood and conserve of wild Aquilaria stock. However, the existing agarwood-inducing methods produce poor-quality agarwood at low yield. Our study evaluated a novel technique for producing agarwood in cultivated Aquilaria trees, called the whole-tree agarwood-inducing technique (Agar-Wit). Ten different agarwood inducers were used for comparison of Agar-Wit with three existing agarwood-inducing methods. For Aquilaria trees treated with these ten inducers, agarwood formed and spread throughout the entire tree from the transfusion point in the trunk to the roots and branches of the whole tree. Agarwood yield per tree reached 2,444.83 to 5,860.74 g, which is 4 to 28 times higher than that by the existing agarwood-inducing methods. Furthermore, this agarwood derived from Agar-Wit induction was found to have a higher quality compared with the existing methods, and similar to that of wild agarwood. This indicates Agar-Wit may have commercial potential. Induction of cultivated agarwood using this method could satisfy the significant demand for agarwood, while conserving and protecting the remaining wild Aquilaria trees.

  17. Whole-tree Agarwood-Inducing Technique: An Efficient Novel Technique for Producing High-Quality Agarwood in Cultivated Aquilaria sinensis Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjiang Chen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Agarwood is the fragrant resin-infused wood derived from the wounded trees of Aquilaria species. It is a valuable non-timber forest product used in fragrances and as medicine. Reforestation for Aquilaria trees in combination with artificial agarwood-inducing methods serves as a way to supply agarwood and conserve of wild Aquilaria stock. However, the existing agarwood-inducing methods produce poor-quality agarwood at low yield. Our study evaluated a novel technique for producing agarwood in cultivated Aquilaria trees, called the whole-tree agarwood-inducing technique (Agar-Wit. Ten different agarwood inducers were used for comparison of Agar-Wit with three existing agarwood-inducing methods. For Aquilaria trees treated with these ten inducers, agarwood formed and spread throughout the entire tree from the transfusion point in the trunk to the roots and branches of the whole tree. Agarwood yield per tree reached 2,444.83 to 5,860.74 g, which is 4 to 28 times higher than that by the existing agarwood-inducing methods. Furthermore, this agarwood derived from Agar-Wit induction was found to have a higher quality compared with the existing methods, and similar to that of wild agarwood. This indicates Agar-Wit may have commercial potential. Induction of cultivated agarwood using this method could satisfy the significant demand for agarwood, while conserving and protecting the remaining wild Aquilaria trees.

  18. Complex reconstruction of the dorsal hand using the induced membrane technique associated with bone substitute: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Moris

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: The induced membrane technique allowed the reconstruction of small bone deficits in the long bones of the hand in a two-step procedure, the first step taking place in an emergency context of composite tissue trauma.

  19. Transfection with extracellularly UV-damaged DNA induces human and rat cells to express a mutator phenotype towards parvovirus H-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinsart, C.; Cornelis, J.J.; Klein, B.; van der Eb, A.J.; Rommelaere, J.

    1984-02-01

    Human and rat cells transfected with UV-irradiated linear double-stranded DNA from calf thymus displayed a mutator activity. This phenotype was identified by growing a lytic thermosensitive single-stranded DNA virus (parvovirus H-1) in those cells and determining viral reversion frequencies. Likewise, exogenous UV-irradiated closed circular DNAs, either double-stranded (simian virus 40) or single-stranded (phi X174), enhanced the ability of recipient cells to mutate parvovirus H-1. The magnitude of mutator activity expression increased along with the number of UV lesions present in the inoculated DNA up to a saturation level. Unirradiated DNA displayed little inducing capacity, irrespective of whether it was single or double stranded. Deprivation of a functional replication origin did not impede UV-irradiated simian virus 40 DNA from providing rat and human cells with a mutator function. Our data suggest that in mammalian cells a trans-acting mutagenic signal might be generated from UV-irradiated DNA without the necessity for damaged DNA to replicate.

  20. Fast capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence analysis of ligase chain reaction products: human mitochondrial DNA point mutations causing Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth, J; Williams, P M; Williams, S J; Brown, M D; Wallace, D C; Karger, B L

    1996-12-01

    High speed capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) has been used to separate and detect point mutations using the ligase chain reaction (LCR). The method utilizes short capillary columns (7.5 cm effective length) and fields of 400 V/cm to analyze DNA-ethidium bromide complexes using an He/Ne laser. The method was first demonstrated with a commercially available kit for LCR based on a lacI gene fragment inserted in a Bluescript II phagemid. LCR-CE-LIF was then applied to detect point mutations in human mitochondrial DNA, resulting in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Three severe mutations were analyzed in which the original base is substituted by a thymidine base at positions 3460, 11778 and 14459. Appropriate primers were designed with polyT tails for length discrimination of pooled samples. Successful detection of mutated samples was achieved, with appropriate correction for small amounts of nonspecific ligated product. The method is rapid, easy to implement, and automatable.

  1. K-ras mutations and mucin profile in preneoplastic lesions and colon tumors induced in rats by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femia, Angelo Pietro; Tarquini, Elena; Salvadori, Maddalena; Ferri, Stefania; Giannini, Augusto; Dolara, Piero; Caderni, Giovanna

    2008-01-01

    K-ras and mucin profile variations, associated with intestinal carcinogenesis, were studied in the preneoplastic lesions, mucin-depleted foci (MDF) and aberrant crypt foci (ACF), and in colonic tumors induced in rats by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). The frequency of lesions with K-ras mutations was 23% (3/13), 5.5% (1/18) and 100% (14/14) in MDF, tumors and ACF, respectively. Two of three MDF mutated in K-ras also carried a missense mutation in Apc. We also tested the expression of MUC2, a mucin abundantly expressed in normal colon and M1/MUCA5C, up-regulated in colon carcinogenesis, using immunohistochemistry. MDF and tumors showed a dramatic reduction in the expression of MUC2, whereas ACF showed only a slight reduction. The expression of M1/MUC5AC was almost absent in normal mucosa, but was increased in all the lesions (MDF, tumors and ACF). The expression of the intestinal trefoil factor (ITF), a marker of goblet cell lineage, was reduced in MDF and tumors compared to normal mucosa but not in ACF. In conclusion, although K-ras mutations are present in all ACF, they are less frequent in MDF and tumors; M1/MUC5AC is a marker associated with all preneoplastic events while the reduction of MUC2 and ITF expression is selectively associated with more advanced lesions such as MDF and tumors. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Sequence analysis of lacZ~- mutations induced by ion beam irradiation in double-stranded M13mp18DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨剑波; 吴李君; 李莉; 吴家道; 余增亮; 许智宏

    1997-01-01

    While M13mpl8 double-stranded DNA was irradiated with ion beam, and transfected into E. coli JM103, a decrease of transfecting activity was discovered. The lacZ-mutation frequency at 20% survival could reach (3.6-16.8) × 104, about 2.3-10 times that of unirradiated M13DNA. Altogether, 27 lacZ~ mutants were select-ed, 10 of which were used for sequencing. 7 of the sequenced mutants show base changes in 250-bp region examined (the remaining 3 mutants probably have base changes outside the regions sequenced). 5 of the base-changed mutants contain more than one mutational base sites (some of them even have 5-6 mutational base sites in 250-bp region ex-amined) ; this dense distribution of base changes in polysites has seldom been seen in X-rays, γ-rays or UV induced DNA mutations. Our experiments also showed that the types of base changes include transitions( 50 % ), transversions (45% ) and deletion (5% ); no addition or duplication was observed. The transitions were mainly C→T and A→G; the transversion

  3. Features of a Chinese family with cerebral cavernous malformation induced by a novel CCM1 gene mutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xue; LIU Xue-wu; Nora Lee; LIU Qi-ji; LI Wen-na; HAN Tao; WEI Kun-kun

    2013-01-01

    Background Familial cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs),characterized by hemorrhagic stroke,recurrent headache and epilepsy,are congenital vascular anomalies of the central nervous system.Familial CCMs is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder and three CCM genes have been identified.We report a Chinese family with CCMs and intend to explore clinical,pathological,magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and pathogenic gene mutation of this family.Methods Totally 25 family members underwent brain MRI examination and clinical check.Two patients with surgical indications had surgical treatment and the specimens were subjected to histopathological and microstructural examination.In addition,polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing were performed with genomic DNA extracted from 25 family members' blood samples for mutation detection.Results Brain MRI identified abnormal results in seven family members.All of them had multiple intracranial lesions and four cases had skin cavernous hemangioma.T2-weighted sequence showed that the lesions were typically characterized by an area of mixed signal intensity.Gradient-echo (GRE) sequence was more sensitive to find microcavernous hemangiomas.There was a wide range in the clinical manifestations as well as the age of onset in the family.The youngest patient was an 8-year-old boy with least intracranial lesions.Histopathological and microstructural examination showed that CCMs were typically discrete multi-sublobes of berry-like lesions,with hemorrhage in various stages of illness evolution.They were formed by abnormally enlarged sinusoids and the thin basement membranes.A novel T deletion mutation in exon 14 of CCM1 gene was identified by mutation detection in the seven patients.But unaffected members and healthy controls did not carry this mutation.Conclusions The clinical manifestations were heterogenic within this family.We identified a novel mutation (c.1396delT) was the disease-causing mutation for this

  4. Drug-induced sleep endoscopy: conventional versus target controlled infusion techniques--a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito, Andrea; Agnoletti, Vanni; Berrettini, Stefano; Piraccini, Emanuele; Criscuolo, Armando; Corso, Ruggero; Campanini, Aldo; Gambale, Giorgio; Vicini, Claudio

    2011-03-01

    Understanding the sites of pharyngeal collapse is mandatory for surgical treatment decision-making in obstructive sleep-apnea-hypopnea syndrome patients. Drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) allows for the direct observation of the upper airway during sedative-induced sleep. In order to re-create snoring and apnea patterns related to a spontaneous sleep situation, the authors used a target-controlled infusion (TCI) sleep endoscopy (DISE-TCI), comparing this technique to conventional DISE, in which sedation was reached by a manual bolus injection. The authors conducted a prospective, randomized, unicenter study. The apneic event observation and its correlation with pharyngeal collapse patterns is the primary endpoint; secondary endpoints are defined as stability and safety of sedation plans of DISE-TCI technique. From January 2009 to June 2009, 40 OSAHS patients were included in the study and randomized allocated in two groups: the bolus injection conventional DISE group and the DISE-TCI group. We recorded the complete apnea event at the oropharynx and hypopharynx levels in 4 patients of the conventional DISE group (20%) and in 17 patients of the DISE-TCI group (85%) (P DISE group because of severe desaturation that resulted from the first bolus of propofol (1 mg/kg) (P = 0.4872 ns). We recorded the instability of the sedation plan in 13 patients from the conventional DISE group (65%) and 1 patient from the DISE-TCI group (5%) (P = 0.0001). Our results suggest that the DISE-TCI technique should be the first choice in performing sleep endoscopy because of its increased accuracy, stability and safety.

  5. Panel-based next generation sequencing as a reliable and efficient technique to detect mutations in unselected patients with retinal dystrophies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glöckle, Nicola; Kohl, Susanne; Mohr, Julia; Scheurenbrand, Tim; Sprecher, Andrea; Weisschuh, Nicole; Bernd, Antje; Rudolph, Günther; Schubach, Max; Poloschek, Charlotte; Zrenner, Eberhart; Biskup, Saskia; Berger, Wolfgang; Wissinger, Bernd; Neidhardt, John

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary retinal dystrophies (RD) constitute a group of blinding diseases that are characterized by clinical variability and pronounced genetic heterogeneity. The different forms of RD can be caused by mutations in >100 genes, including >1600 exons. Consequently, next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are among the most promising approaches to identify mutations in RD. So far, NGS is not routinely used in gene diagnostics. We developed a diagnostic NGS pipeline to identify mutations in 170 genetically and clinically unselected RD patients. NGS was applied to 105 RD-associated genes. Underrepresented regions were examined by Sanger sequencing. The NGS approach was successfully established using cases with known sequence alterations. Depending on the initial clinical diagnosis, we identified likely causative mutations in 55% of retinitis pigmentosa and 80% of Bardet–Biedl or Usher syndrome cases. Seventy-one novel mutations in 40 genes were newly associated with RD. The genes USH2A, EYS, ABCA4, and RHO were more frequently affected than others. Occasionally, cases carried mutations in more than one RD-associated gene. In addition, we found possible dominant de-novo mutations in cases with sporadic RD, which implies consequences for counseling of patients and families. NGS-based mutation analyses are reliable and cost-efficient approaches in gene diagnostics of genetically heterogeneous diseases like RD. PMID:23591405

  6. A laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for obtaining neutral hydrogen densities in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, X.Z.; Yang, T.F.; Chang-Diaz, F.R. [Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The resonance fluorescence of neutral hydrogen illuminated by {ital H}{sub {alpha}} radiation has been used as a technique for the spatially and temporally resolved density measurements of neutral hydrogen in high temperature plasmas, such as in the tokamak and magnetic mirror plasma fusion devices. The fluorescence signal, usually very weak and buried in the background of stray laser light and {ital H}{sub {alpha}} emission, is very difficult to extract and its measurements are inaccurate. This paper discusses the improvement of the signal extraction using two optical path laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) methods. One optical path carries the fluorescence signal and the background (the stray laser light and {ital H}{sub {alpha}} emission), whereas the other path carries only the background signal. By combining these two signals, a clean fluorescence signal can be isolated by subtracting out the background using a differential amplifier. The measurement is obtained instantaneously from these two signals which are taken simultaneously in one pulse rather than being extracted from two separate spectra taken in two sequential pulses (double pulses). This method, therefore, makes a significant improvement on the double pulse technique in terms of the accuracy of the measurement and the time resolution. Using this LIF technique the measurement of the neutral density profile in the exhaust of a tandem mirror plasma propulsion device is obtained and presented. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  7. Nitric oxide as a carcinogen. Analysis by yeast functional assay of inactivating p53 mutations induced by nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Jun-Ichi; Tada, Mitsuhiro; Sawamura, Yutaka; Shinohe, Yumiko; Abe, Hiroshi [Laboratory for Molecular Brain Research, Department of Neurosurgery, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Iggo, Richard D. [Oncogene group, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research ISREC, Epalinges (Switzerland)

    1997-10-06

    We have used a yeast p53 functional assay to study induction of mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene by nitric oxide and cytosine methylation. The yeast assay identifies only biologically important p53 mutations. p53 cDNA was treated with the nitric oxide donor sydnonimine, PCR-amplified and transfected into yeast. Sydnonimine produced a significant, dose-dependent increase in C:G->A:T transversions. Many important p53 mutational hotspots are postulated to arise by deamination of methylCpG in tumors. We therefore examined nitric oxide induction of mutations in p53 cDNA methylated by PCR-mediated substitution of 5-methylcytosine for cytosine or by treatment with the SssI CpG methylase. Both methylation procedures increased the baseline mutation rate, and nitric oxide treatment produced a further increase in mutation yield. Sequence analysis showed that methylation alone led to C:G->T:A transitions, whereas nitric oxide treatment simply produced more C:G->A:T transversions. Thus the most important factor in C:G->T:A transition at CpG sites identified in this experimental system is cytosine methylation, consistent with spontaneous conversion of 5-methylcytosine to thymine by deamination

  8. Novel OCT flushing technique for complex scenarios: imaging during iatrogenic transient AV block induced by intracoronary adenosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreckovic, Miodrag J; Jagic, Nikola B; Neskovic, Aleksandar N

    2014-11-01

    We report the application of a novel optical coherence tomography (OCT) flushing technique where OCT run was performed during transient complete atrioventricular block induced by intracoronary bolus of adenosine. This technique may allow lower hydraulic force needed for contrast flush and reduce artifacts, with consequently improved OCT imaging in demanding clinical scenarios.

  9. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Technique in Identification of Ancient Ceramics Bodies and Glazes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Khaled; Imam, Hisham; Madkour, Fatma; Meheina, Galila; Gamal, Yosr

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we report a study on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) as a promising non-destructive technique for the identification of the colored glazes, and clay's bodies of Fatimid ceramics ancient artifacts. The scientific examination of ceramics may be helpful in unraveling the history of ancient shards, particularly as the process of its production such as firing condition and temperatures. The analysis of pottery, ceramic bodies and glazed coatings is required in order to structure the conservation or restoration of a piece. Revealing the technical skills of ancient potters has been one of the most important issues for gaining a deep insight of bygone culture and also it is required in order to structure the conservation or restoration of a piece of art. LIBS measurements were carried out by focusing a Nd-YAG laser at 1064 nm with pulse width of 10 ns and 50 mJ pulse energy on the surface of the sample by a 100-mm focal length lens. The plasma emission was collected by telescopic system and transferred through a fiber to Echelle spectrometer attached to an ICCD camera. The focal spot diameter is found to be in the range of 100-150 μm. which is small enough to consider this technique as a non-destructive technique. LIBS technique clarified that each piece of archaeological objects has its own finger print. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was carried out on these archaeological ceramic body samples to study raw materials such as clays, which allowed the investigation of the crystal structure and showed the changes in its structure through firing process. This provided information on the ceramic characteristic and composition of the ceramic bodies.

  10. Optical nonlinearity of Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency in thermal vapor using the optical-heterodyne-detection technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Arup; Sahoo, Sushree S.; Mohapatra, Ashok K.

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the optical-heterodyne-detection technique to study the absorption and dispersion of a probe beam propagating through a medium with a narrow resonance. The technique has been demonstrated for Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency in rubidium thermal vapor and the optical nonlinearity of a probe beam with variable intensity has been studied. A quantitative comparison of the experimental result with a suitable theoretical model is presented. The limitations and the working regime of the technique are discussed.

  11. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line from a 36-year-old Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease patient with GJB1 mutation (CMTX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryeon Son

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX is inherited neurological disorder caused by gap junction beta 1 gene (GJB1 mutation. We generated induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line from 36-year-old CMTX disease patient by electroporation of skin fibroblasts with episomal vectors encoding OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, L-MYC, LIN28 and shRNA-p53. Established iPSCs expressed various pluripotency markers, had differentiation potential of three germ layers in vitro, had normal karyotype and retained GJB1 mutation. This CMT patient-derived iPSC line could be useful in vitro tool for CMTX research as disease modeling and drug development.

  12. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from an Alzheimer's disease patient carrying a M146I mutation in PSEN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tong; Pires, Carlota; Nielsen, Troels T; Waldemar, Gunhild; Hjermind, Lena E; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Dinnyes, Andras; Holst, Bjørn; Hyttel, Poul; Freude, Kristine K

    2016-03-01

    Skin fibroblasts were obtained from a 46-year-old symptomatic man carrying a M146I mutation in the presenilin 1 gene (PSEN1), responsible for causing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were derived via transfection with episomal vectors carrying hOCT4, hSOX2, hKLF2, hL-MYC, hLIN28 and shTP53 genes. M146I-iPSCs were free of genomically integrated reprogramming genes, had the specific mutation but no additional genomic aberrancies, expressed the expected pluripotency markers and displayed in vitro differentiation potential to the three germ layers. The reported M146I-iPSCs line may be a useful resource for in vitro modeling of familial AD. Copyright © 2016 University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from an Alzheimer's disease patient carrying a L150P mutation in PSEN-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubsuwan, Alisa; Pires, Carlota; Rasmussen, Mikkel A; Schmid, Benjamin; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Hjermind, Lena E; Hall, Vanessa; Nielsen, Troels T; Waldemar, Gunhild; Hyttel, Poul; Clausen, Christian; Kitiyanant, Narisorn; Freude, Kristine K; Holst, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were generated from skin fibroblasts isolated from a 58-year old male with a L150P mutation in the presenilin 1 (PSEN-1) gene, which is responsible for the majority of familial cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The iPSCs were established by co-electroporation with episomal plasmids containing hOCT4, hSOX2, hL-MYC, hKLF4, hNANOG, hLIN28, and short hairpin RNA against TP53. The iPSCs contained the specific heterozygous mutation c.449C>T, had normal karyotype, expressed the expected pluripotency genes and displayed in vitro differentiation potential to the three germ layers. The iPSCs may be useful for studying familial AD pathology in vitro. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from an Alzheimer's disease patient carrying an A79V mutation in PSEN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tong; Pires, Carlota; Nielsen, Troels T; Waldemar, Gunhild; Hjermind, Lena E; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Dinnyes, Andras; Hyttel, Poul; Freude, Kristine K

    2016-03-01

    Skin fibroblasts were obtained from a 48-year-old presymptomatic woman carrying a A79V mutation in the presenilin 1 gene (PSEN1), causing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs) were derived via transfection with episomal vectors carrying hOCT4, hSOX2, hKLF2, hL-MYC, hLIN28 and shTP53 genes. A79V-iPSCs were free of genomically integrated reprogramming genes, had the specific mutation but no additional genomic aberrancies, expressed the expected pluripotency markers and displayed in vitro differentiation potential to the three germ layers. The reported A79V-iPSCs line may be a useful resource for in vitro modeling of familial AD. Copyright © 2016 University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from an Alzheimer's disease patient carrying a M146I mutation in PSEN1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Skin fibroblasts were obtained from a 46-year-old symptomatic man carrying a M146I mutation in the presenilin 1 gene (PSEN1, responsible for causing Alzheimer's disease (AD. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs were derived via transfection with episomal vectors carrying hOCT4, hSOX2, hKLF2, hL-MYC, hLIN28 and shTP53 genes. M146I-iPSCs were free of genomically integrated reprogramming genes, had the specific mutation but no additional genomic aberrancies, expressed the expected pluripotency markers and displayed in vitro differentiation potential to the three germ layers. The reported M146I-iPSCs line may be a useful resource for in vitro modeling of familial AD.

  16. Derivation, Characterization, and Neural Differentiation of Integration-Free Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines from Parkinson's Disease Patients Carrying SNCA, LRRK2, PARK2, and GBA Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momcilovic, Olga; Sivapatham, Renuka; Oron, Tal Ronnen

    2016-01-01

    We report generation of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from ten Parkinson's disease (PD) patients carrying SNCA, PARK2, LRRK2, and GBA mutations, and one age-matched control. After validation of pluripotency, long-term genome stability, and integration-free reprogramming, eight...... of these lines (one of each SNCA, LRRK2 and GBA, four PARK2 lines, and the control) were differentiated into neural stem cells (NSC) and subsequently to dopaminergic cultures. We did not observe significant differences in the timeline of neural induction and NSC derivation between the patient and control line...... to identify alterations by large-scale evaluation. While gene expression profiling clearly distinguished cells at different stages of differentiation, no mutation-specific clustering or difference was observed, though consistent changes in patient lines were detected in genes associated mitochondrial biology...

  17. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from an Alzheimer's disease patient carrying an A79V mutation in PSEN1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Skin fibroblasts were obtained from a 48-year-old presymptomatic woman carrying a A79V mutation in the presenilin 1 gene (PSEN1, causing Alzheimer's disease (AD. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs were derived via transfection with episomal vectors carrying hOCT4, hSOX2, hKLF2, hL-MYC, hLIN28 and shTP53 genes. A79V-iPSCs were free of genomically integrated reprogramming genes, had the specific mutation but no additional genomic aberrancies, expressed the expected pluripotency markers and displayed in vitro differentiation potential to the three germ layers. The reported A79V-iPSCs line may be a useful resource for in vitro modeling of familial AD.

  18. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from a Bernard–Soulier syndrome patient carrying a W71R mutation in the GPIX gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Lopez-Onieva

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We generated an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line from a Bernard–Soulier Syndrome (BSS patient carrying the mutation p.Trp71Arg in the GPIX locus (BSS1-PBMC-iPS4F4. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were reprogrammed using heat sensitive non-integrative Sendai viruses containing the reprogramming factors Oct3/4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC. Successful silencing of the exogenous reprogramming factors was checked by RT-PCR. Characterization of BSS1-PBMC-iPS4F4 included mutation analysis of GPIX locus, Short Tandem Repeats (STR profiling, alkaline phosphatase enzymatic activity, analysis of conventional pluripotency-associated factors at mRNA and protein level and in vivo differentiation studies. BSS1-PBMC-iPS4F4 will provide a powerful tool to study BSS.

  19. Conjugation between quinolone-susceptible bacteria can generate mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region, inducing quinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitondo-Silva, André; Martins, Vinicius Vicente; Silva, Carolina Fávero da; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2015-02-01

    Quinolones are an important group of antibacterial agents that can inhibit DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV activity. DNA gyrase is responsible for maintaining bacteria in a negatively supercoiled state, being composed of subunits A and B. Topoisomerase IV is a homologue of DNA gyrase and consists of two subunits codified by the parC and parE genes. Mutations in gyrA and gyrB of DNA gyrase may confer resistance to quinolones, and the majority of resistant strains show mutations between positions 67 and 106 of gyrA, a region denoted the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR). The most frequent substitutions occur at positions 83 and 87, but little is known about the mechanisms promoting appearance of mutations in the QRDR. The present study proposes that some mutations in the QRDR could be generated as a result of the natural mechanism of conjugation between bacteria in their natural habitat. This event was observed following conjugation in vitro of two different isolates of quinolone-susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which transferred plasmids of different molecular weights to a recipient strain of Escherichia coli (HB101), also quinolone-susceptible, generating two different transconjugants that presented mutations in DNA gyrase and acquisition of resistance to all quinolones tested.

  20. Suppression of edr2-mediated powdery mildew resistance, cell death and ethylene-induced senescence by mutations in ALD1 in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haozhen Nie; Yingying Wu; Chunpeng Yao; Dingzhong Tang

    2011-01-01

    EDR2 is a negative regulator of the defense response and cell death in Arabidopsis. Loss-of-function of EDR2 leads to enhanced resistance to powdery mildew. To identify new components in the EDR2 signal transduction pathway, mutations that suppress edr2 resistant phenotypes were screened. Three mutants, edts5-1, edts5-2 and edts5-3 (edr (t)wo (s)uppressor 5), were identified. The EDTS5 gene was identified by map-based cloning and previously was shown to encode an aminotransferase (ALD1). Therefore we renamed these three alleles ald1-10, ald1-11 and ald1-12, respectively. Mutations in ALD1 suppressed all edr2-mediated phenotypes, including powdery mildew resistance, programmed cell death and ethylene-induced senescence. Accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in edr2 was also suppressed by ald1 mutation. The expression of defense-related genes was up-regulated in the edr2 mutant, and the up-regulation of those genes in edr2 was suppressed in the edr2/ald1 double mutant. The ald1 single mutant displayed delayed ethylene-induced senescence. In addition, ald1 mutation suppressed edr1-mediated powdery mildew resistance, but could not suppress the edr1/edr2 double-mutant phenotype. These data demonstrate that ALD1 plays important roles in edr2-mediated defense responses and senescence, and revealed a crosstalk between ethylene and salicylic acid signaling mediated by ALD1 and EDR2.

  1. Reduction of trophic support enhances apoptosis in PC12 cells expressing Alzheimer's APP mutation and sensitizes cells to staurosporine-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutz, Steffen; Steiner, Barbara; Marques, Celio A; Haass, Christian; Müller, Walter E; Eckert, Anne

    2002-06-01

    Mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene are known as causative factors in the pathogenesis of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). In this study, the influence of the Swedish double-mutation form of APP (APPsw; KM670/671NL) on apoptosis regulation in PC12 cells was investigated. APPsw-transfected PC12 cells were compared with wild-type APP (APPwt)-expressing and vector-transfected PC12 cells with regard to their susceptibility to cell death induced by the reduction of trophic support or by additional treatment with staurosporine. Expression of APPsw markedly enhanced the level of apoptotic PC12 cells induced by serum reduction. A similar hypersensitivity of APPsw-expressing PC12 cells could be detected after differentiation with nerve growth factor under serum-reduced conditions. Likewise, the expression of APPsw rendered PC12 cells more vulnerable to staurosporine but only under serum-reduced conditions. This APPsw-effect disappeared in high serum-containing medium. Thus, expression of APPsw seems to enhance cellular sensitivity not in general but after the reduction of trophic factors probably by causing oxidative stress. This, in turn, may sensitize cells to secondary apoptotic stimuli. Moreover, the mutation-specific increase in vulnerability to cell death was only seen at the stage of apoptotic nuclei, but not using methods measuring cell death by determining metabolic activity or membrane integrity. Therefore, the expression of APPsw seems to affect specifically apoptotic cell death rather than overall cell death in vitro. Our study further emphasizes the pathogenic role of mutant APP and may provide new insights in the mechanisms underlying the massive neurodegeneration in brain from patients bearing the APPsw mutation.

  2. Acceleration of 5-methylcytosine deamination in cyclobutane dimers by G and its implications for UV-induced C-to-T mutation hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannistraro, Vincent J; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2009-10-01

    Sunlight-induced C-->T mutation hotspots occur most frequently at methylated CpG sites in tumor suppressor genes and are thought to arise from translesion synthesis past deaminated cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). While it is known that methylation enhances CPD formation in sunlight, little is known about the effect of methylation and sequence context on the deamination of 5-methylcytosine ((m)C) and its contribution to mutagenesis at these hotspots. Using an enzymatic method, we have determined the yields and deamination rates of C and (m)C in CPDs and find that the frequency of UVB-induced CPDs correlates with the oxidation potential of the flanking bases. We also found that the deamination of T(m)C and (m)CT CPDs is about 25-fold faster when flanked by G's than by A's, C's or T's in duplex DNA and appears to involve catalysis by the O6 group of guanine. In contrast, the first deamination of either C or (m)C in AC(m)CG with a flanking G was much slower (t(1/2) >250 h) and rate limiting, while the second deamination was much faster. The observation that C(m)CG dimers deaminate very slowly but at the same time correlate with C-->T mutation hotspots suggests that their repair must be slow enough to allow sufficient time for deamination. There are, however, a greater number of single C-->T mutations than CC-->TT mutations at C(m)CG sites even though the second deamination is very fast, which could reflect faster repair of doubly deaminated dimers.

  3. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: A versatile technique of elemental analysis and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rai, V N

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the state of art technology of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Research on LIBS is gaining momentum in the field of instrumentation and data analysis technique due to its wide application in various field particularly in environmental monitoring and in industry. The main focus is on its miniaturization for field application and on increasing its sensitivity. The sensitivity of LIBS has been increased by confining the laser produced plasma using external magnetic field as well as using two successive laser pulse excitation of plasma. LIBS has capability for simultaneous multi element determination, localized microanalysis, surface analysis and has been used successfully for determination and identification of hazardous explosive and biological samples. Experimental findings of LIBS study in different applications have been discussed.

  4. Sensing Technique Using Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Integrated with Micro-droplet Ejection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ikezawa

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS using micro-droplet NaCl solution is described. Since the 1980s, many liquid micronizing techniques for LIBS measurements have been reported. In this study, micro-droplet ejection systems for sampling are designed and presented for two volumes. These micro-droplet ejection systems enable a constant volume of the sample liquid to be obtained and they take advantage of the liquid physical state; the density of the solution can be controlled accurately. The methods presented here generate small droplets (diameter 30 or 50 μm by confining the entire volume of the sample material in the laser beam spot area (minimum beam spot diameter: 53.2 μm and separating it from its surroundings. Using these liquid micronizing methods, improved sensitivities are obtained for drawing calibration curves for quantitative LIBS measurements.

  5. Formation and Characterization of Alaminum Thin Films Produced by Laser Induced Forward Transfer Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafie A. ALMUSLET

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Picoseconds Nd – YAG laser was used in this work to irradiate pure samples of Aluminum (Al and produce plasma. The plasma plume was deposited as thin films, using Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT technique, on two different types of substrate; the first one from copper and the second one from agate (SiO2. The thin films were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM and Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-rays (EDAX, in addition to scratch and scotch-tape for adhesion test. The effects of laser power density, the target thickness and the type of substrate on the homogeneity and adhesion of the films were investigated. The best conditions were: 2∙1013 W/cm2 laser power density, 2 µm target thickness and agate substrate. Al thin films with high quality were deduced using these conditions.

  6. Nitric oxide induces ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein-dependent γH2AX protein formation in pancreatic β cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleson, Bryndon J; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Schreiber, Katherine H; Tarakanova, Vera L; Corbett, John A

    2014-04-18

    In this study, the effects of cytokines on the activation of the DNA double strand break repair factors histone H2AX (H2AX) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) were examined in pancreatic β cells. We show that cytokines stimulate H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX formation) in rat islets and insulinoma cells in a nitric oxide- and ATM-dependent manner. In contrast to the well documented role of ATM in DNA repair, ATM does not appear to participate in the repair of nitric oxide-induced DNA damage. Instead, nitric oxide-induced γH2AX formation correlates temporally with the onset of irreversible DNA damage and the induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, inhibition of ATM attenuates cytokine-induced caspase activation. These findings show that the formation of DNA double strand breaks correlates with ATM activation, irreversible DNA damage, and ATM-dependent induction of apoptosis in cytokine-treated β cells.

  7. The use of laser-induced plasma spectroscopy technique for the characterization of boiler tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolas, G. [Universidad de A Coruna, Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial II, E-15403 Ferrol (A Coruna) (Spain)], E-mail: gines@cdf.udc.es; Mateo, M.P.; Yanez, A. [Universidad de A Coruna, Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial II, E-15403 Ferrol (A Coruna) (Spain)

    2007-12-15

    The present work focuses on the characterization of boiler tube walls using laser-induced plasma spectroscopy technique with visual inspection by optical and scanning electron microscopy of the cross-sections of these tubes. In a watertube boiler, water runs through tubes that are surrounded by a heating source. As a result, the water is heated to very high temperatures, causing accumulation of deposits on the inside surfaces of the tubes. These deposits play an important role in the efficiency of the boiler tube because they produce a reduction of the boiler heat rate and an increase in the number of tube failures. The objectives are to determine the thickness and arrangement of deposits located on the highest heat area of the boiler and compare them with tube parts where the heat flux is lower. The major deposits found were copper and magnetite. These deposits come mainly from the boiler feedwater and from the reaction between iron and water, and they do not form on the tube walls at a uniform rate over time. Their amount depends on the areas where they are collected. A Nd:YAG laser operating at 355 nm has been used to perform laser-induced plasma spectra and depth profiles of the deposits.

  8. Positron Annihilation Induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy of Inner Shell Transitions Using Time-Of Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuping; Jiang, Neng; Weiss, A. H.

    2003-03-01

    Positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy (PAES) has been shown to have unique advantages over conventional electron collision induced Auger techniques, including the ability to eliminate the secondary electron background and selectively probe the top-most atomic layer on the sample surface. Here we report on the development of a new time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer which combines features high efficiency magnetic transport and parrallel energy measurment with high resolution by using an innovative timing method. The new TOF-PAES system, was used to make the first quantitative comparative measurements of the Auger intensities associated with the annihilation of positrons with the deep core levels (1s) of S KLL (180eV), C KLL (270eV), N KLL (360eV), and O KLL (510eV). Experimental results of Auger probabilities at outer core level (3s, 3P) of Cu M2,3VV (60eV), M1VV (105eV) are compared with the theoretical value of Jensen and Weiss. Quantitatively study the surface adsorbate process on Cu is performed and concentration changes of surface components are obtained. These results demonstrate that TOF-PAES can be used to obtain quantitative,top-layer specific, information from chemically important elements including those with relatively deep core levels (e.g. C and O).

  9. Techniques to distinguish between electron and photon induced events using segmented germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroeninger, K.

    2007-06-05

    Two techniques to distinguish between electron and photon induced events in germanium detectors were studied: (1) anti-coincidence requirements between the segments of segmented germanium detectors and (2) the analysis of the time structure of the detector response. An 18-fold segmented germanium prototype detector for the GERDA neutrinoless double beta-decay experiment was characterized. The rejection of photon induced events was measured for the strongest lines in {sup 60}Co, {sup 152}Eu and {sup 228}Th. An accompanying Monte Carlo simulation was performed and the results were compared to data. An overall agreement with deviations of the order of 5-10% was obtained. The expected background index of the GERDA experiment was estimated. The sensitivity of the GERDA experiment was determined. Special statistical tools were developed to correctly treat the small number of events expected. The GERDA experiment uses a cryogenic liquid as the operational medium for the germanium detectors. It was shown that germanium detectors can be reliably operated through several cooling cycles. (orig.)

  10. Application of background-oriented schlieren (BOS) technique to a laser-induced underwater shock wave

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Shota; Kameda, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    We build an ultra-high-speed imaging system based on the background-oriented schlieren (BOS) technique in order to capture a laser-induced underwater shock wave. This BOS technique is able to provide two-dimensional density-gradient field of fluid and requires a simple setup. The imaging system consists of an ultra-high speed video camera, a laser stroboscope, and a patterned background. This system takes images every 0.2 $\\mu$s. Furthermore, since the density change of water disturbed by the shock is exceedingly small, the system has high spatial resolution $\\sim$ 10 $\\mu$m/pixel. Using this BOS system, we examine temporal position of a shock wave. The position agrees well with that measured by conventional shadowgraph, which indicates that the high-speed imaging system can successfully capture the instantaneous position of the underwater shock wave that propagates with the speed of about 1500 m/s. The local density gradient can be determined up to $O$(10$^3$ kg/m$^4$), which is confirmed by the gradient est...

  11. Uncertainty in Estimation of Bioenergy Induced Lulc Change: Development of a New Change Detection Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N.; Vatsavai, R. R.; Patlolla, D.; Bhaduri, B. L.; Lim, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent estimates of bioenergy induced land use land cover change (LULCC) have large uncertainty due to misclassification errors in the LULC datasets used for analysis. These uncertainties are further compounded when data is modified by merging classes, aggregating pixels and change in classification methods over time. Hence the LULCC computed using these derived datasets is more a reflection of change in classification methods, change in input data and data manipulation rather than reflecting actual changes ion ground. Furthermore results are constrained by geographic extent, update frequency and resolution of the dataset. To overcome this limitation we have developed a change detection system to identify yearly as well as seasonal changes in LULC patterns. Our method uses hierarchical clustering which works by grouping objects into a hierarchy based on phenological similarity of different vegetation types. The algorithm explicitly models vegetation phenology to reduce spurious changes. We apply our technique on globally available Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) NDVI data at 250-meter resolution. We analyze 10 years of bi-weekly data to predict changes in the mid-western US as a case study. The results of our analysis are presented and its advantages over existing techniques are discussed.

  12. Techniques of Human Embryonic Stem Cell and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Jarosław; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2016-10-01

    Developing procedures for the derivation of human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) gave rise to novel pathways into regenerative medicine research. For many years, stem cells have attracted attention as a potentially unlimited cell source for cellular therapy in neurodegenerative disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and spinal cord injuries, for example. In these studies, adult stem cells were insufficient; therefore, many attempts were made to obtain PSCs by other means. This review discusses key issues concerning the techniques of pluripotent cell acquisition. Technical and ethical issues hindered the medical use of somatic cell nuclear transfer and embryonic stem cells. Therefore, induced PSCs (iPSCs) emerged as a powerful technique with great potential for clinical applications, patient-specific disease modelling and pharmaceutical studies. The replacement of viral vectors or the administration of analogous proteins or chemical compounds during cell reprogramming are modifications designed to reduce tumorigenesis risk and to augment the procedure efficiency. Intensified analysis of new PSC lines revealed other barriers to overcome, such as epigenetic memory, disparity between human and mouse pluripotency, and variable response to differentiation of some iPSC lines. Thus, multidimensional verification must be conducted to fulfil strict clinical-grade requirements. Nevertheless, the first clinical trials in patients with spinal cord injury and macular dystrophy were recently carried out with differentiated iPSCs, encouraging alternative strategies for potential autologous cellular therapies.

  13. In utero exposure to nanosized carbon black (Printex90) does not induce tandem repeat mutations in female murine germ cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anne Mette Zenner; Shipley, Thomas; Jackson, Petra

    2013-01-01

    J mice were exposed four times during gestation by intratracheal instillation of 67μg/animal of nanosized carbon black Printex90 or vehicle (gestation days 7, 10, 15 and 18). Female offspring were raised to maturity and mated with unexposed CBA males. Expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) germline...... mutation rates in the resulting F2 generation were determined from full pedigrees (mother, father, offspring) of F1 female mice (178 CB-exposed and 258 control F2 offspring). ESTR mutation rates in CB-exposed F2 female offspring were not statistically different from those of F2 female control offspring....

  14. Human biallelic MFN2 mutations induce mitochondrial dysfunction, upper body adipose hyperplasia, and suppression of leptin expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, Nuno; Bulger, David A; Frontini, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    body adipose overgrowth. We describe similar massive adipose overgrowth with suppressed leptin expression in four further patients with biallelic MFN2 mutations and at least one p.Arg707Trp allele. Overgrown tissue was composed of normal-sized, UCP1-negative unilocular adipocytes, with mitochondrial...... normal in skin fibroblasts. These findings suggest that specific MFN2 mutations cause tissue-selective mitochondrial dysfunction with increased adipocyte proliferation and survival, confirm a novel form of excess adiposity with paradoxical suppression of leptin expression, and suggest potential targeted...

  15. DFNB59 Gene Mutation Screening Using PCR-SSCP/HA Technique in Non-syndromic Genetic Hearing Loss in Bushehr Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Azadegan Dehkordi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hearing impairment (HI is the most prevalent Neurosensory disorder which is heterogenous and can also occur due to environmental causes. The majority of hearing deficiencies are of genetic origin affecting about 60% of the HI cases. A novel gene DFNB59 encodes pejvakin has been recently shown to cause deafness. This study aims to determine the frequency of DFNB59 gene mutations in coding region the gene in Bushehr province. Methods: In this descriptive experimental study, we investigated the presence of DFNB59 gene mutations in Exons (2-7 of the gene in 80 deaf subjects. DNA was extracted using standard phenol –chloroform method. The screening of gene mutations was performed by PCR-SSCP/HA procedure. Finally, the possible mutations were confirmed by direct sequencing. Results: In all, 9 polymorphisms 793C>G were found in 80 non-syndromic, genetic hearing loss subjects studied. However no DFNB59 gene mutation was identified. Conclusion: We conclude that the association of DFNB59 gene mutations with hearing loss is very low in samples studies

  16. Tuning of Block Copolymer Membrane Morphology through Water Induced Phase Inversion Technique

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima

    2016-06-01

    Isoporous membranes are attractive for the regulation and detection of transport at the molecular level. A well-defined asymmetric membranes from diblock copolymers with an ordered nanoporous membrane morphologies were fabricated by the combination of block copolymer self-assembly and non-solvent-induced phase separation (NIPS) technique. This is a straightforward and fast one step procedure to develop integrally anisotropic (“asymmetric”) membranes having isoporous top selective layer. Membranes prepared via this method exhibit an anisotropic cross section with a thin separation layer supported from underneath a macroporous support. These membrane poses cylindrical pore structure with ordered nanopores across the entire membrane surfaces with pore size in the range from 20 to 40 nm. Tuning the pore morphology of the block copolymer membranes before and after fabrication are of great interest. In this thesis, we first investigated the pore morphology tuning of asymmetric block copolymer membrane by complexing with small organic molecules. We found that the occurrence of hydrogen-bond formation between PS-b-P4VP block copolymer and –OH/ –COOH functionalized organic molecules significantly tunes the pore morphology of asymmetric nanoporous membranes. In addition, we studied the complexation behavior of ionic liquids with PS-b-P4VP block copolymer in solutions and investigated their effect on final membrane morphology during the non-solvent induced phase separation process. We found that non-protic ionic liquids facilitate the formation of hexagonal nanoporous block copolymer structure, while protic ionic liquids led to a lamella-structured membrane. Secondly, we demonstrated the catalytic activity of the gold nanoparticle-enhanced hollow fiber membranes by the reduction of nitrophenol. Also, we systematically investigated the pore morphology of isoporous PS-b-P4VP using 3D imaging technique. Thirdly, we developed well-distributed silver nanoparticles on the

  17. Curcumin inhibits growth potential by G1 cell cycle arrest and induces apoptosis in p53-mutated COLO 320DM human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasiram, Jade Dhananjay; Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Kannan, Janani; Kotteeswaran, Venkatesan; Sivalingam, Nageswaran

    2017-02-01

    Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic compound and it is isolated from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, have been reported to possess anticancer effect against stage I and II colon cancer. However, the effect of curcumin on colon cancer at Dukes' type C metastatic stage III remains still unclear. In the present study, we have investigated the anticancer effects of curcumin on p53 mutated COLO 320DM human colon adenocarcinoma cells derived from Dukes' type C metastatic stage. The cellular viability and proliferation were assessed by trypan blue exclusion assay and MTT assay, respectively. The cytotoxicity effect was examined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) cytotoxicity assay. Apoptosis was analyzed by DNA fragmentation analysis, Hoechst and propidium iodide double fluorescent staining and confocal microscopy analysis. Cell cycle distribution was performed by flow cytometry analysis. Here we have observed that curcumin treatment significantly inhibited the cellular viability and proliferation potential of p53 mutated COLO 320DM cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, curcumin treatment showed no cytotoxic effects to the COLO 320DM cells. DNA fragmentation analysis, Hoechst and propidium iodide double fluorescent staining and confocal microscopy analysis revealed that curcumin treatment induced apoptosis in COLO 320DM cells. Furthermore, curcumin caused cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, decreased the cell population in the S phase and induced apoptosis in COLO 320DM colon adenocarcinoma cells. Together, these data suggest that curcumin exerts anticancer effects and induces apoptosis in p53 mutated COLO 320DM human colon adenocarcinoma cells derived from Dukes' type C metastatic stage.

  18. Autism-associated R451C mutation in neuroligin3 leads to activation of the unfolded protein response in a PC12 Tet-On inducible system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Lisa; Favaloro, Flores Lietta; Trobiani, Laura; Marchetti, Valentina; Patel, Vruti; Pascucci, Tiziana; Comoletti, Davide; Marciniak, Stefan J; De Jaco, Antonella

    2016-02-15

    Several forms of monogenic heritable autism spectrum disorders are associated with mutations in the neuroligin genes. The autism-linked substitution R451C in neuroligin3 induces local misfolding of its extracellular domain, causing partial retention in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) of expressing cells. We have generated a PC12 Tet-On cell model system with inducible expression of wild-type or R451C neuroligin3 to investigate whether there is activation of the UPR (unfolded protein response) as a result of misfolded protein retention. As a positive control for protein misfolding, we also expressed the mutant G221R neuroligin3, which is known to be completely retained within the ER. Our data show that overexpression of either R451C or G221R mutant proteins leads to the activation of all three signalling branches of the UPR downstream of the stress sensors ATF6 (activating transcription factor 6), IRE1 (inositol-requiring enzyme 1) and PERK [PKR (dsRNA-dependent protein kinase)-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase]. Each branch displayed different activation profiles that partially correlated with the degree of misfolding caused by each mutation. We also show that up-regulation of BiP (immunoglobulin heavy-chain-binding protein) and CHOP [C/EBP (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein)-homologous protein] was induced by both mutant proteins but not by wild-type neuroligin3, both in proliferative cells and cells differentiated to a neuron-like phenotype. Collectively, our data show that mutant R451C neuroligin3 activates the UPR in a novel cell model system, suggesting that this cellular response may have a role in monogenic forms of autism characterized by misfolding mutations.

  19. Visible Light-Responsive Platinum-Containing Titania Nanoparticle-Mediated Photocatalysis Induces Nucleotide Insertion, Deletion and Substitution Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-Shan Sun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventional photocatalysts are primarily stimulated using ultraviolet (UV light to elicit reactive oxygen species and have wide applications in environmental and energy fields, including self-cleaning surfaces and sterilization. Because UV illumination is hazardous to humans, visible light-responsive photocatalysts (VLRPs were discovered and are now applied to increase photocatalysis. However, fundamental questions regarding the ability of VLRPs to trigger DNA mutations and the mutation types it elicits remain elusive. Here, through plasmid transformation and β-galactosidase α-complementation analyses, we observed that visible light-responsive platinum-containing titania (TiO2 nanoparticle (NP-mediated photocatalysis considerably reduces the number of Escherichia coli transformants. This suggests that such photocatalytic reactions cause DNA damage. DNA sequencing results demonstrated that the DNA damage comprises three mutation types, namely nucleotide insertion, deletion and substitution; this is the first study to report the types of mutations occurring after photocatalysis by TiO2-VLRPs. Our results may facilitate the development and appropriate use of new-generation TiO2 NPs for biomedical applications.

  20. Targeted correction of a thalassemia-associated beta-globin mutation induced by pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonkar, Pallavi; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kuan, Jean Y

    2009-01-01

    Beta-thalassemia is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the beta-globin gene. Triplex-forming oligonucleotides and triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in mammalian cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures...

  1. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) pathogenic mutations induce mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic death in transmitochondrial cells incubated with galactose medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghelli, Anna; Zanna, Claudia; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Schapira, Anthony H V; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Carelli, Valerio; Rugolo, Michela

    2003-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a maternally inherited form of central vision loss, is associated with mitochondrial DNA pathogenic point mutations affecting different subunits of complex I. We here report that osteosarcoma-derived cytoplasmic hybrids (cybrid) cell lines harboring one of the three most frequent LHON pathogenic mutations, at positions 11778/ND4, 3460/ND1, and 14484/ND6, undergo cell death when galactose replaces glucose in the medium, contrary to control cybrids that maintain some growth capabilities. This is a well known way to produce a metabolic stress, forcing the cells to rely on the mitochondrial respiratory chain to produce ATP. We demonstrate that LHON cybrid cell death is apoptotic, showing chromatin condensation and nuclear DNA laddering. Moreover, we also document the mitochondrial involvement in the activation of the apoptotic cascade, as shown by the increased release of cytochrome c into the cytosol in LHON cybrid cells as compared with controls. Cybrids bearing the 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6 mutations seemed more readily prone to undergo apoptosis as compared with the 11778/ND4 mutation. In conclusion, LHON cybrid cells forced by the reduced rate of glycolytic flux to utilize oxidative metabolism are sensitized to an apoptotic death through a mechanism involving mitochondria.

  2. [Effect of the female genotype on the yield of dominant lethal mutations induced by thiophosphamide in mature mouse spermia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korogodina, Iu V

    1980-02-01

    On crossing of thiophosphamide treated CBA males to untreated A/He, C57BL/6, C57BL/Mib and fidget females the lowest output of dominant lethal mutations was found in progeny of C57BL/Mib females. It is suggested that the ceparation of premutational lesions is most effective in egg cells of this strain.

  3. Visible Light-Responsive Platinum-Containing Titania Nanoparticle-Mediated Photocatalysis Induces Nucleotide Insertion, Deletion and Substitution Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Der-Shan; Tseng, Yao-Hsuan; Wu, Wen-Shiang; Wong, Ming-Show; Chang, Hsin-Hou

    2016-12-28

    Conventional photocatalysts are primarily stimulated using ultraviolet (UV) light to elicit reactive oxygen species and have wide applications in environmental and energy fields, including self-cleaning surfaces and sterilization. Because UV illumination is hazardous to humans, visible light-responsive photocatalysts (VLRPs) were discovered and are now applied to increase photocatalysis. However, fundamental questions regarding the ability of VLRPs to trigger DNA mutations and the mutation types it elicits remain elusive. Here, through plasmid transformation and β-galactosidase α-complementation analyses, we observed that visible light-responsive platinum-containing titania (TiO₂) nanoparticle (NP)-mediated photocatalysis considerably reduces the number of Escherichia coli transformants. This suggests that such photocatalytic reactions cause DNA damage. DNA sequencing results demonstrated that the DNA damage comprises three mutation types, namely nucleotide insertion, deletion and substitution; this is the first study to report the types of mutations occurring after photocatalysis by TiO₂-VLRPs. Our results may facilitate the development and appropriate use of new-generation TiO₂ NPs for biomedical applications.

  4. Evidence for dominant suppression of repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) in crosses with the wild-isolated Neurospora crassa strains Sugartown and Adiopodoume-7

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Felicite K. Noubissi; K. Aparna; Kevin McCluskey; Durgadas P. Kasbekar

    2001-08-01

    A convenient assay to score repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) in Neurospora employs the erg-3 locus as a mutagenesis target. Using this assay we screened 132 wild-isolated Neurospora crassa strains for ability to dominantly suppress RIP. RIP was exceptionally inefficient in crosses with the wild isolates Sugartown (P0854) and Adiopodoume-7 (P4305), thereby suggesting the presence of dominant RIP suppressors in these strains. In other experiments, we found no evidence for dominant RIP suppression by the Spore killer haplotypes Sk-2 and Sk-3.

  5. Fast homozygosity mapping and identification of a zebrafish ENU-induced mutation by whole-genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voz, Marianne L; Coppieters, Wouter; Manfroid, Isabelle; Baudhuin, Ariane; Von Berg, Virginie; Charlier, Carole; Meyer, Dirk; Driever, Wolfgang; Martial, Joseph A; Peers, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Forward genetics using zebrafish is a powerful tool for studying vertebrate development through large-scale mutagenesis. Nonetheless, the identification of the molecular lesion is still laborious and involves time-consuming genetic mapping. Here, we show that high-throughput sequencing of the whole zebrafish genome can directly locate the interval carrying the causative mutation and at the same time pinpoint the molecular lesion. The feasibility of this approach was validated by sequencing the m1045 mutant line that displays a severe hypoplasia of the exocrine pancreas. We generated 13 Gb of sequence, equivalent to an eightfold genomic coverage, from a pool of 50 mutant embryos obtained from a map-cross between the AB mutant carrier and the WIK polymorphic strain. The chromosomal region carrying the causal mutation was localized based on its unique property to display high levels of homozygosity among sequence reads as it derives exclusively from the initial AB mutated allele. We developed an algorithm identifying such a region by calculating a homozygosity score along all chromosomes. This highlighted an 8-Mb window on chromosome 5 with a score close to 1 in the m1045 mutants. The sequence analysis of all genes within this interval revealed a nonsense mutation in the snapc4 gene. Knockdown experiments confirmed the assertion that snapc4 is the gene whose mutation leads to exocrine pancreas hypoplasia. In conclusion, this study constitutes a proof-of-concept that whole-genome sequencing is a fast and effective alternative to the classical positional cloning strategies in zebrafish.

  6. Fast homozygosity mapping and identification of a zebrafish ENU-induced mutation by whole-genome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne L Voz

    Full Text Available Forward genetics using zebrafish is a powerful tool for studying vertebrate development through large-scale mutagenesis. Nonetheless, the identification of the molecular lesion is still laborious and involves time-consuming genetic mapping. Here, we show that high-throughput sequencing of the whole zebrafish genome can directly locate the interval carrying the causative mutation and at the same time pinpoint the molecular lesion. The feasibility of this approach was validated by sequencing the m1045 mutant line that displays a severe hypoplasia of the exocrine pancreas. We generated 13 Gb of sequence, equivalent to an eightfold genomic coverage, from a pool of 50 mutant embryos obtained from a map-cross between the AB mutant carrier and the WIK polymorphic strain. The chromosomal region carrying the causal mutation was localized based on its unique property to display high levels of homozygosity among sequence reads as it derives exclusively from the initial AB mutated allele. We developed an algorithm identifying such a region by calculating a homozygosity score along all chromosomes. This highlighted an 8-Mb window on chromosome 5 with a score close to 1 in the m1045 mutants. The sequence analysis of all genes within this interval revealed a nonsense mutation in the snapc4 gene. Knockdown experiments confirmed the assertion that snapc4 is the gene whose mutation leads to exocrine pancreas hypoplasia. In conclusion, this study constitutes a proof-of-concept that whole-genome sequencing is a fast and effective alternative to the classical positional cloning strategies in zebrafish.

  7. The Connexin40A96S mutation from a patient with atrial fibrillation causes decreased atrial conduction velocities and sustained episodes of induced atrial fibrillation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübkemeier, Indra; Andrié, René; Lickfett, Lars; Bosen, Felicitas; Stöckigt, Florian; Dobrowolski, Radoslaw; Draffehn, Astrid M; Fregeac, Julien; Schultze, Joachim L; Bukauskas, Feliksas F; Schrickel, Jan Wilko; Willecke, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of cardiac arrhythmia and a major cause of stroke. In the mammalian heart the gap junction proteins connexin40 (Cx40) and connexin43 (Cx43) are strongly expressed in the atrial myocardium mediating effective propagation of electrical impulses. Different heterozygous mutations in the coding region for Cx40 were identified in patients with AF. We have generated transgenic Cx40A96S mice harboring one of these mutations, the loss-of-function Cx40A96S mutation, as a model for atrial fibrillation. Cx40A96S mice were characterized by immunochemical and electrophysiological analyses. Significantly reduced atrial conduction velocities and strongly prolonged episodes of atrial fibrillation were found after induction in Cx40A96S mice. Analyses of the gating properties of Cx40A96S channels in cultured HeLa cells also revealed significantly lower junctional conductance and enhanced sensitivity voltage gating of Cx40A96S in comparison to Cx40 wild-type gap junctions. This is caused by reduced open probabilities of Cx40A96S gap junction channels, while single channel conductance remained the same. Similar to the corresponding patient, heterozygous Cx40A96S mice revealed normal expression levels and localization of the Cx40 protein. We conclude that heterozygous Cx40A96S mice exhibit prolonged episodes of induced atrial fibrillation and severely reduced atrial conduction velocities similar to the corresponding human patient.

  8. Molecular dynamics of mesophilic-like mutants of a cold-adapted enzyme: insights into distal effects induced by the mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Papaleo

    Full Text Available Networks and clusters of intramolecular interactions, as well as their "communication" across the three-dimensional architecture have a prominent role in determining protein stability and function. Special attention has been dedicated to their role in thermal adaptation. In the present contribution, seven previously experimentally characterized mutants of a cold-adapted α-amylase, featuring mesophilic-like behavior, have been investigated by multiple molecular dynamics simulations, essential dynamics and analyses of correlated motions and electrostatic interactions. Our data elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the ability of single and multiple mutations to globally modulate dynamic properties of the cold-adapted α-amylase, including both local and complex unpredictable distal effects. Our investigation also shows, in agreement with the experimental data, that the conversion of the cold-adapted enzyme in a warm-adapted variant cannot be completely achieved by the introduction of few mutations, also providing the rationale behind these effects. Moreover, pivotal residues, which are likely to mediate the effects induced by the mutations, have been identified from our analyses, as well as a group of suitable candidates for protein engineering. In fact, a subset of residues here identified (as an isoleucine, or networks of mesophilic-like salt bridges in the proximity of the catalytic site should be considered, in experimental studies, to get a more efficient modification of the features of the cold-adapted enzyme.

  9. In silico reversal of repeat-induced point mutation (RIP identifies the origins of repeat families and uncovers obscured duplicated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hane James K

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP is a fungal genome defence mechanism guarding against transposon invasion. RIP mutates the sequence of repeated DNA and over time renders the affected regions unrecognisable by similarity search tools such as BLAST. Results DeRIP is a new software tool developed to predict the original sequence of a RIP-mutated region prior to the occurrence of RIP. In this study, we apply deRIP to the genome of the wheat pathogen Stagonospora nodorum SN15 and predict the origin of several previously uncharacterised classes of repetitive DNA. Conclusions Five new classes of transposon repeats and four classes of endogenous gene repeats were identified after deRIP. The deRIP process is a new tool for fungal genomics that facilitates the identification and understanding of the role and origin of fungal repetitive DNA. DeRIP is open-source and is available as part of the RIPCAL suite at http://www.sourceforge.net/projects/ripcal.

  10. Dilated cardiomyopathy mutation (R134W in mouse cardiac troponin T induces greater contractile deficits against α-myosin heavy chain than against β-myosin heavy chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampath K Gollapudi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have demonstrated that depressed myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity is common to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM in humans. However, it remains unclear whether a single determinant — such as myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity — is sufficient to characterize all cases of DCM because the severity of disease varies widely with a given mutation. Because dynamic features dominate in the heart muscle, alterations in dynamic contractile parameters may offer better insight on the molecular mechanisms that underlie disparate effects of DCM mutations on cardiac phenotypes. Dynamic features are dominated by myofilament cooperativity that stem from different sources. One such source is the strong tropomyosin binding region in troponin T (TnT, which is known to modulate crossbridge (XB recruitment dynamics in a myosin heavy chain (MHC-dependent manner. Therefore, we hypothesized that the effects of DCM-linked mutations in TnT on contractile dynamics would be differently modulated by α- and β-MHC. After reconstitution with the mouse TnT equivalent (TnTR134W of the human DCM mutation (R131W, we measured dynamic contractile parameters in detergent-skinned cardiac muscle fiber bundles from normal (α-MHC and transgenic mice (β-MHC. TnTR134W significantly attenuated the rate constants of tension redevelopment, XB recruitment dynamics, XB distortion dynamics, and the magnitude of length-mediated XB recruitment only in α-MHC fiber bundles. TnTR134W decreased myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity to a greater extent in α-MHC (0.14 pCa units than in β-MHC fiber bundles (0.08 pCa units. Thus, our data demonstrate that TnTR134W induces a more severe DCM-like contractile phenotype against α-MHC than against β-MHC background.

  11. Remote measurement of photosynthetic efficiency using laser induced fluorescence transient (LIFT) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieruschka, R.; Rascher, U.; Klimov, D.; Kolber, Z. S.; Berry, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    An understanding of spatial and temporal diversity of photosynthetic processes, water and energy exchange of complex plant canopies is essential for carbon and climate models. Remote sensing from space or aircraft platforms provides the only practical way to characterize the vast extent of plant canopies around the globe, but the basis for relating physiological processes to remote sensing is still largely theoretical. Experiments that bridge this gap are needed. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements have been widely applied to quantify photosynthetic efficiency and non- photochemical energy dissipation non-destructively in photosynthetically active organisms. The most commonly used Pulse Amplitude Modulated (PAM) technique provides a saturating light pulse and is not practical at the canopy scale. We report here on a recently developed technique, Laser Induced Fluorescence Transient (LIFT), capable of remote measurement of photosynthetic efficiency of selected leaves at a distance of up to 50 m and we present here continuous studies on plans growing under natural conditions during the beginning of the winter season and the onset of summer drought in this Mediterranean climate. i) Lichens showed a strong diurnal variation in photosynthetic efficiency which correlated with relative humidity; ii) Photosynthetic efficiency of annual grass decreased with progressing drought stress; iii) An oak canopy showed very little variation of quantum yield from leaf out in spring to summer; iv) The combined effect of low temperature and high light intensity during an early winter strongly reduced the photosynthetic efficiency of four different species in response to chilling stress. These measures with the LIFT correlated well with (more limited) sampling by PAM fluoromentry and gas exchange. The ability to make continuous, automatic and remote measurements of photosynthetic efficiency of leaves with the LIFT provides a new approach for studying the heterogeneity of

  12. Conductive silver ink printing through the laser-induced forward transfer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florian, C.; Caballero-Lucas, F.; Fernández-Pradas, J.M. [Departament de Física Aplicada i Òptica, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Artigas, R. [Sensofar-Tech S.L., Parc Audiovisual de Catalunya, Crta. BV1274 Km1, E-08225 Terrassa (Spain); Ogier, S. [Center for Process Innovation Ltd, The Wilton Centre, TS10 4RF Cleveland (United Kingdom); Karnakis, D. [Oxford Lasers Ltd, Unit 8 Moorbrook Park, OX11 7HP Didcot (United Kingdom); Serra, P., E-mail: pserra@ub.edu [Departament de Física Aplicada i Òptica, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • We have devised a strategy which allows eliminating the bulging problem during the LIFT of conductive lines. • The strategy consists of the alternate deposition of two sets of non-overlapping droplets with an intermediate drying step. • The process allows mitigating capillary flows along the printed line which are responsible for bulging and line breakup. • Conductivity measurements of laser cured lines prove the feasibility of the technique for the fabrication of interconnects. - Abstract: Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a technique which allows printing a wide variety of materials. It presents several advantages over inkjet printing, such as a potentially higher resolution, being free from clogging issues, and the possibility to work with a much broader range of viscosities. LIFT appears, therefore, as an interesting alternative in all those fields where miniaturization is a major requirement, as in the microelectronics industry. The fabrication of electronic devices requires the printing of small, narrow and thin conductive lines, and in this work we investigate the printing of continuous lines of conductive silver ink on glass substrates through LIFT. Lines are initially formed through sequentially printing adjacent droplets with different overlaps. We show that above a certain overlap continuous lines can be obtained, but unfortunately they show bulging, a problem which compromises the functionality of the lines. In order to solve the problem, other printing strategies are tested; they consist in printing adjacent droplets in alternate sequences. It is found that the alternate printing of two overlapping sets of droplets with an intermediate drying step allows obtaining functional continuous lines without bulging.

  13. Overexpression of Parkinson’s Disease-Associated Mutation LRRK2 G2019S in Mouse Forebrain Induces Behavioral Deficits and α-Synuclein Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grima, Jonathan C.; Chen, Guanxing; Swing, Debbie; Tessarollo, Lino

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene have been identified as an unambiguous cause of late-onset, autosomal-dominant familial Parkinson’s disease (PD) and LRRK2 mutations are the strongest genetic risk factor for sporadic PD known to date. A number of transgenic mice expressing wild-type or mutant LRRK2 have been described with varying degrees of LRRK2-related abnormalities and modest pathologies. None of these studies directly addressed the role of the kinase domain in the changes observed and none of the mice present with robust features of the human disease. In an attempt to address these issues, we created a conditional LRRK2 G2019S (LRRK2 GS) mutant and a functionally negative control, LRRK2 G2019S/D1994A (LRRK2 GS/DA). Expression of LRRK2 GS or LRRK2 GS/DA was conditionally controlled using the tet-off system in which the presence of tetracycline-transactivator protein (tTA) with a CAMKIIα promoter (CAMKIIα-tTA) induced expression of TetP-LRRK2 GS or TetP-LRRK2 GS/DA in the mouse forebrain. Overexpression of LRRK2 GS in mouse forebrain induced behavioral deficits and α-synuclein pathology in a kinase-dependent manner. Similar to other genetically engineered LRRK2 GS mice, there was no significant loss of dopaminergic neurons. These mice provide an important new tool to study neurobiological changes associated with the increased kinase activity from the LRRK2 G2019S mutation, which may ultimately lead to a better understanding of not only the physiologic actions of LRRK2, but also potential pathologic actions that underlie LRRK2 GS-associated PD.

  14. Low-Dose Actinomycin-D Induces Redistribution of Wild-Type and Mutated Nucleophosmin Followed by Cell Death in Leukemic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodská, Barbora; Holoubek, Aleš; Otevřelová, Petra; Kuželová, Kateřina

    2016-06-01

    Specific mutations involving C-terminal part of the nucleolar protein nucleophosmin (NPM) are associated with better outcome of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) therapy, possibly due to aberrant cytoplasmic NPM localization facilitating induction of anti-NPM immune response. Actinomycin D (actD) is known to induce nucleolar stress leading to redistribution of many nucleolar proteins, including NPM. We analyzed the distribution of both wild-type and mutated NPM (NPMmut) in human cell lines, before and after low-dose actD treatment, in living cells expressing exogenous fluorescently labeled proteins as well as using immunofluorescence staining of endogenous proteins in fixed cells. The wild-type NPM form is prevalently nucleolar in intact cells and relocalizes mainly to the nucleoplasm following actD addition. The mutated NPM form is found both in the nucleoli and in the cytoplasm of untreated cells. ActD treatment leads to a marked increase in NPMmut amount in the nucleoplasm while a mild decrease is observed in the cytoplasm. Cell death was induced by low-dose actD in all the studied leukemic cell lines with different p53 and NPM status. In cells expressing the tumor suppresor p53 (CML-T1, OCI-AML3), cell cycle arrest in G1/G0 phase was followed by p53-dependent apoptosis while in p53-null HL60 cells, transient G2/M-phase arrest was followed by cell necrosis. We conclude that although actD does not increase NPM concentration in the cytoplasm, it could improve the effect of standard chemotherapy in leukemias through more general mechanisms.

  15. In situ genetic correction of the sickle cell anemia mutation in human induced pluripotent stem cells using engineered zinc finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiano, Vittorio; Maeder, Morgan L; Angstman, James F; Haddad, Bahareh; Khayter, Cyd; Yeo, Dana T; Goodwin, Mathew J; Hawkins, John S; Ramirez, Cherie L; Batista, Luis F Z; Artandi, Steven E; Wernig, Marius; Joung, J Keith

    2011-11-01

    The combination of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology and targeted gene modification by homologous recombination (HR) represents a promising new approach to generate genetically corrected, patient-derived cells that could be used for autologous transplantation therapies. This strategy has several potential advantages over conventional gene therapy including eliminating the need for immunosuppression, avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis by therapeutic vectors, and maintaining expression of the corrected gene by endogenous control elements rather than a constitutive promoter. However, gene targeting in human pluripotent cells has remained challenging and inefficient. Recently, engineered zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) have been shown to substantially increase HR frequencies in human iPSCs, raising the prospect of using this technology to correct disease causing mutations. Here, we describe the generation of iPSC lines from sickle cell anemia patients and in situ correction of the disease causing mutation using three ZFN pairs made by the publicly available oligomerized pool engineering method (OPEN). Gene-corrected cells retained full pluripotency and a normal karyotype following removal of reprogramming factor and drug-resistance genes. By testing various conditions, we also demonstrated that HR events in human iPSCs can occur as far as 82 bps from a ZFN-induced break. Our approach delineates a roadmap for using ZFNs made by an open-source method to achieve efficient, transgene-free correction of monogenic disease mutations in patient-derived iPSCs. Our results provide an important proof of principle that ZFNs can be used to produce gene-corrected human iPSCs that could be used for therapeutic applications.

  16. Protein homeostasis disorders of key enzymes of amino acids metabolism: mutation-induced protein kinetic destabilization and new therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pey, Angel L

    2013-12-01

    Many inborn errors of amino acids metabolism are caused by single point mutations affecting the ability of proteins to fold properly (i.e., protein homeostasis), thus leading to enzyme loss-of-function. Mutations may affect protein homeostasis by altering intrinsic physical properties of the polypeptide (folding thermodynamics, and rates of folding/unfolding/misfolding) as well as the interaction of partially folded states with elements of the protein homeostasis network (such as molecular chaperones and proteolytic machineries). Understanding these mutational effects on protein homeostasis is required to develop new therapeutic strategies aimed to target specific features of the mutant polypeptide. Here, I review recent work in three different diseases of protein homeostasis associated to inborn errors of amino acids metabolism: phenylketonuria, inherited homocystinuria and primary hyperoxaluria type I. These three different genetic disorders involve proteins operating in different cell organelles and displaying different structural complexities. Mutations often decrease protein kinetic stability of the native state (i.e., its half-life for irreversible denaturation), which can be studied using simple kinetic models amenable to biophysical and biochemical characterization. Natural ligands and pharmacological chaperones are shown to stabilize mutant enzymes, thus supporting their therapeutic application to overcome protein kinetic destabilization. The role of molecular chaperones in protein folding and misfolding is also discussed as well as their potential pharmacological modulation as promising new therapeutic approaches. Since current available treatments for these diseases are either burdening or only successful in a fraction of patients, alternative treatments must be considered covering studies from protein structure and biophysics to studies in animal models and patients.

  17. Not only emerging technologies are at risk: The case of mutation breeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagemann, Kit S.; Scholderer, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    plants. Unlike crop cultivars developed by newer techniques such as genetic engineering, mutation-bred cultivars are not subject to special types of horizontal regulation in any UN country. Based on representative survey data (N = 1000), public attitudes towards mutation breeding were compared....... One technology where such a latent crisis potential has often been suspected is mutation breeding. Mutation breeding is a standard technique in the development of new crop cultivars, known since the 1930s, typically involving the use of ionizing radiation to induce alterations in the genomes of crop...... with attitudes towards several other agricultural and food biotechnologies in terms of evaluative extremity, strength, and structure. Among the technologies included in the survey, mutation breeding was by far the most negatively evaluated one (substantially more so than genetic engineering). At the same time...

  18. Benzo(a)pyrene and X-rays induce reversions of the pink-eyed unstable mutation in the retinal pigment epithelium of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, A J; Kosaras, B; Sidman, R L; Schiestl, R H

    2000-12-20

    The pink-eyed unstable (p(un)) mutation is the result of a 70kb tandem duplication within the murine p gene. Homologous deletion/recombination of the locus to wild-type occurs spontaneously in embryos and results in pigmented spots in the fur and eye that persist for life. Such deletion events are also inducible by a variety of DNA damaging agents, as we have observed previously with the fur spot assay. Here, we describe the use of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the eye to detect reversion events induced with two differently acting agents. Benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) induces a high frequency, and X-ray exposure a more modest increase, of p(un) reversion in both the fur and the eye. The eye-spot assay requires fewer mice for significant results than the fur spot assay. Previous work had elucidated the cell proliferation pattern in the RPE and a position effect variegation phenotype in the pattern of p(un) reversions, which we have confirmed. Acute exposure to B(a)P or X-rays resulted in an increased frequency of reversion events. The majority of the spontaneous reversions lie toward the periphery of the RPE whereas induced events are found more centrally, closer to the optic nerve head. The induced distribution corresponds to the major sites of cell proliferation in the RPE at the time of exposure, and further advocates the proposal that dividing cells are at highest risk to develop deletions.

  19. Collateral damage: Spread of repeat-induced point mutation from a duplicated DNA sequence into an adjoining single-copy gene in Neurospora crassa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meenal Vyas; Durgadas P Kasbekar

    2005-02-01

    Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) is an unusual genome defense mechanism that was discovered in Neurospora crassa. RIP occurs during a sexual cross and induces numerous G : C to A : T mutations in duplicated DNA sequences and also methylates many of the remaining cytosine residues. We measured the susceptibility of the erg-3 gene, present in single copy, to the spread of RIP from duplications of adjoining sequences. Genomic segments of defined length (1, 1.5 or 2 kb) and located at defined distances (0, 0.5, 1 or 2 kb) upstream or downstream of the erg-3 open reading frame (ORF) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the duplications were created by transformation of the amplified DNA. Crosses were made with the duplication strains and the frequency of erg-3 mutant progeny provided a measure of the spread of RIP from the duplicated segments into the erg-3 gene. Our results suggest that ordinarily RIP-spread does not occur. However, occasionally the mechanism that confines RIP to the duplicated segment seems to fail (frequency 0.1–0.8%) and then RIP can spread across as much as 1 kb of unduplicated DNA. Additionally, the bacterial hph gene appeared to be very susceptible to the spread of RIP-associated cytosine methylation.

  20. An Inducible Lentiviral Guide RNA Platform Enables the Identification of Tumor-Essential Genes and Tumor-Promoting Mutations In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon J. Aubrey

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The CRISPR/Cas9 technology enables the introduction of genomic alterations into almost any organism; however, systems for efficient and inducible gene modification have been lacking, especially for deletion of essential genes. Here, we describe a drug-inducible small guide RNA (sgRNA vector system allowing for ubiquitous and efficient gene deletion in murine and human cells. This system mediates the efficient, temporally controlled deletion of MCL-1, both in vitro and in vivo, in human Burkitt lymphoma cell lines that require this anti-apoptotic BCL-2 protein for sustained survival and growth. Unexpectedly, repeated induction of the same sgRNA generated similar inactivating mutations in the human Mcl-1 gene due to low mutation variability exerted by the accompanying non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ process. Finally, we were able to generate hematopoietic cell compartment-restricted Trp53-knockout mice, leading to the identification of cancer-promoting mutants of this critical tumor suppressor.

  1. Normal repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in familial melanoma without CDKN2A or CDK4 gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, J A; Matias, C; Luxford, C; Kefford, R F; Mann, G J

    1999-04-01

    Excessive sun exposure and family history are strong risk factors for the development of cutaneous melanoma. Inherited susceptibility to this type of skin cancer could therefore result from constitutively impaired capacity to repair ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA lesions. While a proportion of familial melanoma kindreds exhibit germline mutations in the cell cycle regulatory gene CDKN2A (p16INK4a) or its protein target, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), the biochemical basis of most familial melanoma is unknown. We have examined lymphoblastoid cell lines from melanoma-affected and unaffected individuals from large hereditary melanoma kindreds which are not attributable to CDKN2A or CDK4 gene mutation. These lines were tested for sensitivity of clonogenic growth to UV radiation and for their ability to repair transfected UV-damaged plasmid templates (host cell reactivation). Two of seven affected-unaffected pairs differed in colony survival after exposure to UVB radiation; however, no significant differences were observed in the host-cell reactivation assays. These results indicate that melanoma susceptibility genes other than CDKN2A and CDK4 do not impair net capacity to repair UV-induced DNA damage.

  2. Changing in lipid profile induced by the mutation of Foxn1 gene: A lipidomic analysis of Nude mice skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzini, Justine; Dargère, Delphine; Regazzetti, Anne; Tebani, Abdellah; Laprévote, Olivier; Auzeil, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Nude mice carry a spontaneous mutation affecting the gene Foxn1 mainly expressed in the epidermis. This gene is involved in several skin functions, especially in the proliferation and the differentiation of keratinocytes which are key cells of epithelial barrier. The skin, a protective barrier for the body, is essentially composed of lipids. Taking into account these factors, we conducted a lipidomic study to search for any changes in lipid composition of skin possibly related to Foxn1 mutation. Lipids were extracted from skin biopsies of Nude and BALB/c mice to be analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to a high resolution mass spectrometer (HRMS). Multivariate and univariate data analyses were carried out to compare lipid extracts. Identification was performed using HRMS data, retention time and mass spectrometry fragmentation study. These results indicate that mutation of Foxn1 leads to significant modifications in the lipidome in Nude mice skin. An increase in cholesterol sulfate, phospholipids, sphingolipids and fatty acids associated with a decrease in glycerolipids suggest that the lipidome in mice skin is regulated by the Foxn1 gene. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  3. Development of severe skeletal defects in induced SHP-2-deficient adult mice: a model of skeletal malformation in humans with SHP-2 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Bauler

    2011-03-01

    SHP-2 (encoded by PTPN11 is a ubiquitously expressed protein tyrosine phosphatase required for signal transduction by multiple different cell surface receptors. Humans with germline SHP-2 mutations develop Noonan syndrome or LEOPARD syndrome, which are characterized by cardiovascular, neurological and skeletal abnormalities. To study how SHP-2 regulates tissue homeostasis in normal adults, we used a conditional SHP-2 mouse mutant in which loss of expression of SHP-2 was induced in multiple tissues in response to drug administration. Induced deletion of SHP-2 resulted in impaired hematopoiesis, weight loss and lethality. Most strikingly, induced SHP-2-deficient mice developed severe skeletal abnormalities, including kyphoses and scolioses of the spine. Skeletal malformations were associated with alterations in cartilage and a marked increase in trabecular bone mass. Osteoclasts were essentially absent from the bones of SHP-2-deficient mice, thus accounting for the osteopetrotic phenotype. Studies in vitro revealed that osteoclastogenesis that was stimulated by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL was defective in SHP-2-deficient mice. At least in part, this was explained by a requirement for SHP-2 in M-CSF-induced activation of the pro-survival protein kinase AKT in hematopoietic precursor cells. These findings illustrate an essential role for SHP-2 in skeletal growth and remodeling in adults, and reveal some of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved. The model is predicted to be of further use in understanding how SHP-2 regulates skeletal morphogenesis, which could lead to the development of novel therapies for the treatment of skeletal malformations in human patients with SHP-2 mutations.

  4. Hepatic gene mutations induced in Big Blue rats by both the potent rat liver azo-carcinogen 6BT and its reported noncarcinogenic analogue 5BT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, K; Soames, A R; Tinwell, H; Lefevre, P A; Ashby, J

    1999-01-01

    The potent rat liver carcinogen 6-p-dimethylaminophenylazobenzthiazole (6BT) and its reported noncarcinogenic analogue 5-p-dimethylaminophenylazobenzthiazole (5BT; evaluated for carcinogenicity under the similar limited bioassay conditions used for 6BT) have been studied in order to seek an explanation for their different carcinogenic activities. Both compounds act as DNA-damaging agents to the rat liver, and both have now been shown to induce lacI (-) gene mutations in the liver of Big Blue(trade mark) transgenic rats. Both compounds were mutagenic following ten daily gavage doses or following administration in diet for 10 days. Neither chemical induced cell proliferation in the liver following repeat gavage administrations. In contrast, dietary administration of 6BT, and to a lesser extent of 5BT, induced hepatic cell proliferation. The carcinogen 6BT, but not the noncarcinogen 5BT, caused proliferation of oval stem cells in the livers by both routes of administration. It is possible that mutations induced in oval cells by 6BT are responsible for its potent carcinogenicity, and that the comparative absence of these cells in 5BT-treated livers may account for the carcinogenic inactivity of 5BT. Equally, the proliferation of the oval cells may reflect changes in liver homeostasis associated with the liver toxicity observed at the dose level of 6BT used (which was, nonetheless, the dose level used in the positive cancer bioassays). It is concluded that the new data presented cannot explain the differing carcinogenic activities of 5BT and 6BT, and that the reported noncarcinogen 5BT may also be carcinogenic when adequately assessed for this activity.

  5. Fast Microwave-Induced Thermoacoustic Tomography Based on Multi-Element Phase-Controlled Focus Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Lü-Ming; XING Da; GU Huai-Min; YANG Di-Wu; YANG Si-Hua; XIANG Liang-Zhong

    2006-01-01

    @@ We develop a fast microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography system based on a 320-element phase-controlled focus linear transducer array. A 1.2-GHz microwave generator transmits microwave with a pulse width of 0.5 μs and an incident energy density of 0.45 m J/cm2, and the microwave energy is delivered by a rectangular waveguide with a cross section of (80.01 ± 0.02) × 10-4 m2. Compared to single transducer collection, the system with the multi-element linear transducer array can eliminate the mechanical rotation of the transducer, hence can effectively reduce the image blurring and improve the image resolution. Using a phase-controlled focus technique to collect thermoacoustic signals, the data need not be averaged because of a high signal-to-noise ratio, resulting in a total data acquisition time of less than 5s. The system thus provides a rapid and reliable approach to thermoacoustic imaging, which can potentially be developed as a powerful diagnostic tool for early-stage breast caners.

  6. Biotechnological approach in crop improvement by mutation breeding in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeranto, H.; Sobrizal; Sutarto, Ismiyati; Manurung, Simon; Mastrizal [National Nuclear Energy Agency, Center for Research and Development of Isotope and Radiation Technology, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2002-02-01

    Mutation breeding has become a proven method of improving crop varieties. Most research on plant mutation breeding in Indonesia is carried out at the Center for Research and Development of Isotope and Radiation Technology, National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN). Nowadays, a biotechnological approach has been incorporated in some mutation breeding researches in order to improve crop cultivars. This approach is simply based on cellular totipotency, or the ability to regenerate whole, flowering plants from isolated organs, pieces of tissue, individual cells, and protoplasts. Tissue culture technique has bee extensively used for micro propagation of disease-free plants. Other usage of this technique involves in various steps of the breeding process such as germplasm preservation, clonal propagation, and distant hybridization. Mutation breeding combined with tissue culture technique has made a significant contribution in inducing plant genetic variation, by improving selection technology, and by accelerating breeding time as for that by using anther or pollen culture. In Indonesia, research on mutation breeding combined with tissue culture techniques has been practiced in different crop species including rice, ginger, banana, sorghum etc. Specially in rice, a research on identification of DNA markers linked to blast disease resistance is now still progressing. A compiled report from some research activities is presented in this paper. (author)

  7. Investigation of chemical vapour deposition diamond detectors by X- ray micro-beam induced current and X-ray micro-beam induced luminescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Olivero, P; Vittone, E; Fizzotti, F; Paolini, C; Lo Giudice, A; Barrett, R; Tucoulou, R

    2004-01-01

    Tracking detectors have become an important ingredient in high-energy physics experiments. In order to survive the harsh detection environment of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), trackers need to have special properties. They must be radiation hard, provide fast collection of charge, be as thin as possible and remove heat from readout electronics. The unique properties of diamond allow it to fulfill these requirements. In this work we present an investigation of the charge transport and luminescence properties of "detector grade" artificial chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond devices developed within the CERN RD42 collaboration, performed by means of X-ray micro-beam induced current collection (XBICC) and X-ray micro- beam induced luminescence (XBIL) techniques. XBICC technique allows quantitative estimates of the transport parameters of the material to be evaluated and mapped with micrometric spatial resolution. In particular, the high resolution and sensitivity of the technique has allowed a quantitati...

  8. Characterization of a novel mutation in NS1 protein of influenza A virus induced by a chemical substance for the attenuation of pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Sasaki

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV has the potential for use as a vaccination against flu. In this study, we demonstrated the nature of an influenza A virus (IAV mutant induced by treating the IAV with a stable furan derivative, (1R,2R-1-(5'-methylfur-3'-ylpropane-1,2,3-triol (MFPT, which had been isolated from Streptomyces sp. strain FV60 with the objective of it being an LAIV candidate. The resulting MFPT-resistant (MFPTr IAVs possessed attenuated pathogenicity in vitro and in vivo when compared with that of the parent virus (H1N1 subtype, NWS strain. Sequencing analysis revealed that a novel mutation, C490U in ns gene (P164S in NS1, was detected in all MFPTr virus clones tested. Therefore, NS1 might be a main target of MFPT, and it was suggested that the P164S mutation contributed to the attenuated pathogenicity of the mutants. Although the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is one of the targets of NS1, the MFPTr virus suppressed the phosphorylation of Akt when compared with the wild-type (WT virus. It was suggested that this might lead to the subsequent inhibition of the cleavage of PARP-1 and caspase-3, which is important for the progression of apoptosis. At the same time, nucleoprotein (NP was found to be retained in the nuclei in MFPTr virus-infected cells while nuclear export of NP was detected in WT virus-infected cells. In addition, the expression levels of interferon-β transcripts were significantly decreased in MFPTr virus-infected cells. From these results it can be shown that the mutation, NS1P164S, might be one of the key residues to control NS1 function concerning the induction of apoptosis. In conclusion, MFPT induced favorable mutation in the ns gene for the attenuation of IAV, and therefore might provide the novel methodology for preparing LAIVs.

  9. SH3BP2 cherubism mutation potentiates TNF-α-induced osteoclastogenesis via NFATc1 and TNF-α-mediated inflammatory bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Tomoyuki; Ishida, Shu; Ishikawa, Remi; Yoshitaka, Teruhito; Kittaka, Mizuho; Gallant, Richard; Lin, Yi-Ling; Rottapel, Robert; Brotto, Marco; Reichenberger, Ernst J; Ueki, Yasuyoshi

    2014-12-01

    Cherubism (OMIM# 118400) is a genetic disorder with excessive jawbone resorption caused by mutations in SH3 domain binding protein 2 (SH3BP2), a signaling adaptor protein. Studies on the mouse model for cherubism carrying a P416R knock-in (KI) mutation have revealed that mutant SH3BP2 enhances tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation in myeloid cells. TNF-α is expressed in human cherubism lesions, which contain a large number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells, and TNF-α plays a critical role in inflammatory bone destruction in homozygous cherubism mice (Sh3bp2(KI/KI) ). The data suggest a pathophysiological relationship between mutant SH3BP2 and TNF-α-mediated bone loss by osteoclasts. Therefore, we investigated whether P416R mutant SH3BP2 is involved in TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation and bone loss. Here, we show that bone marrow-derived M-CSF-dependent macrophages (BMMs) from the heterozygous cherubism mutant (Sh3bp2(KI/+) ) mice are highly responsive to TNF-α and can differentiate into osteoclasts independently of RANKL in vitro by a mechanism that involves spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) and phospholipase Cγ2 (PLCγ2) phosphorylation, leading to increased nuclear translocation of NFATc1. The heterozygous cherubism mutation exacerbates bone loss with increased osteoclast formation in a mouse calvarial TNF-α injection model as well as in a human TNF-α transgenic mouse model (hTNFtg). SH3BP2 knockdown in RAW264.7 cells results in decreased TRAP-positive multinucleated cell formation. These findings suggest that the SH3BP2 cherubism mutation can cause jawbone destruction by promoting osteoclast formation in response to TNF-α expressed in cherubism lesions and that SH3BP2 is a key regulator for TNF-α-induced osteoclastogenesis. Inhibition of SH3BP2 expression in osteoclast progenitors could be a potential strategy for

  10. A new technique for investigating the induced and profile drag coefficients of a smooth wing and a tubercled wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolzon Michael

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The induced and profile drag coefficients of a wing are typically determined through a complex experimental technique, such as wake surveying. Such a technique requires measurement of all three orthogonal components of the downstream velocity to find the components of drag, which results in the necessary usage of a sophisticated and costly measurement device, such as multi-hole pressure probe. However, in this paper data is presented which demonstrate that the relative changes in the induced and profile drag coefficients can largely be determined through the sole measurement of the downstream, streamwise velocity. To demonstrate this, the induced and profile drags of two NACA 0021 wings, one with a smooth leading edge and the other wing a tubercled leading edge for comparison, are determined through the measurement of the three orthogonal velocities. The downstream, streamwise velocity distribution of each wing is then constructed and relationships can be determined. The wings were surveyed at 3°, 9°, and 12°. It has been found that the relative magnitude of the profile drag coefficient can be found for all considered angles of attack, while the relative magnitude of the induced drag coefficient can be found at 9° and 12°. These findings produce an innovative, simpler, and more cost effective experimental technique in determining the components of drag of a wing, and reduces the burdensome requirement of a sophisticated measurement device for such an experiment. Further investigation is required to determine the induced drag at 3°.

  11. Revisiting the time domain induced polarization technique, from linearization to inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S.; Oldenburg, D.

    2015-12-01

    The induced polarization (IP) technique has been successful in mineral exploration, particularly for finding disseminated sulphide or porphyry deposits, but also in helping solve geotechnical and environmental problems. Electrical induced polarization (EIP) surveys use grounded electrodes and take measurements of the electric field while the current is both "on" and "off". Currently, 2D and 3D inversions of EIP data are generally carried out by first finding a background conductivity from the asymptotic "on-time" measurements. The DC resistivity problem is then linearized about that conductivity to obtain a linear relationship between the off-time data and the "pseudo-chargeability". The distribution of pseudo-chargeability in the earth is then interpreted within the context of the initial geoscience problem pursued. Despite its success, the current EIP implementation does have challenges. A fundamental assumption, that there is no electromagnetic induction (EM) effect, breaks down when the background is conductive. This is especially problematic in regions having conductive overburden. EM induction complicates, and sometimes overwhelms, the IP signal. To ameliorate this effect, we estimate the inductive signal, subtract it from the "off-time" data and invert the resultant IP data using the linearized formulation. We carefully examine the conditions under which this works. We also investigate the potential alterations to the linearized sensitivity function that are needed to allow a linearized inversion to be carried out. Inversions of EIP data recover a "chargeability" but this is not a uniquely defined quantity. There are multiple definitions of this property because there are a diverse number of ways in which an IP datum is defined. In time domain IP surveys, the data might be mV/V or a time-integrated voltage with units of ms. In reality however, data from an EIP survey have many time channels and each one can be inverted separately to produce a chargeability

  12. Correction of Hirschsprung-Associated Mutations in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Via Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/Cas9, Restores Neural Crest Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Frank Pui-Ling; Lau, Sin-Ting; Wong, John Kwong-Leong; Gui, Hongsheng; Wang, Reeson Xu; Zhou, Tingwen; Lai, Wing Hon; Tse, Hung-Fat; Tam, Paul Kwong-Hang; Garcia-Barcelo, Maria-Mercedes; Ngan, Elly Sau-Wai

    2017-07-01

    Hirschsprung disease is caused by failure of enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs) to fully colonize the bowel, leading to bowel obstruction and megacolon. Heterozygous mutations in the coding region of the RET gene cause a severe form of Hirschsprung disease (total colonic aganglionosis). However, 80% of HSCR patients have short-segment Hirschsprung disease (S-HSCR), which has not been associated with genetic factors. We sought to identify mutations associated with S-HSCR, and used the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 gene editing system to determine how mutations affect ENCC function. We created induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from 1 patient with total colonic aganglionosis (with the G731del mutation in RET) and from 2 patients with S-HSCR (without a RET mutation), as well as RET(+/-) and RET(-/-) iPSCs. IMR90-iPSC cells were used as the control cell line. Migration and differentiation capacities of iPSC-derived ENCCs were analyzed in differentiation and migration assays. We searched for mutation(s) associated with S-HSCR by combining genetic and transcriptome data from patient blood- and iPSC-derived ENCCs, respectively. Mutations in the iPSCs were corrected using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. ENCCs derived from all iPSC lines, but not control iPSCs, had defects in migration and neuronal lineage differentiation. RET mutations were associated with differentiation and migration defects of ENCCs in vitro. Genetic and transcriptome analyses associated a mutation in the vinculin gene (VCL M209L) with S-HSCR. CRISPR/Cas9 correction of the RET G731del and VCL M209L mutations in iPSCs restored the differentiation and migration capacities of ENCCs. We identified mutations in VCL associated with S-HSCR. Correction of this mutation in iPSC using CRISPR/Cas9 editing, as well as the RET G731del mutation that causes Hirschsprung disease with total colonic aganglionosis, restored ENCC function. Our study demonstrates how human i

  13. Novel ENU-Induced Mutation in Tbx6 Causes Dominant Spondylocostal Dysostosis-Like Vertebral Malformations in the Rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Abe

    Full Text Available Congenital vertebral malformations caused by embryonic segmentation defects are relatively common in humans and domestic animals. Although reverse genetics approaches in mice have provided information on the molecular mechanisms of embryonic somite segmentation, hypothesis-driven approaches cannot adequately reflect human dysmorphology within the population. In a N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutagenesis project in Kyoto, the Oune mutant rat strain was isolated due to a short and kinked caudal vertebra phenotype. Skeletal staining of heterozygous rats showed partial loss of the cervical vertebrae as well as hemivertebrae and fused vertebral blocks in lumbar and sacral vertebrae. In homozygous embryos, severe displacement of the whole vertebrae was observed. The Oune locus was genetically mapped to rat chromosome 1 using 202 backcross animals and 50 genome-wide microsatellite markers. Subsequently, a miss-sense mutation in the Tbx6 gene was identified in the critical region. Although the mutation is located within the T-box domain near a predicted dimmer-interface, in vitro experiments revealed that the Tbx6 variant retains normal DNA binding ability and translational efficiency. However, the variant has decreased transcriptional activation potential in response to Notch-mediated signaling. Recently, it was reported that a dominant type of familial spondylocostal dysostosis is caused by a stoploss mutation in TBX6. Thus, we propose that partial dysfunction of Tbx6 leads to similar congenital vertebral malformations in both humans and rats. The Oune strain could be a unique animal model for dominant spondylocostal dysostosis and is useful for molecular dissection of the pathology of congenital vertebral malformations in humans.

  14. New approaches for effective mutation induction in gamma field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagatomi, Shigeki [National Institute of Agrobiological Resources, Institute of Radiation Breeding, Omiya, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of the report is to clarify the effects of chronic irradiation using in vitro culture on inducing the mutation of two model plants. Culture technique combined with irradiation can overcome the problem of chimera formation and provided 10 times greater mutation efficiency than conventional method. Proper mutagenic treatment using cultured materials is indispensable to effective mutation induction. The chronic culture method showed the widest color spectrum in chrysanthemum and extended toward not only the negative but positive direction. However, the acute culture methods indicated a relatively low mutation rate and a very limited flower color spectrum. Flower color mutation of the regenerations could be induced more from petals and buds than from leaves. These facts is supposed that the gene loci fully expressed on floral organs may be unstable for mutation by mutagenesis or culture. It may be likely to control a direction of desired mutation. One possible reason why the chronic culture methods showed higher frequencies is that most of the cells composing the tissue and organs continually irradiated into a cell division which was highly sensitive and more mutable to irradiation. Under these conditions, many mutated sectors may accumulate in the cells of the growing organs. Regenerated mutant lines show remarkable decrease of chromosome numbers by irradiation. It is a proper indicator to monitor radiation damage. In this study, the six flower color mutant varieties registered were derived from chronic irradiation. The combined method of chronic irradiation with floral organ cultures proved to be of particularly great practical use in mutation breeding for not only flower species but any other species. (author)

  15. Obesity promotes PhIP-induced small intestinal carcinogenesis in hCYP1A-db/db mice: involvement of mutations and DNA hypermethylation of Apc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Liu, Anna; Kuo, Yingyi; Chi, Eric; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Lanjing; Yang, Chung S

    2016-07-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of cancer. To study the promotion of dietary carcinogen-induced gastrointestinal cancer by obesity, we employed 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) to induce intestinal tumorigenesis in CYP1A-humanized (hCYP1A) mice, in which mouse Cyp1a1/1a2 was replaced with human CYP1A1/1A2 Obesity was introduced in hCYP1A mice by breeding with Lepr(db/+) mice to establish the genetically induced obese hCYP1A-Lepr(db/db) mice or by feeding hCYP1A mice a high-fat diet. PhIP induced the formation of small intestinal tumors at the ages of weeks 28-40 in obese hCYP1A mice, but not in lean hCYP1A mice. No tumors were found in colon and other gastrointestinal organs in the lean or obese mice. Using immunohistochemistry (IHC), we found strong positive staining of NF-κB p65, pSTAT3 and COX2 as well as elevated levels of nuclear β-catenin (Ctnnb1) in small intestinal tumors, but not in normal tissues. By sequencing Apc and Ctnnb1 genes, we found that most PhIP-induced small intestinal tumors in obese mice carried only a single heterozygous mutation in Apc By bisulfite-sequencing of CpG islands of Apc, we found DNA hypermethylation in a CpG cluster located in its transcription initiation site, which most likely caused the inactivation of the wild-type Apc allele. Our findings demonstrate that PhIP-induced small intestinal carcinogenesis in hCYP1A-db/db mice is promoted by obesity and involves Apc mutation and inactivation by DNA hypermethylation. This experimental result is consistent with the association of obesity and the increased incidence of small intestinal cancer in humans in recent decades. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Comparative evaluation of differential laser-induced perturbation spectroscopy as a technique to discriminate emerging skin pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozikowski, Raymond T; Smith, Sarah E; Lee, Jennifer A; Castleman, William L; Sorg, Brian S; Hahn, David W

    2012-06-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has been widely investigated as a technique for identifying pathological tissue; however, unrelated subject-to-subject variations in spectra complicate data analysis and interpretation. We describe and evaluate a new biosensing technique, differential laser-induced perturbation spectroscopy (DLIPS), based on deep ultraviolet (UV) photochemical perturbation in combination with difference spectroscopy. This technique combines sequential fluorescence probing (pre- and post-perturbation) with sub-ablative UV perturbation and difference spectroscopy to provide a new spectral dimension, facilitating two improvements over fluorescence spectroscopy. First, the differential technique eliminates significant variations in absolute fluorescence response within subject populations. Second, UV perturbations alter the extracellular matrix (ECM), directly coupling the DLIPS response to the biological structure. Improved biosensing with DLIPS is demonstrated in vivo in a murine model of chemically induced skin lesion development. Component loading analysis of the data indicates that the DLIPS technique couples to structural proteins in the ECM. Analysis of variance shows that DLIPS has a significant response to emerging pathology as opposed to other population differences. An optimal likelihood ratio classifier for the DLIPS dataset shows that this technique holds promise for improved diagnosis of epithelial pathology. Results further indicate that DLIPS may improve diagnosis of tissue by augmenting fluorescence spectra (i.e. orthogonal sensing).

  17. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression. Annual report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkan, A.

    1992-12-31

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

  18. Vesicourethral reflux-induced renal failure in a patient with ICF syndrome due to a novel DNMT3B mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutluğ, Seyhan; Ogur, Gönül; Yilmaz, Aysegül; Thijssen, Peter E; Abur, Ummet; Yildiran, Alisan

    2016-12-01

    ICF syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency disease characterized by hypo- or agammaglobulinemia, centromeric instability mainly on chromosomes 1, 9, and 16 and facial anomalies. ICF syndrome presents with frequent respiratory tract infections in infancy. A 20-month-old female patient was referred to our clinic due to frequent lower respiratory tract infections. ICF syndrome was considered because of comorbidity of hypogammaglobulinemia, facial anomalies, and neuromotor growth retardation. Metaphase chromosome analysis revealed centromeric instability on chromosomes 1, 9, and 16 and through Sanger a previously unreported homozygous missense mutation (c.1805T>C; [p.V602A]) was identified in the DNMT3B, confirming ICF1. The patient was found to have a breakdown in renal function 1 year later; the urinary system was examined and bilateral vesicoureteral reflux was found, warranting the need for dialysis in time. This report expands the mutation spectrum of ICF1 and is the first to describe bilateral vesicoureteral reflux accompanying ICF syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Induced mutations in the starch branching enzyme II (SBEII) genes increase amylose and resistant starch content in durum wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazard, Brittany; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Colasuonno, Pasqualina; Uauy, Cristobal; Beckles, Diane M; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Starch is the largest component of the wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain and consists of approximately 70-80% amylopectin and 20-30% amylose. Amylopectin is a highly-branched, readily digested polysaccharide, whereas amylose has few branches and forms complexes that resist digestion and mimic dietary fiber (resistant starch). Down-regulation of the starch branching enzyme II (SBEII) gene by RNA interference (RNAi) was previously shown to increase amylose content in both hexaploid and tetraploid wheat. We generated ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS) mutants for the SBEIIa-A and SBEIIa-B homoeologs in the tetraploid durum wheat variety Kronos (T. turgidum ssp. durum L.). Single-gene mutants showed non-significant increases in amylose and resistant starch content, but a double mutant combining a SBEIIa-A knock-out mutation with a SBEIIa-B splice-site mutation showed a 22% increase in amylose content (P<0.0001) and a 115% increase in resistant starch content (P<0.0001). In addition, we obtained mutants for the A and B genome copies of the paralogous SBEIIb gene, mapped them 1-2 cM from SBEIIa, and generated double SBEIIa-SBEIIb mutants to study the effect of the SBEIIb gene in the absence of SBEIIa. These mutants are available to those interested in increasing amylose content and resistant starch in durum wheat.

  20. Temperature-dependent changes in neuronal dynamics in a patient with an SCN1A mutation and hyperthermia induced seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, C.; Rosch, R. E.; Hughes, E.; Ruben, P. C.

    2016-09-01

    Dravet syndrome is the prototype of SCN1A-mutation associated epilepsies. It is characterised by prolonged seizures, typically provoked by fever. We describe the evaluation of an SCN1A mutation in a child with early-onset temperature-sensitive seizures. The patient carries a heterozygous missense variant (c3818C > T pAla1273Val) in the NaV1.1 brain sodium channel. We compared the functional effects of the variant vs. wild type NaV1.1 using patch clamp recordings from channels expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells at different temperatures (32, 37, and 40 °C). The variant channels produced a temperature-dependent destabilization of activation and fast inactivation. Implementing these empirical abnormalities in a computational model predicts a higher threshold for depolarization block in the variant, particularly at 40 °C, suggesting a failure to autoregulate at high-input states. These results reveal direct effects of abnormalities in NaV1.1 biophysical properties on neuronal dynamics. They illustrate the value of combining cellular measurements with computational models to integrate different observational scales (gene/channel to patient).

  1. Recombination-Independent Recognition of DNA Homology for Repeat-Induced Point Mutation (RIP Is Modulated by the Underlying Nucleotide Sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Gladyshev

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Haploid germline nuclei of many filamentous fungi have the capacity to detect homologous nucleotide sequences present on the same or different chromosomes. Once recognized, such sequences can undergo cytosine methylation or cytosine-to-thymine mutation specifically over the extent of shared homology. In Neurospora crassa this process is known as Repeat-Induced Point mutation (RIP. Previously, we showed that RIP did not require MEI-3, the only RecA homolog in Neurospora, and that it could detect homologous trinucleotides interspersed with a matching periodicity of 11 or 12 base-pairs along participating chromosomal segments. This pattern was consistent with a mechanism of homology recognition that involved direct interactions between co-aligned double-stranded (ds DNA molecules, where sequence-specific dsDNA/dsDNA contacts could be established using no more than one triplet per turn. In the present study we have further explored the DNA sequence requirements for RIP. In our previous work, interspersed homologies were always examined in the context of a relatively long adjoining region of perfect homology. Using a new repeat system lacking this strong interaction, we now show that interspersed homologies with overall sequence identity of only 36% can be efficiently detected by RIP in the absence of any perfect homology. Furthermore, in this new system, where the total amount of homology is near the critical threshold required for RIP, the nucleotide composition of participating DNA molecules is identified as an important factor. Our results specifically pinpoint the triplet 5'-GAC-3' as a particularly efficient unit of homology recognition. Finally, we present experimental evidence that the process of homology sensing can be uncoupled from the downstream mutation. Taken together, our results advance the notion that sequence information can be compared directly between double-stranded DNA molecules during RIP and, potentially, in other processes

  2. Recombination-Independent Recognition of DNA Homology for Repeat-Induced Point Mutation (RIP) Is Modulated by the Underlying Nucleotide Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladyshev, Eugene; Kleckner, Nancy

    2016-05-01

    Haploid germline nuclei of many filamentous fungi have the capacity to detect homologous nucleotide sequences present on the same or different chromosomes. Once recognized, such sequences can undergo cytosine methylation or cytosine-to-thymine mutation specifically over the extent of shared homology. In Neurospora crassa this process is known as Repeat-Induced Point mutation (RIP). Previously, we showed that RIP did not require MEI-3, the only RecA homolog in Neurospora, and that it could detect homologous trinucleotides interspersed with a matching periodicity of 11 or 12 base-pairs along participating chromosomal segments. This pattern was consistent with a mechanism of homology recognition that involved direct interactions between co-aligned double-stranded (ds) DNA molecules, where sequence-specific dsDNA/dsDNA contacts could be established using no more than one triplet per turn. In the present study we have further explored the DNA sequence requirements for RIP. In our previous work, interspersed homologies were always examined in the context of a relatively long adjoining region of perfect homology. Using a new repeat system lacking this strong interaction, we now show that interspersed homologies with overall sequence identity of only 36% can be efficiently detected by RIP in the absence of any perfect homology. Furthermore, in this new system, where the total amount of homology is near the critical threshold required for RIP, the nucleotide composition of participating DNA molecules is identified as an important factor. Our results specifically pinpoint the triplet 5'-GAC-3' as a particularly efficient unit of homology recognition. Finally, we present experimental evidence that the process of homology sensing can be uncoupled from the downstream mutation. Taken together, our results advance the notion that sequence information can be compared directly between double-stranded DNA molecules during RIP and, potentially, in other processes where homologous

  3. Pristimerin induces apoptosis in imatinib-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia cells harboring T315I mutation by blocking NF-κB signaling and depleting Bcr-Abl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Qi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is characterized by the chimeric tyrosine kinase Bcr-Abl. Bcr-Abl-T315I is the notorious point mutation that causes resistance to imatinib and the second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors, leading to poor prognosis. CML blasts have constitutive p65 (RelA NF-κB transcriptional activity, and NF-κB may be a potential target for molecular therapies in CML that may also be effective against CML cells with Bcr-Abl-T315I. Results In this report, we discovered that pristimerin, a quinonemethide triterpenoid isolated from Celastraceae and Hippocrateaceae, inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in CML cells, including the cells harboring Bcr-Abl-T315I mutation. Additionally, pristimerin inhibited the growth of imatinib-resistant Bcr-Abl-T315I xenografts in nude mice. Pristimerin blocked the TNFα-induced IκBα phosphorylation, translocation of p65, and expression of NF-κB-regulated genes. Pristimerin inhibited two steps in NF-κB signaling: TAK1→IKK and IKK→IκBα. Pristimerin potently inhibited two pairs of CML cell lines (KBM5 versus KBM5-T315I, 32D-Bcr-Abl versus 32D-Bcr-Abl-T315I and primary cells from a CML patient with acquired resistance to imatinib. The mRNA and protein levels of Bcr-Abl in imatinib-sensitive (KBM5 or imatinib-resistant (KBM5-T315I CML cells were reduced after pristimerin treatment. Further, inactivation of Bcr-Abl by imatinib pretreatment did not abrogate the TNFα-induced NF-κB activation while silencing p65 by siRNA did not affect the levels of Bcr-Abl, both results together indicating that NF-κB inactivation and Bcr-Abl inhibition may be parallel independent pathways. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that pristimerin is effective in vitro and in vivo against CML cells, including those with the T315I mutation. The mechanisms may involve inhibition of NF-κB and Bcr-Abl. We concluded that pristimerin could be a lead compound for

  4. Evaluation of the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique for determination of the chemical composition of copper concentrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Łazarek, Łukasz, E-mail: lukasz.lazarek@pwr.wroc.pl [Laser and Fiber Electronics Group, Faculty of Electronics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Antończak, Arkadiusz J.; Wójcik, Michał R. [Laser and Fiber Electronics Group, Faculty of Electronics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Drzymała, Jan [Faculty of Geoengineering, Mining and Geology, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Abramski, Krzysztof M. [Laser and Fiber Electronics Group, Faculty of Electronics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2014-07-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), like many other spectroscopic techniques, is a comparative method. Typically, in qualitative analysis, synthetic certified standard with a well-known elemental composition is used to calibrate the system. Nevertheless, in all laser-induced techniques, such calibration can affect the accuracy through differences in the overall composition of the chosen standard. There are also some intermediate factors, which can cause imprecision in measurements, such as optical absorption, surface structure and thermal conductivity. In this work the calibration performed for the LIBS technique utilizes pellets made directly from the tested materials (old well-characterized samples). This choice produces a considerable improvement in the accuracy of the method. This technique was adopted for the determination of trace elements in industrial copper concentrates, standardized by conventional atomic absorption spectroscopy with a flame atomizer. A series of copper flotation concentrate samples was analyzed for three elements: silver, cobalt and vanadium. We also proposed a method of post-processing the measurement data to minimize matrix effects and permit reliable analysis. It has been shown that the described technique can be used in qualitative and quantitative analyses of complex inorganic materials, such as copper flotation concentrates. It was noted that the final validation of such methodology is limited mainly by the accuracy of the characterization of the standards. - Highlights: • A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique is introduced for composition monitoring in industrial copper concentrates. • Calibration samples consisted of pellets produced from the tested materials. • The proposed method of post-processing significantly minimizes matrix effects. • The possible uses of this technique are limited mainly by accurate characterization of the standard samples.

  5. Bioenergetic consequences of PINK1 mutations in Parkinson disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Yurevich Abramov

    Full Text Available Mutations of the gene for PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1 are a cause of familial Parkinson's disease (PD. PINK1 protein has been localised to mitochondria and PINK1 gene knockout models exhibit abnormal mitochondrial function. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cells derived from PD patients with a range of PINK1 mutations demonstrate similar defects of mitochondrial function, whether the nature and severity of the abnormalities vary between mutations and correlate with clinical features.We investigated mitochondrial bioenergetics in live fibroblasts from PINK1 mutation patients using single cell techniques. We found that fibroblasts from PINK1 mutation patients had significant defects of bioenergetics including reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, altered redox state, a respiratory deficiency that was determined by substrate availability, and enhanced sensitivity to calcium stimulation and associated mitochondrial permeability pore opening. There was an increase in the basal rate of free radical production in the mutant cells. The pattern and severity of abnormality varied between different mutations, and the less severe defects in these cells were associated with later age of onset of PD.The results provide insight into the molecular pathology of PINK1 mutations in PD and also confirm the critical role of substrate availability in determining the biochemical phenotype--thereby offering the potential for novel therapeutic strategies to circumvent these abnormalities.

  6. Success rate and risk factors of failure of the induced membrane technique in children: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurégan, Jean-Charles; Bégué, Thierry; Rigoulot, Guillaume; Glorion, Christophe; Pannier, Stéphanie

    2016-12-01

    The induced membrane technique was designed by Masquelet et al. to address segmental bone defects of critical size in adults. It has been used after bone defects of traumatic, infectious and tumoral origin with satisfactory results. Recently, it has been used in children but, after an initial enthusiasm, several cases of failure have been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the success rate and the risk factors of failure of the induced membrane for children. We conducted a systematic review of all the studies reporting the results of the induced membrane technique to address bone defects of critical size in children. Our primary outcome was the success rate of the technique defined as a bone union before any iterative surgery. Our secondary outcomes were the complications and the risk factors of failure. We searched Medline via Pubmed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library. Twelve studies, including 69 patients, met the inclusion criteria. There were 41 boys and 28 girls. Mean age at surgery was 10 years. Mean size of resection was 12.38 cm and the mean time between the two stages was 5.86 months. Mean rate of bone union after the two stages of the induced membrane technique was 58% (40/69) but this rate increased to 87% after revision surgeries (60/69). Main complications were non-unions (19/69), lysis of the graft (6/69) and fractures of the bone graft (6/69). Only 1/69 deep infection was reported. Other non specific complications were regularly reported such limb length discrepancies, joint stiffness and protruding wires. Risk factor of failure that could be suspected comprised the resection of a malignant tumour, a bone defect located at the femur, a wide resection, a long time between the two stages, an unstable osteosynthesis and a bone graft associating autograft to other graft materials. The induced membrane technique is suitable for bone defects of critical size in children. It is a reliable technique with no need of micro vascular surgery

  7. Genetic analysis of colon tumors induced by a dietary carcinogen PhIP in CYP1A humanized mice: Identification of mutation of β-catenin/Ctnnb1 as the driver gene for the carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Zhou, Hong; Liu, Anna; Guo, Xiangyi; Yang, Chung S

    2015-11-01

    Replacing mouse Cyp1a with human CYP1A enables the humanized CYP1A mice to mimic human metabolism of the dietary carcinogen, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), by N(2) -hydroxylation to a proximate carcinogen. Our previous study demonstrated that PhIP, combined with the dextrin sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, induces colon carcinogenesis in hCYP1A mice. Here, we employed whole exome sequencing and found multiple gene mutations in PhIP/DSS-induced colon tumors. Mutations in the exon 3 of Ctnnb1/β-catenin, however, were the predominant events. We further sequenced the key fragments of Apc, Ctnnb1, and Kras, because mutations of these genes in the humans are commonly found as the drivers of colorectal cancer. Mutations on either codon 32 or 34 in the exon 3 of Ctnnb1 were found in 39 out of 42 tumors, but no mutation was found in either Apc or Kras. The sequence context of codons 32 and 34 suggests that PhIP targets +3G in a TGGA motif of Ctnnb1. Since mutations that activate Wnt signal is a major driving force for human colorectal cancers, we conclude that the mutated β-catenin is the driver in PhIP/DSS-induced colon carcinogenesis. This result suggests that the colon tumors in hCYP1A mice mimic human colorectal carcinogenesis not only in the dietary etiology involving PhIP, but also in the aberrant activation of the Wnt signaling pathway as the driving force.

  8. A factor in a wild isolated Neurospora crassa strain enables a chromosome segment duplication to suppress repeat-induced point mutation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukund Ramakrishnan; T Naga Sowjanya; Kranthi B Raj; Durgadas P Kasbekar

    2011-12-01

    Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) is a sexual stage-specific mutational process of Neurospora crassa and other fungi that alters duplicated DNA sequences. Previous studies from our laboratory showed that chromosome segment duplications (Dps) longer than ∼300 kbp can dominantly suppress RIP, presumably by titration of the RIP machinery, and that although Dps < 200 kbp did not individually suppress RIP, they could do so in homozygous and multiply heterozygous crosses, provided the sum of the duplicated DNA exceeds ∼300 kbp. Here we demonstrate suppression of RIP in a subset of progeny carrying the normally sub-threshold 154 kbp Dp(R2394) from a cross of T(R2394) to the wild isolated Carrefour Mme. Gras strain (CMG). Thus, the CMG strain contains a factor that together with Dp(R2394) produces a synthetic RIP suppressor phenotype. It is possible that the factor is a cryptic Dp that together with Dp(R2394) can exceed the size threshold for titration of the RIP machinery and thereby causes RIP suppression.

  9. Seamless modification of wild-type induced pluripotent stem cells to the natural CCR5Δ32 mutation confers resistance to HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lin; Wang, Jiaming; Beyer, Ashley I; Teque, Fernando; Cradick, Thomas J; Qi, Zhongxia; Chang, Judy C; Bao, Gang; Muench, Marcus O; Yu, Jingwei; Levy, Jay A; Kan, Yuet Wai

    2014-07-01

    Individuals homozygous for the C-C chemokine receptor type 5 gene with 32-bp deletions (CCR5Δ32) are resistant to HIV-1 infection. In this study, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) homozygous for the naturally occurring CCR5Δ32 mutation through genome editing of wild-type iPSCs using a combination of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) or RNA-guided clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 together with the piggyBac technology. Remarkably, TALENs or CRISPR-Cas9-mediated double-strand DNA breaks resulted in up to 100% targeting of the colonies on one allele of which biallelic targeting occurred at an average of 14% with TALENs and 33% with CRISPR. Excision of the piggyBac using transposase seamlessly reproduced exactly the naturally occurring CCR5Δ32 mutation without detectable exogenous sequences. We differentiated these modified iPSCs into monocytes/macrophages and demonstrated their resistance to HIV-1 challenge. We propose that this strategy may provide an approach toward a functional cure of HIV-1 infection.

  10. HDAC6 Inhibitors Rescued the Defective Axonal Mitochondrial Movement in Motor Neurons Derived from the Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells of Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with HSPB1 Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Yon; Woo, So-Youn; Hong, Young Bin; Choi, Heesun; Kim, Jisoo; Choi, Hyunjung; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Ha, Nina; Kyung, Jangbeen; Koo, Soo Kyung; Jung, Sung-Chul; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2016-01-01

    The Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 2F (CMT2F) and distal hereditary motor neuropathy 2B (dHMN2B) are caused by autosomal dominantly inherited mutations of the heat shock 27 kDa protein 1 (HSPB1) gene and there are no specific therapies available yet. Here, we assessed the potential therapeutic effect of HDAC6 inhibitors on peripheral neuropathy with HSPB1 mutation using in vitro model of motor neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of CMT2F and dHMN2B patients. The absolute velocity of mitochondrial movements and the percentage of moving mitochondria in axons were lower both in CMT2F-motor neurons and in dHMN2B-motor neurons than those in controls, and the severity of the defective mitochondrial movement was different between the two disease models. CMT2F-motor neurons and dHMN2B-motor neurons also showed reduced α-tubulin acetylation compared with controls. The newly developed HDAC6 inhibitors, CHEMICAL X4 and CHEMICAL X9, increased acetylation of α-tubulin and reversed axonal movement defects of mitochondria in CMT2F-motor neurons and dHMN2B-motor neurons. Our results suggest that the neurons derived from patient-specific iPSCs can be used in drug screening including HDAC6 inhibitors targeting peripheral neuropathy.

  11. HDAC6 Inhibitors Rescued the Defective Axonal Mitochondrial Movement in Motor Neurons Derived from the Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells of Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with HSPB1 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yon Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 2F (CMT2F and distal hereditary motor neuropathy 2B (dHMN2B are caused by autosomal dominantly inherited mutations of the heat shock 27 kDa protein 1 (HSPB1 gene and there are no specific therapies available yet. Here, we assessed the potential therapeutic effect of HDAC6 inhibitors on peripheral neuropathy with HSPB1 mutation using in vitro model of motor neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs of CMT2F and dHMN2B patients. The absolute velocity of mitochondrial movements and the percentage of moving mitochondria in axons were lower both in CMT2F-motor neurons and in dHMN2B-motor neurons than those in controls, and the severity of the defective mitochondrial movement was different between the two disease models. CMT2F-motor neurons and dHMN2B-motor neurons also showed reduced α-tubulin acetylation compared with controls. The newly developed HDAC6 inhibitors, CHEMICAL X4 and CHEMICAL X9, increased acetylation of α-tubulin and reversed axonal movement defects of mitochondria in CMT2F-motor neurons and dHMN2B-motor neurons. Our results suggest that the neurons derived from patient-specific iPSCs can be used in drug screening including HDAC6 inhibitors targeting peripheral neuropathy.

  12. Suppression of phase-induced intensity noise in fibre optic delay line signal processors using an optical phase modulation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Erwin H W

    2010-10-11

    A technique that can suppress the dominant phase-induced intensity noise in fibre optic delay line signal processors is presented. It is based on phase modulation of the optical carrier to distribute the phase noise at the information band into a high frequency band which can be filtered out. This technique is suitable for suppressing the phase noise in various delay line structures and for integrating in the conventional fibre optic links. It can also suppress the coherent interference effect at the same time. A model for predicting the amount of phase noise reduction in various delay line structures using the optical phase modulation technique is presented for the first time and is experimentally verified. Experimental results demonstrate the technique can achieve a large phase noise reduction in various fibre optic delay line signal processors.

  13. Mutations induced in Tradescantia by small doses of X-rays and neutrons - Analysis of dose-response curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, A. H.; Underbrink, A. G.; Rossi, H. H.

    1972-01-01

    Dose-response curves for pink somatic mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs were analyzed after neutron and X-ray irradiation with doses ranging from a fraction of a rad to the region of saturation. The dose-effect relation for neutrons indicates a linear dependence from 0.01 to 8 rads; between 0.25 and 5 rads, a linear dependence is indicated for X-rays also. As a consequence the relative biological effectiveness reaches a constant value (about 50) at low doses. The observations are in good agreement with the predictions of the theory of dual radiation action and support its interpretation of the effects of radiation on higher organisms. The doubling dose of X-rays was found to be nearly 1 rad.

  14. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from a patient with frontotemporal dementia caused by a P301L mutation in microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel A.; Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Hasholt, Lis Frydenreich;

    2016-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts were obtained froma 57-year-old woman diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia. The diseaseis caused by a P301L mutation in microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT). Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were established by electroporation with episomal plasmids containing hOCT4, h......SOX2, hKLF2, hL-MYC,hLIN-28 and shP53. iPSCs were free of genomically integrated reprogramming genes, contained the expected c.902C>T substitution in exon 10 of the MAPT gene, expressed the expected pluripotency markers, displayed in vitro differentiation potential to the three germ layers and had...... normal karyotype. The iPSC line may be useful for studying hereditary frontotemporal dementia and TAU pathology in vitro....

  15. Computational modeling of allosteric communication reveals organizing principles of mutation-induced signaling in ABL and EGFR kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuman Dixit

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The emerging structural information about allosteric kinase complexes and the growing number of allosteric inhibitors call for a systematic strategy to delineate and classify mechanisms of allosteric regulation and long-range communication that control kinase activity. In this work, we have investigated mechanistic aspects of long-range communications in ABL and EGFR kinases based on the results of multiscale simulations of regulatory complexes and computational modeling of signal propagation in proteins. These approaches have been systematically employed to elucidate organizing molecular principles of allosteric signaling in the ABL and EGFR multi-domain regulatory complexes and analyze allosteric signatures of the gate-keeper cancer mutations. We have presented evidence that mechanisms of allosteric activation may have universally evolved in the ABL and EGFR regulatory complexes as a product of a functional cross-talk between the organizing αF-helix and conformationally adaptive αI-helix and αC-helix. These structural elements form a dynamic network of efficiently communicated clusters that may control the long-range interdomain coupling and allosteric activation. The results of this study have unveiled a unifying effect of the gate-keeper cancer mutations as catalysts of kinase activation, leading to the enhanced long-range communication among allosterically coupled segments and stabilization of the active kinase form. The results of this study can reconcile recent experimental studies of allosteric inhibition and long-range cooperativity between binding sites in protein kinases. The presented study offers a novel molecular insight into mechanistic aspects of allosteric kinase signaling and provides a quantitative picture of activation mechanisms in protein kinases at the atomic level.

  16. Changes in membrane fatty acid composition through proton-induced fabF mutation enhancing 1-butanol tolerance in E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Haeyoung; Kim, Sun Hong; Han, Sang Soo; Kim, Myung Hee; Lee, Keun Chul

    2012-07-01

    While a rational approach based on genomic data has become the preferred method for microbial strain development, radiation-induced random mutagenesis is still a robust method for organisms such as plants whose genome or target gene information is unavailable. We previously reported on a combined approach that consists of proton irradiation and a long-term experimental evolution to enhance 1-butanol tolerance of the E. coli C strain so that it can be used as a basal strain for the production of 1-butanol, a potential biofuel along with ethanol. Genome sequencing of one randomly chosen clone (PKH5000) from the endpoint population revealed eleven mutations occurring in the coding regions, and we found that a mutation (F74C) in fabF gene encoding β-ketoacyl-ACP synthases II is associated with a twofold increase in the major unsaturated fatty acid, cis-vaccenic acid. The increase of cis-vaccenic acid by wild-type FabF, which is more active at low temperatures or in the presence of organic compounds, is considered to be a protective mechanism against cold stress. A structural analysis of the FabF protein suggests that the F74C mutation may affect the enzyme activity through a change in flexibility around the catalytic site. The expression of a plasmid that harbors mutant fabF gene in the fabF knockout strain enhanced growth in a medium containing butanol with a concomitant elevation of the cis-vaccenic acid level. Among the eight available Keio knockout strains for genes that have amino acid substitution in the PKH5000 strain, the fabF mutant showed the slowest growth in the presence of 0.7% butanol. We propose that fabF, as probably the gene most responsible for butanol tolerance in wild-type form, contributes further when converted into a F74C missense mutation, which is beneficial as it increases the level of cis-vaccenic acid.

  17. Overexpression of a Rrp1 transgene reduces the somatic mutation and recombination frequency induced by oxidative DNA damage in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szakmary, A; Huang, S M; Chang, D T; Beachy, P A; Sander, M

    1996-02-20

    Recombination repair protein 1 (Rrp1) includes a C-terminal region homologous to several DNA repair proteins, including Escherichia coli exonuclease III and human APE, that repair oxidative and alkylation damage to DNA. The nuclease activities of Rrp1 include apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease, 3'-phosphodiesterase, 3'-phosphatase, and 3'-exonuclease. As shown previously, the C-terminal nuclease region of Rrp1 is sufficient to repair oxidative- and alkylation-induced DNA damage in repair-deficient E. coli mutants. DNA strand-transfer and single-stranded DNA renaturation activities are associated with the unique N-terminal region of Rrp1, which suggests possible additional functions that include recombinational repair or homologous recombination. By using the Drosophila w/w+ mosaic eye system, which detects loss of heterozygosity as changes in eye pigmentation, somatic mutation and recombination frequencies were determined in transgenic flies overexpressing wild-type Rrp1 protein from a heat-shock-inducible transgene. A large decrease in mosaic clone frequency is observed when Rrp1 overexpression precedes treatment with gamma-rays, bleomycin, or paraquat. In contrast, Rrp1 overexpression does not alter the spot frequency after treatment with the alkylating agents methyl methanesulfonate or methyl nitrosourea. A reduction in mosaic clone frequency depends on the expression of the Rrp1 transgene and on the nature of the induced DNA damage. These data suggest a lesion-specific involvement of Rrp1 in the repair of oxidative DNA damage.

  18. Dasatinib inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in the KASUMI-1 cell line bearing the t(8;21)(q22;q22) and the N822K c-kit mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpakou, Vassiliki E; Kontsioti, Frieda; Papageorgiou, Sotiris; Spathis, Aris; Kottaridi, Christine; Girkas, Kostas; Karakitsos, Petros; Dimitriadis, George; Dervenoulas, Ioannis; Pappa, Vasiliki

    2013-02-01

    Activating mutations of the c-kit gene are frequently found in CBF (core binding factor) leukemias. We evaluated the effect of tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib in leukemic cell lines bearing or not c-kit mutations. Our data demonstrate that in the AML Kasumi-1 cell line, bearing the N822K c-kit mutation, dasatinib is a potent suppressor of c-kit and Src kinase activity and inhibits the phosphorylation of their downstream target AKT, possibly through the Src-mediated VEGF/VEGFR receptor type 2 pathway. Dasatinib also effectively blocks proliferation and induces apoptosis through caspase-3 activation in Kasumi-1 cells. These data further encourage the integration of dasatinib in the treatment of CBF AML with c-kit mutations in the context of clinical trials, which are eagerly anticipated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Grape seed extract induces anoikis and caspase-mediated apoptosis in human prostate carcinoma LNCaP cells: possible role of ataxia telangiectasia mutated-p53 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manjinder; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2006-05-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cancer diagnosed in elderly males in the Western world. Epidemiologic studies suggest that dietary modifications could be an effective approach in reducing various cancers, including prostate cancer, and accordingly cancer-preventive efficacy of dietary nutrients has gained increased attention in recent years. We have recently shown that grape seed extract (GSE) inhibits growth and induces apoptotic death of advanced human prostate cancer DU145 cells in culture and xenograft. Because prostate cancer is initially an androgen-dependent malignancy, here we used LNCaP human prostate cancer cells as a model to assess GSE efficacy and associated mechanisms. GSE treatment of cells led to their detachment within 12 hours, as occurs in anoikis, and caused a significant decrease in live cells mostly due to their apoptotic death. GSE-induced anoikis and apoptosis were accompanied by a strong decrease in focal adhesion kinase levels, but an increase in caspase-3, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage; however, GSE caused both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptosis as evidenced by cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor release into cytosol. Additional studies revealed that GSE causes DNA damage-induced activation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase and Chk2, as well as p53 Ser(15) phosphorylation and its translocation to mitochondria, suggesting this to be an additional mechanism for apoptosis induction. GSE-induced apoptosis, cell growth inhibition, and cell death were attenuated by pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine and involved reactive oxygen species generation. Together, these results show GSE effects in LNCaP cells and suggest additional in vivo efficacy studies in prostate cancer animal models.

  20. Evaluation of the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique for determination of the chemical composition of copper concentrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łazarek, Łukasz; Antończak, Arkadiusz J.; Wójcik, Michał R.; Drzymała, Jan; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2014-07-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), like many other spectroscopic techniques, is a comparative method. Typically, in qualitative analysis, synthetic certified standard with a well-known elemental composition is used to calibrate the system. Nevertheless, in all laser-induced techniques, such calibration can affect the accuracy through differences in the overall composition of the chosen standard. There are also some intermediate factors, which can cause imprecision in measurements, such as optical absorption, surface structure and thermal conductivity. In this work the calibration performed for the LIBS technique utilizes pellets made directly from the tested materials (old well-characterized samples). This choice produces a considerable improvement in the accuracy of the method. This technique was adopted for the determination of trace elements in industrial copper concentrates, standardized by conventional atomic absorption spectroscopy with a flame atomizer. A series of copper flotation concentrate samples was analyzed for three elements: silver, cobalt and vanadium. We also proposed a method of post-processing the measurement data to minimize matrix effects and permit reliable analysis. It has been shown that the described technique can be used in qualitative and quantitative analyses of complex inorganic materials, such as copper flotation concentrates. It was noted that the final validation of such methodology is limited mainly by the accuracy of the characterization of the standards.

  1. Derivation, Characterization, and Neural Differentiation of Integration-Free Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines from Parkinson's Disease Patients Carrying SNCA, LRRK2, PARK2, and GBA Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momcilovic, Olga; Sivapatham, Renuka; Oron, Tal Ronnen; Meyer, Morten; Mooney, Sean; Rao, Mahendra S; Zeng, Xianmin

    2016-01-01

    We report generation of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from ten Parkinson's disease (PD) patients carrying SNCA, PARK2, LRRK2, and GBA mutations, and one age-matched control. After validation of pluripotency, long-term genome stability, and integration-free reprogramming, eight of these lines (one of each SNCA, LRRK2 and GBA, four PARK2 lines, and the control) were differentiated into neural stem cells (NSC) and subsequently to dopaminergic cultures. We did not observe significant differences in the timeline of neural induction and NSC derivation between the patient and control line, nor amongst the patient lines, although we report considerable variability in the efficiency of dopaminergic differentiation among patient lines. We performed whole genome expression analyses of the lines at each stage of differentiation (fibroblast, iPSC, NSC, and dopaminergic culture) in an attempt to identify alterations by large-scale evaluation. While gene expression profiling clearly distinguished cells at different stages of differentiation, no mutation-specific clustering or difference was observed, though consistent changes in patient lines were detected in genes associated mitochondrial biology. We further examined gene expression in a stress model (MPTP-induced dopaminergic neuronal death) using two clones from the SNCA triplication line, and detected changes in genes associated with mitophagy. Our data suggested that even a well-characterized line of a monogenic disease may not be sufficient to determine the cause or mechanism of the disease, and highlights the need to use more focused strategies for large-scale data analysis.

  2. Twenty year results on application of induced mutation in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) breeding at Agricultural Genetics Institute (AGI), Hanoi, Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mai Quang Vinh; Phan Phai; Ngo Phuong Thinh; Tran Dinh Dong; Tran Thuy Oanh [Agricultural Genetics Institute (AGI), Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2001-03-01

    Research on application of the induced mutation method combined with crossing in soybean breeding for 20 years (1980-2000) plays an important role in research work at AGI, (Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development of Vietnam). 23 soybean varieties and hybrid lines (including 6 local cultivars, 14 selected and introduced varieties, 3 hybrid lines) were treated with Roentgen ray irradiation, Gamma Ray {sup 60}Co with doses 7, 10, 12, 15, 18, 20 krad, and with chemical mutagens: EI, NMU, DNMU, DES, EMS, DEU with various concentrations 0.008, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08%. As the results, we obtained the important conclusions about the rule of induced mutation process in soybean in the natural conditions of Vietnam. 8 mutant varieties [1 National varieties (DT84) and 6 regional production varieties (DT83, DT90, DT94, DT95, DT99, AK06 (DT-55))]. Several promising varieties were selected and released for farmers to produce in the large areas that occupied 50-90% percentage of soybean cultivated areas in Vietnam. These varieties have high-yield 1.5-3.5 tons/ha, short growth duration 75-100 days, tolerance to cold and hot temperature and can be planted in 3 crops per year (Winter, Spring and Summer season) over 35-40 thousands ha/year. At present, the mutagens are being used for defect-orientated repair of some promising hybrid lines, in order to contribute new good varieties to soybean production in Vietnam. (author)

  3. Four New 2-(2-Phenylethylchromone Derivatives from Chinese Agarwood Produced via the Whole-Tree Agarwood-Inducing Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Yang Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Four new 2-(2-phenylethylchromone derivatives (1–4 were isolated from the EtOH extract of Chinese agarwood produced via the whole-tree agarwood-inducing technique, coming from Aquilaria sinensis (Lour. Spreng. (Thymelaeaceae. Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods, such as UV, IR, MS, 1D as well as 2D NMR. All of the isolates were then assessed for their anti-inflammatory activities on lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO production in RAW 264.7. Compound 1 exhibited significant inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 4.6 μM.

  4. Inducing sadness and anxiousness through visual media: measurement techniques and persistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Kuijsters

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The persistence of negative moods (sadness and anxiousness induced by three visual Mood Induction Procedures (MIP was investigated. The evolution of the mood after the MIP was monitored for a period of 8 minutes with the Self-Assessment Manikin (every 2 minutes and with recordings of skin conductance level (SCL and electrocardiography (ECG. The SAM pleasure ratings showed that short and longer film fragments were effective in inducing a longer lasting negative mood, whereas the negative mood induced by the IAPS slideshow was short lived. The induced arousal during the anxious MIPs diminished quickly after the mood induction; nevertheless, the SCL data suggest longer lasting arousal effects for both movies. The decay of the induced mood follows a logarithmic function; diminishing quickly in the first minutes, thereafter returning slowly back to baseline. These results reveal that caution is needed when investigating the effects of the induced mood on a task or the effect of interventions on induced moods, because the induced mood diminishes quickly after the mood induction.

  5. Coat protein mutations in an attenuated Cucumber mosaic virus encoding mutant 2b protein that lacks RNA silencing suppressor activity induces chlorosis with photosynthesis gene repression and chloroplast abnormalities in infected tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Tomofumi; Yamazaki, Ryota; Wada, Tomoya; Ohki, Satoshi T

    2014-05-01

    In tobacco plants, the Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) pepo strain induces mosaic symptoms, including pale green chlorosis and malformed tissues. Here, we characterized the involvement of 2b protein and coat protein (CP) in the development of mosaic symptoms. A 2b mutant (R46C) that lacks viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR) activity showed an asymptomatic phenotype with low levels of virus accumulation. Tomato spotted wilt virus NSs protein did not complement the virulence of the R46C, although it did restore high-level virus accumulation. However, R46C mutants expressing mutated CP in which the amino acid P129 was mutated to A, E, C, Q, or S induced chlorosis that was associated with reduced expression of chloroplast and photosynthesis related genes (CPRGs) and abnormal chloroplasts with fewer thylakoid membranes. These results suggest that the CP of the CMV pepo strain acquires virulence by amino acid mutations, which causes CPRG repression and chloroplast abnormalities.

  6. Evaluation of AgClNPs@SBA-15/IL nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress and DNA mutation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Farrokh; Dabbagh, Somayyeh; Alizadeh, Sina; Rostamnia, Sadegh

    2016-08-01

    The bactericidal effects of silver nanoparticles have been demonstrated in the past years. Recently, the new antimicrobial compounds of silver nanoparticles with different formulations have been developed. In this work, AgClNPs@SBA-15/IL as a new compound of Ag nanoparticles, was synthesized and characterized by XRD, TEM, SEM, FTIR, and EDX. The antibacterial activity and the molecular mechanism effects of AgClNPs@SBA-15/IL nanoparticles (SNPs) on Escherichia coli DH5α cells were investigated by analyzing the growth inhibitory, H2O2 level, catalase activity, DNA mutation, and plasmid copy number following treatment with AgClNPs@SBA-15/IL nanoparticles. In experimental results, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was observed in 75 μg/ml and the antibacterial efficacy (ABE) in CFU analysis was estimated 95.3 %. In bacterial cells treated with 75 and 100 μg/ml, H2O2 level significantly increased and catalase activity decreased compared with control. The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was used to evaluate the effect of AgClNPs@SBA-15/IL nanoparticles in DNA damages and mutation in E. coli genome. RADP-PCR results indicated different banding patterns including appearance or disappearance of bands and differences in their intensity. Cluster analysis of the RAPD-PCR results based on genetic similarity showed genetic difference between E. coli cells treated with AgClNPs@SBA-15/IL nanoparticles, and control and phylogenetic tree were divided to two clusters. Plasmid copy number analysis indicated that after 8 h incubation of E. coli cells with 50, 75, and 100 μg/ml AgClNPs@SBA-15/IL nanoparticles, copy number of pET21a (+) significantly decreased compared with control which indicating DNA replication inhibition by Ag nanoparticles. In conclusion, the results of this study indicated that AgClNPs@SBA-15/IL nanoparticles can be used as an effective bactericidal agent against bacterial cells.

  7. Assessment of blasting induced effects on medical 316 LVM stainless steel by contacting and non-contacting thermoelectric power techniques

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Grit blasting is a low cost surface modification treatment widely used to enhance mechanical fixation of implants through increasing their roughness. As a result of the severe surface plastic deformation, beneath the surface it produces additional effects such as grain size refinement, work hardening and compressive residual stresses, which are generally evaluated with destructive techniques. In this research work, the blasting induced effects by Al2O3 and ZrO2 particles and their evolution a...

  8. Induced point mutations in the phytoene synthase 1 gene cause differences in carotenoid content during tomato fruit ripening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gady, A.L.F.; Vriezen, W.; Wal, van de M.H.B.J.; Huang, P.; Bovy, A.G.; Visser, R.G.F.; Bachem, C.W.B.

    2012-01-01

    In tomato, carotenoids are important with regard to major breeding traits such as fruit colour and human health. The enzyme phytoene synthase (PSY1) directs metabolic flux towards carotenoid synthesis. Through TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes), we have identified two point mutatio

  9. Study on measurement technique for sodium aerosols based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtaka, Masahiko; Hayashida, Hitoshi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2003-03-01

    Detection of small-scale sodium leak in its early stage is effective for enhancing fast reactor safety. Feasibility of the measuring technique for sodium aerosols based on LIBS was assessed. The technique is expected to enhance performance on high discrimination for the sodium aerosols with an equivalent detection limit of conventional small sodium leak detectors. Experiments using sodium aerosols were performed in order to design a measuring system and to study on some basic measuring performances. The results show the LIBS technique is feasible as a small sodium leak detector. (author)

  10. A quartz-crystal-microbalance technique to investigate ion-induced erosion of fusion relevant surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golczewski, A. [Institut fuer Allgemeine Physik, TU Wien, Wiedner Hauptstr. 8-10/E134, Association EURATOM-OAW, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: golczewski@iap.tuwien.ac.at; Dobes, K.; Wachter, G.; Schmid, M. [Institut fuer Allgemeine Physik, TU Wien, Wiedner Hauptstr. 8-10/E134, Association EURATOM-OAW, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Aumayr, F. [Institut fuer Allgemeine Physik, TU Wien, Wiedner Hauptstr. 8-10/E134, Association EURATOM-OAW, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: aumayr@iap.tuwien.ac.at

    2009-02-15

    We describe a highly sensitive quartz-crystal-microbalance technique capable of determining erosion as well as implantation and retention rates for fusion relevant surfaces under ion bombardment. Total sputtering yields obtained with this technique for Ar ion impact on polycrystalline gold and tungsten surfaces are presented. The results compare well with existing experimental data as well as theoretical predictions and thus demonstrate the feasibility of the developed technique. Our setup is capable of detecting mass-changes as small as 10{sup -5} {mu}g/s, which corresponds to a removal of only 10{sup -4} W monolayers/s.

  11. Analysis of UV-induced mutation spectra in Escherichia coli by DNA polymerase {eta} from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago, Maria Jesus [Departamento de Genetica, Facultad de Ciencias, Edificio Gregor Mendel, Campus Rabanales, Universidad de Cordoba (Spain); Alejandre-Duran, Encarna [Departamento de Genetica, Facultad de Ciencias, Edificio Gregor Mendel, Campus Rabanales, Universidad de Cordoba (Spain); Ruiz-Rubio, Manuel [Departamento de Genetica, Facultad de Ciencias, Edificio Gregor Mendel, Campus Rabanales, Universidad de Cordoba (Spain)]. E-mail: ge1rurum@uco.es

    2006-10-10

    DNA polymerase {eta} belongs to the Y-family of DNA polymerases, enzymes that are able to synthesize past template lesions that block replication fork progression. This polymerase accurately bypasses UV-associated cis-syn cyclobutane thymine dimers in vitro and therefore may contributes to resistance against sunlight in vivo, both ameliorating survival and decreasing the level of mutagenesis. We cloned and sequenced a cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana which encodes a protein containing several sequence motifs characteristics of Pol{eta} homologues, including a highly conserved sequence reported to be present in the active site of the Y-family DNA polymerases. The gene, named AtPOLH, contains 14 exons and 13 introns and is expressed in different plant tissues. A strain from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, deficient in Pol{eta} activity, was transformed with a yeast expression plasmid containing the AtPOLH cDNA. The rate of survival to UV irradiation in the transformed mutant increased to similar values of the wild type yeast strain, showing that AtPOLH encodes a functional protein. In addition, when AtPOLH is expressed in Escherichia coli, a change in the mutational spectra is detected when bacteria are irradiated with UV light. This observation might indicate that AtPOLH could compete with DNA polymerase V and then bypass cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers incorporating two adenylates.

  12. Growth parameter components of adaptive specificity during experimental evolution of the UVR-inducible mutator Pseudomonas cichorii 302959.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Weigand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutagenic DNA repair (MDR transiently increases mutation rate through the activation of low-fidelity repair polymerases in response to specific, DNA-damaging environmental stress conditions such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR exposure. These repair polymerases also confer UVR tolerance, intimately linking mutability and survival in bacteria that colone habitats subject to regular UVR exposure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we investigate adaptive specificity in experimental lineages of the highly UVR-mutable epiphytic plant pathogen Pseudomonas cichorii 302959. Relative fitness measurements of isolates and population samples from replicate lineages indicated that adaptive improvements emerged early in all lineages of our evolution experiment and specific increases in relative fitness correlated with distinct improvements in doubling and lag times. Adaptive improvements gained under UVR and non-UVR conditions were acquired preferentially, and differentially contributed to relative fitness under varied growth conditions. CONCLUSIONS: These results support our earlier observations that MDR activation may contribute to gains in relative fitness without impeding normal patterns of adaptive specificity in P. cichorii 302959.

  13. Analysis of UV-induced mutation spectra in Escherichia coli by DNA polymerase eta from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, María Jesús; Alejandre-Durán, Encarna; Ruiz-Rubio, Manuel

    2006-10-10

    DNA polymerase eta belongs to the Y-family of DNA polymerases, enzymes that are able to synthesize past template lesions that block replication fork progression. This polymerase accurately bypasses UV-associated cis-syn cyclobutane thymine dimers in vitro and therefore may contributes to resistance against sunlight in vivo, both ameliorating survival and decreasing the level of mutagenesis. We cloned and sequenced a cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana which encodes a protein containing several sequence motifs characteristics of Pol eta homologues, including a highly conserved sequence reported to be present in the active site of the Y-family DNA polymerases. The gene, named AtPOLH, contains 14 exons and 13 introns and is expressed in different plant tissues. A strain from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, deficient in Pol eta activity, was transformed with a yeast expression plasmid containing the AtPOLH cDNA. The rate of survival to UV irradiation in the transformed mutant increased to similar values of the wild type yeast strain, showing that AtPOLH encodes a functional protein. In addition, when AtPOLH is expressed in Escherichia coli, a change in the mutational spectra is detected when bacteria are irradiated with UV light. This observation might indicate that AtPOLH could compete with DNA polymerase V and then bypass cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers incorporating two adenylates.

  14. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from af pre-symptomatic carrier of a R406W mutation in microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) causing frontotemporal dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel A.; Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Hasholt, Lis Frydenreich

    2016-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts were obtained from a 28-year-old pre-symptomatic woman carrying a R406W mutation in microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT), known to cause frontotemporal dementia. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs) were established by electroporation with episomal plasmids containing hOCT4...

  15. Inducement of semitendinosus tendon regeneration to the pes anserinus after its harvest for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction-A new inducer grafting technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murakami Hidetaka

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To investigate the usefulness of the “inducer grafting” technique for regeneration of the semitendinosus (ST tendon after its harvest for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction. Methods Twenty knees of 20 patients (mean age at the time of surgery, 23.1 years underwent ACL reconstruction with a double bundle autograft using the ST tendon (7 patients and the ST + the gracilis (G tendons (13 patients. “Inducer grafting” technique After harvesting the ST tendon, a passing pin with a loop thread is inserted along with the tendon stripper. The passing pin is pulled out from the medial thigh and the loop thread retained. As an inducer graft, the ST tendon branch is used. After the ACL graft has been secured, the inducer graft is sutured to the pes anserinus and the proximal end passed through by pu