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Sample records for induced genomic instability

  1. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

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    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  2. Radiation-induced instability of human genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabchenko, N.N.; Demina, Eh.A.

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is dedicated to the phenomenon of radiation-induced genomic instability where the increased level of genomic changes in the offspring of irradiated cells is characteristic. Particular attention is paid to the problems of genomic instability induced by the low-dose radiation, role of the bystander effect in formation of radiation-induced instability, and its relationship with individual radiosensitivity. We believe that in accordance with the paradigm of modern radiobiology the increased human individual radiosensitivity can be formed due to the genome instability onset and is a significant risk factor for radiation-induced cancer

  3. Mechanisms of cadmium induced genomic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipič, Metka

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium is an ubiquitous environmental contaminant that represents hazard to humans and wildlife. It is found in the air, soil and water and, due to its extremely long half-life, accumulates in plants and animals. The main source of cadmium exposure for non-smoking human population is food. Cadmium is primarily toxic to the kidney, but has been also classified as carcinogenic to humans by several regulatory agencies. Current evidence suggests that exposure to cadmium induces genomic instability through complex and multifactorial mechanisms. Cadmium dose not induce direct DNA damage, however it induces increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which in turn induce DNA damage and can also interfere with cell signalling. More important seems to be cadmium interaction with DNA repair mechanisms, cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis as well as with epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression control. Cadmium mediated inhibition of DNA repair mechanisms and apoptosis leads to accumulation of cells with unrepaired DNA damage, which in turn increases the mutation rate and thus genomic instability. This increases the probability of developing not only cancer but also other diseases associated with genomic instability. In the in vitro experiments cadmium induced effects leading to genomic instability have been observed at low concentrations that were comparable to those observed in target organs and tissues of humans that were non-occupationally exposed to cadmium. Therefore, further studies aiming to clarify the relevance of these observations for human health risks due to cadmium exposure are needed.

  4. c-MYC-Induced Genomic Instability

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    Kuzyk, Alexandra; Mai, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    MYC dysregulation initiates a dynamic process of genomic instability that is linked to tumor initiation. Early studies using MYC-carrying retroviruses showed that these viruses were potent transforming agents. Cell culture models followed that addressed the role of MYC in transformation. With the advent of MYC transgenic mice, it became obvious that MYC deregulation alone was sufficient to initiate B-cell neoplasia in mice. More than 70% of all tumors have some form of c-MYC gene dysregulation, which affects gene regulation, microRNA expression profiles, large genomic amplifications, and the overall organization of the nucleus. These changes set the stage for the dynamic genomic rearrangements that are associated with cellular transformation. PMID:24692190

  5. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

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    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  6. Radiation induced genome instability: multiscale modelling and data analysis

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    Andreev, Sergey; Eidelman, Yuri

    2012-07-01

    Genome instability (GI) is thought to be an important step in cancer induction and progression. Radiation induced GI is usually defined as genome alterations in the progeny of irradiated cells. The aim of this report is to demonstrate an opportunity for integrative analysis of radiation induced GI on the basis of multiscale modelling. Integrative, systems level modelling is necessary to assess different pathways resulting in GI in which a variety of genetic and epigenetic processes are involved. The multilevel modelling includes the Monte Carlo based simulation of several key processes involved in GI: DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) generation in cells initially irradiated as well as in descendants of irradiated cells, damage transmission through mitosis. Taking the cell-cycle-dependent generation of DNA/chromosome breakage into account ensures an advantage in estimating the contribution of different DNA damage response pathways to GI, as to nonhomologous vs homologous recombination repair mechanisms, the role of DSBs at telomeres or interstitial chromosomal sites, etc. The preliminary estimates show that both telomeric and non-telomeric DSB interactions are involved in delayed effects of radiation although differentially for different cell types. The computational experiments provide the data on the wide spectrum of GI endpoints (dicentrics, micronuclei, nonclonal translocations, chromatid exchanges, chromosome fragments) similar to those obtained experimentally for various cell lines under various experimental conditions. The modelling based analysis of experimental data demonstrates that radiation induced GI may be viewed as processes of delayed DSB induction/interaction/transmission being a key for quantification of GI. On the other hand, this conclusion is not sufficient to understand GI as a whole because factors of DNA non-damaging origin can also induce GI. Additionally, new data on induced pluripotent stem cells reveal that GI is acquired in normal mature

  7. Dioxin induces genomic instability in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

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    Merja Korkalainen

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation and certain other exposures have been shown to induce genomic instability (GI, i.e., delayed genetic damage observed many cell generations later in the progeny of the exposed cells. The aim of this study was to investigate induction of GI by a nongenotoxic carcinogen, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (C3H10T1/2 were exposed to 1, 10 or 100 nM TCDD for 2 days. Micronuclei (MN and expression of selected cancer-related genes were assayed both immediately and at a delayed point in time (8 days. For comparison, similar experiments were done with cadmium, a known genotoxic agent. TCDD treatment induced an elevated frequency of MN at 8 days, but not directly after the exposure. TCDD-induced alterations in gene expression were also mostly delayed, with more changes observed at 8 days than at 2 days. Exposure to cadmium produced an opposite pattern of responses, with pronounced effects immediately after exposure but no increase in MN and few gene expression changes at 8 days. Although all responses to TCDD alone were delayed, menadione-induced DNA damage (measured by the Comet assay, was found to be increased directly after a 2-day TCDD exposure, indicating that the stability of the genome was compromised already at this time point. The results suggested a flat dose-response relationship consistent with dose-response data reported for radiation-induced GI. These findings indicate that TCDD, although not directly genotoxic, induces GI, which is associated with impaired DNA damage response.

  8. BLM protein mitigates formaldehyde-induced genomic instability.

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    Kumari, Anuradha; Owen, Nichole; Juarez, Eleonora; McCullough, Amanda K

    2015-04-01

    Formaldehyde is a reactive aldehyde that has been classified as a class I human carcinogen by the International Agency for Cancer Research. There are growing concerns over the possible adverse health effects related to the occupational and environmental human exposures to formaldehyde. Although formaldehyde-induced DNA and protein adducts have been identified, the genomic instability mechanisms and the cellular tolerance pathways associated with formaldehyde exposure are not fully characterized. This study specifically examines the role of a genome stability protein, Bloom (BLM) in limiting formaldehyde-induced cellular and genetic abnormalities. Here, we show that in the absence of BLM protein, formaldehyde-treated cells exhibited increased cellular sensitivity, an immediate cell cycle arrest, and an accumulation of chromosome radial structures. In addition, live-cell imaging experiments demonstrated that formaldehyde-treated cells are dependent on BLM for timely segregation of daughter cells. Both wild-type and BLM-deficient formaldehyde-treated cells showed an accumulation of 53BP1 and γH2AX foci indicative of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs); however, relative to wild-type cells, the BLM-deficient cells exhibited delayed repair of formaldehyde-induced DSBs. In response to formaldehyde exposure, we observed co-localization of 53BP1 and BLM foci at the DSB repair site, where ATM-dependent accumulation of formaldehyde-induced BLM foci occurred after the recruitment of 53BP1. Together, these findings highlight the significance of functional interactions among ATM, 53BP1, and BLM proteins as responders associated with the repair and tolerance mechanisms induced by formaldehyde. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Causes of genome instability

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    Langie, Sabine A S; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    , genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other......Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome's integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus...... chemicals present in our modern society could contribute to carcinogenesis by indirectly affecting genome stability. The selected chemicals with their mechanisms of action proposed to indirectly contribute to genome instability are: heavy metals (DNA repair, epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling...

  10. β-Catenin induces T-cell transformation by promoting genomic instability

    OpenAIRE

    Dose, Marei; Emmanuel, Akinola Olumide; Chaumeil, Julie; Zhang, Jiangwen; Sun, Tianjiao; Germar, Kristine; Aghajani, Katayoun; Davis, Elizabeth M.; Keerthivasan, Shilpa; Bredemeyer, Andrea L.; Sleckman, Barry P.; Rosen, Steven T.; Skok, Jane A.; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Georgopoulos, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Understanding molecular mechanisms that underlie genomic instability will remove a major obstacle to effective treatment of cancer. Here we characterize a unique animal model that allows insight into mechanisms of genomic instability leading to oncogenic translocations. We show that thymocyte-specific activation of β-catenin induces genomically unstable lymphomas with Tcra/Myc translocations, reminiscent of human leukemia. Tcf-1, the partner of β-catenin, colocalized throughout the genome wit...

  11. Pomegranate Intake Protects Against Genomic Instability Induced by Medical X-rays In Vivo in Mice.

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    Nallanthighal, Sameera; Shirode, Amit B; Judd, Julius A; Reliene, Ramune

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a well-documented human carcinogen. The increased use of IR in medical procedures has doubled the annual radiation dose and may increase cancer risk. Genomic instability is an intermediate lesion in IR-induced cancer. We examined whether pomegranate extract (PE) suppresses genomic instability induced by x-rays. Mice were treated orally with PE and exposed to an x-ray dose of 2 Gy. PE intake suppressed x-ray-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in peripheral blood and chromosomal damage in bone marrow. We hypothesized that PE-mediated protection against x-ray-induced damage may be due to the upregulation of DSB repair and antioxidant enzymes and/or increase in glutathione (GSH) levels. We found that expression of DSB repair genes was not altered (Nbs1 and Rad50) or was reduced (Mre11, DNA-PKcs, Ku80, Rad51, Rad52 and Brca2) in the liver of PE-treated mice. Likewise, mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes were reduced (Gpx1, Cat, and Sod2) or were not altered (HO-1 and Sod1) as a function of PE treatment. In contrast, PE-treated mice with and without IR exposure displayed higher hepatic GSH concentrations than controls. Thus, ingestion of pomegranate polyphenols is associated with inhibition of x-ray-induced genomic instability and elevated GSH, which may reduce cancer risk.

  12. Is delayed genomic instability specifically induced by high-LET particles?

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    Testard, Isabelle; Sabatier, Laure

    1998-12-01

    Ionizing radiation can induce a large variety of damages in the DNA. The processing or repair of this damage occurs in the first minutes up to several hours after irradiation. Afterwhile the remaining lesions are fixed in an irreparable state. However, in recent years, data have accumulated to suggest that genomic instability can manifest in the progeny of irradiated cells leading to accumulation of damage through cell generations. Different biological endpoints were described: delayed cell death, delayed mutations, de novo chromosomal instability. The question regarding the ability of sparsely ionizing X-or γ-rays to induce such phenomenon is still unclear for normal cells. In most of the reports, high linear energy transfer (LET) particles are able to induce genomic instability but not low-LET particles. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are still unknown. In human fibroblasts irradiated by heavy ions in a large range of LETs, we showed that the chromosomal instability is characterized by telomeric associations (TAS) involving specific chromosomes. The same instability is observed during the senescence process and during the first passages after viral transfection. The specific chromosomal instability that we observed after irradiation would not be a direct consequence of irradiation but would be a natural phenomenon occurring after many cell divisions. The effect of the irradiation would lie on the bypass of the senescence process that would permit cells with end to end fusions to survive and be transmitted through cell generations, accumulating chromosome rearrangements and chromosome imbalances. Research on molecular mechanisms of chromosomal instability is focused on the role of telomeres in end to end fusions. Such observations could contribute to understand why chromosomal instability is not a dose dependant phenomenon. Why high-LET particles would be so potent in inducing delayed instability? The answer might lie in the study of primary effects of

  13. Genomic instability and radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian Streffer

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Cancer, genetic mutations and developmental abnormalities are apparently associated with an increased genomic instability. Such phenomena have been frequently shown in human cancer cells in vitro and in situ. It is also well-known that individuals with a genetic predisposition for cancer proneness, such as ataxia telangiectesia, Fanconi anaemia etc. demonstrate a general high genomic instability e.g. in peripheral lymphocytes before a cancer has developed. Analogous data have been found in mice which develop a specific congenital malformation which has a genetic background. Under these aspects it is of high interest that ionising radiation can increase the genomic instability of mammalian cells after exposures in vitro an in vivo. This phenomenon is expressed 20 to 40 cell cycles after the exposure e.g. by de novo chromosomal aberrations. Such effects have been observed with high and low LET radiation, high LET radiation is more efficient. With low LET radiation a good dose response is observed in the dose range 0.2 to 2.0 Gy, Recently it has been reported that senescence and genomic instability was induced in human fibroblasts after 1 mGy carbon ions (1 in 18 cells are hit), apparently bystander effects also occurred under these conditions. The instability has been shown with DNA damage, chromosomal aberrations, gene mutation and cell death. It is also transferred to the next generation of mice with respect to gene mutations, chromosomal aberrations and congenital malformations. Several mechanisms have been discussed. The involvement of telomeres has gained interest. Genomic instability seems to be induced by a general lesion to the whole genome. The transmission of one chromosome from an irradiated cell to an non-irradiated cell leads to genomic instability in the untreated cells. Genomic instability increases mutation rates in the affected cells in general. As radiation late effects (cancer, gene mutations and congenital

  14. Transposable elements as stress adaptive capacitors induce genomic instability in fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae.

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    Sonia Chadha

    Full Text Available A fundamental problem in fungal pathogenesis is to elucidate the evolutionary forces responsible for genomic rearrangements leading to races with fitter genotypes. Understanding the adaptive evolutionary mechanisms requires identification of genomic components and environmental factors reshaping the genome of fungal pathogens to adapt. Herein, Magnaporthe oryzae, a model fungal plant pathogen is used to demonstrate the impact of environmental cues on transposable elements (TE based genome dynamics. For heat shock and copper stress exposed samples, eight TEs belonging to class I and II family were employed to obtain DNA profiles. Stress induced mutant bands showed a positive correlation with dose/duration of stress and provided evidences of TEs role in stress adaptiveness. Further, we demonstrate that genome dynamics differ for the type/family of TEs upon stress exposition and previous reports of stress induced MAGGY transposition has underestimated the role of TEs in M. oryzae. Here, we identified Pyret, MAGGY, Pot3, MINE, Mg-SINE, Grasshopper and MGLR3 as contributors of high genomic instability in M. oryzae in respective order. Sequencing of mutated bands led to the identification of LTR-retrotransposon sequences within regulatory regions of psuedogenes. DNA transposon Pot3 was identified in the coding regions of chromatin remodelling protein containing tyrosinase copper-binding and PWWP domains. LTR-retrotransposons Pyret and MAGGY are identified as key components responsible for the high genomic instability and perhaps these TEs are utilized by M. oryzae for its acclimatization to adverse environmental conditions. Our results demonstrate how common field stresses change genome dynamics of pathogen and provide perspective to explore the role of TEs in genome adaptability, signalling network and its impact on the virulence of fungal pathogens.

  15. Genomic instability induced by 60Co γ ray radiation in normal human liver cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gen Xiaohua; Guo Xianhua; Zuo Yahui; Wang Xiaoli; Wang Zhongwen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the genomic instability induced by 60 Co γ rays. Methods: The cloning efficiency and micronucleus efficiency of normal human liver cell irradiated by 60 Co γ rays were detected, and the method of single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) was carried out to measure DNA chains damage. The fast-growing cells were divided into different dose-groups and then irradiated by 60 Co γ rays. After 40 populations doubling, the progenies were secondly irradiated with 2 Gy 60 Co γ rays. Results: The cloning efficiency decreased with the increase of doses after the initial irradiation. After the survival cells were given second irradiation, both results of SCGE and micronucleus frequency showed that the second damage was correlated with the original irradiation doses. Conclusions: 60 Co γ rays can not only induce the immediate biological effects in liver cells, but also lead to the genomic instability in the descendants that leads to an enhanced frequency of genetic changes occurring among the progeny of the original irradiated cell. The expanding effect of second event helps to study the genomic instability. (authors)

  16. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression induces genomic instability in MCF10A breast epithelial cells.

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    Singh, Balraj; Vincent, Laura; Berry, Jacob A; Multani, Asha S; Lucci, Anthony

    2007-06-15

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is induced in many breast cancers and COX-2 expression correlates with a worse outcome in the clinic. We hypothesized that the induction of genomic instability is a major mechanism through which COX-2 contributes to breast cancer progression. We transfected a normal immortalized breast epithelial cell line of Basal B subtype, MCF10A, with the pSG5-COX-2 vector and established the stably transfected cell line MCF10A/COX-2. We analyzed the genomic instability phenotype by chromosomal analysis of metaphase-arrested MCF10A and MCF10A/COX-2 cells after Giemsa staining. Groups were compared using chi(2) tests. To investigate the DNA damage checkpoint signaling, we analyzed the phosphorylation status of CHK1 protein with a phospho-specific antibody. Cytogenetic analysis of early passage transfected cells showed that COX-2 expression increased genomic instability compared with the MCF10A cells transfected with a luciferase vector alone. COX-2 overexpression was associated with a significant increase in chromosomal aberrations (fusions, breaks, and tetraploidy). There was a statistically significant increase in the number of polyploid cells in the COX-2 transfected cells versus the control (P=0.004). We also found that an inhibitory CHK1 phosphorylation at Ser-280 was dramatically increased upon COX-2 overexpression in MCF10A cells, thus explaining the mechanism of inactivation of an important cell cycle checkpoint. Further analysis of the MCF10A/COX-2 cells showed that these cells have acquired a premalignant phenotype characterized by a morphological transformation, a resistance to anoikis, a reduced requirement of epidermal growth factor for growth in culture, but their inability to establish tumors in a nude mouse model of malignancy. We found that COX-2 expression in MCF10A breast epithelial cells confers a premalignant phenotype that includes enhanced genomic instability and altered cell-cycle regulation.

  17. Upregulation of FOXM1 induces genomic instability in human epidermal keratinocytes

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    Philpott Michael P

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human cell cycle transcription factor FOXM1 is known to play a key role in regulating timely mitotic progression and accurate chromosomal segregation during cell division. Deregulation of FOXM1 has been linked to a majority of human cancers. We previously showed that FOXM1 was upregulated in basal cell carcinoma and recently reported that upregulation of FOXM1 precedes malignancy in a number of solid human cancer types including oral, oesophagus, lung, breast, kidney, bladder and uterus. This indicates that upregulation of FOXM1 may be an early molecular signal required for aberrant cell cycle and cancer initiation. Results The present study investigated the putative early mechanism of UVB and FOXM1 in skin cancer initiation. We have demonstrated that UVB dose-dependently increased FOXM1 protein levels through protein stabilisation and accumulation rather than de novo mRNA expression in human epidermal keratinocytes. FOXM1 upregulation in primary human keratinocytes triggered pro-apoptotic/DNA-damage checkpoint response genes such as p21, p38 MAPK, p53 and PARP, however, without causing significant cell cycle arrest or cell death. Using a high-resolution Affymetrix genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP mapping technique, we provided the evidence that FOXM1 upregulation in epidermal keratinocytes is sufficient to induce genomic instability, in the form of loss of heterozygosity (LOH and copy number variations (CNV. FOXM1-induced genomic instability was significantly enhanced and accumulated with increasing cell passage and this instability was increased even further upon exposure to UVB resulting in whole chromosomal gain (7p21.3-7q36.3 and segmental LOH (6q25.1-6q25.3. Conclusion We hypothesise that prolonged and repeated UVB exposure selects for skin cells bearing stable FOXM1 protein causes aberrant cell cycle checkpoint thereby allowing ectopic cell cycle entry and subsequent genomic instability. The aberrant

  18. Genomic instability in rat: Breakpoints induced by ionising radiation and interstitial telomeric-like sequences

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    Camats, Nuria [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora [Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Parrilla, Juan Jose [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Ctra, Madrid-Cartagena, s/n, El Palmar, 30120 Murcia (Spain); Acien, Maribel [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Ctra, Madrid-Cartagena, s/n, El Palmar, 30120 Murcia (Spain); Paya, Pilar [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Ctra, Madrid-Cartagena, s/n, El Palmar, 30120 Murcia (Spain); Giulotto, Elena [Dipartimento di Genetica e Microbiologia Adriano Buzzati Traverso, Universita degli Studi di Pavia, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Egozcue, Josep [Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Francisca [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Montserrat [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain) and Departament de Biologia Cellular, Fisiologia i Immunologia Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: Montserrat.Garcia.Caldes@uab.es

    2006-03-20

    The Norwegian rat (Rattus norvegicus) is the most widely studied experimental species in biomedical research although little is known about its chromosomal structure. The characterisation of possible unstable regions of the karyotype of this species would contribute to the better understanding of its genomic architecture. The cytogenetic effects of ionising radiation have been widely used for the study of genomic instability, and the importance of interstitial telomeric-like sequences (ITSs) in instability of the genome has also been reported in previous studies in vertebrates. In order to describe the unstable chromosomal regions of R. norvegicus, the distribution of breakpoints induced by X-irradiation and ITSs in its karyotype were analysed in this work. For the X-irradiation analysis, 52 foetuses (from 14 irradiated rats) were studied, 4803 metaphases were analysed, and a total of 456 breakpoints induced by X-rays were detected, located in 114 chromosomal bands, with 25 of them significantly affected by X-irradiation (hot spots). For the analysis of ITSs, three foetuses (from three rats) were studied, 305 metaphases were analysed and 121 ITSs were detected, widely distributed in the karyotype of this species. Seventy-six percent of all hot spots analysed in this study were co-localised with ITSs.

  19. Genomic instability in rat: Breakpoints induced by ionising radiation and interstitial telomeric-like sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camats, Nuria; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora; Parrilla, Juan Jose; Acien, Maribel; Paya, Pilar; Giulotto, Elena; Egozcue, Josep; Garcia, Francisca; Garcia, Montserrat

    2006-01-01

    The Norwegian rat (Rattus norvegicus) is the most widely studied experimental species in biomedical research although little is known about its chromosomal structure. The characterisation of possible unstable regions of the karyotype of this species would contribute to the better understanding of its genomic architecture. The cytogenetic effects of ionising radiation have been widely used for the study of genomic instability, and the importance of interstitial telomeric-like sequences (ITSs) in instability of the genome has also been reported in previous studies in vertebrates. In order to describe the unstable chromosomal regions of R. norvegicus, the distribution of breakpoints induced by X-irradiation and ITSs in its karyotype were analysed in this work. For the X-irradiation analysis, 52 foetuses (from 14 irradiated rats) were studied, 4803 metaphases were analysed, and a total of 456 breakpoints induced by X-rays were detected, located in 114 chromosomal bands, with 25 of them significantly affected by X-irradiation (hot spots). For the analysis of ITSs, three foetuses (from three rats) were studied, 305 metaphases were analysed and 121 ITSs were detected, widely distributed in the karyotype of this species. Seventy-six percent of all hot spots analysed in this study were co-localised with ITSs

  20. The Role of DNA Methylation Changes in Radiation-Induced Transgenerational Genomic Instability and Bystander Effects in cranial irradiated Mice

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    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Gao, Yinglong; Zhang, Baodong

    Heavy-ion radiation could lead to genome instability in the germline, and therefore to transgenerational genome and epigenome instability in offspring of exposed males. The exact mechanisms of radiation-induced genome instability in directly exposed and in bystander organ remain obscure, yet accumulating evidence points to the role of DNA methylation changes in genome instability development. The potential of localized body-part exposures to affect the germline and thus induce genome and epigenome changes in the progeny has not been studied. To investigate whether or not the paternal cranial irradiation can exert deleterious changes in the protected germline and the offsprings, we studied the alteration of DNA methylation in the shielded testes tissue. Here we report that the localized paternal cranial irradiation results in a significant altered DNA methylation in sperm cells and leads to a profound epigenetic dysregulation in the unexposed progeny conceived 3 months after paternal exposure. The possible molecular mechanisms and biological consequences of the observed changes are discussed. Keywords: Heavy-ion radiation; Transgenerational effect; Genomic Instability Bystander Effects; DNA methylation.

  1. RECQL5 Suppresses Oncogenic JAK2-Induced Replication Stress and Genomic Instability

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    Edwin Chen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available JAK2V617F is the most common oncogenic lesion in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs. Despite the ability of JAK2V617F to instigate DNA damage in vitro, MPNs are nevertheless characterized by genomic stability. In this study, we address this paradox by identifying the DNA helicase RECQL5 as a suppressor of genomic instability in MPNs. We report increased RECQL5 expression in JAK2V617F-expressing cells and demonstrate that RECQL5 is required to counteract JAK2V617F-induced replication stress. Moreover, RECQL5 depletion sensitizes JAK2V617F mutant cells to hydroxyurea (HU, a pharmacological inducer of replication stress and the most common treatment for MPNs. Using single-fiber chromosome combing, we show that RECQL5 depletion in JAK2V617F mutant cells impairs replication dynamics following HU treatment, resulting in increased double-stranded breaks and apoptosis. Cumulatively, these findings identify RECQL5 as a critical regulator of genome stability in MPNs and demonstrate that replication stress-associated cytotoxicity can be amplified specifically in JAK2V617F mutant cells through RECQL5-targeted synthetic lethality.

  2. RECQL5 Suppresses Oncogenic JAK2-Induced Replication Stress and Genomic Instability.

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    Chen, Edwin; Ahn, Jong Sook; Sykes, David B; Breyfogle, Lawrence J; Godfrey, Anna L; Nangalia, Jyoti; Ko, Amy; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Green, Anthony R; Mullally, Ann

    2015-12-22

    JAK2V617F is the most common oncogenic lesion in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). Despite the ability of JAK2V617F to instigate DNA damage in vitro, MPNs are nevertheless characterized by genomic stability. In this study, we address this paradox by identifying the DNA helicase RECQL5 as a suppressor of genomic instability in MPNs. We report increased RECQL5 expression in JAK2V617F-expressing cells and demonstrate that RECQL5 is required to counteract JAK2V617F-induced replication stress. Moreover, RECQL5 depletion sensitizes JAK2V617F mutant cells to hydroxyurea (HU), a pharmacological inducer of replication stress and the most common treatment for MPNs. Using single-fiber chromosome combing, we show that RECQL5 depletion in JAK2V617F mutant cells impairs replication dynamics following HU treatment, resulting in increased double-stranded breaks and apoptosis. Cumulatively, these findings identify RECQL5 as a critical regulator of genome stability in MPNs and demonstrate that replication stress-associated cytotoxicity can be amplified specifically in JAK2V617F mutant cells through RECQL5-targeted synthetic lethality. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bystander effects in UV-induced genomic instability: Antioxidants inhibit delayed mutagenesis induced by ultraviolet A and B radiation

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    Dahle Jostein

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic instability is characteristic of many types of human cancer. Recently, we reported that ultraviolet radiation induced elevated mutation rates and chromosomal instability for many cell generations after ultraviolet irradiation. The increased mutation rates of unstable cells may allow them to accumulate aberrations that subsequently lead to cancer. Ultraviolet A radiation, which primarily acts by oxidative stress, and ultraviolet B radiation, which initially acts by absorption in DNA and direct damage to DNA, both produced genomically unstable cell clones. In this study, we have determined the effect of antioxidants on induction of delayed mutations by ultraviolet radiation. Delayed mutations are indicative of genomic instability. Methods Delayed mutations in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt gene were detected by incubating the cells in medium selectively killing hprt mutants for 8 days after irradiation, followed by a 5 day period in normal medium before determining mutation frequencies. Results The UVB-induced delayed hprt mutations were strongly inhibited by the antioxidants catalase, reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase, while only reduced glutathione had a significant effect on UVA-induced delayed mutations. Treatment with antioxidants had only minor effects on early mutation frequenies, except that reduced glutathione decreased the UVB-induced early mutation frequency by 24 %. Incubation with reduced glutathione was shown to significantly increase the intracellular amount of reduced glutathione. Conclusion The strong effects of these antioxidants indicate that genomic instability, which is induced by the fundamentally different ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B radiation, is mediated by reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide and downstream products. However, cells take up neither catalase nor SOD, while incubation with glutathione resulted in increased intracellular levels of

  4. Radiation-induced genomic instability: Are epigenetic mechanisms the missing link?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aypar, Umut; Morgan, William F.; Baulch, Janet E.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: This review examines the evidence for the hypothesis that epigenetics are involved in the initiation and perpetuation of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI). Conclusion: In addition to the extensively studied targeted effects of radiation, it is now apparent that non-targeted delayed effects such as RIGI are also important post-irradiation outcomes. In RIGI, unirradiated progeny cells display phenotypic changes at delayed times after radiation of the parental cell. RIGI is thought to be important in the process of carcinogenesis, however, the mechanism by which this occurs remains to be elucidated. In the genomically unstable clones developed by Morgan and colleagues, radiation-induced mutations, double-strand breaks, or changes in mRNA levels alone could not account for the initiation or perpetuation of RIGI. Since changes in the DNA sequence could not fully explain the mechanism of RIGI, inherited epigenetic changes may be involved. Epigenetics are known to play an important role in many cellular processes and epigenetic aberrations can lead to carcinogenesis. Recent studies in the field of radiation biology suggest that the changes in methylation patterns may be involved in RIGI. Together these clues have led us to hypothesize that epigenetics may be the missing link in understanding the mechanism behind RIGI.

  5. Distinct Mechanisms of Nuclease-Directed DNA-Structure-Induced Genetic Instability in Cancer Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junhua; Wang, Guliang; Del Mundo, Imee M; McKinney, Jennifer A; Lu, Xiuli; Bacolla, Albino; Boulware, Stephen B; Zhang, Changsheng; Zhang, Haihua; Ren, Pengyu; Freudenreich, Catherine H; Vasquez, Karen M

    2018-01-30

    Sequences with the capacity to adopt alternative DNA structures have been implicated in cancer etiology; however, the mechanisms are unclear. For example, H-DNA-forming sequences within oncogenes have been shown to stimulate genetic instability in mammals. Here, we report that H-DNA-forming sequences are enriched at translocation breakpoints in human cancer genomes, further implicating them in cancer etiology. H-DNA-induced mutations were suppressed in human cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair nucleases, ERCC1-XPF and XPG, but were stimulated in cells deficient in FEN1, a replication-related endonuclease. Further, we found that these nucleases cleaved H-DNA conformations, and the interactions of modeled H-DNA with ERCC1-XPF, XPG, and FEN1 proteins were explored at the sub-molecular level. The results suggest mechanisms of genetic instability triggered by H-DNA through distinct structure-specific, cleavage-based replication-independent and replication-dependent pathways, providing critical evidence for a role of the DNA structure itself in the etiology of cancer and other human diseases. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiation and chemotherapy bystander effects induce early genomic instability events: Telomere shortening and bridge formation coupled with mitochondrial dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, Sheeona; Tosetto, Miriam [Centre for Colorectal Disease, St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Lyng, Fiona; Howe, Orla [Radiation and Environmental Science Centre, Dublin Institute of Technology and St. Luke' s Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Sheahan, Kieran; O' Donoghue, Diarmuid; Hyland, John; Mulcahy, Hugh [Centre for Colorectal Disease, St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); O' Sullivan, Jacintha, E-mail: jacintha.osullivan@ucd.ie [Centre for Colorectal Disease, St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2009-10-02

    The bridge breakage fusion cycle is a chromosomal instability mechanism responsible for genomic changes. Radiation bystander effects induce genomic instability; however, the mechanism driving this instability is unknown. We examined if radiation and chemotherapy bystander effects induce early genomic instability events such as telomere shortening and bridge formation using a human colon cancer explant model. We assessed telomere lengths, bridge formations, mitochondrial membrane potential and levels of reactive oxygen species in bystander cells exposed to medium from irradiated and chemotherapy-treated explant tissues. Bystander cells exposed to media from 2 Gy, 5 Gy, FOLFOX treated tumor and matching normal tissue showed a significant reduction in telomere lengths (all p values <0.018) and an increase in bridge formations (all p values <0.017) compared to bystander cells treated with media from unirradiated tissue (0 Gy) at 24 h. There was no significant difference between 2 Gy and 5 Gy treatments, or between effects elicited by tumor versus matched normal tissue. Bystander cells exposed to media from 2 Gy irradiated tumor tissue showed significant depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane potential (p = 0.012) and an increase in reactive oxygen species levels. We also used bystander cells overexpressing a mitochondrial antioxidant manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) to examine if this antioxidant could rescue the mitochondrial changes and subsequently influence nuclear instability events. In MnSOD cells, ROS levels were reduced (p = 0.02) and mitochondrial membrane potential increased (p = 0.04). These events were coupled with a decrease in percentage of cells with anaphase bridges and a decrease in the number of cells undergoing telomere length shortening (p values 0.01 and 0.028 respectively). We demonstrate that radiation and chemotherapy bystander responses induce early genomic instability coupled with defects in mitochondrial function. Restoring

  7. Radiation and chemotherapy bystander effects induce early genomic instability events: telomere shortening and bridge formation coupled with mitochondrial dysfunction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, Sheeona

    2012-02-01

    The bridge breakage fusion cycle is a chromosomal instability mechanism responsible for genomic changes. Radiation bystander effects induce genomic instability; however, the mechanism driving this instability is unknown. We examined if radiation and chemotherapy bystander effects induce early genomic instability events such as telomere shortening and bridge formation using a human colon cancer explant model. We assessed telomere lengths, bridge formations, mitochondrial membrane potential and levels of reactive oxygen species in bystander cells exposed to medium from irradiated and chemotherapy-treated explant tissues. Bystander cells exposed to media from 2Gy, 5Gy, FOLFOX treated tumor and matching normal tissue showed a significant reduction in telomere lengths (all p values <0.018) and an increase in bridge formations (all p values <0.017) compared to bystander cells treated with media from unirradiated tissue (0Gy) at 24h. There was no significant difference between 2Gy and 5Gy treatments, or between effects elicited by tumor versus matched normal tissue. Bystander cells exposed to media from 2Gy irradiated tumor tissue showed significant depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane potential (p=0.012) and an increase in reactive oxygen species levels. We also used bystander cells overexpressing a mitochondrial antioxidant manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) to examine if this antioxidant could rescue the mitochondrial changes and subsequently influence nuclear instability events. In MnSOD cells, ROS levels were reduced (p=0.02) and mitochondrial membrane potential increased (p=0.04). These events were coupled with a decrease in percentage of cells with anaphase bridges and a decrease in the number of cells undergoing telomere length shortening (p values 0.01 and 0.028 respectively). We demonstrate that radiation and chemotherapy bystander responses induce early genomic instability coupled with defects in mitochondrial function. Restoring mitochondrial

  8. Radiation-induced genomic instability driven by de novo chromosomal rearrangement hot spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosovsky, A.J.; Allen, R.N.; Moore, S.R.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability has become generally recognized as a critical contributor to tumor progression by generating the necessary number of genetic alterations required for expression of a clinically significant malignancy. Our study of chromosomal instability investigates the hypothesis that chromosomal rearrangements can generate novel breakage-prone sites, resulting in instability acting predominantly in cis. Here we present an analysis of the karyotypic distribution of instability associated chromosomal rearrangements in TK6 and derivative human lymphoblasts. Karyotypic analysis performed on a total of 455 independent clones included 183 rearrangements distributed among 100 separate unstable clones. The results demonstrate that the breakpoints of chromosomal rearrangements in unstable clones are non-randomly distributed throughout the genome. This pattern is statistically significant, and incompatible with expectations for random breakage associated with loss or alteration of a trans-acting factor. Furthermore, specific chromosomal breakage hot spots associated with instability have been identified; these occur in several independent unstable clones and are often repeatedly broken and rejoined during the outgrowth of an individual clone. In complimentary studies, genomic instability was generated without any exposure to a DNA-damaging agent, but rather by transfection with alpha heterochromatin DNA. In a prospective analysis, human-hamster hybrid AL cells containing a single human chromosome 11 were transfected with heterochromatic alpha DNA repeats and clones were analyzed by chromosome 11 painting. Transfection with alpha DNA was associated with karyotypic heterogeneity in 40% of clones examined; control transfections with plasmid alone did not lead to karyotypic heterogeneity

  9. The role of radiation types and dose in induced genomic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadhim Munira, A.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Genomic Instability (GI) is defined as long-term alterations induced by low-dose exposure to a variety of genotoxic agents in mammalian cells that act to increase the 'apparent' spontaneous mutation frequency.GI is a hallmark of tumorigenic progression and is observed in the progeny of irradiated and bystander cells as the delayed and stochastic appearance of de novo chromosomal aberrations, gene mutations and delayed lethal mutations both in vitro and in vivo. It occurs at a frequency several orders of magnitude greater than would be expected for mutation in a single gene, implying that GI is a multigenic phenomenon. The expression of GI can be influenced by genotype, cell type and radiation quality; however the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. While several studies have demonstrated GI induction by high and low LET radiation, our work on human and mouse primary cell systems has shown significant differences in the capacity to induce GI and the spectrum of alterations depending on LET. These differences might be attributed to differences in radiation track structure, radiation dose and radiation exposure regime (distribution of hit and un hit cells). In this presentation I shall review the role of radiation quality; describe the possible mechanisms underlining the observed differences between radiation type and present results of experiments demonstrating that the dose of low LET radiation might be the most significant factor in determining the role of radiation type in the induction of GI.

  10. Complex DNA Damage: A Route to Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability and Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifigeneia V. Mavragani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cellular effects of ionizing radiation (IR are of great variety and level, but they are mainly damaging since radiation can perturb all important components of the cell, from the membrane to the nucleus, due to alteration of different biological molecules ranging from lipids to proteins or DNA. Regarding DNA damage, which is the main focus of this review, as well as its repair, all current knowledge indicates that IR-induced DNA damage is always more complex than the corresponding endogenous damage resulting from endogenous oxidative stress. Specifically, it is expected that IR will create clusters of damage comprised of a diversity of DNA lesions like double strand breaks (DSBs, single strand breaks (SSBs and base lesions within a short DNA region of up to 15–20 bp. Recent data from our groups and others support two main notions, that these damaged clusters are: (1 repair resistant, increasing genomic instability (GI and malignant transformation and (2 can be considered as persistent “danger” signals promoting chronic inflammation and immune response, causing detrimental effects to the organism (like radiation toxicity. Last but not least, the paradigm shift for the role of radiation-induced systemic effects is also incorporated in this picture of IR-effects and consequences of complex DNA damage induction and its erroneous repair.

  11. Genomic instability induced by 137Cs γ-ray irradiation in CHL surviving cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Jingyin; Liu Bingchen; Wu Hongying; Zhou Jiwen; Mu Chuanjie

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study in parallel several possible manifestations of instability of surviving CHL cells after irradiation, namely the frequencies of mutation at locus, micronuclei and apoptosis. Methods: The frequencies of mutation at HGPRT locus, micronuclei and apoptosis were assayed at various times in surviving cells irradiated with γ-rays. Results: The surviving cells showed a persistently increased frequency of mutation at the HGPRT locus after irradiation until 53 days. Mutant fraction as high as 10 -4 was scored, tens of times higher than those assayed in control cells studied in parallel. The frequency of bi nucleated cells with micronuclei determined within 24 hours after irradiation increased with dose and reached a peak value of (26.58 +- 2.48)% at 3 Gy, decreasing at higher doses to a plateau around 20%. The micronucleus frequency decreased steeply to about (14.47 +- 2.39)% within the first 3 days post-irradiation, and fluctuated at around 10% up to 56 days post-irradiation. The delayed efficiency of irradiated cells was significantly decreased. The frequency of apoptosis peaked about (24.90 +- 4.72)% at 10 Gy 48 h post-irradiation (γ-ray dose between 3-10 Gy) and then decreased to about 12% within 3 days. It was significantly higher than in control cells until 14 days. Conclusions: It shows that genomic instability induced by radiation can be transmitted to the progeny of surviving cells and may take many forms of expression such as lethal mutation, chromosome aberrations, gene mutation, etc

  12. Formaldehyde-Induced Genome Instability is Suppressed by an XPF-dependent Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Anuradha; Lim, Yun Xin; Newell, Amy Hanlon; Olson, Susan B.; McCullough, Amanda K.

    2011-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a reactive chemical that is commonly used in the production of industrial, laboratory, household, and cosmetic products. The causal association between formaldehyde exposure and increased incidence of cancer led the International Agency for Research on Cancer to classify formaldehyde as a carcinogen. Formaldehyde-induced DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) elicit responses involving nucleotide excision repair (NER) and homologous recombination (HR) repair pathways; however, little is known about the cellular and genetic changes that subsequently lead to formaldehyde-induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects. Herein, investigations of genes that modulate the cytotoxic effects of formaldehyde exposure revealed that of five NER-deficient Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines tested, XPF- and ERCC1-deficient cells were most sensitive to formaldehyde treatment as compared to wild-type cells. Cell cycle analyses revealed that formaldehyde-treated XPF-deficient cells exhibited an immediate G2/M arrest that was associated with altered cell ploidy and apoptosis. Additionally, an elevated number of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), chromosomal breaks and radial formation were also observed in XPF-deficient cells following formaldehyde treatment. Formaldehyde-induced DSBs occurred in a replication-dependent, but an XPF-independent manner. However, delayed DSB repair was observed in the absence of XPF function. Collectively, our findings highlight the role of an XPF-dependent pathway in mitigating the sensitivity to formaldehyde-induced DNA damage as evidenced by the increased genomic instability and reduced cell viability in an XPF-deficient background. In addition, centrosome and microtubule abnormalities, as well as enlarged nuclei, caused by formaldehyde exposure are also demonstrated in a repair-proficient cell line. PMID:22186232

  13. Double-strand break repair-adox: Restoration of suppressed double-strand break repair during mitosis induces genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, Masahiro; Shinohara, Akira; Shinohara, Miki

    2014-12-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the severest types of DNA damage. Unrepaired DSBs easily induce cell death and chromosome aberrations. To maintain genomic stability, cells have checkpoint and DSB repair systems to respond to DNA damage throughout most of the cell cycle. The failure of this process often results in apoptosis or genomic instability, such as aneuploidy, deletion, or translocation. Therefore, DSB repair is essential for maintenance of genomic stability. During mitosis, however, cells seem to suppress the DNA damage response and proceed to the next G1 phase, even if there are unrepaired DSBs. The biological significance of this suppression is not known. In this review, we summarize recent studies of mitotic DSB repair and discuss the mechanisms of suppression of DSB repair during mitosis. DSB repair, which maintains genomic integrity in other phases of the cell cycle, is rather toxic to cells during mitosis, often resulting in chromosome missegregation and aberration. Cells have multiple safeguards to prevent genomic instability during mitosis: inhibition of 53BP1 or BRCA1 localization to DSB sites, which is important to promote non-homologous end joining or homologous recombination, respectively, and also modulation of the non-homologous end joining core complex to inhibit DSB repair. We discuss how DSBs during mitosis are toxic and the multiple safeguard systems that suppress genomic instability. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  14. Genomic instability and bystander effects induced by high-LET radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Eric J; Hei, Tom K

    2003-10-13

    An understanding of the radiobiological effects of high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation is essential for radiation protection and human risk assessment. Ever since the discovery of X-rays was made by Röntgen more than a century ago, it has always been accepted that the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation, such as mutation and carcinogenesis, are due mainly to direct damage to DNA. With the availability of a precision single-particle microbeam, it is possible to demonstrate, unequivocally, the presence of a bystander effect with many biological end points. These studies provide clear evidence that irradiated cells can induce a bystander mutagenic response in neighboring cells not directly traversed by alpha-particles, and that cell-cell communication processes play a critical role in mediating the bystander phenomenon. Following exposure to high-LET radiation, immortalized human bronchial (BEP2D) and breast (MCF-10F) cells have been shown to undergo malignant transformation through a series of successive steps, before becoming tumorigenic in nude mice. There is a progressive increase in genomic instability, determined either by gene amplification or allelic imbalance, with the highest incidence observed among established tumor cell lines, relative to transformed, nontumorigenic and control cell lines.

  15. Long-term persistence of X-ray-induced genomic instability in quiescent normal human diploid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Keiji; Kashino, Genro; Kodama, Seiji; Watanabe, Masami

    2009-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can induce genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells, as was demonstrated in various experimental systems. Most in vitro studies have utilized replicating cells, but it is not clear whether radiation-induced genomic instability persists in quiescent cells. Here we show the induction of X-ray-induced genomic instability in normal human diploid cells irradiated and maintained in a quiescent state for up to 24 months while cells were subcultured approximately once every 2-3 months. Every 12 months, a fraction of the irradiated cell population was stimulated to divide by culturing at a low density, and we found that these cells showed increased frequencies of phosphorylated ATM foci, decreased colony-forming ability, and increased frequency of chromosomal aberrations. No significant increases in ROS levels were detected in long-term cultured cells. These results suggest that there are ROS-independent mechanism(s) induced by radiation, which can generate persistent delayed effects in quiescent cells, and could ultimately contribute to carcinogenesis.

  16. Accumulation of abasic sites induces genomic instability in normal human gastric epithelial cells during Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidane, D; Murphy, D L; Sweasy, J B

    2014-11-24

    Helicobacter pylori infection of the human stomach is associated with inflammation that leads to the release of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONs), eliciting DNA damage in host cells. Unrepaired DNA damage leads to genomic instability that is associated with cancer. Base excision repair (BER) is critical to maintain genomic stability during RONs-induced DNA damage, but little is known about its role in processing DNA damage associated with H. pylori infection of normal gastric epithelial cells. Here, we show that upon H. pylori infection, abasic (AP) sites accumulate and lead to increased levels of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs). In contrast, downregulation of the OGG1 DNA glycosylase decreases the levels of both AP sites and DSBs during H. pylori infection. Processing of AP sites during different phases of the cell cycle leads to an elevation in the levels of DSBs. Therefore, the induction of oxidative DNA damage by H. pylori and subsequent processing by BER in normal gastric epithelial cells has the potential to lead to genomic instability that may have a role in the development of gastric cancer. Our results are consistent with the interpretation that precise coordination of BER processing of DNA damage is critical for the maintenance of genomic stability.

  17. Non-homologous end-joining genes are not inactivated in human radiation-induced sarcomas with genomic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, S.H.; Coquelle, A.; Gonin-Laurent, N.

    2005-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways are implicated in the maintenance of genomic stability. However the alterations of these pathways, as may occur in human tumor cells with strong genomic instability, remain poorly characterized. We analyzed the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and the presence of mutations for a series of genes implicated in DSB repair by non-homologous end-joining in five radiation-induced sarcomas devoid of both active Tp53 and Rb1. LOH was recurrently observed for 8 of the 9 studied genes (KU70, KU80, XRCC4, LIG4, Artemis, MRE11, RAD50, NBS1) but not for DNA-PKcs. No mutation was found in the remaining allele of the genes with LOH and the mRNA expression did not correlate with the allelic status. Our findings suggest that non-homologous end-joining repair pathway alteration is unlikely to be involved in the high genomic instability observed in these tumors. (author)

  18. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S. [GSI, Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/{mu}m) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  19. The role of free radicals and stress signalling in persistent genomic instability induced by long wavelength UV light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillipson, R.; McMillan, T.J.

    2003-01-01

    Induction of persistent genomic instability has commonly been investigated with ionising radiation. It has been characterised as a decrease in plating efficiency, and an increase in chromosomal aberrations and mutation frequency in the progeny of cells that survive the initial irradiation. We now present data demonstrating the phenomenon following exposure to long-wavelength solar UV-A (320-400nm) radiation at environmentally relevant doses. Using the spontaneously immortalised human skin keratinocyte line, HaCaT, we observed a significant decrease in plating efficiency (77 +/- 2% of control), and increase in micronuclei (2.5 fold) and mutation frequency (2 fold), 7 days after the initial radiation insult. Modification of UV-A-induced instability by incubation with exogenous catalase implicated reactive oxygen species (ROS), in-particular hydrogen peroxide, in the production and/or maintenance of the phenomenon. Assessment of anti-oxidant enzymes revealed a significant increase in glutathione-s-transferase activity (158 +/- 4% of control) at day 7 in the irradiated cell population, which was inhibited by incubation with exogenous catalase (97 +/- 3%), providing further evidence for an ROS-mediated pathway. Furthermore, inhibition of UV-A-induced micronuclei at day 7 by the flavonoid-containing-protein inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) indicates that the NADPH oxidase family of enzymes may be involved in this phenomenon. Measurement of superoxide production by the cytochrome c reduction assay revealed that the irradiated cell population produce 50% more superoxide than the unirradiated controls, and that incubation with DPI led to a preferential reduction in superoxide production in the UV-A treated population at day 7. Finally, NADPH oxidase activity is increased significantly over controls in UV-A-treated cells. These data demonstrate that oxidative stress, analogous to that produced by ionising radiation, induces persistent genomic instability through a

  20. PARP Inhibitors in Clinical Use Induce Genomic Instability in Normal Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhei Ito

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs are the first proteins involved in cellular DNA repair pathways to be targeted by specific inhibitors for clinical benefit. Tumors harboring genetic defects in homologous recombination (HR, a DNA double-strand break (DSB repair pathway, are hypersensitive to PARP inhibitors (PARPi. Early phase clinical trials with PARPi have been promising in patients with advanced BRCA1 or BRCA2-associated breast, ovary and prostate cancer and have led to limited approval for treatment of BRCA-deficient ovary cancer. Unlike HR-defective cells, HR-proficient cells manifest very low cytotoxicity when exposed to PARPi, although they mount a DNA damage response. However, the genotoxic effects on normal human cells when agents including PARPi disturb proficient cellular repair processes have not been substantially investigated. We quantified cytogenetic alterations of human cells, including primary lymphoid cells and non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic epithelial cell lines, exposed to PARPi at clinically relevant doses by both sister chromatid exchange (SCE assays and chromosome spreading. As expected, both olaparib and veliparib effectively inhibited poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR, and caused marked hypersensitivity in HR-deficient cells. Significant dose-dependent increases in SCEs were observed in normal and non-tumorigenic cells with minimal residual PAR activity. Clinically relevant doses of the FDA-approved olaparib led to a marked increase of SCEs (5-10-fold and chromatid aberrations (2-6-fold. Furthermore, olaparib potentiated SCE induction by cisplatin in normal human cells. Our data have important implications for therapies with regard to sustained genotoxicity to normal cells. Genomic instability arising from PARPi warrants consideration, especially if these agents will be used in people with early stage cancers, in prevention strategies or for non-oncologic indications.

  1. IR-inducible clusterin gene expression: a protein with potential roles in ionizing radiation-induced adaptive responses, genomic instability, and bystander effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klokov, Dmitry [Laboratory of Molecular Stress Responses, Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University, 2103 Cornell Road, Wolstein Research Building 3-531, Cleveland, OH 44106-4942 (United States); Criswell, Tracy [Laboratory of Molecular Stress Responses, Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University, 2103 Cornell Road, Wolstein Research Building 3-531, Cleveland, OH 44106-4942 (United States); Program in Molecular and Cellular Basis of Disease, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106-4942 (United States); Leskov, Konstantin S. [Laboratory of Molecular Stress Responses, Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University, 2103 Cornell Road, Wolstein Research Building 3-531, Cleveland, OH 44106-4942 (United States); Araki, Shinako [Laboratory of Molecular Stress Responses, Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University, 2103 Cornell Road, Wolstein Research Building 3-531, Cleveland, OH 44106-4942 (United States); Mayo, Lindsey [Laboratory of Molecular Stress Responses, Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University, 2103 Cornell Road, Wolstein Research Building 3-531, Cleveland, OH 44106-4942 (United States); Boothman, David A. [Laboratory of Molecular Stress Responses, Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University, 2103 Cornell Road, Wolstein Research Building 3-531, Cleveland, OH 44106-4942 (United States) and Program in Molecular and Cellular Basis of Disease, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106-4942 (United States)]. E-mail: dab30@po.cwru.edu

    2004-12-02

    Clusterin (CLU) plays numerous roles in mammalian cells after stress. A review of the recent literature strongly suggests potential roles for CLU proteins in low dose ionizing radiation (IR)-inducible adaptive responses, bystander effects, and delayed death and genomic instability. Its most striking and evident feature is the inducibility of the CLU promoter after low, as well as high, doses of IR. Two major forms of CLU, secreted (sCLU) and nuclear (nCLU), possess opposite functions in cellular responses to IR: sCLU is cytoprotective, whereas nCLU (a byproduct of alternative splicing) is a pro-death factor. Recent studies from our laboratory and others demonstrated that down-regulation of sCLU by specific siRNA increased cytotoxic responses to chemotherapy and IR. sCLU was induced after low non-toxic doses of IR (0.02-0.5 Gy) in human cultured cells and in mice in vivo. The low dose inducibility of this survival protein suggests a possible role for sCLU in radiation adaptive responses, characterized by increased cell radioresistance after exposure to low adapting IR doses. Although it is still unclear whether the adaptive response is beneficial or not to cells, survival of damaged cells after IR may lead to genomic instability in the descendants of surviving cells. Recent studies indicate a link between sCLU accumulation and cancer incidence, as well as aging, supporting involvement of the protein in the development of genomic instability. Secreted after IR, sCLU may also alter intracellular communication due to its ability to bind cell surface receptors, such as the TGF-{beta} receptors (types I and II). This interference with signaling pathways may contribute to IR-induced bystander effects. We hypothesize that activation of the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway, which often occurs after IR exposure, can in turn activate the CLU promoter. TGF-{beta} and IR-inducible de novo synthesized sCLU may then bind the TGF-{beta} receptors and suppress downstream growth arrest

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard L. Liber; Jeffrey L. Schwartz

    2005-10-31

    There are many different model systems that have been used to study chromosome instability. What is clear from all these studies is that conclusions concerning chromosome instability depend greatly on the model system and instability endpoint that is studied. The model system for our studies was the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. TK6 was isolated from a spontaneously immortalized lymphoblast culture. Thus there was no outside genetic manipulation used to immortalize them. TK6 is a relatively stable p53-normal immortal cell line (37). It shows low gene and chromosome mutation frequencies (19;28;31). Our general approach to studying instability in TK6 cells has been to isolate individual clones and analyze gene and chromosome mutation frequencies in each. This approach maximizes the possibility of detecting low frequency events that might be selected against in mass cultures.

  3. Opposite roles for p38MAPK-driven responses and reactive oxygen species in the persistence and resolution of radiation-induced genomic instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Werner

    Full Text Available We report the functional and temporal relationship between cellular phenotypes such as oxidative stress, p38MAPK-dependent responses and genomic instability persisting in the progeny of cells exposed to sparsely ionizing low-Linear Energy Transfer (LET radiation such as X-rays or high-charge and high-energy (HZE particle high-LET radiation such as (56Fe ions. We found that exposure to low and high-LET radiation increased reactive oxygen species (ROS levels as a threshold-like response induced independently of radiation quality and dose. This response was sustained for two weeks, which is the period of time when genomic instability is evidenced by increased micronucleus formation frequency and DNA damage associated foci. Indicators for another persisting response sharing phenotypes with stress-induced senescence, including beta galactosidase induction, increased nuclear size, p38MAPK activation and IL-8 production, were induced in the absence of cell proliferation arrest during the first, but not the second week following exposure to high-LET radiation. This response was driven by a p38MAPK-dependent mechanism and was affected by radiation quality and dose. This stress response and elevation of ROS affected genomic instability by distinct pathways. Through interference with p38MAPK activity, we show that radiation-induced stress phenotypes promote genomic instability. In contrast, exposure to physiologically relevant doses of hydrogen peroxide or increasing endogenous ROS levels with a catalase inhibitor reduced the level of genomic instability. Our results implicate persistently elevated ROS following exposure to radiation as a factor contributing to genome stabilization.

  4. The Role of Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert L Ullrich; Susan Bailey

    2008-01-17

    The mechanistic role of radiation-induced genomic instability in radiation carcinogenesis is an attractive hypothesis that remains to be rigorously tested. There are few in vivo studies on which to base judgments, but work in our laboratory with mouse models of radiogenic mammary neoplasia provided the first indications that certain forms of genetically predisposed radiation-induced genomic instability may contribute to tumor development. The central goal of this research project is to more firmly establish the mechanistic basis of this radiation-associated genomic instability and, from this, to assess whether such induced instability might play a major role in tumorigenesis at low doses of low LET radiation. In the case of mouse mammary tumors, susceptibility to induced instability is expressed as an autosomal recessive trait in mammary epithelial cells and is manifest largely as excess chromatid damage. Recently published studies associate this form of instability with DNA repair deficiency, polymorphic variation in the gene encoding DNA-PKcs (Prkdc), and mammary associated susceptibility. The underlying hypothesis being tested in this project is that tumor-associated genomic instability is preferentially expressed in certain recombinogenic genomic domains and that these may be cell lineage/individual-specific.

  5. Genomic instability in liver cells caused by an LPS-induced bystander-like effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Kovalchuk

    Full Text Available Bacterial infection has been linked to carcinogenesis, however, there is lack of knowledge of molecular mechanisms that associate infection with the development of cancer. We analyzed possible effects of the consumption of heat-killed E. coli O157:H7 cells or its cellular components, DNA, RNA, protein or lipopolysaccharides (LPS on gene expression in naïve liver cells. Four week old mice were provided water supplemented with whole heat-killed bacteria or bacterial components for a two week period. One group of animals was sacrificed immediately, whereas another group was allowed to consume uncontaminated tap water for an additional two weeks, and liver samples were collected, post mortem. Liver cells responded to exposure of whole heat-killed bacteria and LPS with alteration in γH2AX levels and levels of proteins involved in proliferation, DNA methylation (MeCP2, DNMT1, DNMT3A and 3B or DNA repair (APE1 and KU70 as well as with changes in the expression of genes involved in stress response, cell cycle control and bile acid biosynthesis. Other bacterial components analysed in this study did not lead to any significant changes in the tested molecular parameters. This study suggests that lipopolysaccharides are a major component of Gram-negative bacteria that induce molecular changes within naïve cells of the host.

  6. The moyamoya disease susceptibility variant RNF213 R4810K (rs112735431) induces genomic instability by mitotic abnormality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitomi, Toshiaki [Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Habu, Toshiyuki [Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Harada, Kouji H. [Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Osafune, Kenji [Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Taura, Daisuke; Sone, Masakatsu [Department of Medicine and Clinical Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Asaka, Isao; Ameku, Tomonaga; Watanabe, Akira; Kasahara, Tomoko; Sudo, Tomomi; Shiota, Fumihiko [Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Hashikata, Hirokuni; Takagi, Yasushi [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Morito, Daisuke [Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kyoto (Japan); Miyamoto, Susumu [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nakao, Kazuwa [Department of Medicine and Clinical Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Koizumi, Akio, E-mail: koizumi.akio.5v@kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K inhibited cell proliferation. •Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K had the time of mitosis 4-fold and mitotic failure. •R4810K formed a complex with MAD2 more readily than wild-type. •iPSECs from the MMD patients had elevated mitotic failure compared from the control. •RNF213 R4810K induced mitotic abnormality and increased risk of aneuploidy. -- Abstract: Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a cerebrovascular disease characterized by occlusive lesions in the Circle of Willis. The RNF213 R4810K polymorphism increases susceptibility to MMD. In the present study, we characterized phenotypes caused by overexpression of RNF213 wild type and R4810K variant in the cell cycle to investigate the mechanism of proliferation inhibition. Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K in HeLa cells inhibited cell proliferation and extended the time of mitosis 4-fold. Ablation of spindle checkpoint by depletion of mitotic arrest deficiency 2 (MAD2) did not shorten the time of mitosis. Mitotic morphology in HeLa cells revealed that MAD2 colocalized with RNF213 R4810K. Immunoprecipitation revealed an RNF213/MAD2 complex: R4810K formed a complex with MAD2 more readily than RNF213 wild-type. Desynchronized localization of MAD2 was observed more frequently during mitosis in fibroblasts from patients (n = 3, 61.0 ± 8.2%) compared with wild-type subjects (n = 6, 13.1 ± 7.7%; p < 0.01). Aneuploidy was observed more frequently in fibroblasts (p < 0.01) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) (p < 0.03) from patients than from wild-type subjects. Vascular endothelial cells differentiated from iPSCs (iPSECs) of patients and an unaffected carrier had a longer time from prometaphase to metaphase than those from controls (p < 0.05). iPSECs from the patients and unaffected carrier had significantly increased mitotic failure rates compared with controls (p < 0.05). Thus, RNF213 R4810K induced mitotic abnormalities and increased risk of genomic instability.

  7. The moyamoya disease susceptibility variant RNF213 R4810K (rs112735431) induces genomic instability by mitotic abnormality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitomi, Toshiaki; Habu, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Harada, Kouji H.; Osafune, Kenji; Taura, Daisuke; Sone, Masakatsu; Asaka, Isao; Ameku, Tomonaga; Watanabe, Akira; Kasahara, Tomoko; Sudo, Tomomi; Shiota, Fumihiko; Hashikata, Hirokuni; Takagi, Yasushi; Morito, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Susumu; Nakao, Kazuwa; Koizumi, Akio

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K inhibited cell proliferation. •Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K had the time of mitosis 4-fold and mitotic failure. •R4810K formed a complex with MAD2 more readily than wild-type. •iPSECs from the MMD patients had elevated mitotic failure compared from the control. •RNF213 R4810K induced mitotic abnormality and increased risk of aneuploidy. -- Abstract: Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a cerebrovascular disease characterized by occlusive lesions in the Circle of Willis. The RNF213 R4810K polymorphism increases susceptibility to MMD. In the present study, we characterized phenotypes caused by overexpression of RNF213 wild type and R4810K variant in the cell cycle to investigate the mechanism of proliferation inhibition. Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K in HeLa cells inhibited cell proliferation and extended the time of mitosis 4-fold. Ablation of spindle checkpoint by depletion of mitotic arrest deficiency 2 (MAD2) did not shorten the time of mitosis. Mitotic morphology in HeLa cells revealed that MAD2 colocalized with RNF213 R4810K. Immunoprecipitation revealed an RNF213/MAD2 complex: R4810K formed a complex with MAD2 more readily than RNF213 wild-type. Desynchronized localization of MAD2 was observed more frequently during mitosis in fibroblasts from patients (n = 3, 61.0 ± 8.2%) compared with wild-type subjects (n = 6, 13.1 ± 7.7%; p < 0.01). Aneuploidy was observed more frequently in fibroblasts (p < 0.01) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) (p < 0.03) from patients than from wild-type subjects. Vascular endothelial cells differentiated from iPSCs (iPSECs) of patients and an unaffected carrier had a longer time from prometaphase to metaphase than those from controls (p < 0.05). iPSECs from the patients and unaffected carrier had significantly increased mitotic failure rates compared with controls (p < 0.05). Thus, RNF213 R4810K induced mitotic abnormalities and increased risk of genomic instability

  8. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: I. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    A long-standing dogma in the radiation sciences is that energy from radiation must be deposited in the cell nucleus to elicit a biological effect. A number of non-targeted, delayed effects of ionizing radiation have been described that challenge this dogma and pose new challenges to evaluating potential hazards associated with radiation exposure. These effects include induced genomic instability and non-targeted bystander effects. The in vitro evidence for non-targeted effects in radiation biology will be reviewed, but the question as to how one extrapolates from these in vitro observations to the risk of radiation-induced adverse health effects such as cancer remains open.

  9. Genome organization, instabilities, stem cells, and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil Kumar Pazhanisamy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is now widely recognized that advances in exploring genome organization provide remarkable insights on the induction and progression of chromosome abnormalities. Much of what we know about how mutations evolve and consequently transform into genome instabilities has been characterized in the spatial organization context of chromatin. Nevertheless, many underlying concepts of impact of the chromatin organization on perpetuation of multiple mutations and on propagation of chromosomal aberrations remain to be investigated in detail. Genesis of genome instabilities from accumulation of multiple mutations that drive tumorigenesis is increasingly becoming a focal theme in cancer studies. This review focuses on structural alterations evolve to raise a variety of genome instabilities that are manifested at the nucleotide, gene or sub-chromosomal, and whole chromosome level of genome. Here we explore an underlying connection between genome instability and cancer in the light of genome architecture. This review is limited to studies directed towards spatial organizational aspects of origin and propagation of aberrations into genetically unstable tumors.

  10. Genome instabilities arising from ribonucleotides in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Hannah L

    2017-08-01

    Genomic DNA is transiently contaminated with ribonucleotide residues during the process of DNA replication through misincorporation by the replicative DNA polymerases α, δ and ε, and by the normal replication process on the lagging strand, which uses RNA primers. These ribonucleotides are efficiently removed during replication by RNase H enzymes and the lagging strand synthesis machinery. However, when ribonucleotides remain in DNA they can distort the DNA helix, affect machineries for DNA replication, transcription and repair, and can stimulate genomic instabilities which are manifest as increased mutation, recombination and chromosome alterations. The genomic instabilities associated with embedded ribonucleotides are considered here, along with a discussion of the origin of the lesions that stimulate particular classes of instabilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Detection of genomic instability in hypospadias patients by random ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The primer detectability on genomic instability in 12 samples ranged from 25% with primer OPA-01 to 66% with OPA-08. Case 2 showed the highest genomic instability (80%). The lowest genomic instabamility was (10%) case 6. The results determined numbers of genomic instabilities among hypospadias patients.

  12. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: II. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vivo, clastogenic factors and transgenerational effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize the evidence for non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation in vivo. Currently, human health risks associated with radiation exposures are based primarily on the assumption that the detrimental effects of radiation occur in irradiated cells. Over the years a number of non-targeted effects of radiation exposure in vivo have been described that challenge this concept. These include radiation-induced genomic instability, bystander effects, clastogenic factors produced in plasma from irradiated individuals that can cause chromosomal damage when cultured with nonirradiated cells, and transgenerational effects of parental irradiation that can manifest in the progeny. These effects pose new challenges to evaluating the risk(s) associated with radiation exposure and understanding radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  13. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects: inter-related inflammatory-type non-targeted effects of exposure to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, E.G. (Molecular and Cellular Pathology Laboratories, Division of Pathology and Neuroscience, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, Scotland (United Kingdom))

    2008-12-15

    The dogma that genetic alterations are restricted to directly irradiated cells has been challenged by observations in which effects of ionizing radiation, characteristically associated with the consequences of energy deposition in the cell nucleus, arise in non-irradiated cells. These, so called, untargeted effects are demonstrated in cells that are the descendants of irradiated cells (radiation-induced genomic instability) or in cells that have communicated with neighbouring irradiated cells (radiation-induced bystander effects). There are also reports of long-range signals in vivo, known as clastogenic factors, with the capacity to induce damage in unirradiated cells. Clastogenic factors may be related to the inflammatory responses that have been implicated in some of the pathological consequences of radiation exposures. The phenotypic expression of untargeted effects reflects a balance between the type of signals produced and the responses of cell populations to such signals, both of which may be significantly influenced by cell type and genotype. There is accumulating evidence that untargeted effects in vitro involve inter-cellular signalling, production of cytokines and free radical generation. These are also features of inflammatory responses in vivo that are known to have the potential for both bystander-mediated and persisting damage as well as for conferring a predisposition to malignancy. At present it is far from clear how untargeted effects contribute to overall cellular radiation responses and in vivo consequences but it is possible that the various untargeted effects may reflect inter-related aspects of a non-specific inflammatory-type response to radiation-induced stress and injury and be involved in a variety of the pathological consequences of radiation exposures. (orig.)

  14. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects: inter-related inflammatory-type non-targeted effects of exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, E.G.

    2008-01-01

    The dogma that genetic alterations are restricted to directly irradiated cells has been challenged by observations in which effects of ionizing radiation, characteristically associated with the consequences of energy deposition in the cell nucleus, arise in non-irradiated cells. These, so called, untargeted effects are demonstrated in cells that are the descendants of irradiated cells (radiation-induced genomic instability) or in cells that have communicated with neighbouring irradiated cells (radiation-induced bystander effects). There are also reports of long-range signals in vivo, known as clastogenic factors, with the capacity to induce damage in unirradiated cells. Clastogenic factors may be related to the inflammatory responses that have been implicated in some of the pathological consequences of radiation exposures. The phenotypic expression of untargeted effects reflects a balance between the type of signals produced and the responses of cell populations to such signals, both of which may be significantly influenced by cell type and genotype. There is accumulating evidence that untargeted effects in vitro involve inter-cellular signalling, production of cytokines and free radical generation. These are also features of inflammatory responses in vivo that are known to have the potential for both bystander-mediated and persisting damage as well as for conferring a predisposition to malignancy. At present it is far from clear how untargeted effects contribute to overall cellular radiation responses and in vivo consequences but it is possible that the various untargeted effects may reflect inter-related aspects of a non-specific inflammatory-type response to radiation-induced stress and injury and be involved in a variety of the pathological consequences of radiation exposures. (orig.)

  15. One-hit wonders of genomic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strunnikov Alexander V

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent data show that cells from many cancers exhibit massive chromosome instability. The traditional view is that the gradual accumulation of mutations in genes involved in transcriptional regulation and cell cycle controls results in tumor development. This, however, does not exclude the possibility that some mutations could be more potent than others in destabilizing the genome by targeting both chromosomal integrity and corresponding checkpoint mechanisms simultaneously. Three such examples of "single-hit" lesions potentially leading to heritable genome destabilization are discussed. They include: failure to release sister chromatid cohesion due to the incomplete proteolytic cleavage of cohesin; massive merotelic kinetochore misattachments upon condensin depletion; and chromosome under-replication. In all three cases, cells fail to detect potential chromosomal bridges before anaphase entry, indicating that there is a basic cell cycle requirement to maintain a degree of sister chromatid bridging that is not recognizable as chromosomal damage.

  16. Targets for, and consequences of, radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Mark Isaac

    Chromosomal instability has been demonstrated in a human- hamster hybrid cell line, GM10115, after exposure to x- rays. Chromosomal instability in these cells is characterized by the appearance of novel chromosomal rearrangements multiple generations after exposure to ionizing radiation. To identify the cellular target(s) for radiation-induced chromosomal instability, cells were treated with 125I-labeled compounds. Labeling cells with 125I-iododeoxyuridine, which caused radiation damage to the DNA and associated nuclear structures, did induce chromosomal instability. While cell killing and first-division chromosomal rearrangements increased with increasing numbers of 125I decays, the frequency of chromosomal instability was independent of dose. Incorporation of an 125I-labeled protein, 125I-succinyl- concanavalin A, into either the plasma membrane or the cytoplasm, failed to elicit chromosomal instability. These results show that radiation damage to the nucleus, and not to extranuclear regions, contributes to the induction of chromosomal instability. To determine the role of DNA strand breaks as a molecular lesion responsible for initiating chromosomal instability, cells were treated with a variety of DNA strand breaking agents. Agents capable of producing complex DNA double strand breaks, including X-rays, Neocarzinostatin and bleomycin, were able to induce chromosomal instability. In contrast, double strand breaks produced by restriction endonucleases as well as DNA strand breaks produced by hydrogen peroxide failed to induce chromosomal instability. This demonstrates that the type of DNA breakage is important in the eventual manifestation of chromosomal instability. In order to understand the relationship between chromosomal instability and other end points of genomic instability, chromosomally stable and unstable clones were analyzed for sister chromatid exchange, delayed reproductive cell death, delayed mutation, mismatch repair and delayed gene amplification

  17. Delayed chromosomal instability induced by DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.F.; Marder, B.A.; Day, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    Cellular exposure to DNA damaging agents rapidly results in a dose dependent increase in chromosomal breakage and gross structural chromosomal rearrangements. Over recent years, evidence has been accumulating indicating genomic instability can manifest multiple generations after cellular exposure to physical and chemical DNA damaging agents. Genomic instability manifests in the progeny of surviving cells, and has been implicated in mutation, gene application, cellular transformation, and cell killing. To investigate chromosome instability following DNA damage, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal rearrangements in a human/hamster somatic hybrid cell line following exposure to ionizing radiation. Delayed chromosomal instability was detected when multiple populations of uniquely arranged metaphases were observed in clonal isolates raised from single cells surviving X-irradiation many generations after exposure. At higher radiation doses, chromosomal instability was observed in a relatively high frequency of surviving clones and, in general, those clones showed delayed chromosome instability also showed reduced survival as measured by colony forming ability

  18. Detection of genomic instability in hypospadias patients by random ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DIRECTOR

    2011-05-16

    May 16, 2011 ... The results determined numbers of genomic instabilities among hypospadias patients. In addition, the RAPD-PCR technique is a powerful tool for detection of genomic instability in hypospadias patients. Further larger studies are needed, which include low and high grade of patients to: 1) Obtain RAPD ...

  19. Role of oxidative DNA damage in genome instability and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bignami, M.; Kunkel, T.

    2009-01-01

    Inactivation of mismatch repair (MMR) is associated with a dramatic genomic instability that is observed experimentally as a mutator phenotype and micro satellite instability (MSI). It has been implicit that the massive genetic instability in MMR defective cells simply reflects the accumulation of spontaneous DNA polymerase errors during DNA replication. We recently identified oxidation damage, a common threat to DNA integrity to which purines are very susceptible, as an important cofactor in this genetic instability

  20. In situ quantification of genomic instability in breast cancer progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos; Chin, Koei; Gray, Joe W.; Lockett, Stephen J.

    2003-05-15

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of breast and other solid cancers. Presumably caused by critical telomere reduction, GI is responsible for providing the genetic diversity required in the multi-step progression of the disease. We have used multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and 3D image analysis to quantify genomic instability cell-by-cell in thick, intact tissue sections of normal breast epithelium, preneoplastic lesions (usual ductal hyperplasia), ductal carcinona is situ or invasive carcinoma of the breast. Our in situ-cell by cell-analysis of genomic instability shows an important increase of genomic instability in the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma, followed by a reduction of instability in invasive carcinoma. This pattern suggests that the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma corresponds to telomere crisis and invasive carcinoma is a consequence of telomerase reactivation afertelomere crisis.

  1. Loss of yeast peroxiredoxin Tsa1p induces genome instability through activation of the DNA damage checkpoint and elevation of dNTP levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hei-Man Vincent Tang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Peroxiredoxins are a family of antioxidant enzymes critically involved in cellular defense and signaling. Particularly, yeast peroxiredoxin Tsa1p is thought to play a role in the maintenance of genome integrity, but the underlying mechanism is not understood. In this study, we took a genetic approach to investigate the cause of genome instability in tsa1Delta cells. Strong genetic interactions of TSA1 with DNA damage checkpoint components DUN1, SML1, and CRT1 were found when mutant cells were analyzed for either sensitivity to DNA damage or rate of spontaneous base substitutions. An elevation in intracellular dNTP production was observed in tsa1Delta cells. This was associated with constitutive activation of the DNA damage checkpoint as indicated by phosphorylation of Rad9/Rad53p, reduced steady-state amount of Sml1p, and induction of RNR and HUG1 genes. In addition, defects in the DNA damage checkpoint did not modulate intracellular level of reactive oxygen species, but suppressed the mutator phenotype of tsa1Delta cells. On the contrary, overexpression of RNR1 exacerbated this phenotype by increasing dNTP levels. Taken together, our findings uncover a new role of TSA1 in preventing the overproduction of dNTPs, which is a root cause of genome instability.

  2. Genomic instability in children born from the Chernobyl accident victims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komar, V.; Koliubaeva, S.; Monakhov, V.; Bejenar, V.

    1997-01-01

    It seems in all probability that the radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of cell genome. Evidence has been presented in the previous reports of our laboratory that a chromosome instability could be found out in liquidators of the Chernobyl accident and in children from the regions with a high radiation level. Data on a chromosome instability in children born from the Chernobyl victims are presented in this paper. We investigated women in 1986 within the limits of 30 km zone around the Chernobyl nuclear power station. Children born from these women were a main subject of our studies. In some cases an examination of their fathers was also carried out. It seems to us that a genetic instability transmitted from the parents is realized as an increased sensitivity to the different environmental factors, including an enhanced radiation level, chemical mutagens et al. Latent hereditary disturbances in these children probably appear later as a result of their contact with mutagens of a different nature. (authors)

  3. p53-Dependent suppression of genome instability in germ cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otozai, Shinji [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Oda, Shoji [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan); Kamei, Yasuhiro [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ryo, Haruko [Nomura Project, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Osaka 565-0085 (Japan); Sato, Ayuko [Department of Pathology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Nomura, Taisei [Nomura Project, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Osaka 565-0085 (Japan); Mitani, Hiroshi [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan); Tsujimura, Tohru [Department of Pathology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Inohara, Hidenori [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Todo, Takeshi, E-mail: todo@radbio.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Radiation-induced microsatellite instability (MSI) was investigated in medaka fish. • msh2{sup −/−} fish had a high frequency of spontaneous MSI. • p53{sup −/−} fish had a high frequency of radiation-induced MSI. • p53 and msh2 suppress MSI by different pathways: mismatch removal and apoptosis. - Abstract: Radiation increases mutation frequencies at tandem repeat loci. Germline mutations in γ-ray-irradiated medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) were studied, focusing on the microsatellite loci. Mismatch-repair genes suppress microsatellite mutation by directly removing altered sequences at the nucleotide level, whereas the p53 gene suppresses genetic alterations by eliminating damaged cells. The contribution of these two defense mechanisms to radiation-induced microsatellite instability was addressed. The spontaneous mutation frequency was significantly higher in msh2{sup −/−} males than in wild-type fish, whereas there was no difference in the frequency of radiation-induced mutations between msh2{sup −/−} and wild-type fish. By contrast, irradiated p53{sup −/−} fish exhibited markedly increased mutation frequencies, whereas their spontaneous mutation frequency was the same as that of wild-type fish. In the spermatogonia of the testis, radiation induced a high level of apoptosis both in wild-type and msh2{sup −/−} fish, but negligible levels in p53{sup −/−} fish. The results demonstrate that the msh2 and p53 genes protect genome integrity against spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation by two different pathways: direct removal of mismatches and elimination of damaged cells.

  4. Genomic instability in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a new step towards precision medicine and novel therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ibrahim H; Lowery, Maeve A; Stadler, Zsofia K; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Kelsen, David P; O'Reilly, Eileen M

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most challenging cancers. Whole genome sequencing studies have been conducted to elucidate the underlying fundamentals underscoring disease behavior. Studies have identified a subgroup of pancreatic cancer patients with distinct molecular and clinical features. Genetic fingerprinting of these tumors is consistent with an unstable genome and defective DNA repair pathways, which creates unique susceptibility to agents inducing DNA damage. BRCA1/2 mutations, both germline and somatic, which lead to impaired DNA repair, are found to be important biomarkers of genomic instability as well as of response to DNA damaging agents. Recent studies have elucidated that PARP inhibitors and platinum agents may be effective to induce tumor regression in solid tumors bearing an unstable genome including pancreatic cancer. In this review we discuss the characteristics of genomic instability in pancreatic cancer along with its clinical implications and the utility of DNA targeting agents particularly PARP inhibitors as a novel treatment approach.

  5. A Signature of Genomic Instability Resulting from Deficient Replication Licensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven C Pruitt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient licensing of DNA replication origins has been shown to result in genome instability, stem cell deficiency, and cancers. However, it is unclear whether the DNA damage resulting from deficient replication licensing occurs generally or if specific sites are preferentially affected. To map locations of ongoing DNA damage in vivo, the DNAs present in red blood cell micronuclei were sequenced. Many micronuclei are the product of DNA breaks that leave acentromeric remnants that failed to segregate during mitosis and should reflect the locations of breaks. To validate the approach we show that micronuclear sequences identify known common fragile sites under conditions that induce breaks at these locations (hydroxyurea. In MCM2 deficient mice a different set of preferred breakage sites is identified that includes the tumor suppressor gene Tcf3, which is known to contribute to T-lymphocytic leukemias that arise in these mice, and the 45S rRNA gene repeats.

  6. Pathways and Mechanisms that Prevent Genome Instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Christopher D.; Kolodner, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    Genome rearrangements result in mutations that underlie many human diseases, and ongoing genome instability likely contributes to the development of many cancers. The tools for studying genome instability in mammalian cells are limited, whereas model organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae are more amenable to these studies. Here, we discuss the many genetic assays developed to measure the rate of occurrence of Gross Chromosomal Rearrangements (called GCRs) in S. cerevisiae. These genetic assays have been used to identify many types of GCRs, including translocations, interstitial deletions, and broken chromosomes healed by de novo telomere addition, and have identified genes that act in the suppression and formation of GCRs. Insights from these studies have contributed to the understanding of pathways and mechanisms that suppress genome instability and how these pathways cooperate with each other. Integrated models for the formation and suppression of GCRs are discussed. PMID:28684602

  7. Induction of genomic instability and activation of autophagy in artificial human aneuploid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ariyoshi, Kentaro [Hirosaki University, Institute of Radiation Emergency Medicine, 66-1 Hon-cho, Hirosaki 036-8564 (Japan); Miura, Tomisato; Kasai, Kosuke; Fujishima, Yohei [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 66-1 Hon-cho, Hirosaki 036-8564 (Japan); Oshimura, Mitsuo [Chromosome Engineering Research Center (CERC), Tottori University, Nishicho 86, Yonago, Tottori 683-8503 (Japan); Yoshida, Mitsuaki A., E-mail: ariyoshi@hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Hirosaki University, Institute of Radiation Emergency Medicine, 66-1 Hon-cho, Hirosaki 036-8564 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Clones with artificial aneuploidy of chromosome 8 or chromosome 22 both show inhibited proliferation and genomic instability. • Increased autophagy was observed in the artificially aneuploid clones. • Inhibition of autophagy resulted in increased genomic instability and DNA damage. • Intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species were up-regulated in the artificially aneuploid clones. - Abstract: Chromosome missegregation can lead to a change in chromosome number known as aneuploidy. Although aneuploidy is a known hallmark of cancer cells, the various mechanisms by which altered gene and/or DNA copy number facilitate tumorigenesis remain unclear. To understand the effect of aneuploidy occurring in non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cells, we generated clones harboring artificial aneuploidy using microcell-mediated chromosome transfer. Our results demonstrate that clones with artificial aneuploidy of chromosome 8 or chromosome 22 both show inhibited proliferation and genomic instability. Also, the increased autophagy was observed in the artificially aneuploidy clones, and inhibition of autophagy resulted in increased genomic instability and DNA damage. In addition, the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species were up-regulated in the artificially aneuploid clones, and inhibition of autophagy further increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Together, these results suggest that even a single extraneous chromosome can induce genomic instability, and that autophagy triggered by aneuploidy-induced stress is a mechanism to protect cells bearing abnormal chromosome number.

  8. Induction of genomic instability and activation of autophagy in artificial human aneuploid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariyoshi, Kentaro; Miura, Tomisato; Kasai, Kosuke; Fujishima, Yohei; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Yoshida, Mitsuaki A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Clones with artificial aneuploidy of chromosome 8 or chromosome 22 both show inhibited proliferation and genomic instability. • Increased autophagy was observed in the artificially aneuploid clones. • Inhibition of autophagy resulted in increased genomic instability and DNA damage. • Intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species were up-regulated in the artificially aneuploid clones. - Abstract: Chromosome missegregation can lead to a change in chromosome number known as aneuploidy. Although aneuploidy is a known hallmark of cancer cells, the various mechanisms by which altered gene and/or DNA copy number facilitate tumorigenesis remain unclear. To understand the effect of aneuploidy occurring in non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cells, we generated clones harboring artificial aneuploidy using microcell-mediated chromosome transfer. Our results demonstrate that clones with artificial aneuploidy of chromosome 8 or chromosome 22 both show inhibited proliferation and genomic instability. Also, the increased autophagy was observed in the artificially aneuploidy clones, and inhibition of autophagy resulted in increased genomic instability and DNA damage. In addition, the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species were up-regulated in the artificially aneuploid clones, and inhibition of autophagy further increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Together, these results suggest that even a single extraneous chromosome can induce genomic instability, and that autophagy triggered by aneuploidy-induced stress is a mechanism to protect cells bearing abnormal chromosome number.

  9. Genetic predisposition and genomic instability: studies with mouse embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streffer, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Strahlenbiologie

    1999-07-01

    The preimplantation mouse embryo is a useful system for radiobiological studies. Chromosomal aberrations were determined after exposure to X-rays and neutrons during the zygote (1-cell stage). New aberrations developed and were expressed during the 2nd and 3rd mitosis after irradiation. These later aberration developed from DNA damage which was originally not a DSB. Further chromosomal aberrations were studied in fibroblasts of fetuses 19 days post conception. A significant increase of chromosome aberrations was found in the fetuses which were irradiated in the 1-cell stage and which had developed a malformation. These data can only be explained by the induction of a genome instability through the radiation exposure which had been performed many cell generations earlier. Until recently it was generally accepted that an exposure to ionizing radiation during the preimplantation period of mammalian development will not induce malformations. However, recently it could be shown that certain sensitive mouse strains exist in which malformations are induced by exposure to X-rays and neutrons during the preimplantation period. It was further demonstrated that this effect can be suppressed if the sensitive mouse strain is crossbred with mice from a resistant mouse strain. These data show that this radiation effect is due to a genetic phenomenon with a recessive trait. Studies on protein patterns in normal fetuses and in fetuses with the malformation showed that characteristic changes occur. There are proteins which are no longer expressed in the malformed fetuses and new proteins may appear. Certain changes in glycoproteins and phosphoproteins were found not only in liver of malformed fetuses but also in skin and kidney of these organisms. The analysis of the genome of these malformed fetuses have given evidence that changes in two or three genes are responsible for the radiation-induced malformation. It was possible to localize 1 gene on chromosome 13 and another gene on

  10. PCNA Retention on DNA into G2/M Phase Causes Genome Instability in Cells Lacking Elg1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Johnson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Loss of the genome maintenance factor Elg1 causes serious genome instability that leads to cancer, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Elg1 forms the major subunit of a replication factor C-like complex, Elg1-RLC, which unloads the ring-shaped polymerase clamp PCNA from DNA during replication. Here, we show that prolonged retention of PCNA on DNA into G2/M phase is the major cause of genome instability in elg1Δ yeast. Overexpression-induced accumulation of PCNA on DNA causes genome instability. Conversely, disassembly-prone PCNA mutants that relieve PCNA accumulation rescue the genome instability of elg1Δ cells. Covalent modifications to the retained PCNA make only a minor contribution to elg1Δ genome instability. By engineering cell-cycle-regulated ELG1 alleles, we show that abnormal accumulation of PCNA on DNA during S phase causes moderate genome instability and its retention through G2/M phase exacerbates genome instability. Our results reveal that PCNA unloading by Elg1-RLC is critical for genome maintenance.

  11. Separase prevents genomic instability by controlling replication fork speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucco, Francesco; Palumbo, Elisa; Camerini, Serena; D’Alessio, Barbara; Quarantotti, Valentina; Casella, Maria Luisa; Rizzo, Ilaria Maria; Cukrov, Dubravka; Delia, Domenico; Russo, Antonella; Crescenzi, Marco

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Proper chromosome segregation is crucial for preserving genomic integrity, and errors in this process cause chromosome mis-segregation, which may contribute to cancer development. Sister chromatid separation is triggered by Separase, an evolutionary conserved protease that cleaves the cohesin complex, allowing the dissolution of sister chromatid cohesion. Here we provide evidence that Separase participates in genomic stability maintenance by controlling replication fork speed. We found that Separase interacted with the replication licensing factors MCM2–7, and genome-wide data showed that Separase co-localized with MCM complex and cohesin. Unexpectedly, the depletion of Separase increased the fork velocity about 1.5-fold and caused a strong acetylation of cohesin's SMC3 subunit and altered checkpoint response. Notably, Separase silencing triggered genomic instability in both HeLa and human primary fibroblast cells. Our results show a novel mechanism for fork progression mediated by Separase and thus the basis for genomic instability associated with tumorigenesis. PMID:29165708

  12. Damage-induced tensile instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hult, J.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents a unified description of ductile and brittle rupture phenomena in structural components under tensile loading with particular emphasis on creep rupture. Two structural elements are analyzed in detail: 1) the uniform tensile bar subject to a Heaviside history of tensile force and superimposed such loadings, i.e. staircase histories, and 2) the thinwalled spherical pressure vessel subject to a Heaviside history of internal pressure. For both these structures the conditions for instantaneous as well as delayed rupture are analysed. It is shown that a state of mechanical instability will be reached at a certain load or after a certain time. The cases of purely ductile rupture and purely brittle fracture are identified as two limiting cases of this general instability phenomenon. The Kachanov-Rabotnov damage law implies that a structural component will fail in tension only when it has reached a state of complete damage, i.e. zero load carrying capacity. The extended law predicts failure at an earlier stage of the deterioration process and is therefore more compatible with experimental observation. Further experimental support is offered by predictions for staircase loading histories, both step-up and step-down type. The presented damage theory here predicts strain histories which are in closer agreement with test data than predictions based on other phenomenological theories

  13. Genome instability in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sybesma, W.; Molenaar, D.; IJcken, W. van; Venema, K.; Korta, R.

    2013-01-01

    We describe here a comparative genome analysis of three dairy product isolates of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and the ATCC 53103 reference strain to the published genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG. The analysis showed that in two of three isolates, major DNA segments were missing from the

  14. Industrialization and the increasing risk of genome instability in developing countries: nutrigenomics as a promising antidote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anetor, J I

    2010-12-01

    as much genome damage as that induced by exposure to a high dose of ionizing radiation. Even moderate folate deficiency causes very severe damage to the genome in the general population. All these accentuate the susceptibility of populations in these nations to environmental toxic assault requiring preventive measures employing the science of Nutrigenomics, probably augmented with adaptive response pathways such as the Nrf2 signaling pathway. Human populations in developing countries are increasingly exposed to a diverse array of industrial chemicals, which adversely modify the genome, the precursor of many diseases especially cancer. Nutrigenomics encompasses nutritional factors that protect the genome from damage and is a promising new field that can be exploited, perhaps augmented with the Nrf2 signaling pathway with international collaboration in these nations as an antidote to chemical-induced genome instability.

  15. Genome instability in blood cells of a BRCA1+ breast cancer family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Fengxia; Lynch, Henry; Wang, San Ming; Kim, Yeong C; Snyder, Carrie; Wen, Hongxiu; Chen, Pei Xian; Luo, Jiangtao; Becirovic, Dina; Downs, Bradley; Cowan, Kenneth H

    2014-01-01

    BRCA1 plays an essential role in maintaining genome stability. Inherited BRCA1 germline mutation (BRCA1+) is a determined genetic predisposition leading to high risk of breast cancer. While BRCA1+ induces breast cancer by causing genome instability, most of the knowledge is known about somatic genome instability in breast cancer cells but not germline genome instability. Using the exome-sequencing method, we analyzed the genomes of blood cells in a typical BRCA1+ breast cancer family with an exon 13-duplicated founder mutation, including six breast cancer-affected and two breast cancer unaffected members. We identified 23 deleterious mutations in the breast cancer-affected family members, which are absent in the unaffected members. Multiple mutations damaged functionally important and breast cancer-related genes, including transcriptional factor BPTF and FOXP1, ubiquitin ligase CUL4B, phosphorylase kinase PHKG2, and nuclear receptor activator SRA1. Analysis of the mutations between the mothers and daughters shows that most mutations were germline mutation inherited from the ancestor(s) while only a few were somatic mutation generated de novo. Our study indicates that BRCA1+ can cause genome instability with both germline and somatic mutations in non-breast cells

  16. Tolerance of Whole-Genome Doubling Propagates Chromosomal Instability and Accelerates Cancer Genome Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dewhurst, Sally M.; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of whole-genome doubling to chromosomal instability (CIN) and tumor evolution is unclear. We use long-term culture of isogenic tetraploid cells from a stable diploid colon cancer progenitor to investigate how a genome-doubling event affects genome stability over time. Rare cells ...

  17. Mechanisms of Low Dose Radio-Suppression of Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelward, Bevin P. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2009-09-16

    The major goal of this project is to contribute toward the elucidation of the impact of long term low dose radiation on genomic stability. We have created and characterized novel technologies for delivering long term low dose radiation to animals, and we have studied genomic stability by applying cutting edge molecular analysis technologies. Remarkably, we have found that a dose rate that is 300X higher than background radiation does not lead to any detectable genomic damage, nor is there any significant change in gene expression for genes pertinent to the DNA damage response. These results point to the critical importance of dose rate, rather than just total dose, when evaluating public health risks and when creating regulatory guidelines. In addition to these studies, we have also further developed a mouse model for quantifying cells that have undergone a large scale DNA sequence rearrangement via homologous recombination, and we have applied these mice in studies of both low dose radiation and space radiation. In addition to more traditional approaches for assessing genomic stability, we have also explored radiation and possible beneficial effects (adaptive response), long term effects (persistent effects) and effects on communication among cells (bystander effects), both in vitro and in vivo. In terms of the adaptive response, we have not observed any significant induction of an adaptive response following long term low dose radiation in vivo, delivered at 300X background. In terms of persistent and bystander effects, we have revealed evidence of a bystander effect in vivo and with researchers at and demonstrated for the first time the molecular mechanism by which cells “remember” radiation exposure. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms by which radiation can induce genomic instability is fundamental to our ability to assess the biological impact of low dose radiation. Finally, in a parallel set of studies we have explored the effects of heavy

  18. Curvature-Induced Instabilities of Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzulla, Matteo; Stoop, Norbert; Steranka, Mark P.; Bade, Abdikhalaq J.; Holmes, Douglas P.

    2018-01-01

    Induced by proteins within the cell membrane or by differential growth, heating, or swelling, spontaneous curvatures can drastically affect the morphology of thin bodies and induce mechanical instabilities. Yet, the interaction of spontaneous curvature and geometric frustration in curved shells remains poorly understood. Via a combination of precision experiments on elastomeric spherical shells, simulations, and theory, we show how a spontaneous curvature induces a rotational symmetry-breaking buckling as well as a snapping instability reminiscent of the Venus fly trap closure mechanism. The instabilities, and their dependence on geometry, are rationalized by reducing the spontaneous curvature to an effective mechanical load. This formulation reveals a combined pressurelike term in the bulk and a torquelike term in the boundary, allowing scaling predictions for the instabilities that are in excellent agreement with experiments and simulations. Moreover, the effective pressure analogy suggests a curvature-induced subcritical buckling in closed shells. We determine the critical buckling curvature via a linear stability analysis that accounts for the combination of residual membrane and bending stresses. The prominent role of geometry in our findings suggests the applicability of the results over a wide range of scales.

  19. Causation of cancer by ionizing radiation and genomic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The causation of cancer by ionizing radiation has been shown in many epidemiological (with exposed humans) as well as experimental studies with mammals especially mice but also rats, dogs and monkeys. Risk values have been determined in medium radiation dose ranges (∼100 to 2,000 mSv). However, in the low dose range (<100 mSv) the situation is unclear and unsolved up to now. A better knowledge of the mechanisms for the development of cancer in humans over decades after low to medium radiation exposures is necessary for the understanding of the open questions. An increase of chromosomal aberrations and other genetic changes have been frequently observed directly after radiation exposures in many cell systems including human cells. However, in 1989 it was found that an increase of genomic instability occurred after irradiation of mouse zygotes in the fibroblasts of the neonates developing from the irradiated zygotes. That means genomic instability developed many cell generations later in cells which never had been exposed to various qualities of ionizing radiations in vivo and any treatment and secondary cancers developed in photon irradiated M.Hodgkin patients preferentially in those patients who showed a comparatively high genomic instability in their lymphocytes. Since several decades it has been experienced that certain cancer patients show an extremely high radio-sensitivity. This clinical observation has been confirmed by experimental investigations with cells of such patients. It has been proven that this increased radio-sensitivity is due to genetic mutations. A number of syndromes could be defined on such a genetic basis like ataxia telangiectasia, bloom's syndrome, fanconi anemia, retinoblasoma and others. In all these syndromes mutations occur in genes which are to regulation of the cell cycle or DNA repair (preferentially repair of DSBs). These patients with an increased radio-sensitivity frequently develop cancer - very often lymphoma - and they also

  20. Myc-dependent genome instability and lifespan in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Greer

    Full Text Available The Myc family of transcription factors are key regulators of cell growth and proliferation that are dysregulated in a large number of human cancers. When overexpressed, Myc family proteins also cause genomic instability, a hallmark of both transformed and aging cells. Using an in vivo lacZ mutation reporter, we show that overexpression of Myc in Drosophila increases the frequency of large genome rearrangements associated with erroneous repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. In addition, we find that overexpression of Myc shortens adult lifespan and, conversely, that Myc haploinsufficiency reduces mutation load and extends lifespan. Our data provide the first evidence that Myc may act as a pro-aging factor, possibly through its ability to greatly increase genome instability.

  1. Predisposition and genome instability: studies with mouse embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streffer, C. [Essen Universitatsklinikum, (Germany). Institut fur Medizinische Strahlenbiologie

    1997-03-01

    The preimplantation mouse embryo is a useful system for radiobiological studies. Chromosomal aberrations were determined after exposure to X-rays and neutrons during the zygote (1-cell stage). New aberrations developed and were expressed during the 2. and 3. mitosis after irradiation. These later aberration developed from DNA damage which was originally not a DSB. Further chromosomal aberrations were studied in fibroblasts of fetuses 19 days post conception. A significant increase of chromosome aberrations was found in the fetuses which were irradiated in the 1-cell stage and which had developed a malformation. These data can only be explained by the induction of a genome instability through the radiation exposure which had been performed many cell generations earlier. Until recently is was generally accepted that an exposure which had been performed many cell generations earlier. Until recently it was generally accepted that an exposure to ionizing radiation during the preimplantation period of mammalian development will not induce malformations. However, recently it could be shown that certain sensitive mouse strains exist in which malformations are induced by exposure to X-rays and neutrons during the preimplantation period. It was further demonstrated that this effect can be suppressed if the sensitive mouse strain is crossbred with mice from a resistant mouse train. These data show that this radiation effect is due to a genetic phenomenon with a recessive trait. Studies on protein patterns in normal fetuses and in fetuses with the malformation showed that characteristic changes occur. There are proteins which are no longer expressed in the malformed fetuses nd new proteins may appear. Certain changes in glycoproteins and phosphoproteins were found not only in liver of malformed fetuses but also in skin and kidney of these organisms. The analysis of the genome of these malformed fetuses have given evidence that changes in two or three genes are responsible for

  2. A biological-based model that links genomic instability, bystander effects, and adaptive response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper links genomic instability, bystander effects, and adaptive response in mammalian cell communities via a novel biological-based, dose-response model called NEOTRANS 3 . The model is an extension of the NEOTRANS 2 model that addressed stochastic effects (genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) associated with brief exposure to low radiation doses. With both models, ionizing radiation produces DNA damage in cells that can be associated with varying degrees of genomic instability. Cells with persistent problematic instability (PPI) are mutants that arise via misrepair of DNA damage. Progeny of PPI cells also have PPI and can undergo spontaneous neoplastic transformation. Unlike NEOTRANS 2 , with NEOTRANS 3 newly induced mutant PPI cells and their neoplastically transformed progeny can be suppressed via our previously introduced protective apoptosis-mediated (PAM) process, which can be activated by low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. However, with NEOTRANS 3 (which like NEOTRANS 2 involves cross-talk between nongenomically compromised [e.g., nontransformed, nonmutants] and genomically compromised [e.g., mutants, transformants, etc.] cells), it is assumed that PAM is only activated over a relatively narrow, dose-rate-dependent interval (D PAM ,D off ); where D PAM is a small stochastic activation threshold, and D off is the stochastic dose above which PAM does not occur. PAM cooperates with activated normal DNA repair and with activated normal apoptosis in guarding against genomic instability. Normal repair involves both error-free repair and misrepair components. Normal apoptosis and the error-free component of normal repair protect mammals by preventing the occurrence of mutant cells. PAM selectively removes mutant cells arising via the misrepair component of normal repair, selectively removes existing neoplastically transformed cells, and probably selectively removes other genomically compromised cells when it is activated

  3. Acquired genomic aberrations associated with methotrexate resistance vary with background genomic instability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Snijders, A.M.; Hermsen, M.A.; Baughman, J.; Buffart, T.E.; Huey, B.; Jirsová, Pavla; Roydasgupta, R.; Tokuyasu, T.; Meijer, G.A.; Fridlyand, J.; Albertson, D. G.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 1 (2008), s. 71-83 ISSN 1045-2257 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : genomic instability * array comparative genomic hybridization * methotrexate Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.925, year: 2008

  4. Chromosomal instability can be induced by the formation of breakage-prone chromosome rearrangement junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.N.; Ritter, L.; Moore, S.R.; Grosovsky, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Studies in our lab have led to the hypothesis that chromosomal rearrangements can generate novel breakage-prone sites, resulting in chromosomal instability acting predominantly in cis. For example, specific breakage of large blocks of centromeric region heterochromatin on chromosome 16q by treatment with 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP) is associated with repeated rearrangement of chromosome 16q during outgrowth of DAP-treated clones, thereby establishing a link between the initial site of damage and the occurrence of persistent chromosomal instability. Similarly, karyotypic analysis of gamma ray induced instability demonstrated that chromosomal rearrangements in sub-clones were significantly clustered near the site of previously identified chromosomal rearrangement junctions in unstable parental clones. This study investigates the hypothesis that integration of transfected sequences into host chromosomes could create breakage-prone junction regions and persistent genomic instability without exposure to DNA-damage agents. These junctions may mimic the unstable chromosomal rearrangements induced by DAP or radiation, and thus provide a test of the broader hypothesis that instability can to some extent be attributed to the formation of novel chromosomal breakage hot spots. These experiments were performed using human-hamster hybrid AL cells containing a single human chromosome 11, which was used to monitor instability in a chromosomal painting assay. AL cells were transfected with a 2.5 Kb fragment containing multiple copies of the 180 bp human alpha heterochromatic repeat, which resulted in chromosomal instability in 41% of the transfected clones. Parallel exposure to gamma-radiation resulted in a similar level of chromosomal instability, although control transfections with plasmid alone did not lead to karyotypic instability. Chromosomal instability induced by integration of alpha heterochromatic repeats was also frequently associated with delayed reproductive

  5. Separase prevents genomic instability by controlling replication fork speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucco, Francesco; Palumbo, Elisa; Camerini, Serena; D'Alessio, Barbara; Quarantotti, Valentina; Casella, Maria Luisa; Rizzo, Ilaria Maria; Cukrov, Dubravka; Delia, Domenico; Russo, Antonella; Crescenzi, Marco; Musio, Antonio

    2018-01-09

    Proper chromosome segregation is crucial for preserving genomic integrity, and errors in this process cause chromosome mis-segregation, which may contribute to cancer development. Sister chromatid separation is triggered by Separase, an evolutionary conserved protease that cleaves the cohesin complex, allowing the dissolution of sister chromatid cohesion. Here we provide evidence that Separase participates in genomic stability maintenance by controlling replication fork speed. We found that Separase interacted with the replication licensing factors MCM2-7, and genome-wide data showed that Separase co-localized with MCM complex and cohesin. Unexpectedly, the depletion of Separase increased the fork velocity about 1.5-fold and caused a strong acetylation of cohesin's SMC3 subunit and altered checkpoint response. Notably, Separase silencing triggered genomic instability in both HeLa and human primary fibroblast cells. Our results show a novel mechanism for fork progression mediated by Separase and thus the basis for genomic instability associated with tumorigenesis. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Initiation of genome instability and preneoplastic processes through loss of Fhit expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua C Saldivar

    Full Text Available Genomic instability drives tumorigenesis, but how it is initiated in sporadic neoplasias is unknown. In early preneoplasias, alterations at chromosome fragile sites arise due to DNA replication stress. A frequent, perhaps earliest, genetic alteration in preneoplasias is deletion within the fragile FRA3B/FHIT locus, leading to loss of Fhit protein expression. Because common chromosome fragile sites are exquisitely sensitive to replication stress, it has been proposed that their clonal alterations in cancer cells are due to stress sensitivity rather than to a selective advantage imparted by loss of expression of fragile gene products. Here, we show in normal, transformed, and cancer-derived cell lines that Fhit-depletion causes replication stress-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Using DNA combing, we observed a defect in replication fork progression in Fhit-deficient cells that stemmed primarily from fork stalling and collapse. The likely mechanism for the role of Fhit in replication fork progression is through regulation of Thymidine kinase 1 expression and thymidine triphosphate pool levels; notably, restoration of nucleotide balance rescued DNA replication defects and suppressed DNA breakage in Fhit-deficient cells. Depletion of Fhit did not activate the DNA damage response nor cause cell cycle arrest, allowing continued cell proliferation and ongoing chromosomal instability. This finding was in accord with in vivo studies, as Fhit knockout mouse tissue showed no evidence of cell cycle arrest or senescence yet exhibited numerous somatic DNA copy number aberrations at replication stress-sensitive loci. Furthermore, cells established from Fhit knockout tissue showed rapid immortalization and selection of DNA deletions and amplifications, including amplification of the Mdm2 gene, suggesting that Fhit loss-induced genome instability facilitates transformation. We propose that loss of Fhit expression in precancerous lesions is the first step in the

  7. Genome Instability in Childhood Obesity – a potential role for bariatric surgery in cancer prevention?

    OpenAIRE

    Usman, M.; Volpi, E.

    2017-01-01

    Severe paediatric obesity is associated with a range of metabolic complications and is characterised by a chronic meta-inflammatory state. It is postulated that this inflammatory response may result in an excess of systemic reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are well known for inducing DNA damage and reducing the capability of DNA synthesis and repair enzymes. Consequently, chronic inflammation in obesity may promote an accumulation of deleterious DNA mutations, leading to genome instability ...

  8. Essential roles of Caspase-3 in facilitating Myc-induced genetic instability and carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Ian M; Liu, Xinjian; Zhou, Min; Li, Fang; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2017-07-10

    The mechanism for Myc-induced genetic instability is not well understood. Here we show that sublethal activation of Caspase-3 plays an essential, facilitative role in Myc-induced genomic instability and oncogenic transformation. Overexpression of Myc resulted in increased numbers of chromosome aberrations and γH2AX foci in non-transformed MCF10A human mammary epithelial cells. However, such increases were almost completely eliminated in isogenic cells with CASP3 gene ablation. Furthermore, we show that endonuclease G, an apoptotic nuclease downstream of Caspase-3, is directly responsible for Myc-induced genetic instability. Genetic ablation of either CASP3 or ENDOG prevented Myc-induced oncogenic transformation of MCF10A cells. Taken together, we believe that Caspase-3 plays a critical, unexpected role in mediating Myc-induced genetic instability and transformation in mammalian cells.

  9. Development of genomic instability after irradiation; Entwicklung einer genomischen Instabilitaet nach Bestrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streffer, C. [Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Universitaetsklinikum

    2001-07-01

    It has been shown for various endpoints, both in vitro and in vivo, that genomic instability can be induced by low as well as by high LET radiation. Genomic instability in this case is not limited to a specific chromosome or gene. It can be passed on over many cell generations and in mammals can even be inherited to the next generation. It is capable of being induced in gametes. A dose dependence of the development of genomic instability has been found to exist in the range from 0.5 to 2.0 Gy. However, there are no data available in the low dose range. The mechanisms by which genomic instability is induced are still not understood at present. Various possibilities have been suggested. An understanding of these mechanisms will contribute to developing a deepened knowledge of processes such as stochastic radiation effects with multi-step mutation processes, and in particular carcinogenesis. It will facilitate the evaluation of radiation risks in the low-dose range. [German] Die Induktion einer genomischen Instabilitaet durch niedrige ebenso wie Hoch-LET-Strahlung ist fuer verschiedene Endpunkte gezeigt worden. Dieses ist sowohl in vitro als auch in vivo beobachtet worden. Die genomische Instabilitaet ist nicht auf ein spezifisches Chromosom oder Gen begrenzt. Sie kann ueber viele Zellgenerationen weitergegeben und auf die naechste Generation bei Saeugetieren vererbt werden. Eine Induktion in Keimzellen ist moeglich. Eine Dosisabhaengigkeit der Entwicklung genomischer Instabilitaet ist fuer den Dosisbereich von 0,5-2,0 Gy beobachtet worden. Daten im niedrigen Dosisbereich fehlen. Die Mechanismen der Induktion der genomischen Instabilitaet werden bisher nicht verstanden. Eine Anzahl verschiedener Moeglichkeiten ist vorgeschlagen worden. Die genomische Instabilitaet und das Verstaendnis der Mechanismen wird helfen, ein besseres Wissen ueber die Prozesse, wie stochastische Strahleneffekte mit Mehrschrittmutationsprozessen, besonders die Karzinogenese, zu entwickeln

  10. GSK-3 inhibitors induce chromosome instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staples Oliver D

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several mechanisms operate during mitosis to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. However, during tumour evolution these mechanisms go awry resulting in chromosome instability. While several lines of evidence suggest that mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC may promote chromosome instability, at least in colon cancer, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we turn our attention to GSK-3 – a protein kinase, which in concert with APC, targets β-catenin for proteolysis – and ask whether GSK-3 is required for accurate chromosome segregation. Results To probe the role of GSK-3 in mitosis, we inhibited GSK-3 kinase activity in cells using a panel of small molecule inhibitors, including SB-415286, AR-A014418, 1-Azakenpaullone and CHIR99021. Analysis of synchronised HeLa cells shows that GSK-3 inhibitors do not prevent G1/S progression or cell division. They do, however, significantly delay mitotic exit, largely because inhibitor-treated cells have difficulty aligning all their chromosomes. Although bipolar spindles form and the majority of chromosomes biorient, one or more chromosomes often remain mono-oriented near the spindle poles. Despite a prolonged mitotic delay, anaphase frequently initiates without the last chromosome aligning, resulting in chromosome non-disjunction. To rule out the possibility of "off-target" effects, we also used RNA interference to selectively repress GSK-3β. Cells deficient for GSK-3β exhibit a similar chromosome alignment defect, with chromosomes clustered near the spindle poles. GSK-3β repression also results in cells accumulating micronuclei, a hallmark of chromosome missegregation. Conclusion Thus, not only do our observations indicate a role for GSK-3 in accurate chromosome segregation, but they also raise the possibility that, if used as therapeutic agents, GSK-3 inhibitors may induce unwanted side effects by inducing chromosome instability.

  11. Genetic predisposition and genomic instability in murine stem cells exposed to low LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.A.; Bowler, D.A.; Moore, S.R.; Papworth, D.; Kadhim, M.A.; Goodhead, D.T.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The contribution of genetic factors to the initiation of radiation-induced genomic instability remains poorly understood. Studies with high LET α-particles and very high doses of low LET radiation have described several common mouse strains that differ in their sensitivity to the induction of genomic instability and apoptosis. The aim here was to investigate whether low doses of low LET radiation would elucidate a similar genetic predisposition. To assess the influence of genetic factors on the initiation of genomic instability by low doses of low LET radiation, we irradiated stem cells from two mouse strains known to differ in susceptibility to radiation-induced delayed chromosomal instability. The frequency of delayed chromosomal aberrations was measured in bone marrow cells from CBA/H and C57BL/6 mice after exposure to 0.1 - 2 Gy of 250 kV X-rays. The yield of both chromosomal and chromatid-type aberrations were assessed 13-15 cell divisions post-irradiation in the clonal descendents of surviving stem cells. The apoptotic index of these surviving clones was scored as morphological changes by electron microscopy. At low doses, the frequency of cells with aberrations increased significantly in both strains, contrary to the strain differences observed with high LET α-particles in earlier studies (Watson et al. 1997). The percentage of apoptotic cells was similar between the strains at low doses, with both showing comparable levels of cells with aberrations and apoptotic cells. However, at higher doses, strain differences became evident: CBA/H cells had a substantially higher fraction of cells with aberrations to apoptotic cells, while the converse was true for C57/Bl/6. This data indicates that low doses may be insufficient to initiate the apoptotic pathway, while still resulting in significant induction of delayed chromosomal instability. Overall, these observations have important implications for low dose low LET radiation risk assessment and human

  12. Baicalin hydrate inhibits cancer progression in nasopharyngeal carcinoma by affecting genome instability and splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Weiwei; Jia, Jiantao; Yan, Bin; Jiang, Yiqun; Shi, Ying; Chen, Ling; Mao, Chao; Liu, Xiaoli; Tang, Haosheng; Gao, Menghui; Cao, Ya; Liu, Shuang; Tao, Yongguang

    2018-01-02

    Baicalin hydrate (BH), a natural compound, has been investigated for many years because of its traditional medicinal properties. However, the anti-tumor activities of BH and its epigenetic role in NPC have not been elucidated. In this study, we identified that BH inhibits NPC cell growth in vivo and in vitro by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. BH epigenetically regulated genome instability by up-regulating the expression of satellite 2 (Sat2), alpha satellite (α-Sat), and major satellite (Major-Sat). BH also increased the level of IKKα, Suv39H1, and H3K9me3 and decreased LSH expression. Interestingly, BH promoted the splicing of Suv39H1 via the enhancement of m6A RNA methylation, rather than DNA methylation. Taken together, our results demonstrated that BH has an anti-tumor role in NPC and revealed a unique role of BH in genome instability and splicing in response to DNA damage.

  13. Oxidative DNA damage causes mitochondrial genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doudican, Nicole A; Song, Binwei; Shadel, Gerald S; Doetsch, Paul W

    2005-06-01

    Mitochondria contain their own genome, the integrity of which is required for normal cellular energy metabolism. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by normal mitochondrial respiration can damage cellular macromolecules, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and have been implicated in degenerative diseases, cancer, and aging. We developed strategies to elevate mitochondrial oxidative stress by exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2) or utilizing mutants lacking mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (sod2Delta). Experiments were conducted with strains compromised in mitochondrial base excision repair (ntg1Delta) and oxidative damage resistance (pif1Delta) in order to delineate the relationship between these pathways. We observed enhanced ROS production, resulting in a direct increase in oxidative mtDNA damage and mutagenesis. Repair-deficient mutants exposed to oxidative stress conditions exhibited profound genomic instability. Elimination of Ntg1p and Pif1p resulted in a synergistic corruption of respiratory competency upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). Mitochondrial genomic integrity was substantially compromised in ntg1Delta pif1Delta sod2Delta strains, since these cells exhibit a total loss of mtDNA. A stable respiration-defective strain, possessing a normal complement of mtDNA damage resistance pathways, exhibited a complete loss of mtDNA upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). This loss was preventable by Sod2p overexpression. These results provide direct evidence that oxidative mtDNA damage can be a major contributor to mitochondrial genomic instability and demonstrate cooperation of Ntg1p and Pif1p to resist the introduction of lesions into the mitochondrial genome.

  14. Genome instability and chromosomal rearrangements in a heterothallic wine yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklos, I; Varga, T; Nagy, A; Sipiczki, M

    1997-01-01

    Wine strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are usually homothallic diploids and show chromosome length polymorphism. We describe the analysis of a heterothallic strain heterozygous for the mating types a and alpha. Surveying cultures of the strain, we found a remarkable degree of heterogeneity in ploidy and in electrophoretic karyotype. The CHEF analysis of tetrads and dyads revealed an enormous variability of band patterns hampering the analysis of chromosome segregation. We propose that the instability of ploidy and chromosome polymorphism might be due to heterothallism that precludes the process "genome renewal" (MORTIMER et al. 1994) by selfdiploidization of spore clones.

  15. Segregation induced fingering instabilities in granular avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Mark; Thornton, Anthony; Johnson, Chris; Kokelaar, Pete; Gray, Nico

    2013-04-01

    the governing equations, are linearly unstable to arbitrarily small perturbations. It should be noted similar stability characteristics are found for shallow layer fluid flows on an inclined plane, with small wavelength perturbations stabilised by the inclusion of empirical frictional drag and viscous dissipation. Furthermore, depth-averaged models for roll waves on a monodisperse, shallow granular layer released on an inclined plane have a similar problem with high wave-number modes remaining linearly unstable. In this case the high wavenumber instability can be suppressed by the inclusion of (phenomenological) viscous dissipation. It is possible that by including similar rheological terms in our depth-averaged model the small wavelength modes can be stabilised and a well defined finger width can be predicted. This is the first model to describe the break-up of a uniform front of granular material, and it represents a crucial step forward in obtaining a mathematical model of this process. However, the current model is not complete and remains linearly unstable to arbitrarily small wavelength perturbations. We anticipate that these small wavelength instabilities can be stabilised by including additional physical effects, and this remains an active avenue of investigation. Reference: Woodhouse, M; Thornton, A. R.; Johnson, C.G.; Kokelaar, P, and Gray, J.M.N.T. Segregation-induced fingering instabilities in granular free surface flows. Journal of Fluids Mechanics. (2012). 709 543-580

  16. Induction of Genomic Instability In Vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rithidech, Kanokporn; Simon, Sanford R.; Whorton, Elbert B.

    2006-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to determine if low doses (below or equal to the level traditionally requiring human radiation protection, i.e. less than or equal to 10 cGy) of low LET radiation can induce genomic instability. The magnitude of genomic instability was measured as delayed chromosome instability in bone marrow cells of exposed mice with different levels of endogenous DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) activity, i.e. high (C57BL/6J mice), intermediate (BALB/cJ mice), and extremely low (Scid mice). In addition, at early time points (1 and 4 hrs) following irradiation, levels of activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), a transcription factor known to be involved in regulating the expression of genes responsible for cell protection following stimuli, were measured in these cells. Bone marrow cells were collected at different times following irradiation, i.e. 1 hr, 4 hrs, 1 month, and 6 months. A total of five mice per dose per strain were sacrificed at each time point for sample collection. As a result, a total of 80 mice from each strain were used. The frequency and the type of metaphase chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells collected from exposed mice at different times following irradiation were used as markers for radiation-induced genomic instability. A three-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol for mouse chromosomes 1, 2, and 3 was used for the analysis of delayed stable chromosomal aberrations in metaphase cells. All other visible chromatid-type aberrations and gross structural abnormalities involving non-painted chromosomes were also evaluated on the same metaphase cells used for scoring the stable chromosomal aberrations of painted chromosomes. Levels of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation were also determined in cells at 1 and 4 hrs following irradiation (indicative of early responses)

  17. Bystander-mediated genomic instability after high LET radiation in murine primary haemopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowler, Deborah A.; Moore, Stephen R.; Macdonald, Denise A.; Smyth, Sharon H.; Clapham, Peter; Kadhim, Munira A.

    2006-01-01

    Communication between irradiated and unirradiated (bystander) cells can result in responses in unirradiated cells that are similar to responses in their irradiated counterparts. The purpose of the current experiment was to test the hypothesis that bystander responses will be similarly induced in primary murine stem cells under different cell culture conditions. The experimental systems used here, co-culture and media transfer, are similar in that they both restrict communication between irradiated and bystander cells to media borne factors, but are distinct in that with the media transfer technique, cells can only communicate after irradiation, and with co-culture, cells can communication before, during and after irradiation. In this set of parallel experiments, cell type, biological endpoint, and radiation quality and dose, were kept constant. In both experimental systems, clonogenic survival was significantly decreased in all groups, whether irradiated or bystander, suggesting a substantial contribution of bystander effects (BE) to cell killing. Genomic instability (GI) was induced under all radiation and bystander conditions in both experiments, including a situation where unirradiated cells were incubated with media that had been conditioned for 24 h with irradiated cells. The appearance of delayed aberrations (genomic instability) 10-13 population doublings after irradiation was similar to the level of initial chromosomal damage, suggesting that the bystander factor is able to induce chromosomal alterations soon after irradiation. Whether these early alterations are related to those observed at later timepoints remains unknown. These results suggest that genomic instability may be significantly induced in a bystander cell population whether or not cells communicate during irradiation

  18. The elevation of radiation load on ecosystems and genome instability of organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaziyev, A. I.; Bezlepkin, V.Q.

    2002-01-01

    prophylaxis of human disorders. Thus, it was found that the action of low-dose ionizing radiation on living organisms might induce an adaptive repair response in them aimed at decreasing the genetic consequences of the exposure. However, the potentialities of defense and repair systems of an organism are limited, so an increase in genome lesions may cause inheritable mutations, cancer and other pathologies, and death. DNA lesions caused by ionizing radiation in small and sublethal doses can essentially be repaired, whereas unrepaired lesions and errors of repair, replication, and recombination systems lead to formation of mutational changes in DNA sequences. These changes may be transmitted to daughter cells and induce genome instability in the progeny. Induced genome instability in survived somatic cells is characterized by persistence of a high level of acquired variability in many generations of these cells. Genome instability manifests itself as an increased frequency of karyotypic anomalies, chromosome and gene mutations, clonal heterogeneity, and malignant transformation in the progeny of cells exposed to DNA-damaging agents. Besides, cells with genome instability show increased amplification of genes and changes in their expression, as well as disturbances in their differentiation, delays in reproductive death and other phenotypic characters of abnormal development. Whereas some progress has been made towards knowledge of genome instability in the somatic cells of mammals, the radiation-induced genome instability in germ cells transmitted to individuals of the next generation is still not clearly understood. At the same time, evidence has been obtained which suggests that the transmission of genome instability to the somatic cells of the progeny from the germ cells of gamma - radiation-exposed parents is possible. This conclusion is based on the data on mutation frequency in the progeny of parents exposed to DNA-damaging agents. For instance, a significant increase in

  19. Analysis of genomic instability in bronchial cells from uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neft, R.E.; Belinsky, S.A.; Gilliland, F.D.; Lechner, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show that underground uranium miners have a radon progeny exposure-dependent increased risk for developing lung cancer. The odds ratio for lung cancer in uranium miners increase for all cumulative exposures above 99 Working Level Months. In addition, there is a strong multiplicative effect of cigarette smoking on the development of lung cancer in uranium miners. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether or not early genetic changes, as indicated by genomic instability, can be detected in bronchial cells from uranium miners. Investigations of this nature may serve as a means of discovering sub-clinical disease and could lead to earlier detection of lung cancer and a better prognosis for the patient

  20. Genomic instability and the role of radiation quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadhim, M. A.; Hill, M. A.; Moore, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    Genomic instability (GI) is a hallmark of tumorigenic progression and is observed as delayed genetic damage in the progeny of irradiated and unirradiated bystander cells. The expression of GI can be influenced by genotype, cell type and radiation quality. While several studies have demonstrated the induction of GI by high and low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, our work on human and mouse primary cell systems has shown LET-dependent differences in the induction and expression of GI. These differences might be attributed to differences in radiation track structure, dose rate, contribution of bystander cells and radiation dose. This paper reviews the role of radiation quality in the induction of GI and describe the possible mechanisms underlining the observed differences between radiation types on its induction. The experimental results presented suggest that dose might be the most significant factor in determining induction of GI after low-LET radiation. (authors)

  1. Is there a common mechanism underlying genomic instability, bystander effects and other nontargeted effects of exposure to ionizing radiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    A number of nontargeted and delayed effects associated with radiation exposure have now been described. These include radiation-induced genomic instability, death-inducing and bystander effects, clastogenic factors and transgenerational effects. It is unlikely that these nontargeted effects are directly induced by cellular irradiation. Instead, it is proposed that some as yet to be identified secreted factor can be produced by irradiated cells that can stimulate effects in nonirradiated cells (death-inducing and bystander effects, clastogenic factors) and perpetuate genomic instability in the clonally expanded progeny of an irradiated cell. The proposed factor must be soluble and capable of being transported between cells by cell-to-cell gap junction communication channels. Furthermore, it must have the potential to stimulate cellular cytokines and/or reactive oxygen species. While it is difficult to imagine a role for such a secreted factor in contributing to transgenerational effects, the other nontargeted effects of radiation may all share a common mechanism.

  2. Dicamba causes genomic instability in Phaseolus vulgaris seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Murat; Taşpınar, Mahmut Sinan; Arslan, Esra; Yaǧci, Semra; Aǧar, Güleray

    2017-04-01

    The herbicide 3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid (dicamba) is principally used widely agriculture today. The widely use of dicamba in agriculture may represent a potential toxic risks to some crops. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the genotoxic effects of dicamba by using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) in Phaseolus vulgaris seedlings. The results showed that persistent DNA damage and decreased genomic template stability (GTS) induced by dicamba (0,2, 0,4 and 0,6 ppm).

  3. Anticipating Terrorist Safe Havens from Instability Induced Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Robert; Marvin, Brett

    This chapter presents recent methods developed at the Center for Army Analysis to classify patterns of nation-state instability that lead to conflict. The ungoverned areas endemic to failed nation-states provide terrorist organizations with safe havens from which to plan and execute terrorist attacks. Identification of those states at risk for instability induced conflict should help to facilitate effective counter terrorism policy planning efforts. Nation-states that experience instability induced conflict are similar in that they share common instability factors that make them susceptible to experiencing conflict. We utilize standard pattern classification algorithms to identify these patterns. First, we identify features (political, military, economic and social) that capture the instability of a nation-state. Second, we forecast the future levels of these features for each nation-state. Third, we classify each future state’s conflict potential based upon the conflict level of those states in the past most similar to the future state.

  4. Ectopic Expression of Testis Germ Cell Proteins in Cancer and Its Potential Role in Genomic Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaraby Yoheswaran Nielsen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genomic instability is a hallmark of human cancer and an enabling factor for the genetic alterations that drive cancer development. The processes involved in genomic instability resemble those of meiosis, where genetic material is interchanged between homologous chromosomes. In most types of human cancer, epigenetic changes, including hypomethylation of gene promoters, lead to the ectopic expression of a large number of proteins normally restricted to the germ cells of the testis. Due to the similarities between meiosis and genomic instability, it has been proposed that activation of meiotic programs may drive genomic instability in cancer cells. Some germ cell proteins with ectopic expression in cancer cells indeed seem to promote genomic instability, while others reduce polyploidy and maintain mitotic fidelity. Furthermore, oncogenic germ cell proteins may indirectly contribute to genomic instability through induction of replication stress, similar to classic oncogenes. Thus, current evidence suggests that testis germ cell proteins are implicated in cancer development by regulating genomic instability during tumorigenesis, and these proteins therefore represent promising targets for novel therapeutic strategies.

  5. The Dual Roles of MYC in Genomic Instability and Cancer Chemoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Alpana; Folk, Watson P.; Sakamuro, Daitoku

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is associated with genomic instability and aging. Genomic instability stimulates tumorigenesis, whereas deregulation of oncogenes accelerates DNA replication and increases genomic instability. It is therefore reasonable to assume a positive feedback loop between genomic instability and oncogenic stress. Consistent with this premise, overexpression of the MYC transcription factor increases the phosphorylation of serine 139 in histone H2AX (member X of the core histone H2A family), which forms so-called γH2AX, the most widely recognized surrogate biomarker of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs). Paradoxically, oncogenic MYC can also promote the resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic DNA-damaging agents such as cisplatin, clearly implying an antagonistic role of MYC in genomic instability. In this review, we summarize the underlying mechanisms of the conflicting functions of MYC in genomic instability and discuss when and how the oncoprotein exerts the contradictory roles in induction of DSBs and protection of cancer-cell genomes. PMID:28590415

  6. Trans-generational radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the female enhances the action of chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camats, Nuria; Garcia, Francisca; Parrilla, Juan Jose; Calaf, Joaquim; Martin, Miguel; Caldes, Montserrat Garcia

    2008-01-01

    Genomic instability can be produced by ionising radiation, so-called radiation-induced genomic instability, and chemical mutagens. Radiation-induced genomic instability occurs in both germinal and somatic cells and also in the offspring of irradiated individuals, and it is characterised by genetic changes including chromosomal rearrangements. The majority of studies of trans-generational, radiation-induced genomic instability have been described in the male germ line, whereas the authors who have chosen the female as a model are scarce. The aim of this work is to find out the radiation-induced effects in the foetal offspring of X-ray-treated female rats and, at the same time, the possible impact of this radiation-induced genomic instability on the action of a chemical mutagen. In order to achieve both goals, the quantity and quality of chromosomal damage were analysed. In order to detect trans-generational genomic instability, a total of 4806 metaphases from foetal tissues from the foetal offspring of X-irradiated female rats (5 Gy, acute dose) were analysed. The study's results showed that there is radiation-induced genomic instability: the number of aberrant metaphases and the breaks per total metaphases studied increased and were found to be statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05), with regard to the control group. In order to identify how this trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability could influence the chromosomal behaviour of the offspring of irradiated rat females in front of a chemical agent (aphidicolin), a total of 2481 metaphases were studied. The observed results showed that there is an enhancement of the action of the chemical agent: chromosomal breaks per aberrant metaphases show significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in the X-ray- and aphidicolin-treated group as regards the aphidicolin-treated group. In conclusion, our findings indicate that there is trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the foetal cells

  7. Trans-generational radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the female enhances the action of chemical mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camats, Nuria [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Francisca [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Parrilla, Juan Jose [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, 30120 El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Calaf, Joaquim [Servei de Ginecologia i Obstetricia, Hospital Universitari de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Martin, Miguel [Departament de Pediatria, d' Obstetricia i Ginecologia i de Medicina Preventiva, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caldes, Montserrat Garcia [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: Montserrat.Garcia.Caldes@uab.es

    2008-04-02

    Genomic instability can be produced by ionising radiation, so-called radiation-induced genomic instability, and chemical mutagens. Radiation-induced genomic instability occurs in both germinal and somatic cells and also in the offspring of irradiated individuals, and it is characterised by genetic changes including chromosomal rearrangements. The majority of studies of trans-generational, radiation-induced genomic instability have been described in the male germ line, whereas the authors who have chosen the female as a model are scarce. The aim of this work is to find out the radiation-induced effects in the foetal offspring of X-ray-treated female rats and, at the same time, the possible impact of this radiation-induced genomic instability on the action of a chemical mutagen. In order to achieve both goals, the quantity and quality of chromosomal damage were analysed. In order to detect trans-generational genomic instability, a total of 4806 metaphases from foetal tissues from the foetal offspring of X-irradiated female rats (5 Gy, acute dose) were analysed. The study's results showed that there is radiation-induced genomic instability: the number of aberrant metaphases and the breaks per total metaphases studied increased and were found to be statistically significant (p {<=} 0.05), with regard to the control group. In order to identify how this trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability could influence the chromosomal behaviour of the offspring of irradiated rat females in front of a chemical agent (aphidicolin), a total of 2481 metaphases were studied. The observed results showed that there is an enhancement of the action of the chemical agent: chromosomal breaks per aberrant metaphases show significant differences (p {<=} 0.05) in the X-ray- and aphidicolin-treated group as regards the aphidicolin-treated group. In conclusion, our findings indicate that there is trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the foetal

  8. Substrate-induced instability in gas microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.F.

    1992-12-01

    The results of a programme of research into substrate-induced gain instability in gas microstrip detectors are reported. Information has been collected on a wide range of substrates including many commonly available glasses and ceramics. A theoretical model of the gain instability is proposed. While we have not yet found an acceptable substrate for the construction of high flux detectors our experience points to electronically conductive glasses as the most promising source of a stable substrate. (Author)

  9. Genomic instability and telomere fusion of canine osteosarcoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Maeda

    Full Text Available Canine osteosarcoma (OSA is known to present with highly variable and chaotic karyotypes, including hypodiploidy, hyperdiploidy, and increased numbers of metacentric chromosomes. The spectrum of genomic instabilities in canine OSA has significantly augmented the difficulty in clearly defining the biological and clinical significance of the observed cytogenetic abnormalities. In this study, eight canine OSA cell lines were used to investigate telomere fusions by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH using a peptide nucleotide acid probe. We characterized each cell line by classical cytogenetic studies and cellular phenotypes including telomere associated factors and then evaluated correlations from this data. All eight canine OSA cell lines displayed increased abnormal metacentric chromosomes and exhibited numerous telomere fusions and interstitial telomeric signals. Also, as evidence of unstable telomeres, colocalization of γ-H2AX and telomere signals in interphase cells was observed. Each cell line was characterized by a combination of data representing cellular doubling time, DNA content, chromosome number, metacentric chromosome frequency, telomere signal level, cellular radiosensitivity, and DNA-PKcs protein expression level. We have also studied primary cultures from 10 spontaneous canine OSAs. Based on the observation of telomere aberrations in those primary cell cultures, we are reasonably certain that our observations in cell lines are not an artifact of prolonged culture. A correlation between telomere fusions and the other characteristics analyzed in our study could not be identified. However, it is important to note that all of the canine OSA samples exhibiting telomere fusion utilized in our study were telomerase positive. Pending further research regarding telomerase negative canine OSA cell lines, our findings may suggest telomere fusions can potentially serve as a novel marker for canine OSA.

  10. Telomere-mediated chromosomal instability triggers TLR4 induced inflammation and death in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabindra N Bhattacharjee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telomeres are essential to maintain chromosomal stability. Cells derived from mice lacking telomerase RNA component (mTERC-/- mice display elevated telomere-mediated chromosome instability. Age-dependent telomere shortening and associated chromosome instability reduce the capacity to respond to cellular stress occurring during inflammation and cancer. Inflammation is one of the important risk factors in cancer progression. Controlled innate immune responses mediated by Toll-like receptors (TLR are required for host defense against infection. Our aim was to understand the role of chromosome/genome instability in the initiation and maintenance of inflammation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the function of TLR4 in telomerase deficient mTERC-/- mice harbouring chromosome instability which did not develop any overt immunological disorder in pathogen-free condition or any form of cancers at this stage. Chromosome instability was measured in metaphase spreads prepared from wildtype (mTERC+/+, mTERC+/- and mTERC-/- mouse splenocytes. Peritoneal and/or bone marrow-derived macrophages were used to examine the responses of TLR4 by their ability to produce inflammatory mediators TNFalpha and IL6. Our results demonstrate that TLR4 is highly up-regulated in the immune cells derived from telomerase-null (mTERC-/- mice and lipopolysaccharide, a natural ligand for TLR4 stabilises NF-kappaB binding to its promoter by down-regulating ATF-3 in mTERC-/- macrophages. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings implied that background chromosome instability in the cellular level stabilises the action of TLR4-induced NF-kappaB action and sensitises cells to produce excess pro-inflammatory mediators. Chromosome/genomic instability data raises optimism for controlling inflammation by non-toxic TLR antagonists among high-risk groups.

  11. Ultradeep sequencing of a human ultraconserved region reveals somatic and constitutional genomic instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna De Grassi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of cancer-associated genomic instability is crucial, particularly in tumour types in which this instability represents the essential underlying mechanism of tumourigenesis. Currently used methods require the presence of already established neoplastic cells because they only detect clonal mutations. In principle, parallel sequencing of single DNA filaments could reveal the early phases of tumour initiation by detecting low-frequency mutations, provided an adequate depth of coverage and an effective control of the experimental error. We applied ultradeep sequencing to estimate the genomic instability of individuals with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC. To overcome the experimental error, we used an ultraconserved region (UCR of the human genome as an internal control. By comparing the mutability outside and inside the UCR, we observed a tendency of the ultraconserved element to accumulate significantly fewer mutations than the flanking segments in both neoplastic and nonneoplastic HNPCC samples. No difference between the two regions was detectable in cells from healthy donors, indicating that all three HNPCC samples have mutation rates higher than the healthy genome. This is the first, to our knowledge, direct evidence of an intrinsic genomic instability of individuals with heterozygous mutations in mismatch repair genes, and constitutes the proof of principle for the development of a more sensitive molecular assay of genomic instability.

  12. UV-C-irradiated Arabidopsis and tobacco emit volatiles that trigger genomic instability in neighboring plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Youli; Danna, Cristian H; Zemp, Franz J; Titov, Viktor; Ciftci, Ozan Nazim; Przybylski, Roman; Ausubel, Frederick M; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-10-01

    We have previously shown that local exposure of plants to stress results in a systemic increase in genome instability. Here, we show that UV-C-irradiated plants produce a volatile signal that triggers an increase in genome instability in neighboring nonirradiated Arabidopsis thaliana plants. This volatile signal is interspecific, as UV-C-irradiated Arabidopsis plants transmit genome destabilization to naive tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants and vice versa. We report that plants exposed to the volatile hormones methyl salicylate (MeSA) or methyl jasmonate (MeJA) exhibit a similar level of genome destabilization as UV-C-irradiated plants. We also found that irradiated Arabidopsis plants produce MeSA and MeJA. The analysis of mutants impaired in the synthesis and/or response to salicylic acid (SA) and/or jasmonic acid showed that at least one other volatile compound besides MeSA and MeJA can communicate interplant genome instability. The NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 (npr1) mutant, defective in SA signaling, is impaired in both the production and the perception of the volatile signals, demonstrating a key role for NPR1 as a central regulator of genome stability. Finally, various forms of stress resulting in the formation of necrotic lesions also generate a volatile signal that leads to genomic instability.

  13. Epstein–Barr virus particles induce centrosome amplification and chromosomal instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumilov, Anatoliy; Tsai, Ming-Han; Schlosser, Yvonne T.; Kratz, Anne-Sophie; Bernhardt, Katharina; Fink, Susanne; Mizani, Tuba; Lin, Xiaochen; Jauch, Anna; Mautner, Josef; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Feederle, Regina; Hoffmann, Ingrid; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Infections with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) are associated with cancer development, and EBV lytic replication (the process that generates virus progeny) is a strong risk factor for some cancer types. Here we report that EBV infection of B-lymphocytes (in vitro and in a mouse model) leads to an increased rate of centrosome amplification, associated with chromosomal instability. This effect can be reproduced with virus-like particles devoid of EBV DNA, but not with defective virus-like particles that cannot infect host cells. Viral protein BNRF1 induces centrosome amplification, and BNRF1-deficient viruses largely lose this property. These findings identify a new mechanism by which EBV particles can induce chromosomal instability without establishing a chronic infection, thereby conferring a risk for development of tumours that do not necessarily carry the viral genome. PMID:28186092

  14. Genomic instability in normal human fibroblasts for chronically low-dose radiation in heavy-ion radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Uchihori, Yukio; Ishizaki, Kanji; Hayashi, Hiroko; Yamane, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Hideaki

    2004-01-01

    We have been studying genomic instability of biological effects in normal human fibroblasts exposed to chronic low-dose radiation in heavy-ion radiation field. This year we try to irradiate cells with low-density carbon ions using faint beams. Genomic instability in cellular responses was examined to measure either cell killing or mutation induction in low-dose accumulated cell populations after exposing to X-ray challenging doses. The results showed that there was no enhanced effect on cell killing between the low-dose pretreated and unirradiated cell populations with carbon-ion faint beams after exposing to defined challenging doses of 200 kV X rays. On the other hand, the frequency of mutation induction, which was measured as the induction of a 6-thioguanine resistant clone focused on hprt locus, of the low-dose pretreated cell population was much higher than that of unirradiated cell population. The results suggested that genomic instability was induced in mutagenesis by the pretreatment of low-density carbon ions. (author)

  15. Genomic instability in normal human fibroblasts for chronically low-dose radiation in heavy-ion radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Fujitaka, Kazunobu; Ishizaki, Kanji; Hayashi, Hiroko; Yamane, Y.; Nakamura, H.

    2003-01-01

    We have been studying genomic instability of biological effects in normal human fibroblasts exposed to chronically low-dose radiation in heavy-ion radiation field. Cells were cultured in a CO 2 incubator, which was placed in the irradiation room for biological study of heavy ions in the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) and irradiated with scattered radiations produced with heavy-ion beams throughout the life span of the cell population. Genomic instability in cellular responses was examined to measure either cell killing or mutation induction in low-dose accumulated cell populations after exposing to X-ray challenging doses. The results showed that there was no enhanced effect on cell killing between the low-dose accumulated and non-irradiated cell populations after exposing to defined challenging doses of 200 kV X rays. On the contrary, the mutation frequency, which 2 was measured as the induction of a 6-thioguanine resistant clone focused on hprt locus, of the low-dose accumulated cell population was much higher than that of non-irradiated cell population. The results suggested that genomic instability was induced in mutagenesis by the chronic low-dose irradiations in heavy-ion radiation field. (author)

  16. Loss of RMI2 Increases Genome Instability and Causes a Bloom-Like Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien F Hudson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bloom syndrome is a recessive human genetic disorder with features of genome instability, growth deficiency and predisposition to cancer. The only known causative gene is the BLM helicase that is a member of a protein complex along with topoisomerase III alpha, RMI1 and 2, which maintains replication fork stability and dissolves double Holliday junctions to prevent genome instability. Here we report the identification of a second gene, RMI2, that is deleted in affected siblings with Bloom-like features. Cells from homozygous individuals exhibit elevated rates of sister chromatid exchange, anaphase DNA bridges and micronuclei. Similar genome and chromosome instability phenotypes are observed in independently derived RMI2 knockout cells. In both patient and knockout cell lines reduced localisation of BLM to ultra fine DNA bridges and FANCD2 at foci linking bridges are observed. Overall, loss of RMI2 produces a partially active BLM complex with mild features of Bloom syndrome.

  17. Detection of genomic instability in normal human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to 238Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, C.H.; Fukushima, N.H.; Neft, R.E.; Lechner, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Alpha particle-emitting radon daughters constitute a risk for development of lung cancer in humans. The development of this disease involves multiple genetic alterations. These changes and the time course they follow are not yet defined despite numerous in vitro endeavors to transform human lung cells with various physical or chemical agents. However, genomic instability, characterized both by structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations and by elevated rates of point mutations, is a common feature of tumor cells. Further, both types of genomic instability have been reported in the noncancerous progeny of normal murine hemopoietic cells exposed in vitro to α-particles. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if genomic instability is also a prominent feature of normal human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to α-particle irradiation from the decay of inhaled radon daughters

  18. Rac2-MRC-cIII-generated ROS cause genomic instability in chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells and primitive progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieborowska-Skorska, Margaret; Kopinski, Piotr K; Ray, Regina; Hoser, Grazyna; Ngaba, Danielle; Flis, Sylwia; Cramer, Kimberly; Reddy, Mamatha M; Koptyra, Mateusz; Penserga, Tyrone; Glodkowska-Mrowka, Eliza; Bolton, Elisabeth; Holyoake, Tessa L; Eaves, Connie J; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Valent, Peter; Hochhaus, Andreas; Hughes, Timothy P; van der Kuip, Heiko; Sattler, Martin; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw; Richardson, Christine; Dorrance, Adrienne; Stoklosa, Tomasz; Williams, David A; Skorski, Tomasz

    2012-05-03

    Chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP) is induced by BCR-ABL1 oncogenic tyrosine kinase. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors eliminate the bulk of CML-CP cells, but fail to eradicate leukemia stem cells (LSCs) and leukemia progenitor cells (LPCs) displaying innate and acquired resistance, respectively. These cells may accumulate genomic instability, leading to disease relapse and/or malignant progression to a fatal blast phase. In the present study, we show that Rac2 GTPase alters mitochondrial membrane potential and electron flow through the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex III (MRC-cIII), thereby generating high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in CML-CP LSCs and primitive LPCs. MRC-cIII-generated ROS promote oxidative DNA damage to trigger genomic instability, resulting in an accumulation of chromosomal aberrations and tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant BCR-ABL1 mutants. JAK2(V617F) and FLT3(ITD)-positive polycythemia vera cells and acute myeloid leukemia cells also produce ROS via MRC-cIII. In the present study, inhibition of Rac2 by genetic deletion or a small-molecule inhibitor and down-regulation of mitochondrial ROS by disruption of MRC-cIII, expression of mitochondria-targeted catalase, or addition of ROS-scavenging mitochondria-targeted peptide aptamer reduced genomic instability. We postulate that the Rac2-MRC-cIII pathway triggers ROS-mediated genomic instability in LSCs and primitive LPCs, which could be targeted to prevent the relapse and malignant progression of CML.

  19. RAPD-based detection of genomic instability in cucumber plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... test using five primers OP-C10, OP-G14, OP-H05, OP-Y03 and OP-AT01. The results indicate the usefulness of RAPD markers to detect genetic instability in cucumber primary regenerant plants derived from somatic embryogenesis, and as a certification tool for monitoring genetic stability during the generation process.

  20. Nutritional treatment of genome instability: a paradigm shift in disease prevention and in the setting of recommended dietary allowances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenech, Michael

    2003-06-01

    The link between genome instability and adverse health outcomes during the various stages of life, such as infertility, fetal development and cancer, is briefly reviewed against a background of evidence indicating that genome instability, in the absence of overt exposure to genotoxins, is itself a sensitive marker of nutritional deficiency. The latter is illustrated with cross-sectional and dietary intervention data obtained using the micronucleus assay, an efficient biomarker for diagnosing genome instability and nutritional deficiency. The concept of recommended dietary allowances for genome stability and how this could be achieved is discussed together with the emerging field of nutritional genomics for genome stability. The review concludes with a vision for a disease-prevention strategy based on the diagnosis and nutritional treatment of genome instability, i.e. 'Genome Health Clinics'.

  1. Dehydration-induced instabilities at intermediate depths in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantut, Nicolas; Stefanou, Ioannis; Sulem, Jean

    2017-08-01

    We formulate a model for coupled deformation and dehydration of antigorite, based on a porosity-dependent yield criterion and including shear-enhanced compaction. A pore pressure and compaction instability can develop when the net volume change associated with the reaction is negative, i.e., at intermediate depth in subduction zones. The instability criterion is derived in terms of the dependence of the yield criterion on porosity: if that dependence is strong, instabilities are more likely to occur. We also find that the instability is associated with strain localization, over characteristic length scales determined by the hydraulic diffusivity, the elasto-plastic parameters of the rock, and the reaction rate. Typical lower bounds for the localization length are of the order of 10 to 100 for antigorite dehydration and deformation at 3 GPa. The fluid pressure and deformation instability is expected to induce stress buildup in the surrounding rocks forming the subducted slab, which provides a mechanism for the nucleation and propagation of intermediate-depth earthquakes.

  2. Extracellular signaling through the microenvironment: a hypothesis relating carcinogenesis, bystander effects, and genomic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Brooks, A. L.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Cell growth, differentiation and death are directed in large part by extracellular signaling through the interactions of cells with other cells and with the extracellular matrix; these interactions are in turn modulated by cytokines and growth factors, i.e. the microenvironment. Here we discuss the idea that extracellular signaling integrates multicellular damage responses that are important deterrents to the development of cancer through mechanisms that eliminate abnormal cells and inhibit neoplastic behavior. As an example, we discuss the action of transforming growth factor beta (TGFB1) as an extracellular sensor of damage. We propose that radiation-induced bystander effects and genomic instability are, respectively, positive and negative manifestations of this homeostatic process. Bystander effects exhibited predominantly after a low-dose or a nonhomogeneous radiation exposure are extracellular signaling pathways that modulate cellular repair and death programs. Persistent disruption of extracellular signaling after exposure to relatively high doses of ionizing radiation may lead to the accumulation of aberrant cells that are genomically unstable. Understanding radiation effects in terms of coordinated multicellular responses that affect decisions regarding the fate of a cell may necessitate re-evaluation of radiation dose and risk concepts and provide avenues for intervention.

  3. Decrease in Lymphoid Specific Helicase and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine Is Associated with Metastasis and Genome Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jiantao; Shi, Ying; Chen, Ling; Lai, Weiwei; Yan, Bin; Jiang, Yiqun; Xiao, Desheng; Xi, Sichuan; Cao, Ya; Liu, Shuang; Cheng, Yan; Tao, Yongguang

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification as a hallmark in cancer. Conversion of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) by ten-eleven translocation (TET) family enzymes plays an important biological role in embryonic stem cells, development, aging and disease. Lymphoid specific helicase (LSH), a chromatin remodeling factor, is regarded as a reader of 5-hmC. Recent reports show that the level of 5-hmC is altered in various types of cancers. However, the change in 5-hmC levels in cancer and associated metastasis is not well defined. We report that the level of 5-hmC was decreased in metastatic tissues of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, breast cancer, and colon cancer relative to that in non-metastasis tumor tissues. Furthermore, our data show that TET2, but not TET3, interacted with LSH, whereas LSH increased TET2 expression through silencing miR-26b-5p and miR-29c-5p. Finally, LSH promoted genome stability by silencing satellite expression by affecting 5-hmC levels in pericentromeric satellite repeats, and LSH was resistant to cisplatin-induced DNA damage. Our data indicate that 5-hmC might serve as a metastasis marker for cancer and that the decreased expression of LSH is likely one of the mechanisms of genome instability underlying 5-hmC loss in cancer.

  4. Membrane Shape Instability Induced by Protein Crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiming; Atefi, Ehsan; Baumgart, Tobias

    2016-11-01

    Peripheral proteins can bend membranes through several different mechanisms, including scaffolding, wedging, oligomerization, and crowding. The crowding effect in particular has received considerable attention recently, in part because it is a colligative mechanism-implying that it could, in principle, be explored by any peripheral protein. Here we sought to clarify to what extent this mechanism is exploited by endocytic accessory proteins. We quantitatively investigate membrane curvature generation by means of a GUV shape stability assay. We found that the amount of crowding required to induce membrane curvature is correlated with membrane tension. Importantly, we also revealed that at the same membrane tension, the crowding mechanism requires far higher protein coverage to induce curvature changes compared to those observed for the endophilin BAR domain, serving here as an example of an endocytic accessory protein. Our results are important for the design of membrane-targeted biosensors as well as the understanding of mechanisms of biological membrane shaping. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. New type of genome instability in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, P.G.; Simonova, O.B.; Gerasimova, T.I.

    1988-01-01

    During crossing of two stable laboratory lines, y 2 sc 1w aG and Df(1)Pgd-kz/FM4, y 31d sc 8 dm B, consistent instability originated reproducibly in progeny containing a y 2 sc 1 w aG chromosome and autosomes of both lines. It is expressed in active mutagenesis observed over the course of several tens of generations. Destabilization occurs independently of direction of crossing. Mutagenesis occurs both in somatic and in sex cells of males and females. It displays high locus specificity. A transpositional nature was shown for at least some of the mutations. Results of the experiments concerning hybridization in situ with different mobile elements indicates an absence or low frequency of tranpositional bursts in the system. Possible mechanisms of induction of genetic instability in the system described are discussed

  6. Separase prevents genomic instability by controlling replication fork speed

    OpenAIRE

    Cucco, Francesco; Palumbo, Elisa; Camerini, Serena; D’Alessio, Barbara; Quarantotti, Valentina; Casella, Maria Luisa; Rizzo, Ilaria Maria; Cukrov, Dubravka; Delia, Domenico; Russo, Antonella; Crescenzi, Marco; Musio, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Proper chromosome segregation is crucial for preserving genomic integrity, and errors in this process cause chromosome mis-segregation, which may contribute to cancer development. Sister chromatid separation is triggered by Separase, an evolutionary conserved protease that cleaves the cohesin complex, allowing the dissolution of sister chromatid cohesion. Here we provide evidence that Separase participates in genomic stability maintenance by controlling replication fork speed. We fou...

  7. DNA repair defects and genome instability in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalo, Susana; Kreienkamp, Ray

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of the nuclear lamina has emerged as an important factor in the maintenance of genome stability. In particular, mutations in the LMNA gene, encoding A-type lamins (lamin A/C), alter nuclear morphology and function, and cause genomic instability. LMNA gene mutations are associated with a variety of degenerative diseases and devastating premature aging syndromes such as Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) and Restrictive Dermopathy (RD). HGPS is a severe laminopathy, with ...

  8. Lack of Major Genome Instability in Tumors of p53 Null Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermsen, Roel; Toonen, Pim; Kuijk, Ewart|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304834459; Youssef, Sameh A.; Kuiper, Raoul; van Heesch, Sebastiaan; de Bruin, Alain; Cuppen, Edwin|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/183050487; Simonis, Marieke

    2015-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is often associated with loss of tumor suppressor genes (such as TP53), genomic instability and telomere lengthening. Previously, we generated and characterized a rat p53 knockout model in which the homozygous rats predominantly develop hemangiosarcomas whereas the heterozygous rats

  9. Lerner's theory on the genetic relationship between heterozygosity, genomic co-adaptation, and developmental instability revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pertoldi, Cino; Sorensen, Jesper G.; David, Jean R.

    2006-01-01

    inbreeding is likely to have purged the genome of some of its genetic load and its most deleterious variants. The greater developmental instability in the parthenogenetic and inbred strains implies a non-linear relationship between heritability (h(2)) and additive genetic variance (sigma(2)(a)) (which...

  10. Study on the relationship between DNA-PKcs and genomic instability and hyper-radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Kang; Zhu Jiayun; Ding Nan; Li Junhong; Hu Wentao; Su Fengtao; He Jinpeng; Li Sha

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between DNA-PKcs and genome instability and hyper-radiosensitivity, human glioma cell lines M059K and M059J, as a model expressing wild-type DNA-PKcs and a model defective in DNA-PKcs activity, were exposed to low doses of X-rays. Cells survival fractions were assessed by colony-forming assay and Cytochalasin-B micronucleus assay was employed to detect the genomic instability happening in each single irradiated colony. It has been found that as the post-incubation time increased, M059K cells expressing wild-type DNA-PKcs exhibited low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and showed a similar genomic instability after 0.2 Gy and 0.6 Gy irradiations, but the M059J cells lacking in DNA-PKcs didn't present low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and showed a higher genomic instability of 0.6 Gy than that of 0.2 Gy. The results indicate that DNA-PKcs may act as one of the key factors that lead to low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity. (authors)

  11. Analysis of beam loss induced abort kicker instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang W.; Sandberg, J.; Ahrens, L.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mi, J.; Pai, C.; Tan, Y.

    2012-05-20

    Through more than a decade of operation, we have noticed the phenomena of beam loss induced kicker instability in the RHIC beam abort systems. In this study, we analyze the short term beam loss before abort kicker pre-fire events and operation conditions before capacitor failures. Beam loss has caused capacitor failures and elevated radiation level concentrated at failed end of capacitor has been observed. We are interested in beam loss induced radiation and heat dissipation in large oil filled capacitors and beam triggered thyratron conduction. We hope the analysis result would lead to better protection of the abort systems and improved stability of the RHIC operation.

  12. Radiation-induced instability at the virescent locus in groundnut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S.H.; Mouli Chandra

    1975-01-01

    A new case of instability induced in groundnut by γ-irradiation was classified as a variegated mutation according to its phenotypic expression. The mutant was isolated in M 2 generation and segregated for 50% virescents in subsequent generations. Studies on the phenotypic and genetic behaviour of the mutant suggested that (i) a mutation was induced v-locus and its unstable expression further mutated to a stable recessive condition, i.e., virescence, (ii) another mutation for gametophyte of Vsup(m) factor through the pollen, (iii) test crosses indicated that the variegation was controlled by a nuclear gene and not by plasmon. (author)

  13. Characterization of genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and engaging teaching strategies described in two curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Alexandra P.

    Cancer arises through an accumulation of mutations in the genome. In cancer cells, mutations are frequently caused by DNA rearrangements, which include chromosomal breakages, deletions, insertions, and translocations. Such events contribute to genomic instability, a known hallmark of cancer. To study cycles of chromosomal instability, we are using baker's yeast as a model organism. In yeast, a ChrVII system was previously developed (Admire et al., 2006), in which a disomic yeast strain was used to identify regions of instability on ChrVII. Using this system, a fragile site on the left arm of ChrVII (Admire et al., 2006) was identified and characterized. This study led to insight into mechanisms involved in chromosomal rearrangements and mutations that arise from them as well as to an understanding of mechanisms involved in genomic instability. To further our understanding of genomic instability, I devised a strategy to study instability on a different chromosome (ChrV) (Figure 3), so that we could determine whether lessons learned from the ChrVII system are applicable to other chromosomes, and/or whether other mechanisms of instability could be identified. A suitable strain was generated and analyzed, and our findings suggest that frequencies of instability on the right arm of ChrV are similar to those found in ChrVII. The results from the work in ChrV described in this paper support the idea that the instability found on ChrVII is not an isolated occurrence. My research was supported by an NSF GK-12 grant. The aim of this grant is to improve science education in middle schools, and as part of my participation in this program, I studied and practiced effective science communication methodologies. In attempts to explain my research to middle school students, I collaborated with others to develop methods for explaining genetics and the most important techniques I used in my research. While developing these methods, I learned more about what motivates people to learn

  14. Thermal-Performance Instability in Piezoresistive Sensors: Inducement and Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Wang, Hai; Zhao, Wei; Qin, Hongbo; Fang, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    The field of piezoresistive sensors has been undergoing a significant revolution in terms of design methodology, material technology and micromachining process. However, the temperature dependence of sensor characteristics remains a hurdle to cross. This review focuses on the issues in thermal-performance instability of piezoresistive sensors. Based on the operation fundamental, inducements to the instability are investigated in detail and correspondingly available ameliorative methods are presented. Pros and cons of each improvement approach are also summarized. Though several schemes have been proposed and put into reality with favorable achievements, the schemes featuring simple implementation and excellent compatibility with existing techniques are still emergently demanded to construct a piezoresistive sensor with excellent comprehensive performance. PMID:27886125

  15. Gastric cancers of Western European and African patients show different patterns of genomic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulder Chris JJ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with H. pylori is important in the etiology of gastric cancer. Gastric cancer is infrequent in Africa, despite high frequencies of H. pylori infection, referred to as the African enigma. Variation in environmental and host factors influencing gastric cancer risk between different populations have been reported but little is known about the biological differences between gastric cancers from different geographic locations. We aim to study genomic instability patterns of gastric cancers obtained from patients from United Kingdom (UK and South Africa (SA, in an attempt to support the African enigma hypothesis at the biological level. Methods DNA was isolated from 67 gastric adenocarcinomas, 33 UK patients, 9 Caucasian SA patients and 25 native SA patients. Microsatellite instability and chromosomal instability were analyzed by PCR and microarray comparative genomic hybridization, respectively. Data was analyzed by supervised univariate and multivariate analyses as well as unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis. Results Tumors from Caucasian and native SA patients showed significantly more microsatellite instable tumors (p Conclusions Gastric cancers from SA and UK patients show differences in genetic instability patterns, indicating possible different biological mechanisms in patients from different geographical origin. This is of future clinical relevance for stratification of gastric cancer therapy.

  16. Adaptive response and genomic instability: allosteric response of genome to negative impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masao S.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there is an upsurge concern on the unique response of living cells to low dose ionizing radiation for its inconformity to the existing paradigm of the biological action of radiation and its impact on the current understanding of risk evaluation of health effect of radiation in our workplace and environment. For the allosteric response to have significance, the cells must have an excellent sensing mechanism to discriminate tolerable and intolerable signals. In a series of experiments with mammalian, including human, cells, we demonstrated a novel sensing and signaling mechanism in the low-dose irradiated cells that was mediated by a PKCα-p3BMAPK-PLCδ1 feedback regulatory loop. Upon irradiation, PKCα is immediately activated, which in turn activate p38MAPK. The activation of p38MAPK is feedbacked to the activation of PKCα via PLCδ1, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of PtdInsP2 to generate PKCα-directed second messengers DAG and lnsP3. At low doses, the PKCα and p38MAPK continue to be activated for long time through this feedback loop, but when the cells encounter the high dose (>10 cGy or equivalent), the feedback loop is immediately comes to shutdown by deprivation of PKCα protein, known as down-regulation of PKC signaling. Thus, PKCα plays a key role in the long lasting nature of adaptive response to low doses and a binary switch to the genomic instability by too much signals. Tumor suppressor protein, p53, is a downstream effecter

  17. Genomic instability, bystander effect, cytoplasmic irradiation and other phenomena that may achieve fame without fortune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, E. J.

    2001-01-01

    The possible risk of induced malignancies in astronauts, as a consequence of the radiation environment in space, is a factor of concern for long term missions. Cancer risk estimates for high doses of low LET radiation are available from the epidemiological studies of the A-bomb survivors. Cancer risks at lower doses cannot be detected in epidemiological studies and must be inferred by extrapolation from the high dose risks. The standard setting bodies, such as the ICRP recommend a linear, no-threshold extrapolation of risks from high to low doses, but this is controversial. A study of mechanisms of carcinogenesis may shed some light on the validity of a linear extrapolation. The multi-step nature of carcinogenesis suggests that the role of radiation may be to induce a mutation leading to a mutator phenotype. High energy Fe ions, such as those encountered in space are highly effective in inducing genomic instability. Experiments involving the single particle microbeam have demonstrated a "bystander effect", ie a biological effect in cells not themselves hit, but in close proximity to those that are, as well as the induction of mutations in cells where only the cytoplasm, and not the nucleus, have been traversed by a charged particle. These recent experiments cast doubt on the validity of a simple linear extrapolation, but the data are so far fragmentary and conflicting. More studies are necessary. While mechanistic studies cannot replace epidemiology as a source of quantitative risk estimates, they may shed some light on the shape of the dose response relationship and therefore on the limitations of a linear extrapolation to low doses.

  18. Lack of major genome instability in tumors of p53 null rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roel Hermsen

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis is often associated with loss of tumor suppressor genes (such as TP53, genomic instability and telomere lengthening. Previously, we generated and characterized a rat p53 knockout model in which the homozygous rats predominantly develop hemangiosarcomas whereas the heterozygous rats mainly develop osteosarcomas. Using genome-wide analyses, we find that the tumors that arise in the heterozygous and homozygous Tp53C273X mutant animals are also different in their genomic instability profiles. While p53 was fully inactivated in both heterozygous and homozygous knockout rats, tumors from homozygous animals show very limited aneuploidy and low degrees of somatic copy number variation as compared to the tumors from heterozygous animals. In addition, complex structural rearrangements such as chromothripsis and breakage-fusion-bridge cycles were never found in tumors from homozygous animals, while these were readily detectable in tumors from heterozygous animals. Finally, we measured telomere length and telomere lengthening pathway activity and found that tumors of homozygous animals have longer telomeres but do not show clear telomerase or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT activity differences as compared to the tumors from heterozygous animals. Taken together, our results demonstrate that host p53 status in this rat p53 knockout model has a large effect on both tumor type and genomic instability characteristics, where full loss of functional p53 is not the main driver of large-scale structural variations. Our results also suggest that chromothripsis primarily occurs under p53 heterozygous rather than p53 null conditions.

  19. Transgenerational genomic instability in children of irradiated parents as a result of the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghajanyan, Anna, E-mail: ann-aghajanyan@yandex.ru [Cytogenetics Laboratory, FSI Russian Scientific Center of Roentgenology and Radiology, Profsoyuznaya 86, GSP-7, Moscow, 117997 (Russian Federation); Suskov, Igor [Laboratory of Ecological Genetics, N.I. Vavilov Institute of General Genetics Russian Academy of Sciences, Gybkin st. 3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2009-12-01

    The study of families irradiated as a result of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed significantly increased aberrant genomes frequencies (AGFs) not only in irradiated parents (n = 106, p < 0.01), but also in their children born after the accident (n = 159, p < 0.05). This is an indicative of the phenomenon of transgenerational genomic instability. To elucidate this phenomenon, experiments were undertaken to model genomic instability by using single and fractional in vitro {gamma}-irradiation ({sup 137}Cs) of peripheral blood samples from the children and their parents at doses of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 Gy. The spectrum and frequency of chromosome aberrations were studied in the 1st and 2nd cell generations. The average AGF was significantly increased at all doses (except 0.1 Gy) in children of irradiated parents, as compared to children born from non-irradiated parents. Amplification of cells with single-break chromosome aberrations in mitosis 2, as compared to mitosis 1, suggests the replication mechanism of realization of potential damage in DNA and the occurrence of genomic instability in succeeding cell generations.

  20. Overexpressed of RAD51 suppresses recombination defects: a possible mechanism to reverse genomic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2009-10-15

    RAD51, a key protein in the homologous recombinational DNA repair (HRR) pathway, is the major strand-transferase required for mitotic recombination. An important early step in HRR is the formation of single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) coated by RPA (a ss-DNA binding protein). Displacement of RPA by RAD51 is highly regulated and facilitated by a number of different proteins known as the 'recombination mediators'. To assist these recombination mediators, a second group of proteins also is required and we are defining these proteins here as 'recombination co-mediators'. Defects in either recombination mediators or comediators, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, lead to impaired HRR that can genetically be complemented for (i.e. suppressed) by overexpression of RAD51. Defects in HRR have long been known to contribute to genomic instability leading to tumor development. Since genomic instability also slows cell growth, precancerous cells presumably require genomic restabilization to gain a growth advantage. RAD51 is overexpressed in many tumors, and therefore, we hypothesize that the complementing ability of elevated levels of RAD51 in tumors with initial HRR defects limits genomic instability during carcinogenic progression. Of particular interest, this model may also help explain the high frequency of TP53 mutations in human cancers, since wild-type p53 represses RAD51.

  1. Significance of genomic instability in breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors: analysis of microarray-comparative genomic hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Masahiro; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Miura, Shiro; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    It has been postulated that ionizing radiation induces breast cancers among atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors. We have reported a higher incidence of HER2 and C-MYC oncogene amplification in breast cancers from A-bomb survivors. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of A-bomb radiation exposure on genomic instability (GIN), which is an important hallmark of carcinogenesis, in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues of breast cancer by using microarray-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Tumor DNA was extracted from FFPE tissues of invasive ductal cancers from 15 survivors who were exposed at 1.5 km or less from the hypocenter and 13 calendar year-matched non-exposed patients followed by aCGH analysis using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray. The total length of copy number aberrations (CNA) was used as an indicator of GIN, and correlation with clinicopathological factors were statistically tested. The mean of the derivative log ratio spread (DLRSpread), which estimates the noise by calculating the spread of log ratio differences between consecutive probes for all chromosomes, was 0.54 (range, 0.26 to 1.05). The concordance of results between aCGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for HER2 gene amplification was 88%. The incidence of HER2 amplification and histological grade was significantly higher in the A-bomb survivors than control group (P = 0.04, respectively). The total length of CNA tended to be larger in the A-bomb survivors (P = 0.15). Correlation analysis of CNA and clinicopathological factors revealed that DLRSpread was negatively correlated with that significantly (P = 0.034, r = -0.40). Multivariate analysis with covariance revealed that the exposure to A-bomb was a significant (P = 0.005) independent factor which was associated with larger total length of CNA of breast cancers. Thus, archival FFPE tissues from A-bomb survivors are useful for genome-wide aCGH analysis. Our results suggested that A

  2. Current-induced atomic dynamics, instabilities, and Raman signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Brandbyge, Mads; Hedegard, Per

    2012-01-01

    We derive and employ a semiclassical Langevin equation obtained from path integrals to describe the ionic dynamics of a molecular junction in the presence of electrical current. The electronic environment serves as an effective nonequilibrium bath. The bath results in random forces describing Joule...... heating, current-induced forces including the nonconservative wind force, dissipative frictional forces, and an effective Lorentz-type force due to the Berry phase of the nonequilibrium electrons. Using a generic two-level molecular model, we highlight the importance of both current-induced forces...... and Joule heating for the stability of the system. We compare the impact of the different forces, and the wide-band approximation for the electronic structure on our result. We examine the current-induced instabilities (excitation of runaway "waterwheel" modes) and investigate the signature...

  3. Links between persistent DNA damage, genome instability, and aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dynan, William S. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2016-11-14

    The goal of this study was to examine long-term effects of low-dose radiation exposure. One of the hypotheses was that radiation exposure would accelerate the normal aging process. The study was jointly funded by NASA and examined both low-LET radiation (γ-rays) and high-LET radiation (1000 MeV/nucleon 56Fe ions) at doses of 0.1 Gy and up. The work used the Japanese medaka fish (Oryzias latipes), as a vertebrate model organism that can be maintained in large numbers at low cost for lifetime studies. Like other small laboratory fish, Japanese medaka share many anatomical and histological characteristics with other vertebrates, and a variety of genetic and genomic resources are available. Some work also used the zebrafish (Danio rerio), another widely used laboratory model organism.

  4. Survivin and chromosome instability induced by X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Bo; Ju Guizhi; Liu Yang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the biological effect of survivin on chromosome instability induced by X-ray irradiation. Methods: Immunocytochemistry was used to detect the expression of sutvivin in HeLa cells. Carrier pSUPER-SVV was transfected into HeLa cells to interfere the expression of survivin. Flow cytometry assay was applied to detect the occurrence of polyploid at 0 h, 4 h, 12 h, and 48 h after the HeLa cells transfected with pSUPER-SVV and irradiated with 4 Gy X-rays irradiation, and compared with the group irradiated with 4 Gy X-rays but no transfection. Results: The expression of survivin was down-regulated by transfecting with small hair RNA, its depression rate was estimated to be about 32.16% at 48 h after transfection. The occurrence of polyploid giant cells was higher in the 4 Gy X-ray irradiated group at 48 h after the irradiation than the control groups (P<0.001). Being expression of survivin interfered, the occurrence at 12 h or 48 h after irradiation, however, was about two times higher than that in the control group. Conclusion: X-ray irradiation can induce chromosome instability in HeLa cells and the effect could be enhanced by interfering the expression of surviving. It was suggested that survivin plays an important role in maintaining the stability of chromosome. (authors)

  5. Growth induced buckling instability of anisotropic tube and its application in wound edge instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Le

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced anisotropic material abounds in biological world. It has been demonstrated in previous theoretical and experimental works that growth of biological soft tubular tissue plays a significant role in morphogenesis and pathology. Here we investigate growth-induced buckling of anisotropic cylindrical tissue, focusing on the effects of type of growth(constraint/unconstraint, isotropic/anisotropic, fiber property(orientation, density and strength, geometry and any interaction between these factors. We studied one-layer and two-layer models and obtained a rich spectrum of results. For one-layer model, we demonstrate that circumferential fiber orientation has a consistent stabilizing effect under various scenarios of growth. Higher fiber density has a destabilizing effect by disabling high-mode buckling. For two-layer model, we found that critical buckling strain at inner boundary is an invariant under same isotropic growth rate ratio between inner/ outer layer(g1 /g0. Then we applied our model to wound healing and illustrate the effects of skin residual stress, fiber property, proliferation region width and wound size on the wound edge stability. We conclude that fiber-reinforcement is an important factor to consider when investigating growth induced instability of anisotropic soft tissue.

  6. Growth induced buckling instability of anisotropic tube and its application in wound edge instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Le; Witten, Tarynn M.; Pidaparti, Ramana M.

    2017-01-01

    Fiber reinforced anisotropic material abounds in biological world. It has been demonstrated in previous theoretical and experimental works that growth of biological soft tubular tissue plays a significant role in morphogenesis and pathology. Here we investigate growth-induced buckling of anisotropic cylindrical tissue, focusing on the effects of type of growth(constraint/unconstraint, isotropic/anisotropic), fiber property(orientation, density and strength), geometry and any interaction between these factors. We studied one-layer and two-layer models and obtained a rich spectrum of results. For one-layer model, we demonstrate that circumferential fiber orientation has a consistent stabilizing effect under various scenarios of growth. Higher fiber density has a destabilizing effect by disabling high-mode buckling. For two-layer model, we found that critical buckling strain at inner boundary is an invariant under same isotropic growth rate ratio between inner/ outer layer(g1 /g0). Then we applied our model to wound healing and illustrate the effects of skin residual stress, fiber property, proliferation region width and wound size on the wound edge stability. We conclude that fiber-reinforcement is an important factor to consider when investigating growth induced instability of anisotropic soft tissue.

  7. Amplification of HER2 is a marker for global genomic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Love Brad

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic alterations of the proto-oncogene c-erbB-2 (HER-2/neu are associated with aggressive behavior and poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer. The variable clinical outcomes seen in patients with similar HER2 status, given similar treatments, suggests that the effects of amplification of HER2 can be influenced by other genetic changes. To assess the broader genomic implications of structural changes at the HER2 locus, we investigated relationships between genomic instability and HER2 status in patients with invasive breast cancer. Methods HER2 status was determined using the PathVysion® assay. DNA was extracted after laser microdissection from the 181 paraffin-embedded HER2 amplified (n = 39 or HER2 negative (n = 142 tumor specimens with sufficient tumor available to perform molecular analysis. Allelic imbalance (AI was assessed using a panel of microsatellite markers representing 26 chromosomal regions commonly altered in breast cancer. Student t-tests and partial correlations were used to investigate relationships between genomic instability and HER2 status. Results The frequency of AI was significantly higher (P P Conclusion The poor prognosis associated with HER2 amplification may be attributed to global genomic instability as cells with high frequencies of chromosomal alterations have been associated with increased cellular proliferation and aggressive behavior. In addition, high levels of DNA damage may render tumor cells refractory to treatment. In addition, specific alterations at chromosomes 11q13, 16q22-q24, and 18q21, all of which have been associated with aggressive tumor behavior, may serve as genetic modifiers to HER2 amplification. These data not only improve our understanding of HER in breast pathogenesis but may allow more accurate risk profiles and better treatment options to be developed.

  8. The Adaptive Response, Genetic Haplo-Insufficiency and Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geard, Charles R. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Center for Radiological Research

    2014-12-12

    The linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis is the driving force in the establishment of radiation protection standards. However, the scientific basis for linearity has been brought into question, particularly due to the concerns about induced radiation resistance as it pertains to oxidative stress. Specifically, we investigated the observation that tumor hypoxia is associated with malignant progression, increased metastases, chemo- and radioresistance and poor prognosis. Experiments were conducted with non-malignant 3T3/NIH cells and normal human lung fibroblasts (NHLF) that were subjected to γ-irradiation under the levels of oxygen resembling those in growing tumors, and related our data to the concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO), which is a better indicator of the amounts of residual oxygen inside the cells cultured in the hypoxic or anoxic atmosphere. We found that at DO levels about 0.5 mg/L cells subjected to both short-term (17 hours) and prolonged (48-72 hours) hypoxia continued to proliferate, and that apoptotic events were decreased at the early hours of hypoxic treatment. We showed that the short-term hypoxia up-regulated p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) and resulted in facilitated 53BP1 nuclear foci formation and disappearance, thus indicating the higher efficiency of DNA double strand breaks repair processes. The latter was confirmed by the lower micronuclei incidence in irradiated hypoxic cells.

  9. MicroRNA-34a promotes genomic instability by a broad suppression of genome maintenance mechanisms downstream of the oncogene KSHV-vGPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Claudia J; Popp, Oliver; Thirunarayanan, Nanthakumar; Dittmar, Gunnar; Lipp, Martin; Müller, Gerd

    2016-03-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-encoded chemokine receptor vGPCR acts as an oncogene in Kaposi's sarcomagenesis. Until now, the molecular mechanisms by which the vGPCR contributes to tumor development remain incompletely understood. Here, we show that the KSHV-vGPCR contributes to tumor progression through microRNA (miR)-34a-mediated induction of genomic instability. Large-scale analyses on the DNA, gene and protein level of cell lines derived from a mouse model of vGPCR-driven tumorigenesis revealed that a vGPCR-induced upregulation of miR-34a resulted in a broad suppression of genome maintenance genes. A knockdown of either the vGPCR or miR-34a largely restored the expression of these genes and confirmed miR-34a as a downstream effector of the KSHV-vGPCR that compromises genome maintenance mechanisms. This novel, protumorigenic role of miR-34a questions the use of miR-34a mimetics in cancer therapy as they could impair genome stability.

  10. Role of Ku80-dependent end-joining in delayed genomic instability in mammalian cells surviving ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Keiji, E-mail: kzsuzuki@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Course of Life Sciences and Radiation Research, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Kodama, Seiji [Research Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuen-machi, Sakai 599-8570 (Japan); Watanabe, Masami [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Kumatori-cho Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2010-01-05

    Ionizing radiation induces delayed destabilization of the genome in the progenies of surviving cells. This phenomenon, which is called radiation-induced genomic instability, is manifested by delayed induction of radiation effects, such as cell death, chromosome aberration, and mutation in the progeny of cells surviving radiation exposure. Previously, there was a report showing that delayed cell death was absent in Ku80-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, however, the mechanism of their defect has not been determined. We found that delayed induction of DNA double strand breaks and chromosomal breaks were intact in Ku80-deficient cells surviving X-irradiation, whereas there was no sign for the production of chromosome bridges between divided daughter cells. Moreover, delayed induction of dicentric chromosomes was significantly compromised in those cells compared to the wild-type CHO cells. Reintroduction of the human Ku86 gene complimented the defective DNA repair and recovered delayed induction of dicentric chromosomes and delayed cell death, indicating that defective Ku80-dependent dicentric induction was the cause of the absence of delayed cell death. Since DNA-PKcs-defective cells showed delayed phenotypes, Ku80-dependent illegitimate rejoining is involved in delayed impairment of the integrity of the genome in radiation-survived cells.

  11. Corona-induced electrohydrodynamic instabilities in low conducting liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, F.; Perez, A.T. [Depto. Electronica y Electromagnetismo, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes, s/n. 41012, Sevilla (Spain)

    2003-06-01

    The rose-window electrohydrodynamic (EHD) instability has been observed when a perpendicular field with an additional unipolar ion injection is applied onto a low conducting liquid surface. This instability has a characteristic pattern with cells five to 10 times greater than those observed in volume instabilities caused by unipolar injection. We have used corona discharge from a metallic point to perform some measurements of the rose-window instability in low conducting liquids. The results are compared to the linear theoretical criterion for an ohmic liquid. They confirmed that the minimum voltage for this instability is much lower than that for the interfacial instability in high conducting liquids. This was predicted theoretically in the dependence of the critical voltage as a function of the non-dimensional conductivity. It is shown that in a non-ohmic liquid the rose window appears as a secondary instability after the volume instability. (orig.)

  12. Instability of a Traffic Jam Induced by Slowing Down

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    1997-07-01

    A traffic jam induced by slowing down is investigated using the optimal velocity model of the car following models. When cars are decelerated in the presence of hindrances, two kinds of traffic jam occur behind the hindrance: one is an oscillating jam and the other is a homogeneous jam. When the slowing down is small, the oscillating jam occurs. If the slowing down is large, the jam is homogeneous over space and time. The linear stability theory is applied to the traffic jam. The critical line and critical mode of the instability are found. It is shown that the boundary between the oscillating and homogeneous jams is consistent with the critical line of the linear stability. The periods of the oscillating jam are about two times and four times the critical mode estimated by the linear stability theory.

  13. Early telomere shortening and genomic instability in tubo-ovarian preneoplastic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chene, Gautier; Tchirkov, Andrei; Pierre-Eymard, Eleonore; Dauplat, Jacques; Raoelfils, Ines; Cayre, Anne; Watkin, Emmanuel; Vago, Philippe; Penault-Llorca, Frederique

    2013-06-01

    Genetic instability plays an important role in ovarian carcinogenesis. We investigated the level of telomere shortening and genomic instability in early and preinvasive stages of ovarian cancer, serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC), and tubo-ovarian dysplasia (TOD). Fifty-one TOD from prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomies with BRCA1 or 2 mutation, 12 STICs, 53 tubo-ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma, and 36 noncancerous controls were laser capture microdissected from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections, analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and for telomere length (using quantitative real-time PCR based on the Cawthon's method). TOD and STICs were defined by morphologic scores and immunohistochemical expressions of p53, Ki67, and γH2AX. TOD showed marked telomere shortening compared with noncancerous controls (P STICs had even shorter telomeres than TOD (P = 0.0008). Ovarian carcinoma had shorter telomeres than controls but longer than STICs and dysplasia. In TOD, telomeres were significantly shorter in those with BRCA1 mutation than in those with BRCA2 mutation (P = 0.005). In addition, γH2AX expression in TOD and STIC groups with short telomeres was significantly increased (P STICs. The total number of genetic alterations was the highest in ovarian cancers. These findings suggest that genetic instability occurs in early stages of ovarian tumorigenesis. STICs and noninvasive dysplasia are likely an important step in early serous ovarian neoplasia. ©2013 AACR

  14. Molecular Basis of Genomic Instability in Breast Cancer: Regulation of the Centrosome Duplication Cycle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Du, Jian

    2003-01-01

    Alteration in the expression and activity of the centrosomal kinase in breast cancers, Aurora-A/STK15, affect genomic stability, disrupt the fidelity of centrsome duplication, and induce cellular transformation...

  15. Hexavalent chromium induces chromosome instability in human urothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, Sandra S.; Holmes, Amie L.; Liou, Louis; Adam, Rosalyn M.; Wise, John Pierce Sr.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous metals are well-known human bladder carcinogens. Despite the significant occupational and public health concern of metals and bladder cancer, the carcinogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Chromium, in particular, is a metal of concern as incidences of bladder cancer have been found elevated in chromate workers, and there is an increasing concern for patients with metal hip implants. However, the impact of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) on bladder cells has not been studied. We compared chromate toxicity in two bladder cell lines; primary human urothelial cells and hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells. Cr(VI) induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in chromosome damage in both cell lines, with the hTERT-immortalized cells exhibiting more chromosome damage than the primary cells. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in aneuploid metaphases in both cell lines which was not observed after a 24 h exposure. Aneuploidy induction was higher in the hTERT-immortalized cells. When we correct for uptake, Cr(VI) induces a similar amount of chromosome damage and aneuploidy suggesting that the differences in Cr(VI) sensitivity between the two cells lines were due to differences in uptake. The increase in chromosome instability after chronic chromate treatment suggests this may be a mechanism for chromate-induced bladder cancer, specifically, and may be a mechanism for metal-induced bladder cancer, in general. - Highlights: • Hexavalent chromium is genotoxic to human urothelial cells. • Hexavalent chromium induces aneuploidy in human urothelial cells. • hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells model the effects seen in primary urothelial cells. • Hexavalent chromium has a strong likelihood of being carcinogenic for bladder tissue.

  16. Profiles of Genomic Instability in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer Predict Treatment Outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhigang C.; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Culhane, Aedín C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: High-grade serous cancer (HGSC) is the most common cancer of the ovary and is characterized by chromosomal instability. Defects in homologous recombination repair (HRR) are associated with genomic instability in HGSC, and are exploited by therapy targeting DNA repair. Defective HRR cause...... clusters differed with respect to chemotherapy resistance, and the extent of LOH correlated with PFS. LOH burden may indicate vulnerability to treatment targeting DNA repair, such as PARP1 inhibitors. Clin Cancer Res; 18(20); 5806–15. ©2012 AACR....... into two subgroups. The second group contained remarkably less LOH. BRCA1 promoter methylation was associated with the major group. LOH clusters were reproducible when validated in two independent HGSC datasets. LOH burden in the major cluster of HGSC was similar to triple-negative, and distinct from other...

  17. G2/M-Phase Checkpoint Adaptation and Micronuclei Formation as Mechanisms That Contribute to Genomic Instability in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsbeek, Danî; Golsteyn, Roy M

    2017-11-06

    One of the most common characteristics of cancer cells is genomic instability. Recent research has revealed that G2/M-phase checkpoint adaptation-entering mitosis with damaged DNA-contributes to genomic changes in experimental models. When cancer cells are treated with pharmacological concentrations of genotoxic agents, they undergo checkpoint adaptation; however, a small number of cells are able to survive and accumulate micronuclei. These micronuclei harbour damaged DNA, and are able to replicate and reincorporate their DNA into the main nucleus. Micronuclei are susceptible to chromothripsis, which is a phenomenon characterised by extensively rearranged chromosomes that reassemble from pulverized chromosomes in one cellular event. These processes contribute to genomic instability in cancer cells that survive a genotoxic anti-cancer treatment. This review provides insight into checkpoint adaptation and its connection to micronuclei and possibly chromothripsis. Knowledge about these mechanisms is needed to improve the poor cancer treatment outcomes that result from genomic instability.

  18. TopBP1/Dpb11 binds DNA anaphase bridges to prevent genome instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, Susanne M; Schramke, Vera; Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard

    2014-01-01

    yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the avian DT40 cell line as model systems for studying DNA anaphase bridges and show that TopBP1/Dpb11 plays an evolutionarily conserved role in their metabolism. Together with the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA, TopBP1/Dpb11 binds to UFBs, and depletion......DNA anaphase bridges are a potential source of genome instability that may lead to chromosome breakage or nondisjunction during mitosis. Two classes of anaphase bridges can be distinguished: DAPI-positive chromatin bridges and DAPI-negative ultrafine DNA bridges (UFBs). Here, we establish budding...

  19. UV-C–Irradiated Arabidopsis and Tobacco Emit Volatiles That Trigger Genomic Instability in Neighboring Plants[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Youli; Danna, Cristian H.; Zemp, Franz J.; Titov, Viktor; Ciftci, Ozan Nazim; Przybylski, Roman; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that local exposure of plants to stress results in a systemic increase in genome instability. Here, we show that UV-C–irradiated plants produce a volatile signal that triggers an increase in genome instability in neighboring nonirradiated Arabidopsis thaliana plants. This volatile signal is interspecific, as UV-C–irradiated Arabidopsis plants transmit genome destabilization to naive tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants and vice versa. We report that plants exposed to the volatile hormones methyl salicylate (MeSA) or methyl jasmonate (MeJA) exhibit a similar level of genome destabilization as UV-C–irradiated plants. We also found that irradiated Arabidopsis plants produce MeSA and MeJA. The analysis of mutants impaired in the synthesis and/or response to salicylic acid (SA) and/or jasmonic acid showed that at least one other volatile compound besides MeSA and MeJA can communicate interplant genome instability. The NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 (npr1) mutant, defective in SA signaling, is impaired in both the production and the perception of the volatile signals, demonstrating a key role for NPR1 as a central regulator of genome stability. Finally, various forms of stress resulting in the formation of necrotic lesions also generate a volatile signal that leads to genomic instability. PMID:22028460

  20. CMTX1 patients' cells present genomic instability corrected by CamKII inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mones, Saleh; Gess, Burkhardt; Bordignon, Benoit; Altié, Alexandre; Young, Peter; Bihel, Frederic; Fraterno, Marc; Peiretti, Franck; Fontes, Michel; Saleh, Mones; Burkhardt, Gess; Benoit, Bordignon; Alexandre, Altié; Peter, Young; Frederic, Bihel; Marc, Fraterno; Franck, Peiretti; Michel, Fontes

    2015-05-07

    We previously described that fibroblasts from animal models of CMTX1 present genomic instability and poor connexon activity. In vivo, these transgenic mice present motor deficits. This phenotype could be significantly reverted by treatment with (CamKII) inhibitors. The objective of this study is to translate our findings to patients. We cultured fibroblasts from skin biopsies of CMTX1 patients and analyzed cells for genomic instabilty, connexon activity, and potential correction by CamKII inhibitors. The phenotypic analysis of these cells confirmed strong similarities between the GJB1 transgenic mouse cell lines and CMTX1 patient fibroblast cell lines. Both present mitotic anomalies, centrosome overduplication, and connexon activity deficit. This phenotype is corrected by CamKII inhibitors. Our data demonstrate that fibroblasts from CMTX1 patients present a phenotype similar to transgenic lines that can be corrected by CamKII inhibitors. This presents a track to develop therapeutic strategies for CMTX1 treatment.

  1. Amplification of HER2 is a marker for global genomic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellsworth, Rachel E; Ellsworth, Darrell L; Patney, Heather L; Deyarmin, Brenda; Love, Brad; Hooke, Jeffrey A; Shriver, Craig D

    2008-01-01

    Genomic alterations of the proto-oncogene c-erbB-2 (HER-2/neu) are associated with aggressive behavior and poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer. The variable clinical outcomes seen in patients with similar HER2 status, given similar treatments, suggests that the effects of amplification of HER2 can be influenced by other genetic changes. To assess the broader genomic implications of structural changes at the HER2 locus, we investigated relationships between genomic instability and HER2 status in patients with invasive breast cancer. HER2 status was determined using the PathVysion ® assay. DNA was extracted after laser microdissection from the 181 paraffin-embedded HER2 amplified (n = 39) or HER2 negative (n = 142) tumor specimens with sufficient tumor available to perform molecular analysis. Allelic imbalance (AI) was assessed using a panel of microsatellite markers representing 26 chromosomal regions commonly altered in breast cancer. Student t-tests and partial correlations were used to investigate relationships between genomic instability and HER2 status. The frequency of AI was significantly higher (P < 0.005) in HER2 amplified (27%) compared to HER2 negative tumors (19%). Samples with HER2 amplification showed significantly higher levels of AI (P < 0.05) at chromosomes 11q23, 16q22-q24 and 18q21. Partial correlations including ER status and tumor grade supported associations between HER2 status and alterations at 11q13.1, 16q22-q24 and 18q21. The poor prognosis associated with HER2 amplification may be attributed to global genomic instability as cells with high frequencies of chromosomal alterations have been associated with increased cellular proliferation and aggressive behavior. In addition, high levels of DNA damage may render tumor cells refractory to treatment. In addition, specific alterations at chromosomes 11q13, 16q22-q24, and 18q21, all of which have been associated with aggressive tumor behavior, may serve as genetic modifiers to HER2

  2. Transgenerational developmental effects and genomic instability after X-irradiation of preimplantation embryos: Studies on two mouse strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet, P.; Buset, J.; Neefs, M.; Vankerkom, J.; Benotmane, M.A.; Derradji, H.; Hildebrandt, G.; Baatout, S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent results have shown that irradiation of a single cell, the zygote or 1-cell embryo of various mouse strains, could lead to congenital anomalies in the fetuses. In the Heiligenberger strain, a link between the radiation-induced congenital anomalies and the development of a genomic instability was also suggested. Moreover, further studies showed that in that strain, both congenital anomalies and genomic instability could be transmitted to the next generation. The aim of the experiments described in this paper was to investigate whether such non-targeted transgenerational effects could also be observed in two other radiosensitive mouse strains (CF1 and ICR), using lower radiation doses. Irradiation of the CF1 and ICR female zygotes with 0.2 or 0.4 Gy did not result in a decrease of their fertility after birth, when they had reached sexual maturity. Moreover, females of both strains that had been X-irradiated with 0.2 Gy exhibited higher rates of pregnancy, less resorptions and more living fetuses. Additionally, the mean weight of living fetuses in these groups had significantly increased. Exencephaly and dwarfism were observed in CF1 fetuses issued from control and X-irradiated females. In the control group of that strain, polydactyly and limb deformity were also found. The yields of abnormal fetuses did not differ significantly between the control and X-irradiated groups. Polydactyly, exencephaly and dwarfism were observed in fetuses issued from ICR control females. In addition to these anomalies, gastroschisis, curly tail and open eye were observed at low frequencies in ICR fetuses issued from X-irradiated females. Again, the frequencies of abnormal fetuses found in the different groups did not differ significantly. In both CF1 and ICR mouse strains, irradiation of female zygotes did not result in the development of a genomic instability in the next generation embryos. Overall, our results suggest that, at the moderate doses used, developmental defects

  3. Transgenerational developmental effects and genomic instability after X-irradiation of preimplantation embryos: Studies on two mouse strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, P., E-mail: pjacquet@sckcen.be [Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Buset, J.; Neefs, M. [Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Vankerkom, J. [Division of Environmental Research, VITO, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Benotmane, M.A.; Derradji, H. [Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Hildebrandt, G. [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Stephanstrasse 9a, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Department of Radiotherapy, University of Rostock, Suedring 75, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Baatout, S. [Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2010-05-01

    Recent results have shown that irradiation of a single cell, the zygote or 1-cell embryo of various mouse strains, could lead to congenital anomalies in the fetuses. In the Heiligenberger strain, a link between the radiation-induced congenital anomalies and the development of a genomic instability was also suggested. Moreover, further studies showed that in that strain, both congenital anomalies and genomic instability could be transmitted to the next generation. The aim of the experiments described in this paper was to investigate whether such non-targeted transgenerational effects could also be observed in two other radiosensitive mouse strains (CF1 and ICR), using lower radiation doses. Irradiation of the CF1 and ICR female zygotes with 0.2 or 0.4 Gy did not result in a decrease of their fertility after birth, when they had reached sexual maturity. Moreover, females of both strains that had been X-irradiated with 0.2 Gy exhibited higher rates of pregnancy, less resorptions and more living fetuses. Additionally, the mean weight of living fetuses in these groups had significantly increased. Exencephaly and dwarfism were observed in CF1 fetuses issued from control and X-irradiated females. In the control group of that strain, polydactyly and limb deformity were also found. The yields of abnormal fetuses did not differ significantly between the control and X-irradiated groups. Polydactyly, exencephaly and dwarfism were observed in fetuses issued from ICR control females. In addition to these anomalies, gastroschisis, curly tail and open eye were observed at low frequencies in ICR fetuses issued from X-irradiated females. Again, the frequencies of abnormal fetuses found in the different groups did not differ significantly. In both CF1 and ICR mouse strains, irradiation of female zygotes did not result in the development of a genomic instability in the next generation embryos. Overall, our results suggest that, at the moderate doses used, developmental defects

  4. Associations between circulating carotenoids, genomic instability and the risk of high-grade prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordström, Tobias; Van Blarigan, Erin L; Ngo, Vy; Roy, Ritu; Weinberg, Vivian; Song, Xiaoling; Simko, Jeffry; Carroll, Peter R; Chan, June M; Paris, Pamela L

    2016-03-01

    Carotenoids are a class of nutrients with antioxidant properties that have been purported to protect against cancer. However, the reported associations between carotenoids and prostate cancer have been heterogeneous and lacking data on interactions with nucleotide sequence variations and genomic biomarkers. To examine the associations between carotenoid levels and the risk of high-grade prostate cancer, also considering antioxidant-related genes and tumor instability. We measured plasma levels of carotenoids and genotyped 20 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in SOD1, SOD2, SOD3, XRCC1, and OGG1 among 559 men with non-metastatic prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy. We performed copy number analysis in a subset of these men (n = 67) to study tumor instability assessed as Fraction of the Genome Altered (FGA). We examined associations between carotenoids, genotypes, tumor instability and risk of high-grade prostate cancer (Gleason grade ≥ 4 + 3) using logistic and linear regression. Circulating carotenoid levels were inversely associated with the risk of high-grade prostate cancer; odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) comparing highest versus lowest quartiles were: 0.34 (95% CI: 0.18-0.66) for α-carotene, 0.31 (95% CI: 0.15-0.63) for β-carotene, 0.55 (0.28-1.08) for lycopene and 0.37 (0.18-0.75) for total carotenoids. SNPs rs25489 in XRCC1, rs699473 in SOD3 and rs1052133 in OGG1 modified these associations for α-carotene, β-carotene and lycopene, respectively (P ≤ 0.05). The proportion of men with a high degree of FGA increased with Gleason Score (P carotenoids at diagnosis, particularly among men carrying specific somatic variations, were inversely associated with risk of high-grade prostate cancer. In exploratory analyses, higher lycopene level was associated with less genomic instability among men with low-grade disease which is novel and supports the hypothesis that lycopene may inhibit progression of

  5. ORBIT modelling of fast particle redistribution induced by sawtooth instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Doohyun; Podestà, Mario; Poli, Francesca; Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Team

    2017-10-01

    Initial tests on NSTX-U show that introducing energy selectivity for sawtooth (ST) induced fast ion redistribution improves the agreement between experimental and simulated quantities, e.g. neutron rate. Thus, it is expected that a proper description of the fast particle redistribution due to ST can improve the modelling of ST instability and interpretation of experiments using a transport code. In this work, we use ORBIT code to characterise the redistribution of fast particles. In order to simulate a ST crash, a spatial and temporal displacement is implemented as ξ (ρ , t , θ , ϕ) = ∑ξmn (ρ , t) cos (mθ + nϕ) to produce perturbed magnetic fields from the equilibrium field B-> , δB-> = ∇ × (ξ-> × B->) , which affect the fast particle distribution. From ORBIT simulations, we find suitable amplitudes of ξ for each ST crash to reproduce the experimental results. The comparison of the simulation and the experimental results will be discussed as well as the dependence of fast ion redistribution on fast ion phase space variables (i.e. energy, magnetic moment and toroidal angular momentum). Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  6. Genomic instability after targeted irradiation of human lymphocytes: Evidence for inter-individual differences under bystander conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadhim, Munira A., E-mail: mkadhim@brookes.ac.uk [School of Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford OX3 0BP (United Kingdom); Lee, Ryonfa [Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Moore, Stephen R.; Macdonald, Denise A. [Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Medical Research Council, Harwell, Oxfordshire OX11 0RD (United Kingdom); Chapman, Kim L. [School of Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford OX3 0BP (United Kingdom); Patel, Gaurang; Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-01

    Environmental {sup 222}radon exposure is a human health concern, and many studies demonstrate that very low doses of high LET {alpha}-particle irradiation initiate deleterious genetic consequences in both irradiated and non-irradiated bystander cells. One consequence, radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI), is a hallmark of tumorigenesis and is often assessed by measuring delayed chromosomal aberrations. We utilised a technique that facilitates transient immobilization of primary lymphocytes for targeted microbeam irradiation and have reported that environmentally relevant doses, e.g. a single {sup 3}He{sup 2+} particle traversal to a single cell, are sufficient to induce RIGI. Herein we sought to determine differences in radiation response in lymphocytes isolated from five healthy male donors. Primary lymphocytes were irradiated with a single particle per cell nucleus. We found evidence for inter-individual variation in radiation response (RIGI, measured as delayed chromosome aberrations). Although this was not highly significant, it was possibly masked by high levels of intra-individual variation. While there are many studies showing a link between genetic predisposition and RIGI, there are few studies linking genetic background with bystander effects in normal human lymphocytes. In an attempt to investigate inter-individual variation in the induction of bystander effects, primary lymphocytes were irradiated with a single particle under conditions where fractions of the population were traversed. We showed a marked genotype-dependent bystander response in one donor after exposure to 15% of the population. The findings may also be regarded as a radiation-induced genotype-dependent bystander effect triggering an instability phenotype.

  7. Genomic instability in quartz dust exposed rat lungs: Is inflammation responsible?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, C; Schins, R P F [Institut fuer Umweltmedizinische Forschung (IUF) at the Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf (Germany); Demircigil, G Cakmak; Coskun, Erdem [Gazi University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Toxicology, Ankara (Turkey); Schooten, F J van [Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht (NUTRIM), Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, University of Maastricht (Netherlands); Borm, P J A [Centre of Expertise in Life Sciences (Cel), Hogeschool Zuyd, Heerlen (Netherlands); Knaapen, A M, E-mail: catrin.albrecht@uni-duesseldorf.d

    2009-02-01

    the aluminium coated quartz intermediate effects were found. These findings were in line with the kinetics of inflammation and epithelial proliferation in the rat lungs for the different treatments. Notably, a highly significant correlation was observed between neutrophil numbers and micronucleus frequencies, indicative for a role of inflammation in eliciting genomic instability in target cells of quartz-induced carcinogenesis. Our ongoing investigations focus on the evaluation of the causality between both in relation to quartz exposure.

  8. Simultaneous Aurora-A/STK15 overexpression and centrosome amplification induce chromosomal instability in tumour cells with a MIN phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentini, Laura; Amato, Angela; Schillaci, Tiziana; Di Leonardo, Aldo

    2007-01-01

    Genetic instability is a hallmark of tumours and preneoplastic lesions. The predominant form of genome instability in human cancer is chromosome instability (CIN). CIN is characterized by chromosomal aberrations, gains or losses of whole chromosomes (aneuploidy), and it is often associated with centrosome amplification. Centrosomes control cell division by forming a bipolar mitotic spindle and play an essential role in the maintenance of chromosomal stability. However, whether centrosome amplification could directly cause aneuploidy is not fully established. Also, alterations in genes required for mitotic progression could be involved in CIN. A major candidate is represented by Aurora-A/STK15 that associates with centrosomes and is overexpressed in several types of human tumour. Centrosome amplification were induced by hydroxyurea treatment and visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy. Aurora-A/STK15 ectopic expression was achieved by retroviral infection and puromycin selection in HCT116 tumour cells. Effects of Aurora-A/STK15 depletion on centrosome status and ploidy were determined by Aurora-A/STK15 transcriptional silencing by RNA interference. Changes in the expression levels of some mitotic genes were determined by Real time RT-PCR. We investigated whether amplification of centrosomes and overexpression of Aurora-A/STK15 induce CIN using as a model system a colon carcinoma cell line (HCT116). We found that in HCT116 cells, chromosomally stable and near diploid cells harbouring a MIN phenotype, centrosome amplification induced by hydroxyurea treatment is neither maintained nor induces aneuploidy. On the contrary, ectopic overexpression of Aurora-A/STK15 induced supernumerary centrosomes and aneuploidy. Aurora-A/STK15 transcriptional silencing by RNA interference in cells ectopically overexpressing this kinase promptly decreased cell numbers with supernumerary centrosomes and aneuploidy. Our results show that centrosome amplification alone is not sufficient

  9. Yeast Sub1 and human PC4 are G-quadruplex binding proteins that suppress genome instability at co-transcriptionally formed G4 DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Christopher R; Singh, Shivani; Hambarde, Shashank; Griffin, Wezley C; Gao, Jun; Chib, Shubeena; Yu, Yang; Ira, Grzegorz; Raney, Kevin D; Kim, Nayun

    2017-06-02

    G-quadruplex or G4 DNA is a non-B secondary DNA structure consisting of a stacked array of guanine-quartets that can disrupt critical cellular functions such as replication and transcription. When sequences that can adopt Non-B structures including G4 DNA are located within actively transcribed genes, the reshaping of DNA topology necessary for transcription process stimulates secondary structure-formation thereby amplifying the potential for genome instability. Using a reporter assay designed to study G4-induced recombination in the context of an actively transcribed locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we tested whether co-transcriptional activator Sub1, recently identified as a G4-binding factor, contributes to genome maintenance at G4-forming sequences. Our data indicate that, upon Sub1-disruption, genome instability linked to co-transcriptionally formed G4 DNA in Top1-deficient cells is significantly augmented and that its highly conserved DNA binding domain or the human homolog PC4 is sufficient to suppress G4-associated genome instability. We also show that Sub1 interacts specifically with co-transcriptionally formed G4 DNA in vivo and that yeast cells become highly sensitivity to G4-stabilizing chemical ligands by the loss of Sub1. Finally, we demonstrate the physical and genetic interaction of Sub1 with the G4-resolving helicase Pif1, suggesting a possible mechanism by which Sub1 suppresses instability at G4 DNA. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Temperature-gradient instability induced by conducting end walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Ryutov, D.D.; Tsidulko, Yu.A.

    1990-04-01

    A new rapidly growing electron temperature gradient instability is found for a plasma in contact with a conducting wall. The linear instability analysis is presented and speculations are given for its nonlinear consequences. This instability illustrates that conducting walls can produce effects that are detrimental to plasma confinement. This mode should be of importance in open-ended systems including astrophysical plasmas, mirror machines and at the edge of tokamaks where field lines are open and are connected to limiters or divertors. 16 refs., 2 figs

  11. Separase phosphosite mutation leads to genome instability and primordial germ cell depletion during oogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Xu

    Full Text Available To ensure equal chromosome segregation and the stability of the genome during cell division, Separase is strictly regulated primarily by Securin binding and inhibitory phosphorylation. By generating a mouse model that contained a mutation to the inhibitory phosphosite of Separase, we demonstrated that mice of both sexes are infertile. We showed that Separase deregulation leads to chromosome mis-segregation, genome instability, and eventually apoptosis of primordial germ cells (PGCs during embryonic oogenesis. Although the PGCs of mutant male mice were completely depleted, a population of PGCs from mutant females survived Separase deregulation. The surviving PGCs completed oogenesis but produced deficient initial follicles. These results indicate a sexual dimorphism effect on PGCs from Separase deregulation, which may be correlated with a gender-specific discrepancy of Securin. Our results reveal that Separase phospho-regulation is critical for genome stability in oogenesis. Furthermore, we provided the first evidence of a pre-zygotic mitotic chromosome segregation error resulting from Separase deregulation, whose sex-specific differences may be a reason for the sexual dimorphism of aneuploidy in gametogenesis.

  12. The contribution of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures to DNA damage and genome instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamperl, Stephan; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2014-07-01

    Accurate DNA replication and DNA repair are crucial for the maintenance of genome stability, and it is generally accepted that failure of these processes is a major source of DNA damage in cells. Intriguingly, recent evidence suggests that DNA damage is more likely to occur at genomic loci with high transcriptional activity. Furthermore, loss of certain RNA processing factors in eukaryotic cells is associated with increased formation of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures known as R-loops, resulting in double-strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA damage. However, the molecular mechanisms by which R-loop structures ultimately lead to DNA breaks and genome instability is not well understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the formation, recognition and processing of RNA:DNA hybrids, and discuss possible mechanisms by which these structures contribute to DNA damage and genome instability in the cell. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Chronic p53-independent p21 expression causes genomic instability by deregulating replication licensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galanos, Panagiotis; Vougas, Konstantinos; Walter, David

    2016-01-01

    cells strongly expressing p21 showed proliferation features. This occurred predominantly in p53-mutant human cancers, suggesting p53-independent upregulation of p21 selectively in more aggressive tumour cells. Multifaceted phenotypic and genomic analyses of p21-inducible, p53-null, cancerous and near...

  14. DNA damage-induced alterations in chromatin contribute to genomic integrity and age-related changes in gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberdoerffer, Philipp; Michan, Shaday; McVay, Michael; Mostoslavsky, Raul; Vann, James; Park, Sang-Kyu; Hartlerode, Andrea; Stegmuller, Judith; Hafner, Angela; Loerch, Patrick; Wright, Sarah M.; Mills, Kevin D.; Bonni, Azad; Yankner, Bruce A.; Scully, Ralph; Prolla, Tomas A.; Alt, Frederick W.; Sinclair, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Genomic instability and alterations in gene expression are hallmarks of eukaryotic aging. The yeast histone deacetylase Sir2 silences transcription and stabilizes repetitive DNA, but during aging or in response to a DNA break, the Sir complex relocalizes to sites of genomic instability, resulting in the desilencing of genes that cause sterility, a characteristic of yeast aging. Using embryonic stem cells, we show that mammalian Sir2, SIRT1, represses repetitive DNA and a functionally diverse set of genes across the mouse genome. In response to DNA damage, SIRT1 dissociates from these loci and relocalizes to DNA breaks to promote repair, resulting in transcriptional changes that parallel those in the aging mouse brain. Increased SIRT1 expression promotes survival in a mouse model of genomic instability and suppresses age-dependent transcriptional changes. Thus, DNA damage-induced redistribution of SIRT1 and other chromatin modifying proteins may be a conserved mechanism of aging in eukaryotes. PMID:19041753

  15. Genomic instability during reprogramming by nuclear transfer is DNA replication dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Gloryn; Agudo, Judith; Treff, Nathan; Sauer, Mark V; Billing, David; Brown, Brian D; Baer, Richard; Egli, Dieter

    2017-04-01

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state by nuclear transfer into oocytes, yet developmental arrest often occurs. While incomplete transcriptional reprogramming is known to cause developmental failure, reprogramming also involves concurrent changes in cell cycle progression and nuclear structure. Here we study cellular reprogramming events in human and mouse nuclear transfer embryos prior to embryonic genome activation. We show that genetic instability marked by frequent chromosome segregation errors and DNA damage arise prior to, and independent of, transcriptional activity. These errors occur following transition through DNA replication and are repaired by BRCA1. In the absence of mitotic nuclear remodelling, DNA replication is delayed and errors are exacerbated in subsequent mitosis. These results demonstrate that independent of gene expression, cell-type-specific features of cell cycle progression constitute a barrier sufficient to prevent the transition from one cell type to another during reprogramming.

  16. Chronic inflammation-associated genomic instability paves the way for human esophageal carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Dongping; Lei, Zhijin; Chen, Donglin; Xu, Zexin; Su, Min

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with increased risk of cancer development, whereas the link between chronic inflammation and esophageal carcinogenesis is still obscure heretofore. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between chronic inflammation and DNA damage, as well as the possible role of DNA damage in esophageal carcinogenic process. Endoscopic esophageal biopsies from 109 individuals from Chaoshan littoral, a high-risk region for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), were examined to evaluate the association between chronic inflammation and histological severity, while additional 204 esophageal non-tumor samples from patients with ESCC were collected. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the oxidative DNA damage and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Significantly positive correlation was observed between degree of chronic inflammation and esophageal precursor lesions (rs = 0.37, P inflammation (rs = 0.21, P inflammation degree (P inflammation-associated genomic instability with esophageal carcinogenesis and suggest possibilities for early detection and intervention of esophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:27028857

  17. Centrosome Dysfunction Contributes To Chromosome Instability, Chromoanagenesis And Genome Reprograming In Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    German A Pihan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The unique ability of centrosomes to nucleate and organize microtubules makes them unrivaled conductors of important interphase processes, such as intracellular payload traffic, cell polarity, cell locomotion, and organization of the immunologic synapse. But it is in mitosis that centrosomes loom large, for they orchestrate, with clockmaker’s precision, the assembly and functioning of the mitotic spindle, ensuring the equal partitioning of the replicated genome into daughter cells. Centrosome dysfunction is inextricably linked to aneuploidy and chromosome instability, both hallmarks of cancer cells. Several aspects of centrosome function in normal and cancer cells have been molecularly characterized during the last two decades, greatly enhancing our mechanistic understanding of this tiny organelle. Whether centrosome defects alone can cause cancer, remains unanswered. Until recently, the aggregate of the evidence had suggested that centrosome dysfunction, by deregulating the fidelity of chromosome segregation, promotes and accelerates the characteristic Darwinian evolution of the cancer genome enabled by increased mutational load and/or decreased DNA repair. Very recent experimental work has shown that missegreated chromosomes resulting from centrosome dysfunction may experience extensive DNA damage, suggesting additional dimensions to the role of centrosomes in cancer. Centrosome dysfunction is particularly prevalent in tumors in which the genome has undergone extensive structural rearrangements and chromosome domain reshuffling. Ongoing gene reshuffling reprograms the genome for continuous growth, survival, and evasion of the immune system. Manipulation of molecular networks controlling centrosome function may soon become a viable target for specific therapeutic intervention in cancer, particularly since normal cells, which lack centrosome alterations, may be spared the toxicity of such therapies.

  18. Mutational signatures reveal the role of RAD52 in p53-independent p21-driven genomic instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galanos, Panagiotis; Pappas, George; Polyzos, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genomic instability promotes evolution and heterogeneity of tumors. Unraveling its mechanistic basis is essential for the design of appropriate therapeutic strategies. In a previous study, we reported an unexpected oncogenic property of p21WAF1/Cip1, showing that its chronic expressio...

  19. The influence of elevated endogenous free radical production on apoptosis and genomic instability in transgenic growth hormone mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemon, J.A.; Rollo, D.; Boreham, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Previous studies have shown transgenic growth hormone mice (TGM) have significantly elevated levels of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation, shortened lifespan (approximately 50% of normal siblings), greatly enhanced learning in youth, and accelerated aging with a rapid age-related loss of cognitive abilities. A complex oral antioxidant supplement was found to completely abolish the cognitive decline and significantly extend longevity in TGM. We have determined in a recently completed experiment studying radiation-induced apoptosis that the antioxidant supplement significantly reduces the elevated level of apoptosis seen in untreated old TGM compared to age-matched controls. It was also determined that older normal mice treated with the supplement also show a reduction in apoptosis. We are conducting experiments using spectral karyotyping to examine genomic instability in TGM and their normal siblings, that indicate, given their elevated ROS, TGM show an increase in chromosome aberrations compared to normal controls. Based on our previous experiments we speculate that TGM treated with the antioxidant supplement are expected to show a reduction in ROS induced chromosome aberrations

  20. Scaling of Kinetic Instability Induced Fast Ion Losses in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.D. Fredrickson; D. Darrow; S. Medley; J. Menard; H. Park; L. Roquemore; D. Stutman; K. Tritz; S. Kubota; K.C. Lee

    2005-06-24

    During neutral beam injection (NBI) in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), a wide variety of fast ion driven instabilities is excited by the large ratio of fast ion velocity to Alfven velocity, together with the relatively high fast ion beta, beta(sub)f. The fast ion instabilities have frequencies ranging from a few kilohertz to the ion cyclotron frequency. The modes can be divided roughly into three categories, starting with Energetic Particle Modes (EPM) in the lowest frequency range (0 to 120 kHz), the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) in the intermediate frequency range (50 to 200 kHz) and the Compressional and Global Alfven Eigenmodes (CAE and GAE, respectively) from approximately equal to 300 kHz up to the ion cyclotron frequency. Each of these categories of modes exhibits a wide range of behavior, including quasi-continuous oscillation, bursting, chirping and, except for the lower frequency range, turbulence.

  1. Induced modulation instability and recurrence in nonlocal nonlinear media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeckman, J; Neyts, K [Liquid Crystals and Photonics Group, Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Haelterman, M [Service d' optique et acoustique, Universite libre de Bruxelles CP 194/5, 50 avenue F D Roosevelt, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)], E-mail: jeroen.beeckman@elis.ugent.be

    2008-03-28

    The long-term behaviour of spatial modulation instability in nonlocal nonlinear Kerr media is studied theoretically and numerically. Seeding the modulation instability with a periodic modulation leads to an energy transfer to higher-order modes and the long-term behaviour of the system shows the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam recurrence. For large spatial frequencies, close to the cut-off frequency, the stable solution can be found analytically. The propagation with an initial state different from the stable solution results in a propagation circling around the stable point. For general frequencies, the calculation of the stable point is performed numerically. Comparison of the calculations with earlier reported experimental results in nematic liquid crystals shows a satisfactory agreement.

  2. Interfacial instability induced by lateral vapor pressure fluctuation in bounded thin liquid-vapor layers

    OpenAIRE

    Kanatani, Kentaro

    2008-01-01

    We study an instability of thin liquid-vapor layers bounded by rigid parallel walls from both below and above. In this system, the interfacial instability is induced by lateral vapor pressure fluctuation, which is in turn attributed to the effect of phase change: evaporation occurs at a hotter portion of the interface and condensation at a colder one. The high vapor pressure pushes the interface downward and the low one pulls it upward. A set of equations describing the temporal evolution of ...

  3. Effects of two organomodified clays intended to food contact materials on the genomic instability and gene expression of hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisanaba, Sara; Jordá-Beneyto, María; Cameán, Ana M; Jos, Ángeles

    2016-02-01

    Globally, food industries have made significant progress in order to increase the shelf-life of food products and have fewer economic losses. In this sense, the use of organomodified clays destined to be incorporated in polymer matrices play a novel role, leading to improved materials named nanocomposites with enhanced technological profiles. Due to the presence of these clays into the package, the safety of the consumers is a main concern. Cloisite(®)30B and Clay1 are two organomodified clays containing quaternary ammonium salts as modifiers, that can be potentially used to reinforce packaging polymers. Available toxicity data about these clays, specifically genotoxicity, is still limited and inconclusive in some aspects. Thus, the purpose of this work was to evaluate both clays ability to induce genomic instability through the cytokinesis block micronucleus cytome assay (CBMN) and for the first time, their influence in the modulation of several genes involved in genotoxicity and cell death mechanisms. Overall, no genotoxicity response was obtained in any case at the conditions tested. On the other hand, significant expression changes were observed on the genes selected. Nevertheless, further studies are highly needed to elucidate and increase the knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of clays toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A mutation in the centriole-associated protein centrin causes genomic instability via increased chromosome loss in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall Wallace F

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of centrioles in mitotic spindle function remains unclear. One approach to investigate mitotic centriole function is to ask whether mutation of centriole-associated proteins can cause genomic instability. Results We addressed the role of the centriole-associated EF-hand protein centrin in genomic stability using a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii centrin mutant that forms acentriolar bipolar spindles and lacks the centrin-based rhizoplast structures that join centrioles to the nucleus. Using a genetic assay for loss of heterozygosity, we found that this centrin mutant showed increased genomic instability compared to wild-type cells, and we determined that the increase in genomic instability was due to a 100-fold increase in chromosome loss rates compared to wild type. Live cell imaging reveals an increased rate in cell death during G1 in haploid cells that is consistent with an elevated rate of chromosome loss, and analysis of cell death versus centriole copy number argues against a role for multipolar spindles in this process. Conclusion The increased chromosome loss rates observed in a centrin mutant that forms acentriolar spindles suggests a role for centrin protein, and possibly centrioles, in mitotic fidelity.

  5. Topoisomerase I plays a critical role in suppressing genome instability at a highly transcribed G-quadruplex-forming sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puja Yadav

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available G-quadruplex or G4 DNA is a non-B secondary DNA structure that comprises a stacked array of guanine-quartets. Cellular processes such as transcription and replication can be hindered by unresolved DNA secondary structures potentially endangering genome maintenance. As G4-forming sequences are highly frequent throughout eukaryotic genomes, it is important to define what factors contribute to a G4 motif becoming a hotspot of genome instability. Using a genetic assay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we previously demonstrated that a potential G4-forming sequence derived from a guanine-run containing immunoglobulin switch Mu (Sμ region becomes highly unstable when actively transcribed. Here we describe assays designed to survey spontaneous genome rearrangements initiated at the Sμ sequence in the context of large genomic areas. We demonstrate that, in the absence of Top1, a G4 DNA-forming sequence becomes a strong hotspot of gross chromosomal rearrangements and loss of heterozygosity associated with mitotic recombination within the ∼ 20 kb or ∼ 100 kb regions of yeast chromosome V or III, respectively. Transcription confers a critical strand bias since genome rearrangements at the G4-forming Sμ are elevated only when the guanine-runs are located on the non-transcribed strand. The direction of replication and transcription, when in a head-on orientation, further contribute to the elevated genome instability at a potential G4 DNA-forming sequence. The implications of our identification of Top1 as a critical factor in suppression of instability associated with potential G4 DNA-forming sequences are discussed.

  6. Hund's Induced Fermi-Liquid Instabilities and Enhanced Quasiparticle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    de'Medici, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Hund's coupling is shown to generally favor, in a doped half-filled Mott insulator, an increase in the compressibility culminating in a Fermi-liquid instability towards phase separation. The largest effect is found near the frontier between an ordinary and an orbitally decoupled ("Hund's") metal. The increased compressibility implies an enhancement of quasiparticle scattering, thus favoring other possible symmetry breakings. This physics is shown to happen in simulations of the 122 Fe-based superconductors, possibly implying the relevance of this mechanism in the enhancement of the critical temperature for superconductivity.

  7. Chromosomal instability in Afrotheria: fragile sites, evolutionary breakpoints and phylogenetic inference from genome sequence assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-Herrera Aurora

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extant placental mammals are divided into four major clades (Laurasiatheria, Supraprimates, Xenarthra and Afrotheria. Given that Afrotheria is generally thought to root the eutherian tree in phylogenetic analysis of large nuclear gene data sets, the study of the organization of the genomes of afrotherian species provides new insights into the dynamics of mammalian chromosomal evolution. Here we test if there are chromosomal bands with a high tendency to break and reorganize in Afrotheria, and by analyzing the expression of aphidicolin-induced common fragile sites in three afrotherian species, whether these are coincidental with recognized evolutionary breakpoints. Results We described 29 fragile sites in the aardvark (OAF genome, 27 in the golden mole (CAS, and 35 in the elephant-shrew (EED genome. We show that fragile sites are conserved among afrotherian species and these are correlated with evolutionary breakpoints when compared to the human (HSA genome. Inddition, by computationally scanning the newly released opossum (Monodelphis domestica and chicken sequence assemblies for use as outgroups to Placentalia, we validate the HSA 3/21/5 chromosomal synteny as a rare genomic change that defines the monophyly of this ancient African clade of mammals. On the other hand, support for HSA 1/19p, which is also thought to underpin Afrotheria, is currently ambiguous. Conclusion We provide evidence that (i the evolutionary breakpoints that characterise human syntenies detected in the basal Afrotheria correspond at the chromosomal band level with fragile sites, (ii that HSA 3p/21 was in the amniote ancestor (i.e., common to turtles, lepidosaurs, crocodilians, birds and mammals and was subsequently disrupted in the lineage leading to marsupials. Its expansion to include HSA 5 in Afrotheria is unique and (iii that its fragmentation to HSA 3p/21 + HSA 5/21 in elephant and manatee was due to a fission within HSA 21 that is probably shared

  8. Chromosomal Replication Complexity: A Novel DNA Metrics and Genome Instability Factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Kuzminov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As the ratio of the copy number of the most replicated to the unreplicated regions in the same chromosome, the definition of chromosomal replication complexity (CRC appears to leave little room for variation, being either two during S-phase or one otherwise. However, bacteria dividing faster than they replicate their chromosome spike CRC to four and even eight. A recent experimental inquiry about the limits of CRC in Escherichia coli revealed two major reasons to avoid elevating it further: (i increased chromosomal fragmentation and (ii complications with subsequent double-strand break repair. Remarkably, examples of stable elevated CRC in eukaryotic chromosomes are well known under various terms like "differential replication," "underreplication," "DNA puffs," "onion-skin replication," or "re-replication" and highlight the phenomenon of static replication fork (sRF. To accurately describe the resulting "amplification by overinitiation," I propose a new term: "replification" (subchromosomal overreplication. In both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, replification, via sRF processing, causes double-strand DNA breaks and, with their repair elevating chromosomal rearrangements, represents a novel genome instability factor. I suggest how static replication bubbles could be stabilized and speculate that some tandem duplications represent such persistent static bubbles. Moreover, I propose how static replication bubbles could be transformed into tandem duplications, double minutes, or inverted triplications. Possible experimental tests of these models are discussed.

  9. Turbulent mixing induced by Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivets, V. V.; Ferguson, K. J.; Jacobs, J. W.

    2017-01-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is studied in shock tube experiments with an Atwood number of 0.7. The interface is formed in a vertical shock tube using opposed gas flows, and three-dimensional random initial interface perturbations are generated by the vertical oscillation of gas column producing Faraday waves. Planar Laser Mie scattering is used for flow visualization and for measurements of the mixing process. Experimental image sequences are recorded at 6 kHz frequency and processed to obtain the time dependent variation of the integral mixing layer width. Measurements of the mixing layer width are compared with Mikaelian's [1] model in order to extract the growth exponent θ where a fairly wide range of values is found varying from θ ≈ 0.2 to 0.6.

  10. Field-induced magnetic instability within a superconducting condensate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzone, Daniel Gabriel; Raymond, Stephane; Gavilano, Jorge Luis

    2017-01-01

    The application of magnetic fields, chemical substitution, or hydrostatic pressure to strongly correlated electron materials can stabilize electronic phases with different organizational principles. We present evidence for a fieldinduced quantum phase transition, in superconducting Nd0.05Ce0.95Co...... that the magnetic instability is not magnetically driven, and we propose that it is driven by a modification of superconducting condensate at H*.......In5, that separates two antiferromagnetic phases with identical magnetic symmetry. At zero field, we find a spin-density wave that is suppressed at the critical field mu H-0* = 8 T. For H > H*, a spin-density phase emerges and shares many properties with the Q phase in CeCoIn5. These results suggest...

  11. The Adaptive Response in p53 Cancer Prone Mice: Loss of heterozygosity and Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josee, Lavoie [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences; Dolling, Jo-Anna [Credit Valley Hospital, Missassauga, ON (Canada); Mitchel, Ron E.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL), Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Boreham, Douglas R. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences

    2004-09-28

    mice, only numerical aberrations were observed in 5 to 20% of the cells. There seem to be an age related increase in numerical aberrations as mice grow old. The results indicate that the presence of a defective copy of the Trp53 gene does not seem to affect spontaneous chromosomal instability or in response to chronic low dose exposure to g-radiation. In previous studies it was speculated that low dose and low dose rate in vivo exposure to g-radiation induces an adaptive response, which reduces the risk of cancer death generated by subsequent DNA damage from either spontaneous or radiation induced events due to enhanced recombinational repair. Induced recombination could result from reversion to homozygosity at Trp53 gene locus (Trp53 +/- to +/+) or loss of heterozygosity in unexposed mice (Trp53 +/- to -/-). This hypothesis was investigated using the quantitative real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (QRT-PCR) quantification method and the novel Rolling Circle Amplification technique (RCA). For these purposes, spleenocytes and bone marrow cells from all the mice were isolated for cell fixation and DNA extraction. The defective Trp53 allele is generated by integration of a portion of the cloning vector pKONEO DNA into the coding sequence. Therefore, the genotypic changes are monitored based on the detection of the NEO allele and the normal Trp53 allele in the cells. To evaluate loss of heterozygosity at the Trp53 gene locus in a cell, detection of the NEO allele and the normal Trp53 allele using the dual color RCA was utilized. In our hands, this protocol did not give the required sensitivity. The gene signal enumeration was inconsistent and not reproducible. The protocol was modified and could not be optimized. Therefore, the QRT-PCR method was selected to evaluate the loss of heterozygosity with greater sensitivity and efficiency. A set of 4 primers was designed to target the NEO allele and the normal Trp53 allele in a PCR experiment using the LightCycler instrument

  12. The Adaptive Response in p53 Cancer Prone Mice: Loss of heterozygosity and Genomic Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavoie Jose; Dolling Jo-Anna; Mitchel Ron E J; Boreham Douglas R

    2004-01-01

    mice, only numerical aberrations were observed in 5 to 20% of the cells. There seem to be an age related increase in numerical aberrations as mice grow old. The results indicate that the presence of a defective copy of the Trp53 gene does not seem to affect spontaneous chromosomal instability or in response to chronic low dose exposure to g-radiation. In previous studies it was speculated that low dose and low dose rate in vivo exposure to g-radiation induces an adaptive response, which reduces the risk of cancer death generated by subsequent DNA damage from either spontaneous or radiation induced events due to enhanced recombinational repair. Induced recombination could result from reversion to homozygosity at Trp53 gene locus (Trp53 +/- to +/+) or loss of heterozygosity in unexposed mice (Trp53 +/- to -/-). This hypothesis was investigated using the quantitative real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (QRT-PCR) quantification method and the novel Rolling Circle Amplification technique (RCA). For these purposes, spleenocytes and bone marrow cells from all the mice were isolated for cell fixation and DNA extraction. The defective Trp53 allele is generated by integration of a portion of the cloning vector pKONEO DNA into the coding sequence. Therefore, the genotypic changes are monitored based on the detection of the NEO allele and the normal Trp53 allele in the cells. To evaluate loss of heterozygosity at the Trp53 gene locus in a cell, detection of the NEO allele and the normal Trp53 allele using the dual color RCA was utilized. In our hands, this protocol did not give the required sensitivity. The gene signal enumeration was inconsistent and not reproducible. The protocol was modified and could not be optimized. Therefore, the QRT-PCR method was selected to evaluate the loss of heterozygosity with greater sensitivity and efficiency. A set of 4 primers was designed to target the NEO allele and the normal Trp53 allele in a PCR experiment using the LightCycler instrument

  13. X-ray lasing as a result of an induced instability in an ablative capillary discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellwi, S. S.; Juschkin, L.; Ferri, S.; Kunze, H. J.; Koshelev, K. N.; E. Louis,

    2001-01-01

    We report lasing of the CVI Balmer-alpha line at 18.22 nm using the new technique of an induced MHD instability in an ablative capillary discharge. A large spike of this line during the second half-cycle of the discharge is observed. The spike is identified as amplified spontaneous emission (ASE),

  14. Shock train unsteadiness induced by separation bubble instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Robin; Driscoll, James; Gamba, Mirko

    2017-11-01

    A shock train is a highly three-dimensional system of shock and compression waves that gradually decelerates a supersonic flow in a duct and is typically found in the isolator section of high-speed air breathing engines. These fluid systems exhibit what we term inherent unsteadiness, which are self-excited fluctuations of the shock train system about its time-average position even with nominally constant inflow and outflow conditions. We have found that the instabilities of the separation bubbles within the shock train system contribute to the shock unsteadiness. The existence of boundary layer separation along the shock train is generally an accepted or assumed feature of shock trains. However, its properties, such as the point of separation, its length and thickness, are not well defined from works in the literature. Here, we present two-component particle image velocimetry measurements to examine the separation bubble characteristics and determine the physical structure of the perturbations that the separation bubble creates.

  15. Agent Model Development for Assessing Climate-Induced Geopolitical Instability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boslough, Mark B.; Backus, George A.

    2005-12-01

    We present the initial stages of development of new agent-based computational methods to generate and test hypotheses about linkages between environmental change and international instability. This report summarizes the first year's effort of an originally proposed three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project. The preliminary work focused on a set of simple agent-based models and benefited from lessons learned in previous related projects and case studies of human response to climate change and environmental scarcity. Our approach was to define a qualitative model using extremely simple cellular agent models akin to Lovelock's Daisyworld and Schelling's segregation model. Such models do not require significant computing resources, and users can modify behavior rules to gain insights. One of the difficulties in agent-based modeling is finding the right balance between model simplicity and real-world representation. Our approach was to keep agent behaviors as simple as possible during the development stage (described herein) and to ground them with a realistic geospatial Earth system model in subsequent years. This work is directed toward incorporating projected climate data--including various C02 scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Third Assessment Report--and ultimately toward coupling a useful agent-based model to a general circulation model.3

  16. Radiation induced chromosomal instability in lymphocytes of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, H.; Sagara, M.; Ban, S.; Noda, S.; Iwakawa, M.; Harada, Y.; Imai, T.; Cologne, J.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay has been extensively used to evaluate the radiation sensitivity of human individuals. Using the CBMN assay, Scott et al (1998, 1999) demonstrated that a fraction of radiosensitive individuals in breast cancer case population was larger than in normal individual population. However, Vral et al were very skeptical about the Scott et al's findings (2002). Under the approval from the ethical committee of NIRS, peripheral blood was obtained from 46 normal healthy females, 131 breast cancer patients, 32 cervical cancer patients and 7 female head and neck cancer patients. Radiosensitivity of T-lymphocytes was assessed by using a CBMN assay. The frequencies of MN per binucleated cell in healthy donors were 0.031(±0.010) and 0.151(±0.066) for cells treated before and after X-ray-irradiation (2Gy), respectively. Spontaneous MN frequencies in cancer patients were significantly higher than healthy donors (p < 0.001). Radiation sensitivities of breast- and head and neck-cancer patients were significantly higher than normal individuals (p < 0.001). Cervical cancer patients were more resistant to irradiation than healthy donors, though the number of cases for statistical analysis was small. (p < 0.001). We are considering that the HPV infection affected the radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cases. Because it is widely believed that one key mechanism which leads to spontaneous micronucleus formation involves an imbalance of chromosomal segregation and a chromosomal instability in patients' lymphocytes might be greater than that in normal individuals' lymphocytes. Recently, Kuschel et al (2002) demonstrated that ratios in two SNPs on XRCC3 were significantly different between cancer patients and healthy females. Then, we can suppose that the radiation-related genes with low penetrance may be involved in tumorigenesis of mammary- and head and neck-cells, and also, in patients' radiation susceptibility

  17. Evidence of a genetic instability induced by the incorporation of a DNA precursor marked with tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saintigny, Y.; Laurent, D.; Lahayel, J.B.; Roche, St.; Meynard, D.; Lopez, B.S.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report a molecular geno-toxicology investigation which allowed molecular events induced par intracellular incorporation of tritium to be studied, and the genetic instability resulting from a chronic exposure even at low dose to be analysed. For this purpose, they developed cell models (hamster tumorous cells and human fibroblasts) in which they know how to incorporate given quantities of marked nucleotides in the DNA. They show that the incorporation of tritium, even with doses which are said to be non toxic, causes a prolonged exposure of the cell to a genotoxic stress, and maybe a genetic instability due to a too great number of recombination events

  18. Experimental study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced by a Mach 3 shock wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BP Puranik; JG Oakley; MH Anderson; R Bonaazza

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 An experimental investigation of a shock-induced interfacial instability (Richtmyer-Meshkov instability) is undertaken in an effort to study temporal evolution of interfacial perturbations in the late stages of development. The experiments are performed in a vertical shock tube with a square cross-section. A membraneless interface is prepared by retracting a sinusoidally shaped metal plate initially separating carbon dioxide from air, with both gases initially at atmospheric pressure. With carbon dioxide above the plate, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability commences as the plate is retracted and the amplitude of the initial sinusoidal perturbation imposed on the interface begins to grow. The interface is accelerated by a strong shock wave (M=3.08) while its shape is still sinusoidal and before the Kelvin-Helmhotz instability distorts it into the well known mushroom-like structures; its initial amplitude to wavelength ratio is large enough that the interface evolution enters its nonlinear stage very shortly after shock acceleration. The pre-shock evolution of the interface due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the post-shock evolution of the interface due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability are visualized using planar Mie scattering. The pre-shock evolution of the interface is carried out in an independent set of experiments. The initial conditions for the Richtmyer-Meshkov experiment are determined from the pre-shock Rayleigh-Taylor growth. One image of the post-shock interface is obtained per experiment and image sequences, showing the post-shock evolution of the interface, are constructed from several experiments. The growth rate of the perturbation amplitude is measured and compared with two recent analytical models of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

  19. Lead Exposure Induces Telomere Instability in Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géraldine Pottier

    Full Text Available Lead (Pb is an important environmental contaminant due to its widespread use over many centuries. While it affects primarily every organ system of the body, the most pernicious effects of Pb are on the central nervous system leading to cognitive and behavioral modification. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms responsible for Pb toxicity remain poorly understood. Recent work has suggested that Pb exposure may have consequences on chromosomal integrity as it was shown that Pb exposure leads to the generation of γH2Ax foci, a well-established biomarker for DNA double stranded break (DSB formation. As the chromosomal localization of γH2Ax foci plays an important role in determining the molecular mechanism responsible for their formation, we examined the localization of Pb-induced foci with respect to telomeres. Indeed, short or dysfunctional telomeres (uncapped or damaged telomeres may be recognized as DSB by the DNA repair machinery, leading to "telomere-Induced Foci" (TIFs. In the current study, we show that while Pb exposure did not increase intra-chromosomal foci, it significantly induced TIFs, leading in some cases, to chromosomal abnormalities including telomere loss. The evidence suggests that these chromosomal abnormalities are likely due to perturbation of telomere replication, in particular on the lagging DNA strand. We propose a mechanism by which Pb exposure leads to the loss of telomere maintenance. As numerous studies have demonstrated a role for telomere maintenance in brain development and tissue homeostasis, our results suggest a possible mechanism for lead-induced neurotoxicity.

  20. Cavitation instabilities and rotordynamic effects in turbopumps and hydroturbines turbopump and inducer cavitation, experiments and design

    CERN Document Server

    Salvetti, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The book provides a detailed approach to the physics, fluid dynamics, modeling, experimentation and numerical simulation of cavitation phenomena, with special emphasis on cavitation-induced instabilities and their implications on the design and operation of high performance turbopumps and hydraulic turbines. The first part covers the fundamentals (nucleation, dynamics, thermodynamic effects, erosion) and forms of cavitation (attached cavitation, cloud cavitation, supercavitation, vortex cavitation) relevant to hydraulic turbomachinery, illustrates modern experimental techniques for the characterization, visualization and analysis of cavitating flows, and introduces the main aspects of the hydrodynamic design and performance of axial inducers, centrifugal turbopumps and hydo-turbines. The second part focuses on the theoretical modeling, experimental analysis, and practical control of cavitation-induced fluid-dynamic and rotordynamic instabilities of hydraulic turbomachinery, with special emphasis on cavitating...

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection induces genetic instability of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Figueiredo, Ceu; Touati, Eliette

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Helicobacter pylori is a major cause of gastric carcinoma. To investigate a possible link between bacterial infection and genetic instability of the host genome, we examined the effect of H. pylori infection on known cellular repair pathways in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, various types...... of genetic instabilities in the nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were examined. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We observed the effects of H. pylori infection on a gastric cell line (AGS), on C57BL/6 mice, and on individuals with chronic gastritis. In AGS cells, the effect of H. pylori infection on base excision...... cells and chronic gastritis tissue were determined by PCR, single-stranded conformation polymorphism, and sequencing. H. pylori vacA and cagA genotyping was determined by multiplex PCR and reverse hybridization. RESULTS: Following H. pylori infection, the activity and expression of base excision repair...

  2. DNA Oncogenic Virus-Induced Oxidative Stress, Genomic Damage, and Aberrant Epigenetic Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mankgopo Magdeline Kgatle

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 20% of human cancers is attributable to DNA oncogenic viruses such as human papillomavirus (HPV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. Unrepaired DNA damage is the most common and overlapping feature of these DNA oncogenic viruses and a source of genomic instability and tumour development. Sustained DNA damage results from unceasing production of reactive oxygen species and activation of inflammasome cascades that trigger genomic changes and increased propensity of epigenetic alterations. Accumulation of epigenetic alterations may interfere with genome-wide cellular signalling machineries and promote malignant transformation leading to cancer development. Untangling and understanding the underlying mechanisms that promote these detrimental effects remain the major objectives for ongoing research and hope for effective virus-induced cancer therapy. Here, we review current literature with an emphasis on how DNA damage influences HPV, HVB, and EBV replication and epigenetic alterations that are associated with carcinogenesis.

  3. Mitigation of radiation-pressure-induced angular instability of a Fabry–Perot cavity consisting of suspended mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, Koji, E-mail: knagano@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [KAGRA Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Enomoto, Yutaro; Nakano, Masayuki [KAGRA Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Furusawa, Akira [Department of Applied Physics, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Kawamura, Seiji [KAGRA Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2016-12-01

    To observe radiation pressure noise in optical cavities consisting of suspended mirrors, high laser power is necessary. However, because the radiation pressure on the mirrors could cause an angular anti-spring effect, the high laser power could induce angular instability to the cavity. An angular control system using radiation pressure as an actuator, which was previously invented to reduce the anti-spring effect for the low power case, was applied to the higher power case where the angular instability would occur. As a result the angular instability was mitigated. It was also demonstrated that the cavity was unstable without this control system. - Highlights: • High laser power could cause angular instability to a suspended Fabry–Perot cavity. • To mitigate the instability, the control system using radiation pressure is applied. • Mitigating the radiation-pressure-induced angular instability is demonstrated. • It is also confirmed that the cavity would be unstable without the control system.

  4. Electromagnetic interference-induced instability in CPP-GMR read heads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khunkitti, P.; Siritaratiwat, A.; Kaewrawang, A. [KKU-Seagate Cooperation Research Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Mewes, T.; Mewes, C.K.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Kruesubthaworn, A., E-mail: anankr@kku.ac.th [KKU-Seagate Cooperation Research Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)

    2016-08-15

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) has been a significant issue for the current perpendicular-to-the-plane giant magnetoresistance (CPP-GMR) read heads because it can cause magnetic failure. Furthermore, the magnetic noise induced by the spin transfer torque (STT) effect has played an important role in the CPP read heads because it can affect the stability of the heads. Accordingly, this work proposed an investigation of the magnetic instabilities induced by EMI through the STT effect in a CPP-GMR read head via micromagnetic simulations. The magnetization fluctuation caused by EMI was examined, and then, magnetic noise was evaluated by using power spectral density analysis. It was found that the magnetization orientation can be fluctuated by EMI in close proximity to the head. The results also showed a multimode spectral density. The main contributions of the spectral density were found to originate at the edges of the stripe height sides due to the characteristics of the demagnetization field inside the free layer. Hence, the magnetic instabilities produced by EMI become a significant factor that essentially impacts the reliability of the CPP-GMR read heads. - Highlights: • The instability induced by electromagnetic interference in read head is examined. • The magnetization orientation can be fluctuated by electromagnetic interference. • The electromagnetic interference can induce additional noise spectra to the system. • The noise is mainly located at stripe height of the read head. • The noise induced by electromagnetic interference is a crucial factor for the head.

  5. Molecular instability induced by aluminum stress in Plantago species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Sofia; Matos, Manuela; Ferreira, Vanessa; Martins, Neusa; Gonçalves, Sandra; Romano, Anabela; Pinto-Carnide, Olinda

    2014-08-01

    Aluminum (Al) is one of the most abundant metals on earth's crust and Al toxicity represents one of the major factors that limit plant growth and productivity in acid soils (with a pH≤5.0). In this study the mutagenic/genotoxic effects of Al were evaluated in roots and leaves of two Plantago, species, Plantago almogravensis and Plantago lagopus, using ISSRs markers. Both species were exposed to 400 μM Al during 7 and 21 days. Ten ISSR primers produced polymorphic bands. In P. almogravensis, a total of 257 and 258 bands in roots and 255 and 265 bands in leaves were produced in the presence and absence of Al, respectively. In P. lagopus were produced 279 and 278 a total bands in roots and 275 and 274 bands in leaves, under the same conditions. The changes in ISSR profiles after Al treatment were considered as gain and/or loss of bands compared with the controls. The results suggest that changes in genomic template stability (GTS) could be detected with ISSR profiles. This molecular marker proved to be a good tool to detect the effects of Al on DNA profiles. It seems that Al did not interfere significantly with DNA integrity in both species but generated less ISSR stability in P. almogravensis than in P. lagopus. The results confirm the tolerance of P. almogravensis and suggest the same behavior of P. lagopus. Although further studies are required for confirmation the Al tolerance behavior of P. lagopus, a potential application for phytoremediation can be also considered due its wide distribution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Light induced modulation instability of surfaces under intense illumination

    KAUST Repository

    Burlakov, V. M.

    2013-12-17

    We show that a flat surface of a polymer in rubber state illuminated with intense electromagnetic radiation is unstable with respect to periodic modulation. Initial periodic perturbation is amplified due to periodic thermal expansion of the material heated by radiation. Periodic heating is due to focusing-defocusing effects caused by the initial surface modulation. The surface modulation has a period longer than the excitation wavelength and does not require coherent light source. Therefore, it is not related to the well-known laser induced periodic structures on polymer surfaces but may contribute to their formation and to other phenomena of light-matter interaction.

  7. Genomic Instability Promoted by Overexpression of Mismatch Repair Factors in Yeast: A Model for Understanding Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Ujani; Dinh, Timothy A; Alani, Eric

    2018-04-13

    Mismatch repair (MMR) proteins act in spellchecker roles to excise misincorporation errors that occur during DNA replication. Curiously, large-scale analyses of a variety of cancers showed that increased expression of MMR proteins often correlated with tumor aggressiveness, metastasis, and early recurrence. To better understand these observations, we used the TCGA and GENT databases to analyze MMR protein expression in cancers. We found that the MMR genes MSH2 and MSH6 are overexpressed more frequently than MSH3 , and that MSH2 and MSH6 are often co-overexpressed as a result of copy number amplifications of these genes. These observations encouraged us to test the effects of upregulating MMR protein levels in baker's yeast, where we can sensitively monitor genome instability phenotypes associated with cancer initiation and progression. Msh6 overexpression (2 to 4-fold) almost completely disrupted mechanisms that prevent recombination between divergent DNA sequences by interacting with the DNA polymerase processivity clamp PCNA and by sequestering the Sgs1 helicase. Importantly, co-overexpression of Msh2 and Msh6 (∼8-fold) conferred, in a PCNA interaction dependent manner, several genome instability phenotypes including increased mutation rate, increased sensitivity to the DNA replication inhibitor hydroxyurea and the DNA damaging agents methyl methanesulfonate and 4-nitroquinoline N-oxide, and elevated loss of heterozygosity. Msh2 and Msh6 co-overexpression also altered the cell cycle distribution of exponentially growing cells, resulting in an increased fraction of unbudded cells, consistent with a larger percentage of cells in G1. These novel observations suggested that overexpression of MSH factors affected the integrity of the DNA replication fork, causing genome instability phenotypes that could be important for promoting cancer progression. Copyright © 2018, Genetics.

  8. Dysregulation of mitotic machinery genes precedes genome instability during spontaneous pre-malignant transformation of mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulises Urzúa

    2016-10-01

    suggests altered control of nuclear RNA maturation, features recently linked to impaired DNA damage response leading to genome instability. These results, combined with cytogenetic analysis by other authors in this model, suggest that transcriptional profile at passage 14 might induce cytokinesis failure by which tetraploid cells approach a near-tetraploid stage containing primary chromosome aberrations that initiate the tumorigenic drive.

  9. Wave instability induced by nonlocal spatial coupling in a model of the light-sensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola, Ernesto M.; Bär, Markus; Engel, Harald

    2006-06-01

    We study spatiotemporal patterns resulting from instabilities induced by nonlocal spatial coupling in the Oregonator model of the light-sensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. In this system, nonlocal coupling can be externally imposed by means of an optical feedback loop which links the intensity of locally applied illumination with the activity in a certain vicinity of a particular point weighted by a given coupling function. This effect is included in the three-variable Oregonator model by an additional integral term in the photochemically induced bromide flow. A linear stability analysis of this modified Oregonator model predicts that wave and Turing instabilities of the homogeneous steady state can be induced for experimentally realistic parameter values. In particular, we find that a long-range inhibition in the optical feedback leads to a Turing instability, while a long-range activation induces wave patterns. Using a weakly nonlinear analysis, we derive amplitude equations for the wave instability which are valid close to the instability threshold. Therein, we find that the wave instability occurs supercritically or subcritically and that traveling waves are preferred over standing waves. The results of the theoretical analysis are in good agreement with numerical simulations of the model near the wave instability threshold. For larger distances from threshold, a secondary breathing instability is found for traveling waves.

  10. Effects of As2O3 on DNA methylation, genomic instability, and LTR retrotransposon polymorphism in Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erturk, Filiz Aygun; Aydin, Murat; Sigmaz, Burcu; Taspinar, M Sinan; Arslan, Esra; Agar, Guleray; Yagci, Semra

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic is a well-known toxic substance on the living organisms. However, limited efforts have been made to study its DNA methylation, genomic instability, and long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon polymorphism causing properties in different crops. In the present study, effects of As2O3 (arsenic trioxide) on LTR retrotransposon polymorphism and DNA methylation as well as DNA damage in Zea mays seedlings were investigated. The results showed that all of arsenic doses caused a decreasing genomic template stability (GTS) and an increasing Random Amplified Polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs) profile changes (DNA damage). In addition, increasing DNA methylation and LTR retrotransposon polymorphism characterized a model to explain the epigenetically changes in the gene expression were also found. The results of this experiment have clearly shown that arsenic has epigenetic effect as well as its genotoxic effect. Especially, the increasing of polymorphism of some LTR retrotransposon under arsenic stress may be a part of the defense system against the stress.

  11. Nonlinear instabilities induced by the F coil power amplifier at FTU: Modeling and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaccarian, L.; Boncagni, L.; Cascone, D.; Centioli, C.; Cerino, S.; Gravanti, F.; Iannone, F.; Mecocci, F.; Pangione, L.; Podda, S.; Vitale, V.; Vitelli, R.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the instabilities caused by the nonlinear behavior of the F coil current amplifier at FTU. This behavior induces closed-loop instability of the horizontal position stabilizing loop whenever the requested current is below the circulating current level. In the paper we first illustrate a modeling phase where nonlinear dynamics are derived and identified to reproduce the open-loop responses measured by the F coil current amplifier. The derived model is shown to successfully reproduce the experimental behavior by direct comparison with experimental data. Based on this dynamic model, we then reproduce the closed-loop scenario of the experiment and show that the proposed nonlinear model successfully reproduces the nonlinear instabilities experienced in the experimental sessions. Given the simulation setup, we next propose a nonlinear control solution to this instability problem. The proposed solution is shown to recover stability in closed-loop simulations. Experimental tests are scheduled for the next experimental campaign after the FTU restart.

  12. Elliptical instability of a vortex tube and drift current induced by it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumoto, Y; Hirota, M

    2008-01-01

    We revisit, with some extension to the nonlinear regime, the Moore-Saffman-Tsai-Widnall instability, which is the three-dimensional instability of a straight vortex tube elliptically strained by a pure shear flow. A circular cylindrical vortex tube supports neutrally stable three-dimensional waves called Kelvin waves. A pure shear breaks the circular symmetry, causing a parametric resonance between two Kelvin waves whose azimuthal wavenumbers are separated by two. The eigenvalues and functions are written out in full in terms of the Bessel and the modified Bessel functions, and so is the growth rate. That this instability has a link with the elliptical instability in the short-wave limit is established in this study. This result is studied in the light of Krein's theory for Hamiltonian spectra. We develop a Lagrangian (particle) formulation that makes feasible an efficient calculation of iso-vortical disturbances up to second order in amplitude and thereby facilitates calculation of the energy of Kelvin waves. It is found that a Kelvin wave induces a drift current along the vortex tube.

  13. Nuclear DNA-Content in Mesenchymal Lesions in Dogs: Its Value as Marker of Malignancy and Extent of Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerkamp, Kim M., E-mail: K.M.Boerkamp@uu.nl; Rutteman, Gerard R. [Department of Clinical Science of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, UU, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kik, Marja J. L. [Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, UU, Yalelaan 1, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kirpensteijn, Jolle [Department of Clinical Science of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, UU, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schulze, Christoph; Grinwis, Guy C. M. [Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, UU, Yalelaan 1, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-12-03

    DNA-aneuploidy may reflect the malignant nature of mesenchymal proliferations and herald gross genomic instability as a mechanistic factor in tumor genesis. DNA-ploidy and -index were determined by flow cytometry in canine inflammatory or neoplastic mesenchymal tissues and related to clinico-pathological features, biological behavior and p53 gene mutational status. Half of all sarcomas were aneuploid. Benign mesenchymal neoplasms were rarely aneuploid and inflammatory lesions not at all. The aneuploidy rate was comparable to that reported for human sarcomas with significant variation amongst subtypes. DNA-ploidy status in canines lacked a relation with histological grade of malignancy, in contrast to human sarcomas. While aneuploidy was related to the development of metastases in soft tissue sarcomas it was not in osteosarcomas. No relation amongst sarcomas was found between ploidy status and presence of P53 gene mutations. Heterogeneity of the DNA index between primary and metastatic sarcoma sites was present in half of the cases examined. Hypoploidy is more common in canine sarcomas and hyperploid cases have less deviation of the DNA index than human sarcomas. The variation in the presence and extent of aneuploidy amongst sarcoma subtypes indicates variation in genomic instability. This study strengthens the concept of interspecies variation in the evolution of gross chromosomal aberrations during cancer development.

  14. Nuclear DNA-Content in Mesenchymal Lesions in Dogs: Its Value as Marker of Malignancy and Extent of Genomic Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Schulze

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA-aneuploidy may reflect the malignant nature of mesenchymal proliferations and herald gross genomic instability as a mechanistic factor in tumor genesis. DNA-ploidy and -index were determined by flow cytometry in canine inflammatory or neoplastic mesenchymal tissues and related to clinico-pathological features, biological behavior and p53 gene mutational status. Half of all sarcomas were aneuploid. Benign mesenchymal neoplasms were rarely aneuploid and inflammatory lesions not at all. The aneuploidy rate was comparable to that reported for human sarcomas with significant variation amongst subtypes. DNA-ploidy status in canines lacked a relation with histological grade of malignancy, in contrast to human sarcomas. While aneuploidy was related to the development of metastases in soft tissue sarcomas it was not in osteosarcomas. No relation amongst sarcomas was found between ploidy status and presence of P53 gene mutations. Heterogeneity of the DNA index between primary and metastatic sarcoma sites was present in half of the cases examined. Hypoploidy is more common in canine sarcomas and hyperploid cases have less deviation of the DNA index than human sarcomas. The variation in the presence and extent of aneuploidy amongst sarcoma subtypes indicates variation in genomic instability. This study strengthens the concept of interspecies variation in the evolution of gross chromosomal aberrations during cancer development.

  15. Nuclear DNA-Content in Mesenchymal Lesions in Dogs: Its Value as Marker of Malignancy and Extent of Genomic Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerkamp, Kim M.; Rutteman, Gerard R.; Kik, Marja J. L.; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; Schulze, Christoph; Grinwis, Guy C. M.

    2012-01-01

    DNA-aneuploidy may reflect the malignant nature of mesenchymal proliferations and herald gross genomic instability as a mechanistic factor in tumor genesis. DNA-ploidy and -index were determined by flow cytometry in canine inflammatory or neoplastic mesenchymal tissues and related to clinico-pathological features, biological behavior and p53 gene mutational status. Half of all sarcomas were aneuploid. Benign mesenchymal neoplasms were rarely aneuploid and inflammatory lesions not at all. The aneuploidy rate was comparable to that reported for human sarcomas with significant variation amongst subtypes. DNA-ploidy status in canines lacked a relation with histological grade of malignancy, in contrast to human sarcomas. While aneuploidy was related to the development of metastases in soft tissue sarcomas it was not in osteosarcomas. No relation amongst sarcomas was found between ploidy status and presence of P53 gene mutations. Heterogeneity of the DNA index between primary and metastatic sarcoma sites was present in half of the cases examined. Hypoploidy is more common in canine sarcomas and hyperploid cases have less deviation of the DNA index than human sarcomas. The variation in the presence and extent of aneuploidy amongst sarcoma subtypes indicates variation in genomic instability. This study strengthens the concept of interspecies variation in the evolution of gross chromosomal aberrations during cancer development

  16. Moisture-induced solid state instabilities in α-chymotrypsin and their reduction through chemical glycosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solá Ricardo J

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein instability remains the main factor limiting the development of protein therapeutics. The fragile nature (structurally and chemically of proteins makes them susceptible to detrimental events during processing, storage, and delivery. To overcome this, proteins are often formulated in the solid-state which combines superior stability properties with reduced operational costs. Nevertheless, solid protein pharmaceuticals can also suffer from instability problems due to moisture sorption. Chemical protein glycosylation has evolved into an important tool to overcome several instability issues associated with proteins. Herein, we employed chemical glycosylation to stabilize a solid-state protein formulation against moisture-induced deterioration in the lyophilized state. Results First, we investigated the consequences of moisture sorption on the stability and structural conformation of the model enzyme α-chymotrypsin (α-CT under controlled humidity conditions. Results showed that α-CT aggregates and inactivates as a function of increased relative humidity (RH. Furthermore, α-CT loses its native secondary and tertiary structure rapidly at increasing RH. In addition, H/D exchange studies revealed that α-CT structural dynamics increased at increasing RH. The magnitude of the structural changes in tendency parallels the solid-state instability data (i.e., formation of buffer-insoluble aggregates, inactivation, and loss of native conformation upon reconstitution. To determine if these moisture-induced instability issues could be ameliorated by chemical glycosylation we proceeded to modify our model protein with chemically activated glycans of differing lengths (lactose and dextran (10 kDa. The various glycoconjugates showed a marked decrease in aggregation and an increase in residual activity after incubation. These stabilization effects were found to be independent of the glycan size. Conclusion Water sorption leads to

  17. Cytokinesis Failure Leading to Chromosome Instability in v-Src-Induced Oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yuji; Soeda, Shuhei; Ikeuchi, Masayoshi; Kakae, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2017-04-12

    v-Src, an oncogene found in Rous sarcoma virus, is a constitutively active variant of c-Src. Activation of Src is observed frequently in colorectal and breast cancers, and is critical in tumor progression through multiple processes. However, in some experimental conditions, v-Src causes growth suppression and apoptosis. In this review, we highlight recent progress in our understanding of cytokinesis failure and the attenuation of the tetraploidy checkpoint in v-Src-expressing cells. v-Src induces cell cycle changes-such as the accumulation of the 4N cell population-and increases the number of binucleated cells, which is accompanied by an excess number of centrosomes. Time-lapse analysis of v-Src-expressing cells showed that cytokinesis failure is caused by cleavage furrow regression. Microscopic analysis revealed that v-Src induces delocalization of cytokinesis regulators including Aurora B and Mklp1. Tetraploid cell formation is one of the causes of chromosome instability; however, tetraploid cells can be eliminated at the tetraploidy checkpoint. Interestingly, v-Src weakens the tetraploidy checkpoint by inhibiting the nuclear exclusion of the transcription coactivator YAP, which is downstream of the Hippo pathway and its nuclear exclusion is critical in the tetraploidy checkpoint. We also discuss the relationship between v-Src-induced chromosome instability and growth suppression in v-Src-induced oncogenesis.

  18. R-loops cause genomic instability in T helper lymphocytes from patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Koustav; Han, Seong-Su; Wen, Kuo-Kuang; Ochs, Hans D; Dupré, Loïc; Seidman, Michael M; Vyas, Yatin M

    2017-12-15

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), X-linked thrombocytopenia (XLT), and X-linked neutropenia, which are caused by WAS mutations affecting Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) expression or activity, manifest in immunodeficiency, autoimmunity, genomic instability, and lymphoid and other cancers. WASp supports filamentous actin formation in the cytoplasm and gene transcription in the nucleus. Although the genetic basis for XLT/WAS has been clarified, the relationships between mutant forms of WASp and the diverse features of these disorders remain ill-defined. We sought to define how dysfunctional gene transcription is causally linked to the degree of T H cell deficiency and genomic instability in the XLT/WAS clinical spectrum. In human T H 1- or T H 2-skewing cell culture systems, cotranscriptional R-loops (RNA/DNA duplex and displaced single-stranded DNA) and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were monitored in multiple samples from patients with XLT and WAS and in normal T cells depleted of WASp. WASp deficiency provokes increased R-loops and R-loop-mediated DSBs in T H 1 cells relative to T H 2 cells. Mechanistically, chromatin occupancy of serine 2-unphosphorylated RNA polymerase II is increased, and that of topoisomerase 1, an R-loop preventing factor, is decreased at R-loop-enriched regions of IFNG and TBX21 (T H 1 genes) in T H 1 cells. These aberrations accompany increased unspliced (intron-retained) and decreased spliced mRNA of IFNG and TBX21 but not IL13 (T H 2 gene). Significantly, increased cellular load of R-loops and DSBs, which are normalized on RNaseH1-mediated suppression of ectopic R-loops, inversely correlates with disease severity scores. Transcriptional R-loop imbalance is a novel molecular defect causative in T H 1 immunodeficiency and genomic instability in patients with WAS. The study proposes that cellular R-loop load could be used as a potential biomarker for monitoring symptom severity and prognostic outcome in the XLT-WAS clinical spectrum

  19. Colorectal carcinomas from Middle East: Molecular and tissue microarray analysis of genomic instability pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bavi, P.P.; Abubaker, Jehad A.; Jehan, Zeenath D.; Al-Jomah, Naif A.; Siraj, Abdul K.; Al-Harbi, Sayer R.; Atizado, Valerie L.; Uddin, S.; Al-Kuraya, Khawla S.; Abduljabbar, Alaa S.; Al-Homoud, Samar J.; Ashari, Luai H.; Al-Sanea, Nasser A.; Al-Dayel, Fouad H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to evaluate the overall incidence of microsatellite instability (MSI), hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer and tumor suppressor gene (TP53) mutations in Saudi colorectal carcinomas. We studied the MSI pathway in Saudi colorectal cancers (CRC) from 179 unselected patients using 2 methods: MSI by polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry detection of mutL homologs 1 and mutS homologs 2 proteins. The TP53 mutations were studied by sequencing exons 5, 6, 7 and 8. Of the 150 colorectal carcinomas analyzed for MSI, 16% of the tumors showed high level instability (MSI-H), 19.3% had low level instability (MSI-L) and the remaining 64% tumors were stable. Survival of the MSI-H group was better as compared to the MSI-L or microsatellite stable group (p=0.0217). In the MSI-H group, 48% were familial MSI tumors which could be attributable to the high incidence of consanguinity in the Saudi population. The TP53 mutations were found in 24% of the cases studied. A high production of familial MSI cases and a lower incidence of TP53 mutations are some of the hallmarks of the Saudi colorectal carcinomas which need to be explored further. (author)

  20. Detection of genomic instability in descendants of male mice exposed to chronic low-level gamma-radiation using the test 'adaptive response'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanova, O.M.; Zaichkina, S.I.; Akhmadieva, A.; Aptikaeva, G.F.; Klokov, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The goal of the present study was to examine whether the genomic instability can be revealed in vivo using the test 'adaptive response' (AR). Two-month-old BALB/C male mice were subjected to chronic irradiation in the gamma-field with a dose of 0.1 Gy (0.01 Gy/day) and a dose of 0.5 Gy (0.01 and 0.05 Gy/day). Control animals were kept under similar conditions but without irradiation. Fifteen days after the irradiation, males from the irradiated and control groups were mated in separate cages with unirradiated females for 2 weeks. The males, descendants from irradiated and unirradiated parents, at an age of two months were subjected to additional irradiation with a dose of 1.5 Gy. To reveal the genetic instability using the AR test, another group of males, the descendants from irradiated and unirradiated parents, were exposed to acute irradiation by the scheme of AR: with an adapting dose (D1) of 0.1 Gy (0.125 Gy/min) followed after a day by a challenging dose (D2) of 1.5 Gy (0.47 Gy/min). After 28 h, the animals of all groups were killed. Bone marrow specimens for calculating micronuclei (MN) in polychromatophyl erythrocytes (PCE) were prepared. It was found that in descendants that resulted from unirradiated parents and the parents irradiated with a dose of 0.1 Gy, the percentages of PCE with injuries were nearly equal. Upon irradiation of parents with a dose of 0.5 Gy, the percentage of PCE with MN in descendants increased. The examination of radiosensitivity of descendants from irradiated parents showed that the percentage of PCE with MN decreased three-to-fourfold (depending on the dose of irradiation of the parents) compared to descendants from unirradiated parents. If the descendants from exposed parents were irradiated by the scheme of AR, no AR was observed. Thus, the experimental data indicated that, it is possible to detect the transition of gamma-radiation-induced genomic instability in sex cells of male parents into somatic cells of mice (F1

  1. Living with genome instability: the adaptation of phytoplasmas todiverse environments of their insect and plant hosts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jianhua; Ewing, Adam; Miller, Sally A.; Radek, Agnes; Shevchenko, Dimitriy; Tsukerman, Kiryl; Walunas, Theresa; Lapidus, Alla; Campbell, John W.; Hogenhout Saskia A.

    2006-02-17

    Phytoplasmas (Candidatus Phytoplasma, Class Mollicutes) cause disease in hundreds of economically important plants, and are obligately transmitted by sap-feeding insects of the order Hemiptera, mainly leafhoppers and psyllids. The 706,569-bp chromosome and four plasmids of aster yellows phytoplasma strain witches broom (AY-WB) were sequenced and compared to the onion yellows phytoplasma strain M (OY-M) genome. The phytoplasmas have small repeat-rich genomes. The repeated DNAs are organized into large clusters, potential mobile units (PMUs), which contain tra5 insertion sequences (ISs), and specialized sigma factors and membrane proteins. So far, PMUs are unique to phytoplasmas. Compared to mycoplasmas, phytoplasmas lack several recombination and DNA modification functions, and therefore phytoplasmas probably use different mechanisms of recombination, likely involving PMUs, for the creation of variability, allowing phytoplasmas to adjust to the diverse environments of plants and insects. The irregular GC skews and presence of ISs and large repeated sequences in the AY-WB and OY-M genomes are indicative of high genomic plasticity. Nevertheless, segments of {approx}250 kb, located between genes lplA and glnQ are syntenic between the two phytoplasmas, contain the majority of the metabolic genes and no ISs. AY-WB is further along in the reductive evolution process than OY-M. The AY-WB genome is {approx}154 kb smaller than the OY-M genome, primarily as a result of fewer multicopy sequences, including PMUs. Further, AY-WB lacks genes that are truncated and are part of incomplete pathways in OY-M. This is the first comparative phytoplasma genome analysis and report of the existence of PMUs in phytoplasma genomes.

  2. Crossing the LINE toward genomic instability: LINE-1 retrotransposition in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline R. Kemp

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Retrotransposons are repetitive DNA sequences that are positioned throughout the human genome. Retrotransposons are capable of copying themselves and mobilizing new copies to novel genomic locations in a process called retrotransposition. While most retrotransposon sequences in the human genome are incomplete and incapable of mobilization, the LINE-1 retrotransposon, which comprises approximately 17% of the human genome, remains active. The disruption of cellular mechanisms that suppress retrotransposon activity is linked to the generation of aneuploidy, a potential driver of tumor development. When retrotransposons insert into a novel genomic region, they have the potential to disrupt the coding sequence of endogenous genes and alter gene expression, which can lead to deleterious consequences for the organism. Additionally, increased LINE-1 copy numbers provide more chances for recombination events to occur between retrotransposons, which can lead to chromosomal breaks and rearrangements. LINE-1 activity is increased in various cancer cell lines and in patient tissues resected from primary tumors. LINE-1 activity also correlates with increased cancer metastasis. This review aims to give a brief overview of the connections between LINE-1 retrotransposition and the loss of genome stability. We will also discuss the mechanisms that repress retrotransposition in human cells and their links to cancer.

  3. The induction of genomic instability in related human lymphoblasts following exposure to Cs gamma radiation vs accelerated 56Fe Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, H.H.; Horng, M.-F.; Ricanati, M.; Diaz-Insua, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The induction of genomic instability by exposure to Cs-137 gamma radiation and Fe-56 accelerated ions was investigated by measuring the frequency and characteristics of TK6 and WTK1 unstable clones isolated 36 generations after exposure. While the two cell lines are related, TK6 is more sensitive to radiation, has normal p53 expression, and is repair deficient. Clones surviving the radiation and respective controls were analyzed for 17 characteristics including chromosomal aberrations, growth defects, alterations in response to a second radiation and mutant frequencies at two different loci. Putative unstable clones were defined as those exhibiting a significant alteration in one or more characteristics as compared to the respective control medians. Over half of the unstable WTK1 clones and over 90% of the TK6 unstable clones surviving exposure to either radiation exhibited chromosomal instability, the major aberrations consisting of chromatid breaks and dicentric chromosomes formed by end-to-end fusions. Alterations in the other measured characteristics occurred much less often than cytogenetic alterations in the TK6 unstable clones. The phenotype of the WTK1 unstable clones was more diverse and complex than in the case of TK6 unstable clones. The phenotype of the TK6 unstable clones differed in the survivors of Cs-137 vs. Fe-56. In the clones surviving Cs-137, the aberrations consisted mainly of dicentric chromosomes, while clones surviving exposure to Fe-56 exhibited both breaks and dicentrics. The uniform prevalence of chromosomal aberrations in the unstable TK6 clones vs. the relatively diverse phenotype of the unstable WTK1 clones suggests that the deficiency in DNA double-strand break repair in TK6 cells may be accompanied by a deficiency in telomere maintenance that leads to telomere fusion, dicentric chromosomes, anaphase bridges, breakage and the occurrence of chromosomal instability in the majority of clones isolated following exposure

  4. Comparative Genomics of a Parthenogenesis-Inducing Wolbachia Symbiont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Amelia R. I.; Werren, John H.; Richards, Stephen; Stouthamer, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Wolbachia is an intracellular symbiont of invertebrates responsible for inducing a wide variety of phenotypes in its host. These host-Wolbachia relationships span the continuum from reproductive parasitism to obligate mutualism, and provide a unique system to study genomic changes associated with the evolution of symbiosis. We present the genome sequence from a parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia strain (wTpre) infecting the minute parasitoid wasp Trichogramma pretiosum. The wTpre genome is the most complete parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia genome available to date. We used comparative genomics across 16 Wolbachia strains, representing five supergroups, to identify a core Wolbachia genome of 496 sets of orthologous genes. Only 14 of these sets are unique to Wolbachia when compared to other bacteria from the Rickettsiales. We show that the B supergroup of Wolbachia, of which wTpre is a member, contains a significantly higher number of ankyrin repeat-containing genes than other supergroups. In the wTpre genome, there is evidence for truncation of the protein coding sequences in 20% of ORFs, mostly as a result of frameshift mutations. The wTpre strain represents a conversion from cytoplasmic incompatibility to a parthenogenesis-inducing lifestyle, and is required for reproduction in the Trichogramma host it infects. We hypothesize that the large number of coding frame truncations has accompanied the change in reproductive mode of the wTpre strain. PMID:27194801

  5. Comparative Genomics of a Parthenogenesis-Inducing Wolbachia Symbiont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Amelia R I; Werren, John H; Richards, Stephen; Stouthamer, Richard

    2016-07-07

    Wolbachia is an intracellular symbiont of invertebrates responsible for inducing a wide variety of phenotypes in its host. These host-Wolbachia relationships span the continuum from reproductive parasitism to obligate mutualism, and provide a unique system to study genomic changes associated with the evolution of symbiosis. We present the genome sequence from a parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia strain (wTpre) infecting the minute parasitoid wasp Trichogramma pretiosum The wTpre genome is the most complete parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia genome available to date. We used comparative genomics across 16 Wolbachia strains, representing five supergroups, to identify a core Wolbachia genome of 496 sets of orthologous genes. Only 14 of these sets are unique to Wolbachia when compared to other bacteria from the Rickettsiales. We show that the B supergroup of Wolbachia, of which wTpre is a member, contains a significantly higher number of ankyrin repeat-containing genes than other supergroups. In the wTpre genome, there is evidence for truncation of the protein coding sequences in 20% of ORFs, mostly as a result of frameshift mutations. The wTpre strain represents a conversion from cytoplasmic incompatibility to a parthenogenesis-inducing lifestyle, and is required for reproduction in the Trichogramma host it infects. We hypothesize that the large number of coding frame truncations has accompanied the change in reproductive mode of the wTpre strain. Copyright © 2016 Lindsey et al.

  6. Comparative Genomics of a Parthenogenesis-Inducing Wolbachia Symbiont

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia R. I. Lindsey

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Wolbachia is an intracellular symbiont of invertebrates responsible for inducing a wide variety of phenotypes in its host. These host-Wolbachia relationships span the continuum from reproductive parasitism to obligate mutualism, and provide a unique system to study genomic changes associated with the evolution of symbiosis. We present the genome sequence from a parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia strain (wTpre infecting the minute parasitoid wasp Trichogramma pretiosum. The wTpre genome is the most complete parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia genome available to date. We used comparative genomics across 16 Wolbachia strains, representing five supergroups, to identify a core Wolbachia genome of 496 sets of orthologous genes. Only 14 of these sets are unique to Wolbachia when compared to other bacteria from the Rickettsiales. We show that the B supergroup of Wolbachia, of which wTpre is a member, contains a significantly higher number of ankyrin repeat-containing genes than other supergroups. In the wTpre genome, there is evidence for truncation of the protein coding sequences in 20% of ORFs, mostly as a result of frameshift mutations. The wTpre strain represents a conversion from cytoplasmic incompatibility to a parthenogenesis-inducing lifestyle, and is required for reproduction in the Trichogramma host it infects. We hypothesize that the large number of coding frame truncations has accompanied the change in reproductive mode of the wTpre strain.

  7. Progress in understanding turbulent mixing induced by Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Ye; Remington, B.A.; Robey, H.F.; Cook, A.W.; Glendinning, S.G.; Dimits, A.; Buckingham, A.C.; Zimmerman, G.B.; Burke, E.W.; Peyser, T.A.; Cabot, W.; Eliason, D.

    2003-01-01

    Turbulent hydrodynamic mixing induced by the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities occurs in settings as varied as exploding stars (supernovae), inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule implosions, and macroscopic flows in fluid dynamics facilities such as shock tubes. Turbulence theory and modeling have been applied to RT and RM induced flows and developed into a quantitative description of turbulence from the onset to the asymptotic end-state. The treatment, based on a combined approach of theory, direct numerical simulation (DNS), and experimental data analysis, has broad generality. Three areas of progress will be reported. First, a robust, easy to apply criteria will be reported for the mixing transition in a time-dependent flow. This allows an assessment of whether flows, be they from supernova explosions or ICF experiments, should be mixed down to the molecular scale or not. Second, through DNS, the structure, scaling, and spectral evolution of the RT instability induced flow will be inspected. Finally, using these new physical insights, a two-scale, dynamic mix model has been developed that can be applied to simulations of ICF experiments and astrophysics situations alike

  8. Complex ordered patterns in mechanical instability induced geometrically frustrated triangular cellular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sung; Shan, Sicong; Kosmrlj, Andrej; Noorduin, Wim; Shian, Samuel; Weaver, James; Clarke, David; Bertoldi, Katia

    2014-03-01

    Geometrical frustration arises when a local order cannot propagate throughout the space due to geometrical constraints. It plays a major role in many natural and synthetic systems including water ice, spin ice, and metallic glasses. All of these geometrically frustrated systems are degenerate and tend to form disordered ground-state configurations. Here, we report a theoretical and experimental study on the behavior of buckling-induced geometrically frustrated triangular cellular structures. To our surprise, we find that mechanical instabilities induce complex ordered patterns with tunability. For structures with low porosity, an ordered symmetric pattern emerges, which shows striking correlations with the ideal spin solid. In contrast, for high porosity systems, an ordered chiral pattern forms with a new spin configuration. Our analysis using a spin-like model reveals that the connected geometry of the cellular structure plays a crucial role in the formation of ordered states in this system. Since in our study geometrical frustration is induced by a mechanical instability that is scale-independent, our findings can be extended to different materials, stimuli, and length scales, providing a general strategy to study and visualize the physics of frustration.

  9. The general dispersion relation of induced streaming instabilities in quantum outflow systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mehdian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this manuscript the dispersion relations of streaming instabilities, by using the unique property (neutralized in charge and current by default of plasma shells colliding, have been generalized and studied. This interesting property for interpenetrating beams enables one to find the general dispersion relations without any restrictions used in the previous works in this area. In our previous work [H. Mehdian et al., ApJ. 801, 89 (2015], employing the plasma shell concept and boost frame method, the general dispersion relation for filamentation instability has been derived in the relativistic classical regime. But in this paper, using the above mentioned concepts, the general dispersion relations (for each of streaming instabilities, filamentation, two-stream and multi-stream in the non-relativistic quantum regime have been derived by employing the quantum fluid equations together with Maxwell equations. The derived dispersion relations enable to describe any arbitrary system of interacting two and three beams, justified neutralization condition, by choosing the inertial reference frame embedded on the one of the beams. Furthermore, by the numerical and analytical study of these dispersion relations, many new features of streaming instabilities (E.g. their cut-off wave numbers and growth rates in terms of all involved parameters have been illustrated. The obtained results in this paper can be used to describe many astrophysical systems and laboratory astrophysics setting, such as collision of non-parallel plasma shells over a background plasma or the collision of three neutralized plasma slabs, and justifying the many plasma phenomena such as particle accelerations and induced fields.

  10. Observation of acoustically induced modulation instability in a Brillouin photonic crystal fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, Birgit; Sylvestre, Thibaut

    2013-05-01

    We report the experimental observation of self-induced modulation instability (MI) in a Brillouin fiber laser made with a solid-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with strong anomalous dispersion. We identify this MI as the result of parametric amplification of optical sidebands generated by guided acoustic modes within the core of the PCF. It is further shown that MI leads to passive harmonic mode locking and to the generation of a picosecond pulse train at a repetition rate of 1.15 GHz which matches the acoustic frequency of the fundamental acoustic mode of the PCF.

  11. Significance of genetic predisposition and genomic instability for individual sensitivity to radiation. Implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, H.

    2001-01-01

    At its closed-door meeting on 20/21 January 2000 the Radiation Protection Committee dedicated much of its attention to the significance of genetic predisposition and genetic instability for individual radiation sensitivity and to the implication of this for radiation protection. The statements and contributions to the closing plenary discussion touched on many aspects of ethics, personal rights, occupational medicine and insurance issues relating to this subject, all of which extend far beyond the purely technical issues of radiation protection. The present volume contains the lecture manuscripts of the meeting as well as a summarising assessment by the Radiation Protection Committee [de

  12. Phosphate steering by Flap Endonuclease 1 promotes 5′-flap specificity and incision to prevent genome instability

    KAUST Repository

    Tsutakawa, Susan E.

    2017-06-27

    DNA replication and repair enzyme Flap Endonuclease 1 (FEN1) is vital for genome integrity, and FEN1 mutations arise in multiple cancers. FEN1 precisely cleaves single-stranded (ss) 5\\'-flaps one nucleotide into duplex (ds) DNA. Yet, how FEN1 selects for but does not incise the ss 5\\'-flap was enigmatic. Here we combine crystallographic, biochemical and genetic analyses to show that two dsDNA binding sites set the 5\\'polarity and to reveal unexpected control of the DNA phosphodiester backbone by electrostatic interactions. Via phosphate steering\\', basic residues energetically steer an inverted ss 5\\'-flap through a gateway over FEN1\\'s active site and shift dsDNA for catalysis. Mutations of these residues cause an 18,000-fold reduction in catalytic rate in vitro and large-scale trinucleotide (GAA) repeat expansions in vivo, implying failed phosphate-steering promotes an unanticipated lagging-strand template-switch mechanism during replication. Thus, phosphate steering is an unappreciated FEN1 function that enforces 5\\'-flap specificity and catalysis, preventing genomic instability.

  13. Non integrative strategy decreases chromosome instability and improves endogenous pluripotency genes reactivation in porcine induced pluripotent-like stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congras, Annabelle; Barasc, Harmonie; Canale-Tabet, Kamila; Plisson-Petit, Florence; Delcros, Chantal; Feraud, Olivier; Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Hadadi, Eva; Griscelli, Franck; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Turhan, Ali; Afanassieff, Marielle; Ferchaud, Stéphane; Pinton, Alain; Yerle-Bouissou, Martine; Acloque, Hervé

    2016-06-01

    The pig is an emerging animal model, complementary to rodents for basic research and for biomedical and agronomical purposes. However despite the progress made on mouse and rat models to produce genuine pluripotent cells, it remains impossible to produce porcine pluripotent cell lines with germline transmission. Reprogramming of pig somatic cells using conventional integrative strategies remains also unsatisfactory. In the present study, we compared the outcome of both integrative and non-integrative reprogramming strategies on pluripotency and chromosome stability during pig somatic cell reprogramming. The porcine cell lines produced with integrative strategies express several pluripotency genes but they do not silence the integrated exogenes and present a high genomic instability upon passaging. In contrast, pig induced pluripotent-like stem cells produced with non-integrative reprogramming system (NI-iPSLCs) exhibit a normal karyotype after more than 12 months in culture and reactivate endogenous pluripotency markers. Despite the persistent expression of exogenous OCT4 and MYC, these cells can differentiate into derivatives expressing markers of the three embryonic germ layers and we propose that these NI-iPSLCs can be used as a model to bring new insights into the molecular factors controlling and maintaining pluripotency in the pig and other non-rodent mammalians.

  14. Grain Boundary Induced Bias Instability in Soluble Acene-Based Thin-Film Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ky V.; Payne, Marcia M.; Anthony, John E.; Lee, Jung Hun; Song, Eunjoo; Kang, Boseok; Cho, Kilwon; Lee, Wi Hyoung

    2016-09-01

    Since the grain boundaries (GBs) within the semiconductor layer of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) have a strong influence on device performance, a substantial number of studies have been devoted to controlling the crystallization characteristics of organic semiconductors. We studied the intrinsic effects of GBs within 5,11-bis(triethylsilylethynyl) anthradithiophene (TES-ADT) thin films on the electrical properties of OFETs. The GB density was easily changed by controlling nulceation event in TES-ADT thin films. When the mixing time was increased, the number of aggregates in as-spun TES-ADT thin films were increased and subsequent exposure of the films to 1,2-dichloroethane vapor led to a significant increase in the number of nuleation sites, thereby increasing the GB density of TES-ADT spherulites. The density of GBs strongly influences the angular spread and crystallographic orientation of TES-ADT spherulites. Accordingly, the FETs with higher GB densities showed much poorer electrical characteristics than devices with lower GB density. Especially, GBs provide charge trapping sites which are responsible for bias-stress driven electrical instability. Dielectric surface treatment with a polystyrene brush layer clarified the GB-induced charge trapping by reducing charge trapping at the semiconductor-dielectric interface. Our study provides an understanding on GB induced bias instability for the development of high performance OFETs.

  15. Systemic chemotherapy induces microsatellite instability in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Fernando LA; Sant Ana, Aleksandra VL; Bendit, Israel; Arias, Vitor; Costa, Luciano J; Pinhal, Aparecida A; Giglio, Auro del

    2005-01-01

    Systemic chemotherapy is an important part of treatment for breast cancer. We conducted the present study to evaluate whether systemic chemotherapy could produce microsatellite instability (MSI) in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell fraction of breast cancer patients. We studied 119 sequential blood samples from 30 previously untreated breast cancer patients before, during and after chemotherapy. For comparison, we also evaluated 20 women who had no relevant medical history (control group). In 27 out of 30 patients we observed MSI in at least one sample, and six patients had loss of heterozygosity. We found a significant correlation between the number of MSI events per sample and chemotherapy with alkylating agents (P < 0.0001). We also observed an inverse correlation between the percentage of cells positive for hMSH2 and the number of MSI events per sample (P = 0.00019) and use of alkylating agents (P = 0.019). We conclude that systemic chemotherapy may induce MSI and loss of heterozygosity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from breast cancer patients receiving alkylating agents, possibly mediated by a chemotherapy-induced decrease in the expression of hMSH2. These effects may be related to the generation of secondary leukaemia in some patients, and may also intensify the genetic instability of tumours and increase resistance to treatment

  16. Systemic chemotherapy induces microsatellite instability in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Fernando L A; Sant Ana, Aleksandra V L; Bendit, Israel; Arias, Vitor; Costa, Luciano J; Pinhal, Aparecida A; del Giglio, Auro

    2005-01-01

    Systemic chemotherapy is an important part of treatment for breast cancer. We conducted the present study to evaluate whether systemic chemotherapy could produce microsatellite instability (MSI) in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell fraction of breast cancer patients. We studied 119 sequential blood samples from 30 previously untreated breast cancer patients before, during and after chemotherapy. For comparison, we also evaluated 20 women who had no relevant medical history (control group). In 27 out of 30 patients we observed MSI in at least one sample, and six patients had loss of heterozygosity. We found a significant correlation between the number of MSI events per sample and chemotherapy with alkylating agents (P < 0.0001). We also observed an inverse correlation between the percentage of cells positive for hMSH2 and the number of MSI events per sample (P = 0.00019) and use of alkylating agents (P = 0.019). We conclude that systemic chemotherapy may induce MSI and loss of heterozygosity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from breast cancer patients receiving alkylating agents, possibly mediated by a chemotherapy-induced decrease in the expression of hMSH2. These effects may be related to the generation of secondary leukaemia in some patients, and may also intensify the genetic instability of tumours and increase resistance to treatment.

  17. Zinc sulfate supplementation of cultured peripheral blood Lymphocytes: genomic instability related to its deficiency and excess

    OpenAIRE

    Padula, Gisel; Ponzinibbio, Maria Virginia; Seoane, Analia Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) plays a vital role in children growth and is involved in DNA synthesis and maintenance processes. The current nutrient intake recommendations do not consider the levels required for maintaining genomic stability. The objective of this study is to analyze the cytotoxic and genotoxic effect of in vitro Zn supplementation to evaluate deficiency and excess, and the concentrations within the normal physiological range established for children (80-280 µg/dl). To achieve Zn deficiency, the...

  18. Twist1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition according to microsatellite instability status in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Bo Young; Kim, So-Young; Lee, Yeo Song; Hong, Hye Kyung; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Seok Hyung; Lee, Woo Yong; Cho, Yong Beom

    2016-08-30

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) with microsatellite instability (MSI) may exhibit impaired epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), but little is known about the underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon. In this study, we investigated the role of Twist1 and its downstream signaling cascades in EMT induction according to MSI status. To investigate the effects of Twist1 on EMT induction according to MSI status, MSS LS513 and MSI LoVo colon cancer cell lines, which overexpress human Twist1, were generated. Twist1-induced EMT and its downstream signaling pathways were evaluated via in vitro and in vivo experiments. We found that Twist1 induced EMT markers and stem cell-like characteristics via AKT signaling pathways. Twist1 induced activation of AKT and suppression of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β, which resulted in the activation of β-catenin, increasing CD44 expression. In addition, Twist1 activated the AKT-induced NF-κB pathway, increasing CD44 and CD166 expression. Activation of both the AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin and AKT/NF-κB pathways occurred in MSS LS513 cells, while only the AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin pathway was activated in MSI LoVo cells. In conclusion, Twist1 induces stem cell-like characteristics in colon cancer cell lines related to EMT via AKT signaling pathways, and those pathways depend on MSI status.

  19. 56Fe particle exposure results in a long-lasting increase in a cellular index of genomic instability and transiently suppresses adult hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarolis, Nathan A.; Rivera, Phillip D.; Ahn, Francisca; Amaral, Wellington Z.; LeBlanc, Junie A.; Malhotra, Shveta; Shih, Hung-Ying; Petrik, David; Melvin, Neal R.; Chen, Benjamin P. C.; Eisch, Amelia J.

    2014-07-01

    The high-LET HZE particles from galactic cosmic radiation pose tremendous health risks to astronauts, as they may incur sub-threshold brain injury or maladaptations that may lead to cognitive impairment. The health effects of HZE particles are difficult to predict and unfeasible to prevent. This underscores the importance of estimating radiation risks to the central nervous system as a whole as well as to specific brain regions like the hippocampus, which is central to learning and memory. Given that neurogenesis in the hippocampus has been linked to learning and memory, we investigated the response and recovery of neurogenesis and neural stem cells in the adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus after HZE particle exposure using two nestin transgenic reporter mouse lines to label and track radial glia stem cells (Nestin-GFP and Nestin-CreERT2/R26R:YFP mice, respectively). Mice were subjected to 56Fe particle exposure (0 or 1 Gy, at either 300 or 1000 MeV/n) and brains were harvested at early (24 h), intermediate (7 d), and/or long time points (2-3 mo) post-irradiation. 56Fe particle exposure resulted in a robust increase in 53BP1+ foci at both the intermediate and long time points post-irradiation, suggesting long-term genomic instability in the brain. However, 56Fe particle exposure only produced a transient decrease in immature neuron number at the intermediate time point, with no significant decrease at the long time point post-irradiation. 56Fe particle exposure similarly produced a transient decrease in dividing progenitors, with fewer progenitors labeled at the early time point but equal number labeled at the intermediate time point, suggesting a recovery of neurogenesis. Notably, 56Fe particle exposure did not change the total number of nestin-expressing neural stem cells. These results highlight that despite the persistence of an index of genomic instability, 56Fe particle-induced deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be transient. These data support

  20. Nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, and R-loops modulate convergent transcription-induced cell death and repeat instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfu Lin

    Full Text Available Expansion of CAG•CTG tracts located in specific genes is responsible for 13 human neurodegenerative disorders, the pathogenic mechanisms of which are not yet well defined. These disease genes are ubiquitously expressed in human tissues, and transcription has been identified as one of the major pathways destabilizing the repeats. Transcription-induced repeat instability depends on transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER, the mismatch repair (MMR recognition component MSH2/MSH3, and RNA/DNA hybrids (R-loops. Recently, we reported that simultaneous sense and antisense transcription-convergent transcription-through a CAG repeat not only promotes repeat instability, but also induces a cell stress response, which arrests the cell cycle and eventually leads to massive cell death via apoptosis. Here, we use siRNA knockdowns to investigate whether NER, MMR, and R-loops also modulate convergent-transcription-induced cell death and repeat instability. We find that siRNA-mediated depletion of TC-NER components increases convergent transcription-induced cell death, as does the simultaneous depletion of RNase H1 and RNase H2A. In contrast, depletion of MSH2 decreases cell death. These results identify TC-NER, MMR recognition, and R-loops as modulators of convergent transcription-induced cell death and shed light on the molecular mechanism involved. We also find that the TC-NER pathway, MSH2, and R-loops modulate convergent transcription-induced repeat instability. These observations link the mechanisms of convergent transcription-induced repeat instability and convergent transcription-induced cell death, suggesting that a common structure may trigger both outcomes.

  1. Genomic mutation study for long-term cells induced by carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.; Furusawa, Y.; Suzuki, M.; Hirayama, R.; Matsumoto, Y.; Qin, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: Densely ionizing (high LET) radiation can increase the relative biological effectiveness of cell and tissue. Astronauts in the space exploration have the potential exposure of chronic low-dose radiations in the field of low-flux galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and the subsequent biological effects have become one of the major concerns of space science. Furthermore, Heavy ions also are used new radiation therapy owing increased lethal effectiveness of high LET radiation. During radiation therapy, normal tissues also are exposed to ionizing radiation. Radiation can induce genomic mutation and instability in descendants of irradiated cells. Induction of genomic instability can represent one of the initiating steps leading to malignant transformation. Higher frequencies of mutation can be expected to provide higher rates of carcinogenicity with human exposure. Therefore, the study of radiation induced genomic mutation and instability is relevant to the estimates of the risk of secondary malignancies associated with radiation therapy and the carcinogenic effects of space environmental radiation. The hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) locus has been the most commonly used as a target gene for mutation detection studies. In this study, we investigated the generation expression dependence of mutation induction on HPRT locus in CHO cells irradiated with carbon ions. Methods: Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were irradiated with graded doses of carbon ions (290MeV/u, LET:13kev/um) accelerated with Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at National Institute of Radiological Sciences(NIRS). The survival effect of cells plated immediately after irradiation was measured with cell colony formation assay. After irradiation, cells were continues reseeding and cultures for lone-term proliferation. Cell samples were collected at 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 37 and 44 days post irradiation. Mutation induction of cell

  2. Generation of an ICF Syndrome Model by Efficient Genome Editing of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using the CRISPR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izuho Hatada

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Genome manipulation of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells is essential to achieve their full potential as tools for regenerative medicine. To date, however, gene targeting in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs has proven to be extremely difficult. Recently, an efficient genome manipulation technology using the RNA-guided DNase Cas9, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR system, has been developed. Here we report the efficient generation of an iPS cell model for immunodeficiency, centromeric region instability, facial anomalies syndrome (ICF syndrome using the CRISPR system. We obtained iPS cells with mutations in both alleles of DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B in 63% of transfected clones. Our data suggest that the CRISPR system is highly efficient and useful for genome engineering of human iPS cells.

  3. Lingering Questions about Enhancer RNA and Enhancer Transcription-Coupled Genomic Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Gerson; Basu, Uttiya

    2017-02-01

    Intergenic and intragenic enhancers found inside topologically associated regulatory domains (TADs) express noncoding RNAs, known as enhancer RNAs (eRNAs). Recent studies have indicated these eRNAs play a role in gene regulatory networks by controlling promoter and enhancer interactions and topology of higher-order chromatin structure. Misregulation of enhancer and promoter associated noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) could stabilize deleterious secondary DNA structures, noncoding RNA associated DNA/RNA hybrid formation, and promote collisions of transcription complexes with replisomes. It is revealing that many chromosomal aberrations, some associated with malignancies, are present inside enhancer and/or promoter sequences. Here, we expand on current concepts to discuss enhancer RNAs and enhancer transcription, and how enhancer transcription influences genomic organization and integrity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. DNA end resection by CtIP and exonuclease 1 prevents genomic instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eid, Wassim; Steger, Martin; El-Shemerly, Mahmoud

    2010-01-01

    End resection of DNA-which is essential for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination-relies first on the partnership between MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) and CtIP, followed by a processive step involving helicases and exonucleases such as exonuclease 1 (EXO1). In this s......End resection of DNA-which is essential for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination-relies first on the partnership between MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) and CtIP, followed by a processive step involving helicases and exonucleases such as exonuclease 1 (EXO1...... of DNA-PK-dependent radial chromosome formation. Thus, our study identifies new functions of CtIP and EXO1 in DNA end resection and provides new information on the regulation of DSB repair pathways, which is a key factor in the maintenance of genome integrity....

  5. Genomic Instability of the Sex-Determining Locus in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubieniecki, Krzysztof P; Lin, Song; Cabana, Emily I; Li, Jieying; Lai, Yvonne Y Y; Davidson, William S

    2015-09-22

    Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout, like other members of the subfamily Salmoninae, are gonochoristic with male heterogamety. The finding that sex-linked genetic markers varied between species suggested that the sex-determining gene differs among salmonid species, or that there is one sex-determining gene that has the capacity to move around the genome. The discovery of sdY, the sex-determining gene in rainbow trout, and its presence in many male salmonids gave support to the latter. Additional evidence for a salmonid-specific, sex-determining jumping gene came from the mapping of the sex-determining locus to three different chromosomes in Tasmanian male Atlantic salmon lineages. To characterize the sex-determining region, we isolated three sdY containing BACs from an Atlantic salmon male library. Sequencing of these BACs yielded two contigs, one of which contained the sdY gene. Sequence analysis of the borders of male-specific and female/male common regions revealed highly repetitive sequences associated with mobile elements, which may allow an sdY cassette to jump around the genome. FISH analysis using a BAC or a plasmid containing the sdY gene showed that the sdY gene did indeed localize to the chromosomes where SEX had been mapped in different Tasmanian Atlantic salmon families. Moreover, the plasmid sdY gene probe hybridized primarily to one of the sex chromosomes as would be expected of a male-specific gene. Our results suggest that a common salmonid sex-determining gene (sdY) can move between three specific loci on chromosomes 2, 3, and 6, giving the impression that there are multiple SEX loci both within and between salmonid species. Copyright © 2015 Lubieniecki et al.

  6. Back-Analyses of Landfill Instability Induced by High Water Level: Case Study of Shenzhen Landfill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ren; Hou, Yujing; Zhan, Liangtong; Yao, Yangping

    2016-01-01

    In June 2008, the Shenzhen landfill slope failed. This case is used as an example to study the deformation characteristics and failure mode of a slope induced by high water levels. An integrated monitoring system, including water level gauges, electronic total stations, and inclinometers, was used to monitor the slope failure process. The field measurements suggest that the landfill landslide was caused by a deep slip along the weak interface of the composite liner system at the base of the landfill. The high water level is considered to be the main factor that caused this failure. To calculate the relative interface shear displacements in the geosynthetic multilayer liner system, a series of numerical direct shear tests were carried out. Based on the numerical results, the composite lining system simplified and the centrifuge modeling technique was used to quantitatively evaluate the effect of water levels on landfill instability. PMID:26771627

  7. Back-Analyses of Landfill Instability Induced by High Water Level: Case Study of Shenzhen Landfill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In June 2008, the Shenzhen landfill slope failed. This case is used as an example to study the deformation characteristics and failure mode of a slope induced by high water levels. An integrated monitoring system, including water level gauges, electronic total stations, and inclinometers, was used to monitor the slope failure process. The field measurements suggest that the landfill landslide was caused by a deep slip along the weak interface of the composite liner system at the base of the landfill. The high water level is considered to be the main factor that caused this failure. To calculate the relative interface shear displacements in the geosynthetic multilayer liner system, a series of numerical direct shear tests were carried out. Based on the numerical results, the composite lining system simplified and the centrifuge modeling technique was used to quantitatively evaluate the effect of water levels on landfill instability.

  8. Instability in time-delayed switched systems induced by fast and random switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yao; Lin, Wei; Chen, Yuming; Wu, Jianhong

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we consider a switched system comprising finitely or infinitely many subsystems described by linear time-delayed differential equations and a rule that orchestrates the system switching randomly among these subsystems, where the switching times are also randomly chosen. We first construct a counterintuitive example where even though all the time-delayed subsystems are exponentially stable, the behaviors of the randomly switched system change from stable dynamics to unstable dynamics with a decrease of the dwell time. Then by using the theories of stochastic processes and delay differential equations, we present a general result on when this fast and random switching induced instability should occur and we extend this to the case of nonlinear time-delayed switched systems as well.

  9. Roughening instability and ion-induced viscous relaxation of SiO2 surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, T.M.; Chason, E.; Howard, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    We characterize the development of nanometer scale topography (roughness) on SiO 2 surfaces as a result of low energy, off-normal ion bombardment, using in situ energy dispersive x-ray reflectivity and atomic force microscopy. Surfaces roughen during sputtering by heavy ions (Xe), with roughness increasing approximately linearly with ion fluence up to 10 17 cm -2 . A highly coherent ripple structure with wavelength of 30 nm and oriented with the wave vector parallel to the direction of incidence is observed after Xe sputtering at 1 keV. Lower frequency, random texture is also observed. Subsequent light ion (H, He) bombardment smoothens preroughened surfaces. The smoothing kinetics are first order with ion fluence and strongly dependent on ion energy in the range 0.2--1 eV. We present a linear model to account for the experimental observations which includes roughening both by random stochastic processes and by development of a periodic surface instability due to sputter yield variations with surface curvature which leads to ripple development. Smoothing occurs via ion bombardment induced viscous flow and surface diffusion. From the smoothing kinetics with H and He irradiation we measure the radiation enhanced viscosity of SiO 2 and find values on the order of 1--20x10 12 N s m -2 . The viscous relaxation per ion scales as the square root of the ion induced displacements in the film over the range of the ion penetration, suggesting short-lived defects with a bimolecular annihilation mechanism. The surface instability mechanism accounts for the ripple formation, while inclusion of stochastic roughening produces the random texture and reproduces the observed linear roughening kinetics and the magnitude of the overall roughness

  10. Modeling Genomic Imprinting Disorders Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Stormy J; Germain, Noelle D; Chen, Pin-Fang; Hsiao, Jack S; Glatt-Deeley, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has allowed for the invaluable modeling of many genetic disorders including disorders associated with genomic imprinting. Genomic imprinting involves differential DNA and histone methylation and results in allele-specific gene expression. Most of the epigenetic marks in somatic cells are erased and reestablished during the process of reprogramming into iPSCs. Therefore, in generating models of disorders associated with genomic imprinting, it is important to verify that the imprinting status and allele-specific gene expression patterns of the parental somatic cells are maintained in their derivative iPSCs. Here, we describe three techniques: DNA methylation analysis, allele-specific PCR, and RNA FISH, which we use to analyze genomic imprinting in iPSC models of neurogenetic disorders involving copy number variations of the chromosome 15q11-q13 region.

  11. Delayed chromosomal instability caused by large deletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojima, M.; Suzuki, K.; Kodama, S.; Watanabe, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: There is accumulating evidence that genomic instability, manifested by the expression of delayed phenotypes, is induced by X-irradiation but not by ultraviolet (UV) light. It is well known that ionizing radiation, such as X-rays, induces DNA double strand breaks, but UV-light mainly causes base damage like pyrimidine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts. Although the mechanism of radiation-induced genomic instability has not been thoroughly explained, it is suggested that DNA double strand breaks contribute the induction of genomic instability. We examined here whether X-ray induced gene deletion at the hprt locus induces delayed instability in chromosome X. SV40-immortalized normal human fibroblasts, GM638, were irradiated with X-rays (3, 6 Gy), and the hprt mutants were isolated in the presence of 6-thioguanine (6-TG). A 2-fold and a 60-fold increase in mutation frequency were found by 3 Gy and 6 Gy irradiation, respectively. The molecular structure of the hprt mutations was determined by multiplex polymerase chain reaction of nine exons. Approximately 60% of 3 Gy mutants lost a part or the entire hprt gene, and the other mutants showed point mutations like spontaneous mutants. All 6 Gy mutants show total gene deletion. The chromosomes of the hprt mutants were analyzed by Whole Human Chromosome X Paint FISH or Xq telomere FISH. None of the point or partial gene deletion mutants showed aberrations of X-chromosome, however total gene deletion mutants induced translocations and dicentrics involving chromosome X. These results suggest that large deletion caused by DNA double strand breaks destabilizes chromosome structure, which may be involved in an induction of radiation-induced genomic instability

  12. Universal model of bias-stress-induced instability in inkjet-printed carbon nanotube networks field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Haesun; Choi, Sungju; Jang, Jun Tae; Yoon, Jinsu; Lee, Juhee; Lee, Yongwoo; Rhee, Jihyun; Ahn, Geumho; Yu, Hye Ri; Kim, Dong Myong; Choi, Sung-Jin; Kim, Dae Hwan

    2018-02-01

    We propose a universal model for bias-stress (BS)-induced instability in the inkjet-printed carbon nanotube (CNT) networks used in field-effect transistors (FETs). By combining two experimental methods, i.e., a comparison between air and vacuum BS tests and interface trap extraction, BS instability is explained regardless of either the BS polarity or ambient condition, using a single platform constituted by four key factors: OH- adsorption/desorption followed by a change in carrier concentration, electron concentration in CNT channel corroborated with H2O/O2 molecules in ambient, charge trapping/detrapping, and interface trap generation. Under negative BS (NBS), the negative threshold voltage shift (ΔVT) is dominated by OH- desorption, which is followed by hole trapping in the interface and/or gate insulator. Under positive BS (PBS), the positive ΔVT is dominated by OH- adsorption, which is followed by electron trapping in the interface and/or gate insulator. This instability is compensated by interface trap extraction; PBS instability is slightly more complicated than NBS instability. Furthermore, our model is verified using device simulation, which gives insights on how much each mechanism contributes to BS instability. Our result is potentially useful for the design of highly stable CNT-based flexible circuits in the Internet of Things wearable healthcare era.

  13. SERIES: Genomic instability in cancer Balancing repair and tolerance of DNA damage caused by alkylating agents

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Dragony; Calvo, Jennifer A.; Samson, Leona D

    2012-01-01

    Alkylating agents comprise a major class of frontline chemotherapeutic drugs that inflict cytotoxic DNA damage as their main mode of action, in addition to collateral mutagenic damage. Numerous cellular pathways, including direct DNA damage reversal, base excision repair (BER), and mismatch repair (MMR) respond to alkylation damage to defend against alkylation-induced cell death or mutation. However, maintaining a proper balance of activity both within and between these pathways is crucial fo...

  14. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-01-18

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and other environmental agents can affect the genomic integrity of germ cells and induce adverse health effects in the progeny. Efficient DNA repair during gametogenesis and the early embryonic cycles after fertilization is critical for preventing transmission of DNA damage to the progeny and relies on maternal factors stored in the egg before fertilization. The ability of the maternal repair machinery to repair DNA damage in both parental genomes in the fertilizing egg is especially crucial for the fertilizing male genome that has not experienced a DNA repair-competent cellular environment for several weeks prior to fertilization. During the DNA repair-deficient period of spermatogenesis, DNA lesions may accumulate in sperm and be carried into the egg where, if not properly repaired, could result in the formation of heritable chromosomal aberrations or mutations and associated birth defects. Studies with female mice deficient in specific DNA repair genes have shown that: (i) cell cycle checkpoints are activated in the fertilized egg by DNA damage carried by the sperm; and (ii) the maternal genotype plays a major role in determining the efficiency of repairing genomic lesions in the fertilizing sperm and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also growing evidence that implicates DNA damage carried by the fertilizing gamete as a mediator of postfertilization processes that contribute to genomic instability in subsequent generations. Transgenerational genomic instability most likely involves epigenetic mechanisms or error-prone DNA repair processes in the early embryo. Maternal and embryonic DNA repair processes during the early phases of mammalian embryonic development can have far reaching consequences for the genomic integrity and health of subsequent generations.

  15. Omics Approaches for Identifying Physiological Adaptations to Genome Instability in Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edifizi, Diletta; Schumacher, Björn

    2017-11-04

    DNA damage causally contributes to aging and age-related diseases. The declining functioning of tissues and organs during aging can lead to the increased risk of succumbing to aging-associated diseases. Congenital syndromes that are caused by heritable mutations in DNA repair pathways lead to cancer susceptibility and accelerated aging, thus underlining the importance of genome maintenance for withstanding aging. High-throughput mass-spectrometry-based approaches have recently contributed to identifying signalling response networks and gaining a more comprehensive understanding of the physiological adaptations occurring upon unrepaired DNA damage. The insulin-like signalling pathway has been implicated in a DNA damage response (DDR) network that includes epidermal growth factor (EGF)-, AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPK)- and the target of rapamycin (TOR)-like signalling pathways, which are known regulators of growth, metabolism, and stress responses. The same pathways, together with the autophagy-mediated proteostatic response and the decline in energy metabolism have also been found to be similarly regulated during natural aging, suggesting striking parallels in the physiological adaptation upon persistent DNA damage due to DNA repair defects and long-term low-level DNA damage accumulation occurring during natural aging. These insights will be an important starting point to study the interplay between signalling networks involved in progeroid syndromes that are caused by DNA repair deficiencies and to gain new understanding of the consequences of DNA damage in the aging process.

  16. Genome Instability of Chironomus riparius Mg. (Diptera, Chironomidae from Polluted Water Basins in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Ilkova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Larvae of Chironomus riparius Mg. (Chironomidae, Diptera collected from two polluted water basins in Bulgaria, the Maritsa and Chaya Rivers (adjacent to Plovdiv and Asenovgrad respectively, a small pool (near Plovdiv plus controls reared in the laboratory were studied. High concentrations of the heavy metals Pb, Cu and Cd were recorded in the sediments of the polluted stations. Marked somatic structural chromosome aberrations were found in C. riparius salivary polytene chromosomes from the field stations and their frequency was significantly higher (p<0.01 compared to the control. The observed somatic chromosome changes are discussed as a response of the chironomid genome to aquatic pollution. A new cytogenetic index based on the number of aberrations found in larvae from polluted regions in comparison with the control was applied to the data to more easily evaluate the degree of heavy metal pollution in aquatic ecosystems. Our study of a polluted site near the River Chaya showed that the somatic index was very high at 3.35 for 2010 and 11.66 for 2013 compared to 0.5 in the control. The cytogenetic index was effective in showing that all studied sites were highly polluted in comparison with the control. To determine the mechanism involved in the concentration of aberration breakpoints within specific regions of the chironomid polytene chromosome the FISH method was applied. The localization of a transposable element TFB1 along the polytene chromosomes of C. riparius was analyzed and the sites of localization were compared with breakpoints of chromosome aberrations. A significant correlation (p<0.05 was found which shows that most of the aberrations do not appear randomly but are concentrated in sites rich in transposable elements.

  17. SERIES: Genomic instability in cancer Balancing repair and tolerance of DNA damage caused by alkylating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dragony; Calvo, Jennifer A.; Samson, Leona D

    2013-01-01

    Alkylating agents comprise a major class of frontline chemotherapeutic drugs that inflict cytotoxic DNA damage as their main mode of action, in addition to collateral mutagenic damage. Numerous cellular pathways, including direct DNA damage reversal, base excision repair (BER), and mismatch repair (MMR) respond to alkylation damage to defend against alkylation-induced cell death or mutation. However, maintaining a proper balance of activity both within and between these pathways is crucial for an organism's favorable response to alkylating agents. Furthermore, an individual's response to alkylating agents can vary considerably from tissue to tissue and from person to person, pointing to genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that modulate alkylating agent toxicity. PMID:22237395

  18. An analytical study on excitation of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability due to seismically induced resonance in BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Masashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a scoping study on seismically induced resonance of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability in BWRs, which was conducted by using TRAC-BF1 within a framework of a point kinetics model. As a result of the analysis, it is shown that a reactivity insertion could occur accompanied by in-surge of coolant into the core resulted from the excitation of the nuclear-coupled instability by the external acceleration. In order to analyze this phenomenon more in detail, it is necessary to couple a thermal-hydraulic code with a three-dimensional nuclear kinetics code.

  19. Oxidative Stress, Bone Marrow Failure, and Genome Instability in Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Richardson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS can be generated by defective endogenous reduction of oxygen by cellular enzymes or in the mitochondrial respiratory pathway, as well as by exogenous exposure to UV or environmental damaging agents. Regulation of intracellular ROS levels is critical since increases above normal concentrations lead to oxidative stress and DNA damage. A growing body of evidence indicates that the inability to regulate high levels of ROS leading to alteration of cellular homeostasis or defective repair of ROS-induced damage lies at the root of diseases characterized by both neurodegeneration and bone marrow failure as well as cancer. That these diseases may be reflective of the dynamic ability of cells to respond to ROS through developmental stages and aging lies in the similarities between phenotypes at the cellular level. This review summarizes work linking the ability to regulate intracellular ROS to the hematopoietic stem cell phenotype, aging, and disease.

  20. Convergent transcription at intragenic super-enhancers targets AID-initiated genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fei-Long; Du, Zhou; Federation, Alexander; Hu, Jiazhi; Wang, Qiao; Kieffer-Kwon, Kyong-Rim; Meyers, Robin M; Amor, Corina; Wasserman, Caitlyn R; Neuberg, Donna; Casellas, Rafael; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Bradner, James E; Liu, X Shirley; Alt, Frederick W

    2014-12-18

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates both somatic hypermutation (SHM) for antibody affinity maturation and DNA breakage for antibody class switch recombination (CSR) via transcription-dependent cytidine deamination of single-stranded DNA targets. Though largely specific for immunoglobulin genes, AID also acts on a limited set of off-targets, generating oncogenic translocations and mutations that contribute to B cell lymphoma. How AID is recruited to off-targets has been a long-standing mystery. Based on deep GRO-seq studies of mouse and human B lineage cells activated for CSR or SHM, we report that most robust AID off-target translocations occur within highly focal regions of target genes in which sense and antisense transcription converge. Moreover, we found that such AID-targeting "convergent" transcription arises from antisense transcription that emanates from super-enhancers within sense transcribed gene bodies. Our findings provide an explanation for AID off-targeting to a small subset of mostly lineage-specific genes in activated B cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Detection of genomic instability in α-irradiated and bystander human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponnaiya, B.; Jenkins-Baker, G.; Bigelow, A.; Marino, S.; Geard, C.R.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We have previously demonstrated a radiation induced bystander effect using novel co-culturing techniques where irradiated and bystander cells were cultured on two surfaces of mylar separated by media. Here we present data from experiments designed to investigate the induction of chromosomal aberrations in irradiated and bystander fibroblasts using these co-culturing techniques. Immortalized fibroblasts ((BJ1-tert) were cultured on both mylar surfaces and cells on one side were irradiated with 0.1 or 1 Gy -particles (an average of 1 and 10 particles per cell nucleus respectively), the two sides were separated 1 hour post irradiation and analyzed for chromosomal aberrations using standard Giemsa staining at either immediate or delayed time points. At 24-30 hours post irradiation, frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in irradiated populations were increased in a dose dependent manner as expected. Populations that received 0.1 and 1 Gy had 0.3 and 1.3 aberrations/cell; these aberrations were almost exclusively chromosome type aberrations. In contrast, at these times bystander populations had elevated yields of chromatid-type aberrations. When assayed at later times (15-20 population doublings post irradiation) both irradiated and bystander cells demonstrated elevated frequencies of chromatid-type aberrations. Frequencies in the irradiated populations ranged from 0.07 to 0.09 aberrations/ cell at 15 doublings, and 0.09-0.14/cell at 20 doublings, with no apparent dose response. Aberration frequencies in the bystander populations were between 0.08-0.14 per cell at the delayed time points assayed. Interestingly, the chromatid-type aberrations observed immediately post irradiation in the bystander cells, and at later times in both the irradiated and bystander populations were qualitatively similar to those previously observed at delayed times in neutron irradiated epithelial cells. Furthermore, there was a similar lack of a dose response in those studies as

  2. Phyllanthus emblica L. fruit extract induces chromosomal instability and suppresses necrosis in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xihan; Ni, Juan; Liu, Xuemin; Xue, Jinglun; Wang, Xu

    2013-01-01

    Phyllanthus emblica L. (PE) is an edible fruit indigenous to Southeast Asia. It has been considered as a potent functional food due to its numerous pharmacological applications, such as anti-oxidant, antimicrobial, anti-diabetic and protection for multiple organs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a water extract of PE fruit on genomic damage and cell death in the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line COLO320 using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay. Cells were exposed to RPMI-1640 medium containing 0, 20, 40, 80, or 160 μg/mL PE for 24, 48, 72, or 96 hours. The results showed that PE induced a significant decrease in necrosis (p PE exposure, and the frequency of CIN was negatively correlated with NDI (r = - 0.640, p PE also significantly increased apoptosis (p PE suppresses necrosis and delays mitotic progression, which results in massive CIN followed by apoptosis in COLO320 cells.

  3. Laser induced ablatively driven interfacial nonlinear fluid instabilities in multilayer targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manoranjan Khan; Gupta, M.R.; Mandal, L.K.; Roy, S.; Banerjee, R.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. High power laser driven shock waves in condensed matter have important application for studying equation of state (EOS) and high pressure physics. This is an important phenomenon in fuel compression for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments where multilayer targets of differing shock impedance are interacted by laser induced shocks. The interface between the two fluid becomes unstable when driven by the impulsive force (Richtmyer-Meshkov) due to such a shock wave or a continuously acting force e.g., gravity (Rayleigh-Taylor). In the nonlinear stage, the fluid interface is found to develop structures having finger-like shapes. The structures resemble a bubble (spike) accordingly as a lighter (heavier) fluid pushes in a heavier (lighter) fluid. These effects need to be mitigated for efficient compression in ICF experiment. We have studied the effect of density variation on R-T and R-M instability on the temporal development of nonlinear two fluid interfacial structures like bubble and spike. It is shown that the velocity of bubble or spike decreases leading to stabilization if the density of the fluids leads to lowering of the Atwood number. The Atwood number A = ρ a -ρ b / ρ a +ρ b changes to A* = ρ a *ρ b */ ρ a *ρ b * where ρ* m = ρ m (1-1/γ m ), m = [a,b], assuming ρ a > ρ b . It has been seen that the stabilization or destabilization (depending on the algebraic sign of the gradient) will be proportional to the pressure p 0 at the interface. The set of equation describing the dynamics of the bubbles and spikes in presence of fluid density variation are not analytically integrable in closed form. All the results are derived by numerical methods and are represented and interpreted. Analytical calculations are performed (not presented here) to modify the dynamical boundary condition between the two fluids and we have finally arrived at the following expression for the asymptotic bubble velocity ν b 2 = 2(r

  4. Eliminating the microbunching-instability-induced sideband in a soft x-ray self-seeding free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaiqing; Zeng, Li; Qi, Zheng; Feng, Chao; Wang, Dong

    2018-02-01

    Soft x-ray self-seeding has been proved to be a feasible method to improve the longitudinal coherence of high gain free-electron laser. However, a pedestal-like sideband in the spectrum has been observed in the experiment, which generally limits the purity of the radiation pulse and the user's application. The previous theoretical study indicates that the pedestal-like sideband is mainly induced by microbunching instability generated from LINAC. In this paper, three dimensional simulations have been performed to confirm the analytical results and show the formation process of the spectral sideband. A probable method is proposed to eliminate the pedestal-like sideband by simply inserting a magnetic chicane before the self-seeding FEL undulator. Theoretical and numerical simulations have been performed and the results show that the proposed method can efficiently eliminate the microbunching-instability-induced sideband in a soft x-ray self-seeding FEL.

  5. Investigation of genomic instability by assay of DNA fingerprint from the offspring of male mice exposed to chronic low-level γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezlepkin, V.G.; Vasil'eva, G.V.; Lomaeva, M.G.; Sirota, N.P.; Gaziev, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    By polymerase chain reaction with arbitrary primer (AP-PCR), the possibility of transmission of genome instability to somatic cells of the offspring (F 1 generation) from male parents of mice exposed to chronic low-dose γ-radiation was studied. Male mice 15 days after exposure to 10-50 cGy were mated with unirradiated females. Biopsies were taken from tale tips of two month-old mice progeny for DNA separation. Primer in the AP-PCR was 20-mer oligonucleotide flanking the micro-satellite locus Atplb2 on chromosome 11 of the mouse. Comparative analysis of individual fingerprints of AP-PCR products on DNA-templates from the offspring of irradiated and unirradiated male mice revealed an increased variability of micro-satellite-associated sequences in the genome of the offspring of males exposed to 25 and 50 cGy. DNA-fingerprints of the offspring of male mice exposed to chronic irradiation doses 10 and 25 cGy. 15 days before fertilization (at the post-meiotic stage of spermatogenesis) showed an increased frequency of non-parent bands. Result of the study point to the possibility of transmission to the offspring somatic cells of changes increasing genome instability from male parents exposed to chronic low-dose radiation prior to fertilization [ru

  6. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S.; Liu, D.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvén frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n=5 to n=6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m=1. The transition occurs when the m=1, n=5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (q fi ) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes

  7. Spatio-temporal dynamics induced by competing instabilities in two asymmetrically coupled nonlinear evolution equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schüler, D.; Alonso, S.; Bär, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestrasse 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Torcini, A. [CNR-Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi - Via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN Sez. Firenze, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2014-12-15

    Pattern formation often occurs in spatially extended physical, biological, and chemical systems due to an instability of the homogeneous steady state. The type of the instability usually prescribes the resulting spatio-temporal patterns and their characteristic length scales. However, patterns resulting from the simultaneous occurrence of instabilities cannot be expected to be simple superposition of the patterns associated with the considered instabilities. To address this issue, we design two simple models composed by two asymmetrically coupled equations of non-conserved (Swift-Hohenberg equations) or conserved (Cahn-Hilliard equations) order parameters with different characteristic wave lengths. The patterns arising in these systems range from coexisting static patterns of different wavelengths to traveling waves. A linear stability analysis allows to derive a two parameter phase diagram for the studied models, in particular, revealing for the Swift-Hohenberg equations, a co-dimension two bifurcation point of Turing and wave instability and a region of coexistence of stationary and traveling patterns. The nonlinear dynamics of the coupled evolution equations is investigated by performing accurate numerical simulations. These reveal more complex patterns, ranging from traveling waves with embedded Turing patterns domains to spatio-temporal chaos, and a wide hysteretic region, where waves or Turing patterns coexist. For the coupled Cahn-Hilliard equations the presence of a weak coupling is sufficient to arrest the coarsening process and to lead to the emergence of purely periodic patterns. The final states are characterized by domains with a characteristic length, which diverges logarithmically with the coupling amplitude.

  8. Electron-temperature-gradient-induced instability in tokamak scrape-off layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Ryutov, D.D.; Tsidulko, Y.A.; Xu, X.Q.

    1992-08-01

    An electron temperature instability driven by the Kunkel-Guillory sheath impedance, has been applied to the scrape-off layer of tokamaks. The formalism has been generalized to more fully account for parallel wavelength dynamics, to differentiate between electromagnetic and electrostatic perturbations and to account for particle recycling effects. It is conjectured that this conducting wall instability leads to edge fluctuations in tokamaks that produce scrape-off widths of many ion Larmor radii ≅10. The predicted instability characteristics correlate somewhat with DIII-D edge fluctuation data, and the scrape-off layer width in the DIII-D experiment agrees with theoretical estimates that can be derived from mixing lenght theory

  9. Vibro-acoustical instabilities induced by combustion dynamics in gas turbine combustors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozarlik, Artur Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    The lean premixed combustion suffers from a high sensitivity to thermo-acoustic instabilities which may occur in acombustion chamber of a gas turbine. The high level of acoustic excitation is hazardous to the combustion chamber walls(liner). The situation is even worse when mutual interaction

  10. Asymptotic behavior of the mixed mass in Rayleigh–Taylor and Richtmyer–Meshkov instability induced flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ye; Cabot, William H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Thornber, Ben [The University of Sydney, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, New South Wales 2006, Sydney (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Rayleigh–Taylor instability (RTI) and Richtmyer–Meshkov instability (RMI) are serious practical issues in inertial confinement fusion research, and also have relevance to many cases of astrophysical fluid dynamics. So far, much of the attention has been paid to the late-time scaling of the mixed width, which is used as a surrogate to how well the fluids have been mixed. Yet, the actual amount of mixed mass could be viewed as a more direct indicator on the evolution of the mixing layers due to hydrodynamic instabilities. Despite its importance, there is no systematic study as yet on the scaling of the mixed mass for either the RTI or the RMI induced flow. In this article, the normalized mixed mass (Ψ) is introduced for measuring the efficiency of the mixed mass. Six large numerical simulation databases have been employed: the RTI cases with heavy-to-light fluid density ratios of 1.5, 3, and 9; the single shock RMI cases with density ratios of 3 and 20; and a reshock RMI case with density ratio of 3. Using simulated flow fields, the normalized mixed mass Ψ is shown to be more sensitive in discriminating the variation with Atwood number for the RTI flows. Moreover, Ψ is demonstrated to provide more consistent results for both the RTI and RMI flows when compared with the traditional mixedness parameters, Ξ and Θ.

  11. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) deficiency decreases reprogramming efficiency and leads to genomic instability in iPS cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Taisuke [Department of Cell Differentiation, The Sakaguchi Laboratory, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Nagamatsu, Go, E-mail: gonag@sc.itc.keio.ac.jp [Department of Cell Differentiation, The Sakaguchi Laboratory, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Kosaka, Takeo [Department of Urology, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Takubo, Keiyo [Department of Cell Differentiation, The Sakaguchi Laboratory, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hotta, Akitsu [Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Department of Reprogramming Science, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Ellis, James [Ontario Human iPS Cell Facility, Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Developmental and Stem Cell Biology, SickKids, Toronto, Canada MG1L7 (Canada); Suda, Toshio, E-mail: sudato@sc.itc.keio.ac.jp [Department of Cell Differentiation, The Sakaguchi Laboratory, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan)

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} iPS cells were induced with a fluorescence monitoring system. {yields} ATM-deficient tail-tip fibroblasts exhibited quite a low reprogramming efficiency. {yields} iPS cells obtained from ATM-deficient cells had pluripotent cell characteristics. {yields} ATM-deficient iPS cells had abnormal chromosomes, which were accumulated in culture. -- Abstract: During cell division, one of the major features of somatic cell reprogramming by defined factors, cells are potentially exposed to DNA damage. Inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene p53 raised reprogramming efficiency but resulted in an increased number of abnormal chromosomes in established iPS cells. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), which is critical in the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks, may also play an important role during reprogramming. To clarify the function of ATM in somatic cell reprogramming, we investigated reprogramming in ATM-deficient (ATM-KO) tail-tip fibroblasts (TTFs). Although reprogramming efficiency was greatly reduced in ATM-KO TTFs, ATM-KO iPS cells were successfully generated and showed the same proliferation activity as WT iPS cells. ATM-KO iPS cells had a gene expression profile similar to ES cells and WT iPS cells, and had the capacity to differentiate into all three germ layers. On the other hand, ATM-KO iPS cells accumulated abnormal genome structures upon continuous passages. Even with the abnormal karyotype, ATM-KO iPS cells retained pluripotent cell characteristics for at least 20 passages. These data indicate that ATM does participate in the reprogramming process, although its role is not essential.

  12. Stratified flow instability and slug formation leading to condensation-induced water hammer in a horizontal refrigerant pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel Martin, C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: An experimental apparatus was designed for the purpose of investigating the phenomenon of condensation-induced water hammer in an ammonia refrigeration system. Water hammer was initiated by introducing warm ammonia gas over static subcooled ammonia liquid placed in a horizontal 146.3 mm diameter carbon steel pipe 6.0 m in length. By means of fast response piezoelectric pressure transducers and a high speed data acquisition system rapid dynamic pressures were recorded whenever a shock event occurred. Moreover, by means of top-mounted diaphragm pressure transducers the speed of liquid slugs propagating along the pipe was determined. The occurrence of condensation induced water hammer depended upon three major variables; namely, (1) initial liquid depth, (2) liquid temperature, and (3) mass flow rate of warm gas. For given liquid depth and temperature, once the warm gas threshold conditions were exceeded shocks occurred with greater magnitude as the mass flow rate of gas input was increased. With adequate subcooling condensation-induced water hammer occurred for initial liquid depths ranging from 25% to 95% of internal pipe diameter. The threshold mass flow rate of warm gas necessary to initiate water hammer was greater as the initial liquid depth was lowered. Based upon experimental results obtained from four pressure transducers located on the top of the test pipe conditions corresponding to bridging were ascertained. For various initial liquid depths the onset of instability from stratified flow to bridging was correlated with the Taitel-Dukler instability criterion. (author)

  13. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darryl Blalock

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA. Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA.

  14. Pathogenesis of spinal cord involvement induced by lower cervical instability in rheumatoid spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Hironobu; Kuwabara, Shigeru; Fukuda, Kenji; Kuroki, Tatsuji; Tajima, Naoya (Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan))

    1994-07-01

    To examine prognostic factors in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), plain radiography findings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were compared with histopathological findings in 129 RA patients who had local or neurologic symptoms due to the cervical spine. All patients underwent plain radiography, and subdislocation more than 2 mm towards the anterior and posterior directions on plain radiographs was defined as instability. In predicting induction of instability of the inferior cervical spine and risk for spinal compression, erosion of the vertebral rim, as seen on plain X-rays, and irregular findings of the end-plate of the vertebral body and Gd-enhanced nodules around the intervertebral disk, as seen on MRI, seemed to be important. (N.K.).

  15. A Hierarchical FEM approach for Simulation of Geometrical and Material induced Instability of Composite Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders L.; Lund, Erik; Pinho, Silvestre T.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a hierarchical FE approach is utilized to simulate delamination in a composite plate loaded in uni-axial compression. Progressive delamination is modelled by use of cohesive interface elements that are automatically embedded. The non-linear problem is solved quasi-statically in whic...... the interaction between material degradation and structural instability is solved iteratively. The effect of fibre bridging is studied numerically and in-plane failure is predicted using physically based failure criteria....

  16. Bacterial Responses and Genome Instability Induced by Subinhibitory Concentrations of Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Gutierrez

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance have become an utmost medical and economical problem. It has also become evident that subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics, which pollute all kind of terrestrial and aquatic environments, have a non-negligible effect on the evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations. Subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics have a strong effect on mutation rates, horizontal gene transfer and biofilm formation, which may all contribute to the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance. Therefore, the molecular mechanisms and the evolutionary pressures shaping the bacterial responses to subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics merit to be extensively studied. Such knowledge is valuable for the development of strategies to increase the efficacy of antibiotic treatments and to extend the lifetime of antibiotics used in therapy by slowing down the emergence of antibiotic resistance.

  17. Continuous in vitro exposure to low dose genistein induces genomic instability in breast epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Young Mi; Yang, Shihe; Xu, Weihong; Li, Shibo; Yang, Xiaohe

    2008-01-01

    Genistein is a major soy isoflavone with multiple properties. The impact of soy/genistein on breast cancer is controversial. One of the issues is whether soy/genistein has a genotoxic effect at physiological concentrations. To address this question using an in vitro model, we first established MCF-10A/G0 and MCF-10A/G1 cell lines, which were MCF-10A cells exposed to 0.01% DMSO (as vehicle control), i.e. MCF-10A/G0, or 1 µM of genistein for three months, MCF-10A/G1, respectively. Chromosomal c...

  18. Genome instability in mismatch repair and its role on radiation-induced cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munakata, Nobuo; Morohoshi, Fumiko [National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan). Research Inst

    2000-02-01

    Studies on mismatch repair mechanism have been progressed using Caenorhabditis elegans, a nematode since its genetic analysis is comparatively easy. In this study, homologue gene for mismatch repairing of nematoda were investigated and 3 kinds of homologue genes of mut S; msh G, msh Z and msh F and two kinds of mut L homologue genes were identified. Based on these genes, each cDNA was isolated aiming to determine the sequence and clarify the phylogenetic relationship. Either of msh G, msh Z and msh F is present in the cDNA library, suggesting that these genes might be expressed in every stage of development. Northern analysis was made using the RNA fractions extracted from nematoda at various stages of development as a probe for cDNA of msh G and msh Z, and each corresponding bands were detected for the imago and the matured larva, but not so distinct for the larva and embryo, suggesting that both genes would be regulated in the transcription step at each development stage. Then, resistant larva in which Tcl transposon is activated was cultured and its DNA was extracted to use as a template DNA. Thus, Tcl transposon inserted strains for three of 8 repair related genes were obtained. The passages of these strains were kept comparatively stable. However, the sensitivities to ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light and alkyl agents of these inserted strains were not so different from the control. PCR reaction revealed that DNA fragments of which Tcl was excluded were produced in a certain stage of development. This suggest in vivo exclusion of Tcl in somatic cells. (M.N.)

  19. Field-induced magnetic instability and quantum criticality in the antiferromagnet CeCu2Ge2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Xie, Donghua; Wang, Xiaoying; Zhu, Kangwei; Yang, Ruilong

    2016-01-13

    The magnetic quantum criticality in strongly correlated electron systems has been considered to be closely related with the occurrence of unconventional superconductivity. Control parameters such as magnetic field, pressure or chemical doping are frequently used to externally tune the quantum phase transition for a deeper understanding. Here we report the research of a field-induced quantum phase transition using conventional bulk physical property measurements in the archetypal antiferromagnet CeCu2Ge2, which becomes superconductive under a pressure of about 10 GPa with Tc ~ 0.64 K. We offer strong evidence that short-range dynamic correlations start appearing above a magnetic field of about 5 T. Our demonstrations of the magnetic instability and the field-induced quantum phase transition are crucial for the quantum criticality, which may open a new route in experimental investigations of the quantum phase transition in heavy-fermion systems.

  20. Chromosomal instability in the progeny of irradiated parents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voro btsova, I.E.; Vorobyova, M.V.; Bogomazova, A.N.

    1997-01-01

    Genomic instability have been demonstrated in irradiated cells as the increased frequency of sporadic chromosome aberrations persisted over multiple generations of cell divisions. We found that chromosomal instability characterized as well the somatic cells of irradiated parents progeny. It means that radiation induced genomic instability can be transmitted via germ line cells. As a measure of instability the sensitivity of chromosomes to radiation was estimated. In animal experiments the irradiation of mature germ cells of male rats (dose - 4.5 Gy of X-rays) increase the frequency of chromosome aberrations induced by challenging irradiation in regenerating hepatocytes, in bone marrow cells and in fetal fibroblasts in the progeny of irradiated male rats. The chromosomal sensitivity of cultivated lymphocytes to in vitro irradiation (1.5 Gy of γ(rays 137 Cs) is increased in the children born parents undergone antitumor radiotherapy or worked as 'liquidators' of Chernobyl accident consequences before conception in comparison to the children of unexposed parents. The cytogenetic radiosensitivity of lymphocytes to irradiation in vitro is also increased in children evacuated from contaminated by radionuclides areas ('positive' control group). The increased spontaneous frequency of chromatid-type acentric was found in all group of children with irradiation history. The instability of genome of irradiated parents progeny seems could be the mechanism of these health effects. (authors)

  1. Cell geometry dictates TNFα-induced genome response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Aninda; Venkatachalapathy, Saradha; Ratna, Prasuna; Wang, Yejun; Jokhun, Doorgesh Sharma; Shivashankar, G V

    2017-05-16

    Cells in physiology integrate local soluble and mechanical signals to regulate genomic programs. Whereas the individual roles of these signals are well studied, the cellular responses to the combined chemical and physical signals are less explored. Here, we investigated the cross-talk between cellular geometry and TNFα signaling. We stabilized NIH 3T3 fibroblasts into rectangular anisotropic or circular isotropic geometries and stimulated them with TNFα and analyzed nuclear translocation of transcription regulators -NFκB (p65) and MKL and downstream gene-expression patterns. We found that TNFα induces geometry-dependent actin depolymerization, which enhances IκB degradation, p65 nuclear translocation, nuclear exit of MKL, and sequestration of p65 at the RNA-polymerase-II foci. Further, global transcription profile of cells under matrix-TNFα interplay reveals a geometry-dependent gene-expression pattern. At a functional level, we find cell geometry affects TNFα-induced cell proliferation. Our results provide compelling evidence that fibroblasts, depending on their geometries, elicit distinct cellular responses for the same cytokine.

  2. Self-induced dipole force and filamentation instability of a matter wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saffman, M.

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of copropagating electromagnetic and matter waves is described with a set of coupled higher-order nonlinear Schrodinger equations. Optical self-focusing modulates an initially planar wave leading to the generation of dipole forces on the atoms. Atomic channeling due to the dipole...... forces leads, in the nonlinear regime, to filamentation of the atomic beam. Instability growth rates are calculated for atomic beams with both low and high phase space densities. In one transverse dimension an exact solution is found that describes a coupled optical and atomic soliton....

  3. New macroscopic theory of anamalous diffusion induced by the dissipative trapped-ion instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wimmel, H.K.

    1975-03-01

    For an axisymmetric toroidal plasma of the TOKAMAK type a new set of dissipative trapped-fluid equations is established. In addition to E vector x B vector drifts and collisions of the trapped particles, these equations take full account of the effect of Esub(//) (of the trapped ion modes) on free and trapped particles, and of the effect of grad delta 0 (delta 0 = equilibrium fraction of trapped particles). From the new equations the linear-mode properties of the dissipative trapped-ion instability and the anomalous diffusion flux of the trapped particles are derived. (orig.) [de

  4. Parametric instability producing broad symmetrical structure in the spectrum of ionospheric heating-induced radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, S.P.

    1997-01-01

    A four-wave interaction process in which an O-mode electromagnetic pump decays parametrically into a lower hybrid decay mode and two-electron Bernstein sidebands is analyzed. It is shown that the instability can be excited in a spatial region near the electron Bernstein/upper hybrid double resonance and in a narrow pump frequency range slightly below the third harmonic electron cyclotron resonance. The two electron Bernstein sidebands have about the same intensity and thus, produce Broad Symmetrical Structure (BSS) in the emission spectrum after being converted into electromagnetic radiation by scattering off background field-aligned density irregularities. The results also show that the size of the instability zone becomes very small as the pump frequency operates near a cyclotron harmonic higher than the third. Thus, the converted emission will be too weak to be detected. This explains why the BSS feature in the spectrum of stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEEs) has only been observed in the third harmonic case. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  5. Genomic stability during cellular reprogramming: Mission impossible?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joest, Mathieu von; Búa Aguín, Sabela; Li, Han, E-mail: han.li@pasteur.fr

    2016-06-15

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from adult somatic cells is one of the most exciting discoveries in recent biomedical research. It holds tremendous potential in drug discovery and regenerative medicine. However, a series of reports highlighting genomic instability in iPSCs raises concerns about their clinical application. Although the mechanisms cause genomic instability during cellular reprogramming are largely unknown, several potential sources have been suggested. This review summarizes current knowledge on this active research field and discusses the latest efforts to alleviate the genomic insults during cellular reprogramming to generate iPSCs with enhanced quality and safety.

  6. Phyllanthus emblica Fruit Extract Activates Spindle Assembly Checkpoint, Prevents Mitotic Aberrations and Genomic Instability in Human Colon Epithelial NCM460 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xihan; Wang, Xu

    2016-09-03

    The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. (PE) has been widely consumed as a functional food and folk medicine in Southeast Asia due to its remarkable nutritional and pharmacological effects. Previous research showed PE delays mitotic progress and increases genomic instability (GIN) in human colorectal cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the similar effects of PE by the biomarkers related to spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), mitotic aberrations and GIN in human NCM460 normal colon epithelial cells. Cells were treated with PE and harvested differently according to the biomarkers observed. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) and nuclear bud (NB) in cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay were used as indicators of GIN. Mitotic aberrations were assessed by the biomarkers of chromosome misalignment, multipolar division, chromosome lagging and chromatin bridge. SAC activity was determined by anaphase-to- metaphase ratio (AMR) and the expression of core SAC gene budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles related 1 (BubR1). Compared with the control, PE-treated cells showed (1) decreased incidences of MN, NPB and NB (p genomic damages partially by enhancing the function of SAC.

  7. Phyllanthus emblica Fruit Extract Activates Spindle Assembly Checkpoint, Prevents Mitotic Aberrations and Genomic Instability in Human Colon Epithelial NCM460 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xihan Guo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. (PE has been widely consumed as a functional food and folk medicine in Southeast Asia due to its remarkable nutritional and pharmacological effects. Previous research showed PE delays mitotic progress and increases genomic instability (GIN in human colorectal cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the similar effects of PE by the biomarkers related to spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, mitotic aberrations and GIN in human NCM460 normal colon epithelial cells. Cells were treated with PE and harvested differently according to the biomarkers observed. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN, nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB and nuclear bud (NB in cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay were used as indicators of GIN. Mitotic aberrations were assessed by the biomarkers of chromosome misalignment, multipolar division, chromosome lagging and chromatin bridge. SAC activity was determined by anaphase-to- metaphase ratio (AMR and the expression of core SAC gene budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles related 1 (BubR1. Compared with the control, PE-treated cells showed (1 decreased incidences of MN, NPB and NB (p < 0.01; (2 decreased frequencies of all mitotic aberration biomarkers (p < 0.01; and (3 decreased AMR (p < 0.01 and increased BubR1 expression (p < 0.001. The results revealed PE has the potential to protect human normal colon epithelial cells from mitotic and genomic damages partially by enhancing the function of SAC.

  8. Buneman instability and Pierce instability in a collisionless bounded plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizuka, Satoru; Saeki, Koichi; Sato, Noriyoshi; Hatta, Yoshisuke

    1983-01-01

    A systematic experiment is performed on the Buneman instability and the Pierce instability in a bounded plasma consisting of beam electrons and stationary ions. Current fluctuations are confirmed to be induced by the Buneman instability. On the other hand, the Pierce instability gives rise to a current limitation. The phenomena are well explained by Mikhailovskii's theory taking account of ion motion in a bounded plasma. (author)

  9. Vector condensate and AdS soliton instability induced by a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Li, Li; Li, Li-Fang; Wu, You

    2014-01-01

    We continue to study the holographic p-wave superconductor model in the Einstein-Maxwell-complex vector field theory with a non-minimal coupling between the complex vector field and the Maxwell field. In this paper we work in the AdS soliton background which describes a conformal field theory in the confined phase and focus on the probe approximation. We find that an applied magnetic field can lead to the condensate of the vector field and the AdS soliton instability. As a result, a vortex lattice structure forms in the spatial directions perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. As a comparison, we also discuss the vector condensate in the Einstein-SU(2) Yang-Mills theory and find that in the setup of the present paper, the Einstein-Maxwell-complex vector field model is a generalization of the SU(2) model in the sense that the vector field has a general mass and gyromagnetic ratio

  10. Sparsely Ionizing Diagnostic and Natural Background Radiations are Likely Preventing Cancer and Other Genomic-Instability-Associated Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Bobby R.; Di Palma, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Routine diagnostic X-rays (e.g., chest X-rays, mammograms, computed tomography scans) and routine diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures using sparsely ionizing radiation forms (e.g., beta and gamma radiations) stimulate the removal of precancerous neo-plastically transformed and other genomically unstable cells from the body (medical radiation hormesis). The indicated radiation hormesis arises because radiation doses above an individual-specific stochastic threshold activate a system of coop...

  11. Mustard gas surrogate, 2-chloroethyl ethylsulfide (2-CEES), induces centrosome amplification and aneuploidy in human and mouse cells : 2-CEES induces centrosome amplification and chromosome instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Richard A; Behrens, Elizabeth; Zinn, Ashtyn; Duncheon, Christian; Lamkin, Thomas J

    2014-08-01

    Mustard gas is a simple molecule with a deadly past. First used as a chemical weapon in World War I, its simple formulation has raised concerns over its use by terrorist organizations and unstable governments. Mustard gas is a powerful vesicant and alkylating agent that causes painful blisters on epithelial surfaces and increases the incidence of cancer in those exposed. The mechanism of mustard gas toxicity and tumorigenesis is not well understood but is thought to be mediated by its ability to induce oxidative stress and DNA damage. Interestingly, several proteins that have been shown to either be targets of mustard gas or mediate mustard gas toxicity have also been shown to regulate centrosome duplication. Centrosomes are small nonmembrane-bound organelles that direct the segregation of chromosomes during mitosis through the formation of the bipolar mitotic spindle. Cells with more or less than two centrosomes during mitosis can segregate their chromosomes unequally, resulting in chromosome instability, a common phenotype of cancer cells. In our studies, we show that subtoxic levels of 2-chloroethyl ethylsulfide (2-CEES), a mustard gas analog, induce centrosome amplification and chromosome instability in cells, which may hasten the mutation rate necessary for tumorigenesis. These data may explain why those exposed to mustard gas exhibit higher incidences of cancer than unexposed individuals of the same cohort.

  12. The genome structure of Arachis hypogaea (Linnaeus, 1753 and an induced Arachis allotetraploid revealed by molecular cytogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza F. de M. B. do Nascimento

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Peanut, Arachis hypogaea (Linnaeus, 1753 is an allotetraploid cultivated plant with two subgenomes derived from the hybridization between two diploid wild species, A. duranensis (Krapovickas & W. C. Gregory, 1994 and A. ipaensis (Krapovickas & W. C. Gregory, 1994, followed by spontaneous chromosomal duplication. To understand genome changes following polyploidy, the chromosomes of A. hypogaea, IpaDur1, an induced allotetraploid (A. ipaensis × A. duranensis4x and the diploid progenitor species were cytogenetically compared. The karyotypes of the allotetraploids share the number and general morphology of chromosomes; DAPI+ bands pattern and number of 5S rDNA loci. However, one 5S rDNA locus presents a heteromorphic FISH signal in both allotetraploids, relative to corresponding progenitor. Whilst for A. hypogaea the number of 45S rDNA loci was equivalent to the sum of those present in the diploid species, in IpaDur1, two loci have not been detected. Overall distribution of repetitive DNA sequences was similar in both allotetraploids, although A. hypogaea had additional CMA3+ bands and few slight differences in the LTR-retrotransposons distribution compared to IpaDur1. GISH showed that the chromosomes of both allotetraploids had preferential hybridization to their corresponding diploid genomes. Nevertheless, at least one pair of IpaDur1 chromosomes had a clear mosaic hybridization pattern indicating recombination between the subgenomes, clear evidence that the genome of IpaDur1 shows some instability comparing to the genome of A. hypogaea that shows no mosaic of subgenomes, although both allotetraploids derive from the same progenitor species. For some reasons, the chromosome structure of A. hypogaea is inherently more stable, or, it has been at least, partially stabilized through genetic changes and selection.

  13. Correlation of MLH1 and MGMT expression and promoter methylation with genomic instability in patients with thyroid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Juliana Carvalho

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene silencing of the repair genes MLH1 and MGMT was shown to be a mechanism underlying the development of microsatellite instability (MSI, a phenotype frequently associated with various human malignancies. Recently, aberrant methylation of MLH1, MGMT and MSI were shown to be associated with mutations in genes such as BRAF, RAS and IDH1 in colon and brain tumours. Little is known about the methylation status of MLH1 and MGMT in thyroid tumours and its association with MSI and mutational status. Methods In a series of 96 thyroid tumours whose mutational profiles of BRAF, IDH1 and NRAS mutations and RET/PTC were previously determined, we investigated MLH1 and MGMT expression and methylation status by qPCR and methylation-specific PCR after bisulphite treatment, respectively. MSI was determined by PCR using seven standard microsatellite markers. Results Samples with point mutations (BRAF, IDH1 and NRAS show a decrease in MLH1 expression when compared to negative samples. Additionally, malignant lesions show a higher MSI pattern than benign lesions. The MSI phenotype was also associated with down-regulation of MLH1. Conclusions The results of this study allow us to conclude that low expression of MLH1 is associated with BRAF V600E mutations, RET/PTC rearrangements and transitions (IDH1 and NRAS in patients with thyroid carcinoma. In addition, a significant relationship between MSI status and histological subtypes was found.

  14. Superregular breathers, characteristics of nonlinear stage of modulation instability induced by higher-order effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Hui; Liu, Chong

    2017-01-01

    We study the higher-order generalized nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation describing the propagation of ultrashort optical pulse in optical fibres. By using Darboux transformation, we derive the superregular breather solution that develops from a small localized perturbation. This type of solution can be used to characterize the nonlinear stage of the modulation instability (MI) of the condensate. In particular, we show some novel characteristics of the nonlinear stage of MI arising from higher-order effects: (i) coexistence of a quasi-Akhmediev breather and a multipeak soliton; (ii) two multipeak solitons propagation in opposite directions; (iii) a beating pattern followed by two multipeak solitons in the same direction. It is found that these patterns generated from a small localized perturbation do not have the analogues in the standard NLS equation. Our results enrich Zakharov’s theory of superregular breathers and could provide helpful insight on the nonlinear stage of MI in presence of the higher-order effects. PMID:28413335

  15. Assessment of whole genome amplification-induced bias through high-throughput, massively parallel whole genome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plant Ramona N

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole genome amplification is an increasingly common technique through which minute amounts of DNA can be multiplied to generate quantities suitable for genetic testing and analysis. Questions of amplification-induced error and template bias generated by these methods have previously been addressed through either small scale (SNPs or large scale (CGH array, FISH methodologies. Here we utilized whole genome sequencing to assess amplification-induced bias in both coding and non-coding regions of two bacterial genomes. Halobacterium species NRC-1 DNA and Campylobacter jejuni were amplified by several common, commercially available protocols: multiple displacement amplification, primer extension pre-amplification and degenerate oligonucleotide primed PCR. The amplification-induced bias of each method was assessed by sequencing both genomes in their entirety using the 454 Sequencing System technology and comparing the results with those obtained from unamplified controls. Results All amplification methodologies induced statistically significant bias relative to the unamplified control. For the Halobacterium species NRC-1 genome, assessed at 100 base resolution, the D-statistics from GenomiPhi-amplified material were 119 times greater than those from unamplified material, 164.0 times greater for Repli-G, 165.0 times greater for PEP-PCR and 252.0 times greater than the unamplified controls for DOP-PCR. For Campylobacter jejuni, also analyzed at 100 base resolution, the D-statistics from GenomiPhi-amplified material were 15 times greater than those from unamplified material, 19.8 times greater for Repli-G, 61.8 times greater for PEP-PCR and 220.5 times greater than the unamplified controls for DOP-PCR. Conclusion Of the amplification methodologies examined in this paper, the multiple displacement amplification products generated the least bias, and produced significantly higher yields of amplified DNA.

  16. Numerical Analysis of Block Caving-Induced Instability in Large Open Pit Slopes: A Finite Element/Discrete Element Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyazmensky, Alexander; Stead, D.; Elmo, D.; Moss, A.

    2010-02-01

    This paper addresses one of the most challenging problems in mining rock engineering—the interaction between block cave mining and a large overlying open pit. The finite element modeling/discrete element modeling (FEM/DEM) approach was utilized in the analysis of block caving-induced step-path failure development in a large open pit slope. The analysis indicated that there is a threshold percentage of critical intact rock bridges along a step-path failure plane that may ensure the stability of an open pit throughout caving operations. Transition from open pit to underground mining at Palabora mine presents an important example of a pit wall instability triggered by caving. Using combined FEM/DEM-DFN (discrete fracture network) modeling, it was possible to investigate the formation of a basal failure surface within an open pit slope as a direct result of cave mining. The modeling of Palabora highlighted the importance of rock mass tensile strength and its influence on caving-induced slope response.

  17. Zinc chromate induces chromosome instability and DNA double strand breaks in human lung cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Hong; Holmes, Amie L.; Young, Jamie L.; Qin Qin; Joyce, Kellie; Pelsue, Stephen C.; Peng Cheng; Wise, Sandra S.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Wallace, William T.; Hammond, Dianne; Wise, John Pierce

    2009-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is a respiratory toxicant and carcinogen, with solubility playing an important role in its carcinogenic potential. Zinc chromate, a water insoluble or 'particulate' Cr(VI) compound, has been shown to be carcinogenic in epidemiology studies and to induce tumors in experimental animals, but its genotoxicity is poorly understood. Our study shows that zinc chromate induced concentration-dependent increases in cytotoxicity, chromosome damage and DNA double strand breaks in human lung cells. In response to zinc chromate-induced breaks, MRE11 expression was increased and ATM and ATR were phosphorylated, indicating that the DNA double strand break repair system was initiated in the cells. In addition, our data show that zinc chromate-induced double strand breaks were only observed in the G2/M phase population, with no significant amount of double strand breaks observed in G1 and S phase cells. These data will aid in understanding the mechanisms of zinc chromate toxicity and carcinogenesis

  18. Depletion-induced instability in protein-DNA mixtures: Influence of protein charge and size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de R.J.

    2006-01-01

    While there is abundant experimental and theoretical work on polymer-induced DNA condensation, it is still unclear whether globular proteins can condense linear DNA or not. We develop a simple analytical approximation for the depletion attraction between rodlike segments of semiflexible

  19. Genetic instability in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raptis, Stavroula; Bapat, Bharati

    2006-01-01

    Genetic, or genomic, instability refers to a series of observed spontaneous genetic changes occurring at an accelerated rate in cell populations derived from the same ancestral precursor. This is far from a new finding, but is one that has increasingly gained more attention in the last decade due to its plausible role(s) in tumorigenesis. The majority of genetic alterations contributing to the malignant transformation are seen in growth regulatory genes, and in genes involved in cell cycle progression and arrest. Genomic instability may present itself through alterations in the length of short repeat stretches of coding and non-coding DNA, resulting in microsatellite instability. Tumors with such profiles are referred to as exhibiting a mutator phenotype, which is largely a consequence of inactivating mutations in DNA damage repair genes. Genomic instability may also, and most commonly, results from gross chromosomal changes, such as translocations or amplifications, which lead to chromosomal instability. Telomere length and telomerase activity, important in maintaining chromosomal structure and in regulating a normal cell's lifespan, have been shown to have a function in both suppressing and facilitating malignant transformation. In addition to such direct sequence and structural changes, gene silencing through the hypermethylation of promoter regions, or increased gene expression through the hypomethylation of such regions, together, form an alternative, epigenetic mechanism leading to instability. Emerging evidence also suggests that dietary and environmental agents can further modulate the contribution of genetic instability to tumorigenesis. Currently, there is still much debate over the distinct classes of genomic instability and their specific roles in the initiation of tumor formation, as well as in the progressive transition to a cancerous state. This review examines the various molecular mechanisms that result in this genomic instability and the potential

  20. Structural instability of shell-like assemblies of a keplerate-type polyoxometalate induced by ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veen, Sandra J; Kegel, Willem K

    2009-11-19

    We demonstrate a new structural instability of shell-like assemblies of polyoxometalates. Besides the colloidal instability, that is, the formation of aggregates that consist of many single layered POM-shells, these systems also display an instability on a structural scale within the shell-like assemblies. This instability occurs at significantly lower ionic strength than the colloidal stability limit and only becomes evident after a relatively long time. For the polyoxometalate, abbreviated as {Mo(72)Fe(30)}, it is shown that the structural stability limit of POM-shells lies between a NaCl concentration of 1.00 and 5.00 mM in aqueous solution.

  1. Beam instability induced by rf deflectors in the combiner ring of the CLIC test facility and mitigation by damped deflecting structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Alesini

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the CTF3 (CLIC test facility 3 run of November 2007, a vertical beam instability has been found in the combiner ring during operation. After a careful analysis, the source of the instability has been identified in the vertical deflecting modes trapped in the rf deflectors and excited by the beam passage. A dedicated tracking code that includes the induced transverse wakefield and the multibunch multipassage effects has been written and the results of the beam dynamics analysis are presented in the paper. The mechanism of the instability was similar to the beam breakup in a linear accelerator or in an energy recovery linac. The results of the code allowed identifying the main key parameters driving such instability and allowed finding the main knobs to mitigate it. To completely suppress such beam instability, two new rf deflectors have been designed, constructed, and installed in the ring. In the new structures the frequency separation between the vertical and horizontal deflecting modes has been increased, changing the position of the rods inside the cells, and special antennas have been inserted to absorb the power released by the beam to the modes. The deflectors have been made in aluminum to reduce the costs and delivery time and have been successfully tested and installed in the ring. The design, the realization procedures, and the rf test results are illustrated.

  2. Radiation-induced instability of MnS precipitates and its possible consequences on IASCC of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) continues to be a significant materials issue for the light water reactor industry and may also pose a problem for fusion power devices that employ water cooling. Although a number of potential mechanisms have been proposed to participate in this phenomenon, at this time it is not clear that any of these candidate mechanisms are sufficient to rationalize the observed failures. A new mechanism is proposed in this paper that involves the radiation-induced release into solution of elements not usually thought to participate in IASCC. It is shown in this paper that MnS precipitates, which contain most of the sulphur in stainless steels, are probably unstable under irradiation. First, the Mn transmutes very strongly to Fe in highly thermalized neutron spectra. Second, the combination of cascade-induced disordering and the inverse-Kirkendall effect operating at the incoherent interfaces of MnS precipitates will probably act as a pump to export Mn from the precipitate surface into the alloy matrix. Both of these processes will most likely allow some of the sulphur to re-enter the alloy matrix. Sulphur is known to exert a deleterious influence on grain boundary cracking. MnS precipitates are also thought to be a reservoir of other deleterious impurities such as fluorine which could be also released due to radiation-induced instability of the precipitates. This possibility has been confirmed by Auger electron spectroscopy of Types 304, 316, and 348 stainless steel specimens sectioned from several BWR components irradiated up to 3.5x10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV).

  3. Advancing induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology by assessing genetic instability and immune response

    OpenAIRE

    Requena Osete, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    [eng] Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) can be made from adult somatic cells by reprogramming them with Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc. IPSC have given rise to a new technology to study and treat human disease (Takahashi et al., 2007). However, before iPSC clinical application, we need to step back and address two main challenges: (i) Genetic stability of iPSC. (ii) Immune response of iPSC-derived cells. To address these key issues, the overall mission of this PhD thesis is to adva...

  4. Hopf Bifurcation and Delay-Induced Turing Instability in a Diffusive lac Operon Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xin; Song, Yongli; Zhang, Tonghua

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of a lac operon model with delayed feedback and diffusion effect. If the system is without delay or the delay is small, the positive equilibrium is stable so that there are no spatial patterns formed; while the time delay is large enough the equilibrium becomes unstable so that rich spatiotemporal dynamics may occur. We have found that time delay can not only incur temporal oscillations but also induce imbalance in space. With different initial values, the system may have different spatial patterns, for instance, spirals with one head, four heads, nine heads, and even microspirals.

  5. The pursuit of the genome instability by comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) in patients with cancer of the cavum in western Algerian; La recherche de l'instabilite genomique par le test des cometes (single cell gel electrophoresis) chez les malades atteints d'un cancer du cavum dans l'Ouest algerien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukerche, A.; Dali-Youcef, A.F. [Service de Radiotherapie, Oran (Algeria); Bouali-Youcef, Y. [Laboratoire d' Immunologie, Oran (Algeria); Mehadji, M. [Service d' ORL, Oran (Algeria); Chenal, C. [Rennes-1 Univ., UMR CNRS 6853, 35 (France)

    2007-11-15

    The analysis of results has shown a constitutional genome instability among the patients with a cavum cancer with a defect in DNA repair where some exogenous factors ( Epstein-Barr virus, EBV) seem play an important part. (N.C.)

  6. Architecture of Burkholderia cepacia complex σ70 gene family: evidence of alternative primary and clade-specific factors, and genomic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menard Aymeric

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc groups bacterial species with beneficial properties that can improve crop yields or remediate polluted sites but can also lead to dramatic human clinical outcomes among cystic fibrosis (CF or immuno-compromised individuals. Genome-wide regulatory processes of gene expression could explain parts of this bacterial duality. Transcriptional σ70 factors are components of these processes. They allow the reversible binding of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase to form the holoenzyme that will lead to mRNA synthesis from a DNA promoter region. Bcc genome-wide analyses were performed to investigate the major evolutionary trends taking place in the σ70 family of these bacteria. Results Twenty σ70 paralogous genes were detected in the Burkholderia cenocepacia strain J2315 (Bcen-J2315 genome, of which 14 were of the ECF (extracytoplasmic function group. Non-ECF paralogs were related to primary (rpoD, alternative primary, stationary phase (rpoS, flagellin biosynthesis (fliA, and heat shock (rpoH factors. The number of σ70 genetic determinants among this genome was of 2,86 per Mb. This number is lower than the one of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a species found in similar habitats including CF lungs. These two bacterial groups showed strikingly different σ70 family architectures, with only three ECF paralogs in common (fecI-like, pvdS and algU. Bcen-J2315 σ70 paralogs showed clade-specific distributions. Some paralogs appeared limited to the ET12 epidemic clone (ecfA2, particular Bcc species (sigI, the Burkholderia genus (ecfJ, ecfF, and sigJ, certain proteobacterial groups (ecfA1, ecfC, ecfD, ecfE, ecfG, ecfL, ecfM and rpoS, or were broadly distributed in the eubacteria (ecfI, ecfK, ecfH, ecfB, and rpoD-, rpoH-, fliA-like genes. Genomic instability of this gene family was driven by chromosomal inversion (ecfA2, recent duplication events (ecfA and RpoD, localized (ecfG and large scale deletions (sig

  7. Clonal evolution and progression of 20-methylcholanthrene-induced squamous cell carcinoma of mouse epidermis as revealed by DNA instability and other malignancy markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Hirai

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined the clonal evolution of skin malignant lesions by repeated topical applications of 20- methylcholanthrene (20-MC to the skin, which induces hyperplastic epidermis, papillomatous lesion and invasive carcinoma in mice. The lesions were examined histologically and immunohistochemically with anti-single-stranded DNA after acid hydrolysis (DNA-instability test, p53, VEGF, DFF45, PCNA and AgNORs parameters analyses. Multiple clones with increased DNA instability comparable to that of invasive carcinoma were noted in early-stage (2-6 weeks hyperplastic epidermis, and their number increased in middle (7-11 weeks, and late-stages (12-25 weeks of hyperplastic epidermis, indicating that they belong to the malignancy category. All papillomatous lesions and invasive carcinomas showed a positive DNA-instability test. Positive immunostaining for various biomarkers and AgNORs parameters appeared in clones with a positive DNA-instability test in earlyor middle-stage hyperplastic epidermis, and markedly increased in late-stage hyperplastic epidermis, papillomatous lesions and invasive carcinomas. The percentage of PCNA-positive vascular endothelial cells was significantly higher in VEGFpositive lesions with a positive DNA-instability test and became higher toward the late-stage of progression. Cut-woundings were made to papillomatous and invasive carcinoma lesions, and the regeneration activity of vascular endothelial cells was determined by using flash labeling with tritiated thymidine (3H-TdR. In small papillomatous lesions, vascular endothelial cells showed regenerative response, but the response was weak in large lesions. No such response was noted in invasive carcinomas; rather, cut-wounding induced collapse of blood vessels, which in turn induced massive coagulative necrosis of cancer cells. These responses can be interpreted to reflect exhausted vascular growth activity due to excessive stimulation by VEGF-overexpression, which was persistently

  8. Low Dose Studies with Focused X-rays in Cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry D. Michael; Kathryn Held; Kevin Prise

    2002-12-19

    The management of the risks of exposure of people to ionizing radiation is important in relation to its uses in industry and medicine, also to natural and man-made radiation in the environment. The vase majority of exposures are at a very low level of radiation dose. The risks are of inducing cancer in the exposed individuals and a smaller risk of inducing genetic damage that can be transmitted to children conceived after exposure. Studies of these risks in exposed population studies with any accuracy above the normal levels of cancer and genetic defects unless the dose levels are high. In practice, this means that our knowledge depends very largely on the information gained from the follow-up of the survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Japanese cities. The risks calculated from these high-dose short-duration exposures then have to be projected down to the low-dose long-term exposures that apply generally. Recent research using cells in culture has revealed that the relations hi between high- and low-dose biological damage may be much more complex than had previously been thought. The aims of this and other projects in the DOE's Low-Dose Program are to gain an understanding of the biological actions of low-dose radiation, ultimately to provide information that will lead to more accurate quantification of low-dose risk. Our project is based on the concept that the processes by which radiation induces cancer start where the individual tracks of radiation impact on cells and tissues. At the dose levels of most low-dose exposures, these events are rare and any individual cells only ''sees'' radiation tracks at intervals averaging from weeks to years apart. This contracts with the atomic bomb exposures where, on average, each cell was hit by hundreds of tracks instantaneously. We have therefore developed microbeam techniques that enable us to target cells in culture with any number of tracks, from one upwards. This approach enables us to

  9. Molecular motor-induced instabilities and cross linkers determine biopolymer organization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.; Ziebert, F.; Humphrey, D.; Duggan, C.; Steinbeck, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Kas, J.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Leipzig; Univ. of Texas at Austin; Univ. Bayreuth

    2007-01-01

    All eukaryotic cells rely on the active self-organization of protein filaments to form a responsive intracellular cytoskeleton. The necessity of motility and reaction to stimuli additionally requires pathways that quickly and reversibly change cytoskeletal organization. While thermally driven order-disorder transitions are, from the viewpoint of physics, the most obvious method for controlling states of organization, the timescales necessary for effective cellular dynamics would require temperatures exceeding the physiologically viable temperature range. We report a mechanism whereby the molecular motor myosin II can cause near-instantaneous order-disorder transitions in reconstituted cytoskeletal actin solutions. When motor-induced filament sliding diminishes, the actin network structure rapidly and reversibly self-organizes into various assemblies. Addition of stable cross linkers was found to alter the architectures of ordered assemblies. These isothermal transitions between dynamic disorder and self-assembled ordered states illustrate that the interplay between passive crosslinking and molecular motor activity plays a substantial role in dynamic cellular organization.

  10. Snow instability evaluation: calculating the skier-induced stress in a multi-layered snowpack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Fabiano; Gaume, Johan; van Herwijnen, Alec; Schweizer, Jürg

    2016-03-01

    The process of dry-snow slab avalanche formation can be divided into two phases: failure initiation and crack propagation. Several approaches tried to quantify slab avalanche release probability in terms of failure initiation based on shear stress and strength. Though it is known that both the properties of the weak layer and the slab play a major role in avalanche release, most previous approaches only considered slab properties in terms of slab depth, average density and skier penetration. For example, for the skier stability index, the additional stress (e.g. due to a skier) at the depth of the weak layer is calculated by assuming that the snow cover can be considered a semi-infinite, elastic, half-space. We suggest a new approach based on a simplification of the multi-layered elasticity theory in order to easily compute the additional stress due to a skier at the depth of the weak layer, taking into account the layering of the snow slab and the substratum. We first tested the proposed approach on simplified snow profiles, then on manually observed snow profiles including a stability test and, finally, on simulated snow profiles. Our simple approach reproduced the additional stress obtained by finite element simulations for the simplified profiles well - except that the sequence of layering in the slab cannot be replicated. Once implemented into the classical skier stability index and applied to manually observed snow profiles classified into different stability classes, the classification accuracy improved with the new approach. Finally, we implemented the refined skier stability index into the 1-D snow cover model SNOWPACK. The two study cases presented in this paper showed promising results even though further verification is still needed. In the future, we intend to implement the proposed approach for describing skier-induced stress within a multi-layered snowpack into more complex models which take into account not only failure initiation but also crack

  11. Induction of chromosomal instability in human lymphoblasts by low doses of γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, C.F.; Grosovsky, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Genomic instability is a hallmark of tumorigenic progression, and a similar phenotype is also observed in a high fraction (10 - 50%) of cells that survive exposure to ionizing radiation. In both cases unstable clones are characterized by non-clonal chromosomal rearrangements, which are indicative of a high rate of genetic change during the outgrowth of an unstable parental cell. We postulate that the remarkably high frequency of radiation-induced genomic instability is incompatible with a mutational mechanism for a specific gene, or even a large family of genes. Rather, we hypothesize that a major portion of instability is attributable to the formation of chromosomal rearrangement junction sequences that act as de novo chromosomal breakage hotspots. We further suggest that critical target sequences, which represent at least 10% of the genome and include repetitive DNA sequences such as those found in centromeric heterochromatin, can be involved in breakage and rearrangement hotspots that drive persistent genomic instability and karyotypic heterogeneity. Since chromosomal damage is induced even by low dose radiation exposure, we hypothesize that this phenotype can be efficiently induced at doses that are relevant to environmental, occupational, or medical exposure. In the present study, TK6 human B-lymphoblastoid cells were irradiated with 0, 10, 20 and 200cGy, in order to provide a set of data points for single, low dose exposures. Independent clones were analyzed karyotypically approximately 40 generations after radiation exposure. Preliminary results suggest that the fraction of clones exhibiting genomic instability after 20 cGy (0.16) is similar to and statistically indistinguishable from the fraction of unstable clones following 200 cGy (0.2) exposure. These findings support the hypothesis that instability following radiation, and perhaps also in cancer, primarily reflects non-mutational mechanisms

  12. Repeat-Induced Point Mutation and Other Genome Defense Mechanisms in Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladyshev, Eugene

    2017-07-01

    Transposable elements have colonized the genomes of nearly all organisms, including fungi. Although transposable elements may sometimes provide beneficial functions to their hosts their overall impact is considered deleterious. As a result, the activity of transposable elements needs to be counterbalanced by the host genome defenses. In fungi, the primary genome defense mechanisms include repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) and methylation induced premeiotically, meiotic silencing by unpaired DNA, sex-induced silencing, cosuppression (also known as somatic quelling), and cotranscriptional RNA surveillance. Recent studies of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa have shown that the process of repeat recognition for RIP apparently involves interactions between coaligned double-stranded segments of chromosomal DNA. These studies have also shown that RIP can be mediated by the conserved pathway that establishes transcriptional (heterochromatic) silencing of repetitive DNA. In light of these new findings, RIP emerges as a specialized case of the general phenomenon of heterochromatic silencing of repetitive DNA.

  13. Fenton reaction induced cancer in wild type rats recapitulates genomic alterations observed in human cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Akatsuka

    Full Text Available Iron overload has been associated with carcinogenesis in humans. Intraperitoneal administration of ferric nitrilotriacetate initiates a Fenton reaction in renal proximal tubules of rodents that ultimately leads to a high incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC after repeated treatments. We performed high-resolution microarray comparative genomic hybridization to identify characteristics in the genomic profiles of this oxidative stress-induced rat RCCs. The results revealed extensive large-scale genomic alterations with a preference for deletions. Deletions and amplifications were numerous and sometimes fragmented, demonstrating that a Fenton reaction is a cause of such genomic alterations in vivo. Frequency plotting indicated that two of the most commonly altered loci corresponded to a Cdkn2a/2b deletion and a Met amplification. Tumor sizes were proportionally associated with Met expression and/or amplification, and clustering analysis confirmed our results. Furthermore, we developed a procedure to compare whole genomic patterns of the copy number alterations among different species based on chromosomal syntenic relationship. Patterns of the rat RCCs showed the strongest similarity to the human RCCs among five types of human cancers, followed by human malignant mesothelioma, an iron overload-associated cancer. Therefore, an iron-dependent Fenton chemical reaction causes large-scale genomic alterations during carcinogenesis, which may result in distinct genomic profiles. Based on the characteristics of extensive genome alterations in human cancer, our results suggest that this chemical reaction may play a major role during human carcinogenesis.

  14. Release of Dengue Virus Genome Induced by a Peptide Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrobowski, Yancey M.; Hoffmann, Andrew R.; Rowe, Dawne K.; Kukkaro, Petra; Holdaway, Heather; Chipman, Paul; Fontaine, Krystal A.; Holbrook, Michael R.; Garry, Robert F.; Kostyuchenko, Victor; Wimley, William C.; Isern, Sharon; Rossmann, Michael G.; Michael, Scott F.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus infects approximately 100 million people annually, but there is no available therapeutic treatment. The mimetic peptide, DN59, consists of residues corresponding to the membrane interacting, amphipathic stem region of the dengue virus envelope (E) glycoprotein. This peptide is inhibitory to all four serotypes of dengue virus, as well as other flaviviruses. Cryo-electron microscopy image reconstruction of dengue virus particles incubated with DN59 showed that the virus particles were largely empty, concurrent with the formation of holes at the five-fold vertices. The release of RNA from the viral particle following incubation with DN59 was confirmed by increased sensitivity of the RNA genome to exogenous RNase and separation of the genome from the E protein in a tartrate density gradient. DN59 interacted strongly with synthetic lipid vesicles and caused membrane disruptions, but was found to be non-toxic to mammalian and insect cells. Thus DN59 inhibits flavivirus infectivity by interacting directly with virus particles resulting in release of the genomic RNA. PMID:23226444

  15. Comparison of the coherent radiation-induced microbunching instability in a free-electron laser and a magnetic chicane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Reiche

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available A self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser (SASE FEL is a device which is based on the creation of a very intense, relativistic electron beam which has very little temperature in all three phase planes. The beam in this system is described as having “high brightness,” and when it is bent repetitively in a magnetic undulator, undergoes a radiation-mediated microbunching instability. This instability can amplify the original radiation amplitude at a particular, resonant wavelength by many orders of magnitude. In order to obtain high brightness beams, it is necessary to compress them to obtain higher currents than available from the electron source. Compression is accomplished by the use of magnetic chicanes, which are quite similar to, if much longer than, a single period of the undulator. It should not be surprising that such chicanes also support a radiation-mediated microbunching interaction, which has recently been investigated, and has been termed coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR instability. The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast the characteristics of the closely related FEL and CSR microbunching instabilities. We show that a high-gain regime of the CSR instability exists which is formally similar to the FEL instability.

  16. Microsatellite instability in hematological malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Maletzki, Claudia; Stier, Saskia; Linnebacher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The genome of colorectal carcinomas displaying pronounced microsatellite instability codes for an extraordinarily high number of mutated proteins that elicit tumor-specific cellular immune responses. We have recently demonstrated that leukemic cells are also vulnerable to T cells specific for tumor-associated antigens produced in the context of microsatellite instability. This finding extends our understanding of secondary and therapy-related leukemogenesis, linking it to the mutual interacti...

  17. Cinerama sickness and postural instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Ledegang, W.D.; Lubeck, A.J.A.; Stins, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Motion sickness symptoms and increased postural instability induced by motion pictures have been reported in a laboratory, but not in a real cinema. We, therefore, carried out an observational study recording sickness severity and postural instability in 19 subjects before, immediately and 45 min

  18. Genomic Instability and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    chromatin. J Cell Biol 181, 227-240. Sung, P., Krejci, L., Van Komen, S., and Sehorn, M.G. (2003). Rad51 recombinase and recombination mediators. J Biol...8. Nijman, S. M., Luna-Vargas, M. P., Velds , A., Brummelkamp, T. R., Dirac, BRCC36 Is Regulated by Two Scaffold Proteins OCTOBER 1, 2010 • VOLUME 285...and Research (Y.W.). E.S. is the incumbent of the Soretta and Henry Shapiro career development chair. Y.S. is co-founder and on the scientific

  19. Genomic Instability and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    indicated. (B) Schematic diagrams of wild-type and mutant FIGN1 used in this study. (C) GST pull down experiments confirmed a direct interaction...States, Korea, Hong Kong, India and China. Many of them are continuing breast cancer research, with topics ranging from DNA damage response, mitotic...N-terminal-tagged fusion protein. SFB (triple-epitope of S-protein, FLAG, and streptavi- din binding peptide), Myc, MBP, and GST -tagged proteins were

  20. Genomic Instability and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    EDVP complex and katanin p60. (b) Bacterially expressed recombinant MBP-tagged EDD, DDB1 or VPRBP bound to amylase -Sepharose beads was incubated with...or MBP–VPRBP bound to amylase -Sepharose beads were incubated with bacterially purified GST–katanin for 1 h at 4 °C; the washed complexes were eluted...2 heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein u (hnrnp u) 1 dna-binding protein a 1 tubulin alpha -6 chain 1 60s acidic

  1. Genome instability in Alzheimer disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Yujun; Song, Hyundong; Croteau, Deborah L

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and the most common form of dementia. Autosomal dominant, familial AD (fAD) is very rare and caused by mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin-1 (PSEN-1), and presenilin-2 (PSEN-2) genes. The pathogenesis...

  2. Carpal instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.; Froehner, S.; Coblenz, G.; Christopoulos, G.

    2006-01-01

    This review addresses the pathoanatomical basics as well as the clinical and radiological presentation of instability patterns of the wrist. Carpal instability mostly follows an injury; however, other diseases, like CPPD arthropathy, can be associated. Instability occurs either if the carpus is unable to sustain physiologic loads (''dyskinetics'') or suffers from abnormal motion of its bones during movement (''dyskinematics''). In the classification of carpal instability, dissociative subcategories (located within proximal carpal row) are differentiated from non-dissociative subcategories (present between the carpal rows) and combined patterns. It is essential to note that the unstable wrist initially does not cause relevant signs in standard radiograms, therefore being ''occult'' for the radiologic assessment. This paper emphasizes the high utility of kinematographic studies, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR arthrography for detecting these predynamic and dynamic instability stages. Later in the natural history of carpal instability, static malalignment of the wrist and osteoarthritis will develop, both being associated with significant morbidity and disability. To prevent individual and socio-economic implications, the handsurgeon or orthopedist, as well as the radiologist, is challenged for early and precise diagnosis. (orig.)

  3. Genome constraint through sexual reproduction: application of 4D-Genomics in reproductive biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Steven D; Abdallah, Batoul Y; Stevens, Joshua B; Liu, Guo; Ye, Karen J; Bremer, Steven W; Heng, Henry H Q

    2013-06-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies have been used to achieve pregnancies since the first successful test tube baby was born in 1978. Infertile couples are at an increased risk for multiple miscarriages and the application of current protocols are associated with high first-trimester miscarriage rates. Among the contributing factors of these higher rates is a high incidence of fetal aneuploidy. Numerous studies support that protocols including ovulation-induction, sperm cryostorage, density-gradient centrifugation, and embryo culture can induce genome instability, but the general mechanism is less clear. Application of the genome theory and 4D-Genomics recently led to the establishment of a new paradigm for sexual reproduction; sex primarily constrains genome integrity that defines the biological system rather than just providing genetic diversity at the gene level. We therefore propose that application of assisted reproductive technologies can bypass this sexual reproduction filter as well as potentially induce additional system instability. We have previously demonstrated that a single-cell resolution genomic approach, such as spectral karyotyping to trace stochastic genome level alterations, is effective for pre- and post-natal analysis. We propose that monitoring overall genome alteration at the karyotype level alongside the application of assisted reproductive technologies will improve the efficacy of the techniques while limiting stress-induced genome instability. The development of more single-cell based cytogenomic technologies are needed in order to better understand the system dynamics associated with infertility and the potential impact that assisted reproductive technologies have on genome instability. Importantly, this approach will be useful in studying the potential for diseases to arise as a result of bypassing the filter of sexual reproduction.

  4. Genomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, T. A. (Terence A.)

    2002-01-01

    ... of genome expression and replication processes, and transcriptomics and proteomics. This text is richly illustrated with clear, easy-to-follow, full color diagrams, which are downloadable from the book's website...

  5. Genome-wide mapping for clinically relevant predictors of lamotrigine- and phenytoin-induced hypersensitivity reactions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCormack, Mark

    2012-03-01

    An association between carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity and HLA-A*3101 has been reported in populations of both European and Asian descent. We aimed to investigate HLA-A*3101 and other common variants across the genome as markers for cutaneous adverse drug reactions (cADRs) attributed to lamotrigine and phenytoin.

  6. Overcoming a fast transverse instability by means of octupole-induced tune spread in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Montag

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available During the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider commissioning in 2001 a fast transverse instability was observed on the ramp. In general this could be counteracted with increased chromaticity, resulting in Landau damping. However this method could not be applied around transition energy where chromaticities have to change sign. So octupoles were used near transition energy to create transverse Landau damping and avoid the transverse instability, emittance blowup, and beam loss. This paper describes the considerations that led to the present scheme, as well as experimental results.

  7. Collisionless Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and vortex-induced reconnection in the external region of the Earth magnetotail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pegoraro, F; Faganello, M; Califano, F

    2008-01-01

    In a magnetized plasma streaming with a non uniform velocity, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability plays a major role in mixing different plasma regions and in stretching the magnetic field lines leading to the formation of layers with a sheared magnetic field where magnetic field line reconnection can take place. A relevant example is provided by the formation of a mixing layer between the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind at low latitudes during northward periods. In the considered configuration, in the presence of a magnetic field nearly perpendicular to the plane defined by the velocity field and its inhomogeneity direction, velocity shear drives a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability which advects and distorts the magnetic field configuration. If the Alfven velocity associated to the in-plane magnetic field is sufficiently weak with respect to the variation of the fluid velocity in the plasma, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability generates fully rolled-up vortices which advect the magnetic field lines into a complex configuration, causing the formation of current layers along the inversion curves of the in-plane magnetic field component. Pairing of the vortices generated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is a well know phenomenon in two-dimensional hydrodynamics. Here we investigate the development of magnetic reconnection during the vortex pairing process and show that completely different magnetic structures are produced depending on how fast the reconnection process develops on the time scale set by the pairing process.

  8. The stabilizing effect of collision-induced velocity shear on the ionospheric feedback instability in Earth's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydorenko, D.; Rankin, R.

    2017-07-01

    The feedback instability in the ionospheric Alfvén resonator in Earth's magnetosphere is examined using a two-dimensional multifluid numerical model of coupled ionosphere and magnetosphere. Two simulation configurations are used to demonstrate that the instability occurs under an assumption that is unrealistic for Earth's ionosphere. In the first configuration, a flat sheet height-integrated conducting boundary replaces the ionospheric E layer. In the second configuration, plasma dynamics in a simplified E layer is resolved ignoring ion production, loss, and diffusion. For the same parameters (plasma and neutral density profiles and convection electric field), the instability develops only with the flat sheet boundary. When the E layer is resolved, the variation of ion-neutral collision frequencies with altitude produces vertical shear in the horizontal ion flow velocity. The shear prevents density perturbations from remaining field aligned, causing them to decay rather than grow. It is suggested that the instability cannot occur in Earth's ionosphere because ion-neutral collision frequencies always have a significant variation with altitude through the E layer.

  9. Evidence for a Higher Risk of Hypovolemia-Induced Hemodynamic Instability in Females: Implications for Decision Support During Prehospital Triage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    3): 177–84. 8. Convertino VA, Grudic GZ, Mulligan J, Moulton S: Estimation of indi- vidual-specific progression to cardiovascular instability using...Moulton SL, Mulligan J, Grudic GZ, et al: Running on empty? The compensatory reserve index. J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2013; 75(6): 1053–9. 29

  10. R-loops: targets for nuclease cleavage and repeat instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenreich, Catherine H

    2018-01-11

    R-loops form when transcribed RNA remains bound to its DNA template to form a stable RNA:DNA hybrid. Stable R-loops form when the RNA is purine-rich, and are further stabilized by DNA secondary structures on the non-template strand. Interestingly, many expandable and disease-causing repeat sequences form stable R-loops, and R-loops can contribute to repeat instability. Repeat expansions are responsible for multiple neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington's disease, myotonic dystrophy, and several types of ataxias. Recently, it was found that R-loops at an expanded CAG/CTG repeat tract cause DNA breaks as well as repeat instability (Su and Freudenreich, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114, E8392-E8401, 2017). Two factors were identified as causing R-loop-dependent breaks at CAG/CTG tracts: deamination of cytosines and the MutLγ (Mlh1-Mlh3) endonuclease, defining two new mechanisms for how R-loops can generate DNA breaks (Su and Freudenreich, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114, E8392-E8401, 2017). Following R-loop-dependent nicking, base excision repair resulted in repeat instability. These results have implications for human repeat expansion diseases and provide a paradigm for how RNA:DNA hybrids can cause genome instability at structure-forming DNA sequences. This perspective summarizes mechanisms of R-loop-induced fragility at G-rich repeats and new links between DNA breaks and repeat instability.

  11. APC/C Dysfunction Limits Excessive Cancer Chromosomal Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansregret, Laurent; López-García, Carlos; Koch, André; McGranahan, Nicholas; Chao, William Chong Hang; Barry, David J.; Rowan, Andrew; Instrell, Rachael; Horswell, Stuart; Way, Michael; Howell, Michael; Singleton, Martin R.; Medema, René H.; Nurse, Paul; Petronczki, Mark; Swanton, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Intercellular heterogeneity, exacerbated by chromosomal instability (CIN), fosters tumor heterogeneity and drug resistance. However, extreme CIN correlates with improved cancer outcome, suggesting that karyotypic diversity required to adapt to selection pressures might be balanced in tumors against the risk of excessive instability. Here, we used a functional genomics screen, genome editing, and pharmacologic approaches to identify CIN-survival factors in diploid cells. We find partial anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) dysfunction lengthens mitosis, suppresses pharmacologically induced chromosome segregation errors, and reduces naturally occurring lagging chromosomes in cancer cell lines or following tetraploidization. APC/C impairment caused adaptation to MPS1 inhibitors, revealing a likely resistance mechanism to therapies targeting the spindle assembly checkpoint. Finally, CRISPR-mediated introduction of cancer somatic mutations in the APC/C subunit cancer driver gene CDC27 reduces chromosome segregation errors, whereas reversal of an APC/C subunit nonsense mutation increases CIN. Subtle variations in mitotic duration, determined by APC/C activity, influence the extent of CIN, allowing cancer cells to dynamically optimize fitness during tumor evolution. Significance We report a mechanism whereby cancers balance the evolutionary advantages associated with CIN against the fitness costs caused by excessive genome instability, providing insight into the consequence of CDC27 APC/C subunit driver mutations in cancer. Lengthening of mitosis through APC/C modulation may be a common mechanism of resistance to cancer therapeutics that increase chromosome segregation errors. PMID:28069571

  12. Simulation study of electron cloud induced instabilities and emittance growth for the CERN Large Hadron Collider proton beam

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetto, Elena; Schulte, Daniel; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    The electron cloud may cause transverse single-bunch instabilities of proton beams such as those in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). We simulate these instabilities and the consequent emittance growth with the code HEADTAIL, which models the turn-by-turn interaction between the cloud and the beam. Recently some new features were added to the code, in particular, electric conducting boundary conditions at the chamber wall, transverse feedback, and variable beta functions. The sensitivity to several numerical parameters has been studied by varying the number of interaction points between the bunch and the cloud, the phase advance between them, and the number of macroparticles used to represent the protons and the electrons. We present simulation results for both LHC at injection and SPS with LHC-type beam, for different electron-cloud density levels, chromaticities, and bunch intensities. Two regimes with qualitatively different emittance growth are observed: above th...

  13. Genome stability in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaften, G.W. van

    2006-01-01

    Genome stability is closely linked to cancer. Most, if not all tumor cells show some form of genome instability, mutations can range from single point mutations to gross chromosomal rearrangements and aneuploidy. Genome instability is believed to be the driving force behind tumorigenesis. In order

  14. Synergistic Interactions with PI3K Inhibition that Induce Apoptosis. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activating mutations involving the PI3K pathway occur frequently in human cancers. However, PI3K inhibitors primarily induce cell cycle arrest, leaving a significant reservoir of tumor cells that may acquire or exhibit resistance. We searched for genes that are required for the survival of PI3K mutant cancer cells in the presence of PI3K inhibition by conducting a genome scale shRNA-based apoptosis screen in a PIK3CA mutant human breast cancer cell. We identified 5 genes (PIM2, ZAK, TACC1, ZFR, ZNF565) whose suppression induced cell death upon PI3K inhibition.

  15. FINANCIAL INSTABILITY AND POLITICAL INSTABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionescu Cristian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an important link between the following two variables: financial instability and political instability. Often, the link is bidirectional, so both may influence each other. This is way the lately crisis are becoming larger and increasingly complex. Therefore, the academic environment is simultaneously talking about economic crises, financial crises, political crises, social crises, highlighting the correlation and causality between variables belonging to the economic, financial, political and social areas, with repercussions and spillover effects that extend from one area to another. Given the importance, relevance and the actuality of the ones described above, I consider that at least a theoretical analysis between economic, financial and political factors is needed in order to understand the reality. Thus, this paper aims to find links and connections to complete the picture of the economic reality.

  16. Simulated space radiation-induced mutants in the mouse kidney display widespread genomic change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell S Turker

    Full Text Available Exposure to a small number of high-energy heavy charged particles (HZE ions, as found in the deep space environment, could significantly affect astronaut health following prolonged periods of space travel if these ions induce mutations and related cancers. In this study, we used an in vivo mutagenesis assay to define the mutagenic effects of accelerated 56Fe ions (1 GeV/amu, 151 keV/μm in the mouse kidney epithelium exposed to doses ranging from 0.25 to 2.0 Gy. These doses represent fluences ranging from 1 to 8 particle traversals per cell nucleus. The Aprt locus, located on chromosome 8, was used to select induced and spontaneous mutants. To fully define the mutagenic effects, we used multiple endpoints including mutant frequencies, mutation spectrum for chromosome 8, translocations involving chromosome 8, and mutations affecting non-selected chromosomes. The results demonstrate mutagenic effects that often affect multiple chromosomes for all Fe ion doses tested. For comparison with the most abundant sparsely ionizing particle found in space, we also examined the mutagenic effects of high-energy protons (1 GeV, 0.24 keV/μm at 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. Similar doses of protons were not as mutagenic as Fe ions for many assays, though genomic effects were detected in Aprt mutants at these doses. Considered as a whole, the data demonstrate that Fe ions are highly mutagenic at the low doses and fluences of relevance to human spaceflight, and that cells with considerable genomic mutations are readily induced by these exposures and persist in the kidney epithelium. The level of genomic change produced by low fluence exposure to heavy ions is reminiscent of the extensive rearrangements seen in tumor genomes suggesting a potential initiation step in radiation carcinogenesis.

  17. Simulated space radiation-induced mutants in the mouse kidney display widespread genomic change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turker, Mitchell S; Grygoryev, Dmytro; Lasarev, Michael; Ohlrich, Anna; Rwatambuga, Furaha A; Johnson, Sorrel; Dan, Cristian; Eckelmann, Bradley; Hryciw, Gwen; Mao, Jian-Hua; Snijders, Antoine M; Gauny, Stacey; Kronenberg, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to a small number of high-energy heavy charged particles (HZE ions), as found in the deep space environment, could significantly affect astronaut health following prolonged periods of space travel if these ions induce mutations and related cancers. In this study, we used an in vivo mutagenesis assay to define the mutagenic effects of accelerated 56Fe ions (1 GeV/amu, 151 keV/μm) in the mouse kidney epithelium exposed to doses ranging from 0.25 to 2.0 Gy. These doses represent fluences ranging from 1 to 8 particle traversals per cell nucleus. The Aprt locus, located on chromosome 8, was used to select induced and spontaneous mutants. To fully define the mutagenic effects, we used multiple endpoints including mutant frequencies, mutation spectrum for chromosome 8, translocations involving chromosome 8, and mutations affecting non-selected chromosomes. The results demonstrate mutagenic effects that often affect multiple chromosomes for all Fe ion doses tested. For comparison with the most abundant sparsely ionizing particle found in space, we also examined the mutagenic effects of high-energy protons (1 GeV, 0.24 keV/μm) at 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. Similar doses of protons were not as mutagenic as Fe ions for many assays, though genomic effects were detected in Aprt mutants at these doses. Considered as a whole, the data demonstrate that Fe ions are highly mutagenic at the low doses and fluences of relevance to human spaceflight, and that cells with considerable genomic mutations are readily induced by these exposures and persist in the kidney epithelium. The level of genomic change produced by low fluence exposure to heavy ions is reminiscent of the extensive rearrangements seen in tumor genomes suggesting a potential initiation step in radiation carcinogenesis.

  18. Detection of induced male germline mutation: Correlations and comparisons between traditional germline mutation assays, transgenic rodent assays and expanded simple tandem repeat instability assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, Timothy M.; Lambert, Iain B.; Williams, Andrew; Douglas, George R.; Yauk, Carole L.

    2006-01-01

    Several rodent assays are capable of monitoring germline mutation. These include traditional assays, such as the dominant lethal (DL) assay, the morphological specific locus (SL) test and the heritable translocation (HT) assay, and two assays that have been developed more recently-the expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) and transgenic rodent (TGR) mutation assays. In this paper, we have compiled the limited amount of experimental data that are currently available to make conclusions regarding the comparative ability of the more recently developed assays to detect germline mutations induced by chemical and radiological agents. The data suggest that ESTR and TGR assays are generally comparable with SL in detecting germline mutagenicity induced by alkylating agents and radiation, though TGR offered less sensitivity than ESTR in some cases. The DL and HT assays detect clastogenic events and are most susceptible to mutations arising in post-spermatogonial cells, and they may not provide the best comparisons with TGR and ESTR instability. The measurement of induced ESTR instability represents a relatively sensitive method of identifying agents causing germline mutation in rodents, and may also be useful for bio-monitoring exposed individuals in the human population. Any future use of the TGR and ESTR germline mutation assays in a regulatory testing context will entail more robust and extensive characterization of assay performance. This will require substantially more data, including experiments measuring multiple endpoints, a greatly expanded database of chemical agents and a focus on characterizing stage-specific activity of mutagens in these assays, preferably by sampling epididymal sperm exposed at defined pre-meiotic, meiotic and post-meiotic stages of development

  19. Detection of induced male germline mutation: Correlations and comparisons between traditional germline mutation assays, transgenic rodent assays and expanded simple tandem repeat instability assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Timothy M. [Mutagenesis Section, Environmental and Occupational Toxicology Division, Safe Environments Programme, 0803A, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ont., K1A 0K9 (Canada); Department of Biology, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ont., K1S 5B6 (Canada); Lambert, Iain B. [Department of Biology, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ont., K1S 5B6 (Canada); Williams, Andrew [Biostatistics and Epidemiology Division, Safe Environments Programme, 6604B, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ont., K1A 0K9 (Canada); Douglas, George R. [Mutagenesis Section, Environmental and Occupational Toxicology Division, Safe Environments Programme, 0803A, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ont., K1A 0K9 (Canada); Yauk, Carole L. [Mutagenesis Section, Environmental and Occupational Toxicology Division, Safe Environments Programme, 0803A, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ont., K1A 0K9 (Canada)]. E-mail: carole_yauk@hc-sc.gc.ca

    2006-06-25

    Several rodent assays are capable of monitoring germline mutation. These include traditional assays, such as the dominant lethal (DL) assay, the morphological specific locus (SL) test and the heritable translocation (HT) assay, and two assays that have been developed more recently-the expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) and transgenic rodent (TGR) mutation assays. In this paper, we have compiled the limited amount of experimental data that are currently available to make conclusions regarding the comparative ability of the more recently developed assays to detect germline mutations induced by chemical and radiological agents. The data suggest that ESTR and TGR assays are generally comparable with SL in detecting germline mutagenicity induced by alkylating agents and radiation, though TGR offered less sensitivity than ESTR in some cases. The DL and HT assays detect clastogenic events and are most susceptible to mutations arising in post-spermatogonial cells, and they may not provide the best comparisons with TGR and ESTR instability. The measurement of induced ESTR instability represents a relatively sensitive method of identifying agents causing germline mutation in rodents, and may also be useful for bio-monitoring exposed individuals in the human population. Any future use of the TGR and ESTR germline mutation assays in a regulatory testing context will entail more robust and extensive characterization of assay performance. This will require substantially more data, including experiments measuring multiple endpoints, a greatly expanded database of chemical agents and a focus on characterizing stage-specific activity of mutagens in these assays, preferably by sampling epididymal sperm exposed at defined pre-meiotic, meiotic and post-meiotic stages of development.

  20. Morphological, Genome and Gene Expression Changes in Newly Induced Autopolyploid Chrysanthemum lavandulifolium (Fisch. ex Trautv.) Makino.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ri; Wang, Haibin; Dong, Bin; Yang, Xiaodong; Chen, Sumei; Jiang, Jiafu; Zhang, Zhaohe; Liu, Chen; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Fadi

    2016-10-09

    Autopolyploidy is widespread in higher plants and plays an important role in the process of evolution. The present study successfully induced autotetraploidys from Chrysanthemum lavandulifolium by colchicine. The plant morphology, genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenetic changes between tetraploid and diploid plants were investigated. Ligulate flower, tubular flower and leaves of tetraploid plants were greater than those of the diploid plants. Compared with diploid plants, the genome changed as a consequence of polyploidization in tetraploid plants, namely, 1.1% lost fragments and 1.6% novel fragments occurred. In addition, DNA methylation increased after genome doubling in tetraploid plants. Among 485 common transcript-derived fragments (TDFs), which existed in tetraploid and diploid progenitors, 62 fragments were detected as differentially expressed TDFs, 6.8% of TDFs exhibited up-regulated gene expression in the tetraploid plants and 6.0% exhibited down-regulation. The present study provides a reference for further studying the autopolyploidization role in the evolution of C. lavandulifolium. In conclusion, the autopolyploid C. lavandulifolium showed a global change in morphology, genome and gene expression compared with corresponding diploid.

  1. A triple-helix forming oligonucleotide targeting genomic DNA fails to induce mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshat, Reshat; Priestley, Catherine C; Gooderham, Nigel J

    2012-11-01

    Purine tracts in duplex DNA can bind oligonucleotide strands in a sequence specific manner to form triple-helix structures. Triple-helix forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) targeting supFG1 constructs have previously been shown to be mutagenic raising safety concerns for oligonucleotide-based pharmaceuticals. We have engineered a TFO, TFO27, to target the genomic Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus to define the mutagenic potential of such structures at genomic DNA. We report that TFO27 was resistant to nuclease degradation and readily binds to its target motif in a cell free system. Contrary to previous studies using the supFG1 reporter construct, TFO27 failed to induce mutation within the genomic HPRT locus. We suggest that it is possible that previous reports of triplex-mediated mutation using the supFG1 reporter construct could be confounded by DNA quadruplex formation. Although the present study indicates that a TFO targeting a genomic locus lacks mutagenic activity, it is unclear if this finding can be generalised to all TFOs and their targets. For the present, we suggest that it is prudent to avoid large purine stretches in oligonucleotide pharmaceutical design to minimise concern regarding off-target genotoxicity.

  2. Whole-Genome DNA Methylation Analyses Revealed Epigenetic Instability in Tumorigenic Human iPS Cell-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Tsuyoshi; Iwanami, Akio; Sanosaka, Tsukasa; Kohyama, Jun; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Nagoshi, Narihito; Kashiwagi, Rei; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Okano, Hideyuki

    2017-05-01

    Although human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) derivatives are considered promising cellular resources for regenerative medicine, their tumorigenicity potentially limits their clinical application in hiPSC technologies. We previously demonstrated that oncogenic hiPSC-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (hiPSC-NS/PCs) produced tumor-like tissues that were distinct from teratomas. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying the regulation of tumorigenicity in hiPSC-NS/PCs, we performed an integrated analysis using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array and the HumanHT-12 v4.0 Expression BeadChip array to compare the comprehensive DNA methylation and gene expression profiles of tumorigenic hiPSC-NS/PCs (253G1-NS/PCs) and non-tumorigenic cells (201B7-NS/PCs). Although the DNA methylation profiles of 253G1-hiPSCs and 201B7-hiPSCs were similar regardless of passage number, the methylation status of the global DNA methylation profiles of 253G1-NS/PCs and 201B7-NS/PCs differed; the genomic regions surrounding the transcriptional start site of the CAT and PSMD5 genes were hypermethylated in 253G1-NS/PCs but not in 201B7-NS/PCs. Interestingly, the aberrant DNA methylation profile was more pronounced in 253G1-NS/PCs that had been passaged more than 15 times. In addition, we identified aberrations in DNA methylation at the RBP1 gene locus; the DNA methylation frequency in RBP1 changed as 253G1-NS/PCs were sequentially passaged. These results indicate that different NS/PC clones have different DNA methylomes and that DNA methylation patterns are unstable as cells are passaged. Therefore, DNA methylation profiles should be included in the criteria used to evaluate the tumorigenicity of hiPSC-NS/PCs in the clinical setting. Stem Cells 2017;35:1316-1327. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  3. Ionization instability induced striations in low frequency and pulsed He/H2O atmospheric pressure plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.

    2018-01-01

    In previous work [Kawamura et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 25, 054009 (2016)] and [Kawamura et al., J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 50, 145204 (2017)], 1D kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of narrow gap (1 to 4 mm), high frequency (27 MHz) or dc-driven, He/2%H2O atmospheric pressure plasmas (APPs) showed an ionization instability resulting in standing striations (spatial oscillations) in the bulk plasma. We developed a steady-state striation theory which showed that the striations are due to non-local electron kinetics. In both the high frequency and dc-driven cases, the equilibrium electron density n0 in the plasma bulk was stationary. In this work, we first conduct 1D PIC simulations of a 1 mm gap He/2%H2O APP, driven by a sinusoidal current at a low frequency of f = 50 kHz such that ω = 2πf is well below the ionization frequency νiz. In this case, n0 varies with time, and we observe a time-varying instability which quasistatically depends on n0(t). At each phase of the rf cycle, the discharge resembles a dc discharge at the same n0. At higher frequencies (200 kHz-1 MHz), ω approaches νiz, and quasistatic equilibrium at each phase breaks down. The discharge is also driven with a 200 kHz, 50% duty cycle square wave pulse with a short rise and fall time of 0.1 μs in an attempt to directly measure the striation growth rate s during the on-cycle before it saturated. However, the spike in current during the rise time leads to a spike in electron temperature Te and hence νiz and s at the beginning of the rise which saturated during the beginning of the on-cycle. To predict the instability growth rate and saturation during and after the current spike, we extend our striation theory to include time-varying n0, Te, νiz, as well as terms for the nonlinear saturation and noise floor of the striation amplitude. The time-varying global model predictions are compared to the PIC simulations, showing reasonable agreement.

  4. Evaluation of plasma-induced damage and bias temperature instability depending on type of antenna layer using current-starved ring oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Ryo; Furuta, Jun; Kobayashi, Kazutoshi

    2018-04-01

    Plasma-induced damage (PID) and bias temperature instability (BTI) are inevitable reliability issues that degrade the performance of transistors. In this study, PID and BTI, depending on the type of antenna layer, are evaluated in current-starved ring oscillators (ROs) to separate degradations in PMOS and NMOS transistors in a 65 nm silicon-on-insulator (SOI) process. Oscillation frequencies of ROs fluctuate with the performance of MOSFET switches between power/ground rails and virtual power/ground nodes. The initial frequencies of ROs with PMOS switches having antennas on upper layers decrease. However, those with NMOS switches become higher than those without PID because high-k dielectrics are damaged by positive charges. The degradation induced by negative BTI (NBTI) in PMOS is 1.5 times larger than that induced by positive BTI (PBTI) in NMOS. However, both NBTI- and PBTI-induced degradations are the same among different antenna layers. The frequency fluctuation caused by PID is converted to threshold voltage shifts by circuit simulations. Threshold voltages shift by 8.4 and 11% owing to PID in PMOS and NMOS transistors, respectively.

  5. Human Metapneumovirus Induces Formation of Inclusion Bodies for Efficient Genome Replication and Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes-Muñoz, Nicolás; Branttie, Jean; Slaughter, Kerri Beth; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2017-12-15

    induce the formation of large cytoplasmic granules, named inclusion bodies, for genome replication and transcription. Unlike other cytoplasmic structures, such as stress granules and processing bodies, inclusion bodies are exclusively present in infected cells and contain HMPV RNA and proteins to more efficiently transcribe and replicate the viral genome. Though inclusion body formation is nuanced, it corresponds to a more generalized strategy used by different viruses, including filoviruses and rhabdoviruses, for genome transcription and replication. Thus, an understanding of inclusion body formation is crucial for the discovery of innovative therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Irradiation-induced Deinococcus radiodurans genome fragmentation triggers transposition of a single resident insertion sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Pasternak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress-induced transposition is an attractive notion since it is potentially important in creating diversity to facilitate adaptation of the host to severe environmental conditions. One common major stress is radiation-induced DNA damage. Deinococcus radiodurans has an exceptional ability to withstand the lethal effects of DNA-damaging agents (ionizing radiation, UV light, and desiccation. High radiation levels result in genome fragmentation and reassembly in a process which generates significant amounts of single-stranded DNA. This capacity of D. radiodurans to withstand irradiation raises important questions concerning its response to radiation-induced mutagenic lesions. A recent study analyzed the mutational profile in the thyA gene following irradiation. The majority of thyA mutants resulted from transposition of one particular Insertion Sequence (IS, ISDra2, of the many different ISs in the D. radiodurans genome. ISDra2 is a member of a newly recognised class of ISs, the IS200/IS605 family of insertion sequences.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of HOXC9-induced neuronal differentiation of neuroblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwei Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Induction of differentiation is a therapeutic strategy in neuroblastoma, a common pediatric cancer of the sympathetic nervous system. The homeobox protein HOXC9 is a key regulator of neuroblastoma differentiation. To gain a molecular understanding of the function of HOXC9 in promoting differentiation of neuroblastoma cells, we conducted a genome-wide analysis of the HOXC9-induced differentiation program by microarray gene expression profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation in combination with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq. Here we describe in detail the experimental system, methods, and quality control for the generation of the microarray and ChIP-seq data associated with our recent publication [1].

  8. Genome Architecture and Its Roles in Human Copy Number Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Besides single-nucleotide variants in the human genome, large-scale genomic variants, such as copy number variations (CNVs, are being increasingly discovered as a genetic source of human diversity and the pathogenic factors of diseases. Recent experimental findings have shed light on the links between different genome architectures and CNV mutagenesis. In this review, we summarize various genomic features and discuss their contributions to CNV formation. Genomic repeats, including both low-copy and high-copy repeats, play important roles in CNV instability, which was initially known as DNA recombination events. Furthermore, it has been found that human genomic repeats can also induce DNA replication errors and consequently result in CNV mutations. Some recent studies showed that DNA replication timing, which reflects the high-order information of genomic organization, is involved in human CNV mutations. Our review highlights that genome architecture, from DNA sequence to high-order genomic organization, is an important molecular factor in CNV mutagenesis and human genomic instability.

  9. Development of radiation-induced mutation techniques and functional genomics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Sub; Kang, Si Yong; Kim, Jin Baek

    2012-01-01

    This project has been performed to develop plant genetic resources using radiation (gamma-rays, ion-beam, space environments), to conduct functional genomics studies with mutant resources, and to develop new radiation plant breeding techniques using various radiation sources during 3 years. In the first section, we developed flower genetic resources, functional crop resources, and bio-industrial plant resources. In the second section, we cloned several mutated genes and studied mechanisms of gene expression and genetic diversity of mutations induced by gamma-rays. In the third section, we developed new plant breeding techniques using gamma-phytotron, heavy ion-beam, and space environments. Based on these results, a total of 8 cultivars containing Chrysanthemum, Hibiscus, kenaf, rice, and soybean were applied for plant variety protection (PVP) and a total of 4 cultivars were registered for PVP. Also, license agreement for the dwarf type Hibiscus mutant 'Ggoma' was conducted with Supro co. and the manufacturing technology for natural antioxidant pear-grape vinegar was transferred into Enzenic co. Also, 8 gene sequences, such as F3'H and LDOX genes associated with flower color in Chrysanthemum and EPSPS gene from Korean lawn grass, were registered in the database of National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). In the future study, we will develop new radiation mutation breeding techniques through the mutation spectrum induced by various radiation sources, the studies for mechanism of the cellular response to radiation, and the comparative·structural·functional genomics studies for useful traits

  10. Hydrogen peroxide induced loss of heterozygosity correlates with replicative lifespan and mitotic asymmetry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Erin D.; Parker, Meighan C.; Gupta, Nilin; Rodrigues, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Cellular aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae can lead to genomic instability and impaired mitotic asymmetry. To investigate the role of oxidative stress in cellular aging, we examined the effect of exogenous hydrogen peroxide on genomic instability and mitotic asymmetry in a collection of yeast strains with diverse backgrounds. We treated yeast cells with hydrogen peroxide and monitored the changes of viability and the frequencies of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in response to hydrogen peroxide doses. The mid-transition points of viability and LOH were quantified using sigmoid mathematical functions. We found that the increase of hydrogen peroxide dependent genomic instability often occurs before a drop in viability. We previously observed that elevation of genomic instability generally lags behind the drop in viability during chronological aging. Hence, onset of genomic instability induced by exogenous hydrogen peroxide treatment is opposite to that induced by endogenous oxidative stress during chronological aging, with regards to the midpoint of viability. This contrast argues that the effect of endogenous oxidative stress on genome integrity is well suppressed up to the dying-off phase during chronological aging. We found that the leadoff of exogenous hydrogen peroxide induced genomic instability to viability significantly correlated with replicative lifespan (RLS), indicating that yeast cells’ ability to counter oxidative stress contributes to their replicative longevity. Surprisingly, this leadoff is positively correlated with an inverse measure of endogenous mitotic asymmetry, indicating a trade-off between mitotic asymmetry and cell’s ability to fend off hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress. Overall, our results demonstrate strong associations of oxidative stress to genomic instability and mitotic asymmetry at the population level of budding yeast. PMID:27833823

  11. Polygonal instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labousse, Matthieu

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of a vortex with a free surface is encountered in a series of experiments, the hydraulic jump, the hydraulic bump, the toroidal Leidenfrost experiment. All these experiments share in common an unstable configuration in which azimuthal perturbations give rise to polygonal patterns. We propose a unified theoretical framework to model the emergence of this instability by investigating the stability of a liquid torus with a poloidal motion. As simple as it is, we show that the model retains the necessary ingredients to account for the experimental observations. In this talk, I will first describe the model and compare it to the existing data. However this model is purely inviscid and reaches its limits when being applied to relatively moderate Reynolds flows. So in a second part, I will present a recent experimental and theoretical investigation in which polygonal patterns are now driven by Marangoni flows. To our great surprise, it extends the range of validity of the initial proposed framework, much more than initially expected.

  12. Expression of Cyclins A, E and Topoisomerase II α correlates with centrosome amplification and genomic instability and influences the reliability of cytometric S-phase determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laytragoon-Lewin Nongnit

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progression of normal cells through the cell cycle is meticulously regulated by checkpoints guaranteeing the exact replication of the genome during S-phase and its equal division at mitosis. A prerequisite for this achievement is synchronized DNA-replication and centrosome duplication. In this context the expression of cyclins A and E has been shown to play a principal role. Results Our results demonstrated a correlation between centrosome amplification, cell cycle fidelity and the level of mRNA and protein expression of cyclins A and E during the part of the cell cycle defined as G1-phase by means of DNA content based histogram analysis. It is shown that the normal diploid breast cell line HTB-125, the genomically relatively stable aneuploid breast cancer cell line MCF-7, and the genomically unstable aneuploid breast cancer cell line MDA-231 differ remarkably concerning both mRNA and protein expression of the two cyclins during G1-phase. In MDA-231 cells the expression of e.g. cyclin A mRNA was found to be ten times higher than in MCF-7 cells and about 500 times higher than in HTB-125 cells. Topoisomerase II α showed high mRNA expression in MDA compared to MCF-7 cells, but the difference in protein expression was small. Furthermore, we measured centrosome aberrations in 8.4% of the MDA-231 cells, and in only 1.3% of the more stable aneuploid cell line MCF-7. MDA cells showed 27% more incorporation of BrdU than reflected by S-phase determination with flow cytometric DNA content analysis, whereas these values were found to be of the same size in both HTB-125 and MCF-7 cells. Conclusions Our data indicate that the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-231, although both DNA-aneuploid, differ significantly regarding the degree of cell cycle disturbance and centrosome aberrations, which partly could explain the different genomic stability of the two cell lines. The results also question the reliability of cytometric DNA

  13. The effects of in utero irradiation on mutation induction and transgenerational instability in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, Ruth C.; Hardwick, Robert J.; Shanks, Morag E.; Glen, Colin D.; Mughal, Safeer K.; Voutounou, Mariel; Dubrova, Yuri E.

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that the deleterious effects of prenatal irradiation can manifest during childhood, resulting in an increased risk of leukaemia and solid cancers after birth. However, the mechanisms underlying the long-term effects of foetal irradiation remain poorly understood. This study was designed to analyse the impact of in utero irradiation on mutation rates at expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) DNA loci in directly exposed mice and their first-generation (F 1 ) offspring. ESTR mutation frequencies in the germline and somatic tissues of male and female mice irradiated at 12 days of gestation remained highly elevated during adulthood, which was mainly attributed to a significant increase in the frequency of singleton mutations. The prevalence of singleton mutations in directly exposed mice suggests that foetal irradiation results in genomic instability manifested both in utero and during adulthood. The frequency of ESTR mutation in the F 1 offspring of prenatally irradiated male mice was equally elevated across all tissues, which suggests that foetal exposure results in transgenerational genomic instability. In contrast, maternal in utero exposure did not affect the F 1 stability. Our data imply that the passive erasure of epigenetic marks in the maternal genome can diminish the transgenerational effects of foetal irradiation and therefore provide important clues to the still unknown mechanisms of radiation-induced genomic instability. The results of this study offer a plausible explanation for the effects of in utero irradiation on the risk of leukaemia and solid cancers after birth.

  14. Mismatch repair genes Mlh1 and Mlh3 modify CAG instability in Huntington's disease mice: genome-wide and candidate approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ricardo Mouro; Dragileva, Ella; Kirby, Andrew; Lloret, Alejandro; Lopez, Edith; St Claire, Jason; Panigrahi, Gagan B; Hou, Caixia; Holloway, Kim; Gillis, Tammy; Guide, Jolene R; Cohen, Paula E; Li, Guo-Min; Pearson, Christopher E; Daly, Mark J; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2013-10-01

    The Huntington's disease gene (HTT) CAG repeat mutation undergoes somatic expansion that correlates with pathogenesis. Modifiers of somatic expansion may therefore provide routes for therapies targeting the underlying mutation, an approach that is likely applicable to other trinucleotide repeat diseases. Huntington's disease Hdh(Q111) mice exhibit higher levels of somatic HTT CAG expansion on a C57BL/6 genetic background (B6.Hdh(Q111) ) than on a 129 background (129.Hdh(Q111) ). Linkage mapping in (B6x129).Hdh(Q111) F2 intercross animals identified a single quantitative trait locus underlying the strain-specific difference in expansion in the striatum, implicating mismatch repair (MMR) gene Mlh1 as the most likely candidate modifier. Crossing B6.Hdh(Q111) mice onto an Mlh1 null background demonstrated that Mlh1 is essential for somatic CAG expansions and that it is an enhancer of nuclear huntingtin accumulation in striatal neurons. Hdh(Q111) somatic expansion was also abolished in mice deficient in the Mlh3 gene, implicating MutLγ (MLH1-MLH3) complex as a key driver of somatic expansion. Strikingly, Mlh1 and Mlh3 genes encoding MMR effector proteins were as critical to somatic expansion as Msh2 and Msh3 genes encoding DNA mismatch recognition complex MutSβ (MSH2-MSH3). The Mlh1 locus is highly polymorphic between B6 and 129 strains. While we were unable to detect any difference in base-base mismatch or short slipped-repeat repair activity between B6 and 129 MLH1 variants, repair efficiency was MLH1 dose-dependent. MLH1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in 129 mice compared to B6 mice, consistent with a dose-sensitive MLH1-dependent DNA repair mechanism underlying the somatic expansion difference between these strains. Together, these data identify Mlh1 and Mlh3 as novel critical genetic modifiers of HTT CAG instability, point to Mlh1 genetic variation as the likely source of the instability difference in B6 and 129 strains and suggest that MLH1

  15. Mismatch repair genes Mlh1 and Mlh3 modify CAG instability in Huntington's disease mice: genome-wide and candidate approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Mouro Pinto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Huntington's disease gene (HTT CAG repeat mutation undergoes somatic expansion that correlates with pathogenesis. Modifiers of somatic expansion may therefore provide routes for therapies targeting the underlying mutation, an approach that is likely applicable to other trinucleotide repeat diseases. Huntington's disease Hdh(Q111 mice exhibit higher levels of somatic HTT CAG expansion on a C57BL/6 genetic background (B6.Hdh(Q111 than on a 129 background (129.Hdh(Q111 . Linkage mapping in (B6x129.Hdh(Q111 F2 intercross animals identified a single quantitative trait locus underlying the strain-specific difference in expansion in the striatum, implicating mismatch repair (MMR gene Mlh1 as the most likely candidate modifier. Crossing B6.Hdh(Q111 mice onto an Mlh1 null background demonstrated that Mlh1 is essential for somatic CAG expansions and that it is an enhancer of nuclear huntingtin accumulation in striatal neurons. Hdh(Q111 somatic expansion was also abolished in mice deficient in the Mlh3 gene, implicating MutLγ (MLH1-MLH3 complex as a key driver of somatic expansion. Strikingly, Mlh1 and Mlh3 genes encoding MMR effector proteins were as critical to somatic expansion as Msh2 and Msh3 genes encoding DNA mismatch recognition complex MutSβ (MSH2-MSH3. The Mlh1 locus is highly polymorphic between B6 and 129 strains. While we were unable to detect any difference in base-base mismatch or short slipped-repeat repair activity between B6 and 129 MLH1 variants, repair efficiency was MLH1 dose-dependent. MLH1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in 129 mice compared to B6 mice, consistent with a dose-sensitive MLH1-dependent DNA repair mechanism underlying the somatic expansion difference between these strains. Together, these data identify Mlh1 and Mlh3 as novel critical genetic modifiers of HTT CAG instability, point to Mlh1 genetic variation as the likely source of the instability difference in B6 and 129 strains and suggest

  16. Radiation-induced colon cancer with high frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H), report of a case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Masami; Ueno, Masashi; Koizumi, Koichi [Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital] [and others

    2002-07-01

    We report a 67-year-old female with radiation-induced colon cancer which developed 23 years after radiation therapy for cancer of the endometrium. She was strongly suspected to be a case of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) due to her clinical manifestations, i.e. metachronous multiple cancer developed in the endometrium and colon. MSI test and immunohistochemistry for mismatch repair (MMR) proteins revealed that MSI was highly positive and expression of hMSH2 was lost in the colon cancers. Further, on examining the genetic change, the point mutation, ACG{yields}ATG, responsible for amino acid change, was detected in codon8 (exon1) of the hMSH2 gene. The change, however, could be a polymorphism of this gene and further analyses were necessitated to confirm the genetic background for HNPCC. Interestingly, three cancers with adenoma were located in the mucosa of radiation colitis, in which several atypical glands were also found. This is the only case of radiation-induced colorectal cancer with MSI-H in our hospital. Because of our previous studies, we believe that the genetic pathway in carcinogenesis of the radiation-induced colon cancer is different from that of HNPCC, despite their having several kinds of clinical and pathological features in common. (author)

  17. Radiation-induced colon cancer with high frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H), report of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Masami; Ueno, Masashi; Koizumi, Koichi

    2002-01-01

    We report a 67-year-old female with radiation-induced colon cancer which developed 23 years after radiation therapy for cancer of the endometrium. She was strongly suspected to be a case of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) due to her clinical manifestations, i.e. metachronous multiple cancer developed in the endometrium and colon. MSI test and immunohistochemistry for mismatch repair (MMR) proteins revealed that MSI was highly positive and expression of hMSH2 was lost in the colon cancers. Further, on examining the genetic change, the point mutation, ACG→ATG, responsible for amino acid change, was detected in codon8 (exon1) of the hMSH2 gene. The change, however, could be a polymorphism of this gene and further analyses were necessitated to confirm the genetic background for HNPCC. Interestingly, three cancers with adenoma were located in the mucosa of radiation colitis, in which several atypical glands were also found. This is the only case of radiation-induced colorectal cancer with MSI-H in our hospital. Because of our previous studies, we believe that the genetic pathway in carcinogenesis of the radiation-induced colon cancer is different from that of HNPCC, despite their having several kinds of clinical and pathological features in common. (author)

  18. Genome-wide pharmacogenomic study of citalopram-induced side effects in STAR*D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, D E; Clark, S L; Åberg, K; Hettema, J M; Bukszár, J; McClay, J L; Souza, R P; van den Oord, E J C G

    2012-07-03

    Affecting about 1 in 12 Americans annually, depression is a leading cause of the global disease burden. While a range of effective antidepressants are now available, failure and relapse rates remain substantial, with intolerable side effect burden the most commonly cited reason for discontinuation. Thus, understanding individual differences in susceptibility to antidepressant therapy side effects will be essential to optimize depression treatment. Here we perform genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify genetic variation influencing susceptibility to citalopram-induced side effects. The analysis sample consisted of 1762 depression patients, successfully genotyped for 421K single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), from the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR(*)D) study. Outcomes included five indicators of citalopram side effects: general side effect burden, overall tolerability, sexual side effects, dizziness and vision/hearing side effects. Two SNPs met our genome-wide significance criterion (qeffects of citalopram on vision/hearing side effects (P=3.27 × 10(-8), q=0.026). The second genome-wide significant finding, representing a haplotype spanning ∼30 kb and eight genotyped SNPs in a gene desert on chromosome 13, was associated with general side effect burden (P=3.22 × 10(-7), q=0.096). Suggestive findings were also found for SNPs at LAMA1, AOX2P, EGFLAM, FHIT and RTP2. Although our findings require replication and functional validation, this study demonstrates the potential of GWAS to discover genes and pathways that potentially mediate adverse effects of antidepressant medications.

  19. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M; Churkin, Dmitry V; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2016-08-09

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin-Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system-spectrally dependent losses-achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin-Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering.

  20. Development of radiation-induced mutation techniques and functional genomics studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Sub; Kang, Si Yong; Kim, Jin Baek [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2012-01-15

    This project has been performed to develop plant genetic resources using radiation (gamma-rays, ion-beam, space environments), to conduct functional genomics studies with mutant resources, and to develop new radiation plant breeding techniques using various radiation sources during 3 years. In the first section, we developed flower genetic resources, functional crop resources, and bio-industrial plant resources. In the second section, we cloned several mutated genes and studied mechanisms of gene expression and genetic diversity of mutations induced by gamma-rays. In the third section, we developed new plant breeding techniques using gamma-phytotron, heavy ion-beam, and space environments. Based on these results, a total of 8 cultivars containing Chrysanthemum, Hibiscus, kenaf, rice, and soybean were applied for plant variety protection (PVP) and a total of 4 cultivars were registered for PVP. Also, license agreement for the dwarf type Hibiscus mutant 'Ggoma' was conducted with Supro co. and the manufacturing technology for natural antioxidant pear-grape vinegar was transferred into Enzenic co. Also, 8 gene sequences, such as F3'H and LDOX genes associated with flower color in Chrysanthemum and EPSPS gene from Korean lawn grass, were registered in the database of National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). In the future study, we will develop new radiation mutation breeding techniques through the mutation spectrum induced by various radiation sources, the studies for mechanism of the cellular response to radiation, and the comparative{center_dot}structural{center_dot}functional genomics studies for useful traits.

  1. Bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy: A genome-wide association study on multiple myeloma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Chiara; da Silva Filho, Miguel Inacio; Weinhold, Niels; Mahmoudpour, Seyed Hamidreza; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Hemminki, Kari; Merz, Maximilian; Försti, Asta

    2018-02-01

    The proteasome-inhibitor bortezomib was introduced into the treatment of multiple myeloma more than a decade ago. It is clinically beneficial, but peripheral neuropathy (PNP) is a side effect that may limit its use in some patients. To examine the possible genetic predisposing factors to PNP, we performed a genome-wide association study on 646 bortezomib-treated German multiple myeloma patients. Our aim was to identify genetic risk variants associated with the development of PNP as a serious side effect of the treatment. We identified 4 new promising loci for bortezomib-induced PNP at 4q34.3 (rs6552496), 5q14.1 (rs12521798), 16q23.3 (rs8060632), and 18q21.2 (rs17748074). Even though the results did not reach genome-wide significance level, they support the idea of previous studies, suggesting a genetic basis for neurotoxicity. The identified single nucleotide polymorphisms map to genes or next to genes involved in the development and function of the nervous system (CDH13, DCC, and TENM3). As possible functional clues, 2 of the variants, rs12521798 and rs17748074, affect enhancer histone marks in the brain. The rs12521798 may also impact expression of THBS4, which affects specific signal trasduction pathways in the nervous system. Further research is needed to clarify the mechanism of action of the identified single nucleotide polymorphisms in the development of drug-induced PNP and to functionally validate our in silico predictions. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Fungal-induced cell cycle impairment, chromosome instability and apoptosis via differential activation of NF-κB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariem Ben-Abdallah

    Full Text Available Microbial pathogens have developed efficient strategies to compromise host immune responses. Cryptococcus neoformans is a facultative intracellular pathogen, recognised as the most common cause of systemic fungal infections leading to severe meningoencephalitis, mainly in immunocompromised patients. This yeast is characterized by a polysaccharide capsule, which inhibits its phagocytosis. Whereas phagocytosis escape and macrophage intracellular survival have been intensively studied, extracellular survival of this yeast and restraint of host innate immune response are still poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated whether C. neoformans affected macrophage cell viability and whether NF-κB (nuclear factor-κB, a key regulator of cell growth, apoptosis and inflammation, was involved. Using wild-type (WT as well as mutant strains of C. neoformans for the pathogen side, and WT and mutant cell lines with altered NF-κB activity or signalling as well as primary macrophages for the host side, we show that C. neoformans manipulated NF-κB-mediated signalling in a unique way to regulate macrophage cell fate and viability. On the one hand, serotype A strains reduced macrophage proliferation in a capsule-independent fashion. This growth decrease, which required a critical dosage of NF-κB activity, was caused by cell cycle disruption and aneuploidy, relying on fungal-induced modification of expression of several cell cycle checkpoint regulators in S and G2/M phases. On the other hand, C. neoformans infection induced macrophage apoptosis in a capsule-dependent manner with a differential requirement of the classical and alternative NF-κB signalling pathways, the latter one being essential. Together, these findings shed new light on fungal strategies to subvert host response through uncoupling of NF-κB activity in pathogen-controlled apoptosis and impairment of cell cycle progression. They also provide the first demonstration of induction of

  3. Genome-wide association study of epirubicin-induced leukopenia in Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Yuvaraj; Sasa, Mitsunori; Honda, Junko; Takahashi, Atsushi; Uno, Satoko; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Zembutsu, Hitoshi

    2011-09-01

    Despite long-term clinical experience with epirubicin, unpredictable severe adverse reactions remain an important determinant to limit the drug use. To identify a genetic factor(s) affecting the risk of epirubicin-induced leukopenia/neutropenia, we performed a genome-wide association study. We studied 270 patients consisting of 67 patients with grade 3 or 4 leukopenia/neutropenia, and 203 patients showing no toxicity (patients with grade 1 or 2 were excluded from the study) for genome-wide association study. We further examined the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) showing P values of less than 0.0001 using an additional set of 48 patients with grade 3/4 leukopenia/neutropenia. The combined analysis indicated that rs2916733 in microcephalin 1 [combined PFisher min=2.27×10, odds ratio (OR)=2.74 with 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.96-3.83; the nonrisk genotype as reference] was significantly associated with epirubicin-induced leukopenia/neutropenia. A subgroup analysis of patients with only breast cancer showed a similar trend of association for the marker SNP rs2916733 (combined PFisher min=6.76×10, OR=2.80 with 95% CI=1.86-4.21). We subsequently performed haplotype analysis and found that a haplotype constructed from rs2916733 and rs1031309, which was in linkage disequilibrium with rs2916733 (r=0.64), showed stronger association (P=2.20×10, OR=2.88 with 95% CI=2.05-4.03) than a single landmark SNP (rs2916733; P=2.27×10, OR=2.74 with 95% CI=1.96-3.83), suggesting that causative variant(s) that could influence the susceptibility of epirubicin-induced adverse drug reactions (ADRs) might exist in this haplotype. Our findings show that genetic variants in the microcephalin 1 locus are suggestively associated with the risk of epirubicin-induced ADRs and might be applicable in development of diagnostic system for predicting the risk of the ADRs, leading to better prognosis and quality of life for patients with cancer. However, these results should be considered

  4. Eicosapentaenoic acid prevents high fat diet-induced metabolic disorders: Genomic and metabolomic analyses of underlying mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previously our lab demonstrated eicosapenaenoic acid (EPA)'s ability to prevent high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity by decreasing insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and inflammation. In the current study, we used genomic and metabolomic approaches to further investigate the molecular basis for t...

  5. Scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in the ASDEX upgrade tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Muñoz, M; Fahrbach, H-U; Zohm, H

    2009-05-01

    A scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses has been designed and installed on the ASDEX upgrade (AUG) tokamak [A. Herrmann and O. Gruber, Fusion Sci. Technol. 44, 569 (2003)]. The detector resolves in time the energy and pitch angle of fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) fluctuations. The use of a novel scintillator material with a very short decay time and high quantum efficiency allows to identify the MHD fluctuations responsible for the ion losses through Fourier analysis. A Faraday cup (secondary scintillator plate) has been embedded behind the scintillator plate for an absolute calibration of the detector. The detector is mounted on a manipulator to vary its radial position with respect to the plasma. A thermocouple on the inner side of the graphite protection enables the safety search for the most adequate radial position. To align the scintillator light pattern with the light detectors a system composed by a lens and a vacuum-compatible halogen lamp has been allocated within the detector head. In this paper, the design of the scintillator probe, as well as the new technique used to analyze the data through spectrograms will be described. A last section is devoted to discuss the diagnosis prospects of this method for ITER [M. Shimada et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, S1 (2007)].

  6. Cross-Diffusion Induced Turing Instability and Amplitude Equation for a Toxic-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton Model with Nonmonotonic Functional Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Renji; Dai, Binxiang

    2017-06-01

    The spatiotemporal pattern induced by cross-diffusion of a toxic-phytoplankton-zooplankton model with nonmonotonic functional response is investigated in this paper. The linear stability analysis shows that cross-diffusion is the key mechanism for the formation of spatial patterns. By taking cross-diffusion rate as bifurcation parameter, we derive amplitude equations near the Turing bifurcation point for the excited modes in the framework of a weakly nonlinear theory, and the stability analysis of the amplitude equations interprets the structural transitions and stability of various forms of Turing patterns. Furthermore, we illustrate the theoretical results via numerical simulations. It is shown that the spatiotemporal distribution of the plankton is homogeneous in the absence of cross-diffusion. However, when the cross-diffusivity is greater than the critical value, the spatiotemporal distribution of all the plankton species becomes inhomogeneous in spaces and results in different kinds of patterns: spot, stripe, and the mixture of spot and stripe patterns depending on the cross-diffusivity. Simultaneously, the impact of toxin-producing rate of toxic-phytoplankton (TPP) species and natural death rate of zooplankton species on pattern selection is also explored.

  7. Direct and inverted repeats elicit genetic instability by both exploiting and eluding DNA double-strand break repair systems in mycobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina A Wojcik

    Full Text Available Repetitive DNA sequences with the potential to form alternative DNA conformations, such as slipped structures and cruciforms, can induce genetic instability by promoting replication errors and by serving as a substrate for DNA repair proteins, which may lead to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. However, the contribution of each of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR, non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ and single-strand annealing (SSA, to this sort of genetic instability is not fully understood. Herein, we assessed the genome-wide distribution of repetitive DNA sequences in the Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli genomes, and determined the types and frequencies of genetic instability induced by direct and inverted repeats, both in the presence and in the absence of HR, NHEJ, and SSA. All three genomes are strongly enriched in direct repeats and modestly enriched in inverted repeats. When using chromosomally integrated constructs in M. smegmatis, direct repeats induced the perfect deletion of their intervening sequences ~1,000-fold above background. Absence of HR further enhanced these perfect deletions, whereas absence of NHEJ or SSA had no influence, suggesting compromised replication fidelity. In contrast, inverted repeats induced perfect deletions only in the absence of SSA. Both direct and inverted repeats stimulated excision of the constructs from the attB integration sites independently of HR, NHEJ, or SSA. With episomal constructs, direct and inverted repeats triggered DNA instability by activating nucleolytic activity, and absence of the DSB repair pathways (in the order NHEJ>HR>SSA exacerbated this instability. Thus, direct and inverted repeats may elicit genetic instability in mycobacteria by 1 directly interfering with replication fidelity, 2 stimulating the three main DSB repair pathways, and 3 enticing L5 site-specific recombination.

  8. Direct and inverted repeats elicit genetic instability by both exploiting and eluding DNA double-strand break repair systems in mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Ewelina A; Brzostek, Anna; Bacolla, Albino; Mackiewicz, Pawel; Vasquez, Karen M; Korycka-Machala, Malgorzata; Jaworski, Adam; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences with the potential to form alternative DNA conformations, such as slipped structures and cruciforms, can induce genetic instability by promoting replication errors and by serving as a substrate for DNA repair proteins, which may lead to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). However, the contribution of each of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR), non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and single-strand annealing (SSA), to this sort of genetic instability is not fully understood. Herein, we assessed the genome-wide distribution of repetitive DNA sequences in the Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli genomes, and determined the types and frequencies of genetic instability induced by direct and inverted repeats, both in the presence and in the absence of HR, NHEJ, and SSA. All three genomes are strongly enriched in direct repeats and modestly enriched in inverted repeats. When using chromosomally integrated constructs in M. smegmatis, direct repeats induced the perfect deletion of their intervening sequences ~1,000-fold above background. Absence of HR further enhanced these perfect deletions, whereas absence of NHEJ or SSA had no influence, suggesting compromised replication fidelity. In contrast, inverted repeats induced perfect deletions only in the absence of SSA. Both direct and inverted repeats stimulated excision of the constructs from the attB integration sites independently of HR, NHEJ, or SSA. With episomal constructs, direct and inverted repeats triggered DNA instability by activating nucleolytic activity, and absence of the DSB repair pathways (in the order NHEJ>HR>SSA) exacerbated this instability. Thus, direct and inverted repeats may elicit genetic instability in mycobacteria by 1) directly interfering with replication fidelity, 2) stimulating the three main DSB repair pathways, and 3) enticing L5 site-specific recombination.

  9. Influence of cytosine methylation on ultraviolet-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation in genomic DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochette, Patrick J. [Division of Pathology, Department of Medical Biology, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Division of Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Lacoste, Sandrine [Division of Pathology, Department of Medical Biology, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Division of Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada); Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Therrien, Jean-Philippe [Division of Pathology, Department of Medical Biology, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Bastien, Nathalie [Division of Pathology, Department of Medical Biology, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Division of Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada); Brash, Douglas E. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Drouin, Regen, E-mail: Regen.Drouin@USherbrooke.ca [Division of Pathology, Department of Medical Biology, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Division of Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada)

    2009-06-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) component of sunlight is the main cause of skin cancer. More than 50% of all non-melanoma skin cancers and >90% of squamous cell carcinomas in the US carry a sunlight-induced mutation in the p53 tumor suppressor gene. These mutations have a strong tendency to occur at methylated cytosines. Ligation-mediated PCR (LMPCR) was used to compare at nucleotide resolution DNA photoproduct formation at dipyrimidine sites either containing or lacking a methylated cytosine. For this purpose, we exploited the fact that the X chromosome is methylated in females only on the inactive X chromosome, and that the FMR1 (fragile-X mental retardation 1) gene is methylated only in fragile-X syndrome male patients. Purified genomic DNA was irradiated with UVC (254 nm), UVB (290-320 nm) or monochromatic UVB (302 and 313 nm) to determine the effect of different wavelengths on cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation along the X-linked PGK1 (phosphoglycerate kinase 1) and FMR1 genes. We show that constitutive methylation of cytosine increases the frequency of UVB-induced CPD formation by 1.7-fold, confirming that methylation per se is influencing the probability of damage formation. This was true for both UVB sources used, either broadband or monochromatic, but not for UVC. Our data prove unequivocally that following UVB exposure methylated cytosines are significantly more susceptible to CPD formation compared with unmethylated cytosines.

  10. Influence of cytosine methylation on ultraviolet-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation in genomic DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochette, Patrick J.; Lacoste, Sandrine; Therrien, Jean-Philippe; Bastien, Nathalie; Brash, Douglas E.; Drouin, Regen

    2009-01-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) component of sunlight is the main cause of skin cancer. More than 50% of all non-melanoma skin cancers and >90% of squamous cell carcinomas in the US carry a sunlight-induced mutation in the p53 tumor suppressor gene. These mutations have a strong tendency to occur at methylated cytosines. Ligation-mediated PCR (LMPCR) was used to compare at nucleotide resolution DNA photoproduct formation at dipyrimidine sites either containing or lacking a methylated cytosine. For this purpose, we exploited the fact that the X chromosome is methylated in females only on the inactive X chromosome, and that the FMR1 (fragile-X mental retardation 1) gene is methylated only in fragile-X syndrome male patients. Purified genomic DNA was irradiated with UVC (254 nm), UVB (290-320 nm) or monochromatic UVB (302 and 313 nm) to determine the effect of different wavelengths on cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation along the X-linked PGK1 (phosphoglycerate kinase 1) and FMR1 genes. We show that constitutive methylation of cytosine increases the frequency of UVB-induced CPD formation by 1.7-fold, confirming that methylation per se is influencing the probability of damage formation. This was true for both UVB sources used, either broadband or monochromatic, but not for UVC. Our data prove unequivocally that following UVB exposure methylated cytosines are significantly more susceptible to CPD formation compared with unmethylated cytosines.

  11. The physics of transverse mode instability-induced nonlinear phase distortions in large area optical fiber amplifiers and their mitigation with applications in scaling of pulsed and continuous wave high-energy lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-13

    Technol.Lett.11, 39 (1999) 21. Y. Panbiharwala, C. S. Kumar, D. Venkitesh, and B. Srinivasan in International Conference on Fibre Optics and Photonics...24. Y. Panbiharwala, C. S. Kumar, D. Venkitesh, and B. Srinivasan in International Conference on Fibre Optics and Photonics, OSA Technical Digest...AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0001 The physics of transverse mode instability-induced nonlinear phase distortions in large area optical fiber amplifiers and

  12. Microsatellite instability in human mammary epithelial cells transformed by heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanada, S.; Yang, T. C.; George, K.; Okayasu, R.; Ando, K.; Tsujii, H.

    1998-11-01

    We analyzed DNA and proteins obtained from normal and transformed human mammary epithelial cells for studying the neoplastic transformation by high-LET irradiation in vitro. We also examined microsatellite instability in human mammary cells transformed to various stages of carcinogenesis, such as normal, growth variant and tumorigenic, using microsatellite marker D5S177 on the chromosome 5 and CY17 on the Chromosome 10. Microsatellite instabilities were detected in the tumorigenic stage. These results suggest that microsatellite instability may play a role in the progression of tumorigenecity. The cause of the genomic instability has been suggested as abnormalities of DNA-repair systems which may be due to one of the three reasons: 1) alterations of cell cycle regulating genes. 2) mutations in any of the DNA mismatch repair genes, 3) mutation in any of the DNA strand breaks repair genes. No abnormality of these genes and encoded proteins, however was found in the present studies. These studies thus suggest that the microsatellite instability is induced by an alternative mechanism.

  13. Genome-wide mapping of histone H3K9me2 in acute myeloid leukemia reveals large chromosomal domains associated with massive gene silencing and sites of genome instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C Salzberg

    Full Text Available A facultative heterochromatin mark, histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2, which is mediated by histone methyltransferases G9a/GLP (EHMT2/1, undergoes dramatic rearrangements during myeloid cell differentiation as observed by chromatin imaging. To determine whether these structural transitions also involve genomic repositioning of H3K9me2, we used ChIP-sequencing to map genome-wide topography of H3K9me2 in normal human granulocytes, normal CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors, primary myeloblasts from acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients, and a model leukemia cell line K562. We observe that H3K9me2 naturally repositions from the previously designated "repressed" chromatin state in hematopoietic progenitors to predominant association with heterochromatin regions in granulocytes. In contrast, AML cells accumulate H3K9me2 on previously undefined large (> 100 Kb genomic blocks that are enriched with AML-specific single nucleotide variants, sites of chromosomal translocations, and genes downregulated in AML. Specifically, the AML-specific H3K9me2 blocks are enriched with genes regulated by the proto-oncogene ERG that promotes stem cell characteristics. The AML-enriched H3K9me2 blocks (in contrast to the heterochromatin-associated H3K9me2 blocks enriched in granulocytes are reduced by pharmacological inhibition of the histone methyltransferase G9a/GLP in K562 cells concomitantly with transcriptional activation of ERG and ETS1 oncogenes. Our data suggest that G9a/GLP mediate formation of transient H3K9me2 blocks that are preserved in AML myeloblasts and may lead to an increased rate of AML-specific mutagenesis and chromosomal translocations.

  14. Genome-wide mapping of histone H3K9me2 in acute myeloid leukemia reveals large chromosomal domains associated with massive gene silencing and sites of genome instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzberg, Anna C; Harris-Becker, Abigail; Popova, Evgenya Y; Keasey, Nikki; Loughran, Thomas P; Claxton, David F; Grigoryev, Sergei A

    2017-01-01

    A facultative heterochromatin mark, histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2), which is mediated by histone methyltransferases G9a/GLP (EHMT2/1), undergoes dramatic rearrangements during myeloid cell differentiation as observed by chromatin imaging. To determine whether these structural transitions also involve genomic repositioning of H3K9me2, we used ChIP-sequencing to map genome-wide topography of H3K9me2 in normal human granulocytes, normal CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors, primary myeloblasts from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, and a model leukemia cell line K562. We observe that H3K9me2 naturally repositions from the previously designated "repressed" chromatin state in hematopoietic progenitors to predominant association with heterochromatin regions in granulocytes. In contrast, AML cells accumulate H3K9me2 on previously undefined large (> 100 Kb) genomic blocks that are enriched with AML-specific single nucleotide variants, sites of chromosomal translocations, and genes downregulated in AML. Specifically, the AML-specific H3K9me2 blocks are enriched with genes regulated by the proto-oncogene ERG that promotes stem cell characteristics. The AML-enriched H3K9me2 blocks (in contrast to the heterochromatin-associated H3K9me2 blocks enriched in granulocytes) are reduced by pharmacological inhibition of the histone methyltransferase G9a/GLP in K562 cells concomitantly with transcriptional activation of ERG and ETS1 oncogenes. Our data suggest that G9a/GLP mediate formation of transient H3K9me2 blocks that are preserved in AML myeloblasts and may lead to an increased rate of AML-specific mutagenesis and chromosomal translocations.

  15. Karyotypic Determinants of Chromosome Instability in Aneuploid Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, William D.; Li, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies in cancer cells and budding yeast demonstrated that aneuploidy, the state of having abnormal chromosome numbers, correlates with elevated chromosome instability (CIN), i.e. the propensity of gaining and losing chromosomes at a high frequency. Here we have investigated ploidy- and chromosome-specific determinants underlying aneuploidy-induced CIN by observing karyotype dynamics in fully isogenic aneuploid yeast strains with ploidies between 1N and 2N obtained through a random meiotic process. The aneuploid strains exhibited various levels of whole-chromosome instability (i.e. chromosome gains and losses). CIN correlates with cellular ploidy in an unexpected way: cells with a chromosomal content close to the haploid state are significantly more stable than cells displaying an apparent ploidy between 1.5 and 2N. We propose that the capacity for accurate chromosome segregation by the mitotic system does not scale continuously with an increasing number of chromosomes, but may occur via discrete steps each time a full set of chromosomes is added to the genome. On top of such general ploidy-related effect, CIN is also associated with the presence of specific aneuploid chromosomes as well as dosage imbalance between specific chromosome pairs. Our findings potentially help reconcile the divide between gene-centric versus genome-centric theories in cancer evolution. PMID:22615582

  16. Galloping instability to chaos of cables

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Albert C J

    2017-01-01

    This book provides students and researchers with a systematic solution for fluid-induced structural vibrations, galloping instability and the chaos of cables. They will also gain a better understanding of stable and unstable periodic motions and chaos in fluid-induced structural vibrations. Further, the results presented here will help engineers effectively design and analyze fluid-induced vibrations.

  17. Aeroelastic instability problems for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Hartvig

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the aeroelostic instabilities that have occurred and may still occur for modem commercial wind turbines: stall-induced vibrations for stall-turbines, and classical flutter for pitch-regulated turbines. A review of previous works is combined with derivations of analytical sta...... issues that represent unsolved aeroelostic instability problems for wind turbines. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.......This paper deals with the aeroelostic instabilities that have occurred and may still occur for modem commercial wind turbines: stall-induced vibrations for stall-turbines, and classical flutter for pitch-regulated turbines. A review of previous works is combined with derivations of analytical...... stability limits for typical blade sections that show the fundamental mechanisms of these instabilities. The risk of stall-induced vibrations is mainly related to blade airfoil characteristics, effective direction of blade vibrations and structural damping, whereas the blade tip speed, torsional blade...

  18. A genome-wide association study of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is one of the most common adverse events caused by conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, yet there has been very little progress in the prevention or treatment of this side effect. Although this is not a life-threatening event, alopecia is very psychologically difficult for many women to manage. In order to improve the quality of life for these women, it is important to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced alopecia and develop ways to effectively prevent and/or treat it. To identify the genetic risk factors associated with chemotherapy-induced alopecia, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using DNA samples from breast cancer patients who were treated with chemotherapy. Methods We performed a case-control association study of 303 individuals who developed grade 2 alopecia, and compared them with 880 breast cancer patients who did not show hair loss after being treated with conventional chemotherapy. In addition, we separately analyzed a subset of patients who received specific combination therapies by GWASs and applied the weighted genetic risk scoring (wGRS) system to investigate the cumulative effects of the associated SNPs. Results We identified an SNP significantly associated with drug-induced grade 2 alopecia (rs3820706 in CACNB4 (calcium channel voltage-dependent subunit beta 4) on 2q23, P = 8.13 × 10-9, OR = 3.71) and detected several SNPs that showed some suggestive associations by subgroup analyses. We also classified patients into four groups on the basis of wGRS analysis and found that patients who classified in the highest risk group showed 443 times higher risk of antimicrotubule agents-induced alopecia than the lowest risk group. Conclusions Our study suggests several associated genes and should shed some light on the molecular mechanism of alopecia in chemotherapy-treated breast cancer patients and hopefully will contribute to development of interventions that will

  19. Posterolateral elbow joint instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole; Nielsen, K K

    1998-01-01

    Thirty-five osteoligamentous elbows were included in a study on the kinematics of posterolateral elbow joint instability during the pivot shift test (PST) before and after separate ligament cuttings in the lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC). Division of the annular ligament or the lateral...... ulnar collateral ligament caused no laxity during the PST. Division of the lateral collateral ligament caused maximal laxity of 4 degrees and 23 degrees during forced PST in valgus and external rotation (supination), respectively. Cutting of the LCLC at the ulnar or the humeral insertion was necessary...... for any PST stressed elbow joint laxity to occur. Total division of the LCLC induced a maximal laxity of 7.9 degrees and 37 degrees during forced PST in valgus and external rotation (supination), respectively. This study suggests the lateral collateral ligament to be the primary soft tissue constraint...

  20. Reply to ‘Comment on the paper N. A. Dyatko, I. V. Kochetov and A. P. Napartovich ‘Non-thermal plasma instabilities induced by deformation of the electron energy distribution function’, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 23 (2014) 043001’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyatko, N. A.; Kochetov, I. V.; Napartovich, A. P.

    2016-02-01

    In this reply we respond to the comment made by E A Bogdanov, M V Krasilnikov and A A Kudryavtsev on our review ‘Non-thermal plasma instabilities induced by deformation of the electron energy distribution function’.

  1. Reply to ‘Comment on the paper N. A. Dyatko, I. V. Kochetov and A. P. Napartovich ‘Non-thermal plasma instabilities induced by deformation of the electron energy distribution function’, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 23 (2014) 043001’

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyatko, N A; Kochetov, I V; Napartovich, A P

    2016-01-01

    In this reply we respond to the comment made by E A Bogdanov, M V Krasilnikov and A A Kudryavtsev on our review ‘Non-thermal plasma instabilities induced by deformation of the electron energy distribution function’. (reply)

  2. Genome wide transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to stress-induced perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal eTaymaz-Nikerel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cells respond to environmental and/or genetic perturbations in order to survive and proliferate. Characterization of the changes after various stimuli at different -omics levels is crucial to comprehend the adaptation of cells to changing conditions. Genome wide quantification and analysis of transcript levels, the genes affected by perturbations, extends our understanding of cellular metabolism by pointing out the mechanisms that play role in sensing the stress caused by those perturbations and related signaling pathways, and in this way guides us to achieve endeavors such as rational engineering of cells or interpretation of disease mechanisms. Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system has been studied in response to different perturbations and corresponding transcriptional profiles were followed either statically or/and dynamically, short- and long- term. This review focuses on response of yeast cells to diverse stress inducing perturbations including nutritional changes, ionic stress, salt stress, oxidative stress, osmotic shock, as well as to genetic interventions such as deletion and over-expression of genes. It is aimed to conclude on common regulatory phenomena that allow yeast to organize its transcriptomic response after any perturbation under different external conditions.

  3. Graft-accelerated virus-induced gene silencing facilitates functional genomics in rose flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huijun; Shi, Shaochuan; Ma, Nan; Cao, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Hao; Qiu, Xianqin; Wang, Qigang; Jian, Hongying; Zhou, Ningning; Zhang, Zhao; Tang, Kaixue

    2018-01-01

    Rose has emerged as a model ornamental plant for studies of flower development, senescence, and morphology, as well as the metabolism of floral fragrances and colors. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has long been used in functional genomics studies of rose by vacuum infiltration of cuttings or seedlings with an Agrobacterium suspension carrying TRV-derived vectors. However, VIGS in rose flowers remains a challenge because of its low efficiency and long time to establish silencing. Here we present a novel and rapid VIGS method that can be used to analyze gene function in rose, called 'graft-accelerated VIGS', where axillary sprouts are cut from the rose plant and vacuum infiltrated with Agrobacterium. The inoculated scions are then grafted back onto the plants to flower and silencing phenotypes can be observed within 5 weeks, post-infiltration. Using this new method, we successfully silenced expression of the RhDFR1, RhAG, and RhNUDX1 in rose flowers, and affected their color, petal number, as well as fragrance, respectively. This grafting method will facilitate high-throughput functional analysis of genes in rose flowers. Importantly, it may also be applied to other woody species that are not currently amenable to VIGS by conventional leaf or plantlet/seedling infiltration methods. © 2017 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  4. Integrated Genomic Analysis of Diverse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from the Progenitor Cell Biology Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomonis, Nathan; Dexheimer, Phillip J; Omberg, Larsson; Schroll, Robin; Bush, Stacy; Huo, Jeffrey; Schriml, Lynn; Ho Sui, Shannan; Keddache, Mehdi; Mayhew, Christopher; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Wells, James; Daily, Kenneth; Hubler, Shane; Wang, Yuliang; Zambidis, Elias; Margolin, Adam; Hide, Winston; Hatzopoulos, Antonis K; Malik, Punam; Cancelas, Jose A; Aronow, Bruce J; Lutzko, Carolyn

    2016-07-12

    The rigorous characterization of distinct induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) derived from multiple reprogramming technologies, somatic sources, and donors is required to understand potential sources of variability and downstream potential. To achieve this goal, the Progenitor Cell Biology Consortium performed comprehensive experimental and genomic analyses of 58 iPSC from ten laboratories generated using a variety of reprogramming genes, vectors, and cells. Associated global molecular characterization studies identified functionally informative correlations in gene expression, DNA methylation, and/or copy-number variation among key developmental and oncogenic regulators as a result of donor, sex, line stability, reprogramming technology, and cell of origin. Furthermore, X-chromosome inactivation in PSC produced highly correlated differences in teratoma-lineage staining and regulator expression upon differentiation. All experimental results, and raw, processed, and metadata from these analyses, including powerful tools, are interactively accessible from a new online portal at https://www.synapse.org to serve as a reusable resource for the stem cell community. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Coordinated Changes in Mutation and Growth Rates Induced by Genome Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issei Nishimura

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome size is determined during evolution, but it can also be altered by genetic engineering in laboratories. The systematic characterization of reduced genomes provides valuable insights into the cellular properties that are quantitatively described by the global parameters related to the dynamics of growth and mutation. In the present study, we analyzed a small collection of W3110 Escherichia coli derivatives containing either the wild-type genome or reduced genomes of various lengths to examine whether the mutation rate, a global parameter representing genomic plasticity, was affected by genome reduction. We found that the mutation rates of these cells increased with genome reduction. The correlation between genome length and mutation rate, which has been reported for the evolution of bacteria, was also identified, intriguingly, for genome reduction. Gene function enrichment analysis indicated that the deletion of many of the genes encoding membrane and transport proteins play a role in the mutation rate changes mediated by genome reduction. Furthermore, the increase in the mutation rate with genome reduction was highly associated with a decrease in the growth rate in a nutrition-dependent manner; thus, poorer media showed a larger change that was of higher significance. This negative correlation was strongly supported by experimental evidence that the serial transfer of the reduced genome improved the growth rate and reduced the mutation rate to a large extent. Taken together, the global parameters corresponding to the genome, growth, and mutation showed a coordinated relationship, which might be an essential working principle for balancing the cellular dynamics appropriate to the environment.

  6. Disorder induced gap states as a cause of threshold voltage instabilities in Al2O3/AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matys, M.; Kaneki, S.; Nishiguchi, K.; Adamowicz, B.; Hashizume, T.

    2017-12-01

    We proposed that the disorder induced gap states (DIGS) can be responsible for the threshold voltage (Vth) instability in Al2O3/AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors. In order to verify this hypothesis, we performed the theoretical calculations of the capacitance voltage (C-V) curves for the Al2O3/AlGaN/GaN structures using the DIGS model and compared them with measured ones. We found that the experimental C-V curves with a complex hysteresis behavior varied with the maximum forward bias and the sweeping rate can be well reproduced theoretically by assuming a particular distribution in energy and space of the DIGS continuum near the Al2O3/AlGaN interface, i.e., a U-shaped energy density distribution and exponential depth decay from the interface into Al2O3 layer (up to 4 nm), as well as suitable DIGS capture cross sections (the order of magnitude of 10-15 cm2). Finally, we showed that the DIGS model can also explain the negative bias induced threshold voltage instability. We believe that these results should be critical for the successful development of the passivation techniques, which allows to minimize the Vth instability related effects.

  7. Comparison of space flight and heavy ion radiation induced genomic/epigenomic mutations in rice (Oryza sativa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinming; Lu, Weihong; Sun, Yeqing

    2014-04-01

    Rice seeds, after space flight and low dose heavy ion radiation treatment were cultured on ground. Leaves of the mature plants were obtained for examination of genomic/epigenomic mutations by using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and methylation sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) method, respectively. The mutation sites were identified by fragment recovery and sequencing. The heritability of the mutations was detected in the next generation. Results showed that both space flight and low dose heavy ion radiation can induce significant alterations on rice genome and epigenome (P < 0.05). For both genetic and epigenetic assays, while there was no significant difference in mutation rates and their ability to be inherited to the next generation, the site of mutations differed between the space flight and radiation treated groups. More than 50% of the mutation sites were shared by two radiation treated groups, radiated with different LET value and dose, while only about 20% of the mutation sites were shared by space flight group and radiation treated group. Moreover, in space flight group, we found that DNA methylation changes were more prone to occur on CNG sequence than CG sequence. Sequencing results proved that both space flight and heavy ion radiation induced mutations were widely spread on rice genome including coding region and repeated region. Our study described and compared the characters of space flight and low dose heavy ion radiation induced genomic/epigenomic mutations. Our data revealed the mechanisms of application of space environment for mutagenesis and crop breeding. Furthermore, this work implicated that the nature of mutations induced under space flight conditions may involve factors beyond ion radiation.

  8. Bisphenol A Inhibits Follicle Growth and Induces Atresia in Cultured Mouse Antral Follicles Independently of the Genomic Estrogenic Pathway1

    OpenAIRE

    Peretz, Jackye; Craig, Zelieann R.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2012-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an estrogenic chemical used to manufacture many commonly used plastic and epoxy resin-based products. BPA ubiquitously binds to estrogen receptors throughout the body, including estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) in the ovary. Few studies have investigated the effects of BPA on ovarian antral follicles. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that BPA alters cell cycle regulators and induces atresia in antral follicles via the genomic estrogenic pathway, inhibiting follicle growth. To...

  9. Use of RNA Domains in the Viral Genome as Innate Immunity Inducers for Antiviral Strategies and Vaccine Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Pulido, Miguel R.; Sobrino Castelló, Francisco; Borrego, Belén; Sáiz, Margarita

    2013-01-01

    This chapter will focus on the role of innate immunity induction on antiviral responses with an emphasis on nucleic acids as type-I interferon (IFN) inducers and their use as antiviral compounds and vaccine adjuvants. A general and up-to-date view of the different mechanisms operating in the host cell for sensing viral genomes will be given, as well as viral strategies counteracting this response through immune evasion or specifically targeted antagonism. Our own recent data describing the ab...

  10. Cinerama sickness and postural instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Jelte E; Ledegang, Wietse D; Lubeck, Astrid J A; Stins, John F

    2013-01-01

    Motion sickness symptoms and increased postural instability induced by motion pictures have been reported in a laboratory, but not in a real cinema. We, therefore, carried out an observational study recording sickness severity and postural instability in 19 subjects before, immediately and 45 min after watching a 1 h 3D aviation documentary in a cinema. Sickness was significantly larger right after the movie than before, and in a lesser extent still so after 45 min. The average standard deviation of the lateral centre of pressure excursions was significantly larger only right afterwards. When low-pass filtered at 0.1 Hz, lateral and for-aft excursions were both significantly larger right after the movie, while for-aft excursions then remained larger even after 45 min. Speculating on previous findings, we predict more sickness and postural instability in 3D than in 2D movies, also suggesting a possible, but yet unknown risk for work-related activities and vehicle operation. Watching motion pictures may be sickening and posturally destabilising, but effects in a cinema are unknown. We, therefore, carried out an observational study showing that sickness then is mainly an issue during the exposure while postural instability is an issue afterwards.

  11. Instability of expanded simple tandem repeats is induced in cell culture by a variety of agents: N-Nitroso-N-ethylurea, benzo(a)pyrene, etoposide and okadaic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyzos, Aris; Parfett, Craig; Healy, Caroline; Douglas, George R.; Yauk, Carole L.

    2006-01-01

    Expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) sequences have proven useful biomarkers to detect genotoxicity in vivo. Their high sensitivity has been used to assess environmentally relevant doses of mutagens such as ionizing radiation, DNA alkylating agents and airborne particulate pollution, for germline mutations in mouse assays. The mutagenic response involves size alteration of these ESTR loci induced by agents causing a variety of cellular damage. The mechanistic aspects of this induced instability remain unclear and have not been studied in detail. Mechanistic knowledge is important to help understand the relevance of increased ESTR mutation frequencies. In this study, we applied a murine cell culture system to examine induced response to four agents exhibiting different modes of toxic action including: N-nitroso-N-ethylurea (ENU), benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), okadaic acid and etoposide at slightly sub-toxic levels. We used single-molecule-polymerase chain reaction (SM-PCR) to assess the relative mutant frequency after 4-week chemical treatments at the Ms6-hm ESTR sequence of cultured C3H/10T1/2 cells (a mouse embryonic cell line). Increased mutation was observed with both 0.64 mM ENU (1.95-fold increase, P < 0.0001), 1 μM benzo(a)pyrene (1.87-fold increase, P = 0.0006) and 3 nM etoposide (1.89-fold increase, P = 0.0003). The putative ESTR mutagen okadaic acid (1.27-fold increase, P = 0.2289), administered at 0.5 nM, did not affect the C3H/10T1/2 Ms6-hm locus. Therefore, agents inducing small and bulky adducts, and indirectly causing strand breaks through inhibition of topoisomerase, caused similar induction of instability at an ESTR locus at matched toxicities. As size spectra for induced mutations were identical, the data indicate that although these chemicals exhibit distinct modes of action, a similar indirect process is influencing ESTR instability. In contrast, a potent tumour promoter that is a kinase inhibitor does not contribute to induced ESTR instability in cell

  12. Genome-wide high-resolution mapping of UV-induced mitotic recombination events in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and most other eukaryotes, mitotic recombination is important for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs. Mitotic recombination between homologous chromosomes can result in loss of heterozygosity (LOH. In this study, LOH events induced by ultraviolet (UV light are mapped throughout the genome to a resolution of about 1 kb using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP microarrays. UV doses that have little effect on the viability of diploid cells stimulate crossovers more than 1000-fold in wild-type cells. In addition, UV stimulates recombination in G1-synchronized cells about 10-fold more efficiently than in G2-synchronized cells. Importantly, at high doses of UV, most conversion events reflect the repair of two sister chromatids that are broken at approximately the same position whereas at low doses, most conversion events reflect the repair of a single broken chromatid. Genome-wide mapping of about 380 unselected crossovers, break-induced replication (BIR events, and gene conversions shows that UV-induced recombination events occur throughout the genome without pronounced hotspots, although the ribosomal RNA gene cluster has a significantly lower frequency of crossovers.

  13. Bosonic instability of charged black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaina, A.B.; Ternov, I.M.

    1986-01-01

    The processes of spontaneous and induced production and accumulation of charged bosons on quasibound superradiant levels in the field of Kerr-Newman black hole is analysed. It is shown that bosonic instability may be caused exclusively by the rotation of the black hole. Particulary, the Reissner-Nordstrom configuration is stable. In the case of rotating and charged black hole the bosonic instability may cause an increase of charge of the black hole

  14. Beam Instabilities in Circular Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067185

    2017-01-01

    The theory of impedance-induced bunched-beam coherent instabilities is reviewed following Laclare's formalism, adding the effect of an electronic damper in the transverse plane. Both single-bunch and coupled-bunch instabilities are discussed, both low-intensity and high-intensity regimes are analysed, both longitudinal and transverse planes are studied, and both short-bunch and long-bunch regimes are considered. Observables and mitigation measures are also examined.

  15. Evolution of herbivore-induced early defense signaling was shaped by genome-wide duplications inNicotiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenwu; Brockmöller, Thomas; Ling, Zhihao; Omdahl, Ashton; Baldwin, Ian T; Xu, Shuqing

    2016-11-04

    Herbivore-induced defenses are widespread, rapidly evolving and relevant for plant fitness. Such induced defenses are often mediated by early defense signaling (EDS) rapidly activated by the perception of herbivore associated elicitors (HAE) that includes transient accumulations of jasmonic acid (JA). Analyzing 60 HAE-induced leaf transcriptomes from closely-related Nicotiana species revealed a key gene co-expression network (M4 module) which is co-activated with the HAE-induced JA accumulations but is elicited independently of JA, as revealed in plants silenced in JA signaling. Functional annotations of the M4 module were consistent with roles in EDS and a newly identified hub gene of the M4 module (NaLRRK1) mediates a negative feedback loop with JA signaling. Phylogenomic analysis revealed preferential gene retention after genome-wide duplications shaped the evolution of HAE-induced EDS in Nicotiana . These results highlight the importance of genome-wide duplications in the evolution of adaptive traits in plants.

  16. Low power lasers on genomic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajano, Larissa Alexsandra da Silva Neto; Sergio, Luiz Philippe da Silva; Stumbo, Ana Carolina; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da

    2018-03-01

    Exposure of cells to genotoxic agents causes modifications in DNA, resulting to alterations in the genome. To reduce genomic instability, cells have DNA damage responses in which DNA repair proteins remove these lesions. Excessive free radicals cause DNA damages, repaired by base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair pathways. When non-oxidative lesions occur, genomic stability is maintained through checkpoints in which the cell cycle stops and DNA repair occurs. Telomere shortening is related to the development of various diseases, such as cancer. Low power lasers are used for treatment of a number of diseases, but they are also suggested to cause DNA damages at sub-lethal levels and alter transcript levels from DNA repair genes. This review focuses on genomic and telomere stabilization modulation as possible targets to improve therapeutic protocols based on low power lasers. Several studies have been carried out to evaluate the laser-induced effects on genome and telomere stabilization suggesting that exposure to these lasers modulates DNA repair mechanisms, telomere maintenance and genomic stabilization. Although the mechanisms are not well understood yet, low power lasers could be effective against DNA harmful agents by induction of DNA repair mechanisms and modulation of telomere maintenance and genomic stability. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of human-specific transcript variants induced by DNA insertions in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Seon; Hahn, Yoonsoo

    2011-01-01

    Many genes in the human genome produce a wide variety of transcript variants resulting from alternative exon splicing, differential promoter usage, or altered polyadenylation site utilization that may function differently in human cells. Here, we present a bioinformatics method for the systematic identification of human-specific novel transcript variants that might have arisen after the human-chimpanzee divergence. The procedure involved collecting genomic insertions that are unique to the human genome when compared with orthologous chimpanzee and rhesus macaque genomic regions, and that are expressed in the transcriptome as exons evidenced by mRNAs and/or expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Using this procedure, we identified 112 transcript variants that are specific to humans; 74 were associated with known genes and the remaining transcripts were located in unannotated genomic loci. The original source of inserts was mostly transposable elements including L1, Alu, SVA, and human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs). Interestingly, some non-repetitive genomic segments were also involved in the generation of novel transcript variants. Insert contributions to the transcripts included promoters, terminal exons and insertions in exons, splice donors and acceptors and complete exon cassettes. Comparison of personal genomes revealed that at least seven loci were polymorphic in humans. The exaptation of human-specific genomic inserts as novel transcript variants may have increased human gene versatility or affected gene regulation.

  18. Genetic instability in inherited and sporadic leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Henning D; Bohlander, Stefan K

    2010-12-01

    Genetic instability due to increased DNA damage and altered DNA repair is of central significance in the initiation and progression of inherited and sporadic human leukemias. Although very rare, some inherited DNA repair insufficiency syndromes (e.g., Fanconi anemia, Bloom's syndrome) have added substantially to our understanding of crucial mechanisms of leukemogenesis in recent years. Conversely, sporadic leukemias account for the main proportion of leukemias and here DNA damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a central role. Although the exact mechanisms of increased ROS production remain largely unknown and no single pathway has been detected thus far, some oncogenic proteins (e.g., the activated tyrosine kinases BCR-ABL1 and FLT3-ITD) seem to play a key role in driving genetic instability by increased ROS generation which influences the disease course (e.g., blast crisis in chronic myeloid leukemia or relapse in FLT3-ITD positive acute myeloid leukemia). Of course other mechanisms, which promote genetic instability in leukemia also exist. A newly emerging mechanism is the genome-wide alteration of epigenetic marks (e.g., hypomethylation of histone H3K79), which promotes chromosomal instability. Taken together genetic instability plays a critical role both in inherited and sporadic leukemias and emerges as a common theme in both inherited and sporadic leukemias. Beyond its theoretical impact, the analysis of genetic instability may lead the way to the development of innovative therapy strategies. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Sex Differences in Aging: Genomic Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Kathleen E; Riddle, Nicole C

    2018-01-16

    Aging is characterized by decreasing physiological integration, reduced function, loss of resilience, and increased risk of death. Paradoxically, although women live longer, they suffer greater morbidity particularly late in life. These sex differences in human lifespan and healthspan are consistently observed in all countries and during every era for which reliable data exist. While these differences are ubiquitous in humans, evidence of sex differences in longevity and health for other species is more equivocal. Among fruit flies, nematodes, and mice, sex differences in lifespan vary depending on strain and treatment. In this review, we focus on sex differences in age-related alterations in DNA damage and mutation rates, telomere attrition, epigenetics, and nuclear architecture. We find that robust sex differences exist, eg, the higher incidence of DNA damage in men compared to women, but sex differences are not often conserved between species. For most mechanisms reviewed here, there are insufficient data to make a clear determination regarding the impact of sex, largely because sex differences have not been analyzed. Overall, our findings reveal an urgent need for well-designed studies that explicitly examine sex differences in molecular drivers of aging. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Gene expression profile and genomic alterations in colonic tumours induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Femia, Angelo Pietro; Luceri, Cristina; Toti, Simona; Giannini, Augusto; Dolara, Piero; Caderni, Giovanna

    2010-01-01

    Azoxymethane (AOM) or 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats shares many phenotypical similarities with human sporadic colon cancer and is a reliable model for identifying chemopreventive agents. Genetic mutations relevant to human colon cancer have been described in this model, but comprehensive gene expression and genomic analysis have not been reported so far. Therefore, we applied genome-wide technologies to study variations in gene expression and genomic alterations in DMH-induced colon cancer in F344 rats. For gene expression analysis, 9 tumours (TUM) and their paired normal mucosa (NM) were hybridized on 4 × 44K Whole rat arrays (Agilent) and selected genes were validated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Functional analysis on microarray data was performed by GenMAPP/MappFinder analysis. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) was performed on 10 paired TUM-NM samples hybridized on Rat genome arrays 2 × 105K (Agilent) and the results were analyzed by CGH Analytics (Agilent). Microarray gene expression analysis showed that Defcr4, Igfbp5, Mmp7, Nos2, S100A8 and S100A9 were among the most up-regulated genes in tumours (Fold Change (FC) compared with NM: 183, 48, 39, 38, 36 and 32, respectively), while Slc26a3, Mptx, Retlna and Muc2 were strongly down-regulated (FC: -500; -376, -167, -79, respectively). Functional analysis showed that pathways controlling cell cycle, protein synthesis, matrix metalloproteinases, TNFα/NFkB, and inflammatory responses were up-regulated in tumours, while Krebs cycle, the electron transport chain, and fatty acid beta oxidation were down-regulated. a-CGH analysis showed that four TUM out of ten had one or two chromosomal aberrations. Importantly, one sample showed a deletion on chromosome 18 including Apc. The results showed complex gene expression alterations in adenocarcinomas encompassing many altered pathways. While a-CGH analysis showed a low degree of genomic imbalance, it is interesting to

  1. Nonlinear evolution of drift instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.; Krommes, J.A.; Oberman, C.R.; Smith, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of collisionless drift instabilities in a shear-free magnetic field has been studied by means of gyrokinetic particle simulation as well as numerical integration of model mode-coupling equations. The purpose of the investigation is to identify relevant nonlinear mechanisms responsible for the steady-state drift wave fluctuations. It is found that the saturation of the instability is mainly caused by the nonlinear E x B convection of the resonant electrons and their associated velocity space nonlinearity. The latter also induces energy exchange between the competing modes, which, in turn, gives rise to enhanced diffusion. The nonlinear E x B convection of the ions, which contributes to the nonlinear frequency shift, is also an important ingredient for the saturation

  2. Experimental study on low pressure flow instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shengyao; Wu Xinxin; Wu Shaorong; Bo Jinhai; Zhang Youjie

    1997-05-01

    The experiment was performed on the test loop (HRTL-5), which simulates the geometry and system design of the 5 MW reactor. The flow behavior for a wide range of inlet subcooling, in which the flow undergoes from single phase to two phase, is described in a natural circulation system at low pressure (p = 0.1, 0.24 MPa). Several kinds of flow instability, e.g. subcooled boiling instability, subcooled boiling induced flashing instability, pure flashing instability as well as flashing coupled density wave instability and high frequency flow oscillation, are investigated. The mechanism of flashing and flashing concerned flow instability, which has never been studied well in this field, is especially interpreted. The experimental results show that, firstly, for a low pressure natural circulation system the two phase flow is unstable in most of inlet subcooling conditions, the two phase stable flow can only be reached at very low inlet subcooling; secondly, at high inlet subcooling the flow instability is dominated by subcooled boiling in the heated section, and at middle inlet subcooling is dominated by void flashing in the adiabatic long riser; thirdly, in two phase stable flow region the condition for boiling out of the core, namely, single phase flow in the heated section, two phase flow in the riser due to vapor flashing, can be realized. The experimental results are very important for the design and accident analysis of the vessel and swimming pool type natural circulation nuclear heating reactor. (7 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.)

  3. Diet and genomic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Graeme P

    2007-01-01

    Cancer results from a disordered and unstable genome - the degree of abnormality progresses as the process of oncogenesis proceeds. Such genomic instability appears to be subject to control by environmental factors as evidenced by the number of cancers that are either caused by specific environmental agents (lung, skin, cervix) or else regulated by a broader range of agents such as effect of diet on gastric and colorectal cancers. Dietary factors might interact in several ways with the genome to protect against cancer. An agent might interact directly with the genome and regulate expression (as a genetic or epigenetic regulator) or indirectly by influencing DNA 'repair' responses and so improve genomic stability. Research now shows that diet-genomic interactions in cancer go beyond interactions with the normal genome and involve enhancement of normal cellular responses to DNA damage such that genome stability is more effectively maintained. Activation of apoptosis may be a key to protection.

  4. Hydrodynamic instabilities in inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, N.M.

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses topics on hydrodynamics instabilities in inertial confinement: linear analysis of Rayleigh-Taylor instability; ablation-surface instability; bubble rise in late-stage Rayleigh-Taylor instability; and saturation and multimode interactions in intermediate-stage Rayleigh-Taylor instability

  5. Neutrino beam plasma instability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We derive relativistic fluid set of equations for neutrinos and electrons from relativistic Vlasov equations with Fermi weak interaction force. Using these fluid equations, we obtain a dispersion relation describing neutrino beam plasma instability, which is little different from normal dispersion relation of streaming instability.

  6. Genome wide analysis of drug-induced torsades de pointes: lack of common variants with large effect sizes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah R Behr

    Full Text Available Marked prolongation of the QT interval on the electrocardiogram associated with the polymorphic ventricular tachycardia Torsades de Pointes is a serious adverse event during treatment with antiarrhythmic drugs and other culprit medications, and is a common cause for drug relabeling and withdrawal. Although clinical risk factors have been identified, the syndrome remains unpredictable in an individual patient. Here we used genome-wide association analysis to search for common predisposing genetic variants. Cases of drug-induced Torsades de Pointes (diTdP, treatment tolerant controls, and general population controls were ascertained across multiple sites using common definitions, and genotyped on the Illumina 610k or 1M-Duo BeadChips. Principal Components Analysis was used to select 216 Northwestern European diTdP cases and 771 ancestry-matched controls, including treatment-tolerant and general population subjects. With these sample sizes, there is 80% power to detect a variant at genome-wide significance with minor allele frequency of 10% and conferring an odds ratio of ≥2.7. Tests of association were carried out for each single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP by logistic regression adjusting for gender and population structure. No SNP reached genome wide-significance; the variant with the lowest P value was rs2276314, a non-synonymous coding variant in C18orf21 (p  =  3×10(-7, odds ratio = 2, 95% confidence intervals: 1.5-2.6. The haplotype formed by rs2276314 and a second SNP, rs767531, was significantly more frequent in controls than cases (p  =  3×10(-9. Expanding the number of controls and a gene-based analysis did not yield significant associations. This study argues that common genomic variants do not contribute importantly to risk for drug-induced Torsades de Pointes across multiple drugs.

  7. A model of postural control in quiet standing: robust compensation of delay-induced instability using intermittent activation of feedback control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Asai

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to compare two different feedback controllers for the stabilization of quiet standing in humans, taking into account that the intrinsic ankle stiffness is insufficient and that there is a large delay inducing instability in the feedback loop: 1 a standard linear, continuous-time PD controller and 2 an intermittent PD controller characterized by a switching function defined in the phase plane, with or without a dead zone around the nominal equilibrium state. The stability analysis of the first controller is carried out by using the standard tools of linear control systems, whereas the analysis of the intermittent controllers is based on the use of Poincaré maps defined in the phase plane. When the PD-control is off, the dynamics of the system is characterized by a saddle-like equilibrium, with a stable and an unstable manifold. The switching function of the intermittent controller is implemented in such a way that PD-control is 'off' when the state vector is near the stable manifold of the saddle and is 'on' otherwise. A theoretical analysis and a related simulation study show that the intermittent control model is much more robust than the standard model because the size of the region in the parameter space of the feedback control gains (P vs. D that characterizes stable behavior is much larger in the latter case than in the former one. Moreover, the intermittent controller can use feedback parameters that are much smaller than the standard model. Typical sway patterns generated by the intermittent controller are the result of an alternation between slow motion along the stable manifold of the saddle, when the PD-control is off, and spiral motion away from the upright equilibrium determined by the activation of the PD-control with low feedback gains. Remarkably, overall dynamic stability can be achieved by combining in a smart way two unstable regimes: a saddle and an unstable spiral. The intermittent

  8. Cytogenetic and molecular characterization of human radio-induced tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, S.

    2002-09-01

    After a brief recall of some fundamentals regarding radiobiology, this research thesis discusses some epidemiological aspects of radio carcinogenesis, based on epidemiological studies performed on people having survived to Hiroshima, Nagasaki and Chernobyl, but also performed on people submitted to domestic or professional exposures to radon, or to medicine-related exposures. The author highlights some predispositions to radio-induced cancers. Then, she discusses the genetic mechanisms of radio-induced carcinogenesis and the genetic alterations observed in human radio-induced tumours. She discusses and comments the genomic instability, its mechanisms and some models observed on mice, and describes the various forms of radio-induced genomic instability. After a discussion of all these aspects, the author draws some perspectives for future research works

  9. Methylene Blue Is Effective to Reverse Refractory Hemodynamic Instability due to Dimethoate Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Youssefi

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion:MB treatment was effective to reverse hypotension and restore hemodynamic instability caused by dimethoate poisoning. This index case may pave way to further investigation of MB therapy for OP-induced hemodynamic instabilities.

  10. Seeded Supercontinuum Generation - Modulation Instability Gain, Coherent and Incoherent Rogue Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Simon Toft; Larsen, Casper; Møller, Uffe Visbech

    2012-01-01

    Deterministic supercontinuum can be generated by seeding the modulation instability-induced pulse break-up. We investigate the influence of the modulation instability gain on seeding and demonstrate the generation of coherent and incoherent rogue waves....

  11. PTEN in the maintenance of genome integrity: From DNA replication to chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Sheng-Qi; Ouyang, Meng; Brandmaier, Andrew; Hao, Hongbo; Shen, Wen H

    2017-10-01

    Faithful DNA replication and accurate chromosome segregation are the key machineries of genetic transmission. Disruption of these processes represents a hallmark of cancer and often results from loss of tumor suppressors. PTEN is an important tumor suppressor that is frequently mutated or deleted in human cancer. Loss of PTEN has been associated with aneuploidy and poor prognosis in cancer patients. In mice, Pten deletion or mutation drives genomic instability and tumor development. PTEN deficiency induces DNA replication stress, confers stress tolerance, and disrupts mitotic spindle architecture, leading to accumulation of structural and numerical chromosome instability. Therefore, PTEN guards the genome by controlling multiple processes of chromosome inheritance. Here, we summarize current understanding of the PTEN function in promoting high-fidelity transmission of genetic information. We also discuss the PTEN pathways of genome maintenance and highlight potential targets for cancer treatment. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The Power of CRISPR-Cas9-Induced Genome Editing to Speed Up Plant Breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hieu X. Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing with engineered nucleases enabling site-directed sequence modifications bears a great potential for advanced plant breeding and crop protection. Remarkably, the RNA-guided endonuclease technology (RGEN based on the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR and CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9 is an extremely powerful and easy tool that revolutionizes both basic research and plant breeding. Here, we review the major technical advances and recent applications of the CRISPR-Cas9 system for manipulation of model and crop plant genomes. We also discuss the future prospects of this technology in molecular plant breeding.

  13. The Power of CRISPR-Cas9-Induced Genome Editing to Speed Up Plant Breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenqin; Le, Hien T. T.

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing with engineered nucleases enabling site-directed sequence modifications bears a great potential for advanced plant breeding and crop protection. Remarkably, the RNA-guided endonuclease technology (RGEN) based on the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) is an extremely powerful and easy tool that revolutionizes both basic research and plant breeding. Here, we review the major technical advances and recent applications of the CRISPR-Cas9 system for manipulation of model and crop plant genomes. We also discuss the future prospects of this technology in molecular plant breeding. PMID:28097123

  14. Genome sequencing of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells reveals retroelement stability and infrequent DNA rearrangement during reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Aaron R; Boland, Michael J; Leibowitz, Mitchell L; Shumilina, Svetlana; Pehrson, Sidney M; Baldwin, Kristin K; Hall, Ira M

    2011-10-04

    The biomedical utility of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) will be diminished if most iPSC lines harbor deleterious genetic mutations. Recent microarray studies have shown that human iPSCs carry elevated levels of DNA copy number variation compared with those in embryonic stem cells, suggesting that these and other classes of genomic structural variation (SV), including inversions, smaller duplications and deletions, complex rearrangements, and retroelement transpositions, may frequently arise as a consequence of reprogramming. Here we employ whole-genome paired-end DNA sequencing and sensitive mapping algorithms to identify all classes of SV in three fully pluripotent mouse iPSC lines. Despite the improved scope and resolution of this study, we find few spontaneous mutations per line (one or two) and no evidence for endogenous retroelement transposition. These results show that genome stability can persist throughout reprogramming, and argue that it is possible to generate iPSCs lacking gene-disrupting mutations using current reprogramming methods. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A re-sequencing based assessment of genomic heterogeneity and fast neutron-induced deletions in a common bean cultivar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie A. O'Rourke

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A small fast neutron mutant population has been established from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Red Hawk. We leveraged the available P. vulgaris genome sequence and high throughput next generation DNA sequencing to examine the genomic structure of five Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Red Hawk fast neutron mutants with striking visual phenotypes. Analysis of these genomes identified three classes of structural variation; between cultivar variation, natural variation within the fast neutron mutant population, and fast neutron induced mutagenesis. Our analyses focused on the latter two classes. We identified 23 large deletions (>40 bp common to multiple individuals, illustrating residual heterogeneity and regions of structural variation within the common bean cv. Red Hawk. An additional 18 large deletions were identified in individual mutant plants. These deletions, ranging in size from 40 bp to 43,000 bp, are potentially the result of fast neutron mutagenesis. Six of the 18 deletions lie near or within gene coding regions, identifying potential candidate genes causing the mutant phenotype.

  16. Risk bubbles and market instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsili, Matteo; Raffaelli, Giacomo

    2006-10-01

    We discuss a simple model of correlated assets capturing the feedback effects induced by portfolio investment in the covariance dynamics. This model predicts an instability when the volume of investment exceeds a critical value. Close to the critical point the model exhibits dynamical correlations very similar to those observed in real markets. Maximum likelihood estimates of the model's parameter for empirical data indeed confirms this conclusion. We show that this picture is confirmed by the empirical analysis for different choices of the time horizon.

  17. MRI of shoulder instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, Lynne S. [University of California San Francisco, 505 Parnassus, Suite M392, San Francisco, CA 94143-0628 (United States)], E-mail: lynne.steinbach@radiology.ucsf.edu

    2008-10-15

    The most unstable joint in the body, the glenohumeral joint is subject to many insults including microinstability, subluxation and dislocation. During the last two decades, MRI has allowed for direct visualization of many of the lesions related to instability, aiding in diagnosis as well as therapeutic planning and follow-up. This article reviews the use of MRI for shoulder instability and describes the different types of lesions associated with this disorder. Topics include technical considerations, the use of MR arthrography, normal anatomy and variants, labral and glenohumeral ligament pathology, and osseous lesions related to instability.

  18. Agrobacterium rhizogenes-induced cotton hairy root culture as an alternative tool for cotton functional genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although well-accepted as the ultimate method for cotton functional genomics, Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated cotton transformation is not widely used for functional analyses of cotton genes and their promoters since regeneration of cotton in tissue culture is lengthy and labor intensive. In cer...

  19. Electron-ion attachment induced instability of dust acoustic waves in the presence of ionization in a charge varying collisional dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Samiran; Khan, Manoranjan

    2006-01-01

    Low frequency electrostatic dust acoustic wave (DAW) instability with a significant background pressure of neutrals has been investigated in a collisional dusty plasma incorporating the dust charge relaxation and electron-ion attachment (recombination) onto dust grains using a self consistent theory. A long wavelength mode is found to be unstable due to electron-ion attachment on to the dust grains. Applications to experimental observations of low frequency fluctuation and the relevance of these results to 'void' in a laboratory gas discharge dusty plasma are briefly discussed

  20. Characterization of genomic changes in the cervical pre-cancerous lesions and tumors induced by different types of human papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozdanov, Petar; Hadjidekova, Savina; Dimova, Ivanka; Nikolova, Ivanka; Toncheva, Draga; Ganchev, Gancho; Zlatkov, Victor; Galabov, Angel S

    2016-09-01

    Cervical carcinoma is the second most common malignancy among women in both incidence and mortality. Although much is known about the etiology and treatment of cervical cancer, the role of genetic alterations in the multistep pathway of cervical tumorigenesis is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to characterize the genomic changes in the cervical pre-cancerous lesions and tumors, induced by different types of human papillomaviruses. In this research was used the BlueGnome CytoChip oligo 2 × 105 K microarray for whole-genome oligo-array CGH. Microarray CGH analysis of 40 specimens was carried out-12 specimens from patients with early-stage squamous cell carcinomas; 19 specimens from patients with mild to moderate dysplasia and 9 with severe dysplasia. First we performed microarray CGH analysis of five DNA pools which contained the DNA from homogeneous groups of patients. The results revealed presence of micro chromosomal aberrations in chromosome region 14q11.2. According to the genome database these aberrations represent polymorphisms. Microarray analysis of DNA from 9 separate carcinoma lesions revealed a total of 26 aberrations in 14 chromosomes of nine patients. Our results showed the advantages of high-resolution chips in the clinical diagnosis of patients with cancerous and precancerous lesions caused by viral infection with HPV, but also highlight the need for extensive population studies revealing the molecular nature and clinical significance of different CNVs and the creation of detailed maps of variations in the Bulgarian population. This would facilitate extremely precise interpretation of specific genomic imbalances in the clinical aspect.

  1. Spondylolisthesis and Posterior Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niggemann, P.; Beyer, H.K.; Frey, H.; Grosskurth, D.; Simons, P.; Kuchta, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with a spondylolisthesis of L5 on S1 due to spondylolysis at the level L5/S1. The vertebral slip was fixed and no anterior instability was found. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an upright MRI scanner, posterior instability at the level of the spondylolytic defect of L5 was demonstrated. A structure, probably the hypertrophic ligament flava, arising from the spondylolytic defect was displaced toward the L5 nerve root, and a bilateral contact of the displaced structure with the L5 nerve root was shown in extension of the spine. To our knowledge, this is the first case described of posterior instability in patients with spondylolisthesis. The clinical implications of posterior instability are unknown; however, it is thought that this disorder is common and that it can only be diagnosed using upright MRI

  2. Spondylolisthesis and Posterior Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niggemann, P.; Beyer, H.K.; Frey, H.; Grosskurth, D. (Privatpraxis fuer Upright MRT, Koeln (Germany)); Simons, P.; Kuchta, J. (Media Park Klinik, Koeln (Germany))

    2009-04-15

    We present the case of a patient with a spondylolisthesis of L5 on S1 due to spondylolysis at the level L5/S1. The vertebral slip was fixed and no anterior instability was found. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an upright MRI scanner, posterior instability at the level of the spondylolytic defect of L5 was demonstrated. A structure, probably the hypertrophic ligament flava, arising from the spondylolytic defect was displaced toward the L5 nerve root, and a bilateral contact of the displaced structure with the L5 nerve root was shown in extension of the spine. To our knowledge, this is the first case described of posterior instability in patients with spondylolisthesis. The clinical implications of posterior instability are unknown; however, it is thought that this disorder is common and that it can only be diagnosed using upright MRI.

  3. Potential impacts of aquatic pollutants: Sub-clinical antibiotic concentrations induce genome changes and promote antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise eChow

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are disseminated into aquatic environments via human waste streams and agricultural run-off. Here they can persist at low, but biologically relevant, concentrations. Antibiotic pollution establishes a selection gradient for resistance and may also raise the frequency of events that generate resistance: point mutations; recombination; and lateral gene transfer. This study examined the response of bacteria to sub-inhibitory levels of antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas protegens were exposed kanamycin, tetracycline or ciprofloxacin at 1/10 the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC in a serial streaking experiment over 40 passages. Significant changes in rep-PCR fingerprints were noted in both species when exposed to sub-inhibitory antibiotic concentrations. These changes were observed in as few as five passages, despite the fact that the protocols used sample less than 0.3% of the genome, in turn suggesting much more widespread alterations to sequence and genome architecture. Experimental lines also displayed variant colony morphologies. The final MICs were significantly higher in some experimental lineages of Ps. protegens, suggesting that 1/10 the MIC induces de-novo mutation events that generate resistance phenotypes. The implications of these results are clear: exposure of the environmental microbiome to antibiotic pollution will induce similar changes, including generating newly resistant species that may be of

  4. Efficient Multiple Genome Modifications Induced by the crRNAs, tracrRNA and Cas9 Protein Complex in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohga, Rie; Ota, Satoshi; Kawahara, Atsuo

    2015-01-01

    The type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) associated with Cas9 endonuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) has become a powerful genetic tool for understanding the function of a gene of interest. In zebrafish, the injection of Cas9 mRNA and guide-RNA (gRNA), which are prepared using an in vitro transcription system, efficiently induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at the targeted genomic locus. Because gRNA was originally constructed by fusing two short RNAs CRISPR RNA (crRNA) and trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA), we examined the effect of synthetic crRNAs and tracrRNA with Cas9 mRNA or Cas9 protein on the genome editing activity. We previously reported that the disruption of tyrosinase (tyr) by tyr-gRNA/Cas9 mRNA causes a retinal pigment defect, whereas the disruption of spns2 by spns2-gRNA1/Cas9 mRNA leads to a cardiac progenitor migration defect in zebrafish. Here, we found that the injection of spns2-crRNA1, tyr-crRNA and tracrRNA with Cas9 mRNA or Cas9 protein simultaneously caused a migration defect in cardiac progenitors and a pigment defect in retinal epithelial cells. A time course analysis demonstrated that the injection of crRNAs and tracrRNA with Cas9 protein rapidly induced genome modifications compared with the injection of crRNAs and tracrRNA with Cas9 mRNA. We further show that the crRNA-tracrRNA-Cas9 protein complex is functional for the visualization of endogenous gene expression; therefore, this is a very powerful, ready-to-use system in zebrafish. PMID:26010089

  5. Efficient Multiple Genome Modifications Induced by the crRNAs, tracrRNA and Cas9 Protein Complex in Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohito Kotani

    Full Text Available The type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR associated with Cas9 endonuclease (CRISPR/Cas9 has become a powerful genetic tool for understanding the function of a gene of interest. In zebrafish, the injection of Cas9 mRNA and guide-RNA (gRNA, which are prepared using an in vitro transcription system, efficiently induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs at the targeted genomic locus. Because gRNA was originally constructed by fusing two short RNAs CRISPR RNA (crRNA and trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA, we examined the effect of synthetic crRNAs and tracrRNA with Cas9 mRNA or Cas9 protein on the genome editing activity. We previously reported that the disruption of tyrosinase (tyr by tyr-gRNA/Cas9 mRNA causes a retinal pigment defect, whereas the disruption of spns2 by spns2-gRNA1/Cas9 mRNA leads to a cardiac progenitor migration defect in zebrafish. Here, we found that the injection of spns2-crRNA1, tyr-crRNA and tracrRNA with Cas9 mRNA or Cas9 protein simultaneously caused a migration defect in cardiac progenitors and a pigment defect in retinal epithelial cells. A time course analysis demonstrated that the injection of crRNAs and tracrRNA with Cas9 protein rapidly induced genome modifications compared with the injection of crRNAs and tracrRNA with Cas9 mRNA. We further show that the crRNA-tracrRNA-Cas9 protein complex is functional for the visualization of endogenous gene expression; therefore, this is a very powerful, ready-to-use system in zebrafish.

  6. Manipulation of interfacial instabilities by using a soft, deformable ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    parameter regimes, it is also possible to enhance the flow instabilities by tuning the shear modulus of ... induces new fluid–solid interfacial instabilities both at zero and finite Reynolds number which are qualitatively .... A standard temporal linear stability analysis is carried out by imposing small perturbations on base state ...

  7. Isotope separation of uranium by laser: tuning and frequency instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broglia, M.; Massimi, M.; Spoglia, U.; Zampetti, P.

    1983-01-01

    Intensity measurements of laser induced fluorescence in an uranium atomic beam are affected by the axial mode structure of the commercial pulsed dye laser used and by its strong frequency instability. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations on the possible causes of frequency instability are reported

  8. Streaming gravity mode instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shui.

    1989-05-01

    In this paper, we study the stability of a current sheet with a sheared flow in a gravitational field which is perpendicular to the magnetic field and plasma flow. This mixing mode caused by a combined role of the sheared flow and gravity is named the streaming gravity mode instability. The conditions of this mode instability are discussed for an ideal four-layer model in the incompressible limit. (author). 5 refs

  9. When it is too hot for photosynthesis: heat-induced instability of photosynthesis in relation to respiratory burst, cell permeability changes and H₂O₂ formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüve, Katja; Bichele, Irina; Rasulov, Bahtijor; Niinemets, Ulo

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthesis rate (A(n)) becomes unstable above a threshold temperature, and the recovery upon return to low temperature varies because of reasons not fully understood. We investigated responses of A(n), dark respiration and chlorophyll fluorescence to supraoptimal temperatures of varying duration and kinetics in Phaseolus vulgaris asking whether the instability of photosynthesis under severe heat stress is associated with cellular damage. Cellular damage was assessed by Evans blue penetration (enhanced membrane permeability) and by H₂O₂ generation [3,3'-diaminobenzidine 4HCl (DAB)-staining]. Critical temperature for dark fluorescence (F(0) ) rise (T(F)) was at 46-48 °C, and a burst of respiration was observed near T(F). However, A(n) was strongly inhibited already before T(F) was reached. Membrane permeability increased with temperature according to a switch-type response, with enhanced permeability observed above 48 °C. Experiments with varying heat pulse lengths and intensities underscored the threshold-type loss of photosynthetic function, and indicated that the degree of photosynthetic deterioration and cellular damage depended on accumulated heat-dose. Beyond the 'point of no return', propagation of cellular damage and reduction of photosynthesis continued upon transfer to lower temperatures and photosynthetic recovery was slow or absent. We conclude that instability of photosynthesis under severe heat stress is associated with time-dependent propagation of cellular lesions. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Genome-Wide Mutation Avalanches Induced in Diploid Yeast Cells by a Base Analog or an APOBEC Deaminase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lada, Artem G.; Stepchenkova, Elena I.; Waisertreiger, Irina S. R.; Noskov, Vladimir N.; Dhar, Alok; Eudy, James D.; Boissy, Robert J.; Hirano, Masayuki; Rogozin, Igor B.; Pavlov, Youri I.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic information should be accurately transmitted from cell to cell; conversely, the adaptation in evolution and disease is fueled by mutations. In the case of cancer development, multiple genetic changes happen in somatic diploid cells. Most classic studies of the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis have been performed in haploids. We demonstrate that the parameters of the mutation process are different in diploid cell populations. The genomes of drug-resistant mutants induced in yeast diploids by base analog 6-hydroxylaminopurine (HAP) or AID/APOBEC cytosine deaminase PmCDA1 from lamprey carried a stunning load of thousands of unselected mutations. Haploid mutants contained almost an order of magnitude fewer mutations. To explain this, we propose that the distribution of induced mutation rates in the cell population is uneven. The mutants in diploids with coincidental mutations in the two copies of the reporter gene arise from a fraction of cells that are transiently hypersensitive to the mutagenic action of a given mutagen. The progeny of such cells were never recovered in haploids due to the lethality caused by the inactivation of single-copy essential genes in cells with too many induced mutations. In diploid cells, the progeny of hypersensitive cells survived, but their genomes were saturated by heterozygous mutations. The reason for the hypermutability of cells could be transient faults of the mutation prevention pathways, like sanitization of nucleotide pools for HAP or an elevated expression of the PmCDA1 gene or the temporary inability of the destruction of the deaminase. The hypothesis on spikes of mutability may explain the sudden acquisition of multiple mutational changes during evolution and carcinogenesis. PMID:24039593

  11. Composition driven structural instability in perovskite ferroelectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Xu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ferroelectric solid solutions usually exhibit enhanced functional properties at the morphotropic phase boundary separating two ferroelectric phases with different orientations of polarization. The underlying mechanism is generally associated with polarization rotational instability and the flattened free energy profile. In this work we show that the polarization extensional instability can also be induced at the morphotropic phase boundary beyond the reported polar-nonpolar phase boundary. The piezoelectricity enhanced by this mechanism exhibits excellent thermal stability, which helps to develop high performance piezoelectric materials with good temperature stability.

  12. STRUCTURAL STRESS RELAXATION IN STAINLESS INSTABILITY STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lyabuk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The approach to the description of conditions of martensitic transformation in austenitic steel is advanced. Transformation induced hardening is the result of Le Chatelier principle in instability alloys. The phase transformation in austenitic instability stainless steel is the cause of reduction of grain refining and increase of strength. It was experimentally shown that physical-mechanical characteristics of the prepared materials were defined by the structure and inhomogeneous distribution of the hardening phase within a grain. The reasons for high thermal stability of inverse austenitic were established. The factors determining the inverse austenitic relaxation resistibility and resources for its increasing were revealed.

  13. Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genome and Epigenome Instability Symposium and Epigenetic Mechanisms, DNA Repair, and Chromatin Symposium at the EMS 2008 Annual Meeting - October 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, William F; Kovalchuk, Olga; Dolinoy, Dana C; Dubrova, Yuri E; Coleman, Matthew A; Schär, Primo; Pogribny, Igor; Hendzel, Michael

    2010-02-19

    The Low Dose Radiation Symposium thoughtfully addressed ionizing radiation non-mutational but transmissable alterations in surviving cells. Deregulation of epigenetic processes has been strongly implicated in carcinogenesis, and there is increasing realization that a significant fraction of non-targeted and adaptive mechanisms in response to ionizing radiation are likely to be epigenetic in nature. Much remains to be learned about how chromatin and epigenetic regulators affect responses to low doses of radiation, and how low dose radiation impacts other epigenetic processes. The Epigenetic Mechanisms Symposium focused on on epigenetic mechanisms and their interplay with DNA repair and chromatin changes. Addressing the fact that the most well understood mediators of epigenetic regulation are histone modifications and DNA methylation. Low levels of radiation can lead to changes in the methylation status of certain gene promoters and the expression of DNA methyltransferases, However, epigenetic regulation can also involve changes in higher order chromosome structure.

  14. CRISPR/Cas9-Induced (CTG⋅CAG)nRepeat Instability in the Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Locus: Implications for Therapeutic Genome Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Agtmaal, Ellen L; André, Laurène M; Willemse, Marieke; Cumming, Sarah A; van Kessel, Ingeborg D G; van den Broek, Walther J A A; Gourdon, Geneviève; Furling, Denis; Mouly, Vincent; Monckton, Darren G; Wansink, Derick G; Wieringa, Bé

    2017-01-04

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by (CTG⋅CAG) n -repeat expansion within the DMPK gene and thought to be mediated by a toxic RNA gain of function. Current attempts to develop therapy for this disease mainly aim at destroying or blocking abnormal properties of mutant DMPK (CUG)n RNA. Here, we explored a DNA-directed strategy and demonstrate that single clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-cleavage in either its 5' or 3' unique flank promotes uncontrollable deletion of large segments from the expanded trinucleotide repeat, rather than formation of short indels usually seen after double-strand break repair. Complete and precise excision of the repeat tract from normal and large expanded DMPK alleles in myoblasts from unaffected individuals, DM1 patients, and a DM1 mouse model could be achieved at high frequency by dual CRISPR/Cas9-cleavage at either side of the (CTG⋅CAG)n sequence. Importantly, removal of the repeat appeared to have no detrimental effects on the expression of genes in the DM1 locus. Moreover, myogenic capacity, nucleocytoplasmic distribution, and abnormal RNP-binding behavior of transcripts from the edited DMPK gene were normalized. Dual sgRNA-guided excision of the (CTG⋅CAG)n tract by CRISPR/Cas9 technology is applicable for developing isogenic cell lines for research and may provide new therapeutic opportunities for patients with DM1. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fiber amplifiers under thermal loads leading to transverse mode instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Mette Marie; Hansen, Kristian Rymann; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2014-01-01

    Transverse mode instability (TMI) in rare-earth doped fiber amplifiers operating above an average power threshold is caused by intermodal stimulated thermal Rayleigh scattering due to quantum defect heating. We investigate thermally induced longitudinal waveguide perturbations causing power trans...

  16. Estrogen receptor-dependent attenuation of hypoxia-induced changes in the lung genome of pulmonary hypertension rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frump, Andrea L; Albrecht, Marjorie E; McClintick, Jeanette N; Lahm, Tim

    2017-03-01

    17β-estradiol (E2) exerts complex and context-dependent effects in pulmonary hypertension. In hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH), E2 attenuates lung vascular remodeling through estrogen receptor (ER)-dependent effects; however, ER target genes in the hypoxic lung remain unknown. In order to identify the genome regulated by the E2-ER axis in the hypoxic lung, we performed a microarray analysis in lungs from HPH rats treated with E2 (75 mcg/kg/day) ± ER-antagonist ICI182,780 (3 mg/kg/day). Untreated HPH rats and normoxic rats served as controls. Using a false discovery rate of 10%, we identified a significantly differentially regulated genome in E2-treated versus untreated hypoxia rats. Genes most upregulated by E2 encoded matrix metalloproteinase 8, S100 calcium binding protein A8, and IgA Fc receptor; genes most downregulated by E2 encoded olfactory receptor 63, secreted frizzled-related protein 2, and thrombospondin 2. Several genes affected by E2 changed in the opposite direction after ICI182,780 co-treatment, indicating an ER-regulated genome in HPH lungs. The bone morphogenetic protein antagonist Grem1 (gremlin 1) was upregulated by hypoxia, but found to be among the most downregulated genes after E2 treatment. Gremlin 1 protein was reduced in E2-treated versus untreated hypoxic animals, and ER-blockade abolished the inhibitory effect of E2 on Grem1 mRNA and protein. In conclusion, E2 ER-dependently regulates several genes involved in proliferative and inflammatory processes during hypoxia. Gremlin 1 is a novel target of the E2-ER axis in HPH. Understanding the mechanisms of E2 gene regulation in HPH may allow for selectively harnessing beneficial transcriptional activities of E2 for therapeutic purposes.

  17. Genome-Wide Locations of Potential Epimutations Associated with Environmentally Induced Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Disease Using a Sequential Machine Learning Prediction Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, M Muksitul; Holder, Lawrence B; Skinner, Michael K

    2015-01-01

    Environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and phenotypic variation involves germline transmitted epimutations. The primary epimutations identified involve altered differential DNA methylation regions (DMRs). Different environmental toxicants have been shown to promote exposure (i.e., toxicant) specific signatures of germline epimutations. Analysis of genomic features associated with these epimutations identified low-density CpG regions (machine learning computational approach to predict all potential epimutations in the genome. A number of previously identified sperm epimutations were used as training sets. A novel machine learning approach using a sequential combination of Active Learning and Imbalance Class Learner analysis was developed. The transgenerational sperm epimutation analysis identified approximately 50K individual sites with a 1 kb mean size and 3,233 regions that had a minimum of three adjacent sites with a mean size of 3.5 kb. A select number of the most relevant genomic features were identified with the low density CpG deserts being a critical genomic feature of the features selected. A similar independent analysis with transgenerational somatic cell epimutation training sets identified a smaller number of 1,503 regions of genome-wide predicted sites and differences in genomic feature contributions. The predicted genome-wide germline (sperm) epimutations were found to be distinct from the predicted somatic cell epimutations. Validation of the genome-wide germline predicted sites used two recently identified transgenerational sperm epimutation signature sets from the pesticides dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and methoxychlor (MXC) exposure lineage F3 generation. Analysis of this positive validation data set showed a 100% prediction accuracy for all the DDT-MXC sperm epimutations. Observations further elucidate the genomic features associated with transgenerational germline epimutations and identify a genome

  18. The plasticizer butyl benzyl phthalate induces genomic changes in rat mammary gland after neonatal/prepubertal exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamartiniere Coral A

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phthalate esters like n-butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP are widely used plasticizers. BBP has shown endocrine-disrupting properties, thus having a potential effect on hormone-sensitive tissues. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of neonatal/prepubertal exposure (post-natal days 2–20 to BBP on maturation parameters and on the morphology, proliferative index and genomic signature of the rat mammary gland at different ages of development (21, 35, 50 and 100 days. Results Here we show that exposure to BBP increased the uterine weight/body weight ratio at 21 days and decreased the body weight at time of vaginal opening. BBP did not induce significant changes on the morphology of the mammary gland, but increased proliferative index in terminal end buds at 35 days and in lobules 1 at several ages. Moreover, BBP had an effect on the genomic profile of the mammary gland mainly at the end of the exposure (21 days, becoming less prominent thereafter. By this age a significant number of genes related to proliferation and differentiation, communication and signal transduction were up-regulated in the glands of the exposed animals. Conclusion These results suggest that BBP has an effect in the gene expression profile of the mammary gland.

  19. Genomic integration of the full-length dystrophin coding sequence in Duchenne muscular dystrophy induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farruggio, Alfonso P; Bhakta, Mital S; du Bois, Haley; Ma, Julia; P Calos, Michele

    2017-04-01

    The plasmid vectors that express the full-length human dystrophin coding sequence in human cells was developed. Dystrophin, the protein mutated in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, is extraordinarily large, providing challenges for cloning and plasmid production in Escherichia coli. The authors expressed dystrophin from the strong, widely expressed CAG promoter, along with co-transcribed luciferase and mCherry marker genes useful for tracking plasmid expression. Introns were added at the 3' and 5' ends of the dystrophin sequence to prevent translation in E. coli, resulting in improved plasmid yield. Stability and yield were further improved by employing a lower-copy number plasmid origin of replication. The dystrophin plasmids also carried an attB site recognized by phage phiC31 integrase, enabling the plasmids to be integrated into the human genome at preferred locations by phiC31 integrase. The authors demonstrated single-copy integration of plasmid DNA into the genome and production of human dystrophin in the human 293 cell line, as well as in induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Plasmid-mediated dystrophin expression was also demonstrated in mouse muscle. The dystrophin expression plasmids described here will be useful in cell and gene therapy studies aimed at ameliorating Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Copyright © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Fingerprints of dynamical instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.; Colonna, M.; Guarnera, A.

    1993-01-01

    It is explained why any reduced descriptions, such as mean field approximation, are stochastic in nature. It is shown that the introduction of this stochastic dynamics leads to a predictive theory in a statistical sens whatever the individual trajectories are characterized by the occurrence of bifurcations, instabilities or phase transitions. Concerning nuclear matter, the spinodal instability is discussed. In such a critical situation, the possibility to replace the stochastic part of the collision integral in the Boltzmann-Langevin model by the numerical noise associated with the finite number of test particles in ordinary BUU treatment is studied. It is shown that the fingerprints of these instabilities are kept during the evolution because of the relatively long recombination time compared with the typical time scales imposed by the Coulomb repulsion and the possible collective expansion. (author) 5 refs., 12 figs

  1. Instability and star evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzoyan, L.V.

    1981-01-01

    The observational data are discussed which testify that the phenomena of dynamical instability of stars and stellar systems are definite manifestations of their evolution. The study of these phenomena has shown that the instability is a regular phase of stellar evolution. It has resulted in the recognition of the most important regularities of the process of star formation concerning its nature. This became possible due to the discovery in 1947 of stellar associations in our Galaxy. The results of the study of the dynamical instability of stellar associations contradict the predictions of classical hypothesis of stellar condensation. These data supplied a basis for a new hypothesis on the formation of stars and nebulae by the decay of superdense protostars [ru

  2. A general theory for dynamic instability of tube arrays in crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S. S.

    1987-01-01

    A general theory of fluidelastic instability for a tube array in crossflow is presented. Various techniques to obtain the motion-dependent fluid-force coefficients are discussed and the general instability characteristics are summarized. The theory is also used to evaluate the results of other mathematical models for crossflow-induced instability.

  3. CamKII inhibitors reduce mitotic instability, connexon anomalies and progression of the in vivo behavioral phenotype in transgenic animals expressing a mutated Gjb1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mones, Saleh; Bordignon, Benoit; Peiretti, Franck; Landrier, Jean F; Gess, Burkhardt; Bourguignon, Jean J; Bihel, Frédéric; Fontés, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Mutation in the Gjb1 gene, coding for a connexin (Cx32), is associated with an inherited peripheral neuropathic disorder (X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth, CMTX). Our previous work reported that transgenic animals expressing a human Gjb1 transgene present polyploidy and abnormal over-duplication of the centrosome, suggesting a role for Gjb1 in mitotic stability. In this article, we propose mechanisms by which mutations in Gjb1 induce mitotic instability and discuss its potential relation with the CMTX phenotype. We showed that transgenic cells exhibit CamKII over-stimulation, a phenomenon that has been linked to mitotic instability (polyploidy, nuclear volume and centrosome over-duplication), that is reversed by CamKII inhibitors. We also demonstrate that connexon activity is partially restored in transgenic cells with CamKII inhibitors. Our model supports the role for Pim1, a kinase that has been associated with genomic instability in cancers, in genomic instability in Cx32 mutations. Regarding in vivo phenotype, we showed that degradation on the rotarod test in our transgenic mice is significantly lowered by treatment with a CamKII inhibitor (KN93). This effect was seen in two lines with different point mutations in GJB1, and stopping the treatment led to degradation of the phenotype.

  4. Systematic evaluation of bias in microbial community profiles induced by whole genome amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direito, Susana O L; Zaura, Egija; Little, Miranda; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Röling, Wilfred F M

    2014-03-01

    Whole genome amplification methods facilitate the detection and characterization of microbial communities in low biomass environments. We examined the extent to which the actual community structure is reliably revealed and factors contributing to bias. One widely used [multiple displacement amplification (MDA)] and one new primer-free method [primase-based whole genome amplification (pWGA)] were compared using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method as control. Pyrosequencing of an environmental sample and principal component analysis revealed that MDA impacted community profiles more strongly than pWGA and indicated that this related to species GC content, although an influence of DNA integrity could not be excluded. Subsequently, biases by species GC content, DNA integrity and fragment size were separately analysed using defined mixtures of DNA from various species. We found significantly less amplification of species with the highest GC content for MDA-based templates and, to a lesser extent, for pWGA. DNA fragmentation also interfered severely: species with more fragmented DNA were less amplified with MDA and pWGA. pWGA was unable to amplify low molecular weight DNA (< 1.5 kb), whereas MDA was inefficient. We conclude that pWGA is the most promising method for characterization of microbial communities in low-biomass environments and for currently planned astrobiological missions to Mars. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Comparative genome analysis of three eukaryotic parasites with differing abilities to transform leukocytes reveals key mediators of Theileria-induced leukocyte transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Kyoko; Hara, Yuichiro; Abe, Takashi; Yamasaki, Chisato; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kosuge, Takehide; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sato, Yoshiharu; Kawashima, Shuichi; Katayama, Toshiaki; Wakaguri, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Noboru; Homma, Keiichi; Tada-Umezaki, Masahito; Yagi, Yukio; Fujii, Yasuyuki; Habara, Takuya; Kanehisa, Minoru; Watanabe, Hidemi; Ito, Kimihito; Gojobori, Takashi; Sugawara, Hideaki; Imanishi, Tadashi; Weir, William; Gardner, Malcolm; Pain, Arnab; Shiels, Brian; Hattori, Masahira; Nene, Vishvanath; Sugimoto, Chihiro

    2012-01-01

    We sequenced the genome of Theileria orientalis, a tick-borne apicomplexan protozoan parasite of cattle. The focus of this study was a comparative genome analysis of T. orientalis relative to other highly pathogenic Theileria species, T. parva and T. annulata. T. parva and T. annulata induce transformation of infected cells of lymphocyte or macrophage/monocyte lineages; in contrast, T. orientalis does not induce uncontrolled proliferation of infected leukocytes and multiplies predominantly within infected erythrocytes. While synteny across homologous chromosomes of the three Theileria species was found to be well conserved overall, subtelomeric structures were found to differ substantially, as T. orientalis lacks the large tandemly arrayed subtelomere-encoded variable secreted protein-encoding gene family. Moreover, expansion of particular gene families by gene duplication was found in the genomes of the two transforming Theileria species, most notably, the TashAT/TpHN and Tar/Tpr gene families. Gene families that are present only in T. parva and T. annulata and not in T. orientalis, Babesia bovis, or Plasmodium were also identified. Identification of differences between the genome sequences of Theileria species with different abilities to transform and immortalize bovine leukocytes will provide insight into proteins and mechanisms that have evolved to induce and regulate this process. The T. orientalis genome database is available at http://totdb.czc.hokudai.ac.jp/.

  6. Comparative genome analysis of three eukaryotic parasites with differing abilities to transform leukocytes reveals key mediators of theileria-induced leukocyte transformation

    KAUST Repository

    Hayashida, Kyoko

    2012-09-04

    We sequenced the genome of Theileria orientalis, a tick-borne apicomplexan protozoan parasite of cattle. The focus of this study was a comparative genome analysis of T. orientalis relative to other highly pathogenic Theileria species, T. parva and T. annulata. T. parva and T. annulata induce transformation of infected cells of lymphocyte or macrophage/monocyte lineages; in contrast, T. orientalis does not induce uncontrolled proliferation of infected leukocytes and multiplies predominantly within infected erythrocytes. While synteny across homologous chromosomes of the three Theileria species was found to be well conserved overall, subtelomeric structures were found to differ substantially, as T. orientalis lacks the large tandemly arrayed subtelomere-encoded variable secreted protein-encoding gene family. Moreover, expansion of particular gene families by gene duplication was found in the genomes of the two transforming Theileria species, most notably, the TashAT/TpHN and Tar/Tpr gene families. Gene families that are present only in T. parva and T. annulata and not in T. orientalis, Babesia bovis, or Plasmo-dium were also identified. Identification of differences between the genome sequences of Theileria species with different abilities to transform and immortalize bovine leukocytes will provide insight into proteins and mechanisms that have evolved to induce and regulate this process. The T. orientalis genome database is available at http://totdb.czc.hokudai.ac.jp/. 2012 Hayashida et al. T.

  7. The Armc10/SVH gene: genome context, regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and protection against Aβ-induced mitochondrial fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrat, R; Mirra, S; Figueiro-Silva, J; Navas-Pérez, E; Quevedo, M; López-Doménech, G; Podlesniy, P; Ulloa, F; Garcia-Fernàndez, J; Trullas, R; Soriano, E

    2014-04-10

    Mitochondrial function and dynamics are essential for neurotransmission, neural function and neuronal viability. Recently, we showed that the eutherian-specific Armcx gene cluster (Armcx1-6 genes), located in the X chromosome, encodes for a new family of proteins that localise to mitochondria, regulating mitochondrial trafficking. The Armcx gene cluster evolved by retrotransposition of the Armc10 gene mRNA, which is present in all vertebrates and is considered to be the ancestor gene. Here we investigate the genomic organisation, mitochondrial functions and putative neuroprotective role of the Armc10 ancestor gene. The genomic context of the Armc10 locus shows considerable syntenic conservation among vertebrates, and sequence comparisons and CHIP-data suggest the presence of at least three conserved enhancers. We also show that the Armc10 protein localises to mitochondria and that it is highly expressed in the brain. Furthermore, we show that Armc10 levels regulate mitochondrial trafficking in neurons, but not mitochondrial aggregation, by controlling the number of moving mitochondria. We further demonstrate that the Armc10 protein interacts with the KIF5/Miro1-2/Trak2 trafficking complex. Finally, we show that overexpression of Armc10 in neurons prevents Aβ-induced mitochondrial fission and neuronal death. Our data suggest both conserved and differential roles of the Armc10/Armcx gene family in regulating mitochondrial dynamics in neurons, and underscore a protective effect of the Armc10 gene against Aβ-induced toxicity. Overall, our findings support a further degree of regulation of mitochondrial dynamics in the brain of more evolved mammals.

  8. Strains of bacterial species induce a greatly varied acute adaptive immune response: The contribution of the accessory genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela, Uri; Euler, Chad W; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Fischetti, Vincent A

    2018-01-01

    A fundamental question in human susceptibility to bacterial infections is to what extent variability is a function of differences in the pathogen species or in individual humans. To focus on the pathogen species, we compared in the same individual the human adaptive T and B cell immune response to multiple strains of two major human pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. We found wide variability in the acute adaptive immune response induced by various strains of a species, with a unique combination of activation within the two arms of the adaptive response. Further, this was also accompanied by a dramatic difference in the intensity of the specific protective T helper (Th) response. Importantly, the same immune response differences induced by the individual strains were maintained across multiple healthy human donors. A comparison of isogenic phage KO strains, demonstrated that of the pangenome, prophages were the major contributor to inter-strain immune heterogeneity, as the T cell response to the remaining "core genome" was noticeably blunted. Therefore, these findings extend and modify the notion of an adaptive response to a pathogenic bacterium, by implying that the adaptive immune response signature of a bacterial species should be defined either per strain or alternatively to the species' 'core genome', common to all of its strains. Further, our results demonstrate that the acquired immune response variation is as wide among different strains within a single pathogenic species as it is among different humans, and therefore may explain in part the clinical heterogeneity observed in patients infected with the same species.

  9. Strains of bacterial species induce a greatly varied acute adaptive immune response: The contribution of the accessory genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uri Sela

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental question in human susceptibility to bacterial infections is to what extent variability is a function of differences in the pathogen species or in individual humans. To focus on the pathogen species, we compared in the same individual the human adaptive T and B cell immune response to multiple strains of two major human pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. We found wide variability in the acute adaptive immune response induced by various strains of a species, with a unique combination of activation within the two arms of the adaptive response. Further, this was also accompanied by a dramatic difference in the intensity of the specific protective T helper (Th response. Importantly, the same immune response differences induced by the individual strains were maintained across multiple healthy human donors. A comparison of isogenic phage KO strains, demonstrated that of the pangenome, prophages were the major contributor to inter-strain immune heterogeneity, as the T cell response to the remaining "core genome" was noticeably blunted. Therefore, these findings extend and modify the notion of an adaptive response to a pathogenic bacterium, by implying that the adaptive immune response signature of a bacterial species should be defined either per strain or alternatively to the species' 'core genome', common to all of its strains. Further, our results demonstrate that the acquired immune response variation is as wide among different strains within a single pathogenic species as it is among different humans, and therefore may explain in part the clinical heterogeneity observed in patients infected with the same species.

  10. Plastic Instabilities Induced by the Portevin - Le Châtelier Effect and Fracture Character of Deformed Mg-Li Alloys Investigated Using the Acoustic Emission Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawełek A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of the investigation of both mechanical and acoustic emission (AE behaviors of Mg4Li5Al and Mg4Li4Zn alloys subjected to compression and tensile tests at room temperature are compared with the test results obtained using the same alloys and loading scheme but at elevated temperatures. The main aim of the paper is to investigate, to determine and to explain the relation between plastic flow instabilities and the fracture characteristics. There are discussed the possible influence of the factors related with enhanced internal stresses such as: segregation of precipitates along grain boundaries, interaction of solute atoms with mobile dislocations (Cottrell atmospheres as well as dislocation pile-ups which may lead to the microcracks formation due to the creation of very high stress concentration at grain boundaries. The results show that the plastic flow discontinuities are related to the Portevin-Le Châtelier phenomenon (PL effect and they are correlated with the generation of characteristic AE pulse trains. The fractography of broken samples was analyzed on the basis of light (optical, TEM and SEM images.

  11. A genome-wide association study of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia using an electronic medical record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karnes, Jason H; Cronin, Robert M; Rollin, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    . Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and candidate gene study using HIT cases and controls identified using electronic medical records (EMRs) coupled to a DNA biobank and attempted to replicate GWAS associations in an independent cohort. We subsequently investigated influences......-heparin treated patients (OR 3.09; 1.14-8.13; p=0.02). In the candidate gene study, SNPs at HLA-DRA were nominally associated with HIT (OR 0.25; 0.15-0.44; p=2.06×10(-6)). Further study of TDAG8 and HLA-DRA SNPs is warranted to assess their influence on the risk of developing HIT....

  12. Neutrino beam plasma instability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We derive relativistic fluid set of equations for neutrinos and electrons from relativistic. Vlasov equations with Fermi weak interaction force. Using these fluid equations, we obtain a dis- persion relation describing neutrino beam plasma instability, which is little different from normal dispersion relation of streaming ...

  13. Elbow joint instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Henriksen, M G; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole

    1994-01-01

    The effect of simultaneous ulnar and radial collateral ligament division on the kinematics of the elbow joint is studied in a cadaveric model. Severance of the anterior part of the ulnar collateral ligament and the annular ligament led to significant elbow joint instability in valgus and varus...

  14. Structural and Material Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cifuentes, Gustavo Cifuentes

    This work is a small contribution to the general problem of structural and material instability. In this work, the main subject is the analysis of cracking and failure of structural elements made from quasi-brittle materials like concrete. The analysis is made using the finite element method. Three...

  15. Atlantooccipital instability. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, H L; Roberts, T S

    1978-04-01

    A patient is presented who had neck pain and transient episodes of visual-field defect followed by unconsciousness when he hyperextended his neck. Radiographic examination revealed atlantooccipital instability on flexion and extension views. Treatment by fusion of the occiput to C-2 resulted in relief of symptoms.

  16. Functional and Genomic Architecture of Borrelia burgdorferi-Induced Cytokine Responses in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosting, Marije; Kerstholt, Mariska; ter Horst, Rob; Li, Yang; Deelen, Patrick; Smeekens, Sanne; Jaeger, Martin; Lachmandas, Ekta; Vrijmoeth, Hedwig; Lupse, Mihaela; Flonta, Mirela; Cramer, Robert A.; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Kumar, Vinod; Xavier, Ramnik; Wijmenga, Cisca; Netea, Mihai G.; Joosten, Leo A. B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of immune variation for the symptoms and outcome of Lyme disease, the factors influencing cytokine production during infection with the causal pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi remain poorly understood. Borrelia infection-induced monocyte- and T cell-derived cytokines were

  17. Tracking Code for Microwave Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heifets, S.; SLAC

    2006-01-01

    To study microwave instability the tracking code is developed. For bench marking, results are compared with Oide-Yokoya results [1] for broad-band Q = 1 impedance. Results hint to two possible mechanisms determining the threshold of instability

  18. Induced Genome-Wide Binding of Three Arabidopsis WRKY Transcription Factors during Early MAMP-Triggered Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkenbihl, Rainer P; Kracher, Barbara; Somssich, Imre E

    2017-01-01

    During microbial-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity (MTI), molecules derived from microbes are perceived by cell surface receptors and upon signaling to the nucleus initiate a massive transcriptional reprogramming critical to mount an appropriate host defense response. WRKY transcription factors play an important role in regulating these transcriptional processes. Here, we determined on a genome-wide scale the flg22-induced in vivo DNA binding dynamics of three of the most prominent WRKY factors, WRKY18, WRKY40, and WRKY33. The three WRKY factors each bound to more than 1000 gene loci predominantly at W-box elements, the known WRKY binding motif. Binding occurred mainly in the 500-bp promoter regions of these genes. Many of the targeted genes are involved in signal perception and transduction not only during MTI but also upon damage-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity, providing a mechanistic link between these functionally interconnected basal defense pathways. Among the additional targets were genes involved in the production of indolic secondary metabolites and in modulating distinct plant hormone pathways. Importantly, among the targeted genes were numerous transcription factors, encoding predominantly ethylene response factors, active during early MTI, and WRKY factors, supporting the previously hypothesized existence of a WRKY subregulatory network. Transcriptional analysis revealed that WRKY18 and WRKY40 function redundantly as negative regulators of flg22-induced genes often to prevent exaggerated defense responses. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  19. Association between genome-wide copy number variation and arsenic-induced skin lesions: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibriya, Muhammad G; Jasmine, Farzana; Parvez, Faruque; Argos, Maria; Roy, Shantanu; Paul-Brutus, Rachelle; Islam, Tariqul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Rakibuz-Zaman, Muhammad; Shinkle, Justin; Slavkovich, Vesna; Graziano, Joseph H; Ahsan, Habibul

    2017-07-18

    Exposure to arsenic in drinking water is a global health problem and arsenic-induced skin lesions are hallmark of chronic arsenic toxicity. We and others have reported germline genetic variations as risk factors for such skin lesions. The role of copy number variation (CNV) in the germline DNA in this regard is unknown. From a large prospectively followed-up cohort, exposed to arsenic, we randomly selected 2171 subjects without arsenic-induced skin lesions at enrollment and genotyped their whole blood DNA samples on Illumina Cyto12v2.1 SNP chips to generate DNA copy number. Participants were followed up every 2 years for a total of 8 years, especially for the development of skin lesions. In Cox regression models, each CNV segment was used as a predictor, accounting for other potential covariates, for incidence of skin lesions. The presence of genomic deletion(s) in a number of genes (OR5J2, GOLGA6L7P, APBA2, GALNTL5, VN1R31P, PHKG1P2, SGCZ, ZNF658) and lincRNA genes (RP11-76I14.1, CTC-535 M15.2, RP11-73B2.2) were associated with higher risk [HR between 1.67 (CI 1.3-2.1) and 2.15 (CI 1.5-2.9) for different CNVs] for development of skin lesions independent of gender, age, and arsenic exposure. Some deletions had stronger effect in a specific gender (ZNF658 in males, SGCZ in females) and some had stronger effect in higher arsenic exposure (lincRNA CTD-3179P9.1) suggesting a possible gene-environment interaction. This first genome-wide CNV study in a prospectively followed-up large cohort, exposed to arsenic, suggests that DNA deletion in several genes and lincRNA genes may predispose an individual to a higher risk of development of arsenic-induced skin lesions.

  20. Evidence of a genetic instability induced by the incorporation of a DNA precursor marked with tritium; Mise en evidence d'une instabilite genetique induite par l'incorporation d'un precurseur de L'ADN marque au tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saintigny, Y.; Laurent, D.; Lahayel, J.B. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, IRCM-LRTS, U967 - CEA/INSERM/Universites Paris 7 and Paris-11, 92 (France); Roche, St.; Meynard, D.; Lopez, B.S. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, LMR - UMR 217 - CEA/CNRS, Institut de Radiobiologie Cellulaire et moleculaire, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, 92 (France)

    2009-07-01

    The authors report a molecular geno-toxicology investigation which allowed molecular events induced par intracellular incorporation of tritium to be studied, and the genetic instability resulting from a chronic exposure even at low dose to be analysed. For this purpose, they developed cell models (hamster tumorous cells and human fibroblasts) in which they know how to incorporate given quantities of marked nucleotides in the DNA. They show that the incorporation of tritium, even with doses which are said to be non toxic, causes a prolonged exposure of the cell to a genotoxic stress, and maybe a genetic instability due to a too great number of recombination events

  1. HEK293 in cell biology and cancer research: phenotype, karyotype, tumorigenicity, and stress-induced genome-phenotype evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, A A; Dmitrenko, V V

    2015-09-15

    293 cell line (widely known as the Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells) and its derivatives were the most used cells after HeLa in cell biology studies and after CHO in biotechnology as a vehicle for the production of adenoviral vaccines and recombinant proteins, for analysis of the neuronal synapse formation, in electrophysiology and neuropharmacology. Despite the historically long-term productive exploitation, the origin, phenotype, karyotype, and tumorigenicity of 293 cells are still debated. 293 cells were considered the kidney epithelial cells or even fibroblasts. However, 293 cells demonstrate no evident tissue-specific gene expression signature and express the markers of renal progenitor cells, neuronal cells and adrenal gland. This complicates efforts to reveal the authentic cell type/tissue of origin. On the other hand, the potential to propagate the highly neurotropic viruses, inducible synaptogenesis, functionality of the endogenous neuron-specific voltage-gated channels, and response to the diverse agonists implicated in neuronal signaling give credibility to consider 293 cells of neuronal lineage phenotype. The compound phenotype of 293 cells can be due to heterogeneous, unstable karyotype. The mean chromosome number and chromosome aberrations differ between 293 cells and derivatives as well as between 293 cells from the different cell banks/labs. 293 cells are tumorigenic, whereas acute changes of expression of the cancer-associated genes aggravate tumorigenicity by promoting chromosome instability. Importantly, the procedure of a stable empty vector transfection can also impact karyotype and phenotype. The discussed issues caution against misinterpretations and pitfalls during the different experimental manipulations with 293 cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Caryocar brasiliense camb protects against genomic and oxidative damage in urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.B.R. Colombo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant effects of Caryocar brasiliense Camb, commonly known as the pequi fruit, have not been evaluated to determine their protective effects against oxidative damage in lung carcinogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated the role of pequi fruit against urethane-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress in forty 8-12 week old male BALB/C mice. An in vivo comet assay was performed to assess DNA damage in lung tissues and changes in lipid peroxidation and redox cycle antioxidants were monitored for oxidative stress. Prior supplementation with pequi oil or its extract (15 µL, 60 days significantly reduced urethane-induced oxidative stress. A protective effect against DNA damage was associated with the modulation of lipid peroxidation and low protein and gene expression of nitric oxide synthase. These findings suggest that the intake of pequi fruit might protect against in vivo genotoxicity and oxidative stress.

  3. Deletions induced by gamma rays in the genome of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raha, Manidipa; Hutchinson, Franklin

    1991-01-01

    An Escherichia coli lysogen was constructed with a lambda phage bearing a lacZ gene surrounded by about 100 x 10 3 base-pairs of dispensable DNA. The lacZ mutants induced by gamma rays in this lysogen were more than 10% large deletions, ranging in size from 0.6 x 10 -3 to 70 x 10 3 base-pairs. These deletions were centered, not on lacZ, but on a ColE1 origin of DNA replication located 1.2 x 10 3 bases downstream from lacZ, suggesting that this origin of replication was involved in the process by which deletions were formed. In agreement with this hypothesis, a lysogen of the same phage without the ColE1 origin showed a very much lower percentage of radiation-induced deletions, as did a second lysogen of a lambda phage without any known plasmid origin of replication. Indirect evidence is presented for radiation-induced deletions centered on the lambda origin of DNA replication in a lysogen. (author)

  4. Ornithine decarboxylase antizyme induces hypomethylation of genome DNA and histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2 in human oral cancer cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Yamamoto

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Methylation of CpG islands of genome DNA and lysine residues of histone H3 and H4 tails regulates gene transcription. Inhibition of polyamine synthesis by ornithine decarboxylase antizyme-1 (OAZ in human oral cancer cell line resulted in accumulation of decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine (dcSAM, which acts as a competitive inhibitor of methylation reactions. We anticipated that accumulation of dcSAM impaired methylation reactions and resulted in hypomethylation of genome DNA and histone tails.Global methylation state of genome DNA and lysine residues of histone H3 and H4 tails were assayed by Methylation by Isoschizomers (MIAMI method and western blotting, respectively, in the presence or absence of OAZ expression. Ectopic expression of OAZ mediated hypomethylation of CpG islands of genome DNA and histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2. Protein level of DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B and histone H3K9me specific methyltransferase G9a were down-regulated in OAZ transfectant.OAZ induced hypomethylation of CpG islands of global genome DNA and H3K9me2 by down-regulating DNMT3B and G9a protein level. Hypomethylation of CpG islands of genome DNA and histone H3K9me2 is a potent mechanism of induction of the genes related to tumor suppression and DNA double strand break repair.

  5. The development of a viral mediated CRISPR/Cas9 system with doxycycline dependent gRNA expression for inducible in vitro and in vivo genome editing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. de Solis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease, from the type II prokaryotic Clustered Regularly Interspersed Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR adaptive immune system, has been adapted and utilized by scientists to edit the genomes of eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the development of a viral mediated CRISPR/Cas9 system that can be rendered inducible utilizing doxycycline (Dox and can be delivered to cells in vitro and in vivo utilizing adeno-associated virus (AAV. Specifically, we developed an inducible gRNA (gRNAi AAV vector that is designed to express the gRNA from a H1/TO promoter. This AAV vector is also designed to express the Tet repressor (TetR to regulate the expression of the gRNAi in a Dox dependent manner. We show that H1/TO promoters of varying length and a U6/TO promoter can edit DNA with similar efficiency in vitro, in a Dox dependent manner. We also demonstrate that our inducible gRNAi vector can be used to edit the genomes of neurons in vivo within the mouse brain in a Dox dependent manner. Genome editing can be induced in vivo with this system by supplying animals Dox containing food for as little as one day. This system might be cross compatible with many existing S. pyogenes Cas9 systems (i.e. Cas9 mouse, CRISPRi, etc., and therefore it likely can be used to render these systems inducible as well.

  6. Ischemic acute kidney injury induces a distant organ functional and genomic response distinguishable from bilateral nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassoun, Heitham T; Grigoryev, Dmitry N; Lie, Mihaela L; Liu, Manchang; Cheadle, Chris; Tuder, Rubin M; Rabb, Hamid

    2007-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with significant mortality, which increases further when combined with acute lung injury. Experiments in rodents have shown that kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) facilitates lung injury and inflammation. To identify potential ischemia-specific lung molecular pathways involved, we conducted global gene expression profiling of lung 6 or 36 h following 1) bilateral kidney IRI, 2) bilateral nephrectomy (BNx), and 3) sham laparotomy in C57BL/6J mice. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid analysis revealed increased total protein, and lung histology revealed increased cellular inflammation following IRI, but not BNx, compared with sham controls. Total RNA from whole lung was isolated and hybridized to 430MOEA (22,626 genes) GeneChips (n = 3/group), which were analyzed by robust multichip average and significance analysis of microarrays and linked to gene ontology (GO) terms using MAPPFinder. The microarray power analysis predicted that the false discovery rate (q or =50%-fold change compared with sham would represent significant changes in gene expression. Analysis identified 266 and 455 ischemia-specific, AKI-associated lung genes with increased expression and 615 and 204 with decreased expression at 6 and 36 h, respectively, compared with sham controls. Real-time PCR analysis validated select array changes in lung serum amyloid A3 and endothelin-1. GO analysis revealed significant activation (Z > 1.95) of several proinflammatory and proapoptotic biological processes. Ischemic AKI induces functional and transcriptional changes in the lung distinct from those induced by uremia alone. Further investigation using this lung molecular signature induced by kidney IRI will provide mechanistic insights and new therapies for critically ill patients with AKI.

  7. Photon-induced cell migration and integrin expression promoted by DNA integration of HPV16 genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieken, Stefan; Simon, Florian; Habermehl, Daniel; Dittmar, Jan Oliver; Combs, Stephanie E.; Weber, Klaus; Debus, Juergen; Lindel, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Persistent human papilloma virus 16 (HPV16) infections are a major cause of cervical cancer. The integration of the viral DNA into the host genome causes E2 gene disruption which prevents apoptosis and increases host cell motility. In cervical cancer patients, survival is limited by local infiltration and systemic dissemination. Surgical control rates are poor in cases of parametrial infiltration. In these patients, radiotherapy (RT) is administered to enhance local control. However, photon irradiation itself has been reported to increase cell motility. In cases of E2-disrupted cervical cancers, this phenomenon would impose an additional risk of enhanced tumor cell motility. Here, we analyze mechanisms underlying photon-increased migration in keratinocytes with differential E2 gene status. Isogenic W12 (intact E2 gene status) and S12 (disrupted E2 gene status) keratinocytes were analyzed in fibronectin-based and serum-stimulated migration experiments following single photon doses of 0, 2, and 10 Gy. Quantitative FACS analyses of integrin expression were performed. Migration and adhesion are increased in E2 gene-disrupted keratinocytes. E2 gene disruption promotes attractability by serum components, therefore, effectuating the risk of local infiltration and systemic dissemination. In S12 cells, migration is further increased by photon RT which leads to enhanced expression of fibronectin receptor integrins. HPV16-associated E2 gene disruption is a main predictor of treatment-refractory cancer virulence. E2 gene disruption promotes cell motility. Following photon RT, E2-disrupted tumors bear the risk of integrin-related infiltration and dissemination. (orig.) [de

  8. Instability and internet design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Braman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Instability - unpredictable but constant change in one’s environment and the means with which one deals with it - has replaced convergence as the focal problem for telecommunications policy in general and internet policy in particular. Those who designed what we now call the internet during the first decade of the effort (1969-1979, who in essence served simultaneously as its policy-makers, developed techniques for coping with instability of value for network designers today and for those involved with any kind of large-scale sociotechnical infrastructure. Analysis of the technical document series that was medium for and record of that design process reveals coping techniques that began with defining the problem and went on to include conceptual labour, social practices, and technical approaches.

  9. Orphans and political instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuning, Marijke; Ishiyama, John

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the security implications of growing orphan populations, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Little has been written about the security implications of this especially vulnerable group of children. Are growing orphan populations associated with increases in political instability as has been suggested? Using data from several sources, we employ regression analysis to test whether Sub-Saharan African countries with larger proportions of orphans and those with increasing orphan populations experience higher rates of political instability. We find that the increase in the orphan population is related to an increasing incidence of civil conflict, but do not find a similar relationship for the proportion of orphans. In addition, we find that the causes of orphanhood matter. We conclude that increases in orphan populations (rather than simple proportions) are destabilizing. We suggest possible avenues for mediating the security risks posed by growing orphan populations.

  10. State Instability and Terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    security, heterosexual relationships and goods and services. Although prisons constitute a very controlled social structure to begin with, it is...closely although the NBRM model fits slightly better. The Vuong test preferred the ZINB model over the NBRM (p<.0000). This suggests that I ought to...then, it is preferred because it allows me to examine the effects of instability within-country only. This is the purest test