WorldWideScience

Sample records for induce neurological disorders

  1. Neurological disorders in children with autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Zavadenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During a clinical examination of children with autistic spectrum disorders, attention should be drawn to both their major clinical manifestations and neurological comorbidities. The paper considers the mechanisms of autism-induced neurological disorders, the spectrum of which may include manifestations, such as retarded and disharmonic early psychomotor development; the specific features of sensory perception/processing; rigidity and monotony of motor and psychic reactions; motor disinhibition and hyperexcitability; motor stereotypies; uncoordinated movements; developmental coordination disorders (dyspraxia; impaired expressive motor skills; speech and articulation disorders; tics; epilepsy. It describes the specific features of neurological symptoms in Asperger’s syndrome, particularly in semantic-pragmatic language disorders, higher incidence rates of hyperlexia, motor and vocal tics. The incidence rate of epilepsy in autistic spectrum disorders is emphasized to be greater than the average population one. At the same time, the risk of epilepsy is higher in mentally retarded patients with autism. Identification of neurological disorders is of great importance in determining the tactics of complex care for patients with autistic spectrum disorders

  2. Modeling human neurological disorders with induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Yoichi; Okano, Hideyuki

    2014-05-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells obtained by reprogramming technology are a source of great hope, not only in terms of applications in regenerative medicine, such as cell transplantation therapy, but also for modeling human diseases and new drug development. In particular, the production of iPS cells from the somatic cells of patients with intractable diseases and their subsequent differentiation into cells at affected sites (e.g., neurons, cardiomyocytes, hepatocytes, and myocytes) has permitted the in vitro construction of disease models that contain patient-specific genetic information. For example, disease-specific iPS cells have been established from patients with neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and autism, as well as from those with neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. A multi-omics analysis of neural cells originating from patient-derived iPS cells may thus enable investigators to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of neurological diseases that have heretofore been unknown. In addition, large-scale screening of chemical libraries with disease-specific iPS cells is currently underway and is expected to lead to new drug discovery. Accordingly, this review outlines the progress made via the use of patient-derived iPS cells toward the modeling of neurological disorders, the testing of existing drugs, and the discovery of new drugs. The production of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from the patients' somatic cells and their subsequent differentiation into specific cells have permitted the in vitro construction of disease models that contain patient-specific genetic information. Furthermore, innovations of gene-editing technologies on iPS cells are enabling new approaches for illuminating the pathogenic mechanisms of human diseases. In this review article, we outlined the current status of neurological diseases-specific iPS cell research and described recently obtained

  3. The potential of induced pluripotent stem cells in models of neurological disorders: implications on future therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Jeremy Micah; Wallace, Gordon; Tomaskovic-Crook, Eva

    2015-03-01

    There is an urgent need for new and advanced approaches to modeling the pathological mechanisms of complex human neurological disorders. This is underscored by the decline in pharmaceutical research and development efficiency resulting in a relative decrease in new drug launches in the last several decades. Induced pluripotent stem cells represent a new tool to overcome many of the shortcomings of conventional methods, enabling live human neural cell modeling of complex conditions relating to aberrant neurodevelopment, such as schizophrenia, epilepsy and autism as well as age-associated neurodegeneration. This review considers the current status of induced pluripotent stem cell-based modeling of neurological disorders, canvassing proven and putative advantages, current constraints, and future prospects of next-generation culture systems for biomedical research and translation.

  4. Cardiomyopathy in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Wahbi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    According to the American Heart Association, cardiomyopathies are classified as primary (solely or predominantly confined to heart muscle), secondary (those showing pathological myocardial involvement as part of a neuromuscular disorder) and those in which cardiomyopathy is the first/predominant manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder. Cardiomyopathies may be further classified as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, or unclassified cardiomyopathy (noncompaction, Takotsubo-cardiomyopathy). This review focuses on secondary cardiomyopathies and those in which cardiomyopathy is the predominant manifestation of a myopathy. Any of them may cause neurological disease, and any of them may be a manifestation of a neurological disorder. Neurological disease most frequently caused by cardiomyopathies is ischemic stroke, followed by transitory ischemic attack, syncope, or vertigo. Neurological disease, which most frequently manifests with cardiomyopathies are the neuromuscular disorders. Most commonly associated with cardiomyopathies are muscular dystrophies, myofibrillar myopathies, congenital myopathies and metabolic myopathies. Management of neurological disease caused by cardiomyopathies is not at variance from the same neurological disorders due to other causes. Management of secondary cardiomyopathies is not different from that of cardiomyopathies due to other causes either. Patients with neuromuscular disorders require early cardiologic investigations and close follow-ups, patients with cardiomyopathies require neurological investigation and avoidance of muscle toxic medication if a neuromuscular disorder is diagnosed. Which patients with cardiomyopathy profit most from primary stroke prevention is unsolved and requires further investigations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Affective disorders in neurological diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, F M; Kessing, L V; Sørensen, T M

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the temporal relationships between a range of neurological diseases and affective disorders. METHOD: Data derived from linkage of the Danish Psychiatric Central Register and the Danish National Hospital Register. Seven cohorts with neurological index diagnoses and two...... of affective disorder was lower than the incidence in the control groups. CONCLUSION: In neurological diseases there seems to be an increased incidence of affective disorders. The elevated incidence was found to be particularly high for dementia and Parkinson's disease (neurodegenerative diseases)....

  6. Wikipedia and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, Willem M

    2015-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popular free online encyclopedia used by patients and physicians to search for health-related information. The following Wikipedia articles were considered: Alzheimer's disease; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Dementia; Epilepsy; Epileptic seizure; Migraine; Multiple sclerosis; Parkinson's disease; Stroke; Traumatic brain injury. We analyzed information regarding the total article views for 90 days and the rank of these articles among all those available in Wikipedia. We determined the highest search volume peaks to identify possible relation with online news headlines. No relation between incidence or prevalence of neurological disorders and the search volume for the related articles was found. Seven out of 10 neurological conditions showed relations in search volume peaks and news headlines. Six out of these seven peaks were related to news about famous people suffering from neurological disorders, especially those from showbusiness. Identification of discrepancies between disease burden and health seeking behavior on Wikipedia is useful in the planning of public health campaigns. Celebrities who publicly announce their neurological diagnosis might effectively promote awareness programs, increase public knowledge and reduce stigma related to diagnoses of neurological disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Neurologic disorder and criminal responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Gideon

    2013-01-01

    Sufferers from neurologic and psychiatric disorders are not uncommonly defendants in criminal trials. This chapter surveys a variety of different ways in which neurologic disorder bears on criminal responsibility. It discusses the way in which a neurologic disorder might bear on the questions of whether or not the defendant acted voluntarily; whether or not he or she was in the mental state that is required for guilt for the crime; and whether or not he or she is deserving of an insanity defense. The discussion demonstrates that a just determination of whether a sufferer from a neurologic disorder is diminished in his or her criminal responsibility for harmful conduct requires equal appreciation of the nature of the relevant disorder and its impact on behavior, on the one hand, and of the legal import of facts about the psychologic mechanisms through which behavior is generated, on the other. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Neurological Disorders in Adult Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease may initially present as a neurological disorder. Alternatively, celiac disease may be complicated by neurological changes. With impaired nutrient absorption, different deficiency syndromes may occur and these may be manifested clinically with neurological changes. However, in patients with deficiency syndromes, extensive involvement of the small intestine with celiac disease is often evident. There are a number of reports of celiac disease associated with neuropathy, ataxia, dementia and seizure disorder. In these reports, there is no clear relationship with nutrient deficiency and a precise mechanism for the neurological changes has not been defined. A small number of patients have been reported to have responded to vitamin E administration, but most do not. In some, gluten antibodies have also been described, especially in those with ataxia, but a consistent response to a gluten-free diet has not been defined. Screening for celiac disease should be considered in patients with unexplained neurological disorders, including ataxia and dementia. Further studies are needed, however, to determine if a gluten-free diet will lead to improvement in the associated neurological disorder.

  9. Meige's Syndrome: Rare Neurological Disorder Presenting as Conversion Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debadatta, Mohapatra; Mishra, Ajay K

    2013-07-01

    Meige's syndrome is a rare neurological syndrome characterized by oromandibular dystonia and blepharospasm. Its pathophysiology is not clearly determined. A 35-year-old female presented to psychiatric department with blepharospasm and oromandibular dystonia with clinical provisional diagnosis of psychiatric disorder (Conversion Disorder). After thorough physical examination including detailed neurological exam and psychiatric evaluation no formal medical or psychiatric diagnosis could be made. The other differential diagnoses of extra pyramidal symptom, tardive dyskinesia, conversion disorder, anxiety disorder were ruled out by formal diagnostic criteria. Consequently with suspicion of Meige's syndrome she was referred to the department of Neurology and the diagnosis was confirmed. Hence, Meige's syndrome could be misdiagnosed as a psychiatric disorder such as conversion disorder or anxiety disorder because clinical features of Meige's syndrome are highly variable and affected by psychological factors and also can be inhibited voluntarily to some extent.

  10. Bridging neuroanatomy, neuroradiology and neurology: three-dimensional interactive atlas of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, W L; Chua, B C

    2013-06-01

    Understanding brain pathology along with the underlying neuroanatomy and the resulting neurological deficits is of vital importance in medical education and clinical practice. To facilitate and expedite this understanding, we created a three-dimensional (3D) interactive atlas of neurological disorders providing the correspondence between a brain lesion and the resulting disorder(s). The atlas contains a 3D highly parcellated atlas of normal neuroanatomy along with a brain pathology database. Normal neuroanatomy is divided into about 2,300 components, including the cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, spinal cord, arteries, veins, dural sinuses, tracts, cranial nerves (CN), white matter, deep gray nuclei, ventricles, visual system, muscles, glands and cervical vertebrae (C1-C5). The brain pathology database contains 144 focal and distributed synthesized lesions (70 vascular, 36 CN-related, and 38 regional anatomy-related), each lesion labeled with the resulting disorder and associated signs, symptoms, and/or syndromes compiled from materials reported in the literature. The initial view of each lesion was preset in terms of its location and size, surrounding surface and sectional (magnetic resonance) neuroanatomy, and labeling of lesion and neuroanatomy. In addition, a glossary of neurological disorders was compiled and for each disorder materials from textbooks were included to provide neurological description. This atlas of neurological disorders is potentially useful to a wide variety of users ranging from medical students, residents and nurses to general practitioners, neuroanatomists, neuroradiologists and neurologists, as it contains both normal (surface and sectional) brain anatomy and pathology correlated with neurological disorders presented in a visual and interactive way.

  11. Oxidative stress and neurological disorders in relation to blood lead levels in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, M; Fareed, Mohd; Kumar, A; Siddiqui, W A; Siddiqui, M K J

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders. Free radical generation appears to be the mode of lead toxicity. We evaluated the effects of blood lead levels on oxidative stress parameters in children suffering from neurological disorders. Thirty children (aged 3-12 years) with neurological disorders (cerebral palsy [n = 12], seizures [n = 11], and encephalopathy [n = 7]) were recruited in the study group. Sixty healthy children (aged 3-12 years) from similar socio-economic environments and not suffering from any chronic disease were taken as the controls. Blood lead levels and oxidant/antioxidant status were determined. Mean blood lead level was significantly higher while delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (delta-ALAD) activity, a biomarker for lead exposure, was significantly lower in the study group as compared to the control group (P children with neurological disorders. Lead-induced oxidative stress as an underlying mechanism for neurological diseases in children warranted further investigation.

  12. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Hospitalization among Children with Neurologic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millman, Alexander J; Finelli, Lyn; Bramley, Anna M; Peacock, Georgina; Williams, Derek J; Arnold, Sandra R; Grijalva, Carlos G; Anderson, Evan J; McCullers, Jonathan A; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T; Edwards, Kathryn M; Jain, Seema

    2016-06-01

    To describe and compare the clinical characteristics, outcomes, and etiology of pneumonia among children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with neurologic disorders, non-neurologic underlying conditions, and no underlying conditions. Children children's hospitals. Neurologic disorders included cerebral palsy, developmental delay, Down syndrome, epilepsy, non-Down syndrome chromosomal abnormalities, and spinal cord abnormalities. We compared the epidemiology, etiology, and clinical outcomes of CAP in children with neurologic disorders with those with non-neurologic underlying conditions, and those with no underlying conditions using bivariate, age-stratified, and multivariate logistic regression analyses. From January 2010-June 2012, 2358 children with radiographically confirmed CAP were enrolled; 280 (11.9%) had a neurologic disorder (52.1% of these individuals also had non-neurologic underlying conditions), 934 (39.6%) had non-neurologic underlying conditions only, and 1144 (48.5%) had no underlying conditions. Children with neurologic disorders were older and more likely to require intensive care unit (ICU) admission than children with non-neurologic underlying conditions and children with no underlying conditions; similar proportions were mechanically ventilated. In age-stratified analysis, children with neurologic disorders were less likely to have a pathogen detected than children with non-neurologic underlying conditions. In multivariate analysis, having a neurologic disorder was associated with ICU admission for children ≥2 years of age. Children with neurologic disorders hospitalized with CAP were less likely to have a pathogen detected and more likely to be admitted to the ICU than children without neurologic disorders. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Autism spectrum symptoms in children with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryland, Hilde K; Hysing, Mari; Posserud, Maj-Britt; Gillberg, Christopher; Lundervold, Astri J

    2012-11-12

    The aims of the present study were to assess symptoms associated with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children with neurological disorders as reported by parents and teachers on the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ), as well as the level of agreement between informants for each child. The ASSQ was completed by parents and teachers of the 5781 children (11-13 years) who participated in the second wave of the Bergen Child Study (BCS), an on-going longitudinal population-based study. Out of these children, 496 were reported to have a chronic illness, including 99 whom had a neurological disorder. The neurological disorder group included children both with and without intellectual disabilities. Children with neurological disorders obtained significantly higher parent and teacher reported ASSQ scores than did non-chronically ill children and those with other chronic illnesses (pchildren with neurological disorders was moderate to high for the total score and for three sub scores generated from a factor analysis, and low to moderate for single items. The ASSQ identifies a high rate of ASD symptoms in children with neurological disorders, and a large number of children screened in the positive range for ASD. Although a firm conclusion awaits further clinical studies, the present results suggest that health care professionals should be aware of potential ASD related problems in children with neurological disorders, and should consider inclusion of the ASSQ or similar screening instruments as part of their routine assessment of this group of children.

  14. [Clinical study of comparing comorbidity between depression and neurological disorder with depressive disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; He, Mao-Lin; Li, Shun-Wei

    2010-01-26

    To compare the clinical traits in comorbidity between depression and neurological disorder with depressive disorder and explore the characteristic of the outpatients with neurological disorder comorbidity in depression. According to Diagnosis and Statistic Manual for Mental Disorder-IV (DSM-IV) criteria, outpatients were diagnosed as depressive disorder at Departments of Neurology and Psychology. We used HAMD-17 scale to evaluate the patient's severity. There was no statistical difference in severity of depression in two groups. But the clinical traits showed significant differences between two outpatient groups: the outpatients with neurological disorder comorbidity in depression were elder, had more somatic disorders and a higher retard symptom factor score while the other are relative younger, have less physical disorders and higher the core symptom factor score on the other hand. The patients of comorbidity between depression and neurological disorders have unique clinical traits. Thus it will be helpful to improve the identification of diagnosis and choose an appropriate treatment if we know the differences well.

  15. Feeding problems in children with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamroz, Ewa; Głuszkiewicz, Ewa; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Woś, Halina

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of selected risk factors of weight deficiency in children with chronic metabolic diseases. The study group involved 160 children, from 2 months to 15 years (mean age 3.14 years), with diseases of the nervous system and body weight deficiency. According to the type of neurological disease the following groups of patients were separated: static encephalopathies, progressive encephalopathies, disorders of mental development of undetermined etiology, genetically determined diseases. As the exponent of malnutrition, z-score of weight-for-age standards was used. An inclusion criterion for the study group was z-score of weight-for-age children, neurological disorders, oral motor dysfunction, diseases of other organs, gastrointestinal motility disorders (oral cavity, esophagus, intestines) and type of nutritional therapy. The most advanced malnutrition was in children with progressive encephalopathies and genetically determined diseases. Seizures and muscular hypotonia were most common neurological disorders. Oral motor dysfunctions were observed in 40% of patients. Malnutrition in children with neurological disorders is associated mainly with neurological deficits. In this group of children monitoring of somatic development and early nutritional intervention are necessary.

  16. Vaccination and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Gkampeta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Active immunization of children has been proven very effective in elimination of life threatening complications of many infectious diseases in developed countries. However, as vaccination-preventable infectious diseases and their complications have become rare, the interest focuses on immunization-related adverse reactions. Unfortunately, fear of vaccination-related adverse effects can led to decreased vaccination coverage and subsequent epidemics of infectious diseases. This review includes reports about possible side effects following vaccinations in children with neurological disorders and also published recommendations about vaccinating children with neurological disorders. From all international published data anyone can conclude that vaccines are safer than ever before, but the challenge remains to convey this message to society.

  17. [Prevalence of neurological disorders among children with Down syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaete, Beatriz; Mellado, Cecilia; Hernández, Marta

    2012-02-01

    Neurological disturbances are common problems in children with Down Syndrome (DS). To determine the prevalence of neurological disorders affecting children with Down Syndrome. Review of medical records of 253 children aged from 1 day to 23 years affected with DS, attended at a public hospital and a University clinic. The overall prevalence of neurological disorders was 38.7%. The most common problems were ocular motor disorders in 26% of cases and epilepsy in 12%. Neurological disorders are more common in children with DS than in the general population. Motor ocular disorders and epilepsy are the predominant disturbances detected.

  18. Autism spectrum symptoms in children with neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryland Hilde K

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of the present study were to assess symptoms associated with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD in children with neurological disorders as reported by parents and teachers on the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ, as well as the level of agreement between informants for each child. Methods The ASSQ was completed by parents and teachers of the 5781 children (11–13 years who participated in the second wave of the Bergen Child Study (BCS, an on-going longitudinal population-based study. Out of these children, 496 were reported to have a chronic illness, including 99 whom had a neurological disorder. The neurological disorder group included children both with and without intellectual disabilities. Results Children with neurological disorders obtained significantly higher parent and teacher reported ASSQ scores than did non-chronically ill children and those with other chronic illnesses (p Conclusions The ASSQ identifies a high rate of ASD symptoms in children with neurological disorders, and a large number of children screened in the positive range for ASD. Although a firm conclusion awaits further clinical studies, the present results suggest that health care professionals should be aware of potential ASD related problems in children with neurological disorders, and should consider inclusion of the ASSQ or similar screening instruments as part of their routine assessment of this group of children.

  19. Children's sleep disturbance scale in differentiating neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Rony; Halevy, Ayelet; Shuper, Avinoam

    2013-12-01

    We use the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children (SDSC) routinely as a tool for evaluating children's sleep quality in our pediatric neurology clinic. We analyzed at its ability to detect sleep disturbances distinctive to selected neurological disorders. One-hundred and eighty-six children (age range 2-18 years) who were evaluated by the SDSC questionnaire were divided into three groups according to their principal diagnosis: epilepsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or others. Their responses were analyzed. The average frequency of abnormal total sleep score was 26.9%. The most frequent sleep disorders were excessive somnolence (25.3%), initiating and maintaining sleep (24.7%), and arousal/nightmares (23.1%). There were no significant group differences for total scores or sleep disorder-specific scores; although a sleep-wake transition disorder was more frequent among children with epilepsy (31%). A literature search revealed that the frequency of abnormal total scores in several neurological disorders (e.g., epilepsy, cerebral palsy) ranges between 20% and 30%. The mechanism underlying sleep disturbances in many neurological disorders may be unrelated to that of the primary disease but rather originate from nonspecific or environmental factors (e.g., familial/social customs and habits, temperament, psychological parameters). Although the SDSC is noninformative for studying the effect of a specific neurological disorder on sleep, we still recommend its implementation for screening for sleep disturbances in children with neurological abnormalities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Psychological assessment of malingering in psychogenic neurological disorders and non-psychogenic neurological disorders : relationship to psychopathology levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beilen, M.; Griffioen, B. T.; Gross, A.; Leenders, K. L.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: It remains unknown whether psychological distress causes malingering in patients with psychogenic symptoms. Methods: We studied 26 patients with psychogenic neurological disorders on psychopathology and malingering in comparison with 26 patients with various neurological

  1. [Current emergency medicine for neurological disorders in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osamura, Toshio

    2010-01-01

    In 2006, the number of pediatric outpatients consulting our hospital during non-practice hours increased by 218.1% of that in 1996. The number of pediatric inpatients during non-practice hours in 2006 increased by 71.3% of that in 1996. In 2006, the number of patients who were admitted with neurological disorders in children during non-practice hours increased to 213.3% of that in 1996. The proportion of these pediatric patients among those who were admitted during non-practice hours was 16.6% in our hospital, suggesting the importance of neurological disorders in pediatric emergency medicine. More than 60% of inpatients with neurological disorders in children were 3 years old or younger. The most common neurological symptoms observed at admission included convulsion (81.6%) and disturbance of consciousness (8.5%). The disorders were mainly febrile seizure (41.4%) and epilepsy (29.0%). Most patients with severe disorders requiring emergency medicine, such as head bruise, acute encephalitis/encephalopathy, purulent meningitis, and head trauma, were admitted during non-practice hours. The prognoses of most neurological disorders in children were favorable. However, patients with sequelae (especially, hypoxic encephalopathy, acute encephalitis/encephalopathy) showed an unfavorable neurological prognosis. Early rehabilitation during admission was useful as a support method for their families. In the future, a comprehensive rehabilitation program for children with acquired brain injury should be established and laws to promote home care must be passed.

  2. Diagnostic Exercise: Neurologic Disorder in a Cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-21

    IWORK UNIT ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. ACCESSION NO. 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) Diagnostic Exercise - Neurologic Disorder in a Cat 12...and identify by block number) This report documents the fifth reported occurrance of cerebral phaeophyphomycosis in cats . Because mycotic...Exercise: Neurologic Disorder in a Cat Ronald C. Bell United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick

  3. Modern network science of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Cornelis J

    2014-10-01

    Modern network science has revealed fundamental aspects of normal brain-network organization, such as small-world and scale-free patterns, hierarchical modularity, hubs and rich clubs. The next challenge is to use this knowledge to gain a better understanding of brain disease. Recent developments in the application of network science to conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury and epilepsy have challenged the classical concept of neurological disorders being either 'local' or 'global', and have pointed to the overload and failure of hubs as a possible final common pathway in neurological disorders.

  4. Urea cycle disorders: brain MRI and neurological outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bireley, William R; Van Hove, Johan L K; Gallagher, Renata C; Fenton, Laura Z

    2012-04-01

    Urea cycle disorders encompass several enzyme deficiencies that can result in cerebral damage, with a wide clinical spectrum from asymptomatic to severe. The goal of this study was to correlate brain MRI abnormalities in urea cycle disorders with clinical neurological sequelae to evaluate whether MRI abnormalities can assist in guiding difficult treatment decisions. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients with urea cycle disorders and symptomatic hyperammonemia. Brain MRI images were reviewed for abnormalities that correlated with severity of clinical neurological sequelae. Our case series comprises six urea cycle disorder patients, five with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and one with citrullinemia type 1. The observed trend in distribution of brain MRI abnormalities as the severity of neurological sequelae increased was the peri-insular region first, extending into the frontal, parietal, temporal and, finally, the occipital lobes. There was thalamic restricted diffusion in three children with prolonged hyperammonemia. Prior to death, this site is typically reported to be spared in urea cycle disorders. The pattern and extent of brain MRI abnormalities correlate with clinical neurological outcome in our case series. This suggests that brain MRI abnormalities may assist in determining prognosis and helping clinicians with subsequent treatment decisions.

  5. Urea cycle disorders: brain MRI and neurological outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bireley, William R. [University of Colorado, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Van Hove, Johan L.K. [University of Colorado, Department of Genetics and Inherited Metabolic Diseases, Aurora, CO (United States); Gallagher, Renata C. [Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Genetics and Inherited Metabolic Diseases, Aurora, CO (United States); Fenton, Laura Z. [Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Urea cycle disorders encompass several enzyme deficiencies that can result in cerebral damage, with a wide clinical spectrum from asymptomatic to severe. The goal of this study was to correlate brain MRI abnormalities in urea cycle disorders with clinical neurological sequelae to evaluate whether MRI abnormalities can assist in guiding difficult treatment decisions. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients with urea cycle disorders and symptomatic hyperammonemia. Brain MRI images were reviewed for abnormalities that correlated with severity of clinical neurological sequelae. Our case series comprises six urea cycle disorder patients, five with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and one with citrullinemia type 1. The observed trend in distribution of brain MRI abnormalities as the severity of neurological sequelae increased was the peri-insular region first, extending into the frontal, parietal, temporal and, finally, the occipital lobes. There was thalamic restricted diffusion in three children with prolonged hyperammonemia. Prior to death, this site is typically reported to be spared in urea cycle disorders. The pattern and extent of brain MRI abnormalities correlate with clinical neurological outcome in our case series. This suggests that brain MRI abnormalities may assist in determining prognosis and helping clinicians with subsequent treatment decisions. (orig.)

  6. Urea cycle disorders: brain MRI and neurological outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bireley, William R.; Van Hove, Johan L.K.; Gallagher, Renata C.; Fenton, Laura Z.

    2012-01-01

    Urea cycle disorders encompass several enzyme deficiencies that can result in cerebral damage, with a wide clinical spectrum from asymptomatic to severe. The goal of this study was to correlate brain MRI abnormalities in urea cycle disorders with clinical neurological sequelae to evaluate whether MRI abnormalities can assist in guiding difficult treatment decisions. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients with urea cycle disorders and symptomatic hyperammonemia. Brain MRI images were reviewed for abnormalities that correlated with severity of clinical neurological sequelae. Our case series comprises six urea cycle disorder patients, five with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and one with citrullinemia type 1. The observed trend in distribution of brain MRI abnormalities as the severity of neurological sequelae increased was the peri-insular region first, extending into the frontal, parietal, temporal and, finally, the occipital lobes. There was thalamic restricted diffusion in three children with prolonged hyperammonemia. Prior to death, this site is typically reported to be spared in urea cycle disorders. The pattern and extent of brain MRI abnormalities correlate with clinical neurological outcome in our case series. This suggests that brain MRI abnormalities may assist in determining prognosis and helping clinicians with subsequent treatment decisions. (orig.)

  7. Wikipedia and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C.; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, WM

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a

  8. Thyroid-related neurological disorders and complications in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi-Munshi, Debika; Taplin, Craig E

    2015-04-01

    Thyroid hormones exert critical roles throughout the body and play an important and permissive role in neuroendocrine, neurological, and neuromuscular function. We performed a PubMed search through June 2014 with search terms including "hypothyroidism," "hyperthyroidism," "neurological complications," "neuropathy," "myopathy," "congenital hypothyroidism," and "encephalopathy." Relevant publications reviewed included case series, individual case reports, systematic reviews, retrospective analyses, and randomized controlled trials. The neurological outcomes of congenital hypothyroidism were reviewed, along with the clinical features of associated neuromuscular syndromes of both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, including other autoimmune conditions. Evidence for, and pathophysiological controversies surrounding, Hashimoto encephalopathy was also reviewed. The establishment of widespread newborn screening programs has been highly successful in attenuating or preventing early and irreversible neurological harm resulting from congenital thyroid hormone deficiency, but some children continue to display neuromuscular, sensory, and cognitive defects in later life. Acquired disorders of thyroid function such as Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves' disease are associated with a spectrum of central nervous system and/or neuromuscular dysfunction. However, considerable variation in clinical phenotype is described, and much of our knowledge of the role of thyroid disease in childhood neurological disorders is derived from adult case series. Early and aggressive normalization of thyroxine levels in newborn infants with congenital hypothyroidism is important in minimizing neurological sequelae, but maternal thyroid hormone sources are also critically important to the early developing brain. A spectrum of neurological disorders has been reported in older children with acquired thyroid disease, but the frequency with which these occur remains poorly defined in the literature, and

  9. CSF HYPOCRETIN CONCENTRATION IN VARIOUS NEUROLOGICAL AND SLEEP DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Tsutsui, Kou; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Sawaishi, Yukio; Tokunaga, Jun; Sato, Masahiro; Shimizu, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Recent CSF and postmortem brain hypocretin measurements in human narcolepsy suggest that hypocretin deficiency is involved in the pathophysiology of the disease. Thus, it is important to study whether neurological disorders also have abnormal CSF hypocretin levels. We therefore measured hypocretins in the CSF of various neurological disorders and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) to identify altered hypocretin levels. CSF hypocretin levels in patients with OSAS and neurological diseases...

  10. Nanotechnology based diagnostics for neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurek, Nicholas S; Chandra, Sathees B., E-mail: schandra@roosevelt.edu [Department of Biological, Chemical and Physical Sciences, Roosevelt University, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Nanotechnology involves probing and manipulating matter at the molecular level. Nanotechnology based molecular diagnostics have the potential to alleviate the suffering caused by many diseases, including neurological disorders, due to the unique properties of nanomaterials. Most neurological illnesses are multifactorial conditions and many of these are also classified as neurobehavioral disorders. Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington disease, cerebral ischemia, epilepsy, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders like Rett syndrome are some examples of neurological disorders that could be better treated, diagnosed, prevented and possibly cured using nanotechnology. In order to improve the quality of life for disease afflicted people, a wide range of nanomaterials that include gold and silica nanoparticles, quantum dots and DNA along with countless other forms of nanotechnology have been investigated regarding their usefulness in advancing molecular diagnostics. Other small scaled materials like viruses and proteins also have potential for use as molecular diagnostic tools. Information obtained from nanotechnology based diagnostics can be stored and manipulated using bioinformatics software. More advanced nanotechnology based diagnostic procedures for the acquisition of even greater proteomic and genomic knowledge can then be developed along with better ways to fight various diseases. Nanotechnology also has numerous applications besides those related to biotechnology and medicine. In this article, we will discuss and analyze many novel nanotechnology based diagnostic techniques at our disposal today. (author)

  11. Nanotechnology based diagnostics for neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurek, Nicholas S.; Chandra, Sathees B., E-mail: schandra@roosevelt.edu [Department of Biological, Chemical and Physical Sciences, Roosevelt University, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Nanotechnology involves probing and manipulating matter at the molecular level. Nanotechnology based molecular diagnostics have the potential to alleviate the suffering caused by many diseases, including neurological disorders, due to the unique properties of nanomaterials. Most neurological illnesses are multifactorial conditions and many of these are also classified as neurobehavioral disorders. Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington disease, cerebral ischemia, epilepsy, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders like Rett syndrome are some examples of neurological disorders that could be better treated, diagnosed, prevented and possibly cured using nanotechnology. In order to improve the quality of life for disease afflicted people, a wide range of nanomaterials that include gold and silica nanoparticles, quantum dots and DNA along with countless other forms of nanotechnology have been investigated regarding their usefulness in advancing molecular diagnostics. Other small scaled materials like viruses and proteins also have potential for use as molecular diagnostic tools. Information obtained from nanotechnology based diagnostics can be stored and manipulated using bioinformatics software. More advanced nanotechnology based diagnostic procedures for the acquisition of even greater proteomic and genomic knowledge can then be developed along with better ways to fight various diseases. Nanotechnology also has numerous applications besides those related to biotechnology and medicine. In this article, we will discuss and analyze many novel nanotechnology based diagnostic techniques at our disposal today. (author)

  12. Nanotechnology based diagnostics for neurological disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurek, Nicholas S.; Chandra, Sathees B.

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology involves probing and manipulating matter at the molecular level. Nanotechnology based molecular diagnostics have the potential to alleviate the suffering caused by many diseases, including neurological disorders, due to the unique properties of nanomaterials. Most neurological illnesses are multifactorial conditions and many of these are also classified as neurobehavioral disorders. Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington disease, cerebral ischemia, epilepsy, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders like Rett syndrome are some examples of neurological disorders that could be better treated, diagnosed, prevented and possibly cured using nanotechnology. In order to improve the quality of life for disease afflicted people, a wide range of nanomaterials that include gold and silica nanoparticles, quantum dots and DNA along with countless other forms of nanotechnology have been investigated regarding their usefulness in advancing molecular diagnostics. Other small scaled materials like viruses and proteins also have potential for use as molecular diagnostic tools. Information obtained from nanotechnology based diagnostics can be stored and manipulated using bioinformatics software. More advanced nanotechnology based diagnostic procedures for the acquisition of even greater proteomic and genomic knowledge can then be developed along with better ways to fight various diseases. Nanotechnology also has numerous applications besides those related to biotechnology and medicine. In this article, we will discuss and analyze many novel nanotechnology based diagnostic techniques at our disposal today. (author)

  13. Conversion disorder and mass psychogenic illness in child neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mink, Jonathan W

    2013-11-01

    A common problem faced by neurologists is the existence of disorders that present with neurological symptoms but do not have identifiable neurological bases. Conversion disorder is the most common of these disorders. In some situations, members of a cohesive social group will develop the same or similar symptoms. This review discusses conversion disorder in children, with an emphasis on function movement disorders. It also reviews a recent occurrence of mass psychogenic illness in New York State with discussion of the key features of mass psychogenic illness. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. The Role of Magnesium in Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E. Kirkland

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is well known for its diverse actions within the human body. From a neurological standpoint, magnesium plays an essential role in nerve transmission and neuromuscular conduction. It also functions in a protective role against excessive excitation that can lead to neuronal cell death (excitotoxicity, and has been implicated in multiple neurological disorders. Due to these important functions within the nervous system, magnesium is a mineral of intense interest for the potential prevention and treatment of neurological disorders. Current literature is reviewed for migraine, chronic pain, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and stroke, as well as the commonly comorbid conditions of anxiety and depression. Previous reviews and meta-analyses are used to set the scene for magnesium research across neurological conditions, while current research is reviewed in greater detail to update the literature and demonstrate the progress (or lack thereof in the field. There is strong data to suggest a role for magnesium in migraine and depression, and emerging data to suggest a protective effect of magnesium for chronic pain, anxiety, and stroke. More research is needed on magnesium as an adjunct treatment in epilepsy, and to further clarify its role in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Overall, the mechanistic attributes of magnesium in neurological diseases connote the macromineral as a potential target for neurological disease prevention and treatment.

  15. VEGF Signaling in Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon W. Shim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is a potent growth factor playing diverse roles in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. In the brain, VEGF mediates angiogenesis, neural migration and neuroprotection. As a permeability factor, excessive VEGF disrupts intracellular barriers, increases leakage of the choroid plexus endothelia, evokes edema, and activates the inflammatory pathway. Recently, we discovered that a heparin binding epidermal growth factor like growth factor (HB-EGF—a class of EGF receptor (EGFR family ligands—contributes to the development of hydrocephalus with subarachnoid hemorrhage through activation of VEGF signaling. The objective of this review is to entail a recent update on causes of death due to neurological disorders involving cerebrovascular and age-related neurological conditions and to understand the mechanism by which angiogenesis-dependent pathological events can be treated with VEGF antagonisms. The Global Burden of Disease study indicates that cancer and cardiovascular disease including ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke are two leading causes of death worldwide. The literature suggests that VEGF signaling in ischemic brains highlights the importance of concentration, timing, and alternate route of modulating VEGF signaling pathway. Molecular targets distinguishing two distinct pathways of VEGF signaling may provide novel therapies for the treatment of neurological disorders and for maintaining lower mortality due to these conditions.

  16. Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into neural stem cells or neurons for neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shaoping; Lu, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into neurons or neural stem cells is one of the most important frontier fields in current neuroscience research. Without undergoing the pluripotency stage, induced neurons or induced neural stem cells are a safer and timelier manner resource in comparison to those derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. In this prospective, we review the recent advances in generation of induced neurons and induced neural stem cells in vitro and in vivo and their potential treatments of neurological disorders.

  17. Laryngotracheal Stenosis in Children and Infants With Neurological Disorders: Management and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicollas, Richard; Moreddu, Eric; Le Treut-Gay, Claire; Roman, Stéphane; Mancini, Julien; Triglia, Jean-Michel

    2016-12-01

    The goal of this retrospective study is to compare the management and outcome of surgical treatment of laryngotracheal stenosis in children and infants with and without an associated neurological disorder. In a series of children operated on for subglottic stenosis (SGS), patients with an associated neurological disorder were identified. The following criteria were compared in children with and without neurological disease: grade of stenosis, age, technique (Crico-Tracheal Resection (CTR), Laryngo-Tracheo-Plasty (LTP) in single and 2 stage, laser), analyzing duration, preoperative tracheostomy, decannulation rate, preoperative gastrostomy, and number of days in intensive care unit and in hospital. Two hundred twenty-three children were operated on for subglottic stenosis, of whom 68 (30.5%) had an associated neurological disorder. Some criteria were found to be statistically different between the 2 populations: mean age of 43 months in neurological population versus 13 months (P neurological disorder-66.6% versus 36.5% (P = .013); the median duration of stenting was 20 days in those with neurological disease versus 12 (P = .021). Preoperative tracheotomy was noted in 75% of neurological patients versus 47.7% of the others (P neurological disorder, as against 86.5% of neurologically unimpaired subjects. The difference in outcome of surgery was not statistically different (P = .392) between the 2 groups. It appears that subglottic stenosis in children with associated neurological disorder is not more severe than in neurologically normal patients. In three-quarters of the neurologically impaired cases, a preoperative tracheostomy was needed, but the rates of failure of postoperative decannulation are not statistically significant between the 2 groups. In our experience, 2-stage techniques are more often performed than single stage in this population in order to allow airway safety, for example after feeding. If properly managed, the final results are similar in the 2

  18. Survey of Neurological Disorders in Children Aged 9-15 Years in Northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rashmi; Bhave, Anupama; Bhargava, Roli; Agarwal, G G

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of neurological disorders in resource-poor settings, although likely to be high, is largely unexplored. The prevalence and risk factors for neurological disorders, including epilepsy and intellectual, motor, vision, and hearing deficits, in children aged 9 to 15 years in the community were investigated. A new instrument was developed, validated, and used in a 2-stage community survey for neurological disorders in Lucknow, India. Screen-positives and random proportion of screen-negatives were validated using predefined criteria. Prevalence of different neurological disorders was calculated by weighted proportions. Of 6431 children screened, 221 were positive. A total of 214 screen-positives and 251 screen-negatives were validated. Prevalence of neurological disorders was 31.3 per 1000 children of this age group (weighted 95% confidence interval = 16.5, 46.4). The final model for risk factors included age, mud house, delayed cry at birth, and previous head injury. The prevalence of neurological disorders is high in this region. Predictors of neurological disorders are largely modifiable. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Global, regional, and national burden of neurological disorders during 1990-2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Comparable data on the global and country-specific burden of neurological disorders and their trends are crucial for health-care planning and resource allocation. The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors (GBD) Study provides such information but does not routinely...... aggregate results that are of interest to clinicians specialising in neurological conditions. In this systematic analysis, we quantified the global disease burden due to neurological disorders in 2015 and its relationship with country development level. METHODS: We estimated global and country......-specific prevalence, mortality, disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), years of life lost (YLLs), and years lived with disability (YLDs) for various neurological disorders that in the GBD classification have been previously spread across multiple disease groupings. The more inclusive grouping of neurological...

  20. Transition to adult care for children with chronic neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camfield, Peter; Camfield, Carol

    2011-03-01

    Chronic neurological disorders in children have significant effects on adult medical and social function. Transition and then formal transfer of care from pediatric to adult services is a complex process, although there are virtually no objective data to inform physicians about the most effective approach. Some neurological disorders that start in children are a danger to society if poorly treated in adulthood, some disorders that were previously lethal in childhood now permit survival well into adulthood, and others are static in childhood but progressive in adulthood. Some disorders remit or are cured in childhood but continue to have serious comorbidity in adulthood, whereas others are similar and persistent in children and adults. Maturity, provision of information, and cognitive problems are confounders. We discuss several models of transition/transfer but prefer a joint pediatric/adult transition clinic. We make a series of suggestions about how to improve the transition/transfer process with the hope of better medical and social adult outcome for children with neurological disorders. Copyright © 2011 American Neurological Association.

  1. Aquatic rehabilitation for the treatment of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D M

    1994-01-01

    Patients with neurological disorders present therapists with complex challenges for treatment, including weakness, hypertonicity, voluntary movement deficit, limited range of motion, sensory loss, incoordination, and postural instability. The presence of one or more of these impairments negatively influences these patients by contributing to problems in walking, transferring, and reaching. Aquatic rehabilitation offers a unique, versatile approach to the treatment of these disabilities. This article examines the problems encountered by patients with neurological disorders, general principles guiding neurotreatment, and aquatic neurorehabilitation approaches.

  2. Evidence based effects of yoga in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooventhan, A; Nivethitha, L

    2017-09-01

    Though yoga is one of the widely used mind-body medicine for health promotion, disease prevention and as a possible treatment modality for neurological disorders, there is a lack of evidence-based review. Hence, we performed a comprehensive search in the PubMed/Medline electronic database to review relevant articles in English, using keywords "yoga and neurological disorder, yoga and multiple sclerosis, yoga and stroke, yoga and epilepsy, yoga and Parkinson's disease, yoga and dementia, yoga and cerebrovascular disease, yoga and Alzheimer disease, yoga and neuropathy, yoga and myelopathy, and yoga and Guillain-Barre syndrome". A total of 700 articles published from 1963 to 14th December 2016 were available. Of 700 articles, 94 articles were included in this review. Based on the available literature, it could be concluded that yoga might be considered as an effective adjuvant for the patients with various neurological disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetics of hereditary neurological disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yue; Yu, Sui; Wu, Zhanhe; Tang, Beisha

    2014-04-01

    Hereditary neurological disorders (HNDs) are relatively common in children compared to those occurring in adulthood. Recognising clinical manifestations of HNDs is important for the selection of genetic testing, genetic testing results interpretation, and genetic consultation. Meanwhile, advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have significantly enabled the discovery of genetic causes of HNDs and also challenge paediatricians on applying genetic investigation. Combination of both clinical information and advanced technologies will enhance the genetic test yields in clinical setting. This review summarises the clinical presentations as well as genetic causes of paediatric neurological disorders in four major areas including movement disorders, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuron peripheral disorders and epilepsy. The aim of this review is to help paediatric neurologists not only to see the clinical features but also the complex genetic aspect of HNDs in order to utilise genetic investigation confidently in their clinical practice. A smooth transition from research based to clinical use of comprehensive genetic testing in HNDs in children could be foreseen in the near future while genetic testing, genetic counselling and genetic data interpretation are in place appropriately.

  4. Blood lead levels in children with neurological disorders: a single centre preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, Touran; Modaresi, Mohamadreza; Zarei, Ali; Poursafa, Parinaz; Kelishadi, Roya

    2009-11-01

    Lead poisoning is a potentially devastating problem among young children. Chronic low level lead exposure can lead to learning disabilities and behavior changes such as colic, insomnia, hyperactivity, impaired growth, hearing loss and upper extremity weakness. The purpose of this cross sectional study was to determine the blood lead level in children with neurological disorders in comparison with healthy controls. Blood lead concentrations were measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry in 100 children aged 1-10 years and suffering from various neurological disorders. One hundred age and sex-matched healthy children served as controls. The mean blood lead concentration was higher in children with neurological disorders than in controls (113.2 + or - 47.5 microg/L vs 84.7 + or - 38.0 microg/L; pchildren with neurological disorders and 19% of controls were found to have increased blood lead levels, i.e.>100 microg/L. An increase in blood lead level in children might be related to neurological disorders. The measurement of blood lead level might be included in diagnostic eveluation of children with neurological disorders.

  5. Study of the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging on neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hokezu, Youichi (Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1992-05-01

    One hundred and ten patients with several neurological disorders including cerebrovascular diseases (CVD), degenerative diseases, demyelinating diseases, infections of the nervous systems, neurometabolic disorders, myopathies, diseases of the spine or spinal cord and myelopathy were studied by employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Superconductive magnetic systems of 0.5 T, 1.0 T or 1.5 T were used for this study. MRI could show the lesions clearly in many neurological disorders such as CVD, demyelinating diseases, infections of the nervous systems, neurometabolic disorders, myopathies and myeloythy. However, MRI could not necessarily show the lesions cleary in neurodegenerative disease and bone or calcified lesions such as ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament. MRI is better than CT in spatial and tissue resolution. MRI study is expected to be the more beneficial procedure in neurological disorders, if a much shorter scanning time can be achieved. (author).

  6. Study of the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging on neurological disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokezu, Youichi

    1992-01-01

    One hundred and ten patients with several neurological disorders including cerebrovascular diseases (CVD), degenerative diseases, demyelinating diseases, infections of the nervous systems, neurometabolic disorders, myopathies, diseases of the spine or spinal cord and myelopathy were studied by employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Superconductive magnetic systems of 0.5 T, 1.0 T or 1.5 T were used for this study. MRI could show the lesions clearly in many neurological disorders such as CVD, demyelinating diseases, infections of the nervous systems, neurometabolic disorders, myopathies and myeloythy. However, MRI could not necessarily show the lesions cleary in neurodegenerative disease and bone or calcified lesions such as ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament. MRI is better than CT in spatial and tissue resolution. MRI study is expected to be the more beneficial procedure in neurological disorders, if a much shorter scanning time can be achieved. (author)

  7. [Neurology of hysteria (conversion disorder)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoo, Masahiro

    2014-07-01

    Hysteria has served as an important driving force in the development of both neurology and psychiatry. Jean Martin Charcot's devotion to mesmerism for treating hysterical patients evoked the invention of psychoanalysis by Sigmund Freud. Meanwhile, Joseph Babinski took over the challenge to discriminate between organic and hysterical patients from Charcot and found Babinski's sign, the greatest milestone in modern neurological symptomatology. Nowadays, the usage of the term hysteria is avoided. However, new terms and new classifications are complicated and inconsistent between the two representative taxonomies, the DSM-IV and ICD-10. In the ICD-10, even the alternative term conversion disorder, which was becoming familiar to neurologists, has also disappeared as a group name. The diagnosis of hysteria remains important in clinical neurology. Extensive exclusive diagnoses and over investigation, including various imaging studies, should be avoided because they may prolong the disease course and fix their symptoms. Psychological reasons that seem to explain the conversion are not considered reliable. Positive neurological signs suggesting nonorganic etiologies are the most reliable measures for diagnosing hysteria, as Babinski first argued. Hysterical paresis has several characteristics, such as giving-way weakness or peculiar distributions of weakness. Signs to uncover nonorganic paresis utilizing synergy include Hoover's test and the Sonoo abductor test.

  8. Neurological disorders in HIV-infected children in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Shah, D M; Shah, I

    2009-09-01

    There are few studies of HIV-related neurological disorders from centres in low-income countries where facilities are available for detailed investigation. Records of all patients attending the paediatric HIV outpatient department at B. J. Wadia Hospital for Children, Mumbai between April 2000 and March 2008 were reviewed. Of 668 HIV-infected patients, 48 (7.2%) had neurological manifestations and are included in this study. Twenty-six (54.2%) children had HIV encephalopathy. Other causes of neurological manifestations include febrile convulsion in five (10.4%), bacterial meningitis in three (6.3%), epilepsy in two (4.2%), tuberculous meningitis and progressive multi-focal encephalopathy in two (4.2%) each and toxoplasmosis, vasculitis, acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome, Down's syndrome, birth asphyxia, herpes simplex encephalopathy and mitochondrial encephalopathy in one (2.1%) each. Mean (SD) age at presentation was 4.36 (3.38) years with a range of 2 months to 15 years. The common subtle neurological manifestations were abnormal deep tendon reflexes and extensor plantar reflexes. The common symptomatic manifestations were delayed milestones in 21 children (43.8%) and seizures in 19 (39.6%). Seizures were more common in males (54%) than in females (25%) (p=0.038). In children neurological deficits were more common in older children. Of the 13 children who received HAART, nine (60.23%) improved. Early diagnosis of neurological disorders in HIV-infected children is important for appropriate investigation and management, especially the introduction of HAART.

  9. Cognitive-analytical therapy for a patient with functional neurological symptom disorder-conversion disorder (psychogenic myopia: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Nasiri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional neurological symptom disorder commonly presents with symptoms and defects of sensory and motor functions. Therefore, it is often mistaken for a medical condition. It is well known that functional neurological symptom disorder more often caused by psychological factors. There are three main approaches namely analytical, cognitive and biological to manage conversion disorder. Any of such approaches can be applied through short-term treatment programs. In this case, study a 12-year-old boy with the diagnosed functional neurological symptom disorder (psychogenic myopia was put under a cognitive-analytical treatment. The outcome of this treatment modality was proved successful.

  10. Cognitive-analytical therapy for a patient with functional neurological symptom disorder-conversion disorder (psychogenic myopia): A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Hamid; Ebrahimi, Amrollah; Zahed, Arash; Arab, Mostafa; Samouei, Rahele

    2015-05-01

    Functional neurological symptom disorder commonly presents with symptoms and defects of sensory and motor functions. Therefore, it is often mistaken for a medical condition. It is well known that functional neurological symptom disorder more often caused by psychological factors. There are three main approaches namely analytical, cognitive and biological to manage conversion disorder. Any of such approaches can be applied through short-term treatment programs. In this case, study a 12-year-old boy with the diagnosed functional neurological symptom disorder (psychogenic myopia) was put under a cognitive-analytical treatment. The outcome of this treatment modality was proved successful.

  11. Metabolic syndrome as a risk factor for neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Akhlaq A; Farooqui, Tahira; Panza, Francesco; Frisardi, Vincenza

    2012-03-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of common pathologies: abdominal obesity linked to an excess of visceral fat, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension. At the molecular level, metabolic syndrome is accompanied not only by dysregulation in the expression of adipokines (cytokines and chemokines), but also by alterations in levels of leptin, a peptide hormone released by white adipose tissue. These changes modulate immune response and inflammation that lead to alterations in the hypothalamic 'bodyweight/appetite/satiety set point,' resulting in the initiation and development of metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for neurological disorders such as stroke, depression and Alzheimer's disease. The molecular mechanism underlying the mirror relationship between metabolic syndrome and neurological disorders is not fully understood. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that all cellular and biochemical alterations observed in metabolic syndrome like impairment of endothelial cell function, abnormality in essential fatty acid metabolism and alterations in lipid mediators along with abnormal insulin/leptin signaling may represent a pathological bridge between metabolic syndrome and neurological disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease and depression. The purpose of this review is not only to describe the involvement of brain in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, but also to link the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome with neurochemical changes in stroke, Alzheimer's disease and depression to a wider audience of neuroscientists with the hope that this discussion will initiate more studies on the relationship between metabolic syndrome and neurological disorders. © Springer Basel AG 2011

  12. The nature, consequences, and management of neurological disorders in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Bahman; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2018-04-01

    Perhaps no other organ in the body is affected as often and in as many ways as the brain is in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Several factors contribute to the neurological disorders in CKD including accumulation of uremic toxins, metabolic and hemodynamic disorders, oxidative stress, inflammation, and impaired blood brain barrier among others. The neurological disorders in CKD involve both peripheral and central nervous system. The peripheral neurological symptoms of CKD are due to somatic and cranial peripheral neuropathies as well as a myopathy. The central neurological symptoms of CKD are due to the cortical predominantly cortical, or subcortical lesions. Cognitive decline, encephalopathy, cortical myoclonus, asterixis and epileptic seizures are distinct features of the cortical disorders of CKD. Diffuse white matter disease due to ischemia and hypoxia may be an important cause of subcortical encephalopathy. A special and more benign form of subcortical disorder caused by brain edema in CKD is termed posterior reversible encephalopathy. Subcortical pathology especially when it affects the basal ganglia causes a number of movement disorders including Parkinsonism, chorea and dystonia. A stimulus-sensitive reflex myoclonus is believed to originate from the medullary structures. Sleep disorder and restless leg syndrome are common in CKD and have both central and peripheral origin. This article provides an overview of the available data on the nature, prevalence, pathophysiology, consequences and treatment of neurological complications of CKD. © 2017 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  13. Clinical neurogenetics: neurologic presentations of metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jennifer M; D'Aco, Kristin E

    2013-11-01

    This article reviews aspects of the neurologic presentations of selected treatable inborn errors of metabolism within the category of small molecule disorders caused by defects in pathways of intermediary metabolism. Disorders that are particularly likely to be seen by neurologists include those associated with defects in amino acid metabolism (organic acidemias, aminoacidopathies, urea cycle defects). Other disorders of small molecule metabolism are discussed as additional examples in which early treatments have the potential for better outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Aphasia, Just a Neurological Disorder?

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Ozdemir

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto%u2019s encephalopathy (HE) is a rare disorder associated with autoimmune thyroiditis. Etiology of HE is not completely understood. High levels of serum antithyroid antibodies are seen in HE. Presentation with otoimmune thyroiditis, cognitive impairment, psychiatric and neurologic symptoms and absence of bacterial or viral enfections are characteristics of HE. HE is a steroid responsive encephalopathy. 60 years old male patient admitted to hospital with forget fulness continuing for ...

  15. Neurological Disorders in Primary Sjögren's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel J. Tobón

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease characterized by an autoimmune exocrinopathy involving mainly salivary and lacrimal glands. The histopathological hallmark is periductal lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands, resulting in loss of their secretory function. Several systemic manifestations may be found in patients with Sjögren's syndrome including neurological disorders. Neurological involvement ranges from 0 to 70% among various series and may present with central nervous system and/or peripheral nervous system involvement. This paper endeavors to review the main clinical neurological manifestations in Sjögren syndrome, the physiopathology, and their therapeutic response.

  16. Practical approach to management of respiratory complications in neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangera Z

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Zaheer Mangera, Kirat Panesar, Himender MakkerRespiratory Medicine, North Middlesex University Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Patients with certain neurological diseases are at increased risk of developing chest infections as well as respiratory failure due to muscular weakness. In particular, patients with certain neuromuscular disorders are at higher risk. These conditions are often associated with sleep disordered breathing. It is important to identify patients at risk of respiratory complications early in the course of their disease, although patients with neuromuscular disorders often present in the acute setting with respiratory involvement. This review of the respiratory complications of neurological disorders, with a particular focus on neuromuscular disorders, explores why this happens and looks at how to recognize, investigate, and manage these patients effectively.Keywords: respiratory failure, respiratory muscle weakness

  17. Neurological Soft Signs In Psychoses A Comparison Between Schizophrenia & Other Psychotic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahsavand. E. Noroozian. M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is one of the most important and disabling mental disorders in the world. Males and females are equally affected. Diagnosis is a very difficult problem in this disorder. Because the diagnostic systems such as ICD-10 and DSM-IV are mainly subjective, they are not valid and reliable. Essentially, in the future, we will need to more objective criteria in psychiatry especially in diagnosis of schizophrenia. Neurological soft signs are an example of these objective criteria. In this study we evaluated the prevalence of neurological soft signs in schizophrenic patients and compared it with the prevalence of these signs in other psychotic patients (except mood disorders with psychotic features and normal subjects."nMethods: We compared the neurological soft signs (sensory motor integration, motor. Coordination, consequent complex motor acts, primary reflexes, and eye movements in 30 schizophrenic patients, 30 other psychotic patients (other than mood disorders with psychotic features and 30 normal subjects. Diagnosis of schizophrenia and also other psychoses were based on DSM-IN criteria. Normal subjects have been selected form the staff of Roozbeh hospital randomly."nResults: The difference between the means of motor coordination subscale of neurological soft signs in schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders (other than mood disorders with psychotic features were significant (P value < 0.04. There were no significant differences between the means of other subscales of neurological soft signs in two groups of patients."nConclusion: There are some disturbances of motor coordination subscale of neurological soft signs in patients with schizophrenia. It seems that, these disturbances are evidence of involvements of basal ganglia, motor cerebral cortex, and cerebellum. So it may be suggested that motor coordination as a marker can be used in differentiation between the schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders.

  18. The classification of conversion disorder (functional neurologic symptom disorder) in ICD and DSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, J L; Sharpe, M

    2016-01-01

    The name given to functional neurologic symptoms has evolved over time in the different editions of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), reflecting a gradual move away from an etiologic conception rooted in hysterical conversion to an empiric phenomenologic one, emphasizing the central role of the neurologic examination and testing in demonstrating that the symptoms are incompatible with recognized neurologic disease pathophysiology, or are internally inconsistent. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Homovanillic acid in cerebrospinal fluid of 1388 children with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molero-Luis, Marta; Serrano, Mercedes; Ormazábal, Aida; Pérez-Dueñas, Belén; García-Cazorla, Angels; Pons, Roser; Artuch, Rafael

    2013-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of dopaminergic abnormalities in 1388 children with neurological disorders, and to analyse their clinical, neuroradiological, and electrophysiological characteristics. We studied biogenic amines in 1388 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from children with neurological disorders (mean age 3y 10mo, SD 4y 5mo; 712 males, 676 females. Correlations among CSF homovanillic acid (HVA) values and other biochemical, clinical, neuroradiological, and electrophysiological parameters were analysed. Twenty-one patients with primary dopaminergic deficiencies were identified. Of the whole sample, 20% showed altered HVA. We report neurological diseases with abnormal CSF HVA values such as pontocerebellar hypoplasia, perinatal asphyxia, central nervous system infections, mitochondrial disorders, and other genetic diseases. Overlapping HVA levels between primary and secondary dopamine deficiencies were observed. Prevalence of low CSF HVA levels was significantly higher in neonatal patients (χ(2) =84.8, pneurological diseases, but some are probably an unspecific finding. No clear limits for CSF HVA values pointing towards primary diseases can be stated. We report several neurological diseases showing HVA alterations. No neuroimaging traits were associated with low HVA values, except for white matter abnormalities. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2013 Mac Keith Press.

  20. [Comorbidity in autism spectrum disorders - II. Genetic syndromes and neurological problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noterdaeme, Michele A; Hutzelmeyer-Nickels, Anna

    2010-07-01

    Children with a pervasive developmental disorder show in addition to core symptoms a variety of genetic syndromes as well as neurological problems, which are relevant for the treatment and the course of the disorder. The objective of our study is to analyse the nature and the frequency of these co-morbid somatic disorders in relation to the level of intellectual functioning of the patients. The sample consists of 601 patients with a pervasive developmental disorder diagnosed at the Department of Developmental Disorders at the Heckscher-Klinikum between 1997 and 2007. In addition to genetic syndromes, we also recorded a variety of neurological disorders. 373 of the patients (62%) had at least one additional diagnosis and 121 (20%) had at least two additional diagnoses on Axis IV of the multi-axial classification scheme. Genetic syndromes were found in 6% of the patients (N = 37). Movement disorders (N = 214; 35.6%) and epilepsy (N = 98; 16.3%) were the most frequent neurological disorders. Children with mental retardation showed significantly more somatic diagnoses than children without mental retardation. Children with pervasive developmental disorders show a wide variety of co-morbid somatic problems, which are relevant for the treatment and the course of the disorder. Children with autism and mental retardation show more co-morbid conditions and are more impaired in their psychosocial adaptation than children with autism without mental retardation.

  1. Mild neurological impairment may indicate a psychomotor endophenotype in patients with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbabi, Mohammad; Paast, Negin; Karim, Hamid Reza; Faghfori, Sara; Memari, Amir Hossein

    2016-11-30

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) show any neurological soft signs compared to healthy controls. Furthermore we sought to examine the role of common symptoms related to BPD, such as depression, anxiety or impulsivity, in association with neurological soft signs. Thirty patients with borderline personality disorder and thirty hospital-based controls were examined for neurological soft signs. The total score of neurological soft signs in BPD was significantly higher than controls. In terms of subscales, patients had higher scores in Sensory Integration and Motor Coordination and other neurological soft signs compared to control group. Multiple regression analysis showed that the impulsivity score was the best significant predictor of neurological soft signs in BPD. The increase of neurological soft signs in patients with BPD may address a non-focal neurological dysfunction in borderline personality disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Uroflowmetry in neurologically normal children with voiding disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K M; Nielsen, K.K.; Kristensen, E S

    1985-01-01

    of neurological deficits underwent a complete diagnostic program including intravenous urography, voiding cystography and cystoscopy as well as spontaneous uroflowmetry, cystometry-emg and pressure-flow-emg study. The incidence of dyssynergia was 22%. However, neither the flow curve pattern nor single flow...... variables were able to identify children with dyssynergia. Consequently uroflowmetry seems inefficient in the screening for dyssynergia in neurological normal children with voiding disorders in the absence of anatomical bladder outlet obstruction....

  3. Neurological disorders associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies: a Brazilian series

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    Maurício Fernandes

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD antibodies are rare pleomorphic diseases of uncertain cause, of which stiff-person syndrome (SPS is the best-known. Here, we described nine consecutive cases of neurological disorders associated with anti-GAD, including nine patients with SPS and three cases with cerebellar ataxia. Additionally, four had hypothyroidism, three epilepsy, two diabetes mellitus and two axial myoclonus.

  4. Psychiatry and the Necker Cube. Neurological and Psychological Conceptions of Psychiatric Disorder

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    D. Rogers

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological and psychological conceptions of psychiatric disorder are in conflict at the present time. This conflict is considered in the context of the history of psychiatry and the philosophy of science. Its practical consequences are considered for the motor disorder of schizophrenia, the cognitive impairment in psychiatric illnesses, the use of the terms organic and functional and the association of neurological disorder with psychotic and neurotic disorders. The conflict is also examined in individual cases and the implications for treatment assessed.

  5. Novel paths towards neural cellular products for neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daadi, Marcel M

    2011-11-01

    The prospect of using neural cells derived from stem cells or from reprogrammed adult somatic cells provides a unique opportunity in cell therapy and drug discovery for developing novel strategies for brain repair. Cell-based therapeutic approaches for treating CNS afflictions caused by disease or injury aim to promote structural repair of the injured or diseased neural tissue, an outcome currently not achieved by drug therapy. Preclinical research in animal models of various diseases or injuries report that grafts of neural cells enhance endogenous repair, provide neurotrophic support to neurons undergoing degeneration and replace lost neural cells. In recent years, the sources of neural cells for treating neurological disorders have been rapidly expanding and in addition to offering therapeutic potential, neural cell products hold promise for disease modeling and drug discovery use. Specific neural cell types have been derived from adult or fetal brain, from human embryonic stem cells, from induced pluripotent stem cells and directly transdifferentiated from adult somatic cells, such as skin cells. It is yet to be determined if the latter approach will evolve into a paradigm shift in the fields of stem cell research and regenerative medicine. These multiple sources of neural cells cover a wide spectrum of safety that needs to be balanced with efficacy to determine the viability of the cellular product. In this article, we will review novel sources of neural cells and discuss current obstacles to developing them into viable cellular products for treating neurological disorders.

  6. Functional Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology of Functional Neurological Disorders (Conversion Disorder).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, Valerie; Cavanna, Andrea E; Coburn, Kerry; Sampson, Shirlene; Reeve, Alya; LaFrance, W Curt

    2016-01-01

    Much is known regarding the physical characteristics, comorbid symptoms, psychological makeup, and neuropsychological performance of patients with functional neurological disorders (FNDs)/conversion disorders. Gross neurostructural deficits do not account for the patients' deficits or symptoms. This review describes the literature focusing on potential neurobiological (i.e. functional neuroanatomic/neurophysiological) findings among individuals with FND, examining neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies of patients with the various forms of motor and sensory FND. In summary, neural networks and neurophysiologic mechanisms may mediate "functional" symptoms, reflecting neurobiological and intrapsychic processes.

  7. The applications of pharmacogenomics to neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, C; McSweeney, C; Mao, Y

    2014-01-01

    The most common neurological disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders, have received recent attention with regards to pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine. Here, we will focus on a neglected neurodegenerative disorder, cerebral ischemic stroke (CIS), and highlight recent advances in two disorders, Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's diseases (AD), that possess both similar and distinct mechanisms in regards to potential therapeutic targets. In the first part of this review, we will focus primarily on mechanisms that are somewhat specific to each disorder which are involved in neurodegeneration (i.e., protease pathways, calcium homeostasis, reactive oxygen species regulation, DNA repair mechanisms, neurogenesis regulation, mitochondrial function, etc.). In the second part of this review, we will discuss the applications of the genome-wide technology on pharmacogenomics of mental illnesses including schizophrenia (SCZ), autism spectrum disorders (ASD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD).

  8. Spasmodic dysphonia: description of the disease and associated neurologic disorders

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    Coelho, Marina Serrato

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spasmodic dysphonia (SD is a problem that affects speech and vocalization, one of the most devastating disorders of oral communication. It is characterized by vocal quality tensaestrangulada, harshly and / or interspersed with abrupt vocal attack and a great tension in the vocal tract. The etiology of spasmodic dysphonia is unclear. Some authors point to psychogenic causes, neurological or even unknown. Objective: To assess the prevalence of muscular dystonias and other neurological symptoms in patients with ED. Method: A retrospective study of 10 cases with diagnosis of ED for symptoms and neurological disorders associated. Results: There was a significant predominance of the disease in females (9:1. The average age of onset of symptoms was 32 years, ranging between 14 and 60 years. The mean disease duration was 10 years. Among the patients, 87.5% had a diagnosis of disorders of movement made by a neurologist, including orofacial dystonias (50%, essential tremor (50% and spastic paraparesis (12%. Conclusion: The presence of movement disorders followed almost all cases of spasmodic dysphonia. More studies are needed to clarify the pathophysiological basis of disease.

  9. Conversion disorder in a neurological emergency department: Restrospective series

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    Alejandro Cardozo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the conversion disorder in a neurological emergency department. Methods: It is common that the initial approach to this patients include the use of various diagnostic exams. In this series we reviewed 94 patients that arrived a neurological emergency room in a 3 year period.Results: 72 patients were females (76%, and the initial presumptive diagnosis were: neurovascular syndrome in 36 patients (38.3%, convulsive disorder in 20 patients (21.28%, and conversive disorder in 8 patients (8.51%. 82 patients had motor symptoms and 61 sensitive symptoms. 88 patients (93% required neuroimaging studies, 77 (81% patients underwent through basic biochemical panels. Other tests performed were: electroencephalogram in 12 patients (12.77%, electromyography in 11 patients (11.7%, lumbar punction in 8 patients (8.04% and regarding the medical consult in the care of these patients 11 were evaluated by 1 specialists, 35 (37.2% by 2 different specialties, 42 (44.63% patients required evaluation by 3, and 6 patients (6.38% required evaluation by 4 different specialties.Conclusions: Based on this data, we conclude that conversion disorders require a lot of resources in the emergency room and that the similarities with neurological diseases demands a complete workup including expensive diagnostic tools. However, this patients can be discharged safely without requiring hospitalization.

  10. 76 FR 10040 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... Disorders and Stroke Special Emphasis Panel, Neural Development and Genetics of Zebrafish. Date: February 25... Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Special Emphasis Panel, Specials Review Panel. Date: March 24...

  11. Neurological disorders in hypertensive patients

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    N. V. Vakhnina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the most common vascular diseases. The brain as target organs in hypertension is damaged more often and earlier. Neurological complications due to hypertension are frequently hyperdiagnosed in Russian neurological practice. Thus, headache, dizziness, impaired recall of recent events, nocturnal sleep disorders, and many other complaints in a hypertensive patient are usually regarded as a manifestation of dyscirculatory encephalopathy. At the same time headaches (tension headache and migraine in hypertensive patients are predominantly primary; headache associated with dramatic marked elevations in blood pressure is encountered in only a small number of patients. The role of cerebrovascular diseases in the development of dizziness in hypertensive patients is also overestimated. The vast majority of cases, patients with this complaint are in fact identified to have benign paroxysmal postural vertigo, Mеniеre’s disease, vestibular neuronitis, or vestibular migraine. Psychogenic disorders or multisensory insufficiency are generally responsible for non-systemic vertigo in hypertensive patients. Chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency may cause non-systemic vertigo as a subjective equivalent of postural instability.Cognitive impairments (CIs are the most common and earliest manifestation of cerebrovascular lesion in hypertension. In most cases, CIs in hypertension were vascular and associated with cerebrovascular lesion due to lacunar infarcts and leukoaraiosis. However, mixed CIs frequently occur when hypertensive patients are also found to have signs of a degenerative disease, most commonly in Alzheimer’s disease.

  12. Neurological Disorders in Medical Use of Cannabis: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solimini, Renata; Rotolo, Maria Concetta; Pichini, Simona; Pacifici, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    Medical cannabis is increasingly used as a treatment or adjunct treatment with different levels of efficacy in several neurological disorders or related symptoms (such as multiple sclerosis, autism, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease, Tourette's syndrome, Huntington's disease, neuropathic pain, epilepsy, headache), as well as in other medical conditions (e.g. nausea and vomiting, glaucoma, appetite stimulation, cancer, inflammatory conditions, asthma). Nevertheless, a number of neurological adverse effects from use of medical cannabis on the short- and on the longterm have been reported, in addition to other adverse health events. It has been noticed that the use of medical cannabis can lead to a paradoxical effects depending on the amount of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) -like cannabinoids the preparation contain. Accordingly, some neurological disorders or symptoms (e.g. multiple sclerosis, seizures, epilepsy, headache) may be caused or exacerbated by the same treatment supposed to cure them. The current review presents an update of the neurological adverse effects resulting from the use of cannabis for medical purposes, highlighting the need to weigh the benefits and risks, when using cannabinoidbased treatments. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Prevalence of neurological disorders in Al Quseir, Egypt: methodological aspects

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    El-Tallawy H

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hamdy El-Tallawy,1 Wafa Farghaly,1 Nabil Metwally,2 Tarek Rageh,1 Ghaydaa A Shehata,1 Reda Badry,1 Esam El Moselhy,2 Mahmoud Hassan,2 Mohamed M Sayed,3 Ahmed A Abdelwarith,1 Y Hamed,2 I Shaaban,2 Talal Mohamed,4 Mohamed Abd El Hamed,1 MR Kandil1 1Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt; 2Department of Neurology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Azhar University (Assiut branch, Assiut, Egypt; 3Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Sohag, Egypt; 4Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Qena University, Qena, Egypt Abstract: Methodology and strategy play a very important role in epidemiological studies. Determination of the study area, geographical features, facilities, difficulties, and key personnel from the same area are important factors for successful methodology. Over 31 months (July 1, 2009 to January 31, 2012, a screening and an examination survey were carried out to ascertain the prevalence of epilepsy, stroke, dementia, cerebellar ataxia, migraine, cerebral palsy, Parkinsonism, chorea, athetosis, dystonia, trigeminal neuralgia, Bell's palsy, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord disorders, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorders in Al Quseir, Red Sea Governorate, Egypt. A total of 33,285 people were screened by three neurologists in a door-to-door manner, including every door, using a standardized Arabic questionnaire to detect any subject with a neurological disorder. The methodological aspects of this project were carried out through eight phases: (1 data collection; (2 preparation; (3 screening; (4 case ascertainment; (5 investigations; (6 classifications; (7 data entry; and (8 statistics and tabulations. The results of this study reveal that the total prevalence of neurological disorders in Al Quseir was 4.6% and higher among females (5.2% than males (3.9%. The highest prevalence was recorded in the elderly population (60+ years [8.0%] and among the age

  14. THE KETOGENIC DIET AS A TREATMENT PARADIGM FOR DIVERSE NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS

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    Jong Min Rho

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Dietary and metabolic therapies have been attempted in a wide variety of neurological diseases, including epilepsy, headache, neurotrauma, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, sleep disorders, brain cancer, autism, pain, and multiple sclerosis. The impetus for using various diets to treat – or at least ameliorate symptoms of – these disorders stems from both a lack of effectiveness of pharmacological therapies, and also the intrinsic appeal of implementing a more natural treatment. The enormous spectrum of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the aforementioned diseases would suggest a degree of complexity that cannot be impacted universally by any single dietary treatment. Yet, it is conceivable that alterations in certain dietary constituents could affect the course and impact the outcome of these brain disorders. Further, it is possible that a final common neurometabolic pathway might be influenced by a variety of dietary interventions. The most notable example of a dietary treatment with proven efficacy against a neurological condition is the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD used in patients with medically intractable epilepsy. While the mechanisms through which the KD works remain unclear, there is now compelling evidence that its efficacy is likely related to the normalization of aberrant energy metabolism. The concept that many neurological conditions are linked pathophysiologically to energy dysregulation could well provide a common research and experimental therapeutics platform, from which the course of several neurological diseases could be favorably influenced by dietary means. Here we provide an overview of studies using the KD in a wide panoply of neurologic disorders in which neuroprotection is an essential component.

  15. Neurologic disorders associated with weight lifting and bodybuilding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busche, Kevin

    2009-02-01

    Weight lifting and other forms of strength training are becoming more common because of an increased awareness of the need to maintain individual physical fitness. Emergency room data indicate that injuries caused by weight training have become more universal over time, likely because of increased participation rates. Neurologic injuries can result from weight lifting and related practices. Although predominantly peripheral nervous system injuries have been described, central nervous system disease may also occur. This article illustrates the types of neurologic disorders associated with weight lifting.

  16. Household food insecurity and symptoms of neurologic disorder in Ethiopia: An observational analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessema Fasil

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Food insecurity (FI has been shown to be associated with poor health both in developing and developed countries. Little is known about the relation between FI and neurological disorder. We assessed the relation between FI and risk for neurologic symptoms in southwest Ethiopia. Methods Data about food security, gender, age, household assets, and self-reported neurologic symptoms were collected from a representative, community-based sample of adults (N = 900 in Jimma Zone, Ethiopia. We calculated univariate statistics and used bivariate chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression models to assess the relation between FI and risk of neurologic symptoms including seizures, extremity weakness, extremity numbness, tremors/ataxia, aphasia, carpal tunnel syndrome, vision dysfunction, and spinal pain. Results In separate multivariate models by outcome and gender, adjusting for age and household socioeconomic status, severe FI was associated with higher odds of seizures, movement abnormalities, carpal tunnel, vision dysfunction, spinal pain, and comorbid disorders among women. Severe FI was associated with higher odds of seizures, extremity numbness, movement abnormalities, difficulty speaking, carpal tunnel, vision dysfunction, and comorbid disorders among men. Conclusion We found that FI was associated with symptoms of neurologic disorder. Given the cross-sectional nature of our study, the directionality of these associations is unclear. Future research should assess causal mechanisms relating FI to neurologic symptoms in sub-Saharan Africa.

  17. Neurological gait disorders in elderly people: clinical approach and classification.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, A.H.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Giladi, N.; Bloem, B.R.

    2007-01-01

    Gait disorders are common and often devastating companions of ageing, leading to reductions in quality of life and increased mortality. Here, we present a clinically oriented approach to neurological gait disorders in the elderly population. We also draw attention to several exciting scientific

  18. Increased pediatric functional neurological symptom disorders after the Boston marathon bombings: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Réjean M; Pier, Danielle B; de Gusmão, Claudio M; Bernson-Leung, Miya E; Maski, Kiran P; Urion, David K; Waugh, Jeff L

    2014-11-01

    Functional neurological symptom disorders are frequently the basis for acute neurological consultation. In children, they are often precipitated by high-frequency everyday stressors. The extent to which a severe traumatic experience may also precipitate functional neurological abnormalities is unknown. For the 2-week period after the Boston Marathon bombings, we prospectively collected data on patients whose presentation suggested a functional neurological symptom disorder. We assessed clinical and demographic variables, duration of symptoms, extent of educational impact, and degree of connection to the Marathon bombing. We contacted all patients at 6 months after presentation to determine the outcome and accuracy of the diagnosis. In a parallel study, we reported a baseline of 2.6 functional neurological presentations per week in our emergency room. In the week after the Marathon bombings, this frequency tripled. Ninety-one percent of presentations were delayed by 1 week, with onset around the first school day after a city-wide lockdown. Seventy-three percent had a history of a prior psychiatric diagnosis. At the 6 months follow-up, no functional neurological symptom disorder diagnoses were overturned and no new organic diagnosis was made. Pediatric functional neurological symptom disorder may be precipitated by both casual and high-intensity stressors. The 3.4-fold increase in incidence after the Boston Marathon bombings and city-wide lockdown demonstrates the marked effect that a community-wide tragedy can have on the mental health of children. Care providers must be aware of functional neurological symptom disorders after stressful community events in vulnerable patient populations, particularly those with prior psychiatric diagnoses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mental, neurologic, and substance use (MNS) disorders among street homeless people in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayano, Getinet; Assefa, Dawit; Haile, Kibrom; Chaka, Asrat; Solomon, Haddish; Hagos, Petros; Yohannis, Zegeye; Haile, Kelemua; Bekana, Lulu; Agidew, Melkamu; Demise, Seife; Tsegaye, Belachew; Solomon, Melat

    2017-01-01

    About 25-60% of the homeless population is reported to have some form of mental disorder. To our knowledge, there are no studies aimed at the screening, diagnosis, treatment, care, rehabilitation, and support of homeless people with mental, neurologic, and substance use (MNS) disorders in general in Ethiopia. This is the first study of its kind in Africa which was aimed at screening, diagnosis, care, treatment, rehabilitation, and support of homeless individuals with possible MNS disorder. Community-based survey was conducted from January to March 2015. Homeless people who had overt and observable psychopathology and positive for screening instruments (SRQ20, ASSIST, and PSQ) were involved in the survey and further assessed for possible diagnosis by structured clinical interview for DSM-IV diagnoses and international diagnostic criteria for seizure disorders for possible involvement in care, treatment, rehabilitation services, support, and training. The Statistical Program for Social Science (SPSS version 20) was used for data entry, clearance, and analyses. A total of 456 homeless people were involved in the survey. Majority of the participants were male ( n   =  402; 88.16%). Most of the homeless participants had migrated into Addis Ababa from elsewhere in Ethiopia and Eritrea (62.50%). Mental, neurologic, and substance use disorders resulted to be common problems in the study participants (92.11%; n   =  420). Most of the participants with mental, neurologic, and substance use disorders (85.29%; n   =  354) had psychotic disorders. Most of those with psychosis had schizophrenia (77.40%; n   =  274). Almost all of the participants had a history of substance use (93.20%; n   =  425) and about one in ten individuals had substance use disorders (10.54%; n   =  48). Most of the participants with substance use disorder had comorbid other mental and neurologic disorders (83.33%; n   =  40). Mental, neurologic, and substance use disorders are common (92

  20. Neurological soft signs discriminating mood disorders from first episode schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, MPM; Liddle, PF; Burgerhof, JGM; Knegtering, R; Bosch, RJ

    Objective: To investigate the specificity of neurological soft signs (NSS) for first episode schizophrenia compared with mood disorders. Method: We assessed NSS in a sample of 60 healthy controls, 191 first episode psychosis patients and 81 mood disorder patients. We used a principle component

  1. Quality of life of unaffected siblings of children with chronic neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Pratyaksha; Mishra, Devendra

    2015-06-01

    To study quality of life (QoL) of the siblings of children with chronic neurological disorders. Between 1st August and 30th September, 2013, 50 children aged 12-18 y, whose child sibling was suffering from a chronic neurological disorder, were enrolled (Study group). Fifty age- and sex- matched siblings of apparently non-neurologically affected children were enrolled as controls (Control group). Those with more than one affected child or any affected adult in the family were excluded. QoL was assessed by a validated version of the WHOQOL-BREF in Hindi, and QoL was compared between cases and controls. The disorders in the index cases included cerebral palsy, 18 (15 with epilepsy); autism, 15; mental retardation, 12 and epilepsy, 5. The QoL in all domains was significantly poorer in the study group as compared to the controls. 64% study group children had insufficient knowledge about their sibling's condition. More than 1/4th study subjects faced difficulties in studies, play or work. There was no difference among the groups with regard to number of siblings who had 'dropped from the school'. The QoL of unaffected siblings of children with chronic neurological disorders was significantly impaired. Health-workers may consider including older siblings of neurologically affected children during family-counseling sessions, to provide information and suggest coping strategies. This intervention is likely to improve the functioning of the family unit as a whole.

  2. [Drooling therapy in children with neurological disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Táboas-Pereira, M Andrea; Paredes-Mercado, Cecilia; Alonso-Curcó, Xènia; Badosa-Pagès, Joaquim; Muchart, Jordi; Póo, Pilar

    2015-07-16

    Drooling is the inability to retain saliva in the mouth and its progression to the digestive tract, being a common problem in pediatric patients with neurological disorders. Three different treatment options are available. To assess the effectiveness and safety of trihexyphenidyl, scopolamine and botulinum toxin infiltration in the treatment of drooling in children with neurological disorders. This is an open and prospective type study. We include patients treated in the Neurology Service that present excessive drooling, affecting their quality of life, between 2009 and 2013. We enrolled 46 patients in the study. The treatment with oral trihexyphenidyl was indicated in 46, obtaining good result in 15 (32.6%), three with temporary effect and the rest with lasting effect. Three patients presented side effects (6.5%). Four out of 11 (36.36%) patients treated with scopolamine patch had beneficial effects. One was withdrawn due to lack of efficacy and six due to side effects. Twenty-five patients were infiltrated with botulinum toxin, with a significant decrease of drooling in 16 patients (64%) after the first injection. We observed no significant changes in nine patients. Only one out of 25 showed side effects (mild dysphagia). Currently there is not a fully effective therapeutic option for drooling. We recommend starting treatment with trihexyphenidyl. A second option could be the scopolamine patch and botulinum toxin as a third option. Botulinum toxin infiltration in salivary glands is shown as an effective and safe alternative in our study.

  3. The emerging link between O-GlcNAcylation and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaofeng; Li, He; He, Yating; Hao, Junwei

    2017-10-01

    O-linked β-N-acetylglucosaminylation (O-GlcNAcylation) is involved in the regulation of many cellular cascades and neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and stroke. In the brain, the expression of O-GlcNAcylation is notably heightened, as is that of O-linked N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (OGT) and β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (OGA), the presence of which is prominent in many regions of neurological importance. Most importantly, O-GlcNAcylation is believed to contribute to the normal functioning of neurons; conversely, its dysregulation participates in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders. In neurodegenerative diseases, O-GlcNAcylation of the brain's key proteins, such as tau and amyloid-β, interacts with their phosphorylation, thereby triggering the formation of neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques. An increase of O-GlcNAcylation by pharmacological intervention prevents neuronal loss. Additionally, O-GlcNAcylation is stress sensitive, and its elevation is cytoprotective. Increased O-GlcNAcylation ameliorated brain damage in victims of both trauma-hemorrhage and stroke. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of O-GlcNAcylation's physiological and pathological roles in the nervous system and provide a foundation for development of a therapeutic strategy for neurological disorders.

  4. Biomedical and Clinical Promises of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nopporn Jongkamonwiwat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders are characterized by the chronic and progressive loss of neuronal structures and functions. There is a variability of the onsets and causes of clinical manifestations. Cell therapy has brought a new concept to overcome brain diseases, but the advancement of this therapy is limited by the demands of specialized neurons. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs have been promised as a renewable resource for generating human neurons for both laboratory and clinical purposes. By the modulations of appropriate signalling pathways, desired neuron subtypes can be obtained, and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provide genetically matched neurons for treating patients. These hPSC-derived neurons can also be used for disease modeling and drug screening. Since the most urgent problem today in transplantation is the lack of suitable donor organs and tissues, the derivation of neural progenitor cells from hPSCs has opened a new avenue for regenerative medicine. In this review, we summarize the recent reports that show how to generate neural derivatives from hPSCs, and discuss the current evidence of using these cells in animal studies. We also highlight the possibilities and concerns of translating these hPSC-derived neurons for biomedical and clinical uses in order to fight against neurological disorders.

  5. Quantitative analysis of neurological effects induced by cranio-caudal gamma-irradiation of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydov, B.I.; Ushakov, I.B.; Karpov, V.N.

    1987-01-01

    A study was made of the frequency and duration of neurological disorders after cranio-caudal irradiation of rats with doses of 7.5-500 Gy delivered to the head. As the mean effective dose increased the neurological disorders occurred in the following order: tremor, rotatory movements hyperkinesia, opisthotonos, and convulsions. The europhysiological disorders observed were subjected to a pathophysiological analysis

  6. Grey matter abnormalities in children and adolescents with functional neurological symptom disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowska, Kasia; Griffiths, Kristi R; Foster, Sheryl L; Linton, James; Williams, Leanne M; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh S

    2017-01-01

    Functional neurological symptom disorder refers to the presence of neurological symptoms not explained by neurological disease. Although this disorder is presumed to reflect abnormal function of the brain, recent studies in adults show neuroanatomical abnormalities in brain structure . These structural brain abnormalities have been presumed to reflect long-term adaptations to the disorder, and it is unknown whether child and adolescent patients, with illness that is typically of shorter duration, show similar deficits or have normal brain structure. High-resolution, three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were acquired in 25 patients (aged 10-18 years) and 24 healthy controls. Structure was quantified in terms of grey matter volume using voxel-based morphometry. Post hoc, we examined whether regions of structural difference related to a measure of motor readiness to emotional signals and to clinical measures of illness duration, illness severity, and anxiety/depression. Patients showed greater volumes in the left supplementary motor area (SMA) and right superior temporal gyrus (STG) and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) (corrected p disorder.

  7. Limiting exercise inhibits neuronal recovery from neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan S Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients who are bedridden often suffer from muscular atrophy due to reduced daily activities and can become depressed. However, patients who undergo physical therapy sometimes demonstrate positive benefits including a reduction of stressful and depressed behavior. Regenerative medicine has seen improvements in two stem cell-based therapies for central nervous system disorders. One therapy is through the transfer of exogenous stem cells. The other therapy is a more natural method and focuses on the increasing endogenous neurogenesis and restoring the neurological impairments. This study overviews how immobilization-induced disuse atrophy affects neurogenesis in rats, specifically hypothesizing that immobilization diminishes circulating trophic factor levels, like vascular endothelial growth factors or brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which in turn limits neurogenesis. This hypothesis requires the classification of the stem cell microenvironment by probing growth factors in addition to other stress-related proteins that correlate with exercise-induced neurogenesis. There is research examining the effects of increased exercise on neurogenesis while limiting exercise, which better demonstrates the pathological states of immobile stroke patients, remains relatively unexplored. To examine the effects of immobilization on neurogenesis quantitative measurements of movements, 5-bromo-2deoxyuridine labeling of proliferative cells, biochemical assays of serum, cerebrospinal fluid and neurological levels of trophic factors, growth factors, and stress-related proteins will indicate levels of neurogenesis. In further research, studies are needed to show how in vivo stimulation, or lack thereof, affects stem cell microenvironments to advance treatment procedures for strengthening neurogenesis in bedridden patients. This paper is a review article. Referred literature in this paper has been listed in the references section. The datasets supporting the

  8. Olfactory Disorder Pattern In Patients With Neurological Diseases Excluding Psychiatric And Traumatic Aetiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haro-Licer, Josep; González-Fernández, Adela; Planas-Comes, Albert; González-Ares, Josep Antón

    2018-03-23

    The most common cause of olfactory ENT disorders are colds and flu, chronic sinusitis, allergies and traumatic brain injury. Rarer aetiologies include certain neurological, psychiatric and metabolic injuries. The aim of this paper was to check the sort of olfactory disorders found in people who have suffered a brain injury, excluding: cranial traumas, psychiatric diseases, epilepsy, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, and synaesthesia. A descriptive study based on 61 patients with diagnoses of various neurological injuries, which were tested by BAST-24 olfactometer. The results were compared with those of a control group (n= 120). The results show major impairment in these patients' olfactory sense. The neurological injury patients were able to detect from 60-77% of the odours, while the control group were able to detect between 98-100%. The neurological patients were able, at best, to identify, 11-32% of the odours correctly, while the control group were able to correctly detect between 59 -75%. The differences between odour detection and correct identification were statistically significant (p<.05). We concluded: a) Neurological injury, not caused by traumatic brain injury, psychiatric disorders or ENT diseases, ranged from 68-89% of the olfactory failures. b) We must bear in mind that these sorts of injuries can cause olfactory disorders. c) ENT and Neurologists should collaborate in the treatment of these disorders. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Blood Lead Level in Children with Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhoudeh, Marzieh; Inaloo, Soroor; Zahmatkeshan, Mozhgan; Seratishirazi, Zahra; Haghbin, Saeedeh

    2018-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the blood lead level (BLL) in children with neurologic disorders of unknown causes and compare with normal children. In this prospective case-control study, 68 patients aged 1 to 18 yr with neurologic disorders of unknown causes, were referred to pediatric neurology clinics and wards, Shiraz, Iran selected during a 12 months period from Sep 2013. They were compared with 1:1 ratio, age, and sex-matched healthy children. BLL was checked from all participants using 3 cc heparinized venous blood sample. Level of ≥5 mcg/dl was considered toxic dose. Totally, 136 children (68 cases and 68 controls) with mean ages of 5.20±4.12 and 4.18±3.86 yr, respectively, were enrolled. Mean BLL was higher in case group than in controls but the difference was not significant ( P =0.84), though they were less than toxic levels in both. In addition, the difference in mean BLLs was not significant in terms of living place, sex, and age. Totally, 17.7% of the study sample had BLL ≥5 mcg/dl. The frequency of BLL ≥5 mcg/dl was significantly higher in case group ( P =0.024) with an odds ratio 2.9 times higher (95% CI: 1.066-7.60). Strategies in public health must focus on practicing primary and secondary preventions of lead exposure in children.

  10. Aphasia, Just a Neurological Disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ozdemir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto%u2019s encephalopathy (HE is a rare disorder associated with autoimmune thyroiditis. Etiology of HE is not completely understood. High levels of serum antithyroid antibodies are seen in HE. Presentation with otoimmune thyroiditis, cognitive impairment, psychiatric and neurologic symptoms and absence of bacterial or viral enfections are characteristics of HE. HE is a steroid responsive encephalopathy. 60 years old male patient admitted to hospital with forget fulness continuing for 9 months and speech loss starting 2 days ago. Strong positivity of antithyroid antibodies increases the odds for HE. Thyroid function tests showed severe hypothyroidism. Electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging results were compatible with HE. HE is diagnosed with differantial diagnosis and exclusion of other reasons. This uncommon disorder is not recognised enough. High titres of serum antithyroid antiboides are always needed for diagnosis. Correct diagnosis requires awareness of wide range of cognitive and clinical presentations of HE.

  11. [Psychogenetic neurological disorders in draft age personnel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmetianov, L A; Ovchinnikov, A V

    2012-07-01

    The tendency of psychogenetic neurological disorders increases with predominance in young persons being students of high schools, students of military, technical and other lyceum was shown. The origin of diseases are psychotraumas (family, work), stress. Also genetic and hereditary factors take place that are indicative for individual rehabilitation organization. The basics of psychosomatic diseases pathogenesis are the disintegration mechanisms in brain structure activity,the disorders of integrative apparatus which provides the relationship between somatic, emotional and vegetative functions. The confirmation of brain work disintegration is achieved by modern computer diagnostic systems. As psychogenic diseases increase the need in methods of computer electroencephalography, evoked potentials, and rheoencephalography application is more actual.

  12. Neurological disorders in Iraqi refugees in Jordan: data from the United Nations Refugee Assistance Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Farrah J; Carone, Marco; Nyce, Sayre; Ghosn, Jad; Mutuerandu, Timothy; Al-Saedy, Huda; Lowenstein, Daniel H; Burnham, Gilbert

    2012-04-01

    The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) recognizes 43.7 million forcibly displaced persons and asylum seekers due to conflict and persecution worldwide. Neurological disorders have rarely been described in displaced persons but likely pose a significant burden of disease. We describe the disease spectrum and health service utilization of Iraqi refugees and asylum seekers with neurological disorders using an information system developed by the UNHCR. Neurological disorders were actively monitored among the 7,642 UNHCR-registered Iraqi refugees and asylum seekers who received health and humanitarian assistance using a pilot, centralized, database called the Refugee Assistance Information System (RAIS) in the Kingdom of Jordan in 2010. There were 122 neurological diagnoses reported in 1,328 refugees (mean age 41 years, 49% female, 10% disabled, 43% with pending resettlement applications) in 2,659 health visits, accounting for 17% of all refugees who sought health assistance in RAIS. Referral to a neurologist occurred in 178 cases (13.4%). The most frequent ICD-10 neurological diagnoses were dorsalgia (back pain) (29.7% of individuals with neurological disorders), headache (13.1%), and epilepsy (12.6%). Approximately 1 in 20 Iraqi refugees with a neurological diagnosis self-reported a history of torture, which was higher than Iraqi refugees without a history of torture [66/1,328 versus 196/6,314, odds ratio (OR) = 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21-2.18]. Neurological disease affects a high proportion of Iraqi refugees, including victims of torture and the disabled. Refugees require dedicated care for treatment of neurological disease with a focus on pain disorders and epilepsy.

  13. Manipulations of MeCP2 in glutamatergic neurons highlight their contributions to Rett and other neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many postnatal onset neurological disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and intellectual disability are thought to arise largely from disruption of excitatory/inhibitory homeostasis. Although mouse models of Rett syndrome (RTT), a postnatal neurological disorder caused by loss-of-functi...

  14. Secondary Abnormalities of Neurotransmitters in Infants with Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Cazorla, A.; Serrano, M.; Perez-Duenas, B.; Gonzalez, V.; Ormazabal, A.; Pineda, M.; Fernandez-Alvarez, E.; Campistol, J. M. D.; Artuch, R. M. D.

    2007-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are essential in young children for differentiation and neuronal growth of the developing nervous system. We aimed to identify possible factors related to secondary neurotransmitter abnormalities in pediatric patients with neurological disorders. We analyzed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and biogenic amine metabolites in 56 infants…

  15. Diffusion-weighted imaging in diagnosing neurological disorders in children: a pediatric neurologist's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, Susan L.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has provided a way to measure early changes in cellular function in the central nervous system. It has permitted rapid, less invasive diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders that were once thought to be untreatable. DWI has also created new avenues of research and alternative ways to measure study outcomes. Seven clinical cases illustrate how DWI enhances the ability of the pediatric neurologist to rapidly diagnose acute neurological disorders in infants and children. (orig.)

  16. Social correlates of mental, neurological, and substance use disorders in China and India: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hui G; Shidhaye, Rahul; Charlson, Fiona; Deng, Fei; Lyngdoh, Tanica; Chen, Shengnan; Nanda, Sharmishtha; Lacroix, Kimberly; Baxter, Amanda; Whiteford, Harvey

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the epidemiological profiles of mental, neurological, and substance use disorders provides opportunities for the identification of high-risk population subgroups and for the development of effective country-specific prevention and intervention strategies. Guided by the Conceptual Framework for Action on the Social Determinants of Health by WHO we reviewed the literature to examine the association between a range of social correlates (eg, sex, age, education, income, urbanicity, marital status, and regional differences) and mental, neurological, and substance use disorders in China and India, the most populous countries in the world. We looked for papers on mental, neurological, and substance use disorders with location identifiers and socioeconomic correlates published between 1990 and 2015 and our search found 65 relevant studies from China and 29 from India. Several association patterns between social correlates and mental, neurological, and substance use disorders were not consistent with those reported in high-income countries, including a high concentration of middle-aged men with alcohol use disorders in China and to a lesser extent in India, and a positive association between being married and depression among women in India. Consistent with previous global reports, low education and poverty were associated with higher occurrence of dementia in both China and India, although there is evidence of an interaction between education and income in the risk for dementia in China. Large variations across regions and ethnic groups were consistently documented in China. These unique correlation patterns for mental, neurological, and substance use disorders identified in China and India emphasise the importance of understanding the local social context when planning targeted strategies to reduce the burden of these disorders. High-quality, up-to-date information about the constantly changing pattern of societal factors correlated with mental, neurological

  17. Functional neurological symptom disorder (conversion disorder): A role for microglial-based plasticity mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Chris P; Baguley, Ian J

    2018-02-01

    Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder (FND) is a relatively common neurological condition, accounting for approximately 3-6% of neurologist referrals. FND is considered a transient disorder of neuronal function, sometimes linked to physical trauma and psychological stress. Despite this, chronic disability is common, for example, around 40% of adults with motor FND have permanent disability. Building on current theoretical models, this paper proposes that microglial dysfunction could perpetuate functional changes within acute motor FND, thus providing a pathophysiological mechanism underlying the chronic stage of the motor FND phenotypes seen clinically. Core to our argument is microglia's dual role in modulating neuroimmunity and their control of synaptic plasticity, which places them at a pathophysiological nexus wherein coincident physical trauma and psychological stress could cause long-term change in neuronal networks without producing macroscopic structural abnormality. This model proposes a range of hypotheses that are testable with current technologies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Managing patients with neurologic disorders who participate in sports activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutchfield, Kevin E

    2014-12-01

    Patients with neurologic conditions have been discouraged from participating in organized sports because of theoretical detrimental effects of these activities to their underlying conditions. The purpose of this article is to review known risks associated with three specific clinical conditions most commonly encountered in a sports neurology clinic (epilepsy, migraines, and multiple sclerosis and to add to the neurologist's toolkit suggested interventions regarding management of athletes with these disorders. Increased participation in sports and athletics has positive benefits for patients with neurologic conditions and can be safely integrated into the lives of these patients with proper supervision from their treating neurologists. Patients with neurologic conditions can and should be encouraged to participate in organized sports as a method of maintaining their overall fitness, improving their overall level of function, and reaping the physical and psychological benefits that athletic competition has to offer.

  19. Zinc in Gut-Brain Interaction in Autism and Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Guillermo; Stark, Peter; Socha, Michael; Sauer, Ann Katrin; Hagmeyer, Simone; Grabrucker, Andreas M.

    2015-01-01

    A growing amount of research indicates that abnormalities in the gastrointestinal (GI) system during development might be a common factor in multiple neurological disorders and might be responsible for some of the shared comorbidities seen among these diseases. For example, many patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have symptoms associated with GI disorders. Maternal zinc status may be an important factor given the multifaceted effect of zinc on gut development and morphology in the offspring. Zinc status influences and is influenced by multiple factors and an interdependence of prenatal and early life stress, immune system abnormalities, impaired GI functions, and zinc deficiency can be hypothesized. In line with this, systemic inflammatory events and prenatal stress have been reported to increase the risk for ASD. Thus, here, we will review the current literature on the role of zinc in gut formation, a possible link between gut and brain development in ASD and other neurological disorders with shared comorbidities, and tie in possible effects on the immune system. Based on these data, we present a novel model outlining how alterations in the maternal zinc status might pathologically impact the offspring leading to impairments in brain functions later in life. PMID:25878905

  20. The Spanish Burden of Disease 2010: Neurological, mental and substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Elvira; Garin, Noé; Ferrari, Alize J; Tyrovolas, Stefanos; Olaya, Beatriz; Sànchez-Riera, Lidia; Whiteford, Harvey A; Haro, Josep Maria

    2015-01-01

    We used data from the Global Burden of Disease, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 to report on the burden of neuropsychiatric disorders in Spain. The summary measure of burden used in the study was the disability-adjusted life-year (DALY), which sums of the years of life lost due to premature mortality (YLLs) and the years lived with disability (YLDs). DALYs were adjusted for comorbidity and estimated with 95% uncertainty intervals. The burden of neuropsychiatric disorders accounted for 18.4% of total all-cause DALYs generated in Spain for 2010. Within this group, the top five leading causes of DALYs were: depressive disorders, Alzheimer's disease, migraine, substance-use disorders, and anxiety disorder, which accounted for 70.9% of all DALYs due to neuropsychiatric disorders. Neurological disorders represented 5.03% of total all cause YLLs, whereas mental and substance-use disorders accounted for 0.8%. Mental and substance-use disorders accounted for 22.4% of total YLDs, with depression being the most disabling disorder. Neurological disorders represented 8.3% of total YLDs. Neuropsychiatric disorders were one of the leading causes of disability in 2010. This finding contributes to our understanding of the burden of neuropsychiatric disorders in the Spanish population and highlights the importance of prioritising neuropsychiatric disorders in the Spanish public health system. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Chapter 50: history of tropical neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunniyi, Adesola

    2010-01-01

    Tropical neurology began less than two centuries ago. Consumption of dietary toxins predominated at the beginning and gave birth to the geographic entity. The story moved from lathyrism through Jamaican neuropathy to cassava-induced epidemic neuropathy, which was contrasted with Konzo, also associated with cassava. Other tropical diseases enumerated with chronological details include: Chaga's diseases, kwashiorkor, Madras type of motor neuron disease, atlanto-axial dislocation, Burkitt's lymphoma and Kuru, associated with cannibalism among the Fore linguistic group in New Guinea. More recent documentation includes the Cuban neuropathy in 1991 with an epidemic of visual loss and neuropathy, Anaphe venata entomophagy in Nigeria presenting as seasonal ataxia, and neurological aspects of the human immunodeficiency virus infection complete the picture. With time, professional associations were formed and the pioneers were given prominence. The World Federation of Neurology featured Geographic Neurology as a theme in 1977 and Tropical Neurology was given prominence at its 1989 meeting in New Delhi, India. The situation remains unchanged with regards to rare diseases like Meniere's, multiple sclerosis, hereditary disorders. However, with westernization and continued urbanization, changing disease patterns are being observed and tropical neurology may depart from dietary toxins to more western world-type disorders.

  2. Clinical Uses of Melatonin in Neurological Diseases and Mental and Behavioural Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Barcelo, Emilio J; Rueda, Noemi; Mediavilla, María D; Martinez-Cue, Carmen; Reiter, Russel J

    2017-11-20

    Melatonin is a molecule with numerous properties applicable to the treatment of neurological diseases. Among these properties are the following: potent scavenger of oxygen and nitrogen reactive species, anti-inflammatory features, immuno-enhancing nature, and modulation of circadian rhythmicity. Furthermore, low concentrations of melatonin are usually found in patients with neurological diseases and mental disorders. The positive results obtained in experimental models of diverse pathologies, including diseases of the nervous system (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington's disease, epilepsy, headaches, etc.) as well as mental and behavioural disordes (e.g., autism spectrum disorders, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorders, etc.), have served as a basis for the design of clinical trials to study melatonin's possible usefulness in human pathology, although the satisfactory results obtained from the laboratory "bench" are not always applicable to the patient's "bedside". In this article, we review those papers describing the results of the administration of melatonin to humans for various therapeutic purposes in the field of neuropathology. Clinical trials with strong methodologies and appropriate doses of melatonin are necessary to support or reject the usefulness of melatonin in neurological diseases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Effect of Chinese Herbal Medicine on Molecular Imaging of Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao; Chen, Ting; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2017-01-01

    Chinese herbal medicine has been used to treat a wide variety of neurological disorders including stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. However, its mechanism behind the effectiveness remains unclear. Recently, molecular imaging technology has been applied for this purpose, since it can assess the cellular or molecular function in a living subject by using specific imaging probes and/or radioactive tracers, which enable efficient analysis and monitoring the therapeutic response repetitively. This chapter reviews the in vivo functional and metabolic changes after administration of Chinese herbal medicine in various neurological disorders and provides perspectives on the future evaluations of therapeutic response of Chinese herbal medicine. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence and risk factors for neurological disorders in children aged 6 months to 2 years in northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rashmi; Bhave, Anupama; Bhargava, Roli; Agarwal, Girdhar G

    2013-04-01

    To study prevalence and risk factors for neurological disorders--epilepsy, global developmental delay, and motor, vision, and hearing defects--in children aged 6 months to 2 years in northern India. A two-stage community survey for neurological disorders was conducted in rural and urban areas of Lucknow. After initial screening with a new instrument, the Lucknow Neurodevelopment Screen, screen positives and a random proportion of screen negatives were validated using predefined criteria. Prevalence was calculated by weighted estimates. Demographic, socio-economic, and medical risk factors were compared between validated children who were positive and negative for neurological disorders by univariate and logistic regression analysis. Of 4801 children screened (mean age [SD] 15.32mo [5.96]; 2542 males, 2259 females), 196 were positive; 190 screen positives and 269 screen negatives were validated. Prevalence of neurological disorders was 27.92 per 1000 (weighted 95% confidence interval 12.24-43.60). Significant risk factors (p≤0.01) for neurological disorders were higher age in months (p=0.010), lower mean number of appliances in the household (p=0.001), consanguineous marriage of parents (p=0.010), family history of neurological disorder (p=0.001), and infants born exceptionally small (parental description; p=0.009). On logistic regression, the final model included age (p=0.0193), number of appliances (p=0.0161), delayed cry at birth (p=0.0270), postneonatal meningoencephalitis (p=0.0549), and consanguinity (p=0.0801). Perinatal factors, lower socio-economic status, and consanguinity emerged as predictors of neurological disorders. These factors are largely modifiable. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2013 Mac Keith Press.

  5. Enterovirus 71-induced neurological disorders in young gerbils, Meriones unguiculatus: development and application of a neurological disease model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Ping Yao

    Full Text Available A reliable disease model mimicking Enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection in humans is essential for understanding pathogenesis and for developing a safe and effective vaccine. Commonly used rodent models including mouse or rat models are not suitable for vaccine evaluation because the rodents are resistant to EV71 infection after they reach the age of 6 days. In this study, 21-day-old gerbils inoculated intraperitoneally (IP with a non mouse-adapted EV71 strain developed neurological lesion-related signs including hind limb paralysis, slowness, ataxia and lethargy similar to those of central nervous system (CNS infection of EV71 in humans. The infected gerbils eventually died of the neurological lesions and EV71 could be isolated from lung, liver, spleen, kidney, heart, spinal cord, brain cortex, brainstem and skeletal muscle. Significantly high virus replication was detected in spinal cord, brainstem and skeletal muscle by cellular analysis, real-time quantitative PCR (RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining. Histopathologic changes such as neuronal degeneration, neuronal loss and neuronophagia were observed in spinal cord, brain cortex, brainstem, and skeletal muscle along with necrotizing myositis and splenic atrophy. Gerbils that received two doses of inactive whole-virus vaccine showed no EV71-specific symptoms after challenged with EV71. In contrast, gerbils that received mock vaccination died of EV71-induced neuropathology after challenged with EV71. The result indicates that gerbils can serve as a reliable disease model for evaluating safety and efficacy of EV71 vaccine.

  6. Factors Related to Social Support in Neurological and Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenov, Kaloyan; Cabello, Maria; Caballero, Francisco Félix; Cieza, Alarcos; Sabariego, Carla; Raggi, Alberto; Anczewska, Marta; Pitkänen, Tuuli; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Despite the huge body of research on social support, literature has been primarily focused on its beneficial role for both physical and mental health. It is still unclear why people with mental and neurological disorders experience low levels of social support. The main objective of this study was to explore what are the strongest factors related to social support and how do they interact with each other in neuropsychiatric disorders. The study used cross-sectional data from 722 persons suffering from dementia, depression, epilepsy, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, and substance use disorders. Multiple linear regressions showed that disability was the strongest factor for social support. Extraversion and agreeableness were significant personality variables, but when the interaction terms between personality traits and disability were included, disability remained the only significant variable. Moreover, level of disability mediated the relationship between personality (extraversion and agreeableness) and level of social support. Moderation analysis revealed that people that had mental disorders experienced lower levels of support when being highly disabled compared to people with neurological disorders. Unlike previous literature, focused on increasing social support as the origin of improving disability, this study suggested that interventions improving day-to-day functioning or maladaptive personality styles might also have an effect on the way people perceive social support. Future longitudinal research, however, is warranted to explore causality. PMID:26900847

  7. Factors Related to Social Support in Neurological and Mental Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaloyan Kamenov

    Full Text Available Despite the huge body of research on social support, literature has been primarily focused on its beneficial role for both physical and mental health. It is still unclear why people with mental and neurological disorders experience low levels of social support. The main objective of this study was to explore what are the strongest factors related to social support and how do they interact with each other in neuropsychiatric disorders. The study used cross-sectional data from 722 persons suffering from dementia, depression, epilepsy, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, and substance use disorders. Multiple linear regressions showed that disability was the strongest factor for social support. Extraversion and agreeableness were significant personality variables, but when the interaction terms between personality traits and disability were included, disability remained the only significant variable. Moreover, level of disability mediated the relationship between personality (extraversion and agreeableness and level of social support. Moderation analysis revealed that people that had mental disorders experienced lower levels of support when being highly disabled compared to people with neurological disorders. Unlike previous literature, focused on increasing social support as the origin of improving disability, this study suggested that interventions improving day-to-day functioning or maladaptive personality styles might also have an effect on the way people perceive social support. Future longitudinal research, however, is warranted to explore causality.

  8. Psychologic theories in functional neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, A; Ludwig, L; Welch, K

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we review key psychologic theories that have been mooted as possible explanations for the etiology of functional neurologic symptoms, conversion disorder, and hysteria. We cover Freudian psychoanalysis and later object relations and attachment theories, social theories, illness behavior, classic and operant conditioning, social learning theory, self-regulation theory, cognitive-behavioral theories, and mindfulness. Dissociation and modern cognitive neuroscience theories are covered in other chapters in this series and, although of central importance, are omitted from this chapter. Our aim is an overview with the emphasis on breadth of coverage rather than depth. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The pattern of neurological disorders in patients admitted to El shaab teaching hospital

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    Mohamed, Taj Eldin Hag Osman [Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1999-07-01

    This thesis was designed to study the pattern of neurological disorders of admitted patients to the neurology centre at El shaab teaching hospital in the period from january 1997 to december 1998. 402 cases were admitted. (35%) were in the age group 21-40, 30% in 41-60, 20% in 61-80, 14% in 0-20 and 1% in >81 males constituted 72% and females 28%. Cerebrovascular diseases top the list with 18.9%, followed by paraplegia's with 17.4%, peripheral neuropathies 11.7, (guillain barre was the most common). Brain space occupying lesions 10.4% (tumors and tuberculomas was the most common),movement disorders with 10% (Parkinson's disease was the most encountered), muscle disorders 6.2% (myasthenia gravis was the commonest). Ataxias 5.5%, headache and migraine was the least group of disorders.

  10. The pattern of neurological disorders in patients admitted to El shaab teaching hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Taj Eldin Hag Osman

    1999-01-01

    This thesis was designed to study the pattern of neurological disorders of admitted patients to the neurology centre at El shaab teaching hospital in the period from january 1997 to december 1998. 402 cases were admitted. (35%) were in the age group 21-40, 30% in 41-60, 20% in 61-80, 14% in 0-20 and 1% in >81 males constituted 72% and females 28%. Cerebrovascular diseases top the list with 18.9%, followed by paraplegia's with 17.4%, peripheral neuropathies 11.7, (guillain barre was the most common). Brain space occupying lesions 10.4% (tumors and tuberculomas was the most common),movement disorders with 10% (Parkinson's disease was the most encountered), muscle disorders 6.2% (myasthenia gravis was the commonest). Ataxias 5.5%, headache and migraine was the least group of disorders

  11. Atropa belladonna neurotoxicity: Implications to neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwakye, Gunnar F; Jiménez, Jennifer; Jiménez, Jessica A; Aschner, Michael

    2018-06-01

    Atropa belladonna, commonly known as belladonna or deadly nightshade, ranks among one of the most poisonous plants in Europe and other parts of the world. The plant contains tropane alkaloids including atropine, scopolamine, and hyoscyamine, which are used as anticholinergics in Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs and homeopathic remedies. These alkaloids can be very toxic at high dose. The FDA has recently reported that Hyland's baby teething tablets contain inconsistent amounts of Atropa belladonna that may have adverse effects on the nervous system and cause death in children, thus recalled the product in 2017. A greater understanding of the neurotoxicity of Atropa belladonna and its modification of genetic polymorphisms in the nervous system is critical in order to develop better treatment strategies, therapies, regulations, education of at-risk populations, and a more cohesive paradigm for future research. This review offers an integrated view of the homeopathy and neurotoxicity of Atropa belladonna in children, adults, and animal models as well as its implications to neurological disorders. Particular attention is dedicated to the pharmaco/toxicodynamics, pharmaco/toxicokinetics, pathophysiology, epidemiological cases, and animal studies associated with the effects of Atropa belladonna on the nervous system. Additionally, we discuss the influence of active tropane alkaloids in Atropa belladonna and other similar plants on FDA-approved therapeutic drugs for treatment of neurological disorders. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Neurological Soft Signs in Indian Children with Specific Developmental Disorders of Scholastic Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, Raja; Mehta, Manju; Kalra, Veena; Sagar, Rajesh; Mongia, Monica

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To compare the occurrence of neurological soft signs (NSS) in children with specific developmental disorders of scholastic skills (SDDSS) and normal children. Methods: 36 cases of SDDSS were compared with 30 control children regarding sociodemographic and clinical variables and neurological soft signs. Results: Children with SDDSS had…

  13. Prevalence of mental, neurological, and substance use disorders in China and India: a systematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Amanda J; Charlson, Fiona J; Cheng, Hui G; Shidhaye, Rahul; Ferrari, Alize J; Whiteford, Harvey A

    2016-09-01

    Population-representative prevalence data for mental, neurological, and substance use disorders are essential for evidence-based decision making. As a background to the China-India Mental Health Alliance Series, we aim to examine the availability of data and report prevalence for the most common mental, neurological, and substance use disorders in China and India from the Global Burden of Disease study 2013 (GBD 2013). In this systematic analysis, data sources were identified from GBD 2013 for the prevalence of mental, neurological, and substance use disorders in China and India published up to Dec 31, 2013. We calculated the proportion of the population represented by the data with the adjusted population coverage (APC) method adjusting for age, sex, and population size. We developed prevalence models with DisMod-MR 2.0, a Bayesian meta-regression instrument used to pool population-representative epidemiological data as part of GBD 2013. We report estimates and 95% uncertainly intervals (95% UI) for 15 mental, neurological, and substance use disorders for China and India in 1990 and 2013, and benchmark these against those for other BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, and South Africa) in 2013. Few population-representative data were found for the disorders, with an average coverage of 15% of the population of the Chinese mainland and 1% of the population of India. For men in both China and India, major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, and alcohol dependence were the most common mental, neurological, and substance use disorders. Prevalence of major depressive disorder was 2·2% (95% UI 1·5-2·8) in Chinese men and 3·5% (2·4-4·6) in Indian men; prevalence of anxiety disorders was 2·0% (1·1-3·2) and 1·9% (1·2-2·3), respectively. For women, anxiety disorders, major depressive disorder, and dysthymia were the most common. Prevalence of major depressive disorder was 3·3% (2·3-4·1) in Chinese women and 4·7% (95% UI 3·3-6·2) in Indian women; prevalence

  14. Disruptive technology disorder: A past, present, and future neurologic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Donald F

    2017-07-25

    Based upon an analysis of 6 major historical technological advances over the last 150 years, a new syndrome, disruptive technology disorder (DTD), is introduced. DTD describes the human health ailments that accompany the implementation of disruptive technologies. Elevator sickness, railway spine, and bicycle face are representative examples. Though the underlying causative disruptive technologies may differ, many neurologic symptoms (headache, dizziness, weakness) are common to multiple DTDs. Born of technology-driven societal change, DTDs manifest as a complex interplay between biological and psychological symptoms. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  15. Connectivity analysis is essential to understand neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Rowe

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders are major causes of morbidity worldwide. A systems level analysis including functional and structural neuroimaging is particularly useful when the pathology leads to disorders of higher order cognitive functions in human patients. However, an analysis that is restricted to regional effects is impoverished and insensitive, compared to the analysis of distributed brain networks. We discuss the issues to consider when choosing an appropriate connectivity method, and compare the results from several different methods that are relevant to fMRI and PET data. These include psychophysiological interactions in general linear models, structural equation modeling, dynamic causal modeling and independent components analysis. The advantages of connectivity analysis are illustrated with a range of structural and neurodegenerative brain disorders. We illustrate the sensitivity of these methods to the presence or severity of disease and/or treatment, even where analyses of voxel-wise activations are insensitive. However, functional and structural connectivity methods should be seen as complementary to, not a substitute for, other imaging and behavioral approaches. The functional relevance of changes in connectivity, to motor or cognitive performance, are considered alongside the complex relationship between structural and functional changes with neuropathology. Finally some of the problems associated with connectivity analysis are discussed. We suggest that the analysis of brain connectivity is an essential complement to the analysis of regionally specific dysfunction, in order to understand neurological and neuropsychiatric disease, and to evaluate the mechanisms of effective therapies.

  16. Application of mass spectrometry-based proteomics for biomarker discovery in neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venugopal Abhilash

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics has emerged as a powerful approach that has the potential to accelerate biomarker discovery, both for diagnostic as well as therapeutic purposes. Proteomics has traditionally been synonymous with 2D gels but is increasingly shifting to the use of gel-free systems and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Quantitative proteomic approaches have already been applied to investigate various neurological disorders, especially in the context of identifying biomarkers from cerebrospinal fluid and serum. This review highlights the scope of different applications of quantitative proteomics in understanding neurological disorders with special emphasis on biomarker discovery.

  17. Neurophysiologic studies of functional neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, M

    2016-01-01

    Functional neurologic disorders are largely genuine and represent conversion disorders, where the dysfunction is unconscious, but there are some that are factitious, where the abnormality is feigned and conscious. Malingering, which can have the same manifestations, is similarly feigned, but not considered a genuine disease. There are no good methods for differentiating these three entities at the present time. Physiologic studies of functional weakness and sensory loss reveal normal functioning of primary motor and sensory cortex, but abnormalities of premotor cortex and association cortices. This suggests a top-down influence creating the dysfunction. Studies of functional tremor and myoclonus show that these disorders utilize normal voluntary motor structures to produce the involuntary movements, again suggesting a higher-level abnormality. Agency is abnormal and studies shows that dysfunction of the temporoparietal junction may be a correlate. The limbic system is overactive and might initiate involuntary movements, but the mechanism for this is not known. The limbic system would then be the source of top-down dysfunction. It can be speculated that the involuntary movements are involuntary due to lack of proper feedforward signaling. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The global burden of mental, neurological and substance use disorders: an analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteford, Harvey A; Ferrari, Alize J; Degenhardt, Louisa; Feigin, Valery; Vos, Theo

    2015-01-01

    The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 (GBD 2010), estimated that a substantial proportion of the world's disease burden came from mental, neurological and substance use disorders. In this paper, we used GBD 2010 data to investigate time, year, region and age specific trends in burden due to mental, neurological and substance use disorders. For each disorder, prevalence data were assembled from systematic literature reviews. DisMod-MR, a Bayesian meta-regression tool, was used to model prevalence by country, region, age, sex and year. Prevalence data were combined with disability weights derived from survey data to estimate years lived with disability (YLDs). Years lost to premature mortality (YLLs) were estimated by multiplying deaths occurring as a result of a given disorder by the reference standard life expectancy at the age death occurred. Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) were computed as the sum of YLDs and YLLs. In 2010, mental, neurological and substance use disorders accounted for 10.4% of global DALYs, 2.3% of global YLLs and, 28.5% of global YLDs, making them the leading cause of YLDs. Mental disorders accounted for the largest proportion of DALYs (56.7%), followed by neurological disorders (28.6%) and substance use disorders (14.7%). DALYs peaked in early adulthood for mental and substance use disorders but were more consistent across age for neurological disorders. Females accounted for more DALYs in all mental and neurological disorders, except for mental disorders occurring in childhood, schizophrenia, substance use disorders, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy where males accounted for more DALYs. Overall DALYs were highest in Eastern Europe/Central Asia and lowest in East Asia/the Pacific. Mental, neurological and substance use disorders contribute to a significant proportion of disease burden. Health systems can respond by implementing established, cost effective interventions, or by supporting the research necessary to develop better

  19. An Analysis of Disorders seen at the Paediatric Neurology Clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Paediatric neurological disorders constitute a major cause of disability in childhood. Children in the developing countries are disproportionately affected and in addition face the added burden of poverty, inadequate health facilities, stigmatisation and lack of facilities for rehabilitative care. OBJECTIVE: To ...

  20. Hyperhomocysteinemia and neurologic disorders: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Ramin; Mahta, Ali; Mallack, Eric; Luo, Jin Jun

    2014-10-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a sulfur-containing amino acid that is generated during methionine metabolism. It has a physiologic role in DNA metabolism via methylation, a process governed by the presentation of folate, and vitamins B6 and B12. Physiologic Hcy levels are determined primarily by dietary intake and vitamin status. Elevated plasma levels of Hcy (eHcy) can be caused by deficiency of either vitamin B12 or folate, or a combination thereof. Certain genetic factors also cause eHcy, such as C667T substitution of the gene encoding methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. eHcy has been observed in several medical conditions, such as cardiovascular disorders, atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, stroke, minimal cognitive impairment, dementia, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, and eclampsia. There is evidence from laboratory and clinical studies that Hcy, and especially eHcy, exerts direct toxic effects on both the vascular and nervous systems. This article provides a review of the current literature on the possible roles of eHcy relevant to various neurologic disorders.

  1. Cochlear implantation in children with congenital cytomegalovirus infection accompanied by psycho-neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Rinko; Moroto, Saburo; Yamazaki, Tomoko; Fujiwara, Keizo; Nakai, Masako; Ito, Juichi; Naito, Yasushi

    2012-04-01

    Cochlear implantation was effective for deaf children with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, but their cochlear implant (CI) outcomes were often impaired, depending on the types of CMV-associated psycho-neurological disorders. Evaluation of cognitive development and autistic tendency of implantees might be useful to predict their CI outcomes. To reveal the influence of CMV-associated psycho-neurological disorders on CI outcomes. This was a retrospective evaluation of 11 implantees with congenital CMV infection (CMV-CIs) and 14 implantees with autosomal recessive hearing loss (genetic-CIs). Nine of 11 CMV-CIs suffered from psycho-neurological disorders; one from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, two from pervasive developmental disorder, and six from mental retardation. Aided hearing thresholds with CIs in the two groups did not differ, but two autistic and two mentally retarded CMV-CIs showed significantly low scores in speech discrimination tests. Language-Social (L-S) developmental quotients (DQs) evaluated by the Kyoto Scale of Psychological development were improved after the implantation in both groups, but the postoperative increase of L-S DQs was significantly smaller in the CMV-CIs than that of genetic-CIs. Interestingly, the postoperative L-S and Cognitive-Adaptive (C-A) DQs showed statistically significant correlation in all cases except for two autistic CMV-CIs whose L-S DQs were much lower than those expected from their C-A DQs.

  2. Neurologic complications of disorders of the adrenal glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertorini, Tulio E; Perez, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of the adrenal glands frequently have secondary neurological manifestations, while some diseases that involve the central nervous system are accompanied by adrenal gland dysfunction. Excessive corticosteroid secretions in primary or secondary Cushing's syndrome causes muscle weakness and behavioral disturbances, such as emotional lability and sometimes depression, while adrenal insufficiency may cause fatigue, weakness, and depression. Adrenoleukodystrophy and adrenoneuromyelopathy are X-linked recessive disorders of the metabolism of very long chain fatty acids that manifest with white matter abnormalities of the brain, myelopathy and/or neuropathy, as well as adrenal insufficiency. Other disorders of the adrenal glands include hyperaldosteroidism, which may cause weakness from hypokalemia. Dysfunction of the adrenal medulla causes excessive or deficient secretion of catecholamines, primarily causing cardiovascular symptoms. This chapter reviews the clinical manifestations and diagnostic aspects and treatment of the various disorders of the adrenal glands. Some of the congenital adrenal diseases are also discussed. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Anesthesia for patients with neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Masafumi; Saito, Shigeru

    2010-09-01

    Several surgical treatments can be employed for the patients with neurological disorders, such as multiple sclerosis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer disease and spinal cord injury. It is possible that anesthesia related complications are induced in these neurologically complicated patients in the perioperative period. Respiratory dysfunction and autonomic nervous system dysfunction are most common in this population. Respiratory muscle weakness and bulbar palsy may cause aspiration pneumonia. Sometimes, postoperative ventilatory support is mandatory in these patients. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction may cause hypotension secondary to postural changes, blood loss, or positive airway pressure. Some therapeutic agents prescribed for neurological symptoms have drug interaction with anesthetic agents. Patients with motor neuron disease should be considered to be vulnerable to hyperkalemia in response to a depolarizing muscle relaxant. Although perioperative treatment guideline for most neurologic disorders has not been reported to lessen perioperative morbidity, knowledge of the clinical features and the interaction of common anesthetics with the drug therapy is important in planning intraoperative and postoperative management.

  4. [Trans fatty acids in the nutrition of children with neurological disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, E; Aguilar, M J; Rizo, M M; Hidalgo, M J

    2013-01-01

    Trans-fatty acids are present in various foods, being the only source of the same in humans. Its presence in high concentrations is a risk factor for health, being involved in a series of events, cardiovascular, inflammatory, etc. Therefore, steps have been taken for its decrease in the diet. The aim is to determine serum and phospholipids of membranes in healthy children and neurological alterations. It has analyzed the fatty acids trans in 34 healthy children and 374 with various neurological pathologies. Serum and blood cells, making the lipid extraction, samples have been separation of the phospholipids of cells membranes, methylation of fatty acids, separation by gas chromatography and quantification using mass detector. The data have been processed statistically. The distribution of trans fatty acids and their sum is not normally distributed, so its nonparemetric tests were used. The values are higher than in serum phospholipids and membrane with a weak but significant correlation. The tC18: 1 is in a double proportion in children with neurological disorders in healthy children, both in serum and membrane phospholipids, with significant differences. The highest proportion of trans-fatty acids in the group of children with neurological disorders is caused no doubt by an increase in intake, due to less adequate food. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  5. Dextromethorphan: An update on its utility for neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Linda; Thomas, Kelan L; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Cavendish, John Z; Crowe, Molly S; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2016-03-01

    Dextromethorphan (DM) is a commonly used antitussive and is currently the only FDA-approved pharmaceutical treatment for pseudobulbar affect. Its safety profile and diverse pharmacologic actions in the central nervous system have stimulated new interest for repurposing it. Numerous preclinical investigations and many open-label or blinded clinical studies have demonstrated its beneficial effects across a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, the optimal dose and safety of chronic dosing are not fully known. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical effects of DM and its putative mechanisms of action, focusing on depression, stroke, traumatic brain injury, seizure, pain, methotrexate neurotoxicity, Parkinson's disease and autism. Moreover, we offer suggestions for future research with DM to advance the treatment for these and other neurological and psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Rett syndrome: a neurological disorder with metabolic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Stephanie M.

    2018-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurological disorder caused by mutations in the X-linked gene methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2), a ubiquitously expressed transcriptional regulator. Despite remarkable scientific progress since its discovery, the mechanism by which MECP2 mutations cause RTT symptoms is largely unknown. Consequently, treatment options for patients are currently limited and centred on symptom relief. Thought to be an entirely neurological disorder, RTT research has focused on the role of MECP2 in the central nervous system. However, the variety of phenotypes identified in Mecp2 mutant mouse models and RTT patients implicate important roles for MeCP2 in peripheral systems. Here, we review the history of RTT, highlighting breakthroughs in the field that have led us to present day. We explore the current evidence supporting metabolic dysfunction as a component of RTT, presenting recent studies that have revealed perturbed lipid metabolism in the brain and peripheral tissues of mouse models and patients. Such findings may have an impact on the quality of life of RTT patients as both dietary and drug intervention can alter lipid metabolism. Ultimately, we conclude that a thorough knowledge of MeCP2's varied functional targets in the brain and body will be required to treat this complex syndrome. PMID:29445033

  7. Body integrity identity disorder: from a psychological to a neurological syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedda, Anna

    2011-12-01

    Body Integrity Identity Disorder (BIID) is a condition in which individuals experience an intense desire for amputation of an healthy limb. Recently, McGeoch and colleagues provided the first direct evidence that this syndrome may be neurological rather than psychological in its origin. However, before including BIID in body ownership disorders, several concerns should be clarified, exploring other components of body representation and not only somatosensory perception.

  8. The Global Burden of Mental, Neurological and Substance Use Disorders: An Analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteford, Harvey A.; Ferrari, Alize J.; Degenhardt, Louisa; Feigin, Valery; Vos, Theo

    2015-01-01

    Background The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 (GBD 2010), estimated that a substantial proportion of the world’s disease burden came from mental, neurological and substance use disorders. In this paper, we used GBD 2010 data to investigate time, year, region and age specific trends in burden due to mental, neurological and substance use disorders. Method For each disorder, prevalence data were assembled from systematic literature reviews. DisMod-MR, a Bayesian meta-regression tool, was used to model prevalence by country, region, age, sex and year. Prevalence data were combined with disability weights derived from survey data to estimate years lived with disability (YLDs). Years lost to premature mortality (YLLs) were estimated by multiplying deaths occurring as a result of a given disorder by the reference standard life expectancy at the age death occurred. Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) were computed as the sum of YLDs and YLLs. Results In 2010, mental, neurological and substance use disorders accounted for 10.4% of global DALYs, 2.3% of global YLLs and, 28.5% of global YLDs, making them the leading cause of YLDs. Mental disorders accounted for the largest proportion of DALYs (56.7%), followed by neurological disorders (28.6%) and substance use disorders (14.7%). DALYs peaked in early adulthood for mental and substance use disorders but were more consistent across age for neurological disorders. Females accounted for more DALYs in all mental and neurological disorders, except for mental disorders occurring in childhood, schizophrenia, substance use disorders, Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy where males accounted for more DALYs. Overall DALYs were highest in Eastern Europe/Central Asia and lowest in East Asia/the Pacific. Conclusion Mental, neurological and substance use disorders contribute to a significant proportion of disease burden. Health systems can respond by implementing established, cost effective interventions, or by supporting the

  9. Coraco- or Costoclavicular Paraosteoarthropathies in Patients with Severe Central Neurological Disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacout, A.; Mompoint, D.; Perrier, Y.; Vallee, C.A.; Carlier, R.Y.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Paraosteoarthropathy (POA) is a frequent disabling orthopedic complication after severe central neurological impairment. The hip is the most frequently affected joint (32.1%) followed by the elbow and the shoulder (25%). Purpose: To evaluate coraco- and costoclavicular paraosteoarthropathy in patients with severe central neurological disorders. Material and Methods: We report a series of five consecutive patients with severe central neurological disorders who developed a POA of the clavicular region (coracoclavicular or costoclavicular POA). Every patient underwent a clinical, radiological, and computed tomographic (CT) examination of the shoulder region. Results: Four patients had a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI), and one an acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). They developed POA of the clavicular region, although not around the glenohumeral joint. The patients complained of shoulder pain and of moderate limitation of movements. Radiological and CT examinations showed the presence of a bony formation in the coracoclavicular space in four cases and extending from the clavicle to the first rib around the costoclavicular joint in one case. Conclusion: In patients with severe brain lesions suffering from shoulder pain and moderate limitation of joint movements, POAs of the clavicular region are rare but should be considered

  10. Door-to-door survey of major neurological disorders (project in Al Quseir City, Red Sea Governorate, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Tallawy HN

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Hamdy NA El Tallawy,1 Wafaa MA Farghaly,1 Tarek A Rageh,1 Ghaydaa A Shehata,1 Reda Badry,1 Nabil A Metwally,2 Esam A El Moselhy,2 Mahmoud Hassan,2 Mohamed A Sayed,3 Ahmed A Waris,1 Yaser Hamed,2 Islam Shaaban,2 Mohamed A Hamed,1 Mahmoud Raafat Kandil11Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt; 2Department of Neurology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Azhar University (Assiut branch, Assiut, Egypt; 3Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Sohag, EgyptAbstract: A door-to-door survey, including every household, was conducted for all inhabitants of Al Quseir City (33,283, Red Sea Governorate, Egypt by three specialists of neurology as well as nine senior staff members of neurology and 15 female social workers to assess the epidemiology of major neurological disorders. Over six phases, from July 1, 2009 to January 31, 2012, screening of all eligible people in the population was carried out, by which case ascertainment of all major neurological disorders included in the study was done according to the accepted definitions and diagnostic criteria of the World Health Organization. The order of frequency of prevalence of the studied neurological disorders was dementia (3.83% for those aged > 60 years, migraine (2.8% for those aged > 8 years, stroke (6.2/1000 for those aged > 20 years, epilepsy (5.5/1000, Parkinson’s disease (452.1/100,000 for those aged > 40 years, cerebral palsy (3.6/1000 among children 37 years, chorea (21.03/100,000, athetosis (15/100,000, and multiple sclerosis (13.74/100,000. The incidence rates of stroke, epilepsy, and Bell’s palsy were 181/100,000, 48/100,000, and 98.9/100,000 per year, respectively.Keywords: prevalence, incidence, neurological disorders

  11. Intestinal helminthiasis in children with chronic neurological disorders in Benin City, Nigeria: intensity and behavioral risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaneri, Damia Uchechukwu; Ibadin, Michael Okoeguale; Ofovwe, Gabriel Egberue; Sadoh, Ayebo Evawere

    2013-05-01

    Behavioral aberrations such as nail biting, finger sucking, and pica have been postulated as risk factors that enhance helminths ova transmission. These aberrations may present commonly in children with chronic neurological disorders and predispose them to heavy intensity of intestinal helminthiasis. This comparative cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence, intensity, and behavioral risk factors for intestinal helminthiasis in children with chronic neurological disorders and apparently healthy controls. Fresh stool samples from 155 children (2-17 years) with chronic neurological disorders seen at the child neurology clinic and 155 age and sex matched controls from nursery and primary schools in Benin City were analyzed using the Kato-Katz technique for detection of ova of helminths from November 2008 to April 2009. The prevalence of intestinal helminthiasis (31.0%) was significantly higher in children with chronic neurological disorders compared with the controls (19.4%) (P=0.03). The intensity of infections in both groups was light ranging 24-144 eggs per gram. Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworm were the intestinal helminths isolated in both groups. Behavioral aberrations were significantly more represented in the subjects than in the controls (Phelminthiasis (P=0.025 and 0.001, respectively) in the subjects only. Hand washing with water and soap after defecation and frequent de-worming exercise were practices significantly associated with decreased prevalence of intestinal helminthiasis in the subjects and controls. Behavioral modification in children with chronic neurological disorders should be an integral part of the control program for intestinal helminthiasis.

  12. Neurological Consequences of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brien, Phillipe D.; Hinder, Lucy M.; Callaghan, Brian C.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2017-01-01

    Obesity, primarily a consequence of poor dietary choices and an increased sedentary lifestyle, has become a global pandemic that brings with it enormous medical, social, and economic challenges. Not only does obesity increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and certain cancers, but it is also recognized as a key driver of other metabolic syndrome (MetS) components. These components include insulin resistance, hyperglycemia with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, and are underlying contributors to systemic metabolic dysfunction. More recently, obesity and diet-induced metabolic dysfunction have been identified as risk factors for the development of a wide variety of neurological disorders in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. An abundance of literature has shown that obesity is associated with mild cognitive impairment and altered hippocampal structure and function, and there is a robust correlation between obesity and Alzheimer’s type dementia. Similarly, many reports show that both the autonomic and somatic components of the peripheral nervous system are impacted by obesity. The autonomic nervous system, under control of the hypothalamus, displays altered catabolic and anabolic processes in obese individuals attributed to sympathetic-parasympathetic imbalances. A close association also exists between obesity and polyneuropathy, a complication most commonly found in prediabetic and diabetic patients, and is likely secondary to a combination of obesity-induced dyslipidemia with hyperglycemia. This review will outline the pathophysiological development of obesity and dyslipidemia, discuss the adverse impact of these conditions on the nervous system, and provide evidence for lipotoxicity and metabolic inflammation as the drivers underlying the neurological consequences of obesity. In addition, this review will examine the benefits of lifestyle and surgical interventions in obesity-induced neurological disorders. PMID

  13. Clinical Spectrum, Etiology, and Outcome of Neurological Disorders in the Rural Hospital of Mosango, the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukendi, Deby; Lilo Kalo, Jean-Roger; Mpanya, Alain; Minikulu, Luigi; Kayembe, Tharcisse; Lutumba, Pascal; Barbé, Barbara; Gillet, Philippe; Jacobs, Jan; Van Loen, Harry; Yansouni, Cédric P; Chappuis, François; Ravinetto, Raffaella; Verdonck, Kristien; Boelaert, Marleen; Winkler, Andrea S; Bottieau, Emmanuel

    2017-11-01

    There is little published information on the epidemiology of neurological disorders in rural Central Africa, although the burden is considered to be substantial. This study aimed to investigate the pattern, etiology, and outcome of neurological disorders in children > 5 years and adults admitted to the rural hospital of Mosango, province of Kwilu, Democratic Republic of Congo, with a focus on severe and treatable infections of the central nervous system (CNS). From September 2012 to January 2015, 351 consecutive patients hospitalized for recent and/or ongoing neurological disorder were prospectively evaluated by a neurologist, subjected to a set of reference diagnostic tests in blood or cerebrospinal fluid, and followed-up for 3-6 months after discharge. No neuroimaging was available. Severe headache (199, 56.7%), gait/walking disorders (97, 27.6%), epileptic seizure (87, 24.8%), and focal neurological deficit (86, 24.5%) were the predominant presentations, often in combination. Infections of the CNS were documented in 63 (17.9%) patients and mainly included bacterial meningitis and unspecified meningoencephalitis (33, 9.4%), second-stage human African trypanosomiasis (10, 2.8%), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related neurological disorders (10, 2.8%). Other focal/systemic infections with neurological manifestations were diagnosed in an additional 60 (17.1%) cases. The leading noncommunicable conditions were epilepsy (61, 17.3%), psychiatric disorders (56, 16.0%), and cerebrovascular accident (23, 6.6%). Overall fatality rate was 8.2% (29/351), but up to 23.8% for CNS infections. Sequelae were observed in 76 (21.6%) patients. Clinical presentations and etiologies of neurological disorders were very diverse in this rural Central African setting and caused considerable mortality and morbidity.

  14. An Emerging Role for Long Non-Coding RNA Dysregulation in Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elio Scarpini

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel class of transcripts, long non coding RNAs (lncRNAs, has recently emerged as key players in several biological processes, including dosage compensation, genomic imprinting, chromatin regulation, embryonic development and segmentation, stem cell pluripotency, cell fate determination and potentially many other biological processes, which still are to be elucidated. LncRNAs are pervasively transcribed in the genome and several lines of evidence correlate dysregulation of different lncRNAs to human diseases including neurological disorders. Although their mechanisms of action are yet to be fully elucidated, evidence suggests lncRNA contributions to the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. In this review, the current state of knowledge linking lncRNAs to different neurological disorders is discussed and potential future directions are considered.

  15. An Emerging Role for Long Non-Coding RNA Dysregulation in Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoglio, Chiara; Ridolfi, Elisa; Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio

    2013-01-01

    A novel class of transcripts, long non coding RNAs (lncRNAs), has recently emerged as key players in several biological processes, including dosage compensation, genomic imprinting, chromatin regulation, embryonic development and segmentation, stem cell pluripotency, cell fate determination and potentially many other biological processes, which still are to be elucidated. LncRNAs are pervasively transcribed in the genome and several lines of evidence correlate dysregulation of different lncRNAs to human diseases including neurological disorders. Although their mechanisms of action are yet to be fully elucidated, evidence suggests lncRNA contributions to the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. In this review, the current state of knowledge linking lncRNAs to different neurological disorders is discussed and potential future directions are considered. PMID:24129177

  16. [Neurological disorders in patients with hypoparathyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roztoczyńska, Dorota; Kroczka, Sławomir; Kumorowicz-Czoch, Małgorzata; Dolezal-Ołtarzewska, Katarzyna; Kacińsk, Marek; Starzyk, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    The term hypoparathyroidism refers to a group of disorders in which a relative or absolute deficiency of PTH leads to hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia. Was to evaluate clinical symptoms in patients with hypoparathyroidism during normocalcemic period and to try to establish its etiology (electrolyte imbalance, organic central nervous system lesions, coincidence of tetany and epilepsy). The analysis included a group of 14 patients with hypoparathyroidism: 3 boys and 11 girls, aged from 12 months to 31 years (median 16.11 years), with duration of the disease 12 months to 26 years (median 10.9 years). In all the patients, the diagnosis was confirmed based on history, physical examination, results of biochemical and hormonal laboratory tests, radiological and neurological examinations. All the patients were followed by endocrinology specialists. Low phosphorus diet, calcium, magnesium, active vitamin D supplementation and management of other endocrine disorders were employed. In 9 patients, pseudo-hypoparathyrodism was diagnosed; of this number, in 8 children, type Ia Albright syndrome was confirmed. Five patients were diagnosed as true hypoparathyroidism, two girls in this group were found to have autoimmune hypoparathyroidism as a component of the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1, 2 others were diagnosed in infancy as congenital hypoparathyroidism and 1 girl had true hypoparathyroidism as a component of Kearns-Sayre syndrome. Five patients were referred to neurological department with epilepsy suspicion. In the medical history, 9 patients had generalized epileptic seizures, moreover, 1 girl manifested absence attack and balance disturbances. In 3 patients, EEG demonstrated changes typical of generalized seizure activity. In 5 patients on anti-epileptic management, additional calcium and active vitamin D treatment was initiated, allowing for achieving seizure remission. CT of the head and pituitary gland showed calcification foci in the central nervous system

  17. How music training enhances working memory: a cerebrocerebellar blending mechanism that can lead equally to scientific discovery and therapeutic efficacy in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervert, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Following in the vein of studies that concluded that music training resulted in plastic changes in Einstein's cerebral cortex, controlled research has shown that music training (1) enhances central executive attentional processes in working memory, and (2) has also been shown to be of significant therapeutic value in neurological disorders. Within this framework of music training-induced enhancement of central executive attentional processes, the purpose of this article is to argue that: (1) The foundational basis of the central executive begins in infancy as attentional control during the establishment of working memory, (2) In accordance with Akshoomoff, Courchesne and Townsend's and Leggio and Molinari's cerebellar sequence detection and prediction models, the rigors of volitional control demands of music training can enhance voluntary manipulation of information in thought and movement, (3) The music training-enhanced blending of cerebellar internal models in working memory as can be experienced as intuition in scientific discovery (as Einstein often indicated) or, equally, as moments of therapeutic advancement toward goals in the development of voluntary control in neurological disorders, and (4) The blending of internal models as in (3) thus provides a mechanism by which music training enhances central executive processes in working memory that can lead to scientific discovery and improved therapeutic outcomes in neurological disorders. Within the framework of Leggio and Molinari's cerebellar sequence detection model, it is determined that intuitive steps forward that occur in both scientific discovery and during therapy in those with neurological disorders operate according to the same mechanism of adaptive error-driven blending of cerebellar internal models. It is concluded that the entire framework of the central executive structure of working memory is a product of the cerebrocerebellar system which can, through the learning of internal models

  18. Telerehabilitation, virtual therapists, and acquired neurologic speech and language disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherney, Leora R; van Vuuren, Sarel

    2012-08-01

    Telerehabilitation (telerehab) offers cost-effective services that potentially can improve access to care for those with acquired neurologic communication disorders. However, regulatory issues including licensure, reimbursement, and threats to privacy and confidentiality hinder the routine implementation of telerehab services into the clinical setting. Despite these barriers, rapid technological advances and a growing body of research regarding the use of telerehab applications support its use. This article reviews the evidence related to acquired neurologic speech and language disorders in adults, focusing on studies that have been published since 2000. Research studies have used telerehab systems to assess and treat disorders including dysarthria, apraxia of speech, aphasia, and mild Alzheimer disease. They show that telerehab is a valid and reliable vehicle for delivering speech and language services. The studies represent a progression of technological advances in computing, Internet, and mobile technologies. They range on a continuum from working synchronously (in real-time) with a speech-language pathologist to working asynchronously (offline) with a stand-in virtual therapist. One such system that uses a virtual therapist for the treatment of aphasia, the Web-ORLA™ (Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL) system, is described in detail. Future directions for the advancement of telerehab for clinical practice are discussed. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Minor Neurological Dysfunction in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Marianne; Punt, Marja; de Groot, Erik; Minderaa, Ruud B; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to improve the understanding of brain function in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in relation to minor neurological dysfunctions (MNDs). Method: We studied MNDs in 122 children (93 males, 29 females; mean age 8y 1mo, SD 2y 6mo) who, among a total cohort of 705 children (513 males, 192 females; mean age…

  20. Abnormalities on the Neurological Examination and EEG in Young Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akshoomoff, Natacha; Farid, Nikdokht; Courchesne, Eric; Haas, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the nature and frequency of neurological and EEG abnormalities in 60 young children (ages 2-6 years) with pervasive developmental disorders. A number of standard neurological functions could not be adequately assessed due to the young age of the children and/or limited comprehension and cooperation. The most common neurological…

  1. Bilirubin-Induced Neurological Dysfunction: A Clinico-Radiological-Neurophysiological Correlation in 30 Consecutive Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Toorn, Ronald; Brink, Philip; Smith, Johan; Ackermann, Christelle; Solomons, Regan

    2016-12-01

    The clinical expression of bilirubin-induced neurological dysfunction varies according to severity and location of the disease. Definitions have been proposed to describe different bilirubin-induced neurological dysfunction subtypes. Our objective was to describe the severity and clinico-radiological-neurophysiological correlation in 30 consecutive children with bilirubin-induced neurological dysfunction seen over a period of 5 years. Thirty children exposed to acute neonatal bilirubin encephalopathy were included in the study. The mean peak total serum bilirubin level was 625 μmol/L (range 480-900 μmol/L). Acoustic brainstem responses were abnormal in 73% (n = 22). Pallidal hyperintensity was observed on magnetic resonance imaging in 20 children. Peak total serum bilirubin levels correlated with motor severity (P = .03). Children with severe motor impairment were likely to manifest severe auditory neuropathy (P bilirubin-induced neurological dysfunction subtype, and the majority of children had abnormal acoustic brainstem responses and magnetic resonance imaging. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. William Shakespeare's neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciaroni, Maurizio; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Many of Shakespeare's plays contain characters who appear to be afflicted by neurological or psychiatric disorders. Shakespeare, in his descriptive analysis of his protagonists, was contributing to the understanding of these disorders. In fact, Charcot frequently used Shakespearean references in his neurological teaching sessions, stressing how acute objective insight is essential to achieving expert clinical diagnosis. Charcot found in Shakespeare the same rigorous observational techniques for which he himself became famous. This chapter describes many of Shakespearean characters suffering from varied neurological disorders, including Parkinsonism, epilepsy, sleeping disturbances, dementia, headache, prion disease, and paralyses. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Disrupted avoidance learning in functional neurological disorder: Implications for harm avoidance theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel S. Morris

    Full Text Available Background: Functional neurological disorder (FND is an elusive disorder characterized by unexplained neurological symptoms alongside aberrant cognitive processing and negative affect, often associated with amygdala reactivity. Methods: We examined the effect of negative conditioning on cognitive function and amygdala reactivity in 25 FND patients and 20 healthy volunteers (HV. Participants were first conditioned to stimuli paired with negative affective or neutral (CS+/CS− information. During functional MRI, subjects then performed an instrumental associative learning task to avoid monetary losses in the context of the previously conditioned stimuli. We expected that FND patients would be better at learning to avoid losses when faced with negatively conditioned stimuli (increased harm avoidance. Multi-echo resting state fMRI was also collected from the same subjects and a robust denoising method was employed, important for removing motion and physiological artifacts. Results: FND subjects were more sensitive to the negative CS+ compared to HV, demonstrated by a reinforcement learning model. Contrary to expectation, FND patients were generally more impaired at learning to avoid losses under both contexts (CS+/CS−, persisting to choose the option that resulted in a negative outcome demonstrated by both behavioural and computational analyses. FND patients showed enhanced amygdala but reduced dorsolateral prefrontal cortex responses when they received negative feedback. Patients also had increased resting state functional connectivity between these two regions. Conclusions: FND patients had impaired instrumental avoidance learning, findings that parallel previous observations of impaired action-outcome binding. FND patients further show enhanced behavioural and neural sensitivity to negative information. However, this did not translate to improved avoidance learning. Put together, our findings do not support the theory of harm avoidance in FND

  4. PREDICTORS FORMATION OF SOCIAL MALADJUSTMENT IN PATIENTS WITH PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA WITH CONCOMITANT SOMATIC-NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy Semionovici PIDKORYTOV

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of the level of stress in patients with paranoid schizophrenia with concomitant somatic-neurological disorders and quality of life as predictors of the formation of their social exclusion. The influence of somatic-neurological pathology for paranoid schizophrenia at different levels of stress.

  5. Current Issues in the Neurology and Genetics of Learning-Related Traits and Disorders: Introduction to the Special Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilger, Jeffrey W.

    2001-01-01

    This introductory article briefly describes each of the following eight articles in this special issue on the neurology and genetics of learning related disorders. It notes the greater appreciation of learning disability as a set of complex disorders with broad and intricate neurological bases and of the large individual differences in how these…

  6. Clinical trials of N-acetylcysteine in psychiatry and neurology: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepmala; Slattery, John; Kumar, Nihit; Delhey, Leanna; Berk, Michael; Dean, Olivia; Spielholz, Charles; Frye, Richard

    2015-08-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is recognized for its role in acetaminophen overdose and as a mucolytic. Over the past decade, there has been growing evidence for the use of NAC in treating psychiatric and neurological disorders, considering its role in attenuating pathophysiological processes associated with these disorders, including oxidative stress, apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, neuroinflammation and glutamate and dopamine dysregulation. In this systematic review we find favorable evidence for the use of NAC in several psychiatric and neurological disorders, particularly autism, Alzheimer's disease, cocaine and cannabis addiction, bipolar disorder, depression, trichotillomania, nail biting, skin picking, obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, drug-induced neuropathy and progressive myoclonic epilepsy. Disorders such as anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and mild traumatic brain injury have preliminary evidence and require larger confirmatory studies while current evidence does not support the use of NAC in gambling, methamphetamine and nicotine addictions and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Overall, NAC treatment appears to be safe and tolerable. Further well designed, larger controlled trials are needed for specific psychiatric and neurological disorders where the evidence is favorable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Protective Effects of Ginseng on Neurological Disorders

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    Wei-Yi eOng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ginseng (Order: Apiales, Family: Araliaceae, Genus: Panax has been used as a traditional herbal medicine for over 2000 years, and is recorded to have antianxiety, antidepressant and cognition enhancing properties. The protective effect of ginseng on neurological disorders is discussed in this review. Ginseng species and ginsenosides, and their intestinal metabolism and bioavailability are briefly introduced. This is followed by molecular mechanisms of effects of ginseng on the brain, including glutamatergic transmission, monoamine transmission, estrogen signaling, nitric oxide production, the Keap1/Nrf2 adaptive cellular stress pathway, neuronal survival, apoptosis, neural stem cells and neuroregeneration, microglia, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and cerebral microvessels. The molecular mechanisms of the neuroprotective effects of ginseng in Alzheimer’s disease including Aβ formation, tau hyperphosphorylation and oxidative stress, major depression, stroke, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis / experimental allergic encephalitis are then presented. It is hoped that this discussion will stimulate more studies on the use of ginseng in these disorders.

  8. Neurologic disorders of mineral metabolism and parathyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Lily; Habib, Zeina; Emanuele, Nicholas V

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of mineral metabolism may cause neurologic manifestations of the central and peripheral nervous systems. This is because plasma calcium stabilizes excitable membranes in the nerve and muscle tissue, magnesium is predominantly intracellular and is required for activation of many intracellular enzymes, and extracellular magnesium affects synaptic transmission. This chapter reviews abnormalities in electrolytes and minerals which can be associated with several neuromuscular symptoms including neuromuscular irritability, mental status changes, cardiac and smooth muscle changes, etc. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Inpatient Assessment and Management of Motor Functional Neurological Disorders: An Interdisciplinary Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Kathleen; Glass, Sean; Adams, Caitlin; Stephen, Christopher D; King, Franklin; Parlman, Kristin; Perez, David L; Kontos, Nicholas

    2018-01-08

    Motor functional neurologic disorders (FND)-previously termed "hysteria" and later "conversion disorder"-are exceedingly common and frequently encountered in the acute hospital setting. Despite their high prevalence, patients with motor FND can be challenging to diagnose accurately and manage effectively. To date, there is limited guidance on the inpatient approach to the neuropsychiatric evaluation of patients with functional (psychogenic) neurologic symptoms. The authors outline an inpatient multidisciplinary approach, involving neurology, psychiatry, and physical therapy, for the assessment and acute inpatient management of motor FND. A vignette of a patient with motor FND is presented followed by a discussion of general assessment principles. Thereafter, a detailed description of the neurologic and psychiatric assessments is outlined. Delivery of a "rule-in" diagnosis is emphasized and specific guidance for what can be accomplished postdiagnosis in the hospital is suggested. We encourage an interdisciplinary approach beginning at the early stages of the diagnostic assessment once an individual is suspected of having motor FND. Practical suggestions for the inpatient assessment of motor FND are presented. It is also important to individualize the diagnostic assessment. Future research should be conducted to test best practices for motor FND management in the acute inpatient hospital setting. Copyright © 2018 Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantitative Evaluation System of Soft Neurological Signs for Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Miki; Yamashita, Yushiro; Iramina, Keiji

    2016-01-18

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Soft neurological signs (SNS) are minor neurological abnormalities in motor performance, and are used as one evaluation method for neurodevelopmental delays in children with ADHD. Our aim is to establish a quantitative evaluation system for children with ADHD. We focused on the arm movement called pronation and supination, which is one such soft neurological sign. Thirty three children with ADHD aged 7-11 years (27 males, six females) and twenty five adults participants aged 21-29 years old (19 males, six females) participated in our experiments. Our results suggested that the pronation and supination function in children with ADHD has a tendency to lag behind that of typically developing children by several years. From these results, our system has a possibility to objectively evaluate the neurodevelopmental delay of children with ADHD.

  11. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Clinical Applications in Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Paes, Flávia; Vieira, Renata Teles; Caixeta, Leonardo; Novaes, Felipe; Marinho, Tamires; Almada, Leonardo Ferreira; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2013-01-01

    Neurological and psychiatric disorders are characterized by several disabling symptoms for which effective, mechanism-based treatments remain elusive. Consequently, more advanced non-invasive therapeutic methods are required. A method that may modulate brain activity and be viable for use in clinical practice is repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). It is a non-invasive procedure whereby a pulsed magnetic field stimulates electrical activity in the brain. Here, we focus on the basic foundation of rTMS, the main stimulation parametters, the factors that influence individual responses to rTMS and the experimental advances of rTMS that may become a viable clinical application to treat neurological and psychiatric disorders. The findings showed that rTMS can improve some symptoms associated with these conditions and might be useful for promoting cortical plasticity in patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, these changes are transient and it is premature to propose these applications as realistic therapeutic options, even though the rTMS technique has been evidenced as a potential modulator of sensorimotor integration and neuroplasticity. Functional imaging of the region of interest could highlight the capacity of rTMS to bring about plastic changes of the cortical circuitry and hint at future novel clinical interventions. Thus, we recommend that further studies clearly determine the role of rTMS in the treatment of these conditions. Finally, we must remember that however exciting the neurobiological mechanisms might be, the clinical usefulness of rTMS will be determined by its ability to provide patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders with safe, long-lasting and substantial improvements in quality of life. PMID:25610279

  12. Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD detected in neurologic disorders Iraqi children

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    Adel A. Kareem

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion In the absence of newborn screening, MSUD is not uncommon in neurologically disorder patients where MSUD was still diagnosed clinically, but delayed. The importance of clinical awareness and accurate biochemical analysis were the key tools for diagnosis and the necessity for a comprehensive national newborn screening program.

  13. Transplantation of Human Chorion-Derived Cholinergic Progenitor Cells: a Novel Treatment for Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Alireza; Maleki-Jamshid, Ali; Sanooghi, Davood; Milan, Peiman Brouki; Rahmani, Arash; Sefat, Farshid; Shahpasand, Koorosh; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Bakhtiari, Mehrdad; Belali, Rafie; Faghihi, Faezeh; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Perry, George; Mozafari, Masoud

    2018-03-16

    A neurological disorder is any disorder or abnormality in the nervous system. Among different neurological disorders, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is recognized as the sixth leading cause of death globally. Considerable research has been conducted to find pioneer treatments for this devastating disorder among which cell therapy has attracted remarkable attentions over the last decade. Up to now, targeted differentiation into specific desirable cell types has remained a major obstacle to clinical application of cell therapy. Also, potential risks including uncontrolled growth of stem cells could be disastrous. In our novel protocol, we used basal forebrain cholinergic progenitor cells (BFCN) derived from human chorion-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hC-MSCs) which made it possible to obtain high-quality population of cholinergic neurons and in vivo in much shorter time period than previous established methods. Remarkably, the transplanted progenitors fully differentiated to cholinergic neurons which in turn integrated in higher cortical networks of host brains, resulting in significant improvement in cognitive assessments. This method may have profound implications in cell therapies for any other neurodegenerative disorders. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  14. Gene Prioritization by Integrated Analysis of Protein Structural and Network Topological Properties for the Protein-Protein Interaction Network of Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashna Paul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders are known to show similar phenotypic manifestations like anxiety, depression, and cognitive impairment. There is a need to identify shared genetic markers and molecular pathways in these diseases, which lead to such comorbid conditions. Our study aims to prioritize novel genetic markers that might increase the susceptibility of patients affected with one neurological disorder to other diseases with similar manifestations. Identification of pathways involving common candidate markers will help in the development of improved diagnosis and treatments strategies for patients affected with neurological disorders. This systems biology study for the first time integratively uses 3D-structural protein interface descriptors and network topological properties that characterize proteins in a neurological protein interaction network, to aid the identification of genes that are previously not known to be shared between these diseases. Results of protein prioritization by machine learning have identified known as well as new genetic markers which might have direct or indirect involvement in several neurological disorders. Important gene hubs have also been identified that provide an evidence for shared molecular pathways in the neurological disease network.

  15. "Symptomatic" infection-associated acute encephalopathy in children with underlying neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Yoshimichi; Saito, Yoshiaki; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2017-03-01

    Development of infection-associated acute encephalopathy (AE) is precipitated by several factors, including viral agents, age, and genetic polymorphisms. In addition, children with prior underlying neurological disorders can also present with AE. We reviewed 55 children with AE who were referred to hospitals participating in the Status Epilepticus Study Group from 1988 to 2013. AE was classified into eight subtypes: acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD); hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia syndrome (HH); acute necrotizing encephalopathy; hemorrhagic shock and encephalopathy syndrome (HSES); clinically mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion; acute encephalitis with refractory, repetitive partial seizures; Reye-like syndrome; and unclassified. Of the 55 AE cases, 14 (25.4%) had underlying neurological disorders, including perinatal insults (n=6) and genetic syndrome and/or brain malformations (n=8). These preceding morbidities were relatively common in AESD (6/18, 33.3%), HH (3/9, 33.3%), and HSES (3/6, 50.0%). History of epilepsy or febrile seizures were frequent in HH cases (4/9, 44.4%), whereas they were rare in other AE subtypes. Among the AE subgroups, HH, HSES, and AESD frequently emerged in preceding etiologies with augmented neuronal excitability. These subgroups may have distinct pathomechanism from the "cytokine storm" mediated AEs during childhood. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Isoprenoid Pathway And Neurological And Psychiatric Disorders

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    Ravikumar A

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The coexistence of neuronal degeneration, psychiatric manifestation, immune activation and malignant transformation has been documented in literature, suggesting a central dysfunction in the pathophysiology of these disorders. The isoprenoid pathway may be candidate in this respect, in view of the changes in the concentration of some products of this pathway in many of these disorders, however, no detailed study has been carried out in this respect. In view of this, a study was undertaken on the isoprenoid pathway in some of these disorders - primary generalized epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease (PD, schizophrenia, manic depressive psychosis (MDP, CNS glioma, multiple sclerosis, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPEand a familial group with familial coexistence of schizophrenia, PD, primary generalized epilepsy, malignant neoplasia, rheumatoid arthritis and syndrome-X over three generations. The following parameters were studied in the patients of these disorders as compared to age and sex matched control subjects - ubiquinone dolichol, digoxin, activity of HMG CoA reductase in the plasma and erthyorcyte membrane Na -K--ATpase. Increase in the activity of HMG CoA reductase and in the concentration of plasma digoxin and dolichol was observed in most of these cases. On the other hand, there was decrease in the concentration of plasma ubiquinone. Decrease in the activity of erythrocyte membrane Na-K- ATpase activity for which digoxin is an inhibitor was also observed in all the cases studied. These results indicate an upregulation of the isoprenoid pathway in the neurological and psychiatric disorders studied. The implications of this change is discussed in details.

  17. Quantitative Evaluation System of Soft Neurological Signs for Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Kaneko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Soft neurological signs (SNS are minor neurological abnormalities in motor performance, and are used as one evaluation method for neurodevelopmental delays in children with ADHD. Our aim is to establish a quantitative evaluation system for children with ADHD. We focused on the arm movement called pronation and supination, which is one such soft neurological sign. Thirty three children with ADHD aged 7–11 years (27 males, six females and twenty five adults participants aged 21–29 years old (19 males, six females participated in our experiments. Our results suggested that the pronation and supination function in children with ADHD has a tendency to lag behind that of typically developing children by several years. From these results, our system has a possibility to objectively evaluate the neurodevelopmental delay of children with ADHD.

  18. Acupuncture for neurological disorders in the Cochrane reviews:Characteristics of included reviews and studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deren Wang; Weimin Yang; Ming Liu

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize Cochrane reviews of acupuncture for neurological disorders, and characteristics of included reviews and studies.DATA SOURCES: A computer-based online search of the Cochrane Library (Issue 7 of 12, July 2010) was performed with the key word "acupuncture" and systematic evaluations for acupuncture for neurological disorders were screened.STUDY SELECTION: Systematic reviews on acupuncture in the treatment of neurological disorders were included, and the characteristics of these reviews were analyzed based on methods recommended by the Cochrane collaboration.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Basic characteristics, methodological quality, main reasons for excluding trials, results and conclusions of Cochrane reviews were assessed.RESULTS: A total of 18 Cochrane systematic reviews were included, including 13 completed reviews and five research protocols. The 13 completed reviews involved 111 randomized controlled trials, including 43 trials (38.7%) conducted in China, 47 trials (42.3%) using sham-acupuncture or placebo as control, 15 trials (13.5%) with relatively high quality, 91 trials (81.9%) reporting data on follow-up. Primary outcomes used in the Cochrane reviews were reported by 65 trials (58.6%), and adverse events were reported in 11 trials (9.9%). Two hundred and eighty three trials were excluded. Two reviews on headache suggested that acupuncture is a valuable non-drug treatment for patients with chronic or recurrent headache, and has better curative effects on migraine compared with preventative drug treatment. CONCLUSION: Of the Cochrane reviews on acupuncture in the treatment of neurological disorders, two reviews evaluating the efficacy of acupuncture in treating headaches drew positive conculsions, while other reviews did not obtain positive conclusions due to a small sample size or low methodological quality. The methodological quality of acupuncture trials needs further improvement.

  19. Neurologic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakeres, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    There is a wide range of indications for radiographic evaluation of possible cerebrovascular disease, since a wide range of neurologic symptoms can be encountered secondary to ischemia. Frequently the diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease is clear on clinical grounds, but radiographic evaluation is essential both to quantify the extent of disease and establish the underlying cause (e.g., vasculitis, embolus) while excluding other causes so that the proper therapy can follow

  20. Systematic review: efficacy and safety of medical marijuana in selected neurologic disorders: report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Barbara S; Brust, John C M; Fife, Terry; Bronstein, Jeff; Youssof, Sarah; Gronseth, Gary; Gloss, David

    2014-04-29

    To determine the efficacy of medical marijuana in several neurologic conditions. We performed a systematic review of medical marijuana (1948-November 2013) to address treatment of symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), epilepsy, and movement disorders. We graded the studies according to the American Academy of Neurology classification scheme for therapeutic articles. Thirty-four studies met inclusion criteria; 8 were rated as Class I. The following were studied in patients with MS: (1) Spasticity: oral cannabis extract (OCE) is effective, and nabiximols and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) are probably effective, for reducing patient-centered measures; it is possible both OCE and THC are effective for reducing both patient-centered and objective measures at 1 year. (2) Central pain or painful spasms (including spasticity-related pain, excluding neuropathic pain): OCE is effective; THC and nabiximols are probably effective. (3) Urinary dysfunction: nabiximols is probably effective for reducing bladder voids/day; THC and OCE are probably ineffective for reducing bladder complaints. (4) Tremor: THC and OCE are probably ineffective; nabiximols is possibly ineffective. (5) Other neurologic conditions: OCE is probably ineffective for treating levodopa-induced dyskinesias in patients with Parkinson disease. Oral cannabinoids are of unknown efficacy in non-chorea-related symptoms of Huntington disease, Tourette syndrome, cervical dystonia, and epilepsy. The risks and benefits of medical marijuana should be weighed carefully. Risk of serious adverse psychopathologic effects was nearly 1%. Comparative effectiveness of medical marijuana vs other therapies is unknown for these indications.

  1. Population-based studies on risk of fracture in patients with neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patients with neurological disorders may be at an increased risk of fracture via multiple causal pathways, including increases in the risk of falls, changes in bone mineral density and quality of bone microarchitecture. Risk of fracture may be increased by the disease itself, by

  2. Guided self-help interventions for mental health disorders in children with neurological conditions: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Sophie; Heyman, Isobel; Coughtrey, Anna; Simmonds, Jess; Varadkar, Sophia; Stephenson, Terence; DeJong, Margaret; Shafran, Roz

    2016-11-04

    Rates of mental health disorders are significantly greater in children with physical illnesses than in physically well children. Children with neurological conditions, such as epilepsy, are known to have particularly high rates of mental health disorders. Despite this, mental health problems in children with neurological conditions have remained under-recognised and under-treated in clinical settings. Evidence-based guided self-help interventions are efficacious in reducing symptoms of mental health disorders in children, but their efficacy in reducing symptoms of common mental health disorders in children with neurological conditions has not been investigated. We aim to pilot a guided self-help intervention for the treatment of mental health disorders in children with neurological conditions. A pilot randomised controlled trial with 18 patients with neurological conditions and mental health disorders will be conducted. Participants attending specialist neurology clinics at a National UK Children's Hospital will be randomised to receive guided self-help for common mental health disorders or to a 12-week waiting list control. Participants in the treatment group will receive 10 sessions of guided self-help delivered over the telephone. The waiting list control group will receive the intervention after a waiting period of 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure is reduction in symptoms of mental health disorders. Exclusion criteria are limited to those at significant risk of harm to self or others, the presence of primary mental health disorder other than anxiety, depression or disruptive behaviour (e.g. psychosis, eating disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder) or intellectual disability at a level meaning potential participants would be unable to access the intervention. The study has ethical approval from the Camden and Islington NHS Research Ethics Committee, registration number 14.LO.1353. Results will be disseminated to patients, the wider public, clinicians and

  3. Epigenetics of cell fate reprogramming and its implications for neurological disorders modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybek, Maciej; Golonko, Aleksandra; Walczak, Marta; Lisowski, Pawel

    2017-03-01

    The reprogramming of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) proceeds in a stepwise manner with reprogramming factors binding and epigenetic composition changes during transition to maintain the epigenetic landscape, important for pluripotency. There arises a question as to whether the aberrant epigenetic state after reprogramming leads to epigenetic defects in induced stem cells causing unpredictable long term effects in differentiated cells. In this review, we present a comprehensive view of epigenetic alterations accompanying reprogramming, cell maintenance and differentiation as factors that influence applications of hiPSCs in stem cell based technologies. We conclude that sample heterogeneity masks DNA methylation signatures in subpopulations of cells and thus believe that beside a genetic evaluation, extensive epigenomic screening should become a standard procedure to ensure hiPSCs state before they are used for genome editing and differentiation into neurons of interest. In particular, we suggest that exploitation of the single-cell composition of the epigenome will provide important insights into heterogeneity within hiPSCs subpopulations to fast forward development of reliable hiPSC-based analytical platforms in neurological disorders modelling and before completed hiPSC technology will be implemented in clinical approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The use of ketogenic diet in special situations: expanding use in intractable epilepsy and other neurologic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The ketogenic diet has been widely used and proved to be effective for intractable epilepsy. Although the mechanisms underlying its anti-epileptic effects remain to be proven, there are increasing experimental evidences for its neuroprotective effects along with many researches about expanding use of the diet in other neurologic disorders. The first success was reported in glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome, in which the diet served as an alternative metabolic source. Many neurologic disorders share some of the common pathologic mechanisms such as mitochondrial dysfunction, altered neurotransmitter function and synaptic transmission, or abnormal regulation of reactive oxygen species, and the role of the ketogenic diet has been postulated in these mechanisms. In this article, we introduce an overview about the expanding use and emerging trials of the ketogenic diet in various neurologic disorders excluding intractable epilepsy and provide explanations of the mechanisms in that usage. PMID:23049588

  5. Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, V W

    2007-10-01

    Menopausal status and estrogen-containing hormone therapy may influence several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, migraine headache, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, sleep disorders, and stroke. For most of these illnesses, evidence on hormone therapy is insufficient to guide practice decisions. For stroke, clinical trial evidence indicates that hormone therapy increases risk of cerebral infarction. For women with Alzheimer's disease, estrogen treatment trials have tended to be small and of short duration. Most suggest that estrogen started after the onset of dementia symptoms does not meaningfully improve cognition or slow disease progression. Hormone therapy initiated after age 64 increased all-cause dementia in the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study. Many observational studies, however, report protective associations between hormone use and Alzheimer risk. Apparent risk reduction may represent a bias toward hormone therapy, since hormones are more often prescribed to healthier women. However, when compared to the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study, estrogen exposures in many observational studies reflect hormone initiation at a younger age, closer to the time of menopause. One intriguing hypothesis is that hormone therapy initiated or used during an early critical window may reduce later Alzheimer incidence. Public health implications of this hypothesis are important, but current data are inadequate to decide the issue.

  6. The feasibility of establishing a free clinic for uninsured patients with neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Joseph J; Larrew, Thomas; Omole, Armina; Roberts, Mallory; Kornegay, Adam; Kornegay, Kelly; Yamada, Lidia; Revuelta, Gonzalo J; Sohn, Mimi; Hughes, Thomas; Edwards, Jonathan C

    2015-08-01

    The Dream Center Neurology Clinic (DCNC) is a free specialty clinic associated with the Medical University of South Carolina that provides health care for uninsured patients with neurologic disorders. Routine neurologic care is often neglected by free primary care clinics, leaving indigent and uninsured patients to suffer from treatable neurologic ailments. The DCNC was established by supplementing existing resources from a free primary care facility called the Dream Center. Our strategy of building a high-need specialty service into a preexisting primary care infrastructure may provide a blueprint for neurologists who are eager to address the neurologic needs of the underserved in their local communities. According to local charge estimates, the DCNC has provided roughly $120,000 worth of outpatient neurologic care over the past year. The clinic runs through the collaborative effort of medical students as well as academic and private health care providers. Donated services such as EEG, diagnostic lab work, botulinum toxin, supplies, and imaging are also critical to clinic operations. In addition to providing the uninsured with services that are normally inaccessible to them, the DCNC provides a unique educational opportunity for medical students, residents, and all volunteers who are eager to help and learn.

  7. Analysis of the influence of various factors on the course of neurological disorders in children with spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Алексей Георгиевич Баиндурашвили

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The study of the influence of various factors on the course of recovery of neurological disorders in children with spinal cord injuries is an important and relevant problem. The main causes of thoracic and lumbar injuries of the spine in children are road accidents and catatraumas. Anatomical and physiological features of the spine and spinal cord in children have a significant influence on the nature of spinal cord injury, clinical manifestations of the injury, and method of treatment. The degree of spinal canal deformity at the level of the damaged segment is directly proportional to the severity of the neurological disorder. The time between injury to when surgery is performed will strongly influence the nature and course of recovery of motor functions. Aim. To assess the influence of different factors in pediatric patients with complicated injuries of the spine at the thoracic and thoracolumbar levels on the recovery of neurological disorders. Materials and methods. The analysis of results of the surgical treatment of 36 children (24 boys and 12 girls aged 3-17 years with damage to the spine and spinal cord in the thoracic spine and thoracolumbar junction, accompanied with neurological deficit in the form of central or peripheral paresis and paralysis, was performed. All patients underwent surgical intervention depending on the type and extent of damage. Clinical methods (i.e., detailed neurological examination as well as X-ray, CT, and MRI were used as diagnostic methods. Results. The study revealed that the most severe damage concerning neurological disorders in children with spinal cord injury occurs in the thoracic spine. The extent of neurological changes depends not only on the level of damage to the spinal column but also on the magnitude of spinal canal stenosis. Surgery performed in the first hours of the injury leads to a more rapid and full recovery of the neurological deficit. Conclusion. Therefore, this study found

  8. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantitative Evaluation of the Use of Actigraphy for Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Pan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative and objective evaluation of disease severity and/or drug effect is necessary in clinical practice. Wearable accelerometers such as an actigraph enable long-term recording of a patient’s movement during activities and they can be used for quantitative assessment of symptoms due to various diseases. We reviewed some applications of actigraphy with analytical methods that are sufficiently sensitive and reliable to determine the severity of diseases and disorders such as motor and nonmotor disorders like Parkinson’s disease, sleep disorders, depression, behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD for vascular dementia (VD, seasonal affective disorder (SAD, and stroke, as well as the effects of drugs used to treat them. We believe it is possible to develop analytical methods to assess more neurological or psychopathic disorders using actigraphy records.

  10. Quantification In Neurology

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    Netravati M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a distinct shift of emphasis in clinical neurology in the last few decades. A few years ago, it was just sufficient for a clinician to precisely record history, document signs, establish diagnosis and write prescription. In the present context, there has been a significant intrusion of scientific culture in clinical practice. Several criteria have been proposed, refined and redefined to ascertain accurate diagnosis for many neurological disorders. Introduction of the concept of impairment, disability, handicap and quality of life has added new dimension to the measurement of health and disease and neurological disorders are no exception. "Best guess" treatment modalities are no more accepted and evidence based medicine has become an integral component of medical care. Traditional treatments need validation and new therapies require vigorous trials. Thus, proper quantification in neurology has become essential, both in practice and research methodology in neurology. While this aspect is widely acknowledged, there is a limited access to a comprehensive document pertaining to measurements in neurology. This following description is a critical appraisal of various measurements and also provides certain commonly used rating scales/scores in neurological practice.

  11. Prevalence and incidence of neurological disorders among adult Ugandans in rural and urban Mukono district; a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddumukasa, Mark; Mugenyi, Leviticus; Kaddumukasa, Martin N; Ddumba, Edward; Devereaux, Michael; Furlan, Anthony; Sajatovic, Martha; Katabira, Elly

    2016-11-17

    The burden of neurological diseases is increasing in developing countries. However, there is a prominent scarcity of literature on the incidence of neurological diseases in sub-Saharan Africa. This study was therefore undertaken to determine the prevalence and incidence of neurological diseases in this setting to serve as a baseline for planning and care for neurological disorders in Uganda. The study was conducted within rural and urban Mukono district, east of Kampala city of Uganda, central region. Over a period of six months, a cross sectional survey was conducted and screening was performed using a standardized questionnaire. All subjects with neurological symptoms and signs were reviewed by a team of neurologists and neurological diagnoses made. Of the 3000 study subjects, 50.3% (1510/3000) were from the rural setting. Out of the participants screened, 67.4% were female, with a median age of 33 years. Among the 98 subjects with confirmed neurological disorders, the frequency of diseases was as follows; peripheral neuropathy (46.2%), chronic headaches (26.4%), and epilepsy (8.5%), followed by pain syndromes (7.5%), stroke (6.6%) and tremors/Parkinson disease (3.8%). The crude prevalence rates of these disorders (95% CI) were 14.3% (8.5-24.1); 13.3% (7.7-22.8); 33.7% (23.9-47.4) for stroke, epilepsy and peripheral neuropathy respectively. Peripheral neuropathy followed by chronic headaches had the highest estimated incidence/1000 years. Stroke had an estimated incidence of 3.6 new cases with 95% CI of (2.1-6.1)/1000 years. Peripheral neuropathy, chronic headaches and epilepsy disorders are major causes of morbidity in Sub-Saharan settings. There is an urgent need of more robust and powered studies to determine the incidence of these diseases.

  12. Lost in Translation: Defects in Transfer RNA Modifications and Neurological Disorders

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    Andrea Bednářová

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNAs (tRNAs are key molecules participating in protein synthesis. To augment their functionality they undergo extensive post-transcriptional modifications and, as such, are subject to regulation at multiple levels including transcription, transcript processing, localization and ribonucleoside base modification. Post-transcriptional enzyme-catalyzed modification of tRNA occurs at a number of base and sugar positions and influences specific anticodon–codon interactions and regulates translation, its efficiency and fidelity. This phenomenon of nucleoside modification is most remarkable and results in a rich structural diversity of tRNA of which over 100 modified nucleosides have been characterized. Most often these hypermodified nucleosides are found in the wobble position of tRNAs, where they play a direct role in codon recognition as well as in maintaining translational efficiency and fidelity, etc. Several recent studies have pointed to a link between defects in tRNA modifications and human diseases including neurological disorders. Therefore, defects in tRNA modifications in humans need intensive characterization at the enzymatic and mechanistic level in order to pave the way to understand how lack of such modifications are associated with neurological disorders with the ultimate goal of gaining insights into therapeutic interventions.

  13. Video Analysis of Human Gait and Posture to Determine Neurological Disorders

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    Ivan Lee

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the application of digital image processing techniques to the detection of neurological disorder. Visual information extracted from the postures and movements of a human gait cycle can be used by an experienced neurologist to determine the mental health of the person. However, the current visual assessment of diagnosing neurological disorder is based very much on subjective observation, and hence the accuracy of diagnosis heavily relies on experience. Other diagnostic techniques employed involve the use of imaging systems which can only be operated under highly constructed environment. A prototype has been developed in this work that is able to capture the subject's gait on video in a relatively simple setup, and from which to process the selected frames of the gait in a computer. Based on the static visual features such as swing distances and joint angles of human limbs, the system identifies patients with Parkinsonism from the test subjects. To our knowledge, it is the first time swing distances are utilized and identified as an effective means for characterizing human gait. The experimental results have shown a promising potential in medical application to assist the clinicians in diagnosing Parkinsonism.

  14. 75 FR 52010 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... attendance limited to space available. Individuals who plan to attend and need special assistance, such as... applications and the discussions could disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.853, Clinical Research Related to Neurological Disorders; 93.854...

  15. Role of the gluten-free diet on neurological-EEG findings and sleep disordered breathing in children with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, P; Pietropaoli, N; Ferretti, A; Nenna, R; Mastrogiorgio, G; Del Pozzo, M; Principessa, L; Bonamico, M; Villa, M P

    2015-02-01

    To determine whether celiac children are at risk for EEG-neurological features and sleep disordered breathing (SDB), and whether an appropriate gluten-free diet (GFD) influences these disorders. We consecutively enrolled 19 children with a new biopsy-proven celiac disease (CD) diagnosis. At CD diagnosis and after 6 months of GFD, each patient underwent a general and neurological examination, an electroencephalogram, a questionnaire about neurological features, and a validated questionnaire about SDB: OSA (obstructive sleep apnea) scores0 predict OSA. At CD diagnosis, 37% of patients complained headache that affected daily activities and 32% showed positive OSA score. The EEG examinations revealed abnormal finding in 48% of children. After 6 months of GFD headache disappeared in 72% of children and EEG abnormalities in 78%; all children showed negative OSA score. According to our preliminary data, in the presence of unexplained EEG abnormalities and/or other neurological disorders/SDB an atypical or silent CD should also be taken into account. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. MR angiography in pediatric neurological disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.C.P.; Park, T.S.; Kaufman, B.A.

    1995-01-01

    MR angiography using 3D and 2D time-of-flight techniques were used to evaluate pediatric neurological disorders. MRA (arteriography) and MRV (venography) were abnormal in 63 and 45 cases, respectively. Conventional cerebral angiography was performed in 30 cases. These techniques were compared with MRI and conventional angiography. In addition, the value of MR angiography for surgical planning was subjectively evaluated. Our results showed that intracranial vessels were invariably better shown on MR angiography than on MRI. MRA and MRV were most useful in evaluating vascular distortions related to congenital brain malformations and intracranial tumors. MRA was valuable in detecting arterial narrowing but overestimated the degree of stenosis compared with conventional angiography. MRV was the technique of choice for evaluation of dural sinus and cerebral venous thrombosis and compression. MRA played little to no role in preoperative planning of vascular malformations and aneurysms. It did not appear to be accurate in assessing tumor vascularity or lesions in small arteries and arteritis. (orig.)

  17. Children with central and peripheral neurologic disorders have distinguishable patterns of dysphagia on videofluoroscopic swallow study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Engel-Hoek, Lenie; Erasmus, Corrie E; van Hulst, Karen C M; Arvedson, Joan C; de Groot, Imelda J M; de Swart, Bert J M

    2014-05-01

    To determine whether findings on videofluoroscopic swallow studies reveal different patterns of dysphagia between children with central and peripheral neurologic disorders, a retrospective study of 118 videofluoroscopic swallow studies was completed. There were 3 groups: cerebral palsy with only spastic features (n = 53), cerebral palsy with dyskinetic features (n = 34), and neuromuscular disorders (myotonic dystrophy I, n = 5; spinal muscular atrophy I-II, n = 8; Duchenne muscular dystrophy, n = 8; other neuromuscular disorder, n = 10). Interpretation of the videofluoroscopic swallow studies was not blinded. The video fluoroscopic swallow study findings were compared dichotomously between the groups. Children with cerebral palsy demonstrated dysphagia in 1 or all phases of swallowing. In neuromuscular disorder, muscle weakness results in pharyngeal residue after swallow. The underlying swallowing problem in neuromuscular disorder is muscle weakness whereas that in cerebral palsy is more complex, having to do with abnormal control of swallowing. This study serves as a first exploration on specific characteristics of swallowing in different neurologic conditions and will help clinicians anticipate what they might expect.

  18. Perioperative Management of Neurological Conditions

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    Manjeet Singh Dhallu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative care of the patients with neurological diseases can be challenging. Most important consideration is the management and understanding of pathophysiology of these disorders and evaluation of new neurological changes that occur perioperatively. Perioperative generally refers to 3 phases of surgery: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative. We have tried to address few commonly encountered neurological conditions in clinical practice, such as delirium, stroke, epilepsy, myasthenia gravis, and Parkinson disease. In this article, we emphasize on early diagnosis and management strategies of neurological disorders in the perioperative period to minimize morbidity and mortality of patients.

  19. Neurologic and neuromuscular functional disorders of the pharynx and esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuttge-Hannig, A.; Hannig, C.

    2007-01-01

    Neurologic swallowing disorders are an increasing diagnostic problem in our overaged population. Undiagnosed chronic aspiration pneumonia is the cause of death in 20-40% of all inhabitants of nursing homes. In neurologic diseases of the pharynx, the physiologic interaction of pharyngeal contraction, closure of the pharynx, and esophageal motility are frequently disturbed. This may be due to cortical, bulbar, or cerebellar brain damage of ischemic or traumatic origin. Furthermore diseases or peripheral nerves, muscles, and synapses cause disturbances. The most life-threatening complication of these disturbances is tracheal aspiration, which requires an iso-osmolar contrast medium for imaging studies that cause no or minimal pulmonary problems. Utilizing fast dynamic documentation we can analyze the swallowing act in 35 images within the passage time of 0.7 s. This requires digital frame sequences from 15-50 images/s, which can be provided by DSI or videofluoroscopy. Neurologic and neuromuscular patterns are demonstrated with and without tracheal aspiration. The differentiation of aspiration in a so-called pre-, intra-, and postdeglutitive form is possible. We distinguish four grades of severity of aspiration, which is also of great clinical impact for the differential rehabilitation therapy. The efficiency of the rehabilitation protocol can be assessed by the dynamic swallowing studies. (orig.) [de

  20. Neurological Disorders in a Murine Model of Chronic Renal Failure

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    Jean-Marc Chillon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is highly prevalent in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF. However, data on the impact of CRF on the cerebral circulatory system are scarce—despite the fact that stroke is the third most common cause of cardiovascular death in people with CRF. In the present study, we examined the impact of CRF on behavior (anxiety, recognition and ischemic stroke severity in a well-defined murine model of CRF. We did not observe any significant increases between CRF mice and non-CRF mice in terms of anxiety. In contrast, CRF mice showed lower levels of anxiety in some tests. Recognition was not impaired (vs. controls after 6 weeks of CRF but was impaired after 10 weeks of CRF. Chronic renal failure enhances the severity of ischemic stroke, as evaluated by the infarct volume size in CRF mice after 34 weeks of CRF. Furthermore, neurological test results in non-CRF mice tended to improve in the days following ischemic stroke, whereas the results in CRF mice tended to worsen. In conclusion, we showed that a murine model of CRF is suitable for evaluating uremic toxicity and the associated neurological disorders. Our data confirm the role of uremic toxicity in the genesis of neurological abnormalities (other than anxiety.

  1. The promise of telemedicine for chronic neurological disorders: the example of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Ruth B; Biglan, Kevin M

    2017-07-01

    Disparities in access to health care, particularly specialist care, exist worldwide. As the prevalence of chronic neurological disorders increases with ageing populations, access to neurologist care is likely to worsen in many regions if there are no changes to models of care. Telemedicine-defined here as the use of real-time, synchronous videoconferencing to deliver medical care-could be used to improve access to neurologist care for patients with a range of chronic neurological disorders. In Parkinson's disease, several studies have shown the feasibility and potential benefits of telemedicine-delivered care. Further research is needed to establish whether telemedicine can deliver on the promise of improved access to neurologist care and whether telemedicine-delivered care is comparable to in-person care in terms of clinical outcomes. Many barriers to widespread implementation of telemedicine services remain to be addressed, including reimbursement, legal considerations, and technological issues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Common gene-network signature of different neurological disorders and their potential implications to neuroAIDS.

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    Vidya Sagar

    Full Text Available The neurological complications of AIDS (neuroAIDS during the infection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are symptomized by non-specific, multifaceted neurological conditions and therefore, defining a specific diagnosis/treatment mechanism(s for this neuro-complexity at the molecular level remains elusive. Using an in silico based integrated gene network analysis we discovered that HIV infection shares convergent gene networks with each of twelve neurological disorders selected in this study. Importantly, a common gene network was identified among HIV infection, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and age macular degeneration. An mRNA microarray analysis in HIV-infected monocytes showed significant changes in the expression of several genes of this in silico derived common pathway which suggests the possible physiological relevance of this gene-circuit in driving neuroAIDS condition. Further, this unique gene network was compared with another in silico derived novel, convergent gene network which is shared by seven major neurological disorders (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Age Macular Degeneration, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Vascular Dementia, and Restless Leg Syndrome. These networks differed in their gene circuits; however, in large, they involved innate immunity signaling pathways, which suggests commonalities in the immunological basis of different neuropathogenesis. The common gene circuits reported here can provide a prospective platform to understand how gene-circuits belonging to other neuro-disorders may be convoluted during real-time neuroAIDS condition and it may elucidate the underlying-and so far unknown-genetic overlap between HIV infection and neuroAIDS risk. Also, it may lead to a new paradigm in understanding disease progression, identifying biomarkers, and developing therapies.

  3. Pattern of traditional medicine use by adult Saudi patients with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Yousef; Al-Ahmari, Ahmed; Al-Dashash, Fahad; Al-Hussain, Fawaz; Al-Masnour, Firas; Masoud, Abdullah; Jradi, Hoda

    2015-04-01

    Traditional medicine (TM) has been established as a two-edged sword. On one edge numerous forms of TM have been proven safe and effective, while on the other edge various modes of TM have been shown to be futile and potentially dangerous. Resorting to TM, especially for chronic diseases, is common world-wide and includes Saudi Arabia. Most neurological diseases are chronic. No data is available on the utilization of TM among patients with neurological disorders. We conducted this study to assess for the prevalence, pattern, perception and triggers for TM use by the adult Saudi patients with neurological disorders. A survey written in Arabic and comprised of 15 questions was used to collect data on the practice of TM among the neurology patients of King Saud University Ambulatory Clinic. The questions in the survey pertain mainly to the frequency of TM practice, its form and the patient's opinion of this practice. The data was collected through a face to face interview by three medical students who were instructed on the survey questions prior to the launch of the study. 292 patients completed the survey (35.9% males and 64.0% females). 67% (n = 196) of the sample used TM. Cupping or what is commonly known as "hojamah" was the most prevalent method (45.4%) followed by herbs, skin cauterization and the Reciting of the Holy Quran (42.3%, 33.7% and 20.4% respectively). The prevalence of TM use did not differ across gender (chi-sq = 2.02; p-value = 0.15), level of education (chi-sq = 4.02; p-value = 0.40), health status (chi-sq = 2.29; p-value = 0.68), age groups (chi-sq = 5.12; p-value = 0.16), or perception toward TM (chi-sq = 2.67; p-value = 0.26) in this population. The practice of TM is common among the neurology patients of Saudi Arabia. Cupping, herbs, and skin cauterization, which can be harmful when wrongly employed, are frequently utilized in this patient population. Measures and policies to endorse the appropriate use of TM by Saudi society must be

  4. CT and MR findings of neurological disorders associated with pregnancy and childbirth

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    Kim, Jee Young; Ahn, Kook Jin; Kim, Young Joo; Kim, Bum Soo; Hahn, Seong Tae [College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    The onset of pregnancy may predispose women to a variety of neurological diseases due to changes in their hemodynamics, hormonal effects, and complications associated with childbirth. The spectrum of neurological disorders associated with pregnancy and childbirth include hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhaging, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) (secondary to eclampsia), Wernicke encephalopathy, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, Sheehan's syndrome, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (secondary to pulmonary amniotic fluid embolism), multifocal infarctions, and extra-potine myelinolysis. The recognition of the various imaging findings of these diseases, along with the clinical presentations should aid in their early diagnosis and prompt treatment. The purpose of this pictorial assay is to describe the characteristic CT and MR findings of these diseases with a literature review to explain the mechanisms and clinical symptoms.

  5. CT and MR findings of neurological disorders associated with pregnancy and childbirth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jee Young; Ahn, Kook Jin; Kim, Young Joo; Kim, Bum Soo; Hahn, Seong Tae

    2008-01-01

    The onset of pregnancy may predispose women to a variety of neurological diseases due to changes in their hemodynamics, hormonal effects, and complications associated with childbirth. The spectrum of neurological disorders associated with pregnancy and childbirth include hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhaging, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) (secondary to eclampsia), Wernicke encephalopathy, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, Sheehan's syndrome, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (secondary to pulmonary amniotic fluid embolism), multifocal infarctions, and extra-potine myelinolysis. The recognition of the various imaging findings of these diseases, along with the clinical presentations should aid in their early diagnosis and prompt treatment. The purpose of this pictorial assay is to describe the characteristic CT and MR findings of these diseases with a literature review to explain the mechanisms and clinical symptoms

  6. Hippotherapy acute impact on heart rate variability non-linear dynamics in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabiddu, Ramona; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Trimer, Renata; Trimer, Vitor; Ricci, Paula Angélica; Italiano Monteiro, Clara; Camargo Magalhães Maniglia, Marcela; Silva Pereira, Ana Maria; Rodrigues das Chagas, Gustavo; Carvalho, Eliane Maria

    2016-05-15

    Neurological disorders are associated with autonomic dysfunction. Hippotherapy (HT) is a therapy treatment strategy that utilizes a horse in an interdisciplinary approach for the physical and mental rehabilitation of people with physical, mental and/or psychological disabilities. However, no studies have been carried out which evaluated the effects of HT on the autonomic control in these patients. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of a single HT session on cardiovascular autonomic control by time domain and non-linear analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). The HRV signal was recorded continuously in twelve children affected by neurological disorders during a HT session, consisting in a 10-minute sitting position rest (P1), a 15-minute preparatory phase sitting on the horse (P2), a 15-minute HT session (P3) and a final 10-minute sitting position recovery (P4). Time domain and non-linear HRV indices, including Sample Entropy (SampEn), Lempel-Ziv Complexity (LZC) and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), were calculated for each treatment phase. We observed that SampEn increased during P3 (SampEn=0.56±0.10) with respect to P1 (SampEn=0.40±0.14, p<0.05), while DFA decreased during P3 (DFA=1.10±0.10) with respect to P1 (DFA=1.26±0.14, p<0.05). A significant SDRR increase (p<0.05) was observed during the recovery period P4 (SDRR=50±30ms) with respect to the HT session period P3 (SDRR=30±10ms). Our results suggest that HT might benefit children with disabilities attributable to neurological disorders by eliciting an acute autonomic response during the therapy and during the recovery period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Additional Virtual Reality Sitting Balance Training Using XBox Kinect™ in Patients with Neurological Disorders: A Pilot Study

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    Xina Henry Quadros

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sitting balance is a prerequisite to upper extremity function, standing and walking, which is affected in various neurological diseases. It is important to attain a good level of sitting balance before one can proceed to standing. In recent years, virtual reality game training has gained a widespread application. Aim: This pilot study aimed to examine the role of additional virtual reality sitting balance training using a commercial interactive virtual reality system- Xbox Kinect™ in patients with neurological disorders. Materials and Methods: Four patients with sitting balance impairments following neurological disorders received two weeks of virtual reality based therapy along with the conventional physiotherapy. Sitting balance was evaluated using FIST (Function In Sitting Test scores at baseline, one week and after two weeks of intervention. Results: All four patients showed clinically significant improvement in FIST score between the pre and post intervention. Percentage of improvement in FIST score was approximately 27% with a minimum change of 10 points in the FIST score Minimal Clinically Important Difference (MCID=6.5. Conclusion: Additional virtual reality training may improve sitting balance control in neurological patients with balance impairments. It can be used as an adjunct in routine neurorehabilitation.

  8. The role for IGF-1-derived small neuropeptides as a therapeutic target for neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jian; Harris, Paul; Brimble, Margaret; Lei, Yang; Lu, Jun; Yang, Yang; Gunn, Alistair J

    2015-06-01

    Exogenous IGF-1 protects the brain from ischemic injury and improves function. However, its clinical application to neurological disorders is limited by its large molecular size, poor central uptake and mitogenic potential. In this review, the authors have discussed the efficacy, pharmacokinetics and mechanisms of IGF-1 derivatives on protecting acute brain injury, preventing memory impairment and improving recovery from neurological degenerative conditions evaluated in various animal models. We have included natural metabolites of IGF-1, glycine-proline-glutamate (GPE), cleaved from N-terminal IGF-1 and cyclic glycine-proline (cGP) as well as the structural analogues of GPE and cGP, glycine-2-methyl-proline-glutamate and cyclo-l-glycyl-l-2-allylproline, respectively. In addition, the regulatory role for cGP in bioavailability of IGF-1 has also been discussed. These small neuropeptides provide effective neuroprotection by offering an improved pharmacokinetic profile and more practical route of administration compared with IGF-1 administration. Developing modified neuropeptides to overcome the limitations of their endogenous counterparts represents a novel strategy of pharmaceutical discovery for neurological disorders. The mechanism of action may involve a regulation of IGF-1 bioavailability.

  9. Devices for Ambulatory Monitoring of Sleep-Associated Disorders in Children with Neurological Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulate-Campos, Adriana; Tsuboyama, Melissa; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2017-12-25

    Good sleep quality is essential for a child's wellbeing. Early sleep problems have been linked to the later development of emotional and behavioral disorders and can negatively impact the quality of life of the child and his or her family. Sleep-associated conditions are frequent in the pediatric population, and even more so in children with neurological problems. Monitoring devices can help to better characterize sleep efficiency and sleep quality. They can also be helpful to better characterize paroxysmal nocturnal events and differentiate between nocturnal seizures, parasomnias, and obstructive sleep apnea, each of which has a different management. Overnight ambulatory detection devices allow for a tolerable, low cost, objective assessment of sleep quality in the patient's natural environment. They can also be used as a notification system to allow for rapid recognition and prompt intervention of events like seizures. Optimal monitoring devices will be patient- and diagnosis-specific, but may include a combination of modalities such as ambulatory electroencephalograms, actigraphy, and pulse oximetry. We will summarize the current literature on ambulatory sleep devices for detecting sleep disorders in children with neurological diseases.

  10. Survey of Japanese pediatricians on vaccination of children with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Takuya; Tagawa, Tetsuzo; Arai, Hiroshi; Imaishi, Hidenori; Uno, Risa; Tanaka, Junko; Nagai, Toshisaburou; Nishida, Masaru; Awaya, Yutaka; Maekawa, Kihei

    2011-10-01

    Primary care physicians in Japan are often unwilling to vaccinate children with neurological disorders. The aim of the present study was to determine the state of vaccination in children who are severely handicapped and/or have convulsive disorders, in order to increase the vaccination rate in this patient population. Six hundred and eighty pediatricians belonging to Osaka Shonika Ikai were asked to answer a questionnaire, and 359 doctors responded. Two hundred and thirty-four doctors consulted for febrile seizures (Fs), 190 for epilepsy and 145 for conditions affecting severely handicapped children, responded that they refused to vaccinate. The reasons for reluctance to vaccinate these children were short interval since the last seizure, including febrile (226 doctors) and epileptic (121 doctors) seizures. It was especially likely that a child with a past history of status epilepticus would be refused vaccination. Primary care doctors are very cautious about the indications for vaccination, especially the inoculation of live vaccines, because they often induce post-vaccination fever-associated convulsions. Intractable daily epileptic seizures was the most common reason for refusal to vaccinate severely handicapped children. Examples of inadequate decision-making as regards the indications for vaccination were: "need more than 6 months observation since last seizure whether Fs or epileptic", "need EEG examination for Fs", "contraindication because of low bodyweight and/or chronic wheezing in severely handicapped children". There is a need to provide correct information about the adverse effects of vaccination and for greater cooperation between primary care doctors and pediatric neurologists. © 2011 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2011 Japan Pediatric Society.

  11. Child Neurology Services in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmshurst, Jo M.; Badoe, Eben; Wammanda, Robinson D.; Mallewa, Macpherson; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Venter, Andre; Newton, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    The first African Child Neurology Association meeting identified key challenges that the continent faces to improve the health of children with neurology disorders. The capacity to diagnose common neurologic conditions and rare disorders is lacking. The burden of neurologic disease on the continent is not known, and this lack of knowledge limits the ability to lobby for better health care provision. Inability to practice in resource-limited settings has led to the migration of skilled professionals away from Africa. Referral systems from primary to tertiary are often unpredictable and chaotic. There is a lack of access to reliable supplies of basic neurology treatments such as antiepileptic drugs. Few countries have nationally accepted guidelines either for the management of epilepsy or status epilepticus. There is a great need to develop better training capacity across Africa in the recognition and management of neurologic conditions in children, from primary health care to the subspecialist level. PMID:22019842

  12. The core competencies for mental, neurological, and substance use disorder care in sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Pamela Y.; Musisi, Seggane; Frehywot, Seble; Patel, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    The 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study points to a changing landscape in which non-communicable diseases, such as mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders, account for an increasing proportion of premature mortality and disability globally. Despite evidence of the need for care, a remarkable deficit of providers for MNS disorder service delivery persists in sub-Saharan Africa. This critical workforce can be developed from a range of non-specialist and specialist health workers who have access to evidence-based interventions, whose roles, and the associated tasks, are articulated and clearly delineated, and who are equipped to master and maintain the competencies associated with providing MNS disorder care. In 2012, the Neuroscience Forum of the Institute of Medicine convened a meeting of key stakeholders in Kampala, Uganda, to discuss a set of candidate core competencies for the delivery of mental health and neurological care, focusing specifically on depression, psychosis, epilepsy, and alcohol use disorders. This article discusses the candidate core competencies for non-specialist health workers and the complexities of implementing core competencies in low- and middle-income country settings. Sub-Saharan Africa, however, has the potential to implement novel training initiatives through university networks and through structured processes that engage ministries of health. Finally, we outline challenges associated with implementing competencies in order to sustain a workforce capable of delivering quality services for people with MNS disorders. PMID:25783229

  13. Effect of cation type and concentration of nitrates on neurological disorders during experimental cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzenkov, V S; Krushinskii, A L; Reutov, V P

    2013-10-01

    Experiments were performed on the model of ischemic stroke due to bilateral occlusion of the carotid arteries. Nitrates had various effects on the dynamics of neurological disorders and mortality rate of Wistar rats, which depended on the cation type and concentration.

  14. Stressful life events and maltreatment in conversion (functional neurological) disorder: systematic review and meta-analysis of case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Lea; Pasman, Joëlle A; Nicholson, Timothy; Aybek, Selma; David, Anthony S; Tuck, Sharon; Kanaan, Richard A; Roelofs, Karin; Carson, Alan; Stone, Jon

    2018-04-01

    Stressful life events and maltreatment have traditionally been considered crucial in the development of conversion (functional neurological) disorder, but the evidence underpinning this association is not clear. We aimed to assess the association between stressors and functional neurological disorder. We systematically reviewed controlled studies reporting stressors occurring in childhood or adulthood, such as stressful life events and maltreatment (including sexual, physical abuse, and emotional neglect) and functional neurological disorder. We did a meta-analysis, with assessments of methodology, sources of bias, and sensitivity analyses. 34 case-control studies, with 1405 patients, were eligible. Studies were of moderate-to-low quality. The frequency of childhood and adulthood stressors was increased in cases compared with controls. Odds ratios (OR) were higher for emotional neglect in childhood (49% for cases vs 20% for controls; OR 5·6, 95% CI 2·4-13·1) compared with sexual abuse (24% vs 10%; 3·3, 2·2-4·8) or physical abuse (30% vs 12%; 3·9, 2·2-7·2). An association with stressful life events preceding onset (OR 2·8, 95% CI 1·4-6·0) was stronger in studies with better methods (interviews; 4·3, 1·4-13·2). Heterogeneity was significant between studies (I 2 21·1-90·7%). 13 studies that specifically ascertained that the participants had not had either severe life events or any subtype of maltreatment all found a proportion of patients with functional neurological disorder reporting no stressor. Stressful life events and maltreatment are substantially more common in people with functional neurological disorder than in healthy controls and patient controls. Emotional neglect had a higher risk than traditionally emphasised sexual and physical abuse, but many cases report no stressors. This outcome supports changes to diagnostic criteria in DSM-5; stressors, although relevant to the cause in many patients, are not a core diagnostic feature. This

  15. Natural or Plant Products for the Treatment of Neurological Disorders: Current Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvez, Mohammad Khalid

    2018-01-01

    In recent decades, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has become very popular in the treatment of several chronic diseases. Natural products as one of the CAM modalities offer potential opportunities to discover lead compounds for novel drug development. The use of CAM or natural products in the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases is comparatively a newer area. A structured online literature search for peer-reviewed research articles was conducted on the PubMed, Europe PMC, Medline and Google Scholar portals, using phrases: natural products for neurologic disorders, phytomedicine for neurodegenerative diseases, natural therapeutics for neurological symptopms etc. Results: The retrieved data showed the natural therapeutics with anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory salutations evidently plays a crucial role in protecting neurons. Of these, the most promising are caffeine, trigonelline, shogaol, curcumin, resveratrol, baicalein, wogonin, ginsenosides, tanshinones, withanolides, picrosides, parthenolide, cannabinoids, Devil's claw and white willow bark, including Chinese formulations Renshen Shouwu and Shengmai San. Though several herbs and their active ingredients have been studied in laboratory and clinical settings, only a few have been investigated for their molecular mechanisms of action. Notably, despite the promising and safe therapeutic benefits of CAM/herbal medicines, there exists a possible risk when combining them with prescription drugs. As a result, many drugs have shown changes in blood pressure, hepatotoxicity, seizures etc. when combined with certain herbs. Certainly, extensive work is needed to make sure that patients should take a regimen of protective and restorative therapy under an experienced healthcare professional. This article updates on the current knowledge of promising natural products used in neurological disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Paraneoplastic neurological disorders in children with benign ovarian tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Mei-Hsin; Huang, Chao-Ching; Hung, Pi-Lien; Huang, Hsiu-Mei; Huang, Li-Tung; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Huang, Song-Chei; Chang, Ying-Chao

    2014-03-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological diseases (PND) are rare, but potentially treatable disorders. Paraneoplastic encephalitis is rapidly emerging as an important but likely under-recognized condition in children. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and spectrum of PND in children with benign ovary tumor and the long-term outcome. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of all female patients below 18years of age diagnosed with a benign ovarian tumor proven by pathology between January 1993 and December 2010. All the clinical symptoms developed within 5years of tumor diagnosis and the related investigations were recorded. There were total 133 children and adolescents with benign ovarian tumors, mostly mature teratoma. Six patients (4.5%) had neuropsychiatric manifestations and all but one were beyond age 10years. The most common neuropsychiatric presentations were depression or low mood (84%), headache (50%), mutism (50%), hypoventilation (50%), seizures (30%), hallucination (30%), vomiting and hypersalivation (30%). Three patients (2.2%) had serious PND including acute disseminated encephalomyelitis in 1 and anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis in 2. Although all of three improved after tumor removal, one without immunotherapy had neurological sequelae and prolonged ICU stay. The prevalence of PND in benign ovary tumor is not so uncommon in children. It is important to survey ovary tumors in female adolescents with subacute presentation of multiple-level involvement of neuraxis where no clear alternate diagnosis is possible. Treatment of serious PND associated with ovary tumors should include immunotherapy in addition to tumor removal. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Incontinentia pigmenti with neurologic and oculodental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Arturo Avina Fierro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Incontinentia pigmenti is a genodermatosis with X-linked dominant inheritance, characterized by cutaneous, neurologic, ophthalmologic, and dental abnormalities with a pattern suggestive of somatic mosaicism. We describe a 21-month-old girl showing characteristic cutaneous findings of incontinentia pigmenti in chronic evolution of hyperpigmented, hypopigmented, and atrophic stages, linear and whorled pattern involving the Blaschko's lines. The patient has history of seizures, and electroencephalography showed epileptiform discharges at temporal lobule, cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed cerebral dysgenesis, neuronal migration disorder, and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum. She has motor and mental delay with spastic quadriplegia, and ophthalmologic loss of central vision by ischemic optic neuropathy with decreased blood flow to eye's optic nerve. The dermatologic features were confirmed by skin biopsy that showed slight atrophy and some scattered apoptotic cells in the epidermis, epidermal hypopigmentation, and reduced melanocyte number, these histological features confirmed the genodermatosis diagnosis: Bloch-Sulzberger syndrome.

  18. The effects of neurologic assessment E-learning in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ji Yeon; Issenberg, S Barry; Roh, Young Sook

    2017-10-01

    A firm understanding of the preliminary assessment of a patient with neurological disorders is needed for ensuring optimal patient outcomes. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of using e-learning on neurologic assessment knowledge, ability, and self-confidence among nurses. This study used a non-equivalent control group pretest-posttest design. Nurses working in the neurology and neurosurgery wards, Republic of Korea PARTICIPANTS: A convenience sample of 50 nurses was assigned to either the experimental group (n=24) or the control group (n=26). The experimental group participated in the self-directed e-learning program related to neurologic assessment, and control group underwent self-directed learning with handout. Knowledge, ability, and self-confidence were measured at pretest and posttest. There were no significant differences in knowledge (U=270, p=0.399) and self-confidence (U=241.5, p=0.171) between the two groups. Nurses in the experimental group showed higher neurologic assessment ability compared with those in the control group (U=199, p=0.028). Self-directed neurologic assessment e-learning induced improvement in the neurologic assessment ability among nurses. Self-directed e-learning can be applied for improving competencies in neurologic assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Zika virus infection, transmission, associated neurological disorders and birth abnormalities: A review of progress in research, priorities and knowledge gaps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yitades Gebre; Nikkiah Forbes; Teshome Gebre

    2016-01-01

    On February 1, 2016, the World Health Organization declared that the cluster of microcephaly cases and other neurological disorders constitute public health emergency of international concern. Furthermore, few studies demonstrated that there was an increased evidence of causal relationship of Zika virus(ZIKAV) infection and microcephaly, birth abnormalities and neurological disorders such as Guillain–Barre′ syndrome.ZIKAV transmission occurs mainly by the bite of infected mosquitos(Aedes species), but there are also reports that infections could occur via the placenta, breast milk, saliva,blood transfusion and sex. This article reviews the global efforts, progress in scientific research to understand the pathogenesis of ZIKAV infection & disease, clinical presentations, congenital transmission and autoimmune neurological disorders. The paper further explores the knowledge gaps, future priority research agenda for strategic response including vector control and prevention. We conducted a systematic literature review to synthesise available evidence on ZIKAV infection and its vector and host interaction from electronic databases.

  20. Zika virus infection, transmission, associated neurological disorders and birth abnormalities:A review of progress in research, priorities and knowledge gaps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yitades Gebre; Nikkiah Forbes; Teshome Gebre

    2016-01-01

    On February 1, 2016, the World Health Organization declared that the cluster of microcephaly cases and other neurological disorders constitute public health emergency of international concern. Furthermore, few studies demonstrated that there was an increased evidence of causal relationship of Zika virus (ZIKAV) infection and micro-cephaly, birth abnormalities and neurological disorders such as Guillain–Barr ´e syndrome. ZIKAV transmission occurs mainly by the bite of infected mosquitos (Aedes species), but there are also reports that infections could occur via the placenta, breast milk, saliva, blood transfusion and sex. This article reviews the global efforts, progress in scientific research to understand the pathogenesis of ZIKAV infection & disease, clinical pre-sentations, congenital transmission and autoimmune neurological disorders. The paper further explores the knowledge gaps, future priority research agenda for strategic response including vector control and prevention. We conducted a systematic literature review to synthesise available evidence on ZIKAV infection and its vector and host interaction from electronic databases.

  1. Zika virus infection, transmission, associated neurological disorders and birth abnormalities: A review of progress in research, priorities and knowledge gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yitades Gebre

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available On February 1, 2016, the World Health Organization declared that the cluster of microcephaly cases and other neurological disorders constitute public health emergency of international concern. Furthermore, few studies demonstrated that there was an increased evidence of causal relationship of Zika virus (ZIKAV infection and microcephaly, birth abnormalities and neurological disorders such as Guillain–Barré syndrome. ZIKAV transmission occurs mainly by the bite of infected mosquitos (Aedes species, but there are also reports that infections could occur via the placenta, breast milk, saliva, blood transfusion and sex. This article reviews the global efforts, progress in scientific research to understand the pathogenesis of ZIKAV infection & disease, clinical presentations, congenital transmission and autoimmune neurological disorders. The paper further explores the knowledge gaps, future priority research agenda for strategic response including vector control and prevention. We conducted a systematic literature review to synthesise available evidence on ZIKAV infection and its vector and host interaction from electronic databases.

  2. [Before you diagnose a patient with a conversion disorder, perform a thorough general medical and neurological examination. Case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawełczyk, Tomasz; Pawełczyk, Agnieszka; Rabe-Jabłońska, Jolanta

    2012-01-01

    Dissociative and conversion disorders are classified together according to ICD-10 as states that are not confirmed by the presence of somatic diseases, which they suggest. According to the DSM-IV, both disorders are classified separately. Conversion disorders are a group of psychiatric disorders whose symptoms mimic the presence of malfunction or loss of motor or sensory function, whereas the nature and dynamics of the observed symptoms is not fully explained by the results of objective assessments and consultations, nor is the direct effect of a psychoactive substance. Impaired mental integration of different functions which normally interact simultaneously in the perception of reality and inner experience of the individual is found in dissociative disorders. The article describes the case of 25-year old man, in whom after initial suspicion of myasthenia gravis and its exclusion, a diagnosis of conversion disorder was made on the basis of the clinical picture and treatment with an SSRI antidepressant and individual psychotherapy were recommended. No improvement in mental and neurological status after six month therapy resulted in an in-depth diagnostics in a clinical setting and diagnosis of brain stem tumor (aastrocytoma fibrillare). (a) Neuroimaging is a source of important clinical data and in many cases should constitute an inherent element of a psychiatric diagnosis. (b) Diagnosis of conversion (dissociative) disorders requires a precise differential diagnosis, excluding the somatic causes of observed neurological ailments. (c) A late diagnosis of neurological or somatic causes of symptoms which arouse a suspicion of conversion (dissociative) disorders may make a radical treatment impossible or may considerably aggravate the remote prognosis and quality of the patients' life.

  3. THE NEUROLOGICAL FACE OF CELIAC DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işikay, Sedat; Kocamaz, Halil

    2015-01-01

    Several neurological disorders have also been widely described in celiac disease patients. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of accompanying different neurologic manifestations in children with celiac disease at the time of diagnosis and to discuss these manifestations in the light of the recent literature. This prospective cross sectional study included 297 children diagnosed with celiac disease. The medical records of all patients were reviewed. In neurological evaluation, totally 40 (13. 5%) of the 297 celiac patients had a neurological finding including headache, epilepsy, migraine, mental retardation, breath holding spells, ataxia, cerebral palsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Down syndrome and Turner syndrome in order of frequency. There was not any significant difference between the laboratory data of the patients with and without neurological manifestations. However; type 3a biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients without neurological manifestations, while type 3b biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients with neurological manifestations. It is important to keep in mind that in clinical course of celiac disease different neurological manifestations may be reported.

  4. The Ability of the Eating Assessment Tool-10 to Detect Aspiration in Patients With Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Selen Serel; Demir, Numan; Kılınç, Hasan E; Karaduman, Aynur A

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Dysphagia is common in patients with neurological disorders. There is a need to identify patients at risk early by a useful clinical tool to prevent its serious complications. The study aims to determine the ability of the Turkish version of Eating Assessment Tool-10 (T-EAT-10) to detect aspiration in patients with neurological disorders. Methods Two hundred fifty-nine patients with neurological disorders who had complaints about swallowing difficulty and referred for a swallowing evaluation were included. Oropharyngeal dysphagia was evaluated with the T-EAT-10 and videofluoroscopic swallowing study in the same day. The penetration-aspiration scale (PAS) was used to document the penetration and aspiration severity. Results The mean age of the patients was 59.72 ± 17.24 years (minimum [min] = 18, maximum [max] = 96), of which 57.1% were male. The mean T-EAT-10 of patients who had aspiration (PAS > 5) was 25.91 ± 10.31 (min = 1, max = 40) and the mean T-EAT-10 of patients who did not have aspiration (PAS < 6) was 15.70 ± 10.54 (min = 0, max = 40) (P < 0.001). Patients with a T-EAT-10 score higher than 15 were 2.4 times more likely to aspirate. A linear correlation was found between T-EAT-10 and PAS scores of the patients (r = 0.416, P < 0.001). The sensitivity of a T-EAT-10 higher than 15 in detecting aspiration was 81.0% and the specificity was 58.0%. A T-EAT-10 score of higher than 15 has a positive predictive value of 72.0% and a negative predictive value of 69.0%. Conclusion The T-EAT-10 can be used to detect unsafe airway protection in neurology clinics to identify and refer dysphagic patients for further evaluation. PMID:28545185

  5. What is the current practice of therapists in the measurement of somatosensation in children with cerebral palsy and other neurological disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Corrin; Taylor, Susan; Parkins, Timothy; Carey, Leeanne; Girdler, Sonya; Elliott, Catherine

    2018-04-01

    Somatosensation is the ability to detect and recognise body sensations such as touch, vibration, pressure, pain, temperature and proprioception. Cerebral palsy is a neurological disorder that is often accompanied by impairments in somatosensation. Current somatosensory assessments have limited psychometrics established for use with these children. The aim of this study was to identify therapists' current practice and perspectives related to the assessment of somatosensation in children with neurological disorders. A cross-sectional questionnaire was used to identify the somatosensory assessments currently used in clinical practice, time allocated to assessment, and therapists' satisfaction and confidence using the available assessments of somatosensation. The questionnaire was adapted from a previously utilised questionnaire that identified therapists' use of somatosensory assessments with adults post-stroke. A total of 135 therapists responded to the questionnaire. Seventy-nine (92%) occupational therapists and 44 (89.7%) physiotherapists indicated that they currently assessed or treated children with somatosensory deficits. Sixty-four (82.1%) occupational therapists and 38 (86.3%) physiotherapists regarded assessment of somatosensation in children with neurological disorders as important to very important. However, only seven (8.8%) occupational therapists and seven (15.9%) physiotherapists reported confidence in their ability to do so. The methods with which therapists detect and measure somatosensory impairment in children with neurological disorders are variable, with non-standardised and/or informal assessments most frequently used. Despite there being recommendations of best practice for the assessment of specific domains of somatosensation in children with cerebral palsy, current practice does not yet mirror these recommendations. Additionally, therapists have low satisfaction and confidence with what they are currently using, highlighting the need for a

  6. Neurological Soft Signs in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: Standardised Assessment and Comparison with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bolton

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available While several studies have detected raised levels of neurological soft signs in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD, the specificity of these abnormalities remains uncertain. This study used a new standardised measure, the Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI, to assess soft signs in 51 subjects with OCD. Comparison was made with data on patients with schizophrenia and a non-clinical control group from a previously reported study. Individuals with OCD showed raised levels of soft signs compared with non-clinical controls in many categories of the CNI: Motor Coordination, Sensory Integration, Primitive Reflexes, Extrapyramidal Signs, and Failure of Suppression. Compared with patients with schizophrenia, the OCD group had lower levels of neurological signs in some CNI categories: Hard Signs, Motor Co-ordination, Tardive Dyskinesia, Catatonic Signs, and Extrapyramidal Signs. However, levels of soft signs in the OCD group did not significantly differ from those in the schizophrenia group in other CNI categories: Sensory Integration, Primitive Reflexes and Failure of Suppression. The significance of these patterns of findings is discussed.

  7. Creation of an open-access, mutation-defined fibroblast resource for neurological disease research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selina Wray

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of many neurological disorders has been greatly enhanced by the discovery of mutations in genes linked to familial forms of these diseases. These have facilitated the generation of cell and animal models that can be used to understand the underlying molecular pathology. Recently, there has been a surge of interest in the use of patient-derived cells, due to the development of induced pluripotent stem cells and their subsequent differentiation into neurons and glia. Access to patient cell lines carrying the relevant mutations is a limiting factor for many centres wishing to pursue this research. We have therefore generated an open-access collection of fibroblast lines from patients carrying mutations linked to neurological disease. These cell lines have been deposited in the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS Repository at the Coriell Institute for Medical Research and can be requested by any research group for use in in vitro disease modelling. There are currently 71 mutation-defined cell lines available for request from a wide range of neurological disorders and this collection will be continually expanded. This represents a significant resource that will advance the use of patient cells as disease models by the scientific community.

  8. Neurology referrals to a liaison psychiatry service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, P

    2012-02-03

    The objective of the present study was to assess the activity of the Liaison Psychiatry service of Cork University Hospital in relation to all in-patient neurology referrals over a 12-month period. Of 1685 neurology admissions, 106 (6%) were referred to liaison psychiatry for assessment. 91 referrals (86%) met criteria for a psychiatric disorder according to DSM-IV, the commonest being major depression (24%) and somatoform disorder (23%). Patients with multiple sclerosis or epilepsy comprised nearly half of all referrals (48 cases; 45%). Approximately 20% of M.S. in-patients (21 cases) were referred for psychiatric assessment, with the corresponding figure in epilepsy being 25% (18 cases). Although only 106 (6%) neurology in-patients were referred to liaison psychiatry, psychiatric diagnoses were documented in 327 (20%) discharge forms, presumably reflecting previous diagnosis. The above findings indicate that psychiatric illness is common among neurology inpatients screened by liaison psychiatry yet referral rates are relatively low in terms of the overall number of neurology in-patients. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed in 86% of referrals indicating high concordance between neurologists and liaison psychiatry regarding the presence of a psychiatric disorder.

  9. Use and tolerability of a side pole static ankle foot orthosis in children with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvert, Céline; Rippert, Pascal; Margirier, Françoise; Vadot, Jean-Pierre; Bérard, Carole; Poirot, Isabelle; Vuillerot, Carole

    2017-04-01

    Transverse-plane foot deformities are a frequently encountered issue in children with neurological disorders. They are the source of many symptoms, such as pain and walking difficulties, making their prevention very important. We aim to describe the use and tolerability of a side pole static ankle foot orthosis used to prevent transverse-plane foot deformities in children with neurologic disorders. Monocentric, retrospective, observational study. Medical data were collected from 103 children with transverse-plane foot deformities in one or both feet caused by a neurological impairment. All children were braced between 2001 and 2010. Unilateral orthosis was prescribed for 32 children and bilateral orthosis for 71. Transverse-plane foot deformities were varus in 66% of the cases and an equinus was associated in 59.2% of the cases. Mean age for the first prescription was 8.6 years. For the 23 patients present at the 4-year visit, 84.8% still wore the orthosis daily, and 64.7% wore the orthosis more than 6 h per day. The rate of permanent discontinuation of wearing the orthosis was 14.7%. The side pole static ankle foot orthosis is well tolerated with very few side effects, which promotes regular wearing and observance. Clinical relevance Side pole static ankle foot orthoses are well tolerated and can be safely used for children with foot abnormalities in the frontal plane that have a neurological pathology origin.

  10. [Neurology and literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, I

    2010-10-01

    Literature complements medical literature in the academic and clinical development of neurologists. The present article explores the contributions of writers of fiction on neurology. Literary works of fiction with particular reference to neurology. A symbiosis between writers of fiction and doctors has been well recognised. From Shakespeare to Cervantes by way of Dickens and Cela to writer - physicians such as Anton Chekhov or António Lobo Antunes have contributed through their medically informed literature to the better understanding of neurology. Some writers like Dostoevsky, Machado de Assis and Margiad Evans have written about their own experiences with disease thus bringing new insights to medicine. Furthermore, some neurological disorders have been largely based on literary descriptions. For instance, Dostoevsky's epilepsy has been retrospectively analysed by famous neurologists including Freud, Alajouanine or Gastaut, whilst his writings and biography have prompted others like Waxman and Geschwind to describe typical behavioural changes in temporal lobe epilepsy, finding their source of inspiration in Dostoevsky. Likewise, Cirignotta et al have named an unusual type of seizure after the Russian novelist. Inspired by Lewis Carroll, Todd introduced the term Alice in Wonderland Syndrome to refer to visual distortions generally associated with migraine. Writers of fiction offer a humanised perception of disease by contributing new insights into the clinical history, informing about the subjective experience of the illness and helping to eradicate the stigma associated to neurological disorders.

  11. THE NEUROLOGICAL FACE OF CELIAC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeveral neurological disorders have also been widely described in celiac disease patients.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to determine the incidence of accompanying different neurologic manifestations in children with celiac disease at the time of diagnosis and to discuss these manifestations in the light of the recent literature.MethodsThis prospective cross sectional study included 297 children diagnosed with celiac disease. The medical records of all patients were reviewed.ResultsIn neurological evaluation, totally 40 (13. 5% of the 297 celiac patients had a neurological finding including headache, epilepsy, migraine, mental retardation, breath holding spells, ataxia, cerebral palsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Down syndrome and Turner syndrome in order of frequency. There was not any significant difference between the laboratory data of the patients with and without neurological manifestations. However; type 3a biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients without neurological manifestations, while type 3b biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients with neurological manifestations.ConclusionIt is important to keep in mind that in clinical course of celiac disease different neurological manifestations may be reported.

  12. Primary sleep disorders seen at a Neurology service-based sleep clinic in India: Patterns over an 8-year period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Kumar Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing awareness for recognition of sleep disorders in India; however, there is still a huge gap in the number of people suffering from various sleep disorders, in the community versus those visiting hospital clinics for the same. Ours is a neurology services-based sleep disorders clinic, which has evolved successfully over the last decade. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the changes in referral patterns and distribution of various sleep disorders in the patients presenting to the clinic. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective chart review-based study on all patients seen over an 8-year period, divided into 2 groups comprising of patients seen during the first 4 years versus those seen over the next 4 years. Only those patients who had the sleep disorder as their presenting manifestation and those who had been formally interviewed with a pre-structured questionnaire detailing about the main features of the common sleep disorders according to the ICSD-R were included. Patients, in whom the sleep disorder could be clearly attributable to another neurological or systemic disorder, were excluded. Statistical analysis was carried out to identify the differences between the two groups as regards the distribution of various sleep disorders and other clinical data. Results: Among 710 patients registered in the clinic, 469 were included for analysis and 222 patients formed group 1 while 247 formed group 2. The main differences observed were in the form of a clear increase in the percentage of patients with sleep-related breathing disorders, sleep-related movement disorder, and the hypersomnias on comparison of distribution over the first 4 years versus the last 4 years; while a clear decline was seen in the number of patients with insomnia and parasomnias. A 3-fold increase was observed in the number of patients in whom polysomnography was obtained. Conclusion: The distribution of various sleep disorders as seen in a neurology

  13. Psychiatric morbidity in a Nigerian neurology clinic | Ajiboye | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychiatric morbidity in a Nigerian neurology clinic. ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... The study supports previous reports that psychiatric disorders are quite common among patients with neurological disorders.

  14. Administration of autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells in children with incurable neurological disorders and injury is safe and improves their quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alok; Gokulchandran, Nandini; Chopra, Guneet; Kulkarni, Pooja; Lohia, Mamta; Badhe, Prerna; Jacob, V C

    2012-01-01

    Neurological disorders such as muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, and injury to the brain and spine currently have no known definitive treatments or cures. A study was carried out on 71 children suffering from such incurable neurological disorders and injury. They were intrathecally and intramuscularly administered autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells. Assessment after transplantation showed neurological improvements in muscle power and a shift on assessment scales such as FIM and Brooke and Vignos scale. Further, imaging and electrophysiological studies also showed significant changes in selective cases. On an average follow-up of 15 ± 1 months, overall 97% muscular dystrophy cases showed subjective and functional improvement, with 2 of them also showing changes on MRI and 3 on EMG. One hundred percent of the spinal cord injury cases showed improvement with respect to muscle strength, urine control, spasticity, etc. Eighty-five percent of cases of cerebral palsy cases showed improvements, out of which 75% reported improvement in muscle tone and 50% in speech among other symptoms. Eighty-eight percent of cases of other incurable neurological disorders such as autism, Retts Syndrome, giant axonal neuropathy, etc., also showed improvement. No significant adverse events were noted. The results show that this treatment is safe, efficacious, and also improves the quality of life of children with incurable neurological disorders and injury.

  15. Nanoparticles in the treatment and diagnosis of neurological disorders: untamed dragon with fire power to heal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwar, Jagat R; Sun, Xueying; Punj, Vasu; Sriramoju, Bhasker; Mohan, Rajiv R; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Chauhan, Ashok; Kanwar, Rupinder K

    2012-05-01

    The incidence of neurological diseases of unknown etiology is increasing, including well-studied diseases such as Alzhiemer's, Parkinson's, and multiple sclerosis. The blood-brain barrier provides protection for the brain but also hinders the treatment and diagnosis of these neurological diseases, because the drugs must cross the blood-brain barrier to reach the lesions. Thus, attention has turned to developing novel and effective delivery systems that are capable of carrying drug and that provide good bioavailability in the brain. Nanoneurotechnology, particularly application of nanoparticles in drug delivery, has provided promising answers to some of these issues in recent years. Here we review the recent advances in the understanding of several common forms of neurological diseases and particularly the applications of nanoparticles to treat and diagnose them. In addition, we discuss the integration of bioinformatics and modern genomic approaches in the development of nanoparticles. In this review paper, applications of nanotechnology-based diagnostic methods and therapeutic modalities are discussed addressing a variety of neurological disorders, with special attention to blood-brain barrier delivery methods. These novel nanomedicine approaches are expected to revolutionize several aspects of clinical neurology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Traumatic Brain Injury Induces Genome-Wide Transcriptomic, Methylomic, and Network Perturbations in Brain and Blood Predicting Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingying Meng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the traumatic brain injury (TBI pathology, particularly concussive injury, is a serious obstacle for diagnosis, treatment, and long-term prognosis. Here we utilize modern systems biology in a rodent model of concussive injury to gain a thorough view of the impact of TBI on fundamental aspects of gene regulation, which have the potential to drive or alter the course of the TBI pathology. TBI perturbed epigenomic programming, transcriptional activities (expression level and alternative splicing, and the organization of genes in networks centered around genes such as Anax2, Ogn, and Fmod. Transcriptomic signatures in the hippocampus are involved in neuronal signaling, metabolism, inflammation, and blood function, and they overlap with those in leukocytes from peripheral blood. The homology between genomic signatures from blood and brain elicited by TBI provides proof of concept information for development of biomarkers of TBI based on composite genomic patterns. By intersecting with human genome-wide association studies, many TBI signature genes and network regulators identified in our rodent model were causally associated with brain disorders with relevant link to TBI. The overall results show that concussive brain injury reprograms genes which could lead to predisposition to neurological and psychiatric disorders, and that genomic information from peripheral leukocytes has the potential to predict TBI pathogenesis in the brain.

  17. Beyond Neural Cubism: Promoting a Multidimensional View of Brain Disorders by Enhancing the Integration of Neurology and Psychiatry in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Joseph J.; Williams, Nolan R.; George, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Cubism was an influential early 20th century art movement characterized by angular, disjointed imagery. The two-dimensional appearance of Cubist figures and objects is created through juxtaposition of angles. The authors posit that the constrained perspectives found in Cubism may also be found in the clinical classification of brain disorders. Neurological disorders are often separated from psychiatric disorders as if they stem from different organ systems. Maintaining two isolated clinical disciplines fractionalizes the brain in the same way that Pablo Picasso fractionalized figures and objects in his Cubist art. This Neural Cubism perpetuates a clinical divide that does not reflect the scope and depth of neuroscience. All brain disorders are complex and multidimensional, with aberrant circuitry and resultant psychopharmacology manifesting as altered behavior, affect, mood or cognition. Trainees should receive a multidimensional education based on modern neuroscience, not a partial education based on clinical precedent. The authors briefly outline the rationale for increasing the integration of neurology and psychiatry and discuss a nested model with which clinical neuroscientists (neurologists and psychiatrists) can approach and treat brain disorders. PMID:25340364

  18. Ketogenic diet and childhood neurological disorders other than epilepsy: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrotti, Alberto; Iapadre, Giulia; Pisano, Simone; Coppola, Giangennaro

    2017-05-01

    In the last years, ketogenic diet (KD) has been experimentally utilized in various childhood neurologic disorders such as mitochondriopathies, alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC), brain tumors, migraine, and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The aim of this review is to analyze how KD can target these different medical conditions, highlighting possible mechanisms involved. Areas covered: We have conducted an analysis on literature concerning KD use in mitochondriopathies, AHC, brain tumors, migraine, and ASD. Expert commentary: The role of KD in reducing seizure activity in some mitochondriopathies and its efficacy in pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency is known. Recently, few cases suggest the potentiality of KD in decreasing paroxysmal activity in children affected by AHC. A few data support its potential use as co-adjuvant and alternative therapeutic option for brain cancer, while any beneficial effect of KD on migraine remains unclear. KD could improve cognitive and social skills in a subset of children with ASD.

  19. Modeling xeroderma pigmentosum associated neurological pathologies with patients-derived iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lina; Xu, Xiuling; Ren, Ruotong; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Weiqi; Yang, Jiping; Ren, Xiaoqing; Wang, Si; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Liang; Yu, Yang; Wang, Zhaoxia; Yang, Ze; Yuan, Yun; Qiao, Jie; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Qu, Jing; Liu, Guang-Hui

    2016-03-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a group of genetic disorders caused by mutations of XP-associated genes, resulting in impairment of DNA repair. XP patients frequently exhibit neurological degeneration, but the underlying mechanism is unknown, in part due to lack of proper disease models. Here, we generated patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) harboring mutations in five different XP genes including XPA, XPB, XPC, XPG, and XPV. These iPSCs were further differentiated to neural cells, and their susceptibility to DNA damage stress was investigated. Mutation of XPA in either neural stem cells (NSCs) or neurons resulted in severe DNA damage repair defects, and these neural cells with mutant XPA were hyper-sensitive to DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Thus, XP-mutant neural cells represent valuable tools to clarify the molecular mechanisms of neurological abnormalities in the XP patients.

  20. The bodily self and its disorders: neurological, psychological and social aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, Peter; Lenggenhager, Bigna

    2014-12-01

    The experience of ourselves as an embodied agent with a first-person perspective is referred to as 'bodily self'. We present a selective overview of relevant clinical and experimental studies. Sharing multisensory body space with others can be observed in patients with structurally altered bodies (amputations, congenital absence of limbs), with altered functionality after hemiplegia, such as denial of limb ownership (somatoparaphrenia) and with alterations in bodily self-consciousness on the level of the entire body (e.g. in autoscopic phenomena). In healthy participants, the mechanisms underpinning body ownership and observer perspective are empirically investigated by multisensory stimulation paradigms to alter the bodily self. The resulting illusions have promoted the understanding of complex disturbances of the bodily self, such as out-of-body experiences. We discuss the role of interoception in differentiating between self and others and review current advances in the study of body integrity identity disorder, a condition shaped as much by neurological as by social-psychological factors. We advocate a social neuroscience approach to the bodily self that takes into account the interactions between body, mind and society and might help close the divide between neurology and psychiatry.

  1. PET and SPECT in neurology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Otte, Andreas (ed.) [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

    2014-07-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  2. PET and SPECT in neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Ghent Univ.; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van; Otte, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  3. Differential diagnosis between dementia and psychiatric disorders: Diagnostic criteria and supplementary exams. Recommendations of the Scientific Department of Cognitive Neurology and Aging of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottino, Cássio M C; de Pádua, Analuiza Camozzato; Smid, Jerusa; Areza-Fegyveres, Renata; Novaretti, Tânia; Bahia, Valeria S

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, the Scientific Department of Cognitive Neurology and Aging of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology published recommendations for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease These recommendations were updated following a review of evidence retrieved from national and international studies held on PUBMED, SCIELO and LILACS medical databases. The main aims of this review article are as follows: 1) to present the evidence found on Brazilian (LILACS, SCIELO) and International (MEDLINE) databases from articles published up to May 2011, on the differential diagnosis of these psychiatric disorders and dementia, with special focus on Dementia due to Alzheimer's and vascular dementia, including a review of supplementary exams which may facilitate the diagnostic process; and2) to propose recommendations for use by clinicians and researchers involved in diagnosing patients with dementia. Differential diagnosis between dementia and other neuropsychiatric disorders should always include assessments for depression, delirium , and use of psychoactive substances, as well as investigate the use of benzodiazepines, anti-epileptics and pattern of alcohol consumption.

  4. Bridging the Gap in Neurotherapeutic Discovery and Development: The Role of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke in Translational Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Meghan; Koroshetz, Walter

    2015-07-01

    The mission of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) is to seek fundamental knowledge about the brain and nervous system and to use that knowledge to reduce the burden of neurological disease. NINDS supports early- and late-stage therapy development funding programs to accelerate preclinical discovery and the development of new therapeutic interventions for neurological disorders. The NINDS Office of Translational Research facilitates and funds the movement of discoveries from the laboratory to patients. Its grantees include academics, often with partnerships with the private sector, as well as small businesses, which, by Congressional mandate, receive > 3% of the NINDS budget for small business innovation research. This article provides an overview of NINDS-funded therapy development programs offered by the NINDS Office of Translational Research.

  5. I-123 Iofetamine SPECT scan in children with neurological disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flamini, J.R.; Konkol, R.J.; Wells, R.G.; Sty, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    I-123 Iofetamine (IMP) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of the brain in 42 patients (ages 14 days to 23 years) was compared with other localizing studies in children with neurological diseases. All had an EEG and at least one imaging study of the brain (computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or both). Seventy-eight percent of the patients had an EEG within 24-72 hours of the IMP-SPECT scan. Thirty-five (83%) had a history of seizures, and the remainder had other neurological conditions without a history of seizures. In most cases, a normal EEG reading with normal CT or MRI result predicted a normal SPECT study. When the EEG was abnormal the majority of the IMP-SPECT scans were abnormal and localized the abnormality to the same region. A comparison with CT and MRI showed that structural abnormalities involving the cortex were usually well demonstrated with IMP-SPECT imaging. Structural lesions confined to the white matter were generally not detectable with IMP-SPECT. In a few cases, SPECT scans revealed abnormalities in deep brain areas not identified by EEG. IMP-SPECT imaging is a valuable technique for the detection and localization of abnormal cerebral metabolic activity in children with seizure disorders. A correlation with CT or MRI is essential for proper interpretation of abnormalities detected with IMP SPECT imaging

  6. The beneficial role of Naringin- a citrus bioflavonoid, against oxidative stress-induced neurobehavioral disorders and cognitive dysfunction in rodents: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanatha, Gollapalle Lakshminarayanashastry; Shylaja, H; Moolemath, Yogananda

    2017-10-01

    Naringin is a bioflavonoid, very abundantly found in citrus species. In literature, naringin has been scientifically well documented for its beneficial effects in various neurological disorders. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we have made an attempt to correlate the protective role of naringin against oxidative stress-induced neurological disorders in rodents. The systematic search was performed using electronic databases; the search was mainly focused on the role of naringin in oxidative stress-induced neuropathological conditions in rodents. While, the meta-analysis was performed on the effect of naringin on oxidative stress markers [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (LPO)], nitrite, mitochondrial complexes (I to IV) and enzymes (acetylcholinesterase, Na + -K + -ATPase, Ca 2+ -ATPase, and Mg 2+ -ATPase) in the rodent brain. The data was analyzed using Review Manager Software. Based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria, twenty studies were selected. The meta-analysis revealed that, naringin could significantly inhibit various physical and chemical stimuli- induced neurological perturbances in the rodent brain, mediated through oxidative stress. Further, naringin also significantly restored the levels of all the oxidative stress markers (oxidative, nitrosative, enzymes, and mitochondrial complexes) in different parts of the rodent brain. This systematic review and meta-analysis supports the available scientific evidence on the beneficial role of naringin in the management of various neurological ailments. However, further studies involving human subjects is recommended to establish the safety and therapeutic efficacy in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Movement disorders in multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica: A clinical marker of neurological disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candeias da Silva, Carolina; Bichuetti, Denis Bernardi; Azevedo Silva, Sonia Maria Cesar de; Ferraz, Henrique Ballalai; Oliveira, Enedina Maria Lobato de; Borges, Vanderci

    2018-03-03

    Movement disorders are not rare in demyelinating diseases but there are few studies comparing their frequency between multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. Our aim was to determine the frequency and the related features of movement disorders in a cohort of patients with multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. It is a cross-sectional study of patients with multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. Patients were evaluated by a movement disorder specialist. Data from a personal interview and neurological examination were collected. Fahn-Tolosa-Marin tremor rating scale was used for tremor evaluation. Health-related quality of life was assessed using EuroQol instrument. Two hundred fifty-three patients were included (mean [SD] age, 40 [12] years; 74.3% female; median [IQR] EDSS score 2.5 [1.0-6.0]); 26% presented with movement disorders. Paroxysmal dystonia (n = 32) and tremor (n = 27) were the most common movement disorders. Patients with multiple sclerosis and low Expanded Disability Status Scale score (below 4.0) have fewer movement disorders than patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. The diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder was strongly associated with paroxysmal dystonia (OR = 22.07, 95% CI = 2.56-189.78; p = 0.005). Patients with multiple sclerosis and patients without movement disorders have a slightly better quality of life. Paroxysmal dystonia was the most common movement disorder in demyelinating diseases and strongly associated with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An Overview of Multiple Sclerosis: Medical, Psychosocial, and Vocational Aspects of a Chronic and Unpredictable Neurological Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumrill, Phillip D., Jr.; Roessler, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an overview of multiple sclerosis (MS), one of the most common neurological disorders in the western hemisphere. Medical and psychosocial aspects of the disease such as causes and risk factors, diagnosis, incidence and prevalence, symptoms, courses, and treatment are described. Existing research regarding the employment…

  9. Prevalence nutritional disorders among patients hospitalised for stroke and discopathy in the neurology department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Sierżantowicz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nutritional disorders pose a huge health problem worldwide. In Poland, symptoms of malnutrition are found on admission to hospital in approximately 30% of patients. Among neurological disorders that predispose to malnutrition, brain injuries are the most frequent. The disease leads to difficulties with self-care, disorientation, reduced intellectual capacity, and dysphagia. Acute spinal pain syndromes affect weight loss because of persistent severe pain, and frequent dizziness and headaches accompanying cervical discopathy. Aim of the research: To assess the degree of malnutrition in patients with stroke and discopathy hospitalised in the neurology ward. Material and methods : The study group consisted of 141 patients, including 90 with stroke and 51 with discopathy, hospitalised in the neurology ward. Research material was collected based on medical records and a proprietary questionnaire. Body mass index (BMI was calculated and assessed for each patient on admission and after hospitalisation. Results and conclusions: The study sample consisted of a similar group of women (49% and men (51% aged from 30 to over 70 years. Ischaemic stroke was diagnosed more often in women (66.2%, whereas discopathy was more common in men (43.4%. The differences in BMI present on admission and after hospitalisation in men and women indicated a falling tendency. A slightly greater drop in BMI was found in women after hospital stay (from 24.1 to 23.3 kg/m 2 . The lowest BMI on admission was observed in students and pensioners. Long-term hospitalisation significantly affected weight reduction – the longer the patients were hospitalised, the lower their BMI was. Preliminary assessment of the nutrition status on admission to a hospital ward and customising individual diets may help reduce the effects of malnutrition.

  10. Neurologic complications of radiation therapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeld, Myrna

    1998-01-01

    Radiation induced toxicities are due to the effect of irradiation of normal surrounding tissue which is included in the radiation port. The mechanisms of radiation induced damage have not been completely elucidated. Hypotheses include direct damage to neural cells versus damage to the vascular endothelium with secondary effects on nervous system structures. Another hypothesis is that radiation damaged glial cells release antigens that are able to evoke and antimmune response against the nervous system resulting in both cellular necrosis and vascular damage. The clinical diagnosis of radiation induced neurotoxicity may be difficult especially in patients who had neurologic signs prior to treatment. It is helpful to determine if the clinical signs correlate with the irradiated site and to know the total dose received and the dose per fraction. Prior or concomitant chemotherapy may act to increase the toxicity produced by radiation. The age of the patient at the time of radiation is important as the very young and the elderly are more likely to develop toxicities. Finally, concurrent neurologic diseases such as demyelinating disorders appear to sensitize neural tissue to radiation damage. Radiation injury can occur at almost any time, from immediately after irradiation to years later. The side effects can generally be divided into those that are acute (within days), early -delayed (within 4 weeks to 4 months after treatment) and late- delayed (months to years after treatment). (The author)

  11. Common data elements for clinical research in mitochondrial disease: a National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karaa, A.; Rahman, S.; Lombes, A.; Yu-Wai-Man, P.; Sheikh, M.K.; Alai-Hansen, S.; Cohen, B.H.; Dimmock, D.; Emrick, L.; Falk, M.J.; McCormack, S.; Mirsky, D.; Moore, T.; Parikh, S.; Shoffner, J.; Taivassalo, T.; Tarnopolsky, M.; Tein, I.; Odenkirchen, J.C.; Goldstein, A.; Koene, S.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; et al.,

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The common data elements (CDE) project was developed by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) to provide clinical researchers with tools to improve data quality and allow for harmonization of data collected in different research studies. CDEs have been

  12. Human iPSC-Derived Neural Progenitors Are an Effective Drug Discovery Model for Neurological mtDNA Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Carmen; Lesimple, Pierre; Bukowiecki, Raul; Zink, Annika; Inak, Gizem; Mlody, Barbara; Singh, Manvendra; Semtner, Marcus; Mah, Nancy; Auré, Karine; Leong, Megan; Zabiegalov, Oleksandr; Lyras, Ekaterini-Maria; Pfiffer, Vanessa; Fauler, Beatrix; Eichhorst, Jenny; Wiesner, Burkhard; Huebner, Norbert; Priller, Josef; Mielke, Thorsten; Meierhofer, David; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Meier, Jochen C; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Adjaye, James; Schuelke, Markus; Wanker, Erich E; Lombès, Anne; Prigione, Alessandro

    2017-05-04

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations frequently cause neurological diseases. Modeling of these defects has been difficult because of the challenges associated with engineering mtDNA. We show here that neural progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) retain the parental mtDNA profile and exhibit a metabolic switch toward oxidative phosphorylation. NPCs derived in this way from patients carrying a deleterious homoplasmic mutation in the mitochondrial gene MT-ATP6 (m.9185T>C) showed defective ATP production and abnormally high mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), plus altered calcium homeostasis, which represents a potential cause of neural impairment. High-content screening of FDA-approved drugs using the MMP phenotype highlighted avanafil, which we found was able to partially rescue the calcium defect in patient NPCs and differentiated neurons. Overall, our results show that iPSC-derived NPCs provide an effective model for drug screening to target mtDNA disorders that affect the nervous system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Neurologic disorders, in-hospital deaths, and years of potential life lost in the USA, 1988-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Benjamin P; Kelly, Michael L; Kshettry, Varun R; Weil, Robert J

    2014-11-01

    Premature mortality is a public health concern that can be quantified as years of potential life lost (YPLL). Studying premature mortality can help guide hospital initiatives and resource allocation. We investigated the categories of neurologic and neurosurgical conditions associated with in-hospital deaths that account for the highest YPLL and their trends over time. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), we calculated YPLL for patients hospitalized in the USA from 1988 to 2011. Hospitalizations were categorized by related neurologic principal diagnoses. An estimated 2,355,673 in-hospital deaths accounted for an estimated 25,598,566 YPLL. The traumatic brain injury (TBI) category accounted for the highest annual mean YPLL at 361,748 (33.9% of total neurologic YPLL). Intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral ischemia, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and anoxic brain damage completed the group of five diagnoses with the highest YPLL. TBI accounted for 12.1% of all inflation adjusted neurologic hospital charges and 22.4% of inflation adjusted charges among neurologic deaths. The in-hospital mortality rate has been stable or decreasing for all of these diagnoses except TBI, which rose from 5.1% in 1988 to 7.8% in 2011. Using YPLL, we provide a framework to compare the burden of premature in-hospital mortality on patients with neurologic disorders, which may prove useful for informing decisions related to allocation of health resources or research funding. Considering premature mortality alone, increased efforts should be focused on TBI, particularly in and related to the hospital setting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Measles vaccination in children with neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Kaplina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The data on the current vaccination process and specific antibody in 212 children with pathology of nervous systems in age from 1 year to 6 years old, vaccinated against measles. The comparison group consisted of 36 children without neurological disease. 86 children (40,6% were vaccinated measles – mumps vaccine, and 126 children (59,4% only measles vaccine. Post-vaccination period in 77,8% immunized against measles, was uneventful, layering intercurrent infections was noted in 22,2% of vaccine’s, and demonstrated the development of viral respiratory infections, bronchitis, otitis media and exacerbation of underlying disease. It is shown that the level of specific antibody to measles in children with pathology of nervous systems at 30 days after vaccination was 5,04±0,16 log 2, which did not differ from the comparison group (5,88±0,31 log 2. No significant differences in the level of antibody in a smooth and complicated course of vaccination period were found. Immunization of children with disorders of the nervous system of live vaccines is quite effective and leads to the formation of protective antibody titers in all vaccinated.

  15. Neurogenetics in Child Neurology: Redefining a Discipline in the Twenty-first Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Walter E

    2016-12-01

    Increasing knowledge on genetic etiology of pediatric neurologic disorders is affecting the practice of the specialty. I reviewed here the history of pediatric neurologic disorder classification and the role of genetics in the process. I also discussed the concept of clinical neurogenetics, with its role in clinical practice, education, and research. Finally, I propose a flexible model for clinical neurogenetics in child neurology in the twenty-first century. In combination with disorder-specific clinical programs, clinical neurogenetics can become a home for complex clinical issues, repository of genetic diagnostic advances, educational resource, and research engine in child neurology.

  16. Xeroderma pigmentosum exhibiting neurological disorders and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hananian, J; Cleaver, J E

    1980-01-01

    A patient is described who has a unique combination of symptoms that correspond with two sun-sensitive conditions: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Both of these conditions have been suggested as being associated with a defect in DNA repair, but this is only clearly established for XP. The patient described is the only known case among US blacks, thus far, although African black cases are known. Her DNA repair levels are 20-30% of normal, within the range found for many XP cell cultures and consistent with her assignment to group C by other investigators. Unusual for group C cases, however, are the neurological disorders, some of which correspond to those found in the de Sanctis Cacchione form of XP, which is commonly assigned to group A. Whether the associated SLE is a consequence of some special aspect of this particular XP condition or whether it is fortuitous cannot be resolved at present. 25 references, 2 figures.

  17. Perception of pediatric neurology among non-neurologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Mohammed M S

    2004-01-01

    Pediatric neurology is considered a relatively new and evolving subspecialty. In Saudi Arabia, neurologic disorders in children are common, and the demand for trained pediatric neurologists is strong. The aim was to study the perception of the pediatric neurology specialty among practicing generalists and their referral practices. Attendees of a symposium on pediatric epilepsy comprehensive review for the generalist were included. A structured 25-item questionnaire was designed to examine their demographics, training, practice, and referral patterns. One hundred nineteen participants attended the symposium, and 90 (76%) questionnaires were returned. Attendees' ages were 22 to 70 years (mean 32 years), with 65.5% female physicians. There were 32% consultants, 51% trainees, and 17% students. Most physicians (67%) were practicing general pediatrics. Only 36% received a structured pediatric neurology rotation during training. Children with neurologic complaints constituted 28.5% of those seen in their practice, and they referred 32.5% of them to pediatric neurology. Only 32% were moderately or highly confident in making the diagnosis or providing the appropriate treatment. Those who received a structured pediatric neurology rotation felt more comfortable in their management (P = .03). Many physicians (38.5%) had no direct access to a pediatric neurologist for referrals. To conclude, pediatric neurologic disorders are common in daily practice. Most generalists did not receive a structured neurology rotation during their training and were not highly confident in diagnosing and treating these children. Given the limited number of pediatric neurologists, I highly recommend that generalists receive appropriate neurologic training.

  18. Historical perspective of Indian neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shrikant; Trikamji, Bhavesh; Singh, Sandeep; Singh, Parampreet; Nair, Rajasekharan

    2013-10-01

    To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. THE HISTORY OF NEUROLOGY IN INDIA IS DIVIDED INTO TWO PERIODS: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C.) during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20(th) century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation's first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835), Calcutta (1835) and Mumbai (1848). Prior to India's independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI). Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN). Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930's. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951) include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991). The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in the amount of basic, clinical and epidemiological research being

  19. Biomarker discovery in neurological diseases: a metabolomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afaf El-Ansary

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Afaf El-Ansary, Nouf Al-Afaleg, Yousra Al-YafaeeBiochemistry Department, Science College, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Biomarkers are pharmacological and physiological measurements or specific biochemicals in the body that have a particular molecular feature that makes them useful for measuring the progress of disease or the effects of treatment. Due to the complexity of neurological disorders, it is very difficult to have perfect markers. Brain diseases require plenty of markers to reflect the metabolic impairment of different brain cells. The recent introduction of the metabolomic approach helps the study of neurological diseases based on profiling a multitude of biochemical components related to brain metabolism. This review is a trial to elucidate the possibility to use this approach to identify plasma metabolic markers related to neurological disorders. Previous trials using different metabolomic analyses including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry, and capillary electrophoresis will be traced.Keywords: metabolic biomarkers, neurological disorders. metabolome, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, chromatography

  20. Neurological soft signs in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Their relationship to executive function and parental neurological soft signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jingbo; Xie, Jingtao; Chen, Gui; Zhang, Yajie; Wang, Suhong

    2015-07-30

    The correlations between neurological soft signs (NSS) in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and their executive function, symptoms of inattention, and hyperactivity-impulsivity and the NSS of their parents remain unclear. This study aimed to examine: (1) the prevalence of NSS in children with ADHD and their parents; (2) the correlation between the NSS of children with ADHD and the NSS of their parents; and (3) the correlation between the NSS of children with ADHD and their executive function and symptoms. NSS were assessed with the Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI) in 57 children with ADHD (and 80 parents) and 60 healthy children (and 75 parents). Executive function was measured with the Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF). Children with ADHD and their parents had significantly higher NSS than normal children and their parents, respectively, and the NSS of children with ADHD were correlated more strongly with the NSS of their fathers than their mothers. No correlation was found between NSS and BRIEF executive function, but Disinhibition in children with ADHD was significantly correlated with hyperactivity-impulsivity symptoms. Paternal and maternal NSS provided different predictions for child NSS. It may be that NSS are more likely to be genetically transmitted by fathers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Morbidity and Mortality Patterns among Neurological Patients in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Objective: The morbidity and mortality of neurological patients managed in the intensive care unit reflect the causes of neurological disorders and the effectiveness of management. Method: The morbidity and mortality patterns of neurological patients admitted into the intensive care unit of the University of Benin ...

  2. Efficacy of modafinil on fatigue and excessive daytime sleepiness associated with neurological disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Sheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modafinil is a novel wake-promoting agent approved by the FDA ameliorating excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS in three disorders: narcolepsy, shift work sleep disorder and obstructive sleep apnea. Existing trials of modafinil for fatigue and EDS associated with neurological disorders provided inconsistent results. This meta-analysis was aimed to assess drug safety and effects of modafinil on fatigue and EDS associated with neurological disorders. METHODS: A comprehensive literature review was conducted in order to identify published studies assessing the effects of modafinil on fatigue and EDS associated with neurological disorders. Primary outcomes included fatigue and EDS. Secondary outcomes included depression and adverse effects. FINDINGS: Ten randomized controlled trials were identified including 4 studies of Parkinson's disease (PD, 3 of multiple sclerosis (MS, 2 of traumatic brain injury (TBI and 1 of post-polio syndrome (PPS. A total of 535 patients were enrolled. Our results suggested a therapeutic effect of modafinil on fatigue in TBI (MD -0.82 95% CI -1.54 - -0.11 p=0.02, I(2=0%, while a beneficial effect of modafinil on fatigue was not confirmed in the pooled studies of PD or MS. Treatment results demonstrated a clear beneficial effect of modafinil on EDS in patients with PD (MD -2.45 95% CI -4.00 - -0.91 p=0.002 I(2=14%, but not with MS and TBI. No difference was seen between modafinil and placebo treatments in patients with PPS. Modafinil seemed to have no therapeutic effect on depression. Adverse events were similar between modafinil and placebo groups except that more patients were found with insomnia and nausea in modafinil group. CONCLUSIONS: Existing trials of modafinil for fatigue and EDS associated with PD, MS, TBI and PPS provided inconsistent results. The majority of the studies had small sample sizes. Modafinil is not yet sufficient to be recommended for these medical conditions until solid data are available.

  3. Neurological soft signs in antisocial men and relation with psychopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Omer Faruk; Demirel, Aysegul; Kadak, Muhammed Tayyib; Emül, Murat; Duran, Alaattin

    2016-06-30

    Neurological soft signs (NSS) were studied in some axis-I disorders like schizophrenia, obsessive compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder, alcohol and substance abuse disorder. Aim of this study is detection of neurological soft signs in antisocial personality disorder and relation of these signs with psychopathy. The study was included 41 antisocial men and 41 healthy control subjects. Sociodemographic form, neurological evaluation scale and Hare psychopathy checklist was applied to the antisocial subjects, whereas sociodemographic form and neurological evaluation scale were applied to the controls. Antisocial men exhibited significiantly more NSS in total score and subgroups scales (ppsychopathy scores and NSS sequencing complex motor tasks (r=0.309; p=0.049) and NSS other tests subgroup scores (r=0.328; p=0.037). Similar relation was also observed in comparison between psychopathy subgroups. NSS accepted as being endophenotypes in schizophrenia, were also detected in antisocial group significantly more than controls in our study. Significant relationship between psychopathy and NSS may also hint the role of genetic mechanisms in personality development, though new extended studies with larger sample size are needed for clarification of this relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Charles Miller Fisher: the grandmaster of neurological observation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutake, Toshio

    2014-11-01

    Charles Miller Fisher is widely regarded as the father of modern stroke neurology. He discovered almost all pathomechanisms of cerebral infarction, including embolism from atrial fibrillation, carotid artery disease, and lacunar infarcts and their syndromes, by the most meticulous clinico-pathological observations. Moreover, his work provided the basis for treatments such as anticoagulation, antiplatelet therapy, and carotid endarterectomy. He also contributed greatly to several topics of General Neurology; for example, migraine, normal pressure hydrocephalus, and Miller Fisher syndrome. In his late years, he tried to expand the neurological field to the more complex disorders of human behavior, including hysteria, dementia, and ill-defined pain syndromes. He thus became known as the grandmaster of refined neurological observation. His lifelong detailed studies were crucially important in helping neurologists all over the world recognize disorders and syndromes that had not previously been understood.

  5. Effects of music and music therapy on mood in neurological patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raglio, Alfredo; Attardo, Lapo; Gontero, Giulia; Rollino, Silvia; Groppo, Elisabetta; Granieri, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Mood disorder and depressive syndromes represent a common comorbid condition in neurological disorders with a prevalence rate that ranges between 20% and 50% of patients with stroke, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson’s disease. Notwithstanding, these conditions are often under-diagnosed and under-treated in the clinical practice and negatively affect the functional recovery, the adherence to treatment, the quality of life, and even the mortality risk. In addition, a bidirectional association between depression and neurological disorders may be possible being that depressive syndromes may be considered as a risk factor for certain neurological diseases. Despite the large amount of evidence regarding the effects of music therapy (MT) and other musical interventions on different aspects of neurological disorders, no updated article reviewing outcomes such as mood, emotions, depression, activity of daily living and so on is actually available; for this reason, little is known about the effectiveness of music and MT on these important outcomes in neurological patients. The aim of this article is to provide a narrative review of the current literature on musical interventions and their effects on mood and depression in patients with neurological disorders. Searching on PubMed and PsycInfo databases, 25 studies corresponding to the inclusion criteria have been selected; 11 of them assess the effects of music or MT in Dementia, 9 explore the efficacy on patients with Stroke, and 5 regard other neurological diseases like Multiple Sclerosis, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/motor neuron disease, Chronic quadriplegia, Parkinson’s Disease, and Acquired Brain dysfunctions. Selected studies are based on relational and rehabilitative music therapy approaches or concern music listening interventions. Most of the studies support the efficacy of MT and other musical interventions on mood, depressive syndromes, and quality of life on neurological patients. PMID:25815256

  6. Effects of music and music therapy on mood in neurological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raglio, Alfredo; Attardo, Lapo; Gontero, Giulia; Rollino, Silvia; Groppo, Elisabetta; Granieri, Enrico

    2015-03-22

    Mood disorder and depressive syndromes represent a common comorbid condition in neurological disorders with a prevalence rate that ranges between 20% and 50% of patients with stroke, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease. Notwithstanding, these conditions are often under-diagnosed and under-treated in the clinical practice and negatively affect the functional recovery, the adherence to treatment, the quality of life, and even the mortality risk. In addition, a bidirectional association between depression and neurological disorders may be possible being that depressive syndromes may be considered as a risk factor for certain neurological diseases. Despite the large amount of evidence regarding the effects of music therapy (MT) and other musical interventions on different aspects of neurological disorders, no updated article reviewing outcomes such as mood, emotions, depression, activity of daily living and so on is actually available; for this reason, little is known about the effectiveness of music and MT on these important outcomes in neurological patients. The aim of this article is to provide a narrative review of the current literature on musical interventions and their effects on mood and depression in patients with neurological disorders. Searching on PubMed and PsycInfo databases, 25 studies corresponding to the inclusion criteria have been selected; 11 of them assess the effects of music or MT in Dementia, 9 explore the efficacy on patients with Stroke, and 5 regard other neurological diseases like Multiple Sclerosis, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/motor neuron disease, Chronic quadriplegia, Parkinson's Disease, and Acquired Brain dysfunctions. Selected studies are based on relational and rehabilitative music therapy approaches or concern music listening interventions. Most of the studies support the efficacy of MT and other musical interventions on mood, depressive syndromes, and quality of life on neurological patients.

  7. Male sexual dysfunction and infertility associated with neurological disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Krogh-Jespersen, Sheila; Brackett, Nancy L

    2012-01-01

    Normal sexual and reproductive functions depend largely on neurological mechanisms. Neurological defects in men can cause infertility through erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities. Among the major conditions contributing to these symptoms are pelvic and retroperito...... December 2011; doi:10.1038/aja.2011.70....

  8. Addition of Kinesio Taping of the orbicularis oris muscles to speech therapy rapidly improves drooling in children with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Denise Lica Yoshimura; Furia, Cristina Lemos Barbosa; Welker, Alexis Fonseca

    2017-09-21

    To evaluate the effects of Kinesio Taping (KT) of the orbicularis oris muscles as an adjunct to standard therapy for drooling. Fifteen children with neurological disorders and drooling received speech therapy and twice-weekly KT of the orbicularis muscles over a 30-day period. Drooling was assessed by six parameters: impact on the life of the child and caregiver; severity of drooling; frequency of drooling; drooling volume (estimated by number of bibs used); salivary leak; and interlabial gap. Seven markers of oral motor skills were also assessed. KT of the orbicularis oris region reduced the interlabial gap. All oral motor skills and almost all markers of drooling improved after 15 days of treatment. In this sample of children with neurological disorders, adding KT of the orbicularis oris muscles to speech therapy caused rapid improvement in oral motor skills and drooling.

  9. Complementary and alternative medicine in chronic neurological pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shri Kant Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a growing trend towards opting for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in the therapeutic management of various medical disorders. We try to evaluate the current recommendations for CAM therapies in key neurological disorders. Materials and Methods: Sources like PubMed, Embase, UCLA libraries, USC libraries, and National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM books were searched to gather data for this review. Results: We discuss the current recommendations for CAM therapies in headaches, neck pains, lower back pains, neuropathic pains, and cancer-related pains. The CAM therapies discussed include natural therapies, mind and body therapies, and several other modalities. Conclusion: We conclude that in spite of vast literature available on the CAM therapies for neurological disorders; there is little evidence for the most beneficial CAM remedies that target common neurological disorders. Although new CAM modalities are brought to light in addition to those that have existed for centuries, further scientific data from evidence-based studies is needed to accurately compare the CAM therapies amongst each other and allopathic treatments.

  10. Disease mongering in neurological disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kochen, Sara Silvia; Córdoba, Marta

    2017-01-01

    “Diseases mongering”, than a simple definition would be enforced "to promote or sell disease". The main and common characteristhics of all these "diseases" is that they are amenable to treatment with drugs. So, the pharmaceutical industry redefining the concept of disease, the normal and pathological. In Neurology exploits the deepest atavistic fears of suffering and death. We select some diseases, the choise was based on lack or weak evidence in definition of disease; or cost benefit of trea...

  11. Neurological aspects of acute radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torubarov, F.S.; Bushmanov, A.Yu.

    1999-01-01

    Results of the most important clinical studies of human nervous system reactions to acute radiation, carried out at Neurology Clinic of the State Research Center of Russia - Institute of Biophysics are presented. Clinical picture of changes in the nervous system in acute radiation disease caused by homologous and heterologous external irradiation is described. Main neurological syndrome of extremely severe acute radiation disease: acute radiation encephalopathy, radiation toxic encephalopathy, and hemorrhagic syndrome of the central nervous system is distinguished. Relationship between neurological disorders and the geometry of exposure are considered [ru

  12. Neurological development of children born to liver transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber-Zamora, J; Kociszewska-Najman, B; Borek-Dzięcioł, B; Drozdowska-Szymczak, A; Czaplińska, N; Pawlik, O; Cyganek, A; Pietrzak, B; Wielgoś, M

    2014-10-01

    Immunosuppressive treatment used in pregnant liver recipients may have a negative impact on fetal development and successively a child. The aim of the study was to make a neurological assessment of infants and children born to liver transplant recipients (LTRs) born between December 4, 2001, and February 11, 2013, in the 1(st) Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Warsaw. The study involved 88 children, of whom 44 children were born to LTR mothers, and 44 children born to women who were not organ recipients and delivered at a similar gestational age. The gestational age of neonates ranged from 33 to 41 weeks, and the birth weight ranged from 1420 g to 4100 g. The neurological examination was performed in children from 7 weeks to 10 years of age. The neurological development was assessed by a specialist in pediatric neurology. The results of the examination were divided according to the following criteria: 1) normal development, 2) slight disorders, 3) moderate disorders, and 4) severe disorders. The Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis. Normal development was found in 35 of 44 (79.54%) children in the LTR group and 39 of 44 (88.63%) children in the control group (P = .3827). Slight disorders were observed in 6 of 44 (13.63%) children in LTR group and 5 of 44 (11.36%) children in the control group. Moderate disorders were found only in 3 of 44 (6.81%) children in the LTR group. No severe disorders were observed in both groups. Neurological development of children born to the liver recipients who were exposed to chronic immunosuppressive treatment in their fetal lives is the same as that of children whose mothers have not undergone organ transplantation.

  13. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C. during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20 th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation′s first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835, Calcutta (1835 and Mumbai (1848. Prior to India′s independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI. Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN. Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930′s. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951 include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991. The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in

  14. What have we learned about the kallikrein-kinin and renin-angiotensin systems in neurological disorders?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria; da; Graa; Naffah-Mazzacoratti; Telma; Luciana; Furtado; Gouveia; Priscila; Santos; Rodrigues; Simōes; Sandra; Regina; Perosa

    2014-01-01

    The kallikrein-kinin system(KKS) is an intricate endogenous pathway involved in several physiological and pathological cascades in the brain. Due to the pathological effects of kinins in blood vessels and tissues, their formation and degradation are tightly controlled. Their components have been related to several central nervous system diseases such as stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy and others. Bradykinin and its receptors(B1R and B2R) may have a role in the pathophysiology of certain central nervous system diseases. It has been suggested that kinin B1R is up-regulated in pathological conditions and has a neurodegenerative pattern, while kinin B2R is constitutive and can act as a neuroprotective factor in many neurological conditions. The renin angiotensin system(RAS) is an important blood pressure regulator and controls both sodium and water intake. AngⅡ is a potent vasoconstrictor molecule and angiotensin converting enzyme is the major enzyme responsible for its release. AngⅡ acts mainly on the AT1 receptor, with involvement in several systemic and neurological disorders. Brain RAS has been associated with physiological pathways, but is also associated with brain disorders. This review describes topics relating to the involvement of both systems in several forms of brain dysfunction and indicates components of the KKS and RAS that have been used as targets in several pharmacological approaches.

  15. Neonatal neurological disorders involving the brainstem: neurosonographic approaches through the squamous suture and the foramen magnum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, Yi-Fang; Chen, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Yuh-Jey; Chang, Ying-Chao; Huang, Chao-Ching

    2005-01-01

    Brainstem damage which often indicates a critical condition is usually underestimated by trans-anterior-fontanel neurosonography (NS) owing to the far-field limitations. Instead, NS alternately scanning through the squamous suture of the temporal bones and the foramen magnum could provide a better visualization of the brainstem structures. The NS characteristics of brainstem lesions caused by various neonatal neurological disorders, such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), metabolic encephalopathy, birth trauma and bacterial meningoencephalitis, can be depicted at the acute stage. An echogenic change in the midbrain was found in patients with HIE or metabolic encephalopathy. In addition to the echogenic change, bilateral transtentorial temporal lobe herniation distorting the contour of the midbrain was observed in a patient with group B streptococcus meningoencephalitis, whereas echogenic changes at the level of the pons and/or the medulla oblongata, mainly localized in the dorsal part, could be observed in newborns with severe HIE, maple syrup urine disease or birth trauma. In this pictorial assay, we demonstrate the feasibility of NS imaging in evaluating the entire brainstem structure of critically ill neonates in the near field and illustrate the characteristic features of brainstem involvement in various neonatal neurological disorders along with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging correlation. (orig.)

  16. Neonatal neurological disorders involving the brainstem: neurosonographic approaches through the squamous suture and the foramen magnum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Yi-Fang [National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine, Tainan (Taiwan); Chen, Cheng-Yu [National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (Taiwan); Lin, Yuh-Jey [National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Tainan (Taiwan); Chang, Ying-Chao [Kaohsiung Chang Gung Children Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung (Taiwan); Huang, Chao-Ching [National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Tainan (Taiwan); National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Institute of Molecular Medicine, Tainan (Taiwan)

    2005-09-01

    Brainstem damage which often indicates a critical condition is usually underestimated by trans-anterior-fontanel neurosonography (NS) owing to the far-field limitations. Instead, NS alternately scanning through the squamous suture of the temporal bones and the foramen magnum could provide a better visualization of the brainstem structures. The NS characteristics of brainstem lesions caused by various neonatal neurological disorders, such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), metabolic encephalopathy, birth trauma and bacterial meningoencephalitis, can be depicted at the acute stage. An echogenic change in the midbrain was found in patients with HIE or metabolic encephalopathy. In addition to the echogenic change, bilateral transtentorial temporal lobe herniation distorting the contour of the midbrain was observed in a patient with group B streptococcus meningoencephalitis, whereas echogenic changes at the level of the pons and/or the medulla oblongata, mainly localized in the dorsal part, could be observed in newborns with severe HIE, maple syrup urine disease or birth trauma. In this pictorial assay, we demonstrate the feasibility of NS imaging in evaluating the entire brainstem structure of critically ill neonates in the near field and illustrate the characteristic features of brainstem involvement in various neonatal neurological disorders along with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging correlation. (orig.)

  17. The Profile of Neurology Patients Evaluated in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Ufuk Emre; Ayşe Semra Demir; Esra Acıman; Nejla Çabuk; Sibel Kıran; Aysun Ünal

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Early, rapid, and multidisciplinary approaches are very important in the diagnosis of neurological disorders in emergency departments. The present study aimed to investigate the features of patients that presented for neurology consultation in the emergency department. METHODS: The present study included 780 patients. Patient demographic features, reasons for emergent treatment and neurological consultation, neurological diagnosis by the neurologist, and laboratory (total blood...

  18. CDKL5 variants: Improving our understanding of a rare neurologic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hector, Ralph D; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Hennig, Friederike; Leonard, Helen; Downs, Jenny; Clarke, Angus; Benke, Tim A; Armstrong, Judith; Pineda, Mercedes; Bailey, Mark E S; Cobb, Stuart R

    2017-12-01

    To provide new insights into the interpretation of genetic variants in a rare neurologic disorder, CDKL5 deficiency, in the contexts of population sequencing data and an updated characterization of the CDKL5 gene. We analyzed all known potentially pathogenic CDKL5 variants by combining data from large-scale population sequencing studies with CDKL5 variants from new and all available clinical cohorts and combined this with computational methods to predict pathogenicity. The study has identified several variants that can be reclassified as benign or likely benign. With the addition of novel CDKL5 variants, we confirm that pathogenic missense variants cluster in the catalytic domain of CDKL5 and reclassify a purported missense variant as having a splicing consequence. We provide further evidence that missense variants in the final 3 exons are likely to be benign and not important to disease pathology. We also describe benign splicing and nonsense variants within these exons, suggesting that isoform hCDKL5_5 is likely to have little or no neurologic significance. We also use the available data to make a preliminary estimate of minimum incidence of CDKL5 deficiency. These findings have implications for genetic diagnosis, providing evidence for the reclassification of specific variants previously thought to result in CDKL5 deficiency. Together, these analyses support the view that the predominant brain isoform in humans (hCDKL5_1) is crucial for normal neurodevelopment and that the catalytic domain is the primary functional domain.

  19. The Profile of Neurology Patients Evaluated in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Emre

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Early, rapid, and multidisciplinary approaches are very important in the diagnosis of neurological disorders in emergency departments. The present study aimed to investigate the features of patients that presented for neurology consultation in the emergency department. METHODS: The present study included 780 patients. Patient demographic features, reasons for emergent treatment and neurological consultation, neurological diagnosis by the neurologist, and laboratory (total blood count, serum glucose level, urea, creatine, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and D-dimer levels and imaging findings were retrospectively evaluated based on patient charts. RESULTS: Impaired consciousness was the most frequent reason for neurological consultation (19.7%. Among these patients, ischemic stroke was diagnosed in 27.9%, hypoxic encephalopathy in 18.2%, cerebral hemorrhage in 9.1%, and 11% had no neurological diagnosis. Other common reasons for neurological consultation were vertigo, headache, seizure, and stroke. Clinical findings were related to other systemic causes in 43.7% of the study group. Focal neurological findings were present, especially in patients that presented with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, epilepsy, and hypoxic encephalopathy. CONCLUSION: In emergency departments, metabolic causes should be ruled out in patients with impaired consciousness and the absence of focal neurological signs. Intracranial structural disorders must be evaluated when focal neurological signs are present. Cautiously prepared algorithms and neurological examination training will help improve the accuracy of emergency department diagnoses

  20. Obsessive–Compulsive Symptoms in Neurologic Disease: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. George

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD is an increasingly recognized disorder with a prevalence of 2–3% (Robins et al., 1984. Once thought to be psychodynamic in origin, OCD is now generally recognized as having a neurobiological cause. Although the exact pathophysiology of OCD in its pure form remains unknown, there are numerous reports of obsessive–compulsive symptoms arising in the setting of known neurological disease. In this paper, we review the reported cases of obsessive–compulsive symptoms associated with neurologic diseases and outline the known facts about the underlying neurobiology of OCD. Finally, we synthesize these findings into a proposed theory of the pathophysiology of OCD, in both its pure form and when it accompanies other neurological illness.

  1. ESPEN guideline clinical nutrition in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Rosa; Bretón, Irene; Cereda, Emanuele; Desport, Jean Claude; Dziewas, Rainer; Genton, Laurence; Gomes, Filomena; Jésus, Pierre; Leischker, Andreas; Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Poulia, Kalliopi-Anna; Preiser, Jean Charles; Van der Marck, Marjolein; Wirth, Rainer; Singer, Pierre; Bischoff, Stephan C

    2018-02-01

    Neurological diseases are frequently associated with swallowing disorders and malnutrition. Moreover, patients with neurological diseases are at increased risk of micronutrient deficiency and dehydration. On the other hand, nutritional factors may be involved in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. Multiple causes for the development of malnutrition in patients with neurological diseases are known including oropharyngeal dysphagia, impaired consciousness, perception deficits, cognitive dysfunction, and increased needs. The present evidence- and consensus-based guideline addresses clinical questions on best medical nutrition therapy in patients with neurological diseases. Among them, management of oropharyngeal dysphagia plays a pivotal role. The guideline has been written by a multidisciplinary team and offers 88 recommendations for use in clinical practice for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, stroke and multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  2. Effectiveness of external cues to facilitate task performance in people with neurological disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Stephanie L; Laver, Kate E; Ninnis, Kayla; Rowett, Cherie; Lannin, Natasha A; Crotty, Maria

    2018-03-09

    To examine in people with neurological disorders, which method/s of providing external cues to improve task performance are most effective. Medline, EMBASE, and PsycINFO were systematically searched. Two reviewers independently screened, extracted data, and assessed the quality of the evidence using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE). Twenty six studies were included. Studies examined a wide-range of cues including visual, tactile, auditory, verbal, and multi-component cues. Cueing (any type) improved walking speed when comparing cues to no cues (mean difference (95% confidence interval): 0.08 m/s (0.06-0.10), I 2  = 68%, low quality of evidence). Remaining evidence was analysed narratively; evidence that cueing improves activity-related outcomes was inconsistent and rated as very low quality. It was not possible to determine which form of cueing may be more effective than others. Providing cues to encourage successful task performance is a core component of rehabilitation, however there is limited evidence on the type of cueing or which tasks benefit most from external cueing. Low-quality evidence suggests there may be a beneficial effect of cueing (any type) on walking speed. Sufficiently powered randomised controlled trials are needed to inform therapists of the most effective cueing strategies to improve activity performance in populations with a neurological disorder. Implications for rehabilitation Providing cues is a core component of rehabilitation and may improve successful task performance and activities in people with neurological conditions including stroke, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury, and multiple sclerosis, but evidence is limited for most neurological conditions with much research focusing on stroke and Parkinson's disease. Therapists should consider using a range of different types of cues depending on the aims of treatment and the neurological condition. There is

  3. Disorder-induced stiffness degradation of highly disordered porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubie, Hadrien; Monfared, Siavash; Radjaï, Farhang; Pellenq, Roland; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2017-09-01

    The effective mechanical behavior of multiphase solid materials is generally modeled by means of homogenization techniques that account for phase volume fractions and elastic moduli without considering the spatial distribution of the different phases. By means of extensive numerical simulations of randomly generated porous materials using the lattice element method, the role of local textural properties on the effective elastic properties of disordered porous materials is investigated and compared with different continuum micromechanics-based models. It is found that the pronounced disorder-induced stiffness degradation originates from stress concentrations around pore clusters in highly disordered porous materials. We identify a single disorder parameter, φsa, which combines a measure of the spatial disorder of pores (the clustering index, sa) with the pore volume fraction (the porosity, φ) to scale the disorder-induced stiffness degradation. Thus, we conclude that the classical continuum micromechanics models with one spherical pore phase, due to their underlying homogeneity assumption fall short of addressing the clustering effect, unless additional texture information is introduced, e.g. in form of the shift of the percolation threshold with disorder, or other functional relations between volume fractions and spatial disorder; as illustrated herein for a differential scheme model representative of a two-phase (solid-pore) composite model material.

  4. Neurologic Manifestations of Vitamin B Deficiency after Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punchai, Suriya; Hanipah, Zubaidah Nor; Meister, Katherine M; Schauer, Philip R; Brethauer, Stacy A; Aminian, Ali

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the incidence, clinical presentation, and outcomes of neurologic disorders secondary to vitamin B deficiencies following bariatric surgery. Patients at a single academic institution who underwent bariatric surgery and developed neurologic complications secondary to low levels of vitamins B1, B2, B6, and B12 between the years 2004 and 2015 were studied. In total, 47 (0.7%) bariatric surgical patients (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass n = 36, sleeve gastrectomy n = 9, and duodenal switch n = 2) developed neurologic manifestations secondary to vitamin B deficiencies. Eleven (23%) patients developed postoperative anatomical complications contributed to poor oral intake. Median duration to onset of neurologic manifestation following surgery was 12 months (IQR, 5-32). Vitamin deficiencies reported in the cohort included B1 (n = 30), B2 (n = 1), B6 (n = 12), and B12 (n = 12) deficiency. The most common manifestations were paresthesia (n = 31), muscle weakness (n = 15), abnormal gait (n = 11), and polyneuropathy (n = 7). Four patients were diagnosed with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) which was developed after gastric bypass (n = 3) and sleeve gastrectomy (n = 1). Seven patients required readmission for management of severe vitamin B deficiencies. Overall, resolution of neurologic symptoms with nutritional interventions and pharmacotherapy was noted in 40 patients (85%). The WKS was not reversible, and all four patients had residual mild ataxia and nystagmus at the last follow-up time. Nutritional neurologic disorders secondary to vitamin B deficiency are relatively uncommon after bariatric surgery. While neurologic disorders are reversible in most patients (85%) with vitamin replacements, persistent residual neurologic symptoms are common in patients with WKS.

  5. Severe neurological complication following adjustable gastric banding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martines, G; Musa, N; Aquilino, F; Capuano, P

    2018-01-01

    In the last years with the increase of bariatric surgery, first of all as a result of new indications, a rise in the incidence of nutrient-related complications has been observed. Currently little is known about the impact of post-bariatric malnutrition and neurological complications. Wernicke's encephalopathy is a severe neurological syndrome which occurs as a result of thiamine deficiency. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome must be considered a serious neurological complication of bariatric surgery with significant morbidity and mortality, with rapidly progressing neurological symptoms, and must be treated immediately. We report the case of a 35 years-old male patient, affected by morbid obesity, anxious-depressive syndrome and alcohol use disorder, who after adjustable gastric banding implanted in another hospital developed a severe malnutrition and neurological syndrome. The patient showed poor adherence to the follow-up and to the dietary indications and after all, we needed to place a PEG for enteral nutrition in order to resolve the malnutrition condition and the neurological syndrome. Our experience emphasizes that preoperative selection and assessment of a patient's nutritional status according to guidelines, is required to identify potential problems, and that bariatric surgeons or physicians caring for patient who have undergone bariatric surgery should be familiar with the constellation of nutritional and neurological disorder that may occur after surgery. We want to remark the importance of preoperative selection of the patients, the follow-up and the cooperation between patient and physician in order to obtain the best result and avoid severe complications.

  6. Reliability and Validity of the Assessment of Neurological Soft-Signs in Children with and without Attention-Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Peik; Svedin, Carl Goran; Ericsson, Ingegerd; Linden, Christian; Karlsson, Magnus K.; Thernlund, Gunilla

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To study the value and reliability of an examination of neurological soft-signs, often used in Sweden, in the assessment of children with attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), by examining children with and without ADHD, as diagnosed by an experienced clinician using the DSM-III-R. Method: We have examined interrater reliability…

  7. Genetic test utilization and diagnostic yield in adult patients with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardakjian, Tanya M; Helbig, Ingo; Quinn, Colin; Elman, Lauren B; McCluskey, Leo F; Scherer, Steven S; Gonzalez-Alegre, Pedro

    2018-03-28

    To determine the diagnostic yield of different genetic test modalities in adult patients with neurological disorders, we evaluated all adult patients seen for genetic diagnostic evaluation in the outpatient neurology practice at the University of Pennsylvania between January 2016 and April 2017 as part of the newly created Penn Neurogenetics Program. Subjects were identified through our electronic medical system as those evaluated by the Program's single clinical genetic counselor in that period. A total of 377 patients were evaluated by the Penn Neurogenetics Program in different settings and genetic testing recommended. Of those, 182 (48%) were seen in subspecialty clinic setting and 195 (52%) in a General Neurogenetics Clinic. Genetic testing was completed in over 80% of patients in whom it was recommended. The diagnostic yield was 32% across disease groups. Stratified by testing modality, the yield was highest with directed testing (50%) and array comparative genomic hybridization (45%), followed by gene panels and exome testing (25% each). In conclusion, genetic testing can be successfully requested in clinic in a large majority of adult patients. Age is not a limiting factor for a genetic diagnostic evaluation and the yield of clinical testing across phenotypes (almost 30%) is consistent with previous phenotype-focused or research-based studies. These results should inform the development of specific guidelines for clinical testing and serve as evidence to improve reimbursement by insurance payers.

  8. Insomnia in central neurologic diseases--occurrence and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Geert; Jennum, Poul; Riemann, Dieter; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this review is to highlight the impact of insomnia in central neurological disorders by providing information on its prevalence and give recommendations for diagnosis and treatment. Insomnia in neurological disorders is a frequent, but underestimated symptom. Its occurrence may be a direct consequence of the disease itself or may be secondary to pain, depression, other sleep disorders or the effects of medications. Insomnia can have a significant impact on the patient's cognitive and physical function and may be associated with psychological distress and depression. Diagnosis of insomnia is primarily based on medical history and validated questionnaires. Actigraphy is a helpful diagnostic tool for assessing the circadian sleep-wake rhythm. For differential diagnosis and to measure the duration of sleep full polysomnography may be recommended. Prior to initiating treatment the cause of insomnia must be clearly identified. First line treatment aims at the underlying neurologic disease. The few high quality treatment studies show that short term treatment with hypnotics may be recommended in most disorders after having ruled out high risk for adverse effects. Sedating antidepressants may be an effective treatment for insomnia in stroke and Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Melatonin and light treatment can stabilize the sleep-wake circadian rhythm and shorten sleep latency in dementias and PD. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be effective in treating insomnia symptoms associated with most of the central neurological diseases. The prevalence and treatment of insomnia in neurological diseases still need to be studied in larger patient groups with randomized clinical trials to a) better understand their impact and causal relationship and b) to develop and improve specific evidence-based treatment strategies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular cloning of human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type I-like proviral genome from the peripheral lymphocyte DNA of a patient with chronic neurologic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, E.P.; Mettus, R.V.; DeFreitas, E.; Wroblewska, Z.; Cisco, M.; Koprowski, H.

    1988-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I), the etiologic agent of human T-cell leukemia, has recently been shown to be associated with neurologic disorders such as tropical spastic paraparesis, HTLV-associated myelopathy, and possibly with multiple sclerosis. In this communication, the authors have examined one specific case of neurologic disorder that can be classified as multiple sclerosis or tropical spastic paraparesis. The patient suffering from chronic neurologic disorder was found to contain antibodies to HTLV-I envelope and gag proteins in his serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Lymphocytes from peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the patient were shown to express viral RNA sequences by in situ hybridization. Southern blot analysis of the patient lymphocyte DNA revealed the presence of HTLV-I-related sequences. Blot-hybridization analysis of the RNA from fresh peripheral lymphocytes stimulated with interleukin 2 revealed the presence of abundant amounts of genomic viral RNA with little or no subgenomic RNA. They have clones the proviral genome from the DNA of the peripheral lymphocytes and determined its restriction map. This analysis shows that this proviral genome is very similar if not identical to that of the prototype HTLV-I genome

  10. Tracheostomy in neurologically compromised paediatric patients: role of starplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Stokken, J; Krakovitz, P; Malhotra, P; Anne, S

    2015-10-01

    Starplasty tracheostomy is an alternative to traditional tracheostomy. This paper reviews neurologically compromised paediatric patients with tracheostomies and discusses the role of starplasty tracheostomy. A retrospective review was conducted of paediatric patients with a neurological disorder who underwent tracheostomy between 1997 and 2011. Forty-eight patients, with an average age of 7.3 years, were identified. The most common indications for tracheostomy were: ventilator dependence (39.6 per cent), an inability to tolerate secretions or recurrent aspiration pneumonia (33.3 per cent), and upper respiratory obstruction or hypotonia (12.5 per cent). The most common underlying neurological diagnosis was cerebral palsy. There were no early complications. Eighteen (43 per cent) of 42 patients with follow up experienced at least 1 delayed complication. Only 12 patients (28.6 per cent) were decannulated. Patients with primary neurological diagnoses have low rates of decannulation; starplasty tracheostomy should be considered for these patients. Patients with seizure disorder or acute neurological injury tended to have a higher short-term decannulation rate; traditional tracheostomy is recommended in these patients.

  11. Neurological soft signs, dissociation and alexithymia in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapancı, Zafer; Yıldırım, Abdullah; Boysan, Murat

    2017-11-21

    A body of evidence has supported that patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have increased rates of various neurological soft signs (NSS) compared to controls. Various lines of research has documented robust relationships between OCD and dissociative symptomatology. The study aimed to examine the associations between obsessive-compulsive symptoms, dissociative experiences alexithymia, and NSS. The study included thirty OCD patients and thirty healthy controls, matched for age, marital status, education, and income. The Neurological Evaluation Scale (NES), Padua Inventory-Revised (PI-R), Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) and Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) were administered. In comparison to healthy controls, patients with OCD had difficulty sequencing for complex motor acts and greater absorption/ imaginative involvement. Using latent class analysis, the study sample was classified into two homogenous subsets as mild NSS (n = 45) and severe NSS (n = 15). Majority of the participants who were grouped into severe NSS latent class were OCD patient (n = 14, 93.3%). Furthermore, those with severe NSS reported greater levels of alexithymia and more severe obsessive-compulsive symptoms, particularly precision. We concluded that relationships between OCD severity and NSS appear to be of crucial importance. Our data along with accumulated evidence suggest that OCD associated with pronounced NSS may represent a specific subtype of the disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Guidelines for uniform reporting of body fluid biomarker studies in neurologic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnanapavan, Sharmilee; Hegen, Harald; Khalil, Michael

    2014-01-01

    , there are concerns over the high attrition rate of promising candidate biomarkers at later phases of development. METHODS: BioMS-eu consortium, a collaborative network working toward improving the quality of biomarker research in neurologic disorders, discussed the merits of standardizing the reporting of body fluid...... biomarker research. A checklist of items integrating the results of other published guidances, literature, conferences, regulatory opinion, and personal expertise was created to ultimately form a structured summary guidance incorporating the key features. RESULTS: The summary guidance is comprised of a 10......-point uniform reporting format ranging from introduction, materials and methods, through to results and discussion. Each item is discussed in detail in the guidance report. CONCLUSIONS: To enhance the future development of body fluid biomarkers, it will be important to standardize the reporting...

  13. Neurological manifestations of dengue viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carod-Artal FJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Francisco Javier Carod-Artal1,21Neurology Department, Raigmore hospital, Inverness, UK; 2Universitat Internacional de Catalunya (UIC, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Dengue is the most common mosquito-borne viral infection worldwide. There is increased evidence for dengue virus neurotropism, and neurological manifestations could make part of the clinical picture of dengue virus infection in at least 0.5%–7.4% of symptomatic cases. Neurological complications have been classified into dengue virus encephalopathy, dengue virus encephalitis, immune-mediated syndromes (acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, myelitis, Guillain–Barré syndrome, neuritis brachialis, acute cerebellitis, and others, neuromuscular complications (hypokalemic paralysis, transient benign muscle dysfunction and myositis, and dengue-associated stroke. Common neuro-ophthalmic complications are maculopathy and retinal vasculopathy. Pathogenic mechanisms include systemic complications and metabolic disturbances resulting in encephalopathy, direct effect of the virus provoking encephalitis, and postinfectious immune mechanisms causing immune-mediated syndromes. Dengue viruses should be considered as a cause of neurological disorders in endemic regions. Standardized case definitions for specific neurological complications are still needed. Keywords: encephalitis, encephalopathy, dengue fever, neurological complications

  14. Clinical and pharmacological properties of incobotulinumtoxinA and its use in neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jost WH

    2015-04-01

    ; the safety profile of intervals shorter than 12 weeks was comparable to intervals of 12 weeks and longer. There were no cases of newly formed neutralizing antibodies during the Phase III and IV incobotulinumtoxinA trials. Phase III head-to-head trials of incobotulinumtoxinA versus onabotulinumtoxinA for the treatment of blepharospasm and CD have demonstrated therapeutic equivalence of both formulations. Additional Phase III trials of incobotulinumtoxinA in conditions such as lower-limb spasticity, spasticity in children with cerebral palsy, and sialorrhea in various neurological disorders are ongoing.Conclusion: IncobotulinumtoxinA is an effective, well-tolerated botulinum neurotoxin type A formulation. Data from randomized clinical trials and further observational studies are expected to help physicians to optimize treatment by tailoring the choice of formulation, dose, and treatment intervals to the patient’s clinical needs.Keywords: blepharospasm, botulinum toxin, cervical dystonia, incobotulinumtoxinA, spasticity, Xeomin

  15. [Cannabis-induced disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyka, M; Preuss, U; Hoch, E

    2017-03-01

    Use and misuse of cannabis and marihuana are frequent. About 5% of the adult population are current users but only 1.2% are dependent. The medical use of cannabis is controversial but there is some evidence for improvement of chronic pain and spasticity. The somatic toxicity of cannabis is well proven but limited and psychiatric disorders induced by cannabis are of more relevance, e.g. cognitive disorders, amotivational syndrome, psychoses and delusional disorders as well as physical and psychological dependence. The withdrawal symptoms are usually mild and do not require pharmacological interventions. To date there is no established pharmacotherapy for relapse prevention. Psychosocial interventions include psychoeducation, behavioral therapy and motivational enhancement. The CANDIS protocol is the best established German intervention among abstinence-oriented therapies.

  16. Neurological manifestations in Fabry's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2007-01-01

    . Neurological symptoms, such as burning sensations (occasionally accompanied by acroparesthesia) and stroke, are among the first to appear, and occur in both male and female patients. A delay in establishing the diagnosis of Fabry's disease can cause unnecessary problems, especially now that enzyme replacement...... treatment is available to prevent irreversible organ damage. Females with Fabry's disease who present with pain have often been ignored and misdiagnosed because of the disorder's X-linked inheritance. This Review will stress the importance of recognizing neurological symptoms for the diagnosis of Fabry...

  17. Neurological manifestation of colonic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzair Chaudhary

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurologic disorders are extremely rare in cancer patients and are most commonly associated with certain tumors, such as ovarian cancer, small cell lung cancer, and breast cancer. We report here a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome in a 53-year-old man with colonic adenocarcinoma with a solitary liver metastasis. His paraneoplastic syndrome was successfully treated by methylprednisolone and primary oncologic therapies including neoadjuvant chemotherapy and definitive surgery. This is also the first documented case of simultaneous manifestation of a sensory neuropathy and limbic encephalitis with colon cancer.

  18. Neurological, psychological, and cognitive disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease on conservative and replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Silvia; Mecarelli, Oriano; Pulitano, Patrizia; Romanello, Roberto; Davi, Leonardo; Zarabla, Alessia; Mariotti, Amalia; Carta, Maria; Tasso, Giorgia; Poli, Luca; Mitterhofer, Anna Paola; Testorio, Massimo; Frassetti, Nicla; Aceto, Paola; Galani, Alessandro; Lai, Carlo

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a highly prevalent condition in the world. Neurological, psychological, and cognitive disorders, related to CKD, could contribute to the morbidity, mortality, and poor quality of life of these patients. The aim of this study was to assess the neurological, psychological, and cognitive imbalance in patients with CKD on conservative and replacement therapy.Seventy-four clinically stable patients affected by CKD on conservative therapy, replacement therapy (hemodialysis (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD)), or with kidney transplantation (KT) and 25 healthy controls (HC), matched for age and sex were enrolled. Clinical, laboratory, and instrumental examinations, as renal function, inflammation and mineral metabolism indexes, electroencephalogram (EEG), psychological (MMPI-2, Sat P), and cognitive tests (neuropsychological tests, NPZ5) were carried out.The results showed a significant differences in the absolute and relative power of delta band and relative power of theta band of EEG (P = 0.008, P therapy, and Grade 2-3 in KT patients. The scales of MMPI-2 hysteria and paranoia, are significantly correlated with creatinine, eGFR, serum nitrogen, CRP, 1,25-(OH)2D3, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), phosphorus, and cynical and hysterical personality, are correlated with higher relative power of delta (P = 0.016) and theta band (P = 0.016). Moreover, all NPZ5 scores showed a significant difference between the means of nephropathic patients and the means of the HC, and a positive correlation with eGFR, serum nitrogen, CRP, iPTH, and vitamin D.In CKD patients, simple and noninvasive instruments, as EEG, and cognitive-psychological tests, should be performed and careful and constant monitoring of renal risk factors, probably involved in neuropsychological complications (inflammation, disorders of mineral metabolism, electrolyte disorders, etc.), should be carried out. Early identification and adequate therapy of neuropsychological

  19. Iron deficiency and neurologic disease in children | Chiabi | Clinics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Iron deficiency is a frequent disorder and a public health problem especially in children and pregnant women. The clinical manifestations are varied, and the most dreaded are neurologic. These neurologic manifestations are often missed as differential diagnosis in current clinical practice. The authors review iron ...

  20. Perspectives for computational modeling of cell replacement for neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Aimone

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling of anatomically-constrained neural networks has provided significant insights regarding the response of networks to neurological disorders or injury. A logical extension of these models is to incorporate treatment regimens to investigate network responses to intervention. The addition of nascent neurons from stem cell precursors into damaged or diseased tissue has been used as a successful therapeutic tool in recent decades. Interestingly, models have been developed to examine the incorporation of new neurons into intact adult structures, particularly the dentate granule neurons of the hippocampus. These studies suggest that the unique properties of maturing neurons can impact circuit behavior in unanticipated ways. In this perspective, we review the current status of models used to examine damaged CNS structures with particular focus on cortical damage due to stroke. Secondly, we suggest that computational modeling of cell replacement therapies can be made feasible by implementing approaches taken by current models of adult neurogenesis. The development of these models is critical for generating hypotheses regarding transplant therapies and improving outcomes by tailoring transplants to desired effects.

  1. Establishing the NeuroRecovery Network Community Fitness and Wellness facilities: multi-site fitness facilities provide activity-based interventions and assessments for evidence-based functional gains in neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle, Heather; Rapacz, Andrew; Weintraub, Barry; Shogren, Carrie; Harkema, Susan J; Gibson, Jeremy L

    2017-08-17

    Physical fitness is a necessity for those living with a spinal cord injury, yet access to fitness facilities, equipment, and specially trained fitness experts are limited. This article introduces the concept of a network of fitness facilities specially geared towards individuals with spinal cord injury and other neurological disorders. The Community Fitness and Wellness branch of the NeuroRecovery Network was created to provide a continuum of care after traditional rehabilitation for individuals living with a spinal cord injury and other neurological disorders. Community Fitness and Wellness facilities translate activity-based interventions performed during rehabilitation into a community setting as well as provide other fitness and wellness opportunities. Community Fitness and Wellness facilities are staffed by professionals with training on the specialized needs of individuals living with spinal cord injury or other neurological disorders. Standardized assessments evaluate functional, health, and quality of life gains at regular intervals. A national database gathers information on standardized interventions and assessment outcomes providing a mechanism for evaluation of interventions performed in the community setting. The establishment of Community Fitness and Wellness facilities allows for the quick translation and evaluation of novel, effective approaches from research to individuals in the community. Implications for Rehabilitation Fitness needs of individuals with spinal cord injury living in the community necessitate the use of special equipment and trained staff. Community Fitness and Wellness Programs offer specially trained staff and adaptive equipment providing a continuity of care for those with spinal cord injuries and other neurological disorders.

  2. Effectiveness of Music Therapy as an aid to Neurorestoration of children with severe neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L Bringas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was a two-armed parallel group design aimed at testing real world effectiveness of a music therapy (MT intervention for children with severe neurological disorders. The control group received only the standard neurorestoration program and the experimental group received an additional MT Auditory Attention plus Communication (ACC protocol just before the usual occupational and speech therapy. Multivariate Item Response Theory (MIRT identified a neuropsychological status-latent variable manifested in all children and which exhibited highly significant changes only in the experimental group. Changes in brain plasticity also occurred in the experimental group, as evidenced using a Mismatch Event Related paradigm which revealed significant post intervention positive responses in the latency range between 308 and 400 ms in frontal regions. LORETA EEG source analysis identified prefrontal and midcingulate regions as differentially activated by the MT in the experimental group. Taken together, our results showing improved attention and communication as well as changes in brain plasticity in children with severe neurological impairments, highlight/comfort the importance of MT for the rehabilitation of patients across a wide range of dysfunctions.

  3. Effectiveness of music therapy as an aid to neurorestoration of children with severe neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringas, Maria L; Zaldivar, Marilyn; Rojas, Pedro A; Martinez-Montes, Karelia; Chongo, Dora M; Ortega, Maria A; Galvizu, Reynaldo; Perez, Alba E; Morales, Lilia M; Maragoto, Carlos; Vera, Hector; Galan, Lidice; Besson, Mireille; Valdes-Sosa, Pedro A

    2015-01-01

    This study was a two-armed parallel group design aimed at testing real world effectiveness of a music therapy (MT) intervention for children with severe neurological disorders. The control group received only the standard neurorestoration program and the experimental group received an additional MT "Auditory Attention plus Communication protocol" just before the usual occupational and speech therapy. Multivariate Item Response Theory (MIRT) identified a neuropsychological status-latent variable manifested in all children and which exhibited highly significant changes only in the experimental group. Changes in brain plasticity also occurred in the experimental group, as evidenced using a Mismatch Event Related paradigm which revealed significant post intervention positive responses in the latency range between 308 and 400 ms in frontal regions. LORETA EEG source analysis identified prefrontal and midcingulate regions as differentially activated by the MT in the experimental group. Taken together, our results showing improved attention and communication as well as changes in brain plasticity in children with severe neurological impairments, confirm the importance of MT for the rehabilitation of patients across a wide range of dysfunctions.

  4. [Neurology! Adieau? (Part 2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szirmai, Imre

    2010-05-30

    The education of neurologists is debilitated worldwide. University professors are engaged in teaching, research and patient-care. This triple challenge is very demanding, and results in permanent insecurity of University employees. To compensate for the insufficient clinical training, some institutes in the USA employ academic staff members exclusively for teaching. The formation of new subspecialties hinders the education and training of general neurologists. At present, four generations of medical doctors are working together in hospitals. The two older generations educate the younger neurologists who have been brought up in the world of limitless network of sterile information. Therefore their manual skills at the bedside and their knowledge of emergency treatment are deficient. Demographics of medical doctors changed drastically. Twice as many women are working in neurology and psychiatry than men. Integrity of neurology is threatened by: (1) Separation of the cerebrovascular diseases from general neurology. Development of "stroke units" was facilitated by the better reimbursement for treatment and by the interest of the pharmaceutical companies. Healthcare politics promoted the split of neurology into two parts. The independent status of "stroke departments" will reduce the rest of clinical neurology to outpatient service. (2) The main argumentation to segregate the rare neurological diseases was that their research will provide benefit for the diseases with high prevalence. This argumentation serves territorial ambitions. The separation of rare diseases interferes with the teaching of differential diagnostics in neurological training. The traditional pragmatic neurology can not be retrieved. The faculty of neurology could retain its integrity by the improvement of diagnostic methods and the ever more effective drugs. Nevertheless, even the progression of neurological sciences induces dissociation of clinical neurology. Neurology shall suffer fragmentation if

  5. Clinical features of movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, C Y

    1983-08-01

    The descriptive aspects of all types of movement disorders and their related syndromes and terminologies used in the literature are reviewed and described. This comprises the features of (a) movement disorders secondary to neurological diseases affecting the extrapyramidal motor system, such as: athetosis, chorea, dystonia, hemiballismus, myoclonus, tremor, tics and spasm, (b) drug induced movement disorders, such as: akathisia, akinesia, hyperkinesia, dyskinesias, extrapyramidal syndrome, and tardive dyskinesia, and (c) abnormal movements in psychiatric disorders, such as: mannerism, stereotyped behaviour and psychomotor retardation. It is intended to bring about a more comprehensive overview of these movement disorders from a phenomenological perspective, so that clinicians can familiarize with these features for diagnosis. Some general statements are made in regard to some of the characteristics of movement disorders.

  6. [Conversion disorder: from DSM IV to DSM 5 or from a psychiatric to a neurological diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, M; Willems, M H A

    2015-01-01

    According to one of the diagnostic criteria of the dsm iv for conversion disorder there has to be a temporal relationship between psychological factors and the onset, or the worsening, of the symptoms. This criterion has been omitted in the dsm-5. Another criterion, namely that the symptoms are not produced intentionally, has also been abandoned. A new recommendation is that therapists should look for neurological symptoms that support the diagnosis. To investigate whether studies support the changes in the criteria. We searched literature using PubMed. When the symptoms first appear, trauma or stress in 37% of patients is of a physical rather than a psychological nature. Different forms of stress were found in equal proportions (20%) in patients with or without conversion disorder. There are no specific stressors, except possibly in patients with dysphonia. The percentages of childhood abuse vary widely, namely from 0 to 85%. The characteristic phenomenon of 'la belle indifference' occurs in only 3% of patients with conversion disorder versus only 2% of controls. Most of the 'positive' clinical tests for partial paralysis and sensory and gait disorders are highly specific. There are no reliable tests for distinguishing conversion disorder from simulation. The changes of the criteria are supported by recent studies.

  7. Neurological Disease Burden in two Semi-urban Communities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Neurological disorders are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Urban hospital -based studies give some perspectives on the burden of neurological disease but there are no community- based studies from South East Nigeria. AIM: This study sought to screen for the scope and pattern of ...

  8. Microbiota and neurologic diseases: potential effects of probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbrello, Giulia; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-10-19

    The microbiota colonizing the gastrointestinal tract have been associated with both gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal diseases. In recent years, considerable interest has been devoted to their role in the development of neurologic diseases, as many studies have described bidirectional communication between the central nervous system and the gut, the so-called "microbiota-gut-brain axis". Considering the ability of probiotics (i.e., live non-pathogenic microorganisms) to restore the normal microbial population and produce benefits for the host, their potential effects have been investigated in the context of neurologic diseases. The main aims of this review are to analyse the relationship between the gut microbiota and brain disorders and to evaluate the current evidence for the use of probiotics in the treatment and prevention of neurologic conditions. Overall, trials involving animal models and adults have reported encouraging results, suggesting that the administration of probiotic strains may exert some prophylactic and therapeutic effects in a wide range of neurologic conditions. Studies involving children have mainly focused on autism spectrum disorder and have shown that probiotics seem to improve neuro behavioural symptoms. However, the available data are incomplete and far from conclusive. The potential usefulness of probiotics in preventing or treating neurologic diseases is becoming a topic of great interest. However, deeper studies are needed to understand which formulation, dosage and timing might represent the optimal regimen for each specific neurologic disease and what populations can benefit. Moreover, future trials should also consider the tolerability and safety of probiotics in patients with neurologic diseases.

  9. CK2—An Emerging Target for Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Castello

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinase CK2 has received a surge of attention in recent years due to the evidence of its overexpression in a variety of solid tumors and multiple myelomas as well as its participation in cell survival pathways. CK2 is also upregulated in the most prevalent and aggressive cancer of brain tissue, glioblastoma multiforme, and in preclinical models, pharmacological inhibition of the kinase has proven successful in reducing tumor size and animal mortality. CK2 is highly expressed in the mammalian brain and has many bona fide substrates that are crucial in neuronal or glial homeostasis and signaling processes across synapses. Full and conditional CK2 knockout mice have further elucidated the importance of CK2 in brain development, neuronal activity, and behavior. This review will discuss recent advances in the field that point to CK2 as a regulator of neuronal functions and as a potential novel target to treat neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  10. Disorder-induced quantum bond percolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Shinya; Katsuno, Shuji; Goda, Masaki

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the effects of off-diagonal disorder on localization properties in quantum bond percolation networks on cubic lattices, motivated by the finding that the off-diagonal disorder does not always enhance the quantum localization of wavefunctions. We numerically construct a diagram of the 'percolation threshold', distinguishing extended states from localized states as a function of two degrees of disorder, by using the level statistics and finite-size scaling. The percolation threshold increases in a characteristic way on increasing the disorder in the connected bonds, while it gradually decreases on increasing the disorder in the disconnected bonds. Furthermore, the exchange of connected and disconnected bonds induced by the disorder causes a dramatic change of the percolation threshold.

  11. The Effect of Neurological Dysfunction on the Social and Emotional Development of Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parette, Howard P., Jr.; Hourcade, Jack J.

    The literature review examines the relationship of neurological impairment in young children with their social and emotional development. It identifies disorders of interaction and/or attachment and disorders of independence/dependence as specific maladaptive social and emotional states associated with neurological impairment. Three theoretical…

  12. Neurological signs and late-life depressive symptoms in a community population: the ESPRIT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soremekun, Mishael; Stewart, Robert; Portet, Florence; Artero, Sylvaine; Ancelin, Marie-Laure; Ritchie, Karen

    2010-07-01

    Depression in the elderly is common and often resistant to treatment. It has been suggested that late-life depression may be related to underlying neurobiological changes. However, these observations are derived from diverse clinical samples and as yet have not been confirmed in a more representative population study. Our aim was to investigate associations between neurological signs as markers of underlying brain dysfunction and caseness for depression in an elderly community sample, controlling for physical health and comorbid/past neurological disorders. A cross-sectional analysis of 2102 older people without dementia from the ESPRIT project. Depressive symptomatology was ascertained using the CES-D and abnormal neurological signs/comorbidity from a full neurological examination according to ICD-10 criteria. Pyramidal, extrapyramidal, cranial nerve and sensory deficit signs were significantly associated with case-level depressive symptoms. However, all odds ratios were close to null values in participants who did not have previous neurological disorder. We confirmed previous findings of an association between neurological signs and case-level depressive symptoms in late life. However, this association may simply reflect the impact of more severe comorbid neurological disorder. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Insomnia in central neurologic diseases--occurrence and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Geert; Jennum, Poul; Riemann, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this review is to highlight the impact of insomnia in central neurological disorders by providing information on its prevalence and give recommendations for diagnosis and treatment. Insomnia in neurological disorders is a frequent, but underestimated symptom. Its occurrence may...... be a direct consequence of the disease itself or may be secondary to pain, depression, other sleep disorders or the effects of medications. Insomnia can have a significant impact on the patient's cognitive and physical function and may be associated with psychological distress and depression. Diagnosis...... of insomnia is primarily based on medical history and validated questionnaires. Actigraphy is a helpful diagnostic tool for assessing the circadian sleep-wake rhythm. For differential diagnosis and to measure the duration of sleep full polysomnography may be recommended. Prior to initiating treatment...

  14. Neurologic abnormalities in murderers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, P Y; Pincus, J H; Buckner, C

    1995-09-01

    Thirty-one individuals awaiting trial or sentencing for murder or undergoing an appeal process requested a neurologic examination through legal counsel. We attempted in each instance to obtain EEG, MRI or CT, and neuropsychological testing. Neurologic examination revealed evidence of "frontal" dysfunction in 20 (64.5%). There were symptoms or some other evidence of temporal lobe abnormality in nine (29%). We made a specific neurologic diagnosis in 20 individuals (64.5%), including borderline or full mental retardation (9) and cerebral palsy (2), among others. Neuropsychological testing revealed abnormalities in all subjects tested. There were EEG abnormalities in eight of the 20 subjects tested, consisting mainly of bilateral sharp waves with slowing. There were MRI or CT abnormalities in nine of the 19 subjects tested, consisting primarily of atrophy and white matter changes. Psychiatric diagnoses included paranoid schizophrenia (8), dissociative disorder (4), and depression (9). Virtually all subjects had paranoid ideas and misunderstood social situations. There was a documented history of profound, protracted physical abuse in 26 (83.8%) and of sexual abuse in 10 (32.3%). It is likely that prolonged, severe physical abuse, paranoia, and neurologic brain dysfunction interact to form the matrix of violent behavior.

  15. Post-marketing observational program of the effectiveness of fluvoxamine for the treatment of depression in patients with neurological disorders: the FRIENDS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahno NN

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Nikolay N Yahno,1 Anastasia V Fedotova2 1Neurology Department, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, 2Neurology Department, Additional Professional Education Faculty, Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University, Moscow, Russian Federation Abstract: In a prospective, non-blinded, uncontrolled, multicenter, post-marketing, observational study (FRIENDS; NCT02043197, fluvoxamine (50–300 mg/day for 90 days was effective for the treatment of depression in 299 adult patients (age ≥18 years with neurological disorders at baseline. The therapeutic effect of fluvoxamine was measured by means of changes in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression and anxiety scores (HADS-D and HADS-A, respectively, global severity of illness, and clinical condition (measured using the Clinical Global Improvement [CGI] scale. The mean HADS-D subscale score at baseline in the per-protocol cohort (n=296 was 11.7±3.1 points and the corresponding mean HADS-A score was 12.6±3.2. Significant (P<0.0001 improvements in both scores were recorded during fluvoxamine treatment and later follow-up. Most patients (>85% recorded reductions versus baseline in both indices. In the CGI-based assessment, most evaluated patients (>200 experienced moderate to very substantial clinical improvement, with no or limited side effects. Significant improvements were also recorded in the exploratory outcomes of sleep quality, assessed using the Insomnia Severity Index, and cognitive function, assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (P<0.0001 vs baseline for both. No death or serious adverse drug reactions were reported during the study. The results of this observational study affirm that fluvoxamine is effective and well tolerated for the treatment of depression in the context of neurological disorders. The effects on the exploratory endpoints of this research merit evaluation in controlled trials. Keywords: depression, anxiety, fluvoxamine

  16. Utility of the Community Integration Questionnaire in a sample of adults with neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders receiving prevocational training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, Robert; Mitrushina, Maura

    2015-08-03

    To investigate utility of the Community Integration Questionnaire (CIQ) in a mixed sample of adults with neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Cross-sectional, interview-based study. Participants were community-dwelling adults with disabilities resulting from neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders (N = 54), who participated in a pre-vocational readiness and social skills training program. Psychometric properties of the Community Integration Questionnaire (CIQ) were assessed and validated against Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI) and The Problem Checklist from the New York University Head Injury Family Interview (PCL). Based on the revised scoring procedures, psychometric properties of the CIQ Home Competency scale were excellent, followed by the Total score and Social Integration scale. Productive Activity scale had low content validity and a weak association with the total score. Convergent and discriminant validity of the CIQ were demonstrated by correlation patterns with MPAI scales in the expected direction. Significant relationship was found with PCL Physical/Dependency scale. Significant associations were found with sex, living status, and record of subsequent employment. The results provide support for the use of the CIQ as a measure of participation in individuals with neurological and neuropsychiatric diagnoses and resulting disabilities. Implications for Rehabilitation An important goal of rehabilitation and training programs for individuals with dysfunction of the central nervous system is to promote their participation in social, vocational, and domestic activities. The Community Integration Questionnaire (CIQ) is a brief and efficient instrument for measuring these participation domains. This study demonstrated good psychometric properties and high utility of the CIQ in a sample of 54 individuals participating in a prevocational training program.

  17. Rehabilitation robotics for the upper extremity: review with new directions for orthopaedic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Renée M; Tunis, Brandon G; Ross, Michael D

    2017-11-01

    The focus of research using technological innovations such as robotic devices has been on interventions to improve upper extremity function in neurologic populations, particularly patients with stroke. There is a growing body of evidence describing rehabilitation programs using various types of supportive/assistive and/or resistive robotic and virtual reality-enhanced devices to improve outcomes for patients with neurologic disorders. The most promising approaches are task-oriented, based on current concepts of motor control/learning and practice-induced neuroplasticity. Based on this evidence, we describe application and feasibility of virtual reality-enhanced robotics integrated with current concepts in orthopaedic rehabilitation shifting from an impairment-based focus to inclusion of more intense, task-specific training for patients with upper extremity disorders, specifically emphasizing the wrist and hand. The purpose of this paper is to describe virtual reality-enhanced rehabilitation robotic devices, review evidence of application in patients with upper extremity deficits related to neurologic disorders, and suggest how this technology and task-oriented rehabilitation approach can also benefit patients with orthopaedic disorders of the wrist and hand. We will also discuss areas for further research and development using a task-oriented approach and a commercially available haptic robotic device to focus on training of grasp and manipulation tasks. Implications for Rehabilitation There is a growing body of evidence describing rehabilitation programs using various types of supportive/assistive and/or resistive robotic and virtual reality-enhanced devices to improve outcomes for patients with neurologic disorders. The most promising approaches using rehabilitation robotics are task-oriented, based on current concepts of motor control/learning and practice-induced neuroplasticity. Based on the evidence in neurologic populations, virtual reality-enhanced robotics

  18. Apollo’s gift: new aspects of neurologic music therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenmüller, Eckart; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2015-01-01

    Music listening and music making activities are powerful tools to engage multisensory and motor networks, induce changes within these networks, and foster links between distant, but functionally related brain regions with continued and life-long musical practice. These multimodal effects of music together with music’s ability to tap into the emotion and reward system in the brain can be used to facilitate and enhance therapeutic approaches geared toward rehabilitating and restoring neurological dysfunctions and impairments of an acquired or congenital brain disorder. In this article, we review plastic changes in functional networks and structural components of the brain in response to short- and long-term music listening and music making activities. The specific influence of music on the developing brain is emphasized and possible transfer effects on emotional and cognitive processes are discussed. Furthermore, we present data on the potential of using musical tools and activities to support and facilitate neurorehabilitation. We will focus on interventions such as melodic intonation therapy and music-supported motor rehabilitation to showcase the effects of neurologic music therapies and discuss their underlying neural mechanisms. PMID:25725918

  19. Neurology and the Internet: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moccia, Marcello; Brigo, Francesco; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Bonavita, Simona; Lavorgna, Luigi

    2018-06-01

    Nowadays, the Internet is the major source to obtain information about diseases and their treatments. The Internet is gaining relevance in the neurological setting, considering the possibility of timely social interaction, contributing to general public awareness on otherwise less-well-known neurological conditions, promoting health equity and improving the health-related coping. Neurological patients can easily find several online opportunities for peer interactions and learning. On the other hand, neurologist can analyze user-generated data to better understand patient needs and to run epidemiological studies. Indeed, analyses of queries from Internet search engines on certain neurological diseases have shown a strict temporal and spatial correlation with the "real world." In this narrative review, we will discuss how the Internet is radically affecting the healthcare of people with neurological disorders and, most importantly, is shifting the paradigm of care from the hands of those who deliver care, into the hands of those who receive it. Besides, we will review possible limitations, such as safety concerns, financial issues, and the need for easy-to-access platforms.

  20. Cotard syndrome in neurological and psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Bermudez, Jesus; Aguilar-Venegas, Luis C; Crail-Melendez, Daniel; Espinola-Nadurille, Mariana; Nente, Francisco; Mendez, Mario F

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe the frequency and characteristics of Cotard syndrome among neurological and psychiatric inpatients at a tertiary referral center. All inpatients from the National Institute of Neurology of Mexico (March 2007-May 2009) requiring neuropsychiatric consultation were reviewed. Among 1,321 inpatient consultations, 63.7% had neurological disease and one (0.11%) had viral encephalitis and Cotard syndrome. Of inpatients, 36.2% had pure psychiatric disorders and three (0.62%) had Cotard syndrome, associated with psychotic depression, depersonalization, and penile retraction (koro syndrome). This review discusses potential mechanisms for Cotard syndrome, including the role of a perceptual-emotional dissociation in self-misattribution in the deliré des negations.

  1. Pediatric neurological syndromes and inborn errors of purine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camici, Marcella; Micheli, Vanna; Ipata, Piero Luigi; Tozzi, Maria Grazia

    2010-02-01

    This review is devised to gather the presently known inborn errors of purine metabolism that manifest neurological pediatric syndromes. The aim is to draw a comprehensive picture of these rare diseases, characterized by unexpected and often devastating neurological symptoms. Although investigated for many years, most purine metabolism disorders associated to psychomotor dysfunctions still hide the molecular link between the metabolic derangement and the neurological manifestations. This basically indicates that many of the actual functions of nucleosides and nucleotides in the development and function of several organs, in particular central nervous system, are still unknown. Both superactivity and deficiency of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase cause hereditary disorders characterized, in most cases, by neurological impairments. The deficiency of adenylosuccinate lyase and 5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide ribotide transformylase/IMP cyclohydrolase, both belonging to the de novo purine synthesis pathway, is also associated to severe neurological manifestations. Among catabolic enzymes, hyperactivity of ectosolic 5'-nucleotidase, as well as deficiency of purine nucleoside phosphorylase and adenosine deaminase also lead to syndromes affecting the central nervous system. The most severe pathologies are associated to the deficiency of the salvage pathway enzymes hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and deoxyguanosine kinase: the former due to an unexplained adverse effect exerted on the development and/or differentiation of dopaminergic neurons, the latter due to a clear impairment of mitochondrial functions. The assessment of hypo- or hyperuricemic conditions is suggestive of purine enzyme dysfunctions, but most disorders of purine metabolism may escape the clinical investigation because they are not associated to these metabolic derangements. This review may represent a starting point stimulating both scientists and physicians involved in the study of

  2. Hypnosis as therapy for functional neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeley, Q

    2016-01-01

    Suggestion in hypnosis has been applied to the treatment of functional neurologic symptoms since the earliest descriptions of hypnosis in the 19th century. Suggestion in this sense refers to an intentional communication of beliefs or ideas, whether verbally or nonverbally, to produce subjectively convincing changes in experience and behavior. The recognition of suggestion as a psychologic process with therapeutic applications was closely linked to the derivation of hypnosis from earlier healing practices. Animal magnetism, the immediate precursor of hypnosis, arrived at a psychologic concept of suggestion along with other ideas and practices which were then incorporated into hypnosis. Before then, other forms of magnetism and ritual healing practices such as exorcism involved unintentionally suggestive verbal and nonverbal stimuli. We consider the derivation of hypnosis from these practices not only to illustrate the range of suggestive processes, but also the consistency with which suggestion has been applied to the production and removal of dissociative and functional neurologic symptoms over many centuries. Nineteenth-century practitioners treated functional symptoms with induction of hypnosis per se; imperative suggestions, or commands for specific effects; "medical clairvoyance" in hypnotic trance, in which patients diagnosed their own condition and predicted the time and manner of their recovery; and suggestion without prior hypnosis, known as "fascination" or "psychotherapeutics." Modern treatments largely involve different types of imperative suggestion with or without hypnosis. However, the therapeutic application of suggestion in hypnosis to functional and other symptoms waned in the first half of the 20th century under the separate pressures of behaviorism and psychoanalysis. In recent decades suggestion in hypnosis has been more widely applied to treating functional neurologic symptoms. Suggestion is typically applied within the context of other

  3. Neurologic Involvement in Scleroderma en Coup de Sabre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Tiago Nardi; Marques Neto, João Francisco; Lapa, Aline Tamires; Peres, Fernando Augusto; Guirau, Caio Rodrigues; Appenzeller, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Localized scleroderma is a rare disease, characterized by sclerotic lesions. A variety of presentations have been described, with different clinical characteristics and specific prognosis. In scleroderma en coup de sabre (LScs) the atrophic lesion in frontoparietal area is the disease hallmark. Skin and subcutaneous are the mainly affected tissues, but case reports of muscle, cartilage, and bone involvement are frequent. These cases pose a difficult differential diagnosis with Parry-Romberg syndrome. Once considered an exclusive cutaneous disorder, the neurologic involvement present in LScs has been described in several case reports. Seizures are most frequently observed, but focal neurologic deficits, movement disorders, trigeminal neuralgia, and mimics of hemiplegic migraines have been reported. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have aided the characterization of central nervous system lesions, and cerebral angiograms have pointed to vasculitis as a part of disease pathogenesis. In this paper we describe the clinical and radiologic aspects of neurologic involvement in LScs. PMID:22319646

  4. Victoria Symptom Validity Test performance in children and adolescents with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Brian L

    2012-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly more important to study, use, and promote the utility of measures that are designed to detect non-compliance with testing (i.e., poor effort, symptom non-validity, response bias) as part of neuropsychological assessments with children and adolescents. Several measures have evidence for use in pediatrics, but there is a paucity of published support for the Victoria Symptom Validity Test (VSVT) in this population. The purpose of this study was to examine the performance on the VSVT in a sample of pediatric patients with known neurological disorders. The sample consisted of 100 consecutively referred children and adolescents between the ages of 6 and 19 years (mean = 14.0, SD = 3.1) with various neurological diagnoses. On the VSVT total items, 95% of the sample had performance in the "valid" range, with 5% being deemed "questionable" and 0% deemed "invalid". On easy items, 97% were "valid", 2% were "questionable", and 1% was "invalid." For difficult items, 84% were "valid," 16% were "questionable," and 0% was "invalid." For those patients given two effort measures (i.e., VSVT and Test of Memory Malingering; n = 65), none was identified as having poor test-taking compliance on both measures. VSVT scores were significantly correlated with age, intelligence, processing speed, and functional ratings of daily abilities (attention, executive functioning, and adaptive functioning), but not objective performance on the measure of sustained attention, verbal memory, or visual memory. The VSVT has potential to be used in neuropsychological assessments with pediatric patients.

  5. Parental quality of life in complex paediatric neurologic disorders of unknown aetiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nimwegen, K J M; Kievit, W; van der Wilt, G J; Schieving, J H; Willemsen, M A A P; Donders, A R T; Verhaak, C M; Grutters, J P C

    2016-09-01

    Complex paediatric neurology (CPN) patients generally present with non-specific symptoms, such as developmental delay, impaired movement and epilepsy. The diagnostic trajectory in these disorders is usually complicated and long-lasting, and may be burdensome to the patients and their parents. Additionally, as caring for a chronically ill child can be stressful and demanding, parents of these patients may experience impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL). This study aims to assess parental HRQoL and factors related to it in CPN. Physical and mental HRQoL of 120 parents was measured and compared to the general population using the SF-12 questionnaire. Parents also completed this questionnaire for the measurement of patient HRQoL. Additional questionnaires were used to measure parental uncertainty (Visual Analogue Scale) and worry phenomena (Penn State Worry Questionnaire), and to obtain socio-demographic data. A linear mixed model with random effect was used to investigate which of these variables were associated with parental HRQoL. As compared to the general population, HRQoL of these parents appeared diminished. Fathers showed both lowered physical (51.76, p parental worry phenomena were significantly correlated with overall and mental parental HRQoL. The reduction in parental mental HRQoL is alarming, also because children strongly rely on their parents and parental mental health is known to influence children's health. Awareness of these problems among clinicians, and supportive care if needed are important to prevent exacerbation of the problems. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Tele-neurology in sub-Saharan Africa: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfo, Fred S; Adamu, Sheila; Awuah, Dominic; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2017-09-15

    The rapid advancement in telecommunications on the African continent has opened up avenues for improving medical care to underserved populations. Although the greatest burden of neurological disorders is borne by Low-and-Middle Income Countries (LMICs) including sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), there is a profound paucity of neurologists to serve the population. Telemedicine presents a promising avenue for effective mobilization and utilization of the few neurologists in Africa. To systematically review the published literature on the use of telemedicine for improved care and outcomes for patients with neurological disorders in SSA. We searched PubMed and Cochrane library from January 1, 1980 to April 30, 2017 using the following keywords: "Telemedicine neurology Africa", "Teleneurology Africa", "Telestroke Africa", "Telerehabilitation Africa", "Telemedicine for epilepsy", "Telemedicine for Parkinson's disease Africa", "Telemedicine for dementia Africa", "Telehealth neurology Africa". Our inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials, or case series that reported the utilization of telemedicine for care/education of individuals with neurological disorders in sub-Saharan Africa. This search yielded 6 abstracts. By consensus between two investigators, 1 publication met the criteria for inclusion and further review. The one study identified utilized telemedicine for the purpose of improving education/knowledge of 16 doctors and 17 allied health professionals in Parkinson's disease (PD) in Cameroon. The study noted feasibility and satisfaction of participants with telemedicine as well as improved knowledge base of participants after the educational course but noted access to healthcare by patients did not change. No studies have evaluated the use of telemedicine for care of patients with neurological disorders. The indication is that teleneurology may be feasible in SSA and studies are needed to assess feasibility, acceptability, efficacy, cost-effectiveness of this

  7. Molecular genetics in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J B

    1993-12-01

    There has been remarkable progress in the identification of mutations in genes that cause inherited neurological disorders. Abnormalities in the genes for Huntington disease, neurofibromatosis types 1 and 2, one form of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, fragile X syndrome, myotonic dystrophy, Kennedy syndrome, Menkes disease, and several forms of retinitis pigmentosa have been elucidated. Rare disorders of neuronal migration such as Kallmann syndrome, Miller-Dieker syndrome, and Norrie disease have been shown to be due to specific gene defects. Several muscle disorders characterized by abnormal membrane excitability have been defined as mutations of the muscle sodium or chloride channels. These advances provide opportunity for accurate molecular diagnosis of at-risk individuals and are the harbinger of new approaches to therapy of these diseases.

  8. Preliminary report on theNeurology workload ina central hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Identification of the local pattern of neurological diseases is expected to help setting the priorities for good planning of management and public education. Objectives: To identify the pattern of neurological disorders in a second biggest central hospital in Sudan. Methodology: Review of the diagnosis of 170 ...

  9. Apollo's gift: new aspects of neurologic music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenmüller, Eckart; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2015-01-01

    Music listening and music making activities are powerful tools to engage multisensory and motor networks, induce changes within these networks, and foster links between distant, but functionally related brain regions with continued and life-long musical practice. These multimodal effects of music together with music's ability to tap into the emotion and reward system in the brain can be used to facilitate and enhance therapeutic approaches geared toward rehabilitating and restoring neurological dysfunctions and impairments of an acquired or congenital brain disorder. In this article, we review plastic changes in functional networks and structural components of the brain in response to short- and long-term music listening and music making activities. The specific influence of music on the developing brain is emphasized and possible transfer effects on emotional and cognitive processes are discussed. Furthermore, we present data on the potential of using musical tools and activities to support and facilitate neurorehabilitation. We will focus on interventions such as melodic intonation therapy and music-supported motor rehabilitation to showcase the effects of neurologic music therapies and discuss their underlying neural mechanisms. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ambient air pollution and pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie; Stayner, Leslie; Slama, Rémy

    2014-01-01

    to ambient air pollution and pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders including gestational hypertension and preeclampsia. We searched electronic databases for English language studies reporting associations between ambient air pollution and pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders published between December.......5), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), proximity to major roads, and traffic density met our inclusion criteria. Most studies reported that air pollution increased risk for pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders. There was significant heterogeneity in meta-analysis, which included 16 studies reporting...... on gestational hypertension and preeclampsia as separate or combined outcomes; there was less heterogeneity in findings of the 10 studies reporting solely on preeclampsia. Meta-analyses showed increased risks of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy for all pollutants except CO. Random-effect meta...

  11. [Cinema and neurology: early educational applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vázquez, Susana; Carrillo, Jesús M

    2015-03-01

    Since its earliest days, cinema has been used in the teaching of neurology both to illustrate the professor's explanations and to make learning easier for students. To analyse some of the first applications of cinema to the teaching and learning of neurology. Shortly after the birth of the film projector it became apparent that it could be a valuable aid in teaching medicine, and especially neurology. Initially, actual recordings made by doctors themselves were used, and later documentaries, short films and feature films were employed as means of showing diagnostic and therapeutic methods, as well as different pathological signs, such as movement disorders. The intention was not to replace other methodologies but instead to complement them and to make the process of acquiring knowledge easier. Applying cinema in teaching is a useful way to portray the contents of different subjects, especially in the field of neurology, and to favour the acquisition of both specific and cross-disciplinary competences, with very positive results being obtained among students.

  12. The Spectrum of Neurological Manifestations Associated with Gaucher Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamanna Roshan Lal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease, the most common lysosomal storage disorder, is due to a deficiency in the enzyme glucocerebrosidase. This leads to the accumulation of its normal substrate, glucocerebroside, in tissue macrophages, affecting the hematological, visceral, bone and neurologic systems. Gaucher disease is classified into three broad phenotypes based upon the presence or absence of neurological involvement: type 1 (non-neuronopathic, type 2 (acute neuronopathic, and type 3 (subacute neuronopathic. Phenotypically, there is a wide spectrum of visceral and neurological manifestations. Enzyme replacement is effective in managing the visceral disease; however, treating the neurological manifestations has proved to be more challenging. This review discusses the various neurological manifestations encountered in Gaucher disease, and provides a brief overview regarding the treatment and ongoing research challenges.

  13. Microbiota and Neurological Disorders: A Gut Feeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Walter H; Faller, Douglas V; Harpp, David N; Kanara, Iphigenia; Pernokas, Julie; Powers, Whitney R; Steliou, Kosta

    2016-01-01

    In the past century, noncommunicable diseases have surpassed infectious diseases as the principal cause of sickness and death, worldwide. Trillions of commensal microbes live in and on our body, and constitute the human microbiome. The vast majority of these microorganisms are maternally derived and live in the gut, where they perform functions essential to our health and survival, including: digesting food, activating certain drugs, producing short-chain fatty acids (which help to modulate gene expression by inhibiting the deacetylation of histone proteins), generating anti-inflammatory substances, and playing a fundamental role in the induction, training, and function of our immune system. Among the many roles the microbiome ultimately plays, it mitigates against untoward effects from our exposure to the environment by forming a biotic shield between us and the outside world. The importance of physical activity coupled with a balanced and healthy diet in the maintenance of our well-being has been recognized since antiquity. However, it is only recently that characterization of the host-microbiome intermetabolic and crosstalk pathways has come to the forefront in studying therapeutic design. As reviewed in this report, synthetic biology shows potential in developing microorganisms for correcting pathogenic dysbiosis (gut microbiota-host maladaptation), although this has yet to be proven. However, the development and use of small molecule drugs have a long and successful history in the clinic, with small molecule histone deacetylase inhibitors representing one relevant example already approved to treat cancer and other disorders. Moreover, preclinical research suggests that epigenetic treatment of neurological conditions holds significant promise. With the mouth being an extension of the digestive tract, it presents a readily accessible diagnostic site for the early detection of potential unhealthy pathogens resident in the gut. Taken together, the data outlined

  14. Solving the puzzle of neurological diseases: an interview with Huda Zoghbi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Y. Zoghbi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Huda Zoghbi's achievements in the field of neurology are internationally acclaimed. She is best known for elucidating the genetic basis of two complex neurological disorders, spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and Rett syndrome, and has been honored with many prizes, including The Shaw Prize in Life Science and Medicine in 2016 and the 2017 Breakthrough Prize for Life Sciences. A diligent and creative research scientist at the bench, a respected lab mentor and founding Director of the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas Children's Hospital, her inspiration has always been the burning need to help patients faced with devastating neurological problems. Her pursuit of the mechanisms mediating spinocerebellar ataxia and Rett syndrome has been dogged, requiring 30 years of focused effort. As highlighted in this interview, her work is now paying dividends by starting to reveal potential therapeutic targets for these intractable and complex disorders.

  15. Physical Therapy for Neurological Conditions in Geriatric Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Carmeli, Eli

    2017-01-01

    With more of the world’s population surviving longer, individuals often face age-related neurology disorders and decline of function that can affect lifestyle and well-being. Despite neurophysiological changes affecting the brain function and structure, the aged brain, in some degree, can learn and relearn due to neuroplasticity. Recent advances in rehabilitation techniques have produced better functional outcomes in age-related neurological conditions. Physical therapy (PT) of the elderly in...

  16. Overview of Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Delirium Additional Content Medical News Overview of Movement Disorders By Hector A. Gonzalez-Usigli, MD, Professor ... Neurology, HE UMAE Centro Médico Nacional de Occidente; Movement Disorders Clinic, Neurology at IMSS Alberto Espay, MD, ...

  17. Prevalence of neuroleptic-induced movement disorders in chronic schizophrenia inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janno, Sven; Holi, Matti; Tuisku, Katinka; Wahlbeck, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    Since most of the world's schizophrenia patients are treated with conventional antipsychotics, the authors evaluated various methods for establishing the prevalence of neuroleptic-induced movement disorders in these patients. DSM-IV criteria and established score thresholds on a movement disorder rating scale were used to identify cases of neuroleptic-induced movement disorder in a representative Estonian patient sample of 99 chronic institutionalized schizophrenia patients, 18-65 years old, treated with conventional neuroleptics (79.8%) or clozapine (20.2%). Neuroleptic-induced movement disorders according to DSM-IV criteria were found in 61.6% of the group: 31.3% had neuroleptic-induced akathisia, 23.2% had neuroleptic-induced parkinsonism, and 32.3% had neuroleptic-induced tardive dyskinesia. Prevalence rates for akathisia and tardive dyskinesia were similar when either DSM-IV criteria or rating scale scores were used, but the prevalence rate for parkinsonism was much lower per DSM-IV criteria than according to rating scale score. Nearly two-thirds of chronic schizophrenia patients suffered from a neuroleptic-induced movement disorder. Globally, extrapyramidal adverse effects still impose a huge burden on the majority of neuroleptic-treated individuals with schizophrenia. The discrepancy between the standard identification methods for neuroleptic-induced movement disorder indicate the need for further research.

  18. Disorders of body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Camilo R

    2014-01-01

    The human body generates heat capable of raising body temperature by approximately 1°C per hour. Normally, this heat is dissipated by means of a thermoregulatory system. Disorders resulting from abnormally high or low body temperature result in neurologic dysfunction and pose a threat to life. In response to thermal stress, maintenance of normal body temperature is primarily maintained by convection and evaporation. Hyperthermia results from abnormal temperature regulation, leading to extremely elevated body temperature while fever results from a normal thermoregulatory mechanism operating at a higher set point. The former leads to specific clinical syndromes with inability of the thermoregulatory mechanism to maintain a constant body temperature. Heat related illness encompasses heat rash, heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke, in order of severity. In addition, drugs can induce hyperthermia and produce one of several specific clinical syndromes. Hypothermia is the reduction of body temperature to levels below 35°C from environmental exposure, metabolic disorders, or therapeutic intervention. Management of disorders of body temperature should be carried out decisively and expeditiously, in order to avoid secondary neurologic injury. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Neurological symptoms in patients with biopsy proven celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürk, Katrin; Farecki, Marie-Louise; Lamprecht, Georg; Roth, Guenter; Decker, Patrice; Weller, Michael; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Oertel, Wolfang

    2009-12-15

    In celiac disease (CD), the gut is the typical manifestation site but atypical neurological presentations are thought to occur in 6 to 10% with cerebellar ataxia being the most frequent symptom. Most studies in this field are focused on patients under primary neurological care. To exclude such an observation bias, patients with biopsy proven celiac disease were screened for neurological disease. A total of 72 patients with biopsy proven celiac disease (CD) (mean age 51 +/- 15 years, mean disease duration 8 +/- 11 years) were recruited through advertisements. All participants adhered to a gluten-free diet. Patients were interviewed following a standard questionnaire and examined clinically for neurological symptoms. Medical history revealed neurological disorders such as migraine (28%), carpal tunnel syndrome (20%), vestibular dysfunction (8%), seizures (6%), and myelitis (3%). Interestingly, 35% of patients with CD reported of a history of psychiatric disease including depression, personality changes, or even psychosis. Physical examination yielded stance and gait problems in about one third of patients that could be attributed to afferent ataxia in 26%, vestibular dysfunction in 6%, and cerebellar ataxia in 6%. Other motor features such as basal ganglia symptoms, pyramidal tract signs, tics, and myoclonus were infrequent. 35% of patients with CD showed deep sensory loss and reduced ankle reflexes in 14%. Gait disturbances in CD do not only result from cerebellar ataxia but also from proprioceptive or vestibular impairment. Neurological problems may even develop despite strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. (c) 2009 Movement Disorder Society.

  20. Unspecific neurologic symptoms as possible psychogenic complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, M; Schepank, H; Schellberg, D

    1993-01-01

    Prevalence and course of psychogenically influenced symptoms in neurology and their dependence on age and gender are reported. The epidemiological basis of the data is a long-term follow-up investigation of a high-risk population for about 10 years (n = 240): the Mannheim Cohort Study on Epidemiology of Psychogenic Disorders. Seven psychogenic symptoms of neurologic relevance (headache, lumbar and cervical vertebral complaints, functional vertigo, hyperkinesias, pareses, sleep and concentration disturbances) are characterized in regard to frequency, course and diagnostic significance.

  1. Wavelet-based characterization of gait signal for neurological abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratin, E; Sugavaneswaran, L; Umapathy, K; Ioana, C; Krishnan, S

    2015-02-01

    Studies conducted by the World Health Organization (WHO) indicate that over one billion suffer from neurological disorders worldwide, and lack of efficient diagnosis procedures affects their therapeutic interventions. Characterizing certain pathologies of motor control for facilitating their diagnosis can be useful in quantitatively monitoring disease progression and efficient treatment planning. As a suitable directive, we introduce a wavelet-based scheme for effective characterization of gait associated with certain neurological disorders. In addition, since the data were recorded from a dynamic process, this work also investigates the need for gait signal re-sampling prior to identification of signal markers in the presence of pathologies. To benefit automated discrimination of gait data, certain characteristic features are extracted from the wavelet-transformed signals. The performance of the proposed approach was evaluated using a database consisting of 15 Parkinson's disease (PD), 20 Huntington's disease (HD), 13 Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 16 healthy control subjects, and an average classification accuracy of 85% is achieved using an unbiased cross-validation strategy. The obtained results demonstrate the potential of the proposed methodology for computer-aided diagnosis and automatic characterization of certain neurological disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Spanish translation and linguistic validation of the quality of life in neurological disorders (Neuro-QoL) measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, H; Pérez, B; Arnold, B; Wong, Alex W K; Lai, J S; Kallen, M; Cella, D

    2015-03-01

    The quality of life in neurological disorders (Neuro-QoL) measurement system is a 470-item compilation of health-related quality of life domains for adults and children with neurological disorders. It was developed and cognitively debriefed in English and Spanish, with general population and clinical samples in the USA. This paper describes the Spanish translation and linguistic validation process. The translation methodology combined forward and back-translations, multiple reviews, and cognitive debriefing with 30 adult and 30 pediatric Spanish-speaking respondents in the USA. The adult Fatigue bank was later also tested in Spain and Argentina. A universal approach to translation was adopted to produce a Spanish version that can be used in various countries. Translators from several countries were involved in the process. Cognitive debriefing results indicated that most of the 470 Spanish items were well understood. Translations were revised as needed where difficulty was reported or where participants' comments revealed misunderstanding of an item's intended meaning. Additional testing of the universal Spanish adult Fatigue item bank in Spain and Argentina confirmed good understanding of the items and that no country-specific word changes were necessary. All the adult and pediatric Neuro-QoL measures have been linguistically validated with Spanish speakers in the USA. Instruments are available for use at www.assessmentcenter.net.

  3. Epilepsy as a Network Disorder (1): What can we learn from other network disorders such as autistic spectrum disorder and mood disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanner, Andres M; Scharfman, Helen; Jette, Nathalie; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Bernard, Christophe; Camfield, Carol; Camfield, Peter; Legg, Karen; Dinstein, Ilan; Giacobbe, Peter; Friedman, Alon; Pohlmann-Eden, Bernd

    2017-12-01

    Epilepsy is a neurologic condition which often occurs with other neurologic and psychiatric disorders. The relation between epilepsy and these conditions is complex. Some population-based studies have identified a bidirectional relation, whereby not only patients with epilepsy are at increased risk of suffering from some of these neurologic and psychiatric disorders (migraine, stroke, dementia, autism, depression, anxiety disorders, Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and psychosis), but also patients with these conditions are at increased risk of suffering from epilepsy. The existence of common pathogenic mechanisms has been postulated as a potential explanation of this phenomenon. To reassess the relationships between neurological and psychiatric conditions in general, and specifically autism, depression, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and epilepsy, a recent meeting brought together basic researchers and clinician scientists entitled "Epilepsy as a Network Disorder." This was the fourth in a series of conferences, the "Fourth International Halifax Conference and Retreat". This manuscript summarizes the proceedings on potential relations between Epilepsy on the one hand and autism and depression on the other. A companion manuscript provides a summary of the proceedings about the relation between epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia, closed by the role of translational research in clarifying these relationships. The review of the topics in these two manuscripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms operant in some of the common neurologic and psychiatric comorbidities of epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. "Pinheads": the exhibition of neurologic disorders at "The Greatest Show on Earth".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Farrah J; Boes, Christopher J

    2010-11-30

    The circus sideshow was a smorgasbord of human performers, shrewdly designed to entertain the middle-class public and exploit the attitudes of the time. Under the vernacular of "pinheads," people with microcephaly and mental retardation were displayed as "freaks." This article presents original materials from the Ringling Brothers Circus Museum Archives and Harvard Theater Collection, including sideshow banners, circus programs, song lyrics, and performance photographs, in addition to contemporary newspaper articles, major medical journal publications, and other secondary sources regarding microcephaly in the 19th and early 20th century circuses. More than 20 performers were exhibited as "pinheads," popularly portrayed as "missing links" or children from lost civilizations. People with neurologic disorders were displayed as wild and juvenile and thus, joined a series of hoaxes of the American sideshow. Although incomplete data exist on their true lives, the exhibition of people with microcephaly eventually declined due to protective laws passed in part due to the American circus "freak shows."

  5. Neurological legal disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishna H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders with a prolonged course, either remediable or otherwise are being seen increasingly in clinical practice and many such patients are young and are part of some organization or other wherein their services are needed if they were healthy and fit. The neurologists who are on the panel of these organizations are asked to certify whether these subjects are fit to work or how long they should be given leave. These certificates may be produced in the court of law and may be subjected to verification by another neurologist or a medical board. At present there are no standard guidelines in our country to effect such certification unlike in orthopedic specialty or in ophthalmology. The following is a beginning, based on which the neurologist can certify the neurological disability of such subjects and convey the same meaning to all neurologists across the country.

  6. Neurologic outcome of urea cycle disorder liver transplant recipients may be predicted by pretransplant neurological imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Scott M; Campbell, Kathleen M; Kukreja, Marcia; Kohli, Rohit

    2015-08-01

    Liver transplantation treats the hepatic affectation of UCDs; however, irreversible neurologic damage pretransplant is difficult to assess providing transplant teams with ethical dilemmas for liver transplantation. The purpose of our study was to determine whether pretransplant neuroimaging can predict developmental outcomes post-liver-transplant in children with UCDs. Patients undergoing liver transplantation for UCDs at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center between 2002 and 2012 were identified. Neurologic assessments prior to and after transplantation were categorized into mild, moderate, or severe disability. Neuroimaging data were categorized into mild, moderate, or severe by a single pediatric neuroradiologist. Fifteen patients were identified of whom eight had neuroimaging prior to transplantation. Of the eight patients that had neuroimaging, four were categorized as severe, one moderate, and three no-to-mild delay. All four patients whose imaging was severe were found to have moderate-to-severe neurologic delay. Of the three patients with no-to-mild changes on neuroimaging two of three were found to have no-to-mild delay on developmental assessments after transplantation. Neuroimaging may be a helpful tool in determining developmental prognosis and outcomes post-liver-transplantation for UCDs. Further studies maybe needed to validate our preliminary findings. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. NEUROLOGICAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN 9-YEAR-OLD CHILDREN FED BREAST-MILK OR FORMULA-MILK AS BABIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LANTING, CI; FIDLER, [No Value; HUISMAN, M; TOUWEN, BCL; BOERSMA, ER

    1994-01-01

    The presence of minor neurological dysfunction is associated with behavioural and cognitive development at school age. We have previously shown a relation between minor neurological dysfunction and perinatal disorders, especially abnormal neonatal neurological condition. We have now investigated the

  8. The Clinical Spectrum Of Paediatric Neurological Disorders In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The predominant neurologic morbidities included: cerebral palsy (42.4%), epilepsy (27.8%), febrile seizure (6.5%), mental retardation(6.2%), microcephaly (5.6%), behavioral problems (5.6%), poliomyelitis (4.5%), hydrocephalus (4.2%), visual impairment (2.8%), down syndrome (1.7%), and attention deficit hyperactivity ...

  9. Concepts and strategies for clinical management of blast-induced traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Huang, Wei; Constantini, Shlomi

    2013-01-01

    After exposure of the human body to blast, kinetic energy of the blast shock waves might be transferred into hydraulic energy in the cardiovascular system to cause a rapid physical movement or displacement of blood (a volumetric blood surge). The volumetric blood surge moves through blood vessels from the high-pressure body cavity to the low-pressure cranial cavity, causing damage to tiny cerebral blood vessels and the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Large-scale cerebrovascular insults and BBB damage that occur globally throughout the brain may be the main causes of non-impact, blast-induced brain injuries, including the spectrum of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The volumetric blood surge may be a major contributor not only to blast-induced brain injuries resulting from physical trauma, but may also be the trigger to psychiatric disorders resulting from emotional and psychological trauma. Clinical imaging technologies, which are able to detect tiny cerebrovascular insults, changes in blood flow, and cerebral edema, may help diagnose both TBI and PTSD in the victims exposed to blasts. Potentially, prompt medical treatment aiming at prevention of secondary neuronal damage may slow down or even block the cascade of events that lead to progressive neuronal damage and subsequent long-term neurological and psychiatric impairment.

  10. Neurologic sequelae associated with foscarnet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lor, E; Liu, Y Q

    1994-09-01

    To report three cases of possible foscarnet-induced neurologic sequelae. We report two cases of seizures and one case of hand cramping and finger paresthesia after starting foscarnet therapy with no evidence of predisposing risk factors, such as serum laboratory abnormalities, renal dysfunction, or known central nervous system (CNS) involvement. All three patients had stable laboratory values during therapy and when the neurologic adverse effects occurred. All patients were receiving appropriate dosages of foscarnet. The incidence of seizures in AIDS patients was reviewed. A history of CNS lesions, infections, and/or AIDS per se may increase the risk of a neurologic adverse effect while receiving foscarnet therapy. Acute ionized hypocalcemia may cause these neurologic adverse effects. Ionized hypocalcemia is transitory, is related to the rate of foscarnet infusion, and may not be reflected as a change in total serum calcium concentration. Foscarnet probably contributed to the neurologic adverse effects reported here. Foscarnet may need to be administered at a slower rate than is recommended by the manufacturer. Electrolytes must be monitored closely; however, a neurologic adverse effect may not be foreseen.

  11. Age at disease onset and peak ammonium level rather than interventional variables predict the neurological outcome in urea cycle disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posset, Roland; Garcia-Cazorla, Angeles; Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Teles, Elisa Leão; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Brassier, Anaïs; Burlina, Alberto B; Burgard, Peter; Cortès-Saladelafont, Elisenda; Dobbelaere, Dries; Couce, Maria L; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Häberle, Johannes; Lund, Allan M; Chakrapani, Anupam; Schiff, Manuel; Walter, John H; Zeman, Jiri; Vara, Roshni; Kölker, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Patients with urea cycle disorders (UCDs) have an increased risk of neurological disease manifestation. Determining the effect of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions on the neurological outcome. Evaluation of baseline, regular follow-up and emergency visits of 456 UCD patients prospectively followed between 2011 and 2015 by the E-IMD patient registry. About two-thirds of UCD patients remained asymptomatic until age 12 days [i.e. the median age at diagnosis of patients identified by newborn screening (NBS)] suggesting a potential benefit of NBS. In fact, NBS lowered the age at diagnosis in patients with late onset of symptoms (>28 days), and a trend towards improved long-term neurological outcome was found for patients with argininosuccinate synthetase and lyase deficiency as well as argininemia identified by NBS. Three to 17 different drug combinations were used for maintenance therapy, but superiority of any single drug or specific drug combination above other combinations was not demonstrated. Importantly, non-interventional variables of disease severity, such as age at disease onset and peak ammonium level of the initial hyperammonemic crisis (cut-off level: 500 μmol/L) best predicted the neurological outcome. Promising results of NBS for late onset UCD patients are reported and should be re-evaluated in a larger and more advanced age group. However, non-interventional variables affect the neurological outcome of UCD patients. Available evidence-based guideline recommendations are currently heterogeneously implemented into practice, leading to a high variability of drug combinations that hamper our understanding of optimised long-term and emergency treatment.

  12. Guided self-help for mental health disorders in children and young people with chronic neurological conditions: A qualitative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Sophie D; Coughtrey, Anna E; Heyman, Isobel; Greally, Suzanna; Clarkson, Harriet; Bhattacharyya, Tuhina; Lewis, Corah; Varadkar, Sophia; Shafran, Roz

    2018-03-09

    Children with neurological conditions such as epilepsy are at high risk of developing mental health disorders. Guided self-help can be used to increase access to psychological therapies. When developing and evaluating interventions, it is important to obtain the views of service-users about their acceptability. A telephone-guided self-help intervention was used to treat common mental health difficulties in children and young people with neurological conditions. The intervention was not adapted in content to account for chronic illness. This study therefore reports on qualitative interviews with participants to determine the acceptability of the intervention. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 27 participants (25 parents and 2 young people) who had undertaken a telephone-delivered guided self-help intervention for common mental health difficulties in the context of a paediatric neurological condition. Transcripts were analysed thematically using the framework approach. Thirteen themes were extracted, organised into three main domains, which covered: the practicalities of telephone guided self-help treatment; the outcomes of the intervention; and the extent to which adaptation was needed for chronic illness. Most families found the intervention helpful in working towards their specific goals and noticed changes for the child and/or parents and family. Participants had a positive experience of the intervention and the majority of parents found the standard intervention with individualised goals sufficient to meet the young person's mental health needs. Copyright © 2018 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Rates of diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders within a prevalent population of community-dwelling elderly people in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity Dewhurst

    2012-12-01

    Conclusions: Levels of diagnosis and treatment were low, with some gender inequality. Reasons for this may include a lack of recognition of the condition within the local population and lack of access to appropriate services. In the absence of effective primary and secondary preventative measures, and effective treatment, the burden of neurological disorders is likely to increase with further demographic ageing.

  14. Vestibular migraine in multicenter neurology clinics according to the appendix criteria in the third beta edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Soo-Jin; Kim, Byung-Kun; Kim, Byung-Su; Kim, Jae-Moon; Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Moon, Heui-Soo; Song, Tae-Jin; Cha, Myoung-Jin; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Sohn, Jong-Hee

    2016-04-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM), the common term for recurrent vestibular symptoms with migraine features, has been recognized in the appendix criteria of the third beta edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3β). We applied the criteria for VM in a prospective, multicenter headache registry study. Nine neurologists enrolled consecutive patients visiting outpatient clinics for headache. The presenting headache disorder and additional VM diagnoses were classified according to the ICHD-3β. The rates of patients diagnosed with VM and probable VM using consensus criteria were assessed. A total of 1414 patients were enrolled. Of 631 migraineurs, 65 were classified with VM (10.3%) and 16 with probable VM (2.5%). Accompanying migraine subtypes in VM were migraine without aura (66.2%), chronic migraine (29.2%), and migraine with aura (4.6%). Probable migraine (75%) was common in those with probable VM. The most common vestibular symptom was head motion-induced dizziness with nausea in VM and spontaneous vertigo in probable VM. The clinical characteristics of VM did not differ from those of migraine without VM. We diagnosed VM in 10.3% of first-visit migraineurs in neurology clinics using the ICHD-3β. Applying the diagnosis of probable VM can increase the identification of VM. © International Headache Society 2015.

  15. Diagnosis and management of functional neurological symptoms: The Dutch experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Schipper, Laura J.; Vermeulen, Marinus; Eeckhout, Augustinus M.; Foncke, Elisabeth M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Functional neurological symptoms (FNS) were considered as a psychiatric disorder at the beginning of the 20th century (conversion disorder). Psychiatrists performed diagnosis and treatment throughout most of the past century in the Netherlands, but in the latest decades patients were usually firstly

  16. Diagnosis and management of functional neurological symptoms: The Dutch experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Schipper, L.J.; Vermeulen, M; Eeckhout, A.M.; Foncke, E.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Functional neurological symptoms (FNS) were considered as a psychiatric disorder at the beginning of the 20th century (conversion disorder). Psychiatrists performed diagnosis and treatment throughout most of the past century in the Netherlands, but in the latest decades patients were

  17. Ultrasonic energy enhanced the efficiency of advance extraction methodology for enrichment of trace level of copper in serum samples of patients having neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Mariam S; Kazi, Tasneem G; Afridi, Hassan I; Ali, Jamshed; Akhtar, Asma

    2017-07-01

    An innovative dual dispersive ionic liquid based on ultrasound assisted microextraction (UDIL-μE), for the enrichment of trace levels of copper ion (Cu 2+ ), in serum (blood) of patients suffering from different neurological disorders. The enriched metal ions were subjected to flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). In the UDIL-μE method, the extraction solvent, ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [C 4 mim][PF 6 ], was dispersed into the aqueous samples using an ultrasonic bath. The(PAN) 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol was used as ligand for the complexation of Cu ion in IL (as extracting solvent). The various variables such as sonication time, pH, concentration of complexing agent, time and rate of centrifugation, IL volume that affect the extraction process were optimized. The enhancement factor (EF) and detection limit (LOD) was found under favorable condition was 31 and 0.36μgL -1 , respectively. Reliability of the proposed method was checked by relative standard deviation (%RSD), which was found to be <5%. The accuracy of developed procedure was assured by using certified reference material (CRM) of blood serum. The developed procedure was applied successfully to the analysis of concentration of Cu ion in blood serum of different neurological disorders subjects and referents of same age group. It was observed that the levels of Cu ion was two folds higher in serum samples of neurological disorders patients as related to normal referents of same age group. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Psycho-Neurological Status in Children with Malocclusions and Muscle Pressure Habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubleva, Irina A; Persin, Leonid S; Slabkovskaya, Anna B; Zavadenko, Nikolay N; Deregibus, Andrea; Debernardi, Cesare L

    2015-01-01

    Non-nutritive sucking behaviors such as finger- and tongue-sucking, tongue thrust, lips- or cheek-sucking, nail-, lip- or tongue-biting and other pressure habits represent risk factors for malocclusion. The association between psycho-neurological disorders and different types of malocclusion in children with sucking habits was long studied. During neurological examination, many children with sucking habits are diagnosed as Minimal Cerebral Dysfunction or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) bearers. The aim of this study is to assess the psycho-neurological status and motor disorders in children with malocclusion and normal occlusion. 135 children, aged between 8 and 12 years old, were examined, 42 children with normal occlusion and 93 children with different types of malocclusion. Besides clinical examination, all children were studied by the following psychoneurological methods: 1) Parent's Questionnaire, 2) Diagnostic interview Kiddie-Sads 3) Physical and Neurological Exam for Subtle Signs and 4) stabilometric tests. This study shows as in presence of dentofacial anomalies, pressure habits, ADHD reports significant effects on the functional state of the motor system: increases are noted in all basic parameters of statokinesiograms (crossed distance, sway area and ellipse surface), which lead to increased physiologic energy costs to maintain the vertical position of the body.

  19. Secondary psychosis induced by metabolic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier eBonnot

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders are not well recognized by psychiatrists as a possible source of secondary psychoses. Inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs are not frequent. Although, their prompt diagnosis may lead to suitable treatments. IEMs are well known to paediatricians, in particular for their most serious forms, having an early expression most of the time. Recent years discoveries have unveiled later expression forms, and sometimes, very discreet first physical signs. There is a growing body of evidence that supports the hypothesis that IEMs can manifest as atypical psychiatric symptoms, even in the absence of clear neurological symptoms. In the present review, we propose a detailed overview at schizophrenia-like and autism-like symptoms that can lead practitioners to bear in mind an IEM. Other psychiatric manifestations are also found, as behavioral., cognitive, learning and mood disorders. However, they are less frequent. Ensuring an accurate IEM diagnosis, in front of these psychiatric symptoms should be a priority, in order to grant suitable and valuable treatment for these pathologies.

  20. A national neurological excellence centers network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzi, S; Cristiani, P; Cavallini, A

    1998-02-01

    The most relevant problems related to the management of neurological disorders are (i) the frequent hospitalization in nonspecialist departments, with the need for neurological consultation, and (ii) the frequent requests of GPs for highly specialized investigations that are very expensive and of little value in arriving at a correct diagnosis. In 1996, the Consorzio di Bioingegneria e Informatica Medica in Italy realized the CISNet project (in collaboration with the Consorzio Istituti Scientifici Neuroscienze e Tecnologie Biomediche and funded by the Centro Studi of the National Public Health Council) for the implementation of a national neurological excellence centers network (CISNet). In the CISNet project, neurologists will be able to give on-line interactive consultation and off-line consulting services identifying correct diagnostic/therapeutic procedures, evaluating the need for both examination in specialist centers and admission to specialized centers, and identifying the most appropriate ones.

  1. Overall biological activity of sensorimotor and visual brain cortex of rabbits with early neurological disorders induced by high doses of γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silin, D.Ya.

    1988-01-01

    The overall bioelectrical activity of the sensorimotor and visual brain cortex of rabbits was estimated during early neurological impairment caused by 120 Gy gamma irradiation. The characteristic changes were revealed in the amplitude, form, energy spectrum and spatial biopotential synchronization. The changes in the bioelectrical activity of the brain were associated with the clinically displayed stages of the neurological process development

  2. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  3. Mind-body interventions: applications in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahbeh, Helané; Elsas, Siegward-M; Oken, Barry S

    2008-06-10

    Half of the adults in the United States use complementary and alternative medicine with mind-body therapy being the most commonly used form. Neurology patients often turn to their physicians for insight into the effectiveness of the therapies and resources to integrate them into their care. The objective of this article is to give a clinical overview of mind-body interventions and their applications in neurology. Medline and PsychInfo were searched on mind-body therapies and neurologic disease search terms for clinical trials and reviews and published evidence was graded. Meditation, relaxation, and breathing techniques, yoga, tai chi, and qigong, hypnosis, and biofeedback are described. Mind-body therapy application to general pain, back and neck pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, headaches, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, muscular dysfunction, stroke, aging, Parkinson disease, stroke, and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder are reviewed. There are several conditions where the evidence for mind-body therapies is quite strong such as migraine headache. Mind-body therapies for other neurology applications have limited evidence due mostly to small clinical trials and inadequate control groups.

  4. [Neurological disorders and the blood-brain barrier. Strategies and limitations for drug delivery to the brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Alazne; Álvarez, Antonia; Suárez-Merino, Blanca; Goñi-de-Cerio, Felipe

    2014-03-01

    The incidence in the central nervous system diseases has increased with a growing elderly population. Unfortunately, conventional treatments used to treat the mentioned diseases are frequently ineffective due to the presence of the blood brain barrier. To illustrate the blood-brain barrier properties that limit drug transport into the brain and the main strategies employed to treat neurologic disorders. The blood-brain barrier is mainly composed of a specialized microvascular endothelium and of glial cells. It constitutes a valuable tool to separate the central nervous system from the rest of the body. Nevertheless, it also represents an obstacle to the delivery of therapeutic drugs to the brain. To be effective, drugs must reach their target in the brain. On one hand, therapeutic agents could be designed to be able to cross the blood brain barrier. On the other hand, drug delivery systems could be employed to facilitate the therapeutic agents' entry into the central nervous system. In vivo models of neurological diseases, in addition to in vitro models of the blood brain barrier, have been widely employed for the evaluation of drugs utilized to treat central nervous system diseases.

  5. Clinical neurofeedback: case studies, proposed mechanism, and implications for pediatric neurology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legarda, Stella B; McMahon, Doreen; Othmer, Siegfried; Othmer, Sue

    2011-08-01

    Trends in alternative medicine use by American health care consumers are rising substantially. Extensive literature exists reporting on the effectiveness of neurofeedback in the treatment of autism, closed head injury, insomnia, migraine, depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy, and posttraumatic stress disorder. We speculated that neurofeedback might serve as a therapeutic modality for patients with medically refractory neurological disorders and have begun referring patients to train with clinical neurofeedback practitioners. The modality is not always covered by insurance. Confident their child's medical and neurological needs would continue to be met, the parents of 3 children with epilepsy spectrum disorder decided to have their child train in the modality. The children's individual progress following neurofeedback are each presented here. A proposed mechanism and practice implications are discussed.

  6. Medical comorbidity of sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikeos, Dimitris; Georgantopoulos, Georgios

    2011-07-01

    Recently published literature indicates that sleep disorders present with medical comorbidities quite frequently. The coexistence of a sleep disorder with a medical disorder has a substantial impact for both the patient and the health system. Insomnia and hypersomnia are highly comorbid with medical conditions, such as chronic pain and diabetes, as well as with various cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, urinary and neurological disorders. Restless legs syndrome and periodic leg movement syndrome have been associated with iron deficiency, kidney disease, diabetes, and neurological, autoimmune, cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. Rapid eye movement behaviour disorder has been described as an early manifestation of serious central nervous system diseases; thus, close neurological monitoring of patients referring with this complaint is indicated. Identification and management of any sleep disorder in medical patients is important for optimizing the course and prognosis. Of equal importance is the search for undetected medical disorder in patients presenting with sleep disorders.

  7. New techniques for positron emission tomography in the study of human neurological disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1989-11-01

    This progress report represents a summary of our performance during the two year period following initial start-up of these research activities at Michigan. Productivity has been excellent; already over 47 papers and abstracts have been published or accepted for publication from this still young program. They represent significant contributions to extending the technology of positron emission tomography in the study of human neurological disorders. Our focus is to develop more cost effective and efficient means for producing new functionally specific tracers and simpler, less expensive, means for acquiring and interpreting quantitative data. These improved processes are required for the future growth of PET as a sophisticated research tool and for the transfer of this technology to clinical use. Our approach concentrates on two separate yet related areas, radiosynthesis and data analysis. In subproject 1, Drs. Jewett and Mulholland have introduced innovative methods for improving 11C and 18F synthetic processes. In Subproject 2, Dr. Hutchins has laid the foundations for an objective analysis of the limitations and opportunities for quantifying regional PET data. In Subproject 3, Dr. Koeppe has extended rapid techniques for parameter estimation in kinetic modeling of new ligands. Finally, in Subproject 4, Dr. Frey has applied kinetic analysis to ligand tracing of the cholinergic neurotransmitter system in animal and human brain. These DOE supported studies have direct impact on clinical research here and elsewhere which is expected to improve diagnosis and treatment of degenerative neurological diseases, mental illness and brain tumors. 47 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Integral Characterization of Defective BDNF/TrkB Signalling in Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders Leads the Way to New Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejeda, Gonzalo S.; Díaz-Guerra, Margarita

    2017-01-01

    Enhancement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling has great potential in therapy for neurological and psychiatric disorders. This neurotrophin not only attenuates cell death but also promotes neuronal plasticity and function. However, an important challenge to this approach is the persistence of aberrant neurotrophic signalling due to a defective function of the BDNF high-affinity receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), or downstream effectors. Such changes have been already described in several disorders, but their importance as pathological mechanisms has been frequently underestimated. This review highlights the relevance of an integrative characterization of aberrant BDNF/TrkB pathways for the rational design of therapies that by combining BDNF and TrkB targets could efficiently promote neurotrophic signalling. PMID:28134845

  9. A focus on adolescence to reduce neurological, mental health and substance-use disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Leslie L; Grigorenko, Elena L; Boivin, Michael J; Rapa, Elizabeth; Stein, Alan

    2015-11-19

    Globally, there is a crucial need to prioritize research directed at reducing neurological, mental health and substance-use disorders in adolescence, which is a pivotal age for the development of self-control and regulation. In adolescence, behaviour optimally advances towards adaptive long-term goals and suppresses conflicting maladaptive short-lived urges to balance impulsivity, exploration and defiance, while establishing effective societal participation. When self-control fails to develop, violence, injury and neurological, mental health and substance-use disorders can result, further challenging the development of self-regulation and impeding the transition to a productive adulthood. Adolescent outcomes, positive and negative, arise from both a life-course perspective and within a socioecological framework. Little is known about the emergence of self-control and regulation in adolescents in low- and middle-income countries where enormous environmental threats are more common (for example, poverty, war, local conflicts, sex trafficking and slavery, early marriage and/or pregnancy, and the absence of adequate access to education) than in high-income countries and can threaten optimal neurodevelopment. Research must develop or adapt appropriate assessments of adolescent ability and disability, social inclusion and exclusion, normative development, and neurological, mental health and substance-use disorders. Socioecological challenges in low- and middle-income countries require innovative strategies to prevent mental health, neurological and substance-use disorders and develop effective interventions for adolescents at risk, especially those already living with these disorders and the consequent disability.

  10. Neurology and psychiatry: waking up to opportunities of sleep. State of the art and clinical/research priorities for the next decade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bassetti, C.L.; Ferini-Strambi, L.; Brown, S.; Adamantidis, A.; Benedetti, F.; Bruni, O.; Cajochen, C.; Dolenc-Groselj, L.; Ferri, R.; Gais, S.; Huber, R.; Khatami, R.; Lammers, G.J.; Luppi, P.H.; Manconi, M.; Nissen, C.; Nobili, L.; Peigneux, P.; Pollmacher, T.; Randerath, W.; Riemann, D.; Santamaria, J.; Schindler, K.; Tafti, M.; van Someren, E.J.W.; Wetter, T.C.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, evidence has emerged for a bidirectional relationship between sleep and neurological and psychiatric disorders. First, sleep-wake disorders (SWDs) are very common and may be the first/main manifestation of underlying neurological and psychiatric disorders. Secondly, SWDs may

  11. Neurology and psychiatry : waking up to opportunities of sleep. : State of the art and clinical/research priorities for the next decade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bassetti, C L; Ferini-Strambi, L; Brown, S; Adamantidis, A; Benedetti, F; Bruni, O; Cajochen, C; Dolenc-Groselj, L; Ferri, R; Gais, S; Huber, R; Khatami, R; Lammers, G J; Luppi, P H; Manconi, M; Nissen, C; Nobili, L; Peigneux, P; Pollmächer, T; Randerath, W; Riemann, D; Santamaria, J; Schindler, K; Tafti, M; Van Someren, E; Wetter, T C

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, evidence has emerged for a bidirectional relationship between sleep and neurological and psychiatric disorders. First, sleep-wake disorders (SWDs) are very common and may be the first/main manifestation of underlying neurological and psychiatric disorders. Secondly, SWDs may

  12. The Neurology of Proverbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Van Lancker

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Although proverb tests are commonly used in the mental status examination surprisingly little is known about either normal comprehension or the interpretation of proverbial expressions. Current proverbs tests have conceptual and linguistic shortcomings, and few studies have been done to investigate the specific effects of neurological and psychiatric disorders on the interpretation of proverbs. Although frontal lobes have traditionally been impugned in patients who are “concrete”, recent studies targeting deficient comprehension of non literal language (e.g. proverbs, idioms, speech formulas, and indirect requests point to an important role of the right hemisphere (RH. Research describing responses of psychiatrically and neurologically classified groups to tests of proverb and idiom usage is needed to clarify details of aberrant processing of nonliteral meanings. Meanwhile, the proverb test, drawing on diverse cognitive skills, is a nonspecific but sensitive probe of mental status.

  13. Koumine exhibits anxiolytic properties without inducing adverse neurological effects on functional observation battery, open-field and Vogel conflict tests in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Jie; Zhong, Zhi-Feng; Xin, Zhi-Ming; Hong, Long-Hui; Su, Yan-Ping; Yu, Chang-Xi

    2017-04-01

    Koumine, an active alkaloid of neurotoxic plant Gelsemium, has been focused on its therapeutic uses, especially in central nervous system. Nevertheless, less is known about the neurological effects of koumine, which hampers its potential therapeutic exploitation. Moreover, as the anxiolytic potential of Gelsemium has raised many critical issues, its active principles on the anxiolytic and other neurological effects need to be further investigated. Here, we used functional observation battery (FOB) of mice to systematically measure the neurological effects of koumine at the effective doses, and then further confirmed its anxiolytic properties in open-field test (OFT) of mice and Vogel conflict test (VCT) of rats. Koumine exhibited anxiolytic-like activities but did not affect other autonomic, neurological and physical functions in FOB. Furthermore, koumine released anxiolytic responses and anti-punishment action in a manner similar to diazepam in OFT and VCT, respectively. The results constitutes solid set of fundamental data further demonstrating anxiolytic properties of koumine at the therapeutic doses without inducing adverse neurological effects, which supports the perspectives for the development of safe and effective koumine medicine against pathological anxiety.

  14. Animal-Assisted Therapy in Elderly Patients: Evidence and Controversies in Dementia and Psychiatric Disorders and Future Perspectives in Other Neurological Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Silvio; De Rosa, Anna; De Lucia, Natascia; Antenora, Antonella; Illario, Maddalena; Esposito, Marcello; De Michele, Giuseppe

    2018-01-01

    Animal-assisted therapy (AAT) includes a set of nonpharmacological interventions aimed at improving human health through the use of trained or untrained animals. In recent decades, AAT has been trialed for different neurological and psychiatric disorders. In patients with dementia, interaction with animals seems to have a positive influence on aggressiveness and anxiety and to ameliorate quality of life and relationship skills. In psychiatric patients, AAT seems to increase motivation and self-esteem, improve prosocial conduct, and decrease behavioral problems. The aim of this study is to review the literature on AAT for elderly people with dementia and psychiatric disorders. Other fields of possible application for AAT are suggested.

  15. Design and screening of ASIC inhibitors based on aromatic diamidines for combating neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuanmao; Orser, Beverley A; MacDonald, John F

    2010-12-01

    Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are implicated in various brain functions including learning and memory and are involved in a number of neurological disorders such as pain, ischemic stroke, depression, and multiple sclerosis. We have recently defined ASICs as one of receptor targets of aromatic diamidines in neurons. Aromatic diamidines are DNA-binding agents and have long been used in the treatment of leishmaniasis, trypanosomiasis, pneumocystis pneumonia and babesiosis. Moreover, some aromatic diamidines are used as skin-care and baby products and others have potential to suppress tumor growth or to combat malaria. A large number of aromatic diamidines or analogs have been synthesized. Many efforts are being made to optimize the therapeutic spectrum of aromatic diamidines, i.e. to reduce toxicity, increase oral bioavailability and enhance their penetration of the blood-brain barrier. Aromatic diamidines therefore provide a shortcut of screening for selective ASIC inhibitors with therapeutic potential. Intriguingly nafamostat, a protease inhibitor for treating acute pancreatitis, also inhibits ASIC activities. Aromatic diamidines and nafamostat have many similarities although they belong to distinct classes of medicinal agents for curing different diseases. Here we delineate background, clinical application and drug development of aromatic diamidines that could facilitate the screening for selective ASIC inhibitors for research purposes. Further studies may lead to a drug with therapeutic value and extend the therapeutic scope of aromatic diamidines to combat neurological diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Neurological manifestations of HIV infection in Nigerians | Imam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Nervous system complications commonly accompany HIV infection and are associated with significant ... In all, 89 patients (44%) were diagnosed with at least one neurological disorder.

  17. Manic depressive psychosis and schizophrenia are neurological disorders at the extremes of CNS maturation and nutritional disorders associated with a deficit in marine fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugstad, L F

    2001-12-01

    The maturational theory of brain development comprises manic depressive psychosis and schizophrenia. It holds that the disorders are part of human diversity in growth and maturation, which explains their ubiquity, shared susceptibility genes and multifactorial inheritance. Rate of maturation and age at puberty are the genotype; the disorders are localized at the extremes with normality in between. This is based on the association between onset of puberty and the final regressive event, with pruning of 40% of excitatory synapses leaving the inhibitory ones fairly unchanged. This makes excitability, a fundamental property of nervous tissue, a distinguishing factor: the earlier puberty, the greater excitability--the later puberty, the greater deficit. Biological treatment supports deviation from the norm: neuroleptics are convulsant; antidepressives are anti-epiletogenic. There is an association between onset of puberty and body-build: early maturers are pyknic broad-built, late ones linearly leptosomic. This discrepancy is similar to that in the two disorders, supporting the theory that body-build is the phenotype. Standard of living is the environmental factor, which affects pubertal age and shifts the panorama of mental illness accordingly. Unnatural death has increased with antipsychotics. Other treatment is needed. PUFA deficit has been observed in RBC in both disorders and striking improvements with addition of minor amounts of PUFA. This supports that dietary deficit might cause psychotic development and that prevention is possible. Other neurological disorders also profit from PUFA, underlining a general deficit in the diet.

  18. VPA alleviates neurological deficits and restores gene expression in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixiang Guo

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RTT is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder that occurs once in every 10,000-15,000 live female births. Despite intensive research, no effective cure is yet available. Valproic acid (VPA has been used widely to treat mood disorder, epilepsy, and a growing number of other disorders. In limited clinical studies, VPA has also been used to control seizure in RTT patients with promising albeit somewhat unclear efficacy. In this study we tested the effect of VPA on the neurological symptoms of RTT and discovered that short-term VPA treatment during the symptomatic period could reduce neurological symptoms in RTT mice. We found that VPA restores the expression of a subset of genes in RTT mouse brains, and these genes clustered in neurological disease and developmental disorder networks. Our data suggest that VPA could be used as a drug to alleviate RTT symptoms.

  19. Minds on replay: musical hallucinations and their relationship to neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Erin C; Josephs, Keith A

    2015-12-01

    The phenomenon of musical hallucinations, in which individuals perceive music in the absence of an external auditory stimulus, has been described sparingly in the literature through small case reports and series. Musical hallucinations have been linked to multiple associated conditions, including psychiatric and neurologic disease, brain lesions, drug effect, and hearing impairment. This study aimed to review the demographics of subjects with musical hallucinations and to determine the prevalence of neurological disorders, particularly neurodegenerative disease. Through the Mayo medical record, 393 subjects with musical hallucinations were identified and divided into five categories based on comorbid conditions that have been associated with musical hallucinations: neurological, psychiatric, structural, drug effect and not otherwise classifiable. Variables, including hearing impairment and the presence of visual and other auditory hallucinations, were evaluated independently in all five groups. The mean age at onset of the hallucinations was 56 years, ranging from 18 to 98 years, and 65.4% of the subjects were female. Neurological disease and focal brain lesions were found in 25% and 9% of the total subjects, respectively. Sixty-five subjects were identified with a neurodegenerative disorder, with the Lewy body disorders being the most common. Visual hallucinations were more common in the group with neurological disease compared to the psychiatric, structural, and not otherwise classifiable groups (P < 0.001), whereas auditory hallucinations were more common in the psychiatric group compared to all other groups (P < 0.001). Structural lesions associated with musical hallucinations involved both hemispheres with a preference towards the left, and all but two included the temporal lobe. Hearing impairment was common, particularly in the not otherwise classifiable category where 67.2% had documented hearing impairment, more than in any other group (P < 0.001). Those

  20. Genetic disorders of thyroid metabolism and brain development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, Manju A; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Normal thyroid metabolism is essential for human development, including the formation and functioning of the central and peripheral nervous system. Disorders of thyroid metabolism are increasingly recognized within the spectrum of paediatric neurological disorders. Both hypothyroid and hyperthyroid disease states (resulting from genetic and acquired aetiologies) can lead to characteristic neurological syndromes, with cognitive delay, extrapyramidal movement disorders, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and neuromuscular manifestations. In this review, the neurological manifestations of genetic disorders of thyroid metabolism are outlined, with particular focus on Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome and benign hereditary chorea. We report in detail the clinical features, major neurological and neuropsychiatric manifestations, molecular genetic findings, disease mechanisms, and therapeutic strategies for these emerging genetic ‘brain-thyroid’ disorders. PMID:24665922

  1. Sera of patients with celiac disease and neurologic disorders evoke a mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervio, Elisabetta; Volta, Umberto; Verri, Manuela; Boschi, Federica; Pastoris, Ornella; Granito, Alessandro; Barbara, Giovanni; Parisi, Claudia; Felicani, Cristina; Tonini, Marcello; De Giorgio, Roberto

    2007-07-01

    The mechanisms underlying neurologic impairment in celiac disease remain unknown. We tested whether antineuronal antibody-positive sera of patients with celiac disease evoke neurodegeneration via apoptosis in vitro. SH-Sy5Y cells were exposed to crude sera, isolated immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgG-depleted sera of patients with and without celiac disease with and without neurologic disorders, and antineuronal antibodies. Adsorption studies with gliadin and tissue transglutaminase (tTG) were performed in celiac disease sera. Apoptosis activated caspase-3, apaf-1, Bax, cytochrome c, cleaved caspase-8 and caspase-9 and mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes were evaluated with different methods. SH-Sy5Y cells exposed to antineuronal antibody-positive sera and isolated IgG from the same sera exhibited a greater percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei than that of antineuronal antibody-negative sera. Neuroblasts exposed to antineuronal antibody-negative celiac disease sera also showed greater TUNEL positivity and apaf-1 immunolabeled cells than controls. Antigliadin- and anti-tTG-depleted celiac disease sera had an apoptotic effect similar to controls. Anti-caspase-3 immunostained cells were greater than controls when exposed to positive sera. The mitochondrial respiratory chain complex was reduced by positive sera. Western blot demonstrated only caspase-9 cleavage in positive sera. Cytochrome c and Bax showed reciprocal translocation (from mitochondria to cytoplasm and vice versa) after treatment with positive sera. Antineuronal antibodies and, to a lower extent, combined antigliadin and anti-tTG antibodies in celiac disease sera contribute to neurologic impairment via apoptosis. Apaf-1 activation with Bax and cytochrome c translocation suggest a mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis.

  2. Mental disorders induced by carbamazepine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, K; Naito, Y; Yoshida, M; Nakanishi, T; Koizumi, J

    1990-03-01

    We present here a case with various physical and neuropsychiatric symptoms caused by the administration of carbamazepine. The patient suffering from right ophthalmic neuralgia showed fever, eczema, erythema, lymphoadenopathy, eosinophilia, vomiting, headache, dizziness, nystagmus, and various mental disorders which consisted of emotional instability, personality change, delusions of reference and persecution, depressive state, and hyperventilation syndrome during the administration of carbamazepine. The physical symptoms in the present case were conformable to the side effect of carbamazepine. The mental disorders appeared in a few days from the start of carbamazepine administration and disappeared after the discontinuation of the administration of this drug without antipsychotic therapy and have never relapsed until now. The mental disorders and the physical symptoms were in parallel with their clinical course. This kind of mental disorders induced by carbamazepine has not yet been reported.

  3. Artesunate-mefloquine combination therapy in acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria in young children: a field study regarding neurological and neuropsychiatric safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Sarabel G; Chelo, David; Kinkela, Mina N; Djoukoue, Florence; Tietche, Felix; Hatz, Christoph; Weber, Peter

    2010-10-21

    Mefloquine-artesunate combination therapy for uncomplicated falciparum malaria is one of the treatments used in African children. Data concerning neurological safety in adults and children treated with mefloquine and artesunate combination therapy is well documented in Asia. Safety data for neurological and neuropsychiatric side effects of mefloquine and artesunate combination therapy in African children are scarce, although WHO recommends this therapy in Africa. A phase IV, open label, single arm study was conducted among African children between 10 and 20 kg with acute uncomplicated falciparum malaria. They were treated over three consecutive days with a paediatric fixed-dose combination of artesunate (50 mg/d) and mefloquine (125 mg/d). Parasitological, clinical and neurological examinations and standardized questions about neuropsychiatric symptoms were carried out on days 0, 4, 7, 28 and 63. The primary objective was to assess the neurological and neuropsychiatric safety of artesunate-mefloquine combination therapy in young children. From December 2007 to March 2009, 220 children with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria were treated with artesunate and mefloquine. 213 children were analysed according to study protocol. 50 neurological and neuropsychiatric adverse events occurred in 28 patients. Eleven drug-related neurological and neuropsychiatric adverse events occurred in eight patients. Sleeping disorders were present in 2.3%, neurological disorders in 1.4%, neuropsychiatric disorders in 1% and eating disorders in 0.5% of the patients. Adverse events were of mild to moderate intensity and resolved spontaneously. African children showed a low percentage of self-limited neurological and neuropsychiatric adverse events, confirming studies on neurological safety in Asian children treated with artesunate and mefloquine. Sleeping disorders were most frequently observed.

  4. An investigation into closed-loop treatment of neurological disorders based on sensing mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Scott D; Kouzani, Abbas Z; Tye, Susannah J; Bennet, Kevin E; Berk, Michael

    2018-02-13

    Dynamic feedback based closed-loop medical devices offer a number of advantages for treatment of heterogeneous neurological conditions. Closed-loop devices integrate a level of neurobiological feedback, which allows for real-time adjustments to be made with the overarching aim of improving treatment efficacy and minimizing risks for adverse events. One target which has not been extensively explored as a potential feedback component in closed-loop therapies is mitochondrial function. Several neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders including Parkinson's disease, Major Depressive disorder and Bipolar disorder have been linked to perturbations in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This paper investigates the potential to monitor this mitochondrial function as a method of feedback for closed-loop neuromodulation treatments. A generic model of the closed-loop treatment is developed to describe the high-level functions of any system designed to control neural function based on mitochondrial response to stimulation, simplifying comparison and future meta-analysis. This model has four key functional components including: a sensor, signal manipulator, controller and effector. Each of these components are described and several potential technologies for each are investigated. While some of these candidate technologies are quite mature, there are still technological gaps remaining. The field of closed-loop medical devices is rapidly evolving, and whilst there is a lot of interest in this area, widespread adoption has not yet been achieved due to several remaining technological hurdles. However, the significant therapeutic benefits offered by this technology mean that this will be an active area for research for years to come.

  5. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  6. The practice of neurology: Looking ahead by looking back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringel, Steven P

    2015-05-19

    Over the last 50 years, there have been many improvements in therapy for individuals with neurologic disorders. Simultaneously, the complexity and cost of care have increased. The delivery of neurologic services is inefficient. The needs of both patients and neurologists are not being optimally addressed. Although greater attention is on the quality, safety, and value of the care, there remains a need for fundamental redesign in the way neurologic services are provided. The future practice of neurology will likely be interdisciplinary and provide both easy access and efficient coordination of services. No matter what changes in financing of health care are adopted, focus needs to be on reducing health care costs. Patients seeking neurologic care will expect seamless, innovative, and cost-effective services and to be active participants in their care. The proposed modifications address current demands and advocate for prospective innovative solutions. The changes proposed to improve care for patients will simultaneously make the careers of neurologists more gratifying and less stressful. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  7. Neurological complications of renal dialysis and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunaratne, Kushan; Taube, David; Khalil, Nofal; Perry, Richard; Malhotra, Paresh A

    2018-04-01

    Neurological complications from renal replacement therapy contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality in patients with renal failure. Such complications can affect either the central or peripheral nervous systems. Most neurological disturbances associated with the uraemic state do not respond fully to renal replacement therapy. There are also complications specifically associated with dialysis and transplantation. A multidisciplinary approach, involving both nephrologists and neurologists, is critical for the diagnosis and effective management of these disorders. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Neuroprotective effect of lithium after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Namgue; Choi, Yun-Sik; Kim, Seong Yun; Kim, Hee Jung

    2017-01-01

    Status epilepticus is the most common serious neurological condition triggered by abnormal electrical activity, leading to severe and widespread cell loss in the brain. Lithium has been one of the main drugs used for the treatment of bipolar disorder for decades, and its anticonvulsant and neuroprotective properties have been described in several neurological disease models. However, the therapeutic mechanisms underlying lithium's actions remain poorly understood. The muscarinic receptor agonist pilocarpine is used to induce status epilepticus, which is followed by hippocampal damage. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of lithium post-treatment on seizure susceptibility and hippocampal neuropathological changes following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. Status epilepticus was induced by administration of pilocarpine hydrochloride (320 mg/kg, i.p.) in C57BL/6 mice at 8 weeks of age. Lithium (80 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered 15 minutes after the pilocarpine injection. After the lithium injection, status epilepticus onset time and mortality were recorded. Lithium significantly delayed the onset time of status epilepticus and reduced mortality compared to the vehicle-treated group. Moreover, lithium effectively blocked pilocarpine-induced neuronal death in the hippocampus as estimated by cresyl violet and Fluoro-Jade B staining. However, lithium did not reduce glial activation following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. These results suggest that lithium has a neuroprotective effect and would be useful in the treatment of neurological disorders, in particular status epilepticus.

  9. Neurology and neurologic practice in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fu-Dong; Jia, Jian-Ping

    2011-11-29

    In the wake of dramatic economic success during the past 2 decades, the specialized field of neurology has undergone a significant transformation in China. With an increase in life expectancy, the problems of aging and cognition have grown. Lifestyle alterations have been associated with an epidemiologic transition both in the incidence and etiology of stroke. These changes, together with an array of social issues and institution of health care reform, are creating challenges for practicing neurologists throughout China. Notable problems include overcrowded, decrepit facilities, overloaded physician schedules, deteriorating physician-patient relationships, and an insufficient infrastructure to accommodate patients who need specialized neurologic care. Conversely, with the creation of large and sophisticated neurology centers in many cities across the country, tremendous opportunities exist. Developments in neurologic subspecialties enable delivery of high-quality care. Clinical and translational research based on large patient populations as well as highly sophisticated technologies are emerging in many neurologic centers and pharmaceutical companies. Child neurology and neurorehabilitation will be fast-developing subdisciplines. Given China's extensive population, the growth and progress of its neurology complex, and its ever-improving quality control, it is reasonable to anticipate that Chinese neurologists will contribute notably to unraveling the pathogenic factors causing neurologic diseases and to providing new therapeutic solutions.

  10. Optimisation of statistical methodologies for a better diagnosis of neurological and psychiatric disorders by means of SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagani, M.; Salmaso, D.; Borbely, K.

    2005-01-01

    In the last years there has been a wide consensus on the importance of brain imaging in assessing neuro degenerative and psychiatric disorders. Different techniques for functional and anatomical examination are currently clinically implemented in neurology and psychiatry to improve sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the diagnosis of various diseases. In addition, the increasing life expectancy in the Western world raises the social importance and the economical impact of age-related neuro degenerative disorders since the incidence of Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease is higher in the elderly. An early diagnosis of neuro-psychiatric diseases and the assessment of natural changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) distribution during normal aging are hence of utmost importance. In the recent past brain disorders have extensively been investigated by means of optimised nuclear medicine techniques, instruments and algorithms. Diagnosis can be better achieved by identifying those structures in which CBF or metabolism deviate from normality resulting in significant changes as compared to a reference database. In the present paper we present some studies investigating, by means of recently implemented diagnostic tools, patients bearer of various neuro-psychiatric disorders. The improved nuclear medicine techniques and instrumentation, the state-of-the-art software for brain imaging standardisation and the use of sophisticated multivariate data analysis are extensively reviewed. (author)

  11. Postoperative conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afolabi, Kola; Ali, Sameer; Gahtan, Vivian; Gorji, Reza; Li, Fenghua; Nussmeier, Nancy A

    2016-05-01

    Conversion disorder is a psychiatric disorder in which psychological stress causes neurologic deficits. A 28-year-old female surgical patient had uneventful general anesthesia and emergence but developed conversion disorder 1 hour postoperatively. She reported difficulty speaking, right-hand numbness and weakness, and right-leg paralysis. Neurologic examination and imaging revealed no neuronal damage, herniation, hemorrhage, or stroke. The patient mentioned failing examinations the day before surgery and discontinuing her prescribed antidepressant medication, leading us to diagnose conversion disorder, with eventual confirmation by neuroimaging and follow-up examinations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Costs of informal nursing care for patients with neurologic disorders: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, Freya; König, Hans-Helmut; Mietzner, Claudia; Brettschneider, Christian

    2018-01-02

    To systematically review the economic burden of informal nursing care (INC), often called informal care, caused by multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson disease (PD), and epilepsy, with special attention to disease severity. We systematically searched MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and NHS Economic Evaluation Database for articles on the cost of illness of the diseases specified. Title, abstract, and full-text review were conducted in duplicate by 2 researchers. The distribution of hours and costs of INC were extracted and used to compare the relevance of INC across included diseases and disease severity. Seventy-one studies were included (44 on MS, 17 on PD, and 10 on epilepsy). Studies on epilepsy reported an average of 2.3-54.5 monthly hours of INC per patient. For PD, average values of 42.9-145.9 hours and for MS average values of 9.2-249 hours per patient per month were found. In line with utilized hours, costs of INC were lowest for epilepsy (interquartile range [IQR] 229-1,466 purchasing power parity US dollars [PPP-USD]) and similar for MS (IQR 4,454-11,222 PPP-USD) and PD (IQR 1,440-7,117 PPP-USD). In addition, costs of INC increased with disease severity and accounted for 38% of total health care costs in severe MS stages on average. The course of diseases and disease severity matter for the amount of INC used by patients. For each of the neurologic disorders, an increase in the costs of INC, due to increasing disease severity, considerably contributes to the rise in total health care costs. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  13. Clinical and immunological relevance of anti-neuronal antibodies in celiac disease with neurological manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caio, Giacomo; Giorgio, Roberto De; Venturi, Alessandro; Giancola, Fiorella; Latorre, Rocco; Boschetti, Elisa; Serra, Mauro; Ruggeri, Eugenio; Volta, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess anti-neuronal antibodies (NA) prevalence and their correlation with neurological disorders and bowel habits in celiac disease (CD) patients. Background: Neurological manifestations are estimated to occur in about 10% of celiac disease patients and NA to central nervous system (CNS) and enteric nervous system (ENS) are found in a significant proportion of them. Little is known about the clinical and immunological features in CD patients with neurological manifestations. Patients and methods: NA to CNS and ENS were investigated in 106 CD patients and in 60 controls with autoimmune disorders by indirect immunofluorescence on rat / primate cerebellar cortex and intestinal (small and large bowel) sections. Results: IgG NA to CNS (titer 1:50 - 1:400) were positive in 23 celiacs (21%), being more frequently detected in those with neurological disorders that in those without neurological dysfunction (49% vs. 8%, P 1:200 had severe constipation. Only one patient with cerebellar ataxia and intestinal sub-occlusion was positive for NA to CNS and ENS. NA to CNS and ENS were found in 7% and 5% of controls, respectively. Conclusion: In CD the positivity of NA to CNS can be regarded as a marker of neurological manifestations. High titer NA to ENS are associated with severe constipation. The demonstration of NA to CNS and ENS suggests an immune-mediated pathogenesis leading to central neural impairment as well as gut dysfunction (hence constipation), respectively. PMID:25926940

  14. Survey of the professors of child neurology: neurology versus pediatrics home for child neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Phillip L; McConnell, Emily R; Fernandez, Rosamary; Brooks-Kayal, Amy

    2014-09-01

    The optimal academic home for child neurology programs between adult neurology versus pediatric departments remains an open question. The Professors of Child Neurology, the national organization of child neurology department chairs, division chiefs, and training program directors, was surveyed to evaluate the placement of child neurology programs. Professors of Child Neurology members were surveyed regarding the placement of child neurology programs within adult neurology versus pediatric departments. Questions explored academic versus clinical lines of reporting and factors that may be advantages and disadvantages of these affiliations. Issues also addressed were the current status of board certification and number of clinics expected in academic child neurology departments. Of 120 surveys sent, 95 responses were received (79% response rate). The primary academic affiliation is in neurology in 54% of programs versus 46% in pediatrics, and the primary clinical affiliation is 45% neurology and 55% pediatrics. Advantages versus disadvantages of one's primary affiliation were similar whether the primary affiliation was in neurology or pediatrics. While 61% of respondents are presently board certified in pediatrics, only 2% of those with time-limited certification in general pediatrics plan to be recertified going forward. Typically six to eight half-day clinics per week are anticipated for child neurologists in academic departments without additional funding sources. Overall, leaders of child neurology departments and training programs would not change their affiliation if given the opportunity. Advantages and disadvantages associated with current affiliations did not change whether child neurology was located in neurology or pediatrics. Board certification by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in child neurology is virtually universal, whereas pediatric board certification by the American Board of Pediatrics is being maintained by very few. Most academic

  15. Localized scleroderma en coup de sabre in the Neurology Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, João; Rocha, João; Sousa, Filipa; Macedo, Cristiana; Soares-Fernandes, João; Cerqueira, João; Maré, Ricardo; Lourenço, Esmeralda; Pereira, João

    2016-07-01

    Localized scleroderma en coup de sabre (LScs) is a form of localized scleroderma thought to be an autoimmune disorder. Central nervous system involvement is not rare and neurological manifestations include seizures, focal neurological deficits, headache and neuropsychiatric changes. Patients attending the Neurology Clinic with the final diagnosis of LScs with neurological manifestations were identified and clinical and imagiological records reviewed. Five patients (0.024%) had LScs with neurological involvement, presenting with transient focal neurologic deficits, seizures, headache or migraine with aura. Neuroimaging studies confirmed localized skin depression and showed bone thinning, white matter lesions, brain calcifications, sulcal effacement and meningeal enhancement. Three patients experienced clinical improvement after immunosuppressive therapy, and in two of these patients neuroimaging findings also improved. Recognizing typical dermatologic changes is keystone for the diagnosis of LScs with neurological involvement. It is a diagnosis of exclusion and extensive etiological diagnostic evaluation should be performed. Treatment options, including conservative follow-up or immunosuppressive therapy, should be carefully considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Synaptic Interactome Mining Reveals p140Cap as a New Hub for PSD Proteins Involved in Psychiatric and Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Alfieri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Altered synaptic function has been associated with neurological and psychiatric conditions including intellectual disability, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Amongst the recently discovered synaptic proteins is p140Cap, an adaptor that localizes at dendritic spines and regulates their maturation and physiology. We recently showed that p140Cap knockout mice have cognitive deficits, impaired long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD, and immature, filopodia-like dendritic spines. Only a few p140Cap interacting proteins have been identified in the brain and the molecular complexes and pathways underlying p140Cap synaptic function are largely unknown. Here, we isolated and characterized the p140Cap synaptic interactome by co-immunoprecipitation from crude mouse synaptosomes, followed by mass spectrometry-based proteomics. We identified 351 p140Cap interactors and found that they cluster to sub complexes mostly located in the postsynaptic density (PSD. p140Cap interactors converge on key synaptic processes, including transmission across chemical synapses, actin cytoskeleton remodeling and cell-cell junction organization. Gene co-expression data further support convergent functions: the p140Cap interactors are tightly co-expressed with each other and with p140Cap. Importantly, the p140Cap interactome and its co-expression network show strong enrichment in genes associated with schizophrenia, autism, bipolar disorder, intellectual disability and epilepsy, supporting synaptic dysfunction as a shared biological feature in brain diseases. Overall, our data provide novel insights into the molecular organization of the synapse and indicate that p140Cap acts as a hub for postsynaptic complexes relevant to psychiatric and neurological disorders.

  17. Neuromodulator and Emotion Biomarker for Stress Induced Mental Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Simeng; Wang, Wei; Wang, Fushun; Huang, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    Affective disorders are a leading cause of disabilities worldwide, and the etiology of these many affective disorders such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder is due to hormone changes, which includes hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in the peripheral nervous system and neuromodulators in the central nervous system. Consistent with pharmacological studies indicating that medical treatment acts by increasing the concentration of catecholamine, the locus coeruleus (LC)/norepinephrine (NE) system is regarded as a critical part of the central "stress circuitry," whose major function is to induce "fight or flight" behavior and fear and anger emotion. Despite the intensive studies, there is still controversy about NE with fear and anger. For example, the rats with LC ablation were more reluctant to leave a familiar place and took longer to consume the food pellets in an unfamiliar place (neophobia, i.e., fear in response to novelty). The reason for this discrepancy might be that NE is not only for flight (fear), but also for fight (anger). Here, we try to review recent literatures about NE with stress induced emotions and their relations with mental disorders. We propose that stress induced NE release can induce both fear and anger. "Adrenaline rush or norepinephrine rush" and fear and anger emotion might act as biomarkers for mental disorders.

  18. A phase I study of low-pressure hyperbaric oxygen therapy for blast-induced post-concussion syndrome and post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harch, Paul G; Andrews, Susan R; Fogarty, Edward F; Amen, Daniel; Pezzullo, John C; Lucarini, Juliette; Aubrey, Claire; Taylor, Derek V; Staab, Paul K; Van Meter, Keith W

    2012-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on the safety and efficacy of 1.5 ATA hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in military subjects with chronic blast-induced mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI)/post-concussion syndrome (PCS) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Sixteen military subjects received 40 1.5 ATA/60 min HBOT sessions in 30 days. Symptoms, physical and neurological exams, SPECT brain imaging, and neuropsychological and psychological testing were completed before and within 1 week after treatment. Subjects experienced reversible middle ear barotrauma (5), transient deterioration in symptoms (4), and reversible bronchospasm (1); one subject withdrew. Post-treatment testing demonstrated significant improvement in: symptoms, neurological exam, full-scale IQ (+14.8 points; pSPECT coefficient of variation in all white matter and some gray matter ROIs after the first HBOT, and in half of white matter ROIs after 40 HBOT sessions, and SPECT statistical parametric mapping analysis (diffuse improvements in regional cerebral blood flow after 1 and 40 HBOT sessions). Forty 1.5 ATA HBOT sessions in 1 month was safe in a military cohort with chronic blast-induced PCS and PTSD. Significant improvements occurred in symptoms, abnormal physical exam findings, cognitive testing, and quality-of-life measurements, with concomitant significant improvements in SPECT.

  19. Depressive symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and in non-neurological medical illnesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assogna F

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Francesca Assogna,1 Sabrina Fagioli,1 Luca Cravello,1 Giuseppe Meco,2 Mariangela Pierantozzi,3 Alessandro Stefani,3 Francesca Imperiale,2 Carlo Caltagirone,1,3 Francesco E Pontieri,4 Gianfranco Spalletta11I.R.C.C.S. Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Neurology and Psychiatry (Parkinson’s Centre and Research Centre of Social Diseases (CIMS, University “Sapienza”, Rome, Italy; 3Department of Neuroscience, University “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy; 4Department of Neuroscience, Mental Health and Sensory Systems, University “Sapienza”, Movement Disorder Unit, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Rome, ItalyBackground: Patients with neurological and non-neurological medical illnesses very often complain of depressive symptoms that are associated with cognitive and functional impairments. We compared the profile of depressive symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD patients with that of control subjects (CS suffering from non-neurological medical illnesses.Methods: One-hundred PD patients and 100 CS were submitted to a structured clinical interview for identification of major depressive disorder (MDD and minor depressive disorder (MIND, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, text revision (DSM-IV-TR, criteria. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were also administered to measure depression severity.Results: When considering the whole groups, there were no differences in depressive symptom frequency between PD and CS apart from worthlessness/guilt, and changes in appetite reduced rates in PD. Further, total scores and psychic and somatic subscores of HDRS and BDI did not differ between PD and CS. After we separated PD and CS in those with MDD, MIND, and no depression (NODEP, comparing total scores and psychic/somatic subscores of HDRS and BDI, we found increased total depression severity in NODEP PD and reduced severity of the psychic symptoms of

  20. Neurological implications and neuropsychological considerations on folk music and dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, Vittorio A; Riva, Michele A

    2015-01-01

    Neurological and neuropsychological aspects of folk music and traditional dance have been poorly investigated by historical and scientific literature. Some of these performances could be indeed the manifestation of latent pathological conditions or the expression of liberation rituals. This chapter aimed at analyzing the relationships between traditional dance, folk music, and neurological and psychiatric disorders. Since ancient times, dance has been used in the individual or collective as treatment of some diseases, including epilepsy and movement disorders (dyskinesia, chorea, etc.). Dionysia in Ancient Greece, St. Vitus dance in the Middle Age, tarantism and other traditional dances of southern Italy and of non-Western countries might be credited as curative rituals of these neurological and psychiatric conditions. During the nineteenth century, dance was also used for the treatment of psychiatric patients; the relationship between dance and insanity could also be reflected in classical ballets and music of that period. Nowadays, neuropsychiatric manifestations could also be evidenced in modern dances (mass fainting at rock concerts, flash mobs); some ballroom dances are commonly used for the rehabilitation of patients suffering from neurodegenerative and psychiatric conditions. Interdisciplinary research on these subjects (ethnomusicology and cultural anthropology, clinical neurology and dynamic psychology, neuroradiology and neurophysiology, and socioneurology and neuromusicology) should be increased. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Neurological signs and cognitive performance distinguish between adolescents with and without psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniegas, David B; Rojas, Donald C; Kleman, Michelle Ramos; Asherin, Ryan; Reite, Martin L

    2007-01-01

    Neurological and cognitive aspects of adolescent psychotic disorders are understudied. The authors assessed 19 adolescents with psychosis and 16 healthy comparison subjects using the Neurological Evaluation Scale (NES) and age-appropriate Wechsler intelligence quotient (IQ) scales. NES scores were highest and IQ scores were lowest among subjects with psychosis. Subjects with psychosis did not demonstrate age-related decreases in NES score. The combination of NES and IQ scores predicted both the presence of psychosis and psychiatric diagnosis. There were no relationships between medication status and either NES or IQ scores. These results support a broadly conceived neurodevelopmental formulation of adolescent psychotic disorders.

  2. Disorder-induced transitions in resonantly driven Floquet topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titum, Paraj; Lindner, Netanel H.; Refael, Gil

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the effects of disorder in Floquet topological insulators (FTIs) occurring in semiconductor quantum wells. Such FTIs are induced by resonantly driving a transition between the valence and conduction bands. We show that when disorder is added, the topological nature of such FTIs persists as long as there is a mobility gap at the resonant quasienergy. For strong enough disorder, this gap closes and all the states become localized as the system undergoes a transition to a trivial insulator. Interestingly, the effects of disorder are not necessarily adverse: we show that in the same quantum well, disorder can also induce a transition from a trivial to a topological system, thereby establishing a Floquet topological Anderson insulator (FTAI). We identify the conditions on the driving field necessary for observing such a transition.

  3. Neurological implications of urea cycle disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summar, M.; Leonard, J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The urea cycle disorders constitute a group of rare congenital disorders caused by a deficiency of the enzymes or transport proteins required to remove ammonia from the body. Via a series of biochemical steps, nitrogen, the waste product of protein metabolism, is removed from the blood and converted into urea. A consequence of these disorders is hyperammonaemia, resulting in central nervous system dysfunction with mental status changes, brain oedema, seizures, coma, and potentially death. Both acute and chronic hyperammonaemia result in alterations of neurotransmitter systems. In acute hyperammonaemia, activation of the NMDA receptor leads to excitotoxic cell death, changes in energy metabolism and alterations in protein expression of the astrocyte that affect volume regulation and contribute to oedema. Neuropathological evaluation demonstrates alterations in the astrocyte morphology. Imaging studies, in particular 1H MRS, can reveal markers of impaired metabolism such as elevations of glutamine and reduction of myoinositol. In contrast, chronic hyperammonaemia leads to adaptive responses in the NMDA receptor and impairments in the glutamate–nitric oxide–cGMP pathway, leading to alterations in cognition and learning. Therapy of acute hyperammonaemia has relied on ammonia-lowering agents but in recent years there has been considerable interest in neuroprotective strategies. Recent studies have suggested restoration of learning abilities by pharmacological manipulation of brain cGMP with phosphodiesterase inhibitors. Thus, both strategies are intriguing areas for potential investigation in human urea cycle disorders. PMID:18038189

  4. Temperature-induced transitions in disordered proteins probed by NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Poulsen, Flemming Martin; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are abundant in nature and perform many important physiological functions. Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy has been crucial for the understanding of the conformational properties of disordered proteins and is increasingly used to probe their conformational...... ensembles. Compared to folded proteins, disordered proteins are more malleable and more easily perturbed by environmental factors. Accordingly, the experimental conditions and especially the temperature modify the structural and functional properties of disordered proteins. NMR spectroscopy allows analysis...... of temperature-induced structural changes at residue resolution using secondary chemical shift analysis, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, and residual dipolar couplings. This chapter discusses practical aspects of NMR studies of temperature-induced structural changes in disordered proteins....

  5. ACETAZOLAMIDE IN PEDIATRIC NEUROLOGY: HISTORY AND PERSPECTIVE OF CILNICAL USE

    OpenAIRE

    A.N. Boyko; E.I. Gusev; O.V. Bykova; L.M. Kuzenkova; O.I. Maslova

    2006-01-01

    Resume the up tob date pharmacological and clinical findings have revealed new opportunities for the use of known for a long time pharmaceutical agents in various fields of practical medicine. For more than 50 years acetozolamide, systemic carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, has been used in neurology to correct liquorodynamic disorders. High clinical efficacy and good tolerb ability in longbterm use has made acetazolamide an essential agent in pediatric neurology, along with this the true therapeu...

  6. Neuromodulator and Emotion Biomarker for Stress Induced Mental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeng Gu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Affective disorders are a leading cause of disabilities worldwide, and the etiology of these many affective disorders such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder is due to hormone changes, which includes hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in the peripheral nervous system and neuromodulators in the central nervous system. Consistent with pharmacological studies indicating that medical treatment acts by increasing the concentration of catecholamine, the locus coeruleus (LC/norepinephrine (NE system is regarded as a critical part of the central “stress circuitry,” whose major function is to induce “fight or flight” behavior and fear and anger emotion. Despite the intensive studies, there is still controversy about NE with fear and anger. For example, the rats with LC ablation were more reluctant to leave a familiar place and took longer to consume the food pellets in an unfamiliar place (neophobia, i.e., fear in response to novelty. The reason for this discrepancy might be that NE is not only for flight (fear, but also for fight (anger. Here, we try to review recent literatures about NE with stress induced emotions and their relations with mental disorders. We propose that stress induced NE release can induce both fear and anger. “Adrenaline rush or norepinephrine rush” and fear and anger emotion might act as biomarkers for mental disorders.

  7. Primary care perceptions of neurology and neurology services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Angela M; Wade, Carrie; McCarron, Mark O

    2016-06-01

    Neurophobia (fear of neural sciences) and evaluation of independent sector contracts in neurology have seldom been examined among general practitioners (GPs). A questionnaire determined GPs' perceptions of neurology compared with other medical specialties. GP experiences of neurology services with independent sector companies and the local National Health Service (NHS) were compared. Areas of potential improvement in NHS neurology services were recorded from thematic analyses. Among 76 GPs neurology was perceived to be as interesting as other medical specialties. GPs reported less knowledge, more difficulty and less confidence in neurology compared with other medical specialties. There was a preference for a local NHS neurology service (pneurology services provided better patient satisfaction. GPs prefer local NHS neurology services to independent sector contracts. GPs' evaluations should inform commissioning of neurology services. Combating neurophobia should be an integral part of responsive commissioning. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Generation of Xeroderma Pigmentosum-A Patient-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Line for Use As Future Disease Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Hiroe; Kawasaki, Takashi; Deguchi, Tomonori; Yuba, Shunsuke

    2015-08-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XP-A) is a genetic disorder in which there is an abnormality in nucleotide excision repair that causes hypersensitivity to sunlight and multiple skin cancers. The development of central and peripheral neurological disorders not correlated to ultraviolet light exposure is associated with XP-A. The genes responsible for XP-A have been identified and a XPA knockout mouse has been generated. These knockout mice exhibit cutaneous symptoms, but they do not show neurological disorders. The mechanism of pathogenesis of neurological disorders is still unclear and therapeutic methods have not been established. Therefore, we generated XP-A patient-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells (XPA-iPSCs) to produce in vitro models of neurological disorders. We obtained iPSC lines from fibroblasts of two patients carrying different mutations. Drugs screened using XPA-iPSC lines can be helpful for treating XP-A patients in Japan. Additionally, we revealed that these iPSCs have the potential to differentiate into neural lineage cells, including dopaminergic neurons, which decrease in XP-A patients. Our results indicate that expression of the normal XPA gene without mutations is not required for generation of iPSCs and differentiation of iPSCs into neural lineage cells. XPA-iPSCs may become useful models that clarify our understanding of neurological pathogenesis and help to establish therapeutic methods.

  9. Neurological manifestations of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome(s): A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castori, Marco; C. Voermans, Nicol

    2014-01-01

    The term “Ehlers-Danlos syndrome” (EDS) groups together an increasing number of heritable connective tissue disorders mainly featuring joint hypermobility and related complications, dermal dysplasia with abnormal skin texture and repair, and variable range of the hollow organ and vascular dysfunctions. Although the nervous system is not considered a primary target of the underlying molecular defect, recently, increasing attention has been posed on neurological manifestations of EDSs, such as musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, headache, muscle weakness and paresthesias. Here, a comprehensive overview of neurological findings of these conditions is presented primarily intended for the clinical neurologist. Features are organized under various subheadings, including pain, fatigue, headache, stroke and cerebrovascular disease, brain and spine structural anomalies, epilepsy, muscular findings, neuropathy and developmental features. The emerging picture defines a wide spectrum of neurological manifestations that are unexpectedly common and potentially disabling. Their evaluation and correct interpretation by the clinical neurologist is crucial for avoiding superfluous investigations, wrong therapies, and inappropriate referral. A set of basic tools for patient’s recognition is offered for raising awareness among neurologists on this underdiagnosed group of hereditary disorders. PMID:25632331

  10. Quantum pumping induced by disorder in one dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Jihong [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Guo, Huaiming, E-mail: hmguo@buaa.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-07-01

    The topological property in one dimension is protected by symmetry. Based on a concrete model, we study the effect of disorder preserving or breaking the symmetry and show the nature of symmetry protecting in the one dimensional topological phase. A stable quantum pumping can be constructed within the topological model. It is shown that an integer charge is pumped across a periodic chain in a cyclic process. Furthermore we find that not only the quantum pumping is stable to on-site disorder, but also can be induced by it. These results may be realized experimentally using quasicrystals. - Highlights: • We study the effect of disorder preserving or breaking the symmetry. • We show that an integer charge is pumped across a periodic chain in a cyclic process. • Not only the quantum pumping is stable to on-site disorder, but also can be induced by it.

  11. Hypophosphatemia is a common complication in severely disabled individuals with neurological disorders and is caused by infection, refeeding and Fanconi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshiaki; Aoki, Yusuke; Takeshita, Eri; Saito, Takashi; Sugai, Kenji; Komaki, Hirofumi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Ishiyama, Akihiko; Takanoha, Satoko; Wada, Satoru; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2014-11-01

    To describe the characteristics of hypophosphatemia in severely disabled individuals with neurological disorders and to identify its causative factors. We retrospectively reviewed clinical data from 82 individuals with motor skills classified as sitting, rollover or bedridden. Age, gender and body mass index were compared in individuals with (n=19) and without (n=63) a history of hypophosphatemia (serum phosphate levels refeeding syndrome (n=4) and Fanconi syndrome (n=3), but was unidentifiable in one episode. Significant elevations in C-reactive protein levels and reductions in sodium levels were observed during hypophosphatemia episodes. Hypophosphatemia is a common complication in severely disabled individuals with frequent bacterial infections, refeeding following malnutrition and valproate administration for epilepsy treatment. Because severe hypophosphatemia is life threatening, serum phosphate levels should be closely monitored in this population. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Post-marketing observational program of the effectiveness of fluvoxamine for the treatment of depression in patients with neurological disorders: the FRIENDS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahno, Nikolay N; Fedotova, Anastasia V

    2017-01-01

    In a prospective, non-blinded, uncontrolled, multicenter, post-marketing, observational study (FRIENDS; NCT02043197), fluvoxamine (50-300 mg/day for 90 days) was effective for the treatment of depression in 299 adult patients (age ≥18 years) with neurological disorders at baseline. The therapeutic effect of fluvoxamine was measured by means of changes in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression and anxiety scores (HADS-D and HADS-A, respectively), global severity of illness, and clinical condition (measured using the Clinical Global Improvement [CGI] scale). The mean HADS-D subscale score at baseline in the per-protocol cohort (n=296) was 11.7±3.1 points and the corresponding mean HADS-A score was 12.6±3.2. Significant ( P 85%) recorded reductions versus baseline in both indices. In the CGI-based assessment, most evaluated patients (>200) experienced moderate to very substantial clinical improvement, with no or limited side effects. Significant improvements were also recorded in the exploratory outcomes of sleep quality, assessed using the Insomnia Severity Index, and cognitive function, assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment ( P effective and well tolerated for the treatment of depression in the context of neurological disorders. The effects on the exploratory endpoints of this research merit evaluation in controlled trials.

  13. Paraneoplastic neurologic syndrome: A practical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheeran Kannoth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS are rare disorders associated with cancer, not caused by direct invasion, metastasis or consequences of treatment. They are usually autoimmune in nature. Often, PNS precedes the manifestations of cancer. Onconeural antibodies are important in the diagnosis and management of these disorders. These antibodies are specific for the malignancy rather than for a particular neurological syndrome. Often, there are different antibodies associated with the same syndrome. Multiple antibodies are also known to coexist in a given patient with malignancy. While investigating a patient for suspected PNS, the entire gamut of onconeural antibodies should be investigated so as not to miss the diagnosis. In 30-40% of the cases, PNS can occur without antibodies. Investigations for identifying the underlying cancer can be directed by the antibody panel. If conventional screening for cancer is negative, a positron emission scanning/computed tomography scan can be useful. Patients need follow-up surveillance for cancer if not detected in the first instance. Cancer detection and treatment, immunotherapy and supportive care are important components of treatment of PNS. Immunotherapy is very effective in PNS associated with cell membrane-associated antibodies like voltage-gated potassium channel complex, NMDA receptor antibodies and voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies. Immunotherapy includes steroids, IVIgG, plasmaphereis, cytotoxic medications and rituximab. Supportive therapy includes symptomatic treatment with antiepileptic and analgesic medications, physiotherapy, speech therapy and occupational therapy. PNS can mimic any neurologic syndrome. A high index of clinical suspicion is important for early diagnosis and prompt management and better outcome.

  14. E-learning in neurology education: Principles, opportunities and challenges in combating neurophobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhetri, Suresh Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Neurophobia, the fear of clinical neurology, affects not only medical students but also non-career neurologists globally. This can have significant implications on patient care, especially given the increasing burden of chronic neurological disorders. The negative perception and lack of confidence amongst general practitioners and hospital physicians may lead to increased referrals to neurology, thereby increasing waiting times and inpatient stay. The onus, therefore, should be on improving training and stimulating interest in neurology. There is emerging evidence that integrating e-learning to traditional pedagogies can improve delivery of neurology education and help combat neurophobia. However, embracing e-learning may be challenging for contemporary neurologists, mostly 'digital immigrants', involved in the training of tomorrow's doctors who are largely 'digital natives'. This paper reviews the principles, opportunities and challenges of incorporating e-learning in neurology education to help improve learners' perception of clinical neurology, facilitate delivery of self-directed experiential learning and perhaps breed 'neurophilia'. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Prefronto–cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation improves visuospatial memory, executive functions, and neurological soft signs in patients with euthymic bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minichino A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Amedeo Minichino, Francesco Saverio Bersani, Laura Bernabei, Francesco Spagnoli, Lucilla Vergnani, Alessandra Corrado, Ines Taddei, Massimo Biondi, Roberto Delle Chiaie Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy Objective: The aim of the study was to improve neuropsychological functioning of euthymic patients with bipolar disorder (BD using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS applied to cerebellar and prefrontal cortices.Methods: Twenty-five BD outpatients underwent prefrontal (anodal and cerebellar (cathodal tDCS for 3 consecutive weeks. All participants were assessed through the Rey Complex Figure Test delay and copy and the Neurological Examination Scale at baseline and after therapy with tDCS.Results: After tDCS treatment, patients showed significant improvements in visuospatial memory tasks. Patients with worse baseline cognitive performances also showed a significant improvement in executive functioning tasks. Neurological Examination Scale total score and motor coordination subscale significantly improved.Conclusion: Prefrontal-excitatory and cerebellar-inhibitory stimulations in euthymic BD patients may lead to better neurocognitive performances. This improvement could result from the modulation of prefronto–thalamic–cerebellar circuit activity pattern, which can be disrupted in BD. Keywords: cerebellum, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, neuropsychology, cognition 

  16. Astaxanthin as a Potential Neuroprotective Agent for Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijian Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurological diseases, which consist of acute injuries and chronic neurodegeneration, are the leading causes of human death and disability. However, the pathophysiology of these diseases have not been fully elucidated, and effective treatments are still lacking. Astaxanthin, a member of the xanthophyll group, is a red-orange carotenoid with unique cell membrane actions and diverse biological activities. More importantly, there is evidence demonstrating that astaxanthin confers neuroprotective effects in experimental models of acute injuries, chronic neurodegenerative disorders, and neurological diseases. The beneficial effects of astaxanthin are linked to its oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic characteristics. In this review, we will focus on the neuroprotective properties of astaxanthin and explore the underlying mechanisms in the setting of neurological diseases.

  17. Maternal stress induces epigenetic signatures of psychiatric and neurological diseases in the offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola C R Zucchi

    Full Text Available The gestational state is a period of particular vulnerability to diseases that affect maternal and fetal health. Stress during gestation may represent a powerful influence on maternal mental health and offspring brain plasticity and development. Here we show that the fetal transcriptome, through microRNA (miRNA regulation, responds to prenatal stress in association with epigenetic signatures of psychiatric and neurological diseases. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were assigned to stress from gestational days 12 to 18 while others served as handled controls. Gestational stress in the dam disrupted parturient maternal behaviour and was accompanied by characteristic brain miRNA profiles in the mother and her offspring, and altered transcriptomic brain profiles in the offspring. In the offspring brains, prenatal stress upregulated miR-103, which is involved in brain pathologies, and downregulated its potential gene target Ptplb. Prenatal stress downregulated miR-145, a marker of multiple sclerosis in humans. Prenatal stress also upregulated miR-323 and miR-98, which may alter inflammatory responses in the brain. Furthermore, prenatal stress upregulated miR-219, which targets the gene Dazap1. Both miR-219 and Dazap1 are putative markers of schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder in humans. Offspring transcriptomic changes included genes related to development, axonal guidance and neuropathology. These findings indicate that prenatal stress modifies epigenetic signatures linked to disease during critical periods of fetal brain development. These observations provide a new mechanistic association between environmental and genetic risk factors in psychiatric and neurological disease.

  18. Gait Monitoring for Early Neurological Disorder Detection Using Sensors in a Smartphone: Validation and a Case Study of Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raknim, Paweeya; Lan, Kun-Chan

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosing brain disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD) or Alzheimer's disease, is often difficult, especially in the early stages. Moreover, it has been estimated that nearly 40% of people with PD may not be diagnosed. Traditionally, the diagnosis of neurological disorders, such as PD, often required a doctor to observe the patient over time to recognize signs of rigidity in movement. The pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR) system is a self-contained technique that has been widely used for indoor localization. In this work we propose a PDR-based method to continuously monitor and record the patient's gait characteristics using a smartphone. Seventeen patients were studied over a period of 1 year. During the year it became apparent that 1 of the patients was actually developing PD. To the best of our knowledge, our work is the first attempt to use sensors in a smartphone to help identify patients in their early stages of neurological disease. On average, the accuracy of our step length estimation was about 98%. Using a binary classification method-namely, support vector machine-we carried out a case study and showed that it was feasible to identify changes in the walking patterns of a PD patient with an accuracy of 94%. Using 1 year of gait trace data obtained from the users' phones, our work provides a first step to experimentally show the possibility of applying smartphone sensor data to provide early warnings to potential PD patients to encourage them to seek medical assistance and thus help doctors diagnose this disease earlier.

  19. CNS penetration of intrathecal-lumbar idursulfase in the monkey, dog and mouse: implications for neurological outcomes of lysosomal storage disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pericles Calias

    Full Text Available A major challenge for the treatment of many central nervous system (CNS disorders is the lack of convenient and effective methods for delivering biological agents to the brain. Mucopolysaccharidosis II (Hunter syndrome is a rare inherited lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (I2S. I2S is a large, highly glycosylated enzyme. Intravenous administration is not likely to be an effective therapy for disease-related neurological outcomes that require enzyme access to the brain cells, in particular neurons and oligodendrocytes. We demonstrate that intracerebroventricular and lumbar intrathecal administration of recombinant I2S in dogs and nonhuman primates resulted in widespread enzyme distribution in the brain parenchyma, including remarkable deposition in the lysosomes of both neurons and oligodendrocytes. Lumbar intrathecal administration also resulted in enzyme delivery to the spinal cord, whereas little enzyme was detected there after intraventricular administration. Mucopolysaccharidosis II model is available in mice. Lumbar administration of recombinant I2S to enzyme deficient animals reduced the storage of glycosaminoglycans in both superficial and deep brain tissues, with concurrent morphological improvements. The observed patterns of enzyme transport from cerebrospinal fluid to the CNS tissues and the resultant biological activity (a warrant further investigation of intrathecal delivery of I2S via lumbar catheter as an experimental treatment for the neurological symptoms of Hunter syndrome and (b may have broader implications for CNS treatment with biopharmaceuticals.

  20. Intention, false beliefs, and delusional jealousy: insights into the right hemisphere from neurological patients and neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortigue, Stephanie; Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Jealousy sits high atop of a list comprised of the most human emotional experiences, although its nature, rationale, and origin are poorly understood. In the past decade, a series of neurological case reports and neuroimaging findings have been particularly helpful in piecing together jealousy's puzzle. In order to understand and quantify the neurological factors that might be important in jealousy, we reviewed the current literature in this specific field. We made an electronic search, and examined all literature with at least an English abstract, through Mars 2010. The search identified a total of 20 neurological patients, who experienced jealousy in relation with a neurological disorder; and 22 healthy individuals, who experienced jealousy under experimental neuroimaging settings. Most of the clinical cases of reported jealousy after a stroke had delusional-type jealousy. Right hemispheric stroke was the most frequently reported neurological disorder in these patients, although there was a wide range of more diffuse neurological disorders that may be reported to be associated with different other types of jealousy. This is in line with recent neuroimaging data on false beliefs, moral judgments, and intention [mis]understanding. Together the present findings provide physicians and psychologists with a potential for high impact in understanding the neural mechanisms and treatment of jealousy. By combining findings from case reports and neuroimaging data, the present article allows for a novel and unique perspective, and explores new directions into the neurological jealous mind.

  1. Medical genetic issues in clinical of pediatric neurology practice:a history of pediatrics in Peking University First Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xi-ru

    2006-02-18

    The Department of Pediatrics of Peking University First Hospital has a long term of outstanding history. It was established about 60 years ago. After the division of pediatric neurology (DPN) had been established in 1960s, it had been assigned to cover genetic disorders. During the recent 20 years, efforts have been put on three aspects: (1) Pediatric neurology clinical service and education; (2) research studies of childhood epilepsies and pediatric neurogenetic disorders; and (3) development of a strong DPN team to establish a comprehensive pediatric neurological program. In this paper, we reviewed the history of the pediatric neurology division in our department, our clinical and research work and achievements for neurogenetic diseases.

  2. Dysprosody nonassociated with neurological diseases--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, José Antonio; Corso, Renato José; Guilherme, Ana Cláudia Rocha; Pinho, Sílvia Rebelo; Nóbrega, Monica de Oliveira

    2004-03-01

    Dysprosody also known as pseudo-foreign dialect, is the rarest neurological speech disorder. It is characterized by alterations in intensity, in the timing of utterance segments, and in rhythm, cadency, and intonation of words. The terms refers to changes as to duration, fundamental frequency, and intensity of tonic and atonic syllables of the sentences spoken, which deprive an individual's particular speech of its characteristics. The cause of this disease is usually associated with neurological pathologies such as brain vascular accidents, cranioencephalic traumatisms, and brain tumors. The authors report a case of dysprosody attended to at the Núcleo de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia de Cabeça e Pescoço de São Paulo (NOSP). It is about a female patient with bilateral III degree Reinke's edema and normal neurological examinations that started presenting characteristics of the German dialect following a larynx microsurgery.

  3. Aripiprazole-induced sleep-related eating disorder: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Takano, Masahiro

    2018-04-05

    Sleep-related eating disorder is characterized by parasomnia with recurrent episodes of nocturnal eating or drinking during the main sleep period. Several drugs, including atypical antipsychotics, induce sleep-related eating disorder. However, aripiprazole has not previously been associated with sleep-related eating disorder. A 41-year-old Japanese man visited our clinic complaining of depression. The patient was treated with sertraline, which was titrated up to 100 mg for 4 weeks. A sleep inducer and an anxiolytic were coadministered. His depressive mood slightly improved, but it continued for an additional 4 months. Subsequently, aripiprazole (3 mg) was added as an adjunctive therapy. After 3 weeks, the patient's mother found that the patient woke up and ate food at night. The next morning, the patient was amnesic for this event, felt full, and wondered why the bags of food were empty. This episode lasted for 2 days. The patient gained 5 kg during these 3 weeks. After the aripiprazole dose was reduced to 1.5 mg, the patient's nocturnal eating episodes rapidly and completely disappeared. To the best of our knowledge, this is first report of sleep-related eating disorder induced by aripiprazole, and it indicates that this disorder should be considered a possible side effect of aripiprazole. Although aripiprazole is used mainly in patients with schizophrenia, its recently documented use as an adjunctive therapy in patients with depression might induce hitherto unknown side effects.

  4. Cortical arousal in children and adolescents with functional neurological symptoms during the auditory oddball task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasia Kozlowska, MBBS., PhD. FRANZCP

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Our findings add to a growing literature indicating that a baseline state of high arousal may be a precondition for generating functional neurological symptoms, a finding that helps explain why a range of psychological and physiological stressors can trigger functional neurological symptoms in some patients. Interventions that target cortical arousal may be central to the treatment of paediatric patients with functional neurological symptom disorder.

  5. Whole Exome Sequencing in Pediatric Neurology Patients: Clinical Implications and Estimated Cost Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Danielle; Carlson, Martha

    2016-06-01

    Genetic heterogeneity in neurologic disorders has been an obstacle to phenotype-based diagnostic testing. The authors hypothesized that information compiled via whole exome sequencing will improve clinical diagnosis and management of pediatric neurology patients. The authors performed a retrospective chart review of patients evaluated in the University of Michigan Pediatric Neurology clinic between 6/2011 and 6/2015. The authors recorded previous diagnostic testing, indications for whole exome sequencing, and whole exome sequencing results. Whole exome sequencing was recommended for 135 patients and obtained in 53 patients. Insurance barriers often precluded whole exome sequencing. The most common indication for whole exome sequencing was neurodevelopmental disorders. Whole exome sequencing improved the presumptive diagnostic rate in the patient cohort from 25% to 48%. Clinical implications included family planning, medication selection, and systemic investigation. Compared to current second tier testing, whole exome sequencing can result in lower long-term charges and more timely diagnosis. Overcoming barriers related to whole exome sequencing insurance authorization could allow for more efficient and fruitful diagnostic neurological evaluations. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Insights into the Pathology of the α3 Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase Ion Pump in Neurological Disorders; Lessons from Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Thomas H; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2016-01-01

    consequences of Atp1a3 modulation. The different mice show varying degrees of hyperactivity, gait problems, and learning disability as well as stress-induced seizures. With the advent of several Atp1a3-gene or chemically modified animal models that closely phenocopy many aspects of the human disorders, we will be able to reach a much better understanding of the etiology of RDP, AHC, and CAPOS syndrome.

  7. Prevalence and pattern of sleep disorder among children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sleep disorders significantly affect the quality of live and may impair cognitive development. Sleep disorders are reported to be common in children with neurological diseases. However no report has evaluated the prevalence of sleep disorders among children chronic neurological diseases in Nigeria.

  8. Neurological status and ethanol preference in rats during alcohol addiction formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Tarasov

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To estimate the features of neurological status and drinking behaviour in rats during 20 days of chronic alcohol intake. Methods. The current study was performed on 40 male Wistar rats (170-300 g. The animals from the study group were administered 15% solution of ethanol used as the only fluid source. On day 20 of the experiment the alcohol preference test and evaluation of neurological status were performed: tail-suspension (to determine paresis and paralysis, home cage motion activity (to determine gait disorders and stereotypic movements and features of horizontal beam-walking (evaluation of movement coordination were assessed, presence of the basic reflexes (startle reflex, external auditory canal reflex, corneal reflex was controlled. Results. The main neurological signs were presented as ataxic form, in which unsteady gait in beam-walking test was predominant. In the experimental groups, the signs of ataxic form of neurological deficit were demonstrated, when animals slipped off and fell off the beam within 40 s from the beginning of the test. This was associated with the significant increase of discrimination ratio in alcohol preference test. Conclusion. In rat models of chronic alcohol intake, significant changes in drinking behavior and alcohol preference test were found on day 20 of the experiment, reflecting formation of alcohol addiction; changes in drinking behavior were associated with mild and moderate neurological deficit, primarily including movement coordination disorders that illustrates the malfunction of peripheral nervous system.

  9. Permittivity disorder induced Anderson localization in magnetophotonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdi-Ghaleh, R., E-mail: r.abdi@bonabu.ac.ir [Department of Laser and Optical Engineering, University of Bonab, 5551761167 Bonab (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Namdar, A. [Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, 5166614766 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    This theoretical study was carried out to investigate the permittivity disorder induced Anderson localization of light in one-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals. It was shown that the disorder create the resonant transmittance modes associated with enhanced Faraday rotations inside the photonic band gap. The average localization length of the right- and left-handed circular polarizations (RCP and LCP), the total transmittance together with the ensemble average of the RCP and LCP phases, and the Faraday rotation of the structure were also investigated. For this purpose, the off-diagonal elements of the permittivity tensor were varied for various wavelengths of incident light. The obtained results revealed the nonreciprocal property of circular eigen modes. This study can potentially open up a new aspect for utilizing the disorder magnetophotonic structures in nonreciprocal systems such as isolators and circulators. - Highlights: • We theoretically investigated the permittivity disorder induced Anderson localization of light in magnetophotonic crystals. • The disorder considered in the diagonal elements of the permittivity tensor of magneto-optical layers. • The disorder create the resonant transmittance modes associated with enhanced Faraday rotations in the photonic band gap. • The average localization length of the circular polarizations and the ensemble average of their phases were investigated. • The obtained results revealed the nonreciprocal property of circular eigen modes.

  10. Spinal cheiro-oral syndrome: a common neurological entity in an unusual site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hung-Sheng; Yin, Hsin-Ling; Chui, Chi; Lui, Chun-Chung; Chen, Wei-Hsi

    2011-01-01

    Cheiro-oral syndrome (COS) is an established neurological entity characterized by a sensory impairment confined to the mouth angle and ipsilateral finger(s)/ hand. The current understanding of localization is a concomitant involvement of the spinothalamic and trigeminothalamic tract between the cortex and pons. The cervical spinal cord has not been mentioned in this situation yet, and this unusual location may heretofore increase the risk of misdiagnosis. Six patients who presented with unilateral COS due to cervical cord disorder are reported. All patients were women and their age ranged between 42 and 70 years. Their neurological deficits included unilateral paraesthesiae restricted to cheirooral distribution, positive radicular sign, and mild change of tendon reflex. Cervical spinal stenosis at middle/lower cervical spine with variable magnitude of cord compression and intrinsic cord damage was found. A diagnostic dilemma obviously arises from the lack of tangible neurological signs or typical pattern of myelopathy, in addition to the previous concept of cerebral involvement. A benign course ensued in all reported patients. Cheiro-oral syndrome can be an early neurological sign for cervical cord disorder; it further suggests that it is a strong neurological but weak localizing sign. A reciprocal influence of multiple factors is considered to generate COS at the cervical cord. Therefore, an absence of brain pathology should lead to a thorough examination of the cervical cord in case of COS.

  11. Neurologic complications of cerebral angiography in childhood moyamoya syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.L.; Chavali, R.V.; Robson, C.D.; Barnes, P.D.; Burrows, P.E.; Eldredge, E.A.; Scott, R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the incidence of neurologic complications of cerebral angiography in children with moyamoya syndrome (MMS) as compared to children without MMS. Materials and methods. One-hundred-ninety consecutive cerebral angiograms obtained in 152 children were evaluated. Sixty of these angiograms were obtained in 40 children with MMS. Patients underwent neurologic evaluation prior to and after the procedure. For this study, a neurologic complication was defined as any new focal neurologic deficit or alteration in mental status occurring during the procedure or within the ensuing 24 hours. Results. There were 2 neurologic complications within 24 hours of angiography, one in the MMS group and one in the non-MMS group. One patient with MMS became mute following angiography. The symptom resolved within 12 hours. One patient without MMS being examined postoperatively for residual arteriovenous malformation developed intracranial hemorrhage requiring reexploration 12 hours after the angiogram. Using a two-tail Fisher's exact test, there was no significant statistical difference in the ischemic (P = 0.3) or hemorrhagic (P = 1.0) complication rates between the group of patients with MMS and the non-MMS groups. Conclusion. The risk of a neurologic complication from cerebral angiography in children with MMS is low and not statistically different from the risk in children with other cerebrovascular disorders. (orig.)

  12. African Journal of Neurological Sciences 2011 - Vol. 30, No 2 http ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJNS WEBMASTERS

    Neurology Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, ... services in Nigeria makes for mismanagement of several disorders amongst ... CASE SUMMARY 1 ... was fully conscious but had expressive dysphasia.

  13. African Journal of Neurological Sciences - 2009 Vol. 28 No 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neurological disorders were seizures (26.6%) and infectious diseases (18.1%) ... ward nursing notes on established patients were reviewed for identification .... from the patients or, in case of children, their respective parents was also obtained ...

  14. Neurological presentations, imaging, and associated anomalies in 50 patients with sacral agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami-Naeini, Parisa; Rahbar, Ziba; Nejat, Farideh; Kajbafzadeh, Abdolmohammad; El Khashab, Mostafa

    2010-10-01

    Sacral agenesis is an uncommon congenital disorder that involves multiple organs. We studied neurological manifestations of the disease, common associated disorders, and their relation with extent of bony malformation. We investigated neurological manifestations of 50 patients with sacral agenesis. Patients were evaluated for previous procedures, ambulation, limb abnormalities, vertebral alignment, recurrent urinary tract infection, urinary incontinence, dribbling, dimple, lower extremities weakness, myelomeningocele (MMC), and lipomyelomenangocele. Weakness of lower extremities was seen in 37 (74%) patients. Concurrent weakness of proximal and distal muscles of the lower limb was statistically associated with a type of bony aplasia (P = .001). However, paraplegia was seen in only 2 of 44 children over the age of 1, and the rest could walk. Myelodysplastic syndromes were seen in 21 patients. Sacral agenesis is diagnosed in children with concomitant MMC at younger ages and reveals more severe symptoms. Progression of neurological disorders was seen in 19 patients, in all of whom MRI showed tethering of the spinal cord. Urinary disorders including diurnal urinary incontinence (in 30 of 35 children over age 4) and recurrent urinary tract infections (in 37) were also common. Imperforate anus was seen in 11 patients. Twelve children over age 4 reported fecal incontinence, a problem that had statistically significant association with imperforate anus (P = .013). Different disorders can concurrently affect patients with sacral agenesis that may have profound impressions on patients and their families. Early diagnosis, thorough evaluation, and proper intervention are of utmost importance as they can prevent or lessen future complications.

  15. Congenital and Neurological Abnormalities in Infants with Phenylketonuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Charles F.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Examined was the occurrence of congenital and neurological abnormalities in 150 children with phenylketonuria (PKU--a metabolic disorder which may result in mental retardation) age 1 year or older, who have been treated with a restricted phenylalanine diet, according to the protocol used in a nation-wide longitudinal collaborative study.…

  16. Disorder-induced trapping versus Anderson localization in Bose-Einstein condensates expanding in disordered potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Palencia, L; Clement, D; Lugan, P; Bouyer, P; Aspect, A

    2008-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the localization of an expanding Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) with repulsive atom-atom interactions in a disordered potential. We focus on the regime where the initial inter-atomic interactions dominate over the kinetic energy and the disorder. At equilibrium in a trapping potential and for the considered small disorder, the condensate shows a Thomas-Fermi shape modified by the disorder. When the condensate is released from the trap, a strong suppression of the expansion is obtained in contrast to the situation in a periodic potential with similar characteristics. This effect crucially depends on both the momentum distribution of the expanding BEC and the strength of the disorder. For strong disorder as in the experiments reported by Clement et al 2005 Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 170409 and Fort et al 2005 Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 170410, the suppression of the expansion results from the fragmentation of the core of the condensate and from classical reflections from large modulations of the disordered potential in the tails of the condensate. We identify the corresponding disorder-induced trapping scenario for which large atom-atom interactions and strong reflections from single modulations of the disordered potential play central roles. For weak disorder, the suppression of the expansion signals the onset of Anderson localization, which is due to multiple scattering from the modulations of the disordered potential. We compute analytically the localized density profile of the condensate and show that the localization crucially depends on the correlation function of the disorder. In particular, for speckle potentials the long-range correlations induce an effective mobility edge in 1D finite systems. Numerical calculations performed in the mean-field approximation support our analysis for both strong and weak disorder

  17. Disorder-induced modification of the transmission of light through two-dimensional photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beggs, D M; Kaliteevski, M A; Abram, R A; Cassagne, D; Albert, J P

    2005-01-01

    Disordered two-dimensional photonic crystals with a complete photonic band-gap have been investigated. Transmission and reflection spectra have been modelled for both ballistic and scattered light. The density of states and electromagnetic field profiles of disorder-induced localized states have also been calculated, for various levels of disorder. It is found that there is a threshold-like behaviour in the amount of disorder. Below the threshold, it is seen that there is a vanishing probability of disorder-induced localized states being introduced into the centre of the photonic band-gap, but that edge-states narrow the band-gap. Above the threshold, there is a non-zero probability of disorder-induced localized states throughout the photonic band-gap, and the modification of the transmission and reflection spectra due to disorder rapidly increases with increasing disorder

  18. Behavioral outcome including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder/hyperactivity disorder and minor neurological signs in perinatal high-risk newborns at 4-6 years of age with relation to risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masuko; Aotani, Hirofumi; Hattori, Ritsuko; Funato, Masahisa

    2004-06-01

    Diagnostic problems with the criteria of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the Diagnostic Statistical Manual, 4th edn, have been identified. The aim of this study was to clarify whether the minor neurological signs test (MNT) the authors had previously reported was a predictor for the criteria of ADHD or hyperactivity disorder (HD) in perinatal risk children at 4-6 years of age and what kind of risk factors related to MNT. A total of 136 children discharged from neonatal intensive care units were examined at the age of 4-6 years by a developmental neuropediatrician using both MNT and diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV ADHD/ICD-10 (International Classification of Diseases, 10th edn) HD. SPSS base and professional were used for statistical analysis. On comparison of diagnostic criteria between ADHD (11.0%) and HD (27.5%), the incidence in the same subjects showed significant difference. MNT scores showed significant correlation with criteria of ADHD (P Apgar 5 in the NLBW group and toxemia of pregnancy and small for gestational age (SGA) in VLBW group were highly correlated with behavioral outcome. Minor neurological signs test score was a significant predictor for criteria of ADHD and HD. High incidences of positive MNT were suspected in not only VLBW children but also NLBW children and Apgar 5 in NLBW children and toxemia of pregnancy and SGA in VLBW children influenced behavioral outcome.

  19. Narcolepsy induced by chronic heavy alcohol consumption: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinyuan

    2012-01-01

    Summary Narcolepsy is a chronic neurological disorder, characterized by uncontrollable excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplectic episodes, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations, and night time sleep disruption. The paper reviewed the related literature and reported a case of long-term drinking induced narcolepsy which was significantly improved after treatment with paroxetine and dexzopiclone. PMID:25328357

  20. Radiation-induced camptocormia and dropped head syndrome. Review and case report of radiation-induced movement disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, Clemens; Kuhnt, Thomas; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Hering, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, camptocormia and dropped head syndrome (DHS) have gained attention as particular forms of movement disorders. Camptocormia presents with involuntary forward flexion of the thoracolumbar spine that typically increases during walking or standing and may severely impede walking ability. DHS is characterized by weakness of the neck extensors and a consecutive inability to extend the neck; in severe cases the head is fixed in a ''chin to chest position.'' Many diseases may underlie these conditions, and there have been some reports about radiation-induced camptocormia and DHS. A PubMed search with the keywords ''camptocormia,'' ''dropped head syndrome,'' ''radiation-induced myopathy,'' ''radiation-induced neuropathy,'' and ''radiation-induced movement disorder'' was carried out to better characterize radiation-induced movement disorders and the radiation techniques involved. In addition, the case of a patient developing camptocormia 23 years after radiation therapy of a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the abdomen is described. In total, nine case series of radiation-induced DHS (n = 45 patients) and - including our case - three case reports (n = 3 patients) about radiogenic camptocormia were retrieved. Most cases (40/45 patients) occurred less than 15 years after radiotherapy involving extended fields for Hodgkin's disease. The use of wide radiation fields including many spinal segments with paraspinal muscles may lead to radiation-induced movement disorders. If paraspinal muscles and the thoracolumbar spine are involved, the clinical presentation can be that of camptocormia. DHS may result if there is involvement of the cervical spine. To prevent these disorders, sparing of the spine and paraspinal muscles is desirable. (orig.) [de

  1. [Deficiency, disability, neurology and cinema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vázquez, Susana; Cano de la Cuerda, Roberto; Jiménez-Antona, Carmen

    2010-12-16

    Cinema has been defined in many different ways, but most of them agree that it should be considered both a technique and an art. Although films often depict fantasy stories, in many cases they also reflect day-to-day realities. In its earliest days cinema was already attracted to the world of health and sickness, and frequently addressed topics like medical practice, how patients lived with their illnesses, bioethical issues, the relationship between physician and patient or research. To review the presence of neurological pathologies in the cinema with a view to identifying the main neurological disorders that have been portrayed in films. Likewise it also intends to describe the medical praxis that is employed, the relationship between physician and patient, how the experiences of the patient and the family are represented, the adaptation to social and occupational situations, and the intervention of other health care professionals related with neurological patients. Some of the most significant films that have addressed these topics were reviewed and it was seen that in some of them the illness is dealt with in a very true-to-life manner, whereas others tend to include a greater number of inaccuracies and a larger degree of fiction. Cinema has helped to shape certain ways of thinking about the health care professionals who work with neurological patients, the importance of support from the family and the social role, among other things. This confirms that resorting to cinematographic productions is a fruitful tool for stimulating a critical interest in the past and present of medical practice.

  2. Neurological Findings in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Paydas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN arise from genetic deficiencies at the level of pluripotent stem cells. Each of these neoplasms is a clonal stem cell disorder with specific phenotypic, genetic and clinical properties. Age is one of the most important factors in the development of symptoms and complications associated with MPNs.High white blood cell counts in chronic myelocytic leukemia also known as leukocytosis may lead to central nervous system findings. Tumors developing outside the bone marrow named as extramedullary myeloid tumors (EMMT could be detected at the initial diagnosis or during the prognosis of the disease, which may cause neurological symptoms due to pressure of leukemic cell mass on various tissues along with spinal cord. Central nervous system involvement and thrombocytopenic hemorrhage may lead to diverse neurological symptoms and findings.Transient ischemic attack and thrombotic stroke are the most common symptoms in polycythemia vera. Besides thrombosis and hemorrage, transformation to acute leukemia can cause neurological symptoms and findings. Transient ischemic attack, thrombotic stroke and specifically hemorrage can give rise to neurological symptoms similar to MPN in essential thrombocytosis.Extramedullary hematopoiesis refers to hematopoietic centers arise in organ/tissues other than bone marrow in myelofibrosis. Extramedullar hematopoietic centers may cause intracranial involvement, spinal cord compression, seizures and hydrocephalia. Though rare, extramedullary hematopoiesis can be detected in cranial/spinal meninges, paraspinal tissue and intracerebral regions. Extramedullary hematopoiesis has been reported in peripheral neurons, choroid plexus, pituitary, orbits, orbital and lacrimal fossa and in sphenoidal sinuses. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 157-169

  3. Fasting and Systemic Insulin Signaling Regulate Phosphorylation of Brain Proteins That Modulate Cell Morphology and Link to Neurological Disorders*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Quan, Chao; Toth, Rachel; Campbell, David G.; MacKintosh, Carol; Wang, Hong Yu; Chen, Shuai

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is strongly associated with cognitive decline, but the molecular reasons are unknown. We found that fasting and peripheral insulin promote phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, respectively, of specific residues on brain proteins including cytoskeletal regulators such as slit-robo GTPase-activating protein 3 (srGAP3) and microtubule affinity-regulating protein kinases (MARKs), in which deficiency or dysregulation is linked to neurological disorders. Fasting activates protein kinase A (PKA) but not PKB/Akt signaling in the brain, and PKA can phosphorylate the purified srGAP3. The phosphorylation of srGAP3 and MARKs were increased when PKA signaling was activated in primary neurons. Knockdown of PKA decreased the phosphorylation of srGAP3. Furthermore, WAVE1, a protein kinase A-anchoring protein, formed a complex with srGAP3 and PKA in the brain of fasted mice to facilitate the phosphorylation of srGAP3 by PKA. Although brain cells have insulin receptors, our findings are inconsistent with the down-regulation of phosphorylation of target proteins being mediated by insulin signaling within the brain. Rather, our findings infer that systemic insulin, through a yet unknown mechanism, inhibits PKA or protein kinase(s) with similar specificity and/or activates an unknown phosphatase in the brain. Ser858 of srGAP3 was identified as a key regulatory residue in which phosphorylation by PKA enhanced the GAP activity of srGAP3 toward its substrate, Rac1, in cells, thereby inhibiting the action of this GTPase in cytoskeletal regulation. Our findings reveal novel mechanisms linking peripheral insulin sensitivity with cytoskeletal remodeling in neurons, which may help to explain the association of diabetes with neurological disorders such as Alzheimer disease. PMID:26499801

  4. Can repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation increase muscle strength in functional neurological paresis? A proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broersma, M; Koops, E A; Vroomen, P C; Van der Hoeven, J H; Aleman, A; Leenders, K L; Maurits, N M; van Beilen, M

    2015-05-01

    Therapeutic options are limited in functional neurological paresis disorder. Earlier intervention studies did not control for a placebo effect, hampering assessment of effectivity. A proof-of-principle investigation was conducted into the therapeutic potential of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), using a single-blind two-period placebo-controlled cross-over design. Eleven patients received active 15 Hz rTMS over the contralateral motor cortex (hand area), in two periods of 5 days, for 30 min once a day at 80% of resting motor threshold, with a train length of 2 s and an intertrain interval of 4 s. Eight of these eleven patients were also included in the placebo treatment condition. Primary outcome measure was change in muscle strength as measured by dynamometry after treatment. Secondary outcome measure was the subjective change in muscle strength after treatment. In patients who received both treatments, active rTMS induced a significantly larger median increase in objectively measured muscle strength (24%) compared to placebo rTMS (6%; P difference due to treatment, i.e. patients did not perceive these objectively measured motor improvements (P = 0.40). Our findings suggest that rTMS by itself can potentially improve muscle weakness in functional neurological paresis disorder. Whereas patients' muscle strength increased as measured with dynamometry, patients did not report increased functioning of the affected hand, subjectively. The results may indicate that decreased muscle strength is not the core symptom and that rTMS should be added to behavioral approaches in functional neurological paresis. © 2015 EAN.

  5. IGF-1 derived small neuropeptides and analogues: a novel strategy for the development of pharmaceuticals for neurological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jian; Gluckman, Peter D

    2009-07-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is neuroprotective and improves long-term function after brain injury. However, its clinical application to neurological disorders is limited by its large molecular size, poor central uptake and mitogenic potential. Glycine-proline-glutamate (GPE) is naturally cleaved from the IGF-1 N-terminal and it is also neuroprotective after ischemic injury, which provided a novel strategy of drug discovery for neurological disorders. GPE is not enzymatically stable, thus intravenous infusion of GPE becomes necessary for stable and potent neuroprotection. The broad effective dose range and treatment window of 3-7 h after the lesion suggest its potential for treating acute brain injuries. G-2meth-PE, a GPE analogue designed to be more enzymatic resistant, has a prolonged plasma half-life and is more potent in neuroprotection. Neuroprotection by GPE and its analogue may involve modulation of inflammation, promotion of astrocytosis, inhibition of apoptosis and vascular remodelling. Acute administration of GPE also prevents 6-OHDA-induced nigrostrial dopamine depletion. Delayed treatment with GPE does not prevent dopamine loss, but improves long-term function. Cyclo-glycyl-proline (cyclic Gly-Pro) is an endogenous DKP that may be derived from GPE. Cyclic Gly-Pro and its analogue cyclo-L-glycyl-L-2-allylproline (NNZ 2591) are both neuroprotective after ischaemic injury. NNZ2591 is highly enzymatic resistant and centrally accessible. Its peripheral administration improves somatosensory-motor function and long-term histological outcome after brain injury. Our research suggests that small neuropeptides have advantages over growth factors in the treatment of brain injury, and that modified neuropeptides designed to overcome the limitations of their endogenous counterparts represent a novel strategy of pharmaceutical discovery for neurological disorders.

  6. Stiff Person Syndrome: A Rare Neurological Disorder, Heterogeneous in Clinical Presentation and Not Easy to Treat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Buechner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Stiff person syndrome (SPS is a rare neurological disorder characterized by progressive rigidity of axial and limb muscles associated with painful spasms. SPS can be classified into classic SPS, paraneoplastic SPS, and SPS variants. Its underlying pathogenesis is probably autoimmune, as in most cases antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD are observed. Similarly, paraneoplastic SPS is usually linked to anti-amphiphysin antibodies. Treatment is based on drugs enhancing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA transmission and immunomodulatory agents. Case Series. Patient 1 is a 45-year-old male affected by the classic SPS, Patient 2 is a 73-year-old male affected by paraneoplastic SPS, and Patient 3 is a 68-year-old male affected by the stiff limb syndrome, a SPS variant where symptoms are confined to the limbs. Symptoms, diagnostic findings, and clinical course were extremely variable in the three patients, and treatment was often unsatisfactory and not well tolerated, thus reducing patient compliance. Clinical manifestations also included some unusual features such as recurrent vomiting and progressive dysarthria. Conclusions. SPS is a rare disorder that causes significant disability. Because of its extensive clinical variability, a multitask and personalized treatment is indicated. A clearer understanding of uncommon clinical features and better-tolerated therapeutic strategies are still needed.

  7. Usefulness of Videotape Instruction in an Academic Department of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, David M.; Kaufman, Rita G.

    1983-01-01

    Videotape instruction produced better performance in identification in only certain areas in a neurology clerkship: neuropsychologic phenomena, disorders with subtle or unique movements, and seizures. The choice and cost of equipment and some professional assurances are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  8. Neurological complications of infective endocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Sonia A.A.; Yaqub, Basim A.; Al-Deeb, Saleh M.

    1996-01-01

    We reviewed the files of 80 successive patients with native and prosthetic valve endocarditis admitted to Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital. Neurolological complications (NC) occurred in 28 (35%) patients. The valves involved were mitral in 12 (43%), aortic in eight (29%), combined mitral and aortic lesions in six (21%) and others in two (7%). The common causative organisms were Streptococci in 12 (43%), Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermides, both occurring in four (14%). Compared to the 52 infective endocarditis patients with no neurological complications (NNC), the NC occurred more frequently in male patients, those with aortic valve lesion, those with atrial fibrillation, those with delayed therapy and those with causative organisms being Streptococci or Staphylococci. Eleven patients died (39%), 12 (43%) recovered with motor sequelae, six (21%) had seizure disorder and five (18%) had full recovery. The frequency of neurological complications and mortality is comparable to those reported in the literature: however, the frequency was higher in our patients. (author)

  9. Training issues pertaining to sleep medicine and child neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotagal, Suresh

    2011-06-01

    Co-morbid sleep disorders are quite common in Child Neurology. Formal training in the field of sleep medicine and routine attention to sleep-wake function in clinical practice enhances the ability of the child neurologist to deliver comprehensive care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The specificity of neurological signs in schizophrenia : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, S; Knegtering, R; van den Bosch, RJ

    2000-01-01

    This review examines the extent to which neurological signs are more prevalent in schizophrenia patients, compared to mood-disorder patients and healthy subjects, and whether there is a pattern in any of the differences that may be found. We included 17 studies and calculated the weighted mean

  11. Neurologic complications of cerebral angiography in childhood moyamoya syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, R.L.; Chavali, R.V.; Robson, C.D.; Barnes, P.D.; Burrows, P.E. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Eldredge, E.A. [Department of Anesthesia, Children`s Hospital Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Scott, R.M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Children`s Hospital Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Purpose. To determine the incidence of neurologic complications of cerebral angiography in children with moyamoya syndrome (MMS) as compared to children without MMS. Materials and methods. One-hundred-ninety consecutive cerebral angiograms obtained in 152 children were evaluated. Sixty of these angiograms were obtained in 40 children with MMS. Patients underwent neurologic evaluation prior to and after the procedure. For this study, a neurologic complication was defined as any new focal neurologic deficit or alteration in mental status occurring during the procedure or within the ensuing 24 hours. Results. There were 2 neurologic complications within 24 hours of angiography, one in the MMS group and one in the non-MMS group. One patient with MMS became mute following angiography. The symptom resolved within 12 hours. One patient without MMS being examined postoperatively for residual arteriovenous malformation developed intracranial hemorrhage requiring reexploration 12 hours after the angiogram. Using a two-tail Fisher`s exact test, there was no significant statistical difference in the ischemic (P = 0.3) or hemorrhagic (P = 1.0) complication rates between the group of patients with MMS and the non-MMS groups. Conclusion. The risk of a neurologic complication from cerebral angiography in children with MMS is low and not statistically different from the risk in children with other cerebrovascular disorders. (orig.) With 8 tabs., 37 refs.

  12. [Incidence and follow-up characteristics of neurologically relevant psychogenic symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, M; Schellberg, D; Reister, G; Schepank, H

    1993-06-01

    The author reports on the prevalence and stability of the course of neurologically relevant psychogenic symptoms as well as their dependence on age and sex. Altogether 240 probands from the Mannheim Cohort Study on the epidemiology of psychogenic disorders were examined for psychogenic impairment over a 10-year period during three investigation periods. On the whole, seven neurologically relevant groups of symptoms (headache, lumbar and cervical vertebral complaints, non-systematic vertigo, functional hyperkinesia, functional paresis, sleep disturbances, concentration disturbances) differ clearly in frequency, characteristics of the course and clinical relevance.

  13. [Reconciliating neurology and psychiatry: The prototypical case of frontotemporal dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, J; Sarazin, M

    2017-10-01

    Frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) in its behavioral variant (bvFTD) is probably one of the conditions that best illustrates the links between psychiatry and neurology. It is indeed admitted that between a third and half of patients with this condition, especially in early-onset forms, receive an initial diagnosis of psychiatric disorder (depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder) and are then referred to a psychiatric ward. BvFTD can thus be considered a neurological disorder with a psychiatric presentation. Among psychiatric symptoms reported in this disease, psychotic symptoms (hallucinations, delusions, especially of persecution), which have long been underestimated in bvFTD and are not part of the current diagnostic criteria, are present in about 20% of cases and may be inaugural. They are particularly common in the genetic forms related to a mutation in the C9orf72 gene (up to 50%), and to a lesser extent in the GRN gene (up to 25%). C9orf72 gene mutation is often associated with a family history of dementia or motor neuron disease but also of psychiatric disorders. It has also been described in sporadic presentation forms. Sometimes, the moderate degree of brain atrophy on MRI described in patients carrying this mutation may complicate the differential diagnosis with late-onset psychiatric diseases. In the present article, we underline the importance of considering that psychiatric - especially psychotic - symptoms are not rare in bvFTD, which should lead to a revision of the diagnostic criteria of this disease by taking greater account of this fact. We also propose a diagnostic chart, based on concerted evaluation by neurologists and psychiatrists for cases of atypical psychiatric symptoms (late-onset or pharmacoresistant troubles) leading to consider the possibility of a neurological disorder, in order to shed a new light on these difficult clinical situations. In the field of research, bvFTD may constitute a model to explore the neural basis of certain

  14. Adrenal Disorders and the Paediatric Brain: Pathophysiological Considerations and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Salpietro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various neurological and psychiatric manifestations have been recorded in children with adrenal disorders. Based on literature review and on personal case-studies and case-series we focused on the pathophysiological and clinical implications of glucocorticoid-related, mineralcorticoid-related, and catecholamine-related paediatric nervous system involvement. Childhood Cushing syndrome can be associated with long-lasting cognitive deficits and abnormal behaviour, even after resolution of the hypercortisolism. Exposure to excessive replacement of exogenous glucocorticoids in the paediatric age group (e.g., during treatments for adrenal insufficiency has been reported with neurological and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI abnormalities (e.g., delayed myelination and brain atrophy due to potential corticosteroid-related myelin damage in the developing brain and the possible impairment of limbic system ontogenesis. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH, a disorder of unclear pathophysiology characterised by increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pressure, has been described in children with hypercortisolism, adrenal insufficiency, and hyperaldosteronism, reflecting the potential underlying involvement of the adrenal-brain axis in the regulation of CSF pressure homeostasis. Arterial hypertension caused by paediatric adenomas or tumours of the adrenal cortex or medulla has been associated with various hypertension-related neurological manifestations. The development and maturation of the central nervous system (CNS through childhood is tightly regulated by intrinsic, paracrine, endocrine, and external modulators, and perturbations in any of these factors, including those related to adrenal hormone imbalance, could result in consequences that affect the structure and function of the paediatric brain. Animal experiments and clinical studies demonstrated that the developing (i.e., paediatric CNS seems to be particularly vulnerable to alterations induced by

  15. [Nineteen cases of school-aged children with degenerative or metabolic neurological disorders initially presenting with learning difficulty and/or behavior disturbance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honzawa, Shiho; Sugai, Kenji; Akaike, Hiroto; Nakayama, Tojo; Fujikawa, Yoshinao; Komaki, Hirofumi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2012-07-01

    We reported 19 cases of school-aged children. They were initially judged to have learning difficulty or school maladaptation because of attention deficits, hyperactive behaviors or poor school performance, followed by the diagnosis such as degenerative or metabolic neurological diseases. The patients consisted of 4 cases of adrenoleukodystrophy, 5 cases of dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, 3 cases of Sanfilippo syndrome, 3 cases of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, and each one case of juvenile Gaucher disease, juvenile Huntington disease, juvenile metachromatic leukodystrophy and Leigh disease. They had markedly poor school performance, and/or abnormal behaviors, followed by seizures, character disorders or psychomotor regression. The diagnostic clues included brain CT scan and/or MRI, peculiar facial appearance and notable family histories. When the children were indicated to have learning difficulty or maladjustment to school life, we should make deliberate differential diagnoses before concluding that they have a learning disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Instead they should be recommended to visit child neurologists, when they present with any problems as aforesaid.

  16. Physical Therapy for Neurological Conditions in Geriatric Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Carmeli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available With more of the world’s population surviving longer, individuals often face age-related neurology disorders and decline of function that can affect lifestyle and well-being. Despite neurophysiological changes affecting the brain function and structure, the aged brain, in some degree, can learn and relearn due to neuroplasticity. Recent advances in rehabilitation techniques have produced better functional outcomes in age-related neurological conditions. Physical therapy (PT of the elderly individual focuses in particular on sensory–motor impairments, postural control coordination, and prevention of sarcopenia. Geriatric PT has a significant influence on quality of life, independent living, and life expectancy. However, in many developed and developing countries, the profession of PT is underfunded and understaffed. This article provides a brief overview on (a age-related disease of central nervous system and (b the principles, approaches, and doctrines of motor skill learning and point out the most common treatment models that PTs use for neurological patients.

  17. Physical Therapy for Neurological Conditions in Geriatric Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmeli, Eli

    2017-01-01

    With more of the world's population surviving longer, individuals often face age-related neurology disorders and decline of function that can affect lifestyle and well-being. Despite neurophysiological changes affecting the brain function and structure, the aged brain, in some degree, can learn and relearn due to neuroplasticity. Recent advances in rehabilitation techniques have produced better functional outcomes in age-related neurological conditions. Physical therapy (PT) of the elderly individual focuses in particular on sensory-motor impairments, postural control coordination, and prevention of sarcopenia. Geriatric PT has a significant influence on quality of life, independent living, and life expectancy. However, in many developed and developing countries, the profession of PT is underfunded and understaffed. This article provides a brief overview on (a) age-related disease of central nervous system and (b) the principles, approaches, and doctrines of motor skill learning and point out the most common treatment models that PTs use for neurological patients.

  18. Introduction to Neurogenic Communication Disorders. Fifth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookshire, Robert H.

    This book provides an overview of the causes and symptoms, and the typical courses, treatments, and outcomes of neurogenic communication disorders. Chapter 1 reviews the human nervous system and neurologic causes of adult communication disorders. Chapter 2 discusses the neurologic assessment and arriving at a diagnosis, including the neurologist's…

  19. Thymolipoma combined with hyperthyroidism discovered by neurological symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hidenobu; Harada, Masahiko; Kimura, Masakazu; Kato, Harubumi

    2007-04-01

    Thymolipomas are rare slow-growing mediastinal thymic neoplasms. Most cases are asymptomatic and are sometimes discovered as a huge mass on chest x-ray films. A few cases have been discovered during examinations for other diseases. We report the second case of thymolipoma combined with hyperthyroidism in the English language literature. Neurological symptoms suddenly appeared in a 45-year-old woman. Central nervous system disorder was suggested but no significant abnormalities were found on brain MR nor were there any neurological signs. Several months later, neurological and systemic examinations on admission revealed hyperthyroidism and an anterior mediastinal tumor, 9.0x5.0x3.0 cm in size on chest CT films. Despite treatment of hyperthyroidism by medication, her neurological symptoms remained. Neurologists recommended resection of the mediastinal tumor. Malignancy could not be ruled out because of the irregularity of the tumor appearance on contrast-enhanced chest CT. Furthermore, the tumor appeared to be attached to the ascending aorta, so cytological and/or pathological diagnosis by CT-guided needle biopsy before operation were contraindicated. Extended thymectomy was performed in May 2005. The pathological diagnosis was benign thymolipoma consisting of mature fatty tissue and thymic tissue structures with Hassall's corpuscles. Her neurological symptoms seemed slightly but not markedly improved. The relationship between thymolipoma and hyperthyroidism is still unknown.

  20. The economic cost of brain disorders in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J; Gustavsson, A; Svensson, M

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, we presented for the first time overall estimates of annual costs for brain disorders (mental and neurologic disorders) in Europe. This new report presents updated, more accurate, and comprehensive 2010 estimates for 30 European countries.......In 2005, we presented for the first time overall estimates of annual costs for brain disorders (mental and neurologic disorders) in Europe. This new report presents updated, more accurate, and comprehensive 2010 estimates for 30 European countries....

  1. [Structural CNS abnormalities responsible for coincidental occurrence of endocrine disorders, epilepsy and psychoneurologic disorders in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzyk, Jerzy; Kwiatkowski, Stanisław; Kaciński, Marek; Kroczka, Sławomir; Wójcik, Małgorzata

    2010-01-01

    In the population of children and adolescents, epilepsy affects 0.5-1% of individuals; approximately 3% of general population suffer from non-epileptic seizures, while endocrine disorders are several times more frequent. All of the above factors result in a relatively common non-accidental occurrence of endocrine disorders, epilepsy and neuropsychiatric disorders. However, structural central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities that cause both endocrine and neurologic disorders seem to be markedly less common. No reports addressing this problem are available in the literature. 1) Assessment of the frequency of non-coincidental occurrence of epilepsy and endocrine disorders in inpatients and outpatients with structural CSN abnormalities managed in Department Endocrinology. 2) Presentation of diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties in these patients, and 3) An attempt at defining a common etiology of both disorders. A retrospective analysis of the medical records of the patients with coincidence of endocrine disorders and epilepsy and psycho-neurologic disorders (treated in Chair and Department of Children's and Adolescents Neurology, University Children's Hospital of Krakow or in another pediatric neurology center) and with organic CNS abnormalities (treated or followed up as inpatients and outpatient of Department of Pediatric Surgery, Children's University Hospital of Krakow, was performed. The patients were selected from among several thousands of children treated as inpatients and outpatients of the Department. Various forms of symptomatic and idiopathic epilepsy and other psychoneurological disorders (disorders of behavior and emotions, obsession-compulsion syndromes, stereotypias, aggression, compulsive ideas and movements, anorexia or hypothalamic obesity) coincident with one or more endocrine disorders such as precocious or delayed puberty, multihormonal pituitary deficiency, panhypopituitarism and secondary hypothyroidism were detected in 42 patients with

  2. Study of psychiatric comorbidity in patients with headache using a short structured clinical interview in a rural neurology clinic in Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soaham Dilip Desai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric disorders are common in patients attending neurology clinics with headache. Evaluation of psychiatric comorbidity in patients with headache is often missed in the busy neurology clinics. Aims: To assess the prevalence of Axis-I DSM-IV psychiatric disorders in patients with primary headache disorders in a rural-based tertiary neurology clinic in Western India. Settings and Design : A cross-sectional observation survey was conducting assessing all patients with migraine, tension-type headache and chronic daily headache attending the Neurology Clinic of Shree Krishna Hospital, a rural medical teaching hospital in Karamsad, in Gujarat in Western India. Materials and Methods: A total of 101 consecutive consenting adults with headache were interviewed using Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I., a structured diagnostic clinical interview to assess prevalence of Axis-I DSM-IV psychiatric disorders. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics were calculated using SPSS software version 16 and a binomial regression model was used to study the relationship of psychiatric co-morbidity with patient-related factors. Results: 49 out of 101 (48.5% patients with headache suffered from depressive disorders (dysthymia or depression or suicidality, 18 out of 101 patients with headache (17.90% suffered from anxiety related disorders (generalized anxiety disorder or agoraphobia or social phobia or panic disorder. Conclusions: Axis-I psychiatric disorders are a significant comorbidity among patients with headache disorders. M.I.N.I. can be used as a short, less time consuming instrument to assess all patients with headache disorders.

  3. Imaging of dopamine release induced by pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic stimulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sang Soo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Technological advances in molecular imaging made it possible to image synaptic neurotransmitter concentration in living human brain. The dopaminergic system has been most intensively studied because of its importance in neurological as well as psychiatric disorders. This paper provides a brief overview of recent progress in imaging studies of dopamine release induced by pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic stimulations.

  4. Applications of disorder-induced melting concept to critical-solute-accumulation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Heuer, J.K.

    2001-01-01

    A generalized version of the Lindemann melting criterion has recently been used to develop a unified thermodynamic description of disorder-induced amorphization and heat-induced melting. This concept of amorphization as a melting process is based on the fact that the melting temperature of a defective crystal driven far from equilibrium will decrease relative to that of its defect-free equilibrium state. The broader view of melting provides a new perspective of damage-accumulation processes such as radiation damage, ion implantation, ion beam mixing, plastic deformation, and fracture. For example, within this conceptual framework, disorder-induced amorphization is simply polymorphous melting of a critically disordered crystal at temperatures below the glass transition temperature. In the present communication, we discuss the application of the concept to two specific cases: amorphous phase formation during ion implantation and solute segregation-induced intergranular fracture

  5. Patient Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicines in an Outpatient Pediatric Neurology Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Daniel; Jenkins, Sarah; Youssef, Paul; Kotagal, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    This article describes the use of complementary and alternative medicines in an outpatient pediatric neurology clinic, and assesses family attitudes toward the efficacy of complementary and alternative medicines versus prescription medications. Complementary and alternative medicine is an important element of the modern health care landscape. There is limited information about whether, and to what extent, families perceive its utility in childhood neurological disorders. Surveys were distributed to 500 consecutive patients at a child neurology clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Questions pertained to the child's diagnoses, use of complementary and alternative medicines, and the specific complementary and alternative medicine modalities that were used. Opinions were also gathered on the perceived efficacy of complementary and alternative medicines and prescription medications. Data were compared using χ(2) or Fisher exact tests as indicated. A total of 484 surveys were returned, of which 327 were usable. Only 17.4% admitted to use of complementary and alternative medicine to treat neurological problems. However, in follow-up questioning, actually 41.6% of patients recognized that they were using one or more types of complementary and alternative medicines. Disorders associated with a statistically significant increased prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use were headache (50.8% with headache used complementary and alternative medicine versus 35.7% without headache; P = 0.008, Fisher exact test), chronic fatigue (63.2% vs 38.8%; P = 0.005, Fisher exact test), and sleep disorders (77.1% vs 37.3%; P complementary and alternative medicine. Only 38.5% of these recognize themselves as using complementary and alternative medicine, underlining the need to inquire in-depth about its use. Patients who are less satisfied with their prescription medications are more likely to use complementary and alternative medicine, perhaps reflecting the less tractable

  6. Conversion Disorder, Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder, and Chronic Pain: Comorbidity, Assessment, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Patricia; Deptula, Andrew; Yuan, Derek Y

    2017-06-01

    This paper examines the overlap of conversion disorder with chronic pain conditions, describes ways to assess for conversion disorder, and provides an overview of evidence-based treatments for conversion disorder and chronic pain, with a focus on conversion symptoms. Conversion disorder is a significant problem that warrants further study, given that there are not many well-established guidelines. Accurate and timely assessment should help move treatment in a more fruitful direction and avoid unnecessary medical interventions. Advances in neuroimaging may also help further our understanding of conversion disorder. Creating a supportive environment and a collaborative treatment relationship and improving understanding of conversion symptoms appear to help individuals diagnosed with conversion disorder engage in appropriate treatments. Novel uses of earlier treatments, such as hypnosis and psychodynamic approaches, could potentially be beneficial and require a more vigorous and systematic study. There are treatments that produce significant improvements in functioning and reduction of physical symptoms from conversion disorder even for very severe cases. Hypnotherapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, and inpatient multidisciplinary treatment with intensive physiotherapy for severe cases have the most evidence to support reduction of symptoms. Components of treatment for conversion disorder overlap with treatments for chronic pain and can be used together to produce therapeutic effects for both conditions. Treatment needs to be tailored for each individual's specific symptoms.

  7. Contribution of positron emission tomography in neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, E.; Franck, G.

    1992-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a scanner technique using tracers labelled with shortlived radioisotopes which allows to study and quantify human metabolic processes or drug pharmacology in vivo. The technique is first applied in physiological studies. Sleep, normal brain metabolism or cerebral activations have been studied. The pharmacological approach concerns both drug distribution in the human brain and blood flow or metabolic variations under treatment. Main neurological applications in pathology are cerebrovascular disorders, diseases leading to dementia, epilepsy, movement disorders, and brain tumors. In each field of application, PET gives unique and frequently early informations. It nicely combines both dynamic informations and measurement precision. (author)

  8. Neurological soft signs in the clinical course of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke eBachmann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurological soft signs (NSS comprise subtle deficits in sensory integration, motor coordination, and sequencing of complex motor acts which are typically observed in the majority of schizophrenia patients, including chronic cases and neuroleptic-naïve first-episode patients. However, recent studies clearly demonstrate that NSS are not a static feature of schizophrenia but vary in the clinical course of the disorder. This effect was investigated in a meta-analysis based on 17 longitudinal studies published between 1992 and 2012. Studies included between 10 and 93 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (total number 787 with follow-up periods between 2 and 208 weeks. Beside the Neurological Examination Scale, the Cambridge Neurological Inventory and the Heidelberg NSS Scale were used to assess NSS. All but three studies found NSS to decrease in parallel with remission of psychopathological symptoms. This effect was more pronounced in patients with a remitting compared to a non-remitting, chronic course (Cohen´s d 0.81 vs. 0.15 and was significantly correlated with length of the follow-up period (r=-0.64 but not with age (r=0.28. NSS scores did not decrease to the level typically observed in healthy controls. From a clinical perspective, NSS may therefore be used to identify subjects at risk to develop schizophrenia and to monitor disease progression.

  9. PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiachuan; Zhang, Hong [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University, Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); Tian, Mei [University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Human neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis are caused by loss of different types of neurons and glial cells in the brain and spinal cord. At present, there are no effective therapies against these disorders. Discovery of the therapeutic potential of stem cells offers new strategies for the treatment of neurological diseases. Direct assessment of stem cells' survival, interaction with the host and impact on neuronal functions after transplantation requires advanced in vivo imaging techniques. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a potential molecular imaging modality to evaluate the viability and function of transplanted tissue or stem cells in the nervous system. This review focuses on PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases. (orig.)

  10. Phenobarbital use and neurological problems in FMR1 premutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldarriaga, Wilmar; Lein, Pamela; González Teshima, Laura Yuriko; Isaza, Carolina; Rosa, Lina; Polyak, Andrew; Hagerman, Randi; Girirajan, Santhosh; Silva, Marisol; Tassone, Flora

    2016-03-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a CGG expansion in the FMR1 gene located at Xq27.3. Patients with the premutation in FMR1 present specific clinical problems associated with the number of CGG repeats (55-200 CGG repeats). Premutation carriers have elevated FMR1 mRNA expression levels, which have been associated with neurotoxicity potentially causing neurodevelopmental problems or neurological problems associated with aging. However, cognitive impairments or neurological problems may also be related to increased vulnerability of premutation carriers to neurotoxicants, including phenobarbital. Here we present a study of three sisters with the premutation who were exposed differentially to phenobarbital therapy throughout their lives, allowing us to compare the neurological effects of this drug in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Neurological manifestations of excessive alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas-Ballvé, Anna; Grau-López, Laia; Morillas, Rosa María; Planas, Ramón

    2017-12-01

    This article reviews the different acute and chronic neurological manifestations of excessive alcohol consumption that affect the central or peripheral nervous system. Several mechanisms can be implicated depending on the disorder, ranging from nutritional factors, alcohol-related toxicity, metabolic changes and immune-mediated mechanisms. Recognition and early treatment of these manifestations is essential given their association with high morbidity and significantly increased mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U., AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  12. Combining non-pharmacological treatments with pharmacotherapies for neurological disorders: a unique interface of the brain, drug-device, and intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Mobile medical applications (mHealth), music, and video games are being developed and tested for their ability to improve pharmacotherapy outcomes and medication adherence. Pleiotropic mechanism of music and gamification engages an intrinsic motivation and the brain reward system, supporting therapies in patients with neurological disorders, including neuropathic pain, depression, anxiety, or neurodegenerative disorders. Based on accumulating results from clinical trials, an innovative combination treatment of epilepsy seizures, comorbidities, and the medication non-adherence can be designed, consisting of antiepileptic drugs and disease self-management software delivering clinically beneficial music. Since creative elements and art expressed in games, music, and software are copyrighted, therefore clinical and regulatory challenges in developing copyrighted, drug-device therapies may be offset by a value proposition of the exclusivity due to the patent-independent protection, which can last for over 70 years. Taken together, development of copyrighted non-pharmacological treatments (e-therapies), and their combinations with pharmacotherapies, offer incentives to chronically ill patients and outcome-driven health care industries.

  13. Combining Non-pharmacological Treatments with Pharmacotherapies for Neurological Disorders: a Unique Interface of the Brain, Drug-Device and Intellectual Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz eBulaj

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mobile medical applications (mHealth, music and video games are being developed and tested for their ability to improve pharmacotherapy outcomes and medication adherence. Pleiotropic mechanism of music and gamification engage an intrinsic motivation and the brain reward system, supporting therapies in patients with neurological disorders, including neuropathic pain, depression, anxiety, or neurodegenerative disorders. Based on accumulating results from clinical trials, an innovative combination treatment of epilepsy seizures, comorbidities and the medication non-adherence can be designed, consisting of antiepileptic drugs and disease self-management software delivering clinically beneficial music. Since creative elements and art expressed in games, music and software are copyrighted, therefore clinical and regulatory challenges in developing copyrighted, drug-device therapies may be offset by a value proposition of the exclusivity due to the patent-independent protection which can last for over 70 years. Taken together, development of copyrighted non-pharmacological treatments (e-therapies, and their combinations with pharmacotherapies, offers incentives to chronically-ill patients and outcome-driven health care industries.

  14. Combining Non-Pharmacological Treatments with Pharmacotherapies for Neurological Disorders: A Unique Interface of the Brain, Drug–Device, and Intellectual Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Mobile medical applications (mHealth), music, and video games are being developed and tested for their ability to improve pharmacotherapy outcomes and medication adherence. Pleiotropic mechanism of music and gamification engages an intrinsic motivation and the brain reward system, supporting therapies in patients with neurological disorders, including neuropathic pain, depression, anxiety, or neurodegenerative disorders. Based on accumulating results from clinical trials, an innovative combination treatment of epilepsy seizures, comorbidities, and the medication non-adherence can be designed, consisting of antiepileptic drugs and disease self-management software delivering clinically beneficial music. Since creative elements and art expressed in games, music, and software are copyrighted, therefore clinical and regulatory challenges in developing copyrighted, drug–device therapies may be offset by a value proposition of the exclusivity due to the patent–independent protection, which can last for over 70 years. Taken together, development of copyrighted non-pharmacological treatments (e-therapies), and their combinations with pharmacotherapies, offer incentives to chronically ill patients and outcome-driven health care industries. PMID:25071711

  15. Burden of neurological diseases in the US revealed by web searches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Baeza-Yates

    Full Text Available Analyzing the disease-related web searches of Internet users provides insight into the interests of the general population as well as the healthcare industry, which can be used to shape health care policies.We analyzed the searches related to neurological diseases and drugs used in neurology using the most popular search engines in the US, Google and Bing/Yahoo.We found that the most frequently searched diseases were common diseases such as dementia or Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD, as well as medium frequency diseases with high social impact such as Parkinson's disease, MS and ALS. The most frequently searched CNS drugs were generic drugs used for pain, followed by sleep disorders, dementia, ADHD, stroke and Parkinson's disease. Regarding the interests of the healthcare industry, ADHD, Alzheimer's disease, MS, ALS, meningitis, and hypersomnia received the higher advertising bids for neurological diseases, while painkillers and drugs for neuropathic pain, drugs for dementia or insomnia, and triptans had the highest advertising bidding prices.Web searches reflect the interest of people and the healthcare industry, and are based either on the frequency or social impact of the disease.

  16. Hypocretin/orexin disturbances in neurological disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronczek, R.; Baumann, C.R.; Lammers, G.J.; Bassetti, C.L.; Overeem, S.

    2009-01-01

    The hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) system plays a crucial role in the regulation of sleep and wakefulness. The strongest evidence for this is the fact that the primary sleep disorder narcolepsy is caused by disrupted hypocretin signaling in humans as well as various animal models. There is a

  17. Purinergic Receptors in Neurological Diseases With Motor Symptoms: Targets for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ágatha Oliveira-Giacomelli

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Since proving adenosine triphosphate (ATP functions as a neurotransmitter in neuron/glia interactions, the purinergic system has been more intensely studied within the scope of the central nervous system. In neurological disorders with associated motor symptoms, including Parkinson's disease (PD, motor neuron diseases (MND, multiple sclerosis (MS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Huntington's Disease (HD, restless leg syndrome (RLS, and ataxias, alterations in purinergic receptor expression and activity have been noted, indicating a potential role for this system in disease etiology and progression. In neurodegenerative conditions, neural cell death provokes extensive ATP release and alters calcium signaling through purinergic receptor modulation. Consequently, neuroinflammatory responses, excitotoxicity and apoptosis are directly or indirectly induced. This review analyzes currently available data, which suggests involvement of the purinergic system in neuro-associated motor dysfunctions and underlying mechanisms. Possible targets for pharmacological interventions are also discussed.

  18. Fasting and Systemic Insulin Signaling Regulate Phosphorylation of Brain Proteins That Modulate Cell Morphology and Link to Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Quan, Chao; Toth, Rachel; Campbell, David G; MacKintosh, Carol; Wang, Hong Yu; Chen, Shuai

    2015-12-11

    Diabetes is strongly associated with cognitive decline, but the molecular reasons are unknown. We found that fasting and peripheral insulin promote phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, respectively, of specific residues on brain proteins including cytoskeletal regulators such as slit-robo GTPase-activating protein 3 (srGAP3) and microtubule affinity-regulating protein kinases (MARKs), in which deficiency or dysregulation is linked to neurological disorders. Fasting activates protein kinase A (PKA) but not PKB/Akt signaling in the brain, and PKA can phosphorylate the purified srGAP3. The phosphorylation of srGAP3 and MARKs were increased when PKA signaling was activated in primary neurons. Knockdown of PKA decreased the phosphorylation of srGAP3. Furthermore, WAVE1, a protein kinase A-anchoring protein, formed a complex with srGAP3 and PKA in the brain of fasted mice to facilitate the phosphorylation of srGAP3 by PKA. Although brain cells have insulin receptors, our findings are inconsistent with the down-regulation of phosphorylation of target proteins being mediated by insulin signaling within the brain. Rather, our findings infer that systemic insulin, through a yet unknown mechanism, inhibits PKA or protein kinase(s) with similar specificity and/or activates an unknown phosphatase in the brain. Ser(858) of srGAP3 was identified as a key regulatory residue in which phosphorylation by PKA enhanced the GAP activity of srGAP3 toward its substrate, Rac1, in cells, thereby inhibiting the action of this GTPase in cytoskeletal regulation. Our findings reveal novel mechanisms linking peripheral insulin sensitivity with cytoskeletal remodeling in neurons, which may help to explain the association of diabetes with neurological disorders such as Alzheimer disease. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Skin temperature in the extremities of healthy and neurologically impaired children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedberg, Lena E; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Nordahl, Gunnar; Lundeberg, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Little emphasis has been accorded to peripheral skin temperature impairments in children with neurological disorders but attention has been paid to the significance of cold extremities (autonomic failure) for well-being and quality of life in adults stroke patients. Therefore, it seems important to investigate skin temperature in children with neurological disorder, especially when their communication is impaired. In the present study, we wanted to objectively verify any skin temperature differences between pre-school children with and without neurological disorders and also ascertain if any correlation existed between skin temperature and physical activity. Skin temperatures in 25 healthy children and 15 children with cerebral or spinal cord damages were assessed using infrared radiation. The temperatures were recorded on the palm and the dorsal surface of the hands and on the sole and dorsal surface of the feet three times at 15-minute intervals over 30min. A significant lower mean skin temperature in all measurement points was seen in non-walking children with cerebral damages compared to healthy controls. Also, the mean skin temperature was significantly lower in all foot measuring points in the children with cerebral damages that were unable to walk compared to those walking. In conclusion, as cold extremities may result in impaired well-being and hypothetically may be associated with other symptoms born by the child, further investigations of thermal dysfunction and autonomic function are of importance and treatment may be warranted.

  20. Disorder-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massobrio, C. (Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique Experimentale); Pontikis, V.; Doan, N.V.; Martin, G. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Physique des Particules Elementaires)

    The reaction of the crystalline compound NiZr{sub 2} to imposed chemical disorder has been studied by molecular dynamics in the isobaric canonical ensemble. The cohesive energy used is inspired by the second moment apporoximation of the local density of states in the tight binding model. Imposed chemical disorder induced swelling (3% for full disorder, 1% for 10% disorder). Above 10% disorder, the crystalline structure athermally collapses to an amorphous state which retains much of the local chemical order. (orig.).

  1. Disorder-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds: A molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massobrio, C.; Pontikis, V.; Doan, N.V.; Martin, G.

    1991-01-01

    The reaction of the crystalline compound NiZr 2 to imposed chemical disorder has been studied by molecular dynamics in the isobaric canonical ensemble. The cohesive energy used is inspired by the second moment apporoximation of the local density of states in the tight binding model. Imposed chemical disorder induced swelling (3% for full disorder, 1% for 10% disorder). Above 10% disorder, the crystalline structure athermally collapses to an amorphous state which retains much of the local chemical order. (orig.)

  2. Unusual neurological syndrome induced by atmospheric pressure change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, Judy A; Yazinski, Nancy A; Block, Clay A; Buckey, Jay C

    2013-05-01

    We describe a case of a 46-yr-old female who developed hypertension, tachycardia, dysarthria, and leg weakness provoked by pressure changes associated with flying. Typically during the landing phase of flight, she would feel dizzy and note that she had difficulty with speech and leg weakness. After the flight the leg weakness persisted for several days. The symptoms were mitigated when she took a combined alpha-beta blocker (labetalol) prior to the flight. To determine if these symptoms were related to atmospheric pressure change, she was referred for testing in a hyperbaric chamber. She was exposed to elevated atmospheric pressure (maximum 1.2 ATA) while her heart rate and blood pressure were monitored. Within 1 min she developed tachycardia and hypertension. She also quickly developed slurred speech, left arm and leg weakness, and sensory changes in her left leg. She was returned to sea level pressure and her symptoms gradually improved. A full neurological workup has revealed no explanation for these findings. She has no air collections, cysts, or other anatomic findings that could be sensitive to atmospheric pressure change. The pattern is most consistent with a vascular event stimulated by altitude exposure. This case suggests that atmospheric pressure change can produce neurological symptoms, although the mechanism is unknown.

  3. Brain MRI and SPECT in the diagnosis of early neurological involvement in Wilson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piga, Mario; Satta, Loredana; Serra, Alessandra; Loi, Gianluigi; Murru, Alessandra; Demelia, Luigi; Sias, Alessandro; Marrosu, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of brain MRI and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in early detection of central nervous system abnormalities in patients affected by Wilson's disease (WD) with or without neurological involvement. Out of 25 consecutive WD patients, 13 showed hepatic involvement, ten hepatic and neurological manifestations, and twp hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric symptoms, including mainly movement disorders, major depression, and psychosis. Twenty-four healthy, age-gender matched subjects served as controls. All patients underwent brain MRI and 99m Tc-ethyl-cysteinate dimer (ECD) SPECT before starting specific therapy. Voxel-by-voxel analyses were performed using statistical parametric mapping to compare differences in 99m Tc-ECD brain uptake between the two groups. Brain MRI showed T2-weighted hyperintensities in seven patients (28%), six of whom were affected by hepatic and neurological forms. Brain perfusion SPECT showed pathological data in 19 patients (76%), revealing diffuse or focal hypoperfusion in superior frontal (Brodmann area (BA) 6), prefrontal (BA 9), parietal (BA 40), and occipital (BA 18, BA 39) cortices in temporal gyri (BA 37, BA 21) and in caudatus and putamen. Moreover, hepatic involvement was detected in nine subjects; eight presented both hepatic and neurological signs, while two exhibited WD-correlated hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric alterations. All but one patient with abnormal MRI matched with abnormal ECD SPECT. Pathologic MRI findings were obtained in six out of ten patients with hepatic and neurological involvement while abnormal ECD SPECT was revealed in eight patients. Both patients with hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric involvement displayed abnormal ECD SPECT and one displayed an altered MRI. These findings suggest that ECD SPECT might be useful in detecting early brain damage in WD, not only in the perspective of assessing and treating motor impairment but also in evaluating better the

  4. Neurological soft signs in psychoses. I: a comparative study of prevalence amongst drug naive first episode patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranjal Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aims and objective of the study was to find out the prevalence of neurological soft signs (NSS amongst the three groups of psychiatric disorder which were brief psychotic disorder, schizophreniform psychosis, and schizophrenia. Material and methods: The study was conducted over a period of seven months starting from 1st of May, 2010 to 30th November, 2010. NSS were assessed by the Heidelberg Manual. Results: We found that all the patients from each of the three groups have shown at least one or more neurological abnormalities. The present study found a significant association between types of NSS namely in group of motor coordination, motor sequencing, and sensory integration, and the different category of disorders under study whereas the severity of neurological impairment was not found to be significantly associated within the three groups. Conclusion: We hope that in future larger studies observing for long period of time will shed definite lights in the present study findings.

  5. The neurological manifestations of trauma: lessons from World War I

    OpenAIRE

    Linden, S.; Hess, V.; Jones, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the clinical presentation of functional disorders and the influence of social and cultural factors can be investigated through the historical case notes from mental hospitals. World War I (WWI) was a potent trigger of functional disorders with neurological or psychiatric symptoms. We analysed 100 randomly selected case files of German servicemen admitted to the Department of Psychiatry of the Charité Medical School of Berlin University during WWI and classified them according to co...

  6. Population-Level Retrospective Study of Neurologically Expressed Disorders in Ruminants before the Onset of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in Belgium, a BSE Risk III Country

    OpenAIRE

    Saegerman, C.; Berkvens, D.; Claes, L.; Dewaele, A.; Coignoul, F.; Ducatelle, R.; Cassart, D.; Brochier, B.; Costy, F.; Roels, S.; Deluyker, H.; Vanopdenbosch, E.; Thiry, E.

    2005-01-01

    A retrospective epidemiological study (n = 7,875) of neurologically expressed disorders (NED) in ruminants before the onset of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy epidemic (years studied, 1980 to 1997) was carried out in Belgium. The archives of all veterinary laboratories and rabies and transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) epidemiosurveillance networks were consulted. For all species, a significantly higher number of NED with virological causes (rabies) was reported south of the Sa...

  7. Comorbidity in illness-induced posttraumatic stress disorder versus posttraumatic stress disorder due to external events in a nationally representative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Jordana L; Mota, Natalie; Edmondson, Donald; El-Gabalawy, Renée

    2018-05-10

    The current study compared physical and mental health characteristics and quality of life of illness-induced posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) versus those with PTSD due to external traumatic events in a population-based sample. PTSD was assessed with the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule (AUDADIS-5) using DSM-5 criteria in the 2012-2013 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Participants with past-year PTSD (n = 1779) were categorized into two groups: illness-induced (6.5%) and other trauma-induced PTSD (92.9%) based on index trauma. Group differences in physical health, mental health, and quality of life were estimated using multiple logistic and linear regressions with adjustment for demographics and medical morbidity. Compared to PTSD due to external events, illness-induced PTSD had higher rates of life-threatening illness in the past year. Illness-induced PTSD compared to PTSD due to external events was associated with reduced odds of depressive/bipolar disorders and antisocial personality disorder, but increased odds of cannabis use disorder. The groups did not differ on quality of life after accounting for medical morbidity. Illness-induced PTSD is common among American adults and has a similar impact on quality of life as PTSD due to external events, but may have distinct mental health correlates. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rates and Predictors of Conversion to Schizophrenia or Bipolar Disorder Following Substance-Induced Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzer, Marie Stefanie Kejser; Nordentoft, Merete; Hjorthøj, Carsten

    2018-04-01

    The authors investigated the rates of conversion to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder after a substance-induced psychosis, as well as risk factors for conversion. All patient information was extracted from the Danish Civil Registration System and the Psychiatric Central Research Register. The study population included all persons who received a diagnosis of substance-induced psychosis between 1994 and 2014 (N=6,788); patients were followed until first occurrence of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder or until death, emigration, or August 2014. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to obtain cumulative probabilities for the conversion from a substance-induced psychosis to schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios for all covariates. Overall, 32.2% (95% CI=29.7-34.9) of patients with a substance-induced psychosis converted to either bipolar or schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. The highest conversion rate was found for cannabis-induced psychosis, with 47.4% (95% CI=42.7-52.3) converting to either schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Young age was associated with a higher risk of converting to schizophrenia. Self-harm after a substance-induced psychosis was significantly linked to a higher risk of converting to both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Half the cases of conversion to schizophrenia occurred within 3.1 years after a substance-induced psychosis, and half the cases of conversion to bipolar disorder occurred within 4.4 years. Substance-induced psychosis is strongly associated with the development of severe mental illness, and a long follow-up period is needed to identify the majority of cases.

  9. Neurological development of children born to mothers after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber-Zamora, Joanna; Szpotanska-Sikorska, Monika; Drozdowska-Szymczak, Agnieszka; Czaplinska, Natalia; Pietrzak, Bronisława; Wielgos, Miroslaw; Kociszewska-Najman, Bozena

    2017-12-03

    Pregnancies after kidney transplantation are at high risk of complications such as preterm birth and foetal growth restriction. Until now, the impact of these factors on neurological development of children born to transplant mothers has not been established. A comparison of neurological examinations performed in 36 children of kidney transplant women (study group) and 36 children born to healthy mothers (control group). The children from both groups were born at a similar gestational age and in the similar time period from 12/1996 to 09/2012. Neurological examinations were performed from 07/2010 to 11/2013. Each examination was adjusted to the patient's age and performed after the neonatal period. Three years later children were re-consulted, if they presented neurological deviations or were less than 12 months old at the time of the first examination. Normal neurological development was found in 86% of children in both groups (p = .999). Mild neurological deviations were observed in four (11%) children born to kidney transplant mothers and in five (14%) children born to healthy mothers (p = .999). Moderate deviations were diagnosed in one premature child born to transplant mother, whose pregnancy was complicated with a severe preeclampsia and foetal growth restriction. In the study population, no severe neurological disorders were found. Almost all (8/10) children with neurological deviations were born prematurely in good general conditions. The neurological deviations observed in the first year of life were mild and transient. In children over 1 year of age, deviations were more pronounced and continued to maintain. The neurological development of children of kidney transplant women is similar to that of the general population and possible deviations seem to be the result of intrauterine hypotrophy and prematurity. Therefore, in clinical practice, it is necessary to plan post-transplant pregnancies especially in women at high risk of these complications.

  10. Psychiatric comorbidities in a young man with subacute myelopathy induced by abusive nitrous oxide consumption: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mancke F

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Falk Mancke,1,2,* Gintare Kaklauskaite,1,* Jennifer Kollmer,3 Markus Weiler1 1Department of Neurology, 2Department of General Psychiatry, Center for Psychosocial Medicine, 3Department of Neuroradiology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nitrous oxide (N2O, a long-standing anesthetic, is known for its recreational use, and its consumption is on the rise. Several case studies have reported neurological and psychiatric complications of N2O use. To date, however, there has not been a study using standardized diagnostic procedures to assess psychiatric comorbidities in a patient consuming N2O. Here, we report about a 35-year-old male with magnetic resonance imaging confirmed subacute myelopathy induced by N2O consumption, who suffered from comorbid cannabinoid and nicotine dependence as well as abuse of amphetamines, cocaine, lysergic acid diethylamide, and ketamine. Additionally, there was evidence of a preceding transient psychotic and depressive episode induced by synthetic cannabinoid abuse. In summary, this case raises awareness of an important mechanism of neural toxicity, with which physicians working in the field of ­substance-related disorders should be familiar. In fact, excluding N2O toxicity in patients with recognized substance-related disorders and new neurological deficits is compulsory, as untreated for months the damage to the nervous system is at risk of becoming irreversible. Keywords: addictive disorders, laughing gas, subacute combined degeneration, substance use disorder, vitamin B12 deficiency

  11. A prospective emergency department-based study of pattern and outcome of neurologic and neurosurgical diseases in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthélemy, Ernest Joseph; Benjamin, Ernest; Edouard Jean-Pierre, Marie Yolaine; Poitevien, Geneviève; Ernst, Silvia; Osborn, Irene; Germano, Isabelle M

    2014-12-01

    To perform the first prospective survey of neurologic and neurosurgical emergency department (ED) admissions in Haiti. Data of all ED admissions at 3 Haitian hospitals for 90 consecutive days per site were collected prospectively. Patients who were given a diagnosis of a neurologic or neurosurgical disorder by the ED physician were entered in a deidentified database including demographics, presenting symptoms, brain imaging (when available), requests for neurosurgical consultation, and outcome. Of the 7628 patients admitted to the ED during this study, 1243 patients had a neurologic disorder, yielding an ED-based neurologic disease prevalence of 16%. The 3 most common neurologic diseases were cerebrovascular disease (31%), neurotrauma (28%), and altered mental status (12%). Neurosurgical pathologies represented 19% of all neurologic admissions with a combined ED-based disease prevalence of 3%. Mortality rate was 9%. The most common neurosurgical disease was neurotrauma (87%), caused by motor vehicle accidents (59%), falls (20%), and assault (17%). Neurosurgical procedures were performed in 14 of 208 patients with a mortality rate of 33%. This prospective survey represents the first study of neurosurgical or neurologic disease patterns in Haiti. The results suggest specific disease priorities for this population that can guide efforts to improve Haitian health care and conduct more comprehensive epidemiologic studies in Haiti. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Coenzyme Q10 and Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Siciliano

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, or ubiquinone is a small electron carrier of the mitochondrial respiratory chain with antioxidant properties. CoQ10 supplementation has been widely used for mitochondrial disorders. The rationale for using CoQ10 is very powerful when this compound is primary decreased because of defective synthesis. Primary CoQ10 deficiency is a treatable condition, so heightened “clinical awareness” about this diagnosis is essential. CoQ10 and its analogue, idebenone, have also been widely used in the treatment of other neurodegenerative disorders. These compounds could potentially play a therapeutic role in Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Friedreich’s ataxia, and other conditions which have been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. This article reviews the physiological roles of CoQ10, as well as the rationale and the role in clinical practice of CoQ10 supplementation in different neurological diseases, from primary CoQ10 deficiency to neurodegenerative disorders.

  13. Dissociative disorder manifesting for underlying adolescent hemi-parkinsonism: New chronology for old mummies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Shailesh; Garg, Amit; Khanna, Amit

    2015-08-01

    Dissociative symptoms can be induced by a variety of conditions that can either coexist or mimic each other in clinical presentation. In coexisting dissociative disorder with medical illness, the causality remains uncertain, but sometime its role as nidus for dissociative symptoms just cannot be ruled out. The origin of "organic dissociative disorder" is undoubtedly found by various authors who demonstrated that a high percentage of patients with dissociative symptoms present with some form of neurological insult before developing the symptom. Herein we report on a case of adolescent onset hemi-parkinsonism with coexisting dissociative disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Psychiatric disorders and neurological comorbidity in children with intellectual disability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wriedt, Elke; Wiberg, Anja; Sakar, Vehbi; Noterdaeme, Michele

    2010-05-01

    This article gives an overview of the consultant child and adolescent psychiatric services in the region of Upper Bavaria (Germany). The data of 257 children and adolescents with intellectual disability and psychiatric disorders were evaluated. About 14% of the children with ID in special schools or day care centers, and 40% of the children with ID in residential care showed a definite psychiatric disorder. The most frequently diagnosed disorders were adjustment disorders, hyperkinetic disorders and conduct disorders, as well as emotional problems and pervasive developmental disorders. Children with severe intellectual disability had more additional somatic disorders and were more impaired in their psychosocial functions. The results show the need for psychiatric services for children and adolescents with intellectual disability and psychiatric disorders. The development and implementation of integrative and interdisciplinary models is necessary to allow for adequate medical care for these patients.

  15. Electroencephalography as a diagnostic technique for canine neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrzosek Marcin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG is a non-invasive examination method for the assessment of functional central nervous system (CNS disturbances. In human medicine it has a special importance as a diagnostic tool for epilepsy. Although many studies were done on the use of EEG for diagnostics of canine central nervous system disorders, the technique is still not applied routinely. The purpose of this paper was to review the use of the electroencephalography in canine neurological disorders of central nervous system diagnosis and assess the future perspectives of this technique in veterinary medicine.

  16. Prevalence and Distribution of Neurological Disease in a Neurology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uche

    Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research – January 2011 – Vol. 1 N0.1. >>>63<<<. Prevalence and Distribution of Neurological Disease in a. Neurology Clinic in Enugu, Nigeria. Onwuekwe IO* and Ezeala-Adikaibe B*. *Neurology Unit, Department of Medicine,. University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, ...

  17. Resilience linked to personality dimensions, alexithymia and affective symptoms in motor functional neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilianhasanpour, Rozita; Williams, Benjamin; Gilman, Isabelle; Burke, Matthew J; Glass, Sean; Fricchione, Gregory L; Keshavan, Matcheri S; LaFrance, W Curt; Perez, David L

    2018-04-01

    Reduced resilience, a construct associated with maladaptive stress coping and a predisposing vulnerability for Functional Neurological Disorders (FND), has been under-studied compared to other neuropsychiatric factors in FND. This prospective case-control study investigated self-reported resilience in patients with FND compared to controls and examined relationships between resilience and affective symptoms, personality traits, alexithymia, health status and adverse life event burden. 50 individuals with motor FND and 47 healthy controls participated. A univariate test followed by a logistic regression analysis investigated group-level differences in Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) scores. For within-group analyses performed separately in patients with FND and controls, univariate screening tests followed by multivariate linear regression analyses examined factors associated with self-reported resilience. Adjusting for age, gender, education status, ethnicity and lifetime adverse event burden, patients with FND reported reduced resilience compared to controls. Within-group analyses in patients with FND showed that individual-differences in mental health, extraversion, conscientiousness, and openness positively correlated with CD-RISC scores; post-traumatic stress disorder symptom severity, depression, anxiety, alexithymia and neuroticism scores negatively correlated with CD-RISC scores. Extraversion independently predicted resilience scores in patients with FND. In control subjects, univariate associations were appreciated between CD-RISC scores and gender, personality traits, anxiety, alexithymia and physical health; conscientiousness independently predicted resilience in controls. Patients with FND reported reduced resilience, and CD-RISC scores covaried with other important predisposing vulnerabilities for the development of FND. Future research should investigate if the CD-RISC is predictive of clinical outcomes in patients with FND. Copyright

  18. Disordered resonant media: Self-induced transparency versus light localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novitsky, Denis V.

    2018-01-01

    We propose a concept of disordered resonant media, which are characterized by random variations of their parameters along the light propagation direction. In particular, a simple model of disorder considered in the paper implies random change of the density of active particles (two-level atoms). Within this model, the effect of disorder on self-induced transparency (SIT) is analyzed using numerical simulations of light pulse propagation through the medium. The transition from the SIT to localization regime is revealed as well as its dependence on the disorder level, atom density, medium thickness, and period of random variations.

  19. Effects of music and music therapy on mood in neurological patients

    OpenAIRE

    Raglio, Alfredo; Attardo, Lapo; Gontero, Giulia; Rollino, Silvia; Groppo, Elisabetta; Granieri, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Mood disorder and depressive syndromes represent a common comorbid condition in neurological disorders with a prevalence rate that ranges between 20% and 50% of patients with stroke, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson’s disease. Notwithstanding, these conditions are often under-diagnosed and under-treated in the clinical practice and negatively affect the functional recovery, the adherence to treatment, the quality of life, and even the mortality risk. In addition, a bidirectional as...

  20. Interrogative suggestibility in patients with conversion disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foong, J; Lucas, P A; Ron, M A

    1997-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that increased interrogative suggestibility may contribute to the shaping and maintaining of conversions symptoms. Interrogative suggestibility was measured in 12 patients with conversion disorder and 10 control patients with confirmed neurological disease matched for age, premorbid intelligence, and as closely as possible in terms of their neurological symptoms to the patients with conversion disorder. Our observations do not support the contention that individual differences in interrogative suggestibility are of importance in the etiology of conversion disorders.