WorldWideScience

Sample records for indonesia nuclear infrastructure

  1. LDC nuclear power: Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poneman, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    Indonesia's five-year plan to develop a research reactor is still in the feasibility stage of a policy to minimize domestic oil consumption. The evolution of a nuclear program in Indonesia illustrates the importance of strong political leadership in developing countries which lack technical skills and political and economic stability and the need for strong international support. 39 references

  2. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Vivek; Tawfik, Magdy S.

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy concept is becoming a reality for the US energy infrastructure where combinations of the various potential energy sources (nuclear, wind, solar, biomass, and so on) are integrated in a hybrid energy system. This paper focuses on challenges facing a hybrid system with a Small Modular Reactor at its core. The core of the paper will discuss efforts required to develop supervisory control center that collects data, supports decision-making, and serves as an information hub for supervisory control center. Such a center will also be a model for integrating future technologies and controls. In addition, advanced operations research, thermal cycle analysis, energy conversion analysis, control engineering, and human factors engineering will be part of the supervisory control center. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure would allow operators to optimize the cost of energy production by providing appropriate means of integrating different energy sources. The data needs to be stored, processed, analyzed, trended, and projected at right time to right operator to integrate different energy sources.

  3. Infrastructure and inequality: An empirical evidence from Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amien Makmuri

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This research is an attempt to study the empirical relationship between infrastructure and income inequality in Indonesia. It uses regression analysis with panel data set covering 32 provinces in the period of 2007–2013 in order to estimate whether the infrastructure has positive or negative effects on income inequality. We use a conventional income inequality measure, Gini index. The model is estimated by simple pooled OLS, fixed-effect and random-effect models. To overcome the endogeneity problem, infrastructures quantity and quality indicators enter the regressions with one-year lag. We find that road and telecommunication quantities tend to boost income inequality, while electricity quantity, airport quantity, and airport quality have a favorable impact on the distribution of income and help to alleviate income inequality. Whereas, when these different categories of infrastructure are formed as synthetic indices, the relation between these indices and income inequality lends support to the idea that infrastructure increases income inequality.

  4. Land Ecological on Public Transport Infrastructure Development In Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, N.

    2017-10-01

    The development of public transport infrastructure in Indonesia has been growing rapidly since the last five years. The utilization of area as public transport infrastructure, for example bus depot, bus Station and terminal requires wide area and influences many elements, such as land ecological quality, water supplies, power supplies, and environmental balance. However the development of public transport infrastructure now days is less considering on environmental approach, especially for green and catchment area for water conservation (water balance).This paper aims to propose the concept of Public Transport Infrastructure using green concept. The green design concept is using GBCI (Green Building Council Indonesia) standard, which contains seven categories: land ecological enhancement, movement and connectivity, water management and conservation, solid waste and material, community wellbeing strategy, building and energy, and also innovation and future development. The result is, by using the GBCI standard for the green design of Public Transport Infrastructure, the land ecological impact could be decreased. The effective areas that required are at least 5000 m2, from which the green areas for public increase 36% and 76% of areas could be used as catchment area for water conservation.

  5. Cyber Threats to Nuclear Infrastructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert S. Anderson; Paul Moskowitz; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Curtis St. Michel

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear facility personnel expend considerable efforts to ensure that their facilities can maintain continuity of operations against both natural and man-made threats. Historically, most attention has been placed on physical security. Recently however, the threat of cyber-related attacks has become a recognized and growing world-wide concern. Much attention has focused on the vulnerability of the electric grid and chemical industries to cyber attacks, in part, because of their use of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. Lessons learned from work in these sectors indicate that the cyber threat may extend to other critical infrastructures including sites where nuclear and radiological materials are now stored. In this context, this white paper presents a hypothetical scenario by which a determined adversary launches a cyber attack that compromises the physical protection system and results in a reduced security posture at such a site. The compromised security posture might then be malevolently exploited in a variety of ways. The authors conclude that the cyber threat should be carefully considered for all nuclear infrastructures.

  6. Cyber Threats to Nuclear Infrastructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Robert S.; Moskowitz, Paul; Schanfein, Mark; Bjornard, Trond; St. Michel, Curtis

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear facility personnel expend considerable efforts to ensure that their facilities can maintain continuity of operations against both natural and man-made threats. Historically, most attention has been placed on physical security. Recently however, the threat of cyber-related attacks has become a recognized and growing world-wide concern. Much attention has focused on the vulnerability of the electric grid and chemical industries to cyber attacks, in part, because of their use of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. Lessons learned from work in these sectors indicate that the cyber threat may extend to other critical infrastructures including sites where nuclear and radiological materials are now stored. In this context, this white paper presents a hypothetical scenario by which a determined adversary launches a cyber attack that compromises the physical protection system and results in a reduced security posture at such a site. The compromised security posture might then be malevolently exploited in a variety of ways. The authors conclude that the cyber threat should be carefully considered for all nuclear infrastructures.

  7. 77 FR 55186 - Executive-Led Indonesia Vietnam Infrastructure Business Development Mission Statement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Executive-Led Indonesia Vietnam Infrastructure Business Development Mission Statement--Clarification and Amendment AGENCY: International Trade..., International Trade Administration, U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service (CS) is publishing this supplement to...

  8. Basic infrastructure for a nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    There are several stages in the process of introducing nuclear power in a country. These include development of nuclear policies and regulations, feasibility studies, public consultations, technology evaluation, requests for proposals and evaluations, contracts and financing, supply, construction, commissioning, operation and finally decommissioning. This publication addresses the 'basic' infrastructure needs, which are adequate until the issue of the construction license. It is obvious that a fully developed nuclear infrastructure will be required for the further implementation stages of a nuclear power reactor. The officials and experts in each country will undertake the transition from a basic infrastructure to a fully developed infrastructure that covers the stages of construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning. The publication is directed to provide guidance for assessing the basic infrastructure necessary for: - A host country to consider when engaging in the implementation of nuclear power, and - A supplier country to consider when assessing whether the recipient country is in an acceptable condition to begin the implementation of a nuclear power project. The target users are decision makers, advisers and senior managers in the governmental organizations, utilities, industrial organizations and regulatory bodies in the countries adopting nuclear power programmes or exporting supplies for these programmes. The governmental organizations that may find this publication useful include: Ministries of Economy, Energy, Foreign Affairs, Finance, Mining, Internal Affairs, Academic Institutions, Nuclear Energy Agencies and Environmental Agencies. This publication was produced within the IAEA programme directed to increase the capability of Member States to plan and implement nuclear power programmes and to establish and enhance national nuclear infrastructure. This publication should be used in conjunction with the IAEA Safety Standards Series and other

  9. Infrastructure development through civil nuclear cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphrey, A.M.; Burkart, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Due to growing concerns over electricity demand, energy security, and climate change, numerous countries are considering the construction of new nuclear power plants. Most of these will be built in nations with existing nuclear power programs, but an increasing number of States have expressed serious interest in developing new nuclear power programs. These countries will be faced with many challenges in establishing the robust infrastructures necessary for the safe, secure, and safeguarded deployment of nuclear power. Fortunately, there is much a State can gain through cooperation with other States with more developed programs. By sharing information on previous experience and established best practices, an emerging nuclear energy State can benefit from the lessons learned by its partners. Through a broad range of civil nuclear cooperation, the United States is helping new entrants develop the sound infrastructure necessary to deploy nuclear power plants with the highest standards of safety, security, and nonproliferation

  10. Economic consideration for Indonesia's nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahimsa, D.; Sudarsono, B.

    1987-01-01

    Indonesia experienced relatively high economic growth during the 1970s and the energy supply system was strained to keep up with demand. Several energy studies were thus carried out around 1980, including a nuclear power planning study and a nuclear plant feasibility study. During the 1980s, economic growth rates were subtantially lower, but surprisingly electricity demand remained fairly high. In 1984 it was therefore decided to update previous nuclear power studies. This effort was completed in 1986. Using energy projections and cost estimates developed during the updating of previous nuclear power studies, the paper discusses the economic justification for a nuclear power program in Indonesia. Results of the update, including computer runs of MAED and WASP models supplied by the IAEA, will be presented along with appropriate sensitivity analysis. These results are then analyzed in the light of 1986 developments in international oil price. Preparations for the forthcoming nuclear power program are described, including the construction of a multi-purpose reactor and associated laboratories in Serpong, near Jakarta. (author)

  11. Proliferation risks from nuclear power infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squassoni, Sharon

    2017-11-01

    Certain elements of nuclear energy infrastructure are inherently dual-use, which makes the promotion of nuclear energy fraught with uncertainty. Are current restraints on the materials, equipment, and technology that can be used either to produce fuel for nuclear electricity generation or material for nuclear explosive devices adequate? Technology controls, supply side restrictions, and fuel market assurances have been used to dissuade countries from developing sensitive technologies but the lack of legal restrictions is a continued barrier to permanent reduction of nuclear proliferation risks.

  12. Norms, Culture and Local Infrastructure: Evidence from Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Sarmistha Pal

    2009-01-01

    The present paper explores the role of religious and social norms on a community’s access to public infrastructure. Distinguishing between social and physical infrastructure, we argue that investment in social infrastructural goods (e.g., health, education) could contribute to exchange both within and outside the community, while that in physical infrastructure (e.g., road, transport, communications) could only improve exchange outside the community. Accordingly, traditional communities may p...

  13. Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, John

    2010-01-01

    The decision to implement the Innovation in Nuclear Infrastructure and Engineering Program (INIE) was an important first step towards ensuring that the United States preserves its worldwide leadership role in the field of nuclear science and engineering. Prior to INIE, university nuclear science and engineering programs were waning, undergraduate student enrollment was down, university research reactors were being shut down, while others faced the real possibility of closure. For too long, cutting edge research in the areas of nuclear medicine, neutron scattering, radiochemistry, and advanced materials was undervalued and therefore underfunded. The INIE program corrected this lapse in focus and direction and started the process of drawing a new blueprint with positive goals and objectives that supports existing as well the next generation of educators, students and researchers.

  14. Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Bernard

    2010-12-13

    The decision to implement the Innovation in Nuclear Infrastructure and Engineering Program (INIE) was an important first step towards ensuring that the United States preserves its worldwide leadership role in the field of nuclear science and engineering. Prior to INIE, university nuclear science and engineering programs were waning, undergraduate student enrollment was down, university research reactors were being shut down, while others faced the real possibility of closure. For too long, cutting edge research in the areas of nuclear medicine, neutron scattering, radiochemistry, and advanced materials was undervalued and therefore underfunded. The INIE program corrected this lapse in focus and direction and started the process of drawing a new blueprint with positive goals and objectives that supports existing as well the next generation of educators, students and researchers.

  15. Developing Infrastructure for New Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-09-01

    Many countries are interested in introducing or expanding nuclear energy programmes because they regard nuclear power as a clean and stable source of electricity that can help to mitigate the impact of climate change. However, the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan - caused by an earthquake and tsunami of unprecedented proportions - demonstrated that there is a constant need to improve global nuclear safety, despite the great progress made in the previous 25 years. A 'safety first' approach needs to become fully entrenched among nuclear power plant operators, governments and regulators everywhere. Safety first must also be the watchword for Member States considering the introduction of nuclear power. I believe that all IAEA Member States should have access to nuclear power if they wish to add it their energy mix. While it is up to each country to decide whether or not to opt for nuclear power, the IAEA has a key role to play in ensuring that the development of nuclear power programmes takes place in a safe, efficient, responsible and sustainable manner. The IAEA has developed guidelines and milestones to help countries work in a systematic way towards the introduction of nuclear power. Use of the 'Milestones' approach can increase transparency both within a country introducing nuclear power, and between it and other States. This brochure summarizes the services which the IAEA offers to Member States considering introducing nuclear power. These include advice on proper planning, building the required human resources and infrastructure, establishing legal and regulatory frameworks, and ensuring the highest standards of safety and security, without increasing proliferation risks. The IAEA offers independent know-how on the construction, commissioning, startup and operation of nuclear reactors. Through the Technical Cooperation programme, we provide targeted support to 'newcomer' countries in response to national development needs

  16. Nuclear power infrastructure - issues, strategy and possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Y.A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Today humanity faces daunting challenges: the pressing need for development in many parts of the world and the desire for a more effective system of international security. At the outset of the 21st century, the Millennium Development Goals and the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation have both set global objectives for sustainable development (SD) that give high priority to the eradication of poverty and hunger, environmental sustainability, universal access to plentiful fresh water and energy. In this context there are many expectations about Nuclear Renascence supported by many national and international studies, by discussions in the mass media and international forums, etc. The Agency has taken an integrated approach outlining all considerations that have to be taken into account for the introduction of a nuclear power programme, providing guiding documents, forums for sharing information, consultancies and technical meetings and sending multidisciplinary teams to countries requesting assistance with nuclear power infrastructure. The process also includes specific assistance and review services in the areas of infrastructure readiness, feasibility studies, draft nuclear law, regulatory frameworks and organization, siting issues, human resource development and planning, bid evaluation and technology assessment, owner/operator competence, and safety and security. It is important to support the decision making processes of States introducing nuclear power to ensure they can make informed choices on the role of nuclear power in their energy mixes. The IAEA helps countries prepare for the introduction or expansion of nuclear power by 1) helping them ensure that nuclear energy is used safely, securely and with minimal proliferation risk, and 2) meeting the need of developing countries to build capacity in terms of human resources, energy analysis, regulatory capabilities and other infrastructure necessary for nuclear power. The process also includes

  17. The Gulf Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Institute (GNEII) Four Years On

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, Robert J.; Mohagheghi, Amir H.; Solodov, Alexander; Beeley, Philip A.; Boyle, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: What is GNEII? • Regionally based Institution → human resource capability → Future decision makers → managers & regulators. • Education & Development → Nuclear energy infrastructure → Integrated safeguards, safety, and security (3S) → Nuclear power fundamentals. • Strategic effort → Coordinated partnership → Responsible national nuclear energy program → Regional context. Why GNEII? • Build indigenous human resources → Education, Research, Technical capacity → Integrated 3S Systems Approach - coupled with - Nuclear Energy Infrastructure. • GNEII Addresses a Need → Increased nuclear power demand → Regional Nuclear Infrastructure → GNEII is a sustainable mechanism for developing a responsible nuclear energy program

  18. Human resource development, National Nuclear Energy Agency, Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsono

    2007-01-01

    The development of an adequate national education and training infrastructure is the solution to solve the demand for qualified manpower to meet the national requirements of any nuclear program. Education and training activities were initiated in the year of 1981 with the forming of the Education and Training Center (ETC). The aging of manpower and the government policy on zero growth results in the discontinuity of knowledge transfer within the organization, and may be in the future of nuclear technology implementation. Since 1981 ETC has contributed to the training of its employees and industrial personnel through 800 training and involving around eleven thousand participants. Education and Training Center of BATAN accredited by BAPETEN as the nuclear training institutes for Radiation Protection Officer Certification, and in process of accreditation by National Accreditation Board as training institute for Non Destructive Test Personnel Certification. Annually ETC conduct 5 RPO training and 5 NDT Level I and 3 NDT Level II training. As shown in attached Table, there are at least 2999 RPO in Indonesia responsible for the safe operation of 4843 radioactive sources and 3741 radiation sources. Among the approximately 3700 employees of BATAN, national infrastructure has contributed to the education of 911 S1-graduates program, 24 master degree and 21 doctoral degree programs, while 46 bachelors degree, 201 master degree and 98 doctoral degree were taken overseas. Human resources have been identified on many occasions as being one of the most important elements for engaging in various types of nuclear applications. Major efforts must be directed towards attracting sufficient number of bright and interested students to the nuclear field for both current and future nuclear technology utilization. Therefore, it is necessary to transfer knowledge and know-how to the young generation for the sustainable development of nuclear science and technology. Courses in nuclear

  19. Risk management of infrastructure development in border area Indonesia - Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitri, Suryani; Trikariastoto, Reinita, Ita

    2017-11-01

    Border area is geographically adjacent to neighboring countries with the primary function of maintaining state sovereignty and public welfare. Area in question is part of the provinces, districts or cities that directly intersect with national boundaries (or territory) and / or that have a functional relationship (linkage) and has a strategic value for the state. The border area is considered strategic because it involves the national lives of many people in terms of the interests of political, economic, social and cultural as well as defense and security (poleksosbudhankam) both located on land, sea or air. The border area is geographically adjacent to neighboring countries with the primary function of maintaining state sovereignty and public welfare. Area in question is part of the provinces, districts or cities that directly intersect with national boundaries (or territory) and / or that have a functional relationship (linkage) and has a strategic value for the state. To realize the necessary research on the development of the area, based on good practices from other countries some of the city that can meet all these challenges and at least can be applied with minor changes / adjustments. Furthermore, the application must be supported by the availability of funds. This study to discuss about any problems either obstacles or things that drive to develop function becomes an ideal border area with major support infrastructure for housing, transportation, energy availability, and distribution of clean water which will strengthen in its function which consists of five pillars, namely: central community service; trade and distribution center; financial center; tourism center; related to the field of community development. Articulation between key stakeholders such as government, private, and community is a major concern in this study, including in determining the appropriate financing schemes. The results of this study will be recommended to the government to improve

  20. Prospect and potential of nuclear power plants in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subki, I.R.; Adiwardojo; Kasim, M.S.; Iskandar, A.; Mulyanto

    1997-01-01

    In line with the national energy policy of Indonesia in promoting the intensification, diversification and conversation of energy, some important steps need to be taken in order to establish alternative energy strategies which will be decisive in the formulation and development of the national energy plan in the future. At present, Indonesia does not have any nuclear power plants. The introduction of nuclear power In Indonesia is not only to reach an optimum energy mix based on costs and the environment, but also to relieve the pressure arising from increasing domestic demand for oil and gas. This paper addresses the present feasibility study being performed on the introduction of nuclear power plants in Indonesia. It is anticipated that nuclear power will contribute about 10% of Indonesia's electrical supply as of the year 2019. This represents approximately 12,600 MWe in capability. The paper describes the results, to date, of the Feasibility Study on nuclear power including the national energy market analysis, the electricity expansion plan and the associated role of nuclear power, the economics and financial plan, site studies on volcanology, seismology and the environment. (author). 3 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs

  1. The Impact of Airport Performance towards Construction and Infrastructure Expansion in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laksono, T. D.; Kurniasih, N.; Hasyim, C.; Setiawan, M. I.; Ahmar, A. S.

    2018-01-01

    Development that is generated from airport areas includes construction and infrastructure development. This research reviews about how the implementation of material management in certain construction project and the relationship between development especially construction and infrastructure development with Airport Performance. The method that is used in this research is mixed method. The population in this research is 297 airports that are existed in Indonesia. From those 297 airports then it is chosen airports that have the most completed data about construction project and it is obtained 148 airports. Based on the coefficient correlation (R) test it is known that construction and infrastructure development has relatively strong relation with airport performance variable, but there are still other factors that influence construction and infrastructure development become bigger effect.

  2. Managing Productivity in the Infrastructure Sector: A Case Study from Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R. W. Knight

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the nature of assessing productivity and effectiveness in infrastructure investment in the context of governments’ increasing investment in new infrastructure. Taking the case of energy infrastructure investment within Indonesia, this paper makes three contributions: (i develops a model for assessing infrastructure productivity based on landscape, regime and niche-level changes, (ii suggests the interconnection between these levels based on sequencing multi-level changes over time, and (iii shows the role of supply and demand side initiatives in enabling new infrastructure investment is evaluated.    Abstrak Artikel ini mempertimbangkan sifat dari penilaian produktivitas dan efektivitas pada investasi infrastruktur dalam rangka peningkatan investasi pemerintah pada infrastruktur baru. Dengan menggunakan kasus investasi infrastruktur energi di Indonesia, artikel ini menghasilkan tiga hal: (i nembangun model untuk menilai produktivitas infrastruktur berdasarkan perubahan dari lanskap, rezim, dan perubahan di level yang tepat, (ii menunjukkan interkoneksi antar level-level tersebut berdasarkan perubahan multi-level yang berurutan dari waktu ke waktu, dan (iii menunjukkan peran dari inisiatif sisi penawaran dan permintaan yang memungkinkan investasi infrastruktur baru untuk dievaluasi. Kata kunci: Infrastruktur; Investasi; Produktivitas; Kerangka Perspektif Multi-Level; Inovasi JEL classifications: O25; O33; O38

  3. Nuclear science and technology education and training in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsono

    2007-01-01

    Deployment of nuclear technology requires adequate nuclear infrastructure which includes governmental infrastructure, science and technology infrastructure, education and training infrastructure, and industrial infrastructure. Governmental infrastructure in nuclear, i.e. BATAN (the National Nuclear Energy Agency) and BAPETEN (the Nuclear Energy Control Agency), need adequate number of qualified manpower with general and specific knowledge of nuclear. Science and technology infrastructure is mainly contained in the R and D institutes, education and training centers, scientific academies and professional associations, and national industry. The effectiveness of this infrastructure mainly depends on the quality of the manpower, in addition to the funding and available facilities. Development of human resource needed for research, development, and utilization of nuclear technology in the country needs special attention. Since the national industry is still in its infant stage, the strategy for HRD (human resource development) in the nuclear field addresses the needs of the following: BATAN for its research and development, promotion, and training; BAPETEN for its regulatory functions and training; users of nuclear technology in industry, medicine, agriculture, research, and other areas; radiation safety officers in organizations or institutions licensed to use radioactive materials; the education sector, especially lecturers and teachers, in tertiary and secondary education. Nuclear science and technology is a multidisciplinary and a highly specialized subject. It includes areas such as nuclear and reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, chemistry, material science, radiation protection, nuclear safety, health science, and radioactive waste management. Therefore, a broad nuclear education is absolutely essential to master the wide areas of science and technology used in the nuclear domain. The universities and other institutions of higher education are the only

  4. Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development Program: Korean Education Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Yeol; Hwang, Il Soon; Kim, Si Hwan

    2009-01-01

    Many countries have decided nuclear power for next energy resources as one of the long-term energy supply options. IAEA projected nuclear power expansion up to 2030 reaching between 447 GWe and 691 GWe compared to 370 GWe and 2660 TWh at the end of 2006. Both low and high projection is accompanied with new nuclear power plant constructions respectively 178 and 357, about 11 units per year, and most new construction is in North America, the Far East, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia. During the last forty years, thirty three countries have established commercial nuclear power programs but only some of them have developed comprehensive and large scale peaceful nuclear power infrastructure. Although various cooperation and guidance program of nuclear power infrastructure, developing appropriate environment and infrastructure of nuclear power plant is still challenging problems for developing countries launching nuclear power program. With increasing the demand of safety and safeguard from international society, creating appropriate infrastructure becomes essential requirements in national nuclear power program. In the viewpoint of developing countries, without sufficient explanation and proper guidance, infrastructure could be seen only as another barrier in its nuclear power program. The importance of infrastructure development would be obscured by ostensible business and infrastructure program can result in increasing entering barriers to peaceful nuclear power application field without benefits to developing countries and international community. To avoid this situation by providing enough explanation and realistic case example and cooperate with the countries wanting to establish comprehensive nuclear power infrastructure in the peaceful applications, we are creating the education program of infrastructure development with basic guidelines of the IAEA infrastructure series and Korean experiences from least developed country to advanced country

  5. Potential for sharing nuclear power infrastructure between countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    The introduction or expansion of a nuclear power programme in a country and its successful execution is largely dependent on the network of national infrastructure, covering a wide range of activities and capabilities. The infrastructure areas include legal framework, safety and environmental regulatory bodies, international agreements, physical facilities, finance, education, training, human resources and public information and acceptance. The wide extent of infrastructure needs require an investment that can be too large or onerous for the national economy. The burden of infrastructure can be reduced significantly if a country forms a sharing partnership with other countries. The sharing can be at regional or at multinational level. It can include physical facilities, common programmes and knowledge, which will reflect in economic benefits. The sharing can also contribute in a significant manner to harmonization of codes and standards in general and regulatory framework in particular. The opportunities and potential of sharing nuclear power infrastructure is determined by the objectives, strategy and scenario of the national nuclear power programme. A review of individual infrastructure items shows that there are several opportunities for sharing of nuclear power infrastructure between countries if they cooperate with each other. International cooperation and sharing of nuclear power infrastructure are not new. This publication provides criteria and guidance for analyzing and identifying the potential for sharing of nuclear power infrastructure during the stages of nuclear power project life cycle. The target users are decision makers, advisers and senior managers in utilities, industrial organizations, regulatory bodies and governmental organizations in countries adopting or extending nuclear power programmes. This publication was produced within the IAEA programme directed to increase the capability of Member States to plan and implement nuclear power

  6. Prospect on desalination by using nuclear energy in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunaryo, G.R.; Rusli, A.; Nurdin, M.; Titiresmi; Prawiranata, H.; Theresia

    1997-01-01

    Due to the population growth and its effect on the environment and hydrological cycle make the need of water in drinking water, hydro power, household water etc., increase. Not only in eastern parts of Indonesia with low wetness level compare with other part, but also in many provinces with high population, the lack of water becomes a serious problem. Based on this, a suitable method of desalination plant that converts sea water into fresh water as a method with a good promising will be described. A probable future method of coupling a small nuclear power with desalination plants in Indonesia also will be explained. (author). 11 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  7. IAEA Completes Nuclear Security Review Mission in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    A team of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) experts today completed a two-week mission to review nuclear security practices in Indonesia. At the request of the Indonesian Government, the IAEA conducted an International Physical Protection Advisory Service (IPPAS) mission that reviewed the current status of the State's Physical Protection Regime of nuclear and other radioactive material, as well as associated facilities and activities in Indonesia. This included the country's nuclear security-related legislative and regulatory framework and the physical protection systems at the nuclear research sites in Serpong, Bandung and Yogyakarta, as well as radioactive facilities at Bekasi and Cibitung. The mission also reviewed how the recommendations of previous IPPAS missions in 2001 and 2007 had been implemented. The IPPAS team concluded that, since the last missions, Indonesia has improved its national security regime, especially its legislation and regulations, and had introduced new physical protection equipment. It also found that areas remained that required attention and efforts were needed to reach an overall comprehensive and effective nuclear security regime. The team made a number of new recommendations and suggestions aimed at further strengthening the overall regime

  8. Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review (INIR) Missions: The First Six Years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-12-01

    IAEA Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review (INIR) missions are designed to assist Member States in evaluating the status of their national infrastructure for the introduction of a nuclear power programme. INIR missions are conducted upon request from the Member State. Each INIR mission is coordinated and led by the IAEA and conducted by a team of IAEA staff and international experts drawn from Member States which have experience in different aspects of developing and deploying nuclear infrastructure. INIR missions cover the 19 infrastructure issues described in Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power, IAEA Nuclear Energy Series No. NG-G-3.1, published in 2007 and revised in 2015, and the assessment is based on an analysis of a self-evaluation report prepared by the Member State, a review of the documents it provides and interviews with its key officials. Phase 1 INIR missions evaluate the status of the infrastructure to achieve Milestone 1 (Ready to make a knowledgeable commitment to a nuclear power programme). Phase 2 INIR missions evaluate the status of the infrastructure to achieve Milestone 2 (Ready to invite bids/negotiate a contract for the first nuclear power plant). From 2009 to 2014, 14 IAEA INIR missions and follow-ups were conducted in States embarking on a nuclear power programme and one State expanding its programme. During this time, considerable experience was gained by the IAEA on the conduct of INIR missions, and this feedback has been used to continually improve the overall INIR methodology. The INIR methodology has thus evolved and is far more comprehensive today than in 2009. Despite the limited number of INIR missions conducted, some common findings were identified in Member States embarking on nuclear power programmes. This publication summarizes the results of the missions and highlights the most significant areas in which recommendations were made

  9. Current status nuclear training and education in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsono

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear technology was officially recognized through the setting up Panitia Negara untuk Penyelidikan Radioaktivitet in 1954, and the founding of Dewan Tenaga Atom Nasional and Lembaga Tenaga Atom (National Atomic Energy Board) in 1958 which then further reorganized and named BATAN (National Atomic Energy Agency) in 1964. Since the construction of the first research reactor in 1965, BATAN has been operating 3 research reactors. The application of nuclear technology in research, which was started in 1960's, was followed by application in non energy sectors such as agriculture and industries, and the utilization of radiation and radioisotopes in medical therapy and diagnostic. In 1997, in order to separate the control function and the promotion function of the application of nuclear energy in Indonesia, the Government set up two nuclear administrative agencies, i.e. the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) and the Nuclear Energy Control Board (BAPETEN). To provide well-educated and well-trained personnel in the fields of research, development, and application of nuclear technology, BATAN implementing its education and training program through the ETC (BATAN Education and Training Center) and STTN (Polytechnic Institute of Nuclear Technology), which were set up in 1981 and 1991, respectively. While STTN, formerly known as PATN, offers formal education at D3-level and D4-level in Technophysics and Techno-chemistry, the ETC is responsible for implementing education and training program, mainly in nuclear science and technology. In conducting education and training, ETC cooperates also with other education and training institutions, domestic as well as overseas institutions. ETC has set up a national network of nuclear education and training which involves some state universities and school, such as University of Indonesia, University of Gadjah Mada, Bandung Institute of Technology, Bogor Agriculture Institute, University of Pajajaran, and School of Medical

  10. Sister Lab Program Prospective Partner Nuclear Profile: Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bissani, M; Tyson, S

    2006-01-01

    Indonesia has participated in cooperative technical programs with the IAEA since 1957, and has cooperated with regional partners in all of the traditional areas where nuclear science is employed: in medicine, public health (such as insect control and eradication programs), agriculture (e.g. development of improved varieties of rice), and the gas and oil industries. Recently, Indonesia has contributed significantly to the Reduced Enrichment Research and Training Reactor (RERTR) Program by conducting experiments to confirm the feasibility of Mo-99 production using high-density low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, a primary goal of the RERTR Program. Indonesia's first research reactor, the TRIGA Mark II at Bandung, began operation in 1964 at 250 kW and was subsequently upgraded in 1971 to 1 MW and further upgraded in 2000 to 2 MW. This reactor was joined by another TRIGA Mark II, the 100-kW Kartini-PPNY at Yogyakarta, in 1979, and by the 30-MW G.A. Siwabessy multipurpose reactor in Serpong, which achieved criticality in July 1983. A 10-MW radioisotope production reactor, to be called the RPI-10, also was proposed for construction at Serpong in the late 1990s, but the project apparently was not carried out. In the five decades since its nuclear research program began, Indonesia has trained a cadre of scientific and technical staff who not only operate and conduct research with the current facilities, but also represent the nucleus of a skilled labor pool to support development of a nuclear power program. Although Indonesia's previous on-again, off-again consideration of nuclear power has not gotten very far in the past, it now appears that Indonesia again is giving serious consideration to beginning a national nuclear energy program. In June 2006, Research and Technology Minister Kusmayanto Kadiman said that his ministry was currently putting the necessary procedures in place to speed up the project to acquire a nuclear power plant, indicating that, ''We will need around

  11. Application of Resource Portfolio Concept in Nuclear Regulatory Infrastructure Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. E.; Ha, J. T.; Chang, H. S.; Kam, S. C.; Ryu, Y. H.

    2010-01-01

    As the new entrants in the global nuclear construction market are increasing and the establishment of an effective and sustainable regulatory infrastructure becomes more important, they have requested international assistance from the international nuclear communities with mature nuclear regulatory programmes. It needs to optimize the use of limited resources from regulatory organization providing support to regulatory infrastructure of new comers. This paper suggests the resource portfolio concept like a GE/Mckinsey Matrix used in business management and tries to apply it to the current needs considered in the regulatory support program in Korea as the case study

  12. Infrastructure and social tie: Spatial model approach on understanding poverty in Malang regency, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, I. R. D.; Hasyim, A. W.; Pratama, B. A.; Helmy, M.; Sheilla, M. N.

    2017-06-01

    Poverty is a problem that requires attention from the government especially in developing countries such as Indonesia. This Research takes Place at Kasembon District because it has 53,19% family below poverty line in the region. The purpose of this research is to measure poverty based on 3 poverty indicators published by World Bank and 1 multidimensional poverty index. Furthermore, this research invesitigas the relationship between poverty with social and infrastructure in Kasembon District. This study using social network analysis, hot spots analysis, and regression analysis with ordinary least squares. From the poverty indicators known that Pondokagung Village has the highest poverty rate compared to another region. Results from regression model indicate that social and infrastructure affecting poverty in Kasembon District. Social parameter that affecting poverty is density. Infrastructure parameter that affecting poverty is length of paved road. Coefficient value of density is the largest in the model. Therefore it can be concluded that social factors can give more opportunity to reduce poverty rates in Kasembon District. In the local model of paved road coefficient, it is known that the coefficient for each village has not much different value from the global model.

  13. Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Database Description and User’s Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidrich, Brenden [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-11-01

    In 2014, the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Science and Technology Innovation initiated the Nuclear Energy (NE)–Infrastructure Management Project by tasking the Nuclear Science User Facilities, formerly the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility, to create a searchable and interactive database of all pertinent NE-supported and -related infrastructure. This database, known as the Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Database (NEID), is used for analyses to establish needs, redundancies, efficiencies, distributions, etc., to best understand the utility of NE’s infrastructure and inform the content of infrastructure calls. The Nuclear Science User Facilities developed the database by utilizing data and policy direction from a variety of reports from the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Research Council, the International Atomic Energy Agency, and various other federal and civilian resources. The NEID currently contains data on 802 research and development instruments housed in 377 facilities at 84 institutions in the United States and abroad. The effort to maintain and expand the database is ongoing. Detailed information on many facilities must be gathered from associated institutions and added to complete the database. The data must be validated and kept current to capture facility and instrumentation status as well as to cover new acquisitions and retirements. This document provides a short tutorial on the navigation of the NEID web portal at NSUF-Infrastructure.INL.gov.

  14. Infrastructure needs and organizational aspect of nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    I. Introduction. II. Infrastructure development for nuclear power program: a) pre-requisites and requirements for a nuclear power program; b) long-term national policy for a nuclear power (long-term policy reason; national commitment); c) manpower development (role of academic institutions; practical manpower training); d) laws and regulations (regulatory framework; main national laws and regulations); e) nuclear research and development implementation (researches in the university; long term nuclear R and D program; research reactors); f) functions of government organizations (Atomic Energy Commission (PNRI); Department of Science and Technology; Department of Energy; Department of Education and Culture); g) industrial infrastructure; h) technology transfer (recipients's preparedness); i) safeguards obligations; j) public acceptance activities. III. Stages of nuclear power development (stage 1: planning; stage 2: detailed study and procurement; stage 3: construction; stage 4: operation) IV. Conclusion/Recommendation. (author)

  15. Book of presentations. Tokyo Tech COE-INES. Indonesia international symposium 2005. 'Prospect of nuclear energy in Indonesia'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The symposium of the title was organized by the 21st Century COE Program, Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems for Sustainable Development of the World, the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech COE-INES), the Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), and the National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN). The symposium included presentations of 21 from Japan 24 from Indonesia and discussions on innovative nuclear energy systems and on a number of topics related to nuclear energy, including long-term policies and regulation for its development. Students from Japan and Indonesia played an important role in the symposium, presenting excellent work and discussion on their research topics as well as participating in very fruitful panel discussions on 'Education in Nuclear Field' and 'Attractiveness of Jobs in the Nuclear Field'. (J.P.N.)

  16. Effects of hypothetical improvised nuclear detonation on the electrical infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, Christopher L.; Eubank, Stephen; Evrenosoglu, C. Yaman; Marathe, Achla; Marathe, Madhav V.; Phadke, Arun; Thorp, James; Vullikanti, Anil

    2013-01-01

    We study the impacts of a hypothetical improvised nuclear detonation (IND) on the electrical infrastructure and its cascading effects on other urban inter-dependent infrastructures of a major metropolitan area in the US. We synthesize open source information, expert knowledge, commercial software and Google Earth data to derive a realistic electrical transmission and distribution network spanning the region. A dynamic analysis of the geo-located grid is carried out to determine the cause of malfunction of components, and their short-term and long-term effect on the stability of the grid. Finally a detailed estimate of the cost of damage to the major components of the infrastructure is provided.

  17. Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Database Fitness and Suitability Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidrich, Brenden [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    In 2014, the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Science and Technology Innovation (NE-4) initiated the Nuclear Energy-Infrastructure Management Project by tasking the Nuclear Science User Facilities (NSUF) to create a searchable and interactive database of all pertinent NE supported or related infrastructure. This database will be used for analyses to establish needs, redundancies, efficiencies, distributions, etc. in order to best understand the utility of NE’s infrastructure and inform the content of the infrastructure calls. The NSUF developed the database by utilizing data and policy direction from a wide variety of reports from the Department of Energy, the National Research Council, the International Atomic Energy Agency and various other federal and civilian resources. The NEID contains data on 802 R&D instruments housed in 377 facilities at 84 institutions in the US and abroad. A Database Review Panel (DRP) was formed to review and provide advice on the development, implementation and utilization of the NEID. The panel is comprised of five members with expertise in nuclear energy-associated research. It was intended that they represent the major constituencies associated with nuclear energy research: academia, industry, research reactor, national laboratory, and Department of Energy program management. The Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Database Review Panel concludes that the NSUF has succeeded in creating a capability and infrastructure database that identifies and documents the major nuclear energy research and development capabilities across the DOE complex. The effort to maintain and expand the database will be ongoing. Detailed information on many facilities must be gathered from associated institutions added to complete the database. The data must be validated and kept current to capture facility and instrumentation status as well as to cover new acquisitions and retirements.

  18. The supply chain of civil construction industries for support the nuclear power plant construction in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharu Dewi; Sriyana; Moch-Djoko Birmano; Sahala Lumbanraja; Nurlaila

    2013-01-01

    The use of domestic products for electricity infrastructure has been set out in the Ministerial Decree number: 54/M-IND/PER/3/2012, but the infrastructure of nuclear power plants (NPP) construction has not been included. Therefore, the potential of the local industries needs to be mapped it especially supply chain of civil construction industries to estimate the capability of the local component level (DCL) at the nuclear power plant project in Indonesia. NPP is a high-technology so that if NPP will be constructed, it is necessary to involve the national capability as media technology transfer, especially for EPC (Engineering, Procurement and Construction) services. Civil construction (civil part) play role is very large, about 21%. Therefore it is necessary in particular the role of the national civil construction industry to increase the capability of local content. Preparation of Civil construction infrastructure are depend on the supply chain of raw materials. The aim of the research was to map the supply chain of the civil construction industries. Methodology this study is a survey of national industries, literature review, and searching web site. The result study is a map of civil construction industries with raw material supply chain. (author)

  19. Senagal National Presentation on Nuclear Power Infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moutapha, S.T

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory Body (RB) implementation is in progress: decree defining Role, Responsibility and Mission of RB signed after IAEA Advisory Mission received 7-11 December 2009. Self-assessment on some topics of the Milestones will be done by Working Group (WG). The political statement from government Declaration of indentation to consider nuclear energy generation was read at IAEA General Conference). Decree 2008-1433 (December -12- 2008d) creates under the authority of the President de la République a Work Group for the Management and the realization of the Senegalese Nuclear Power Project in the horizon 2016. The Draft Law in preparation and the laws on Radiation protection and Nuclear Safety (law 2004-17 and law 2009-14) provide for a Regulatory Body but ASRN is not yet fully established by decrees although the decree 2010-893 July 30 2010 defining the role and missions of ASRN has been signed by President

  20. Infrastructure development assistance modeling for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. H.; Hwang, K.; Park, K. M.; Kim, S. W.; Lee, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a model, a general frame to be utilized in assisting newcomer countries to start a nuclear power program. A nuclear power plant project involves technical complexity and high level of investment with long duration. Considering newcomers are mostly developing countries that lack the national infrastructure, key infrastructure issues may constitute the principal constraints to the development of a nuclear power program. In this regard, it is important to provide guidance and support to set up an appropriate infrastructure when we help them with the first launch of nuclear power plant project. To date, as a sole nuclear power generation company, KHNP has been invited many times to mentor or assist newcomer countries for their successful start of a nuclear power program since Republic of Korea is an exemplary case of a developing country which began nuclear power program from scratch and became a major world nuclear energy country in a short period of time. Through hosting events organized to aid newcomer countries' initiation of nuclear power projects, difficulties have been recognized. Each event had different contents according to circumstances because they were held as an unstructured and one-off thing. By developing a general model, we can give more adequate and effective aid in an efficient way. In this paper, we created a model to identify necessary infrastructures at the right stage, which was mainly based on a case of Korea. Taking into account the assistance we received from foreign companies and our own efforts for technological self-reliance, we have developed a general time table and specified activities required to do at each stage. From a donor's perspective, we explored various ways to help nuclear infrastructure development including technical support programs, training courses, and participating in IAEA technical cooperation programs on a regular basis. If we further develop the model, the next task would be to

  1. Plant Design Nuclear Fuel Element Production Capacity Optimization to Support Nuclear Power Plant in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambang Galung Susanto

    2007-01-01

    The optimization production capacity for designing nuclear fuel element fabrication plant in Indonesia to support the nuclear power plant has been done. From calculation and by assuming that nuclear power plant to be built in Indonesia as much as 12 NPP and having capacity each 1000 MW, the optimum capacity for nuclear fuel element fabrication plant is 710 ton UO 2 /year. The optimum capacity production selected, has considered some aspects such as fraction batch (cycle, n = 3), length of cycle (18 months), discharge burn-up value (Bd) 35,000 up 50,000 MWD/ton U, enriched uranium to be used in the NPP (3.22 % to 4.51 %), future market development for fuel element, and the trend of capacity production selected by advances country to built nuclear fuel element fabrication plant type of PWR. (author)

  2. Future spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste infrastructure in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerlie, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    In Norway a Governmental Committee was appointed in 1991 to make an evaluation of the future steps that need to be taken in Norway to find a final solution for the spent nuclear fuel and for some other radioactive waste for which a disposal option does not exist today. The report from the Committee is now undergoing a formal hearing process. Based on the Committees recommendation and comments during the hearing the responsible Ministry will take a decision on future infrastructure in Norway for the spent nuclear fuel. This will be decisive for the future management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste in Norway. (author)

  3. Nuclear Regulatory Infrastructure in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonin, Teofilo V. Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Regulating the use of radioactive materials in the Philippines involves the adherence to legislation, regulations, standards and regulatory guides. It is based on a detailed review and assessment of the radiation safety program of owners and users of these materials and associated equipment against safety requirements and on additional verification of the operating practices and procedures. Republic Acts 5207 and 2067, both as amended, are implemented through the regulations which are titled Code of PNRI Regulations or CPRs are developed and issued together with supporting regulatory guides, Bulletins and other documents detailing the safety requirements. These issuance adhere to internationally accepted requirements on radiation protection, and nuclear safety and security, as well as safeguards. Design documents and technical Specifications of important radioactive materials, equipment and components are required to be submitted and reviewed by the PNRI before the issuance of an authorization in the form of a license Verification of adherence to regulations and safety requirements are periodically checked through the implementation of an inspection and enforcement program. The ISO certified regulatory management system of PNRI is documented in a QMS manual that provides guidance on all work processes. It involves systematic planning and evaluation of activities, multiple means of getting feedback on the work processes, and continuous efforts to improve its effectiveness. Efforts are implemented in order to strengthen the transparency openness, independence, technical competence and effectiveness of the regulatory body. (author)

  4. Nuclear data and reactor physics activities in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liem, P.H. [National Atomic Energy Agency, Tangerang (Indonesia). Center for Multipurpose Reactor

    1998-03-01

    The nuclear data and reactor physics activities in Indonesia, especially, in the National Atomic Energy Agency are presented. In the nuclear data field, the Agency is now taking the position of a user of the main nuclear data libraries such as JENDL and ENDF/B. These nuclear data libraries become the main sources for producing problem dependent cross section sets that are needed by cell calculation codes or transport codes for design, analysis and safety evaluation of research reactors. In the reactor physics field, besides utilising the existing core analysis codes obtained from bilateral and international co-operation, the Agency is putting much effort to self-develop Batan`s codes for reactor physics calculations, in particular, for research reactor and high temperature reactor design, analysis and fuel management. Under the collaboration with JAERI, Monte Carlo criticality calculations on the first criticality of RSG GAS (MPR-30) first core were done using JAERI continuous energy, vectorized Monte Carlo code, MVP, with JENDL-3.1 and JENDL-3.2 nuclear data libraries. The results were then compared with the experiment data collected during the commissioning phase. Monte Carlo calculations with both JENDL-3.1 and -3.2 libraries produced k{sub eff} values with excellent agreement with experiment data, however, systematically, JENDL-3.2 library showed slightly higher k{sub eff} values than JENDL-3.1 library. (author)

  5. Thailand: Infrastructure Development and Challenges to Launch Nuclear Power Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keinmeesuke, Sirichai

    2011-01-01

    In June 2007, the cabinet passed a resolution for Thailand's Power Development Plan (PDP 2007). It was mentioned in the plan that Thailand will have 2 x 1,000 MWe nuclear power plants in 2020 and another 2 x 1,000 MWe in 2021. The PDP 2007 was revised in March 2009 and it was agreed to change the nuclear power generation to only 1 x 1,000 MWe in 2020 and 2021 respectively due to the large excess capacity at present. Many activities related to development of infrastructures in order to support electricity generation using nuclear power are being executed. Milestones for nuclear power program implementation has been developed using the IAEA document 'Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power' with some amendment/additions to suit the country situation. According to the schedule, a lot of activities related to infrastructure establishment, feasibility study, utility preparation and public education and participation are being performed. Within the year 2011, various issues such as legal and regulatory systems and international commitment, industrial and commercial infrastructure, technology transfer and human resource development, safety and environmental protection, public information and public acceptance, preparation of the nuclear power utility establishment, etc. must be solved out and undertaken to assure the cabinet to make final decision to go nuclear. There are many challenges for Thailand embarking of the nuclear power programme. It is essential to plan for the establishment of a regulatory body at the national level to support and regulate the nuclear power plant industry. Currently, the application for a license and the monitoring of a power plant are administered by the authorities of various agencies under different ministries; hence the process is very time-consuming and overlaps with one another. The approach that the regulatory body and the authorities to issue licenses relevant to the nuclear power plant operation

  6. Literacy Infrastructure, Access to Books, and the Implementation of the School Literacy Movement in Primary Schools in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laksono, K.; Retnaningdyah, P.

    2018-01-01

    Literacy Infrastructure and access to books are the foundation of literacy activity. Indonesia has regulations from the Ministry of Education and Culture requiring that 15 minutes should be used each day before the learning begins to read books other than textbooks. However, many schools are not yet obeying this requirement. The purposes of this study are to describe the literacy infrastructure in primary schools in Indonesia, to analyze access to books in primary schools, to explain the School Literacy Movement implementation, and to identify issues around the implementation of reading strategies in a context in which there is limited access to books. The questionnaire and interview study were conducted in 30 primary schools in East Java, Indonesia. The study concluded that the literacy infrastructure and access to books in 30 primary schools are below standard, but the school community enthusiastically implements the objectives of the School Literacy Movement. Many primary schools are already implementing good many reading strategies although there are some problems related to teacher competence.

  7. Developing industrial infrastructures to support a programme of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This Guidebook is intended to offer assistance in the many considerations and decisions involved in preparing the national industry for participation in a nuclear power programme. The heavy financial investment, the setting up of certain infrastructures many years ahead of plant construction, plus the high level of technology involved require early and systematic planning. A further purpose of this Guidebook is to serve particularly those decision makers and planners in the various governmental authorities, the technological institutions and in the industries likely to be involved in a nuclear project. These industries include the services of the national engineering resources, the domestic design and manufacturing groups as well as the civil construction companies. These will be responsible for plant erection, testing and commissioning and most of all for the establishment of a framework for quality assurance. All of these are the components of an essential infrastructure necessary to raise the standards of the national industry and to displace increasingly foreign suppliers to the extent possible. In addition, this Guidebook should help to show some of the implications, consequences and options involved in a nuclear power programme. It does not consider the basic decisions for going nuclear, nor does it review the choice of the technology or nuclear process selected for the programme. Instead, it limits itself to a consideration of the nuclear power plant and its essential cycle activities. Figs and tabs

  8. Challenges faced by nuclear research centres in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subki, I.R.; Soentono, S.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear research centres in Indonesia are mainly owned and operated by the National Nuclear Energy Agency, covering basically various research and development facilities for non-energy and energy related activities. The research and development activities cover a broad spectrum of basic, applied, and developmental research involving nuclear science and technology in supporting various fields ranging from basic human needs, e.g. food and health; natural resources and nuclear and environmental safety; as well as industry. Recent economic crisis, triggered by monetary turmoil, has dictated the IAEA to face new challenges and to give more efforts on the application of the so called 'instant technology' i.e. the technology which has been developed and is ready for implementation, especially on food and health, to be better utilized to overcome various problems in the society. Various short and medium term programmes on the application of isotopes, radiation, and nuclear techniques for non-energy related activities have emerged in accord with these efforts. In this regard, besides the intensification of the instant technology implementation on food and health, the nuclear research and development on food plant mutation, fertilizers, radio-vaccines, production of meat and milk, production processes of various radiopharmaceuticals, and radioisotopes as well as radiation processing related to agro-industry have to be intensified using the available laboratories processing facilities. The possibility of the construction of irradiators for post harvesting processes in some provinces is being studied, while the designing and manufacturing of various prototypes of devices, equipment, and instruments for nuclear techniques in health and industry are continued. Considering the wide applications of accelerators for non-energy and energy related research and development, construction of accelerator-based laboratories is being studied. In energy related research the feasibility of

  9. Development of k-300 concrete mix for earthquake-resistant Housing infrastructure in indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkarnain, Fahrizal

    2018-03-01

    In determining the strength of K-300 concrete mix that is suitable for earthquake-resistant housing infrastructure, it is necessary to research the materials to be used for proper quality and quantity so that the mixture can be directly applied to the resident’s housing, in the quake zone. In the first stage, the examination/sieve analysis of the fine aggregate or sand, and the sieve analysis of the coarse aggregate or gravel will be carried out on the provided sample weighing approximately 40 kilograms. Furthermore, the specific gravity and absorbance of aggregates, the examination of the sludge content of aggregates passing the sieve no. 200, and finally, examination of the weight of the aggregate content. In the second stage, the planned concrete mix by means of the Mix Design K-300 is suitable for use in Indonesia, with implementation steps: Planning of the cement water factor (CWF), Planning of concrete free water (Liters / m3), Planning of cement quantity, Planning of minimum cement content, Planning of adjusted cement water factor, Planning of estimated aggregate composition, Planning of estimated weight of concrete content, Calculation of composition of concrete mixture, Calculation of mixed correction for various water content. Implementation of the above tests also estimates the correction of moisture content and the need for materials of mixture in kilograms for the K-300 mixture, so that the slump inspection result will be achieved in planned 8-12 cm. In the final stage, a compressive strength test of the K-300 experimental mixture is carried out, and subsequently the composition of the K-300 concrete mixture suitable for one sack of cement of 50 kg is obtained for the foundation of the proper dwelling. The composition is consists of use of Cement, Sand, Gravel, and Water.

  10. Industrial infrastructure for the Indian nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.R.

    1986-04-01

    For the inception of the Indian nuclear power programme, great emphasis has been laid on development of comprehensive indigenous capability in design, construction and operation of nuclear power plants. The choice of the pressurised heavy water reactor as the mainline for India's first generation nuclear power stations fitted into this perspective. Apart from the inherent advantages of high neutron economy, low fuelling costs and high capacity factors, this system offered significant opportunities for manufacture and design of all the components within the country. The development of indigenous capability has not been without its problems, namely cost overruns and delays. The main causes for these delays have been the developmental nature of the jobs involving learning process and continued tightening of the quality control requirements. The strategy of development to be pursued by any country is naturally dependent upon the size of the programme it wishes to embark upon and the state of industrial infrastructure in the country. The Indian experience has demonstrated that for development of a comprehensive capability, it is necessary to have a well formulated reactor policy, a good inter-disciplinary R and D base, a good base of conventional industrial infrastructure, a comprehensive manpower development programme and an innovative management. It is hoped that this experience will be of benefit to other developing countries embarking on their own nuclear programme

  11. Role of Nuclear Knowledge Infrastructure in Building and Developing a Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershukov, V.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Current level of development of nuclear technology pushes future owners and users to address several important challenges at the very beginning of preparation for introduction of nuclear power programme including development of national expertise and technical competence for safe and secure use of nuclear technology and creation of national scientific and research infrastructure. However, many times national stakeholders involved into the development of nuclear power programmes act in separate information environments. This creates confusion and may result in delays of execution of a nuclear power programmes. A common environment in this case is important to ensure information exchange and collaborative work on nuclear power programme development. A common environment facilitates transfer, preservation and spread of nuclear knowledge to all stakeholders involved in a national nuclear power programme. Due to the long life cycle of nuclear power plants, strengthening and maintaining the effective management of knowledge and information over the entire life cycle for licensed nuclear facilities is imperative. This covers areas including design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning, especially in newcomer countries and new builds. Nuclear knowledge infrastructure assumes this role and helps countries deciding to develop nuclear programmes ensure the safe and secure use of its nuclear power for national development. (author

  12. The role of R and D in the nuclear infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulton, J.

    1986-04-01

    A solid R and D base is an essential component of the nuclear infrastructure, particularly so when a significant degree of self-sufficiency in the nuclear power program is expected. The R and D base can be formed in a number of ways, as centres of excellence in academic institutions, in industrial or utility associations or in national institutions but, as a minimum, a national nuclear research and development laboratory should be in place. The role played by the R and D organizations is a broad one. Some aspects which will be discussed are: (a) to provide a training ground for the scientists and engineers required in an expanding nuclear program, bridging the gap from the academic world of the universities to the industrialized environment, (b) to provide the expertise necessary, at least initially, to adequately receive and absorb the technology which will have to be transferred during the early stages of development of the nuclear power program; this is particularly important for fuel cycle technology, (c) to provide ongoing support during the construction and operation of the nuclear power plants, (d) to establish credibility and seek acceptance in the world-wide research and development community so that the nation can keep abreast with ongoing technological development. (author)

  13. Preparation of the Regulatory Infrastructure for the New Nuclear Build

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cimesa, Sinisa; Persic, Andreja; Vrankar, Leopold; Stritar, Andrej

    2011-01-01

    Slovenia is seriously considering building a new nuclear power plant. The Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) is very much aware of the complexity of such a project as well as of the fact that at the moment the SNSA does not have sufficient resources for licensing and overseeing the design, construction and operation of the possible new plant. Likewise, the question arises whether technical support organizations which support SNSA in supervising the existing Krsko nuclear power plant have sufficient capacity. Therefore SNSA established a special project team with the task to prepare the Administration for the possible start of the new nuclear build. In the beginning of 2009, the project team prepared the analysis of licensing process, which is basically an overview of spatial planning, construction and nuclear safety regulation processes. The purpose of the review of the whole process, from spatial planning to the issuance of the operating license, was to identify phases which will require most effort. The next step was to set the strategy for the review process as well as to analyze and establish the basis for resource demands needed for SNSA's and other stakeholders involvements and decision making in the process. This will enable SNSA to establish a qualified and effective infrastructure for a possible new nuclear build. (authors)

  14. Applications of nuclear and isotopic techniques in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilmy, N.; Hendranto, K. [Centre for Applications of Isotopes and Radiation, Batan (Indonesia)

    1994-12-31

    Applications of Nuclear and Isotopic Techniques have been developed by the National Atomic Energy Agency (BATAN) since early 1970 in Indonesia. The scope of these applications covers various fields such as agriculture, hydrology, sedimentology and industry. Some applications of tracer techniques in industry which have been done such as measurement of homogeneity of mixing process in fertiliser and paper factory, residence time distribution in gold processing plant, mercury inventory in caustic soda plant, enhanced oil recovery in oil production wells, leakage investigation in dust chamber of fertiliser plant and blockage of pipeline, are presented in this paper. In the field of NDT by radiographic technique, BATAN regularly conducts training courses and also issues licences for Level I and II. Some applications of nuclear techniques in agriculture such as mutation breeding, animal production and animal health have shown the potential of radiation in creating variability as a basis for varietal improvements in several food crop species, the potential of using isotopes as tracers in the studies on metabolism, particularly in relation to the efficiency of rumen fermentative digestion and biological evaluation of locally available feedstuffs from agricultural and agro-industrial byproducts. So far, four varieties of nice, two varieties of soybean, and one variety of mungbean have been officially approved for release, and one formulation of feed supplement utilizing locally available agricultural and agro-industrial byproducts has been established and used for cattle and goats. In animal health, a radiovaccine against coccidiosis in poultry has been produced and used routinely.

  15. Development of Secure and Sustainable Nuclear Infrastructure in Emerging Nuclear Nations Such as Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipwash, Jacqueline L; Kovacic, Donald N

    2008-01-01

    The global expansion of nuclear energy will require international cooperation to ensure that nuclear materials, facilities, and sensitive technologies are not diverted to non-peaceful uses. Developing countries will require assistance to ensure the effective regulation, management, and operation of their nuclear programs to achieve best practices in nuclear nonproliferation. A developing nation has many hurdles to pass before it can give assurances to the international community that it is capable of implementing a sustainable nuclear energy program. In August of this year, the U.S. Department of Energy and the Ministry of Science and Technology of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam signed an arrangement for Information Exchange and Cooperation on the Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy. This event signals an era of cooperation between the U.S. and Vietnam in the area of nuclear nonproliferation. This paper will address how DOE is supporting the development of secure and sustainable infrastructures in emerging nuclear nations such as Vietnam

  16. The US nuclear weapon infrastructure and a stable global nuclear weapon regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Immele, John D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wagner, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    US nuclear weapons capabilities -- extant force structure and nuclear weapons infrastructure as well as declared policy -- influence other nations' nuclear weapons postures, at least to some extent. This influence can be desirable or undesirable, and is, of course, a mixture of both. How strong the influence is, and its nature, are complicated, controversial, and -- in our view -- not well understood but often overstated. Divergent views about this influence and how it might shape the future global nuclear weapons regime seem to us to be the most serious impediment to reaching a national consensus on US weapons policy, force structure and supporting infrastructure. We believe that a paradigm shift to capability-based deterrence and dissuasion is not only consistent with the realities of the world and how it has changed, but also a desirable way for nuclear weapon postures and infrastructures to evolve. The US and other nuclear states could not get to zero nor even reduce nuclear arms and the nuclear profile much further without learning to manage latent capability. This paper has defined three principles for designing NW infrastructure both at the 'next plateau' and 'near zero.' The US can be a leader in reducing weapons and infrastructure and in creating an international regime in which capability gradually substitutes for weapons in being and is transparent. The current 'strategy' of not having policy or a Congressionally-approved plan for transforming the weapons complex is not leadership. If we can conform the US infrastructure to the next plateau and architect it in such a way that it is aligned with further arms reductions, it will have these benefits: The extant stockpile can be reduced in size, while the smaller stockpile still deters attack on the US and Allies. The capabilities of the infrastructure will dissuade emergence of new challenges/threats; if they emerge, nevertheless, the US will be able to deal with them in

  17. Policy Model of Sustainable Infrastructure Development (Case Study : Bandarlampung City, Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persada, C.; Sitorus, S. R. P.; Marimin; Djakapermana, R. D.

    2018-03-01

    Infrastructure development does not only affect the economic aspect, but also social and environmental, those are the main dimensions of sustainable development. Many aspects and actors involved in urban infrastructure development requires a comprehensive and integrated policy towards sustainability. Therefore, it is necessary to formulate an infrastructure development policy that considers various dimensions of sustainable development. The main objective of this research is to formulate policy of sustainable infrastructure development. In this research, urban infrastructure covers transportation, water systems (drinking water, storm water, wastewater), green open spaces and solid waste. This research was conducted in Bandarlampung City. This study use a comprehensive modeling, namely the Multi Dimensional Scaling (MDS) with Rapid Appraisal of Infrastructure (Rapinfra), it uses of Analytic Network Process (ANP) and it uses system dynamics model. The findings of the MDS analysis showed that the status of Bandarlampung City infrastructure sustainability is less sustainable. The ANP analysis produces 8 main indicators of the most influential in the development of sustainable infrastructure. The system dynamics model offered 4 scenarios of sustainable urban infrastructure policy model. The best scenario was implemented into 3 policies consist of: the integrated infrastructure management, the population control, and the local economy development.

  18. Case Study for Effectiveness Analysis on Nuclear Regulatory Infrastructure Support for Emerging Nuclear Energy Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. E.; Byeon, M. J.; Yoo, J. W.; Lee, J. M.; Lim, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    The donor countries need to make decisions on various steps such as whether to fully accept newcomers’ requests, the depth of support, and how the supportive action will be carried out. Such is not an easy task due to limited time, resources, manpower, etc. Thus, creating an infrastructure to support emerging nuclear energy countries is needed. This paper suggests the resource portfolio concept used in business management and aims to analyze the validity of supporting the new entrants’ development of regulatory infrastructure as a case study. This study tries to develop a very simple Excel-based tool for assessing the supporting strategy quantitatively and screening the activities that is projected to be less effective and attractive. There are many countries, so called newcomers, which have expressed interests in developing their own nuclear power program. It has been recognized by the international community that every country considering embarking upon their own nuclear power program should establish their nuclear safety infrastructure to sustain a high level of nuclear safety. The newcomers have requested for considerable assistance from the IAEA and they already have bilateral cooperation programs with the advanced countries with matured nuclear regulatory programs. Currently, the regulatory bodies that provide support are confronted with two responsibilities as follows; the primary objective of the regulatory bodies is to ensure that the operator fulfills the responsibility to protect human health

  19. Integrating security issues in nuclear engineering curriculum in Indonesia. Classical vs policy approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putero, Susetyo Hario; Rosita, Widya; Sihana, Fnu; Ferdiansjah; Santosa, Haryono Budi; Muharini, Anung

    2015-01-01

    Recently, risk management for nuclear facilities becomes more complex due to security issue addressed by IAEA. The harmonization between safety, safeguards and security is still questionable. It also challenges to nuclear engineering curriculum in the world how to appropriately lecture the new issue. This paper would like to describe how to integrate this issue in developing nuclear engineering curriculum in Indonesia. Indonesia has still no nuclear power plant, but there are 3 research reactors laid in Indonesia. As addition, there are several hospitals and industries utilizing radioisotopes in their activities. The knowledge about nuclear security of their staffs is also not enough for handling radioactive material furthermore the security officers. Universitas Gadjah Mada (UGM) is the only university in Indonesia offering nuclear engineering program, as consequently the university should actively play the role in overcoming this issue not only in Indonesia, but also in Southeast Asia. In the other hand, students has to have proper knowledge in order to complete in the global nuclear industry. After visited several universities in USA and participated in INSEN meeting, we found that most of universities in the world anticipate this issue by giving the student courses related to policy (non-technical) study based on IAEA NSS 12. In the other hand, the rest just make nuclear security as a case study on their class. Furthermore, almost all of programs are graduate level. UGM decided to enhance several present related undergraduate courses with security topics as first step to develop the awareness of student to nuclear security. The next (curriculum 2016) is to integrate security topics into the entire of curriculum including designing a nuclear security elective course for undergraduate level. The first trial has successfully improved the student knowledge and awareness on nuclear security. (author)

  20. Nuclear Safeguards Infrastructure Required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Mark Schanfein; Philip Casey Durst

    2012-07-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) to be constructed near Idaho Falls, Idaho The NGNP is intrinsically safer than current reactors and is planned for startup ca. 2021 Safety is more prominent in the minds of the Public and Governing Officials following the nuclear reactor meltdown accidents in Fukushima, Japan The authors propose that the NGNP should be designed with International (IAEA) Safeguards in mind to support export to Non-Nuclear-Weapons States There are two variants of the NGNP design; one using integral Prismatic-shaped fuel assemblies in a fixed core; and one using recirculating fuel balls (or Pebbles) The following presents the infrastructure required to safeguard the NGNP This infrastructure is required to safeguard the Prismatic and Pebble-fueled NGNP (and other HTGR/VHTR) The infrastructure is based on current Safeguards Requirements and Practices implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for similar reactors The authors of this presentation have worked for decades in the area of International Nuclear Safeguards and are recognized experts in this field Presentation for INMM conference in July 2012.

  1. INIR: Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review Missions. Guidance on Preparing and Conducting INIR Missions (Rev. 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-04-01

    The IAEA's Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review (INIR) missions are designed to assist Member States, at their request, in evaluating the status of their national infrastructure for the introduction of a nuclear power programme. Each INIR mission is coordinated and led by the IAEA and conducted by a team of international experts drawn from Member States who have experience in different aspects of developing and deploying nuclear infrastructure. The IAEA publication Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power (IAEA Nuclear Energy Series No. NG-G-3.1) contains a description of 19 infrastructure issues to be considered during the different stages of development of a nuclear power programme. The starting point for an INIR mission is a self-evaluation performed by the Member State against these infrastructure issues. Following the self-evaluation, the INIR mission reviews the status of the national nuclear infrastructure, identifies existing gaps in specific infrastructure-related areas and proposes recommendations to fill these gaps. The INIR mission provides Member State representatives with an opportunity to have in depth discussions with international experts about experiences and best practices in different countries. In developing its recommendations, the INIR team takes into account the comments made by the relevant national organizations. Implementation of any of the team's recommendations is at the discretion of the Member State requesting the mission. The results of the INIR mission are expected to help the Member State to develop an action plan to fill any gaps, which in turn will help the development of the national nuclear infrastructure. The IAEA stands ready to assist, as requested and appropriate, in the different steps of this action plan. This guidance publication is directed to assist in preparing and conducting the INIR missions. It was developed under the coordination of the IAEA Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure

  2. The Collaborative Management Model on Developing the Infrastructure of the Pomalaa’s Airport, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Sc. Abdul Sabaruddin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative management of public sector is being introduced as a new approach to solve the problems which is mainly on the restrictiveness of bureaucracy in answering such public demand. Therefore, collaboration approach presents new actors out of the government in processing the public sectors. The relationship among actors in its collaboration is well developed through consensus to gain valuable decision to all. Based on the problems mentioned, this study focuses on the model of collaborative management on developing the infrastructure of an airport. To answer the objective of the study, therefore, this research applied qualitative approach in which the respondents are those who were being involved in construction process of the airport. The data gained from interview will be analysed through interactive model consisting of some procedures; data reduction, data presentation, verification of the data/ drawing conclusion. The result showed that collaborative management model in infrastructure development of the airport was a management model, in this case collective action based on the principle of synergetic participation. In this context, there was no single actor on the development of infrastructure of the airport. Through collective action, the related aspects, in this case the development of infrastructure, was transparently communicated to avoid miscommunication among the members. Therefore, the actors which were being involved on the collaboration bore the needs reasonably and also there was no such member who were being burden. Thus, the implication of collaboration based on the consensus, the collaboration on the development of infrastructure of the airport is on the basis of participative, which pointed out the appointment and the continuation of the development.

  3. Kenya's Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayacko, Ochilo G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Lessons learnt for INIR preparation: → A detailed Self Evaluation report is critical to proper evaluation of each infrastructure; → Involvement of all relevant organizations in preparation of self evaluation report and the main mission; → Meetings on individual infrastructure issues to consolidate the country position; → Openness during interviews and provision of adequate information

  4. Prospect of floating desalination facilities using nuclear energy in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusli, A.; Rina, G.; Gunandjar; Subki, I.R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper summarizes studies on the water demand and supply problems in Indonesia in the last few years. During the dry season in 1990, it was reported that lack of fresh drinking water in Java and Bali amounted to 2.4 x 10 6 ton/month. Since Indonesia consists of more than 13,000 islands, more problems are faced by other islands. The studies are focused on certain regions (groups of islands) which may have a potential for using a floating desalination facility. Water reservoirs in each island and delivery systems from the floating desalination facilities need to be assessed to see the prospective uses of the systems. Cheap, self-forgiving and easily operated systems, using transportable ship mounted desalination facilities, may be required as a solution to the water supply shortages for these islands. Conclusions based on current problems in water demand and supply and comments on the prospective future market using floating desalination facilities in Indonesia are also given. (author). 9 refs, 10 tabs

  5. Infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Fekete, Jean-Daniel

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Supporting the strong demand in data storage, computation and interactive performances required by visual analytics applications is still a challenge. All currently existing visual analytics applications need to build their own specialised infrastructure for their specific problem. One of the most difficult issues of visual analytics is that it is both user driven and data-driven. It is user-driven because during the interactive steps of the analysis, the user is specif...

  6. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A.Gaddi

    2011-01-01

    Between the end of March to June 2011, there has been no detector downtime during proton fills due to CMS Infrastructures failures. This exceptional performance is a clear sign of the high quality work done by the CMS Infrastructures unit and its supporting teams. Powering infrastructure At the end of March, the EN/EL group observed a problem with the CMS 48 V system. The problem was a lack of isolation between the negative (return) terminal and earth. Although at that moment we were not seeing any loss of functionality, in the long term it would have led to severe disruption to the CMS power system. The 48 V system is critical to the operation of CMS: in addition to feeding the anti-panic lights, essential for the safety of the underground areas, it powers all the PLCs (Twidos) that control AC power to the racks and front-end electronics of CMS. A failure of the 48 V system would bring down the whole detector and lead to evacuation of the cavern. EN/EL technicians have made an accurate search of the fault, ...

  7. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Gaddi and P. Tropea

    2012-01-01

    The CMS Infrastructures teams are preparing for the LS1 activities. A long list of maintenance, consolidation and upgrade projects for CMS Infrastructures is on the table and is being discussed among Technical Coordination and sub-detector representatives. Apart from the activities concerning the cooling infrastructures (see below), two main projects have started: the refurbishment of the SX5 building, from storage area to RP storage and Muon stations laboratory; and the procurement of a new dry-gas (nitrogen and dry air) plant for inner detector flushing. We briefly present here the work done on the first item, leaving the second one for the next CMS Bulletin issue. The SX5 building is entering its third era, from main assembly building for CMS from 2000 to 2007, to storage building from 2008 to 2012, to RP storage and Muon laboratory during LS1 and beyond. A wall of concrete blocks has been erected to limit the RP zone, while the rest of the surface has been split between the ME1/1 and the CSC/DT laborat...

  8. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Gaddi and P. Tropea

    2011-01-01

    Most of the work relating to Infrastructure has been concentrated in the new CSC and RPC manufactory at building 904, on the Prevessin site. Brand new gas distribution, powering and HVAC infrastructures are being deployed and the production of the first CSC chambers has started. Other activities at the CMS site concern the installation of a new small crane bridge in the Cooling technical room in USC55, in order to facilitate the intervention of the maintenance team in case of major failures of the chilled water pumping units. The laser barrack in USC55 has been also the object of a study, requested by the ECAL community, for the new laser system that shall be delivered in few months. In addition, ordinary maintenance works have been performed during the short machine stops on all the main infrastructures at Point 5 and in preparation to the Year-End Technical Stop (YETS), when most of the systems will be carefully inspected in order to ensure a smooth running through the crucial year 2012. After the incide...

  9. A Socio-Ecological Approach to GIS Least-Cost Modelling for Regional Mining Infrastructure Planning: A Case Study from South-East Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex M. Lechner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional planning approaches to mining infrastructure aim to reduce the conflict associated with mining operations and existing land uses, such as urban areas and biodiversity conservation, as well as the cumulative impacts that occur offsite. In this paper, we describe a method for conducting Geographical Information System (GIS least-cost path and least-cost corridor analysis for linear mining infrastructure, such as roads. Least-cost path analysis identifies the optimal pathways between two locations as a function of the cost of traveling through different land use/cover types. In a case study from South-East Sulawesi, Indonesia, we identify potential linear networks for road infrastructure connecting mines, smelters, and ports. The method used interview data from government officials to characterise their orientation (perceived importance and positive/negative attitude toward the social and environmental factors associated with mining infrastructure. A cost-surface was constructed by integrating spatial layers representing the social and environmental factors to identify areas that should be avoided and areas that were compatible with linear infrastructure using the least-cost path analysis. We compared infrastructure scenario outputs from local and national government officials by the degree of spatial overlap and found broad spatial agreement for infrastructure corridors. We conclude by discussing this approach in relation to the wider social-ecological and mine planning literature and how quantitative approaches can reduce the conflict associated with infrastructure planning.

  10. An overview on the future trend of nuclear energy application and development in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subki, M.H.; Aritomi, M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the recent circumstances in Indonesia concerning nuclear energy program and try to anticipate the challenges and the future trend on the application of nuclear power for electricity generation. It is indispensable for Indonesia with regard to development of industries and improvement of the quality of life to establish sufficient and stable electric power supply. A national energy policy has been adopted, in its way to secure the continuity of energy supply at affordable price; to enhance the people's quality of life, and to reserve an adequate supply of oil and gas as important sources to fund national development program. It is expected that nuclear energy will reduce the dependence on a single type of fuel, economize energy utilization, as well as to support environmental program by applying clean-energy technology. (author)

  11. The Role of Gadjah Mada University on Forming Public’s Perception About Nuclear in Indonesia Through Community Services Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosita, W.; Muharini, A.; Wijayanti, E.

    2015-01-01

    The plan for building Nuclear Power Plant in Indonesia have been announced since 1956, but it is always postponed until now. One of these reasons is public’s perception about nuclear technology. In Indonesia, information about nuclear technology is still limited although we have used this technology in health and agriculture area. There were some reasons why this is happened. The first is insufficient introduction about nuclear chapter for our primary, secondary and high school students. Second is there are many rural community that is spread in thousand islands which has different education level compared to urban community. We thought that these two main reasons which affect people opinions about nuclear in Indonesia. So innovative ways to educate people about nuclear programme in Indonesia are needed. Gadjah Mada University, having the only Nuclear Engineering Department in Indonesia, has community services programmes that could be used for dissemination nuclear technologies and nuclear application in schools, rural and urban communities. Through these activities, we did several ways to promote nuclear which depends on the participant’s education level and observe people’s opinions about it. We hope these programmes could make better perception about nuclear. (author)

  12. The Cuban nuclear program and its Scientific and Technical Infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandarias Cruz, D.; Codorniu Pujals, D.

    1995-01-01

    The present paper shows the aspects including the Cuban Nuclear Program and underlines its close connection with the strategy of economic, social and scientific technical development in the country, the organizing structure of the Cuban nuclear activity is explained. The application of nuclear techniques and research development activity in the nuclear field are also expressed in detailed in this paper

  13. Improving Role of Construction Industry for More Effective Post-Disaster Emergency Response To Road Infrastructure in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pribadi Krishna S.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Geo- and hydro-meteorological disasters typically caused disruptive impact to road networks due to damaged road infrastructure, which in turn disconnect access to and isolate the disaster affected areas. Road clearing work and emergency road recovery operation are considered a priority to reconnect the access during post-disaster emergency response. However, the operation is not always smooth and in many cases delayed due to various problems. An investigation is conducted to understand the current practice of post-disaster emergency road recovery operation in Indonesia and to study possible participation of construction industry in order to improve its effectiveness. In-depth interviews with Local Disaster Management Agencies (BPBDs and local road agencies in West Java Province were conducted to understand current practices in emergency road recovery operation and to view perspectives on local contractor participation. The surveys showed supports from the local governments for contractor involvement as long as it is still under guidance of related agencies (Ministry of Public Works and Housing despite some possible obstacles from the current regulation that may hamper contractors’ participation, which indicate that there is a potential role of construction industry for more effective post-disaster emergency response, provided that contractor associations are involved and existing procurement regulation is improved.

  14. Improving water, sanitation, and hygiene in schools in Indonesia: A cross-sectional assessment on sustaining infrastructural and behavioral interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karon, Andrew J; Cronin, Aidan A; Cronk, Ryan; Hendrawan, Reza

    2017-05-01

    Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) in schools are important for child health, development, and educational performance; yet coverage in Indonesian schools remains low. To address this deficiency, UNICEF and partners conducted a WASH intervention in 450 schools across three provinces in Indonesia. A survey evaluating the sustainability of infrastructure and behavioral interventions in comparison to control districts was conducted one year after completion of the intervention. The survey data were also compared with national government data to assess the suitability of government data to report progress on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Logistic regression was used to explore associations between WASH conditions and behaviors. Intervention schools were more likely to have handwashing stations with soap and water. In multivariable analyses, schools with a toilet operation and maintenance fund were more likely to have functional toilets. Students who learn hygiene skills from their teachers were less likely to defecate openly, more likely to share hygiene knowledge with their parents, and more likely to wash their hands. Survey data were comparable with government data, suggesting that Indonesian government monitoring may be a reliable source of data to measure progress on the SDGs. This research generates important policy and practice findings for scaling up and sustaining WASH in schools and may help improve WASH in schools programs in other low-resource contexts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Some issues related to the development of nuclear power plant in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panggabean, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Indonesia being a member of ASEAN belongs to the group of developing country. If Indonesia decides to embark on the establishment of nuclear power plan then the country will have no choice but to discuss the following issues: Safe operation of the plant and management of the nuclear waste. Safe operation of the power plant is important not only from the point of view of hazards to human being, or economic loss, or even death, but equally important it is also from the psychological point of view in that not to loose the society's confidence in the overall nuclear power plant programme in the future. The issue of safe operation involves both a safely designed system as well as skilled personnels to execute a well designed operation procedure. The issue of nuclear safety is getting more and more attention lately for various, some due to a deep concern about the quality of the inherent safety of the nuclear power plant to be built, others may just use their emotion to ask question like ''what its''. The issue of nuclear waste is as fundamental as the plant safety. Common people make very little difference between an atomic bomb and waste from a nuclear power plant. Another issue is one of transfer of technology which needs to be tied up with the overall industrialization process, meaning that embarking on nuclear power programme needs to contribute to local industrial activities, at least for some parts or components which can be manufactured locally. (author)

  16. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Document Server

    Andrea Gaddi

    2010-01-01

    In addition to the intense campaign of replacement of the leaky bushing on the Endcap circuits, other important activities have also been completed, with the aim of enhancing the overall reliability of the cooling infrastructures at CMS. Remaining with the Endcap circuit, the regulating valve that supplies cold water to the primary side of the circuit heat-exchanger, is not well adapted in flow capability and a new part has been ordered, to be installed during a stop of LHC. The instrumentation monitoring of the refilling rate of the circuits has been enhanced and we can now detect leaks as small as 0.5 cc/sec, on circuits that have nominal flow rates of some 20 litres/sec. Another activity starting now that the technical stop is over is the collection of spare parts that are difficult to find on the market. These will be stored at P5 with the aim of reducing down-time in case of component failure. Concerning the ventilation infrastructures, it has been noticed that in winter time the relative humidity leve...

  17. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Gaddi

    2012-01-01

    The CMS Infrastructures teams are constantly ensuring the smooth operation of the different services during this critical period when the detector is taking data at full speed. A single failure would spoil hours of high luminosity beam and everything is put in place to avoid such an eventuality. In the meantime however, the fast approaching LS1 requires that we take a look at the various activities to take place from the end of the year onwards. The list of infrastructures consolidation and upgrade tasks is already long and will touch all the services (cooling, gas, inertion, powering, etc.). The definitive list will be available just before the LS1 start. One activity performed by the CMS cooling team that is worth mentioning is the maintenance of the cooling circuits at the CMS Electronics Integration Centre (EIC) at building 904. The old chiller has been replaced by a three-units cooling plant that also serves the HVAC system for the new CSC and RPC factories. The commissioning of this new plant has tak...

  18. The implementation of nuclear security program and the improvement of physical protection in Indonesia: progress and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairul

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Non Proliferation of Nuclear Weapon Treaty (NPT), and the comprehensive safeguards agreements regime on IAEA model INFCIRC/153 Corr., nuclear safeguards systems have been operated for over three decades. Indonesia ratified the NPT agreement by Act No. 8 Year 1979. The government of the Republic of Indonesia is committed to general contribution in achieving a condition of safe, secure and peace the world in relation of nuclear energy utilization and to continue its strong support for the principles of the treaty. At that time Indonesian nuclear program was not as big as present programs. By time changes, the utilization of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes was significantly increasing based on the world's nuclear research and technology development. Nowadays, Indonesia has three research reactors and other nuclear installations for research activities. The first nuclear power plant is planned will operating on year 2016. National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) as promoting body in Indonesia has several reactor research centers. They are located at different province such as Bandung nuclear research center, Yogyakarta nuclear research center and Serpong nuclear research center. As the research and development institution belongs to government BATAN has also develop research by using radioactive substances for peaceful purpose. At three reactor research center are used nuclear materials with different nuclear category. The biggest research reactor in Indonesia is located in national center for science and technology development or called PUSPIPTEK, Serpong district, Province of Banten. In Serpong nuclear research center comprise several nuclear installation such as research reactor G.A. Siwabessy (30 Mw thermal), fuel element production installation, experimental fuel element installation, radio metallurgy installation, radioisotopes installation, radioactive waste installation. The Serpong whole area is wide approximately 24 ha and including supporting

  19. The control and supervision of nuclear energy in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahimsa, Kjali

    1989-01-01

    The establishment and responsibilities of the Nuclear Control Bureau within the Indonesian National Atomic Energy Agency (BATAN) are discussed. The current Indonesian legislation and the draft decree under discussion which will establish the State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials and implement the 1980 IAEA Safeguards Agreement are described. The safeguards implications of the new facilities under construction at the Nuclear Research Center at Serpong are examined. Materials Balance Areas, safeguards techniques and reports are outlined. The health and safety and regulatory roles of the Nuclear Control Bureau are also discussed. 1 fig

  20. Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Database Description and User's Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidrich, Brenden

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Science and Technology Innovation initiated the Nuclear Energy (NE)–Infrastructure Management Project by tasking the Nuclear Science User Facilities, formerly the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility, to create a searchable and interactive database of all pertinent NE-supported and -related infrastructure. This database, known as the Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Database (NEID), is used for analyses to establish needs, redundancies, efficiencies, distributions, etc., to best understand the utility of NE's infrastructure and inform the content of infrastructure calls. The Nuclear Science User Facilities developed the database by utilizing data and policy direction from a variety of reports from the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Research Council, the International Atomic Energy Agency, and various other federal and civilian resources. The NEID currently contains data on 802 research and development instruments housed in 377 facilities at 84 institutions in the United States and abroad. The effort to maintain and expand the database is ongoing. Detailed information on many facilities must be gathered from associated institutions and added to complete the database. The data must be validated and kept current to capture facility and instrumentation status as well as to cover new acquisitions and retirements. This document provides a short tutorial on the navigation of the NEID web portal at NSUF-Infrastructure.INL.gov.

  1. Kenya National Presentation on Nuclear Power Infrastructure Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinyanjui, B

    2010-01-01

    Kenya will factored 1200MW of nuclear energy in the period 2022-2023 of the national Least Cost Power Development Plan and 4200MW by 2030. A national nuclear power programme is now at inception. The National Economic and Social Council endorsed adoption of the nuclear programme in April 2010. Electricity demand is expected to rise from the current 1200 MW to over 15000 MW by 2030. The achievement of the Vision 2030 requires affordable and stable electricity tariffs. Formation of a Nuclear Power Committee to study and initially promote the development of the nuclear power program will be established e.g. Nuclear Power Committee - Kenyan version of Nuclear Energy Programme Implementing Organization formed. The Nuclear Power Committee is expected to precede formation of the NEPIO. There was proposal to review of current laws –e.g. Energy Act, Radiation Protection Act, Environmental Management and Control Act, Penal Code, etc. Potential sites proposed along the Indian Ocean Coastal areas, near Lake Victoria and the central region near the main national hydropower plants, based on power grid layout and water bodies. Kenya is in Phase 1 of milestones- Consideration before a decision is taken to start a NPP. Capacity Building towards Development of a Nuclear Power Programme (NPP) in Kenya is underway. To implement the national least cost power development plan so as to increase the capacity from current 1,300MW to 18,000MW by 2030 to support achievement of the ‘Vision 2030’

  2. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Document Server

    Andrea Gaddi

    2010-01-01

    During the last six months, the main activity on the cooling circuit has essentially been preventive maintenance. At each short machine technical stop, a water sample is extracted out of every cooling circuit to measure the induced radioactivity. Soon after, a visual check of the whole detector cooling network is done, looking for water leaks in sensitive locations. Depending on sub-system availability, the main water filters are replaced; the old ones are inspected and sent to the CERN metallurgical lab in case of suspicious sediments. For the coming winter technical stop, a number of corrective maintenance activities and infrastructure consolidation work-packages are foreseen. A few faulty valves, found on the muon system cooling circuit, will be replaced; the cooling gauges for TOTEM and CASTOR, in the CMS Forward region, will be either changed or shielded against the magnetic stray field. The demineralizer cartridges will be replaced as well. New instrumentation will also be installed in the SCX5 PC farm ...

  3. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Document Server

    A. Gaddi and P. Tropea

    2013-01-01

      Most of the CMS infrastructures at P5 will go through a heavy consolidation-work period during LS1. All systems, from the cryogenic plant of the superconducting magnet to the rack powering in the USC55 counting rooms, from the cooling circuits to the gas distribution, will undergo consolidation work. As announced in the last issue of the CMS Bulletin, we present here one of the consolidation projects of LS1: the installation of a new dry-gas plant for inner detectors inertion. So far the oxygen and humidity suppression inside the CMS Tracker and Pixel volumes were assured by flushing dry nitrogen gas evaporated from a large liquid nitrogen tank. For technical reasons, the maximum flow is limited to less than 100 m3/h and the cost of refilling the tank every two weeks with liquid nitrogen is quite substantial. The new dry-gas plant will supply up to 400 m3/h of dry nitrogen (or the same flow of dry air, during shut-downs) with a comparatively minimal operation cost. It has been evaluated that the...

  4. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Gaddi

    2011-01-01

    During the last winter technical stop, a number of corrective maintenance activities and infrastructure consolidation work-packages were completed. On the surface, the site cooling facility has passed the annual maintenance process that includes the cleaning of the two evaporative cooling towers, the maintenance of the chiller units and the safety checks on the software controls. In parallel, CMS teams, reinforced by PH-DT group personnel, have worked to shield the cooling gauges for TOTEM and CASTOR against the magnetic stray field in the CMS Forward region, to add labels to almost all the valves underground and to clean all the filters in UXC55, USC55 and SCX5. Following the insertion of TOTEM T1 detector, the cooling circuit has been branched off and commissioned. The demineraliser cartridges have been replaced as well, as they were shown to be almost saturated. New instrumentation has been installed in the SCX5 PC farm cooling and ventilation network, in order to monitor the performance of the HVAC system...

  5. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Gaddi

    The long winter shut-down allows for modifications that will improve the reliability of the detector infrastructures at P5. The annual maintenance of detector services is taking place as well. This means a full stop of water-cooling circuits from November 24th with a gradual restart from mid January 09. The annual maintenance service includes the cleaning of the two SF5 cooling towers, service of the chiller plants on the surface, and the cryogenic plant serving the CMS Magnet. In addition, the overall site power is reduced from 8MW to 2MW, compatible with the switchover to the Swiss power network in winter. Full power will be available again from end of January. Among the modification works planned, the Low Voltage cabinets are being refurbished; doubling the cable sections and replacing the 40A circuit breakers with 60A types. This will reduce the overheating that has been experienced. Moreover, two new LV transformers will be bought and pre-cabled in order to assure a quick swap in case of failure of any...

  6. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Andrea Gaddi.

    The various water-cooling circuits ran smoothly over the summer. The overall performance of the cooling system is satisfactory, even if some improvements are possible, concerning the endcap water-cooling and the C6F14 circuits. In particular for the endcap cooling circuit, we aim to lower the water temperature, to provide more margin for RPC detectors. An expert-on-call piquet has been established during the summer global run, assuring the continuous supervision of the installations. An effort has been made to collect and harmonize the existing documentation on the cooling infrastructures at P5. The last six months have seen minor modifications to the electrical power network at P5. Among these, the racks in USC55 for the Tracker and Sniffer systems, which are backed up by the diesel generator in case of power outage, have been equipped with new control boxes to allow a remote restart. Other interventions have concerned the supply of assured power to those installations that are essential for CMS to run eff...

  7. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Andrea Gaddi

    With all the technical services running, the attention has moved toward the next shutdown that will be spent to perform those modifications needed to enhance the reliability of CMS Infrastructures. Just to give an example for the cooling circuit, a set of re-circulating bypasses will be installed into the TS/CV area to limit the pressure surge when a circuit is partially shut-off. This problem has affected especially the Endcap Muon cooling circuit in the past. Also the ventilation of the UXC55 has to be revisited, allowing the automatic switching to full extraction in case of magnet quench. (Normally 90% of the cavern air is re-circulated by the ventilation system.) Minor modifications will concern the gas distribution, while the DSS action-matrix has to be refined according to the experience gained with operating the detector for a while. On the powering side, some LV power lines have been doubled and the final schematics of the UPS coverage for the counting rooms have been released. The most relevant inte...

  8. Guidelines for Preparing and Conducting an Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review (INIR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    As of 1 July 2017, there were 447 operational nuclear power reactors in 30 countries and another 60 were under construction in 15 countries. Technically and financially, access to nuclear power is no longer limited to advanced economies. Many developing countries are interested in introducing or expanding nuclear energy programmes because they regard nuclear power as a stable and reliable source of baseload electricity, which, in addition, makes a significant contribution to climate change mitigation. While several operating countries are planning to expand current capacity, about 30 Member States, mostly developing countries, are considering embarking on a nuclear power programme, some are developing the necessary infrastructure, and some others are negotiating or building their first nuclear power plant. Building a nuclear power programme is a major undertaking with significant international implications and is based upon a commitment to use nuclear power for peaceful purposes, in a safe, secure and sustainable manner. This commitment requires establishing a sustainable national infrastructure that provides governmental, legal, regulatory, managerial, technological, human resource, industrial and stakeholder support for the nuclear power programme throughout its life cycle. The demonstration of compliance with international legal instruments, internationally accepted nuclear safety standards, nuclear security guidelines and safeguards requirements is essential in establishing a responsible nuclear power programme. In response to growing demand by embarking countries for advice and assistance, the IAEA has developed an approach to assist Member States that are considering or planning their first nuclear power plant to understand the commitments and obligations associated with developing a nuclear power programme. States that already have nuclear power can also assess their preparedness for expansion. This approach is set out in the publication Milestones in the

  9. Regulatory aspect of nuclear application and radioactive waste management in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad Ridwan

    2002-01-01

    Experience over more than 56 years in the field of nuclear application has shown that such technology is generally safely used. Nevertheless, there have been instances, when safety systems have been circumvented and serious radiological accident have occurred, and have resulted with fatal consequences. During the last 56 years, such radiological accidents, in total, caused 101 person dead, and it is very interesting to note that this figure is more than double the dead caused by nuclear accident as the result of nuclear fuel failure, such as in nuclear power plant, in submarine or in enrichment plant, which has only 47 fatalities. The article 8 of the convention on nuclear safety, stipulates inter alia that the contracting party shall established a regulatory body separated from the promotional or the executing organization of nuclear energy. Indonesia is not operating any nuclear power. At present, it is only operating three research reactors, and some laboratories connected with this reactor, such as one nuclear fuel fabrication plant for research reactors, one experimental fuel fabrication plant for nuclear power, one isotope production facility, radiometalurgy laboratory and some other research facilities. However, in anticipation of the expansion of nuclear programme in Indonesia, and looking into the various accident in the nuclear application, the Indonesian Government has, since April 10, 1997, enacted the new act, Act No. 10/1997 on Nuclear Energy. The new Act addresses several key requirements for the successful conduct of Indonesia nuclear programme, including the establishment of both the Executing Body responsible for nuclear research and development, mining and processing nuclear fuels and materials, production of radio-isotopes and management of radioactive wastes and the independent Nuclear Energy Control Board, which has the power to regulate, to license and to inspect all facets of any activity utilizing nuclear energy. It also sets out the basic

  10. Development of the efficient emergency preparedness system for the nuclear critical infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinov, V.; Marn, J.; Petelin, S.

    2007-01-01

    The evaluation of the critical nuclear infrastructure vulnerability to threats like human occurrences, terrorist attacks and natural disasters and the preparation of emergency response plans with the estimation of optimized costs are of the vital importance for the assurance of a safe nuclear facilities operation and the national security. In the past national emergency systems did not include vulnerability assessments of the critical nuclear infrastructure as the important part of the comprehensive preparedness framework. The fundamental aims of the efficient emergency preparedness and response system are to provide a sustained emergency readiness and to prevent an emergency situation and accidents. But when an event happens the mission is to mitigate consequences and to protect the people and environment against the nuclear and radiological damage. The efficient emergency response system, which would be activated in the case of the nuclear and/or radiological emergency and release of the radioactivity to the environment, is an important element of a comprehensive system of the nuclear and radiation safety. In the article the new methodology for the critical nuclear infrastructure vulnerability assessment as a missing part of an efficient emergency preparedness system is presented. It can help the overall national energy sectors to identify and better understand the terrorist threats and vulnerabilities of their critical infrastructure. The presented methodology could also facilitate national agencies to develop and implement a vulnerability awareness and education programs for their critical assets to enhance the security, reliability and safe operation of the whole energy infrastructure. The vulnerability assessment methodology will also assist nuclear power plants to develop, validate, and disseminate the assessment and survey of new efficient countermeasures. The significant benefits of the new vulnerability assessment research are to increase nuclear power

  11. Development of the nuclear safety infrastructure in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilemas, J.

    1999-01-01

    After Lithuania took over the electric power plant, it had to form ties with Western specialists while not breaking off ties with Russian institutions; form a nucleus from known Lithuanian energy professionals, who, while being occupied only with problem of nuclear security, would become specialists in this area; attract Lithuanian specialists in related fields, acquaint them with the problems of nuclear energy and, where possible, use their skills; begin the preparation of new specialists in this field

  12. Preservation and enhancement of nuclear knowledge towards Indonesia's plan to operate first nuclear power plant by 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardisasmita, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear power is needed to sustain economic development in the world's fourth most populous country. More than half of Indonesia's 220 million people live on the island of Java. The problem is not that Indonesia lacks resources, but that they are far from Java - much of the coal, oil, natural gas and other assets are hundreds of miles away in the northern part of the island of Sumatra. Indonesia will need a nuclear power plant (NPP) to overcome the lack of power supply due to increasing consumption of electricity while the traditional power supply, including crude oil, has been decreasing. The National Nuclear Energy Agency (Batan) has advocated the introduction of nuclear power in Indonesia as a part of a long-term national energy system. According to the landmark of Batan, the first Indonesian nuclear power plant construction would start by 2010 and the plant would be operational by 2016. Since the decision to build nuclear power plant, according to the law number 10 year 1997, has to be consulted to the Parliament, it is indeed necessary to have always excellent communication with members of Parliament, to be understood by them and has to be supported by the society at large. In the past, efforts to launch nuclear power programs based mainly on economic justification have failed for various reasons; ones of the most important reasons were due to the lack of public support. Indonesia is pushing ahead with nuclear power at a time when the commercial use of nuclear power is in decline after 40 years of expansion. It is being rejected because of escalating costs, faulty technology and continuing public concern about accidents and radioactive waste disposal. Again this mean strong, effective and credible public information, public education and public relation organization have to be established to win the heart and the mind of the public. The problem is the majority of the people in Indonesia is low educated that makes them easy to be manipulated by the

  13. IAEA Catalogue of Services for Nuclear Infrastructure Development. Rev. 1, April 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-04-01

    This IAEA Catalogue offers a wide range of services to Member States embarking on a new nuclear power programme or expanding an existing one. A new IAEA Catalogue of Services for Nuclear Infrastructure Development helps Member States to identify and request IAEA assistance for national organizations at different stages of the development or expansion of a nuclear power programme. This IAEA Catalogue of Services is presented in two tables. It is based on the IAEA Milestones Approach for nuclear power infrastructure development, documented in 'Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power' (IAEA Nuclear Energy Series NG-G-3.1). The two tables allow users to identify and select available IAEA services by: i) The three phases of the IAEA Milestones Approach, or ii) Organizations typically involved in the development of a nuclear power programme: the government / Nuclear Energy Programme Implementing Organization (NEPIO), the regulatory body and the owner operator of a nuclear power plant. This Catalogue includes information on the following IAEA services: i) Workshops / Training Courses; ii) Expert Missions / Advisory Services; iii) Review Missions / Peer Reviews; iv) Training tools and networks. The Catalogue lists both existing IAEA services and those being developed for the 19 issues to be addressed in developing a national nuclear infrastructure. Each existing service is linked to a relevant IAEA webpage that either describes a particular service or gives practical examples of the type of assistance that the Agency offers (e.g. workshops or missions). The owners of these webpages can be contacted for more detailed information or to request assistance. This IAEA Catalogue of Services will be updated regularly

  14. The Establishment of Regulation for Supporting the Development of the First Nuclear Power Plant in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardha, Amil; Sinaga, Dahlia C.; Huda, Khoirul

    2011-01-01

    To support construction and operation of the first Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), Government of Indonesia through BAPETEN as a national authority in nuclear energy usage has pushed ahead in enhancing the development of regulatory system. BAPETEN is currently focusing its activities to the development of regulations in the form of Chairman Decree, the development of licensing and inspection system, and manpower for NPP regulators. The process of the establishment of national legislation is based on the Act No.10 Year 2004 on The establishment of legislation. The process of legal drafting to establish or to revise a regulation for controlling of the use of nuclear energy shall comply with the constitutional and institutional requirements of national political and legal system. In drafting the regulation of nuclear safety of NPP, BAPETEN has been involving some other agencies or other related government agencies, and also stakeholders such as utility, academic institutions, and publics. In general, in the process of legal drafting, international publications or other country regulations can be a reference. Present paper deals with the legal basis of regulation, the establishment of legislation in Indonesia, the process in legal drafting regulations of NPP, and the current status of NPP regulations. (author)

  15. Perspectives for photonuclear research at the Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipescu, D.; Balabanski, D.L.; Constantin, P.; Gales, S.; Tesileanu, O.; Ur, C.A.; Ursu, I.; Zamfir, N.V. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for R and D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP), Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Anzalone, A.; La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C. [INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy); Belyshev, S.S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Physics Faculty, Moscow (Russian Federation); Camera, F. [Departement of Physics, University of Milano, Milano (Italy); INFN section of Milano, Milano (Italy); Csige, L.; Krasznahorkay, A. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA Atomki), Institute of Nuclear Research, Post Office Box 51, Debrecen (Hungary); Cuong, P.V. [Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Centre of Nuclear Physics, Institute of Physics, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Mazzocchi, C. [University of Warsaw, Warszawa (Poland); Derya, V.; Zilges, A. [University of Cologne, Institute for Nuclear Physics, Cologne (Germany); Gai, M. [University of Connecticut, LNS at Avery Point, Connecticut, Groton (United States); Gheorghe, I. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for R and D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP), Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); University of Bucharest, Nuclear Physics Department, Post Office Box MG-11, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Ishkhanov, B.S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Physics Faculty, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, A.A.; Orlin, V.N.; Stopani, K.A.; Varlamov, V.V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Pietralla, N. [Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Institut fur Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Sin, M. [University of Bucharest, Nuclear Physics Department, Post Office Box MG-11, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Utsunomiya, H. [Konan University, Department of Physics, Kobe (Japan); University of Tokyo, Center for Nuclear Study, Saitama (Japan); Weller, H.R. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, North Carolina, Durham (United States); Duke University, Department of Physics, North Carolina, Durham (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The perspectives for photonuclear experiments at the new Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility are discussed in view of the need to accumulate novel and more precise nuclear data. The parameters of the ELI-NP gamma beam system are presented. The emerging experimental program, which will be realized at ELI-NP, is presented. Examples of day-one experiments with the nuclear resonance fluorescence technique, photonuclear reaction measurements, photofission experiments and studies of nuclear collective excitation modes and competition between various decay channels are discussed. The advantages which ELI-NP provides for all these experiments compared to the existing facilities are discussed. (orig.)

  16. Technical Meeting/Workshop on Topical Issues on Infrastructure Development: Managing the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power Plants. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of the TM/Workshop is to provide an opportunity for exchange of specific information on the management of the development of a sustainable national infrastructure for Nuclear Power Plants as it is recommended in the Agency's Milestones approach. Taking into account the actual status of new nuclear power programmes in Member States, this Agency event shall focus on the moving beyond the consideration of the nuclear power and advancing to the next phase, when future partners (Consultants, NPP Vendors, EPC Contractors, etc.) shall be selected and contracted for the first Nuclear Power Plant. The objectives of the Technical Meeting/Workshop are the following: 1. To exchange specific information and to facilitate the management and coordination of the development and implementation of a national infrastructure for nuclear power; 2. To present and discuss case studies, good practices and lessons learned about recent experiences in implementing an appropriate infrastructure for nuclear power, including management methods and self-evaluation processes; 3. To allow participants to improve their knowledge of various aspects of nuclear infrastructure development; and 4. To provide a forum in which participants can discuss common challenges, opportunities for cooperation, concerns and issues their countries face in the infrastructure implementation process.

  17. Site infrastructure as required during the construction and erection of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, K.F.; Wagner, H.

    1978-01-01

    In general, in an exchange of experience on constructing nuclear power plants priority is given to design and lay-out, financing, quality assurance etc., but in this paper an attempt has been made to describe range and type of site infrastructure required during construction and erection. Site infrastructure will make considerable demands on the planning, supply of material and maintenance that may result from the frequently very isolated location of power plant sites. Examples for specific values and experiences are given for a nuclear power plant with two units on the 1300-MW type at present under construction of the Persian Gulf in Iran. Data concerning the site infrastructure, including examples, are given and explained on the basis of graphs. The site is split up into a technical and a social infrastructure. The main concern of the technical site infrastructure is the timely provision and continuous availability of electric energy, water, communication grids, workshops, warehouses, offices, transport and handling facilities, as well as the provision of heavy load roads, harbour facilities, etc. The social site infrastructure in general comprises accommodation, food supplies and the care and welfare of all site personnel, which includes a hospital, school, self-service shop, and sport and recreation facilities. (author)

  18. Assessment of the human resources infrastructure for nuclear energy program in Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaushevski, A.; Spasevska, H.; Nikolova-Poceva, S.; Popov, P.

    2015-01-01

    Macedonia is a country with no nuclear power and research reactors. The nuclear application is currently only in the medical industry, agriculture and food industry, accompanied by radiation measuring and protection activities in these sectors. On the other side the energy needs have been increasing in the last ten years, which resulted in electrical energy import of about 20–30% (around 3000 GWh). Nuclear power is one of the options for satisfying energy needs in the next 50 years. One of the crucial problems in nuclear energy implementation are human resources needs and educational infrastructure development in this field. No matter what will be the future energy scenario in the Republic of Macedonia, the nuclear educational program is the first step to have HR in the field of nuclear energy. This paper presents the proposed direction for having HR in nuclear energy program in a small country such as the Republic of Macedonia. Taking into account the existing national education program related to nuclear topics and in particular to nuclear power, and following the guidance and recommendations from the international nuclear educational programs at the IAEA, EHRO and others, the planning of the educational nuclear programs and human resources development in the Republic of Macedonia has been carried out. This includes the enhancing the capabilities of the national regulatory body in the Republic of Macedonia. (authors) Keywords: NEP (Nuclear Energy Program), HR (Human Resources), NEPIO (Nuclear Energy Program Implementation Organization), NRB (Nuclear Regulatory Body), NPP

  19. Emerging battery research in Indonesia: The role of nuclear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartini, E.

    2015-12-01

    Development of lithium ion batteries will play an important role in achieving innovative sustainable energy. To reduce the production cost of such batteries, the Indonesian government has instituted a strategy to use local resources. Therefore, this technology is now part of the National Industrial Strategic Plan. One of the most important scientific challenges is to improve performance of lithium batteries. Neutron scattering is a very important technique to investigate crystal structure of electrode materials. The unique properties of neutrons, which allow detection of light elements such as lithium ions, are indispensable. The utilization of neutron scattering facilities at the Indonesian National Nuclear Energy Agency will provide significant contributions to the development of improved lithium ion battery technologies.

  20. Planning for a space infrastructure for disposal of nuclear space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelo, J. Jr.; Albert, T.E.; Lee, J.

    1989-01-01

    The development of safe, reliable, and compact power systems is vital to humanity's exploration, development, and, ultimately, civilization of space. Nuclear power systems appear to present to offer the only practical option of compact high-power systems. From the very beginning of US space nuclear power activities, safety has been a paramount requirement. Assurance of nuclear safety has included prelaunch ground handling operations, launch, and space operations of nuclear power sources, and more recently serious attention has been given to postoperational disposal of spent or errant nuclear reactor systems. The purpose of this paper is to describe the progress of a project to utilize the capabilities of an evolving space infrastructure for planning for disposal of space nuclear systems. Project SIREN (Search, Intercept, Retrieve, Expulsion - Nuclear) is a project that has been initiated to consider post-operational disposal options for nuclear space power systems. The key finding of Project SIREN was that although no system currently exists to affect the disposal of a nuclear space power system, the requisite technologies for such a system either exist or are planned for part of the evolving space infrastructure

  1. Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education From the SW Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, Warren

    2011-03-22

    This report describes the final expenditures for the INIE project during FY 08/09. (There were no expenditures during FY09/10 or during FY10/11.) To see the list of accomplishments done using the INIE funds, please see the reports included here. The last of the FY 07/08 funds were brought forward and used to complete two distance education modules teaching reactor experiments. These modules and parts from the modules are still being used and are being disseminated off-campus as a part of our distance education effort. The second largest expenditure was sending students to the ANS to present student papers on work that they had done the previous year underwritten by INIE funds. The remaining expenditures were IDC charges and minor travel expenses to give students a tour of a medical facility. Once again we wish to express of sincere appreciation of the INIE program and hope that the return on investment is appreciated by the DOE. Although INIE has come to a close, looking back at all the Consortium has accomplished is astounding. And, as was hoped, these funds have proved to be a springboard for continuing work, particularly at Texas A&M. With the resurgence of nuclear power, the utilities have realized that the nuclear workforce in the near future will be too small for the task of bringing dozens of new plants on line and have turned their attention to the URRs to help feed the workforce pipeline. The distance education modules developed at the A&M are soon to be broadcast throughout the country to help train a new generation of nuclear workers. Our students at the Nuclear Science Center at being snapped up by the nuclear power plants after graduating. Our research projects at A&M have all ended with new data, new ways of looking at old problems, and produced a covey of good students. I want to say 'Thanks' with utmost sincerity because without the INIE funds our efforts would yield a small fraction of the accomplishments you see in this report.

  2. Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education From the SW Consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, Warren

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the final expenditures for the INIE project during FY 08/09. (There were no expenditures during FY09/10 or during FY10/11.) To see the list of accomplishments done using the INIE funds, please see the reports included here. The last of the FY 07/08 funds were brought forward and used to complete two distance education modules teaching reactor experiments. These modules and parts from the modules are still being used and are being disseminated off-campus as a part of our distance education effort. The second largest expenditure was sending students to the ANS to present student papers on work that they had done the previous year underwritten by INIE funds. The remaining expenditures were IDC charges and minor travel expenses to give students a tour of a medical facility. Once again we wish to express of sincere appreciation of the INIE program and hope that the return on investment is appreciated by the DOE. Although INIE has come to a close, looking back at all the Consortium has accomplished is astounding. And, as was hoped, these funds have proved to be a springboard for continuing work, particularly at Texas A and M. With the resurgence of nuclear power, the utilities have realized that the nuclear workforce in the near future will be too small for the task of bringing dozens of new plants on line and have turned their attention to the URRs to help feed the workforce pipeline. The distance education modules developed at the A and M are soon to be broadcast throughout the country to help train a new generation of nuclear workers. Our students at the Nuclear Science Center at being snapped up by the nuclear power plants after graduating. Our research projects at A and M have all ended with new data, new ways of looking at old problems, and produced a covey of good students. I want to say 'Thanks' with utmost sincerity because without the INIE funds our efforts would yield a small fraction of the accomplishments you see in this report.

  3. Recent progress in the feasibility study for the first nuclear power plant in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adiwardojo

    1997-01-01

    The energy consumption in Indonesia has been continually increasing since 1970 at an average rate of ∼ 10.6%/year. Specifically, for the island of Java, which consumes ∼ 80% of Indonesia's electricity, the installed capacity by PLN was 6363MW in 1990/91. This has increased by ∼ 17%/year during the past three years. Additional increase in electrical consumption of the Java-Bali system projects the need for the installed capacity to reach 31,845 MW in 2003/04. In anticipation of this major addition of installed capacity, the government of Indonesia is conducting feasibility studies of the nuclear option as a means of filling the projected deficit or gap where other fuel options are likely to reach their limits. This paper describes the scope of the present feasibility study including energy economics and financing, technical and safety aspects, the fuel cycle and waste management, general management, and site and environmental studies. (author). 4 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs

  4. The reform of the Moldovan nuclear and radiological regulatory infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzdugan, Artur

    2008-01-01

    Establishment of an independent and efficient regulatory body was recognized as a high level state priority in the last years. On May 11, 2006, the Parliament approved the new Law 111-XVI 'On safe deployment of nuclear and radiological activities'. According to the Law, there is being established a single regulatory body - National Agency for Regulation of Nuclear and Radiological Activities (further 'Regulator') and replaced those four domestic domestic regulatory bodies, being earlier in force. On february 28, 2007, the government has approved its Regulation and structure. The Regulator is established under the Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources, but having the necessary financial and decision independence, The Director General of the Regulator is appointed by the Prime-Minister upon the recommendation of the respective Minister. The Regulator is responsible for the authorization, review and assessment on regulation, norms, inspection and enforcement. The mains kinds of activities with ionizing radiation sources are subjects of authorization by licensing of registration. The authorizations are issued if the user respects fully the conditions of legal norms forwarded by the Regulator. Authorizations are delivered under the form of license or certificates of registration, respective for I-III or IV-V categories of used ionizing radiation sources. For the first time, it is introduced in practice the categorization of radioactive sources, based on IAEA recommendations. Certificates of registration are issued by the Regulator, contrary to the licenses, which are issued or revoked by the Chamber of Licensing, on the base of the Regulator written notification. All services of the Regulator are free of charge. The Inspectorate is established as the subdivision of the Regulator. It is subordinated directly to the Director General of the Regulator, who is the Main State Inspector from the office. The inspectors have the right to perform inspections independent or

  5. Republic of Uganda National Presentation on Nuclear Power Infrastructure Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbit, B.; Tungotyo, T.D

    2010-01-01

    The total installed electricity capacity is 595.8 MW mainly hydropower, cogeneration from biomass and thermal power. The Installed Capacity is expected to rise to about 802 MW in 2011 with commissioning of Bujagali hydropower Plant currently under construction, and other mini hydropower plants. Current contribution to the Energy Supply Pattern: Electricity 1.1%, Oil products 9.5% and Biomass 89.4%. (Uganda Energy balance, 2009). The need to drift from use of Biomass as source of energy prompted the consideration of energy supply options which are environmentally friendly. This includes the energy efficiency campaigns, renewable energy technologies and NPP. Uganda government intends to substantially increase power generation capacity in the next 20 years of which nuclear will have significant contribution. Legal framework has been put in place and currently building of capacity through training of young scientists. Ministry of Energy and Mineral Development is the home of all the energy Sector programmes including the nuclear Energy Programme. The Atomic Energy Act 2008 has been promulgated and the Atomic Energy Council was established to regulate the peaceful application of Atomic energy. The Council is mandated to provide protection and safety of individuals, society and the environment from the dangers resulting from ionizing radiation

  6. Analysis of economic and infrastructure issues associated with hydrogen production from nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, W.A.; Gorensek, M.B.; Danko, E.; Schultz, K.R.; Richards, M.B.; Brown, L.C.

    2004-01-01

    Consideration is being given to the large-scale transition of the world's energy system from one based on carbon fuels to one based on the use of hydrogen as the carrier. This transition is necessitated by the declining resource base of conventional oil and gas, air quality concerns, and the threat of global climate change linked to greenhouse gas emissions. Since hydrogen can be produced from water using non-carbon primary energy sources, it is the ideal sustainable fuel. The options for producing the hydrogen include renewables (e.g. solar and wind), fossil fuels with carbon sequestration, and nuclear energy. A comprehensive study has been initiated to define economically feasible concepts and to determine estimates of efficiency and cost for hydrogen production using next generation nuclear reactors. A unique aspect of the study is the assessment of the integration of a nuclear plant, a hydrogen production process and the broader infrastructure requirements. Hydrogen infrastructure issues directly related to nuclear hydrogen production are being addressed, and the projected cost, value and end-use market for hydrogen will be determined. The infrastructure issues are critical, since the combined cost of storing, transporting, distributing, and retailing the hydrogen product could well exceed the cost of hydrogen production measured at the plant gate. The results are expected to be useful in establishing the potential role that nuclear hydrogen can play in the future hydrogen economy. Approximately half of the three-year study has been completed. Results to date indicate that nuclear produced hydrogen can be competitive with hydrogen produced from natural gas for use at oil refineries or ammonia plants, indicating a potential early market opportunity for large-scale centralized hydrogen production. Extension of the hydrogen infrastructure from these large industrial users to distributed hydrogen users such as refueling stations and fuel cell generators could

  7. The bomb as option. Motivation for the development of a nuclear infrastructure in the Federal Republic of Germany until 1963

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanel, Tilmann

    2015-01-01

    The book on the motivation for the development of a nuclear infrastructure in the Federal Republic of Germany until 1963 discusses the following issues: History of the German reactor development during the time of the National Socialism and World War II, reactor research abroad (examples Sweden and Switzerland), protagonists and motivation (politics, science, economy, army), the development of a nuclear infrastructure, results and consequences of the German nuclear policy until 1963.

  8. Network computing infrastructure to share tools and data in global nuclear energy partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Guehee; Suzuki, Yoshio; Teshima, Naoya

    2010-01-01

    CCSE/JAEA (Center for Computational Science and e-Systems/Japan Atomic Energy Agency) integrated a prototype system of a network computing infrastructure for sharing tools and data to support the U.S. and Japan collaboration in GNEP (Global Nuclear Energy Partnership). We focused on three technical issues to apply our information process infrastructure, which are accessibility, security, and usability. In designing the prototype system, we integrated and improved both network and Web technologies. For the accessibility issue, we adopted SSL-VPN (Security Socket Layer - Virtual Private Network) technology for the access beyond firewalls. For the security issue, we developed an authentication gateway based on the PKI (Public Key Infrastructure) authentication mechanism to strengthen the security. Also, we set fine access control policy to shared tools and data and used shared key based encryption method to protect tools and data against leakage to third parties. For the usability issue, we chose Web browsers as user interface and developed Web application to provide functions to support sharing tools and data. By using WebDAV (Web-based Distributed Authoring and Versioning) function, users can manipulate shared tools and data through the Windows-like folder environment. We implemented the prototype system in Grid infrastructure for atomic energy research: AEGIS (Atomic Energy Grid Infrastructure) developed by CCSE/JAEA. The prototype system was applied for the trial use in the first period of GNEP. (author)

  9. Network Computing Infrastructure to Share Tools and Data in Global Nuclear Energy Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Guehee; Suzuki, Yoshio; Teshima, Naoya

    CCSE/JAEA (Center for Computational Science and e-Systems/Japan Atomic Energy Agency) integrated a prototype system of a network computing infrastructure for sharing tools and data to support the U.S. and Japan collaboration in GNEP (Global Nuclear Energy Partnership). We focused on three technical issues to apply our information process infrastructure, which are accessibility, security, and usability. In designing the prototype system, we integrated and improved both network and Web technologies. For the accessibility issue, we adopted SSL-VPN (Security Socket Layer-Virtual Private Network) technology for the access beyond firewalls. For the security issue, we developed an authentication gateway based on the PKI (Public Key Infrastructure) authentication mechanism to strengthen the security. Also, we set fine access control policy to shared tools and data and used shared key based encryption method to protect tools and data against leakage to third parties. For the usability issue, we chose Web browsers as user interface and developed Web application to provide functions to support sharing tools and data. By using WebDAV (Web-based Distributed Authoring and Versioning) function, users can manipulate shared tools and data through the Windows-like folder environment. We implemented the prototype system in Grid infrastructure for atomic energy research: AEGIS (Atomic Energy Grid Infrastructure) developed by CCSE/JAEA. The prototype system was applied for the trial use in the first period of GNEP.

  10. Assessment of infrastructure development requirements for embarking on nuclear power program in Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, N.; Ilijovski, I.; Popovski, V.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades nuclear energy has been proven as reliable and economical energy supply that is capable of meeting demanding energy market requirements. Many countries around the world consider entering into new nuclear energy programs and building new power reactors for satisfying their increasing electrical energy needs. A nuclear power program is a major undertaking requiring careful planning, preparation and investment, and human resources for building adequate nuclear infrastructure. Preparations for making a decision to enter into a new nuclear energy program requires a significant amount of financial and human resources, time, and assistance from already developed countries and international nuclear organizations. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from Vienna provides technical help, financial assistance, and documented knowledge that are important for countries facing the challenge of entering nuclear programs for the first time. The IAEA organizes technical courses and information exchange meetings for new countries at which experiences and lessons learned are provided to new countries. This paper describes the key activities in the process for making a decision to enter a new nuclear energy program. It describes the efforts currently being conducted in the Republic of Macedonia in the direction of collecting information, performing various feasibility studies, and engaging in regional cooperation for utilizing experiences of the regional countries in performing such activities, and in developing their nuclear power programs. This paper also provides an overview of the IAEA documents and recommendations that are relevant for this topic

  11. IRIS guidelines. 2014 ed. Integrated Review of Infrastructure for Safety (IRIS) for self-assessment when establishing the safety infrastructure for a nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The IAEA safety standards reflect an international consensus on what constitutes a high level of safety for protecting people and the environment, and therefore represent what all Member States should achieve, whilst recognizing the ultimate responsibility of each State to ensure safety when implementing a nuclear power programme. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSG-16, entitled Establishing the Safety Infrastructure for a Nuclear Power Programme was published in order to provide recommendations, presented in the form of sequential actions, on meeting safety requirements progressively during the initial three phases of the development of safety, as described in INSAG-22, Nuclear Safety Infrastructure for a National Nuclear Power Programme Supported by the IAEA Fundamental Safety Principles. To that end, the 200 safety related actions, which are proposed by SSG-16, constitute a roadmap to establish a foundation for promoting a high level of safety over the entire lifetime of the nuclear power plant. These actions reflect international consensus on good practice in order to achieve full implementation of IAEA safety standards. The IAEA has developed a methodology and tool, the Integrated Review of Infrastructure for Safety (IRIS), to assist States in undertaking self-assessment with respect to SSG-16 recommendations when establishing the safety infrastructure for a nuclear power programme, and to develop an action plan for improvement. The IRIS methodology and the associated tool are fully compatible with the IAEA safety standards and are also used, when appropriate, in the preparation of review missions, such as the Integrated Regulatory Review Service and advisory missions. The present guidelines describe the IRIS methodology for self-assessment against SSG-16 recommendations. Through IRIS implementation, every organization concerned with nuclear safety may gain proper awareness and engage in a continuous progressive process to develop the effective national

  12. Research Devices Maintenance Programs and Safety Network Infrastructures in Nuclear Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainudin Jaafar; Muhammad Zahidee Taat; Ishak Mansor

    2015-01-01

    Instrumentation and Automation Center (PIA) is responsible in carrying out maintenance work for building safety infrastructure and area for nuclear scientific and research work. Care cycle and nuclear scientific tools starting from the preparation of specifications until devices disposal- to get the maximum output from devices therefore PIA has introduced Effective and Comprehensive Maintenance Plan under Management/ Trust/ Development/ Science Fund budgets and also user, Asset Management, caring and handling of the devices. This paper also discussed more on case study related to using and handling so that it can be guidance and standard when its involving mishandling, improper maintenance, inadequacy of supervision and others including improvement suggestion programs. (author)

  13. Extreme Light Infrastructure Nuclear Physics (ELI–NP: Present status and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamfir N.V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme Light InfrastructureNuclear Physics (ELI–NP, a new Research Center under construction, will use extreme electromagnetic fields for nuclear physics research and will be operational in 2018. The status of the Project implementation will be presented. At ELI–NP, a high power laser system together with a very brilliant gamma beam are the two main research tools. Their targeted operational parameters will be described. The related experimental set-ups will be presented, together with the main directions of the research envisioned.

  14. International workshop on infrastructure for nuclear energy development. The experience of Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco, M.; Menendez, E.; Palacios, L.; Brime, J.; Ruiz, A.; Jimenez, J.L.; Santamaria, J.

    1996-01-01

    Certain aspects in Spain are presented helping to establish an adequate infrastructure for the re-launching of nuclear energy, on the basis of the situation traditionally existing in this country, and taking into account the different points of view of all the areas involved. Historical evolution, current situation and medium-term future scenario are discussed.A series of measures have to be taken at institutional level, in order for the nuclear option to be a reality in the future. (R.P.)

  15. Strategic areas for non-electric application of nuclear energy in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasmojo, S.; Subki, I.R.; Lasman, A.N.

    1997-01-01

    An attempt is made to identify strategic areas, whereby non-electric application of nuclear energy may be justified. Subject to further evaluation, particularly on the economic aspects, non-electric application of nuclear energy in Indonesia may have justifiable strategic role in the long term sustainability of the development of the country. The key arguments are: (a) within not too far distant future, domestic resources constraints of oil and natural gas will strongly be felt, especially if the current trend in the rate of production of the two commodities has to be maintained to satisfy the growing demand for energy and to secure foreign exchange earning; (b) nuclear option, in concurrent with coal and biomass options, can provide the need for heat supply required to undertake strategic schemes for (i) improving oil production capacity; (ii) prolong the availability of oil and natural gas by displacing their uses as heat sources in industry, whenever appropriate; (iii) coal conversion to synthetic natural gas (SNG), or synthesis gas, to substitute or at least supplement the use of natural gas as industrial chemical feedstock; and (iv) sea water desalination by evaporation, to overcome shortage of fresh drinking and industrial water supply, as well as to secure its reliability and availability. In terms of carbon emission to the atmosphere, the nuclear option offers an interesting choice. In view of those, serious consideration for further technical assessment, and thorough evaluation on the economic viability and social acceptability for the option is recommended. (author). 7 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  16. Indonesia's present status and needs of human resource development in nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruslan, Jeni; Sagala, F.P.

    2000-01-01

    BATAN, started out as a governmental committee established in 1954, has a new organizational structure, based on Presidential Decree of 1998. BATAN has developed its researches in almost practically all-nuclear fields. The situation in Indonesia has been much influenced by the economic crisis, which still being faced by Indonesia. BATAN's strategic planning is described in four areas, those are: 1. Basic human needs, 2. Energy, natural resources and environment, 3. Industry, 4. Socio-cultural and institution. Priority has been given to fulfill, as well as to promote agriculture, health and the industry related to people's welfare, which may develop and improve the immediate needs of the people. In the meantime, we have made considerable investments in manpower development in anticipation of the introduction of nuclear power. BATAN, as of September 1999, has 3889 employees, 26 % of them have bachelor degree, 6 % hold master degrees, and only 2% hold doctoral degree, a total of 34 % employees with university education. Others 11 % have either non-vocational or vocational education beyond High School. The rest of 55 % have high school education or lower, they are administrative clerks (25 %) or technicians (30 %). In the human resources development, BATAN's Education and Training Center, in collaboration with some universities and other national/international institutions, is managing education and training programs for employees. To date, there are 43 BATAN employees studying in various universities in Japan, while another 42 employees are studying in six different countries. Research and Development that have more direct impact to the community will become a priority in the coming years. Without undermining the importance of basic research in advanced fields, we will expect to have more research on application to optimize utilization of research reactors and related facilities for the benefit of both the energy and non-energy sectors. (Tanaka, Y.)

  17. Core designs of ABWR for proposed of the first nuclear power plant in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yohannes Sardjono; Masanori Aritomi; Larry E-Fennern

    2011-01-01

    Indonesia as an archipelago has been experiencing high growth industry and energy demand due to high population growth, dynamic economic activities. The total population is around 230 million people and 75 % to the total population is living in Java. The introduction of Nuclear Power Plant on Java Bali electricity grid will be possible in 2022 for 2 GWe, using proven technology reactor like ABWR or others light water reactor with nominal power 1,000 MWe. In this case, the rated thermal power for the equilibrium cycles is 3,926 MWt, the cycle length is 18 month and overall capacity factor is 87 %. The designs were performed for an 872-fuel bundles ABWR core using GE-11 fuel type in an 9×9 fuel rod arrays with 2 Large Central Water Rods (LCWR). The calculations were divided into two steps; the first is to generate bundle library and the other is to make the thermal and reactivity limits satisfied for the core designs. Toshiba General Electric Bundle lattice Analysis (TGBLA) and PANACEA computer codes were used as designs tools. TGBLA is a General Electric proprietary computer code which is used to generate bundle lattice library for fuel designs. PANACEA is General Electric proprietary computer code which is used as thermal hydraulic and neutronic coupled BWR core simulator. This result of core designs describes reactivity and thermal margins i.e.; Maximum Linear Heat Generation rate (MLHGR) is lower than 14.4 kW/ft, Minimum Critical Power Ratio (MCPR) is upper than 1.25, Hot Excess Reactivity (HOTXS) is upper than 1 % Dk at BOC and 0.8 % Dk at 200 MWD/ST and Cold Shutdown Margin Reactivity (CSDM) is upper than 1 % Dk. It is concluded that the equilibrium core design using GE-11 fuel bundle type satisfies the core design objectives for the proposed of the firs Indonesia ABWR Nuclear Power Plant. (author)

  18. Cyber security in nuclear power plants and its portability to other industrial infrastructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champigny, Sebastien; Gupta, Deeksha; Watson, Venesa; Waedt, Karl [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Power generation increasingly relies on decentralised and interconnected computerised systems. Concepts like ''Industrial Internet of Things'' of the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC), and ''Industry 4.0'' find their way in this strategic industry. Risk of targeted exploits of errors and vulnerabilities increases with complexity, interconnectivity and decentralization. Inherently stringent security requirements and features make nuclear computerised applications and systems a benchmark for industrial counterparts seeking to hedge against those risks. Consequently, this contribution presents usual cyber security regulations and practices for nuclear power plants. It shows how nuclear cyber security can be ported and used in an industrial context to protect critical infrastructures against cyber-attacks and industrial espionage.

  19. Cyber security in nuclear power plants and its portability to other industrial infrastructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champigny, Sebastien; Gupta, Deeksha; Watson, Venesa; Waedt, Karl

    2017-01-01

    Power generation increasingly relies on decentralised and interconnected computerised systems. Concepts like ''Industrial Internet of Things'' of the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC), and ''Industry 4.0'' find their way in this strategic industry. Risk of targeted exploits of errors and vulnerabilities increases with complexity, interconnectivity and decentralization. Inherently stringent security requirements and features make nuclear computerised applications and systems a benchmark for industrial counterparts seeking to hedge against those risks. Consequently, this contribution presents usual cyber security regulations and practices for nuclear power plants. It shows how nuclear cyber security can be ported and used in an industrial context to protect critical infrastructures against cyber-attacks and industrial espionage.

  20. Integration of Nuclear Safeguards Infrastructure Development with UNSCR 1540 Implementation - Context and Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreicer, M; Essner, J

    2008-11-03

    On 28 April 2004, the UN Security Council adopted Resolution 1540 (2004), obliging States, inter alia, to refrain from supporting by any means non-State actors from developing, acquiring, manufacturing, possessing, transporting, transferring or using nuclear, chemical or biological weapons and their delivery systems. It imposes binding obligations on all States to establish domestic controls to prevent the proliferation of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons, and their means of delivery, including by establishing appropriate controls over related materials. This mandate was extended an additional two years with the adoption of Resolution 1673 (2006) and an additional three years with the adoption of Resolution 1810 (2008). UNSCR 1540 is a key nonproliferation and counterterrorism tool that needs to be implemented well. Its obligations are a core part of nuclear infrastructure development.

  1. Implementation status of the extreme light infrastructure - nuclear physics (ELI-NP) project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gales, S.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2015-01-01

    The Project Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) is part of the European Strategic Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) Roadmap. ELI will be built as a network of three complementary pillars at the frontier of laser technologies. The ELI-NP pillar (NP for Nuclear Physics) is under construction near Bucharest (Romania) and will develop a scientific program using two 10 PW lasers and a Compton back-scattering high-brilliance and intense gamma beam, a marriage of laser and accelerator technology at the frontier of knowledge. In the present paper, the technical description of the facility, the present status of the project as well as the science, applications and future perspectives will be discussed

  2. Implementation status of the extreme light infrastructure - nuclear physics (ELI-NP) project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gales, S., E-mail: sydney.gales@eli-np.ro; Zamfir, N. V., E-mail: sydney.gales@eli-np.ro [ELI-NP, Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 30 Reactorului Street, RO-077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2015-02-24

    The Project Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) is part of the European Strategic Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) Roadmap. ELI will be built as a network of three complementary pillars at the frontier of laser technologies. The ELI-NP pillar (NP for Nuclear Physics) is under construction near Bucharest (Romania) and will develop a scientific program using two 10 PW lasers and a Compton back-scattering high-brilliance and intense gamma beam, a marriage of laser and accelerator technology at the frontier of knowledge. In the present paper, the technical description of the facility, the present status of the project as well as the science, applications and future perspectives will be discussed.

  3. Nuclear Power Introduction in Indonesia : Securing the National Energy Supply for Sustainable Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyana; Sudi Ariyanto; Arnold Y Soetrisnanto

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear power construction planning study has already done by BATAN. The studies that cover various aspects have also done related to this preparation. The research centers in BATAN that have activities in energy application are directed to this preparation. This paper will generally describe the activities and result of the preparation study, especially related to technology aspect, site aspect, and social-economic impact. The preparation study has taken into account of some aspects, but still need updated and some more complementary study. The choice of technology will determine the ability for technology transfer. Industrial infrastructure and the design and engineering capability are the key role for self reliance in nuclear power technology. But the technology transfer will not succeed without government support. Muria Peninsula, precisely in Ujung Lemahabang has become the first candidate site, while Ujung Grenggengan and Ujung Watu as a second and third candidate sites. Though site could accommodate 7.000 MWe installed capacity, but are need to consider stability and capacity of transmission line to channeling the nuclear power out put in Jawa-Madura-Bali grid interconnection. From the economic impact aspect, nuclear power is competitive among other power plant system in order the role of nuclear power to give a solution in energy optimum mix policy and will reduce oil fuel consumption. (author)

  4. Cote D’voire National Presentation on Nuclear Power Infrastructure Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Limited production capacity to meet energy demand is 1316 MW in 2010 with impossibility to satisfy the demand in the high scenario of 41 000 GWh in 2020. There is necessity of using other sources of production that include nuclear power plant for a mass production. NEPIO not formally established, its establishment is underway to implement the entire infrastructure necessary to achieve the nuclear power plant in Côte d’Ivoire. Projects of nuclear law and decree were drawn up with the legal assistance of the IAEA. Universities and engineers schools do not offer courses adapted to the development of a nuclear industry. Therefore the Government is taking measures for implementation of the NEPIO and ratifying all the international agreement connected to nuclear power plant. Face to the constantly increasing energy demand, Côte d’Ivoire showed its intention to develop an nuclear power programme for the satisfaction of needs by 2025. To implement this programme, a national strategic plan has been established

  5. Public acceptance of nuclear energy in Indonesia. A traditional puppet show for NPP in Java

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyudi Soeliarno

    1995-01-01

    In Indonesia, activities on public relation have been carried out since the establishment of the agency responsible for research and development of atomic energy in 1958 (which later in the year 1964 became Batan, National Atomic Energy Agency), wile activities on public acceptance started 'at the end of 1985. After the Government indicated that it has to look seriously into the construction of the NPP, as from 1990, the public acceptance (PA) activities have been intensified in anticipation of the construction of the first NPP. An important part of the preparatory activities for the construction of the NPP is preparing the people, particularly those who live near the NPP site, to accept and to support the NPP program. The interdepartmental team has bee established in August 1990 consisting of representatives of several institutions, namely, Ministry of Information, Ministry of Domestic Affairs, Ministry of Defense, Land Utilization Agency, State Electricity Corporation, Office of the Minister for Population and Environment, and Batan. This team, called the 'Team on Public Acceptance of NPP', has the main task providing extensive information to the public concerning the government plan to construct nuclear power plants in Indonesia. From 1990 through the middle of 1994 the activity of the Team on Public Acceptance of NPP was focused on providing information on te NPP program to the local community leaders and the public, particularly in the districts of the NPP site in the Muria Peninsula region. Its main purpose was to precondition the people who live near the NPP site to accept the NPP in their neighbourhood without fear

  6. Analysis of good governance towards optimizing of nuclear energy utilization in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eko Riyadi

    2011-01-01

    Good Governance is very influential in the process of government organization, especially related to information technology (IT Governance), that its implementation will ensure organizational transparency, efficiency and effectiveness. It can even avoid the formation of islands-of-information that not only making ineffective governance, but also potentially cause data integrity problems at later. To support the optimization of monitoring the nuclear energy utilization in Indonesia, Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) should implement this IT Governance, which can be applied when an organization already know the IT maturity level in support of his organization. Assessment of IT maturity level can be conducted using a best practice such as Control Objectives for Information and Related Technology (CobiT), which has been recognized internationally. Then determine a target of IT maturity that want to be achieved, by determining the Critical Success Factor (CSF) including recommendations for its achievement. In addition, the determination of the impact and effort needs to be conducted to get the prioritization of the CSF achievement. The next step is establishing Key Performance Indicator (KPI) that can measure the success rate of performance, so that organizational goals to provide excellent service to the community can be realized easily. (author)

  7. Analysis of the Institutional Framework For Radioactive Waste Management in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    D.S. Wisnubroto

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of the infrastructure for radioactive waste management in Indonesia has been studied using several parameters, i.e. policy, regulatory authorities and their regulations, implementing organizations and financial system. By considering the International trends and the Indonesian program to utilize nuclear power, the infrastructure of radioactive waste management needs to be improved. The Act No. 10/1997 on Nuclear Energy for the future beneficence will have to be amended to incorpo...

  8. An example of a complete treatment cycle for low- and medium-level waste at the nuclear research centre at Pupspitek-Serpong (Indonesia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eymeri, M.J.; Gauthey, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear power installations and nuclear research laboratories produce large quantities of liquid and solid waste in Indonesia. By controlling the entire waste treatment process from production to storage, TECHNICATOME has been able to set up for BATAN (BADAN TENEGA ATOM NASIONAL) the Indonesian nuclear research centre, a radioactive waste treatment plant on the PUPSPITEK site

  9. Resilience framework for critical infrastructures: An empirical study in a nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labaka, Leire; Hernantes, Josune; Sarriegi, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    The safety and proper functioning of Critical Infrastructures (CIs) are essential for ensuring the welfare of society, which puts the issue of improving their resilience level at the forefront of the field of crisis management. Most of the resilience-building principles defined in the literature do not cover all the dimensions that make up resilience and most of them only focus within the boundaries of the CI, neglecting the role of the external agents that also have an influence on enhancing resilience. Furthermore, most of the principles that are present in the literature are theoretical and difficult to implement in practice. In light of this situation, the aim of this research is to present a holistic resilience framework for critical infrastructures in order to improve their resilience level by taking into account internal and external agents and covering all the resilience dimensions. Furthermore, this framework has been defined in close collaboration with the general management of CIs to facilitate its implementation in practice. Finally, in order to illustrate the value added of this framework it was implemented in a nuclear plant. - Highlights: • Resilience protects against foreseen and unpredicted events. • There are two types of resilience: internal resilience and external resilience. • Sixteen policies and thirty sub-policies assist on building resilience. • Power nuclear plant focused on risk management approach rather than resilience. • The plant’s event driven risk management was enhanced with an all hazard approach

  10. Maintaining knowledge, training and infrastructure for research and development in nuclear safety. A note by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this INSAG Note is to emphasize the importance of maintaining capabilities for nuclear research and education, especially with regard to safety aspects, so that nuclear safety may be maintained in IAEA Member States, and to alert Member States to the potential for significant harm if the infrastructure for research, development and education is not maintained

  11. Radiation and Environmental Protection Programme for the First Upcoming Nuclear Power Plant in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syahrir

    2007-01-01

    Indonesia plans to operate the first nuclear power plant (NPP) by 2016. A radiation and environmental protection arrangement for NPPs is part of the whole safety system which is embedded in every practice involved radiation exposure to workers and members of public. A radiation and environmental protection programme for the NPP should adhere to international standards and mainstream in order to be acceptable to the public and international communities. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has recommended a radiation protection standard for NPPs as studied in this paper. Focus is given to the operational aspects of radiation protection program and discharge control to the environment. Some documents related to Safety Analysis Reports were used as working examples on its implementation. The study includes the classification of working areas and access control; local rules and supervision of work; work planning and work permits; protective clothing and protective equipment; facilities, shielding and equipment; application of the principle of optimization of protection; and removal or reduction in intensity of sources of radiation. The radiological protection aspects blend together in the whole NPP practices, each individual has his/her own responsibility in association with the radiation protection program implementation. It also present in the whole steps of NPP preparation up to its decommissioning. Promise on safety improvement and significant dose reduction in the recent development in NPP technology should scrutinized so that the option of proven technology as required in commercial power reactor licensing considers this tendency. (author)

  12. Calculation of investment cost and electricity tariff on first building of Nuclear power plant in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochamad Nasrullah; Sudi Arianto

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear power plant as one alternative power plant for Indonesia is expected to attract interest of investors to invest in electricity sector. Calculation of investment cost and electricity tariff is a nearly necessary Information needed by investors. Spread sheet calculations on construction cost including Interest During Construction and escalation as well as financial viability are implemented. Result of the study show that overnight cost before escalation is US $ 2.682.865.200,- and after IDC and escalation it becomes US $ 3.795.712.088 or 1.807,5 US$/k We. Levelized Tariff is at around 4,57 cents/kWh. Levelized Tariff is 3,5 cents/kWh not feasible to the project of because all financial parameter show negative value. The project is financially feasible if calculated levelized tariff within arrange of 4,0 cents/kWh-5,5 cents/kWh. The most profitable tariff for investor is within arrange of 4,87 cents/kWh - 5,11 cents/kWh. (author)

  13. Los Alamos nuclear enterprise resource and infrastructure model (LA-NERIM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ning; Dale, Crystal; Kern, Kristen; Scott, Sara

    2009-01-01

    In this nascent global 'Nuclear Renaissance', potential shortages of human resources and supply chains have become the top concerns for the policymakers and industry leaders. A number of industry studies have examined the potential supply shortages in qualified labors for specific deployment scenarios, the general shortage in nuclear engineers, and ways to ramp up educational and training pipelines. A Los Alamos National Laboratory team has been developing a nuclear enterprise resource and infrastructure model (LA-NERIM) to provide a dynamic and versatile tool for the systematic study of resource needs and flows. LA-NERIM is built around a stock-and-flow model of the nuclear fuel cycle model using the iThinkTM software, with modules and connections describing all the front-end, reactor operation and back-end processes. It is driven by nuclear power demand growth. We are using LA-NERIM to study the human resource development (HRD) needs for a number of scenarios for US and Russia. The US study includes a comparison of three scenarios of maintaining current capacity, expansion at 500 MWe/yr and maintaining current market share. We are also examining the impact of the sharply peaked demographics of the ageing US nuclear workforce on future growth. LA-NERIM can be modularized with more detailed labor categories and customer defined boundary conditions to provide high fidelity projection of dynamic staffing needs for nuclear vendors, owner/operators and suppliers. With different kinds of inputs, LA-NERIM can be used to project needs of other resources, such as concrete, steels, capital outlays and manufacturing capacities. Coupled with data from NFCSim, another Los Alamos code that calculates the quantities and isotopic compositions in the flows of nuclear materials throughout the fuel cycles, LA-NERIM has the potential to become a powerful and versatile system tool for policymakers and industry leaders to examine and compare the feasibilities and impacts of various

  14. Comparative study of Malaysian and Philippine regulatory infrastructures on radiation and nuclear safety with international standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cayabo, Lynette B.

    2013-06-01

    This study presents the results of the critical reviews, analysis, and comparison of the regulatory infrastructures for radiation and nuclear safety of Malaysis and the Philippines usi ng the IAEA safety requirements, GSR Part 1, G overnment, Legal and Regulatory Framework for Safety'' as the main basis and in part, the GSR Part 3, R adiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources: International Basic Safety Standards . The scope of the comparison includes the elements of the relevant legislations, the regulatory system and processes including the core functions of the regulatory body (authorization, review and assessment, inspection and enforcement, development of regulations and guides); and the staffing and training of regulatory body. The respective availabe data of the Malaysian and Philippine regulatory infrastructures and current practices were gathered and analyzed. Recommendations to fill the gaps and strengthen the existing regulatory infrastructure of each country was given using as bases relevant IAEA safety guides. Based on the analysis made, the main findings are: the legislations of both countries do not contain al the elements of teh national policy and strategy for safety as well as those of teh framework for safety in GR Part I. Among the provision that need to be included in the legislations are: emergency planning and response; decommissioning of facilities safe management of radioactive wastes and spent fuel; competence for safety; and technical sevices. Provisions on coordination of different authorities with safety responsibilities within the regulatory framework for safety as well as liaison with advisory bodies and support organizations need to be enhanced. The Philippines needs to establish an independent regulatory body, ie. separate from organizations charged with promotion of nuclear technologies and responsible for facilitiesand activities. Graded approach on the system of notification and authorization by registration and

  15. The role of national consultant services industries to support the first nuclear power plant programme in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharu Dewi; Sahala Lumbanraja; Sriyana

    2007-01-01

    Study has been done which concerning the role of Indonesian National Consultant Services Industries to support the First Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Programme in Indonesia. NPP programme activities will be success if the studies should be started with good planning. To obtain the optimal results, the opportunity and the role of national consultants should be considered to the localization of NPP Programme to be bigger. Utilizing of national consultants services can be expected to become second opinion which is to play important role in socialization of NPP Programme. The Government and NPP Project Owner's candidate should analysis, plan and implement the Nuclear Power Plant Programme activities, started from identification of the available national consultants, considering the national consults procurement process, definition of scope of works of national consultants activities, carry out the selection of national consultants, evaluation, monitoring and supervision so that the utilizing of national consultants will give benefit more effective, efficient, economic appropriate objectives and good quality. This study to assess the structure and type of national consultants, works package which can be done by national consultants, selection methods of national consultants, constraints of national consultants and enhancing of the role of national consultants to involve and support in the nuclear power plant programme in Indonesia. The research methods are literature study, consultation with resource person and exploring of website/internet. (author)

  16. Nuclear knowledge management: a very fundament of a national radiation protection infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, Slobodan

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Knowledge is fundament of any progress, and so is the case with nuclear knowledge (NK) for radiation protection. However, this axiomatic and notorious fact is sometimes interpreted/understood in a sense that knowledge is there for granted. If persistent, this dangerously wrong attitude may silently lead to prevailing of ignorance vs. knowledge/ competence and to RP degradation in much respect, with far reaching consequences. Having behind many decades of experience with research, development and utilization of radiation sources for various purposes (including both electric power generation and non-power applications) and with renewed expectations from nuclear sector in solving global energy crisis in front, nuclear knowledge management (NKM) is getting a growing attention lately. This comes due to accentuation, in many counties, of issues with NK creation, dissemination, transfer, preservation and maintenance, or its proper verification/ employing, positioning versus other knowledge, even valorization and public acceptance. Therein, RP is among the areas much sensitive and depending on the effects mentioned. RP infrastructure in a country comprising regulatory elements (institutional and legal framework), technical support organizations (service providers), educational institutions (universities, training centers), RP associations, source manufacturers, traders and users themselves is, as a matter of fact, a complex system of multidisciplinary nature. Physicists, chemists, biologists, environmentalists, medical physicists and practitioners, engineers, managers, lawyers, technicians have their place within the system. It is a common denominator for them all to need a particular NK pertinent to their duties. This very knowledge cannot be missed. Also, it cannot be improvised or substituted by some other knowledge from their respective specialties, neither by that of other people with different backgrounds, who might come in replacement. Unfortunately, it

  17. Steps to implement the legal and regulatory infrastructure for physical protection of nuclear material in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Quijada, R.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The signature of Peru to become part of the Convention of Physical Protection of Nuclear Material in 1995 has implied an obligation to formalize the legal and regulatory infrastructure for this purpose. As first step, physical protection measures were formalized on the two nuclear facilities: one critical assembly of zero power (RP0) and another research reactor of 10 Mw thermal power (RP10). Both of the installations use low enriched uranium nuclear fuel (Material and Testing Material - MTR type). On the other side, even thorium was put in perspective to control; currently it is being used for non-nuclear purposes and has not been included inside the physical protection measures. Its physical and chemical form and its small quantity do not warrant for applying the Convention. The physical protection measures implemented in the research reactor are well depicted and it is concluded that the physical protection system meets the recommendations of INFCIRC/225/Rev.3. The critical facility (RP0), as having nuclear material categorized III, has implemented a less restrictive system but enough to meet the requirements. In 1999 an evaluation of all physical protection systems was performed for these two nuclear installations. This evaluation took into account the recommendations of INFCIRC/225/Rev.4. The general conclusion was that the performance of physical protection system was suitable to the categories of nuclear material - II and III - and that the installations where nuclear material is used were suitably protected against non-authorized or illegal removal of nuclear material and sabotage. However, some of components of the system were not appropriately working and could make all of the system weak. Another of the identified problems was the lack of a rule on physical protection and also the lack of the Design Basis Threat, although this fact was well known due the social conditions in the country. The second undertaking has been to prepare the rule on

  18. Thermal-hydraulic R and D infrastructure for water cooled reactors of the Indian nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayan, P.K.; Jain, V.; Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2009-01-01

    R and D has been the critical ingredient of Indian Nuclear Power Program from the very inception. Approach to R and D infrastructure has been closely associated with the three-stage nuclear power program that was crafted on the basis of available resources and technology in the short-term and energy security in the long-term. Early R and D efforts were directed at technologies relevant to Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) which are currently the mainstay of Indian nuclear power program. Lately, the R and D program has been steered towards the design and development of advanced and innovative reactors with the twin objective of utilization of abundant thorium and to meet the future challenges to nuclear power such as enhanced safety and reliability, better economy, proliferation resistance etc. Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is an Indian innovative reactor currently being developed to realize the above objectives. Extensive R and D infrastructure has been created to validate the system design and various passive concepts being incorporated in the AHWR. This paper provides a brief review of R and D infrastructure that has been developed at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre for thermal-hydraulic investigations for water-cooled reactors of Indian nuclear power program. (author)

  19. Report on the seminar on supporting industrial infrastructure requirements and development for nuclear power, Vienna, 14-18 April, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    The Seminar on Supporting Industrial Infrastructure Requirements and Development for Nuclear Power reviewed the following problem areas: establishing the programmatic objectives of a realistic national participation and the technology transfer which would be necessary to qualify such a participation; promoting the level of industrialization which would be necessary to attain the targeted national participation; assuring quality in industry by enforcing comprehensive QA programme; setting-up a national R and D infrastructure to assist the transfer of technology and act as a permanent asset to solve problems as they arise in industry

  20. A technical and economic evaluation of reverse osmosis nuclear desalination as applied at the Muria site in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, J.R.; Davies, K.; Vu, T.D.; Aryono, N.A.; Peryoga, Y.

    1998-01-01

    In many regions of the world, the supply of renewable water resources is inadequate to meet current needs, and that from non-renewable sources is being rapidly depleted. Since the worldwide demand for potable water is steadily growing, the result is water shortages that are already reaching serious proportions in many regions. This is particularly true in Indonesia where there is an increasing reliance on bottled water due to shortage of safe, fresh drinking water. To mitigate the stress being placed on water resources, additional fresh water production capability must be developed. Because of Indonesia's long coastline, seawater desalination is a good alternative. The main drawback of desalination, however, is that it is an energy intensive process. Therefore, the increasing global demand for desalted water creates a tremendous collateral demand for new sources of electrical power. In addition to providing a means of meeting regional electricity demand, the CANDU nuclear reactor can also serve as an energy source for a reverse osmosis (RO) seawater desalination plant. In conjunction with the use of electrical energy, waste heat from the reactor is used in the desalination plant to improve the efficiency of the RO process. This is done by using condenser cooling water being discharged from the CANDU reactor as a source of preheated feedwater for the RO system. The system design also makes use of advanced feedwater pretreatment and sophisticated design optimization analyses. The net result is improved efficiency of energy utilization, increased potable water production capability, reduced product water cost and reduced environmental burden. This approach to the integration of a seawater desalination plant with a CANDU nuclear reactor has the advantage of maximizing the benefits of system integration while at the same time minimizing the impacts of physical interaction between the two systems. Consequently, transients in one plant do not necessarily have adverse

  1. Developing the necessary infrastructure. Chapter 1; IAEA activities in support of countries considering embarking on Nuclear Power Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akira, O.

    2010-01-01

    The IAEA supports in a variety of ways in establishing an appropriate infra-structure necessary to secure safe and reliable operation and still maintaining the international safeguards regime, especially in developing countries which are considering introduction of nuclear power programme. The TC projects to support introduction of nuclear power has been formulated and its number increased significantly recently. Various guidance documents have been published by the IAEA recently to enable progressive development of national infrastructure. The IAEA guidance documents constitute a basis of advises to newcomer countries. The recently formulated important mission is INIR mission to review the status of national infrastructure in the context of measuring the distance to the expected milestone. Finally, it is expected that the newcomers would make informed decision-making on going to nuclear power by fully understanding the necessary obligations and national long-term commitment, by confirming viability of nuclear power options in the country's energy plan through Energy Planning and long-term strategic assessment using IAEA guidance and tools

  2. Maintaining knowledge, training and infrastructure for research and development in nuclear safety - INSAG-16. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to emphasize the importance of maintaining capabilities for nuclear research and education, especially with regard to safety aspects, so that nuclear safety may be maintained in IAEA Member States, and to alert Member States to the potential for significant harm if the infrastructure for research, development and education is not maintained. If the infrastructure for nuclear safety is not maintained, there will be a steady decrease in expertise, and thus in capability to respond to new challenges. The lead time in developing replacement educational opportunities is very long, because most institutions will require an indication of the number of enthusiastic potential students before investing in new infrastructure, and potential students may look elsewhere in the absence of an exciting analytical and experimental programme and a growing career field. Once lost, it would require massive inputs of resources from many IAEA Member States to attempt to re-establish the infrastructure, as was done to establish it when nuclear technology was new. The result could be a downward spiral in which expertise is lost, influence of the technical community on the decision making process is diminished, and complacency, fed by diminished technical capability, begins to exert a strong effect. In view of the above, INSAG has the following recommendations: In order to maintain and further enhance the safety of nuclear facilities and to protect workers and the public and the environment from radiological consequences, the infrastructure for safety research (experimental facilities, highly competent staff and modern analytical tools) must be maintained and supported by the responsible governmental organizations as well as by the operating organizations and manufacturers. This support should include international networking and co-operation, including joint funding of centres of excellence that have facilities and equipment for use in nuclear research

  3. Maintaining knowledge, training and infrastructure for research and development in nuclear safety. INSAG-16. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to emphasize the importance of maintaining capabilities for nuclear research and education, especially with regard to safety aspects, so that nuclear safety may be maintained in IAEA Member States, and to alert Member States to the potential for significant harm if the infrastructure for research, development and education is not maintained. If the infrastructure for nuclear safety is not maintained, there will be a steady decrease in expertise, and thus in capability to respond to new challenges. The lead time in developing replacement educational opportunities is very long, because most institutions will require an indication of the number of enthusiastic potential students before investing in new infrastructure, and potential students may look elsewhere in the absence of an exciting analytical and experimental programme and a growing career field. Once lost, it would require massive inputs of resources from many IAEA Member States to attempt to re-establish the infrastructure, as was done to establish it when nuclear technology was new. The result could be a downward spiral in which expertise is lost, influence of the technical community on the decision making process is diminished, and complacency, fed by diminished technical capability, begins to exert a strong effect. In view of the above, INSAG has the following recommendations: In order to maintain and further enhance the safety of nuclear facilities and to protect workers and the public and the environment from radiological consequences, the infrastructure for safety research (experimental facilities, highly competent staff and modern analytical tools) must be maintained and supported by the responsible governmental organizations as well as by the operating organizations and manufacturers. This support should include international networking and co-operation, including joint funding of centres of excellence that have facilities and equipment for use in nuclear research

  4. Nuclear Heat Application: Desalination as an Alternative Process for Potable Water Production in Indonesia (part 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amir-Rusli

    2000-01-01

    A survey of water supply and demand system and identification of desalination process need for Indonesia has been carried out. Even Indonesia is located in tropical zone of equator; it is still reported lack of water resources, especially during 6 months dry season. Due to miss-water management and bad attitude of the people itself occurred in the past; most of conventional water resources of river, lake and reservoir were damaged during development period of industrial and agriculture sectors. A half of 200 millions peoples of Indonesian population are still scarce of potable drinking water during the year of 1997. Jakarta as the capital has a population of 10 millions people which is the worse water availability in capita per year in the world at present. Seawater intrusion problem to about more than 11 km away is also detected in big cities of the main islands of Indonesia, and these same conditions are faced to other thousands of small islands. Therefore it is an urgent situation to develop a total integrated water management system in order to improve the performance of water resources. Desalination system of seawater/brackish water is considered and showed a good alternative for potable water production for domestic or industrial purposes. But in the long-term, water management system of the effectiveness cycle use of water should be implemented at sites. (author)

  5. Promoting Implementation of Safety Culture in Nuclear Application for Industrial Facilities; an Important Role of Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setianingsih, Lilis Susanti

    2012-01-01

    Implementation of nuclear energy for industrial purposes has reached its highest peak. BAPETEN, as Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency of Indonesia has published regulations regarding nuclear energy utilization. As high risk associating such utilization requires direct and thoroughly supervision in order to assure its compliance to safety and security aspect, procedures related to operational activities must by fully applied. Radiation Protection Program as one type of procedures that must be available in nuclear energy utilization operation is intended to provide operators specifically technical guidance to avoid undesired negative effects of incidents or accidents. It is the responsibility of managerial level in a company to provide the procedures and to further supervise their application in the field. Radiation workers, those are all employees working in or within radiation area must understand how to execute the procedures properly. The radiation protection program is intended to protect workers, member of community and property as well as the environment from the negative impacts of nuclear utilization operational due to its radiation exposure. Safety culture, a compound of nature derived from behavior of organization and people within the organization to pay a full attention and give main priority in radiation safety matters, is expected to be achieved by implementing the radiation protection program as safety habits at the work place. It requires a management commitment to ensure that all aspect in safety and, whenever necessary, security are accomplished within the radiation protection program in order to build a safety culture in a radiation work place. Government Regulation No. 33 2007 about Safety for Ionizing Radiation and Security for Radioactive Source and Government Regulation No. 29 2008 regarding Licensing for Utilization of Ionizing Radiation and Nuclear Material present regulation and arrangement related to radiation protection program as a basic

  6. Transportation infrastructure upgrades in the South: A compilation of state plans for construction near nuclear reactor sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    There are currently 27 nuclear reactor sites located in the southern region. In many instances, the most practicable modes of transportation of spent nuclear fuel from these sites we through the use of highway and rail systems. These two transportation modes have important differences that affect their applicability; chief among these, perhaps, is the fact that while highway systems are publicly owned and maintained rail lines are owned by private entities. For this reason, track condition and maintenance, usage rates and other aspects of rail transport can vary widely. This report reviews southern state, department plans for infrastructure upgrades in the vicinity of nuclear reactor sites. This report includes a summary of planned modifications to bridges, access highways, and rail spurs (where applicable) over the next five years. The information contained herein was gathered from interviews with officials within state departments of transportation. With few exceptions, the contact person was an official within the departmental planning division

  7. Transportation infrastructure upgrades in the South: A compilation of state plans for construction near nuclear reactor sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    There are currently 27 nuclear reactor sites located in the southern region. In many instances, the most practicable modes of transportation of spent nuclear fuel from these sites we through the use of highway and rail systems. These two transportation modes have important differences that affect their applicability; chief among these, perhaps, is the fact that while highway systems are publicly owned and maintained rail lines are owned by private entities. For this reason, track condition and maintenance, usage rates and other aspects of rail transport can vary widely. This report reviews southern state, department plans for infrastructure upgrades in the vicinity of nuclear reactor sites. This report includes a summary of planned modifications to bridges, access highways, and rail spurs (where applicable) over the next five years. The information contained herein was gathered from interviews with officials within state departments of transportation. With few exceptions, the contact person was an official within the departmental planning division.

  8. The new technologies and infrastructure conversion of nuclear testing in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadyrzhanov, K.K.

    1999-01-01

    It is known, that in August, 1991, in accordance with Decree by the Kazakhstan President, the Semipalatinsk test site (STS) was shut down, and practical works on its conversion were initiated. In 1991 the decision on creation of the Kazakhstan National Nuclear Center (KNNC) on a base of the test site scientific and industrial enterprises and Inst. of Nuclear Physics was taken. In 1993 within frame KNNC three new institutes (Inst. of Atomic Energy, Inst. of Geophysical Research, Inst. of Radiation Safety and Ecology) were created. Owing to this, at the condition of USSR disintegration and liquidation of military division in test site territory, high-qualified personnel was saved, the facilities that represent nuclear danger were left under operation and surveillance, and the full-scale program of STS conversion was developed and put into life. At present guidelines for the major research activities at KNNC on conversion program are as follows: liquidation of consequences of nuclear tests; liquidation of technological structure used before for preparation and implementation of nuclear weapons tests; creation of technology, equipment and locations for receipt and storage of radioactive wastes; working out the concept of nuclear power development in Kazakhstan; investigation of the behaviour of melted reactor core in view of potential heavy accidents at nuclear power plants; development of technique and means for detection of nuclear test in the world, continuous control for nuclear explosions; experimental works on investigation of behaviour of the materials-candidates for role of constructional materials for the thermonuclear reactor ITER; creation of high-technology industries. These and other activities undertaken in this respect allow to attract considerable foreign investments, to create in Kurchatov city hundreds of additional working places.The Government support rendered to KNNC in future will allow to expand substantially this area of activities as well as to

  9. Economic Aspect of HVDC Transmission System for Indonesia Consideration in Nuclear Power Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwaren Liun

    2009-01-01

    As a country with hundreds million people, Indonesia needs to generate large scale power and distribute it to thorough country to improve gross domestic product of the population. In the power transmission domain, the High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmission system should be considered for the next decades concerning any technical and economical problems with HVAC transmission. HVDC transmission system is the answer for the Indonesian condition. This system can connect the high energy potential regions to the high energy demand regions. HVDC is the most efficient to transport energy from one region to another one region. Dismantling and removing assets costs are included to the estimated for capital costs, while the environmental and property costs are the costs of securing designations and resource consents, and valuation and legal advice for the HVDC investment. Although converter terminals are expensive however, for long transmissions HVDC system can compensate the costs over breakeven distance through very efficient transmission system. Efficiency of HVDC is appearing from conductor wire, supporting tower, low energy loses and free space used by route of the transmission line. HVDC system is also free from some problem, concerning stability, inductive and capacitive load components, phase differences and frequency system. In the economic aspect the HVDC capital costs for the transmission options comprise estimates of the cost to design, purchase and construct new HVDC transmission components. While operating and maintenance costs of HVDC assets comprise the costs for replacement the old existing overhead transmission lines, underground and submarine cables, and HVDC converter station components. (author)

  10. Supply chain of steel industries for the nuclear power plant construction in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharu Dewi; Sahala M Lumbanraja

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Construction needs steel materials for the manufacturing of heavy components and civil work construction. National industries is expected to supply steel components especially for non nuclear component needs. Supply chain of steel industries is required to know the potency of steel industries from upstream to downstream industries which can support the NPP construction sustainability. The type of steel needed in the NPP construction consist of structure steel, rebar, steel plate, etc. The aim of the study is to identify supply chain of steel industries from upstream industries to downstream industries so that they can supply steel needs in the NPP construction. The methodology used are literature review and industries survey by purposive sampling test which sent questionnaires and carrying out technical visits to the potential industries to supply steel components for NPP construction. From the analysis of the questionnaires and survey, it has been obtained that the Indonesian steel industries capable of supplying steel for construction materials of non-nuclear parts are PT. Krakatau Steel, PT. Gunung Steel Group (PT Gunung Garuda and PT. Gunung Raja Paksi), PT. Cilegon Fabricators and PT. Ometraco Arya Samanta. While steel materials for primary components with nuclear grade, such as steel materials for reactor vessels and pressure vessels, the Indonesian steel industry has not been able to supply them. Therefore, the Indonesian steel industries must improve its capability, both in raw material processing and fabrication capability in order to meet the requirements of specifications, codes and standards of nuclear grade. (author)

  11. Mission Report on the Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review (INIR), 18-29 June 2012, Minsk, Republic of Belarus. Counterpart: Ministry of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In a letter dated 23 November 2011, the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Belarus to the International Organizations in Vienna requested the IAEA to carry out an Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review Mission (INIR). The Republic of Belarus (hereafter Belarus) also provided their self-evaluation report (in Russian and English) entitled: Report on the Assessment of the National Nuclear Infrastructure of the Republic of Belarus. After preparatory activities, the INIR mission was conducted from 18 to 29 June 2012 in Minsk and represents an evaluation of the development status of the infrastructure issues described in the Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power (Nuclear Energy Series No. NG-G-3.1). The methodology for the evaluation is described in Evaluation of the Status of National Nuclear Infrastructure Development (Nuclear Energy Series No. NG-T-3.2). Given the status of Belarus's programme, the mission covered conditions for both Phases 1 and 2. Belarus began its preparations for nuclear power in the 1980s but stopped after the Chernobyl accident. In July 2006, after strategic energy planning activities, Belarus decided to again consider the possibility of introducing nuclear power into the national energy mix. Subsequently on September 17, 2007, The Concept of Energy Security of the Republic of Belarus was approved by the Decree No. 433 of the President and included a plan to commission two nuclear power units with total power capacity of 2000 MWe by 2020. The Resolution of the Security Council of Belarus in 2008 approved the construction. The Law on the Use of Atomic Energy in Belarus was adopted on July 30, 2008 and provides the legal basis for safe nuclear power development. In 2009, the Master Plan of Key Organizational Measures for Construction of Nuclear Power Plant was adopted. The mission team concluded that the Government of Belarus has made a clear commitment to a nuclear power programme, which is important to

  12. The practical experience with assistance programs: view from a non-nuclear weapons-state with a significant nuclear infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetvergov, S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In the area of nuclear energy utilization, the Republic of Kazakhstan follows international legislation standards. Since December 13, 1993 Kazakhstan has been a participant of the Nuclear Weapon Non-proliferation Treaty and does not have nuclear weapons. In the framework of this treaty, Kazakhstan provides measures to ensure the non-proliferation regime. The republic signed the agreement with IAEA on the guarantees, that were ratified by a presidential decree in 1995. Nuclear objects in Kazakhstan have the following characteristics: Ulba Metallurgical Plant, located in the eastern area of Kazakhstan, manufactures fuel pellets of uranium dioxide for heat release assemblies of RBMK and LWR reactor types. These pellets have an enrichment of U235 1.6-4.4 %. Ulba also has a radioactive waste disposal storage site; a power plant for heat and power supply, and water desalination is based at the BN-350 fast breeder reactor. This reactor is located in Aktau city on the Caspian Sea. Since April 1999, the reactor has been in the process of being decommissioned. There is a lot of spent fuel with highly radioactive and toxic weapon plutonium there. There are also research reactors of National Nuclear Centre, located in the north-eastern area of Kazakhstan, near Semipalatinsk city. These research reactors have nuclear materials of the first category, which are attractive to criminal groups: IVG.1 M - light-water heterogeneous reactor of vessel type on thermal neutrons, with light water moderator and coolant, maximum power is 35 MW; IGR - impulse homogeneous graphite reactor on thermal neutrons, with graphite reflector; RA - high temperature gas cooled reactor on thermal neutrons, 0.5 MW power. There is also a research reactor site near Almaty city, with LWR-K - light-water reactor, with 10 MW power, uses highly enriched uranium (up to 36 % of U-235). The following activity was accomplished in the framework of physical security modernization for nuclear objects and

  13. Agricultural production - Phase 2. Indonesia. Rice - azolla - fish culture - use of nuclear technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Iwao.

    1991-01-01

    The primary aim of the expert mission was to provide advice on the use of nuclear techniques to study rice-azolla-fish culture. Results of the work performed so far show that basal application of azolla gives similar or better yields of rice than basal application of urea. Fish productivity was also found to be significantly higher when azolla is present. 2 tabs

  14. The Role of Vocation of Process Technology and Material Synthesis in Order to Support Nuclear Industries in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusnanto

    2009-01-01

    Energy has become a basic need, which is comparable to the food requirement. With regard to forecast to the future, it is a time to visualize a reduction of dependency on the primary energy source i.e. fossil fuel, and seriously enhance a development of another new source of energy, that is a nuclear energy, which is synergy extend with other new and renewable energy sources. Development of an advanced reactor will be necessary if the nuclear energy is still to be the main choice to fulfill the energy requirement. An opportunity to extend material process industries in Indonesia is increasingly opened. Natural resources, i.e. mineral and energy sources, will be a big capital investment when it is supported by an ability of grasping technology and also the government policy that is in favor to the ability and independency of the nation. If hydrogen production is commercially produced by an advanced reactor, surely that the requirement of zircon oxide as a fuel-cell which is an intermediate product of industry of zirconium metal will increase significantly. SOFC, a kind of fuel cell, is believed to be the most effective fuel cell as a converter energy when hydrogen used as a fuel energy source. In order to realize this independency of Indonesian nation, it is required knowledgeable, expertise and skilled human resources in the process technology field. These expertise human resources can not be prepared by a formal education in collages/universities only, but also through 3 (three) steps of training, i.e. education, skilled/ professional training and working experience. The last two steps have a large contribution to the personal expertise. Therefore, skilled/ professional certification of someone, that consist of professional training and working experienced will be necessary for the above requirements. formal education, professional training, working experience. (author)

  15. Buyer's participation and well developed domestic infrastructure. Keys to successful introduction of nuclear power in a small country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numminen, K.; Laine, P.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear power is advantageous for a small country such as Finland which does not possess indigenous fossil fuel. For instance, the cost of imports required by nuclear fuel is essentially smaller than the cost of production of electric energy based on coal or fuel oil. In Finland the advantageousness of nuclear power was already proved in the 1950s but before starting the first power plant project it took 15 years to develop step by step the required infrastructure: building the research institutes and training their staff, creating connections to the international organizations and elsewhere abroad, training Finnish design staff, developing the domestic industry to the high quality required by nuclear power, and establishing the necessary authorities and public administration. Thanks to thorough preparation the implementation of the plant projects progressed at a good pace in the 1970s. The lesson learned from operation of the plants is that in a small country - located far from its main supplier - the staff at the plant and the supporting staff in the power company have to be able to analyse the problems occurring, usually in the conventional equipment, and carry out quick repairs without aid from the main supplier. This requires a high level of educational attainment from the staff and the best way to achieve this is for the staff to participate in the design and construction as much as possible already in the implementation phase. In order to maintain high availability, the capability of the domestic industry must also be good - especially in the fields of mechanical industry and electronics. In Finland over 30% of electric energy was produced in 1981 by four nuclear units. Two of these were built as manifold east-west adjustment work with the Soviet supplier and the other two are of Swedish origin

  16. An Extreme Meteorological Events Analysis For Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Siting Project at Bangka Island, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septiadi, Deni; S, Yarianto Sugeng B.; Sriyana; Anzhar, Kurnia; Suntoko, Hadi

    2018-03-01

    The potential sources of meteorological phenomena in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) area of interest are identified and the extreme values of the possible resulting hazards associated which such phenomena are evaluated to derive the appropriate design bases for the NPP. The appropriate design bases shall be determined according to the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (Bapeten) applicable regulations, which presently do not indicate quantitative criteria for purposes of determining the design bases for meteorological hazards. These meteorological investigations are also carried out to evaluate the regional and site specific meteorological parameters which affect the transport and dispersion of radioactive effluents on the environment of the region around the NPP site. The meteorological hazards are to be monitored and assessed periodically over the lifetime of the plant to ensure that consistency with the design assumptions is maintained throughout the full lifetime of the facility.

  17. A study of the environmental impact on Australia of a nuclear accident in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, G.D.; Davidson, N.E.; Logan, W.; Mills, G.A.; Puri, K.; McDonald, N.R.; Cameron, R.F.; Clark, G.; Crawford, J.; Domel, R.U.; Hambley, D.; Harris, F.F.; Barton, R.; Manins, P.C.; Hibberd, M.F.

    1998-01-01

    This study has considered the circumstances under which radioactive material, released as a result of a severe accident in a reactor of the type that could be proposed for Indonesia, might reach Australia. This assumes the latest available technology for a pressurised water reactor, a boiling water reactor, or an 'advanced' light-water reactor, each with a modern containment building. The methodology consisted of developing detailed definitions of the accident scenarios, calculating he transport of the radioactive cloud to Australia and its dispersion by means of a numerical meteorological model, developed by ANSTO, and determining the impact on individuals in Australia by means of a radiological consequences model. A single release was considered with variations in the time of release, the meteorological situation, the height of release, its duration, the amount and the type of material released. The calculations are currently based on the ICRP Standard 70 Kg man. The major pathways considered are inhalation, groundshine, cloudshine and ingestion of plants, meet and milk. A source term was determined for radionuclides, represented by Xenon-133, Iodine-131 and Cesium- 137. Three type of weather conditions that could cause a radioactive cloud to reach Australia were considered. The calculations have shown that the active monsoonal cases impact on north-western and northern Australia, the monsoonal break-period cases impact on western and north-western Australia and that mid-tropospheric cases can impact on a wide band across central and southern Australia. The area of impact for a mid-tropospheric release can be greater than for a near-surface release. It was concluded that even with an extreme release, for actual meteorological conditions, the maximum dose would be below the 5 mSv, dose at which the National Health and Medical Research Council advises that consideration be given to control of milk and foodstuff. This study has been limited in scope, primarily

  18. A study of the environmental impact on Australia of a nuclear accident in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, G.D.; Davidson, N.E.; Logan, W.; Mills, G.A.; Puri, K. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); McDonald, N.R.; Cameron, R.F.; Clark, G.; Crawford, J.; Domel, R.U.; Hambley, D.; Harris, F.F.; Barton, R. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Manins, P.C.; Hibberd, M.F. [Commonwealth Scientific Industrial Research Organisation, Aspendale, VIC (Australia). Division of Atmospheric Research

    1998-12-31

    This study has considered the circumstances under which radioactive material, released as a result of a severe accident in a reactor of the type that could be proposed for Indonesia, might reach Australia. This assumes the latest available technology for a pressurised water reactor, a boiling water reactor, or an `advanced` light-water reactor, each with a modern containment building. The methodology consisted of developing detailed definitions of the accident scenarios, calculating he transport of the radioactive cloud to Australia and its dispersion by means of a numerical meteorological model, developed by ANSTO, and determining the impact on individuals in Australia by means of a radiological consequences model. A single release was considered with variations in the time of release, the meteorological situation, the height of release, its duration, the amount and the type of material released. The calculations are currently based on the ICRP Standard 70 Kg man. The major pathways considered are inhalation, groundshine, cloudshine and ingestion of plants, meet and milk. A source term was determined for radionuclides, represented by Xenon-133, Iodine-131 and Cesium- 137. Three type of weather conditions that could cause a radioactive cloud to reach Australia were considered. The calculations have shown that the active monsoonal cases impact on north-western and northern Australia, the monsoonal break-period cases impact on western and north-western Australia and that mid-tropospheric cases can impact on a wide band across central and southern Australia. The area of impact for a mid-tropospheric release can be greater than for a near-surface release. It was concluded that even with an extreme release, for actual meteorological conditions, the maximum dose would be below the 5 mSv, dose at which the National Health and Medical Research Council advises that consideration be given to control of milk and foodstuff. This study has been limited in scope, primarily

  19. Summary report on transportation of nuclear fuel materials in Japan : transportation infrastructure, threats identified in open literature, and physical protection regulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, John Russell; Ouchi, Yuichiro (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Japan); Furaus, James Phillip; Marincel, Michelle K.

    2008-03-01

    This report summarizes the results of three detailed studies of the physical protection systems for the protection of nuclear materials transport in Japan, with an emphasis on the transportation of mixed oxide fuel materials1. The Japanese infrastructure for transporting nuclear fuel materials is addressed in the first section. The second section of this report presents a summary of baseline data from the open literature on the threats of sabotage and theft during the transport of nuclear fuel materials in Japan. The third section summarizes a review of current International Atomic Energy Agency, Japanese and United States guidelines and regulations concerning the physical protection for the transportation of nuclear fuel materials.

  20. Infrastructures Development Strategy in Energy Engineering Education and Research: a Bonus to Introduce a Safe and Secure Nuclear Power Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhelal, Oum Keltoum [National School of Mineral Industry, ENIM, BP 753, Agdal, 10000 Rabat (Morocco)

    2008-07-01

    In the area of Energy Engineering, high education programs including nuclear activities are currently running in collaboration with the employment sector to provide skills oriented profiles; the available packages are thus characterized by a limited size and a low impact in enhancing power technology teaching and industrial partnerships. However, ongoing nuclear applications activities are undertaken through strong legal and institutional infrastructures as Morocco has joined a large number of international conventions and agreements trusted by the IAEA. The introduction of nuclear power is subject to a close attention today to investigate if it is an alternative solution to meet the increasing energy needs. For a country not much industrialized and characterized by a medium electricity grid, the decision on the recourse to nuclear power needs to carry up early a training, R and D federative program on behalf of the engineering sector and the international cooperation. As the challenges associated to develop a successful nuclear power program requires an important effort directed toward increasing capacity, new education and training programs in the field of Energy Sciences and Engineering are presently targeted in several high education institutions prior to the goals of the education and research national reform. The preparation of a new master and engineer diploma at ENIM 'Power Systems Engineering and Management' is in process: the curricula introduces innovative concepts bringing together academic teachers, researchers and stakeholders to establish new discipline-based teaching and learning tools: what is mainly focused is to increase competency profile in consultation with the industry sector and to attract high quality students to ensure availability of human resources at the right time in the field of power technology utilization including nuclear power. A coordinated approach joining national and international partnership to implement oriented R

  1. Infrastructures Development Strategy in Energy Engineering Education and Research: a Bonus to Introduce a Safe and Secure Nuclear Power Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouhelal, Oum Keltoum

    2008-01-01

    In the area of Energy Engineering, high education programs including nuclear activities are currently running in collaboration with the employment sector to provide skills oriented profiles; the available packages are thus characterized by a limited size and a low impact in enhancing power technology teaching and industrial partnerships. However, ongoing nuclear applications activities are undertaken through strong legal and institutional infrastructures as Morocco has joined a large number of international conventions and agreements trusted by the IAEA. The introduction of nuclear power is subject to a close attention today to investigate if it is an alternative solution to meet the increasing energy needs. For a country not much industrialized and characterized by a medium electricity grid, the decision on the recourse to nuclear power needs to carry up early a training, R and D federative program on behalf of the engineering sector and the international cooperation. As the challenges associated to develop a successful nuclear power program requires an important effort directed toward increasing capacity, new education and training programs in the field of Energy Sciences and Engineering are presently targeted in several high education institutions prior to the goals of the education and research national reform. The preparation of a new master and engineer diploma at ENIM 'Power Systems Engineering and Management' is in process: the curricula introduces innovative concepts bringing together academic teachers, researchers and stakeholders to establish new discipline-based teaching and learning tools: what is mainly focused is to increase competency profile in consultation with the industry sector and to attract high quality students to ensure availability of human resources at the right time in the field of power technology utilization including nuclear power. A coordinated approach joining national and international partnership to implement oriented R and D

  2. Fiscal 1996 survey for the upgrading of the Asia/Pacific coal development. Survey of the coal infrastructure propagation in Indonesia; 1996 nendo Asia Taiheiyo sekitan kaihatsu kodoka chosa. Indonesia ni okeru sekitan infura seibi chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    Phase 1 survey in fiscal 1996 was conducted based on `Agreement on the comprehensive survey of a coal transportation system in South Sumatra` concluded between NEDO and the Ministry of Mine and Energy in Indonesia. In the survey, conducted were collection of data on coal fields and site surveys, collection of data on inland transportation and site surveys, collection of data on harbors and site surveys, and worked out were a simplified database and a coal transportation plan by optimization of the coal chain system. The area for survey is the periphery of the Musi River of South Sumatra. The results of the simulation by LP models were as follows: When the coal of Bukit Asam coal mine is $25/t in price, only coal of 5500Kcal/kg is profitable, and when $27/t in price, coal of 4500Kcal/kg also becomes profitable. This shows that if the coal is of good quality, it can pay arriving at Suralaya, independent of the distance of transportation. 47 figs., 63 tabs.

  3. Transportation infrastructure between nuclear power plant gates and nearest line-haul networks: Plan and procedure for data development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saricks, C.L.; Singh, M.K.; Stammer, R.E. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    This study is concerned with the segments of the transportation system that include possible routings over public roads and private (or public) rail links, and waterway access (within 25 miles) from the gates of typical reactor sites to proximate links of what can be termed the national through-route system. These routings are by no means uniform throughout the United States. Local roads and rail links near reactor sites may be subject to a wide variety of jurisdictions for maintenance, repair, and inspection; may or may not (at present) qualify for federal assistance under the Federal-Aid Highway and related funding programs; may or may not meet accepted construction standards for facilities expected to bear heavy loads; and, perhaps most importantly for the spent-fuel transportation program, may be subject to occasional and currently unavoidable disruptions that could seriously impair shipment schedules. The overall objectives of the study are to describe a framework for identifying the characteristics of the near-site transportation networks of all existing nuclear power plants that could give rise to important shipment scheduling and programming constraints. These characteristics cover both transportation infrastructure and existing structural and environmental limitation, and define a scope and schedule for constructing a data base for the transportation networks surrounding all nuclear power plants. 6 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs

  4. Communication dated 16 July 2008 received from the Resident Representative of Japan to the Agency concerning an International Initiative on 3S-Based Nuclear Energy Infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Director General has received a communication dated 16 July 2008 from the Resident Representative of Japan attaching a document entitled 'International Initiative on 3S-based Nuclear Energy Infrastructure'. The communication, and as requested therein, its attachment, are circulated herewith for information

  5. Study of an intrinsically safe infrastructure for training and research on nuclear technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripani Marco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Within European Partitioning & Transmutation research programs, infrastructures specifically dedicated to the study of fundamental reactor physics and engineering parameters of future fast-neutron-based reactors are very important, being some of these features not available in present zero-power prototypes. This presentation will illustrate the conceptual design of an Accelerator-Driven System with high safety standards, but ample flexibility for measurements. The design assumes as base option a 70 MeV, 0.75 mA proton cyclotron, as the one which will be installed at the INFN National Laboratory in Legnaro, Italy and a Beryllium target, with Helium gas as core coolant. Safety is guaranteed by limiting the thermal power to 200 kW, with a neutron multiplication coefficient around 0.94, loading the core with fuel containing Uranium enriched at 20% inserted in a solid-lead diffuser. The small decay heat can be passively removed by thermal radiation from the vessel. Such a system could be used to study, among others, some specific aspects of neutron diffusion in lead, beam-core coupling, target cooling and could serve as a training facility.

  6. Study of an intrinsically safe infrastructure for training and research on nuclear technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripani, Marco; Frambati, Stefano; Mansani, Luigi; Bruzzone, Maurizio; Reale, Marco; Monti, Stefano; Ciotti, Marco; Barbagallo, Massimo; Colonna, Nicola; Celentano, Andrea; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ricco, Giovanni; Saracco, Paolo; Viberti, Carlo Maria; Frasciello, Oscar; Boccaccio, Pasquale; Esposito, Juan; Lombardi, Augusto; Maggiore, Mario; Piazza, Leandro A. C.; Prete, Gianfranco; Alba, Rosa; Calabretta, Luciano; Cosentino, Gianluigi; Del Zoppo, Antonio; Di Pietro, Alessia; Figuera, Pierpaolo; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Maiolino, Cettina; Santonocito, Domenico; Schillaci, Maria; Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Previtali, Ezio; Sisti, Monica; Kostyukov, Alexander; Cammi, Antonio; Bortot, Sara; Lorenzi, Stefano; Ricotti, Marco; Dulla, Sandra; Ravetto, Piero; Lomonaco, Guglielmo; Rebora, Alessandro; Alloni, Daniele; Borio di Tigliole, Andrea; Cagnazzo, Marcella; Cremonesi, Riccardo; Magrotti, Giovanni; Manera, Sergio; Panza, Fabio; Prata, Michele; Salvini, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Within European Partitioning & Transmutation research programs, infrastructures specifically dedicated to the study of fundamental reactor physics and engineering parameters of future fast-neutron-based reactors are very important, being some of these features not available in present zero-power prototypes. This presentation will illustrate the conceptual design of an Accelerator-Driven System with high safety standards, but ample flexibility for measurements. The design assumes as base option a 70 MeV, 0.75 mA proton cyclotron, as the one which will be installed at the INFN National Laboratory in Legnaro, Italy and a Beryllium target, with Helium gas as core coolant. Safety is guaranteed by limiting the thermal power to 200 kW, with a neutron multiplication coefficient around 0.94, loading the core with fuel containing Uranium enriched at 20% inserted in a solid-lead diffuser. The small decay heat can be passively removed by thermal radiation from the vessel. Such a system could be used to study, among others, some specific aspects of neutron diffusion in lead, beam-core coupling, target cooling and could serve as a training facility.

  7. Legal and governmental infrastructure for nuclear, radiation, radioactive waste and transport safety. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This publication establishes requirements for legal and governmental responsibilities in respect of the safety of nuclear facilities, the safe use of sources of ionizing radiation, radiation protection, the safe management of radioactive waste and the safe transport of radioactive material. Thus, it covers development of the legal framework for establishing a regulatory body and other actions to achieve effective regulatory control of facilities and activities. Other responsibilities are also covered, such as those for developing the necessary support for safety, involvement in securing third party liability and emergency preparedness

  8. Legal and governmental infrastructure for nuclear, radiation, radioactive waste and transport safety. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This publication establishes requirements for legal and governmental responsibilities in respect of the safety of nuclear facilities, the safe use of sources of ionizing radiation, radiation protection, the safe management of radioactive waste and the safe transport of radioactive material. Thus, it covers development of the legal framework for establishing a regulatory body and other actions to achieve effective regulatory control of facilities and activities. Other responsibilities are also covered, such as those for developing the necessary support for safety, involvement in securing third party liability and emergency preparedness

  9. Development of a Flexible Computerized Management Infrastructure for a Commercial Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Syed Firasat; Hajek, Brian K.; Usman, Shoaib

    2006-05-01

    The report emphasizes smooth transition from paper-based procedure systems (PBPSs) to computer-based procedure systems (CBPSs) for the existing commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S. The expected advantages and of the transition are mentioned including continued, safe and efficient operation of the plants under their recently acquired or desired extended licenses. The report proposes a three-stage survey to aid in developing a national strategic plan for the transition from PBPSs to CBPSs. It also includes a comprehensive questionnaire that can be readily used for the first stage of the suggested survey.

  10. Development of a Flexible Computerized Management Infrastructure for a Commercial Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Syed Firasat; Hajek, Brian K.; Usman, Shoaib

    2006-01-01

    The report emphasizes smooth transition from paper-based procedure systems (PBPSs) to computer-based procedure systems (CBPSs) for the existing commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S. The expected advantages and of the transition are mentioned including continued, safe and efficient operation of the plants under their recently acquired or desired extended licenses. The report proposes a three-stage survey to aid in developing a national strategic plan for the transition from PBPSs to CBPSs. It also includes a comprehensive questionnaire that can be readily used for the first stage of the suggested survey

  11. Prospect on Desalination and Other Non-Electric Applications of Nuclear Energy In Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.R. Sunaryo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Molten-Salt Reactor (MSR is a design of an advanced reactor system from the GEN IV family working in thermal or epithermal neutron spectrum and using thorium or transuranium fuel in the form of molten fluorides. It is based on the experience with the development of the molten-salt reactor technology in the Oak-Ridge National Laboratory in the United States. The MSR fuel cycle with integrated reprocessing represents one of the potential ways both for significant decrease of total amount of radioactive wastes for final deposition and for utilization of nuclear energy for electricity and heat production as effectively as possible. There are two pyrochemical reprocessing techniques studied in NRI Rez plc which are considered to be applied both for reprocessing of already existing spent fuel and for preparation and „on-line“ reprocessing of MSR fuel: (i the Fluoride Volatility Method (FVM, which performs chemical conversion of spent thermal oxide fuel components into fluorides and their consequent separation by means of their different volatility, thermal stability and chemical affinity to various sorbents; and (ii electrochemical separation of the actinides (Ans and fission products (FP, represented mainly by lanthanides (Lns, from each other by electrolytic deposition method on solid cathode in molten fluoride media.

  12. Nigeria’s Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review (INIR) Mission For Phase 2 - Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erepamo Osaisai, F.

    2015-01-01

    Lessons Learned from Mission and Preparation: - Planning and successful implementation of a new NP programme is an enormous task; must take into consideration strict adherence to an established regime of nuclear safety and security; - Requires development of multilateral and bilateral partnerships and commitment to transparency, as well as the need to subject national programme implementation to external scrutiny: • The INIR process allows for independent assessment of national programmes against established standards and international best practices; • The period of development of the Self-Evaluation Report creates an opportunity for genuine soul searching and enthrones some degree of realism; • Preparation for and hosting of the INIR Mission strengthen the national stakeholder base and creates a convivial atmosphere for effective cooperation and partnership between national institutions (seventeen in Nigeria); and • Makes an embarking country a better informed and more knowledgeable customer.

  13. Opening Address [Technical Meeting/Workshop on Topical Issues on Infrastructure Development: Managing the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power Plants, Vienna (Austria), 24-27 January 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Good morning, ladies and gentlemen. I would like to express my cordial welcome to the participants of the 6th annual workshop on nuclear power infrastructure since 2006. Looking back at the development of nuclear power programmes for embarking countries since 2006, I am glad to see that many embarking countries apply the IAEA Milestones approach and have made much progress, since several countries already have entered or entering into phase 3, the construction of the first nuclear power plant. Since the last annual workshop, the most shocking event was the accident in Fukushima Daiichi in March 2011, which was caused by an earthquake and tsunami of unprecedented severity. Looking at the impact of this accident on the nuclear power, there were speculations that the expansion in interest in nuclear power, which we had experienced in recent years, could come to an end. However, it is clear now that there will be continuous and significant growth in the use of nuclear power in the next two decades, although at a slower rate than in our previous projections. Most of the growth will occur in countries that already have operating nuclear power plants, such as China, India and Russia. In countries which are considering introducing nuclear power, interest remains strong, despite Fukushima Daiichi. Most of these countries are proceeding with plans to add nuclear power to their energy mix, with the Agency's assistance. Only a few countries cancelled or revised their plans, while others have taken a ''wait and see'' approach. However, the factors that contributed to increasing interest in nuclear power before the Fukushima Daiichi accident have not changed: these include increasing global demand for energy, as well as concerns about climate change, volatile fossil fuel prices and security of energy supply. The countries strongly committed to nuclear power such as the United Arab Emirates, Turkey, Belarus, Vietnam, Jordan, Bangladesh and Poland, keep the same position even

  14. Global nuclear energy partnership fuels transient testing at the Sandia National Laboratories nuclear facilities : planning and facility infrastructure options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, John E.; Wright, Steven Alan; Tikare, Veena; MacLean, Heather J.; Parma, Edward J.Jr; Peters, Curtis D.; Vernon, Milton E.; Pickard, Paul S.

    2007-01-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership fuels development program is currently developing metallic, oxide, and nitride fuel forms as candidate fuels for an Advanced Burner Reactor. The Advance Burner Reactor is being designed to fission actinides efficiently, thereby reducing the long-term storage requirements for spent fuel repositories. Small fuel samples are being fabricated and evaluated with different transuranic loadings and with extensive burnup using the Advanced Test Reactor. During the next several years, numerous fuel samples will be fabricated, evaluated, and tested, with the eventual goal of developing a transmuter fuel database that supports the down selection to the most suitable fuel type. To provide a comparative database of safety margins for the range of potential transmuter fuels, this report describes a plan to conduct a set of early transient tests in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories. The Annular Core Research Reactor is uniquely qualified to perform these types of tests because of its wide range of operating capabilities and large dry central cavity which extents through the center of the core. The goal of the fuels testing program is to demonstrate that the design and fabrication processes are of sufficient quality that the fuel will not fail at its design limit--up to a specified burnup, power density, and operating temperature. Transient testing is required to determine the fuel pin failure thresholds and to demonstrate that adequate fuel failure margins exist during the postulated design basis accidents

  15. Global nuclear energy partnership fuels transient testing at the Sandia National Laboratories nuclear facilities : planning and facility infrastructure options.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, John E.; Wright, Steven Alan; Tikare, Veena; MacLean, Heather J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Peters, Curtis D.; Vernon, Milton E.; Pickard, Paul S.

    2007-10-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership fuels development program is currently developing metallic, oxide, and nitride fuel forms as candidate fuels for an Advanced Burner Reactor. The Advance Burner Reactor is being designed to fission actinides efficiently, thereby reducing the long-term storage requirements for spent fuel repositories. Small fuel samples are being fabricated and evaluated with different transuranic loadings and with extensive burnup using the Advanced Test Reactor. During the next several years, numerous fuel samples will be fabricated, evaluated, and tested, with the eventual goal of developing a transmuter fuel database that supports the down selection to the most suitable fuel type. To provide a comparative database of safety margins for the range of potential transmuter fuels, this report describes a plan to conduct a set of early transient tests in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories. The Annular Core Research Reactor is uniquely qualified to perform these types of tests because of its wide range of operating capabilities and large dry central cavity which extents through the center of the core. The goal of the fuels testing program is to demonstrate that the design and fabrication processes are of sufficient quality that the fuel will not fail at its design limit--up to a specified burnup, power density, and operating temperature. Transient testing is required to determine the fuel pin failure thresholds and to demonstrate that adequate fuel failure margins exist during the postulated design basis accidents.

  16. Analysis of the Institutional Framework For Radioactive Waste Management in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Wisnubroto

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the infrastructure for radioactive waste management in Indonesia has been studied using several parameters, i.e. policy, regulatory authorities and their regulations, implementing organizations and financial system. By considering the international trends and the Indonesian program to utilize nuclear power, the infrastructure of radioactive waste management needs to be improved. The Act No. 10/1997 on Nuclear Energy for the future beneficence will have to be amended to incorporate several missing key points on waste management, such as definition of radioactive waste, disposal of Low and Intermediate Level Waste (LILW, and classification of waste. Full involvement of some important stakeholders, especially the State Ministry of Environment, on the radioactive waste management infrastructure is required since some radioactive waste is generated from non nuclear waste. Assigning full authority to the State Ministry of Environment for regulating radioactive waste generated by non nuclear facilities may be more effective, whereas BAPETEN is still holding onto control over the waste generated from nuclear facilities. In the near future, several regulations on clearance level, classification of waste, NORM/TENORM, and financial system are expected to be set up for urgent need. By considering the high risk for handling of radioactivity, including for transportation and storage, the liability or assurance of the safety for such activities must be accounted for. Finally, establishment of financial system for long term waste management in Indonesia needs to be implemented to ensure that the radioactive waste will not be the burden on future generations.

  17. Analysis of the Institutional Framework For Radioactive Waste Management in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisnubroto, D.S.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of the infrastructure for radioactive waste management in Indonesia has been studied using several parameters, i.e. policy, regulatory authorities and their regulations, implementing organizations and financial system. By considering the international trends and the Indonesian program to utilize nuclear power, the infrastructure of radioactive waste management needs to be improved. The Act No. 10/1997 on Nuclear Energy for the future beneficence will have to be amended to incorporate several missing key points on waste management, such as definition of radioactive waste, disposal of Low and Intermediate Level Waste (LILW), and classification of waste. Full involvement of some important stakeholders, especially the State Ministry of Environment, on the radioactive waste management infrastructure is required since some radioactive waste is generated from non nuclear waste. Assigning full authority to the State Ministry of Environment for regulating radioactive waste generated by non nuclear facilities may be more effective, whereas BAPETEN is still holding onto control over the waste generated from nuclear facilities. In the near future, several regulations on clearance level, classification of waste, NORM/TENORM, and financial system are expected to be set up for urgent need. By considering the high risk for handling of radioactivity, including for transportation and storage, the liability or assurance of the safety for such activities must be accounted for. Finally, establishment of financial system for long term waste management in Indonesia needs to be implemented to ensure that the radioactive waste will not be the burden on future generations (author)

  18. Establishing the Safety Infrastructure for NPP in Mongolia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enkhbat, Norov [Korea Advanced Institue of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y. E. [Korean Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    creation of newcomers to nuclear power solid foundation of safety and confidence-building measures at the international level. Egypt, Jordan, UAE, Kazakhstan, Vietnam, Indonesia and Malaysia have been involving in the international program. The IAEA Safety Standard Guide SSG-16 'Establish the Safety Infrastructure for a Nuclear Power Program' provides guidance on the implementation of the requirements of the relevant IAEA standards and as well as identified and recommended that the period of the formation of the safety infrastructure, the sequence necessary for safety operations, responsible government agencies, and major organization participating. To identify nuclear professional opinions on establishment of nuclear energy, a survey questionnaire on this matter was conducted for the nuclear related organization in Mongolia.

  19. The bomb as option. Motivation for the development of a nuclear infrastructure in the Federal Republic of Germany until 1963; Die Bombe als Option. Motive fuer den Aufbau einer atomtechnischen Infrastruktur in der Bundesrepublik bis 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanel, Tilmann

    2015-07-01

    The book on the motivation for the development of a nuclear infrastructure in the Federal Republic of Germany until 1963 discusses the following issues: History of the German reactor development during the time of the National Socialism and World War II, reactor research abroad (examples Sweden and Switzerland), protagonists and motivation (politics, science, economy, army), the development of a nuclear infrastructure, results and consequences of the German nuclear policy until 1963.

  20. Idaho National Laboratory Ten-year Site Plan (2012 through 2021) -- DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability -- Developing and Maintaining the INL Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cal Ozaki

    2010-06-01

    To meet long-term objectives to transform the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), we are providing an integrated, long-term vision of infrastructure requirements that support research, development and demonstration (RD&D) goals outlined in the DOE strategic plans, including the NE Roadmap and reports such as Facilities for the Future of Nuclear Energy Research: A Twenty-year Outlook. The goal of the INL Ten-year Site Plan (TYSP) is to clearly link RD&D mission goals and INL core capabilities with infrastructure requirements (single and multi-program), establish the 10-year end-state vision for INL complexes, identify and prioritize infrastructure and capability gaps, as well as the most efficient and economic approaches to closing those gaps.

  1. Building safeguards infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, Rebecca S.; McClelland-Kerr, John

    2009-01-01

    Much has been written in recent years about the nuclear renaissance - the rebirth of nuclear power as a clean and safe source of electricity around the world. Those who question the nuclear renaissance often cite the risk of proliferation, accidents or an attack on a facility as concerns, all of which merit serious consideration. The integration of these three areas - sometimes referred to as 3S, for safety, security and safeguards - is essential to supporting the growth of nuclear power, and the infrastructure that supports them should be strengthened. The focus of this paper will be on the role safeguards plays in the 3S concept and how to support the development of the infrastructure necessary to support safeguards. The objective of this paper has been to provide a working definition of safeguards infrastructure, and to discuss xamples of how building safeguards infrastructure is presented in several models. The guidelines outlined in the milestones document provide a clear path for establishing both the safeguards and the related infrastructures needed to support the development of nuclear power. The model employed by the INSEP program of engaging with partner states on safeguards-related topics that are of current interest to the level of nuclear development in that state provides another way of approaching the concept of building safeguards infrastructure. The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative is yet another approach that underscored five principal areas for growth, and the United States commitment to working with partners to promote this growth both at home and abroad.

  2. Building safeguards infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClelland-Kerr, J.; Stevens, J.

    2010-01-01

    Much has been written in recent years about the nuclear renaissance - the rebirth of nuclear power as a clean and safe source of electricity around the world. Those who question the nuclear renaissance often cite the risk of proliferation, accidents or an attack on a facility as concerns, all of which merit serious consideration. The integration of three areas - sometimes referred to as 3S, for safety, security and safeguards - is essential to supporting the clean and safe growth of nuclear power, and the infrastructure that supports these three areas should be robust. The focus of this paper will be on the development of the infrastructure necessary to support safeguards, and the integration of safeguards infrastructure with other elements critical to ensuring nuclear energy security

  3. Islamic Public Infrastructure Financing: An Analysis of Alternative Financing Instruments with Application in Developing Countries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Islam, Saiful

    2004-01-01

    This project examines the structure of public infrastructure financing in Indonesia and examines whether financing based on Islamic principles is a feasible alternative to current financing mechanisms...

  4. EMME (Indonesia)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — EMME is a program specific M&E tool for the Indonesia Mission that is managed by RTI and provides access to project statuses and success stories for the USAID...

  5. Green Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    To promote the benefits of green infrastructure, help communities overcome barriers to using GI, and encourage the use of GI to create sustainable and resilient water infrastructure that improves water quality and supports and revitalizes communities.

  6. Private Infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2002-01-01

    Drawing on the World Bank's Private Participation in Infrastructure Project Database, this Note provides an overview of private activity in infrastructure in developing countries between 1990 and 2000. Three main trends characterized that decade: Private activity in infrastructure grew each year except 1998 and 1999. Most developing countries introduced some form of private activity in inf...

  7. Infrastructure Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Junko Sagara; Mikio Ishiwatari

    2013-01-01

    Social infrastructure and public utilities are critical for quick and effective disaster response and recovery. Japan's rigorous seismic reinforcement of infrastructure has greatly reduced the effort required to restore essential facilities. Identification of priority infrastructure, legislation of financial arrangements for rehabilitation, and establishment of pre-disaster plans alongside...

  8. Guidance for the application of an assessment methodology for innovative nuclear energy systems. INPRO manual - Infrastructure. Vol. 3 of the final report of phase 1 of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-11-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was initiated in the year 2000, based on a resolution of the IAEA General Conference (GC(44)/RES/21). The main objectives of INPRO are (1) to help to ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute in fulfilling energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner, (2) to bring together both technology holders and technology users to consider jointly the international and national actions required to achieve desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles; and (3) to create a forum to involve all relevant stakeholders that will have an impact on, draw from, and complement the activities of existing institutions, as well as ongoing initiatives at the national and international level. The INPRO manual is comprised of an overview volume and eight additional volumes covering the areas of economics (Volume 2), infrastructure (Volume 3, outlined here), waste management (Volume 4), proliferation resistance (Volume 5), physical protection (Volume 6), environment (Volume 7), safety of reactors (Volume 8), and safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities (Volume 9). Within INPRO, the term infrastructure can be defined as the collection of capabilities of institutions involved in a nuclear power program in a given country that are necessary for the successful deployment (or enlargement) and operation of an INS, including legal and institutional, industrial and economic, and socio-political features. Within INPRO, the definition of an INS includes activities and facilities (i.e. components) at both the front end of the fuel cycle (e.g., mining, enrichment, fuel fabrication) and the back end (e.g., reprocessing, storage, and repository) (Section 4.2.1 of Volume 1 of the INPRO manual. Consequently, within INPRO, such facilities are not considered to be a part of the INPRO area of infrastructure, albeit that they influence the size of the necessary infrastructure required in a given

  9. Site development and demands on infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieke, K.F.

    1976-01-01

    All sub-fields are examined which form the infrastructure, the infrastructure being indispensable for the site development of a nuclear power plant. The main emphasis is put on the technical infrastructure, but the social infrastructure is dealt with, too. The most important sub-fields are: traffic connections, energy supply, external communications, foundation, building mearures. (UA) [de

  10. Protocol Additional to the Agreement between the Republic of Indonesia and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Protocol Additional to the Agreement between the Republic of Indonesia and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), which was approved by the Board of Governors on 20 September 1999 and signed in Vienna on 29 September 1999. The Protocol entered into force on 29 September 1999

  11. Information features and activities needed to build public acceptance for the first nuclear power plant in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santosa, H.B.

    1998-01-01

    The global tendency toward sustainable development and free market policies, combined with the fuzzy thinking of Indonesian people and the Indonesian anti-nuclear groups, provide an opportunity to formulate options to disseminate information and conduct related activities. Obtaining successful public acceptance depends on the spectrum of cooperation and achievement of mutual understanding between Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) vendors, relevant Indonesian institutions and the nuclear communities in ASEAN and Asian countries. The most significant factor in getting good public acceptance of nuclear power usage is the proof that Indonesian engineers and scientists working with NPPs are competent and that there is a clear national benefit. However all information should be packaged in a proper way, suitable to public needs, and distributed in a way that makes optimal use of existing methods of distribution. The governmental and traditional social system methods of interaction cannot be avoided. (authors)

  12. Infrastructure sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kenichi; Schooling, Jennifer

    2016-08-06

    Design, construction, maintenance and upgrading of civil engineering infrastructure requires fresh thinking to minimize use of materials, energy and labour. This can only be achieved by understanding the performance of the infrastructure, both during its construction and throughout its design life, through innovative monitoring. Advances in sensor systems offer intriguing possibilities to radically alter methods of condition assessment and monitoring of infrastructure. In this paper, it is hypothesized that the future of infrastructure relies on smarter information; the rich information obtained from embedded sensors within infrastructure will act as a catalyst for new design, construction, operation and maintenance processes for integrated infrastructure systems linked directly with user behaviour patterns. Some examples of emerging sensor technologies for infrastructure sensing are given. They include distributed fibre-optics sensors, computer vision, wireless sensor networks, low-power micro-electromechanical systems, energy harvesting and citizens as sensors.

  13. Infrastructure sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kenichi; Schooling, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Design, construction, maintenance and upgrading of civil engineering infrastructure requires fresh thinking to minimize use of materials, energy and labour. This can only be achieved by understanding the performance of the infrastructure, both during its construction and throughout its design life, through innovative monitoring. Advances in sensor systems offer intriguing possibilities to radically alter methods of condition assessment and monitoring of infrastructure. In this paper, it is hypothesized that the future of infrastructure relies on smarter information; the rich information obtained from embedded sensors within infrastructure will act as a catalyst for new design, construction, operation and maintenance processes for integrated infrastructure systems linked directly with user behaviour patterns. Some examples of emerging sensor technologies for infrastructure sensing are given. They include distributed fibre-optics sensors, computer vision, wireless sensor networks, low-power micro-electromechanical systems, energy harvesting and citizens as sensors. PMID:27499845

  14. EVALUATING AND DEVELOPING LOGISTICS SYSTEM FOR EXPORTING SMALL AND MEDIUM ENTERPRISES (CASE STUDY IN YOGYAKARTA PROVINCE AND ADJACENT AREAS, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizkie Syahputera

    2013-05-01

    The recommendations are established by developing 5th party logistics, constructing clear and market responsive regulations, and improving the facilities of transport infrastructure. Keywords: SME, logistics, Indonesia, export.

  15. Cooperation of nuclear manpower development between Viet Nam and Korea in order to enhance establishment of infrastructure in exporting nuclear technology to Viet Nam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. J.; Han, K. W.; Park, J. K.; Kim, Y. T.; Nam, Y. M.; Jang, Y. H.; Yang, M. H.

    2003-08-01

    Through this project, KAERI provided OJT Programme to 3 nuclear experts of Viet Nam at the KAERI for 3 months as a cooperation of human resource development in the field of nuclear policy, nuclear safety analysis and thermo hydraulic. We could have publicity activities of S/W and H/W then achieve an advantage position of economical and technical in exporting nuclear technology to Viet Nam. Also we have provided a training course and seminar for a high-level delegation of nuclear policy decision makers, which is consisted of 5 deputy ministers and general directors of Viet Nam in Korea. Thus we could have Vietnamese who are favoring Korea. The KAERI will also prepare a data base of trained Vietnamese in Korea for the maximum utilization of them in cooperating with Viet Nam. We accomplished the cooperation of human resource development and providing program and curriculum of the nuclear education and training in Viet Nam. Furthermore, it is expected that the enhancement of nuclear technical cooperation between Viet Nam and Korea and the nuclear human resource development

  16. Cooperation of nuclear manpower development between Viet Nam and Korea in order to enhance establishment of infrastructure in exporting nuclear technology to Viet Nam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E. J.; Han, K. W.; Park, J. K.; Kim, Y. T.; Nam, Y. M.; Jang, Y. H.; Yang, M. H

    2003-08-15

    Through this project, KAERI provided OJT Programme to 3 nuclear experts of Viet Nam at the KAERI for 3 months as a cooperation of human resource development in the field of nuclear policy, nuclear safety analysis and thermo hydraulic. We could have publicity activities of S/W and H/W then achieve an advantage position of economical and technical in exporting nuclear technology to Viet Nam. Also we have provided a training course and seminar for a high-level delegation of nuclear policy decision makers, which is consisted of 5 deputy ministers and general directors of Viet Nam in Korea. Thus we could have Vietnamese who are favoring Korea. The KAERI will also prepare a data base of trained Vietnamese in Korea for the maximum utilization of them in cooperating with Viet Nam. We accomplished the cooperation of human resource development and providing program and curriculum of the nuclear education and training in Viet Nam. Furthermore, it is expected that the enhancement of nuclear technical cooperation between Viet Nam and Korea and the nuclear human resource development.

  17. Status of National Nuclear Infrastructure Development (NG-T-3.2). Basis for Evaluation - Legal, safety, security, safeguards issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yllera, Javier

    2010-01-01

    A framework for achieving high levels of nuclear safety and security worldwide Builds upon: Legal Instruments; Use of IAEA SSs and security guidance; Harmonization of national regulations; Exchange of knowledge, experiences & regulatory practices and Multinational cooperation and safety reviews. The IAEA is the depository of many key international conventions and legal agreements. All countries with operating nuclear power plants are now parties to the Convention. The main objective of Convention on Nuclear Safety is to achieve and maintain a high level of nuclear safety worldwide through the enhancement of national measures and international cooperation including, where appropriate, safety related technical co-operation. All practical efforts must be made to prevent and mitigate nuclear or radiation accidents. The primary means of preventing and mitigating the consequences of accidents is “defence in depth”. Safety assessments are to be carried out and documented by the organization responsible for operating the facility, are to be independently verified and are to be submitted to the regulatory body as part of the licensing or authorization process. Licensing process must be well-defined, clear, transparent and traceable. The public should be given an opportunity to provide their views during certain steps of the licensing process

  18. Financing Infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz de Mello; Douglas Sutherland

    2014-01-01

    The need for infrastructure building, replacement and updating is large worldwide and governments - particularly subnational governments - will need to mobilise budgetary resources while simultaneously restoring public finances to sound health and meeting other spending pressures. This paper considers the factors affecting investment in infrastructure (with an emphasis on fixed networks), the specific characteristics of the different financing modalities applicable to subnational governments ...

  19. Sustainable infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Elle, Morten; Jensen, Jesper Ole

    1998-01-01

    an article on the analytic approach used in analysis of technical infrastructure in the Copenhagen region and other European regions.......an article on the analytic approach used in analysis of technical infrastructure in the Copenhagen region and other European regions....

  20. Exercising Synergy of Safeguards Safety and Security at Facility Level of the GA Siwabessy Multi-Purpose Reactor, Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susilowati, E.

    2015-01-01

    Safeguards, safety and security (3Ss) constitute as essential elements for successful development of nuclear technology in the life time of nuclear installation. All 3Ss need to be coordinated due workers, the public and the environment require protection from plant malfunction, human error, malicious acts and proliferation of nuclear materials and technologies. Then the importance of the 3Ss was deemed valuable, particularly to a country having willingness to expand to nuclear power reactor such as Indonesia that in the near future plans to build small experimental power reactor. This paper is aimed to discuss synergy among safeguards, safety and security which will have opportunity been exercising at the GA Siwabessy Reactor (RSG-GAS), Indonesia. Synergy among safeguards, safety and security offers much opportunity for cost savings and enhance efficiency. Discussion is carried out by first investigating common values and conflicts exist among 3S. Up to now each of them was accomplished separately by different division and using different equipment due lack of coordination among them. The objective of this exercise is to develop more efficient and effective 3Ss infrastructures and also to support skill and knowledge of human resources. Benefitting from synergy between safeguards and security such as management of nuclear material and non proliferation; safeguards and safety such as management of nuclear material and waste management; safety and security such as prevent radiological release and also tension among them if any are discussed. It is expected that outcome of this exercise will able to develop a role model of infrastructures to the up-coming small experimental power reactor in Indonesia. (author)

  1. Seismic Vulnerability Assessment of Site-Vicinity Infrastructure for Supporting the Accident Management of a Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Katona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear power plants shall be designed to resist the effects of large earthquakes. The design basis earthquake affects large area around the plant site and can cause serious consequences that will affect the logistical support of the emergency actions at the plant, influence the psychological condition of the plant personnel, and determine the workload of the country’s disaster management personnel. In this paper the main qualitative findings of a study are presented that have been performed for the case of a hypothetical 10−4/a probability design basis earthquake for the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, Hungary. The study covers the qualitative assessment of the postearthquake conditions at the settlements around the plant site including quantitative evaluation of the condition of dwellings. The main goal of the recent phase of the study was to identify public utility vulnerabilities that define the outside support conditions of the nuclear power plant accident management. The results of the study can be used for the planning of logistical support of the plant accident management staff. The study also contributes to better understanding of the working conditions of the disaster management services in the region around the nuclear power plant.

  2. Infrastructure sociotechnique

    OpenAIRE

    Millerand, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Le terme « infrastructure » évoque spontanément les équipements routiers, ferroviaires, maritimes, le système d’électricité ou le réseau hydraulique. En science, les infrastructures de recherche réfèrent aux grands équipements scientifiques (observatoires astronomiques, synchrotrons, réseaux de surveillance de l’environnement), aux collections (musées d’histoire naturelle) ou encore aux infrastructures informationnelles (Internet et grandes bases de données). Sur le plan théorique, la notion ...

  3. Infrastructure Specifications

    OpenAIRE

    Floros, Evangelos; Konstantinou, Ioannis; Kenny, Stuart; Aggelou, Evangelos; Loomis, Charles; Mpoumpouka, Christina

    2010-01-01

    This document presents the computing infrastructure deployed in the context of StratusLab project, details the configuration of the computing resources used and the commitments made from the project partners to contribute with computing resources in the project. During the first months of operation this infrastructure has already been significantly exploited to deliver the first results towards the project's goals. The OpenNebula virtual management software has been used to install private cl...

  4. Infrastructure and Other Considerations to Launch Nuclear Power Programme: The Case of Sub-Sahara African Developing Countries like Ethiopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshesha, Atnatiwos Zeleke

    2011-01-01

    Trends in the world's population and energy use during the past decades show dramatic increases; and the demand for electricity, mainly from developing countries, is expected to increase more rapidly than the demand for other forms of energy. Besides, concern of climate change led to the need for production of significant amount of 'safe and clean' energy which in turn favours to nuclear option. Other alternative renewable sources like solar and wind can assist but currently they are short of supplying the required high energy demand either economically or/and in substantial amount. Nuclear option therefore remains a possible (developed) technology to fill this energy gap; and many countries including developing one show interest to make use of this energy source. In this paper the economic situations and energy production of six East Africa Sub-Saharan developing countries, with total population of 240 million were assessed, and 6.8% and 2.9% average GDP and population growth respectively registered in the last four years; however, their energy production in 2008 (est.) was 17.662 billion kWh, which is the least in the world. The contribution of inadequate energy and its poor coverage in hampering development, increase poverty and unstability were also analyzed. To come out of this cyclic challenge; it is recommended that countries based on regional economic cooperation should interconnect their electricity grid like EAPP and cooperate to invest commonly or unilaterally to launch Nuclear Power Programmes in relatively stable countries. Candid support of the international community is crucial, and IAEA should support and encourage such arrangements. It is also noted that the best candidate to start NP programme in these countries would be the worldwide dominant water cooled reactors. However, for countries with low grid capacity and to carry out projects in remote areas which are far-away from national grid systems or to desalinate water, considerations for smaller

  5. eDOC: A collaboration infrastructure to manage knowledge and information on nuclear projects and research activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Craeynest, J.M.; Jacquemet, F.; Chermette, D.; Bonneau, S.

    2004-01-01

    After a brief recall of Knowledge Management issues and of the MKSM knowledge modelling method developed and used by the CEA, this paper focuses on the eDOC web collaboration platform designed to support a large range of cross-collaboration needs and a large spectrum of community types (from small units to large European Networks of Excellence). Online community members have different needs : knowing other members and their roles, accessing to reference information and documents, reviewing, annotating and publishing documents or sending information to all or part of members, being informed of events, scheduling shared jobs and manage tasks, discuss some questions using forums, etc. They also want to develop a common identity and portal look and structure customizations are very useful for that purpose. The Information System Department of the CEA has launched the eDOC project to supply a rapid demand growth for those tools. In the CEA, this demand is due to the growing importance and number of internal and external cross-collaborations and alliances with industrial and research partners. After a systematic evaluation campaign of both proprietary and open-source solutions, and after having defined the most pragmatic deployment strategy, we have chosen the Collaborative Portal Server (CPS) edited by Nuxeo. CPS is based on the Zope open-source object-oriented application server. Then we invested to improve functionalities and performances of CPS but also to design and implement a security policy adapted to different types of security requirements and information privacy levels. The eDOC web collaboration infrastructure is now used by 50 projects and this number keeps increasing. The main uses are internal documents repositories (to simplify classical 'Intranet' building and maintaining process) and information repositories (including documents but also events, news, calendar, conferences, etc.) for external collaborations. The 6th European research framework program

  6. Indonesia country report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murni Soedyartomo Soentono, Tri [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia - Batan, Radioisotopes and Radiopharmaceuticals Development Centre, Pasar Jum' at, Cinere Raya, 12570 Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2008-07-01

    Several nuclear research are currently operation in Serpong, Jakarta, Bandung and Yogyakarta; these facilities has been in operation step wisely and having strong link with various universities and laboratories within the country (30 MW in Serpong, 2 MW in Bandung, Cyclotron CS-30 Serpong, Accelerator Yogyakarta, Irradiator Co-60). Public Acceptance: Further more the routine activities of the public information by WiN regarding the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, especially to the immediate environment of the NPP candidate site are indeed of important steps. Future of nuclear power: Since 1990's, Indonesia planned to build NPP station in Jepara to anticipate future energy crisis. Indonesia National Energy Policy has four main objectives: - Securing the continuity of energy supply for domestic use at price affordable to the public, - Enhancing the life quality of the people, - Stimulating economic growth, and, - Reserving an adequate supply of oil and gas for expert to provide source of foreign exchange to fund the national development program. Nuclear Waste Management Policy: Law no 10/1997 on nuclear power became the basic policy in management of radioactive waste The only national agency dealing with radioactive substances, BATAN possesses all data and information concerning the use of nuclear power. Radioactive waste management is particularly earmarked for maximum protection of living creatures, the environment and its ecosystems. In order to guarantee maximum safety and protection, all parties involved in the acquisition of radioactive materials should abide by the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle. In order to achieve radioactive waste management that complies with the principle of sustainable development, technological applications should be technically and economically viable for maximum protection of the environment and safety from any potential nuclear hazards, now and in future. The application must also be accepted by the community

  7. Evaluative Infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornberger, Martin; Pflueger, Dane; Mouritsen, Jan

    To date, much of the accounting literature focuses on control and coordination within and from the perspective of organizations, reflecting what Hopwood described as accounting’s “hierarchical consciousness”. Inspired by the growing phenomenon of network organizational forms such as eBay, Air...... for the hierarchical firm, evaluative infrastructures provide the accounting practices for networks. Illustrating the concept of evaluative infrastructure with the extended example of eBay, the paper’s contribution is to extend accounting scholars’ analytical focus from hierarchical settings to heterarchies...

  8. Prospect for introduction of nuclear power in Southeast Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Yuji; Kouno, Seiji; Murakami, Tomoko

    2008-01-01

    Southeast Asian countries such as Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Viet Nam plan to introduce nuclear power by around 2020 with government's lead to cope with increase of electricity demand and secure energy resources. However in reality, the plan will be delayed more than several years by issues related with introduction of nuclear power. Taking into consideration of energy policy and prospect, political and economic conditions, infrastructure preparation, social and industrial systems of each country, the situation differs in countries largely. As for Viet Nam and Thailand with promotion systems prepared nuclear programs may proceed rather smoothly with some possible delay, while as for Philippines with the promotion system not well prepared it may be difficult to make earlier progress smoothly although there exists possibility of utilization of a nuclear power plant with construction works suspended. There seems no need of earlier introduction of nuclear energy in Malaysia and in Indonesia possibility of great delay of the program due to infrastructure preparation and investment environments. Japanese nuclear industry may contribute the programs through efforts of personnel training, system design and information dissemination. (T. Tanaka)

  9. IAEA news: • Newcomer countries face common challenges in nuclear infrastructure development. • Safety and licensing requirements for small modular reactors: IAEA hosts first workshop for regulators. • IAEA reaches milestone in disposal of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollar, Lenka; Dyck, Elisabeth; Dixit, Aabha; Gaspar, Miklos; Gil, Laura

    2016-01-01

    • Newcomer countries face common challenges in nuclear infrastructure development: Countries embarking on a nuclear power programme need to make sure that the development of their legal, regulatory and support infrastructure keeps pace with the construction of the power plant itself. This is the only way to ensure that the programme proceeds in a safe, secure and sustainable way, concluded participants of a workshop on nuclear power infrastructure development hosted at the IAEA last February. • Safety and licensing requirements for small modular reactors: IAEA hosts first workshop for regulators: A new generation of advanced, prefab nuclear power reactors called small modular reactors (SMRs) could be licensed and hit the market as early as 2020, and the IAEA is helping regulators prepare for their debut. In a series of workshops that began earlier this year, the IAEA is working closely with regulators on approaches to safety and licensing ahead of potential SMR deployment worldwide. • IAEA reaches milestone in disposal of radioactive sources: Successful tests of a promising technology for moving and storing low level radioactive sealed sources are paving the way for a new disposal method for dealing with small volumes of radioactive waste around the world. The method, which involves placing and covering sealed sources in a narrow hole a few hundred metres deep, would allow countries to safely and securely take charge of their own disused radioactive sources. The proof of concept for the technology was tested in Croatia late last year — without the use of actual radioactive material.

  10. Rebuilding Infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan Schwartz; Pablo Halkyard

    2006-01-01

    Postconflict countries have had difficulty attracting private investment in infrastructure, and their growth and stability have suffered as a result. But the success of a few countries hints at policy initiatives that governments could pursue to close this destabilizing gap in investment. The emphasis should be on making sure that sector reforms go far enough, getting the timing and sequen...

  11. Greening infrastructure

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available , and coal, with a concomitant release of greenhouse gases. Green infrastructure seeks to perform those functions in a manner that, at the very least, minimises its impact on the natural environment and, at best, enhances the quality of the natural...

  12. eDOC : A collaboration infrastructure to manage knowledge and information on nuclear projects and research activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Craeynest, J.M.; Jacquemet, F.; Chermette, D.; Bonneau, S.

    2004-01-01

    One of EU's strategic goals was launched at Lisbon 2000 European summit: becoming the most competitive knowledge economy by 2010. In the field of nuclear technologies, we know that capitalizing knowledge and acquired experience is vital to preserve nuclear equipment's' safe use in the future. Knowledge Management encompasses various domains of business practices, relating to human resources management, information, information technologies, strategy, and accounting. Facing such complex issues, especially in R and D organizations, knowledge management cannot only stand on a few organizational or technical solutions. All functions must be involved to achieve those strategic objectives: management must find realistic incentives and inscribe Knowledge Management as a core management objective (just as Quality Insurance has been). Human Resources departments and education institutes can benefit from new technologies to improve training methods. Research units have to launch knowledge capitalization projects to retrieve, save and transfer critical knowledge, technical skills and know-how. An a-posteriori knowledge saving 'fireman-type' action must be done in the case of major events but we must promote an on-going capitalization effort as well and embed KM into projects and activities management methods. This effort during the project and afterwards is implemented through a perennial information system. This information system should provide a wide range of services for scientific publications and patents management, corporate or local knowledge bases and document repositories, project management and collaboration, rich media authoring, etc. Implementing virtual workspaces with eDOC Research and engineering activities are more and more cross-organizations funded and netlike organized. Furthermore, it is very difficult for project managers to deal with security constraints as they must share but protect knowledge as well. Before sharing information, teams have to share a

  13. PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION OF FOREIGN TOURIST DISTRIBUTION IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriono

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia should be able to distribute evenly the visits of foreign tourists so that the visit is not merely focused on certain places. It is expected that all the tourism objects in Indonesia can attract and be visited by foreign tourists with the same quantity or number in every tourist destination. In the first year, this study aimed to identify the motivation of foreign tourists visiting Indonesia and identify the problems of distribution of foreign tourists in Indonesia. The study sites were in DKI Jakarta, Batam, and Bali. In the second year later, a distribution channel strategy will be developed in order to create competiveness of tourism. This study was conducted using qualitative research methods with descriptive analysis. The data were collected using in-depth interviews with tourism stakeholders (the Government, International Travelers, and Tourism Bureau/Travel Agencies. The research results show that the motivation of foreign tourists visiting Indonesia was related to business and purely on vacation. Additionally, the problems of foreign tourist distribution in Indonesia emerged because of some aspects, including limited entrance of foreign tourists to Indonesia, lack of connectivity between airports in Indonesia and international flights, lack of inter-regional cooperation between tourism actors, lack of infrastructure, and the ignorance of foreign tourists to all tourist destinations in Indonesia due to less effective and efficient promotion activities.

  14. EPA Collaboration with Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indonesia is a key actor in the global environmental arena. In addition to significant ecological resources, Indonesia also has the fourth largest population in the world and the third largest greenhouse gas emissions.

  15. Railway infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Kruit, P.; Van Overbeek, F.; Gravendeel, B.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract of corresponding document: EP 2017118 (A1) The invention relates to a railway infrastructure for a tram- or train transport system, comprising rails and an overhead contact line for providing the tram or train movable over the rails with an electrical drive power, which overhead contact line comprises overhead contact line sections connected to each other, each of which are individually connected with at least one feeder cable, wherein each separate overhead contact line section is a...

  16. Prospection of implementation of distance learning for the course on fundamentals of Nuclear Physics at the graduate course of IPEN using free software infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tondim, Jose Egidio Marin

    2009-01-01

    In modern society, the utilization of technological resources and of the internet are of fundamental importance in ali areas and as such the educational activities have to follow this evolution. In this context, distance learning is a fundamental tool for educational development, being innovative and stimulating , offering a variety of resources that are complementary to the activities of the students. Also it is important to point out that distance learning can be brought to remote regions, of difficult access in many cases, so allowing a wide dissemination of knowledge and also implying in lower costs. The objective of this work is the prospection of the interest and viability of implantation of distance learning in the course on Fundamentals of Nuclear Physics at the pos-graduate course of IPEN, using free software infra-structure , by means of a pilot project on distance learning. The work was developed in three phases. In the first phase, a questionnaire was applied to the students , with the aim of finding out about their profiles and interest in distance learning, before they had contact with the pilot project. In the second phase, other students were interviewed , also with the objective of knowing their opinion about distance learning ,but after they had access to the pilot project. Finally,the professors of the graduate course of IPEN were consulted, also by means of a questionnaire, in order to know about their interest in the utilization of distance learning. The results obtained in the present work show that distance learning is a welcome pedagogical resource for students as well for teachers; these results will subsidize the future implementation of distance learning in the pos-graduate course of IPEN. (author)

  17. Infrastructure Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Idongesit

    2012-01-01

    It is the quest of every government to achieve universal Access and service of telecommunication services and ICTs. Unfortunately due to the high cost of deploying infrastructure in rural areas of developing countries due to non-significant or no economic activity, this dream of achieving Universal...... access and service of telecommunications/ICTs have been stalled. This paper throws light on a possible Public Private Partnership framework as a development path that will enable affordable network technologies to be deployed in rural areas at a cost that will translate to what the rural dweller...... in a developing country in Africa can afford. The paper is a conceptual paper...

  18. Pavement Technology and Airport Infrastructure Expansion Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabib; Setiawan, M. I.; Kurniasih, N.; Ahmar, A. S.; Hasyim, C.

    2018-01-01

    This research aims for analyzing construction and infrastructure development activities potential contribution towards Airport Performance. This research is correlation study with variable research that includes Airport Performance as X variable and construction and infrastructure development activities as Y variable. The population in this research is 148 airports in Indonesia. The sampling technique uses total sampling, which means 148 airports that becomes the population unit then all of it become samples. The results of coefficient correlation (R) test showed that construction and infrastructure development activities variable have a relatively strong relationship with Airport Performance variable, but the value of Adjusted R Square shows that an increase in the construction and infrastructure development activities is influenced by factor other than Airport Performance.

  19. Making green infrastructure healthier infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mare Lõhmus

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing urban green and blue structure is often pointed out to be critical for sustainable development and climate change adaptation, which has led to the rapid expansion of greening activities in cities throughout the world. This process is likely to have a direct impact on the citizens’ quality of life and public health. However, alongside numerous benefits, green and blue infrastructure also has the potential to create unexpected, undesirable, side-effects for health. This paper considers several potential harmful public health effects that might result from increased urban biodiversity, urban bodies of water, and urban tree cover projects. It does so with the intent of improving awareness and motivating preventive measures when designing and initiating such projects. Although biodiversity has been found to be associated with physiological benefits for humans in several studies, efforts to increase the biodiversity of urban environments may also promote the introduction and survival of vector or host organisms for infectious pathogens with resulting spread of a variety of diseases. In addition, more green connectivity in urban areas may potentiate the role of rats and ticks in the spread of infectious diseases. Bodies of water and wetlands play a crucial role in the urban climate adaptation and mitigation process. However, they also provide habitats for mosquitoes and toxic algal blooms. Finally, increasing urban green space may also adversely affect citizens allergic to pollen. Increased awareness of the potential hazards of urban green and blue infrastructure should not be a reason to stop or scale back projects. Instead, incorporating public health awareness and interventions into urban planning at the earliest stages can help insure that green and blue infrastructure achieves full potential for health promotion.

  20. Making green infrastructure healthier infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lõhmus, Mare; Balbus, John

    2015-01-01

    Increasing urban green and blue structure is often pointed out to be critical for sustainable development and climate change adaptation, which has led to the rapid expansion of greening activities in cities throughout the world. This process is likely to have a direct impact on the citizens' quality of life and public health. However, alongside numerous benefits, green and blue infrastructure also has the potential to create unexpected, undesirable, side-effects for health. This paper considers several potential harmful public health effects that might result from increased urban biodiversity, urban bodies of water, and urban tree cover projects. It does so with the intent of improving awareness and motivating preventive measures when designing and initiating such projects. Although biodiversity has been found to be associated with physiological benefits for humans in several studies, efforts to increase the biodiversity of urban environments may also promote the introduction and survival of vector or host organisms for infectious pathogens with resulting spread of a variety of diseases. In addition, more green connectivity in urban areas may potentiate the role of rats and ticks in the spread of infectious diseases. Bodies of water and wetlands play a crucial role in the urban climate adaptation and mitigation process. However, they also provide habitats for mosquitoes and toxic algal blooms. Finally, increasing urban green space may also adversely affect citizens allergic to pollen. Increased awareness of the potential hazards of urban green and blue infrastructure should not be a reason to stop or scale back projects. Instead, incorporating public health awareness and interventions into urban planning at the earliest stages can help insure that green and blue infrastructure achieves full potential for health promotion.

  1. Evaluative Infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornberger, Martin; Pflueger, Dane; Mouritsen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Platform organizations such as Uber, eBay and Airbnb represent a growing disruptive phenomenon in contemporary capitalism, transforming economic organization, the nature of work, and the distribution of wealth. This paper investigates the accounting practices that underpin this new form of organi......Platform organizations such as Uber, eBay and Airbnb represent a growing disruptive phenomenon in contemporary capitalism, transforming economic organization, the nature of work, and the distribution of wealth. This paper investigates the accounting practices that underpin this new form...... of organizing, and in doing so confronts a significant challenge within the accounting literature: the need to escape what Hopwood (1996) describes as its “hierarchical consciousness”. In order to do so, this paper develops the concept of evaluative infrastructure which describes accounting practices...

  2. Ritual Infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjørslev, Inger

    2017-01-01

    This article compares the ways in which two different religions in Brazil generate roads to certainty through objectification, one through gods, the other through banknotes. The Afro-Brazilian religion Candomblé provides a road to certainty based on cosmological ideas about gods whose presence...... in ritual is made indubitable through performance and social consensus. Candomblé has historically gained its spiritual force by being both marginal to mainstream religion and spatially peripheral. In contrast, the Neo-Pentecostal Universal Church of the Kingdom of God is located in easily accessible places...... within urban life. There is a certain parallel between these different locations and the difference in ritual roads to certainty in the two religions. The article draws out connections between different levels of infrastructure – material, spatial and ritual. The comparison between the two religions...

  3. Human Resources Capacity Building as a Strategy in Strengthening Nuclear Knowledge Sustainability in the Experimental Fuel Element Installation of BATAN-Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratih Langenati; Bambang, Herutomo; Arief Sasongko Adhi

    2014-01-01

    Strategy in Strengthening Nuclear Knowledge Sustainability: • In order to maintain human resources capacity related to nuclear fuel production technology, a nuclear knowledge preservation program is implemented in the EFEI. • The program includes coaching/training, mentoring and documenting important knowledge. • The program activities are monitored and evaluated quarterly for its improvement in the following year

  4. Highlight: Forging the new Indonesia-Canada partnership | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Apr 15, 2016 ... Canada and Indonesia share a mutual interest in building a stronger relationship and closer business ties, a recent high-level meeting in Jakarta heard. Areas identified for collaboration include trade, regional security, education, transport infrastructure, and agriculture and food security.

  5. Widening access to water for slum residents in Indonesia | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Jun 15, 2016 ... Access to water for poor residents in Jakarta, Indonesia, is limited. Among the challenges they face are the high prices demanded by water service providers, poor water quality, and limited access to water infrastructure. With support from IDRC, the global humanitarian agency Mercy Corps worked with ...

  6. Japan, Indonesia to investigate condom plant feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    The Japanese government has begun investigations on the possibility of constructing a condom manufacturing plant in Indonesia in response to a request by the Indonesian government. Indonesia, which hopes to reduce its birthrate as of 1971 by 1/2 by 1990, asked for Japanese assistance in building a condom plant based on the expectation that demand for this contraceptive method, although quite low at present, will increase rapidly in the near future with stepped-up motivation campaigns. As a 1st step in the investigation, the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) sent a study team of family planning experts headed by Family Planning Federation of Japan Chairman Dr. Hidebumi Kubo and including JOICFP International Division Director MR. Tameyoshi Katagiri to Indonesia from March 15-24. During its visit, the JICA team held discussions with representatives of BKKBN (the National Family Planning Coordinating Board) including its Chairman and Minister of Health Dr. Suwardjono and reached agreement on the scope and schedule of work toward determining the feasibility of building and operating a condom plant in Indonesia. In defining the scope of work and the schedule, the JICA team and the BKKBN representatives decided on specific issues to be investigated in the feasibility study to be carried out by JICA and scheduled to be completed by the end of October of this year. To be included in the feasibility study are: estimation of future domestic demand for condoms, examination of the domestic supply of latex capacity, chemicals and packaging materials, and collection of information on infrastructure relating to water, energy, transportation, etc. Actual data collection for the study is expected to begin in late May or early June. Dr. Kubo and Mr. Katagiri, upon returning to Japan, reported great enthusiasm for the project in Indonesia and expressed the hope that the plant construction will be feasible so that the country's family planning program can be given a boost

  7. Critical Infrastructure Protection- Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bofman, Ryan K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-24

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been a key facet of Critical National Infrastructure since the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima exposed the nature of the Laboratory’s work in 1945. Common knowledge of the nature of sensitive information contained here presents a necessity to protect this critical infrastructure as a matter of national security. This protection occurs in multiple forms beginning with physical security, followed by cybersecurity, safeguarding of classified information, and concluded by the missions of the National Nuclear Security Administration.

  8. Pengembangan Model E-Bisnis di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Subekti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Problems in building e-business is the number of influential factors that really should be considered in the design, especially from the aspect of a relatively bad infrastructure in Indonesia. By doing appropriate design, it can at least reduce the impact due to various shortcomings that exist, it is intended that the users are able to surf comfortably and safely in a business website in cyberspace. In managing e-Business, there are business models that can be done by the businessman in the virtual world, but the e-Business models vary according to the character and culture of each region. What e-Business models are suitable to be applied in Indonesia, according to the character and culture of Indonesia, as well as the ability of the existing infrastructure will be described in this article. One solution is the utilization of social networking that is widely used, even though there are positive and negative sides of it. Then, what kinds of advantages are gained, in both for managing the site and as well as benefits for the customers

  9. What is infrastructure?

    OpenAIRE

    Buhr, Walter

    2003-01-01

    After having pointed out the diverse uses of the term infrastructure in the literature on the market-economy, the different categories of infrastructure will be described. The argument in this context is that the classification of infrastructure suggested by Jochimsen has proved useful: institutional, personal, and material infrastructure. On this basis a concept for the definition of infrastructure will be developed. The hitherto taken approach to understanding infrastructure, especially mat...

  10. What is infrastructure?

    OpenAIRE

    Walter Buhr

    2003-01-01

    : After having pointed out the diverse uses of the term "infrastructure" in the literature on the market-economy, the different categories of infrastructure will be described. The argument in this context is that the classification of infrastructure suggested by Jochimsen has proved useful: institutional, personal, and material infrastructure. On this basis a concept for the definition of infrastructure will be developed. The hitherto taken approach to understanding infrastructure, especially...

  11. SASTRA CYBER DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laily Fitriani

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The digital era started when the internet technology spread to the developing countries including Indonesia. The flourish of cyber literature leads to the debate on the quality of the work of literature. Above all, the existence of literature sites (cyber literature becomes an important alternative for writers and literary activist in Indonesia.

  12. Central Region Green Infrastructure

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This Green Infrastructure data is comprised of 3 similar ecological corridor data layers ? Metro Conservation Corridors, green infrastructure analysis in counties...

  13. Armenia - Irrigation Infrastructure

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — This study evaluates irrigation infrastructure rehabilitation in Armenia. The study separately examines the impacts of tertiary canals and other large infrastructure...

  14. Nanotechnology: Development and challenges in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joni, I. Made; Muthukannan, Vanitha; Hermawan, Wawan; Panatarani, Camellia

    2018-02-01

    Nanotechnology today is regarded as a revolutionary technology that can help to address the key needs related to energy, environment, health and agriculture in developing countries. This paper is a short review on the development and challenges of nanotechnology in Indonesia. Nanotechnology offers great potential benefits, there is emerging concerns arising from its novel physicochemical properties. The main applications of nanotechnology in the different sectors which is vital and its economic impact in Indonesia is also discussed. The achievment and development of nanotechnology including synthesis and dispersion of nanoparticles (NPs) and its applications in various fields is briefly addressed in Nanotehcnology and Graphene Research Center, Universitas Padjadjaran (Unpad). Despite significant progress in developmental goals, many challenges in the development of nanotechnology proccesing need to be resolved such as support infrastructure and evolution of new form of collaborative arrangements between various sectors and policies which is emerged as an important factor enabling development.

  15. Chinese Foreign Direct Investment in Indonesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, Peter; Tarmidi, Lepi T.

    China‟s increasing integration with the world economy is met with much anticipation and much anxiety in the Southeast Asian region. In Indonesia, there is intense interest in Chinese foreign direct investment (FDI), not only among academics but also among policy makers, industrialists...... conducted in 2008 among Chinese invested enterprises supplemented with available official statistics and secondary data, the study finds that Chinese FDI in Indonesia is performed by mixed entities: some are owned by central government, some by regional government and some are private firms. In the case...... of joint ventures, their local partners are mostly local Chinese, except in the infrastructure, mining and energy sector where their local partners are Indonesian state-owned enterprises. Where the local developmental effects are concerned, a picture emerges where Chinese investments, at this early period...

  16. Site Response Analysis Using DeepSoil: Case Study of Bangka Site, Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iswanto, Eko Rudi; Yee, Eric [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Indonesia government declared through Act No. 17 year 2007 on the National Long-Term Development Plant Year 2005-2025 and Presidential Decree No. 5 year 2006 on the National Energy Policy (Indonesia 2007; Indonesia 2006), that nuclear energy is stated as a part of the national energy system. In order to undertake the above national policy, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia, as the promotor for the utilization of nuclear energy will conduct site study, which is a part of infrastructure preparation for NPP construction. Thorough preparation and steps are needed to operate an NPP and it takes between 10 to 15 years from the preliminary study (site selection, financial study, etc.) up to project implementation (manufacturing, construction, commissioning). During project implementation, it is necessary to prepare various documents relevant for permit application such as Safety Evaluation Report for site permit, Preliminary Safety Analysis Report and Environment Impact Assessment Report for construction permit. Considering the continuously increasing electricity energy demand, it is necessary to prepare for alternative NPP sites. The safety requirements of NPP's are stringent; amongst the various requirements is the ability to safely shut down in the wake of a possible earthquake. Ground response analysis of a potential site therefore needs to be carried out, parameter that affect the resistance of an NPP to earthquakes such as peak strain profiles is analysed. The objective of this paper is to analyse the ground response of the selected site for a NPP, using The Mw 7.9 in Sikuai Island, West Sumatra on September 12, 2007 as present input motion. This analysis will be carried out using a ground response analysis program, DeepSoil. In addition to this, an attempt was made to define the site specific input motion characteristics of the selected site for use in DeepSoil (DeepSoil 5.0). A site investigation at the WB site was performed primarily on the PS

  17. Self Assessment for the Safety of Research Reactor in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melani, Ai; Chang, Soon Heung

    2008-01-01

    At the present Indonesia has no nuclear power plant in operation yet, although it is expected that the first nuclear power plant will be operated and commercially available in around the year of 2016 to 2017 in Muria Peninsula. National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) has three research reactor; which are: Reactor Triga Mark II at Bandung, Reactor Kartini at Yogyakarta and Reactor Serbaguna (Multi Purpose Reactor) at Serpong. The Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors establishes 'best practice' guidelines for the licensing, construction and operation of research reactors. In this paper the author use the requirement in code of conduct to review the safety of research reactor in Indonesia

  18. Dinamika Kurikulum di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Asri

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Education does not have a standard reference, which covers access for revision by the authorities. Because education continues to grow along with the rolling times. Therefore, all matters relating to education also do not have a standard reference, including educational curriculum. The curriculum is one of the important elements that has a role to advance education in Indonesia, in accordance with the ideals of the constitution. Curriculum changes are not taboo for education in developed countries of the world (such as Japan, Finlandia,  USA, etc.. Basically the dynamics of curriculum in Indonesia aims to make education in Indonesia able to compete with the developed countries in the world.

  19. The dynamics of rice production in Indonesia 1961–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah R. Panuju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice is one of the important agricultural products in Indonesia. The production has been fully supported by infrastructure including research and development as well as government regulations in pricing. Its vulnerability to climate change requires adaptation strategies on irrigation, biotechnology and selection of alternative crops. The primary goal of this paper was to evaluate the historical perspective of the dynamics of rice production, technologies particularly in seed inventions, labour in farming and consumption of rice from 1961 to 2009 in conjunction with land capability. The study of historical rice production could be a benefit for future agricultural planning in Indonesia.

  20. Implementation of green infrastructure concept in Citarum Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryati, Sri; Humaira, An Nisaa'Siti

    2017-03-01

    Green infrastructure has several benefits compared to grey infrastructure in term of environmental services and sustainability, such as reducing energy consumption, improving air quality, providing carbon sequestration, and increasing property values. Nevertheless in practice, the implementation of the concept in Indonesia is still limited. Implementation of the certain concept has to be guided in planning document. In this paper, green infrastructure concept in the current spatial plan and other planning documents is assessed. The purpose of this research is to figure out how far the green infrastructure concept is integrated into planning system, based on the analysis of planning documents in Citarum Watershed and expert interviews with local stakeholders. Content analysis method is used to analyze the documents and result of interview. The result shows that green infrastructure concept has not been accommodated in spatial plan or other planning documents widely. There are some challenges in implementing the concept including reward and punishment system (incentive and disincentive), coordination, and lack of human resources.

  1. Nuclear Power Newsletter, Vol. 10, No. 1, January 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Several countries have made a decision to start a nuclear power programme in recent years. The IAEA has been providing them with integrated assistance across a wide range of infrastructure areas. The Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review (INIR) missions are a key component in assessing infrastructure status and identifying areas for further action. INIR missions have been conducted to Bangladesh, Belarus, Indonesia, Jordan, Thailand, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Vietnam since the mission was established in 2009. In 2013, INIR missions are planned to South Africa - the first country with an operating nuclear power programme that has requested this service - Poland and Turkey. Bangladesh and Jordan may consider follow-up missions while other countries such as Egypt, Kenya, Malaysia, and Nigeria have also expressed interest in receiving this mission. The INIR Mission is an integral part of the IAEA's Milestones approach, which comprises three phases of development of a national nuclear infrastructure programme and covers 19 infrastructure issues, ranging from a government's national position on nuclear power to the procurement of items and services for the first nuclear power plant. The end of each phase is marked by a 'milestone', i.e. when a country is making the decision to move forward with nuclear power (Milestone 1), as a follow-up review of progress and before initiating the bidding process (Milestone 2), and at the end of phase three, when a country is ready to commission and operate its first nuclear power plant (Milestone 3). 'The INIR Mission can support Member States in building confidence that their national infrastructure is adequately established, by identifying areas which need further recommendations on progress towards the next milestone', explained JK Park, Director of the Division of Nuclear Power, who has been the IAEA team leader for most INIR Missions. By providing a comprehensive assessment of all facets of a nuclear power programme

  2. The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO): General description and implications for the research reactor infrastructure needed for R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Yury A.

    2005-01-01

    The substantial growth in 21st century energy supplies needed to meet sustainable development goals has been emphasized by UNCSD, WSSD, IPCC and others. This will be driven by continuing population growth, economic development and aspiration to provide access to modern energy systems to the 1,6 billion people now without such access, the growth demand on limiting greenhouse gas emissions, and reducing the risk of climate change. A key factor to the future of nuclear power is the degree to which innovative nuclear technologies can be developed to meet challenges of economic competitiveness, safety, waste and proliferation concerns. There are two major international initiatives in the area of innovative nuclear technology: the IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycle (INPRO) and the Generation IV International Forum. With INPRO some scenarios of future energy needs were identified and the methodology for holistic assessment of the innovative nuclear energy systems (INS), which can be developed to meet these scenarios, was developed.. The current status of the INPRO project and details of the INPRO methodology will be reported. The research needs identified due to Agency's activities on innovative nuclear system development assume the use of research reactors. The areas crucial for the development of INS which critically dependent of the RR experiments and following requirements addressed to the RR will be discussed. These areas include the development of advanced fuel and core materials for proposed innovative power reactor concepts. (author)

  3. Jepara Indonesia Furniture

    OpenAIRE

    romanzick

    2016-01-01

    Jepara Indonesia Furniture A wide choice of Indonesian furniture companies provide free business listings to all types of furniture also for outlets and stores. Each section is accessible that contains a comprehensive list of our range of furniture details information and full campaign. We provided a platform create various products along with featured inspiration section related products, services, accessories. Indonesia Furniture Teak Garden Furniture It is bringing customers distinctive as...

  4. Determinan Ekspor CPO Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratih Rosita

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Palm oil is one of the products that are important to the economy of Indonesia. This study aims to analyze the performance of Indonesia's CPO exports and to look for the influence of the independent variables such as production volume CPO, CPO consumption and the value of the rupiah against the U.S. dollar. The authors of this study tested using the Method of Error Correction Model. The time interval used is from 1998 to 2011 with the data quarter. The findings suggest that Indonesia's CPO production volume variables exert a positive and significant impact on the number of Indonesian CPO exports in both the short and long term, then the variable volume Indonesia CPO consumption in the short and long term is also a significant effect on the number of Indonesian CPO exports but negatively related, this is due to the domestic CPO consumption greater that the capacity to export will be reduced. Variables of the Rupiah against the U.S. dollar also affects Indonesia's CPO exports significantly and negatively related to both the short and long term and conditions of the depreciation of the rupiah exchange rate is not enough to effectively be driving exports. Estimates show that the close relationship between external demand caused exports to Indonesia's export performance vulnerable to external shocks. Side factors are also a determinant of export performance.

  5. Determinan Ekspor CPO Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratih Rosita

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Palm oil is one of the products that are important to the economy of Indonesia. This study aims to analyze the performance of Indonesia's CPO exports and to look for the influence of the independent variables such as production volume CPO, CPO consumption and the value of the rupiah against the U.S. dollar. The authors of this study tested using the Method of Error Correction Model. The time interval used is from 1998 to 2011 with the data quarter. The findings suggest that Indonesia's CPO production volume variables exert a positive and significant impact on the number of Indonesian CPO exports in both the short and long term, then the variable volume Indonesia CPO consumption in the short and long term is also a significant effect on the number of Indonesian CPO exports but negatively related, this is due to the domestic CPO consumption greater that the capacity to export will be reduced. Variables of the Rupiah against the U.S. dollar also affects Indonesia's CPO exports significantly and negatively related to both the short and long term and conditions of the depreciation of the rupiah exchange rate is not enough to effectively be driving exports. Estimates show that the close relationship between external demand caused exports to Indonesia's export performance vulnerable to external shocks. Side factors are also a determinant of export performance. Keywords: palm oil, CPO consumption, Error Correction Model

  6. ANALISIS KETERKAITAN KETERSEDIAAN INFRASTRUKTUR DENGAN PERTUMBUHAN EKONOMI DI INDONESIA: PENDEKATAN ANALISIS GRANGER CAUSALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesta Karolina B Sembanyang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study are to analyze the causal relationship of public service provision (infrastructure, economic growth and tax inIndonesiaand to formulate the policy implications of causal link and infrastructure inIndonesia’s economic growth. The data used was time series data, from 1987 up to 2009. They were from many sources such as Government Expenditure (APBN, Central Bureau of Statistics (BPS and the International Financial Statistics (IFS. The method used is a causal analysis approach or the Granger causality. The findings of this study is that there is a direct relationship between GDP to infrastructure and the GDP to tax revenue. The conclusions of this study are Gross Domestic Product (GDP can lead the availability of infrastructure (for example road length in Indonesia,there is a causal connection between the economic growth and the tax revenue in Indonesia, andthe increased tax revenue will increase the availability of infrastructure, especially road.

  7. Preservation of knowledge: general principals, methodology and application in nuclear industry. Working material. Report prepared within the framework of the Programmes: C.3. Nuclear Knowledge Management and A.2. Improving Quality Assurance, Technical Infrastructure and Human Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    There is an immediate need to preserve existing knowledge in nuclear science and technology for peaceful applications for future generations, as it represents a valuable human capital asset. The development of an exciting vision for nuclear technology is prerequisite for attracting young scientists and professionals to seek careers in nuclear science and technology. Irrespective of current national energy policies, the need to maintain or even enhance the nuclear knowledge base and national capability will persist. In this way, the knowledge base will be available to meet requirements for evolving policy development. A number of IAEA advisory committees and technical meetings stressed the importance of preserving and further enhancing nuclear science and technology for socio-economic development. For nuclear science and technology to contribute to sustainable development requires knowledge and capacity on three levels: (a) basic nuclear science, (b) technology, (c) engineering and operation. There was unanimous consensus that IAEA has an obligation to lead activities towards preservation and enhancement of nuclear knowledge by complementing, and as appropriate supplementing, activities by governments, industry, academia and international organizations. International co-operation is of vital importance. Unless action is taken now, invaluable assets in critical nuclear knowledge and capacity will soon be lost. The IAEA is developing guidance documents on nuclear knowledge management including knowledge preservation and knowledge transfer in nuclear sector. This activity would assist nuclear organizations in MS to effectively apply this guidance, and to assist them in benchmarking their practices against those of other industry organizations. The present Working Material provides general principals for knowledge preservation in nuclear sector, which could be applied in different nuclear organization and in particular in Nuclear Power Plants

  8. Perlawanan Terhadap Penjajahan dalam Puisi-Puisi Indonesia dan Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusri Fajar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Penjajahan di muka bumi, seperti yang dialami Indonesia dan Korea telah mengakibatkan kerugian materiil dan non materiil. Akibat-a­kibat dari kolonialisme ini mendapat respon puitik dari para penyair Indonesia dan Korea yang tidak hanya menulis puisi namun juga bersentuhan dengan gerakan perlawanan untuk menggapai kemerdekaan. Artikel ini membahas resistensi terhadap penjajahan sebagaimana tercermin dalam puisi-puisi para penyair Indonesia dan Korea. Untuk meneliti puisi-puisi tersebut konsep sastra bandingan digunakan dan dielaborasi bersama dengan teori kolonialisme. Sumber data penelitian ini adalah antologi puisi Korea yang berjudul Puisi buat Rakyat Indonesia (terjemahan Chung Yong Rim tahun 2013 dan antologi puisi Indonesia Aku ini Binatang Jalang karya Chairil Anwar cetakan tahun 2015. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa pengalaman ketika dijajah Jepang membuat para penyair kedua negara ini melahirkan puisi-puisi yang secara tematis menggambarkan berbagai akibat kolonialisme dan semangat antipenjajahan yang lahir sebagai bentuk perlawanan. Abstract: Colonization as experienced by Indonesia and Korea brought about impacts on infrastructure and people of both countries. Those effects triggered Indonesian and Korean poets to give poetical response. These poets not only wrote poems but also involved in the movement in gaining independence. This article discusses the resistance toward colonization as represented in the poems by Indonesian and Korean Poets. The concept of comparative literature and colonialism are employed in this research. Sources of the data in this research are taken from the anthology of Korean poems entitled Puisi buat Rakyat Indonesia (translated into Indonesian by Chung Yong Rim in 2013 and anthology of Indonesian poems by Chairil Anwar entitled Aku ini Binatang Jalang published in 2015. The result of the research shows that colonization in Indonesia and Korea inspired the poets from these two colonized countries to

  9. Green Infrastructure Modeling Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modeling tools support planning and design decisions on a range of scales from setting a green infrastructure target for an entire watershed to designing a green infrastructure practice for a particular site.

  10. Sustainable Water Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources for state and local environmental and public health officials, and water, infrastructure and utility professionals to learn about sustainable water infrastructure, sustainable water and energy practices, and their role.

  11. Representasi Identitas di Medan Pasar Seni Lukis Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djuli Djatiprambudi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the middle of 1980s, Indonesian arts show striking growth, due to the dynamic appearance of painting market which was often referred as the boom of paintings. This phenomenon is triggered by the change of social-political-economical conditions of Asia, which are also influencing the infrastructure and suprastructure changes of the social-politics-and economy of Indonesia. It leads to the dialectical rise of the class of economical elite in Indonesia, which is dominated by the Chinese ethnic group. This group, which was politically pressurized during New Order regime, has built a tantalous room in economy. Their involvement in the arts market can bee seen as the starting point to comprehend the economical-capitalism of Indonesian Arts. It is expected that by constructing the role of Chinese ethnic group in art market, we will obtain a complete understandings of the social history of arts in Indonesia.

  12. Taking technological infrastructure seriously

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mair, C.S.

    2017-01-01

    Taking Technological Infrastructure Seriously attempts to take stock of a sea-change in the way modern infrastructural resources are provided. Unlike traditional infrastructure, such as roads and electricity cables, where the State has largely been responsible for its provision, much of the key

  13. Project Increase of infrastructure: 'Establishment of a laboratory for studies of pollutants in air, water and soil through atomic and nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldape U, F.

    1993-10-01

    In this report there are the guidelines of this project as well as the goals, activities and costs. The general objectives were: 1. A laboratory that allows to analyze with efficiency samples of air, water and soil pollutants using atomic and nuclear origin techniques as PIXE (Proton Induced X-ray Emission, NRA (Nuclear Reaction Analysis) and RBS (Rutherford Backscattering) as well as auxiliary and/or complementary techniques. 2. To obtain indicators of the influence of the pollution of the Valley of Mexico about the ecology and the health of the inhabitants of Mexico City with perspectives of carrying out studies in other cities. 3. To develop an appropriate technology for the realization of those studies and to generate human resources in this area. (Author)

  14. Prospection of implementation of distance learning at IPEN/CNEN-SP for the course on fundamentals of nuclear physics using infrastructure of free software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tondin, Jose Egidio M.; Menezes, Mario O. de; Vasconcellos, Marina B.A.; Osso Junior, Joao A., E-mail: mbvascon@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The main objective of the present work is to prospect the implementation of the methods and techniques of distance learning to the course of Fundamentals of Nuclear Physics,which is obligatory for all students of the graduate course of IPEN/CNEN-SP (USP - Area of Nuclear Technology). It was chosen the free software MOODLE (Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment), created in 2001, which allows the collaborative educational work by means of internet navigation. The first part of the present work was to prepare a pilot project for the implantation of distance learning for the course on Fundamentals of Nuclear Physics at the graduate course of IPEN/CNEN-SP, by inserting in the platform all the lecture presentations prepared by the teacher responsible for the course, as well as papers related to the subject, videos, exercises and tests. A total of 118 students at MSc and PhD levels of IPEN participated of the research, as well as 16 professors responsible for several courses at IPEN. The data collection comprised the following phases: questionnaires about the profile of the students, utilization of the course inserted in the Moodle platform, opinion of the students about the use of the platform and opinion of the professors about distance learning. (author)

  15. Prospection of implementation of distance learning at IPEN/CNEN-SP for the course on fundamentals of nuclear physics using infrastructure of free software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tondin, Jose Egidio M.; Menezes, Mario O. de; Vasconcellos, Marina B.A.; Osso Junior, Joao A.

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of the present work is to prospect the implementation of the methods and techniques of distance learning to the course of Fundamentals of Nuclear Physics,which is obligatory for all students of the graduate course of IPEN/CNEN-SP (USP - Area of Nuclear Technology). It was chosen the free software MOODLE (Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment), created in 2001, which allows the collaborative educational work by means of internet navigation. The first part of the present work was to prepare a pilot project for the implantation of distance learning for the course on Fundamentals of Nuclear Physics at the graduate course of IPEN/CNEN-SP, by inserting in the platform all the lecture presentations prepared by the teacher responsible for the course, as well as papers related to the subject, videos, exercises and tests. A total of 118 students at MSc and PhD levels of IPEN participated of the research, as well as 16 professors responsible for several courses at IPEN. The data collection comprised the following phases: questionnaires about the profile of the students, utilization of the course inserted in the Moodle platform, opinion of the students about the use of the platform and opinion of the professors about distance learning. (author)

  16. Understanding the infrastructure of European Research Infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Maria Duclos; Kropp, Kristoffer

    2017-01-01

    European Research Infrastructure Consortia (ERIC) are a new form of legal and financial framework for the establishment and operation of research infrastructures in Europe. Despite their scope, ambition, and novelty, the topic has received limited scholarly attention. This article analyses one ERIC...... within the social sciences—the European Social Survey (ESS). We observe that the ESS experienced a decline in the number of participating countries upon its acquisition of ERIC status. We explore the links between methodological, organizational, and financial elements in the process through which the ESS...... became an ERIC using the Bowker and Star’s sociology of infrastructures. We conclude that focusing on ERICs as a European standard for organising and funding research collaboration gives new insights into the problems of membership, durability, and standardisation faced by research infrastructures...

  17. The urban features of informal settlements in Jakarta, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Alzamil

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This data article contains the urban features of three informal settlements in Jakarta: A. Kampung Bandan; B. Kampung Luar Batang; And C. Kampung Muara Baru. The data describes the urban features of physical structures, infrastructures, and public services. These data include maps showing locations of these settlements, photography of urban status, and examples of urban fabric. The data are obtained from the statistical records and field surveys of three settlements cases. Keywords: Informal settlements, Physical, Features, Urban, Kampung, Jakarta, Indonesia

  18. Prospect study of nuscale small NPP in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rr Arum Puni Rijanti; Sahala M Lumbanraja

    2012-01-01

    Electrical energy demand in Indonesia has increased proportional with population growth, incomes, and improving people's lifestyle, such as the use of information technology, etc. A variety of alternative power generation needs to be studied in terms of supply reliability, economy, safety, security, environmental impact, so as to meet the prescribed criteria. Conventional large nuclear power plant construction in Indonesia is constrained to the rejection of society and thus cast doubt on the government financing decisions. NuScale small nuclear power plant is one alternative that can be implemented in Indonesia because of the cost of capital is small, the construction unit of the n easily tailored to the needs, short construction time (about 3 years), the installed capacity of greater than 90%, passive safety systems and inherent. (author)

  19. Peramalan Pengguna Broadband di Indonesia [Forecasting of Broadband Users in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azwar Aziz

    2016-07-01

    always anticipating in arranging telecommunications regulation, one of them is accelerating the deployment of broadband infrastructure, such as issuing Presidential Regulation  Number 96 Year 2014 on Indonesian Broadband Plan 2014 - 2019. In fact, the development of broadband network in Indonesia is still carried out in major cities, considering the telecommunications users are mostly located in large cities. In addition, handset devices or mobile phones, the availability on the market is still limited and the price is still expensive. This study uses a quantitative research methodology to calculate forecasting and qualitatively, by means of observation or direct observation to the field to the company Telkom, Telkomsel, XL Axiata and Indosat. The results of this study showed five factors that influence the use of broadband i.e population, gross domestic product, per capita income, economic growth and inflation, and the rate of broadband penetration. Beside that, the results show that for the next five years, broadband users is increasing.

  20. Petroleum systems of Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doust, H.; Noble, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Indonesia contains many Tertiary basins, several of which have proven to be very prolific producers of oil and gas. The geology and petroleum systems of these productive basins are reviewed, summarized and updated according to the most recent developments. We have linked the recognized petroleum

  1. My Classroom: Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balazs, Erica

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the teaching experiences of Alief Noor Farida--a junior lecturer at Indonesia's "Universitas Negeri Semarang" (Semarang State University [UNNES]). Now teaching her fourth semester and an alumna of the English Education program at UNNES, Ms. Farida is an especially motivated and dedicated educator. She teaches 18…

  2. IDRC in Indonesia

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    and establish an Internet access point for students at its tsunami-devastated campus in Banda Aceh. Community forest management. IDRC has long supported research on the sustainable use of forests in Indonesia. It contributed, for example, to community participation in managing the Berau and Margowitan forests, two ...

  3. EKSISTENSI OMBUDSMAN REPUBLIK INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    yusnani hasjimzoem

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Republic of Indonesia is a rule of law under Article 1 (3 of the 1945 Constitution and should uphold respect for the rights of individuals and communities in implementing the country. The rights strengthened by the basic norms that become the main spirit of the people of Indonesia, Pancasila. Basic norms that the political objectives in developing the Indonesian nation and enact any bill. Thus the state agency that was created by a special law should work in line with the basic norms of the nation and work together to create prosperity. In 2003 the Ombudsman created by a special law has the duty and function to oversee public services effectively, efficiently, and in spite of the practice of (corruption, collusion, and nepotism. Ombudsman based its duties and functions that have the same vision as mandated in the fourth paragraph of the preamble of the Constitution of 1945. The Ombudsman is thus expected to make a good bureaucratic reform so that it can be a model and public services watchdog whose presence is really felt by the people of Indonesia. Keywords: Ombudsman of the Republic of Indonesia

  4. ANALISIS EKSPOR KOPI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRI - WIDAYANTI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT   This study aimed at analyzing, firstly, the factors influencing the coffee export of Indonesia; secondly, the factors influencing the domestic coffee supply; and thirdly, the factors influencing the domestic coffee demand. This research used secondary data, time series data of 1975–1997 which were collected from many resources, i.e. Statistical Center Bureau (BPS, Trade Department, Indonesian Coffee Exporter Association, Forestry and Commercial Agricultural Enterprise Department, and the Indonesian Bank. The factors influencing the coffee export of Indonesia as well as the domestic coffee demand and supply were analyzed by simultaneous equation model in the form of double logarithm using the two stage least square method (2SLS. The research results show that the factors influencing the export quantity of coffee were the coffee FOB price, the coffee price in domestic markets, the exchange rate and the coffee supply of the previous year. The coffee export price had negative correlation with the coffee export quantity of Indonesia with export supply elasticity toward the export price of 2.04. In other words, the increase of coffee export price was followed by the decrease of coffee export quantity. This condition was due to the low quality of the coffee export of Indonesia. The coffee price at domestic markets has positive correlation with the coffee export quantity of Indonesia. Export was still conducted when the coffee price at domestic markets increased because the demand for domestic coffee was still very low. Other factors positively influencing the coffee export quantity were the exchange rate of rupiah and the coffee supply of the previous year. The factors influencing the domestic coffee supply were the domestic coffee price, technology level and the coffee supply of the previous year. The domestic coffee price positively related to the coffee supply at domestic markets with a supply elasticity of 0.04. This means that the

  5. IDRC in Indonesia

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Indonesia's young democracy, large pluralist society, and global environ- mental significance have made the country an important site for IDRC- supported research. Information and communication technologies, in particular, are important tools for development in the world's largest archipelago. IDRC support enabled the ...

  6. Kriptosporidiosis di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Wijayanti

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTCryptosporidiosis included to waterborne and soil transmited diseases, caused by Cryptosporidium, obligat intraceluller pathogen organism. Cryptosporidium cause intestinal infection of human and animal acute diarrhea. Lung cryptosporidiosis on HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis  patients was reported. Diarrhea still be important health problem because diarrhea was be the third dominant contributor of children morbidity and mortality at some country include Indonesia. Every children have 1,6-2x diarrhea onset annually. Diarrhea cases caused by Cryptosporidium sp parasite was around 4-11%. Focus of this review is  about cryptosporidiosis on children, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis patients, animal, environment, diagnostic and it’s prevention and control. Cryptosporidium species confirmed in Indonesia are C. wrairi, C. muris,  C. felis, C. hominis, C. meleagridis and C. parvum, indicated that there was a big rule of animal on Cryptosporidium transmission. Cryptosporidium was necessary to be one of diseases diagnose on HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis patients. Transmission of Cryptosporidium by  respiratory secretion (droplet, aerosol or contact with vomiting must be anticipated to prevent cryptosporidiosis especially on imunocompromissed/imunodeficiency people. Rapid Diagnostic Test that have highly sensitivity and spesificity is very important on Cryptosporidium cases finding and surveillance in Indonesia. Environment and cattle sanitation, personal hygiene, water and food treatment, is necessary to prevent cryptosporidiosis transmission.  Kriptosporidiosis termasuk waterborne dan soil transmitted diseases, disebabkan oleh Cryptosporidium yang bersifat obligat intraseluler. Cryptosporidium menyebabkan infeksi pada usus halus dan dapat menyebabkan diare akut pada manusia dan hewan. Kriptosporidiosis paru telah dilaporkan pada penderita HIV/AIDS dan tuberkulosis. Diare merupakan penyumbang utama ketiga angka kesakitan dan kematian anak di berbagai negara

  7. MEWUJUDKAN NEGARA HUKUM INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Soebechi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Artikel yang berjudul “Mewujudkan Negara Hukum” ini merupakan studi tentang konsepsi negara hukum Indonesia yang membedakannya dengan konsepsi negara hukum lain. meski mendapat pengaruh dari berbagai pemikiran, tetapi konsepsi negara hukum Indonesia berbeda dengan konsepsi rule of law dan rechtsstaat. Hal tersebut dapat ditelisik dari dasar falsafah, sifat kedaulatan, kekuasaan organ negara, dan hak asasi manusia. Terdapat enam unsur utama negara hukum indonesia, yaitu : 1 Pancasila; 2 supremasi hukum; 3 demokratis; 4 pembatasan dan pemencaran kekuasaan negara; 5 kekuasaan kehakiman yang bebas dan mandiri; 6 perlindungan hak asasi manusia. Dengan penguatan Indonesia sebagai negara hukum yang demokratis berdasarkan Pancasila maka seharusnya segala bentuk tindakan bernegara dan bermasyarakat harus disandarkan pada hukum.   This Article entitled " the State law of Indonesian" is the result of a study on the conception of the characteristic of law states of Indonesian that distinguish the conception of the state laws in other countries. Based on the research results, can be explained even get the effect of various thoughts, but the conception of law state of Indonesian different with conception the rule of law and rechtstaat. This can be searched from basic of philosophy, the nature of sovereignty, the powers of state organs, and human rights. There are six main elements of Indonesian law states, namely: 1 Pancasila; 2 supremacy of law;; 3 democratic 4 restrictions and dispersal of state power; 4 independent judiciary; 6 protection of human rights. the statement of Indonesia as a democratic rule of law based on Pancasila then should all forms of civic and social action must be based on the law.

  8. Breastfeeding practices in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suharyono; Paul, M

    1997-01-01

    Breastfeeding promotion program was started by the paediatricians and others in 1977, and is becoming a strong activity since 1990 it was declared by the President of the Republic of Indonesia as a National Movement. One year later the First Lady stated the importance of every Indonesian mother to breast-feed her baby, and thereafter many hospitals created the so called "Baby Friendly Hospital". In this occasion we only limit with eminent topics, i.e., "Exclusive Breast-feeding" in Indonesia, and "Breastfeeding amongst Working Mothers." In fact, until now the percentage of mothers who breastfeed exclusively is very low. Although the ever breastfed babies in Indonesia is 97% (Kodyat, 1996) but the data of the "Exclusive Breastfeeding" of Indonesia is just like Pakistan and Thailand, i.e. nearly 2 months, whereas the Philippines and Ceylon showed a figure of 4 months, and India 5 months. The Home Health Survey (SKRT) data in 1992 showed that 63.7% of the babies were exclusively breast-fed until 3 months. Three quarter of the quality of the exclusive breastmilk is quite good, enough or excellent, whereas the other one quarter is poor and this should be interfered by increasing the quality of the breastmilk and/or adding other formula, to prevent the baby of getting "failure to thrive" (Suharyono, 1996). Working mothers use to do "Early Weaning Practices" with very high mixed feeding practices (Matulessy et al, 1996). Mothers have to go to work because they have to support their family income, but unfortunately most of them ignore their main task of care their children. the experience in Indonesia proves that a very hard work should still be continued on the effort of promoting breastfeeding, especially regarding the two issues, i.e. "Exclusive breastfeeding" (we do hope at least until 4 months) and the other issue is regarding the "Working Mothers".

  9. Compliance of national radiation protection regulatory infrastructure with international norms: a prerequisite for self-sustainability of technical support organization in a small 'non-nuclear' country: example of Montenegro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, Slobodan

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Regulatory control of radiation sources in a country is based upon two essential elements of regulatory infrastructure: national RP legislation system (including nuclear law and subsequent regulations) at one side and institutions regulatory authority (RA) and technical support organizations (TSO) at the other. International norms and standards in radiation protection are (or should be, in principle) transposed through international legal instruments (conventions, treaties, directives, codes) into national regulatory systems, thus making radiation protection regulatory practices standardized and omnipresent. We know, however, that this is often not the case, to more or less extent. More one goes down the pyramid (i.e. from international norms via national regulatory infrastructure to actual RP practice), more there is chance that ultimate/bottom practical actions will not be undertaken properly, or even not at all. One of the key elements in the above mentioned (potentially problematic) RP bottom level is how technical support to regulatory authority is organized. RP legal requirements create a market of services to be effectuated by competent professional organizations, TSO 's. In a small country, there is usually not more than one (if any) of the kind not rarely just surviving at the edge of existence. A TSO scope of RP interests/activities typically include: (1) radiation monitoring and measurements in the environment (air, soil, waters, biota), as well as in public areas, working and living places, (2) personal, workplace and field dosimetry, (3) import, export and trade control of radioactivity in food, forage, construction materials, toys, cosmetics and other goods/consumables, (4) quality control (QC) of radiation sources in medicine, industry, etc., (5) low/medium activity radioactive waste management, (6) transport of radioactive materials, (7) a role in national radiological emergency preparedness and response scheme and (8) advisory services

  10. Structures and infrastructures series

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2008-01-01

    "Research, developments, and applications...on the most advanced techonologies for analyzing, predicting, and optimizing the performance of structures and infrastructures such as buildings, bridges, dams...

  11. NEGARA HUKUM INDONESIA KEBALIKAN NACHTWACHTERSTAAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkarnain Ridlwan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan penulisan ini adalah untuk mendeskripsikan konsep negara hukum Indonesia berdasarkan konstitusi yang pernah dan sedang berlaku di Indonesia. Berdasarkan tinjauan normatif dan perkembangan ketatanegaraan Indonesia disimpulkan bahwa sejak awal Republik Indonesia berdiri pilihan konsep negara hukum yang dicitakan adalah negara hukum demokratis yang secara aktif bertujuan untuk mewujudkan perlindungan terhadap segenap bangsa Indonesia dan seluruh tumpah darah Indonesia; memajukan kesejahteraan umum; mencerdaskan kehidupan bangsa; dan ikut serta memelihara ketertiban dunia yang berdasarkan kemerdekaan, perdamaian abadi dan keadilan sosial. Disamping itu, negara hukum Indonesia dipengaruhi Pancasila sebagai kumpulan nilai-nilai dasar yang disepakatu dan menjadi landasan praktek kedaulatan rakyat, yakni Ketuhanan Yang Maha Esa; Kemanusiaan Yang Adil dan Beradab; Persatuan Indonesia dan Kerakyatan yang dipimpin oleh hikmat kebijaksanaan dalam Permusyawaratan/Perwakilan; serta menciptakan keadilan sosial bagi seluruh rakyat Indonesia. Dengan demikian, Negara Hukum Indonesia yang dijalankan haruslah senantiasa memperhatikan aspek ketuhanan, kemanusiaan, persatuan, permusyawaratan dan keadilan. Meski pernah berganti konstitusi dan melakukan perubahan atas konstitusi yang berlaku, namun pilihan konsep negara hukum masih tetap sama yaitu negara hukum aktif atau dinamis dalam mewujudkan kesejahteraan rakyat. Konsep negara hukum demikian dipresentasikan sebagai welvaarstaat, yang adalah kebalikan negara penjaga malam (nachtwachterstaat.

  12. An optimal renewable energy mix for Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Sylvain; Patrizio, Piera; Yowargana, Ping; Kraxner, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Indonesia has experienced a constant increase of the use of petroleum and coal in the power sector, while the share of renewable sources has remained stable at 6% of the total energy production during the last decade. As its domestic energy demand undeniably continues to grow, Indonesia is committed to increase the production of renewable energy. Mainly to decrease its dependency on fossil fuel-based resources, and to decrease the anthropogenic emissions, the government of Indonesia has established a 23 percent target for renewable energy by 2025, along with a 100 percent electrification target by 2020 (the current rate is 80.4 percent). In that respect, Indonesia has abundant resources to meet these targets, but there is - inter alia - a lack of proper integrated planning, regulatory support, investment, distribution in remote areas of the Archipelago, and missing data to back the planning. To support the government of Indonesia in its sustainable energy system planning, a geographic explicit energy modeling approach is applied. This approach is based on the energy systems optimization model BeWhere, which identifies the optimal location of energy conversion sites based on the minimization of the costs of the supply chain. The model will incorporate the existing fossil fuel-based infrastructures, and evaluate the optimal costs, potentials and locations for the development of renewable energy technologies (i.e., wind, solar, hydro, biomass and geothermal based technologies), as well as the development of biomass co-firing in existing coal plants. With the help of the model, an optimally adapted renewable energy mix - vis-à-vis the competing fossil fuel based resources and applicable policies in order to promote the development of those renewable energy technologies - will be identified. The development of the optimal renewable energy technologies is carried out with special focus on nature protection and cultural heritage areas, where feedstock (e.g., biomass

  13. Analisis Cadangan Devisa Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusia Bunga Uli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aims to determine the relationship between variables export, import, and exchange rate against Foreign Exchange Reserves in Indonesia. The data used in the empirical study of a sequence of data monthly time of year 2011.01 through 2014.12 from Bank Indonesia and the Central Statistics Agency (BPS. The analysis tool used is Auto Regression Vector Model (VAR. The results of this study indicate that the one-way relationship between the variables of foreign reserves and export. Then one-way relationship between exchange rate and exports. Lastly, there is a two-way relationship between imports and foreign exchange reserves, two-way relationship between exchange rate and foreign exchange reserves, two-way relationship between imports and exports, two-way relationship between the exchange rate and imports. The results also showed foreign exchange reserves are significantly influenced by the movement itself at a probability of 1 %. Export variable negative and not significantly affect the foreign exchange reserves. While imports of positive and not significant to the foreign exchange reserves. Foreign Exchange Reserves Indonesia is positively influenced by the exchange rate and not significant. Keywords: Foreign exchange reserves, exports, imports, exchange rate   Abstrak. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui seberapa keterkaitan antar variabel ekspor, impor, dan nilai tukar rupiah terhadap Cadangan Devisa Indonesia. Data yang digunakan dalam kajian empiris ini merupakan data runtutaan waktu bulanan dari tahun 2011.01 sampai 2014. 12 yang berasal dari Bank Indonesia dan Badan Pusat Statistik (BPS. Alat analisis yang digunakan yaitu Vector Autoregression Model (VAR. Hasil dari penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa hubungan searah antara variabel cadangan devisa ke ekspor. Lalu hubungan searah antara kurs terhadap ekspor Terakhir, terdapat hubungan dua arah antara impor dan cadangan devisa, hubungan dua arah antara kurs dan cadangan

  14. Physical resources and infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foeken, D.W.J.; Hoorweg, J.; Foeken, D.W.J.; Obudho, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    This chapter describes the main physical characteristics as well as the main physical and social infrastructure features of Kenya's coastal region. Physical resources include relief, soils, rainfall, agro-ecological zones and natural resources. Aspects of the physical infrastructure discussed are

  15. Supporting clinicians in infrastructuring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper; Hertzum, Morten; Karasti, Helena

    2015-01-01

    the notion of infrastructuring, we carry out an infrastructural analysis of eWBs and approach our joint efforts as unfolding and continuing the con-figuration of participatory design activities. We identify a need for local support and novel competences among the clinicians in order for them to engage...

  16. Infrastructure Survey 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the Group of Eight (Go8) conducted a survey on the state of its buildings and infrastructure. The survey is the third Go8 Infrastructure survey, with previous surveys being conducted in 2007 and 2009. The current survey updated some of the information collected in the previous surveys. It also collated data related to aspects of the…

  17. Smart Valley Infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maule, R. William

    1994-01-01

    Discusses prototype information infrastructure projects in northern California's Silicon Valley. The strategies of the public and private telecommunications carriers vying for backbone services and industries developing end-user infrastructure technologies via office networks, set-top box networks, Internet multimedia, and "smart homes"…

  18. Clustering of Infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, J.K.C.A.S.

    2001-01-01

    Bundling or converging infrastructure has been the leading principle for locating infrastructure since the mid seventies. It is assumed to offer certain advantages, such as a restriction of severance, consumption of free space and environmental hindrance. However, the concept of converging

  19. Building an evaluation infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandrup, Morten; Østergaard, Kija Lin

    Infrastructuring does not happen by itself; it must be supported. In this paper, we present a feedback mechanism implemented as a smartphone-based application, inspired by the concept of infrastructure probes, which supports the in situ elicitation of feedback. This is incorporated within an eval...

  20. Ads in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulan Roro Retno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmetics industry created the beauty myth for women through advertising. A cosmetic ad in Indonesia has spread a new concept of white skin: East Asia beauty myth. The white concept of Asia white skin basically derived from colonial legacy. The purpose of the research was analyzing the beauty myth in Indonesia ads using postcolonial perspective. The principal result brought the discourse analysis and postcolonial perspective a new insight in communication research. Particularly on media and cultural studies. Major conclusions showed that the beauty myth since the Dutch colonial period never been change. The main concept is always in colonialism’s idea: “white is better”. The West is better than the East.

  1. The Implementation of Ict Based Education in Elementary Teacher Education (PGSD in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adie E. Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In fact, Information Communication and Technology (ICT have been utilized in schools even though relatively small in numbers. At present, there is a program for Elementary Teacher Education called PGSD program in Indonesia. The PGSD program is an in-service teacher training program especially for elementary school teachers in Indonesia, to improve their qualifications from Diploma-2 to Strata-1 level, conducted through ICT-based distance learning mode. This study uses survey method to examine the accessibility of ICT infrastructure and networks, and the effectiveness of using ICT for teaching and learning in six university member of PGSD program in Indonesia. The results of the study show that the PGSD program needs to improve the ICT infrastructure and networks as well as apply ICT based teaching and learning skills. 

  2. KONFLIK AGRARIA DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zuber

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article describe agrarian conflict in Indonesia. Until this moment many agrarian conflict are happen in Papua, Java, Kalimantan and Sumatera. This conflict consist many interests and there isn’t equity policy to society are following this conflict. The implication the agrarian conflict become latent conflict. It usually make huge damage in society and nation.

  3. Risiko Sistemik Perbankan Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Wijaya, Miryam Lilian; Utama, Chandra; Kusuma, Charvin

    2015-01-01

    Studi ini menelaah penggunaan Altman Z-score sebagai sebuah indikator untuk menggambarkan kesehatan bank secara individual dalam konteks stabilitas industri perbankan. Terhadap 77 bank umum di Indonesia, masing-masing dengan 96 periode waktu (bulanan 2006 - 2013), dihitung nilai Altman Z-score (ZSCORE). Rasio simpanan suatu bank di bank lain dalam portofolio asset bank tersebut dipakai sebagai indikator keterkaitan bank tersebut dengan bank lain (GIRO), sedangkan rasio simpanan masyarakat di ...

  4. Designing Futures in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Crosby

    2016-08-01

    This curated issue takes as its departure point Fry’s notion that design broadly shapes the world we occupy. To ask what happens when the world we occupy is not conceived simply in terms of local issues and solutions, but rather as a set of shared concerns that are localised and play out through global flows. To do so this issue presents ten contributions from Indonesia.

  5. Terrorism in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusponegoro, Aryono D

    2003-01-01

    Indonesia has had its share of natural and manmade disasters. From 1997 to 2002, Indonesia has experienced 90 incidents of terrorist bomb attacks. In 13 (14.4%) of the terrorist attacks, the bombs did not explode. A total of 224 persons have been killed, and 340 persons have been injured. Most of those killed or injured were the result of the bombings in Jakarta and Bali. Besides bombings, there have been riots, especially in Jakarta. The Indonesian Surgeons Association established the 1-1-8 Emergency Ambulance Service Foundation to develop the Prehospital Emergency Medical Services in Indonesia. Despite difficulties, this service has been implemented in 18 cities. The occurrence of disasters, riots, ethnic conflicts, terrorist attacks, and the introduction of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course in 1995, have helped to convince the people and the government that it was important to develop this 1-1-8 Emergency Ambulance Services system, and agreed to accept a Safe Community Program. With the Safe Community Program, Jakarta with its Integrated 1-1-8 Emergency Ambulance Service managed to provide proper emergency medical care to the casualties caused by terrorist bombings, riots, and in the three weeks of floods during which 75% of Jakarta was submerged.

  6. Iodization: case report: Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, R; Pandaya

    1996-01-01

    Historically, most of Indonesia's interior has been severely iodine-deficient, resulting in high levels of endemic goiter and cretinism. In some interior hamlets during the 1980s, cretinism prevalence was found to be 15%, among the world's highest levels. Early in 1995, a national survey of iodized salt consumption found that half of 220,000 households were using adequately iodized salt, 28% inadequately iodized salt, and the rest noniodized salt. A program to teach primary school students about the existence of and rationale for using iodized salt was launched in West Java and six other provinces in 1995. The program was subsequently expanded in 1996 with the training of 100,000 more teachers nationwide. 95% of children in Indonesia attend primary school. Part of Indonesia's goal to eliminate iodine deficiency disorders by the year 2000, the program involves children testing samples of salt consumed at home for the presence of adequate iodine content. Students and parents are then expected to tell their neighbors about the need for iodized salt and share their school iodine test kit with them.

  7. Tobacco Diversity in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djajadi Djajadi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco variants in Indonesia are very diverse which can be identified from their morphology or their characteristics. This is related to tobacco long adaptation in different agro ecology of plantation areas which spread out at 15 provinces, from dry to irrigated land and from low land to high land areas. Tobacco has been introduced in Indonesia for more than four centuries and mostly used as cigarette. This commodity and its products are still economically important for government and farmer income. It contributes in government income which reached up to 114 trillion rupiahs and farmer income up to 70% in 2014. Tobacco diversity in Indonesia can be grouped according to their growing season and their usage in cigarette blending. Tobaccos which grown at the end of wet season and harvested in dry season are called Voor Oogst tobaccos, otherwise tobaccos which grown at dry season and harvested in wet season are called Na Oogst tobaccos. Based on their usage, tobaccos are categorized as main ingredients for kretek cigarette, Rolled Your Own (RYO cigarette, and cigar industries.

  8. Economic corridor of industrial development in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berawi, M. A.; Miraj, P.; Sidqi, H.

    2017-12-01

    Indonesia as an archipelago country categorize its regional development into six corridors from Sumatra, Java, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, Bali-Nusa Tenggara and Papua-Maluku. Currently, industrial development becomes one of the highest contributing factors to the national economic growth. However, each region in the nation experience inequality of development mainly related to the infrastructure sector. Thus, the research aims to develop a sustainable economic corridor by considering the characteristics and its potential. The research uses a qualitative approach through a desk study, benchmarking and in-depth interview. Location Quotient is used for the method of the analysis tool. The results show each characteristic of every corridor in the country. Sumatera as national plantation and processing industry corridor, Java as cyber technology innovation and services center, Kalimantan as national energy reserves and processing, Sulawesi as national aquaculture and processing industry, Bali - Nusa Tenggara as national eco-tourism center, and Papua - Maluku as national ore mining and processing.

  9. COUNTER-TERRORISM IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Sebastian Meliala

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the incident of World Trade Center (WTC in USA, Indonesia has become an easy target for the next terrorism. Counterterrorist campaigns can be undertaken by military and paramilitary forces. Counterterrorism refers to proactive policies that specifically seek to eliminate terrorist environments and groups, Regardless of which policy is selected, the ultimate goal of counterterrorism is clear: to save lives by proactively preventing or decreasing the number of terrorist attacks. But, so far the Government of Indonesia is only able to capture the terrorists but is unable to eradicate terrorism. Therefore, the government of Indonesia still needs a comprehensive ways to counter terrorism in Indonesia

  10. A Global Review of Public Private Partnerships Trends and Challenges for Social Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktavianus Adrianto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In developing countries, the government which has limited budget for public infrastructure development should choose which infrastructure should be developed. Most countries decided to build more economic infrastructure than social infrastructure because former have direct economic impact for society. The involvement of private sector in public infrastructure financing has been accomplished for decades in the form of Public Private Partnership (PPP. However, the implementation is also more often for economic infrastructure, but some countries have started to implement PPP for social infrastructure (education, healthcare, care of the elderly, etc. when they think to add human capital and improve quality of life. This study attempts to review a set of public private partnership implementation models relevant for social infrastructure development in some countries. Moreover, this study also more explores to the challenges and issues in different areas of social infrastructure. The outcome is to show a trend public-private partnership for social infrastructure in some successful projects from different countries. The challenges and issues about implementation public-private partnership for social infrastructure also be a part of the results from this study. Finally, the study has a valuable input for implementation of PPP on social infrastructure in Indonesia.

  11. Security infrastructure for dynamically provisioned cloud infrastructure services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demchenko, Y.; Ngo, C.; de Laat, C.; Lopez, D.R.; Morales, A.; García-Espín, J.A.; Pearson, S.; Yee, G.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses conceptual issues, basic requirements and practical suggestions for designing dynamically configured security infrastructure provisioned on demand as part of the cloud-based infrastructure. This chapter describes general use cases for provisioning cloud infrastructure services

  12. Towards an infrastructure description language for modeling computing infrastructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghijsen, M.; van der Ham, J.; Grosso, P.; de Laat, C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the Infrastructure and Network Description Language (INDL). The aim of INDL is to provide technology independent descriptions of computing infrastructures. These descriptions include the physical resources and the network infrastructure that connects these resources. The

  13. Near-Site Transportation Infrastructure Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N.

    1992-02-01

    There are 122 commercial nuclear facilities from which spent nuclear fuel will be accepted by the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS). Since some facilities share common sites and some facilities are on adjacent sites, 76 sites were identified for the Near-Site Transportation Infrastructure (NSTI) project. The objective of the NSTI project was to identify the options available for transportation of spent-fuel casks from each of these commercial nuclear facility sites to the main transportation routes -- interstate highways, commercial rail lines and navigable waterways available for commercial use. The near-site transportation infrastructure from each site was assessed, based on observation of technical features identified during a survey of the routes and facilities plus data collected from referenced information sources. The potential for refurbishment of transportation facilities which are not currently operational was also assessed, as was the potential for establishing new transportation facilities

  14. Climatic change in Asia: Indonesia country report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-07-01

    The report studies the impacts of climate change in Indonesia on the coastal zone, agriculture, and human health, recommends strategies to adapt to these impacts, and identifies some cost-effective mitigation opportunities in the energy sector. As an archipelago of nearly 17,000 islands, Indonesia will suffer significant physical and socioeconomic impacts from even small rises in sea level. Effects including land use, agriculture, infrastructure and communication, disease incidence, coastal zones and forestry are discussed. National policy options recommended favour adaption over mitigation and preventative over curative action. These include modification to farming practice, afforestation investment in research training, subsidies and incentives to facilitate adaptive responses in local communities, construction of sea walls and dikes, encouragement in water conservation, and prevention, surveillance and treatment of diseases (malaria, dengue fever and diarrhoea). Mitigation options include switching away from coal-based generation. Regional cooperation through, for example ASEAN, should be encouraged in coping with climate change. An inventory of Greenhouse gases emissions is included in the report. 93 refs., 8 figs., 34 tabs.

  15. Contemporary United States Foreign Policy Towards Indonesia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McAslan, Hugh

    2004-01-01

    United States national interests in Indonesia have traditionally being based on strategic security requirements given Indonesia's geographic location between the Indian and Pacific Oceans, and strong...

  16. Information infrastructure(s) boundaries, ecologies, multiplicity

    CERN Document Server

    Mongili, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    This book marks an important contribution to the fascinating debate on the role that information infrastructures and boundary objects play in contemporary life, bringing to the fore the concern of how cooperation across different groups is enabled, but also constrained, by the material and immaterial objects connecting them. As such, the book itself is situated at the crossroads of various paths and genealogies, all focusing on the problem of the intersection between different levels of scale...

  17. Chef infrastructure automation cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Marschall, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Chef Infrastructure Automation Cookbook contains practical recipes on everything you will need to automate your infrastructure using Chef. The book is packed with illustrated code examples to automate your server and cloud infrastructure.The book first shows you the simplest way to achieve a certain task. Then it explains every step in detail, so that you can build your knowledge about how things work. Eventually, the book shows you additional things to consider for each approach. That way, you can learn step-by-step and build profound knowledge on how to go about your configuration management

  18. Nuclear Technology Review 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    In 2009, construction started on 12 new nuclear power reactors, the largest number since 1985, and projections of future nuclear power growth were once again revised upwards. However, only two new reactors were connected to the grid, and, with three reactors retired during the year, the total nuclear power capacity around the world dropped slightly for the second year in a row. Current expansion, as well as near term and long term growth prospects, remain centred in Asia. Ten of the 12 construction starts were in Asia, as were both of the new grid connections. Although the global financial crisis that started in the second half of 2008 did not dampen overall projections for nuclear power, it was cited as a contributing factor in near-term delays or postponements affecting nuclear projects in some regions of the world. In some European countries where previously there were restrictions on the future use of nuclear power, there was a trend towards reconsidering these policies. Interest in starting new nuclear power programmes remained high. Over 60 Member States have expressed to the IAEA interest in considering the introduction of nuclear power, and, in 2009, the IAEA conducted its first Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review missions in Jordan, Indonesia and Vietnam. Estimates of identified conventional uranium resources (at less than $130/kg U) increased slightly, due mainly to increases reported by Australia, Canada and Namibia. Uranium spot prices declined, and final data for 2009 are expected to show a consequent decrease in uranium exploration and development. The Board of Governors has authorized the IAEA Director General to sign an agreement with the Russian Federation to establish an international reserve of low enriched uranium (LEU). It would contain 120 tonnes of LEU that could be made available to a country affected by a non-commercial interruption of its LEU supply. The agreement between the IAEA and the Russian Federation was signed in March 2010

  19. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-02-01

    This proceedings contains information from the IPHE Infrastructure Workshop, a two-day interactive workshop held on February 25-26, 2010, to explore the market implementation needs for hydrogen fueling station development.

  20. EV Charging Infrastructure Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karner, Donald [Electric Transportation Inc., Rogers, AR (United States); Garetson, Thomas [Electric Transportation Inc., Rogers, AR (United States); Francfort, Jim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    As highlighted in the U.S. Department of Energy’s EV Everywhere Grand Challenge, vehicle technology is advancing toward an objective to “… produce plug-in electric vehicles that are as affordable and convenient for the average American family as today’s gasoline-powered vehicles …” [1] by developing more efficient drivetrains, greater battery energy storage per dollar, and lighter-weight vehicle components and construction. With this technology advancement and improved vehicle performance, the objective for charging infrastructure is to promote vehicle adoption and maximize the number of electric miles driven. The EV Everywhere Charging Infrastructure Roadmap (hereafter referred to as Roadmap) looks forward and assumes that the technical challenges and vehicle performance improvements set forth in the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge will be met. The Roadmap identifies and prioritizes deployment of charging infrastructure in support of this charging infrastructure objective for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge

  1. Indonesia : Country Financial Accountability Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2001-01-01

    This Country Financial Accountability Assessment (CFAA) report, supports the Government of Indonesia's efforts to reform the process of managing public resources, increase transparency in handling financial affairs, and combat corruption. The report assesses that the control environment in Indonesia is weak, despite a political leadership committed to improvement, and, recommends enacting ...

  2. ANALISIS DAYA SAING KEDELAI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwono Sarwono

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available RCA (Revealed Comparative Advantage index of soybean in Indonesia from 1983 up to 2013 is less than one, mostly. It means that the competitiveness of soybean in Indonesia is low. The purpose of this study is to analyze the factors influence the soybean competitiveness. OLS (Ordinary Least Square was used as the analysis method. Hypotheses test based on that analysis model is not bias, so that, classic divergence test is needed. It is for getting the Best Linier Unbiased Estimator (BLUE appraisal. T statistic and F statistic were also applied. The result of this research shows that production and export have positive and significant influence. In addition, exchange rate and government policy do not influence the Indonesia soybean competitiveness.Indeks RCA (Revealed Comparative Advantage kedelai Indonesia dari tahun 1983-2013 kecenderungan bernilai kurang dari satu yang berarti daya saing kedelai Indonesia rendah.Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis faktor-faktor yang mempengaruhi daya saing kedelai Indonesia.Metode analisis yang digunakan adalah Ordinary Least Square (OLS.Pengujian hipotesis berdasarkan model analisis tersebut tidak bias maka perlu dilakukan uji penyimpangan klasik yang tujuannya agar diperoleh penaksiran yang bersifat Best Linier Unbiased Estimator (BLUE.Pengujian statistik menggunakan uji t statistikdan uji f statistik.Hasil penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa produksi dan ekspor berpengaruh secara positif dan signifikan terhadap daya saing kedelai Indonesia. Nilai tukar rupiah dan kebijakan pemerintah tidak berpengaruh terhadap daya saing kedelai Indonesia.

  3. Infrastructure Engineering and Deployment Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Infrastructure Engineering and Deployment Division advances transportation innovation by being leaders in infrastructure technology, including vehicles and...

  4. MFC Communications Infrastructure Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Cannon; Terry Barney; Gary Cook; George Danklefsen, Jr.; Paul Fairbourn; Susan Gihring; Lisa Stearns

    2012-01-01

    Unprecedented growth of required telecommunications services and telecommunications applications change the way the INL does business today. High speed connectivity compiled with a high demand for telephony and network services requires a robust communications infrastructure.   The current state of the MFC communication infrastructure limits growth opportunities of current and future communication infrastructure services. This limitation is largely due to equipment capacity issues, aging cabling infrastructure (external/internal fiber and copper cable) and inadequate space for telecommunication equipment. While some communication infrastructure improvements have been implemented over time projects, it has been completed without a clear overall plan and technology standard.   This document identifies critical deficiencies with the current state of the communication infrastructure in operation at the MFC facilities and provides an analysis to identify needs and deficiencies to be addressed in order to achieve target architectural standards as defined in STD-170. The intent of STD-170 is to provide a robust, flexible, long-term solution to make communications capabilities align with the INL mission and fit the various programmatic growth and expansion needs.

  5. Civilian application of propulsion reactor in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djokolelono, M.; Arbie, B.; Lasman, A.N.

    2000-01-01

    It has been learned that to cope with energy requirement in the remote islands and less developed regions of Indonesia, small or very small nuclear reactors producing electricity and/or process heat could be appropriately applied. The barge mounted propulsion power reactors are the attractive examples so far envisioned, and technology information of which is being exposed to the world these last years. The solutions for least maintenance and no on-site refueling, no radioactive discharge, and no radioactive waste to remain in the user country are among the attractions for further deliberations. It has been understood, however, that there are many uncertainties to overcome, especially for the developing countries to introduce this novel application. International acceptance is the most crucial, availability of first-of-the-kind engineering, prototype or reference plant that would prove licensibility in the vendor's country is the second, and economic competitiveness due to very small size is the third among issues to enlighten. The relevant regulations concerning marine nuclear safety, marine transportation, and proliferation of information, as well as international forums to justify the feasibility of related transfer of technology, are the items that the IAEA could help to provide to smoothen any possible international transaction. Indonesia supports this AGM as one of the appropriate IAEA efforts in this line, and expects from it positive international consensus and possible studies/R and D work that this country could participate in. (author)

  6. Emergence of Melioidosis in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauran, Patricia M; Sennang, Nurhayana; Rusli, Benny; Wiersinga, W Joost; Dance, David; Arif, Mansyur; Limmathurotsakul, Direk

    2015-12-01

    Melioidosis is known to be highly endemic in parts of southeast Asia and northern Australia; however, cases are rarely reported in Indonesia. Here we report three cases of melioidosis in Makassar, South Sulawesi, Indonesia occurring between 2013 and 2014. Two patients died and the other was lost to follow-up. Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates from all three cases were identified by the VITEK2 Compact installed in the hospital in 2012. None of the three patients reported received antimicrobials recommended for melioidosis because of the delayed recognition of the organism. We reviewed the literature and found only seven reports of melioidosis in Indonesia. Five were reported before 1960. We suggest that melioidosis is endemic throughout Indonesia but currently under-recognized. Training on how to identify B. pseudomallei accurately and safely in all available microbiological facilities should be provided, and consideration should be given to making melioidosis a notifiable disease in Indonesia. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  7. Standardization of Nuclear Instrumentation Applied in the NPP and in other nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusnowo, Arlinah; Darmawati, Suzie

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear power plant (NPP) and other nuclear installations have been recognized as applications needing very sophisticated technologies. One of technologies used in this all nuclear facilities is nuclear instrumentation. In order that NPP and other nuclear installations be operated safely, nuclear instrumentation requires standardization from design to its operation. Internationally, standardizations of nuclear instrumentation have been issued by IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission). Formulation of standard in nuclear instrumentation in IEC is carried out by Technical Committee (TC) 45. This paper describes briefly the standardization of nuclear instrumentation applied in Indonesia as Indonesian National Standard (SNI, Standard National Indonesia), standardization of nuclear instrumentation developed by TC 45, SC 45A, and SC 45B, as well as the possibility to adopt and apply those IEC standard in Indonesia

  8. KURVA PHILLIPS DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maichal Maichal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to analyze the existence of the Philips curve in the Indonesian economy, 2000Q1-2010Q3. The results obtained by using OLS method shows that the expectations augmented Philips curve and the New Keynesian Philips curve models cannot give a clear results of Philips curve existence in the Idonesia economy. Shocks variable such as percentage change of exchange rates and crude oil prices provide a very small effect on the inflation rate in Indonesia. Furthermore, the results obtained by using GMM method on the hybrid model of the New Keynesian Philips curve shows that the Philips curve exists in the Indonesian economy.

  9. Building Connecticut's clinical biodosimetry laboratory surge capacity to mitigate the health consequences of radiological and nuclear disasters: A collaborative approach between the state biodosimetry laboratory and Connecticut's medical infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albanese, Joseph; Martens, Kelly; Arnold, Jeffrey L.; Kelley, Katherine; Kristie, Virginia; Forte, Elaine; Schneider, Mark; Dainiak, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    further optimize biodosimetry specimen processing protocols in Connecticut. Based on our findings, we conclude that clinical laboratory professionals are an important resource for assisting with the processing biodosimetry specimens that are used for triage of patients from accidental or terrorist-related mass-casualty radiological or nuclear catastrophies. The approach described in this paper to enroll and train clinical laboratorians in sample preparation for dicentric analysis forms the basis for the next step (namely, further training on harvesting cultured cells and preparing cytogenetic slides) in collaborative efforts between the State of Connecticut's Biodosimetry Laboratory and the state's medical infrastructure towards building laboratory surge capacity to estimate radiation dose in victims of a mass casualty event

  10. New infrastructures, new landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Nifosì

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available New infrastructures, new landscapes AbstractThe paper will discuss one recent Italian project that share a common background: the relevance of the existing maritime landscape as a non negotiable value. The studies will be discussed in details a feasibility study for the new port in Monfalcone. National infrastructural policies emphasize competitiveness and connection as a central issue incultural, economic and political development of communities . Based on networks and system development along passageways that make up the European infrastructural armor; the two are considered at the meantime as cause and effect of "territorialisation”. These two views are obviously mutually dependent. It's hard to think about a strong attractiveness out of the network, and to be part of the latter encourages competitiveness. Nonetheless this has proved to be conflictual when landscape values and the related attractiveness are considered.The presented case study project, is pursuing the ambition to promote a new approach in realizing large infrastructures; its double role is to improve connectivity and to generate lasting and positive impact on the local regions. It deal with issues of inter-modality and the construction of nodes and lines which connects Europe, and its markets.Reverting the usual approach which consider landscape project as as a way to mitigate or to compensate for the infrastructure, the goal is to succeed in realizing large infrastructural works by conceiving them as an occasion to reinterpret a region or, as extraordinary opportunities, to build new landscapes.The strategy proposed consists in achieving structural images based on the reinforcement of the environmental and historical-landscape systems. Starting from the reinterpretation of local maritime context and resources it is possible not just to preserve the attractiveness of a specific landscape but also to conceive infrastructure in a more efficient way. 

  11. The Role of Nuclear Diplomacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sriwidjaja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the midst of nuclear countries and non-nuclear countries in the framework of non-proliferation and disarmament, Indonesia has played an important role. Indonesia has been actively involved in each activity at the international level to create a world free from nuclear weapons. This involvements needs to be maintained and increased in the years to come. As a large country, Indonesia should play a key role in the field of nuclear diplomacy. All of the efforts of nuclear diplomacy as mentioned above had a clear objective to support Indonesia’s energy program, at the institution framework as well as capacity building. Indonesia’s effort is also directed to attain appropriated international public acceptance.

  12. Jurnalisme Tabloid di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diyah Hayu Rahmitasari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Many scholars have criticised tabloid journalism because it often contains drama and sensationalism. However, tabloid journalism actually cater the taste of the readers who were ignored by mainstream newspapers. This article is based on a research analyse Pos Kota and Lampu Hijau, relying on content analysis of the papers’ editions in December 2011 and January 2012, as well as interviews with the editors and journalists. The analyses conclude that tabloid journalism in Indonesia is an urban phenomenon focuses on local issues and targets urban workers as their core readers and has been most successful in Jakarta and its surrounds. Abstrak: Jurnalisme tabloid merupakan terminologi yang sering diperdebatkan, dikritisi dan dicaci. Padahal, bentuk jurnalisme ini sebenarnya melayani selera pembaca yang cenderung diabaikan oleh jurnalisme arus utama. Artikel ini dibuat berdasarkan penelitian atas isi Pos Kota dan Lampu Hijau periode Desember 2011-Januari 2012, serta wawancara dengan editor dan jurnalis. Hasil analisis menunjukkan bahwa jurnalisme tabloid di Indonesia adalah jurnalisme yang fokus pada isu-isu lokal dan menyasar para pekerja urban sebagai pembaca utamanya sehingga meraih sukses di kota-kota besar terutama Jakarta dan sekitarnya.

  13. Public-Private Partnerships: an International Development vis a vis Indonesia Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizal Yaya

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available For more than two decades, Public Private Partnerships (PPP had developed worldwide as an instrument to procure public infrastructure where government funds are limited. This practice supports the covergent theory of the public and private sector. Indonesia experience with PPP follows most of what had been done by countries overseas with some deviations. The main reasons for going for PPP for Indonesia government is to fill the gap in finance and capability in procuring the infrastructure. Unofficial reason such as for off-balance sheet and ideological is not relevant. Up to now, the Government only allow investment in hard economic infrastructure. Instead of using pure private finance, Indonesia Government facilitates public funds either from Central Government or Local Governments to finance PPP projects. In most cases, this involvement is because of marginality of the project. This results in the condition where the Government still has dominant role in the existing PPP projects. Compared to the PPP framework in other countries like in the UK, Indonesia PPP lacks of attention on output specification and risk transfer. This may be because of lacking of experiences as well as due to high degree of Government involvement. Rigorous policy is needed in this area to ensure Government to achieve better value for money.

  14. EFISIENSI PERBANKAN SYARIAH DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afif Amirillah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to find out the factors that can cause the efficiency value difference of Islamic Banking in In-donesia. The data at this research is monetary data of Islamic Banking. It was obtained from Bank of Indonesia. Then, it was divided into input and output variables. The determination of input output variables at this research uses Value Added Approach. Its input output variables consist of Demand Deposits, Saving Deposits, Time Depo-sits, Paid -In Capital, Placement at Bank ofIndonesia, Inter Bank Assets, Mudharabah, Musyara kah, Murabahah, Istishna, Ijarahand Qardh. This research used Data Envelopment Analysis method. This method has a strength that is having the capability to measure inefficiency input output variables, so that, the variable can have the efficiency. This research has resulted Islamic Banking efficiency in Indonesia, but it does not include BPRS. The mean efficiency of Islamic banking in Indonesia is 99,94%. Penelitian ini bertujuan mencari faktor –faktor penyebab perbedaan nilai efisiensiperbankan syariah di Indo-nesia yang dibandingkan secara relatif untuk setiap periode. Data yang digunakan pada penelitian ini menggu-nakan data keuangan perbankan syariah yang diperoleh dari Bank Indonesia kemudian dibagi menjadi variabel input dan output. Penentuan variabel input dan output pada penelitian ini menggunakan pendekatan Value Added Approach. Variabel input outputnyaterdiri dari : Giro iB, Tabungan iB, Deposito iB, Modal disetor, Pen-empatan padaBank Indonesia, Penempatan pada bank lain, Mudharabah, Musyarakah, Murabahah,Istishna, Ijarah dan Qardh. Pada penelitian ini menggunakan metode Data Envelopment Analysis yang mempunyai kel-ebihan dalam menghitung efisiensi untuk setiap variabel input outputyang mengalami inefisiensi. Penelitian ini menghasilkan nilai efisiensi perbankan syariah di Indoenesia (tidak termasuk BPRS. Efisiensi perbankan syariah di Indonesia mengalami efisiensi rata-rata sebesar 99,94%.

  15. Tourism infrastructure development prioritization in Sabang Island using analytic network process methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Hafnidar A.; Afifuddin, Moch.; Akbar, Herry

    2017-11-01

    Indonesia has been widely known as an archipelago country, with its geographical location is at the equator, which make this country as a tropical country. It has the topography of diverse islands which consist of lakes, mountains, and one of countries which have the longest coastline. This condition cause Indonesia has various beautiful tourism objects and become the attraction to the international tourists to come. Indonesia still has the other islands which are as beautiful as Bali Island offering different beauties. One of them is an island located in the most western island of Indonesia, which becomes the zero point of the country. It is Sabang Island in Aceh Province. Sabang Island is the small volcanic island located in the most western island of Sumatra. Infrastructure becomes the basic device in supporting this tourism aspect, which the buildings and service institutions play the important role in appropriate managing of economic and community needs. The problem in this study is how to determine the priority of tourism infrastructure development in Sabang Island. The objective of this study is to determine the priority rank of tourism infrastructure development and the priority rank of the potential investment in Sabang Island to be developed. The ranking results of the Analytic Network Process (ANP) calculations of tourism locations/zones and tourism supporting infrastructure found that Teupin Layeu and Gapang, and Rubiah Island have the highest priority to be developed in the hotel/accommodation infrastructure which scores are 0.02589 and 0.02120. Then followed by parking infrastructure in Teupin Layeu and access road to Km 0 which became as the main priority determined by Sabang government which scores are 0.01750 and 0.01618.

  16. Infrastructures for healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhoff, Tue Odd; Amstrup, Mikkel Hvid; Mørck, Peter

    2018-01-01

    of classifications, on the entire Danish population. However, in the Autumn of 2014, the system was temporarily shut down due to a lawsuit filed by two general practitioners. In this article, we ask why and identify a political struggle concerning authority, control, and autonomy related to a transformation...... adding new actors or purposes to a system without due consideration to the nature of the infrastructure. We argue that while long-term information infrastructures are dynamic by nature and constantly impacted by actors joining or leaving the project, each activity of adding new actors must take reverse...... synergy into account, if not to risk breaking down the fragile nature of otherwise successful information infrastructures supporting research on healthcare....

  17. Making Energy Infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schick, Lea; Winthereik, Brit Ross

    2016-01-01

    in a pragmatic present and in an unprecedented future; between being tied to the specific site of the competition and belonging to no place in particular; and not least between being predominantly an art project and primarily an infrastructure project. Remarkable differences between cosmopolitics and smooth......Integrating renewable energy sources into the power grid and ensuring public interest in energy is a key concern in many countries. What role may art play, and what political strategies do artists employ, in order to intervene in the infrastructuring of energy and public environments? As the case...... politics appear here, especially compared to the literature analysing the roles played by art and design when imagining new ways of living with energy. Oscillation between smooth politics and cosmopolitics may provide a generative way forward for actors wishing to engage in the infrastructuring...

  18. Railway infrastructure security

    CERN Document Server

    Sforza, Antonio; Vittorini, Valeria; Pragliola, Concetta

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive monograph addresses crucial issues in the protection of railway systems, with the objective of enhancing the understanding of railway infrastructure security. Based on analyses by academics, technology providers, and railway operators, it explains how to assess terrorist and criminal threats, design countermeasures, and implement effective security strategies. In so doing, it draws upon a range of experiences from different countries in Europe and beyond. The book is the first to be devoted entirely to this subject. It will serve as a timely reminder of the attractiveness of the railway infrastructure system as a target for criminals and terrorists and, more importantly, as a valuable resource for stakeholders and professionals in the railway security field aiming to develop effective security based on a mix of methodological, technological, and organizational tools. Besides researchers and decision makers in the field, the book will appeal to students interested in critical infrastructur...

  19. Digital Democracy in Rural Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuswantoro Ranggabumi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Citizen participation is the key to democracy. The development of information and communication technologies makes citizens more empowered, have broad access to information and able to influence policy making, especially at the local level. This paper will describe digital democracy in rural indonesia, when the villagers report their local isues and fight for their right to have a favorable policy. “Speaker Kampung” is an online community media that express the aspirations of citizens in Ketangga Village, East Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia. “Speaker Kampung” is a prototype of a digital democracy in Indonesia.

  20. The ATLAS Simulation Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

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Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Irles Quiles, A.; Ishikawa, A.; Ishino, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Isobe, T.; Issakov, V.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Itoh, Y.; Ivashin, A.V.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J.M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, J.N.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M.R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakubek, J.; Jana, D.K.; Jansen, E.; Jantsch, A.; Janus, M.; Jared, R.C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jeanty, L.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Jenni, P.; Jez, P.; Jezequel, S.; Ji, W.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jimenez Belenguer, M.; Jin, S.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joffe, D.; Johansen, M.; Johansson, K.E.; Johansson, P.; Johnert, S; Johns, K.A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Jones, T.J.; Jorge, P.M.; Joseph, J.; Juranek, V.; Jussel, P.; Kabachenko, V.V.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kaiser, S.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalinin, S.; Kalinovskaya, L.V.; Kalinowski, A.; Kama, S.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kantserov, V.A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kaplon, J.; Kar, D.; Karagounis, M.; Karagoz Unel, M.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A.N.; Kashif, L.; Kasmi, A.; Kass, R.D.; Kastanas, A.; Kastoryano, M.; Kataoka, M.; Kataoka, Y.; Katsoufis, E.; Katzy, J.; Kaushik, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kayl, M.S.; Kayumov, F.; Kazanin, V.A.; Kazarinov, M.Y.; Keates, J.R.; Keeler, R.; Keener, P.T.; Kehoe, R.; Keil, M.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Kelly, M.; Kenyon, M.; Kepka, O.; Kerschen, N.; Kersevan, B.P.; Kersten, S.; Kessoku, K.; Khakzad, M.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharchenko, D.; Khodinov, A.; Khomich, A.; Khoriauli, G.; Khovanskiy, N.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kim, H.; Kim, M.S.; Kim, P.C.; Kim, S.H.; Kind, O.; Kind, P.; King, B.T.; Kirk, J.; Kirsch, G.P.; Kirsch, L.E.; Kiryunin, A.E.; Kisielewska, D.; Kittelmann, T.; Kiyamura, H.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klemetti, M.; Klier, A.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinkby, E.B.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Klok, P.F.; Klous, S.; Kluge, E.E.; Kluge, T.; Kluit, P.; Klute, M.; Kluth, S.; Knecht, N.S.; Kneringer, E.; Ko, B.R.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koblitz, B.; Kocian, M.; Kocnar, A.; Kodys, P.; Koneke, K.; Konig, A.C.; Koenig, S.; Kopke, L.; Koetsveld, F.; Koevesarki, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kohn, F.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kolesnikov, V.; Koletsou, I.; Koll, J.; Kollar, D.; Kolos, S.; Kolya, S.D.; Komar, A.A.; Komaragiri, J.R.; Kondo, T.; Kono, T.; Konoplich, R.; Konovalov, S.P.; Konstantinidis, N.; Koperny, S.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E.V.; Korotkov, V.A.; Kortner, O.; Kostka, P.; Kostyukhin, V.V.; Kotov, S.; Kotov, V.M.; Kotov, K.Y.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Koutsman, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, H.; Kowalski, T.Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A.S.; Kral, V.; Kramarenko, V.A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasny, M.W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kreisel, A.; Krejci, F.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krieger, N.; Krieger, P.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; 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Strohmer, R.; Strom, D.M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Soh, D.A.; Su, D.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V.V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.H.; Sundermann, J.E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M.R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szymocha, T.; Sanchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M.C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G.F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F.E.; Taylor, G.N.; Taylor, R.P.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P.K.; Tennenbaum-Katan, Y.D.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R.J.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J.P.; Thompson, E.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, R.J.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R.P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V.O.; Tikhonov, Y.A.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F.J.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokar, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N.D.; Torrence, E.; Torro Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D.R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T.N.; Tripiana, M.F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocme, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J.C-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P.V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E.G.; Tsukerman, I.I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuggle, J.M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P.M.; Twomey, M.S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J.A.; Van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E.W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K.E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Vazeille, F.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vetterli, M.C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G.H.A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E.G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M.G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V.B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T.T.; Vossebeld, J.H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C.P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, M.F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A.T.; Waugh, B.M.; Weber, M.D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M.S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P.S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M.J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S.R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F.J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L.A.M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M.A.; Wilkens, H.G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H.H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J.A.; Wilson, M.G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M.W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M.J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B.M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A.M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C.G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zivkovic, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-01-01

    The simulation software for the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is being used for large-scale production of events on the LHC Computing Grid. This simulation requires many components, from the generators that simulate particle collisions, through packages simulating the response of the various detectors and triggers. All of these components come together under the ATLAS simulation infrastructure. In this paper, that infrastructure is discussed, including that supporting the detector description, interfacing the event generation, and combining the GEANT4 simulation of the response of the individual detectors. Also described are the tools allowing the software validation, performance testing, and the validation of the simulated output against known physics processes.

  1. Transformation of technical infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev

    , the evolution of large technological systems and theories about organisational and technological transformationprocesses. The empirical work consist of three analysis at three different levels: socio-technical descriptions of each sector, an envestigation of one municipality and envestigations of one workshop......The scope of the project is to investigate the possibillities of - and the barriers for a transformation of technical infrastructure conserning energy, water and waste. It focus on urban ecology as a transformation strategy. The theoretical background of the project is theories about infrastructure...

  2. PENGARUH INFRASTRUKTUR, PMDN DAN PMA TERHADAP PRODUK DOMESTIK BRUTO DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firdausi Nuritasari

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak ___________________________________________________________________ Anggaran infrastruktur setiap tahun mengalami peningkatan, akan tetapi penelitian dari laporan World Economic Forum menunjukkan peringkat kualitas infrastruktur di Indonesia masih tergolong rendah. Jika dibandingkan grafik pertumbuhan ekonomi Indonesia dengan realisasi PMDN dan PMA hampir bergerak kearah yang sama. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengkaji apakah terdapat pengaruh antara infrastruktur, PMDN dan PMA terhadap Produk Domestik Bruto.Data yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah data sekunder yang bersumber pada laporan Badan Pusat Statistik (BPS khususnya data tahun 1986 sampai dengan tahun 2011. Data yang diteliti meliputi data Produk Domestik Bruto, panjang jalan menurut kewenangan pemerintah, jumlah air yang di salurkan, jumlah listrik yang di produksi, realisasi Penanaman Modal Dalam Negeri, dan realisasi Penanaman Modal Asing. Metode pengumpulan data yang digunakan adalah metode dokumentasi. Data yang dianalisis menggunakan metode analisis deskriptif kuantitatif, Uji Regresi Berganda, dan Uji Asumsi Klasik.Hasil penelitian diperoleh menunjukan bahwa secara bersama-sama infrastruktur jalan, air. Listrik, PMDN dan PMA berpengaruh positif dan signifikan terhadap Produk Domestik  bruto di Indonesia. Kesimpulan dari penelitian ini adalah secara parsial yaitu terdapat 2 variabel independen yang digunakan tidak memiliki pengaruh signifikan terhadap Produk Domestik Bruto di Indonesia. Variabel tersebut yaitu Penanaman Modal Dalam Negeri dan Penanaman Modal Asing. Abstract ______________________________________________________________ The infrastructure budget has increased every year, but research from the World Economic Forum report shows the ranking of the quality of infrastructure in Indonesia is still relatively low. When compared to Indonesia's economic growth charts with the realization Domestic Capital Investment and Foreign Direct Investment almost

  3. NGNP Infrastructure Readiness Assessment: Consolidation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian K Castle

    2011-02-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project supports the development, demonstration, and deployment of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). The NGNP project is being reviewed by the Nuclear Energy Advisory Council (NEAC) to provide input to the DOE, who will make a recommendation to the Secretary of Energy, whether or not to continue with Phase 2 of the NGNP project. The NEAC review will be based on, in part, the infrastructure readiness assessment, which is an assessment of industry's current ability to provide specified components for the FOAK NGNP, meet quality assurance requirements, transport components, have the necessary workforce in place, and have the necessary construction capabilities. AREVA and Westinghouse were contracted to perform independent assessments of industry's capabilities because of their experience with nuclear supply chains, which is a result of their experiences with the EPR and AP-1000 reactors. Both vendors produced infrastructure readiness assessment reports that identified key components and categorized these components into three groups based on their ability to be deployed in the FOAK plant. The NGNP project has several programs that are developing key components and capabilities. For these components, the NGNP project have provided input to properly assess the infrastructure readiness for these components.

  4. NGNP Infrastructure Readiness Assessment: Consolidation Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castle, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project supports the development, demonstration, and deployment of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). The NGNP project is being reviewed by the Nuclear Energy Advisory Council (NEAC) to provide input to the DOE, who will make a recommendation to the Secretary of Energy, whether or not to continue with Phase 2 of the NGNP project. The NEAC review will be based on, in part, the infrastructure readiness assessment, which is an assessment of industry's current ability to provide specified components for the FOAK NGNP, meet quality assurance requirements, transport components, have the necessary workforce in place, and have the necessary construction capabilities. AREVA and Westinghouse were contracted to perform independent assessments of industry's capabilities because of their experience with nuclear supply chains, which is a result of their experiences with the EPR and AP-1000 reactors. Both vendors produced infrastructure readiness assessment reports that identified key components and categorized these components into three groups based on their ability to be deployed in the FOAK plant. The NGNP project has several programs that are developing key components and capabilities. For these components, the NGNP project have provided input to properly assess the infrastructure readiness for these components.

  5. Konservatisme Akuntansi di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Hananto Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Dalam penyajian laporan keuangan yang berkualitas, perusahaan dihadapkan oleh pertimbangan yang salah satunya adalah penerapan konservatisme akuntansi. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk memberikan bukti empiris pengaruh company growth, profitability, dan investment opportunity set (IOS terhadap penerapan prinsip konservatisme akuntansi. Konservatisme akuntansi dalam penelitian ini diukur menggunakan perhitungan total akrual. Total akrual adalah selisih antara laba sebelum extraordinary item ditambah dengan depresiasi dikurangi dengan arus kas operasi untuk mengetahui apakah perusahaan menggunakan konservatisme akuntansi tinggi atau rendah di dalam perusahaan. Sampel yang digunakan sebanyak 114 perusahaan manufaktur yang terdaftar di Bursa Efek Indonesia (BEI di tahun 2012 dan 2013. Metoda pemilihan sampel yang digunakan yaitu purposive sampling. Alat analisis yang digunakan untuk pengujian adalah regresi linier berganda yang sebelumnya harus lolos uji asumsi klasik. Hasil pengujian secara parsial menunjukkan company growth, profitability dan investment opportunity set berpengaruh positif signifikan terhadap konservatisme akuntansi.

  6. Plasmodium ovale in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, J K; Purnomo; Masbar, S

    1990-12-01

    We report 34 infections by Plasmodium ovale found among 15,806 blood film examinations taken between 1973 and 1989 from several sites in Indonesia. Twenty five of the P. ovale infections occurred in a single sample of 514 people living in Owi, Irian Jaya. We detected five additional infections at 3 other sites in Irian Jaya. Other infections by P. ovale occurred at two sites in West Flores. Another infection has already been reported from East Timor. Despite relatively frequent sampling of populations on Sumatra, Kalimantan, Java and Sulawesi, P. ovale has not been found on those islands. It appears that this parasite occurs only on the easternmost islands of the Indonesian archipelago where it is nonetheless a rare finding.

  7. Health services in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosen, S; Gunawan, S

    In Indonesia, rapid economic development has led to a reduction in poverty among the 195 million inhabitants. While population increased more than 50% from 1971 to 1990, the annual growth rate, crude birth rate, and total fertility rates have declined rapidly. Life expectancy has increased from 45.7 years in 1971 to 62.7 in 1994 as crude death rates and infant and child mortality rates have declined. Causes of death have shifted from infectious to chronic diseases, but in 1992 major causes of death in children under 5 years old were preventable, and the maternal mortality rate was 425/100,000. Policies which guide the development of health care call for improvements in quality of life, adherence to humanitarian principles, use of scientifically approved traditional medicine, and provision of public health through a three-tiered system. Health care is financed by the government and the community, and managed care has been encouraged. Foreign aid has bolstered development in the health sector. Adequate sanitation has been achieved for 35% of the population, and 65% of urban and 35% of rural residents have reasonable access to clean water. Improvements in health indicators include 55% contraceptive prevalence, reduction in prevalence of anemia during pregnancy, 55.8% of pregnant women receiving prenatal care, a decrease in protein-energy malnutrition among children under five, and high vaccination coverage. Remaining public health problems include malaria, tuberculosis, dengue hemorrhagic fever, an increase in HIV/AIDS, iodine-deficiency, an increasing number of traffic fatalities, and an increasing number of smokers. New health policies have been instituted to meet these challenges as Indonesia's need for a productive and competitive labor force increases.

  8. ASEAN SINGLE AVIATION MARKET AND INDONESIA - WILL IT SURVIVE AGAINST THE GIANTS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruwantissa Indranath Abeyratne

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available  To say that Indonesia is an enigma in air transport is an understatement.  On the one hand,  the  demand for air transport in Indonesia is higher in proportion to its GDP per capita.  Its economy can be expected to grow 6% to 10% annually. A single aviation market could add another 6% to 10% growth in sheer demand.  It is one of the wealthiest countries in the world, being the 16th richest country currently, and, according to an Airbus forecast,   will be the 7th richest in 2030.  Yet its airports are badly in need of expansion, its infrastructure is bursting at its seems, and above all, its airlines are strongly resisting liberalization of air transport in the region for fear of being wiped out by stronger contenders in the region.  Against this backdrop, it is incontrovertible that Indonesia's civil aviation is intrinsically linked to regional and global considerations.  Indonesia's archipelagic topography makes its people heavily reliant on safe, regular and reliable air services that may connect them not only internally but also to the outside world.A single aviation market in the ASEAN region will bring both benefits to Indonesia and challengers to its air transport sector. This article discusses the economic and regulatory challenges that Indonesia faces with the coming into effect of the ASEAN Single Aviation market in 2015.

  9. Evaluation of implementation viability gap funding (VGF) policy on toll road investment in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahani, Iris; Tamin, Rizal Z.; Pribadi, Krishna S.; Wibowo, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    VGF policy for toll road investment in Indonesia must be reviewed. Since 2012 the Government of Indonesia (GOI) has issued viability gap funding (VGF) policy for PPP infrastructure project through ministry of finance decision (PMK) No.223/2012. One of VGF purpose is to improve the financial feasibility. In the toll road investment in Indonesia, the implementation of this policy has some problems. This study aimed to evaluate the policy by seeking implementation constraints so can be given an alternative. This research was conducted qualitatively, included aspects of implementation process VGF policy. The analysis process is based on literature study and in-depth interviews to related parties include business entity, ministry of finance, and the ministry of public works, Indonesia Toll Road Authority (BPJT) and professional societies. The literature review conducted by reviewing existing policies and best practices in countries that already practice VGF. The conclusion of this study are 1) There is a conflict of regulation in viability gap funding (VGF) for toll road investment in Indonesia; 2) If Government of Indonesia (GOI) want implement construction grant as VGF, so the regulation must improve in time limited for submission and clearly define limited given in regulation; 3) If GOI want implement partial construction as VGF, so the regulation must be improve in guideline for submission and given.

  10. English Language Teaching in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musthafa, Bachrudin

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the education system in Indonesia, the development of a national English syllabus, English in elementary and secondary schools and in higher education, private sector English courses, teacher preparation and professional development, and expatriate English teachers. (Author/VWL)

  11. Interregional migration flows in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wajdi, N.; van Wissen, L.J.G.; Mulder, C.H.

    2015-01-01

    Population Census and Intercensal Population Survey data permit description of the origin–destination patterns that characterize interregional migration flows in Indonesia. Application of the framework of population redistribution proposed by Long (1985) results in indications of over-urbanization,

  12. Decentralization and Governance in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzhacker, Ronald; Wittek, Rafael; Woltjer, Johan

    2016-01-01

    I. Theoretical Reflections on Decentralization and Governance for Sustainable Society 1. Decentralization and Governance for Sustainable Society in Indonesia Ronald Holzhacker, Rafael Wittek and Johan Woltjer 2. Good Governance Contested: Exploring Human Rights and Sustainability as Normative Goals

  13. December 2004 Sumatra, Indonesia Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The December 26, 2004 magnitude 9.1 Sumatra, Indonesia earthquake (3.316 N, 95.854 E, depth 30 km) generated a tsunami that was observed worldwide and caused...

  14. PENGARUH INFRASTRUKTUR DAN KELEMBAGAAN TERHADAP KINERJA EKSPOR AGREGAT DAN SEKTORAL INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenal Asikin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Export performance of a country is influenced by many aspects, some of which include infrastructure and institutionalization. The major problem that is faced by Indonesia is the low quality of infrastructure and institutionalization; as a result, the trading cost is relatively high. If this is not dealt immediately, it will cause a decline in the Indonesian export performance. This research was aimed to analyze the influence of infrastructure and institutionalization as well as other related variables on the performance of aggregate export, agricultural materials, foods, and manufactures of Indonesia. The research used secondary data with time series between 2005 and 2013 and cross-section of the Indonesian export main target countries. The research used a gravity model with fixed-effect estimation methods. The results of the research showed that infrastructure and institutionalization as well as other related variables influenced the Indonesian export flows. Based on the findings mentioned above, in order to increase Indonesian export, it is important to improve the infrastructure and institutionalization performances that are related, firstly, to the capacity and quality of transportation infrastructure, especially roads and ports; secondly, to optimization of communication information technology, especially the use of e-marketing; thirdly, to increased quality of Indonesian governance, especially control of corruption, rule of law, regulatory quality and government effectiveness; and fourthly to acceleration of export duration and simplification of export permit document.  Furthermore, Indonesia needs to review its import tariff policy that applies to export target countries and also review whether it is necessary to improve domestic support.Keywords: export, gravity model, infrastructure, institutionalization

  15. Assessing spatial data infrastructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grus, L.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last two decades many countries and regions throughout the world have taken steps to establish Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDIs). Developing SDIs requires a considerable amount of time, energy and financial resources. Therefore it is increasingly important to assess SDI outcomes in order

  16. Documentation of Infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Workspace

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the software infrastructure developed within the WorkSPACE  project, both from a software architectural point of view and from a user point of  view. We first give an overview of the system architecture, then go on to present the  more prominent features of the 3D graphical...

  17. An Infrastructure Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    This article invites teachers to let their students' imaginations soar as they become part of a team that will design a whole new kind of living technological museum, a facility that celebrates the world of infrastructure. In this activity, a new two-story building will be built, occupying a vacant corner parcel of land, approximately 150…

  18. Infrastructure Survey 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    In 2008 the Group of Eight (Go8) released a first report on the state of its buildings and infrastructure, based on a survey undertaken in 2007. A further survey was undertaken in 2009, updating some information about the assessed quality, value and condition of buildings and use of space. It also collated data related to aspects of the estate not…

  19. Infrastructuring for Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus; Danholt, Peter; Ubbesen, Morten Bonde

    2015-01-01

    indicators for quality in treatment to guide and govern their performance, in order to investigate whether this may generate a new performance measurement infrastructure that will improve quality of healthcare. The project is entitled: “New governance in the patient’s perspective”....

  20. Managing municipal infrastructure assets

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wall, K

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available and critical analysis of good practice. But, above all, there is a need for a national strategy to ensure that municipal infrastructure assets deliver services to specification for the whole of their design lives – and for the carrying through of this strategy...

  1. CERN printing infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, R; Sucik, J

    2008-01-01

    For many years CERN had a very sophisticated print server infrastructure [13] which supported several different protocols (AppleTalk, IPX and TCP/IP) and many different printing standards. Today's situation differs a lot: we have a much more homogenous network infrastructure, where TCP/IP is used everywhere and we have less printer models, which almost all work using current standards (i.e. they all provide PostScript drivers). This change gave us the possibility to review the printing architecture aiming at simplifying the infrastructure in order to achieve full automation of the service. The new infrastructure offers both: LPD service exposing print queues to Linux and Mac OS X computers and native printing for Windows based clients. The printer driver distribution is automatic and native on Windows and automated by custom mechanisms on Linux, where the appropriate Foomatic drivers are configured. Also the process of printer registration and queue creation is completely automated following the printer registration in the network database. At the end of 2006 we have moved all (∼1200) CERN printers and all users' connections at CERN to the new service. This paper will describe the new architecture and summarize the process of migration

  2. Language Convergence Infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Zaytsev (Vadim); J.M. Fernandes; R. Lämmel (Ralf); J.M.W. Visser (Joost); J. Saraiva

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractThe process of grammar convergence involves grammar extraction and transformation for structural equivalence and contains a range of technical challenges. These need to be addressed in order for the method to deliver useful results. The paper describes a DSL and the infrastructure behind

  3. Green(ing) infrastructure

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available (Krayenhoff and Bass, 2003; Foster, Lowe and Winkelman, 2012; Gill, 2007).spell out all authors first time referenced Biophilic urbanism and green infrastructure Harvard biologist E. O. Wilson popularised the concept of biophilia, describing it as “the...

  4. Serial private infrastructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, V.A.C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates private supply of two congestible infrastructures that are serial, where the consumer has to use both in order to consume. Four market structures are analysed: a monopoly and 3 duopolies that differ in how firms interact. It is well known that private supply leads too high

  5. Kedudukan Musyawarah dan Demokrasi di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Hanafi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak: Kedudukan Musyawarah dan Demokrasi di Indonesia. Negara Kesatuan Republik Indonesia (NKRI berdasarkan lintasan sejarah perjuangan, memiliki konstruksi kenegaraan satu-satunya di dunia yang bangsa terlahir dahulu, kemudian baru membentuk negara. Presiden pertama Republik Indonesia Ir. Soekarno menegaskan, bahwa Negara Kesatuan ialah Negara Kebangsaan. Tujuan Bangsa Indonesia terlahir, merdeka, dan membentuk negara memiliki satu cita-cita, Kehendak Untuk Mengangkat Harkat dan Martabat Hidup Rakyat Indonesia (Kedaulatan Rakyat Indonesia. Melalui analisis atas realitas kehidupan saat ini, Bangsa Indonesia telah hidup pada kondisi tatanan kehidupan seolah-olah sama dengan Negara Demokrasi, ialah negara dulu terbentuk baru bangsanya dilahirkan kemudian. Sehingga kedaulatan rakyat Indonesia yang berdasarkan prinsip musyawara-mufakat dan perwakilan belum mampu terealisasi. Sementara pelaksanaan demokrasi voting yang memiliki dasar liberalisme terus bergulir, sehingga kehidupan bangsa Indonesia semakin jauh dari cita-cita awal. DOI: 10.15408/jch.v1i2.2657

  6. Diferensi Makna Kurikulum Di Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    In Indonesia, the curriculum is understood in accordance with the Act mentioned in the National Education System in the top ie, a set of plans and arrangements regarding the purpose, content, and teaching materials, as well as the methods used to guide the organization of learning activities to achieve specific educational goals. Here explicitly can be observed that the anatomy curriculum in Indonesia contains three aspects, namely: learning objectives, learning materials, and methods. Then s...

  7. PROSES PEMBENTUKAN KOMUNITAS MUSLIM INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirhan AM

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a study in mapping out more about the process of formation of the Muslim community in Indonesia. History is a reconstruct of the past. It seems as if the past was to be away from the present. Is it true that this view. We borrow the Kuntowijoyo’s words: “Historians are like people take who takes the train to look back, and he can freely turn to the right and to the left, which can not be done is to look ahead”. History is a valuable clue, a picture of the past that can be used as guidelines in stride, present and future. The Indonesian Islam history has significance for this nation generation. Because it has its own characteristics compared to the history of Islam in other countries. It can give the feel of the real Islam in Indonesia. The Indonesian Islam is an Islamic hue promising future in the era of globalization. Thus, Indonesian Islam will be in focus in the eyes of the world. In this description, the writer describes the entry and the development of Islam in Indonesia with discussion; process and the introduction of Islam to Indonesia, acceptance by indigenous and institutionalization of Islam in society. Then, point the establishment of Islam in Indonesia, as well as the transformation of Indonesia society

  8. KEANEKARAGAMAN HAYATI FLORA DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecep Kusmana

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia merupakan negara kepuluauan seluas sekitar 9 juta km2 yang terletak diantara dua samudra dan dua benua dengan jumlah pulau sekitar 17.500 buah yang panjang garis pantainya sekitar 95.181 km. Kondisi geografis tersebut menyebabkan negara Indonesia menjadi suatu negara megabiodiversitas walaupun luasnya hanya sekitar 1,3% dari luas bumi. Dalam dunia tumbuhan, flora di wilayah Indonesia termasuk bagian dari flora dari Malesiana yang diperkirakan memiliki sekitar 25% dari spesies tumbuhan berbunga yang ada di dunia yang menempati urutan negara terbesar ketujuh dengan jumlah spesies mencapai 20.000 spesies, 40%-nya merupakan tumbuhan endemik atau asli Indonesia. Negara Indonesia termasuk negara dengan tingkat keterancaman dan kepunahan spesies tumbuhan tertinggi di dunia. Saat ini tercatat sekitar 240 spesies tanaman dinyatakan langka, diantaranya banyak yang merupakan spesies tanaman budidaya. Selain itu, sekitar 36 spesies pohon di Indonesia dinyatakan terancam punah, termasuk kayu ulin di Kalimantan Selatan, sawo kecik di Jawa Timur, Bali Barat, dan Sumbawa, kayu hitam di Sulawesi, dan kayu pandak di Jawa serta ada sekitar 58 spesies tumbuhan yang berstatus dilindungi.Keywords: keanekaragaman hayati flora, megabiodiversitas, tingkat kepunahan, tumbuhan dilindungi, tumbuhan langka

  9. Social capital and healthy ageing in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Junran; Rammohan, Anu

    2016-07-22

    A large international literature has found a positive association between social capital and measures of physical and mental health. However, there is a paucity of research on the links between social capital and healthy ageing in a developing country environment, where universal social security coverage is absent and health infrastructure is poor. In this paper, we develop and empirically test a model of the linkages between social capital and the health outcomes for older adults in Indonesia, using data from the Indonesian Family Life Survey-East (IFLS-East), conducted in 2012. Using multivariate regression analysis, we examine whether social capital plays a role in mitigating poor health among older individuals aged 50 years and above in Indonesia's most vulnerable provinces. We test the robustness of these social capital variables across different health measures (self-assessed health, Activities of Daily Living (ADL), measures of chronic illness and mental health measures), as well as across different demographic groups, after controlling for an array of socio-economic, demographic and geographic characteristics. Our findings show that access to better social capital (using measures of neighbourhood trust and community participation) is associated with a higher degree of physical mobility, independence, and mental well-being among older individuals but has no influence on chronic illnesses. These results are consistent when we estimate samples disaggregated by gender, rural/urban residence, and by age categories. From a policy perspective these results point to the importance of social capital measures in moderating the influence of poor health, particularly in the Activities of Daily Living.

  10. Design Basis Threat (DBT) Approach for the First NPP Security System in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ign Djoko Irianto

    2004-01-01

    Design Basis Threat (DBT) is one of the main factors to be taken into account in the design of physical protection system of nuclear facility. In accordance with IAEA's recommendations outlined in INFCIRC/225/Rev.4 (Corrected), DBT is defined as: attributes and characteristics of potential insider and/or external adversaries, who might attempt unauthorized removal of nuclear material or sabotage against the nuclear facilities. There are three types of adversary that must be considered in DBT, such as adversary who comes from the outside (external adversary), adversary who comes from the inside (internal adversary), and adversary who comes from outside and colludes with insiders. Current situation in Indonesia, where many bomb attacks occurred, requires serious attention on DBT in the physical protection design of NPP which is to be built in Indonesia. This paper is intended to describe the methodology on how to create and implement a Design Basis Threat in the design process of NPP physical protection in Indonesia. (author)

  11. Security infrastructure for on-demand provisioned Cloud infrastructure services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demchenko, Y.; Ngo, C.; de Laat, C.; Wlodarczyk, T.W.; Rong, C.; Ziegler, W.

    2011-01-01

    Providing consistent security services in on-demand provisioned Cloud infrastructure services is of primary importance due to multi-tenant and potentially multi-provider nature of Clouds Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) environment. Cloud security infrastructure should address two aspects of the

  12. Western Nuclear Science Alliance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Reese; George Miller; Stephen Frantz; Denis Beller; Denis Beller; Ed Morse; Melinda Krahenbuhl; Bob Flocchini; Jim Elliston

    2010-12-07

    The primary objective of the INIE program is to strengthen nuclear science and engineering programs at the member institutions and to address the long term goal of the University Reactor Infrastructure and Education Assistance Program.

  13. IMPLEMENTASI PENDIKTEAN BAHASA INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayu Purwarianti

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Paper ini memaparkan hasil penelitian dalam membangun aplikasi pendiktean Bahasa Indonesia untuk waktu nyata. Dalam membangun sebuah aplikasi pendiktean, terdapat beberapa masalah seperti perintah suara (voice command, Out Of Vocabulary (OOV, noise, dan filler. Adapun yang menjadi fokus dalam penelitian ini adalah penanganan perintah suara dan OOV dari kata yang didiktekan. Pendiktean suara merupakan pengembangan lanjut dari pengenalan suara secara waktu nyata dengan tambahan metode untuk menangani hal-hal yang telah dinyatakan sebelumnya. Untuk menangani perintah suara, sebuah modul ditambahkan untuk mengecek hasil decoding dari sistem pengenalan suara. Adapun untuk menangani OOV, ditambahkan modul penanganan pengejaan setelah sebelumnya dinyatakan status ejaan. Model perintah suara dan model huruf ditambahkan ke dalam kamus dan digunakan sebagai pelatihan dari model bahasa n-gram. Dalam pengujian, dilakukan evaluasi terhadap sistem pengenalan suara, penanganan perintah suara, dan modul pengejaan sebagai strategi untuk menangani kata OOV. Untuk modul pengenalan suara, akurasi yang dicapai adalah 70%. Untuk modul penanganan perintah suara, pengujian menunjukkan bahwa perintah suara dapat ditangani dengan baik. Sedangkan untuk modul pengejaan, pengujian menunjukkan bahwa hanya 20 dari 26 huruf yang berhasil dikenali. In this paper, we presented the results of research in building applications dictation of the Bahasa Indonesia for real-time. In developing a dictation application, there are some problems such as voice command, Out of Vocabulary (OOV, noise, and filler. As the focus in this research is the handling of voice command and OOV from dictated words. Voice dictation is a further development of real time voice recognition with an additional method to deal with things that have been stated before. To handle voice commands, a module is added to check the results of decoding of the voice recognition system. To handle OOV, spelling handling

  14. Glossary of Spatial Data Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedjeljko Frančula

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available All items are listed in the Glossary by alphabetical order. If an item consists of two or more words, the first is always a noun. For example: spatial data infrastructure is listed as infrastructure, saptial data.

  15. Green Infrastructure Checklists and Renderings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materials and checklists for Denver, CO to review development project plans for green infrastructure components, best practices for inspecting and maintaining installed green infrastructure. Also includes renderings of streetscape projects.

  16. Flowscapes : Designing infrastructure as landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, S.; Jauslin, D.T.; Van der Hoeven, F.D.

    2015-01-01

    Social, cultural and technological developments of our society are demanding a fundamental review of the planning and design of its landscapes and infrastructures, in particular in relation to environmental issues and sustainability. Transportation, green and water infrastructures are important

  17. Quantitative analysis of Indonesia's reserves and energy security as an evaluation by the nation in facing global competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiratama, Hadi; Yerido, Hezron; Tetrisyanda, Rizki; Ginting, Rizqy R.; Wibawa, Gede

    2015-12-01

    Energy security has become a serious concern for all countries in the world and each country has its own definiton for measuring its energy security. The objective of this study was to measure energy security of Indonesia quantitatively by comparing it with other countries and provide some recommendations for enhancing the energy security. In this study, the database was developed from various sources and was cross-checked to confirm validity of the data. Then the parameters of energy security were defined, where all of data will be processed towards the selected parameters. These parameters (e.g. Primary Energy mix, TPES/capita, FEC/capita, Self Sufficiency, Refining capacity, Overseas Energy Resources, Resources diversification) are the standards used to produce an analysis or evaluation of national energy management. Energy balances for Indonesia and 10 selected countries (USA, Germany, Russia, England, Japan, China, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand and India) were presented from 2009 to 2013. With a base index of 1.0 for Indonesia, calculated energy security index capable of representing Indonesia energy security compared relatively to other countries were also presented and discussed in detail. In 2012, Indonesia security index is ranked 11 from 11 countries, while USA and South Korea are the highest with security index of 3.36 and 2.89, respectively. According to prediction for 2025, Indonesia energy security is ranked 10 from 11 countries with only Thailand has lower security index (0.98). This result shows that Indonesia energy security was vulnerable to crisis and must be improved. Therefore this study proposed some recommendations to improve Indonesia energy security. Indonesia need to increase oil production by constructing new refinery plants, developing infrastructure for energy distribution to reduce the potential of energy shortage and accelerating the utilization of renewable energy to reduce the excessive use of primary energy. From energy policy

  18. Wastewater treatment and pollution control in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danu, Sugiarto

    2006-01-01

    Present status of radiation facilities for Co-60 gamma ray irradiation and electron beam irradiation in Indonesia is first presented. Wastewater treatment is explained: kinds of waste, industrial, agricultural, municipal and nuclear. Each liquid wastewater containing various kinds of contaminants, radioactive or non-radioactive is differently treated by waste treatment industries. On-going project is use of electron beams in which combination with ozone to reduce chlorinated solvent, disinfected sludge from sewage treatment containing organic and inorganic components for soil fertilizer, and high color river water for water supplying. The cost factor and the effect of combined treatment are being examined. Other on-going projects are applications of electron beams for vulcanization of natural rubber latex and flue gas treatment by BATAN. (S. Ohno)

  19. Social experience infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistgaard, Peter

    2006-01-01

    and explorative fashion to share with others thoughts and ideas concerning the development of new ways to construct/reconstruct recreational spaces with a better coherence with regard to designing experiences. This article claims that it is possible to design recreational spaces with good social experience...... infrastructure in order to create experience spaces for personal experiences (in line with Schultze’s social constructivist view of experiences) without completely adhering to the economic rationalist thoughts and guidelines of Pine & Gilmore that claim that experiences can be designed and controlled...... by experience designers. The notion of social experience infrastructure may be placed in the cross field between the social constructivist and the economic rationalist approach....

  20. Chef infrastructure automation cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Marschall, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    This book is for system engineers and administrators who have a fundamental understanding of information management systems and infrastructure. It helps if you've already played around with Chef; however, this book covers all the important topics you will need to know. If you don't want to dig through a whole book before you can get started, this book is for you, as it features a set of independent recipes you can try out immediately.

  1. Digital Currencies as Infrastructures

    OpenAIRE

    Miscione, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Currencies are information infrastructures at least because they classify goods (through pricing), communicate prices across markets and establish, maintain and transform social and power relations. Possibly, information goods have always existed. New waves of information technologies (alphabet, paper, printing press, TV, computers) have emphasized those goods' peculiarities: Walter Benjamin wrote about "The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction" already in 1936 BUT the distinctio...

  2. Kwajalein Infrastructure Prioritization Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Marshall Islands in 1885 (Peattie, 1988) and by 1906 they were combined with the Marinas , Paulaus, and Carolines to form one administrative...conditions and better understand the garrison’s infrastructure. We toured all of the facilities and witnessed the effects of the extremely corrosive ...system has a reduced life span because it is exposed to the extremely corrosive salt and wind environment. The open-air shelter is not enclosed and

  3. The mapping and preparation of human resources for NPP’S operation and maintenance in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moch-Djoko Birmano; Yohanes Dwi Anggoro

    2013-01-01

    The preparation of the competent human resources (HRs) is one of the basic infrastructure of NPP’s development. IAEA recommends that at the initial activity in preparation of human resources for NPP is doing Business Process Mapping by identifying the knowledge, skills and abilities of required human resources to carry out the operation and maintenance of NPPs. This study aims to mapping and preparing of human resources for NPP’s operation and maintenance in Indonesia. The method used are mapping business processes at operation and maintenance stage of NPP, identifying positions, conducting surveys with questionnaires and calculations, and data analysis. Surveys and questionnaires to determine the level of technical competence of personnel in BATAN at operation and maintenance stage. Analysis using the Method of Gap Analysis with human resources Competency Standards Criteria based on technical competence qualifications. This study uses the assumption that the nuclear power plant will be built 2 units (twin) and start operation in 2027. The results showed that from the aspect of education, BATAN able to meet the needs of human resources at 53.64 to 73.75%. While from the aspect of training and specific work experience, participation level of BATAN’s human resources is still very low of IAEA requirements. This case caused because young human resources in BATAN who have educational qualifications, experience, training and technical certifications in the field of operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants is still limited. Based on this, there should be preparation of NPP’s human resources with establish NPP’s human resources development program based on required qualifications. (author)

  4. Regulation of gas infrastructure expansion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Joode, J.

    2012-01-01

    The topic of this dissertation is the regulation of gas infrastructure expansion in the European Union (EU). While the gas market has been liberalised, the gas infrastructure has largely remained in the regulated domain. However, not necessarily all gas infrastructure facilities – such as gas

  5. DESENTRALISASI PENGELUARAN DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Herni Rochana

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the implementation of Law 22/1999 and Law 25/1999 of 2001, has been an increase in the implementation of fiscal decentralization with a phenomenon called Big Bang. The study was conducted to determine the degree of decentralization of expenditure covering the period before and after the implementation of regional autonomy. The research data is a panel data drawn from 30 provinces between 1994 to 2007. The results showed that in Indonesia there has been a significant increase in expenditure decentralization since 2001. Significant increases occurred mainly on the expenditure side, especially the decentralization of authority be spending more than doubled from the previous. On a national scale, the degree of decentralization of authority expenditure increased from 10.48% in the year 2000 to 25.45% in 2001. And the average for each province, the degree of decentralization of spending authority increased from 0.40% in 2000 to 0, 85% in 2001DOI: 10.15408/sjie.v2i2.2423

  6. TREN URBANISASI DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felecia P. Adam

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization always give negative and positive influences to the development in anysectors. Impact that has been occurred from this process is not only be implicated to the aspect ofspacing, but also to social, economy, and cultural aspect. The consequences of urbanization flowrapidly to urban area will cause the slum settlements spread widely, and the micro informalsectors are mushrooming. Informal sector is really developed rapidly and profitable, but it has aconsequence to the increasing of poverty. This condition will disturb the urban structure becausebuffer area like “DAS” will be the target of settlement. The increasing of labor force which couldnot be involved in the industry are able to bring about internal conflict in the sector ofmanpower, like unemployment. Social and services facilities became increasingly as a reactionof user demand, however the benefit does not spread evenly because of high cost operating.The analysis of secondary data in this article/writing will try to show the urbanizationcondition in Indonesia and its developments.

  7. Health Information in Indonesian (Bahasa Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → Indonesian (Bahasa Indonesia) URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/indonesian.html Health Information in Indonesian (Bahasa Indonesia) To use the sharing features on this page, ...

  8. BATAN Activities in Developing Nuclear Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darmawati, S.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: BATAN (National Atomic Energy Agency of Indonesia) was established in 1964, and after the issuance of Law 10 of 1997 it become National Nuclear Energy Agency. During the last seven years, BATAN has suffered the loss of many of its valuable human resources due to the zero-growth policy of the government in recruiting new staffs. The uncertain future of nuclear power programme in Indonesia has also reduced the interest of young generation to study nuclear related subjects, resulting in the closing of several departments in universities that once offered nuclear sciences as subject of studies. These situations triggered management of BATAN to develop various efforts to keep nuclear knowledge exist and disseminate among BATAN itself, university students, and public as a whole. BATAN has in recent years established higher school of nuclear technology and organized various nuclear related training programmes, and also in cooperation with other governmental organizations establish nuclear zones, nuclear information centres and nuclear corners in public as well as in high school areas throughout Indonesia. All these efforts are aimed to transfer and preserve nuclear knowledge for the better future of the applications of nuclear science and technology in Indonesia. (author

  9. Optimistic forecasts for Asian nuclear programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, David.

    1986-01-01

    Six countries in the Far East are rapidly developing nuclear power. The position in these six -Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Philippines, Indonesia and the Peoples' Republic of China - is discussed. The present number of nuclear power stations and the percentage of nuclear-generated electricity is given. The future plans and needs of each country are then considered. (U.K.)

  10. Growing electricity demand and role of nuclear power in Asia. WANO Tokyo Center summarizes Asian Nuclear Power Atlas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    Present status of the activities of World Association of Nuclear Operations (WANO) in Asia was briefly summarized here. The WANO Tokyo Center is the hub for WANO's activities having a member ship of 17 operators from six countries and territories. The center conducts a variety of activities designed to enhance the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants (NPPs) in Asia. Asian economy is expanding now in spite of the stagnation of recent world economy. The economic development has been paralleled by population growth in Asia and the 21st century may become the 'age of Asia'. Despite this remarkable economic growth, some parts of Asia are still at the developing stage in terms of electric power infrastructure. Demand for electric power is expected to increase dramatically from now on, making the development of electric power plants an urgent priority. Nuclear power has thus become the focus of increasing interest in Asia. At present, 17 operators in six countries of Asia operate 79 units at 32 power stations with a total capacity of approximately 60 GW, or equivalent to around 17% of the total capacity of all WANO members. China's massive NPP construction program and Indonesia's nuclear power program are expected to boost total capacity in future. (M.N.)

  11. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heydorn, Edward C

    2013-03-12

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a real-world retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation's hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling

  12. Fallout Concentration Various Environmental Samples in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutarman

    2001-01-01

    The testing of nuclear weapons have been carried out by the advanced countries, such as United States, Russian Federation, United Kingdom, France, China, India and Pakistan, since about 1945 until 1998. Nuclear weapons tests were conducted at various locations, on and above the earth's surface or underground or on and under the ocean's surface. Nuclear explosions caused the radionuclides of fission product, such as 131 l, 89 Sr, 90 Sr, 134 Cs, 137 Cs, and 239 Pu released to the atmospheric layer. In the atmospheric layer, the long-lived radionuclides, i.e, 90 Sr dan 137 Cs will be distributed into the environment as the fallout radionuclides, and deposited in the various environmental samples (soil, water, and biota). In general, at several locations in Indonesia the 90 Sr and 137 Cs in the various environmental samples still can be detected. The data of measurement results of 90 Sr and 137 Cs concentrations were generally lower than that from some countries in the northern hemisphere. (author)

  13. Infrastructure needs for waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.

    2001-01-01

    National infrastructures are needed to safely and economically manage radioactive wastes. Considerable experience has been accumulated in industrialized countries for predisposal management of radioactive wastes, and legal, regulatory and technical infrastructures are in place. Drawing on this experience, international organizations can assist in transferring this knowledge to developing countries to build their waste management infrastructures. Infrastructure needs for disposal of long lived radioactive waste are more complex, due to the long time scale that must be considered. Challenges and infrastructure needs, particularly for countries developing geologic repositories for disposal of high level wastes, are discussed in this paper. (author)

  14. Infrastructure: concept, types and value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E. Lantsov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Researches of influence of infrastructure on the economic growth and development of the countries gained currency. However the majority of authors drop the problem of definition of accurate concept of studied object and its criteria out. In the given article various approaches in the definition of «infrastructure» concept, criterion and the characteristics of infrastructure distinguishing it from other capital assets are presented. Such types of infrastructure, as personal, institutional, material, production, social, etc. are considered. Author’s definition of infrastructure is given.

  15. Nuclear Law: A Key Against Nuclear Terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardozo, P.

    2004-01-01

    The role of the legal instruments in the war against nuclear terrorism. Control of radioactive sources. Elements of Nuclear Law: Definition: it is the body of special legislation that regulates the pacific uses of nuclear energy and the conduct of the persons engaged in activities related to fissionable materials and ionizing radiation . Objective: to provide a legal framework in order to protect individuals , property and the environment against the harmful effects of the use of nuclear energy and ionising radiation. Principles of nuclear energy legislation: safety principle, exclusively operator responsibility, authorization, independence of the regulatory body, inspections and enforcement, nuclear damage compensation, international cooperation. National regulatory infrastructure. Establishment of special law in Emergency Preparedness for nuclear or radiological disaster. IAEA Conventions. Transportation of nuclear material. IAEA regulations on radioactive material. Compensation for nuclear damage. Nuclear safety, security and terrorism. International and domestic instruments. Anti terrorism acts. International agreements on Safety Cooperation. (Author)

  16. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE ECONOMIC DETERMINANTS OF FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT IN PAKISTAN, INDIA AND INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Azam, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    In this study an attempt has been made to investigate the effects of economic factors on foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows into Pakistan, India and Indonesia. Simple loglinear regression model for each country has been used and the method of least squares has been applied. Empirical results show that market size, domestic investment, tradeopenness, and physical infrastructure are the important economic determinants of FDI.Further, this study also found that the empirical results of the ...

  17. Kenaf: its prospect in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estri Laras Arumingtyas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Kenaf is a plant fibre with high potential as source of material industry. Originally, kenaf usage in Indonesia is still limited only for jute sacks material, which is then displaced by plastic sacks production. While at international scale, kenaf has been started to be developed as pulp material, polypropylene composite, fibreglass replacement, and particle board for automotive industry materials. Indonesia is a tropical country this condition which suitable for kenaf cultivation. However, research reports about kenaf potential usages are still few and limited in domestic level only. Whereas, Indonesian kenaf plant information is needed by international community to understand comprehensively about the potential of tropical plants. This article aims to provide an overview about kenaf cultivation potential and usages in Indonesia as well as the possibility of future development. Key words: kenaf, fibre, prospect, potential.

  18. PERSPEKTIF ARSITEKTUR SURYA DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Priatman

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy is a prospective alternative resource due to its existence as a non-polluting source of renewable energy. The potency of solar energy in Indonesia at the belt of equator enables its usage in buildings directly to fulfill human needs. The integrative implementation of solar technology into building emerges specific challenges in architectural design and evolves a new architectural approach which is called "solar architecture". Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Energi surya merupakan sumberdaya alternatif yang prospektif karena energi surya merupakan sumber energi yang dapat diperbarui dan tidak menimbulkan polusi. Potensi energi surya di Indonesia yang berada dijalur khatulistiwa memungkinkan penggunaan secara langsung dalam bangunan untuk memenuhi kebutuhan manusia. Implementasi teknik pemanfaatan energi surya kedalam bangunan secara integratif menimbulkan tantangan spesifik dalam perancangan arsitektur dan merupakan embrio pewujudan suatu tatanan arsitektur baru yang dikenal sebagai "arsitektur surya" Keywords: arsitektur surya, energi surya

  19. DETERMINAN TABUNGAN MUDHARABAH DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roikhan Moch Aziz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research to determine how the influence of macro variables were Profit Sharing Ratio (equivalent rate, Inflation, GDP, and SWBI against Mudharabah Savings at Islamic Banking in Indonesia. The data used in this research were data time series by using multiple regressions and analysis by Ordinary Least Squares. The results showed that simultaneously independent variables (Profit Sharing ratio, Inflation, GDP, and SWBI have significant influence the dependent variable (MudharabaH Savings with probability 0.000000. End that partially independent variables (Inflation with probability 0.0013, GDP with probability 0.0000, and SWBI with probability 0.0000 have positively influence and significantly to dependent variable (Mudharabah Savings in the Islamic Banking of Indonesia. While between the variable independent (Profit Sharing ratio to dependent variable (Mudharabah Savings have not significantly with probability 0.2040, in the Islamic Banking of IndonesiaDOI: 10.15408/sjie.v2i2.2425

  20. Growing the Blockchain information infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbar, Karim; Bjørn, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present ethnographic data that unpacks the everyday work of some of the many infrastructuring agents who contribute to creating, sustaining and growing the Blockchain information infrastructure. We argue that this infrastructuring work takes the form of entrepreneurial actions......, which are self-initiated and primarily directed at sustaining or increasing the initiator’s stake in the emerging information infrastructure. These entrepreneurial actions wrestle against the affordances of the installed base of the Blockchain infrastructure, and take the shape of engaging...... or circumventing activities. These activities purposefully aim at either influencing or working around the enablers and constraints afforded by the Blockchain information infrastructure, as its installed base is gaining inertia. This study contributes to our understanding of the purpose of infrastructuring, seen...

  1. ANALISIS IMPOR BERAS DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratih Kumala Sari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak ___________________________________________________________________ Salah satu kebijakan pemerintah untuk memenuhi kebutuhan beras yaitu dengan menggenjot produksi beras dalam negeri. Namun dengan semakin meningkatnya jumlah penduduk akan meningkatkan permintaan terhadap beras dan upaya peningkatan produktivitas dalam negeri tidak dapat memenuhi kebutuhan beras dalam negeri. Sehingga untuk menutupi kekurangan tersebut pemerintah mengambil keputusan untuk melakukan impor beras dari negara lain. Akan tetapi pada kenyataannya impor beras dilakukan ketika data statistik menunjukkan bahwa Indonesia sedang mengalami surplus beras. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui faktor-faktor apa saja yang mempengaruhi impor beras di Indonesia. Metode analisis yang digunakan adalah analisis regresi linier berganda dengan model Error Correction Model (ECM. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian disimpulkan bahwa secara parsial maupun secara bersama-sama produksi beras, konsumsi beras, harga beras dalam negeri dan nilai tukar rupiah terhadap dollar AS berpengaruh dan signifikan terhadap impor beras di Indonesia. Abstract ___________________________________________________________________ One of the government’s policy to fulfill the need of rice is to boost the domestic production. However, by increasing the population, the demand of rice will also increase and the effort of increasing the domestic productivity cannot supply domestic rice need. So, to cover the shortage the government make decision to import rice from other countries. Yet, in fact importing rice is occurred when the statistical data showed that the supply of rice in Indonesia is surplus. The purpose of this research is necessary to study the factors which influence the import of rice in Indonesia. The analysis method used is multiple linear regression analysis model with Error Correction Model (ECM. Based on the research proven that partially or jointly the production, the consumption, the

  2. Radiation protection infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    A prerequisite for the safe use of ionizing radiation in a country is the availability of an adequate infrastructure to achieve the desired degree of protection. The extent of such an infrastructure, generally comprising regulatory mechanisms and technical capabilities for application and enforcement of regulations, has to be commensurate with the stage of technological development. The expanding application of ionizing radiation in medicine, industry and research calls for vigorous promotion of effective radiation protection efforts, not only to prevent any unsafe practices but also to assess correctly and provide authoritative information on the safety of adopted practices. Experience reveals that radiation protection practices vary considerably from one country to another. The regulatory structures and type of organization with regard to radiation protection are very different, depending on a number of factors such as the constitutional framework, the legal and administrative systems of the country concerned, the state of technical development, the status of application of radiation sources, the existence of research and associated institutions, and the technical skills and financial resources available. Radiation protection principles evolve with time as further experience is gained and as new research evidence becomes available. Regulation of radiation protection has to take account of such changes and adapt to changing conditions. Forty-eight papers from 29 Member States and two International Organizations were presented in nine scientific sessions. Topics included radiation protection regulation and licensing notification, registration, inspection and control programmes, education and training, the role of supporting institutions such as national laboratories and research institutes, the role of professional associations, the contribution of radiation protection services, and international activities. A concluding panel addressed development strategies to

  3. Infrastructure for microsystem production

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heeren, Henne; Sanchez, Stefan; Elders, Job; Heideman, Rene G.

    1999-03-01

    Manufacturing of micro-systems differs from IC manufacturing because the market requires a diversity of products and lower volumes per product. In addition, a diversity of micro-technologies has been developed, including non-IC compatible processes and potentially IC compatible processes. An infrastructure for the production of micro- system devices is lacking. On one side the technology for MST is available at the universities and small university related companies. On the other side there are several small and medium enterprises and bigger companies wanting to implement MST devices in their products, but unwilling to be dependent on universities. Philips Electronics in the Netherlands and Twente MicroProducts realized this problem and have started a project to fill this gap. At this moment the basic of the infrastructure is available: OnStream BV, Eindhoven, The Netherlands, opened its waferfab and assembly facilities for the production of MST devices. Twente MicroProducts will take care of the design of the products and of the small-scale production. Integration of quality systems for maintenance, yield, statistical process control and production in a Manufacturing Execution System offers direct access for all people involved to all the relevant information. It also ensures quality of the products made. The available capabilities of the infrastructure in the current status are compared to the market needs. In this article, a description of a seamless Micro-System Engineering Foundry is given. A seamless organization is capable of helping the customer from design to production. Several examples are given.

  4. Sustainable Bridge Infrastructure Procurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safi, Mohammed; Du, Guangli; Simonsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The lack of a flexible but systematic approach for integrating lifecycle aspects into bridge investment decisions is a major obstacle hindering the procurement of sustainable bridge infrastructures. This paper addresses this obstacle by introducing a holistic approach that agencies could use to p...... to procure the most “sustainable” (lifecycle-efficient) bridge through a fair design-build (D-B) tendering process, considering all the main aspects: life-cycle cost (LCC), service life-span, aesthetic demands and environmental impacts (LCA)....

  5. Fractal actors and infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøge, Ask Risom

    2011-01-01

    -network-theory (ANT) into surveillance studies (Ball 2002, Adey 2004, Gad & Lauritsen 2009). In this paper, I further explore the potential of this connection by experimenting with Marilyn Strathern’s concept of the fractal (1991), which has been discussed in newer ANT literature (Law 2002; Law 2004; Jensen 2007). I...... under surveillance. Based on fieldwork conducted in 2008 and 2011 in relation to my Master’s thesis and PhD respectively, I illustrate fractal concepts by describing the acts, actors and infrastructure that make up the ‘DNA surveillance’ conducted by the Danish police....

  6. CERN Infrastructure Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Computer Centre is reviewing strategies for optimizing the use of the existing infrastructure in the future, and in the likely scenario that any extension will be remote from CERN, and in the light of the way other large facilities are today being operated. Over the past six months, CERN has been investigating modern and widely-used tools and procedures used for virtualisation, clouds and fabric management in order to reduce operational effort, increase agility and support unattended remote computer centres. This presentation will give the details on the project’s motivations, current status and areas for future investigation.

  7. Agile Infrastructure Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, P.; Ascenso, J.; Fedorko, I.; Fiorini, B.; Paladin, M.; Pigueiras, L.; Santos, M.

    2014-06-01

    At the present time, data centres are facing a massive rise in virtualisation and cloud computing. The Agile Infrastructure (AI) project is working to deliver new solutions to ease the management of CERN data centres. Part of the solution consists in a new "shared monitoring architecture" which collects and manages monitoring data from all data centre resources. In this article, we present the building blocks of this new monitoring architecture, the different open source technologies selected for each architecture layer, and how we are building a community around this common effort.

  8. Agile infrastructure monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, P; Ascenso, J; Fedorko, I; Fiorini, B; Paladin, M; Pigueiras, L; Santos, M

    2014-01-01

    At the present time, data centres are facing a massive rise in virtualisation and cloud computing. The Agile Infrastructure (AI) project is working to deliver new solutions to ease the management of CERN data centres. Part of the solution consists in a new 'shared monitoring architecture' which collects and manages monitoring data from all data centre resources. In this article, we present the building blocks of this new monitoring architecture, the different open source technologies selected for each architecture layer, and how we are building a community around this common effort.

  9. Building National Healthcare Infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Blegind; Thorseng, Anne

    2017-01-01

    This case chapter is about the evolution of the Danish national e-health portal, sundhed.dk, which provides patient-oriented digital services. We present how the organization behind sundhed.dk succeeded in establishing a national healthcare infrastructure by (1) collating and assembling existing...... data resources, (2) repurposing and enhancing current data sources in the health sector, and (3) engaging a multiplicity of stakeholders. We argue that these activities represent three ways of capitalizing on the installed base that has led to the evolution and current situation of the e-health portal...

  10. Probabilitas Teroris Perempuan di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Endy Saputro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Indonesian police through Densus 88 have analyzed and predicted the strategy of terrorism in Indonesia, which was important to note that those Indonesian terrorist are males. In short, the Indonesian terrorists need to set up their strategy of attack. Will the Indonesian terrorists build a new strategy with taking involve woman within the strategy? This paper aims to understand the involvement of women terrorist in some suicide actions in global context. To sum up, this paper argues that the emergence of women terrorist in Indonesia are possible, yet it requires the precedence conditions of world women terrorists in global contexts.

  11. Radiation Protection Infrastructure In Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriambololona, R.; Ratovonjanahary, J.F.; Zafimanjato, J.L.R.; Randriantseheno, H.F.; Ramanandraibe, M.J.; Randriantsizafy, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation sources are widely used in medicine, industry, research and education in Madagascar. Safety and security of these sources are the main statutory functions of the Regulatory Authority as defined by the regulations in Radiation Protection in Madagascar. These functions are carried out through the system of notification, authorization and inspection, inventory of radiation source and emergency preparedness. The law no 97-041 on radiation protection and radioactive waste management in Madagascar was promulgated on 2nd January 1998. It governs all activities related to the peaceful use of nuclear energy in Madagascar in order to protect the public, the environment and for the safety of radiation sources. This law complies with the International Basic Safety Standards for protection against ionising Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS, IAEA Safety Series no 115). Following the promulgation of the law, four decrees have been enacted by the Malagasy Government. With an effective implementation of these decrees, the ANPSR will be the Highest Administrative Authority in the Field of Radiation Protection and Waste Management in Madagascar. This Regulatory Authority is supported by an Executive Secretariat, assisted by the OTR for Radiation Protection and the OCGDR for Managing Radioactive Waste.The paper includes an overview of the regulatory infrastructure and the organizations of radiation protection in Madagascar

  12. Nuclear energy and security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blejwas, Thomas E.; Sanders, Thomas L.; Eagan, Robert J.; Baker, Arnold B.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power is an important and, the authors believe, essential component of a secure nuclear future. Although nuclear fuel cycles create materials that have some potential for use in nuclear weapons, with appropriate fuel cycles, nuclear power could reduce rather than increase real proliferation risk worldwide. Future fuel cycles could be designed to avoid plutonium production, generate minimal amounts of plutonium in proliferation-resistant amounts or configurations, and/or transparently and efficiently consume plutonium already created. Furthermore, a strong and viable US nuclear infrastructure, of which nuclear power is a large element, is essential if the US is to maintain a leadership or even participatory role in defining the global nuclear infrastructure and controlling the proliferation of nuclear weapons. By focusing on new fuel cycles and new reactor technologies, it is possible to advantageously burn and reduce nuclear materials that could be used for nuclear weapons rather than increase and/or dispose of these materials. Thus, the authors suggest that planners for a secure nuclear future use technology to design an ideal future. In this future, nuclear power creates large amounts of virtually atmospherically clean energy while significantly lowering the threat of proliferation through the thoughtful use, physical security, and agreed-upon transparency of nuclear materials. The authors must develop options for policy makers that bring them as close as practical to this ideal. Just as Atoms for Peace became the ideal for the first nuclear century, they see a potential nuclear future that contributes significantly to power for peace and prosperity

  13. Proceedings of Seminar on Nuclear Geology and Mining Resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zulkarnain, Iskandar; Soeprapto; Soetarno, Djoko; H, Johan-Baratha; Effendi, Amir; Widiyanta; Arief, Erni-Rifandriah; Supriyadi; Yusron, Hari

    2004-01-01

    The proceedings contains the result research and development on nuclear geology and mining resources by the center for development of nuclear ore-National Nuclear Energy Agency, Indonesia. The proceedings consist of nuclear mining activity, exploration/exploitation mining mineral and processing, and environmental process. The proceedings consists of one article from keynote speaker and 22 articles from BATAN participants. (PPIN)

  14. An upgrade for the LHCb monitoring infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    El Majdoubi, Driss; Haen, Christophe; Brarda, Loic

    This document is the result of my work during the second year internship, realized within the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). The goal of this internship is to design and setup a new monitoring infrastructure based on Icinga 2 tool and integrate it as much as possible to a new configuration management tool, Puppet. During this internship, the first step of my mission was to interact with members of the LHCb Online team to have an overview of the system. Then I had to understand the basic concepts of Icinga 2 as well as those of Puppet before proceeding to the implementation of the complete monitoring solution.

  15. Diferensi Makna Kurikulum Di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Muhammad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In Indonesia, the curriculum is understood in accordance with the Act mentioned in the National Education System in the top ie, a set of plans and arrangements regarding the purpose, content, and teaching materials, as well as the methods used to guide the organization of learning activities to achieve specific educational goals. Here explicitly can be observed that the anatomy curriculum in Indonesia contains three aspects, namely: learning objectives, learning materials, and methods. Then some of the experts whom Hilda Taba, Nana Syaodih Sukmadinata and Oemar Hamalik add evaluation component as an important component of the curriculum, because the evaluation is considered as an inseparable part of the curriculum. Di Indonesia kurikulum dipahami sesuai dengan yang disebutkan dalam Undang-undang Sistem Pendidikan Nasional di atas yaitu, seperangkat rencana dan pengaturan mengenai tujuan, isi, dan bahan pelajaran, serta cara yang digunakan sebagai pedoman penyelenggaraan kegiatan pembelajaran untuk mencapai tujuan pendidikan tertentu. Di sini secara eksplisit dapat diamati bahwa anatomi kurikulum di Indonesia mengandung tiga aspek, yaitu: tujuan pembelajaran, materi pembelajaran, dan metode. Kemudian beberapa para ahli di antaranya Hilda Taba, Nana Syaodih Sukmadinata dan Oemar Hamalik menambah komponen evaluasi sebagai komponen penting kurikulum, karena evaluasi dianggap sebagai bagian yang tidak dapat dipisahkan dari kurikulum.

  16. Politik Pemberantasan Korupsi di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suherry Suherry

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the politics of eradicating corruption in Indonesia. The most difficult problem in the running of the government process is due to the massive corruption, collusion and nepotism practices that have impacted widely on society. Corruption in the legal world is classified as an extraordinary crime because it not only harms the State's finances, but also practices violate the social and economic rights of society widely so that its eradication measures must also be done in an extraordinary way. That is what is disclosed in the consideration of the Law on the Eradication of Corruption. Through a juridical-empirical approach of this article, the question of corruption in Indonesia is well answered.   Artikel ini membahas tentan politik pemberantasan korupsi di Indonesia. Masalah tersulit dalam berjalannya proses pemerintahan dikarenakan massifnya praktik korupsi, kolusi dan nepotisme yang meraja lela yang berdampak secara luas bagi masyarakat. Korupsi dalam dunia hukum sudah tergolong sebagai extra ordinary crime (kejahatan luar biasa karena tidak hanya merugikan keuangan Negara, tetapi juga praktik tersebut melanggar hak-hak sosial dan ekonomi masyarakat secara luas sehingga tindakan pemberantasannya harus juga dilakukan dengan cara yang luar biasa pula. Begitulah yang diungkapkan dalam konsideran Undang-Undang Tentang Pemberantasan Tindak Pidana Korupsi. Melalui pendekatan yuridis-empiris, pertanyaan terkait pemberatasan korupsi di Indonesia terjawab dengan baik.

  17. Community Solutions for Indonesia's Waste

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    test

    The tragedy at the Leuwigajah landfill is the most spectacular recent example of Indonesia's challenges in solid waste management. Although less dramatic, the daily struggle of the poorest residents of Indonesian cities with deficient solid waste management also imposes major costs in health and environmental impacts.

  18. Road infrastructure resilience to tsunami in Cilegon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arini, Srikandi Wahyu; Sumabrata, Jachrizal

    2017-11-01

    Indonesia is vulnerable to natural disasters. The highest number of natural disaster occurs on the west side of Java Island with the tsunami as the most deadly. Cilegon, a densely populated city with high industrial activity is located on the west coast of Java Island with a gently sloping topography, hence it is vulnerable to tsunami. Simulations conducted by the National Disaster Management Authority indicates that earthquakes with epicenters in the Sunda strait will cause tsunamis which can sweep away the whole industrial area in one hour. The availability of evacuation routes which can accommodate the evacuation of large numbers of people within a short time is required. Road infrastructure resilience is essential to support the performance of the evacuation routes. Poor network resilience will reduce mobility and accessibility during the evacuation. The objectives of this paper are to analyze the impact of the earthquake-generated tsunami on the evacuation routes and to simulate and analyze the performance of existing evacuation routes in Cilegon. The limitations of the modeling approaches including the current and future challenges in evacuation transport research and its applications are also discussed. The conclusion from this study is accurate data source are needed to build a more representative model and predict the areas susceptible to tsunamis vulnerable areas and to construct cogent tsunami mitigation plans and actions for the most vulnerable areas.

  19. The future of infrastructure security :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Pablo; Turnley, Jessica Glicken; Parrott, Lori K.

    2013-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories hosted a workshop on the future of infrastructure security on February 27-28, 2013, in Albuquerque, NM. The 17 participants came from backgrounds as diverse as federal policy, the insurance industry, infrastructure management, and technology development. The purpose of the workshop was to surface key issues, identify directions forward, and lay groundwork for cross-sectoral and cross-disciplinary collaborations. The workshop addressed issues such as the problem space (what is included in infrastructure problems?), the general types of threats to infrastructure (such as acute or chronic, system-inherent or exogenously imposed) and definitions of secure and resilient infrastructures. The workshop concluded with a consideration of stakeholders and players in the infrastructure world, and identification of specific activities that could be undertaken by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other players.

  20. Michigan E85 Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Matthew M.

    2012-03-30

    This is the final report for a grant-funded project to financially assist and otherwise provide support to projects that increase E85 infrastructure in Michigan at retail fueling locations. Over the two-year project timeframe, nine E85 and/or flex-fuel pumps were installed around the State of Michigan at locations currently lacking E85 infrastructure. A total of five stations installed the nine pumps, all providing cost share toward the project. By using cost sharing by station partners, the $200,000 provided by the Department of Energy facilitated a total project worth $746,332.85. This project was completed over a two-year timetable (eight quarters). The first quarter of the project focused on project outreach to station owners about the incentive on the installation and/or conversion of E85 compatible fueling equipment including fueling pumps, tanks, and all necessary electrical and plumbing connections. Utilizing Clean Energy Coalition (CEC) extensive knowledge of gasoline/ethanol infrastructure throughout Michigan, CEC strategically placed these pumps in locations to strengthen the broad availability of E85 in Michigan. During the first and second quarters, CEC staff approved projects for funding and secured contracts with station owners; the second through eighth quarters were spent working with fueling station owners to complete projects; the third through eighth quarters included time spent promoting projects; and beginning in the second quarter and running for the duration of the project was spent performing project reporting and evaluation to the US DOE. A total of 9 pumps were installed (four in Elkton, two in Sebewaing, one in East Lansing, one in Howell, and one in Whitmore Lake). At these combined station locations, a total of 192,445 gallons of E85, 10,786 gallons of E50, and 19,159 gallons of E30 were sold in all reporting quarters for 2011. Overall, the project has successfully displaced 162,611 gallons (2,663 barrels) of petroleum, and reduced

  1. Energy policy review of Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-11-21

    The Republic of Indonesia is the world's fourth most populous nation and a developing economy in transition. It is now consolidating its democratic government and implementing governance and financial reforms. After the Asian financial crisis of 1997-99, Indonesia's economy has returned to a strong and stable 5-6% annual growth. Over recent decades, its resource wealth, openness to trade and investment, and a strategically favourable location in East Asia have made Indonesia a key global exporter of oil, gas, and coal. However, Indonesia now faces the serious challenge of fast-rising domestic energy demand with declining oil and gas production. The country's energy policy makers are looking closely at domestic energy requirements and best policies to meet these needs. This includes moving prices towards international parity, improving the energy sector investment climate, and developing electricity generation capacity. While some very difficult decisions have been made over recent years, many challenges remain. This study assesses the country's major energy issues. The study was conducted by a team of IEA member country specialists - an approach which has also been used for national and sectoral reviews of other non-IEA countries, including Angola, China, India, Russia, and Ukraine, as well as the Western Balkan region. The Review offers an analysis of Indonesia's energy sector, with findings and recommendations that draw on experience in IEA member countries. Six areas are suggested for priority attention, including progressive reduction in fuel and electricity subsidies, better implementation of policy, improving clarity of the investment framework, helping the energy regulators do their job more effectively, and harnessing a sustainable development agenda particularly renewable energy and energy efficiency.

  2. Hanford Site Infrastructure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Hanford Site Infrastructure Plan (HIP) has been prepared as an overview of the facilities, utilities, systems, and services that support all activities on the Hanford Site. Its purpose is three-fold: to examine in detail the existing condition of the Hanford Site's aging utility systems, transportation systems, Site services and general-purpose facilities; to evaluate the ability of these systems to meet present and forecasted Site missions; to identify maintenance and upgrade projects necessary to ensure continued safe and cost-effective support to Hanford Site programs well into the twenty-first century. The HIP is intended to be a dynamic document that will be updated accordingly as Site activities, conditions, and requirements change. 35 figs., 25 tabs

  3. Energy Transmission and Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathison, Jane

    2012-12-31

    The objective of Energy Transmission and Infrastructure Northern Ohio (OH) was to lay the conceptual and analytical foundation for an energy economy in northern Ohio that will: • improve the efficiency with which energy is used in the residential, commercial, industrial, agricultural, and transportation sectors for Oberlin, Ohio as a district-wide model for Congressional District OH-09; • identify the potential to deploy wind and solar technologies and the most effective configuration for the regional energy system (i.e., the ratio of distributed or centralized power generation); • analyze the potential within the district to utilize farm wastes to produce biofuels; • enhance long-term energy security by identifying ways to deploy local resources and building Ohio-based enterprises; • identify the policy, regulatory, and financial barriers impeding development of a new energy system; and • improve energy infrastructure within Congressional District OH-09. This objective of laying the foundation for a renewable energy system in Ohio was achieved through four primary areas of activity: 1. district-wide energy infrastructure assessments and alternative-energy transmission studies; 2. energy infrastructure improvement projects undertaken by American Municipal Power (AMP) affiliates in the northern Ohio communities of Elmore, Oak Harbor, and Wellington; 3. Oberlin, OH-area energy assessment initiatives; and 4. a district-wide conference held in September 2011 to disseminate year-one findings. The grant supported 17 research studies by leading energy, policy, and financial specialists, including studies on: current energy use in the district and the Oberlin area; regional potential for energy generation from renewable sources such as solar power, wind, and farm-waste; energy and transportation strategies for transitioning the City of Oberlin entirely to renewable resources and considering pedestrians, bicyclists, and public transportation as well as drivers

  4. Infrastructural politics on Facebook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Andreas

    broadening of the avenues of possible inquiry could be timely in relation to Facebook. What can we learn from Facebook as a venue for organizing in emergencies or around public issues? In order start answering this question I examine a recent controversy over plans to build a new road-pricing infrastructure...... to curb congestion in Copenhagen. The so-called payment ring project has now been officially dropped, but only after becoming one of the most heated topics in Danish politics in recent years. Thousands of people mobilized on Facebook pages for and against the actualization of the payment ring. I suggest...... that such issue-oriented pages represent an interesting reappropriation of the Facebook platform, whose ’pages’ feature is mainly targeted at commercial brands and other institutions. The majority of the pages founded in reaction to the payment ring were marked by sharp protests, something that generates...

  5. The infrastructure of telecare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Niels Christian Mossfeldt

    2018-01-01

    Telecare can offer a unique experience of trust in patient-nurse relationships, embracing new standards for professional discretion among nurses, but also reflects an increasingly complicated relationship between nurses and doctors. The study uses ethnographic methodology in relation to a large 5...... million euro project at four hospitals caring for 120 patients with COPD. Twenty screen-mediated conferences were observed and two workshops, centring on nurses’ photo elucidation of the practice of telecare, were conducted with a focus on shifting tasks, professional discretion, responsibility...... and boundaries between nurses and doctors. Analytically, the study draws on Star’s notion of ‘infrastructure’ and Mol, Moser and Pols’ ideas of care as ‘tinkering’. Infrastructure is understood as human and non-human conduct that is embedded into wider organisational conventions, sites and structures...

  6. Proceedings of the nuclear safety seminar, 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin S Zarkasih; Dhandang P; Rohadi A; Djarwani; Santoso; Abdul Waris; Zaki Su'ud; Sihana; Heryudo Kusumo; Yusri Heni; Yus Rusdian; Judi Pramono; Amil Mardha

    2011-06-01

    The Proceedings of the nuclear safety seminar by Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency with the theme of strengthening in nuclear safety control, nuclear security and nuclear safeguard to Introduction of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in Indonesia held on Jakarta 27-28 June 2011. The seminar is an annual routine activities which organized by Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) as an exchange for information from scientists and researchers for using nuclear technology. The proceeding consist of 4 articles from keynotes’ speaker and 39 articles from BAPETEN, BATAN and outside participants. (PPIKSN)

  7. Nuclear honeymoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The Australian National University (ANU) and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to collaborate across research fields including key accelerator facilities, future energy sources and nuclear non-proliferation. T he potential of this partnership demonstrates the value of Commonwealth institutions working together for the betterment of all Australians,' says ANY vice-chancellor Professor Ian Chubb who believes that both organisations have infrastructure and facilities available that if shared could bring greater benefit to the nation. The partnership will develop a national strategy to coordinate use and development of a heavy-ion accelerator and ion source technology, he says. In addition, it will undertake collaborative activities that enhance educational programs in nuclear physics, nuclear engineering and materials science.

  8. Public information and education on radiation safety and protection in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djaloeis, Azhar [National Atomic Energy Agency, Jalan KH Abdul Rohim, Mampang Prapatan, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    1999-09-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of public information and education concerning nuclear science and technology in general and radiation safety and protection in particular in Indonesia from the perspective of promoting the development and utilization of nuclear science and technology in the country. The role of nuclear science and technology in Indonesia is first introduced, followed by an overview of the nuclear activities in the country. Basic considerations, major objectives of the public information and education program on radiation safety and protection as well as basic and operational strategies to achieve those objectives are then presented. Major programs including highlights of the past and present activities as well as prospect on future course of actions are discussed. (author)

  9. Public information and education on radiation safety and protection in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djaloeis, Azhar

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of public information and education concerning nuclear science and technology in general and radiation safety and protection in particular in Indonesia from the perspective of promoting the development and utilization of nuclear science and technology in the country. The role of nuclear science and technology in Indonesia is first introduced, followed by an overview of the nuclear activities in the country. Basic considerations, major objectives of the public information and education program on radiation safety and protection as well as basic and operational strategies to achieve those objectives are then presented. Major programs including highlights of the past and present activities as well as prospect on future course of actions are discussed. (author)

  10. Indonesia-DLN Is A Digital Library Network In Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahmi, Ismail

    2001-01-01

    Within this paper, philosophy of the knowledge sharing, vision of the network, and how it can give benefits to Indonesia are described. The status of the network is described that show the successfulness of the architecture in tying together partner's knowledge from all big islands of Indonesia (Sumatera, Java, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Irian Jaya) whether they have dedicated internet connection or only a dial-up one. Currently 13 institutions have joined the network and 15+ in progress of developing their servers. Features of the software, Ganesha Digital Library (GDL version 3.1) are presented, that is now distributed as a Free-Software that is based on My SQL, PHP, and Apache

  11. Cyber and physical infrastructure interdependencies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Laurence R.; Kelic, Andjelka; Warren, Drake E.

    2008-09-01

    The goal of the work discussed in this document is to understand the risk to the nation of cyber attacks on critical infrastructures. The large body of research results on cyber attacks against physical infrastructure vulnerabilities has not resulted in clear understanding of the cascading effects a cyber-caused disruption can have on critical national infrastructures and the ability of these affected infrastructures to deliver services. This document discusses current research and methodologies aimed at assessing the translation of a cyber-based effect into a physical disruption of infrastructure and thence into quantification of the economic consequences of the resultant disruption and damage. The document discusses the deficiencies of the existing methods in correlating cyber attacks with physical consequences. The document then outlines a research plan to correct those deficiencies. When completed, the research plan will result in a fully supported methodology to quantify the economic consequences of events that begin with cyber effects, cascade into other physical infrastructure impacts, and result in degradation of the critical infrastructure's ability to deliver services and products. This methodology enables quantification of the risks to national critical infrastructure of cyber threats. The work addresses the electric power sector as an example of how the methodology can be applied.

  12. Cameroon's infrastructure : a continental perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Dominguez-Torres, Carolina; Foster, Vivien

    2011-01-01

    Better access to improved infrastructure services is an important engine for economic growth. The poor state of infrastructure is a key bottleneck to growth in African countries, and Cameroon is no exception. Between 2000 and 2005, improvements in information and communication technologies boosted Cameroon's growth performance by 1.26 percentage points per capita, while deficient power inf...

  13. Cyberwarfare on the Electricity Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murarka, N.; Ramesh, V.C.

    2000-03-20

    The report analyzes the possibility of cyberwarfare on the electricity infrastructure. The ongoing deregulation of the electricity industry makes the power grid all the more vulnerable to cyber attacks. The report models the power system information system components, models potential threats and protective measures. It therefore offers a framework for infrastructure protection.

  14. Private investments in new infrastructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarsma, B.; Poort, J.P.; Teulings, C.N.; de Nooij, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Lisbon Strategy demands large investments in transport projects, broadband networks and energy infrastructure. Despite the widely-acknowledged need for investments in new infrastructures, European and national public funds are scarce in the current economic climate. Moreover, both policy-makers

  15. Radiation protection and safety infrastructures in Albania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paci, Rustem; Ylli, Fatos

    2008-01-01

    The paper intends to present the evolution and actual situation of radiation protection and safety infrastructure in Albania, focusing in its establishing and functioning in accordance with BBS and other important documents of specialized international organizations. There are described the legal framework of radiation safety, the regulatory authority, the services as well the practice of their functioning. The issue of the establishing and functioning of the radiation safety infrastructure in Albania was considered as a prerequisite for a good practices development in the peaceful uses of radiation sources . The existence of the adequate legislation and the regulatory authority, functioning based in the Basic Safety Standards (BSS), are the necessary condition providing the fulfilment of the most important issues in the mentioned field. The first document on radiation protection in Albania stated that 'for the safe use of radiation sources it is mandatory that the legal person should have a valid permission issued by Radiation Protection Commission'. A special organ was established in the Ministry of Health to supervise providing of the radiation protection measures. This organization of radiation protection showed many lacks as result of the low efficiency . The personnel monitoring, import, transport, waste management and training of workers were in charge of Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP). In 1992 an IAEA RAPAT mission visited Albania and proposed some recommendations for radiation protection improvements. The mission concluded that 'the legislation of the radiation protection should be developed'. In 1995 Albania was involved in the IAEA Model Project 'Upgrading of Radiation Protection Infrastructure'. This project, which is still in course, intended to establish the modern radiation safety infrastructures in the countries with low efficiency ones and to update and upgrade all aspects related with radiation safety: legislation and regulations, regulatory

  16. Present status of research reactor decommissioning programme in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suripto, A.; Mulyanto, N.

    2002-01-01

    At present Indonesia has 3 research reactors, namely the 30 MW MTR-type multipurpose reactor at Serpong Site, two TRIGA-type research reactors, the first one being 1 MW located at Bandung Site and the second one a small reactor of 100 kW at Yogyakarta Site. The TRIGA Reactor at the Bandung Site reached its first criticality at 250 kW in 1964, and then was operated at 1000 kW since 1971. In October 2000 the reactor power was successfully upgraded to 2 MW. This reactor has already been operated for 38 years. There is not yet any decision for the decommissioning of this reactor. However it will surely be an object for the near future decommissioning programme and hence anticipation for the above situation becomes necessary. The regulation on decommissioning of research reactor is already issued by the independent regulatory body (BAPETEN) according to which the decommissioning permit has to be applied by the BATAN. For Indonesia, an early decommissioning strategy for research reactor dictates a restricted re-use of the site for other nuclear installation. This is based on high land price, limited availability of radwaste repository site, and other cost analysis. Spent graphite reflector from the Bandung TRIGA reactor is recommended for a direct disposal after conditioning, without any volume reduction treatment. Development of human resources, technological capability as well as information flow from and exchange with advanced countries are important factors for the future development of research reactor decommissioning programme in Indonesia. (author)

  17. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW IN INDONESIA AFTER 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Selvie Sinaga

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the major changes of intellectual property condition in Indonesia after 2001. In that year, Indonesia, which has become a member of the Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS since 1994, was ready to meet its commitment under TRIPS. To do so, Indonesiahas made changes in the areas of legislation, administration, court proceedings, and law enforcement. The paper also discusses problematic issues surrounded the implementation of such changes in Indonesia. Tulisan ini melihat kembali perubahan-perubahan besar dalam bidang hak kekayaan intelektual di Indonesia setelah tahun 2001. Pada tahun tersebut, Indonesia, yang telah menjadi anggota Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS sejak 1994, siap untuk memenuhi komitmennya dalam TRIPS. Untuk memenuhi komitmen tersebut, Indonesia telah membuat perubahan-perubahan dalam bidang legislatif, administratif, tata cara pengadilan dan penegakan hukum. Tulisan ini juga membahas permasalahan di seputar pelaksanaan perubahan-perubahan tersebut.

  18. FINANCIAL DEPTH AND FINANCIAL ACCESS IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigit Setiawan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study is intended to analyze the current levels of financial depth and financial access in Indonesia and to analyze the factors affecting them. The analysis method used was a combination of descriptive quantitative, benchmarking, and literature reviews. The conclusion is that the financial depth in Indonesia has not shown a satisfactory level since it was the lowest, or the second lowest ranked country among the sampled countries. Meanwhile, the financial access in Indonesia is relatively better than its financial depth, especially for financial markets, in which Indonesia ranks in the lower average group. From literature reviews, it can be inferred that the main factor driving the poor financial depth in Indonesia is non-competitiveness of the institutions; whereas the driving force of poor financial access in Indonesia are geographical constraints, poverty, a high income gap, and a less than effective national financial development policy.

  19. Mapping the outdoor gamma dose rate in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandar, Dadong; Syarbaini, Sutarman; Bunawas, Kusdiana

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Indonesia is the largest archipelago in the world, comprising five main islands - Java, Sumatra, Sulawesi, Kalimantan and Papua - as well as 30 archipelagoes totaling 17,508 islands with about 6000 of those inhabited. Mapping the outdoor gamma dose rate in Indonesia is a research project conducted by National Nuclear Energy Agency since 2005 aiming to produce a baseline data map as an overview for planning purposes. In these three years 4 main islands has been measured. The grid system has been used in the research. In Sumatra Island the grid is 50 x 50 km 2 , while in Java 40 x 40 km 2 , in Kalimantan 60 x 60 km 2 , and in Sulawesi 40 x 40 km 2 . The gamma dose rates have been measured by Mini Gamma Ray Spectrometer Model GR-130 made by Exploranium-Canada. Figure 1 shows the map of outdoor gamma dose rate in Indonesia. Range of dose rate are in Sumatra from 22,96 ± 0,46 n Sv/h to 186,08 ± 3,72 n Sv/h, in Java 11,32 ± 0,72 n Sv/h to 127,54 ± 6,14 n Sv/h, in Kalimantan 10.72 ± 8.32 n Sv/h to 349,48 ± 57,21 n Sv/h, and in Sulawesi 17.7 ± 11,5 n Sv/h to 467 ± 102 n Sv/h. The arithmetic and geometric mean of dose rate in Indonesia are 68 n Sv/h and 53 n Sv/h, respectively. In general, outdoor gamma dose rate in Indonesia is in a normal range. There are some regions have anomaly of gamma dose rate, for examples at North Sumatra 186.08 ± 3,72 n Sv/h (N 2.12727, E 99.80909), at West Kalimantan 349,48 ± 57,21 n Sv/h (S 1.39507, E 110.57584), at West Sulawesi 487 ± 103 n Sv/h (S 2.95781, E 118.86995), etc. These data is very useful as a radiation baseline in Indonesia. (author)

  20. Prologue to 'nuclear renaissance'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Takuya

    2009-01-01

    Increased awareness of the dangers and effects of global warming and climate change has led decision makers and the public to realize that the use of fossil fuels must be reduced and replaced by low-emission sources of energy such as nuclear power. About new 20 projects of nuclear power are running and about 30 plants in the planning stage in USA. Sweden, England and Italy are moving to construct the nuclear power plants. China will increase nuclear power generation from 9 to 40 million kW till 2020. India has its plan from 40 to 63 million kW till 2032. Indonesia, Vietnam, Thailand, Chile and UAE are planning introduction of nuclear power generation. History of nuclear power generation and its part of Japan are stated. (S.Y.)

  1. Nuclear education, training and support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vityazev, Vsevolod; Ushakov Artem

    2016-01-01

    The structure and key elements of the ROSATOM education and training system are presented. Educational and training services and technical support are provided during the NPP lifetime, including nuclear Infrastructure, nuclear power plant personnel training, equipment and post-warranty spare parts, nuclear power plant operation support, maintenance and repair, modernization and lifetime extension

  2. International Conference of Applied Science and Technology for Infrastructure Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvina Santoso, Shelvy; Hardianto, Ekky

    2017-11-01

    Preface: International Conference of Applied Science and Technology for Infrastructure Engineering (ICASIE) 2017. The International Conference of Applied Science and Technology for Infrastructure Engineering (ICASIE) 2017 has been scheduled and successfully taken place at Swiss-Bell Inn Hotel, Surabaya, Indonesia, on August 5th 2017 organized by Department of Civil Infrastructure Engineering, Faculty of Vocation, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember (ITS). This annual event aims to create synergies between government, private sectors; employers; practitioners; and academics. This conference has different theme each year and “MATERIAL FOR INFRASTUCTURE ENGINEERING” will be taken for this year’s main theme. In addition, we also provide a platform for various other sub-theme topic including but not limited to Geopolymer Concrete and Materials Technology, Structural Dynamics, Engineering, and Sustainability, Seismic Design and Control of Structural Vibrations, Innovative and Green Buildings, Project Management, Transportation and Highway Engineering, Geotechnical Engineering, Water Engineering and Resources Management, Surveying and Geospatial Engineering, Coastal Engineering, Geophysics, Energy, Electronic and Mechatronic, Industrial Process, and Data Mining. List of Organizers, Journal Editors, Steering Committee, International Scientific Committee, Chairman, Keynote Speakers are available in this pdf.

  3. Global information infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, D A

    1994-01-01

    The High Performance Computing and Communications Program (HPCC) is a multiagency federal initiative under the leadership of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, established by the High Performance Computing Act of 1991. It has been assigned a critical role in supporting the international collaboration essential to science and to health care. Goals of the HPCC are to extend USA leadership in high performance computing and networking technologies; to improve technology transfer for economic competitiveness, education, and national security; and to provide a key part of the foundation for the National Information Infrastructure. The first component of the National Institutes of Health to participate in the HPCC, the National Library of Medicine (NLM), recently issued a solicitation for proposals to address a range of issues, from privacy to 'testbed' networks, 'virtual reality,' and more. These efforts will build upon the NLM's extensive outreach program and other initiatives, including the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS), MEDLARS, and Grateful Med. New Internet search tools are emerging, such as Gopher and 'Knowbots'. Medicine will succeed in developing future intelligent agents to assist in utilizing computer networks. Our ability to serve patients is so often restricted by lack of information and knowledge at the time and place of medical decision-making. The new technologies, properly employed, will also greatly enhance our ability to serve the patient.

  4. MAGNET/INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Gaddi

    Most of the infrastructure at Pt5 has been completed and is now passing their commissioning phase. The power distribution is almost completed. During autumn the powering of UXC55 racks from USC55 cabinets has been achieved. The full control/safety chain has been tested by injecting smoke into the sensitive rack volume in YE+ racks and is being extended to all the other racks as soon as cabling is done. The USC55 cooling station has all the water circuits commissioned and running. The annual maintenance of the surface cooling towers has been done during weeks 45 and 46 and a special plan has been set up, in close coordination with the CERN technical department. All the USC55 racks have passed a campaign of cleaning of the water filters and quality checks. A new partition of the USC55 area, for the function of the AUG (General Emergency Stop) buttons, is being done. This has an impact on the design of the underground UPS (Uninterruptible Power System) that secure the Magnet system and the electronics racks ...

  5. MOEMS industrial infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heeren, Henne; Paschalidou, Lia

    2004-08-01

    Forecasters and analysts predict the market size for microsystems and microtechnologies to be in the order of 68 billion by the year 2005 (NEXUS Market Study 2002). In essence, the market potential is likely to double in size from its 38 billion status in 2002. According to InStat/MDR the market for MOEMS (Micro Optical Electro Mechanical Systems) in optical communication will be over $1.8 billion in 2006 and WTC states that the market for non telecom MOEMS will be even larger. Underpinning this staggering growth will be an infrastructure of design houses, foundries, package/assembly providers and equipment suppliers to cater for the demand in design, prototyping, and (mass-) production. This infrastructure is needed to provide an efficient route to commercialisation. Foundries, which provide the infrastructure to prototype, fabricate and mass-produce the designs emanating from the design houses and other companies. The reason for the customers to rely on foundries can be diverse: ranging from pure economical reasons (investments, cost-price) to technical (availability of required technology). The desire to have a second source of supply can also be a reason for outsourcing. Foundries aim to achieve economies of scale by combining several customer orders into volume production. Volumes are necessary, not only to achieve the required competitive cost prices, but also to attain the necessary technical competence level. Some products that serve very large markets can reach such high production volumes that they are able to sustain dedicated factories. In such cases, captive supply is possible, although outsourcing is still an option, as can be seen in the magnetic head markets, where captive and non-captive suppliers operate alongside each other. The most striking examples are: inkjet heads (>435 million heads per year) and magnetic heads (>1.5 billion heads per year). Also pressure sensor and accelerometer producers can afford their own facilities to produce the

  6. Perlakuan Akuntansi Karbon di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Meliana Taurisianti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to understand the implementation of accounting for carbon, about how it can be measured, recognized, recorded, presentedand disclosed based on Pernyataan Standar Akuntansi (PSAK 19, 23, 32 and 57, also the impact toward the financial ratios. The object of this study is the financial statements of an integrated timber company in Indonesia. This study has analyzed the enables account to be used to record accounting for carbon, also analyzed the impact of implementation of accounting for carbon toward the financial ratios. The results of this study are support the previous study, which intangible asset can be recognized based on PSAK 19, whereas asset and contingent liabilities can be recognized based on PSAK 57. This study also fit out the previous study, which a company can recognize its expense and other income based on PSAK 19, 23 and 32 as a basis for forestry accounting in Indonesia.

  7. KERAGAAN KOPI PASAR DOMESTIK INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufani Sagita

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Coffee has been becoming one of priority commodity of Indonesia since this country also as one of main producer in the world. However, Indonesia got hardly in maintaining world position due to increasing of production and capacity of other country such as in Vietnam and Brazil. Therefore, it is necessary to recognize situation of demand and supply for coffee commodity in domestic scope to understand further the bargaining position level. Various variable such as production, productivity,demand, supply, domestic price, export and import of coffe are considered to be performance variables for domestic market. This research used SAS (Statistical Analysis System tool by using times series data. The result of the analysis shown that the performance of Indonesian coffee trading is affected by the supply, demand and price of Indonesian coffee.

  8. PURWARUPA PORTAL MEMBER DOTA 2 INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Yogi Anggoro; Tri Listyorini; Tutik Khotimah

    2017-01-01

    Game di Indonesia sangatlah berkembang pesat, dari game offline maupun online. Penggemar game bukan hanya dari kalangan anak kecil, namun dari semua kalangan. Apalagi game online, sampai diperlombakan. Salah satunya yaitu game Dota 2, yang merupakan salah satu game online. Pada gamers bahkan tidak hanya di lingkup Indonesia saja, namun dapat tanding dengan negara manapun. Dari game ini muncul komunitas Dota 2, di Indonesia terdapat website yang memberikan informasi tentang Dota 2. Tetapi dari...

  9. Area Handbook Series: Indonesia: A Country Study,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    131 viii Trad’tional and Modern Health Practices .......... 132 Acquireýd Immune Deficiency Syndrome .......... 133 Pharmaceuticals...Often they use Baha - sa Indonesia because they are no longer sure of the social situation at home. Although Bahasa Indonesia is a neutral medium, it...Deficiency Syndrome Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) posed a major public health threat for Indonesia in the early 1990s. Although in an

  10. Perancangan Basecamp Arsenal Indonesia Supporter Di Surabaya

    OpenAIRE

    Poppy F. Nilasari, Ifan Setiawan Andereas Pandu Setiawan

    2016-01-01

    Football is one of the sports that is loved by many people. Many fans of a club founded organizations in support of their beloved club. One of the clubs that have a lot of fans is Arsenal FC. In Indonesia, many fans have set up an organization called Arsenal Indonesia Supporter. Where they support Arsenal by watching alongside Arsenal's games and various other activities. But there's a lack of place to accommodate a wide range of activities of Arsenal Indonesia Supporter.

  11. Analisis Industri Pengolahan Susu di Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    lim Sanny

    2011-01-01

    Milk is the main food for all ages. In addition, many products can be made from milk such as food, beverages, cheese, butter, yogurt, etc.. Opportunities milk processing industry in Indonesia is very good, considering that Indonesia with a population based on census 2010 reached 237.6 million people. If viewed from the supply side, current milk production in Indonesia is still very low, the number of dairy farmers around 118.75 thousand breeders. National dairy cow productivity stagnated, the...

  12. KEJAHATAN KORPORASI DALAM HUKUM PERBANKAN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodosiva Yovita

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Subjects involved in criminal law are people and corporation. In banking crime when a corporate involved the law enforcement is frequently less cared about. Therefore, it will be a need to do further study on how a banking law regulates the corporation crime in Indonesia. Corporation in Banking Law has a broader meaning than in Civil Law A form of corporation crime is raising fund from the community without any license from Central Bank of Indonesia, Bank Indonesia.

  13. An optimal renewable energy mix for Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Leduc, S.; Patrizio, P.; Yowargana, P.; Kraxner, F.

    2016-01-01

    Indonesia has experienced a constant increase of the use of petroleum and coal in the power sector, while the share of renewable sources has remained stable at 6% of the total energy production during the last decade. As its domestic energy demand undeniably continues to grow, Indonesia is committed to increase the production of renewable energy. Mainly to decrease its dependency on fossil fuel-based resources, and to decrease the anthropogenic emissions, the government of Indonesia has estab...

  14. FINANCIAL DEPTH AND FINANCIAL ACCESS IN INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Sigit Setiawan

    2015-01-01

    This study is intended to analyze the current levels of financial depth and financial access in Indonesia and to analyze the factors affecting them. The analysis method used was a combination of descriptive quantitative, benchmarking, and literature reviews. The conclusion is that the financial depth in Indonesia has not shown a satisfactory level since it was the lowest, or the second lowest ranked country among the sampled countries. Meanwhile, the financial access in Indonesia is relativel...

  15. Transmigration and accumulation in Indonesia.

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Sáinz, Juan Pablo

    1980-01-01

    ILO pub-wep pub. Working paper tracing the evolution of migration policy involving state intervention to reduce problems of overpopulation and employment in Indonesia - describes historical internal migration from java and bali to the outer islands during colonialism and after to up 1979, and argues that migration policy based on exploitation of surplus labour supply for reasons of capitalism has ended in failure. References and statistical tables.

  16. 6. The Global Infrastructure Development Sector

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    Studies of global infrastructure development often omit a perspective on the infrastructure development industry itself. Infrastructure development is the industry that turns infrastructure ideas into physical reality — contractors, engineering firms, hardware suppliers, and so on. Consequently, market penetration, cost functions, scale and scope economies, and other competitive variables that characterize infrastructure development have a direct effect on its economics. Vibrant competition a...

  17. Improved performances of 36 m small-angle neutron scattering spectrometer BATAN in Serpong Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putra, Edy Giri Rachman; Bharoto; Santoso, Eddy; Ikram, Abarrul

    2009-01-01

    SMARTer, a 36 m small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) spectrometer owned by the National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN) was installed at the Neutron Scattering Laboratory (NSL) in Serpong, Indonesia. Lots of works on replacing, upgrading and improving the control system, experimental methods, data collection and reduction in the last two years have been carried out to optimize the performance of SMARTer. Some standard samples such as silver behenate, monodisperse polystyrene nanoparticle, porous silica and block copolymer PS-PEP film were measured for the inter-laboratory comparison.

  18. Present status and prospects of radioisotopes and radiation utilization in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baiquni, A.

    1982-01-01

    The present status and prospects of RI and radiation utilization in Indonesia, which developed under the Government's assistance and supervision since the opening of the research reactor in 1965, was reviewed. Utilization of short half-life RI in various fields was described. Utilization in medicine, sterilization of medical supplies, the industrial world and hydrology was detailed. Annual changes in these fields were shown and tables were presented. The status of various types of radiation and RI utilization in Indonesia, which included nuclear analytical techniques in industry and various laboratories in agriculture, industry and biology, was reported. Finally, the plan of construction of a third research reactor was referred to. (Chiba, N.)

  19. Pembaruan Hukum Perwakafan di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Siregar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article concentrates on Islamic law product relating to charitable religious endowment (waqf in Indonesia. Based on the traditional perspective of fiqh originated from the earlier Islamic jurists of orthodox view and in turn it had long been legislised as part of Indonesia positive law system, the law of waqfhad regulated that the wealth to be waqf shall be limited to only unmoving properties.  This regulation had led the management of waqf to be unproductive to raise the social welfare.By the virtue of the relatively wider viwpoint of the contemporar y Islamic law thinkers,the Islamic law refor m takes place in Indonesia particularly at the level of postive law ,namely Law Number 41/2004 Relating to Waqf. This law stipulates the thing to be waqf could be either unmoving or moving properties, like cash, gold, certificate of obligation, inteletual wealth, and so forth. This law also lays down the regulation relating to the penalty against those who deviate in managing a waqf. However, as a critque and recommendation the writer propose that the society could be involved in preser ving the purpose of a waqf which is the right of Allah. And it could be conducted by stipulating the class action as a way of the settlements of dispute occuring to a waqf property.

  20. Rethinking Language Education in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maslihatul Umami Umami

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Language education in Indonesia may be discussed by over viewing the nature of the three language categories in the country: Indonesian language, indigenous languages, and foreign languages. From the picture of how the three groups of languages work and function, the problem raised in this paper is based on two fundamental assumptions. Language education in this multilingual and multicultural country is not done on the context of literacy, on the one hand, and it is not yet considered important in comparison with that of the subjects related to basic science and technology, on the other. After reviewing a number of models of bilingual education and comparing them with what has been done in Indonesia, a preferred model will be offered. Finally, it will also be suggested that language education in Indonesia should be associated with literacy development in a wider sense. Furthermore, meanwhile language education should be given an adequate room; language teaching should be based on the functional use of the existing languages in the country and should be done in tandem with the teaching of content since content is delivered through the medium of language.

  1. Multinationals and Unionism in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riani Rachmawati

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a critical analysis of the factors shaping the interaction between multinationals and trade unions in Indonesia, focusing on the recent period of democratization following the downfall of the Suharto regime. It has been suggested that union growth risks undermining Indonesia’s competitive advantages (cheap labour and could encourage the exit of multinationals to cheaper competitors. In order to test this proposition, two case studies were conducted: one in the automotive industry and the other in the banking industry. The paper first provides an overview of multinational activity and FDI in Indonesia, and their interaction with a nascent union movement. This is followed by presenting the findings of interviews conducted at the multinational enterprises with managers and union officials; to provide empirical insights into the bargaining process. The final part of the paper provides a preliminary assessment of the impact of union behaviour on MNC profitability and competitiveness in Indonesia. In contrast to traditional views of unions as impeding MNC profitability and “encouraging” exit, the paper finds that unions and MNCs can engage in constructive partnerships, but that pressures and contradictions in the relationship remain.

  2. Multinationals and Unionism in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riani Rachmawati

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a critical analysis of the factors shaping the interaction between multinationals and trade unions in Indonesia, focusing on the recent period of democratization following the downfall of the Suharto regime. It has been suggested that union growth risks undermining Indonesia’s competitive advantages (cheap labour and could encourage the exit of multinationals to cheaper competitors. In order to test this proposition, two case studies were conducted: one in the automotive industry and the other in the banking industry.The paper first provides an overview of multinational activity and FDI in Indonesia, and their interaction with a nascent union movement. This is followed by presenting the findings of interviews conducted at the multinational enterprises with managers and union officials; to provide empirical insights into the bargaining process. The final part of the paper provides a preliminary assessment of the impact of union behaviour on MNC profitability and competitiveness in Indonesia. In contrast to traditional views of unions as impeding MNC profitability and “encouraging” exit, the paper finds that unions and MNCs can engage in constructive partnerships, but that pressures and contradictions in the relationship remain.

  3. Development and application of isotopes and radiation technology in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djaloeis, A.

    1997-01-01

    The National Atomic Energy Agency (BATAN) of the Republic of Indonesia is the highest agency in the country, charged amongst others with the development and application of Isotopes and Radiation Technology as a tool in the search for the optimal solution of various national development problems, such as those encountered in the fields of Agriculture, Livestock, health/medicine, Industry, Environment and Energy. The acquisition and development of the scientific and technical expertise, R and D facilities/instruments and infrastructure have been achieved primarily through bilateral and multilateral collaborative activities with domestic, foreign and international institutions. On the basis of the achieved R and D results, the acquired techniques have been progressively transferred to the end-users and applied in solving scientific-technical problems in the aforementioned fields. This paper gives a brief overview of the present status and future trend of activities in the development and applications of isotopes and radiation technology in Agriculture, Livestock and Industry in Indonesia. In the field of Agriculture the research activities are focussed on obtaining and disseminating new crop varieties with desired specific characteristics and on increasing soil fertilizer efficiency. These research results and those on livestock feed supplementation formula and disease prevention have been applied in helping farmers in various parts of Indonesia to increase their productivity. In industry, irradiation technology for food preservation and sterilization has been successfully transferred to the commercial companies. The same is also true for Non-Destructive Examination, Radioactive Tracer and Radiation Based Process Monitoring Techniques. Natural and radioactive isotopes have been widely used also in hydrology, sedimentology and geothermal studies. Highlights of the results are presented and discussed

  4. Development and application of isotopes and radiation technology in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djaloeis, A. [DDG, Batan, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    1997-10-01

    The National Atomic Energy Agency (BATAN) of the Republic of Indonesia is the highest agency in the country, charged amongst others with the development and application of Isotopes and Radiation Technology as a tool in the search for the optimal solution of various national development problems, such as those encountered in the fields of Agriculture, Livestock, health/medicine, Industry, Environment and Energy. The acquisition and development of the scientific and technical expertise, R and D facilities/instruments and infrastructure have been achieved primarily through bilateral and multilateral collaborative activities with domestic, foreign and international institutions. On the basis of the achieved R and D results, the acquired techniques have been progressively transferred to the end-users and applied in solving scientific-technical problems in the aforementioned fields. This paper gives a brief overview of the present status and future trend of activities in the development and applications of isotopes and radiation technology in Agriculture, Livestock and Industry in Indonesia. In the field of Agriculture the research activities are focussed on obtaining and disseminating new crop varieties with desired specific characteristics and on increasing soil fertilizer efficiency. These research results and those on livestock feed supplementation formula and disease prevention have been applied in helping farmers in various parts of Indonesia to increase their productivity. In industry, irradiation technology for food preservation and sterilization has been successfully transferred to the commercial companies. The same is also true for Non-Destructive Examination, Radioactive Tracer and Radiation Based Process Monitoring Techniques. Natural and radioactive isotopes have been widely used also in hydrology, sedimentology and geothermal studies. Highlights of the results are presented and discussed

  5. PERSPEKTIF GLOBAL PENYELESAIAN SENGKETA INVESTASI DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Syaifuddin

    2011-06-01

    Pembentukan UUPM No. 25/2007 adalah konsekwensi yuridis dari ratifikasi Perjanjian WTO. TRIMs, yang bertujuan menciptakan hukum investasi, termasuk hukum penyelesaian sengketa investasi, yang sesuai dengan kehendak investor asing dalam perspektif global, yaitu: pertama, mengandung karakter hukum yang berkepastian, berkeadilan, dan berefisiensi; dan kedua, berlandaskan spirit hukum yang mengarahkan pemerintah dan penanaman modal asing menyelesaikan sengketa investasi melalui arbitrase internasional daripada pengadilan bahkan arbitrase nasional di Indonesia. Krisis lembaga peradilan di Indonesia harus diselesaikan dengan cara membangun sistem hukum peradilan dengan mengacu pada Pancasila sebagai cita hukum investasi Indonesia. Hal tersebut adalah  suatu syarat bagi terbentuknya aturan hukum penyelesaian sengketa investasi yang serasi dalam perspektif global dan lokal (Indonesia.

  6. The Third Wave of Democratization in Indonesia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delin, Azizan

    2000-01-01

    .... The revolutionary struggle shaped general Indonesian acceptance of the authoritarian rule. However, by 1997 Indonesia's authoritarian rule was faced with a serious problem of legitimacy and governability...

  7. Social capital and healthy ageing in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junran Cao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large international literature has found a positive association between social capital and measures of physical and mental health. However, there is a paucity of research on the links between social capital and healthy ageing in a developing country environment, where universal social security coverage is absent and health infrastructure is poor. Method In this paper, we develop and empirically test a model of the linkages between social capital and the health outcomes for older adults in Indonesia, using data from the Indonesian Family Life Survey-East (IFLS-East, conducted in 2012. Using multivariate regression analysis, we examine whether social capital plays a role in mitigating poor health among older individuals aged 50 years and above in Indonesia’s most vulnerable provinces. We test the robustness of these social capital variables across different health measures (self-assessed health, Activities of Daily Living (ADL, measures of chronic illness and mental health measures, as well as across different demographic groups, after controlling for an array of socio-economic, demographic and geographic characteristics. Results Our findings show that access to better social capital (using measures of neighbourhood trust and community participation is associated with a higher degree of physical mobility, independence, and mental well-being among older individuals but has no influence on chronic illnesses. These results are consistent when we estimate samples disaggregated by gender, rural/urban residence, and by age categories. Conclusion From a policy perspective these results point to the importance of social capital measures in moderating the influence of poor health, particularly in the Activities of Daily Living.

  8. Environmental Effects Of Ecotourism In Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Butarbutar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The ecotourism is global issues who most talked lately in Indonesia, it is one of the activities special tourist interest which low impacts on natural tourism.The presence of ecotourism in the era of sustainable and tourism development mission should be minimum negative impacts, both on the environment resources and on socio-cultural local values.  Ecotourism activities were more oriented on the utilization of natural resources, the natural ecosystems and have not been polluted yet.  However, when all of tourism development can not be separated from the negative impacts, such as ecosystem distress in ecotourism object when visited by large number of tourists, there are many conflicts of interest between the ecotourism management with local communities, especially regarding the benefits sharing and its accessibilities.  The purpose of this paper is to identify the environmental impacts arising as a result of ecotourism activities and to find out alternative efforts in mitigating the environmental impact of ecotourism activities. Carrying capacity of ecotourism is not just limited to the number of visits, but also covers other aspects, such as: (1 ecological capacity that is ability of natural environment in providing the needs of tourists, (2 physical capacity, that is ability of facilities and infrastructure in providing the needs of tourists,  (3 social capacity, that is ability to absorb tourism activities without the negative impacts on the local communities, (4 the economic capacity, that is ability to absorb destination commercial efforts and accommodateany interests of the local economy. Keywords: Ecotourism, environmental impacts, carrying capacity.

  9. Improving food security empowerment in Indonesia- Timor Leste border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, G. D. P.; Yustikaningrum, R. V.

    2018-03-01

    Post Referendum 1999, Indonesia and Timor Leste have a strategic challenge to provide food consistently around the border. This research intended to discover an appropriate strategy to tackle fragility of food security in the land border of Indonesia-Timor Leste, to improve collaborative actions between parties, as well as, opportunity to actualize food cross-border trading between local farmers and factories. For the result, there are two approaches will be applied. First, the empowerment term refers to the strategy of empowerment in strengthening the capability and capacity of human capital as one of the determinant factors of the resilience and self-sufficiency achievement. Second, the gender approach looks at the women and men build confidence, resilience, and independence which one of them through an educational intervention that enable the local people to manage food chain. Atambua is a region count as relatively as high poverty, poor human capital, weak quality and competitiveness of agriculture products, livestock and fishery, SMEs, and infrastructure. Thus, field study research is applied to find the actual and strategic effort aim to lead the achievement of food security and to engage Atambua over food trade to Timor Leste.

  10. Measuring Carbon Footprint of Flexible Pavement Construction Project in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatmoko, Jati Utomo Dwi; Hidayat, Arif; Setiawati, Apsari; Prasetyo, Stefanus Catur Adi

    2018-02-01

    Road infrastructure in Indonesia is mainly dominated by flexible pavement type. Its construction process, however, has raised concerns in terms of its environment impacts. This study aims to track and measure the carbon footprint of flexible pavement. The objectives are to map the construction process in relation to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, to quantify them in terms of carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2e) as generated by the process of production and transportation of raw materials, and the operation of plant off-site and on-site project. Data collection was done by having site observations and interviews with project stakeholders. The results show a total emissions of 70.888 tonnes CO2e, consisting of 34.248 tonnes CO2e (48.31%) off-site activities and 36.640 tonnes CO2e (51.687%) on-site activities. The two highest CO2e emissions were generated by the use of plant for asphalt concrete laying activities accounted 34.827 tonnes CO2e (49.130%), and material transportation accounted 24.921 (35.155%). These findings provide a new perspective of the carbon footprint in flexible pavement and suggest the urgent need for the use of more efficient and environmentally friendly plant in construction process as it shows the most significant contribution on the CO2e. This study provides valuable understanding on the environmental impact of typical flexible pavement projects in Indonesia, and further can be used for developing green road framework.

  11. Carbon emissions of infrastructure development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Daniel B; Liu, Gang; Løvik, Amund N; Modaresi, Roja; Pauliuk, Stefan; Steinhoff, Franciska S; Brattebø, Helge

    2013-10-15

    Identifying strategies for reconciling human development and climate change mitigation requires an adequate understanding of how infrastructures contribute to well-being and greenhouse gas emissions. While direct emissions from infrastructure use are well-known, information about indirect emissions from their construction is highly fragmented. Here, we estimated the carbon footprint of the existing global infrastructure stock in 2008, assuming current technologies, to be 122 (-20/+15) Gt CO2. The average per-capita carbon footprint of infrastructures in industrialized countries (53 (± 6) t CO2) was approximately 5 times larger that that of developing countries (10 (± 1) t CO2). A globalization of Western infrastructure stocks using current technologies would cause approximately 350 Gt CO2 from materials production, which corresponds to about 35-60% of the remaining carbon budget available until 2050 if the average temperature increase is to be limited to 2 °C, and could thus compromise the 2 °C target. A promising but poorly explored mitigation option is to build new settlements using less emissions-intensive materials, for example by urban design; however, this strategy is constrained by a lack of bottom-up data on material stocks in infrastructures. Infrastructure development must be considered in post-Kyoto climate change agreements if developing countries are to participate on a fair basis.

  12. Flowscapes : Infrastructure as landscape, landscape as infrastructure. Graduation Lab Landscape Architecture 2012/2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, S.; Jauslin, D.; De Vries, C.

    2012-01-01

    Flowscapes explores infrastructure as a type of landscape and landscape as a type of infrastructure, and is focused on landscape architectonic design of transportation-, green- and water infrastructures. These landscape infrastructures are considered armatures for urban and rural development. With

  13. Western Nuclear Science Alliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reese, Steve; Miller, George; Frantz, Stephen; Beller, Denis; Morse, Ed; Krahenbuhl, Melinda; Flocchini, Bob; Elliston, Jim

    2010-01-01

    The Western Nuclear Science Alliance (WNSA) was formed at Oregon State University (OSU) under the DOE Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) program in 2002. The primary objective of the INIE program is to strengthen nuclear science and engineering programs at the member institutions and to address the long term goal of the University Reactor Infrastructure and Education Assistance Program. WNSA has been very effective in meeting these goals. The infrastructure at several of the WNSA university nuclear reactors has been upgraded significantly, as have classroom and laboratory facilities for Nuclear Engineering, Health Physics, and Radiochemistry students and faculty. Major nuclear-related education programs have been inaugurated, including considerable assistance by WNSA universities to other university nuclear programs. Research has also been enhanced under WNSA, as has outreach to pre-college and college students and faculty. The INIE program under WNSA has been an exceptional boost to the nuclear programs at the eight funded WNSA universities. In subsequent years under INIE these programs have expanded even further in terms of new research facilities, research reactor renovations, expanded educational opportunities, and extended cooperation and collaboration between universities, national laboratories, and nuclear utilities.

  14. Infrastructure Task Force Sustainable Infrastructure Goals and Concepts Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document outlines the concepts of appropriate infrastructure and sustainable management entities to guide the coordinated federal efforts to achieve greater sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation.

  15. INDONESIA: FROM PLURALISM TO MULTICULTURALISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasino Wasino

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia was not a new entity when started to become national country. It was called a continuation of the history of the Dutch East Indies. The people lived under western colonial was a pluralistic society, people separated by social class, ethnicity, religion, race and inter-group. Between the authorities and the people separated along racial lines. In addition there was the separation of ethnic groups associated with the economic, educational and social relations. After Indonesian independence the pluralistic society situation continues. The end of the New Order has opened a Pandora's Box of poor relations between ethnic and inter-religious. As a result many conflicts occurred based on religious and ethnic differences. The conflict heated up as the influx of political interests. The process of political reform gave birth to a new awareness of the relationship between ethnicity and religion. The starting point of this change was when the President Abdurrahman Wahid unlocked barriers on multicultural relationship that respects the differences of cultural orientation among the existing ethnic. From that moment the concept of multiculturalism experienced socialization process within Indonesian society. Key words: pluralism, multiculturalism, colonial, new order, socialization Ketika Indonesia lahir sebagai negara nasional, Indonesia bukanlah  entitas yang baru. Ia merupakan kelanjutan  sejarah dari masyarakat yang disebut Hindia Belanda. Masyarakat di bawah penjajah Barat ini merupakan masyarakat majemuk, masyarakat yang terpisah-pisah berdasarkan kelas sosial, suku, agama, ras, dan antar golongan. Antara penguasa dan rakyat terpisah secara garis rasial. Selain itu ada pe-misahan suku bangsa terkait dengan ekonomi, pendidikan, dan hubungan-hubungan sosial. Setelah Indonesia merdeka situasi masyarakat majemuk terus berlangsung. Berakhirnya Orde Baru telah membuka kotak pandora  buruknya hubungan antar etnik dan antar agama. Akibatnya

  16. Austria announces new money for research infrastructure and social sciences

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Austria's Minister for Science and Research, Johannes Hahn, has announced funding for research infrastructures and the social sciences, amounting to EUR 6.9 million in total. The largest chunk of the money will go to a new data processing centre for the analysis of data from the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN). The idea is that the new centre will provide Austria with access to the key technology for solving highly complex scientific and technological problems, while strengthening Austria's domestic research infrastructure in the field of 'advanced communication networks'.

  17. Developing an infrastructure index : phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Over the past decade the American Society of Civil Engineers has used the Infrastructure Report : Card to raise awareness of infrastructure issues. Aging and deteriorating infrastructure has : recently been highlighted in the popular media. However, ...

  18. Physical infrastructure and economic development in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Jan, Sajjad Ahmad; Chani, Muhammad Irfan; Pervaiz, Zahid; Chaudhary, Amatul R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the relationship between physical infrastructure and economic development of Pakistan. A composite index of physical infrastructure has been constructed through Principal Component Analysis. This has been done by taking into account three different dimensions of infrastructure i.e. transportation infrastructure, energy infrastructure, and telecommunication infrastructure. Johansen Co-integration Technique has been applied to confirm the existence of co-integrati...

  19. Kajian Tvc Wonderful Indonesia sebagai Cermin Citra Indonesia di Mata Dunia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Oscario

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is one of the most important sectors supporting the economy of Indonesia. One way to develop the Indonesian tourism is strengthening the image of Indonesia in the world. To strengthen the image, Indonesia has replaced the old brand, “Visit Indonesia”, and launched a new brand, “Wonderful Indonesia”. Besides the logo, in order to campaign “Wonderful Indonesia,” some television commercials have been launched. An advertising, which creates a powerful image, not only has a great power to influence the viewers but can also be a double-edged sword. Advertising can become a mirror of reality, but it can also become a distorted mirror of reality. A similar case happens with Wonderful Indonesia television commercial, which was released early in 2012 by the Ministry of Tourism and Creative Economy. The television commercial is considered to have distorted the image of Indonesia in the world by displaying only the culture, society, and nature of Java and Bali. Meanwhile, the other Wonderful Indonesia television commercial, “Feeling is Believing,” which was launched by Indonesia Tourism Board in 2012 considered to have become quite successful framing the beauty, and diversity of the cultures, communities, regions, and natures of Indonesia. Learning from the mistakes, and considering the importance of an image, the future Wonderful Indonesia television commercial should be dealt more carefully. The image that is proper to represent Indonesia, the visual signifier should reflect the intended signified precisely.  

  20. Assisted reproduction in Indonesia: policy reform in an Islamic culture and developing nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Taylor E

    2015-11-01

    This article considers how religious and economic factors shape assisted reproductive technology (ART) policy in Indonesia, the world's most populous Muslim country. Infertility clinic policies are grounded on both the views of the country's powerful Islamic coalition and those of the worldwide Islamic community. Indonesian government officials, physicians, and Islamic scholars have expressed concern over who can use ART and which procedures can be performed. Indonesia has also faced economic challenges related to ART, including inadequate health insurance coverage, inequitable access to ART, and maintenance of expensive ART infrastructure. The prohibitive price of infertility treatment and regional differences in the provision of health care prohibit most Indonesians from obtaining ART. In the absence of a shift in religious mores and a rapid reduction in poverty and inequality, Indonesia will need to adopt creative means to make ART both more available and less necessary as a solution to infertility. This paper suggests policy reforms to promote more affordable treatment methods and support preventative health programmes to reduce infertility rates. This country-specific analysis of the laws and customs surrounding ART in Indonesia reveals that strategies to reduce infertility must be tailored to a country's unique religious and economic climate. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. DETERMINAN FDI INDUSTRI HULU MIGAS DI INDONESIA SERTA DAMPAKNYA PERIODE TAHUN 2003–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudi Iskandar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The inclusion of Indonesia as a net importer of oil, gas and high energy expenditure compared with oil and gas revenues is because of the lack of investment in upstream oil and gas in Indonesia. Indonesian oil and gas potential is relatively large, especially within eastern Indonesia. Taking into the account of the financial condition, risk and technological capabilities, the state still needs FDI to increase the upstream oil and gas operations in Indonesia. This study examined the FDI determinants by using panel data regression from 2003 until 2013 with a cross section of 82 mining areas. In addition, this study also analyzed the impact of FDI on energy security (proxy production and state revenues, then compared them with domestic direct investment (DDI represented by the state. Based on the data regression panel results, the variables which have positive influences on FDI were infrastructure, technology, education, corruption free index, raw oil price, oil and gas reservation, and BPMIGAS dispersion. Meanwhile, variables which hold negative influences were the market size, inflation, and economical openness. FDI holds positive impact on the state production and revenue level, nevertheless, from the production side, DDI gave bigger impact compared to FDI.Keywords: determinants, impact, FDI upstream oil and gas industry, and panel data

  2. Incorporating Green Infrastructure into TMDLs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fact sheet provides examples of how some states describe green infrastructure and low impact development activities in their TMDL implementation sections to address stormwater-source impaired waters.

  3. Office of Aviation Safety Infrastructure -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Office of Aviation Safety Infrastructure (AVS INF) provides authentication and access control to AVS network resources for users. This is done via a distributed...

  4. Green Infrastructure for Arid Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    how green infrastructure practices and the many associated benefits can be effective not only in wetter climates, but also for those communities in arid and semi-arid regions around the nation that have different precipitation patterns

  5. Landscape infrastructure : urbanism beyond engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bélanger, P.

    2013-01-01

    As ecology becomes the new engineering, the project of Landscape Infrastructure - a contemporary, synthetic alignment of the disciplines of landscape architecture, civil engineering and urban planning - is proposed here. Predominant challenges facing urban regions today are addressed, including

  6. Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center (EIOC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center (EIOC) at PNNL brings together industry-leading software, real-time grid data, and advanced computation into a fully...

  7. Enterprise integration. Upgrading the infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupito, M C

    1998-02-01

    As organizations increase the number of applications and users, they increase demands on their networks. There is no one one-size-fits-all infrastructure, no minimum requirements...except maybe speed.

  8. Embedded Processor Oriented Compiler Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DJUKIC, M.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, research of special compiler techniques and algorithms for embedded processors broaden the knowledge of how to achieve better compiler performance in irregular processor architectures. However, industrial strength compilers, besides ability to generate efficient code, must also be robust, understandable, maintainable, and extensible. This raises the need for compiler infrastructure that provides means for convenient implementation of embedded processor oriented compiler techniques. Cirrus Logic Coyote 32 DSP is an example that shows how traditional compiler infrastructure is not able to cope with the problem. That is why the new compiler infrastructure was developed for this processor, based on research. in the field of embedded system software tools and experience in development of industrial strength compilers. The new infrastructure is described in this paper. Compiler generated code quality is compared with code generated by the previous compiler for the same processor architecture.

  9. GEO-SPATIAL MODELING OF TRAVEL TIME TO MEDICAL FACILITIES IN MUNA BARAT DISTRICT, SOUTHEAST SULAWESI PROVINCE, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Sula

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health services are strongly influenced by regional topography. Road infrastructure is a key in access to health services. The geographic information system becomes a tool in modeling access to health services. Objective: To analyze geospatial data of the travel time to medical facilities in Muna Barat district, Southeast Sulawesi Province, Indonesia. Methods: This research used geospatial analysis with classification of raster data then overlaid with raster data such as Digital Elevation Modeling (DEM, Road of Vector data, and the point of Public Health Center (Puskesmas. Results: The result of geospatial analysis showed that the travel time to Puskesmas in Napano Kusambi and Kusambi sub districts is between 90-120 minutes, and travel time to the hospital in Kusambi sub district is required more than 2 hours. Conclusion: The output of this geospatial analysis can be an input for local government in planning infrastructure development in Muna Barat District, Indonesia.

  10. Reviewing the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Economic Coop- eration and Development (OECD) Europe—from 28 to 12 percent in 2030. This does not necessarily mean that OECD Europe CO2 emissions ...exists to- day. Unaligned nations such as Indonesia and Mexico 53 still argue that weapons states must go much further in reducing their nuclear...es- sential if the United States and other states are serious about reducing carbon emissions in the quickest, least costly manner. Such states

  11. Critical Infrastructures: Background, Policy, and Implementation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moteff, John D

    2002-01-01

    .... electricity, the power plants that generate it, and the electric grid upon which it is distributed). Computers and communications, themselves critical infrastructures, are increasingly tying these infrastructures together...

  12. Critical Infrastructures: Background, Policy, and Implementation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moteff, John D

    2003-01-01

    .... electricity, the power plants that generate it, and the electric grid upon which it is distributed). Computers and communications, themselves critical infrastructures, are increasingly tying these infrastructures together...

  13. Prospects for nuclear power in the Pacific Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiss, M.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear power for countries in the Pacific Basin were discussed. The countries involved were Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China, Indonesia and Mexico. Present nuclear power and prospects for nuclear power over the next four years were outlined, as well as the economics involved. (U.K.)

  14. Art Medium and Art Infrastructure Development in Contemporary Indonesian Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rikrik Kusmara

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This research review Indonesian contemporary artists that used the various media in the presentation in his works over the years since 2000 until now. Survey at Pameran Besar Indonesia "Manifesto" in May 2008, were around 670 Indonesian living artists, 350 are consistently professional artists, 41 artists who utilize a variety of media in each works and 6 of them are artists who used a various of media on their solo exhibition including combining conventional media with new media and installation approaches. 6 artists are analyzed on the structure of the media presentation configuration their used, and generally they used more than 3 types of media in their solo exhibition, first, painting/drawing, second, sculpture/object/installation, and third video/photography. In the study of each exhibition process, generally utilizing the curatorial and sponsored by promotor (gallery. This research shows a rapid development of economic infrastructure in Indonesian the art in 2000-an era with the emergence of many auction hall, a new generation of collectors and galleries, and the Asian art market and global orientation, it became one of the holding in contemporary art of Indonesia, has been shifting art situation from cultural appreciation in the era of 90-to an era to cultural production.

  15. Country report INDONESIA - MFS II EVALUATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, D.C.; Kusters, C.S.L.; Pradhan, M.; Vigh, M.; Groot Bruinderink, M.; Rossum, van I.; Böhnke, L.; Wallaart, K.; Malamas, S.; Berkhout, E.; Ni Wayan Suriasatini,; Sikoki, B.; Ginting, M.B.; Mulia, M.; Ningsih, K.; Pujiastuti, S.; Dwi Andari, B.; Suprobo, N.; Priyahita, W.; Sihombing, R.R.; Rokhmatulloh, S.W.; Rosita, I.; Wieriks, M.; Smidt, H.; Nugroho, K.; Prasetyo, K.; Larastiti, C.; Amir, S.; Sutikno,

    2015-01-01

    This report on Indonesia is one of a series of evaluation reports, consisting of ten reports in total, reflecting the results of the jointly-organised MFS II evaluation: - eight country reports (India, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Uganda, Indonesia, DR Congo, Liberia, Pakistan); - a synthesis report

  16. JENIS PINJAL DAN INANG DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil Ustiawan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pinjal (ordo Siphonaptera serangga sangatpenting dalam bidang kesehatan karenakemampuannya menularkan berbagai jenispenyakit. Beberapa hasil penelitian tentang pinjalini menggambarkan keaneragaman pinjal diIndonesia dan tidak menutup kemungkinan spesiesyang akan ditemukan bertambah karena masihluasnya daerah dan sedikitnya tenaga yangmendalami bidang ini. Beberapa spesies pinjal daninang yang terdapat di Indonesia

  17. The Third Wave of Democratization in Indonesia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delin, Azizan

    2000-01-01

    .... For half a century, authoritarianism was dominant in Indonesia, but like all dictatorships, Indonesia subsequently had to return to democracy. Pressures from within the authoritarian government and Indonesian society dictated the democratization process. However, the long term prospects for unstable democracy remain unclear.

  18. Report on Fulbright Summer Seminar on Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Charles Elroy

    This resource packet was compiled by a participant in the Fulbright Summer Seminar on Indonesia. The materials provide information for teaching about the diaspora of Hinduism and Islamic beliefs throughout the southeast Asia archipelagoes and their influence on art and culture. The handouts supplement information on Indonesia as part of an Asian…

  19. Strategic plan for infrastructure optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donley, C.D.

    1998-05-27

    This document represents Fluor Daniel Hanford`s and DynCorp`s Tri-Cities Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 1998--2002, the road map that will guide them into the next century and their sixth year of providing safe and cost effective infrastructure services and support to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Hanford Site. The Plan responds directly to the issues raised in the FDH/DOE Critical Self Assessment specifically: (1) a strategy in place to give DOE the management (systems) and physical infrastructure for the future; (2) dealing with the barriers that exist to making change; and (3) a plan to right-size the infrastructure and services, and reduce the cost of providing services. The Plan incorporates initiatives from several studies conducted in Fiscal Year 1997 to include: the Systems Functional Analysis, 200 Area Water Commercial Practices Plan, $ million Originated Cost Budget Achievement Plan, the 1OO Area Vacate Plan, the Railroad Shutdown Plan, as well as recommendations from the recently completed Review of Hanford Electrical Utility. These and other initiatives identified over the next five years will result in significant improvements in efficiency, allowing a greater portion of the infrastructure budget to be applied to Site cleanup. The Plan outlines a planning and management process that defines infrastructure services and structure by linking site technical base line data and customer requirements to work scope and resources. The Plan also provides a vision of where Site infrastructure is going and specific initiatives to get there.

  20. DEBRIS FLOW DISASTER MITIGATION THROUGH COMMUNITY-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENT MANAGEMENT (BEST PRACTICE IN MT. MERAPI AREA, INDONESIA)

    OpenAIRE

    Otani, Kazuhiko; Suharyanto, Suharyanto

    2015-01-01

    Mt. Merapi is one of many active volcanoes in Indonesia which erupts frequently. The small eruption occurred nearly every year, whereas the big ones occurred at approximately once every five years. The eruption often produces impacts at both positive and negative view points, such as production of sediment as construction material and damage on infrastructures due to debris flow occurrences respectively. The eruption produces two types of disasters, i.e. primary disaster (such as ash fall, py...

  1. Shia: Its History and Development in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh Hasyim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Shiah becomes a new problem in Indonesia after hundreds years of living together. Currently, treatment to Shiah tends to violate the principles of religious freedom. Therefore, it is necessary to know, how the history of the emergence of Shiah and its development in Indonesia? This is a library research using a critical analysis approach. This study found that the Syiah is a religious ideology which refers to the views of Saidina Ali (the fourth khalifat and his descendants. This teaching emerged since the beginning of the khulafaurasidin. Shiah has developed dozens of religiousstreams due to disagreement and differences on the idea of Imamah. There are four stages of Shiah development in Indonesia, namely: Firstly, along with the arrival of Islam in Indonesia; Secondly, after the Islamic revolution in Iran; Thirdly, through Indonesian Muslim Intellectuals who studied in Iran, and Finally,  during the open era there was an establishment of as association Jamaah Ahlul Bai’t Indonesia.

  2. International Nuclear Safeguards at Sandia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternat, Matthew R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    As global nuclear energy expands, assuring peaceful uses of nuclear technology becomes increasingly important. In addition to complying with international nuclear safeguards, a responsible nuclear energy program promotes a corresponding safeguards culture. Establishment of transparent peaceful uses of nuclear technologies starts with cooperative international engagements and safeguards systems. Developing states investing in nuclear energy must assure the international community of their longterm commitment to safeguards, safety, and security (3S) of nuclear materials and technologies. Cultivating a safeguards culture starts in the initial phases of infrastructure planning and must be integrated into the process of developing a responsible nuclear energy program. Sandia National Laboratories supports the implementation of safeguards culture through a variety of activities, including infrastructure development.

  3. Perkembangan Korupsi Dalam Novel Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shoim Anwar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Tulisan ini bertujuan mendeskripsikan perkembangan korupsi yang terepresentasikan dalam novel Indonesia. Teori yang digunakan adalah teori sosiologi, kajian budaya, jaringan, dan pasca­kolonial. Sumber datanya adalah novel Korupsi (1954 karya Pramoedya Ananta Toer, Senja di Jakarta (1970 karya Mochtar Lubis, Ladang Perminus (1990 karya Ramadhan K.H., Orang-­Orang Proyek (2002 karya Ahmad Tohari, dan Memburu Koruptor (2009 karya Urip Sutomo. Hasil penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa sesuai dengan latar waktu dalam novel, waktu penyelesaian, serta waktu diterbitkan, perkembangan korupsi dalam novel Indonesia dapat dirumuskan dengan periode tahun: 1945-1954, 1954-1957, 1966-1976/1982, 1991-1992/2001, 1998-2009. Korupsi dalam teks novel Indonesia berkembang semakin luas baik dari segi pelaku, penyebab, modus, maupun sifatnya. Abstract: This paper is aimed at describing the development of corruption in Indonesian novels. This paper uses theories of sociology, cultural studies, network, and postcolonial. The sources of data are Korupsi (1954 by Pramoedya Ananta Toer, Senja di Jakarta (1970 by Mochtar Lubis, Ladang Perminus (1990 by Ramadhan K.H., Orang­Orang Proyek (2002 by Ahmad Tohari, and Memburu Koruptor (2009 by Urip Sutomo. The result of the research shows that in accordance with the background of the time in the novels, completion time, and publication time, the development of corruption in Indonesian novels can be formulated by the way of periods of years: 1945-1954, 1954-1957, 1966-1976/1982, 1991-1992/2001, 1998-2009. Corruption in the texts of Indonesian novels has developed widely in terms of actors, causes, modes, and nature. Key Words: corruption, period, development, Indonesian novels

  4. Ecologically Enhancing Coastal Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Arthur, Mairi; Naylor, Larissa; Hansom, Jim; Burrows, Mike; Boyd, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Hard engineering structures continue to proliferate in the coastal zone globally in response to increasing pressures associated with rising sea levels, coastal flooding and erosion. These structures are typically plain-cast by design and function as poor ecological surrogates for natural rocky shores which are highly topographically complex and host a range of available microhabitats for intertidal species. Ecological enhancement mitigates some of these negative impacts by integrating components of nature into the construction and design of these structures to improve their sustainability, resilience and multifunctionality. In the largest UK ecological enhancement trial to date, 184 tiles (15x15cm) of up to nine potential designs were deployed on vertical concrete coastal infrastructure in 2016 at three sites across the UK (Saltcoats, Blackness and Isle of Wight). The surface texture and complexity of the tiles were varied to test the effect of settlement surface texture at the mm-cm scale of enhancement on the success of colonisation and biodiversity in the mid-upper intertidal zone in order to answer the following experimental hypotheses: • Tiles with mm-scale geomorphic complexity will have greater barnacle abundances • Tiles with cm-scale geomorphic complexity will have greater species richness than mm-scale tiles. A range of methods were used in creating the tile designs including terrestrial laser scanning of creviced rock surfaces to mimic natural rocky shore complexity as well as artificially generated complexity using computer software. The designs replicated the topographic features of high ecological importance found on natural rocky shores and promoted species recruitment and community composition on artificial surfaces; thus enabling us to evaluate biological responses to geomorphic complexity in a controlled field trial. At two of the sites, the roughest tile designs (cm scale) did not have the highest levels of barnacle recruits which were

  5. Safeguarding Water Contracts in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Mova Al Afghani

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The provision of water and sewerage services has been in the public sector for thousands of years. However, the trend towards privatising these basic services has recently been growing. When dealing with Multinational Corporations (MNCs, governments face risks in the form of legal asymmetries. This paper explains the theory and practice of water privatisation in Indonesia. It analyses the legal anatomy of privatisation, from the regulatory to the contractual levels. It attempts to highlight important issues and risks that governments and other stakeholders need to focus on when dealing with privatisation.

  6. Indonesia knowledge dissemination: a snapshot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, M. K. M.

    2018-03-01

    The educational progress of a country or educational institution is measured through the implementation of knowledge dissemination. Evidence of knowledge dissemination has carried out be in form of the type of published document, which is based on the databases of the index of scientific publications: Scopus. This paper expresses a simple form of knowledge dissemination based on document type. Although the growth of knowledge dissemination does not have the same pattern based on the appearance of document types, the general implementation is almost the same. However, maximum effort needs to be done by PTN-bh to support Indonesia knowledge dissemination.

  7. MANAJEMEN RANTAI PASOKAN INDUSTRI FARMASI DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny H. Mustamu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Supply Chain Management (SCM plays a very important role in the pharmaceutical industry, especially in Indonesia, where more than 90 percent of raw materials for pharmaceutical industry are actually imported. It is known that Indonesia's pharmaceutical industry is very expensive. Government of Indonesia (GOI is hardly managed the pharmaceutical industry due to its complexity. Too many players put its stakes in this industry. The growing industry clusters are also coloring the competition amongst existing players. This article is a literature review and enriched with secondary data to continue the work of Mustamu (2000. Meant to describe Indonesia's pharmaceutical industry from the perspective of supply chain management. The 120 days throughput time within the industry and the high margins make this industry very attractive for illegal pharmaceutical producers. To make it worse, the illegal pharmaceutical producers that copying products of legal pharmaceutical companies are also developing its distribution channels in the market. At the end, the unaware end-users are becoming victims of the game. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Manajemen Rantai Pasokan (MRP memainkan peran penting dalam industri farmasi, terutama di Indonesia di mana lebih dari 90 prosen bahan baku industri farmasi adalah bahan impor. Di dunia, industri farmasi Indonesia dikenal sangat mahal. Pemerintah Republik Indonesia (RI sulit mengendalikan industri farmasi akibat kompleksitas yang dimilikinya. Terlalu banyak pemain yang memiliki kepentingan dalam industri ini. Kelompok industri pendukung yang sedang tumbuh juga mewarnai persaingan antar pemain yang ada. Artikel ini bersifat kajian pustaka dan diperkaya dengan data sekunder sebagai kelanjutan karya Mustamu (2000. Dimaksudkan untuk menggambarkan industri farmasi Indonesia dari perspektif MRP. 120 hari waktu perlaluan (throughput time dalam industri ini serta tingginya prosentase keuntungan, menjadikan industri ini sangat

  8. INDUSTRI KREATIF INDONESIA: PENDEKATAN ANALISIS KINERJA INDUSTRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Kamil

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In 2008, the Department of Commerce of the Republic of Indonesia has launched a creative economic development documents interpreted the 2025 Indonesia became the starting point and guide the development of the creative economy in Indonesia. With the existence of this document, the industry and its stakeholders or other stakeholders can readily develop the creative economy in Indonesia. Economic development in the direction of the creative industries is one manifestation of optimism aspiration to support the Master Plan for the Acceleration and Expansion of Indonesia's Economic Development in realizing the vision of Indonesia are being developed nation. The main objective of this study is the first to analyze the role of the creative industries in Indonesia for labor, value added and productivity, secondly, to analyze the performance trend of the creative industries sector, and third, to analyze the factors affecting the performance of the creative industries sector in Indonesia. Under Indonesia Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC and codes 151-372 (manufacturing industries category identified 18 industry groups belonging to the creative industries, showed that the performance of the national creative industries has been relatively high (in terms of trend analysis of the performance of the industrial creative. Furthermore, regression analysis of panel data (econometrics indicates that company size (SIZE, wages for workers (WAGE and the content of local inputs (LOCAL has a significant impact on the performance of Indonesia's creative industry. Meanwhile, the concentration ratio (CR4 no consequences but have koresi significantly positive effect on the performance of Indonesia’s creative industry.

  9. Impact of Fishery Policy on Fishery Manufacture Output, Economy and Welfare in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmansyah; Oktavilia, Shanty; Sugiyanto, F. X.; Hamzah, Ibnu N.

    2018-02-01

    The fisheries sector and fish manufacturing industry are the bright prospect sectors of Indonesia, due to its huge potency, which has not been worked out optimally. In facts, these sectors can generate a large amount of foreign exchange. The Government has paid significant attention to the development of these sectors. This study simulates the impact of fishery policies on the production of fish manufacturing industry, national economic and welfare in Indonesia. By employing the Input-Output Analysis approach, impacts of various government policy scenarios are developed, covering fisheries technical policy, as well as infrastructure development policies in the fisheries sector. This study indicates that the policies in the fisheries sector increase the output of fishery, the production of fish manufacturing industry, the sectoral and national outputs, as well as the level of national income.

  10. The growth of nuclear power in the Pacific and the IAEA's support for its development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, A.

    2014-01-01

    'Full text:' According to the International Atomic Energy Agency's projections produced in 2013 and for the period up to 2030, the world's nuclear power generation capacity is expected to grow by 17% in a low case scenario and by 94% in a high case scenario. These figures are both slightly lower than the equivalent scenario projections made in 2012, reflecting the continuing impact of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the low price of natural gas and the increasing use of renewable energy. As of 1 July 2014,435 nuclear power reactors are in operation worldwide, and the total global nuclear energy generating capacity surpassed 372 gigawatts-electric (GW(e)).Additionally, 72 reactors are under construction, the highest number since 1989. Of these,48 are in Asia, which remains the centre of near and long term growth prospects. Also, of the 30 countries currently using nuclear power, 25 are either expanding or planning to expand their fleet. In addition to those countries operating nuclear power plants, over 30 countries are currently considering a nuclear power programme or are introducing nuclear power into their energy mix. In 2013, the UAE and Belarus have ongoing construction for their first nuclear power plants. Furthermore, Bangladesh, and Turkey made significant progress on developing their first nuclear power plant projects and construction is expected to begin shortly. In the Pacific Basin, several countries are considering the introduction of nuclear power to meet their growing energy needs and overall development goals. Viet Nam currently plans to begin construction on its first nuclear power plant in 2017, which will make it the first operating country in the local region. Similar efforts are also underway in Malaysia and Indonesia, which are taking steps to develop the infrastructure necessary to support nuclear power, while continuing to evaluate whether to proceed. Recently, the Philippines announced that it would revisit the

  11. Children’s use of Bahasa Indonesia in Jakarta kindergartens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everaert, M.B.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071746080; Van de Velde, H.; Kushartanti, B.

    2015-01-01

    At a very young age children living in Jakarta use both Colloquial Jakarta Indonesia and Bahasa Indonesia. The children’s first and most used language is Colloquial Jakarta Indonesia. In the formal school setting Bahasa Indonesia is frequently used and stimulated on a daily basis, and the learning

  12. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Richard C.

    2014-04-15

    SciDAC-2 Project The Secret Life of Quarks: National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory, from March 15, 2011 through March 14, 2012. The objective of this project is to construct the software needed to study quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of the strong interactions of sub-atomic physics, and other strongly coupled gauge field theories anticipated to be of importance in the energy regime made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It builds upon the successful efforts of the SciDAC-1 project National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory, in which a QCD Applications Programming Interface (QCD API) was developed that enables lattice gauge theorists to make effective use of a wide variety of massively parallel computers. This project serves the entire USQCD Collaboration, which consists of nearly all the high energy and nuclear physicists in the United States engaged in the numerical study of QCD and related strongly interacting quantum field theories. All software developed in it is publicly available, and can be downloaded from a link on the USQCD Collaboration web site, or directly from the github repositories with entrance linke http://usqcd-software.github.io

  13. Sustainable management of infrastructures using risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, B.

    2005-01-01

    Today, maintenance costs of industrial infrastructures are growing up continuously. It is thus necessary to have a general and systematic method allowing to hierarchize the investment priorities in order to optimize the benefits. Taking into account the diversity of infrastructures, components and stakes, such a task is far to be easy. However, methods are implementing in the civil engineering world in order to give help to engineers and decision-makers to jointly develop strategies answering their technical, financial or environmental problems. Oxand, a counsel company of the Electricite de France (EdF) group, has developed and implemented a decisive decision-help tool. By combining the notion of risk with social, financial or environmental impacts, it becomes possible to estimate and compare different activities submitted to exploitation, safety and budget constraints. Moreover, it is possible to introduce the time dimension in the analysis by the integration of the most recent knowledge on materials aging, still with the aim of an optimized technical and financial management. This article presents the concepts of this methodology and its applications in particular in the domain of nuclear industry. (J.S.)

  14. Analysis on traditional fishing grounds in Indonesia`s Natuna waters under International Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniaty, R.; Ikaningtyas; Ruslijanto, P. A.

    2018-04-01

    This paper examines the boundary tension between Indonesia and China regarding traditional fishing ground in Natuna. Indonesia`s Natuna island is claimed by the China government as its traditional fishing zone/ground. The inclusion of Natuna territory into China`s traditional fishing zone brings new problems to Indonesia, especially with the Chinese ships docked and entered Indonesia`s exclusive economic zone, as well as several cases of illegal fishing over the territorial waters of Indonesia. Claims on traditional fishing zones have the potential to threaten the sovereignty of the Indonesian territory. This study aims to analyze the claims of the traditional fishing rights of China over the waters of the Natuna Islands under international law, especially UNCLOS 1982. This study revealed that the china`s argument of traditional fishing ground in Natuna to the nine dash line map is a unilateral claim, there is no international legal norm that can be used as the legal basis. Indonesia and some ASEAN countries have Internationally validated bilateral agreement on the continental shelf (i.e. Indonesia-Vietnam and Indonesia-Malaysia) thus the inclusion of Natuna into China`s nine dash line map rejects the legal status of Indonesian water under UNCLOS 1982.

  15. ANALISIS PERANAN DAN DAMPAK INVESTASI INFRASTRUKTUR TERHADAP PEREKONOMIAN INDONESIA: ANALISIS INPUT-OUTPUT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Darma Permana

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Despite being recovered from economic crisis, the infrastructure development in Indonesia still hasn’t shown a significant improvement. It is reflected from the diminishing government allocation for infrastructure as a percentage of Gross Domestic Products. The main objective of the study is to analyze the role of infrastructure through the linkage analysis, dispersion effect analysis, multiplier effect analysis, and the investment effect analysis. The scope of infrastructure is only referred to electricity, gas and water, and construction sector. The data used for this study is the 2005 Indonesian Input-Output Table. The result of the study has shown that infrastructure has a higher backward linkage than its forward. In addition, all of the infrastructure sectors has shown more than one dispersion coefficient and conversely has revealed less than one value for the dispersion sensitivity. Which means that infrastructure had a better capability to support the development of its upstream sectors than its downstream. Infrastructure has a positive multiplier effect toward the other sectors. The growth of the investment in the electricity, gas and water sector has given the biggest effect toward the change of the total outpu, while the water sector has given the biggest effect toward the change in the total income,  and road, bridge and port sector has given the biggest effect toward the change in the total labour.

  16. Proceeding of the Fifth Scientific Presentation on Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Development of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology in Third Millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suripto, A.; Sastratenaya, A.S.; Sutarno, D.

    2000-01-01

    The proceeding contains papers presented in the Fifth Scientific Presentation on Nuclear Fuel Element Cycle with theme of Development of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology in Third Millennium, held on 22 February in Jakarta, Indonesia. These papers were divided by three groups that are technology of exploration, processing, purification and analysis of nuclear materials; technology of nuclear fuel elements and structures; and technology of waste management, safety and management of nuclear fuel cycle. There are 35 papers indexed individually. (id)

  17. Menggagas Pendidikan Multikultur di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anin Nurhayati

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia with diversity of ethnic, culture, tradition, social group, religion, and so on, on the one hand, has aroused the dynamics of cultural diversity and positive civilization; on the other hand, it will even become the cause of conflict and disintegration, if it is not managed wisely and comprehensively. Multicultural education in Indonesia, however, should not only become an academic discourse, but it needs to be implemented in the concrete sphere, among them is in the education realm. Here, we need a conceptual frame in its implementation, so that the problem that emerges as the effect of the diversity and religiousness bias does not become a heavy burden of this nation. Multicultural education is a reform as well as the process of education which inculcate to the students the values and beliefs the importance of uniqueness recognition at every ethnic, culture, and other social groups. There are at least five scopes in multicultural education, they are (1 promotion to strengthen cultural diversity; (2 promotion to respect human right and other different people; (3 promotion to act based on his own way of life for every human being; and (5 promotion to the importance of equality and distribution of authority among different social groups.

  18. Responding book banning in indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aji, RNB; Artono; Liana, C.

    2018-01-01

    The prohibition of books conducted by the government through its apparatus without any due process of law is unfortunate. The Constitutional Court of the Republic of Indonesia (MKRI) in 2010 was decided that book banning is contradictory to the 1945 Constitution (UUD 1945). The purpose of this paper is to know Indonesia, according to the Constitutional Court must absolutely carry out the function of due process of law that is law enforcement in a judicial system when it wants to prohibit printed material which is a book, whether it is a book that is considered criticism and books that teach radicalism. It would be wise for anyone who disagrees with a book, and then responds by writing through a book. The result of this article is to support and suggest that the government and its apparatus in the state of the law should not arbitrarily impose a book ban. Likewise, people should not take violence action to respond this issue. In historical records, the prohibition of books without due process of law is always followed by the withdrawal of books and make people unable to deal with differences, especially in knowledge. That’s why, the government and its apparatus must create a conducive situation and support the creation of various perspectives in the framework of the progress of science through a book. It would implicate that people can respect in any perspective and thought.

  19. Pricing of electricity in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarullah, M.

    1983-01-01

    The objectives of this study are 1) to establish a sound theoretical basis for the determinants of electricity demand in Indonesia, 2) to measure the welfare losses of existing electricity pricing, and 3) to suggest a method of reducing these welfare losses. An econometric model for electricity demand is estimated using pooled time-series of fifteen regions in Indonesia covering the period 1970-1979. The short run price elasticities for both residential and industrial/business sectors are found to be inelastic, while the long run price elasticities for these sectors are found to be quite elastic with a value of -.61 for the residential sector and of -1.1 for the industrial/business sector. Income elasticity is .8 in the short run and around 1.00 for the long run. The exposure variable that captures the accessibility of electricity, has long run elasticity of 1.00 for the residential sector and less than 1.00 for the industrial/business sector. Due to distributional considerations, the 1980's electricity rate was set below its efficient level, and has created a welfare loss of Rp.8273.23 million per month. This accounts for 36.03% of the monthly electricity revenue. A rebate mechanism is recommended in this study, which provides a way to mitigate conflicting aspects of efficiency and equity

  20. Profil Literasi Informasi Pustakawan Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arief Wicaksono

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Information literacy is one of the competencies of the library profession. Information literacy is needed in the work of librarianship. Reference service, the key determinant of library status in the society, requires competencies in information literacy. The purpose of this study is to find out how librarians in Indonesia meet the requirement of information literacy competencies and what factors affect the mastery of information literacy. This study is a qualitative research with literature survey. Based on the existing literature, the hypothesis was developed that librarians of Indonesia have information literacy skills if their personal development are supported by both internal and external factors. Internal factors comprise motivation (encouragement of work, efforts to achieve success, material and non-material motivation, attitudes towards the profession (job satisfaction, professional satisfaction, and organizational commitment, and other knowledge-skill-attitude (knowledge, computer literacy, digital literacy, and English language skills, educational background, and level of education. While external factors include availability of computers and Internet network, library policy to support the development of information literacy of librarians.