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Sample records for increasing running test

  1. An educational intervention to increase awareness reduces unnecessary laboratory testing in an internal medicine resident-run clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Erika; Song, Shuang; Al-Abboud, Omar; Shams, Shahed; English, John; Naji, Wisam; Huang, Yafei; Robison, Leon; Balis, Fred; Kawsar, Hameem I

    2017-07-01

    At our resident-run clinic in an underserved community, laboratory test costs in 2013 exceeded the government subsidy by $400 000. To optimize limited resources and improve patient care, an education program to reduce testing was implemented. Between November 2014 and January 2015, residents attended lectures on utilization of laboratory testing, focusing on standard practice guidelines, and analyses of unnecessary tests. Multivariate nonparametric statistical methods and subgroup analysis were used to evaluate cost reduction. There were 453 clinic visits during the intervention period and 471 visits during the control period. Lectures were independently associated with a significant laboratory cost reduction. Median laboratory cost per visit decreased from $106.00 to $74.00. Total cost in the study period decreased from $79 403 to $51 463. There were similar reductions of laboratory costs in two subgroups: age groups of <50 years and ≥50 years, new encounters, and follow-up visits . In the analysis of individual tests, the cost of TSH and Vitamin D tests had the greatest reduction ($8176 and $5088 respectively). An appropriate physician education program can reduce laboratory tests and costs. Screening tests with inadequate evidence support were reduced most, whereas those with proven benefits did not decrease significantly.

  2. Robotic Bipedal Running: Increasing disturbance rejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssen, J.G.D.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the research presented in this thesis is to increase the understanding of the human running gait. The understanding of the human running gait is essential for the development of devices, such as prostheses and orthoses, that enable disabled people to run or that enable able people to inc

  3. GASIFICATION TEST RUN TC06

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services, Inc.

    2003-08-01

    This report discusses test campaign TC06 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC06. Test run TC06 was started on July 4, 2001, and completed on September 24, 2001, with an interruption in service between July 25, 2001, and August 19, 2001, due to a filter element failure in the PCD caused by abnormal operating conditions while tuning the main air compressor. The reactor temperature was varied between 1,725 and 1,825 F at pressures from 190 to 230 psig. In TC06, 1,214 hours of solid circulation and 1,025 hours of coal feed were attained with 797 hours of coal feed after the filter element failure. Both reactor and PCD operations were stable during the test run with a stable baseline pressure drop. Due to its length and stability, the TC06 test run provided valuable data necessary to analyze long-term reactor operations and to identify necessary modifications to improve equipment and process performance as well as progressing the goal of many thousands of hours of filter element exposure.

  4. 40 CFR 92.126 - Test run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test run. 92.126 Section 92.126... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.126 Test run. (a) The following steps... water from the pretest value, the test is void. (7)(i) For bag samples, as soon as possible transfer...

  5. 40 CFR 86.884-12 - Test run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test run. 86.884-12 Section 86.884-12... Heavy-Duty Engines; Smoke Exhaust Test Procedure § 86.884-12 Test run. (a) The temperature of the air... may be used, if desired, but no allowance will be made for possible increased smoke emissions...

  6. Reliability and validity of the maximal anaerobic running test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummela, A; Alberts, M; Rijntjes, R P; Luhtanen, P; Rusko, H

    1996-07-01

    Physically active men (n = 13) twice performed the Maximal Anaerobic Running Test (MART) on a treadmill and once the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) on a cycle ergometer. The MART consisted of n 20-s runs with 100-s recovery between the runs. The speed of the first run was 14.6 km.h-1 and the inclination 4 degrees. Thereafter, the speed was increased by 1.37 km.h-1 every run until exhaustion. During all tests oxygen uptake was measured breath-by-breath and blood samples were taken from the fingertip 40s after each run to determine the lactate concentration (BLa). Power at submaximal BLa levels and maximal power (P5mM, P10mM and Pmax, respectively) were calculated and P was expressed as the oxygen demand of running according to the American College of Sports Medicine equation. In the MART the Pmax was 108 ml.kg-1.min-1 and peak BLa was 15.6 mM. The reliability for the power indices in the MART were as follows: r = 0.92 (p cycle ergometer test measure slightly different qualities.

  7. New hydrocracking catalysts increase throughput, run length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huizinga, T. [Shell Internationale Petroleum Mij., The Hague (Netherlands); Theunissen, J.M.H. [Rayong Refinery Co. Ltd., Rayong (Thailand); Minderhoud, H.; Veen, R. van [Koninklijke/Shell-Lab., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-06-26

    An improved, second-stage hydrocracking catalyst has been developed by combining stabilized Y zeolites with amorphous silica alumina cracking components. A commercial application of this catalyst, along with a new, first-stage zeolitic hydrocracking catalyst, resulted in increased unit throughput and cycle length. The paper discusses the hydrocracking process, first-stage catalysts, second-stage catalysts, hydrogenation process, commercial results, and product properties.

  8. 40 CFR 86.1438 - Test run-EPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test run-EPA. 86.1438 Section 86.1438... Short Test Procedures § 86.1438 Test run—EPA. (a) This section describes the test run performed by the... prior to conduct of the CST. The test run consists of the wait time, vehicle preconditioning, and...

  9. A Runs-Test Algorithm: Contingent Reinforcement and Response Run Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachiga, Yosuke; Sakagami, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    Four rats' choices between two levers were differentially reinforced using a runs-test algorithm. On each trial, a runs-test score was calculated based on the last 20 choices. In Experiment 1, the onset of stimulus lights cued when the runs score was smaller than criterion. Following cuing, the correct choice was occasionally reinforced with food,…

  10. 40 CFR 86.1234-96 - Running loss test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Running loss test. 86.1234-96 Section... Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1234-96 Running loss test. (a) Overview. Gasoline- and methanol-fueled vehicles are to be tested for running loss emissions during simulated high-temperature...

  11. 49 CFR 238.319 - Running brake test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Running brake test. 238.319 Section 238.319... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.319 Running brake test. (a) As soon as conditions safely permit, a running brake test shall be performed on each passenger train after the train has received,...

  12. 40 CFR 90.409 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 90.409... Test Procedures § 90.409 Engine dynamometer test run. (a) Engine and dynamometer start-up. (1) Only... practice. (3) For Phase 1 engines, at the manufacturer's option, the engine can be run with the throttle...

  13. Lower-limb muscular strategies for increasing running speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schache, Anthony G; Dorn, Tim W; Williams, Gavin P; Brown, Nicholas A T; Pandy, Marcus G

    2014-10-01

    This clinical commentary discusses the mechanisms used by the lower-limb musculature to achieve faster running speeds. A variety of methodological approaches have been taken to evaluate lower-limb muscle function during running, including direct recordings of muscle electromyographic signal, inverse dynamics-based analyses, and computational musculoskeletal modeling. Progressing running speed from jogging to sprinting is mostly dependent on ankle and hip muscle performance. For speeds up to approximately 7.0 m/s, the dominant strategy is to push on the ground forcefully to increase stride length, and the major ankle plantar flexors (soleus and gastrocnemius) have a particularly important role in this regard. At speeds beyond approximately 7.0 m/s, the force-generating capacity of these muscles becomes less effective. Therefore, as running speed is progressed toward sprinting, the dominant strategy shifts toward the goal of increasing stride frequency and pushing on the ground more frequently. This strategy is achieved by generating substantially more power at the hip joint, thereby increasing the biomechanical demand on proximal lower-limb muscles such as the iliopsoas, gluteus maximus, rectus femoris, and hamstrings. Basic science knowledge regarding lower-limb muscle function during running has implications for understanding why sprinting performance declines with age. It is also of great value to the clinician for designing rehabilitation programs to restore running ability in young, previously active adults who have sustained a traumatic brain injury and have severe impairments of muscle function (eg, weakness, spasticity, poor motor control) that limit their capacity to run at any speed.

  14. The interval shuttle run test for intermittent sport players : evaluation of reliability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmink, K.A.P.M.; Visscher, C.; Lambert, M.I.; Lamberts, R.P.

    2004-01-01

    The reliability of the interval shuttle run test (ISRT) as a submaximal and maximal field test to measure intermittent endurance capacity was examined. During the ISRT, participants alternately run for 30 seconds and walk for 15 seconds. The running speed is increased from 10 km.h(-1) every 90 secon

  15. 40 CFR 86.1537 - Idle test run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... test run. The following steps shall be taken for each test: (a) Check the device(s) for removing water from the exhaust sample and the sample filter(s). Remove any water from the water trap(s). Clean and... test run, the test is void. ...

  16. 40 CFR 86.1437 - Test run-manufacturer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test run-manufacturer. 86.1437 Section... Trucks; Certification Short Test Procedures § 86.1437 Test run—manufacturer. (a) This section describes the test run performed by the manufacturer for its data submittal pursuant to obtaining a...

  17. Validity of the modified Conconi running test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentija, D; Vucetic, V; Markovic, G

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the validity of a fast ramp treadmill protocol for determination of the heart rate deflection point (HR (dp)) and speed of deflection (S (dp)) in trained runners. Fifty-one trained male runners performed a standard (T (stand); speed increase 1 km . h (-1) every 60 s) and a fast (T (fast); speed increase 1 km . h (-1) every 30 s) incremental treadmill test until volitional exhaustion. Heart rate was continuously recorded, and the HR (dp) was estimated after data averaging as the point of deflection in the linear speed/HR relationship. The HR (dp) and S (dp) recorded in T (fast) were compared with the corresponding values obtained in T (stand) by examining the Student's T-test, correlation coefficient (r), and limits of agreement (LoA). The HR (dp) recorded during standard and fast treadmill protocol were highly correlated (r = 0.92, p increased significantly with the faster ramp function (p increase 1 km x h (-1) every 30 s) may be used for determination of the HR (dp) in trained runners, while S (dp) is protocol dependent and caution is warranted regarding its practical applicability.

  18. 40 CFR 86.1337-2007 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 86.1337... Procedures § 86.1337-2007 Engine dynamometer test run. (a) The following steps shall be taken for each test...) Immediately after the engine is turned off, turn off the engine cooling fan(s) if used. As soon as...

  19. 40 CFR 86.1337-96 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 86.1337... Procedures § 86.1337-96 Engine dynamometer test run. (a) The following steps shall be taken for each test: (1... system from the CVS). As soon as possible, transfer the “cold start cycle” exhaust and dilution air...

  20. Long-Run Impact of Increased Wage Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Claus Thustrup

    1999-01-01

    An unanticipated permanent increase in wage pressure is analyzed in a dynamic general-equilibrium model combining standard theory of capital accumulation and monopolistic wage setting. The long-run (steady-state) implications are identical percentage reduction in employment, consumption, and capi......, and capital stock whereas wages and the real interest rate are unchanged. The reduction in employment on impact is larger than the steady-state reduction whereas wages rise and the real interest rate declines on impact...

  1. Running cosmological constant with observational tests

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Zhang, Kaituo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the running cosmological constant model with dark energy linearly proportional to the Hubble parameter, $\\Lambda = \\sigma H + \\Lambda_0$, in which the $\\Lambda$CDM limit is recovered by taking $\\sigma=0$. We derive the linear perturbation equations of gravity under the Friedmann-Lema\\"itre-Robertson-Walker cosmology, and show the power spectra of the CMB temperature and matter density distribution. By using the Markov chain Monte Carlo method, we fit the model to the current observational data and find that $\\sigma H_0/ \\Lambda_0 \\lesssim 2.63 \\times 10^{-2}$ and $6.74 \\times 10^{-2}$ for $\\Lambda(t)$ coupled to matter and radiation-matter, respectively, along with constraints on other cosmological parameters.

  2. Running cosmological constant with observational tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Qiang Geng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the running cosmological constant model with dark energy linearly proportional to the Hubble parameter, Λ=σH+Λ0, in which the ΛCDM limit is recovered by taking σ=0. We derive the linear perturbation equations of gravity under the Friedmann–Lemaïtre–Robertson–Walker cosmology, and show the power spectra of the CMB temperature and matter density distribution. By using the Markov chain Monte Carlo method, we fit the model to the current observational data and find that σH0/Λ0≲2.63×10−2 and 6.74×10−2 for Λ(t coupled to matter and radiation-matter, respectively, along with constraints on other cosmological parameters.

  3. Running cosmological constant with observational tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lee, Chung-Chi; Zhang, Kaituo

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the running cosmological constant model with dark energy linearly proportional to the Hubble parameter, Λ = σH +Λ0, in which the ΛCDM limit is recovered by taking σ = 0. We derive the linear perturbation equations of gravity under the Friedmann-Lemaïtre-Robertson-Walker cosmology, and show the power spectra of the CMB temperature and matter density distribution. By using the Markov chain Monte Carlo method, we fit the model to the current observational data and find that σH0 /Λ0 ≲ 2.63 ×10-2 and 6.74 ×10-2 for Λ (t) coupled to matter and radiation-matter, respectively, along with constraints on other cosmological parameters.

  4. A LABORATORY TEST FOR THE EXAMINATION OF ALACTIC RUNNING PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Kibele

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A new testing procedure is introduced to evaluate the alactic running performance in a 10s sprint task with near-maximal movement velocity. The test is performed on a motor-equipped treadmill with inverted polarity that increases mechanical resistance instead of driving the treadmill belt. As a result, a horizontal force has to be exerted against the treadmill surface in order to overcome the resistant force of the engine and to move the surface in a backward direction. For this task, subjects lean with their hands towards the front safety barrier of the treadmill railing with a slightly inclined body posture. The required skill resembles the pushing movement of bobsleigh pilots at the start of a race. Subjects are asked to overcome this mechanical resistance and to cover as much distance as possible within a time period of 10 seconds. Fifteen male students (age: 27.7 ± 4.1 years, body height: 1.82 ± 0.46 m, body mass: 78.3 ± 6.7 kg participated in a study. As the resistance force was set to 134 N, subjects ran 35.4 ± 2.6 m on the average corresponding to a mean running velocity of 3.52 ± 0.25 m·s-1. The validity of the new test was examined by statistical inference with various measures related to alactic performance including a metabolic equivalent to estimate alactic capacity (2892 ± 525 mL O2, an estimate for the oxygen debt (2662 ± 315 ml, the step test by Margaria to estimate alactic energy flow (1691 ± 171 W, and a test to measure the maximal strength in the leg extensor muscles (2304 ± 351 N. The statistical evaluation showed that the new test is in good agreement with the theoretical assumptions for alactic performance. Significant correlation coefficients were found between the test criteria and the measures for alactic capacity (r = 0.79, p < 0.01 as well as alactic power (r = 0.77, p < 0.01. The testing procedure is easy to administer and it is best suited to evaluate the alactic capacity for bobsleigh pilots as well as for

  5. Peak treadmill running velocity during the VO2 max test predicts running performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noakes, T D; Myburgh, K H; Schall, R

    1990-01-01

    Twenty specialist marathon runners and 23 specialist ultra-marathon runners underwent maximal exercise testing to determine the relative value of maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), peak treadmill running velocity, running velocity at the lactate turnpoint, VO2 at 16 km h-1, % VO2max at 16 km h-1, and running time in other races, for predicting performance in races of 10-90 km. Race time at 10 or 21.1 km was the best predictor of performance at 42.2 km in specialist marathon runners and at 42.2 and 90 km in specialist ultra-marathon runners (r = 0.91-0.97). Peak treadmill running velocity was the best laboratory-measured predictor of performance (r = -0.88(-)-0.94) at all distances in ultra-marathon specialists and at all distances except 42.2 km in marathon specialists. Other predictive variables were running velocity at the lactate turnpoint (r = -0.80(-)-0.92); % VO2max at 16 km h-1 (r = 0.76-0.90) and VO2max (r = 0.55(-)-0.86). Peak blood lactate concentrations (r = 0.68-0.71) and VO2 at 16 km h-1 (r = 0.10-0.61) were less good predictors. These data indicate: (i) that in groups of trained long distance runners, the physiological factors that determine success in races of 10-90 km are the same; thus there may not be variables that predict success uniquely in either 10 km, marathon or ultra-marathon runners, and (ii) that peak treadmill running velocity is at least as good a predictor of running performance as is the lactate turnpoint. Factors that determine the peak treadmill running velocity are not known but are not likely to be related to maximum rates of muscle oxygen utilization.

  6. Bovine Colostrum Supplementation During Running Training Increases Intestinal Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant D. Brinkworth

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Endurance exercise training can increase intestinal permeability which may contribute to the development of gastrointestinal symptoms in some athletes. Bovine colostrum (BC supplementation reduces intestinal permeability induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This study aimed to determine whether BC could also reduce intestinal permeability induced by endurance exercise. Thirty healthy adult males (25.0 ± 4.7 yr; mean ± SD completed eight weeks of running three times per week for 45 minutes at their lactate threshold while consuming 60 g/day of BC, whey protein (WP or control (CON. Intestinal permeability was assessed at baseline and after eight weeks by measuring the ratio of urinary lactulose (L and rhamnose (R excretion. After eight weeks the L/R ratio increased significantly more in volunteers consuming BC (251 ± 140% compared with WP (21 ± 35%, P < 0.05 and CON (−7 ± 13%, P < 0.02. The increase in intestinal permeability with BC may have been due to BC inducing greater leakiness of tight junctions between enterocytes or by increasing macromolecular transport as it does in neonatal gut. Further research should investigate the potential for BC to increase intestinal macromolecular transport in adults.

  7. Increased ventilation in runners during running as compared to walking at similar metabolic rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M J; Dunn, C J; Pittman, C L; Kerr, W C; Adair, N E

    1996-01-01

    At similar levels of carbon dioxide production (VCO2) and oxygen consumption (VO2), runners have been shown to have a greater minute ventilation (VE) during running as compared to walking. The mechanism responsible for these differences has yet to be identified. To determine if these differences are a result of differences in acid-base status, potassium (K+), norepinephrine and/or epinephrine levels, seven well-trained runners completed walk and run tests at similar VO2 and VCO2 levels. The occurrence of entrainment of the breathing and stride frequencies during both walking and running was also determined. VE was significantly greater during the run as compared to the walk, 73.7 (2.2) versus 68.6 (2.0) l.min-1, respectively, despite the similarity in VO2 and VCO2 levels. Alveolar ventilation was not significantly different between the run and the walk, 60.4 (4.7) versus 59.6 (4.4) l.min-1, respectively. Dead space ventilation was found to be significantly greater during running as compared to walking, 13.3 (3.2) versus 9.0 (4.7) l.min-1, respectively. The increases in VE were due to increases in breathing frequency and decreases in tidal volume during the run as compared to the walk. Arterial partial pressures of CO2 (PaCO2) were not significantly different when comparing walking and running to rest values nor when comparing walking and running. Arterial pH was significantly lower during walking as compared to rest and running. Bicarbonate levels were significantly lower during walking as compared to rest. Lactate was significantly greater during walking as compared to rest and to running. K+ levels were significantly higher during walking and running as compared to rest. Epinephrine and norepinephrine levels were not significantly different between running and walking. During the walk, six of the seven subjects entrained their breathing frequency to the stride frequency, and during the run three of the seven subjects demonstrated entrainment. Results from this

  8. Lack of influence of muscular performance parameters on spatio-temporal adaptations with increased running velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche-Seruendo, Luis E; García-Pinillos, Felipe; Haicaguerre, Joana; Bataller-Cervero, Ana V; Soto-Hermoso, Víctor M; Latorre-Román, Pedro Á

    2017-02-08

    This study aimed to analyse the influence of muscular performance parameters on spatio-temporal gait characteristics during running when gradually increasing speed. 51 recreationally trained male endurance runners (age: 28 ± 8 years) voluntarily participated in this study. Subjects performed a battery of jumping tests (squat jump, countermovement jump, and 20 cm drop jump), and after that, the subjects performed an incremental running test (10 to 20 km/h) on a motorized treadmill. Spatio-temporal parameters were measured using the OptoGait system. Cluster k-means analysis grouped subjects according to the jumping test performance, by obtaining a group of good jumpers (GJ, n = 19) and a group of bad jumpers (BJ, n = 32). With increased running velocity, contact time was shorter, flight time and step length longer, whereas cadence and stride angle were greater (p adaptations between those runners with good jumping ability and those with poor jumping ability. Based on that, it seems that muscular performance parameters do not play a key role in spatio-temporal adaptations experienced by recreational endurance runners with increased velocity. However, taken into consideration the well-known relationship between running performance and neuromuscular performance, the authors suggest that muscular performance parameters would be much more determinant in the presence of fatigue (exhausted condition), or in the case of considering other variables such as running economy or kinetic.

  9. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2002-06-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC08 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Gasifier was operated as a pressurized gasifier in air- and oxygen-blown modes during TC08. Test Run TC08 was started on June 9, 2002 and completed on June 29. Both gasifier and PCD operations were stable during the test run with a stable baseline pressure drop. The oxygen feed supply system worked well and the transition from air to oxygen blown was smooth. The gasifier temperature was varied between 1,710 and 1,770 F at pressures from 125 to 240 psig. The gasifier operates at lower pressure during oxygen-blown mode due to the supply pressure of the oxygen system. In TC08, 476 hours of solid circulation and 364 hours of coal feed were attained with 153 hours of pure oxygen feed. The gasifier and PCD operations were stable in both enriched air and 100 percent oxygen blown modes. The oxygen concentration was slowly increased during the first transition to full oxygen-blown operations. Subsequent transitions from air to oxygen blown could be completed in less than 15 minutes. Oxygen-blown operations produced the highest synthesis gas heating value to date, with a projected synthesis gas heating value averaging 175 Btu/scf. Carbon conversions averaged 93 percent, slightly lower than carbon conversions achieved during air-blown gasification.

  10. Data reproducibility of pace strategy in a laboratory test run

    Science.gov (United States)

    de França, Elias; Xavier, Ana Paula; Hirota, Vinicius Barroso; Côrrea, Sônia Cavalcanti; Caperuto, Érico Chagas

    2016-01-01

    This data paper contains data related to a reproducibility test for running pacing strategy in an intermittent running test until exhaustion. Ten participants underwent a crossover study (test and retest) with an intermittent running test. The test was composed of three-minute sets (at 1 km/h above Onset Blood Lactate Accumulation) until volitional exhaustion. To assess pace strategy change, in the first test participants chose the rest time interval (RTI) between sets (ranging from 30 to 60 s) and in the second test the maximum RTI values were either the RTI chosen in the first test (maximum RTI value), or less if desired. To verify the reproducibility of the test, rating perceived exertion (RPE), heart rate (HR) and blood plasma lactate concentration ([La]p) were collected at rest, immediately after each set and at the end of the tests. As results, RTI, RPE, HR, [La]p and time to exhaustion were not statistically different (p>0.05) between test and retest, as well as they demonstrated good intraclass correlation. PMID:27081672

  11. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2003-04-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC11 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). Test run TC11 began on April 7, 2003, with startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until April 18, 2003, when a gasifier upset forced the termination of the test run. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,650 and 1,800 F at pressures from 160 to 200 psig during air-blown operations and around 135 psig during enriched-air operations. Due to a restriction in the oxygen-fed lower mixing zone (LMZ), the majority of the test run featured air-blown operations.

  12. SLUDGE BATCH SUPPLEMENTAL SRAT RUNS EFFECTS OF YIELD STRESS AND CYCLE TIME INCREASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, A.

    2010-08-10

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has transitioned from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) processing to Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) processing. Phase III-Tank 40 Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet simulations have been completed to determine the initial processing conditions for the DWPF transition. The impact of higher yield stress (SB-25) and cycle time extension (SB6-26) on the physical and chemical effects of SB6 processing during the SRAT (Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank) cycle were evaluated. No significant impacts on the SRAT chemistry were noted during the higher yield stress run. In particular, no impact on mercury stripping was noted, indicating that settling of elemental mercury was not the primary factor in the low mercury recovery noted in the flowsheet testing. The SRAT product from this run retained the higher yield stress of the starting sludge. The run indicated that ultrasonication is an effective tool to increase the yield stress of simulants to targeted values and the chemistry of downstream processing is not impacted. Significant differences were noted in the cycle time extension test compared to the Phase III flowsheet baseline runs. Large decreases in the ammonia and hydrogen generation rates were noted along with reduced mercury stripping efficiency. The latter effect is similar to that of operating under a high acid stoichiometry. It is conceivable that, under the distinctly different conditions of high formic acid concentration (high acid run) or slow formic acid addition (extended run), that mercury could form amalgams with noble metals, possibly rendering both inert. Thus, the removal of free mercury and noble metals could decrease the rate of catalytic formic acid reactions which would decrease generation of ammonium and hydrogen. The potential underlying reasons for the behavior noted during this run would require additional testing.

  13. APEX: A Prime EXperiment at Jefferson Lab - Test Run Results and Full Run Plans; Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beacham, James [Ohio University, JLAB

    2015-06-01

    APEX is an experiment at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) in Virginia, USA, that searches for a new gauge boson (A') with sub-GeV mass and coupling to ordinary matter of g' ~ (10-6 - 10⁻²)e. Electrons impinge upon a fixed target of high-Z material. An A' is produced via a process analogous to photon bremsstrahlung, decaying to an e⁺+e⁻ pair. A test run was held in July of 2010, covering mA' = 175 to 250 MeV and couplings g'/e > 10⁻³. A full run is approved and will cover mA' ~ 65 to 525 MeV and g'/e > 2.3 x 10⁻⁴, and is expected to occur sometime in 2016 or 2017.

  14. 40 CFR 86.134-96 - Running loss test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... be set to operate in “automatic” temperature and fan modes with the system set at 72 °F. (vii... conditioning systems shall be set to operate in “automatic” temperature and fan modes with the system set at 72...-fueled vehicles are to be tested for running loss emissions during simulated high-temperature urban...

  15. Running economy assessment within cardiopulmonary exercise testing for recreational runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeroff, Tobias; Bernardi, Andreas; Vogt, Lutz; Banzer, Winfried

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of running economy (RE) on running performance within recreational runners of different maximal aerobic capacity, and the feasibility of RE assessment within routine cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). Sixty-eight recreational runners (m: 49, f: 19; age: 21-54) completed a graded exercise test (GXT) until exhaustion. Maximal oxygen uptake and respiratory compensation point were obtained via CPET. RE was calculated as relative oxygen uptake per covered distance (mL/kg/km) one step below respiratory compensation point (RCP). Subjects were grouped for RE via median split and categorized into one of six fitness levels (Very Poor, Poor, Fair, Good, Excellent, Superior) (ACSM 2010). Irrespective of fitness levels, recreational runners with a more energy efficient movement (REVO2max values ranged between 35.2 and 66.0 ml/min/kg. Running velocity at RCP of runners within VO2max categories Good and Superior differed significantly (P<0.05) between RE groups. This study provides evidence that RE influences submaximal running performance in recreational distance runners within a broad range of maximal aerobic capacity. Complementing routine CPET with RE assessment at physiological threshold intensities and ACSM based categorization seems feasible to delineate the impact of movement efficiency and aerobic fitness on performance in recreational runners.

  16. Social facilitation revisited: increase in foraging efforts and synchronization of running in domestic chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Yukiko; Matsushima, Toshiya

    2011-01-01

    Social influences on foraging efforts were examined in domestic chicks by investigating the frequency of runs made to feeders and the amount of pecking to gain food. Single or paired chicks foraged in an I-shaped maze equipped with a millet feeder on each end, that distributed one or two grains at variable intervals. Regardless of when the grain(s) were dispensed, chicks ran back and forth between the feeders. Analyses of their movement patterns revealed: (1) running patterns were not directly synchronized with the dispensing of grain(s), (2) running distance was longer in paired chicks than in single chicks, (3) paired chicks partially synchronized their runs between feeders, and (4) social effects were immediate but cumulative after repeated blocks. We further examined the social effects on running by dividing the I-maze into two parallel lanes separated by a transparent wall, so that kleptoparasitic interference of food did not occur. Again, the chicks increased their running speed and were even more synchronized with their partner's movements, indicating that food competition alone was not responsible for increased foraging effort. The number of pecks to get grains was also assessed under conditions where the food tray was gradually replaced, from an easy one to more difficult ones. When tested in the separated I-maze, paired chicks pecked more in the difficult food situation without increase in the number of gained grains. Results suggest that (i) social facilitation leads to increased foraging efforts and (ii) the presence of a conspecific is alone may lead to enhanced foraging efforts in chicks. These findings are discussed in terms of possible ecological background of social facilitation.

  17. Caffeine stimulates voluntary wheel running in mice without increasing aerobic capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claghorn, Gerald C; Thompson, Zoe; Wi, Kristianna; Van, Lindsay; Garland, Theodore

    2017-03-01

    The "energy drink" Red Bull and the "sports drink" Gatorade are often marketed to athletes, with claims that they cause performance gains. However, both are high in sugars, and also consumed by non-athletes. Few studies have addressed the effects of these drinks or their biologically active components in rodent exercise models. We used three experiments to test effects on both voluntary exercise behavior and maximal aerobic capacity in lines of mice known to differ in "athletic" traits. Mice from four replicate High Runner (HR) lines have been selectively bred for voluntary running on wheels, and run approximately three times as many revolutions per day as do mice from four non-selected Control (C) lines. HR mice also have higher endurance and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) during forced treadmill exercise. In Experiment 1, we tested the hypothesis that Gatorade or Red Bull might cause or allow mice to increase their voluntary wheel running. On days 5 and 6 of 6days of wheel access, as is used to select breeders, HR mice ran 3.3-fold more than C, and females ran 1.2-fold more than males, with no linetype by sex interaction. On day 7, mice were administered Gatorade, Red Bull or tap water. During the subsequent 19-hour period, Gatorade had no statistical effect on running, but Red Bull significantly increased distance run by both sexes and in both HR and C lines. The increase in distance run caused by Red Bull was attributable to time spent running, not an increase in mean (or maximum) speed. As previous studies have found that sucrose alone does not generally increase wheel running, we tested two other active ingredients in Red Bull, caffeine and taurine, in Experiment 2. With a similar testing protocol, caffeine alone and caffeine+taurine increased running by about half the magnitude of Red Bull. In Experiment 3, we tested the hypothesis that Red Bull or caffeine alone can increase physiological performance ability during aerobic exercise, measured as VO2max

  18. Test of the classic model for predicting endurance running performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, James E; Howley, Edward T; Bassett, David R; Thompson, Dixie L; Fitzhugh, Eugene C

    2010-05-01

    To compare the classic physiological variables linked to endurance performance (VO2max, %VO2max at lactate threshold (LT), and running economy (RE)) with peak treadmill velocity (PTV) as predictors of performance in a 16-km time trial. Seventeen healthy, well-trained distance runners (10 males and 7 females) underwent laboratory testing to determine maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), RE, percentage of maximal oxygen uptake at the LT (%VO2max at LT), running velocity at LT, and PTV. Velocity at VO2max (vVO2max) was calculated from RE and VO2max. Three stepwise regression models were used to determine the best predictors (classic vs treadmill performance protocols) for the 16-km running time trial. Simple Pearson correlations of the variables with 16-km performance showed vVO2max to have the highest correlation (r = -0.972) and %VO2max at the LT the lowest (r = 0.136). The correlation coefficients for LT, VO2max, and PTV were very similar in magnitude (r = -0.903 to r = -0.892). When VO2max, %VO2max at LT, RE, and PTV were entered into SPSS stepwise analysis, VO2max explained 81.3% of the total variance, and RE accounted for an additional 10.7%. vVO2max was shown to be the best predictor of the 16-km performance, accounting for 94.4% of the total variance. The measured velocity at VO2max (PTV) was highly correlated with the estimated velocity at vVO2max (r = 0.8867). Among well-trained subjects heterogeneous in VO2max and running performance, vVO2max is the best predictor of running performance because it integrates both maximal aerobic power and the economy of running. The PTV is linked to the same physiological variables that determine vVO2max.

  19. Yo-Yo IR1 vs. incremental continuous running test for prediction of 3000-m performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Boris; Klose, Andreas; Schelleckes, Katrin; Jekat, Charlotte M; Krüger, Michael; Brand, Stefan-Martin

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to compare physiological responses during the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1) Test and an incremental continuous running field Test (ICRT) and to analyze their predictive value on 3000-m running performance. Forty moderately trained individuals (18 females) performed the ICRT and Yo-Yo IR1 Test to exhaustion. The ICRT was performed as graded running test with an increase of 2.0 km·h-1 after each 3 min interval for lactate diagnostic. In both tests, blood lactate levels were determined after the test and at 2 and 5 min of recovery. Heart rate (HR) was recorded to monitor differences in HR slopes and HR recovery. Comparison revealed a correlation between ICRT and Yo-Yo IR1 Test performance (R2=0.83, Prunning time (R2=0.77, Prunning performances such as 3000-m runs but maximum HR and blood lactate values differ significantly. The ICRT may have higher predictive power for middle- to long- distance running performance such as 3000-m runs offering a reliable test for coaches in the recruitment of athletes or supervision of training concepts.

  20. Limited measurement dependence in multiple runs of a Bell test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, James E.; Kay, Alastair

    2013-09-01

    The assumption of free will—the ability of an experimentalist to make random choices—is central to proving the indeterminism of quantum resources, the primary tool in quantum cryptography. Relaxing the assumption in a Bell test allows violation of the usual classical threshold by correlating the random number generators used to select measurements with the devices that perform them. In this paper, we examine not only these correlations, but those across multiple runs of the experiment. This enables an explicit exposition of the optimal cheating strategy and how the correlations manifest themselves within this strategy. Similar to other recent results, we prove that there remain Bell violations for a sufficiently high, yet nonmaximal degree of free will which cannot be simulated by a classical attack, regardless of how many runs of the experiment those choices are correlated over.

  1. Safety evaluation of the ITP filter/stripper test runs and quiet time runs using simulant solution. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, M.K.

    1994-06-01

    The purpose is to provide the technical bases for the evaluation of Unreviewed Safety Question for the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) Filter/Stripper Test Runs (Ref. 7) and Quiet Time Runs Program (described in Section 3.6). The Filter/Stripper Test Runs and Quiet Time Runs program involves a 12,000 gallon feed tank containing an agitator, a 4,000 gallon flush tank, a variable speed pump, associated piping and controls, and equipment within both the Filter and the Stripper Building.

  2. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2002-09-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC09 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Gasifier was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC09 in air- and oxygen-blown modes. Test Run TC09 was started on September 3, 2002, and completed on September 26, 2002. Both gasifier and PCD operations were stable during the test run, with a stable baseline pressure drop. The oxygen feed supply system worked well and the transition from air to oxygen was smooth. The gasifier temperature varied between 1,725 and 1,825 F at pressures from 125 to 270 psig. The gasifier operates at lower pressure during oxygen-blown mode due to the supply pressure of the oxygen system. In TC09, 414 hours of solid circulation and over 300 hours of coal feed were attained with almost 80 hours of pure oxygen feed.

  3. Increased Blood Lactate Level Deteriorates Running Economy in World Class Endurance Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Jan; Støren, Øyvind; Finstad, Arnstein; Wang, Eivind; Helgerud, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Blood lactate accumulation is associated with development of muscle fatigue and negatively correlated to endurance performance. No research has quantified the effects of lactate presence at moderate levels of lactate accumulation. The purpose of this study was to test whether 2 moderate blood lactate concentration levels affect running economy (RE) when running at the individual lactate threshold (LT). Seven male world class endurance athletes with an average V[Combining Dot Above]O2max of 80.7 ± 2.7 ml·kg·min or 5.8 ± 0.5 L·min participated in this study. After the V[Combining Dot Above]O2max test, the subjects were resting or walking and in a random order tested for RE at their LT velocity when the blood lactate level reached either 3 mmol·L or 5 mmol·L. After a new 5-minute exercising period at maximal aerobic velocity, the crossover lactate value RE testing was performed. Running economy was significantly (p ≤ 0.05) deteriorated from 0.668 ± 0.044 to 0.705 ± 0.056 ml·kg·m or 5.5% (p ≤ 0.05) for blood lactate level of 3 mmol·L compared with 5 mmol·L, respectively. Increased lactate level from 3 to 5 mmol·L is thus accompanied by deteriorated RE at LT running velocity. The deteriorated RE at moderate levels of lactate concentration emphasizes the importance of avoiding intensities above LT in the early parts of a dominantly aerobic endurance competition. It also emphasizes the importance of a high V[Combining Dot Above]O2max for aerobic endurance athletes and may partly explain the V[Combining Dot Above]O2 slow component as impaired RE.

  4. Changes in long jump take-off technique with increasing run-up speed

    OpenAIRE

    Bridgett, LA; Linthorne, NP

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of run-up speed on take-off technique in the long jump. Seventy-one jumps by an elite male long jumper were recorded in the sagittal plane by a high-speed video camera. A wide range of run-up speeds was obtained using direct intervention to set the length of the athlete's run-up. As the athlete's run-up speed increased, the jump distance and take-off speed increased, the leg angle at touchdown remained almost unchanged, and the take-off ang...

  5. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2002-12-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC10 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Gasifier was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC10 in air- (mainly for transitions and problematic operations) and oxygen-blown mode. Test Run TC10 was started on November 16, 2002, and completed on December 18, 2002. During oxygen-blown operations, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,675 and 1,825 F at pressures from 150 to 180 psig. After initial adjustments were made to reduce the feed rate, operations with the new fluidized coal feeder were stable with about half of the total coalfeed rate through the new feeder. However, the new fluidized-bed coal feeder proved to be difficult to control at low feed rates. Later the coal mills and original coal feeder experienced difficulties due to a high moisture content in the coal from heavy rains. Additional operational difficulties were experienced when several of the pressure sensing taps in the gasifier plugged. As the run progressed, modifications to the mills (to address processing the wet coal) resulted in a much larger feed size. This eventually resulted in the accumulation of large particles in the circulating solids causing operational instabilities in the standpipe and loop seal. Despite problems with the coal mills, coal feeder, pressure tap nozzles and the standpipe, the gasifier did experience short periods of stability during oxygenblown operations. During these periods, the syngas quality was high. During TC10, the gasifier gasified over 609 tons of Powder River Basin subbituminous coal and

  6. The discriminative power of the Interval Shuttle Run Test and the Maximal Multistage Shuttle Run Test for playing level of soccer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmink, K.A.P.M.; Verheijen, R.; Visscher, C.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to examine the discriminative power of the recently developed Interval Shuttle Run Test (ISRT) and the widely used Maximal Multistage 20 m Shuttle Run Test (MMSRT) for soccer players at different levels of competition. The main difference between the tests is that

  7. Test Run Report of the P348 Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Gninenko, S N

    2015-01-01

    The P348 Collaboration preformed test measurements in the H4 SPS beam line during a period of 2 weeks in September-October. The measurements were designed with two main objectives. The first was to test the new detector components such as Micromegas and straw tube tracker, high-energy electron tagging system, ECAL, and HCAL. The second was to explore the feasibility of searching for invisible decays of dark photons in the sub- GeV mass range. Here we report various results of the test measurements. The main outcome of the run is that by using simple selection criteria, without good track definition, we reject background in the signal region down to the level of a few ×10^−8 per incident electron. As we do not see any other issues that represent fundamental problems for the experiment, our conclusion is that after small modifications the P348 detector is ready to start data taking in the year 2016. We recall that the A‘ with a mass in sub-GeV range is still one of the favorable explanation of the muon g-2...

  8. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC07

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2002-04-05

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC07 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC07. Prior to TC07, the Transport Reactor was modified to allow operations as an oxygen-blown gasifier. Test Run TC07 was started on December 11, 2001, and the sand circulation tests (TC07A) were completed on December 14, 2001. The coal-feed tests (TC07B-D) were started on January 17, 2002 and completed on April 5, 2002. Due to operational difficulties with the reactor, the unit was taken offline several times. The reactor temperature was varied between 1,700 and 1,780 F at pressures from 200 to 240 psig. In TC07, 679 hours of solid circulation and 442 hours of coal feed, 398 hours with PRB coal and 44 hours with coal from the Calumet mine, and 33 hours of coke breeze feed were attained. Reactor operations were problematic due to instrumentation problems in the LMZ resulting in much higher than desired operating temperatures in the reactor. Both reactor and PCD operations were stable and the modifications to the lower part of the gasifier performed well while testing the gasifier with PRB coal feed.

  9. 40 CFR 86.237-94 - Dynamometer test run, gaseous emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dynamometer test run, gaseous... test run, gaseous emissions. (a) The complete dynamometer test consists of a cold start drive of... terminates after the first period (505 seconds) is run. (d) The provisions of § 86.137(b) apply to...

  10. 40 CFR 86.137-90 - Dynamometer test run, gaseous and particulate emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dynamometer test run, gaseous and... New Otto-Cycle Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.137-90 Dynamometer test run, gaseous... first period (505 seconds) is run. (2) Petroleum-fueled and methanol-fueled diesel vehicles. The...

  11. 40 CFR 1045.501 - How do I run a valid emission test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I run a valid emission test... Procedures § 1045.501 How do I run a valid emission test? (a) Applicability. This subpart is addressed to you... maximum test speed. (g) Special and alternate procedures. If you are unable to run the duty...

  12. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin, Blaise P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). VHTR Program

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel.

  13. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin, Blaise P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). VHTR Program

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: 1. Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. 2. Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. 3. Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tristructural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S.-produced fuel.

  14. LHC to skip low-energy test runs

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartwright, Jon

    2007-01-01

    "The Large Hadron Collider will not be ready in time to perform a low-energy "engineering run", which was originally scheduled to take place this November, according to an official at CERN. This will leave the operators no chance to gain exerinece with the particle accelerator's steering and detection systems before the high-energy runs begin in spring next year." (1 page)

  15. Methodological framework for heart rate variability analysis during exercise: application to running and cycling stress testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, David; Hernando, Alberto; Casajús, Jose A; Laguna, Pablo; Garatachea, Nuria; Bailón, Raquel

    2017-09-26

    Standard methodologies of heart rate variability analysis and physiological interpretation as a marker of autonomic nervous system condition have been largely published at rest, but not so much during exercise. A methodological framework for heart rate variability (HRV) analysis during exercise is proposed, which deals with the non-stationary nature of HRV during exercise, includes respiratory information, and identifies and corrects spectral components related to cardiolocomotor coupling (CC). This is applied to 23 male subjects who underwent different tests: maximal and submaximal, running and cycling; where the ECG, respiratory frequency and oxygen consumption were simultaneously recorded. High-frequency (HF) power results largely modified from estimations with the standard fixed band to those obtained with the proposed methodology. For medium and high levels of exercise and recovery, HF power results in a 20 to 40% increase. When cycling, HF power increases around 40% with respect to running, while CC power is around 20% stronger in running.

  16. 40 CFR 1048.501 - How do I run a valid emission test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I run a valid emission test... § 1048.501 How do I run a valid emission test? (a) Use the equipment and procedures for spark-ignition... 86.132-96(h) and then operate the engine for 60 minutes over repeat runs of the duty cycle...

  17. 40 CFR 1054.501 - How do I run a valid emission test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I run a valid emission test... Procedures § 1054.501 How do I run a valid emission test? (a) Applicability. This subpart is addressed to you... your production engines will be equipped with a vapor line that routes running loss vapors into...

  18. Testing ATLAS Z+MET excess with LHC run 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiaochuan [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Shirai, Satoshi [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Terada, Takahiro [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics (APCTP), Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The ATLAS collaboration reported a 3σ excess in the search of events containing on-Z dilepton, jets, and large missing momentum (MET) in the 8 TeV LHC run. Motivated by this excess, many models of new physics have been proposed. Recently, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations reported new results for similar Z+MET channels in the 13 TeV run. In this paper, we comprehensively discuss the consistency between the proposed models and the LHC results of Run 1 and Run 2. We find that in models with heavy gluino production, there is generically some tension between the 8 TeV and 13 TeV results. On the other hand, models with light squark production provide relatively better fitting to both results.

  19. AGR-2 IRRADIATION TEST FINAL AS-RUN REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaise, Collin

    2014-07-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a half calendar years. The test

  20. AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaise P. Collin

    2012-06-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 ?1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). We’ll say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below 10-7 with only one

  1. Changes in long jump take-off technique with increasing run-up speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgett, Lisa A; Linthorne, Nicholas P

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of run-up speed on take-off technique in the long jump. Seventy-one jumps by an elite male long jumper were recorded in the sagittal plane by a high-speed video camera. A wide range of run-up speeds was obtained using direct intervention to set the length of the athlete's run-up. As the athlete's run-up speed increased, the jump distance and take-off speed increased, the leg angle at touchdown remained almost unchanged, and the take-off angle and take-off duration steadily decreased. The predictions of two previously published mathematical models of the long jump take-off are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Changes in coordination and its variability with an increase in running cadence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafer, Jocelyn F; Freedman Silvernail, Julia; Hillstrom, Howard J; Boyer, Katherine A

    2016-08-01

    Alterations in joint mechanics have been associated with common overuse injuries. An increase in running cadence in healthy runners has been shown to improve several parameters that have been tied to injury, but the reorganisation of motion that produces these changes has not been examined. The purpose of this study was to determine if runners change their segment coordination and coordination variability with an acute increase in cadence. Data were collected as ten uninjured runners ran overground at their preferred cadence as well as a cadence 10% higher than preferred. Segment coordination and coordination variability were calculated for select thigh-shank and shank-foot couples and selected knee mechanics were also calculated. Paired t-tests were used to examine differences between the preferred and increased cadence conditions. With increased cadence, there was a decrease in peak knee flexion and a later occurrence of peak knee flexion and internal rotation and shank internal rotation. Segment coordination was altered with most changes occurring in mid-late stance. Coordination variability decreased with an increase in cadence across all couples and phases of gait. These results suggest examination of coordination and its variability could give insight into the risk of intervention-induced injury.

  3. 77 FR 62396 - Annual Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Banking Organizations With Total Consolidated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    .... 1438] RIN 7100-AD-86 Annual Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Banking Organizations With Total... federal financial regulatory agency to conduct stress tests on an annual basis. The Board is adopting this final rule to implement the company-run stress test requirements in the Dodd-Frank Act regarding...

  4. 40 CFR 86.137-96 - Dynamometer test run, gaseous and particulate emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dynamometer test run, gaseous and particulate emissions. 86.137-96 Section 86.137-96 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... New Otto-Cycle Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.137-96 Dynamometer test run,...

  5. 40 CFR 1042.501 - How do I run a valid emission test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I run a valid emission test? 1042.501 Section 1042.501 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Test Procedures § 1042.501 How do I run a valid emission test? (a) Use the equipment and procedures...

  6. 9 CFR 54.11 - Approval of laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Approval of laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. 54.11 Section 54.11 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. (a) State, Federal, and...

  7. Can we test Dark Energy with Running Fundamental Constants ?

    CERN Document Server

    Doran, M

    2004-01-01

    We investigate a link between the running of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$ and a time evolving scalar dark energy field. Employing a versatile parameterization for the equation of state, we exhaustively cover the space of dark energy models. Under the assumption that the change in $\\alpha$ is to first order given by the evolution of the Quintessence field, we show that current Oklo, Quasi Stellar Objects and Equivalence Principle observations restrict the model parameters considerably stronger than observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background, Large Scale Structure and Supernovae Ia combined.

  8. Can we test dark energy with running fundamental constants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Michael

    2005-04-01

    We investigate a link between the running of the fine structure constant α and a time evolving scalar dark energy field. Employing a versatile parametrization for the equation of state, we exhaustively cover the space of dark energy models. Under the assumption that the change in α is to first order given by the evolution of the quintessence field, we show that current Oklo, quasi-stellar object and equivalence principle observations restrict the model parameters considerably more strongly than observations of the cosmic microwave background, large scale structure and supernovae Ia combined.

  9. A PILOT STUDY COMPARING TWO FIELD TESTS WITH THE TREADMILL RUN TEST IN SOCCER PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rashid Aziz

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the performances obtained during soccer-specific field tests of the 20 m multistage shuttle run test (MST and the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test (YIET, with the measured maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max obtained in both field tests as well as that obtained in the traditional test of running to exhaustion on a treadmill (TRT, in young trained soccer players. Twenty-one National-level youth players performed, in random order, the MST and YIET to determine the relationship between the two field tests. From these, eight randomly chosen players performed their field tests as well as a TRT, equipped with an ambulatory gas exchange measurement device. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis showed that the players' performance (i.e. distance covered in the MST and YIET was correlated (r = 0.65, p 0.05. In contrast, significant correlations were observed between the players' performance in the MST with the measured VO2max obtained in the same MST and in the YIET (both p < 0.05; and attained almost statistical significance with the measured VO2max in the TRT (p = 0.06. The lack of association between distances covered in the YIET with all the measured VO2max values suggest that measured VO2max per se may not be suitable to characterize soccer players' intermittent endurance performance. In comparison with the MST, the YIET may be a more favourable field-based assessment of soccer player's endurance performance

  10. LHC Report: Tests of new LHC running modes

    CERN Multimedia

    Verena Kain for the LHC team

    2012-01-01

    On 13 September, the LHC collided lead ions with protons for the first time. This outstanding achievement was key preparation for the planned 2013 operation in this mode. Outside of two special physics runs, the LHC has continued productive proton-proton luminosity operation.   Celebrating proton-ion collisions. The first week of September added another 1 fb-1 of integrated luminosity to ATLAS’s and CMS’s proton-proton data set. It was a week of good and steady production mixed with the usual collection of minor equipment faults. The peak performance was slightly degraded at the start of the week but thanks to the work of the teams in the LHC injectors the beam brightness – and thus the LHC peak performance – were restored to previous levels by the weekend. The LHC then switched to new running modes and spectacularly proved its potential as a multi-purpose machine. This is due in large part to the LHC equipment and controls, which have been designed wi...

  11. Increased Skeletal Muscle GLUT4 Expression in Obese Mice After Voluntary Wheel Running Exercise Is Posttranscriptional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurley, Jami M; Griesel, Beth A; Olson, Ann Louise

    2016-10-01

    Exercise promotes glucose clearance by increasing skeletal muscle GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake. Importantly, exercise upregulates muscle GLUT4 expression in an insulin-independent manner under conditions of insulin resistance, such as with type 2 diabetes. However, the insulin-independent mechanism responsible for rescued muscle GLUT4 expression is poorly understood. We used voluntary wheel running (VWR) in mice to test the prevailing hypothesis that insulin-independent upregulation of skeletal muscle GLUT4 protein expression with exercise is through increased Glut4 transcription. We demonstrate that 4 weeks of VWR exercise in obese mice rescued high-fat diet-induced decreased muscle GLUT4 protein and improved both fasting plasma insulin and hepatic triacylglyceride levels, but did not rescue muscle Glut4 mRNA. Persistent reduction in Glut4 mRNA suggests that a posttranscriptional mechanism regulated insulin-independent muscle GLUT4 protein expression in response to exercise in lean and obese mice. Reduction of GLUT4 protein in sedentary animals upon treatment with rapamycin revealed mTORC1-dependent GLUT4 regulation. However, no difference in GLUT4 protein expression was observed in VWR-exercised mice treated with either rapamycin or Torin 1, indicating that exercise-dependent regulation on GLUT4 was mTOR independent. The findings provide new insight into the mechanisms responsible for exercise-dependent regulation of GLUT4 in muscle.

  12. Adaptive testing for psychological assessment: how many items are enough to run an adaptive testing algorithm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner-Menghin, Michaela M; Masters, Geoff N

    2013-01-01

    Although the principles of adaptive testing were established in the psychometric literature many years ago (e.g., Weiss, 1977), and practice of adaptive testing is established in educational assessment, it not yet widespread in psychological assessment. One obstacle to adaptive psychological testing is a lack of clarity about the necessary number of items to run an adaptive algorithm. The study explores the relationship between item bank size, test length and measurement precision. Simulated adaptive test runs (allowing a maximum of 30 items per person) out of an item bank with 10 items per ability level (covering .5 logits, 150 items total) yield a standard error of measurement (SEM) of .47 (.39) after an average of 20 (29) items for 85-93% (64-82%) of the simulated rectangular sample. Expanding the bank to 20 items per level (300 items total) did not improve the algorithm's performance significantly. With a small item bank (5 items per ability level, 75 items total) it is possible to reach the same SEM as with a conventional test, but with fewer items or a better SEM with the same number of items.

  13. 40 CFR 1039.501 - How do I run a valid emission test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I run a valid emission test? 1039.501 Section 1039.501 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Procedures § 1039.501 How do I run a valid emission test? (a) Use the equipment and procedures...

  14. 40 CFR 86.341-79 - Diesel engine dynamometer test run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Diesel engine dynamometer test run. 86.341-79 Section 86.341-79 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR....341-79 Diesel engine dynamometer test run. (a) This section applies to Diesel engines only....

  15. Testing LHT at the LHC Run-II

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Qing-Hong; Liu, Yandong

    2016-01-01

    We study the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT) in the process of $pp \\to W_H^+W_H^- \\to W^+W^- A_H A_H$ at the 14 TeV LHC. With the $W$-jet tagging technique, we demonstrate that the bulk of the model parameter space can be probed at the level of more than $5\\sigma$ in the signature of two fat $W$-jets plus large missing energy. Furthermore, we propose a novel strategy of measuring the principle parameter $f$ that is crucial to testify the LHT model and to fix mass spectrum, including dark matter particle. Our proposal can be easily incorporated into current experimental program of diboson searches at the LHC Run-II.

  16. RUNS TEST FOR A CIRCULAR DISTRIBUTION AND A TABLE OF PROBABILITIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    of the well-known Wald - Wolfowitz runs test for a distribution on a straight line. The primary advantage of the proposed test is that it minimizes the number of assumptions on the theoretical distribution.

  17. Influence of running stride frequency in heart rate variability analysis during treadmill exercise testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailón, Raquel; Garatachea, Nuria; de la Iglesia, Ignacio; Casajús, Jose Antonio; Laguna, Pablo

    2013-07-01

    The analysis and interpretation of heart rate variability (HRV) during exercise is challenging not only because of the nonstationary nature of exercise, the time-varying mean heart rate, and the fact that respiratory frequency exceeds 0.4 Hz, but there are also other factors, such as the component centered at the pedaling frequency observed in maximal cycling tests, which may confuse the interpretation of HRV analysis. The objectives of this study are to test the hypothesis that a component centered at the running stride frequency (SF) appears in the HRV of subjects during maximal treadmill exercise testing, and to study its influence in the interpretation of the low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components of HRV during exercise. The HRV of 23 subjects during maximal treadmill exercise testing is analyzed. The instantaneous power of different HRV components is computed from the smoothed pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution of the modulating signal assumed to carry information from the autonomic nervous system, which is estimated based on the time-varying integral pulse frequency modulation model. Besides the LF and HF components, the appearance is revealed of a component centered at the running SF as well as its aliases. The power associated with the SF component and its aliases represents 22±7% (median±median absolute deviation) of the total HRV power in all the subjects. Normalized LF power decreases as the exercise intensity increases, while normalized HF power increases. The power associated with the SF does not change significantly with exercise intensity. Consideration of the running SF component and its aliases is very important in HRV analysis since stride frequency aliases may overlap with LF and HF components.

  18. 40 CFR 89.407 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... permitted to precondition the engine at rated speed and maximum horsepower until the oil and water... is void and may be aborted. The test mode may be restarted by preconditioning with the previous mode... pretest value, the test segment is void. ...

  19. Testing for Long-Run Relation between Economic Growth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael O. Mensah

    2016-06-01

    Jun 1, 2016 ... cointegration test based on Johansen's procedure indicate the existence of a cointegration between export earnings of ..... going by the result of the Trace statistic, the null ..... Shumway R. H. and Stoffer D. S. (2010), Time.

  20. Running increases cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the adult mouse dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Praag, H; Kempermann, G; Gage, F H

    1999-03-01

    Exposure to an enriched environment increases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of adult rodents. Environmental enrichment, however, typically consists of many components, such as expanded learning opportunities, increased social interaction, more physical activity and larger housing. We attempted to separate components by assigning adult mice to various conditions: water-maze learning (learner), swim-time-yoked control (swimmer), voluntary wheel running (runner), and enriched (enriched) and standard housing (control) groups. Neither maze training nor yoked swimming had any effect on bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cell number. However, running doubled the number of surviving newborn cells, in amounts similar to enrichment conditions. Our findings demonstrate that voluntary exercise is sufficient for enhanced neurogenesis in the adult mouse dentate gyrus.

  1. Comparison of Sprint and Run Times with Performance on the Wingate Anaerobic Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, Gerald D.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Male volunteers were studied to examine the relationship between the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) and sprint-run times and to determine the influence of age and weight. Results indicate the WAnT is a moderate predictor of dash and run times but becomes a stronger predictor when adjusted for body weight. (Author/MT)

  2. The relationship between the interval shuttle run test and maximal oxygen uptake in soccer players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmink, KAPM; Visscher, C

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the interval shuttle run test (ISRT) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) in soccer players. The ISRT was developed to measure interval endurance capacity. During the ISRT, subjects alternately run for 30 sec and walk for 15 sec with

  3. 40 CFR 91.409 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... water temperatures are stabilized. The temperatures are defined as stabilized if they are maintained... another mode, the test is void and must be restarted as described at paragraph (b)(1) of this section. (11... period for each mode. If this requirement is not met, the mode is void and must be restarted. (12) If at...

  4. Reflex response and control of the human soleus and gastrocnemius muscles during walking and running at increasing velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjær, Tine; Raffalt, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    than the soleus H-reflex. In both muscles the H-reflex increased significantly from walking to running but also with increasing running speed. The peak of EMG activity increased in both muscles with increasing speed. The V-wave of both muscles was absent or rather low during walking, but it increased...... significantly from walking to running with increasing running speed in the soleus but not in the medial gastrocnemius. In both muscles the V-wave was highest just prior to heel strike. It is suggested that this was due to a high firing frequency of the motoneurones in this phase of the movement. It is concluded...

  5. Does e-Commerce Always Increase Social Welfare in the Long Run?

    OpenAIRE

    Nakayama, Yuji; Nishimura, Kiyohiko G.

    2002-01-01

    We examine the effect of electronic commerce ("e-commerce") on social welfare, in the framework of conventional spatial competition models. We consider the case where both conventional and electronic retailers coexist in equilibrium. We show that e-commerce does not necessarily increase social welfare in the long run. In particular, when electronic retailers have clear cost advantage over conventional retailers, then the advent of e-commerce is shown to reduce social welfare.

  6. Does e-Commerce Always Increase Social Welfare in the Long Run?

    OpenAIRE

    Nakayama, Yuji; Nishimura, kiyohiko G.

    2002-01-01

    We examine the effect of electronic commerce ("e-commerce") on social welfare, in the framework of conventional spatial competition models. We consider the case where both conventional and electronic retailers coexist in equilibrium. We show that e-commerce does not necessarily increase social welfare in the long run. In particular, when electronic retailers have clear cost advantage over conventional retailers, then the advent of e-commerce is shown to reduce social welfare.

  7. Test runs of a Belle II PXD prototype readout system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getzkow, Dennis; Kuehn, Wolfgang; Lange, Soeren; Lautenbach, Klemens [Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut (Germany); Gessler, Thomas [KEK, Tsukuba (Japan); Collaboration: Belle II-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Belle II PXD readout system (called ONSEN for Online Selection Nodes) uses ATCA (Advanced Telecommunications Architecture) boards with Xilinx Virtex-5 FX70T FPGAs and high speed optical links (6.5 Gbit/s each). The full system consists of 9 carrier boards and 33 daughter cards. The ONSEN system has several interfaces: (a) it receives PXD data from the DHH (Data Handling Hybrid) system, (b) it receives ROI (Regions-of-Interest) data for online data reduction from the HLT (High Level Trigger) system by GbE, and (c) it features data ports to two event builders: EVB1 combines data from all detectors except PXD (in order to generate the ROIs) and EVB2 combines the reduced PXD data with all other data. One of the critical issues is the matching of trigger numbers in the data (received by DHH from the timing distribution system) and trigger numbers in the ROIs (received by the HLT). In order to test the interfaces, in particular for a high HLT rate up to 30 kHz, a prototype system with 3 daughter cards was installed at KEK and tested with DHH, HLT and EVB2. Test results are presented.

  8. Reliability and validity of a novel intermittent peak running speed test for Australian football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Mitchell G; Hunter, Jayden R; O'Brien, Brendan J; Berry, Jason T; Young, Warren B

    2011-04-01

    Australian football requires frequent intermittent sprinting close to peak running speed. However, tests assessing the capability to maintain intermittent peak running speed are not reported in scientific literature. Therefore, our objective is to report the reliability and validity of a novel intermittent peak running speed test. The intermittent peak running speed test required footballers to perform 10 repetitions on 25-second intervals. Each repetition required 15-m jogging, 20-m acceleration to peak speed, 10 m to sustain peak speed, 20-m deceleration, and finally a 15-m jog. Intermittent peak running speed was determined by portable global positioning system. To assess reliability, 26 footballers performed the intermittent peak running speed test on 2 occasions 3-5 days apart. Our results revealed that average peak speed had a coefficient of variation of 2.2% and an intraclass correlation of 0.91. To assess construct validity, average peak speed was compared between elite, sub-elite, and regional footballers. The average peak speed of the elite footballers (28.6 ± 1.7 km · h(-1)) was higher than that of the sub-elite (27.4 ± 1.7 km · h(-1)) and regional (27 ± 1.9 km · h(-1)) competitors (p intermittent peak running speed test possesses acceptable reliability and distinguishes between elite and sub-elite footballers.

  9. Loading rate increases during barefoot running in habitually shod runners: Individual responses to an unfamiliar condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Nicholas; Astephen Wilson, Janie L; Coetzee, Devon R; van Pletsen, Leanri; Tucker, Ross

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of barefoot running on initial loading rate (LR), lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics, and neuromuscular control in habitually shod runners with an emphasis on the individual response to this unfamiliar condition. Kinematics and ground reaction force data were collected from 51 habitually shod runners during overground running in a barefoot and shod condition. Joint kinetics and stiffness were calculated with inverse dynamics. Inter-individual initial LR variability was explored by separating individuals by a barefoot/shod ratio to determine acute responders/non-responders. Mean initial LR was 54.1% greater in the barefoot when compared to the shod condition. Differences between acute responders/non-responders were found at peak and initial contact sagittal ankle angle and at initial ground contact. Correlations were found between barefoot sagittal ankle angle at initial ground contact and barefoot initial LR. A large variability in biomechanical responses to an acute exposure to barefoot running was found. A large intra-individual variability was found in initial LR but not ankle plantar-dorsiflexion between footwear conditions. A majority of habitually shod runners do not exhibit previously reported benefits in terms of reduced initial LRs when barefoot. Lastly, runners who increased LR when barefoot reduced LRs when wearing shoes to levels similar seen in habitually barefoot runners who do adopt a forefoot-landing pattern, despite increased dorsiflexion.

  10. AGR 3/4 Irradiation Test Final As Run Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin, Blaise P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Several fuel and material irradiation experiments have been planned for the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Reactor Technologies Technology Development Office Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program (referred to as the INL ART TDO/AGR fuel program hereafter), which supports the development and qualification of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for use in HTGRs. The goals of these experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination and safety testing (INL 05/2015). AGR-3/4 combined the third and fourth in this series of planned experiments to test TRISO coated low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide fuel. This combined experiment was intended to support the refinement of fission product transport models and to assess the effects of sweep gas impurities on fuel performance and fission product transport by irradiating designed-to-fail fuel particles and by measuring subsequent fission metal transport in fuel-compact matrix material and fuel-element graphite. The AGR 3/4 fuel test was successful in irradiating the fuel compacts to the burnup and fast fluence target ranges, considering the experiment was terminated short of its initial 400 EFPD target (Collin 2015). Out of the 48 AGR-3/4 compacts, 42 achieved the specified burnup of at least 6% fissions per initial heavy-metal atom (FIMA). Three capsules had a maximum fuel compact average burnup < 10% FIMA, one more than originally specified, and the maximum fuel compact average burnup was <19% FIMA for the remaining capsules, as specified. Fast neutron fluence fell in the expected range of 1.0 to 5.5×1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for all compacts. In addition, the AGR-3/4 experiment was globally successful in keeping the

  11. System and Component Software Specification, Run-time Verification and Automatic Test Generation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The following background technology is described in Part 5: Run-time Verification (RV), White Box Automatic Test Generation (WBATG). Part 5 also describes how WBATG...

  12. MEASUREMENT OF AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF A HANG-GLIDER-WING BY GROUND RUN TESTS USING A TEST VEHICLE

    OpenAIRE

    Hozumi, Koki; KOMODA, Masaki; Ono, Takatsugu; TSUKANO, Yukichi; 穂積, 弘毅; 古茂田, 真幸; 小野, 孝次; 塚野, 雄吉

    1987-01-01

    In order to investigate longitudinal force and moment characteristics of a hang-glider-wing, ground run tests were conducted using a test vehicle. A hang-glider-wing was installed on a test vehicle using a six-components-balance for wind tunnel use. Aerodynamic force and moment were measrued during the vehicle run at various constant speeds. Geometrical twist distribution along the wing span was recorded as well. Measured force and moment data were corrected for possible ground effect and upw...

  13. PEP Run Report for Simulant Shakedown/Functional Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josephson, Gary B.; Geeting, John GH; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.

    2009-12-29

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes." The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP; and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct injection of steam to accelerate the leach process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP-1, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3-8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP-2, the slurry is concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration

  14. A novel mouse running wheel that senses individual limb forces: biomechanical validation and in vivo testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Grahm C; Edke, Mangesh; Griffin, Timothy M

    2012-08-15

    Biomechanical data provide fundamental information about changes in musculoskeletal function during development, adaptation, and disease. To facilitate the study of mouse locomotor biomechanics, we modified a standard mouse running wheel to include a force-sensitive rung capable of measuring the normal and tangential forces applied by individual paws. Force data were collected throughout the night using an automated threshold trigger algorithm that synchronized force data with wheel-angle data and a high-speed infrared video file. During the first night of wheel running, mice reached consistent running speeds within the first 40 force events, indicating a rapid habituation to wheel running, given that mice generated >2,000 force-event files/night. Average running speeds and peak normal and tangential forces were consistent throughout the first four nights of running, indicating that one night of running is sufficient to characterize the locomotor biomechanics of healthy mice. Twelve weeks of wheel running significantly increased spontaneous wheel-running speeds (16 vs. 37 m/min), lowered duty factors (ratio of foot-ground contact time to stride time; 0.71 vs. 0.58), and raised hindlimb peak normal forces (93 vs. 115% body wt) compared with inexperienced mice. Peak normal hindlimb-force magnitudes were the primary force component, which were nearly tenfold greater than peak tangential forces. Peak normal hindlimb forces exceed the vertical forces generated during overground running (50-60% body wt), suggesting that wheel running shifts weight support toward the hindlimbs. This force-instrumented running-wheel system provides a comprehensive, noninvasive screening method for monitoring gait biomechanics in mice during spontaneous locomotion.

  15. 78 FR 67218 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Company-Run Annual Stress Test Reporting Template and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... Stress Test Reporting Template and Documentation for Covered Institutions With Total Consolidated Assets... requirement for national banks and Federal savings associations titled, ``Company-Run Annual Stress Test....gov/tools-forms/forms/bank-operations/stress-test-reporting.html ). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The...

  16. As-Run Physics Analysis for the UCSB-1 Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Joseph Wayne [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) -1 experiment was irradiated in the A-10 position of the ATR. The experiment was irradiated during cycles 145A, 145B, 146A, and 146B. Capsule 6A was removed from the test train following Cycle 145A and replaced with Capsule 6B. This report documents the as-run physics analysis in support of Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE) of the test. This report documents the as-run fluence and displacements per atom (DPA) for each capsule of the experiment based on as-run operating history of the ATR. Average as-run heating rates for each capsule are also presented in this report to support the thermal analysis.

  17. Test report for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation retrieval Pump-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglin, B.G.

    1997-08-15

    This report will provide the findings of the demonstration test conducted on the Double-Shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 HMR Pump-3 in accordance with WHC-SDWM-TP-434 ``Test plan for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation/retrieval pump-3`` at the 400 Area Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) building from 7 June 1996 through 30 July 1996 per work package 4A-96-92/W. The DST 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation retrieval Pump-3 is a 200-HP submersible electric driven pump that has been modified for use in the DST 241-SY-101 containing mixed waste located in the 200W area. The pump has a motor driven rotation mechanism that allows the pump column to rotate through 355{degree}. Prior to operation, pre-operational checks were performed which included loop calibration grooming and alignment of instruments, learning how plumb HMR-3 assembly hung in a vertical position and bump test of the motor to determine rotation direction. The pump was tested in the MASF Large Diameter Cleaning Vessel (LDCV) with process water at controlled temperatures and levels. In addition, the water temperature of the cooling water to the motor oil heat exchanger was recorded during testing. A 480-volt source powered a Variable Frequency Drive (VFD). The VFD powered the pump at various frequencies and voltages to control speed and power output of the pump. A second VFD powered the oil cooling pump. A third VFD was not available to operate the rotational drive motor during the 72 hour test, so it was demonstrated as operational before and after the test. A Mini Acquisition and Control System (Mini-DACS) controls pump functions and monitoring of the pump parameters. The Mini-DACS consists of three computers, software and some Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC). Startup and shutdown of either the pump motor or the oil cooling pump can be accomplished by the Mini-DACS. When the pump was in operation, the Mini-DACS monitors automatically collects data electronically. However, some required data

  18. Replication of Non-Trivial Directional Motion in Multi-Scales Observed by the Runs Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yura, Yoshihiro; Ohnishi, Takaaki; Yamada, Kenta; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

    Non-trivial autocorrelation in up-down statistics in financial market price fluctuation is revealed by a multi-scale runs test(Wald-Wolfowitz test). We apply two models, a stochastic price model and dealer model to understand this property. In both approaches we successfully reproduce the non-stationary directional price motions consistent with the runs test by tuning parameters in the models. We find that two types of dealers exist in the markets, a short-time-scale trend-follower and an extended-time-scale contrarian who are active in different time periods.

  19. How to finance investment in Bangladesh: Finding long-run factors in a bounds test method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biru Paksha Paula

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Investment in Bangladesh has been at almost one-fourth of the country’s output since the early 2000s. Consequently, Bangladesh’s growth has also remained stagnant at around 6 percent since then. The question of how to increase investment in Bangladesh has been of crucial discussion of late. This study examines the long run determinants of investment in Bangladesh by applying the bounds test over 1976-2010. There should not be any policy dilemma about the effect of lending rates, which must be reduced to boost investment and domestic credit should be expanded. Further liberalization in trade and finance is recommended since economic openness and financial deepening show a positive impact on capital formation. The policy prescriptions for Bangladesh are not different from those for other nations that embarked on liberalization to augment investment for accelerating growth.

  20. 40 CFR 86.340-79 - Gasoline-fueled engine dynamometer test run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline-fueled engine dynamometer... Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.340-79 Gasoline-fueled engine dynamometer test run. (a) This section applies to...

  1. Testing for purchasing power parity in the long-run for ASEAN-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choji, Niri Martha; Sek, Siok Kun

    2017-04-01

    For more than a decade, there has been a substantial interest in testing for the validity of the purchasing power parity (PPP) hypothesis empirically. This paper performs a test on revealing a long-run relative Purchasing Power Parity for a group of ASEAN-5 countries for the period of 1996-2016 using monthly data. For this purpose, we used the Pedroni co-integration method to test for the long-run hypothesis of purchasing power parity. We first tested for the stationarity of the variables and found that the variables are non-stationary at levels but stationary at first difference. Results of the Pedroni test rejected the null hypothesis of no co-integration meaning that we have enough evidence to support PPP in the long-run for the ASEAN-5 countries over the period of 1996-2016. In other words, the rejection of null hypothesis implies a long-run relation between nominal exchange rates and relative prices.

  2. Lactate minimum test during incremental running after a submaximal cycling exercise: a novel test with training applications for triathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Campous, D; Barbado, C; Nuñez, M J; Chicharro, J L

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether running speed determined in a lactate minimum test (lactate minimum intensity, LMI) during a treadmill incremental exercise performed just after submaximal cycling corresponds to the speed of a respiratory exchange ratio of 1.00 (RER-1) and, by extension, to the maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) previously obtained in a standard incremental exercise test. Eighteen moderately trained triathletes (15 men, 3 women) underwent two exercise sessions 72 h apart in random order: 1) a standard incremental treadmill test to identify the speed corresponding to RER-1, and 2) a submaximal exercise test on a bicycle-ergometer to obtain the LT (lactate threshold) followed by the incremental portion of the lactate minimum test on the treadmill. No significant differences were detected between running speed and heart rate at RER-1 and LMI (14.44±1.24 vs. 14.11±1.36 km·h-1 and 166.38±9.30 vs. 169.55±8.97 beats·min-1, respectively). Moreover, 95% of the differences between the results of the two incremental tests for running speed and heart rate were within the limits of agreement. These findings suggest the possibility of obtaining a valid physiological profile of a triathlete using a single test to assess the level of training in both cycling and running.

  3. Running with a minimalist shoe increases plantar pressure in the forefoot region of healthy female runners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, S. A.; Kluitenberg, B.; Dekker, R.; Bredeweg, S. W.; Postema, K.; Van den Heuvel, E. R.; Hijmans, J. M.; Sobhani, S.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Minimalist running shoes have been proposed as an alternative to barefoot running. However, several studies have reported cases of forefoot stress fractures after switching from standard to minimalist shoes. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the differences in pl

  4. A seven day running training period increases basal urinary hepcidin levels as compared to cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sim, M.; Dawson, B.; Landers, G.J.; Swinkels, D.W.; Tjalsma, H.; Wiegerinck, E.T.G.; Trinder, D.; Peeling, P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This investigation compared the effects of an extended period of weight-bearing (running) vs. non-weight-bearing (cycling) exercise on hepcidin production and its implications for iron status. METHODS: Ten active males performed two separate exercise training blocks with either running (

  5. A seven day running training period increases basal urinary hepcidin levels as compared to cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sim, M.; Dawson, B.; Landers, G.J.; Swinkels, D.W.; Tjalsma, H.; Wiegerinck, E.T.G.; Trinder, D.; Peeling, P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This investigation compared the effects of an extended period of weight-bearing (running) vs. non-weight-bearing (cycling) exercise on hepcidin production and its implications for iron status. METHODS: Ten active males performed two separate exercise training blocks with either running

  6. Exponential increase of signal crayfish in running waters in Sweden – due to illegal introductions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohman P.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Sweden has only one indigenous species of crayfish, the noble crayfish (Astacus astacus, Fabricius. There has been a steady decline of noble crayfish populations in Sweden since 1907, mainly due to the crayfish plague. To substitute the noble crayfish fishery lost, the Swedish government launched a large-scale introduction of the signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus Dana. Today, the signal crayfish is regarded as a chronic carrier of the crayfish plague, and an expansion of the species may seriously threaten the noble crayfish. This paper examines the decrease of noble crayfish populations, and the concurrent expansion of signal crayfish in running waters. Data from the Swedish Electrofishing RegiSter (SERS was used. We found that in 1980–1984 the noble crayfish occurred in 4.5% of the studied river sections. In 2008–2009 the occurrences had decreased to 1.9%. In contrast, the signal crayfish had increased in occurrence, from 0.2% (1980–1984 to 11.8% in (2008–2009. We studied the number of stocking permits for signal crayfish introductions, and the available signal crayfish population from the open fishery in Lake Vättern, as possible causes of this expansion. A negative correlation between stocking permits and increased occurrence in streams, and a positive correlation between the availability of crayfish in Lake Vättern and the occurrence in streams was found. This suggests that the expansion of signal crayfish may be due to illegal introductions, further endangering the endemic noble crayfish.

  7. Toxicological assessment of heavy straight run naphtha in a repeated dose/reproductive toxicity screening test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Richard H; Steup, David; Schreiner, Ceinwen; Podhasky, Paula; Malley, Linda A; Roberts, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Gasoline blending stocks (naphthas) are comprised of normal, iso- and cycloparaffins and aromatic hydrocarbons with carbon numbers ranging from C4 to C12. Heavy straight run naphtha (HSRN, CAS number 64741-41-9) was selected for toxicity screening because substances of this type contain relatively high levels (28%) of cycloparaffins by comparison to other naphtha streams and the data complement toxicity information on other gasoline blending streams. Rats were exposed by inhalation to wholly vaporized material at levels of approximately 100, 500, or 3000 parts per million (ppm) daily to screen the potential for systemic toxicity, neurotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, and developmental effects to postnatal day 4. All animals survived the treatment period. Principal effects of repeated exposure included increased liver weights in males and females, increased kidney weights in males, and histological changes in the thyroid, secondary to liver enzyme induction. These changes were not considered to be toxicologically meaningful and are not relevant to humans. There were no treatment-related effects in functional observation tests or motor activity; no significant reductions in fertility or changes in other reproductive parameters; and no evidence of developmental toxicity in offspring. The overall no observed adverse effect concentration was 3000 ppm (approximately 13, 600 mg/m(3)). In conclusion the HSRN effects on liver and kidney are consistent with the results of other studies of volatile fractions or other naphthas or formulated gasoline, and there were no HSRN effects on neurological developmental or reproductive parameters.

  8. Improved running economy and increased hemoglobin mass in elite runners after extended moderate altitude exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, P U; Telford, R D; Pyne, D B; Hahn, A G; Gore, C J

    2009-01-01

    There is conflicting evidence whether hypoxia improves running economy (RE), maximal O(2) uptake (V(O)(2max)), haemoglobin mass (Hb(mass)) and performance, and what total accumulated dose is necessary for effective adaptation. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of an extended hypoxic exposure on these physiological and performance measures. Nine elite middle distance runners were randomly assigned to a live high-train low simulated altitude group (ALT) and spent 46+/-8 nights (mean+/-S.D.) at 2860+/-41m. A matched control group (CON, n=9) lived and trained near sea level ( approximately 600m). ALT decreased submaximal V(O)(2) (Lmin(-1)) (-3.2%, 90% confidence intervals, -1.0% to -5.2%, p=0.02), increased Hb(mass) (4.9%, 2.3-7.6%, p=0.01), decreased submaximal heart rate (-3.1%, -1.8% to -4.4%, p=0.00) and had a trivial increase in V(O)(2max) (1.5%, -1.6 to 4.8; p=0.41) compared with CON. There was a trivial correlation between change in Hb(mass) and change in V(O)(2max) (r=0.04, p=0.93). Hypoxic exposure of approximately 400h was sufficient to improve Hb(mass), a response not observed with shorter exposures. Although total O(2) carrying capacity was improved, the mechanism(s) to explain the lack of proportionate increase in V(O)(2max) were not identified.

  9. Skeletal muscle Ca(2+)-independent kinase activity increases during either hypertrophy or running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluck, M.; Waxham, M. N.; Hamilton, M. T.; Booth, F. W.

    2000-01-01

    Spikes in free Ca(2+) initiate contractions in skeletal muscle cells, but whether and how they might signal to transcription factors in skeletal muscles of living animals is unknown. Since previous studies in non-muscle cells have shown that serum response factor (SRF) protein, a transcription factor, is phosphorylated rapidly by Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase after rises in intracellular Ca(2+), we measured enzymatic activity that phosphorylates SRF (designated SRF kinase activity). Homogenates from 7-day-hypertrophied anterior latissimus dorsi muscles of roosters had more Ca(2+)-independent SRF kinase activity than their respective control muscles. However, no differences were noted in Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent SRF kinase activity between control and trained muscles. To determine whether the Ca(2+)-independent and Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent forms of Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) might contribute to some of the SRF kinase activity, autocamtide-3, a synthetic substrate that is specific for CaMKII, was employed. While the Ca(2+)-independent form of CaMKII was increased, like the Ca(2+)-independent form of SRF kinase, no alteration in CaMKII occurred at 7 days of stretch overload. These observations suggest that some of SRF phosphorylation by skeletal muscle extracts could be due to CaMKII. To determine whether this adaptation was specific to the exercise type (i.e., hypertrophy), similar measurements were made in the white vastus lateralis muscle of rats that had completed 2 wk of voluntary running. Although Ca(2+)-independent SRF kinase was increased, no alteration occurred in Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent SRF kinase activity. Thus any role of Ca(2+)-independent SRF kinase signaling has downstream modulators specific to the exercise phenotype.

  10. Skeletal muscle Ca(2+)-independent kinase activity increases during either hypertrophy or running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluck, M.; Waxham, M. N.; Hamilton, M. T.; Booth, F. W.

    2000-01-01

    Spikes in free Ca(2+) initiate contractions in skeletal muscle cells, but whether and how they might signal to transcription factors in skeletal muscles of living animals is unknown. Since previous studies in non-muscle cells have shown that serum response factor (SRF) protein, a transcription factor, is phosphorylated rapidly by Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase after rises in intracellular Ca(2+), we measured enzymatic activity that phosphorylates SRF (designated SRF kinase activity). Homogenates from 7-day-hypertrophied anterior latissimus dorsi muscles of roosters had more Ca(2+)-independent SRF kinase activity than their respective control muscles. However, no differences were noted in Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent SRF kinase activity between control and trained muscles. To determine whether the Ca(2+)-independent and Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent forms of Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) might contribute to some of the SRF kinase activity, autocamtide-3, a synthetic substrate that is specific for CaMKII, was employed. While the Ca(2+)-independent form of CaMKII was increased, like the Ca(2+)-independent form of SRF kinase, no alteration in CaMKII occurred at 7 days of stretch overload. These observations suggest that some of SRF phosphorylation by skeletal muscle extracts could be due to CaMKII. To determine whether this adaptation was specific to the exercise type (i.e., hypertrophy), similar measurements were made in the white vastus lateralis muscle of rats that had completed 2 wk of voluntary running. Although Ca(2+)-independent SRF kinase was increased, no alteration occurred in Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent SRF kinase activity. Thus any role of Ca(2+)-independent SRF kinase signaling has downstream modulators specific to the exercise phenotype.

  11. Familiarization, reliability, and comparability of a 40-m maximal shuttle run test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaister, Mark; Hauck, Hanna; Abraham, Corinne S; Merry, Kevin L; Beaver, Dean; Woods, Bernadette; McInnes, Gillian

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine familiarization and reliability associated with a 40-m maximal shuttle run test (40-m MST), and to compare performance measures from the test with those of a typical unidirectional multiple sprint running test (UMSRT). 12 men and 4 women completed four trials of the 40-m MST (8 × 40-m; 20 s rest periods) followed by one trial of a UMSRT (12 × 30-m; repeated every 35 s); with seven days between trials. All trials were conducted indoors and performance times were recorded via twin-beam photocells. Significant between-trial differences in mean 40-m MST times were indicative of learning effects between trials 1 and 2. Test-retest reliability across the remaining trials as determined by coefficient of variation (CV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) revealed: a) very good reliability for measures of fastest and mean shuttle time (CV = 1.1 - 1.3%; ICC = 0.91 - 0.92); b) good reliability for measures of blood lactate (CV = 10.1 - 23.9%; ICC = 0.74 - 0.82) and ratings of perceived exertion (CV = 5.3 - 7.6%; ICC = 0.79 - 0.84); and c) poor reliability for measures of fatigue (CV = 38.7%; ICC = 0.59). Comparisons between performance indices of the 40-m MST and the UMSRT revealed significant correlations between all measures, except pre-test blood lactate concentration (r = 0. 47). Whilst the 40-m MST does not appear to provide more information than can be gleaned from a typical UMSRT, following the completion of a familiarization trial, the 40-m MST provides an alternative and, except for fatigue measures, reliable means of evaluating repeated sprint ability. Key pointsTests of multiple sprint performance are a popular means of evaluating repeated sprint ability.Multiple sprint tests incorporating changes of direction may be more ecologically valid than unidirectional protocols.The 40-m maximal shuttle run test is a reliable way of evaluating repeated sprint ability following the completion of one familiarization trial

  12. Behavioral Traits are Affected by Selective Breeding for Increased Wheel-Running Behavior in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonas, I.; Schubert, K. A.; Reijne, A. C.; Scholte, J.; Garland, T.; Gerkema, M. P.; Scheurink, A. J. W.; Nyakas, C.; van Dijk, G.; Garland Jr., T.; Maxson, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Voluntary physical activity may be related to personality traits. Here, we investigated these relations in two mouse lines selectively bred for high voluntary wheel-running behavior and in one non-selected control line. Selection lines were more explorative and "information gathering" in the open-fi

  13. Behavioral Traits are Affected by Selective Breeding for Increased Wheel-Running Behavior in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonas, I.; Schubert, K. A.; Reijne, A. C.; Scholte, J.; Garland, T.; Gerkema, M. P.; Scheurink, A. J. W.; Nyakas, C.; van Dijk, G.; Garland Jr., T.; Maxson, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Voluntary physical activity may be related to personality traits. Here, we investigated these relations in two mouse lines selectively bred for high voluntary wheel-running behavior and in one non-selected control line. Selection lines were more explorative and "information gathering" in the open-fi

  14. Tendon elastic strain energy in the human ankle plantar-flexors and its role with increased running speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Adrian; Schache, Anthony G; Lin, Yi-Chung; Pandy, Marcus G

    2014-09-01

    The human ankle plantar-flexors, the soleus and gastrocnemius, utilize tendon elastic strain energy to reduce muscle fiber work and optimize contractile conditions during running. However, studies to date have considered only slow to moderate running speeds up to 5 m s(-1). Little is known about how the human ankle plantar-flexors utilize tendon elastic strain energy as running speed is advanced towards maximum sprinting. We used data obtained from gait experiments in conjunction with musculoskeletal modeling and optimization techniques to calculate muscle-tendon unit (MTU) work, tendon elastic strain energy and muscle fiber work for the ankle plantar-flexors as participants ran at five discrete steady-state speeds ranging from jogging (~2 m s(-1)) to sprinting (≥8 m s(-1)). As running speed progressed from jogging to sprinting, the contribution of tendon elastic strain energy to the positive work generated by the MTU increased from 53% to 74% for the soleus and from 62% to 75% for the gastrocnemius. This increase was facilitated by greater muscle activation and the relatively isometric behavior of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscle fibers. Both of these characteristics enhanced tendon stretch and recoil, which contributed to the bulk of the change in MTU length. Our results suggest that as steady-state running speed is advanced towards maximum sprinting, the human ankle plantar-flexors continue to prioritize the storage and recovery of tendon elastic strain energy over muscle fiber work.

  15. W-026 integrated engineering cold run operational test report for balance of plant (BOP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersten, J.K.

    1998-02-24

    This Cold Run test is designed to demonstrate the functionality of systems necessary to move waste drums throughout the plant using approved procedures, and the compatibility of these systems to function as an integrated process. This test excludes all internal functions of the gloveboxes. In the interest of efficiency and support of the facility schedule, the initial revision of the test (rev 0) was limited to the following: Receipt and storage of eight overpacked drums, four LLW and four TRU; Receipt, routing, and staging of eleven empty drums to the process area where they will be used later in this test; Receipt, processing, and shipping of two verification drums (Route 9); Receipt, processing, and shipping of two verification drums (Route 1). The above listed operations were tested using the rev 0 test document, through Section 5.4.25. The document was later revised to include movement of all staged drums to and from the LLW and TRU process and RWM gloveboxes. This testing was performed using Sections 5.5 though 5.11 of the rev 1 test document. The primary focus of this test is to prove the functionality of automatic operations for all mechanical and control processes listed. When necessary, the test demonstrates manual mode operations as well. Though the gloveboxes are listed, only waste and empty drum movement to, from, and between the gloveboxes was tested.

  16. A comparison of two different shuttle run tests for the estimation of VO2max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, L M; Cooley, D; Kearney, V; Smith, S

    1996-06-01

    The aims of this experiment were twofold. The first was to determine whether there was a significant difference between two types of 20-m shuttle run test used to estimate VO2max, these being the Canadian version (CT) and the European versione (ET). The second aim was to determine which of the two tests best estimated direct VO2 measurement in our laboratory. To accomplish the first aim, 500 schoolchildren aged 12 to 16 years were randomly chosen from schools within Tasmania to undertake the two tests within seven days of each other. On the day of testing the children were assigned to one of the two tests and had no knowledge as to which test was being undertaken. Half of the children underwent the CT test first while the other half undertook the ET test first. Seven days after the first test was completed the appropriate second test was undertaken. The instructions to each child centred around the necessity to complete as many shuttles as possible staying in time with a pre-recorded signal. A relationship between the two sets of shuttle run data indicated that there was a significant correlation between the ET and CT, r = 0.834 (p test revealed that when the estimates of VO2max were compared however, there was a significant difference between the two tests (p VO2max at 34.9 +/- 0.45 ml.kg-1.min-1 whereas the CT estimated VO2max at 43.3 +/- 0.40 ml.kg-1.min-1. When this data was correlated, the co-efficient dropped to r = 0.761 which was still significant (p VO2max test (DM) which was conducted via standard open circuit spirometry using a Quinton Metabolic Cart (QMC). The highest correlation was DM:ET being r = 0.93 whereas DM:CT was r = 0.87, both being significant at p VO2max as 37.6 +/- 0.37 ml.kg-1.min-1 whereas ET underestimated DM and measured VO2max at 34.7 +/- 0.56 ml.kg-1.min-1. The CT (41.9 +/- 0.62 ml.kg-1.min-1) over estimated DM by 11.4% however, the difference here also being significant (p test or the other in the estimation of VO2max as the two

  17. An alternative approach to the Army Physical Fitness Test two-mile run using critical velocity and isoperformance curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, David H; Smith, Abbie E; Kendall, Kristina L; Cramer, Joel T; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of critical velocity (CV) and isoperformance curves as an alternative to the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) two-mile running test. Seventy-eight men and women (mean +/- SE; age: 22.1 +/- 0.34 years; VO2(MAX): 46.1 +/- 0.82 mL/kg/min) volunteered to participate in this study. A VO2(MAX) test and four treadmill running bouts to exhaustion at varying intensities were completed. The relationship between total distance and time-to-exhaustion was tracked for each exhaustive run to determine CV and anaerobic running capacity. A VO2(MAX) prediction equation (Coefficient of determination: 0.805; Standard error of the estimate: 3.2377 mL/kg/min) was developed using these variables. Isoperformance curves were constructed for men and women to correspond with two-mile run times from APFT standards. Individual CV and anaerobic running capacity values were plotted and compared to isoperformance curves for APFT 2-mile run scores. Fifty-four individuals were determined to receive passing scores from this assessment. Physiological profiles identified from this procedure can be used to assess specific aerobic or anaerobic training needs. With the use of time-to-exhaustion as opposed to a time-trial format used in the two-mile run test, pacing strategies may be limited. The combination of variables from the CV test and isoperformance curves provides an alternative to standardized time-trial testing.

  18. Hypothalamic Npy mRNA is correlated with increased wheel running and decreased body fat in calorie-restricted rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegsegger, Gregory N; Speichinger, Katherine R; Manier, Jacob B; Younger, Kyle M; Childs, Thomas E; Booth, Frank W

    2016-04-01

    The neuro-molecular mechanisms that regulate the relationship between physical activity level, energy homeostasis regulation, and body fat are unclear. Thus, we aimed to investigate the relationship between mRNAs in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) related to energy homeostasis, wheel running distance, and body fat in ad lib (AL) and calorie-restricted (CR) growing rats. We hypothesized that changes in select mRNAs (Pomc, Cart, Agrp, Npy, Lepr, Insr, Mc4r, Ampk, Sirt1, Sirt3) in CR would be associated with decreases in body fat percentage and increased wheel running behavior. Male Wistar rats were given access to voluntary running wheels at 4 weeks of age and randomized into AL (n=8) and CR (70% of AL; n=7) groups at 5 weeks of age until study termination at 12 weeks of age. Body composition, serum leptin, insulin, and adiponectin, and ARC mRNA expression in AL and CR rats were assessed and correlated with week-12 running distance to examine potential relationships that may exist. By 12 weeks of age, wheel running was increased ∼3.3-fold (p=0.03) while body fat percentage was ∼2-fold lower in CR compared to AL (p=0.001). Compared to AL, ARC Npy mRNA expression was ∼2-fold greater in CR (p=0.02), while Lepr, Insr, Ampk, and Sirt1 mRNA were additionally increased in CR (pNpy mRNA levels versus week-12 wheel running distance (r=0.81, p=0.03), body fat (r=-0.93, pNpy action.

  19. Membrane leakage and increased content of Na+ -K+ pumps and Ca2+ in human muscle after a 100-km run

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Kristian; Lindstrøm, Tue; Ingemann-Hansen, Thorsten

    2002-01-01

    content, and plasma concentrations of creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). After completion of a 100-km run, significant increases were found in plasma K+ (from 4.0 +/- 0.1 to 5.5 +/- 0.2 mM, P

  20. Determination of maximum aerobic velocity by a five minute test with reference to running world records. A theoretical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoux, A; Berthon, P; Laubignat, J F

    1996-01-01

    Field measurement of the maximal aerobic velocity (MAV) is closely linked to effort-duration then to the used protocol. We construct the relationship between running speed and running-duration logarithm from running world records. It appears a noteworthy point at 4.97 minutes, to be suggested as MAV duration point. By agreement, MAV could be measured on field by a five minute test whatever the sport may be.

  1. On the mechanism of running-in during wear tests of a babbitt B83

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeeva, A. Kh.; Valeev, I. Sh.; Fazlyakhmetov, R. F.; Pshenichnyuk, A. I.

    2015-05-01

    Based on an analysis of changes in the structure of cast babbitt of grade B83 in the process of wear tests and on a comparison of the wear curves of cast babbitt and electroplated coating of the same phase composition, there is proposed a wear mechanism at the running-in stage of B83, which is reduced to the spalling-off of coarse particles of the intermetallic β phase, pressing-in of the cleaved particles into the soft plastic matrix, and the formation of a fairly homogeneous coating uniformly paved by small, hard particles.

  2. Wind tunnel tests on slow-running vertical-axis wind-rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasegaram, S.

    1981-09-01

    This paper summarizes the results of investigations on the Savonius-type, slow-running, vertical-axis wind-rotors as well as on rotor designs on different subclasses under comparable design and test conditions. It is seen that the performance of the conventional Savonius rotor could be considerably improved upon and the best results are achieved by using two-bladed rotors with a more sophisticated sectional profile than in the conventional design. Rotors with several blades, although capable of considerably higher performance than the Savonius rotor, do not appear to be as good as those with two blades and improved sectional geometry.

  3. Large Scale Model Test Investigation on Wave Run-Up in Irregular Waves at Slender Piles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez, Jorge Robert Rodriguez; Frigaard, Peter; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    2013-01-01

    from high speed video recordings. Based on the measured run-up heights different types of prediction formulae for run-up in irregular waves were evaluated. In conclusion scale effects on run-up levels seems small except for differences in spray. However, run-up of individual waves is difficult...

  4. Increased wheel-running activity in the genetically skeletal muscle fast-twitch fiber-dominant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Masataka; Nakano, Hiroshi; Higaki, Yasuki; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Katsuta, Shigeru; Kumagai, Shuzo

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether genetic differences in muscle histochemical characteristics were related to the voluntary wheel-running activity level by using genetically fast-twitch fiber-dominant rats (FFDR) and control rats (CR). The rats were divided into four groups; sedentary CR (Sed-CR), wheel-running CR (WR-CR), sedentary FFDR (Sed-FFDR), and wheel-running FFDR (WR-FFDR). Wheel access was started at age 9 wk and lasted for 7 days. The FFDR showed a lower percentage of type I fibers of the deep portion of gastrocnemius and soleus muscles and a higher percentage of both type IIX fibers of the gastrocnemius muscle and type IIA fibers of the soleus muscle compared with CR. A higher capillary density and smaller fiber cross-sectional area were also observed in FFDR. The daily running distance in WR-FFDR was higher than in WR-CR for each 7 days. The total running distance for 7 days in WR-FFDR was 3.2-fold higher than in WR-CR. On day 7 of the 7-day test, the total number of active 1-min intervals for 24 h, the average rpm when they were active, and the maximum rpm for any single 1-min period in the WR-FFDR were significantly higher than in the WR-CR (1.5-, 2.9-, and 2.0-fold, respectively). These results suggest that mechanical or physiological muscle characteristics may thus affect the wheel-running activity level.

  5. Rapamycin increases grip strength and attenuates age-related decline in maximal running distance in old low capacity runner rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qian-Li; Yang, Huanle; Li, Hui-Fen; Abadir, Peter M; Burks, Tyesha N; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Carlson, Joshua; Chen, Laura; Walston, Jeremy D; Leng, Sean X

    2016-04-01

    Rapamycin is known to extend lifespan. We conducted a randomized placebo-controlled study of enteric rapamycin-treatment to evaluate its effect on physical function in old low capacity runner (LCR) rats, a rat model selected from diverse genetic background for low intrinsic aerobic exercise capacity without genomic manipulation and characterized by increased complex disease risks and aging phenotypes. The study was performed in 12 male and 16 female LCR rats aged 16-22 months at baseline. The treatment group was fed with rapamycin-containing diet pellets at approximately 2.24mg/kg body weight per day and the placebo group with the same diet without rapamycin for six months. Observation was extended for additional 2 months. Physical function measurements include grip strength measured as maximum tensile force using a rat grip strength meter and maximum running distance (MRD) using rat physical treadmill test. The results showed that rapamycin improved grip strength by 13% (p=.036) and 60% (p=.001) from its baseline in female and male rats, respectively. Rapamycin attenuated MRD decline by 66% (p=.001) and 46% (p=.319) in females and males, respectively. These findings provide initial evidence for beneficial effect of rapamycin on physical functioning in an aging rat model of high disease risks with significant implication in humans.

  6. FAMILIARIZATION, RELIABILITY, AND COMPARABILITY OF A 40-M MAXIMAL SHUTTLE RUN TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Glaister

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to examine familiarization and reliability associated with a 40-m maximal shuttle run test (40-m MST, and to compare performance measures from the test with those of a typical unidirectional multiple sprint running test (UMSRT. 12 men and 4 women completed four trials of the 40-m MST (8 × 40-m; 20 s rest periods followed by one trial of a UMSRT (12 × 30-m; repeated every 35 s; with seven days between trials. All trials were conducted indoors and performance times were recorded via twin-beam photocells. Significant between-trial differences in mean 40-m MST times were indicative of learning effects between trials 1 and 2. Test-retest reliability across the remaining trials as determined by coefficient of variation (CV and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC revealed: a very good reliability for measures of fastest and mean shuttle time (CV = 1.1 - 1.3%; ICC = 0.91 - 0.92; b good reliability for measures of blood lactate (CV = 10.1 - 23.9%; ICC = 0.74 - 0.82 and ratings of perceived exertion (CV = 5.3 - 7.6%; ICC = 0.79 - 0.84; and c poor reliability for measures of fatigue (CV = 38.7%; ICC = 0.59. Comparisons between performance indices of the 40-m MST and the UMSRT revealed significant correlations between all measures, except pre-test blood lactate concentration (r = 0. 47. Whilst the 40-m MST does not appear to provide more information than can be gleaned from a typical UMSRT, following the completion of a familiarization trial, the 40-m MST provides an alternative and, except for fatigue measures, reliable means of evaluating repeated sprint ability

  7. Thin film fabrication and system integration test run for a microactuator for a tuneable lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoheisel, Dominik; Rissing, Lutz

    2014-03-01

    An electromagnetic microactuator, for controlling of a tuneable lens, with an integrated electrostatic element is fabricated by thin film technology. The actuator consists of two parts: the first part with microcoil and flux guide and the second part with a ring shaped back iron on a polyimide membrane. The back iron is additionally useable as electrode for electrostatic measurement of the air gap and for electrostatic actuation. By attracting the back iron an optical liquid is displaced and forms a liquid lens inside the back iron ring covered by the membrane. For testing the thin film fabrication sequence, up-scaled systems are generated in a test run. To fabricate the flux guide in an easy and quick way, a Ni-Fe foil with a thickness of 50 μm is laminated on the Si-wafer. This foil is also utilized in the following fabrication sequence as seed layer for electroplating. Compared to Ni-Fe structures deposited by electroplating, the foil is featuring better soft magnetic properties. The foil is structured by wet chemical etching and the backside of the wafer is structured by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). For post fabrication thinning, the polyimide membrane is treated by oxygen plasma etching. To align the back iron to the microcoil and the flux guide, a flip-chip-bonder is used during test run of system integration. To adjust a constant air gap, a water solvable polymer is tested. A two component epoxy and a polyimide based glue are compared for their bonding properties of the actuator parts.

  8. Concomitant increase in blood plasma levels of immunoreactive hemorphin-7 and beta-endorphin following long distance running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glämsta, E L; Mørkrid, L; Lantz, I; Nyberg, F

    1993-11-19

    Hemorphins are endogenous opioids derived by enzymatic degradation of hemoglobin, a protein released in blood plasma during long distance running. We examined levels of beta-endorphin and the heptapeptide hemorphin-7, in heparinized venous blood plasma from 15 sedentary controls (8 males, 7 females) and from 15 age- and sex-matched marathon runners at baseline and after running 42 km or 21 km. Baseline levels of beta-endorphin (range 0.2-4.3 fmol/ml) were neither dependent upon weight, body mass index weight/height, running status nor sex. Baseline levels of hemorphin-7 (range 0.2-6.9 pmol/ml) were lower in women (P < 0.04) and covariated positively with body weight (P = 0.06), explaining lower levels in runners by their lower body weight. Covariation with body mass index was positive, but not significant (P = 0.10), however, here the dependence upon sex appeared stronger (P = 0.014). Running induced significant and correlated increases in hemorphin-7 and beta-endorphin (r = 0.74; P < 0.002), possibly indicating a functional relationship between these two peptides.

  9. Trial Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.; Deibert, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.

    2014-06-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires), caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat', 'thermal-cycle', or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine 4 moisture-cured silicones, 4 foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 deg C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden, Miami, and Phoenix for 1 year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

  10. Increased variability of lap speeds: differentiating medalists and nonmedalists in middle-distance running and swimming events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytton, Graham J; Archer, David T; Turner, Louise; Skorski, Sabrina; Renfree, Andrew; Thompson, Kevin G; St Clair Gibson, Alan

    2015-04-01

    Previous literature has presented pacing data of groups of competition finalists. The aim of this study was to analyze the pacing patterns displayed by medalists and nonmedalists in international competitive 400-m swimming and 1500-m running finals. Split times were collected from 48 swimming finalists (four 100-m laps) and 60 running finalists (4 laps) in international competitions from 2004 to 2012. Using a cross-sectional design, lap speeds were normalized to whole-race speed and compared to identify variations of pace between groups of medalists and nonmedalists. Lap-speed variations relative to the gold medalist were compared for the whole field. In 400-m swimming the medalist group demonstrated greater variation in speed than the nonmedalist group, being relatively faster in the final lap (P .001; moderate effect). There were also greater variations of pace in the 1500-m running medalist group than in the nonmedalist group, with a relatively faster final lap (P = .03; moderate effect) and slower second lap (P = .01; small effect). Swimming gold medalists were relatively faster than all other finalists in lap 4 (P = .04), and running gold medalists were relatively faster than the 5th- to 12th-placed athletes in the final lap (P = .02). Athletes who win medals in 1500-m running and 400-m swimming competitions show different pacing patterns than nonmedalists. End-spurt-speed increases are greater with medalists, who demonstrate a slower relative speed in the early part of races but a faster speed during the final part of races than nonmedalists.

  11. 78 FR 59791 - Annual Company-Run Stress Tests at Banking Organizations With Total Consolidated Assets of More...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... test by the Federal Reserve and the requirements for semi-annual company run stress tests. See 12 CFR....154 Annual stress test. (a) General requirements--(1) Savings and loan holding companies with average... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 12...

  12. Effects of measurement dependence on generalized Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt Bell test in the single-run and multiple-run scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan-Dan; Zhou, Yu-Qian; Gao, Fei; Li, Xin-Hui; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2016-07-01

    Bell tests, as primitive tools to detect nonlocality in bipartite systems, rely on an assumption, i.e., measurement independence. Since ensuring measurement independence in a practical Bell test is difficult, it is crucial to explore the effects of relaxing this assumption. Recently, in the simplest Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt Bell (CHSH-Bell) test, Koh et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 160404 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.160404] built the relation among measurement dependence, guessing probability, and the maximum value of CHSH-Bell correlation function that an adversary (Eve) can fake. As well, Pope et al. [Phys. Rev. A 88, 032110 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.032110] and Yuan et al. [Phys. Rev. A. 91, 032111 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.032111] settled the same problem in the multiple-run scenario with the general input distribution and the factorizable one, respectively. However, pertinent results in the generalized CHSH-Bell test are still missing. Here, we study this problem and establish the relation among measurement dependence, guessing probability, and the maximum value of the generalized CHSH-Bell correlation function that Eve can fake. Furthermore, we also consider the multiple-run scenario and show the relations in both input distributions. Interestingly, compared with the simplest CHSH-Bell test, we find that it is more difficult for Eve to fake a violation in the generalized CHSH-Bell test in some special cases. We expect that our conclusions will serve as a reference for quantum information processing tasks such as quantum key distribution, randomness expansion, and other tasks in the device-independent framework.

  13. Running more than three kilometers during the first week of a running regimen may be associated with increased risk of injury in obese novice runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, R.O.; Bertelsen, Michael Lejbach; Parner, Erik Thorlund;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Training guidelines for novice runners are needed to reduce the risk of injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the risk of injury varied in obese and non-obese individuals initiating a running program at different weekly distances. METHODS: A volunteer sample of ...

  14. Plasma adiponectin is increased in mice selectively bred for high wheel-running activity, but not by wheel running per se

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaanholt, L. M.; Meerlo, P.; Garland, T.; Visser, G. H.; van Dijk, G.

    2007-01-01

    Mice selectively bred for high wheel-running activity (S) have decreased fat content compared to mice from randomly bred control (C) lines. We explored whether this difference was associated with alterations in levels of circulating hormones involved in regulation of food intake and energy balance,

  15. The use of portable NIRS to measure muscle oxygenation and haemodynamics during a repeated sprint running test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ben; Hesford, Catherine M; Cooper, Chris E

    2013-01-01

    Portable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) devices were originally developed for use in exercise and sports science by Britton Chance in the 1990s (the RunMan and microRunman series). However, only recently with the development of more robust, and wireless systems, has the routine use in elite sport become possible. As with the medical use of NIRS, finding applications of the technology that are relevant to practitioners is the key issue. One option is to use NIRS to track exercise training-induced adaptations in muscle. Portable NIRS devices enable monitoring during the normal 'field' routine uses to assess fitness, such as repeat sprint shuttle tests. Knowledge about the acute physiological responses to these specific tests has practical applications within team sport training prescription, where development of both central and peripheral determinants of high-intensity intermittent exercise needs to be considered. The purpose of this study was to observe NIRS-detected parameters during a repeat sprint test. We used the PortaMon, a two wavelength spatially resolved NIR spectrometer manufactured by Artinis Inc., to assess NIR changes in the gastrocnemius muscle of both the left and right leg during high-intensity running. Six university standard rugby players were assessed (age 20 ± 1.5 years; height 183 ± 1.0 cm; weight 89.4 ± 5.8 kg; body fat 12.2 ± 3.0 %); the subjects completed nine repeated shuttle runs, which incorporated forward, backward and change of direction movements. Individual sprint time, total time to complete test, blood lactate response (BL), heart rate values (HR) and haemoglobin variables (ΔHHb, ΔtHb, ΔHbO2 and ΔTSI%) were measured. Total time to complete the test was 260 ± 20 s, final blood lactate was 14.3 ± 2.8 mM, and maximal HR 182 ± 5 bpm. NIRS variables displayed no differences between right and left legs. During the test, the group-averaged data showed a clear decrease in HbO2 (max. decrease 11.41 ± 4.95 μM), increase in HHb

  16. Testing on a Large Scale Running the ATLAS Data Acquisition and High Level Trigger Software on 700 PC Nodes

    CERN Document Server

    Burckhart-Chromek, Doris; Adragna, P; Alexandrov, L; Amorim, A; Armstrong, S; Badescu, E; Baines, J T M; Barros, N; Beck, H P; Bee, C; Blair, R; Bogaerts, J A C; Bold, T; Bosman, M; Caprini, M; Caramarcu, C; Ciobotaru, M; Comune, G; Corso-Radu, A; Cranfield, R; Crone, G; Dawson, J; Della Pietra, M; Di Mattia, A; Dobinson, Robert W; Dobson, M; Dos Anjos, A; Dotti, A; Drake, G; Ellis, Nick; Ermoline, Y; Ertorer, E; Falciano, S; Ferrari, R; Ferrer, M L; Francis, D; Gadomski, S; Gameiro, S; Garitaonandia, H; Gaudio, G; George, S; Gesualdi-Mello, A; Gorini, B; Green, B; Haas, S; Haberichter, W N; Hadavand, H; Haeberli, C; Haller, J; Hansen, J; Hauser, R; Hillier, S J; Höcker, A; Hughes-Jones, R E; Joos, M; Kazarov, A; Kieft, G; Klous, S; Kohno, T; Kolos, S; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Kotov, V; Kugel, A; Landon, M; Lankford, A; Leahu, L; Leahu, M; Lehmann-Miotto, G; Le Vine, M J; Liu, W; Maeno, T; Männer, R; Mapelli, L; Martin, B; Masik, J; McLaren, R; Meessen, C; Meirosu, C; Mineev, M; Misiejuk, A; Morettini, P; Mornacchi, G; Müller, M; Garcia-Murillo, R; Nagasaka, Y; Negri, A; Padilla, C; Pasqualucci, E; Pauly, T; Perera, V; Petersen, J; Pope, B; Albuquerque-Portes, M; Pretzl, K; Prigent, D; Roda, C; Ryabov, Yu; Salvatore, D; Schiavi, C; Schlereth, J L; Scholtes, I; Sole-Segura, E; Seixas, M; Sloper, J; Soloviev, I; Spiwoks, R; Stamen, R; Stancu, S; Strong, S; Sushkov, S; Szymocha, T; Tapprogge, S; Teixeira-Dias, P; Torres, R; Touchard, F; Tremblet, L; Ünel, G; Van Wasen, J; Vandelli, W; Vaz-Gil-Lopes, L; Vermeulen, J C; von der Schmitt, H; Wengler, T; Werner, P; Wheeler, S; Wickens, F; Wiedenmann, W; Wiesmann, M; Wu, X; Yasu, Y; Yu, M; Zema, F; Zobernig, H; Computing In High Energy and Nuclear Physics

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS Data Acquisition (DAQ) and High Level Trigger (HLT) software system will be comprised initially of 2000 PC nodes which take part in the control, event readout, second level trigger and event filter operations. This high number of PCs will only be purchased before data taking in 2007. The large CERN IT LXBATCH facility provided the opportunity to run in July 2005 online functionality tests over a period of 5 weeks on a stepwise increasing farm size from 100 up to 700 PC dual nodes. The interplay between the control and monitoring software with the event readout, event building and the trigger software has been exercised the first time as an integrated system on this large scale. New was also to run algorithms in the online environment for the trigger selection and in the event filter processing tasks on a larger scale. A mechanism has been developed to package the offline software together with the DAQ/HLT software and to distribute it via peer-to-peer software efficiently to this large pc cluster. T...

  17. Testing on a Large Scale running the ATLAS Data Acquisition and High Level Trigger Software on 700 PC Nodes

    CERN Document Server

    Burckhart-Chromek, Doris; Adragna, P; Albuquerque-Portes, M; Alexandrov, L; Amorim, A; Armstrong, S; Badescu, E; Baines, J T M; Barros, N; Beck, H P; Bee, C; Blair, R; Bogaerts, J A C; Bold, T; Bosman, M; Caprini, M; Caramarcu, C; Ciobotaru, M; Comune, G; Corso-Radu, A; Cranfield, R; Crone, G; Dawson, J; Della Pietra, M; Di Mattia, A; Dobinson, Robert W; Dobson, M; Dos Anjos, A; Dotti, A; Drake, G; Ellis, Nick; Ermoline, Y; Ertorer, E; Falciano, S; Ferrari, R; Ferrer, M L; Francis, D; Gadomski, S; Gameiro, S; Garcia-Murillo, R; Garitaonandia, H; Gaudio, G; George, S; Gesualdi-Mello, A; Gorini, B; Green, B; Haas, S; Haberichter, W N; Hadavand, H; Haeberli, C; Haller, J; Hansen, J; Hauser, R; Hillier, S J; Hughes-Jones, R E; Höcker, A; Joos, M; Kazarov, A; Kieft, G; Klous, S; Kohno, T; Kolos, S; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Kotov, V; Kugel, A; Landon, M; Lankford, A; Le Vine, M J; Leahu, L; Leahu, M; Lehmann-Miotto, G; Liu, W; Maeno, T; Mapelli, L; Martin, B; Masik, J; McLaren, R; Meessen, C; Meirosu, C; Mineev, M; Misiejuk, A; Morettini, P; Mornacchi, G; Männer, R; Müller, M; Nagasaka, Y; Negri, A; Padilla, C; Pasqualucci, E; Pauly, T; Perera, V; Petersen, J; Pope, B; Pretzl, K; Prigent, D; Roda, C; Ryabov, Yu; Salvatore, D; Schiavi, C; Schlereth, J L; Scholtes, I; Seixas, M; Sloper, J; Sole-Segura, E; Soloviev, I; Spiwoks, R; Stamen, R; Stancu, S; Strong, S; Sushkov, S; Szymocha, T; Tapprogge, S; Teixeira-Dias, P; Torres, R; Touchard, F; Tremblet, L; Van Wasen, J; Vandelli, W; Vaz-Gil-Lopes, L; Vermeulen, J C; Wengler, T; Werner, P; Wheeler, S; Wickens, F; Wiedenmann, W; Wiesmann, M; Wu, X; Yasu, Y; Yu, M; Zema, F; Zobernig, H; von der Schmitt, H; Ünel, G; Computing In High Energy and Nuclear Physics

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS Data Acquisition (DAQ) and High Level Trigger (HLT) software system will be comprised initially of 2000 PC nodes which take part in the control, event readout, second level trigger and event filter operations. This high number of PCs will only be purchased before data taking in 2007. The large CERN IT LXBATCH facility provided the opportunity to run in July 2005 online functionality tests over a period of 5 weeks on a stepwise increasing farm size from 100 up to 700 PC dual nodes. The interplay between the control and monitoring software with the event readout, event building and the trigger software has been exercised the first time as an integrated system on this large scale. New was also to run algorithms in the online environment for the trigger selection and in the event filter processing tasks on a larger scale. A mechanism has been developed to package the offline software together with the DAQ/HLT software and to distribute it via peer-to-peer software efficiently to this large pc cluster. T...

  18. Relationship between the modified star excursion balance test and the 4x10 m shuttle run test in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Calatayud

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumen La agilidad y el equilibrio dinámico son habilidades cruciales en la actividad física prepuberal y la participación deportiva, por lo tanto es necesaria la identificación de pruebas eficientes para su evaluación. Evaluar la correlación entre la agilidad y el equilibrio dinámico en niños escolares de primaria. Veintisiete niños y veinte niñas de 10 años participaron voluntariamente en el estudio. El Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT modificado y el 4x10 m Shuttle Run Test se utilizaron respectivamente para evaluar el equilibrio dinámico y agilidad. Las puntuaciones compuestas del equilibrio dinámico con apoyo diestro mostraron solo entre los niños una moderada correlación significativa (r = -0.51, p < 0.05 con la prueba de agilidad. Sin embargo, entre las niñas se mostró una correlación significativa (r = -0.45, p < 0.05 durante la distancia de alcance posterolateral obtenida en el SEBT. La realización del test completo o de las distancias alcanzadas a nivel posteromedial y posterolateral del SEBT se asocia moderadamente con la agilidad entre los niños, mientras que la distancia posterolateral se asocia con la agilidad entre las niñas.

  19. 78 FR 47217 - Proposed Supervisory Guidance on Implementing Dodd-Frank Act Company-Run Stress Tests for Banking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... Company-Run Stress Tests for Banking Organizations With Total Consolidated Assets of More Than $10 Billion...'') stress tests, applicable to all bank and savings-and-loan holding companies, national banks, state-member... ``$10-50 billion companies''). The guidance discusses supervisory expectations for DFA stress...

  20. Validity of the Pediatric Running-Based Anaerobic Sprint Test to Determine Anaerobic Performance in Healthy Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, Bart C.; Werkman, Maarten S.; Blokland, Donna; Eijsermans, Maria J. C.; van der Torre, Patrick; Bartels, Bart; Verschuren, Olaf; Takken, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine criterion validity of the pediatric running-based anaerobic sprint test (RAST) as a nonsophisticated field test for evaluating anaerobic performance in healthy children and adolescents. Methods: Data from 65. healthy children (28 boys and 37 girls between 6 and 18 years of age,

  1. Apparatus and method for heat-run test on high-power PWM converters with low energy expenditure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J S Siva Prasad; G Narayanan

    2013-06-01

    Before installation, a voltage source converter is usually subjected to heat-run test to verify its thermal design and performance under load. For heat-run test, the converter needs to be operated at rated voltage and rated current for a substantial length of time. Hence, such tests consume huge amount of energy in case of high-power converters. Also, the capacities of the source and loads available in the research and development (R & D) centre or the production facility could be inadequate to conduct such tests. This paper proposes a method to conduct heat-run tests on highpower, pulse width modulated (PWM) converters with low energy consumption. The experimental set-up consists of the converter under test and another converter (of similar or higher rating), both connected in parallel on the ac side and open on the dc side. Vector-control or synchronous reference frame control is employed to control the converters such that one draws certain amount of reactive power and the other supplies the same; only the system losses are drawn from the mains. The performance of the controller is validated through simulation and experiments. Experimental results, pertaining to heat-run tests on a high-power PWM converter, are presented at power levels of 25 kVA to 150 kVA.

  2. Voluntary running prevents progressive memory decline and increases adult hippocampal neurogenesis and growth factor expression after whole-brain irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Goodrich, Sarah J E; Pfau, Madeline L; Flores, Catherine T; Fraser, Jennifer A; Williams, Christina L; Jones, Lee W

    2010-11-15

    Whole-brain irradiation (WBI) therapy produces progressive learning and memory deficits in patients with primary or secondary brain tumors. Exercise enhances memory and adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the intact brain, so we hypothesized that exercise may be an effective treatment to alleviate consequences of WBI. Previous studies using animal models to address this issue have yielded mixed results and have not examined potential molecular mechanisms. We investigated the short- and long-term effects of WBI on spatial learning and memory retention and determined whether voluntary running after WBI aids recovery of brain and cognitive function. Forty adult female C57Bl/6 mice given a single dose of 5 Gy or sham WBI were trained 2.5 weeks and up to 4 months after WBI in a Barnes maze. Half of the mice received daily voluntary wheel access starting 1 month after sham or WBI. Daily running following WBI prevented the marked decline in spatial memory retention observed months after irradiation. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) immunolabeling and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay indicated that this behavioral rescue was accompanied by a partial restoration of newborn BrdUrd+/NeuN+ neurons in the dentate gyrus and increased hippocampal expression of brain-derived vascular endothelial growth factor and insulin-like growth factor-1, and occurred despite irradiation-induced elevations in hippocampal proinflammatory cytokines. WBI in adult mice produced a progressive memory decline consistent with what has been reported in cancer patients receiving WBI therapy. Our findings show that running can abrogate this memory decline and aid recovery of adult hippocampal plasticity, thus highlighting exercise as a potential therapeutic intervention.

  3. A New Content-Based Image Retrieval Using the Multidimensional Generalization of Wald-Wolfowitz Runs Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leauhatong, Thurdsak; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Atsuta, Kiyoaki; Kondo, Shozo

    This paper proposes two new similarity measures for the content-based image retrieval (CBIR) systems. The similarity measures are based on the k-means clustering algorithm and the multidimensional generalization of the Wald-Wolfowitz (MWW) runs test. The performance comparisons between the proposed similarity measures and a current CBIR similarity measure based on the MWW runs test were performed, and it can be seen that the proposed similarity measures outperform the current similarity measure with respect to the precision and the computational time.

  4. Increasing HIV testing among male partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orne-Gliemann, Joanna; Balestre, Eric; Tchendjou, Patrice; Miric, Marija; Darak, Shrinivas; Butsashvili, Maia; Perez-Then, Eddy; Eboko, Fred; Plazy, Melanie; Kulkarni, Sanjeevani; du Lou, Annabel Desgrees; Dabis, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Couple-oriented posttest HIV counselling (COC) provides pregnant women with tools and strategies to invite her partner to HIV counselling and testing. We conducted a randomized trial of the efficacy of COC on partner HIV testing in low/medium HIV prevalence settings (Cameroon, Dominican

  5. Increasing HIV testing among male partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orne-Gliemann, Joanna; Balestre, Eric; Tchendjou, Patrice; Miric, Marija; Darak, Shrinivas; Butsashvili, Maia; Perez-Then, Eddy; Eboko, Fred; Plazy, Melanie; Kulkarni, Sanjeevani; du Lou, Annabel Desgrees; Dabis, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Couple-oriented posttest HIV counselling (COC) provides pregnant women with tools and strategies to invite her partner to HIV counselling and testing. We conducted a randomized trial of the efficacy of COC on partner HIV testing in low/medium HIV prevalence settings (Cameroon, Dominican R

  6. Control entropy identifies differential changes in complexity of walking and running gait patterns with increasing speed in highly trained runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Stephen J.; Busa, Michael A.; Skufca, Joseph; Yaggie, James A.; Bollt, Erik M.

    2009-06-01

    Regularity statistics have been previously applied to walking gait measures in the hope of gaining insight into the complexity of gait under different conditions and in different populations. Traditional regularity statistics are subject to the requirement of stationarity, a limitation for examining changes in complexity under dynamic conditions such as exhaustive exercise. Using a novel measure, control entropy (CE), applied to triaxial continuous accelerometry, we report changes in complexity of walking and running during increasing speeds up to exhaustion in highly trained runners. We further apply Karhunen-Loeve analysis in a new and novel way to the patterns of CE responses in each of the three axes to identify dominant modes of CE responses in the vertical, mediolateral, and anterior/posterior planes. The differential CE responses observed between the different axes in this select population provide insight into the constraints of walking and running in those who may have optimized locomotion. Future comparisons between athletes, healthy untrained, and clinical populations using this approach may help elucidate differences between optimized and diseased locomotor control.

  7. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin, Blaise P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a

  8. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaise Collin

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a half calendar years. The test

  9. Mission assurance increased with regression testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, R.; Spezio, M.

    Knowing what to test is an important attribute in any testing campaign, especially when it has to be right or the mission could be in jeopardy. The New Horizons mission, developed and operated by the John Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, received a planned major upgrade to their Mission Operations and Control (MOC) ground system architecture. Early in the mission planning it was recognized that the ground system platform would require an upgrade to assure continued support of technology used for spacecraft operations. With the planned update to the six year operational ground architecture from Solaris 8 to Solaris 10, it was critical that the new architecture maintain critical operations and control functions. The New Horizons spacecraft is heading to its historic rendezvous with Pluto in July 2015 and then proceeding into the Kuiper Belt. This paper discusses the Independent Software Acceptance Testing (ISAT) Regression test campaign that played a critical role to assure the continued success of the New Horizons mission. The New Horizons ISAT process was designed to assure all the requirements were being met for the ground software functions developed to support the mission objectives. The ISAT team developed a test plan with a series of test case designs. The test objectives were to verify that the software developed from the requirements functioned as expected in the operational environment. As the test cases were developed and executed, a regression test suite was identified at the functional level. This regression test suite would serve as a crucial resource in assuring the operational system continued to function as required with such a large scale change being introduced. Some of the New Horizons ground software changes required modifications to the most critical functions of the operational software. Of particular concern was the new MOC architecture (Solaris 10) is Intel based and little endian, and the legacy architecture (Solaris 8) was SPA

  10. Running the running

    CERN Document Server

    Cabass, Giovanni; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pajer, Enrico; Silk, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We use the recent observations of Cosmic Microwave Background temperature and polarization anisotropies provided by the Planck satellite experiment to place constraints on the running $\\alpha_\\mathrm{s} = \\mathrm{d}n_{\\mathrm{s}} / \\mathrm{d}\\log k$ and the running of the running $\\beta_{\\mathrm{s}} = \\mathrm{d}\\alpha_{\\mathrm{s}} / \\mathrm{d}\\log k$ of the spectral index $n_{\\mathrm{s}}$ of primordial scalar fluctuations. We find $\\alpha_\\mathrm{s}=0.011\\pm0.010$ and $\\beta_\\mathrm{s}=0.027\\pm0.013$ at $68\\%\\,\\mathrm{CL}$, suggesting the presence of a running of the running at the level of two standard deviations. We find no significant correlation between $\\beta_{\\mathrm{s}}$ and foregrounds parameters, with the exception of the point sources amplitude at $143\\,\\mathrm{GHz}$, $A^{PS}_{143}$, which shifts by half sigma when the running of the running is considered. We further study the cosmological implications of this anomaly by including in the analysis the lensing amplitude $A_L$, the curvature parameter ...

  11. AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin, Blaise P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 x 1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). We’ll say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below

  12. [Internship-test reveals increased knowledge gaps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östgren, Carl-Johan; Krook-Brandt, Margareta; Carlborg, Andreas

    2016-04-08

    We present the results of the medical knowledge test after fulfilled internship for Swedish medical authorization during the years 2009 to the spring of 2015. A total of 7,613 tests were analyzed. Interns graduated from Swedish universities failed in 2.7% to 3.8% of the test moments. Interns who graduated from countries within the European Union (EU) failed in 21.2% and interns graduated from a non-EU country failed in 41.6%. The results from those who graduated from EU and non-EU countries have worsened compared to an earlier study in 2009. Proper measures have now to be implemented for doctors graduated from a non-Swedish university to improve the outcome and introduction to the Swedish health care system.

  13. Reliability and validity of data for 2 newly developed shuttle run tests in children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, Olaf; Takken, Tim; Ketelaar, Majolijn; Gorter, Jan Willem; Helders, Paul J. M.

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose. The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of data obtained with 2 newly developed shuttle run tests (SRT-I and SRT-II) to measure aerobic power in children with cerebral palsy (CP) who were classified at level I or II on the Gross Motor Function Cl

  14. Testing the running coupling $k_{T}$-factorization formula for the inclusive gluon production

    CERN Document Server

    Durães, F O; Goncalves, V P; Navarra, F S

    2016-01-01

    The inclusive gluon production at midrapidities is described in the Color Glass Condensate formalism using the $k_T$ - factorization formula, which was derived at fixed coupling constant considering the scattering of a dilute system of partons with a dense one. Recent analysis demonstrated that this approach provides a satisfactory description of the experimental data for the inclusive hadron production in $pp/pA/AA$ collisions. However, these studies are based on the fixed coupling $k_T$ - factorization formula, which does not take into account the running coupling corrections, which are important to set the scales present in the cross section. In this paper we consider the running coupling corrected $k_T$ - factorization formula conjectured some years ago and investigate the impact of the running coupling corrections on the observables. In particular, the pseudorapidity distributions and charged hadrons multiplicity are calculated considering $pp$, $dAu/pPb$ and $AuAu/PbPb$ collisions at RHIC and LHC energi...

  15. Testing the running coupling kT-factorization formula for the inclusive gluon production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durães, F. O.; Giannini, A. V.; Gonçalves, V. P.; Navarra, F. S.

    2016-09-01

    The inclusive gluon production at midrapidities is described in the color glass condensate formalism using the kT-factorization formula, which was derived at fixed coupling constant considering the scattering of a dilute system of partons with a dense one. Recent analysis demonstrated that this approach provides a satisfactory description of the experimental data for the inclusive hadron production in p p /p A /A A collisions. However, these studies are based on the fixed coupling kT-factorization formula. This formula does not take into account the running coupling corrections, which are important to set the scales present in the cross section. In this paper we consider the running coupling corrected kT-factorization formula conjectured some years ago and investigate the impact of the running coupling corrections on the observables. In particular, the pseudorapidity distributions and charged hadrons' multiplicity are calculated considering p p , d A u /p P b , and A u A u /P b P b collisions at RHIC and LHC energies. We compare the corrected running coupling predictions with those obtained using the original kT-factorization assuming a fixed coupling or a prescription for the inclusion of the running of the coupling. Considering the Kharzeev-Levin-Nardi unintegrated gluon distribution and a simplified model for the nuclear geometry, we demonstrate that the distinct predictions are similar for the pseudorapidity distributions in p p /p A /A A collisions and for the charged hadrons' multiplicity in p p /p A collisions. On the other hand, the running coupling corrected kT-factorization formula predicts a smoother energy dependence for d N /d η in A A collisions.

  16. Strategies for Maximizing Successful Drug Substance Technology Transfer Using Engineering, Shake-Down, and Wet Test Runs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Sushil; Bain, David; Bowers, John; Larivee, Victor; Leira, Francisco; Xie, Jasmina

    2015-01-01

    The technology transfer of biological products is a complex process requiring control of multiple unit operations and parameters to ensure product quality and process performance. To achieve product commercialization, the technology transfer sending unit must successfully transfer knowledge about both the product and the process to the receiving unit. A key strategy for maximizing successful scale-up and transfer efforts is the effective use of engineering and shake-down runs to confirm operational performance and product quality prior to embarking on good manufacturing practice runs such as process performance qualification runs. We consider key factors to consider in making the decision to perform shake-down or engineering runs. We also present industry benchmarking results of how engineering runs are used in drug substance technology transfers alongside the main themes and best practices that have emerged. Our goal is to provide companies with a framework for ensuring the "right first time" technology transfers with effective deployment of resources within increasingly aggressive timeline constraints.

  17. Reliability of the Three-minute All-out Test for Non-motorized Treadmill Tethered Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, M C T; Sousa, F A B; Dos Reis, I G M; Gobatto, C A

    2016-07-13

    The 3-min all-out test was developed and validated on a cycle ergometer using a modification of a linear mathematical equation (1/time vs. power) obtained from the original critical power model. The purpose of this development was to obtain, in a single test, the aerobic and anaerobic capacity parameters and identify the exercise transition moment from heavy to severe intensity. The aim of this study was to propose an adaptation of the all-out 3-min cycle ergometer to a non-motorized treadmill with tethered running. In addition, we tested the reproducibility of this adapted protocol, highlighting the need for mechanical power evaluation using a specific ergometer. Consequently, 10 physically active individuals visited the laboratory 4 times for testing and data collection. The results suggested that the protocol adaptation for the 3-min all-out test for non-motorized treadmill with tethered running was reproducible and feasible. It was also possible to show that the AO3 application in this ergometer ensures the specificity of the sports that involve the running exercise, from assessment of both aerobic and anaerobic parameters, accomplished in a single day of application.

  18. Test-particle simulations in increasingly strong turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontius, D. H., Jr.; Gray, P. C.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1995-01-01

    Quasi-linear theory supposes that the energy in resonant fluctuations is small compared to that in the mean magnetic field. This is evident in the fact that the zeroth-order particle trajectories are helices about a mean field B(sub o) that is spatially uniform over many correlation lengths. However, in the solar wind it is often the case that the fluctuating part of the field is comparable in magnitude to the mean part. It is generally expected that quasi-linear theory remains viable for particles that are in resonance with a region of the fluctuation spectrum having only small energy density, but even so, care must be taken when comparing simulations to theoretical predictions. We have performed a series of test-particle simulations to explore the evolution of ion distributions in turbulent situations with varying levels of magnetic fluctuations. As delta-B/B(sub o) is increased the distinctions among absolute pitch angle (defined relative to B(sub o)), local pitch angle (defined relative to B(x)), and magnetic moment become important, some of them exhibiting periodic sloshing unrelated to the nonadiabatic processes of interest. Comparing and contrasting the various runs illustrates the phenomena that must be considered when the premise underlying quasi-linear theory are relaxed.

  19. Running Away

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Running Away KidsHealth > For Kids > Running Away Print A ... life on the streets. continue The Reality of Running Away When you think about running away, you ...

  20. Testing the running of the cosmological constant with Type Ia Supernovae at high z

    CERN Document Server

    Espana-Bonet, C; Shapiro, I L; Solà, J; Espana-Bonet, Cristina; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Shapiro, Ilya L.; Sola, Joan

    2004-01-01

    Within the Quantum Field Theory context the idea of a "cosmological constant" (CC) evolving with time looks quite natural as it just reflects the change of the vacuum energy with the typical energy of the universe. In the particular frame of Ref.[30], a "running CC" at low energies may arise from generic quantum effects near the Planck scale, M_P, provided there is a smooth decoupling of all massive particles below M_P. In this work we further develop the cosmological consequences of a "running CC" by addressing the accelerated evolution of the universe within that model. The rate of change of the CC stays slow, without fine-tuning, and is comparable to H^2 M_P^2. It can be described by a single parameter, \

  1. A novel mouse running wheel that senses individual limb forces: biomechanical validation and in vivo testing

    OpenAIRE

    Roach, Grahm C.; Edke, Mangesh; Griffin, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Biomechanical data provide fundamental information about changes in musculoskeletal function during development, adaptation, and disease. To facilitate the study of mouse locomotor biomechanics, we modified a standard mouse running wheel to include a force-sensitive rung capable of measuring the normal and tangential forces applied by individual paws. Force data were collected throughout the night using an automated threshold trigger algorithm that synchronized force data with wheel-angle dat...

  2. Reliability of a Shuttle Run Test for Children with Cerebral Palsy Who Are Classified at Gross Motor Function Classification System Level III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuren, Olaf; Bosma, Liesbeth; Takken, Tim

    2011-01-01

    For children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level III there is no running-based field test available to assess their cardiorespiratory fitness. The current study investigated whether a shuttle run test can be reliably (test-retest) performed in a group of children with…

  3. Percentile Values for Running Sprint Field Tests in Children Ages 6-17 Years: Influence of Weight Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Pinero, Jose; Gonzalez-Montesinos, Jose Luis; Keating, Xiaofen D.; Mora, Jesus; Sjostrom, Michael; Ruiz, Jonatan R.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide percentile values for six different sprint tests in 2,708 Spanish children (1,234 girls) ages 6-17.9 years. We also examined the influence of weight status on sprint performance across age groups, with a focus on underweight and obese groups. We used the 20-m, 30-m, and 50-m running sprint standing start and…

  4. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Chamizo

    2012-01-01

      On 17th January, as soon as the services were restored after the technical stop, sub-systems started powering on. Since then, we have been running 24/7 with reduced shift crew — Shift Leader and DCS shifter — to allow sub-detectors to perform calibration, noise studies, test software upgrades, etc. On 15th and 16th February, we had the first Mid-Week Global Run (MWGR) with the participation of most sub-systems. The aim was to bring CMS back to operation and to ensure that we could run after the winter shutdown. All sub-systems participated in the readout and the trigger was provided by a fraction of the muon systems (CSC and the central RPC wheel). The calorimeter triggers were not available due to work on the optical link system. Initial checks of different distributions from Pixels, Strips, and CSC confirmed things look all right (signal/noise, number of tracks, phi distribution…). High-rate tests were done to test the new CSC firmware to cure the low efficiency ...

  5. Running GCM physics and dynamics on different grids: Algorithm and tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molod, A.

    2006-12-01

    The major drawback in the use of sigma coordinates in atmospheric GCMs, namely the error in the pressure gradient term near sloping terrain, leaves the use of eta coordinates an important alternative. A central disadvantage of an eta coordinate, the inability to retain fine resolution in the vertical as the surface rises above sea level, is addressed here. An `alternate grid' technique is presented which allows the tendencies of state variables due to the physical parameterizations to be computed on a vertical grid (the `physics grid') which retains fine resolution near the surface, while the remaining terms in the equations of motion are computed using an eta coordinate (the `dynamics grid') with coarser vertical resolution. As a simple test of the technique a set of perpetual equinox experiments using a simplified lower boundary condition with no land and no topography were performed. The results show that for both low and high resolution alternate grid experiments, much of the benefit of increased vertical resolution for the near surface meridional wind (and mass streamfield) can be realized by enhancing the vertical resolution of the `physics grid' in the manner described here. In addition, approximately half of the increase in zonal jet strength seen with increased vertical resolution can be realized using the `alternate grid' technique. A pair of full GCM experiments with realistic lower boundary conditions and topography were also performed. It is concluded that the use of the `alternate grid' approach offers a promising way forward to alleviate a central problem associated with the use of the eta coordinate in atmospheric GCMs.

  6. Effects of marathon running on running economy and kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyröläinen, H; Pullinen, T; Candau, R; Avela, J; Huttunen, P; Komi, P V

    2000-07-01

    The present study was designed to investigate interactions between running economy and mechanics before, during, and after an individually run marathon. Seven experienced triathletes performed a 5-min submaximal running test on a treadmill at an individual constant marathon speed. Heart rate was monitored and the expired respiratory gas was analyzed. Blood samples were drawn to analyze serum creatine kinase activity (S-CK), skeletal troponin I (sTnI), and blood lactate (B-La). A video analysis was performed (200 frames x s(-1)) to investigate running mechanics. A kinematic arm was used to determine the external work of each subject. The results of the present study demonstrate that after the marathon, a standardized 5-min submaximal running test resulted in an increase in oxygen consumption, ventilation, and heart rate (P stride frequency and a similar decrease in stride length were observed (P < 0.01). These results demonstrate clearly that weakened running economy cannot be explained by changes in running mechanics. Therefore, it is suggested that the increased physiological loading is due to several mechanisms: increased utilization of fat as an energy substrate, increased demands of body temperature regulation, and possible muscle damage.

  7. Plasma antioxidant responses and oxidative stress following a 20 meter shuttle run test in female volleyball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Özgür Bulduk

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of physical exercise on oxidant stress and antioxidants has been investigated extensively in the last twenty years. Cells continuously produce free radicals under normal conditions during mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC. Experimental studies have shown elevated metabolic rate by strenuous physical exercise induces oxidative stress and production of excessive amounts of free radicals. Lipid peroxidation occurs when free radicals react with cellular components involving polyunsaturated fatty acid residues of phospholipids which are very sensitive to oxidation. This study aimed to determine plasma antioxidant responses and oxidative stress following a 20 meter shuttle run test in female volleyball players. Ten female volleyball players from the same team, and ten sedentary female ages between 18-24 years old volunteered to participate in this study. They were in good health and 48 hours before the test did not receive any drug or alcohol. None of them had any endocrine, orthopedic problems. Before the study, Informed, written consent was obtained from all the participants after full explanation of the procedures involved. All procedures were approved by the Selçuk University Meram Medical School of Ethical Committee. 20 meter shuttle run test was designed to estimate the maximal aerobic power of athletes performing in sports with frequent stops and starts (eg. Basketball, volleyball, fencing and so on. Findings of our study demonstrate that in both female groups 20 meter shuttle run test leads to production of more reactive oxygen species than the antioxidant systems can scavenge. Decrease in the activities of these antioxidant enzymes may be due to their inactivation caused by the higher production of the free radicals. it seems that the vulnerability of the body to oxidative stress is significantly enhanced after strenuous exercise test.

  8. 7 CFR 97.142 - For testing or increase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false For testing or increase. 97.142 Section 97.142... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION Marking Or Labeling Provisions § 97.142 For testing or increase. An owner who contemplates filing an application and releases for testing or increase, seed of the variety or...

  9. Downhill running and exercise in hot environments increase leukocyte Hsp72 (HSPA1A) and Hsp90α (HSPC1) gene transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, James A; Castle, Paul C; Metcalfe, Alan J; Midgley, Adrian W; Taylor, Lee; Lewis, Mark P

    2015-04-15

    Stressors within humans and other species activate Hsp72 and Hsp90α mRNA transcription, although it is unclear which environmental temperature or treadmill gradient induces the largest increase. To determine the optimal stressor for priming the Hsp system, physically active but not heat-acclimated participants (19.8 ± 1.9 and 20.9 ± 3.6 yr) exercised at lactate threshold in either temperate (20°C, 50% relative humidity; RH) or hot (30°C, 50% RH) environmental conditions. Within each condition, participants completed a flat running (temperate flat or hot flat) and a downhill running (temperate downhill or hot downhill) experimental trial in a randomized counterbalanced order separated by at least 7 days. Venous blood samples were taken immediately before (basal), immediately after exercise, and 3 and 24 h postexercise. RNA was extracted from leukocytes and RT-quantitative PCR conducted to determine Hsp72 and Hsp90α mRNA relative expression. Leukocyte Hsp72 mRNA was increased immediately after exercise following downhill running (1.9 ± 0.9-fold) compared with flat running (1.3 ± 0.4-fold; P = 0.001) and in hot (1.9 ± 0.6-fold) compared with temperate conditions (1.1 ± 0.5-fold; P = 0.003). Leukocyte Hsp90α mRNA increased immediately after exercise following downhill running (1.4 ± 0.8-fold) compared with flat running (0.9 ± 0.6-fold; P = 0.002) and in hot (1.6 ± 1.0-fold) compared with temperate conditions (0.9 ± 0.6-fold; P = 0.003). Downhill running and exercise in hot conditions induced the largest stimuli for leukocyte Hsp72 and Hsp90α mRNA increases. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Increase of Total Body Water with Decrease of Body Mass while Running 100 km Nonstop--Formation of Edema?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Beat; Wirth, Andrea; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We investigated whether ultraendurance runners in a 100-km run suffer a decrease of body mass and whether this loss consists of fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, or total body water. Male ultrarunners were measured pre- and postrace to determine body mass, fat mass, and skeletal muscle mass by using the anthropometric method. In addition,…

  11. Increase of Total Body Water with Decrease of Body Mass while Running 100 km Nonstop--Formation of Edema?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Beat; Wirth, Andrea; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We investigated whether ultraendurance runners in a 100-km run suffer a decrease of body mass and whether this loss consists of fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, or total body water. Male ultrarunners were measured pre- and postrace to determine body mass, fat mass, and skeletal muscle mass by using the anthropometric method. In addition,…

  12. Fixed-bed gasifier and cleanup system engineering summary report through Test Run No. 100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pater, K. Jr.; Headley, L.; Kovach, J.; Stopek, D.

    1984-06-01

    The state-of-the-art of high-pressure, fixed-bed gasification has been advanced by the many refinements developed over the last 5 years. A novel full-flow gas cleanup system has been installed and tested to clean coal-derived gases. This report summarizes the results of tests conducted on the gasifier and cleanup system from its inception through 1982. Selected process summary data are presented along with results from complementary programs in the areas of environmental research, process simulation, analytical methods development, and component testing. 20 references, 32 figures, 42 tables.

  13. Changes in Run Distance Observed in two explosives at the threshold for sustained ignition using the Modified Gap Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Richard; Forbes, Jerry; Tasker, Douglas; Orme, Rebecca

    2009-06-01

    The Modified Gap Test was used to quantify different levels of partial reaction for various input stresses. This test configuration has been historically useful in highlighting thresholds for first reaction, sustained ignition, and detonation. Two different HMX based compositions were studied; a cast-cured composition with 88% HMX and a pressed composition with 92% HMX. The final ingredients of each comprised different unreactive polymeric binder systems. Short samples (50.8 mm in diameter and 12.7 mm thick) were shock loaded using the standard large scale gap test donor system. Product-cloud blow-off velocities at the opposite end of the sample were measured using a high-speed digital-camera. Velocity versus input pressure plots provided changes in reactivity that had developed by the 12.7 mm run distance. Results were fairly consistent for the lower input pressures. In contrast, the results varied widely in a range of input stresses around the transition threshold for sustained ignition in both explosives. These results indicate that both explosives are subject to variation in run to detonation distance in a range of input stresses just prior to prompt detonation.

  14. 40 CFR 86.137-94 - Dynamometer test run, gaseous and particulate emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... such that the system meets the design criteria of § 86.109 and § 86.110. For samples in which the... necessary. (iv) For formaldehyde samples, the flow rates shall be set such that the system meets the design... according to the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule (§ 86.115). Note: During particulate testing, adjust the...

  15. Multi-Stage 20-m Shuttle Run Fitness Test, Maximal Oxygen Uptake and Velocity at Maximal Oxygen Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisis, Giorgos P; Zacharogiannis, Elias; Mandila, Dafni; Smirtiotou, Athanasia; Argeitaki, Polyxeni; Cooke, Carlton B

    2014-06-28

    The multi-stage 20-m shuttle run fitness test (20mMSFT) is a popular field test which is widely used to measure aerobic fitness by predicting maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) and performance. However, the velocity at which VO2max occurs (vVO2max) is a better indicator of performance than VO2max, and can be used to explain inter-individual differences in performance that VO2max cannot. It has been reported as a better predictor for running performance and it can be used to monitor athletes' training for predicting optimal training intensity. This study investigated the validity and suitability of predicting VO2max and vVO2max of adult subjects on the basis of the performance of the 20mMST. Forty eight (25 male and 23 female) physical education students performed, in random order, a laboratory based continuous horizontal treadmill test to determine VO2max, vVO2max and a 20mMST, with an interval of 3 days between each test. The results revealed significant correlations between the number of shuttles in the 20mMSFT and directly determined VO2max (r = 0.87, pVO2max was y = 0.0276x + 27.504, whereas for vVO2max it was y = 0.0937x + 6.890. It can be concluded that the 20mMSFT can accurately predict VO2max and vVO2max and this field test can provide useful information regarding aerobic fitness of adults. The predicted vVO2max can be used in monitoring athletes, especially in determining optimal training intensity.

  16. Multi-Stage 20-m Shuttle Run Fitness Test, Maximal Oxygen Uptake and Velocity at Maximal Oxygen Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paradisis Giorgos P.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The multi-stage 20-m shuttle run fitness test (20mMSFT is a popular field test which is widely used to measure aerobic fitness by predicting maximum oxygen uptake (VO2 max and performance. However, the velocity at which VO 2 max occurs (vVO 2 max is a better indicator of performance than VO 2 max, and can be used to explain inter-individual differences in performance that VO 2 max cannot. It has been reported as a better predictor for running performance and it can be used to monitor athletes’ training for predicting optimal training intensity. This study investigated the validity and suitability of predicting VO2max and vVO2max of adult subjects on the basis of the performance of the 20mMST. Forty eight (25 male and 23 female physical education students performed, in random order, a laboratory based continuous horizontal treadmill test to determine VO2max, vVO 2 max and a 20mMST, with an interval of 3 days between each test. The results revealed significant correlations between the number of shuttles in the 20mMSFT and directly determined VO 2 max (r = 0.87, p<0.05 and vVO 2 max (r = 0.93, p<0.05. The equation for prediction of VO 2 max was y = 0.0276x + 27.504, whereas for vVO 2 max it was y = 0.0937x + 6.890. It can be concluded that the 20mMSFT can accurately predict VO 2 max and vVO 2 max and this field test can provide useful information regarding aerobic fitness of adults. The predicted vVO 2 max can be used in monitoring athletes, especially in determining optimal training intensity.

  17. Results from the 1997 run of the LHCb ring imaging Cherenkov test-beam

    CERN Document Server

    Halley, A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, Guy

    1998-01-01

    Analysis results of data from the ring imaging Cherenkov test-beam using hybrid photo diodes are presented. Details are given of the geometrical arrangement of the prototype and data-taking conditions, together with results of simulation and studies of the detector performance, photon yield and Cherenkov angle resolution using different radiators. Good agreement with simulation is found for both gas and aerogel photon yield calculations and the observed Cherenkov angle resolution.1

  18. The 10x5 metre shuttle run test may be a good predictor of aerobic performance in pre-pubertal children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christina; Petersen, Mette; Froberg, Karsten

    Sports. 2009. 2. Bar-Or O & Inbar O. Relationships among anaerobic capacity, sprint and middle distance running of school children. In Shephard, RJ. and Lavallée, H. eds., Physical fitness assessment. Springfield, 1978. 3. Inbar O & Bar-Or O. Relationships of anaerobic and aerobic arm and leg capacities...... to swimming performance of 8-12 year old children. In Shephard, R.J. and Lavallée, H. eds., Frontiers of activity and child health. Quebec: Pélican, 1977. 4. Andersen LB., et Al. An Intermittent running test to estimate maximal oxygen uptake: the Andersen test. J Sports Med Physical Fitness 2008....... in two field tests, the short shuttle run test (SSRT), 10x5 m measuring agility and speed , and the long modified 20 metre shuttle run, the Andersen test (AT) measuring cardio-respiratory fitness (4), representing anaerob and aerob performance respectively. Methods: The population and data was collected...

  19. Washing Up with Hot and Cold Running Neutrons: Tests of Fundamental Physical Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoreaux, Steve K.

    2005-05-01

    The properties of the Neutron and its interactions with matter have been long applied to tests of fundamental physical principles. An example of such an application is a test of the stability of the fundamental constants of physics based on possible changes in low energy absorption resonances and the isotopic composition of a prehistoric natural reactor that operated two billion years ago in equatorial Africa. A recent re-analysis of this event indicates that some fundamental constants have changed. The focus of the presentation will be on the uses of cold and ultracold neutrons (UCNs), and in particular, the experimental search for the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) which would be evidence for time reversal asymmetry in the microscopic interactions within the neutron. Ultracold neutrons are neutrons with kinetic energy sufficiently low that they can be reflected from material surfaces for all angles of incidence, allowing UCNs to be stored in material bottles for times approaching the beta decay lifetime of the neutron. Vagaries associated with the production, transport, and storage of UCNs will be described, and an overview progress on development of a new neutron EDM experiment to be operated at LANSCE will be presented. This new experiment has potential to improve the measurement sensitivity by a factor of 100. Although an EDM has not be observed for any elementary particle, experimental limits have been crucial for testing extensions to the so-called Standard Model of Electroweak Interactions. Our anticipated sensitivity will be sufficient to address questions regarding the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry in the Universe.

  20. Running and cycling economy in athletes; determining factors,training interventions and testing

    OpenAIRE

    Støren, Øyvind

    2009-01-01

    Løps- og sykkeløkonomi hos idrettsutøvere; bestemmende faktorer,treningsintervensjoner og testingArbeidet som denne doktorgradsavhandlingen er basert på ble utført ved Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet og Høgskolen i Telemark. Det består av en rekke på fem eksperimentelle studier som har undersøkt bestemmende faktorer for løps- og sykkeløkonomi, treningsintervensjoner og testmetoder. De viktigste målemetodene i dette doktorgradsarbeidet var målinger av oksygenopptak under submaks...

  1. The effects of a systematic increase in relative humidity on thermoregulatory and circulatory responses during prolonged running exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Muhamed, Ahmad Munir; Atkins, Kerry; Stannard, Stephen R; Mündel, Toby; Thompson, Martin William

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the thermoregulatory and circulatory responses, and exercise performance of trained distance runners during exercise in the heat (31°C) at varying relative humidity (RH). In a randomized order, 11 trained male distance runners performed 5 60 min steady-state runs at a speed eliciting 70% of VO2max in RH of 23, 43, 52, 61 and 71%. This was followed immediately with an incremental exercise test to volitional exhaustion. Core (Tre) and mean skin temperature (T¯sk), cardiac output (Q), heart rate (HR), and stroke volume (SV) were recorded at regular intervals. A significant (P = 0.003) main effect was detected for RH on mean body temperature (Tb), with a significantly higher Tb detected during steady-state exercise in the 61 and 71% RH compared to that in the 23% RH. During the steady-state exercise, no differences were detected in whole body sweat loss (P = 0.183). However, a significant main effect of RH was observed for HR and SV (P = 0.001 and 0.006, respectively) but not Q (P = 0.156). The time to exhaustion of the incremental exercise test was significantly reduced at 61 and 71% RH compared with 23% RH (P = 0.045 and 0.005, respectively). Despite an increase in dry heat loss, a greater thermoregulatory and circulatory stress was evident during steady-state exercise at 61 and 71% RH. This ultimately limits the capacity to perform the subsequent incremental exercise to exhaustion. This study highlighted that in a warm environment, the range of the prescriptive zone progressively narrows as RH increases.

  2. The effects of a systematic increase in relative humidity on thermoregulatory and circulatory responses during prolonged running exercise in the heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Muhamed, Ahmad Munir; Atkins, Kerry; Stannard, Stephen R.; Mündel, Toby; Thompson, Martin William

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study examined the thermoregulatory and circulatory responses, and exercise performance of trained distance runners during exercise in the heat (31°C) at varying relative humidity (RH). In a randomized order, 11 trained male distance runners performed 5 60 min steady-state runs at a speed eliciting 70% of VO2max in RH of 23, 43, 52, 61 and 71%. This was followed immediately with an incremental exercise test to volitional exhaustion. Core (Tre) and mean skin temperature (T¯sk), cardiac output (Q), heart rate (HR), and stroke volume (SV) were recorded at regular intervals. A significant (P = 0.003) main effect was detected for RH on mean body temperature (Tb), with a significantly higher Tb detected during steady-state exercise in the 61 and 71% RH compared to that in the 23% RH. During the steady-state exercise, no differences were detected in whole body sweat loss (P = 0.183). However, a significant main effect of RH was observed for HR and SV (P = 0.001 and 0.006, respectively) but not Q (P = 0.156). The time to exhaustion of the incremental exercise test was significantly reduced at 61 and 71% RH compared with 23% RH (P = 0.045 and 0.005, respectively). Despite an increase in dry heat loss, a greater thermoregulatory and circulatory stress was evident during steady-state exercise at 61 and 71% RH. This ultimately limits the capacity to perform the subsequent incremental exercise to exhaustion. This study highlighted that in a warm environment, the range of the prescriptive zone progressively narrows as RH increases.

  3. Trial-Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D. C.; Deibert, S. L.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2014-06-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat,' 'thermal-cycle,' or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial-run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine four moisture-cured silicones, four foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 degrees C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden (CO), Miami (FL), and Phoenix (AZ) for one year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

  4. Comparison of VO2 Max Prediction Value, Physiological Response, and Borg Scale between 12-Minute and 3200-Meter Run Fitness Tests among Indonesian Army Soldiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maulidi Abdillah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the VO2 max and physiological responses between 12-minute and 3200-meter run fitness tests. Methods: The subjects were 40 soldiers aged 18–21 years old of the Infantry Battalion 303/SSM of Cikajang, Garut, West Java, Indonesia. The 12-minute and 3200-meter run fitness tests were conducted with one week resting period. The measurement of the VO2 max prediction was based on each of the formulations and the measurement of physiological response included blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, Borg scale and oxygen saturation before and after the tests. This study used a cross-sectional method while the data were analyzed statistically using t-test (p=0.05. Results: The results showed that the VO2 max prediction in 12-minute run fitness test was 52.046±2.980 mL/KgBB/min and the 3200-meter run test was 55.323±3.238 mL/KgBB/min. The value was statistically significant (p=0.008. There was no significant difference in the physiological response in both tests, except the SpO2 parameter after the tests (p=0.021. Conclusions: There is a significant difference in VO2 max prediction between 12 minutes and 3200 meter run test. No significant difference was found in the physiological response in both tests, except the SpO2 parameter.

  5. Adolescent Girls' Preferences Pertaining to Cardiovascular Fitness Testing: A Comparison between the One-Mile Run and PACER Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Carol; Brown, Lanell; Graser, Sue Vincent; Pennington, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    Many adolescent girls are not participating in the recommended levels of physical activity (PA) and are at risk for unhealthy lifestyles (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2008). Helping girls understand the importance of PA and giving them positive experiences in physical education classes, including fitness testing, may help to…

  6. Changes in running economy following downhill running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Trevor C; Nosaka, Kazunori; Tu, Jui-Hung

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we examined the time course of changes in running economy following a 30-min downhill (-15%) run at 70% peak aerobic power (VO2peak). Ten young men performed level running at 65, 75, and 85% VO2peak (5 min for each intensity) before, immediately after, and 1 - 5 days after the downhill run, at which times oxygen consumption (VO2), minute ventilation, the respiratory exchange ratio (RER), heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and blood lactate concentration were measured. Stride length, stride frequency, and range of motion of the ankle, knee, and hip joints during the level runs were analysed using high-speed (120-Hz) video images. Downhill running induced reductions (7 - 21%, P run. Oxygen consumption increased (4 - 7%, P stride frequency, as well as reductions in stride length and range of motion of the ankle and knee. The results suggest that changes in running form and compromised muscle function due to muscle damage contribute to the reduction in running economy for 3 days after downhill running.

  7. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Rakness.

    2013-01-01

    After three years of running, in February 2013 the era of sub-10-TeV LHC collisions drew to an end. Recall, the 2012 run had been extended by about three months to achieve the full complement of high-energy and heavy-ion physics goals prior to the start of Long Shutdown 1 (LS1), which is now underway. The LHC performance during these exciting years was excellent, delivering a total of 23.3 fb–1 of proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, 6.2 fb–1 at 7 TeV, and 5.5 pb–1 at 2.76 TeV. They also delivered 170 μb–1 lead-lead collisions at 2.76 TeV/nucleon and 32 nb–1 proton-lead collisions at 5 TeV/nucleon. During these years the CMS operations teams and shift crews made tremendous strides to commission the detector, repeatedly stepping up to meet the challenges at every increase of instantaneous luminosity and energy. Although it does not fully cover the achievements of the teams, a way to quantify their success is the fact that that...

  8. Measuring fitness of Kenyan children with polyparasitic infections using the 20-meter shuttle run test as a morbidity metric.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaya L Bustinduy

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available To date, there has been no standardized approach to the assessment of aerobic fitness among children who harbor parasites. In quantifying the disability associated with individual or multiple chronic infections, accurate measures of physical fitness are important metrics. This is because exercise intolerance, as seen with anemia and many other chronic disorders, reflects the body's inability to maintain adequate oxygen supply (VO(2 max to the motor tissues, which is frequently linked to reduced quality-of-life in terms of physical and job performance. The objective of our study was to examine the associations between polyparasitism, anemia, and reduced fitness in a high risk Kenyan population using novel implementation of the 20-meter shuttle run test (20mSRT, a well-standardized, low-technology physical fitness test.Four villages in coastal Kenya were surveyed during 2009-2010. Children 5-18 years were tested for infection with Schistosoma haematobium (Sh, malaria, filaria, and geohelminth infections by standard methods. After anthropometric and hemoglobin testing, fitness was assessed with the 20 mSRT. The 20 mSRT proved easy to perform, requiring only minimal staff training. Parasitology revealed high prevalence of single and multiple parasitic infections in all villages, with Sh being the most common (25-62%. Anemia prevalence was 45-58%. Using multiply-adjusted linear modeling that accounted for household clustering, decreased aerobic capacity was significantly associated with anemia, stunting, and wasting, with some gender differences.The 20 mSRT, which has excellent correlation with VO(2, is a highly feasible fitness test for low-resource settings. Our results indicate impaired fitness is common in areas endemic for parasites, where, at least in part, low fitness scores are likely to result from anemia and stunting associated with chronic infection. The 20 mSRT should be used as a common metric to quantify physical fitness and compare sub

  9. Standard guide for measuring the wear volumes of piston ring segments run against flat coupons in reciprocating wear tests

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers and describes a profiling method for use accurately measuring the wear loss of compound-curved (crowned) piston ring specimens that run against flat counterfaces. It does not assume that the wear scars are ideally flat, as do some alternative measurement methods. Laboratory-scale wear tests have been used to evaluate the wear of materials, coatings, and surface treatments that are candidates for piston rings and cylinder liners in diesel engines or spark ignition engines. Various loads, temperatures, speeds, lubricants, and durations are used for such tests, but some of them use a curved piston ring segment as one sliding partner and a flat or curved specimen (simulating the cylinder liner) as its counterface. The goal of this guide is to provide more accurate wear measurements than alternative approaches involving weight loss or simply measuring the length and width of the wear marks. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its ...

  10. Reliability of a Cycle Ergometer Peak Power Test in Running-based Team Sport Athletes: A Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe, George M; Gabbett, Tim J; Hartwig, Timothy B; Mclellan, Christopher P

    2015-07-01

    Given the importance of ensuring athletes train and compete in a nonfatigued state, reliable tests are required to regularly monitor fatigue. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability of a cycle ergometer to measure peak power during short maximal sprint cycle efforts in running-based team sport athletes. Fourteen professional male Australian rules footballers performed a sprint cycle protocol during 3 separate trials, with each trial separated by 7 days. The protocol consisted of a standardized warm-up, a maximal 6-second sprint cycle effort, a 1-minute active recovery, and a second maximal 6-second sprint cycle effort. Peak power was recorded as the highest power output of the 2 sprint cycle efforts. Absolute peak power (mean ± SD) was 1502 ± 202, 1498 ± 191, and 1495 ± 210 W for trials 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The mean coefficient of variation, intraclass correlation coefficient, and SE of measurement for peak power between trials was 3.0% (90% confidence intervals [CIs] = 2.5-3.8%), 0.96 (90% CIs = 0.91-0.98), and 39 W, respectively. The smallest worthwhile change for relative peak power was 6.0%, which equated to 1.03 W·kg⁻¹. The cycle ergometer sprint test protocol described in this study is highly reliable in elite Australian rules footballers and can be used to track meaningful changes in performance over time, making it a potentially useful fatigue-monitoring tool.

  11. Feeding history and obese-prone genotype increase survival of rats exposed to a challenge of food restriction and wheel running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane, Abdoulaye; Pierce, W David; Heth, C Donald; Russell, James C; Richard, Denis; Proctor, Spencer D

    2012-09-01

    We hypothesized that obese-prone genotype and history of food restriction confer a survival advantage to genetically obese animals under environmental challenge. Male juvenile JCR:LA-cp rats, obese-prone and lean-prone, were exposed to 1.5 h daily meals and 22.5-h voluntary wheel running, a procedure inducing activity anorexia (AA). One week before the AA challenge, obese-prone rats were freely fed (obese-FF), or pair fed (obese-PF) to lean-prone, free-feeding rats (lean-FF). Animals were removed from protocol at 75% of initial body weight (starvation criterion) or after 14 days (survival criterion). AA challenge induced weight loss in all rats, but percent weight loss was more rapid and sustained in lean-FF rats than in obese-FF or obese-PF animals (P Wheel running increased linearly in all groups; lean-FF increased more rapidly than obese-FF (P wheel running. Prior food restriction of juvenile obese-prone rats induces a survival benefit beyond genotype, that is related to achievement of homeostasis. This metabolic adaptive process may help explain the development of human obesity in the presence of an unstable food environment which subsequently transitions to an abundant food supply.

  12. The 10x5 metre shuttle run test may be a good predictor of aerobic performance in pre-pubertal children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christina; Petersen, Mette; Froberg, Karsten

    in two field tests, the short shuttle run test (SSRT), 10x5 m measuring agility and speed , and the long modified 20 metre shuttle run, the Andersen test (AT) measuring cardio-respiratory fitness (4), representing anaerob and aerob performance respectively. Methods: The population and data was collected....... Conclusion: The SSRT may provide scientists, teachers and health care professionals with an important tool to estimate physical fitness in children in an easy, non-expensive, fast and fun way in the future. References: 1. Andersen LB, et Al. Secular trends in physical fitness in Danish adol.. Scand J Med Sci...

  13. Effect of compression stockings on physiological responses and running performance in division III collegiate cross-country runners during a maximal treadmill test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Brian C; Coughlin, Adam M; Hew-Butler, Tamara D; Goslin, Brian R

    2014-06-01

    There is a growing trend for runners to use compression stockings (CS) to improve performance. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of CS on physiological variables associated with running performance. Participants were 10 NCAA division III cross-country runners. The study used a randomized, crossover design with 2 conditions (with CS and without CS). Both conditions consisted of a maximal treadmill test that involved 3-minute stages of increasing speed and incline, separated by a minute and one-half walking recovery stage. Seven days later, the participants repeated the maximal test but switched CS condition. Heart rate, blood lactate (BLa), blood lactate threshold, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), respiratory exchange ratio, rating of perceived exertion, and time to fatigue were measured. Before and during the maximal treadmill tests, the variables showed no significant difference (p ≤ 0.05) between the CS conditions. Blood lactate was lower while wearing CS when measured during recovery at the 1-minute (CS = 13.3 ± 2.9 mmol · L(-1), non-CS = 14.8 ± 2.8 mmol · L(-1), p = 0.03) and the 5-minute (CS = 11.0 ± 2.7 mmol · L(-1), non-CS = 12.8 ± 2.8 mmol · L(-1), p = 0.02) periods. Time to fatigue was longer without CS (CS = 23.570 ± 2.39 minutes, non-CS = 23.93 ± 2.49 minutes, p = 0.04). These findings suggest that CS may not improve running performance, but could lend credence to certain manufacturers' claims of improved recovery through lower BLa values after exercise.

  14. Body mass change and ultraendurance performance: a decrease in body mass is associated with an increased running speed in male 100-km ultramarathoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüst, Christoph A; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Wirth, Andrea; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    We investigated, in 50 recreational male ultrarunners, the changes in body mass, selected hematological and urine parameters, and fluid intake during a 100-km ultramarathon. The athletes lost (mean and SD) 2.6 (1.8) % in body mass (p Running speed was significantly and negatively related to the change in body mass (p running speed (r = 0.33, p = 0.0182) and the change in body mass (r = 0.44, p = 0.0014) and significantly and negatively to both postrace serum [Na⁺] (r = -0.42, p = 0.0022) and the change in serum [Na⁺] (r = -0.38, p = 0.0072). This field study showed that recreational, male, 100-km ultramarathoners dehydrated as evidenced by the decrease in >2 % body mass and the increase in urine-specific gravity. Race performance, however, was not impaired because of the loss in body mass. In contrast, faster athletes lost more body mass compared with slower athletes while also drinking more. The concept that a loss of >2% in body mass leads to dehydration and consequently impairs endurance performance must be questioned for ultraendurance athletes competing in the field. For practical applications, a loss in body mass during a 100-km ultramarathon was associated with a faster running speed.

  15. NASA test flights with increased flight stress indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, I. S., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the objectives, results, and conclusions stemming from a series of six test flights conducted for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) by the National Scientific Balloon Facility (NSBF). Results from the test flights indicate that: (1) the current two U.S. balloon films are capable of being flown at significantly increased flight stress index values; (2) payload weights less than the design minimum payload can be reliably flown without fear of structural failure due to increased circumferential stress; and (3) large and rapid decreases in payload weight can be tolerated by current balloons without structural failure.

  16. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Christophe Delaere

    2012-01-01

      On Wednesday 14 March, the machine group successfully injected beams into LHC for the first time this year. Within 48 hours they managed to ramp the beams to 4 TeV and proceeded to squeeze to β*=0.6m, settings that are used routinely since then. This brought to an end the CMS Cosmic Run at ~Four Tesla (CRAFT), during which we collected 800k cosmic ray events with a track crossing the central Tracker. That sample has been since then topped up to two million, allowing further refinements of the Tracker Alignment. The LHC started delivering the first collisions on 5 April with two bunches colliding in CMS, giving a pile-up of ~27 interactions per crossing at the beginning of the fill. Since then the machine has increased the number of colliding bunches to reach 1380 bunches and peak instantaneous luminosities around 6.5E33 at the beginning of fills. The average bunch charges reached ~1.5E11 protons per bunch which results in an initial pile-up of ~30 interactions per crossing. During the ...

  17. Rules of thumb to increase the software quality through testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttu, M.; Bartolini, M.; Migoni, C.; Orlati, A.; Poppi, S.; Righini, S.

    2016-07-01

    The software maintenance typically requires 40-80% of the overall project costs, and this considerable variability mostly depends on the software internal quality: the more the software is designed and implemented to constantly welcome new changes, the lower will be the maintenance costs. The internal quality is typically enforced through testing, which in turn also affects the development and maintenance costs. This is the reason why testing methodologies have become a major concern for any company that builds - or is involved in building - software. Although there is no testing approach that suits all contexts, we infer some general guidelines learned during the Development of the Italian Single-dish COntrol System (DISCOS), which is a project aimed at producing the control software for the three INAF radio telescopes (the Medicina and Noto dishes, and the newly-built SRT). These guidelines concern both the development and the maintenance phases, and their ultimate goal is to maximize the DISCOS software quality through a Behavior-Driven Development (BDD) workflow beside a continuous delivery pipeline. We consider different topics and patterns; they involve the proper apportion of the tests (from end-to-end to low-level tests), the choice between hardware simulators and mockers, why and how to apply TDD and the dependency injection to increase the test coverage, the emerging technologies available for test isolation, bug fixing, how to protect the system from the external resources changes (firmware updating, hardware substitution, etc.) and, eventually, how to accomplish BDD starting from functional tests and going through integration and unit tests. We discuss pros and cons of each solution and point out the motivations of our choices either as a general rule or narrowed in the context of the DISCOS project.

  18. IMPLEMENTING FISCAL OR MONETARY POLICY IN TIME OF CRISIS? RUNNING GRANGER CAUSALITY TO TEST THE PHILLIPS CURVE IN SOME EURO ZONE COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Gianluigi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to provide empirical evidence about the theoretical relationship between inflation and unemployment in 9 European countries. Based on two major goals for economic policymakers namely, to keep both inflation and unemployment low, we use the ingredients of the Phillips curve to orient fiscal and monetary policies. These policies are prerogative for the achievement of a desirable combination of unemployment and inflation. More in detail, we attempt to address two basic issues. One strand of the study examines the size and sign of the impact of unemployment rate on percentage changes in inflation. In our preferred econometric model, we have made explicit the evidence according to which one unit increase (% in unemployment reduces inflation of roughly 0.73 percent, on average. Next, we turn to the question concerning the causal link between inflation and unemployment and we derive a political framework enables to orient European policymakers in the implementation of either fiscal or monetary policy. In this context, by means of the Granger causality test, we mainly find evidence of a directional causality which runs from inflation to unemployment in 4 out of 9 European countries under analysis. This result implies that political authorities of Austria, Belgium, Germany and Italy should implement monetary policy in order to achieve pre-established targets of unemployment and inflation. In the same context, a directional causality running from unemployment to inflation has been found in France and Cyprus suggesting that a reduction in the unemployment level can be achieved through controlling fiscal policy. However, succeeding in this goal may lead to an increasing demand for goods and services which, in turn, might cause a higher inflation than expected. Finally, while there is no statistical evidence of a causal link between unemployment and inflation in Finland and Greece, a bidirectional causality has been found in Estonia. This

  19. Influência da aptidão aeróbia no running anaerobic sprint test (RAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Luiz de Andrade

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi verificar a possível influência de diferentes níveis de aptidão aeróbia (VO2MAX sobre os parâmetros do running anaerobic sprint test (RAST. Para isso, 38 indivíduos (Idade = 18,1±2,5 anos, Estatura = 173±1 cm e Massa corporal = 65,1±6,5 kg foram classificados em dois grupos, baixa e elevada aptidão aeróbias (GBA: n=22 e GEA: n=16. O VO2MAX foi determinado por um esforço incremental em esteira rolante até a exaustão voluntária. O RAST foi composto de seis esforços máximos de 35m separados por 10s de intervalo passivo. O VO2MAX foi significativamente diferente entre os grupos (GBA = 51,7±1,9 mL.kg-1.min-1; GEA = 58,6±3,1 mL.kg-1.min-1. A potência média (PM foi significativamente superior no grupo GBA (552,7±132,1 W em relação ao grupo GEA (463,6±132,8 W. O impulso (ImP foi significativamente correlacionado com o VO2MAX no GEA. Pode-se concluir que há um indicativo que o metabolismo aeróbio exerce uma influência na realização do RAST.

  20. [A caloric vestibular test with increased positive evidence (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzeja, A; Strauss, P; Kapell, H

    1979-12-01

    A decrease of the variance of a caloric test would increase the importance of the statement of this test. An important source of variance are the differences concerning the timecourse of the induced heat wave, determined by the different anatomic conditions in the petrous bone, particularly the pneumatisation. A constant temperature gradient is obtained by the irigation in a pessimum position with the head flexed 30 degrees to the front. This temperature gradient evokes immediately a constant maximum vestibular stimulus after having reflected the head 90 degrees to the back. Comparing this new method with the traditional irrigation, one can state an important reduction of variance. The dependence of the nystagumus response on caloric irrigation of the petrous bone demands a X-ray-examination according to the technique of Schüller before starting with the caloric examination. In case of differences between the right and left sides the described test would be necessary in our opinion.

  1. Crack path for run-out specimens in fatigue tests: is it belonging to high- or very-high-cycle fatigue regime?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shanyavskiy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue tests run-out specimens up to 106 – 5x107 load cycles are used to determine the stress level named “fatigue limit”. Nevertheless, it is not clear what kind of fatigue cracking takes or will take place in these specimens. To discuss this problem, fatigue tests of titanium alloy VT3-1 specimens have been performed under tension with different values of R-ratio and under rotating-bending after various thermo-mechanical treatments (tempering, surface hardening and their combinations. Well-known S-N curves in High-Cycle- Fatigue regime have been plotted with run-out specimens usually used for “fatigue limit” determination. Then, after fatigue tests, run-out specimens have been tensed up to their failure, and fracture surface analyses have been performed for all tested specimens. It is found that run-out specimens in all combinations of treatments, for different R-ratio, have fracture surfaces for crack path in Very-High-Cycle-Fatigue regime. Based on this result, all S-N curves have been reconstructed in duplex curves for High- and Very-High-Cycle-Fatigue regime without using knowledge about “fatigue limit”. Detailed fracture surfaces analyses have been developed, and crack paths have been compared for various combinations of materials and surface states.

  2. Are Increasing Test Scores in Texas Really a Myth?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Toenjes

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Pass rates by Texas tenth-graders on the high school exit exam improved from 52 percent in 1994 to 72 percent in 1998. In his article "The Myth of the Texas Miracle in Education" (EPAA, August 2000 Professor Walt Haney argued that some part of this increased pass rate was, as he put it, an illusion. Haney contended that the combined effects of students dropping out of school prior to taking the 10th grade TAAS and special education exemptions accounted for much of the increase in TAAS pass rates. Relying on the same methodology and data that Haney used, we demonstrate that his conclusion is incorrect. None of the 20 percent improvement in the TAAS exit test pass rate between 1994 and 1998 is explained by combined increases in dropout rates or special education exemptions.

  3. Diagnostic values of combination of free running asthma screening test and total serum allergen IgE level in children with asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Xin; Li Yong; Zeng Meiying

    2014-01-01

    Background A free running asthma screening test is usually used for screening exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.The total serum allergen IgE level can reveal the patient's atopy characteristics.Our study is to evaluate the diagnostic values of the combination of the two tests in asthmatic children and compare this new diagnostic method with the Intemational Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISSAC) questionnaires and the bronchial provocation test,which are popular diagnostic tool for pediatric asthma.Methods A total of 773 school children were recruited in this study.The children's asthma was diagnosed by means of a combination of the free running asthma screening test and total serum allergen IgE level.The new diagnostic method value was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and compared with other diagnostic tools such as ISSAC questionnaires and the bronchial provocation test.Results The AUC of this new diagnostic method was higher than 0.9.When the cut-off value of total serum allergen IgE level was ≥47 KU/L,the sensitivity and the specificity were 71.4% and 85.1%,respectively,which were better than those of either the ISSAC questionnaires or bronchial provocation test.Conclusion The combination of the free running asthma screening test and total serum allergen IgE level may be an effective diagnostic tool for children's asthma.

  4. Increasing the instrumental throughput of gas chromatography method using multiple injections in a single experimental run: application in determination of friedelan-3-ol and friedelin in Maytenus ilicifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vistuba, Jacqueline Pereira; Piovezan, Marcel; Pizzolatti, Moacir Geraldo; Rebelo, Andrey Martinez; Azevedo, Mônia Stremel; Vitali, Luciano; Costa, Ana Carolina Oliveira; Amadeu Micke, Gustavo

    2013-01-25

    The aim of this study was to develop a separation method using multiple injections in a single experimental run (MISER) employing gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) for the first time, without instrument modification, to increase the instrumental throughput. The method was applied to the determination of the triterpenes friedelan-3-ol and friedelin in a plant extract obtained from Maytenus ilicifolia leaves. The column used in the chromatography system was a ZB-50 (30 m × 0.25 mm × 0.15 μm) with 50% phenyl-50% methyl-polysiloxane. The samples (1.0 μL) were injected using the split mode (1:90), with the injector at 280 °C and FID detector at 320 °C. The column temperature was programmed to isothermal mode at 300°C. Helium was used as the carrier gas with a constant flow of 1.5 mL min(-1). It was possible to perform three injections in the same run using the MISER method. An increase in the instrumental throughput by a factor of around 2.6 was observed when the use of multiple injections was compared with the single injection method. This method showed good linearity for both analytes with R(2)>0.99 and the values for the limit of detection were 0.24 mg L(-1) and 0.44 mg L(-1), for friedelan-3-ol and friedelin, respectively. Furthermore, the values for the limits of quantification were 0.79 mg L(-1) for friedelan-3-ol and 1.16 mg L(-1) for friedelin. The proposed method has potential for other GC applications, allowing an increase in the instrumental throughput of the methods by applying this separation technique.

  5. Diet-induced obesity resistance of adult female mice selectively bred for increased wheel-running behavior is reversed by single perinatal exposure to a high-energy diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guidotti, Stefano; Meyer, Neele; Przybyt, Ewa; Scheurink, Anton J.W.; Harmsen, Martin C.; Garland Jr., Theodore; van Dijk, Gertjan

    2016-01-01

    Female mice from independently bred lines previously selected over 50 generations for increased voluntary wheel-running behavior (S1, S2) resist high energy (HE) diet-induced obesity (DIO) at adulthood, even without actual access to running wheels, as opposed to randomly bred controls (CON). We inve

  6. Diet-induced obesity resistance of adult female mice selectively bred for increased wheel-running behavior is reversed by single perinatal exposure to a high-energy diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guidotti, Stefano; Meyer, Neele; Przybyt, Ewa; Scheurink, Anton J.W.; Harmsen, Martin C.; Garland Jr., Theodore; van Dijk, Gertjan

    2016-01-01

    Female mice from independently bred lines previously selected over 50 generations for increased voluntary wheel-running behavior (S1, S2) resist high energy (HE) diet-induced obesity (DIO) at adulthood, even without actual access to running wheels, as opposed to randomly bred controls (CON). We

  7. Diet-induced obesity resistance of adult female mice selectively bred for increased wheel-running behavior is reversed by single perinatal exposure to a high-energy diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guidotti, Stefano; Meyer, Neele; Przybyt, Ewa; Scheurink, Anton J.W.; Harmsen, Martin C.; Garland Jr., Theodore; van Dijk, Gertjan

    2016-01-01

    Female mice from independently bred lines previously selected over 50 generations for increased voluntary wheel-running behavior (S1, S2) resist high energy (HE) diet-induced obesity (DIO) at adulthood, even without actual access to running wheels, as opposed to randomly bred controls (CON). We inve

  8. Running Linux

    CERN Document Server

    Dalheimer, Matthias Kalle

    2006-01-01

    The fifth edition of Running Linux is greatly expanded, reflecting the maturity of the operating system and the teeming wealth of software available for it. Hot consumer topics such as audio and video playback applications, groupware functionality, and spam filtering are covered, along with the basics in configuration and management that always made the book popular.

  9. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Delaere

    2013-01-01

    Since the LHC ceased operations in February, a lot has been going on at Point 5, and Run Coordination continues to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities. In the last months, the Pixel detector was extracted and is now stored in the pixel lab in SX5; the beam pipe has been removed and ME1/1 removal has started. We regained access to the vactank and some work on the RBX of HB has started. Since mid-June, electricity and cooling are back in S1 and S2, allowing us to turn equipment back on, at least during the day. 24/7 shifts are not foreseen in the next weeks, and safety tours are mandatory to keep equipment on overnight, but re-commissioning activities are slowly being resumed. Given the (slight) delays accumulated in LS1, it was decided to merge the two global runs initially foreseen into a single exercise during the week of 4 November 2013. The aim of the global run is to check that we can run (parts of) CMS after several months switched off, with the new VME PCs installed, th...

  10. Repo Runs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, A.; Skeie, D.; von Thadden, E.L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper develops a model of financial institutions that borrow short- term and invest into long-term marketable assets. Because these financial intermediaries perform maturity transformation, they are subject to runs. We endogenize the profits of the intermediary and derive distinct liquidity and

  11. Prolonged running, not fluoxetine treatment, increases neurogenesis, but does not alter neuropathology, in the 3xTg mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlatt, Michael W; Potter, Michelle C; Bayer, Thomas A; van Praag, Henriette; Lucassen, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Reductions in adult neurogenesis have been documented in the original 3xTg mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), notably occurring at the same age when spatial memory deficits and amyloid plaque pathology appeared. As this suggested reduced neurogenesis was associated with behavioral deficits, we tested whether activity and pharmacological stimulation could prevent memory deficits and modify neurogenesis and/or neuropathology in the 3xTg model backcrossed to the C57Bl/6 strain. We chronically administered the antidepressant fluoxetine to one group of mice, allowed access to a running wheel in another, and combined both treatments in a third cohort. All treatments lasted for 11 months. The female 3xTg mice failed to exhibit any deficits in spatial learning and memory as measured in the Morris water maze, indicating that when backcrossed to the C57Bl/6 strain, the 3xTg mice lost the behavioral phenotype that was present in the original 3xTg mouse maintained on a hybrid background. Despite this, the backcrossed 3xTg mice expressed prominent intraneuronal amyloid beta (Aβ) levels in the cortex and amygdala, with lower levels in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. In the combined cohort, fluoxetine treatment interfered with exercise and reduced the total distance run. The extent of Aβ neuropathology, the tau accumulations, or BDNF levels, were not altered by prolonged exercise. Thus, neuropathology was present but not paralleled by spatial memory deficits in the backcrossed 3xTg mouse model of AD. Prolonged exercise for 11 months did improve the long-term survival of newborn neurons generated during middle-age, whereas fluoxetine had no effect. We further review and discuss the relevant literature in this respect.

  12. Running Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Running Club

    2011-01-01

    The cross country running season has started well this autumn with two events: the traditional CERN Road Race organized by the Running Club, which took place on Tuesday 5th October, followed by the ‘Cross Interentreprises’, a team event at the Evaux Sports Center, which took place on Saturday 8th October. The participation at the CERN Road Race was slightly down on last year, with 65 runners, however the participants maintained the tradition of a competitive yet friendly atmosphere. An ample supply of refreshments before the prize giving was appreciated by all after the race. Many thanks to all the runners and volunteers who ensured another successful race. The results can be found here: https://espace.cern.ch/Running-Club/default.aspx CERN participated successfully at the cross interentreprises with very good results. The teams succeeded in obtaining 2nd and 6th place in the Mens category, and 2nd place in the Mixed category. Congratulations to all. See results here: http://www.c...

  13. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Christophe Delaere

    2013-01-01

    The focus of Run Coordination during LS1 is to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities, to smooth interactions between subsystems and to ensure that all are ready in time to resume operations in 2015 with a fully calibrated and understood detector. After electricity and cooling were restored to all equipment, at about the time of the last CMS week, recommissioning activities were resumed for all subsystems. On 7 October, DCS shifts began 24/7 to allow subsystems to remain on to facilitate operations. That culminated with the Global Run in November (GriN), which   took place as scheduled during the week of 4 November. The GriN has been the first centrally managed operation since the beginning of LS1, and involved all subdetectors but the Pixel Tracker presently in a lab upstairs. All nights were therefore dedicated to long stable runs with as many subdetectors as possible. Among the many achievements in that week, three items may be highlighted. First, the Strip...

  14. Running Test and Optimization of Bamboo OSB Medium Experimental Line%竹质OSB中试线的运行试验及优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅万四; 周建波

    2012-01-01

    Bamboo OSB ( BOSB) medium experimental line and key equipments are presented for the first time based on the analysis of BOSB production technologies and processes requirements. Component of BOSB medium experimental line and key equipments stated. The paper illustrated BOSB flaker, glue blender, orienting former. Then medium experimental line is given to a great deal of test run and optimization. The tests indicated that the medium experimental line operated smoothly for producing BOSB. Tested BOSB key performance indicators were higher than the LY/T 1580-2000 (OSB/4).

  15. Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) runs and consumer fitness: growth and energy storage in stream-dwelling salmonids increase with salmon spawner density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinella, Daniel J.; Wipfli, Mark S.; Stricker, Craig A.; Heintz, Ron A.; Rinella, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    We examined how marine-derived nutrients (MDN), in the form of spawning Pacific salmon, influenced the nutritional status and δ15N of stream-dwelling fishes. We sampled juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and Dolly Varden (Salvelinus malma) during spring and fall from 11 south-central Alaskan streams that ranged widely in spawning salmon biomass (0.1–4.7 kg·m–2). Growth rate (as indexed by RNA–DNA ratios), energy density, and δ15N enrichment in spring-sampled fishes increased with spawner biomass, indicating the persistence of spawner effects more than 6 months after salmon spawning. Point estimates suggest that spawner effects on nutrition were substantially greater for coho salmon than Dolly Varden (268% and 175% greater for growth and energy, respectively), indicating that both species benefitted physiologically, but that juvenile coho salmon accrued more benefits than Dolly Varden. Although the data were less conclusive for fall- than spring-sampled fish, they do suggest spawner effects were also generally positive during fall, soon after salmon spawned. In a follow-up analysis where growth rate and energy density were modeled as a function of δ15N enrichment, results suggested that both increased with MDN assimilation, especially in juvenile coho salmon. Our results support the importance of salmon runs to the nutritional ecology of stream-dwelling fishes.

  16. The ATLAS RunTimeTester

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS RunTimeTester is a job based software test system. The RunTimeTester runs jobs, and optional tests on the job outputs. Job and test results are reported via a web site. The system currently runs $\\approx$ 8000 jobs daily, and the web site receives $\\approx$ 25K hits a week. This note provides an overview of the system.

  17. Comparative analysis of the 1-mile run test evaluation formulae: Assessment of aerobic capacity in male law enforcement officers aged 20–23 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gürhan Kayihan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare values of aerobic performance in the 1-mile run test (1-MRT using different formulae. Material and Methods: Aerobic capacities of 351 male volunteers working for the Turkish National Police within the age range of 20-23 years were evaluated by the 1-MRT and the 20-metre shuttle run (20-MST. VO2max values were estimated by the prediction equations developed by George et al. (1993, Cureton et al. (1995 and Kline et al. (1987 for the 1-MRT and by Leger and Lambert (1982 for the 20-MST. Results: The difference between the results of the different formulae was significant (p = 0.000. The correlation coefficient between the estimated VO2max using Cureton's equation, George's equation, Kline's equation and the 20-MST were 0.691 (p < 0.001, 0.486 (p < 0.001 and 0.608 (p < 0.001, respectively. The highest correlation coefficient was between the VO2max estimated by the 20-MST and Cureton's equation. Similarly, the highest correlation coefficient (r = -0.779 was between the 1-mile run time and the VO2max estimated by Cureton's equation. Conclusions: When analysing more vigorous exercise than sub-maximal exercise, we suggest that Cureton's equation be used to predict the VO2max from 1-mile run/walk performance in large numbers of healthy individuals with high VO2max. This research compares the use of 3 different formulae to estimate VO2max from 1-mile run/ walk performance in male law enforcement officers aged 20-23 years for the first time and reports the most accurate formula to use when evaluating aerobic capacities of large numbers of healthy individuals.

  18. Calculation of Sodium Fire Test-I (Run-E6) using sodium combustion analysis code ASSCOPS version 2.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagiri, Toshio; Ohno, Shuji; Miyake, Osamu [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1997-11-01

    The calculation of Sodium Fire Test-I (Run-E6) was performed using the ASSCOPS (Analysis of Simultaneous Sodium Combustions in Pool and Spray) code version 2.0 in order to determine the parameters used in the code for the calculations of sodium combustion behavior of small or medium scale sodium leak, and to validate the applicability of the code. The parameters used in the code were determined and the validation of the code was confirmed because calculated temperatures, calculated oxygen concentration and other calculated values almost agreed with the test results. (author)

  19. Normative reference values for the 20 m shuttle‐run test in a population‐based sample of school‐aged youth in Bogota, Colombia: the FUPRECOL study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios‐López, Adalberto; Humberto Prieto‐Benavides, Daniel; Enrique Correa‐Bautista, Jorge; Izquierdo, Mikel; Alonso‐Martínez, Alicia; Lobelo, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Our aim was to determine the normative reference values of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and to establish the proportion of subjects with low CRF suggestive of future cardio‐metabolic risk. Methods A total of 7244 children and adolescents attending public schools in Bogota, Colombia (55.7% girls; age range of 9–17.9 years) participated in this study. We expressed CRF performance as the nearest stage (minute) completed and the estimated peak oxygen consumption (V˙O2peak). Smoothed percentile curves were calculated. In addition, we present the prevalence of low CRF after applying a correction factor to account for the impact of Bogota's altitude (2625 m over sea level) on CRF assessment, and we calculated the number of participants who fell below health‐related FITNESSGRAM cut‐points for low CRF. Results Shuttles and V˙O2peak were higher in boys than in girls in all age groups. In boys, there were higher levels of performance with increasing age, with most gains between the ages of 13 and 17. The proportion of subjects with a low CRF, suggestive of future cardio‐metabolic risk (health risk FITNESSGRAM category) was 31.5% (28.2% for boys and 34.1% for girls; X2 P = .001). After applying a 1.11 altitude correction factor, the overall prevalence of low CRF was 11.5% (9.6% for boys and 13.1% for girls; X2 P = .001). Conclusions Our results provide sex‐ and age‐specific normative reference standards for the 20 m shuttle‐run test and estimated V˙O2peak values in a large, population‐based sample of schoolchildren from a large Latin‐American city at high altitude. PMID:27500986

  20. Running With an Elastic Lower Limb Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Michael S; Kota, Sridhar; Young, Aaron; Ferris, Daniel P

    2016-06-01

    Although there have been many lower limb robotic exoskeletons that have been tested for human walking, few devices have been tested for assisting running. It is possible that a pseudo-passive elastic exoskeleton could benefit human running without the addition of electrical motors due to the spring-like behavior of the human leg. We developed an elastic lower limb exoskeleton that added stiffness in parallel with the entire lower limb. Six healthy, young subjects ran on a treadmill at 2.3 m/s with and without the exoskeleton. Although the exoskeleton was designed to provide ~50% of normal leg stiffness during running, it only provided 24% of leg stiffness during testing. The difference in added leg stiffness was primarily due to soft tissue compression and harness compliance decreasing exoskeleton displacement during stance. As a result, the exoskeleton only supported about 7% of the peak vertical ground reaction force. There was a significant increase in metabolic cost when running with the exoskeleton compared with running without the exoskeleton (ANOVA, P exoskeletons for human running are human-machine interface compliance and the extra lower limb inertia from the exoskeleton.

  1. Barefoot running: biomechanics and implications for running injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Allison R; Davis, Irene S

    2012-01-01

    Despite the technological developments in modern running footwear, up to 79% of runners today get injured in a given year. As we evolved barefoot, examining this mode of running is insightful. Barefoot running encourages a forefoot strike pattern that is associated with a reduction in impact loading and stride length. Studies have shown a reduction in injuries to shod forefoot strikers as compared with rearfoot strikers. In addition to a forefoot strike pattern, barefoot running also affords the runner increased sensory feedback from the foot-ground contact, as well as increased energy storage in the arch. Minimal footwear is being used to mimic barefoot running, but it is not clear whether it truly does. The purpose of this article is to review current and past research on shod and barefoot/minimal footwear running and their implications for running injuries. Clearly more research is needed, and areas for future study are suggested.

  2. Mean platelet volume (MPV predicts middle distance running performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Lippi

    Full Text Available Running economy and performance in middle distance running depend on several physiological factors, which include anthropometric variables, functional characteristics, training volume and intensity. Since little information is available about hematological predictors of middle distance running time, we investigated whether some hematological parameters may be associated with middle distance running performance in a large sample of recreational runners.The study population consisted in 43 amateur runners (15 females, 28 males; median age 47 years, who successfully concluded a 21.1 km half-marathon at 75-85% of their maximal aerobic power (VO2max. Whole blood was collected 10 min before the run started and immediately thereafter, and hematological testing was completed within 2 hours after sample collection.The values of lymphocytes and eosinophils exhibited a significant decrease compared to pre-run values, whereas those of mean corpuscular volume (MCV, platelets, mean platelet volume (MPV, white blood cells (WBCs, neutrophils and monocytes were significantly increased after the run. In univariate analysis, significant associations with running time were found for pre-run values of hematocrit, hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH, red blood cell distribution width (RDW, MPV, reticulocyte hemoglobin concentration (RetCHR, and post-run values of MCH, RDW, MPV, monocytes and RetCHR. In multivariate analysis, in which running time was entered as dependent variable whereas age, sex, blood lactate, body mass index, VO2max, mean training regimen and the hematological parameters significantly associated with running performance in univariate analysis were entered as independent variables, only MPV values before and after the trial remained significantly associated with running time. After adjustment for platelet count, the MPV value before the run (p = 0.042, but not thereafter (p = 0.247, remained significantly associated with running

  3. Running Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Running Club

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 edition of the annual CERN Road Race will be held on Wednesday 29th September at 18h. The 5.5km race takes place over 3 laps of a 1.8 km circuit in the West Area of the Meyrin site, and is open to everyone working at CERN and their families. There are runners of all speeds, with times ranging from under 17 to over 34 minutes, and the race is run on a handicap basis, by staggering the starting times so that (in theory) all runners finish together. Children (< 15 years) have their own race over 1 lap of 1.8km. As usual, there will be a “best family” challenge (judged on best parent + best child). Trophies are awarded in the usual men’s, women’s and veterans’ categories, and there is a challenge for the best age/performance. Every adult will receive a souvenir prize, financed by a registration fee of 10 CHF. Children enter free (each child will receive a medal). More information, and the online entry form, can be found at http://cern.ch/club...

  4. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Delaere

    2012-01-01

      With the analysis of the first 5 fb–1 culminating in the announcement of the observation of a new particle with mass of around 126 GeV/c2, the CERN directorate decided to extend the LHC run until February 2013. This adds three months to the original schedule. Since then the LHC has continued to perform extremely well, and the total luminosity delivered so far this year is 22 fb–1. CMS also continues to perform excellently, recording data with efficiency higher than 95% for fills with the magnetic field at nominal value. The highest instantaneous luminosity achieved by LHC to date is 7.6x1033 cm–2s–1, which translates into 35 interactions per crossing. On the CMS side there has been a lot of work to handle these extreme conditions, such as a new DAQ computer farm and trigger menus to handle the pile-up, automation of recovery procedures to minimise the lost luminosity, better training for the shift crews, etc. We did suffer from a couple of infrastructure ...

  5. The physiology of deep-water running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Thomas; Dowzer, Clare N; Cable, N T

    2003-12-01

    Deep-water running is performed in the deep end of a swimming pool, normally with the aid of a flotation vest. The method is used for purposes of preventing injury and promoting recovery from strenuous exercise and as a form of supplementary training for cardiovascular fitness. Both stroke volume and cardiac output increase during water immersion: an increase in blood volume largely offsets the cardiac decelerating reflex at rest. At submaximal exercise intensities, blood lactate responses to exercise during deep-water running are elevated in comparison to treadmill running at a given oxygen uptake (VO2). While VO2, minute ventilation and heart rate are decreased under maximal exercise conditions in the water, deep-water running nevertheless can be justified as providing an adequate stimulus for cardiovascular training. Responses to training programmes have confirmed the efficacy of deep-water running, although positive responses are most evident when measured in a water-based test. Aerobic performance is maintained with deep-water running for up to 6 weeks in trained endurance athletes; sedentary individuals benefit more than athletes in improving maximal oxygen uptake. There is some limited evidence of improvement in anaerobic measures and in upper body strength in individuals engaging in deep-water running. A reduction in spinal loading constitutes a role for deep-water running in the prevention of injury, while an alleviation of muscle soreness confirms its value in recovery training. Further research into the applications of deep-water running to exercise therapy and athletes' training is recommended.

  6. PEP Integrated Test D Run Report Caustic and Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.; Geeting, John GH; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Josephson, Gary B.

    2009-12-11

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes" of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan. The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario (Test B and D) has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario (Test A) has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP and vessels UFP VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In Test D, 19M sodium hydroxide (NaOH, caustic) was added to the waste slurry in the UFP VSL T02 vessel after the solids were concentrated to ~20% undissolved solids. The NaOH was added to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by heating to 85°C using direct injection of steam to accelerate the leach process. The main difference of Test D compared to Test B is that the leach temperature is 85°C for 24 hrs as compared to 100°C for 12 hours. The other difference is the Test D simulant had Cr in the

  7. Do Generous Welfare States Generate Efficiency Gains Which Counterbalance Short Run Losses? Testing Downside Risk Theory with Economic Panel Data for the U.S., Germany and the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headey, Bruce; Muffels, Ruud

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to assess the theory that the downside risk insurance provided by more generous welfare states generates long run efficiency gains, which counterbalance the short run efficiency losses caused by work disincentives in these states (Feldstein 1974, 1976; Sinn 1995, 1996). Testing downside risk theory requires long term…

  8. Chemical complexity of odors increases reliability of olfactory threshold testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleszkiewicz, Anna; Pellegrino, Robert; Pusch, Katharina; Margot, Celine; Hummel, Thomas

    2017-01-10

    Assessment of odor thresholds is a widely recognized method of measuring olfactory abilities in humans. To date no attempts have been made to assess whether chemical complexity of odors used can produce more reliable results. To this end, we performed two studies of repeated measures design with 121 healthy volunteers (age 19-62 years). In Study 1, we compared thresholds obtained from tests based on one odor presented in a pen-like odor dispensing device with three odors and six odors mixtures presented in glass containers. In study 2 we compared stimuli of one and three odors, both presented in glass containers. In both studies measurements were performed twice, separated by at least three days. Results indicate that the multiple odor mixtures produced more reliable threshold scores, as compared to thresholds based on a single substance.

  9. Increasing the specificity of the forensic luminol test for blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quickenden, T I; Cooper, P D

    2001-01-01

    It is shown that the presumptive luminol chemiluminescence test for the presence of traces of blood can be made more determinative by measuring the peak emission wavelength of the luminol chemiluminescence. When sprayed onto a surface containing traces of human haemoglobin, a 1 g/L solution of aqueous luminol containing 7 g/L sodium perborate gives an emission peak at 455 +/- 2 nm, whereas the same mixture gives an emission peak at 430 +/- 3 nm when sprayed onto a surface containing traces of sodium hypochlorite (household bleach). This spectral difference can readily be determined using spectroscopic equipment that either scans the spectrum before significant luminescence decay occurs or corrects the spectrum for the effects of any decay. It was found that bovine haemoglobin and human haemoglobin showed no significant spectral differences.

  10. [Stress fracture after changing to barefoot running].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Mikkel

    2014-12-15

    Barefoot running is increasing in popularity but little is known about the implications in respect to injuries. It has been proposed that barefoot running is associated with a decrease in running injuries as it represents a more natural way of running. A 50-year-old runner with a weekly running distance of 50 km presented suffering from a stress fracture of the second metatarsal after six weeks of intensive barefoot running.

  11. Hanford Waste Vitrification Program process development: Melt testing subtask, pilot-scale ceramic melter experiment, run summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaoka, R.K.; Bates, S.O.; Elmore, M.R.; Goles, R.W.; Perez, J.M.; Scott, P.A.; Westsik, J.H.

    1996-03-01

    Hanford Waste Vitrification Program (HWVP) activities for FY 1985 have included engineering and pilot-scale melter experiments HWVP-11/HBCM-85-1 and HWVP-12/PSCM-22. Major objectives designated by HWVP fo these tests were to evaluate the processing characteristics of the current HWVP melter feed during actual melter operation and establish the product quality of HW-39 borosilicate glass. The current melter feed, defined during FY 85, consists of reference feed (HWVP-RF) and glass-forming chemicals added as frit.

  12. Secular trends in the performance of children and adolescents (1980-2000): an analysis of 55 studies of the 20m shuttle run test in 11 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkinson, Grant R; Léger, Luc A; Olds, Tim S; Cazorla, Georges

    2003-01-01

    It is widely believed that the performance of children and adolescents on aerobic fitness tests is declining. To test this hypothesis, this meta-analysis compared the results of 55 reports of the performance of children and adolescents aged 6-19 years who have used the 20m shuttle run test (20mSRT). All data were collected in the period 1981-2000. Following corrections for methodological variation, the results of all studies were expressed using the common metric of running speed (km/h) at the last completed stage. Raw data were combined with pseudodata generated from reported means and standard deviations using Monte Carlo simulation. Where data were available on children and adolescents from the same country of the same age and sex, but tested at different times, linear regression was used to calculate rates of change. This was possible for 11 (mainly developed) countries, representing a total of 129,882 children and adolescents in 151 age x sex x country slices. There has been a significant decline in performance in the 11 countries where data were available, and in most age x sex groups, with a sample-weighted mean decline of 0.43% of mean values per year. The decline was most marked in older age groups and the rate of decline was similar for boys and girls. There has been a very rapid secular decline in the 20mSRT performance of children and adolescents over the last 20 years, at least in developed countries. The rate of decline is not related to the change in the country's relative wealth, as quantified by per capita gross domestic product (GDP).

  13. Influence of footwear designed to boost energy return on running economy in comparison to a conventional running shoe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, J; Mcgrath, R; Brook, O; Taylor, P J; Dillon, S

    2016-01-01

    Running economy is a reflection of the amount of inspired oxygen required to maintain a given velocity and is considered a determining factor for running performance. Athletic footwear has been advocated as a mechanism by which running economy can be enhanced. New commercially available footwear has been developed in order to increase energy return, although their efficacy has not been investigated. This study aimed to examine the effects of energy return footwear on running economy in relation to conventional running shoes. Twelve male runners completed 6-min steady-state runs in conventional and energy return footwear. Overall, oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate, respiratory exchange ratio, shoe comfort and rating of perceived exertion were assessed. Moreover, participants subjectively indicated which shoe condition they preferred for running. Differences in shoe comfort and physiological parameters were examined using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, whilst shoe preferences were tested using a chi-square analysis. The results showed that VO2 and respiratory exchange ratio were significantly lower, and shoe comfort was significantly greater, in the energy return footwear. Given the relationship between running economy and running performance, these observations indicate that the energy return footwear may be associated with enhanced running performance in comparison to conventional shoes.

  14. A novel running mechanic's class changes kinematics but not running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craighead, Daniel H; Lehecka, Nick; King, Deborah L

    2014-11-01

    A novel method of running technique instruction, Midstance to Midstance Running (MMR), was studied to determine how MMR affected kinematics and running economy (RE) of recreational runners. An experimental pre-post randomized groups design was used. Participants (n = 18) were recreational runners who ran at least 3 days a week and 5 km per run. All testing was performed on a treadmill at 2.8 m·s. The intervention group (n = 9) completed 8 weeks of instruction in MMR; the control group (n = 9) continued running without instruction. The MMR group showed significant decreases in stride length (SL) (p = 0.02) and maximum knee flexion velocity in stance (p = 0.01), and a significant increase in stride rate (SR) (p = 0.02) after 8 weeks. No significant changes were found in heart rate, rating of perceived exertion, or RE. Midstance to Midstance Running was effective in changing SR and SL, but was not effective in changing other kinematic variables such as foot contact position and maximum knee flexion during swing. Midstance to Midstance Running did not affect RE. Evidence suggests that MMR may be an appropriate instructional method for recreational runners trying to decrease SL and increase SR.

  15. Increasing pro-environmental behaviors by increasing self-concordance: Testing an intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Kerrie L; McNeill, Ilona M

    2017-01-01

    Globally, there is a clear need to change our behavior to mitigate climate change. Many people, however, will not find the need for mitigation important enough to make their behavior more environmentally sustainable. Three studies supported the hypothesis that it is possible to overcome this issue by connecting these behaviors to goals that are important to people, even if such goals are unrelated to climate change or the environment in general. Study 1 (N = 305 working adults) showed that stronger self-concordance of behavior related to energy sustainability was related to a greater chance of signing a petition for increasing renewable energy sources. Next, 2 experimental studies (Study 2: N = 412 working and nonworking adults, and Study 3: N = 300 working adults) showed that increasing self-concordance of environmentally sustainable behaviors by asking people to cognitively connect either sustainable energy use (Study 2) or commuting behaviors (Study 3) to their personal goals increased intentions to engage in these behaviors compared to a control condition (Study 2 and Study 3) and compared to persuasion attempts based on climate change mitigation (Study 3). These findings occurred even after controlling for political orientation and environmental concerns. This research has significant practical implications for workplaces, particularly for those in which employees or managers place a low priority on environmental and climate change considerations. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. Crossvalidation of two 20-m shuttle-run tests for predicting VO2max in female collegiate soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael S; Esco, Michael R; Martin, Tyler D; Pritchett, Robert C; McHugh, Aindrea N; Williford, Henry N

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was twofold: (a) to compare the maximal attained speed (MAS) from the 20-m shuttle (MST) and 20-m square-shuttle (SST) tests and (b) to crossvalidate 2 equations for predicting maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) that were previously developed from MST and SST in a group of female collegiate soccer players. Thirty-nine subjects (age: 20.1 ± 1.5 years) participated in the study. A maximal graded exercise treadmill test was used to measure VO2max. In addition, VO2max was predicted from the MAS obtained during MST ((pred)VO2maxMST) and SST ((pred)VO2maxSST) using previously developed equations. Measured VO2max for the group was 44.2 ± 3.3 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1). The MAS was 12.5 ± 0.6 km·h(-1) for MST and 13.3 ± 0.8 km·h(-1) for SST (p < 0.05). The prediction methods yielded a (pred)VO2maxMST of 49.6 ± 3.9 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) and predVO2maxSST of 41.8 ± 3.1 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), which were significantly different from measured VO2max (p < 0.05). The validity statistics revealed the following constant error (CE), correlation coefficient (r), standard error of estimate (SEE), and total error (TE) for (pred)VO2maxMST and (pred)VO2maxSST: CE = 5.35 ± 3.83, r = 0.45 (p < 0.05), SEE = 2.97 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), TE = 6.39 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1); and CE = -2.43 ± 2.49, r = 0.69 (p < 0.05), SEE = 2.39 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), TE = 3.43 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), respectively. Residual plots indicated no proportional bias for either prediction model. The results of this study suggest that female collegiate soccer players had a higher MAS from SST compared with that from MST. In addition, SST appeared to be a more accurate predictor of VO2max than MST in the group of athletes.

  17. Preventing Running Injuries through Barefoot Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Priscilla M.; Smith, Darla R.

    2008-01-01

    Running has become a very popular lifetime physical activity even though there are numerous reports of running injuries. Although common theories have pointed to impact forces and overpronation as the main contributors to chronic running injuries, the increased use of cushioning and orthotics has done little to decrease running injuries. A new…

  18. Effect of Minimalist Footwear on Running Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Gillinov, Stephen M.; Laux, Sara; Kuivila, Thomas; Hass, Daniel; Joy, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although minimalist footwear is increasingly popular among runners, claims that minimalist footwear enhances running biomechanics and efficiency are controversial. Hypothesis: Minimalist and barefoot conditions improve running efficiency when compared with traditional running shoes. Study Design: Randomized crossover trial. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: Fifteen experienced runners each completed three 90-second running trials on a treadmill, each trial performed in a differ...

  19. Does Test Item Performance Increase with Test-to-Standards Alignment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Variation in test performance among examinees from different regions or national jurisdictions is often partially attributed to differences in the degree of content correspondence between local school or training program curricula, and the test of interest. This posited relationship between test-curriculum correspondence, or "alignment,"…

  20. The microvascular volume of the achilles tendon is increased in patients with tendinopathy at rest and after a 1-hour treadmill run

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Harrison, Adrian; Simonsen, Lene

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is initiated asymptomatically and is therefore often discovered at a very late stage. PURPOSE:To elucidate whether the microvascular volume (MV) of the Achilles tendon is elevated in patients with AT compared with healthy controls during pre-exercise rest...... of tendinopathy. CLINICAL RELEVANCE:This study underlines that tendon flexibility is altered in patients with AT and that CEU is a promising tool to establish the early diagnosis of this condition......., after acute exercise, and 24 hours after exercise. Additionally, this study investigated the muscle activation pattern of the gastrocnemius muscle and the relative elasticity of the Achilles tendon during a 1-hour treadmill run in healthy patients and in patients with AT. STUDY DESIGN...

  1. Evaluation of the running-based anaerobic sprint test as a measure of repeated sprint ability in collegiate-level soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keir, Daniel A; Thériault, Francis; Serresse, Olivier

    2013-06-01

    Repeated sprint ability (RSA) refers to an individual's ability to perform maximal sprints of short duration in succession with little recovery between sprints. The running-based anaerobic sprint test (RAST) has been adapted from the Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) protocol as a tool to assess RSA and anaerobic power. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between performance variables and physiological responses obtained during the RAST and the WAnT using 8 collegiate-level soccer players. Participants performed a single trial of both the WAnT and the RAST. Breath-by-breath gas exchange was monitored throughout each trial, and blood lactate (BL) measures were recorded postexercise. The oxygen uptake (VO2) profile suggested that the RAST required greater contributions from aerobic metabolism although there was no difference in VO2peak (p < 0.05). Peak BL values were also similar between the RAST and the WAnT (p < 0.05). Neither peak physiological values nor performance variables (peak and mean power) were significantly correlated between protocols. The weak association in physiological responses indicates that different combinations of metabolic contributions exist between protocols, suggesting that individual performances on each test are not related in collegiate soccer players. Further studies on these relationships with players of other competitive levels and team sport athletes are warranted.

  2. A Reduction in Maximal Incremental Exercise Test Duration 48 h Post Downhill Run Is Associated with Muscle Damage Derived Exercise Induced Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrismas, Bryna C. R.; Taylor, Lee; Siegler, Jason C.; Midgley, Adrian W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To examine whether exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD) and muscle soreness reduce treadmill maximal incremental exercise (MIE) test duration, and true maximal physiological performance as a consequence of exercise induced pain (EIP) and perceived effort. Methods: Fifty (14 female), apparently healthy participants randomly allocated into a control group (CON, n = 10), or experimental group (EXP, n = 40) visited the laboratory a total of six times: visit 1 (familiarization), visit 2 (pre 1), visit 3 (pre 2), visit 4 (intervention), visit 5 (24 h post) and visit 6 (48 h post). Both groups performed identical testing during all visits, except during visit 4, where only EXP performed a 30 min downhill run and CON performed no exercise. During visits 2, 3, and 6 all participants performed MIE, and the following measurements were obtained: time to exhaustion (TTE), EIP, maximal oxygen consumption (V·O2max), rate of perceived exertion (RPE), maximum heart rate (HRmax), maximum blood lactate (BLamax), and the contribution of pain to terminating the MIE (assessed using a questionnaire). Additionally during visits 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6 the following markers of EIMD were obtained: muscle soreness, maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), voluntary activation (VA), creatine kinase (CK). Results: There were no significant differences (p ≥ 0.32) between any trials for any of the measures obtained during MIE for CON. In EXP, TTE decreased by 34 s (3%), from pre 2 to 48 h post (p MVC, and VA. The exact mechanisms responsible for this require further investigation. PMID:28337151

  3. TESTING CMAQ CHEMISTRY SENSITIVITIES IN BASE CHASE AND EMISSION CONTROL RUNS AT SEARCH AND SOS 99 SURFACE SITES IN THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    CMAQ was run to simulate urban conditions in the southeastern U.S. in July 1999 at 32, 8, and 2 km grid spacings. Runs were made with two older mechanisms, Carbon Bond IV (CB4) and the Regional Acid Deposition Model, version 2 (RADM2), and with the more recent California Statewid...

  4. Science advancements key to increasing management value of life stage monitoring networks for endangered Sacramento River winter-run Chinook salmon in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rachel C.; Windell, Sean; Brandes, Patricia L.; Conrad, J. Louise; Ferguson, John; Goertler, Pascale A. L.; Harvey, Brett N.; Heublein, Joseph; Isreal, Joshua A.; Kratville, Daniel W.; Kirsch, Joseph E.; Perry, Russell W.; Pisciotto, Joseph; Poytress, William R.; Reece, Kevin; Swart, Brycen G.

    2017-01-01

    A robust monitoring network that provides quantitative information about the status of imperiled species at key life stages and geographic locations over time is fundamental for sustainable management of fisheries resources. For anadromous species, management actions in one geographic domain can substantially affect abundance of subsequent life stages that span broad geographic regions. Quantitative metrics (e.g., abundance, movement, survival, life history diversity, and condition) at multiple life stages are needed to inform how management actions (e.g., hatcheries, harvest, hydrology, and habitat restoration) influence salmon population dynamics. The existing monitoring network for endangered Sacramento River winterrun Chinook Salmon (SRWRC, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in California’s Central Valley was compared to conceptual models developed for each life stage and geographic region of the life cycle to identify relevant SRWRC metrics. We concluded that the current monitoring network was insufficient to diagnose when (life stage) and where (geographic domain) chronic or episodic reductions in SRWRC cohorts occur, precluding within- and among-year comparisons. The strongest quantitative data exist in the Upper Sacramento River, where abundance estimates are generated for adult spawners and emigrating juveniles. However, once SRWRC leave the upper river, our knowledge of their identity, abundance, and condition diminishes, despite the juvenile monitoring enterprise. We identified six system-wide recommended actions to strengthen the value of data generated from the existing monitoring network to assess resource management actions: (1) incorporate genetic run identification; (2) develop juvenile abundance estimates; (3) collect data for life history diversity metrics at multiple life stages; (4) expand and enhance real-time fish survival and movement monitoring; (5) collect fish condition data; and (6) provide timely public access to monitoring data in open data

  5. A Reduction in Maximal Incremental Exercise Test Duration 48 h Post Downhill Run Is Associated with Muscle Damage Derived Exercise Induced Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrismas, Bryna C R; Taylor, Lee; Siegler, Jason C; Midgley, Adrian W

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To examine whether exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD) and muscle soreness reduce treadmill maximal incremental exercise (MIE) test duration, and true maximal physiological performance as a consequence of exercise induced pain (EIP) and perceived effort. Methods: Fifty (14 female), apparently healthy participants randomly allocated into a control group (CON, n = 10), or experimental group (EXP, n = 40) visited the laboratory a total of six times: visit 1 (familiarization), visit 2 (pre 1), visit 3 (pre 2), visit 4 (intervention), visit 5 (24 h post) and visit 6 (48 h post). Both groups performed identical testing during all visits, except during visit 4, where only EXP performed a 30 min downhill run and CON performed no exercise. During visits 2, 3, and 6 all participants performed MIE, and the following measurements were obtained: time to exhaustion (TTE), EIP, maximal oxygen consumption [Formula: see text], rate of perceived exertion (RPE), maximum heart rate (HRmax), maximum blood lactate (BLamax), and the contribution of pain to terminating the MIE (assessed using a questionnaire). Additionally during visits 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6 the following markers of EIMD were obtained: muscle soreness, maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), voluntary activation (VA), creatine kinase (CK). Results: There were no significant differences (p ≥ 0.32) between any trials for any of the measures obtained during MIE for CON. In EXP, TTE decreased by 34 s (3%), from pre 2 to 48 h post (p < 0.001). There was a significant association between group (EXP, CON) and termination of the MIE due to "pain" during 48 h post (χ(2) = 14.7, p = 0.002). Conclusion: EIMD resulted in premature termination of a MIE test (decreased TTE), which was associated with EIP, MVC, and VA. The exact mechanisms responsible for this require further investigation.

  6. Increase of energy efficiency of testing of traction electric machines of direct and pulsating current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Afanasov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of the analysis of the effect of the load current of traction electric machines when tested for heating on the total electricity consumption for the test are presented. It is shown that increase of load current at the heating test permits to significantly reduce the consumption of electrical energy, and reduce the testing time without reducing its quality.

  7. Mechanical spring technology improves running economy in endurance runners

    OpenAIRE

    Riess, Kenneth James

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increase in participation in timed running events. With this increase, the motivation for individuals to run their best has motivated the running shoe industry to make design changes to traditional running foot wear in an effort to improve running economy (RE) and decrease running times. One such design change has been to incorporate mechanical springs (MS) into the midsole of the running shoe. Evaluation of this technology has yet to be performed. This study...

  8. Increasing the Depth of Current Understanding: Sensitivity Testing of Deep-Sea Larval Dispersal Models for Ecologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Rebecca E; Nimmo-Smith, W Alex M; Howell, Kerry L

    2016-01-01

    Larval dispersal is an important ecological process of great interest to conservation and the establishment of marine protected areas. Increasing numbers of studies are turning to biophysical models to simulate dispersal patterns, including in the deep-sea, but for many ecologists unassisted by a physical oceanographer, a model can present as a black box. Sensitivity testing offers a means to test the models' abilities and limitations and is a starting point for all modelling efforts. The aim of this study is to illustrate a sensitivity testing process for the unassisted ecologist, through a deep-sea case study example, and demonstrate how sensitivity testing can be used to determine optimal model settings, assess model adequacy, and inform ecological interpretation of model outputs. Five input parameters are tested (timestep of particle simulator (TS), horizontal (HS) and vertical separation (VS) of release points, release frequency (RF), and temporal range (TR) of simulations) using a commonly employed pairing of models. The procedures used are relevant to all marine larval dispersal models. It is shown how the results of these tests can inform the future set up and interpretation of ecological studies in this area. For example, an optimal arrangement of release locations spanning a release area could be deduced; the increased depth range spanned in deep-sea studies may necessitate the stratification of dispersal simulations with different numbers of release locations at different depths; no fewer than 52 releases per year should be used unless biologically informed; three years of simulations chosen based on climatic extremes may provide results with 90% similarity to five years of simulation; and this model setup is not appropriate for simulating rare dispersal events. A step-by-step process, summarising advice on the sensitivity testing procedure, is provided to inform all future unassisted ecologists looking to run a larval dispersal simulation.

  9. Increasing the Depth of Current Understanding: Sensitivity Testing of Deep-Sea Larval Dispersal Models for Ecologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo-Smith, W. Alex M.; Howell, Kerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Larval dispersal is an important ecological process of great interest to conservation and the establishment of marine protected areas. Increasing numbers of studies are turning to biophysical models to simulate dispersal patterns, including in the deep-sea, but for many ecologists unassisted by a physical oceanographer, a model can present as a black box. Sensitivity testing offers a means to test the models’ abilities and limitations and is a starting point for all modelling efforts. The aim of this study is to illustrate a sensitivity testing process for the unassisted ecologist, through a deep-sea case study example, and demonstrate how sensitivity testing can be used to determine optimal model settings, assess model adequacy, and inform ecological interpretation of model outputs. Five input parameters are tested (timestep of particle simulator (TS), horizontal (HS) and vertical separation (VS) of release points, release frequency (RF), and temporal range (TR) of simulations) using a commonly employed pairing of models. The procedures used are relevant to all marine larval dispersal models. It is shown how the results of these tests can inform the future set up and interpretation of ecological studies in this area. For example, an optimal arrangement of release locations spanning a release area could be deduced; the increased depth range spanned in deep-sea studies may necessitate the stratification of dispersal simulations with different numbers of release locations at different depths; no fewer than 52 releases per year should be used unless biologically informed; three years of simulations chosen based on climatic extremes may provide results with 90% similarity to five years of simulation; and this model setup is not appropriate for simulating rare dispersal events. A step-by-step process, summarising advice on the sensitivity testing procedure, is provided to inform all future unassisted ecologists looking to run a larval dispersal simulation. PMID

  10. Can Unshod Running Reduce Running Injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    quadrupeds run, their internal organs expand and contract like an accordion as they stride when running. As a cheetah strides forward, its lungs expand...and take in air. When the cheetah compresses its stride, the lungs are collapsed and the cheetah breathes out. This take-a-step and take-a- breath

  11. Wave Run-Up on Rubble Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van de Walle, Bjorn; De Rouck, Julien; Troch, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Seven sets of data for wave run-up on a rubble mound breakwater were combined and re-analysed, with full-scale, large-scale and small-scale model test results being taken into account. The dimensionless wave run-up value Ru-2%/Hm0 was considered, where R u-2% is the wave run-up height exceeded by...

  12. What we can learn about running from barefoot running: an evolutionary medical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Daniel E

    2012-04-01

    Barefoot running, which was how people ran for millions of years, provides an opportunity to study how natural selection adapted the human body to run. Because humans evolved to run barefoot, a barefoot running style that minimizes impact peaks and provides increased proprioception and foot strength, is hypothesized to help avoid injury, regardless of whether one is wearing shoes.

  13. Determinants Of Savings Behavior In Pakistan: Long Run - Short Run Association And Causality

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Fawad

    2015-01-01

    The existing studies on private savings have mostly investigated the long run and short association of different variables with private savings, whereas no known study has investigated both long run and short run causality of variables against private savings by using data of Pakistan. The current study used time series data of Pakistan over the period of 1972 to 2012 and employed long run cointegration test, first normalized equation for long run association, vector error correction model fo...

  14. INCREASE OF RUNNING ABILITIES OF WOODCUTTING KNIFES BY THE COMBINED METHOD OF APPLICATION VACUUM STRENGTHENING COVERINGS AND MAGNETIC-PULSE PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Alifanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of modes of vacuum spatter of strengthening coverings (in particular titanium nitride on steel samples and magnetic-pulse processing of these coverings on durability of adhesive bindings of the applied covering with bottom layer (steel sample is studied. Results of experimental-industrial tests of the woodcutting knifes strengthened by the combined method of applying of vacuum strengthening coverings and magnetic-pulse processing are presented.

  15. Platelet function and fibrinolytic activity following distance running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, J B; Brodthagen, U; Gormsen, J; Jordal, R; Nørregaard-Hansen, K; Paulev, P E

    1982-11-01

    6 long distance runners from the Danish marathon elite and 6 non-runners completed test runs of 28 and 12 km, respectively. Distance runners and non-runners showed the same responses in platelet function. We found a significant decrease in ADP induced platelet aggregability, a decreased serotonin release induced by ADP and collagen and an increase in platelet factor 4 immediately following the run. The antithrombin III levels remained constant. Euglobulin lysis time was shortened (by approximately 50%) and the plasminogen levels significantly increased. The last 2 findings indicate an equal increase in fibrinolytic activity during distance running in both groups. While short term, strenuous exercise induces platelet hyperaggregation, long term distance running induces a state of exhaustion of platelet aggregation capacity.

  16. Warm-up with a weighted vest improves running performance via leg stiffness and running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, K R; Hopkins, W G; McGuigan, M R; Kilding, A E

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effects of "strides" with a weighted-vest during a warm-up on endurance performance and its potential neuromuscular and metabolic mediators. A bout of resistance exercise can enhance subsequent high-intensity performance, but little is known about such priming exercise for endurance performance. A crossover with 5-7 days between an experimental and control trial was performed by 11 well-trained distance runners. Each trial was preceded by a warm-up consisting of a 10-min self-paced jog, a 5-min submaximal run to determine running economy, and six 10-s strides with or without a weighted-vest (20% of body mass). After a 10-min recovery period, runners performed a series of jumps to determine leg stiffness and other neuromuscular characteristics, another 5-min submaximal run, and an incremental treadmill test to determine peak running speed. Clinical and non-clinical forms of magnitude-based inference were used to assess outcomes. Correlations and linear regression were used to assess relationships between performance and underlying measures. The weighted-vest condition resulted in a very-large enhancement of peak running speed (2.9%; 90% confidence limits ±0.8%), a moderate increase in leg stiffness (20.4%; ±4.2%) and a large improvement in running economy (6.0%; ±1.6%); there were also small-moderate clear reductions in cardiorespiratory measures. Relationships between change scores showed that changes in leg stiffness could explain all the improvements in performance and economy. Strides with a weighted-vest have a priming effect on leg stiffness and running economy. It is postulated the associated major effect on peak treadmill running speed will translate into enhancement of competitive endurance performance. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Barefoot running: does it prevent injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kelly; Curry, Emily J; Matzkin, Elizabeth G

    2013-11-01

    Endurance running has evolved over the course of millions of years and it is now one of the most popular sports today. However, the risk of stress injury in distance runners is high because of the repetitive ground impact forces exerted. These injuries are not only detrimental to the runner, but also place a burden on the medical community. Preventative measures are essential to decrease the risk of injury within the sport. Common running injuries include patellofemoral pain syndrome, tibial stress fractures, plantar fasciitis, and Achilles tendonitis. Barefoot running, as opposed to shod running (with shoes), has recently received significant attention in both the media and the market place for the potential to promote the healing process, increase performance, and decrease injury rates. However, there is controversy over the use of barefoot running to decrease the overall risk of injury secondary to individual differences in lower extremity alignment, gait patterns, and running biomechanics. While barefoot running may benefit certain types of individuals, differences in running stance and individual biomechanics may actually increase injury risk when transitioning to barefoot running. The purpose of this article is to review the currently available clinical evidence on barefoot running and its effectiveness for preventing injury in the runner. Based on a review of current literature, barefoot running is not a substantiated preventative running measure to reduce injury rates in runners. However, barefoot running utility should be assessed on an athlete-specific basis to determine whether barefoot running will be beneficial.

  18. PDU Run 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-01

    PDU Run 10, a 46-day H-Coal syncrude mode operation using Wyodak coal, successfully met all targeted objectives, and was the longest PDU operation to date in this program. Targeted coal conversion of 90 W % was exceeded with a C/sub 4/-975/sup 0/F distillate yield of 43 to 48 W %. Amocat 1A catalyst was qualified for Pilot Plant operation based on improved operation and superior performance. PDU 10 achieved improved yields and lower hydrogen consumption compared to PDU 6, a similar operation. High hydroclone efficiency and high solids content in the vacuum still were maintained throughout the run. Steady operations at lower oil/solids ratios were demonstrated. Microautoclave testing was introduced as an operational aid. Four additional studies were successfully completed during PDU 10. These included a catalyst tracer study in conjunction with Sandia Laboratories; tests on letdown valve trims for Battelle; a fluid dynamics study with Amoco; and special high-pressure liquid sampling.

  19. Maximal and submaximal physiological responses to adaptation to deep water running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Liane B; Lambert, Mike I; Zogaib, Paulo S; Barros Neto, Turibio L

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the study was to compare physiological responses between runners adapted and not adapted to deep water running at maximal intensity and the intensity equivalent to the ventilatory threshold. Seventeen runners, either adapted (n = 10) or not adapted (n = 7) to deep water running, participated in the study. Participants in both groups undertook a maximal treadmill running and deep water running graded exercise test in which cardiorespiratory variables were measured. Interactions between adaptation (adapted vs. non-adapted) and condition (treadmill running vs. deep water running) were analysed. The main effects of adaptation and condition were also analysed in isolation. Runners adapted to deep water running experienced less of a reduction in maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) in deep water running compared with treadmill running than runners not adapted to deep water running. Maximal oxygen consumption, maximal heart rate, maximal ventilation, VO2max at the ventilatory threshold, heart rate at the ventilatory threshold, and ventilation at the ventilatory threshold were significantly higher during treadmill than deep water running. Therefore, we conclude that adaptation to deep water running reduces the difference in VO2max between the two modalities, possibly due to an increase in muscle recruitment. The results of this study support previous findings of a lower maximal and submaximal physiological response on deep water running for most of the measured parameters.

  20. Increased shelterin mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and skeletal muscle following an ultra-long-distance running event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laye, Matthew J; Solomon, Thomas; Karstoft, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    . In this study, we examine the mRNA and protein levels of proteins within and associated with the shelterin complex in subjects (n = 8, mean age = 44 yr) who completed a physiological stress of seven marathons in 7 days. Twenty-two to 24 h after the last marathon, subjects had increased mRNA levels of DNA repair...

  1. Is Moderate Intensity Cycling Sufficient to Induce Cardiorespiratory and Biomechanical Modifications of Subsequent Running?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Joel A; Dawber, James P; Lepers, Romuald; Brown, Marc; Stapley, Paul J

    2017-04-01

    Walsh, JA, Dawber, JP, Lepers, R, Brown, M, and Stapley, PJ. Is moderate intensity cycling sufficient to induce cardiorespiratory and biomechanical modifications of subsequent running? J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 1078-1086, 2017-This study sought to determine whether prior moderate intensity cycling is sufficient to influence the cardiorespiratory and biomechanical responses during subsequent running. Cardiorespiratory and biomechanical variables measured after moderate intensity cycling were compared with control running at the same intensity. Eight highly trained, competitive triathletes completed 2 separate exercise tests; (a) a 10-minute control run (no prior cycling) and, (b) a 30-minute transition run (TR) (preceded by 20-minute of variable cadence cycling, i.e., run versus cycle-run). Respiratory, breathing frequency (fb), heart rate (HR), cost of running (Cr), rate constant, stride length, and stride frequency variables were recorded, normalized, and quantified at the mean response time (MRT), third minute, 10th minute (steady state), and overall for the control run (CR) and TR. Cost of running increased (p ≤ 0.05) at all respective times during the TR. The V[Combining Dot Above]E/V[Combining Dot Above]CO2 and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) were significantly (p stride frequency increased at the MRT and 3 minutes (p < 0.01). The findings suggest that at moderate intensity, prior cycling influences the cardiorespiratory response during subsequent running. Furthermore, prior cycling seems to have a sustained effect on the Cr during subsequent running.

  2. Body borne loads impact walk-to-run and running biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T N; O'Donovan, M; Hasselquist, L; Corner, B D; Schiffman, J M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a biomechanics-based assessment of body borne load during the walk-to-run transition and steady-state running because historical research has limited load carriage assessment to prolonged walking. Fifteen male military personnel had trunk and lower limb biomechanics examined during these locomotor tasks with three different load configurations (light, ∼6 kg, medium, ∼20 kg, and heavy, ∼40 kg). Subject-based means of the dependent variables were submitted to repeated measures ANOVA to test the effects of load configuration. During the walk-to-run transition, the hip decreased (P=0.001) and knee increased (P=0.004) their contribution to joint power with the addition of load. Additionally, greater peak trunk (P=0.001), hip (P=0.001), and knee flexion (Prun transition. Body borne load had no significant effect (P>0.05) on distribution of lower limb joint power during steady-state running, but increased peak trunk (Prun transition the load carrier may move joint power production distally down the kinetic chain and adopt biomechanical profiles to maintain performance of the task. The load carrier, however, may not adopt lower limb kinematic adaptations necessary to shift joint power distribution during steady-state running, despite exhibiting potentially detrimental larger lower limb joint loads. As such, further study appears needed to determine how load carriage impairs maximal locomotor performance.

  3. How to run 100 meters?

    CERN Document Server

    Aftalion, Amandine

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to bring a mathematical justification to the optimal way of organizing one's effort when running. It is well known from physiologists that all running exercises of duration less than 3mn are run with a strong initial acceleration and a decelerating end; on the contrary, long races are run with a final sprint. This can be explained using a mathematical model describing the evolution of the velocity, the anaerobic energy, and the propulsive force: a system of ordinary differential equations, based on Newton's second law and energy conservation, is coupled to the condition of optimizing the time to run a fixed distance. We show that the monotony of the velocity curve vs time is the opposite of that of the oxygen uptake (V O2) vs time. Since the oxygen uptake is monotone increasing for a short run, we prove that the velocity is exponentially increasing to its maximum and then decreasing. For longer races, the oxygen uptake has an increasing start and a decreasing end and this accounts for...

  4. The examination of the heart rate recovery after anaerobic running in soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Halil; Erkmen, Nurtekin; Cicioglu, Ibrahim

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the heart rate recovery depending on anaerobic running. A total of 23 professional soccer players who were player of Turkish Super Leagues, were examined. Anaerobic Run test was applied to the soccer players and their heart rates were recorded before running, just after running, in 3rd and 6th minutes of recovery period. Any statistical differences were not found between the heart rates before run and in 6th minute after run (p > 0.05). On the other hand, there was a statistical difference between the heart rates before run, after run and in 3rd minute after run; the heart rates after run and before run; the heart rates in 3rd and 6th minutes of recovery (p rates after run, before run (r = 0.457) and in 3rd minute of recovery (r = 0.537) and the heart rates in 3rd and 6th minutes of recovery (r = 0.629). On the other hand, no relation was found between the heart rates before run, in 3rd minute recovery (r = 0.247) and in 6th minute of recovery (r = -0.004) and the heart rates just after run and in 6th minute of recovery (r = 0.280) (p > 0.05). In conclusion, even if the increase of heart rate occurring after anaerobic run doesn't completely return to normal in 3rd minute of recovery, it will supply the athlete with a suitable condition for the second loading with regard to efficient rest. It is thought that a rest over 3 minutes should be given for athletes to make the heart rate after anaerobic run return to normal.

  5. Increased shelterin mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and skeletal muscle following an ultra-long-distance running event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laye, Matthew J; Solomon, Thomas P J; Karstoft, Kristian; Pedersen, Karin K; Nielsen, Susanne D; Pedersen, Bente K

    2012-03-01

    Located at the end of chromosomes, telomeres are progressively shortened with each replication of DNA during aging. Integral to the regulation of telomere length is a group of proteins making up the shelterin complex, whose tissue-specific function during physiological stress is not well understood. In this study, we examine the mRNA and protein levels of proteins within and associated with the shelterin complex in subjects (n = 8, mean age = 44 yr) who completed a physiological stress of seven marathons in 7 days. Twenty-two to 24 h after the last marathon, subjects had increased mRNA levels of DNA repair enzymes Ku70 and Ku80 (P < 0.05) in both skeletal muscle and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Additionally, the PBMCs displayed an increment in three shelterin protein mRNA levels (TRF1, TRF2, and Pot-1, P < 0.05) following the event. Seven days of ultrarunning did not result in changes in mean telomere length, telomerase activity, hTert mRNA, or hterc mRNAs found in PBMCs. Higher protein concentrations of TRF2 were found in skeletal muscle vs. PBMCs at rest. Mean telomere length in skeletal muscle did not change and did not contain detectable levels of htert mRNA or telomerase activity. Furthermore, changes in the PBMCs could not be attributed to changes in the proportion of subtypes of CD4(+) or CD8(+) cells. We have provided the first evidence that, in humans, proteins within and associated with the shelterin complex increase at the mRNA level in response to a physiological stress differentially in PBMCs and skeletal muscle.

  6. Biomechanics of Distance Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Peter R., Ed.

    Contributions from researchers in the field of running mechanics are included in the 13 chapters of this book. The following topics are covered: (1) "The Mechanics of Distance Running: A Historical Perspective" (Peter Cavanagh); (2) "Stride Length in Distance Running: Velocity, Body Dimensions, and Added Mass Effects" (Peter Cavanagh, Rodger…

  7. Fatigue associated with prolonged graded running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giandolini, Marlene; Vernillo, Gianluca; Samozino, Pierre; Horvais, Nicolas; Edwards, W Brent; Morin, Jean-Benoît; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2016-10-01

    Scientific experiments on running mainly consider level running. However, the magnitude and etiology of fatigue depend on the exercise under consideration, particularly the predominant type of contraction, which differs between level, uphill, and downhill running. The purpose of this review is to comprehensively summarize the neurophysiological and biomechanical changes due to fatigue in graded running. When comparing prolonged hilly running (i.e., a combination of uphill and downhill running) to level running, it is found that (1) the general shape of the neuromuscular fatigue-exercise duration curve as well as the etiology of fatigue in knee extensor and plantar flexor muscles are similar and (2) the biomechanical consequences are also relatively comparable, suggesting that duration rather than elevation changes affects neuromuscular function and running patterns. However, 'pure' uphill or downhill running has several fatigue-related intrinsic features compared with the level running. Downhill running induces severe lower limb tissue damage, indirectly evidenced by massive increases in plasma creatine kinase/myoglobin concentration or inflammatory markers. In addition, low-frequency fatigue (i.e., excitation-contraction coupling failure) is systematically observed after downhill running, although it has also been found in high-intensity uphill running for different reasons. Indeed, low-frequency fatigue in downhill running is attributed to mechanical stress at the interface sarcoplasmic reticulum/T-tubule, while the inorganic phosphate accumulation probably plays a central role in intense uphill running. Other fatigue-related specificities of graded running such as strategies to minimize the deleterious effects of downhill running on muscle function, the difference of energy cost versus heat storage or muscle activity changes in downhill, level, and uphill running are also discussed.

  8. Palm cooling does not improve running performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheadler, C M; Saunders, N W; Hanson, N J; Devor, S T

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of the BEX Runner palm cooling device during a combination of exercise and environmental heat stress. Twelve subjects completed two randomly ordered time-to-exhaustion runs at 75% VO2max, 30 °C, and 50% relative humidity with and without palm cooling. Time to exhaustion runs started once the warm-up had elicited a core temperature of 37.5 °C. Heart rate, Rating of Perceived Exertion, Feeling Scale, and core temperature were recorded at 2-min intervals during each run. Time to exhaustion was longer in control than treatment (46.7±31.1 vs. 41.3±26.3 min, respectively, prate-of-rise of core temperature was not different between control and treatment (0.047 vs. 0.048 °C · min-1, respectively). The use of the BEX Runner palm cooling device during a run in hot conditions did not eliminate or even attenuate the rise in core temperature. Exercise time in hot conditions did not increase with the use of the palm cooling device and time to exhaustion was reduced. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. The Effect of Training in Minimalist Running Shoes on Running Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge, Sarah T; Standifird, Tyler; Rivera, Jessica; Johnson, A Wayne; Mitchell, Ulrike; Hunter, Iain

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of minimalist running shoes on oxygen uptake during running before and after a 10-week transition from traditional to minimalist running shoes. Twenty-five recreational runners (no previous experience in minimalist running shoes) participated in submaximal VO2 testing at a self-selected pace while wearing traditional and minimalist running shoes. Ten of the 25 runners gradually transitioned to minimalist running shoes over 10 weeks (experimental group), while the other 15 maintained their typical training regimen (control group). All participants repeated submaximal VO2 testing at the end of 10 weeks. Testing included a 3 minute warm-up, 3 minutes of running in the first pair of shoes, and 3 minutes of running in the second pair of shoes. Shoe order was randomized. Average oxygen uptake was calculated during the last minute of running in each condition. The average change from pre- to post-training for the control group during testing in traditional and minimalist shoes was an improvement of 3.1 ± 15.2% and 2.8 ± 16.2%, respectively. The average change from pre- to post-training for the experimental group during testing in traditional and minimalist shoes was an improvement of 8.4 ± 7.2% and 10.4 ± 6.9%, respectively. Data were analyzed using a 2-way repeated measures ANOVA. There were no significant interaction effects, but the overall improvement in running economy across time (6.15%) was significant (p = 0.015). Running in minimalist running shoes improves running economy in experienced, traditionally shod runners, but not significantly more than when running in traditional running shoes. Improvement in running economy in both groups, regardless of shoe type, may have been due to compliance with training over the 10-week study period and/or familiarity with testing procedures. Key pointsRunning in minimalist footwear did not result in a change in running economy compared to running in traditional footwear

  10. Influence of the Lower Jaw Position on the Running Pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Maurer

    Full Text Available The effects of manipulated dental occlusion on body posture has been investigated quite often and discussed controversially in the literature. Far less attention has been paid to the influence of dental occlusion position on human movement. If human movement was analysed, it was mostly while walking and not while running. This study was therefore designed to identify the effect of lower jaw positions on running behaviour according to different dental occlusion positions.Twenty healthy young recreational runners (mean age = 33.9±5.8 years participated in this study. Kinematic data were collected using an eight-camera Vicon motion capture system (VICON Motion Systems, Oxford, UK. Subjects were consecutively prepared with four different dental occlusion conditions in random order and performed five running trials per test condition on a level walkway with their preferred running shoes. Vector based pattern recognition methods, in particular cluster analysis and support vector machines (SVM were used for movement pattern identification.Subjects exhibited unique movement patterns leading to 18 clusters for the 20 subjects. No overall classification of the splint condition could be observed. Within individual subjects different running patterns could be identified for the four splint conditions. The splint conditions lead to a more symmetrical running pattern than the control condition.The influence of an occlusal splint on running pattern can be confirmed in this study. Wearing a splint increases the symmetry of the running pattern. A more symmetrical running pattern might help to reduce the risk of injuries or help in performance. The change of the movement pattern between the neutral condition and any of the three splint conditions was significant within subjects but not across subjects. Therefore the dental splint has a measureable influence on the running pattern of subjects, however subjects individuality has to be considered when choosing the

  11. THE SMALL BUT SIGNIFICANT AND NONTRANSITORY INCREASE IN PRICES (SSNIP TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviana Niminet

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Small but Significant Nontransitory Increase in Price Test was designed to define the relevant market by concepts of product, geographical area and time. This test, also called the ,,hypothetical monopolistic test” is the subject of many researches both economical and legal as it deals with economic concepts as well as with legally aspects.

  12. Withdrawal of fall-risk-increasing drugs in older persons: Effect on mobility test outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. van der Velde (Nathalie); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); T.J.M. van der Cammen (Tischa)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Previously, we have shown that withdrawal of fall-risk-increasing drugs (FRIDs) as a single intervention reduces falls incidence. Improvement of mobility may be an important factor in this finding and we therefore tested whether mobility tests improved after FRID withdrawal.

  13. Pediatric running injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Craig K; Statuta, Siobhan M; Solari, Ian L

    2010-07-01

    As more children have become involved in athletic activities and running, there has been a significant increase in overuse injuries. The young athlete with open growth plates is vulnerable to unique overuse injuries involving the apophyses, articular cartilage, and growth plate. The physician caring for these young athletes needs to be aware of these conditions to diagnose and treat them appropriately. Physicians should also be aware of the risk of overtraining and overuse injury in athletes participating in year-round sports and competition. Current guidelines for overuse injury prevention in young athletes are primarily based on consensus and expert opinion. Further research is needed to provide evidence-based guidelines for overuse injury prevention in young athletes and runners. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. KINETIC CONSEQUENCES OF CONSTRAINING RUNNING BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Mercer

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available It is known that impact forces increase with running velocity as well as when stride length increases. Since stride length naturally changes with changes in submaximal running velocity, it was not clear which factor, running velocity or stride length, played a critical role in determining impact characteristics. The aim of the study was to investigate whether or not stride length influences the relationship between running velocity and impact characteristics. Eight volunteers (mass=72.4 ± 8.9 kg; height = 1.7 ± 0.1 m; age = 25 ± 3.4 years completed two running conditions: preferred stride length (PSL and stride length constrained at 2.5 m (SL2.5. During each condition, participants ran at a variety of speeds with the intent that the range of speeds would be similar between conditions. During PSL, participants were given no instructions regarding stride length. During SL2.5, participants were required to strike targets placed on the floor that resulted in a stride length of 2.5 m. Ground reaction forces were recorded (1080 Hz as well as leg and head accelerations (uni-axial accelerometers. Impact force and impact attenuation (calculated as the ratio of head and leg impact accelerations were recorded for each running trial. Scatter plots were generated plotting each parameter against running velocity. Lines of best fit were calculated with the slopes recorded for analysis. The slopes were compared between conditions using paired t-tests. Data from two subjects were dropped from analysis since the velocity ranges were not similar between conditions resulting in the analysis of six subjects. The slope of impact force vs. velocity relationship was different between conditions (PSL: 0.178 ± 0.16 BW/m·s-1; SL2.5: -0.003 ± 0.14 BW/m·s-1; p < 0.05. The slope of the impact attenuation vs. velocity relationship was different between conditions (PSL: 5.12 ± 2.88 %/m·s-1; SL2.5: 1.39 ± 1.51 %/m·s-1; p < 0.05. Stride length was an important factor

  15. Does plant architectural complexity increase with increasing habitat complexity? A test with a pioneer shrub in the Brazilian Cerrado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, F A O; Oliveira, E G

    2013-05-01

    Understanding variation in plant traits in heterogeneous habitats is important to predict responses to changing environments, but trait-environment associations are poorly known along ecological gradients. We tested the hypothesis that plant architectural complexity increases with habitat complexity along a soil fertility gradient in a Cerrado (Neotropical savanna) area in southeastern Brazil. Plant architecture and productivity (estimated as the total number of healthy infructescences) of Miconia albicans (SW.) Triana were examined in three types of vegetation which together form a natural gradient of increasing soil fertility, tree density and canopy cover: grasslands (campo sujo, CS), shrublands (cerrado sensu strico, CE) and woodlands (cerradão, CD). As expected, plants growing at the CS were shorter and had a lower branching pattern, whereas plants at the CD were the tallest. Unexpectedly, however, CD plants did not show higher architectural complexity compared to CE plants. Higher architectural similarity between CE and CD plants compared to similarity between CS and CE plants suggests reduced expression of functional architectural traits under shade. Plants growing at the CE produced more quaternary shoots, leading to a larger number of infructescences. This higher plant productivity in CE indicates that trait variation in ecological gradients is more complex than previously thought. Nematode-induced galls accounted for fruit destruction in 76.5% infructescences across physiognomies, but percentage of attack was poorly related to architectural variables. Our data suggest shade-induced limitation in M. albicans architecture, and point to complex phenotypic variation in heterogeneous habitats in Neotropical savannas.

  16. Does plant architectural complexity increase with increasing habitat complexity? A test with a pioneer shrub in the Brazilian Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAO Silveira

    Full Text Available Understanding variation in plant traits in heterogeneous habitats is important to predict responses to changing environments, but trait-environment associations are poorly known along ecological gradients. We tested the hypothesis that plant architectural complexity increases with habitat complexity along a soil fertility gradient in a Cerrado (Neotropical savanna area in southeastern Brazil. Plant architecture and productivity (estimated as the total number of healthy infructescences of Miconia albicans (SW. Triana were examined in three types of vegetation which together form a natural gradient of increasing soil fertility, tree density and canopy cover: grasslands (campo sujo, CS, shrublands (cerrado sensu strico, CE and woodlands (cerradão, CD. As expected, plants growing at the CS were shorter and had a lower branching pattern, whereas plants at the CD were the tallest. Unexpectedly, however, CD plants did not show higher architectural complexity compared to CE plants. Higher architectural similarity between CE and CD plants compared to similarity between CS and CE plants suggests reduced expression of functional architectural traits under shade. Plants growing at the CE produced more quaternary shoots, leading to a larger number of infructescences. This higher plant productivity in CE indicates that trait variation in ecological gradients is more complex than previously thought. Nematode-induced galls accounted for fruit destruction in 76.5% infructescences across physiognomies, but percentage of attack was poorly related to architectural variables. Our data suggest shade-induced limitation in M. albicans architecture, and point to complex phenotypic variation in heterogeneous habitats in Neotropical savannas.

  17. Running surface couplings

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the renormalization group improved effective action and running surface couplings in curved spacetime with boundary. Using scalar self-interacting theory as an example, we study the influence of the boundary effects to effective equations of motion in spherical cap and the relevance of surface running couplings to quantum cosmology and symmetry breaking phenomenon. Running surface couplings in the asymptotically free SU(2) gauge theory are found.

  18. The energetics of ultra-endurance running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzer, Stefano; Salvadego, Desy; Rejc, Enrico; Buglione, Antonio; Antonutto, Guglielmo; di Prampero, Pietro Enrico

    2012-05-01

    Our objective was to determine the effects of long-lasting endurance events on the energy cost of running (C(r)), and the role of maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)), its fractional utilisation (F) and C(r) in determining the performance. Ten healthy runners (age range 26-59 years) participated in an ultra-endurance competition consisting of three running laps of 22, 48 and 20 km on three consecutive days in the North-East of Italy. Anthropometric characteristics and VO(2max) by a graded exercise test on a treadmill were determined 5 days before and 5 days after the competition. In addition, C(r) was determined on a treadmill before and after each running lap. Heart rate (HR) was recorded throughout the three laps. Results revealed that mean C(r) of the individual laps did not increase significantly with lap number (P = 0.200), thus ruling out any chronic lap effect. Even so, however, at the end of lap 3, C(r) was 18.0% (P increase of C(r-mean) during the competition yields to marked worsening of the performance, and (2) the three variables F, VO(2max) and C(r-mean) combined as described above explaining 87% of the total competition time variance.

  19. Production test PTA-002, increased graphite temperature limit -- B, C and D Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, A.

    1965-12-17

    The fundamental objective of the graphite temperature limit is to prevent excessive oxidation of the graphite moderator blocks with carbon dioxide and water vapor in the reactor atmosphere. Laboratory tests have shown that 10% uniform oxidation of graphite results in a loss in strength of approximately 50%. Production Test IP-725 was conducted at F Reactor for a period of six months at graphite temperatures approximately 50 and 100 C higher than the present graphite temperature limit of 650 C. The results from the F Reactor test suggest that an increase in the graphite temperature limit from 650 C to 700 C is technically feasible from the standpoint of oxidation of the graphite moderator with CO{sub 2}. Any significant additional increase was shown to lead to excessively high oxidation rates and is therefore not considered feasible. The objective of this test, therefore, is to extend the higher temperature investigations to B, C, and D Reactors. For the duration of this test, the graphite temperature limit will be increased from 650 C and 700 C, corresponding to an increase in the graphite stringer temperature limit from 735 C to 790 C. The test is expected to last for approximately six months but may be terminated early on any or all the reactors.

  20. Deletion of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors 2 and 3 (mGlu2 & mGlu3 in Mice Disrupts Sleep and Wheel-Running Activity, and Increases the Sensitivity of the Circadian System to Light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Pritchett

    Full Text Available Sleep and/or circadian rhythm disruption (SCRD is seen in up to 80% of schizophrenia patients. The co-morbidity of schizophrenia and SCRD may in part stem from dysfunction in common brain mechanisms, which include the glutamate system, and in particular, the group II metabotropic glutamate receptors mGlu2 and mGlu3 (encoded by the genes Grm2 and Grm3. These receptors are relevant to the pathophysiology and potential treatment of schizophrenia, and have also been implicated in sleep and circadian function. In the present study, we characterised the sleep and circadian rhythms of Grm2/3 double knockout (Grm2/3-/- mice, to provide further evidence for the involvement of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in the regulation of sleep and circadian rhythms. We report several novel findings. Firstly, Grm2/3-/- mice demonstrated a decrease in immobility-determined sleep time and an increase in immobility-determined sleep fragmentation. Secondly, Grm2/3-/- mice showed heightened sensitivity to the circadian effects of light, manifested as increased period lengthening in constant light, and greater phase delays in response to nocturnal light pulses. Greater light-induced phase delays were also exhibited by wildtype C57Bl/6J mice following administration of the mGlu2/3 negative allosteric modulator RO4432717. These results confirm the involvement of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in photic entrainment and sleep regulation pathways. Finally, the diurnal wheel-running rhythms of Grm2/3-/- mice were perturbed under a standard light/dark cycle, but their diurnal rest-activity rhythms were unaltered in cages lacking running wheels, as determined with passive infrared motion detectors. Hence, when assessing the diurnal rest-activity rhythms of mice, the choice of assay can have a major bearing on the results obtained.

  1. A CBPR Partnership Increases HIV Testing among men who have sex with men (MSM): Outcome Findings from a Pilot Test of the CyBER/testing Internet Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Scott D.; Vissman, Aaron T.; Stowers, Jason; Miller, Cindy; McCoy, Thomas P.; Hergenrather, Kenneth C.; Wilkin, Aimee M.; Reece, Michael; Bachmann, Laura H.; Ore, Addison; Ross, Michael W.; Hendrix, Ellen; Eng, Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    The Internet has emerged as an important tool for the delivery of health promotion and disease prevention interventions. Our community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnership developed and piloted CyBER/testing, a culturally congruent intervention designed to promote HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM) within existing Internet chat rooms. Using a quasi-experimental, single-group study design, cross-sectional data were collected from chat room participants, known as “chatters,” at pretest (n=346) and post-test (n=315). Extant profile data also were collected to describe the demographics of the online population. The intervention significantly increased self-reported HIV testing among chatters overall, increasing rates from 44.5% at pretest to nearly 60% at post-test (p<.001). Furthermore, chatters who reported having both male and female sexual partners had nearly 6 times the odds of reporting HIV testing at post-test. Findings suggest that chat room-based HIV testing intervention may increase testing among MSM who may be difficult to reach in traditional physical spaces. PMID:21393625

  2. Overuse injuries in running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Rasmussen, Sten; Jørgensen, Jens Erik

    2016-01-01

    What is an overuse injury in running? This question is a corner stone of clinical documentation and research based evidence.......What is an overuse injury in running? This question is a corner stone of clinical documentation and research based evidence....

  3. Running to Extremes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PHILIP JONES

    2010-01-01

    @@ For some, simply running 21 km, or a full marathon at 42 kin, isn't enough of an achievement. I mean, you can run a marathon in almost every major city in the world and many of them are centerpiece events watched by a global audience.

  4. Direct Release of Test Results to Patients Increases Patient Engagement and Utilization of Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Pillemer

    Full Text Available An important focus for meaningful use criteria is to engage patients in their care by allowing them online access to their health information, including test results. There has been little evaluation of such initiatives. Using a mixed methods analysis of electronic health record data, surveys, and qualitative interviews, we examined the impact of allowing patients to view their test results via patient portal in one large health system. Quantitative data were collected for new users and all users of the patient portal. Qualitative interviews occurred with patients who had received an HbA1c or abnormal Pap result. Survey participants were active patient portal users. Our main measures were patient portal usage, factors associated with viewing test results and utilizing care, and patient and provider experiences with patient portal and direct release. Usage data show 80% of all patient portal users viewed test results during the year. Of survey respondents, 82.7% noted test results to be a very useful feature and 70% agreed that patient portal has made their provider more accessible to them. Interviewed patients reported feeling they should have direct access to test results and identified the ability to monitor results over time and prepare prior to communicating with a provider as benefits. In interviews, both patients and physicians reported instances of test results leading to unnecessary patient anxiety. Both groups noted the benefits of results released with provider interpretation. Quantitative data showed patient utilization to increase with viewing test results online, but this effect is mitigated when results are manually released by physicians. Our findings demonstrate that patient portal access to test results was highly valued by patients and appeared to increase patient engagement. However, it may lead to patient anxiety and increase rates of patient visits. We discuss how such unintended consequences can be addressed and larger

  5. Design for High-speed Ball Screw Running-life Test Machine Based on Linear Motor%基于直线电机的高速滚珠丝杠副寿命试验机设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童亮; 王准

    2014-01-01

    A high-speed ball screw running-life test machine based on a linear motor was designed according to the testing requirements for the high-speed ball screw.A high-speed ball screw running-life test machine which used the linear motor as the loading mechanism,the rotation servo motor for the screw drive mechanism and the programmable multi-axis controller as motion controller,was de-signed and met the testing requirements of life testing and related parameters of the ball screw in the case of the long-running high-speed,high acceleration,big load under the conditions of continuous sta-ble varying loading.The test results demonstrate the feasibility of the system.%针对高速滚珠丝杠副性能指标的测量需求,设计了一套基于直线电机的高速滚珠丝杠副寿命测试试验系统,系统以直线电机为加载机构、旋转伺服电机为丝杠驱动机构、多轴运动控制卡为运动控制器。据此系统设计的滚珠丝杠副高速加载跑合寿命试验机在连续稳定变负载的情况下,可以对滚珠丝杠在高速、高加速度、大负荷等条件下进行长时间运行测试,满足寿命试验机对滚珠丝杠副寿命试验和相关参数的测试要求。试验结果证明了系统的可行性。

  6. Energetics of bipedal running. II. Limb design and running mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, T J; Chen, M S; Taylor, C R

    1998-10-01

    Compared with quadrupeds, bipedal runners of the same weight have longer legs, take longer steps and can presumably use slower, more economical muscle fibers. One might predict that bipedal running is less expensive, but it is not. We hypothesized that bipeds recruit a larger volume of muscle to support their weight, eliminating the potential economy of longer legs and slower steps. To test our hypothesis, we calculated the relative volume of muscle needed to support body weight over a stride in small dogs (Canis familiaris) and wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) of the same weight. First, we confirmed that turkeys and dogs use approximately the same amount of energy to run at the same speed, and found that turkeys take 1. 8-fold longer steps. Higher muscle forces and/or longer muscle fibers would require a greater volume of active muscle, since muscle volume is proportional to the product of force and fascicle length. We measured both mean fascicle length and mean mechanical advantage for limb extensor muscles. Turkeys generated approximately the same total muscle force to support their weight during running and used muscle fascicles that are on average 2.1 times as long as in dogs, thus requiring a 2.5-fold greater active muscle volume. The greater volume appears to offset the economy of slower rates of force generation, supporting our hypothesis and providing a simple explanation for why it costs the same to run on two and four legs.

  7. Validity of the Nike+ device during walking and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, N A; Simmons, M C; John, D; Thompson, D L; Bassett, D R; Basset, D R

    2010-02-01

    We determined the validity of the Nike+ device for estimating speed, distance, and energy expenditure (EE) during walking and running. Twenty trained individuals performed a maximal oxygen uptake test and underwent anthropometric and body composition testing. Each participant was outfitted with a Nike+ sensor inserted into the shoe and an Apple iPod nano. They performed eight 6-min stages on the treadmill, including level walking at 55, 82, and 107 m x min(-1), inclined walking (82 m x min(-1)) at 5 and 10% grades, and level running at 134, 161, and 188 m x min(-1). Speed was measured using a tachometer and EE was measured by indirect calorimetry. Results showed that the Nike+ device overestimated the speed of level walking at 55 m x min(-1) by 20%, underestimated the speed of level walking at 107 m x min(-1) by 12%, but closely estimated the speed of level walking at 82 m x min(-1), and level running at all speeds (p<0.05). Similar results were found for distance. The Nike+ device overestimated the EE of level walking by 18-37%, but closely estimated the EE of level running (p<0.05). In conclusion the Nike+ in-shoe device provided reasonable estimates of speed and distance during level running at the three speeds tested in this study. However, it overestimated EE during level walking and it did not detect the increased cost of inclined locomotion.

  8. A Metadata Model Based on Coupling Testing Information to Increase Testability of Component

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Liang-li; GUO Fu-liang; WU Zhao-hui

    2008-01-01

    A software component must be tested every time it is reused in order to assure quality of component itself and system in which it is to be integrated. So how to increase testability of component has become a key technology in the software engineering community. Here a method is introduced to increase component testability. And meanings of component testability and relative effective ways to increase testability are summarized. Then definitions of component coupling testing criterion, DU-I (Definition-Use Information) and OP-Vs (Observation-Point Values) are given. Base on these, a definition-use table is introduced, which includes DU-A and OP-Vs item, to help component testers to understand and observe interior details about component under test better. Then a framework of testable component based on above DU-table is given. These facilities provide ways to detect errors, observe state variables by observation-points based monitor mechanism. Moreover, above methods are applied to our application developed by ourselves before, and some test cases are generated. Then our method is compared with Orso method and Kan method using the same example, presenting the comparison results. The results illustrate the validity of our method, effectively generating test cases and killing more mutants.

  9. On the Run

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MICHAEL; GOLD

    2009-01-01

    Istarted running at age 14, inspired in equal parts by an incipient teenage desire for athletic greatness, the movie Personal Best, and the fact that all my classmates on sports teams got a free period during gym class.

  10. Learning to Run

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Jiafu

    2006-01-01

    @@ In Africa, there live antelopes and lions.In the morning, the antelope wakes up from sleep. His first sense is that he has to run faster than the fastest lion, otherwise, he will be eaten out. In the meanwhile, when the lion opens his eyes, his first thought is he must run faster than the slowest antelope,otherwise, he will starve to death.

  11. Effects of running velocity on running kinetics and kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brughelli, Matt; Cronin, John; Chaouachi, Anis

    2011-04-01

    Sixteen semiprofessional Australian football players performed running bouts at incremental velocities of 40, 60, 80, and 100% of their maximum velocity on a Woodway nonmotorized force treadmill. As running velocity increased from 40 to 60%, peak vertical and peak horizontal forces increased by 14.3% (effect size [ES] = 1.0) and 34.4% (ES = 4.2), respectively. The changes in peak vertical and peak horizontal forces from 60 to 80% were 1.0% (ES = 0.05) and 21.0% (ES = 2.9), respectively. Finally, the changes in peak vertical and peak horizontal forces from 80% to maximum were 2.0% (ES = 0.1) and 24.3% (ES = 3.4). In addition, both stride frequency and stride length significantly increased with each incremental velocity (p velocity (p velocity (r = 0.47). For the kinematic variables, only stride length was found to have a significant positive correlation with maximum running velocity (r = 0.66). It would seem that increasing maximal sprint velocity may be more dependent on horizontal force production as opposed to vertical force production.

  12. Wave Run-up on Slender Piles in Design Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Frigaard, Peter; Damsgaard, M. L.;

    2011-01-01

    in the design of Horns Reef 1. As a consequence damage was observed on the platforms. This has been the situation for several sites and design tools for platform loads are lacking. As a consequence a physical model test study was initiated at Aalborg University to clarify wave run-up on cylindrical piles...... to the pile an empirical factor is included on the velocity head. The evaluation of the calculation model shows that an accurate design rule can be established even in breaking wave conditions. However, calibration of a load model showed that it was necessary to increase the run-up factor on the velocity head...

  13. Impact Accelerations of Barefoot and Shod Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M; Seegmiller, J; McGowan, C P

    2016-05-01

    During the ground contact phase of running, the body's mass is rapidly decelerated resulting in forces that propagate through the musculoskeletal system. The repetitive attenuation of these impact forces is thought to contribute to overuse injuries. Modern running shoes are designed to reduce impact forces, with the goal to minimize running related overuse injuries. Additionally, the fore/mid foot strike pattern that is adopted by most individuals when running barefoot may reduce impact force transmission. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of the barefoot running form (fore/mid foot strike & decreased stride length) and running shoes on running kinetics and impact accelerations. 10 healthy, physically active, heel strike runners ran in 3 conditions: shod, barefoot and barefoot while heel striking, during which 3-dimensional motion analysis, ground reaction force and accelerometer data were collected. Shod running was associated with increased ground reaction force and impact peak magnitudes, but decreased impact accelerations, suggesting that the midsole of running shoes helps to attenuate impact forces. Barefoot running exhibited a similar decrease in impact accelerations, as well as decreased impact peak magnitude, which appears to be due to a decrease in stride length and/or a more plantarflexed position at ground contact.

  14. É possível determinar a economia de corrida através do teste progressivo até a exaustão? Is possible to predict running economy using maximal incremental exercise test?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo Cássio de Moraes Bertuzzi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo foi verificar a possibilidade de se estimar a economia de corrida (EC a partir do coeficiente angular gerado pela relação VO2 vs. intensidade de testes progressivos até a exaustão (EC INCLINA. Para tanto, 16 corredores de provas de longa duração (idade 32 ± 7 anos, massa corporal 70,0 ± 6,7 kg, estatura 173,3 ± 5,0 cm, O2máx 57,9 ± 5,8 ml·kg-1·min-1 foram submetidos a um teste incremental e a dois testes de cargas constantes (12 km·h-1 e a intensidade de 90% do segundo limiar ventilatório para a mensuração da EC. Foram detectadas correlações fracas entre o EC INCLINA e a EC estabelecida a 12 km·h-1 (r = 0,49; p = 0,054 e na intensidade de 90% do segundo limiar ventilatório (r = 0,55; p = 0,027. Além disso, o EC INCLINA também estava negativamente correlacionado com a concentração sanguínea de lactato (r = -0,75; p = 0,001 e a razão de troca respiratória (r = -0,80; p The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between running economy (RE and the slope of the regression line obtained as the individual relationship between oxygen uptake and the corresponding intensity in the incremental test (EC INCLINA. Sixteen recreational long-distance runners (age 32 ± 7 years, body mass 70,0 ± 6.7 kg, height 173.3 ± 5.0 cm, VO2max 57.9 ± 5.8 ml·kg-1·min-1 performed a progressive incremental test and two submaximal workload tests (at 12 km·h-1 and 90% second ventilatory threshold to determine the RE. There was significant correlation between EC INCLINA and RE measured at 12 km·h-1 (r = 0.49; p = 0.054 and at 90% second ventilatory threshold (r = 0.55; p = 0.027. In addition, EC INCLINA also was negatively correlated with peak blood lactate (r = -0.75; p = 0.001 and peak respiratory exchange rate (r = -0.80; p < 0.001. These findings suggest that EC INCLINA would be an alternative parameter employed to determine the endurance performance in recreational long

  15. Enhanced neuroendocrine response to insulin tolerance test performed under increased ambient temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezová, D; Kvetnanský, R; Nazar, K; Vigas, M

    1998-01-01

    The hypothesis that an increase in ambient temperature modulates neuroendocrine response in clinically used provocative pituitary function tests was verified. Healthy male volunteers were subjected to insulin tolerance tests in two randomized trials. In the first trial hypoglycemia was induced by a bolus injection of insulin (0.1 U per kg of BW, i.v.) at room temperature. In the second trial, the subjects were exposed to increased ambient temperature for 45 min before insulin injection and for 45 min thereafter. The environmental temperature was selected to increase body temperature less than 1C. Under conditions of increased temperature basal hormone levels as measured in antecubital venous blood samples failed to be modified and the hypoglycemia was less severe. Nevertheless, the responses of most (beta-endorphin, ACTH, prolactin, catecholamines), but not all (growth hormone, cortisol), hormones to hypoglycemia were exaggerated. The remarkable increase in ACTH and beta-endorphin release was not accompanied by concomitant increase of plasma cortisol response. The sympathetic-adrenomedullary system was significantly activated, which was manifested particularly by enhanced norepinephrine release. Growth hormone response to hypoglycemia was not modified, while that of prolactin was enhanced. Thus during evaluation of neuroendocrine function under clinical conditions, changes in ambient and body temperature should not be underestimated.

  16. Increased capability gas generator for Space Shuttle APU. Development/hot restart test report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of an increased capability gas generator for use in space shuttles are described. Results show an unlimited hot restart capability in the range of feed pressures from 400 psi to 80 psi. Effects of vacuum on hot restart were not addressed, and only beginning-of-life bed conditions were tested. No starts with bubbles were performed. A minimum expected life of 35 hours or more is projected, and the design will maintain a surface temperature of 350 F or more.

  17. Footwear and running cardio-respiratory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, D A; Butler, R J; Beckman, B; Hackney, A C

    2009-05-01

    This study compared cardio-respiratory responses during running wearing a motion control shoe (MC) or a cushioning shoe (CU) in a cross-over single blinded design. Fourteen runners (10F/4M, age=27.3+/-5.1 years, body mass=64.1+/-12.2 kg, height=167.8+/-7.5 cm, VO (2)max=52.3+/-8.8 ml/kg/min) completed a 40-min run at approximately 65% VO (2) max under both shoe conditions. Oxygen uptake (mL/kg/min; L/min), minute ventilation (L/min), respiratory exchange ratio, and heart rate were measured at minutes 8-10, 18-20, 28-30 and 38-40 of exercise. Rating of perceived exertion was obtained at minutes 10, 20, 30 and 40. Two (footwear) by four (time) repeated measures ANOVAs showed no differences between footwear conditions in overall oxygen consumption (MC=36.8+/-1.5 vs. CU=35.3+/-1.4 mL/kg/min, p=0.143), minute ventilation (MC=50.4+/-4 vs. CU=48.5+/-3.8, p=0.147), respiratory exchange ratio (MC=0.90+/-0.01 vs. CU=0.89+/-0.01, p=0.331), heart rate (MC=159+/-3 vs. CU=160+/-3, p=0.926), or rate of perceived exertion. The design of motion control footwear does not appear to affect cardio-respiratory or perceived exertion responses during submaximal running. The findings are specific to the shoes tested. Nonetheless, the outcomes suggest that footwear selection to reduce certain overuse injuries does not increase the work of running.

  18. The influence of increased roof strength on belted and unbelted dummies in rollover and drop tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahling, G S; Bundorf, R T; Moffatt, E A; Orlowski, K F

    1995-04-01

    This report condenses and summarizes two related and previously published reports. These two reports analyzed the effect of added roof strength on both belted and unbelted dummies. The reports, which have been dubbed Malibu I and Malibu II, respectively, presented data from a total of 16 rollover crash tests and four test conditions in which vehicles were dropped on their roofs. To evaluate the effect of roof strength, half of all test vehicles were modified to incorporate rigid rollcages, the other half were production vehicles. To evaluate the effect of belt restraints, half of all tests incorporated restrained dummies, the other half were unrestrained. The data from these tests clearly demonstrated that increased roof strength provided no reduction in dummy neck loads for belted or unbelted dummies when they were located over the area of the roof that impacted the ground. The tests also demonstrated that the neck loads resulted from "diving" type impacts, where the head stops and the torso momentum loads the neck. Roof deformation never caused the dummy to be compressed between the roof and seat.

  19. 油管悬挂器及下放工具性能鉴定试验方法∗%Performance Identification Test Method for Tubing Hanger and Running Tool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈萌; 张来斌; 郑文培; 柴亚军; 段梦兰; 李荣

    2016-01-01

    Performance identification test method for tubing hanger and running tool can guarantee product performance and reliability and it is of great significance on reducing the possibility of potential accidents� Basic concept and objectives of the performance identification test are described on the basis of introduction to structure and function of the tubing hanger and running tool� Based on related standards and characteristics of research ob⁃ject, a performance identification test method is proposed for horizontal christmas tree tubing hanger and running tool� This method specifically divides the test process into test preparation, testing process and summary after tes⁃ting and adds the analysis on fault mode and effect of tested object and fault handling program in the test; it can give specific acceptance or failure criteria for different test objects and test items based on actual conditions and re⁃lated standard regulations� The conclusion is of great significance on guaranteeing operation safety of subsea christ⁃mas tree.%对油管悬挂器及其下放工具进行性能鉴定试验能确保产品的性能和可靠性,对于减小潜在事故发生的可能性具有重要意义。在介绍油管悬挂器及其下放工具结构功能的基础上,阐述了性能鉴定试验的基本概念及目的,参考相关标准并结合所研究对象的特点,提出了一套卧式采油树油管挂及其下放工具的性能鉴定试验方法。该方法将试验过程详细划分为试验准备、试验运行及试验后总结3个阶段,增加了对受试物体的故障模式和影响分析以及试验过程中故障的处理程序等;同时能针对不同的试验对象及试验项目,结合实际情况和相关标准中的规定,给出具体的接受或失效判据。所得结论对保证水下采油树安全运行意义重大。

  20. Driving-Simulator-Based Test on the Effectiveness of Auditory Red-Light Running Vehicle Warning System Based on Time-To-Collision Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuedong Yan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The collision avoidance warning system is an emerging technology designed to assist drivers in avoiding red-light running (RLR collisions at intersections. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the effect of auditory warning information on collision avoidance behaviors in the RLR pre-crash scenarios and further to examine the casual relationships among the relevant factors. A driving-simulator-based experiment was designed and conducted with 50 participants. The data from the experiments were analyzed by approaches of ANOVA and structural equation modeling (SEM. The collisions avoidance related variables were measured in terms of brake reaction time (BRT, maximum deceleration and lane deviation in this study. It was found that the collision avoidance warning system can result in smaller collision rates compared to the without-warning condition and lead to shorter reaction times, larger maximum deceleration and less lane deviation. Furthermore, the SEM analysis illustrate that the audio warning information in fact has both direct and indirect effect on occurrence of collisions, and the indirect effect plays a more important role on collision avoidance than the direct effect. Essentially, the auditory warning information can assist drivers in detecting the RLR vehicles in a timely manner, thus providing drivers more adequate time and space to decelerate to avoid collisions with the conflicting vehicles.

  1. Increase in contact allergy to fragrances: patch-test results 1989-1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunder, T; Kansky, A

    2000-08-01

    We report the results of patch tests with fragrance-mix as a part of the standard series carried out over the last 10 years (1989-1998) during routine testing of 6129 patients in our department. 5.9% of the total number of patients who were patch tested were positive to fragrance mix. The sex ratio was 2.3:1 with a female predominance. In 1989-1993, the frequency of contact sensitivity to fragrance mix was 3.9% (4.9% for females and 2.1% for males). This rate rose both in female and male patients during the observed period of time and attained 8.9% (females) and 4.1% (males) in 1994-1998; the overall frequency in 1994-98 was 7.5%. This rising trend, which was statistically significant, might be the consequence of an increased use of cosmetics and toiletries containing fragrances in our population.

  2. Heat stress attenuates the increase in arterial blood pressure during the cold pressor test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; Shibasaki, Manabu; Low, David A; Keller, David M; Davis, Scott L; Crandall, Craig G

    2010-11-01

    The mechanisms by which heat stress impairs the control of blood pressure leading to compromised orthostatic tolerance are not thoroughly understood. A possible mechanism may be an attenuated blood pressure response to a given increase in sympathetic activity. This study tested the hypothesis that whole body heating attenuates the blood pressure response to a non-baroreflex-mediated sympathoexcitatory stimulus. Ten healthy subjects were instrumented for the measurement of integrated muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate, sweat rate, and forearm skin blood flow. Subjects were exposed to a cold pressor test (CPT) by immersing a hand in an ice water slurry for 3 min while otherwise normothermic and while heat stressed (i.e., increase core temperature ~0.7°C via water-perfused suit). Mean responses from the final minute of the CPT were evaluated. In both thermal conditions CPT induced significant increases in MSNA and MAP without altering heart rate. Although the increase in MSNA to the CPT was similar between thermal conditions (normothermia: Δ14.0 ± 2.6; heat stress: Δ19.1 ± 2.6 bursts/min; P = 0.09), the accompanying increase in MAP was attenuated when subjects were heat stressed (normothermia: Δ25.6 ± 2.3, heat stress: Δ13.4 ± 3.0 mmHg; P < 0.001). The results demonstrate that heat stress can attenuate the pressor response to a sympathoexcitatory stimulus.

  3. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngeraa, Tobias; Pedersen, Lars Møller; Mantoni, T

    2013-01-01

    for eight subjects, respectively, were excluded from analysis because of insufficient signal quality. Running increased mean arterial pressure and mean MCA velocity and induced rhythmic oscillations in BP and in MCA velocity corresponding to the difference between step rate and heart rate (HR) frequencies......) blood flow velocity, photoplethysmographic finger BP, and step frequency were measured continuously during three consecutive 5-min intervals of treadmill running at increasing running intensities. Data were analysed in the time and frequency domains. BP data for seven subjects and MCA velocity data....... During running, rhythmic oscillations in arterial BP induced by interference between HR and step frequency impact on cerebral blood velocity. For the exercise as a whole, average MCA velocity becomes elevated. These results suggest that running not only induces an increase in regional cerebral blood flow...

  4. Minimum Wage Effects in the Longer Run

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, David; Nizalova, Olena

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to minimum wages at young ages could lead to adverse longer-run effects via decreased labor market experience and tenure, and diminished education and training, while beneficial longer-run effects could arise if minimum wages increase skill acquisition. Evidence suggests that as individuals reach their late 20s, they earn less the longer…

  5. Increased incidence of kidney diseases in general practice after a nationwide albuminuria self-test program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verheij Robert A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the influence of a nationwide albuminuria self-test program on the number of GP contacts for urinary complaints and/or kidney diseases and the number of newly diagnosed patients with kidney diseases by the GP. Methods Data were used from the Netherlands Information Network of General Practice (LINH, including a representative sample of general practices with a dynamic population of approximately 300.000 listed patients. Morbidity data were retrieved from electronic medical records, kept in a representative sample of general practices. The incidence of kidney diseases and urinary complaints before and after the albuminuria self-test program was compared with logistic regression analyses. Results Data were used from 139 general practices, including 444,220 registered patients. The number of GP consultations for kidney diseases and urinary complaints was increased in the year after the albuminuria self-test program and particularly shortly after the start of the program. Compared with the period before the self-test program, more patients have been diagnosed by the GP with symptoms/complaints of kidney disease and urinary diseases (OR = 1.7 (CI 1.4 - 2.0 and OR = 2.1 (CI 1.9 - 2.3, respectively. The odds on an abnormal urine-test in the period after the self-test program was three times higher than the year before (OR = 3.0 (CI 2.4 - 3.6. The effect of the self-test program on newly diagnosed patients with an abnormal urine test was modified by both the presence of the risk factors hypertension and diabetes mellitus. For this diagnosis the highest OR was found in patients without both conditions (OR = 4.2 (CI 3.3 - 5.4. Conclusions A nationwide albuminuria self-test program resulted in an increasing number of newly diagnosed kidney complaints and diseases the year after the program. The highest risks were found in patients without risk factors for kidney diseases.

  6. Mechanical power output during running accelerations in wild turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Thomas J; Scales, Jeffrey A

    2002-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the hindlimb muscles of wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) can produce maximal power during running accelerations. The mechanical power developed during single running steps was calculated from force-plate and high-speed video measurements as turkeys accelerated over a trackway. Steady-speed running steps and accelerations were compared to determine how turkeys alter their running mechanics from a low-power to a high-power gait. During maximal accelerations, turkeys eliminated two features of running mechanics that are characteristic of steady-speed running: (i) they produced purely propulsive horizontal ground reaction forces, with no braking forces, and (ii) they produced purely positive work during stance, with no decrease in the mechanical energy of the body during the step. The braking and propulsive forces ordinarily developed during steady-speed running are important for balance because they align the ground reaction force vector with the center of mass. Increases in acceleration in turkeys correlated with decreases in the angle of limb protraction at toe-down and increases in the angle of limb retraction at toe-off. These kinematic changes allow turkeys to maintain the alignment of the center of mass and ground reaction force vector during accelerations when large propulsive forces result in a forward-directed ground reaction force. During the highest accelerations, turkeys produced exclusively positive mechanical power. The measured power output during acceleration divided by the total hindlimb muscle mass yielded estimates of peak instantaneous power output in excess of 400 W kg(-1) hindlimb muscle mass. This value exceeds estimates of peak instantaneous power output of turkey muscle fibers. The mean power developed during the entire stance phase increased from approximately zero during steady-speed runs to more than 150 W kg(-1) muscle during the highest accelerations. The high power outputs observed during accelerations

  7. Physiological and biomechanical responses while running with and without a stroller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J D; Smith, J D; Kinser, K B; Dugan, E; Reed, M

    2005-09-01

    This study examined the effects of pushing a jogging stroller on biomechanical and physiological variables. The hypothesis was that running with a stroller for 30 minutes would shorten stride length and increase physiological indices of exercise. this was a repeated measures design. participants were recruited from road races in the Dallas/Fort Worth, TX area. Graded exercise tests were performed in a laboratory setting, field tests were performed on a 400 m all-weather outdoor track. 5 males and 5 females were assessed. participants performed a graded exercise test and 2 field tests. The 1st field test involved running at 75% VO2max for 30 minutes without a stroller and the 2nd involved running at the same speed with the stroller. VO2, stride length, heart rate, lactate, ventilation, and RPE were evaluated. No differences for VO2 or stride length were evident. Heart rate (p=0.0001), lactate concentration (p=0.025), ventilation (p=0.009), and RPE (p=0.002) increased from 10 to 30 minutes while running with the stroller. Heart rate (p=0.002), lactate concentration (p=0.0001), ventilation (p=0.006), and RPE (p=0.001) were significantly higher while running with the stroller after 30 minutes compared to running without it. These results indicate that pushing a stroller affects some indices of exercise intensity while running. Gait does not change. These data do not support an association between stroller use during running and an increase risk of orthopedic injury. Further studies should examine these variables at lower intensities that are run by most recreational joggers.

  8. Patellofemoral Joint and Achilles Tendon Loads During Overground and Treadmill Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, Richard W; Halsey, Lisa; Hayek, Andrew; Johnson, Holly; Willson, John D

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Level 4, controlled laboratory study. Background Little is known regarding how the potential differences between treadmill and overground running may affect patellofemoral joint and Achilles tendon loading characteristics. Objectives To compare measures of loading of the patellofemoral joint and Achilles tendon across treadmill and overground running in healthy, uninjured runners. Methods Eighteen healthy runners ran at their self-selected speed on an instrumented treadmill and overground, while 3-D running mechanics were sampled. A musculoskeletal model derived peak load, rate of loading, and estimated cumulative load per 1 km of continuous running for the patellofemoral joint and Achilles tendon for each condition. Data were analyzed via paired t tests and Pearson correlations to detect differences and assess relationships, respectively, between the 2 running mediums. Results No differences (P>.05) were found between treadmill and overground running for peak load, rate of loading, or estimated cumulative patellofemoral joint stress per 1 km of continuous running. However, treadmill running resulted in 12.5% greater peak Achilles tendon force (P0.70) and moderate agreements (r>0.50) for most patellofemoral joint and Achilles measures, respectively, between treadmill and overground running. Conclusion No differences were observed in loading characteristics to the patellofemoral joint between running mediums; however, treadmill running resulted in greater Achilles tendon loading compared with overground running. Future investigations should examine whether sudden bouts of treadmill running may increase the risk of mechanical overload of the Achilles tendon in runners who habitually train overground. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):664-672. Epub 12 May 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6494.

  9. Running Boot Camp

    CERN Document Server

    Toporek, Chuck

    2008-01-01

    When Steve Jobs jumped on stage at Macworld San Francisco 2006 and announced the new Intel-based Macs, the question wasn't if, but when someone would figure out a hack to get Windows XP running on these new "Mactels." Enter Boot Camp, a new system utility that helps you partition and install Windows XP on your Intel Mac. Boot Camp does all the heavy lifting for you. You won't need to open the Terminal and hack on system files or wave a chicken bone over your iMac to get XP running. This free program makes it easy for anyone to turn their Mac into a dual-boot Windows/OS X machine. Running Bo

  10. Prevention of running injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Karl B; Sykes, Jeannie C; Walker, Katherine M; Jackson, Jonathan C

    2010-01-01

    Evidence for preventive strategies to lessen running injuries is needed as these occur in 40%-50% of runners on an annual basis. Many factors influence running injuries, but strong evidence for prevention only exists for training modification primarily by reducing weekly mileage. Two anatomical factors - cavus feet and leg length inequality - demonstrate a link to injury. Weak evidence suggests that orthotics may lessen risk of stress fracture, but no clear evidence proves they will reduce the risk of those athletes with leg length inequality or cavus feet. This article reviews other potential injury variables, including strength, biomechanics, stretching, warm-up, nutrition, psychological factors, and shoes. Additional research is needed to determine whether interventions to address any of these will help prevent running injury.

  11. Effects of graduated compression stockings on skin temperature after running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priego Quesada, J I; Lucas-Cuevas, A G; Gil-Calvo, M; Giménez, J V; Aparicio, I; Cibrián Ortiz de Anda, R M; Salvador Palmer, R; Llana-Belloch, S; Pérez-Soriano, P

    2015-08-01

    High skin temperatures reduce the thermal gradient between the core and the skin and they can lead to a reduction in performance and increased risk of injury. Graduated compression stockings have become popular among runners in the last years and their use may influence the athlete's thermoregulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of graduated compression stockings on skin temperature during running in a moderate indoor environment. Forty-four runners performed two running tests lasting 30min (10min of warm-up and 20min at 75% of their maximal aerobic speed) with and without graduated compressive stockings. Skin temperature was measured in 12 regions of interest on the lower limb by infrared thermography before and after running. Heart rate and perception of fatigue were assessed during the last minute of the running test. Compression stockings resulted in greater increase of temperature (p=0.002 and ES=2.2, 95% CI [0.11-0.45°C]) not only in the body regions in contact (tibialis anterior, ankle anterior and gastrocnemius) but also in the body regions that were not in contact with the garment (vastus lateralis, abductor and semitendinosus). No differences were observed between conditions in heart rate and perception of fatigue (p>0.05 and ESrunning with graduated compression stockings produces a greater increase of skin temperature without modifying the athlete's heart rate and perception of fatigue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Gas spark switches with increased operating life for Marx generator of lightning test complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykov, Yu. A.; Krastelev, E. G., E-mail: ekrastelev@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperature (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    A new design of gas spark switches with an increased operating life and stable dynamic characteristics for the Marx generator of the lightning test complex has been developed. The switches are characterized by the following parameters in the mode of operation: voltage up to 80 kV, discharge current up to 50 kA, flowing charge up to 3.5 C/pulse. An increased operating life is achieved by using torus-shaped electrodes with increased working surface area and a trigger electrode in the form of a thick disk with a hole located between them. Low breakdown delay time and high stability of breakdown voltage under dynamic conditions are provided by gas preionization in the spark gap using UV radiation of an additional corona discharge in the axial region.

  13. Estimating Heart Rate, Energy Expenditure, and Physical Performance With a Wrist Photoplethysmographic Device During Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parak, Jakub; Uuskoski, Maria; Machek, Jan; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2017-07-25

    Wearable sensors enable long-term monitoring of health and wellbeing indicators. An objective evaluation of sensors' accuracy is important, especially for their use in health care. The aim of this study was to use a wrist-worn optical heart rate (OHR) device to estimate heart rate (HR), energy expenditure (EE), and maximal oxygen intake capacity (VO2Max) during running and to evaluate the accuracy of the estimated parameters (HR, EE, and VO2Max) against golden reference methods. A total of 24 healthy volunteers, of whom 11 were female, with a mean age of 36.2 years (SD 8.2 years) participated in a submaximal self-paced outdoor running test and maximal voluntary exercise test in a sports laboratory. OHR was monitored with a PulseOn wrist-worn photoplethysmographic device and the running speed with a phone GPS sensor. A physiological model based on HR, running speed, and personal characteristics (age, gender, weight, and height) was used to estimate EE during the maximal voluntary exercise test and VO2Max during the submaximal outdoor running test. ECG-based HR and respiratory gas analysis based estimates were used as golden references. OHR was able to measure HR during running with a 1.9% mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). VO2Max estimated during the submaximal outdoor running test was closely similar to the sports laboratory estimate (MAPE 5.2%). The energy expenditure estimate (n=23) was quite accurate when HR was above the aerobic threshold (MAPE 6.7%), but MAPE increased to 16.5% during a lighter intensity of exercise. The results suggest that wrist-worn OHR may accurately estimate HR during running up to maximal HR. When combined with physiological modeling, wrist-worn OHR may be used for an estimation of EE, especially during higher intensity running, and VO2Max, even during submaximal self-paced outdoor recreational running.

  14. Estimating Heart Rate, Energy Expenditure, and Physical Performance With a Wrist Photoplethysmographic Device During Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uuskoski, Maria; Machek, Jan; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2017-01-01

    Background Wearable sensors enable long-term monitoring of health and wellbeing indicators. An objective evaluation of sensors’ accuracy is important, especially for their use in health care. Objective The aim of this study was to use a wrist-worn optical heart rate (OHR) device to estimate heart rate (HR), energy expenditure (EE), and maximal oxygen intake capacity (VO2Max) during running and to evaluate the accuracy of the estimated parameters (HR, EE, and VO2Max) against golden reference methods. Methods A total of 24 healthy volunteers, of whom 11 were female, with a mean age of 36.2 years (SD 8.2 years) participated in a submaximal self-paced outdoor running test and maximal voluntary exercise test in a sports laboratory. OHR was monitored with a PulseOn wrist-worn photoplethysmographic device and the running speed with a phone GPS sensor. A physiological model based on HR, running speed, and personal characteristics (age, gender, weight, and height) was used to estimate EE during the maximal voluntary exercise test and VO2Max during the submaximal outdoor running test. ECG-based HR and respiratory gas analysis based estimates were used as golden references. Results OHR was able to measure HR during running with a 1.9% mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). VO2Max estimated during the submaximal outdoor running test was closely similar to the sports laboratory estimate (MAPE 5.2%). The energy expenditure estimate (n=23) was quite accurate when HR was above the aerobic threshold (MAPE 6.7%), but MAPE increased to 16.5% during a lighter intensity of exercise. Conclusions The results suggest that wrist-worn OHR may accurately estimate HR during running up to maximal HR. When combined with physiological modeling, wrist-worn OHR may be used for an estimation of EE, especially during higher intensity running, and VO2Max, even during submaximal self-paced outdoor recreational running. PMID:28743682

  15. Running enhances neurogenesis, learning, and long-term potentiation in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Praag, Henriette; Christie, Brian R.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Gage, Fred H.

    1999-01-01

    Running increases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, a brain structure that is important for memory function. Consequently, spatial learning and long-term potentiation (LTP) were tested in groups of mice housed either with a running wheel (runners) or under standard conditions (controls). Mice were injected with bromodeoxyuridine to label dividing cells and trained in the Morris water maze. LTP was studied in the dentate gyrus and area CA1 in hippocampal slices from these mice. Running improved water maze performance, increased bromodeoxyuridine-positive cell numbers, and selectively enhanced dentate gyrus LTP. Our results indicate that physical activity can regulate hippocampal neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and learning. PMID:10557337

  16. Run-to-run product quality control of batch processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Li; SHI Ji-ping; CHENG Da-shuai; CHIU Min-sen

    2009-01-01

    Batch processes have been increasingly used in the production of low volume and high value added products.Consequently,optimization control in batch processes is crucial in order to derive the maximum benefit.In this paper,a run-to-run product quality control based on iterative learning optimization control is developed.Moreover,a rigorous theorem is proposed and proven in this paper,which states that the tracking error under the optimal iterative learning control (ILC) law can converge to zero.In this paper,a typical nonlinear batch continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) is considered,and the results show that the performance of trajectory tracking is gradually improved by the ILC.

  17. TestMeEast: a campaign to increase HIV testing in hospitals and to reduce late diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, R; O'Connell, R; Lascar, M; Ferrand, R; Strachan, S; Matin, N; Bassnet, I; Orkin, C

    2016-01-01

    Late diagnosis occurs in almost half of those diagnosed in the UK (HIV Prevention England, 2013. Retrieved June 22, 2014, from HIV Prevention England: http://www.hivpreventionengland.org.uk/Campaigns-Current/National-HIV-Testing-Week ). Testing occurs mainly in sexual health and antenatal clinics despite recommendations to test more broadly [Ellis, S., & Curtis, H. (2012). HIV diagnoses and missed opportunities. Results of the British HIV association (BHIVA) National Audit 2010. Clinical Medicine, 12(5), 430-434]. We report the findings of an HIV-testing week campaign to offer testing to those who have blood tests as part of routine care within outpatient clinics and emergency departments of six London hospitals. The campaign target was to test 500 patients a day during the 2013 National HIV Testing Week (NHTW). Clinic staff and medical students were trained to offer routine HIV testing. Linkage to care was arranged for those who tested HIV-positive. During NHTW we tested 2402 of the planned 2500 test target. 2402/4317 (55.6% 95% CI 54.1-57.1%) of those who had routine blood tests were tested for HIV. There were eight HIV-positive tests; three were new diagnoses (all linked to care). The campaign hashtag #TestMeEast achieved a total Twitter "reach" of 238, 860 and the campaign had widespread news coverage. Our campaign showed that staff and students could be trained and mobilised to do thousands of routine HIV tests during a campaign.

  18. From Walking to Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Juergen; Blum, Yvonne; Seyfarth, Andre

    The implementation of bipedal gaits in legged robots is still a challenge in state-of-the-art engineering. Human gaits could be realized by imitating human leg dynamics where a spring-like leg behavior is found as represented in the bipedal spring-mass model. In this study we explore the gap between walking and running by investigating periodic gait patterns. We found an almost continuous morphing of gait patterns between walking and running. The technical feasibility of this transition is, however, restricted by the duration of swing phase. In practice, this requires an abrupt gait transition between both gaits, while a change of speed is not necessary.

  19. Advanced overlay: sampling and modeling for optimized run-to-run control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramany, Lokesh; Chung, WoongJae; Samudrala, Pavan; Gao, Haiyong; Aung, Nyan; Gomez, Juan Manuel; Gutjahr, Karsten; Park, DongSuk; Snow, Patrick; Garcia-Medina, Miguel; Yap, Lipkong; Demirer, Onur Nihat; Pierson, Bill; Robinson, John C.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years overlay (OVL) control schemes have become more complicated in order to meet the ever shrinking margins of advanced technology nodes. As a result, this brings up new challenges to be addressed for effective run-to- run OVL control. This work addresses two of these challenges by new advanced analysis techniques: (1) sampling optimization for run-to-run control and (2) bias-variance tradeoff in modeling. The first challenge in a high order OVL control strategy is to optimize the number of measurements and the locations on the wafer, so that the "sample plan" of measurements provides high quality information about the OVL signature on the wafer with acceptable metrology throughput. We solve this tradeoff between accuracy and throughput by using a smart sampling scheme which utilizes various design-based and data-based metrics to increase model accuracy and reduce model uncertainty while avoiding wafer to wafer and within wafer measurement noise caused by metrology, scanner or process. This sort of sampling scheme, combined with an advanced field by field extrapolated modeling algorithm helps to maximize model stability and minimize on product overlay (OPO). Second, the use of higher order overlay models means more degrees of freedom, which enables increased capability to correct for complicated overlay signatures, but also increases sensitivity to process or metrology induced noise. This is also known as the bias-variance trade-off. A high order model that minimizes the bias between the modeled and raw overlay signature on a single wafer will also have a higher variation from wafer to wafer or lot to lot, that is unless an advanced modeling approach is used. In this paper, we characterize the bias-variance trade off to find the optimal scheme. The sampling and modeling solutions proposed in this study are validated by advanced process control (APC) simulations to estimate run-to-run performance, lot-to-lot and wafer-to- wafer model term monitoring to

  20. Running free: embracing a healthy lifestyle through distance running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipway, Richard; Holloway, Immy

    2010-11-01

    Sport and leisure activity contribute to both health and quality of life. There is a dearth of qualitative studies on the lived experiences of active people, so the aim of this paper is to develop a deeper understanding of the experiences of one particular group of active leisure participants, distance runners, and to highlight the associated health and well-being benefits that result from participating in this increasingly popular form of active leisure. In doing so, this paper will briefly explore the potential opportunities and implications for sport and leisure policy and provision, and highlight examples of how distance running could positively contribute towards government objectives linked to tackling obesity levels, healthy living and physical well-being. It is suggested that similar benefits also exist across other forms of physical activity, exercise and sport. Qualitative methods of enquiry were adopted to understand the nature of the social world of long distance runners through interviews and observations, which were thematically analyzed. One of the key themes emerging from the data was the desire to embrace a healthy lifestyle, which then led to the emergence of four main sub-themes. The first was linked to the importance of seeking self-esteem and confirmation through running; second, an investigation of a selection of negative aspects associated with exercise addiction; third, the need to exercise among sport and leisure participants; and finally, an understanding of the concept of the 'running body'. Cautionary notes also identified negative aspects associated with exercise and physical activity. The findings highlight the potential role that distance running can play as an easily accessible and enjoyable leisure activity, one that can help facilitate increased participation in exercise and physical activity as an integral part of an active and healthy lifestyle.

  1. The Art of Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jill Harris

    2007-01-01

    Every year, the Parent-Teacher Association of Ferndale Elementary School in Atlanta, Georgia sponsors a fun road race for the students, teachers, families, and community. This annual event has inspired the author to develop the Running and Art project to show off her students' art and squeeze in a little art history, too. In this article, the…

  2. Optimizing Running Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widule, Carol J.

    1989-01-01

    The optimization of step length and step rate (frequency) is essential for sprinters. This article analyzes data that compare step rate and step length to height, as a function of running speed, for ten elite runners. How results of such analyses can be used in training runners is also discussed. (IAH)

  3. Effects of unaccustomed downhill running on muscle damage, oxidative stress, and leukocyte apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Shin; Lee, Man-Gyoon

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of unaccustomed downhill running on muscle damage, oxidative stress, and leukocyte apoptosis. Thirteen moderately trained male subjects performed three 40 min treadmill runs at ~70% VO2max on separate days: a level run (L) followed by two downhill runs (DH1 and DH2). Blood samples were taken at rest (PRE) and immediately (POST), 2 h, 24 h, and 48 h after each run. Data were analyzed using 2-way repeated measures ANOVA with post hoc Tukey tests. Creatine kinase (CK) activity and oxidative stress level were significantly elevated at 24 h and 48 h following DH1 (P < 0.05). The level of oxidative stress at the POST measurement following DH1 and DH2 was greater than PRE. The rate of leukocyte apoptosis was significantly increased at the POST measurement following all three runs, and remained elevated for up to 48 h following DH1 (P < 0.01). CK activity and oxidative stress were elevated following an acute bout of moderate intensity downhill running, resulting in a greater apoptotic response at 24 h and 48 h post-exercise in comparison with level grade running or a second downhill run. These elevations were blunted following DH2. Although the link between exercise-induced muscle damage and leukocyte apoptosis is currently unknown, the differential response to DH1 vs. L and DH2 indicates that it may be mediated by the elevation of oxidative stress.

  4. 制冷装置增加夜间运行时间的性能分析%Performance analysis on increasing running time of refrigeration plants at nighttime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建一; 陈海洋

    2011-01-01

    介绍了福建省目前的分时电价政策.基于冷库实例,模拟计算了制冷装置增加夜间运行时间,采用不同蓄冷运行方案的运行费用.结果显示,理想条件下冷库的运行电费可节省47.3%以上,现场调研的某冷库运行电费可减少约31%.根据气象台的逐时气象数据统计,厦门市夜间湿球温度下降1.2~1.8℃.计算表明,制冷装置夜间运行的COP因此比白天提高1.6%-2.92%.%The timeshare electricity price policy in Fujian Province was introduced in this paper. Different operating modes that used thermal energy storage and increased running time in nighttime were simulated based on a selected warehousing facility.The results show that the operating electricity bill for refrigerated warehouses can be reduced by 47.3% even more under ideal condition. The operating electricity bill for the observed warehouse can be reduced by 31%. The nighttime wet bulb temperatures were 1.2 - 1.8℃ lower than that of daytime in Xiamen city based on hourly temperatures from Xiamen Meteorological Agency. It was indicated from calculation that the COPs of refrigeration plants at nighttime will be improved by 1.6% to 2.92%.

  5. Increased congruence does not necessarily indicate increased phylogenetic accuracy--the behavior of the incongruence length difference test in mixed-model analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowton, Mark; Austin, Andrew D

    2002-02-01

    Comprehensive phylogenetic analyses utilize data from distinct sources, including nuclear, mitochondrial, and plastid molecular sequences and morphology. Such heterogeneous datasets are likely to require distinct models of analysis, given the different histories of mutational biases operating on these characters. The incongruence length difference (ILD) test is increasingly being used to arbitrate between competing models of phylogenetic analysis in cases where multiple data partitions have been collected. Our work suggests that the ILD test is unlikely to be an effective measure of congruence when two datasets differ markedly in size. We show that models that increase the contribution of one data partition over another are likely to increase congruence, as measured by this test. More alarmingly, for many bipartition comparisons, character congruence increases bimodally - either increasing or decreasing the contribution of one data partition will increase congruence - making it impossible to arrive at a single optimally congruent model of analysis.

  6. Weekly running volume and risk of running-related injuries among marathon runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christina Haugaard; Nielsen, Rasmus Østergaard; Juul, Martin Serup

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSEBACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate if the risk of injury declines with increasing weekly running volume before a marathon race.......PURPOSEBACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate if the risk of injury declines with increasing weekly running volume before a marathon race....

  7. Weekly running volume and risk of running-related injuries among marathon runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christina Haugaard; Nielsen, R.O.; Juul, Martin Serup

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if the risk of injury declines with increasing weekly running volume before a marathon race.......The purpose of this study was to investigate if the risk of injury declines with increasing weekly running volume before a marathon race....

  8. Weekly running volume and risk of running-related injuries among marathon runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christina Haugaard; Nielsen, Rasmus Østergaard; Juul, Martin Serup;

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSEBACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate if the risk of injury declines with increasing weekly running volume before a marathon race.......PURPOSEBACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate if the risk of injury declines with increasing weekly running volume before a marathon race....

  9. Pre-exercise stretching does not impact upon running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Philip R; Walker, Adrian

    2007-11-01

    Pre-exercise stretching has been widely reported to reduce performance in tasks requiring maximal or near-maximal force or torque. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 3 different pre-exercise stretching routines on running economy. Seven competitive male middle and long-distance runners (mean +/- SD) age: 32.5 +/- 7.7 years; height: 175.0 +/- 8.8 cm; mass: 67.8 +/- 8.6 kg; V(.-)O2max: 66.8 +/- 7.0 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) volunteered to participate in this study. Each participant completed 4 different pre-exercise conditions: (a) a control condition, (b) static stretching, (c) progressive static stretching, and (d) dynamic stretching. Each stretching routine consisted of 2 x 30-second stretches for each of 5 exercises. Dependent variables measured were sit and reach test before and after each pre-exercise routine, running economy (ml x kg(-1) x km(-1)), and steady-state oxygen uptake (ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)), which were measured during the final 3 minutes of a 10-minute run below lactate threshold. All 3 stretching routines resulted in an increase in the range of movement (p = 0.008). There was no change in either running economy (p = 0.915) or steady-state V(.-)O2 (p = 0.943). The lack of change in running economy was most likely because it was assessed after a period of submaximal running, which may have masked any effects from the stretching protocols. Previously reported reductions in performance have been attributed to reduced motor unit activation, presumably IIX. In this study, these motor units were likely not to have been recruited; this may explain the unimpaired performance. This study suggests that pre-exercise stretching has no impact upon running economy or submaximal exercise oxygen cost.

  10. Challenges in testing genetically modified crops for potential increases in endogenous allergen expression for safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, R; Ariyarathna, H; Amnuaycheewa, P; Tetteh, A; Pramod, S N; Taylor, S L; Ballmer-Weber, B K; Goodman, R E

    2013-02-01

    Premarket, genetically modified (GM) plants are assessed for potential risks of food allergy. The major risk would be transfer of a gene encoding an allergen or protein nearly identical to an allergen into a different food source, which can be assessed by specific serum testing. The potential that a newly expressed protein might become an allergen is evaluated based on resistance to digestion in pepsin and abundance in food fractions. If the modified plant is a common allergenic source (e.g. soybean), regulatory guidelines suggest testing for increases in the expression of endogenous allergens. Some regulators request evaluating endogenous allergens for rarely allergenic plants (e.g. maize and rice). Since allergic individuals must avoid foods containing their allergen (e.g. peanut, soybean, maize, or rice), the relevance of the tests is unclear. Furthermore, no acceptance criteria are established and little is known about the natural variation in allergen concentrations in these crops. Our results demonstrate a 15-fold difference in the major maize allergen, lipid transfer protein between nine varieties, and complex variation in IgE binding to various soybean varieties. We question the value of evaluating endogenous allergens in GM plants unless the intent of the modification was production of a hypoallergenic crop. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Norepinephrine remains increased in the six-minute walking test after heart transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Veiga Guimarães

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We sought to evaluate the neurohormonal activity in heart transplant recipients and compare it with that in heart failure patients and healthy subjects during rest and just after a 6-minute walking test. INTRODUCTION: Despite the improvements in quality of life and survival provided by heart transplantation, the neurohormonal profile is poorly described. METHODS: Twenty heart transplantation (18 men, 49±11 years and 8.5±3.3 years after transplantation, 11 heart failure (8 men, 43±10 years, and 7 healthy subjects (5 men 39±8 years were included in this study. Blood samples were collected immediately before and during the last minute of the exercise. RESULTS: During rest, patients' norepinephrine plasma level (659±225 pg/mL was higher in heart transplant recipients (463±167 pg/mL and heathy subjects (512±132, p<0.05. Heart transplant recipient's norepinephrine plasma level was not different than that of healthy subjects. Just after the 6-minute walking test, the heart transplant recipient's norepinephrine plasma level (1248±692 pg/mL was not different from that of heart failure patients (1174±653 pg/mL. Both these groups had a higher level than healthy subjects had (545±95 pg/mL, p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Neurohormonal activity remains increased after the 6-minute walking test after heart transplantation.

  12. Reading and listening to music increase resting energy expenditure during an indirect calorimetry test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Blaire; Fullmer, Susan; Eggett, Dennis L

    2014-12-01

    Indirect calorimetry is often done early in the morning in a fasting state, with the subject unshowered and abstained from caffeine or other stimulants. Subjects often fall asleep, resulting in measurement of a sleeping metabolic rate rather than a resting metabolic rate. The objective of this study was to determine whether listening to self-selected relaxing music or reading an electronic device or magazine affects resting energy expenditure (REE) during measurement in healthy adults. A randomized trial comparing three different conditions (ie, resting, reading, and listening to music) was performed. Sixty-five subjects (36 female and 29 male) were used in final data analysis. Inclusion criteria included healthy subjects between the ages of 18 and 50 years with a stable weight. Exclusion criteria included pregnant or lactating women or use of medications known to affect metabolism. Results showed that reading either a magazine or an electronic device significantly increased REE by 102.7 kcal/day when compared with resting (Pmusic increased REE by 27.6 kcal/day compared with rest (P=0.0072). Based on our results, we recommend subjects refrain from reading a magazine or electronic device during an indirect calorimetry test. Whether or not the smaller difference found while listening to music is practically significant would be a decision for the indirect calorimetry test administrator.

  13. Fatigue test of a fiberglass based composite panel. Increasing the lifetime of freight wagon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobek, M.; Baier, A.; Grabowski, Ł.; Majzner, M.

    2016-08-01

    In the XXI century transportation of goods plays a key role in the economy. Due to a good logistics the economy is able to grow fluently. Although land transportation is carried out mainly through trucks for the last several years there has been noted an increase in the percentage share of rail transport in the freight transport. The main goods transported by railways are mineral fuels, mining and quarrying products. They constitute the greater part of 70% of total transported goods. Transportation of material of such high weight, high hardness and with different shapes involves increased and accelerated wear and tear of the cargo space of the wagon. This process is also magnified by substances used to prevent overheating or goods theft. Usually they are in the form of chemical compounds powder, eg. Calcium. A very large impact on the wear of the freight wagons hull is made because of mechanical damage. Their source comes mostly from loading cargo with impetus and using heavy machines during unloading. A large number of cycles of loading and unloading during the working period causes abrasion of body and as a result after several years a wagon car qualifies for a major maintenance. Possibility of application composite panels in the process of renovating the wagons body could reduce the weight of whole train and prolong the service life between mandatory technical inspection. The Paper "Fatigue test of a fiberglass based composite panel. Increasing the lifetime of freight wagon" presents the research process and the results of the endurance test of the composite panel samples fixed to a metal plate. As a fixing method a stainless steel rivet nut and a stainless steel button head socket screws were chosen. Cyclic and multiple load were applied to test samples using a pneumatic cylinder. Such a methodology simulated the forces resulting from loading and unloading of the wagon and movement of the cargo during transport. In the study a dedicated stand equipped with a

  14. Empirical testing of Kotler's high-performance factors to increase sales growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren Dayan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and/or objectives: The primary objective of this study is to empirically test Kotler's (2003 high-performance model which ensures an increase in sales growth. More specifically, the study explores the influence of process variables (as measured by marketing strategies, resources management (as measured by the management of labour, materials, machines, information technology and energy and organisational variables (as measured by TQM and organisational culture on sales growth in the food, motorcar and high-technology manufacturing industries. Problem investigated Various research studies suggest that the managers of firms are continuously challenged in their attempts to increase their sales (Morre, 2007; Pauwels, Silva Risso, Srinivasan & Hanssens, 2004: 142-143; Gray & Hayes, 2007: 1. Kotler (2003 suggests a model that leads to a high performing business. The question is posed as to whether this model can be used to increase sales growth in all businesses. This study seeks to develop a generic model to increase sales growth across industries by using an adapted version of Kotler's (2003 high-performance model. The study investigates the application of this adapted model on the food, motorcar and high-technology manufacturing industries. Design and/or methodology and/or approach: An empirical causal research design that includes 770 marketing and product development practitioners from multinational food, motorcar and high-technology manufacturing firms, was used in this study. A response rate of 76.1% was achieved as only 571 useable questionnaires were returned. The internal reliability and discriminant validity of the measuring instrument were assessed by the calculation of Cronbach alpha coefficients and the conducting an exploratory factor analysis respectively. Structural Equation Modelling SEM was used to statistically test the relationships between the independent variables (marketing strategies, resource management, TQM and

  15. The 'X60' CORADIA LIREX trains for Stockholm's regional-express system. Results of test and approval runs; Der S-Bahntriebzug CORADIA LIREX fuer Stockholm (X 60). Ergebnisse der Erprobungs- und Zulassungsversuche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, G.; Fischer, C. [ALSTOM LHB GmbH, Salzgitter (Germany)

    2005-11-01

    It was back in spring 2002 that Transitio (a company specialized in the provision of rolling stock) ordered 55 new regional-express train sets for the network around the Swedish capital. Even before all the tenders had been processed and contracts awarded, it had emerged clearly that, in addition to financial considerations, the requirements regarding safety, reliability, comfort and impacts on the environment were going to play an above-average role. For this reason, very detailed technical solutions were included in proposals and these were refined even further during the subsequent contract negotiations, going as far as including definitions of how the above-mentioned aspects were to be technically tested. The authors report on the outcome of the programme of tests and the approval runs with the new trains. (orig.)

  16. Comparison of fractions of inactive modules between Run1 and Run2

    CERN Document Server

    Motohashi, Kazuki; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Fraction of inactive modules for each component of the ATLAS pixel detector at the end of Run 1 and the beginning of Run 2. A similar plot which uses a result of functionality tests during LS1 can be found in ATL-INDET-SLIDE-2014-388.

  17. CB1 receptor deficiency decreases wheel-running activity: consequences on emotional behaviours and hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreucq, Sarah; Koehl, Muriel; Abrous, Djoher N; Marsicano, Giovanni; Chaouloff, Francis

    2010-07-01

    Chronic voluntary wheel-running activity has been reported to hypersensitise central CB1 receptors in mice. On the other hand, pharmacological findings suggest that the CB1 receptor could be involved in wheel-running behaviour and in running-induced neurogenesis in the hippocampus. We analysed wheel-running behaviour for 6 weeks and measured its consequences on hippocampal neurogenesis in CB1 knockout (CB1(-/-)) animals, compared to wild-type (CB1(+/+)) littermates. Because wheel running has been shown to affect locomotor reactivity in novel environments, memory for aversive events and depression-like behaviours, we also assessed these behaviours in control and running CB1(+/+) and CB1(-/-) mice. When compared with running CB1(+/+) mice, the distance covered weekly by CB1(-/-) mice was decreased by 30-40%, an observation accounted for by decreased time spent and maximal velocity on the wheels. Analyses of running distances with respect to the light/dark cycle revealed that mutant covered less distance throughout both the inactive and the active phases of that cycle. Locomotion in an activity cage, exploration in an open field, and immobility time in the forced swim test proved insensitive to chronic wheel running in either genotype. Wheel running, per se, did not influence the expression and extinction of cued fear memory but counteracted in a time-dependent manner the deficiency of extinction measured in CB1(-/-) mice. Hippocampal neurogenesis, assessed by doublecortin labelling of immature neurons in the dentate gyrus, was lowered by 40% in control CB1(-/-) mice, compared to control CB1(+/+) mice. Although CB1(-/-) mice ran less than their wild-type littermates, the 6-week running protocol increased neurogenesis to similar extents (37-39%) in both genotypes. This study suggests that mouse CB1 receptors control wheel running but not its neurogenic consequences in the hippocampus.

  18. Running kinematics and shock absorption do not change after brief exhaustive running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, John P; Sell, Timothy C; Chu, Yungchien; Lovalekar, Mita; Burdett, Ray G; Lephart, Scott M

    2011-06-01

    Because of the nature of running, the forces encountered require a proper coordination of joint action of the lower extremity to dissipate the ground reaction forces and accelerations through the kinetic chain. Running-related muscle fatigue may reduce the shock absorbing capacity of the lower extremity and alter running kinematics. The purpose of this study was to determine if a bout of exhaustive running at a physiologically determined high intensity, changes running kinematics, impact accelerations, and alters shock attenuating capabilities. It was hypothesized that as a result of fatigue induced by an exhaustive run, running kinematics, impact accelerations at the head and shank, acceleration reduction, and shock attenuation would change. A within-subject, repeated-measures design was used for this study. Twelve healthy, competitive male and female distance runners participated. Subjects performed 2 testing sessions consisting of a VO2max treadmill protocol to determine the heart rate at ventilatory threshold and a fatigue-inducing running bout at the identified ventilatory threshold heart rate. Kinematic data included knee flexion, pronation, time to maximum knee flexion, and time to maximum pronation. Acceleration data included shank acceleration, head acceleration, and shock attenuation. No significant differences resulted for the kinematic or acceleration variables. Although the results of this study do not support the original hypotheses, the influence of running fatigue on kinematics and accelerations remains inconclusive. Future research is necessary to examine fatigue-induced changes in running kinematics and accelerations and to determine the threshold at which point the changes may occur.

  19. Orthopaedic Perspective on Barefoot and Minimalist Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Jonathan; Neumann, Julie; Tao, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there has been a movement toward barefoot and minimalist running. Advocates assert that a lack of cushion and support promotes a forefoot or midfoot strike rather than a rearfoot strike, decreasing the impact transient and stress on the hip and knee. Although the change in gait is theorized to decrease injury risk, this concept has not yet been fully elucidated. However, research has shown diminished symptoms of chronic exertional compartment syndrome and anterior knee pain after a transition to minimalist running. Skeptics are concerned that, because of the effects of the natural environment and the lack of a standardized transition program, barefoot running could lead to additional, unforeseen injuries. Studies have shown that, with the transition to minimalist running, there is increased stress on the foot and ankle and risk of repetitive stress injuries. Nonetheless, despite the large gap of evidence-based knowledge on minimalist running, the potential benefits warrant further research and consideration.

  20. An Exploratory Study Investigating the Effects of Barefoot Running on Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloway, Ross G; Alloway, Tracy Packiam; Magyari, Peter M; Floyd, Shelley

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the potential cognitive benefits of running barefoot compared to shod. Young adults (N = 72, M age = 24.4 years, SD = 5.5) ran both barefoot and shod on a running track while stepping on targets (poker chips) and when not stepping on targets. The main finding was that participants performed better on a working memory test when running barefoot compared to shod, but only when they had to step on targets. These results supported the idea that additional attention is needed when running barefoot to avoid stepping on objects that could potentially injure the foot. Significant increases in participant's heart rate were also found in the barefoot condition. No significant differences were found in participants' speed across conditions. These findings suggested that working memory may be enhanced after at least 16 minutes of barefoot running if the individual has to focus attention on the ground.

  1. Does Addiction Run in Families?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Addiction? » Does Addiction Run in Families? Does Addiction Run in Families? Listen PDF: EasyToRead_WhatIsAddiction_Final_ ... English Español "Heart disease runs in some families. Addiction runs in ours." ©istock.com/ Antonio_Diaz Matt's ...

  2. Standard laboratory tests to identify older adults at increased risk of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Susan E; Rockwood, Michael R H; Mitnitski, Arnold; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2014-10-07

    Older adults are at an increased risk of death, but not all people of the same age have the same risk. Many methods identify frail people (that is, those at increased risk) but these often require time-consuming interactions with health care providers. We evaluated whether standard laboratory tests on their own, or added to a clinical frailty index (FI), could improve identification of older adults at increased risk of death. This is a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study, where community dwelling and institutionalized participants in the Canadian Study of Health and Aging who also volunteered for blood collection (n = 1,013) were followed for up to six years. A standard FI (FI-CSHA) was constructed from data obtained during the clinical evaluation and a second, novel FI was constructed from laboratory data plus systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements (FI-LAB). A combined FI included all items from each index. Predictive validity was tested using Cox proportional hazards analysis and discriminative ability by the area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Of 1,013 participants, 51.3% had died by six years. The mean baseline value of the FI-LAB was 0.27 (standard deviation 0.11; range 0.05 to 0.63), the FI-CSHA was 0.25 (0.11; 0.02 to 0.72), and the combined FI was 0.26 (0.09; 0.06 to 0.59). In an age- and sex-adjusted model, with each increment in the FI-LAB, the hazard ratios increased by 2.8% (95% confidence interval 1.02 to 1.04). The hazard ratios for the FI-CSHA and the combined FI were 1.02 (1.01 to 1.03) and 1.04 (1.03 to 1.05), respectively. The FI-LAB and FI-CSHA remained independently associated with death in the face of the other. The areas under the ROC curves were 0.72 for FI-LAB, 0.73 for FI-CSHA and 0.74 for the combined FI. An FI based on routine laboratory data can identify older adults at increased risk of death. Additional evaluation of this approach in clinical settings is warranted.

  3. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyngeraa, T S; Pedersen, L M; Mantoni, T; Belhage, B; Rasmussen, L S; van Lieshout, J J; Pott, F C

    2013-02-01

    Running induces characteristic fluctuations in blood pressure (BP) of unknown consequence for organ blood flow. We hypothesized that running-induced BP oscillations are transferred to the cerebral vasculature. In 15 healthy volunteers, transcranial Doppler-determined middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow velocity, photoplethysmographic finger BP, and step frequency were measured continuously during three consecutive 5-min intervals of treadmill running at increasing running intensities. Data were analysed in the time and frequency domains. BP data for seven subjects and MCA velocity data for eight subjects, respectively, were excluded from analysis because of insufficient signal quality. Running increased mean arterial pressure and mean MCA velocity and induced rhythmic oscillations in BP and in MCA velocity corresponding to the difference between step rate and heart rate (HR) frequencies. During running, rhythmic oscillations in arterial BP induced by interference between HR and step frequency impact on cerebral blood velocity. For the exercise as a whole, average MCA velocity becomes elevated. These results suggest that running not only induces an increase in regional cerebral blood flow but also challenges cerebral autoregulation. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Increased circulating cytokine receptors and ex vivo interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and interleukin-1 beta production but decreased tumour necrosis factor-alpha production after a 5-km run

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenth, JPH; Krebbers, RJM; Bijzet, J; van der Meer, JWM

    1998-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a 5-km run on blood leucocytes, acute-phase proteins and cytokines. In addition, cytokines were measured in the supernatants from whole-blood cell cultures incubated with lipolysaccharide (LPS). Methods Ten healthy, recreational train

  5. Running biomechanics: shorter heels, better economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, M N; Bobbert, M F; van Soest, A J; Clark, J R; van Heerden, J

    2008-10-01

    Better running economy (i.e. a lower rate of energy consumption at a given speed) is correlated with superior distance running performance. There is substantial variation in running economy, even among elite runners. This variation might be due to variation in the storage and reutilization of elastic energy in tendons. Using a simple musculoskeletal model, it was predicted that the amount of energy stored in a tendon during a given movement depends more critically on moment arm than on mechanical properties of the tendon, with the amount of stored energy increasing as the moment arm gets smaller. Assuming a link between elastic energy reutilization and overall metabolic cost of running, a smaller moment arm should therefore be associated with superior running economy. This prediction was confirmed experimentally in a group of 15 highly trained runners. The moment arm of the Achilles tendon was determined from standardized photographs of the ankle, using the position of anatomical landmarks. Running economy was measured as the rate of metabolic energy consumption during level treadmill running at a speed of 16 km h(-1). A strong correlation was found between the moment arm of the Achilles tendon and running economy. Smaller muscle moment arms correlated with lower rates of metabolic energy consumption (r(2)=0.75, P<0.001).

  6. The Running Gravitational Couplings

    OpenAIRE

    Dou, Djamel; Percacci, Roberto

    1997-01-01

    We compute the running of the cosmological constant and Newton's constant taking into account the effect of quantum fields with any spin between 0 and 2. We find that Newton's constant does not vary appreciably but the cosmological constant can change by many orders of magnitude when one goes from cosmological scales to typical elementary particle scales. In the extreme infrared, zero modes drive the cosmological constant to zero.

  7. PEP Run Report for Integrated Test A, Caustic Leaching in UFP-VSL-T01A, Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Daniel, Richard C.; Su, Yin-Fong; Geeting, John GH; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Josephson, Gary B.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Smith, Dennese M.; Valdez, Patrick LJ; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Young, Joan K.

    2009-12-04

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.”(a) The PEP, located in the Process Engineering Laboratory-West (PDLW) located in Richland, Washington, is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  8. Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Integrated Test B Run Report--Caustic and Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geeting, John GH; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Josephson, Gary B.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.

    2009-12-10

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  9. Blood glutathione status following distance running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufaux, B; Heine, O; Kothe, A; Prinz, U; Rost, R

    1997-02-01

    In 12 moderately trained subjects reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) as well as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were measured in the blood before and during the first two hours and first two days after a 2.5-h run. The participants covered between 19 and 26 km (20.8 +/- 2.5 km, mean +/- SD). The running speed was between 53 and 82% of the speed at which blood lactate concentration reached 4 mmol/L lactate (67.9 +/- 8.2%, mean +/- SD) assessed during a previously performed treadmill test. Blood samples were collected 1 h before, immediately before, immediately after, 1 and 2 h after, as well as 1 and 2 days after the run. Immediately after exercise GSH was significantly decreased (p < 0.01) and GSSG significantly increased (p < 0.01). In all subjects the ratio of GSH to GSSG showed a marked decline to 18 +/- 4% (mean +/- SD) of the pre-exercise values (p < 0.01). One hour later the mean GSH and GSSG values returned to baseline. However, there were considerable inter-individual differences. In some subjects the GSH/ GSSG ratio overshot the pre-exercise levels, in others the ratio remained low even two hours after exercise. Compared with the pre-exercise values TBARS concentrations did not change significantly at any time point after exercise. The findings suggest that after prolonged exercise in moderately trained subjects a critical shift in the blood glutathione redox status may be reached. The changes observed were generally short-lived, the duration of which may have depended on the relative importance of reactive oxygen species generation by the capillary endothelial cells and neutrophil and eosinophil granulocytes after the end of exercise.

  10. Testing Informative Hypotheses in SEM Increases Power: An Illustration Contrasting Classical Hypothesis Testing with a Parametric Bootstrap Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Schoot, Rens; Strohmeier, Dagmar

    2011-01-01

    In the present paper, the application of a parametric bootstrap procedure, as described by van de Schoot, Hoijtink, and Dekovic (2010), will be applied to demonstrate that a direct test of an informative hypothesis offers more informative results compared to testing traditional null hypotheses against catch-all rivals. Also, more power can be…

  11. A comprehensive test of evolutionarily increased competitive ability in a highly invasive plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Srijana; Gruntman, Michal; Bilton, Mark; Seifan, Merav; Tielbörger, Katja

    2014-12-01

    A common hypothesis to explain plants' invasive success is that release from natural enemies in the introduced range selects for reduced allocation to resistance traits and a subsequent increase in resources available for growth and competitive ability (evolution of increased competitive ability, EICA). However, studies that have investigated this hypothesis have been incomplete as they either did not test for all aspects of competitive ability or did not select appropriate competitors. Here, the prediction of increased competitive ability was examined with the invasive plant Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife) in a set of common-garden experiments that addressed these aspects by carefully distinguishing between competitive effect and response of invasive and native plants, and by using both intraspecific and interspecific competition settings with a highly vigorous neighbour, Urtica dioica (stinging nettle), which occurs in both ranges. While the intraspecific competition results showed no differences in competitive effect or response between native and invasive plants, the interspecific competition experiment revealed greater competitive response and effect of invasive plants in both biomass and seed production. The use of both intra- and interspecific competition experiments in this study revealed opposing results. While the first experiment refutes the EICA hypothesis, the second shows strong support for it, suggesting evolutionarily increased competitive ability in invasive populations of L. salicaria. It is suggested that the use of naturally co-occurring heterospecifics, rather than conspecifics, may provide a better evaluation of the possible evolutionary shift towards greater competitive ability. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Increased range of ultrasonic guided wave testing of overhead transmission line cables using dispersion compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Mathew; Yücel, Mehmet K; Kappatos, Vassilios; Selcuk, Cem; Gan, Tat-Hean

    2015-09-01

    Overhead Transmission Line (OVTL) cables can experience structural defects and are, therefore, inspected using Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) techniques. Ultrasonic Guided Waves (UGW) is one NDT technique that has been investigated for inspection of these cables. For practical use, it is desirable to be able to inspect as long a section of cable as possible from a single location. This paper investigates increasing the UGW inspection range on Aluminium Conductor Steel Reinforced (ACSR) cables by compensating for dispersion using dispersion curve data. For ACSR cables, it was considered to be difficult to obtain accurate dispersion curves using modelling due to the complex geometry and unknown coupling between wire strands. Group velocity dispersion curves were, therefore, measured experimentally on an untensioned, 26.5m long cable and a method of calculating theoretical dispersion curves was obtained. Attenuation and dispersion compensation were then performed for a broadband Maximum Length Sequence (MLS) excitation signal. An increase in the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of about 4-8dB compared to that of the dispersed signal was obtained. However, the main benefit was the increased ability to resolve the individual echoes from the end of the cable and an introduced defect in the form of a cut, which was 7 to at least 13dB greater than that of the dispersed signal. Five echoes were able to be clearly detected using MLS excitation signal, indicating the potential for an inspection range of up to 130m in each direction. To the best of the authors knowledge, this is the longest inspection range for ACSR cables reported in the literature, where typically cables, which were only one or two meter long, have been investigated previously. Narrow band tone burst and Hann windowed tone burst excitation signal also showed increased SNR and ability to resolve closely spaced echoes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 40 CFR 86.1237-85 - Dynamometer runs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dynamometer runs. 86.1237-85 Section... Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1237-85 Dynamometer runs. (a) The vehicle shall be either driven... the diurnal loss test and beginning of the hot soak preparation run shall not exceed 3 minutes,...

  14. The ATLAS Tau Trigger Performance during LHC Run 1 and Prospects for Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Mitani, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS tau trigger is designed to select hadronic decays of the tau leptons. Tau lepton plays an important role in Standard Model (SM) physics, such as in Higgs boson decays. Tau lepton is also important in beyond the SM (BSM) scenarios, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles, as they are often produced preferentially in these models. During the 2010-2012 LHC run (Run1), the tau trigger was accomplished successfully, which leads several rewarding results such as evidence for $H\\rightarrow \\tau\\tau$. From the 2015 LHC run (Run2), LHC will be upgraded and overlapping interactions per bunch crossing (pile-up) are expected to increase by a factor two. It will be challenging to control trigger rates while keeping interesting physics events. This paper summarized the tau trigger performance in Run1 and its prospects for Run2.

  15. Run-Time Data-Flow Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李剑慧; 臧斌宇; 吴蓉; 朱传琪

    2002-01-01

    Parallelizing compilers have made great progress in recent years. However, there still remains a gap between the current ability of parallelizing compilers and their final goals.In order to achieve the maximum parallelism, run-time techniques were used in parallelizing compilers during last few years. First, this paper presents a basic run-time privatization method.The definition of run-time dead code is given and its side effect is discussed. To eliminate the imprecision caused by the run-time dead code, backward data-flow information must be used.Proteus Test, which can use backward information in run-time, is then presented to exploit more dynamic parallelism. Also, a variation of Proteus Test, the Advanced Proteus Test, is offered to achieve partial parallelism. Proteus Test was implemented on the parallelizing compiler AFT.In the end of this paper the program fpppp.f of Spec95fp Benchmark is taken as an example, to show the effectiveness of Proteus Test.

  16. Testes de broncoprovocação com metacolina e com exercício em bicicleta e corrida livre em crianças com asma intermitente Bronchial provocation tests using methacholine, cycle ergometer exercise and free running in children with intermittent asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. T. G. Souza

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar a responsividade de vias aéreas à metacolina e ao teste de exercício na bicicleta ergométrica e corrida livre em crianças com asma intermitente. MÉTODOS: Estudo randomizado. Trinta crianças de ambos os sexos com asma intermitente participaram do estudo. Cada teste foi realizado em 3 dias diferentes, através de randomização: a broncoprovocação com metacolina, método do dosímetro; b teste de exercício: corrida livre em um corredor de 50 m; c teste de exercício: bicicleta ergométrica com ar seco. A freqüência cardíaca atingida foi 80 a 90% da freqüência cardíaca máxima. A espirometria foi realizada aos 3, 6, 10, 15, 20 e 30 minutos após o exercício. Broncoespasmo induzido por exercício foi definido como a queda de volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo (VEF1 > 10% em relação aos valores pré-teste. RESULTADOS: A média de idade foi 11±3 anos. O VEF1 e VEF1/CVF (capacidade vital forçada foram normais e similares antes dos três testes de broncoprovocação. A freqüência cardíaca máxima foi de 178±7 bpm durante o exercício na bicicleta e 181±6 bpm na corrida livre (p > 0,05. Broncoespasmo significante foi visto em 23 crianças após o teste com metacolina, em 19 após a corrida livre e em 14 crianças após exercício em bicicleta (p OBJECTIVE: To compare airway responsiveness to methacholine, cycle ergometer exercise and free running in children with intermittent asthma. METHODS: A randomized study was conducted with 30 children of both genders with intermittent asthma. Each child was submitted to challenge testing on three separate days, in random order: a Methacholine challenge using a dosimeter; b Exercise challenge testing - free running along a 50-meter-long corridor; c Dry-air exercise challenge on a cycle ergometer. Target heart rate during exercise was 80 to 90% of the maximum predicted value. Spirometry was performed 3, 6,10,15,20 and 30 minutes after exercise. Exercise

  17. Whole sediment toxicity tests for metal risk assessments: on the importance of equilibration and test design to increase ecological relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegehuchte, Michiel B; Nguyen, Lien T H; De Laender, Frederik; Muyssen, Brita T A; Janssen, Colin R

    2013-04-01

    Current laboratory-based approaches for predicting metal toxicity in sediments exhibit a number of limitations. The most important are (1) a lack of sufficient equilibration resulting in unrealistically low pH values or unnaturally high porewater metal concentrations and (2) an inadequate test design regarding the metal concentrations selected for spiking. The present study illustrates that by explicitly accounting for these limitations, one obtains reliable and environmentally realistic toxicity data, thus advancing the metal risk assessments of sediments. To this end, a toxicity test design with natural sediments was developed in which the administered metal concentrations were selected to comprise a range of the difference between the molar concentration of simultaneously extracted metals and acid volatile sulfides (SEM-AVS) closely surrounding zero. In addition, the test design presented includes a 35- or 40-d equilibration period with overlying water renewal during which conductivity, pH, and metal concentrations in the overlying water are monitored. This allows toxicity testing to start after equilibrium for these parameters has been reached. This test design was applied to Ephoron virgo (Olivier, 1791), Gammarus pulex (Linnaeus, 1758), and Lumbriculus variegatus (Mueller, 1774) exposed to Zn and Pb. These tests indicated that the general concept of absence of toxicity when SEM-AVS<0 could not be rejected. However, the onset of Zn toxicity occurred at lower concentrations than generally assumed.

  18. Simplifying consent for HIV testing is associated with an increase in HIV testing and case detection in highest risk groups, San Francisco January 2003-June 2007.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola M Zetola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Populations at highest risk for HIV infection face multiple barriers to HIV testing. To facilitate HIV testing procedures, the San Francisco General Hospital Medical Center eliminated required written patient consent for HIV testing in its medical settings in May 2006. To describe the change in HIV testing rates in different hospital settings and populations after the change in HIV testing policy in the SFDH medical center, we performed an observational study using interrupted time series analysis. METHODS: Data from all patients aged 18 years and older seen from January 2003 through June 2007 at the San Francisco Department of Public Health (SFDPH medical care system were included in the analysis. The monthly HIV testing rate per 1000 had patient-visits was calculated for the overall population and stratified by hospital setting, age, sex, race/ethnicity, homelessness status, insurance status and primary language. RESULTS: By June 2007, the average monthly rate of HIV tests per 1000 patient-visits increased 4.38 (CI, 2.17-6.60, p<0.001 over the number predicted if the policy change had not occurred (representing a 44% increase. The monthly average number of new positive HIV tests increased from 8.9 (CI, 6.3-11.5 to 14.9 (CI, 10.6-19.2, p<0.001, representing a 67% increase. Although increases in HIV testing were seen in all populations, populations at highest risk for HIV infection, particularly men, the homeless, and the uninsured experienced the highest increases in monthly HIV testing rates after the policy change. CONCLUSIONS: The elimination of the requirement for written consent in May 2006 was associated with a significant and sustained increase in HIV testing rates and HIV case detection in the SFDPH medical center. Populations facing the higher barriers to HIV testing had the highest increases in HIV testing rates and case detection in response to the policy change.

  19. Ubuntu Up and Running

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, Robin

    2010-01-01

    Ubuntu for everyone! This popular Linux-based operating system is perfect for people with little technical background. It's simple to install, and easy to use -- with a strong focus on security. Ubuntu: Up and Running shows you the ins and outs of this system with a complete hands-on tour. You'll learn how Ubuntu works, how to quickly configure and maintain Ubuntu 10.04, and how to use this unique operating system for networking, business, and home entertainment. This book includes a DVD with the complete Ubuntu system and several specialized editions -- including the Mythbuntu multimedia re

  20. Increases in Recent HIV Testing Among Men Who Have Sex With Men Coincide With the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Expanded Testing Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Laura A.; Wejnert, Cyprian; Rose, Charles E.; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela; Taussig, Jennifer; Gern, Robert; Hoyte, Tamika; Salazar, Laura; White, Jianglan; Todd, Jeff; Bautista, Greg; Flynn, Colin; Sifakis, Frangiscos; German, Danielle; Isenberg, Debbie; Driscoll, Maura; Hurwitz, Elizabeth; Doherty, Rose; Wittke, Chris; Prachand, Nikhil; Benbow, Nanette; Melville, Sharon; Pannala, Praveen; Yeager, Richard; Sayegh, Aaron; Dyer, Jim; Sheu, Shane; Novoa, Alicia; Thrun, Mark; Al-Tayyib, Alia; Wilmoth, Ralph; Higgins, Emily; Griffin, Vivian; Mokotoff, Eve; MacMaster, Karen; Wolverton, Marcia; Risser, Jan; Rehman, Hafeez; Padgett, Paige; Bingham, Trista; Sey, Ekow Kwa; LaLota, Marlene; Metsch, Lisa; Forrest, David; Beck, Dano; Cardenas, Gabriel; Nemeth, Chris; Anderson, Bridget J.; Watson, Carol-Ann; Smith, Lou; Robinson, William T.; Gruber, DeAnn; Barak, Narquis; Murrill, Chris; Neaigus, Alan; Jenness, Samuel; Hagan, Holly; Reilly, Kathleen H.; Wendel, Travis; Cross, Helene; Bolden, Barbara; D'Errico, Sally; Wogayehu, Afework; Godette, Henry; Brady, Kathleen A.; Kirkland, Althea; Sifferman, Andrea; Miguelino-Keasling, Vanessa; Velasco, Al; Tovar, Veronica; Raymond, H. Fisher; De León, Sandra Miranda; Rolón-Colón, Yadira; Marzan, Melissa; Courogen, Maria; Jaenicke, Tom; Thiede, Hanne; Burt, Richard; Jia, Yujiang; Opoku, Jenevieve; Sansone, Marie; West, Tiffany; Magnus, Manya; Kuo, Irene

    2015-01-01

    According to National HIV Behavioral Surveillance system data, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing increased among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men from 2008 to 2011 in cities funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Expanded Testing Initiative, suggesting that focused HIV testing initiatives might have positive effects. PMID:25352589

  1. Increases in Recent HIV Testing Among Men Who Have Sex With Men Coincide With the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Expanded Testing Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    According to National HIV Behavioral Surveillance system data, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing increased among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men from 2008 to 2011 in cities funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Expanded Testing Initiative, suggesting that focused HIV testing initiatives might have positive effects.

  2. Heart-rate recommendations: transfer between running and cycling exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roecker, K; Striegel, H; Dickhuth, H-H

    2003-04-01

    With the expanding use of portable heart rate (HR) monitors in endurance sports, HR is increasingly used as a marker for exercise intensity. Hereby, HR at the so-called individual anaerobic threshold (IAT) is one possible reference point. However, once determined, it is often attempted to apply HR recommendations from one type of ergometry to different kinds of exercises. We examined whether HR at IAT and at 4 mmol x l -1 blood lactate is predictable from cycling to running and vice versa. Data of 371 subjects (304 male, 67 female) were analyzed. All subjects underwent an incremental test on a treadmill (TR, starting speed 6 or 8 km x h -1, increments 2 km x h -1 every 3 min) and on a bicycle ergometer (BE, start at 50 Watt, increments 25 or 50 Watt every 3 min). IAT was determined at a net increase of lactate concentration of 1 - 5 mmol x l -1 above lactate concentration at lactate threshold for running (as in: Med Sci Sports Exerc 1998, 30 (10); 1552 - 1557) and 1.0 mmol x l -1 for cycling. A maximum time span of three weeks was allowed between the tests. We found that heart rate at IAT or at 4 mmol x l -1 blood lactate did not correlate between cycling and running. A sports specific test seems to be a prerequisite for reliable heart rate recommendations.

  3. Dual specimens increase the diagnostic accuracy and reduce the reaction duration of rapid urease test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Hung; Hsu; Sophie; SW; Wang; Chiao-Yun; Chen; Ching-Wen; Chang; Jaw-Yuan; Wang; Yuan-Chieh; Yang; Deng-Chyang; Wu; Ming-Tsang; Wu

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the influence of multiple samplings during esophagogastr oduodenoscopy(EGD) on the accuracy of the rapid urease test,and the validity of newly developed rapid urease tests,HelicotecUT plus test and HelicotecUT test,CLO test and ProntoDry test.METHODS:A total of 355 patients undergoing EGD for dyspepsia were included.Their Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) treatment status was either nave or eradicated.Six biopsy specimens from antrum and gastric body,respectively,were obtained during EGD.Single...

  4. ATLAS people can run!

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira; Pauline Gagnon

    It must be all the training we are getting every day, running around trying to get everything ready for the start of the LHC next year. This year, the ATLAS runners were in fine form and came in force. Nine ATLAS teams signed up for the 37th Annual CERN Relay Race with six runners per team. Under a blasting sun on Wednesday 23rd May 2007, each team covered the distances of 1000m, 800m, 800m, 500m, 500m and 300m taking the runners around the whole Meyrin site, hills included. A small reception took place in the ATLAS secretariat a week later to award the ATLAS Cup to the best ATLAS team. For the details on this complex calculation which takes into account the age of each runner, their gender and the color of their shoes, see the July 2006 issue of ATLAS e-news. The ATLAS Running Athena Team, the only all-women team enrolled this year, won the much coveted ATLAS Cup for the second year in a row. In fact, they are so good that Peter Schmid and Patrick Fassnacht are wondering about reducing the women's bonus in...

  5. Can music lessons increase the performance of preschool children in IQ tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviani, Hossein; Mirbaha, Hilda; Pournaseh, Mehrangiz; Sagan, Olivia

    2014-02-01

    The impact of music on human cognition has a distinguished history as a research topic in psychology. The focus of the present study was on investigating the effects of music instruction on the cognitive development of preschool children. From a sample of 154 preschool children of Tehran kindergartens, 60 children aged between 5 and 6 were randomly assigned to two groups, one receiving music lessons and the other (matched for sex, age and mother's educational level) not taking part in any music classes. Children were tested before the start of the course of music lessons and at its end with 4 subtests of the Tehran-Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale (TSB). The experimental group participated in twelve 75-min weekly music lessons. Statistical analysis showed significant IQ increase in participants receiving music lessons, specifically on the TSB verbal reasoning and short-term memory subtests. The numerical and visual/abstract reasoning abilities did not differ for the two groups after lessons. These data support studies that found similar skills enhancements in preschool children, despite vast differences in the setting in which the instruction occurred. These findings appear to be consistent with some neuroimaging and neurological observations which are discussed in the paper.

  6. Sympathetic activation by the cold pressor test does not increase the muscle force generation capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, Silvestro; Farina, Dario

    2011-06-01

    A positive inotropic action by the sympathetic nervous system on skeletal muscles has been observed and investigated in animal and in vitro studies. This action provided a theoretical basis for the putative ergogenic action of catecholamines and adrenergic agonists, although there is no clear evidence of this effect in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of inotropic effects associated to physiological sympathetic activation in healthy subjects. The muscle force capacity was investigated in the tibialis anterior (n = 9 subjects) and in the soleus (n = 9) muscles electrically stimulated with single pulses and double pulses with variable interspike interval (4-1,000 ms) and short pulse trains (frequency: 5-14 Hz) before, during, and after sympathetic activation by the cold pressor test (CPT). CPT significantly decreased by 10.4 ± 7.2 and 10.6 ± 4.4% the force produced by single and double pulse stimulation, respectively, and produced smaller decreases in the force obtained by train stimulation in the tibialis anterior, while no significant changes were observed in either type of contraction in the soleus muscle. CPT failed to induce any increase in the force capacity of the investigated muscles. The prevalent decrease in force evidenced in this study supports the concept that the weakening sympathetic action on type I fiber, already shown to occur in humans, prevails over the putative potentiating action.

  7. Opting out increases HIV testing in a large sexually transmitted infections outpatient clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijman, R.L.J.; Stolte, I.G.; Thiesbrummel, H.F.J.; van Leent, E.; Coutinho, R.A.; Fennema, J.S.A.; Prins, M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: In January 2007, opt-out HIV testing replaced provider-initiated testing at the sexually transmitted infections (STI) outpatient clinic in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The effect of the opt-out strategy on the uptake of HIV testing was studied and factors associated with refusal of HIV

  8. The PS locomotive runs again

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Over forty years ago, the PS train entered service to steer the magnets of the accelerator into place... ... a service that was resumed last Tuesday. Left to right: Raymond Brown (CERN), Claude Tholomier (D.B.S.), Marcel Genolin (CERN), Gérard Saumade (D.B.S.), Ingo Ruehl (CERN), Olivier Carlier (D.B.S.), Patrick Poisot (D.B.S.), Christian Recour (D.B.S.). It is more than ten years since people at CERN heard the rumbling of the old PS train's steel wheels. Last Tuesday, the locomotive came back into service to be tested. It is nothing like the monstrous steel engines still running on conventional railways -just a small electric battery-driven vehicle employed on installing the magnets for the PS accelerator more than 40 years ago. To do so, it used the tracks that run round the accelerator. In fact, it is the grandfather of the LEP monorail. After PS was commissioned in 1959, the little train was used more and more rarely. This is because magnets never break down, or hardly ever! In fact, the loc...

  9. Run-off-road crashes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2014-01-01

    In the Netherlands, one-third of all fatalities and one-sixth of all seriously injured are the consequence of run-off-road crashes. The outcome of run-off-road crashes is relatively severe, one fatality in five seriously injured, which is twice the average in the Netherlands. Serious run-off-road cr

  10. ctypes. ctypes run!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available

    One of the new features of Python 2.5 is the introduction of ctypes as a standard library module. At the simplest level, ctypes adds the standard C types to Python: signed and unsigned bytes, shorts, ints and longs; as well as structs, unions, pointers and functions. At run-time it can load a shared library (DLL and import its symbols, allowing a Python application to make function calls into the library without any special preparation.  ctypes can be used to wrap native libraries in place of interface generators such as SWIG, to manipulate memory and Python objects at the lowest level, and to prototype application development in other languages.

    This paper begins with a quick introduction to ctypes, shows some advanced techniques, and describes some examples of how it has been used by the author in his recent work.

  11. Aging increases compensatory saccade amplitude in the video head impulse test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R Anson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Rotational vestibular function declines with age resulting in saccades as a compensatory mechanism to improve impaired gaze stability. Small reductions in rotational vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR gain that would be considered clinically normal have been associated with compensatory saccades. We evaluated whether compensatory saccade characteristics varied as a function of age, independent of semicircular canal function as quantified by VOR gain.Methods: Horizontal VOR gain was measured in 243 participants age 27-93 from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging using video head impulse testing (HIT. Latency and amplitude of the first saccade (either covert – occurring during head impulse, or overt – occurring following head impulse were measured for head impulses with compensatory saccades (n = 2230 head impulses. The relationship between age and saccade latency, as well as the relationship between age and saccade amplitude, were evaluated using regression analyses adjusting for VOR gain, gender, and race.Results: Older adults (mean age 75.9 made significantly larger compensatory saccades relative to younger adults (mean age 45.0. In analyses adjusted for VOR gain, there was a significant association between age and amplitude of the first compensatory covert saccade (β = 0.015, p = 0.008. In analyses adjusted for VOR gain, there was a significant association between age and amplitude of the first compensatory overt saccade (β = 0.02, p < 0.001. Compensatory saccade latencies did not vary significantly by age. Conclusions: We observed that aging increases the compensatory catch-up saccade amplitude in healthy adults after controlling for VOR gain. Size of compensatory saccades may be useful in addition to VOR gain for characterizing vestibular function in aging adults.

  12. Run 16, eIPM Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dawson, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Jao, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Schoefer, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-08-05

    Three problems with the eIPMs were corrected during the 2015 summer shutdown. These involved ac coupling and 'negative profiles', detector 'dead zone' created by biasing, and gain control on ramp. With respect to Run 16, problems dealt with included gain depletion on horizontal MCP and rf pickup on profile signals; it was found that the MCP was severely damaged over part of the aperture. Various corrective measures were applied. Some results of these measured obtained during Run 16 are shown. At the end of Run 16 there was a three-­day beam run to study polarized proton beams in the AGS. Attempts to minimize beam injection errors which increase emittance by using the eIPMs to measure the contribution of injection mismatch to the AGS output beam emittance are recounted. .

  13. Injury-free running - a utopia? Risk factors of running-related injuries in men and women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worp, M.P. van der

    2016-01-01

    Running is a popular sport worldwide and has a positive effect on health and well-being. However, the rate of running-related injuries and the associated costs are high. Van der Worp performed a systematic review to examine which factors increase the risk of running injuries, and whether this is the

  14. Lower limb mechanics during moderate high-heel jogging and running in different experienced wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Fengqin; Zhang, Yan; Shu, Yang; Ruan, Guoqing; Sun, Jianjun; Baker, Julien S; Gu, Yaodong

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the differences in lower limb kinematics and kinetics between experienced (EW) and inexperienced (IEW) moderate high-heel wearers during jogging and running. Eleven experienced female wearers of moderate high-heel shoes and eleven matched controls participated in jogging and running tests. A Vicon motion analysis system was used to capture kinematic data and a Kistler force platform was used to collect ground reaction force (GRF). There were no significant differences in jogging and running speed respectively. Compared with IEW, EW adopted larger stride length (SL) with lower stride frequency (SF) at each corresponding speed. During running, EW enlarged SL significantly while IEW increased both SL and SF significantly. Kinematic data showed that IEW had generally larger joint range of motion (ROM) and peak angles during stance phase. Speed effect was not obvious within IEW. EW exhibited a significantly increased maximal vertical GRF (Fz2) and vertical average loading rate (VALR) during running, which was potentially caused by overlong stride. These suggest that both EW and IEW are at high risk of joint injuries when running on moderate high heels. For wearers who have to do some running on moderate high heels, it is crucial to control joint stability and balance SL and SF consciously.

  15. The effect of graduated compression tights, compared with running shorts, on counter movement jump performance before and after submaximal running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugg, Stuart; Sternlicht, Eric

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if wearing graduated compression tights, compared with loose fitting running shorts, would increase and or help sustain counter movement jump (CMJ) height after submaximal running. Fourteen competitive runners (6 women and 8 men) participated in this study. The subjects' mean (±SD) for age, height, body mass, percent body fat, resting heart rate, and maximal heart rate were 28.2 ± 14.0 years, 174.7 ± 8.6 cm, 70.2 ± 14.9 kg, 15.5 ± 8.1%, 67.2 ± 7.4 b.min, and 186.5 ± 9.5 b.min, respectively. During testing, subjects wore a Polar RS400 heart rate monitor. Each trial consisted of 15 minutes of continual treadmill running with 5 minutes performed at 50%, 70%, and 85% of the subject's heart rate reserve. Using a Vertec vertical leaper, each subject performed 3 CMJ, both pre- and postrun trials, with the mean value used to measure relative leg power. In addition to the CMJ height data, each subject rated their level of perceived exertion (RPE), and their comfort level, after the postrun trials. The mean postrun CMJ height in graduated compression tights of 60.3 ± 19.4 cm was significantly greater (at the p increase) and the postrun running shorts of 57.7 ± 19.6 cm (4.5% increase). In addition, the subjects reported a significantly lower level of perceived exertion and greater comfort values while wearing the graduated compression tights. The results of the present study support the use of graduated compression tights for maintenance of lower limb muscle power after submaximal endurance running.

  16. Muscular strategy shift in human running: dependence of running speed on hip and ankle muscle performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Tim W; Schache, Anthony G; Pandy, Marcus G

    2012-06-01

    Humans run faster by increasing a combination of stride length and stride frequency. In slow and medium-paced running, stride length is increased by exerting larger support forces during ground contact, whereas in fast running and sprinting, stride frequency is increased by swinging the legs more rapidly through the air. Many studies have investigated the mechanics of human running, yet little is known about how the individual leg muscles accelerate the joints and centre of mass during this task. The aim of this study was to describe and explain the synergistic actions of the individual leg muscles over a wide range of running speeds, from slow running to maximal sprinting. Experimental gait data from nine subjects were combined with a detailed computer model of the musculoskeletal system to determine the forces developed by the leg muscles at different running speeds. For speeds up to 7 m s(-1), the ankle plantarflexors, soleus and gastrocnemius, contributed most significantly to vertical support forces and hence increases in stride length. At speeds greater than 7 m s(-1), these muscles shortened at relatively high velocities and had less time to generate the forces needed for support. Thus, above 7 m s(-1), the strategy used to increase running speed shifted to the goal of increasing stride frequency. The hip muscles, primarily the iliopsoas, gluteus maximus and hamstrings, achieved this goal by accelerating the hip and knee joints more vigorously during swing. These findings provide insight into the strategies used by the leg muscles to maximise running performance and have implications for the design of athletic training programs.

  17. Oxygen delivery does not limit peak running speed during incremental downhill running to exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liefeldt, G; Noakes, T D; Dennis, S C

    1992-01-01

    Oxygen consumption (VO2), ventilation (VI), respiratory exchange ratio (R), stride frequency and blood lactate concentrations were measured continuously in nine trained athletes during two continuous incremental treadmill runs to exhaustion on gradients of either 0 degree or -3 degrees. Compared to the run at 0 degree gradient, the athletes reached significantly higher maximal treadmill velocities but significantly lower VO2, VI, R and peak blood lactate concentrations (P less than 0.001) during downhill running. These lower VO2 and blood lactate concentrations at exhaustion indicated that factors other than oxygen delivery limited maximal performance during the downhill run. In contrast, stride frequencies were similar at each treadmill velocity; the higher maximal speed during the downhill run was achieved with a significantly longer stride length (P less than 0.001); maximal stride frequency was the same between tests. Equivalent maximal stride frequencies suggested that factors determining the rate of lower limb stride recovery may have limited maximal running speed during downhill running and, possibly, also during horizontal running.

  18. Sex differences in running mechanics and patellofemoral joint kinetics following an exhaustive run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, John D; Loss, Justin R; Willy, Richard W; Meardon, Stacey A

    2015-11-26

    Patellofemoral joint pain (PFP) is a common running-related injury that is more prevalent in females and thought to be associated with altered running mechanics. Changes in running mechanics have been observed following an exhaustive run but have not been analyzed relative to the sex bias for PFP. The purpose of this study was to test if females demonstrate unique changes in running mechanics associated with PFP following an exhaustive run. For this study, 18 females and 17 males ran to volitional exhaustion. Peak PFJ contact force and stress, PFJ contact force and stress loading rates, hip adduction excursion, and hip and knee joint frontal plane angular impulse were analyzed between females and males using separate 2 factor ANOVAs (2 (male/female)×2 (before/after exhaustion)). We observed similar changes in running mechanics among males and females over the course of the exhaustive run. Specifically, greater peak PFJ contact force loading rate (5%, P=.01), PFJ stress loading rate (5%, Pmechanics due to exhaustion do not appear to contribute to the sex bias for PFP.

  19. Design of a Control System for the Running-in Test Bench of AC-DC Wheel Set Motor%交直流轮对电机跑合试验台控制系统设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张春红

    2014-01-01

    After assembly of the wheel set motor,it is required to make running-in test on the wheel set in order to check whether the gear box, motor bearings and wheel set bearings conform to the installation requirement.Three control systems are designed,namely data collection,AC-DC drive and intelligence test and control.In the design of the data collecting system,sensors are used to collect signals about ,temperature and rotation speed during motor running-in.The AC-DC drive is designed to meet the requirement of the drive of the AC-DC haulage motor.The intelligent control design adopts ADVANTECH industrial computer as control terminal,and MCGS configuration software and communication equipment 485 are used to perform the function of automatic collection of experimental data.The test device,with manual and automatic functions has high control precision and other advantages.%轮对电机组装完成之后,为了检查齿轮箱、电机轴承、轮对轴承等是否符合安装要求,需要对轮对进行跑合试验。从数据采集、交直流传动和智能测控这三个控制系统进行设计。数据采集系统设计采用传感器采集电机跑合过程中的振动、温度、转速等信号。交直流传动设计是为了满足交直流机车电机传动的需求。智能测控设计采用研华工控机作为控制终端,用MC GS组态软件和485通讯实现试验过程数据自动采集等功能。试验装置具备手动和自动两种功能,具有控制精度高等优点。

  20. Two for One: Using QAR to Increase Reading Comprehension and Improve Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Susan

    2016-01-01

    This teaching tip describes an intervention used in a third-grade classroom implemented to help students pass an end-of-grade reading comprehension test. Low scores on a practice end-of-grade comprehension test prompted a re-examination of classroom reading instruction and a plan for intervention. This teaching tip describes the phases implemented…

  1. Increasing value in diagnostic research: Publication and reporting of test accuracy studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korevaar, D.A.

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic tests form an essential part of daily clinical practice. Unfortunately, most tests are not perfectly accurate; they usually produce a proportion of false positive and false negative results. Diagnostic accuracy studies evaluate a test’s ability to find out whether or not individuals have

  2. Caffeine supplementation and multiple sprint running performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaister, Mark; Howatson, Glyn; Abraham, Corinne S; Lockey, Richard A; Goodwin, Jon E; Foley, Paul; McInnes, Gillian

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of caffeine supplementation on multiple sprint running performance. Using a randomized double-blind research design, 21 physically active men ingested a gelatin capsule containing either caffeine (5 mg x kg(-1) body mass) or placebo (maltodextrin) 1 h before completing an indoor multiple sprint running trial (12 x 30 m; repeated at 35-s intervals). Venous blood samples were drawn to evaluate plasma caffeine and primary metabolite concentrations. Sprint times were recorded via twin-beam photocells, and earlobe blood samples were drawn to evaluate pretest and posttest lactate concentrations. Heart rate was monitored continuously throughout the tests, with RPE recorded after every third sprint. Relative to placebo, caffeine supplementation resulted in a 0.06-s (1.4%) reduction in fastest sprint time (95% likely range = 0.04-0.09 s), which corresponded with a 1.2% increase in fatigue (95% likely range = 0.3-2.2%). Caffeine supplementation also resulted in a 3.4-bpm increase in mean heart rate (95% likely range = 0.1-6.6 bpm) and elevations in pretest (+0.7 mmol x L(-1); 95% likely range = 0.1-1.3 mmol x L(-1)) and posttest (+1.8 mmol x L(-1); 95% likely range = 0.3-3.2 mmol x L(-1)) blood lactate concentrations. In contrast, there was no significant effect of caffeine supplementation on RPE. Although the effect of recovery duration on caffeine-induced responses to multiple sprint work requires further investigation, the results of the present study show that caffeine has ergogenic properties with the potential to benefit performance in both single and multiple sprint sports.

  3. Stability Criterion for Humanoid Running

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIZhao-Hui; HUANGQiang; LIKe-Jie

    2005-01-01

    A humanoid robot has high mobility but possibly risks of tipping over. Until now, one main topic on humanoid robots is to study the walking stability; the issue of the running stability has rarely been investigated. The running is different from the walking, and is more difficult to maintain its dynamic stability. The objective of this paper is to study the stability criterion for humanoid running based on the whole dynamics. First, the cycle and the dynamics of running are analyzed. Then, the stability criterion of humanoid running is presented. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed stability criterion is illustrated by a dynamic simulation example using a dynamic analysis and design system (DADS).

  4. Polarization Issues in Run 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang,S.Y.; Ahrens, L.; Huang, H.; Zeno, K.

    2008-07-01

    The RHIC proton beam polarization has a strong dependence on intensity in Run 2008, whereas the dependence is almost absent in Run 2006. Meanwhile, the RHIC beam transverse emittance also has a dependence on intensity in Run 2008, but little in Run 2006. Using the emittance measurement at the AGS IPM and the BtA multiwires, the source of this difference between 2006 and 2008 runs is traced to the Booster. It is found that at least the degree of the vertical scraping in the Booster is different in 2006 and 2008. The effect of this scraping for the RHIC beam emittance and polarization is studied.

  5. Does high-stakes testing increase cultural capital among low-income and racial minority students?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Pyo Hong

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This article draws on research from Texas and Chicago to examine whether high-stakes testing enables low-income and racial minority students to acquire cultural capital. While students' performance on state or district tests rose after the implementation of high-stakes testing and accountability policies in Texas and Chicago in the 1990s, several studies indicate that these policies seemed to have had deleterious effects on curriculum, instruction, the percentage of students excluded from the tests, and student dropout rates. As a result, the policies seemed to have had mixed effects on students' opportunities to acquire embodied and institutionalized cultural capital. These findings are consistent with the work of Shepard (2000, Darling-Hammond (2004a, and others who have written of the likely negative repercussions of high-stakes testing and accountability policies.

  6. Accepting test-anxiety-related thoughts increases academic performance among undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senay Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Given that unwanted thoughts are enhanced when suppressed, we tested among college freshmen who were about to take an academic exam if an acceptance strategy consisting of not suppressing intrusive thoughts will improve test performance. This strategy proved superior to students’ own default strategies as much as a modified, alternative strategy, avoiding the antecedents of intrusive thoughts. Moreover, the combination of the two strategies counteracted a stronger, negative effect of test anxiety on test performance as compared with each strategy used alone. The results suggest that not only intrusive thoughts per se but also the suppression of these thoughts can disrupt test performance, and hint that approaching such thoughts with acceptance may not interfere with simultaneously working toward avoiding the antecedents of these thoughts.

  7. Access to Adequate Healthcare for Hmong Women: A Patient Navigation Program to Increase Pap Test Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon S. Chen, Jr

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development and implementation of a Hmong Cervical Cancer Intervention Program utilizing a patient navigation model to raise cervical cancer awareness for Hmong women through educational workshops and to assist Hmong women in obtaining a Pap test. Out of 402 women who participated in a baseline survey, the Patient Navigation Program was able to enroll 109 participants who had not had a Pap test in the past 3 years and had never had a Pap test. Through utilization of outreach, an awareness campaign and patient navigation support, at least 38 percent of 109 participants obtained a Pap test. Overall, 21 workshops and 43 outreach activities were conducted by the Hmong Women’s Heritage Association, leading to 63 percent of those enrolled in the Patient Navigation Program who could be contacted to obtain a Pap test.

  8. Development of an Evaluation System for Vertical Vibration of Railway Vehicles with Field-Portable Actuators (1st Report, Data Processing Method to Estimate Running-Vehicle Vibration from Stationary Vibration Test)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Takahiro; Takigami, Tadao

    The authors are developing a vibration evaluation system, which consists of field-portable exciters (actuators) and data processing software, to estimate vertical vibration and ride quality of railway vehicles. One of the main characteristics of the system is that the acceleration power spectral density (PSD) at arbitrary point on the carbody in running condition is synthesized numerically from measured data obtained when each axle box or each wheelset is excited individually using limited number of actuators. This paper focuses upon the data processing method for the vibration evaluation system. A series of excitation tests for a commuter vehicle is carried out to confirm the basic concept to estimate the PSD by using the rolling stock testing plant at Railway Technical Research Institute. Some excitation methodologies and data processing formulae are compared among each other. It is clearly shown that the estimated PSDs well agree with actual PSD. It is found out that the estimation gives high accurate results when only excited axle box acceleration are used in estimation analysis.

  9. Physiological assessment of isolated running does not directly replicate running capacity after triathlon-specific cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etxebarria, Naroa; Hunt, Julie; Ingham, Steve; Ferguson, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Triathlon running is affected by prior cycling and power output during triathlon cycling is variable in nature. We compared constant and triathlon-specific variable power cycling and their effect on subsequent submaximal running physiology. Nine well-trained male triathletes (age 24.6 ± 4.6 years, [Formula: see text] 4.5 ± 0.4 L · min(-1); mean ± SD) performed a submaximal incremental run test, under three conditions: no prior exercise and after a 1 h cycling trial at 65% of maximal aerobic power with either a constant or a variable power profile. The variable power protocol involved multiple 10-90 s intermittent efforts at 40-140% maximal aerobic power. During cycling, pulmonary ventilation (22%, ± 14%; mean; ± 90% confidence limits), blood lactate (179%, ± 48%) and rating of perceived exertion (7.3%, ± 10.2%) were all substantially higher during variable than during constant power cycling. At the start of the run, blood lactate was 64%, ± 61% higher after variable compared to constant power cycling, which decreased running velocity at 4 mM lactate threshold by 0.6, ± 0.9 km · h(-1). Physiological responses to incremental running are negatively affected by prior cycling and, to a greater extent, by variable compared to even-paced cycling. Testing and training of triathletes should account foe higher physiological cost of triathlon-specific cycling and its effect on subsequent running.

  10. Helminths and skewed cytokine profiles increase tuberculin skin test positivity in Warao Amerindians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, L.M.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Warris, A.; Groot, R. de; Maes, M.; Villalba, J.A.; del Nogal, B.; Hof, S. van den; Mughini Gras, L.; Soolingen, D. van; Pinelli, E.; Waard, J.H. de

    2012-01-01

    The immune regulatory mechanisms involved in the acquisition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in children are largely unknown. We investigated the influence of parasitic infections, malnutrition and plasma cytokine profiles on tuberculin skin test (TST) positivity in Warao Amerindians in Vene

  11. The QCD Running Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Deur, A; de Teramond, G F

    2016-01-01

    We review the present knowledge for $\\alpha_s$, the fundamental coupling underlying the interactions of quarks and gluons in QCD. The dependence of $\\alpha_s(Q^2)$ on momentum transfer $Q$ encodes the underlying dynamics of hadron physics -from color confinement in the infrared domain to asymptotic freedom at short distances. We review constraints on $\\alpha_s(Q^2)$ at high $Q^2$, as predicted by perturbative QCD, and its analytic behavior at small $Q^2$, based on models of nonperturbative dynamics. In the introductory part of this review, we explain the phenomenological meaning of $\\alpha_s$, the reason for its running, and the challenges facing a complete understanding of its analytic behavior in the infrared domain. In the second, more technical, part of the review, we discuss the behavior of $\\alpha_s(Q^2)$ in the high $Q^2$ domain of QCD. We review how $\\alpha_s$ is defined, including its renormalization scheme dependence, the definition of its renormalization scale, the utility of effective charges, as ...

  12. Factors affecting running economy in trained distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Philo U; Pyne, David B; Telford, Richard D; Hawley, John A

    2004-01-01

    Running economy (RE) is typically defined as the energy demand for a given velocity of submaximal running, and is determined by measuring the steady-state consumption of oxygen (VO2) and the respiratory exchange ratio. Taking body mass (BM) into consideration, runners with good RE use less energy and therefore less oxygen than runners with poor RE at the same velocity. There is a strong association between RE and distance running performance, with RE being a better predictor of performance than maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) in elite runners who have a similar VO2max). RE is traditionally measured by running on a treadmill in standard laboratory conditions, and, although this is not the same as overground running, it gives a good indication of how economical a runner is and how RE changes over time. In order to determine whether changes in RE are real or not, careful standardisation of footwear, time of test and nutritional status are required to limit typical error of measurement. Under controlled conditions, RE is a stable test capable of detecting relatively small changes elicited by training or other interventions. When tracking RE between or within groups it is important to account for BM. As VO2 during submaximal exercise does not, in general, increase linearly with BM, reporting RE with respect to the 0.75 power of BM has been recommended. A number of physiological and biomechanical factors appear to influence RE in highly trained or elite runners. These include metabolic adaptations within the muscle such as increased mitochondria and oxidative enzymes, the ability of the muscles to store and release elastic energy by increasing the stiffness of the muscles, and more efficient mechanics leading to less energy wasted on braking forces and excessive vertical oscillation. Interventions to improve RE are constantly sought after by athletes, coaches and sport scientists. Two interventions that have received recent widespread attention are strength training and

  13. High-Stakes Testing and Student Achievement: Does Accountability Pressure Increase Student Learning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon L. Nichols

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between high-stakes testing pressure and student achievement across 25 states. Standardized portfolios were created for each study state. Each portfolio contained a range of documents that told the “story” of accountability implementation and impact in that state. Using the “law of comparative judgments,” over 300 graduate-level education students reviewed one pair of portfolios and made independent evaluations as to which of the two states’ portfolios reflected a greater degree of accountability pressure. Participants’ judgments yielded a matrix that was converted into a single rating system that arranged all 25 states on a continuum of accountability “pressure” from high to low. Using this accountability pressure rating we conducted a series of regression and correlation analyses. We found no relationship between earlier pressure and later cohort achievement for math at the fourth- and eighth-grade levels on the National Assessment of Educational Progress tests. Further, no relationship was found between testing pressure and reading achievement on the National Assessment of Education Progress tests at any grade level or for any ethnic student subgroup. Data do suggest, however, that a case could be made for a causal relationship between high-stakes testing pressure and subsequent achievement on the national assessment tests—but only for fourth grade, non-cohort achievement and for some ethnic subgroups. Implications and directions for future studies are discussed.

  14. HIV testing of patients diagnosed with tuberculosis increased in Denmark during the period from 2007 to 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perch, M; Andersen, PH; Kok-Jensen, A

    2013-01-01

    We examined the trends of HIV testing among patients notified with TB in Denmark during a 3-year period from 2007 to 2009. We were able to obtain HIV testing status for 96%. There was a significant increase of patients examined for HIV infection during the 3-year period. HIV prevalence among HIV...

  15. Four-Stage Audit Demonstrating Increased Uptake of HIV Testing in Acute Neurology Admissions Using Staged Practical Interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilraj Singh Sokhi

    Full Text Available UK National Guidelines (UKNG advise HIV testing in clinically indicated neurological presentations. We audited the impact of our practical strategies to increase uptake of HIV testing at a regional acute neurology admissions unit.We audited HIV testing in 4 periods over 2 years: before we designed a UKNG-based "HIV testing in Neurology" protocol ("pre-protocol"; after dissemination of the protocol alone ("post-protocol"; post-protocol dissemination combined with both a tailored departmental admissions clerking proforma to prompt for HIV testing & consenting, and regular focussed tutorials to doctors on HIV testing in neurological patients ("post-proforma"; and finally one year after the post-proforma period ("+1 year". We also looked at the total number of HIV tests sent from the unit during the two-year period. We assessed significance using Fisher's exact test.47.8% of all acute neurology non-stroke admissions were eligible for HIV testing during all the audit periods. Testing rates were as follows: pre-protocol 21.9%; post-protocol 36.6%; post-proforma 83.3%; and at +1 year 65.4% (p<0.05 for both post-protocol and +1 year when compared to pre-protocol. Documentation of consent for HIV testing improved from 25% to 67.6% with the HIV-tailored clerking proforma. The total number of HIV tests requested from the unit doubled in the post-proforma period compared to pre-protocol (p<0.05.the combination of an HIV testing protocol, a tailored departmental clerking proforma and regular focussed teaching to doctors on indications for HIV testing led to a sustained increase in HIV testing uptake in our regional acute neurology admissions unit.

  16. Thermal-Load Mechanic Running Test of Power Turbine%燃气轮机动力涡轮热负荷机械运转试验方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张三多; 刘京春; 王兆丰

    2014-01-01

    阐述了利用工厂动力设备,在非专用试验车台上,进行兆瓦级大功率工业燃气轮机动力涡轮工厂检验性试车的方法。采用空气管路连接动力涡轮进气口与排气口,构成密闭闭环回路,利用电动机驱动动力涡轮运转,涡轮叶片搅动空气使其升温,实现了热态空负荷机械运转的试验状态,达到了在额定工作转速下进行机械磨合运转试验,和在一定温度下对动力涡轮进行热态检验试验的目的。本方法对其他型号动力涡轮试车具有重要参考价值。%A rig test method was illustrated for the power turbine of the high-power industrial gas turbine of MWs order on unspecialized test rig using plant power facility. An air line was used to connect the power turbine inlet with its outlet to construct a closed circuit loop, using electric motor to drive the power turbine, with the turbine blades stirring air to heat the air. In this way, a closed circuit cycle was constructed through air-line connection and the power turbine was driven by electric motor. The power turbine was given me-chanic grounding-in test at normal operation speed and thermal test verification by heating air , making a mechanic running test of thermal state and void load. The study is of great importance of reference for the test of other types of power turbines.

  17. Classroom Test Report: Compressed Speech Tapes--An Effective Teaching Tool for Increasing Rate and Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Jerry

    Compressed speech tapes--recordings of a voice reading a selection at the normal rate of approximately 150 words per minute that are speeded up to as much as 400 words a minute--can be used successfully with students to provide practice in improving reading rate and comprehension. In a field test conducted with 23 high school juniors and seniors…

  18. Focal increase of cerebral blood flow during stereognostic testing in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roland, E; Larsen, B

    1976-01-01

    An attempt was made to study the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) pattern during stereognostic discrimination in man. The rCBF was measured in 18 subjects who had no major neurological defects. The clearance from the hemisphere of xenon 133 injected (133Xe) into the carotid artery was measured...... with a 254-channel dynamic gamma camera. During stereognostic discrimination with hand, mouth, or foot, the rCBF increased focally in the corresponding contralateral sensory-motor region and increased focally in the premotor part of the frontal lobe. The increase in the sensory region was attributed...

  19. Analysis of Test Run Problems and Solution Measures of Low-Temperature Methanol Wash Unit%低温甲醇洗装置试车问题分析及解决措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王学军; 乔洪凯; 郭晓鹏

    2012-01-01

    A comparison is made of low-temperature methanol wash and NHD processes for removal of acid gases in large plants for chemical processing of coal. A description is given of the process flow and special features of the low-temperature methanol wash unit. Experience in the test run is presented, with emphasis on the problems encountered and their solutions, such as water plugging in the tube pass of heat exchanger ( E6 ) during start-up, thorough absorption of CO2 in gas delivery to the system, insufficient accuracy in adjustment of the butterfly valve and inability of two-way sealing of valves in the battery limit.%对大型煤化工酸性气体脱除采用的低温甲醇洗与NHD工艺进行了对比,概述了低温甲醇洗装置的工艺流程及特点.介绍了低温甲醇洗装置试车经验,重点阐述开车过程中出现的换热器(E6)管程水堵塞、系统导气时CO2彻底吸收、蝶阀调节精度不足和界区阀不能双向密封等问题及解决措施.

  20. 刘江黄河大桥主桥运行环境下的振动测试%Vibration Test of the Running Environment of the Main Bridge of Liujiang Yellow River Bridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洁

    2014-01-01

    Based on the vibration test of the running environment of the main bridge of Liujiang Yellow River Bridge measured vibration Liu Jiang Yellow River main bridge operating environment, this paper got the response vibration stability diagram of vertical and lateral acceleration under different frequencies, torsional vibration mode and torsional frequency, judged the effect of the damage of boom on vertical and lateral vibration, so as to predict the current operating status of bridge.%本文通过对刘江黄河大桥主桥运行环境下的振动实测,得到桥梁的在不同频率下的竖向加速度、横向加速度的响应振动稳定图,扭转振型及扭转频率,判断吊杆的损伤对横、竖向振动的影响,推知桥梁目前的运行状态。

  1. In vitro interaction cocktail assay for nine major cytochrome P450 enzymes with 13 probe reactions and a single LC/MSMS run: analytical validation and testing with monoclonal anti-CYP antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Ari; Petsalo, Aleksanteri; Turpeinen, Miia; Uusitalo, Jouko; Pelkonen, Olavi

    2007-07-01

    A sensitive and rugged LC/MSMS method was developed for a comprehensive in vitro metabolic interaction screening assay with N-in-1 approach reported earlier. A cocktail consisting of ten cytochrome P450 (CYP)-selective probe substrates with known kinetic, metabolic and interaction properties in vivo was incubated in a pool of human liver microsomes, and metabolites of melatonin (CYP1A2), coumarin (CYP2A6), bupropion (CYP2B6), amodiaquine (CYP2C8) tolbutamide (CYP2C9), omeprazole (CYP2C19 and CYP3A4), dextromethorphan (CYP2D6), chlorzoxazone (CYP2E1), midazolam (CYP3A4) and testosterone (CYP3A4) were simultaneously analysed with a single LC/MSMS run. Altogether, 13 metabolites and internal standard phenacetin were analysed in multiple reaction mode. Polarity switching mode was utilized to acquire negative ion mode electrospray data for hydroxychlorzoxazone and positive ionization data for the rest of the analytes. Fast gradient elution was applied, giving total injection cycle of 8 min. The method was modified for two different LC/MSMS systems, and was validated for linear range, detection limit, accuracy and precision for each metabolite. In addition, cocktail inhibition system was further tested using monoclonal anti-CYP antibodies as inhibitors for each probe reaction. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. 基于游程检验的上海股票市场弱式有效性研究%Effectiveness Research on Shanghai Stock Market Weakness Based on Runs Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴丽俊; 李先流

    2011-01-01

    有效市场假说理论是股票市场理论研究的基础之一,股票市场的有效性对政府的监管和投资者的投资策略都有着重要影响.本文选取2006年至2010年上海股票市场的一系列指数的日收盘价进行游程检验,得出上海股票市场是弱式有效市场的结论.%The efficient market hypothesis theory is one basis of the stock market theory research, the effectiveness of the stock market has a significant impact on government regulation and investment strategies of investors. This paper selects closing price in a series of indexes from 2006 to 2010 of Shanghai stock market to runs test, making the concluding of Shanghai stock market is weak form efficient market.

  3. Improving quality of preventive care at a student-run free clinic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neel M Butala

    Full Text Available Student-run clinics increasingly serve as primary care providers for patients of lower socioeconomic status, but studies show that quality of care at student-run clinics has room for improvement.To examine change in provision of preventive services in a student-run free clinic after implementation of a student-led QI intervention involving prompting.Review of patient charts pre- and post-intervention, examining adherence to screening guidelines for diabetes, dyslipidemia, HIV, and cervical cancer.Adherence to guidelines among eligible patients increased after intervention in 3 of 4 services examined. Receipt of HIV testing increased from 33% (80/240 to 48% (74/154; p = 0.004, fasting lipid panel increased from 53% (46/86 to 72% (38/53; p = 0.033, and fasting blood glucose increased from 59% (27/46 to 82% (18/22; p = 0.059.This student-run free clinic implemented a student-led QI intervention that increased provision of prevention. Such a model for QI could extend to other student-run clinics nationally.

  4. Energy expenditure and cardiorespiratory responses at the transition between walking and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, J; Le Gallais, D; Durand, M; Goudal, C; Micallef, J P; Préfaut, C

    1994-01-01

    We investigated whether the spontaneous transition between walking and running during moving with increasing speed corresponds to the speed at which walking becomes less economical than running. Seven active male subjects [mean age, 23.7 (SEM 0.7) years, mean maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), 57.5 (SEM 3.3) ml.kg-1.min-1, mean ventilatory threshold (VTh), 37.5 (SEM3) ml.kg-1.min-1] participated in this study. Each subject performed four exercise tests separated by 1-week intervals: test 1, VO2max and VTh were determined; test 2, the speed at which the transition between walking and running spontaneously occurs (ST) during increasing speed (increases of 0.5 km.h-1 every 4 min from 5 km.h-1) was determined; test 3, the subjects were constrained to walk for 4 min at ST, at ST +/- 0.5 km.h-1 and at ST +/- 1 km.h-1; and test 4, the subjects were constrained to run for 4 min at ST, at ST +/- 0.5 km.h-1 and at ST +/- 1 km.h-1. During exercise oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate (HR), ventilation (VE), ventilatory equivalents for oxygen and carbon dioxide (VE/VO2, VE/VCO2), respiratory exchange ratio (R), stride length (SL), and stride frequency (SF) were measured.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Genomic testing interacts with reproductive surplus in reducing genetic lag and increasing economic net return

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortø, Line; Ettema, Jehan Frans; Kargo, Morten

    2015-01-01

    , especially if genomic tests are used in combination with sexed semen or a high management level for reproductive performance, because both factors provide the opportunity for generating a reproductive surplus in the herd. In this study, sexed semen is used in combination with beef semen to produce high-value...... simulates the parity distribution of the dams of heifer calves. The ADAM program estimates genetic merit per year in a herd under different strategies for use of sexed semen and genomic tests. The annual net return per slot was calculated as the sum of operational return and value of genetic lag minus costs......Until now, genomic information has mainly been used to improve the accuracy of genomic breeding values for breeding animals at a population level. However, we hypothesize that the use of information from genotyped females also opens up the possibility of reducing genetic lag in a dairy herd...

  6. A NEW TEST PROCEDURE FOR NEW BETTER THAN USED IN INCREASING CONVEX ORDERING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiaohu

    2004-01-01

    A new nonparametric procedure is developed to test the exponentiality against the strict NBUC property of a life distribution. The exact null distribution is derived by the theory of sample spacings, and the asymptotic normality is also established by the large sample theory of L-statistics. Finally, the lower and upper tailed probability of the exact null distribution and some numerical simulation results are presented as well.

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori in times of increasing antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sinéad M; O'Morain, Colm; McNamara, Deirdre

    2014-08-07

    The gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) causes chronic gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Treatment is recommended in all symptomatic patients. The current treatment options for H. pylori infection are outlined in this review in light of the recent challenges in eradication success, largely due to the rapid emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of H. pylori. Antibiotic resistance is a constantly evolving process and numerous studies have shown that the prevalence of H. pylori antibiotic resistance varies significantly from country to country, and even between regions within the same country. In addition, recent data has shown that previous antibiotic use is associated with harbouring antibiotic resistant H. pylori. Local surveillance of antibiotic resistance is warranted to guide clinicians in their choice of therapy. Antimicrobial resistance is assessed by H. pylori culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Recently developed molecular tests offer an attractive alternative to culture and allow for the rapid molecular genetic identification of H. pylori and resistance-associated mutations directly from biopsy samples or bacterial culture material. Accumulating evidence indicates that surveillance of antimicrobial resistance by susceptibility testing is feasible and necessary to inform clinicians in their choice of therapy for management of H. pylori infection.

  8. Structural Testing at the NWTC Helps Improve Blade Design and Increase System Reliability; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-08-01

    Since 1990, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s (NREL's) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) has tested more than 150 wind turbine blades. NWTC researchers can test full-scale and subcomponent articles, conduct data analyses, and provide engineering expertise on best design practices. Structural testing of wind turbine blades enables designers, manufacturers, and owners to validate designs and assess structural performance to specific load conditions. Rigorous structural testing can reveal design and manufacturing problems at an early stage of development that can lead to overall improvements in design and increase system reliability.

  9. The QCD running coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deur, Alexandre; Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.

    2016-09-01

    We review the present theoretical and empirical knowledge for αs, the fundamental coupling underlying the interactions of quarks and gluons in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The dependence of αs(Q2) on momentum transfer Q encodes the underlying dynamics of hadron physics-from color confinement in the infrared domain to asymptotic freedom at short distances. We review constraints on αs(Q2) at high Q2, as predicted by perturbative QCD, and its analytic behavior at small Q2, based on models of nonperturbative dynamics. In the introductory part of this review, we explain the phenomenological meaning of the coupling, the reason for its running, and the challenges facing a complete understanding of its analytic behavior in the infrared domain. In the second, more technical, part of the review, we discuss the behavior of αs(Q2) in the high momentum transfer domain of QCD. We review how αs is defined, including its renormalization scheme dependence, the definition of its renormalization scale, the utility of effective charges, as well as "Commensurate Scale Relations" which connect the various definitions of the QCD coupling without renormalization-scale ambiguity. We also report recent significant measurements and advanced theoretical analyses which have led to precise QCD predictions at high energy. As an example of an important optimization procedure, we discuss the "Principle of Maximum Conformality", which enhances QCD's predictive power by removing the dependence of the predictions for physical observables on the choice of theoretical conventions such as the renormalization scheme. In the last part of the review, we discuss the challenge of understanding the analytic behavior αs(Q2) in the low momentum transfer domain. We survey various theoretical models for the nonperturbative strongly coupled regime, such as the light-front holographic approach to QCD. This new framework predicts the form of the quark-confinement potential underlying hadron spectroscopy and

  10. Predicting whether dietary restriction would increase longevity in species not tested so far.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bourg, Eric

    2010-07-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) is often considered as a nearly universal means to extend longevity in animal species. This article argues that whether DR will increase longevity is dependent on life-history strategies. Long-lived species are not expected to live much longer under DR, contrarily to short-lived ones. However, species able to cover long distances are not expected to live longer under DR, even if they are short-lived. Human beings are long-lived and can also cover long distances: thus, DR would probably not increase their lifespan. One may wonder whether DR mimetics would have some effects in human beings if DR does not increase longevity in this species.

  11. Oxygen cost of running barefoot vs. running shod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, N J; Berg, K; Deka, P; Meendering, J R; Ryan, C

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the oxygen cost of running barefoot vs. running shod on the treadmill as well as overground. 10 healthy recreational runners, 5 male and 5 female, whose mean age was 23.8±3.39 volunteered to participate in the study. Subjects participated in 4 experimental conditions: 1) barefoot on treadmill, 2) shod on treadmill, 3) barefoot overground, and 4) shod overground. For each condition, subjects ran for 6 min at 70% vVO (2)max pace while VO (2), heart rate (HR), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were assessed. A 2 × 2 (shoe condition x surface) repeated measures ANOVA revealed that running with shoes showed significantly higher VO (2) values on both the treadmill and the overground track (pbarefoot. It was concluded that at 70% of vVO (2)max pace, barefoot running is more economical than running shod, both overground and on a treadmill.

  12. CDF RunRun Control and Online Monitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.Arisawa; W.Badgett; 等

    2001-01-01

    In this paper,we discuss the CDF RunRun Control and online event monitoring system.Run Control is the top level application that controls the data acquisition activities across 150 front end VME crates and related service processes,Run Control is a real-time multi-threaded application implemented in Java with flexible state machines,using JDBC database connections to configure clients,and including a user friendly and powerful graphical user interface.The CDF online event monitoring system consists of several parts;the eent monitoring programs,the display to browse their results,the server program which communicates with the display via socket connections ,the error receiver which displays error messages and communicates with run Control,and the state manager which monitors the state of the monitor programs.

  13. Effect of Light/Dark Cycle on Wheel Running and Responding Reinforced by the Opportunity to Run Depends on Postsession Feeding Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belke, T. W.; Mondona, A. R.; Conrad, K. M.; Poirier, K. F.; Pickering, K. L.

    2008-01-01

    Do rats run and respond at a higher rate to run during the dark phase when they are typically more active? To answer this question, Long Evans rats were exposed to a response-initiated variable interval 30-s schedule of wheel-running reinforcement during light and dark cycles. Wheel-running and local lever-pressing rates increased modestly during…

  14. Ethnic hair care products may increase false positives in hair drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, David A; Smith, Frederick P; Shepherd, Arica R

    2015-12-01

    The question of why different races appear more susceptible to hair contamination by external drugs remains controversial. This research studied susceptibility of head hair to external cocaine and methamphetamine when hair products have been applied. Three different chemical classes of ethnic hair products were applied to Caucasian, Asian, and African hair. Some products increased the methamphetamine and cocaine concentrations in all hair types. A unique finding of this research is that certain ethnic hair products can replace moisture as a diffusion medium, thereby increasing the susceptibility to contamination over 100-fold compared to petroleum-based products.

  15. Running-based pica in rats. Evidence for the gastrointestinal discomfort hypothesis of running-based taste aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Sadahiko; Katayama, Tomomi

    2014-12-01

    Voluntary running in an activity wheel establishes aversion to paired taste in rats. A proposed mechanism underlying this taste aversion learning is gastrointestinal discomfort caused by running. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the pica behavior (kaolin clay intake) of rats, because it is known that rats engage in pica behavior after various nausea-inducing treatments including irradiation, motion sickness, and injection of emetic drugs such as lithium chloride (LiCl). Following a demonstration of the already-known phenomenon of LiCl-based pica in Experiment 1, we successfully showed running-based pica behavior in Experiment 2 where the running treatment was compared with a non-running control treatment (i.e., confinement in a locked wheel). These results suggest that not only LiCl but also running induces nausea in rats, supporting the gastrointestinal discomfort hypothesis of running-based taste aversion learning.

  16. Utilization of the graded universal testing system to increase the efficiency for assessing aerobic and anaerobic capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Sandra L.

    1992-01-01

    The in-flight exercise test performed by cosmonauts as part of the Russian Exercise Countermeasure Program is limited to 5 minutes due to communication restrictions. During a recent graded exercise test on a U.S. Shuttle flight, the test was terminated early due to an upcoming loss of signal (LOS) with the ground. This exercise test was a traditional test where the subject's exercise capacity dictates the length of the test. For example, one crew member may take 15 minutes to complete the test, while another may take 18 minutes. The traditional exercise test limits the flight schedulers to large blocks of space flight time in order to provide medical and research personnel information on the fitness capacity (maximal oxygen uptake: VO2max) of crew members during flight. A graded exercise test that would take a finite amount of time and a set preparation and recovery time would ease this problem by allowing flight schedulers to plan exercise tests in advance of LOS. The Graded Universal Testing System (GUTS) was designed to meet this goal. Fitness testing of astronauts before and after flight provides pertinent data on many variables. The Detailed Supplemental Objective (DSO608) protocol (6) is one of the graded exercise tests (GXT) currently used in astronaut testing before and after flight. Test times for this protocol have lasted from 11 to 18 minutes. Anaerobic capacity is an important variable that is currently not being evaluated before and after flight. Recent reports (1,2,5) from the literature have suggested that the oxygen deficit at supramaximal exercise is a measure of anaerobic capacity. We postulated that the oxygen deficit at maximal exercise would be an indication of anaerobic capacity. If this postulate can be accepted, then the efficiency of acquiring data from a graded exercise test would increase at least twofold. To examine this hypothesis anaerobic capacity was measured using a modified treadmill test (3,4) designed to exhaust the anaerobic

  17. Energy costs and performance of transfemoral amputees and non-amputees during walking and running: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengelkoch, Larry J; Kahle, Jason T; Highsmith, M Jason

    2017-10-01

    Limited information is available concerning the effects of prosthetic foot components on energy costs and ambulatory performance for transfemoral amputees. Compare energy costs (VO2; gait economy) and ambulatory performance (self-selected walking speeds, self-selected running speeds, peak running speeds) differences during walking and running for transfemoral amputees and matched, non-amputee runners. Repeated measures. Transfemoral amputees were accommodated and tested with three prosthetic feet: conventional foot, solid-ankle cushioned heel (SACH); energy storing and return foot, Renegade; and running-specific energy storing and return foot, Nitro. During walking, VO2 was similar between transfemoral amputees but was increased compared to controls. Self-selected walking speeds were slower for SACH compared to Renegade and Nitro. For transfemoral amputees, gait economy was decreased and self-selected walking speeds were slower compared to controls. During fixed running speeds, transfemoral amputees ran using Nitro, and VO2 was greater compared to controls. Transfemoral amputees ran at self-selected running speeds using Renegade and Nitro. Self-selected running speeds were slower for Renegade compared to Nitro. For transfemoral amputees, gait economy was decreased and self-selected running speeds were slower compared to controls. VO2 peak was similar between transfemoral amputees and controls, but controls achieved greater peak running speeds and % grade. Energy costs were greater and ambulatory performance was lower for transfemoral amputees compared to matched, non-amputee controls for all prosthetic foot conditions. Clinical relevance Both types of energy storing and return feet may improve walking performance for transfemoral amputees by providing faster self-selected walking speeds. For transfemoral amputees interested in performing vigorous running (exercise and running competition), clinicians should recommend a running-specific energy storing and return

  18. The possibility to increase the rated output as a result of index tests performed in Iron Gates II- Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novac, D; Pantelimon, D [Hidroelectrica - SH Portile de Fier, Str. I.G. Bibicescu Nr.2, Drobeta Turnu Severin, RO - 220103 (Romania); Popescu, E, E-mail: dragos.novac@hidroelectrica.r [Hidroelectrica Bucuresti, Str. C-tin Nacu Nr.3, Bucuresti, RO - 020995 (Romania)

    2010-08-15

    The Index Tests have been used for many years to obtain the optimized cam correlation between wicket gates and runner blades for double regulated turbines (Kaplan, bulb). The cam is based on homologous model tests and is verified by site measurements, as model tests generally do not reproduce the exact intake configuration. Index Tests have also a considerable importance for checking of the relative efficiency curve of all type of turbines and can demonstrate if the prototype efficiency curve at plant condition has the shape expected from the test of the homologues model. During the Index Tests measurements the influence of all losses at multiple points of turbine operation can be proved. This publication deals with an overview on the Index Tests made after modernization of large bulb units in Iron Gates II - Romania. These field tests, together with the comparative, fully homologous tests for the new hydraulic shape of the runner blades have confirmed the smooth operational behavior and the guaranteed performance. Over the whole 'guaranteed operating range' for H = 8m, the characteristic of the Kaplan curve (enveloping curve to the propeller curves), agreed very well to the predicted efficiency curve from the hydraulic prototype hill chart. The new cam correlation have been determined for different head and realised in the governor, normally based on model tests. The guaranteed, maximum turbine output for H = 7,8m is specified with 32, 5 MW. The maximum measured turbine output during the Index Tests on cam operation was 35,704 MW at the net head of 7,836 m. This corresponds to 35,458 MW for the specified head H= 7, 8 m. All these important improvements ensure a significant increase of annual energy production without any change of the civil construction and without increasing the runner diameter. Also the possibility to increase the turbine rated output is evident.

  19. Testing models of the attentional blink : Does masking increase processing duration in RSVP?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wyble, Brad; Sense, Florian; Nieuwenstein, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Theories of the attentional blink (AB) – an impairment in perceiving the second of two targets shown within less than 500 ms of each other – generally assume that this effect reflects the time required to consolidate the first target in memory. In this view, the fact that the AB is strongly increase

  20. Increased Intrasubject Variability in Boys with ADHD across Tests of Motor and Cognitive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosch, Keri Shiels; Dirlikov, Benjamin; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2013-01-01

    Increased intrasubject variability (ISV), or short-term, within-person fluctuations in behavioral performance is consistently found in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). ADHD is also associated with impairments in motor control, particularly in boys. The results of the few studies that have examined variability in self-generated…

  1. Increased Intrasubject Variability in Boys with ADHD across Tests of Motor and Cognitive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosch, Keri Shiels; Dirlikov, Benjamin; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2013-01-01

    Increased intrasubject variability (ISV), or short-term, within-person fluctuations in behavioral performance is consistently found in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). ADHD is also associated with impairments in motor control, particularly in boys. The results of the few studies that have examined variability in self-generated…

  2. Evaluation of the Incremental Prognostic Utility of Increasingly Complex Testing in Chronic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Tariq; O'Brien, Emily C; Schulte, Phillip J; Stevens, Susanna R; Fiuzat, Mona; Kitzman, Dalane W; Adams, Kirkwood F; Kraus, William E; Piña, Ileana L; Donahue, Mark P; Zannad, Faiez; Whellan, David J; O'Connor, Christopher M; Felker, G Michael

    2015-07-01

    Current heart failure (HF) risk prediction models do not consider how individual patient assessments occur in incremental steps; furthermore, each additional diagnostic evaluation may add cost, complexity, and potential morbidity. Using a cohort of well-treated ambulatory HF patients with reduced ejection fraction who had complete clinical, laboratory, health-related quality of life, imaging, and exercise testing data, we estimated incremental prognostic information provided by 5 assessment categories, performing an additional analysis on those with available N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels. We compared the incremental value of each additional assessment (quality of life screen, laboratory testing, echocardiography, and exercise testing) to baseline clinical assessment for predicting clinical outcomes (all-cause mortality, all-cause mortality/hospitalization, and cardiovascular death/HF hospitalizations), gauging incremental improvements in prognostic ability with more information using area under the curve and reclassification improvement (net reclassification index), with and without NT-proBNP availability. Of 2331 participants, 1631 patients had complete clinical data; of these, 1023 had baseline NT-proBNP. For prediction of all-cause mortality, models with incremental assessments sans NT-proBNP showed improvements in C-indices (0.72 [clinical model alone]-0.77 [complete model]). Compared with baseline clinical assessment alone, net reclassification index improved from 0.035 (w/laboratory data) to 0.085 (complete model). These improvements were significantly attenuated for models in the subset with measured NT-proBNP data (c-indices: 0.80 [w/laboratory data]-0.81 [full model]); net reclassification index improvements were similarly marginal (0.091→0.096); prediction of other clinical outcomes had similar findings. In chronic HF patients with reduced ejection fraction, the marginal benefit of complex prognostic evaluations should be

  3. Non-destructive testing. increasingly important tool in the control of security; Los ensayos no destructivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza Gomez, C.

    2015-07-01

    The importance of the non-destructive testing in society is considered of great importance, given the contribution in aspects of quality and safety in a multitude of industries, which include nuclear, the aeronautics, the petrochemical, shipbuilding, etc. Its main contribution is to have allowed guarantee the quality of any manufactured product or check your status in service, it is techniques that do not impair or destroy the component analyzed, determining its dimensions, characteristics and status of the properties of the material, and of course the presence or absence of defects that may affect their integrity and therefore to the fulfillment of the functions assigned. (Author)

  4. Muscle injury after low-intensity downhill running reduces running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Cory W; Green, Michael S; Doyle, J Andrew; Rupp, Jeffrey C; Ingalls, Christopher P; Corona, Benjamin T

    2014-05-01

    Contraction-induced muscle injury may reduce running economy (RE) by altering motor unit recruitment, lowering contraction economy, and disturbing running mechanics, any of which may have a deleterious effect on endurance performance. The purpose of this study was to determine if RE is reduced 2 days after performing injurious, low-intensity exercise in 11 healthy active men (27.5 ± 5.7 years; 50.05 ± 1.67 VO2peak). Running economy was determined at treadmill speeds eliciting 65 and 75% of the individual's peak rate of oxygen uptake (VO2peak) 1 day before and 2 days after injury induction. Lower extremity muscle injury was induced with a 30-minute downhill treadmill run (6 × 5 minutes runs, 2 minutes rest, -12% grade, and 12.9 km·h(-1)) that elicited 55% VO2peak. Maximal quadriceps isometric torque was reduced immediately and 2 days after the downhill run by 18 and 10%, and a moderate degree of muscle soreness was present. Two days after the injury, steady-state VO2 and metabolic work (VO2 L·km(-1)) were significantly greater (4-6%) during the 65% VO2peak run. Additionally, postinjury VCO2, VE and rating of perceived exertion were greater at 65% but not at 75% VO2peak, whereas whole blood-lactate concentrations did not change pre-injury to postinjury at either intensity. In conclusion, low-intensity downhill running reduces RE at 65% but not 75% VO2peak. The results of this study and other studies indicate the magnitude to which RE is altered after downhill running is dependent on the severity of the injury and intensity of the RE test.

  5. Biomechanics of sprint running. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mero, A; Komi, P V; Gregor, R J

    1992-06-01

    Understanding of biomechanical factors in sprint running is useful because of their critical value to performance. Some variables measured in distance running are also important in sprint running. Significant factors include: reaction time, technique, electromyographic (EMG) activity, force production, neural factors and muscle structure. Although various methodologies have been used, results are clear and conclusions can be made. The reaction time of good athletes is short, but it does not correlate with performance levels. Sprint technique has been well analysed during acceleration, constant velocity and deceleration of the velocity curve. At the beginning of the sprint run, it is important to produce great force/power and generate high velocity in the block and acceleration phases. During the constant-speed phase, the events immediately before and during the braking phase are important in increasing explosive force/power and efficiency of movement in the propulsion phase. There are no research results available regarding force production in the sprint-deceleration phase. The EMG activity pattern of the main sprint muscles is described in the literature, but there is a need for research with highly skilled sprinters to better understand the simultaneous operation of many muscles. Skeletal muscle fibre characteristics are related to the selection of talent and the training-induced effects in sprint running. Efficient sprint running requires an optimal combination between the examined biomechanical variables and external factors such as footwear, ground and air resistance. Further research work is needed especially in the area of nervous system, muscles and force and power production during sprint running. Combining these with the measurements of sprinting economy and efficiency more knowledge can be achieved in the near future.

  6. Wave Run-up on the Zeebrugge Rubble Mound Breakwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Rouck, Julien; Van de Walle, Björn; Troch, Peter

    2007-01-01

    A clear difference between full-scale wave run-up measurements and small-scale model test results had been noticed during a MAST II project. This finding initiated a thorough study of wave run-up through the European MAST III OPTICREST project. Full-scale measurement have been carried out on the ......-up and may explain the dependency of wave run-up on the water level observed in Zeebrugge. An influence of the spectral shape has also been noticed....

  7. Financial Dollarization: Short-Run Determinants in Transition Economies

    OpenAIRE

    Kyriakos C. Neanidis; Christos S. Savva

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the determinants of financial dollarization in transition economies from a short-run perspective. Using monthly data of deposit and loan dollarization we study the drivers of short-term fluctuations in dollarization and test their importance at different levels of dollarization. The results provide evidence that (a) the positive short-run effects of depreciation on deposit dollarization are exacerbated in high-dollarization countries; (b) short-run loan dollarization is ma...

  8. The Run-2 ATLAS Trigger System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Martínez, A.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The ATLAS trigger successfully collected collision data during the first run of the LHC between 2009-2013 at different centre-of-mass energies between 900 GeV and 8TeV. The trigger system consists of a hardware Level-1 and a software-based high level trigger (HLT) that reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of a few hundred Hz. In Run-2, the LHC will operate at centre-of-mass energies of 13 and 14 TeV and higher luminosity, resulting in up to five times higher rates of processes of interest. A brief review of the ATLAS trigger system upgrades that were implemented between Run-1 and Run-2, allowing to cope with the increased trigger rates while maintaining or even improving the efficiency to select physics processes of interest, will be given. This includes changes to the Level-1 calorimeter and muon trigger systems, the introduction of a new Level-1 topological trigger module and the merging of the previously two-level HLT system into a single event processing farm. A few examples will be shown, such as the impressive performance improvements in the HLT trigger algorithms used to identify leptons, hadrons and global event quantities like missing transverse energy. Finally, the status of the commissioning of the trigger system and its performance during the 2015 run will be presented.

  9. Veratrine blocks the lamotrigine-induced swimming increase and immobility decrease in the modified forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codagnone, F T; Consoni, F T; Rodrigues, A L S; Vital, M A B F; Andreatini, R

    2007-08-15

    Lamotrigine exhibits an anti-immobility effect in the modified forced swimming test, increasing swimming and climbing, behaviors that are related to serotonergic and noradrenergic effects, respectively. However, these effects could be secondary to lamotrigine blockade of Na(+) sensitive channel. Thus, this study investigated the influence of veratrine (0.1 mg/kg, ip, 10 min before each lamotrigine administration), an Na(+) channel activator, in the effect of lamotrigine (20 mg/kg, ip, 24, 5, 1 h before the test session) in the modified forced swimming test. Veratrine pre-treatment blocked lamotrigine-induced immobility decrease and swimming increase but it did not change the effect of lamotrigine on climbing. These results suggest that the serotonergic effect of lamotrigine in the modified forced swimming test is dependent on Na(+) voltage sensitive channel blockade, whereas its noradrenergic effect is not.

  10. Multitarget stool DNA tests increases colorectal cancer screening among previously noncompliant Medicare patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Mark; Lester, Lynn; Chiniwala, Rupal; Berger, Barry

    2017-01-21

    To determine the uptake of noninvasive multitarget stool DNA (mt-sDNA) in a cohort of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening non-compliant average-risk Medicare patients. This cross sectional primary care office-based study examined mt-sDNA uptake in routine clinical practice among 393 colorectal cancer screening non-compliant Medicare patients ages 50-85 ordered by 77 physicians in a multispecialty group practice (USMD Physician Services, Dallas, TX) from October, 2014-September, 2015. Investigators performed a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant retrospective review of electronic health records to identify mt-sDNA use in patients who were either > 10 years since last colonoscopy and/or > 1 year since last fecal occult blood test. Test positive patients were advised to get diagnostic colonoscopy and thereafter patients were characterized by the most clinically significant lesion documented on histopathology of biopsies or excisional tissue. Descriptive statistics were employed. Key outcome measures included mt-sDNA compliance and diagnostic colonoscopy compliance on positive cases. Over 12 mo, 77 providers ordered 393 mt-sDNA studies with 347 completed (88.3% compliance). Patient mean age was 69.8 (50-85) and patients were 64% female. Mt-sDNA was negative in 85.3% (296/347) and positive in 14.7% (51/347). Follow-up colonoscopy was performed in 49 positive patients (96.1% colonoscopy compliance) with two patients lost to follow up. Index findings included: colon cancer (4/49, 8.2%), advanced adenomas (21/49, 42.9%), non-advanced adenomas (15/49, 30.6%), and negative results (9/49, 18.4%). The positive predictive value for advanced colorectal lesions was 51.0% and for any colorectal neoplasia was 81.6%. The mean age of patients with colorectal cancer was 70.3 and all CRC's were localized Stage I (2) and Stage II (2), three were located in the proximal colon and one was located in the distal colon. Mt-sDNA provided medical benefit to screening

  11. Utilization of Human-Like Pelvic Rotation for Running Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya eOtani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The spring loaded inverted pendulum (SLIP is used to model human running. It is based on a characteristic feature of human running, in which the linear-spring-like motion of the standing leg is produced by the joint stiffness of the knee and ankle. Although this model is widely used in robotics, it does not include human-like pelvic motion. In this study, we show that the pelvis actually contributes to the increase in jumping force and absorption of landing impact. On the basis of this finding, we propose a new model, SLIP2 (spring loaded inverted pendulum with pelvis, to improve running in humanoid robots. The model is composed of a body mass, a pelvis, and leg springs, and, it can control its springs while running by use of pelvic movement in the frontal plane. To achieve running motions, we developed a running control system that includes a pelvic oscillation controller to attain control over jumping power and a landing placement controller to adjust the running speed. We also developed a new running robot by using the SLIP2 model and performed hopping and running experiments to evaluate the model. The developed robot could accomplish hopping motions only by pelvic movement. The results also established that the difference between the pelvic rotational phase and the oscillation phase of the vertical mass displacement affects the jumping force. In addition, the robot demonstrated the ability to run with a foot placement controller depending on the reference running speed.

  12. The increase in cobalt release in metal-on-polyethylene hip bearings in tests with third body abrasives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Villiers, Danielle; Traynor, Alison; Collins, Simon N; Shelton, Julia C

    2015-09-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving metal-on-metal hip replacements have been attributed to corrosion products as observed by elevated cobalt and chromium ions in the blood. Although the majority of cases are reported in metal-on-metal, incidences of these reactions have been reported in the metal-on-polyethylene patient population. To date, no in vitro study has considered cobalt release for this bearing combination. This study considered four 28 mm and seven 52 mm diameter metal-on-polyethylene bearings tested following ISO standard hip simulator conditions as well as under established abrasive conditions. These tests showed measurable cobalt in all bearings under standard conditions. Cobalt release, as well as polyethylene wear, increased with diameter, increasing from 52 to 255 ppb. The introduction of bone cement particles into the articulation doubled polyethylene wear and cobalt release while alumina particles produced significant damage on the heads demonstrated by cobalt levels of 70,700 ppb and an increased polyethylene wear from a mean value of 9-160 mm(3)/mc. Cobalt release was indicative of head damage and correlated with polyethylene wear at the next gravimetric interval. The removal of third body particles resulted in continued elevated cobalt levels in the 52 mm diameter bearings tested with alumina compared to standard conditions but the bearings tested with bone cement particles returned to standard levels. The polyethylene wear in the bone cement tested bearings also recovered to standard levels, although the alumina tested bearings continued to wear at a higher rate of 475 mm(3)/mc. Cobalt release was shown to occur in metal-on-polyethylene bearings indicating damage to the metal head resulting in increased polyethylene wear. While large diameter metal-on-polyethylene bearings may provide an increased range of motion and a reduced dislocation risk, increased levels of cobalt are likely to be released and this needs to be fully

  13. A Paradigm of Uphill Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padulo, Johnny; Powell, Douglas; Milia, Raffaele; Ardigò, Luca Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The biomechanical management of bioenergetics of runners when running uphill was investigated. Several metabolic and mechanical variables have been studied simultaneously to spread light on the locomotory strategy operated by humans for effective locomotion. The studied variables were: heart rate, heart rate variability, oxygen intake and blood lactate, metabolic cost, kinematics, ground reaction force and muscular activity. 18 high-level competitive male runners ran at 70% VO2max on different uphill slope conditions: 0%, 2% and 7%. Modifications were significant in almost all variables studied, and were more pronounced with increasing incline. Step frequency/length and ground reaction force are adjusted to cope with both the task of uphill progression and the available (limited) metabolic power. From 0% to 7% slope, step frequency and ground reaction force and metabolic cost increased concurrently by 4%, 12% and 53%, respectively (with a 4% step length decrease as well). It is hypothesised that this biomechanical management is allowed by an environment-body communication performed by means of specific muscular activity. PMID:23874850

  14. Brief Report: Gonorrhea and Chlamydia Testing Increasing but Still Lagging in HIV Clinics in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Stephen A; Ghanem, Khalil G; Mathews, William Christopher; Korthuis, Philip Todd; Yehia, Baligh R; Agwu, Allison L; Lehmann, Christoph U; Moore, Richard D; Allen, Sara L; Gebo, Kelly A

    2015-11-01

    Screening persons living with HIV for gonorrhea and chlamydia has been recommended since 2003. We compared annual gonorrhea/chlamydia testing to syphilis and lipid testing among 19,368 adults (41% men who have sex with men, 30% heterosexual men, and 29% women) engaged in HIV care. In 2004, 22%, 62%, and 70% of all patients were tested for gonorrhea/chlamydia, syphilis, and lipid levels, respectively. Despite increasing steadily [odds ratio per year (95% confidence interval): 1.14 (1.13 to 1.15)], gonorrhea/chlamydia testing in 2010 remained lower than syphilis and lipid testing (39%, 77%, 76%, respectively). Interventions to improve gonorrhea/chlamydia screening are needed. A more targeted screening approach may be warranted.

  15. Benzodiazepines increase the reward effects of buprenorphine in a conditioned place preference test in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lin-Lin; Freret, Thomas; Lange, Mathilde; Bourgine, Joanna; Coquerel, Antoine; Lelong-Boulouard, Véronique

    2014-12-01

    Buprenorphine (BPN) is widely used as a substitution treatment for opioid addiction. Some cases of abuse and misuse, especially associated with various benzodiazepines (BZDs), have been described, and a previous study has shown that BZDs increase the sedative effect of BPN and decrease its anxiogenic properties. To investigate the reward effect that may lead to the abusive combination of BPN and BZD, we studied the influence of different doses of three BZDs extensively used with BPN by drug addicts on conditioned place preference behavior in mice. BPN (0.3, 1, 3 mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously into male mice alone or in combination with a BZD administered intraperitoneally: dipotassium clorazepate (CRZ; 1, 4, 16 mg/kg), diazepam (DAZ; 0.5, 1, 5 mg/kg), or bromazepam (BMZ; 0.5, 1, 3 mg/kg). Amphetamine (8 mg/kg) was used as a reference drug. Reward effects of BPN alone or in combination were measured in a conditioned place preference paradigm using an unbiased procedure. Our results showed that groups treated with BPN associated with different doses of diazepam and clorazepate, but not bromazepam, spent significantly more time in the drug-paired compartment compared to the group treated with BPN alone. Our study shows that joint consumption of diazepam and clorazepate, but not bromazepam, can increase the reward properties of BPN alone in mice. These results could help to explain the use of this type of drug combination in the drug addict population. © 2014 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  16. 低温乙烯输出系统试车故障分析%Analysis of Fault Occurred in Test Run of Sending-out System for Cryogenic Ethylene Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘先禹

    2009-01-01

    为解决低温乙烯储罐输出系统在试车运行阶段频繁停车的问题,从故障现象及泵解体后发现的损坏部位分析,排除了泵转子平衡、安装高度、杂质、进口管径、操作方法等方面的原因,确定故障是由系统内的气体积聚引起.通过对气体产生量和排气能力的定量计算,判断保持进口管线的稳定流型和降低气体在进口管线中的积聚时间是解决问题的根本,总结出了相应的措施方法后,取得了良好效果.%In order to solve the problems occurred in the test run of the sending - out system for cryogenic ethylene plant, the fault phenomena and the damaged structure were analyzed. The fault possibilities from the aspects of pump rotator balance, installation ele-vation, debris, inlet diameter or operation condition had been removed. Finally, it was determined that the fault was due to the accu-mulation of the gas in the system. Through quantitative calculation for the productive gas and discharge capacity, it was recognized that to keep stable flow and to decrease the duration of gas accumulation in the inlet pipe were key methods to solve the problem. The appli-cation of these correct methods have resulted in good effects.

  17. The Effects of Backwards Running Training on Forward Running Economy in Trained Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordway, Jason D; Laubach, Lloyd L; Vanderburgh, Paul M; Jackson, Kurt J

    2016-03-01

    Backwards running (BR) results in greater cardiopulmonary response and muscle activity compared with forward running (FR). BR has traditionally been used in rehabilitation for disorders such as stroke and lower leg extremity injuries, as well as in short bursts during various athletic events. The aim of this study was to measure the effects of sustained backwards running training on forward running economy in trained male athletes. Eight highly trained, male runners (26.13 ± 6.11 years, 174.7 ± 6.4 cm, 68.4 ± 9.24 kg, 8.61 ± 3.21% body fat, 71.40 ± 7.31 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) trained with BR while harnessed on a treadmill at 161 m·min(-1) for 5 weeks following a 5-week BR run-in period at a lower speed (134 m·min(-1)). Subjects were tested at baseline, postfamiliarized, and post-BR training for body composition, a ramped VO2max test, and an economy test designed for trained male runners. Subjects improved forward running economy by 2.54% (1.19 ± 1.26 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), p = 0.032) at 215 m·min(-1). VO2max, body mass, lean mass, fat mass, and % body fat did not change (p > 0.05). Five weeks of BR training improved FR economy in healthy, trained male runners without altering VO2max or body composition. The improvements observed in this study could be a beneficial form of training to an already economical population to improve running economy.

  18. Testes mass, but not sperm length, increases with higher levels of polyandry in an ancient sex model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E Vrech

    Full Text Available There is strong evidence that polyandrous taxa have evolved relatively larger testes than monogamous relatives. Sperm size may either increase or decrease across species with the risk or intensity of sperm competition. Scorpions represent an ancient direct mode with spermatophore-mediated sperm transfer and are particularly well suited for studies in sperm competition. This work aims to analyze for the first time the variables affecting testes mass, ejaculate volume and sperm length, according with their levels of polyandry, in species belonging to the Neotropical family Bothriuridae. Variables influencing testes mass and sperm length were obtained by model selection analysis using corrected Akaike Information Criterion. Testes mass varied greatly among the seven species analyzed, ranging from 1.6 ± 1.1 mg in Timogenes dorbignyi to 16.3 ± 4.5 mg in Brachistosternus pentheri with an average of 8.4 ± 5.0 mg in all the species. The relationship between testes mass and body mass was not significant. Body allocation in testes mass, taken as Gonadosomatic Index, was high in Bothriurus cordubensis and Brachistosternus ferrugineus and low in Timogenes species. The best-fitting model for testes mass considered only polyandry as predictor with a positive influence. Model selection showed that body mass influenced sperm length negatively but after correcting for body mass, none of the variables analyzed explained sperm length. Both body mass and testes mass influenced spermatophore volume positively. There was a strong phylogenetic effect on the model containing testes mass. As predicted by the sperm competition theory and according to what happens in other arthropods, testes mass increased in species with higher levels of sperm competition, and influenced positively spermatophore volume, but data was not conclusive for sperm length.

  19. Testes mass, but not sperm length, increases with higher levels of polyandry in an ancient sex model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrech, David E; Olivero, Paola A; Mattoni, Camilo I; Peretti, Alfredo V

    2014-01-01

    There is strong evidence that polyandrous taxa have evolved relatively larger testes than monogamous relatives. Sperm size may either increase or decrease across species with the risk or intensity of sperm competition. Scorpions represent an ancient direct mode with spermatophore-mediated sperm transfer and are particularly well suited for studies in sperm competition. This work aims to analyze for the first time the variables affecting testes mass, ejaculate volume and sperm length, according with their levels of polyandry, in species belonging to the Neotropical family Bothriuridae. Variables influencing testes mass and sperm length were obtained by model selection analysis using corrected Akaike Information Criterion. Testes mass varied greatly among the seven species analyzed, ranging from 1.6 ± 1.1 mg in Timogenes dorbignyi to 16.3 ± 4.5 mg in Brachistosternus pentheri with an average of 8.4 ± 5.0 mg in all the species. The relationship between testes mass and body mass was not significant. Body allocation in testes mass, taken as Gonadosomatic Index, was high in Bothriurus cordubensis and Brachistosternus ferrugineus and low in Timogenes species. The best-fitting model for testes mass considered only polyandry as predictor with a positive influence. Model selection showed that body mass influenced sperm length negatively but after correcting for body mass, none of the variables analyzed explained sperm length. Both body mass and testes mass influenced spermatophore volume positively. There was a strong phylogenetic effect on the model containing testes mass. As predicted by the sperm competition theory and according to what happens in other arthropods, testes mass increased in species with higher levels of sperm competition, and influenced positively spermatophore volume, but data was not conclusive for sperm length.

  20. RUN TO RUN CONTROL OF TIME-PRESSURE DISPENSING SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Yixiang; Li Hanxiong; Ding Han; Xiong Youlun

    2004-01-01

    In electronics packaging the time-pressure dispensing system is widely used to squeeze the adhesive fluid in a syringe onto boards or sub-strates with the pressurized air.However,complexity of the process,which includes the air-fluid coupling and the nonlinear uncertainties,makes it diffi-cult to have a consistent process per-formance.An integrated dispensing process model is first introduced and then its input-output regression rela-tionship is used to design a run to run control methodology for this process.The controller takes EWMA scheme and its stability region is given.Ex-perimental results verify the effective-ness of the proposed run to run control method for dispensing process.

  1. Intensity related changes of running economy in recreational level distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeroff, Tobias; Bernardi, Andreas; Niederer, Daniel; Wilke, Jan; Vogt, Lutz; Banzer, Winfried

    2017-09-01

    Running economy (RE) is often described as a key demand of running performance. The variety of currently used assessment methods with different running intensities and outcomes restricts interindividual comparability of RE in recreational level runners. The purpose of this study was to compare the influence of RE, assessed as oxygen cost (OC) and caloric unit cost (CUC), on running speed at individual physiological thresholds. Eighteen recreational runners performed: 1) a graded exercise test to estimate first ventilatory threshold (VT1), respiratory compensation point (RCP) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max); 2) discontinuous RE assessment to determine relative OC in milliliters per kilogram per kilometer (mL/kg/km) and CUC in kilocalories per kilogram per kilometer (kcal/kg/km) at three different running intensities: VT1, RCP and at a third standardized reference point (TP) in between. OC (mL/kg/km; at VT1: 235.4±26.2; at TP: 227.8±23.4; at RCP: 224.9±21.9) and CUC (kcal/kg/km at VT1: 1.18±0.13; at TP: 1.14±0.12; at RCP: 1.13±0.11) decreased with increasing intensities (P≤0.01). Controlling for the influence of sex OC and CUC linearly correlated with running speed at RCP and VO2max (P≤0.01). RE, even assessed at low intensity, is strongly related to running performance in recreational athletes. Both calculation methods used (OC and CUC) are sensitive for monitoring intensity related changes of substrate utilization. RE values decreased with higher running intensity indicating an increase of anaerobic and subsequent decrease of aerobic substrate utilization.

  2. Applying the cost of generating force hypothesis to uphill running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter Hoogkamer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Historically, several different approaches have been applied to explain the metabolic cost of uphill human running. Most of these approaches result in unrealistically high values for the efficiency of performing vertical work during running uphill, or are only valid for running up steep inclines. The purpose of this study was to reexamine the metabolic cost of uphill running, based upon our understanding of level running energetics and ground reaction forces during uphill running. In contrast to the vertical efficiency approach, we propose that during incline running at a certain velocity, the forces (and hence metabolic energy required for braking and propelling the body mass parallel to the running surface are less than during level running. Based on this idea, we propose that the metabolic rate during uphill running can be predicted by a model, which posits that (1 the metabolic cost of perpendicular bouncing remains the same as during level running, (2 the metabolic cost of running parallel to the running surface decreases with incline, (3 the delta efficiency of producing mechanical power to lift the COM vertically is constant, independent of incline and running velocity, and (4 the costs of leg and arm swing do not change with incline. To test this approach, we collected ground reaction force (GRF data for eight runners who ran thirty 30-second trials (velocity: 2.0–3.0 m/s; incline: 0–9°. We also measured the metabolic rates of eight different runners for 17, 7-minute trials (velocity: 2.0–3.0 m/s; incline: 0–8°. During uphill running, parallel braking GRF approached zero for the 9° incline trials. Thus, we modeled the metabolic cost of parallel running as exponentially decreasing with incline. With that assumption, best-fit parameters for the metabolic rate data indicate that the efficiency of producing mechanical power to lift the center of mass vertically was independent of incline and running velocity, with a value of ∼29

  3. Run-to-Run Control Strategy for Diabetes Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    quite serious ( diabetic coma), and the long- term implications of varying glucose levels ( nephropathy , retinopathy, and other tissue damage ) have...Trial Re- search Group, \\The e ect of intensive treatment of diabetes on the development and progression of long{term complications in insulin{dependent...1 RUN-TO-RUN CONTROL STRATEGY FOR DIABETES MANAGEMENT F.J. Doyle III1, B. Srinivasan2, and D. Bonvin2 1Department of Chemical Engineering, University

  4. Effects of Cycling Versus Running Training on Sprint and Endurance Capacity in Inline Speed Skating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangier, Carolin; Abel, Thomas; Mierau, Julia; Hollmann, Wildor; Strüder, Heiko K

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of running versus cycling training on sprint and endurance capacity in inline speed skating. Sixteen elite athletes (8 male, 8 female, 24 ± 8 yrs) were randomly assigned into 2 training groups performing either 2 session per week of treadmill running or ergometer cycling in addition to 3 skating specific sessions (technique, plyometrics, parkour) for 8 weeks. Training intensity was determined within non-specific (cycling or running) and effects on specific endurance capacity within a specific incremental exercise test. Before and after the intervention all athletes performed a specific (300m) and one non-specific (30s cycling or 200m running) all-out sprint test according to the group affiliation. To determine the accumulation of blood lactate (BLa) and glucose (BGL) 20 μl arterialized blood was drawn at rest, as well as in 1 min intervals for 10 min after the sprint test. The sport-specific peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) was significantly increased (+17%; p = 0.01) in both groups and highly correlated with the sprint performance (r = -0.71). BLa values decreased significantly (-18%, p = 0.02) after the specific sprint test from pre to post-testing without any group effect. However, BGL values only showed a significant decrease (-2%, p = 0.04) in the running group. The close relationship between aerobic capacity and sprint performance in inline speed skating highlights the positive effects of endurance training. Although both training programs were equally effective in improving endurance and sprint capacities, the metabolic results indicate a faster recovery after high intensity efforts for all athletes, as well as a higher reliance on the fat metabolism for athletes who trained in the running group. Key pointsIn addition to a highly developed aerobic performance inline speed skaters also require a highly trained anaerobic capacity to be effective in the sprint sections such as the mass start, tactical attacks

  5. Are There Long-Run Effects of the Minimum Wage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkin, Isaac

    2015-04-01

    An empirical consensus suggests that there are small employment effects of minimum wage increases. This paper argues that these are short-run elasticities. Long-run elasticities, which may differ from short-run elasticities, are policy relevant. This paper develops a dynamic industry equilibrium model of labor demand. The model makes two points. First, long-run regressions have been misinterpreted because even if the short- and long-run employment elasticities differ, standard methods would not detect a difference using US variation. Second, the model offers a reconciliation of the small estimated short-run employment effects with the commonly found pass-through of minimum wage increases to product prices.

  6. Increased intestinal permeability in inflammatory bowel diseases assessed by iohexol test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vanya A Gerova; Simeon G Stoynov; Dimitar S Katsarov; Dobrin A Svinarov

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study intestinal permeability (IP) and its relationship to the disease activity in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD)-Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: Fifty-eight patients with active IBD (32 with CD and 26 with UC) and 25 healthy controls consented to participate in the study. The clinical activity of CD was estimated using the Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI),and the endoscopic activity of UC using the Mayo scoring system. IP was assessed by the rise in levels of iohexol,which was administered orally (25 mL,350 mg/mL) 2 h after breakfast. Three and six hours later serum (SIC mg/L) and urine (UIC g/mol) iohexol concentrations were determined by a validated HPLC-UV technique. RESULTS: In the CD group,SIC values at 3 h (2.95 ± 2.11 mg/L) and at 6 h after ingestion (2.63 ± 2.18 mg/L) were significantly higher compared to those of healthy subjects (1.25 ± 1.40 mg/L and 1.11 ± 1.10 mg/L,respectively,P < 0.05). UIC (g/mol) values were also higher in patients,but the differences were significant only for UIC at 6 h. Significant positive correlation (P < 0.05) was found between the CDAI and IP,assessed by SIC at 3 h (r = 0.60) and 6 h (r = 0.74) after the ingestion. In comparison to controls,SIC and UIC of UC patients were higher in the two studied periods,but the differences were significant at 6 h only. Significantly higher values of SIC (P < 0.05) were found in patients with severe endoscopic activity of UC compared to those of patients with mild and moderate activity (3.68 ± 3.18 vs 0.92 ± 0.69 mg/L). CONCLUSION: Serum levels of iohexol at 3 h and 6 h after its ingestion reflect increased IP,which is related to the disease activity in patients with IBD.

  7. Analysis of RE4 Construction Cosmic Muon Test Data and Comparison with 2015 Collision Calibration Run Data for the Newly Installed RPC Chambers in the 4th Muon Endcap Station of the CMS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Iqbal, Muhammad Ansar

    2015-01-01

    RPC are the heart of the muon system of CMS experiment at LHC, CERN. Recently a new endcap layer, RE4, was added to increase redundancy. These added chambers were tested during the construction period with cosmic muons in the 904 lab at Prevessin, CERN. This study analyzes the HV scan from those tests and compares them with the first 2015 collision data taken at Point-5. The analysis showed that most of the chambers were producing more than 90% efficiency and were in good agreement with the Point-5 results. Those which did not give good results were reported. Other variables like working point and maximum efficiency were also studied.

  8. Development and Testing of a Device to Increase the Level of Automation of a Conventional Milking Parlor through Vocal Commands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Zaninelli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A portable wireless device with a “vocal commands” feature for activating the mechanical milking phase in conventional milking parlors was developed and tested to increase the level of automation in the milking procedures. The device was tested in the laboratory and in a milking parlor. Four professional milkers participated in the experiment. Before the start of the tests, a set of acoustic models with speaker-dependent commands defined for the project was acquired for each milker using a dedicated “milker training procedure”. Two experimental sessions were performed by each milker, with one session in the laboratory and a subsequent session in the milking parlor. The device performance was evaluated based on the accuracy demonstrated in the vocal command recognition task and rated using the word recognition rate (WRR. The data were expressed as %WRR and grouped based on the different cases evaluated. Mixed effects logistic regression modeling was used to evaluate the association between the %WRR and explanatory variables. The results indicated significant effects due to the location where the tests were performed. Higher values of the %WRR were found for tests performed in the laboratory, whereas lower values were found for tests performed in the milking parlor (due to the presence of background noise. Nevertheless, the general performance level achieved by the device was sufficient for increasing the automation level of conventional milking parlors.

  9. Testing the effect of different enzyme blends on increasing the biogas yield of straw and digested manure fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njoku, Stephen Ikechukwu; Jurado, Esperanza; Malmgren-Hansen, Bjørn;

    In this study, enzymatic treatment was tested to increase the biogas yield of wheat straw (WS) and digested manure fibers (DMF) in the Re-Injection Loop Concept, which combines anaerobic digestion with solid separation to enhance the biogas yield per ton of manure by: 1. Digestion of the easily d...

  10. Self-Sampling for Human Papillomavirus Testing among Non-Attenders Increases Attendance to the Norwegian Cervical Cancer Screening Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enerly, Espen; Bonde, Jesper; Schee, Kristina;

    2016-01-01

    Increasing attendance to screening offers the best potential for improving the effectiveness of well-established cervical cancer screening programs. Self-sampling at home for human papillomavirus (HPV) testing as an alternative to a clinical sampling can be a useful policy to increase attendance....... To determine whether self-sampling improves screening attendance for women who do not regularly attend the Norwegian Cervical Cancer Screening Programme (NCCSP), 800 women aged 25-69 years in the Oslo area who were due to receive a 2nd reminder to attend regular screening were randomly selected and invited...... alternative for increasing cervical cancer screening coverage in Norway....

  11. Effects of cold water immersion on lower extremity joint biomechanics during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuchi, Claudiane Arakaki; da Rocha, Emmanuel Souza; Stefanyshyn, Darren John

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the influence of cryotherapy on lower extremity running biomechanics. Twenty-six healthy male volunteers were randomised into two intervention groups: cold water (cold water at ~11°C) or tepid water (tepid water at ~26°C). They were required to run at 4.0 ± 0.2 m · s(-1) before and after they underwent water immersion for 20 min. Differences between pre- and post-intervention were used to compare the influence of water intervention during running. Peak joint angles, peak joint moments, peak ground reaction forces (GRF) and contact time (CT) were calculated using three-dimensional gait analysis. Independent t-tests were applied with a significant alpha level set at 0.05. Decreased peak propulsive and vertical GRF, decreased plantarflexion moments, increased hip flexion angle and longer CT were observed following cold water immersion. Although cold water immersion (cryotherapy) affected the running movement, none of the alterations have been related to running biomechanical patterns associated with injuries. Therefore, our results indicated that cold water immersion appears safe prior to running activities.

  12. Operation of the upgraded ATLAS Central Trigger Processor during the LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Bertelsen, H.; Deviveiros, P.O.; Eifert, T.; Galster, G.; Glatzer, J.; Haas, S.; Marzin, A.; Silva Oliveira, M.V.; Pauly, T.; Schmieden, K.; Spiwoks, R.; Stelzer, J.

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Central Trigger Processor (CTP) is responsible for forming the Level-1 trigger decision based on the information from the calorimeter and muon trigger processors. In order to cope with the increase of luminosity and physics cross-sections in Run 2, several components of this system have been upgraded. In particular, the number of usable trigger inputs and trigger items have been increased from 160 to 512 and from 256 to 512, respectively. The upgraded CTP also provides extended monitoring capabilities and allows to operate simultaneously up to three independent combinations of sub-detectors with full trigger functionality, which is particularly useful for commissioning, calibration and test runs. The software has also undergone a major upgrade to take advantage of all these new functionalities. An overview of the commissioning and the operation of the upgraded CTP during the LHC Run 2 is given.

  13. Daytime Running Lights. Public Consultation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-12-15

    The Road Safety Authority is considering the policy options available to promote the use of Daytime Running Lights (DRL), including the possibility of mandating the use of DRL on all vehicles. An EC Directive would make DRL mandatory for new vehicles from 2011 onwards and by 2024 it is predicted that due to the natural replacement of the national fleet, almost all vehicles would be equipped with DRL. The RSA is inviting views on introducing DRL measures earlier, whereby all road vehicles would be required to use either dipped head lights during hours of daylight or dedicated DRL from next year onwards. The use of DRL has been found to enhance the visibility of vehicles, thereby increasing road safety by reducing the number and severity of collisions. This paper explores the benefits of DRL and the implications for all road users including pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists. In order to ensure a comprehensive consideration of all the issues, the Road Safety Authority is seeking the views and advice of interested parties.

  14. Piketty in the long run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowell, Frank A

    2014-12-01

    I examine the idea of 'the long run' in Piketty (2014) and related works. In contrast to simplistic interpretations of long-run models of income- and wealth-distribution Piketty (2014) draws on a rich economic analysis that models the intra- and inter-generational processes that underly the development of the wealth distribution. These processes inevitably involve both market and non-market mechanisms. To understand this approach, and to isolate the impact of different social and economic factors on inequality in the long run, we use the concept of an equilibrium distribution. However the long-run analysis of policy should not presume that there is an inherent tendency for the wealth distribution to approach equilibrium.

  15. Turkey Run Landfill Emissions Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — landfill emissions measurements for the Turkey run landfill in Georgia. This dataset is associated with the following publication: De la Cruz, F., R. Green, G....

  16. Phthalate SHEDS-HT runs

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Inputs and outputs for SHEDS-HT runs of DiNP, DEHP, DBP. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Moreau, M., J. Leonard, K. Phillips, J. Campbell,...

  17. Effects of static stretching on 1-mile uphill run performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Ryan P; Joy, Jordan M; Brown, Lee E; Oliveira de Souza, Eduardo; Wistocki, David R; Davis, Gregory S; Naimo, Marshall A; Zito, Gina A; Wilson, Jacob M

    2014-01-01

    It is previously demonstrated that static stretching was associated with a decrease in running economy and distance run during a 30-minute time trial in trained runners. Recently, the detrimental effects of static stretching on economy were found to be limited to the first few minutes of an endurance bout. However, economy remains to be studied for its direct effects on performance during shorter endurance events. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of static stretching on 1-mile uphill run performance, electromyography (EMG), ground contact time (GCT), and flexibility. Ten trained male distance runners aged 24 ± 5 years with an average VO2max of 64.9 ± 6.5 mL·kg-1·min-1 were recruited. Subjects reported to the laboratory on 3 separate days interspersed by 72 hours. On day 1, anthropometrics and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max were determined on a motor-driven treadmill. On days 2 and 3, subjects performed a 5-minute treadmill warm-up and either performed a series of 6 lower-body stretches for three 30-second repetitions or sat still for 10 minutes. Time to complete a 1-mile run under stretching and nonstretching conditions took place in randomized order. For the performance run, subjects were instructed to run as fast as possible at a set incline of 5% until a distance of 1 mile was completed. Flexibility from the sit and reach test, EMG, GCT, and performance, determined by time to complete the 1-mile run, were recorded after each condition. Time to complete the run was significantly less (6:51 ± 0:28 minutes) in the nonstretching condition as compared with the stretching condition (7:04 ± 0:32 minutes). A significant condition-by-time interaction for muscle activation existed, with no change in the nonstretching condition (pre 91.3 ± 11.6 mV to post 92.2 ± 12.9 mV) but increased in the stretching condition (pre 91.0 ± 11.6 mV to post 105.3 ± 12.9 mV). A significant condition-by-time interaction for GCT was also present, with no changes in

  18. Effects of Cycling Versus Running Training on Sprint and Endurance Capacity in Inline Speed Skating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Stangier, Thomas Abel, Julia Mierau, Wildor Hollmann, Heiko K. Strüder

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of running versus cycling training on sprint and endurance capacity in inline speed skating. Sixteen elite athletes (8 male, 8 female, 24 ± 8 yrs were randomly assigned into 2 training groups performing either 2 session per week of treadmill running or ergometer cycling in addition to 3 skating specific sessions (technique, plyometrics, parkour for 8 weeks. Training intensity was determined within non-specific (cycling or running and effects on specific endurance capacity within a specific incremental exercise test. Before and after the intervention all athletes performed a specific (300m and one non-specific (30s cycling or 200m running all-out sprint test according to the group affiliation. To determine the accumulation of blood lactate (BLa and glucose (BGL 20 μl arterialized blood was drawn at rest, as well as in 1 min intervals for 10 min after the sprint test. The sport-specific peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak was significantly increased (+17%; p = 0.01 in both groups and highly correlated with the sprint performance (r = -0.71. BLa values decreased significantly (-18%, p = 0.02 after the specific sprint test from pre to post-testing without any group effect. However, BGL values only showed a significant decrease (-2%, p = 0.04 in the running group. The close relationship between aerobic capacity and sprint performance in inline speed skating highlights the positive effects of endurance training. Although both training programs were equally effective in improving endurance and sprint capacities, the metabolic results indicate a faster recovery after high intensity efforts for all athletes, as well as a higher reliance on the fat metabolism for athletes who trained in the running group.

  19. Gender equality and education: Increasing the uptake of HIV testing among married women in Kenya, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kavita; Luseno, Winnie; Haney, Erica

    2013-01-01

    Gender equality and education are being promoted as strategies to combat the HIV epidemic in Africa, but few studies have looked at the role of gender equality and education in the uptake of a vital service - HIV testing. This study looks at the associations between education (a key input needed for gender equality) and key gender equality measures (financial decision making and attitudes toward violence) with ever tested for HIV and tested for HIV in the past year. The study focused on currently married women ages between15-24 and 25-34 in three countries - Kenya, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The data came from the Demographic and Health Surveys. Logistic regression was used to study the role of gender equality and education on the HIV testing outcomes after controlling for both social and biological factors. Results indicated that education had a consistent positive relationship with testing for both age groups, and the associations were always significant for young women aged 15-24 years (pgender-based violence is unacceptable was positively associated with testing for women aged 25-34 in all the three countries, although the associations were only significant in Kenya (among women reporting ever being tested: OR 1.58, pgender equality are important strategies for increasing uptake of a vital HIV service, and thus are important tools for protecting girls and young women against HIV.

  20. Validity of Self-Reported Running Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dideriksen, Mette; Soegaard, Cristina; Nielsen, Rasmus O

    2016-06-01

    It is unclear whether there is a difference between subjective evaluation and objective global positioning systems (GPS) measurement of running distance. The purpose of this study was to investigate if such difference exists. A total of 100 participants (51% men; median age, 41.5; body mass, 78.1 kg ±13.8 SD) completed a run of free choice, then subjectively reported the distance in kilometer (km). This information was subsequently compared with the distance derived from a nondifferential GPS watch using paired t-tests and Bland-Altman's 95% limits of agreement. No significant difference was found between the mean paired differences between subjective evaluations and GPS measurements (1.86%, 95% confidence interval = -1.53%; 5.25%, p = 0.96). The Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement revealed considerable variation (lower limit = -28% and upper limit = 40%). Such variation exceeds the clinical error range of 10%. In conclusion, the mean running distance (km) is similar between self-reporting and GPS measurements. However, researchers should consider using GPS measurements in favor of subjective reporting of running distance because of considerable variation on an individual level.

  1. Effect of motion control running shoes compared with neutral shoes on tibial rotation during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Alice; Birch, Ivan; Kuisma, Raija

    2011-09-01

    To determine whether a motion control running shoe reduces tibial rotation in the transverse plane during treadmill running. An experimental study measuring tibial rotation in volunteer participants using a repeated measures design. Human Movement Laboratory, School of Health Professions, University of Brighton. Twenty-four healthy participants were tested. The group comprised males and females with size 6, 7, 9 and 11 feet. The age range for participants was 19 to 31 years. The total range of proximal tibial rotation was measured using the Codamotion 3-D Movement Analysis System. A one-tailed paired t-test indicated a statistically significant decrease in the total range of proximal tibial rotation when a motion control shoe was worn (mean difference 1.38°, 95% confidence interval 0.03 to 2.73, P=0.04). There is a difference in tibial rotation in the transverse plane between a motion control running shoe and a neutral running shoe. The results from this study have implications for the use of supportive running shoes as a form of injury prevention. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of a minimalist shoe on running economy and 5-km running performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Joel T; Thewlis, Dominic; Tsiros, Margarita D; Brown, Nicholas A T; Buckley, Jonathan D

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if minimalist shoes improve time trial performance of trained distance runners and if changes in running economy, shoe mass, stride length, stride rate and footfall pattern were related to any difference in performance. Twenty-six trained runners performed three 6-min sub-maximal treadmill runs at 11, 13 and 15 km·h(-1) in minimalist and conventional shoes while running economy, stride length, stride rate and footfall pattern were assessed. They then performed a 5-km time trial. In the minimalist shoe, runners completed the trial in less time (effect size 0.20 ± 0.12), were more economical during sub-maximal running (effect size 0.33 ± 0.14) and decreased stride length (effect size 0.22 ± 0.10) and increased stride rate (effect size 0.22 ± 0.11). All but one runner ran with a rearfoot footfall in the minimalist shoe. Improvements in time trial performance were associated with improvements in running economy at 15 km·h(-1) (r = 0.58), with 79% of the improved economy accounted for by reduced shoe mass (P economy and 5-km running performance.

  3. Standardize Test Sites and Increase Test Credibility%建设标准化考点增强考试公信力

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程飞; 郭贵潮

    2013-01-01

      为了提升国家教育考试规范化和科学化的管理水平,营造公平的考试环境,增强考试公信力,维护国家教育考试严肃性、权威性和广大考生、考试工作人员的合法权益,必须建设设施完备、功能齐全、运行良好的标准化考点。本文重点阐述了标准化考点建设的目的和意义,论述标准化考点技术防范的功能和作用,并探讨其在教育考试队伍建设、制度建设等方面的具体措施。%To improve the standardization of national educational tests and scientific management, create a fair test environment, increase test credibility, maintain the seriousness, authority of national educational tests and legal rights of examinees and test working personnel, it is a fundamental means to build standardization test sites with all sorts of facilities, complete functions and good operation. This article elaborates the purposes and meanings of the building of standardization test sites, expounds the functions of technical precautions of them and probe into the construction of the educational test team and system, etc.

  4. Prophylactic ankle taping: influence on treadmill-running kinematics and running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Sally; Braun, William A

    2014-02-01

    Prophylactic ankle taping (PAT) is commonly used in sport. Prophylactic ankle taping may restrict ankle motion, which would affect the kinetic chain and alter gait. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of PAT on lower extremity (LE) kinematics and running economy during treadmill running. Twelve recreational runners (9 women, 3 men; M ± SD age = 31.33 ± 8.04 years, height = 1.67 ± 0.81 m, mass = 61.84 ± 9.38 kg) completed two 20-minute running sessions (PAT and no tape: control [CON]) at a self-selected pace. Before each run, reflective markers were placed along the right side of the body. Sagittal plane kinematic data (60 Hz) were captured 4 times, and expired gases were measured for 2-minute after each video capture during both trials. Stride frequency, stride length, LE kinematic variables at initial contact and end contact (EC) were calculated. Cardiorespiratory variables and heart rate were also measured. Running economy was normalized to oxygen uptake per unit body mass per kilometer (milliliter per kilogram per kilometer) as running speeds varied. At EC, the PAT hip angle significantly decreased (p = 0.01) by 3.82°, whereas CON decreased by 0.85°. The range of motion tended to decrease over the 20-minute run (p = 0.08). Heart rate significantly increased over time (6.7%) but was not different between conditions. Prophylactic ankle taping did not significantly affect the physiological measures associated with the metabolic cost of treadmill running or the other kinematic variables. These findings suggest that the hip angle continued to decrease during the PAT condition at push-off in recreational runners without impacting the metabolic cost of transport.

  5. Destructive testing in gauge R&R studies. Correlation. Runs and Runs tests. (and other contributions)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mast, J.; Trip, A.; Ruggeri, F.; Faltin, F.W.; Kennett, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    Short description of the Encyclopedia of Statistics in Quality and Reliability: An essential reference for statisticians, engineers, and quality professionals in industry, academia, and government, Encyclopedia of Statistics in Quality and Reliability offers an essential knowledge source in an area

  6. Does a run/walk strategy decrease cardiac stress during a marathon in non-elite runners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottenrott, Kuno; Ludyga, Sebastian; Schulze, Stephan; Gronwald, Thomas; Jäger, Frank-Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Although alternating run/walk-periods are often recommended to novice runners, it is unclear, if this particular pacing strategy reduces the cardiovascular stress during prolonged exercise. Therefore, the aim of the study was to compare the effects of two different running strategies on selected cardiac biomarkers as well as marathon performance. Randomized experimental trial in a repeated measure design. Male (n=22) and female subjects (n=20) completed a marathon either with a run/walk strategy or running only. Immediately after crossing the finishing line cardiac biomarkers were assessed in blood taken from the cubital vein. Before (-7 days) and after the marathon (+4 days) subjects also completed an incremental treadmill test. Despite different pacing strategies, run/walk strategy and running only finished the marathon with similar times (04:14:25±00:19:51 vs 04:07:40±00:27:15 [hh:mm:ss]; p=0.377). In both groups, prolonged exercise led to increased B-type natriuretic peptide, creatine kinase MB isoenzyme and myoglobin levels (pcorrelated with the velocity at the individual anaerobic threshold. Run/walk strategy compared to running only reported less muscle pain and fatigue (p=0.006) after the running event. In conclusion, the increase in cardiac biomarkers is a reversible, physiological response to strenuous exercise, indicating temporary stress on the myocyte and skeletal muscle. Although a combined run/walk strategy does not reduce the load on the cardiovascular system, it allows non-elite runners to achieve similar finish times with less (muscle) discomfort. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biomechanics and Physiology of Uphill and Downhill Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernillo, Gianluca; Giandolini, Marlène; Edwards, W Brent; Morin, Jean-Benoît; Samozino, Pierre; Horvais, Nicolas; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2017-04-01

    Most running studies have considered level running (LR), yet the regulation of locomotor behaviour during uphill (UR) and downhill (DR) running is fundamental to increase our understanding of human locomotion. The purpose of this article was to review the existing literature regarding biomechanical, neuromuscular and physiological adaptations during graded running. Relative to LR, UR is characterized by a higher step frequency, increased internal mechanical work, shorter swing/aerial phase duration, and greater duty factor, while DR is characterized by increased aerial time, reduced step frequency and decreased duty factor. Grade also modifies foot strike patterns, with a progressive adoption of a mid- to fore-foot strike pattern during UR, and rear-foot strike patterns during DR. In UR, lower limb muscles perform a higher net mechanical work compared to LR and DR to increase the body's potential energy. In DR, energy dissipation is generally prevalent compared to energy generation. The increased demands for work as running incline increases are met by an increase in power output at all joints, particularly the hip. This implies that UR requires greater muscular activity compared to LR and DR. Energy cost of running (C r) linearly increases with positive slope but C r of DR decreases until a minimum slope is reached at -20 %, after which C r increases again. The effects of slope on biomechanics, muscle contraction patterns and physiological responses have important implications for injury prevention and success of athletes engaged in graded running competitions.

  8. Frequency of allergic contact dermatitis to isoeugenol is increasing: a review of 3636 patients tested from 2001 to 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J M L; White, I R; Glendinning, A; Fleming, J; Jefferies, D; Basketter, D A; McFadden, J P; Buckley, D A

    2007-09-01

    Isoeugenol is an important fragrance allergen. The cosmetic industry was recommended voluntarily to reduce concentrations of isoeugenol in finished cosmetic products from 0.2% to 0.02% in 1998. It was suspected that this would reduce the incidence of patch test positivity in individuals undergoing routine patch testing after approximately 2-3 years (the Dillarstone effect). To review our patch test data since the change in practice by industry, to see if there has been an observable decrease in isoeugenol contact sensitivity. We retrospectively analysed all subjects patch tested to isoeugenol 1% pet. in the St John's Department of Cutaneous Allergy over a period of 5 years, commencing 3 years after the changes. We identified 3636 subjects, 97 of whom were positive for isoeugenol. Year-on-year incidence shows an increasing trend, with an overall incidence of 2.67%. Using the exact Cochran-Armitage test, this ascending trend is statistically significant (P = 0.0182). Seventy-two of 97 isoeugenol-positive subjects were also positive to fragrance mix I. Other fragrances positive in these 97 patients included Myroxylon pereirae (30%), Evernia prunastri (22%) and eugenol (15%). We suspect that the increasing trend may be due to allergen substitution with compounds chemically related to isoeugenol, or which hydrolyse to isoeugenol itself.

  9. Changing step width alters lower extremity biomechanics during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindle, Richard A; Milner, Clare E; Zhang, Songning; Fitzhugh, Eugene C

    2014-01-01

    Step width is a spatiotemporal parameter that may influence lower extremity biomechanics at the hip and knee joint. The purpose of this study was to determine the biomechanical response of the lower extremity joints to step width changes during running. Lower extremity data from 30 healthy runners, half of them male, were collected during running in three step width conditions: preferred, wide, and narrow. Dependent variables and step width were analyzed using a mixed model ANOVA and pairwise t-tests for post hoc comparisons. Step width was successfully altered in the wide and narrow conditions. Generally, frontal plane peak values decreased as step width increased from narrow to preferred to wide. Peak hip adduction and rearfoot eversion angles decreased as step width increased from narrow to wide. Peak knee abduction moment and knee abduction impulse also decreased as step width increased from narrow to wide. Although men and women ran differently, gender only influenced the effect of step width on peak rearfoot inversion moment. In conclusion, step width influences lower extremity biomechanics in healthy runners. When step width increased from narrow to wide, peak values of frontal plane variables decreased. In addition to previously reported changes at the rearfoot, the hip and knee joint biomechanics were also influenced by changes in step width.

  10. Effect Of Running Shoes on Foot Impact During Running

    CERN Document Server

    Nassif, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Running is part of almost every sport, and requires a great amount of stamina, endurance, mental toughness and overall strength. At every step, the foot experiences ground reaction forces necessary to support the motion of the body. With the advancements in shoe technology, running shoes have grown in popularity among runners, as well as non-runners, because they reduce the risk of injuries from the impact felt by the foot. The purpose of this report is to analyze the effect of running shoes on impact forces on the foot. This is achieved through the use of three force pads fixed at different locations on the foot The force measured by each sensor is then used to estimate the vertical ground reaction force, using the sensors' calibrations equations . Based on the ground reaction force, the effective mass corresponding to the momentum change occurring during the transient phase of the impact is estimated. The results show that running at 9 miles per hour without running shoes generates an effective mass of (14....

  11. Running of the Running and Entropy Perturbations During Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    van de Bruck, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    In single field slow-roll inflation, one expects that the spectral index $n_s -1$ is first order in slow-roll parameters. Similarly, its running $\\alpha_s = dn_s/d \\log k$ and the running of the running $\\beta_s = d\\alpha_s/d \\log k$ are second and third order and therefore expected to be progressively smaller, and usually negative. Hence, such models of inflation are in considerable tension with a recent analysis hinting that $\\beta_s$ may actually be positive, and larger than $\\alpha_s$. Motivated by this, in this work we ask the question of what kinds of inflationary models may be useful in achieving such a hierarchy of runnings, particularly focusing on two--field models of inflation in which the late-time transfer of power from isocurvature to curvature modes allows for a much more diverse range of phenomenology. We calculate the runnings due to this effect and briefly apply our results to assessing the feasibility of finding $|\\beta_s| \\gtrsim |\\alpha_s|$ in some specific models.

  12. Common Running Overuse Injuries and Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žiga Kozinc

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Runners are particularly prone to developing overuse injuries. The most common running-related injuries include medial tibial stress syndrome, Achilles tendinopathy, plantar fasciitis, patellar tendinopathy, iliotibial band syndrome, tibial stress fractures, and patellofemoral pain syndrome. Two of the most significant risk factors appear to be injury history and weekly distance. Several trials have successfully identified biomechanical risk factors for specific injuries, with increased ground reaction forces, excessive foot pronation, hip internal rotation and hip adduction during stance phase being mentioned most often. However, evidence on interventions for lowering injury risk is limited, especially regarding exercise-based interventions. Biofeedback training for lowering ground reaction forces is one of the few methods proven to be effective. It seems that the best way to approach running injury prevention is through individualized treatment. Each athlete should be assessed separately and scanned for risk factors, which should be then addressed with specific exercises. This review provides an overview of most common running-related injuries, with a particular focus on risk factors, and emphasizes the problems encountered in preventing running-related injuries.

  13. The Run-2 ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS trigger successfully collected collision data during the first run of the LHC between 2009-2013 at different centre-of-mass energies between 900 GeV and 8 TeV. The trigger system consists of a hardware Level-1 and a software-based high level trigger (HLT) that reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of a few hundred Hz. In Run-2, the LHC will operate at centre-of-mass energies of 13 and 14 TeV and higher luminosity, resulting in roughly five times higher trigger rates. A brief review of the ATLAS trigger system upgrades that were implemented between Run-1 and Run-2, allowing to cope with the increased trigger rates while maintaining or even improving the efficiency to select physics processes of interest, will be given. This includes changes to the Level-1 calorimeter and muon trigger systems, the introduction of a new Level-1 topological trigger module and the merging of the previously two-level HLT system into a single event filter farm. A ...

  14. Fitness Assessment Comparison Between the "Jackie Chan Action Run" Videogame, 1-Mile Run/Walk, and the PACER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Bryan; Siegel, Shannon; Costa, Pablo; Jarvis, Sarah; Klug, Nicholas; Medina, Ernie; Wilkin, Linda

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether a correlation existed among the scores of the "Jackie Chan Studio Fitness(™) Action Run" active videogame (XaviX(®), SSD Company, Ltd., Kusatsu, Japan), the 1-mile run/walk, and Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run (PACER) aerobic fitness tests of the FITNESSGRAM(®) (The Cooper Institute, Dallas, TX) in order to provide a potential alternative testing method for days that are not environmentally desirable for outdoor testing. Participants were a convenience sample from physical education classes of students between the ages of 10 and 15 years. Participants (n=108) were randomly assigned to one of three groups with the only difference being the order of testing. The tests included the "Jackie Chan Action Run" active videogame, the 1-mile run/walk, and the PACER. Testing occurred on three different days during the physical education class. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was reported. Significant correlations (r=-0.598 to 0.312) were found among the three aerobic fitness tests administered (Peducation teachers to perform aerobic fitness testing in an indoor setting that requires less space. Also, children may be more willing to participate in the "Jackie Chan Action Run" based on the lower RPE.

  15. Effects of Whole-body Vibration Training on Sprint Running Kinematics and Explosive Strength Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgos, Paradisis; Elias, Zacharogiannis

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 6 wk of whole body vibration (WBV) training on sprint running kinematics and explosive strength performance. Twenty-four volunteers (12 women and 12 men) participated in the study and were randomised (n = 12) into the experimental and control groups. The WBV group performed a 6-wk program (16-30 min·d(-1), 3 times a week) on a vibration platform. The amplitude of the vibration platform was 2.5 mm and the acceleration was 2.28 g. The control group did not participate in any training. Tests were performed Pre and post the training period. Sprint running performance was measured during a 60 m sprint where running time, running speed, step length and step rate were calculated. Explosive strength performance was measured during a counter movement jump (CMJ) test, where jump height and total number of jumps performed in a period of 30 s (30CVJT). Performance in 10 m, 20 m, 40 m, 50 m and 60 m improved significantly after 6 wk of WBV training with an overall improvement of 2.7%. The step length and running speed improved by 5.1% and 3.6%, and the step rate decreased by 3.4%. The countermovement jump height increased by 3.3%, and the explosive strength endurance improved overall by 7.8%. The WBV training period of 6 wk produced significant changes in sprint running kinematics and explosive strength performance. Key pointsWBV training.Sprint running kinematics.Explosive strength performance.

  16. Anthropometric, Sprint, and High-Intensity Running Profiles of English Academy Rugby Union Players by Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrall-Jones, Joshua D; Jones, Ben; Till, Kevin

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anthropometric, sprint, and high-intensity running profiles of English academy rugby union players by playing positions, and to investigate the relationships between anthropometric, sprint, and high-intensity running characteristics. Data were collected from 67 academy players after the off-season period and consisted of anthropometric (height, body mass, sum of 8 skinfolds [∑SF]), 40-m linear sprint (5-, 10-, 20-, and 40-m splits), the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (Yo-Yo IRTL-1), and the 30-15 intermittent fitness test (30-15 IFT). Forwards displayed greater stature, body mass, and ∑SF; sprint times and sprint momentum, with lower high-intensity running ability and sprint velocities than backs. Comparisons between age categories demonstrated body mass and sprint momentum to have the largest differences at consecutive age categories for forwards and backs; whereas 20-40-m sprint velocity was discriminate for forwards between under 16s, 18s, and 21s. Relationships between anthropometric, sprint velocity, momentum, and high-intensity running ability demonstrated body mass to negatively impact on sprint velocity (10 m; r = -0.34 to -0.46) and positively affect sprint momentum (e.g., 5 m; r = 0.85-0.93), with large to very large negative relationships with the Yo-Yo IRTL-1 (r = -0.65 to -0.74) and 30-15 IFT (r = -0.59 to -0.79). These findings suggest that there are distinct anthropometric, sprint, and high-intensity running ability differences between and within positions in junior rugby union players. The development of sprint and high-intensity running ability may be impacted by continued increases in body mass as there seems to be a trade-off between momentum, velocity, and the ability to complete high-intensity running.

  17. Social isolation increases aggressive behaviour and alters the effects of diazepam in the rat social interaction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwitdecha, N; Marsden, C A

    1996-02-01

    Isolation rearing in the early stages of life has been shown to modify a variety of behaviours in many animals and the responsitivity to psychotropic drugs. The aims of the present study were to investigate the effects of isolation rearing on anxiety using the social interaction paradigm and to compare the effects of diazepam on social interaction behaviours in isolation and socially reared rats. Male Lister hooded rats were reared from weaning either alone (isolation reared) or in groups of four (socially reared) for 6 weeks and then were tested for social interaction. Both isolation and socially reared rats were exposed to the social interaction test either without drug treatment or following saline or diazepam (1 and 2.5 mg/kg, i.p., 30 min before testing). The results demonstrate that under high light in an unfamiliar arena, the isolation compared to the socially reared rats showed a significantly (P < 0.01) higher level of social interaction, manifested as increases in aggressive and avoidance behaviours, and that this interaction occur for a greater length of time during the test period (10 min). However, when the light level was decreased or when the arena was familiar, active social interaction of isolation reared rats decreased but increased in the socially reared rats. In both conditions the isolation reared rats displayed more aggressive behaviours, in particular biting and boxing the partners which did not occur with the socially reared rats. Pretreatment of diazepam (1 and 2.5 mg/kg., i.p.) caused a dose-related reduction in aggressive behaviours in rats reared under both conditions but increased passive interactions in the socially reared rats. In contrast diazepam (2.5 mg/kg) reduced active interaction in the isolation reared rats but had no effect on passive interaction. These results indicate that isolation rearing increases aggressive behaviours and alters the effects of diazepam.

  18. The SPIRIT Action Framework: A structured approach to selecting and testing strategies to increase the use of research in policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Sally; Turner, Tari; Davies, Huw; Williamson, Anna; Haynes, Abby; Brennan, Sue; Milat, Andrew; O'Connor, Denise; Blyth, Fiona; Jorm, Louisa; Green, Sally

    2015-07-01

    The recent proliferation of strategies designed to increase the use of research in health policy (knowledge exchange) demands better application of contemporary conceptual understandings of how research shapes policy. Predictive models, or action frameworks, are needed to organise existing knowledge and enable a more systematic approach to the selection and testing of intervention strategies. Useful action frameworks need to meet four criteria: have a clearly articulated purpose; be informed by existing knowledge; provide an organising structure to build new knowledge; and be capable of guiding the development and testing of interventions. This paper describes the development of the SPIRIT Action Framework. A literature search and interviews with policy makers identified modifiable factors likely to influence the use of research in policy. An iterative process was used to combine these factors into a pragmatic tool which meets the four criteria. The SPIRIT Action Framework can guide conceptually-informed practical decisions in the selection and testing of interventions to increase the use of research in policy. The SPIRIT Action Framework hypothesises that a catalyst is required for the use of research, the response to which is determined by the capacity of the organisation to engage with research. Where there is sufficient capacity, a series of research engagement actions might occur that facilitate research use. These hypotheses are being tested in ongoing empirical work.

  19. Increasing Public Awareness of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Tests: Health Care Access, Internet Use, and Population Density Correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila J. Finney Rutten

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainty around the value of and appropriate regulatory models for direct-to-consumer (DTC genetic testing underscores the importance of tracking public awareness of these services. We analyzed nationally representative, cross-sectional data from the Health Information National Trends Survey in 2008 (n=7,674 and 2011 (n=3,959 to assess population-level changes in awareness of DTC genetic testing in the U.S. and to explore sociodemographic, health care, Internet use, and population density correlates. Overall, awareness increased significantly from 29% in 2008 to 37% in 2011. The observed increase in awareness from 2008 to 2011 remained significant (OR=1.39 even when adjusted for sociodemographic variables, health care access, Internet use, and population density. Independent of survey year, the odds of awareness of DTC genetic tests were significantly higher for those aged 50–64 (OR=1.64, and 65–74 (OR=1.60; college graduates (OR=2.02; those with a regular source of health care (OR=1.27; those with a prior cancer diagnosis (OR=1.24; those who use the Internet (OR=1.27; and those living in urban areas (OR=1.25. Surveillance of awareness—along with empirical data on use of and response to genetic risk information—can inform public health and policy efforts to maximize benefits and minimize risks of DTC genetic testing.

  20. Effect of Level and Downhill Running on Breathing Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D. Cook

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventilatory equivalents for oxygen and carbon dioxide are physiological measures of breathing efficiency, and are known to be affected by the intensity and mode of exercise. We examined the effect of level running (gradient 0% and muscle-damaging downhill running (−12%, matched for oxygen uptake, on the ventilatory equivalents for oxygen ( and carbon dioxide (. Nine men (27 ± 9 years, 179 ± 7 cm, 75 ± 12 kg, : 52.0 ± 7.7 mL·kg−1·min−1 completed two 40-min running bouts (5 × 8-min with 2-min inter-bout rest, one level and one downhill. Running intensity was matched at 60% of maximal metabolic equivalent. Maximal isometric force of m.quadriceps femoris was measured before and after the running bouts. Data was analyzed with 2-way ANOVA or paired samples t-tests. Running speed (downhill: 13.5 ± 3.2, level: 9.6 ± 2.2 km·h−1 and isometric force deficits (downhill: 17.2 ± 7.6%, level: 2.0 ± 6.9% were higher for downhill running. Running bouts for level and downhill gradients had , heart rates and respiratory exchange ratio values that were not different indicating matched intensity and metabolic demands. During downhill running, the , (downhill: 29.7 ± 3.3, level: 27.2 ± 1.6 and  (downhill: 33.3 ± 2.7, level: 30.4 ± 1.9 were 7.1% and 8.3% higher (p < 0.05 than level running. In conclusion, breathing efficiency appears lower during downhill running (i.e., muscle-damaging exercise compared to level running at a similar moderate intensity.

  1. Effects of Short or Long Warm-up on Intermediate Running Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Tillaar, Roland; Vatten, Tormod; von Heimburg, Erna

    2017-01-01

    van den Tillaar, R, Vatten, T, and von Heimburg, E. Effects of short or long warm-up on intermediate running performance. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 37-44, 2017-The aim of the study was to compare the effects of a long warm-up (general + specific) and a short warm-up (specific) on intermediate running performance (3-minute run). Thirteen experienced endurance-trained athletes (age 23.2 ± 2.3 years, body mass 79.8 ± 8.2 kg, body height 1.82 ± 0.05 m) conducted 2 types of warm-ups in a crossover design with 1 week in between: a long warm-up (10 minutes, 80% maximal heart rate, and 8 × 60 m sprint with increasing intensity and 1 minute rest in between) and a short warm-up (8 × 60 m sprint with increasing intensity and 1 minute rest in between). Each warm-up was followed by a 3-minute running test on a nonmotorized treadmill. Total running distance, running velocity at each 30 seconds, heart rate, blood lactate concentration, oxygen uptake, and rate of perceived exertion were measured. No significant differences in running performance variables and physiological parameters were found between the 2 warm-up protocols, except for the rate of perceived exertion and heart rate, which were higher after the long warm-up and after the 3-minute running test compared with the short warm-up. It was concluded that a short warm-up is as effective as a long warm-up for intermediate performance. Therefore, athletes can choose for themselves if they want to include a general part in their warm-up routines, even though it would not enhance their running performance more compared with only using a short, specific warm-up. However, to increase efficiency of time for training or competition, these short, specific warm-ups should be performed instead of long warm-ups.

  2. The CDF Run IIb silicon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, M.; Bacchetta, N.; Behari, S.; Benjamin, D.; Bisello, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Burghard, A.; Busetto, G.; Cabrera, S.; Canepa, A.; Castro, A.; Cardoso, G.; Chertok, M.; Ciobanu, C.; Derylo, G.; Fang, I.; Flaugher, B. E-mail: brenna@fnal.gov; Freeman, J.; Galtieri, L.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Gorelov, I.; Haber, C.; Hara, K.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Holbrook, B.; Hrycyk, M.; Junk, T.; Kim, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Krieger, B.; Kruse, M.; Lander, R.; Lu, R.-S.; Lukens, P.; Malferrari, L.; Manea, C.; Margotti, A.; Maksimovic, P.; Merkel, P.; Moccia, S.; Nakano, I.; Naoumov, D.; Novak, J.; Okusawa, T.; Orlov, Y.; Pancaldi, G.; Pantano, D.; Pavlicek, V.; Pellett, D.; Seidel, S.; Semeria, F.; Takei, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Wang, Z.; Watje, P.; Weber, M.; Wester, W.; Wilkes, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Yao, W.; Zimmermann, S.; Zucchelli, S.; Zucchini, A

    2004-02-01

    Fermilab plans to deliver 5-15 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity to the CDF and D0 experiments. The current inner silicon detectors at CDF (SVXIIa and L00) will not tolerate the radiation dose associated with high-luminosity running and will need to be replaced. A new readout chip (SVX4) has been designed in radiation-hard 0.25 {mu}m, CMOS technology. Single-sided sensors are arranged in a compact structure, called a stave, with integrated readout and cooling systems. This paper describes the general design of the Run IIb system, testing results of prototype electrical components (staves), and prototype silicon sensor performance before and after irradiation.

  3. The Millennium Run Observatory: First Light

    CERN Document Server

    Overzier, R; Angulo, R E; Bertin, E; Blaizot, J; Henriques, B M B; Marleau, G -D; White, S D M

    2012-01-01

    Simulations of galaxy evolution aim to capture our current understanding as well as to make predictions for testing by future experiments. Simulations and observations are often compared in an indirect fashion: physical quantities are estimated from the data and compared to models. However, many applications can benefit from a more direct approach, where the observing process is also simulated and the models are seen fully from the observer's perspective. To facilitate this, we have developed the Millennium Run Observatory (MRObs), a theoretical virtual observatory which uses virtual telescopes to `observe' semi-analytic galaxy formation models based on the suite of Millennium Run dark matter simulations. The MRObs produces data that can be processed and analyzed using the standard software packages developed for real observations. At present, we produce images in forty filters from the rest-frame UV to IR for two stellar population synthesis models, three different models of IGM absorption, and two cosmologi...

  4. The Robust Running Ape: Unraveling the Deep Underpinnings of Coordinated Human Running Proficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kiely

    2017-06-01

    , misuse, and disuse—this spectrum of available ‘choice’ dysfunctionally contracts, and our capacity to safely disperse the mechanical ‘stress’ of running progressively diminishes. Now the running work burden falls increasingly on reduced populations of collaborating components. Accordingly our capacity to effectively manage, dissipate and accommodate running-imposed stress diminishes, and vulnerability to Overuse syndromes escalates. Awareness of the deep underpinnings of running coordination enhances conceptual clarity, thereby informing training and rehabilitation insights designed to offset the legacy of excessive or progressively accumulating exposure to running-imposed mechanical stress.

  5. How Fast Can a Human Run? - Bipedal vs. Quadrupedal Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinugasa, Ryuta; Usami, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Usain Bolt holds the current world record in the 100-m run, with a running time of 9.58 s, and has been described as the best human sprinter in history. However, this raises questions concerning the maximum human running speed, such as "Can the world's fastest men become faster still?" The correct answer is likely "Yes." We plotted the historical world records for bipedal and quadrupedal 100-m sprint times according to competition year. These historical records were plotted using several curve-fitting procedures. We found that the projected speeds intersected in 2048, when for the first time, the winning quadrupedal 100-m sprint time could be lower, at 9.276 s, than the winning bipedal time of 9.383 s. Video analysis revealed that in quadrupedal running, humans employed a transverse gallop with a small angular excursion. These results suggest that in the future, the fastest human on the planet might be a quadrupedal runner at the 2048 Olympics. This may be achieved by shifting up to the rotary gallop and taking longer strides with wide sagittal trunk motion.

  6. Percentile values for aerobic performance running/walking field tests in children aged 6 to 17 years: influence of weight status Valores de percentiles de los tests de campo de capacidad aeróbica en niños de 6 a 17 años: influencia del peso corporal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Castro-Piñero

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to provide percentiles values for four different aerobic performance tests in 2752 (1,261 girls Spanish children aged 6 to 17.9 years. Aerobic performance was assessed by the shuttle run test (20mSRT, 1-mile, 1/2-mile and 1/4-mile run/walk tests. Height and weight were measured, and body mass index was calculated. Boys had significantly better score than girls in the studied tests in all age groups, except in 1/4-mile test in 6-7 year old children. Underweight children had similar performance than their normalweight counterparts, and underweight boys had better performance than their obese counterparts. Overweight and obese children had lower performance than their normalweight counterparts. Having percentile values of the most used field tests to measure aerobic performance in youth may help to identify children and adolescents at risk for the major chronic diseases, as well as to evaluate the effects of alternative interventions.El propósito de este estudio fue proporcionar los valores de percentiles para cuatro pruebas de rendimiento aeróbico en 2752 (1261 chicas niños españoles con edades de 6 a 17,9 años. El rendimiento aeróbico se evalúo mediante la carrera durante 20 minutos (20mSRT, y las pruebas de correr / caminar 1 milla, ½ milla y ¼ de milla. Se midieron el peso y la talla y se calculó el índice de masa corporal. Los chicos tuvieron puntuaciones significativamente mejores que las chicas en las pruebas evaluadas y para todos los grupos de edad, excepto en la prueba de ¼ de milla en el grupo de 6-7 años. Los niños con peso bajo mostraron un rendimiento similar a sus homólogos con peso normal y los primeros tuvieron un rendimiento mejor que sus homólogos obesos. Los niños obesos y con sobrepeso tuvieron un menor rendimiento que sus homólogos con peso normal. El disponer de valores de percentiles para las pruebas empleadas más habitualmente para evaluar el rendimiento aeróbico en los j

  7. Changes in lipid peroxidation and antioxidant capacity during walking and running of the same and different intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Sükrü Serdar; Okudan, Nilsel; Pepe, Hamdi; Gökbel, Hakki; Revan, Serkan; Kurtoğlu, Firuze; Akkuş, Hasan

    2010-09-01

    The aim was to investigate the changes in lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme activities, and muscle damage in the same and different exercise intensities during walking and running. Fourteen healthy males participated in this study. The subjects' individual preferred walk-to-run transition speeds (WRTS) were determined. Each subject covered a 1.5-mile distance for 4 exercise tests; walking (WRTS-W) and running (WRTS-R) tests at WRTS, 2 kmxh-1 slower walking than WRTS (WRTS-2) and 2 kmxh-1 faster running than WRTS (WRTS+2). Blood samples were taken pre, immediately, and 30 minutes post each test. The changes in (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and creatine kinase activities were measured. Oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide output, oxygen uptake per kilogram of body weight, and heart rate during exercises were significantly higher in both the WRTS-W and the WRTS+2 exercises compared with the WRTS-2 and WRTS-R. Oxygen consumption and energy expenditure were higher in walking than in the running exercise at the preferred WRTS and only WRTS-W exercise significantly increased MDA levels. Catalase activities were increased by WRTS-W, WRTS-R, and WRTS+2 exercises. Changes in SOD and CAT activities were not different between walking and running exercises at the preferred WRTS. Total plasma GSH increased in response to WRTS-W exercise, which could be associated with an increase in MDA. Also, total GSH levels 30 minutes postexercise were significantly lower than postexercise in WRTS-2, WRTS-W, and WRTS+2 exercises. Our results indicate that walking and running exercises at the preferred WRTS have different oxidative stress and antioxidant responses.

  8. Does running cause osteoarthritis in the hip or knee?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Pamela; English, Michael; Willick, Stuart E

    2012-05-01

    Running is an excellent activity to promote general health and well-being. However, running injuries are common, and concern is sometimes raised that running might lead to osteoarthritis in weight-bearing joints. This article reviews the relevant in vitro and in vivo literature that looks at possible associations between running and the development of osteoarthritis. Also reviewed is the limited literature on running barefoot and with minimalist footwear. Low- and moderate-volume runners appear to have no more risk of developing osteoarthritis than nonrunners. The existing literature is inconclusive about a possible association between high-volume running and the development of osteoarthritis. The early literature on running barefoot and running with minimalist footwear has primarily focused on biomechanics but has not yet focused on any effect on cartilage health. Experienced and beginner runners should be encouraged to allow the body adequate time to adapt to changes in gait biomechanics caused by changing footwear, which can be done by slowly increasing running mileage in the new footwear. Clinicians can improve the health of runners by encouraging appropriate treatment of musculoskeletal injuries, encouraging maintenance of an optimal body mass index, and correcting gait abnormalities caused by deficits in flexibility, strength, or motor control along the kinetic chain.

  9. Acute changes in muscle activation and leg extension performance after different running exercises in elite long distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorimaa, Timo; Virlander, Rami; Kurkilahti, Pasi; Vasankari, Tommi; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2006-02-01

    This study investigated acute changes in muscle activation and muscular power performance after three different running exercises in elite long-distance runners. Twenty-two nationally and internationally ranked long-distance runners performed first an incremental treadmill running test until exhaustion (MR) and then 40 min continuous (TR) and intermittent (2 min run/2 min rest) (IR) running exercises at an intensity of 80 and 100% of the velocity associated with VO(2max), respectively. Muscle activation and muscular power performance tests (counter-movement jumps, CMJ, and a set of ten maximal half squats from the static starting position with an extra load of 35% of the subjects, one repetition maximum) were performed before and immediately after the runs. The average mechanical power (P) of the half squats was calculated and the root mean square electromyogram (EMGrms) from the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, gastrocnemius and biceps femoris muscles was recorded simultaneously during the half squat performances. The results showed an acute exercise-induced increase in P (ANOVA time effect, P = 0.000) together with a reduction in EMGrms of the knee extensor muscles (ANOVA time effect, P = 0.000). However, mechanical P expressed as a relative change within the set decreased after MR. In TR the improvement in P correlated positively with the maximal running performance of the runners (P muscles, and may lead to a different coordination strategy in leg extension exercises performed into the vertical direction. After continuous type of running the power improvement correlates positively with maximal endurance running capacity, whereas after intermittent type of running it correlates negatively.

  10. Increasing HIV-related knowledge, communication, and testing intentions among Latinos: Protege tu Familia: Hazte la Prueba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Ellis, Britt; Espinoza, Lilia; Bird, Mara; Garcia, Melawhy; D'Anna, Laura Hoyt; Bellamy, Laura; Scolari, Rosana

    2010-08-01

    Latinos are less likely to be aware of their HIV seropositivity than African Americans and Whites. 'Protege tu Familia: Hazte la Prueba' is a culturally and linguistically-sensitive HIV/AIDS prevention and testing program targeting Latino families. Using community-based participatory research techniques, Spanish-speaking bicultural community health workers helped develop and then used an educational flip chart and materials to conduct outreach and HIV prevention education in diverse settings. The intervention was created to increase HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, to improve communication regarding sexual risk, and to augment intentions to use condoms and test for HIV. A secondary purpose was to decrease HIV-related stigma by improving knowledge about transmission and reducing homophobia. Participants demonstrated significant increases in HIV knowledge, intention to practice safer sex and communicate sexual risk to partner(s), and intention to test for HIV. Improvements were also found in self-reported comfort levels when interacting with and caring for the HIV positive, thus decreasing HIV/AIDS-related stigma.

  11. Dramatic and sustained increase in HIV-testing rates among antenatal attendees in Eastern Uganda after a policy change from voluntary counselling and testing to routine counselling and testing for HIV: a retrospective analysis of hospital records, 2002-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onyango Saul

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The burden of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Uganda is high. The aim of this paper is to describe the experience of the first 7 years of the prevention of mother- to- child transmission of HIV (PMTCT programme in Mbale Regional Hospital, Eastern Uganda, with particular reference to the lessons learnt in changing from voluntary counselling and testing (VCT to routine counselling and testing (RCT for HIV testing in antenatal services. Methods The study was a retrospective analysis of the PMTCT records of Mbale Regional Referral Hospital, Uganda, from May 2002 to April 2009. The data on HIV testing of pregnant women and their male partners was extracted from the reports and registers using a standardized data extraction form, and data was analysed using descriptive statistics. Permission to conduct the study was obtained from School of Medicine, Makerere University College of Health Sciences; Uganda National Council of Science and Technology, and Mbale Hospital. Results A total of 54 429 new antenatal (ANC attendees and 469 male-partners accessed antenatal services at Mbale Regional Referral Hospital. There was a sustained, significant increase in HIV testing among new ANC attendees from 22% during the VCT period to 88% during the RCT period (p = 0.002, while among male partners, HIV testing increased from 88% to 100% (p = 0.010 However, the overall number of male partners who tested for HIV remained very low despite the change from VCT to RCT approach in HIV testing. Conclusions Routine offer of antenatal HIV testing dramatically increased HIV testing in pregnant women and their partners in Uganda. Our findings call for further strengthening of the policy for routine HIV testing in antenatal clinics. Our study also showed that male partner HIV testing in antenatal clinics is low and this area needs further work through research and innovative interventions in order to improve male partner involvement.

  12. Simulating test and energy-saving analysis of elevator running based on waiting-time%考虑等待时间的电梯运行模拟测试与节能分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卿晓霞; 王波; 段军

    2012-01-01

    Up till now, the main target of elevator scheduling algorithms at home and abroad is minimization of passenger waiting time, which results in fewer passenger numbers and higher energy consumption during elevator operation in non-rush hour traffic. In order to balance the service efficiency and energy-saving of elevator, a new elevator scheduling rule for energy-saving based on elevator waiting-time is proposed. In order to quantitatively analyze the energy-saving effects of the new elevator scheduling rule based on the waiting-time, the new software is developed. The software can simulate elevator operation, calculate energy consumption and analyze energy-saving effected by generating randomly passenger flows, and then the amount of energy consumption, the elevator start and stop frequency and running distances are compared in different combined conditions of the height of building, the numbers of elevator, the elevator rated capacity, the concentration ratio of passenger in 5 min while different waiting-times are used and not used. The results of simulating tests show that the average energy-saving effects of 7.1%~9.4% can be gotten by using different waiting-time, and that introducing the elevator scheduling rule based on the waiting-time into the traditional elevator scheduling algorithms is a low-cost effective method of elevator energy-saving.%国内外电梯调度算法都以追求乘客候梯时间的最小化为主要目标,导致电梯在非高峰交通时段载客率较低,运行能耗较大.为兼顾电梯服务效率和节能,提出了一种基于等待时间的电梯运行节能调度规则.为定量分析新规则的节能效果,利用所开发的电梯模拟运行、能耗计算与节能分析软件,通过随机产生客流,计算办公建筑电梯在不同组合条件(建筑物高度、电梯台数、电梯额定载客率、5 min乘客集中率)下,加入不同等待时间后的电梯启停次数、运行里程及电能消耗,并与相同组合

  13. Biomechanics and energetics of running on uneven terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshina, Alexandra S; Ferris, Daniel P

    2015-03-01

    In the natural world, legged animals regularly run across uneven terrain with remarkable ease. To gain understanding of how running on uneven terrain affects the biomechanics and energetics of locomotion, we studied human subjects (N=12) running at 2.3 m s(-1) on an uneven terrain treadmill, with up to a 2.5 cm height variation. We hypothesized that running on uneven terrain would show increased energy expenditure, step parameter variability and leg stiffness compared with running on smooth terrain. Subject energy expenditure increased by 5% (0.68 W kg(-1); Prunning on uneven terrain compared with smooth terrain. Step width and length variability also increased by 27% and 26%, respectively (Prunning on uneven terrain compared with smooth terrain. Calculations of gravitational potential energy fluctuations suggest that about half of the energetic increases can be explained by additional positive and negative mechanical work for up and down steps on the uneven surface. This is consistent between walking and running, as the absolute increases in energetic cost for walking and running on uneven terrain were similar: 0.68 and 0.48 W kg(-1), respectively. These results provide insight into how surface smoothness can affect locomotion biomechanics and energetics in the real world.

  14. Changes in mechanical work during severe exhausting running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avogadro, Patrick; Dolenec, Ales; Belli, Alain

    2003-09-01

    The possible contribution of muscular work to the increase in oxygen uptake ( VO(2)) over time during running was investigated on 11 adult males who were asked to run until exhaustion at 90 (3)% [mean (SD)] of their maximal aerobic velocity on a treadmill ergometer. Ground reaction forces, expired gases and EMG from leg muscles were collected for 30 s at min 3 and during the last minute of the run. Subjects ran for 829 (165) s and showed an increase in VO(2 )of 179 (93) ml.min(-1) between min 3 and exhaustion. Increased ventilation explained 41 (27)% of the increase in VO(2). Stride frequency slightly decreased but no significant differences were found in the mechanical work or in integrated EMG. It was concluded that, in running, the increase in VO(2 )could not be related to a drift in muscle work.

  15. Corona pre-ionized gas switches with an increased lifetime for Marx generator of the lightning test complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, Yu A.; Krastelev, E. G.

    2017-05-01

    A new design of triggered spark gas switches with an increased operation life and stable dynamic performances for 2.4 MV, 4 MJ Marx generator of the lightning test complex is developed. An operation mode of switches in the test complex is the following: the total voltage - up to 80 kV, the discharge current - up to 50 kA, the charge flowing - up to 3.5 C/pulse, the working gas - dry air at an atmospheric pressure. An increased operating life is achieved by using the torus-shaped electrodes with an increased working area and by the application of a thick disk with a hole, as a trigger electrode, installed between the two torus-shaped electrodes. A short breakdown time delay and a high stability of the breakdown voltage under dynamic conditions are provided by gas pre-ionization in the spark gap by UV-radiation of an additional corona discharge in the axial region of the switch.

  16. Elite cross-country skiers do not reach their running VO2max during roller ski skating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losnegard, T; Hallén, J

    2014-08-01

    Cross-country skiers' VO2max is often measured during treadmill running. However, VO2max during treadmill skiing with the diagonal stride technique is higher, whereas it is lower during double poling, another classical style technique. How these values compare to VO2max during ski skating in elite cross country skiers is not known. Therefore, this study compared VO2max during treadmill uphill running and treadmill roller ski skating. Twenty-two males (21±2 years, 182±6 cm, 77±7 kg, VO2max running; 72.4±4.4 mL·kg-1·min-1) elite cross-country skiers and biathlon athletes underwent testing in both running and roller ski skating before (May) and at the end (October) of the preseason training. From May to October VO2max increased during running (3.1±4.5%, P=0.003, Effect size; ES=0.44, small) but not during roller ski skating (1.8±5.6%, P=0.13, ES=0.24, small). In May the subjects' VO2max during running was 1.7±4.7% higher compared to during roller ski skating (P=0.08, ES=0.24, small) while in October this difference was 3.0±5.0 % (PVO2max during roller ski skating than during running and this relationship does not change during the pre-season training period.

  17. Bremen Workshop : Run-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Schlütter, F.

    The objective of the workshop was a comparison between the prototype and the laboratory measurements. the emphasis is put on comparison between recorded run-up levels. Three enclosed reports present measurements and results from University of Ghent (UG)/ FCCD, Flanders Hydraulics (FH) and Aalborg...

  18. Running and Breathing in Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramble, Dennis M.; Carrier, David R.

    1983-01-01

    Mechanical constraints appear to require that locomotion and breathing be synchronized in running mammals. Phase locking of limb and respiratory frequency has now been recorded during treadmill running in jackrabbits and during locomotion on solid ground in dogs, horses, and humans. Quadrupedal species normally synchronize the locomotor and respiratory cycles at a constant ratio of 1:1 (strides per breath) in both the trot and gallop. Human runners differ from quadrupeds in that while running they employ several phase-locked patterns (4:1, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1, 5:2, and 3:2), although a 2:1 coupling ratio appears to be favored. Even though the evolution of bipedal gait has reduced the mechanical constraints on respiration in man, thereby permitting greater flexibility in breathing pattern, it has seemingly not eliminated the need for the synchronization of respiration and body motion during sustained running. Flying birds have independently achieved phase-locked locomotor and respiratory cycles. This hints that strict locomotor-respiratory coupling may be a vital factor in the sustained aerobic exercise of endothermic vertebrates, especially those in which the stresses of locomotion tend to deform the thoracic complex.

  19. ATLAS Searches in Run I

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Michael; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Title: Searches for di-Higgs production in 4b final states and new phenomena with boosted Higgs using the ATLAS detector at LHC Run I Abstract : Measurement of Higgs boson pair production has a fundamental importance in understanding the nature of the Higgs boson and electroweak symmetry breaking. TeVscale resonances decaying to a pair of Higgs boson are also predicted in various extensions of the Standard Models, e.g, Kaluza-Klein excitation of the gravitons in the bulk Randall- Sundrum extra dimensions, heavy scalar particles in two-Higgs-doublet models. This talk highlights ATLAS Run I searches for di-Higgs production in 4b final states with resolved topology using small-radius jets and boosted topology using large-radius jets with associated b-tagged track-jets. Other Run I searches employing techniques to identify boosted Higgs bosons are also presented in this talk. Title: Searches for vector-like quarks and resonances decaying into top-quarks with the ATLAS detector at LHC Run I Abstract : In theories ...

  20. Running gratings in photoconductive materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kukhtarev, N. V.; Kukhtareva, T.; Lyuksyutov, S. F.

    2005-01-01

    Starting from the three-dimensional version of a standard photorefractive model (STPM), we obtain a reduced compact Set of equations for an electric field based on the assumption of a quasi-steady-state fast recombination. The equations are suitable for evaluation of a current induced by running...