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Sample records for increases neurotransmitter release

  1. Hexabromocyclododecane inhibits depolarization-induced increase in intracellular calcium levels and neurotransmitter release in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemans, Milou M L; Heusinkveld, Harm J; de Groot, Aart; Bergman, Ake; van den Berg, Martin; Westerink, Remco H S

    2009-02-01

    Environmental levels of the brominated flame retardant (BFR) hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) have been increasing. HBCD has been shown to cause adverse effects on learning and behavior in mice, as well as on dopamine uptake in rat synaptosomes and synaptic vesicles. For other BFRs, alterations in the intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis have been observed. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the technical HBCD mixture and individual stereoisomers affect the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in a neuroendocrine in vitro model (PC12 cells). [Ca(2+)](i) and vesicular catecholamine release were measured using respectively single-cell Fura-2 imaging and amperometry. Exposure of PC12 cells to the technical HBCD mixture or individual stereoisomers did neither affect basal [Ca(2+)](i), nor the frequency of basal neurotransmitter release. However, exposure to HBCD (0-20 microM) did cause a dose-dependent reduction of a subsequent depolarization-evoked increase in [Ca(2+)](i). This effect was apparent only when HBCD was applied at least 5 min before depolarization (maximum effect after 20 min exposure). The effects of alpha- and beta-HBCD were comparable to that of the technical mixture, whereas the inhibitory effect of gamma-HBCD was larger. Using specific blockers of L-, N- or P/Q-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs) it was shown that the inhibitory effect of HBCD is not VGCC-specific. Additionally, the number of cells showing depolarization-evoked neurotransmitter release was markedly reduced following HBCD exposure. Summarizing, HBCD inhibits depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)](i) and neurotransmitter release. As increasing HBCD levels should be anticipated, these findings justify additional efforts to establish an adequate exposure, hazard and risk assessment.

  2. The Role of Neurotrophins in Neurotransmitter Release

    OpenAIRE

    William J Tyler; Perrett, Stephen P.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas D.

    2002-01-01

    The neurotrophins (NTs) have recently been shown to elicit pronounced effects on quantal neurotransmitter release at both central and peripheral nervous system synapses. Due to their activity-dependent release, as well as the subcellular localization of both protein and receptor, NTs are ideally suited to modify the strength of neuronal connections by “fine-tuning” synaptic activity through direct actions at presynaptic terminals. Here, using BDNF as a prototypical example, the authors provid...

  3. Immunoglobulin Fc gamma receptor promotes immunoglobulin uptake, immunoglobulin-mediated calcium increase, and neurotransmitter release in motor neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Habib A.; Mosier, Dennis R.; Zou, Ling L.; Siklos, Laszlo; Alexianu, Maria E.; Engelhardt, Jozsef I.; Beers, David R.; Le, Wei-dong; Appel, Stanley H.

    2002-01-01

    Receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG; FcgammaRs) facilitate IgG uptake by effector cells as well as cellular responses initiated by IgG binding. In earlier studies, we demonstrated that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patient IgG can be taken up by motor neuron terminals and transported retrogradely to the cell body and can alter the function of neuromuscular synapses, such as increasing intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release from motor axon terminals after passive transfer. In the present study, we examined whether FcgammaR-mediated processes can contribute to these effects of ALS patient immunoglobulins. F(ab')(2) fragments (which lack the Fc portion) of ALS patient IgG were not taken up by motor axon terminals and were not retrogradely transported. Furthermore, in a genetically modified mouse lacking the gamma subunit of the FcR, the uptake of whole ALS IgG and its ability to enhance intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release were markedly attenuated. These data suggest that FcgammaRs appear to participate in IgG uptake into motor neurons as well as IgG-mediated increases in intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release from motor axon terminals. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. The Role of Neurotrophins in Neurotransmitter Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, William J.; Perrett, Stephen P.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas D.

    2009-01-01

    The neurotrophins (NTs) have recently been shown to elicit pronounced effects on quantal neurotransmitter release at both central and peripheral nervous system synapses. Due to their activity-dependent release, as well as the subcellular localization of both protein and receptor, NTs are ideally suited to modify the strength of neuronal connections by “fine-tuning” synaptic activity through direct actions at presynaptic terminals. Here, using BDNF as a prototypical example, the authors provide an update of recent evidence demonstrating that NTs enhance quantal neurotransmitter release at synapses through presynaptic mechanisms. The authors further propose that a potential target for NT actions at presynaptic terminals is the mechanism by which terminals retrieve synaptic vesicles after exocytosis. Depending on the temporal demands placed on synapses during high-frequency synaptic transmission, synapses may use two alternative modes of synaptic vesicle retrieval, the conventional slow endosomal recycling or a faster rapid retrieval at the active zone, referred to as “kiss-and-run.” By modulating Ca2+ microdomains associated with voltage-gated Ca2+ channels at active zones, NTs may elicit a switch from the slow to the fast mode of endocytosis of vesicles at presynaptic terminals during high-frequency synaptic transmission, allowing more reliable information transfer and neuronal signaling in the central nervous system. PMID:12467374

  5. Interaction of anesthetics with neurotransmitter release machinery proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zheng; McMillan, Kyle; Pike, Carolyn M; Cahill, Anne L; Herring, Bruce E; Wang, Qiang; Fox, Aaron P

    2013-02-01

    General anesthetics produce anesthesia by depressing central nervous system activity. Activation of inhibitory GABA(A) receptors plays a central role in the action of many clinically relevant general anesthetics. Even so, there is growing evidence that anesthetics can act at a presynaptic locus to inhibit neurotransmitter release. Our own data identified the neurotransmitter release machinery as a target for anesthetic action. In the present study, we sought to examine the site of anesthetic action more closely. Exocytosis was stimulated by directly elevating the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration at neurotransmitter release sites, thereby bypassing anesthetic effects on channels and receptors, allowing anesthetic effects on the neurotransmitter release machinery to be examined in isolation. Three different PC12 cell lines, which had the expression of different release machinery proteins stably suppressed by RNA interference, were used in these studies. Interestingly, there was still significant neurotransmitter release when these knockdown PC12 cells were stimulated. We have previously shown that etomidate, isoflurane, and propofol all inhibited the neurotransmitter release machinery in wild-type PC12 cells. In the present study, we show that knocking down synaptotagmin I completely prevented etomidate from inhibiting neurotransmitter release. Synaptotagmin I knockdown also diminished the inhibition produced by propofol and isoflurane, but the magnitude of the effect was not as large. Knockdown of SNAP-25 and SNAP-23 expression also changed the ability of these three anesthetics to inhibit neurotransmitter release. Our results suggest that general anesthetics inhibit the neurotransmitter release machinery by interacting with multiple SNARE and SNARE-associated proteins.

  6. Marine Toxins Potently Affecting Neurotransmitter Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Frédéric A.; Mattei, César; Molgó, Jordi

    Synapses are specialised structures where interneuronal communication takes place. Not only brain function is absolutely dependent on synaptic activity, but also most of our organs are intimately controlled by synaptic activity. Synapses re therefore an ideal target to act upon and poisonous species have evolved fascinating neurotoxins capable of shutting down neuronal communication by blocking or activating essential components of the synapse. By hijacking key proteins of the communication machinery, neurotoxins are therefore extremely valuable tools that have, in turn, greatly helped our understanding of synaptic biology. Moreover, analysis and understanding of the molecular strategy used by certain neurotoxins has allowed the design of entirely new classes of drugs acting on specific targets with high selectivity and efficacy. This chapter will discuss the different classes of marine neurotoxins, their effects on neurotransmitter release and how they act to incapacitate key steps in the process leading to synaptic vesicle fusion.

  7. Hexabromocyclododecane inhibits depolarization-induced increase in intracellular calcium levels and neurotransmitter release in PC12 cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dingemans, M.M.L.; Heusinkveld, H.J.; de Groot, A.; Bergman, A.; van den Berg, M.; Westerink, R.H.S.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental levels of the brominated flame retardant (BFR) hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) have been increasing. HBCD has been shown to cause adverse effects on learning and behavior in mice, as well as on dopamine uptake in rat synaptosomes and synaptic vesicles. For other BFRs, alterations in the

  8. [Mechanisms of neurotransmitter release facilitation in strontium solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhamed'iarov, M A; Kochunova, Iu O; Telina, E N; Zefirov, A L

    2008-02-01

    Mechanisms of neurotransmitter release facilitation were studied using electrophysiological recording of end-plate currents (EPC) and nerve ending (NE) responses after substitution of extracellular Ca ions with Sr ions at the frog neuromuscular junction. The solutions with 0.5 mM concentration of Ca ions (calcium solution) or 1 mM concentration of Sr ions (strontium solution) were used where baseline neurotransmitter release (at low-frequency stimulation) is equal. Decay of paired-pulse facilitation of EPC at calcium solutions with increase of interpulse interval from 5 to 500 ms was well described by three-exponential function consisting of early, first and second components. Facilitation at strontium solutions was significantly diminished due mainly to decrease of early and first components. At the same time, EPC facilitation with rhythmic stimulation (10 or 50 imp/s) at strontium solutions was significantly increased. Also more pronounced decrease of NE response 3rd phase, reflecting potassium currents was detected under rhythmic stimulation of 50 imp/s at strontium solutions comparing to calcium solutions. It was concluded that facilitation sites underlying first and early components had lower affinity to Sr ions than to Ca ions. The enhancement of frequency facilitation at strontium solutions is mediated by two mechanisms: more pronounced broadening of NE action potential and increase of bivalent cation influx due to feebly marked activation of Ca(2+)-dependent potassium current by Sr ions, and slower dynamics of Sr(2+) removal from NE axoplasm comparing to Ca(2+).

  9. Ricardo Miledi and the calcium hypothesis of neurotransmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Jade-Ming

    2002-01-01

    Ricardo Miledi has made significant contributions to our basic understanding of how synapses work. Here I discuss aspects of Miledi's research that helped to establish the requirement of presynaptic calcium for neurotransmitter release, from his earliest scientific studies to his classic experiments in the squid giant synapse.

  10. Depolarization by K*O+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in gabaergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of gaba

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, Bo; Hansen, G.H.; Schousboe, Arne

    1993-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release, gaba release, membrane transporter, vesicles, intracellular CA*OH, neuron cultures......Neurotransmitter release, gaba release, membrane transporter, vesicles, intracellular CA*OH, neuron cultures...

  11. Depolarization by K+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in GABAergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of GABA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Schousboe, A

    1993-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release and changes in the concentration of intracellular free calcium ([Ca++]i) were studied in cultured GABAergic cerebral cortical neurons, from mice, upon depolarization with either an unphysiologically high potassium concentration (55 mM) or the physiological excitatory...... neurotransmitter glutamate (100 microM). Both depolarizing stimuli exerted prompt increases in the release of preloaded [3H]GABA as well as in [Ca++]i. However, the basic properties of transmitter release and the increase in [Ca++]i under a variety of conditions were different during stimulation with K...... in nature whereas that induced by the neurotransmitter glutamate is not....

  12. Parallel expression of synaptophysin and evoked neurotransmitter release during development of cultured neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Treiman, M; Hansen, Gert Helge;

    1991-01-01

    and neurotransmitter release were measured in each of the culture types as a function of development for up to 8 days in vitro, using the same batch of cells for both sets of measurements to obtain optimal comparisons. The content and the distribution of synaptophysin in the developing cells were assessed...... by quantitative immunoblotting and light microscope immunocytochemistry, respectively. In both cell types, a close parallelism was found between the temporal pattern of development in synaptophysin expression and neurotransmitter release. This temporal pattern differed between the two types of neurons....... The cerebral cortex neurons showed a biphasic time course of increase in synaptophysin content, paralleled by a biphasic pattern of development in their ability to release [3H]GABA in response to depolarization by glutamate or elevated K+ concentrations. In contrast, a monophasic, approximately linear increase...

  13. The dependence of neuronal encoding efficiency on Hebbian plasticity and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Faramarz; Moustafa, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses act as information filters by different molecular mechanisms including retrograde messenger that affect neuronal spiking activity. One of the well-known effects of retrograde messenger in presynaptic neurons is a change of the probability of neurotransmitter release. Hebbian learning describe a strengthening of a synapse between a presynaptic input onto a postsynaptic neuron when both pre- and postsynaptic neurons are coactive. In this work, a theory of homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release by retrograde messenger and Hebbian plasticity in neuronal encoding is presented. Encoding efficiency was measured for different synaptic conditions. In order to gain high encoding efficiency, the spiking pattern of a neuron should be dependent on the intensity of the input and show low levels of noise. In this work, we represent spiking trains as zeros and ones (corresponding to non-spike or spike in a time bin, respectively) as words with length equal to three. Then the frequency of each word (here eight words) is measured using spiking trains. These frequencies are used to measure neuronal efficiency in different conditions and for different parameter values. Results show that neurons that have synapses acting as band-pass filters show the highest efficiency to encode their input when both Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release exist in synapses. Specifically, the integration of homeostatic regulation of feedback inhibition with Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release in the synapses leads to even higher efficiency when high stimulus intensity is presented to the neurons. However, neurons with synapses acting as high-pass filters show no remarkable increase in encoding efficiency for all simulated synaptic plasticity mechanisms. This study demonstrates the importance of cooperation of Hebbian mechanism with regulation of neurotransmitter release induced by rapid diffused retrograde

  14. Group IIA secretory phospholipase A2 stimulates exocytosis and neurotransmitter release in pheochromocytoma-12 cells and cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, S; Ong, W Y; Thwin, M M; Fong, C W; Farooqui, A A; Gopalakrishnakone, P; Hong, W

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) may play a role in membrane fusion and fission, and may thus affect neurotransmission. The present study therefore aimed to elucidate the effects of sPLA2 on vesicle exocytosis. External application of group IIA sPLA2 (purified crotoxin subunit B or purified human synovial sPLA2) caused an immediate increase in exocytosis and neurotransmitter release in pheochromocytoma-12 (PC12) cells, detected by carbon fiber electrodes placed near the cells, or by changes in membrane capacitance of the cells. EGTA and a specific inhibitor of sPLA2 activity, 12-epi-scalaradial, abolished the increase in neurotransmitter release, indicating that the effect of sPLA2 was dependent on calcium and sPLA2 enzymatic activity. A similar increase in neurotransmitter release was also observed in hippocampal neurons after external application of sPLA2, as detected by changes in membrane capacitance of the neurons. In contrast to external application, internal application of sPLA2 to PC12 cells and neurons produced blockade of neurotransmitter release. Our recent studies showed high levels of sPLA2 activity in the normal rat hippocampus, medulla oblongata and cerebral neocortex. The sPLA2 activity in the hippocampus was significantly increased, after kainate-induced neuronal injury. The observed effects of sPLA2 on neurotransmitter release in this study may therefore have a physiological, as well as a pathological role.

  15. The dependence of neuronal encoding efficiency on Hebbian plasticity and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz eFaghihi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Synapses act as information filters by different molecular mechanisms including retrograde messenger that affect neuronal spiking activity. One of the well-known effects of retrograde messenger in presynaptic neurons is a change of the probability of neurotransmitter release. Hebbian learning describe a strengthening of a synapse between a presynaptic input onto a postsynaptic neuron when both pre- and postsynaptic neurons are coactive. In this work, a theory of homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release by retrograde messenger and Hebbian plasticity in neuronal encoding is presented. Encoding efficiency was measured for different synaptic conditions. In order to gain high encoding efficiency, the spiking pattern of a neuron should be dependent on the intensity of the input and show low levels of noise. In this work, we represent spiking trains as zeros and ones (corresponding to non-spike or spike in a time bin, respectively as words with length equal to three. Then the frequency of each word (here eight words is measured using spiking trains. These frequencies are used to measure neuronal efficiency in different conditions and for different parameter values. Results show that neurons that have synapses acting as band-pass filters show the highest efficiency to encode their input when both Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release exist in synapses. Specifically, the integration of homeostatic regulation of feedback inhibition with Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release in the synapses leads to even higher efficiency when high stimulus intensity is presented to the neurons. However, neurons with synapses acting as high-pass filters show no remarkable increase in encoding efficiency for all simulated synaptic plasticity mechanisms.

  16. PRRT2 Is a Key Component of the Ca2+-Dependent Neurotransmitter Release Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierluigi Valente

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Heterozygous mutations in proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2 underlie a group of paroxysmal disorders, including epilepsy, kinesigenic dyskinesia, and migraine. Most of the mutations lead to impaired PRRT2 expression, suggesting that loss of PRRT2 function may contribute to pathogenesis. We show that PRRT2 is enriched in presynaptic terminals and that its silencing decreases the number of synapses and increases the number of docked synaptic vesicles at rest. PRRT2-silenced neurons exhibit a severe impairment of synchronous release, attributable to a sharp decrease in release probability and Ca2+ sensitivity and associated with a marked increase of the asynchronous/synchronous release ratio. PRRT2 interacts with the synaptic proteins SNAP-25 and synaptotagmin 1/2. The results indicate that PRRT2 is intimately connected with the Ca2+-sensing machinery and that it plays an important role in the final steps of neurotransmitter release.

  17. PRRT2 Is a Key Component of the Ca(2+)-Dependent Neurotransmitter Release Machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Pierluigi; Castroflorio, Enrico; Rossi, Pia; Fadda, Manuela; Sterlini, Bruno; Cervigni, Romina Ines; Prestigio, Cosimo; Giovedì, Silvia; Onofri, Franco; Mura, Elisa; Guarnieri, Fabrizia C; Marte, Antonella; Orlando, Marta; Zara, Federico; Fassio, Anna; Valtorta, Flavia; Baldelli, Pietro; Corradi, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-04-05

    Heterozygous mutations in proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) underlie a group of paroxysmal disorders, including epilepsy, kinesigenic dyskinesia, and migraine. Most of the mutations lead to impaired PRRT2 expression, suggesting that loss of PRRT2 function may contribute to pathogenesis. We show that PRRT2 is enriched in presynaptic terminals and that its silencing decreases the number of synapses and increases the number of docked synaptic vesicles at rest. PRRT2-silenced neurons exhibit a severe impairment of synchronous release, attributable to a sharp decrease in release probability and Ca(2+) sensitivity and associated with a marked increase of the asynchronous/synchronous release ratio. PRRT2 interacts with the synaptic proteins SNAP-25 and synaptotagmin 1/2. The results indicate that PRRT2 is intimately connected with the Ca(2+)-sensing machinery and that it plays an important role in the final steps of neurotransmitter release.

  18. PRRT2 Is a Key Component of the Ca2+-Dependent Neurotransmitter Release Machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Pierluigi; Castroflorio, Enrico; Rossi, Pia; Fadda, Manuela; Sterlini, Bruno; Cervigni, Romina Ines; Prestigio, Cosimo; Giovedì, Silvia; Onofri, Franco; Mura, Elisa; Guarnieri, Fabrizia C.; Marte, Antonella; Orlando, Marta; Zara, Federico; Fassio, Anna; Valtorta, Flavia; Baldelli, Pietro; Corradi, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Heterozygous mutations in proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) underlie a group of paroxysmal disorders, including epilepsy, kinesigenic dyskinesia, and migraine. Most of the mutations lead to impaired PRRT2 expression, suggesting that loss of PRRT2 function may contribute to pathogenesis. We show that PRRT2 is enriched in presynaptic terminals and that its silencing decreases the number of synapses and increases the number of docked synaptic vesicles at rest. PRRT2-silenced neurons exhibit a severe impairment of synchronous release, attributable to a sharp decrease in release probability and Ca2+ sensitivity and associated with a marked increase of the asynchronous/synchronous release ratio. PRRT2 interacts with the synaptic proteins SNAP-25 and synaptotagmin 1/2. The results indicate that PRRT2 is intimately connected with the Ca2+-sensing machinery and that it plays an important role in the final steps of neurotransmitter release. PMID:27052163

  19. Actions of tremorgenic fungal toxins on neurotransmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, P J; Smith, C C; De Belleroche, J; Bradford, H F; Mantle, P G; Thomas, A J; Penny, R H

    1980-01-01

    The neurochemical effects of the tremorgenic mycotoxins Verruculogen and Penitrem A, which produce a neurotoxic syndrome characterised by sustained tremors, were studied using sheep and rat synaptosomes. The toxins were administered in vivo, either by chronic feeding (sheep) or intraperitoneal injection 45 min prior to killing (rat), and synaptosomes were subsequently prepared from cerebrocortical and spinal cord/medullary regions of rat, and corpus striatum of sheep. Penitrem A (400 mg mycelium/kg) increased the spontaneous release of endogenous glutamate, GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), and aspartate by 213%, 455%, and 277%, respectively, from cerebrocortical synaptosomes. Verruculogen (400 mg mycelium/kg) increased the spontaneous release of glutamate and aspartate by 1300% and 1200%, respectively, but not that of GABA from cerebrocortical synaptosomes. The spontaneous release of the transmitter amino acids or other amino acids was not increased by the tremorgens in spinal cord/medullary synaptosomes. Penitrem A pretreatment reduced the veratrine (75 microM) stimulated release of glutamate, aspartate, and GABA from cerebrocortical synaptosomes by 33%, 46%, and 11%, respectively, and the stimulated release of glycine and GABA from spinal cord/medulla synaptosomes by 67% and 32% respectively. Verruculogen pretreatment did not alter the veratrine-induced release of transmitter amino acids from cerebrocortex and spinal cord/medulla synaptosomes. Penitrem A pretreatment increased the spontaneous release of aspartate, glutamate, and GABA by 68%, 62%, and 100%, respectively, from sheep corpus striatum synaptosomes but did not alter the synthesis and release of dopamine in this tissue. Verruculogen was shown to cause a substantial increase (300-400%) in the miniature-end-plate potential (m.e.p.p.) frequency at the locust neuromuscular junction. The response was detectable within 1 min, rose to a maximum within 5-7 min, and declined to the control rate over a similar

  20. Mimicking Neurotransmitter Release in Chemical Synapses via Hysteresis Engineering in MoS2 Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Andrew J; Razavieh, Ali; Nasr, Joseph R; Schulman, Daniel S; Eichfeld, Chad M; Das, Saptarshi

    2017-03-10

    Neurotransmitter release in chemical synapses is fundamental to diverse brain functions such as motor action, learning, cognition, emotion, perception, and consciousness. Moreover, improper functioning or abnormal release of neurotransmitter is associated with numerous neurological disorders such as epilepsy, sclerosis, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. We have utilized hysteresis engineering in a back-gated MoS2 field effect transistor (FET) in order to mimic such neurotransmitter release dynamics in chemical synapses. All three essential features, i.e., quantal, stochastic, and excitatory or inhibitory nature of neurotransmitter release, were accurately captured in our experimental demonstration. We also mimicked an important phenomenon called long-term potentiation (LTP), which forms the basis of human memory. Finally, we demonstrated how to engineer the LTP time by operating the MoS2 FET in different regimes. Our findings could provide a critical component toward the design of next-generation smart and intelligent human-like machines and human-machine interfaces.

  1. FMRP Regulates Neurotransmitter Release and Synaptic Information Transmission by Modulating Action Potential Duration via BK channels

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Pan-Yue; Rotman, Ziv; Blundon, Jay A.; Cho, Yongcheol; Cui, Jianmin; Cavalli, Valeria; Zakharenko, Stanislav S; Klyachko, Vitaly A.

    2013-01-01

    Loss of FMRP causes Fragile X syndrome (FXS), but the physiological functions of FMRP remain highly debatable. Here we show that FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release in CA3 pyramidal neurons by modulating action potential (AP) duration. Loss of FMRP leads to excessive AP broadening during repetitive activity, enhanced presynaptic calcium influx and elevated neurotransmitter release. The AP broadening defects caused by FMRP loss have a cell-autonomous presynaptic origin and can be acutely r...

  2. Complexins facilitate neurotransmitter release at excitatory and inhibitory synapses in mammalian central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mingshan; Stradomska, Alicja; Chen, Hongmei; Brose, Nils; Zhang, Weiqi; Rosenmund, Christian; Reim, Kerstin

    2008-06-03

    Complexins (Cplxs) are key regulators of synaptic exocytosis, but whether they act as facilitators or inhibitors is currently being disputed controversially. We show that genetic deletion of all Cplxs expressed in the mouse brain causes a reduction in Ca(2+)-triggered and spontaneous neurotransmitter release at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Our results demonstrate that at mammalian central nervous system synapses, Cplxs facilitate neurotransmitter release and do not simply act as inhibitory clamps of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery.

  3. Octyl-methoxycinnamate (OMC), an ultraviolet (UV) filter, alters LHRH and amino acid neurotransmitters release from hypothalamus of immature rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwarcfarb, B; Carbone, S; Reynoso, R; Bollero, G; Ponzo, O; Moguilevsky, J; Scacchi, P

    2008-02-01

    OMC (octyl-methoxycinnamate), is an endocrine disruptor with estrogenic activity, which is used in sunscreen creams as a UV filter. We studied its " IN VITRO" effects on the hypothalamic release of LHRH as well as on the amino acid neurotransmitter system in immature rats of 15 (prepubertal) and 30 (peripubertal) days of age. OMC decreased the LH-RH release significantly in male and female rats of both age. In male rats OMC increased the release of GABA while in the female ones It diminished the excitatory amino acid aspartate (ASP) and Glutamate (GLU) without modifications in the hypothalamic GABA release. These results suggest that during sexual maturation the inhibitory effect of OMC on LH-RH release appears to be related to its action on the inhibitory and excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters in male and female rats.

  4. Tetanus Toxin Action : Inhibition of Neurotransmitter Release Linked to Synaptobrevin Proteolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Link, Egenhard; Edelmann, Lambert; Chou, Judy H.; Binz, Thomas; Yamasaki, Shinji; Eisel, Uli; Baumert, Marion; Südhof, Thomas C.; Niemann, Heiner; Jahn, Reinhard

    1992-01-01

    Tetanus toxin is a potent neurotoxin that inhibits the release of neurotransmitters from presynaptic nerve endings. The mature toxin is composed of a heavy and a light chain that are linked via a disulfide bridge. After entry of tetanus toxin into the cytoplasm, the released light chain causes block

  5. Tetanus Toxin Action : Inhibition of Neurotransmitter Release Linked to Synaptobrevin Proteolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Link, Egenhard; Edelmann, Lambert; Chou, Judy H.; Binz, Thomas; Yamasaki, Shinji; Eisel, Uli; Baumert, Marion; Südhof, Thomas C.; Niemann, Heiner; Jahn, Reinhard

    1992-01-01

    Tetanus toxin is a potent neurotoxin that inhibits the release of neurotransmitters from presynaptic nerve endings. The mature toxin is composed of a heavy and a light chain that are linked via a disulfide bridge. After entry of tetanus toxin into the cytoplasm, the released light chain causes block

  6. Synapsin II desynchronizes neurotransmitter release at inhibitory synapses by interacting with presynaptic calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrihan, Lucian; Cesca, Fabrizia; Raimondi, Andrea; Lignani, Gabriele; Baldelli, Pietro; Benfenati, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    In the central nervous system, most synapses show a fast mode of neurotransmitter release known as synchronous release followed by a phase of asynchronous release, which extends over tens of milliseconds to seconds. Synapsin II (SYN2) is a member of the multigene synapsin family (SYN1/2/3) of synaptic vesicle phosphoproteins that modulate synaptic transmission and plasticity, and are mutated in epileptic patients. Here we report that inhibitory synapses of the dentate gyrus of Syn II knockout mice display an upregulation of synchronous neurotransmitter release and a concomitant loss of delayed asynchronous release. Syn II promotes γ-aminobutyric acid asynchronous release in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner by a functional interaction with presynaptic Ca(2+) channels, revealing a new role in synaptic transmission for synapsins.

  7. Modulation of neurotransmitter release via histamine H3 heteroreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, E; Malinowska, B; Kathmann, M; Göthert, M

    1994-01-01

    Presynaptic H3 receptors occur on histaminergic neurones of the CNS (autoreceptors) and on non-histaminergic neurones of the central and autonomic nervous system (heteroreceptors). H3 heteroreceptors, most probably located on the postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibres innervating the resistance vessels and the heart, have been identified in the model of the pithed rat. Furthermore, we could show in superfusion experiments that H3 heteroreceptors also occur on the sympathetic neurones supplying the human saphenous vein and the vasculature of the pig retina and on the serotoninergic, dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurones in the brain of various mammalian species, including man. The effects of three recently described H3 receptor ligands were studied in superfused mouse brain cortex slices. The potency of the novel H3 receptor agonist imetit exceeded that of R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (the reference H3 receptor agonist) by one log unit and that of histamine by almost two log units. Clobenpropit was shown to be a competitive H3 receptor antagonist, exhibiting a pA2 as high as 9.6 (exceeding the pA2 of the reference H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide by one log unit). The irreversible antagonism of N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ) was also studied. Interactions of the H3 heteroreceptor with the dopamine autoreceptor in mouse striatal slices and the alpha 2-autoreceptor in mouse brain cortex slices could be demonstrated. Activation of alpha 2-autoreceptors decreases the H3 receptor-mediated effect. Blockade of alpha 2-autoreceptors increases the H3 receptor-mediated effect only if the alpha 2-autoreceptors are simultaneously activated by endogenous noradrenaline. The H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in mouse brain cortex slices was attenuated by the K+ channel blocker tetraethylammonium but this attenuation was abolished by reduction of the Ca2+ concentration in the medium (to compensate for the facilitatory effect of

  8. Amnesia produced by altered release of neurotransmitters after intraamygdala injections of a protein synthesis inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canal, Clinton E; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E

    2007-07-24

    Amnesia produced by protein synthesis inhibitors such as anisomycin provides major support for the prevalent view that the formation of long-lasting memories requires de novo protein synthesis. However, inhibition of protein synthesis might disrupt other neural functions to interfere with memory formation. Intraamygdala injections of anisomycin before inhibitory avoidance training impaired memory in rats tested 48 h later. Release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin, measured at the site of anisomycin infusions, increased quickly by approximately 1,000-17,000%, far above the levels seen under normal conditions. NE and DA release later decreased far below baseline for several hours before recovering at 48 h. Intraamygdala injections of a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist or agonist, each timed to blunt effects of increases and decreases in NE release after anisomycin, attenuated anisomycin-induced amnesia. In addition, similar to the effects on memory seen with anisomycin, intraamygdala injections of a high dose of NE before training impaired memory tested at 48 h after training. These findings suggest that altered release of neurotransmitters may mediate amnesia produced by anisomycin and, further, raise important questions about the empirical bases for many molecular theories of memory formation.

  9. Kv3 voltage-gated potassium channels regulate neurotransmitter release from mouse motor nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Ruth E; Moores, Thomas S; Morris, Neil P; Parson, Simon H; Deuchars, Jim

    2004-12-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are critical to regulation of neurotransmitter release throughout the nervous system but the roles and identity of the subtypes involved remain unclear. Here we show that Kv3 channels regulate transmitter release at the mouse neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Light- and electron-microscopic immunohistochemistry revealed Kv3.3 and Kv3.4 subunits within all motor nerve terminals of muscles examined [transversus abdominus, lumbrical and flexor digitorum brevis (FDB)]. To determine the roles of these Kv3 subunits, intracellular recordings were made of end-plate potentials (EPPs) in FDB muscle fibres evoked by electrical stimulation of tibial nerve. Tetraethylammonium (TEA) applied at low concentrations (0.05-0.5 mM), which blocks only a few known potassium channels including Kv3 channels, did not affect muscle fibre resting potential but significantly increased the amplitude of all EPPs tested. Significantly, this effect of TEA was still observed in the presence of the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel blockers iberiotoxin (25-150 nM) and Penitrem A (100 nM), suggesting a selective action on Kv3 subunits. Consistent with this, 15-microM 4-aminopyridine, which blocks Kv3 but not large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, enhanced evoked EPP amplitude. Unexpectedly, blood-depressing substance-I, a toxin selective for Kv3.4 subunits, had no effect at 0.05-1 microM. The combined presynaptic localization of Kv3 subunits and pharmacological enhancement of EPP amplitude indicate that Kv3 channels regulate neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals at the NMJ.

  10. Control of neurotransmitter release by an internal gel matrix in synaptic vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigada, David; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Gorostiza, Pau; Verdaguer, Albert; Gómez de Aranda, Inmaculada; Pineda, Oriol; Vilarrasa, Jaume; Marsal, Jordi; Blasi, Joan; Aleu, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2003-03-18

    Neurotransmitters are stored in synaptic vesicles, where they have been assumed to be in free solution. Here we report that in Torpedo synaptic vesicles, only 5% of the total acetylcholine (ACh) or ATP content is free, and that the rest is adsorbed to an intravesicular proteoglycan matrix. This matrix, which controls ACh and ATP release by an ion-exchange mechanism, behaves like a smart gel. That is, it releases neurotransmitter and changes its volume when challenged with small ionic concentration change. Immunodetection analysis revealed that the synaptic vesicle proteoglycan SV2 is the core of the intravesicular matrix and is responsible for immobilization and release of ACh and ATP. We suggest that in the early steps of vesicle fusion, this internal matrix regulates the availability of free diffusible ACh and ATP, and thus serves to modulate the quantity of transmitter released.

  11. The magnitude and significance of Ca2+ domains for release of neurotransmitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharon, S; Parnas, H; Parnas, I

    1994-11-01

    It is now widely accepted that localized high concentrations of Ca2+ (Ca2+ domains) play a major role in controlling the time course of neurotransmitter release. In the present work we calculate the magnitude and the time course of Ca2+ domains that evolve in the vicinity of a Ca2+ channel and an adjacent release site. In the calculations we consider a accurately dimensioned Ca2+ channel. Moreover, the Ca2+ current is continuously adjusted with regard to the accumulated intracellular Ca2+ and, in addition, endogenous buffers are considered. The calculations, carried out by the software FIDAP, based on finite element method, show that the Ca2+ concentrations achieved near the release sites are significantly lower than claimed by other investigators. Furthermore, we present arguments indicating that the Ca2+ domains, regardless of their magnitude, do not play a role in controlling the time course of release of neurotransmitter.

  12. Synaptic PI(3,4,5)P3 is required for Syntaxin1A clustering and neurotransmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuong, Thang Manh; Habets, Ron L P; Kuenen, Sabine; Witkowska, Agata; Kasprowicz, Jaroslaw; Swerts, Jef; Jahn, Reinhard; van den Bogaart, Geert; Verstreken, Patrik

    2013-03-20

    PI(3,4,5)P3 is a low-abundance lipid thought to play a role in the regulation of synaptic activity; however, the mechanism remains obscure. We have constructed novel split Venus-based probes and used superresolution imaging to localize PI(3,4,5)P3 at Drosophila larval neuromuscular synapses. We find the lipid in membrane domains at neurotransmitter release sites, where it concentrates with Syntaxin1A, a protein essential for vesicle fusion. Reducing PI(3,4,5)P3 availability disperses Syntaxin1A clusters and increasing PI(3,4,5)P3 levels rescues this defect. In artificial giant unilamellar vesicles, PI(3,4,5)P3 also induces Syntaxin1A domain formation and this clustering, in vitro and in vivo, is dependent on positively charged residues in the Syntaxin1A-juxtamembrane domain. Functionally, reduced PI(3,4,5)P3 causes temperature-sensitive paralysis and reduced neurotransmitter release, a phenotype also seen in animals expressing a Syntaxin1A with a mutated juxtamembrane domain. Thus, our data indicate that PI(3,4,5)P3, based on electrostatic interactions, clusters Syntaxin1A at release sites to regulate neurotransmitter release.

  13. Stochastic Properties of Neurotransmitter Release Expand the Dynamic Range of Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Release of neurotransmitter is an inherently random process, which could degrade the reliability of postsynaptic spiking, even at relatively large synapses. This is particularly important at auditory synapses, where the rate and precise timing of spikes carry information about sounds. However, the functional consequences of the stochastic properties of release are unknown. We addressed this issue at the mouse endbulb of Held synapse, which is formed by auditory nerve fibers onto bushy cells (BCs) in the anteroventral cochlear nucleus. We used voltage clamp to characterize synaptic variability. Dynamic clamp was used to compare BC spiking with stochastic or deterministic synaptic input. The stochastic component increased the responsiveness of the BC to conductances that were on average subthreshold, thereby increasing the dynamic range of the synapse. This had the benefit that BCs relayed auditory nerve activity even when synapses showed significant depression during rapid activity. However, the precision of spike timing decreased with stochastic conductances, suggesting a trade-off between encoding information in spike timing versus probability. These effects were confirmed in fiber stimulation experiments, indicating that they are physiologically relevant, and that synaptic randomness, dynamic range, and jitter are causally related. PMID:24005293

  14. Intranasal exposure to manganese disrupts neurotransmitter release from glutamatergic synapses in the central nervous system in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberly, Andrew H; Czarnecki, Lindsey A; Pottackal, Joseph; Rubinstein, Tom; Turkel, Daniel J; Kass, Marley D; McGann, John P

    2012-10-01

    Chronic exposure to aerosolized manganese induces a neurological disorder that includes extrapyramidal motor symptoms and cognitive impairment. Inhaled manganese can bypass the blood-brain barrier and reach the central nervous system by transport down the olfactory nerve to the brain's olfactory bulb. However, the mechanism by which Mn disrupts neural function remains unclear. Here we used optical imaging techniques to visualize exocytosis in olfactory nerve terminals in vivo in the mouse olfactory bulb. Acute Mn exposure via intranasal instillation of 2-200 μg MnCl(2) solution caused a dose-dependent reduction in odorant-evoked neurotransmitter release, with significant effects at as little as 2 μg MnCl(2) and a 90% reduction compared to vehicle controls with a 200 μg exposure. This reduction was also observed in response to direct electrical stimulation of the olfactory nerve layer in the olfactory bulb, demonstrating that Mn's action is occurring centrally, not peripherally. This is the first direct evidence that Mn intoxication can disrupt neurotransmitter release, and is consistent with previous work suggesting that chronic Mn exposure limits amphetamine-induced dopamine increases in the basal ganglia despite normal levels of dopamine synthesis (Guilarte et al., J Neurochem 2008). The commonality of Mn's action between glutamatergic neurons in the olfactory bulb and dopaminergic neurons in the basal ganglia suggests that a disruption of neurotransmitter release may be a general consequence wherever Mn accumulates in the brain and could underlie its pleiotropic effects.

  15. Spatial organization and dynamic properties of neurotransmitter release sites in the enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanden Berghe, P; Klingauf, J

    2007-03-02

    Synaptic communication requires an efficient coupling of vesicle fusion to release neurotransmitter and vesicle retrieval to repopulate the synapse. In synapses of the CNS many proteins involved in exocytosis, endocytosis and refilling of vesicles have been identified. However, little is known about the organization and functioning of synaptic contacts in the enteric nervous system (ENS). We used fluorescent antibodies against presynaptic proteins (synaptobrevin, synaptophysin, synaptotagmin and bassoon) to identify synaptic contacts not only in guinea-pig enteric ganglia but also in the interconnecting fiber strands. Staining patterns were not altered by colchicine (100 microM), ruling out a contribution of protein transport at the time of fixation. Active release sites at fiber intersections and around neuronal cell bodies were labeled with FM1-43 (10 microM) by high K+ or electric field stimulation (EFS). During a second round of EFS, vesicles were reused, as reflected by dye loss. Destaining rates increased with stimulus frequency (2-30 Hz), reaching a maximum at about 15 Hz, likely caused by synaptic depression at higher frequencies. Tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 microM) as well as nominally zero external Ca2+ (2 mM EGTA) prevented all destaining. The readily releasable pool (RRP, a subset of vesicles docked at the membrane and ready to fuse upon [Ca2+]i increase) can be specifically released by a hypertonic challenge (500 mM sucrose). We measured this pool to be approximately 27% of the total recycling pool, remarkably similar to synapses in the CNS. In whole-mount preparations, FM1-43 also reliably labeled active release sites in ganglia, fiber strands and in muscle bundles. The staining pattern indicated that the presynaptic antibodies mainly labeled active sites. The presence of numerous release sites suggests information processing capability within interconnecting fibers. With FM imaging, enteric synaptic function can be monitored independent of any postsynaptic

  16. FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release and synaptic information transmission by modulating action potential duration via BK channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Pan-Yue; Rotman, Ziv; Blundon, Jay A; Cho, Yongcheol; Cui, Jianmin; Cavalli, Valeria; Zakharenko, Stanislav S; Klyachko, Vitaly A

    2013-02-20

    Loss of FMRP causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), but the physiological functions of FMRP remain highly debatable. Here we show that FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release in CA3 pyramidal neurons by modulating action potential (AP) duration. Loss of FMRP leads to excessive AP broadening during repetitive activity, enhanced presynaptic calcium influx, and elevated neurotransmitter release. The AP broadening defects caused by FMRP loss have a cell-autonomous presynaptic origin and can be acutely rescued in postnatal neurons. These presynaptic actions of FMRP are translation independent and are mediated selectively by BK channels via interaction of FMRP with BK channel's regulatory β4 subunits. Information-theoretical analysis demonstrates that loss of these FMRP functions causes marked dysregulation of synaptic information transmission. FMRP-dependent AP broadening is not limited to the hippocampus, but also occurs in cortical pyramidal neurons. Our results thus suggest major translation-independent presynaptic functions of FMRP that may have important implications for understanding FXS neuropathology.

  17. CDK5 serves as a major control point in neurotransmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Ryan, Timothy A

    2010-09-09

    CDK5 is an important kinase in nervous system function, controlling neural development and postsynaptic signal integration. Here we show that CDK5 plays a major role in controlling neurotransmitter release. Inhibition of CDK5 activity, by either acute or genetic means, leads to profound potentiation of presynaptic function, including unmasking of previously "silent" synapses. Removal of CDK5 activity additionally unlocks access to the resting synaptic vesicle pool, which normally remains recalcitrant to exocytosis and recycling even following prolonged action potential stimuli. Presynaptic CDK5 levels are additionally severely depleted by chronic neuronal silencing, a treatment that is functionally similar to CDK5 knockdown with regard to presynaptic potentiation. Thus CDK5 appears to be an integral element in presynaptic homeostatic scaling, and the resting vesicle pool appears to provide a potent functional presynaptic homeostatic control parameter. These studies thus pinpoint CDK5 as a major control point for modulation of neurotransmitter release in mammalian neurons.

  18. High-Probability Neurotransmitter Release Sites Represent an Energy-Efficient Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhongmin; Chouhan, Amit K; Borycz, Jolanta A; Lu, Zhiyuan; Rossano, Adam J; Brain, Keith L; Zhou, You; Meinertzhagen, Ian A; Macleod, Gregory T

    2016-10-10

    Nerve terminals contain multiple sites specialized for the release of neurotransmitters. Release usually occurs with low probability, a design thought to confer many advantages. High-probability release sites are not uncommon, but their advantages are not well understood. Here, we test the hypothesis that high-probability release sites represent an energy-efficient design. We examined release site probabilities and energy efficiency at the terminals of two glutamatergic motor neurons synapsing on the same muscle fiber in Drosophila larvae. Through electrophysiological and ultrastructural measurements, we calculated release site probabilities to differ considerably between terminals (0.33 versus 0.11). We estimated the energy required to release and recycle glutamate from the same measurements. The energy required to remove calcium and sodium ions subsequent to nerve excitation was estimated through microfluorimetric and morphological measurements. We calculated energy efficiency as the number of glutamate molecules released per ATP molecule hydrolyzed, and high-probability release site terminals were found to be more efficient (0.13 versus 0.06). Our analytical model indicates that energy efficiency is optimal (∼0.15) at high release site probabilities (∼0.76). As limitations in energy supply constrain neural function, high-probability release sites might ameliorate such constraints by demanding less energy. Energy efficiency can be viewed as one aspect of nerve terminal function, in balance with others, because high-efficiency terminals depress significantly during episodic bursts of activity.

  19. Live Imaging of Nicotine Induced Calcium Signaling and Neurotransmitter Release Along Ventral Hippocampal Axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chongbo; Talmage, David A; Role, Lorna W

    2015-06-24

    Sustained enhancement of axonal signaling and increased neurotransmitter release by the activation of pre-synaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) is an important mechanism for neuromodulation by acetylcholine (ACh). The difficulty with access to probing the signaling mechanisms within intact axons and at nerve terminals both in vitro and in vivo has limited progress in the study of the pre-synaptic components of synaptic plasticity. Here we introduce a gene-chimeric preparation of ventral hippocampal (vHipp)-accumbens (nAcc) circuit in vitro that allows direct live imaging to analyze both the pre- and post-synaptic components of transmission while selectively varying the genetic profile of the pre- vs post-synaptic neurons. We demonstrate that projections from vHipp microslices, as pre-synaptic axonal input, form multiple, reliable glutamatergic synapses with post-synaptic targets, the dispersed neurons from nAcc. The pre-synaptic localization of various subtypes of nAChRs are detected and the pre-synaptic nicotinic signaling mediated synaptic transmission are monitored by concurrent electrophysiological recording and live cell imaging. This preparation also provides an informative approach to study the pre- and post-synaptic mechanisms of glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in vitro.

  20. Synaptotagmin-1 and -7 Trigger Synchronous and Asynchronous Phases of Neurotransmitter Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacaj, Taulant; Wu, Dick; Yang, Xiaofei; Morishita, Wade; Zhou, Peng; Xu, Wei; Malenka, Robert C.; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    In forebrain neurons, knockout of synaptotagmin-1 blocks fast Ca2+-triggered synchronous neurotransmitter release, but enables manifestation of slow Ca2+-triggered asynchronous release. Here, we show using single-cell PCR that individual hippocampal neurons abundantly co-express two Ca2+-binding synaptotagmin isoforms, synaptotagmin-1 and synaptotagmin-7. In synaptotagmin-1 deficient synapses of excitatory and inhibitory neurons, loss-of-function of synaptotagmin-7 suppressed asynchronous release. This phenotype was rescued by wild-type but not mutant synaptotagmin-7 lacking functional Ca2+-binding sites. Even in synaptotagmin-1 containing neurons, synaptotagmin-7 ablation partly impaired asynchronous release induced by extended high-frequency stimulus trains. Synaptotagmins bind Ca2+ via two C2-domains, the C2A- and C2B-domains. Surprisingly, synaptotagmin-7 function selectively required its C2A-domain Ca2+-binding sites, whereas synaptotagmin-1 function required its C2B-domain Ca2+-binding sites. Our data show that nearly all Ca2+-triggered release at a synapse is due to synaptotagmins, with synaptotagmin-7 mediating a slower form of Ca2+-triggered release that is normally occluded by faster synaptotagmin-1-induced release, but becomes manifest upon synaptotagmin-1 deletion. PMID:24267651

  1. FMRP Regulates Neurotransmitter Release and Synaptic Information Transmission by Modulating Action Potential Duration via BK channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Pan-Yue; Rotman, Ziv; Blundon, Jay A.; Cho, Yongcheol; Cui, Jianmin; Cavalli, Valeria; Zakharenko, Stanislav S.; Klyachko, Vitaly A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Loss of FMRP causes Fragile X syndrome (FXS), but the physiological functions of FMRP remain highly debatable. Here we show that FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release in CA3 pyramidal neurons by modulating action potential (AP) duration. Loss of FMRP leads to excessive AP broadening during repetitive activity, enhanced presynaptic calcium influx and elevated neurotransmitter release. The AP broadening defects caused by FMRP loss have a cell-autonomous presynaptic origin and can be acutely rescued in postnatal neurons. These presynaptic actions of FMRP are translation-independent and are mediated selectively by BK channels via interaction of FMRP with BK channel’s regulatory β4 subunits. Information-theoretical analysis demonstrates that loss of these FMRP functions causes marked dysregulation of synaptic information transmission. FMRP-dependent AP broadening is not limited to the hippocampus, but also occurs in cortical pyramidal neurons. Our results thus suggest major translation-independent presynaptic functions of FMRP that may have important implications for understanding FXS neuropathology. PMID:23439122

  2. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Kyu Kwon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance.

  3. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Sando, Richard; Maximov, Anton; Polleux, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU)-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance. PMID:27429220

  4. In vitro effect of octyl - methoxycinnamate (OMC) on the release of Gn-RH and amino acid neurotransmitters by hypothalamus of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, S; Szwarcfarb, B; Reynoso, R; Ponzo, O J; Cardoso, N; Ale, E; Moguilevsky, J A; Scacchi, P

    2010-05-01

    OMC (octyl-methoxycinnamate), an endocrine disruptor having estrogenic activity, is used in sunscreen creams as UV filter. We studied its "in vitro" effects on the hypothalamic release of Gn-RH as well as on the amino acid neurotransmitter system. OMC significantly decreased Gn-RH release in normal male and female rats as well as in castrated rats with substitutive therapy. No effects were observed in castrated rats without substitutive therapy. In males OMC increases the release of GABA, decreasing the production of glutamate (GLU) while in the female decreases the excitatory amino acid aspartate (ASP) and GLU without modifications in the hypothalamic GABA release. These results suggest that OMC acting as endocrine disruptor could alter the sex hormone-neurotransmitter-Gn-RH axis relationships in adult rats.

  5. The impact of calcium current reversal on neurotransmitter release in the electrically stimulated retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werginz, Paul; Rattay, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Objective. In spite of intense theoretical and experimental investigations on electrical nerve stimulation, the influence of reversed ion currents on network activity during extracellular stimulation has not been investigated so far. Approach. Here, the impact of calcium current reversal on neurotransmitter release during subretinal stimulation was analyzed with a computational multi-compartment model of a retinal bipolar cell (BC) that was coupled with a four-pool model for the exocytosis from its ribbon synapses. Emphasis was laid on calcium channel dynamics and how these channels influence synaptic release. Main results. Stronger stimulation with anodic pulses caused transmembrane voltages above the Nernst potential of calcium in the terminals and, by this means, forced calcium ions to flow in the reversed direction from inside to the outside of the cell. Consequently, intracellular calcium concentration decreased resulting in a reduced vesicle release or preventing release at all. This mechanism is expected to lead to a pronounced ring-shaped pattern of exocytosis within a group of neighbored BCs when the stronger stimulated cells close to the electrode fail in releasing vesicles. Significance. Stronger subretinal stimulation causes failure of synaptic exocytosis due to reversal of calcium flow into the extracellular space in cells close to the electrode.

  6. Can nanofluidic chemical release enable fast, high resolution neurotransmitter-based neurostimulation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D Jones

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Artificial chemical stimulation could provide improvements over electrical neurostimulation. Physiological neurotransmission between neurons relies on the nanoscale release and propagation of specific chemical signals to spatially-localized receptors. Current knowledge of nanoscale fluid dynamics and nanofluidic technology allows us to envision artificial mechanisms to achieve fast, high resolution neurotransmitter release. Substantial technological development is required to reach this goal. Nanofluidic technology — rather than microfluidic — will be necessary; this should come as no surprise given the nanofluidic nature of neurotransmission.This perspective reviews the state of the art of high resolution electrical neuroprostheses and their anticipated limitations. Chemical release rates from nanopores are compared to rates achieved at synapses and with iontophoresis. A review of microfluidic technology justifies the analysis that microfluidic control of chemical release would be insufficient. Novel nanofluidic mechanisms are discussed, and we propose that hydrophobic gating may allow control of chemical release suitable for mimicking neurotransmission. The limited understanding of hydrophobic gating in artificial nanopores and the challenges of fabrication and large-scale integration of nanofluidic components are emphasized. Development of suitable nanofluidic technology will require dedicated, long-term efforts over many years.

  7. Real-time monitoring of inhibitory effects on glutamate-induced neurotransmitter release using a potassium ion image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Akiteru; Sakurai, Takashi; Hattori, Toshiaki; Okumura, Koichi; Ishida, Makoto; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2015-02-01

    To directly image the release of neurotransmitters from neurons, we combined a substance-selective layer with a 128 × 128-pixel ion image sensor based on CMOS technology. Using the substance-specific image sensors, we studied the dynamics of potassium ion ( K+) release from neurons and examined the effect of ouabain on K+ release. K+ transients were significantly inhibited by ouabain. The K+ image sensor used in this study demonstrated the dynamic analysis of ligand-operated signal release and the pharmacological assessment of secretagogues without requiring cell labeling.

  8. Aquatic contaminants alter genes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and gonadotropin release in largemouth bass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martyniuk, Christopher J. [Department of Physiological Sciences and Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sanchez, Brian C. [Department of Forestry and Natural Resources and School of Civil Engineering, 195 Marsteller St., Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Szabo, Nancy J.; Denslow, Nancy D. [Department of Physiological Sciences and Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sepulveda, Maria S., E-mail: mssepulv@purdue.edu [Department of Forestry and Natural Resources and School of Civil Engineering, 195 Marsteller St., Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2009-10-19

    Many aquatic contaminants potentially affect the central nervous system, however the underlying mechanisms of how toxicants alter normal brain function are not well understood. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of emerging and prevalent environmental contaminants on the expression of brain transcripts with a role in neurotransmitter synthesis and reproduction. Adult male largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were injected once for a 96 h duration with control (water or oil) or with one of two doses of a single chemical to achieve the following body burdens ({mu}g/g): atrazine (0.3 and 3.0), toxaphene (10 and 100), cadmium (CdCl{sub 2}) (0.000067 and 0.00067), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 126 (0.25 and 2.5), and phenanthrene (5 and 50). Partial largemouth bass gene segments were cloned for enzymes involved in neurotransmitter (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, GAD65; tyrosine hydroxylase) and estrogen (brain aromatase; CYP19b) synthesis for real-time PCR assays. In addition, neuropeptides regulating feeding (neuropeptide Y) and reproduction (chicken GnRH-II, cGnRH-II; salmon GnRH, sGnRH) were also investigated. Of the chemicals tested, only cadmium, PCB 126, and phenanthrene showed any significant effects on the genes tested, while atrazine and toxaphene did not. Cadmium (0.000067 {mu}g/g) significantly increased cGnRH-II mRNA while PCB 126 (0.25 {mu}g/g) decreased GAD65 mRNA. Phenanthrene decreased GAD65 and tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels at the highest dose (50 {mu}g/g) but increased cGnRH-II mRNA at the lowest dose (5 {mu}g/g). CYP19b, NPY, and sGnRH mRNA levels were unaffected by any of the treatments. A hierarchical clustering dendrogram grouped PCB 126 and phenanthrene more closely than other chemicals with respect to the genes tested. This study demonstrates that brain transcripts important for neurotransmitter synthesis neuroendocrine function are potential targets for emerging and prevalent aquatic contaminants.

  9. Determining Ca2+-sensor binding time and its variability in evoked neurotransmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ava Chomee; Kathpalia, Vinnie; D'Silva, Sahana; Cimenser, Aylin; Hua, Shao-Ying

    2008-02-15

    The speed and reliability of neuronal reactions are important factors for proper functioning of the nervous system. To understand how organisms use protein molecules to carry out very fast biological actions, we quantified single-molecule reaction time and its variability in synaptic transmission. From the synaptic delay of crayfish neuromuscular synapses the time for a few Ca(2+) ions to bind with their sensors in evoked neurotransmitter release was estimated. In standard crayfish saline at room temperature, the average Ca(2+) binding time was 0.12 ms for the first evoked quanta. At elevated extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations this binding time reached a limit due to saturation of Ca(2+) influx. Analysis of the synaptic delay variance at various Ca(2+) concentrations revealed that the variability of the Ca(2+)-sensor binding time is the major source of the temporal variability of synaptic transmission, and that the Ca(2+)-independent molecular reactions after Ca(2+) influx were less stochastic. The results provide insights into how organisms maximize reaction speed and reliability.

  10. Depleted internal store-activated Ca2+ entry can trigger neurotransmitter release in bovine chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powis, D A; Clark, C L; O'Brien, K J

    1996-02-09

    A potential role of the intracellular Ca2+ stores in modulating catecholamine release has been investigated in bovine chromaffin cells maintained in tissue culture. Pharmacological depletion of the stores with a combination of caffeine, histamine and thapsigargin in Ca2+-free media resulted in a significantly greater release of catecholamines on re-exposure to Ca2+-containing media compared with that from non-store depleted cells. The increase in catecholamine release was prevented by intracellular BAPTA indicating that the increase was caused by a rise in Ca2+. Measurement of intracellular free Ca2+ concentration with the fluorescent indicator, fura-2, over the same time-course as the catecholamine release experiments showed that upon restoration of external Ca2+ there was an immediate, substantial and maintained increase in cytosolic Ca2+. It is most probable that the increase in catecholamine release was a consequence of an increase in Ca2+ influx triggered by prior depletion of the internal Ca2+ stores. However, the data suggest that capacitative Ca2+ entry is poorly linked to catecholamine release; although Ca2+ entry on restoration of external Ca2+ was immediate and substantial, the increase in catecholamine release, although quantitatively significant, was slowly realised.

  11. Release of a single neurotransmitter from an identified interneuron coherently affects motor output on multiple time scales

    OpenAIRE

    Dacks, Andrew M.; Weiss, Klaudiusz R.

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitters can have diverse effects that occur over multiple time scales often making the consequences of neurotransmission difficult to predict. To explore the consequences of this diversity, we used the buccal ganglion of Aplysia to examine the effects of GABA release by a single interneuron, B40, on the intrinsic properties and motor output of the radula closure neuron B8. B40 induces a picrotoxin-sensitive fast IPSP lasting milliseconds in B8 and a slow EPSP lasting seconds. We fou...

  12. Amyloid-β acts as a regulator of neurotransmitter release disrupting the interaction between synaptophysin and VAMP2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L Russell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is becoming increasingly evident that deficits in the cortex and hippocampus at early stages of dementia in Alzheimer's disease (AD are associated with synaptic damage caused by oligomers of the toxic amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42. However, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms behind these deficits are not fully understood. Here we provide evidence of a mechanism by which Aβ42 affects synaptic transmission regulating neurotransmitter release. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: We first showed that application of 50 nM Aβ42 in cultured neurones is followed by its internalisation and translocation to synaptic contacts. Interestingly, our results demonstrate that with time, Aβ42 can be detected at the presynaptic terminals where it interacts with Synaptophysin. Furthermore, data from dissociated hippocampal neurons as well as biochemical data provide evidence that Aβ42 disrupts the complex formed between Synaptophysin and VAMP2 increasing the amount of primed vesicles and exocytosis. Finally, electrophysiology recordings in brain slices confirmed that Aβ42 affects baseline transmission. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our observations provide a necessary and timely insight into cellular mechanisms that underlie the initial pathological events that lead to synaptic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease. Our results demonstrate a new mechanism by which Aβ42 affects synaptic activity.

  13. Amino acid neurotransmitter release and learning: a study of visual imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, R M; McCabe, B J; Kendrick, K M; Horn, G

    2004-01-01

    The intermediate and medial part of the hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV) is an area of the domestic chick forebrain that stores information acquired through the learning process of imprinting. The effects of visual imprinting on the release of the amino acids aspartate, arginine, citrulline, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate, glycine and taurine from the left and right IMHVs in vitro were measured at 3.5, 10 and 24 h after training. Chicks were exposed to an imprinting stimulus for 1 h, their preferences measured 10 min afterward and a preference score calculated as a measure of the strength of learning. Potassium stimulation was used to evoke amino acid release from the IMHVs of trained and untrained chicks in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca2+. Ca2+-dependent, K+-evoked release of glutamate was significantly (34.4%) higher in trained than in untrained chicks. This effect was not influenced by time after training or by side (left or right IMHV). Training influenced the evoked release of GABA and taurine from the left IMHV at both 3.5 and 10 h. The training effects at the two times were statistically homogeneous so data (imprinting stimulus glutamatergic excitatory transmission in IMHV is enhanced, and remains enhanced for at least 24 h. In contrast, the learning-related elevations in taurine and GABA release are not sustained over this period. The change in GABA release may reflect a transient increase in inhibitory transmission in the left IMHV. Copyright 2004 IBRO

  14. Inhibition of Calpains Protects Mn-Induced Neurotransmitter release disorders in Synaptosomes from Mice: Involvement of SNARE Complex and Synaptic Vesicle Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Can; Xu, Bin; Ma, Zhuo; Liu, Chang; Deng, Yu; Liu, Wei; Xu, Zhao-Fa

    2017-06-16

    Overexposure to manganese (Mn) could disrupt neurotransmitter release via influencing the formation of SNARE complex, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. A previous study demonstrated that SNAP-25 is one of substrate of calpains. The current study investigated whether calpains were involved in Mn-induced disorder of SNARE complex. After mice were treated with Mn for 24 days, Mn deposition increased significantly in basal nuclei in Mn-treated and calpeptin pre-treated groups. Behaviorally, less time spent in the center of the area and decreased average velocity significantly in an open field test after 24 days of Mn exposure. With the increase in MnCl2 dosage, intracellular Ca(2+) increased significantly, but pretreatment with calpeptin caused a dose-dependent decrease in calpains activity. There were fragments of N-terminal of SNAP-25 protein appearance in Mn-treated groups, but it is decreased with pretreatment of calpeptin. FM1-43-labeled synaptic vesicles also provided evidence that the treatment with Mn resulted in increasing first and then decreasing, which was consistent with Glu release and the 80 kDa protein levels of SNARE complexes. In summary, Mn induced the disorder of neurotransmitter release through influencing the formation of SNARE complex via cleaving SNAP-25 by overactivation of calpains in vivo.

  15. Release of a single neurotransmitter from an identified interneuron coherently affects motor output on multiple time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacks, Andrew M; Weiss, Klaudiusz R

    2013-05-01

    Neurotransmitters can have diverse effects that occur over multiple time scales often making the consequences of neurotransmission difficult to predict. To explore the consequences of this diversity, we used the buccal ganglion of Aplysia to examine the effects of GABA release by a single interneuron, B40, on the intrinsic properties and motor output of the radula closure neuron B8. B40 induces a picrotoxin-sensitive fast IPSP lasting milliseconds in B8 and a slow EPSP lasting seconds. We found that the excitatory effects of this slow EPSP are also mediated by GABA. Together, these two GABAergic actions structure B8 firing in a pattern characteristic of ingestive programs. Furthermore, we found that repeated B40 stimulation induces a persistent increase in B8 excitability that was occluded in the presence of the GABA B receptor agonist baclofen, suggesting that GABA affects B8 excitability over multiple time scales. The phasing of B8 activity during the feeding motor programs determines the nature of the behavior elicited during that motor program. The persistent increase in B8 excitability induced by B40 biased the activity of B8 during feeding motor programs causing the motor programs to become more ingestive in nature. Thus, a single transmitter released from a single interneuron can have consequences for motor output that are expressed over multiple time scales. Importantly, despite the differences in their signs and temporal characteristics, the three actions of B40 are coherent in that they promote B8 firing patterns that are characteristic of ingestive motor outputs.

  16. Cannabinoid- and lysophosphatidylinositol-sensitive receptor GPR55 boosts neurotransmitter release at central synapses

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 55 is sensitive to certain cannabinoids, it is expressed in the brain and, in cell cultures, it triggers mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+). However, the adaptive neurobiological significance of GPR55 remains unknown. Here, we use acute hippocampal slices and combine two-photon excitation Ca(2+) imaging in presynaptic axonal boutons with optical quantal analysis in postsynaptic dendritic spines to find that GPR55 activation transiently increases release prob...

  17. Cannabinoid- and lysophosphatidylinositol-sensitive receptor GPR55 boosts neurotransmitter release at central synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylantyev, Sergiy; Jensen, Thomas P; Ross, Ruth A; Rusakov, Dmitri A

    2013-03-26

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 55 is sensitive to certain cannabinoids, it is expressed in the brain and, in cell cultures, it triggers mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+). However, the adaptive neurobiological significance of GPR55 remains unknown. Here, we use acute hippocampal slices and combine two-photon excitation Ca(2+) imaging in presynaptic axonal boutons with optical quantal analysis in postsynaptic dendritic spines to find that GPR55 activation transiently increases release probability at individual CA3-CA1 synapses. The underlying mechanism involves Ca(2+) release from presynaptic Ca(2+) stores, whereas postsynaptic stores (activated by spot-uncaging of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) remain unaffected by GPR55 agonists. These effects are abolished by genetic deletion of GPR55 or by the GPR55 antagonist cannabidiol, a constituent of Cannabis sativa. GPR55 shows colocalization with synaptic vesicle protein vesicular glutamate transporter 1 in stratum radiatum. Short-term potentiation of CA3-CA1 transmission after a short train of stimuli reveals a presynaptic, Ca(2+) store-dependent component sensitive to cannabidiol. The underlying cascade involves synthesis of phospholipids, likely in the presynaptic cell, but not the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol or anandamide. Our results thus unveil a signaling role for GPR55 in synaptic circuits of the brain.

  18. Phorbol esters and neurotransmitter release: more than just protein kinase C?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silinsky, Eugene M; Searl, Timothy J

    2003-01-01

    This review focuses on the effects of phorbol esters and the role of phorbol ester receptors in the secretion of neurotransmitter substances. We begin with a brief background on the historical use of phorbol esters as tools to decipher the role of the enzyme protein kinase C in signal transduction cascades. Next, we illustrate the structural differences between active and inactive phorbol esters and the mechanism by which the binding of phorbol to its recognition sites (C1 domains) on a particular protein acts to translocate that protein to the membrane. We then discuss the evidence that the most important nerve terminal receptor for phorbol esters (and their endogenous counterpart diacylglycerol) is likely to be Munc13. Indeed, Munc13 and its invertebrate homologues are the main players in priming the secretory apparatus for its critical function in the exocytosis process. PMID:12711617

  19. Rab3A deletion selectively reduces spontaneous neurotransmitter release at the mouse neuromuscular synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sons, Michèle S; Plomp, Jaap J

    2006-05-17

    Rab3A is a synaptic vesicle-associated GTP-binding protein thought to be involved in modulation of presynaptic transmitter release through regulation of vesicle trafficking and membrane fusion. Electrophysiological studies at central nervous system synapses of Rab3A null-mutant mice have indicated that nerve stimulation-evoked transmitter release and its short- and long-term modulation are partly dependent on Rab3A, whereas spontaneous uniquantal release is completely independent of it. Here, we studied the acetylcholine (ACh) release at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) of diaphragm and soleus muscles from Rab3A-deficient mice with intracellular microelectrode methods. Surprisingly, we found 20-40% reduction of spontaneous ACh release but completely intact nerve action potential-evoked release at both high- and low-rate stimulation and during recovery from intense release. The ACh release induced by hypertonic medium was also unchanged, indicating that the pool of vesicles for immediate release is unaltered at the Rab3A-deficient NMJ. These results indicate a selective role of Rab3A in spontaneous transmitter release at the NMJ which cannot or only partly be taken over by the closely related Rab3B, Rab3C, or Rab3D isoforms when Rab3A is deleted. It has been hypothesized that Rab3A mutation underlies human presynaptic myasthenic syndromes, in which severely reduced nerve action potential-evoked ACh release at the NMJ causes paralysis. Our observation that Rab3A deletion does not reduce evoked ACh release at any stimulation rate at the mouse NMJ, argues against this hypothesis.

  20. Loss of Ahi1 impairs neurotransmitter release and causes depressive behaviors in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyan Ren

    Full Text Available Major depression is becoming one of the most prevalent forms of psychiatric disorders. However, the mechanisms of major depression are still not well-understood. Most antidepressants are only effective in some patients and produce some serious side effects. Animal models of depression are therefore essential to unravel the mechanisms of depression and to develop novel therapeutic strategies. Our previous studies showed that Abelson helper integration site-1 (Ahi1 deficiency causes depression-like behaviors in mice. In this study, we characterized the biochemical and behavioral changes in Ahi1 knockout (KO mice. In Ahi1 KO mice, neurotransmitters including serotonin and dopamine were significantly decreased in different brain regions. However, glutamate and GABA levels were not affected by Ahi1 deficiency. The antidepressant imipramine attenuated depressive behaviors and partially restored brain serotonin level in Ahi1 KO mice. Our findings suggest that Ahi1 KO mice can be used for studying the mechanisms of depression and screening therapeutic targets.

  1. Administration of caffeine inhibited adenosine receptor agonist-induced decreases in motor performance, thermoregulation, and brain neurotransmitter release in exercising rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xinyan; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of an adenosine receptor agonist on caffeine-induced changes in thermoregulation, neurotransmitter release in the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus, and endurance exercise performance in rats. One hour before the start of exercise, rats were intraperitoneally injected with either saline alone (SAL), 10 mg kg(-1) caffeine and saline (CAF), a non-selective adenosine receptor agonist (5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine [NECA]: 0.5 mg kg(-1)) and saline (NECA), or the combination of caffeine and NECA (CAF+NECA). Rats ran until fatigue on the treadmill with a 5% grade at a speed of 18 m min(-1) at 23 °C. Compared to the SAL group, the run time to fatigue (RTTF) was significantly increased by 52% following caffeine administration and significantly decreased by 65% following NECA injection (SAL: 91 ± 14.1 min; CAF: 137 ± 25.8 min; NECA: 31 ± 13.7 min; CAF+NECA: 85 ± 11.8 min; pcaffeine injection inhibited the NECA-induced decreases in the RTTF, Tcore, heat production, heat loss, and extracellular DA release. Neither caffeine nor NECA affected extracellular noradrenaline or serotonin release. These results support the findings of previous studies showing improved endurance performance and overrides in body limitations after caffeine administration, and imply that the ergogenic effects of caffeine may be associated with the adenosine receptor blockade-induced increases in brain DA release.

  2. Amnesia produced by altered release of neurotransmitters after intraamygdala injections of a protein synthesis inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Paul E Gold

    2007-01-01

    Amnesia produced by protein synthesis inhibitors such as anisomycin provides major support for the prevalent view that the formation of long-lasting memories requires de novo protein synthesis. However, inhibition of protein synthesis might disrupt other neural functions to interfere with memory formation. Intraamygdala injections of anisomycin before inhibitory avoidance training impaired memory in rats tested 48 h later. Release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin, measured...

  3. Synaptically released neurotransmitter fails to desensitize postsynaptic GABA(A) receptors in cerebellar cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, J R; Randall, A D

    2001-05-01

    GABA concentration jump experiments performed on membrane patches predict that postsynaptic GABA(A) receptors will become desensitized following the release of the contents of a single GABA-containing synaptic vesicle. To examine this we used a single synaptic bouton stimulation technique to directly examine whether postsynaptic GABA(A) receptors in cultured cerebellar granule cells exhibit transmitter-induced desensitization. In a large number of recordings, no evidence was found for desensitization of postsynaptic GABA(A) receptors by vesicularly released transmitter. This was the case even when as many as 40 vesicles were released from a single bouton within 1.5 s. In addition, postsynaptic depolarization and application of the benzodiazepine flunitrazepam, manipulations previously shown to enhance desensitization of GABA(A) receptors, failed to unmask transmitter-induced desensitization. In contrast, a single 2- to 3-s application of a high concentration of exogenous GABA was able to depress synaptic responsiveness for up to 70 s. Furthermore, pharmacological depletion of GABA eliminated inhibitory synaptic communication, suggesting that GABA is the transmitter and the desensitization-resistant inhibitory postsynaptic currents are not mediated by a "nondesensitizing" ligand such as beta-alanine. Overall our data indicate that a specific desensitization-resistant population of GABA(A) receptors are present at postsynaptic sites on cultured cerebellar granule cells.

  4. PGC-1α provides a transcriptional framework for synchronous neurotransmitter release from parvalbumin-positive interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Elizabeth K; Dougherty, Sarah E; McMeekin, Laura J; Reid, Courtney S; Dobrunz, Lynn E; West, Andrew B; Hablitz, John J; Cowell, Rita M

    2014-10-22

    Accumulating evidence strongly implicates the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) in the pathophysiology of multiple neurological disorders, but the downstream gene targets of PGC-1α in the brain have remained enigmatic. Previous data demonstrate that PGC-1α is primarily concentrated in inhibitory neurons and that PGC-1α is required for the expression of the interneuron-specific Ca(2+)-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) throughout the cortex. To identify other possible transcriptional targets of PGC-1α in neural tissue, we conducted a microarray on neuroblastoma cells overexpressing PGC-1α, mined results for genes with physiological relevance to interneurons, and measured cortical gene and protein expression of these genes in mice with underexpression and overexpression of PGC-1α. We observed bidirectional regulation of novel PGC-1α-dependent transcripts spanning synaptic [synaptotagmin 2 (Syt2) and complexin 1 (Cplx1)], structural [neurofilament heavy chain (Nefh)], and metabolic [neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase 1 (Nceh1), adenylate kinase 1 (Ak1), inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase J (Inpp5j), ATP synthase mitochondrial F1 complex O subunit (Atp5o), phytanol-CoA-2hydroxylase (Phyh), and ATP synthase mitrochondrial F1 complex α subunit 1 (Atp5a1)] functions. The neuron-specific genes Syt2, Cplx1, and Nefh were developmentally upregulated in an expression pattern consistent with that of PGC-1α and were expressed in cortical interneurons. Conditional deletion of PGC-1α in PV-positive neurons significantly decreased cortical transcript expression of these genes, promoted asynchronous GABA release, and impaired long-term memory. Collectively, these data demonstrate that PGC-1α is required for normal PV-positive interneuron function and that loss of PGC-1α in this interneuron subpopulation could contribute to cortical dysfunction in disease states.

  5. Autoreceptor Modulation of Peptide/Neurotransmitter Co-release from PDF Neurons Determines Allocation of Circadian Activity in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Charles; Cao, Guan; Tanenhaus, Anne K.; McCarthy, Ellena v.; Jung, Misun; Schleyer, William; Shang, Yuhua; Rosbash, Michael; Yin, Jerry C.P.; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster flies concentrate behavioral activity around dawn and dusk. This organization of daily activity is controlled by central circadian clock neurons, including the lateral ventral pacemaker neurons (LNvs) that secrete the neuropeptide PDF (Pigment Dispersing Factor). Previous studies have demonstrated the requirement for PDF signaling to PDF receptor (PDFR)-expressing dorsal clock neurons in organizing circadian activity. While LNvs also express functional PDFR, the role of these autoreceptors has remained enigmatic. Here we show that (1) PDFR activation in LNvs shifts the balance of circadian activity from evening to morning, similar to behavioral responses to summer-like environmental conditions and (2) this shift is mediated by stimulation of the Ga,s-cAMP pathway and a consequent change in PDF/neurotransmitter co-release from the LNvs. These results suggest a novel mechanism for environmental control of the allocation of circadian activity and provide new general insight into the role of neuropeptide autoreceptors in behavioral control circuits. PMID:22938867

  6. Experience-Dependent Regulation of Presynaptic NMDARs Enhances Neurotransmitter Release at Neocortical Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban-Ciecko, Joanna; Wen, Jing A.; Parekh, Puja K.; Barth, Alison L.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory experience can selectively alter excitatory synaptic strength at neocortical synapses. The rapid increase in synaptic strength induced by selective whisker stimulation (single-row experience/SRE, where all but one row of whiskers has been removed from the mouse face) is due, at least in part, to the trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs)…

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of the effects of vesicle geometry on calcium microdomains and neurotransmitter release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limsakul, Praopim; Modchang, Charin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the effects of synaptic vesicle geometry on Ca2+ diffusion dynamics in presynaptic terminals using MCell, a realistic Monte Carlo algorithm that tracks individual molecules. By modeling the vesicle as a sphere and an oblate or a prolate spheroid with a reflective boundary, we measure the Ca2+ concentration at various positions relative to the vesicle. We find that the presence of a vesicle as a diffusion barrier modifies the shape of the [Ca2+] microdomain in the vicinity of the vesicle. Ca2+ diffusion dynamics also depend on the distance between the vesicle and the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and on the shape of the vesicle. The oblate spheroidal vesicle increases the [Ca2+] up to six times higher than that in the absence of a vesicle, while the prolate spheroidal vesicle can increase the [Ca2+] only 1.4 times. Our results also show that the presence of vesicles that have different geometries can maximally influence the [Ca2+] microdomain when the vesicle is located less than 50 nm from VGCCs.

  8. Fast methods for analysis of neurotransmitters from single cell and monitoring their releases in central nervous system by capillary electrophoresis, fluorescence microscopy and luminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ziqiang [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-12-10

    Fast methods for separation and detection of important neurotransmitters and the releases in central nervous system (CNS) were developed. Enzyme based immunoassay combined with capillary electrophoresis was used to analyze the contents of amino acid neurotransmitters from single neuron cells. The release of amino acid neurotransmitters from neuron cultures was monitored by laser induced fluorescence imaging method. The release and signal transduction of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in CNS was studied with sensitive luminescence imaging method. A new dual-enzyme on-column reaction method combined with capillary electrophoresis has been developed for determining the glutamate content in single cells. Detection was based on monitoring the laser-induced fluorescence of the reaction product NADH, and the measured fluorescence intensity was related to the concentration of glutamate in each cell. The detection limit of glutamate is down to 10-8 M level, which is 1 order of magnitude lower than the previously reported detection limit based on similar detection methods. The mass detection limit of a few attomoles is far superior to that of any other reports. Selectivity for glutamate is excellent over most of amino acids. The glutamate content in single human erythrocyte and baby rat brain neurons were determined with this method and results agreed well with literature values.

  9. Fast methods for analysis of neurotransmitters from single cell and monitoring their releases in central nervous system by capillary electrophoresis, fluorescence microscopy and luminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ziqiang

    1999-12-10

    Fast methods for separation and detection of important neurotransmitters and the releases in central nervous system (CNS) were developed. Enzyme based immunoassay combined with capillary electrophoresis was used to analyze the contents of amino acid neurotransmitters from single neuron cells. The release of amino acid neurotransmitters from neuron cultures was monitored by laser induced fluorescence imaging method. The release and signal transduction of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in CNS was studied with sensitive luminescence imaging method. A new dual-enzyme on-column reaction method combined with capillary electrophoresis has been developed for determining the glutamate content in single cells. Detection was based on monitoring the laser-induced fluorescence of the reaction product NADH, and the measured fluorescence intensity was related to the concentration of glutamate in each cell. The detection limit of glutamate is down to 10{sup {minus}8} M level, which is 1 order of magnitude lower than the previously reported detection limit based on similar detection methods. The mass detection limit of a few attomoles is far superior to that of any other reports. Selectivity for glutamate is excellent over most of amino acids. The glutamate content in single human erythrocyte and baby rat brain neurons were determined with this method and results agreed well with literature values.

  10. Glutamate acts as a neurotransmitter for gastrin releasing peptide-sensitive and insensitive itch-related synaptic transmission in mammalian spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Jennifer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Itch sensation is one of the major sensory experiences of human and animals. Recent studies have proposed that gastrin releasing peptide (GRP is a key neurotransmitter for itch in spinal cord. However, no direct evidence is available to indicate that GRP actually mediate responses between primary afferent fibers and dorsal horn neurons. Here we performed integrative neurobiological experiments to test this question. We found that a small population of rat dorsal horn neurons responded to GRP application with increases in calcium signaling. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings revealed that a part of superficial dorsal horn neurons responded to GRP application with the increase of action potential firing in adult rats and mice, and these dorsal horn neurons received exclusively primary afferent C-fiber inputs. On the other hands, few Aδ inputs receiving cells were found to be GRP positive. Finally, we found that evoked sensory responses between primary afferent C fibers and GRP positive superficial dorsal horn neurons are mediated by glutamate but not GRP. CNQX, a blocker of AMPA and kainate (KA receptors, completely inhibited evoked EPSCs, including in those Fos-GFP positive dorsal horn cells activated by itching. Our findings provide the direct evidence that glutamate is the principal excitatory transmitter between C fibers and GRP positive dorsal horn neurons. Our results will help to understand the neuronal mechanism of itch and aid future treatment for patients with pruritic disease.

  11. In vitro screening of major neurotransmitter systems possibly involved in the mechanism of action of antibodies to S100 protein in released-active form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbunov EA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Evgeniy A Gorbunov, Irina A Ertuzun, Evgeniya V Kachaeva, Sergey A Tarasov, Oleg I EpsteinOOO “NPF “MATERIA MEDICA HOLDING”, Moscow, Russian FederationAbstract: Experimentally and clinically, it was shown that released-active form of antibodies to S100 protein (RAF of Abs to S100 exerts a wide range of pharmacological activities: anxiolytic, antiasthenic, antiaggressive, stress-protective, antihypoxic, antiischemic, neuroprotective, and nootropic. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of RAF of Abs to S100 on major neurotransmitter systems (serotoninergic, GABAergic, dopaminergic, and on sigma receptors as well which are possibly involved in its mechanism of pharmacological activity. Radioligand binding assays were used for assessment of the drug influence on ligand–receptor interaction. [35S]GTPγS binding assay, cyclic adenosine monophosphate HTRF™, cellular dielectric spectroscopy assays, and assays based on measurement of intracellular concentration of Ca2+ ions were used for assessment of agonist or antagonist properties of the drug toward receptors. RAF of Abs to S100 increased radioligand binding to 5-HT1F, 5-HT2B, 5-HT2Cedited, 5-HT3, and to D3 receptors by 142.0%, 131.9%, 149.3%, 120.7%, and 126.3%, respectively. Also, the drug significantly inhibited specific binding of radioligands to GABAB1A/B2 receptors by 25.8%, and to both native and recombinant human sigma1 receptors by 75.3% and 40.32%, respectively. In the functional assays, it was shown that the drug exerted antagonism at 5-HT1B, D3, and GABAB1A/B2 receptors inhibiting agonist-induced responses by 23.24%, 32.76%, and 30.2%, respectively. On the contrary, the drug exerted an agonist effect at 5-HT1A receptors enhancing receptor functional activity by 28.0%. The pharmacological profiling of RAF of Abs to S100 among 27 receptor provides evidence for drug-related modification of major neurotransmitter systems.Keywords: dopamine agent, released

  12. Electrochemical Analysis of Neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Elizabeth S; Wightman, R Mark

    2015-01-01

    Chemical signaling through the release of neurotransmitters into the extracellular space is the primary means of communication between neurons. More than four decades ago, Ralph Adams and his colleagues realized the utility of electrochemical methods for the study of easily oxidizable neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin and their metabolites. Today, electrochemical techniques are frequently coupled to microelectrodes to enable spatially resolved recordings of rapid neurotransmitter dynamics in a variety of biological preparations spanning from single cells to the intact brain of behaving animals. In this review, we provide a basic overview of the principles underlying constant-potential amperometry and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, the most commonly employed electrochemical techniques, and the general application of these methods to the study of neurotransmission. We thereafter discuss several recent developments in sensor design and experimental methodology that are challenging the current limitations defining the application of electrochemical methods to neurotransmitter measurements.

  13. Electrochemical Analysis of Neurotransmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Elizabeth S.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2015-07-01

    Chemical signaling through the release of neurotransmitters into the extracellular space is the primary means of communication between neurons. More than four decades ago, Ralph Adams and his colleagues realized the utility of electrochemical methods for the study of easily oxidizable neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin and their metabolites. Today, electrochemical techniques are frequently coupled to microelectrodes to enable spatially resolved recordings of rapid neurotransmitter dynamics in a variety of biological preparations spanning from single cells to the intact brain of behaving animals. In this review, we provide a basic overview of the principles underlying constant-potential amperometry and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, the most commonly employed electrochemical techniques, and the general application of these methods to the study of neurotransmission. We thereafter discuss several recent developments in sensor design and experimental methodology that are challenging the current limitations defining the application of electrochemical methods to neurotransmitter measurements.

  14. Neurotransmitter transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gether, Ulrik; Andersen, Peter H; Larsson, Orla M

    2006-01-01

    The concentration of neurotransmitters in the extracellular space is tightly controlled by distinct classes of membrane transport proteins. This review focuses on the molecular function of two major classes of neurotransmitter transporter that are present in the cell membrane of neurons and....../or glial cells: the solute carrier (SLC)1 transporter family, which includes the transporters that mediate the Na(+)-dependent uptake of glutamate, and the SLC6 transporter family, which includes the transporters that mediate the Na(+)-dependent uptake of dopamine, 5-HT, norepinephrine, glycine and GABA....... Recent research has provided substantial insight into the structure and function of these transporters. In particular, the recent crystallizations of bacterial homologs are of the utmost importance, enabling the first reliable structural models of the mammalian neurotransmitter transporters...

  15. Plasma membrane ordering agent pluronic F-68 (PF-68) reduces neurotransmitter uptake and release and produces learning and memory deficits in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, M. S.; Prendergast, M. A.; Terry, A. V. Jr

    1999-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence indicates that aged-related changes in the fluidity and lipid composition of the plasma membrane contribute to cellular dysfunction in humans and other mammalian species. In the CNS, reductions in neuronal plasma membrane order (PMO) (i.e., increased plasma membrane fluidity) have been attributed to age as well as the presence of the beta-amyloid peptide-25-35, known to play an important role in the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). These PMO increases may influence neurotransmitter synthesis, receptor binding, and second messenger systems as well as signal transduction pathways. The effects of neuronal PMO on learning and memory processes have not been adequately investigated, however. Based on the hypothesis that an increase in PMO may alter a number of aspects of synaptic transmission, we investigated several neurochemical and behavioral effects of the membrane ordering agent, PF-68. In cell culture, PF-68 (nmoles/mg SDS extractable protein) reduced [3H]norepinephrine (NE) uptake into differentiated PC-12 cells as well as reduced nicotine stimulated [3H]NE release. The compound (800-2400 microg/kg, i.p., resulting in nmoles/mg SDS extractable protein in the brain) decreased step-through latencies and increased the frequencies of crossing into the unsafe side of the chamber in inhibitory avoidance training. In the Morris water maze, PF-68 increased the latencies and swim distances required to locate a hidden platform and reduced the time spent and distance swam in the previous target quadrant during transfer (probe) trials. PF-68 did not impair performance of a well-learned working memory task, the rat delayed stimulus discrimination task (DSDT), however. Studies with 14C-labeled PF-68 indicated that significant (pmoles/mg wet tissue) levels of the compound entered the brain from peripheral (i.p.) injection. No PF-68 related changes were observed in swim speeds or in visual acuity tests in water maze experiments, rotorod

  16. Neurotransmitter: Sodium Symporters: Caught in the Act!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinauskaite, Lina

    The neurotransmitter: sodium symporters in the neurons. Communication between neurons is mediated by the release of molecules called neurotransmitters (blue dots) from first neuron and sensed by receptors on the surface of the second (purple sphere). The signal is ended by active reuptake...... of these neurotransmitters by a family of proteins called neurotransmitter: sodium symporters (NSS), which are driven using the large concentration difference of sodium (orange dots) between the outside and the inside of the cell...

  17. The Role of TM5 in Na2 Release and the Conformational Transition of Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters toward the Inward-Open State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Li, Zheng; Quick, Matthias; Malinauskaite, Lina; Nissen, Poul; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A; Shi, Lei

    2017-03-20

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSS) terminate neurotransmission by the reuptake of released neurotransmitters. This active accumulation of substrate against its concentration gradient is driven by the transmembrane Na+ gradient and requires that the transporter traverses several conformational states. LeuT, a prokaryotic NSS homolog, has been crystallized in outward-open, outward-occluded and inward-open states. Two crystal structures of another prokaryotic NSS homolog, the multi-hydrophobic amino acid transporter (MhsT) from Bacillus halodurans have been resolved in novel inward-occluded states, with the extracellular vestibule closed and the intracellular portion of TM5 (TM5i) in either an unwound or a helical conformation. We have investigated the potential involvement of TM5i in binding and unbinding of Na2, i.e. the Na(+) bound in the Na2 site, by carrying out comparative molecular dynamics simulations of the models derived from the two MhsT structures. We find that the helical TM5i conformation is associated with a higher propensity for Na2 release, which leads to the repositioning of the N terminus (NT) and transition to an inward-open state. By using comparative interaction network analysis, we also identify allosteric pathways connecting TM5i and the Na2 binding site to the extracellular and intracellular regions. Based on our combined computational and mutagenesis studies of MhsT and LeuT, we propose that TM5i plays a key role in Na2 binding and release associated with the conformational transition toward the inward-open state, a role that is likely to be shared across the NSS family.

  18. Cav2-type calcium channels encoded by cac regulate AP-independent neurotransmitter release at cholinergic synapses in adult Drosophila brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Huaiyu; Jiang, Shaojuan Amy; Campusano, Jorge M; Iniguez, Jorge; Su, Hailing; Hoang, Andy An; Lavian, Monica; Sun, Xicui; O'Dowd, Diane K

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels containing alpha1 subunits encoded by Ca(v)2 family genes are critical in regulating release of neurotransmitter at chemical synapses. In Drosophila, cac is the only Ca(v)2-type gene. Cacophony (CAC) channels are localized in motor neuron terminals where they have been shown to mediate evoked, but not AP-independent, release of glutamate at the larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Cultured embryonic neurons also express CAC channels, but there is no information about the properties of CAC-mediated currents in adult brain nor how these channels regulate transmission in central neural circuits where fast excitatory synaptic transmission is predominantly cholinergic. Here we report that wild-type neurons cultured from late stage pupal brains and antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs) examined in adult brains, express calcium currents with two components: a slow-inactivating current sensitive to the spider toxin Plectreurys toxin II (PLTXII) and a fast-inactivating PLTXII-resistant component. CAC channels are the major contributors to the slow-inactivating PLTXII-sensitive current based on selective reduction of this component in hypomorphic cac mutants (NT27 and TS3). Another characteristic of cac mutant neurons both in culture and in whole brain recordings is a reduced cholinergic miniature excitatory postsynaptic current frequency that is mimicked in wild-type neurons by acute application of PLTXII. These data demonstrate that cac encoded Ca(v)2-type calcium channels regulate action potential (AP)-independent release of neurotransmitter at excitatory cholinergic synapses in the adult brain, a function not predicted from studies at the larval NMJ.

  19. Simultaneous administration of fluoxetine and simvastatin ameliorates lipid profile, improves brain level of neurotransmitters, and increases bioavailability of simvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman K; Ullah, Zabih; Al Masoudi, Aqeel Salman; Ahmad, Ishtiaque

    2017-01-01

    Simvastatin (STT), a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, is widely prescribed for dyslipidemia, whereas fluoxetine (FLX) is the first-choice drug for the treatment of depression and anxiety. A recent report suggests that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors can interact with the cytochrome P450 3A4 substrate, and another one suggests that STT enhances the antidepressant activity of FLX. However, the data are inconclusive. The present study was designed to explore the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic consequences of coadministration of STT and FLX in experimental animals. For this, Wistar rats weighing 250±10 g were divided into four groups, including control, STT (40 mg/kg/day), FLX (20 mg/kg/day), and STT+FLX group, respectively. After the dosing period of 4 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and the blood and brain samples were collected for the analysis of STT, simvastatin acid (STA), FLX, total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine, and hydroxy indole acetic acid. It was found that the coadministration resulted in a significant increase in the bioavailability of STT in the plasma (41.8%) and brain (68.7%) compared to administration of STT alone (pSTT was also found to be increased significantly in the plasma and brain compared to that achieved after monotherapy (pSTT failed to improve the pharmacokinetics of FLX up to a significant level. The results of this study showed that the combined regimen significantly reduced the level of cholesterol and triglyceride and increased the level of HDL when compared to STT monotherapy. Furthermore, the coadministration of STT with FLX led to an elevated level of neurotransmitters in the brain (pSTT in the plasma and brain. The coadministration of these drugs also led to an improved lipid profile. However, in the long-term, this interaction may have a vital clinical importance because the increase in STT level may lead to life-threatening side

  20. Involvement of cannabinoid receptors in the regulation of neurotransmitter release in the rodent striatum: a combined immunochemical and pharmacological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köfalvi, Attila; Rodrigues, Ricardo J; Ledent, Catherine; Mackie, Ken; Vizi, E Sylvester; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Sperlágh, Beáta

    2005-03-16

    Despite the profound effect of cannabinoids on motor function, and their therapeutic potential in Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, the cellular and subcellular distributions of striatal CB1 receptors are not well defined. Here, we show that CB1 receptors are primarily located on GABAergic (vesicular GABA transporter-positive) and glutamatergic [vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (VGLUT-1)- and VGLUT-2-positive] striatal nerve terminals and are present in the presynaptic active zone, in the postsynaptic density, as well as in the extrasynaptic membrane. Both the nonselective agonist WIN552122 [(R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3[(4-morpholinyl)methyl] pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazinyl]-(1-naphthalenyl)methanone mesylate salt] (EC50, 32 nM) and the CB1-selective agonist ACEA [N-(2-chloroethyl)-5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z-eicosatetraenamide] inhibited [3H]GABA release from rat striatal slices. The effect of these agonists was prevented by the CB1-selective antagonists SR141716A [N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide] (1 microM) and AM251 [1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-1-piperidinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide trifluoroacetate salt] (1 microM), indicating that cannabinoids inhibit the release of GABA via activation of presynaptic CB1 receptors. Cannabinoids modulated glutamate release via both CB1 and non-CB1 mechanisms. Cannabinoid agonists and antagonists inhibited 25 mM K+-evoked [3H]glutamate release and sodium-dependent [3H]glutamate uptake. Partial involvement of CB1 receptors is suggested because low concentrations of SR141716A partly and AM251 fully prevented the effect of WIN552122 and CP55940 [5-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)-2-[5-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxypropyl)cyclohexyl]phenol]. However, the effect of CB1 agonists and antagonists persisted in CB1 knock-out mice, indicating the involvement of non-CB1,CB1-like receptors. In contrast, cannabinoids did not modulate [3H]dopamine release or [3H]dopamine and [3H

  1. Muscarinic receptors discriminated by pirenzepine are involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release in rat nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Belleroche, J.; Gardiner, I. M.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of pirenzepine, a selective muscarinic antagonist, was tested on the oxotremorine facilitation of the K+-evoked release of [14C]-dopamine from tissue slices of rat nucleus accumbens. The effect of pirenzepine was compared with that of scopolamine and other antagonists which show no heterogeneity in their action on muscarinic receptors in order to determine whether a selective action at a single receptor subtype, M1 or M2, could be distinguished. Pirenzepine and scopolamine both antagonized the oxotremorine-induced (EC50 = 3 X 10(-7) M) facilitation of [14C]-dopamine release with pA2 values of 7.5 and 8.9 respectively. This result indicated that the high affinity pirenzepine receptor (M1) was involved in this response. Low concentrations of 3-quinuclidinyl benzilate (3 X 10(-10) M), N-methylscopolamine (3 X 10(-9) M) and methyl atropine (10(-8) M) also abolished this facilitatory effect of oxotremorine. PMID:2864975

  2. F3/Contactin-Related Proteins in Helix pomatia Nervous Tissue (HCRPs): Distribution and Function in Neurite Growth and Neurotransmitter Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanese, Chiara; Fiumara, Ferdinando; Bizzoca, Antonella; Giachello, Carlo; Leitinger, Gerd; Gennarini, Gianfranco; Montarolo, Pier Giorgio; Ghirardi, Mirella

    2010-01-01

    By using antibodies against mouse F3/contactin, we found immunologically related glycoproteins expressed in the nervous tissue of the snail Helix pomatia. Helix contactin-related proteins (HCRPs) include different molecules ranging in size from 90 to 240 kD. Clones isolated from a cDNA expression library allowed us to demonstrate that these proteins are translated from a unique 6.3-kb mRNA, suggesting that their heterogeneity depends on posttranslational processing. This is supported by the results of endoglycosidase F treatment, which indicate that the high-molecular-weight components are glycosylation variants of the 90-kD chain. In vivo and in cultures, HCRPs antibodies label neuronal soma and neurite extensions, giving the appearance of both cytoplasmic and cell surface immunostaining. On the other hand, no expression is found on nonneural tissues. Functionally, HCRPs are involved in neurite growth control and appear to modulate neurotransmitter release, as indicated by the inhibiting effects of specific antibodies on both functions. These data allow the definition of HCRPs glycoproteins as growth-promoting molecules, suggesting that they play a role in neurite development and presynaptic terminal maturation in the invertebrate nervous system. PMID:17941055

  3. Dehydroepiandrosterone increases synaptosomal glutamate release and improves the performance in inhibitory avoidance task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhullier, F L R; Nicolaidis, R; Riera, N G; Cipriani, F; Junqueira, D; Dahm, K C S; Brusque, A M; Souza, D O

    2004-03-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) exerts multiple effects in the rodent central nervous system (CNS), mediated through its nongenomic actions on several neurotransmitter systems, increasing neuronal excitability, modulating neuronal plasticity and presenting neuroprotective properties. It has been demonstrated that DHEA is a potent modulator of GABA(A), NMDA and Sigma receptors. In the present study, we investigated the effect of DHEA on (i) basal- and K(+)-stimulated l-[(3)H]glutamate release from synaptosomes (both in vitro and ex vivo), (ii) synaptosomal l-[(3)H]glutamate uptake (in vitro), and (iii) an inhibitory avoidance task (in vivo). The results indicated that DHEA in vitro increased glutamate release by 57%, and its intracerebroventricular infusion increased the basal-[(3)H]glutamate release by 15%. After 30 min of intraperitoneal administration, DHEA levels in the serum or CSF increased 33 and 21 times, respectively. Additionally, DHEA, intraperitoneally administrated 30 min before training, improved memory for inhibitory avoidance task. Concluding, DHEA could improve memory on an inhibitory avoidance task, perhaps due to its ability to physiologically strength the glutamatergic tonus by increasing glutamate release.

  4. Thin film microelectrodes for electrochemical detection of neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Tylsgaard

    An important signaling process in the nervous system is the release of chemical messengers called neurotransmitters from neurons. In this thesis alternative thin film electrode materials for applications targeting electrochemical detection of neurotransmitters in chip devices were evaluated...

  5. Protective effects of gastrodia elata on aluminium-chloride-induced learning impairments and alterations of amino acid neurotransmitter release in adult rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuchang, He; Qiao, Niu; Piye, Niu; Mingwei, He; Xiaoshu, Sun; Feng, Shao; Sheng, Wang; Opler, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Purpose High brain levels of aluminum (Al) can be neurotoxic and cause learning and memory deficits. Gastrodia elata (GE) is a Chinese herb widely used for improving mental function in traditional Chinese medicine. We measured changes in Al-induced neurotransmitter alteration and performance on a learning and memory task to elucidate the mechanism of Al toxicity and to assess whether these alterations could be attenuated by GE. Methods Thirty-six adult, male rats were randomly divided into six groups. Four Al-exposed groups were given aluminum chloride at 5 mg/kg/day or 10 mg/kg/day (i.p.) for two months, with two of these groups (one for each dose of Al) receiving GE (0.4 g/kg, via oral intubation, with the GE powder mixed in the drinking water) while the other two groups received vehicle. A GE control group was given injections of saline plus GE and a saline control group was given injections of saline and with 3 injection days and one day off. A step-down test was used to measure learning and memory ability. Al concentrations in the neocortex were assayed with a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Amino acid neurotransmitter levels in the neocortex were determined by high performance liquid chromatogram-fluorescence. Results Al-exposed rats showed impaired learning and memory ability as indicated by shorter step down latency and more retention errors. Cortical concentrations (mean ± SEM) of Al were: 56.22 ± 34.10 ng/g (wet weight) in the Saline control group; 172.87 ± 111.06 in the 5 mg/kg/dayAl group; 289.15 ± 102.55 in the 10mg Al group; 74.98 ± 19.00 in the GE control group; 232.55 ± 35.74 in 5 mg Al+GE group; and 291.35 ± 98.38 in 10 mg Al+GE group respectively. Al exposure produced a significant increase in cortical GABA levels. Gastrodia elata reduced learning and memory deficits without affecting brain Al levels. Conclusions Rats exposed to AlCl3 suffer from deficits in learning and memory, accompanied by increases in GABA levels

  6. Modafinil increases histamine release in the anterior hypothalamus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Tomoko; Sakamoto, Yasuhiko; Sakurai, Toshimi; Yamatodani, Atsushi

    2003-03-20

    Modafinil, (RS)-2-(Diphenylmethylsulfinyl)acetamide, is a well known wake promoting drug used for the treatment of narcolepsy. We investigated the effect of modafinil on the hypothalamic histamine release in the anesthetized rat using in vivo microdialysis. Modafinil (150 mg/kg, i.p.) increased histamine release by 150% of the basal release. The intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of modafinil (1 nmol) also increased histamine release, however, when modafinil (1 nmol) was injected directly into the tuberomammillary nucleus, a limited region where cell bodies of the histaminergic neurons are located, histamine release was not altered. These observations suggest that modafinil may promote waking via the activation of the histaminergic system, although it does not appear to be a direct pharmacological target of modafinil.

  7. Sulpiride in combination with fluvoxamine increases in vivo dopamine release selectively in rat prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ago, Yukio; Nakamura, Shigeo; Baba, Akemichi; Matsuda, Toshio

    2005-01-01

    Coadministration of atypical antipsychotics and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) enhances the release of monoamines such as dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), and serotonin (5-HT) in the prefrontal cortex. To clarify the role of DA-D2/3 receptors in the combination effect, we examined the effects of coadministration of the selective DA-D2/3 antagonist sulpiride and the SSRI fluvoxamine on amine neurotransmitter release in rat prefrontal cortex. Sulpiride (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and fluvoxamine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) alone did not affect extracellular DA levels, while their coadministration caused a significant increase in DA levels. Sulpiride alone did not affect extracellular levels of 5-HT and NE in the prefrontal cortex, while fluvoxamine alone caused a marked increase in 5-HT levels and a slight increase in NE levels. Sulpiride did not affect the fluvoxamine-induced increases in extracellular levels of 5-HT and NE. The DA-D2/3 antagonist haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg) in combination with fluvoxamine also caused a selective increase in extracellular DA levels in the cortex. Coadministration of sulpiride and fluvoxamine did not affect extracellular DA levels in the striatum. Combination of systemic sulpiride and local fluvoxamine did not increase the DA levels, but that of systemic fluvoxamine with local sulpiride increased. The combination effect in increasing prefrontal DA levels was antagonized systemically, but not locally, by the 5-HT1A antagonist WAY100635 at a low dose. These findings suggest that the combination of prefrontal DA-D2/3 receptor blockade and 5-HT1A receptor activation in regions other than the cortex plays an important role in sulpiride and fluvoxamine-induced increase in prefrontal DA release.

  8. Potassium softens vascular endothelium and increases nitric oxide release

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of aldosterone, plasma sodium in the high physiological range stiffens endothelial cells and reduces the release of nitric oxide. We now demonstrate effects of extracellular potassium on stiffness of individual cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells by using the tip of an atomic force microscope as a mechanical nanosensor. An acute increase of potassium in the physiological range swells and softens the endothelial cell and increases the release of nitric oxide. A high physio...

  9. Calcium-sensing beyond neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Han, Weiping

    2009-01-01

    synaptotagmins are located in brain and endocrine cells, and some of these synaptotagmins bind to phospholipids and calcium at levels that trigger regulated exocytosis of SVs and LDCVs. This led to the proposed synaptotagmin-calcium-sensor paradigm, that is, members of the synaptotagmin family function...... as calcium sensors for the regulated exocytosis of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones. Here, we provide an overview of the synaptotagmin family, and review the recent mouse genetic studies aimed at understanding the functions of synaptotagmins in neurotransmission and endocrine-hormone secretion......Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through the regulated exocytosis of SVs (synaptic vesicles) and LDCVs (large dense-core vesicles), a process that is controlled by calcium. Synaptotagmins are a family of type 1 membrane proteins that share a common domain structure. Most...

  10. Centrally injected histamine increases posterior hypothalamic acetylcholine release in hemorrhage-hypotensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinbas, Burcin; Yilmaz, Mustafa S; Savci, Vahide; Jochem, Jerzy; Yalcin, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Histamine, acting centrally as a neurotransmitter, evokes a reversal of hemorrhagic hypotension in rats due to the activation of the sympathetic and the renin-angiotensin systems as well as the release of arginine vasopressin and proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides. We demonstrated previously that central nicotinic cholinergic receptors are involved in the pressor effect of histamine. The aim of the present study was to examine influences of centrally administrated histamine on acetylcholine (ACh) release at the posterior hypothalamus-a region characterized by location of histaminergic and cholinergic neurons involved in the regulation of the sympathetic activity in the cardiovascular system-in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats. Hemodynamic and microdialysis studies were carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats. Hemorrhagic hypotension was induced by withdrawal of a volume of 1.5 ml blood/100 g body weight over a period of 10 min. Acute hemorrhage led to a severe and long-lasting decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and an increase in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and choline (Ch) levels by 56% and 59%, respectively. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered histamine (50, 100, and 200 nmol) dose- and time-dependently increased MAP and HR and caused an additional rise in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch levels at the most by 102%, as compared to the control saline-treated group. Histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) completely blocked histamine-evoked hemodynamic and extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch changes, whereas H2 and H3/H4 receptor blockers ranitidine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) and thioperamide (50 nmol; i.c.v.) had no effect. In conclusion, centrally administered histamine, acting via H1 receptors, increases ACh release at the posterior hypothalamus and causes a pressor and tachycardic response in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats.

  11. Enhanced Neurohypophyseal Vasopressin Release is Associated with Increased Opioid Inhibition of Oxytocin Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijning, B J; Herik, I K; Rots, N Y; Greidanus, T B

    1991-02-01

    Abstract We tested the hypothesis of a cross-inhibition of oxytocin (OT) release by endogenous opioid peptides co-released with vasopressin (VP). This opioid cross-inhibition resulted in a selective block of OT release and hence in preferential release of VP. The effects of the opiate receptor antagonist naloxone were tested on neurohypophyseal VP release during dehydration, ethanol administration and sulphated cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8S) application, assuming that the inhibition of pituitary OT release by endogenous opioids increases as neurohypophyseal VP output increases. A high VP output was found to coincide with increased inhibition of OT release: Subcutaneous injection of graded doses of naloxone (30 min prior to decapitation), augmented OT plasma levels significantly more in 24 h water-deprived male rats than in normally hydrated rats. Naloxone had no effect on VP release. Ethanol (10% in saline) administered intragastrically 50 min prior to decapitation and 20 min before subcutaneous naloxone (5 mg/kg) resulted in the inhibition of VP output. The ethanol treatment resulted in a rise in plasma OT levels that was additional to the effect of naloxone. These features were present in normally hydrated as well as in 24 h water-deprived animals, but were more pronounced in the latter group. Peripheral CCK-8S administration induces an abrupt and selective secretion of OT. Blocking the opioid inhibition of OT release with naloxone resulted in a significant rise of OT compared to that with CCK-8S alone. The magnitude of the opioid inhibition coincided with the activity of the VP system, and a higher dose of naloxone was needed to potentiate the CCK-8S effect on OT release in the water-deprived group than in euhydrated rats. No effect of CCK-8S and/or naloxone was found on VP plasma levels. The data indicate that opioid peptides co-released with VP (like dynorphin) may be responsible for cross-inhibition of OT release during dehydration. This suggests that

  12. [Axolemmal transporters for neurotransmitter uptake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-López, M

    Neurotransmission is a fundamental process in interneuronal communication. It starts with the release of the neurotransmitter following a nerve impulse and ends either by uptake by specific specific transporters or by metabolization to an inactive compound. In this review we will consider the molecular, ion dependence and electrogenic properties of the axolemal transporters for neurotransmitters and also the pathological consequences of their impairment as well as the drugs that can interact with them. Most axolemmal transporters have been cloned and grouped into two large families according to their molecular characteristics and electrogenic properties: 1. Those dependent on Na+/Cl- include transporters of GABA, noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin, choline, proline, betaine, glycine and taurine, and 2. Those dependent on Na+/K+, which include the transporters of glutamate, alanine, serine and cysteine. The clonation of transporters has permitted (and will continue to permit) the correlation of molecular alterations of transporters with different neuro-degenerative disorders (e.g. multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease), with brain lesions (e.g. cerebral ischemia, status epilepticus) and with psychiatric alterations (e.g. schizophrenia, depression). In this respect, chemical synthesis of new selective drugs which interact with the different systems for uptake of neurotransmitters will offer new approaches to the treatment of many disorders of the central nervous system which still have no satisfactory drug treatment.

  13. Focus On: Neurotransmitter Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Valenzuela, C. Fernando; Puglia, Michael P.; Zucca, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Neurotransmitter systems have been long recognized as important targets of the developmental actions of alcohol (i.e., ethanol). Short- and long-term effects of ethanol on amino acid (e.g., γ-aminobutyric acid and glutamate) and biogenic amine (e.g., serotonin and dopamine) neurotransmitters have been demonstrated in animal models of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Researchers have detected ethanol effects after exposure during developmental periods equivalent to the first, second, a...

  14. Neurotransmitters affecting time perception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:It has been demonstrated that dopamine and acetylcholine are the main neurotransmitters that affect time perception,which is also affected by other neurotransmitters.OBJECTIVE:To summarize how the neurotransmitter affect the time perception,and put forward the perspectives for further study on time perception.RETRIEVE STRATEGY:An online search for related literatures published in English was conducted in Elsevier SDOL(ScienceDirect Online)database from May 1990 to March 2007 using key words of "timing neurotransmitter".Totally 69 literatures were collected,and they were primarily checked.Inclusive criteria:Reviews and experimental studies;correlative studies of timing neurotransmitter.Exclusive criteria:Repeated studies.LITERATURE EVALUATION:The literatures were mainly sourced from Cognitive Brain Research and Neuroscience,and they were analyzed according to the inclusive criteria.Nineteen of them were involved,and all were experimental studies and reviews.DATA SYNTHESIS:The studies on time perception are developed mainly concentrating on dopamine and acetylcholine.Dopamine D2 receptors mainly affect the speed of internal clock.Dopamine receptors play an important role in both timing excitation and inhibition,which suggests the bi-directional regulation of dopamine.Injection of dopamine agonist can affect the attention to timing information.Injection of BW813U(antagonist of acetylcholine) can induce memory disorder,which indicates the effect of acetylcholine on timing memory,and further study shows that it is the effect of acetylcholine in precentral medial area.In a word,the study on the neurotransmitters affecting time perception is still at the primary stage.CONCLUSION:Dopamine and acetylcholine are the neurotransmitters known to be related to time perception.Dopamine in the basal ganglia is related to internal-clock in the range of seconds and minutes;Acetylcholine in prefrontal cortex is related to the mechanisms of temporal memory and attention

  15. Neurotransmitter release: vacuolar ATPase V0 sector c-subunits in possible gene or cell therapies for Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and psychiatric diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashida, Haruhiro; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Tsuji, Chiharu; Muramatsu, Shin-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    We overview the 16-kDa proteolipid mediatophore, the transmembrane c-subunit of the V0 sector of the vacuolar proton ATPase (ATP6V0C) that was shown to mediate the secretion of acetylcholine. Acetylcholine, serotonin, and dopamine (DA) are released from cell soma and/or dendrites if ATP6V0C is expressed in cultured cells. Adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene transfer of ATP6V0C into the caudate putamen enhanced the depolarization-induced overflow of endogenous DA in Parkinson-model mice. Motor impairment was ameliorated in hemiparkinsonian model mice when ATP6V0C was expressed with DA-synthesizing enzymes. The review discusses application in the future as a potential tool for gene therapy, cell transplantation therapy, and inducible pluripotent stem cell therapy in neurological diseases, from the view point of recent findings regarding vacuolar ATPase.

  16. Adenovirus with DNA Packaging Gene Mutations Increased Virus Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechman, Stephen L.; Rao, Xiao-Mei; McMasters, Kelly M.; Zhou, Heshan Sam

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) have been extensively manipulated for the development of cancer selective replication, leading to cancer cell death or oncolysis. Clinical studies using E1-modified oncolytic Ads have shown that this therapeutic platform was safe, but with limited efficacy, indicating the necessity of targeting other viral genes for manipulation. To improve the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic Ads, we treated the entire Ad genome repeatedly with UV-light and have isolated AdUV which efficiently lyses cancer cells as reported previously (Wechman, S. L. et al. Development of an Oncolytic Adenovirus with Enhanced Spread Ability through Repeated UV Irradiation and Cancer Selection. Viruses 2016, 8, 6). In this report, we show that no mutations were observed in the early genes (E1 or E4) of AdUV while several mutations were observed within the Ad late genes which have structural or viral DNA packaging functions. This study also reported the increased release of AdUV from cancer cells. In this study, we found that AdUV inhibits tumor growth following intratumoral injection. These results indicate the potentially significant role of the viral late genes, in particular the DNA packaging genes, to enhance Ad oncolysis. PMID:27999391

  17. Neurotransmitters act as paracrine signals to regulate insulin secretion from the human pancreatic islet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Menegaz, Danusa; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2014-08-15

    In this symposium review we discuss the role of neurotransmitters as paracrine signals that regulate pancreatic islet function. A large number of neurotransmitters and their receptors has been identified in the islet, but relatively little is known about their involvement in islet biology. Interestingly, neurotransmitters initially thought to be present in autonomic axons innervating the islet are also present in endocrine cells of the human islet. These neurotransmitters can thus be released as paracrine signals to help control hormone release. Here we propose that the role of neurotransmitters may extend beyond controlling endocrine cell function to work as signals modulating vascular flow and immune responses within the islet.

  18. Simultaneous determination of the repertoire of classical neurotransmitters released from embryonal carcinoma stem cells using online microdialysis coupled with hydrophilic interaction chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Ya-Bin [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Translational Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Sun, Fan [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Teng, Lin [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Department of Cardiology and Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, The First College of Clinical Medical Sciences, China Three Gorges University, Yichang 443000, Hubei (China); Li, Wen-Bin; An, Shi-Min [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Translational Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhang, Chun; Yang, Xin-Jie; Lv, Hao-Yu; Ding, Xu-Ping [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhu, Liang, E-mail: zhuliang17@gmail.com [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Translational Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); and others

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • An online MD-HILIC–MS/MS method for simultaneously measuring the repertoire of classical transmitters was developed and validated. • Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) was successfully employed to online system. • Stable isotope labeled internal standards and authentic matrix have been applied to guarantee reliable results. • The method features simple procedure (no sample preparation), high recovery (≥73%), high accuracy (89.36% ≤ RE ≤ 116.89%), good reproducibility (2.18% ≤ RSD ≤ 14.56%), and sensitive limits of detection (2 pg for acetylcholine, serotonin, and glutamate, 10 pg for dopamine, norepinephrine, GABA, and glycine). - Abstract: Dynamic, continuous, and simultaneous multi-analysis of transmitters is important for the delineation of the complex interactions between the neuronal and intercellular communications. But the analysis of the whole repertoire of classical transmitters of diverse structure is challenging due to their different physico-chemical properties and to their high polarity feature which leads to poor retention in traditional reversed-phase columns during LC–MS analysis. Here, an online microdialysis coupled with hydrophilic interaction chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (online MD-HILIC–MS/MS) detection method was developed for the simultaneous measurement of the repertoire of classical transmitters (acetylcholine, serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, glutamate, GABA, and glycine). Stable isotope labeled internal standards and authentic matrix have been applied to guarantee reliable results. The method was successfully employed to reveal the characteristics of transmitter release from embryonal carcinoma stem cells. The method features simple procedure (no sample preparation), high recovery (≥73%), high accuracy (89.36% ≤ RE ≤ 116.89%), good reproducibility (2.18% ≤ RSD ≤ 14.56%), and sensitive limits of detection (2 pg for acetylcholine, serotonin, and glutamate, 10 pg

  19. Neurotransmitter evaluation in the hippocampus of rats after intracerebral injection of TsTX scorpion toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALA Nencioni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available TsTX is an α-type sodium channel toxin that stimulates the discharge of neurotransmitters from neurons. In the present study we investigated which neurotransmitters are released in the hippocampus after TsTX injection and if they are responsible for electrographic or histopathological effects. Microdialysis revealed that the toxin increased glutamate extracellular levels in the hippocampus; however, levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, glycine, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA, homovanillic acid (HVA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC were not significantly altered. Neurodegeneration in pyramidal cells of hippocampus and electroencephalographic alterations caused by the toxin were blocked by pretreatment with riluzole, a glutamate release inhibitor. The present results suggest a specific activity of TsTX in the hippocampus which affects only glutamate release.

  20. Dopamine D2 receptor desensitization by dopamine or corticotropin releasing factor in ventral tegmental area neurons is associated with increased glutamate release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Herman, Melissa; You, Chang; Arora, Devinder S; McElvain, Maureen A; Roberto, Marisa; Brodie, Mark S

    2014-07-01

    Neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are the source of dopaminergic (DAergic) input to important brain regions related to addiction. Prolonged exposure of these VTA neurons to moderate concentrations of dopamine (DA) causes a time-dependent decrease in DA-induced inhibition, a complex desensitization called DA inhibition reversal (DIR). DIR is mediated by conventional protein kinase C (cPKC) through concurrent stimulation of D2 and D1-like DA receptors, or by D2 stimulation concurrent with activation of some Gq-linked receptors. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) acts via Gq, and can modulate glutamater neurotransmission in the VTA. In the present study, we used brain slice electrophysiology to characterize the interaction of DA, glutamate antagonists, and CRF agonists in the induction and maintenance of DIR in the VTA. Glutamate receptor antagonists blocked induction but not maintenance of DIR. Putative blockers of neurotransmitter release and store-operated calcium channels blocked and reversed DIR. CRF and the CRF agonist urocortin reversed inhibition produced by the D2 agonist quinpirole, consistent with our earlier work indicating that Gq activation reverses quinpirole-mediated inhibition. In whole cell recordings, the combination of urocortin and quinpirole, but not either agent alone, increased spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in VTA neurons. Likewise, the combination of a D1-like receptor agonist and quinpirole, but not either agent alone, increased sEPSCs in VTA neurons. In summary, desensitization of D2 receptors induced by dopamine or CRF on DAergic VTA neurons is associated with increased glutamatergic signaling in the VTA.

  1. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a novel neurotransmitter system

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Elizabeth S.; Greer, Christina L.; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N.; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M.; Nguyen, Bac T.; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven; Krantz, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Storage and release of classical and amino acid neurotransmitters requires vesicular transporters. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila...

  2. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a novel neurotransmitter system

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Elizabeth S.; Greer, Christina L.; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N.; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M.; Nguyen, Bac T.; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven; Krantz, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Storage and release of classical and amino acid neurotransmitters requires vesicular transporters. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila...

  3. Mechanical tension contributes to clustering of neurotransmitter vesicles at presynaptic terminals

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Memory and learning in animals are mediated by neurotransmitters that are released from vesicles clustered at the synapse. As a synapse is used more frequently, its neurotransmission efficiency increases, partly because of increased vesicle clustering in the presynaptic neuron. Vesicle clustering has been believed to result primarily from biochemical signaling processes that require the connectivity of the presynaptic terminal with the cell body, the central nervous system, and the postsynapt...

  4. Human prolactin - 24-hour pattern with increased release during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassin, J. F.; Weitzman, E. D.; Kapen, S.; Frantz, A. G.

    1972-01-01

    Human prolactin was measured in plasma by radioimmunoassay at 20-minute intervals for a 24-hour period in each of six normal adults, whose sleep-wake cycles were monitored polygraphically. A marked diurnal variation in plasma concentrations was demonstrated, with highest values during sleep. Periods of episodic release occurred throughout the 24 hours.

  5. Lack of CB1 receptors increases noradrenaline release in vas deferens without affecting atrial noradrenaline release or cortical acetylcholine release

    OpenAIRE

    Schlicker, Eberhard; Redmer, Agnes; Werner, André; Kathmann, Markus

    2003-01-01

    We studied whether cannabinoid CB1 receptor gene disruption (to yield CB1−/− mice) affects the electrically evoked tritium overflow from vas deferens and atrial pieces preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline (NA) (‘noradrenaline release') and from cerebral cortex slices preincubated with [3H]-choline (‘acetylcholine release').NA release was higher by 37% in vas deferens from CB1−/− mice than in vas deferens from CB1+/+ mice. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 inhibited, and the CB1 re...

  6. Kaempferia parviflora rhizome extract and Myristica fragrans volatile oil increase the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters and impact the proteomic profiles in the rat hippocampus: Mechanistic insights into their neuroprotective effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waluga Plaingam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Potentially useful in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, Kaempferia parviflora and Myristica fragrans have been shown to possess a wide spectrum of neuropharmacological activities and neuroprotective effects in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we determined whether and how K. parviflora ethanolic extract and M. fragrans volatile oil could influence the levels of neurotransmitters and the whole proteomic profile in the hippocampus of Sprague Dawley (SD rats. The effects of K. parviflora and M. fragrans on protein changes were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-gel, and proteins were identified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. The target proteins were then confirmed by Western blot. The levels of neurotransmitters were evaluated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC. The results showed that K. parviflora, M. fragrans and fluoxetine (the control drug for this study increased serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine in the rat hippocampus compared to that of the vehicle-treated group. Our proteomic data showed that 37 proteins in the K. parviflora group were up-regulated, while 14 were down-regulated, and 27 proteins in the M. fragrans group were up-regulated, while 16 were down-regulated. In the fluoxetine treatment group, we found 29 proteins up-regulated, whereas 14 proteins were down-regulated. In line with the proteomic data, the levels of GFAP, PDIA3, DPYSL2 and p-DPYSL2 were modified in the SD rat groups treated with K. parviflora, M. fragrans and fluoxetine as confirmed by Western blot. K. parviflora and M. fragrans mediated not only the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters but also the proteomic profiles in the rat hippocampus, thus shedding light on the mechanisms targeting neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Differential signaling in presynaptic neurotransmitter release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.E.J.M. Ghijsen; A.G.M. Leenders

    2005-01-01

    Neuronal communication is tightly regulated by presynaptic signaling, thereby temporarily and locally secreting one or more transmitters in order to exert propagation or modulation of network activity. In the last 2 decades our insight into the molecular regulation of presynaptic transmitter vesicle

  8. Neurotransmitter Switching? No Surprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Nicholas C

    2015-06-03

    Among the many forms of brain plasticity, changes in synaptic strength and changes in synapse number are particularly prominent. However, evidence for neurotransmitter respecification or switching has been accumulating steadily, both in the developing nervous system and in the adult brain, with observations of transmitter addition, loss, or replacement of one transmitter with another. Natural stimuli can drive these changes in transmitter identity, with matching changes in postsynaptic transmitter receptors. Strikingly, they often convert the synapse from excitatory to inhibitory or vice versa, providing a basis for changes in behavior in those cases in which it has been examined. Progress has been made in identifying the factors that induce transmitter switching and in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which it is achieved. There are many intriguing questions to be addressed.

  9. Waiting time before release increases the motivation to home in homing pigeons (Columba livia)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dell'Ariccia, Gaia; Costantini, David; Dell'Omo, Giacomo; Lipp, Hans-Peter

    2009-01-01

    .... Quite often, the last pigeons disappear straightforward from the release site. The question is whether this reflects improved orientation because of prolonged exposure to the release place or whether it reflects increased homing motivation...

  10. Acute intraperitoneal injection of caffeine improves endurance exercise performance in association with increasing brain dopamine release during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xinyan; Takatsu, Satomi; Wang, Hongli; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine changes of thermoregulation, neurotransmitters in the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus (PO/AH), which is the thermoregulatory center, and endurance exercise performance after the intraperitoneal injection of caffeine in rats. Core body temperature (Tcore), oxygen consumption (VO₂) and tail skin temperature (Ttail) were measured. A microdialysis probe was inserted in the PO/AH, and samples for the measurements of extracellular dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) levels were collected. During the rest experiment, 1 h after baseline collections in the chamber (23 °C), the rats were intraperitoneally injected with saline, or 3 mg kg(-1) or 10 mg kg(-1) caffeine. The duration of the test was 4 h. During the exercise experiment, baseline collections on the treadmill were obtained for 1 h. One hour before the start of exercise, rats were intraperitoneally injected with either 10 mg kg(-1) caffeine (CAF) or saline (SAL). Animals ran until fatigue at a speed of 18 m min(-1), at a 5% grade, on the treadmill in a normal environment (23 °C). At rest, 3 mg kg(-1) caffeine did not influence Tcore, Ttail, VO₂, extracellular DA, NA and 5-HT. 10 mg kg(-1) caffeine caused significant increases in Tcore, VO₂, Ttail and extracellular DA in the PO/AH. In addition, 10 mg kg(-1) caffeine increased the run time to fatigue (SAL: 104.4 ± 30.9 min, CAF: 134.0 ± 31.1 min, pexercise increased Tcore, VO₂, Ttail and extracellular DA in the PO/AH. NA increased during exercise, while neither caffeine nor exercise changed 5-HT. These results indicate that caffeine has ergogenic and hyperthermic effects, and these effects may be related to changes of DA release in the brain.

  11. Laurate Biosensors Image Brain Neurotransmitters In Vivo: Can an Antihypertensive Medication Alter Psychostimulant Behavior?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Murthy

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuromolecular Imaging (NMI with novel biosensors enables the selective detection of neurotransmitters in vivo within seconds, on line and in real time. Biosensors remain in place for continuing studies over a period of months. This biotechnological advance is based on conventional electrochemistry; the biosensors detect neurotransmitters by electron transfer. Simply stated, biosensors adsorb electrons from each neurotransmitter at specific oxidation potentials; the current derived from electron transfer is proportional to neurotransmitter concentration. Selective electron transfer properties of these biosensors permit the imaging of neurotransmitters, metabolites and precursors. The novel BRODERICK PROBE® biosensors we have developed, differ in formulation and detection capabilities from biosensors/electrodes used in conventional electrochemistry/ voltammetry. In these studies, NMI, specifically, the BRODERICK PROBE® laurate biosensor images neurotransmitter signals within mesolimbic neuronal terminals, nucleus accumbens (NAc; dopamine (DA, serotonin (5-HT, homovanillic acid (HVA and Ltryptophan (L-TP are selectively imaged. Simultaneously, we use infrared photobeams to monitor open-field movement behaviors on line with NMI in the same animal subjects. The goals are to investigate integrated neurochemical and behavioral effects of cocaine and caffeine alone and co-administered and further, to use ketanserin to decipher receptor profiles for these psychostimulants, alone and co-administered. The rationale for selecting this medication is: ketanserin (a is an antihypertensive and cocaine and caffeine produce hypertension and (b acts at 5-HT2A/2C receptors, prevalent in NAc and implicated in hypertension and cocaine addiction. Key findings are: (a the moderate dose of caffeine simultaneously potentiates cocaine's neurochemical and behavioral responses. (b ketanserin simultaneously inhibits cocaine-increased DA and 5-HT release in

  12. Increased oxidative metabolism and neurotransmitter cycling in the brain of mice lacking the thyroid hormone transporter SLC16A2 (MCT8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago B Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Mutations of the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8 cause a severe X-linked intellectual deficit and neurological impairment. MCT8 is a specific thyroid hormone (T4 and T3 transporter and the patients also present unusual abnormalities in the serum profile of thyroid hormone concentrations due to altered secretion and metabolism of T4 and T3. Given the role of thyroid hormones in brain development, it is thought that the neurological impairment is due to restricted transport of thyroid hormones to the target neurons. In this work we have investigated cerebral metabolism in mice with Mct8 deficiency. Adult male mice were infused for 30 minutes with (1-(13C glucose and brain extracts prepared and analyzed by (13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Genetic inactivation of Mct8 resulted in increased oxidative metabolism as reflected by increased glutamate C4 enrichment, and of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions as observed by the increases in glutamine C4 and GABA C2 enrichments, respectively. These changes were distinct to those produced by hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. Similar increments in glutamate C4 enrichment and GABAergic neurotransmission were observed in the combined inactivation of Mct8 and D2, indicating that the increased neurotransmission and metabolic activity were not due to increased production of cerebral T3 by the D2-encoded type 2 deiodinase. In conclusion, Mct8 deficiency has important metabolic consequences in the brain that could not be correlated with deficiency or excess of thyroid hormone supply to the brain during adulthood.

  13. Waiting time before release increases the motivation to home in homing pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Ariccia, Gaia; Costantini, David; Dell'Omo, Giacomo; Lipp, Hans-Peter

    2009-10-01

    When performing homing experiments with individual releases, pigeons have to wait in a transport box for a certain amount of time before being released and hence perceive the departure of companions. Quite often, the last pigeons disappear straightforward from the release site. The question is whether this reflects improved orientation because of prolonged exposure to the release place or whether it reflects increased homing motivation. By releasing pigeons from a familiar site, we investigated the effects of the time spent at the release site on homing performance, recording pigeons' flights with GPS loggers. Our results show that, despite individual peculiarities of flight patterns, the waiting time at release site had a positive effect on homing speed and time, and reduced the time spent circling around the release point. However, the overall path efficiency as derived from GPS tracking was not influenced. These results suggest that a longer waiting time before release improves homing performance and this is related not only to increased navigational abilities but also to increased homing motivation.

  14. Acute fasting increases somatodendritic dopamine release in the ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseberry, Aaron G

    2015-08-01

    Fasting and food restriction alter the activity of the mesolimbic dopamine system to affect multiple reward-related behaviors. Food restriction decreases baseline dopamine levels in efferent target sites and enhances dopamine release in response to rewards such as food and drugs. In addition to releasing dopamine from axon terminals, dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) also release dopamine from their soma and dendrites, and this somatodendritic dopamine release acts as an autoinhibitory signal to inhibit neighboring VTA dopamine neurons. It is unknown whether acute fasting also affects dopamine release, including the local inhibitory somatodendritic dopamine release in the VTA. In these studies, I have tested whether fasting affects the inhibitory somatodendritic dopamine release within the VTA by examining whether an acute 24-h fast affects the inhibitory postsynaptic current mediated by evoked somatodendritic dopamine release (D2R IPSC). Fasting increased the contribution of the first action potential to the overall D2R IPSC and increased the ratio of repeated D2R IPSCs evoked at short intervals. Fasting also reduced the effect of forskolin on the D2R IPSC and led to a significantly bigger decrease in the D2R IPSC in low extracellular calcium. Finally, fasting resulted in an increase in the D2R IPSCs when a more physiologically relevant train of D2R IPSCs was used. Taken together, these results indicate that fasting caused a change in the properties of somatodendritic dopamine release, possibly by increasing dopamine release, and that this increased release can be sustained under conditions where dopamine neurons are highly active.

  15. Diagnosis and treatment of neurotransmitter disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Phillip L; Hartka, Thomas R; Taylor, Jacob

    2006-11-01

    The neurotransmitter disorders represent an enigmatic and enlarging group of neurometabolic conditions caused by abnormal neurotransmitter metabolism or transport. A high index of clinical suspicion is important, given the availability of therapeutic strategies. This article covers disorders of monoamine (catecholamine and serotonin) synthesis, glycine catabolism, pyridoxine dependency, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism. The technological aspects of appropriate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection, shipment, study, and interpretation merit special consideration. Diagnosis of disorders of monoamines requires analysis of CSF homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, ortho-methyldopa, BH4, and neopterin. The delineation of new disorders with important therapeutic implications, such as cerebral folate deficiency and PNPO deficiency, serves to highlight the value of measuring CSF neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites. The impressive responsiveness of Segawa fluctuating dystonia to levodopa is a hallmark feature of previously unrecognized neurologic morbidity becoming treatable at any age. Aromatic amino acid decarboxylase and tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency have more severe phenotypes and show variable responsiveness to levodopa. Glycine encephalopathy usually has a poor outcome; benzoate therapy may be helpful in less affected cases. Pyridoxine-dependent seizures are a refractory but treatable group of neonatal and infantile seizures; rare cases require pyridoxal-5-phosphate. Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency is relatively common in comparison to the remainder of this group of disorders. Treatment directed at the metabolic defect with vigabatrin has been disappointing, and multiple therapies are targeted toward specific but protean symptoms. Other disorders of GABA metabolism, as is true of the wide spectrum of neurotransmitter disorders, will require increasing use of CSF analysis for diagnosis, and ultimately, treatment.

  16. Dexamethasone rapidly increases GABA release in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus via retrograde messenger-mediated enhancement of TRPV1 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei V Derbenev

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids influence vagal parasympathetic output to the viscera via mechanisms that include modulation of neural circuitry in the dorsal vagal complex, a principal autonomic regulatory center. Glucocorticoids can modulate synaptic neurotransmitter release elsewhere in the brain by inducing release of retrograde signalling molecules. We tested the hypothesis that the glucocorticoid agonist dexamethasone (DEX modulates GABA release in the rat dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings revealed that DEX (1-10 µM rapidly (i.e. within three minutes increased the frequency of tetrodotoxin-resistant, miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs in 67% of DMV neurons recorded in acutely prepared slices. Glutamate-mediated mEPSCs were also enhanced by DEX (10 µM, and blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors reduced the DEX effect on mIPSC frequency. Antagonists of type I or II corticosteroid receptors blocked the effect of DEX on mIPSCs. The effect was mimicked by application of the membrane-impermeant BSA-conjugated DEX, and intracellular blockade of G protein function with GDP βS in the recorded cell prevented the effect of DEX. The enhancement of GABA release was blocked by the TRPV1 antagonists, 5'-iodoresiniferatoxin or capsazepine, but was not altered by the cannabinoid type 1 receptor antagonist AM251. The DEX effect was prevented by blocking fatty acid amide hydrolysis or by inhibiting anandamide transport, implicating involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the response. These findings indicate that DEX induces an enhancement of GABA release in the DMV, which is mediated by activation of TRPV1 receptors on afferent terminals. The effect is likely induced by anandamide or other 'endovanilloid', suggesting activation of a local retrograde signal originating from DMV neurons to enhance synaptic inhibition locally in response to glucocorticoids.

  17. Morphine treatment during juvenile isolation increases social activity and opioid peptides release in the adult rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berg, C L; Kitchen, I; Gerrits, M A; Spruijt, B M; Van Ree, J M

    1999-05-29

    The consequences of juvenile isolation and morphine treatment on general activity, social activity and endogenous opioid release during a social interaction test were investigated in the adult rat. Rats were either isolated or socially housed during weeks 4 and 5 of age and treated daily during this isolation period subcutaneously with either saline or morphine. Directly after a social interaction test at 10 weeks of age, rats were injected with [3H]-diprenorphine and subsequently prepared for in vivo autoradiography. The autoradiographic technique was used to visualise neuroanatomical changes in opioid receptor occupancy, probably reflecting changes in opioid peptide release, as a result of social activity. Juvenile isolation increased general activity during the social interaction test, an effect which was accompanied by a reduction of opioid receptor occupancy in many brain areas, suggesting an increased opioid peptide release as a consequence of socially-induced general activity. Morphine treatment in isolated rats caused an increase in adult social activity and enhanced opioid peptide release in some cortical regions and the ventral tegmental area as compared to saline treated rats. Both social activity and opioid receptor occupancy were unaffected by morphine treatment in non-isolated rats. The present study underscores the role of opioid systems in adult social behaviors as a consequence of juvenile isolation. The results suggest a relationship between social activity and opioid peptide release during social contact. Increased social activity seems to be accompanied by elevated opioid peptide release in distinct brain areas after morphine treatment during juvenile isolation.

  18. Selected hormonal and neurotransmitter mechanisms regulating feed intake in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartin, J L; Daniel, J A; Whitlock, B K; Wilborn, R R

    2010-11-01

    Appetite control is a major issue in normal growth and in suboptimal growth performance settings. A number of hormones, in particular leptin, activate or inhibit orexigenic or anorexigenic neurotransmitters within the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, where feed intake regulation is integrated. Examples of appetite regulatory neurotransmitters are the stimulatory neurotransmitters neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AgRP), orexin and melanin-concentrating hormone and the inhibitory neurotransmitter, melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH). Examination of messenger RNA (using in situ hybridization and real-time PCR) and proteins (using immunohistochemistry) for these neurotransmitters in ruminants has indicated that physiological regulation occurs in response to fasting for several of these critical genes and proteins, especially AgRP and NPY. Moreover, intracerebroventricular injection of each of the four stimulatory neurotransmitters can increase feed intake in sheep and may also regulate either growth hormone, luteinizing hormone, cortisol or other hormones. In contrast, both leptin and MSH are inhibitory to feed intake in ruminants. Interestingly, the natural melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) antagonist, AgRP, as well as NPY can prevent the inhibition of feed intake after injection of endotoxin (to model disease suppression of appetite). Thus, knowledge of the mechanisms regulating feed intake in the hypothalamus may lead to mechanisms to increase feed intake in normal growing animals and prevent the wasting effects of severe disease in animals.

  19. Cochlear Damage Affects Neurotransmitter Chemistry in the Central Auditory System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Albert Godfrey

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus, the perception of a monotonous sound not actually present in the environment, affects nearly 20% of the population of the United States. Although there has been great progress in tinnitus research over the past 25 years, the neurochemical basis of tinnitus is still poorly understood. We review current research about the effects of various types of cochlear damage on the neurotransmitter chemistry in the central auditory system and document evidence that different changes in this chemistry can underlie similar behaviorally measured tinnitus symptoms. Most available data have been obtained from rodents following cochlear damage produced by cochlear ablation, loud sound, or ototoxic drugs. Effects on neurotransmitter systems have been measured as changes in neurotransmitter level, synthesis, release, uptake, and receptors. In this review, magnitudes of changes are presented for neurotransmitter-related amino acids, acetylcholine, and serotonin. A variety of effects have been found in these studies that may be related to animal model, survival time, type of cochlear damage, or methodology. The overall impression from the evidence presented is that any imbalance of neurotransmitter-related chemistry could disrupt auditory processing in such a way as to produce tinnitus.

  20. Release of intracellular Calcium increase production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in renal distal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Henning F.

    Release of intracellular Calcium increase production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in renal distal epithelial cells. Henning F. Bjerregaard, Roskilde University, Department of Science, Systems and Models , 4000 Roskilde, Denmark. HFB@ RUC.DK Reactive oxygen species (ROS) like, hydrogen...... to G-protein stimulation of phospholipase C and release of inositol -3 phosphate. Cd (0.4 mM) treatment of A6 cells enhanced the ROS production after one minutes incubation. The production rate was constant for at least 10 to 20 min. Experiments showed that the Cd induced increase in ROS production...

  1. Increased release of histamine in patients with respiratory symptoms related to perfume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elberling, J; Skov, P S; Mosbech, H; Holst, H; Dirksen, A; Johansen, J D

    2007-11-01

    Environmental perfume exposure may cause respiratory symptoms. Individuals with asthma and perfume contact allergy report such symptoms more frequently than others. However, immunologic mechanisms have not been demonstrated and the symptoms are not associated with IgE-mediated allergy. The study aimed to investigate whether basophils from patients with respiratory symptoms related to perfume released more histamine in the presence of perfume as compared with healthy volunteers. Histamine release was measured by the glass fibre method. Blood was obtained from healthy volunteers (n=20) and patients with respiratory symptoms related to perfume (n=17) attending a dermatological outpatient clinic for patch testing. The effect of an international brand perfume was investigated using the basophil histamine release test with perfume. Furthermore, basophils from a healthy non-atopic donor were incubated with participant's sera and histamine release induced by perfume was measured. In both groups incremental perfume concentrations showed a positive and significant (Pperfume concentration, the basophils released significantly (PPerfume induces a dose-dependent non-IgE-mediated release of histamine from human peripheral blood basophils. Increased basophil reactivity to perfume was found in patients with respiratory symptoms related to perfume.

  2. Intrahippocampal Infusions of Anisomycin Produce Amnesia: Contribution of Increased Release of Norepinephrine, Dopamine, and Acetylcholine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhenghan; Gold, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    Intra-amygdala injections of anisomycin produce large increases in the release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin in the amygdala. Pretreatment with intra-amygdala injections of the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol attenuates anisomycin-induced amnesia without reversing the inhibition of protein synthesis, and…

  3. Intrahippocampal Infusions of Anisomycin Produce Amnesia: Contribution of Increased Release of Norepinephrine, Dopamine, and Acetylcholine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhenghan; Gold, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    Intra-amygdala injections of anisomycin produce large increases in the release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin in the amygdala. Pretreatment with intra-amygdala injections of the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol attenuates anisomycin-induced amnesia without reversing the inhibition of protein synthesis, and…

  4. Determining the neurotransmitter concentration profile at active synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scimemi, Annalisa; Beato, Marco

    2009-12-01

    Establishing the temporal and concentration profiles of neurotransmitters during synaptic release is an essential step towards understanding the basic properties of inter-neuronal communication in the central nervous system. A variety of ingenious attempts has been made to gain insights into this process, but the general inaccessibility of central synapses, intrinsic limitations of the techniques used, and natural variety of different synaptic environments have hindered a comprehensive description of this fundamental phenomenon. Here, we describe a number of experimental and theoretical findings that has been instrumental for advancing our knowledge of various features of neurotransmitter release, as well as newly developed tools that could overcome some limits of traditional pharmacological approaches and bring new impetus to the description of the complex mechanisms of synaptic transmission.

  5. Estradiol potentiation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone responsiveness in the anterior pituitary is mediated by an increase in gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menon, M.; Peegel, H.; Katta, V.

    1985-02-15

    In order to investigate the mechanism by which 17 beta-estradiol potentiates the action of gonadotropin-releasing hormone on the anterior pituitary in vitro, cultured pituitary cells from immature female rats were used as the model system. Cultures exposed to estradiol at concentrations ranging from 10(-10) to 10(-6) mol/L exhibited a significant augmentation of luteinizing hormone release in response to a 4-hour gonadotropin-releasing hormone (10 mumol/L) challenge at a dose of 10(-9) mol/L compared to that of control cultures. The estradiol augmentation of luteinizing hormone release was also dependent on the duration of estradiol exposure. When these cultures were incubated with tritium-labeled L-leucine, an increase in incorporation of radiolabeled amino acid into total proteins greater than that in controls was observed. A parallel stimulatory effect of estradiol on iodine 125-labeled D-Ala6 gonadotropin-releasing hormone binding was observed. Cultures incubated with estradiol at different concentrations and various lengths of time showed a significant increase in gonadotropin-releasing hormone binding capacity and this increase was abrogated by cycloheximide. Analysis of the binding data showed that the increase in gonadotropin-releasing hormone binding activity was due to a change in the number of gonadotropin-releasing hormone binding sites rather than a change in the affinity. These results suggest that (1) estradiol treatment increases the number of pituitary receptors for gonadotropin-releasing hormone, (2) the augmentary effect of estradiol on luteinizing hormone release at the pituitary level might be mediated, at least in part, by the increase in the number of binding sites of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, and (3) new protein synthesis may be involved in estradiol-mediated gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor induction.

  6. Improvement of aromatic thiol release through the selection of yeasts with increased β-lyase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda, Ignacio; Ruiz, Javier; Navascués, Eva; Marquina, Domingo; Santos, Antonio

    2016-05-16

    The development of a selective medium for the rapid differentiation of yeast species with increased aromatic thiol release activity has been achieved. The selective medium was based on the addition of S-methyl-l-cysteine (SMC) as β-lyase substrate. In this study, a panel of 245 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains was tested for their ability to grow on YCB-SMC medium. Yeast strains with an increased β-lyase activity grew rapidly because of their ability to release ammonium from SMC in comparison to others, and allowed for the easy isolation and differentiation of yeasts with promising properties in oenology, or another field, for aromatic thiol release. The selective medium was also helpful for the discrimination between those S. cerevisiae strains, which present a common 38-bp deletion in the IRC7 sequence (present in around 88% of the wild strains tested and are likely to be less functional for 4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one (4MMP) production), and those S. cerevisiae strains homozygous for the full-length IRC7 allele. The medium was also helpful for the selection of non-Saccharomyces yeasts with increased β-lyase activity. Based on the same medium, a highly sensitive, reproducible and non-expensive GC-MS method for the evaluation of the potential volatile thiol release by different yeast isolates was developed.

  7. Increased glucocorticoid sensitivity in pancreatic beta-cells : Effects on glucose metabolism and insulin release

    OpenAIRE

    Davani, Behrous

    2003-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by three pathological alterations: (1) insulin resistance in peripheral tissues, (2) increased hepatic glucose production and (3) impaired insulin secretion from the pancreatic beta-cells. Glucocorticoids (GCs) exert profound effects on glucose homeostasis. They decrease glucose uptake and increase hepatic glucose production. In addition, they may directly inhibit insulin release. The main aim of this thesis was to investigate...

  8. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Induces Neurotransmitter Switching in Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamber, Bruce A.; Masters, Brian A.; Hoyle, Gary W.; Brinster, Ralph L.; Palmiter, Richard D.

    1994-08-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is a cytokine growth factor that induces rat sympathetic neurons to switch their neurotransmitter phenotype from noradrenergic to cholinergic in vitro. To test whether LIF can influence neuronal differentiation in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that expressed LIF in pancreatic islets under the control of the insulin promoter and evaluated the neurotransmitter phenotype of the pancreatic sympathetic innervation. We also used the insulin promoter to coexpress nerve growth factor in the islets, which greatly increased the density of sympathetic innervation and facilitated analysis of the effects of LIF. Our data demonstrate that tyrosine hydroxylase and catecholamines declined and choline acetyltransferase increased in response to LIF. We conclude that LIF can induce neurotransmitter switching of sympathetic neurons in vivo.

  9. Are vesicular neurotransmitter transporters potential treatment targets for temporal lobe epilepsy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joeri eVan Liefferinge

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The vesicular neurotransmitter transporters (VNTs are small proteins responsible for packing synaptic vesicles with neurotransmitters thereby determining the amount of neurotransmitter released per vesicle through fusion in both neurons and glial cells. Each transporter subtype was classically seen as a specific neuronal marker of the respective nerve cells containing that particular neurotransmitter or structurally related neurotransmitters. More recently, however, it has become apparent that common neurotransmitters can also act as co-transmitters, adding complexity to neurotransmitter release and suggesting intriguing roles for VNTs therein. We will first describe the current knowledge on vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1/2/3, the vesicular excitatory amino acid transporter (VEAT, the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT, vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT1/2, the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT and the vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA transporter (VGAT in the brain. We will focus on evidence regarding transgenic mice with disruptions in VNTs in different models of seizures and epilepsy. We will also describe the known alterations and reorganizations in the expression levels of these VNTs in rodent models for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and in human tissue resected for epilepsy surgery. Finally, we will discuss perspectives on opportunities and challenges for VNTs as targets for possible future epilepsy therapies.

  10. Gymnema sylvestre stimulates insulin release in vitro by increased membrane permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, S J; Al-Majed, H; Raman, A; Jones, P M

    1999-11-01

    To determine whether extracts of Gymnema sylvestre may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), we examined the effects of an alcoholic extract of G. sylvestre (GS4) on insulin secretion from rat islets of Langerhans and several pancreatic beta-cell lines. GS4 stimulated insulin release from HIT-T15, MIN6 and RINm5F beta-cells and from islets in the absence of any other stimulus, and GS4-stimulated insulin secretion was inhibited in the presence of 1 mM EGTA. Blockade of voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels with 10 microM isradipine did not significantly affect GS4-induced secretion, and insulin release in response to GS4 was independent of incubation temperature. Examination of islet and beta-cell integrity after exposure to GS4, by trypan blue exclusion, indicated that concentrations of GS4 that stimulated insulin secretion also caused increased uptake of dye. Two gymnemic acid-enriched fractions of GS4, obtained by size exclusion and silica gel chromatography, also caused increases in insulin secretion concomitant with increased trypan blue uptake. These results confirm the stimulatory effects of G. sylvestre on insulin release, but indicate that GS4 acts by increasing cell permeability, rather than by stimulating exocytosis by regulated pathways. Thus the suitability of GS4 as a potential novel treatment for NIDDM can not be assessed by direct measurements of beta-cell function in vitro.

  11. Stimulating the Release of Exosomes Increases the Intercellular Transfer of Prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Belinda B; Bellingham, Shayne A; Hill, Andrew F

    2016-03-04

    Exosomes are small extracellular vesicles released by cells and play important roles in intercellular communication and pathogen transfer. Exosomes have been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, including prion disease and Alzheimer disease. Prion disease arises upon misfolding of the normal cellular prion protein, PrP(C), into the disease-associated isoform, PrP(Sc). The disease has a unique transmissible etiology, and exosomes represent a novel and efficient method for prion transmission. The precise mechanism by which prions are transmitted from cell to cell remains to be fully elucidated, although three hypotheses have been proposed: direct cell-cell contact, tunneling nanotubes, and exosomes. Given the reported presence of exosomes in biological fluids and in the lipid and nucleic acid contents of exosomes, these vesicles represent an ideal mechanism for encapsulating prions and potential cofactors to facilitate prion transmission. This study investigates the relationship between exosome release and intercellular prion dissemination. Stimulation of exosome release through treatment with an ionophore, monensin, revealed a corresponding increase in intercellular transfer of prion infectivity. Conversely, inhibition of exosome release using GW4869 to target the neutral sphingomyelinase pathway induced a decrease in intercellular prion transmission. Further examination of the effect of monensin on PrP conversion revealed that monensin also alters the conformational stability of PrP(C), leading to increased generation of proteinase K-resistant prion protein. The findings presented here provide support for a positive relationship between exosome release and intercellular transfer of prion infectivity, highlighting an integral role for exosomes in facilitating the unique transmissible nature of prions.

  12. Neurotransmitters and neuromodulators controlling the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneoka, Y; Fujisawa, Y; Matsuura, M; Ikeda, T

    1991-01-01

    1. The anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis is innervated by at least two kinds of nerves, excitatory and relaxing nerves. The principal neurotransmitters released from these nerves have been shown to be acetylcholine and serotonin, respectively. 2. Some other monoamines, such as dopamine and octopamine, and various peptides, such as FMRFamide-related peptides, Mytilus inhibitory peptides, SCP-related peptides and a catch-relaxing peptide, may also be involved in the regulation of the muscle as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators. 3. The ABRM seems to be typical of invertebrate muscles controlled by multiple neurotransmitters and neuromodulators.

  13. Neurotransmitters, Pharmacologic Synergy, and Clinical Strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stark, Martha

    2006-01-01

    ... of neurotransmitters and their receptor sites, more ingenious methods of drug administration, and more creative combinations of the various drugs, more than half our patients have psychiatric sympto...

  14. Suilysin stimulates the release of heparin binding protein from neutrophils and increases vascular permeability in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaolong Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the deaths that occurred during two large outbreaks of Streptococcus suis (S. suis infections in 1998 and 2005 in China were caused by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS, which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. Heparin binding protein (HBP is thought to mediate the vascular leakage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed mechanism underlying the release of HBP and the vascular leakage induced by S. suis. Significantly higher serum levels of HBP were detected in Chinese patients with STSS than in patients with meningitis or healthy controls. Suilysin (SLY is an exotoxin secreted by the highly virulent strain 05ZYH33, and it stimulated the release of HBP from the polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mediated vascular leakage in mice. The release of HBP induced by SLY was caused by a calcium influx-dependent degranulation. Analyses using a pharmacological approach revealed that the release of HBP induced by SLY was related to Toll-like receptor 4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. It was also dependent on a G protein-coupled seven-membrane spanning receptor. The results of this study provide new insights into the vascular leakage in STSS associated with non-Group A streptococci, which could lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for STSS associated with S. suis.

  15. Hyperinsulinemia is Associated with Increased Soluble Insulin Receptors Release from Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiriart, Marcia; Sanchez-Soto, Carmen; Diaz-Garcia, Carlos Manlio; Castanares, Diana T.; Avitia, Morena; Velasco, Myrian; Mas-Oliva, Jaime; Macias-Silva, Marina; González-Villalpando, Clicerio; Delgado-Coello, Blanca; Sosa-Garrocho, Marcela; Vidaltamayo, Román; Fuentes-Silva, Deyanira

    2014-01-01

    It has been generally assumed that insulin circulates freely in blood. However it can also interact with plasma proteins. Insulin receptors are located in the membrane of target cells and consist of an alpha and beta subunits with a tyrosine kinase cytoplasmic domain. The ectodomain, called soluble insulin receptor (SIR) has been found elevated in patients with diabetes mellitus. We explored if insulin binds to SIRs in circulation under physiological conditions and hypothesize that this SIR may be released by hepatocytes in response to high insulin concentrations. The presence of SIR in rat and human plasmas and the culture medium of hepatocytes was explored using Western blot analysis. A purification protocol was performed to isolated SIR using affinity, gel filtration, and ion exchange chromatographies. A modified reverse hemolytic plaque assay was used to measure SIR release from cultured hepatocytes. Incubation with 1 nmol l−1 insulin induces the release of the insulin receptor ectodomains from normal rat hepatocytes. This effect can be partially prevented by blocking protease activity. Furthermore, plasma levels of SIR were higher in a model of metabolic syndrome, where rats are hyperinsulinemic. We also found increased SIR levels in hyperinsulinemic humans. SIR may be an important regulator of the amount of free insulin in circulation. In hyperinsulinemia, the amount of this soluble receptor increases and this could lead to higher amounts of insulin bound to this receptor, rather than free insulin, which is the biologically active form of the hormone. This observation could enlighten the mechanisms of insulin resistance. PMID:24995000

  16. Omega 3 fatty acids increase spontaneous release of cytosolic components from tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenski, L.J.; Sturdevant, L.K.; Ehringer, W.D.; Stillwell, W. (Department of Biology, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis (United States))

    1991-05-01

    Mice fed menhaden (fish) oil or coconut oil-rich diets were inoculated intraperitoneally with a rapidly growing leukemia, T27A. After one week, the tumor cells were harvested, and 51Cr was used to label intracellular molecules. Spontaneous release of 51Cr was used as a measure of plasma membrane permeability. Compared to cells from mice fed coconut oil (rich in saturated fatty acids), tumor cells from mice fed menhaden oil (rich in long chain polyunsaturated omega 3 fatty acids) showed an increased level of spontaneous 51Cr release, which was exacerbated by increased temperature and reduced by extracellular protein. At physiological salt concentrations, the released 51Cr was detected in particles of approximately 2700 daltons. Enhanced permeability correlated with the incorporation of dietary (fish oil) omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acid into the tumor cells. The results demonstrate that omega 3 fatty acids are incorporated into cellular constituents of tumor cells and change properties associated with the plasma membrane. This result suggests that dietary manipulation may be used to enhance tumor cell permeability and contribute to tumor eradication.

  17. Hyperinsulinemia is associated with increased soluble insulin receptors release from hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia eHiriart

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been generally assumed that insulin circulates freely in blood. However it can also interact with plasma proteins. Insulin receptors are located in the membrane of target cells and consist of an alpha and beta subunits with a tyrosine kinase cytoplasmic domain. The ectodomain, called soluble insulin receptor (SIR has been found elevated in patients with diabetes mellitus. We explored if insulin binds to SIRs in circulation under physiological conditions and hypothesize that this SIR may be released by hepatocytes in response to high insulin concentrations. The presence of SIR in rat and human plasmas and the culture medium of hepatocytes was explored using Western blot analysis. A purification protocol was performed to isolated SIR using affinity, gel filtration and ion exchange chromatographies. A modified reverse hemolytic plaque assay was used to measure SIR release from cultured hepatocytes. Incubation with 1 nmol l-1 insulin induces the release of the insulin receptor ectodomains from normal rat hepatocytes. This effect can be partially prevented by blocking protease activity. Furthermore, plasma levels of SIR were higher in a model of metabolic syndrome, where rats are hyperinsulinemic. We also found increased SIR levels in hyperinsulinemic humans. SIR may be an important regulator of the amount of free insulin in circulation. In hyperinsulinemia the amount of this soluble receptor increases, this could lead to higher amounts of insulin bound to this receptor, rather than free insulin, which is the biologically active form of the hormone. This observation could enlighten the mechanisms of insulin resistance.

  18. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantcheva, Adriana Krassimirova; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs...

  19. Nitrogen, phosphorus, calcium, and magnesium applied individually or as a slow release or controlled release fertilizer increase growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has restricted concentrated animal feeding operation(CAFO) release of waste products into U.S. waters. These waste products must be disposed of using best management practices. Most of the waste is spread on cropland, but some operations have found ot...

  20. APP Homodimers Transduce an Amyloid-β-Mediated Increase in Release Probability at Excitatory Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilla Fogel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ, the proteolytic products of the amyloid precursor protein (APP, induces a variety of synaptic dysfunctions ranging from hyperactivity to depression that are thought to cause cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease. While depression of synaptic transmission has been extensively studied, the mechanisms underlying synaptic hyperactivity remain unknown. Here, we show that Aβ40 monomers and dimers augment release probability through local fine-tuning of APP-APP interactions at excitatory hippocampal boutons. Aβ40 binds to the APP, increases the APP homodimer fraction at the plasma membrane, and promotes APP-APP interactions. The APP activation induces structural rearrangements in the APP/Gi/o-protein complex, boosting presynaptic calcium flux and vesicle release. The APP growth-factor-like domain (GFLD mediates APP-APP conformational changes and presynaptic enhancement. Thus, the APP homodimer constitutes a presynaptic receptor that transduces signal from Aβ40 to glutamate release. Excessive APP activation may initiate a positive feedback loop, contributing to hippocampal hyperactivity in Alzheimer’s disease.

  1. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a novel neurotransmitter system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Elizabeth S.; Greer, Christina L.; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N.; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M.; Nguyen, Bac T.; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven; Krantz, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Storage and release of classical and amino acid neurotransmitters requires vesicular transporters. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila gene portabella (prt) that is structurally similar to known vesicular transporters. Both larval and adult brains express PRT in the KCs of the MBs. Additional PRT cells project to the central complex and optic ganglia. prt mutation causes an olfactory learning deficit and an unusual defect in the male’s position during copulation that is rescued by expression in KCs. Since prt is expressed in neurons that lack other known vesicular transporters or neurotransmitters, it may define a previously unknown neurotransmitter system responsible for sexual behavior and a component of olfactory learning. PMID:22017990

  2. Nicotine induces self-renewal of pancreatic cancer stem cells via neurotransmitter-driven activation of sonic hedgehog signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wadei, Mohammed H; Banerjee, Jheelam; Al-Wadei, Hussein A N; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2016-01-01

    A small subpopulation of pancreatic cancer cells with characteristics of stem cells drive tumour initiation, progression and metastasis. A better understanding of the regulation of cancer stem cells may lead to more effective cancer prevention and therapy. We have shown that the proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cell lines is activated by the nicotinic receptor-mediated release of stress neurotransmitters, responses reversed by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). However, the observed cancer inhibiting effects of GABA will only succeed clinically if GABA inhibits pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSCs) in addition to the more differentiated cancer cells that comprise the majority of cancer tissues and cell lines. Using PCSCs isolated from two pancreatic cancer patients by cell sorting and by spheroid formation assay from pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1, we tested the hypothesis that nicotine induces the self-renewal of PCSCs. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) α3, α4, α5 and α7 were expressed and chronic exposure to nicotine increased the protein expression of these receptors. Immunoassays showed that PCSCs produced the stress neurotransmitters epinephrine and norepinephrine and the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. Chronic nicotine significantly increased the production of stress neurotransmitters and sonic hedgehog (SHH) while inducing Gli1 protein and decreasing GABA. GABA treatment inhibited the induction of SHH and Gli1. Spheroid formation and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide assays showed significant nicotine-induced increases in self renewal and cell proliferation, responses blocked by GABA. Our data suggest that nicotine increases the SHH-mediated malignant potential of PCSCs and that GABA prevents these effects.

  3. Direct Release of Test Results to Patients Increases Patient Engagement and Utilization of Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Pillemer

    Full Text Available An important focus for meaningful use criteria is to engage patients in their care by allowing them online access to their health information, including test results. There has been little evaluation of such initiatives. Using a mixed methods analysis of electronic health record data, surveys, and qualitative interviews, we examined the impact of allowing patients to view their test results via patient portal in one large health system. Quantitative data were collected for new users and all users of the patient portal. Qualitative interviews occurred with patients who had received an HbA1c or abnormal Pap result. Survey participants were active patient portal users. Our main measures were patient portal usage, factors associated with viewing test results and utilizing care, and patient and provider experiences with patient portal and direct release. Usage data show 80% of all patient portal users viewed test results during the year. Of survey respondents, 82.7% noted test results to be a very useful feature and 70% agreed that patient portal has made their provider more accessible to them. Interviewed patients reported feeling they should have direct access to test results and identified the ability to monitor results over time and prepare prior to communicating with a provider as benefits. In interviews, both patients and physicians reported instances of test results leading to unnecessary patient anxiety. Both groups noted the benefits of results released with provider interpretation. Quantitative data showed patient utilization to increase with viewing test results online, but this effect is mitigated when results are manually released by physicians. Our findings demonstrate that patient portal access to test results was highly valued by patients and appeared to increase patient engagement. However, it may lead to patient anxiety and increase rates of patient visits. We discuss how such unintended consequences can be addressed and larger

  4. Paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy increases substance P release in rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Terumasa; Oka, Yusuke; Kambe, Toshie; Koizumi, Naoya; Abe, Kenji; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Utsunomiya, Iku; Taguchi, Kyoji

    2016-01-05

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common adverse effect of paclitaxel treatment. The major dose-limiting side effect of paclitaxel is peripheral sensory neuropathy, which is characterized by painful paresthesia of the hands and feet. To analyze the contribution of substance P to the development of paclitaxel-induced mechanical hyperalgesia, substance P expression in the superficial layers of the rat spinal dorsal horn was analyzed after paclitaxel treatment. Behavioral assessment using the von Frey test and the paw thermal test showed that intraperitoneal administration of 2 and 4mg/kg paclitaxel induced mechanical allodynia/hyperalgesia and thermal hyperalgesia 7 and 14 days after treatment. Immunohistochemistry showed that paclitaxel (4mg/kg) treatment significantly increased substance P expression (37.6±3.7% on day 7, 43.6±4.6% on day 14) in the superficial layers of the spinal dorsal horn, whereas calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression was unchanged. Moreover, paclitaxel (2 and 4mg/kg) treatment significantly increased substance P release in the spinal cord on day 14. These results suggest that paclitaxel treatment increases release of substance P, but not CGRP in the superficial layers of the spinal dorsal horn and may contribute to paclitaxel-induced painful peripheral neuropathy.

  5. Transient increase in neuronal chloride concentration by neuroactive amino acids released from glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eBertollini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal chloride concentration ([Cl-]i is known to be dynamically modulated and alterations in Cl- homeostasis may occur in the brain at physiological and pathological conditions, being also likely involved in glioma-related seizures. However, the mechanism leading to changes in neuronal [Cl-]i during glioma invasion are still unclear. To characterize the potential effect of glioma released soluble factors on neuronal [Cl-]i, we used genetically encoded CFP/YFP-based ratiometric Cl-Sensor transiently expressed in cultured hippocampal neurons. Exposition of neurons to glioma conditioned medium (GCM caused rapid and transient elevation of [Cl-]i, resulting in the increase of fluorescence ratio, which was strongly reduced by blockers of ionotropic glutamate receptors APV and NBQX. Furthermore, in HEK cells expressing GluR1-AMPA receptors, GCM activated ionic current with efficacy similar to those caused by glutamate, supporting the notion that GCM contains glutamate or glutamatergic agonists, which cause neuronal depolarization, activation of NMDA and AMPA/KA receptors leading to elevation of [Cl-]i. Chromatographic analysis of the GCM showed that it contained several aminoacids, including glutamate, whose release from glioma cells did not occur via the most common glial mechanisms of transport, or in response to hypoosmotic stress. GCM also contained glycine, whose action contrasted the glutamate effect. Indeed, strychnine application significantly increased GCM-induced depolarization and [Cl-]i rise. GCM-evoked [Cl-]i elevation was not inhibited by antagonists of Cl- transporters and significantly reduced in the presence of anion channels blocker NPPB, suggesting that Cl-selective channels are a major route for GCM-induced Cl- influx. Altogether, these data show that glioma released aminoacids may dynamically alter Cl- equilibrium in surrounding neurons, deeply interfering with their inhibitory balance, likely leading to physiological and

  6. Nicotine enhancement of dopamine release by a calcium-dependent increase in the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Timothy J

    2004-12-15

    A major factor underlying compulsive tobacco use is nicotine-induced modulation of dopamine release in the mesolimbic reward pathway (Wise and Rompre, 1989). An established biochemical mechanism for nicotine-enhanced dopamine release is by activating presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) (Wonnacott, 1997). Prolonged application of 10(-7) to 10(-5) m nicotine to striatal synaptosomes promoted a sustained efflux of [3H]dopamine. This nicotine effect was mediated by non-alpha7 nAChRs, because it was blocked by 5 mum mecamylamine but was resistant to 100 nm alpha-bungarotoxin (alphaBgTx). Dopamine release was diminished by omitting Na+ or by applying peptide calcium channel blockers, indicating that nAChRs trigger release by depolarizing the nerve terminals. However, because alpha7 receptors rapidly desensitize in the continuous presence of agonists, a repetitive stimulation protocol was used to evaluate the possible significance of desensitization. This protocol produced a transient increase in [3H]dopamine released by depolarization and a significant increase in the response to hypertonic solutions that measure the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP) of synaptic vesicles. The nicotine-induced increase in the size of the readily releasable pool was blocked by alphaBgTx and by the calmodulin antagonist calmidazolium, suggesting that Ca2+ entry through alpha7 nAChRs specifically enhances synaptic vesicle mobilization at dopamine terminals. Thus, nicotine enhances dopamine release by two complementary actions mediated by discrete nAChR subtypes and suggest that the alpha7 nAChR-mediated pathway is tightly and specifically coupled to refilling of the RRP of vesicles in dopamine terminals.

  7. Binding of Neurotransmitters to Lipid Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Werge, Mikkel; Elf-Lind, Maria Northved

    2014-01-01

    We have performed a series of thermodynamic measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the interactions between the neurotransmitters (NTs) 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), g-aminobutyrate (GABA), glycine (GLY), acetylcholine (ACH) and glutamate (GLU) as well as the amidated...... as the most important interaction by which the NTs are anchored to the membrane. These distinctive interactions could be related to nonspecific effects of these neurotransmitters and could point to a bilayer-mediated modulation of nerve transmission. However, due to the strong variability in affinity observed...... for the different NTs, this attraction is not an inherent property of all neurotransmitters....

  8. Augmentation of moxonidine-induced increase in ANP release by atrial hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chunhua; Kang, Chang Won; Kim, Sung Zoo; Kim, Suhn Hee

    2004-07-01

    Imidazoline receptors are divided into I(1) and I(2) subtypes. I(1)-imidazoline receptors are distributed in the heart and are upregulated during hypertension or heart failure. The aim of this study was to define the possible role of I(1)-imidazoline receptors in the regulation of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release in hypertrophied atria. Experiments were performed on isolated, perfused, hypertrophied atria from remnant-kidney hypertensive rats. The relatively selective I(1)-imidazoline receptor agonist moxonidine caused a decrease in pulse pressure. Moxonidine (3, 10, and 30 micromol/l) also caused dose-dependent increases in ANP secretion, but clonidine (an alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist) did not. Pretreatment with efaroxan (a selective I(1)-imidazoline receptor antagonist) or rauwolscine (a selective alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist) inhibited the moxonidine-induced increases in ANP secretion and interstitial ANP concentration and decrease in pulse pressure. However, the antagonistic effect of efaroxan on moxonidine-induced ANP secretion was greater than that of rauwolscine. Neither efaroxan nor rauwolscine alone has any significant effects on ANP secretion and pulse pressure. In hypertrophied atria, the moxonidine-induced increase in ANP secretion and decrease in pulse pressure were markedly augmented compared with nonhypertrophied atria, and the relative change in ANP secretion by moxonidine was positively correlated to atrial hypertrophy. The accentuation by moxonidine of ANP secretion was attenuated by efaroxan but not by rauwolscine. These results show that moxonidine increases ANP release through (preferentially) the activation of atrial I(1)-imidazoline receptors and also via different mechanisms from clonidine, and this effect is augmented in hypertrophied atria. Therefore, we suggest that cardiac I(1)-imidazoline receptors play an important role in the regulation of blood pressure.

  9. Temperature-induced increase in methane release from peat bogs: a mesocosm experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Winden, Julia F; Reichart, Gert-Jan; McNamara, Niall P; Benthien, Albert; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe

    2012-01-01

    Peat bogs are primarily situated at mid to high latitudes and future climatic change projections indicate that these areas may become increasingly wetter and warmer. Methane emissions from peat bogs are reduced by symbiotic methane oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs). Higher temperatures and increasing water levels will enhance methane production, but also methane oxidation. To unravel the temperature effect on methane and carbon cycling, a set of mesocosm experiments were executed, where intact peat cores containing actively growing Sphagnum were incubated at 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25°C. After two months of incubation, methane flux measurements indicated that, at increasing temperatures, methanotrophs are not able to fully compensate for the increasing methane production by methanogens. Net methane fluxes showed a strong temperature-dependence, with higher methane fluxes at higher temperatures. After removal of Sphagnum, methane fluxes were higher, increasing with increasing temperature. This indicates that the methanotrophs associated with Sphagnum plants play an important role in limiting the net methane flux from peat. Methanotrophs appear to consume almost all methane transported through diffusion between 5 and 15°C. Still, even though methane consumption increased with increasing temperature, the higher fluxes from the methane producing microbes could not be balanced by methanotrophic activity. The efficiency of the Sphagnum-methanotroph consortium as a filter for methane escape thus decreases with increasing temperature. Whereas 98% of the produced methane is retained at 5°C, this drops to approximately 50% at 25°C. This implies that warming at the mid to high latitudes may be enhanced through increased methane release from peat bogs.

  10. Temperature-induced increase in methane release from peat bogs: a mesocosm experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia F van Winden

    Full Text Available Peat bogs are primarily situated at mid to high latitudes and future climatic change projections indicate that these areas may become increasingly wetter and warmer. Methane emissions from peat bogs are reduced by symbiotic methane oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs. Higher temperatures and increasing water levels will enhance methane production, but also methane oxidation. To unravel the temperature effect on methane and carbon cycling, a set of mesocosm experiments were executed, where intact peat cores containing actively growing Sphagnum were incubated at 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25°C. After two months of incubation, methane flux measurements indicated that, at increasing temperatures, methanotrophs are not able to fully compensate for the increasing methane production by methanogens. Net methane fluxes showed a strong temperature-dependence, with higher methane fluxes at higher temperatures. After removal of Sphagnum, methane fluxes were higher, increasing with increasing temperature. This indicates that the methanotrophs associated with Sphagnum plants play an important role in limiting the net methane flux from peat. Methanotrophs appear to consume almost all methane transported through diffusion between 5 and 15°C. Still, even though methane consumption increased with increasing temperature, the higher fluxes from the methane producing microbes could not be balanced by methanotrophic activity. The efficiency of the Sphagnum-methanotroph consortium as a filter for methane escape thus decreases with increasing temperature. Whereas 98% of the produced methane is retained at 5°C, this drops to approximately 50% at 25°C. This implies that warming at the mid to high latitudes may be enhanced through increased methane release from peat bogs.

  11. Clavulanic acid increases dopamine release in neuronal cells through a mechanism involving enhanced vesicle trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Gina Chun; Selvaraj, Senthil; Lee, Young Bok; Kim, Deog Joong; Ahn, Chang-Ho; Singh, Brij B

    2011-01-01

    Clavulanic acid is a CNS-modulating compound with exceptional blood-brain barrier permeability and safety profile. Clavulanic acid has been proposed to have anti-depressant activity and is currently entering Phase IIb clinical trials for the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Studies have also shown that clavulanic acid suppresses anxiety and enhances sexual functions in rodent and primate models by a mechanism involving central nervous system (CNS) modulation, although its detailed mechanism of action has yet to be elucidated. To further examine its potential as a CNS modulating agent as well as its mechanism of action, we investigated the effects of clavulanic acid in neuronal cells. Our results indicate that clavulanic acid enhances dopamine release in PC12 and SH-SY5Y cells without affecting dopamine synthesis. Furthermore, using affinity chromatography we were able to identify two proteins, Munc18-1 and Rab4 that potentially bind to clavulanic acid and play a critical role in neurosecretion and the vesicle trafficking process. Consistent with this result, an increase in the translocation of Munc18-1 and Rab4 from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane was observed in clavulanic acid treated cells. Overall, these data suggest that clavulanic acid enhances dopamine release in a mechanism involving Munc18-1 and Rab4 modulation and warrants further investigation of its therapeutic use in CNS disorders, such as depression. PMID:21964384

  12. Clavulanic acid increases dopamine release in neuronal cells through a mechanism involving enhanced vesicle trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Gina Chun; Selvaraj, Senthil; Lee, Young Bok; Kim, Deog Joong; Ahn, Chang-Ho; Singh, Brij B

    2011-10-24

    Clavulanic acid is a CNS-modulating compound with exceptional blood-brain barrier permeability and safety profile. Clavulanic acid has been proposed to have anti-depressant activity and is currently entering Phase IIb clinical trials for the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Studies have also shown that clavulanic acid suppresses anxiety and enhances sexual functions in rodent and primate models by a mechanism involving central nervous system (CNS) modulation, although its detailed mechanism of action has yet to be elucidated. To further examine its potential as a CNS modulating agent as well as its mechanism of action, we investigated the effects of clavulanic acid in neuronal cells. Our results indicate that clavulanic acid enhances dopamine release in PC12 and SH-SY5Y cells without affecting dopamine synthesis. Furthermore, using affinity chromatography we were able to identify two proteins, Munc18-1 and Rab4 that potentially bind to clavulanic acid and play a critical role in neurosecretion and the vesicle trafficking process. Consistent with this result, an increase in the translocation of Munc18-1 and Rab4 from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane was observed in clavulanic acid treated cells. Overall, these data suggest that clavulanic acid enhances dopamine release in a mechanism involving Munc18-1 and Rab4 modulation and warrants further investigation of its therapeutic use in CNS disorders, such as depression.

  13. Use of Controlled Release Fertilizer for Increasing N Efficiency of Direct Seeding Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Field trials on a silt-loamy paddy soil derived from shallow-sea deposit in direct seeding rice fields were conducted in Zhejiang, China, in 1996 to compare N efficiency of controlled release fertilizers (LP fertilizers) with the conventional urea. Six treatments including CK (no N fertilizer), conventional urea and different types of LP fertilizers at different rates were designed for two succeeding crops of early and late rice. A blend of different types of LP fertilizers as a single preplant "co-situs" application released N in a rate and amount synchronizing with uptake pattern of direct seeding rice. A single preplant application of the LP fertilizers could meet the N requirement of rice for the whole growth period without need of topdressing. Using LP fertilizer blends, equivalent grain yields could be maintained even if the N fertilization rates were reduced by 25%~50% compared with the conventional urea. Agronomic efficiency of the LP fertilizers was 13.6%~86.4% higher than that of the conventional urea in early rice and 100%~164.1% in late rice, depending on the amounts of the LP fertilizers applied. N fertilizer recovery rate increased from 27.4% for the conventional application of urea to 41.7%~54.1% for the single preplant "co-situs" application of the LP fertilizers. Use of the LP fertilizers was promising if the increase in production costs due to the high LP fertilizer prices could be compensated by increase in yield and N efficiency, reduction in labor costs and improvement in environment.

  14. Eicosanoid release is increased by membrane destabilization and CFTR inhibition in Calu-3 cells.

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    Florence Borot

    Full Text Available The antiinflammatory protein annexin-1 (ANXA1 and the adaptor S100A10 (p11, inhibit cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2alpha by direct interaction. Since the latter is responsible for the cleavage of arachidonic acid at membrane phospholipids, all three proteins modulate eicosanoid production. We have previously shown the association of ANXA1 expression with that of CFTR, the multifactorial protein mutated in cystic fibrosis. This could in part account for the abnormal inflammatory status characteristic of this disease. We postulated that CFTR participates in the regulation of eicosanoid release by direct interaction with a complex containing ANXA1, p11 and cPLA2alpha. We first analyzed by plasmon surface resonance the in vitro binding of CFTR to the three proteins. A significant interaction between p11 and the NBD1 domain of CFTR was found. We observed in Calu-3 cells a rapid and partial redistribution of all four proteins in detergent resistant membranes (DRM induced by TNF-alpha. This was concomitant with increased IL-8 synthesis and cPLA2alpha activation, ultimately resulting in eicosanoid (PGE2 and LTB4 overproduction. DRM destabilizing agent methyl-beta-cyclodextrin induced further cPLA2alpha activation and eicosanoid release, but inhibited IL-8 synthesis. We tested in parallel the effect of short exposure of cells to CFTR inhibitors Inh172 and Gly-101. Both inhibitors induced a rapid increase in eicosanoid production. Longer exposure to Inh172 did not increase further eicosanoid release, but inhibited TNF-alpha-induced relocalization to DRM. These results show that (i CFTR may form a complex with cPLA2alpha and ANXA1 via interaction with p11, (ii CFTR inhibition and DRM disruption induce eicosanoid synthesis, and (iii suggest that the putative cPLA2/ANXA1/p11/CFTR complex may participate in the modulation of the TNF-alpha-induced production of eicosanoids, pointing to the importance of membrane composition and CFTR function in the

  15. Eicosanoid release is increased by membrane destabilization and CFTR inhibition in Calu-3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borot, Florence; Vieu, Diane-Lore; Faure, Grazyna; Fritsch, Janine; Colas, Julien; Moriceau, Sandra; Baudouin-Legros, Maryvonne; Brouillard, Franck; Ayala-Sanmartin, Jesus; Touqui, Lhousseine; Chanson, Marc; Edelman, Aleksander; Ollero, Mario

    2009-10-22

    The antiinflammatory protein annexin-1 (ANXA1) and the adaptor S100A10 (p11), inhibit cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2alpha) by direct interaction. Since the latter is responsible for the cleavage of arachidonic acid at membrane phospholipids, all three proteins modulate eicosanoid production. We have previously shown the association of ANXA1 expression with that of CFTR, the multifactorial protein mutated in cystic fibrosis. This could in part account for the abnormal inflammatory status characteristic of this disease. We postulated that CFTR participates in the regulation of eicosanoid release by direct interaction with a complex containing ANXA1, p11 and cPLA2alpha. We first analyzed by plasmon surface resonance the in vitro binding of CFTR to the three proteins. A significant interaction between p11 and the NBD1 domain of CFTR was found. We observed in Calu-3 cells a rapid and partial redistribution of all four proteins in detergent resistant membranes (DRM) induced by TNF-alpha. This was concomitant with increased IL-8 synthesis and cPLA2alpha activation, ultimately resulting in eicosanoid (PGE2 and LTB4) overproduction. DRM destabilizing agent methyl-beta-cyclodextrin induced further cPLA2alpha activation and eicosanoid release, but inhibited IL-8 synthesis. We tested in parallel the effect of short exposure of cells to CFTR inhibitors Inh172 and Gly-101. Both inhibitors induced a rapid increase in eicosanoid production. Longer exposure to Inh172 did not increase further eicosanoid release, but inhibited TNF-alpha-induced relocalization to DRM. These results show that (i) CFTR may form a complex with cPLA2alpha and ANXA1 via interaction with p11, (ii) CFTR inhibition and DRM disruption induce eicosanoid synthesis, and (iii) suggest that the putative cPLA2/ANXA1/p11/CFTR complex may participate in the modulation of the TNF-alpha-induced production of eicosanoids, pointing to the importance of membrane composition and CFTR function in the regulation of

  16. Immobilization increases interleukin-6, but not tumour necrosis factor-a, release from the leg during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reihmane, Dace; Hansen, Andreas Vigelsø; Jensen, Martin Gram;

    2013-01-01

    Data on interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) release during acute exercise are not conclusive, and information is lacking about the impact of physical inactivity. Some studies have shown an increase, but others report no changes in IL-6 and TNF-a release during exercise. We...

  17. Regulation of neurosteroid biosynthesis by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides

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    Jean-Luc eDo-Rego

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic pathways leading to the synthesis of bioactive steroids in the brain are now almost completely elucidated in various groups of vertebrates and, during the last decade, the neuronal mechanisms involved in the regulation of neurosteroid production have received increasing attention. This report reviews the current knowledge concerning the effects of neurotransmitters, peptide hormones and neuropeptides on the biosynthesis of neurosteroids. Anatomical studies have been carried out to visualize the neurotransmitter- or neuropeptide-containing fibers contacting steroid-synthesizing neurons as well as the neurotransmitter, peptide hormones or neuropeptide receptors expressed in these neurons. Biochemical experiments have been conducted to investigate the effects of neurotransmitters, peptide hormones or neuropeptides on neurosteroid biosynthesis, and to characterize the type of receptors involved. Thus, it has been found that glutamate, acting through kainate and/or AMPA receptors, rapidly inactivates P450arom, and that melatonin produced by the pineal gland and eye inhibits the biosynthesis of 7-hydroxypregnenolone (7-OH-5P, while prolactin produced by the adenohypophysis enhances the formation of 7-OH-5P. It has also been demonstrated that the biosynthesis of neurosteroids is inhibited by GABA, acting through GABAA receptors, and neuropeptide Y, acting through Y1 receptors. In contrast, it has been shown that the octadecaneuropetide ODN, acting through central-type benzodiazepine receptors, the triakontatetraneuropeptide TTN, acting though peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, and vasotocine, acting through V1a-like receptors, stimulate the production of neurosteroids. Since neurosteroids are implicated in the control of various neurophysiological and behavioral processes, these data suggest that some of the neurophysiological effects exerted by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides may be mediated via the regulation

  18. The dopamine beta-hydroxylase inhibitor nepicastat increases dopamine release and potentiates psychostimulant-induced dopamine release in the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoto, Paola; Flore, Giovanna; Saba, Pierluigi; Bini, Valentina; Gessa, Gian Luigi

    2014-07-01

    The dopamine-beta-hydroxylase inhibitor nepicastat has been shown to reproduce disulfiram ability to suppress the reinstatement of cocaine seeking after extinction in rats. To clarify its mechanism of action, we examined the effect of nepicastat, given alone or in association with cocaine or amphetamine, on catecholamine release in the medial prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens, two key regions involved in the reinforcing and motivational effects of cocaine and in the reinstatement of cocaine seeking. Nepicastat effect on catecholamines was evaluated by microdialysis in freely moving rats. Nepicastat reduced noradrenaline release both in the medial prefrontal cortex and in the nucleus accumbens, and increased dopamine release in the medial prefrontal cortex but not in the nucleus accumbens. Moreover, nepicastat markedly potentiated cocaine- and amphetamine-induced extracellular dopamine accumulation in the medial prefrontal cortex but not in the nucleus accumbens. Extracellular dopamine accumulation produced by nepicastat alone or by its combination with cocaine or amphetamine was suppressed by the α2 -adrenoceptor agonist clonidine. It is suggested that nepicastat, by suppressing noradrenaline synthesis and release, eliminated the α2 -adrenoceptor mediated inhibitory mechanism that constrains dopamine release and cocaine- and amphetamine-induced dopamine release from noradrenaline or dopamine terminals in the medial prefrontal cortex.

  19. Acute stress increases depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the rat prefrontal/frontal cortex: the dampening action of antidepressants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Musazzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Behavioral stress is recognized as a main risk factor for neuropsychiatric diseases. Converging evidence suggested that acute stress is associated with increase of excitatory transmission in certain forebrain areas. Aim of this work was to investigate the mechanism whereby acute stress increases glutamate release, and if therapeutic drugs prevent the effect of stress on glutamate release. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Rats were chronically treated with vehicle or drugs employed for therapy of mood/anxiety disorders (fluoxetine, desipramine, venlafaxine, agomelatine and then subjected to unpredictable footshock stress. Acute stress induced marked increase in depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex in superfusion, and the chronic drug treatments prevented the increase of glutamate release. Stress induced rapid increase in the circulating levels of corticosterone in all rats (both vehicle- and drug-treated, and glutamate release increase was blocked by previous administration of selective antagonist of glucocorticoid receptor (RU 486. On the molecular level, stress induced accumulation of presynaptic SNARE complexes in synaptic membranes (both in vehicle- and drug-treated rats. Patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex revealed that stress increased glutamatergic transmission through both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, and that antidepressants may normalize it by reducing release probability. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Acute footshock stress up-regulated depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex. Stress-induced increase of glutamate release was dependent on stimulation of glucocorticoid receptor by corticosterone. Because all drugs employed did not block either elevation of corticosterone or accumulation of SNARE complexes, the dampening action of the drugs on glutamate release must be downstream of these processes

  20. A Fast Hydrogen Sulfide-Releasing Donor Increases the Tumor Response to Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Preter, Géraldine; Deriemaeker, Caroline; Danhier, Pierre; Brisson, Lucie; Cao Pham, Thanh Trang; Grégoire, Vincent; Jordan, Bénédicte F; Sonveaux, Pierre; Gallez, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the last gaseous transmitter identified in mammals, and previous studies have reported disparate conclusions regarding the implication of H2S in cancer progression. In the present study, we hypothesized that sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a fast H2S-releasing donor, might interfere with the mitochondrial respiratory chain of tumor cells, increase tumor oxygenation, and potentiate the response to irradiation. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry, we found a rapid increase in tumor pO2 after NaHS administration (0.1 mmol/kg) in two human tumor models (breast MDA-MB-231 and cervix SiHa), an effect that was due to a decreased oxygen consumption and an increased tumor perfusion. Tumors irradiated 15 minutes after a single NaHS administration were more sensitive to irradiation compared with those that received irradiation alone (increase in growth delay by 50%). This radiosensitization was due to the oxygen effect, as the increased growth delay was abolished when temporarily clamped tumors were irradiated. In contrast, daily NaHS injection (0.1 mmol/kg/day for 14 days) did not provide any effect on tumor growth in vivo. To understand these paradoxical data, we analyzed the impact of external factors on the cellular response to NaHS. We found that extracellular pH had a dramatic effect on the cell response to NaHS, as the proliferation rate (measured in vitro by BrdU incorporation) was increased at pH = 7.4, but decreased at pH = 6.5. Overall, our study highlights the complex role of environmental components in the response of cancer cells to H2S and suggests a new approach for the use of H2S donors in combination with radiotherapy.

  1. The dose-dependent toxicological effects and potential perturbation on the neurotransmitter secretion in brain following intranasal instillation of copper nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Bai, Ru; Liu, Ying; Meng, Li; Li, Bai; Wang, Liming; Xu, Ligeng; Le Guyader, Laurent; Chen, Chunying

    2012-08-01

    Increasing production and application of metallic nanomaterials are likely to result in the release of these particles into the environment. These released nanoparticles may enter into the lungs and the central nervous system (CNS) directly through inhalation, which therefore poses a potential risk to human health. Herein, we focus on the systemic toxicity and potential influence on the neurotransmitter secretion of intranasally instilled copper nanoparticles (23.5 nm) at three different doses. Copper nanoparticle-exposed mice exhibit pathological lesions at different degrees in certain tissues and especially in lung tissue as revealed by histopathology and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations. Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) results show that the liver, lung and olfactory bulb are the main tissues in which the copper concentrations increased significantly after exposure to a higher level of Cu nanoparticles (40 mg/kg of body weight). The secretion levels of various neurotransmitters changed as well in some brain regions, especially in the olfactory bulb. Our results indicate that the intranasally instilled copper nanoparticles not only cause the lesions where the copper accumulates, but also affect the neurotransmitter levels in the brain.

  2. Shaker-type Kv1 channel blockers increase the peristaltic activity of guinea-pig ileum by stimulating acetylcholine and tachykinins release by the enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna-Jorge, Rosane; Oliveira, Cyntia F; Garcia, Maria L; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme

    2003-01-01

    1 A constant intraluminal pressure system was used to evaluate the effects of Kv1 channel blockers on the peristaltic activity of guinea-pig ileum. 2 The nortriterpene correolide, a non-selective inhibitor of all Kv1 sub-types, causes progressive and sustained reduction of the pressure threshold for eliciting peristaltic contractions. 3 Margatoxin (MgTX), alpha-dendrotoxin (alpha-DTX) and dendrotoxin-K (DTX-K), highly selective peptidyl inhibitors of certain Kv1 sub-types, cause immediate reduction of the pressure threshold. This effect subsides with time, irrespective of the peptides' concentration in the bath. In preparations pretreated with saturating concentrations of MgTX, correolide further stimulates the peristaltic activity. 4 Iberiotoxin (IbTX), a selective inhibitor of the high-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels, and charybdotoxin (ChTX), which inhibits Kv1.2 and Kv1.3 as well as BK channels, fail to stimulate the peristaltic activity. 5 Blockade of muscarinic receptors by atropine reduces, and occasionally suppresses the peristaltic activity of guinea-pig ileum. In atropine-treated preparations, correolide and MgTX retain their abilities to reduce the pressure threshold and are able to restore the peristaltic reflex in the preparations where this reflex was suppressed by atropine. 6 The stimulatory effect of correolide and MgTX in atropine-treated preparations is abolished by subsequent addition of selective antagonists of both NK1 and NK2 receptors. 7 In conclusion, blockade of Kv1, particularly Kv1.1 channels, increases the peristaltic activity of guinea-pig ileum by enhancing the release of neurotransmitters at the enteric nervous system. In contrast, stimulation of the myogenic motility by blockade of BK channels does not affect the threshold for the peristaltic reflex.

  3. Growth cone neurotransmitter receptor activation modulates electric field-guided nerve growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erskine, L; McCaig, C D

    1995-10-01

    We have studied the interactions between two nerve guidance cues, which alone induce substantial growth cone turning: endogenous neurotransmitters and small dc electric fields. d-tubocurarine, a nicotinic AChR (acetylcholine receptor) antagonist, inhibited field-induced cathodal orientation of cultured neurites, whereas atropine, a muscarinic AChR blocker, and suramin, a P2-purinoceptor antagonist, markedly enhanced the guidance properties of the applied field. These experiments implicate the activation of growth cone nicotinic AChRs by self-released acetylcholine in the mechanism underpinning electric field-induced neurite orientation and raise the possibility that growth cones release neurotransmitter prior to target interaction in order to assist their own pathfinding. Additionally, they provide the first evidence that coactivation of several neurotransmitter receptors may interact to regulate directed nerve growth. Such interaction in vivo, where guidance signals coexist, would add further levels of control to neurite guidance.

  4. Increasing potassium (K release from K-containing minerals in the presence of insoluble phosphate by bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Sarikhani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Phosphorus and potassium are major essential macronutrients for biological growth and development. Application of soil microorganisms is one approach to enhance crop growth. Some bacteria are efficient in releasing K and solubilizing P from mineral sources but their behavior was not studied more in presence together. Materials and methods: In this study the ability of seven bacterial strains, including Pseudomonas putida P13, P. putida Tabriz, P. fluorescens Tabriz, P. fluorescens Chao, Pantoea agglomerans P5, Azotobacter sp. and Bacillus megaterium JK3 to release mineral K from muscovite and biotite with application of insoluble (Ca3(PO42 or soluble (Na2HPO4 P-sources was investigated. Nutrient Broth was used to prepare an overnight culture of bacteria to inoculate in Aleksandrov medium, which was used to study the dissolution of silicate minerals. It should be mentioned that Aleksandrov medium was used to determine the amount of released P from tricalcium phosphate (TCP while muscovite was added to the medium as a sole source of potassium. Concentration of P was determined spectrophotometrically by ammonium-vanadate-molybdate method and K was determined by flame photometry. Results: The insoluble P-source led to a significantly increased released K into assay medium (66%, and the net release of K from the biotite was significantly enhanced. Among bacterial strains, the highest mean of released K was observed with P. putida P13 which released more K (27% than the control. The amounts of released K from micas in the presence of insoluble and soluble phosphate by P. putida P13 were 8.25 and 4.87 mg/g, respectively. Discussion and conclusion: Application of insoluble phosphate could increase K release from mica minerals. The enhanced releasing of mineral K might be attributed to the release of organic acids from the bacteria, a mechanism which plays a pivotal role in solubilizing phosphate from inorganic source of phosphate.

  5. Protection against 1,2-di-methylhydrazine-induced systemic oxidative stress and altered brain neurotransmitter status by probiotic Escherichia coli CFR 16 secreting pyrroloquinoline quinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sumeet; Singh, Ashish; Chaudhari, Nirja; Nampoothiri, Laxmipriya P; Kumar, G Naresh

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to environmental pollutant 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) is attributed to systemic oxidative stress and is known to cause neurotropic effect by altering brain neurotransmitter status. Probiotics are opted as natural therapeutic against oxidative stress and also have the ability to modulate gut-brain axis. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is water-soluble, heat-stable antioxidant molecule. Aim of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant efficacy of PQQ-producing probiotic E. coli CFR 16 on DMH-induced systemic oxidative damage and altered neurotransmitter status in rat brain. Adult virgin Charles Forster rats (200-250 g) were given DMH dose (25 mg/kg body weight, s.c.) for 8 weeks. Blood lipid peroxidation levels exhibited a marked increase while antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione peroxidase were found to be reduced in DMH-treated rats. Likewise, brain serotonin and norepinephrine levels displayed a significant decrease, whereas epinephrine levels demonstrated a marked increase in brain of these rats. PQQ-producing E. coli CFR 16 supplementation reduced systemic oxidative stress and also restored brain neurotransmitter status. However, E. coli CFR 16 did not show any effect on these parameters. In contrast, E. coli CFR 16:: vgb-gfp and E. coli CFR 16:: vgb-gfp vector exhibited some degree of protection again oxidative stress but they were not able to modulate neurotransmitter levels. In conclusion, continuous and sustained release of PQQ by probiotic E. coli in rat intestine ameliorates systemic oxidative stress and restored brain neurotransmitter levels.

  6. Dopamine release in ventral striatum during Iowa Gambling Task performance is associated with increased excitement levels in pathological gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jakob; Møller, Arne; Peterson, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Gambling excitement is believed to be associated with biological measures of pathological gambling. Here, we tested the hypothesis that dopamine release would be associated with increased excitement levels in Pathological Gamblers compared with Healthy Controls.......Gambling excitement is believed to be associated with biological measures of pathological gambling. Here, we tested the hypothesis that dopamine release would be associated with increased excitement levels in Pathological Gamblers compared with Healthy Controls....

  7. Growth Factors Released from Gelatin Hydrogel Microspheres Increase New Neurons in the Adult Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Nakaguchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that new neurons are continuously generated by endogenous neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ of the adult mammalian brain. Some of these new neurons migrate to injured brain tissues and differentiate into mature neurons, suggesting that such new neurons may be able to replace neurons lost to degenerative disease or injury and improve or repair neurological deficits. Here, we tested whether delivering growth factors via gelatin hydrogel microspheres would support neurogenesis in the SVZ. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1-containing microspheres increased the number of new neurons in the SVZ. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF-containing microspheres increased the number of new neurons migrating from the SVZ towards the injured striatum in a stroke model in mouse. These results suggest that the strategy of using gelatin hydrogel microspheres to achieve the sustained release of growth factors holds promise for the clinical regeneration of damaged brain tissues from endogenous neural stem cells in the adult SVZ.

  8. Recurrent hypoglycemia increases anxiety and amygdala norepinephrine release during subsequent hypoglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewan eMcNay

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent hypoglycemia (RH is a common and debilitating side effect of therapy in patients with both type 1 and, increasingly, type 2 diabetes. Previous studies in rats have shown marked effects of RH on subsequent hippocampal behavioral, metabolic, and synaptic processes. In addition to impaired memory, patients experiencing RH report alterations in cognitive processes that include mood and anxiety, suggesting that RH may also affect amygdala function. We tested the impact of RH on amygdala function using an elevated plus-maze test of anxiety together with in vivo amygdala microdialysis for norepinephrine (NEp, a widely used marker of basolateral amygdala cognitive processes. In contrast to findings in the hippocampus and pre-frontal cortex, neither RH nor acute hypoglycemia alone significantly affected plus-maze performance or NEp release. However, animals tested when hypoglycemic who had previously experienced RH had elevated amygdala NEp during plus-maze testing, accompanied by increased anxiety (i.e. less time spent in the open arms of the plus-maze. The results show that RH has widespread effects on subsequent brain function, which vary by neural system.

  9. Local histamine release increases leukocyte rolling in the cerebral microcirculation of the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, T; Zheng, M Q; Linthicum, D S

    1997-10-01

    Histamine-mediated induction of leukocyte rolling and adhesion in the cerebral microcirculation was examined in two inbred strains of mice (SJL/J and BALB/c). A cranial window was surgically prepared for the visualization of the cerebral microcirculation using intra-vital microscopy. Leukocyte rolling and adhesion to pial venular walls were assessed during off-line video playback analyses. The surgical preparation of the cranial windows was found to trigger 'spontaneous' leukocyte rolling, and this was attributed to disruption of dural mast cells and localized release of vasoactive histamine. This spontaneous leukocyte rolling was observed only in the SJL/J strain of mice, and could be prevented by presurgical treatment with the mast cell stabilizer sodium cromoglycate. BALB/c mice did not show 'spontaneous' leukocyte rolling or adhesion; this strain is known to have low numbers of CNS-associated mast cells. Exogenous histamine, applied topically to the cerebral microcirculation via the cranial window in mice pretreated with sodium cromoglycate, produced significant dose-dependent increases in leukocyte rolling and adhesion to pial venules in SJL/J mice, but not in BALB/c mice. Diphenhydramine (H1 receptor antagonist), but not cimetidine (H2 receptor antagonist), abolished both 'spontaneous' and histamine-induced leukocyte rolling. Anti-P-selectin antibody was found efficiently to block both spontaneous and histamine-induced increases in leukocyte rolling, but not leukocyte adhesion.

  10. NEUROTRANSMITTERS AND IMMUNITY: 1. DOPAMINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Hritcu

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine is one of the principal neurotransmitters in the central nervous system (CNC, and its neuronal pathways are involved in several key functions such as behavior (Hefco et al., 2003a,b, control of movement, endocrine regulation, immune response (Fiserova et al., 2002; Levite et al., 2001, Hritcu et al., 2006a,b,c, and cardiovascular function. Dopamine has at least five G-protein, coupled receptor subtypes, D1-D5, each arising from a different gene (Sibley et al., 1993. Traditionally, these receptors have been classified into D1-like (the D1 and D5 and D2-like (D2, D3 and D4 receptors subtypes, primarily according to their ability to stimulate or inhibit adenylate cyclase, respectively, and to their pharmacological characteristics (Seeman et al., 1993. Receptors for dopamine (particularly of D2 subclass are the primary therapeutic target in a number of neuropathological disorders including schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s chorea (Seeman et al., 1987. Neither dopamine by itself, nor dopaminergic agonists by themselves, has been shown to activate T cell function. Nevertheless, lymphocytes are most probably exposed to dopamine since the primary and secondary lymphoid organs of various mammals are markedly innervated, and contain nerve fibers which stain for tyrosine hydroxylase (Weihe et al., 1991, the enzyme responsible for dopamine synthesis. Moreover, cathecolamines and their metabolites are present in single lymphocytes and in extracts of T and B cell clones, and pharmacological inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase reduces catecholamine levels, suggesting catecholamine synthesis by lymphocytes (Bergquist et al., 1994. The existence of putative dopamine receptors of D2, D3, D4 and D5 subtypes on immune cells has been proposed of several authors, primarily on the basis of dopaminergic ligand binding assays and specific mRNA expression as monitored by reverse transcription-PCR. Several experiments evoked the idea of a

  11. Dirty electricity, chronic stress, neurotransmitters and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milham, Samuel; Stetzer, David

    2013-12-01

    Dirty electricity, also called electrical pollution, is high-frequency voltage transients riding along the 50 or 60 Hz electricity provided by the electric utilities. It is generated by arcing, by sparking and by any device that interrupts current flow, especially switching power supplies. It has been associated with cancer, diabetes and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in humans. Epidemiological evidence also links dirty electricity to most of the diseases of civilization including cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and suicide, beginning at the turn of the twentieth century. The dirty electricity level in a public library was reduced from over 10 000 Graham/Stetzer (G/S) units to below 50 G/S units by installing plug-in capacitive filters. Before cleanup, the urinary dopamine level of only one of seven volunteers was within normal levels, while four of seven phenylethylamine levels were normal. After an initial decline, over the next 18 weeks the dopamine levels gradually increased to an average of over 215 μg/g creatinine, which is well above 170 μg/g creatinine, the high normal level for the lab. Average phenylethylamine levels also rose gradually to slightly above 70 μg/g creatinine, the high normal level for the lab. Neurotransmitters may be biomarkers for dirty electricity and other electromagnetic field exposures. We believe that dirty electricity is a chronic stressor of electrified populations and is responsible for many of their disease patterns.

  12. Zn2+ modulation of neurotransmitter transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, K.; Gether, U.

    2006-01-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters located at the presynaptic or glial cell membrane are responsible for the stringent and rapid clearance of the transmitter from the synapse, and hence they terminate signaling and control the duration of synaptic inputs in the brain. Two distinct families of neurotra......Neurotransmitter transporters located at the presynaptic or glial cell membrane are responsible for the stringent and rapid clearance of the transmitter from the synapse, and hence they terminate signaling and control the duration of synaptic inputs in the brain. Two distinct families...... of neurotransmitter transporters have been identified based on sequence homology: (1) the neurotransmitter sodium symporter family (NSS), which includes the Na+/C1(-)-dependent transporters for dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin; and (2) the dicarboxylate/amino acid cation symporter family (DAACS), which...... indirectly suggested the possibility that several of the transporters are modulated by Zn2+ in vivo, and thus that Zn2+ can play a role as a neuromodulator by affecting the function of neurotransmitter transporters....

  13. Transcriptional coordination of synaptogenesis and neurotransmitter signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratsios, Paschalis; Pinan-Lucarré, Bérangère; Kerk, Sze Yen; Weinreb, Alexis; Bessereau, Jean-Louis; Hobert, Oliver

    2015-05-18

    During nervous system development, postmitotic neurons face the challenge of generating and structurally organizing specific synapses with appropriate synaptic partners. An important unexplored question is whether the process of synaptogenesis is coordinated with the adoption of specific signaling properties of a neuron. Such signaling properties are defined by the neurotransmitter system that a neuron uses to communicate with postsynaptic partners, the neurotransmitter receptor type used to receive input from presynaptic neurons, and, potentially, other sensory receptors that activate a neuron. Elucidating the mechanisms that coordinate synaptogenesis, neuronal activation, and neurotransmitter signaling in a postmitotic neuron represents one key approach to understanding how neurons develop as functional units. Using the SAB class of Caenorhabditis elegans motor neurons as a model system, we show here that the phylogenetically conserved COE-type transcription factor UNC-3 is required for synaptogenesis. UNC-3 directly controls the expression of the ADAMTS-like protein MADD-4/Punctin, a presynaptically secreted synapse-organizing molecule that clusters postsynaptic receptors. UNC-3 also controls the assembly of presynaptic specializations and ensures the coordinated expression of enzymes and transporters that define the cholinergic neurotransmitter identity of the SAB neurons. Furthermore, synaptic output properties of the SAB neurons are coordinated with neuronal activation and synaptic input, as evidenced by UNC-3 also regulating the expression of ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors and putative stretch receptors. Our study shows how synaptogenesis and distinct, function-defining signaling features of a postmitotic neuron are hardwired together through coordinated transcriptional control.

  14. Roscovitine increases intracellular calcium release and capacitative calcium entry in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ho Sook; Chung, Sul-Hee

    2010-01-18

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), which is activated by the non-cyclin regulator p35 or p39, is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase that is implicated in many physiological and pathological processes. Here, we studied calcium signaling using the fluorescent cytosolic calcium indicator, Fura-4, in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells treated with roscovitine, a Cdk5 inhibitor. As compared to the control cells, the roscovitine-treated cells significantly potentiated intracellular calcium release by membrane depolarization (high K(+)) or through thapsigargin. In addition, roscovitine increased the magnitude of capacitative calcium entry (CCE), i.e., a calcium influx mechanism triggered by the depletion of intracellular calcium stores. Notably, roscovitine markedly slowed the rate of Ca(2+) removal from the plasma membrane. These results suggest that Cdk5 regulates intracellular calcium homeostasis and that the dysregulation of Cdk5 may contribute to disease pathogenesis by perturbing cellular Ca(2+) signaling. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. LDL but not HDL increases adiponectin release of primary human adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautbauer, Sabrina; Neumeier, Markus; Eisinger, Kristina; Hader, Yvonne; Dada, Ashraf; Schmitz, Gerd; Aslanidis, Charalampos; Buechler, Christa

    2013-12-01

    Adipocytes in obesity have inappropriately low cholesterol while adiponectin release is reduced. Cholesterol shortage may contribute to low adiponectin and 3T3-L1 cells treated with lovastatin have diminished adiponectin in cell supernatants. LDL and HDL deliver cholesterol to adipocytes. LDL but not HDL increases adiponectin in cell supernatants of primary human adipocytes. The effect of LDL is not blocked by receptor associated protein suggesting that members of the LDL-receptor family are not involved. To evaluate whether these in vitro observations translate into changes in systemic adiponectin, adiponectin was measured in serum of three patients before, immediately after and 3d after LDL-apheresis. Whereas circulating lipoproteins are reduced immediately after apheresis adiponectin is not changed. Therefore, acute lowering of lipoproteins does not affect systemic adiponectin also excluding that plenty of adiponectin is bound to lipoprotein particles. Accordingly, levels of adiponectin in purified lipoproteins are quite low. Familial hypobetalipoproteinemia (FHBL) is a rare disorder associated with low plasma LDL. Serum adiponectin is, however, similar compared to healthy controls. Thus, neither LDL nor HDL directly contributes to circulating adiponectin concentrations.

  16. Episodic ataxia type 1 mutations differentially affect neuronal excitability and transmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeroma, Joost H; Henneberger, Christian; Rajakulendran, Sanjeev; Hanna, Michael G; Schorge, Stephanie; Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2009-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations of KCNA1, the gene encoding potassium channel Kv1.1 subunits, cause episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1), which is characterized by paroxysmal cerebellar incoordination and interictal myokymia. Some mutations are also associated with epilepsy. Although Kv1.1-containing potassium channels play important roles in neuronal excitability and neurotransmitter release, it is not known how mutations associated with different clinical features affect the input-output relationships of individual neurons. We transduced rat hippocampal neurons, which were cultured on glial micro-islands, with lentiviruses expressing wild-type or mutant human KCNA1, and injected either depolarizing currents to evoke action potentials or depolarizing voltage commands to evoke autaptic currents. alpha-Dendrotoxin and tetraethylammonium allowed a pharmacological dissection of potassium currents underlying excitability and neurotransmission. Overexpression of wild-type Kv1.1 decreased both neuronal excitability and neurotransmitter release. By contrast, the C-terminus-truncated R417stop mutant, which is associated with severe drug-resistant EA1, had the opposite effect: increased excitability and release probability. Another mutant, T226R, which is associated with EA1 that is complicated by contractures and epilepsy, had no detectable effect on neuronal excitability; however, in common with R417stop, it markedly enhanced neurotransmitter release. The results provide direct evidence that EA1 mutations increase neurotransmitter release, and provide an insight into mechanisms underlying the phenotypic differences that are associated with different mutations.

  17. Alterations in Brain Monoamine Neurotransmitter Release at High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Services Division F 02-295-2188 ISD/ADMIN/hNXRI )D FORM 1473,84 MAR 83 APR edition may oe used until exnausted. SECURITY CLASIFICATION OF TWIS PAGE All...ml) of the synaptosomal preparation con- taining 3.0 3.5 mg ml protein were incubated for Is mm Of [3H]serotonin from synaptosome fractions iso- 370...Brauer R"’. Beaser RW. Sheehan ME (1978) Role of mono- S~napsin I ( protein I1). a nerse terminal-specific phospho- amnine neurotransmnitters in the

  18. Do neurotransmitters sampled by brain microdialysis reflect functional release?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, BHC; Timmerman, W

    1999-01-01

    Brain microdialysis is an invasive sampling technique and will always cause damage to nervous tissue. For proper interpretation of the results, possible sources of interference need to be identified. The present review discusses the possible artefacts of the microdialysis technique and evaluates

  19. A trans-synaptic nanocolumn aligns neurotransmitter release to receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ai-Hui; Chen, Haiwen; Li, Tuo P; Metzbower, Sarah R; MacGillavry, Harold D; Blanpied, Thomas A

    2016-08-11

    Synaptic transmission is maintained by a delicate, sub-synaptic molecular architecture, and even mild alterations in synapse structure drive functional changes during experience-dependent plasticity and pathological disorders. Key to this architecture is how the distribution of presynaptic vesicle fusion sites corresponds to the position of receptors in the postsynaptic density. However, while it has long been recognized that this spatial relationship modulates synaptic strength, it has not been precisely described, owing in part to the limited resolution of light microscopy. Using localization microscopy, here we show that key proteins mediating vesicle priming and fusion are mutually co-enriched within nanometre-scale subregions of the presynaptic active zone. Through development of a new method to map vesicle fusion positions within single synapses in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, we find that action-potential-evoked fusion is guided by this protein gradient and occurs preferentially in confined areas with higher local density of Rab3-interacting molecule (RIM) within the active zones. These presynaptic RIM nanoclusters closely align with concentrated postsynaptic receptors and scaffolding proteins, suggesting the existence of a trans-synaptic molecular 'nanocolumn'. Thus, we propose that the nanoarchitecture of the active zone directs action-potential-evoked vesicle fusion to occur preferentially at sites directly opposing postsynaptic receptor-scaffold ensembles. Remarkably, NMDA receptor activation triggered distinct phases of plasticity in which postsynaptic reorganization was followed by trans-synaptic nanoscale realignment. This architecture suggests a simple organizational principle of central nervous system synapses to maintain and modulate synaptic efficiency.

  20. Increased maize yield using slow-release attapulgite-coated fertilizers

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Yu; Song, Chao; Gan, Yantai; Li, Feng-Min

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Slow-release fertilizers could improve the productivity of field crops and reduce environmental pollution. So far, no slow-release fertilizers are suited for maize cultivation in semiarid areas of China. Therefore, we tested attapulgite-coated fertilizers. Attapulgite-coated fertilizers were prepared by dividing chemical fertilizers into three parts according to the nutrient demand of maize in its three main growth stages and coating each part with a layer of attapulgi...

  1. Increased maize yield using slow-release attapulgite-coated fertilizers

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Yu; Song, Chao; Gan, Yantai; Li, Feng-Min

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Slow-release fertilizers could improve the productivity of field crops and reduce environmental pollution. So far, no slow-release fertilizers are suited for maize cultivation in semiarid areas of China. Therefore, we tested attapulgite-coated fertilizers. Attapulgite-coated fertilizers were prepared by dividing chemical fertilizers into three parts according to the nutrient demand of maize in its three main growth stages and coating each part with a layer of attapulgi...

  2. Elevated Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone in Human Pregnancy Increases the Risk of Postpartum Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Ilona S.; Glynn, Laura M.; Schetter, Christine Dunkel; Hobel, Calvin J.; Chicz-DeMet, Aleksandra; Sandman, Curt A.

    2009-01-01

    Context Postpartum depression (PPD) is common and has serious implications for the mother and her newborn. A possible link between placental corticotropin-releasing hormone (pCRH) and PPD incidence has been discussed, but there is a lack of empirical evidence. Objective To determine whether accelerated pCRH increases throughout pregnancy are associated with PPD symptoms. Design Pregnant women were recruited into this longitudinal cohort study. Blood samples were obtained at 15, 19, 25, 31 and 37 weeks gestational age (GA) for assessment of pCRH, cortisol and ACTH. Depressive symptoms were assessed with a standardized questionnaire at the last four pregnancy visits and postpartum. Setting Subjects were recruited from two Southern California Medical Centers, and visits were conducted in university research laboratories. Participants 100 adult women with a singleton pregnancy. Main Outcome Measure PPD symptoms were assessed 8.7 weeks (SD = 2.94 wks) after delivery with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Results Sixteen women developed PPD symptoms. At 25 weeks GA, pCRH was a strong predictor of PPD symptoms (R2 = .21, β = .46, p < .001), an effect that remained significant after controlling for prenatal depressive symptoms. No significant associations were found for cortisol and ACTH. Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analyses revealed that pCRH at 25 weeks GA is a useful diagnostic test (area under the curve = .78, p = .001). Sensitivity (.75) and specificity (.74) at the ideal cut-off point (56.86 pg/ml pCRH) were high. Growth curve analyses indicated that pCRH trajectories in women with PPD symptoms are significantly accelerated between 23 and 26 weeks GA. Conclusion There is a critical period in mid-pregnancy during which pCRH is a sensitive and specific early diagnostic test for PPD symptoms. If replicated, these results have implications for identification and treatment of pregnant women at risk of PPD. PMID:19188538

  3. Gene Deletions Resulting in Increased Nitrogen Release by Azotobacter vinelandii: Application of a Novel Nitrogen Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart, Lauren J.; Ohlert, Janet M.; Knutson, Carolann M.; Plunkett, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii is a widely studied model diazotrophic (nitrogen-fixing) bacterium and also an obligate aerobe, differentiating it from many other diazotrophs that require environments low in oxygen for the function of the nitrogenase. As a free-living bacterium, A. vinelandii has evolved enzymes and transporters to minimize the loss of fixed nitrogen to the surrounding environment. In this study, we pursued efforts to target specific enzymes and further developed screens to identify individual colonies of A. vinelandii producing elevated levels of extracellular nitrogen. Targeted deletions were done to convert urea into a terminal product by disrupting the urease genes that influence the ability of A. vinelandii to recycle the urea nitrogen within the cell. Construction of a nitrogen biosensor strain was done to rapidly screen several thousand colonies disrupted by transposon insertional mutagenesis to identify strains with increased extracellular nitrogen production. Several disruptions were identified in the ammonium transporter gene amtB that resulted in the production of sufficient levels of extracellular nitrogen to support the growth of the biosensor strain. Further studies substituting the biosensor strain with the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana confirmed that levels of nitrogen produced were sufficient to support the growth of this organism when the medium was supplemented with sufficient sucrose to support the growth of the A. vinelandii in coculture. The nature and quantities of nitrogen released by urease and amtB disruptions were further compared to strains reported in previous efforts that altered the nifLA regulatory system to produce elevated levels of ammonium. These results reveal alternative approaches that can be used in various combinations to yield new strains that might have further application in biofertilizer schemes. PMID:25888177

  4. Presynaptic transporter-mediated release of glutamate evoked by the protonophore FCCP increases under altered gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, T. A.; Krisanova, N. V.

    2008-12-01

    High-affinity Na +-dependent glutamate transporters of the plasma membrane mediate the glutamate uptake into neurons, and thus maintain low levels of extracellular glutamate in the synaptic cleft. The study focused on the release of glutamate by reversal of Na +-dependent glutamate transporters from rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) under conditions of centrifuge-induced hypergravity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed similarity in the size and cytoplasmic granularity between synaptosomal preparations obtained from control and G-loaded animals (10 G, 1 h). The release of cytosolic L-[ 14C]glutamate from synaptosomes was evaluated using the protonophore FCCP, which dissipated synaptic vesicle proton gradient, thus synaptic vesicles were not able to keep glutamate inside and the latter enriched cytosol. FCCP per se induced the greater release of L-[ 14C]glutamate in hypergravity as compared to control (4.8 ± 1.0% and 8.0 ± 1.0% of total label). Exocytotic release of L-[ 14C]glutamate evoked by depolarization was reduced down to zero after FCCP application under both conditions studied. Depolarization stimulated release of cytosolic L-[ 14C]glutamate from synaptosomes preliminary treated with FCCP was considerably increased from 27.0 ± 2.2% of total label in control to 35.0 ± 2.3% in hypergravity. Non-transportable inhibitor of glutamate transporter DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate was found to significantly inhibit high-KCl and FCCP-stimulated release of L-[ 14C]glutamate, confirming the release by reversal of glutamate transporters. The enhancement of transporter-mediated release of glutamate in hypergravity was found to result at least partially from the inhibition of the activity of Na/K-ATPase in the plasma membrane of synaptosomes. We suggested that hypergravity-induced alteration in transporter-mediated release of glutamate indicated hypoxic injury of neurons.

  5. Increased release of histamine in patients with respiratory symptoms related to perfume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, J; Skov, P S; Mosbech, H

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Environmental perfume exposure may cause respiratory symptoms. Individuals with asthma and perfume contact allergy report such symptoms more frequently than others. However, immunologic mechanisms have not been demonstrated and the symptoms are not associated with IgE-mediated allergy....... The study aimed to investigate whether basophils from patients with respiratory symptoms related to perfume released more histamine in the presence of perfume as compared with healthy volunteers. METHODS: Histamine release was measured by the glass fibre method. Blood was obtained from healthy volunteers (n......=20) and patients with respiratory symptoms related to perfume (n=17) attending a dermatological outpatient clinic for patch testing. The effect of an international brand perfume was investigated using the basophil histamine release test with perfume. Furthermore, basophils from a healthy non...

  6. Detection and Quantification of Neurotransmitters in Dialysates

    OpenAIRE

    Zapata, Agustin; Chefer, Vladimir I.; Shippenberg, Toni S.; Denoroy, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Sensitive analytical methods are needed for the separation and quantification of neurotransmitters obtained in microdialysate studies. This unit describes methods that permit quantification of nanomolar concentrations of monoamines and their metabolites (high-pressure liquid chromatography electrochemical detection), acetylcholine (HPLC-coupled to an enzyme reactor), and amino acids (HPLC-fluorescence detection; capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection).

  7. The increase in cobalt release in metal-on-polyethylene hip bearings in tests with third body abrasives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Villiers, Danielle; Traynor, Alison; Collins, Simon N; Shelton, Julia C

    2015-09-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving metal-on-metal hip replacements have been attributed to corrosion products as observed by elevated cobalt and chromium ions in the blood. Although the majority of cases are reported in metal-on-metal, incidences of these reactions have been reported in the metal-on-polyethylene patient population. To date, no in vitro study has considered cobalt release for this bearing combination. This study considered four 28 mm and seven 52 mm diameter metal-on-polyethylene bearings tested following ISO standard hip simulator conditions as well as under established abrasive conditions. These tests showed measurable cobalt in all bearings under standard conditions. Cobalt release, as well as polyethylene wear, increased with diameter, increasing from 52 to 255 ppb. The introduction of bone cement particles into the articulation doubled polyethylene wear and cobalt release while alumina particles produced significant damage on the heads demonstrated by cobalt levels of 70,700 ppb and an increased polyethylene wear from a mean value of 9-160 mm(3)/mc. Cobalt release was indicative of head damage and correlated with polyethylene wear at the next gravimetric interval. The removal of third body particles resulted in continued elevated cobalt levels in the 52 mm diameter bearings tested with alumina compared to standard conditions but the bearings tested with bone cement particles returned to standard levels. The polyethylene wear in the bone cement tested bearings also recovered to standard levels, although the alumina tested bearings continued to wear at a higher rate of 475 mm(3)/mc. Cobalt release was shown to occur in metal-on-polyethylene bearings indicating damage to the metal head resulting in increased polyethylene wear. While large diameter metal-on-polyethylene bearings may provide an increased range of motion and a reduced dislocation risk, increased levels of cobalt are likely to be released and this needs to be fully

  8. N-methyl-D-aspartate increases acetylcholine release from rat striatum and cortex: its effect is augmented by choline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulus, I. H.; Buyukuysal, R. L.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), a glutamate agonist, and of glutamate itself, on acetylcholine (ACh) release from superfused rat striatal slices. In a Mg(++)-free medium, NMDA (32-1000 microM) as well as glutamate (1 mM) increased basal ACh release by 35 to 100% (all indicated differences, P less than .05), without altering tissue ACh or choline contents. This augmentation was blocked by Mg++ (1.2 mM) or by MK-801 (10 microM). Electrical stimulation (15 Hz, 75 mA) increased ACh release 9-fold (from 400 to 3660 pmol/mg of protein): this was enhanced (to 4850 pmol/mg of protein) by NMDA (100 microM). ACh levels in stimulated slices fell by 50 or 65% depending on the absence or presence of NMDA. The addition of choline (40 microM) increased ACh release both basally (570 pmol/mg of protein) and with electrical stimulation (6900 pmol/mg of protein). In stimulated slices choline acted synergistically with NMDA, raising ACh release to 10,520 pmol/mg of protein. The presence of choline also blocked the fall in tissue ACh. No treatment affected tissue phospholipid or protein levels. NMDA (32-320 microM) also augmented basal ACh release from cortical but not hippocampal slices. Choline efflux from striatal and cortical (but not hippocampal) slices decreased by 34 to 50% in Mg(++)-free medium. These data indicate that NMDA-like drugs may be useful, particularly in combination with choline, to enhance striatal and cortical cholinergic activity. ACh release from rat hippocampus apparently is not affected by NMDA receptors.

  9. Long-term pharmacological kindling increases in vitro release of IR-Met and IR-Leu-enkephalin from amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, M; Matamoros-Trejo, G; Linares, G

    1998-06-01

    Met-enkephalin release is increased from amygdala and striatum 1 and 15 days after pharmacological kindling with pentylenetetrazol, following potassium-induced depolarization in vitro via a Ca2+ dependent mechanism. Leu-enkephalin release was only enhanced in amygdala and striatum 1 day after the last seizure. IR-Met-enkephalin amygdala tissue content enhanced 1 and 15 days after seizure. In striatum, we found an IR-Met-enkephalin decrease 35 days after the last stimulus. IR-Leu-enkephalin amygdala tissue content enhanced 1 day after the last seizure, and no significant increases were found in striatum 1, 15 and 35 days after the last seizure. In this paper, we show that opioid peptides release is differentially enhanced in rat brain for several days after the last seizure, thus suggesting that opioid peptides may have a protective action against seizure activity.

  10. Neurotransmitter transporters expressed in glial cells as regulators of synapse function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eulenburg, Volker; Gomeza, Jesús

    2010-05-01

    Synaptic neurotransmission at high temporal and spatial resolutions requires efficient removal and/or inactivation of presynaptically released transmitter to prevent spatial spreading of transmitter by diffusion and allow for fast termination of the postsynaptic response. This action must be carefully regulated to result in the fine tuning of inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission, necessary for the proper processing of information in the central nervous system. At many synapses, high-affinity neurotransmitter transporters are responsible for transmitter deactivation by removing it from the synaptic cleft. The most prevailing neurotransmitters, glutamate, which mediates excitatory neurotransmission, as well as GABA and glycine, which act as inhibitory neurotransmitters, use these uptake systems. Neurotransmitter transporters have been found in both neuronal and glial cells, thus suggesting high cooperativity between these cell types in the control of extracellular transmitter concentrations. The generation and analysis of animals carrying targeted disruptions of transporter genes together with the use of selective inhibitors have allowed examining the contribution of individual transporter subtypes to synaptic transmission. This revealed the predominant role of glial expressed transporters in maintaining low extrasynaptic neurotransmitter levels. Additionally, transport activity has been shown to be actively regulated on both transcriptional and post-translational levels, which has important implications for synapse function under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The analysis of these mechanisms will enhance not only our understanding of synapse function but will reveal new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of human neurological diseases.

  11. Altered neurotransmitter metabolism in adolescents with high-functioning autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenthen, G.S.; Barendse, E.M.; Aldenkamp, A.P.; Veenendaal, T. van; Puts, N.A.J.; Edden, R.A.E.; Zinger, S.; Thoonen, G.H.J.; Hendriks, M.P.H.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Jansen, J.F.A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that alterations in excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmitters might play a crucial role in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) can provide valuable information about abnormal brain metabolism and neurotransmitter concentration

  12. orlistat improves release of gut hormones increasing satiety in obese women

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Orlistat, which reduces fat absorption by inhibiting intestinal lipase is a registered drug for obesity pharmacotherapy. Meta-analyzes indicate various positive metabolic effects of orlistat, including improvements in glucose and lipid metabolism, lowering both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. It is assumed that orlistat can reduce postprandial satiety by inhibiting the release of intestinal hormones (incretins), especially glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Impact analysis of the secreti...

  13. Increased nitric oxide release by neutrophils of a patient with tyrosinemia type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Eufemia, Patrizia; Finocchiaro, Roberto; Celli, Mauro; Raccio, Ivana; Properzi, Enrico; Zicari, Alessandra

    2009-06-01

    Tyrosinemia type III (OMIM 276710) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4-HPD). Few cases have been described with mental retardation or neurological symptoms. Recently it has been demonstrated that 4-HPD participates to nitric oxide (NO) intracellular sequestration in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. 4-HPD is an ubiquitous enzyme with a prominent expression in neutrophils and neurons. In the nervous system NO has been perceived to be a potential neuromodulator although prolonged excessive generation is detrimental. We analyzed NO release by neutrophils of a patient with tyrosinemia type III in order to evaluate a possible influence of 4-HPD deficiency on this process. Our patient, previously described, is a 30-year-old women with persistent tyrosinemia (450-680 micromol/l) and deficient activity of 4-HPD. At 17 months of age she experienced an acute ataxia and drowsiness lasting for 10 days, but further clinical course showed persistent tyrosinemia with normal growth and psychomotor development. Neutrophils isolated from our patient exhibited a NO release greatly higher in respect to the controls (mean+/-SEM 23.2+/-1.8 micromol/10(6) cells vs 3.5+/-0.5 micromol/10(6) cells). Clinical findings of tyrosinemia type III include neurological symptoms and mental retardation but no consistent phenotype has emerged. Therefore the pathogenesis of neurological involvement is yet not well understood. Our results suggest that an excessive neutrophils of NO release could reflect the lack of scavenging action of 4-HPD. Considering the prominent expression of this enzyme in neurons, we hypothesize that excessive NO release could participate in neuronal damage explaining the neurological involvement described in patients with tyrosinemia type III.

  14. Leukotriene D4 and interleukin-13 cooperate to increase the release of eotaxin-3 by airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Provost

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Airway epithelial cells play a central role in the physiopathology of asthma. They release eotaxins when treated with T(H2 cytokines such as interleukin (IL-4 or IL-13, and these chemokines attract eosinophils and potentiate the biosynthesis of cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs, which in turn induce bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion. These effects of cysLTs mainly mediated by CysLT(1 and CysLT(2 receptors on epithelial cell functions remain largely undefined. Because the release of inflammatory cytokines, eotaxins, and cysLTs occur relatively at the same time and location in the lung tissue, we hypothesized that they regulate inflammation cooperatively rather than redundantly. We therefore investigated whether cysLTs and the T(H2 cytokines would act in concert to augment the release of eotaxins by airway epithelial cells. METHODS: A549 cells or human primary bronchial epithelial cells were incubated with or without IL-4, IL-13, and/or LTD(4. The release of eotaxin-3 and the expression of cysLT receptors were assessed by ELISA, RT-PCR, and flow cytometry, respectively. RESULTS: IL-4 and IL-13 induced the release of eotaxin-3 by airway epithelial cells. LTD(4 weakly induced the release of eotaxin-3 but clearly potentiated the IL-13-induced eotaxin-3 release. LTD(4 had no effect on IL-4-stimulated cells. Epithelial cells expressed CysLT(1 but not CysLT(2. CysLT(1 expression was increased by IL-13 but not by IL-4 and/or LTD(4. Importantly, the upregulation of CysLT(1 by IL-13 preceded eotaxin-3 release. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate a stepwise cooperation between IL-13 and LTD(4. IL-13 upregulates CysLT(1 expression and consequently the response to cysLTs This results in an increased release of eotaxin-3 by epithelial cells which at its turn increases the recruitment of leukocytes and their biosynthesis of cysLTs. This positive amplification loop involving epithelial cells and leukocytes could be implicated in the

  15. Increased Release of Mercury from Dental Amalgam Fillings due to Maternal Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields as a Possible Mechanism for the High Rates of Autism in the Offspring: Introducing a Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Gh; Haghani, M; Rastegarian, N; Zarei, S; Mortazavi, S M J

    2016-03-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), factors such as growing electricity demand, ever-advancing technologies and changes in social behaviour have led to steadily increasing exposure to man-made electromagnetic fields.  Dental amalgam fillings are among the major sources of exposure to elemental mercury vapour in the general population. Although it was previously believed that low levels are mercury (i.g. release of mercury from dental amalgam) is not hazardous, now numerous data indicate that even very low doses of mercury cause toxicity. There are some evidence indicating that perinatal exposure to mercury is significantly associated with an increased risk of developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Furthermore, mercury can decrease the levels of neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, noreprenephrine, and acetylcholine in the brain and cause neurological problems. On the other hand, a strong positive correlation between maternal and cord blood mercury levels is found in some studies. We have previously shown that exposure to MRI or microwave radiation emitted by common mobile phones can lead to increased release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings. Moreover, when we investigated the effects of MRI machines with stronger magnetic fields, our previous findings were confirmed. As a strong association between exposure to electromagnetic fields and mercury level has been found in our previous studies, our findings can lead us to this conclusion that maternal exposure to electromagnetic fields in mothers with dental amalgam fillings may cause elevated levels of mercury and trigger the increase in autism rates. Further studies are needed to have a better understanding of the possible role of the increased mercury level after exposure to electromagnetic fields and the rate of autism spectrum disorders in the offspring.

  16. Increased Release of Mercury from Dental Amalgam Fillings due to Maternal Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields as a Possible Mechanism for the High Rates of Autism in the Offspring: Introducing a Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Gh.; Haghani, M.; Rastegarian, N.; Zarei, S.; Mortazavi, S.M.J.

    2016-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), factors such as growing electricity demand, ever-advancing technologies and changes in social behaviour have led to steadily increasing exposure to man-made electromagnetic fields.  Dental amalgam fillings are among the major sources of exposure to elemental mercury vapour in the general population. Although it was previously believed that low levels are mercury (i.g. release of mercury from dental amalgam) is not hazardous, now numerous data indicate that even very low doses of mercury cause toxicity. There are some evidence indicating that perinatal exposure to mercury is significantly associated with an increased risk of developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Furthermore, mercury can decrease the levels of neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, noreprenephrine, and acetylcholine in the brain and cause neurological problems. On the other hand, a strong positive correlation between maternal and cord blood mercury levels is found in some studies. We have previously shown that exposure to MRI or microwave radiation emitted by common mobile phones can lead to increased release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings. Moreover, when we investigated the effects of MRI machines with stronger magnetic fields, our previous findings were confirmed. As a strong association between exposure to electromagnetic fields and mercury level has been found in our previous studies, our findings can lead us to this conclusion that maternal exposure to electromagnetic fields in mothers with dental amalgam fillings may cause elevated levels of mercury and trigger the increase in autism rates. Further studies are needed to have a better understanding of the possible role of the increased mercury level after exposure to electromagnetic fields and the rate of autism spectrum disorders in the offspring. PMID:27026954

  17. High-level inhibition of mitochondrial complexes III and IV is required to increase glutamate release from the nerve terminal

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kilbride, Sean M

    2011-07-26

    Abstract Background The activities of mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, EC 1.10.2.2) and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase EC 1.9.3.1) are reduced by 30-70% in Huntington\\'s disease and Alzheimer\\'s disease, respectively, and are associated with excitotoxic cell death in these disorders. In this study, we investigated the control that complexes III and complex IV exert on glutamate release from the isolated nerve terminal. Results Inhibition of complex III activity by 60-90% was necessary for a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release to occur from isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes) depolarized with 4-aminopyridine or KCl. Similarly, an 85-90% inhibition of complex IV activity was required before a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release from depolarized synaptosomes was observed. Inhibition of complex III and IV activities by ~ 60% and above was required before rates of glutamate efflux from polarized synaptosomes were increased. Conclusions These results suggest that nerve terminal mitochondria possess high reserves of complex III and IV activity and that high inhibition thresholds must be reached before excess glutamate is released from the nerve terminal. The implications of the results in the context of the relationship between electron transport chain enzyme deficiencies and excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  18. Increasing of MERARG experimental performances: on-line fission gas release measurement by mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontillon, Y.; Capdevila, H.; Clement, S. [CEA, DEN, DEC, SA3C, LAMIR, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance, (France); Guigues, E.; Janulyte, A.; Zerega, Y.; Andre, J. [Aix-Marseille Universite, LISA EA 4672, 13397 MARSEILLE cedex 20, (France)

    2015-07-01

    The MERARG device - implemented at the LECASTAR Hot Laboratory, at the CEA Cadarache - allows characterizing nuclear fuels with respect to the behaviour of fission gases during thermal transients representative of normal or off normal operating nuclear power plant conditions. The fuel is heated in order to extract a part or the total gas inventory it contains. Fission Gas Release (FGR) is actually recorded by mean of both on-line gamma spectrometry station and micro gas chromatography. These two devices monitor the quantity and kinetics of fission gas release rate. They only address {sup 85}Kr radioactive isotope and the elemental quantification of Kr, Xe and He (with a relatively low detection limit in the latter case, typically 5-10 ppm). In order to better estimate the basic mechanisms that promote fission gas release from irradiated nuclear fuels, the CEA fuel study department decided to improve its experimental facility by modifying MERARG to extend the studies of gamma emitter fission gases to all gases (including Helium) with a complete isotopic distribution capability. To match these specifications, a Residual Gas Analyser (RGA) has been chosen as mass spectrometer. This paper presents a review of the main aspects of the qualification/calibration phase of the RGA type analyser. In particular, results recorded over three mass ranges 1-10 u, 80-90 u and 120-140 u in the two classical modes of MERARG, i.e. on-line and off-line measurements are discussed. Results obtained from a standard gas bottle show that the quantitative analysis at a few ppm levels can be achieved for all isotopes of Kr and Xe, as well as masses 2 and 4 u. (authors)

  19. Peptides and neurotransmitters that affect renin secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W. F.; Porter, J. P.; Bahnson, T. D.; Said, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    Substance P inhibits renin secretion. This polypeptide is a transmitter in primary afferent neurons and is released from the peripheral as well as the central portions of these neurons. It is present in afferent nerves from the kidneys. Neuropeptide Y, which is a cotransmitter with norepinephrine and epinephrine, is found in sympathetic neurons that are closely associated with and presumably innervate the juxtagolmerular cells. Its effect on renin secretion is unknown, but it produces renal vasoconstriction and natriuresis. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a cotransmitter with acetylocholine in cholinergic neurons, and this polypeptide stimulates renin secretion. We cannot find any evidence for its occurence in neurons in the kidneys, but various stimuli increase plasma VIP to levels comparable to those produced by doses of exogenous VIP which stimulated renin secretion. Neostigmine increases plasma VIP and plasma renin activity, and the VIP appears to be responsible for the increase in renin secretion, since the increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Stimulation of various areas in the brain produces sympathetically mediated increases in plasma renin activity associated with increases in blood pressure. However, there is pharmacological evidence that the renin response can be separated from the blood pressure response. In anaesthetized dogs, drugs that increase central serotonergic discharge increase renin secretion without increasing blood pressure. In rats, activation of sertonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus increases renin secretion by a pathway that projects from this nucleus to the ventral hypothalamus, and from there to the kidneys via the sympathetic nervous system. The serotonin releasing drug parachloramphetamine also increases plasma VIP, but VIP does not appear to be the primary mediator of the renin response. There is preliminary evidence that the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus are part of the

  20. Peptides and neurotransmitters that affect renin secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W. F.; Porter, J. P.; Bahnson, T. D.; Said, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    Substance P inhibits renin secretion. This polypeptide is a transmitter in primary afferent neurons and is released from the peripheral as well as the central portions of these neurons. It is present in afferent nerves from the kidneys. Neuropeptide Y, which is a cotransmitter with norepinephrine and epinephrine, is found in sympathetic neurons that are closely associated with and presumably innervate the juxtagolmerular cells. Its effect on renin secretion is unknown, but it produces renal vasoconstriction and natriuresis. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a cotransmitter with acetylocholine in cholinergic neurons, and this polypeptide stimulates renin secretion. We cannot find any evidence for its occurence in neurons in the kidneys, but various stimuli increase plasma VIP to levels comparable to those produced by doses of exogenous VIP which stimulated renin secretion. Neostigmine increases plasma VIP and plasma renin activity, and the VIP appears to be responsible for the increase in renin secretion, since the increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Stimulation of various areas in the brain produces sympathetically mediated increases in plasma renin activity associated with increases in blood pressure. However, there is pharmacological evidence that the renin response can be separated from the blood pressure response. In anaesthetized dogs, drugs that increase central serotonergic discharge increase renin secretion without increasing blood pressure. In rats, activation of sertonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus increases renin secretion by a pathway that projects from this nucleus to the ventral hypothalamus, and from there to the kidneys via the sympathetic nervous system. The serotonin releasing drug parachloramphetamine also increases plasma VIP, but VIP does not appear to be the primary mediator of the renin response. There is preliminary evidence that the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus are part of the

  1. Increased survival rate by local release of diclofenac in a murine model of recurrent oral carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will OM

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Olga Maria Will,1,* Nicolai Purcz,2,* Athena Chalaris,3 Carola Heneweer,4,5 Susann Boretius,1 Larissa Purcz,2 Lila Nikkola,6 Nureddin Ashammakhi,6 Holger Kalthoff,7 Claus-Christian Glüer,1 Jörg Wiltfang,2 Yahya Açil,2 Sanjay Tiwari1 1Section Biomedical Imaging, Clinic for Radiology and Neuroradiology, MOIN CC, 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, 3Institute of Biochemistry, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, 4Clinic for Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, 5Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 6Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland; 7Institute for Experimental Cancer Research, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Despite aggressive treatment with radiation and combination chemotherapy following tumor resection, the 5-year survival rate for patients with head and neck cancer is at best only 50%. In this study, we examined the therapeutic potential of localized release of diclofenac from electrospun nanofibers generated from poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide polymer. Diclofenac was chosen since anti-inflammatory agents that inhibit cyclooxygenase have shown great potential in their ability to directly inhibit tumor growth as well as suppress inflammation-mediated tumor growth. A mouse resection model of oral carcinoma was developed by establishing tumor growth in the oral cavity by ultrasound-guided injection of 1 million SCC-9 cells in the floor of the mouth. Following resection, mice were allocated into four groups with the following treatment: 1 no treatment, 2 implanted scaffolds without diclofenac, 3 implanted scaffolds loaded with diclofenac, and 4 diclofenac given orally. Small animal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging were utilized for longitudinal

  2. Biochar increases arsenic release from an anaerobic paddy soil due to enhanced microbial reduction of iron and arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Xue, Xi-Mei; Juhasz, Albert L; Chang, Zhi-Zhou; Li, Hong-Bo

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that biochar enhances microbial reduction of iron (Fe) oxyhydroxide under anaerobic incubation. However, there is a lack of data on its influence on arsenic (As) release from As-contaminated paddy soils. In this study, paddy soil slurries (120 mg As kg(-1)) were incubated under anaerobic conditions for 60 days with and without the addition of biochar (3%, w/w) prepared from rice straw at 500 °C. Arsenic release, Fe reduction, and As fractionation were determined at 1, 10, 20, 30, and 60 d, while Illumina sequencing and real-time PCR were used to characterize changes in soil microbial community structure and As transformation function genes. During the first month of incubation, As released into soil solution increased sharply from 27.9 and 55.9 to 486 and 630 μg kg(-1) in unamended and biochar amended slurries, with inorganic trivalent As (As(III)) being the dominant specie (52.7-91.0% of total As). Compared to unamended slurries, biochar addition increased As and ferrous ion (Fe(2+)) concentrations in soil solution but decreased soil As concentration in the amorphous Fe/Al oxide fraction (F3). Difference in released As between biochar and unamended treatments (ΔAs) increased with incubation time, showing strong linear relationships (R(2) = 0.23-0.33) with ΔFe(2+) and ΔF3, confirming increased As release due to enhanced Fe reduction. Biochar addition increased the abundance of Fe reducing bacteria such as Clostridum (27.3% vs. 22.7%), Bacillus (3.34% vs. 2.39%), and Caloramator (4.46% vs. 3.88%). In addition, copy numbers in biochar amended slurries of respiratory As reducing (arrA) and detoxifying reducing genes (arsC) increased 19.0 and 1.70 fold, suggesting microbial reduction of pentavalent As (As(V)) adsorbed on Fe oxides to As(III), further contributing to increased As release.

  3. Sulfur mustard primes human neutrophils for increased degranulation and stimulates cytokine release via TRPM2/p38 MAPK signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Hwa-Yong [Department of Pharmacology, Infectious Diseases Medical Research Center, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Chang-Won, E-mail: chyj7983@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biological Warfare Research, The Armed Forces Medical Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Si-Nae [Department of Pharmacology, Infectious Diseases Medical Research Center, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Min-Soo [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeon-Ja [Department of Pharmacology, Infectious Diseases Medical Research Center, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Dong-Keun, E-mail: dksong@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, Infectious Diseases Medical Research Center, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (2,2′-bis-chloroethyl-sulfide; SM) has been a military threat since the World War I. The emerging threat of bioterrorism makes SM a major threat not only to military but also to civilian world. SM injury elicits an inflammatory response characterized by infiltration of neutrophils. Although SM was reported to prime neutrophils, the mechanism has not been identified yet. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of SM-induced priming in human neutrophils. SM increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent fashion. Transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM) 2 inhibitors (clotrimazole, econazole and flufenamic acid) and silencing of TRPM2 by shRNA attenuated SM-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase. SM primed degranulation of azurophil and specific granules in response to activation by fMLP as previously reported. SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, inhibited SM-induced priming. Neither PD98057, an ERK inhibitor, nor SP600215, a JNK inhibitor, inhibited SM-induced priming. In addition, SM enhanced phosphorylation of NF-kB p65 and release of TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. SB203580 inhibited SM-induced NF-kB phosphorylation and cytokine release. These results suggest the involvement of TRPM2/p38 MAPK pathway in SM-induced priming and cytokines release in neutrophils. -- Highlights: ► SM increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in human neutrophils through TPRM2-mediated calcium influx. ► SM primed degranulation of azurophil and specific granules. ► SM enhanced p38 MAPK and NF-κB p65 phosphorylation in human neutrophils. ► SM enhanced release of TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 from human neutrophils. ► SB203580 inhibited SM-induced priming, NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and cytokine release.

  4. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-04-02

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  5. orlistat improves release of gut hormones increasing satiety in obese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teona Albertovna Shvangiradze

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Orlistat, which reduces fat absorption by inhibiting intestinal lipase is a registered drug for obesity pharmacotherapy. Meta-analyzes indicate various positive metabolic effects of orlistat, including improvements in glucose and lipid metabolism, lowering both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. It is assumed that orlistat can reduce postprandial satiety by inhibiting the release of intestinal hormones (incretins, especially glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1. Impact analysis of the secretion of incretins, with prolonged use of orlistat was conducted. The aim of the study M.Olszanecka-Glinianowicz et al. was to evaluate the effect of 8 weeks of treatment with orlistat as part of a weight loss program for preprandialnye levels of peptide YY and GLP-1.

  6. Knockdown of a Laccase in Populus deltoides Confers Altered Cell Wall Chemistry and Increased Sugar Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Anthony C.; Jawdy, Sara; Gunter, Lee; Gjersing, Erica; Sykes, Robert; Hinchee, Maud A. W.; Winkeler, Kimberly A.; Collins, Cassandra M.; Engle, Nancy; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Yang, Xiaohan; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Muchero, Wellington; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2016-10-01

    Plant laccases are thought to function in the oxidation of monolignols which leads to higher order lignin formation. Only a hand-full of laccases in plants have been functionally evaluated and as such little is known about the breadth of their impact on cell wall chemistry or structure. Here we describe a previously uncharacterized laccase from Populus, encoded by locus Potri.008G064000, whose reduced expression resulted in transgenic Populus trees with changes in syringyl/guaiacyl (S/G) ratios as well as altered sugar release phenotypes. These phenotypes are consistent with plant biomass exhibiting reduced recalcitrance. Interestingly, the transgene effect on recalcitrance is dependent on a mild pretreatment prior to chemical extraction of sugars. Metabolite profiling suggests the transgene modulates phenolics that are associated with the cell wall structure. We propose that this particular laccase has a range of functions related to oxidation of phenolics and conjugation of flavonoids that interact with lignin in the cell wall.

  7. Knockdown of a laccase in Populus deltoides confers altered cell wall chemistry and increased sugar release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Anthony C; Jawdy, Sara; Gunter, Lee; Gjersing, Erica; Sykes, Robert; Hinchee, Maud A W; Winkeler, Kimberly A; Collins, Cassandra M; Engle, Nancy; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Yang, Xiaohan; Tuskan, Gerald A; Muchero, Wellington; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2016-10-01

    Plant laccases are thought to function in the oxidation of monolignols which leads to higher order lignin formation. Only a hand-full of laccases in plants have been functionally evaluated, and as such little is known about the breadth of their impact on cell wall chemistry or structure. Here, we describe a previously uncharacterized laccase from Populus, encoded by locus Potri.008G064000, whose reduced expression resulted in transgenic Populus trees with changes in syringyl/guaiacyl ratios as well as altered sugar release phenotypes. These phenotypes are consistent with plant biomass exhibiting reduced recalcitrance. Interestingly, the transgene effect on recalcitrance is dependent on a mild pretreatment prior to chemical extraction of sugars. Metabolite profiling suggests the transgene modulates phenolics that are associated with the cell wall structure. We propose that this particular laccase has a range of functions related to oxidation of phenolics and conjugation of flavonoids that interact with lignin in the cell wall.

  8. Receptor desensitization by neurotransmitters in membranes: are neurotransmitters the endogenous anesthetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, Robert S

    2003-10-21

    A mechanism of anesthesia is proposed that addresses one of the most troubling peculiarities of general anesthesia: the remarkably small variability of sensitivity within the human population and across a broad range of animal phyla. It is hypothesized that in addition to the rapid, saturable binding of a neurotransmitter to its receptor that results in activation, the neurotransmitter also acts indirectly on the receptor by diffusing into the postsynaptic membrane and changing its physical properties, causing a shift in receptor conformational equilibrium (desensitization). Unlike binding, this slower indirect mechanism is nonspecific: each neurotransmitter will, in principle, affect all receptors in the membrane. For proteins modeled as having only resting and active conformational states, time-dependent ion currents are predicted that exhibit many characteristics of desensitization for both inhibitory and excitatory channels. If receptors have been engineered to regulate the time course of ion currents by this mechanism, then (a) mutations that significantly alter receptor sensitivity to this effect would be lethal and (b) by design, excitatory receptors would be inhibited, but inhibitory receptors activated, so that their effects are not counterproductive. The wide range of exogenous molecules that affect the physical properties of membranes as do neurotransmitters, but that do not bind to receptors, would thus inhibit excitatory channels and activate inhibitory channels, i.e., they would act as anesthesics. The endogenous anesthetics would thus be the neurotransmitters, the survival advantage conferred by their proper membrane-mediated desensitization of receptors explaining the selection pressure for anesthesic sensitivity.

  9. Temperature dependence of electrical properties of mixture of exogenous neurotransmitters dopamine and epinephrine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Mugdha; Patil, Vidya

    2016-05-01

    Neurotransmitters are chemical messengers that support the communication between the neurons. In vitro study of exogenous neurotransmitters Dopamine and Epinephrine and their mixture, carried out to learn about their electrical properties being dielectric constant and conductivity amongst others. Dielectric constant and conductivity of the selected neurotransmitters are found to increase with temperature. As a result, the time constant of the system increases with temperature. This change leads to increase in the time taken by the synapse to transport the action potential. The correlation between physical properties of exogenous neurotransmitters and psychological and physiological behaviour of human being may be understood with the help of current study. The response time of Epinephrine is in microseconds whereas response time of Dopamine is in milliseconds. The response time for both the neurotransmitters and their mixture is found to be increasing with temperature indicating the symptoms such as depression, apathy, chronic fatigue and low physical energy with no desire to exercise the body, which are observed during the fever.

  10. Intracellular Ca2+ Stores and Ca2+ Influx Are Both Required for BDNF to Rapidly Increase Quantal Vesicular Transmitter Release

    OpenAIRE

    Amaral, Michelle D.; Lucas Pozzo-Miller

    2012-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is well known as a survival factor during brain development as well as a regulator of adult synaptic plasticity. One potential mechanism to initiate BDNF actions is through its modulation of quantal presynaptic transmitter release. In response to local BDNF application to CA1 pyramidal neurons, the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSC) increased significantly within 30 seconds; mEPSC amplitude and kinetics were unchanged. This...

  11. Controlled release fertilizer increased phytoremediation of petroleum-contaminated sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartmill, Andrew D; Cartmill, Donita L; Alarcón, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to determine the effect of the application of controlled release fertilizer [(CRF) 0, 4,6, or 8 kg m(-3)] on Lolium multiflorum Lam. survival and potential biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (0, 3000, 6000, or 15000 mg kg(-1)) in sandy soil. Plant adaptation, growth, photosynthesis, total chlorophyll, and proline content as well as rhizosphere microbial population (culturable heterotrophic fungal and bacterial populations) and total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH)-degradation were determined. Petroleum induced-toxicity resulted in reduced plant growth, photosynthesis, and nutrient status. Plant adaptation, growth, photosynthesis, and chlorophyll content were enhanced by the application of CRF in contaminated soil. Proline content showed limited use as a physiological indicator of petroleum induced-stress in plants. Bacterial and filamentous fungi populations were stimulated by the petroleum concentrations. Bacterial populations were stimulated by CRF application. At low petroleum contamination, CRF did not enhance TPH-degradation. However, petroleum degradation in the rhizosphere was enhanced by the application of medium rates of CRF, especially when plants were exposed to intermediate and high petroleum contamination. Application of CRF allowed plants to overcome the growth impairment induced by the presence of petroleum hydrocarbons in soils.

  12. Nitric oxide induces tyrosine nitration and release of cytochrome c preceding an increase of mitochondrial transmembrane potential in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortelano, S; Alvarez, A M; Boscá, L

    1999-12-01

    Treatment of elicited peritoneal macrophages or the macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 with high concentrations of nitric oxide donors is followed by apoptotic cell death. Analysis of the changes in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)) with specific fluorescent probes showed a rapid and persistent increase of DeltaPsi(m), a potential that usually decreases in cells undergoing apoptosis through mitochondrial-dependent mechanisms. Using confocal microscopy, the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol was characterized as an early event preceding the rise of DeltaPsi(m). The cytochrome c from cells treated with nitric oxide donors was modified chemically, probably through the formation of nitrotyrosine residues, suggesting the synthesis of peroxynitrite in the mitochondria. These results indicate that nitric oxide-dependent apoptosis in macrophages occurs in the presence of a sustained increase of DeltaPsi(m), and that the chemical modification and release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria precede the changes of DeltaPsi(m).-Hortelano, S., Alvarez, A. M., Boscá, L. Nitric oxide induces tyrosine nitration and release of cytochrome c preceding an increase of mitochondrial transmembrane potential in macrophages.

  13. Characterizing Enzymatic Deposition for Microelectrode Neurotransmitter Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosein, W. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yorita, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tolosa, V. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-12

    The enzyme immobilization process, one step in creating an enzymatic biosensor, was characterized and analyzed as a function of its physical properties. The neural glutamic biosensor is a flexible device, effectively minimizing trauma to the area of implantation. The Multielectrode Array (MEA) is composed primarily of a proprietary polymer which has been successfully implanted into human subjects in recent years. This polymer allows the device the pliability that other devices normally lack, though this poses some challenges to implantation. The electrodes are made of Platinum (Pt), and can range in number from eight to thirty two electrodes per device. These electrodes are electroplated with a semipermeable polymer layer to improve selectivity of the electrode to the neurotransmitter of interest, in this case glutamate. A signal is created from the interaction of glutamate in the brain with the glutamate oxidase (GluOx) which is immobilized on the surface of the electrode by using crosslinking chemistry in conjunction with glutaraldehyde and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA). The glutamate is oxidized by glutamate oxidase, producing α-ketoglutarate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a by-product. The production of H2O2 is crucial for detection of the presence of the glutamate within the enzymatic coating, as it diffuses through the enzyme layer and oxidizes at the surface of the electrode. This oxidation is detectable by measurable change in the current using amperometry. Hence, the MEA allows for in vivo monitoring of neurotransmitter activity in real time. The sensitivity of the sensor to these neurotransmitters is dependent on the thickness of the layer, which is investigated in these experiments in order to optimize the efficacy of the device to detecting the substrate, once implanted.

  14. Mapping neurotransmitter networks with PET: an example on serotonin and opioid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuominen, Lauri; Nummenmaa, Lauri; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Raitakari, Olli; Hietala, Jarmo

    2014-05-01

    All functions of the human brain are consequences of altered activity of specific neural pathways and neurotransmitter systems. Although the knowledge of "system level" connectivity in the brain is increasing rapidly, we lack "molecular level" information on brain networks and connectivity patterns. We introduce novel voxel-based positron emission tomography (PET) methods for studying internal neurotransmitter network structure and intercorrelations of different neurotransmitter systems in the human brain. We chose serotonin transporter and μ-opioid receptor for this analysis because of their functional interaction at the cellular level and similar regional distribution in the brain. Twenty-one healthy subjects underwent two consecutive PET scans using [(11)C]MADAM, a serotonin transporter tracer, and [(11)C]carfentanil, a μ-opioid receptor tracer. First, voxel-by-voxel "intracorrelations" (hub and seed analyses) were used to study the internal structure of opioid and serotonin systems. Second, voxel-level opioid-serotonin intercorrelations (between neurotransmitters) were computed. Regional μ-opioid receptor binding potentials were uniformly correlated throughout the brain. However, our analyses revealed nonuniformity in the serotonin transporter intracorrelations and identified a highly connected local network (midbrain-striatum-thalamus-amygdala). Regionally specific intercorrelations between the opioid and serotonin tracers were found in anteromedial thalamus, amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and left parietal cortex, i.e., in areas relevant for several neuropsychiatric disorders, especially affective disorders. This methodology enables in vivo mapping of connectivity patterns within and between neurotransmitter systems. Quantification of functional neurotransmitter balances may be a useful approach in etiological studies of neuropsychiatric disorders and also in drug development as a biomarker-based rationale for targeted

  15. Intravenously administered lidocaine in therapeutic doses increases the intraspinal release of acetylcholine in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Höglund, A Urban

    2002-01-01

    The local anesthetic lidocaine suppresses different pain conditions when administered systemically. Part of the antinociceptive effect appears to be mediated via receptor mechanisms. We have previously shown that muscarinic and nicotinic agonists that produce antinociception increase the intraspi...

  16. Interaction of neurotransmitters with a phospholipid bilayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Werge, Mikkel; Elf-Lind, Maria Northved

    2014-01-01

    We have performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations to study the interactions between the neurotransmitters (NTs) γ-aminobutyrate (GABA), glycine (GLY), acetylcholine (ACH) and glutamate (GLU) as well as the amidated/acetylated γ-aminobutyrate (GABAneu) and the osmolyte molecule glycerol...... umbrella sampling simulations, which were conducted for the four naturally occurring NTs. Free energy profiles for ACH and GLU show a minimum of ∼2–3 kJ/mol close to the bilayer interface, while for GABA and GLY, a minimum of respectively ∼2 kJ/mol and ∼5 kJ/mol is observed when these NTs are located...

  17. Obesity augments the age-induced increase in mitochondrial capacity for H(2) O(2) release in Zucker fatty rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Jeppesen, Jacob; Madsen, K;

    2012-01-01

    determined and related to citrate synthase activity to determine intrinsic mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial-specific super-oxide dismuthase (MnSOD) protein content was determined in isolated mitochondria and muscle homogenate. Catalase protein content was determined in muscle homogenate. Results: Young...... was associated with increased mitochondrial hydrogenperoxide release. MnSOD tended to be higher in the obese strain in the isolated mitochondria. Regardless of age, catalase protein content was significantly lower in the obese rats. Conclusions: This study shows that the augmented increase in obesity and insulin...

  18. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh,S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 {angstrom} above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the

  19. Mechanical tension contributes to clustering of neurotransmitter vesicles at presynaptic terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siechen, Scott; Yang, Shengyuan; Chiba, Akira; Saif, Taher

    2009-08-04

    Memory and learning in animals are mediated by neurotransmitters that are released from vesicles clustered at the synapse. As a synapse is used more frequently, its neurotransmission efficiency increases, partly because of increased vesicle clustering in the presynaptic neuron. Vesicle clustering has been believed to result primarily from biochemical signaling processes that require the connectivity of the presynaptic terminal with the cell body, the central nervous system, and the postsynaptic cell. Our in vivo experiments on the embryonic Drosophila nervous system show that vesicle clustering at the neuromuscular presynaptic terminal depends on mechanical tension within the axons. Vesicle clustering vanishes upon severing the axon from the cell body, but is restored when mechanical tension is applied to the severed end of the axon. Clustering increases when intact axons are stretched mechanically by pulling the postsynaptic muscle. Using micro mechanical force sensors, we find that embryonic axons that have formed neuromuscular junctions maintain a rest tension of approximately 1 nanonewton. If the rest tension is perturbed mechanically, axons restore the rest tension either by relaxing or by contracting over a period of approximately 15 min. Our results suggest that neuromuscular synapses employ mechanical tension as a signal to modulate vesicle accumulation and synaptic plasticity.

  20. Dopamine release in ventral striatum during Iowa Gambling Task performance is associated with increased excitement levels in pathological gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jakob; Møller, Arne; Peterson, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Aims Gambling excitement is believed to be associated with biological measures of pathological gambling. Here, we tested the hypothesis that dopamine release would be associated with increased excitement levels in Pathological Gamblers compared with Healthy Controls. Design Pathological Gamblers...... and Healthy Controlswere experimentally compared in a non-gambling (baseline) and gambling condition. Measurements We used Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with the tracer raclopride to measure dopamine D 2/3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum during a non-gambling and gambling condition...... of the Iowa GamblingTask (IGT). After each condition participants rated their excitement level. Setting Laboratory experiment. Participants 18 Pathological Gamblers and 16 Healthy Controls. Findings Pathological Gamblers with dopamine release in the ventral striatum had significantly higher excitement levels...

  1. Temperature-induced increase in methane release from peat bogs: A mesocosm experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winden, J.F. van; Reichart, G.-J.; McNamara, N.P.; Benthien, A.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2012-01-01

    Peat bogs are primarily situated at mid to high latitudes and future climatic change projections indicate that these areas may become increasingly wetter and warmer. Methane emissions from peat bogs are reduced by symbiotic methane oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs). Higher temperatures and

  2. Temperature-Induced Increase in Methane Release from Peat Bogs: A Mesocosm Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Winden, J.F.; Reichart, G.J.; McNamara, N.P.; Benthien, A.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2012-01-01

    Peat bogs are primarily situated at mid to high latitudes and future climatic change projections indicate that these areas may become increasingly wetter and warmer. Methane emissions from peat bogs are reduced by symbiotic methane oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs). Higher temperatures and

  3. Temperature-Induced Increase in Methane Release from Peat Bogs: A Mesocosm Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Winden, J.F.; Reichart, G.J.; McNamara, N.P.; Benthien, A.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2012-01-01

    Peat bogs are primarily situated at mid to high latitudes and future climatic change projections indicate that these areas may become increasingly wetter and warmer. Methane emissions from peat bogs are reduced by symbiotic methane oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs). Higher temperatures and increasi

  4. Temperature-induced increase in methane release from peat bogs: A mesocosm experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winden, J.F. van; Reichart, G.-J.; McNamara, N.P.; Benthien, A.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2012-01-01

    Peat bogs are primarily situated at mid to high latitudes and future climatic change projections indicate that these areas may become increasingly wetter and warmer. Methane emissions from peat bogs are reduced by symbiotic methane oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs). Higher temperatures and increasi

  5. Decreased cerebral spinal fluid neurotransmitter levels in Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, S E; Wassif, C A; Goodwin, H; Conley, S K; Lanham, D C; Kratz, L E; Hyland, K; Gropman, A; Tierney, E; Porter, F D

    2014-05-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is an autosomal recessive, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with cognitive impairment and a distinct behavioral phenotype that includes autistic features. SLOS is caused by a defect in 3β-hydroxysterol Δ(7)-reductase which leads to decreased cholesterol levels and elevated cholesterol precursors, specifically 7- and 8-dehydrocholesterol. However, the pathological processes contributing to the neurological abnormalities in SLOS have not been defined. In view of prior data suggesting defects in SLOS in vesicular release and given the association of altered serotonin metabolism with autism, we were interested in measuring neurotransmitter metabolite levels in SLOS to assess their potential to be used as biomarkers in therapeutic trials. We measured cerebral spinal fluid levels of serotonin and dopamine metabolites, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA) and homovanillic acid (HVA) respectively, in 21 SLOS subjects. Results were correlated with the SLOS anatomical severity score, Aberrant Behavior Checklist scores and concurrent sterol biochemistry. Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) levels of both 5HIAA and HVA were significantly reduced in SLOS subjects. In individual patients, the levels of both 5HIAA and HVA were reduced to a similar degree. CSF neurotransmitter metabolite levels did not correlate with either CSF sterols or behavioral measures. This is the first study demonstrating decreased levels of CSF neurotransmitter metabolites in SLOS. We propose that decreased levels of neurotransmitters in SLOS are caused by a sterol-related defect in synaptic vesicle formation and that CSF 5HIAA and HVA will be useful biomarkers in development of future therapeutic trials.

  6. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantcheva, Adriana K; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei; Winther, Anne-Marie Lund; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A; Nissen, Poul

    2013-05-21

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs have a serine. The LeuT-E290S mutant displays chloride-dependent activity. We show that, in LeuT-E290S cocrystallized with bromide or chloride, the anion is coordinated by side chain hydroxyls from Tyr47, Ser290, and Thr254 and the side chain amide of Gln250. The bound anion and the nearby sodium ion in the Na1 site organize a connection between their coordinating residues and the extracellular gate of LeuT through a continuous H-bond network. The specific insights from the structures, combined with results from substrate binding studies and molecular dynamics simulations, reveal an anion-dependent occlusion mechanism for NSS and shed light on the functional role of chloride binding.

  7. The amyloid pathology progresses in a neurotransmitter-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Karen F S; Ducatenzeiler, Adriana; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Duff, Karen; Bennett, David A; Cuello, A Claudio

    2006-11-01

    Past studies using transgenic models of early-staged amyloid pathology, have suggested that the amyloid pathology progresses in a neurotransmitter-specific manner where cholinergic terminals appear most vulnerable, followed by glutamatergic terminals and finally by somewhat more resistant GABAergic terminals. To determine whether this neurotransmitter-specific progression persists at later pathological stages, presynaptic bouton densities, and the areas of occupation and localization of plaque adjacent dystrophic neurites were quantified in 18-month-old APP(K670N, M671L)+PS1(M146L) doubly transgenic mice. Quantification revealed that transgenic animals had significantly lower cholinergic, glutamatergic and GABAergic presynaptic bouton densities. Cholinergic and glutamatergic dystrophic neurites appear to be heavily influenced by fibrillar Abeta as both types displayed a decreasing area of occupation with respect to increasing plaque size. Furthermore, cholinergic dystrophic neurites reside in closer proximity to plaques than glutamatergic dystrophic neurites, while GABAergic dystrophic neurites were minimal regardless of plaque size. To investigate whether similarities exist in the human AD pathology, a monoclonal antibody (McKA1) against the human vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGluT1) was developed. Subsequent staining in AD brain tissue revealed the novel presence of glutamatergic dystrophic neurites, to our knowledge the first evidence of a structural glutamatergic deficit in the AD pathology.

  8. Increased plasma ghrelin suppresses insulin release in wethers fed with a high-protein diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T; Sato, K; Kato, S; Yonezawa, T; Kobayashi, Y; Ohtani, Y; Ohwada, S; Aso, H; Yamaguchi, T; Roh, S G; Katoh, K

    2014-06-01

    Ghrelin is a multifunctional peptide that promotes an increase of food intake and stimulates GH secretion. Ghrelin secretion is regulated by nutritional status and nutrients. Although a high-protein (HP) diet increases plasma ghrelin secretion in mammals, the mechanisms and the roles of the elevated ghrelin concentrations due to a HP diet have not been fully established. To clarify the roles of elevated acylated ghrelin upon intake of a HP diet, we investigated the regulation of ghrelin concentrations in plasma and tissues in wethers fed with either the HP diet or the control (CNT) diet for 14 days, and examined the action of the elevated plasma ghrelin by using a ghrelin-receptor antagonist. The HP diet gradually increased the plasma acylated-ghrelin concentrations, but the CNT diet did not. Although the GH concentrations did not vary significantly across the groups, an injection of ghrelin-receptor antagonist enhanced insulin levels in circulation in the HP diet group. In the fundus region of the stomach, the ghrelin levels did not differ between the HP and CNT diet groups, whereas ghrelin O-acyltransferase mRNA levels were higher in the group fed with HP diet than those of the CNT diet group were. These results indicate that the HP diet elevated the plasma ghrelin levels by increasing its synthesis; this elevation strongly suppresses the appearance of insulin in the circulation of wethers, but it is not involved in GH secretion. Overall, our findings indicate a role of endogenous ghrelin action in secretion of insulin, which acts as a regulator after the consumption of a HP diet.

  9. Optical quantal analysis indicates that long-term potentiation at single hippocampal mossy fiber synapses is expressed through increased release probability, recruitment of new release sites, and activation of silent synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Christopher A; Dixon, Don B; Takahashi, Michiko; Bliss, Tim V P; Fine, Alan

    2004-04-01

    It is generally believed that long-term potentiation (LTP) at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses between dentate granule and CA3 pyramidal cells is expressed through presynaptic mechanisms leading to an increase in quantal content. The source of this increase has remained undefined but could include enhanced probability of transmitter release at existing functional release sites or increases in the number of active release sites. We performed optical quantal analyses of transmission at individual mossy fiber synapses in cultured hippocampal slices, using confocal microscopy and intracellular fluorescent Ca(2+) indicators. Our results indicate that LTP is expressed at functional synapses by both increased probability of transmitter release and recruitment of new release sites, including the activation of previously silent synapses here visualized for the first time.

  10. Activation of gastric afferents increases noradrenaline release in the paraventricular nucleus and plasma oxytocin level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, Y; Kannan, H; Higuchi, T; Negoro, H; Yamaguchi, K; Yamashita, H

    2000-01-14

    Effects of electrical stimulation of the gastric vagal nerves on plasma levels of oxytocin (OXT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) were examined in rats anesthetized with urethane. Electrical stimulation of the gastric vagal nerves increased the plasma levels of OXT, but not AVP. The concentrations of extracellular noradrenaline (NA) in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) were measured by in vivo microdialysis in rats anesthetized with urethane. Electrical stimulation of the gastric vagal nerves evoked an increase followed by a slight decrease in the concentrations of NA. The responses of spontaneous firing magnocellular neurosecretory neurons in the PVN to both electrical stimulation of the gastric vagal nerves and intravenous (i.v.) administration of CCK-8 were examined. Most of the putative OXT-secreting cells recorded were excited by both electrical stimulation of gastric vagal nerves and i.v. administration of CCK-8. These results suggest that gastric vagal afferents activate the central noradrenergic system from the brainstem to the PVN and secretion of OXT.

  11. Increased release of brain serotonin reduces vulnerability to ventricular fibrillation in the cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Hendrik; Lombardi, Federico; Raeder, Ernst A.; Lorenzo, Antonio V.; Verrier, Richard L.; Lown, Bernard; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of administering the serotonin precursor 5-l-hydroxytryptophan, in conjunction with a monamine oxidase inhibitor phenelzine and a l-amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor carbidopa, on neurochemical changes in the concentrations of serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the cerebrospinal fluid of the cat were investigated. Results showed that this drug regimen led to increases of serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid by 330 and 830 percent, respectively. Concomitantly, the threshold of ventricular fibrillation was found to be elevated by 42 percent and the effective refractory period was prolonged by 7 percent; the efferent sympathetic neural activity was suppressed in the normal heart. The results indicate that the enhancement of central serotoninergic neurotransmission can reduce the susceptibility of the heart to ventricular fibrillation mediated through a decline in sympathetic neural traffic to the heart.

  12. Increased circulating leptin in alcoholic cirrhosis: relation to release and disposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, JJ; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Møller, Søren

    1999-01-01

    Leptin is a cytokine peptide that decreases appetite and thereby food intake and increases energy expenditure. It is produced in fat cells, but recent animal experiments have shown expression of leptin in modified stellate hepatic cells. Because a change in circulating leptin in cirrhosis could...... be caused by an altered production rate, altered disposal rate, or both, the present study was undertaken to identify regions of leptin overflow into the blood stream and regions of leptin extraction. Patients with alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 16) and control patients without liver disease (n = 12) were studied...... during catheterization with elective blood sampling from different vascular beds. Blood samples for leptin determination (radioimmunoassay) were taken simultaneously from artery/hepatic vein, artery/renal vein, artery/iliac vein, and artery/cubital vein. Patients with cirrhosis had significantly...

  13. Tick saliva increases production of three chemokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a histamine-releasing cytokine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhansová, H; Bopp, T; Schmitt, E; Kopecký, J

    2015-02-01

    The effect of Ixodes ricinus tick saliva on the production of various cytokines and chemokines by mouse splenocytes was tested by a cytokine array. We demonstrated a strong upregulation of three chemokines, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), thymus-derived chemotactic agent 3 (TCA-3) and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2). MCP-1 could be induced by tick saliva itself. While TCA-3 and MIP-2 are engaged in Th2 polarization of the host immune response associated with tick feeding, MCP-1 may act as a histamine release factor, increasing blood flow into the feeding lesion thus facilitating tick engorgement in the late, rapid feeding phase.

  14. Short bouts of anaerobic exercise increase non-esterified fatty acids release in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, Alberto; Fanari, Paolo; Marzullo, Paolo; Codecasa, Franco; Tovaglieri, Ilaria; Cornacchia, Mauro; Brunani, Amelia; Luzi, Livio; Longhini, Erminio

    2014-02-01

    It is demonstrated that aerobic exercise plays an important role in weight loss programs for obesity by increasing 24 h metabolic rate. While aerobic exercise can result in health and fitness benefits in obese subjects, also independently of weight loss, not completely clear are the effects of bouts of hard exercise on metabolic outcomes. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that short-term aerobic activity with anaerobic bouts might result in a greater improvement in the management of obesity than aerobic activity alone. We studied 16 obese subjects (eight men) during a progressive cycloergometric test up to exhaustion, before and after 4 weeks of two different training schedules (6 days/week). Insulin and glycaemia, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and lactic acid were sampled. Group A (eight subjects, four men) performed an aerobic cycle workout; Group B (eight subjects, four men) performed a 25 min aerobic workout followed by 5 min of anaerobic workout. All the subjects maintained their individual eating habits. The post-training test showed a decrease in AUCs NEFA in Group A (p obesity, we might suggest at starting weight loss program aerobic with short bouts of anaerobic training to reduce fat mass and subsequently a prolonged aerobic training alone to ameliorate the metabolic profile.

  15. Fasting increases human skeletal muscle net phenylalanine release and this is associated with decreased mTOR signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkel Holm Vendelbo

    Full Text Available Fasting is characterised by profound changes in energy metabolism including progressive loss of body proteins. The underlying mechanisms are however unknown and we therefore determined the effects of a 72-hour-fast on human skeletal muscle protein metabolism and activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, a key regulator of cell growth.Eight healthy male volunteers were studied twice: in the postabsorptive state and following 72 hours of fasting. Regional muscle amino acid kinetics was measured in the forearm using amino acid tracers. Signaling to protein synthesis and breakdown were assessed in skeletal muscle biopsies obtained during non-insulin and insulin stimulated conditions on both examination days.Fasting significantly increased forearm net phenylalanine release and tended to decrease phenylalanine rate of disappearance. mTOR phosphorylation was decreased by ∼50% following fasting, together with reduced downstream phosphorylation of 4EBP1, ULK1 and rpS6. In addition, the insulin stimulated increase in mTOR and rpS6 phosphorylation was significantly reduced after fasting indicating insulin resistance in this part of the signaling pathway. Autophagy initiation is in part regulated by mTOR through ULK1 and fasting increased expression of the autophagic marker LC3B-II by ∼30%. p62 is degraded during autophagy but was increased by ∼10% during fasting making interpretation of autophagic flux problematic. MAFbx and MURF1 ubiquitin ligases remained unaltered after fasting indicating no change in protesomal protein degradation.Our results show that during fasting increased net phenylalanine release in skeletal muscle is associated to reduced mTOR activation and concomitant decreased downstream signaling to cell growth.

  16. Fasting Increases Human Skeletal Muscle Net Phenylalanine Release and This Is Associated with Decreased mTOR Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Møller, Andreas Buch; Christensen, Britt; Nellemann, Birgitte; Clasen, Berthil Frederik Forrest; Nair, K. Sreekumaran; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Jessen, Niels; Møller, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Aim Fasting is characterised by profound changes in energy metabolism including progressive loss of body proteins. The underlying mechanisms are however unknown and we therefore determined the effects of a 72-hour-fast on human skeletal muscle protein metabolism and activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a key regulator of cell growth. Methods Eight healthy male volunteers were studied twice: in the postabsorptive state and following 72 hours of fasting. Regional muscle amino acid kinetics was measured in the forearm using amino acid tracers. Signaling to protein synthesis and breakdown were assessed in skeletal muscle biopsies obtained during non-insulin and insulin stimulated conditions on both examination days. Results Fasting significantly increased forearm net phenylalanine release and tended to decrease phenylalanine rate of disappearance. mTOR phosphorylation was decreased by ∼50% following fasting, together with reduced downstream phosphorylation of 4EBP1, ULK1 and rpS6. In addition, the insulin stimulated increase in mTOR and rpS6 phosphorylation was significantly reduced after fasting indicating insulin resistance in this part of the signaling pathway. Autophagy initiation is in part regulated by mTOR through ULK1 and fasting increased expression of the autophagic marker LC3B-II by ∼30%. p62 is degraded during autophagy but was increased by ∼10% during fasting making interpretation of autophagic flux problematic. MAFbx and MURF1 ubiquitin ligases remained unaltered after fasting indicating no change in protesomal protein degradation. Conclusions Our results show that during fasting increased net phenylalanine release in skeletal muscle is associated to reduced mTOR activation and concomitant decreased downstream signaling to cell growth. PMID:25020061

  17. Vesicular neurotransmitter transporter trafficking in vivo: moving from cells to flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygoruk, Anna; Fei, Hao; Daniels, Richard W; Miller, Bradley R; Chen, Audrey; DiAntonio, Aaron; Krantz, David E

    2010-01-01

    During exocytosis, classical and amino acid neurotransmitters are released from the lumen of synaptic vesicles to allow signaling at the synapse. The storage of neurotransmitters in synaptic vesicles and other types of secretory vesicles requires the activity of specific vesicular transporters. Glutamate and monoamines such as dopamine are packaged by VGLUTs and VMATs respectively. Changes in the localization of either protein have the potential to up- or down regulate neurotransmitter release, and some of the mechanisms for sorting these proteins to secretory vesicles have been investigated in cultured cells in vitro. We have used Drosophila molecular genetic techniques to study vesicular transporter trafficking in an intact organism and have identified a motif required for localizing Drosophila VMAT (DVMAT) to synaptic vesicles in vivo. In contrast to DVMAT, large deletions of Drosophila VGLUT (DVGLUT) show relatively modest deficits in localizing to synaptic vesicles, suggesting that DVMAT and DVGLUT may undergo different modes of trafficking at the synapse. Further in vivo studies of DVMAT trafficking mutants will allow us to determine how changes in the localization of vesicular transporters affect the nervous system as a whole and complex behaviors mediated by aminergic circuits.

  18. [Nutrient use efficiency and yield-increasing effect of single basal application of rice specific controlled release fertilizer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiansheng; Xu, Peizhi; Tang, Shuanhu; Zhang, Fabao; Xie, Chunsheng

    2005-10-01

    A series of pot and field experiments and field demonstrations showed that in comparing with the commonly used specific-fertilizers containing same amounts of nutrients, single basal application of rice-specific controlled release fertilizer could increase the use efficiency of N and P by 12.2% - 22.7% and 7.0% - 35.0%, respectively in pot experiment, and the use efficiency of N by 17.1% in field experiment. In 167 field demonstrations successively conducted for 3 years in various rice production areas of Guangdong Province, single basal application of the fertilizer saved the application rate of N and P by 22.1% and 21.8%, respectively, and increased the yield by 8.2%, compared with normal split fertilization.

  19. Niflumic acid-induced increase in potassium currents in frog motor nerve terminals: effects on transmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, F; Marsal, J; Peres, J; Solsona, C

    1996-04-01

    The actions of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug niflumic acid were studied on frog neuromuscular preparations by conventional electrophysiological techniques. Niflumic acid reduced the amplitude and increased the latency of endplate potentials in a concentration-dependent manner. Neuromuscular junctions pretreated with niflumic acid (0.05-0.5 mM) showed much less depression than control when they were stimulated with trains of impulses. Inhibition of acetylcholine release was reverted by raising the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration but not by simply washing out the preparations with niflumic acid-free solutions. Pretreatment with indomethacin (0.1 mM), another nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, did not affect the niflumic acid-induced inhibition of evoked responses. Niflumic acid (0.1 mM) did not change the amplitude of miniature endplate potentials and had a dual action on the frequency of miniatures: it decreased their frequency at 0.1 mM whereas it produced an enormous increase in the rate of spontaneous discharge at 0.5 mM. Niflumic acid (0.1 - 1 mM) reversibly increased the amplitude and affected the kinetics of presynaptic voltage-activated K+ current and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) current in a concentration-dependent manner. Niflumic acid (0.1 - 1 mM) irreversibly decreased the amplitude and reversibly affected the kinetics of the nodal Na(+) current. Indomethacin (0.1 mM) had no effect on presynaptic currents. In conclusion, niflumic acid reduces acetylcholine release by increasing presynaptic K+ currents. This may shorten the depolarizing phase of the presynaptic action potential and may reduce the entry of Ca(2+) with each impulse.

  20. Vesicular and Plasma Membrane Transporters for Neurotransmitters

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The regulated exocytosis that mediates chemical signaling at synapses requires mechanisms to coordinate the immediate response to stimulation with the recycling needed to sustain release. Two general classes of transporter contribute to release, one located on synaptic vesicles that loads them with transmitter, and a second at the plasma membrane that both terminates signaling and serves to recycle transmitter for subsequent rounds of release. Originally identified as the target of psychoacti...

  1. Secondary Abnormalities of Neurotransmitters in Infants with Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Cazorla, A.; Serrano, M.; Perez-Duenas, B.; Gonzalez, V.; Ormazabal, A.; Pineda, M.; Fernandez-Alvarez, E.; Campistol, J. M. D.; Artuch, R. M. D.

    2007-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are essential in young children for differentiation and neuronal growth of the developing nervous system. We aimed to identify possible factors related to secondary neurotransmitter abnormalities in pediatric patients with neurological disorders. We analyzed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and biogenic amine metabolites in 56 infants…

  2. The essential oil of bergamot enhances the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters in the hippocampus of rat: implication of monoterpene hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrone, Luigi A; Rombolà, Laura; Pelle, Cinzia; Corasaniti, Maria T; Zappettini, Simona; Paudice, Paolo; Bonanno, Giambattista; Bagetta, Giacinto

    2007-04-01

    The effects of bergamot essential oil (BEO) on the release of amino acid neurotransmitters in rat hippocampus have been studied by in vivo microdialysis and by in vitro superfusion of isolated nerve terminals. Intraperitoneal administration of BEO (100microl/kg) significantly elevated the extracellular concentration of aspartate, glycine and taurine in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. A dose-relation study generated a bell-shaped curve. When perfused into the hippocampus via the dialysis probe (20microl/20min), BEO produced a significant increase of extracellular aspartate, glycine, taurine as well as of GABA and glutamate. The augmentation of all amino acids was Ca(2+)-independent. Focally injected 1:1 diluted BEO preferentially caused extracellular increase of glutamate. Interestingly, this release appeared to be strictly Ca(2+)-dependent. BEO concentration-dependently enhanced the release of [(3)H]D-aspartate from superfused hippocampal synaptosomes. Similar results were obtained by monitoring the BEO-evoked release of endogenous glutamate. At relatively high concentrations, the BEO-induced [(3)H]d-aspartate release was almost entirely prevented by the glutamate transporter blocker dl-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartic acid (DL-TBOA) and was Ca(2+)-independent. At relatively low concentrations the release of [(3)H]D-aspartate was only in part ( approximately 50%) DL-TBOA-sensitive and Ca(2+)-independent; the remaining portion of release was dependent on extracellular Ca(2+). Interestingly, the monoterpene hydrocarbon-free fraction of the essential oil appeared to be inactive while the bergapten-free fraction superimposed the releasing effect of BEO supporting the deduction that psoralens may not be implicated. To conclude, BEO contains into its volatile fraction still unidentified monoterpene hydrocarbons able to stimulate glutamate release by transporter reversal and/or by exocytosis, depending on the dose administered.

  3. Intracellular Ca2+ stores and Ca2+ influx are both required for BDNF to rapidly increase quantal vesicular transmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Michelle D; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2012-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is well known as a survival factor during brain development as well as a regulator of adult synaptic plasticity. One potential mechanism to initiate BDNF actions is through its modulation of quantal presynaptic transmitter release. In response to local BDNF application to CA1 pyramidal neurons, the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSC) increased significantly within 30 seconds; mEPSC amplitude and kinetics were unchanged. This effect was mediated via TrkB receptor activation and required both full intracellular Ca(2+) stores as well as extracellular Ca(2+). Consistent with a role of Ca(2+)-permeable plasma membrane channels of the TRPC family, the inhibitor SKF96365 prevented the BDNF-induced increase in mEPSC frequency. Furthermore, labeling presynaptic terminals with amphipathic styryl dyes and then monitoring their post-BDNF destaining in slice cultures by multiphoton excitation microscopy revealed that the increase in frequency of mEPSCs reflects vesicular fusion events. Indeed, BDNF application to CA3-CA1 synapses in TTX rapidly enhanced FM1-43 or FM2-10 destaining with a time course that paralleled the phase of increased mEPSC frequency. We conclude that BDNF increases mEPSC frequency by boosting vesicular fusion through a presynaptic, Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism involving TrkB receptors, Ca(2+) stores, and TRPC channels.

  4. Intracellular Ca2+ Stores and Ca2+ Influx Are Both Required for BDNF to Rapidly Increase Quantal Vesicular Transmitter Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle D. Amaral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is well known as a survival factor during brain development as well as a regulator of adult synaptic plasticity. One potential mechanism to initiate BDNF actions is through its modulation of quantal presynaptic transmitter release. In response to local BDNF application to CA1 pyramidal neurons, the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSC increased significantly within 30 seconds; mEPSC amplitude and kinetics were unchanged. This effect was mediated via TrkB receptor activation and required both full intracellular Ca2+ stores as well as extracellular Ca2+. Consistent with a role of Ca2+-permeable plasma membrane channels of the TRPC family, the inhibitor SKF96365 prevented the BDNF-induced increase in mEPSC frequency. Furthermore, labeling presynaptic terminals with amphipathic styryl dyes and then monitoring their post-BDNF destaining in slice cultures by multiphoton excitation microscopy revealed that the increase in frequency of mEPSCs reflects vesicular fusion events. Indeed, BDNF application to CA3-CA1 synapses in TTX rapidly enhanced FM1-43 or FM2-10 destaining with a time course that paralleled the phase of increased mEPSC frequency. We conclude that BDNF increases mEPSC frequency by boosting vesicular fusion through a presynaptic, Ca2+-dependent mechanism involving TrkB receptors, Ca2+ stores, and TRPC channels.

  5. Yohimbine increases submaxillary kallikrein release into the saliva in dogs: evidence for alpha 2-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition of cholinergic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, J. P.; Bascands, J. L.; Pécher, C.; Berlan, M.; Montastruc, J. L.; Montastruc, P.

    1991-01-01

    1. The effects of the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, yohimbine (0.5 mg kg-1, i.v.) on basal, sympathetic and parasympathetic stimulation-induced submaxillary kallikrein release were investigated in the anaesthetized dog. Kallikrein was measured by its kininogenase activity before and after trypsin activation which also allowed a study of the proportion of active to total enzyme. 2. Yohimbine induced a rapid, three fold increase in basal kallikrein release correlated with an increase in salivary flow rate which lasted for 60 min following injection. 3. Sectioning the chorda tympani did not affect basal kallikrein release but abolished yohimbine-induced rise in salivary kallikrein secretion. 4. Parasympathetic stimulation alone induced a 3 to 4 fold increase in basal kallikrein release correlated with an increase in salivary flow rate. Yohimbine induced a significant additional increase in parasympathetic-stimulated kallikrein release. 5. When the cervical sympathetic nerve was sectioned the basal kallikrein release decreased by 30 to 40%. 6. Sympathetic stimulation alone also induced a 3 to 4 fold increase in basal kallikrein. This was not correlated with the salivary flow and unaffected by yohimbine. 7. The results indicate that yohimbine increases submaxillary kallikrein release into the saliva by inhibition of presynaptic alpha 2-adrenoceptors located on the chorda tympani nerve endings. PMID:1849766

  6. REM sleep at its core—Circuits, neurotransmitters and pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John ePeever

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available REM sleep is generated and maintained by the interaction of a variety of neurotransmitter systems in the brainstem, forebrain and hypothalamus. Within these circuits lies a core region that is active during REM sleep, known as the subcoeruleus nucleus (SubC or sublaterodorsal nucleus. It is hypothesized that glutamatergic SubC neurons regulate REM sleep and its defining features such as muscle paralysis and cortical activation. REM sleep paralysis is initiated when glutamatergic SubC activate neurons in the ventral medial medulla (VMM, which causes release of GABA and glycine onto skeletal motoneurons. REM sleep timing is controlled by activity of GABAergic neurons in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG and dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus (DPGi as well as melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH neurons in the hypothalamus and cholinergic cells in the laterodorsal (LDT and pedunculo-pontine tegmentum (PPT in the brainstem. Determining how these circuits interact with the SubC is important because breakdown in their communication is hypothesized to underlie cataplexy/narcolepsy and REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD. This review synthesizes our current understanding of mechanisms generating healthy REM sleep and how dysfunction of these circuits contributes to common REM sleep disorders such as cataplexy/narcolepsy and RBD.

  7. REM Sleep at its Core – Circuits, Neurotransmitters, and Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraigne, Jimmy J.; Torontali, Zoltan A.; Snow, Matthew B.; Peever, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is generated and maintained by the interaction of a variety of neurotransmitter systems in the brainstem, forebrain, and hypothalamus. Within these circuits lies a core region that is active during REM sleep, known as the subcoeruleus nucleus (SubC) or sublaterodorsal nucleus. It is hypothesized that glutamatergic SubC neurons regulate REM sleep and its defining features such as muscle paralysis and cortical activation. REM sleep paralysis is initiated when glutamatergic SubC cells activate neurons in the ventral medial medulla, which causes release of GABA and glycine onto skeletal motoneurons. REM sleep timing is controlled by activity of GABAergic neurons in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray and dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus as well as melanin-concentrating hormone neurons in the hypothalamus and cholinergic cells in the laterodorsal and pedunculo-pontine tegmentum in the brainstem. Determining how these circuits interact with the SubC is important because breakdown in their communication is hypothesized to underlie narcolepsy/cataplexy and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). This review synthesizes our current understanding of mechanisms generating healthy REM sleep and how dysfunction of these circuits contributes to common REM sleep disorders such as cataplexy/narcolepsy and RBD. PMID:26074874

  8. Four-dimensional multi-site photolysis of caged neurotransmitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Ann eGo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurons receive thousands of synaptic inputs that are distributed in space and time. The systematic study of how neurons process these inputs requires a technique to stimulate multiple yet highly targeted points of interest along the neuron's dendritic tree. Three-dimensional multi-focal patterns produced via holographic projection combined with two-photon photolysis of caged compounds can provide for highly localized release of neurotransmitters within each diffraction-limited focus, and in this way emulate simultaneous synaptic inputs to the neuron. However, this technique so far cannot achieve time-dependent stimulation patterns due to fundamental limitations of the hologram-encoding device and other factors that affect the consistency of controlled synaptic stimulation. Here, we report an advanced technique that enables the design and application of arbitrary spatio-temporal photostimulation patterns that resemble physiological synaptic inputs. By combining holographic projection with a programmable high-speed light-switching array, we have overcome temporal limitations with holographic projection, allowing us to mimic distributed activation of synaptic inputs leading to action potential generation. Our experiments uniquely demonstrate multi-site two-photon glutamate uncaging in three dimensions with submillisecond temporal resolution. Implementing this approach opens up new prospects for studying neuronal synaptic integration in four dimensions.

  9. Effect of methylmercury on some neurotransmitters and oxidative damage of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Jin-ping; YANG Yi-chen; HU Wei-xuan; YANG Liu; WANG Wen-hua; JIA Jin-ping; LIN Xue-yu

    2005-01-01

    In order to study the molecular mechanism of injury in rat organs induced by methylmercury, and the relationship between neurotransmitter and oxidative damage in the toxicity process of rat injury by methylmercury was studied. The control group was AChE, ACh, NOS, NO, MDA, SOD, GSH-Px and GSH in different organs of rats were determined with conventional methods. The results showed that after exposure to methylmercury for 7 d, the mercury content in brain of exposure groups increased clearly and had significant difference compared with the control group( P< 0.01). In rat's brain, serum, liver and kidney, the content of ACh and AChE were all decreased; the content of NOS and NO were all increased; the content of MDA was increased compared with the control group,the exposure groups had significant difference ( P < 0.01 ); the content of SOD, GSH and GSH-Px was decreased compared with the control group, the exposure groups had significant difference( P < 0.01). It could be concluded that methylmercury did effect the change of neurotransmitter and free radical. They participated in the toxicity process of injury by methylmercury. The damage of neurotransmitter maybe cause the chaos of free radical and the chaos of free radical may also do more damage to neurotransmitter vice versa.

  10. Pavlovian conditioning of corticotropin-releasing factor-induced increase of blood pressure and corticosterone secretion in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutz, M; Hellhammer, D; Murison, R; Vetter, H; Krause, U; Lehnert, H

    1992-05-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is clearly involved in the central regulation of the pituitary-adrenal axis and, moreover, of autonomic nervous system functions. Enhanced sympathetic activity with subsequent increases in blood pressure and heart rate and attenuation of the baroreceptor reflex results from the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of CRF. Additionally, the peptide has a variety of potent effects on behavioural responses in animals similar to those observed after an experimentally evoked stress. It was therefore of obvious interest to examine whether CRF is a possible mediator of the learning processes associated with physiological stress reaction patterns. This report clearly demonstrates a classical conditioning of the endocrine (i.e. corticosterone secretion) and haemodynamic (i.e. blood pressure) sequelae following central CRF application and thus indicates that this mechanism is of physiological significance for learned stress responses.

  11. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a neurotransmitter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Elizabeth S; Greer, Christina L; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M; Nguyen, Bac T; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J; de Belle, J Steven; Krantz, David E

    2011-10-20

    Vesicular transporters are required for the storage of all classical and amino acid neurotransmitters in synaptic vesicles. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila gene portabella (prt) that is structurally similar to known vesicular transporters. Both larval and adult brains express PRT in the KCs of the MBs. Additional PRT cells project to the central complex and optic ganglia. prt mutation causes an olfactory learning deficit and an unusual defect in the male's position during copulation that is rescued by expression in KCs. Because prt is expressed in neurons that lack other known vesicular transporters or neurotransmitters, it may define a previously unknown neurotransmitter system responsible for sexual behavior and a component of olfactory learning. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Corticotropin-releasing factor increases GABA synaptic activity and induces inward current in 5-hydroxytryptamine dorsal raphe neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Lynn G; Freeman-Daniels, Emily; Lemos, Julia C; Nunan, John D; Lamy, Christophe; Akanwa, Adaure; Beck, Sheryl G

    2008-11-26

    Stress-related psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression involve dysfunction of the serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] system. Previous studies have found that the stress neurohormone corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) inhibits 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in vivo. The goals of the present study were to characterize the CRF receptor subtypes (CRF-R1 and -R2) and cellular mechanisms underlying CRF-5-HT interactions. Visualized whole-cell patch-clamp recording techniques in brain slices were used to measure spontaneous or evoked GABA synaptic activity in DRN neurons of rats and CRF effects on these measures. CRF-R1 and -R2-selective agonists were bath applied alone or in combination with receptor-selective antagonists. CRF increased presynaptic GABA release selectively onto 5-HT neurons, an effect mediated by the CRF-R1 receptor. CRF increased postsynaptic GABA receptor sensitivity selectively in 5-HT neurons, an effect to which both receptor subtypes contributed. CRF also had direct effects on DRN neurons, eliciting an inward current in 5-HT neurons mediated by the CRF-R2 receptor and in non-5-HT neurons mediated by the CRF-R1 receptor. These results indicate that CRF has direct membrane effects on 5-HT DRN neurons as well as indirect effects on GABAergic synaptic transmission that are mediated by distinct receptor subtypes. The inhibition of 5-HT DRN neurons by CRF in vivo may therefore be primarily an indirect effect via stimulation of inhibitory GABA synaptic transmission. These results regarding the cellular mechanisms underlying the complex interaction between CRF, 5-HT, and GABA systems could contribute to the development of novel treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders.

  13. Drought stress release increased growth rate but did not affect levels of storage carbohydrates in Scots pine trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönbeck, Leonie; Gessler, Arthur; Rigling, Andreas; Schaub, Marcus; Li, Mai-He

    2017-04-01

    For trees, energy storage in the form of non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) plays an important role for survival and growth, especially during stress events such as drought. It is hypothesized, that tree individuals that experience long-term drought stress use up larger amounts of NSCs than trees that do not experience drought. Consequently, such drought-induced depletion might lead to a decrease in tree vigor and carbon starvation, a mechanism that is subject of intensive debates in recent literature. Hence, if carbon starvation is occurring during drought, drought stress release should again increase NSC concentrations. A long-term (13 years) irrigation experiment is being conducted in the Pfyn forest, the largest Pinus sylvestris dominated forest in Switzerland, located in the dry inner-Alpine Swiss Rhone valley (average precipitation 600 mm/year, with frequent dry spells). Water addition ( 600 mm/year) is executed every year during the growing season between April and October. Tree height, stem diameter and crown transparency are being measured since 2003. In February, July and October 2015, roots, stem sapwood and needles were harvested from 30 irrigated and 30 control trees and 5 different crown transparency classes. Shoot length, needle morphology, soluble sugars, starch concentrations, needle δ13C and δ15N were measured. Shoot and stem growth were higher in irrigated trees than in control trees. Growth decreased with increasing crown transparency in both treatments. Only in July, needle starch levels were higher in irrigated trees than in control trees but there was no treatment effect for wood and root starch concentrations. Tissue starch and sugar levels were negatively correlated with crown transparency, particularly in the roots (p<0.001), independent of the treatment. Needle δ13C values were higher in the control trees than in the irrigated trees, where needle δ13C values were positively correlated with increasing transparency (p<0.01). Annual

  14. E2 and not P4 increases NO release from NANC nerves of the gastrointestinal tract: implications in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, S; Nathan, L; Singh, R; Fu, Y S; Chaudhuri, G

    2001-05-01

    In women, during pregnancy, there is decreased motility of the gastrointestinal tract leading to a delay in gastric emptying and an increase in colonic transit time. Whether the rise in estradiol (E2) or progesterone (P4) is responsible for this effect is controversial. As the nitrergic component of the nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) nerves is responsible for modulating gastrointestinal motility in vivo, the purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the increased release of nitric oxide (NO) from the nitrergic component of the NANC nerves innervating the gastric fundus and colon that occurs during late pregnancy in rats is mediated by E2 or P4. Ovariectomized rats treated with E2 or P4 alone or in combination were used for our studies. We also wanted to assess the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved. The NANC activity was studied by assessing changes in tone after application of electric field stimulation (EFS). The role of NO was determined by observing the effects of EFS in the presence and absence of the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and the reversibility of the effects of L-NAME by L-arginine. Our studies indicated that there was increased magnitude of relaxation of isolated strips of rat gastric fundus and rat colon after application of EFS to tissues obtained from animals treated with E2 alone or a combination of E2 + P4 but not from those treated with P4 alone. L-NAME attenuated relaxation responses in E2- and E2 + P4-treated animals. To elucidate whether the increased NO release may be due to an increase in neuronal NOS (nNOS) protein, we used both Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. We also used RT-PCR to determine whether there was an increase in nNOS mRNA after treatment with sex steroids. In nonpregnant animals, nNOS was detected by Western blot in the fundus and the colon and was barely detectable in the ileum. In pregnancy, there was an increase in nNOS in both the gastric fundus

  15. Modulation of vesicular catecholamine release from rat PC12 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, R.H.S.

    2002-01-01

    Intercellular communication is of vital importance for the nervous system, since the nervous system is the main coordinating system in animals. Nerve cell communication is initiated by the release of chemical messengers, neurotransmitters, from the presynaptic nerve cell. The neurotransmitters, such

  16. Melatonin protects rat cerebellar granule cells against electromagnetic field-induced increases in Na(+) currents through intracellular Ca(2+) release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong-Dong; Ren, Zhen; Yang, Guang; Zhao, Qian-Ru; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2014-06-01

    Although melatonin (MT) has been reported to protect cells against oxidative damage induced by electromagnetic radiation, few reports have addressed whether there are other protective mechanisms. Here, we investigated the effects of MT on extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF)-induced Nav activity in rat cerebellar granule cells (GCs). Exposing cerebellar GCs to ELF-EMF for 60 min. significantly increased the Nav current (INa ) densities by 62.5%. MT (5 μM) inhibited the ELF-EMF-induced INa increase. This inhibitory effect of MT is mimicked by an MT2 receptor agonist and was eliminated by an MT2 receptor antagonist. The Nav channel steady-state activation curve was significantly shifted towards hyperpolarization by ELF-EMF stimulation but remained unchanged by MT in cerebellar GC that were either exposed or not exposed to ELF-EMF. ELF-EMF exposure significantly increased the intracellular levels of phosphorylated PKA in cerebellar GCs, and both MT and IIK-7 did not reduce the ELF-EMF-induced increase in phosphorylated PKA. The inhibitory effects of MT on ELF-EMF-induced Nav activity was greatly reduced by the calmodulin inhibitor KN93. Calcium imaging showed that MT did not increase the basal intracellular Ca(2+) level, but it significantly elevated the intracellular Ca(2+) level evoked by the high K(+) stimulation in cerebellar GC that were either exposed or not exposed to ELF-EMF. In the presence of ruthenium red, a ryanodine-sensitive receptor blocker, the MT-induced increase in intracellular calcium levels was reduced. Our data show for the first time that MT protects against neuronal INa that result from ELF-EMF exposure through Ca(2+) influx-induced Ca(2+) release.

  17. Valine but not leucine or isoleucine supports neurotransmitter glutamate synthesis during synaptic activity in cultured cerebellar neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Lasse K; Johansen, Maja L; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2012-09-01

    Synthesis of neuronal glutamate from α-ketoglutarate for neurotransmission necessitates an amino group nitrogen donor; however, it is not clear which amino acid(s) serves this role. Thus, the ability of the three branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), leucine, isoleucine, and valine, to act as amino group nitrogen donors for synthesis of vesicular neurotransmitter glutamate was investigated in cultured mouse cerebellar (primarily glutamatergic) neurons. The cultures were superfused in the presence of (15) N-labeled BCAAs, and synaptic activity was induced by pulses of N-methyl-D-aspartate (300 μM), which results in release of vesicular glutamate. At the end of the superfusion experiment, the vesicular pool of glutamate was released by treatment with α-latrotoxin (3 nM, 5 min). This experimental paradigm allows a separate analysis of the cytoplasmic and vesicular pools of glutamate. Amount and extent of (15) N labeling of intracellular amino acids plus vesicular glutamate were analyzed employing HPLC and LC-MS analysis. Only when [(15) N]valine served as precursor did the labeling of both cytoplasmic and vesicular glutamate increase after synaptic activity. In addition, only [(15) N]valine was able to maintain the amount of vesicular glutamate during synaptic activity. This indicates that, among the BCAAs, only valine supports the increased need for synthesis of vesicular glutamate.

  18. Cytoplasmic permeation pathway of neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Gary

    2011-09-06

    Ion-coupled solute transporters are responsible for transporting nutrients, ions, and signaling molecules across a variety of biological membranes. Recent high-resolution crystal structures of several transporters from protein families that were previously thought to be unrelated show common structural features indicating a large structural family representing transporters from all kingdoms of life. This review describes studies that led to an understanding of the conformational changes required for solute transport in this family. The first structure in this family showed the bacterial amino acid transporter LeuT, which is homologous to neurotransmitter transporters, in an extracellularly oriented conformation with a molecule of leucine occluded at the substrate site. Studies with the mammalian serotonin transporter identified positions, buried in the LeuT structure, that defined a potential pathway leading from the cytoplasm to the substrate binding site. Modeling studies utilized an inverted structural repeat within the LeuT crystal structure to predict the conformation of LeuT in which the cytoplasmic permeation pathway, consisting of positions identified in SERT, was open for diffusion of the substrate to the cytoplasm. From the difference between the model and the crystal structures, a simple "rocking bundle" mechanism was proposed, in which a four-helix bundle changed its orientation with respect to the rest of the protein to close the extracellular pathway and open the cytoplasmic one. Subsequent crystal structures from structurally related proteins provide evidence supporting this model for transport.

  19. Direct effects of TNF-α on local fuel metabolism and cytokine levels in the placebo-controlled, bilaterally infused human leg: increased insulin sensitivity, increased net protein breakdown, and increased IL-6 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Ermina; Nielsen, Roni R; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Møller, Andreas B; Jessen, Niels; Buhl, Mads; K-Hafstrøm, Thomas; Holm, Lars; Pedersen, Steen B; Pilegaard, Henriette; Biensø, Rasmus S; Jørgensen, Jens O L; Møller, Niels

    2013-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has widespread metabolic actions. Systemic TNF-α administration, however, generates a complex hormonal and metabolic response. Our study was designed to test whether regional, placebo-controlled TNF-α infusion directly affects insulin resistance and protein breakdown. We studied eight healthy volunteers once with bilateral femoral vein and artery catheters during a 3-h basal period and a 3-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. One artery was perfused with saline and one with TNF-α. During the clamp, TNF-α perfusion increased glucose arteriovenous differences (0.91 ± 0.17 vs. 0.74 ± 0.15 mmol/L, P = 0.012) and leg glucose uptake rates. Net phenylalanine release was increased by TNF-α perfusion with concomitant increases in appearance and disappearance rates. Free fatty acid kinetics was not affected by TNF-α, whereas interleukin-6 (IL-6) release increased. Insulin and protein signaling in muscle biopsies was not affected by TNF-α. TNF-α directly increased net muscle protein loss, which may contribute to cachexia and general protein loss during severe illness. The finding of increased insulin sensitivity, which could relate to IL-6, is of major clinical interest and may concurrently act to provide adequate tissue fuel supply and contribute to the occurrence of systemic hypoglycemia. This distinct metabolic feature places TNF-α among the rare insulin mimetics of human origin.

  20. Transcriptomic responses in mouse brain exposed to chronic excess of the neurotransmitter glutamate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal Ranu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increases during aging in extracellular levels of glutamate (Glu, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, may be linked to chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Little is known about the molecular responses of neurons to chronic, moderate increases in Glu levels. Genome-wide gene expression in brain hippocampus was examined in a unique transgenic (Tg mouse model that exhibits moderate Glu hyperactivity throughout the lifespan, the neuronal Glutamate dehydrogenase (Glud1 mouse, and littermate 9 month-old wild type mice. Results Integrated bioinformatic analyses on transcriptomic data were used to identify bio-functions, pathways and gene networks underlying neuronal responses to increased Glu synaptic release. Bio-functions and pathways up-regulated in Tg mice were those associated with oxidative stress, cell injury, inflammation, nervous system development, neuronal growth, and synaptic transmission. Increased gene expression in these functions and pathways indicated apparent compensatory responses offering protection against stress, promoting growth of neuronal processes (neurites and re-establishment of synapses. The transcription of a key gene in the neurite growth network, the kinase Ptk2b, was significantly up-regulated in Tg mice as was the activated (phosphorylated form of the protein. In addition to genes related to neurite growth and synaptic development, those associated with neuronal vesicle trafficking in the Huntington's disease signalling pathway, were also up-regulated. Conclusions This is the first study attempting to define neuronal gene expression patterns in response to chronic, endogenous Glu hyperactivity at brain synapses. The patterns observed were characterized by a combination of responses to stress and stimulation of nerve growth, intracellular transport and recovery.

  1. The flavanone homoeriodictyol increases SGLT-1-mediated glucose uptake but decreases serotonin release in differentiated Caco-2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoi, Julia Katharina; Holik, Ann-Katrin; Geissler, Katrin; Hans, Joachim; Friedl, Barbara; Liszt, Kathrin; Krammer, Gerhard E.; Ley, Jakob P.; Somoza, Veronika

    2017-01-01

    Flavanoids and related polyphenols, among them hesperitin, have been shown to modulate cellular glucose transport by targeting SGLT-1 and GLUT-2 transport proteins. We aimed to investigate whether homoeriodictyol, which is structurally related to hesperitin, affects glucose uptake in differentiated Caco-2 cells as a model for the intestinal barrier. The results revealed that, in contrast to other polyphenols, the flavanon homoeriodictyol promotes glucose uptake by 29.0 ± 3.83% at a concentration of 100 μM. The glucose uptake stimulating effect was sensitive to phloridzin, but not to phloretin, indicating an involvement of the sodium-coupled glucose transporter SGLT-1, but not of sodium-independent glucose transporters (GLUT). In addition, in contrast to the increased extracellular serotonin levels by stimulation with 500 mM D-(+)-glucose, treatment with 100 μM homoeriodictyol decreased serotonin release by –48.8 ± 7.57% in Caco-2 cells via a phloridzin-sensitive signaling pathway. Extracellular serotonin levels were also reduced by –57.1 ± 5.43% after application of 0.01 μM homoeriodictyol to human neural SH-SY5Y cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that homoeriodictyol affects both the glucose metabolism and the serotonin system in Caco-2 cells via a SGLT-1-meditated pathway. Furthermore, the results presented here support the usage of Caco-2 cells as a model for peripheral serotonin release. Further investigations may address the value of homoeriodictyol in the treatment of anorexia and malnutrition through the targeting of SGLT-1. PMID:28192456

  2. Increased depression-like behaviors in corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-2-deficient mice: sexually dichotomous responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, Tracy L; Vale, Wylie W

    2003-06-15

    Depressive disorders affect nearly 19 million American adults, making depression and the susceptibility for developing depression a critical focus of mental health research today. Females are twice as likely to develop depression as males. Stress is a known risk factor for developing depression, and recent hypotheses suggest an involvement of an overactive stress axis. As mediators of the stress response, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and its receptors (CRFR1 and CRFR2) have been implicated in the propensity for developing stress-related mood disorders. Mice deficient in CRFR2 display increased anxiety-like behaviors and a hypersensitive stress response. As a possible animal model of depression, these mice were tested for depression-like behaviors in the forced swim test. Comparisons were made between wild-type and mutant animals, as well as between sexes. Male and female CRFR2-mutant mice showed increased immobility as an indicator of depression compared with wild-type mice of the same sex. In addition, mutant and wild-type female mice demonstrated increased immobile time compared with males of the same genotype. Treatment of CRFR2-deficient mice with the CRFR1 antagonist antalarmin decreased immobile time and increased swim time in both sexes. We found a significant effect of sex for both time spent immobile and swimming after antalarmin treatment. Because differences in behaviors in the forced swim test are good indicators of serotonergic and catecholaminergic involvement, our results may reveal an interaction of CRF pathways with other known antidepressant systems and may also support an involvement of CRF receptors in the development of depression such that elevated CRFR1 activity, in the absence of CRFR2, increases depression-like behaviors.

  3. Nucleus accumbens corticotropin-releasing factor increases cue-triggered motivation for sucrose reward: paradoxical positive incentive effects in stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peciña, Susana; Schulkin, Jay; Berridge, Kent C

    2006-01-01

    Background Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is typically considered to mediate aversive aspects of stress, fear and anxiety. However, CRF release in the brain is also elicited by natural rewards and incentive cues, raising the possibility that some CRF systems in the brain mediate an independent function of positive incentive motivation, such as amplifying incentive salience. Here we asked whether activation of a limbic CRF subsystem magnifies the increase in positive motivation for reward elicited by incentive cues previously associated with that reward, in a way that might exacerbate cue-triggered binge pursuit of food or other incentives? We assessed the impact of CRF microinjections into the medial shell of nucleus accumbens using a pure incentive version of Pavlovian-Instrumental transfer, a measure specifically sensitive to the incentive salience of reward cues (which it separates from influences of aversive stress, stress reduction, frustration and other traditional explanations for stress-increased behavior). Rats were first trained to press one of two levers to obtain sucrose pellets, and then separately conditioned to associate a Pavlovian cue with free sucrose pellets. On test days, rats received microinjections of vehicle, CRF (250 or 500 ng/0.2 μl) or amphetamine (20 μg/0.2 μl). Lever pressing was assessed in the presence or absence of the Pavlovian cues during a half-hour test. Results Microinjections of the highest dose of CRF (500 ng) or amphetamine (20 μg) selectively enhanced the ability of Pavlovian reward cues to trigger phasic peaks of increased instrumental performance for a sucrose reward, each peak lasting a minute or so before decaying after the cue. Lever pressing was not enhanced by CRF microinjections in the baseline absence of the Pavlovian cue or during the presentation without a cue, showing that the CRF enhancement could not be explained as a result of generalized motor arousal, frustration or stress, or by persistent

  4. Nucleus accumbens corticotropin-releasing factor increases cue-triggered motivation for sucrose reward: paradoxical positive incentive effects in stress?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulkin Jay

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF is typically considered to mediate aversive aspects of stress, fear and anxiety. However, CRF release in the brain is also elicited by natural rewards and incentive cues, raising the possibility that some CRF systems in the brain mediate an independent function of positive incentive motivation, such as amplifying incentive salience. Here we asked whether activation of a limbic CRF subsystem magnifies the increase in positive motivation for reward elicited by incentive cues previously associated with that reward, in a way that might exacerbate cue-triggered binge pursuit of food or other incentives? We assessed the impact of CRF microinjections into the medial shell of nucleus accumbens using a pure incentive version of Pavlovian-Instrumental transfer, a measure specifically sensitive to the incentive salience of reward cues (which it separates from influences of aversive stress, stress reduction, frustration and other traditional explanations for stress-increased behavior. Rats were first trained to press one of two levers to obtain sucrose pellets, and then separately conditioned to associate a Pavlovian cue with free sucrose pellets. On test days, rats received microinjections of vehicle, CRF (250 or 500 ng/0.2 μl or amphetamine (20 μg/0.2 μl. Lever pressing was assessed in the presence or absence of the Pavlovian cues during a half-hour test. Results Microinjections of the highest dose of CRF (500 ng or amphetamine (20 μg selectively enhanced the ability of Pavlovian reward cues to trigger phasic peaks of increased instrumental performance for a sucrose reward, each peak lasting a minute or so before decaying after the cue. Lever pressing was not enhanced by CRF microinjections in the baseline absence of the Pavlovian cue or during the presentation without a cue, showing that the CRF enhancement could not be explained as a result of generalized motor arousal, frustration or stress

  5. Synthesis of symmetrical and non-symmetrical bivalent neurotransmitter ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stuhr-Hansen, Nicolai; Andersen, Jacob; Thygesen, Mikkel Boas

    2016-01-01

    A novel procedure for synthesis of bivalent neurotransmitter ligands was developed by reacting O-benzyl protected N-nosylated dopamine and serotonin with alkyl- or PEG-linked diols under Fukuyama-Mitsunobu conditions in the presence of DIAD/PPh3 generating three different bivalent neurotransmitter...... ligands in a one-pot reaction. The methodol. establishes a facile route towards bivalent neurotransmitter ligands, and libraries of in total 40 sym. and non-sym. bivalent and monovalent dopamine and serotonin compds. linked through alkyl or PEG spacers of varying length were prepd. Interestingly...

  6. The competitor release effect applied to carnivore species: how red foxes can increase in numbers when persecuted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozano, J.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of our study was to numerically simulate the population dynamics of a hypothetical community of three species of small to medium–sized carnivores subjected to non–selective control within the context of the competitor release effect (CRE. We applied the CRE to three carnivore species, linking interspecific competition with predator control efforts. We predicted the population response of European badger, the red fox and the pine marten to this wildlife management tool by means of numerical simulations. The theoretical responses differed depending on the intrinsic rate of growth (r, although modulated by the competition coefficients. The red fox, showing the highest r value, can increase its populations despite predator control efforts if control intensity is moderate. Populations of the other two species, however, decreased with control efforts, even reaching extinction. Three additional theoretical predictions were obtained. The conclusions from the simulations were: 1 predator control can play a role in altering the carnivore communities; 2 red fox numbers can increase due to control; and 3 predator control programs should evaluate the potential of unintended effects on ecosystems.

  7. Increase of As release and phytotoxicity to rice seedlings in As-contaminated paddy soils by Si fertilizer application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Hsing; Huang, Hsuan-Han; Syu, Chien-Hui; Lin, Tzu-Huei; Lee, Dar-Yuan

    2014-07-15

    Silicon (Si) was shown to be able to reduce arsenic (As) uptake by rice in hydroponic culture or in low As soils using high Si application rates. However, the effect of Si application on As uptake of rice grown in As-contaminated soils using Si fertilizer recommendation rate has not been investigated. In this study, the effect of Si application using Si fertilizer recommendation rate on As release and phytotoxicity in soils with different properties and contents of As was examined. The results show that the concentrations of As in soil solutions increased after Si applications due to competitive adsorption between As and Si on soil solids and the Si concentrations in soil solutions were also elevated to beneficial levels for rice growth. The rice seedlings accumulated more As and its growth was inhibited by Si application in As contaminated/spiked soils. The results indicate that there is an initial aggravation in As toxicity before the beneficial effects of Si fertilizing to rice were revealed when Si application based on fertilizer recommendation rate to As-contaminated paddy soils. Therefore, for As-contaminated paddy soils with high levels of As, the application of Si fertilizer could result in increasing As phytotoxicity and uptake by rice.

  8. Dexamethasone increases growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GRH) receptor mRNA levels in cultured rat anterior pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, M; Sato, M; Matsubara, S; Wada, Y; Takahara, J

    1996-06-01

    To examine the effects of glucocorticoid (GC) on growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GRH) receptor gene expression, a highly-sensitive and quantitative reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was used in this study. Rat anterior pituitary cells were isolated and cultured for 4 days. The cultured cells were treated with dexamethasone for 2, 6, and 24 h. GRH receptor mRNA levels were determined by competitive RT-PCR using a recombinant RNA as the competitor. Dexamethasone significantly increased GRH receptor mRNA levels at 5 nM after 6- and 24 h-incubations, and the maximal effect was found at 25 nM. The GC receptor-specific antagonist, RU 38486 completely eliminated the dexamethasone-induced enhancement of GRH receptor mRNA levels. Dexamethasone did not alter the mRNA levels of beta-actin and prolactin at 5 nM for 24 h, whereas GH mRNA levels were significantly increased by the same treatment. The GH response to GRH was significantly enhanced by the 24-h incubation with 5 nM dexamethasone. These findings suggest that GC stimulates GRH receptor gene expression through the ligand-activated GC receptors in the rat somatotrophs. The direct effects of GC on the GRH receptor gene could explain the enhancement of GRH-induced GH secretion.

  9. The Molecular Basis of Memory. Part 3: Tagging with emotive neurotransmitters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard eMarx

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Many neurons of all animals that exhibit memory (snails, worms, flies, vertebrae present arborized shapes with many varicosities and boutons. These neurons, release neurotransmitters and contain ionotropic receptors that produce and sense electrical signals (ephaptic transmission. The extended shapes maximize neural contact with the surrounding neutrix (neural extracellular matrix (nECM+ diffusible (neurometals and neurotransmitters as well as with other neurons. We propose a tripartite mechanism of animal memory based on the dynamic interactions of splayed neurons with the neutrix. Their interactions form cognitive units of information (cuinfo, metal-centered complexes within the nECM around the neuron. Emotive content is provided by NTs, which embody molecular links between physiologic (body responses and psychic feelings. We propose that neurotransmitters form mixed complexes with cuinfo used for tagging emotive memory.Thus, NTs provide encoding option not available to a Turing, binary-based, device.The neurons employ combinatorially diverse options, with > 10 NMs and > 90 NTs for encoding (flavoring cuinfo with emotive tags. The neural network efficiently encodes, decodes and consolidates related (entangled sets of cuinfo into a coherent pattern, the basis for emotionally imbued memory, critical for determining a behavioral choice aimed at survival. The tripartite mechanism with tagging of NTs permits of a causal connection between physiology and psychology.

  10. Mechanism for alternating access in neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Lucy R; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Jacobs, Miriam T; Gesmonde, Joan; Xie, Li; Honig, Barry H; Rudnick, Gary

    2008-07-29

    Crystal structures of LeuT, a bacterial homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters, show a molecule of bound substrate that is essentially exposed to the extracellular space but occluded from the cytoplasm. Thus, there must exist an alternate conformation for LeuT in which the substrate is accessible to the cytoplasm and a corresponding mechanism that switches accessibility from one side of the membrane to the other. Here, we identify the cytoplasmic accessibility pathway of the alternate conformation in a mammalian serotonin transporter (SERT) (a member of the same transporter family as LeuT). We also propose a model for the cytoplasmic-facing state that exploits the internal pseudosymmetry observed in the crystal structure. LeuT contains two structurally similar repeats (TMs1-5 and TMs 6-10) that are inverted with respect to the plane of the membrane. The conformational differences between them result in the formation of the extracellular pathway. Our model for the cytoplasm-facing state exchanges the conformations of the two repeats and thus exposes the substrate and ion-binding sites to the cytoplasm. The conformational change that connects the two states primarily involves the tilting of a 4-helix bundle composed of transmembrane helices 1, 2, 6, and 7. Switching the tilt angle of this bundle is essentially equivalent to switching the conformation of the two repeats. Extensive mutagenesis of SERT and accessibility measurements, using cysteine reagents, are accommodated by our model. These observations may be of relevance to other transporter families, many of which contain internal inverted repeats.

  11. Dopamine in the Auditory Brainstem and Midbrain: Co-localization with Amino Acid Neurotransmitters and Gene Expression following Cochlear Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avril Genene eHolt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA modulates the effects of amino acid neurotransmitters, including GABA and glutamate, in motor, visual, olfactory and reward systems (Hnasko et al., 2010; Stuber et al., 2010; Hnasko and Edwards, 2012. The results suggest that DA may play a similar modulatory role in the auditory pathways. Previous studies have shown that deafness results in decreased GABA release, changes in excitatory neurotransmitter levels, and increased spontaneous neuronal activity within brainstem regions related to auditory function. Modulation of the expression and localization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; the rate limiting enzyme in the production of DA in the IC following cochlear trauma has been previously reported (Tong et al., 2005. In the current study the possibility of co-localization of TH with amino acid neurotransmitters (AANs was examined. Changes in the gene expression of TH were compared with changes in the gene expression of markers for AANs in the cochlear nucleus (CN and IC to determine whether those deafness related changes occur concurrently. The results indicate that bilateral cochlear ablation significantly reduced TH gene expression in the CN after two months while in the IC the reduction in TH was observed at both three days and two months following ablation. Furthermore, in the CN, glycine transporter 2 (GlyT2 and the GABA transporter (GABAtp were also significantly reduced only after two months. However, in the IC, DA receptor 1 (DRDA1, vesicular glutamate transporters 2 and 3 (vGluT2, vGluT3, GABAtp and GAD67 were reduced in expression both at the three day and two month time points. A close relationship between the distribution of TH and several of the AANs was determined in both the CN and the IC. In addition, GlyT2 and vGluT3 each co-localized with TH within IC somata and dendrites. Therefore, the results of the current study suggest that DA is spatially well positioned to influence the effects of AANs on auditory neurons.

  12. Extracellular Neurotransmitter Receptor Clustering: Think Outside the Box

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthias Kneussel

    2010-01-01

    @@ Postsynaptic submembrane scaffolds cluster neurotransmitter receptors through intracellular protein-protein interactions. Growing evidence supports the view that extracellular factors can be almost as important to trigger synaptic receptor aggregation.

  13. SLC6 Neurotransmitter Transporters: Structure, Function, and Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders S; Andersen, Jacob; Jørgensen, Trine N

    2011-01-01

    The neurotransmitter transporters (NTTs) belonging to the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) gene family (also referred to as the neurotransmitter-sodium-symporter family or Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent transporters) comprise a group of nine sodium- and chloride-dependent plasma membrane transporters for the monoa......The neurotransmitter transporters (NTTs) belonging to the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) gene family (also referred to as the neurotransmitter-sodium-symporter family or Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent transporters) comprise a group of nine sodium- and chloride-dependent plasma membrane transporters....... Furthermore, psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamines have the SLC6 NTTs as primary targets. Beginning with the determination of a high-resolution structure of a prokaryotic homolog of the mammalian SLC6 transporters in 2005, the understanding of the molecular structure, function, and pharmacology...

  14. Analysis of neurotransmitters, neurosteroids and their metabolites in biological samples

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitters and neurosteroids are compounds that regulate the functions of the brain. The neurotransmitters dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) play a role in several psychological conditions, including schizophrenia, depression and anxiety. DA also has an important role in Parkinson s disease. Neurosteroids are involved in neurodegenerative diseases. In Alzheimer s disease and multiple sclerosis, the levels of neurosteroids are decreased in certain areas of the brain. Neurosteroids diff...

  15. Radiotracers for PET and SPECT studies of neurotransmitter systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    The study of neurotransmitter systems is one of the major thrusts in emission tomography today. The current generation of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) radiotracers examines neurotransmitter properties from a number of different perspectives including their pre and post synaptic sites and the activity of the enzymes which regulate their concentration. Although the dopamine system has been the most extensively investigated, other neurotransmitter systems including the acetylcholine muscarine, serotonin, benzodiazepine, opiate, NMDA and others are also under intensive development. Enzymes involved in the synthesis and regulation of neurotransmitter concentration, for example monoamine oxidase and amino acid decarboxylase has also been probed in vivo. Medical applications range from the study of normal function and the characterization of neurotransmitter activity in neurological and psychiatric diseases and in heart disease and cancer to the study of the binding of therapeutic drugs and substances of abuse. This chapter will provide an overview of the current generation of radiotracers for PET and SPECT studies of neurotransmitter systems including radiotracer design, synthesis localization mechanisms and applications in emission tomography. 60 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Constitutive Increases in Amygdalar Corticotropin-Releasing Factor and Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Drive an Anxious Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natividad, Luis A; Buczynski, Matthew W; Herman, Melissa A; Kirson, Dean; Oleata, Christopher S; Irimia, Cristina; Polis, Ilham; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Roberto, Marisa; Parsons, Loren H

    2017-10-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) mediates anxiogenic responses by activating CRF type 1 (CRF1) receptors in limbic brain regions. Anxiety is further modulated by the endogenous cannabinoid (eCB) system that attenuates the synaptic effects of stress. In the amygdala, acute stress activates the enzymatic clearance of the eCB N-arachidonoylethanolamine via fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), although it is unclear whether chronic dysregulation of CRF systems induces maladaptive changes in amygdalar eCB signaling. Here, we used genetically selected Marchigian Sardinian P (msP) rats carrying an innate overexpression of CRF1 receptors to study the role of constitutive upregulation in CRF systems on amygdalar eCB function and persistent anxiety-like effects. We applied behavioral, pharmacological, and biochemical methods to broadly characterize anxiety-like behaviors and amygdalar eCB clearance enzymes in msP versus nonselected Wistar rats. Subsequent studies examined the influence of dysregulated CRF and FAAH systems in altering excitatory transmission in the central amygdala (CeA). msPs display an anxious phenotype accompanied by elevations in amygdalar FAAH activity and reduced dialysate N-arachidonoylethanolamine levels in the CeA. Elevations in CRF-CRF1 signaling dysregulate FAAH activity, and this genotypic difference is normalized with pharmacological blockade of CRF1 receptors. msPs also exhibit elevated baseline glutamatergic transmission in the CeA, and dysregulated CRF-FAAH facilitates stress-induced increases in glutamatergic activity. Treatment with an FAAH inhibitor relieves sensitized glutamatergic responses in msPs and attenuates the anxiety-like phenotype. Pathological anxiety and stress hypersensitivity are driven by constitutive increases in CRF1 signaling that dysregulate N-arachidonoylethanolamine signaling mechanisms and reduce neuronal inhibitory control of CeA glutamatergic synapses. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published

  17. Stimulation of rat cranial dura mater with potassium chloride causes CGRP release into the cerebrospinal fluid and increases medullary blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dux, Mária; Will, Christine; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Fischer, Michael J M; Messlinger, Karl

    2017-02-10

    Primary headaches may be accompanied by increased intracranial blood flow induced by the release of the potent vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from activated meningeal afferents. We aimed to record meningeal and medullary blood flow simultaneously and to localize the sites of CGRP release in rodent preparations in vivo and ex vivo. Blood flow in the exposed rat parietal dura mater and the medulla oblongata was recorded by laser Doppler flowmetry, while the dura was stimulated by topical application of 60mM potassium chloride (KCl). Samples of jugular venous plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected from the cisterna magna were analysed for CGRP concentrations using an enzyme immunoassay. In a hemisected rat skull preparation lined with dura mater the CGRP releasing effect of KCl superfusion was examined. Superfusion of the dura mater with KCl decreased meningeal blood flow unless alpha-adrenoceptors were blocked by phentolamine, whereas the medullary blood flow was increased. The same treatment caused increased CGRP concentrations in jugular plasma and CSF and induced significant CGRP release in the hemisected rat skull preparation. Anaesthesia of the trigeminal ganglion by injection of lidocaine reduced increases in medullary blood flow and CGRP concentration in the CSF upon meningeal KCl application. CGRP release evoked by depolarisation of meningeal afferents is accompanied by increased blood flow in the medulla oblongata but not the dura mater. This discrepancy can be explained by the smooth muscle depolarising effect of KCl and the activation of sympathetic vasoconstrictor mechanisms. The medullary blood flow response is most likely mediated by CGRP released from activated central terminals of trigeminal afferents. Increased blood supply of the medulla oblongata and CGRP release into the CSF may also occur in headaches accompanying vigorous activation of meningeal afferents.

  18. Effect of canagliflozin and metformin on cortical neurotransmitters in a diabetic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, Nadia M S; Marie, Mohamed-Assem S; AlAzimi, Sara Abdullah Mubarak

    2016-10-25

    The rapid economic development in the Arabian Gulf has resulted in lifestyle changes that have increased the prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes, with the greatest increases observed in Kuwait. Dyslipidemia and diabetes are risk factors for disruptions in cortical neurotransmitter homeostasis. This study investigated the effect of the antidiabetic medications canagliflozin (CAN) and metformin (MET) on the levels of cortical neurotransmitters in a diabetic rat model. The rats were assigned to the control (C) group, the diabetic group that did not receive treatment (D) or the diabetic group treated with either CAN (10 mg/kg) or MET (100 mg/kg) for 2 or 4 weeks. Blood and urine glucose levels and cortical acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity were assayed, and amino acid and monoamine levels were measured using HPLC. The diabetic group exhibited a significant increase in AChE activity and a decrease in monoamine and amino acid neurotransmitter levels. In the CAN group, AChE was significantly lower than that in the D and D + MET groups after 2 weeks of treatment. In addition, a significant increase in some cortical monoamines and amino acids was observed in the D + MET and D + CAN groups compared with the D group. Histopathological analysis revealed the presence of severe focal hemorrhage, neuronal degeneration, and cerebral blood vessel congestion, with gliosis in the cerebrum of rats in the D group. The CAN-treated group exhibited severe cerebral blood vessel congestion after 2 weeks of treatment and focal gliosis in the cerebrum after 4 weeks of treatment. Focal gliosis in the cerebrum of rats in the MET-treated group was observed after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment. We conclude that the effect of CAN and MET on neurotransmitters is potentially mediated by their antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects. In addition, the effects of CAN on neurotransmitters might be associated with its receptor activity, and the effect of MET on neurotransmitters

  19. Optogenetic control of serotonin and dopamine release in Drosophila larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ning; Privman, Eve; Venton, B Jill

    2014-08-20

    Optogenetic control of neurotransmitter release is an elegant method to investigate neurobiological mechanisms with millisecond precision and cell type-specific resolution. Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) can be expressed in specific neurons, and blue light used to activate those neurons. Previously, in Drosophila, neurotransmitter release and uptake have been studied after continuous optical illumination. In this study, we investigated the effects of pulsed optical stimulation trains on serotonin or dopamine release in larval ventral nerve cords. In larvae with ChR2 expressed in serotonergic neurons, low-frequency stimulations produced a distinct, steady-state response while high-frequency patterns were peak shaped. Evoked serotonin release increased with increasing stimulation frequency and then plateaued. The steady-state response and the frequency dependence disappeared after administering the uptake inhibitor fluoxetine, indicating that uptake plays a significant role in regulating the extracellular serotonin concentration. Pulsed stimulations were also used to evoke dopamine release in flies expressing ChR2 in dopaminergic neurons and similar frequency dependence was observed. Release due to pulsed optical stimulations was modeled to determine the uptake kinetics. For serotonin, Vmax was 0.54 ± 0.07 μM/s and Km was 0.61 ± 0.04 μM; and for dopamine, Vmax was 0.12 ± 0.03 μM/s and Km was 0.45 ± 0.13 μM. The amount of serotonin released per stimulation pulse was 4.4 ± 1.0 nM, and the amount of dopamine was 1.6 ± 0.3 nM. Thus, pulsed optical stimulations can be used to mimic neuronal firing patterns and will allow Drosophila to be used as a model system for studying mechanisms underlying neurotransmission.

  20. [Single and combining effects of Calculus Bovis and zolpidem on inhibitive neurotransmitter of rat striatum corpora].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; He, Xinrong; Guo, Mei

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the correlation effects between single or combined administration of Calculus Bovis or zolpidem and changes of inhibitive neurotransmitter in rat striatum corpora. Sampling from rat striatum corpora was carried out through microdialysis. The content of two inhibitive neurotransmitters in rat corpus striatum- glycine (Gly) and gama aminobutyric acid (GABA), was determined by HPLC, which involved pre-column derivation with orthophthaladehyde, reversed-phase gradient elution and fluorescence detection. GABA content of rat striatum corpora in Calculus Bovis group was significantly increased compared with saline group (P Calculus Boris plus zolpidem group were increased largely compared with saline group as well (P Calculus Bovis group was higher than combination group (P Calculus Bovis or zolpidem group was markedly increased compared with saline group or combination group (P Calculus Bovis group, zolpidem group and combination group. The magnitude of increase was lower in combination group than in Calculus Bovis group and Zolpidem group, suggesting that Calculus Bovis promoted encephalon inhibition is more powerful than zolpidem. The increase in two inhibitive neurotransmitters did not show reinforcing effect in combination group, suggesting that Calculus Bovis and zolpidem may compete the same receptors. Therefore, combination of Calculus Bovis containing drugs and zolpidem has no clinical significance. Calculus Bovis shouldn't as an aperture-opening drugs be used for resuscitation therapy.

  1. Toward an increased understanding of the barriers to colonic drug absorption in humans: implications for early controlled release candidate assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannergren, Christer; Bergendal, Anna; Lennernäs, Hans; Abrahamsson, Bertil

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to increase the understanding of in vivo colonic drug absorption in humans by summarizing and evaluating all regional in vivo human absorption data with focus on the interpretation of the colonic absorption data in relation to intestinal permeability and solubility. In addition, the usefulness of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) in early assessment of the in vivo colonic absorption potential of controlled release drug candidates was investigated. Clinical regional absorption data (Cmax, Tmax, and AUC) of 42 drugs were collected from journal articles, abstracts, and internal reports, and the relative bioavailability in the colon (Frel(colon)) was obtained directly or calculated. Bioavailability, fraction dose absorbed, and information if the compounds were substrates for P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) were also obtained. The BCS I drugs were well absorbed in the colon (Frel(colon) > 70%), although some drugs had lower values due to bacterial degradation in the colon. The low permeability drugs (BCS III/IV) had a lower degree of absorption in the colon (Frel(colon) colon), and atenolol and metoprolol may function as permeability markers for low and high colonic absorption, respectively. No obvious effect of P-gp on the colonic absorption of the drugs in this study was detected. There was insufficient data available to fully assess the impact of low solubility and slow dissolution rate. The estimated in vivo fractions dissolved of the only two compounds administered to the colon as both a solution and as solid particles were 55% and 92%, respectively. In conclusion, permeability and solubility are important barriers to colonic absorption in humans, and in vitro testing of these properties is recommended in early assessment of colonic absorption potential.

  2. Solvent free fabrication of micro and nanostructured drug coatings by thermal evaporation for controlled release and increased effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman S Zarie

    Full Text Available Nanostructuring of drug delivery systems offers many promising applications like precise control of dissolution and release kinetics, enhanced activities, flexibility in terms of surface coatings, integration into implants, designing the appropriate scaffolds or even integrating into microelectronic chips etc. for different desired applications. In general such kind of structuring is difficult due to unintentional mixing of chemical solvents used during drug formulations. We demonstrate here the successful solvent-free fabrication of micro-nanostructured pharmaceutical molecules by simple thermal evaporation (TE. The evaporation of drug molecules and their emission to a specific surface under vacuum led to controlled assembling of the molecules from vapour phase to solid phase. The most important aspects of thermal evaporation technique are: solvent-free, precise control of size, possibility of fabricating multilayer/hybrid, and free choice of substrates. This could be shown for twenty eight pharmaceutical substances of different chemical structures which were evaporated on surfaces of titanium and glass discs. Structural investigations of different TE fabricated drugs were performed by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy which revealed that these drug substances preserve their structurality after evaporation. Titanium discs coated with antimicrobial substances by thermal evaporation were subjected to tests for antibacterial or antifungal activities, respectively. A significant increase in their antimicrobial activity was observed in zones of inhibition tests compared to controls of the diluted substances on the discs made of paper for filtration. With thermal evaporation, we have successfully synthesized solvent-free nanostructured drug delivery systems in form of multilayer structures and in hybrid drug complexes respectively. Analyses of these substances consolidated that thermal evaporation opens up

  3. Influences of increased daily repeated upstream releases and varying meteorological conditions on temperature distributions in a river-reservoir system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G.; Fang, X.

    2016-08-01

    Temperature distribution in a river-reservoir system was simulated using a calibrated three-dimensional Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code model under various hypothetical weather conditions and daily repeated large releases (DRLRs) from the upstream boundary. Both DRLRs and weather conditions affect and control the formation and spread of density currents and then affect the bottom-layer temperatures. The DRLRs with longer durations (e.g., 6 or 8 hours) can relatively quickly push cooler release water to the Gorgas upstream monitoring station (GOUS) and the river intake. With the air temperature drops in the first 6 days, simulated bottom temperatures at GOUS for 6- and 8-hr DRLRs are lower than one under 4-hr DRLR, but relatively larger bottom-layer temperature drops only primarily occur during the air-temperature drop and rise period. The release with larger flow rate can also maintain the cooler water temperature downstream. Releasing the same amounts of water, with different release durations and flow rates, has a very similar effect on the downstream water temperatures.

  4. Effects of the Bee Venom Herbal Acupuncture on the Neurotransmitters of the Rat Brain Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung-Seok Yun

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effects of bee venom Herbal Acupuncture on neurotransmitters in the rat brain cortex, herbal acupuncture with bee venom group and normal saline group was performed at LI4 bilaterally of the rat. the average optical density of neurotransmitters from the cerebral cortex was analysed 30 minutes after the herbal aqupuncture, by the immunohistochemistry. The results were as follows: 1. The density of NADPH-diaphorase in bee venom group was increased significantly at the motor cortex, visual cortex, auditory cortex, cingulate cortex, retrosplenial cortex and perirhinal cortex compared to the normal saline group. 2. The average optical density of vasoactive intestinal peptide in bee venom group had significant changes at the insular cortex, retrosplenial cortex and perirhinal cortex, compared to the normal saline group. 3. The average optical density of neuropeptide-Y in bee venom group increased significantly at the visual cortex and cingulate cortex, compared to the normal saline group.

  5. Corticosterone modulation of neurotransmitter receptors in rat hippocampus: a quantitative autoradiographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biegon, A. (Hoffmann-La Roche, Inc., Nutley, NJ (USA). Dept. of Pharmacology); Rainbow, T.C. (Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia (USA). School of Medicine); McEwen, B.S. (Rockefeller Univ., New York (USA))

    1985-04-22

    The effect of adrenalectomy (ADX) and corticosterone (CORT) replacement on neurotransmitter receptors was studied in dorsal hippocampus of rat using quantitative autoradiography. ADX for one week causes an increase in (/sup 3/H)5-HT binding to 5-HT/sub 1/ receptors which is significant in the CA1 cell field. CORT treatment of ADX rats for 3-5 days results in localized reductions of (/sup 3/H)5-HT binding including a partial reversal of the increase observed after ADX in CA1. CORT treatment of ADX animals also decreases binding of (/sup 3/H)QNB to muscarinic receptors in the dorsal hippocampus, with a significant effect in an area designated as subiculum. No influence of CORT was detected on (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding to alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic receptors in dorsal hippocampus. Possible mechanisms for hormone effects on neurotransmitter receptor levels are discussed.

  6. Does levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system increase breast cancer risk in peri-menopausal women? An HMO perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegelmann-Danieli, Nava; Katzir, Itzhak; Landes, Janet Vesterman; Segal, Yaakov; Bachar, Rachel; Rabinovich, Hadas Rotem; Bialik, Martin; Azuri, Joseph; Porath, Avi; Lomnicky, Yossef

    2017-09-14

    To evaluate the association between levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) use and breast cancer (BC) risk. A cohort of all Maccabi Healthcare Services (MHS) female members aged 40-50 years between 1/2003 and 12/2013 was used to identify LNG-IUS users as "cases," and 2 age-matched non-users as "controls." Exclusion criteria included: prior BC diagnosis, prior (5 years pre-study) and subsequent treatment with other female hormones or prophylactic tamoxifen. Invasive tumors were characterized by treatments received (chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, trastuzumab, or combination thereof). The analysis included 13,354 LNG-IUS users and 27,324 controls (mean age: 44.1 ± 2.6 vs. 44.9 ± 2.8 years; p < 0.0001). No significant differences in 5-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) estimates for overall BC risk or ductal carcinoma in situ occurrence were observed between groups. There was a trend towards higher risk for invasive BC in LNG-IUS users (5-year KM-estimate: 1.06% vs. 0.93%; p = 0.051). This difference stemmed primarily from the younger women (40-45 years; 0.88% vs. 0.69%, p = 0.014), whereas in older women (46-50 years), it was non-significant (1.44% vs. 1.21%; p = 0.26). Characterization of invasive BC by treatment demonstrated that LNG-IUS users had similar proportions of tumors treated with hormonal therapy, less tumors treated with trastuzumab, (7.5% vs. 14.5%) and more tumors treated with chemotherapy alone (25.8% vs. 14.9%; p = 0.041). In peri-menopausal women, LNG-IUS was not associated with an increased total risk of BC, although in the subgroup of women in their early 40's, it was associated with a slightly increased risk for invasive tumors.

  7. Increased dopamine tone during meditation-induced change of consciousness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Troels W; Bertelsen, Camilla; Piccini, Paola

    2002-01-01

    This is the first in vivo demonstration of an association between endogenous neurotransmitter release and conscious experience. Using 11C-raclopride PET we demonstrated increased endogenous dopamine release in the ventral striatum during Yoga Nidra meditation. Yoga Nidra is characterized by a dep......This is the first in vivo demonstration of an association between endogenous neurotransmitter release and conscious experience. Using 11C-raclopride PET we demonstrated increased endogenous dopamine release in the ventral striatum during Yoga Nidra meditation. Yoga Nidra is characterized...... by a depressed level of desire for action, associated with decreased blood flow in prefrontal, cerebellar and subcortical regions, structures thought to be organized in open loops subserving executive control. In the striatum, dopamine modulates excitatory glutamatergic synapses of the projections from...... the frontal cortex to striatal neurons, which in turn project back to the frontal cortex via the pallidum and ventral thalamus. The present study was designed to investigate whether endogenous dopamine release increases during loss of executive control in meditation. Participants underwent two 11C...

  8. Potential Antidepressant Role of Neurotransmitter CART: Implications for Mental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peizhong Mao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression is one of the most prevalent and debilitating public health concerns. Although no single cause of depression has been identified, it appears that interaction among genetic, epigenetic, biochemical, environmental, and psychosocial factors may explain its etiology. Further, only a fraction of depressed patients show full remission while using current antidepressants. Therefore, identifying common pathways of the disorder and using that knowledge to develop more effective pharmacological treatments are two primary targets of research in this field. Brain-enriched neurotransmitter CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript has multiple functions related to emotions. It is a potential neurotrophic factor and is involved in the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and stress response as well as in energy homeostasis. CART is also highly expressed in limbic system, which is considered to have an important role in regulating mood. Notably, adolescents carrying a missense mutation in the CART gene exhibit increased depression and anxiety. Hence, CART peptide may be a novel promising antidepressant agent. In this paper, we summarize recent progress in depression and CART. In particular, we emphasize a new antidepressant function for CART.

  9. Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry in Studies of Neurotransmitters and Their Metabolites in the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Uutela, PÀivi

    2009-01-01

    Neurotransmitters transfer chemically the electrical impulse from one neuron to another in the brain. The concentration of neurotransmitters in many neurological disorders is altered. The measurement of neurotransmitters in the brain is needed to understand how these diseases develop and how they can be treated. Neurotransmitters can be extracted from the brains of freely moving, alert animals by microdialysis technique. The concentration of neurotransmitters and their metabolites in brain mi...

  10. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) release after heparin stimulation is increased in Type 1 diabetic patients with albuminuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leurs, PB; van Oerle, R; Hamulyak, K; Wolffenbuttel, BHR

    2003-01-01

    Aims To study heparin-stimulated TFPI release in relation to complications in Type 1 diabetic patients. Subjects and methods Nineteen uncomplicated Type 1 diabetic patients (group I) were compared with 18 patients with retinopathy (group II), and nine patients with retinopathy and albuminuria (group

  11. SNA Releases Back to School Nutrition Trends Report: Results Show What Schools Are Doing to Increase Healthy Options for Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curriculum Review, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article talks about the School Nutrition Association's 2008 Back to School Nutrition Trends Report that was released on August 19. According to the report, the trend towards more healthful school meal choices continues this fall with district nutrition programs emphasizing whole grains, fruits, and vegetables while cutting back on trans fats,…

  12. Polycross populations of the native grass Festuca roemeri as pre-varietal germplasm: their derivation, release, increase, and use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale C. Darris; Barbara L. Wilson; Rob Fiegener; Randy Johnson; Matthew E. Horning

    2008-01-01

    Results of a recent common-garden study provide evidence needed to delineate appropriate seed transfer zones for the native grass Festuca roemeri (Pavlick) E. B. Alexeev (Poaceae). That information has been used to develop pre-variety germplasm releases to provide ecologically and genetically appropriate seeds for habitat restoration, erosion...

  13. Study on carbon-fixing,oxygen-releasing,temperature-reducing and humidity-increasing effects of evergreen plants in south highway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Minmin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Li-6400 portable photosynthesis system,was used to test the diurnal variations of photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance of evergreen plants in Southern Highway,and to calculate their ability of absorbing carbon dioxide and releasing oxygen and to calculate the transpiring water volume and absorbing heat quantity of plants.Results showed that Euonymus fortunei Hand-Mazz,Hedera helix.Aucuba eriobotryaefolia had better carbon-fixing and oxygen-releasing effects,while Photinia serrulata,Trachycarpus fortunei,Radix Ophiopogonis had worse carbon-fixing and oxygen-releasing effects.Radix Ophiopogonis,Photinia glabra,Euonymus fortunei Hand.-Mazz had higher cooling and humidification ability,while Photinia serrulata,Trachycarpus fortunei did not act as well as them.Euonymus fortunei Hand.-Mazz and Hedera helix had higher leaf chlorophyll in per unit mass,values are 12.91、10.34、9.93 mg·g-1.Radix Ophiopogonis、Cinnamomum camphora(Linn. Presl and Trachycarpus fortunei had lower leaf chlorophyll in per unit mass,value is 3.55、2.67、2.06 mg·g-1.Releasing oxygen,fixing carbon,net assimilation and chlorophyll content has good correlation(P<0.05.

  14. Increased depressive behaviour in females and heightened corticosterone release in males to swim stress after adolescent social stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Iva Z; Wilton, Aleena; Styles, Amy; McCormick, Cheryl M

    2008-06-26

    We previously reported that males undergoing chronic social stress (SS) (daily 1h isolation and new cage partner on days 30-45 of age) in adolescence habituated (decreased corticosterone release) to the homotypic stressor, but females did not. Here, we report that adolescent males exposed to chronic social stress had potentiated corticosterone release to a heterotypic stressor (15 min of swim stress) compared to acutely stressed and control males. The three groups of males did not differ in depressive-like behaviour (time spent immobile) during the swim stress. Corticosterone release in socially stressed females was elevated 45 min after the swim stress compared to acutely stressed and control females, and socially stressed females exhibited more depressive behaviour (longer durations of immobility and shorter durations of climbing) than the other females during the swim stress. Separate groups of rats were tested as adults several weeks after the social stress, and there were no group differences in corticosterone release after the swim stress. The only group difference in behaviour among the adults was more time spent climbing in socially stressed males than in controls. Thus, there are sex-specific effects of social stress in adolescence on endocrine responses and depressive behaviour to a heterotypic stressor, but, unlike for anxiety, substantial recovery is evident in adulthood in the absence of intervening stress exposures.

  15. Increased nitric oxide release and expression of endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthases in mildly changed porcine mitral valve leaflets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Sophia G; Olsen, Lisbeth H; Viuff, Birgitte M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: Little is known of the local role of nitric oxide (NO) in heart valves in relation to heart valve diseases. The study aim was to examine NO release and the expression of both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in re...

  16. Increased nitric oxide release and expression of endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthases in mildly changed porcine mitral valve leaflets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Sophia Gry; Olsen, Lisbeth Høier; Viuff, Birgitte;

    2007-01-01

    Background and aim of the study: Little is known of the local role of nitric oxide (NO) in heart valves in relation to heart valve diseases. The study aim was to examine NO release and the expression of both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (i...

  17. In vitro ozone exposure increases release of arachidonic acid products from a human bronchial epithelial cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinnon, K.P.; Madden, M.C.; Noah, T.L.; Devlin, R.B. (TRC Environmental Corporation, Chapel Hill, NC (United States))

    1993-02-01

    Eicosanoids released after ozone exposure of a human bronchial epithelial cell line, BEAS-S6, were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of supernatants from exposed cells prelabeled with [3H]arachidonic acid. BEAS cells released thromboxane B2 (TxB2), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), leukotriene C4 (LTC4), LTD4, LTE4, and 12-hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid (HHT) after exposure to ozone at concentrations of 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 ppm. The eicosanoids were identified by coelution with authentic standards. The largest product from ozone-exposed BEAS cells was the most polar peak, designated Peak 1. Release of cyclooxygenase products such as TxB2, PGE2, and HHT was inhibited by acetylsalicylic acid. Peaks that migrated with authentic standards for LTB4, LTC4, and LTD4 were inhibited by the lipoxygenase inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid. The leukotrienes LTB4 and LTC4/D4 could also be detected by immunoassay of concentrated peak fractions. Thus BEAS cells released eicosanoids from cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism following exposure to ozone. Airway epithelial cells may be an important source of eicosanoids following ozone stimulation in humans.

  18. Neurotransmitter segregation: functional and plastic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sámano, Cynthia; Cifuentes, Fredy; Morales, Miguel Angel

    2012-06-01

    Synaptic cotransmission is the ability of neurons to use more than one transmitter to convey synaptic signals. Cotransmission was originally described as the presence of a classic transmitter, which conveys main signal, along one or more cotransmitters that modulate transmission, later on, it was found cotransmission of classic transmitters. It has been generally accepted that neurons store and release the same set of transmitters in all their synaptic processes. However, some findings that show axon endings of individual neurons storing and releasing different sets of transmitters, are not in accordance with this assumption, and give support to the hypothesis that neurons can segregate transmitters to different synapses. Here, we review the studies showing segregation of transmitters in invertebrate and mammalian central nervous system neurons, and correlate them with our results obtained in sympathetic neurons. Our data show that these neurons segregate even classic transmitters to separated axons. Based on our data we suggest that segregation is a plastic phenomenon and responds to functional synaptic requirements, and to 'environmental' cues such as neurotrophins. We propose that neurons have the machinery to guide the different molecules required in synaptic transmission through axons and sort them to different axon endings. We believe that transmitter segregation improves neuron interactions during cotransmission and gives them selective and better control of synaptic plasticity.

  19. Effect of borneol, moschus, storax, and acorus tatarinowii on expression levels of four amino acid neurotransmitters in the rat corpus striatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na Zhang; Ping Liu; Xinrong He

    2012-01-01

    The present study collected cerebrospinal fluid samples from the corpus striatum in rats treated with borneol, moschus, storax, and acorus tatarinowii using brain microdialysis technology. Levels of excitatory neurotransmitters aspartic acid and glutamate, as well as inhibitory neurotransmitters glycine and ?-aminobutyric acid, were measured in samples using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, phosphate gradient elution, and fluorescence detection. Results showed that concentrations of all four amino acid neurotransmitters significantly increased in the corpus striatum following treatment with borneol or moschus, but effects due to borneol were more significant than moschus. Acorus tatarinowii treatment increased ?-aminobutyric acid expression, but decreased glutamate concentrations. Storax increased aspartic acid concentrations and decreased glycine expression. Results demonstrated that borneol and moschus exhibited significant effects on con amino acid neurotransmitter expression; storax exhibited excitatory effects, and acorus tatarinowii resulted in inhibitory effects.

  20. `Full fusion' is not ineluctable during vesicular exocytosis of neurotransmitters by endocrine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinick, Alexander; Svir, Irina; Amatore, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Vesicular exocytosis is an essential and ubiquitous process in neurons and endocrine cells by which neurotransmitters are released in synaptic clefts or extracellular fluids. It involves the fusion of a vesicle loaded with chemical messengers with the cell membrane through a nanometric fusion pore. In endocrine cells, unless it closes after some flickering (`Kiss-and-Run' events), this initial pore is supposed to expand exponentially, leading to a full integration of the vesicle membrane into the cell membrane-a stage called `full fusion'. We report here a compact analytical formulation that allows precise measurements of the fusion pore expansion extent and rate to be extracted from individual amperometric spike time courses. These data definitively establish that, during release of catecholamines, fusion pores enlarge at most to approximately one-fifth of the radius of their parent vesicle, hence ruling out the ineluctability of `full fusion'.

  1. 'Full fusion' is not ineluctable during vesicular exocytosis of neurotransmitters by endocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinick, Alexander; Svir, Irina; Amatore, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Vesicular exocytosis is an essential and ubiquitous process in neurons and endocrine cells by which neurotransmitters are released in synaptic clefts or extracellular fluids. It involves the fusion of a vesicle loaded with chemical messengers with the cell membrane through a nanometric fusion pore. In endocrine cells, unless it closes after some flickering ('Kiss-and-Run' events), this initial pore is supposed to expand exponentially, leading to a full integration of the vesicle membrane into the cell membrane-a stage called 'full fusion'. We report here a compact analytical formulation that allows precise measurements of the fusion pore expansion extent and rate to be extracted from individual amperometric spike time courses. These data definitively establish that, during release of catecholamines, fusion pores enlarge at most to approximately one-fifth of the radius of their parent vesicle, hence ruling out the ineluctability of 'full fusion'.

  2. [Detection of neurotransmitter interactions with PET and SPECT by pharmacological challenge paradigms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlösser, R

    2000-01-01

    Functional brain imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) enables the in vivo study of specific neurochemical processes in the context of normal regulatory mechanisms and pathophysiological alterations of the brain. By combining these methods with pharmacological challenge-paradigms, the study of functional interactions of different neurotransmitter systems is possible. This review will present data from animal and healthy volunteer studies as well as first data from investigations in different patient populations with regard to this research direction. Especially, interactions of different neurotransmitter systems with the dopaminergic and the cholinergic system will be discussed. The database acquired so far confirms existing models of neuronal feedback-circuits, and the first clinical results are consistent with the hypothesis of an increased dopaminergic responsivity in schizophrenic patients. These results open up new perspectives for a further evaluation of treatment response predictors from drug-challenge studies and for the development of new drug treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders.

  3. Influence of ketamine on amino acid neurotransmitters secretion by nerve cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxian Shi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the influence of amino acid neurotransmitters secreted by the nerve cells after ketamine treatment, the nerve cells were cultured in vitro to exclude the interference of other factors in vivo and treated with three different doses of ketamine (1, 3 and 5 µg/mL. Then, the concentration of neuronal amino acid neurotransmitters was examined at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120 min after treatment. The trends of each amino acid concentration after ketamine treatment were nearly the same among the different treatment doses. After 15 min of adapting time, ketamine decreased the excitatory amino acid glutamic acid and aspartic acid concentration, and increased the concentration of the inhibitory amino acid glycine. Their concentrations showed a tendency to return approximately to the original level after 120 min.

  4. Duck cerebellum participates in regulation of food intake via the neurotransmitters serotonin and neuropeptide Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua Z; Li, Xin Y; Tong, Jing J; Qiu, Zheng Y; Zhan, Han C; Sha, Jun N; Peng, Ke M

    2008-10-01

    Two important neurotransmitters, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and neuropeptide Y (NPY), have been confirmed to be involved in food intake regulation. To clarify whether the cerebellum participates in modulation of food intake through these two neurotransmitters, we investigated the distribution and expression levels of 5-HT and NPY in cerebellum of the duck. Our results showed that 5-HT and NPY were distributed only at the Purkinje cell layer of the duck cerebellum. Moreover, the expression level of 5-HT in fasted (4 h) and tryptophan (100-200 mg/kg)-treated ducks was significantly higher than that in control animals (Pfood intake respectively increased and decreased cerebellar 5-HT and NPY in the duck.

  5. 受体-受体相互作用:神经递质受体功能的一种重要调控机制%Receptor-receptor interaction: a critical mechanism for the regulation of neurotransmitter receptor function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘芳

    2011-01-01

    1 Introduction Neurotransmitter receptors are proteins embedded in the synaptic plasma membrane where they play a dual role in synaptic transmission.First,receptors have domains that extend into the synpatic cleft and bind neurotransmitters/agonists that are released into this space from the presynaptic neuron.Second,the binding of neurotransmitters to these domains open or close ion channels directly or indirectly in the postsynaptic membrane,or activate signalling events in the postsynaptic neuron,thus mediating the transfer of information across the synapse[1 ].

  6. Affinity of four polar neurotransmitters for lipid bilayer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Chunhua; Ye, Fengbin; Valardez, Gustavo F.

    2011-01-01

    Weak interactions of neurotransmitters and the lipid matrix in the synaptic membrane have been hypothesized to play a role in synaptic transmission of nerve signals, particularly with respect to receptor desensitization (Cantor, R. S. Biochemistry 2003, 42, 11891). The strength of such interactions......, however, was not measured, and this is an obvious impediment for further evaluation and understanding of a possible role for desensitization. We have used dialysis equilibrium to directly measure the net affinity of selected neurotransmitters for lipid membranes and analyzed this affinity data...... with respect to calorimetric measurements and molecular dynamics simulations. We studied an anionic (glutamate), a cationic (acetylcholine), and two zwitterionic (-aminobutyric acid and glycine) neurotransmitters, and membranes of pure dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC), DMPC doped with 10% anionic lipid...

  7. [Effect of occupational stress on neurotransmitters in petroleum workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu; Lian, Yulong; Tao, Ning; Ge, Hua; Liu, Jiwen

    2015-09-01

    To explore the effects of occupational stress on neurotransmitters in petroleum workers. 178 petroleum workers with the length of service ≥ 1 year were recruited to the subjects by the questionnaire of OSI-R. The levels of 5-hydroxy tryptamine (5-HT), norepinephrine (NE), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and substance P (SP) in serum were measured. The subjects were classified into 3 groups according to the scores of occupational stress. The levels of 5-HT NE and SP for over 15 working years were higher than those of less than 15 years (P petroleum workers (P petroleum workers is correlated with serum monoamine and neuropeptides neurotransmitters, and it may affect serum levels of monoamine and neuropeptides neurotransmitters.

  8. Modulation of monoamine neurotransmitters in fighting fish Betta splendens exposed to waterborne phytoestrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; McNitt, Meredith M; Carpenter, Russ E; Summers, Cliff H

    2010-12-01

    Endogenous estrogens are known to affect the activity of monoamine neurotransmitters in vertebrate animals, but the effects of exogenous estrogens on neurotransmitters are relatively poorly understood. We exposed sexually mature male fighting fish Betta splendens to environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses of three phytoestrogens that are potential endocrine disruptors in wild fish populations: genistein, equol, and β-sitosterol. We also exposed fish to two doses of the endogenous estrogen 17β-estradiol, which we selected as a positive control because phytoestrogens are putative estrogen mimics. Our results were variable, but the effects were generally modest. Genistein increased dopamine levels in the forebrains of B. splendens at both environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses. The environmentally relevant dose of equol increased dopamine levels in B. splendens forebrains, and the pharmacological dose decreased norepinephrine (forebrain), dopamine (hindbrain), and serotonin (forebrain) levels. The environmentally relevant dose of β-sitosterol decreased norepinephrine and dopamine in the forebrain and hindbrain, respectively. Our results suggest that sources of environmental phytoestrogens, such as runoff or effluent from agricultural fields, wood pulp mills, and sewage treatment plants, have the potential to modulate neurotransmitter activity in free-living fishes in a way that could interfere with normal behavioral processes.

  9. Liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection for studying the effects of tetrahydrobiopterin on monoamine neurotransmitters in rat striatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Wen; ZHU; Wei; XU; Haihong; WAN; Fangli; GU; Jing; HA

    2005-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential co-factor in the biosynthesis of monoamine neurotransmitters.A nano-Pt/Pd modified electrode as the electrochemical detector (ED) for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with microdialysis sampling, is used to explore the effect of administration of BH4 on the monoamine neurotransmitters in the rat striatum.The researches demonstrate that the contents of dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and homovanillic acid (HVA) increase significantly with the administration of BH4.The pharmaceutical kinetics is carried out to research into the time course of BH4 effect on the concentration of monoamine neurotransmitters in rat striatum, which provides reliable data for pathology and pharmacology research on neuroscience.

  10. Increased amphetamine-induced locomotor activity, sensitization, and accumbal dopamine release in M5 muscarinic receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lene S; Miller, Anthony D; Lester, Deranda B

    2010-01-01

    showed that M(5) receptor knockout (M (5) (-/-) ) mice are less sensitive to the reinforcing properties of addictive drugs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Here, we investigate the role of M(5) receptors in the effects of amphetamine and cocaine on locomotor activity, locomotor sensitization, and dopamine release...... using M (5) (-/-) mice backcrossed to the C57BL/6NTac strain. STATISTICAL ANALYSES: Sensitization of the locomotor response is considered a model for chronic adaptations to repeated substance exposure, which might be related to drug craving and relapse. The effects of amphetamine on locomotor activity......-induced hyperactivity and dopamine release as well as amphetamine sensitization are enhanced in mice lacking the M(5) receptor. These results support the concept that the M(5) receptor modulates effects of addictive drugs....

  11. Stimulation of glutamate receptors in the ventral tegmental area is necessary for serotonin-2 receptor-induced increases in mesocortical dopamine release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehek, E.A.; Hernan, A.E.

    2017-01-01

    Modulation of dopamine (DA) released by serotonin-2 (5-HT2) receptors has been implicated in the mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs. The mesocortical DA system has been implicated particularly in the cognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia. Agonism at 5-HT2A receptors in the prefrontal cortex is associated with increases in cortical DA release. Evidence indicates that 5-HT2A receptors in the cortex regulate mesocortical DA release through stimulation of a “long-loop” feedback system from the PFC to the VTA and back. However, a causal role for VTA glutamate in the 5-HT2-induced increases in PFC DA has not been established. The present study does so by measuring 5-HT2 agonist-induced DA release in the cortex after infusions of glutamate antagonists into the VTA. Infusions of a combination of a NMDA (AP-5: 2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid) and an AMPA/kainate (CNQX: 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione) receptor antagonist into the VTA blocked the increases in cortical DA produced by administration of the 5-HT2 agonist DOI [(±)-2,5-Dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine] (2.5 mg/kg s.c.). These results demonstrate that stimulation of glutamate receptors in the VTA is necessary for 5-HT2 agonist-induced increases in cortical DA. PMID:25637799

  12. Increasing the oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble carbamazepine using immediate-release pellets supported on SBA-15 mesoporous silica [Erratum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Z

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble carbamazepine using immediate-release pellets supported on SBA-15 mesoporous silica Wang Z, Chen B, Quan G, et al. International Journal of Nanomedicine. 2012;7:5807–5818.This paper was published without the Supplementary materials.Read the original article

  13. Localized infusions of the partial alpha 7 nicotinic receptor agonist SSR180711 evoke rapid and transient increases in prefrontal glutamate release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortz, D M; Mikkelsen, J D; Bruno, J P

    2013-01-01

    The ability of local infusions of the alpha 7 nicotinic acetycholine receptor (α7 nAChR) partial agonist SSR180711 to evoke glutamate release in prefrontal cortex was determined in awake rats using a microelectrode array. Infusions of SSR180711 produced dose-dependent increases in glutamate level...

  14. Altered serous levels of monoamine neurotransmitter metabolites in patiens with refractory and non-refractory depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guiqing Zhang; Yanxia Zhang; Jianxia Yang; Min Hu; Yueqi Zhang; Xia Liang

    2012-01-01

    The study examined plasma metabolite changes of monoamine neurotransmitters in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) and non-TRD before and after therapy. All 30 TRD and 30 non-TRD patients met the diagnostic criteria for a depressive episode in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision. Before treatment, and at 4, 6, and 8 weeks after treatment, the plasma metabolite products of monoamine neurotransmitters in TRD group, including 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl ethylene glycol and homovanillic acid, were significantly lower than those in the non-TRD group. After two types of anti-depressive therapy with 5-serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, combined with psychotherapy, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores were significantly reduced in both groups of patients, and the serous levels of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl ethylene glycol were significantly increased. In contrast, the homovanillic acid level exhibited no significant change. The levels of plasma metabolite products of peripheral monoamine neurotransmitters in depressive patients may predict the degree of depression and the therapeutic effects of treatment.

  15. Increase in the nitric oxide release without changes in cell viability of macrophages after laser therapy with 660 and 808 nm lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Igor Henrique Morais; de Andrade, Samantha Cardoso; de Faria, Andreza Barkokebas Santos; Fonsêca, Deborah Daniela Diniz; Gueiros, Luiz Alcino Monteiro; Carvalho, Alessandra Albuquerque Tavares; da Silva, Wylla Tatiana Ferreira; de Castro, Raul Manhães; Leão, Jair Carneiro

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) with different parameters and wavelengths on nitric oxide (NO) release and cell viability. Irradiation was performed with Ga-Al-As laser, continuous mode and wavelengths of 660 and 808 nm at different energy and power densities. For each wavelength, powers of 30, 50, and 100 mW and times of 10, 30, and 60 s were used. NO release was measured using Griess reaction, and cell viability was evaluated by mitochondrial reduction of bromide 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) to formazan. LLLT promoted statistically significant changes in NO release and MTT value only at the wavelength of 660 nm (p < 0.05). LLLT also promoted an increase in the NO release and cell viability when the energy densities 64 (p = 0.04) and 214 J/cm(2) (p = 0.012), respectively, were used. LLLT has a significant impact on NO release without affecting cell viability, but the significance of these findings in the inflammatory response needs to be further studied.

  16. Acute Exposure to Pacific Ciguatoxin Reduces Electroencephalogram Activity and Disrupts Neurotransmitter Metabolic Pathways in Motor Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gajendra; Au, Ngan Pan Bennett; Lei, Elva Ngai Yu; Mak, Yim Ling; Chan, Leanne Lai Hang; Lam, Michael Hon Wah; Chan, Leo Lai; Lam, Paul Kwan Sing; Ma, Chi Him Eddie

    2016-09-10

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is a common human food poisoning caused by consumption of ciguatoxin (CTX)-contaminated fish affecting over 50,000 people worldwide each year. CTXs are classified depending on their origin from the Pacific (P-CTXs), Indian Ocean (I-CTXs), and Caribbean (C-CTXs). P-CTX-1 is the most toxic CTX known and the major source of CFP causing an array of neurological symptoms. Neurological symptoms in some CFP patients last for several months or years; however, the underlying electrophysiological properties of acute exposure to CTXs remain unknown. Here, we used CTX purified from ciguatera fish sourced in the Pacific Ocean (P-CTX-1). Delta and theta electroencephalography (EEG) activity was reduced remarkably in 2 h and returned to normal in 6 h after a single exposure. However, second exposure to P-CTX-1 induced not only a further reduction in EEG activities but also a 2-week delay in returning to baseline EEG values. Ciguatoxicity was detected in the brain hours after the first and second exposure by mouse neuroblastoma assay. The spontaneous firing rate of single motor cortex neuron was reduced significantly measured by single-unit recording with high spatial resolution. Expression profile study of neurotransmitters using targeted profiling approach based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry revealed an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in the motor cortex. Our study provides a possible link between the brain oscillations and neurotransmitter release after acute exposure to P-CTX-1. Identification of EEG signatures and major metabolic pathways affected by P-CTX-1 provides new insight into potential biomarker development and therapeutic interventions.

  17. Neurotransmitter/sodium symporter orthologue LeuT has a single high-affinity substrate site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscitelli, Chayne L; Krishnamurthy, Harini; Gouaux, Eric

    2010-12-23

    Neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs) couple the uptake of neurotransmitter with one or more sodium ions, removing neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft. NSSs are essential to the function of chemical synapses, are associated with multiple neurological diseases and disorders, and are the targets of therapeutic and illicit drugs. LeuT, a prokaryotic orthologue of the NSS family, is a model transporter for understanding the relationships between molecular mechanism and atomic structure in a broad range of sodium-dependent and sodium-independent secondary transporters. At present there is a controversy over whether there are one or two high-affinity substrate binding sites in LeuT. The first-reported crystal structure of LeuT, together with subsequent functional and structural studies, provided direct evidence for a single, high-affinity, centrally located substrate-binding site, defined as the S1 site. Recent binding, flux and molecular simulation studies, however, have been interpreted in terms of a model where there are two high-affinity binding sites: the central, S1, site and a second, the S2 site, located within the extracellular vestibule. Furthermore, it was proposed that the S1 and S2 sites are allosterically coupled such that occupancy of the S2 site is required for the cytoplasmic release of substrate from the S1 site. Here we address this controversy by performing direct measurement of substrate binding to wild-type LeuT and to S2 site mutants using isothermal titration calorimetry, equilibrium dialysis and scintillation proximity assays. In addition, we perform uptake experiments to determine whether the proposed allosteric coupling between the putative S2 site and the S1 site manifests itself in the kinetics of substrate flux. We conclude that LeuT harbours a single, centrally located, high-affinity substrate-binding site and that transport is well described by a simple, single-substrate kinetic mechanism.

  18. Secondary neurotransmitter deficiencies in epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channelopathies: A potential treatment target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Gabriella A; Demos, Michelle; Shyr, Casper; Matthews, Allison; Zhang, Linhua; Race, Simone; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia; Van Allen, Margot I; Mancarci, Ogan; Toker, Lilah; Pavlidis, Paul; Ross, Colin J; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Trump, Natalie; Heales, Simon; Pope, Simon; Cross, J Helen; van Karnebeek, Clara D M

    2016-01-01

    We describe neurotransmitter abnormalities in two patients with drug-resistant epilepsy resulting from deleterious de novo mutations in sodium channel genes. Whole exome sequencing identified a de novo SCN2A splice-site mutation (c.2379+1G>A, p.Glu717Gly.fs*30) resulting in deletion of exon 14, in a 10-year old male with early onset global developmental delay, intermittent ataxia, autism, hypotonia, epileptic encephalopathy and cerebral/cerebellar atrophy. In the cerebrospinal fluid both homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were significantly decreased; extensive biochemical and genetic investigations ruled out primary neurotransmitter deficiencies and other known inborn errors of metabolism. In an 8-year old female with an early onset intractable epileptic encephalopathy, developmental regression, and progressive cerebellar atrophy, a previously unreported de novo missense mutation was identified in SCN8A (c.5615G>A; p.Arg1872Gln), affecting a highly conserved residue located in the C-terminal of the Nav1.6 protein. Aside from decreased homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate was also found to be low. We hypothesize that these channelopathies cause abnormal synaptic mono-amine metabolite secretion/uptake via impaired vesicular release and imbalance in electrochemical ion gradients, which in turn aggravate the seizures. Treatment with oral 5-hydroxytryptophan, l-Dopa/Carbidopa, and a dopa agonist resulted in mild improvement of seizure control in the male case, most likely via dopamine and serotonin receptor activated signal transduction and modulation of glutamatergic, GABA-ergic and glycinergic neurotransmission. Neurotransmitter analysis in other sodium channelopathy patients will help validate our findings, potentially yielding novel treatment opportunities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cellular Hypertrophy and Increased Susceptibility to Spontaneous Calcium-Release of Rat Left Atrial Myocytes Due to Elevated Afterload.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifei Zhang

    Full Text Available Atrial remodeling due to elevated arterial pressure predisposes the heart to atrial fibrillation (AF. Although abnormal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR function has been associated with AF, there is little information on the effects of elevated afterload on atrial Ca2+-handling. We investigated the effects of ascending aortic banding (AoB on Ca2+-handling in rat isolated atrial myocytes in comparison to age-matched sham-operated animals (Sham. Myocytes were either labelled for ryanodine receptor (RyR or loaded with fluo-3-AM and imaged by confocal microscopy. AoB myocytes were hypertrophied in comparison to Sham controls (P<0.0001. RyR labeling was localized to the z-lines and to the cell edge. There were no differences between AoB and Sham in the intensity or pattern of RyR-staining. In both AoB and Sham, electrical stimulation evoked robust SR Ca2+-release at the cell edge whereas Ca2+ transients at the cell center were much smaller. Western blotting showed a decreased L-type Ca channel expression but no significant changes in RyR or RyR phosphorylation or in expression of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, SR Ca2+ ATPase or phospholamban. Mathematical modeling indicated that [Ca2+]i transients at the cell center were accounted for by simple centripetal diffusion of Ca2+ released at the cell edge. In contrast, caffeine (10 mM induced Ca2+ release was uniform across the cell. The caffeine-induced transient was smaller in AoB than in Sham, suggesting a reduced SR Ca2+-load in hypertrophied cells. There were no significant differences between AoB and Sham cells in the rate of Ca2+ extrusion during recovery of electrically-stimulated or caffeine-induced transients. The incidence and frequency of spontaneous Ca2+-transients following rapid-pacing (4 Hz was greater in AoB than in Sham myocytes. In conclusion, elevated afterload causes cellular hypertrophy and remodeling of atrial SR Ca2+-release.

  20. Chronic prenatal ethanol exposure increases glucocorticoid-induced glutamate release in the hippocampus of the near-term foetal guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, U; Brien, J F; Kapoor, A; Matthews, S G; Reynolds, J N

    2006-11-01

    Exposure to high cortisol concentration can injure the developing brain, possibly via an excitotoxic mechanism involving glutamate (Glu). The present study tested the hypothesis that chronic prenatal ethanol exposure (CPEE) activates the foetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to produce high cortisol exposure in the foetal compartment and alters sensitivity to glucocorticoid-induced Glu release in the foetal hippocampus. Pregnant guinea pigs received daily oral administration of ethanol (4 g/kg maternal body weight/day) or isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding from gestational day (GD) 2 until GD 63 (term, approximately GD 68) at which time they were euthanised, 1 h after their final treatment. Adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol concentrations were determined in foetal plasma. Basal and electrically stimulated Glu and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) efflux in the presence or absence of dexamethasone (DEX), a selective glucocorticoid-receptor agonist, were determined ex vivo in foetal hippocampal slices. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor NR1 subunit mRNA expression were determined in situ in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus. In the near-term foetus, CPEE increased foetal plasma ACTH and cortisol concentrations. Electrically stimulated glutamate, but not GABA, release was increased in CPEE foetal hippocampal slices. Low DEX concentration (0.3 microM) decreased stimulated glutamate, but not GABA, release in both CPEE and control foetal hippocampal slices. High DEX concentration (3.0 microM) increased basal release of Glu, but not GABA, in CPEE foetal hippocampal slices. GR, but not MR, mRNA expression was elevated in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus, whereas NR1 mRNA expression was increased in the CA1 and CA3 fields of the foetal hippocampus. These data demonstrate that CPEE increases high glucocorticoid concentration-induced Glu release in the foetal hippocampus, presumably as a

  1. Bound to be different: neurotransmitter transporters meet their bacterial cousins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, L Keith; Meiler, Jens; Blakely, Randy D

    2007-12-01

    The neurotransmitter transporters belonging to the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family, including the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GAT), norepinephrine (NET), serotonin (SERT) and dopamine (DAT) transporters are extremely important drug targets of great clinical relevance. These Na+, Cl(-)-dependent transporters primarily function following neurotransmission to reset neuronal signaling by transporting neurotransmitter out of the synapse and back into the pre-synaptic neuron. Recent studies have tracked down an elusive binding site for Cl(-) that facilitates neurotransmitter transport using structural differences evident with bacterial family members (e.g., the Aquifex aeolicus leucine transporter LeuT Aa) that lack Cl(-) dependence. Additionally, the crystal structures of antidepressant-bound LeuT Aa reveals a surprising mode of drug interaction that may have relevance for medication development. The study of sequence and structural divergence between LeuT Aa and human SLC6 family transporters can thus inform us as to how and why neurotransmitter transporters evolved a reliance on extracellular Cl(-) to propel the transport cycle; what residue changes and helical rearrangements give rise to recognition of different substrates; and how drugs such as antidepressants, cocaine, and amphetamines halt (or reverse) the transport process.

  2. Inherited disorders of brain neurotransmitters: pathogenesis and diagnostic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Krystyna; Kuśmierska, Katarzyna; Demkow, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitters (NTs) play a central role in the efficient communication between neurons necessary for normal functioning of the nervous system. NTs can be divided into two groups: small molecule NTs and larger neuropeptide NTs. Inherited disorders of NTs result from a primary disturbance of NTs metabolism or transport. This group of disorders requires sophisticated diagnostic procedures. In this review we discuss disturbances in the metabolism of tetrahydrobiopterin, biogenic amines, γ-aminobutyric acid, foliate, pyridoxine-dependent enzymes, and also the glycine-dependent encephalopathy. We point to pathologic alterations of proteins involved in synaptic neurotransmission that may cause neurological and psychiatric symptoms. We postulate that synaptic receptors and transporter proteins for neurotransmitters should be investigated in unresolved cases. Patients with inherited neurotransmitters disorders present various clinical presentations such as mental retardation, refractory seizures, pyramidal and extrapyramidal syndromes, impaired locomotor patterns, and progressive encephalopathy. Every patient with suspected inherited neurotransmitter disorder should undergo a structured interview and a careful examination including neurological, biochemical, and imaging.

  3. The Top 5 Neurotransmitters from a Clinical Neurologist's Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Neurologists are proficient in neuroanatomy and -physiology but their understanding of neurochemistry tends to be mediocre. As a rule, we do not think in biochemical pathways and complex metabolic interactions but rather associate a few neurotransmitters with well-known brain diseases or drugs th...

  4. GABA not only a neurotransmitter: osmotic regulation by GABAAR signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana eCesetti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In neurons the anionic channel γ-aminobutyric (GABA A receptor (GABAAR plays a central role in mediating both the neurotrophic and neurotransmitter role of GABA. Activation of this receptor by GABA also affects the function of non-neuronal cells in the central nervous system (CNS, as GABAARs are expressed in mature macroglia and in almost all progenitor types, including neural stem cells. The relevance of GABA signalling in non-neuronal cells has been comparatively less investigated than in neurons. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that these cells are direct targets of GABA regulation. In non-neuronal cells GABAAR activation leads to influx or efflux of chloride (Cl- depending on the electrochemical gradient. Ion transport is indissolubly associated to water fluxes across the plasma membrane and plays a key role in brain physiology. Therefore, GABAAR could affect osmotic tension in the brain by modulating ion gradients. In addition, since water movements also occur through specialized water channels and transporters, GABAAR signalling could affect the movement of water also by regulating the function of the channels and transporters involved, thereby affecting not only the direction of the water fluxes but also their dynamics. This regulation has consequences at the cellular level as it modulates cell volume and activates multiple intracellular signalling mechanisms important for cell proliferation, maturation and survival. It may also have consequences at the systemic level. For example, it may indirectly control neuronal excitability, by regulating the extracellular space and interstitial concentration of Cl-, and contribute to brain water homeostasis. Therefore, GABAergic osmotic regulation should be taken into account during the treatment of pathologies requiring the administration of GABAAR modulators and for the development of therapies for diseases causing water unbalance in the brain.

  5. Mechanism of chloride interaction with neurotransmitter:sodium symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomot, Elia; Bendahan, Annie; Quick, Matthias; Zhao, Yongfang; Javitch, Jonathan A; Kanner, Baruch I

    2007-10-11

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSS) have a critical role in regulating neurotransmission and are targets for psychostimulants, anti-depressants and other drugs. Whereas the non-homologous glutamate transporters mediate chloride conductance, in the eukaryotic NSS chloride is transported together with the neurotransmitter. In contrast, transport by the bacterial NSS family members LeuT, Tyt1 and TnaT is chloride independent. The crystal structure of LeuT reveals an occluded binding pocket containing leucine and two sodium ions, and is highly relevant for the neurotransmitter transporters. However, the precise role of chloride in neurotransmitter transport and the location of its binding site remain elusive. Here we show that introduction of a negatively charged amino acid at or near one of the two putative sodium-binding sites of the GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) transporter GAT-1 from rat brain (also called SLC6A1) renders both net flux and exchange of GABA largely chloride independent. In contrast to wild-type GAT-1, a marked stimulation of the rate of net flux, but not of exchange, was observed when the internal pH was lowered. Equivalent mutations introduced in the mouse GABA transporter GAT4 (SLC6A11) and the human dopamine transporter DAT (SLC6A3) also result in chloride-independent transport, whereas the reciprocal mutations in LeuT and Tyt1 render substrate binding and/or uptake by these bacterial NSS chloride dependent. Our data indicate that the negative charge, provided either by chloride or by the transporter itself, is required during binding and translocation of the neurotransmitter, probably to counterbalance the charge of the co-transported sodium ions.

  6. Synaptic function is modulated by LRRK2 and glutamate release is increased in cortical neurons of G2019S LRRK2 knock-in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayne A Beccano-Kelly

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase-2 (LRRK2 result in familial Parkinson’s disease and the G2019S mutation alone accounts for up to 30% in some ethnicities. Despite this, the function of LRRK2 is largely undetermined although evidence suggests roles in phosphorylation, protein interactions, autophagy and endocytosis. Emerging reports link loss of LRRK2 to altered synaptic transmission, but the effects of the G2019S mutation upon synaptic release in mammalian neurons are unknown. To assess wild type and mutant LRRK2 in established neuronal networks, we conducted immunocytochemical, electrophysiological and biochemical characterisation of >3 week old cortical cultures of LRRK2 knock-out, wild-type overexpressing and G2019S knock-in mice. Synaptic release and synapse numbers were grossly normal in LRRK2 knock-out cells, but discretely reduced glutamatergic activity and reduced synaptic protein levels were observed. Conversely, synapse density was modestly but significantly increased in wild-type LRRK2 overexpressing cultures although event frequency was not. In knock-in cultures, glutamate release was markedly elevated, in the absence of any change to synapse density; indicating that physiological levels of G2019S LRRK2 elevate probability of release. Several presynaptic regulatory proteins shown by others to interact with LRRK2 were expressed at normal levels in knock-in cultures; however, synapsin 1 phosphorylation was significantly reduced. Thus, perturbations to the presynaptic release machinery and elevated synaptic transmission are early neuronal effects of LRRK2 G2019S. Furthermore, the comparison of knock-in and overexpressing cultures suggests that one copy of the G2019S mutation has a more pronounced effect than an ~3-fold increase in LRRK2 protein. Mutant-induced increases in transmission may convey additional stressors to neuronal physiology that may eventually contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease.

  7. Inequivalent contribution of the five tryptophan residues in the C-lobe of human serum transferrin to the fluorescence increase when iron is released.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Nicholas G; Byrne, Shaina L; Steere, Ashley N; Smith, Valerie C; MacGillivray, Ross T A; Mason, Anne B

    2009-04-07

    Human serum transferrin (hTF), with two Fe3+ binding lobes, transports iron into cells. Diferric hTF preferentially binds to a specific receptor (TFR) on the surface of cells, and the complex undergoes clathrin dependent receptor-mediated endocytosis. The clathrin-coated vesicle fuses with an endosome where the pH is lowered, facilitating iron release from hTF. On a biologically relevant time scale (2-3 min), the factors critical to iron release include pH, anions, a chelator, and the interaction of hTF with the TFR. Previous work, in which the increase in the intrinsic fluorescence signal was used to monitor iron release from the hTF/TFR complex, established that the TFR significantly enhances the rate of iron release from the C-lobe of hTF. In the current study, the role of the five C-lobe Trp residues in reporting the fluorescence change has been evaluated (+/-sTFR). Only four of the five recombinant Trp --> Phe mutants produced well. A single slow rate constant for iron release is found for the monoferric C-lobe (FeC hTF) and the four Trp mutants in the FeC hTF background. The three Trp residues equivalent to those in the N-lobe differed from the N-lobe and each other in their contributions to the fluorescent signal. Two rate constants are observed for the FeC hTF control and the four Trp mutants in complex with the TFR: k(obsC1) reports conformational changes in the C-lobe initiated by the TFR, and k(obsC2) is ascribed to iron release. Excitation at 295 nm (Trp only) and at 280 nm (Trp and Tyr) reveals interesting and significant differences in the rate constants for the complex.

  8. Effect of Dimerization on the Dynamics of Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, Mert; Cheng, Mary Hongying; Zomot, Elia; Bahar, Ivet

    2017-02-07

    Dimerization is a common feature among the members of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family of membrane proteins. Yet, the effect of dimerization on the mechanism of action of NSS members is not fully understood. In this study, we examined the collective dynamics of two members of the family, leucine transporter (LeuT) and dopamine transporter (DAT), to assess the significance of dimerization in modulating the functional motions of the monomers. We used to this aim the anisotropic network model (ANM), an efficient and robust method for modeling the intrinsic motions of proteins and their complexes. Transporters belonging to the NSS family are known to alternate between outward-facing (OF) and inward-facing (IF) states, which enables the uptake and release of their substrate (neurotransmitter) respectively, as the substrate is transported from the exterior to the interior of the cell. In both LeuT and DAT, dimerization is found to alter the collective motions intrinsically accessible to the individual monomers in favor of the functional transitions (OF ↔ IF), suggesting that dimerization may play a role in facilitating transport.

  9. Environment- and activity-dependent dopamine neurotransmitter plasticity in the adult substantia nigra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumann, Tim D

    2016-04-01

    The ability of neurons to change the amount or type of neurotransmitter they use, or 'neurotransmitter plasticity', is an emerging new form of adult brain plasticity. For example, it has recently been shown that neurons in the adult rat hypothalamus up- or down-regulate dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in response to the amount of light the animal receives (photoperiod), and that this in turn affects anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors (Dulcis et al., 2013). In this Chapter I consolidate recent evidence from my laboratory suggesting neurons in the adult mouse substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) also undergo DA neurotransmitter plasticity in response to persistent changes in their electrical activity, including that driven by the mouse's environment or behavior. Specifically, we have shown that the amounts of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, the rate-limiting enzyme in DA synthesis) gene promoter activity, TH mRNA and TH protein in SNc neurons increases or decreases after ∼20h of altered electrical activity. Also, infusion of ion-channel agonists or antagonists into the midbrain for 2 weeks results in ∼10% (∼500 neurons) more or fewer TH immunoreactive (TH+) SNc neurons, with no change in the total number of SNc neurons (TH+ and TH-). Targeting ion-channels mediating cell-autonomous pacemaker activity in, or synaptic input and afferent pathways to, SNc neurons are equally effective in this regard. In addition, exposing mice to different environments (sex pairing or environment enrichment) for 1-2 weeks induces ∼10% more or fewer TH+ SNc (and ventral tegmental area or VTA) neurons and this is abolished by concurrent blockade of synaptic transmission in midbrain. Although further research is required to establish SNc (and VTA) DA neurotransmitter plasticity, and to determine whether it alters brain function and behavior, it is an exciting prospect because: (1) It may play important roles in movement, motor learning, reward, motivation, memory and cognition; and (2

  10. Detoxification of ammonia in mouse cortical GABAergic cell cultures increases neuronal oxidative metabolism and reveals an emerging role for release of glucose-derived alanine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leke, Renata; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Anker, Malene

    2011-01-01

    in a mouse neuronal-astrocytic co-culture model of the GABAergic system. We found that 5 mM ammonium chloride affected energy metabolism by increasing the neuronal TCA cycle activity and switching the astrocytic TCA cycle toward synthesis of substrate for glutamine synthesis. Furthermore, ammonia exposure...... enhanced the synthesis and release of alanine. Collectively, our results demonstrate that (1) formation of glutamine is seminal for detoxification of ammonia; (2) neuronal oxidative metabolism is increased in the presence of ammonia; and (3) synthesis and release of alanine is likely to be important......Cerebral hyperammonemia is believed to play a pivotal role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a debilitating condition arising due to acute or chronic liver disease. In the brain, ammonia is thought to be detoxified via the activity of glutamine synthetase, an astrocytic enzyme...

  11. Does Global seismic energy release increase? An analysis based on the Lithospheric Seismic Energy Flow Model (LSEFM). The case of mega - earthquakes (M > 9)

    CERN Document Server

    Thanassoulas, C; Verveniotis, G; Zymaris, N

    2012-01-01

    In this work the data of the earthquake catalog of the NOAA, National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) are processed in terms of global seismic energy release. The determined Global Cumulative Seismic Energy Release (GCSER) graph as a function of time, is analyzed in the magnitude domain (discrete energy windows). Characteristic components of the analyzed graph are: its accelerated deformation character observed for energy windows lower than the background seismicity (M = 7.0 - 7.5), its lock state that started on 1923 and long seismic quiescence periods that preceded recent mega - earthquakes. The background GCSER value oscillates during the last century with a period of 60 years and with increasing amplitude. The recent (1952 - 2012) 5 mega - earthquakes are closely related to the amplitude increase of the GCSER oscillation. Hence, it is suggested that more mega - earthquakes are probable due to occur in the future. A global mechanism is postulated for the generation of the mega - earthquakes based on the pri...

  12. Bepaling van enkele neurotransmitters, monoaminen, en metabolieten, met behulp van Continuous Flowapparatuur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eigeman L; Schonewille F; Borst M; van der Laan JW

    1986-01-01

    Bij het onderzoek in de psychofarmacologie kan kennis van de effecten van stoffen op de omzettingssnelheid van neurotransmitters een belangrijk aspect zijn. Met de huidige psychofarmaca lijken vooral de klassieke neurotransmitters zoals de monoaminen, noradrenaline, dopamine en serotonine van

  13. Increased mercury release from dental amalgam restorations after exposure to electromagnetic fields as a potential hazard for hypersensitive people and pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Ghazal; Mortazavi, S M J

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, the use of common sources of electromagnetic fields such as Wi-Fi routers and mobile phones has been increased enormously all over the world. There is ongoing concern that exposure to electromagnetic fields can lead to adverse health effects. It has recently been shown that even low doses of mercury are capable of causing toxicity. Therefore, efforts are initiated to phase down or eliminate the use of mercury amalgam in dental restorations. Increased release of mercury from dental amalgam restorations after exposure to electromagnetic fields such as those generated by MRI and mobile phones has been reported by our team and other researchers. We have recently shown that some of the papers which reported no increased release of mercury after MRI, may have some methodological errors. Although it was previously believed that the amount of mercury released from dental amalgam cannot be hazardous, new findings indicate that mercury, even at low doses, may cause toxicity. Based on recent epidemiological findings, it can be claimed that the safety of mercury released from dental amalgam fillings is questionable. Therefore, as some individuals tend to be hypersensitive to the toxic effects of mercury, regulatory authorities should re-assess the safety of exposure to electromagnetic fields in individuals with amalgam restorations. On the other hand, we have reported that increased mercury release after exposure to electromagnetic fields may be risky for the pregnant women. It is worth mentioning that as a strong positive correlation between maternal and cord blood mercury levels has been found in some studies, our findings regarding the effect of exposure to electromagnetic fields on the release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings lead us to this conclusion that pregnant women with dental amalgam fillings should limit their exposure to electromagnetic fields to prevent toxic effects of mercury in their fetuses. Based on these findings, as infants

  14. Hypoxia Mediated Release of Endothelial Microparticles and Increased Association of S100A12 with Circulating Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca V. Vince

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Microparticles are released from the endothelium under normal homeostatic conditions and have been shown elevated in disease states, most notably those characterised by endothelial dysfunction. The endothelium is sensitive to oxidative stress/status and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 expression is upregulated upon activated endothelium, furthermore the presence of VCAM-1 on microparticles is known. S100A12, a calcium binding protein part of the S100 family, is shown to be present on circulating leukocytes and is thought a sensitive marker to local inflammatory process, which may be driven by oxidative stress. Eight healthy males were subjected to breathing hypoxic air (15% O2, approximately equivalent to 3000 metres altitude for 80 minutes in a temperature controlled laboratory and venous blood samples were processed immediately for VCAM-1 microparticles (VCAM-1 MP and S100A12 association with leukocytes by flow cytometry. A pre-hypoxic blood sample was used for comparison. Both VCAM-1 MP and S100A12 association with neutrophils were significantly elevated post hypoxic breathing later declining to levels observed in the pre-test samples. A similar trend was observed in both cases and a correlation may exist between these two markers in response to hypoxia. These data offer evidence using novel markers of endothelial and circulating blood responses to hypoxia.

  15. [Antagonistic effect of gingerols against TNF-α release, ROS overproduction and RIP3 expression increase induced by lectin from Pinellia ternata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong-li; Mao, Shan-hu; Zhao, Teng-fei; Wu, Hao; Pan, Yao-zong; Shu, Chen-yan

    2015-09-01

    To explore the antagonistic effect of gingerols against the inflammation induced by lectin from Pinellia ternata. In this study, ELISA method was used to determine the effect of different extracts from gingerols on the release of inflammatory factor TNF-α from macrophages induced by lectin from P. ternata. The fluorescence probe was used to determine the effect of gingerols on the changes in ROS of macrophages induced by lectin from P. ternata. The western-blot method was applied to study the effect of gingerols on the increase in expression of cell receptor interacting protein RIP3 in macrophages induced by lectin from P. ternata. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to study the effect of gingerols on morphological changes in macrophages induced by lectin from P. ternata. According to the results, gingerols can significantly inhibit the release of inflammatory factor from macrophages induced by lectin from P. ternata, ROS overproduction and increase in RIP3 expression. SEM results showed that gingerols can inhibit the cytomorphosis and necrocytosis induced by lectin from P. ternata. Fresh ginger's detoxication may be related to gingerols' effects in inhibiing release of inflammatory factor, ROS overproduction and increase in RIP3 expression caused by macrophages induced by lectin from P. ternata, which are mainly inflammatory development.

  16. The use of LeuT as a model in elucidating binding sites for substrates and inhibitors in neurotransmitter transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løland, Claus Juul

    2015-01-01

    Background: The mammalian neurotransmitter transporters are complex proteins playing a central role in synaptic transmission between neurons by rapid reuptake of neurotransmitters. The proteins which transport dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin belong to the Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters...

  17. Infection of human endothelial cells by Japanese encephalitis virus: increased expression and release of soluble HLA-E.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shwetank

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV is a single stranded RNA virus that infects the central nervous system leading to acute encephalitis in children. Alterations in brain endothelial cells have been shown to precede the entry of this flavivirus into the brain, but infection of endothelial cells by JEV and their consequences are still unclear. Productive JEV infection was established in human endothelial cells leading to IFN-β and TNF-α production. The MHC genes for HLA-A, -B, -C and HLA-E antigens were upregulated in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, the endothelial-like cell line, ECV 304 and human foreskin fibroblasts upon JEV infection. We also report the release/shedding of soluble HLA-E (sHLA-E from JEV infected human endothelial cells for the first time. This shedding of sHLA-E was blocked by an inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP. In addition, MMP-9, a known mediator of HLA solubilisation was upregulated by JEV. In contrast, human fibroblasts showed only upregulation of cell-surface HLA-E. Addition of UV inactivated JEV-infected cell culture supernatants stimulated shedding of sHLA-E from uninfected ECV cells indicating a role for soluble factors/cytokines in the shedding process. Antibody mediated neutralization of TNF-α as well as IFNAR receptor together not only resulted in inhibition of sHLA-E shedding from uninfected cells, it also inhibited HLA-E and MMP-9 gene expression in JEV-infected cells. Shedding of sHLA-E was also observed with purified TNF-α and IFN-β as well as the dsRNA analog, poly (I:C. Both IFN-β and TNF-α further potentiated the shedding when added together. The role of soluble MHC antigens in JEV infection is hitherto unknown and therefore needs further investigation.

  18. Appearance and distribution of peptidergic neurotransmitters in hippocampal primary culture

    OpenAIRE

    Thiele, Theodor

    2012-01-01

    The internal structure of the hippocampus, especially the development of neuronal circuits, is the subject of current research. The hippocampal primary culture represents a suitable model to study neuronal development and the impact of isolated stimuli and noxious. Focus of the following considerations are the neurons of the hippocampus, especially the peptidergic neurotransmitters somatostatin (SS), neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and cholecystokinin (CCK). By us...

  19. Application of PEDOT-CNT Microelectrodes for Neurotransmitter Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Samba, Ramona; Fuchsberber, Kai; Matiychyn, Ilona; Epple, Sebastian; Kiesel, Lydia; Stett, Alfred; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Stelzle, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, composite microelectrodes from poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and carbon nanotubes (CNT) are characterized as electrochemical sensing material for neurotransmitters. Dopamine can be detected using square wave voltammetry at these microelectrodes. The CNTs improve the sensitivity by a factor of two. In addition, the selectivity towards dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid and uric acid was examined. While both electrodes, PEDOT and PEDOT-CNT are able to detect all ...

  20. Terahertz identification and quantification of neurotransmitter and neurotrophy mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Yan; Yuan, Xiaorong; Zou, Xiang; Chen, Wanqing; Huang, Hui; Zhao, Hongwei; Song, Bo; Chen, Liang; Zhu, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz spectroscopy has been widely used for investigating the fingerprint spectrum of different substances. For cancerous tissues, the greatest difficulty is the absorption peaks of various substances contained in tissues overlap with each other, which are hard to identify and quantitative analyze. As a result, it is very hard to measure the presence of cancer cell and then to diagnose accurately. In this paper, we select three typical neurotransmitters (γ-aminobutyric acid, L-glutamic ac...

  1. Fetal growth-retardation and brain-sparing by malnutrition are associated to changes in neurotransmitters profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Contreras, C; Valent, D; Vázquez-Gómez, M; Arroyo, L; Isabel, B; Astiz, S; Bassols, A; Gonzalez-Bulnes, A

    2017-04-01

    The present study assesses possible changes in the levels of different neurotransmitters (catecholamines and indoleamines) in fetuses affected by nutrient shortage. Hence, we determined the concentration of catecholamines and indoleamines at the hypothalamus of 56 swine fetuses obtained at both 70 and 90days of pregnancy (n=33 and 23 fetuses, respectively). The degree of fetal development and the fetal sex affected the neurotransmitters profile at both stages. At Day 70, there were found higher mean concentrations of l-DOPA in both female and male fetuses with severe IUGR; male fetuses with severe IUGR also showed higher concentrations of TRP than normal male littermates. At Day 90 of pregnancy, the differences between sexes were more evident. There were no significant effects from either severe IUGR on the neurotransmitter profile in male fetuses. However, in the females, a lower body-weight was related to lower concentrations of l-DOPA and TRP and those female fetuses affected by severe IUGR evidenced lower HVA concentration. In conclusion, the fetal synthesis and use of neurotransmitters increase with time of pregnancy but, in case of IUGR, both catecholamines and indoleamines pathways are affected by sex-related effects. Copyright © 2017 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Doublet discharge stimulation increases sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release and improves performance during fatiguing contractions in mouse muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Arthur J; Place, Nicolas; Bruton, Joseph D; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Westerblad, Håkan

    2013-08-01

    Double discharges (doublets) of motor neurones at the onset of contractions increase both force and rate of force development during voluntary submaximal contractions. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of doublet discharges on force and myoplasmic free [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)]i) during repeated fatiguing contractions, using a stimulation protocol mimicking the in vivo activation pattern during running. Individual intact fibres from the flexor digitorum brevis muscle of mice were stimulated at 33°C to undergo 150 constant-frequency (five pulses at 70 Hz) or doublet (an initial, extra pulse at 200 Hz) contractions at 300 ms intervals. In the unfatigued state, doublet stimulation resulted in a transient (∼10 ms) approximate doubling of [Ca(2+)]i, which was accompanied by a greater force-time integral (∼70%) and peak force (∼40%) compared to constant frequency contractions. Moreover, doublets markedly increased force-time integral and peak force during the first 25 contractions of the fatiguing stimulation. In later stages of fatigue, addition of doublets increased force production but the increase in force production corresponded to only a minor portion of the fatigue-induced reduction in force. In conclusion, double discharges at the onset of contractions effectively increase force production, especially in early stages of fatigue. This beneficial effect occurs without additional force loss in later stages of fatigue, indicating that the additional energy cost induced by doublet discharges to skeletal muscle is limited.

  3. Role of antioxidants in the protection of the nitrergic neurotransmitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpaert, Erwin E; Lefebvre, Romain A

    2002-06-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the L-arginine/nitric oxide (NO) pathway generates the non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) neurotransmitter which mediates smooth muscle relaxation in a variety of nitrergically-innervated tissues. However, one strange aspect of this nitrergic neurotransmission process is that certain drugs (i.e. superoxide generators and NO-scavengers) powerfully inhibit relaxations to exogenous NO, but have little or no effect on relaxations to electrical field stimulation. This thesis examined the possibility that in the nitrergically-innervated gastric fundus of the pig tissue antioxidants present in the neuroeffector junction might protect the endogenous nitrergic neurotransmitter (free radical NO) from attack by superoxide anions and scavenging activity, while exogenous NO would still be vulnerable before it reaches the nitrergic synapses within the tissue. We found that several antioxidants (in casu Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, bilirubin) exerted a partial or complete protection of the relaxation induced by exogenous NO against the differentiating drugs under investigation. A close interrelationship between the endogenous nitrergic neurotransmitter and the antioxidants Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and bilirubin (produced by the heme oxygenase/biliverdin reductase system) was corroborated by immunohistochemical data showing the presence of these latter defense systems in all nitrergic neurons. Pharmacological depletion further established a role for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase in peripheral nitrergic neurotransmission. For glutathione, only a partial depletion could be obtained and this did not influence nitrergic neurotransmission.

  4. Profiling neurotransmitter receptor expression in the Ambystoma mexicanum brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Limon, Agenor; Korn, Matthew J; Nakamura, Paul A; Shirkey, Nicole J; Wong, Jamie K; Miledi, Ricardo

    2013-03-22

    Ability to regenerate limbs and central nervous system (CNS) is unique to few vertebrates, most notably the axolotl (Ambystoma sp.). However, despite the fact the neurotransmitter receptors are involved in axonal regeneration, little is known regarding its expression profile. In this project, RT-PCR and qPCR were performed to gain insight into the neurotransmitter receptors present in Ambystoma. Its functional ability was studied by expressing axolotl receptors in Xenopus laevis oocytes by either injection of mRNA or by direct microtransplantation of brain membranes. Oocytes injected with axolotl mRNA expressed ionotropic receptors activated by GABA, aspartate+glycine and kainate, as well as metabotropic receptors activated by acetylcholine and glutamate. Interestingly, we did not see responses following the application of serotonin. Membranes from the axolotl brain were efficiently microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes and two types of native GABA receptors that differed in the temporal course of their responses and affinities to GABA were observed. Results of this study are necessary for further characterization of axolotl neurotransmitter receptors and may be useful for guiding experiments aimed at understanding activity-dependant limb and CNS regeneration.

  5. Electrochemical techniques for subsecond neurotransmitter detection in live rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hascup, Kevin N; Hascup, Erin R

    2014-08-01

    Alterations in neurotransmission have been implicated in numerous neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. Unfortunately, few techniques support the measurement of real-time changes in neurotransmitter levels over multiple days, as is essential for ethologic and pharmacodynamic testing. Microdialysis is commonly used for these research paradigms, but its poor temporal and spatial resolution make this technique inadequate for measuring the rapid dynamics (milliseconds to seconds) of fast signaling neurotransmitters, such as glutamate and acetylcholine. Enzymatic microelectrode arrays (biosensors) coupled with electrochemical recording techniques have demonstrated fast temporal resolution (less than 1 s), excellent spatial resolution (micron-scale), low detection limits (≤200 nM), and minimal damage (50 to 100 μm) to surrounding brain tissue. Here we discuss the benefits, methods, and animal welfare considerations of using platinum microelectrodes on a ceramic substrate for enzyme-based electrochemical recording techniques for real-time in vivo neurotransmitter recordings in both anesthetized and awake, freely moving rodents.

  6. Neurotransmitter receptor-mediated signaling pathways as modulators of carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Hildegard M

    2007-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system with its two antagonistic branches, the sympathicus and the parasympathicus, regulates the activities of all body functions that are not under voluntary control. While the autonomic regulation of organ functions has been extensively studied, little attention has been given to the potential role of neurohumoral transmission at the cellular level in the development of cancer. Studies conducted by our laboratory first showed that binding of the parasympathetic neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, as well as nicotine or its nitrosated cancer-causing derivative, NNK, to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors comprised of alpha7 subunits activated a mitogenic signal transduction pathway in normal and neoplastic pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. On the other hand, beta-adrenergic receptors (Beta-ARs), which transmit signals initiated by binding of the catecholamine neurotransmitters of the sympathicus, were identified by our laboratory as important regulators of cell proliferation in cell lines derived from human adenocarcinomas of the lungs, pancreas, and breast. The tobacco-specific carcinogen NNK bound with high affinity to Beta1- and Beta2-ARs, thus activating cAMP, protein kinase A, and the transcription factor CREB. Collectively, neurotransmitter receptors of the nicotinic and Beta-adrenergic families appear to regulate cellular functions essential for the development and survival of the most common human cancers.

  7. Physiological and chemical analysis of neurotransmitter candidates at a fast excitatory synapse in the jellyfish Cyanea capillata (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peter A V; Trapido-Rosenthal, H G

    2009-12-01

    Motor nerve net (MNN) neurons in the jellyfish Cyanea capillata communicate with one another by way of fast, bidirectional excitatory chemical synapses. As is the case with almost all identified chemical synapses in cnidarians, the identity of the neurotransmitter at these synapses is unclear. MNN neurons are large enough for stable intracellular recordings. This, together with the fact that they can be exposed, providing unlimited access to them and to their synapses, prompted a study of the action of a variety of neurotransmitter candidates, including those typically associated with fast synapses in higher animals. Only the amino acids taurine and beta-alanine produced physiological responses consistent with those of the normal EPSP in these cells. Moreover, chemical analysis revealed that both taurine and beta-alanine are present in the neurons and released by depolarization. These various findings strongly suggest that either or both of these amino acids, or a closely related compound is the neurotransmitter at the fast chemical synapses between MNN neurons.

  8. Modulation of electrogenic transport processes in the porcine proximal colon by enteric neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfannkuche, H; Mauksch, A; Gäbel, G

    2012-06-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the involvement of essential pro- and antisecretory neurotransmitters in regulation of secretion in porcine proximal colon. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), substance P (SP), somatostatin (SOM) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) were located immunohistochemically in the epithelium and subepithelial layer. Modulation of epithelial secretion was studied in Ussing chambers. Application of carbachol (CA), sodium nitroprussid (SNP), VIP and SP but not of NPY or SOM resulted in a chloride dependent increase in short circuit current (I(sc) ). I(sc) increase induced by CA, VIP or SNP was not altered by preincubation with tetrodotoxin or indomethacin. In contrast, SP-induced I(sc) increase was diminished by preincubation with tetrodotoxin, indomethacin, L-nitro-arginin-methyl-ester, and atropine but not hexamethonium. Simultaneous application of CA and VIP, or CA and SNP increased the I(sc) stronger as expected. Applying SP/CA led to a smaller increase in I(sc) as calculated. It is concluded that mainly prosecretory neurotransmitters are involved in regulation of colonic secretion. Cross-potentiations of acetylcholine and nitric oxide and acetylcholine and VIP suggest activation of different intracellular cascades. Similar intracellular pathways may be stimulated by acetylcholine and SP, thus preventing an additive effect of the transmitters.

  9. MDMA increases glutamate release and reduces parvalbumin-positive GABAergic cells in the dorsal hippocampus of the rat: role of cyclooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anneken, John H; Cunningham, Jacobi I; Collins, Stuart A; Yamamoto, Bryan K; Gudelsky, Gary A

    2013-03-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; Ecstasy) is a popular drug of abuse with well-documented acute effects on serotonergic, dopaminergic, and cholinergic transmitter systems, as well as evidence of long-term disruption of serotoninergic systems in the rat brain. Recently, it was demonstrated that MDMA evokes a delayed and sustained increase in glutamate release in the hippocampus. The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of inflammatory mediators in the MDMA-induced increase in glutamate release, as well as the contribution of inflammatory pathways in the persistent neurochemical toxicity associated with repeated MDMA treatment. Treatment with the non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor ketoprofen and the COX-2 selective inhibitor nimesulide attenuated the increase in extracellular glutamate in the hippocampus evoked by repeated MDMA exposure (10 mg/kg, i.p., every 2 h); no attenuation was observed in rats treated with the COX-1 selective inhibitor piroxicam. Reverse dialysis of a major product of COX activity, prostaglandin E2, also resulted in a significant increase in extracellular glutamate in the hippocampus . Repeated exposure to MDMA diminished the number of parvalbumin-positive GABA interneurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, an effect that was attenuated by ketoprofen treatment. However, COX inhibition with ketoprofen did not prevent the long-term depletion of 5-HT in the hippocampus evoked by MDMA treatment. These data are supportive of the view that cyclooxygenase activity contributes to the mechanism underlying both the increased release of glutamate and decreased number of GABA interneurons in the rat hippocampus produced by repeated MDMA exposure.

  10. Peroxisomal malate dehydrogenase is not essential for photorespiration in Arabidopsis but its absence causes an increase in the stoichiometry of photorespiratory CO2 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Asaph B; Pracharoenwattana, Itsara; Zhou, Wenxu; Smith, Steven M; Badger, Murray R

    2008-10-01

    Peroxisomes are important for recycling carbon and nitrogen that would otherwise be lost during photorespiration. The reduction of hydroxypyruvate to glycerate catalyzed by hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR) in the peroxisomes is thought to be facilitated by the production of NADH by peroxisomal malate dehydrogenase (PMDH). PMDH, which is encoded by two genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), reduces NAD(+) to NADH via the oxidation of malate supplied from the cytoplasm to oxaloacetate. A double mutant lacking the expression of both PMDH genes was viable in air and had rates of photosynthesis only slightly lower than in the wild type. This is in contrast to other photorespiratory mutants, which have severely reduced rates of photosynthesis and require high CO(2) to grow. The pmdh mutant had a higher O(2)-dependent CO(2) compensation point than the wild type, implying that either Rubisco specificity had changed or that the rate of CO(2) released per Rubisco oxygenation was increased in the pmdh plants. Rates of gross O(2) evolution and uptake were similar in the pmdh and wild-type plants, indicating that chloroplast linear electron transport and photorespiratory O(2) uptake were similar between genotypes. The CO(2) postillumination burst and the rate of CO(2) released during photorespiration were both greater in the pmdh mutant compared with the wild type, suggesting that the ratio of photorespiratory CO(2) release to Rubisco oxygenation was altered in the pmdh mutant. Without PMDH in the peroxisome, the CO(2) released per Rubisco oxygenation reaction can be increased by over 50%. In summary, PMDH is essential for maintaining optimal rates of photorespiration in air; however, in its absence, significant rates of photorespiration are still possible, indicating that there are additional mechanisms for supplying reductant to the peroxisomal HPR reaction or that the HPR reaction is altogether circumvented.

  11. Anomalous increase of diffuse CO_{2} emission from Brava (Cape Verde): evidence of volcanic unrest or increase gas release from a stationary magma body?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Merino, Marta; García-Hernández, Rubén; Montrond, Eurico; Dionis, Samara; Fernandes, Paulo; Silva, Sonia V.; Alfama, Vera; Cabral, Jeremías; Pereira, Jose M.; Padrón, Eleazar; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2017-04-01

    Brava (67 km2) is the southwestern most and the smallest inhabited island of the Cape Verde archipelago. It is located 18 km west of Fogo Island and rises 976 m from the sea level. Brava has not any documented historical eruptions, but its Holocene volcanism and relatively high seismic activity clearly indicate that it is an active volcanic island. Since there have been no historic eruptions in Brava, volcanic hazard awareness among the population and the authorities is very low; therefore, its volcano monitoring program is scarce. With the aim of helping to provide a multidisciplinary monitoring program for the volcanic surveillance of the island, diffuse CO2 emission surveys have been carried out since 2010; approximately every 2 years. Soil CO2 efflux measurements are periodically performed at ˜ 275 observation sites all over the island and after taking into consideration their accessibility and the island volcano-structural characteristics. At each sampling site, soil CO2 efflux measurement was performed by means of a portable NDIR sensor according to the accumulation chamber method. To quantify the total diffuse CO2 emission from Brava volcanic system, soil CO2 efflux maps were constructed using sequential Gaussian simulations (sGs). An increase trend of diffuse CO2 emission rate from 42 to 681 t d-1at Brava was observed; just one year prior the 2014-2015 Fogo eruption and almost three years before the anomalous seismic activity recorded on August 2016 with more than 1000 seismic events registered by the INMG on August 1st, 2016 (Bruno Faria, personal communication). Due to this anomalous seismic activity, a diffuse CO2 emission survey at Brava was performed from August 2 to 10, 2016, and the estimated degassing rate yield a value about 72 t d-1; typical background values. An additional survey was carried out from October 22 to November 6, 2016. For this last survey, the estimated diffuse CO2 emission from Brava showed the highest observed value with a

  12. Continuous flow augments reactivity of rabbit carotid artery by reducing bioavailability of NO despite an increase in release of EDHF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lasse Enkebølle; Vanhoutte, Paul M. G.; Jensen, Boye L.

    2006-01-01

    of endothelial small- and intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels by apamin plus 1-[(2-chlorophenyl)diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole (TRAM-34). These experiments demonstrate that continuous flow increases the constriction evoked by alpha(1)-adrenergic activation in the rabbit carotid artery...

  13. 白质内的神经递质信号%Neurotransmitter signaling in white matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐颖馨(编译)

    2014-01-01

    signaling in WM, which largely exclude neuronal cell bodies, indicates it must have physiological functions other than neuron-to-neuron communication. A surprising aspect is the diversity of neurotransmitter signaling in WM, with evidence for glutamatergic, purinergic (ATP and adenosine), GABAergic, glycinergic, adrenergic, cholinergic, dopaminergic and serotonergic signaling, acting via a wide range of ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Both axons and glia are potential sources of neurotransmitters and may express the respective receptors. The physiological functions of neurotransmitter signaling in WM are subject to debate, but glutamate and ATP-mediated signaling have been shown to evoke Ca (2+) signals in glia and modulate axonal conduction. Experimental findings support a model of neurotransmitters being released from axons during action potential propagation acting on glial receptors to regulate the homeostatic functions of astrocytes and myelination by oligodendrocytes. Astrocytes also release neurotransmitters, which act on axonal receptors to strengthen action potential propagation, maintaining signaling along potentially long axon tracts. The co-existence of multiple neurotransmitters in WM tracts suggests they may have diverse functions that are important for information processing. Furthermore, the neurotransmitter signaling phenomena described in WM most likely apply to myelinated axons of the cerebral cortex and GM areas, where they are doubtless important for higher cognitive function.

  14. How LeuT shapes our understanding of the mechanisms of sodium-coupled neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penmatsa, Aravind; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters are ion-coupled symporters that drive the uptake of neurotransmitters from neural synapses. In the past decade, the structure of a bacterial amino acid transporter, leucine transporter (LeuT), has given valuable insights into the understanding of architecture and mechanism of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters. Different conformations of LeuT, including a substrate-free state, inward-open state, and competitive and non-competitive inhibitor-bound states, have revealed a mechanistic framework for the transport and transport inhibition of neurotransmitters. The current review integrates our understanding of the mechanistic and pharmacological properties of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters obtained through structural snapshots of LeuT.

  15. Studies on the Mechanism of Single Basal Application of Controlled-Release Fertilizers for Increasing Yield of Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Shuan-hu; YANG Shao-hai; CHEN Jian-sheng; XU Pei-zhi; ZHANG Fa-bao; AI Shao-ying; HUANG Xu

    2007-01-01

    This paper was to explore the mechanism of single basal application of controlled-release fertilizers for increasing yield of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Pot trials and cylinder trials were carried out from 2002 to 2005 to study the influences of single basal application of 3 controlled-release fertilizers on the changes of soil available N, root development, senescence and lodging resistance at late growth stages. Results showed that at 30 days after fertilization, single basal application of controlled-release fertilizers coated with vegetal-substance (CRF1) and polymer materials (CRF3) increased soil available N to 12.0 and 147.9%, respectively, in comparison to split fertilization of rice-specific fertilizer (RSF1). Treatments of the two CRFs obviously benefited the development of root system, resulting in greater rice root weights with extensive distribution and higher root activity. In addition, the two CRF treatments, in comparison to RSF1, enhanced chlorophyll consents of the flag leaves to 9.5 and 15.5%, and soluble protein up to 89.7 and 108.0% respectively. Application of the two CRFs also made the base of rice stems strong and large, declined the proportion of shoot and root, increased root depth index. Though relatively low K rate, single basal application of the CRF3 coated with NH4MgPO4 could also promote the development of root system, enhance root activity and some physiological functions of flag leaves. Based on these results, it was concluded that major mechanisms for increasing rice yield by single basal application of the CRFs should be attributed to grater soil available N supply, superior development of root systems, better nutrient absorption capacity, slower senescence and enhancement of lodging resistance at late stages.

  16. A Yang-invigorating compound mixture alters neurotransmitters in rat telencephalon after exercise-induced fatigue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongzhen Liu; Li Zeng; Xiliang Kong; Lei Zhu; Benhua Hou

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the changes in monoamine and amino acid neurotransmitters in the telencephalon of rats at four functional states after exhaustive exercise and treatment with a Yang-invigorating compound recipe.The main components of this Chinese traditional medicine preparation included Radix Ginseng,Rhizoma Chuanxiong,Fructus Schisandrae,Cortex Cinnamomi,Cornu Cervi Pantotrichum,Radix Morindae Officinalis,and Gecko.This experiment showed that dopamine (DA),5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA),and γ-aminobutyric acid levels noticeably decreased,while DA/5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) increased.Furthermore,glutamate (Glu) and Glu/γ-aminobutyric acid significantly increased after 1 hour of exercise in rats in the exercise + medication group.The 5-HT and 5-HT/5-HIAA levels noticeably decreased,and DA/5-HT and Glu levels showed a robust and significant increase immediately after exhaustive exercise.The 5-HT,5-HT/5-HIAA levels sharply decreased,while DA/5-HT,Glu and γ-aminobutyric acid levels increased at 12 hours after exhaustion recovery.The results prove that Chinese herbal formula for strengthening Yang can induce changes in neurotransmitters in the telencephalon of rats after exhaustive exercise during the recovery process,and further improve central nervous system function.

  17. Global change induced biomass growth offsets carbon released via increased forest fire and respiration of the central Canadian boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsamo, Alemu; Chen, Jing M.; Colombo, Stephen J.; Ter-Mikaelian, Michael T.; Chen, Jiaxin

    2017-05-01

    Northern boreal forests are sensitive to many effects of global change. This is of particular concern due to the proportionally greater climate change projected for the area in which these forests occur. One of the sensitive areas is the Far North of Ontario (FNO), consisting of one of the world's largest remaining tracts of unmanaged boreal forest, the world's third largest area of wetland, and the most southerly area of tundra. We studied past, present, and potential future carbon (C) balance of FNO forests using the Integrated Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon Model and the Canadian Regional Climate Model with stand-replacing fire disturbance. The forced simulations of past (1901-2004) C balances indicated that vegetation C stock remained stable, while soil C stock gradually declined (-0.07 t C ha-1 yr-1, p forest age class structure resulting in an increase in total FNO ecosystem C stock by mid-21st century. However, the projected simulations also indicated that the relative sizes of forest C stocks will change, with relatively less in the soil and more in vegetation, increasing fuel loads and making the entire ecosystem susceptible to forest fire and insect disturbances.

  18. Increasing the oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble carbamazepine using immediate-release pellets supported on SBA-15 mesoporous silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li G

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Zhouhua Wang,1,2 Bao Chen,1 Guilan Quan,1 Feng Li,1 Qiaoli Wu,1 Linghui Dian,1 Yixuan Dong,1 Ge Li,2 Chuanbin Wu1,21School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Research and Development Center of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground and methods: The aim of this study was to develop an immediate-release pellet formulation with improved drug dissolution and adsorption. Carbamazepine, a poorly water-soluble drug, was adsorbed into mesoporous silica (SBA-15-CBZ via a wetness impregnation method and then processed by extrusion/spheronization into pellets. Physicochemical characterization of the preparation was carried out by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption, small-angle and wide-angle x-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry. Flowability and wettability of the drug-loaded silica powder were evaluated by bulk and tapped density and by the angle of repose and contact angle, respectively. The drug-loaded silica powder was formulated into pellets to improve flowability.Results: With maximum drug loading in SBA-15 matrices determined to be 20% wt, in vitro release studies demonstrated that the carbamazepine dissolution rate was notably improved from both the SBA-15 powder and the corresponding pellets as compared with the bulk drug. Correspondingly, the oral bioavailability of SBA-15-CBZ pellets was increased considerably by 1.57-fold in dogs (P < 0.05 compared with fast-release commercial carbamazepine tablets.Conclusion: Immediate-release carbamazepine pellets prepared from drug-loaded silica provide a feasible approach for development of a rapidly acting oral formulation for this poorly water-soluble drug and with better absorption.Keywords: ordered mesoporous silica, poorly water-soluble drug, carbamazepine, extrusion, spheronization, pellets, bioavailability

  19. Pre-Release Consumption of Methyl Eugenol Increases the Mating Competitiveness of Sterile Males of the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, in Large Field Enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, Todd E.; Edu, James; McInnis, Donald

    2010-01-01

    The sterile insect technique may be implemented to control populations of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae), when environmental concerns preclude widespread use of chemical attractants or toxicants. The goal of the present study was to evaluate whether the mating competitiveness of sterile B. dorsalis males could be increased via pre-release feeding on methyl eugenol. Males of the oriental fruit fly are strongly attracted to this plant-borne compound, which they ingest and use in the synthesis of the sex pheromone. Previous studies conducted in the laboratory and small field-cages have shown that males given methyl eugenol produce a more attractive pheromone for females and have a higher mating success rate than males denied methyl eugenol. Here, levels of egg sterility were compared following the release of wild-like flies and either methyl eugenol-fed (treated) or methyl eugenol-deprived (control) sterile males in large field enclosures at four over flooding ratios ranging from 5:1 to 60:1 (sterile: wild-like males). Treated sterile males were fed methyl eugenol for 1–4 h (depending on the over flooding ratio tested) 3 d prior to release. Eggs were dissected from introduced fruits (apples), incubated in the laboratory, and scored for hatch rate. The effect of methyl eugenol was most pronounced at lower over flooding ratios. At the 5:1 and 10:1 over flooding ratios, the level of egg sterility observed for treated, sterile males was significantly greater than that observed for control, sterile males. In addition, the incidence of egg sterility reported for treated sterile males at these lower over flooding ratios was similar to that noted for treated or control sterile males at the 30:1 or 60:1 over flooding ratios. This latter result, in particular, suggests that pre-release feeding on methyl eugenol allows for a reduction in the number of sterile flies that are produced and released, thus increasing the cost

  20. Deletion of mouse FXR gene disturbs multiple neurotransmitter systems and alters neurobehavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fei; Wang, Tingting; Lan, Yunyi; Yang, Li; Pan, Weihong; Zhu, Yonghui; Lv, Boyang; Wei, Yuting; Shi, Hailian; Wu, Hui; Zhang, Beibei; Wang, Jie; Duan, Xiaofeng; Hu, Zhibi; Wu, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in bile acid synthesis and homeostasis. Dysfunction of FXR is involved in cholestasis and atherosclerosis. FXR is prevalent in liver, gallbladder, and intestine, but it is not yet clear whether it modulates neurobehavior. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that mouse FXR deficiency affects a specific subset of neurotransmitters and results in an unique behavioral phenotype. The FXR knockout mice showed less depressive-like and anxiety-related behavior, but increased motor activity. They had impaired memory and reduced motor coordination. There were changes of glutamatergic, GABAergic, serotoninergic, and norepinephrinergic neurotransmission in either hippocampus or cerebellum. FXR deletion decreased the amount of the GABA synthesis enzyme GAD65 in hippocampus but increased GABA transporter GAT1 in cerebral cortex. FXR deletion increased serum concentrations of many bile acids, including taurodehydrocholic acid, taurocholic acid, deoxycholic acid (DCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), tauro-α-muricholic acid, tauro-ω-muricholic acid, and hyodeoxycholic acid (HDCA). There were also changes in brain concentrations of taurocholic acid, taurodehydrocholic acid, tauro-ω-muricholic acid, tauro-β-muricholic acid, deoxycholic acid, and lithocholic acid (LCA). Taken together, the results from studies with FXR knockout mice suggest that FXR contributes to the homeostasis of multiple neurotransmitter systems in different brain regions and modulates neurobehavior. The effect appears to be at least partially mediated by bile acids that are known to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) inducing potential neurotoxicity.

  1. Local release from affinity-based polymers increases urethral concentration of the stem cell chemokine CCL7 in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Delgado, Edgardo; Sadeghi, Zhina; Wang, Nick X; Kenyon, Jonathan; Satyanarayan, Sapna; Kavran, Michael; Flask, Chris; Hijaz, Adonis Z; von Recum, Horst A

    2016-04-21

    The protein chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 7 (CCL7) is significantly over-expressed in urethral and vaginal tissues immediately following vaginal distention in a rat model of stress urinary incontinence. Further evidence, in this scenario and other clinical scenarios, indicates CCL7 stimulates stem cell homing for regenerative repair. This CCL7 gradient is likely absent or compromised in the natural repair process of women who continue to suffer from SUI into advanced age. We evaluated the feasibility of locally providing this missing CCL7 gradient by means of an affinity-based implantable polymer. To engineer these polymers we screened the affinity of different proteoglycans, to use them as CCL7-binding hosts. We found heparin to be the strongest binding host for CCL7 with a 0.323 nM dissociation constant. Our experimental approach indicates conjugation of heparin to a polymer backbone (using either bovine serum albumin or poly (ethylene glycol) as the base polymer) can be used as a delivery system capable of providing sustained concentrations of CCL7 in a therapeutically useful range up to a month in vitro. With this approach we are able to detect, after polymer implantation, significant increase in CCL7 in the urethral tissue directly surrounding the polymer implants with only trace amounts of human CCL7 present in the blood of the animals. Whole animal serial sectioning shows evidence of retention of locally injected human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) only in animals with sustained CCL7 delivery, 2 weeks after affinity-polymers were implanted.

  2. Effect of nitric oxide donor SNAP on GABA release from rat brain nerve terminals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Tarasenko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work we investigated the effect of nanomolar concentrations of nitric oxide on the release of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA from rat brain nerve terminals using a radioisotope method with [3H]GABA and a spectrofluorimetric method with Ca2+-sensitive probe Fluo-4 AM. It was shown that in the presen­ce of dithiothreitol (DTT, nitric oxide donor SNAP at concentration, in which it produces NO in the nanomolar range, caused Ca2+-independent [3H]GABA release from nerve terminals. The applications of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP and nipecotic acid (NA, as the inducers of GABA release from vesicular and cytoplasmic pools, showed that the maximum of SNAP/+DTT-induced [3H]GABA release was registered at 10th min of incubation and coincided in time with significant increase (almost double in NA-induced [3H]GABA release. At this time point, 4-AP-induced release of [3H]GABA was drastically reduced. At the 15th min of incubation of nerve terminals with SNAP/+DTT, the opposite picture was observed: the decrease in NA- and increase in 4-AP-induced [3H]GABA release. Thus, nitric oxide in the form of S-nitrosothiols at nanomolar concentrations causes Ca2+-independent GABA leakage from synaptic vesicles into cytosol with subsequent release from nerve terminals. The reuptake of the neurotransmitter and its re-accumulation in synaptic vesicles occur later.

  3. Neuronal Depolarization Drives Increased Dopamine Synaptic Vesicle Loading via VGLUT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Jenny I; Dunn, Matthew; Mingote, Susana; Karam, Caline S; Farino, Zachary J; Sonders, Mark S; Choi, Se Joon; Grygoruk, Anna; Zhang, Yuchao; Cela, Carolina; Choi, Ben Jiwon; Flores, Jorge; Freyberg, Robin J; McCabe, Brian D; Mosharov, Eugene V; Krantz, David E; Javitch, Jonathan A; Sulzer, David; Sames, Dalibor; Rayport, Stephen; Freyberg, Zachary

    2017-08-30

    The ability of presynaptic dopamine terminals to tune neurotransmitter release to meet the demands of neuronal activity is critical to neurotransmission. Although vesicle content has been assumed to be static, in vitro data increasingly suggest that cell activity modulates vesicle content. Here, we use a coordinated genetic, pharmacological, and imaging approach in Drosophila to study the presynaptic machinery responsible for these vesicular processes in vivo. We show that cell depolarization increases synaptic vesicle dopamine content prior to release via vesicular hyperacidification. This depolarization-induced hyperacidification is mediated by the vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT). Remarkably, both depolarization-induced dopamine vesicle hyperacidification and its dependence on VGLUT2 are seen in ventral midbrain dopamine neurons in the mouse. Together, these data suggest that in response to depolarization, dopamine vesicles utilize a cascade of vesicular transporters to dynamically increase the vesicular pH gradient, thereby increasing dopamine vesicle content. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Detoxification of ammonia in mouse cortical GABAergic cell cultures increases neuronal oxidative metabolism and reveals an emerging role for release of glucose-derived alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leke, Renata; Bak, Lasse K; Anker, Malene; Melø, Torun M; Sørensen, Michael; Keiding, Susanne; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Ott, Peter; Portela, Luis V; Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2011-04-01

    Cerebral hyperammonemia is believed to play a pivotal role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a debilitating condition arising due to acute or chronic liver disease. In the brain, ammonia is thought to be detoxified via the activity of glutamine synthetase, an astrocytic enzyme. Moreover, it has been suggested that cerebral tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolism is inhibited and glycolysis enhanced during hyperammonemia. The aim of this study was to characterize the ammonia-detoxifying mechanisms as well as the effects of ammonia on energy-generating metabolic pathways in a mouse neuronal-astrocytic co-culture model of the GABAergic system. We found that 5 mM ammonium chloride affected energy metabolism by increasing the neuronal TCA cycle activity and switching the astrocytic TCA cycle toward synthesis of substrate for glutamine synthesis. Furthermore, ammonia exposure enhanced the synthesis and release of alanine. Collectively, our results demonstrate that (1) formation of glutamine is seminal for detoxification of ammonia; (2) neuronal oxidative metabolism is increased in the presence of ammonia; and (3) synthesis and release of alanine is likely to be important for ammonia detoxification as a supplement to formation of glutamine.

  5. Neurotransmitters in the Gas Phase: La-Mb Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas, C.; Mata, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    LA-MB-FTMW spectroscopy combines laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets overcoming the problems of thermal decomposition associated with conventional heating methods. We present here the results on LA-MB-FTMW studies of some neurotransmitters. Six conformers of dopamine, four of adrenaline, five of noradrenaline and three conformers of serotonin have been characterized in the gas phase. The rotational and nuclear quadrupole coupling constants extracted from the analysis of the rotational spectrum are directly compared with those predicted by ab initio methods to achieve the conclusive identification of different conformers and the experimental characterization of the intramolecular forces at play which control conformational preferences.

  6. Glucagon-related peptide 1 (GLP-1): hormone and neurotransmitter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Philip J; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    The interest in glucagon-like petide-1 (GLP-1) and other pre-proglucagon derived peptides has risen almost exponentially since seminal papers in the early 1990s proposed to use GLP-1 agonists as therapeutic agents for treatment of type 2 diabetes. A wealth of interesting studies covering both...... normal and pathophysiological role of GLP-1 have been published over the last two decades and our understanding of GLP-1 action has widened considerably. In the present review, we have tried to cover our current understanding of GLP-1 actions both as a peripheral hormone and as a central neurotransmitter...

  7. Name that neurotransmitter: using music to teach psychopharmacology concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanns, Melinda; Lilly, Mary LuAnne; Wilson, Kathy; Russell, Nathan Andrew

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the use of music (i.e., two original songs, "Neurotransmitter Twitter" and "Parkinson's Shuffle") to teach aspects of psychopharmacology to students in the course Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing. Songs were incorporated in both the clinical and classroom settings. This innovative teaching method allowed students the opportunity to revisit the information through multiple exposures of the content for reinforcement and enhancement of student learning in a fun, creative approach. Brain-based research will be discussed, along with the process of development.

  8. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide is a sympathoadrenal neurotransmitter involved in catecholamine regulation and glucohomeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelink, Carol; Tjurmina, Olga; Damadzic, Ruslan; Young, W Scott; Weihe, Eberhard; Lee, Hyeon-Woo; Eiden, Lee E

    2002-01-08

    The adrenal gland is important for homeostatic responses to metabolic stress: hypoglycemia stimulates the splanchnic nerve, epinephrine is released from adrenomedullary chromaffin cells, and compensatory glucogenesis ensues. Acetylcholine is the primary neurotransmitter mediating catecholamine secretion from the adrenal medulla. Accumulating evidence suggests that a secretin-related neuropeptide also may function as a transmitter at the adrenomedullary synapse. Costaining with highly specific antibodies against the secretin-related neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) revealed that PACAP is found in nerve terminals at all mouse adrenomedullary cholinergic synapses. Mice with a targeted deletion of the PACAP gene had otherwise normal cholinergic innervation and morphology of the adrenal medulla, normal adrenal catecholamine and blood glucose levels, and an intact initial catecholamine secretory response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. However, insulin-induced hypoglycemia was more profound and longer-lasting in PACAP knock-outs, and was associated with a dose-related lethality absent in wild-type mice. Failure of PACAP-deficient mice to adequately counterregulate plasma glucose levels could be accounted for by impaired long-term secretion of epinephrine, secondary to a lack of induction of tyrosine hydroxylase, normally occurring after insulin hypoglycemia in wild-type mice, and a consequent depletion of adrenomedullary epinephrine stores. Thus, PACAP is needed to couple epinephrine biosynthesis to secretion during metabolic stress. PACAP appears to function as an "emergency response" cotransmitter in the sympathoadrenal axis, where the primary secretory response is controlled by a classical neurotransmitter but sustained under paraphysiological conditions by a neuropeptide.

  9. The influence of nicotine on granulocytic differentiation – Inhibition of the oxidative burst and bacterial killing and increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renaud Diane E

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophils leave the bone marrow as terminally differentiated cells, yet little is known of the influence of nicotine or other tobacco smoke components on neutrophil differentiation. Therefore, promyelocytic HL-60 cells were differentiated into neutrophils using dimethylsulfoxide in the presence and absence of nicotine (3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl pyridine. Differentiation was evaluated over 5 days by monitoring terminal differentiation markers (CD11b expression and formazan deposition; cell viability, growth phase, kinetics, and apoptosis; assessing cellular morphology and ultrastructure; and conformational changes to major cellular components. Key neutrophil effector functions (oxidative burst, bacterial killing, matrix metalloproteinase release were also examined. Results Nicotine increased the percentage of cells in late differentiation phases (metamyelocytes, banded neutrophils and segmented neutrophils compared to DMSO alone (p p p p in vivo (p Conclusion These findings may partially explain the known increase in susceptibility to bacterial infection and neutrophil-associated destructive inflammatory diseases in individuals chronically exposed to nicotine.

  10. Reduced radioiodine uptake at increased iodine intake and {sup 131}I-induced release of ''cold'' iodine stored in the thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meller, B.; Haase, A.; Richter, E.; Baehre, M. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Seyfarth, M. [Inst. of Clinical Chemistry, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Wenzel, B.E. [Clinic of Internal Medicine I, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Aim: the extent of urinary iodine excretion (UIE) provides information about iodine supply and release. In the present study we investigated correlations between UIE and radioiodine uptake (RIU) as well as effects of radioiodine therapy on UIE in patients with autonomous goitre. Patients, methods: In 197 consecutive patients with thyroid autonomy, UIE was measured twice during radioiodine test (RITe) and correlated with RIU. In 98 of these patients, thyroglobulin and thyroid volume (V) were determined prior to therapy. Individual changes in urinary iodine excretion ({delta}UIE) and TG ({delta}TG) could be investigated four weeks (4W) and six months (6M) after radioiodine therapy. Additionally, {delta}V was determined 6M after therapy. {delta}UIE, {delta}TG and {delta}V were correlated with target dose and target volume. Results: patients with higher iodine excretion exhibited significantly lower thyroidal radioiodine uptake values. Twofold increased UIE prior to therapy decreased radioiodine uptake by 25%. Compared with pretherapeutic values, UIE and TG were significantly increased four weeks after radioiodine therapy (p < 0.001). Median values of both parameters were found to be doubled. The product of target dose and target volume was not only correlated with a decrease of thyroid volume 6M after therapy, but also with an increase of UIE and TG in the early phase after therapy. Conclusions: it was confirmed that UIE during RITe is a measure for iodine intake and can be used to investigate the competition between stable iodine and radioiodine. The increase of UIE and TG four weeks after therapeutic administration of radioiodine can be explained by disintegrated thyroid follicles. The therapy-induced iodine release may be one important cause for the development of hyperthyroidism in some patients during the first weeks after radioiodine therapy. It may contribute to the known decrease of radioiodine uptake after preapplications of {sup 131}I in various thyroid

  11. Ingestion of coffee polyphenols increases postprandial release of the active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1(7-36)) amide in C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yoshie; Osaki, Noriko; Hase, Tadashi; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The widespread prevalence of diabetes, caused by impaired insulin secretion and insulin resistance, is now a worldwide health problem. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a major intestinal hormone that stimulates glucose-induced insulin secretion from β cells. Prolonged activation of the GLP-1 signal has been shown to attenuate diabetes in animals and human subjects. Therefore, GLP-1 secretagogues are attractive targets for the treatment of diabetes. Recent epidemiological studies have reported that an increase in daily coffee consumption lowers diabetes risk. The present study examined the hypothesis that the reduction in diabetes risk associated with coffee consumption may be mediated by the stimulation of GLP-1 release by coffee polyphenol extract (CPE). GLP-1 secretion by human enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells was augmented in a dose-dependent manner by the addition of CPE, and was compatible with the increase in observed active GLP-1(7-36) amide levels in the portal blood after administration with CPE alone in mice. CPE increased intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in a dose-dependent manner, but this was not mediated by G protein-coupled receptor 119 (GPR119). The oral administration of CPE increased diet (starch and glyceryl trioleate)-induced active GLP-1 secretion and decreased glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide release. Although CPE administration did not affect diet-induced insulin secretion, it decreased postprandial hyperglycaemia, which indicates that higher GLP-1 levels after the ingestion of CPE may improve insulin sensitivity. We conclude that dietary coffee polyphenols augment gut-derived active GLP-1 secretion via the cAMP-dependent pathway, which may contribute to the reduced risk of type 2 diabetes associated with daily coffee consumption.

  12. Effect of Puumala hantavirus infection on Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell hemostatic function: platelet interactions, increased tissue factor expression and fibrinolysis regulator release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eGoeijenbier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Puumala virus (PUUV infection causes over 5000 cases of hemorrhagic fever in Europe annually and can influence the hemostatic balance extensively. Infection might lead to hemorrhage, while a recent study showed an increased risk of myocardial infarction during or shortly after PUUV infection. The mechanism by which this hantavirus influences the coagulation system remains unknown. Therefore we aimed to elucidate mechanisms explaining alterations seen in primary and secondary hemostasis during PUUV infection. By using low passage PUUV isolates to infect primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs we were able to show alterations in the regulation of primary- and secondary hemostasis and in the release of fibrinolysis regulators. Our main finding was an activation of secondary hemostasis due to increased tissue factor expression leading to increased thrombin generation in a functional assay. Furthermore, we showed that during infection platelets adhered to HUVECs and subsequently specifically to PUUV virus particles. Infection of HUVECs with PUUV did not result in increased von Willebrand factor while they produced more plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1 compared to controls. The PAI-1 produced in this model formed complexes with vitronectin. This is the first report that reveals a potential mechanism behind the pro-coagulant changes in PUUV patients, which could be the result of increased thrombin generation due to an increased tissue factor expression on endothelial cells during infection. Furthermore, we provide insight into the contribution of endothelial cell responses regarding hemostasis in PUUV pathogenesis.

  13. O-2050 facilitates noradrenaline release and increases the CB1 receptor inverse agonistic effect of rimonabant in the guinea pig hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jergas, Bernd; Schulte, Kirsten; Bindila, Laura; Lutz, Beat; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2014-07-01

    The cannabinoid CB1 receptors on the noradrenergic neurons in guinea pig hippocampal slices show an endogenous endocannabinoid tone. This conclusion is based on rimonabant, the facilitatory effect of which on noradrenaline release might be due to its inverse CB1 receptor agonism and/or the interruption of a tonic inhibition elicited by endocannabinoids. To examine the latter mechanism, a neutral antagonist would be suitable. Therefore, we studied whether O-2050 is a neutral CB1 receptor antagonist in the guinea pig hippocampus and whether it mimics the facilitatory effect of rimonabant. CB1 receptor affinity of O-2050 was quantified in cerebrocortical membranes, using (3)H-rimonabant binding. Its CB1 receptor potency and effect on (3)H-noradrenaline release were determined in superfused hippocampal slices. Its intrinsic activity at CB1 receptors was studied in hippocampal membranes, using (35)S-GTPγS binding. Endocannabinoid levels in hippocampus were determined by liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring. O-2050 was about ten times less potent than rimonabant in its CB1 receptor affinity, potency and facilitatory effect on noradrenaline release. Although not affecting (35)S-GTPγS binding by itself, O-2050 shifted the concentration-response curve of a CB1 receptor agonist to the right but that of rimonabant to the left. Levels of anandamide and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol in guinea pig hippocampus closely resembled those in mouse hippocampus. In conclusion, our results with O-2050 confirm that the CB1 receptors on noradrenergic neurons of the guinea pig hippocampus show an endogenous tone. To differentiate between the two mechanisms leading to an endogenous tone, O-2050 is not superior to rimonabant since O-2050 may increase the inverse agonistic effect of endocannabinoids.

  14. Changes in gonadotropin-releasing hormone and gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene expression after an increase in carbon monoxide concentration in the cavernous sinus of male wild boar and pig crossbread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romerowicz-Misielak, M; Tabecka-Lonczynska, A; Koziol, K; Gilun, P; Stefanczyk-Krzymowska, S; Och, W; Koziorowski, M

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies indicate that there are at least a few regulatory systems involved in photoperiodic synchronisation of reproductive activity, which starts with the retina and ends at the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse generator. Recently we have shown indicated that the amount of carbon monoxide (CO) released from the eye into the ophthalmic venous blood depends on the intensity of sunlight. The aim of this study was to test whether changes in the concentration of carbon monoxide in the ophthalmic venous blood may modulate reproductive activity, as measured by changes in GnRH and GnRH receptor gene expression. The animal model used was mature male swine crossbred from wild boars and domestic sows (n = 48). We conducted in vivo experiments to determine the effect of increased CO concentrations in the cavernous sinus of the mammalian perihypophyseal vascular complex on gene expression of GnRH and GnRH receptors as well as serum luteinizing hormone (LH) levels. The experiments were performed during long photoperiod days near the summer solstice (second half of June) and short photoperiod days near the winter solstice (second half of December). These crossbred swine demonstrated a seasonally-dependent marked variation in GnRH and GnRH receptor gene expression and systemic LH levels in response to changes in CO concentration in ophthalmic venous blood. These results seem to confirm the hypothesis of humoral phototransduction as a mechanism for some of bright light's effects in animal chronobiology and the effect of CO on GnRH and GnRH receptor gene expression.

  15. Enhanced quantal release of excitatory transmitter in anterior cingulate cortex of adult mice with chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Ming-Gao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC is a forebrain structure that plays important roles in emotion, learning, memory and persistent pain. Our previous studies have demonstrated that the enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission was induced by peripheral inflammation and nerve injury in ACC synapses. However, little information is available on their presynaptic mechanisms, since the source of the enhanced synaptic transmission could include the enhanced probability of neurotransmitter release at existing release sites and/or increases in the number of available vesicles. The present study aims to perform quantal analysis of excitatory synapses in the ACC with chronic pain to examine the source of these increases. The quantal analysis revealed that both probability of transmitter release and number of available vesicles were increased in a mouse model of peripheral inflammation, whereas only probability of transmitter release but not number of available vesicles was enhanced in a mouse model of neuropathic pain. In addition, we compared the miniature excitatory postsynaptic potentials (mEPSCs in ACC synapses with those in other pain-related brain areas such as the amygdala and spinal cord. Interestingly, the rate and amplitude of mEPSCs in ACC synapses were significantly lower than those in the amygdala and spinal cord. Our studies provide strong evidences that chronic inflammatory pain increases both probability of transmitter release and number of available vesicles, whereas neuropathic pain increases only probability of transmitter release in the ACC synapses.

  16. Endophilin mutations block clathrin-mediated endocytosis but not neurotransmitter release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verstreken, Patrik; Kjaerulff, Ole; Lloyd, Thomas E

    2002-01-01

    We have identified mutations in Drosophila endophilin to study its function in vivo. Endophilin is required presynaptically at the neuromuscular junction, and absence of Endophilin dramatically impairs endocytosis in vivo. Mutant larvae that lack Endophilin fail to take up FM1-43 dye in synaptic ...

  17. "Stiff neonate" with mitochondrial DNA depletion and secondary neurotransmitter defects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Margaret M

    2011-12-01

    Mitochondrial disorders comprise a heterogenous group. A neonate who presented with episodes of severe truncal hypertonia and apnea progressed to a hypokinetic rigid syndrome characterized by hypokinesia, tremulousness, profound head lag, absent suck and gag reflexes, brisk deep tendon reflexes, ankle and jaw clonus, and evidence of autonomic dysfunction. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid neurotransmitters from age 7 weeks demonstrated low levels of amine metabolites (homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid), tetrahydrobiopterin, and pyridoxal phosphate. Mitochondrial DNA quantitative studies on muscle homogenate demonstrated a mitochondrial DNA depletion disorder. Respiratory chain enzymology demonstrated decreased complex IV activity. Screening for mitochondrial DNA rearrangement disorders and sequencing relevant mitochondrial genes produced negative results. No clinical or biochemical response to treatment with pyridoxal phosphate, tetrahydrobiopterin, or l-dopa occurred. The clinical course was progressive, and the patient died at age 19 months. Mitochondrial disorders causing secondary neurotransmitter diseases are usually severe, but are rarely reported. This diagnosis should be considered in neonates or infants who present with hypertonia, hypokinesia rigidity, and progressive neurodegeneration.

  18. Identification of catecholamine neurotransmitters using fluorescence sensor array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghasemi, Forough [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11155-9516 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hormozi-Nezhad, M. Reza, E-mail: hormozi@sharif.edu [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11155-9516 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahmoudi, Morteza, E-mail: mahmoudi@stanford.edu [Department of Nanotechnology and Nanotechnology Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 13169-43551 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305-5101 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    A nano-based sensor array has been developed for identification and discrimination of catecholamine neurotransmitters based on optical properties of their oxidation products under alkaline conditions. To produce distinct fluorescence response patterns for individual catecholamine, quenching of thioglycolic acid functionalized cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots, by oxidation products, were employed along with the variation of fluorescence spectra of oxidation products. The spectral changes were analyzed with hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) to identify catecholamine patterns. The proposed sensor could efficiently discriminate the individual catecholamine (i.e., dopamine, norepinephrine, and L-DOPA) and their mixtures in the concentration range of 0.25–30 μmol L{sup −1}. Finally, we found that the sensor had capability to identify the various catecholamines in urine sample. - Highlights: • We have proposed a fluorescence sensor array to detect catecholamine neurotransmitters. • Visual differentiation of catecholamines is provided by fluorescence array fingerprints. • Discrimination of catecholamines from each other, and from their mixture is obtained on a PCA plot. • Proposed sensor array can be used for detection of catecholamines in urine samples.

  19. Near-future carbon dioxide levels alter fish behaviour by interfering with neurotransmitter function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Göran E.; Dixson, Danielle L.; Domenici, Paolo; McCormick, Mark I.; Sørensen, Christina; Watson, Sue-Ann; Munday, Philip L.

    2012-03-01

    Predicted future CO2 levels have been found to alter sensory responses and behaviour of marine fishes. Changes include increased boldness and activity, loss of behavioural lateralization, altered auditory preferences and impaired olfactory function. Impaired olfactory function makes larval fish attracted to odours they normally avoid, including ones from predators and unfavourable habitats. These behavioural alterations have significant effects on mortality that may have far-reaching implications for population replenishment, community structure and ecosystem function. However, the underlying mechanism linking high CO2 to these diverse responses has been unknown. Here we show that abnormal olfactory preferences and loss of behavioural lateralization exhibited by two species of larval coral reef fish exposed to high CO2 can be rapidly and effectively reversed by treatment with an antagonist of the GABA-A receptor. GABA-A is a major neurotransmitter receptor in the vertebrate brain. Thus, our results indicate that high CO2 interferes with neurotransmitter function, a hitherto unrecognized threat to marine populations and ecosystems. Given the ubiquity and conserved function of GABA-A receptors, we predict that rising CO2 levels could cause sensory and behavioural impairment in a wide range of marine species, especially those that tightly control their acid-base balance through regulatory changes in HCO3- and Cl- levels.

  20. Transition metal ion FRET uncovers K+ regulation of a neurotransmitter/sodium symporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billesbølle, Christian B.; Mortensen, Jonas S.; Sohail, Azmat; Schmidt, Solveig G.; Shi, Lei; Sitte, Harald H.; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J.

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs) are responsible for Na+-dependent reuptake of neurotransmitters and represent key targets for antidepressants and psychostimulants. LeuT, a prokaryotic NSS protein, constitutes a primary structural model for these transporters. Here we show that K+ inhibits Na+-dependent binding of substrate to LeuT, promotes an outward-closed/inward-facing conformation of the transporter and increases uptake. To assess K+-induced conformational dynamics we measured fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescein site-specifically attached to inserted cysteines and Ni2+ bound to engineered di-histidine motifs (transition metal ion FRET). The measurements supported K+-induced closure of the transporter to the outside, which was counteracted by Na+ and substrate. Promoting an outward-open conformation of LeuT by mutation abolished the K+-effect. The K+-effect depended on an intact Na1 site and mutating the Na2 site potentiated K+ binding by facilitating transition to the inward-facing state. The data reveal an unrecognized ability of K+ to regulate the LeuT transport cycle. PMID:27678200

  1. Transition metal ion FRET uncovers K(+) regulation of a neurotransmitter/sodium symporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billesbølle, Christian B; Mortensen, Jonas S; Sohail, Azmat; Schmidt, Solveig G; Shi, Lei; Sitte, Harald H; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J

    2016-09-28

    Neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs) are responsible for Na(+)-dependent reuptake of neurotransmitters and represent key targets for antidepressants and psychostimulants. LeuT, a prokaryotic NSS protein, constitutes a primary structural model for these transporters. Here we show that K(+) inhibits Na(+)-dependent binding of substrate to LeuT, promotes an outward-closed/inward-facing conformation of the transporter and increases uptake. To assess K(+)-induced conformational dynamics we measured fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescein site-specifically attached to inserted cysteines and Ni(2+) bound to engineered di-histidine motifs (transition metal ion FRET). The measurements supported K(+)-induced closure of the transporter to the outside, which was counteracted by Na(+) and substrate. Promoting an outward-open conformation of LeuT by mutation abolished the K(+)-effect. The K(+)-effect depended on an intact Na1 site and mutating the Na2 site potentiated K(+) binding by facilitating transition to the inward-facing state. The data reveal an unrecognized ability of K(+) to regulate the LeuT transport cycle.

  2. Increased belowground C release during initial plant development of Populus deltoides x nigra grown under light and C reserve limited conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Mirjam S.; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Abiven, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    Plants might be a key factor for the long-term stabilisation of carbon (C) in the soil, e.g. through enhanced physical protection of root-derived C against microbial decomposition in soil aggregates. On the other hand C released by the plants into the soil might promote the decomposition of native soil organic matter (SOM) through the stimulation of microbial activity. We measured the C budget of developing plant-soil systems (Populus deltoides x nigra, Cambisol soil) in the laboratory under controlled environmental conditions. In order to distinguish plant-derived from native C in the SOM and the soil CO2 efflux, we labelled the poplar shoots continuously with 13C-CO2 from first emergence of leaves (sprouting from stem cuttings). Throughout the experiment the CO2 fluxes (photosynthetic assimilation, dark respiratory loss, soil CO2 efflux) were measured frequently (every 30 min) and the 13C was traced in the soil CO2 efflux (1-2 times a week). After 10 weeks the plant-soil systems were destructively harvested and the distribution of the 13C distribution was analysed. The plants developed slowly (compared to previous experiments), most likely due to limitation in C reserves (long term cutting storage) and C supply (low light intensities). The amount of 13C recovered in the roots, microbial biomass and soil CO2 efflux was directly correlated with the leaf area of the different plant individuals. After 3-4 weeks of plant development we observed a high peak in the total soil CO2 efflux. During this time the relative belowground C release was increased massively over the basal rate of 17 % of net C assimilated, whereby the variability between the plant individuals was large. The smallest plants, i.e. the plants that were most resource limited, obtained the highest belowground C release accounting at the peak time for up to 57 % of net assimilated C. We hypothesize that the plants released specific compounds, which either directly (enzymatically) or indirectly (priming

  3. Peroxisomal hydroxypyruvate reductase is not essential for photorespiration in Arabidopsis but its absence causes an increase in the stoichiometry of photorespiratory CO2 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Asaph B; Walker, Berkley J; Pracharoenwattana, Itsara; Smith, Steven M; Badger, Murray R

    2011-09-01

    Recycling of carbon by the photorespiratory pathway involves enzymatic steps in the chloroplast, mitochondria, and peroxisomes. Most of these reactions are essential for plants growing under ambient CO(2) concentrations. However, some disruptions of photorespiratory metabolism cause subtle phenotypes in plants grown in air. For example, Arabidopsis thaliana lacking both of the peroxisomal malate dehydrogenase genes (pmdh1pmdh2) or hydroxypyruvate reductase (hpr1) are viable in air and have rates of photosynthesis only slightly lower than wild-type plants. To investigate how disruption of the peroxisomal reduction of hydroxypyruvate to glycerate influences photorespiratory carbon metabolism we analyzed leaf gas exchange in A. thaliana plants lacking peroxisomal HPR1 expression. In addition, because the lack of HPR1 could be compensated for by other reactions within the peroxisomes using reductant supplied by PMDH a triple mutant lacking expression of both peroxisomal PMDH genes and HPR1 (pmdh1pmdh2hpr1) was analyzed. Rates of photosynthesis under photorespiratory conditions (ambient CO(2) and O(2) concentrations) were slightly reduced in the hpr1 and pmdh1pmdh2hpr1 plants indicating other reactions can help bypass this disruption in the photorespiratory pathway. However, the CO(2) compensation points (Γ) increased under photorespiratory conditions in both mutants indicating changes in photorespiratory carbon metabolism in these plants. Measurements of Γ*, the CO(2) compensation point in the absence of mitochondrial respiration, and the CO(2) released per Rubisco oxygenation reaction demonstrated that the increase in Γ in the hpr1 and pmdh1pmdh2hpr1 plants is not associated with changes in mitochondrial respiration but with an increase in the non-respiratory CO(2) released per Rubisco oxygenation reaction.

  4. Linoleic Acid Activates GPR40/FFA1 and Phospholipase C to Increase [Ca2+]i Release and Insulin Secretion in Islet Beta-Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-jun Zhou; Yu-ling Song; Hui Zhou; Yan Li

    2012-01-01

    To elucidate GPR40/FFA 1 and its downstream signaling pathways in regulating insulin secretion.Methods GPR40/FFA 1 expression was detected by immunofluorescence imaging.We employed linoleic acid (LA),a free fatty acid that has a high affinity to the rat GPR40,and examined its effect on cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in primary rat β-cells by Fluo-3 intensity under confocal microscopy recording.Downregulation of GPR40/FFA1 expression by antisense oligonucleotides was performed in pancreatic β-cells,and insulin secretion was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results LA acutely stimulated insulin secretion from primary cultured rat pancreatic islets.LA induced significant increase of [Ca2+]i in the presence of 5.6 mmol/L and 11.1 mmol/L glucose,which was reflected by increased Fluo-3 intensity under confocal microscopy recording.LA-stimulated increase in [Ca2+]i and insulin secretion were blocked by inhibition of GPR40/FFA1 expression in β-cells after GPR40/FFA1-specific antisense treatment.In addition,the inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) activity by U73122,PLC inhibitor,also markedly inhibited the LA-induced [Ca2+]i increase.Conclusion LA activates GPR40/FFA1 and PLC to stimulate Ca2+ release,resulting in an increase in [Ca2+]i and insulin secretion in rat islet β-cells.

  5. Salvinorin A exerts opposite presynaptic controls on neurotransmitter exocytosis from mouse brain nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilli, Massimo; Neri, Elisa; Zappettini, Stefania; Massa, Francesca; Bisio, Angela; Romussi, Giovanni; Marchi, Mario; Pittaluga, Anna

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effects of salvinorin A on the basal and the 12 mM K(+)-evoked release of preloaded [(3)H]noradenaline ([(3)H]NA) and [(3)H]serotonin ([(3)H]5-HT) from mouse hippocampal nerve terminals (synaptosomes), as well as on the basal and 12mM K(+)-evoked release of preloaded [(3)H]dopamine ([(3)H]DA) from mouse striatal and prefrontal cortex (PFc) synaptosomes. Salvinorin A (0.1-1000 nM) failed to affect the basal release of amines, but inhibited the 12 mM K(+)-evoked, Ca(2+)-dependent, exocytotic-like release of [(3)H]5-HT and [(3)H]DA. At the same concentration, salvinorin A facilitated the 12 mM K(+)-evoked, Ca(2+)-dependent, exocytotic-like release of [(3)H]NA. These effects could not be observed in pertussis toxin (PTx) entrapped synaptosomes. The broad spectrum kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) antagonist norbinaltorphimine (norBNI, 1-100 nM) antagonized the inhibition of [(3)H]5-HT and [(3)H]DA exocytosis as well as the facilitation of [(3)H]NA overflow induced by 100 nM salvinorin A. The KOR agonist U69593 (1-100 nM) mimicked salvinorin A in inhibiting [(3)H]5-HT and of [(3)H]DA exocytosis, its effect being prevented by norBNI, but leaving unchanged the K(+)-evoked release of [(3)H]NA. The effects of Salvinorin A on neurotransmitter exocytosis were not prevented by the selective mu opioid (MOR) receptor antagonist CTAP (10-100 nM), whereas facilitation of [(3)H]NA exocytosis, but not inhibition of [(3)H]5-HT and [(3)H]DA K(+)-evoked release, was counteracted by the delta opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist naltrindole (1-100 nM). We conclude that salvinorin A presynaptically modulates central NA, 5-HT, and DA exocytosis evoked by a mild depolarizing stimulus by acting at presynaptic opioid receptors having different pharmacological profiles.

  6. Conductor compounds of phenylpentane in Mycoleptodonoides aitchisonii mycelium enhance the release of dopamine from rat brain striatum slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Satoshi; Sawasaki, Emi; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2004-04-01

    Monoterpene compound is a major component of essential oils in various aromatic species. Previous reports about the monoterpene compound linalool and its effect on the brain neurotransmitters glutamic acid, GABA and acetylcholine, but not catecholamines, have been reported. In this study, we investigated the effect of linalool or conductor compounds of phenylpentane, including 1-phenyl-3-pentanol and 1-phenyl-3-pentanone, on dopamine release using rat striatal slices. The edible mushroom Mycoleptodonoides aitchisonii belongs to the Climacodontaceae family, and its cultivate medium or mycelium contains derivatives of the fragrant conductor compound, phenylpentane. Compared to basal levels, 2.5 microg linalool increased dopamine from striatal slices 3-fold. A 4-fold increase in dopamine release resulted from 2.5 microg 1-phenyl-3-pentanol administration, while a half dose of this compound induced a 2.5-fold increase. A greater than 2-fold increase resulted with 2.5 microg 1-phenyl-3-pentanone. These data indicate that striatum has sensitivity for these fragrant compounds and different releasing effects result with differ structures. These actions may affect other neurotransmitters and influence brain function.

  7. Inhibitory effects of matrine on electrical signals and amino acid neurotransmitters in hippocampal brain slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuping Wang; Jiping Chen; Guizhi Zhao; Dan Shou; Xuezhi Hong; Jianmin Zhang

    2009-01-01

    -dose groups were separately injected with 58.5, 39.0, and 19.5 mg/kg matrine via caudal vein, respectively. No intervention was administered to the normal group.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The field potential value in the CA1 region of penicillin-induced rat hippocampal brain slices was analyzed using the evoked field potential technique; chromatography was utilized to determine y-aminobutyric acid and glutamic acid content in the mouse hippocampus.RESULTS: (1) Both 0.1 g/L and 0.05 g/L matrine reduced the number of evoked field potentials in the penicillin-induced rat hippocampal brain slices (P<0.05 or P<0.01). In addition, 0.1 g/L matrine led to a reduction of evoked field potential amplitude (P<0.05). (2) Compared with normal mice,y-aminobutyric levels were dramatically increased at 20 minutes after high-dose matdne treatment (P<0.05). In addition, significantly increased y-aminobutyric acid levels were observed at 40 minutes after medium- and low-dose matrine treatments (P<0.05 or P<0.01). The glutamic acid/V-aminobutyric acid ratio was significantly less at 20 minutes after high-dose matrine treatment compared with the normal mice group (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Matrine exerts a central inhibitory effect via increased inhibitory neurotransmitter y-aminobutyric acid levels in the hippocampus.

  8. Effect of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon on the glutamate release from rat brain nerve terminals under altered gravity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, T.; Krisanova, N.

    L-glutamate acts within the mammalian central nervous system as the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter and as a potent neurotoxin The balance between these physiological and pathological actions of glutamate is thought to be kept in check by the rapid removal of the neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft The majority of uptake is mediated by the high-affinity Na -dependent glutamate transporters Depolarization leads to stimulation of glutamate efflux mediated by reversal of the high-affinity glutamate transporters The effects of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon FCCP on the glutamate release from isolated nerve terminals rat brain synaptosomes were investigated in control and after centrifuge-induced hypergravity rats were rotated in a long-arm centrifuge at ten-G during one-hour period The treatment of synaptosomes with 1 mu M FCCP during 11 min resulted in the increase in L- 14 C glutamate release by 23 0 pm 2 3 of total accumulated synaptosomal label in control animals and 24 0 pm 2 3 animals subjected to hypergravity FCCP evoked release of L- 14 C glutamate from synaptosomes was not altered in animals exposed to hypergravity as compared to control Glutamate transport is of electrogenic nature and thus depends on the membrane potential The high-KCl stimulated L- 14 C glutamate release in Ca 2 -free media occurred due to reversal of the glutamate transporters Carrier --mediated release of L- 14 C glutamate 6 min slightly increased as a result of

  9. An attempt to increase efficacy of moth mating disruption by co-releasing pheromones with kairomones and to understand possible underlying mechanisms of this technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelinski, Lukasz L; Gut, Larry J; Miller, James R

    2013-02-01

    Pheromone-based mating disruption is used worldwide for management of the internal fruit feeding codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.). There has been recent interest in the potential of improving mating disruption of C. pomonella, and potentially other insect species in general, by broadcasting combinations of pheromone and attractive host-plant kairomones. Given that such kairomones are attractive by themselves (often to both sexes), and also enhance male moth response to their pheromone, it is possible that the effects of competitive attraction and potentially other mechanisms of disruption might be increased. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that mating disruption of C. pomonella could be enhanced by co-deploying pheromone with either of two kairomones: (2E, 4Z)-2, 4-decadienoate (pear ester), or (E)-β-farnesene, as compared with various pheromone blend components alone. When deployed individually, each kairomone caused a low level of synthetic lure trap disruption and (E)-β-farnesene also caused disruption of mating as measured by tethering virgin females. However, combined release of either pear ester or (E)-β-farnesene with pheromone within the same dispenser or as a co-deployed dispenser treatment, respectively, did not increase the level of mating disruption as compared with deploying pheromone alone. Disruption efficacy did not decline when reducing the amount of (E,E)-8,10-dodecadien-1-ol (codlemone) in dispensers by fourfold, when combined with pear ester. C. pomonella readily were observed briefly approaching all dispenser types (with and without pheromone) in the field. Exposure of male C. pomonella to pear ester alone in a manner mimicking observed field exposures did not reduce the number of males able to contact a female-mimic pheromone lure in flight tunnel assays. Also, reduction of male moth behavioral response to pheromone was similar after exposure to codlemone alone, and codlemone and pear ester after exposures that mimicked those observed in

  10. [Glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in regulation of the gastrointestinal tract motor activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseeva, E V; Popova, T S; Sal'nikov, P S

    2015-01-01

    The review include actual facts, demonstrating high probability of glutamatergic neurotransmitter system role in the regulation of the gastrointestinal tract motor activity. These facts suggest significant role of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system dysfunction in forming motor activity disorders of the digestive tract, including in patients in critical condition. The analysis is based on results of multiple experimental and clinical researches of glutamic acid and other components of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in central nervous system and autonomic nervous system (with the accent on the enteral nervous system) in normal conditions and with functioning changes of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in case of inflammation, hupoxia, stress and in critical condition.

  11. Effect of single-use versus combined-use moschus and diazepam on expression of amino acid neurotransmitters in the rat corpus striatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na Zhang; Ping Liu; Xinrong He

    2012-01-01

    The present study analyzed expressional changes of excitatory neurotransmitters and inhibitory neurotransmitters in the rat corpus striatum after single-use and combined-use diazepam and Chinese herb moschus. The influence of moschus on the central nervous system was analyzed, in particular whether moschus increased penetration of other drugs into the brain. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, which included pre-column derivation with orthophthaladehyde detection, showed varied increased levels of excitatory neurotransmitters, including aspartate and glutamate, and inhibitory neurotransmitters, including glycine and γ-aminobutyric acid, in the corpus striatum after treatment with moschus alone, diazepam alone, or a combination of both. Compared with the diazepam group, aspartate levels significantly decreased at 30 and 60-105 minutes after combined treatment with moschus, while glutamate significantly increased at 45 and 75-105 minutes, glycine levels significantly increased at 105 minutes, and γ-aminobutyric acid increased at 30 and 75-105 minutes. These findings suggested that moschus increased the inhibition effects of diazepam on the brain.

  12. Effects of Acupuncture on Monoamine Neurotransmitters in Raphe Nuclei in Obese Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏群利; 刘志诚

    2003-01-01

    Effects of acupuncture on the levels of neurotransmitters in the raphe nuclei were investigated in obese rats. It was found that the levels of tryptophan (Trp) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were increased, and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) level and 5-HT/5-HIAA ratio decreased in the raphe nuclei of the obese group as compared with the normal group; and that acupuncture could produce weight reduction, increase the 5-HT level and 5-HT/5-HIAA ratio, and decrease the contents of Trp and 5-HIAA, but did not change the levels of dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA). It is indicated that benign regulative action of acupuncture on 5-HT and its metabolism in the raphe nuclei is possibly one of the factors for reducing weight by acupuncture.

  13. Co-existence of functionally different vesicular neurotransmitter transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka eMünster-Wandowski

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The vesicular transmitter transporters VGLUT, VGAT, VMAT2 and VAChT, define phenotype and physiological properties of neuronal subtypes. VGLUTs concentrate the excitatory amino acid glutamate, VGAT the inhibitory amino acid GABA, VMAT2 monoamines, and VAChT acetylcholine into synaptic vesicle (SV. Following membrane depolarization SV release their content into the synaptic cleft. A strict segregation of vesicular transporters is mandatory for the precise functioning of synaptic communication and of neuronal circuits. In the last years, evidence accumulates that subsets of neurons express more than one of these transporters leading to synaptic co-release of different and functionally opposing transmitters and modulation of synaptic plasticity. Synaptic co-existence of transporters may change during pathological scenarios in order to ameliorate misbalances in neuronal activity. In addition, evidence increases that transporters also co-exist on the same vesicle providing another layer of regulation. Generally, vesicular transmitter loading relies on an electrochemical gradient µH+ driven by the proton ATPase rendering the lumen of the vesicle with respect to the cytosol positive ( and acidic (pH. While the activity of VGLUT mainly depends on the component, VMAT, VGAT and VAChT work best at a high pH. Thus, a vesicular synergy of transporters depending on the combination may increase or decrease the filling of SV with the principal transmitter. We provide an overview on synaptic co-existence of vesicular transmitter transporters including changes in the excitatory/inhibitory balance under pathological conditions. Additionally, we discuss functional aspects of vesicular synergy of transmitter transporters.

  14. Co-existence of Functionally Different Vesicular Neurotransmitter Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münster-Wandowski, Agnieszka; Zander, Johannes-Friedrich; Richter, Karin; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    The vesicular transmitter transporters VGLUT, VGAT, VMAT2 and VAChT, define phenotype and physiological properties of neuronal subtypes. VGLUTs concentrate the excitatory amino acid glutamate, VGAT the inhibitory amino acid GABA, VMAT2 monoamines, and VAChT acetylcholine (ACh) into synaptic vesicle (SV). Following membrane depolarization SV release their content into the synaptic cleft. A strict segregation of vesicular transporters is mandatory for the precise functioning of synaptic communication and of neuronal circuits. In the last years, evidence accumulates that subsets of neurons express more than one of these transporters leading to synaptic co-release of different and functionally opposing transmitters and modulation of synaptic plasticity. Synaptic co-existence of transporters may change during pathological scenarios in order to ameliorate misbalances in neuronal activity. In addition, evidence increases that transporters also co-exist on the same vesicle providing another layer of regulation. Generally, vesicular transmitter loading relies on an electrochemical gradient ΔμH(+) driven by the proton ATPase rendering the lumen of the vesicle with respect to the cytosol positive (Δψ) and acidic (ΔpH). While the activity of VGLUT mainly depends on the Δψ component, VMAT, VGAT and VAChT work best at a high ΔpH. Thus, a vesicular synergy of transporters depending on the combination may increase or decrease the filling of SV with the principal transmitter. We provide an overview on synaptic co-existence of vesicular transmitter transporters including changes in the excitatory/inhibitory balance under pathological conditions. Additionally, we discuss functional aspects of vesicular synergy of transmitter transporters.

  15. Substrate-modulated gating dynamics in a Na+-coupled neurotransmitter transporter homologue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongfang; Terry, Daniel S; Shi, Lei; Quick, Matthias; Weinstein, Harel; Blanchard, Scott C; Javitch, Jonathan A

    2011-06-02

    Neurotransmitter/Na(+) symporters (NSSs) terminate neuronal signalling by recapturing neurotransmitter released into the synapse in a co-transport (symport) mechanism driven by the Na(+) electrochemical gradient. NSSs for dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin are targeted by the psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamine, as well as by antidepressants. The crystal structure of LeuT, a prokaryotic NSS homologue, revealed an occluded conformation in which a leucine (Leu) and two Na(+) are bound deep within the protein. This structure has been the basis for extensive structural and computational exploration of the functional mechanisms of proteins with a LeuT-like fold. Subsequently, an 'outward-open' conformation was determined in the presence of the inhibitor tryptophan, and the Na(+)-dependent formation of a dynamic outward-facing intermediate was identified using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. In addition, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging has been used to reveal reversible transitions to an inward-open LeuT conformation, which involve the movement of transmembrane helix TM1a away from the transmembrane helical bundle. We investigated how substrate binding is coupled to structural transitions in LeuT during Na(+)-coupled transport. Here we report a process whereby substrate binding from the extracellular side of LeuT facilitates intracellular gate opening and substrate release at the intracellular face of the protein. In the presence of alanine, a substrate that is transported ∼10-fold faster than leucine, we observed alanine-induced dynamics in the intracellular gate region of LeuT that directly correlate with transport efficiency. Collectively, our data reveal functionally relevant and previously hidden aspects of the NSS transport mechanism that emphasize the functional importance of a second substrate (S2) binding site within the extracellular vestibule. Substrate binding in this S2 site appears to act cooperatively

  16. Biophysics of risk aversion based on neurotransmitter receptor theory

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Taiki

    2011-01-01

    Decision under risk and uncertainty has been attracting attention in neuroeconomics and neuroendocrinology of decision-making. This paper demonstrated that the neurotransmitter receptor theory-based value (utility) function can account for human and animal risk-taking behavior. The theory predicts that (i) when dopaminergic neuronal response is efficiently coupled to the formation of ligand-receptor complex, subjects are risk-aversive (irrespective of their satisfaction level) and (ii) when the coupling is inefficient, subjects are risk-seeking at low satisfaction levels, consistent with risk-sensitive foraging theory in ecology. It is further suggested that some anomalies in decision under risk are due to inefficiency of the coupling between dopamine receptor activation and neuronal response. Future directions in the application of the model to studies in neuroeconomics of addiction and neuroendocrine modulation of risk-taking behavior are discussed.

  17. Wireless Power Transfer for Autonomous Wearable Neurotransmitter Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cuong M; Kota, Pavan Kumar; Nguyen, Minh Q; Dubey, Souvik; Rao, Smitha; Mays, Jeffrey; Chiao, J-C

    2015-09-23

    In this paper, we report a power management system for autonomous and real-time monitoring of the neurotransmitter L-glutamate (L-Glu). A low-power, low-noise, and high-gain recording module was designed to acquire signal from an implantable flexible L-Glu sensor fabricated by micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)-based processes. The wearable recording module was wirelessly powered through inductive coupling transmitter antennas. Lateral and angular misalignments of the receiver antennas were resolved by using a multi-transmitter antenna configuration. The effective coverage, over which the recording module functioned properly, was improved with the use of in-phase transmitter antennas. Experimental results showed that the recording system was capable of operating continuously at distances of 4 cm, 7 cm and 10 cm. The wireless power management system reduced the weight of the recording module, eliminated human intervention and enabled animal experimentation for extended durations.

  18. Wireless Power Transfer for Autonomous Wearable Neurotransmitter Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuong M. Nguyen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report a power management system for autonomous and real-time monitoring of the neurotransmitter L-glutamate (L-Glu. A low-power, low-noise, and high-gain recording module was designed to acquire signal from an implantable flexible L-Glu sensor fabricated by micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS-based processes. The wearable recording module was wirelessly powered through inductive coupling transmitter antennas. Lateral and angular misalignments of the receiver antennas were resolved by using a multi-transmitter antenna configuration. The effective coverage, over which the recording module functioned properly, was improved with the use of in-phase transmitter antennas. Experimental results showed that the recording system was capable of operating continuously at distances of 4 cm, 7 cm and 10 cm. The wireless power management system reduced the weight of the recording module, eliminated human intervention and enabled animal experimentation for extended durations.

  19. Neurotransmitter GABA activates muscle but not α7 nicotinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisio, Leonardo; Bergé, Ignacio; Bravo, Matías; Esandi, María Del Carmen; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Cys-loop receptors are neurotransmitter-activated ion channels involved in synaptic and extrasynaptic transmission in the brain and are also present in non-neuronal cells. As GABAA and nicotinic receptors (nAChR) belong to this family, we explored by macroscopic and single-channel recordings whether the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA has the ability to activate excitatory nAChRs. GABA differentially activates nAChR subtypes. It activates muscle nAChRs, with maximal peak currents of about 10% of those elicited by acetylcholine (ACh) and 15-fold higher EC50 with respect to ACh. At the single-channel level, the weak agonism is revealed by the requirement of 20-fold higher concentration of GABA for detectable channel openings, a major population of brief openings, and absence of clusters of openings when compared with ACh. Mutations at key residues of the principal binding-site face of muscle nAChRs (αY190 and αG153) affect GABA activation similarly as ACh activation, whereas a mutation at the complementary face (εG57) shows a selective effect for GABA. Studies with subunit-lacking receptors show that GABA can activate muscle nAChRs through the α/δ interface. Interestingly, single-channel activity elicited by GABA is similar to that elicited by ACh in gain-of-function nAChR mutants associated to congenital myasthenic syndromes, which could be important in the progression of the disorders due to steady exposure to serum GABA. In contrast, GABA cannot elicit single-channel or macroscopic currents of α7 or the chimeric α7-serotonin-type 3 receptor, a feature important for preserving an adequate excitatory/inhibitory balance in the brain as well as for avoiding activation of non-neuronal receptors by serum GABA. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  20. Expression of gastrin-releasing peptide is increased by prolonged stretch of human myometrium, and antagonists of its receptor inhibit contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Mark; Cordeaux, Yolande; Charnock-Jones, D Stephen; Smith, Gordon C S

    2012-05-01

    Increased uterine stretch appears to increase the risk of preterm labour, but the mechanism is unknown. The aim of this study was to identify factors that mediate the effect of stretch on human myometrium.Myometrial explants, prepared from biopsies obtained at elective caesarean delivery, were either studied acutely, or were maintained in prolonged culture (up to 65 h) under tension with either a 0.6 g or a 2.4 g mass, and compared using in vitro contractility, whole genome array, and qRT-PCR. Tissue held at tonic stretch with the 2.4 g mass for either 24 or 65 h showed increased potassium chloride (KCl)-induced and oxytocin-induced contractility compared with that held with the 0.6 g mass. Gene array identified 62 differentially expressed transcripts after 65 h exposure to increased stretch. Two probes for gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), a known stimulatory agonist of smooth muscle, were among the top five up-regulated by stretch (3.4-fold and 2.0-fold). Up-regulation of GRP mRNA by stretch was confirmed in a separate series of 10 samples using quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) (2.8-fold, P =0.01). GRP stimulated contractions acutely when added to freshly obtained myometrial strips in 2 out of 9 cases, but Western blot demonstrated expression of the GRP receptor in 9 out of a further 9 cases. Prolonged incubation of stretched explants in the GRP antagonists PD-176252 or RC-3095 (65 and 24 h, respectively) significantly reduced KCl- and oxytocin-induced contractility.Tonic stretch of human myometrium increases contractility and stimulates the expression of a known smooth muscle stimulatory agonist, GRP. Incubation of myometrium with GRP receptor antagonists attenuates the effect of stretch. GRP may be a target for novel therapies to reduce the risk of preterm birth in multiple pregnancy.

  1. Neurotransmitters and neuronal apoptotic cell death of chronically aluminum intoxicated Nile catfish (Clarias gariepinus) in response to ascorbic acid supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Samah R; Hussein, Mohamed M A

    2015-12-01

    Few studies have been carried out to assess the neurotoxic effect of aluminum (Al) on the aquatic creatures. This study aims to evaluate the neurotoxic effects of long term Al exposure on the Nile catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and the potential ameliorative influence of ascorbic acid (ASA) over a 180 days exposure period. Forty eight Nile catfish were divided into four groups: control group, placed in clean water, ASA exposed group (5mg/l), AlCl3 received group (28.96 μg/l; 1/20 LC50), and group received AlCl3 concomitantly with ASA. Brain tissue was examined by using flow cytometry to monitor the apoptotic cell population, HPLC analysis for the quantitative estimation of brain monoamine neurotransmitters [serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE)]. The amino acid neurotransmitters [serum taurine, glycine, aspartate and glutamine and brain gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)] levels were assessed, plus changes in brain tissue structure using light microscopy. The concentration of Al in both brain tissue and serum was determined by using atomic absorption spectrophotometery. The Al content in serum and brain tissue were both elevated and Al exposure induced an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, a marked reduction of the monoamine and amino acids neurotransmitters levels and changes in tissue morphology. ASA supplementation partially abolished the effects of AL on the reduced neurotransmitter, the degree of apoptosis and restored the morphological changes to the brain. Overall, our results indicate that, ASA is a promising neuroprotective agent against for Al-induced neurotoxicity in the Nile catfish.

  2. Reduction of relative centrifugal forces increases growth factor release within solid platelet-rich-fibrin (PRF)-based matrices: a proof of concept of LSCC (low speed centrifugation concept).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bagdadi, K; Kubesch, A; Yu, X; Al-Maawi, S; Orlowska, A; Dias, A; Booms, P; Dohle, E; Sader, R; Kirkpatrick, C J; Choukroun, J; Ghanaati, S

    2017-03-21

    Purpose The present study evaluated the platelet distribution pattern and growth factor release (VEGF, TGF-β1 and EGF) within three PRF (platelet-rich-fibrin) matrices (PRF, A-PRF and A-PRF+) that were prepared using different relative centrifugation forces (RCF) and centrifugation times. Materials and methods immunohistochemistry was conducted to assess the platelet distribution pattern within three PRF matrices. The growth factor release was measured over 10 days using ELISA. Results The VEGF protein content showed the highest release on day 7; A-PRF+ showed a significantly higher rate than A-PRF and PRF. The accumulated release on day 10 was significantly higher in A-PRF+ compared with A-PRF and PRF. TGF-β1 release in A-PRF and A-PRF+ showed significantly higher values on days 7 and 10 compared with PRF. EGF release revealed a maximum at 24 h in all groups. Toward the end of the study, A-PRF+ demonstrated significantly higher EGF release than PRF. The accumulated growth factor releases of TGF-β1 and EGF on day 10 were significantly higher in A-PRF+ and A-PRF than in PRF. Moreover, platelets were located homogenously throughout the matrix in the A-PRF and A-PRF+ groups, whereas platelets in PRF were primarily observed within the lower portion. ​Discussion the present results show an increase growthfactor release by decreased RCF. However, further studies must be conducted to examine the extent to which enhancing the amount and the rate of released growth factors influence wound healing and biomaterial-based tissue regeneration. ​Conclusion These outcomes accentuate the fact that with a reduction of RCF according to the previously LSCC (described low speed centrifugation concept), growth factor release can be increased in leukocytes and platelets within the solid PRF matrices.

  3. Tyrosine administration enhances dopamine synthesis and release in light-activated rat retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, C. J.; Watkins, C. J.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Exposure of dark-adapted albino rats to light (350 lux) significantly elevated retinal levels of the dopamine metabolite dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid during the next hour; their return to a dark environment caused dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid levels to fall. Retinal dopamine levels were increased slightly by light exposure, suggesting that the increase in dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid reflected accelerated dopamine synthesis. Administration of tyrosine (100 mg/kg, i.p.) further elevated retinal dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid among light-exposed animals, but failed to affect dopamine release among animals in the dark. These observations show that a physiological stimulus - light exposure - can cause catecholaminergic neurons to become tyrosine-dependent; they also suggest that food consumption may affect neurotransmitter release within the retina.

  4. Carbon Monoxide Releasing Molecule-A1 (CORM-A1 Improves Neurogenesis: Increase of Neuronal Differentiation Yield by Preventing Cell Death.

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    Ana S Almeida

    Full Text Available Cerebral ischemia and neurodegenerative diseases lead to impairment or death of neurons in the central nervous system. Stem cell based therapies are promising strategies currently under investigation. Carbon monoxide (CO is an endogenous product of heme degradation by heme oxygenase (HO activity. Administration of CO at low concentrations produces several beneficial effects in distinct tissues, namely anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory. Herein the CO role on modulation of neuronal differentiation was assessed. Three different models with increasing complexity were used: human neuroblastoma SH-S5Y5 cell line, human teratocarcinoma NT2 cell line and organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC. Cell lines were differentiated into post-mitotic neurons by treatment with retinoic acid (RA supplemented with CO-releasing molecule A1 (CORM-A1. CORM-A1 positively modulated neuronal differentiation, since it increased final neuronal production and enhanced the expression of specific neuronal genes: Nestin, Tuj1 and MAP2. Furthermore, during neuronal differentiation process, there was an increase in proliferative cell number (ki67 mRNA expressing cells and a decrease in cell death (lower propidium iodide (PI uptake, limitation of caspase-3 activation and higher Bcl-2 expressing cells. CO supplementation did not increase the expression of RA receptors. In the case of SH-S5Y5 model, small amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS generation emerges as important signaling molecules during CO-promoted neuronal differentiation. CO's improvement of neuronal differentiation yield was validated using OHSC as ex vivo model. CORM-A1 treatment of OHSC promoted higher levels of cells expressing the neuronal marker Tuj1. Still, CORM-A1 increased cell proliferation assessed by ki67 expression and also prevented cell death, which was followed by increased Bcl-2 expression, decreased levels of active caspase-3 and PI uptake. Likewise, ROS signaling emerged as key factors

  5. Carbon Monoxide Releasing Molecule-A1 (CORM-A1) Improves Neurogenesis: Increase of Neuronal Differentiation Yield by Preventing Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Ana S; Soares, Nuno L; Vieira, Melissa; Gramsbergen, Jan Bert; Vieira, Helena L A

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia and neurodegenerative diseases lead to impairment or death of neurons in the central nervous system. Stem cell based therapies are promising strategies currently under investigation. Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenous product of heme degradation by heme oxygenase (HO) activity. Administration of CO at low concentrations produces several beneficial effects in distinct tissues, namely anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory. Herein the CO role on modulation of neuronal differentiation was assessed. Three different models with increasing complexity were used: human neuroblastoma SH-S5Y5 cell line, human teratocarcinoma NT2 cell line and organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC). Cell lines were differentiated into post-mitotic neurons by treatment with retinoic acid (RA) supplemented with CO-releasing molecule A1 (CORM-A1). CORM-A1 positively modulated neuronal differentiation, since it increased final neuronal production and enhanced the expression of specific neuronal genes: Nestin, Tuj1 and MAP2. Furthermore, during neuronal differentiation process, there was an increase in proliferative cell number (ki67 mRNA expressing cells) and a decrease in cell death (lower propidium iodide (PI) uptake, limitation of caspase-3 activation and higher Bcl-2 expressing cells). CO supplementation did not increase the expression of RA receptors. In the case of SH-S5Y5 model, small amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation emerges as important signaling molecules during CO-promoted neuronal differentiation. CO's improvement of neuronal differentiation yield was validated using OHSC as ex vivo model. CORM-A1 treatment of OHSC promoted higher levels of cells expressing the neuronal marker Tuj1. Still, CORM-A1 increased cell proliferation assessed by ki67 expression and also prevented cell death, which was followed by increased Bcl-2 expression, decreased levels of active caspase-3 and PI uptake. Likewise, ROS signaling emerged as key factors in CO

  6. The Effect of Functional Mandibular Shift on the Muscle Spindle Systems in Head-Neck Muscles and the Related Neurotransmitter Histamine.

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    Du, Bing-Li; Li, Jiang-Ning; Guo, Hong-Ming; Li, Song; Liu, Biao

    2017-09-01

    compared with the control group. After functional mandibular deviation, HDC protein and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels on the ipsilateral sides of the chewing muscle and splenius increased significantly. HDC level changes for digastric muscle were contrary. After the removal of the mandibular position deflector, HDC protein and mRNA levels decreased on the ipsilateral sides of the chewing muscle and splenius while they increased in the digastric muscle. The difference of histamine decarboxylase content in the bilateral trapezius in each experimental group was small. After functional mandibular deviation, the temporomandibular joint mechanical receptors not only caused the fusimotor fiber hypoallergenic fatigue slow response on the ipsilateral sides of splenius, but also increased the injury neurotransmitter histamine release. The authors' results further support the opinion that the temporomandibular joint receptors may be involved in the mechanical theory of the head and neck muscles nervous system regulation.

  7. Repeated otilonium bromide administration prevents neurotransmitter changes in colon of rats underwent to wrap restraint stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traini, Chiara; Evangelista, Stefano; Girod, Vincent; Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria Simonetta; Vannucchi, Maria Giuliana

    2017-04-01

    Otilonium bromide (OB) is a spasmolytic drug successfully used for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Its efficacy has been attributed to the block of L- and T-type Ca(2+) channels and muscarinic and tachykinin receptors in the smooth muscle. Furthermore, in healthy rats, repeated OB administration modified neurotransmitter expression and function suggesting other mechanisms of action. On this basis, we investigated whether repeated OB treatment prevented the functional and neurochemical changes observed in the colon of rats underwent to wrap restrain stress (WRS) a psychosocial stressor considered suitable to reproduce the main IBS signs and symptoms. In control, WRS and OB/WRS rats functional parameters were measured in vivo and morphological investigations were done ex vivo in the colon. The results showed that OB counteracts most of the neurotransmitters changes caused by WRS. In particular, the drug prevents the decrease in SP-, NK1r-, nNOS-, VIP-, and S100β-immunoreactivity (IR) and the increase in CGRP-, and CRF1r-IR. On the contrary, OB does not affect the increase in CRF2r-IR neurons observed in WRS rats and does not interfere with the mild mucosal inflammation due to WRS. Finally, OB per se increases the Mr2 expression in the muscle wall and decreases the number of the myenteric ChAT-IR neurons. Functional findings show a significantly reduction in the number of spontaneous abdominal contraction in OB treated rats. The ability of OB to block L-type Ca(2+) channels, also expressed by enteric neurons, might represent a possible mechanism through which OB exerts its actions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  8. Beneficial effects of lycopene against haloperidol induced orofacial dyskinesia in rats: Possible neurotransmitters and neuroinflammation modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Swati; Jamwal, Sumit; Deshmukh, Rahul; Kumar, Puneet

    2016-01-15

    Tardive Dyskinesia is a severe side effect of chronic neuroleptic treatment consisting of abnormal involuntary movements, characterized by orofacial dyskinesia. The study was designed to investigate the protective effect of lycopene against haloperidol induced orofacial dyskinesia possibly by neurochemical and neuroinflammatory modulation in rats. Rats were administered with haloperidol (1mg/kg, i.p for 21 days) to induce orofacial dyskinesia. Lycopene (5 and 10mg/kg, p.o) was given daily 1hour before haloperidol treatment for 21 days. Behavioral observations (vacuous chewing movements, tongue protrusions, facial jerking, rotarod activity, grip strength, narrow beam walking) were assessed on 0th, 7th(,) 14th(,) 21st day after haloperidol treatment. On 22nd day, animals were killed and striatum was excised for estimation of biochemical parameters (malondialdehyde, nitrite and endogenous enzyme (GSH), pro-inflammatory cytokines [Tumor necrosis factor, Interleukin 1β, Interleukin 6] and neurotransmitters level (dopamine, serotonin, nor epinephrine, 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), Homovanillic acid, 3,4- dihydroxyphenylacetic acid. Haloperidol treatment for 21 days impaired muscle co-ordination, motor activity and grip strength with an increased in orofacial dyskinetic movements. Further free radical generation increases MDA and nitrite levels, decreasing GSH levels in striatum. Neuroinflammatory markers were significantly increased with decrease in neurotransmitters levels. Lycopene (5 and 10mg/kg, p.o) treatment along with haloperidol significantly attenuated impairment in behavioral, biochemical, neurochemical and neuroinflammatory markers. Results of the present study attributed the therapeutic potential of lycopene in the treatment (prevented or delayed) of typical antipsychotic induced orofacial dyskinesia.

  9. Abnormal exocytotic release of glutamate in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanese, Marco; Zappettini, Simona; Onofri, Franco; Musazzi, Laura; Tardito, Daniela; Bonifacino, Tiziana; Messa, Mirko; Racagni, Giorgio; Usai, Cesare; Benfenati, Fabio; Popoli, Maurizio; Bonanno, Giambattista

    2011-03-01

    Glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity plays a major role in the degeneration of motor neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and reduced astrocytary glutamate transport, which in turn increases the synaptic availability of the amino acid neurotransmitter, was suggested as a cause. Alternatively, here we report our studies on the exocytotic release of glutamate as a possible source of excessive glutamate transmission. The basal glutamate efflux from spinal cord nerve terminals of mice-expressing human soluble superoxide dismutase (SOD1) with the G93A mutation [SOD1/G93A(+)], a transgenic model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, was elevated when compared with transgenic mice expressing the wild-type human SOD1 or to non-transgenic controls. Exposure to 15 mM KCl or 0.3 μM ionomycin provoked Ca(2+)-dependent glutamate release that was dramatically increased in late symptomatic and in pre-symptomatic SOD1/G93A(+) mice. Increased Ca(2+) levels were detected in SOD1/G93A(+) mouse spinal cord nerve terminals, accompanied by increased activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II and increased phosphorylation of synapsin I. In line with these findings, release experiments suggested that the glutamate release augmentation involves the readily releasable pool of vesicles and a greater capability of these vesicles to fuse upon stimulation in SOD1/G93A(+) mice. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Carbon dioxide in carbonated beverages induces ghrelin release and increased food consumption in male rats: Implications on the onset of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eweis, Dureen Samandar; Abed, Fida; Stiban, Johnny

    2017-02-19

    The dangerous health risks associated with obesity makes it a very serious public health issue. Numerous studies verified a correlation between the increase in obesity and the parallel increase in soft drink consumption among world populations. The effects of one main component in soft drinks namely the carbon dioxide gas has not been studied thoroughly in any previous research. Male rats were subjected to different categories of drinks and evaluated for over a year. Stomach ex vivo experiments were undertaken to evaluate the amount of ghrelin upon different beverage treatments. Moreover, 20 male students were tested for their ghrelin levels after ingestion of different beverages. Here, we show that rats consuming gaseous beverages over a period of around 1 year gain weight at a faster rate than controls on regular degassed carbonated beverage or tap water. This is due to elevated levels of the hunger hormone ghrelin and thus greater food intake in rats drinking carbonated drinks compared to control rats. Moreover, an increase in liver lipid accumulation of rats treated with gaseous drinks is shown opposed to control rats treated with degassed beverage or tap water. In a parallel study, the levels of ghrelin hormone were increased in 20 healthy human males upon drinking carbonated beverages compared to controls. These results implicate a major role for carbon dioxide gas in soft drinks in inducing weight gain and the onset of obesity via ghrelin release and stimulation of the hunger response in male mammals. Copyright © 2017 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Kisspeptin increases gamma-aminobutyric acidergic and glutamatergic transmission directly to gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in an estradiol-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielecka-Fortuna, Justyna; Moenter, Suzanne M

    2010-01-01

    GnRH neurons are the final central pathway controlling fertility. Kisspeptin potently activates GnRH release via G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54). GnRH neurons express GPR54, and kisspeptin can act directly; however, GPR54 is broadly expressed, suggesting indirect actions are possible. Transsynaptic mechanisms are involved in estradiol-induced potentiation of GnRH neuron response to kisspeptin. To investigate these mechanisms, separate whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings were performed of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic and glutamatergic transmission to GnRH neurons in brain slices before and during kisspeptin treatment. To determine whether estradiol alters the effect of kisspeptin on synaptic transmission, mice were ovariectomized and either left with no further treatment (OVX) or treated with estradiol implants (OVX+E). Cells were first studied in the morning when estradiol exerts negative feedback. Kisspeptin increased frequency and amplitude of GABAergic postsynaptic currents (PSCs) in GnRH neurons from OVX+E mice. Blocking action potentials eliminated the effect on frequency, indicating presynaptic actions. Amplitude changes were due to postsynaptic actions. Kisspeptin also increased frequency of glutamatergic excitatory PSCs in cells from OVX+E animals. Kisspeptin did not affect either GABAergic or glutamatergic transmission to GnRH neurons in cells from OVX mice, indicating effects on transmission are estradiol dependent. In contrast to stimulatory effects on GABAergic PSC frequency during negative feedback, kisspeptin had no effect during positive feedback. These data suggest estradiol enables kisspeptin-mediated increases in GABA and glutamate transmission to GnRH neurons. Furthermore, the occlusion of the response during positive feedback implies one consequence of estradiol positive feedback is an increase in transmission to GnRH neurons mediated by endogenous kisspeptin.

  12. Effects of their nutrient precursors on the synthesis and release of serotonin, the catecholamines, and acetylcholine - Implications for behavioral disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtman, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Authentic foods affect brain serotonin synthesis by modifying brain tryptophan levels, carbohydrates increasing and proteins decreasing these levels. The carbohydrate-induced rise in brain serotonin tends to diminish the likelihood that one carbohydrate-rich, protein-poor meal or snack will be followed by another. This mechanism is apparently disturbed in carbohydrate-craving obesity, which may explain why this syndrome responds well to d-fenfluramine, a serotoninergic drug. Pure nutrients like tyrosine or choline can also affect the rates at which their neurotransmitter products, the catecholamines and acetylcholine, are synthesized in and released from nerve terminals, suggesting that these compounds may find uses as drugs.

  13. Effects of their nutrient precursors on the synthesis and release of serotonin, the catecholamines, and acetylcholine - Implications for behavioral disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtman, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Authentic foods affect brain serotonin synthesis by modifying brain tryptophan levels, carbohydrates increasing and proteins decreasing these levels. The carbohydrate-induced rise in brain serotonin tends to diminish the likelihood that one carbohydrate-rich, protein-poor meal or snack will be followed by another. This mechanism is apparently disturbed in carbohydrate-craving obesity, which may explain why this syndrome responds well to d-fenfluramine, a serotoninergic drug. Pure nutrients like tyrosine or choline can also affect the rates at which their neurotransmitter products, the catecholamines and acetylcholine, are synthesized in and released from nerve terminals, suggesting that these compounds may find uses as drugs.

  14. Microelectronics-Based Biosensors Dedicated to the Detection of Neurotransmitters: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mirzaei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of neurotransmitters (NTs in the human body are related to diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. The mechanisms of several neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, have been linked to NTs. Because the number of diagnosed cases is increasing, the diagnosis and treatment of such diseases are important. To detect biomolecules including NTs, microtechnology, micro and nanoelectronics have become popular in the form of the miniaturization of medical and clinical devices. They offer high-performance features in terms of sensitivity, as well as low-background noise. In this paper, we review various devices and circuit techniques used for monitoring NTs in vitro and in vivo and compare various methods described in recent publications.

  15. Neurotransmitter CART as a New Therapeutic Candidate for Parkinson’s Disease

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    Philippe Thuillier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases. To date, there is no effective treatment that halts its progression. Increasing evidence indicates that mitochondria play an important role in the development of PD. Hence mitochondria-targeted approaches or agents may have therapeutic promise for treatment of the disease. Neuropeptide CART (cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript, a hypothalamus and midbrain enriched neurotransmitter with an antioxidant property, can be found in mitochondria, which is the main source of reactive oxygen species. Systemic administration of CART has been found to ameliorate dopaminergic neuronal loss and improve motor functions in a mouse model of PD. In this article, we summarize recent progress in studies investigating the relationship between CART, dopamine, and the pathophysiology of PD, with a focus on mitochondria-related topics.

  16. Microelectronics-based biosensors dedicated to the detection of neurotransmitters: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Maryam; Sawan, Mohamad

    2014-09-26

    Dysregulation of neurotransmitters (NTs) in the human body are related to diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. The mechanisms of several neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, have been linked to NTs. Because the number of diagnosed cases is increasing, the diagnosis and treatment of such diseases are important. To detect biomolecules including NTs, microtechnology, micro and nanoelectronics have become popular in the form of the miniaturization of medical and clinical devices. They offer high-performance features in terms of sensitivity, as well as low-background noise. In this paper, we review various devices and circuit techniques used for monitoring NTs in vitro and in vivo and compare various methods described in recent publications.

  17. Activities of autonomic neurotransmitters in meibomian gland tissues are associated with menopausal dry eye

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianxiang Li; Dongling Jin; Jinsheng Gao; Liguang Wang; Xianjun Liu; Jingzhang Wang; Zhongxin Xu

    2012-01-01

    The secretory activities of meibomian glands are regulated by the autonomic nervous system. The change in density and activity of autonomic nerves in meibomian glands during menopause play an important role in the pathogenesis of dry eye. In view of this, we established a dry eye rat model by removing the bilateral ovaries. We used neuropeptide Y and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide as markers of autonomic neurotransmitters. Our results showed that the concentration of estradiol in serum significantly decreased, the density of neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity in nerve fibers significantly increased, the density of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide immunoreactivity in nerve fibers significantly decreased, and the ratio of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide/neuropeptide Y positive staining significantly decreased. These results suggest that a decrease in ovary activity may lead to autonomic nervous system dysfunction, thereby affecting the secretory activity of the meibomian gland, which participates in sexual hormone imbalance-induced dry eye.

  18. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors of cattle aggregate on the surface of gonadotrophs and are increased by elevated GnRH concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadokawa, Hiroya; Pandey, Kiran; Nahar, Asrafun; Nakamura, Urara; Rudolf, Faidiban O

    2014-11-30

    The presence of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors (GnRHRs) on gonadotrophs in the anterior pituitary (AP) is an important factor for reproduction control. However, little is known regarding GnRHR gene expression in gonadotrophs of cattle owing to the lack of an appropriate anti-GnRHR antibody. Therefore, an anti-GnRHR antibody for immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and immunocytochemistry assays was developed to characterize GnRHR gene expression in gonadotrophs. The anti-GnRHR antibody could suppress GnRH-induced LH secretion from cultured AP cells of cattle. The GnRHR, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) in the AP tissue was analyzed by fluorescence immunohistochemistry. The GnRHRs were aggregated on a limited area of the cell surface of gonadotrophs, possibly localized to lipid rafts. The LH secretion was stimulated with increasing amounts of GnRH; however, excessive concentrations (> 1 nM) resulted in a decrease in LH secretion. A novel method to purify gonadotrophs was developed using the anti-GnRHR antibody and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Flow cytometric analysis using the anti-GnRHR antibody for cultured bovine AP cells, however, failed to support the hypothesis that GnRH induces GnRHR internalization and decreases GnRHR on the surface of GnRHR-positive AP cells. In contrast, immunocytochemistry using primary antibodies for cultured bovine AP cells showed that 10 nM (P < 0.05) and 100 nM (P < 0.01) GnRH, but not 0.01-1 nM GnRH, increased GnRHR in the cytoplasm of LH-positive cells. In conclusion, these data suggested that GnRHRs were aggregated on the surface of gonadotrophs and GnRHR inside gonadotrophs increased with elevated concentrations of GnRH.

  19. LeuT: a prokaryotic stepping stone on the way to a eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporter structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satinder K

    2008-01-01

    Ion-coupled secondary transport is utilized by a broad range of integral membrane proteins to catalyze the energetically unfavorable movement of solute molecules across a lipid bilayer. Members of the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family, present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, are sodium-coupled symporters that play crucial roles in processes as diverse as nutrient uptake and neurotransmitter clearance. The crystal structure of LeuT, a bacterial member of this family, provided the first atomic-level glimpse into overall architecture, pinpointed the substrate and sodium binding sites and implicated candidate helices and residues in the "gating" conformational changes that accompany ion binding and release. The structure is consistent with a wealth of elegant biochemical data on the eukaryotic counterparts and has for the first time permitted the construction of accurate homology models that can be directly tested experimentally. Sequence identity is especially high near the substrate and sodium binding sites and, thus, molecular insights within these regions have been substantial. However, there are several topics relevant to transport mechanism, inhibition and regulation that structure/function studies of LeuT cannot adequately address, suggesting the need for a eukaryotic transporter crystal structure.

  20. Two Na+ Sites Control Conformational Change in a Neurotransmitter Transporter Homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavoulari, Sotiria; Margheritis, Eleonora; Nagarajan, Anu; DeWitt, David C; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Rosado, Edwin; Ravera, Silvia; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Forrest, Lucy R; Rudnick, Gary

    2016-01-15

    In LeuT, a prokaryotic homolog of neurotransmitter transporters, Na(+) stabilizes outward-open conformational states. We examined how each of the two LeuT Na(+) binding sites contributes to Na(+)-dependent closure of the cytoplasmic pathway using biochemical and biophysical assays of conformation. Mutating either of two residues that contribute to the Na2 site completely prevented cytoplasmic closure in response to Na(+), suggesting that Na2 is essential for this conformational change, whereas Na1 mutants retained Na(+) responsiveness. However, mutation of Na1 residues also influenced the Na(+)-dependent conformational change in ways that varied depending on the position mutated. Computational analyses suggest those mutants influence the ability of Na1 binding to hydrate the substrate pathway and perturb an interaction network leading to the extracellular gate. Overall, the results demonstrate that occupation of Na2 stabilizes outward-facing conformations presumably through a direct interaction between Na(+) and transmembrane helices 1 and 8, whereas Na(+) binding at Na1 influences conformational change through a network of intermediary interactions. The results also provide evidence that N-terminal release and helix motions represent distinct steps in cytoplasmic pathway opening.

  1. Two Na+ Sites Control Conformational Change in a Neurotransmitter Transporter Homolog*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavoulari, Sotiria; Margheritis, Eleonora; Nagarajan, Anu; DeWitt, David C.; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Rosado, Edwin; Ravera, Silvia; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Forrest, Lucy R.; Rudnick, Gary

    2016-01-01

    In LeuT, a prokaryotic homolog of neurotransmitter transporters, Na+ stabilizes outward-open conformational states. We examined how each of the two LeuT Na+ binding sites contributes to Na+-dependent closure of the cytoplasmic pathway using biochemical and biophysical assays of conformation. Mutating either of two residues that contribute to the Na2 site completely prevented cytoplasmic closure in response to Na+, suggesting that Na2 is essential for this conformational change, whereas Na1 mutants retained Na+ responsiveness. However, mutation of Na1 residues also influenced the Na+-dependent conformational change in ways that varied depending on the position mutated. Computational analyses suggest those mutants influence the ability of Na1 binding to hydrate the substrate pathway and perturb an interaction network leading to the extracellular gate. Overall, the results demonstrate that occupation of Na2 stabilizes outward-facing conformations presumably through a direct interaction between Na+ and transmembrane helices 1 and 8, whereas Na+ binding at Na1 influences conformational change through a network of intermediary interactions. The results also provide evidence that N-terminal release and helix motions represent distinct steps in cytoplasmic pathway opening. PMID:26582198

  2. Nitric oxide-dependent activation of CaMKII increases diastolic sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release in cardiac myocytes in response to adrenergic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry Curran

    Full Text Available Spontaneous calcium waves in cardiac myocytes are caused by diastolic sarcoplasmic reticulum release (SR Ca(2+ leak through ryanodine receptors. Beta-adrenergic (β-AR tone is known to increase this leak through the activation of Ca-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII and the subsequent phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor. When β-AR drive is chronic, as observed in heart failure, this CaMKII-dependent effect is exaggerated and becomes potentially arrhythmogenic. Recent evidence has indicated that CaMKII activation can be regulated by cellular oxidizing agents, such as reactive oxygen species. Here, we investigate how the cellular second messenger, nitric oxide, mediates CaMKII activity downstream of the adrenergic signaling cascade and promotes the generation of arrhythmogenic spontaneous Ca(2+ waves in intact cardiomyocytes. Both SCaWs and SR Ca(2+ leak were measured in intact rabbit and mouse ventricular myocytes loaded with the Ca-dependent fluorescent dye, fluo-4. CaMKII activity in vitro and immunoblotting for phosphorylated residues on CaMKII, nitric oxide synthase, and Akt were measured to confirm activity of these enzymes as part of the adrenergic cascade. We demonstrate that stimulation of the β-AR pathway by isoproterenol increased the CaMKII-dependent SR Ca(2+ leak. This increased leak was prevented by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase 1 but not nitric oxide synthase 3. In ventricular myocytes isolated from wild-type mice, isoproterenol stimulation also increased the CaMKII-dependent leak. Critically, in myocytes isolated from nitric oxide synthase 1 knock-out mice this effect is ablated. We show that isoproterenol stimulation leads to an increase in nitric oxide production, and nitric oxide alone is sufficient to activate CaMKII and increase SR Ca(2+ leak. Mechanistically, our data links Akt to nitric oxide synthase 1 activation downstream of β-AR stimulation. Collectively, this evidence supports the hypothesis

  3. Hydrogen sulfide releasing aspirin, ACS14, attenuates high glucose-induced increased methylglyoxal and oxidative stress in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qian; Sparatore, Anna; Del Soldato, Piero; Wu, Lingyun; Desai, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a gasotransmitter with vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory properties. Aspirin is an irreversible cyclooxygenase inhibitor anti-inflammatory drug. ACS14 is a novel synthetic hydrogen sulfide releasing aspirin which inhibits cyclooxygenase and has antioxidant effects. Methylglyoxal is a chemically active metabolite of glucose and fructose, and a major precursor of advanced glycation end products formation. Methylglyoxal is harmful when produced in excess. Plasma methylglyoxal levels are significantly elevated in diabetic patients. Our aim was to investigate the effects of ACS14 on methylglyoxal levels in cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. We used cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells for the study. Methylglyoxal was measured by HPLC after derivatization, and nitrite+nitrate with an assay kit. Western blotting was used to determine NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression. Dicholorofluorescein assay was used to measure oxidative stress. ACS14 significantly attenuated elevation of intracellular methylglyoxal levels caused by incubating cultured vascular smooth muscle cells with methylglyoxal (30 µM) and high glucose (25 mM). ACS14, but not aspirin, caused a significant attenuation of increase in nitrite+nitrate levels caused by methylglyoxal or high glucose. ACS14, aspirin, and sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS, a hydrogen sulfide donor), all attenuated the increase in oxidative stress caused by methylglyoxal and high glucose in cultured cells. ACS14 prevented the increase in NOX4 expression caused by incubating the cultured VSMCs with MG (30 µM). ACS14, aspirin and NaHS attenuated the increase in iNOS expression caused by high glucose (25 mM). In conclusion, ACS14 has the novel ability to attenuate an increase in methylglyoxal levels which in turn can reduce oxidative stress, decrease the formation of advanced glycation end products and prevent many of the known deleterious effects

  4. Hydrogen sulfide releasing aspirin, ACS14, attenuates high glucose-induced increased methylglyoxal and oxidative stress in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Huang

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide is a gasotransmitter with vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory properties. Aspirin is an irreversible cyclooxygenase inhibitor anti-inflammatory drug. ACS14 is a novel synthetic hydrogen sulfide releasing aspirin which inhibits cyclooxygenase and has antioxidant effects. Methylglyoxal is a chemically active metabolite of glucose and fructose, and a major precursor of advanced glycation end products formation. Methylglyoxal is harmful when produced in excess. Plasma methylglyoxal levels are significantly elevated in diabetic patients. Our aim was to investigate the effects of ACS14 on methylglyoxal levels in cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. We used cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells for the study. Methylglyoxal was measured by HPLC after derivatization, and nitrite+nitrate with an assay kit. Western blotting was used to determine NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS protein expression. Dicholorofluorescein assay was used to measure oxidative stress. ACS14 significantly attenuated elevation of intracellular methylglyoxal levels caused by incubating cultured vascular smooth muscle cells with methylglyoxal (30 µM and high glucose (25 mM. ACS14, but not aspirin, caused a significant attenuation of increase in nitrite+nitrate levels caused by methylglyoxal or high glucose. ACS14, aspirin, and sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS, a hydrogen sulfide donor, all attenuated the increase in oxidative stress caused by methylglyoxal and high glucose in cultured cells. ACS14 prevented the increase in NOX4 expression caused by incubating the cultured VSMCs with MG (30 µM. ACS14, aspirin and NaHS attenuated the increase in iNOS expression caused by high glucose (25 mM. In conclusion, ACS14 has the novel ability to attenuate an increase in methylglyoxal levels which in turn can reduce oxidative stress, decrease the formation of advanced glycation end products and prevent many of the known

  5. Imaging of dopamine release induced by pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic stimulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sang Soo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Technological advances in molecular imaging made it possible to image synaptic neurotransmitter concentration in living human brain. The dopaminergic system has been most intensively studied because of its importance in neurological as well as psychiatric disorders. This paper provides a brief overview of recent progress in imaging studies of dopamine release induced by pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic stimulations.

  6. Plasma adiponectin levels are increased despite insulin resistance in corticotropin-releasing hormone transgenic mice, an animal model of Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinahara, Masayuki; Nishiyama, Mitsuru; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Nakayama, Shuichi; Noguchi, Toru; Kambayashi, Machiko; Okada, Yasushi; Tsuda, Masayuki; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P; Hashimoto, Kozo; Terada, Yoshio

    2009-01-01

    Adiponectin (AdN), an adipokine derived from the adipose tissue, has an insulin-sensitizing effect, and plasma AdN is shown to be decreased in obesity and/or insulin resistant state. To clarify whether changes in AdN are also responsible for the development of glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance, we examined AdN concentration in plasma and AdN expression in the adipose tissue, using corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) transgenic mouse (CRH-Tg), an animal model of Cushing syndrome. We found, unexpectedly, that plasma AdN levels in CRHTg were significantly higher than those in wild-type littermates (wild-type: 19.7+/-2.5, CRH-Tg: 32.4+/-3.1 microg/mL, pAdN mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in the adipose tissue of CRH-Tg. Bilateral adrenalectomy in CRH-Tg eliminated both their Cushing's phenotype and their increase in plasma AdN levels (wild-type/sham: 9.4+/-0.5, CRH-Tg/sham: 15.7+/-2.0, CRH-Tg/ADX: 8.5+/-0.4 microg/mL). These results strongly suggest that AdN is not a major factor responsible for the development of insulin resistance in Cushing syndrome. Our data also suggest that glucocorticoid increases plasma AdN levels but decreases AdN expression in adipocytes, the latter being explained possibly by the decrease in AdN metabolism in the Cushing state.

  7. Body weight loss, reduced urge for palatable food and increased release of GLP-1 through daily supplementation with green-plant membranes for three months in overweight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelius, Caroline; Erlandsson, Daniel; Vitija, Egzona; Stenblom, Eva-Lena; Egecioglu, Emil; Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte

    2014-10-01

    The frequency of obesity has risen dramatically in recent years but only few effective and safe drugs are available. We investigated if green-plant membranes, previously shown to reduce subjective hunger and promote satiety signals, could affect body weight when given long-term. 38 women (40-65 years of age, body mass index 25-33 kg/m(2)) were randomized to dietary supplementation with either green-plant membranes (5 g) or placebo, consumed once daily before breakfast for 12 weeks. All individuals were instructed to follow a three-meal paradigm without any snacking between the meals and to increase their physical activity. Body weight change was analysed every third week as was blood glucose and various lipid parameters. On days 1 and 90, following intake of a standardized breakfast, glucose, insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in plasma were measured, as well as subjective ratings of hunger, satiety and urge for different palatable foods, using visual analogue scales. Subjects receiving green-plant membranes lost significantly more body weight than did those on placebo (p weight loss with green-plant extract was 5.0 ± 2.3 kg compared to 3.5 ± 2.3 kg in the control group. Consumption of green-plant membranes also reduced total and LDL-cholesterol (p weight loss, improves obesity-related risk-factors, and reduces the urge for palatable food. The mechanism may reside in the observed increased release of GLP-1.

  8. Intracoronary genistein acutely increases coronary blood flow in anesthetized pigs through beta-adrenergic mediated nitric oxide release and estrogenic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossini, Elena; Molinari, Claudio; Mary, David A S G; Uberti, Francesca; Caimmi, Philippe Primo; Surico, Nicola; Vacca, Giovanni

    2008-05-01

    Various studies have suggested that the phytoestrogen genistein has beneficial cardioprotective and vascular effects. However, there has been scarce information regarding the primary effect of genistein on coronary blood flow and its mechanisms including estrogen receptors, autonomic nervous system, and nitric oxide (NO). The present study was planned to determine the primary effect of genistein on coronary blood flow and the mechanisms involved. In anesthetized pigs, changes in left anterior descending coronary artery caused by intracoronary infusion of genistein at constant heart rate and arterial pressure were assessed using ultrasound flowmeters. In 25 pigs, genistein infused at 0.075 mg/min increased coronary blood flow by about 16.3%. This response was graded in a further five pigs by increasing the infused dose of the genistein between 0.007 and 0.147 mg/min. In the 25 pigs, blockade of cholinergic receptors (iv atropine; five pigs) and alpha-adrenergic receptors (iv phentolamine; five pigs) did not abolish the coronary response to genistein, whose effects were prevented by blockade of beta(2)-adrenergic receptors (iv butoxamine; five pigs), nitric oxide synthase (intracoronary N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester; five pigs) and estrogenic receptors (ERs; ERalpha/ERbeta; intracoronary fulvestrant; five pigs). In porcine aortic endothelial cells, genistein induced the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and NO production through ERK 1/2, Akt, and p38 MAPK pathways, which was prevented by the concomitant treatment by butoxamine and fulvestrant. In conclusion, genistein primarily caused coronary vasodilation the mechanism of which involved ERalpha/ERbeta and the release of NO through vasodilatory beta(2)-adrenoreceptor effects.

  9. Oxygen-glucose deprivation increases the enzymatic activity and the microvesicle-mediated release of ectonucleotidases in the cells composing the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceruti, Stefania; Colombo, Laura; Magni, Giulia; Viganò, Francesca; Boccazzi, Marta; Deli, Mária A; Sperlágh, Beáta; Abbracchio, Maria P; Kittel, Agnes

    2011-08-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), the dynamic interface between the nervous tissue and the blood, is composed by endothelial cells, pericytes and astrocytes. Extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides and their receptors (the purinergic system) constitute a widely diffused signaling system involved in many pathophysiological processes. However, the role of this system in controlling BBB functions is still largely unknown. By using cultures of these three cell types grown separately and a BBB in vitro model consisting of triple co-cultures, we studied for the first time the expression and distribution of the ecto-enzymes nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (NTPDases, the enzymes which hydrolyze extracellular nucleotides) under control and ischemic (oxygen-glucose deprivation in vitro; OGD) conditions. NTPDase1 was detected in all three cell types, whereas NTPDase2 was expressed by astrocytes and pericytes and, to a lesser extent, by endothelial cells. Endothelial cells were extremely susceptible to cell death when OGD was applied to mimic in vitro the cytotoxicity induced by ischemia, whereas astrocytes and pericytes were more resistant. A semi-quantitative assay highlighted markedly increased e-ATPase activity following exposure to OGD in all three cell types, either when grown separately or when co-cultured together to resemble the composition of the BBB. Moreover, electron microscopy analysis showed that both endothelial cells and astrocytes shed microvesicles containing NTPDases from their membrane, which may suggest a novel mechanism to increase the breakdown of ATP released to toxic levels by damaged BBB cells. We hypothesize that this phenomenon could have a protective and/or modulatory effect for brain parenchymal cells. This in vitro model is therefore useful to study the role of extracellular nucleotides in modulating BBB responses to ischemic events, and to develop new effective purinergic-based approaches for brain ischemia.

  10. Nanodomain coupling explains Ca2+ independence of transmitter release time course at a fast central synapse

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    eLife digest The nervous system sends information around the body in the form of electrical signals that travel through cells called neurons. However, these electrical signals cannot cross the synapses between neurons. Instead, the information is carried across the synapse by molecules called neurotransmitters. Calcium ions control the release of neurotransmitters. There is a high concentration of calcium ions outside the neuron but they are not able to pass through the cell membrane under no...

  11. Developmental origins of neurotransmitter and transcriptome alterations in adult female zebrafish exposed to atrazine during embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirbisky, Sara E; Weber, Gregory J; Sepúlveda, Maria S; Xiao, Changhe; Cannon, Jason R; Freeman, Jennifer L

    2015-07-03

    Atrazine is an herbicide applied to agricultural crops and is indicated to be an endocrine disruptor. Atrazine is frequently found to contaminate potable water supplies above the maximum contaminant level of 3μg/L as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The developmental origin of adult disease hypothesis suggests that toxicant exposure during development can increase the risk of certain diseases during adulthood. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying disease progression are still unknown. In this study, zebrafish embryos were exposed to 0, 0.3, 3, or 30μg/L atrazine throughout embryogenesis. Larvae were then allowed to mature under normal laboratory conditions with no further chemical treatment until 7 days post fertilization (dpf) or adulthood and neurotransmitter analysis completed. No significant alterations in neurotransmitter levels was observed at 7dpf or in adult males, but a significant decrease in 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and serotonin turnover was seen in adult female brain tissue. Transcriptomic analysis was completed on adult female brain tissue to identify molecular pathways underlying the observed neurological alterations. Altered expression of 1928, 89, and 435 genes in the females exposed to 0.3, 3, or 30μg/L atrazine during embryogenesis were identified, respectively. There was a high level of overlap between the biological processes and molecular pathways in which the altered genes were associated. Moreover, a subset of genes was down regulated throughout the serotonergic pathway. These results provide support of the developmental origins of neurological alterations observed in adult female zebrafish exposed to atrazine during embryogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. In vitro slow-release urea contained in rice straw-based diets to increase efficiency of rumen microbial protein synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Dede Kardaya; K. G. Wiryawan; A. Parakkasi; H.M Winugroho

    2010-01-01

    Effect of slow-release urea on efficiency of rumen microbial protein synthesis (EMPS) was examined using an in vitro technique. The objective of this experiment was to reveal the in vitro slow-release urea characteristics of zinc-urea, zeolites-urea, and zeolites-zinc-urea in relation to EMPS observed in different incubation time. The experimental design employed was randomized block design with 4 x 3 factorial plus a control treatment, and conducted in two replications. Factors were various ...

  13. HSF1 transcriptional activity mediates alcohol induction of Vamp2 expression and GABA release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence P. Varodayan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Many central synapses are highly sensitive to alcohol, and it is now accepted that short-term alterations in synaptic function may lead to longer term changes in circuit function. The regulation of postsynaptic receptors by alcohol has been well studied, but the mechanisms underlying the effects of alcohol on the presynaptic terminal are relatively unexplored. To identify a pathway by which alcohol regulates neurotransmitter release, we recently investigated the mechanism by which ethanol induces the Vamp2 gene, but not Vamp1, in mouse primary cortical cultures. These two genes encode isoforms of synaptobrevin, a vesicular soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE protein required for synaptic vesicle fusion. We found that alcohol activates the transcription factor heat shock factor 1 (HSF1 to induce Vamp2 gene expression, while Vamp1 mRNA levels remain unaffected. As the Vamp2 gene encodes a SNARE protein, we then investigated whether ethanol exposure and HSF1 transcriptional activity alter neurotransmitter release using electrophysiology. We found that alcohol increased the frequency of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-mediated miniature IPSCs via HSF1, but had no effect on mEPSCs. Overall, these data indicate that alcohol induces HSF1 transcriptional activity to trigger a specific coordinated adaptation in GABAergic presynaptic terminals. This mechanism could explain some of the changes in synaptic function that occur soon after alcohol exposure, and may underlie some of the more enduring effects of chronic alcohol intake on local circuit function.

  14. Real-time detection of acetylcholine release from the human endocrine pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Dando, Robin; Huang, Y Anthony; Berggren, Per-Olof; Roper, Stephen D; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2012-05-03

    Neurons, sensory cells and endocrine cells secrete neurotransmitters and hormones to communicate with other cells and to coordinate organ and system function. Validation that a substance is used as an extracellular signaling molecule by a given cell requires a direct demonstration of its secretion. In this protocol we describe the use of biosensor cells to detect neurotransmitter release from endocrine cells in real-time. Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor M3 were used as ACh biosensors to record ACh release from human pancreatic islets. We show how ACh biosensors loaded with the Ca(2+) indicator Fura-2 and pressed against isolated human pancreatic islets allow the detection of ACh release. The biosensor approach is simple; the Ca(2+) signal generated in the biosensor cell reflects the presence (release) of a neurotransmitter. The technique is versatile because biosensor cells expressing a variety of receptors can be used in many applications. The protocol takes ∼3 h.

  15. Contributions to the field of neurotransmitters by Japanese scientists, and reflections on my own research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Masanori

    2007-03-01

    PART I DESCRIBES IMPORTANT CONTRIBUTIONS MADE BY SOME JAPANESE PIONEERS IN THE FIELD OF NEUROTRANSMITTERS: (their achievements in parentheses) J. Takamine (isolation and crystallization of adrenaline); K. Shimidzu (early hint for acetylcholine as a neurotransmitter); F. Kanematsu (donation of the Kanematsu Memorial Institute in Sydney); T. Hayashi (discovery of the excitatory action of glutamate and the inhibitory action of GABA); and I. Sano (discovery of a high concentration of dopamine in striatum, its reduction in a patient with Parkinson's disease and the treatment with DOPA). In Part II, I present some of my reflections on my research on neurotransmitters. The work of my colleagues and myself has made some significant contributions to the establishment of neurotransmitter roles played by GABA and substance P, the first amino acid and the first peptide neurotransmitters, respectively. By the early 1960s, 3 substances, i.e., acetylcholine, noradrenaline, and adrenaline, had been established as neurotransmitters. Now the number of neurotransmitters is believed to be as many as 50 or even more mainly due to the inclusion of several amino acids and a large number of peptide transmitters.

  16. Development of the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bledsoe, Jonathan M.; Kimble, Christopher J.; Covey, Daniel P.; Blaha, Charles D.; Agnesi, Filippo; Mohseni, Pedram; Whitlock, Sidney; Johnson, David M.; Horne, April; Bennet, Kevin E.; Lee, Kendall H.; Garris, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Object Emerging evidence supports the hypothesis that modulation of specific central neuronal systems contributes to the clinical efficacy of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and motor cortex stimulation (MCS). Real-time monitoring of the neurochemical output of targeted regions may therefore advance functional neurosurgery by, among other goals, providing a strategy for investigation of mechanisms, identification of new candidate neurotransmitters, and chemically guided placement of the stimulating electrode. The authors report the development of a device called the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS) for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring during functional neurosurgery. This device supports fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) for real-time, spatially and chemically resolved neurotransmitter measurements in the brain. Methods The FSCV study consisted of a triangle wave scanned between −0.4 and 1 V at a rate of 300 V/second and applied at 10 Hz. All voltages were compared with an Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The CFM was constructed by aspirating a single carbon fiber (r = 2.5 μm) into a glass capillary and pulling the capillary to a microscopic tip by using a pipette puller. The exposed carbon fiber (that is, the sensing region) extended beyond the glass insulation by ~ 100 μm. The neurotransmitter dopamine was selected as the analyte for most trials. Proof-of-principle tests included in vitro flow injection and noise analysis, and in vivo measurements in urethane-anesthetized rats by monitoring dopamine release in the striatum following high-frequency electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle. Direct comparisons were made to a conventional hardwired system. Results The WINCS, designed in compliance with FDA-recognized consensus standards for medical electrical device safety, consisted of 4 modules: 1) front-end analog circuit for FSCV (that is, current-to-voltage transducer

  17. Precision intrauterine contraception may significantly increase continuation of use: a review of long-term clinical experience with frameless copper-releasing intrauterine contraception devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wildemeersch D

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dirk Wildemeersch,1 Ansgar Pett,2 Sohela Jandi,2 Thomas Hasskamp,3 Patrick Rowe,4 Marc Vrijens5 1Gynecological Outpatient Clinic and IUD Training Center, Ghent, Belgium; 2Gynecological Outpatient Clinic, Berlin, Germany; 3Gynecological Outpatient Clinic, Münster, Germany; 4Formely IUD Research Group at the UNDP/UNFPA/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland; 5Gynecological Outpatient Clinic, Ghent, Belgium Objective: The purpose of this paper is to review the experience with the frameless, anchored, GyneFix copper-releasing intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCDs/IUDs (Contrel Europe, Belgium, and to demonstrate their high acceptability and low rate of discontinuation of use, which could contribute to current efforts that aim to reduce radically the high number of unintended pregnancies and induced abortions, particularly in young women. Materials and methods: This paper is based on studies that examined the differences in uterine volume and cavity size, related to age and parity, and on original clinical research data and practical experience with frameless copper IUDs, as well as on literature data on the IUD–endometrial cavity relationship of conventional IUDs, with special reference to side effects and user discontinuation. Results: The mean transverse diameter in nulliparous and parous women is significantly less than the length of the transverse arm of the TCu380A IUD (ParaGard, Duramed, NY, USA or the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (Mirena, Bayer, Germany. Small, frameless, flexible, and unidimensional copper IUDs appear to be well tolerated, with less impact on menstrual bleeding, resulting in low discontinuation rates when compared with standard-size conventional IUDs, which often result in increased expulsion rates, complaints of pain and erratic or increased menstrual bleeding, and subsequent high rates of

  18. Identification of coffee components that stimulate dopamine release from pheochromocytoma cells (PC-12).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J; Rohm, B; Lang, R; Pariza, M W; Hofmann, T; Somoza, V

    2012-02-01

    Coffee and caffeine are known to affect the limbic system, but data on the influence of coffee and coffee constituents on neurotransmitter release is limited. We investigated dopamine release and Ca(2+)-mobilization in pheochromocytoma cells (PC-12 cells) after stimulation with two lyophilized coffee beverages prepared from either Coffea arabica (AR) or Coffea canephora var. robusta (RB) beans and constituents thereof. Both coffee lyophilizates showed effects in dilutions between 1:100 and 1:10,000. To identify the active coffee compound, coffee constituents were tested in beverage and plasma representative concentrations. Caffeine, trigonelline, N-methylpyridinium, chlorogenic acid, catechol, pyrogallol and 5-hydroxytryptamides increased calcium signaling and dopamine release, although with different efficacies. While N-methylpyridinium stimulated the Ca(2+)-mobilization most potently (EC(200): 0.14±0.29μM), treatment of the cells with pyrogallol (EC(200): 48±14nM) or 5-hydroxytryptamides (EC(200): 10±3nM) lead to the most pronounced effect on dopamine release. In contrast, no effect was seen for the reconstituted biomimetic mixture. We therefore conclude that each of the coffee constituents tested stimulated the dopamine release in PC-12 cells. Since no effect was found for their biomimetic mixture, we hypothesize other coffee constituents being responsible for the dopamine release demonstrated for AR and RB coffee brews. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Modulating dopamine release by optogenetics in transgenic mice reveals terminal dopaminergic dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yao; Driscoll, Nicolette; Ozden, Ilker; Yu, Zeyang; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2015-07-01

    Dopamine (DA) release and uptake dynamics in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) have important implications for neurological diseases and mammalian animal behaviors. We demonstrate here the use of cell-type-specific optogenetic targeting in conjunction with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry applied to brain slices prepared from specifically tailored transgenic mice, which conditionally express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) through dopamine transporter (DAT)-Cre. Terminal dopaminergic dynamics and the direct manipulation of induced DA release level by controlling light intensity, pulse width, and the shape of stimulation waveforms were studied. Effective cell terminal-targeting optogenetic induction of DA release at physiological levels in NAc is demonstrated and discussed. It was found that delivering more light energy by increasing stimulation intensity and length is not the only way to control DA release; the temporal shape of the stimulus waveform at light onset is also critically related to induced DA concentrations. In addition, DA uptake dynamics as well as the recovery of the presynaptic releasable DA pool are studied and modeled. More broadly, our experimental findings provide important further evidence for effectively applying optogenetics to induce neurotransmitter release in the behaviorally relevant region of the brain in a highly cell-type selective context.

  20. Synaptic modulation by astrocytes via Ca2+-dependent glutamate release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santello, M; Volterra, A

    2009-01-12

    In the past 15 years the classical view that astrocytes play a relatively passive role in brain function has been overturned and it has become increasingly clear that signaling between neurons and astrocytes may play a crucial role in the information processing that the brain carries out. This new view stems from two seminal observations made in the early 1990s: 1. astrocytes respond to neurotransmitters released during synaptic activity with elevation of their intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i); 2. astrocytes release chemical transmitters, including glutamate, in response to [Ca2+]i elevations. The simultaneous recognition that astrocytes sense neuronal activity and release neuroactive agents has been instrumental for understanding previously unknown roles of these cells in the control of synapse formation, function and plasticity. These findings open a conceptual revolution, leading to rethink how brain communication works, as they imply that information travels (and is processed) not just in the neuronal circuitry but in an expanded neuron-glia network. In this review we critically discuss the available information concerning: 1. the characteristics of the astrocytic Ca2+ responses to synaptic activity; 2. the basis of Ca2+-dependent glutamate exocytosis from astrocytes; 3. the modes of action of astrocytic glutamate on synaptic function.

  1. Changes in endocrine and neurochemical profiles in neonatal pigs prenatally exposed to increased maternal cortisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanitz, Ellen; Otten, Winfried; Tuchscherer, Margret

    2006-10-01

    Early life environmental factors are able to influence prenatal development and may cause structural and functional effects on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and neurotransmitter systems in the offspring. These effects seem to be species specific and may depend on the period of gestation when the factors are effective. Elevated maternal cortisol levels are assumed to play a crucial role as a programming factor during prenatal development. Thus, the present study was performed in order to examine the effects of increased maternal cortisol levels during mid- and late gestation on central and peripheral alterations of the HPA axis and brain neurotransmitter profiles in piglets. Endogenous cortisol release was induced by i.m. administration of ACTH to sows every second day either during mid- (day 49 until 75) or late gestation (day 85 until 107). Controls received injections of saline. ACTH treatment of sows during mid- and late gestation had no effects on the gestation length, the number of total born and the frequency of stillborn piglets. However, ACTH treatment during late gestation caused an increase of birth weight (P pigs affect growth, HPA axis and brain neurotransmitter systems in the offspring in a sex-specific manner. The observed alterations in endocrine and neurotransmitter systems are dependent on the gestational period. Late gestation appears to be a more sensitive phase for cortisol-induced programming in pigs. Moreover, the present data show that there are marked developmental differences between laboratory animals and domestic pigs, and highlight the importance of species-specific studies on prenatal influences.

  2. Exercise-induced increase in glucose transport, GLUT-4, and VAMP-2 in plasma membrane from human muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, S; Hargreaves, Mark; Richter, Erik

    1996-01-01

    contractions may induce trafficking of GLUT-4-containing vesicles via a mechanism similar to neurotransmitter release. Our results demonstrate for the first time exercise-induced translocation of GLUT-4 and VAMP-2 to the plasma membrane of human muscle and increased sarcolemmal glucose transport.......A major effect of muscle contractions is an increase in sarcolemmal glucose transport. We have used a recently developed technique to produce sarcolemmal giant vesicles from human muscle biopsy samples obtained before and after exercise. Six men exercised for 10 min at 50% maximal O2 uptake (Vo2max...

  3. Kinetics, Ca2+ dependence, and biophysical properties of integrin-mediated mechanical modulation of transmitter release from frog motor nerve terminals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B. M.; Grinnell, A. D.

    1997-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release from frog motor nerve terminals is strongly modulated by change in muscle length. Over the physiological range, there is an approximately 10% increase in spontaneous and evoked release per 1% muscle stretch. Because many muscle fibers do not receive suprathreshold synaptic inputs at rest length, this stretch-induced enhancement of release constitutes a strong peripheral amplifier of the spinal stretch reflex. The stretch modulation of release is inhibited by peptides that block integrin binding of natural ligands. The modulation varies linearly with length, with a delay of no more than approximately 1-2 msec and is maintained constant at the new length. Moreover, the stretch modulation persists in a zero Ca2+ Ringer and, hence, is not dependent on Ca2+ influx through stretch activated channels. Eliminating transmembrane Ca2+ gradients and buffering intraterminal Ca2+ to approximately normal resting levels does not eliminate the modulation, suggesting that it is not the result of release of Ca2+ from internal stores. Finally, changes in temperature have no detectable effect on the kinetics of stretch-induced changes in endplate potential (EPP) amplitude or miniature EPP (mEPP) frequency. We conclude, therefore, that stretch does not act via second messenger pathways or a chemical modification of molecules involved in the release pathway. Instead, there is direct mechanical modulation of release. We postulate that tension on integrins in the presynaptic membrane is transduced mechanically into changes in the position or conformation of one or more molecules involved in neurotransmitter release, altering sensitivity to Ca2+ or the equilibrium for a critical reaction leading to vesicle fusion.

  4. 右美沙芬对小鼠大脑5-羟色胺含量的影响%Influences of Dextromethorphan on Monoamine Neurotransmitter 5-HT in Mouse Brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李迎春; 张久亮; 周莉红

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the antitussive mechanism of dextromethorphan. Methods By using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with fluorescent light detector, we detected the effect of dextromethorphan on the contents of five kinds of monamine neurotransmitters in mouse brain with codeine phosphate serving as a positive drug. Results The results indicated that the antitussive mechanism of dextromethorphan was concerned with monanine neurotransmitter 5-HT. In the dextromethorphan group, 5-HT was 43. 50% higher than in the blank group (P<0.01) , and 5-HIAA was 35. 00% higher than in the blank group (P<0. 05). Dextromethorphan could increase the content of 5-HT in mouse brain to induce antitussive effects, while the antitussice effects of codeine phosphate had no relationship with serotonergic mechanisms. Conclusion The antitussive mechanism of dextromethorphan is related with the release of monanine neurotransmitter 5-HT in mouse brain.%目的 初步探讨右美沙芬通过增加小鼠脑部5-羟色胺(5-HT)的含量的镇咳机制.方法 采用反相高效液相-荧光检测(RP-HPLC-FLD)法,以磷酸可待因为对照药,测定右美沙芬对小鼠脑部5种单胺类神经递质含量的影响.结果 右美沙芬的镇咳机制与单胺类神经递质5-HT有关,右美沙芬组的5-HT含量比空白组增加了43.50%,差异有统计学意义(P <0.01),5-羟基吲哚乙酸(5-HIAA)含量比空白组增加35.00%,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 右美沙芬镇咳作用与小鼠脑部5-HT的释放有关.

  5. Early Antipsychotic Treatment in Juvenile Rats Elicits Long-Term Alterations to the Dopamine Neurotransmitter System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Michael; Lian, Jiamei; Huang, Xu-Feng; Deng, Chao

    2016-11-22

    Prescription of antipsychotic drugs (APDs) to children has substantially increased in recent years. Whilst current investigations into potential long-term effects have uncovered some alterations to adult behaviours, further investigations into potential changes to neurotransmitter systems are required. The current study investigated potential long-term changes to the adult dopamine (DA) system following aripiprazole, olanzapine and risperidone treatment in female and male juvenile rats. Levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), phosphorylated-TH (p-TH), dopamine active transporter (DAT), and D₁ and D₂ receptors were measured via Western blot and/or receptor autoradiography. Aripiprazole decreased TH and D₁ receptor levels in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and p-TH levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of females, whilst TH levels decreased in the PFC of males. Olanzapine decreased PFC p-TH levels and increased D₂ receptor expression in the PFC and nucleus accumbens (NAc) in females only. Additionally, risperidone treatment increased D₁ receptor levels in the hippocampus of females, whilst, in males, p-TH levels increased in the PFC and hippocampus, D₁ receptor expression decreased in the NAc, and DAT levels decreased in the caudate putamen (CPu), and elevated in the VTA. These results suggest that early treatment with various APDs can cause different long-term alterations in the adult brain, across both treatment groups and genders.

  6. Shockwaves increase T-cell proliferation and IL-2 expression through ATP release, P2X7 receptors, and FAK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tiecheng; Junger, Wolfgang G; Yuan, Changji; Jin, An; Zhao, Yi; Zheng, Xueqing; Zeng, Yanjun; Liu, Jianguo

    2010-03-01

    Shockwaves elicited by transient pressure disturbances are used to treat musculoskeletal disorders. Previous research has shown that shockwave treatment affects T-cell function, enhancing T-cell proliferation and IL-2 expression by activating p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Here we investigated the signaling pathway by which shockwaves mediate p38 MAPK phosphorylation. We found that shockwaves at an intensity of 0.18 mJ/mm(2) induce the release of extracellular ATP from human Jurkat T-cells at least in part by affecting cell viability. ATP released into the extracellular space stimulates P2X7-type purinergic receptors that induce the activation of p38 MAPK and of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) by phosphorylation on residues Tyr397 and Tyr576/577. Elimination of released ATP with apyrase or inhibition of P2X7 receptors with the antagonists KN-62 or suramin significantly weakens FAK phosphorylation, p38 MAPK activation, IL-2 expression, and T-cell proliferation. Conversely, addition of exogenous ATP causes phosphorylation of FAK and p38 MAPK. Silencing of FAK expression also reduces these cell responses to shockwave treatment. We conclude that shockwaves enhance p38 MAPK activation, IL-2 expression, and T-cell proliferation via the release of cellular ATP and feedback mechanisms that involve P2X7 receptor activation and FAK phosphorylation.

  7. Increased adherence eight months after switch from twice daily calcineurin inhibitor based treatment to once daily modified released tacrolimus in heart transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doesch AO

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Andreas O Doesch,1 Susanne Mueller,1 Ceylan Akyol,1 Christian Erbel,1 Lutz Frankenstein,1 Arjang Ruhparwar,2 Philipp Ehlermann,1 Thomas J Dengler,3 Hugo A Katus11Department of Cardiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 2Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 3Department of Cardiology, SLK-Kliniken Heilbronn, Bad Friedrichshall, GermanyBackground: Modified-release tacrolimus (TAC is a new, once-daily oral formulation of the established immunosuppressive agent TAC. This study evaluated long-term patient adherence, as well as safety and efficacy, in stable patients after heart transplantation (HTx who switched from a conventional twice daily calcineurin inhibitor-based regimen (TAC or cyclosporine A [CsA] to a once-daily modified-release TAC regimen.Methods: Stable patients were switched from conventional TAC or CsA (twice-daily dosing to modified-release TAC (once-daily dosing according to manufacturer's recommendations using a pre-experimental design. Self-reported adherence was assessed at baseline and 8 months after the switch with the Basel Assessment of Adherence with Immunosuppressive Medication Scale (BAASIS. Additionally, routine laboratory values were analyzed 8 months after switch.Results: Of 76 patients (58 male, 18 female initially included, 72 were available for statistical analysis, as modified-release TAC was discontinued due to diarrhea in one patient and gastrointestinal discomfort in three patients. Overall nonadherence at baseline for any of the four BAASIS items was 75.0% versus 40.3% after 8 months (P<0.0001. After 8 months, adherence was improved in 41 patients (56.9%, unchanged in 27 (37.5%, and reduced in four patients (5.6%. The BAASIS visual analog scale score improved significantly from 87.0% ± 13.5% to 97.5% ± 5.7% (P<0.0001. No significant changes were observed for hematological, renal, or liver function parameters after 8 months (all P=not significant

  8. Increased Secretion of Endogenous GH after Treatment with an Intranasal GH-releasing Peptide-2 Spray Does Not Promote Growth in Short Children with GH Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Yokoya, Susumu; Nishi, Yoshikazu

    2014-10-01

    We investigated whether treatment with an intranasal GH-releasing peptide (GHRP)-2 spray, which acts as a potent GH secretagogue that stimulates endogenous GH secretion, promotes growth in patients with GH deficiency (GHD). This study involved 126 prepubertal short children (81 males, 45 females) with a height SD score of -2 SD or less, who had been diagnosed as having GHD based on GH stimulation tests, and in whom the serum GH concentrations increased up to 9 ng/ml after preliminary administration of an intranasal GHRP-2 spray. The subjects included in this study were divided into 3 groups by use of a double-blind method; that is 44 were placed into the placebo group (P group: 30 males, 14 females), 41 were placed into the GHRP-2 low dose group (L group: 25 males, 16 females), and 41 were placed into the GHRP-2 high dose group (H group: 26 males, 15 females). Those with a body wt of less than 20 kg were administered a placebo (P group), 50 μg of GHRP-2 (L group) or 100 μg of GHRP-2 (H group), and those with a body wt of 20 kg or more were administered a placebo (P group), 100 µg of GHRP-2 (L group) or 200 µg of GHRP-2 (H group) twice daily (morning and evening) for 48 continuous wk. Age and height SD scores at baseline were not significantly different among the three groups: 7.5 yr old and -2.26 SD in the P group, 7.3 yr old and -2.38 SD in the L group, and 7.5 yr old and -2.27 SD in the H group. Of the 126 subjects, 44, 40 and 40 subjects in the P, L and H groups, respectively, completed the 48 continuous wk of treatment. The changes in the mean height SD scores (mean growth rate) after 48 wk of treatment in the P, L and H groups were 0.07 SD, 0.03 SD, and 0.02 SD, respectively, and thus no significant differences was observed among the 3 groups. Also no significant changes in blood IGF-I levels at baseline or after 48 wk of treatment were observed among the 3 groups. This study revealed that in patients with GHD, an increase in endogenous GH secretion as a

  9. Neurotransmitter changes in patients with Parkinson's disease detected by encephalofluctuography technology A non-randomized control study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Han; Zhenfu Wang; Yang Yang; Xianhong Chen; Hong Sun

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Encephalofluctuograph Technology (ET) is an advanced and non-traumatic analytical method of brain function. ET can acquire super-slow waves from electroencephalic signals. Studies have shown that these particular spectra can reflect neurochemical processes in the brain. OBJECTIVE: To verify neurotransmitter changes in the brains Parkinson's disease (PD) patients through the use of ET. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A non-randomized concurrent control experiment was performed at the Department of Neurology in Southern Building, General Hospital of Chinese PLA from August to December 2007. PARTICIPANTS: Sixty-one outpatients with PD were selected from the General Hospital of Chinese PLA from August 2007 to December 2007. In addition, 48 healthy subjects were selected as normal controls. METHODS: All patients underwent assessment of the sub scale Ⅱ,Ⅲ, and V of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), in which part Ⅱ was used to inform activity of daily living, part Ⅲ reflected athletic ability, and part Ⅴ was the Hoehn & Yahr grade for symptoms evaluation. Correlation analysis was performed between dopamine levels and UPDRS assessment. Neurotransmitter changes were observed forty-eight prior to and 1.5 hours after medicating with Benserazide. The S1, S2, S4, S5,S7, and S11 spectras respectively reflect gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid (Glu), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), acetylcholine (ACh), norepinephrine, and dopamine. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Neurotransmitter changes in the brains of all subjects, and correlations between dopamine concentrations and UPDRS assessment. Neurotransmitter changes in a subgroup of patients prior to and 1.5 hours after medicating with Benserazide. RESULTS: Concentrations of 5-HT, ACh, and norepinephrine were decreased in the PD group, and GABA was increased. However, there was no significant difference compared with the normal control group (P > 0.05). The level of dopamine in PD group was

  10. Electrochemical sensors and biosensors for determination of catecholamine neurotransmitters: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, José A; Fernandes, Paula M V; Pereira, Carlos M; Silva, F

    2016-11-01

    This work describes the state of the art of electrochemical devices for the detection of an important class of neurotransmitters: the catecholamines. This class of biogenic amines includes dopamine, noradrenaline (also called norepinephrine) and adrenaline (also called epinephrine). Researchers have focused on the role of catecholamine molecules within the human body because they are involved in many important biological functions and are commonly associated with several diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson. Furthermore, the release of catecholamines as a consequence of induced stimulus is an important indicator of reward-related behaviors, such as food, drink, sex and drug addiction. Thus, the development of simple, fast and sensitive electroanalytical methodologies for the determination of catecholamines is currently needed in clinical and biomedical fields, as they have the potential to serve as clinically relevant biomarkers for specific disease states or to monitor treatment efficacy. Currently, three main strategies have used by researchers to detect catecholamine molecules, namely: the use electrochemical materials in combination with, for example, HPLC or FIA, the incorporation of new materials/layers on the sensor surfaces (Tables 1-7) and in vivo detection, manly by using FSCV at CFMEs (Section 10). The developed methodologies were able not only to accurately detect catecholamines at relevant concentration levels, but to do so in the presence of co-existing interferences in samples detected (ascorbate, for example). This review examines the progress made in electrochemical sensors for the selective detection of catecholamines in the last 15 years, with special focus on highly innovative features introduced by nanotechnology. As the literature in rather extensive, we try to simplify this work by summarizing and grouping electrochemical sensors according to the manner their substrates were chemically modified. We also discuss the current and future

  11. Functional localization of neurotransmitter receptors and synaptic inputs to mature neurons of the medial superior olive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couchman, Kiri; Grothe, Benedikt; Felmy, Felix

    2012-02-01

    Neurons of the medial superior olive (MSO) code for the azimuthal location of low-frequency sound sources via a binaural coincidence detection system operating on microsecond time scales. These neurons are morphologically simple and stereotyped, and anatomical studies have indicated a functional segregation of excitatory and inhibitory inputs between cellular compartments. It is thought that this morphological arrangement holds important implications for the computational task of these cells. To date, however, there has been no functional investigation into synaptic input sites or functional receptor distributions on mature neurons of the MSO. Here, functional neurotransmitter receptor maps for amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), glycine (Gly), and ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A)) receptors (Rs) were compared and complemented by their corresponding synaptic input map. We find in MSO neurons from postnatal day 20-35 gerbils that AMPARs and their excitatory inputs target the soma and dendrites. Functional GlyRs and their inhibitory inputs are predominantly refined to the somata, although a pool of functional GlyRs is present extrasynaptically on MSO dendrites. GABA(A)R responses are present throughout the cell but lack direct synaptic contact indicating an involvement in volume transmission. NMDARs are present both synaptically and extrasynaptically with an overall distribution similar to GlyRs. Interestingly, even at physiological temperatures these functional NMDARs can be potentiated by synaptically released Gly. The functional receptor and synaptic input maps produced here led to the identification of a cross talk between transmitter systems and raises the possibility that extrasynaptic receptors could be modulating leak conductances as a homeostatic mechanism.

  12. Gastric bicarbonate secretion and release of prostaglandin E2 are increased in duodenal ulcer patients but not in Helicobacter pylori-positive healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertz-Nielsen, A; Hillingsø, Jens; Frøkiaer, H;

    1996-01-01

    was present also in the stomach of DU patients. METHODS: Simultaneous determinations of gastric and duodenal bicarbonate secretion and luminal release of PGE2 were performed in 16 healthy volunteers (5 Helicobacter pylori-positive) and 8 inactive DU patients (all H. pylori-positive). RESULTS: In healthy...... volunteers the rates of gastroduodenal bicarbonate secretion and the release of PGE2 were not influenced by H. pylori status. In inactive DU patients the rates of basal (704 +/- 84 versus 356 +/- 40 mumol/h; mean +/- SEM) and vagally stimulated (modified sham feeding) (1724 +/- 376 versus 592 +/- 52 mumol...... for the abnormally high gastric secretion of bicarbonate in inactive DU patients. The defective duodenal secretion of bicarbonate observed in these patients may be a consequence of previous ulceration rather than the mere presence of H. pylori infection....

  13. Gastric bicarbonate secretion and release of prostaglandin E2 are increased in duodenal ulcer patients, but not in Helicobacter pylori positive healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A, Mertz-Nielsen; Hillingsø, Jens; Frøkiær, Hanne;

    1996-01-01

    was present also in the stomach of DU patients. Methods: Simultaneous determinations of gastric and duodenal bicarbonate secretion and luminal release of PGE(2) were performed in 16 healthy volunteers (5 Helicobacter pylori-positive) and 8 inactive DU patients (all H. pylori-positivr). Results: In healthy...... volunteers the rates of gastroduodenal bicarbonate secretion and the release of PGE(2), were not influenced by H. pylori status. In inactive DU patients the rates of basal (704 +/- 84 versus 356 +/- 40 mu mol/h: mean +/- SEM) and vagally stimulated (modified sham feeding) (1724 +/- 376 versus 592 +/- 52 mu...... be responsible for the abnormally high gastric secretion of bicarbonate in inactive DU patients. Th; defective duodenal secretion of bicarbonate observed in these patients may be a consequence of previous ulceration rather than the mere presence of H. pylori infection....

  14. Xylanase and Protease Increase Solubilization of Non-Starch Polysaccharides and Nutrient Release of Corn- and Wheat Distillers Dried Grains with Solubles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Brøgger; Dalsgaard, Søren; Arent, Susan

    2015-01-01

    and protease yielded the highest degree of enzymatic degradation, indicating close association of arabinoxylan and protein within the cell wall matrix. Collectively, the GH10 xylanase degraded DDGS more efficiently than the GH11 xylanases, due to the complexity of the substrate and the substrate affinity...... of this xylanase. The current in vitro results indicate a high potential of xylanase in combination with protease to efficiently degrade DDGS and promote nutrient release in diets for non-ruminant animals....

  15. Gastric bicarbonate secretion and release of prostaglandin E2 are increased in duodenal ulcer patients but not in Helicobacter pylori-positive healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertz-Nielsen, A; Hillingsø, Jens; Frøkiaer, H

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Duodenal ulcer (DU) patients have impaired proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion at rest and in response to luminal acid with higher acid-stimulated mucosal release of prostaglandin (PG) E2 than healthy subjects. Our purpose was to determine whether this abnormality was pres...... for the abnormally high gastric secretion of bicarbonate in inactive DU patients. The defective duodenal secretion of bicarbonate observed in these patients may be a consequence of previous ulceration rather than the mere presence of H. pylori infection.......BACKGROUND: Duodenal ulcer (DU) patients have impaired proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion at rest and in response to luminal acid with higher acid-stimulated mucosal release of prostaglandin (PG) E2 than healthy subjects. Our purpose was to determine whether this abnormality...... was present also in the stomach of DU patients. METHODS: Simultaneous determinations of gastric and duodenal bicarbonate secretion and luminal release of PGE2 were performed in 16 healthy volunteers (5 Helicobacter pylori-positive) and 8 inactive DU patients (all H. pylori-positive). RESULTS: In healthy...

  16. INCREASE IN DOPAMINE RELEASE FROM THE NUCLEUS-ACCUMBENS IN RESPONSE TO FEEDING - A MODEL TO STUDY INTERACTIONS BETWEEN DRUGS AND NATURALLY ACTIVATED DOPAMINERGIC-NEURONS IN THE RAT-BRAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WESTERINK, BHC; TEISMAN, A; DEVRIES, JB

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the interactions between the in vivo release of dopamine and certain drugs, during conditions of increased dopaminergic activity. Dopaminergic neurons in the nucleus accumbens were activated by feeding hungry rats. 48-96 h after implantation of a micro

  17. Toxic effects of methoxychlor in rat striatum: modifications in several neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, A; Cabaleiro, T; Caride, A; Gutiérrez, A; Esquifino, A I

    2007-06-01

    Neurotoxic effects of methoxychlor (MTX) are poorly understood at present. This study was undertaken to evaluate the possible effects of MTX in norepinephrine, dopamine and amino acid contents and serotonin turnover in rat striatum. For this purpose, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered 25 mg/kg/day of MTX in sesame oil or vehicle only for 30 days. The neurotransmitters of interest were measured in the striatum by HPLC. MTX decreased norepinephrine and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) content and serotonin turnover (measured as 5-HIAA/serotonin ratio), and increased glutamate and GABA concentrations. However, the content of serotonin, aspartate, glutamine and taurine was not modified by MTX exposure. These data suggest that MTX exposure inhibits norepinephrine synthesis and serotonin metabolism. The inhibitory effect on norepinephrine could be explained, at least in part, by the increase of both GABA and glutamate contents. Further studies are needed to understand the effects of MTX on serotonin. Also a disruptive effect of MTX on the metabolisms of glutamate, aspartate, glutamine and GABA emerges.

  18. Effects of low dose endosulfan exposure on brain neurotransmitter levels in the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preud'homme, Valérie; Milla, Sylvain; Gillardin, Virginie; De Pauw, Edwin; Denoël, Mathieu; Kestemont, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the impact of pesticides in amphibians is of growing concern to assess the causes of their decline. Among pesticides, endosulfan belongs to one of the potential sources of danger because of its wide use and known effects, particularly neurotoxic, on a variety of organisms. However, the effect of endosulfan was not yet evaluated on amphibians at levels encompassing simultaneously brain neurotransmitters and behavioural endpoints. In this context, tadpoles of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis were submitted to four treatments during 27 d: one control, one ethanol control, and two low environmental concentrations of endosulfan (0.1 and 1 μg L(-1)). Endosulfan induced a significant increase of brain serotonin level at both concentrations and a significant increase of brain dopamine and GABA levels at the lower exposure but acetylcholinesterase activity was not modified by the treatment. The gene coding for the GABA transporter 1 was up-regulated in endosulfan contaminated tadpoles while the expression of other genes coding for the neurotransmitter receptors or for the enzymes involved in their metabolic pathways was not significantly modified by endosulfan exposure. Endosulfan also affected foraging, and locomotion in links with the results of the physiological assays, but no effects were seen on growth. These results show that low environmental concentrations of endosulfan can induce adverse responses in X. laevis tadpoles. At a broader perspective, this suggests that more research using and linking multiple markers should be used to understand the complex mode of action of pollutants.

  19. Mechanism of the Association between Na+ Binding and Conformations at the Intracellular Gate in Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Quick, Matthias; Zhao, Chunfeng; Gotfryd, Kamil; Khelashvili, George; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J; Javitch, Jonathan A; Noskov, Sergei; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei

    2015-05-29

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) terminate neurotransmission by Na(+)-dependent reuptake of released neurotransmitters. Previous studies suggested that Na(+)-binding reconfigures dynamically coupled structural elements in an allosteric interaction network (AIN) responsible for function-related conformational changes, but the intramolecular pathway of this mechanism has remained uncharted. We describe a new approach for the modeling and analysis of intramolecular dynamics in the bacterial NSS homolog LeuT. From microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations and cognate experimental verifications in both LeuT and human dopamine transporter (hDAT), we apply the novel method to identify the composition and the dynamic properties of their conserved AIN. In LeuT, two different perturbations disrupting Na(+) binding and transport (i.e. replacing Na(+) with Li(+) or the Y268A mutation at the intracellular gate) affect the AIN in strikingly similar ways. In contrast, other mutations that affect the intracellular gate (i.e. R5A and D369A) do not significantly impair Na(+) cooperativity and transport. Our analysis shows these perturbations to have much lesser effects on the AIN, underscoring the sensitivity of this novel method to the mechanistic nature of the perturbation. Notably, this set of observations holds as well for hDAT, where the aligned Y335A, R60A, and D436A mutations also produce different impacts on Na(+) dependence. Thus, the detailed AIN generated from our method is shown to connect Na(+) binding with global conformational changes that are critical for the transport mechanism. That the AIN between the Na(+) binding sites and the intracellular gate in bacterial LeuT resembles that in eukaryotic hDAT highlights the conservation of allosteric pathways underlying NSS function.

  20. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) processing by Kupffer cells releases a modified LPS with increased hepatocyte binding and decreased tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulatory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treon, S P; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A

    1993-02-01

    Normal physiological clearance of gut-derived endotoxin lipopolysaccharide [LPS] has been described previously; initially, there is uptake by Kupffer cells (KC), then release of modified LPS, followed by hepatocyte uptake. Previous work in our laboratories indicated that LPS is structurally modified with loss of carbohydrate prior to its release by KC. In this study, we functionally characterize KC modified LPS. KC-modified 125I-LPS was prepared from primary rat KC. Escherichia coli 0127:B8 native 125I-LPS or KC-modified 125I-LPS (40 ng) was incubated for 1 hr with 1 x 10E6 primary hepatocytes. The binding of KC-modified LPS was 4.33-fold higher than native LPS (P = 0.0024). Binding analysis studies were conducted to determine the region of KC-modified LPS responsible for enhanced hepatocyte binding. KC-modified Salmonella minnesota LPS was competed with 100-fold excess native or mutant (Ra, Rc, Rd, or Re) strains of LPS or Lipid A with no decrease to hepatocyte binding. S. minnesota-native 125I-LPS was compared with KC-modified 125I-LPS in a study to assess induction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-gamma by rat peritoneal macrophages. Native or KC-modified 125I-LPS (100 ng) was presented to 1 x 10E7 peritoneal macrophages for 6 hr. TNF-alpha was measured in supernatants using the WEHI-164 cytotoxicity assay. Native LPS induced 5.7-fold higher TNF-alpha levels than KC-modified LPS (P < 0.0001). The above data suggest that structural alterations in KC-modified LPS are accompanied by functional alterations resulting in enhanced hepatocyte binding and decreased TNF-alpha release. The latter result implies that an early step in LPS detoxification occurs in the KC in which LPS is modified to prevent elicitation of biologically active cytokines.

  1. Women in Transition to Health: A Theory-Based Intervention to Increase Engagement in Care for Women Recently Released From Jail or Prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, Alison M; Durand, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    The time after incarceration is widely regarded as tenuous and stressful, and for women living with chronic illness, self-management is yet another stressor. Intervening before the individual is overwhelmed is critical to ensuring success. In this article the Women in Transition to Health, a nurse-led intervention based on Lazarus and Folkman's Transactional Model of Stress and Coping, designed to improve health outcomes in women recently released from jail or prison is described. Motivational interviewing and case management are used to strengthen coping skills and encourage engagement in care. Using the stress model to address the unique needs of this population holds promise for improving health and quality of life.

  2. Sympathetic nervous system catecholamines and neuropeptide Y neurotransmitters are upregulated in human NAFLD and modulate the fibrogenic function of hepatic stellate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Sigala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sympathetic nervous system (SNS signalling regulates murine hepatic fibrogenesis through effects on hepatic stellate cells (HSC, and obesity-related hypertension with SNS activation accelerates progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, the commonest cause of chronic liver disease. NAFLD may lead to cirrhosis. The effects of the SNS neurotransmitters norepinephrine (NE, epinephrine (EPI and neuropeptide Y (NPY on human primary HSC (hHSC function and in NAFLD pathogenesis are poorly understood. AIMS: to determine the mechanistic effects of NE/EPI/NPY on phenotypic changes in cultured hHSC, and to study SNS signalling in human NAFLD livers. METHODS: Freshly isolated hHSC were assessed for expression of cathecholamine/neuropeptide Y receptors and for the synthesis of NE/EPI. The effects of NE/EPI/NPY and adrenoceptor antagonists prazosin (PRZ/propranolol (PRL on hHSC fibrogenic functions and the involved kinases and interleukin pathways were examined. Human livers with proven NAFLD were then assessed for upregulation of SNS signalling components. RESULTS: Activated hHSC express functional α/β-adrenoceptors and NPY receptors, which are upregulated in the livers of patients with cirrhotic NAFLD. hHSC in culture synthesize and release NE/EPI, required for their optimal basal growth and survival. Exogenous NE/EPI and NPY dose-dependently induced hHSC proliferation, mediated via p38 MAP, PI3K and MEK signalling. NE and EPI but not NPY increased expression of collagen-1α2 via TGF-β without involvement of the pro-fibrogenic cytokines leptin, IL-4 and IL-13 or the anti-fibrotic cytokine IL-10. CONCLUSIONS: hHSC synthesize and require cathecholamines for optimal survival and fibrogenic functionality. Activated hHSC express directly fibrogenic α/β-adrenoceptors and NPY receptors, upregulated in human cirrhotic NAFLD. Adrenoceptor and NPY antagonists may be novel anti-fibrotic agents in human NAFLD.

  3. Arachidonic acid triggers [Ca2+]i increases in rat round spermatids by a likely GPR activation, ERK signalling and ER/acidic compartments Ca2+ release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillamanque, Joaquin; Sanchez-Tusie, Ana; Carmona, Emerson M.; Treviño, Claudia L.; Sandoval, Carolina; Nualart, Francisco; Osses, Nelson

    2017-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA), a compound secreted by Sertoli cells (SC) in a FSH-dependent manner, is able to induce the release of Ca2+ from internal stores in round spermatids and pachytene spermatocytes. In this study, the possible site(s) of action of AA in round spermatids, the signalling pathways associated and the intracellular Ca2+ stores targeted by AA-induced signalling were pharmacologically characterized by measuring intracellular Ca2+ using fluorescent Ca2+ probes. Our results suggest that AA acts by interacting with a fatty acid G protein coupled receptor, initiating a G protein signalling cascade that may involve PLA2 and ERK activation, which in turn opens intracellular ryanodine-sensitive channels as wel