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  1. Thyroid hormone and the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moolman, J A

    2002-01-01

    Thyroid hormone has important cardiovascular effects, and abnormalities of its production cause cardiovascular morbidity. The role of both excessive and insufficient thyroid hormone production in the pathogenesis of clinical cardiac diseases can be deduced from thyroid hormone-induced molecular changes. Thyroid hormone regulates the expression of myocardial genes regulating the handling of calcium, which affects both systolic and diastolic myocardial function. Thyroid hormone also has indirect and direct effects on peripheral vascular smooth muscle tone, and alters the coupling of the left ventricle and arterial system. Excessive production of thyroid hormone results in an increased cardiac output as well as increased cardiac work efficiency, but reduced cardiac reserve. Amiodarone therapy for cardiac rhythm can cause both hyper- and hypothyroidism. Amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT) can be due to either excessive thyroid hormone production (type I AIT) or thyroid hormone release due to an inflammatory condition (type II AIT). Classification of AIT is helpful in guiding therapy. Amiodarone causes changes in the thyroid function tests of euthyroid patients on therapy--it inhibits the conversion of T(4) and T(3), which results in decreased T(3) and slightly increased T(4) serum levels in euthyroid patients. Baseline thyroid functions should therefore be determined before starting amiodarone therapy, and at 6-monthly intervals thereafter.

  2. Thyroid Hormone Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need a different dose of thyroid hormone include birth control pills, estrogen, testosterone, some anti-seizure medications (for ... is no evidence that desiccated thyroid has any advantage over synthetic T4. WHAT ABOUT T3? While most ...

  3. Treatment with thyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Bernadette; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid hormone deficiency can have important repercussions. Treatment with thyroid hormone in replacement doses is essential in patients with hypothyroidism. In this review, we critically discuss the thyroid hormone formulations that are available and approaches to correct replacement therapy with thyroid hormone in primary and central hypothyroidism in different periods of life such as pregnancy, birth, infancy, childhood, and adolescence as well as in adult patients, the elderly, and in patients with comorbidities. Despite the frequent and long term use of l-T4, several studies have documented frequent under- and overtreatment during replacement therapy in hypothyroid patients. We assess the factors determining l-T4 requirements (sex, age, gender, menstrual status, body weight, and lean body mass), the major causes of failure to achieve optimal serum TSH levels in undertreated patients (poor patient compliance, timing of l-T4 administration, interferences with absorption, gastrointestinal diseases, and drugs), and the adverse consequences of unintentional TSH suppression in overtreated patients. Opinions differ regarding the treatment of mild thyroid hormone deficiency, and we examine the recent evidence favoring treatment of this condition. New data suggesting that combined therapy with T3 and T4 could be indicated in some patients with hypothyroidism are assessed, and the indications for TSH suppression with l-T4 in patients with euthyroid multinodular goiter and in those with differentiated thyroid cancer are reviewed. Lastly, we address the potential use of thyroid hormones or their analogs in obese patients and in severe cardiac diseases, dyslipidemia, and nonthyroidal illnesses.

  4. Thyroid Hormone Deiodinases and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eBianco

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Deiodinases constitute a group of thioredoxin-containing selenoenzymes that play an important function in thyroid hormone homeostasis and control of thyroid hormone action. There are three known deiodinases: D1 and D2 activate the pro-hormone thyroxine (T4 to T3, the most active form of thyroid hormone, while D3 inactivates thyroid hormone and terminates T3 action. A number of studies indicate that deiodinase expression is altered in several types of cancers, suggesting that (i they may represent a useful cancer marker and/or (ii could play a role in modulating cell proliferation - in different settings thyroid hormone modulates cell proliferation. For example, although D2 is minimally expressed in human and rodent skeletal muscle, its expression level in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS-13 cells is 3-4 fold higher. In basal cell carcinoma (BCC cells, sonic hedgehog (Shh-induced cell proliferation is accompanied by induction of D3 and inactivation of D2. Interestingly a 5-fold reduction in the growth of BCC in nude mice was observed if D3 expression was knocked down. A decrease in D1 activity has been described in renal clear cell carcinoma, primary liver cancer, lung cancer, and some pituitary tumors, while in breast cancer cells and tissue there is an increase in D1 activity. Furthermore D1 mRNA and activity were found to be decreased in papillary thyroid cancer while D1 and D2 activities were significantly higher in follicular thyroid cancer tissue, in follicular adenoma and in anaplastic thyroid cancer. It is conceivable that understanding how deiodinase dysregulation in tumor cells affect thyroid hormone signaling and possibly interfere with tumor progression could lead to new antineoplastic approaches.

  5. Thyroid Hormone Activates Brown Adipose Tissue and Increases Non-Shivering Thermogenesis--A Cohort Study in a Group of Thyroid Carcinoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeders, Evie P M; Vijgen, Guy H E J; Havekes, Bas; Bouvy, Nicole D; Mottaghy, Felix M; Kars, Marleen; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Schrauwen, Patrick; Brans, Boudewijn; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors are present on brown adipose tissue (BAT), indicating a role for thyroid hormone in the regulation of BAT activation. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of thyroid hormone withdrawal followed by thyroid hormone in TSH-suppressive dosages, on energy expenditure and brown adipose tissue activity. This study was a longitudinal study in an academic center, with a follow-up period of 6 months. Ten patients with well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma eligible for surgical treatment and subsequent radioactive iodine ablation therapy were studied in a hypothyroid state after thyroidectomy and in a subclinical hyperthyroid state (TSH-suppression according to treatment protocol). Paired two-tailed t-tests and linear regression analyses were used. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) was significantly higher after treatment with synthetic thyroid hormone (levothyroxine) than in the hypothyroid state (BMR 3.8 ± 0.5 kJ/min versus 4.4 ± 0.6 kJ/min, P = 0.012), and non-shivering thermogenesis (NST) significantly increased from 15 ± 10% to 25 ± 6% (P = 0.009). Mean BAT activity was significantly higher in the subclinical hyperthyroid state than in the hypothyroid state (BAT standard uptake value (SUVMean) 4.0 ± 2.9 versus 2.4 ± 1.8, P = 0.039). Our study shows that higher levels of thyroid hormone are associated with a higher level of cold-activated BAT. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02499471.

  6. Thyroid hormone deiodination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J. Visser (Theo)

    1980-01-01

    textabstractThe enzymatic deiodination of thyroid hormone is an important process since it concerns- among other things- the regulation of thyromimetic activity at the site of the target organ. To understand the mechanism of this regulation it is necessary to have a detailed knowledge of the mode of

  7. Thyroid hormone deiodination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J. Visser (Theo)

    1980-01-01

    textabstractThe enzymatic deiodination of thyroid hormone is an important process since it concerns- among other things- the regulation of thyromimetic activity at the site of the target organ. To understand the mechanism of this regulation it is necessary to have a detailed knowledge of the mode of

  8. Thyroid hormone reverses aging-induced myocardial fatty acid oxidation defects and improves the response to acutely increased afterload.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolena Ledee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Subclinical hypothyroidism occurs during aging in humans and mice and may contribute to the development of heart failure. Aging also impairs myocardial fatty acid oxidation, causing increased reliance on flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH to maintain function. We hypothesize that the metabolic changes in aged hearts make them less tolerant to acutely increased work and that thyroid hormone supplementation reverses these defects. METHODS: Studies were performed on young (Young, 4-6 months and aged (Old, 22-24 months C57/BL6 mice at standard (50 mmHg and high afterload (80 mmHg. Another aged group received thyroid hormone for 3 weeks (Old-TH, high afterload only. Function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions (Fc to the citric acid cycle (CAC using perfusate with (13C labeled lactate, pyruvate, glucose and unlabeled palmitate and insulin. RESULTS: Old mice maintained cardiac function under standard workload conditions, despite a marked decrease in unlabeled (presumably palmitate Fc and relatively similar individual carbohydrate contributions. However, old mice exhibited reduced palmitate oxidation with diastolic dysfunction exemplified by lower -dP/dT. Thyroid hormone abrogated the functional and substrate flux abnormalities in aged mice. CONCLUSION: The aged heart shows diminished ability to increase cardiac work due to substrate limitations, primarily impaired fatty acid oxidation. The heart accommodates slightly by increasing efficiency through oxidation of carbohydrate substrates. Thyroid hormone supplementation in aged mice significantly improves cardiac function potentially through restoration of fatty acid oxidation.

  9. Expansion of microsatellite in the thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 gene linked to increased receptor expression and less aggressive thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onda, Masamitsu; Li, Daisy; Suzuki, Shinichi

    2002-01-01

    involvement, distant metastasis, extrathyroidal invasion and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification. RESULTS: A statistically significant correlation between the length of THRA1 and thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 expression was observed in both cell lines and primary thyroid cancers. Thyroid tumors...... that displayed higher than average thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 expression had expanded THRA1 microsatellites and were less aggressive as judged by TNM ranking. A statistically significant correlation was also found between low thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 expression and more aggressive thyroid cancer...

  10. Increased thyroid hormone levels in tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) on reclaimed wetlands of the athabasca oil sands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentes, Marie-Line; McNabb, Anne; Waldner, Cheryl; Smits, Judit E G

    2007-08-01

    The oil sands of Alberta, Canada are one of the world's largest reserves of crude oil. Oil sands mining companies are now investigating the ecological impacts of reclamation strategies in which wetlands are used for the bioremediation of waste materials. To examine the endocrine disrupting potential of chemicals in Oil Sands Process Materials (OSPM), thyroid hormone concentrations were measured in plasma and thyroid glands of nestling tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) from wetlands partly filled with mine tailings. Plasma triiodothyronine (T(3)) concentrations and thyroxine (T(4)) content within thyroid glands were elevated in nestlings from OSPM sites compared to those from the reference site. Results suggested enhanced hormone synthesis by the thyroid glands independently of activation of the pituitary-thyroid axis, as well as increased deiodination of T(4) into T(3) in peripheral tissues. This might have resulted from exposure to oil sands associated chemicals such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and from environmental factors such as food availability. Modulation of thyroid function might have negative effects on metabolism, behavior, feather development, and molt, which could compromise postfledging survival.

  11. Increase in thyroid stimulating hormone levels in patients with gout treated with inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Chinchilla, Sandra Pamela; Atxotegi, Joana; Urionagüena, Irati; Herrero-Beites, Ana Maria; Aniel-Quiroga, Maria Angeles

    2015-11-01

    Increase in thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels over the upper normal limit has been reported in a small percentage of patients treated with febuxostat in clinical trials, but a mechanistic explanation is not yet available. In an observational parallel longitudinal cohort study, we evaluated changes in TSH levels in patients with gout at baseline and during urate-lowering treatment with febuxostat. Patients to be started on allopurinol who had a measurement of TSH in the 6-month period prior to baseline evaluation were used for comparison. TSH levels and change in TSH levels at 12-month follow-up were compared between groups. Patients with abnormal TSH levels or previous thyroid disease or on amiodarone were not included for analysis. Eighty-eight patients treated with febuxostat and 87 with allopurinol were available for comparisons. Patients to be treated with febuxostat had higher urate levels and TSH levels, more severe gout, and poorer renal function, but were similar regarding other characteristics. A similar rise in TSH levels was observed in both groups (0.4 and 0.5 µUI/mL for febuxostat and allopurinol, respectively); at 12-mo, 7/88 (7.9 %) of patients on febuxostat and 4/87 (3.4 %) of patients on allopurinol showed TSH levels over 0.5 µUI/mL. Doses prescribed (corrected for estimated glomerular filtration rate in the case if patients on allopurinol) and baseline TSH levels were determinants of TSH levels at 12-month follow-up. No impact on free T4 (fT4) levels was observed. Febuxostat, but also allopurinol, increased TSH levels in a dose-dependent way, thus suggesting rather a class effect than a drug effect, but with no apparent impact on either clinical or fT4 levels.

  12. Thyroid hormone dysfunction during pregnancy: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemu, Aynadis; Terefe, Betelihem; Abebe, Molla; Biadgo, Belete

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid dysfunctions such as hypothyroidism, thyrotoxicosis and thyroid nodules may develop during pregnancy leading to abortion, placental abruptions, preeclampsia, preterm delivery and reduced intellectual function in the offspring. Epidemiological data have shown the significant role of maternal thyroid hormone in fetal neurologic development and maternal health. It has been suggested that the deleterious effects of thyroid dysfunction can also extend beyond pregnancy and delivery to affect neuro-intellectual development in the early life of the child. Pregnancy poses an important challenge to the maternal thyroid gland as hormone requirements are increased during gestation as a result of an increase in thyroid- binding globulin, the stimulatory effect of HCG on TSH receptors, and increased peripheral thyroid hormone requirements. Maternal thyroid dysfunction is associated with increased risk for early abortion, preterm delivery, neonatal morbidity and other obstetrical complications. Early diagnosis for thyroid dysfunction of pregnant women and treatment of thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy is important and cost effective to avoid both fetal and maternal complications secondary to thyroid dysfunction. Therefore the aim of this review was to assess the thyroid function changes occurring during pregnancy, the different disorders with their maternal and fetal implications, the laboratory diagnosis and the best ways of management of these conditions. PMID:27981252

  13. Effects of phenobarbital on thyroid hormone contabolism in rat hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatic enzyme inducers such as phenobarbital (PB) decrease circulating thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations in rodents. PB induction of hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes increases thyroid hormones catabolism and biliary elimination. This study examines the catabolism and cl...

  14. Effects of phenobarbital on thyroid hormone contabolism in rat hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatic enzyme inducers such as phenobarbital (PB) decrease circulating thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations in rodents. PB induction of hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes increases thyroid hormones catabolism and biliary elimination. This study examines the catabolism and cl...

  15. Thyroid hormones and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Avais; Pingitore, Alessandro; Pearce, Simon H S; Zaman, Azfar; Iervasi, Giorgio; Razvi, Salman

    2017-01-01

    Myocardial and vascular endothelial tissues have receptors for thyroid hormones and are sensitive to changes in the concentrations of circulating thyroid hormones. The importance of thyroid hormones in maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis can be deduced from clinical and experimental data showing that even subtle changes in thyroid hormone concentrations - such as those observed in subclinical hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism, and low triiodothyronine syndrome - adversely influence the cardiovascular system. Some potential mechanisms linking the two conditions are dyslipidaemia, endothelial dysfunction, blood pressure changes, and direct effects of thyroid hormones on the myocardium. Several interventional trials showed that treatment of subclinical thyroid diseases improves cardiovascular risk factors, which implies potential benefits for reducing cardiovascular events. Over the past 2 decades, accumulating evidence supports the association between abnormal thyroid function at the time of an acute myocardial infarction (MI) and subsequent adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Furthermore, experimental studies showed that thyroid hormones can have an important therapeutic role in reducing infarct size and improving myocardial function after acute MI. In this Review, we summarize the literature on thyroid function in cardiovascular diseases, both as a risk factor as well as in the setting of cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure or acute MI, and outline the effect of thyroid hormone replacement therapy for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  16. In uncontrolled diabetes, thyroid hormone and sympathetic activators induce thermogenesis without increasing glucose uptake in brown adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsen, Miles E; Thaler, Joshua P; Wisse, Brent E; Guyenet, Stephan J; Meek, Thomas H; Ogimoto, Kayoko; Cubelo, Alex; Fischer, Jonathan D; Kaiyala, Karl J; Schwartz, Michael W; Morton, Gregory J

    2013-04-01

    Recent advances in human brown adipose tissue (BAT) imaging technology have renewed interest in the identification of BAT activators for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. In uncontrolled diabetes (uDM), activation of BAT is implicated in glucose lowering mediated by intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of leptin, which normalizes blood glucose levels in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. The potent effect of icv leptin to increase BAT glucose uptake in STZ-diabetes is accompanied by the return of reduced plasma thyroxine (T4) levels and BAT uncoupling protein-1 (Ucp1) mRNA levels to nondiabetic controls. We therefore sought to determine whether activation of thyroid hormone receptors is sufficient in and of itself to lower blood glucose levels in STZ-diabetes and whether this effect involves activation of BAT. We found that, although systemic administration of the thyroid hormone (TR)β-selective agonist GC-1 increases energy expenditure and induces further weight loss in STZ-diabetic rats, it neither increased BAT glucose uptake nor attenuated diabetic hyperglycemia. Even when GC-1 was administered in combination with a β(3)-adrenergic receptor agonist to mimic sympathetic nervous system activation, glucose uptake was not increased in STZ-diabetic rats, nor was blood glucose lowered, yet this intervention potently activated BAT. Similar results were observed in animals treated with active thyroid hormone (T3) instead of GC-1. Taken together, our data suggest that neither returning normal plasma thyroid hormone levels nor BAT activation has any impact on diabetic hyperglycemia, and that in BAT, increases of Ucp1 gene expression and glucose uptake are readily dissociated from one another in this setting.

  17. THYROID HORMONE REVERSES AGING-INDUCED MYOCARDIAL FATTY ACID OXIDATION DEFECTS AND IMPROVES THE RESPONSE TO ACUTELY INCREASED AFTERLOAD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledee, Dolena; Portman, Michael A.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron

    2013-06-07

    Background: Subclinical hypothyroidism occurs during aging in humans and mice and may contribute to development of heart failure. Aging also impairs myocardial fatty acid oxidation, causing increased reliance on flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) to maintain function. We hypothesize that the metabolic changes in aged hearts make them less tolerant to acutely increased work and that thyroid hormone reverses these defects. Methods: Studies were performed on young (Young, 4-6 months) and aged (Old, 22-24 months) C57/BL6 mice at standard (50 mmHg) and high afterload (80 mmHg). Another aged group received thyroid hormone for 3 weeks (Old-TH, high afterload only). Function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle (CAC) using perfusate with 13C labeled lactate, pyruvate, glucose and unlabeled palmitate and insulin. Results: Cardiac function was similar between Young and Old mice at standard afterload. Palmitate Fc was reduced but no individual carbohydrate contributions differed. CAC and individual substrate fluxes decreased in aged. At high afterload, -dP/dT was decreased in Old versus Young. Similar to low afterload, palmitate Fc was decreased in Old. Thyroid hormone reversed aging-induced changes in palmitate Fc and flux while significantly improving cardiac function. Conclusion: The aged heart shows diminished ability to increase cardiac work due to substrate limitations, primarily impaired fatty acid oxidation. The heart accommodates slightly by increasing efficiency through oxidation of carbohydrate substrates. Thyroid hormone supplementation in aged mice significantly improves cardiac function potentially through restoration of fatty acid oxidation.

  18. [Thyroid hormone and the cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraczek, Magdalena Maria; Łacka, Katarzyna

    2014-09-01

    It is well established that thyroid hormones affect the cardiovascular system through genomic and nongenomic actions. TRalpha1 is the major thyroid hormone receptor in the heart. T3 suppresses increased mitotic activity of stimulated cardiomyocytes. Hyperthyroidism induces a hyperdynamic cardiovascular state, which is associated with enhanced left ventricular systolic and diastolic function and the chronotropic and inotropic properties of thyroid hormones. Hypothyroidism, however, is characterized by opposite changes. In addition, thyroid hormones decrease peripheral vascular resistance, influence the rennin-angiotensin system (RAS), and increase blood volume and erythropoetin secretion with subsequent increased preload and cardiac output. Thyroid hormones play an important role in cardiac electrophysiology and have both pro- and anti-arrhytmic potential. Thyroid hormone deficiency is associated with a less favorable lipid profile. Selective modulation of the TRbeta1 receptor is considered as a potential therapeutic target to treat dyslipidemia without cardiac side effects. Thyroid hormones have a beneficial effect on limiting myocardial ischemic injury, preventing and reversing cardiac remodeling and improving cardiac hemodynamics in endstage heart failure. This is crucial because a low T3 syndrome accompanies both acute and chronic cardiac diseases.

  19. Hot stuff: thyroid hormones and AMPK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D Grahame Hardie

    2010-01-01

    @@ Every high school biology student is taught that thyroid hormones increase the metabolic rate. This conclusion mainly arose from the effects of hyperthyroidism, the clinical condition characterized by excessive production of the hormones. Symptoms include weight loss despite increased appetite, tremors,cardiac palpitations, irritability, intolerance to heat and increased perspiration.Although understanding of how thyroid hormones increase metabolic rate at the molecular level has been elusive,a recent paper by Antonio Vidal-Puig and colleagues in Nature Medicine [ 1 ]provides important new insights.

  20. Hypothalamic effects of thyroid hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z.; Boelen, Anita; Bisschop, Peter H; Kalsbeek, A.; Fliers, Eric

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is a key driver of metabolism in mammals. Plasma concentrations of TH are kept within a narrow range by negative feedback regulation in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. Plasma TH concentrations are an important determinant of metabolic processes in liver and brown

  1. Thyroid hormone metabolism in poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darras V.M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone (TH receptors preferentially bind 3.5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3. Therefore the metabolism of thyroxine (T4 secreted by the thyroid gland in peripheral tissues, resulting in the production and degradation of receptor-active T3, plays a major role in thyroid function. The most important metabolic pathway for THs is deiodination. Another important pathway is sulfation, which is a reversible pathway that has been shown to interact with TH deiodination efficiency. The enzymes catalysing TH deiodination consist of three types. Type 1 deiodinase (D1 catalyses both outer ring (ORD and inner ring deiodinalion (IRD. Type II deiodinase (D2 only catalyses ORD while type III (D3 only catalyses IRD. The three chicken deiodinase cDNAs have been cloned recently. These enzymes all belong to the family of selenoproteins. Ontogenetic studies show that the availability of deiodinases is regulated in a tissue specific and developmental stage dependent way. Characteristic for the chicken is the presence of very high levels off, inactivating D3 enzyme in the embryonic liver. Hepatic D3 is subject to acute regulation in a number of situations. Both growth hormone and glucocorticoid injection rapidly decrease hepatic D3 levels, hereby increasing plasma T3 without affecting hepatic D1 levels. The inhibition of D3 seems to be regulated mainly at the level of D3 gene transcription. The effect of growth hormone on D3 expression persists throughout life, while glucocorticoids start to inhibit hepatic D1 expression in posthatch chickens. Food restriction in growing chickens increases hepatic D3 levels. This contributes to the decrease in plasma T3 necessary to reduce energy loss. Refeeding restores hepatic D3 and plasma T3 to control levels within a few hours. It can be concluded that the tissue and time dependent regulation of the balance between TH activating and inactivating enzymes plays an essential role in the control of local T3 availability and hence in

  2. Thyroid Hormone Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This is BX rated vs the other name brand LT4s # = This is AB rated only to Unithroid and is considered the only ... American Thyroid Association Announces Prize Lectureship at International Thyroid Congress By ...

  3. [Thyroid hormone treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, R

    2013-07-01

    The autoimmune thyroiditis with overt or subclinical primary hypothyroidism is the most common endocrine disease. Although the diagnosis of hypothyroidism is not difficult, the question when a replacement therapy in subclinical hypothyroidism should be initiated is still under discussion. In patients with overt hypothyroidism defined as low FT4 and elevated TSH or TSH > 10 mU/L a replacement with levothyroxine is clearly indicated. In patients with subclinical hypothyroidism defined as a TSH between 4 and 10 mU/L and normal FT4, the treatment with Levothyroxine depends on the underlying disease and symptoms. Levothyroxine is a prohormone with is activated by deiodination in the organs to triiodothyronine. Therefore, levothyroxine for replacement therapy is mainly used. Some patients, however, do not feel well with this treatment and therefore studies with a combination therapy of levothyroxine and triiodothyronine had been performed and it could be shown that this might be related to a polymorphism in type 2 deiodinase in some patients, with the consequence of lower intracellular triodothyronine formation. In women on levothyroxine replacement therapy getting pregnant, the demand of levothyroxine increases up to 25-50 µg, especially in the early weeks of pregnancy. It also has to be considered that the resorption of levothyroxine depends on normal stomach acid and therefore patients on acid blockers or atrophic gastritis require higher dosages of levothyroxine. Only patients after thyroidectomy because of differentiated thyroid carcinoma with higher grad of malignancy need a TSH suppressive therapy, those with occult papillary thyroid carcinoma the TSH should be within the low normal range. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Thyroid hormone increases fibroblast growth factor receptor expression and disrupts cell mechanics in the developing organ of corti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarama, Katherine B; Gavara, Núria; Petralia, Ronald S; Chadwick, Richard S; Kelley, Matthew W

    2013-02-09

    Thyroid hormones regulate growth and development. However, the molecular mechanisms by which thyroid hormone regulates cell structural development are not fully understood. The mammalian cochlea is an intriguing system to examine these mechanisms, as cellular structure plays a key role in tissue development, and thyroid hormone is required for the maturation of the cochlea in the first postnatal week. In hypothyroid conditions, we found disruptions in sensory outer hair cell morphology and fewer microtubules in non-sensory supporting pillar cells. To test the functional consequences of these cytoskeletal defects on cell mechanics, we combined atomic force microscopy with live cell imaging. Hypothyroidism stiffened outer hair cells and supporting pillar cells, but pillar cells ultimately showed reduced cell stiffness, in part from a lack of microtubules. Analyses of changes in transcription and protein phosphorylation suggest that hypothyroidism prolonged expression of fibroblast growth factor receptors, and decreased phosphorylated Cofilin. These findings demonstrate that thyroid hormones may be involved in coordinating the processes that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and suggest that manipulating thyroid hormone sensitivity might provide insight into the relationship between cytoskeletal formation and developing cell mechanical properties.

  5. H9c2 cardiomyoblasts produce thyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meischl, Christof; Buermans, Henk P; Hazes, Thierry; Zuidwijk, Marian J; Musters, René J P; Boer, Christa; van Lingen, Arthur; Simonides, Warner S; Blankenstein, Marinus A; Dupuy, Corrine; Paulus, Walter J; Hack, C Erik; Ris-Stalpers, Carrie; Roos, Dirk; Niessen, Hans W M

    2008-05-01

    Thyroid hormone acts on a wide range of tissues. In the cardiovascular system, thyroid hormone is an important regulator of cardiac function and cardiovascular hemodynamics. Although some early reports in the literature suggested an unknown extrathyroidal source of thyroid hormone, it is currently thought to be produced exclusively in the thyroid gland, a highly specialized organ with the sole function of generating, storing, and secreting thyroid hormone. Whereas most of the proteins necessary for thyroid hormone synthesis are thought to be expressed exclusively in the thyroid gland, we now have found evidence that all of these proteins, i.e., thyroglobulin, DUOX1, DUOX2, the sodium-iodide symporter, pendrin, thyroid peroxidase, and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor, are also expressed in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, we found thyroglobulin to be transiently upregulated in an in vitro model of ischemia. When performing these experiments in the presence of 125 I, we found that 125 I was integrated into thyroglobulin and that under ischemia-like conditions the radioactive signal in thyroglobulin was reduced. Concomitantly we observed an increase of intracellularly produced, 125 I-labeled thyroid hormone. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate for the first time that cardiomyocytes produce thyroid hormone in a manner adapted to the cell's environment.

  6. PPARalpha activation and increased dietary lipid oppose thyroid hormone signaling and rescue impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holness, Mark J; Greenwood, Gemma K; Smith, Nicholas D; Sugden, Mary C

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of hyperthyroidism on the characteristics of the islet insulin secretory response to glucose, particularly the consequences of competition between thyroid hormone and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha in the regulation of islet adaptations to starvation and dietary lipid-induced insulin resistance. Rats maintained on standard (low-fat/high-carbohydrate) diet or high-fat/low-carbohydrate diet were rendered hyperthyroid (HT) by triiodothyronine (T(3)) administration (1 mg.kg body wt(-1).day(-1) sc, 3 days). The PPARalpha agonist WY14643 (50 mg/kg body wt ip) was administered 24 h before sampling. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) was assessed during hyperglycemic clamps or after acute glucose bolus injection in vivo and with step-up and step-down islet perifusions. Hyperthyroidism decreased the glucose responsiveness of GSIS, precluding sufficient enhancement of insulin secretion for the degree of insulin resistance, in rats fed either standard diet or high-fat diet. Hyperthyroidism partially opposed the starvation-induced increase in the glucose threshold for GSIS and decrease in glucose responsiveness. WY14643 administration restored glucose tolerance by enhancing GSIS in fed HT rats and relieved the impact of hyperthyroidism to partially oppose islet starvation adaptations. Competition between thyroid hormone receptor (TR) and PPARalpha influences the characteristics of GSIS, such that hyperthyroidism impairs GSIS while PPARalpha activation (and increased dietary lipid) opposes TR signaling and restores GSIS in the fed hyperthyroid state. Increased islet PPARalpha signaling and decreased TR signaling during starvation facilitates appropriate modification of islet function.

  7. The role of thyroid hormone in sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, José Carlos; Andersen, Mônica Levy

    2014-03-01

    Sleep deprivation is a stressful condition, as the subject experiences feelings of inadequate well-being and exhibits impairments in his/her functioning. However, in some circumstances sleep deprivation may be crucial for survival of the individual. Most likely, complex neural circuits and hormones play a role in allowing sleep deprivation to occur. For instance, thyroid hormone activity sharply increases when an individual is in a state of sleep deprivation. We believe that this increase is central to sleep deprivation physiology. During sleep deprivation, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis initially increases as a consequence of increased release of thyroid stimulating hormone from the pituitary. Subsequently, as sleep deprivation continues, the sympathetic nervous system is recruited through its anatomical connection with the thyroid gland. While thyroid stimulating hormone levels markedly increase during sleep deprivation, it has been suggested that these increases are secondary to sleep deprivation. However, there is little evidence to support this assumption. We believe that the physiology of the thyroid axis during sleep deprivation and the actions of the effector hormone thyroid hormone suggest that thyroid hormone inhibits sleep and not the contrary. To our knowledge, few studies have addressed the possible neural functions that enable sleep deprivation. In this article, we discuss the hypothesis that an augmentation in the thyroid hormone axis is central to a subject's ability to curtail sleep.

  8. Thyroid hormone disorders and sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Bin; Yu, Zhui; Li, Yinping

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome with high mortality, which results from severe infection and can lead to secondary organ dysfunction. It is one of the most common cause of death in intensive care unit. Clinical reports have shown that sepsis was often accompanied by thyroid dysfunction, which is called "low triiodothyronine (T3)" syndrome and characterized by decreased blood total T3 and free T3, and by normal or decreased thyroxine (T4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). This syndrome may greatly affect the prognosis of patients with sepsis. The main purpose of this review is to illustrate the role of thyroid hormone disorder in the development and prognosis of sepsis.

  9. Thyroid ultrasonography in congenital isolated thyroid stimulating hormone deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Wakamoto, H; Miyazaki, M.; Tatsumi, K; Amino, N

    1995-01-01

    The effects of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) deficiency on thyroid development was examined using ultrasonography in a child with congenital isolated TSH deficiency. Ultrasound revealed the thyroid gland was one sixth normal volume, suggesting that TSH plays an important part in thyroid growth, but not a critical role in differentiation.

  10. Biological effects of thyroid hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Saatov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the findings from the study on multifunctional effects of thyroid hormones in relation to normal and malignantly transformed tissues and cells. Both “rapid” and «slow» effects of thyroid hormones including calorigenic effects and effects over adenylate cyclase – cAMP system have been described. Thyroxin (Т4 has been established capable to inhibit proliferation and to induce apoptosis of cells carrying Т4 receptors on their membranes as well as to change course of metabolic processes under its effect. Spectrum of Т4 targets is quite broad to include not only cells of hormone-producing organs, to name those of the breast and the colon, but also other types of cells to name melanin-containing ones; Т4 effects resulting in reconstruction of presentation of regulatory proteins on the cell membrane surface to ultimately activate the process of cell apoptosis. Our findings help determine alternative paths for hormonal regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis of cells of hormone-dependent tumors, breast cancer, in particular, upon impossibility to regulate the processes by conventional methods. This facilitates understanding mechanisms for activation of signal system of the breast cancer’s cells by hormones upon changes in expression of receptors on the cells’ surface, making possible development of novel strategy for replacement therapy of hormone-dependent tumors upon low efficacy of drug therapy.

  11. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Is Increased in Hypertensive Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

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    Nanfang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate alteration in serum TSH in hypertensives with OSA and its relation with cardiometabolic risk factors. Methods. 517 hypertensives were cross-sectionally studied. OSA was determined by polysomnography and thyroid function by standard methods. Results. OSA was diagnosed in 373 hypertensives (72.15%. Prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism was significantly higher in OSA hypertensives than in non-OSA ones (15.0% versus 6.9%, P=0.014. Serum LnTSH in hypertensives with severe OSA was significantly higher (0.99±0.81 versus 0.74±0.77 μIU/mL, P<0.05 than in those without OSA. AHI, LSaO2, ODI3, and ODI4 were independently associated with serum TSH for those aged 30–65 years. Dividing subjects into four groups as TSH < 1.0 μIU/mL, 1.0 ≤ THS ≤ 1.9 μIU/mL, 1.91 ≤ TSH < 4.5 μIU/mL, and TSH ≥ 4.5 μIU/mL, only 26.3% of OSA subjects exhibited TSH between 1.0 and 1.9 μIU/mL, significantly less than non-OSA subjects (26.3% versus 38.2%, P=0.01. DBP and serum LDL-c elevated with TSH increasing and were only significantly higher in TSH ≥ 4.5 μIU/mL group than in 1.0 ≤ TSH ≤ 1.9 μIU/mL group (96.32±14.19 versus 92.31±12.86 mmHg; P=0.040; 0.99±0.60 versus 0.87±0.34 mmol/L, P=0.023. Conclusion. OSA might be a risk factor for increased TSH even within reference range in hypertensive population.

  12. Increased oxidative metabolism and neurotransmitter cycling in the brain of mice lacking the thyroid hormone transporter SLC16A2 (MCT8.

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    Tiago B Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Mutations of the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8 cause a severe X-linked intellectual deficit and neurological impairment. MCT8 is a specific thyroid hormone (T4 and T3 transporter and the patients also present unusual abnormalities in the serum profile of thyroid hormone concentrations due to altered secretion and metabolism of T4 and T3. Given the role of thyroid hormones in brain development, it is thought that the neurological impairment is due to restricted transport of thyroid hormones to the target neurons. In this work we have investigated cerebral metabolism in mice with Mct8 deficiency. Adult male mice were infused for 30 minutes with (1-(13C glucose and brain extracts prepared and analyzed by (13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Genetic inactivation of Mct8 resulted in increased oxidative metabolism as reflected by increased glutamate C4 enrichment, and of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions as observed by the increases in glutamine C4 and GABA C2 enrichments, respectively. These changes were distinct to those produced by hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. Similar increments in glutamate C4 enrichment and GABAergic neurotransmission were observed in the combined inactivation of Mct8 and D2, indicating that the increased neurotransmission and metabolic activity were not due to increased production of cerebral T3 by the D2-encoded type 2 deiodinase. In conclusion, Mct8 deficiency has important metabolic consequences in the brain that could not be correlated with deficiency or excess of thyroid hormone supply to the brain during adulthood.

  13. Thyroid hormone and the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzi, Sara; Klein, Irwin

    2012-03-01

    Thyroid hormone has profound effects on the heart and cardiovascular system. This article describes the cellular mechanisms by which thyroid hormone acts at the level of the cardiac myocyte and the vascular smooth muscle cell to alter phenotype and physiology. Because it is well established that thyroid hormone, specifically T(3), acts on almost every cell and organ in the body, studies on the regulation of thyroid hormone transport into cardiac and vascular tissue have added clinical significance. The characteristic changes in cardiovascular hemodynamics and metabolism that accompany thyroid disease states can then be best understood at the cellular level. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. American Thyroid Association Guide to Investigating Thyroid Hormone Economy and Action in Rodent and Cell Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Grant; Forrest, Douglas; Galton, Valerie Anne; Gereben, Balázs; Kim, Brian W.; Kopp, Peter A.; Liao, Xiao Hui; Obregon, Maria Jesus; Peeters, Robin P.; Refetoff, Samuel; Sharlin, David S.; Simonides, Warner S.; Weiss, Roy E.; Williams, Graham R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: An in-depth understanding of the fundamental principles that regulate thyroid hormone homeostasis is critical for the development of new diagnostic and treatment approaches for patients with thyroid disease. Summary: Important clinical practices in use today for the treatment of patients with hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, or thyroid cancer are the result of laboratory discoveries made by scientists investigating the most basic aspects of thyroid structure and molecular biology. In this document, a panel of experts commissioned by the American Thyroid Association makes a series of recommendations related to the study of thyroid hormone economy and action. These recommendations are intended to promote standardization of study design, which should in turn increase the comparability and reproducibility of experimental findings. Conclusions: It is expected that adherence to these recommendations by investigators in the field will facilitate progress towards a better understanding of the thyroid gland and thyroid hormone dependent processes. PMID:24001133

  15. Thyroid hormone action in postnatal heart development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone is a critical regulator of cardiac growth and development, both in fetal life and postnatally. Here we review the role of thyroid hormone in postnatal cardiac development, given recent insights into its role in stimulating a burst of cardiomyocyte proliferation in the murine heart in preadolescence; a response required to meet the massive increase in circulatory demand predicated by an almost quadrupling of body weight during a period of about 21 days from birth to adolescence. Importantly, thyroid hormone metabolism is altered by chronic diseases, such as heart failure and ischemic heart disease, as well as in very sick children requiring surgery for congenital heart diseases, which results in low T3 syndrome that impairs cardiovascular function and is associated with a poor prognosis. Therapy with T3 or thyroid hormone analogs has been shown to improve cardiac contractility; however, the mechanism is as yet unknown. Given the postnatal cardiomyocyte mitogenic potential of T3, its ability to enhance cardiac function by promoting cardiomyocyte proliferation warrants further consideration.

  16. [Thyroid hormones and cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Límanová, Zdeňka; Jiskra, Jan

    Cardiovascular system is essentially affected by thyroid hormones by way of their genomic and non-genomic effects. Untreated overt thyroid dysfunction is associated with higher cardiovascular risk. Although it has been studied more than 3 decades, in subclinical thyroid dysfunction the negative effect on cardiovascular system is much more controversial. Large meta-analyses within last 10 years have shown that subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with higher cardiovascular risk than subclinical hypothyroidism. Conversely, in patients of age > 85 years subclinical hypothyroidism was linked with lower mortality. Therefore, subclinical hyperthyroidism should be rather treated in the elderly while subclinical hypothyroidism in the younger patients and the older may be just followed. An important problem on the border of endocrinology and cardiology is amiodarone thyroid dysfunction. Effective and safe treatment is preconditioned by distinguishing of type 1 and type 2 amiodarone induced hyperthyroidism. The type 1 should be treated with methimazol, therapeutic response is prolonged, according to recent knowledge immediate discontinuation of amiodarone is not routinely recommended and patient should be usually prepared to total thyroidectomy, or rather rarely 131I radioiodine ablation may be used if there is appropriate accumulation. In the type 2 there is a promt therapeutic response on glucocorticoids (within 1-2 weeks) with permanent remission or development of hypothyroidism. If it is not used for life-threatening arrhytmias, amiodarone may be discontinuated earlier (after several weeks). Amiodarone induced hypothyroidism is treated with levothyroxine without amiodarone interruption.Key words: amiodarone induced thyroid dysfunction - atrial fibrillation - cardiovascular risk - heart failure - hyperthyroidism - hypothyroidism - thyroid stimulating hormone.

  17. Thyroid hormones and renin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W F

    Circulating angiotensin is produced by the action of renin from the kidneys on circulating angiotensinogen. There are other renin-angiotensin systems in various organs in the body, and recent observations raise the intriguing possibility that angiotensin II is produced by a totally intracellular pathway in the juxtaglomerular cells, the gonadotrops of the anterior pituitary, neurons, in the brain, salivary duct cells, and neuroblastoma cells. Circulating angiotensin II levels depend in large part on the plasma concentration of angiotensinogen, which is hormonally regulated, and on the rate of renin secretion. Renin secretion is regulated by an intrarenal baroreceptor mechanism, a macula densa mechanism, angiotensin II, vasopressin, and the sympathetic nervous system. The increase in renin secretion produced by sympathetic discharge is mediated for the most part by beta-adrenergic receptors, which are probably located on the juxtaglomerular cells. Hyperthyroidism would be expected to be associated with increased renin secretion in view of the increased beta-adrenergic activity in this condition, and hypothyroidism would be associated with decreased plasma renin activity due to decreased beta-adrenergic activity. Our recent research on serotonin-mediated increases in renin secretion that depend on the integrity of the dorsal raphe nucleus and the mediobasal hypothalamus has led us to investigate the effect of the pituitary on the renin response to p-chloroamphetamine. The response is potentiated immediately after hypophysectomy, but 22 days after the operation, it is abolished. This slowly developing decrease in responsiveness may be due to decreased thyroid function.

  18. Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullur, Rashmi; Liu, Yan-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is required for normal development as well as regulating metabolism in the adult. The thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, α and β, are differentially expressed in tissues and have distinct roles in TH signaling. Local activation of thyroxine (T4), to the active form, triiodothyronine (T3), by 5′-deiodinase type 2 (D2) is a key mechanism of TH regulation of metabolism. D2 is expressed in the hypothalamus, white fat, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and skeletal muscle and is required for adaptive thermogenesis. The thyroid gland is regulated by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). In addition to TRH/TSH regulation by TH feedback, there is central modulation by nutritional signals, such as leptin, as well as peptides regulating appetite. The nutrient status of the cell provides feedback on TH signaling pathways through epigentic modification of histones. Integration of TH signaling with the adrenergic nervous system occurs peripherally, in liver, white fat, and BAT, but also centrally, in the hypothalamus. TR regulates cholesterol and carbohydrate metabolism through direct actions on gene expression as well as cross-talk with other nuclear receptors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), liver X receptor (LXR), and bile acid signaling pathways. TH modulates hepatic insulin sensitivity, especially important for the suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. The role of TH in regulating metabolic pathways has led to several new therapeutic targets for metabolic disorders. Understanding the mechanisms and interactions of the various TH signaling pathways in metabolism will improve our likelihood of identifying effective and selective targets. PMID:24692351

  19. Thyroid hormone and seasonal rhythmicity

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    Hugues eDardente

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms show seasonality in a wide array of functions such as reproduction, fattening, hibernation and migration. At temperate latitudes, changes in photoperiod maintain the alignment of annual rhythms with predictable changes in the environment. The appropriate physiological response to changing photoperiod in mammals requires retinal detection of light and pineal secretion of melatonin, but extraretinal detection of light occurs in birds. A common mechanism across all vertebrates is that these photoperiod-regulated systems alter hypothalamic thyroid hormone conversion. Here we review the evidence that a circadian clock within the pars tuberalis of the adenohypophysis links photoperiod decoding to local changes of thyroid hormone signalling within the medio-basal hypothalamus through a conserved thyrotropin/deiodinase axis. We also focus on recent findings which indicate that, beyond the photoperiodic control of its conversion, thyroid hormone might also be involved in longer term timing processes of seasonal programs. Finally, we examine the potential implication of kisspeptin and RFRP3, two RF-amide peptides expressed within the medio-basal hypothalamus, in seasonal rhythmicity.

  20. Effects of thyroid hormones on the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Uricoechea, Hernando; Bonelo-Perdomo, Anilsa; Sierra-Torres, Carlos Hernán

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones have a significant impact on heart function, mediated by genomic and non-genomic effects. Consequently, thyroid hormone deficiencies, as well as excesses, are expected to result in profound changes in cardiac function regulation and cardiovascular hemodynamics. Thyroid hormones upregulate the expression of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-activated ATPase and downregulate the expression of phospholamban. Overall, hyperthyroidism is characterized by an increase in resting heart rate, blood volume, stroke volume, myocardial contractility, and ejection fraction. The development of "high-output heart failure" in hyperthyroidism may be due to "tachycardia-mediated cardiomyopathy". On the other hand, in a hypothyroid state, thyroid hormone deficiency results in lower heart rate and weakening of myocardial contraction and relaxation, with prolonged systolic and early diastolic times. Cardiac preload is decreased due to impaired diastolic function. Cardiac afterload is increased, and chronotropic and inotropic functions are reduced. Subclinical thyroid dysfunction is relatively common in patients over 65 years of age. In general, subclinical hypothyroidism increases the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality and CHD events, but not of total mortality. The risk of CHD mortality and atrial fibrillation (but not other outcomes) in subclinical hyperthyroidism is higher among patients with very low levels of thyrotropin. Finally, medications such as amiodarone may induce hypothyroidism (mediated by the Wolff-Chaikoff), as well as hyperthyroidism (mediated by the Jod-Basedow effect). In both instances, the underlying cause is the high concentration of iodine in this medication. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Thyroid Hormone Receptor beta Mediates Acute Illness-Induced Alterations in Central Thyroid Hormone Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Boelen; J. Kwakkel; O. Chassande; E. Fliers

    2009-01-01

    Acute illness in mice profoundly affects thyroid hormone metabolism in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. It remains unknown whether the thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-beta is involved in these changes. In the present study, we investigated central thyroid hormone metabolism during lipopolysacchar

  2. Overlapping nongenomic and genomic actions of thyroid hormone and steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Paul J; Lin, Hung-Yun; Mousa, Shaker A; Luidens, Mary K; Hercbergs, Aleck A; Wehling, Martin; Davis, Faith B

    2011-08-01

    Nuclear receptors for thyroid hormone and steroids are members of a receptor superfamily with similar molecular organization, but discrete transcriptional functions that define genomic actions of these nonpeptide hormones. Nongenomic actions of thyroid hormone and estrogens and androgens are initiated outside the nucleus, at receptors in the plasma membrane or in cytoplasm; these actions are largely regarded to be unique to the respective hormones. However, there is an increasing number of descriptions of overlapping nongenomic and genomic effects of thyroid hormone and estrogens and testosterone. These effects are concentrated in tumor cells, where, for example, estrogens and thyroid hormone have similar mitogen-activate protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent proliferative actions on ERα-positive human breast cancer cells, and where dihydrotestosterone also can stimulate proliferation. Steroids and thyroid hormone have similar anti-apoptotic effects in certain tumors. But thyroid hormone and steroids also have overlapping or interacting nongenomic and genomic actions in heart and brain cells. These various effects of thyroid hormone and estrogens and androgens are reviewed here and their possible clinical consequences are enumerated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Thyroid hormone antibodies and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in mongrel dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajatanavin, R.; Fang, S.L.; Pino, S.; Laurberg, P.; Braverman, L.E.; Smith, M.; Bullock, L.P.

    1989-05-01

    Abnormally elevated serum T3 concentrations measured by RIA were observed in 19 clinically euthyroid or hypothyroid mongrel dogs. The serum T4 concentrations in these sera were low, normal, or high. Measurement of the intensity of thyroid hormone binding to serum proteins was determined by equilibrium dialysis. A marked decrease in the percent free T3 was observed in these abnormal sera. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, pH 7.4, of normal dog serum enriched with tracer /sup 125/I-labeled thyroid hormones demonstrated binding of (/sup 125/I)T4 to transthyretin, thyroid hormone-binding globulin, and albumin and of (/sup 125/I)T3 primarily to thyroid hormone-binding globulin. In all abnormal sera, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated strikingly higher binding of T3 to immunoglobulin (Ig). Eleven of 16 abnormal sera had minimal to moderate binding of T4 to Ig. The percent free T4 was lower only in dogs whose sera demonstrated markedly increased binding of T4 to Ig. All abnormal sera tested had positive antithyroglobulin antibodies, consistent with the diagnosis of autoimmune lymphocytic thyroiditis. As in humans, antibodies to thyroid hormones in dogs are more common in the presence of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and should be considered when elevated serum thyroid hormone concentrations are observed in the absence of clinical thyrotoxicosis. When an antibody to only one thyroid hormone is present, a marked discrepancy in the serum concentrations of T3 and T4 will be observed.

  4. Thyroid hormone function in the rat testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying eGao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones are emerging regulators of testicular function since Sertoli, germ and Leydig cells are found to express thyroid hormone receptors. These testicular cells also express deiodinases which are capable of converting the pro-hormone T4 to the active thyroid hormone T3, or inactivating T3 or T4 to a non-biologically active form. Furthermore, thyroid hormone transporters are also found in the testis. Thus, the testis is equipped with the transporters and the enzymes necessary to maintain the optimal level of thyroid hormone in the seminiferous epithelium, as well as the specific thyroid hormone receptors to execute thyroid hormone action in response to different stages of the epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. Studies using genetic models and/or goitrogens (e.g., PTU (propylthiouracil have illustrated a tight physiological relationship between thyroid hormone and testicular function, in particular Sertoli cell differentiation status, mitotic activity, gap junction function and blood-testis barrier (BTB assembly. These findings are briefly summarized and discussed herein.

  5. Thyroid hormone deiodination in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darras, Veerle M; Verhoelst, Carla H J; Reyns, Geert E; Kühn, Eduard R; Van der Geyten, Serge

    2006-01-01

    Because the avian thyroid gland secretes almost exclusively thyroxine (T4), the availability of receptor-active 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3) has to be regulated in the extrathyroidal tissues, essentially by deiodination. Like mammals and most other vertebrates, birds possess three types of iodothyronine deiodinases (D1, D2, and D3) that closely resemble their mammalian counterparts, as shown by biochemical characterization studies in several avian species and by cDNA cloning of the three enzymes in chicken. The tissue distribution of these deiodinases has been studied in detail in chicken at the level of activity and mRNA expression. More recently specific antibodies were used to study cellular localization at the protein level. The abundance and distribution of the different deiodinases shows substantial variation during embryonic development and postnatal life. Deiodination in birds is subject to regulation by hormones from several endocrine axes, including thyroid hormones, growth hormone and glucocorticoids. In addition, deiodination is also influenced by external parameters, such as nutrition, temperature, light and also a number of environmental pollutants. The balance between the outer and inner ring deiodination resulting from the impact of all these factors ultimately controls T3 availability.

  6. [Thyroid hormones and their precursors I. Biochemical properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Gergo; Noszál, Béla

    2013-01-01

    This paper and the following one (see the next issue of Acta Pharmaceutica Hungarica) survey the biological roles and the related site-specific physico-chemical parameters (basicity and lipophilicity) of the presently known thyroid hormones (thyroxine, liothyronine and reverse liothyronine) and their biological precursors (monoiodotyrosine and diiodotyrosine). Here the literature of the thyroid hormone biochemistry, biosynthesis, plasma- and membrane transport is summarized, focusing on the pH-dependent processes. Biosyntheses of the thyroid hormones take place by oxidative coupling of two iodotyrosine residues catalyzed by thyreoperoxidase in thyreoglobulin. The protonation state of the precursors, especially that of the phenolic OH is crucial for the biosynthesis, since anionic iodotyrosine residues can only be coupled in the thyroid hormone biosyntheses. In the blood more than 99% of the circulating thyroid hormone is bound to plasma proteins among which the thyroxine-binding globulin and transthyretin are crucial. The amphiphilic character of the hormones is assumed to be the reason why their membrane transport is an energy-dependent, transport-mediated process, in which the organic anion transporter family, mainly OATP1C1, and the amino acid transporters, such as MCT8 play important roles. Liothyronine is the biologically active hormone; it binds the thyroid hormone receptor, a type of nuclear receptor. There are two major thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, alfa (TRalpha) and beta (TRbeta). The activation of the TRalpha is associated with modifications in cardiac behavior, while activation of the TRbeta is associated with increasing metabolic rates, resulting in weight loss and reduction of blood plasma lipid levels. The affinity of the thyroid hormones for different proteins depends on the ionization state of the ligands. The site-specific physico-chemical characterization of the thyroid hormones is of fundamental importance to understand their (patho

  7. THYROID HORMONE DISRUPTION: FROM KINETICS TO DYNAMICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A wide range of chemicals with diverse structures act as thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs). Broadly defined, TDCs are chemicals that alter the structure or function of the thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormones (THs), or change circulating or t...

  8. Increased nuclear tri-iodothyronine binding and thyroid hormone-stimulated glucose consumption in mononuclear blood cells from patients with liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvetny, J; Matzen, L

    1991-01-01

    between the groups, but thyroid hormone-stimulated oxygen consumption was depressed in cells from patients with AC (P less than 0.05) compared with patients with LC and with controls. We conclude that both thyroid hormone-stimulated glucose consumption and T3 nuclear receptor binding in cells from...

  9. Characterization of thyroid hormone uptake in heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, Haidy Hendrica Antonia Gerarda Maria van der

    2002-01-01

    Transport of T3 and T4 across the plasma membrane is the first step in the sequence of intracellular thyroid hormone action. It is generally accepted that this is mediated by specific carrier proteins. The knowledge about these proteins in liver is abundant, but information about thyroid hormone upt

  10. Exercise induced hypercoagulability, increased von Willebrand factor and decreased thyroid hormone concentrations in sled dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Anne Kirstine Havnsøe; Legind, Pernille; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads;

    2014-01-01

    Sled dogs performing endurance races have been reported to have a high incidence of gastric erosions or ulcerations and an increased risk of gastro intestinal bleeding leading to death in some cases. In addition, these dogs also become hypothyroid during training and exercise. Canine hypothyroidi...

  11. Hyponatremia after Thyroid Hormone Withdrawal in a Patient with Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Jin Jo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyponatremia is an electrolyte abnormality commonly found in clinical practice. It is important to diagnose the underlying etiology of the hyponatremia and correct it appropriately because severe hyponatremia can cause serious complications and substantially increase the risk of mortality. Although hypothyroidism is known to be a cause of hyponatremia, it is rare that hyponatremia occurs in relation to hypothyroidism induced by thyroid hormone withdrawal in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. We report a case of a 76-year-old woman with papillary thyroid carcinoma presenting with severe hyponatremia related to hypothyroidism induced by thyroid hormone withdrawal for radio-active iodine whole-body scanning, who was treated by thyroid hormone replacement and hydration. Considering that the incidence of differentiated thyroid cancer is rapidly increasing, physicians should be aware that, although uncommon, hyponatremia can occur in patients undergoing radioiodine therapy or diagnostic testing.

  12. Role of maternal thyroid hormones in the developing neocortex and during human evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise eStenzel

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of thyroid hormones during brain development has been appreciated for many decades. In humans, low levels of circulating maternal thyroid hormones, e.g. caused by maternal hypothyroidism or lack of iodine in diet, results in a wide spectrum of severe neurological defects, including neurological cretinism characterized by profound neurologic impairment and mental retardation, underlining the importance of the maternal thyroid hormone contribution. In fact, iodine intake, which is essential for thyroid hormone production in the thyroid gland, has been related to the expansion of the brain, associated with the increased cognitive capacities during human evolution. Because thyroid hormones regulate transcriptional activity of target genes via their nuclear thyroid hormone receptors, even mild and transient changes in maternal thyroid hormone levels can directly affect and alter the gene expression profile, and thus disturb fetal brain development. Here we summarize how thyroid hormones may have influenced human brain evolution through the adaptation to new habitats, concomitant with changes in diet and, therefore, iodine intake. Further, we review the current picture we gained from experimental studies in rodents on the function of maternal thyroid hormones during developmental neurogenesis. We aim to evaluate the effects of maternal thyroid hormone deficiency as well as lack of thyroid hormone receptors and transporters on brain development and function, shedding light on the cellular behavior conducted by thyroid hormones.

  13. Thyroid hormone deiodination in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Aurea; Valverde-R, Carlos

    2005-08-01

    We review the experimental evidence accumulated within the past decade regarding the physiologic, biochemical, and molecular characterization of iodothyronine deiodinases (IDs) in piscine species. Agnathans, chondrichthyes, and teleosts express the three isotypes of IDs: ID1, ID2, and ID3, which are responsible for the peripheral fine-tuning of thyroid hormone (TH) bioactivity. At the molecular and operational level, fish IDs share properties with their corresponding vertebrate counterparts. However, fish IDs also exhibit discrete features that seem to be distinctive for piscine species. Indeed, teleostean ID1 is conspicuously resistant to propylthiouracil (PTU) inhibition, and its response to thyroidal status differs from that exhibited by other ID1s. Moreover, both the high level of ID2 activity and its expression in the liver of teleosts are unique among vertebrates. The physiologic role of iodothyronine deiodination in functions regulated by TH in fish is not entirely clear. Nevertheless, current experimental evidence suggests that IDs may coordinate and facilitate, in a tissue-specific fashion, the action of iodothyronines and other hormones involved in such processes.

  14. Receptors for thyrotropin-releasing hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and thyroid hormones in the macaque uterus: effects of long-term sex hormone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulchiy, Mariana; Zhang, Hua; Cline, J Mark; Hirschberg, Angelica Lindén; Sahlin, Lena

    2012-11-01

    Thyroid gland dysfunction is associated with menstrual cycle disturbances, infertility, and increased risk of miscarriage, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. However, little is known about the regulation of these receptors in the uterus. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of long-term treatment with steroid hormones on the expression, distribution, and regulation of the receptors for thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRHR) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSHR), thyroid hormone receptor α1/α2 (THRα1/α2), and THRβ1 in the uterus of surgically menopausal monkeys. Eighty-eight cynomolgus macaques were ovariectomized and treated orally with conjugated equine estrogens (CEE; n = 20), a combination of CEE and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA; n = 20), or tibolone (n = 28) for 2 years. The control group (OvxC; n = 20) received no treatment. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the protein expression and distribution of the receptors in luminal epithelium, glands, stroma, and myometrium of the uterus. Immunostaining of TRHR, TSHR, and THRs was detected in all uterine compartments. Epithelial immunostaining of TRHR was down-regulated in the CEE + MPA group, whereas in stroma, both TRHR and TSHR were increased by CEE + MPA treatment as compared with OvxC. TRHR immunoreactivity was up-regulated, but THRα and THRβ were down-regulated, in the myometrium of the CEE and CEE + MPA groups. The thyroid-stimulating hormone level was higher in the CEE and tibolone groups as compared with OvxC, but the level of free thyroxin did not differ between groups. All receptors involved in thyroid hormone function are expressed in monkey uterus, and they are all regulated by long-term steroid hormone treatment. These findings suggest that there is a possibility of direct actions of thyroid hormones, thyroid-stimulating hormone and thyrotropin-releasing hormone on uterine function.

  15. Expression of Thyroid Hormone Transporters in the Human Hypothalamus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Alkemade; E.C.H. Friesema; A. Kalsbeek; D.F. Swaab; T.J. Visser; E. Fliers

    2011-01-01

    Context: Transport of thyroid hormone across the plasma membrane is required for proper thyroid hormone action and metabolism. Several specific thyroid hormone transporters have been identified capable of facilitating uptake and/or efflux of thyroid hormones. Monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)-8, MCT

  16. Regulation of Thyroid Hormone Bioactivity in Health and Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P. Peeters (Robin)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractTThyroid hormone plays an essential role in a variety of metabolic processes in the human body. Examples are the effects of thyroid hormone on metabolism and on the heart. The production of thyroid hormone by the thyroid is regulated by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) via the TSH

  17. Adipose tissues and thyroid hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Jesus eObregon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The maintenance of energy balance is regulated by complex homeostatic mechanisms, including those emanating from adipose tissue. The main function of the adipose tissue is to store the excess of metabolic energy in the form of fat. The energy stored as fat can be mobilized during periods of energy deprivation (hunger, fasting, diseases. The adipose tissue has also a homeostatic role regulating energy balance and functioning as endocrine organ that secretes substances that control body homeostasis. Two adipose tissues have been identified: white and brown adipose tissues (WAT and BAT with different phenotype, function and regulation. WAT stores energy, while BAT dissipates energy as heat. Brown and white adipocytes have different ontogenetic origin and lineage and specific markers of WAT and BAT have been identified. Brite or beige adipose tissue has been identified in WAT with some properties of BAT. Thyroid hormones exert pleiotropic actions, regulating the differentiation process in many tissues including the adipose tissue. Adipogenesis gives raise to mature adipocytes and is regulated by several transcription factors (c/EBPs, PPARs that coordinately activate specific genes, resulting in the adipocyte phenotype. T3 regulates several genes involved in lipid mobilization and storage and in thermogenesis. Both WAT and BAT are targets of thyroid hormones, which regulate genes crucial for their proper function: lipogenesis, lipolysis, thermogenesis, mitochondrial function, transcription factors, the availability of nutrients. T3 acts directly through specific TREs in the gene promoters, regulating transcription factors. The deiodinases D3, D2 and D1 regulate the availability of T3. D3 is activated during proliferation, while D2 is linked to the adipocyte differentiation program, providing T3 needed for lipogenesis and thermogenesis. We examine the differences between BAT, WAT and brite/beige adipocytes and the process that activate UCP1 in WAT and

  18. Adipose tissues and thyroid hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obregon, Maria-Jesus

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of energy balance is regulated by complex homeostatic mechanisms, including those emanating from adipose tissue. The main function of the adipose tissue is to store the excess of metabolic energy in the form of fat. The energy stored as fat can be mobilized during periods of energy deprivation (hunger, fasting, diseases). The adipose tissue has also a homeostatic role regulating energy balance and functioning as endocrine organ that secretes substances that control body homeostasis. Two adipose tissues have been identified: white and brown adipose tissues (WAT and BAT) with different phenotype, function and regulation. WAT stores energy, while BAT dissipates energy as heat. Brown and white adipocytes have different ontogenetic origin and lineage and specific markers of WAT and BAT have been identified. "Brite" or beige adipose tissue has been identified in WAT with some properties of BAT. Thyroid hormones exert pleiotropic actions, regulating the differentiation process in many tissues including the adipose tissue. Adipogenesis gives raise to mature adipocytes and is regulated by several transcription factors (c/EBPs, PPARs) that coordinately activate specific genes, resulting in the adipocyte phenotype. T3 regulates several genes involved in lipid mobilization and storage and in thermogenesis. Both WAT and BAT are targets of thyroid hormones, which regulate genes crucial for their proper function: lipogenesis, lipolysis, thermogenesis, mitochondrial function, transcription factors, the availability of nutrients. T3 acts directly through specific TREs in the gene promoters, regulating transcription factors. The deiodinases D3, D2, and D1 regulate the availability of T3. D3 is activated during proliferation, while D2 is linked to the adipocyte differentiation program, providing T3 needed for lipogenesis and thermogenesis. We examine the differences between BAT, WAT and brite/beige adipocytes and the process that lead to activation of UCP1 in WAT and

  19. Thyroid hormone, neural tissue and mood modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, M; Whybrow, P C

    2001-04-01

    The successful treatment of affective disorders with thyroid hormone exemplifies the suggested inter-relationship between endocrine and neuronal systems in these disorders. Thyroid hormones have a profound influence on behaviour and appear to be capable of modulating the phenotypic expression of major affective illness. Specifically, there is good evidence that triiodothyronine (T3) may accelerate the antidepressant response to tricylic antidepressants, and some studies suggest that T3 may augment the therapeutic response to antidepressants in refractory depressed patients. Open studies have also indicated that adjunctive supraphysiological doses of thyroxine (T4) can ameliorate depressive symptomatology and help stabilize the long-term course of illness in bipolar and unipolar patients, especially women refractory to standard medications. Despite acceptance of the essential role of thyroid hormone on brain maturation and differentiation, and the clinical and therapeutic observations in association with mood disorders, the molecular action that may underlie the mood-modulating properties of thyroid hormone in the adult brain has only recently become the focus of research. The identification of nuclear T3 receptors, the region-specific expression of deiodinase isoenzymes and the molecular analyses of thyroid-responsive genes in the adult brain have provided the biological bases for a better understanding of thyroid hormone action in mature neurons. Also the influence of thyroid hormones on the putative neurotransmitter systems that regulate mood and behaviour, serotonin and norepinephrine, may be helpful in explaining their mood-modulating effects.

  20. Paracrine interactions of thyroid hormones and thyroid stimulation hormone in the female reproductive tract have an impact on female fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneli eStavreus-Evers

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid disease often causes menstrual disturbances and infertility problems. Thyroid hormone (TH acts through its receptors, transcription factors present in most cell types in the body. Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH stimulates TH synthesis in the thyroid gland, but seems to have other functions as well in the female reproductive tract. The receptors of both TH and TSH increase in the receptive endometrium, suggesting that they are important for implantation, possible by influencing inflammatory mediators such as LIF. The roles of these receptors in the ovary need further studies. However, it is likely that the thyroid system is important for both follicular and embryo development. The association between thyroid disease and infertility indicate that TH and TSH affect the endometrium and ovary on the paracrine level.

  1. Role of maternal thyroid hormones in the developing neocortex and during human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, Denise; Huttner, Wieland B

    2013-01-01

    The importance of thyroid hormones during brain development has been appreciated for many decades. In humans, low levels of circulating maternal thyroid hormones, e.g., caused by maternal hypothyroidism or lack of iodine in diet, results in a wide spectrum of severe neurological defects, including neurological cretinism characterized by profound neurologic impairment and mental retardation, underlining the importance of the maternal thyroid hormone contribution. In fact, iodine intake, which is essential for thyroid hormone production in the thyroid gland, has been related to the expansion of the brain, associated with the increased cognitive capacities during human evolution. Because thyroid hormones regulate transcriptional activity of target genes via their nuclear thyroid hormone receptors (THRs), even mild and transient changes in maternal thyroid hormone levels can directly affect and alter the gene expression profile, and thus disturb fetal brain development. Here we summarize how thyroid hormones may have influenced human brain evolution through the adaptation to new habitats, concomitant with changes in diet and, therefore, iodine intake. Further, we review the current picture we gained from experimental studies in rodents on the function of maternal thyroid hormones during developmental neurogenesis. We aim to evaluate the effects of maternal thyroid hormone deficiency as well as lack of THRs and transporters on brain development and function, shedding light on the cellular behavior conducted by thyroid hormones.

  2. Resistance to Thyroid Hormone due to defective thyroid receptor alpha

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Carla; Chatterjee, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    This is the final version of the article. It first appeared from Elsevier via http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.beem.2015.07.007 Thyroid hormones act via nuclear receptors (TRα1, TRβ1, TRβ2) with differing tissue distribution; the role of α2 protein, derived from the same gene locus as TRα1, is unclear. Resistance to thyroid hormone alpha (RTHα) is characterised by tissue-specific hypothyroidism associated with near-normal thyroid function tests. Clinical features include dysmorphic facies, ...

  3. The thyroid gland and thyroid hormones in sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) during early development and metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, Joseph G; Klaren, Peter H M; Mariavelle, Emeline; Das, Krishna

    2016-04-01

    The sheepshead minnow is widely used in ecotoxicological studies that only recently have begun to focus on disruption of the thyroid axis by xenobiotics and endocrine disrupting compounds. However, reference levels of the thyroid prohormone thyroxine (T4) and biologically active hormone 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) and their developmental patterns are unknown. This study set out to describe the ontogeny and morphology of the thyroid gland in sheepshead minnow, and to correlate these with whole-body concentrations of thyroid hormones during early development and metamorphosis. Eggs were collected by natural spawning in our laboratory. T4 and T3 were extracted from embryos, larvae and juveniles and an enzyme-linked immunoassay was used to measure whole-body hormone levels. Length and body mass, hatching success, gross morphology, thyroid hormone levels and histology were measured. The onset of metamorphosis at 12-day post-hatching coincided with surges in whole-body T4 and T3 concentrations. Thyroid follicles were first observed in pre-metamorphic larvae at hatching and were detected exclusively in the subpharyngeal region, surrounding the ventral aorta. Follicle size and thyrocyte epithelial cell heights varied during development, indicating fluctuations in thyroid hormone synthesis activity. The increase in the whole-body T3/T4 ratio was indicative of an increase in outer ring deiodination activity. This study establishes a baseline for thyroid hormones in sheepshead minnows, which will be useful for the understanding of thyroid hormone functions and in future studies of thyroid toxicants in this species.

  4. Sulfation of thyroid hormone by estrogen sulfotransferase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.A. Kester (Monique); T.J. Visser (Theo); C.H. van Dijk (Caren); D. Tibboel (Dick); A.M. Hood (Margaret); N.J. Rose; W. Meinl; U. Pabel; H. Glatt; C.N. Falany; M.W. Coughtrie

    1999-01-01

    textabstractSulfation is one of the pathways by which thyroid hormone is inactivated. Iodothyronine sulfate concentrations are very high in human fetal blood and amniotic fluid, suggesting important production of these conjugates in utero. Human estrogen sulfotransferas

  5. Sulfation of thyroid hormone by estrogen sulfotransferase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.A. Kester (Monique); T.J. Visser (Theo); C.H. van Dijk (Caren); D. Tibboel (Dick); A.M. Hood (Margaret); N.J. Rose; W. Meinl; U. Pabel; H. Glatt; C.N. Falany; M.W. Coughtrie

    1999-01-01

    textabstractSulfation is one of the pathways by which thyroid hormone is inactivated. Iodothyronine sulfate concentrations are very high in human fetal blood and amniotic fluid, suggesting important production of these conjugates in utero. Human estrogen sulfotransferas

  6. Fundamentals of Thyroid Hormone Physiology, Iodine Metabolism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of iodine and thyroid stimulating hormone (thyrotropin, TSH). To produce T4 at ... for adequate T4 release, a number of factors can modify this ..... Lipid M etabolism. R educed appetite; impaired protein metabolism; reduced glucose deposition.

  7. Sulfation of thyroid hormone by estrogen sulfotransferase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.A. Kester (Monique); T.J. Visser (Theo); C.H. van Dijk (Caren); D. Tibboel (Dick); A.M. Hood (Margaret); N.J. Rose; W. Meinl; U. Pabel; H. Glatt; C.N. Falany; M.W. Coughtrie

    1999-01-01

    textabstractSulfation is one of the pathways by which thyroid hormone is inactivated. Iodothyronine sulfate concentrations are very high in human fetal blood and amniotic fluid, suggesting important production of these conjugates in utero. Human estrogen

  8. 2,4,6-Tribromophenol Interferes with the Thyroid Hormone System by Regulating Thyroid Hormones and the Responsible Genes in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongoh; Ahn, Changhwan; Hong, Eui-Ju; An, Beum-Soo; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-07-12

    2,4,6-Tribromophenol (TBP) is a brominated flame retardant (BFR). Based on its affinity for transthyretin, TBP could compete with endogenous thyroid hormone. In this study, the effects of TBP on the thyroid hormone system were assessed in mice. Briefly, animals were exposed to 40 and 250 mg/kg TBP. Thyroid hormones were also administered with or without TBP. When mice were treated with TBP, deiodinase 1 (Dio1) and thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 2 (Thrβ2) decreased in the pituitary gland. The levels of deiodinase 2 (Dio2) and growth hormone (Gh) mRNA increased in response to 250 mg/kg of TBP, and the relative mRNA level of thyroid stimulating hormone β (Tshβ) increased in the pituitary gland. Dio1 and Thrβ1 expression in the liver were not altered, while Dio1 decreased in response to co-treatment with thyroid hormones. The thyroid gland activity decreased in response to TBP, as did the levels of free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine in serum. Taken together, these findings indicate that TBP can disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis and the presence of TBP influenced thyroid actions as regulators of gene expression. These data suggest that TBP interferes with thyroid hormone systems.

  9. Thyroid Hormone Receptor alpha Modulates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Changes in Peripheral Thyroid Hormone Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Kwakkel; O. Chassande; H.C. van Beeren; E. Fliers; W.M. Wiersinga; A. Boelen

    2010-01-01

    Acute inflammation is characterized by low serum T-3 and T-4 levels accompanied by changes in liver type 1 deiodinase (D1), liver D3, muscle D2, and muscle D3 expression. It is unknown at present whether thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TR alpha) plays a role in altered peripheral thyroid hormone met

  10. New insights into thyroid hormone action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Arturo; Hollenberg, Anthony N

    2017-05-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are endocrine messengers essential for normal development and function of virtually every vertebrate. The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis is exquisitely modulated to maintain nearly constant TH (T4 and T3) levels in circulation. However peripheral tissues and the CNS control the intracellular availability of TH, suggesting that circulating concentrations of TH are not fully representative of what each cell type sees. Indeed, recent work in the field has identified that TH transporters, deiodinases and thyroid hormone receptor coregulators can strongly control tissue-specific sensitivity to a set amount of TH. Furthermore, the mechanism by which the thyroid hormone receptors regulate target gene expression can vary by gene, tissue and cellular context. This review will highlight novel insights into the machinery that controls the cellular response to TH, which include unique signaling cascades. These findings shed new light into the pathophysiology of human diseases caused by abnormal TH signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The thyroid nodule. Thyrotropin and peripheral thyroid hormones; Der Schilddruesenknoten. TSH und periphere Hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimny, M. [Klinikum Hanau (Germany). Inst. fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2008-09-15

    Thyrotropin, free triodothyronine and thyroxine represent the standard serological parameters for the diagnostic work-up of the thyroid but only a minority of thyroid nodules present with subclinical or overt thyroid disorders. Besides a review of the regulation and principle of function of thyroid hormones as well as the effects of subclinical or overt hyperthyroidism, the significant role of these parameters beyond the assessment of hyperthyroidism in thyroid nodules is discussed. There is evidence that the level of thyrotropin within the normal range is predictive for the relevance of autonomous functioning nodules and the risk of malignancy of non-functioning thyroid nodules. Furthermore, the ratio of triodothyronine and thyroxine indicates the etiology of hyperthyroidism. Thyrotropin represents the main parameter to determine the adequate dose of thyroid hormone therapy of thyroid nodules. (orig.)

  12. Prolonged food deprivation increases mRNA expression of deiodinase 1 and 2, and thyroid hormone receptor β-1 in a fasting-adapted mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Bridget; Soñanez-Organis, José G; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Viscarra, Jose A; MacKenzie, Duncan S; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2013-12-15

    Food deprivation in mammals is typically associated with reduced thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations and deiodinase content and activity to suppress metabolism. However, in prolonged-fasted, metabolically active elephant seal pups, TH levels are maintained, if not elevated. The functional relevance of this apparent paradox is unknown and demonstrates variability in the regulation of TH levels, metabolism and function in food-deprived mammals. To address our hypothesis that cellular TH-mediated activity is upregulated with fasting duration, we quantified the mRNA expression and protein content of adipose and muscle deiodinase type I (DI1) and type II (DI2), and TH receptor beta-1 (THrβ-1) after 1, 3 and 7 weeks of fasting in northern elephant seal pups (N=5-7 per week). Fasting did not decrease the concentrations of plasma thyroid stimulating hormone, total triiodothyronine (tT3), free T3, total thyroxine (tT4) or free T4, suggesting that the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis is not suppressed, but rather maintained during fasting. Mean mRNA expression of adipose DI1 and DI2 increased threefold and fourfold, respectively, and 20- and 30-fold, respectively, in muscle. With the exception of adipose DI1, protein expression of adipose DI2 and muscle DI1 and DI2 increased twofold to fourfold. Fasting also increased adipose (fivefold) and muscle (fourfold) THrβ-1 mRNA expression, suggesting that the mechanisms mediating cellular TH activity are upregulated with prolonged fasting. The data demonstrate a unique, atypical mechanism of TH activity and regulation in mammals adapted to prolonged food deprivation in which the potential responsiveness of peripheral tissues and cellular TH activity are increased, which may contribute to their lipid-based metabolism.

  13. Endogenous excitatory amino acid neurotransmission regulates thyroid-stimulating hormone and thyroid hormone secretion in conscious freely moving male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arufe, M C; Durán, R; Perez-Vences, D; Alfonso, M

    2002-04-01

    The role of neurotransmission of endogenous excitatory amino acid (EAA) on serum thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels was examined in conscious and freely moving adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were cannulated at the third ventricle 2 d before the experiments. Several glutamate receptor agonists, such as kainic acid and domoic acid, and antagonists, such as 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and dizocilpine (MK-801) were administered into the third ventricle. Serum TSH levels were assesed by radioimmunoassay, and serum thyroid hormone levels were assessed by enzyme immunoassay. The results showed that the administration of CNQX and MK-801 produced a decrease in serum levels of TSH and thyroid hormones. The administration of kainic acid and domoic acid increased TSH concentrations, whereas CNQX completely blocked the release of TSH induced by kainic acid and domoic acid. These results suggest the importance of endogenous EAA in the regulation of hormone secretion from the pituitary-thyroid axis, as well as the role of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors in the stimulatory effect of EAAs on the pituitary-thyroid axis.

  14. The thyroid and the thyroid hormones (in Romanian)

    OpenAIRE

    Andreea Pap; Crina Mosneang,; CRISTINA, Romeo T.

    2014-01-01

    The thyroid gland is located in the cervical fascia were it is divided in two lateral lobes, right and left, disposed on both sides of the trachea, and unlike other vertebrates, the cat does not have an isthmus that connects the two lobes. The main products of secretion of the thyroid gland are represented by thyroxine [T4] and 3,5,3 'triiodothyronine [T3]. To these are added other hormones resulted from the deiodination of the principle hormones. This process is catalized by the D1, D2 and D...

  15. Thyroid hormone action: Astrocyte-neuron communication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz eMorte

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone action is exerted mainly through regulation of gene expression by binding of T3 to the nuclear receptors. T4 plays an important role as a source of intracellular T3 in the central nervous system via the action of the type 2 deiodinase, expressed in the astrocytes. A model of T3 availability to neural cells has been proposed and validated. The model contemplates that brain T3 has a double origin: a fraction is available directly from the circulation, and another is produced locally from T4 in the astrocytes by type 2 deiodinase. The fetal brain depends almost entirely on the T3 generated locally. The contribution of systemic T3 increases subsequently during development to account for approximately 50% of total brain T3 in the late postnatal and adult stages. In this article we review the experimental data in support of this model, and how the factors affecting T3 availability in the brain, such as deiodinases and transporters, play a decisive role in modulating local thyroid hormone action during development.

  16. Enzymatic deiodination of thyroid hormones

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenmakers, Christian

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThyroid honnone plays an essential role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation and metabolism in vertebrates. These actions are initiated by binding to the nuclear thyroid honnone receptor that has been identified as the translation product of the proto-oncogene c-erbA, the cellular counterpart of the viral oncogene v-erbA. Binding of thyroid honnone to its receptor changes the interaction with cis-acting regulatory elements, that modulate the expression of responsive t...

  17. Development and validation of in vitro bioassays for thyroid hormone receptor mediated endocrine disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freitas, de J.

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate crucial processes in vertebrates such as reproduction, development and energy metabolism. Endocrine disruption via the thyroid hormone system is gaining more attention both from scientists and regulators, because of the increasing incidence of hormone-related cancers and

  18. Expression of thyroid stimulating hormone β splice variant in thyroid of mouse with autoimmune thyroiditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁继红

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of marrowderived thyroid stimulating hormoneβ(TSHβ)splice variant in thyroid of mouse with autoimmune thyroiditis induced by thyroglobulin(Tg)immunization,and to analyze whether TSHβsplice variant participated in the pathological process of autoimmune thyroiditis.Methods Using random number table,forty-eight mice(24 females and 24 males)of 7 to 8 weeks old with body mass 20 to25 g were randomly divided into 4 groups(12 females

  19. Enzymatic deiodination of thyroid hormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.H. Schoenmakers (Christian)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThyroid honnone plays an essential role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation and metabolism in vertebrates. These actions are initiated by binding to the nuclear thyroid honnone receptor that has been identified as the translation product of the proto-oncogene c-erbA, the

  20. Effects of thyroid hormone on the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Serafino; Palmieri, Emiliano A; Lombardi, Gaetano; Biondi, Bernadette

    2004-01-01

    Increased or reduced action of thyroid hormone on certain molecular pathways in the heart and vasculature causes relevant cardiovascular derangements. It is well established that overt hyperthyroidism induces a hyperdynamic cardiovascular state (high cardiac output with low systemic vascular resistance), which is associated with a faster heart rate, enhanced left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic function, and increased prevalence of supraventricular tachyarrhythmias - namely, atrial fibrillation - whereas overt hypothyroidism is characterized by the opposite changes. However, whether changes in cardiac performance associated with overt thyroid dysfunction are due mainly to alterations of myocardial contractility or to loading conditions remains unclear. Extensive evidence indicates that the cardiovascular system responds to the minimal but persistent changes in circulating thyroid hormone levels, which are typical of individuals with subclinical thyroid dysfunction. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with increased heart rate, atrial arrhythmias, increased LV mass, impaired ventricular relaxation, reduced exercise performance, and increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. Subclinical hypothyroidism is associated with impaired LV diastolic function and subtle systolic dysfunction and an enhanced risk for atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction. Because all cardiovascular abnormalities are reversed by restoration of euthyroidism ("subclinical hypothyroidism") or blunted by beta-blockade and L-thyroxine (L-T4) dose tailoring ("subclinical hyperthyroidism"), timely treatment is advisable in an attempt to avoid adverse cardiovascular effects. Interestingly, some data indicate that patients with acute and chronic cardiovascular disorders and those undergoing cardiac surgery may have altered peripheral thyroid hormone metabolism that, in turn, may contribute to altered cardiac function. Preliminary clinical investigations suggest that administration of

  1. Effects of microsomal enzyme inducers on thyroid follicular cell proliferation and thyroid hormone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, C D; Hood, A M

    2001-01-01

    The effects of microsomal enzyme inducers on thyroid hormone homeostasis and the thyroid gland are of concern. We have investigated the effects of microsomal enzyme inducers on thyroid follicular cell proliferation and thyroid hormone metabolism in rats. We have shown that small increases in serum TSH can result in large increases in thyroid follicular cell proliferation. Furthermore, only those microsomal enzyme inducers that increase serum TSH--that is, phenobarbital (PB) and pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile (PCN)-increase thyroid follicular cell proliferation, whereas those microsomal enzyme inducers that do not increase serum TSH--that is, 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC) and Aroclor 1254 (PCB)-do not increase thyroid follicular cell proliferation. Deiodination does not appear to be the reason why serum T3 concentrations are maintained in microsomal enzyme inducer-treated rats. We have also shown that those microsomal enzyme inducers that increase serum TSH increase T3 UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity, whereas those microsomal enzyme inducers that do not increase serum TSH do not increase T3 UGT activity. This finding suggests that induction of T3 glucuronidation, rather than T4 glucuronidation, mediates increases in serum TSH of microsomal enzyme inducer treated rats.

  2. The importance of thyroid hormone sulfation during fetal development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.A. Kester (Monique)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractNormal fetal development requires the presence of thyroid hormone. Disruption of any of the processes regulating the bioavailability of thyroid hormone may contribute to congenital anomalies. This thesis is focussed a) on the importance of thyroid hormone sulfation during fetal developme

  3. Thyroid hormone transporters in health and disease: advances in thyroid hormone deiodination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhrle, Josef

    2007-06-01

    Thyroid hormone metabolism by the three deiodinase selenoproteins -- DIO1, DIO2, and DIO3 -- regulates the local availability of various iodothyronine metabolites and thus mediates their effects on gene expression, thermoregulation, energy metabolism, and many key reactions during the development and maintenance of an adult organism. Circulating serum levels of thyroid hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone, used as a combined indicator of thyroid hormone status, reflect a composite picture of: thyroid secretion; tissue-specific production of T(3) by DIO1 and DIO2 activity, which both contribute to circulating levels of T(3); and degradation of the prohormone T4, of the thyromimetically active T(3), of the inactive rT(3), of other iodothyronines metabolites with a lower iodine content and of thyroid hormone conjugates. Degradation reactions are catalyzed by either DIO1 or DIO3. Aberrant expression of individual deiodinases in disease, single nucleotide polymorphisms in their genes, and novel regulators of DIO gene expression (such as bile acids) provide a more complex picture of the fine tuning and the adaptation of systemic and local bioavailability of thyroid hormones.

  4. Thyroid hormones and growth in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarım, Ömer

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate growth by several mechanisms. In addition to their negative feedback effect on the stimulatory hormones thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and thyrotropin (TSH), thyroid hormones also regulate their receptors in various physiological and pathological conditions. Up-regulation and down-regulation of the thyroid receptors fine-tune the biological effects exerted by the thyroid hormones. Interestingly, the deiodinase enzyme system is another intrinsic regulator of thyroid physiology that adjusts the availability of thyroid hormones to the tissues, which is essential for normal growth and development. Almost all chronic diseases of childhood impair growth and development. Every disease may have a unique mechanism to halt linear growth, but reduced serum concentration or diminished local availability of thyroid hormones seems to be a common pathway. Therefore, the effects of systemic diseases on thyroid physiology must be taken into consideration in the evaluation of growth retardation in affected children.

  5. [Reference Intervals of Thyroid Hormones in Normal Pregnant Women and Effects of Thyroid Autoantibodies on Thyroid Hormone Levels in Pregnant Women in Chengdu Area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Min; Zeng, Jing; Yan, Yue-Rong; Luo, Dan; Huang, Lu; Huang, Hui

    2017-05-01

    To establish the reference intervals of thyroid hormones in normal pregnant women in Chengdu area of China, and to investigate the effects of thyroid autoantibodies on thyroid function in pregnant women. We included 696 pregnant women who had gestation data from June 2013 to March 2014 in Chengdu Women & Children's Central Hospital. Every subject under went questionnaire survey, physical examination, thyroid ultrasound and measurement of thyroid hormone and thyroid autoantibodies. The normal reference intervals were established according to the percentiles (P2.5-P97.5) of the healthy pregnant women in the same trimester. Another 50 non-pregnant women were selected as the control group. Of the 696 pregnant women, 579 subjects had negative thyroid autoantibodies and 117 subjects had positive thyroid autoantibodies. The positive rate of thyroid autoantibodies was 16.81%. Of the 579 subjects with negative thyroid autoantibodies, 257 were in the first trimester, 202 in the second trimester and 120 in the third trimester. In the first trimester of normal pregnancy, the reference intervals of serum thyrotropin (TSH) , free triiodothyronine (FT3) and free thyroxine (FT4) were 0.02-4.03 mIU/L, 3.85-6.27 pmol/L and 11.93-21.04 pmol/L respectively. In the second trimester, the reference intervals of serum TSH, FT3 and FT4 were 0.02-4.05 mIU/L, 3.51-5.82 pmol/L and 11.23-19.22 pmol/L respectively. In the thirdtrimester, the reference intervals for serum TSH, FT3 and FT4 were 0.24-5.41 mIU/L, 3.18-4.97 pmol/L and 11.10-17.00 pmol/L, respectively. When compared with non-pregnant women, the median TSH value was increasingly consisted with the progress of pregnancy period, while the median FT4 and FT3 values were decreasing accordingly. The similar tendencies of TSH, FT3, and FT4 were found in pregnant women with positive thyroid autoantibodies, but the trends were more remarkable when compared with those with negative thyroid autoantibodies. In pregnant women with positive

  6. Activation of tumor cell proliferation by thyroid hormone in a mouse model of follicular thyroid carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid cancers are the most common malignancy of the endocrine system in humans. To understand the molecular genetic events underlying thyroid carcinogenesis, we have generated a mouse model that spontaneously develops follicular thyroid carcinoma similar to human thyroid cancer (ThrbPV/PV mouse). This mutant mouse harbors a dominantnegative mutated thyroid hormone receptor β (denoted PV). The PV mutation was identified in a patient with resistance to thyroid hormone (TH). ThrbPV/PV mice exh...

  7. The thyroid hormone, parathyroid hormone and vitamin D associated hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Chopra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid disorders and primary hyperparathyroidism have been known to be associated with increases in blood pressure. The hypertension related to hypothyroidism is a result of increased peripheral resistance, changes in renal hemodynamics, hormonal changes and obesity. Treatment of hypothyroidism with levo-thyroxine replacement causes a decrease in blood pressure and an overall decline in cardiovascular risk. High blood pressure has also been noted in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism. Hyperthyroidism, on the other hand, is associated with systolic hypertension resulting from an expansion of the circulating blood volume and increase in stroke volume. Increased serum calcium levels associated with a primary increase in parathyroid hormone levels have been also associated with high blood pressure recordings. The mechanism for this is not clear but the theories include an increase in the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and vasoconstriction. Treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism by surgery results in a decline in blood pressure and a decrease in the plasma renin activity. Finally, this review also looks at more recent evidence linking hypovitaminosis D with cardiovascular risk factors, particularly hypertension, and the postulated mechanisms linking the two.

  8. Thyroid hormone regulation of brain gene expression: role of thyroid hormone receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Gil-Ibáñez, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Tesis doctoral inédita, leída en la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Facultad de Medicina. Departamento de Bioquímica. Fecha de lectura: 13 de junio, 2014 Thyroid hormones are important during development of the mammalian brain. They are involved in neuronal and glial cell differentiation and migration, axonal myelination, and synaptogenesis. The effects of thyroid hormones on brain development ...

  9. Biochemical mechanisms of thyroid hormone deiodination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, George G J M; Kester, Monique H A; Peeters, Robin P; Visser, Theo J

    2005-08-01

    Deiodination is the foremost pathway of thyroid hormone metabolism not only in quantitative terms but also because thyroxine (T(4)) is activated by outer ring deiodination (ORD) to 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T(3)), whereas both T(4) and T(3) are inactivated by inner ring deiodination (IRD) to 3,3',5-triiodothyronine and 3,3'-diiodothyronine, respectively. These reactions are catalyzed by three iodothyronine deiodinases, D1-3. Although they are homologous selenoproteins, they differ in important respects such as catalysis of ORD and/or IRD, deiodination of sulfated iodothyronines, inhibition by the thyrostatic drug propylthiouracil, and regulation during fetal and neonatal development, by thyroid state, and during illness. In this review we will briefly discuss recent developments in these different areas. These have resulted in the emerging view that the biological activity of thyroid hormone is regulated locally by tissue-specific regulation of the different deiodinases.

  10. Abnormal serum thyroid hormones concentration with healthy functional gland: a review on the metabolic role of thyroid hormones transporter proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Reza Mansourian

    2011-03-01

    Laboratory findings can definitely help the patients not to enter into status, where the damage might be happen due to a miss-diagnosis based on clinical assessment alone. The secondary disease accompanied with thyroid patients should also carefully check out due to the interference which some diseases can cause in the amount of serum thyroid hormone, particularly the free thyroxin. The dilemma over thyroid clinical diagnosis occur due to variation on serum thyroid hormone which initiated by other non-thyroidal disorders which can play an important roles in metabolic disorders of thyroid hormone due to the alteration which occur on the serum level of thyroid hormone transporter proteins. The majority of serum thyroid hormones of up to 95-99% are bound to the carrier proteins mainly to Thyroxin-Binding Globulins (TBG), some transthyretin already known as pre-albumin and albumin which are all synthesis in the liver and any modification which alter their production may alter the status of thyroid hormones. It seems TBG, transthyretin and albumin carries 75, 20, 5% of thyroid hormones within blood circulation, respectively. The dilemma facing the thyroid hormones following disruption of thyroid hormone transporter protein synthesis originate from this fact that any alteration of these protein contribute to the alteration of total thyroid and free serum thyroid hormones which are in fact the biologically active form of thyroid hormones. The subsequent of latter implication result in miss-understanding and miss-diagnosis of thyroid function tests, with possible wrongly thyroid clinical care, followed by undesired therapy of otherwise healthy thyroid.

  11. THYROID HORMONE PROFILE IN EARLY BREAST CANCER PATIENTS

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    Renija Valiya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Breast cancer is the most common malignant tumour in women worldwide. The relationship between breast cancer and thyroid disease is a controversy. Many of the studies showed hypothyroidism as the commonly found thyroid abnormality in breast cancer. [1] There is considerable evidence for an increased risk of thyroid and breast cancer in patients with iodine deficiency. This ability of iodine to reduce the risk of breast cancer is attributed to the ability of iodine and its compounds to induce apoptosis so that appropriate cell death occurs. Instead, in the absence of optimum level of iodine in the body the transformed cells continue to grow and divide resulting in cancer. AIMS 1. To find out the association of thyroid hormones and breast cancer in early breast cancer patients. 2. To find out the association of thyroid peroxidase antibodies in early breast cancer patients. Settings Cases: 82 breast cancer patients in early stage who attended the breast clinic. Controls: 82 age matched controls (Between 25-80 years. Design: Case control study. MATERIALS AND METHOD In this study, investigated for thyroid function test (T3, T4, TSH and thyroid peroxide antibody level in 82 early breast cancer patients. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS SPSS 16. RESULTS Statistically significant low T4 and high TSH in breast cancer patients, along with elevated thyroid peroxidase antibody. CONCLUSION Compared to hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism was found to be clinically significant in breast cancer patients

  12. Growth and development in a child with resistance to thyroid hormone and ectopic thyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather, Natasha; Hall, Kate; Neas, Katherine; Potter, Howard; Wiltshire, Esko

    2012-03-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone is an uncommon problem, which has rarely been associated with thyroid dysgenesis. We report a case with both thyroid gland ectopy and resistance to thyroid hormone and, thus, a reduced capacity to produce and respond to thyroid hormone. The patient presented at 2 years of age with developmental delay, dysmorphic features, and elevation in both thyroxine and thyrotropin. We document her response to therapy with thyroxine, with particular regard to her growth and development. Persistent elevation of thyrotropin is commonly recognized during treatment of congenital hypothyroidism. Resistance to thyroid hormone may be an important additional diagnosis to consider in cases where thyrotropin remains persistently elevated.

  13. Thyroid Hormones, Autoantibodies, Ultrasonography, and Clinical Parameters for Predicting Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lin-zheng; Zeng, Tian-shu; Pu, Lin; Pan, Shi-xiu; Xia, Wen-fang; Chen, Lu-lu

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate thyroid nodule malignancy prediction using thyroid function tests, autoantibodies, ultrasonographic imaging, and clinical data. We conducted a retrospective cohort study in 1400 patients with nodular thyroid disease (NTD). The thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration was significantly higher in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) versus benign thyroid nodular disease (BTND) (p = 0.004). The receiver operating characteristic curve of TSH showed an AUC of 0.58 (95% CI 0.53–0.62, p = 0.001), sensitivity of 74%, and specificity of 57% at a cut-off of 1.59 mIU/L. There was an incremental increase in TSH concentration along with the increasing tumor size (p < 0.001). Thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) concentration was associated with an increased risk of malignancy (p = 0.029), but this association was lost when the effect of TSH was taken into account (p = 0.11). Thyroid ultrasonographic characteristics, including fewer than three nodules, hypoechoic appearance, solid component, poorly defined margin, intranodular or peripheral-intranodular flow, and punctate calcification, can be used to predict the risk of thyroid cancer. In conclusion, our study suggests that preoperative serum TSH concentration, age, and ultrasonographic features can be used to predict the risk of malignancy in patients with NTD. PMID:27313612

  14. Thyroid hormone metabolism during inflammation and fasting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Pathophysiological circumstances such as illness and fasting affect the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT)-axis. The illness induced alterations, collectively known as the non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) are characterized by decreased serum T3 and T4 concentrations, increased serum rT3

  15. Thyroid hormone metabolism during inflammation and fasting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. de Vries

    2015-01-01

    Pathophysiological circumstances such as illness and fasting affect the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT)-axis. The illness induced alterations, collectively known as the non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) are characterized by decreased serum T3 and T4 concentrations, increased serum rT3 conce

  16. The thyroid gland and thyroid hormones in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) during early development and metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaren, Peter H M; Wunderink, Yvette S; Yúfera, Manuel; Mancera, Juan M; Flik, Gert

    2008-02-01

    We here describe the ontogeny and morphology of the thyroid gland in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis), and correlate these with whole body concentrations of thyroid hormones during early development and metamorphosis. Under our rearing conditions at 19.5 degrees C, most larvae entered metamorphosis in stage 1 at 15 days post-hatching (dph), and completed metamorphosis in stage 4 at 25dph. The onset of metamorphosis coincided with surges in whole body T4 and T3 concentrations. Crossmon's trichrome stain colored the lumen of follicular structures brightly red, and this co-localized with a T4-immunoreactivity. Thyroid follicles were first observed in stage 0 pre-metamorphic larvae at 5dph of age, and were detected exclusively in the subpharyngeal region, surrounding the ventral aorta. Increases in whole body thyroid hormone levels coincided with a 2(1/2)-fold increase in the total thyroidal colloid area in stage 1 larvae (aged 15dph) compared to stage 0 larvae (12dph). This was preceded by an approximately 40%-increase in the follicles' epithelial cell height in stage 0 larvae at 12dph compared to larvae at 5dph, and by an increase in the whole body T3/T4 ratio, indicative of an increase in outer ring deiodination. We conclude that in S. senegalensis there is a clear chronology in the activation of the thyroid gland that starts in early pre-metamorphic larvae.

  17. The thyroid and the thyroid hormones (in Romanian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Pap,

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The thyroid gland is located in the cervical fascia were it is divided in two lateral lobes, right and left, disposed on both sides of the trachea, and unlike other vertebrates, the cat does not have an isthmus that connects the two lobes. The main products of secretion of the thyroid gland are represented by thyroxine [T4] and 3,5,3 'triiodothyronine [T3]. To these are added other hormones resulted from the deiodination of the principle hormones. This process is catalized by the D1, D2 and D3 deiodinase resulting 3,3,5' triiodothyronine [rT3], 3,5-T2, 3,3’-T2 or 3’,5’-T2 which by further deiodination will form 3-3'-T1 and T1. To reach this deiodination must be followed certain steps in the hormon synthesis transport path, and it is important the present of the carrier protein. Once inside the tissue, the concentration of each hormone will vary depending on the binding site and the metabolic processes that will be followed.

  18. Sleep deprivation alters thyroid hormone economy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Nayana Coutinho; da Cruz, Natália Santos; de Paula Nascimento, Cristine; da Conceição, Rodrigo Rodrigues; da Silva, Alba Cenélia Matos; Olivares, Emerson Lopes; Marassi, Michelle Porto

    2015-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? The relationship between the thyroid system and sleep deprivation has seldom been assessed in the literature, and mounting evidence exists that sleep disturbances influence human lifestyles. The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis and thyroid hormone metabolism in sleep-deprived and sleep-restricted rats. What is the main finding and its importance? Central hypothyroidism and high thyroxine (T4 ) to 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3 ) activation in brown adipose tissue were observed following sleep deprivation. Sleep-restricted rats exhibited normal thyroid-stimulating hormone and T4 concentrations despite increased circulating T3 . Sleep recovery for 24 h did not normalize the high T3 concentrations, suggesting that high T3 is a powerful counterregulatory mechanism activated following sleep deprivation. Modern life has shortened sleep time, and the consequences of sleep deprivation have been examined in both human subjects and animal models. As the relationship between thyroid function and sleep deprivation has not been fully investigated, the aim of this study was to assess the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis and thyroid hormone metabolism following paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) and sleep restriction (SR) in rats. The effects of a 24 h rebound period were also studied. Male Wistar rats (200-250 g, n = 10 per group) were subjected to sleep deprivation via the modified multiple platform method. Rats were assigned to the following seven groups: control, PSD for 24 or 96 h, 24 or 96 h of sleep deprivation with rebound (PSD24R and PSD96R), SR for 21 days (SR21) and SR21 with rebound (SR21R). Blood samples were collected to determine the 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3 ), thyroxine (T4 ) and thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations. Brown adipose tissue iodothyronine deiodinase type 2 (D2) activity was also evaluated. Body weight gain was dramatically reduced (by ∼50-100%) in all

  19. Effects of TCDD on thyroid hormone homeostasis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, M C

    2000-02-01

    A physiological dosimetric model was constructed to describe the effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on circulating thyroid hormones in the rat and to test the hypothesis that these hormonal changes cause chronically elevated serum thyrotropin (thyroid stimulating hormone, TSH), which mediates growth promotion and may lead to thyroid tumors in TCDD-treated rats. The model included diffusion restricted distribution of TCDD among compartments for liver, kidney, white fat, slowly and rapidly perfused tissues, and the thyroxine-sensitive tissues brown fat, pituitary, and thyroid. Blood was distributed among major vessels and the capillary beds of the tissues. Metabolism of TCDD was limited to the liver. Secretion of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (3,5,3',5'-tetraiodothyronine, T4) from the thyroid was modeled as stimulated by circulating TSH, whose release from the pituitary was regulated by the hypothalamic peptides thyrotropin releasing hormone (activating) and somatostatin (inhibiting). Release of these peptides was represented as inhibited and activated, respectively, by circulating T4. Binding proteins for T3 and T4 and metabolism of the hormones by deiodination were included in thyroxine-sensitive tissues. Induction of hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase-1*6 (UGT), the enzyme which glucuronidates T4, was modeled as induced by the complex formed between TCDD and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. The computed extent of deiodination, primacy of the thyroid in generating T3 from T4, dependence of liver and kidney on locally produced T3, and export of T3 formed in the pituitary agreed with experimental observations. The model reproduced the observed decrease in circulating T4 and elevated serum TSH following chronic administration of TCDD. The altered levels were attributed to the increased clearance of T4 by the induced UGT and the consequent modification of feedback control of hormone releases. These results are consistent with the

  20. Thyroid hormone and the developing hypothalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneke eAlkemade

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone (TH plays an essential role in normal brain development and function. Both TH excess and insufficiency during development lead to structural brain abnormalities. Proper TH signaling is dependent on active transport of the prohormone thyroxine (T4 across the blood-brain-barrier and into brain cells. In the brain T4 undergoes local deiodination into the more active 3,3’,5-triiodothyronine (T3, which binds to nuclear TH receptors (TRs. TRs are already expressed during the first trimester of pregnancy, even before the fetal thyroid becomes functional. Throughout pregnancy, the fetus is largely dependent on the maternal TH supply. Recent studies in mice have shown that normal hypothalamic development requires intact TH signaling. In addition, the development of the human lateral hypothalamic zone coincides with a strong increase in T3 and TR mRNA concentrations in the brain. During this time the fetal hypothalamus already shows evidence for TH signaling. Expression of components crucial for central TH signaling show a specific developmental timing in the human hypothalamus. A coordinated expression of deiodinases in combination with TH transporters suggests that TH concentrations are regulated to prevent untimely maturation of brain cells. Even though the fetus depends on the maternal TH supply, there is evidence suggesting a role for the fetal hypothalamus in the regulation of TH serum concentrations. A decrease in expression of proteins involved in TH signaling towards the end of pregnancy may indicate a lower fetal TH demand. This may be relevant for the TSH surge that is usually observed after birth, and supports a role for the hypothalamus in the regulation of TH concentrations during the fetal period anticipating birth.

  1. Profile of thyroid hormones in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.P. Saraiva

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen involvement in breast cancer has been established; however, the association between breast cancer and thyroid diseases is controversial. Estrogen-like effects of thyroid hormone on breast cancer cell growth in culture have been reported. The objective of the present study was to determine the profile of thyroid hormones in breast cancer patients. Serum aliquots from 26 patients with breast cancer ranging in age from 30 to 85 years and age-matched normal controls (N = 22 were analyzed for free triiodothyronine (T3F, free thyroxine (T4F, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, antiperoxidase antibody (TPO, and estradiol (E2. Estrogen receptor ß (ERß was determined in tumor tissues by immunohistochemistry. Thyroid disease incidence was higher in patients than in controls (58 vs 18%, P < 0.05. Subclinical hyperthyroidism was the most frequent disorder in patients (31%; hypothyroidism (8% and positive anti-TPO antibodies (19% were also found. Subclinical hypothyroidism was the only dysfunction (18% found in controls. Hyperthyroidism was associated with postmenopausal patients, as shown by significantly higher mean T3 and T4 values and lower TSH levels in this group of breast cancer patients than in controls. The majority of positive ERß tumors were clustered in the postmenopausal patients and all cases presenting subclinical hyperthyroidism in this subgroup concomitantly exhibited Erß-positive tumors. Subclinical hyperthyroidism was present in only one of 6 premenopausal patients. We show here that postmenopausal breast cancer patients have a significantly increased thyroid hormone/E2 ratio (P < 0.05, suggesting a possible tumor growth-promoting effect caused by this misbalance.

  2. An improved thyroid hormone reporter assay to determine the thyroid hormone-like activity of amiodarone, bithionol, closantel and rafoxanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Kana; Sanoh, Seigo; Ohta, Shigeru; Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Sugihara, Kazumi; Fujimoto, Nariaki

    2012-01-05

    A number of environmental chemicals have been reported to exhibit thyroid hormone-like activity. Since thyroid hormones play a crucial role in development, it is important to identify chemicals in the environment that are capable of endocrine disruption of thyroid hormone homeostasis. In order to detect thyroid hormone-like activity, the growth of pituitary cell lines has been commonly used as a sensitive marker, albeit with limited specificity to thyroid hormones. Reporter gene assays using the thyroid hormone responsive element (TRE) connected to the luciferase reporter gene have also been developed. Thus far however, this type of assay appears to have limited sensitivity compared to cell growth assays. In the present study, we developed a highly sensitive TRE reporter gene assay by using a pituitary cell line, MtT/E-2, and by culturing cells in a serum-free medium. Our assay was developed in order to detect T3 activity at a concentration of 10(-11)M. This assay identified thyroid hormone-like activity from the antiarrhythmic drug, amiodarone, and from three anti-parasitic drugs, bithionol, closantel and rafoxanide, all commonly used in veterinary medicine. Thyroid hormone-like activity of these compounds was further confirmed by the induction of BCL3 gene expression in MtT/E-2, which is known to be regulated by thyroid hormones. Our improved assay was proved to be a sensitive tool for assessing thyroid hormone-like activity of environmental chemicals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Thyroid hormone concentrations in dialysate during hemodialysis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, W.; Bulla, M.; Buschsieweke, U.; Kutzim, H.

    1981-12-01

    Thyroxine (T4) concentration in dialysate in the course of hemodialysis was determined in 15 children. Concentrations were measured by a modified radioimmunoassay. During hemodialysis there was a slight increase in T4 concentration. At the end of hemodialysis T4 concentration was about 50% higher than soon after the onset of hemodialysis. The loss of T4 into dialysate during hemodialysis was 19.2 ..mu..g; the loss of T3 was less than 75 ng. The amount of the daily loss of thyroid hormones into dialysate was found to be in the range of normal urinary excretion. The lowering of serum thyroid hormone concentrations in children on hemodialysis cannot be explained by the loss of these hormones into dialysate.

  4. Melatonin in the thyroid gland: regulation by thyroid-stimulating hormone and role in thyroglobulin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Marin, R; Fernandez-Santos, J M; Morillo-Bernal, J; Gordillo-Martinez, F; Vazquez-Roman, V; Utrilla, J C; Carrillo-Vico, A; Guerrero, J M; Martin-Lacave, I

    2015-10-01

    Melatonin is an indoleamine with multiple functions in both plant and animal species. In addition to data in literature describing many other important roles for melatonin, such as antioxidant, circadian rhythm controlling, anti-aging, antiproliferative or immunomodulatory activities, our group recently reported that thyroid C-cells synthesize melatonin and suggested a paracrine role for this molecule in the regulation of thyroid activity. To discern the role played by melatonin at thyroid level and its involvement in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, in the present study we have analyzed the effect of thyrotropin in the regulation of the enzymatic machinery for melatonin biosynthesis in C cells as well as the effect of melatonin in the regulation of thyroid hormone biosynthesis in thyrocytes. Our results show that the key enzymes for melatonin biosynthesis (AANAT and ASMT) are regulated by thyroid-stimulating hormone. Furthermore, exogenous melatonin increases thyroglobulin expression at mRNA and protein levels on cultured thyrocytes and this effect is not strictly mediated by the upregulation of TTF1 or, noteworthy, PAX8 transcription factors. The present data show that thyroid C-cells synthesize melatonin under thyroid-stimulating hormone control and, consistently with previous data, support the hypothesis of a paracrine role for C-cell-synthesised melatonin within the thyroid gland. Additionally, in the present study we show evidence for the involvement of melatonin in thyroid function by directly-regulating thyroglobulin gene expression in follicular cells.

  5. Thyroid hormones and thyroid hormone receptors: Effects of thyromimetics on reverse cholesterol transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matteo; Pedrelli; Camilla; Pramfalk; Paolo; Parini

    2010-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is a complex process which transfers cholesterol from peripheral cells to the liver for subsequent elimination from the body via feces. Thyroid hormones (THs) affect growth, develop- ment, and metabolism in almost all tissues. THs exert their actions by binding to thyroid hormone receptors (TRs). There are two major subtypes of TRs, TRα and TRβ, and several isoforms (e.g. TRα1, TRα2, TRβ1, and TRβ2). Activation of TRα1 affects heart rate, whereas activation of TRβ1 has po...

  6. Do thyroid hormones function in insects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, K G

    2000-01-01

    Earlier work demonstrated that phenoxy-phenyl compounds such as fenoxycarb and thyroxine mimicked the effects of JH III in causing a reduction in volume of the follicle cells of Locusta migratoria. While these compounds were only moderately effective, a derivative of thyroxine, 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3) was as effective as JH III, and T3 has been shown to bind to the same membrane receptor and activate the same pathway as JH III. The current paper shows that other thyroxine derivatives vary in activity. 3,3', 5'-Triiodothyronine (reverse T3) is inactive. 3,5-Diiodothyronine (T2) is more active than JH III, while its relatives (iodines at 3', 5' or at 3,3') are inactive. When follicles are exposed in vitro to rhodamine conjugated T3, the fluorescent compound can be seen to enter the cells and accumulate there: this process is inhibited by cycloheximide or by a temperature of 0 degrees C. The accumulation is antagonised by JH III but not JH I (which does not bind to the JH III membrane receptor) and by an antiserum raised against the putative membrane receptor protein. The action of T3, but not T2, is inhibited by 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil or by aurothioglucose, both known to inhibit deiodinases. The activity of T3, but not of T2, increases with time of exposure to the follicle cells. These facts suggest that T3 enters the cells by receptor mediated endocytosis and is converted to a more active compound. Immunoreactivity to T3, but not thyroxine, can be detected in the haemolymph of locusts, and the titre varies slightly with the gonotrophic cycle. The food shows immunoreactivity for both thyroxine and T3. These findings suggest that thyroid hormones are ingested by locusts and have the potential to be used as hormonal signals in the control of egg production.

  7. Thyroid hormones induce browning of white fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sánchez, Noelia; Moreno-Navarrete, José M; Contreras, Cristina; Rial-Pensado, Eva; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; Fernández-Real, José-Manuel; López, Miguel

    2017-02-01

    The canonical view about the effect of thyroid hormones (THs) on thermogenesis assumes that the hypothalamus acts merely as a modulator of the sympathetic outflow on brown adipose tissue (BAT). Recent data have challenged that vision by demonstrating that THs act on the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) to inhibit AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which regulates the thermogenic program in BAT, leading to increased thermogenesis and weight loss. Current data have shown that in addition to activation of brown fat, the browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) might also be an important thermogenic mechanism. However, the possible central effects of THs on the browning of white fat remain unclear. Here, we show that 3,3',5,5' tetraiodothyroxyne (T4)-induced hyperthyroidism promotes a marked browning of WAT. Of note, central or VMH-specific administration of 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3) recapitulates that effect. The specific genetic activation of hypothalamic AMPK in the VMH reversed the central effect of T3 on browning. Finally, we also showed that the expression of browning genes in human WAT correlates with serum T4 Overall, these data indicate that THs induce browning of WAT and that this mechanism is mediated via the central effects of THs on energy balance. © 2017 The authors.

  8. Thyroid Hormones, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Mancini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and oxidative stress (OS are closely related processes, as well exemplified in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. OS is also related to hormonal derangement in a reciprocal way. Among the various hormonal influences that operate on the antioxidant balance, thyroid hormones play particularly important roles, since both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism have been shown to be associated with OS in animals and humans. In this context, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS that typically manifests as reduced conversion of thyroxine (T4 to triiodothyronine (T3 in different acute and chronic systemic conditions is still a debated topic. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome are reviewed, together with the roles of deiodinases, the enzymes responsible for the conversion of T4 to T3, in both physiological and pathological situations. The presence of OS indexes in NTIS supports the hypothesis that it represents a condition of hypothyroidism at the tissue level and not only an adaptive mechanism to diseases.

  9. Thyroid Hormones, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Antonio; Di Segni, Chantal; Raimondo, Sebastiano; Olivieri, Giulio; Silvestrini, Andrea; Meucci, Elisabetta; Currò, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress (OS) are closely related processes, as well exemplified in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. OS is also related to hormonal derangement in a reciprocal way. Among the various hormonal influences that operate on the antioxidant balance, thyroid hormones play particularly important roles, since both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism have been shown to be associated with OS in animals and humans. In this context, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) that typically manifests as reduced conversion of thyroxine (T4) to triiodothyronine (T3) in different acute and chronic systemic conditions is still a debated topic. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome are reviewed, together with the roles of deiodinases, the enzymes responsible for the conversion of T4 to T3, in both physiological and pathological situations. The presence of OS indexes in NTIS supports the hypothesis that it represents a condition of hypothyroidism at the tissue level and not only an adaptive mechanism to diseases.

  10. Illness-induced changes in thyroid hormone metabolism: focus on the tissue level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Kwakkel; E. Fliers; A. Boelen

    2011-01-01

    During illness changes in thyroid hormone metabolism occur, collectively known as the non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). NTIS is characterised by low serum thyroid hormone levels without the expected rise in serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, indicating a major change in thyroid hormone feedback

  11. Glucose delays the insulin-induced increase in thyroid hormone-mediated signaling in adipose of prolong-fasted elephant seal pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Bridget; Soñanez-Organis, José G; Viscarra, Jose A; Jaques, John T; MacKenzie, Duncan S; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2016-03-15

    Prolonged food deprivation in mammals typically reduces glucose, insulin, and thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations, as well as tissue deiodinase (DI) content and activity, which, collectively, suppress metabolism. However, in elephant seal pups, prolonged fasting does not suppress TH levels; it is associated with upregulation of adipose TH-mediated cellular mechanisms and adipose-specific insulin resistance. The functional relevance of this apparent paradox and the effects of glucose and insulin on TH-mediated signaling in an insulin-resistant tissue are not well defined. To address our hypothesis that insulin increases adipose TH signaling in pups during extended fasting, we assessed the changes in TH-associated genes in response to an insulin infusion in early- and late-fasted pups. In late fasting, insulin increased DI1, DI2, and THrβ-1 mRNA expression by 566%, 44%, and 267% at 60 min postinfusion, respectively, with levels decreasing by 120 min. Additionally, we performed a glucose challenge in late-fasted pups to differentiate between insulin- and glucose-mediated effects on TH signaling. In contrast to the insulin-induced effects, glucose infusion did not increase the expressions of DI1, DI2, and THrβ-1 until 120 min, suggesting that glucose delays the onset of the insulin-induced effects. The data also suggest that fasting duration increases the sensitivity of adipose TH-mediated mechanisms to insulin, some of which may be mediated by increased glucose. These responses appear to be unique among mammals and to have evolved in elephant seals to facilitate their adaptation to tolerate an extreme physiological condition. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. A Case of Resistance to Thyroid Hormone with Chronic Thyroiditis: Discovery of a Novel Mutation (I54V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kammoun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH is a rare disorder characterized by variable tissue hyporesponsiveness to thyroid hormone, usually caused by mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor beta (TRβ. It has been reported that the serum of patients with RTH is free of auto-antibodies against thyroglobulin (Tg and thyroid peroxidase (TPO, except in rare cases where coincidental autoimmune thyroiditis is also present. We describe a 13-year-old girl with chronic thyroiditis and RTH. This patient had increased plasma free T3, free T4 at the upper limits with unsuppressed TSH. She had peripheral manifestations of thyroid hormone excess, hypertension and growth acceleration. Anti-TPO antibodies were positive. Sequence analysis of the TRβ gene was performed and revealed a novel mutation I54V in exon 4. The same mutation was also found in the mother and two asymptomatic sisters. The clinical presentation of our patient is not habitual in RTH because growth retardation is frequently reported in this syndrome. The association between RTH and thyroiditis complicate the management of the hypothyroidism.

  13. The effect of thyroid hormones in psoriasis vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arican Ozer

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Certain endocrinological disturbances are assumed to exacerbate psoriasis. In this study we compared the serum thyroid hormone levels of a group of psoriasis patients with that of a control group. METHODS: The total T3 (TT3, free T3 (FT3, total T4 (TT4, free T4 (FT4 and TSH levels obtained from the sera of 103 psoriatics (37 males and 66 females and 96 controls (40 male and 56 female were measured by immunological assay. RESULTS: Statistical assessments displayed no differences in TT3, FT4 and TSH serum levels for the two groups. Differences between the means of serum TT4 (P=0.033 and serum FT3 (P=0.041 levels showed statistical differences among the groups. We also found that at least one thyroid hormone level in the blood was increased in 23 patients of the psoriatic group compared to 9 patients in the control group (P=0.022. The average Psoriasis Area and Severity Index scores in this patient group were significantly higher than in those with normal hormone levels (P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: The role of thyroid hormones in the etiopathogenesis of psoriasis and the effects of such differences in psoriatic patients must be investigated with wider and comprehensive laboratory and clinical studies.

  14. Thyroid hormone synthesis and anti-thyroid drugs: A bioinorganic chemistry approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gouriprasanna Roy; G Mugesh

    2006-11-01

    Hydrogen peroxide, generated by thyroid oxidase enzymes, is a crucial substrate for the thyroid peroxidase (TPO)-catalysed biosynthesis of thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) in the thyroid gland. It is believed that the H2O2 generation is a limiting step in thyroid hormone synthesis. Therefore, the control of hydrogen peroxide concentration is one of the possible mechanisms for the inhibition of thyroid hormone biosynthesis. The inhibition of thyroid hormone synthesis is required for the treatment of hyperthyroidism and this can be achieved by one or more anti-thyroid drugs. The most widely used anti-thyroid drug methimazole (MMI) inhibits the production of thyroid hormones by irreversibly inactivating the enzyme TPO. Our studies show that the replacement of sulphur in MMI by selenium leads to a selone, which exists predominantly in its zwitterionic form. In contrast to the sulphur drug, the selenium analogue (MSeI) reversibly inhibits the peroxidase-catalysed oxidation and iodination reactions. Theoretical studies on MSeI reveal that the selenium atom in this compound carries a large negative charge. The carbon-selenium bond length in MSeI is found to be close to single-bond length. As the selenium atom exhibits a large nucleophilic character, the selenium analogue of MMI may scavenge the hydrogen peroxide present in the thyroid cells, which may lead to a reversible inhibition of thyroid hormone biosynthesis.

  15. Thyroid hormone receptors bind to defined regions of the growth hormone and placental lactogen genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, J W; Voz, M L; Eliard, P H; Mathy-Harter, M; De Nayer, P; Economidis, I V; Belayew, A; Martial, J A; Rousseau, G G

    1986-12-01

    The intracellular receptor for thyroid hormone is a protein found in chromatin. Since thyroid hormone stimulates transcription of the growth hormone gene through an unknown mechanism, the hypothesis that the thyroid hormone-receptor complex interacts with defined regions of this gene has been investigated in a cell-free system. Nuclear extracts from human lymphoblastoid IM-9 cells containing thyroid hormone receptors were incubated with L-3,5,3'-tri[125I]iodothyronine and calf thymus DNA-cellulose. Restriction fragments of the human growth hormone gene were added to determine their ability to inhibit labeled receptor binding to DNA-cellulose. These fragments encompassed nucleotide sequences from about three kilobase pairs upstream to about four kilobase pairs downstream from the transcription initiation site. The thyroid hormone-receptor complex bound preferentially to the 5'-flanking sequences of the growth hormone gene in a region between nucleotide coordinates -290 and -129. The receptor also bound to an analogous promoter region in the human placental lactogen gene, which has 92% nucleotide sequence homology with the growth hormone gene. These binding regions appear to be distinct from those that are recognized by the receptor for glucocorticoids, which stimulate growth hormone gene expression synergistically with thyroid hormone. The presence of thyroid hormone was required for binding of its receptor to the growth hormone gene promoter, suggesting that thyroid hormone renders the receptor capable of recognizing specific gene regions.

  16. Transport of thyroid hormone in brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva K Wirth

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone (TH transport into the brain is not only pivotal for development and differentiation, but also for maintenance and regulation of adult central nervous system (CNS function. In this review, we highlight some key factors and structures regulating thyroid hormone uptake and distribution. Serum TH binding proteins play a major role for the availability of TH since only free hormone concentrations may dictate cellular uptake. One of these proteins, transthyretin is also present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF after being secreted by the choroid plexus. Entry routes into the brain like the blood-brain-barrier (BBB and the blood-CSF-barrier will be explicated regarding fetal and adult status. Recently identified TH transmembrane transporters (THTT like monocarboxylate transporter 8 (Mct8 play a major role in uptake of TH across the BBB but as well in transport between cells like astrocytes and neurons within the brain. Species differences in transporter expression will be presented and interference of TH transport by endogenous and exogenous compounds including endocrine disruptors and drugs will be discussed.

  17. Thyroid organotypic rat and human cultures used to investigate drug effects on thyroid function, hormone synthesis and release pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vickers, Alison E.M., E-mail: vickers_alison@allergan.com [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine CA 92612 (United States); Heale, Jason; Sinclair, John R.; Morris, Stephen; Rowe, Josh M. [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine CA 92612 (United States); Fisher, Robyn L. [Vitron Inc., Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Drug induced thyroid effects were evaluated in organotypic models utilizing either a rat thyroid lobe or human thyroid slices to compare rodent and human response. An inhibition of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) function led to a perturbation in the expression of key genes in thyroid hormone synthesis and release pathways. The clinically used thiourea drugs, methimazole (MMI) and 6-n-propyl-2-thioruacil (PTU), were used to evaluate thyroid drug response in these models. Inhibition of TPO occurred early as shown in rat thyroid lobes (2 h) and was sustained in both rat (24–48 h) and human (24 h) with ≥ 10 μM MMI. Thyroid from rats treated with single doses of MMI (30–1000 mg/kg) exhibited sustained TPO inhibition at 48 h. The MMI in vivo thyroid concentrations were comparable to the culture concentrations (∼ 15–84 μM), thus demonstrating a close correlation between in vivo and ex vivo thyroid effects. A compensatory response to TPO inhibition was demonstrated in the rat thyroid lobe with significant up-regulation of genes involved in the pathway of thyroid hormone synthesis (Tpo, Dio1, Slc5a5, Tg, Tshr) and the megalin release pathway (Lrp2) by 24 h with MMI (≥ 10 μM) and PTU (100 μM). Similarly, thyroid from the rat in vivo study exhibited an up-regulation of Dio1, Slc5a5, Lrp2, and Tshr. In human thyroid slices, there were few gene expression changes (Slc5a5, ∼ 2-fold) and only at higher MMI concentrations (≥ 1500 μM, 24 h). Extended exposure (48 h) resulted in up-regulation of Tpo, Dio1 and Lrp2, along with Slc5a5 and Tshr. In summary, TPO was inhibited by similar MMI concentrations in rat and human tissue, however an increased sensitivity to drug treatment in rat is indicated by the up-regulation of thyroid hormone synthesis and release gene pathways at concentrations found not to affect human tissue. -- Highlights: ► Novel model of rat thyroid or human thyroid slices to evaluate pathways of injury. ► TPO inhibition by MMI or PTU altered

  18. Challenges in interpretation of thyroid hormone test results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalić Tijana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In interpreting thyroid hormones results it is preferable to think of interference and changes in concentration of their carrier proteins. Outline of Cases. We present two patients with discrepancy between the results of thyroid function tests and clinical status. The first case presents a 62-year-old patient with a nodular goiter and Hashimoto thyroiditis. Thyroid function test showed low thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH and normal to low fT4. By determining thyroid status (ТSH, T4, fT4, T3, fT3 in two laboratories, basal and after dilution, as well as thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG, it was concluded that the thyroid hormone levels were normal. The results were influenced by heterophile antibodies leading to a false lower TSH level and suspected secondary hypothyroidism. The second case, a 40-year-old patient, was examined and followed because of the variable size thyroid nodule and initially borderline elevated TSH, after which thyroid status showed low level of total thyroid hormones and normal TSH. Based on additional analysis it was concluded that low T4 and T3 were a result of low TBG. It is a hereditary genetic disorder with no clinical significance. Conclusion. Erroneous diagnosis of thyroid disorders and potentially harmful treatment could be avoided by proving the interference or TBG deficiency whenever there is a discrepancy between the thyroid function results and the clinical picture.

  19. Molecules important for thyroid hormone synthesis and action - known facts and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brix Klaudia

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thyroid hormones are of crucial importance for the functioning of nearly every organ. Remarkably, disturbances of thyroid hormone synthesis and function are among the most common endocrine disorders affecting approximately one third of the working German population. Over the last ten years our understanding of biosynthesis and functioning of these hormones has increased tremendously. This includes the identification of proteins involved in thyroid hormone biosynthesis like Thox2 and Dehal where mutations in these genes are responsible for certain degrees of hypothyroidism. One of the most important findings was the identification of a specific transporter for triiodothyronine (T3, the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8 responsible for directed transport of T3 into target cells and for export of thyroid hormones out of thyroid epithelial cells. Genetic disturbances of MCT8 in patients result in a biochemical constellation of high T3 levels in combination with low or normal TSH and thyroxine levels leading to a new syndrome of severe X-linked mental retardation. Importantly mice lacking MCT8 presented only with a mild phenotype, indicating that compensatory mechanisms exist in mice. Moreover, it has become clear that not only genomic actions of T3 exist. T3 is also capable to activate adhesion receptors and it signals via activation of PI3K and MAPK pathways. Most recently, thyroid hormone derivatives were identified, the thyronamines which are decarboxylated thyroid hormones initiating physiological actions like lowering body temperature and heart rate, thereby acting in opposite direction to the classical thyroid hormones. So far it is believed that thyronamines function via the activation of a G-protein coupled receptor, TAAR1. The objective of this review is to summarise the recent findings in thyroid hormone synthesis and action and to discuss their implications for diagnosis of thyroid disease and for treatment of patients.

  20. Thyroid hormone resistance may course hypotonia in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivkovska, Julijana; Born, Alfred Peter; Nielsen, Claus Thøger

    2014-01-01

    Allan Herndon Dudley's syndrome (AHDS) is X-linked mental retardation and hypotonia caused by mutations in a thyroid hormone transporter gene - MCT8. The typical thyreoidea AHDS profile is elevated T3, low-normal T4 and normal or elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Neonatal screening...

  1. Interactions of polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons with thyroid hormone metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuur, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    This thesis deals with the possible interactions of polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons and/or their metabolites with thyroid hormone metabolism. This chapter summarizes firstly the effects of thyroid hormone on the induction of biotransformation enzymes by PHAHs. Secondly, the results on

  2. Interactions of polyhalogeneted aromatic hydrocarbons with thyroid hormone metabolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuur, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    This thesis deals with the possible interactions of polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons and/or their metabolites with thyroid hormone metabolism. This chapter summarizes firstly the effects of thyroid hormone on the induction of biotransformation enzymes by PHAHs. Secondly, the results on the inhi

  3. Thyroid hormone effect on human mitochondria measured by flow cytometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvetny, Jan; Bomholt, Tobias; Pedersen, Palle

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial function may be impaired in a number of diseases including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and endocrine disorders. Therefore it is important to be able to measure mitochondrial function in human cells. PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate...... a method to measure mitochondrial function in human derived cells, which also would reflect regulation by thyroid hormones. METHODS: The MDA-MB-231 cell line (a human breast cancer cell line) was incubated with bioactive iodothyronines (T(4), 3'-3, 5-T(3), 3, 5-T(2)) 50 nmol/l for 3 h. Mitochondrial......: It was possible to measure mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in human derived cells and to examine thyroid hormone effects using flow cytometry. Bioactive iodothyronines increased mitochondrial membrane potential. TRIAC had no effect and L-Carnitine only inhibited T(4) stimulation of membrane potential...

  4. Alternate pathways of thyroid hormone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sing-Yung; Green, William L; Huang, Wen-Sheng; Hays, Marguerite T; Chopra, Inder J

    2005-08-01

    The major thyroid hormone (TH) secreted by the thyroid gland is thyroxine (T(4)). Triiodothyronine (T(3)), formed chiefly by deiodination of T(4), is the active hormone at the nuclear receptor, and it is generally accepted that deiodination is the major pathway regulating T(3) bioavailability in mammalian tissues. The alternate pathways, sulfation and glucuronidation of the phenolic hydroxyl group of iodothyronines, the oxidative deamination and decarboxylation of the alanine side chain to form iodothyroacetic acids, and ether link cleavage provide additional mechanisms for regulating the supply of active hormone. Sulfation may play a general role in regulation of iodothyronine metabolism, since sulfation of T(4) and T(3) markedly accelerates deiodination to the inactive metabolites, reverse triiodothyronine (rT(3)) and T(2). Sulfoconjugation is prominent during intrauterine development, particularly in the precocial species in the last trimester including humans and sheep, where it may serve both to regulate the supply of T(3), via sulfation followed by deiodination, and to facilitate maternal-fetal exchange of sulfated iodothyronines (e.g., 3,3'-diiodothyronine sulfate [T(2)S]). The resulting low serum T(3) may be important for normal fetal development in the late gestation. The possibility that T(2)S or its derivative, transferred from the fetus and appearing in maternal serum or urine, can serve as a marker of fetal thyroid function is being studied. Glucuronidation of TH often precedes biliary-fecal excretion of hormone. In rats, stimulation of glucuronidation by various drugs and toxins may lead to lower T(4) and T(3) levels, provocation of thyrotropin (TSH) secretion, and goiter. In man, drug induced stimulation of glucuronidation is limited to T(4), and does not usually compromise normal thyroid function. However, in hypothyroid subjects, higher doses of TH may be required to maintain euthyroidism when these drugs are given. In addition, glucuronidates and

  5. Improved response of growth hormone to growth hormone-releasing hormone and reversible chronic thyroiditis after hydrocortisone replacement in isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Miho; Sato, Haruhiro; Miyamoto, Yoshiyasu; Hirukawa, Takashi; Sawaya, Asako; Miyakogawa, Takayo; Tatsumi, Ryoko; Kakuta, Takatoshi

    2009-07-20

    We report a 44-year-old Japanese man who showed a reversible blunted response of growth hormone (GH) to GH-releasing hormone (GRH) stimulation test and reversible chronic thyroiditis accompanied by isolated ACTH deficiency. He was admitted to our hospital because of severe general malaise, hypotension, and hypoglycemia. He showed repeated attacks of hypoglycemia, and his serum sodium level gradually decreased. Finally, he was referred to the endocrinology division, where his adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol values were found to be low, and his GH level was slightly elevated. An increased value of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and decreased values of free triidothyronine and free thyroxine were observed along with anti-thyroglobulin antibody, suggesting chronic thyroiditis. Pituitary stimulation tests revealed a blunted response of ACTH and cortisol to corticotropin-releasing hormone, and a blunted response of GH to GRH. Hydrocortisone replacement was then started, and this improved the patient's general condition. His hypothyroid state gradually ameliorated and his titer of anti-thyroglobulin antibody decreased to the normal range. Pituitary function was re-evaluated with GRH stimulation test under a maintenance dose of 20 mg/day hydrocortisone and showed a normal response of GH to GRH. It is suggested that re-evaluation of pituitary and thyroid function is useful for diagnosing isolated ACTH deficiency after starting a maintenance dose of hydrocortisone in order to avoid unnecessary replacement of thyroid hormone.

  6. Thyroid hormone availability and activity in avian species: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decuypere, E; Van As, P; Van der Geyten, S; Darras, V M

    2005-07-01

    The intracellular thyroid hormone (TH) availability is influenced by different metabolic pathways. Some of the changes in intracellular TH availability can be linked to changes in local deiodination and sulfation capacities. The secretion of the chicken thyroid consists predominantly of thyroxine (T4). TH receptors (TRs) preferentially bind 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3). Therefore, the metabolism of T4 secreted by the thyroid gland in peripheral tissues, resulting in the production and degradation of receptor-active T3, plays a major role in thyroid function. Food restriction in growing chickens increases hepatic type III deiodinase (D3) levels but decreases growth hormone (GH)-dependent variables such as plasma insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and T3 concentrations. Refeeding restores hepatic D3 and plasma T3 to control levels within a few hours. It can be concluded that the tissue and time dependent regulation of the balance between TH activating and inactivating enzymes plays an essential role in the control of local T3 availability and hence in TH activity. Two separate genes encode multiple TR isoforms, i.e. TRalpha and TRbeta. These TRs consist of a DNA-binding domain, a ligand-binding domain, a hinge region and an amino-terminal (A/B) domain. TRs mediate their effects on transcription by binding as homodimers or heterodimers to the TH response elements (TREs). Also, unliganded TRs can bind to TREs and may so modulate transcription of target genes.

  7. Deiodination of thyroid hormones by iodothyronine deiodinase mimics: does an increase in the reactivity alter the regioselectivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Debasish; Mugesh, Govindasamy

    2011-07-06

    Organoselenium compounds as functional mimics of iodothyronine deiodinase are described. The naphthyl-based compounds having two selenol groups are remarkably efficient in the inner-ring deiodination of thyroxine. The introduction of a basic amino group in close proximity to one of the selenol moieties enhances the deiodination. This study suggests that an increase in the nucleophilic reactivity of the conserved Cys residue at the active site of deiodinases is very important for effective deiodination.

  8. Thyroid hormone acting via TRβ induces expression of browning genes in mouse bone marrow adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Richard C; Mohan, Subburaman

    2017-04-01

    Mutant hypothyroid mouse models have recently shown that thyroid hormone is critical for skeletal development during an important prepubertal growth period. Additionally, thyroid hormone negatively regulates total body fat, consistent with the well-established effects of thyroid hormone on energy and fat metabolism. Since bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells differentiate into both adipocytes and osteoblasts and a relationship between bone marrow adipogenesis and osteogenesis has been predicted, we hypothesized thyroid hormone deficiency during the postnatal growth period increases marrow adiposity in mice. Marrow adiposity in TH-deficient (Tshr (-/-)) mice treated with T3/T4, TH receptor β-specific agonist GC-1, or vehicle control was evaluated via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and osmium micro-computed tomography. To further examine the mechanism for thyroid hormone regulation of marrow adiposity, we used real-time RT-PCR to measure the effects of thyroid hormone on adipocyte differentiation markers in primary mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells and two mouse cell lines in vitro and in Tshr (-/-) mice in vivo. Marrow adiposity increased >20% (P hormone normally increases (day 5-14) rescued this phenotype. Furthermore, GC-1 rescued this phenotype equally well, suggesting this thyroid hormone effect is in part mediated via TRβ signaling. Treatment of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal or ST2 cells with T3 or GC-1 significantly increased expression of several brown/beige fat markers. Moreover, injection of T3/T4 increased browning-specific markers in white fat of Tshr (-/-) mice. These data suggest that thyroid hormone regulation of marrow adiposity is mediated at least in part via activation of TRβ signaling.

  9. Thyroid peroxidase antibodies, levels of thyroid stimulating hormone and development of hypothyroidism in euthyroid subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, A.; Links, T.P.; de Jong-van den Berg, L.T.; Gans, R.O.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.; Bakker, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have been found to be related to the levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and to predict future development of thyroid failure in selected populations. We investigated these relations in a euthyroid general population. Design: Cross-sectional

  10. Thyroid profiles in a patient with resistance to thyroid hormone and episodes of thyrotoxicosis, including repeated painless thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniyama, Matsuo; Otsuka, Fumiko; Tozaki, Teruaki; Ban, Yoshiyuki

    2013-07-01

    Thyrotoxic disease can be difficult to recognize in patients with resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) because the clinical symptoms of thyrotoxicosis cannot be observed, and thyrotropin (TSH) may not be suppressed because of hormone resistance. Painless thyroiditis is a relatively common cause of thyrotoxicosis, but its occurrence in RTH has not been reported. We assessed the thyroid profile in a patient with RTH and episodes of thyrotoxicosis who experienced repeated painless thyroiditis. A 44-year-old Japanese woman with RTH, which was confirmed by the presence of a P453A mutation in the thyroid hormone receptor β (TRβ) gene, showed a slight elevation of the basal levels of thyroid hormones, which indicated that her pituitary RTH was mild. She experienced a slight exacerbation of hyperthyroxinemia concomitant with TSH suppression. A diagnosis of painless thyroiditis was made because of the absence of TSH receptor antibodies, low Tc-99m pertechnetate uptake by the thyroid gland, and transient suppression followed by a slight elevation of TSH following the elevation of thyroid hormones. The patient's complaints of general malaise and occasional palpitations did not change throughout the course of painless thyroiditis. Three years later, painless thyroiditis occurred again without any deterioration of the clinical manifestations. Mild pituitary RTH can be overcome by slight exacerbation of hyperthyroxinemia during mild thyrotoxicosis. When pituitary resistance is severe and TSH is not suppressed, thyrotoxicosis may be overlooked.

  11. Changes in serum thyroid hormone levels and thyroid gland activity of artificially maturing female Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qu Xiancheng(曲宪成); Massaki Nagae; Sinji Adachi; Kohei Yamauchi

    2003-01-01

    In order to evaluate the involvement of the thyroid gland in reproduction, thyroid func-tioning was described in female cultivated Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica ) in progressive stages of sex-ual maturation induced by chum salmon pituitary homogenate (SPH) treatment. Serum thyroid hor-mones, thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) were also measured in each stage. Thyroid gland ac-tivity (epithelial cell height) was high before SPH injection (previtellogenic stage), further increasing at the early vitellogenic stage, thereafter decreasing to late vitellogenic and migratory nucleus stages. Theprofiles of both T3 and T4 changed during vitellogenesis, being high during previtellogenic and earlyvitellogenic stages, and subsequently declining, thus mimicking thyroid gland activity. These resultssuggest that the thyroid has relation with eel ovarian development during artificial maturation.

  12. Thyroid function and stress hormones in children with stress hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordbar, Mohammad Reza; Taj-Aldini, Reza; Karamizadeh, Zohre; Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Karimi, Mehran; Omrani, Gholam Hossein

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the prevalence of stress hyperglycemia and to investigate how thyroid and stress hormones alter during stress hyperglycemia in children admitted to pediatric emergency wards. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in children, less than 19 years old, who were admitted to pediatric emergency wards of Nemazee and Dastgheib Hospitals, Shiraz, Southern Iran. Those patients taking steroids, beta-agonists or intravenously administered glucose before venipuncture, and patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) or thyroid diseases were excluded. Children with blood glucose ≥ 150 mg/dL during admission were regarded as cases. The controls were age- and- sex- matched, euglycemic children. Stress hormones including cortisol, insulin, growth hormone, and prolactin were measured, and thyroid function was tested with a radioimmunoassay (RIA) method in all cases and controls. The results showed that among 1,054 screened children, 39 cases (3.7 %) had stress hyperglycemia and 89 controls were included in the study. The occurrence of hyperglycemia was independent of sex, but it occurred mostly in children under 6 years old. Hyperglycemia occurred more frequently in patients with a positive family history of DM (odds ratio = 3.2, 95 % CI = 1.3-7.9, and P = 0.009). There were no significant differences between cases and controls regarding any hormones except higher cortisol, and lower total T3 and T4 in cases compared with controls. Neither of cases developed diabetes in the 24-month follow-up period. These findings led us to the conclusion that stress hyperglycemia is occasionally seen in critically ill patients. Among the stress hormones measured, only cortisol increased during hyperglycemia. It seems that hyperglycemia is not an important risk factor for future diabetes.

  13. Thyroid Hormone and Leptin in the Testis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Cristiane Fonte; Zamoner, Ariane

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is primarily expressed in white adipose tissue; however, it is expressed in the hypothalamus and reproductive tissues as well. Leptin acts by activating the leptin receptors (Ob-Rs). Additionally, the regulation of several neuroendocrine and reproductive functions, including the inhibition of glucocorticoids and enhancement of thyroxine and sex hormone concentrations in human beings and mice are leptin functions. It has been suggested that thyroid hormones (TH) could directly regulate leptin expression. Additionally, hypothyroidism compromises the intracellular integration of leptin signaling specifically in the arcuate nucleus. Two TH receptor isoforms are expressed in the testis, TRa and TRb, with TRa being the predominant one that is present in all stages of development. The effects of TH involve the proliferation and differentiation of Sertoli and Leydig cells during development, spermatogenesis, and steroidogenesis. In this context, TH disorders are associated with sexual dysfunction. An endocrine and/or direct paracrine effect of leptin on the gonads inhibits testosterone production in Leydig cells. Further studies are necessary to clarify the effects of both hormones in the testis during hypothyroidism. The goal of this review is to highlight the current knowledge regarding leptin and TH in the testis. PMID:25505448

  14. Thyroid hormone and leptin in the testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Fonte Ramos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is primarily expressed in white adipose tissue; however, it is expressed in the hypothalamus and reproductive tissues as well. Leptin acts by activating the leptin receptors (Ob-Rs. Additionally, the regulation of several neuroendocrine and reproductive functions, including the inhibition of glucocorticoids and enhancement of thyroxine and sex hormone concentrations in humans and mice are leptin functions. It has been suggested that thyroid hormones (TH could directly regulate leptin expression. Additionally, hypothyroidism compromises the intracellular integration of leptin signaling specifically in the arcuate nucleus. Two TH receptor isoforms are expressed in the testis, TRa and TRb, with TRa being the predominant one that is present in all stages of development. The effects of TH involve the proliferation and differentiation of Sertoli and Leydig cells during development, spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis. In this context, TH disorders are associated with sexual dysfunction. An endocrine and/or direct paracrine effect of leptin on the gonads inhibits testosterone production in Leydig cells. Further studies are necessary to clarify the effects of both hormones in the testis during hypothyroidism. The goal of this review is to highlight the current knowledge regarding leptin and TH in the testis.

  15. Metabolic effects of thyroid hormone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Maria; de Lange, Pieter; Lombardi, Assunta; Silvestri, Elena; Lanni, Antonia; Goglia, Fernando

    2008-02-01

    The processes and pathways mediating the intermediary metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins are all affected by thyroid hormones (THs) in almost all tissues. Particular attention has been devoted by scientists to the effects of THs on lipid metabolism. Among others, effects related to cholesterol, lipid handling, and cardiac performance have been the subject of study. Many reports are present in the literature concerning the calorigenic effect of THs, with most of them aimed at identifying the molecular basis of this effect. However, at the moment the mechanism(s) underlying the metabolic effects of THs remain to be elucidated. THs exert most of their effects though TH receptors (TRs). However, some effects of THs cannot be explained by a nuclear-mediated pathway, and recently an increasing number of nonnuclear actions have been described, which can provide a regulatory system of which the effects differ from those mediated on the transcriptional level by TRs. Some of the TH derivatives (naturally occurring metabolites and analogs) possess biological activities. TH-related biological effects have been described for physiological products such as tetraiodothyroacetic acid (Tetrac) and triiodothyroacetic acid (Triac) (via oxidative deamination and decarboxylation of thyroxine [T4] and triiodothyronine [T3] alanine chain), 3,3',5'-triiodothyronine (rT3) (via T4 and T3 deiodination), 3,3'-diiodothyronine (3,3'-T2) and 3,5-diiodothyronine (T2) (via T4, T3, and rT3 deiodination), and 3-iodothyronamine (T1AM) and thyronamine (T0AM) (via T4 and T3 deiodination and amino acid decarboxylation), as well as for TH structural analogs, such as 3,5,3'-triiodothyropropionic acid (Triprop), 3,5-dibromo-3-pyridazinone-l-thyronine (L-940901), N-[3,5-dimethyl-4-(4'-hydroxy-3'-isopropylphenoxy)-phenyl]-oxamic acid (CGS 23425), 3,5-dimethyl-4[(4'-hydroxy-3'-isopropylbenzyl)-phenoxy] acetic acid (GC-1), 3,5-dichloro-4[(4-hydroxy-3-isopropylphenoxy)phenyl] acetic acid (KB-141

  16. Differentiated thyroid cancer in patients with resistance to thyroid hormone syndrome. A novel case and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, João; Borges, Fátima; Costa, António; Alvelos, Maria Inês; Mazeto, Glaúcia; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) represents a syndrome in which patients present elevated circulating thyroid hormones in the presence of non-suppressed TSH. We report a novel case where a patient with RTH presented a differentiated thyroid cancer. A19 year-old female had been referred due to thyroid disease that disclosed features characteristic of a RTH. During the follow up it was detected a follicular tumor that led to the recommendation for thyroid surgical ablation, where an incidental papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (mPTC) was found. The increase of thyroglobulin (TG) levels following thyroid removal referred the patient for radioiodine treatment. Post-treatment, it was detected jugular adenopathies and the patient was subjected to cervical lymph node drainage where metastases of the mPTC were found. RTH syndrome was confirmed by the detection of a THRB germline mutation. A BRAF mutation was also found in the mPTC but not detected in the follicular adenoma or normal adjacent tissue. The young age of the patient, the rarity of BRAF mutations in childhood and the high dissemination of the malignancy, lead us to the speculation that increased TSH stimulation in a RTH background and oncogenic activation of BRAF could have served as (co) drivers and might have triggered an advanced stage of the neoplastic disease. These findings together with a review of published cases add novel information to the management of RTH patients with differentiated thyroid cancer.

  17. Hypothalamic regulation of metabolism : Role of thyroid hormone and estrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormone and estrogen both play an essential role in energy metabolism. The current thesis investigated the possible central effects of these hormones in the control of energy metabolism by administrating triiodothyronine (T3), estradiol (E2) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in distinc

  18. Hypothalamic regulation of metabolism : Role of thyroid hormone and estrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormone and estrogen both play an essential role in energy metabolism. The current thesis investigated the possible central effects of these hormones in the control of energy metabolism by administrating triiodothyronine (T3), estradiol (E2) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in

  19. Role of thyroid hormones in ventricular remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Viswanathan; Gerdes, A Martin

    2015-04-01

    Cardiac remodeling includes alterations in molecular, cellular, and interstitial systems contributing to changes in size, shape, and function of the heart. This may be the result of injury, alterations in hemodynamic load, neurohormonal effects, electrical abnormalities, metabolic changes, etc. Thyroid hormones (THs) serve as master regulators for diverse remodeling processes of the cardiovascular system-from the prenatal period to death. THs promote a beneficial cardiomyocyte shape and improve contractility, relaxation, and survival via reversal of molecular remodeling. THs reduce fibrosis by decreasing interstitial collagen and reduce the incidence and duration of arrhythmias via remodeling ion channel expression and function. THs restore metabolic function and also improve blood flow both by direct effects on the vessel architecture and decreasing atherosclerosis. Optimal levels of THs both in the circulation and in cardiac tissues are critical for normal homeostasis. This review highlights TH-based remodeling and clinically translatable strategies for diverse cardiovascular disorders.

  20. Multiple exportins influence thyroid hormone receptor localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Kelly S; Dziedzic, Rose C; Nelson, Hallie N; Stern, Mary E; Roggero, Vincent R; Bondzi, Cornelius; Allison, Lizabeth A

    2015-08-15

    The thyroid hormone receptor (TR) undergoes nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and regulates target genes involved in metabolism and development. Previously, we showed that TR follows a CRM1/calreticulin-mediated nuclear export pathway. However, two lines of evidence suggest TR also follows another pathway: export is only partially blocked by leptomycin B (LMB), a CRM1-specific inhibitor; and we identified nuclear export signals in TR that are LMB-resistant. To determine whether other exportins are involved in TR shuttling, we used RNA interference and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching shuttling assays in transfected cells. Knockdown of exportins 4, 5, and 7 altered TR shuttling dynamics, and when exportins 5 and 7 were overexpressed, TR distribution shifted toward the cytosol. To further assess the effects of exportin overexpression, we examined transactivation of a TR-responsive reporter gene. Our data indicate that multiple exportins influence TR localization, highlighting a fine balance of nuclear import, retention, and export that modulates TR function.

  1. Genetic features of thyroid hormone receptors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maha Rebaï; Imen Kallel; Ahmed Rebaï

    2012-12-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TR) are prototypes of nuclear transcription factors that regulate the expression of target genes. These receptors play an important role in many physiological processes. Moreover, a dysfunction of these proteins is often implicated in several human diseases and malignancies. Here we report genetic variations and alterations of the TRs that have been described in the literature as well as their potential role in the development of some human diseases including cancers. The functional effects of some mutations and polymorphisms in TRs on disease susceptibility, especially on cancer risk, are now established. Therefore, further investigations are needed in order to use these receptors as therapeutic targets or as biological markers to decide on appropriate forms of treatment.

  2. Targeting the thyroid gland with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-nanoliposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolino, Donatella; Cosco, Donato; Gaspari, Marco; Celano, Marilena; Wolfram, Joy; Voce, Pasquale; Puxeddu, Efisio; Filetti, Sebastiano; Celia, Christian; Ferrari, Mauro; Russo, Diego; Fresta, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    Various tissue-specific antibodies have been attached to nanoparticles to obtain targeted delivery. In particular, nanodelivery systems with selectivity for breast, prostate and cancer tissue have been developed. Here, we have developed a nanodelivery system that targets the thyroid gland. Nanoliposomes have been conjugated to the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which binds to the TSH receptor (TSHr) on the surface of thyrocytes. The results indicate that the intracellular uptake of TSH-nanoliposomes is increased in cells expressing the TSHr. The accumulation of targeted nanoliposomes in the thyroid gland following intravenous injection was 3.5-fold higher in comparison to untargeted nanoliposomes. Furthermore, TSH-nanoliposomes encapsulated with gemcitabine showed improved anticancer efficacy in vitro and in a tumor model of follicular thyroid carcinoma. This drug delivery system could be used for the treatment of a broad spectrum of thyroid diseases to reduce side effects and improve therapeutic efficacy. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Free thyroid hormones in patients with severe non-thyroidal illness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boettger, I.; Schneck, H.W.

    1985-11-01

    Free thyroid hormone radioligand assays and indirect methods for FT/sub 4/ and FT/sub 3/ were applied to measurement in sera of patients with severe NTI (hemodialysis, intensive-care, polytrauma). FT/sub 4/ by different techniques was low-normal to decreased by a kinetic two-tube and a T/sub 4/-analogue tracer single-tube assay whereas another two-tube technique measured normal to low-normal but in some instances increased FT/sub 4/ levels. Indirect parameters behaved in a similar fashion. FT/sub 3/ was decreased in most of the cases as were the indirect parameters, mostly due to affected T/sub 4/-T/sub 3/ conversion. Direct and indirect parameters for free thyroid hormones changed in parallel also during follow-up of NTI. There was no clear protein or albumen effect upon the two-tube FT/sub 4/ and the two-tube FT/sub 3/ assay(s). Supersensitively determined basal TSH was found to be decreased in some cases with severe NTI (polytrauma). The findings taken together are consistent with (pseudo) sedondary hypothyroidism in severe NTI. The data show the free thyroid hormone assays tested to be rather reliable with little or no disturbance by severe NTI or specifically hypoalbumenemia.

  4. Effects of substitution and high-dose thyroid hormone therapy on deiodination, sulfoconjugation, and tissue thyroid hormone levels in prolonged critically ill rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debaveye, Yves; Ellger, Björn; Mebis, Liese; Visser, Theo J; Darras, Veerle M; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2008-08-01

    To delineate the metabolic fate of thyroid hormone in prolonged critically ill rabbits, we investigated the impact of two dose regimes of thyroid hormone on plasma 3,3'-diiodothyronine (T(2)) and T(4)S, deiodinase type 1 (D1) and D3 activity, and tissue iodothyronine levels in liver and kidney, as compared with saline and TRH. D2-expressing tissues were ignored. The regimens comprised either substitution dose or a 3- to 5- fold higher dose of T(4) and T(3), either alone or combined, targeted to achieve plasma thyroid hormone levels obtained by TRH. Compared with healthy animals, saline-treated ill rabbits revealed lower plasma T(3) (P=0.006), hepatic T(3) (P=0.02), and hepatic D1 activity (P=0.01). Substitution-dosed thyroid hormone therapy did not affect these changes except a further decline in plasma (P=0.0006) and tissue T(4) (P=0.04). High-dosed thyroid hormone therapy elevated plasma and tissue iodothyronine levels and hepatic D1 activity, as did TRH. Changes in iodothyronine tissue levels mimicked changes in plasma. Tissue T(3) and tissue T(3)/reverse T(3) ratio correlated with deiodinase activities. Neither substitution- nor high-dose treatment altered plasma T(2). Plasma T(4)S was increased only by T(4) in high dose. We conclude that in prolonged critically ill rabbits, low plasma T(3) levels were associated with low liver and kidney T(3) levels. Restoration of plasma and liver and kidney tissue iodothyronine levels was not achieved by thyroid hormone in substitution dose but instead required severalfold this dose. This indicates thyroid hormone hypermetabolism, which in this model of critical illness is not entirely explained by deiodination or by sulfoconjugation.

  5. Thyroid hormones and the cardiovascular system: pathophysiology and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cini, G; Carpi, A; Mechanick, J; Cini, L; Camici, M; Galetta, F; Giardino, R; Russo, M A; Iervasi, G

    2009-12-01

    Thyroid dysfunction, however mild, can significantly affect the cardiovascular (CV) system. The effects of thyroid hormones may be viewed as genomic and non-genomic, with the former occurring over a longer time scale and both affecting structural and functional proteins in CV tissue. As the interplay between thyroid function and the CV system becomes elucidated, particularly in the context of a system biology approach, the heart failure phenotype is better understood. Symptomatology is related to disturbance in inotropic and chronotropic function. Moreover, biochemical changes reflected by thyroid function testing with the non-thyroidal illness syndrome can prognosticate and guide therapy in heart failure. In addition, empiric treatment with thyroid hormone analogues or T3 represent emergent and highly controversial interventions.

  6. Hatching the cleidoic egg: the role of thyroid hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert eDe Groef

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A major life stage transition in birds and other oviparous sauropsids is the hatching of the cleidoic egg. Not unlike amphibian metamorphosis, hatching in these species can be regarded as a transition from a relatively well-protected aqueous environment to a more hazardous and terrestrial life outside the egg, a transition in which thyroid hormones (often in concert with glucocorticoids play an important role. In precocial birds such as the chicken, the perihatch period is characterised by peak values of thyroid hormones. Thyroid hormones are implicated in the control of muscle development, lung maturation and the switch from chorioallantoic to pulmonary respiration, yolk sac retraction, gut development and induction of hepatic genes to accommodate the change in dietary energy source, initiation of thermoregulation, and the final stages of brain maturation as well as early posthatch imprinting behavior. There is evidence that, at least for some of these processes, thyroid hormones may have similar roles in non-avian sauropsids. In altricial birds such as passerines on the other hand, thyroid hormones do not rise significantly until well after hatching and peak values coincide with the development of endothermy. It is not known how hatching-associated processes are regulated by hormones in these animals or how this developmental mode evolved from thyroid hormone-dependent precocial hatching.

  7. Transport of thyroid hormone in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Eva K; Schweizer, Ulrich; Köhrle, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) transport into the brain is not only pivotal for development and differentiation, but also for maintenance and regulation of adult central nervous system (CNS) function. In this review, we highlight some key factors and structures regulating TH uptake and distribution. Serum TH binding proteins play a major role for the availability of TH since only free hormone concentrations may dictate cellular uptake. One of these proteins, transthyretin is also present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after being secreted by the choroid plexus. Entry routes into the brain like the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and the blood-CSF-barrier will be explicated regarding fetal and adult status. Recently identified TH transmembrane transporters (THTT) like monocarboxylate transporter 8 (Mct8) play a major role in uptake of TH across the BBB but as well in transport between cells like astrocytes and neurons within the brain. Species differences in transporter expression will be presented and interference of TH transport by endogenous and exogenous compounds including endocrine disruptors and drugs will be discussed.

  8. Thyroid hormone metabolism and the developing human lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, R; Richard, K; Kaptein, E; Stanley, E L; Visser, T J; Coughtrie, M W

    2001-05-01

    Thyroid hormones are involved in the regulation of fetal lung development, and maturation is accelerated in animal models by antepartum exposure to raised concentrations of the receptor-active thyroid hormone triiodothyronine and glucocorticoids. It is essential that the nature of the regulation of the spatial and temporal metabolism of iodothyronines in the human fetus and infant is known before effective therapies can be developed to modify human lung maturation. Thyroid hormone bioavailability to the human fetus is regulated in part by enzymatic deiodination and reversible sulfation of iodothyronines, with contributions from other factors such as fetomaternal and fetoamniotic hormone transfers, fetal thyroid gland production, and the activities of plasma membrane transporters mediating uptake of iodothyronines from plasma into tissues. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. DE71 suppresses thyroid hormone-mediated dendritogenesis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Keywords: Brain development, DE71, granule cell, Purkinje cell, Thyroid hormone. ... taken up by the neuronal cells and bind to TH receptor ... efforts were made to minimize numbers of animals used ... 0.008%DNase and triturated in same.

  10. Developmental Thyroid Hormone Disruption: Prevalence, Environmental Contaminants and Neurodevelopmental Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are critical for growth and development and particularly brain development. There are numerous environmental agents that lead to marginal reductions of circulating TH. Although it is clear that severe developmental hypothyroidism is profoundly detrimental to...

  11. The effect of thyroid hormone on haemostasis and thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debeij, Jan

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis the relation between thyroid hormones and the coagulation system will be examined. As an introduction, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, the coagulation system and their interactions will be discussed. A short overview of the literature preceding the research reported in this t

  12. Thyroid Hormone-disrupting Effects and the Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Kaori; Ose, Keiko

    2012-03-01

    There are continued concerns about endocrine-disrupting chemical effects, and appropriate vertebrate models for assessment of risk are a high priority. Frog tadpoles are very sensitive to environmental substances because of their habitat and the complex processes of metamorphosis regulated by the endocrine system, mainly thyroid hormones. During metamorphosis, marked alteration in hormonal factors occurs, as well as dramatic structural and functional changes in larval tissues. There are a variety of mechanisms determining thyroid hormone balance or disruption directly or indirectly. Direct-acting agents can cause changes in thyroxine synthesis and/or secretion in thyroid through effects on peroxidases, thyroidal iodide uptake, deiodinase, and proteolysis. At the same time, indirect action may result from biochemical processes such as sulfation, deiodination and glucuronidation. Because their potential to disrupt thyroid hormones has been identified as an important consideration for the regulation of chemicals, the OECD and the EPA have each established guidelines that make use of larval African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) and frog metamorphosis for screening and testing of potential endocrine disrupters. The guidelines are based on evaluation of alteration in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. One of the primary endpoints is thyroid gland histopathology. Others are mortality, developmental stage, hind limb length, snout-vent length and wet body weight. Regarding histopathological features, the guidelines include core criteria and additional qualitative parameters along with grading. Taking into account the difficulties in evaluating amphibian thyroid glands, which change continuously throughout metamorphosis, histopathological examination has been shown to be a very sensitive approach.

  13. Thyroid Hormone Upregulates Hypothalamic kiss2 Gene in the Male Nile Tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi eOgawa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Kisspeptin has recently been recognized as a critical regulator of reproductive function in vertebrates. During the sexual development, kisspeptin neurons receive sex steroids feedback to trigger gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons. In teleosts, a positive correlation has been found between the thyroid status and the reproductive status. However, the role of thyroid hormone in the regulation of kisspeptin system remains unknown. We cloned and characterized a gene encoding kisspeptin (kiss2 in a cichlid fish, the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus. Expression of kiss2 mRNA in the brain was analyzed by in situ hybridization. The effect of thyroid hormone (triiodothyronine, T3 and hypothyroidism with methimazole (MMI on kiss2 and the three GnRH types (gnrh1, gnrh2 and gnrh3 mRNA expression was analyzed by real-time PCR. Expression of thyroid hormone receptor mRNAs were analyzed in laser-captured kisspeptin and GnRH neurons by RT-PCR. The kiss2 mRNA expressing cells were seen in the nucleus of the lateral recess in the hypothalamus. Intraperitoneal administration of T3 (5µg/g body weight to sexually mature male tilapia significantly increased kiss2 and gnrh1 mRNA levels at 24 hr post injection (P < 0.001, while the treatment with an anti-thyroid, MMI (100 ppm for 6 days significantly reduced kiss2 and gnrh1 mRNA levels (P < 0.05. gnrh2, gnrh3 and thyrotropin-releasing hormone mRNA levels were insensitive to the thyroid hormone manipulations. Furthermore, RT-PCR showed expression of thyroid hormone receptor mRNAs in laser-captured GnRH neurons but not in kiss2 neurons. This study shows that GnRH1 may be directly regulated through thyroid hormone, while the regulation of Kiss2 by T3 is more likely to be indirect.

  14. Peripheral thyroid hormone levels and hepatic thyroid hormone deiodinase gene expression in dairy heifers on the day of ovulation and during the early peri-implantation period

    OpenAIRE

    Meyerholz, Marie Margarete; Mense, Kirsten; Linden, Matthias; Raliou, Mariam; Sandra, Olivier; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim; Hoedemaker, Martina; Schmicke, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Background Before the onset of fetal thyroid hormone production, the transplacental delivery of maternal thyroid hormones is necessary for embryonic and fetal development. Therefore, the adaptation of maternal thyroid hormone metabolism may be important for pregnancy success and embryo survival. The aims of this study were to determine the thyroid hormone levels during the early peri-implantation period until day 18 and on the day of ovulation, to determine whether pregnancy success is depend...

  15. Molecular Basis for Certain Neuroprotective Effects of Thyroid Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eDavis

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiology of brain damage that is common to ischemia-reperfusion inury and brain trauma includes disordered neuronal and glial cell energetics, intracellular acidosis, calcium toxicity, extracellular excitotoxic glutamate accumulation and dysfunction of the cytoskeleton and endoplasmic reticulum. Thyroid hormone isoforms, 3, 5, 3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3 and L-thyroxine (T4, have nongenomic and genomic actions that are relevant to repair of certain features of the pathophysiology of brain damage. Thyroid hormone can nongenomically repair intracullar H+ accumulation by stimulation of the Na+/H+ exchanger and can support desirably low [Ca2+]i.c. by activation of plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase. Thyroid hormone nongenomically stimulates astrocyte glutamate uptake, an action that protects both glial cells and neurons. The hormone supports the integrity of the cytoskeleton by its effect on actin. Several proteins linked to thyroid hormone action are also neuroprotective. For example, the hormone stimulates expression of the seladin-1 gene whose gene product is anti-apoptotic and is potentially protection in the setting of neurodegeneration. Transthyretin (TTR is a serum transport protein for T4 that is important to blood-brain barrier transfer of the hormone and TTR has also been found to be neuroprotective in the setting of ischemia. Finally, the interesting thyronamine derivatives of T4 have been shown to protect against ischemic brain damage through their ability to induce hypothermia in the intact organism. Thus, thyroid hromone or hormone derivatives have experimental promise as neuroprotective agents.

  16. Role of Thyroid Hormones in Skeletal Development and Bone Maintenance

    OpenAIRE

    Bassett, J.H. Duncan; Williams, Graham R

    2016-01-01

    The skeleton is an exquisitely sensitive and archetypal T3-target tissue that demonstrates the critical role for thyroid hormones during development, linear growth, and adult bone turnover and maintenance. Thyrotoxicosis is an established cause of secondary osteoporosis, and abnormal thyroid hormone signaling has recently been identified as a novel risk factor for osteoarthritis. Skeletal phenotypes in genetically modified mice have faithfully reproduced genetic disorders in humans, revealing...

  17. Thyroid hormones and iodide in the near-term pregnant rat.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versloot, P.M.

    1998-01-01

    Thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3), are produced by the thyroid gland. To synthesize thyroid hormones the thyroid needs iodide. The uptake of iodide as well as the production and secretion of T4 and T3 by the thyroid gland is regulated by thyrotropin (TSH), which is pr

  18. Thyroid hormones and iodide in the near-term pregnant rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versloot, P.

    1998-01-01

    Thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3), are produced by the thyroid gland. To synthesize thyroid hormones the thyroid needs iodide. The uptake of iodide as well as the production and secretion of T4 and T3 by the thyroid gland is regulated by thyrotropin (TSH),

  19. Hypertrophic response of the Association of Thyroid Hormone and Exercise in the Heart of Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Fernanda Rodrigues de, E-mail: nandaeduca@yahoo.com.br; Resende, Elmiro Santos; Lopes, Leandro; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Chagas, Rafaella; Fidale, Thiago; Rodrigues, Poliana [UFU - Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil)

    2014-02-15

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a component of cardiac remodeling occurring in response to an increase of the activity or functional overload of the heart. Assess hypertrophic response of the association of thyroid hormone and exercise in the rat heart. We used 37 Wistar rats, male, adults were randomly divided into four groups: control, hormone (TH), exercise (E), thyroid hormone and exercise (H + E); the group received daily hormone levothyroxine sodium by gavage at a dose of 20 μg thyroid hormone/100g body weight, the exercise group took swimming five times a week, with additional weight corresponding to 20% of body weight for six weeks; in group H + E were applied simultaneously TH treatment groups and E. The statistics used was analysis of variance, where appropriate, by Tukey test and Pearson correlation test. The T4 was greater in groups TH and H + E. The total weight of the heart was greater in patients who received thyroid hormone and left ventricular weight was greater in the TH group. The transverse diameter of cardiomyocytes increased in groups TH, E and H + E. The percentage of collagen was greater in groups E and H + E Correlation analysis between variables showed distinct responses. The association of thyroid hormone with high-intensity exercise produced cardiac hypertrophy, and generated a standard hypertrophy not directly correlated to the degree of fibrosis.

  20. Thyroid hormones in fetal growth and prepartum maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forhead, A J; Fowden, A L

    2014-06-01

    The thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), are essential for normal growth and development of the fetus. Their bioavailability in utero depends on development of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid gland axis and the abundance of thyroid hormone transporters and deiodinases that influence tissue levels of bioactive hormone. Fetal T4 and T3 concentrations are also affected by gestational age, nutritional and endocrine conditions in utero, and placental permeability to maternal thyroid hormones, which varies among species with placental morphology. Thyroid hormones are required for the general accretion of fetal mass and to trigger discrete developmental events in the fetal brain and somatic tissues from early in gestation. They also promote terminal differentiation of fetal tissues closer to term and are important in mediating the prepartum maturational effects of the glucocorticoids that ensure neonatal viability. Thyroid hormones act directly through anabolic effects on fetal metabolism and the stimulation of fetal oxygen consumption. They also act indirectly by controlling the bioavailability and effectiveness of other hormones and growth factors that influence fetal development such as the catecholamines and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs). By regulating tissue accretion and differentiation near term, fetal thyroid hormones ensure activation of physiological processes essential for survival at birth such as pulmonary gas exchange, thermogenesis, hepatic glucogenesis, and cardiac adaptations. This review examines the developmental control of fetal T4 and T3 bioavailability and discusses the role of these hormones in fetal growth and development with particular emphasis on maturation of somatic tissues critical for survival immediately at birth.

  1. Comparison of the in vitro effects of TCDD, PCB 126 and PCB 153 on thyroid-restricted gene expression and thyroid hormone secretion by the chicken thyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katarzyńska, Dorota; Hrabia, Anna; Kowalik, Kinga; Sechman, Andrzej

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the in vitro effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126; a coplanar PCB congener) and 2,2'4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153; non-coplanar PCB) on mRNA expression of thyroid-restricted genes, i.e. sodium iodide symporter (NIS), thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and thyroglobulin (TG), and thyroid hormone secretion from the thyroid gland of the laying chicken. Relative expression levels of NIS, TG and TPO genes and thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) secretion from the thyroidal explants were quantified by the real-time qPCR and RIA methods, respectively. In comparison with the control group, TCDD and PCB 126 significantly increased mRNA expression of TPO and TG genes. TCDD did not affect NIS mRNA levels, but PCB 126 decreased its expression. No effect of PCB 153 on the expression of these genes was observed. TCDD and PCB 126 significantly decreased T4 and T3 secretion. There was no significant effect of PCB 153 on these hormone secretions. In conclusion, the results obtained show that in comparison with non-coplanar PCB 153, TCDD and coplanar PCB 126 can directly affect thyroid hormone synthesis and secretion, and in consequence, they may disrupt the endocrine function of the thyroid gland of the laying chicken. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A clinical and therapeutic approach to thyrotoxicosis with thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papi, Giampaolo; Papi, Giovanni; Pearce, Elizabeth N; Braverman, Lewis E; Betterle, Corrado; Roti, Elio

    2005-04-01

    Subclinical hyperthyroidism is defined as normal serum free thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations and persistently suppressed thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations. The most common cause of subclinical hyperthyroidism is the use of suppressive doses of L-thyroxine for treatment of hypothyroidism or, less commonly, diffuse nontoxic goiter or thyroid carcinoma (exogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism). Endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism may be caused by a variety of thyroid disorders that result in overproduction and release of thyroid hormones from the gland with normal/high 24-hour thyroid radioiodine uptake or by inflammation in the thyroid resulting in release of excess thyroid hormones and low 24-hour thyroid radioiodine uptake. Several groups have investigated whether persistent endogenous or exogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism, like overt hyperthyroidism, causes symptoms, adverse effects on the cardiovascular and the skeletal systems, and increased mortality, whether endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism evolves to overt thyrotoxicosis, and whether or not it should be treated. The present report reviews the most important and recent studies of subclinical hyperthyroidism and attempts to draw conclusions based upon the literature and the authors' experience.

  3. Transcriptional regulation by nonclassical action of thyroid hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moeller Lars C

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thyroid hormone (TH is essential for normal development, growth and metabolism. Its effects were thought to be principally mediated through triiodothyronine (T3, acting as a ligand for the nuclear TH receptors (TRs α and β residing on thyroid hormone response elements (TREs in the promoter of TH target genes. In this classical model of TH action, T3 binding to TRs leads to recruitment of basal transcription factors and increased transcription of TH responsive genes. Recently, the concept of TH action on gene expression has become more diverse and now includes nonclassical actions of T3 and T4: T3 has been shown to activate PI3K via the TRs, which ultimately increases transcription of certain genes, e.g. HIF-1α. Additionally, both T3 and thyroxine (T4 can bind to a membrane integrin, αvβ3, which leads to activation of the PI3K and MAPK signal transduction pathways and finally also increases gene transcription, e.g. of the FGF2 gene. Therefore, these initially nongenomic, nonclassical actions seem to serve as additional interfaces for transcriptional regulation by TH. Aim of this perspective is to summarize the genes that are currently known to be induced by nonclassical TH action and the mechanisms involved.

  4. Thyroid-stimulating Hormone (TSH): Measurement of Intracellular, Secreted, and Circulating Hormone in Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) is a hormone produced in the pituitary that stimulates the thyroid gland to grow and produce thyroid hormone (TH). The concentration of TH controls developmental changes that take place in a wide variety of organisms. Many use the metaphoric ch...

  5. Endocrine determinants of haemostasis and thrombosis risk: Focus on thyroid hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, L.P.B.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis explores endocrine determinants of the haemostatic system and thrombosis risk with main focus on thyroid hormone. It describes, in three parts, the effects of thyroid hormone on the haemostatic system, the effects of thyroid hormone (mimetics) on lipids and the effects of other hormones

  6. Thyroid hormone is required for hypothalamic neurons regulating cardiovascular functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mittag, J.; Lyons, D.J.; Sällström, J.; Vujoviv, M.; Dudazy-Gralla, S.; Warner, A.; Wallis, K.; Alkemade, A.; Nordström, K.; Monyer, H.; Broberger, C.; Arner, A.; Vennström, B.

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is well known for its profound direct effects on cardiovascular function and metabolism. Recent evidence, however, suggests that the hormone also regulates these systems indirectly through the central nervous system. While some of the molecular mechanisms underlying the hormone’s

  7. Thyroid hormone and development: the importance of transporters and deiodinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.E. Visser (Wil Edward)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThyroid hormone, which is the common name for the prohormone T4 (3,5,3’,5’-tetraiodothyronine; thyroxine) and the bioactive hormone T3 (3,5,3’-triiodothyronine), is indispensable for normal development and metabolism of all tissues. Its effects on metabolism are clearly illustrated by th

  8. The Role of Thyroid Hormones in the Development of Atrial Fibrillation in Thyroid Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.A. Rebrov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the effects of thyroid hormones on the cardiovascular system, their role in the development of cardiac arrhythmias and, particularly, atrial fibrillation. The clinical manifestations and current guidelines for the treatment of thyroid diseases in combination with atrial fibrillation are provided.

  9. Serum Thyroid Hormone Levels in Epileptic Children Receiving Anticonvulsive Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl MAHYAR

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Mahyar A, Ayazi P, Dalirani R, Hosseini SM, Daneshi Kohan MM. Serum Thyroid Hormone Levels in Epileptic Children Receiving AnticonvulsiveDrugs. Iranian Journal of Child Neurology 2011;5(4:21-24.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to investigate serum thyroid hormone levels in epileptic children receiving anticonvulsive drugs.Materials & MethodsIn this case- control study, 30 epileptic children who were receiving anticonvulsive drugs (case group were compared with 30 healthy children (control group. This study was carried out in the Qazvin Children's Hospital (Qazvin, Iran from October to December 2007. Both groups were matched for age and sex. Thyroid hormone levels were measured using a radioimmunoassay and immunoradiometric assay. Data were analyzed using Chi-square and Student's t-tests.ResultsThe mean serum T3 and T4 levels in the case group were 2.36 ± 0.73 nmol/L and 95.96 ± 27.01 nmol/L, respectively, and the corresponding values in the control group were 1.88 ± 0.93 nmol/L and 147.46 ± 35.77 nmol/L, respectively. The mean serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH levels in the case and control groups were 2.73±0.73 mIU/mL and 2.49 ± 2.17mIU/mL, respectively.ConclusionThis study revealed that long-term consumption of anticonvulsive drugs resulted in a decline in serum T4 levels and an increase in serum T3 levels, but had no effect on TSH levels. 1. Johnston M. Neurodegenerative disorders of childhood;Spingolipidoses. Nelson textbook of pediatrics, 17th edPhiladelphia: Saunders; 2004.P.2031-2.2. Sankar R, Koh S, Wu J, Menkes J. Paroxysmal disorders.In(eds: Menkes JH, Sarnat HB, Maria BL. ChildNeurology; 2006.P.7:877.3. Shiva S, Ashrafi M, Mostafavi F, Abasi F, RahbariA, Shabanian R. Effects of anticonvulsant drugs onthyroid function tests. Iranian Journal of pediatrics2003;13(02:101.4. Kimura M, Yoshino K, Suzuki N, Maeoka Y. Effect ofantiepileptic drugs on thyroid function. Psychiatry andclinical neurosciences

  10. Effect of excitatory amino acids on serum TSH and thyroid hormone levels in freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, M; Durán, R; Arufe, M C

    2000-01-01

    The actions of glutamate (L-Glu), and glutamate receptor agonists on serum thyroid hormones (T4 and T3) and TSH levels have been studied in conscious and freely moving adult male rats. The excitatory amino acids (EAA), L-Glu, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), kainic acid (KA) and domoic acid (Dom) were administered intraperitoneally. Blood samples were collected through a cannula implanted in the rats jugular 0--60 min after injection. Thyroid hormone concentrations were measured by enzyme immunoassay, and thyrotrophin (TSH) concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay. The results showed that L-Glu (20 and 25 mg/kg) and NMDA (25 mg/kg) increased serum thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3) and TSH concentrations. Serum thyroid hormone levels increased 30 min after treatment, while serum TSH levels increased 5 min after i.p. administration, in both cases serum levels remained elevated during one hour. Injection of the non-NMDA glutamatergic agonists KA (30 mg/kg) and Dom (1 mg/kg) produced an increase in serum thyroid hormones and TSH levels. These results suggest the importance of EAAs in the regulation of hormone secretion from the pituitary-thyroid axis, as well as the importance of the NMDA and non-NMDA receptors in this stimulatory effect.

  11. Primary and secondary thyroid hormone transporters

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    Kinne Anita

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thyroid hormones (TH are essential for the development of the human brain, growth and cellular metabolism. Investigation of TH transporters became one of the emerging fields in thyroid research after the discovery of inactivating mutations in the Monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8, which was found to be highly specific for TH transport. However, additional transmembrane transporters are also very important for TH uptake and efflux in different cell types. They transport TH as secondary substrates and include the aromatic amino acid transporting MCT10, the organic anion transporting polypeptides (e.g. OATP1C1, OATP1A2, OPTP1A4 and the large neutral amino acid transporters (LAT1 and LAT2. These TH transporters characteristically possess 12 transmembrane spanners but due to the strong differing sequences between the three transporter families we assume an identical conformation is not very likely. In contrast to the others, the LAT family members form a heterodimer with the escort protein 4F2hc/CD98. A comparison of sequence proportions, locations and types of functional sensitive features for TH transport discovered by mutations, revealed that transport sensitive charged residues occur as conserved amino acids only within each family of the transporter types but not in all putative TH transporters. Based on the lack of highly conserved sensitive charged residues throughout the three transporter families as a common counterpart for the amino acid moiety of the substrates, we conclude that the molecular transport mechanism is likely organized either a by different molecular determinants in the divergent transporter types or b the counterparts for the substrates` amino acid moiety at the transporter are not any charged side chains but other proton acceptors or donators. However, positions of transport sensitive residues coincide at transmembrane helix 8 in the TH transporter MCT8, OATP1C1 and another amino acid transporter, the L

  12. Thyroid hormones upregulate apolipoprotein E gene expression in astrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, Corina; Fuior, Elena V.; Trusca, Violeta G. [Institute of Cellular Biology and Pathology “Nicolae Simionescu”, Bucharest (Romania); Kardassis, Dimitris [University of Crete Medical School and Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Foundation for Research and Technology of Hellas, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Simionescu, Maya [Institute of Cellular Biology and Pathology “Nicolae Simionescu”, Bucharest (Romania); Gafencu, Anca V., E-mail: anca.gafencu@icbp.ro [Institute of Cellular Biology and Pathology “Nicolae Simionescu”, Bucharest (Romania)

    2015-12-04

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE), a protein mainly involved in lipid metabolism, is associated with several neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Despite numerous attempts to elucidate apoE gene regulation in the brain, the exact mechanism is still uncovered. The mechanism of apoE gene regulation in the brain involves the proximal promoter and multienhancers ME.1 and ME.2, which evolved by gene duplication. Herein we questioned whether thyroid hormones and their nuclear receptors have a role in apoE gene regulation in astrocytes. Our data showed that thyroid hormones increase apoE gene expression in HTB14 astrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. This effect can be intermediated by the thyroid receptor β (TRβ) which is expressed in these cells. In the presence of triiodothyronine (T3) and 9-cis retinoic acid, in astrocytes transfected to overexpress TRβ and retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), apoE promoter was indirectly activated through the interaction with ME.2. To determine the location of TRβ/RXRα binding site on ME.2, we performed DNA pull down assays and found that TRβ/RXRα complex bound to the region 341–488 of ME.2. This result was confirmed by transient transfection experiments in which a series of 5′- and 3′-deletion mutants of ME.2 were used. These data support the existence of a biologically active TRβ binding site starting at 409 in ME.2. In conclusion, our data revealed that ligand-activated TRβ/RXRα heterodimers bind with high efficiency on tissue-specific distal regulatory element ME.2 and thus modulate apoE gene expression in the brain. - Highlights: • T3 induce a dose-dependent increase of apoE expression in astrocytes. • Thyroid hormones activate apoE promoter in a cell specific manner. • Ligand activated TRβ/RXRα bind on the distal regulatory element ME.2 to modulate apoE. • The binding site of TRβ/RXRα heterodimer is located at 409 bp on ME.2.

  13. Thyroid disease in pregnant women with systemic lupus erythematosus: increased preterm delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagnaro-Green, A; Akhter, E; Yim, C; Davies, Terry F; Magder, Ls; Petri, M

    2011-06-01

    Thyroid disease is common in pregnancy and is associated with miscarriage, preterm delivery and postpartum thyroiditis (PPT). Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with miscarriage and preterm delivery. The hypotheses of the study are (1) pregnant women with SLE will have a high prevalence of undiagnosed hypothyroidism and a high prevalence of PPT, and (2) women with SLE and thyroid disease will have an increased incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes as compared with pregnant women with SLE who do not have thyroid disease. This was a retrospective study of the Hopkins Lupus Cohort. All women had thyroid-stimulating hormone and thyroid antibodies assayed on frozen sera. In total, 63 pregnant women who met the ACR classification for SLE were evaluated. Outcome measures were the prevalence of thyroid disease during pregnancy and postpartum, and pregnancy outcomes. Some 13% of the women were on thyroid hormone prior to becoming pregnant, 11% were diagnosed with hypothyroidism during pregnancy, and 14% developed PPT. The prevalence of preterm delivery was 67% in women with thyroid disease and 18% in women who were thyroid disease free (p = 0.002). The presence of thyroid antibodies was not correlated with preterm delivery. Pregnant women with SLE have an increased prevalence of thyroid disease. Women with SLE and thyroid disease have an increased prevalence of preterm delivery.

  14. Pleiotropic Effects of Thyroid Hormones: Learning from Hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Franco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypothyroidism induces several metabolic changes that allow understanding some physiopathological mechanisms. Under experimental hypothyroid conditions in rats, heart and kidney are protected against oxidative damage induced by ischemia reperfusion. An increased resistance to opening of the permeability transition pore seems to be at the basis of such protection. Moreover, glomerular filtration rate of hypothyroid kidney is low as a result of adenosine receptors-induced renal vasoconstriction. The vascular tone of aorta is also regulated by adenosine in hypothyroid conditions. In other context, thyroid hormones regulate lipoprotein metabolism. High plasma level of LDL cholesterol is a common feature in hypothyroidism, due to a low expression of the hepatic LDL receptor. In contrast, HDL-cholesterol plasma levels are variable in hypothyroidism; several proteins involved in HDL metabolism and structure are expressed at lower levels in experimental hypothyroidism. Based on the positive influence of thyroid hormones on lipoprotein metabolism, thyromimetic drugs are promising for the treatment of dyslipidemias. In summary, hypothyroid status has been useful to understand molecular mechanisms involved in ischemia reperfusion, regulation of vascular function and intravascular metabolism of lipoproteins.

  15. Regulation of adiponectin gene expression in adipose tissue by thyroid hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, Samira; Tabandeh, Mohammad Reza; Nazifi, Saed; Saeb, Mehdi; Shirian, Sadegh; Sarkoohi, Parisa

    2012-06-01

    Available experimental data suggest that adiponectin and thyroid hormones have biological interaction in vivo. However, the effects of thyroid hormones on adipose adiponectin gene expression in thyroid dysfunction are unclear. We induced hyper- (HYPER) and hypothyroidism (HYPO) by daily administration of a 12 mg/l of levothyroxine and 250 mg/l of methimazole in drinking water of rats, respectively, for 42 days. The white adipose tissues and serum sample were taken on days 15, 28, 42 and also 2 weeks after treatment cessation. Analysis of adiponectin gene expression was performed by real-time PCR and 2(-ΔΔct) method. The levels of adipose tissue adiponectin mRNA in the HYPO rats were decreased during the 6-week treatment when compared to control rats (adipose adiponectin gene expression was increased in HYPER rats during the 6-week treatment in parallel with an increase the thyroid hormones concentrations (P adipose tissue is regulated by thyroid hormones at the translation level and that lipid and carbohydrate disturbances in a patient with thyroid dysfunction may be, in part, due to adiponectin gene expression changes.

  16. The effects of thyroid hormones on brown adipose tissue in humans: a PET-CT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiongyue; Miao, Qing; Ye, Hongying; Zhang, Zhaoyun; Zuo, Chuantao; Hua, Fengchun; Guan, Yihui; Li, Yiming

    2014-09-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is important for energy expenditure through thermogenesis, although its regulatory factors are not well known in humans. There is evidence suggesting that thyroid hormones affect BAT functions in some mammals, but the effects of thyroid hormones on BAT activity in humans are still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of thyroid hormones on glucose metabolism of BAT and other organs in humans. Nine Graves' disease-caused hyperthyroid patients who were newly diagnosed and untreated were studied. Putative brown adipose tissue activity was determined by the integrated ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose (¹⁸F-FDG) positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT). All hyperthyroid patients were treated with methimazole and had been monitored until their symptoms disappeared and thyroid hormone levels returned to normal. At the end, a second PET-CT scan was performed. The average follow-up period was 77 days. Meanwhile, compared with a group of seventy-five brown adipose tissue-negative controls, thyroid hormones of seventy-five BAT-positive healthy subjects were measured. Active brown adipose tissue was not present in any of the hyperthyroid patients. However, one patient with normalized thyroid function showed active BAT after therapy. The free T3 levels and free T4 levels were significantly lower in the 75 BAT-positive subjects than in the BAT-negative subjects. All hyperthyroid patients showed symmetrically increased uptake of fluorodeoxyglucose in skeletal muscles before treatment, whereas, the standardized uptake value was substantially decreased after treatment. Abnormally high circulating thyroid hormone levels may not increase brown adipose tissue activity, which may be limited by the increased obligatory thermogenesis of muscle in adult humans. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Amiodarone: Effects on thyroid function and the peripheral metabolism of the thyroid hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braverman, L.E.; Safran, M.; Bambini, G.; Pinchera, A.; Martino, E.

    1985-11-01

    In addition to the effects of Amiodarone on the peripheral metabolism of the thyroid hormones and on pituitary TSH secretion, a major complication of therapy is the relatively high frequency of iodide-induced thyroid dysfunction. The mean T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/ concentration following Amiodarone application was measured in euthyroid, hypothyroid and hyperthyroid patients and in control patients with and without cardiac disorders. Furthermore, the serum TSH was determined in euthyroid Amiodarone-treated euthyroid patients. /sup 131/I uptake was studied in patients with Amiodarone-associated thyrotoxicosis. The difficulties of the therapy of Amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism are outlined. Preliminary studied of the effect of Amiodarone and its analogues on the metabolism of thyroid hormones in the rat indicate that Amiodarone may act as a thyroid hormone agonist in the pituitary. (MG).

  18. Integrin αvβ3 and thyroid hormones promote expansion of progenitors in embryonic neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, Denise; Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela; Wong, Fong Kuan; Heuer, Heike; Huttner, Wieland B

    2014-02-01

    Neocortex expansion during evolution is associated with the enlargement of the embryonic subventricular zone, which reflects an increased self-renewal and proliferation of basal progenitors. In contrast to human, the vast majority of mouse basal progenitors lack self-renewal capacity, possibly due to lack of a basal process contacting the basal lamina and downregulation of cell-autonomous production of extracellular matrix (ECM) constituents. Here we show that targeted activation of the ECM receptor integrin αvβ3 on basal progenitors in embryonic mouse neocortex promotes their expansion. Specifically, integrin αvβ3 activation causes an increased cell cycle re-entry of Pax6-negative, Tbr2-positive intermediate progenitors, rather than basal radial glia, and a decrease in the proportion of intermediate progenitors committed to neurogenic division. Interestingly, integrin αvβ3 is the only known cell surface receptor for thyroid hormones. Remarkably, tetrac, a thyroid hormone analog that inhibits the binding of thyroid hormones to integrin αvβ3, completely abolishes the intermediate progenitor expansion observed upon targeted integrin αvβ3 activation, indicating that this expansion requires the binding of thyroid hormones to integrin αvβ3. Convergence of ECM and thyroid hormones on integrin αvβ3 thus appears to be crucial for cortical progenitor proliferation and self-renewal, and hence for normal brain development and the evolutionary expansion of the neocortex.

  19. Thyroid hormone responsiveness in N-Tera-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, S; McCabe, C J; Visser, T J; Franklyn, J A; Kilby, M D

    2003-07-01

    N-TERA-2 cl/D1 (NT2) cells, a human embryonal cell line with characteristics of central nervous system precursor cells, were utilised to study thyroid hormone action during early neuronal growth and differentiation. Undifferentiated NT2 cells expressed mRNAs encoding thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) alpha1, alpha2 and beta1, iodothyronine deiodinases types 2 (D2) and 3 (D3) (which act as the pre-receptor regulators), and the thyroid hormone-responsive genes myelin basic protein (MBP) and neuroendocrine specific protein A (NSP-A). When terminally differentiated into post-mitotic neurons (hNT), TRalpha1 and TRbeta1 mRNA expression was decreased by 74% (P=0.05) and 95% (P<0.0001) respectively, while NSP-A mRNA increased 7-fold (P<0.05). However, mRNAs encoding TRalpha2, D2, D3 and MBP did not alter significantly upon neuronal differentiation and neither did activities of D2 and D3. With increasing 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T(3)) concentrations, TRbeta1 mRNA expression in cultured NT2 cells increased 2-fold at 10 nM T(3) and 1.3-fold at 100 nM T(3) (P<0.05) compared with that in T(3)-free media but no change was seen with T(3) treatment of hNT cells. D3 mRNA expression in NT2 cells also increased 3-fold at 10 nM T(3) (P=0.01) and 2.4-fold at 100 nM T(3) (P<0.05) compared with control, but there was no change in D3 enzyme activity. In contrast there was a 20% reduction in D3 mRNA expression in hNT cells at 10 nM T(3) (P<0.05) compared with control, with accompanying reductions in D3 activity with increasing T(3) concentrations (P<0.05). There was no significant change in the expression of the TRalpha isoforms, D2, MBP and NSP-A with increasing T(3) concentrations in either NT2 or hNT cells. Undifferentiated NT2 and differentiated hNT cells show differing patterns of T(3)-responsiveness, suggesting that there are different regulatory factors operating within these cell types.

  20. Thyroid Hormone and P-Glycoprotein in Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Davis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available P-glycoprotein (P-gp; multidrug resistance pump 1, MDR1; ABCB1 is a plasma membrane efflux pump that when activated in cancer cells exports chemotherapeutic agents. Transcription of the P-gp gene (MDR1 and activity of the P-gp protein are known to be affected by thyroid hormone. A cell surface receptor for thyroid hormone on integrin αvβ3 also binds tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac, a derivative of L-thyroxine (T4 that blocks nongenomic actions of T4 and of 3,5,3′-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3 at αvβ3. Covalently bound to a nanoparticle, tetrac as nanotetrac acts at the integrin to increase intracellular residence time of chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin and etoposide that are substrates of P-gp. This action chemosensitizes cancer cells. In this review, we examine possible molecular mechanisms for the inhibitory effect of nanotetrac on P-gp activity. Mechanisms for consideration include cancer cell acidification via action of tetrac/nanotetrac on the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE1 and hormone analogue effects on calmodulin-dependent processes and on interactions of P-gp with epidermal growth factor (EGF and osteopontin (OPN, apparently via αvβ3. Intracellular acidification and decreased H+ efflux induced by tetrac/nanotetrac via NHE1 is the most attractive explanation for the actions on P-gp and consequent increase in cancer cell retention of chemotherapeutic agent-ligands of MDR1 protein.

  1. Maternal iron deficiency alters circulating thyroid hormone levels in developing neonatal rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormone insufficiency and iron deficiency (FeD) during fetal and neonatal life are both similarly deleterious to mammalian development suggesting a possible linkage between iron and thyroid hormone insufficiencies. Recent published data from our laboratory demonstrate a r...

  2. Thyroid Hormone and the Neuroglia: Both Source and Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohácsik, Petra; Zeöld, Anikó; Bianco, Antonio C.; Gereben, Balázs

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormone plays a crucial role in the development and function of the nervous system. In order to bind to its nuclear receptor and regulate gene transcription thyroxine needs to be activated in the brain. This activation occurs via conversion of thyroxine to T3, which is catalyzed by the type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase (D2) in glial cells, in astrocytes, and tanycytes in the mediobasal hypothalamus. We discuss how thyroid hormone affects glial cell function followed by an overview on the fine-tuned regulation of T3 generation by D2 in different glial subtypes. Recent evidence on the direct paracrine impact of glial D2 on neuronal gene expression underlines the importance of glial-neuronal interaction in thyroid hormone regulation as a major regulatory pathway in the brain in health and disease. PMID:21876836

  3. Thyroid Hormone and the Neuroglia: Both Source and Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Mohácsik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone plays a crucial role in the development and function of the nervous system. In order to bind to its nuclear receptor and regulate gene transcription thyroxine needs to be activated in the brain. This activation occurs via conversion of thyroxine to T3, which is catalyzed by the type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase (D2 in glial cells, in astrocytes, and tanycytes in the mediobasal hypothalamus. We discuss how thyroid hormone affects glial cell function followed by an overview on the fine-tuned regulation of T3 generation by D2 in different glial subtypes. Recent evidence on the direct paracrine impact of glial D2 on neuronal gene expression underlines the importance of glial-neuronal interaction in thyroid hormone regulation as a major regulatory pathway in the brain in health and disease.

  4. Iodothyronine Deiodinases: structure-function analysis and their role in the regulation of thyroid hormone levels

    OpenAIRE

    Wassen, Frank

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThyroid hormone is important for energy metabolism, the metabolism of nutrients, inorganic ion fluxes and thermogenesis. Thyroid hormone is also essential for stimulation of growth and development of various tissues at critical periods including the central nervous system. Whereas in the adult thyroid hormone deficiency or excess may lead to an extensive array of clinical manifestations which are usually reversible with proper treatment, prolonged deficiency of thyroid hormones du...

  5. Role of Thyroid Hormones in Skeletal Development and Bone Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, J H Duncan; Williams, Graham R

    2016-04-01

    The skeleton is an exquisitely sensitive and archetypal T3-target tissue that demonstrates the critical role for thyroid hormones during development, linear growth, and adult bone turnover and maintenance. Thyrotoxicosis is an established cause of secondary osteoporosis, and abnormal thyroid hormone signaling has recently been identified as a novel risk factor for osteoarthritis. Skeletal phenotypes in genetically modified mice have faithfully reproduced genetic disorders in humans, revealing the complex physiological relationship between centrally regulated thyroid status and the peripheral actions of thyroid hormones. Studies in mutant mice also established the paradigm that T3 exerts anabolic actions during growth and catabolic effects on adult bone. Thus, the skeleton represents an ideal physiological system in which to characterize thyroid hormone transport, metabolism, and action during development and adulthood and in response to injury. Future analysis of T3 action in individual skeletal cell lineages will provide new insights into cell-specific molecular mechanisms and may ultimately identify novel therapeutic targets for chronic degenerative diseases such as osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of the current state of the art.

  6. Thyroid hormone signalling and adult neurogenesis in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie eRemaud

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The vital roles of thyroid hormone in multiple aspects of perinatal brain development have been known for over a century. In the last decades, the molecular mechanisms underlying effects of thyroid hormone on proliferation, differentiation, migration, synaptogenesis and myelination in the developing nervous system have been gradually dissected. However, recent data reveal that thyroid signalling influences neuronal development throughout life, from early embryogenesis to the neurogenesis in the adult brain. This review deals with the latter phase and analyses current knowledge on the role of T3, the active form of thyroid hormone, and its receptors in regulating neural stem cell function in the hippocampus and the subventricular zone, the two principal sites harbouring neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain. In particular, we discuss the critical roles of T3 and TRα1 in commitment to a neuronal phenotype, a process that entails the repression of a number of genes, notably that encoding the pluripotency factor, Sox2. Furthermore, the question of the relevance of thyroid hormone control of adult neurogenesis is considered in the context of brain aging, cognitive decline and neurodegenerative disease.

  7. Comments to guidelines for the treatment of hypothyroidism prepared by the American thyroid association task force on thyroid hormone replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Viktorovich Fadeev

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the discussion about to guidelines for the treatment of hypothyroidism prepared by the American thyroid association task force on thyroid hormone replacement.

  8. Serum levels of sex hormones and expression of their receptors in thyroid tissue in female patients with various types of thyroid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Chen, Guang; Meng, Xian-Ying; Liu, Zhong-Hui; Dong, Su

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in thyroid cancer; however, little is known regarding the levels of estrogen, progesterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH) in serum and the expression of ER, PR, FSH receptor (FSHR), and LH receptor (LHR) in thyroid tissues of patients with different types of thyroid neoplasms. Serum levels of estrogen, progesterone, FSH, and LH were measured by chemiluminescence, and expression of ER, PR, FSHR, and LHR in thyroid tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry in female patients with thyroid adenoma (n = 70), nodular goiter (n = 73), thyroid papillary cancer (n = 149), poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma (n = 12), or undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (n = 8) and in normal controls (n = 60). The positive rates of serum estrogen level and ERα expression were significantly greater in patients with various types of thyroid neoplasms than in normal controls. The positive rates of ERβ expression were significantly less in various types of thyroid neoplasms than in normal thyroid tissues, especially in poorly differentiated carcinoma and undifferentiated carcinoma. The negative rates of serum progesterone level and positive rates of PR expression in thyroid tissue were significantly greater in patients with thyroid adenoma, nodular goiter, or thyroid papillary cancer than in normal controls. The positive rates of serum FSH and LH levels and FSHR and LHR expression were significantly greater in the thyroid adenoma group than in other groups. Our findings suggest that thyroid neoplasms might be sex hormone-dependent. The positive expression of ERα and PR often indicates thyroid papillary carcinoma, and the ERβ expression status is important for the diagnosis of poorly differentiated carcinoma and undifferentiated carcinoma. In addition, thyroid adenoma is often accompanied by an increase in serum FSH and LH levels, as well as

  9. CORAL: prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, A P; Toropov, A A; Benfenati, E

    2015-08-28

    Quantitative structure - activity relationships (QSARs) for binding affinity of thyroid hormone receptors based on attributes of molecular structure extracted from simplified molecular input-line entry systems (SMILES) are established using the CORAL software (http://www.insilico.eu/coral). The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) is used as the measure of the binding affinity of thyroid hormone receptors. Molecular features which are statistically reliable promoters of increase and decrease for IC50 are suggested. The examples of modifications of molecular structure which lead to the increase or to the decrease of the endpoint are represented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. [Thyroid hormones and their precursors. II. Species-specific properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Gergo; Noszál, Béla

    2014-01-01

    This paper surveys the species-specific physico-chemical parameters (basicity and lipophilicity) and related biological functions of thyroid hormones (thyroxine, liothyronine and reverse liothyronine) and their biological precursors (tyrosine, monoiodotyrosine and diiodotyrosine). The protonation macroconstants were determined by 1H NMR-pH titrations while the microconstants were determined by a multimodal spectroscopic-deductive methodology using auxiliary derivatives of reduced complexity. Our results show that the different number and/or position of iodine are the key factors to influence the phenolate basicity. The ionization state of the phenolate site is crucial in the biosynthesis and protein binding of thyroid hormones. The role of the protonation state in the receptor binding was investigated by an in silico docking method. Microspecies of thyroid hormones were docked to the thyroid hormone receptor isoforms. Our results quantitate at the molecular level how the ionization stage and the charge distribution influence the protein binding. The anionic form of the carboxyl group is essential for the protein binding, whereas the protonated form of the amino group loosens it. The protonation state of the phenolate plays a role of secondary importance in the receptor binding. The combined results of docking and microspeciation studies show that microspecies of the highest concentration at the pH of blood are not the strongest binding ones. The site-specific lipophilicity of our investigated molecules was determined with the measurement of distribution coefficients at different pH using carboxymethyl- and O-methyl-derivatives to mimic the partition of some of the individual microspecies. Correction factors were determined and introduced. Our data show that the iodinated aromatic ring system is the definitive structural element that fundamentally determines the lipophilicity of thyroid hormones, whereas the protonation state of the aliphatic part is essential in

  11. [Pediatric reference intervals : retrospective study on thyroid hormone levels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladang, A; Vranken, L; Luyckx, F; Lebrethon, M-C; Cavalier, E

    2017-01-01

    Defining reference range is an essential tool for diagnostic. Age and sexe influences on thyroid hormone levels have been already discussed. In this study, we are defining a new pediatric reference range for TSH, FT3 and FT4 for Cobas C6000 analyzer. To do so, we have taken in account 0 to 18 year old outclinic patients. During the first year of life, thyroid hormone levels change dramatically before getting stabilized around 3 years old. We also compared our results to those obtained in a Canadian large-scale prospective study (the CALIPER initiative).

  12. Inter-individual differences in thyroid hormone bioactivity: the effect of genetic variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M. van der Deure (Wendy)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAdequate levels of thyroid hormone are essential for normal development and growth, since thyroid hormone plays an important role in virtually all metabolic processes in the human body. This is clearly demonstrated in patients with thyroid hormone disorders. Hyperthyroidism leads to high

  13. Inter-individual differences in thyroid hormone bioactivity: the effect of genetic variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M. van der Deure (Wendy)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAdequate levels of thyroid hormone are essential for normal development and growth, since thyroid hormone plays an important role in virtually all metabolic processes in the human body. This is clearly demonstrated in patients with thyroid hormone disorders. Hyperthyroidism leads to high

  14. A new mutation in the thyroid hormone receptor gene of a Chinese family with resistance to thyroid hormone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Qian; GONG Chun-xiu; GU Yi; SU Chang

    2011-01-01

    Background Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a dominant inherited syndrome of reduced tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormone. It is usually due to mutations located at the ligand-binding domain and adjacent hinge region of the thyroid hormone receptor β(TRβ). We report the clinical and laboratory characteristics and the genetic analysis of a patient with this rare disorder and his family members.Methods The clinical presentations and changes of thyroid function tests (TFTs) including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of pituitary and other laboratory tests were analysed. TFTs of his family's members were detected as well. Direct DNA sequencing of the TRβ gene was done for those with abnormal TFTs.Results The RTH child had goiter, irritability, aggressiveness, and sudoresis. His TFTs showed high levels of circulating free thyroid hormones (FT4 and FT3) and normal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations. He felt worse when treated as hyperthyroidism (Grave disease) with thiamazole and his clinical presentations got improved obviously when treated as RTH with bromocriptine without obvious advert effect. We identified a novel missense mutation, A317D, located in exon 9 of the gene of this boy and his mother. His mother had not any clinical presentation, but having abnormal TFTs results.Conclusions This patient reported here was concordant with the criteria of RTH. The feature is dysfunction of hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. A novel mutation was found in the TRβ, A317D, of this family. This research verified the phenomena that there is a clinical heterogeneity within the same mutation of different RTH patients.

  15. Imbalance between thyroid hormones and the dopaminergic system might be central to the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome: a hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Carlos Pereira Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Data collected from medical literature indicate that dopaminergic agonists alleviate Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms while dopaminergic agonists antagonists aggravate them. Dopaminergic agonists is a physiological regulator of thyroid-stimulating hormone. Dopaminergic agonists infusion diminishes the levels of thyroid hormones, which have the ability to provoke restlessness, hyperkinetic states, tremors, and insomnia. Conditions associated with higher levels of thyroid hormones, such as pregnancy or hyperthyroidism, have a higher prevalence of Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms. Low iron levels can cause secondary Restless Legs Syndrome or aggravate symptoms of primary disease as well as diminish enzymatic activities that are involved in dopaminergic agonists production and the degradation of thyroid hormones. Moreover, as a result of low iron levels, dopaminergic agonists diminishes and thyroid hormones increase. Iron therapy improves Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms in iron deprived patients. Medical hypothesis. To discuss the theory that thyroid hormones, when not counterbalanced by dopaminergic agonists, may precipitate the signs and symptoms underpinning Restless Legs Syndrome. The main cause of Restless Legs Syndrome might be an imbalance between the dopaminergic agonists system and thyroid hormones.

  16. Expression of Thyroid Hormone Responsive SPOT 14 Gene Is Regulated by Estrogen in Chicken (Gallus gallus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Junxiao; Xu, Naiyi; Zheng, Hang; Tian, Weihua; Li, Hong; Li, Zhuanjian; Wang, Yanbin; Tian, Yadong; Kang, Xiangtao; Liu, Xiaojun

    2017-08-31

    Thyroid hormone responsive spot 14 (THRSP) is a small nuclear protein that responds rapidly to thyroid hormone. It has been shown that THRSP is abundant in lipogenic tissues such as liver, fat and the mammary gland in mammals. The THRSP gene acts as a key lipogenic activator and can be activated by thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3), glucose, carbohydrate and insulin. Here we report that chicken THRSP is also abundant in lipogenic tissues including the liver and the abdominal fat, and its expression levels increased with sex maturation and reached the highest level at the peak of egg production. Structure analysis of the THRSP gene indicates that there is a conscious estrogen response element (ERE) located in the -2390 - -2402 range of the gene promoter region. Further studies by ChIP-qPCR proved that the ERα interacts with the putative ERE site. In addition, THRSP was significantly upregulated (P estrogen and is involved in the estrogen regulation network in chicken.

  17. Growth Hormone-Insulin-Like Growth Factor Axis, Thyroid Axis, Prolactin, and Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, Anthony C; Davis, Hope C; Lane, Amy R

    2016-01-01

    This chapter addresses what is known about the endocrine system components growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis, thyroid axis, and prolactin relative to exercise and exercise training. Each one of these hormone axes contributes to the maintenance of homeostasis in the body through impact on a multitude of physiological systems. The homeostatic disruption of exercise causes differing responses in each hormone axis. GH levels increase with sufficient stimulation, and IGFs are released in response to GH from the anterior pituitary providing multiple roles including anabolic properties. Changes in the thyroid hormones T3 and T4 vary greatly with exercise, from increases/decreases to no change in levels across different exercise types, intensities and durations. These ambiguous findings could be due to numerous confounding factors (e.g. nutrition status) within the research. Prolactin increases proportionally to the intensity of the exercise. The magnitude may be augmented with extended durations; conflicting findings have been reported with resistance training. While the responses to exercise vary, it appears there may be overall adaptive and regenerative impacts on the body into recovery by these hormones through immune and tissue inflammatory responses/mediations. Nonetheless, well-designed exercise research studies are still needed on each of these hormones, especially thyroid hormones and prolactin.

  18. The bactericidal agent triclosan modulates thyroid hormone-associated gene expression and disrupts postembryonic anuran development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veldhoen, Nik [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, P.O. Box 3055, Stn. CSC, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3P6 (Canada); Skirrow, Rachel C. [Pacific Environmental Science Centre, 2645 Dollarton Highway, North Vancouver, British Columbia V7H 1V2 (Canada); Osachoff, Heather [Pacific Environmental Science Centre, 2645 Dollarton Highway, North Vancouver, British Columbia V7H 1V2 (Canada); Wigmore, Heidi [Pacific Environmental Science Centre, 2645 Dollarton Highway, North Vancouver, British Columbia V7H 1V2 (Canada); Clapson, David J. [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, P.O. Box 3055, Stn. CSC, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3P6 (Canada); Gunderson, Mark P. [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, P.O. Box 3055, Stn. CSC, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3P6 (Canada); Van Aggelen, Graham [Pacific Environmental Science Centre, 2645 Dollarton Highway, North Vancouver, British Columbia V7H 1V2 (Canada); Helbing, Caren C. [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, P.O. Box 3055, Stn. CSC, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3P6 (Canada)]. E-mail: chelbing@uvic.ca

    2006-12-01

    We investigated whether exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of the bactericidal agent, triclosan, induces changes in the thyroid hormone-mediated process of metamorphosis of the North American bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana and alters the expression profile of thyroid hormone receptor (TR) {alpha} and {beta}, basic transcription element binding protein (BTEB) and proliferating nuclear cell antigen (PCNA) gene transcripts. Premetamorphic tadpoles were immersed in environmentally relevant concentrations of triclosan and injected with 1 x 10{sup -11} mol/g body weight 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) or vehicle control. Morphometric measurements and steady-state mRNA levels obtained by quantitative polymerase chain reaction were determined. mRNA abundance was also examined in Xenopus laevis XTC-2 cells treated with triclosan and/or 10 nM T{sub 3}. Tadpoles pretreated with triclosan concentrations as low as 0.15 {+-} 0.03 {mu}g/L for 4 days showed increased hindlimb development and a decrease in total body weight following T{sub 3} administration. Triclosan exposure also resulted in decreased T{sub 3}-mediated TR{beta} mRNA expression in the tadpole tail fin and increased levels of PCNA transcript in the brain within 48 h of T{sub 3} treatment whereas TR{alpha} and BTEB were unaffected. Triclosan alone altered thyroid hormone receptor {alpha} transcript levels in the brain of premetamorphic tadpoles and induced a transient weight loss. In XTC-2 cells, exposure to T{sub 3} plus nominal concentrations of triclosan as low as 0.03 {mu}g/L for 24 h resulted in altered thyroid hormone receptor mRNA expression. Exposure to low levels of triclosan disrupts thyroid hormone-associated gene expression and can alter the rate of thyroid hormone-mediated postembryonic anuran development.

  19. Thyroid hormone modulates ClC-2 chloride channel gene expression in rat renal proximal tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Ornellas, D; Grozovsky, R; Goldenberg, R C; Carvalho, D P; Fong, P; Guggino, W B; Morales, M

    2003-09-01

    Thyroid hormones has its main role in controlling metabolism, but it can also modulate extracellular fluid Volume (ECFV) through its action on the expression and activity of Na(+) transporters. Otherwise, chloride is the main anion in the ECFV and the influence of thyroid hormones in the regulation of chloride transporters is not yet understood. In this work, we studied the effect of thyroid hormones in the expression of ClC-2, a cell Volume-, pH- and voltage-sensitive Cl(-) channel, in rat kidney. To analyze the modulation of ClC-2 gene expression by thyroid hormones, we used hypothyroid (Hypo) rats with or without thyroxine (T(4)) replacement and hyperthyroid (Hyper) rats as our experimental models. Total RNA was isolated and the expression of ClC-2 mRNA was evaluated by a ribonuclease protection assay, and/or semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Renal ClC-2 expression decreased in Hypo rats and increased in Hyper rats. In addition, semi-quantitative RT-PCR of different nephron segments showed that these changes were due exclusively to the modulation of ClC-2 mRNA expression by thyroid hormone in convoluted and straight proximal tubules. To investigate whether thyroid hormones action was direct or indirect, renal proximal tubule primary culture cells were prepared and subjected to different T(4) concentrations. ClC-2 mRNA expression was increased by T(4) in a dose-dependent fashion, as analyzed by RT-PCR. Western blotting demonstrated that ClC-2 protein expression followed the same profile of mRNA expression.

  20. A CORRELATIVE STUDY OF FNAC THYROID WITH THYROID HORMONE PROFILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritica

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Study aims to determine correlation of the cytological pattern of t hyr oid lesions in ad di t ion to the ut i l it y a nd accu r ac y o f F N A C a s in i t ia l dia g nostic me thod a lo n g with t hy roid h o rmone p ro f i l e ( T 3, T4 a nd TSH whi c h p r ovides info r mation a t p hy sio log i ca l a nd p a tho l o g ic a l lev e ls a nd thus ca n e nh a n c e the l i k e l i hood o f ea r l y de te c t i on of a mb ig uous t hyr oid dy sfu nc t i on with m i ni ma l clin ica l findin gs. OBJECTIVES: To obtain role of thyroid hormone profile (T3, T4 and TSH aimed at defining prognostic parameters and correlating it with cytology r e sul t s, dia g nosis of dif f use n o n t o xi c g oi te r, dia g nos i s of sol i ta ry /do m inant t hy roid nodule, c onfi r mation of c l i nic a l l y obvious t hyr oid ma l ig n anc y . MATERIALS AND METHODS: 150 patients with thyroid sw ellings underwent FNAC along with c omp le te t hy roid ho r mone p r o f i l e in Central Diagnostic Lab o f A JI MS Man ga lor e . P r oce d u re w a s p e r f o r med without L .A with the he lp of a spir a t i ng t ec hnique usi n g 23G nee dle a t tache d to 10 ml di s posa b le sy ri nge . An avera ge of one a t te mpt p e r nodule w a s p e r fo rm e d usual l y re sul t ing in 4 dir ec t sme a rs. B oth a ir d r ied a nd w e t fi xe d sme a rs fi xe d in 95% a l c ohol for a bout 30 m i n ute s a nd stain e d with Le ish ma n ’ s stain a nd Pa p stain e x a m i n e d und e r l ig ht m icr osco pe . T hy roid p ro file is a lso p e r f o r med in a ll the a bo v e p a t ie nts. RESULTS: One hund re d a nd fi ft y a spir a t i ons of p a t ie nts (both f e m a les a nd mal e s w er e analyse d. T 3, T4 a nd TSH w a s analy z e d f o r a ll 150 p a t ie nts . The me a n ag e of p a t ie nts in t his stu d y w a s 39.66 year s a nd ag e rang e w a s 1 - 76 yea rs. The r e w er e 142 femal e s (94. 6 6% a nd 8 mal e s (5.3 3% . M ax i m um nu m b e r of

  1. Role of thyroid hormones in thermoregulatory reactions during altitude adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazhenov, Yu.I.; Sydykov, B.K.

    1981-02-01

    The influence of thyroid hormones on thermogenesis at various stages of altitude adaptation is investigated. Oxygen demand, muscle electrical activity and body temperatures were monitored in white rats at ambient temperatures of 22-24 C and 4-6 C during adaptation to an altitude of 3200 m in control animals and in rats injected daily with triiodothyronine or an antithyroidal preparation of thiamazole. Adaptation to altitude hypoxia is found to decrease the metabolic reactions of the control rats to cold. Injections of thiamazole are observed to lead to a decrease in transport processes and heat production, thus adding to the effects of hypoxia and decreasing the thermal stability of the organism. Triiodothyronine, on the other hand, is observed to increase transport levels and body temperatures and reverse the effects of hypoxia. It is thus proposed that a decrease in the functional capability of the thyroid may be partly responsible for the decrease in the effects of cold on muscular contractions observed during adaptation to hypoxia.

  2. Substances that disrupt thyroid hormone biosynthesis (in Romanian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pap, Andreea

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupters are natural or synthetic chemical substances that have the possibility to alter the endocrine functions leading to serious metabolic changes especially in newborns. The accumulation and persistence over long periods of time became a priority in terms of health and environment. The mechanism of action is represented by blocking, mimicking or modifying the effects of thyroid hormones. In this review, the main purpose was to determine what effects have the endocrine disruptors on the thyroid gland, especially on the thyroid hormone biosynthesis and setting the stage involved by it. We focused on the action of perchlorates, phthalates, BPC, PDPEs, soy, isoflavones, nitrates, thiocyanates, bisphenol A and triclorsan and came to the conclusion that their intervention can result in either hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism.

  3. New Insights into Mechanisms of Cardioprotection Mediated by Thyroid Hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Nicolini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure represents the final common outcome in cardiovascular diseases. Despite significant therapeutic advances, morbidity and mortality of heart failure remain unacceptably high. Heart failure is preceded and sustained by a process of structural remodeling of the entire cardiac tissue architecture. Prevention or limitation of cardiac remodeling in the early stages of the process is a crucial step in order to ameliorate patient prognosis. Acquisition of novel pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiac remodeling is therefore required to develop more efficacious therapeutic strategies. Among all neuroendocrine systems, thyroid hormone seems to play a major homeostatic role in cardiovascular system. In these years, accumulating evidence shows that the “low triiodothyronine” syndrome is a strong prognostic, independent predictor of death in patients affected by both acute and chronic heart disease. In experimental models of cardiac hypertrophy or myocardial infarction, alterations in the thyroid hormone signaling, concerning cardiac mitochondrion, cardiac interstitium, and vasculature, have been suggested to be related to heart dysfunction. The aim of this brief paper is to highlight new developments in understanding the cardioprotective role of thyroid hormone in reverting regulatory networks involved in adverse cardiac remodeling. Furthermore, new recent advances on the role of specific miRNAs in thyroid hormone regulation at mitochondrion and interstitial level are also discussed.

  4. Thyroid hormone transporters and deiodinases in the developing human hypothalamus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friesema, E.C.; Visser, T.J.; Borgers, A.J.F.; Kalsbeek, A.; Swaab, D.F.; Fliers, E.; Alkemade, A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Thyroid hormone (TH) signaling in brain cells is dependent on transport of TH across the plasma membrane followed by intracellular deiodination and binding to the nuclear TH receptors. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of the specific TH transporters monocarboxylate

  5. A model for chronic, intrahypothalamic thyroid hormone administration in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z; Bisschop, P H; Foppen, E; van Beeren, H C; Kalsbeek, A; Boelen, A; Fliers, E

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the direct effects of thyroid hormone (TH) on peripheral organs, recent work showed metabolic effects of TH on the liver and brown adipose tissue via neural pathways originating in the hypothalamic paraventricular and ventromedial nucleus (PVN and VMH). So far, these experiments focus

  6. The deiodination of thyroid hormone in rat liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Mol

    1985-01-01

    textabstractAs mentioned in the preceding paragraphs, enzymatic deiodination of T4 is the most important route for the production of the biologically active thyroid hormone, T3• The liver is regarded as the principal site for the peripheral production of T3. Besides deiodination the liver is also

  7. Thyroid hormone transporters and deiodinases in the developing human hypothalamus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C.H. Friesema (Edith); T.J. Visser (Theo); A.J. Borgers (Anke); A. Kalsbeek (Andries); D.F. Swaab (Dick); E. Fliers (Eric); A. Alkemade (Anneke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Thyroid hormone (TH) signaling in brain cells is dependent on transport of TH across the plasma membrane followed by intracellular deiodination and binding to the nuclear TH receptors. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of the specific TH transporters monoc

  8. Thyroid hormone transporters and deiodinases in the developing human hypothalamus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friesema, E.C.; Visser, T.J.; Borgers, A.J.F.; Kalsbeek, A.; Swaab, D.F.; Fliers, E.; Alkemade, A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Thyroid hormone (TH) signaling in brain cells is dependent on transport of TH across the plasma membrane followed by intracellular deiodination and binding to the nuclear TH receptors. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of the specific TH transporters monocarboxylate t

  9. Role of thyroid hormone deiodination in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechan, Ronald M; Fekete, Csaba

    2005-08-01

    Iodothyronine deiodinases (D1, D2, and D3) comprise a family of selenoproteins that are involved in the conversion of thyroxine (T(4)) to active triiodothyronine (T(3)), and also the inactivation of both thyroid hormones. The deiodinase enzymes are of critical importance for the normal development and function of the central nervous system. D1 is absent from the human brain, suggesting that D2 and D3 are the two main enzymes involved in the maintenance of thyroid hormone homeostasis in the central nervous system, D2 as the primary T(3)-producing enzyme, and D3 as the primary inactivating enzyme. While the coordinated action of D2 and D3 maintain constant T(3) levels in the cortex independently from the circulating thyroid hormone levels, the role of deiodinases in the hypothalamus may be more complex, as suggested by the regulation of D2 activity in the hypothalamus by infection, fasting and changes in photoperiod. Tanycytes, the primary source of D2 activity in the hypothalamus, integrate hormonal and probably neuronal signals, and under specific conditions, may influence neuroendocrine functions by altering local T(3) tissue concentrations. This function may be of particular importance in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis during fasting and infection, and in the regulation of appetite and reproductive function. Transient expression of D3 in the preoptic region during a critical time of development suggests a special role for this deiodinase in sexual differentiation of the brain.

  10. Expression of thyroid stimulating hormone receptor in differentiated thyroid carcinoma and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李清怀

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the expression of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor in differentiated thyroid carcinoma and its clinical significance.Methods Seventy-four patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma treated in our department from January 2009 to January 2011were selected as the observation group,and 28 patients with nodular goiter were selected as the control group.Expression of TSH receptor in the two groups were detected by immunohistochemistry.Results The positive rate of TSH receptor expression in the observation group was55.4 (41/74) ,significantly lower than that of the control

  11. Rabbits immunized with thyroid-stimulating hormone produce autoantiidiotypic thyroid-stimulating antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Beall, G N; Rapoport, B; Chopra, I J; Kruger, S R

    1985-01-01

    We immunized rabbits with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) to investigate the hypothesis that such immunization could result in production of thyroid-stimulating autoantiidiotypic antibodies to anti-TSH. Thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) appeared in the serum of several rabbits after immunization. At 160 d, TSI equivalent to 6-18 microU TSH/1.5 mg IgG was present in two of six human (h)TSH-, two of six hTSH beta chain-, and two of the four surviving bovine (b)TSH-immunized animals. Co...

  12. Thyroid hormone treatment among pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism: US national assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraka, Spyridoula; Mwangi, Raphael; Yao, Xiaoxi; Sangaralingham, Lindsey R; Singh Ospina, Naykky M; O’Keeffe, Derek T; De Ycaza, Ana E Espinosa; Rodriguez-Gutierrez, Rene; Coddington, Charles C; Stan, Marius N; Brito, Juan P; Montori, Victor M

    2017-01-01

    Objective To estimate the effectiveness and safety of thyroid hormone treatment among pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Large US administrative database between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2014. Participants 5405 pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism, defined as untreated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration 2.5-10 mIU/L. Exposure Thyroid hormone therapy. Main outcome measure Pregnancy loss and other pre-specified maternal and fetal pregnancy related adverse outcomes. Results Among 5405 pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism, 843 with a mean pre-treatment TSH concentration of 4.8 (SD 1.7) mIU/L were treated with thyroid hormone and 4562 with a mean baseline TSH concentration of 3.3 (SD 0.9) mIU/L were not treated (Ppre-eclampsia (1.61, 1.10 to 2.37); other pregnancy related adverse outcomes were similar between the two groups. The adjusted odds of pregnancy loss were lower in treated women than in untreated women if their pre-treatment TSH concentration was 4.1-10 mIU/L (odds ratio 0.45, 0.30 to 0.65) but not if it was 2.5-4.0 mIU/L (0.91, 0.65 to 1.23) (P<0.01). Conclusion Thyroid hormone treatment was associated with decreased risk of pregnancy loss among women with subclinical hypothyroidism, especially those with pre-treatment TSH concentrations of 4.1-10 mIU/L. However, the increased risk of other pregnancy related adverse outcomes calls for additional studies evaluating the safety of thyroid hormone treatment in this patient population. PMID:28122781

  13. Methimazole-Induced Goitrogenesis in an Adult Patient With the Syndrome of Resistance to Thyroid Hormone

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    Kathleen Glymph DO

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with the syndrome of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH have clinical (tachycardia and anxiety and biochemical (elevated thyroid hormones level features of hyperthyroidism. Based on previous reports in pediatric patients with the RTH, antithyroid treatment in these patients is not indicated. Clinical and biochemical sequel of antithyroid therapy in an adult patient with RTH was not previously reported. A 63-year-old African American female with history of RTH was treated with a therapy consisting of methimazole 15 mg daily and atenolol. Methimazole treatment resulted in reduction in thyroid hormone level while the patient’s TSH increased with a peak of 24.88 mIU/L. Having achieved biochemical euthyroidism, the patient developed thyroid gland enlargement associated with progressive symptoms of dysphagia and dyspnea. Examination demonstrated globally enlarged firm thyroid gland with areas of nodularity in both lobes. A computed tomography of the neck showed enlarged thyroid gland with extension around bilateral sternocleidomastoid muscles and compression onto the trachea. Methimazole therapy was discontinued and patient was treated just on atenolol. Over 12 months following discontinuation of methimazole, the patient experienced marked clinical and radiographic improvement of the goiter size associated with TSH reduction to 1.26 mIU/L and modest free thyroxine increase as expected in RTH. It seems appealing to treat patients with the RTH with antithyroid medications. However, in these patients decrease in thyroid hormone levels will stimulate TSH production, which can, in turn, predispose to goiter formation. Our report supports prior observations in children with RTH that treatment with methimazole is not indicated in adult patients with RTH.

  14. Thyroid hormone is required for hypothalamic neurons regulating cardiovascular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittag, Jens; Lyons, David J; Sällström, Johan; Vujovic, Milica; Dudazy-Gralla, Susi; Warner, Amy; Wallis, Karin; Alkemade, Anneke; Nordström, Kristina; Monyer, Hannah; Broberger, Christian; Arner, Anders; Vennström, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is well known for its profound direct effects on cardiovascular function and metabolism. Recent evidence, however, suggests that the hormone also regulates these systems indirectly through the central nervous system. While some of the molecular mechanisms underlying the hormone's central control of metabolism have been identified, its actions in the central cardiovascular control have remained enigmatic. Here, we describe a previously unknown population of parvalbuminergic neurons in the anterior hypothalamus that requires thyroid hormone receptor signaling for proper development. Specific stereotaxic ablation of these cells in the mouse resulted in hypertension and temperature-dependent tachycardia, indicating a role in the central autonomic control of blood pressure and heart rate. Moreover, the neurons exhibited intrinsic temperature sensitivity in patch-clamping experiments, providing a new connection between cardiovascular function and core temperature. Thus, the data identify what we believe to be a novel hypothalamic cell population potentially important for understanding hypertension and indicate developmental hypothyroidism as an epigenetic risk factor for cardiovascular disorders. Furthermore, the findings may be beneficial for treatment of the recently identified patients that have a mutation in thyroid hormone receptor α1.

  15. Tetrac can replace thyroid hormone during brain development in mouse mutants deficient in the thyroid hormone transporter Mct8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Horn (Sigrun); S. Kersseboom (Simone); S. Mayerl (Steffen); J. Müller (Julia); C. Groba (Claudia); M. Trajkovic-Arsic (Marija); T. Ackermann (Tobias); T.J. Visser (Theo); H. Heuer (Heike)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) plays a critical role in mediating the uptake of thyroid hormones (THs) into the brain. In patients, inactivating mutations in the MCT8 gene are associated with a severe form of psychomotor retardation and abnormal serum TH levels. Here, we evalua

  16. In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo determination of thyroid hormone modulating activity of benzothiazoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    As in vitro assays are increasingly used to screen chemicals for their potential to produce endocrine disrupting adverse effects, it is important to understand their predictive capacity. The potential for a set of six benzothiazoles to affect endpoints related to thyroid hormone ...

  17. The effects of iodine deficiency on thyroid hormone deiodination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obregon, Maria-Jesus; Escobar del Rey, Francisco; Morreale de Escobar, Gabriella

    2005-08-01

    hormones of maternal origin are available to the embryo early in development and continue contributing to fetal thyroid hormone status, even after onset of fetal thyroid secretion. In the case of congenital hypothyroidism and normal maternal T(4), the transfer of the latter, together with increased D2 activity, protects the fetal brain from T(3) deficiency, even when it may be insufficient to maintain euthyroidism in other fetal tissues. Practically all of the T(3) found in the fetal brain is derived locally from T(4), and not from circulating T(3). In the case of severe iodine deficiency, both the embryo and the mother are T(4)-deficient; therefore, the fetal brain is exposed to T(3)-deficiency, both before and after onset of fetal thyroid function. This leads to irreversible alterations and damage to the central nervous system (i.e. abnormal corticogenesis). Moreover, because intrathyroidal autoregulatory mechanisms are not yet operative in the fetus, both T(4) and T(3) continue to be very low until birth, and the fetus is not only hypothyroxinemic, similar to its mother, but also clinically and biochemically hypothyroid.

  18. Elevated levels of circulating thyroid hormone do not cause the medical sequelae of hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Tammas; Denmark, Lawrence; Lieberman, Daniel Z

    2016-11-03

    Clinicians have been reluctant to use high dose thyroid (HDT) to treat affective disorders because high circulating levels of thyroid hormone have traditionally been equated with hyperthyroidism, and understood as the cause of the medical sequelae of hyperthyroidism, such as osteoporosis and cardiac abnormalities. This conclusion is not supported by (HDT) research. A literature review of research related to the morbidity and mortality of HDT treatment was performed. There exists a large body of research involving the use of HDT treatment to prevent the recurrence of differentiated thyroid cancer and to treat affective disorders. A review of this literature finds a lack of support for HDT as a cause of osteoporosis, nor is there support for an increase in morbidity or mortality associated with HDT. This finding contrasts with the well-established morbidity and mortality associated with Graves' disease, thyroiditis, and other endogenous forms of hyperthyroidism. The lack of evidence that exogenous HDT causes osteoporosis, cardiac abnormalities or increases mortality compared with the significant morbidity and mortality of hyperthyroidism requires an alternative cause for the medical sequelae of hyperthyroidism. One possibility is an autoimmune mechanism. High circulating levels of thyroid hormone is not the cause of the sequela of hyperthyroidism. The reluctance to using high dose thyroid is unwarranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Neither bovine somatotropin nor growth hormone-releasing factor alters expression of thyroid hormone receptors in liver and mammary tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuco, A V; Binelli, M; Tucker, H A

    2011-10-01

    Physiological effects of thyroid hormones are mediated primarily by binding of triiodothyronine to specific nuclear receptors. Organ-specific changes in production of triiodothyronine from its prohormone, thyroxine, have been hypothesized to target the action of thyroid hormones on the mammary gland and play a role in mediating or augmenting a galactopoietic response to bovine somatotropin (bST). Additionally, tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormones may be altered by changes in the number or affinity of nuclear receptors for thyroid hormones. In the present study, effects of bST and bovine growth hormone-releasing factor (bGRF) on thyroid hormone receptors in liver and mammary gland were studied. Lactating Holstein cows received continuous infusions of bST or bGRF for 63 d or served as uninfused controls. Nuclei were isolated from harvested mammary and liver tissues and incubated with [(125)I]-triiodothyronine. Treatments did not alter the capacity or affinity of specific binding sites for triiodothyronine in liver or mammary nuclei. Evaluation of transcript abundance for thyroid hormone receptors showed that isoforms of thyroid hormone receptor or retinoid receptor (which may influence thyroid receptor action) expressed in the mammary gland were not altered by bST or bGRF treatment. Data do not support the hypothesis that administration of bST or bGRF alters sensitivity of mammary tissue by changing expression of thyroid hormone receptors.

  20. Thyroid stimulating hormone and cognition during severe, transient hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraml, Frank V; Goslar, Pamela W; Baxter, Leslie; Beason-Held, Lori L

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of our pilot study was to explore the relationship between serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels during overt hypothyroidism (OH) and hypothyroid-related neuropsychological symptoms. We hypothesized that TSH level may reflect the degree of 'brain hypothyroidism' such that an inverse correlation may exist between serum TSH and cognitive function in patients experiencing overt hypothyroidism (OH), and sought to explore this hypothesis. Eleven thyroidectomized patients underwent neuropsychological and thyroid function testing while overtly hypothyroid, and again following thyroid hormone replacement. Their test performance was compared with that of eleven healthy controls at a similarly separated two points in time, and the change over time for the patient group and the controls was likewise assessed and compared. The patients' neuropsychological test scores were then correlated with their serum TSH levels while hypothyroid. The patients' performance while hypothyroid was worse than that of the controls in only one neurocognitive measure--Working Memory Index. The subjects improved similarly or to a greater degree than the controls, when the subjects were thyroid hormone replaced, on all but one neurocognitive measure - Thurstone Word Fluency. TSH level during hypothyroidism was inversely proportional to the patients' performance on these same two measures, but no others. Serum TSH level during hypothyroidism was inversely proportional to performance on the only two neurocognitive measures evidencing an adverse effect from hypothyroidism in our cohort. This suggests that serum TSH level may reflect the severity of 'brain hypothyroidism' during the overt stage of this condition.

  1. Consequences of monocarboxylate transporter 8 deficiency for renal transport and metabolism of thyroid hormones in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Trajkovic-Arsic (Marija); T.J. Visser (Theo); V.M. Darras (Veerle); E.C.H. Friesema (Edith); B. Schlott (Bernhard); J. Mittag (Jens); K. Bauer (Karl); H. Heuer (Heike)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractPatients carrying inactivating mutations in the gene encoding the thyroid hormone transporting monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)-8 suffer from a severe form of psychomotor retardation and exhibit abnormal serum thyroid hormone levels. The thyroidal phenotype characterized by highserum T3

  2. Thyroid hormones correlate with resting metabolic rate, not daily energy expenditure, in two charadriiform seabirds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle H. Elliott

    2013-04-01

    Thyroid hormones affect in vitro metabolic intensity, increase basal metabolic rate (BMR in the lab, and are sometimes correlated with basal and/or resting metabolic rate (RMR in a field environment. Given the difficulty of measuring metabolic rate in the field—and the likelihood that capture and long-term restraint necessary to measure metabolic rate in the field jeopardizes other measurements—we examined the possibility that circulating thyroid hormone levels were correlated with RMR in two free-ranging bird species with high levels of energy expenditure (the black-legged kittiwake, Rissa tridactyla, and thick-billed murre, Uria lomvia. Because BMR and daily energy expenditure (DEE are purported to be linked, we also tested for a correlation between thyroid hormones and DEE. We examined the relationships between free and bound levels of the thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4 and triiodothyronine (T3 with DEE and with 4-hour long measurements of post-absorptive and thermoneutral resting metabolism (resting metabolic rate; RMR. RMR but not DEE increased with T3 in both species; both metabolic rates were independent of T4. T3 and T4 were not correlated with one another. DEE correlated with body mass in kittiwakes but not in murres, presumably owing to the larger coefficient of variation in body mass during chick rearing for the more sexually dimorphic kittiwakes. We suggest T3 provides a good proxy for resting metabolism but not DEE in these seabird species.

  3. A novel mutation of thyroid hormone receptor β in exon 10 in a case of thyroid hormone-resistant non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the thyroid

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ke; Xie, Yanhong; Zhao, Liling; ZHAO, SHAOLI; He, Honghui; Mo, Zhaohui

    2014-01-01

    Only a few previous studies have demonstrated an association between resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) and thyroid cancer. The current study presents the case of a 67-year-old female who was referred to the Third Xiangya Hospital of Central South University with an enlargement of the neck that had grown gradually over two years and subsequently, rapidly enlarged over the two months prior to admission, alongside a slight sensation of shortness of breath. Laboratory data revealed a significan...

  4. Increased Prevalence of Chronic Lymphocytic Thyroiditis in Korean Patients with Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chang-Mo Oh; Sohee Park; Joo Young Lee; Young-Joo Won; Aesun Shin; Hyun-Joo Kong; Kui-Sun Choi; You Jin Lee; Ki-Wook Chung; Kyu-Won Jung

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, some reports have suggested that papillary thyroid cancers are more frequently associated with lymphocytic thyroiditis or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This study investigated a potential increase in the prevalence of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis among papillary thyroid cancer patients. Materials and Methods We used national epidemiological survey data on thyroid cancer patients diagnosed in 1999, 2005, and 2008. A retrospective medical record survey was conducted by...

  5. Nanostructured sensors containing immobilized nuclear receptors for thyroid hormone detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendo, Luana; Casanova, Monise; Figueira, Ana Carolina M; Polikarpov, Igor; Zucolotto, Valtencir

    2014-05-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are members of the nuclear receptors (NRs) superfamily, being encoded by two genes: TRa and TRbeta. In this paper, the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the TRbeta1 isoform was immobilized on the surface of nanostructured electrodes for TR detection. The platforms containing TRbeta1-LBD were applied to the detection of specific ligand agonists, including the natural hormones T3 (triiodothyronine) and T4 (thyroxine), and the synthetic agonists TRIAC (3,5,3'-triiodothyroacetic acid) and GC-1 [3,5-dimethyl-4-(4'-hydroxy-3'-isopropylbenzyl phenoxy) acetic acid]. Detection was performed via impedance spectroscopy. The biosensors were capable of distinguishing between the thyroid hormones T3 and T4, and/or the analogues TRIAC and GC-1 at concentrations as low as 50 nM. The detection and separation of thyroid hormones and analogue ligands by impedance techniques represents an innovative tool in the field of nanomedicine because it allows the design of inexpensive devices for the rapid and real-time detection of distinct ligand/receptor systems.

  6. Impact of elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone levels in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trummer, Christian; Schwetz, Verena; Giuliani, Albrecht; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Lerchbaum, Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse the impact of elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels on the metabolic and endocrine phenotype in 583 women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Endocrine and metabolic parameters were measured in all patients and compared between women with and without elevated TSH levels. Of the 583 women with PCOS, 125 women (21.4%) had thyroid disturbances (thyroid replacement therapy: 109 women, subclinical hypothyroidism: 16 women). Patients with elevated TSH levels had significantly increased fasting insulin, area under the curve-insulin, homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance, and total cholesterol (TC)/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) ratio and lower free thyroxin, insulin sensitivity and HDL (p < 0.05 for all). Euthyroid PCOS women with thyroid hormone substitution showed significant differences in TSH, age, body mass index, HDL and systolic blood pressure compared to those without hormone replacement therapy (p < 0.05 for all). We conclude that hypothyroid disturbances and elevated TSH levels are common findings in PCOS, which are associated with an adverse metabolic profile. Therefore, women with diagnosed PCOS should be screened for thyroid dysfunction.

  7. The role of thyroid hormones in stress response of fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, M C Subhash

    2011-06-01

    Thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)), the principal thyroid hormones (THs) secreted from the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, produce a plethora of physiologic actions in fish. The diverse actions of THs in fishes are primarily due to the sensitivity of thyroid axis to many physical, chemical and biological factors of both intrinsic and extrinsic origins. The regulation of THs homeostasis becomes more complex due to extrathyroidal deiodination pathways by which the delivery of biologically active T(3) to target cells has been controlled. As primary stress hormones and the end products of hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) and brain-sympathetic-chromaffin (BSC) axes, cortisol and adrenaline exert its actions on its target tissues where it promote and integrate osmotic and metabolic competence. Despite possessing specific osmoregulatory and metabolic actions at cellular and whole-body levels, THs may fine-tune these processes in accordance with the actions of hormones like cortisol and adrenaline. Evidences are presented that THs can modify the pattern and magnitude of stress response in fishes as it modifies either its own actions or the actions of stress hormones. In addition, multiple lines of evidence indicate that hypothalamic and pituitary hormones of thyroid and interrenal axes can interact with each other which in turn may regulate THs/cortisol-mediated actions. Even though it is hard to define these interactions, the magnitude of stress response in fish has been shown to be modified by the changes in the status of THs, pointing to its functional relationship with endocrine stress axes particularly with the interrenal axis. The fine-tuned mechanism that operates in fish during stressor-challenge drives the THs to play both fundamental and modulator roles in stress response by controlling osmoregulation and metabolic regulation. A major role of THs in stress response is thus evident in fish. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  8. [Thyroiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffet, Camille; Groussin, Lionel

    2013-02-01

    The diagnosis of thyroiditis encompasses a broad spectrum of thyroid disorders. Analysis of signs and symptoms, biochemical changes, neck ultrasound characteristics and radioactive iodine uptake values allows an accurate diagnosis. Recent studies of the whole genome have helped to identify many susceptibility genes for autoimmune thyroiditis. However, none of these genes contribute to a significant increase in risk of developing this thyroiditis. Clinical awareness of the characteristic presentations of exceptional thyroiditis (acute suppurative thyroiditis, Riedel's thyroiditis) is an important issue. Selenium administration seems to be beneficial for reducing the incidence of thyroiditis. Finally, certain drug-induced thyroiditis remains a therapeutic challenge for the physician.

  9. Circulating thyroid stimulating hormone receptor messenger RNA and differentiated thyroid cancer: A diagnostic meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Chao-Yue; Li, Zhan-Ming; Wang, Li-Shun

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor messenger RNA (TSHR-mRNA) is over-expressed in thyroid cancer patients, which indicates that TSHR-mRNA is a potential biomarker of thyroid cancer. However, system evaluation for TSHR-mRNA as a diagnostic biomarker of thyroid cancer is deficient. The performance of TSHR-mRNA for thyroid cancer diagnosis was evaluated in this study. Three common international databases as well as a Chinese database were applied for literature researching. Quality assessment of the included literatures was conducted by the QUADAS-2 tool. Totally, 1027 patients from nine studies eligible for the meta-analysis were included in this study. Global sensitivity and specificity for the positivity of TSHR-mRNA in the thyroid cancer diagnosis is 72% and 82%. The value of AUC for this test performance was 0.84. Our meta-analysis suggests that TSHR-mRNA might be a potential biomarker to complete present diagnostic methods for early and precision diagnosis of thyroid cancer. Notably, this findings need validation thorough large-scale clinical studies. PMID:28036261

  10. Thyroid hormone-regulated gene expression in juvenile mouse liver: identification of thyroid response elements using microarray profiling and in silico analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paquette Martin A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disruption of thyroid hormone signalling can alter growth, development and energy metabolism. Thyroid hormones exert their effects through interactions with thyroid receptors that directly bind thyroid response elements and can alter transcriptional activity of target genes. The effects of short-term thyroid hormone perturbation on hepatic mRNA transcription in juvenile mice were evaluated, with the goal of identifying genes containing active thyroid response elements. Thyroid hormone disruption was induced from postnatal day 12 to 15 by adding goitrogens to dams' drinking water (hypothyroid. A subgroup of thyroid hormone-disrupted pups received intraperitoneal injections of replacement thyroid hormones four hours prior to sacrifice (replacement. An additional group received only thyroid hormones four hours prior to sacrifice (hyperthyroid. Hepatic mRNA was extracted and hybridized to Agilent mouse microarrays. Results Transcriptional profiling enabled the identification of 28 genes that appeared to be under direct thyroid hormone-regulation. The regulatory regions of the genome adjacent to these genes were examined for half-site sequences that resemble known thyroid response elements. A bioinformatics search identified 33 thyroid response elements in the promoter regions of 13 different genes thought to be directly regulated by thyroid hormones. Thyroid response elements found in the promoter regions of Tor1a, 2310003H01Rik, Hect3d and Slc25a45 were further validated by confirming that the thyroid receptor is associated with these sequences in vivo and that it can bind directly to these sequences in vitro. Three different arrangements of thyroid response elements were identified. Some of these thyroid response elements were located far up-stream (> 7 kb of the transcription start site of the regulated gene. Conclusions Transcriptional profiling of thyroid hormone disrupted animals coupled with a novel bioinformatics search

  11. Thyroid hormone regulation of gene expression in primary cerebrocortical cells: role of thyroid hormone receptor subtypes and interactions with retinoic acid and glucocorticoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Gil-Ibáñez

    Full Text Available The effects of thyroid hormone on brain development and function are largely mediated by the binding of 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3 to its nuclear receptors (TR to regulate positively or negatively gene expression. We have analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction the effect of T3 on primary cultured cells from the embryonic mouse cerebral cortex, on the expression of Hr, Klf9, Shh, Dio3, Aldh1a1, and Aldh1a3. In particular we focused on T3 receptor specificity, and on the crosstalk between T3, retinoic acid and dexamethasone. To check for receptor subtype specificity we used cerebrocortical cells derived from wild type mice and from mice deficient in thyroid hormone receptor subtypes. Receptor subtype specificity was found for Dio3 and Aldh1a1, which were induced by T3 only in cells expressing the T3 receptor alpha 1 subtype. Interactions of T3 with retinoic acid signaling through the control of retinoic acid metabolism are likely to be important during development. T3 had opposing influences on retinoic acid synthesizing enzymes, increasing the expression of Aldh1a1, and decreasing Aldh1a3, while increasing the retinoic acid degrading enzyme Cyp26b1. Dexamethasone increased Klf9 and Aldh1a1 expression. The effects of T3 and dexamethasone on Aldh1a1 were highly synergistic, with mRNA increments of up to 20 fold. The results provide new data on thyroid hormone regulation of gene expression and underscore the importance of thyroid hormone interactions with retinoic acid and glucocorticoids during neural development.

  12. Effects of substitution and high-dose thyroid hormone therapy on deiodination, sulfoconjugation, and tissue thyroid hormone levels in prolonged critically ill rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Debaveye (Yves); B. Ellger (Björn); L. Mebis (Liese); T.J. Visser (Theo); V.M. Darras (Veerle); G. van den Berghe (Greet)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractTo delineate the metabolic fate of thyroid hormone in prolonged critically ill rabbits, we investigated the impact of two dose regimes of thyroid hormone on plasma 3,3′-diiodothyronine (T2) and T4S, deiodinase type 1 (D1) and D3 activity, and tissue iodothyronine levels in liver and kidn

  13. Local activation and inactivation of thyroid hormones: the deiodinase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhrle, J

    1999-05-25

    Tissue-specific activation and inactivation of ligands of nuclear receptors which belong to the steroid retinoid-thyroid hormone superfamily of transcription factors represents an important principle of development- and tissue-specific local modulation of hormone action. Recently, several enzyme families have been identified which act as 'guardians of the gate' of ligand-activated transcription modulation. Three monodeiodinase isoenzymes which are involved in activation the 'prohormone' L-thyroxine (T4), the main secretory product of the thyroid gland, have been identified, characterized, and cloned. Both, type I and type II 5'-deiodinase generate the thyromimetically active hormone 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3) by reductive deiodination of the phenolic ring of T4. Inactivation of T4 and its product T3 occurs by deiodination of iodothyronines at the tyrosyl ring. This reaction is catalyzed both the type III 5-deiodinase and also by the type I enzyme, which has a broader substrate specificity. The three deiodinases appear to constitute a newly discovered family of selenocysteine-containing proteins and the presence of selenocysteine in the protein is critical for enzyme activity. Whereas the selenoenzyme characteristics of the type I and type III deiodinases are definitively established some controversy still exists for the type II 5'-deiodinase in mammals. The mRNA probably encoding the type II 5'-deiodinase subunit is markedly longer than those of the two other deiodinases and its selenocysteine-insertion element is located more than 5 kB downstream of the UGA-codon in the 3'-untranslated region. The three deiodinase isoenzymes show a distinct development- and tissue-specific pattern of expression, operate at individual optimal substrate levels, are differently regulated and modulated by hormones, cytokines, signaling pathways, natural factors, and pharmaceuticals. Whereas circulating T3 mainly originates from hepatic production via the type I 5'-deiodinase, the

  14. The interaction between growth hormone and the thyroid axis in hypopituitary patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Behan, Lucy Ann

    2011-03-01

    Alterations in the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis have been reported following growth hormone (GH) administration in both adults and children with and without growth hormone deficiency. Reductions in serum free thyroxine (T4), increased tri-iodothyronine (T3) with or without a reduction in serum thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion have been reported following GH replacement, but there are wide inconsistencies in the literature about these perturbations. The clinical significance of these changes in thyroid function remains uncertain. Some authors report the changes are transient and revert to normal after a few months or longer. However, in adult hypopituitary patients, GH replacement has been reported to unmask central hypothyroidism biochemically in 36-47% of apparently euthyroid patients, necessitating thyroxine replacement and resulting in an attenuation of the benefit of GH replacement on quality of life in those who became biochemically hypothyroid after GH replacement. The group at highest risk are those with organic pituitary disease or multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies. It is therefore prudent to monitor thyroid function in hypopituitary patients starting GH therapy to identify those who will develop clinical and biochemical features of central hypothyroidism, thus facilitating optimal and timely replacement.

  15. The interaction between growth hormone and the thyroid axis in hypopituitary patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Behan, Lucy Ann

    2012-02-01

    Alterations in the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis have been reported following growth hormone (GH) administration in both adults and children with and without growth hormone deficiency. Reductions in serum free thyroxine (T4), increased tri-iodothyronine (T3) with or without a reduction in serum thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion have been reported following GH replacement, but there are wide inconsistencies in the literature about these perturbations. The clinical significance of these changes in thyroid function remains uncertain. Some authors report the changes are transient and revert to normal after a few months or longer. However, in adult hypopituitary patients, GH replacement has been reported to unmask central hypothyroidism biochemically in 36-47% of apparently euthyroid patients, necessitating thyroxine replacement and resulting in an attenuation of the benefit of GH replacement on quality of life in those who became biochemically hypothyroid after GH replacement. The group at highest risk are those with organic pituitary disease or multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies. It is therefore prudent to monitor thyroid function in hypopituitary patients starting GH therapy to identify those who will develop clinical and biochemical features of central hypothyroidism, thus facilitating optimal and timely replacement.

  16. Deiodinases: the balance of thyroid hormone: type 1 iodothyronine deiodinase in human physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Ana Luiza; Goemann, Iuri Martin; Meyer, Erika L Souza; Wajner, Simone Magagnin

    2011-06-01

    Thyroid hormone is essential for the normal function of virtually all tissues. The iodothyronine deiodinases catalyze the removal of an iodine residue from the pro-hormone thyroxine (T(4)) molecule, thus producing either the active form triiodothyronine (T(3); activation) or inactive metabolites (reverse T(3); inactivation). Type I deiodinase (D1) catalyzes both reactions. Over the last years, several studies have attempted to understand the mechanisms of D1 function, underlying its effects on normal thyroid hormone metabolism and pathological processes. Although peripheral D1-generated T(3) production contributes to a portion of plasma T(3) in euthyroid state, pathologically increased thyroidal D1 activity seems to be the main cause of the elevated T(3) concentrations observed in hyperthyroid patients. On the other hand, D1-deficient mouse models show that, in the absence of D1, inactive and lesser iodothyronines are excreted in feces with the loss of associated iodine, demonstrating the scavenging function for D1 that might be particularly important in an iodine deficiency setting. Polymorphisms in the DIO1 gene have been associated with changes in serum thyroid hormone levels, whereas decreased D1 activity has been reported in the nonthyroid illness syndrome and in several human neoplasias. The current review aims at presenting an updated picture of the recent advances made in the biochemical and molecular properties of D1 as well as its role in human physiology.

  17. Effects of the thyroid hormone derivatives 3-iodothyronamine and thyronamine on rat liver oxidative capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, P.; Napolitano, G.; Di Stefano, L.; Chiellini, G.; Zucchi, R.; Scanlan, T.S.; Di Meo, S.

    2017-01-01

    Thyronamines T0AM and T1AM are naturally occurring decarboxylated thyroid hormone derivatives. Their in vivo administration induces effects opposite to those induced by thyroid hormone, including lowering of body temperature. Since the mitochondrial energy-transduction apparatus is known to be a potential target of thyroid hormone and its derivatives, we investigated the in vitro effects of T0AM and T1AM on the rates of O2 consumption and H2O2 release by rat liver mitochondria. Hypothyroid animals were used because of the low levels of endogenous thyronamines. We found that both compounds are able to reduce mitochondrial O2 consumption and increase H2O2 release. The observed changes could be explained by a partial block, operated by thyronamines, at a site located near the site of action of antimycin A. This hypothesis was confirmed by the observation that thyronamines reduced the activity of Complex III where the site of antimycin action is located. Because thyronamines exerted their effects at concentrations comparable to those found in hepatic tissue, it is conceivable that they can affect in vivo mitochondrial O2 consumption and H2O2 production acting as modulators of thyroid hormone action. PMID:21664427

  18. Early temporal effects of three thyroid hormone synthesis inhibitors in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietge, Joseph E; Butterworth, Brian C; Haselman, Jonathan T; Holcombe, Gary W; Hornung, Michael W; Korte, Joseph J; Kosian, Patricia A; Wolfe, Marilyn; Degitz, Sigmund J

    2010-06-01

    Thyroid axis disruption is an important consideration when evaluating risks associated with chemicals. Bioassay methods that include thyroid-related endpoints have been developed in a variety of species, including amphibians, whose metamorphic development is thyroid hormone (TH)-dependent. Inhibition of TH synthesis in these species leads to developmental delay, and assays designed to capture these effects take several weeks to complete. In an effort to develop a shorter term approach, the early responses of various endpoints were evaluated in Xenopus laevis throughout 8d of exposure to three TH synthesis inhibitors: methimazole (100mg/L), 6-propylthiouracil (6-PTU) (20mg/L), and perchlorate (4 mg/L). Endpoints included thyroid gland histology and cell numbers, circulating TH concentrations, and thyroidal TH and associated iodo-compounds. Thyroidal 3,5-diodo-L-tyrosine (DIT) and thyroxine (T4) were significantly reduced from day 2 onward by all three chemicals, while 3-monoiodo-L-tyrosine (MIT) was significantly reduced by methimazole and perchlorate, but not by 6-PTU. These reductions were the earliest indicators of TH synthesis inhibition. Histological effects were apparent on day 4 and became more exaggerated through day 8. However, reductions in circulating T4 and increases in thyroid gland cell numbers were not apparent until day 6. Reductions of thyroidal MIT, DIT, and T4 and circulating T4 are indicative of inhibitory effects of the chemicals on TH synthesis. Changes in thyroid histology and cell number represent compensatory effects modulated by circulating TSH. These observations establish a basis for the development of short term amphibian-based methods to evaluate thyroid axis effects using a suite of diagnostic endpoints.

  19. Developmental thyroid hormone insufficiency and brain development: A role for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)?*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are essential for normal brain development. Even subclinical hypothyroidism experienced in utero can result in neuropsychological deficits in children despite normal thyroid status at birth. Neurotrophins have been implicated in a host of brain cellular func...

  20. Increased prevalence of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis in Korean patients with papillary thyroid cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Mo Oh

    Full Text Available In recent years, some reports have suggested that papillary thyroid cancers are more frequently associated with lymphocytic thyroiditis or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This study investigated a potential increase in the prevalence of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis among papillary thyroid cancer patients.We used national epidemiological survey data on thyroid cancer patients diagnosed in 1999, 2005, and 2008. A retrospective medical record survey was conducted by representative sampling of a national cancer incidence database. The analysis included 5,378 papillary thyroid cancer patients aged 20-79 years. We calculated the age-standardized prevalence and age-adjusted prevalence ratios using a binomial regression model with a log link for the prevalence of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis among papillary thyroid cancer patients by sex for each year.The prevalence of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis among papillary thyroid cancer patients was 4.0% and 12.8% for men and women in 1999, 6.5% and 24.6% in 2005, and 10.7% and 27.6% in 2008, respectively. Between 1999 and 2008, the age-standardized prevalence of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis increased 4.1-fold in male patients and 2.0-fold in female patients with papillary thyroid cancer. The prevalence of other thyroid diseases, however, did not increase in either gender.Among Korean papillary thyroid cancer patients, the prevalence of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis increased between 1999 and 2008, whereas the prevalence of other thyroid disorders did not change.

  1. Comparison of therapeutic efficacy and clinical parameters between recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone and thyroid hormone withdrawal in high-dose radioiodine treatment with differentiated thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Se Hun; Na, Chang Ju; Kim, Jeong Hun; Han, Yeon Hee; KIm, Hee Kwon; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee; Lim, Seok Tae [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    High-dose radioiodine treatment (HD-RIT) after injection of recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rh-TSH) has become widely used. This study compared the therapeutic efficacy of HD-RIT and clinical parameters between rh-TSH supplement and thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW) after total thyroidectomy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 266 patients (47 male and 219 female; age, 49.0 ± 10.9 years) with differentiated thyroid cancer detected from September 2011 to September 2012. Patients comprised THW (217, 81.6 %) and rh-TSH (49, 18.4 %). Inclusion criteria were: first HD-RIT; any TN stage; absence of distant metastasis. To evaluate the complete ablation of the remnant thyroid tissue or metastasis, we reviewed stimulated serum thyroglobulin (sTg), I-123 whole-body scan (RxWBS) on T4 off-state, and thyroid ultrasonography (US) or [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) 6–8 months after HD-RIT. We defined a complete ablation state when all three of the follow-up conditions were satisfied; <2.0 ng/ml of the sTg, I-123 RxWBS (−), and thyroid US or F-18 FDG PET/CT (−). If one of the three was positive, ablation was considered incomplete. We also compared various clinical biomarkers (body weight, body mass index, liver and kidney function) between THW and rh-TSH groups. The rates of complete ablation were 73.7 % (160/217) for the THW group and 73.5 % (36/49) for the rh-TSH group. There was no significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.970). The follow-up aspartate transaminase (p = 0.001) and alanine transaminase (p = 0.001) were significantly higher in the THW group. The renal function parameters of blood urea nitrogen (p = 0.001) and creatinine (p = 0.005) tended to increase in the THW group. The change of body weight was + Δ0.96 (±1.9) kg for the THW group and was decreased by -Δ1.39 (±1.5) kg for the rh-TSH group. The change

  2. Thyroid hormone signaling: Contribution to neural function, cognition, and relationship to nicotine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Prescott T.; Gould, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is common despite its adverse effects on health, such as cardiovascular disease and stroke. Understanding the mechanisms that contribute to the addictive properties of nicotine makes it possible to target them to prevent the initiation of smoking behavior and/or increase the chance of successful quit attempts. While highly addictive, nicotine is not generally considered to be as reinforcing as other drugs of abuse. There are likely other mechanisms at work that contribute to the addictive liability of nicotine. Nicotine modulates aspects of the endocrine system, including the thyroid, which is critical for normal cognitive functioning. It is possible that nicotine’s effects on thyroid function may alter learning and memory, and this may underlie some of its addictive potential. Here, we review the literature on thyroid function and cognition, with a focus on how nicotine alters thyroid hormone signaling and the potential impact on cognition. Changes in cognition are a major symptom of nicotine addiction. Current anti-smoking therapies have modest success at best. If some of the cognitive effects of nicotine are mediated through the thyroid hormone system, then thyroid hormone agonists may be novel treatments for smoking cessation therapies. The content of this review is important because it clarifies the relationship between smoking and thyroid function, which has been ill-defined in the past. This review is timely because the reduction in smoking rates we have seen in recent decades, due to public awareness campaigns and public smoking bans, has leveled off in recent years. Therefore, novel treatment approaches are needed to help reduce smoking rates further. PMID:26344666

  3. Mice deficient in MCT8 reveal a mechanism regulating thyroid hormone secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cosmo, Caterina; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M; Philp, Nancy J; Weiss, Roy E; Refetoff, Samuel

    2010-09-01

    The mechanism of thyroid hormone (TH) secretion from the thyroid gland into blood is unknown. Humans and mice deficient in monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) have low serum thyroxine (T4) levels that cannot be fully explained by increased deiodination. Here, we have shown that Mct8 is localized at the basolateral membrane of thyrocytes and that the serum TH concentration is reduced in Mct8-KO mice early after being taken off a treatment that almost completely depleted the thyroid gland of TH. Thyroid glands in Mct8-KO mice contained more non-thyroglobulin-associated T4 and triiodothyronine than did those in wild-type mice, independent of deiodination. In addition, depletion of thyroidal TH content was slower during iodine deficiency. After administration of 125I, the rate of both its secretion from the thyroid gland and its appearance in the serum as trichloroacetic acid-precipitable radioactivity was greatly reduced in Mct8-KO mice. Similarly, the secretion of T4 induced by injection of thyrotropin was reduced in Mct8-KO in which endogenous TSH and T4 were suppressed by administration of triiodothyronine. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that Mct8 is involved in the secretion of TH from the thyroid gland and contributes, in part, to the low serum T4 level observed in MCT8-deficient patients.

  4. The menace of endocrine disruptors on thyroid hormone physiology and their impact on intrauterine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastorakos, George; Karoutsou, Eftychia I; Mizamtsidi, Maria; Creatsas, George

    2007-06-01

    The delivery of the appropriate thyroid hormones quantity to target tissues in euthyroidism is the result of unopposed synthesis, transport, metabolism, and excretion of these hormones. Thyroid hormones homeostasis depends on the maintenance of the circulating 'free' thyroid hormone reserves and on the development of a dynamic balance between the 'free' hormones reserves and those of the 'bound' hormones with the transport proteins. Disturbance of this hormone system, which is in constant interaction with other hormone systems, leads to an adaptational counter-response targeting to re-establish a new homeostatic equilibrium. An excessive disturbance is likely to result, however, in hypo- or hyper- thyroid clinical states. Endocrine disruptors are chemical substances forming part of 'natural' contaminating agents found in most ecosystems. There is abundant evidence that several key components of the thyroid hormones homeostasis are susceptible to the action of endocrine disruptors. These chemicals include some chlorinated organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, herbicides, and pharmaceutical agents. Intrauterine exposure to endocrine disruptors that either mimic or antagonize thyroid hormones can produce permanent developmental disorders in the structure and functioning of the brain, leading to behavioral changes. Steroid receptors are important determinants of the consequences of endocrine disruptors. Their interaction with thyroid hormones complicates the effect of endocrine disruptors. The aim of this review is to present the effect of endocrine disruptors on thyroid hormones physiology and their potential impact on intrauterine development.

  5. Dietary Iodine Affected the GSH-Px to Regulate the Thyroid Hormones in Thyroid Gland of Rex Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Feng; Pan, Xiaoqing; Yang, Jie; Li, Sheng; Shao, Le; Zhang, Xia; Liu, Beiyi; Li, Jian

    2017-06-03

    Iodine (I) is an essential trace element that can influence animal health and productivity. In this study, we investigated the effects of dietary iodine on the antioxidant indices of organ (liver and thyroid gland) and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in Rex rabbits. A total of 120 4-month-old Rex rabbits (2235.4 ± 13.04 g BW) were divided into four equal groups, and their diets were supplemented with iodine (0, 0.2, 2, or 4 mg/kg dry matter (DM)). The iodine concentration in basal diet (control group) was 0.36 mg/kg DM. In most of measured parameters, supplemental iodine exerted no significant effect. Growth and slaughter performance and organ weight were not influenced significantly by iodine supplementation. Serum T3 was significantly lower in 2-mg I group than in 0.2 and 4-mg I groups (P  0.05). Conversely, serum catalase (CAT) was significantly reduced (P thyroid, GSH-Px was higher in the 2-mg I group than in the 0.2- and 4-mg I groups (P  0.05). In the thyroid gland, the mRNA expression level of GSH-Px was higher in the 2-mg I group than in the 4-mg I group (P thyroid gland. Thus, on the basis of serum T3 and GSH-Px levels in the thyroid gland, we hypothesized that GSH-Px secretion was increased by adding dietary iodine in the thyroid, which may inhibit the H2O2 generation and further influence the thyroid hormone synthesis.

  6. Studies on the functional relationship between thyroid, adrenal and gonadal hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohei, Atsushi

    2004-02-01

    In order to clarify the functional relationship between thyroid, adrenal and gonadal hormones, hypothyroidism was induced by administration of thiuoracil in adult male and female rats, and the effects of hypothyroidism on the adrenal and the gonadal axes were investigated in the present study. 1. The functional relationship between thyroid and adrenal hormones: Adrenal weights and corticosterone were lowered, whereas the secretion of ACTH, corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) increased in hypothyroid rats compared to euthyroid rats. These results indicate that hypothyroidism causes adrenal dysfunction directly and results in hypersecretion of CRH and AVP from the hypothalamus. 2. The functional relationship between thyroid and gonadal hormones: The pituitary response to LHRH was lowered, whereas the testicular response to hCG was not changed in hypothyroid rats. Hypothyroidism suppressed copulatory behavior in male rats. These results suggest that hypothyroidism probably causes dysfunction in gonadal axis at the hypothalamic-pituitary level in male rats. In adult female rats, hypothyroidism inhibited the follicular development accompanied estradiol secretion, whereas plasma concentrations of progesterone and prolactin (PRL) increased in hypothyroid female rats. Hypothyroidism significantly increased the pituitary content of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) though it did not affect dopamine synthesis. These results suggest that hypothyroidism increases pituitary content of VIP and this increased level of VIP likely affects PRL secretion in a paracrine or autocrine manner. In female rats, inhibition of gonadal function in hypothyroid rats mediated by hyperprolactinemia in addition to hypersecretion of endogenous CRH.

  7. Neither bST nor Growth Hormone Releasing Factor Alter Expression of Thyroid Hormone Receptors in Liver and Mammary Tissues

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    Physiological effects of thyroid hormones are mediated primarily by binding of triiodothyronine, to specific nuclear receptors. It has been hypothesized that organ-specific changes in production of triiodothyronine from its prohormone, thyroxine, target the action of thyroid hormones to the mammary...

  8. A survey on relationships between thyroid hormone levels and clinical findings in dairy calf diarrhea

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    Ali Hajimohammadi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Calf diarrhea is an important disease that occurs in association with the interaction of various infectious agents and calf susceptibility. The economic losses is associated with death loss and treatment costs, reduction of live weight gain, and reduction of productive life span, which may be considerable. Thyroid hormones previously thought mainly in thermoregulation and energy metabolism. Recently, several studies have challenged on their roles in the metabolic response of animals to certain conditions such as nutritional, environmental, or disease state. The aim of the present study was to survey relationships between thyroid hormones in calves with diarrhea in the different clinical features. Holstein calves (50 within 1 day to 2 months old with signs of diarrhea and healthy calves (40 with similar age and sex were selected. Standard clinical examinations and also dehydration degree assessment were carried out on each calf and recorded accordingly. Calves with clinical signs of diarrhea were divided in different groups based on the severity of the clinical findings, fever and degree of dehydration. Blood samples were taken from the jugular vein from all calves into vacutainer tubes for serum collection.T4, fT4, T3 and fT3 concentrations were measured by validated methods. A significant increase in T4, T3 and fT3 in diarrheic calves was observed (P<0.05. Thyroid hormones in calves with severe clinical signs decreased significantly (P<0.001 compared to calves with moderate or mild systemic clinical signs. Thyroid hormones between febrile diarrheic calves compared to afebrile diarrheic calves had no significant changes. Diarrheic calves with severe dehydration compared to diarrheic calves with mild and moderate dehydration had significant decreases in their thyroid hormones (P<0.001.

  9. [Alteration of thyroid hormone secretion after long-term exposure to low doses of endocrine disruptor DDT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaglova, N V; Iaglov, V V

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are exogenous substances that exhibit hormone-like action and consequently disrupt homeostatic action of endogenous hormones. DDT is the most common disruptor. The objective was to evaluate changes in thyroid hormone secretion after long-term exposure to low doses of DDT. The experiment was performed on male Wistar rats. The rats were given DDT at doses of 1.89±0.86 мg/kg/day and 7.77±0.17 мg/kg/day for 6 and 10 weeks. Dose dependent increase of serum total thyroxine, total triiodthyronine, and thyroid peroxidase was revealed after 6 weeks exposure. After 10 weeks free thyroxine secretion was reduced. Such alterations of the thyroid status are typical for iodine deficient goiter. The data obtained indicate that the main mechanism of DDT action includes disruption of thyroxine secretion by thyrocytes, but not inhibition of deiodinase activity and decrease of blood thyroid binding proteins.

  10. Thyroid hormone stimulates hepatic lipid catabolism via activation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Rohit Anthony; You, Seo-Hee; Zhou, Jin; Siddique, Mobin M; Bay, Boon-Huat; Zhu, Xuguang; Privalsky, Martin L; Cheng, Sheue-Yann; Stevens, Robert D; Summers, Scott A; Newgard, Christopher B; Lazar, Mitchell A; Yen, Paul M

    2012-07-01

    For more than a century, thyroid hormones (THs) have been known to exert powerful catabolic effects, leading to weight loss. Although much has been learned about the molecular mechanisms used by TH receptors (TRs) to regulate gene expression, little is known about the mechanisms by which THs increase oxidative metabolism. Here, we report that TH stimulation of fatty acid β-oxidation is coupled with induction of hepatic autophagy to deliver fatty acids to mitochondria in cell culture and in vivo. Furthermore, blockade of autophagy by autophagy-related 5 (ATG5) siRNA markedly decreased TH-mediated fatty acid β-oxidation in cell culture and in vivo. Consistent with this model, autophagy was altered in livers of mice expressing a mutant TR that causes resistance to the actions of TH as well as in mice with mutant nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR). These results demonstrate that THs can regulate lipid homeostasis via autophagy and help to explain how THs increase oxidative metabolism.

  11. Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Receptor Antibodies in Pregnancy: Clinical Relevance

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    Ines Bucci

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Graves’ disease is the most common cause of thyrotoxicosis in women of childbearing age. Approximately 1% of pregnant women been treated before, or are being treated during pregnancy for Graves’ hyperthyroidism. In pregnancy, as in not pregnant state, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH receptor (TSHR antibodies (TRAbs are the pathogenetic hallmark of Graves’ disease. TRAbs are heterogeneous for molecular and functional properties and are subdivided into activating (TSAbs, blocking (TBAbs, or neutral (N-TRAbs depending on their effect on TSHR. The typical clinical features of Graves’ disease (goiter, hyperthyroidism, ophthalmopathy, dermopathy occur when TSAbs predominate. Graves’ disease shows some peculiarities in pregnancy. The TRAbs disturb the maternal as well as the fetal thyroid function given their ability to cross the placental barrier. The pregnancy-related immunosuppression reduces the levels of TRAbs in most cases although they persist in women with active disease as well as in women who received definitive therapy (radioiodine or surgery before pregnancy. Changes of functional properties from stimulating to blocking the TSHR could occur during gestation. Drug therapy is the treatment of choice for hyperthyroidism during gestation. Antithyroid drugs also cross the placenta and therefore decrease both the maternal and the fetal thyroid hormone production. The management of Graves’ disease in pregnancy should be aimed at maintaining euthyroidism in the mother as well as in the fetus. Maternal and fetal thyroid dysfunction (hyperthyroidism as well as hypothyroidism are in fact associated with several morbidities. Monitoring of the maternal thyroid function, TRAbs measurement, and fetal surveillance are the mainstay for the management of Graves’ disease in pregnancy. This review summarizes the biochemical, immunological, and therapeutic aspects of Graves’ disease in pregnancy focusing on the role of the TRAbs in maternal and

  12. The thyroid hormone receptors modulate the skin response to retinoids.

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    Laura García-Serrano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinoids play an important role in skin homeostasis and when administered topically cause skin hyperplasia, abnormal epidermal differentiation and inflammation. Thyroidal status in humans also influences skin morphology and function and we have recently shown that the thyroid hormone receptors (TRs are required for a normal proliferative response to 12-O-tetradecanolyphorbol-13-acetate (TPA in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have compared the epidermal response of mice lacking the thyroid hormone receptor binding isoforms TRα1 and TRβ to retinoids and TPA. Reduced hyperplasia and a decreased number of proliferating cells in the basal layer in response to 9-cis-RA and TPA were found in the epidermis of TR-deficient mice. Nuclear levels of proteins important for cell proliferation were altered, and expression of keratins 5 and 6 was also reduced, concomitantly with the decreased number of epidermal cell layers. In control mice the retinoid (but not TPA induced parakeratosis and diminished expression of keratin 10 and loricrin, markers of early and terminal epidermal differentiation, respectively. This reduction was more accentuated in the TR deficient animals, whereas they did not present parakeratosis. Therefore, TRs modulate both the proliferative response to retinoids and their inhibitory effects on skin differentiation. Reduced proliferation, which was reversed upon thyroxine treatment, was also found in hypothyroid mice, demonstrating that thyroid hormone binding to TRs is required for the normal response to retinoids. In addition, the mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-6 and the chemotactic proteins S1008A and S1008B were significantly elevated in the skin of TR knock-out mice after TPA or 9-cis-RA treatment and immune cell infiltration was also enhanced. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Since retinoids are commonly used for the treatment of skin disorders, these results demonstrating that TRs

  13. Alternative complement pathway and factor B activities in rats with altered blood levels of thyroid hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitencourt, C.S. [Departamento de Análises Clínicas, Toxicológicas e Bromatológicas, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Duarte, C.G.; Azzolini, A.E.C.S.; Assis-Pandochi, A.I. [Departamento de Física e Química, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-03-02

    Evaluating the activity of the complement system under conditions of altered thyroid hormone levels might help elucidate the role of complement in triggering autoimmune processes. Here, we investigated alternative pathway (AP) activity in male Wistar rats (180 ± 10 g) after altering their thyroid hormone levels by treatment with triiodothyronine (T3), propylthiouracil (PTU) or thyroidectomy. T3 and thyroxine (T4) levels were determined by chemiluminescence assays. Hemolytic assays were performed to evaluate the lytic activity of the AP. Factor B activity was evaluated using factor B-deficient serum. An anti-human factor B antibody was used to measure factor B levels in serum by radial immunodiffusion. T3 measurements in thyroidectomized animals or animals treated with PTU demonstrated a significant reduction in hormone levels compared to control. The results showed a reduction in AP lytic activity in rats treated with increasing amounts of T3 (1, 10, or 50 µg). Factor B activity was also decreased in the sera of hyperthyroid rats treated with 1 to 50 µg T3. Additionally, treating rats with 25 µg T3 significantly increased factor B levels in their sera (P < 0.01). In contrast, increased factor B concentration and activity (32%) were observed in hypothyroid rats. We conclude that alterations in thyroid hormone levels affect the activity of the AP and factor B, which may in turn affect the roles of AP and factor B in antibody production.

  14. Alternative complement pathway and factor B activities in rats with altered blood levels of thyroid hormone

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    C.S. Bitencourt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating the activity of the complement system under conditions of altered thyroid hormone levels might help elucidate the role of complement in triggering autoimmune processes. Here, we investigated alternative pathway (AP activity in male Wistar rats (180 ± 10 g after altering their thyroid hormone levels by treatment with triiodothyronine (T3, propylthiouracil (PTU or thyroidectomy. T3 and thyroxine (T4 levels were determined by chemiluminescence assays. Hemolytic assays were performed to evaluate the lytic activity of the AP. Factor B activity was evaluated using factor B-deficient serum. An anti-human factor B antibody was used to measure factor B levels in serum by radial immunodiffusion. T3 measurements in thyroidectomized animals or animals treated with PTU demonstrated a significant reduction in hormone levels compared to control. The results showed a reduction in AP lytic activity in rats treated with increasing amounts of T3 (1, 10, or 50 µg. Factor B activity was also decreased in the sera of hyperthyroid rats treated with 1 to 50 µg T3. Additionally, treating rats with 25 µg T3 significantly increased factor B levels in their sera (P < 0.01. In contrast, increased factor B concentration and activity (32% were observed in hypothyroid rats. We conclude that alterations in thyroid hormone levels affect the activity of the AP and factor B, which may in turn affect the roles of AP and factor B in antibody production.

  15. Mechanisms of crosstalk between endocrine systems: regulation of sex steroid hormone synthesis and action by thyroid hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Guterman, Paula; Navarro-Martín, Laia; Trudeau, Vance L

    2014-07-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are well-known regulators of development and metabolism in vertebrates. There is increasing evidence that THs are also involved in gonadal differentiation and reproductive function. Changes in TH status affect sex ratios in developing fish and frogs and reproduction (e.g., fertility), hormone levels, and gonad morphology in adults of species of different vertebrates. In this review, we have summarized and compared the evidence for cross-talk between the steroid hormone and thyroid axes and present a comparative model. We gave special attention to TH regulation of sex steroid synthesis and action in both the brain and gonad, since these are important for gonad development and brain sexual differentiation and have been studied in many species. We also reviewed research showing that there is a TH system, including receptors and enzymes, in the brains and gonads in developing and adult vertebrates. Our analysis shows that THs influences sex steroid hormone synthesis in vertebrates, ranging from fish to pigs. This concept of crosstalk and conserved hormone interaction has implications for our understanding of the role of THs in reproduction, and how these processes may be dysregulated by environmental endocrine disruptors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Thyroid hormone upregulates zinc-α2-glycoprotein production in the liver but not in adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó, Rafael; Hernández, Cristina; Sáez-López, Cristina; Soldevila, Berta; Puig-Domingo, Manel; Selva, David M

    2014-01-01

    Overproduction of zinc-α2-glycoprotein by adipose tissue is crucial in accounting for the lipolysis occurring in cancer cachexia of certain malignant tumors. The main aim of this study was to explore whether thyroid hormone could enhance zinc-α2-glycoprotein production in adipose tissue. In addition, the regulation of zinc-α2-glycoprotein by thyroid hormone in the liver was investigated. We performed in vitro (HepG2 cells and primary human adipocytes) and in vivo (C57BL6/mice) experiments addressed to examine the effect of thyroid hormone on zinc-α2-glycoprotein production (mRNA and protein levels) in liver and visceral adipose tissue. We also measured the zinc-α2-glycoprotein serum levels in a cohort of patients before and after controlling their hyperthyroidism. Our results showed that thyroid hormone up-regulates zinc-α2-glycoprotein production in HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the zinc-α2-glycoprotein proximal promoter contains functional thyroid hormone receptor binding sites that respond to thyroid hormone treatment in luciferase reporter gene assays in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, zinc-α2-glycoprotein induced lipolysis in HepG2 in a dose-dependent manner. Our in vivo experiments in mice confirmed the up-regulation of zinc-α2-glycoprotein induced by thyroid hormone in the liver, thus leading to a significant increase in zinc-α2-glycoprotein circulating levels. However, thyroid hormone did not regulate zinc-α2-glycoprotein production in either human or mouse adipocytes. Finally, in patients with hyperthyroidism a significant reduction of zinc-α2-glycoprotein serum levels was detected after treatment but was unrelated to body weight changes. We conclude that thyroid hormone up-regulates the production of zinc-α2-glycoprotein in the liver but not in the adipose tissue. The neutral effect of thyroid hormones on zinc-α2-glycoprotein expression in adipose tissue could be the reason why zinc-α2-glycoprotein is not related to weight

  17. Thyroid hormones in chronic heat exposed men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertner, A.; Israeli, R.; Lev, A.; Cassuto, Y.

    1983-03-01

    Previous reports have indicated that thyroid gland activity, is depressed in the heat. Total thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) serum levels in 17 workers of the metal work shop at a plant near the Dead Sea and 8 workers in Beer Sheva, Israel were examined. The metal workshop of the plant near the Dead Sea is part of a large chemical plant. The one in Beer Sheva is part of a large construction company. Maintenance work, as well as metal work projects are performed in both workshops. During the work shifts, the workers of the Dead Sea plant were exposed to temperatures ranging from 30 36°C (May Oct.) and 14 21°C (Dec. Feb). In Beer Sheva the range was 25 32°C (June Sept.) and 10 17°C (Dec. Feb.). Total T4 was measured by competitive protein binding and total T3 by radioimmunoassay in blood drawn before work (0700) in July and January. In summer. T4 was higher and T3 was lower for both groups than in winter. The observed summer T3 decrease may result from depressed extrathyroidal conversion of T4 to T3. We conclude that the regulation of energy metabolism in hot climates may be related to extrathyroidal conversion of T4 to T3.

  18. Thyroid hormone mediates otolith growth and development during flatfish metamorphosis.

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    Schreiber, A M; Wang, X; Tan, Y; Sievers, Q; Sievers, B; Lee, M; Burrall, K

    2010-11-01

    Flatfish begin life as bilaterally symmetrical larvae that swim up-right, then abruptly metamorphose into asymmetrically shaped juveniles with lateralized swimming postures. Flatfish metamorphosis is mediated entirely by thyroid hormone (TH). Changes in flatfish swim posture are thought to be regulated via vestibular remodeling, although the influence of TH on teleost inner ear development remains unclear. This study addresses the role of TH on the development of the three otolith end-organs (sacculus, utricle, and lagena) during southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma) metamorphosis. Compared with pre-metamorphosis, growth rates of the sacculus and utricle otoliths increase dramatically during metamorphosis in a manner that is uncoupled from general somatic growth. Treatment of P. lethostigma larvae with methimazol (a pharmacological inhibitor of endogenous TH production) inhibits growth of the sacculus and utricle, whereas treatment with TH dramatically accelerates their growth. In contrast with the sacculus and utricle otoliths that begin to form and mineralize during embryogenesis, a non-mineralized lagena otolith is first visible 10-12 days after hatching. The lagena grows during pre- and pro-metamorphosis, then abruptly mineralizes during metamorphic climax. Mineralization of the lagena, but not growth, can be induced with TH treatment, whereas treatment with methimazol completely inhibits lagena mineralization without inhibiting its growth. These findings suggest that during southern flounder metamorphosis TH exerts differential effects on growth and development among the three types of otolith.

  19. D2-Thr92Ala, thyroid hormone levels and biochemical hypothyroidism in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procopciuc, Lucia Maria; Caracostea, Gabriela; Hazi, Georgeta; Nemeti, Georgiana; Stamatian, Florin

    2017-02-01

    To identify if there is a relationship between the deiodinase D2-Thr92Ala genetic variant, thyroid hormone levels and biochemical hypothyroidism in preeclampsia. We genotyped 125 women with preeclampsia and 131 normal pregnant women using PCR-RFLP. Serum thyroid hormone levels were determined using ELISA. Our study showed higher TSH and FT4 levels and lower FT3 levels in women with preeclampsia compared to normal pregnant women, with statistical significance for women with mild and severe preeclampsia. The risk to develop pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), mild or severe preeclampsia was increased in carriers of at least one D2-Ala92 allele. TSH and FT4 levels were significantly higher and FT3 levels were significantly lower in preeclamptic women with severe preeclampsia if they carried the D2-Ala92 allele compared to non-carriers. Pregnant women with PIH and mild preeclampsia, carriers of at least one D2-Ala92 allele, delivered at lower gestational age neonates with a lower birth weight compared to non-carriers, but the results were statistically significant only in severe preeclampsia. The D2-Thr92Ala genetic variant is associated with the severity and the obstetric outcome of preeclampsia, and it also influences thyroid hormone levels. The study demonstrates non-thyroidal biochemical hypothyroidism - as a result of deiodination effects due to D2 genotypes.

  20. Effect of laser treatment on thyroid gland hormones in female rabbits

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    N. S. AL-Mustawfi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the effect of laser treatment on thyroid functions and hormones in female rabbits. A total of 18 female rabbits were used in this investigation. Six rabbits were used for examining the thyroid gland location and dissected to be sure that laser therapy will be directed to this gland. Twelve female rabbits were used in this experiment to study the physiological effect of laser therapy (4J/cm2 on normal thyroid function they were divided into two equal groups, six used as control and the others were exposed to laser therapy at the thyroid gland region for three successive days for 5 minutes on each side. Then blood was collected for hormonal assay from ear vein at 1, 6, 12, 18, 24 and 30 days after the last dose of laser treatment. The results revealed a gradual decrease in serum T3 and T4 levels with a concomitant increase in TSH level at the first eighteen days of laser treatment, then normalization of hormones level were take place to be normal after thirty days. More work is needed on this subject to examine the specific role of laser on glands.

  1. Thyroid hormone metabolism in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. Effects of glucose, glucagon, and insulin.

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    Sato, K.; Robbins, J

    1981-01-01

    Primary cultured adult rat hepatocytes were used to study regulation of thyroid hormone deiodination. Control studies showed that these cells survived for at leas 4 d, during which time they actively deiodinated both the phenolic (5'-) and non-phenolic (5-) rings of L-thyroxine (T4),3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine, and 3,3',5'-triiodothyronine. Increasing the substate concentration caused a decrease in fractional iodide release and a corresponding increase in conjugation with sulfate and glucuroni...

  2. Association of Psoriasis Severity with Serum Prolactin, Thyroid Hormones, and Cortisol before and after Treatment

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    Reza M. Robati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prolactin (PRL level is proposed to be associated with the severity of psoriasis although the previous studies reported different results. Objective. To find the association between PRL levels and severity of psoriasis before and after treatment. In addition, we aimed to find a difference in prolactin, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, thyroid hormones (T3 and T4, and cortisol levels between patients with psoriasis and normal controls. Methods. First, the levels of hormones were measured in 30 patients with psoriasis and 30 matched controls. The severity was assessed by psoriasis area and severity index (PASI. Then, patients were treated, and PASI was assessed every week until achieving PASI-75 response. At this time, the hormones were measured again and compared to the baseline. Results. No statistical significant difference was observed in the mean PRL, T3, T4, TSH, and cortisol levels between cases and controls. Comparing to the baseline, a significant decrease in PRL levels and a significant increase in T3 and serum cortisol levels were observed after treatment (P<0.05, while the changes in other hormones were not significant. Conclusion. After treatment, PRL significantly decreased, and T3 and cortisol levels significantly increased. No correlation between hormone levels and improvement of PASI score existed.

  3. Food restriction in young Japanese quails: effects on growth, metabolism, plasma thyroid hormones and mRNA species in the thyroid hormone signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rønning, Bernt; Mortensen, Anne S; Moe, Børge; Chastel, Olivier; Arukwe, Augustine; Bech, Claus

    2009-10-01

    Young birds, in their post-natal growth period, may reduce their growth and metabolism when facing a food shortage. To examine how such responses can be mediated by endocrine-related factors, we exposed Japanese quail chicks to food restriction for either 2 days (age 6-8 days) or 5 days (age 6-11 days). We then measured growth and resting metabolic rate (RMR), and circulating 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3) and 3,5,3',5'-tetraiodothyronine (T4) levels as well as expression patterns of genes involved in growth (insulin-like growth factor-I: IGF-I) and thyroid hormone signalling (thyroid-stimulating hormone-beta: TSHbeta, type II iodothyronine deiodinase: D2, thyroid hormone receptors isoforms: TRalpha and TRbeta). The food-restricted chicks receiving a weight-maintenance diet showed reductions in structural growth and RMR. Plasma levels of both T3 and T4 were reduced in the food-restricted birds, and within the 5 days food-restricted group there was a positive correlation between RMR and T3. IGF-I mRNA showed significantly higher abundance in the liver of ad libitum fed birds at day 8 compared with food-restricted birds. In the brain, TSHbeta mRNA level tended to be lower in food-restricted quails on day 8 compared with controls. Furthermore, TRalpha expression was lower in the brain of food-restricted birds at day 8 compared with birds fed ad libitum. Interestingly, brain D2 mRNA was negatively correlated with plasma T3 levels, tending to increase with the length of food restriction. Overall, our results show that food restriction produced significant effects on circulating thyroid hormones and differentially affected mRNA species in the thyroid hormone signalling pathway. Thus, we conclude that the effects of food restriction observed on growth and metabolism were partly mediated by changes in the endocrine-related factors investigated.

  4. The Relationship between Aggression and Serum Thyroid Hormone Level in Individuals Diagnosed with Antisocial Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrensel, Alper; Ünsalver, Barış Önen; Özşahin, Aytekin

    2016-06-01

    Aggression is one of the leading clinical characteristics of antisocial personality disorder (APD). Studies aiming to clarify and control the biological basis of aggression are ongoing. Thyroid hormones have been indicated to play a role in the development of aggression. The aim of this study was to examine the level of aggression and serum thyroid hormone in a sample of APD and to make contributions to this field with the current findings. The sample consisted of 96 subjects with a diagnosis of APD and 97 subjects as a control group. Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis (SCID) 1 and 2 were used for the diagnosis, and the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire was administered. Based on criminal patterns, the APD group was then divided into two subgroups: "criminal" and "noncriminal" APD groups. The day after the interview, after one night of fasting, blood was collected from the subjects between 7:00 a.m. and 9:00 a.m.. Thyroid function tests and other biochemical analyses related to the confounding variables were also administered. The study group and the control group were compared in terms of their aggression scores and thyroid hormone levels. The mean score of free T3 level in the criminal APD group was found to be significantly higher than that in the noncriminal APD group. APD subjects with higher free T3 levels also had higher aggression scores. In the noncriminal APD group, as serum free T3 and T4 levels increased, there was also an increment in the aggression scores. However, in the criminal APD group, there was no significant correlation between thyroid hormone levels and aggression. The findings of this study indicated that criminal and noncriminal APD groups actually show different properties.

  5. Thyroid hormone and estrogen regulate exercise-induced growth hormone release.

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    Daniele Leão Ignacio

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1 activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60% in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response.

  6. Thyroid hormone and estrogen regulate exercise-induced growth hormone release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S Silvestre, Diego H; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade; Carvalho, Denise P; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response.

  7. Association of High Vitamin D Status with Low Circulating Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Independent of Thyroid Hormone Levels in Middle-Aged and Elderly Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingqing Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A recent study has reported that high circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] is associated with low circulating thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH levels, but only in younger individuals. The goal of the present study was to explore the relationship between vitamin D status and circulating TSH levels with thyroid autoimmunity and thyroid hormone levels taken into consideration in a population-based health survey of middle-aged and elderly individuals. Methods. A total of 1,424 Chinese adults, aged 41–78 years, were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Serum levels of 25(OHD, TSH, thyroid hormones, and thyroid autoantibodies were measured. Results. The prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency was 94.29% in males and 97.22% in females, and the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was 55.61% in males and 69.64% in females. Vitamin D status was not associated with positive thyroid autoantibodies after controlling for age, gender, body mass index, and smoking status. Higher 25(OHD levels were associated with lower TSH levels after controlling for age, FT4 and FT3 levels, thyroid volume, the presence of thyroid nodule(s, and smoking status in males. Conclusion. High vitamin D status in middle-aged and elderly males was associated with low circulating TSH levels independent of thyroid hormone levels.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of cerebral anomalies in subjects with resistance to thyroid hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, C.M. [Univ. of Florida Health Science Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Hauser, P.; Weintraub, B.D. [National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[Baltimore VA Medical Center, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-19

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the human thyroid receptor beta gene on chromosome 3. Individuals with RTH have an increased incidence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The purpose of this study was to search for developmental brain malformations associated with RTH. Forty-three subjects (20 affected males [AM], 23 affected females [AF]) with resistance to thyroid hormone and 32 unaffected first degree relatives (18 unaffected males [UM], 14 unaffected females [UF]) underwent MRI brain scans with a volumetric acquisition that provided 90 contiguous 2 mm thick sagittal images. Films of six contiguous images beginning at a standard sagittal position lateral to the insula were analyzed by an investigator who was blind with respect to subject characteristics. The presence of extra or missing gyri in the parietal bank of the Sylvian fissure (multimodal association cortex) and multiple Heschl`s transverse gyri (primary auditory cortex) were noted. There was a significantly increased frequency of anomalous Sylvian fissures in the left hemisphere in males with RTH (AM: 70%; AF: 30%; UM: 28% UF: 28%). Also, there was an increased frequency of anomalous Sylvian fissures on the left combined with multiple Heschl`s gyri in either hemisphere in males with RTH (AM: 50%; AF: 9%; UM: 6%; UF: 0%). However, RTH subjects with anomalies did not have an increased frequency of ADHD as compared with RTH subjects with no anomalies. Abnormal thyroid hormone action in the male fetus early during brain development may be associated with grossly observable cerebral anomalies of the left hemisphere. The effects of mutations in the thyroid receptor beta gene provide a model system for studying the complex interaction of genetic and non-genetic factors on brain and behavioral development. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Is Very High Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Level Required in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer for Ablation Success?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zekiye Hasbek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Remnant ablation with radioactive iodine (I-131 is a successful form of treatment that aims to destroy the remaining residual tissue and/or metastatic tissue after total thyroidectomy in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC patients. High level of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH (≥30 mIU/L is recommended for success of ablation treatment. In this retrospective study, our aim was to investigate whether the TSH levels at the time of ablation effect the success of radioactive iodine remnant ablation. Methods: Patients who were diagnosed with DTC, treated with bilateral total/near total thyroidectomy and who were referred for I-131 remnant ablation were included in this study. Patients with undetectable TSH-stimulated serum thyroglobulin (Tg level, normal physical examination, negative results on whole body scan with I-131, and no evidence of neck lymph node metastasis on ultrasound were defined as disease-free. The correlation between TSH level at the time of ablation and ablation success was assessed. Results: Two hundred sixty one consecutive patients were included in the present study. Mean TSH level was 19.47±6 mIU/L in the 34 patients with TSH <30 mIU/L, while mean TSH level was 73.65±27 mIU/L in the 227 patients with TSH ≥30 mIU/L during I-131 remnant ablation. Ablation was unsuccessful in only one patient with TSH <30 mIU/L who had lung metastasis. Ablation was unsuccessful in 5.1% of patients with TSH ≥30 mIU/L. The effect of TSH level was not significant on ablation success (p=0.472. Conclusion: In conclusion, we think that a high TSH serum level alone is not a factor for the success of ablation. Age, presence of metastasis, extent of residual thyroid mass should also be considered. Especially, in the presence of metastatic tissue, obtaining adequate increase in TSH level is not always possible. The success of ablation at lower levels of TSH elevations may be sufficient for patients, and long-term hypothyroidism may not

  10. Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma with Ectopic Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Seok Choi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH syndrome is caused most frequently by a bronchial carcinoid tumor or by small cell lung cancer. Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC is a rare etiology of ectopic ACTH syndrome. We describe a case of Cushing syndrome due to ectopic ACTH production from MTC in a 48-year-old male. He was diagnosed with MTC 14 years ago and underwent total thyroidectomy, cervical lymph node dissection and a series of metastasectomies. MTC was confirmed by the pathological examination of the thyroid and metastatic mediastinal lymph node tissues. Two years after his last surgery, he developed Cushingoid features, such as moon face and central obesity, accompanied by uncontrolled hypertension and new-onset diabetes. The laboratory results were compatible with ectopic ACTH syndrome. A bilateral adrenalectomy improved the clinical and laboratory findings that were associated with Cushing syndrome. This is the first confirmed case of ectopic ACTH syndrome caused by MTC in Korea.

  11. Serum Vitamin B12 and thyroid hormone levels in Saudi patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahd A Al-Khamis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the relationship between Vitamin B12 levels and thyroid hormones in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Materials and Methods: One hundred and ten patients with MS were recruited for this study after Institutional Review Board approval. All patients signed a written informed consent form and donated a single blood sample. Plasma Vitamin B12 levels, triiodothyronine (T3, and thyroxine (T4 hormone levels were measured. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS software. Results: Analysis of Vitamin B12 levels in 110 patients with MS revealed that 65% had normal levels of Vitamin B12 (200-900 pg/ml, 30% had low levels of Vitamin B12 (<200 pg/ml, and 5% high levels of Vitamin B12 (higher than 900 pg/ml. Further analysis of patients with low levels of Vitamin B12 revealed that this cohort exhibited a significantly high number of patients with low levels of the thyroid hormones triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4 (P < 0.005. Conclusion: This study suggests a relationship between Vitamin B12 levels and thyroid hormones. This opens the possibility that the use of therapies that increase triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4 levels might be beneficial to patients with MS.

  12. Radioiodine uptake and thyroid hormone levels on or off simultaneous carbimazole medication. A prospective paired comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, M.A.; Mueller-Brand, J. [Inst. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital Basel (Switzerland); Christ-Crain, M.; Mueller, B. [Div. of Endocrinology, Univ. Hospital Basel (Switzerland)

    2005-02-01

    Aim: To allow radioiodine (RAI) treatment in patients with need for anti-thyroid drug medication and low RAI uptakes we investigated the feasibility of discontinuing carbimazole for 3 days to enhance the RAI uptake without concurrent exacerbation of hyperthyroidism. Methods: We prospectively investigated RAI dynamics and thyroid hormone concentration in 12 patients with low RAI uptake (<30%) under simultaneous carbimazole medication and 3 days after discontinuation. At both time points fT{sub 4}, T{sub 3} and TSH were monitored. Results: Discontinuation of carbimazole for 3 days led to a significant increase of RAI uptake in all patients. We found an enhancement up to 4.9-fold compared to the measurement on carbimazole. The mean RAI uptake increased from 15.2{+-}4.4% to 50.1{+-}15.5% (p<0.001). The intrapersonal radioiodine half-life increased from 4.2{+-}1.6 days to 5.4{+-}0.7 days (p=0.13). Mean thyroid hormone concentration was not affected by the three day withdrawal of anti-thyroid drugs and no patient suffered from an aggravation of biochemical hyperthyroidism. Conclusion: A withdrawal of carbimazole for 3 days is long enough to provide sufficiently high RAI uptakes for RAI treatment in patients with low RAI uptakes and short enough to avoid the risk of exacerbation of hyperthyroidism. (orig.)

  13. Effects of PBDE-47 on thyroid and steroid hormone status in juvenile turbot (Schophtalamus maximus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenssen, G.; Tyrhaug, I.B.; Sormo, E.G. [Dept. of Biology, Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Andersen, O.K. [Rogaland Research Akvamiljo, Mekjarvik (Norway)

    2004-09-15

    Many of the brominated flame retardant (BFR) chemicals, and particularly polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), has become of increasing concern to scientists over the past decade. Many of the PBDEs are persistent and lipophilic and have been shown to bioaccumulate. The levels of PBDEs in biota seem to be increasing, and several trends, including in humans, indicate that this increase may be rapid1. In general, BFRs have a low acute toxicity, but there is concern about their long-term toxic effects. Exposure studies have revealed a range of subtle biochemical, cellular and physiological effects following low-dose exposure, and many BFRs have been reported to have endocrine disruptive properties. Thus, there is concern about their potential to affect organisms and populations. Thyroid hormones (THs) play an important role in organism's development, metabolism, growth and behavior. Polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs) including BFRs may affect the thyroid system through several mechanisms. They may directly affect the thyroid gland function, the peripheral metabolism of THs and/or the binding of THs to plasma transport proteins. Effects of PHAHs on TH homeostasis have been documented in a number of species, including fish. Du to its persistence against degradation PBDE-47 is among the most abundant PBDE congener in biota, and there is a great concern about its ecotoxicological effects on organisms and populations. The aim of the present study was to examine if PBDE-47 may affect levels of circulating steroid and thyroid hormones in juvenile turbot (Scophtalamus maximus). The turbot is a benthic living flatfish that can be exposed to PHAHs via the sediment living organisms. Thus, plasma levels of T, E, and the thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) were determined in juvenile turbot that had been continuously exposed to PBDE-47 via water for 3 weeks.

  14. Increased messenger RNA levels of the antagonist thyroid hormone receptor erbA-alpha 2 and decreased levels of erbA-alpha 1 and erbA-beta 1 receptor messenger RNAs in neoplastic rodent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Too, C K; Guernsey, D L

    1992-04-15

    Nothern blot analysis of total RNA from the mouse C3H/10T1/2 cell line indicated that the erbA alpha gene transcribed three mRNA species of similar sizes (2.6, 5.5, 6.6 kilobases) as found in rodents. The 2.6-kilobase mRNA (erbA-alpha 2) was approximately 7- to 8-fold more abundant than either the 5.5- (erbA-alpha 1) or 6.6-kilobase species. The expression of the erbA-alpha 2 transcript increased 3- to 30-fold when "normal" mouse or rat cells were growth arrested by concluence. Triiodothyronine, at a concentration of 1 nM, had no effect on the levels of the erbA-alpha mRNA species in confluent cells nor on the levels of erbA-alpha 2 in proliferative normal or transformed C3H/10T1/2 cells. In log-phase growing cells there was a 2.5- to 5-fold increase in the relative expression of erbA-alpha 2 mRNA in transformed mouse C3H/10T1/2 cells, transformed cloned rat embryo fibroblasts (CREF), transformed rat embryo fibroblasts (REF), and a transformed temperature-sensitive rat mutant cell line (ts7E) when compared with their non-transformed counterparts. In contrast to the elevation of erbA-alpha 2 in transformed cells, erbA-alpha 1 and erbA-beta 1 mRNAs decreased in transformed mouse and rat cell lines. In conclusion, it is suggested that the increased levels of the erbA-alpha 2 transcript and the decreased levels of erbA-alpha 1 and erbA-beta 1 in neoplastic cells may account for the loss of thyroid hormone regulation of inducible pathways and decreased nuclear triiodothyronine binding as previously reported.

  15. Role of Late Maternal Thyroid Hormones in Cerebral Cortex Development: An Experimental Model for Human Prematurity

    OpenAIRE

    Berbel, P.; Navarro, D.; Ausó, E.; Varea, E; Rodríguez, A E; Ballesta, J. J.; Salinas, M; Flores, E; Faura, C. C.; Morreale de Escobar, G

    2009-01-01

    Hypothyroxinemia affects 35–50% of neonates born prematurely (12% of births) and increases their risk of suffering neurodevelopmental alterations. We have developed an animal model to study the role of maternal thyroid hormones (THs) at the end of gestation on offspring's cerebral maturation. Pregnant rats were surgically thyroidectomized at embryonic day (E) 16 and infused with calcitonin and parathormone (late maternal hypothyroidism [LMH] rats). After birth, pups were nursed by normal rats...

  16. Gender-specific regulation of response to thyroid hormone in aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Satoru

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Similar to other systems, the endocrine system is affected by aging. Thyroid hormone, the action of which is affected by many factors, has been shown to be associated with longevity. The most useful marker for the assessment of thyroid hormone action is TSH level. Although age and gender are believed to modify the pituitary set point or response to free thyroid hormone concentration, the precise age- and gender-dependent responses to thyroid hormone have yet to be reported. Methods We analyzed the results of 3564 thyroid function tests obtained from patients who received medication at both out- and inpatient clinics of Shinshu University Hospital. Subjects were from among those with thyroid function test results in the normal or mildly abnormal range. Based on a log-linear relationship between the concentrations of FHs and TSH, we established the putative resistance index to assess the relation between serum FH and TSH levels. Results Free thyroid hormone and TSH concentration showed an inverse log-linear relation. In males, there was a negative relationship between the free T3 resistance index and age. In females, although there were no relationships between age and FHs, the indices were positively related to age. Conclusions These findings indicated that there is a gender-specific response to thyroid hormone with aging. Although the TSH level is a useful marker for the assessment of peripheral thyroid hormone action, the values should be interpreted carefully, especially with regard to age- and gender-related differences.

  17. Thyroid hormone excess and glucose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, G D; Raptis, S A

    2001-01-01

    The elevated plasma glucose levels in hyperthyroidism may be explained by increased rates of endogenous glucose production, due mainly to increased gluconeogenesis. The rates of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in peripheral tissues in hyperthyroidism have been found, in general, either normal or increased. Skeletal muscle is the most important tissue for the disposal of glucose in response to insulin. In this tissue, insulin increases glucose disposal by stimulating glucose transport, glucose phosphorylation/glycolysis, glycogen synthesis and glucose oxidation. Studies examining insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle have suggested that, in the hyperthyroid state, it may be of primary importance to increase the rates of glycolysis and lactate formation relative to glucose oxidation in this tissue in order to provide substrate for gluconeogenesis (increase Cori cycle activity). This effect will be achieved primarily by a decrease in glycogen synthesis and an increase in glycogenolysis. When hyperthyroidism becomes more severe, an increased rate of glucose uptake into muscle may then be necessary since the increased conversion of glycogen to lactate could not be sustained for prolonged periods and might lead to a depletion in glycogen stores. This mechanism would ensure that the level of glucose in plasma is kept normal or slightly increased. Thus, an increased Cori cycle activity may be a necessary mechanism to provide optimal conditions in hyperthyroidism for the control of glucose utilization without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia. In addition to lactate, increased rates of gluconeogenesis in hyperthyroidism can also be sustained by increased plasma concentrations of amino acids (mostly glutamine and alanine) and glycerol, as well as by increased plasma concentrations of free fatty acids.

  18. Profile of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis in Sri Lankans: Is There an Increased Risk of Ancillary Pathologies in Hashimoto's Thyroiditis?

    OpenAIRE

    Eranga Himalee Siriweera; Neelakanthi Vajira Illangakoon Ratnatunga

    2010-01-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis has been reported to be associated with many neoplastic and nonneoplastic thyroid pathologies. This retrospective study aims to determine the demographic profile of Hashimoto's thyroiditis in Sri Lankans, document ancillary pathologies in Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and determine whether there is an increased risk of occurrence of malignancies, benign neoplasms, and nonneoplastic benign lesions in Hashimoto's thyroiditis by comparing with thyroids showing multinodular goi...

  19. Study protocol; Thyroid hormone Replacement for Untreated older adults with Subclinical hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stott, David J.; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Kearney, Patricia M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is a common condition in elderly people, defined as elevated serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) with normal circulating free thyroxine (fT4). Evidence is lacking about the effect of thyroid hormone treatment. We describe the protocol of a large ra...

  20. Human amniotic fluid contaminants alter thyroid hormone signalling and early brain development in Xenopus embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, Jean-Baptiste; Mughal, Bilal B.; Le Mével, Sébastien; Leemans, Michelle; Lettmann, Mélodie; Spirhanzlova, Petra; Affaticati, Pierre; Jenett, Arnim; Demeneix, Barbara A.

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for normal brain development in vertebrates. In humans, abnormal maternal thyroid hormone levels during early pregnancy are associated with decreased offspring IQ and modified brain structure. As numerous environmental chemicals disrupt thyroid hormone signalling, we questioned whether exposure to ubiquitous chemicals affects thyroid hormone responses during early neurogenesis. We established a mixture of 15 common chemicals at concentrations reported in human amniotic fluid. An in vivo larval reporter (GFP) assay served to determine integrated thyroid hormone transcriptional responses. Dose-dependent effects of short-term (72 h) exposure to single chemicals and the mixture were found. qPCR on dissected brains showed significant changes in thyroid hormone-related genes including receptors, deiodinases and neural differentiation markers. Further, exposure to mixture also modified neural proliferation as well as neuron and oligodendrocyte size. Finally, exposed tadpoles showed behavioural responses with dose-dependent reductions in mobility. In conclusion, exposure to a mixture of ubiquitous chemicals at concentrations found in human amniotic fluid affect thyroid hormone-dependent transcription, gene expression, brain development and behaviour in early embryogenesis. As thyroid hormone signalling is strongly conserved across vertebrates the results suggest that ubiquitous chemical mixtures could be exerting adverse effects on foetal human brain development.

  1. Prenatal and Neonatal Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Levels and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Vincent M.; Lutsky, Marta; Yoshida, Cathleen K.; Lasley, Bill; Kharrazi, Martin; Windham, Gayle; Gee, Nancy; Croen, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are critical for normal brain development. This study examined autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels measured in mid-pregnancy maternal serum and infant blood after birth. Three groups of children born in Orange County, CA in 2000-2001 were identified: ASD (n = 78), developmental delay…

  2. Human amniotic fluid contaminants alter thyroid hormone signalling and early brain development in Xenopus embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, Jean-Baptiste; Mughal, Bilal B.; Le Mével, Sébastien; Leemans, Michelle; Lettmann, Mélodie; Spirhanzlova, Petra; Affaticati, Pierre; Jenett, Arnim; Demeneix, Barbara A.

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for normal brain development in vertebrates. In humans, abnormal maternal thyroid hormone levels during early pregnancy are associated with decreased offspring IQ and modified brain structure. As numerous environmental chemicals disrupt thyroid hormone signalling, we questioned whether exposure to ubiquitous chemicals affects thyroid hormone responses during early neurogenesis. We established a mixture of 15 common chemicals at concentrations reported in human amniotic fluid. An in vivo larval reporter (GFP) assay served to determine integrated thyroid hormone transcriptional responses. Dose-dependent effects of short-term (72 h) exposure to single chemicals and the mixture were found. qPCR on dissected brains showed significant changes in thyroid hormone-related genes including receptors, deiodinases and neural differentiation markers. Further, exposure to mixture also modified neural proliferation as well as neuron and oligodendrocyte size. Finally, exposed tadpoles showed behavioural responses with dose-dependent reductions in mobility. In conclusion, exposure to a mixture of ubiquitous chemicals at concentrations found in human amniotic fluid affect thyroid hormone-dependent transcription, gene expression, brain development and behaviour in early embryogenesis. As thyroid hormone signalling is strongly conserved across vertebrates the results suggest that ubiquitous chemical mixtures could be exerting adverse effects on foetal human brain development. PMID:28266608

  3. Prenatal and Neonatal Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Levels and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Vincent M.; Lutsky, Marta; Yoshida, Cathleen K.; Lasley, Bill; Kharrazi, Martin; Windham, Gayle; Gee, Nancy; Croen, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are critical for normal brain development. This study examined autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels measured in mid-pregnancy maternal serum and infant blood after birth. Three groups of children born in Orange County, CA in 2000-2001 were identified: ASD (n = 78), developmental delay…

  4. Iodothyronine Deiodinases: structure-function analysis and their role in the regulation of thyroid hormone levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.W.J.S. Wassen (Frank)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThyroid hormone is important for energy metabolism, the metabolism of nutrients, inorganic ion fluxes and thermogenesis. Thyroid hormone is also essential for stimulation of growth and development of various tissues at critical periods including the central nervous system. Whereas in

  5. The involvement of thyroid hormones and cortisol in the osmotic acclimation of Solea senegalensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arjona, F.J.; Vargas-Chacoff, L.; Rio, M.P. Martin Del; Flik, G.; Mancera, J.M.; Klaren, P.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    The peripheral conversion of the prohormone 3,5,3',5'-tetraiodothyronine (T4) to the biologically active 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3), via enzymatic deiodination by deiodinases, is an important pathway in thyroid hormone metabolism. The aim of this study was to test if thyroid hormones and cortisol,

  6. Beyond low plasma T3: local thyroid hormone metabolism during inflammation and infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Boelen; J. Kwakkel; E. Fliers

    2011-01-01

    Decreased serum thyroid hormone concentrations in severely ill patients were first reported in the 1970s, but the functional meaning of the observed changes in thyroid hormone levels, together known as nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS), remains enigmatic. Although the common view was that NTIS re

  7. T-Screen as a tool to identify thyroid hormone receptor active compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutleb, A.C.; Meerts, I.A.T.M.; Bergsma, J.H.; Schriks, M.; Murk, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The T-Screen represents an in vitro bioassay based on thyroid hormone dependent cell proliferation of a rat pituitary tumour cell line (GH3) in serum-free medium. It can be used to study interference of compounds with thyroid hormone at the cellular level, thus bridging the gap between limitations o

  8. Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether (DE-71)Interferes with Thyroid Hormone Action Independent Of Effects On Circulating Levels of Thyroid Hormone in Male Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are routinely found in human tissues including cord blood and breast milk. PBDEs may interfere with thyroid hormone (TH) during development, which could produce neurobehavioral deficits. An assumption in experimental and epidemiological stud...

  9. Thyroid hormones regulate fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling during chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Joanna C; Williams, Allan J; Rabier, Bénédicte; Chassande, Olivier; Samarut, Jacques; Cheng, Sheue-Yann; Bassett, J H Duncan; Williams, Graham R

    2005-12-01

    Childhood hypothyroidism causes growth arrest with delayed ossification and growth-plate dysgenesis, whereas thyrotoxicosis accelerates ossification and growth. Thyroid hormone (T(3)) regulates chondrocyte proliferation and is essential for hypertrophic differentiation. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are also important regulators of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, and activating mutations of FGF receptor-3 (FGFR3) cause achondroplasia. We investigated the hypothesis that T(3) regulates chondrogenesis via FGFR3 in ATDC5 cells, which undergo a defined program of chondrogenesis. ATDC5 cells expressed two FGFR1, four FGFR2, and one FGFR3 mRNA splice variants throughout chondrogenesis, and expression of each isoform was stimulated by T(3) during the first 6-12 d of culture, when T(3) inhibited proliferation by 50%. FGFR3 expression was also increased in cells treated with T(3) for 21 d, when T(3) induced an earlier onset of hypertrophic differentiation and collagen X expression. FGFR3 expression was reduced in growth plates from T(3) receptor alpha-null mice, which exhibit skeletal hypothyroidism, but was increased in T(3) receptor beta(PV/PV) mice, which display skeletal thyrotoxicosis. These findings indicate that FGFR3 is a T(3)-target gene in chondrocytes. In further experiments, T(3) enhanced FGF2 and FGF18 activation of the MAPK-signaling pathway but inhibited their activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1. FGF9 did not activate MAPK or signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 pathways in the absence or presence of T(3). Thus, T(3) exerted differing effects on FGFR activation during chondrogenesis depending on which FGF ligand stimulated the FGFR and which downstream signaling pathway was activated. These studies identify novel interactions between T(3) and FGFs that regulate chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation during chondrogenesis.

  10. Thyroid-stimulating hormone elevation misdiagnosed as subclinical hypothyroidism following non-convulsive status epilepticus: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunii Yasuto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Non-convulsive status epilepticus is a form of epileptic seizure that occurs without convulsions. Recent reviews suggest that the diagnosis of non-convulsive status epilepticus remains difficult. Here, we report the case of a patient with thyroid-stimulating hormone elevation misdiagnosed as subclinical hypothyroidism following non-convulsive status epilepticus. Case presentation Our patient was a 68-year-old Japanese woman. The results of endocrine testing after her first episode of non-convulsive status epilepticus suggested latent subclinical hypothyroidism: she had elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone with normal levels of free tri-iodothyronine and free thyroxine. On examination, a diagnosis of thyroid disorder was not supported by other test results and our patient remained untreated. A follow-up examination revealed that her thyroid-stimulating hormone levels had spontaneously normalized. When she consulted another doctor for confusion, the transient increase in thyroid-stimulating hormone levels following non-convulsive status epilepticus was mistaken for subclinical hypothyroidism, and unfortunately treated with levothyroxine. Our patient then experienced levothyroxine-induced non-convulsive status epilepticus. Conclusions In this report, we suggested possible mechanisms for latent hypothyroid-like hormone abnormality following epileptic seizures and the possibility of provoking epileptic seizures by administering levothyroxine for misdiagnosed subclinical hypothyroidism.

  11. Relation of Thyroid Hormone Levels with Fluid-Resistant Shock among Preterm Septicemic Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sourabh; Singh, Sarvendra; Bhattacharya, Anish; Venkataseshan, Sundaram; Kumar, Praveen

    2017-02-15

    To compare thyroid hormone levels between septicemic preterm neonates with and without shock. Preterm septicemic infants with shock constituted Group A (n=36) and those without shock constituted Group B, with groups matched (1:1) for gestation and postnatal age. Those with maternal thyroid disorders, thyrotropic medication and life expectancy shock. Thyroid hormone levels do not independently predict presence of shock among septic preterms.

  12. A mechanistic model of effects of dioxin on thyroid hormones in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, M C; Sewall, C H; Lucier, G W; Portier, C J

    1996-01-01

    also predicted responses of UGT mRNA and UGT enzymatic activity comparable to those observed in TCDD-treated rats in experiments whose data were not used in constructing the model. Calculated increases in blood TSH levels are consistent with prolonged stimulation of the thyroid and may represent an early stage in the induction of thyroid tumors identified in previous two-year bioassays. Thus, increases in UGT activity may be useful as a biomarker for tumorigenic changes in hormone levels subsequent to TCDD exposure.

  13. Thyroid hormone and reproduction: regulation of estrogen receptors in goldfish gonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erik R; Allan, Euan R O; Pang, Flora Y; Habibi, Hamid R

    2010-09-01

    There is increasing evidence that thyroid hormones influence reproduction in vertebrates. However, little information is available on the mechanisms by which this happens. As a first step in determining these mechanisms, we test the hypothesis that the estrogen receptor subtypes (ERalpha, ERbeta-1, and ERbeta-2) are regulated by the thyroid hormone, (T(3)), in the gonads of goldfish. All three subtypes were down-regulated by T(3) in the testis or ovary. We also found evidence that T(3) decreased pituitary gonadotropin expression and decreased transcript for gonadal aromatase. Collectively, it appears that T(3) acts to diminish estrogen signaling by (1) decreasing pituitary LH expression and thus steroidogenesis, (2) down-regulating gonadal aromatase expression and thus decreasing estrogen synthesis from androgens, and (3) decreasing sensitivity to estrogen by down-regulating the ER subtypes. Goldfish are seasonal breeders, spawning once a year, and thus have two distinct periods of growth: somatic and reproductive. Circulating thyroid hormone levels have been found to increase just after spawning. Therefore, we propose that this may be an endocrine mechanism that goldfish use to switch their energy expenditure from reproductive to growth efforts in the goldfish. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Rabbits immunized with thyroid-stimulating hormone produce autoantiidiotypic thyroid-stimulating antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, G N; Rapoport, B; Chopra, I J; Kruger, S R

    1985-05-01

    We immunized rabbits with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) to investigate the hypothesis that such immunization could result in production of thyroid-stimulating autoantiidiotypic antibodies to anti-TSH. Thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) appeared in the serum of several rabbits after immunization. At 160 d, TSI equivalent to 6-18 microU TSH/1.5 mg IgG was present in two of six human (h)TSH-, two of six hTSH beta chain-, and two of the four surviving bovine (b)TSH-immunized animals. Control (human serum albumin-immunized rabbits) serum TSI was 4.3 +/- 0.4 (mean +/- SD) at this time. Antiidiotypic antibodies that could bind to monoclonal anti-hTSH were found in the sera of the bTSH-immunized rabbits. The peak TSI activity occurred 3 mo after a TSH booster immunization and declined gradually during subsequent weeks. Evidence that antiidiotypic antibodies to anti-TSH can cause thyroid stimulation strengthens the notion that such antibodies may be the cause of Graves' hyperthyroidism.

  15. Physiological Study on the Relation of Heart Rate Variability in Ageing and Thyroid Hormone Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsayed A. M. Shokr

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate whether cardiac autonomic dysfunction in aging human might be related to an underlying thyroid disturbance. ageing has been associated with hypothyroidism and cardiac autonomic dysfunction. On the basis of body mass index (BMI, 150 patients were grouped into three groups (n = 50 48 years ± 2, 55 years ± 2 and 63 years ± 2. Electrocardiogram was recorded using PowerLab system and the time and frequency domain measures of heart rate variability (HRV were calculated. Fasting blood samples were drawn for measurement of serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, total thyroxin (T4 and total triiodothyronine (T3 concentrations. The levels of TSH, T4 and T3 were not significantly different between the groups. The frequency domain HRV parameter reflecting parasympathetic tone (high-frequency normalized units, HFnu was significantly reduced in aging third groups group. The parameters which reflect sympathetic activation (Heart rate, low-frequency normalized units; LFnu and the LF/HF ratio were significantly increased in the aging group. HFnu was significantly and negatively correlated with age, whereas LFnu and LF/HF ratio were significantly and positively correlated with the above mentioned parameters. No significant relationships were noted between the HRV parameters and the levels of TSH or thyroid hormones. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in aging human is not linked with underlying thyroid disturbance.

  16. Thyroid hormone-dependent development in Xenopus laevis: a sensitive screen of thyroid hormone signaling disruption by municipal wastewater treatment plant effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searcy, Brian T; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M; Beckstrom-Sternberg, James S; Stafford, Phillip; Schwendiman, Angela L; Soto-Pena, Jenifer; Owen, Michael C; Ramirez, Claire; Phillips, Joel; Veldhoen, Nik; Helbing, Caren C; Propper, Catherine R

    2012-05-01

    Because thyroid hormones (THs) are conserved modulators of development and physiology, identification of compounds adversely affecting TH signaling is critical to human and wildlife health. Anurans are an established model for studying disruption of TH signaling because metamorphosis is dependent upon the thyroid system. In order to strengthen this model and identify new gene transcript biomarkers for TH disruption, we performed DNA microarray analysis of Xenopus laevis tadpole tail transcriptomes following treatment with triiodothyronine (T(3)). Comparison of these results with previous studies in frogs and mammals identified 36 gene transcripts that were TH-sensitive across clades. We then tested molecular biomarkers for sensitivity to disruption by exposure to wastewater effluent (WWE). X. laevis tadpoles, exposed to WWE from embryo through metamorphosis, exhibited an increased developmental rate compared to controls. Cultured tadpole tails showed dramatic increases in levels of four TH-sensitive gene transcripts (thyroid hormone receptor β (TRβ), deiodinase type II (DIO2), and corticotropin releasing hormone binding protein (CRHBP), fibroblast activation protein α (FAPα)) when exposed to T(3) and WWE extracts. TRβ, DIO2, and CRHBP were identified as TH sensitive in other studies, while FAPα mRNA transcripts were highly TH sensitive in our array. The results validate the array and demonstrate TH-disrupting activity by WWE. Our findings demonstrate the usefulness of cross-clade analysis for identification of gene transcripts that provide sensitivity to endocrine disruption. Further, the results suggest that development is disrupted by exposure to complex mixes of compounds found in WWE possibly through interference with TH signaling.

  17. Influence of catecholamines, prostaglandins and thyroid hormones on growth hormone secretion by chicken pituitary cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, D J; Perez, F M; Diamante, B S; Malamed, S; Scanes, C G

    1990-01-01

    In young chickens plasma concentrations of growth hormone (GH) are depressed by prostaglandins (PG) E1 and E2, epinephrine, norepinephrine, alpha 2 and beta agonists or thyroid hormones. A primary culture of chicken adenohypophyseal cells was used to examine the direct effects of these agents at the level of the pituitary as evaluated by GH release in the presence and absence of growth hormone releasing factor (GRF). Following collagenase dispersion and culture (preincubation, 48 hr) cells were exposed (incubation, 2 hr) to test agents, except for thyroid hormones which were added during the preincubation, and incubation period. Growth hormone release was increased (P less than .05) in the presence of PGE1 (10(-8)M by 34%; 10(-7)M by 54%), PGE2 (10(-8)M by 29%; 10(-7)M by 29%), PGF2 alpha (10(-8)M by 28%), and the beta agonist isoproterenol (10(-7)M by 46%). Basal GH release from chicken pituitary cells was not affected by dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), or alpha adrenergic agonists. Growth hormone releasing factor stimulated GH release was not affected by the presence of prostaglandins E1, E2 or F2 alpha in the incubation media. However, GRF stimulated GH release was reduced by high doses of catecholamines: dopamine (10(-6)M by 34%), norepinephrine (10(-6)M by 74%), epinephrine (10(-8)M by 47%; 10(-7)M by 41%; 10(-6)M by 89%), and by the alpha 1 adrenergic agonist, phenylephrine (10(-7)M by 52%), the alpha 2 agonist, clonidine (10(-8)M by 34%; 10(-7)M by 83%) and the beta agonist, isoproterenol (10(-7)M by 64%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Gestational urinary bisphenol A and maternal and newborn thyroid hormone concentrations: The HOME Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Megan E., E-mail: megan_romano@brown.edu [Department of Epidemiology, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI (United States); Webster, Glenys M. [Child and Family Research Institute, BC Children' s and Women' s Hospital and Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Vuong, Ann M. [Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Thomas Zoeller, R. [Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Chen, Aimin [Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Hoofnagle, Andrew N. [Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Calafat, Antonia M. [Division of Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States); Karagas, Margaret R. [Children' s Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center and Department of Community and Family Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH (United States); Yolton, Kimberly [Division of General and Community Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lanphear, Bruce P. [Child and Family Research Institute, BC Children' s and Women' s Hospital and Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Braun, Joseph M. [Department of Epidemiology, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor used in consumer products, may perturb thyroid function. Prenatal BPA exposure may have sex-specific effects on thyroid hormones (THs). Our objectives were to investigate whether maternal urinary BPA concentrations during pregnancy were associated with THs in maternal or cord serum, and whether these associations differed by newborn sex or maternal iodine status. We measured urinary BPA concentrations at 16 and 26 weeks gestation among pregnant women in the HOME Study (2003–2006, Cincinnati, Ohio). Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free and total thyroxine (T{sub 4}) and triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) were measured in maternal serum at 16 weeks (n=181) and cord serum at delivery (n=249). Associations between BPA concentrations and maternal or cord serum TH levels were estimated by multivariable linear regression. Mean maternal urinary BPA was not associated with cord THs in all newborns, but a 10-fold increase in mean BPA was associated with lower cord TSH in girls (percent change=−36.0%; 95% confidence interval (CI): −58.4, −1.7%), but not boys (7.8%; 95% CI: −28.5, 62.7%; p-for-effect modification=0.09). We observed no significant associations between 16-week BPA and THs in maternal or cord serum, but 26-week maternal BPA was inversely associated with TSH in girls (−42.9%; 95% CI: −59.9, −18.5%), but not boys (7.6%; 95% CI: −17.3, 40.2%; p-for-effect modification=0.005) at birth. The inverse BPA–TSH relation among girls was stronger, but less precise, among iodine deficient versus sufficient mothers. Prenatal BPA exposure may reduce TSH among newborn girls, particularly when exposure occurs later in gestation. - Highlights: • Examined associations of BPA with thyroid hormones in pregnant women and newborns. • Assessed effect modification of BPA–thyroid hormone associations by newborn sex. • Greater BPA related to decreased thyroid stimulating hormone in girls' cord serum. • Results may

  19. Thyroid hormones changes in infants and children with metabolic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahirović, H F

    1991-10-01

    The influence of the acidotic state on the thyroxine (T4) peripheral metabolism was studied in two different forms of metabolic acidosis, ie infantile diarrhea and diabetic ketoacidosis. The serum concentrations of T4, free T4 (FT4), triiodothyronine (T3), reverse T3 (rT3), thyrotropin (TSH) and thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) were measured and compared to healthy control groups. Lower T4 and T3 and higher rT3 serum concentrations were found in both tested groups of patients in relation to the control groups. In infants with severe metabolic acidosis FT4 values were lower than those observed in the control group. In addition, serum TBG levels were lower in diabetic patients as compared to control subjects. Despite the reduced serum T3 and T4 concentrations in both groups of patients, TSH concentrations, were within the normal range. Therefore, we concluded that acidosis caused either by diarrhea (not so far described) or by diabetes mellitus (well documented up to now) affects the thyroid hormones metabolism in a similar way, at least as far as the thyroid hormones blood levels are concerned.

  20. Thyroid hormone regulation of apoptotic tissue remodeling during anuran metamorphosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Anuran metamorphosis involves systematic transformations of individual organs in a thyroid hormone (TH)-dependent manner. Morphological and cellular studies have shown that the removal of larval or gans/tissues such the tail and the tadpole intestinal epithelium is through programmed cell death or apop tosis. Recent molecular investigations suggest that TH regulates metamorphosis by regulating target gene expression through thyroid hormone receptors (TRs), which are DNA-binding transcription factors. Cloning and characterization of TH response genes show that diverse groups of early response genes are induced by TH. The products of these TH response genes are believed to directly or indirectly affect the expression and/or functions of cell death genes, which are conserved at both sequence and function levels in different animal species. A major challenge for future research lies at determining the signaling pathways leading to the activation of apoptotic processes and whether different death genes are involved in the regulation of apoptosis in different tissues/organs to effect tissue-specific transformations.

  1. Novel insights into thyroid hormones from the study of common genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Colin M; Panicker, Vijay

    2009-04-01

    Effects of thyroid hormones in individual tissues are determined by many factors beyond their serum levels, including local deiodination and expression and activity of thyroid hormone transporters. These effects are difficult to examine by traditional techniques, but a novel approach that exploits the existence of common genetic variants has yielded new and surprising insights. Convincing evidence indicates a role of type 1 iodothyronine deiodinase (D1) in determining the serum T(4):T(3) ratio and a role of phosphodiesterase 8B in determining TSH levels. In addition, studies of type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase (D2) variants have shown that thyroid hormones contribute to osteoarthritis and these variants influence Intelligence quotient alterations associated with iodine deficiency. Preliminary evidence suggests associations between TSH-receptor variants and fasting glucose level, D1 variants and insulin-like growth factor I production, and D2 variants and hypertension, psychological well-being and response to T(3) or T(4) treatment. Intriguingly, most of these associations are independent of serum thyroid hormone levels, which highlights the importance of local regulation of thyroid hormones in tissues. Future research might reveal novel roles for thyroid hormones in obesity, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and depression and could have implications for interpretation of thyroid function tests and individualization of thyroid hormone replacement therapy.

  2. Hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis hormones stimulate mitochondrial function and biogenesis in human hair follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidali, Silvia; Knuever, Jana; Lerchner, Johannes; Giesen, Melanie; Bíró, Tamás; Klinger, Matthias; Kofler, Barbara; Funk, Wolfgang; Poeggeler, Burkhard; Paus, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate mitochondrial function. As other hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis hormones, i.e., thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and thyrotropin (TSH), are expressed in human hair follicles (HFs) and regulate mitochondrial function in human epidermis, we investigated in organ-cultured human scalp HFs whether TRH (30 nM), TSH (10 mU ml(-1)), thyroxine (T4) (100 nM), and triiodothyronine (T3) (100 pM) alter intrafollicular mitochondrial energy metabolism. All HPT-axis members increased gene and protein expression of mitochondrial-encoded subunit 1 of cytochrome c oxidase (MTCO1), a subunit of respiratory chain complex IV, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), and Porin. All hormones also stimulated intrafollicular complex I/IV activity and mitochondrial biogenesis. The TSH effects on MTCO1, TFAM, and porin could be abolished by K1-70, a TSH-receptor antagonist, suggesting a TSH receptor-mediated action. Notably, as measured by calorimetry, T3 and TSH increased follicular heat production, whereas T3/T4 and TRH stimulated ATP production in cultured HF keratinocytes. HPT-axis hormones did not increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Rather, T3 and T4 reduced ROS formation, and all tested HPT-axis hormones increased the transcription of ROS scavengers (catalase, superoxide dismutase 2) in HF keratinocytes. Thus, mitochondrial biology, energy metabolism, and redox state of human HFs are subject to profound (neuro-)endocrine regulation by HPT-axis hormones. The neuroendocrine control of mitochondrial biology in a complex human mini-organ revealed here may be therapeutically exploitable.

  3. Role of Oxidative Stress in Thyroid Hormone-Induced Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy and Associated Cardiac Dysfunction: An Undisclosed Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad T. Elnakish

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hypertrophy is the most documented cardiomyopathy following hyperthyroidism in experimental animals. Thyroid hormone-induced cardiac hypertrophy is described as a relative ventricular hypertrophy that encompasses the whole heart and is linked with contractile abnormalities in both right and left ventricles. The increase in oxidative stress that takes place in experimental hyperthyroidism proposes that reactive oxygen species are key players in the cardiomyopathy frequently reported in this endocrine disorder. The goal of this review is to shed light on the effects of thyroid hormones on the development of oxidative stress in the heart along with the subsequent cellular and molecular changes. In particular, we will review the role of thyroid hormone-induced oxidative stress in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and associated cardiac dysfunction, as well as the potential effectiveness of antioxidant treatments in attenuating these hyperthyroidism-induced abnormalities in experimental animal models.

  4. Role of Oxidative Stress in Thyroid Hormone-Induced Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy and Associated Cardiac Dysfunction: An Undisclosed Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnakish, Mohammad T.; Ahmed, Amany A. E.; Mohler, Peter J.; Janssen, Paul M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is the most documented cardiomyopathy following hyperthyroidism in experimental animals. Thyroid hormone-induced cardiac hypertrophy is described as a relative ventricular hypertrophy that encompasses the whole heart and is linked with contractile abnormalities in both right and left ventricles. The increase in oxidative stress that takes place in experimental hyperthyroidism proposes that reactive oxygen species are key players in the cardiomyopathy frequently reported in this endocrine disorder. The goal of this review is to shed light on the effects of thyroid hormones on the development of oxidative stress in the heart along with the subsequent cellular and molecular changes. In particular, we will review the role of thyroid hormone-induced oxidative stress in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and associated cardiac dysfunction, as well as the potential effectiveness of antioxidant treatments in attenuating these hyperthyroidism-induced abnormalities in experimental animal models. PMID:26146529

  5. Neuroendocrine actions of organohalogens: thyroid hormones, arginine vasopressin, and neuroplasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S; Curras-Collazo, Margarita C

    2010-10-01

    Organohalogen compounds are global environmental pollutants. They are highly persistent, bioaccumulative, and cause adverse effects in humans and wildlife. Because of the widespread use of these organohalogens in household items and consumer products, indoor contamination may be a significant source of human exposure, especially for children. One significant concern with regard to health effects associated with exposure to organohalogens is endocrine disruption. This review focuses on PCBs and PBDEs as old and new organohalogens, respectively, and their effects on two neuroendocrine systems; thyroid hormones and the arginine vasopressin system (AVP). Regarding neuroendocrine effects of organohalogens, there is considerable information on the thyroid system as a target and evidence is now accumulating that the AVP system and associated functions are also susceptible to disruption. AVP-mediated functions such as osmoregulation, cardiovascular function as well as social behavior, sexual function and learning/memory are discussed. For both thyroid and AVP systems, the timing of exposure seems to play a major role in the outcome of adverse effects. The mechanism of organohalogen action is well understood for the thyroid system. In comparison, this aspect is understudied in the AVP system but some similarities in neural processes, shown to be targeted by these pollutants, serve as promising possibilities for study. One challenge in understanding modes of action within neuroendocrine systems is their complexity stemming, in part, from interdependent levels of organization. Further, because of the interplay between neuroendocrine and neural functions and behavior, further investigation into organohalogen-mediated effects is warranted and may yield insights with wider scope. Indeed, the current literature provides scattered evidence regarding the role of organohalogen-induced neuroendocrine disruption in the neuroplasticity related to both learning functions and brain

  6. Thyroid hormone affects the hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids in the rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriuchijima, T; Mizuma, H; Michimata, T; Ogiwara, T; Yamada, M; Murakami, M; Mori, M

    1992-01-06

    We have attempted to elucidate the effect of thyroid hormone on phospholipase C-linked inositol phospholipid hydrolysis in the rat hypothalamus. Hypothalamic slices of each animal, euthyroid control, hypothyroid, and thyroxine (T4)-supplemented hypothyroid rats were labeled with [3H]myoinositol in the presence of 5 mM LiCl, and then incubated for 60 min in KHG buffer containing either vehicle or 1 mM ouabain, a Na-K ATPase inhibitor. Hypothyroidism caused a significant increase in both basal and ouabain-stimulated accumulation of [3H]inositol phosphate ([3H]IP) in hypothalamic slices, whereas supplement with T4 to hypothyroid rats resulted in a complete restoration of hypothalamic [3H]IP formation to the value of euthyroid control. The present results indicate that thyroid hormone affects phospholipase C-linked inositol phospholipid hydrolysis in the hypothalamus, suggesting that negative feedback action of thyroid hormone may occur at a post-receptor site in the hypothalamus.

  7. Thyroid hormone levels and incident chronic kidney disease in euthyroid individuals: the Kangbuk Samsung Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiyi; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Cho, Juhee; Lee, Won-Young; Rhee, Eun-Jung; Kwon, Min-Jung; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto; Rampal, Sanjay; Han, Won Kon; Shin, Hocheol; Guallar, Eliseo

    2014-10-01

    Overt and subclinical hypothyroidism are associated with higher levels of serum creatinine and with increased risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The prospective association between thyroid hormones and kidney function in euthyroid individuals,however, is largely unexplored. We conducted a prospective cohort study in 104 633 South Korean men and women who were free of CKD and proteinuria at baseline and had normal thyroid hormone levels and no history of thyroid disease or cancer. At each annual or biennial follow-up visit, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (FT3) and free thyroxin (FT4) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. The study outcome was incident CKD, defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)<60 ml/min/1.73 m2 based on the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration creatinine equation. After a median follow-up of 3.5 years, 1032 participants developed incident CKD.There was a positive association between high-normal levels of TSH and increased risk of incident CKD. In fully-adjusted models including baseline eGFR, the hazard ratio comparing the highest vs the lowest quintiles of TSH was 1.26 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02 to 1.55; P for linear trend=0.03]. In spline models, FT3 levels below 3 pg/ml were also associated with increased risk of incident CKD. There was no association between FT4 levels and CKD. In a large cohort of euthyroid men and women, high levels of TSH and low levels of FT3, even within the normal range, were modestly associated with an increased risk of incident CKD.

  8. Thyroid hormones differentially affect sarcoplasmic reticulum function in rat atria and ventricles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasik, A; Minajeva, A; Paju, K; Eimre, M; Seppet, E K

    1997-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to compare the effects of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-pump activity, together with assessment of the functional role of SR in providing activator Ca2+ under these altered thyroid states. In response to a shift from hypothyroid to hyperthyroid state, a 10 fold and 2 fold increase in SR Ca(2+)-pump activity in atria and ventricles, respectively, were observed. This was associated with the 8-9 fold increases in atrial contractility (+dT/dt) and relaxation (-dT/dt), but only with a 3-4 fold increase in their ventricular counterparts. Also, the recirculation fraction of activator Ca2+ (RFA) increased to a far greater extent in atria (4 fold) than in papillary muscles, and the relative increment in inhibition of developed tension by ryanodine became 3 times larger in atria than in papillary muscles. A positive force-frequency relationship (FFR) was observed in hypothyroid atria, whereas the hyperthyroid atria, hypothyroid and hyperthyroid papillary muscles showed a negative FFR. These results suggest the greater role of transsarcolemmal (SL) Ca2+ and smaller role of SR Ca2+ in activating contraction in hypothyroid atria compared to other preparations. Thyroid hormones decrease the contribution of SL and increase that of SR in providing activator Ca2+ to the greater extent in atria than in ventricles. This effect of thyroid hormones is based on larger stimulation of SR Ca(2+)-pump in atria compared to ventricles.

  9. Chemistry and Biology in the Biosynthesis and Action of Thyroid Hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Santanu; Raja, Karuppusamy; Schweizer, Ulrich; Mugesh, Govindasamy

    2016-06-27

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are secreted by the thyroid gland. They control lipid, carbohydrate, and protein metabolism, heart rate, neural development, as well as cardiovascular, renal, and brain functions. The thyroid gland mainly produces l-thyroxine (T4) as a prohormone, and 5'-deiodination of T4 by iodothyronine deiodinases generates the nuclear receptor binding hormone T3. In this Review, we discuss the basic aspects of the chemistry and biology as well as recent advances in the biosynthesis of THs in the thyroid gland, plasma transport, and internalization of THs in their target organs, in addition to the deiodination and various other enzyme-mediated metabolic pathways of THs. We also discuss thyroid hormone receptors and their mechanism of action to regulate gene expression, as well as various thyroid-related disorders and the available treatments. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. The controversy of the treatment of critically ill patients with thyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathatos, N; Levetan, C; Burman, K D; Wartofsky, L

    2001-12-01

    There is currently a vast literature available on the changes in thyroid function tests that occur during non-thyroidal illness. The aetiology of these changes is, however, controversial, especially with respect to whether they play an adaptive role for the organism in order to cope with stress or whether they represent primary pathology of the pituitary-thyroid axis. This is particularly true for critically ill patients, in whom the most significant changes in thyroid function are observed. The changes include low levels of thyroxine and very low levels of tri-iodothyronine, which would, on the surface, appear to indicate hypothyroidism. Therapy with thyroid hormone, as either L-T4 or L-T3, has therefore been suggested because of these low values for thyroid hormones in the blood. It is, however, unclear whether treating these patients with thyroid hormone is beneficial or harmful. Multiple studies have addressed this issue with patients with cardiac disease, sepsis, pulmonary disease (e.g. acute respiratory distress syndrome) or severe infection, or with burn and trauma patients. In spite of a very large number of published studies, it is very difficult to form clear recommendations for treatment with thyroid hormone in the intensive care unit. Instead, we find the evidence far from compelling, and would advise withholding thyroid hormone therapy in the critical care setting in the absence of clear clinical or laboratory evidence for hypothyroidism.

  11. Modulation of lipocalin-type prostaglandin D2 synthase expression in catfish seminal vesicles by thyroid disrupting agents and hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasulu, Gunti; Pavani, Ayinampudi; Sudhakumari, Cheni-Chery; Dutta-Gupta, Aparna; Senthilkumaran, Balasubramanian

    2013-11-01

    Thyroid hormones play crucial role in several biological processes including reproduction. Disruption of normal thyroid status by environmental contaminants can cause severe impairment in reproductive functions. In our previous study, we reported down-regulation of a protein in seminal vesicular fluid of air-breathing catfish, Clarias gariepinus during experimentally induced hyperthyroidism. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis followed by search in sequence database denoted it to be lipocalin-type prostaglandin D2 synthase (ptgds-b). In the present study, we cloned full-length cDNA of ptgds-b based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence. Surprisingly, Northern blot as well as RT-PCR analysis demonstrated the presence of ptgds-b transcript predominantly in seminal vesicles and developing testis. Further, ptgds-b mRNA significantly decreased in seminal vesicles following L-thyroxine overdose while there was an increased expression of ptgds-b after depletion of thyroid hormone by thiourea and withdrawal of the treatments reverted this effect. Treatment of catfish with human chorionic gonadotropin and estradiol significantly reduced ptgds-b expression. Taken together, we report ptgds-b as a thyroid hormone regulated protein in the seminal vesicles in addition to gonadotropin and estradiol. Further studies might explain the exclusive presence of ptgds-b in seminal vesicles and developing testis yet present data evaluated it as a putative biomarker for thyroid hormone disruption.

  12. Inhibition of the thyroid hormone pathway in Xenopus laevis by 2-mercaptobenzothiazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietge, Joseph E., E-mail: tietge.joe@epa.gov [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd, Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); Degitz, Sigmund J., E-mail: degitz.sigmund@epa.gov [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd, Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); Haselman, Jonathan T., E-mail: haselman.jon@epa.gov [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd, Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); Butterworth, Brian C., E-mail: butterworth.brian@epa.gov [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd, Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); Korte, Joseph J., E-mail: korte.joe@epa.gov [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd, Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); Kosian, Patricia A., E-mail: kosian.pat@epa.gov [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd, Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); Lindberg-Livingston, Annelie J., E-mail: lind1020@d.umn.edu [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd, Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); and others

    2013-01-15

    Determining the effects of chemicals on the thyroid system is an important aspect of evaluating chemical safety from an endocrine disrupter perspective. Since there are numerous chemicals to test and limited resources, prioritizing chemicals for subsequent in vivo testing is critical. 2-Mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT), a high production volume chemical, was tested and shown to inhibit thyroid peroxidase (TPO) enzyme activity in vitro, a key enzyme necessary for the synthesis of thyroid hormone. To determine the thyroid disrupting activity of MBT in vivo, Xenopus laevis larvae were exposed using 7- and 21-day protocols. The 7-day protocol used 18-357 {mu}g/L MBT concentrations and evaluated: metamorphic development, thyroid histology, circulating T4, circulating thyroid stimulating hormone, thyroidal sodium-iodide symporter gene expression, and thyroidal T4, T3, and related iodo-amino acids. The 21-day protocol used 23-435 {mu}g/L MBT concentrations and evaluated metamorphic development and thyroid histology. Both protocols demonstrated that MBT is a thyroid disrupting chemical at the lowest concentrations tested. These studies complement the in vitro study used to identify MBT as a high priority for in vivo testing, supporting the utility/predictive potential of a tiered approach to testing chemicals for TPO activity inhibition. The 7-day study, with more comprehensive, sensitive, and diagnostic endpoints, provides information at intermediate biological levels that enables linking various endpoints in a robust and integrated pathway for thyroid hormone disruption associated with TPO inhibition.

  13. Effects of domoic acid on serum levels of TSH and thyroid hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arufe, M C; Arias, B; Durán, R; Alfonso, M

    1995-08-01

    The actions of Domoic Acid (Dom), a marine toxin, on the levels of serum TSH and thyroid hormones (T4 and T3) has been studied to determine if these actions could be mediated by the serotoninergic system. In all the experiments, adult male Wistar rats were used. The Dom dissolved in saline was administered via i.p. in doses of 0.5 and 1 mg/kg. The T4 and T3 concentrations were determined by enzimoinmunoassay and TSH concentration was determined by radioinmunoassay. The results show that Dom 1 mg/kg increases the serum T4 levels one hour after treatment and decreases these levels 2 and 3 hr after treatment. Dom 0.5 mg/kg decreased the serum T4 levels 2 and 3 hr after treatment. The concentrations of T3 in serum were unchanged by both doses of Dom. The concentration of TSH was increased by Dom. In order to study the possible mediation of the serotoninergic system in the effect of Dom on the hormone levels, PCPA, a tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor, was administered i.p. 90 min before blood sampling. In this case, with both doses of Dom a decrease in the levels of both hormones occurred with respect to the PCPA group. These results indicate that the serotoninergic system could affect the actions of Dom on TSH and thyroid hormone secretion.

  14. Crosstalk between integrin αvβ3 and estrogen receptor-α is involved in thyroid hormone-induced proliferation in human lung carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Meng

    Full Text Available A cell surface receptor for thyroid hormone that activates extracellular regulated kinase (ERK 1/2 has been identified on integrin αvβ3. We have examined the actions of thyroid hormone initiated at the integrin on human NCI-H522 non-small cell lung carcinoma and NCI-H510A small cell lung cancer cells. At a physiologic total hormone concentration (10(-7 M, T(4 significantly increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA abundance in these cell lines, as did 3, 5, 3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T(3 at a supraphysiologic concentration. Neutralizing antibody to integrin αvβ3 and an integrin-binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD peptide blocked thyroid hormone-induced PCNA expression. Tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac lacks thyroid hormone function but inhibits binding of T(4 and T(3 to the integrin receptor; tetrac eliminated thyroid hormone-induced lung cancer cell proliferation and ERK1/2 activation. In these estrogen receptor-α (ERα-positive lung cancer cells, thyroid hormone (T(4>T(3 caused phosphorylation of ERα; the specific ERα antagonist ICI 182,780 blocked T(4-induced, but not T(3-induced ERK1/2 activation, as well as ERα phosphorylation, proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA expression and hormone-dependent thymidine uptake by tumor cells. Thus, in ERα-positive human lung cancer cells, the proliferative action of thyroid hormone initiated at the plasma membrane is at least in part mediated by ERα. In summary, thyroid hormone may be one of several endogenous factors capable of supporting proliferation of lung cancer cells. Activity as an inhibitor of lung cancer cell proliferation induced at the integrin receptor makes tetrac a novel anti-proliferative agent.

  15. Thyroid hormone concentrations in captive and free-ranging West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, R M; MacKenzie, D S; Worthy, G A

    2000-12-01

    Because thyroid hormones play a critical role in the regulation of metabolism, the low metabolic rates reported for manatees suggest that thyroid hormone concentrations in these animals may also be reduced. However, thyroid hormone concentrations have yet to be examined in manatees. The effects of captivity, diet and water salinity on plasma total triiodothyronine (tT(3)), total thyroxine (tT(4)) and free thyroxine (fT(4)) concentrations were assessed in adult West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus). Free-ranging manatees exhibited significantly greater tT(4) and fT(4) concentrations than captive adults, regardless of diet, indicating that some aspect of a captive existence results in reduced T(4) concentrations. To determine whether this reduction might be related to feeding, captive adults fed on a mixed vegetable diet were switched to a strictly sea grass diet, resulting in decreased food consumption and a decrease in body mass. However, tT(4) and fT(4) concentrations were significantly elevated over initial values for 19 days. This may indicate that during periods of reduced food consumption manatees activate thyroid-hormone-promoted lipolysis to meet water and energetic requirements. Alterations in water salinity for captive animals did not induce significant changes in thyroid hormone concentrations. In spite of lower metabolic rates, thyroid hormone concentrations in captive manatees were comparable with those for other terrestrial and marine mammals, suggesting that the low metabolic rate in manatees is not attributable to reduced circulating thyroid hormone concentrations.

  16. The targeted inactivation of TRβ gene in thyroid follicular cells suggests a new mechanism of regulation of thyroid hormone production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi-Ruby, Samia; Bouazza, Lamia; Obregon, Maria-Jesus; Conscience, Aude; Flamant, Frédéric; Samarut, Jacques; Borson-Chazot, Françoise; Rousset, Bernard

    2014-02-01

    Thyroid epithelial cells, or thyrocytes, express functional thyroid hormone receptors but no precise role has yet been assigned to either TRα or TRβ in the thyroid gland. In this study, we analyzed the impact of inactivating the TRβ gene in the thyroid of mice. First, we generated a mouse line named Thyr-Cre, expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of the thyroglobulin gene promoter, which led to a complete recombination of floxed genes in thyrocytes. Thyr-Cre mice were then crossed with TRβ floxed mice (TRβ(flox/flox)) to obtain a thyrocyte-selective deletion of TRβ. Thyr-TRβ(-/-) mice were characterized by a decrease in the size and functional activity of the thyroid gland. These alterations were associated with a decrease in plasma TSH concentration. Surprisingly, Thyr-TRβ(-/-) displayed elevated serum T(4) and rT(3) concentrations with no significant change in serum T(3) levels. Their intrathyroidal free T(4) and rT(3) contents were also elevated, whereas the ratio of serum T(4) to thyroid free T(4) was decreased by comparison with wild-type littermates. Also, within the thyroid, deiodinases D1 and D2 were reduced as well as the expression levels of genes encoding monocarboxylate transporters (Mct8 and Mct10). Such a decrease in intrathyroidal deiodination of T(4) and in the expression of genes encoding thyroid hormone transporters may contribute to the primary overproduction of T(4) observed in Thyr-TRβ(-/-) mice. In conclusion, these data show that the control of thyroid hormone production involves not only TRβ-dependent mechanisms acting at the level of hypothalamus and pituitary but also TRβ-dependent mechanisms acting at the thyroid level.

  17. Thyroid hormone treatment among pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism: US national assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraka, Spyridoula; Mwangi, Raphael; McCoy, Rozalina G; Yao, Xiaoxi; Sangaralingham, Lindsey R; Singh Ospina, Naykky M; O'Keeffe, Derek T; De Ycaza, Ana E Espinosa; Rodriguez-Gutierrez, Rene; Coddington, Charles C; Stan, Marius N; Brito, Juan P; Montori, Victor M

    2017-01-25

     To estimate the effectiveness and safety of thyroid hormone treatment among pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism.  Retrospective cohort study.  Large US administrative database between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2014.  5405 pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism, defined as untreated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration 2.5-10 mIU/L.  Thyroid hormone therapy.  Pregnancy loss and other pre-specified maternal and fetal pregnancy related adverse outcomes.  Among 5405 pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism, 843 with a mean pre-treatment TSH concentration of 4.8 (SD 1.7) mIU/L were treated with thyroid hormone and 4562 with a mean baseline TSH concentration of 3.3 (SD 0.9) mIU/L were not treated (Pwomen (n=89; 10.6%) than among untreated women (n=614; 13.5%) (Pwomen had lower adjusted odds of pregnancy loss (odds ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.48 to 0.82) but higher odds of preterm delivery (1.60, 1.14 to 2.24), gestational diabetes (1.37, 1.05 to 1.79), and pre-eclampsia (1.61, 1.10 to 2.37); other pregnancy related adverse outcomes were similar between the two groups. The adjusted odds of pregnancy loss were lower in treated women than in untreated women if their pre-treatment TSH concentration was 4.1-10 mIU/L (odds ratio 0.45, 0.30 to 0.65) but not if it was 2.5-4.0 mIU/L (0.91, 0.65 to 1.23) (Pwomen with subclinical hypothyroidism, especially those with pre-treatment TSH concentrations of 4.1-10 mIU/L. However, the increased risk of other pregnancy related adverse outcomes calls for additional studies evaluating the safety of thyroid hormone treatment in this patient population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Carbamazepine (Tegretol) inhibits in vivo iodide uptake and hormone synthesis in rat thyroid glands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, S.M.; Alexander, N.M.

    1987-01-01

    Decreased serum concentrations of T3 and T4 occur in patients treated with the anticonvulsant drug carbamazepine (CBZ), but with rare exception, these patients remain euthyroid. The mechanism that accounts for diminished hormone levels is unknown, and our objective was to study the direct effect of CBZ on iodide uptake and hormone synthesis in thyroid glands of CBZ-treated and pair-fed control rats. Chronic ingestion (per os) of CBZ in male rats reduced the four hour thyroid 131I-iodide uptake by approximately 60%. This inhibition occurred after the animals had received sufficient CBZ to attain plasma CBZ concentrations of 0.8 microgram/ml. Continued treatment with CBZ ranging from 560 to 800 mg/kg/day for 14 days did not result in further inhibition of iodide uptake even though the plasma CBZ concentrations had increased 6-20 fold. No inhibition of iodide uptake was apparent when the animals initially received CBZ ranging from 40 to 152 mg/kg body weight for 22 days when there were no detectable levels of plasma CBZ. Overall growth rates of CBZ-treated rats were slightly (6-10%) less than the pair-fed control animals. Plasma T4 concentrations were reduced by 18% (p less than 0.05) in the CBZ-fed animals, while T3 concentrations were diminished by 53% (p less than 0.01). CBZ appeared to alter thyroidal iodide transport because the thyroid:plasma iodide ratios were decreased by 26% in the drug-treated rats. The distribution of radioiodine in thyroidal iodoamino acids was essentially the same in both groups of rats but the absolute quantities of radioiodine were more than 2.5 times greater in the control rats. CBZ failed to inhibit peroxidase-catalyzed iodide and guaiacol oxidation in vitro.

  19. [Biological markers reflecting peripheral effects of thyroid hormones in autonomous thyroid adenoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Földes, J; Németh, J; Bános, C; Tarján, G; Büki, B

    1991-09-08

    In some patients with functioning thyroid autonomous nodules preclinical hyperthyroidism is detected. It is important to know, whether in this intermediate clinical state beside the suppression of pituitary TSH secretion other target organs are also affected by serum free-thyroxine and free-triiodothyronine levels still within the normal range. Determining some sensitive, but not specific biologic markers reflecting the impact of thyroid hormones at the peripheral tissue level, it was demonstrated that in the group of preclinical hyperthyroidism the mean level of plasma fibronectin exceeded that of the controls (mean +/- S. D.: 583.5 +/- 163.9 vs. 424.2 +/- 84.1 micrograms/ml, p less than 0.001), serum procollagen-III-peptide concentration was already significantly raised, though its value was still within the normal range (mean +/- S. D.: 0.73 +/- 0.17 vs. 0.57 +/- 0.16 U/ml, p less than 0.05), conversely, mean sex-hormone binding globulin level was the same as in euthyroid controls (mean +/- S. D. 47.4 +/- 18.2 vs. 48.3 +/- 16.3 nmol/l). The value of all three parameters was significantly elevated in patients with toxic nodular goiter. Based on the results of this study "tissue"-thyrotoxicosis is suspected in some patients with preclinical hyperthyroidism, which may have therapeutical implications.

  20. Notes on the history of cellular uptake and deiodination of thyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennemann, Georg

    2005-08-01

    In this mini review on the history of the research devoted to thyroid hormone metabolism two pathways are discussed, i.e. uptake and subsequent deiodination in cells and tissues. In the 1950's the investigations of these processes were greatly stimulated when 131I became available for research purposes. The true nature of both mechanisms surfaced in the 1970's when it became apparent that transport of thyroid hormones into cells was a regulated carrier mediated process, while deiodination appeared to be catalyzed by different types of enzymes. Kinetic data indicated that these processes were of great importance in the ultimate regulation of thyroid hormone bio-availability.

  1. High normal thyroid-stimulating hormone is associated with arterial stiffness in healthy postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrinoudaki, Irene; Armeni, Eleni; Rizos, Demetrios; Georgiopoulos, Georgios; Kazani, Maria; Alexandrou, Andreas; Deligeoroglou, Efthymios; Livada, Alexandra; Psychas, Charalampos; Creatsa, Maria; Bouboulis, George; Alevizaki, Maria; Stamatelopoulos, Kimon

    2012-03-01

    Apart from the effects of a dysfunctional thyroid gland on the cardiovascular system, thyroid function within the reference range may have an impact on the vasculature. The present study aimed to evaluate the association between thyroid function and markers of arterial structure and function in euthyroid postmenopausal women. The present cross-sectional study recruited 106 healthy postmenopausal women with a mean age of 55.0 years and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels within the laboratory reference range (0.4-4.5 μIU/ml). Anthropometric and biochemical measures as well as blood pressure were determined in each individual. Vascular structure and function were assessed by intima-media thickness, pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index and flow-mediated dilation, respectively. We evaluated the associations between arterial markers and serum TSH, free triiodothyronine, free thyroxin, as well as serum thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin autoantibodies. Mean levels of PWV increased linearly across increasing TSH quartiles (P value = 0.014). Individuals with serum TSH greater than 2.5 μIU/ml had significantly higher values of PWV when compared with individuals with TSH levels below 2.5 μIU/ml (9.68 ± 1.97 vs. 8.54 ± 1.83 m/s; P = 0.030). In multivariate analysis, age, insulin resistance and TSH above 2.5 μIU/ml were the only significant predictors of PWV (TSH, β-coefficient = 0.222; P = 0.014). No associations were found between the remaining markers and levels of thyroid hormones, whereas thyroid antibodies were not associated with any of the arterial markers. Women with TSH levels in the upper reference range have increased arterial stiffness compared to women with lower TSH. The upper limit of normal TSH in postmenopausal women may need re-evaluation with respect to the effects on the vasculature.

  2. Impact of Endocrine Disruptors on the Thyroid Hormone System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutleb, Arno C; Cambier, Sébastien; Serchi, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormone (TH) system plays a central role in central physiological processes of many species, including mammals and humans, ranging from growth and cell differentiation, energy metabolism, thermoregulation and phasing of hibernation or annual movements of migratory species, metamorphosis from larvae to adult forms, brain development, reproduction, or the cardiovascular system. Several chemicals are known to be TH-disrupting compounds (THDCs) and have been shown to interact with virtually all elements of TH homeostasis such as feedback mechanisms with the hypothalamus-pituitary axis, TH synthesis, TH storage and release from the thyroid gland, transport protein binding and TH distribution in tissues and organs, cellular TH uptake, intracellular TH metabolism, and TH receptor binding. Therefore, chemicals interfering with the TH homeostasis have the potential to interact with many of these important processes, and especially early-life stage exposure results in permanent alterations of tissue organization and homeostatic regulation of adaptive processes. This is not only of theoretical importance as the reported plasma concentrations of THDCs in human plasma fall well within the range of reported in vitro effect concentrations, and this is of even higher importance as the developing fetus and young children are in a sensitive developmental stage. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. The synthetic thyroid hormone, levothyroxine, protects cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus of naturally aged mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ailing Fu; Rumei Zhou; Xingran Xu

    2014-01-01

    The thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine and thyroxine, play important roles in cognitive func-tion during the mammalian lifespan. However, thyroid hormones have not yet been used as a therapeutic agent for normal age-related cognitive deficits. In this study, CD-1 mice (aged 24 months) were intraperitoneally injected with levothyroxine (L-T4;1.6μg/kg per day) for 3 consecutive months. Our findings revealed a significant improvement in hippocampal cyto-skeletal rearrangement of actin and an increase in serum hormone levels of L-T4-treated aged mice. Furthermore, the survival rate of these mice was dramatically increased from 60%to 93.3%. The Morris water maze task indicated that L-T4 restored impaired spatial memory in aged mice. Furthermore, level of choline acetyltransferase, acetylcholine, and superoxide dismutase were in-creased in these mice, thus suggesting that a possible mechanism by which L-T4 reversed cognitive impairment was caused by increased activity of these markers. Overall, supplement of low-dosage L-T4 may be a potential therapeutic strategy for normal age-related cognitive deifcits.

  4. Menstrual and reproductive factors, exogenous hormone use, and risk of thyroid carcinoma in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Geoffrey C; Kim, Mimi Y; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Lane, Dorothy; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Rohan, Thomas E

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the association of reproductive factors and hormone therapy, including type of hormone therapy, with risk of thyroid cancer in postmenopausal women. We assessed these associations with risk of incident thyroid cancer in a cohort of 145,007 postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative. Over 12.7 years of follow-up, 296 cases of thyroid cancer were identified, including 243 with papillary thyroid cancer. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios and 95 % confidence intervals for exposures of interest. In both age-adjusted and multivariable-adjusted analyses, menstrual and reproductive factors including age at menarche, age at menopause, age at first birth, age at last live birth, parity, duration of breastfeeding, miscarriages, stillbirths, hysterectomy, bilateral oophorectomy, and use of oral contraceptives were not associated with risk of all thyroid cancer or papillary thyroid cancer. In addition, ever use of menopausal hormone therapy, current or former use, duration of use, and type were not associated with risk. We found little support for associations of reproductive or hormonal factors with risk of developing thyroid cancer. Importantly, our study showed no association of type of hormone therapy used with thyroid cancer risk.

  5. Thyroid hormone exerts negative feedback on hypothalamic type 4 melanocortin receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decherf, Stéphanie; Seugnet, Isabelle; Kouidhi, Soumaya; Lopez-Juarez, Alejandra; Clerget-Froidevaux, Marie-Stéphanie; Demeneix, Barbara A

    2010-03-01

    The type 4 melanocortin receptor MC4R, a key relay in leptin signaling, links central energy control to peripheral reserve status. MC4R activation in different brain areas reduces food intake and increases energy expenditure. Mice lacking Mc4r are obese. Mc4r is expressed by hypothalamic paraventricular Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) neurons and increases energy usage through activation of Trh and production of the thyroid hormone tri-iodothyronine (T(3)). These facts led us to test the hypothesis that energy homeostasis should require negative feedback by T(3) on Mc4r expression. Quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization showed hyperthyroidism reduces Mc4r mRNA levels in the paraventricular nucleus. Comparative in silico analysis of Mc4r regulatory regions revealed two evolutionarily conserved potential negative thyroid hormone-response elements (nTREs). In vivo ChIP assays on mouse hypothalamus demonstrated association of thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) with a region spanning one nTRE. Further, in vivo gene reporter assays revealed dose-dependent T(3) repression of transcription from the Mc4r promoter in mouse hypothalamus, in parallel with T(3)-dependent Trh repression. Mutagenesis of the nTREs in the Mc4r promoter demonstrated direct regulation by T(3), consolidating the ChIP results. In vivo shRNA knockdown, TR over-expression approaches and use of mutant mice lacking specific TRs showed that both TRalpha and TRbeta contribute to Mc4r regulation. T(3) repression of Mc4r transcription ensures that the energy-saving effects of T(3) feedback on Trh are not overridden by MC4R activation of Trh. Thus parallel repression by T(3) on hypothalamic Mc4r and Trh contributes to energy homeostasis.

  6. Thyroid hormone is required for growth adaptation to pressure load in the ovine fetal heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segar, Jeffrey L; Volk, Ken A; Lipman, Michael H B; Scholz, Thomas D

    2013-03-01

    Thyroid hormone exerts broad effects on the adult heart, but little is known regarding the role of thyroid hormone in the regulation of cardiac growth early in development and in response to pathophysiological conditions. To address this issue, we determined the effects of fetal thyroidectomy on cardiac growth and growth-related gene expression in control and pulmonary-artery-banded fetal sheep. Fetal thyroidectomy (THX) and/or placement of a restrictive pulmonary artery band (PAB) were performed at 126 ± 1 days of gestation (term, 145 days). Four groups of animals [n = 5-6 in each group; (i) control; (ii) fetal THX; (iii) fetal PAB; and (iv) fetal PAB + THX] were monitored for 1 week prior to being killed. Fetal heart rate was significantly lower in the two THX groups compared with the non-THX groups, while mean arterial blood pressure was similar among groups. Combined left and right ventricle free wall + septum weight, expressed per kilogram of fetal weight, was significantly increased in PAB (6.27 ± 0.85 g kg(-1)) compared with control animals (4.72 ± 0.12 g kg(-1)). Thyroidectomy significantly attenuated the increase in cardiac mass associated with PAB (4.94 ± 0.13 g kg(-1)), while THX alone had no detectable effect on heart mass (4.95 ± 0.27 g kg(-1)). The percentage of binucleated cardiomyocytes was significantly decreased in THX and PAB +THX groups (∼16%) compared with the non-THX groups (∼27%). No differences in levels of activated Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase or c-Jun N-terminal kinase were detected among the groups. Markers of cellular proliferation but not apoptosis or expression of growth-related genes were lower in the THX and THX+ PAB groups relative to thyroid-intact animals. These findings suggest that in the late-gestation fetal heart, thyroid hormone has important cellular growth functions in both physiological and pathophysiological states. Specifically, thyroid hormone is required for adaptive fetal cardiac growth in

  7. The role of thyroid hormones in regulating of fatty acid spectrum of brain lipids: ontogenetic aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodynskiy A.G.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In experiments on rats of three age groups the role of thyroid hormones in the regulation of fatty acid spectrum of cortical and hippocampus lipids was studied. It was found that on the background of decreased thyroid status content of polyunsaturated fractions of free fatty acids, significantly changed depending on the age of the animals. In particular, in juvenile rats hypothyroidism was accompanied by a decrease almost twice the number of pentacodan acid decreased lipids viscosity in neurocortex. In old rats reduce of pentacodan acid in the cortex (38% was supplemented by significant (77% decrease in linoleic and linolenic acids. Unlike the two age groups deficiency of thyroid hormones in young animals caused accumulation of free polyunsatarated fatty acids (C18: 2.3 in the cerebral cortex by 74%, which may be associated with a decrease of this fraction in fatty acid spectrum of lipids and increase of viscosity properties of the membranes. These restruc­turing may be associated with modulation of synaptic transmission of specific neurotransmitter systems in the brain.

  8. Thyroid hormone and vitamin D regulate VGF expression and promoter activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jo E; Brameld, John M; Hill, Phil; Wilson, Dana; Barrett, Perry; Ebling, Francis J P; Jethwa, Preeti H

    2016-01-01

    The Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus) survives winter by decreasing food intake and catabolizing abdominal fat reserves, resulting in a sustained, profound loss of body weight. Hypothalamic tanycytes are pivotal for this process. In these cells, short-winter photoperiods upregulate deiodinase 3, an enzyme that regulates thyroid hormone availability, and downregulate genes encoding components of retinoic acid (RA) uptake and signaling. The aim of the current studies was to identify mechanisms by which seasonal changes in thyroid hormone and RA signaling from tanycytes might ultimately regulate appetite and energy expenditure. proVGF is one of the most abundant peptides in the mammalian brain, and studies have suggested a role for VGF-derived peptides in the photoperiodic regulation of body weight in the Siberian hamster. In silico studies identified possible thyroid and vitamin D response elements in the VGF promoter. Using the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line, we demonstrate that RA increases endogenous VGF expression (PSiberian hamsters. Thus, we conclude that VGF expression is a likely target of photoperiod-induced changes in tanycyte-derived signals and is potentially a regulator of seasonal changes in appetite and energy expenditure. PMID:26643910

  9. Essential role of UCP1 modulating the central effects of thyroid hormones on energy balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Crespo, Mayte; Csikasz, Robert I.; Martínez-Sánchez, Noelia; Diéguez, Carlos; Cannon, Barbara; Nedergaard, Jan; López, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Classically, metabolic effects of thyroid hormones (THs) have been considered to be peripherally mediated, i.e. different tissues in the body respond directly to thyroid hormones with an increased metabolism. An alternative view is that the metabolic effects are centrally regulated. We have examined here the degree to which prolonged, centrally infused triiodothyronine (T3) could in itself induce total body metabolic effects and the degree to which brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis was essential for such effects, by examining uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) KO mice. Methods Wildtype and UPC1 KO mice were centrally-treated with T3 by using minipumps. Metabolic measurements were analyzed by indirect calorimetry and expression analysis by RT-PCR or western blot. BAT morphology and histology were studied by immunohistochemistry. Results We found that central T3-treatment led to reduced levels of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and elevated body temperature (0.7 °C). UCP1 was essential for the T3-induced increased rate of energy expenditure, which was only observable at thermoneutrality and notably only during the active phase, for the increased body weight loss, for the increased hypothalamic levels of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and for the increased food intake induced by central T3-treatment. Prolonged central T3-treatment also led to recruitment of BAT and britening/beiging (“browning”) of inguinal white adipose tissue (iWAT). Conclusions We conclude that UCP1 is essential for mediation of the central effects of thyroid hormones on energy balance, and we suggest that similar UCP1-dependent effects may underlie central energy balance effects of other agents. PMID:27069867

  10. Effect of metformin on thyroid stimulating hormone and thyroid volume in patients with prediabetes: A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimifar, Mozhgan; Aminorroaya, Ashraf; Amini, Masoud; Mirfendereski, Taghi; Iraj, Bijan; Feizi, Awat; Norozi, Atsa

    2014-01-01

    Background: The people with prediabetes have insulin resistance (IR). IR may affect thyroid function, size and nodules. We investigated the effects of metformin on the thyroid gland in prediabetic people. Materials and Methods: In a randomized, double-blind placebo-control clinical trial, 89 people with prediabetes, aged 18-65 years were studied for 3 months. They were divided into two, metformin (n = 43) and placebo (n = 46) treated groups. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was measured and thyroid nodules and volume was studied by ultrasonography. The data were compared between and within groups, before and after the study. Results: Mean of the baseline characteristics in metformin and placebo-treated groups had no statistically significant difference. At the end of the study, serum TSH was not significantly different between the two groups. However, if the TSH range was divided into two low normal (0.3-2.5 μU/ml) and high-normal (2.6-5.5 μU/ml) ranges, significant decrease was observed in metformin-treated group with a high-normal basal serum TSH (P = 0.01). Thyroid volume did not change in metformin-treated group. However, in placebo-treated group, the thyroid was enlarged (P = 0.03). In 53.9% of participants, thyroid nodule was observed. There was just a decrease in the volume of small solid (not mixed) nodules from median of 0.07 ml to 0.04 ml in metformin-treated group (P = 0.01). Conclusion: In prediabetic people, metformin decreases serum TSH, only, in those people with TSH >2.5 μU/ml and reduces the size of small solid thyroid nodules. It also prevents an increase in the thyroid volume. PMID:25657744

  11. Effect of metformin on thyroid stimulating hormone and thyroid volume in patients with prediabetes: A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Karimifar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The people with prediabetes have insulin resistance (IR. IR may affect thyroid function, size and nodules. We investigated the effects of metformin on the thyroid gland in prediabetic people. Materials and Methods: In a randomized, double-blind placebo-control clinical trial, 89 people with prediabetes, aged 18-65 years were studied for 3 months. They were divided into two, metformin (n = 43 and placebo (n = 46 treated groups. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH was measured and thyroid nodules and volume was studied by ultrasonography. The data were compared between and within groups, before and after the study. Results: Mean of the baseline characteristics in metformin and placebo-treated groups had no statistically significant difference. At the end of the study, serum TSH was not significantly different between the two groups. However, if the TSH range was divided into two low normal (0.3-2.5 μU/ml and high-normal (2.6-5.5 μU/ml ranges, significant decrease was observed in metformin-treated group with a high-normal basal serum TSH (P = 0.01. Thyroid volume did not change in metformin-treated group. However, in placebo-treated group, the thyroid was enlarged (P = 0.03. In 53.9% of participants, thyroid nodule was observed. There was just a decrease in the volume of small solid (not mixed nodules from median of 0.07 ml to 0.04 ml in metformin-treated group (P = 0.01. Conclusion: In prediabetic people, metformin decreases serum TSH, only, in those people with TSH >2.5 μU/ml and reduces the size of small solid thyroid nodules. It also prevents an increase in the thyroid volume.

  12. Comparison Between the Effects of the Alcholic Extract of Mellissia Officinalis and Atorvastatin on Serum Levels of Thyroid Hormones in Hypercholesterolemic Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Zarei

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Consumption of unsaturated fats reduces the serum level of lipids and leptin. Thyroid hormones and leptin play pivotal roles in metabolism and their amounts are inter-related. This study was done to compare the effects of Mellissia officinalis extract and atorvastatin on the serum levels of thyroid hormones in hypercholesterolemia rats.Materials and Methods: Consumption of unsaturated fats reduces the serum level of lipids and leptin. Thyroid hormones and leptin play pivotal roles in metabolism and their amounts are inter-related. This study was done to compare the effects of Mellissia officinalis extract and atorvastatin on the serum levels of thyroid hormones in hypercholesterolemia rats.Results: The results showed that in experimental groups receiving the plant extract and atorvastatin, the concentration of thyroid hormones increased, whereas the amount of the thyroid-stimulating hormone showed a significant decrease (p<0.05.Conclusion: Mellissia officinalis extract decreases TSH but it increases T3 and T4. Further studies are required for applying this extract to the treatment of hyperthyroidism.

  13. Thyroid Hormone Regulates the mRNA Expression of Small Heterodimer Partner through Liver Receptor Homolog-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwa Young Ahn

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundExpression of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1 is negatively regulated by orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP. In this study, we aimed to find whether thyroid hormone regulates SHP expression by modulating the transcriptional activities of liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1.MethodsWe injected thyroid hormone (triiodothyronine, T3 to C57BL/6J wild type. RNA was isolated from mouse liver and used for microarray analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Human hepatoma cell and primary hepatocytes from mouse liver were used to confirm the effect of T3 in vitro. Promoter assay and electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA were also performed using human hepatoma cell lineResultsInitial microarray results indicated that SHP expression is markedly decreased in livers of T3 treated mice. We confirmed that T3 repressed SHP expression in the liver of mice as well as in mouse primary hepatocytes and human hepatoma cells by real-time PCR analysis. LRH-1 increased the promoter activity of SHP; however, this increased activity was markedly decreased after thyroid hormone receptor β/retinoid X receptor α/T3 administration. EMSA revealed that T3 inhibits specific LRH-1 DNA binding.ConclusionWe found that thyroid hormone regulates the expression of SHP mRNA through interference with the transcription factor, LRH-1.

  14. Iodotyrosine deiodinase, a novel target of environmental halogenated chemicals for disruption of the thyroid hormone system in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Many synthetic chemicals have been identified as environmental contaminants with activity to disrupt normal function of the thyroid hormone system. Thyroid hormones play important roles in growth, development, differentiation, and basal metabolic homeostasis, as well as in brain development in human fetus and children, and thyroid dysfunction can have very serious consequences, including mental retardation. Environmental chemicals may affect thyroid hormone action in multiple ways, including reduced thyroid hormone synthesis owing to direct toxicity at the thyroid gland, interaction with thyroid hormone receptors and transporters such as transthyretin, and disturbance of thyroid hormone metabolism (e.g., glucuronidation, sulfation and deiodination). In addition, iodotyrosine deiodinase, which is involved in iodide salvage by catalyzing deiodination of iodinated by-products of thyroid hormone production, was recently identified as a possible new target for disruption of thyroid hormone homeostasis by environmental halogenated chemicals. This topic, after briefly summarizing findings on the thyroid hormone-disrupting action of environmental chemicals in mammals, focuses on the effects of environmental halogenated chemicals on iodotyrosine deiodinase activity.

  15. Soy isoflavones interfere with thyroid hormone homeostasis in orchidectomized middle-aged rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Šošić-Jurjević, Branka, E-mail: brankasj@ibiss.bg.ac.rs [Institute for Biological Research, Siniša Stanković, University of Belgrade, Despot Stefan Blvd. 142, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Filipović, Branko [Institute for Biological Research, Siniša Stanković, University of Belgrade, Despot Stefan Blvd. 142, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Wirth, Eva Katrin [Institut für Experimentelle Endokrinologie, Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany); Živanović, Jasmina [Institute for Biological Research, Siniša Stanković, University of Belgrade, Despot Stefan Blvd. 142, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Radulović, Niko [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, University of Niš, Višegradska 33, 18000 Niš (Serbia); Janković, Snežana [Institute for Science Application in Agriculture, University of Belgrade, Despot Stefan Blvd. 68b, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Milošević, Verica [Institute for Biological Research, Siniša Stanković, University of Belgrade, Despot Stefan Blvd. 142, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Köhrle, Josef [Institut für Experimentelle Endokrinologie, Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    We previously reported that genistein (G) and daidzein (D) administered subcutaneously (10 mg/kg) induce changes in the angio-follicular units of the thyroid gland, reduce concentration of total thyroid hormones (TH) and increase thyrotropin (TSH) in serum of orchidectomized middle-aged (16-month-old) rats. To further investigate these effects, we now examined expression levels of the thyroglobulin (Tg), thyroperoxidase (Tpo), vascular endothelial growth factor A (Vegfa) and deiodinase type 1 (Dio 1) genes in the thyroid; in the pituitary, genes involved in TH feedback control (Tsh β, Dio 1, Dio 2, Trh receptor); and in the liver and kidney, expression of T{sub 3}-activated genes Dio 1 and Spot 14, as well as transthyretin (Ttr), by quantitative real-time PCR. We also analyzed TPO-immunopositivity and immunofluorescence of T{sub 4} bound to Tg, determined thyroid T{sub 4} levels and measured deiodinase enzyme activities in examined organs. Decreased expression of Tg and Tpo genes (p < 0.05) correlated with immunohistochemical staining results, and together with decreased serum total T{sub 4} levels, indicates decreased Tg and TH synthesis following treatments with both isoflavones. However, expression of Spot 14 (p < 0.05) gene in liver and kidney was up-regulated, and liver Dio 1 expression and activity (p < 0.05) increased. At the level of pituitary, no significant change in gene expression levels, or Dio 1 and 2 enzyme activities was observed. In conclusion, both G and D impaired Tg and TH synthesis, but at the same time increased tissue availability of TH in peripheral tissues of Orx middle-aged rats. - Highlights: • We tested how genistein and daidzein interfere with thyroid hormone homeostasis. • Thyroid: decreased expression of Tg and TPO genes correlated with IHC results. • Serum: total T{sub 4} reduced and TSH increased. • Liver and kidney: expression of Spot 14 and liver Dio 1 activity increased. • Pituitary: expression of T{sub 3}-regulated

  16. An evo-devo approach to thyroid hormones in cerebral and cerebellar cortical development: etiological implications for autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbel, Pere; Navarro, Daniela; Román, Gustavo C

    2014-01-01

    The morphological alterations of cortical lamination observed in mouse models of developmental hypothyroidism prompted the recognition that these experimental changes resembled the brain lesions of children with autism; this led to recent studies showing that maternal thyroid hormone deficiency increases fourfold the risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), offering for the first time the possibility of prevention of some forms of ASD. For ethical reasons, the role of thyroid hormones on brain development is currently studied using animal models, usually mice and rats. Although mammals have in common many basic developmental principles regulating brain development, as well as fundamental basic mechanisms that are controlled by similar metabolic pathway activated genes, there are also important differences. For instance, the rodent cerebral cortex is basically a primary cortex, whereas the primary sensory areas in humans account for a very small surface in the cerebral cortex when compared to the associative and frontal areas that are more extensive. Associative and frontal areas in humans are involved in many neurological disorders, including ASD, attention deficit-hyperactive disorder, and dyslexia, among others. Therefore, an evo-devo approach to neocortical evolution among species is fundamental to understand not only the role of thyroid hormones and environmental thyroid disruptors on evolution, development, and organization of the cerebral cortex in mammals but also their role in neurological diseases associated to thyroid dysfunction.

  17. An evo-devo approach to thyroid hormones in cerebral and cerebellar cortical development: Etiological implications for autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere eBerbel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The morphological alterations of cortical lamination observed in mouse models of developmental hypothyroidism prompted the recognition that these experimental changes resembled the brain lesions of children with autism; this led to recent studies showing that maternal thyroid hormone deficiency increases fourfold the risk of ASD, offering for the first time the possibility of prevention of some forms of autism spectrum disorders (ASD. For ethical reasons, the role of thyroid hormones on brain development is currently studied using animal models, usually mice and rats. Although mammals have in common many basic developmental principles regulating brain development, as well as fundamental basic mechanisms that are controlled by similar metabolic pathway activated genes, there are also important differences. For instance, the rodent cerebral cortex is basically a primary cortex, whereas the primary sensory areas in humans account for a very small surface in the cerebral cortex when compared to the associative and frontal areas that are more extensive. Associative and frontal areas in humans are involved in many neurological disorders, including ASD, attention deficit-hyperactive disorder (ADHD and dyslexia, among others. Therefore, an evo-devo approach to neocortical evolution among species is fundamental to understand not only the role of thyroid hormones and environmental thyroid disruptors on evolution, development and organization of the cerebral cortex in mammals, but also their role in neurological diseases associated to thyroid dysfunction.

  18. Relationships of Thyroid Hormones with Polychlorinated Biphenyls, Dioxins, Furans, and DDE in Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Turyk, Mary E.; Anderson, Henry A.; Persky, Victoria W.

    2007-01-01

    Background Thyroid hormone homeostasis can be disrupted by exposure to ubiquitous and bioaccumulative organochlorines such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs). Whereas investigations of health effects have generally focused on human populations with relatively high exposures through occupation, accident, or high fish consumption, general population exposures may also carry risk. Methods We studied associations of total thyroxine (T4) and thyroid-s...

  19. Essential role of UCP1 modulating the central effects of thyroid hormones on energy balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayte Alvarez-Crespo

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: We conclude that UCP1 is essential for mediation of the central effects of thyroid hormones on energy balance, and we suggest that similar UCP1-dependent effects may underlie central energy balance effects of other agents.

  20. Effects of a Model Inducer, Phenobarbital, on Thyroid Hormone Glucuronidation in Rat Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    In vivo, hepatic enzyme inducers such as phenobarbital (PB) decrease circulating thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations. This decrease in circulating TH occurs in part through extrathyroidal mechanisms. Specifically, through the induction of hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes...

  1. Mechanism-based testing strategy using in vitro approaches for identification of thyroid hormone disrupting chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murk, A.J.; Rijntjes, E.; Blaauboer, B.J.; Clewell, R.; Crofton, K.M.; Dingemans, M.M.L.; Furlow, J.D.; Kavlock, R.; Kohrle, J.; Opitz, R.; Traas, T.; Visser, T.J.; Xia, M.; Gutleb, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    The thyroid hormone (TH) system is involved in several important physiological processes, including regulation of energy metabolism, growth and differentiation, development and maintenance of brain function, thermo-regulation, osmo-regulation, and axis of regulation of other endocrine systems,

  2. Studies on the Functional Relationship between Thyroid, Adrenal and Gonadal Hormones

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    TOHEI, Atsushi

    2004-01-01

    In order to clarify the functional relationship between thyroid, adrenal and gonadal hormones, hypothyroidism was induced by administration of thiuoracil in adult male and female rats, and the effects...

  3. THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY DURING BRAIN DEVELOPMENT REDUCES PARVALBUMIN IMMUNOREACTIVITY AND INHIBITORY FUNCTION IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA must evaluate the risk of exposure of the developing brain to chemicals with the potential to disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis. The existing literature identifies morphological and neurochemical indices of severe neonatal hypothyroidism in the early postnatal period i...

  4. [The disturbances of the thyroid hormone homeostasis caused by chemical substances occurring in natural environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiałka, Marta; Doroszewska, Katarzyna; Mrozińska, Sandra; Milewicz, Tomasz; Stochmal, Ewa; Krzysiek, Józef

    2014-01-01

    The thyroid is an endocrine gland synthesizing, storaging and secreting thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). Currently, there are more and more reports and evidences that various chemical contaminants present in the environment, mainly polychlorinated biphenyls, interfere with stages of regulation, synthesis, secretion, transport of thyroid hormones. That can have a significant negative impact on the human body's endocrine homeostasis.

  5. Analysis of thyroid hormones in gland and serum using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormones (THs), which are critical for growth and development in all vertebrates, can be impacted through chemical perturbation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT)-axis. Amphibian and mammalian models are being used to address this research priority within US EPA...

  6. The relationship between perchlorate in drinking water and cord blood thyroid hormones: First experience from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Javidi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the controversial information regarding the effects of perchlorate on thyroid function of high risk population as neonates, and given the high prevalence rate of thyroid disorders specially congenital hypothyroidism in our region, this study aims to investigate for the first time in Iran, the relationship between drinking groundwater perchlorate and cord blood thyroid hormones level in an industrial region. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, drinking groundwater perchlorate level of rural areas of Zarinshahr, Isfahan was measured. Simultaneously, cord blood level of thyroid hormones of neonates born in the studied region was measured. Thyroid function test of neonates in regions with low and high perchlorate level were compared. Results: In this study, 25 tap water samples were obtained for perchlorate measurement. Level of cord blood thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, T4 and T3 of 25 neonates were measured. Mean (standard deviation of perchlorate, TSH, T4 and T3 was 3.59 (5.10 μg/l, 7.81 (4.14 mIU/m, 6.06 (0.85 mg/dl, and 63.46 (17.53 mg/dl, respectively. Mean levels of thyroid function tests were not different in low ( 0.05. Conclusions: Perchlorate did not appear to be related to thyroid function of neonates in the studied industrial region. It seems that iodine status of the regions, as well as other environmental contaminants and genetic background, could impact on its relation with thyroid function of neonates.

  7. De novo triiodothyronine formation from thyrocytes activated by thyroid-stimulating hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citterio, Cintia E; Veluswamy, Balaji; Morgan, Sarah J; Galton, Valerie A; Banga, J Paul; Atkins, Stephen; Morishita, Yoshiaki; Neumann, Susanne; Latif, Rauf; Gershengorn, Marvin C; Smith, Terry J; Arvan, Peter

    2017-09-15

    The thyroid gland secretes primarily tetraiodothyronine (T4), and some triiodothyronine (T3). Under normal physiological circumstances, only one-fifth of circulating T3 is directly released by the thyroid, but in states of hyperactivation of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptors (TSHRs), patients develop a syndrome of relative T3 toxicosis. Thyroidal T4 production results from iodination of thyroglobulin (TG) at residues Tyr(5) and Tyr(130), whereas thyroidal T3 production may originate in several different ways. In this study, the data demonstrate that within the carboxyl-terminal portion of mouse TG, T3 is formed de novo independently of deiodination from T4 We found that upon iodination in vitro, de novo T3 formation in TG was decreased in mice lacking TSHRs. Conversely, de novo T3 that can be formed upon iodination of TG secreted from PCCL3 (rat thyrocyte) cells was augmented from cells previously exposed to increased TSH, a TSHR agonist, a cAMP analog, or a TSHR-stimulating antibody. We present data suggesting that TSH-stimulated TG phosphorylation contributes to enhanced de novo T3 formation. These effects were reversed within a few days after removal of the hyperstimulating conditions. Indeed, direct exposure of PCCL3 cells to human serum from two patients with Graves' disease, but not control sera, led to secretion of TG with an increased intrinsic ability to form T3 upon in vitro iodination. Furthermore, TG secreted from human thyrocyte cultures hyperstimulated with TSH also showed an increased intrinsic ability to form T3 Our data support the hypothesis that TG processing in the secretory pathway of TSHR-hyperstimulated thyrocytes alters the structure of the iodination substrate in a way that enhances de novo T3 formation, contributing to the relative T3 toxicosis of Graves' disease.

  8. Activation and inactivation of thyroid hormone by deiodinases: local action with general consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gereben, B; Zeöld, A; Dentice, M; Salvatore, D; Bianco, A C

    2008-02-01

    The thyroid hormone plays a fundamental role in the development, growth, and metabolic homeostasis in all vertebrates by affecting the expression of different sets of genes. A group of thioredoxin fold-containing selenoproteins known as deiodinases control thyroid hormone action by activating or inactivating the precursor molecule thyroxine that is secreted by the thyroid gland. These pathways ensure regulation of the availability of the biologically active molecule T3, which occurs in a time-and tissue-specific fashion. In addition, because cells and plasma are in equilibrium and deiodination affects central thyroid hormone regulation, these local deiodinase-mediated events can also affect systemic thyroid hormone economy, such as in the case of non-thyroidal illness. Heightened interest in the field has been generated following the discovery that the deiodinases can be a component in both the Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway and the TGR-5 signaling cascade, a G-protein-coupled receptor for bile acids. These new mechanisms involved in deiodinase regulation indicate that local thyroid hormone activation and inactivation play a much broader role than previously thought.

  9. Multiple Novel Signals Mediate Thyroid Hormone Receptor Nuclear Import and Export*

    OpenAIRE

    Mavinakere, Manohara S.; Powers, Jeremy M.; Subramanian, Kelly S.; Roggero, Vincent R.; Allison, Lizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptor (TR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that shuttles between the cytosol and nucleus. The fine balance between nuclear import and export of TR has emerged as a critical control point for modulating thyroid hormone-responsive gene expression; however, sequence motifs of TR that mediate shuttling are not fully defined. Here, we characterized multiple signals that direct TR shuttling. Along with the known nuclear localization signal in the hinge domain, we ...

  10. Paradigm Shift in Thyroid Hormone Mechanism of Action | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is one of the primary endocrine regulators of human metabolism and homeostasis. Acting through three forms of the thyroid hormone receptor (THR; alpha-1, beta-1, and beta-2), TH regulates target gene expression in nearly every cell in the body, modulating fundamental processes, such as basal metabolic rate, long bone growth, and neural maturation. TH is also essential for proper development and differentiation of all cells of the human body.

  11. Inhibition effects of parathyroid hormone on human medullary thyroid carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaqiong Ni; Qinjiang Liu; Shihong Ma; Ruihui Chen

    2014-01-01

    Objective:The purpose of the study was to investigate the ef ects of parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hor-mone receptor monoclonal antibody on in vitro growth and proliferation of human medul ary thyroid carcinoma celllines. Methods:The medul ary thyroid carcinoma cellline was cultured in vitro, with parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hormone receptor monoclonal antibody treatment intervention, the growth of the cells was observed under an inverted contrast micro-scope, the MTT assay was used to detect the cellgrowth inhibition rate. Results:Under the inverted contrast microscope, the cells changed significantly, the parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hormone receptor monoclonal antibodies can ef ectively inhibit the proliferation of medul ary thyroid cancer cells in a time and dose dependent. When parathyroid hormone concentra-tion reached a concentration of 2.0μmol/L, the parathyroid hormone receptor monoclonal antibody reached a concentration of 1.0μmol/L, the cellgrowth was most significantly inhibited (P<0.05). Conclusion:Parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hormone receptor monoclonal antibody were able to inhibit the proliferation of medul ary thyroid carcinoma cells and signifi-cantly reduce the proliferation index.

  12. Effects of handling regime and sex on changes in cortisol, thyroid hormones and body mass in fasting grey seal pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kimberley A; Moss, Simon E W; Pomeroy, Paddy; Speakman, John R; Fedak, Mike A

    2012-01-01

    Survival of seal pups may be affected by their ability to respond appropriately to stress. Chronic stress can adversely affect secretion of cortisol and thyroid hormones, which contribute to the control of fuel utilisation. Repeated handling could disrupt the endocrine response to stress and/or negatively impact upon mass changes during fasting. Here we investigated the effects of handling regime on cortisol and thyroid hormone levels, and body mass changes, in fasting male and female grey seal pups (Halichoerus grypus). Females had higher thyroid hormone levels than males throughout fasting and showed a reduction in cortisol midway through the fast that was not seen in males. This may reflect sex-specific fuel allocation or development. Neither handling frequency nor cumulative contact time affected plasma cortisol or thyroid hormone levels, the rate of increase in cortisol over the first five minutes of physical contact or the pattern of mass loss during fasting in either sex. The endocrine response to stress and the control of energy balance in grey seal pups appear to be robust to repeated, short periods of handling. Our results suggest that routine handling should have no additional impact on these animals than general disturbance caused by researchers moving around the colony. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of plasticizers and their mixtures on estrogen Receptor and thyroid hormone functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghisari, Mandana; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2009-01-01

    Plasticizers are additives used to increase the flexibility or plasticity of the material to which they are added, normally rigid plastic and as additives in paint and adhesives. They are suspected to interfere with the endocrine system, including the estrogen and the thyroid hormone (TH) systems...... was lower than predicted, suggesting a potential antagonizing effect of the mixture. In conclusion, the tested plasticizers and phenols elicited endocrine-disrupting potential that can be mediated via interference with the estrogen and TH systems. Moreover, the observed mixture effect stresses...

  14. Inlfuence of Depressive State on Levels of Homocysteine and Thyroid Hormone in Patients with Hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei-wei; WANG Yan-ling

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the inlfuence of depressive state on the levels of homocysteine (Hcy) and thyroid hormone in patients with hypertension. Methods:Totally 179 patients with primary hypertension were selected and divided into depression group (n=97) and non-depression group (n=82) according to whether to be complicated with depressive disorder. The venous blood was drawn for detecting the level of Hcy in 2 groups by enzymatic cycling assay, and serum free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyrotropic hormone (TSH) by chemiluminiscence. The correlation between Hamilton depression scale (HAMD) scores and levels of plasma Hcy and serum FT3, FT4 and TSH was analyzed. Results: Compared with non-depression group, the level of plasma Hcy increased and the levels of FT3 and FT4 decreased in depression group (P0.05). HAMD scores in depression group had a positive correlation with the level of plasma Hcy (r=0.593,P=0.024), a negative correlation with the level of serum FT3 (r=-0.421,P=0.011), and no relationships with the levels of serum FT4 and TSH (r=-0.137,P=0.334;r=0.058, P=0.576). Conclusion: Hypertensive patients complicated with depression have abnormal level of Hcy and thyroid hormones. Moreover, the depressive degree of patients is positively correlated with the level of Hcy and negatively with the level of FT3.

  15. Expression of neuropeptide W in rat stomach mucosa: regulation by nutritional status, glucocorticoids and thyroid hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminos, Jorge E; Bravo, Susana B; García-Rendueles, María E R; Ruth González, C; Garcés, Maria F; Cepeda, Libia A; Lage, Ricardo; Suárez, Miguel A; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos

    2008-02-07

    Neuropeptide W (NPW) is a recently identified neuropeptide that binds to G-protein-coupled receptor 7 (GPR7) and 8 (GPR8). In rodent brain, NPW mRNA is confined to specific nuclei in hypothalamus, midbrain and brainstem. Expression of NPW mRNA has also been confirmed in peripheral organs such as stomach. Several reports suggested that brain NPW is implicated in the regulation of energy and hormonal homeostasis, namely the adrenal and thyroid axes; however the precise physiological role and regulation of peripheral NPW remains unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of nutritional status on the regulation of NPW in stomach mucosa. Our results show that in this tissue, NPW mRNA and protein expression is negatively regulated by fasting and food restriction, in all the models we studied: males, females and pregnant females. Next, we examined the effect of glucocorticoids and thyroid hormones on NPW mRNA expression in the stomach mucosa. Our data showed that NPW expression is decreased in this tissue after glucocorticoid treatment or hyperthyroidism. Conversely, hypothyroidism induces a marked increase in the expression of NPW in rat stomach. Overall, these data indicate that stomach NPW is regulated by nutritional and hormonal status.

  16. Renal function markers and thyroid hormone status in undialyzed chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Rajagopalan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study was undertaken to quantify thyroid hormones in undialyzed chronic kidney disease patients’ verses controls and to study the correlation between renal function markers and thyroid hormones. Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with a higher prevalence of primary hypothyroidism (HT, but at the same studies on thyroid hormone status in uremic patients has reported conflicting results. Methods: Thyroid hormones and renal function parameters like serum urea, creatinine, creatinine clearance, total protein and albumin were estimated and correlations between thyroid hormones and renal function parameters were studied in 60 undialyzed chronic kidney disease patients’ verses 100 healthy controls. Results: We found both T3 and T4 were significantly reduced (p<0.0001 for T3 and 0.007 for T4 whereas TSH remains to be unchanged in patient group compared to controls. We also observed that urea and creatinine were negatively correlated whereas creatinine clearance was positively correlated with both T3 and T4 that has high statistical (two-tailed significance at 0.01 level. But urea alone is negatively correlated with TSH that has statistical (two-tailed significance at 0.05 level. Conclusion: From our data, we speculate that renal insufficiency may lead to thyroid hormone disturbances.

  17. Thyroid hormone transport and metabolism by OATP1C1 and consequences of genetic variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Deure, Wendy M; Hansen, Pia Skov; Peeters, Robin P

    2008-01-01

    OATP1C1 has been characterized as a specific thyroid hormone transporter. Based on its expression in capillaries in different brain regions, OATP1C1 is thought to play a key-role in transporting thyroid hormone across the blood-brain barrier. For this reason, we studied the specificity of iodothy......OATP1C1 has been characterized as a specific thyroid hormone transporter. Based on its expression in capillaries in different brain regions, OATP1C1 is thought to play a key-role in transporting thyroid hormone across the blood-brain barrier. For this reason, we studied the specificity...... of iodothyronine transport by OATP1C1 in detail by analysis of thyroid hormone uptake in OATP1C1-transfected COS1 cells. Furthermore, we examined whether OATP1C1 is rate-limiting in subsequent thyroid hormone metabolism in cells co-transfected with deiodinases. We also studied the effect of genetic variation...... (T4S), little transport of rT3 and no transport of T3 or T3S compared to mock transfected cells. Metabolism of T4, T4S and rT3 by co-transfected deiodinases was greatly augmented in the presence of OATP1C1. The OATP1C1-intron3C>T, Pro143Thr and C3035T polymorphisms were not consistently associated...

  18. Maternal Mild Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency in Early Pregnancy and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesto, Thiago; Tiemeier, Henning; Peeters, Robin P; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Hofman, Albert; Verhulst, Frank C; Ghassabian, Akhgar

    2015-09-01

    Maternal thyroid hormone insufficiency during pregnancy can affect children's cognitive development. Nevertheless, the behavioral outcomes of children exposed prenatally to mild thyroid hormone insufficiency are understudied. To examine whether exposure to maternal mild thyroid hormone insufficiency in early pregnancy was related to symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children at 8 years of age. The study was embedded within the Generation R, a population-based birth cohort in the Netherlands. Children in the Generation R Study are followed up from birth (April 1, 2002, through January 31, 2006) until young adulthood. Of the 4997 eligible mother-child pairs with data on maternal thyroid levels (excluding twins), 3873 pairs of children and caregivers (77.5%) visited the Generation R research center for in-depth assessments and were included in the main analyses. Data collection in Generation R started December 1, 2001 (enrollment of pregnant women), and is ongoing. For this study, we used the data that were collected until January 1, 2014. Data analyses started on January 31 and finished June 30, 2014. Maternal hypothyroxinemia, characterized by low levels of free thyroxine coexisting with reference thyrotropin levels, and children's symptoms of ADHD. Maternal thyroid hormone levels (thyrotropin, free thyroxine, thyroid peroxidase antibodies) were measured at a mean (SD) of 13.6 (1.9) weeks of gestation. Children's ADHD symptoms were assessed at 8 years of age using the Conners' Parent Rating Scale-Revised Short Form; higher scores indicate more ADHD symptoms (possible range, 0-36). Maternal hypothyroxinemia (n = 127) in early pregnancy was associated with higher scores for ADHD symptoms in children at 8 years of age after adjustments for child and maternal factors (ie, sex, ethnicity, maternal age, maternal educational level, and income) (increase in ADHD scores, 7% [95% CI, 0.3%-15%]). The results remained essentially unchanged when

  19. Molecular components underlying nongenomic thyroid hormone signaling in embryonic zebrafish neurons

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    Yonkers Marc A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurodevelopment requires thyroid hormone, yet the mechanisms and targets of thyroid hormone action during embryonic stages remain ill-defined. We previously showed that the thyroid hormone thyroxine (T4 rapidly increases voltage-gated sodium current in zebrafish Rohon-Beard cells (RBs, a primary sensory neuron subtype present during embryonic development. Here, we determined essential components of the rapid T4 signaling pathway by identifying the involved intracellular messengers, the targeted sodium channel isotype, and the spatial and temporal expression pattern of the nongenomic αVβ3 integrin T4 receptor. Results We first tested which signaling pathways mediate T4's rapid modulation of sodium current (INa by perturbing specific pathways associated with nongenomic thyroid hormone signaling. We found that pharmacological blockade of protein phosphatase 1 and the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 isoform decreased and increased tonic sodium current amplitudes, respectively, and blockade of either occluded rapid responses to acute T4 application. We next tested for the ion channel target of rapid T4 signaling via morpholino knock-down of specific sodium channel isotypes. We found that selective knock-down of the sodium channel α-subunit Nav1.6a, but not Nav1.1la, occluded T4's acute effects. We also determined the spatial and temporal distribution of a nongenomic T4 receptor, integrin αVβ3. At 24 hours post fertilization (hpf, immunofluorescent assays showed no specific integrin αVβ3 immunoreactivity in wild-type zebrafish embryos. However, by 48 hpf, embryos expressed integrin αVβ3 in RBs and primary motoneurons. Consistent with this temporal expression, T4 modulated RB INa at 48 but not 24 hpf. We next tested whether T4 rapidly modulated INa of caudal primary motoneurons, which express the receptor (αVβ3 and target (Nav1.6a of rapid T4 signaling. In response to T4, caudal primary motoneurons rapidly increased

  20. Effective Cellular Uptake and Efflux of Thyroid Hormone by Human Monocarboxylate Transporter 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesema, Edith C. H.; Jansen, Jurgen; Jachtenberg, Jan-willem; Visser, W. Edward; Kester, Monique H. A.; Visser, Theo J.

    2008-01-01

    Cellular entry of thyroid hormone is mediated by plasma membrane transporters, among others a T-type (aromatic) amino acid transporter. Monocarboxylate transporter 10 (MCT10) has been reported to transport aromatic amino acids but not iodothyronines. Within the MCT family, MCT10 is most homologous to MCT8, which is a very important iodothyronine transporter but does not transport amino acids. In view of this paradox, we decided to reinvestigate the possible transport of thyroid hormone by human (h) MCT10 in comparison with hMCT8. Transfection of COS1 cells with hMCT10 cDNA resulted in 1) the production of an approximately 55 kDa protein located to the plasma membrane as shown by immunoblotting and confocal microscopy, 2) a strong increase in the affinity labeling of intracellular type I deiodinase by N-bromoacetyl-[125I]T3, 3) a marked stimulation of cellular T4 and, particularly, T3 uptake, 4) a significant inhibition of T3 uptake by phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan of 12.5%, 22.2%, and 51.4%, respectively, and 5) a marked increase in the intracellular deiodination of T4 and T3 by different deiodinases. Cotransfection studies using the cytosolic thyroid hormone-binding protein μ-crystallin (CRYM) indicated that hMCT10 facilitates both cellular uptake and efflux of T4 and T3. In the absence of CRYM, hMCT10 and hMCT8 increased T3 uptake after 5 min incubation up to 4.0- and 1.9-fold, and in the presence of CRYM up to 6.9- and 5.8-fold, respectively. hMCT10 was less active toward T4 than hMCT8. These findings establish that hMCT10 is at least as active a thyroid hormone transporter as hMCT8, and that both transporters facilitate iodothyronine uptake as well as efflux. PMID:18337592

  1. Economic Evaluation of Recombinant Human Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Stimulation vs. Thyroid Hormone Withdrawal Prior to Radioiodine Ablation for Thyroid Cancer: The Korean Perspective

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    Seo Young Sohn

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPrevious studies have suggested that recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rhTSH stimulation is an acceptable alternative to thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW when radioiodine remnant ablation is planned for thyroid cancer treatment, based on superior short-term quality of life with non-inferior remnant ablation efficacy. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of radioiodine remnant ablation using rhTSH, compared with the traditional preparation method which renders patients hypothyroid by THW, in Korean perspective.MethodsThis economic evaluation considered the costs and benefits to the Korean public healthcare system. Clinical experts were surveyed regarding the current practice of radioiodine ablation in Korea and their responses helped inform assumptions used in a cost effectiveness model. Markov modelling with 17 weekly cycles was used to assess the incremental costs per quality-adjusted life year (QALY associated with rhTSH. Clinical inputs were based on a multi-center, randomized controlled trial comparing remnant ablation success after rhTSH preparation with THW. The additional costs associated with rhTSH were considered relative to the clinical benefits and cost offsets.ResultsThe additional benefits of rhTSH (0.036 QALY are achieved with an additional cost of Korean won ₩961,105, equating to cost per QALY of ₩26,697,361. Sensitivity analyses had only a modest impact upon cost-effectiveness, with one-way sensitivity results of approximately ₩33,000,000/QALY.ConclusionThe use of rhTSH is a cost-effective alternative to endogenous hypothyroid stimulation prior to radioiodine ablation for patients who have undergone thyroidectomy in Korea.

  2. Hormones of thyroid gland in sera of rats treated with different dose of concentrated potassium iodine solutions

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    Marković Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Potassium iodine (KI is used as a drug therapy for treating numerous diseases such as small-vessel vasculitis, erythema nodosum, vasculitis nodularis, Sweet's syndrome, tuberculosis and granulomatosis, and for iodized salt. At the same time, KI can be harmful. Iodine intake may increase the frequency of thyroiditis in humans, and may induce the occurrence of experimental thyroiditis (ET in animals. Investigations on an experimental model for the examination of thyroiditis in Wistar rats have clearly showed morphological changes in the rat thyroid evoked by KI administration. Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of low and high doses of KI on the thyroid gland of Wistar rats and determine the effect on hormone status (T4, T3 and TSH in this rat strain. Methods Two groups of rats from the Wistar strain were treated with a low iodine dose (225 μg/g BW and with a high iodine dose (675 μg/g BW of KI solutions. Untreated nonimmunized animals served as controls. The solution was administrated daily intraperitoneally during the period of 26 consecutive days. Results Monitoring hormone status (TSH, T3 and T4 and morphological changes it was found that therapeutic doses of KI applied in treatment induced the occurrence of experimental thyroiditis (chronic destructive Hashimoto's thyroiditis in humans and cell necrosis in animals not carrying a genetic susceptibility. Significant inflammatory changes were observed in rats treated with a high iodine dose. Conclusion The early iodine induced cell necrosis and inflammation in the nonimmunized animals without genetic susceptibility is a new experimental model of thyroiditis. .

  3. The association between serum thyroid stimulating hormone and thyroid cancer%血清促甲状腺激素与甲状腺癌的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫慧娴; 谷伟军; 吕朝晖

    2013-01-01

    More and more evidence showed that serum thyroid stimulating hormone(TSH) was an independent predictor for the diagnosis of thyroid cancer in patients with thyroid nodular goiter.In patients with thyroid nodular goiter,the risk of thyroid cancer increases with serum TSH level,and even TSH level within normal ranges,higher TSH level is associated with a higher frequency and more advanced stage of thyroid cancer.TSH suppression therapy can reduce thyroid carcinoma-related mortality and recurrence rate in high risk patients.TSH plays a key role in the development of thyroid cancer.%越来越多的证据显示,血清促甲状腺激素(TSH)是预测结节性甲状腺肿患者发生甲状腺癌的独立危险因素.即使血清TSH水平在正常范围内,结节性甲状腺肿患者发生甲状腺癌的风险也随着血清TSH水平的升高而逐渐增加.高水平的TSH与甲状腺癌的高发生率以及晚期甲状腺癌关系密切.血清TSH抑制治疗能降低肿瘤进展高危患者的复发率和死亡率.血清TSH在甲状腺癌的发展过程中起着非常重要的作用.

  4. Endocrine factors in the hypothalamic regulation of food intake in females: a review of the physiological roles and interactions of ghrelin, leptin, thyroid hormones, oestrogen and insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, V; Gyorffy, A; Scalise, T J; Kiss, D S; Goszleth, G; Bartha, T; Frenyo, V L; Zsarnovszky, A

    2011-06-01

    Controlling energy homeostasis involves modulating the desire to eat and regulating energy expenditure. The controlling machinery includes a complex interplay of hormones secreted at various peripheral endocrine endpoints, such as the gastrointestinal tract, the adipose tissue, thyroid gland and thyroid hormone-exporting organs, the ovary and the pancreas, and, last but not least, the brain itself. The peripheral hormones that are the focus of the present review (ghrelin, leptin, thyroid hormones, oestrogen and insulin) play integrated regulatory roles in and provide feedback information on the nutritional and energetic status of the body. As peripheral signals, these hormones modulate central pathways in the brain, including the hypothalamus, to influence food intake, energy expenditure and to maintain energy homeostasis. Since the growth of the literature on the role of various hormones in the regulation of energy homeostasis shows a remarkable and dynamic expansion, it is now becoming increasingly difficult to understand the individual and interactive roles of hormonal mechanisms in their true complexity. Therefore, our goal is to review, in the context of general physiology, the roles of the five best-known peripheral trophic hormones (ghrelin, leptin, thyroid hormones, oestrogen and insulin, respectively) and discuss their interactions in the hypothalamic regulation of food intake.

  5. The use of konjac glucomannan to lower serum thyroid hormones in hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azezli, Adil Dogan; Bayraktaroglu, Taner; Orhan, Yusuf

    2007-12-01

    Patients with hyperthyroidism occasionally need rapid restoration to the euthyroid state. In view of the increased enterohepatic circulation of thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) in thyrotoxicosis, and metabolic effects of konjac glucomannan in gastrointestinal system, we aimed to determine the activity of glucomannan in treatment of hyperthyroidism. A prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, one-blind study design was used with newly diagnosed 48 hyperthyroid patients (30 patients with Graves' disease and 12 with multinodulary goitre). They were assigned to one of the following treatment groups: I) methimazole 2 x 10 mg, propranolol 2 x 20 mg, and glucomannan (Propol) 2 x 1.3 gr daily for two months; II) methimazole 2 x 10 mg, propranolol 2 x 20 mg, and placebo powder daily for two months. No differences were detected from the point of view of the baseline thyroid hormone levels between groups (p > 0.05). Further analyses revealed that the patients receiving glucomannan at the end of the second, fourth and sixth weeks of the study had significantly lower serum T3, T4, FT3 and FT4 levels than the patients who received placebo (p 0.05). At week 8, thyroid hormone levels were not shown any differences. The glucomannan-treated group had a more rapid decline in all four serum thyroid hormone levels than the placebo-treated group. We believe our preliminary results indicate that glucomannan may be a safe and easily tolerated adjunctive therapeutic agent in the treatment of thyrotoxicosis. This combination therapy seems most effect during first weeks of treatment of a hyperthyroid patient.

  6. Evaluation of Thyroid Diseases by Hormonal Analysis in Pediatric Age Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayana A Shah

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among endocrine disorders commonly encountered in pediatric age group, thyroid diseases are more frequent. Congenital hypothyroidism is one of the major problems in this age with worldwide incidence of 1:3000-4000 live birth and in India it is 1:2500-2800. Objectives: The aim of this study is to know the prevalence of thyroid diseases in newborn and children by hormonal evaluation. Methodology: We have studied 50 children suspected of having signs and symptoms of thyroid diseases. Hormonal evaluation was done by the estimation of serum TSH, T3 and T4. Results: Out of total 50 children, 16 were detected with abnormal hormone level and diagnosed having thyroid diseases. Out of 16 affected children, 4 had congenital hypothyroidism (25%, 6 had subclinical or acquired hypothyroidism (37.5%, 3 had autoimmune thyroiditis (18.75% and 3 had goiter with graves disease (18.75%. Conclusion: Congenital hypothyroidism is one of the major preventable thyroid disease if diagnosed early. Other thyroid diseases commonly seen in pediatric age are subclinical hypothyroidism, autoimmune thyroiditis, goiter and rarely hyperthyroidism. [Natl J Med Res 2013; 3(4.000: 367-370

  7. Examining recombinant human TSH primed {sup 131}I therapy protocol in patients with metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma: comparison with the traditional thyroid hormone withdrawal protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rani, Deepa; Kaisar, Sushma; Awasare, Sushma; Kamaldeep; Abhyankar, Amit; Basu, Sandip [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Radiation Medicine Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2014-09-15

    the difference was not found to be statistically significant (p = 0.301). The mean tumor radiation absorbed dose per mCi was less during the rhTSH protocol (6.04 rad/mCi) than during the thyroid hormone withdrawal protocol (8.68 rad/mCi), and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.049), though visual analysis of the rhTSH posttherapy scans showed avid concentration of {sup 131}I in the metastatic sites and revealed more lesions in 30 % of the patients compared to the traditional large dose scan and equal number of lesions in 65 % of the patients. Visual analysis of the traditional large dose scan, rhTSH pretreatment scan, and rhTSH posttherapy scans showed that the traditional large dose scan is better compared to the rhTSH 1 mCi scan as it showed more lesions in 19 of 37 patients (51.35 %). rhTSH posttherapy scans were better compared to the traditional large dose scans and rhTSH pretreatment scans. More lesions were seen on rhTSH posttherapy scans in 11 of 37 patients (29.7 %) compared to the traditional large dose scans and in 24 of 37 (64.86 %) patients compared to the rhTSH 1 mCi scans. Our findings demonstrate that the rhTSH primed pretreatment scan undertaken at 24 h after diagnostic dose is suboptimal to evaluate whether a metastatic lesion concentrates {sup 131}I. The majority of these lesions demonstrated radioiodine accumulation in the posttreatment scan. Quality of life as assessed using EORTC QOL-3 forms clearly showed that rhTSH improved the quality of life of patients compared to the thyroid hormone withdrawal protocol. Functional scale and global health status were significantly better in the rhTSH protocol compared to the thyroid hormone withdrawal protocol (p < 0.001). The mean symptom scale score was significantly higher in the thyroid hormone withdrawal protocol (45.25) compared to the rhTSH protocol (13.59) (p < 0.001). Of the 20 patients, 4 (20 %) had more than 25 % increase in the TG value on follow-up. The median hospital stay of

  8. Targeting the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor with small molecule ligands and antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Terry F; Latif, Rauf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is the essential molecule for thyroid growth and thyroid hormone production. Since it is also a key autoantigen in Graves’ disease and is involved in thyroid cancer pathophysiology, the targeting of the TSHR offers a logical model for disease control. Areas covered We review the structure and function of the TSHR and the progress in both small molecule ligands and TSHR antibodies for their therapeutic potential. Expert opinion Stabilization of a preferential conformation for the TSHR by allosteric ligands and TSHR antibodies with selective modulation of the signaling pathways is now possible. These tools may be the next generation of therapeutics for controlling the pathophysiological consequences mediated by the effects of the TSHR in the thyroid and other extrathyroidal tissues. PMID:25768836

  9. The involvement of thyroid hormones and cortisol in the osmotic acclimation of Solea senegalensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona, F J; Vargas-Chacoff, L; Martín del Río, M P; Flik, G; Mancera, J M; Klaren, P H M

    2008-02-01

    The peripheral conversion of the prohormone 3,5,3',5'-tetraiodothyronine (T4) to the biologically active 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3), via enzymatic deiodination by deiodinases, is an important pathway in thyroid hormone metabolism. The aim of this study was to test if thyroid hormones and cortisol, as well as the outer ring deiodination (ORD) metabolic pathway, are involved in the osmoregulatory response of Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis, Kaup 1858). We measured osmoregulatory and endocrine parameters in immature juveniles S. senegalensis acclimated to seawater (SW, 38 per thousand) and that were transferred and allowed to acclimate to different salinities (5 per thousand, 15 per thousand, 38 per thousand and 55 per thousand) for 17 days. An adjustment and a chronic regulatory period were identified following acclimation. The adjustment period immediately follows the transfer, and is characterized by altered plasma osmolalities. During this period, plasma cortisol levels increased while plasma free T4 (fT4) levels decreased. Both hormones levels returned to normal values on day 3 post-transfer. In the adjustment period, renal and hepatic ORD activities had increased concomitantly with the decrease in plasma fT4 levels in fishes transferred to extreme salinities (5 per thousand and 55 per thousand). In the chronic regulatory period, where plasma osmolality returned to normal values, plasma cortisol had increased, whereas plasma fT4 levels decreased in animals that were transferred to salinities other than SW. No major changes were observed in branchial ORD activity throughout the experiment. The inverse relationship between plasma cortisol and fT4 suggests an interaction between these hormones during both osmoregulatory periods while ORD pathway can be important in the short-term adjustment period.

  10. Gene specific actions of thyroid hormone receptor subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Z Lin

    Full Text Available There are two homologous thyroid hormone (TH receptors (TRs α and β, which are members of the nuclear hormone receptor (NR family. While TRs regulate different processes in vivo and other highly related NRs regulate distinct gene sets, initial studies of TR action revealed near complete overlaps in their actions at the level of individual genes. Here, we assessed the extent that TRα and TRβ differ in target gene regulation by comparing effects of equal levels of stably expressed exogenous TRs +/- T(3 in two cell backgrounds (HepG2 and HeLa. We find that hundreds of genes respond to T(3 or to unliganded TRs in both cell types, but were not able to detect verifiable examples of completely TR subtype-specific gene regulation. TR actions are, however, far from identical and we detect TR subtype-specific effects on global T(3 response kinetics in HepG2 cells and many examples of TR subtype specificity at the level of individual genes, including effects on magnitude of response to TR +/- T(3, TR regulation patterns and T(3 dose response. Cycloheximide (CHX treatment confirms that at least some differential effects involve verifiable direct TR target genes. TR subtype/gene-specific effects emerge in the context of widespread variation in target gene response and we suggest that gene-selective effects on mechanism of TR action highlight differences in TR subtype function that emerge in the environment of specific genes. We propose that differential TR actions could influence physiologic and pharmacologic responses to THs and selective TR modulators (STRMs.

  11. Thyroid hormone disrupting chemicals and their influence on the developing rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marta Axelstad

    The thyroid hormones triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) are produced in the thyroid gland, and besides their role in the body’s metabolic rate, they also play a determining role during foetal and neonatal brain development. Because thyroid hormones (TH) are needed for proper nerve cell...... differentiation and proliferation, normal status of these hormones during early development is crucial, and in humans even moderate and transient reductions in maternal T4 levels during pregnancy, can adversely affect the child’s neurological development. In order to maintain correct levels of THs, the body...... and offspring had significantly decreased T4 levels during the dosing period, and their thyroid glands were severely affected. The expected neurobehavoiral and auditory effects were seen, as learning and memory was impaired in the adult male offspring, while both males and female offspring showed hyperactivity...

  12. Impaired hair growth and wound healing in mice lacking thyroid hormone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Jurado, Constanza; García-Serrano, Laura; Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia; Paramio, Jesus M; Aranda, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Both clinical and experimental observations show that the skin is affected by the thyroidal status. In hypothyroid patients the epidermis is thin and alopecia is common, indicating that thyroidal status might influence not only skin proliferation but also hair growth. We demonstrate here that the thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) mediate these effects of the thyroid hormones on the skin. Mice lacking TRα1 and TRβ (the main thyroid hormone binding isoforms) display impaired hair cycling associated to a decrease in follicular hair cell proliferation. This was also observed in hypothyroid mice, indicating the important role of the hormone-bound receptors in hair growth. In contrast, the individual deletion of either TRα1 or TRβ did not impair hair cycling, revealing an overlapping or compensatory role of the receptors in follicular cell proliferation. In support of the role of the receptors in hair growth, TRα1/TRβ-deficient mice developed alopecia after serial depilation. These mice also presented a wound-healing defect, with retarded re-epithelialization and wound gaping, associated to impaired keratinocyte proliferation. These results reinforce the idea that the thyroid hormone nuclear receptors play an important role on skin homeostasis and suggest that they could be targets for the treatment of cutaneous pathologies.

  13. Human ketone body production and utilization studied using tracer techniques: Regulation by free fatty acids, insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, U.; Lustenberger, M.; Mueller-Brand, J.G.; Gerber, P.P.; Stauffacher, W.

    1989-05-01

    Ketone body concentrations fluctuate markedly during physiological and pathological conditions. Tracer techniques have been developed in recent years to study production, utilization, and the metabolic clearance rate of ketone bodies. This review describes data on the roles of insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones in the regulation of ketone body kinetics. The data indicate that insulin lowers ketone body concentrations by three independent mechanisms: first, it inhibits lipolysis, and thus lowers free fatty acid availability for ketogenesis; second, it restrains ketone body production within the liver; third, it enhances peripheral ketone body utilization. To assess these effects in humans in vivo, experimental models were developed to study insulin effects with controlled concentrations of free fatty acids, insulin, glucagon, and ketone bodies. Presently available data also support an important role of catecholamines in increasing ketone body concentrations. Evidence was presented that norepinephrine increases ketogenesis not only by stimulating lipolysis, and thus releasing free fatty acids, but also by increasing intrahepatic ketogenesis. Thyroid hormone availability was associated with lipolysis and ketogenesis. Ketone body concentrations after an overnight fast were only modestly elevated in hyperthyroidism resulting from increased peripheral ketone body clearance. There was a significant correlation between serum triiodothyronine levels and the ketone body metabolic clearance rate. Thus, ketone body homeostasis in human subjects resulted from the interaction of hormones such as insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones regulating lipolysis, intrahepatic ketogenesis, and peripheral ketone body utilization. 58 references.

  14. Aberrant Monoaminergic System in Thyroid Hormone Receptor-β Deficient Mice as a Model of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Ookubo, Masanori; Sadamatsu, Miyuki; Yoshimura, Atsushi; SUZUKI, Satoru; Kato, Nobumasa; Kojima, Hideto; Yamada, Naoto; Kanai, Hirohiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thyroid hormone receptors are divided into 2 functional types: TRα and TRβ. Thyroid hormone receptors play pivotal roles in the developing brain, and disruption of thyroid hormone receptors can produce permanent behavioral abnormality in animal models and humans. Methods: Here we examined behavioralchanges, regional monoamine metabolism, and expression of epigenetic modulatory proteins, including acetylated histone H3 and histone deacetylase, in the developing brain of TRα-disrupt...

  15. Activation of protein kinase C or cAMP-dependent protein kinase increases phosphorylation of the c-erbA-encoded thyroid hormone receptor and of the v-erbA-encoded protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldberg, Y; Glineur, C; Gesquière, J C;

    1988-01-01

    of this nuclear receptor. The v-erbA product inhibits terminal differentiation of avian erythroblasts, presumably by affecting the transcription of specific genes. We show here that the c-erbA-encoded nuclear receptor (p46c-erbA) is phosphorylated on serine residues on two distinct sites. One of these sites......The c-erbA proto-oncogene encodes a nuclear receptor for thyroid hormone (T3), which is believed to stimulate transcription from specific target promoters upon binding to cis-acting DNA sequence elements. The v-erbA oncogene of avian erythroblastosis virus (AEV) encodes a ligand-independent version......-v-erbA is enhanced 10-fold following treatment of cells with activators of either protein kinase C or cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Since cAMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylates both p46c-erbA and P75gag-v-erbA in vitro at the same site as that observed in vivo, at least part of the cAMP-dependent...

  16. Propylthiouracil, Perchlorate, and Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Modulate High Concentrations of Iodide Instigated Mitochondrial Superoxide Production in the Thyroids of Metallothionein I/II Knockout Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Duan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIncreased oxidative stress has been suggested as one of the underlying mechanisms in iodide excess-induced thyroid disease. Metallothioneins (MTs are regarded as scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS in oxidative stress. Our aim is to investigate the effects of propylthiouracil (PTU, a thyroid peroxidase inhibitor, perchlorate (KClO4, a competitive inhibitor of iodide transport, and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH on mitochondrial superoxide production instigated by high concentrations of iodide in the thyroids of MT-I/II knockout (MT-I/II KO mice.MethodsEight-week-old 129S7/SvEvBrd-Mt1tm1Bri Mt2tm1Bri/J (MT-I/II KO mice and background-matched wild type (WT mice were used.ResultsBy using a mitochondrial superoxide indicator (MitoSOX Red, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release, and methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT assay, we demonstrated that the decreased relative viability and increased LDH release and mitochondrial superoxide production induced by potassium iodide (100 µM can be relieved by 300 µM PTU, 30 µM KClO4, or 10 U/L TSH in the thyroid cell suspensions of both MT-I/II KO and WT mice (P<0.05. Compared to the WT mice, a significant decrease in the relative viability along with a significant increase in LDH release and mitochondrial superoxide production were detected in MT-I/II KO mice(P<0.05.ConclusionWe concluded that PTU, KClO4, or TSH relieved the mitochondrial oxidative stress induced by high concentrations of iodide in the thyroids of both MT-I/II KO and WT mice. MT-I/II showed antioxidant effects against high concentrations of iodide-induced mitochondrial superoxide production in the thyroid.

  17. The Relation between Thyroid Hormone and Blood Lipid in the Healthy Elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何凤屏; 李山; 洗苏; 刘广钊; 夏宁

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To observethe relationship between Thyroid Hormone (TH) leveland blood lipid level in the healthy elderly with therapyof small dose of TH. Methods A total of 120healthy old persons were randomly divided into twogroups: 60 old persons as treatment group and other 60persons as control group. Each person in the treatmentgroup took a thyroid tablet 10 mg daily continuously forsix months while the control group took VitB1 30 mgdaily instead of thyroid tablet. The level of TH, M -TSH, FT3, FT4, TT4, rT3, TC, TG, LDL- C, HDL-C, ApoA1 were measured in two groups before andafter receiving TH or Vit. B1 treatment. Results Inthe treatment group the level of TH increased obvious-ly. And TC, TG, LDL- C levels decreased also tosome extent while HDL- C, ApoA1 levels increasedslightly which was significant when compared with thecontrol group and pre- treatment group. ConclusionsTo use small dose of TH as supplement treatmentcan increase the TH level of healthy old persons anddecrease their blood lipid level. It would be a benefitfor treating hyperlipidemia in the elderly.

  18. Association of Age with Thyroid Hormone Status and Ischaemic Heart Disease (IHD

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    Md Ashraf-uz-zaman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aging is associated with increased prevalence of thyroid function abnormalities including hypothyroidism. A meta-analysis showed an increased prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular mortality only in a relatively younger population. Objective: To compare the thyroid function status in IHD patients of different age groups. Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out on 31 IHD subjects aged 35-59 years (Group B1 and 19 IHD subjects aged 60-85 years (Group B2 in the Department of Physiology, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka from July 2009 to June 2010. For comparison 24 healthy subjects aged 35-59 years (Group A1 and 26 with age 60-85 years (Group A2 were studied. The IHD subjects were selected from coronary care unit of cardiology department and OPD of Dhaka Medical College Hospital, Dhaka. Serum FT3, FT4 and TSH of all subjects were measured by radioimmunoassay. Statistical analysis was done by unpaired Student’s ‘t’ test. Results: The mean ± SD of FT3 and FT4 were significantly lower and TSH was significantly higher in Group B1 IHD patients than that of Group A1 healthy subjects, but no difference was found between Group A2 and Group B2 and between Group B1 and Group B2. Conclusion: Thyroid hormone levels are significantly lower in younger IHD population (age 35-59 years than the age-matched normal controls.

  19. Structure and function of thyroid hormone plasma membrane transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Ulrich; Johannes, Jörg; Bayer, Dorothea; Braun, Doreen

    2014-09-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) cross the plasma membrane with the help of transporter proteins. As charged amino acid derivatives, TH cannot simply diffuse across a lipid bilayer membrane, despite their notorious hydrophobicity. The identification of monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8, SLC16A2) as a specific and very active TH transporter paved the way to the finding that mutations in the MCT8 gene cause a syndrome of psychomotor retardation in humans. The purpose of this review is to introduce the current model of transmembrane transport and highlight the diversity of TH transmembrane transporters. The interactions of TH with plasma transfer proteins, T3 receptors, and deiodinase are summarized. It is shown that proteins may bind TH owing to their hydrophobic character in hydrophobic cavities and/or by specific polar interaction with the phenolic hydroxyl, the aminopropionic acid moiety, and by weak polar interactions with the iodine atoms. These findings are compared with our understanding of how TH transporters interact with substrate. The presumed effects of mutations in MCT8 on protein folding and transport function are explained in light of the available homology model.

  20. Functional analysis of novel genetic variation in the thyroid hormone activating type 2 deiodinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Zevenbergen (Chantal); W. Klootwijk (Willem); R.P. Peeters (Robin); M. Medici (Marco); Y.B. de Rijke (Yolanda); S.A. Huisman (Sylvia); Goeman, H. (Henk); Boot, E. (Erik); G. Kuijper (Gerda); K.H. de Waal; M.E. Meima (Marcel); P.R. Larsen (Reed); T.J. Visser (Theo); W.E. Visser (Wil Edward)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstractContext: Thyroid hormones (TH) are important for normal brain development and abnormal TH regulation in the brain results in neurocognitive impairments. The type 2 deiodinase (D2) is important for local TH control in the brain by generating the active hormone T3 from its precursor

  1. Mild Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency During Development Compromises Activity-Dependent Neuroplasticity in the Hippocampus of Adult Male Rats

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — behavioral measures of learning and memory in adult offspring of rats treated with thyroid hormone synthesis inhibitor, propylthiouracil. Electrophysiological...

  2. Thyroid hormone synthesis and secretion in humans after 80 milligrams of iodine for 15 days and subsequent withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoropoulou, Anastasia; Vagenakis, Apostolos G; Makri, Maria; Markou, Kostas B

    2007-01-01

    In animals, acute iodine administration results in acute intrathyroidal inhibition of iodinations followed by escape of the inhibition if the excessive iodine intake continues. In humans, the intrathyroidal nonhormonal and hormonal iodine concentration after exposure to large doses of iodine for a relatively long period of time is not known. To determine whether, in human thyroid, administration of large doses of iodine for a relatively long time results in alterations of intrathyroidal hormonal (HI) T4 and T3 and total iodine (TI) content, as well as whether changes in serum concentration of thyroid hormones and TSH would occur after iodine administration or discontinuation. In 33 euthyroid patients with single thyroid nodule or hyperparathyroidism, Lugol solution (80 mg iodine) was administered for 15 d before operation. Groups of six to eight patients underwent operation 0, 5, 10, and 15 d after iodine withdrawal. TI, HI in a sample of thyroid tissue, and serum concentration of T4, T3, and TSH were measured. In 21 normal euthyroid subjects who did not undergo operation, a similar protocol was used and serial blood measurements were taken. Intrathyroidal TI, HI, and serum thyroid hormone and TSH measurements were the main outcome measure. Intrathyroidal HI content and serum T4 and T3 were unchanged during and after iodine discontinuation. TI was increased during iodine administration and returned to control values 5 d after discontinuation of iodine. The ratio of HI/TI was decreased and returned to control values 15 d after the iodine was discontinued. Serum TSH was increased during iodine administration and returned to control values 10 d after iodine withdrawal. In humans, administration of iodine for a relatively long period of time was accompanied by increased intrathyroidal TI, but no changes in HI or demonstrable increases of serum T4 and T3 were observed. It is hypothesized that the maintenance of normal intrathyroidal HI is the result of the combined

  3. Autoantibodies Highly Increased in Patients with Thyroid Dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weibin Wen; Fengying Liu

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the significance of antithyroid antibodie levels, five hundred and twenty-six patients with thyroid diseases and 292 health subjects from Yuci district, Shanxi province, China, were studied. Serum levels were determined for thyroid hormone receptor antibody (TRAb), microsomal antibody (TMAb) and thyrogiobulin antibody (TGAb). Among patients, the percentages for nodular goiter and thyroid adenoma, Graves' disease, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis are 44.1%, 19.6% and 17.7%, respectively. The ratios of female to male were 2.0 to 15.6.Antibody-positive patients for TMAb, TGAb and TRAb were detectable as 94.6%, 76.3% and 20.4% for Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and 40.0%, 30.0% and 90.3% for Graves's disease. In conclusion, the high levels of the TRAb in Graves' disease, and those of the TGAb/TMAb in Hashimoto's thyroiditis and idiopathic hypothyroidism are meaningful for characterizing the epidemiological basis of the diseases and for using as prognostic indicators for the relapse in individual patients.

  4. Study of thyroid hormones free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in subjects with dental fluorosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosur, Mahadevi B; Puranik, R S; Vanaki, Shrinivas; Puranik, Surekha R

    2012-04-01

    Apart from its well-known deleterious dental and skeletal effects, fluoride excess can have toxic effects on many other tissues. Fluoride, when in excess, is known to interfere with thyroid gland function. Fluoride-induced thyroid disturbances similar to those observed in iodine deficiency state in spite of adequate iodine intake have been documented. Similar thyroid disturbances in individuals with dental fluorosis have not been well studied in populations with endemic fluorosis. This work was undertaken to study the effects of fluoride-induced thyroid disturbances in individuals with dental fluorosis. The study group included 65 subjects with dental fluorosis from endemic fluorosis populations. An additional control group was comprised of 10 subjects without dental fluorosis. The drinking water fluoride levels of the study populations were analyzed. Serum free FT3, FT4, and TSH levels of both groups were assessed. All subjects with dental fluorosis had serum levels of thyroid hormones (FT3, FT4, and TSH) within the normal range, with the exception of 1 individual, who had elevated levels of TSH. Statistical significance was found when FT3 and TSH values were compared with different Dean's index groups by a 1-way ANOVA test: FT3 (F = 3.4572; P=.0377) and TSH (F = 3.2649 and P=.0449). Findings of this study did not show any significant alterations in the levels of the thyroid hormones FT3, FT4, and TSH in subjects with dental fluorosis. Our observations suggest that thyroid hormone levels were not altered in subjects with dental fluorosis. Hence, future studies of this kind, along with more detailed investigations are needed.

  5. A component of retinal light adaptation mediated by the thyroid hormone cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana E Bedolla

    Full Text Available Analysis with DNA-microrrays and real time PCR show that several genes involved in the thyroid hormone cascade, such as deiodinase 2 and 3 (Dio2 and Dio3 are differentially regulated by the circadian clock and by changes of the ambient light. The expression level of Dio2 in adult rats (2-3 months of age kept continuously in darkness is modulated by the circadian clock and is up-regulated by 2 fold at midday. When the diurnal ambient light was on, the expression level of Dio2 increased by 4-8 fold and a consequent increase of the related protein was detected around the nuclei of retinal photoreceptors and of neurons in inner and outer nuclear layers. The expression level of Dio3 had a different temporal pattern and was down-regulated by diurnal light. Our results suggest that DIO2 and DIO3 have a role not only in the developing retina but also in the adult retina and are powerfully regulated by light. As the thyroid hormone is a ligand-inducible transcription factor controlling the expression of several target genes, the transcriptional activation of Dio2 could be a novel genomic component of light adaptation.

  6. Thyroid and the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grais, Ira Martin; Sowers, James R

    2014-08-01

    Thyroid hormones modulate every component of the cardiovascular system necessary for normal cardiovascular development and function. When cardiovascular disease is present, thyroid function tests are characteristically indicated to determine if overt thyroid disorders or even subclinical dysfunction exists. As hypothyroidism, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease all increase with advancing age, monitoring of thyroid-stimulating hormone, the most sensitive test for hypothyroidism, is important in this expanding segment of our population. A better understanding of the impact of thyroid hormonal status on cardiovascular physiology will enable health care providers to make decisions about thyroid hormone evaluation and therapy in concert with evaluating and treating hypertension and cardiovascular disease. The goal of this review is to access contemporary understanding of the effects of thyroid hormones on normal cardiovascular function and the potential role of overt and subclinical hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism in a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The immediate and late effects of thyroid hormone (triiodothyronine on murine coagulation gene transcription.

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    Salam Salloum-Asfar

    Full Text Available Thyroid dysfunction is associated with changes in coagulation. The aim of our study was to gain more insight into the role of thyroid hormone in coagulation control. C57Black/6J mice received a low-iodine diet and drinking water supplemented with perchlorate to suppress endogenous triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4 production. Under these conditions, the impact of exogenous T3 on plasma coagulation, and hepatic and vessel-wall-associated coagulation gene transcription was studied in a short- (4 hours and long-term (14 days setting. Comparing euthyroid conditions (normal mice, with hypothyroidism (conditions of a shortage of thyroid hormone and those with replacement by incremental doses of T3, dosages of 0 and 0.5 μg T3/mouse/day were selected to study the impact of T3 on coagulation gene transcription. Under these conditions, a single injection of T3 injection increased strongly hepatic transcript levels of the well-characterized T3-responsive genes deiodinase type 1 (Dio1 and Spot14 within 4 hours. This coincided with significantly reduced mRNA levels of Fgg, Serpinc1, Proc, Proz, and Serpin10, and the reduction of the latter three persisted upon daily treatment with T3 for 14 days. Prolonged T3 treatment induced a significant down-regulation in factor (F 2, F9 and F10 transcript levels, while F11 and F12 levels increased. Activity levels in plasma largely paralleled these mRNA changes. Thbd transcript levels in the lung (vessel-wall-associated coagulation were significantly up-regulated after a single T3 injection, and persisted upon prolonged T3 exposure. Two-week T3 administration also resulted in increased Vwf and Tfpi mRNA levels, whereas Tf levels decreased. These data showed that T3 has specific effects on coagulation, with Fgg, Serpinc1, Proc, Proz, Serpin10 and Thbd responding rapidly, making these likely direct thyroid hormone receptor targets. F2, F9, F10, F11, F12, Vwf, Tf and Tfpi are late responding genes and probably

  8. Optimized FPGA Implementation of the Thyroid Hormone Secretion Mechanism Using CAD Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghazo, Jaafar M

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this paper is to implement the secretion mechanism of the Thyroid Hormone (TH) based on bio-mathematical differential eqs. (DE) on an FPGA chip. Hardware Descriptive Language (HDL) is used to develop a behavioral model of the mechanism derived from the DE. The Thyroid Hormone secretion mechanism is simulated with the interaction of the related stimulating and inhibiting hormones. Synthesis of the simulation is done with the aid of CAD tools and downloaded on a Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) Chip. The chip output shows identical behavior to that of the designed algorithm through simulation. It is concluded that the chip mimics the Thyroid Hormone secretion mechanism. The chip, operating in real-time, is computer-independent stand-alone system.

  9. Expression of type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase in hypothyroid rat brain indicates an important role of thyroid hormone in the development of specific primary sensory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadaño-Ferraz, A; Escámez, M J; Rausell, E; Bernal, J

    1999-05-01

    Thyroid hormone is an important epigenetic factor in brain development, acting by modulating rates of gene expression. The active form of thyroid hormone, 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) is produced in part by the thyroid gland but also after 5'-deiodination of thyroxine (T4) in target tissues. In brain, approximately 80% of T3 is formed locally from T4 through the activity of the 5'-deiodinase type 2 (D2), an enzyme that is expressed mostly by glial cells, tanycytes in the third ventricle, and astrocytes throughout the brain. D2 activity is an important point of control of thyroid hormone action because it increases in situations of low T4, thus preserving brain T3 concentrations. In this work, we have studied the expression of D2 by quantitative in situ hybridization in hypothyroid animals during postnatal development. Our hypothesis was that those regions that are most dependent on thyroid hormone should present selective increases of D2 as a protection against hypothyroidism. D2 mRNA concentration was increased severalfold over normal levels in relay nuclei and cortical targets of the primary somatosensory and auditory pathways. The results suggest that these pathways are specifically protected against thyroid failure and that T3 has a role in the development of these structures. At the cellular level, expression was observed mainly in glial cells, although some interneurons of the cerebral cortex were also labeled. Therefore, the T3 target cells, mostly neurons, are dependent on local astrocytes for T3 supply.

  10. Studies on the possible role of thyroid hormone in altered muscle protein turnover during sepsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselgren, P.O.; Chen, I.W.; James, J.H.; Sperling, M.; Warner, B.W.; Fischer, J.E.

    1987-07-01

    Five days after thyroidectomy (Tx) or sham-Tx in young male Sprague-Dawley rats, sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Control animals underwent laparotomy and manipulation of the cecum without ligation or puncture. Sixteen hours after CLP or laparotomy, protein synthesis and degradation were measured in incubated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) muscles by determining rate of /sup 14/C-phenylalanine incorporation into protein and tyrosine release into incubation medium, respectively. Triiodothyronine (T3) was measured in serum and muscle tissue. Protein synthesis was reduced by 39% and 22% in EDL and SOL, respectively, 16 hours after CLP in sham-Tx rats. The response to sepsis of protein synthesis was abolished in Tx rats. Protein breakdown was increased by 113% and 68% in EDL and SOL, respectively, 16 hours after CLP in sham-Tx animals. The increase in muscle proteolysis during sepsis was blunted in hypothyroid animals and was 42% and 49% in EDL and SOL, respectively. T3 in serum was reduced by sepsis, both in Tx and sham-Tx rats. T3 in muscle, however, was maintained or increased during sepsis. Abolished or blunted response of muscle protein turnover after CLP in hypothyroid animals may reflect a role of thyroid hormones in altered muscle protein metabolism during sepsis. Reduced serum levels of T3, but maintained or increased muscle concentrations of the hormone, suggests that increased T3 uptake by muscle may be one mechanism of low T3 syndrome in sepsis, further supporting the concept of a role for thyroid hormone in metabolic alterations in muscle during sepsis.

  11. Syndromes of reduced sensitivity to thyroid hormone: genetic defects in hormone receptors, cell transporters and deiodination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refetoff, Samuel; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M

    2007-06-01

    At least six major steps are required for secreted thyroid hormone (TH) to exert its action on target tissues. Mutations interfering with three of these steps have been so far identified. The first recognized defect, which causes resistance to TH, involves the TH receptor beta gene and has been given the acronym RTH. Occurring in approximately 1 per 40,000 newborns, more than 1000 affected subjects, from 339 families, have been identified. The gene defect remains unknown in 15% of subjects with RTH. Two novel syndromes causing reduced sensitivity to TH were recently identified. One, producing severe psychomotor defects in > 100 males from 26 families, is caused by mutations in the cell-membrane transporter of TH, MCT8; the second, affecting the intracellular metabolism of TH in four individuals from two families, is caused by mutations in the SECISBP2 gene, which is required for the synthesis of selenoproteins, including TH deiodinases.

  12. Thyroid hormone modulates food intake and glycemia via ghrelin secretion in Zucker fatty rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, K; Joharapurkar, A; Dhanesha, N; Patel, V; Kshirsagar, S; Raval, P; Raval, S; Jain, M R

    2014-10-01

    Hyperthyroidism is known to increase food intake and central administration of thyroid hormone shows acute orexigenic effects in rodents. We investigated whether T3 influences appetite and glucose homeostasis by modulating circulating ghrelin, an important orexigenic hormone, in Zucker fatty rats. The acute anorectic effects of T3 and ghrelin mimetic MK-0677 were studied in rats trained for fasting induced food intake. The serum concentration of T3, ghrelin, glucose, triglycerides, and liver glycogen were estimated. The involvement of sympathetic nervous system was evaluated by conducting similar experiments in vagotomized rats. T3 increased food intake and glucose in rats over 4 h, with increase in serum T3 and decrease in liver glycogen. T3 treatment was associated with increase in serum ghrelin. An additive effect on appetite and glucose was observed when T3 (oral) was administered with central (intracerebroventricular) administration of a ghrelin mimetic, MK-0677. Ghrelin antagonist, compound 8a, antagonized the hyperglycemic and hyperphagic effects of T3. In vagotomized rats, T3 did not show increase in appetite as well as glucose. Serum ghrelin levels were unchanged in these animals after T3 treatment. However, T3 showed increase in serum triglyceride levels indicating its peripheral lipolytic effect, in vagotomized as well as sham treated animals. To conclude, acute orexigenic and hyperglycemic effects of T3 are associated with ghrelin secretion and activity. This effect seems to be mediated via vagus nerves, and is independent of glucoregulatory hormones.

  13. Initiating egg production in turkey breeder hens: thyroid hormone involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siopes, T D; Millam, J R; Steinman, M Q

    2010-10-01

    The role of thyroid hormones in the expression of photosensitivity-photorefractoriness in female turkeys was investigated through the use of an antithyroidal agent, 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU). In experiment 1, females held continuously from hatch on long day lengths (16L:8D; LD) and fed 0.1% PTU from 0 to 16 wk, began laying eggs at 26 wk of age, peaking at 75% hen-day egg production by 29 wk, whereas controls initiated lay 3 wk earlier but only achieved less than 50% hen-day egg production. In experiment 2, PTU treatment from 10 to 18 wk severely suppressed plasma triiodothyronine and thyroxine, as confirmed by RIA. Egg production of PTU and control hens held on LD from hatch began by 23 wk, with PTU hens reaching a substantially greater rate of lay than controls. Eggs were smaller initially in both treatments but exceeded 75 g by 28 wk. In experiment 3, recycled hens on short day lengths (8L:16D) received PTU for 2 wk before LD and 12 wk thereafter; a subset of these hens was killed after 48 h of LD for immunohistochemical analysis of fos-related antigen (FRA) expression in the tuberal hypothalamus as a marker of photoinduced neuronal activity. The PTU treatment completely forestalled egg production until its withdrawal; egg production then rose sharply to control levels before resuming, along with controls, a typical seasonal decline. The PTU treatment did not impair photoinduced FRA expression. Together, these results demonstrate the following: 1) that a period of pharmacological suppression of triiodothyronine and thyroxine can substitute for short day exposure in conferring photosensitivity on juvenile-aged turkeys (and is actually superior to short day exposure), 2) that reproductive development does not limit egg production of turkey hens photostimulated as young as approximately 20 wk of age, and 3) that effects of thyroid suppression on photostimulation lie downstream of photoinduced FRA expression. Taken together, these results suggest that there is

  14. Increased carotid IMT in overweight and obese women affected by Hashimoto's thyroiditis: an adiposity and autoimmune linkage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Guida

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hashimoto's thyroiditis is the most important cause of hypothyroidism. It is a systemic disease that can even affect the cardiovascular system, by accelerating the atherosclerotic process. Aim of this study was to examine whether autoimmune thyroiditis has an effect on the intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery (IMT-CCT, independently of the thyroid function and well-known cardiovascular risk factors. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is a systemic disease. The aim is to examine whether autoimmune thyroiditis and adiposity can effect carotid IMT independently of thyroid hormones and cardiovascular risk factors. Methods A total of 104 obese women (BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m-2, with FT3 and FT4 serum levels in the normal range and TSH levels Results Of the 104 women, 30 (28.8% were affected by autoimmune thyroiditis. Significantly higher values of IMT-CCT (p Conclusions The present study shows that Hashimoto's thyroiditis is associated to an increased IMT only in overweight and obese, independently of the thyroid function, BMI and cardiovascular risk factors. These results suggest that Hashimoto's thyroiditis is a marker of evolution of the atherosclerosis if combined to adiposity.

  15. Reduction of thyroid hormone levels by methylsulfonyl metabolites of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Yoshihisa; Shibahara, Tomoo; Kimura, Ryohei [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka (Japan); Haraguchi, Koichi; Masuda, Yoshito [Daiichi College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats received four consecutive intraperitoneal doses of four kinds of methylsulfonyl (MeSO{sub 2}) metabolites of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners: 3-MeSO{sub 2}-2,2`,3`,4`,5,6-hexachlorobiphenyl (3-MeSO{sub 2}-CB132); 3-MeSO{sub 2}-2,2`,3`,4`, 5,5`-hexachlorobiphenyl (3-MeSO{sub 2}-CB141); 3-MeSO{sub 2}-2,2`,4`,5,5`,6-hexachlorobiphenyl (3-MeSO{sub 2}-CB149) and 4-MeSO{sub 2}-2,2`,4`,5,5`,6-hexachlorobiphenyl (4-MeSO{sub 2}-CB149). The congeners were major MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs determined in human milk, liver and adipose tissue, and the aim was to determine their effect on thyroid hormone levels. All four tested MeSO{sub 2} metabolites (20 {mu}mol/kg once daily for 4 days) reduced serum total thyroxine levels by 22-44% at a much lower dose than phenobarbital (PB; 431 {mu}mol/kg once daily for 4 days) on days 2, 3, 4 and 7 after the final doses. Total triiodothyronine levels were reduced 37% by treatment with 4-MeSO{sub 2}-CB149 at day 7. A 30% increase in thyroid weight was produced by 3-MeSO{sub 2}-CB141 treatment. Total cytochrome P450 content was increased by 3-MeSO{sub 2}-CB132, 3-MeSO{sub 2}-CB141 and 3-MeSO{sub 2}-CB149, but not by 4-MeSO{sub 2}-CB149. Thus, it is likely that the 3-MeSO{sub 2}-hexachlorobiphenyls and 4-MeSO{sub 2}-CB149 could influence the thyroid hormone metabolism by different mechanism(s). The results show that tested 3- and 4-MeSO{sub 2} metabolites of PCB congeners reduce thyroid hormone levels much more than PB in rats. Our finding suggests that the metabolites may act as endocrine-disrupters. (orig.) With 2 figs., 1 tab., 25 refs.

  16. Profile of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis in Sri Lankans: Is There an Increased Risk of Ancillary Pathologies in Hashimoto's Thyroiditis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eranga Himalee Siriweera

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto's thyroiditis has been reported to be associated with many neoplastic and nonneoplastic thyroid pathologies. This retrospective study aims to determine the demographic profile of Hashimoto's thyroiditis in Sri Lankans, document ancillary pathologies in Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and determine whether there is an increased risk of occurrence of malignancies, benign neoplasms, and nonneoplastic benign lesions in Hashimoto's thyroiditis by comparing with thyroids showing multinodular goiters, follicular adenomas, and colloid nodules. The mean age of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is 43.3 years with the majority in the 41 to 60 year age group and a female to male ratio of 10.3 : 1. This study revealed a statistically significant increase of thyroid malignancies in association with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The association of Papillary carcinoma, Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and Hurthle cell adenoma with Hashimoto's thyroiditis was statistically significant.

  17. Profile of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis in Sri Lankans: Is There an Increased Risk of Ancillary Pathologies in Hashimoto's Thyroiditis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriweera, Eranga Himalee; Ratnatunga, Neelakanthi Vajira Illangakoon

    2010-10-10

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis has been reported to be associated with many neoplastic and nonneoplastic thyroid pathologies. This retrospective study aims to determine the demographic profile of Hashimoto's thyroiditis in Sri Lankans, document ancillary pathologies in Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and determine whether there is an increased risk of occurrence of malignancies, benign neoplasms, and nonneoplastic benign lesions in Hashimoto's thyroiditis by comparing with thyroids showing multinodular goiters, follicular adenomas, and colloid nodules. The mean age of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is 43.3 years with the majority in the 41 to 60 year age group and a female to male ratio of 10.3 : 1. This study revealed a statistically significant increase of thyroid malignancies in association with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The association of Papillary carcinoma, Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and Hurthle cell adenoma with Hashimoto's thyroiditis was statistically significant.

  18. Halogen bonding controls the regioselectivity of the deiodination of thyroid hormones and their sulfate analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Debasish; Mondal, Santanu; Mugesh, Govindasamy

    2015-02-02

    The type 1 iodothyronine deiodinase (1D-1) in liver and kidney converts the L-thyroxine (T4), a prohormone, by outer-ring (5') deiodination to biologically active 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3) or by inner-ring (5) deiodination to inactive 3,3',5'-triiodothronine (rT3). Sulfate conjugation is an important step in the irreversible inactivation of thyroid hormones. While sulfate conjugation of the phenolic hydroxyl group stimulates the 5-deiodination of T4 and T3, it blocks the 5'-deiodination of T4. We show that thyroxine sulfate (T4S) undergoes faster deiodination as compared to the parent thyroid hormone T4 by synthetic selenium compounds. It is also shown that ID-3 mimics, which are remarkably selective to the inner-ring deiodination of T4 and T3, changes the selectivity completely when T4S is used as a substrate. From the theoretical investigations, it is observed that the strength of halogen bonding increases upon sulfate conjugation, which leads to a change in the regioselectivity of ID-3 mimics towards the deiodination of T4S. It has been shown that these mimics perform both the 5'- and 5-ring deiodinations by an identical mechanism. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Plasma thyroid hormone concentration is associated with hepatic triglyceride content in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bril, Fernando; Kadiyala, Sushma; Portillo Sanchez, Paola; Sunny, Nishanth E; Biernacki, Diane; Maximos, Maryann; Kalavalapalli, Srilaxmi; Lomonaco, Romina; Suman, Amitabh; Cusi, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms responsible for the development and progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are unclear. Since the thyroid hormone regulates mitochondrial function in the liver, we designed this study in order to establish the association between plasma free T4 levels and hepatic triglyceride accumulation and histological severity of liver disease in patients with T2DM and NAFLD. This is a cross-sectional study including a total of 232 patients with T2DM. All patients underwent a liver MR spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) to quantify hepatic triglyceride content, and an oral glucose tolerance test to estimate insulin resistance. A liver biopsy was performed in patients with a diagnosis of NAFLD. Patients were divided into 5 groups according to plasma free T4 quintiles. We observed that decreasing free T4 levels were associated with an increasing prevalence of NAFLD (from 55% if free T4≥1.18 ng/dL to 80% if free T4triglyceride accumulation by (1)H-MRS (ptriglyceride content in patients with T2DM. These results suggest that thyroid hormone may play a role in the regulation of hepatic steatosis and support the notion that hypothyroidism may be associated with NAFLD. No NCT number required. Copyright © 2016 American Federation for Medical Research.

  20. Correlation of thyroid hormone levels and immune function state with the illness in patients with chronic urticaria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yan Sun; Guang-Zhong Yang; Qing-Xiang Li; Yao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the correlation of thyroid hormone level and immune function state with the illness in patients with chronic urticaria.Methods:A total of 54 patients with chronic urticaria treated in our hospital between May 2015 and October 2015 were selected as the chronic urticaria group (CU group) of the study, 50 healthy volunteers receiving physical examination in our hospital during the same period were selected as the negative control group (NC group) of the study, serum was collected to determine the content of immunoglobulins, complements, interleukins, thyroid hormone and autoantibodies.Results: Serum C3, C4 and IL-2 content of CU group were significantly lower than those of NC group while IgG, IgE, IL-4, IL-17, IL-18 and IL-33 content were significantly higher than those of NC group; serum TT3, TT4, FT3, FT4, TSAb, TGAb, TPOAb and TMAb content of CU group were significantly higher than those of NC group, negatively correlated with serum C3, C4 and IL-2 content, and positively correlated with serum IgG, IgE, IL-4, IL-17, IL-18 and IL-33 content;serum TSH content was significantly lower than that of NC group, positively correlated with serum C3, C4 and IL-2 content, and negatively correlated with serum IgG, IgE, IL-4, IL-17, IL-18 and IL-33 content.Conclusions: Thyroid autoantibody synthesis and thyroid hormone release increase in patients with chronic urticaria, and the change of thyroid hormone levels and immune function is closely related to the illness.

  1. SEX-STEROID AND THYROID HORMONE CONCENTRATIONS IN JUVENILE ALLIGATORS (ALLIGATOR MISSISSIPPIENSIS) FROM CONTAMINATED AND REFERENCE LAKES IN FLORIDA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex-steroid and thyroid hormones are critical regulators of growth and reproduction in all vertebrates, and several recent studies suggest that environmental chemicals can alter circulating concentrations of these hormones. This study examines plasma concentrations of estradiol-...

  2. Effects of topiramate and carbamazepine on thyroid hormone level in adults with epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Yu; Yulan Huang; Hongbin Sun; Jie Liu; Fei Xu; Xiaoping Wang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been demonstrated that traditional antiepileptics, such as phenytoin, carbamazepine (CBZ), phenobarbital, etc., can result in the decrease of thyroid hormone of epileptic patients. However, there is still no sufficient evidence for the studies about the effect of new-type antiepileptics, such as topiramate (TPM),on thyroid hormones.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of TPM and CBZ on the level of thyroid hormones in serum of adults with epilepsy.DESIGN: A comparative observation.SETTING: Department of Neurology, Sichuan Provincial People's Hospital.PARTICIPANTS: Totally 100 outpatients or inpatients newly diagnosed to have epilepsy were selected from the Department of Neurology, Sichuan Provincial People's Hospital from July 2003 to August 2005, including 60males and 40 females, aged 18-70 years. All the patients were accorded with the standard for the classification of epilepsy set by International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) in 1981; Had been Informed and agreed with the detection; Had no history of thyroid gland disease; Had not taken any drugs could affect the thyroid function. Meanwhile, 40 adult healthy examinees were selected from our hospital as the control group, including24 males and 16 females, aged 18-65 years.METHODS: ① The 100 epileptic patients were randomly divided into TPM group (n =50) and CBZ group (n =50),and they were treated with TPM (Xian-Janssen Pharmaceutical, Ltd.; Batch number: 03AS032, Norm: 25mg/tablet) and CBZ (Shanghai Sunve Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.; Batch number: 030201, Norm: 100 mg/tablet)respectively. The initial dosage of TPM was 25 mg per day, increased by 25 mg every week, the objective dosage of 100-200 mg per day was maintained when the symptoms were satisfactorily controlled. The dosage of CBZ was 6-8 mg/kg per day. All the patients were administrated for 1 year. ② The serum levels of total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (FT4), total triiodothyronine (TT3), free triiodothyronine (FT3) and thyroid

  3. Thyroid hormones association with depression severity and clinical outcome in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berent, Dominika; Zboralski, Krzysztof; Orzechowska, Agata; Gałecki, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    The clinical implications of thyroid hormones in depression have been studied extensively and still remains disputable. Supplementation of thyroid hormones is considered to augment and accelerate antidepressant treatment. Studies on the role of thyroid hormones in depression deliver contradictory results. Here we assess theirs impact on depression severity and final clinical outcome in patients with major depression. Thyrotropin, free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations were measured with automated quantitative enzyme immunoassay. Depression severity and final clinical outcome were rated with 17-itemic Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression [HDRS(17)] and Clinical Global Impression Scales for severity and for improvement (CGIs, CGIi). FT3 and FT4 concentrations were significantly positively correlated with clinical improvement evaluated with CGIi (R = 0.38, P = 0.012; R = 0.33, P = 0.034, respectively). There was a significant correlation between FT4 concentrations and depression severity assessed in HDRS(17) (R = 0.31, P = 0.047). Male patients presented significantly higher FT3 serum levels (Z = 2.34, P = 0.018) and significantly greater clinical improvement (Z = 2.36, P = 0.018) when compared to female patients. We conclude that free thyroid hormones concentrations are associated with depression severity and have an impact on final clinical outcome. It can be more efficient to augment and accelerate the treatment of major depressive disorder with triiodothyronine instead of levothyroxine because of individual differences in thyroid hormones metabolism.

  4. Does closantel in therapeutic doses display thyroid hormone-like activity in sheep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoj, T; Cebulj-Kadunc, N; Kobal, S

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to define the thyroid hormone-like activity of closantel in sheep by measuring some blood parameters that are known to be influenced by thyroid hormones triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). Our hypothesis was that, if closantel possesses thyroid hormone-like activity, its use under in vivo conditions will result in changes similar to those in hyperthyroidism. The study was conducted in 20 Jezersko-Solchava breed sheep. Blood sampling was performed before and 10 days after routine anthelmintic treatment with closantel. Complete blood count, plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, protein, and albumin levels, as well as those of serum T3 and T4, were compared before and 10 days after closantel administration. This routine anthelmintic treatment of sheep with closantel did not significantly influence hematological parameters, thyroid hormone levels, or most of the biochemical parameters. No evidence was found for thyroid hormone-like activity of closantel in sheep. However, significantly (P closantel administration. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Association of thyroid-stimulating hormone with insulin resistance and androgen parameters in women with PCOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Ralf; Kajaia, Natia; Cupisti, Susanne; Hoffmann, Inge; Beckmann, Matthias W; Mueller, Andreas

    2009-09-01

    There is a relationship between thyroid function and insulin sensitivity and alterations in lipids and metabolic parameters. Little information is available regarding this relationship in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. However all those pathologies are also described as often affecting women with polycystic ovary syndrome. The association between thyroid-stimulating hormone or =2.5 mIU/l with insulin resistance and endocrine parameters in 103 women with polycystic ovary syndrome was studied. Clinical, metabolic and endocrine parameters were obtained and an oral glucose tolerance test was performed with calculation of insulin resistance indices. Women with thyroid-stimulating hormone > or =2.5 mIU/l had a significantly higher body mass index (P = 0.003), higher fasting insulin concentrations (P = 0.02) and altered insulin resistance indices (P = 0.007), higher total testosterone (P = 0.009) and free androgen indices (P = 0.001) and decreased sex hormone-binding globulin concentrations (P = 0.01) in comparison with women with thyroid-stimulating hormone or =2.5 mIU/l. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome and with thyroid-stimulating hormone > or =2.5 mIU/l had significantly altered endocrine and metabolic changes.

  6. Sex steroid and thyroid hormone receptor expressions in the thyroid of the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) during different life stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Dieldrich S; Skotko, Jeremy P; Ohta, Yasuhiko; Boggs, Ashley S P; Iguchi, Taisen; Guillette, Louis J

    2011-06-01

    The expression of estrogen receptors, ESR1 (ERα) and ESR2 (ERβ), and androgen receptors (AR) in the thyroid gland has been reported in few vertebrate species other than a few mammals. This study reports the presence of sex steroid hormone receptors and thyroid receptors (ERα, ERβ, AR, TRα, and TRβ) in the thyroid gland of the American alligator at several life stages. It provides a semiquantification and distribution of ERα in the thyroid follicle cells using an immunohistochemical approach as well as reports quantitative differences in mRNA expression of ERα, ERβ, TRα, TRβ, and AR in the same tissue using quantitative real time-PCR (Q-PCR) with primers designed specifically for alligators. The thyroid tissue of the American alligator expresses ERα, ERβ, and AR at all of the life stages examined here although no statistically significant differences were observed between male and female in thyroid mRNA expression for any of the genes analyzed. No sexual dimorphism was observed in ERα immunostaining. No statistical analysis across life stages were performed due to confounding factor of season. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Perfluoroalkyl substances, thyroid hormones, and neuropsychological status in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Srishti; Bloom, Michael S; Yucel, Recai; Seegal, Richard F; Rej, Robert; McCaffrey, Robert J; Wu, Qian; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Fitzgerald, Edward F

    2016-12-30

    Minimal data exist regarding the neurotoxicity of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in aging populations and the possible mediating effects of thyroid hormones (THs). Hence, the aims of this study were to: (i) assess associations between PFASs and neuropsychological function, and (ii) determine if such associations are mediated by changes in circulating THs in an aging population. We measured perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), total thyroxine (T4) and free thyroxine (fT4) in serum and performed neuropsychological tests in 157 men and women aged 55-74 years and living in upper Hudson River communities. Multivariable linear regressions were conducted to assess associations between PFASs and neuropsychological test scores. Mediation analyses were performed in a subset of 87 participants for whom information was available on both PFASs and THs. We obtained TH-mediated, non-TH mediated, and total effects of PFASs on neuropsychological test scores. Overall, our results suggested a protective association between higher PFOA and tasks of executive function. A one interquartile range higher PFOA was associated with a 16% lower perseverative score (that is, improved performance) on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (p-value=0.04). T4 and fT4 partially mediated the protective effect of PFOS on Block Design Subtest total scores, a measure of visuospatial function, in the 87 person subsample. Our findings do not suggest that PFASs are associated with poor neuropsychological function. There was some evidence of mediation for the association between PFASs and neuropsychological functions by THs, although some other modes of action also appear likely.

  8. Nutrition, evolution and thyroid hormone levels - a link to iodine deficiency disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    An increased iodine requirement as a result of significant changes in human nutrition rather than a decreased environmental iodine supply is suggested to represent the main cause of the iodine deficiency disorders (IDD). The pathomechanism proposed is based on the fact that serum concentrations of thyroid hormones, especially of trijodothyronine (T3), are dependent on the amount of dietary carbohydrate. High-carbohydrate diets are associated with significantly higher serum T3 concentrations, compared with very low-carbohydrate diets. While our Paleolithic ancestors subsisted on a very low carbohydrate/high protein diet, the agricultural revolution about 10,000 years ago brought about a significant increase in dietary carbohydrate. These nutritional changes have increased T3 levels significantly. Higher T3 levels are associated with an enhanced T3 production and an increased iodine requirement. The higher iodine requirement exceeds the availability of iodine from environmental sources in many regions of the world, resulting in the development of IDD.

  9. Thyroid hormonal disturbances related to treatment of hepatitis C with interferon-alpha and ribavirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Lucia Seguro Danilovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize thyroid disturbances induced by interferon-alpha and ribavirin therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C. INTRODUCTION: Interferon-alpha is used to treat chronic hepatitis C infections. This compound commonly induces both autoimmune and non-autoimmune thyroiditis. METHODS: We prospectively selected 26 patients with chronic hepatitis C infections. Clinical examinations, hormonal evaluations, and color-flow Doppler ultrasonography of the thyroid were performed before and during antiviral therapy. RESULTS: Of the patients in our study, 54% had no thyroid disorders associated with the interferon-alpha therapy but showed reduced levels of total T3 along with a decrease in serum alanine aminotransferase. Total T4 levels were also reduced at 3 and 12 months, but free T4 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH levels remained stable. A total of 19% of the subjects had autoimmune interferon-induced thyroiditis, which is characterized by an emerge of antithyroid antibodies or overt hypothyroidism. Additionally, 16% had non-autoimmune thyroiditis, which presents as destructive thyroiditis or subclinical hypothyroidism, and 11% remained in a state of euthyroidism despite the prior existence of antithyroidal antibodies. Thyrotoxicosis with destructive thyroiditis was diagnosed within three months of therapy, and ultrasonography of these patients revealed thyroid shrinkage and discordant change in the vascular patterns. DISCUSSION: Decreases in the total T3 and total T4 levels may be related to improvements in the hepatocellular lesions or inflammatory changes similar to those associated with nonthyroidal illnesses. The immune mechanisms and direct effects of interferon-alpha can be associated with thyroiditis. CONCLUSION: Interferon-alpha and ribavirin induce autoimmune and non-autoimmune thyroiditis and hormonal changes (such as decreased total T3 and total T4 levels, which occur despite stable free T4 and TSH levels. A thyroid

  10. Fetal and neonatal iron deficiency exacerbates mild thyroid hormone insufficiency effects on male thyroid hormone levels and brain thyroid hormone-responsive gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Thomas W; Prohaska, Joseph R; Georgieff, Michael K; Anderson, Grant W

    2014-03-01

    Fetal/neonatal iron (Fe) and iodine/TH deficiencies lead to similar brain developmental abnormalities and often coexist in developing countries. We recently demonstrated that fetal/neonatal Fe deficiency results in a mild neonatal thyroidal impairment, suggesting that TH insufficiency contributes to the neurodevelopmental abnormalities associated with Fe deficiency. We hypothesized that combining Fe deficiency with an additional mild thyroidal perturbation (6-propyl-2-thiouracil [PTU]) during development would more severely impair neonatal thyroidal status and brain TH-responsive gene expression than either deficiency alone. Early gestation pregnant rats were assigned to 7 different treatment groups: control, Fe deficient (FeD), mild TH deficient (1 ppm PTU), moderate TH deficient (3 ppm PTU), severe TH deficient (10 ppm PTU), FeD/1 ppm PTU, or FeD/3 ppm PTU. FeD or 1 ppm PTU treatment alone reduced postnatal day 15 serum total T4 concentrations by 64% and 74%, respectively, without significantly altering serum total T3 concentrations. Neither treatment alone significantly altered postnatal day 16 cortical or hippocampal T3 concentrations. FeD combined with 1 ppm PTU treatment produced a more severe effect, reducing serum total T4 by 95%, and lowering hippocampal and cortical T3 concentrations by 24% and 31%, respectively. Combined FeD/PTU had a more severe effect on brain TH-responsive gene expression than either treatment alone, significantly altering Pvalb, Dio2, Mbp, and Hairless hippocampal and/or cortical mRNA levels. FeD/PTU treatment more severely impacted cortical and hippocampal parvalbumin protein expression compared with either individual treatment. These data suggest that combining 2 mild thyroidal insults during development significantly disrupts thyroid function and impairs TH-regulated brain gene expression.

  11. Chemical Hybridization of Glucagon and Thyroid Hormone Optimizes Therapeutic Impact for Metabolic Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finan, Brian; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Zhu, Zhimeng

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon and thyroid hormone (T3) exhibit therapeutic potential for metabolic disease but also exhibit undesired effects. We achieved synergistic effects of these two hormones and mitigation of their adverse effects by engineering chemical conjugates enabling delivery of both activities within on...... the cardiovascular system from adverse T3 action. Our findings support the therapeutic utility of integrating these hormones into a single molecular entity that offers unique potential for treatment of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.......Glucagon and thyroid hormone (T3) exhibit therapeutic potential for metabolic disease but also exhibit undesired effects. We achieved synergistic effects of these two hormones and mitigation of their adverse effects by engineering chemical conjugates enabling delivery of both activities within one...

  12. Prevalence of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Eskes; E. Endert; E. Fliers; W.M. Wiersinga

    2010-01-01

    Context: Autoimmune hypophysitis can result in GH deficiency (GHD) and is associated with other autoimmune endocrine diseases like Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Recent studies suggest a high prevalence (5%) of GHD in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Objective: Our objective was to establish the prevalence of GHD

  13. Effects of Polychlorinated Biphenyls on Thyroid Hormone Physiology and Metabolism of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax)

    OpenAIRE

    Schnitzler, Joseph; Klaren, Peter; Celis, Niko; Blust, Ronny; Covaci, Adrian; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Das, Krishna

    2010-01-01

    Studies in the laboratory have shown that a number of synthetic and natural chemicals can interfere with the endocrine system in fish. Among them, organic compounds such as pesticides and polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) are well described endocrine disrupters. Of particular interest are effects on thyroid function, but data on effects of PCB exposure on these hormones and related metabolism has been lacking. We propose here a thorough approach to assess effects of these compounds on the thyroid fu...

  14. Syndrome of Reduced Sensitivity to Thyroid Hormones: Two Case Reports and a Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyfantakis, Anastasios; Vourliotaki, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is an extremely rare dominantly inherited condition of impaired tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormone (TH). Most patients with RTH have mutations in the gene that encodes the β isoform of the receptor of thyroid hormone (THR-β gene). Mutant receptors are unable to activate or repress target genes. The majority of them are asymptomatic or rarely have hypo- or hyperthyroidism. RTH is suspected by the finding of persistent elevation of serum levels of free T3 (FT3) and free T4 (FT4) and nonsuppressed TSH. We present two cases of RTH diagnosed after total thyroidectomy. The first patient was initially diagnosed with primary hyperthyroidism due to toxic multinodular goiter. The second patient had undergone thyroidectomy for multinodular goiter 16 years before diagnosis of RTH. After thyroidectomy, although on relatively high doses of levothyroxine, both of them presented with the laboratory findings of RTH. Genetic analysis revealed RTH.

  15. Effects of Inula racemosa root and Gymnema sylvestre leaf extracts in the regulation of corticosteroid induced diabetes mellitus: involvement of thyroid hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholap, S; Kar, A

    2003-06-01

    The efficacy of Inula racemosa (root) and Gymnema sylvestre (leaf) extracts either alone or in combination was evaluated in the amelioration of corticosteroid-induced hyperglycaemia in mice. Simultaneously thyroid hormone levels were estimated by radio-immunoassay (RIA) in order to ascertain whether the effects are mediated through thyroid hormones or not. While the corticosteroid (dexamethasone) administration increased the serum glucose concentration, it decreased serum concentrations of the thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). Administration of the two plant extracts either alone or in combination decreased the serum glucose concentration in dexamethasone induced hyperglycaemic animals. However, the administration of Inula racemosa and Gymnema sylvestre extracts in combination proved to be more effective than the individual extracts. These effects were comparable to a standard corticosteroid-inhibiting drug, ketoconazole. As no marked changes in thyroid hormone concentrations were observed by the administration of any of the plant extracts in dexamethasone treated animals, it is further suggested that these plant extracts may not prove to be effective in thyroid hormone mediated type II diabetes, but for steroid induced diabetes.

  16. Influence of Depressive State on Levels of Homocysteine and Thyroid Hormone in Patients with Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-wei WANG

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To explore the influence of depressive state on the levels of homocysteine (Hcy and thyroid hormone in patients with hypertension.Methods: Totally 179 patients with primary hypertension were selected and divided into depression group (n=97 and non-depression group (n=82 according to whether to be complicated with depressive disorder. The venous blood was drawn for detecting the level of Hcy of 2 groups by enzymatic cycling assay, and serum free triiodothyronine (FT3, free thyroxine (FT4 and thyrotropic hormone (TSH by chemiluminiscence. The correlation between Hamilton depression scale (HAMD scores and levels of plasma Hcy and serum FT3, FT4 and TSH was analyzed.Results: Compared with non-depression group, the level of plasma Hcy increased and the levels of FT3 and FT4 decreased in depression group (P<0.05, but there was no statistical difference between 2 groups (P>0.05. HAMD scores in depression group had a positive correlation with the level of plasma Hcy (r=0.593, P=0.024, a negative correlation with the level of serum FT3 (r=-0.421,P=0.011, and no relationships with the levels of serum FT4 and TSH (r=-0.137, P=0.334; r=0.058, P=0.576.Conclusion: Hypertensive patients complicated with depression have abnormal level of Hcy and thyroid hormones. Moreover, the depressive degree of patients is positively correlated with the level of Hcy and negatively with the level of FT3.

  17. Thyroid hormones in donkey blood and milk: correlations with milk yield and environmental temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Todini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones (TH are the primary endocrine stimulators of non-shivering thermogenesis and are known to stimulate lactation. Triiodothyronine (T3 is the bioactive form, mainly derived by deiodination of thyroxine (T4, and the free quote (unbound to plasma proteins is immediately bioavailable. This study aimed to evaluate potential relationships among TH in the blood, triiodothyronine in the milk (T3M, milk yield and environmental temperature in March to July for 8 lactating donkeys. Milk yield and blood TH concentrations changed significantly over time, whereas T3M was rather stable among individuals and not affected by time of sampling. Free T3 was not correlated with free T4 or with total TH in the blood, but it was weakly correlated with T3M. No relationship was found between blood TH and milk yield, which was negatively correlated with T3M. Thus, the absolute quantity of bioactive hormone in milk secretion is maintained. Milk yield was positively correlated with the free/total T3 and free T3/free T4 ratios, thus in turn with the relative quote of the circulating bioactive hormone. Circulating T3/T4 ratios were negatively correlated with environmental temperature. It is concluded that environmental temperature, in the range of the present study (-2 to 35°C, does not significantly entrain thyroid gland activity, which is affected more by other factors, such as inter-individual variations and physiological status (i.e., stage of lactation. However, increases in environmental temperature most likely induce decreases in deiodinase activity at the peripheral tissue level, as indicated by the decrease in the T3/T4 ratios in the blood.

  18. Identification of a novel modulator of thyroid hormone receptor-mediated action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard G Baumgartner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetes is characterized by reduced thyroid function and altered myogenesis after muscle injury. Here we identify a novel component of thyroid hormone action that is repressed in diabetic rat muscle. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have identified a gene, named DOR, abundantly expressed in insulin-sensitive tissues such as skeletal muscle and heart, whose expression is highly repressed in muscle from obese diabetic rats. DOR expression is up-regulated during muscle differentiation and its loss-of-function has a negative impact on gene expression programmes linked to myogenesis or driven by thyroid hormones. In agreement with this, DOR enhances the transcriptional activity of the thyroid hormone receptor TR(alpha1. This function is driven by the N-terminal part of the protein. Moreover, DOR physically interacts with TR( alpha1 and to T(3-responsive promoters, as shown by ChIP assays. T(3 stimulation also promotes the mobilization of DOR from its localization in nuclear PML bodies, thereby indicating that its nuclear localization and cellular function may be related. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data indicate that DOR modulates thyroid hormone function and controls myogenesis. DOR expression is down-regulated in skeletal muscle in diabetes. This finding may be of relevance for the alterations in muscle function associated with this disease.

  19. VARIATION IN THYROID HORMONES LEVEL AMONG PEOPLE OF DIFFERENT AGE, GENDER AND SEASONS, PIPARIA, GUJARAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Chaurasia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thyroid is an endocrine gland located below the larynx. The principal thyroid hormones are thyroxine (T4, tri-iodothyroxine (T3. The current study was carried out to investigate the impact of age, gender and seasons on the level of Thyroxine (T4, Triiodothyronine (T3 and Thyroid Stimulating Hormone in individuals free of thyroid diseases. Methods: - Serum levels of T3, T4 and TSH in 198 individuals attending Dhiraj General Hospital in different seasons were examined. Hormonal assay was done by using AIA 360 immunoassay. Results: - Levels of T3, T4 and TSH ranged from 0.98-4.8ng/dl, 0.56-3-25ng/dl and 0.01-5.3μIU/L. There is significant change in thyroid hormone levels in both genders of different age group in different seasons. Conclusion:- It is concluded that the age, gender and seasons have an appreciable effects on the levels T3, T4 and TSH. [National J of Med Res 2011; 1(2.000: 57-59

  20. (-) Arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogungbe, Ifedayo Victor; Crouch, Rebecca A; Demeritte, Teresa

    2014-11-24

    Lignans are important biologically active dietary polyphenolic compounds. Consumption of foods that are rich in lignans is associated with positive health effects. Using modeling tools to probe the ligand-binding pockets of molecular receptors, we found that lignans have high docking affinity for the human thyroid hormone receptor β. Follow-up experimental results show that lignans (-) arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β. The modeled complexes show key plausible interactions between the two ligands and important amino acid residues of the receptor.

  1. Association of the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor gene (TSHR) with Graves' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Oliver J; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Simmonds, Matthew J;

    2009-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is a common autoimmune disease (AID) that shares many of its susceptibility loci with other AIDs. The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) represents the primary autoantigen in GD, in which autoantibodies bind to the receptor and mimic its ligand, thyroid stimulating...... hormone, causing the characteristic clinical phenotype. Although early studies investigating the TSHR and GD proved inconclusive, more recently we provided convincing evidence for association of the TSHR region with disease. In the current study, we investigated a combined panel of 98 SNPs, including 70...

  2. (−) Arctigenin and (+) Pinoresinol Are Antagonists of the Human Thyroid Hormone Receptor β

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Lignans are important biologically active dietary polyphenolic compounds. Consumption of foods that are rich in lignans is associated with positive health effects. Using modeling tools to probe the ligand-binding pockets of molecular receptors, we found that lignans have high docking affinity for the human thyroid hormone receptor β. Follow-up experimental results show that lignans (−) arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β. The modeled complexes show key plausible interactions between the two ligands and important amino acid residues of the receptor. PMID:25383984

  3. The effect of thyroid hormones on the white adipose tissue gene expression of PAI-1 and its serum concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Biz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases and Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1 overexpression may play a significant role in this process. A positive correlation between adipose tissue gene expression of PAI-1 and its serum concentration has been reported. Furthermore, high serum levels of thyroid hormones (T3 and T4 and PAI-1 have been observed in obese children. The present study evaluates the impact of thyroid hormone treatment on white adipose tissue PAI-1 gene expression and its serum concentration. Male Wistar rats (60 days old were treated for three weeks with T4 (50 µg/day, Hyper or with saline (control. Additionally, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated for 24 h with T4 (100 nM or T3 (100 nM. PAI-1 gene expression was determined by real-time PCR, while the serum concentration of PAI-1 was measured by ELISA using a commercial kit (Innovative Research, USA. Both the serum concentration of PAI-1 and mRNA levels were similar between groups in retroperitoneal and epididymal white adipose tissue. Using 3T3-L1 adipocytes, in vitro treatment with T4 and T3 increased the gene expression of PAI-1, suggesting non-genomic and genomic effects, respectively. These results demonstrate that thyroid hormones have different effects in vitro and in vivo on PAI-1 gene expression in adipocytes.

  4. Regulation of in vivo ketogenesis: role of free fatty acids and control by epinephrine, thyroid hormones, insulin and glucagon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beylot, M

    1996-10-01

    The production of ketone bodies (KB) is dependent on the amount of free fatty acids (FFA) supplied to the liver and on the hepatic metabolic fate of fatty acids and their orientation towards oxidation and ketogenesis or reesterification. In vivo ketogenesis can thus be regulated at the pre-hepatic (lipolysis) or hepatic level. We first investigated the role of FFA availability on the rate of KB production and then the effects of epinephrine, thyroid hormones, insulin and glucagon on the relationship between FFA availability and KB production. An increase in FFA availability augmented KB production not only by a mass effect but also by a diversion of hepatic fatty acid metabolism towards ketogenesis. The ketogenic effect of epinephrine and thyroid hormones depended only on their stimulatory action on lipolysis and FFA availability. An excess of thyroid hormones had no direct effect on hepatic ketogenesis, whereas the direct action of epinephrine on liver was rather anti-ketogenic. Glucagon stimulated hepatic ketogenesis, whereas a short-term increase in insulinemia within the physiological range appeared to have no restrictive action.

  5. Thyroid hormone receptors bind to the promoter of the mouse histone H10 gene and modulate its transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Hofmann, R; Alonso, A

    1995-01-01

    It has been shown that the mouse histone H10 promoter contains a DNA element, composed of a direct repeat of the sequence GGTGACC separated by 7 nt, which is able to bind retinoic acid receptors and to modulate transcription of reporter genes following treatment with retinoic acid. We have now investigated whether this DNA motif is also responsive to thyroid hormone. We co-transfected CV-1 monkey kidney cells with chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) expression plasmids containing either 740 bp of the H10 wild-type promoter or five copies of the repeat element cloned in front of the thymidine kinase promoter and expression vectors for human thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) alpha or beta and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR alpha). Treatment of transfected cells with triiodothyronine led to a dose-dependent increase in CAT activity. Transfection experiments with increasing amounts of expression vectors for either TR alpha or RXR alpha resulted in up to 6-fold enhancement of CAT transcription. Furthermore, point mutations within the half-sites of the response element of the H10 promoter, as well as deletions within the interspace region, lowered CAT activity to 60-80% of that of the wild-type control. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the repeat element was able to form retarded complexes with TR alpha homodimers, as well as with TR alpha-RXR alpha heterodimers. Our results suggest that thyroid hormone receptors are involved in the regulation of mouse histone H10 expression. Images PMID:8559662

  6. Changes of serum thyroid hormone and plasma catecholamine of 16 th and 17 th Chinese Expeditioners in Antarctic environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐成丽; 朱广瑾; 薛全福; 祖淑玉

    2003-01-01

    The serum thyroid hormone and plasma catecholamine were examined in 18 male and 2 female members of the Chinese Antarctic Expedition ( who spent the 2000 or 2001 austral winter at the Great Wall Station). The changes of serum thyroid hormone i.e. total thyroxine ( TT4 ) and free T4 ( FT4 ) , total triodothyronine ( TT3 )and freeT3 ( FT3 ), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and plasma eateeholamine,including norepinephrine ( NE), epinephrine (E) and dopamine (DA) , were investigated by Chemoluminescenee Immunoassay (CLIA) and High Performance Liquid Chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). Samples were taken at different time: (1) 1 day before departure to Antarctica (16th expedition 1999/12/09; 17th expedition 2000/12/06). (2) 1 day after returned to China after living 54 weeks in Antarctica ( 16th expedition 2000/12/25; 17th expedition 2001/12/25 ).Comparing the data of before departure and returned, results showed that there was a significant decrease in the contents of TT4 ( P < 0.01 ) with no significant change in the content of TT3, FT3 and FT4. It was also found that the content of TSH increased significantly (P <0. 001 ); No significant changes of plasma NE and DA were found but the content of E decreased significantly ( P < 0. 001 ). The results indicated that the special Antarctic environment led to a restrain effect on the thyroid function and the level of plasma E in Antarctic expedition members. Both the thyroid and adrenal medulla system were associated in response to the Antarctic systemic stress.

  7. Thyroid hormone signaling during early neurogenesis and its significance as a vulnerable window for endocrine disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Préau, Laetitia; Fini, Jean Baptiste; Morvan-Dubois, Ghislaine; Demeneix, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    The essential roles of thyroid hormone (TH) in perinatal brain development have been known for decades. More recently, many of the molecular mechanisms underlying the multiple effects of TH on proliferation, differentiation, migration, synaptogenesis and myelination in the developing nervous system have been elucidated. At the same time data from both epidemiological studies and animal models have revealed that the influence of thyroid signaling on development of the nervous system, extends to all periods of life, from early embryogenesis to neurogenesis in the adult brain. This review focuses on recent insights into the actions of TH during early neurogenesis. A key concept is that, in contrast to the previous ideas that only the unliganded receptor was implicated in these early phases, a critical role of the ligand, T3, is increasingly recognized. These findings are considered in the light of increasing knowledge of cell specific control of T3 availability as a function of deiodinase activity and transporter expression. These requirements for TH in the early stages of neurogenesis take on new relevance given the increasing epidemiological data on adverse effects of TH lack in early pregnancy on children's neurodevelopmental outcome. These ideas lead logically into a discussion on how the actions of TH during the first phases of neurogenesis can be potentially disrupted by gestational iodine lack and/or chemical pollution. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear receptors in animal development.

  8. Thyroid hormone promotes transient nerve growth factor synthesis in rat cerebellar neuroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrasse, S; Jehan, F; Confort, C; Brachet, P; Clos, J

    1992-01-01

    Primary cultures of cerebellum from 5-day-old rats indicated that proliferating neuroblasts synthesize and release nerve growth factor (NGF). Since NGF promotes DNA synthesis in these cells, our findings demonstrate that the early developing cerebellum is a suitable physiological model for studying the autocrine mitogenic action of NGF. Thyroid deficiency led to a greater reduction in the NGF content of the cerebellum than of the olfactory bulbs or hippocampus. Cerebellar NGF mRNA was also very sensitive to hormone deprivation. Physiological amounts of thyroid hormone stimulated both the mitotic activity and NGF production of cultured cerebellar neuroblasts. A lack of thyroid hormone is known to markedly alter cell formation in the cerebellum where postnatal neurogenesis is highly significant, in contrast to the olfactory bulbs and hippocampus. Taken together, these results suggest that the hormonal control of cell formation in the cerebellum is, at least partly, mediated by the autocrine mitogenic action of NGF. The thyroid hormone could temporally regulate the transient NGF synthesis by cerebellar neuroblasts directly and/or through its ontogenetic action, and hence all the NGF-dependent trophic effects.

  9. Increasing incidence of thyroid cancer in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bann, Darrin V; Goyal, Neerav; Camacho, Fabian; Goldenberg, David

    2014-12-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer in the United States has increased rapidly and Pennsylvania is the state with the highest rate of thyroid cancer in the country, although the factors driving this increase are unknown. Moreover, it remains unclear whether the increase in thyroid cancer represents a true increase in disease or is the result of overdiagnosis. To compare the increase in thyroid cancer incidence and tumor characteristics in Pennsylvania with the rest of the United States and gain insight into the factors influencing the increased incidence of thyroid cancer. In a population-based study, data on thyroid cancer from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results 9 (SEER-9) registry and the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry (PCR) from 1985 through 2009 were collected and reviewed for information regarding sex, race, histologic type of thyroid cancer, staging, and tumor size at diagnosis. International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition code C739 (thyroid carcinoma) was used to identify 110,615 records in the SEER-9 registry and 29,030 records in the PCR. Average annual percent change (AAPC) in thyroid cancer incidence across various demographic groups in Pennsylvania. The AAPC for thyroid cancer in Pennsylvania was 7.1% per year (95% CI, 6.3%-7.9%) vs 4.2% (95% CI, 3.7%-4.7%) per year in the remainder of the United States, and trends in incidence were significantly different (P < .001). Females experienced a higher AAPC (7.6% per year; 95% CI, 6.9%-8.3%) compared with males (6.1% per year; 95% CI, 4.9%-7.2%) (P < .01), and trend analysis revealed that thyroid cancer may be increasing more rapidly among black females (8.6% per year; 95% CI, 5.4%-11.9%) than among white females (7.6% per year; 95% CI, 6.8%-8.4) (P = .60; but despite the similarity in AAPC between the 2 groups, the joinpoint models fit to the data were not parallel [P < .005]). The rate of tumors with regional (7.0% per year; 95% CI, 5.8%-8.1%) or distant (1

  10. Photoperiod and acute energy deficits interact on components of the thyroid hormone system in hypothalamic tanycytes of the Siberian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwig, Annika; Wilson, Dana; Logie, Tracy J; Boelen, Anita; Morgan, Peter J; Mercer, Julian G; Barrett, Perry

    2009-05-01

    In the Siberian hamster, seasonal weight loss occurs gradually over many weeks during autumn and winter. This is driven by a regulatory mechanism that is able to integrate duration of exposure to short days (SDs) with the size of body energy reserves. After food restriction in SDs, followed by ad libitum refeeding, body weight of the hamster does not return to its former level; rather, it increases to a level defined by the length of time spent in SDs. In this report, we show that components of the thyroid hormone system that are involved in seasonal weight loss change expression in response to 48 h of starvation. Eight weeks in an SD photoperiod induced weight loss in the Siberian hamster. In the hypothalamus of these hamsters, type II deiodinase expression was decreased and type III deiodinase expression was induced, but there was no change in hypothalamic neuropeptide Y or thyrotropin-releasing hormone gene expression. For the first time, we show that the thyroid hormone transporter monocarboxylate transporter 8 is expressed in tanycytes and is increased in response to an SD photoperiod. Food restriction (48 h of starvation) reversed the direction of gene expression change for type II and III deiodinase and monocarboxylate transporter 8 induced by SD photoperiods. Furthermore, fasting increased neuropeptide Y expression and decreased thyrotropin-releasing hormone expression. VGF, a gene upregulated in SDs in the dorsal region of the medial posterior area of the arcuate nucleus, was not changed by starvation. These data point to a mechanism whereby energy deprivation can interact with an SD photoperiod on hypothalamic tanycytes to regulate components of the thyroid hormone system involved in photoperiodic regulation of seasonal physiology.

  11. Effects of long-term temperature acclimation on thyroid hormone deiodinase function, plasma thyroid hormone levels, growth, and reproductive status of male Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr, D G; Idler, D R; Audet, C; McLeese, J M; Eales, J G

    1998-01-01

    -ring deiodinase activities, predominating respectively in liver and brain, and with properties resembling those of other teleosts, (ii) T4ORD activity of liver is unusually high and may account for the high plasma T3 levels in this species, (iii) T4ORD activity tends to increase during periods of increased somatic growth, and (iv) chronic acclimation of male cod to 2-4 degrees C, as opposed to 6-10 degrees C, decreases somatic growth but does alter circulating levels of thyroid hormones and androgens and it does not change the time of sexual maturation.

  12. Thyroid and the Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Grais, Ira Martin; Sowers, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones modulate every component of the cardiovascular system necessary for normal cardiovascular development and function. When cardiovascular disease is present, thyroid function tests are characteristically indicated to determine if overt thyroid disorders or even subclinical dysfunction exists. As hypothyroidism, hypertension and cardiovascular disease all increase with advancing age monitoring of TSH, the most sensitive test for hypothyroidism, is important in this expanding seg...

  13. Early Phthalates Exposure in Pregnant Women Is Associated with Alteration of Thyroid Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chih-Hsin; Liang, Wei-Yen; Li, Sih-Syuan; Huang, Han-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies revealed that phthalate exposure could alter thyroid hormones during the last trimester of pregnancy. However, thyroid hormones are crucial for fetal development during the first trimester. We aimed to clarify the effect of phthalate exposure on thyroid hormones during early pregnancy. Method We recruited 97 pregnant women who were offered an amniocentesis during the early trimester from an obstetrics clinic in southern Taiwan from 2013 to 2014. After signing an informed consent form, we collected amniotic fluid and urine samples from pregnant women to analyze 11 metabolites, including mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl) phthalate (MECPP), mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), mono-butyl phthalate (MnBP), of 9 phthalates using liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry. We collected blood samples from each subject to analyze serum thyroid hormones including thyroxine (T4), free T4, and thyroid-binding globulin (TBG). Results Three phthalate metabolites were discovered to be >80% in the urine samples of the pregnant women: MEP (88%), MnBP (81%) and MECPP (86%). Median MnBP and MECPP levels in pregnant Taiwanese women were 21.5 and 17.6 μg/g-creatinine, respectively, that decreased after the 2011 Taiwan DEHP scandal. Results of principal component analysis suggested two major sources (DEHP and other phthalates) of phthalates exposure in pregnant women. After adjusting for age, gestational age, TBG, urinary creatinine, and other phthalate metabolites, we found a significantly negative association between urinary MnBP levels and serum T4 (β = –5.41; p-value = 0.012; n = 97) in pregnant women using Bonferroni correction. Conclusion We observed a potential change in the thyroid hormones of pregnant women during early pregnancy after DnBP exposure. Additional study is necessitated to clarify these associations. PMID:27455052

  14. Early Phthalates Exposure in Pregnant Women Is Associated with Alteration of Thyroid Hormones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Chin Huang

    Full Text Available Previous studies revealed that phthalate exposure could alter thyroid hormones during the last trimester of pregnancy. However, thyroid hormones are crucial for fetal development during the first trimester. We aimed to clarify the effect of phthalate exposure on thyroid hormones during early pregnancy.We recruited 97 pregnant women who were offered an amniocentesis during the early trimester from an obstetrics clinic in southern Taiwan from 2013 to 2014. After signing an informed consent form, we collected amniotic fluid and urine samples from pregnant women to analyze 11 metabolites, including mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP, mono-(2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl phthalate (MECPP, mono-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP, mono-butyl phthalate (MnBP, of 9 phthalates using liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry. We collected blood samples from each subject to analyze serum thyroid hormones including thyroxine (T4, free T4, and thyroid-binding globulin (TBG.Three phthalate metabolites were discovered to be >80% in the urine samples of the pregnant women: MEP (88%, MnBP (81% and MECPP (86%. Median MnBP and MECPP levels in pregnant Taiwanese women were 21.5 and 17.6 μg/g-creatinine, respectively, that decreased after the 2011 Taiwan DEHP scandal. Results of principal component analysis suggested two major sources (DEHP and other phthalates of phthalates exposure in pregnant women. After adjusting for age, gestational age, TBG, urinary creatinine, and other phthalate metabolites, we found a significantly negative association between urinary MnBP levels and serum T4 (β = -5.41; p-value = 0.012; n = 97 in pregnant women using Bonferroni correction.We observed a potential change in the thyroid hormones of pregnant women during early pregnancy after DnBP exposure. Additional study is necessitated to clarify these associations.

  15. Thyroid stimulating hormone levels in cord blood are not influenced by non-thyroidal mothers' diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Sterian Ward

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Screening programs not only offer the opportunity to trace and treat almost all cases of congenital hypothyroidism but also mean large savings to the health system. However, carefully planned strategies are necessary to extend their benefits and reduce costs. OBJECTIVE: To determine the possible influence of maternal diseases that affect maternal-fetal placenta dynamics on primary thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH screening for congenital hypothyroidism. DESIGN: Prospective non-randomized clinical trial with at least 3 months of follow-up. SETTING: A public university referral center [CAISM/Hospital das Clínicas, Faculty of Medicine, University of Campinas, Campinas, SP]. PARTICIPANTS: 415 neonates divided into 5 groups: eighty-three infants born from cardiac mothers; 98 from mothers that had toxemia; 54 of the mothers had diabetes mellitus; 40 were HIV positive and 140 had no diseases. INTERVENTION: All newborns had cord blood samples collected on filter paper at birth. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: TSH was measured from dried blood spots using a homemade immunofluorescence assay (sensitivity in dried blood spots = 0.1 mU/L. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the mean TSH levels among the 5 groups. Moreover, TSH levels were around 5 mU/L in 48% of the newborns, indicating that our region is severely deficient in iodine. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that primary TSH screening programs using cord blood are not affected by maternal diseases. We suggest that, besides its technical advantages over heel punctures with T4 primary approaches, neonatal screening using primary cord blood TSH may also be used as a monitoring tool for evaluation and control of iodine deficiency disorders (IDD.

  16. Validation of an EIA kit for determination of total thyroid hormones in rat serum. Effects of different anaesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, M; Arufe, M C; Durán, R

    1998-03-01

    Two enzyme immunoassays for the quantitative determination of total thyroxine (T4) and total triiodothyronine (T3) in human serum were validated to measure total T4 and T3 in rat serum. The specificity, sensitivity, detectability and reproducibility have been tested as well as the effects of different anaesthetics (pentobarbital and a mixture of ketamine and xylacine) on serum thyroid hormone levels. Hormones were quantified, by means of a previously validated technique, 18 hours after surgery for the placement of a stem for blood extraction in conscious and freely moving animals. Thyroid serum levels, especially T3, were slightly lower in xylacine plus ketamine treated animals than in those treated with pentobarbital. The administration of glutamic acid, stimulated the secretion of thyroid hormones, this effect appearing 30 minutes after its administration and it was independent of the anaesthetic used during the surgery for the cannula placement, although in pentobarbital treated rats, the serum T3 level increase induced by glutamate appears 60 minutes after the treatment.

  17. The thyroid hormone receptor β induces DNA damage and premature senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano, Alberto; García-Carpizo, Verónica; Gallardo, María Esther; Villamuera, Raquel; Gómez-Ferrería, Maria Ana; Pascual, Angel; Buisine, Nicolas; Sachs, Laurent M.; Garesse, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the thyroid hormone (TH) receptors (THRs) can play a role in aging, cancer and degenerative diseases. In this paper, we demonstrate that binding of TH T3 (triiodothyronine) to THRB induces senescence and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage in cultured cells and in tissues of young hyperthyroid mice. T3 induces a rapid activation of ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated)/PRKAA (adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinase) signal transduction and recruitment of the NRF1 (nuclear respiratory factor 1) and THRB to the promoters of genes with a key role on mitochondrial respiration. Increased respiration leads to production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, which in turn causes oxidative stress and DNA double-strand breaks and triggers a DNA damage response that ultimately leads to premature senescence of susceptible cells. Our findings provide a mechanism for integrating metabolic effects of THs with the tumor suppressor activity of THRB, the effect of thyroidal status on longevity, and the occurrence of tissue damage in hyperthyroidism. PMID:24395638

  18. Regulation of Na/K-ATPase gene expression by thyroid hormone and hyperkalemia in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Y; Carman, D; Shao, Y; Ismail-Beigi, F; Klein, I; Ojamaa, K

    1999-01-01

    Hypothermic hyperkalemic circulatory arrest has been widely used for myocardial protection during heart surgery. Recent data showed that administration of triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) postoperatively enhanced ventricular function. The effect of hyperkalemic arrest in conjunction with thyroid hormone on the plasma membrane enzyme sodium/potassium-adenosine triphosphatase (Na/K-ATPase), was determined in cultured neonatal rat atrial and ventricular myocytes. Exposure of ventricular myocytes to hyperkalemic medium (50 mM KCl) in the absence of T3 increased expression of the Na/K-ATPase catalytic subunit mRNAs, alpha1 and alpha3 isoforms, by 1.9- and 1.5-fold, respectively (pplasma membrane ion function.

  19. Capsaicin, arterial hypertensive crisis and acute myocardial infarction associated with high levels of thyroid stimulating hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo; Di Bella, Gianluca; Cerrito, Marco; Coglitore, Sebastiano

    2009-05-01

    Chili peppers are rich in capsaicin. The potent vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is stored in a population of C-fiber afferents that are sensitive to capsaicin. CGRP and peptides released from cardiac C fibers have a beneficial effect in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. It has been reported that capsaicin pretreatment deplete cardiac C-fiber peptide stores. Furthermore, it has also been reported that capsaicin-treated pigs significantly increase mean arterial blood pressure compared with controls and that the decrease in CGRP synthesis and release contributes to the elevated blood pressure. It has also been reported that sub-clinical hypothyroidism is associated with a significant risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We present a case of arterial hypertensive crisis and acute myocardial infarction in a 59-year-old Italian man with high levels of thyroid stimulating hormone and with an abundant ingestion of peppers and of chili peppers which occurred the day before.

  20. Thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRa) tissue expression in ductal invasive breast cancer: A study combining quantitative immunohistochemistry with digital slide image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalampoudis, P; Agrogiannis, G; Kontzoglou, K; Kouraklis, G; Sotiropoulos, G C

    2017-08-01

    In breast cancer, hormonal receptors hold promise for developing novel targeted therapies. The thyroid exerts its actions via the thyroid hormone receptors alpha and beta. The clinical significance of the expression of thyroid hormone receptors in breast cancer is unclear. We studied thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRa) expression in 82 samples from 41 women with ductal invasive breast cancer and no thyroid disease. We performed quantitative immunohistochemistry with digital image analysis and correlated TRa expression with clinicopathological parameters. TRa was expressed in both normal breast epithelium and breast cancer, but expression in breast cancer was significantly lower. TRa was expressed significantly less in larger and grade III tumors. Conversely, breast cancers with lymphovascular invasion showed increased TRa expression compared to cancers without lymphovascular invasion. TRa expression was not significantly different between node-positive and node-negative breast cancers, or among different hormonal profiles and intrinsic subtypes. This is the first-in-human study to combine quantitative immunohistochemistry with image analysis to study TRa expression in women with ductal invasive breast cancer and no clinical or biochemical evidence of thyroid dysfunction. We confirm that TRa is expressed in both normal and malignant breast epithelium and suggest that TRa expression is downregulated during breast carcinogenesis. Larger and higher grade breast cancers demonstrate partial loss in TRa expression. Alterations in TRa expression take place even in the absence of clinical or biochemical thyroid disease. The underlying mechanism of these findings and their potential significance in survival and relapse mandate further research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  1. Total and free thyroid hormone levels in chronic renal failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta H

    1991-04-01

    Full Text Available The levels of serum total thyroxine (TT4, triiodothyronine (TT3, free T3, (FT3 free T4 (FT4 and thyrotropin (TSH were measured in 127 clinically euthyroid patients with varying grades of chronic renal failure (CRF; and 97 healthy individuals. They were grouped as: Group I containing 93 patients on conservative management; Group II containing 34 patients on regular dialysis therapy; and Group III (normals. Group I patients showed significant decrease in TT3, TT4 and FT3 levels (p less than 0.001 as compared to Group III, whereas FT4 and TSH values in group I were not significantly altered. TT3, TT4 and FT3 levels reduced as the severity of renal damage increased. Variations in TT3, TT4, FT3, FT4 and TSH levels in Group II patients were similar to those in Group I, except for a decrease in TSH levels (p less than 0.05 as compared to normals. Several thyroid function tests are abnormal in CRF patients, however, finding of normal FT4 and TSH levels would indicate functional euthyroid status.

  2. Thyroid hormone related gene transcription in southern sand flathead (Platycephalus bassensis) is associated with environmental mercury and arsenic exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dingkun; Leef, Melanie; Nowak, Barbara; Bridle, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    Arsenic (As) and mercury (Hg) are ubiquitous elements known to disrupt thyroid function in vertebrates. To explore the underlying mechanisms of Hg and As on the fish thyroid system, we investigated the associations between muscle concentrations of Hg and As with thyroid-related gene transcription in flathead (Platycephalus bassensis) from a contaminated estuary. We sampled fish at several sites to determine the hepatic expression of genes including deiodinases (D1 and D2), transthyretin (TTR), thyroid hormone receptors (TRα and TRβ) and related them to Hg and As levels in the same individuals. Negative correlations were observed between Hg levels and D2, TTR, TRα and TRβ, whereas positive associations were found between As concentrations and TTR and TRβ. These results suggest that Hg and As exposures from environmental pollution affect the regulation of genes important for normal thyroid function in fish. These thyroid-related genes could be used as biomarkers for monitoring environmental thyroid-hormone disrupting chemicals.

  3. Effect of different hormonal therapies on thyroid function in surgical menopause: short-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erel, C Tamer; Gezer, Altay; Sentürk, Levent M; Somunkiran, Asli; Kaleli, Semih; Seyisoglu, Hakan

    2007-12-01

    To determine the effects of different hormone replacement therapy (HRT) regimens on thyroid function in surgical menopause. In a randomized, controlled study, 59 euthyroid women with surgical menopause were randomized to an estrogen-only (n=20), tibolone (n=20) or calcium-only (n=19) group. On the 5th postoperative day and 4th and 12th weeks, serum E2, TSH, free T3 and free T4 levels were determined. Although the initial and week 4 serum E2, TSH, free T3 and free T4 levels were comparable, the week 12 serum E2 and TSH levels were different between the subjects on estrogen therapy and those receiving tibolone or calcium only (p=0.008 and 0.000, respectively). Serum E2 levels were higher and TSH levels lower in subjects receiving estrogen. Moreover, serum TSH levels correlated negatively with serum E2 levels in the 12th week of estrogen use (r=-0.354, p=0.006). TSH increased in the tibolone group as compared to the estrogen group but was still lower than in the calcium-only group; however, the differences were not statistically significant. Irrespective of different regimens, HRT does not have an important short-term effect on thyroid function in women with surgical menopause.

  4. Impact of resistance to thyroid hormone on the cardiovascular system in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcrano, Melania; Palmieri, Emiliano Antonio; Mannavola, Deborah; Ciulla, Michele; Campi, Irene; Covelli, Danila; Lombardi, Gaetano; Biondi, Bernadette; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    The clinical manifestations of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) are highly variable, and the impact of RTH on the cardiovascular system has been poorly investigated. The objective of the study was to evaluate the cardiovascular characteristics of 16 untreated and asymptomatic patients with RTH compared with 16 euthyroid healthy controls to define the cardiovascular involvement in RTH syndrome. Sixteen untreated and asymptomatic RTH patients (eight males; aged 33 +/- 12 yr, range 21-45 yr) and 16 controls (nine males; aged 33 +/- 5 yr, range 24-42 yr) were enrolled. Clinical data, thyroid status, and echocardiographic results were recorded. Heart rate was comparable with that of controls, whereas arterial pressure was higher than controls. Mean interventricular septum diastolic thickness and mean left ventricular (LV) posterior wall diastolic thickness were significantly lower in RTH patients than controls with a consequent significant decrease of the mean LV mass and LV mass indexed by body surface area. Patients also had abnormalities of myocardial relaxation as indicated by a significant increase of peak A and consequent reduction of the early to late ratio. Finally, systemic vascular resistance was significantly higher in RTH patients than controls. Our results suggest the presence of cardiovascular alterations in asymptomatic and untreated RTH patients similar to those reported in hypothyroid patients. Our strict selection likely created a bias in the inclusion of a particular type of RTH patients, who could represent a minority of patients with RTH. However, no correlation was found between the type of mutation and cardiovascular characteristics of RTH patients.

  5. Clinical Analysis on Alteration of Thyroid Hormones in the Serum of Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Low T3 has been associated with increased short-term mortality in intensive care unit and long-term mortality in cardiovascular disease. The objective of this retrospective study is to investigate associations of thyroid hormone status with clinical severity and outcome in acute ischemic stroke, and whether there is association between the pituitary axis abnormality and the anterior/posterior circulation involvement. Patients with no history of thyroid abnormality who presented first ever stroke were studied. Total T3, T4, TSH levels, basic and clinical characteristics were collected and categorized. Neurological impairment was assessed using NIHSS and modified Rankin Scale. Twenty-nine patients (61% had T3 ≤ 75 ng/dL. Low T3 group had significant higher NIHSS compared to normal T3 group. There was a significant negative correlation between T3 levels and NIHSS scores on admission. A significantly smaller percentage of patients with low T3 showed favorable neurological function improvement by both NIHSS and mRS measures compared to those with normal T3. There was no significant difference for anterior or posterior circulation involvement between low T3 and normal T3 groups. It is suggested that low T3 is associated with worse neurological outcome. The severity of low T3 may be a predictor of functional improvement in acute ischemic stroke.

  6. A STUDY OF EFFECT OF PERINATAL ASPHYXIA ON THYROID HORMONE IN NEONATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of perinatal asphyxia on thyroid hormones of term neonates . MATERIAL AND METHOD S : It was a prospective case control study and it was conducted in department of pediatrics, Kamala Nehru Hospital Gandhi Medical College, Bhopal. Total 60 full term neonates who have completed 37 wks of gestation at birth included in study, 30 asphyxiated newborn taken as cases and 30 healthy neonates as control. For inclusion of cases criteria was, 1 and 5 minute APGAR score 7 and no sepsis setting. Classification of HIE done on the bases of Sarnat and Sarnat staging. Blood samples were collected for determination of thyroid profile (T 4, T 3 and TSH, first within 6 hours of birth and seconds 18 to 24hour of age. RESULT: Out of 30 cases, 13.13% were HIE - I, 50% were HIE - II and 36.67% were HIE - III. Mean value of TSH was low at 6 hours as well as at 18 - 24 hours between case and control group while mean value of T 3 andT 4 were low at only 18 - 24hrs of a ge. CONCLUSION : The mean T 3, T 4 and TSH levels at birth of asphyxiated newborn was significantly lower than the control group at 18 - 24 hours . Due to low TSH surge, asphyxiated babies could not increase their T 3 and T 4 level significantly

  7. Role of late maternal thyroid hormones in cerebral cortex development: an experimental model for human prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbel, P; Navarro, D; Ausó, E; Varea, E; Rodríguez, A E; Ballesta, J J; Salinas, M; Flores, E; Faura, C C; de Escobar, G Morreale

    2010-06-01

    Hypothyroxinemia affects 35-50% of neonates born prematurely (12% of births) and increases their risk of suffering neurodevelopmental alterations. We have developed an animal model to study the role of maternal thyroid hormones (THs) at the end of gestation on offspring's cerebral maturation. Pregnant rats were surgically thyroidectomized at embryonic day (E) 16 and infused with calcitonin and parathormone (late maternal hypothyroidism [LMH] rats). After birth, pups were nursed by normal rats. Pups born to LMH dams, thyroxine treated from E17 to postnatal day (P) 0, were also studied. In developing LMH pups, the cortical lamination was abnormal. At P40, heterotopic neurons were found in the subcortical white matter and in the hippocampal stratum oriens and alveus. The Zn-positive area of the stratum oriens of hippocampal CA3 was decreased by 41.5% showing altered mossy fibers' organization. LMH pups showed delayed learning in parallel to decreased phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (pERK1/2) expression in the hippocampus. Thyroxine treatment of LMH dams reverted abnormalities. In conclusion, maternal THs are still essential for normal offspring's neurodevelopment even after onset of fetal thyroid function. Our data suggest that thyroxine treatment of premature neonates should be attempted to compensate for the interruption of the maternal supply.

  8. Effect of mirtazapine on thyroid hormones in adult patients with major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambi, F; De Berardis, D; Sepede, G; Campanella, D; Galliani, N; Carano, A; La Rovere, L; Salini, G; Penna, L; Cicconetti, A; Spinella, S; Quartesan, R; Salerno, R M; Ferro, F M

    2005-01-01

    Hypothalamic pituitary thyroid (HPT) axis abnormalities and alterations in major depression are reported in the literature. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of mirtazapine on thyroid hormones after 6 months of therapy in a sample of adult outpatients with Major Depression (MD). 17 adult outpatients (7 men, 10 women) with MD according to DSM-IV criteria, were included in the study. All participants had to have met criteria for a major depressive episode with a score of at least 15 on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D). Fasting venous blood samples were obtained for determination of serum Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH), Free T3 (FT3) and Free T4 (FT4) concentrations both at baseline and after 6 months of therapy. HAM-D scores decreased significantly from the first day of treatment to the end of the treatment period (Pdeiodination process of T4 into T3.

  9. TRICLOSAN ALTERS THYROID HORMONES HOMEOSTASIS VIA UP-REGULATION OF HEPATIC CATABOLISM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol) is a chlorinated phenolic antibacterial compound used in household and hygiene products. The structural similarity of triclosan to thyroid hormones, in vitro studies demonstrating activation of the human pregnane X receptor (PXR)...

  10. Effects of experimentally manipulated yolk thyroid hormone levels on offspring development in a wild bird species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruuskanen, Suvi; Darras, Veerle M.; Visser, Marcel E.; Groothuis, Ton G.G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Maternal effects are a crucial mechanism in a wide array of taxa to generate phenotypic variation, thereby affecting offspring development and fitness. Maternally derived thyroid hormones (THs) are known to be essential for offspring development in mammalian and fish models, but have been l

  11. Mechanism-based testing strategy using in vitro approaches for identification of thyroid hormone disrupting chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murk, A.J.; Rijntjes, E.; Blaauboer, B.J.; Clewell, R.; Crofton, K.M.; Dingemans, M.M.L.; Furlow, J.D.; Kavlock, R.; Kohrle, J.; Opitz, R.; Traas, T.; Visser, T.J.; Xia, M.; Gutleb, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    The thyroid hormone (TH) system is involved in several important physiological processes, including regulation of energy metabolism, growth and differentiation, development and maintenance of brain function, thermo-regulation, osmo-regulation, and axis of regulation of other endocrine systems, sexua

  12. THE EFFECTS OF LOW DOSE PTU ON ENDPOINTS OF THYROID HORMONE ACTION IN THE DEVELOPING BRAIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is essential for normal brain development. Therefore, there is concern that any factor that reduces TH levels may permanently alter brain development. As part of an EPA Cooperative Agreement, the goal of this work was to characterize the degree to which cir...

  13. Tissue-specific alterations in thyroid hormone homeostasis in combined Mct10 and Mct8 deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Müller (Julia); S. Mayerl (Steffen); T.J. Visser (Theo); V.M. Darras (Veerle); A. Boelen (Anita); L. Frappart (Lucien); L. Mariotta (Luca); F. Verrey; H. Heuer (Heike)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe monocarboxylate transporter Mct10 (Slc16a10; T-type amino acid transporter) facilitates the cellular transport of thyroid hormone (TH) and shows an overlapping expression with the wellestablished TH transporter Mct8. Because Mct8 deficiency is associated with distinct tissue-specific

  14. Genotype-phenotype relationship in patients with mutations in thyroid hormone transporter MCT8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Jansen (John); E.C.H. Friesema (Edith); M.H.A. Kester (Monique); C.E. Schwartz; T.J. Visser (Theo)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractLoss-of-function mutations in thyroid hormone transporter monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) lead to severe X-linked psychomotor retardation and elevated serum T3levels. Most patients, for example those with mutations V235M, S448X, insI189, or delF230, cannot stand, walk, or speak. Pat

  15. The role of Arg445 and Asp498 in the human thyroid hormone transporter MCT8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Groeneweg (Stefan); E.C.H. Friesema (Edith); S. Kersseboom (Simone); W. Klootwijk (Willem); W.E. Visser (Wil Edward); R.P. Peeters (Robin); T.J. Visser (Theo)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractMonocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) facilitates cellular influx and efflux of the thyroid hormones (THs) T4 and T3. Mutations in MCT8 lead to severe psychomotor retardation. Here, we studied the importance of 2 highly conserved residues (Arg445 in transmembrane domain 8 and Asp498 in tr

  16. Mutations in Thyroid Hormone Transporter MCT8: genotype, function and phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Jansen (Jurgen)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe studies presented in this thesis demonstrate that MCT8 is a transmembrane protein that facilitates both in- and efflux of thyroid hormone. MCT8 function is crucial for normal neurological development, as loss-of-function mutations are associated with severe psychomotor retardation. I

  17. Analysis of Agonist and Antagonist Effects on Thyroid Hormone Receptor Conformation by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Figueira, A C M; Saidemberg, D M; Telles de Souza, Paulo; Martínez, L; Scanlan, T S; Baxter, J D; Skaf, M S; Palma, M S; Webb, P M; Polikarpov, I

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are ligand-gated transcription factors with critical roles in development and metabolism. Although x-ray structures of TR ligand-binding domains (LBDs) with agonists are available, comparable structures without ligand (apo-TR) or with antagonists are not. It remains i

  18. Divergent roles for thyroid hormone receptor β isoforms in the endocrine axis and auditory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, E. Dale; Boers, Mary-Ellen; Pazos-Moura, Carmen; Moura, Egberto; Kaulbach, Helen; Zakaria, Marjorie; Lowell, Bradford; Radovick, Sally; Liberman, M. Charles; Wondisford, Fredric

    1999-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) modulate various physiological functions in many organ systems. The TRα and TRβ isoforms are products of 2 distinct genes, and the β1 and β2 isoforms are splice variants of the same gene. Whereas TRα1 and TRβ1 are widely expressed, expression of the TRβ2 isoform is mainly limited to the pituitary, triiodothyronine-responsive TRH neurons, the developing inner ear, and the retina. Mice with targeted disruption of the entire TRβ locus (TRβ-null) exhibit elevated thyroid hormone levels as a result of abnormal central regulation of thyrotropin, and also develop profound hearing loss. To clarify the contribution of the TRβ2 isoform to the function of the endocrine and auditory systems in vivo, we have generated mice with targeted disruption of the TRβ2 isoform. TRβ2-null mice have preserved expression of the TRα and TRβ1 isoforms. They develop a similar degree of central resistance to thyroid hormone as TRβ-null mice, indicating the important role of TRβ2 in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. Growth hormone gene expression is marginally reduced. In contrast, TRβ2-null mice exhibit no evidence of hearing impairment, indicating that TRβ1 and TRβ2 subserve divergent roles in the regulation of auditory function. PMID:10430610

  19. Polychlorinated biphenyls-induced alterations of thyroid hormone homeostasis and brain development in the rat.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morse, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    IntroductionThe work described in this thesis was undertaken to gain insight in the processes involved in the developmental neurotoxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls. It has been previously hypothesized that the alteration of thyroid hormone status by PCBs may be in part responsibl

  20. Trialkyltin rexinoid-X receptor agonists selectively potentiate thyroid hormone induced programs of xenopus laevis metamorphosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mengeling, Brenda J.; Murk, Albertinka J.; Furlow, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    The trialkyltins tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPT) can function as rexinoid-X receptor (RXR) agonists. We recently showed that RXR agonists can alter thyroid hormone (TH) signaling in a mammalian pituitary TH-responsive reporter cell line, GH3.TRE-Luc. The prevalence of TBT and TPT in the

  1. RELATION OF PERIOPERATIVE SERUM THYROID HORMONE CHANGES TO HEART DYSFUNCTION IN PATIENTS UNDERGONE CARDIAC VALVE REPLACEMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between perioperative serum thyroid hormone changes and heart dysfunction in patients undergone cardiac valve replacement. Methods The serum concentrations of free tri- iodothyronine (),free thyroxine (),total total reverse and thyroid-stimulating hor- mone (TSH) in 20 patients undergone routine rheumatic mitral valve replacement were determined by radioim- munoassay at preoperation, the end of myocardial ischemia, and 2,6,12,24 and 48h postoperation, respectively. The alteration hormones above mentioned were comparatively analysed of the normal heart function group (group I,n = 14) and heart dysfunction group (group I ,n=6) after surgery. Results In comparing group I with group I , the more severe the chronic congestive heart failure, the lower the thyroid hormone level before operation;and subse- quently both progressively lowered T3 level and acute heart dysfunction emerged after operation. The decreased extent of serum thyroid hormone was closely parallel to the severity of heart dysfunction. Gonclusion Perioperatively, de- creased serum FT3 and TT3 concentrations are at least an important humoral factor aggravating heart dysfunction, and the patients with preoperative low T3 should be considered as high-risk valvular surgical cases.

  2. Biomimetic deiodination of thyroid hormones and iodothyronamines - a structure-activity relationship study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Santanu; Mugesh, Govindasamy

    2016-10-12

    Mammalian selenoenzymes, iodothyronine deiodinases (DIOs), catalyze the tyrosyl and phenolic ring deiodination of thyroid hormones (THs) and play an important role in maintaining the TH concentration throughout the body. These enzymes also accept the decarboxylated thyroid hormone metabolites, iodothyronamines (TAMs), as substrates for deiodination. Naphthalene-based selenium and/or sulphur-containing small molecules have been shown to mediate the regioselective tyrosyl ring deiodination of thyroid hormones and their metabolites. Herein, we report on the structure-activity relationship studies of a series of peri-substituted selenium-containing naphthalene derivatives for the deiodination of thyroid hormones and iodothyronamines. Single crystal X-ray crystallographic and (77)Se NMR spectroscopic studies indicated that the intramolecular SeX (X = N, O and S) interactions play an important role in the deiodinase activity of the synthetic mimics. Furthermore, the decarboxylated metabolites, TAMs, have been observed to undergo slower tyrosyl ring deiodination than THs by naphthyl-based selenium and/or sulphur-containing synthetic deiodinase mimics and this has been explained on the basis of the strength of SeI halogen bonding formed by THs and TAMs.

  3. Low salinity acclimation and thyroid hormone metabolizing enzymes in gilthead seabream (Sparus auratus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaren, P.H.M.; Guzman, J.M.; Reutelingsperger, S.J.; Mancera, J.M.; Flik, G.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effect of acclimation to low salinity water of gilthead seabream (Sparus auratus), a euryhaline seawater teleost, on the activities of thyroid hormone-metabolizing enzymes in gills, kidney, and liver. Following acclimation to low salinity water, the plasma free thyroxine (T(4))

  4. Low salinity acclimation and thyroid hormone metabolizing enzymes in gilthead seabream (Sparus auratus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaren, P.H.M.; Guzman, J.M.; Reutelingsperger, S.J.; Mancera, J.M.; Flik, G.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effect of acclimation to low salinity water of gilthead seabream (Sparus auratus), a euryhaline seawater teleost, on the activities of thyroid hormone-metabolizing enzymes in gills, kidney, and liver. Following acclimation to low salinity water, the plasma free thyroxine (T(4)) c

  5. Placental Transfer of Perfluoroalkyl Substances and Associations with Thyroid Hormones: Beijing Prenatal Exposure Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Li, Jingguang; Lai, Jianqiang; Luan, Hemi; Cai, Zongwei; Wang, Yibaina; Zhao, Yunfeng; Wu, Yongning

    2016-02-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have been detected in wildlife and human samples worldwide. Toxicology research showed that PFASs could interfere with thyroid hormone homeostasis. In this study, eight PFASs, fifteen PFAS precursors and five thyroid hormones were analyzed in 157 paired maternal and cord serum samples collected in Beijing around delivery. Seven PFASs and two precursors were detected in both maternal and cord sera with significant maternal-fetal correlations (r = 0.336 to 0.806, all P fetal versus maternal serum were from 0.25:1 (perfluorodecanoic acid, PFDA) to 0.65:1 (perfluorooctanoic acid, PFOA). Spearman partial correlation test showed that maternal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was negatively correlated with most maternal PFASs (r = -0.261 to -0.170, all P fetal PFASs (r = -0.229 to -0.165 for T3; r = -0.293 to -0.169 for FT3, all P < 0.05). Our results suggest prenatal exposure of fetus to PFASs and potential associations between PFASs and thyroid hormone homeostasis in humans.

  6. Functional and metabolic adaptation of the heart to prolonged thyroid hormone treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degens, H.; Gilde, A.J.; Lindhout, M.; Willemsen, P.H.; Vusse, G.J. van der; Bilsen, M. van

    2003-01-01

    In heart failure, thyroid hormone (TH) treatment improves cardiac performance. The long-term effects of TH on cardiac function and metabolism, however, are incompletely known. To investigate the effects of up to 28 days of TH treatment, male Wistar rats received 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine (200 micro

  7. Polychlorinated biphenyl-induced alterations of thyroid hormone homeostasis and brain development in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morse, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    Introduction

    The work described in this thesis was undertaken to gain insight in the processes involved in the developmental neurotoxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls. It has been previously hypothesized that the alteration of thyroid hormone status by PCBs may