WorldWideScience

Sample records for including thermal effects

  1. A Verilog-A large signal model for InP DHBT including thermal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuxia, Shi; Zhi, Jin; Zhijian, Pan; Yongbo, Su; Yuxiong, Cao; Yan, Wang

    2013-06-01

    A large signal model for InP/InGaAs double heterojunction bipolar transistors including thermal effects has been reported, which demonstrated good agreements of simulations with measurements. On the basis of the previous model in which the double heterojunction effect, current blocking effect and high current effect in current expression are considered, the effect of bandgap narrowing with temperature has been considered in transport current while a formula for model parameters as a function of temperature has been developed. This model is implemented by Verilog-A and embedded in ADS. The proposed model is verified with DC and large signal measurements.

  2. A methodology to investigate the contribution of conduction and radiation heat transfer to the effective thermal conductivity of packed graphite pebble beds, including the wall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Beer, M., E-mail: maritz.db@gmail.com [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Du Toit, C.G., E-mail: Jat.DuToit@nwu.ac.za [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Rousseau, P.G., E-mail: pieter.rousseau@uct.ac.za [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • The radiation and conduction components of the effective thermal conductivity are separated. • Near-wall effects have a notable influence on the effective thermal conductivity. • Effective thermal conductivity is a function of the macro temperature gradient. • The effective thermal conductivity profile shows a characteristic trend. • The trend is a result of the interplay between conduction and radiation. - Abstract: The effective thermal conductivity represents the overall heat transfer characteristics of a packed bed of spheres and must be considered in the analysis and design of pebble bed gas-cooled reactors. During depressurized loss of forced cooling conditions the dominant heat transfer mechanisms for the passive removal of decay heat are radiation and conduction. Predicting the value of the effective thermal conductivity is complex since it inter alia depends on the temperature level and temperature gradient through the bed, as well as the pebble packing structure. The effect of the altered packing structure in the wall region must therefore also be considered. Being able to separate the contributions of radiation and conduction allows a better understanding of the underlying phenomena and the characteristics of the resultant effective thermal conductivity. This paper introduces a purpose-designed test facility and accompanying methodology that combines physical measurements with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations to separate the contributions of radiation and conduction heat transfer, including the wall effects. Preliminary results obtained with the methodology offer important insights into the trends observed in the experimental results and provide a better understanding of the interplay between the underlying heat transfer phenomena.

  3. Total heat loss coefficient of flat roof constructions with external insulation in tapered layers including the effects of thermal bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    be quite tedious, and therefore a method to generate and optimize solutions has been developed and implemented in a program that also takes into account the effects of different types of thermal bridges, i.e. roof windows, insulation fasteners, roof/wall joints etc. This paper describes a new method...... for design of flat roofs and a pc-program that can be used for calculating the total heat loss coefficient of externally insulated roofs with insulation in tapered layers, taking into account thermal bridges in the roof construction....

  4. A computer program for full-coverage film-cooled blading analysis including the effects of a thermal barrier coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The program input, coolant flow and heat transfer model, and the program output are discussed. As an example, sections of the suction and pressure sides of a high temperature, high pressure turbine vane are analyzed to show the effects of a thermal barrier coating. Compared to the uncoated design, the coating halves the required coolant flow, while simultaneously reducing metal outer temperatures by over 111 K.

  5. Effect of Thermal Distress on Residual Behavior of CFRP-Strengthened Steel Beams Including Periodic Unbonded Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isamu Yoshitake

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the residual behavior of wide-flange steel beams strengthened with high-modulus carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP laminates subjected to thermal loading. Because the coefficients of thermal expansion of the steel and the CFRP are different, temperature-induced distress may take place along their interface. Periodic unbonded zones are considered to represent local interfacial damage. Five test categories are designed depending on the size of the unbonded zones from 10 to 50 mm, and corresponding beams are loaded until failure occurs after exposing to a cyclic temperature range of ΔT = 25 °C (−10 to 15 °C up to 84 days. The composite action between the CFRP and the steel substrate is preserved until yielding of the beams happens, regardless of the thermal cycling and periodic unbonded zones. The initiation and progression of CFRP debonding become apparent as the beams are further loaded, particularly at geometric discontinuities in the vicinity of the unbonded zones along the interface. A simple analytical model is employed to predict the interfacial stress of the strengthened beams. A threshold temperature difference of ΔT = 30 °C is estimated for the initiation and progression of CFRP debonding. Multiple debonding-progression stages in conjunction with the extent of thermal distress appear to exist. It is recommended that high-modulus CFRP be restrictively used for strengthening steel members potentially exposed to a wide temperature variation range.

  6. Total heat loss coefficient of flat roof constructions with external insulation in tapered layers including the effects of thermal bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    and insulation has to be fulfilled. Based on a given design of the tapered insulation the total heat loss coefficient of the roof can be calculated using formulae in EN ISO 6946 for typical segments of the tapered insulation. Performing design and calculations for large roofs with numerous different segments can...... for design of flat roofs and a pc-program that can be used for calculating the total heat loss coefficient of externally insulated roofs with insulation in tapered layers, taking into account thermal bridges in the roof construction.......In order to achieve durability of flat roofs with external insulation, it is necessary to secure proper drainage of the roof, i.e. to avoid water leaking into the insulation. The design of the tapered insulation of the roof is quite difficult as requirements with respect to both drainage...

  7. Effects of Ohmic Heating, Including Electric Field Intensity and Frequency, on Thermal Inactivation of Bacillus subtilis Spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashita, Suguru; Kawamura, Shuso; Koseki, Shigenobu

    2017-01-01

    Methods for microbial inactivation are important in the food industry; however, conventional external heating (CH) reduces food quality. Accordingly, the nonthermal effects of ohmic heating (OH) on Bacillus subtilis spores in a sodium chloride aqueous solution at 101°C (i.e., the boiling point), as well as the effects of electric field intensity and frequency during OH, were investigated. Survival kinetics were compared between OH and external CH. The inactivation effect on B. subtilis was greater for all electric field conditions (5, 10, and 20 V/cm) than for CH. In particular, 20 V/cm showed a significantly higher inactivation effect (P 0.05) in survival kinetics between 20, 40, and 60 kHz; B. subtilis spores were inactivated more efficiently as the frequency increased. B. subtilis spores were almost completely inactivated at 14 to 16 min for the 60-kHz treatment, but spores were still alive at 20 and 40 kHz for the same treatment times. These results demonstrated that OH inactivates B. subtilis spores more effectively than CH. OH conditions with high electric field intensities and high frequencies resulted in efficient B. subtilis spore inactivation.

  8. A uniaxial constitutive model for superelastic NiTi SMA including R-phase and martensite transformations and thermal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbert, Guillaume; Saint-Sulpice, Luc; Arbab Chirani, Shabnam; Dieng, Lamine; Lecompte, Thibaut; Calloch, Sylvain; Pilvin, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    The well-known martensitic transformation is not always the unique solid-solid phase change in NiTi shape memory alloys (SMA). For this material, R-phase can occur from both austenite and martensite. In some applications, macroscopic strain of the material can be limited to 2%. In these cases, R-phase contribution can not be neglected anymore when compared with martensite. Furthermore, different thermomechanical couplings have to be taken into account to carefully predict strain rate effects and to better describe application conditions. In this paper, a new model taking into account various phase transformations with thermomechanical couplings is presented. This model is based on several transformation criteria. In most applications, SMA are used as wires, submitted to tensile-tensile loadings, in the superelasticity working range. Consequently, a uniaxial reduction of the model is presented for its simplicity. A thermodynamic framework is proposed. It enables to describe the internal variables evolution laws. The simple and fast identification process of model parameters is briefly presented. To verify the validity of the proposed model, simulation results are compared with experimental ones. The influences of testing temperature and strain amplitude on the material behavior is discussed. The damping capacity is also studied, using an energy-based criterion.

  9. A Lumped Thermal Model Including Thermal Coupling and Thermal Boundary Conditions for High Power IGBT Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    Detailed thermal dynamics of high power IGBT modules are important information for the reliability analysis and thermal design of power electronic systems. However, the existing thermal models have their limits to correctly predict these complicated thermal behavior in the IGBTs: The typically used...... thermal distribution under long-term studies. Meanwhile the boundary conditions for the thermal analysis are modeled and included, which can be adapted to different real field applications of power electronic converters. Finally, the accuracy of the proposed thermal model is verified by FEM simulations...... thermal model based on one-dimensional RC lumps have limits to provide temperature distributions inside the device, moreover some variable factors in the real-field applications like the cooling and heating conditions of the converter cannot be adapted. On the other hand, the more advanced three...

  10. A Lumped Thermal Model Including Thermal Coupling and Thermal Boundary Conditions for High Power IGBT Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    Detailed thermal dynamics of high power IGBT modules are important information for the reliability analysis and thermal design of power electronic systems. However, the existing thermal models have their limits to correctly predict these complicated thermal behavior in the IGBTs: The typically used...... thermal distribution under long-term studies. Meanwhile the boundary conditions for the thermal analysis are modeled and included, which can be adapted to different real-field applications of power electronic converters. Finally, the accuracy of the proposed thermal model is verified by FEM simulations...... thermal model based on one-dimensional RC lumps have limits to provide temperature distributions inside the device, moreover some variable factors in the real-field applications like the cooling and heating conditions of the converter cannot be adapted. On the other hand, the more advanced three...

  11. On the Effect of Aspect Ratio of Open Heated Channel Including an Active Obstacle upon the Turbulent Characteristics of a Thermal Plume: Experimental Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taoufik Naffouti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports an experimental investigation of aspect ratio effect of open vertical channel on turbulent characteristics of a thermal plume. The physical configuration is constituted essentially by a prallelepipedic channel and an obstacle of a rectangular section. The thermal plume is generated by a rectangular obstacle heated uniformly at the upper surface. This active source is placed at the entry of a vertical channel open at the ends. The symmetrical heating of channel walls by joule effect and by thermal radiation emitted by the plume, causes the appearance of a thermosiphon flow which interacts with this one. To investigate the flow fluctuations, an anemometer at constant current (CCA is used. The results carried out with air (Pr = 0.71 are performed for Rayleigh number equal to 0.63 107 over a wide range of aspect ratio 1.25 ≤ A ≤ 30. Effects of this pertinent parameter are displayed upon thermal and dynamic turbulent fields. Using Taylor hypothesis, time and length scales of turbulent thermal field are studied. It is found that the turbulent characteristics of the flow are significantly influenced by the variation of aspect ratio. An optimum aspect ratio of channel characterized by a strong homogenization of turbulence of the flow is observed. The fine analysis of temperature fluctuations spectra shows the evolution of the vortices in energy cascade owing to the strong effect of thermosiphon flow which favours the vortex stretching.

  12. An acoustic finite element including viscothermal effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, M.J.J.; Wijnant, Y.H.; Boer, de A.

    2007-01-01

    In acoustics it is generally assumed that viscous- en thermal boundary layer effects play a minor role in the propagation of sound waves. Hence, these effects are neglected in the basic set of equations describing the sound field. However, for geometries that include small confinements of air or thi

  13. Provide a suitable range to include the thermal creeping effect on slip velocity and temperature jump of an air flow in a nanochannel by lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimipour, Arash

    2017-01-01

    The thermal creeping effect on slip velocity of air forced convection through a nanochannel is studied for the first time by using a lattice Boltzmann method. The nanochannel side walls are kept hot while the cold inlet air streams along them. The computations are presented for the wide range of Reynolds number, Knudsen number and Eckert number while slip velocity and temperature jump effects are involved. Moreover appropriate validations are performed versus previous works concerned the micro-nanoflows. The achieved results are shown as the velocity and temperature profiles at different cross sections, streamlines and isotherms and also the values of slip velocity and temperature jump along the nanochannel walls. The ability of the lattice Boltzmann method to simulate the thermal creeping effects on hydrodynamic and thermal domains of flow is shown at this study; so that its effects should be involved at lower values of Eckert number and higher values of Reynolds number especially at entrance region where the most temperature gradient exists.

  14. Thermal swing reactor including a multi-flight auger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermanoski, Ivan

    2017-03-07

    A thermal swing reactor including a multi-flight auger and methods for solar thermochemical reactions are disclosed. The reactor includes a multi-flight auger having different helix portions having different pitch. Embodiments of reactors include at least two distinct reactor portions between which there is at least a pressure differential. In embodiments, reactive particles are exchanged between portions during a reaction cycle to thermally reduce the particles at first conditions and oxidize the particles at second conditions to produce chemical work from heat.

  15. An Axisymmetrical Acoustic BEM Formulation Including Visco-Thermal Losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2011-01-01

    dimensions. However, this is not usually true for small devices such as microphones, hearing aids, couplers, MEMS devices, mobile phones, etc., and then the losses need to be modeled. In this paper a numerical implementation of the Boundary Element Method (BEM) which includes visco-thermal losses...... of the boundary into elements is adequate and the problem has a manageable size. The method can be extended to full three-dimensional BEM....

  16. Approximate Analytical Solution for One-Dimensional Solidification Problem of a Finite Superheating Phase Change Material Including the Effects of Wall and Thermal Contact Resistances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid El Qarnia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reports an analytical solution for the solidification of a superheating phase change material (PCM contained in a rectangular enclosure with a finite height. The analytical solution has been obtained by solving nondimensional energy equations by using the perturbation method for a small perturbation parameter: the Stefan number, ε. This analytical solution, which takes into account the effects of the superheating of PCM, finite height of the enclosure, thickness of the wall, and wall-solid shell interfacial thermal resistances, was expressed in terms of nondimensional temperature distributions of the bottom wall of the enclosure and both PCM phases, and the dimensionless solid-liquid interface position and its dimensionless speed. The developed solution was firstly compared with that existing in the literature for the case of nonsuperheating PCM. The predicted results agreed well with those published in the literature. Next, a parametric study was carried out in order to study the impacts of the dimensionless control parameters on the dimensionless temperature distributions of the wall, the solid shell, and liquid phase of the PCM, as well as the solid-liquid interface position and its dimensionless speed.

  17. Analysis of Thermal Performance in a Bidirectional Thermocycler by Including Thermal Contact Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh Jian Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrates an application of a technique for predicting the thermal characteristics of a bidirectional thermocycling device for polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The micromilling chamber is oscillated by a servo motor and contacted with different isothermal heating blocks to successfully amplify the DNA templates. Because a comprehensive database of contact resistance factors does not exist, it causes researchers to not take thermal contact resistance into consideration at all. We are motivated to accurately determine the thermal characteristics of the reaction chamber with thermal contact effects existing between the heater surface and the chamber surface. Numerical results show that the thermal contact effects between the heating blocks and the reaction chamber dominate the temperature variations and the ramping rates inside the PCR chamber. However, the influences of various temperatures of the ambient conditions on the sample temperature during three PCR steps can be negligible. The experimental temperature profiles are compared well with the numerical simulations by considering the thermal contact conductance coefficient which is empirical by the experimental fitting. To take thermal contact conductance coefficients into consideration in the thermal simulation is recommended to predict a reasonable temperature profile of the reaction chamber during various thermal cycling processes. Finally, the PCR experiments present that Hygromycin B DNA templates are amplified successfully. Furthermore, our group is the first group to introduce the thermal contact effect into theoretical study that has been applied to the design of a PCR device, and to perform the PCR process in a bidirectional thermocycler.

  18. Thermal Insulation System for Non-Vacuum Applications Including a Multilayer Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James E. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The thermal insulation system of the present invention is for non-vacuum applications and is specifically tailored to the ambient pressure environment with any level of humidity or moisture. The thermal insulation system includes a multilayered composite including i) at least one thermal insulation layer and at least one compressible barrier layer provided as alternating, successive layers, and ii) at least one reflective film provided on at least one surface of the thermal insulation layer and/or said compressible barrier layer. The different layers and materials and their combinations are designed to provide low effective thermal conductivity for the system by managing all modes of heat transfer. The thermal insulation system includes an optional outer casing surrounding the multilayered composite. The thermal insulation system is particularly suited for use in any sub-ambient temperature environment where moisture or its adverse effects are a concern. The thermal insulation system provides physical resilience against damaging mechanical effects including compression, flexure, impact, vibration, and thermal expansion/contraction.

  19. Integration of Design, Thermal, Structural, and Optical Analysis, Including Thermal Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.

    1993-01-01

    In many industries there has recently been a concerted movement toward 'quality management' and the issue of how to accomplish work more efficiently. Part of this effort is focused on concurrent engineering; the idea of integrating the design and analysis processes so that they are not separate, sequential processes (often involving design rework due to analytical findings) but instead form an integrated system with smooth transfers of information. Presented herein are several specific examples of concurrent engineering methods being carried out at Langley Research Center (LaRC): integration of thermal, structural and optical analyses to predict changes in optical performance based on thermal and structural effects; integration of the CAD design process with thermal and structural analyses; and integration of analysis and presentation by animating the thermal response of a system as an active color map -- a highly effective visual indication of heat flow.

  20. Optimising the composition of natural moulding sands including thermal aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy St. Kowalski

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the problem of the choice of the moulding sand mixture composition in terms of the sand behaviour in contact withmolten metal. Studies of high-temperature phenomena make assessment of the sand composition applicability under real operatingconditions possible, thus leading to the elimination of sand-originating casting defects. The research was conducted on selected moulding materials included in the composition of traditional moulding sand mixtures without the addition of carbon. The effect of moulding sand composition and moisture content on the linear dilatation and stress-induced allotropic changes of quartz was examined. The analysis of these phenomena was based on 3D charts and maps generated from data collected during the tests.

  1. Photon thermal Hall effect

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    A near-field thermal Hall effect (i.e.Righi-Leduc effect) in lattices of magneto-optical particles placed in a constant magnetic field is predicted. This effect is related to a symetry breaking in the system induced by the magnetic field which gives rise to preferential channels for the heat-transport by photon tunneling thanks to the particles anisotropy tuning.

  2. Thermal buckling of axisymmetrically laminated cylindrically orthotropic shallow spherical shells including transverse shear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yong-an; WANG Fan; LIU Ren-huai

    2008-01-01

    The nonlinear thermal buckling of symmetrically laminated cylindrically orthotropic shallow spherical shell under temperature field and uniform pressure including transverse shear is studied.Also the analytic formulas for determining the critical buckling loads under different temperature fields are obtained by using the modified iteration method.The effect of transverse shear deformation and different temperature fields on critical buckling load is discussed.

  3. Noninvasive temperature estimation by detecting echo-strain change including thermal expansion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Yong; Zhang Dong; Gong Xiu-Fen; Liu Xiao-Zhou; Ma Qing-Yu; Qiu Yuan-Yuan

    2007-01-01

    This article studies the feasibility of noninvasive temperature estimation by detecting echo-strain including thermal expansion in therapeutic ultrasound treatment. This technique evaluates distributions of echo-strain and temperature inside the tissue by detecting echo signals pre- and post-heating, in combination with the temperature dependence of sound speed and thermal expansion. In the computer simulation and experimental study, echo signals pre- and postheating are acquired and then the temperature elevation is evaluated by correlation analysis. Results demonstrate that this technique can effectively extend the measured temperature range up to 75℃ with an accuracy of ±2 ℃.

  4. Thermal diffusivity effect in opto-thermal skin measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, P; Imhof, R E [Faculty of ESBE, London South Bank University, 103 Borough Road, London SE1 0AA (United Kingdom); Cui, Y [Sunrise Systems Limited, Flint Bridge Business Centre, Ely Road, Waterbeach, Cambridge CB5 9QZ (United Kingdom); Ciortea, L I; Berg, E P, E-mail: xiaop@lsbu.ac.u [Biox Systems Ltd, 103 Borough Road, London SE1 0AA (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-01

    We present our latest study on the thermal diffusivity effect in opto-thermal skin measurements. We discuss how thermal diffusivity affects the shape of opto-thermal signal, and how to measure thermal diffusivity in opto-thermal measurements of arbitrary sample surfaces. We also present a mathematical model for a thermally gradient material, and its corresponding opto-thermal signal. Finally, we show some of our latest experimental results of this thermal diffusivity effect study.

  5. Thermal wave scattering from subsurface spheroids heteroplasmon defects including non-Fourier effects%考虑非傅里叶效应的亚表面球形异质缺陷的热波散射

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马晓波; 叶胜林; 姜欢琦; 陈德珍

    2014-01-01

    以往对材料内缺陷热波散射问题的研究,多假定孔洞缺陷内无异质且边界条件为绝热的。异质体孔洞缺陷是工程中更为常见的情况。基于非 Fourier 热传导方程,采用波函数展开法,对含异质球形缺陷的半无限体内部的热波散射与温度分布进行了研究。给出了问题的解析解和数值计算结果。分析了缺陷物理参数和几何参数以及入射波波数等对材料表面温度分布的影响。结果表明:异质体的物理参数和几何参数等对材料表面温度的影响是显著的,主要影响因素包括无量纲导热系数,无量纲热扩散长度,无量纲埋藏深度等。%The research on thermal wave scattering problem of the defect inside the material before presuming no heteroplasmon inside the hole and the boundary condition was adiabatic. Based on non-Fourier heat conduction law, employing the methods of wave function expansion, the thermal scattered and temperature distribution in semi-infinite material with subsurface spherical heteroplasmon defects was investigated. The analytical solution and the numerical calculation result of the problem were presented. The effects of physical and geometrical parameter of defects and the incident wave number on surface temperature distribution of the semi-infinite material were analyzed. Result has shown that the physical and geometrical parameter of the heteroplamon have great influence on the surface temperature of the material. And the main influence factors include non-dimensional heat conductivity coefficient, non-dimensional thermal diffusion length, non-dimensional buried depth and so on.

  6. High-level direct-dynamics variational transition state theory calculations including multidimensional tunneling of the thermal rate constants, branching ratios, and kinetic isotope effects of the hydrogen abstraction reactions from methanol by atomic hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meana-Pañeda, Rubén; Truhlar, Donald G; Fernández-Ramos, Antonio

    2011-03-07

    We report a detailed theoretical study of the hydrogen abstraction reaction from methanol by atomic hydrogen. The study includes the analysis of thermal rate constants, branching ratios, and kinetic isotope effects. Specifically, we have performed high-level computations at the MC3BB level together with direct dynamics calculations by canonical variational transition state theory (CVT) with the microcanonically optimized multidimensional tunneling (μOMT) transmission coefficient (CVT/μOMT) to study both the CH(3)OH+H→CH(2)OH+H(2) (R1) reaction and the CH(3)OH+H→CH(3)O+H(2) (R2) reaction. The CVT/μOMT calculations show that reaction R1 dominates in the whole range 298≤T (K)≤2500 and that anharmonic effects on the torsional mode about the C-O bond are important, mainly at high temperatures. The activation energy for the total reaction sum of R1 and R2 reactions changes substantially with temperature and, therefore, the use of straight-line Arrhenius plots is not valid. We recommend the use of new expressions for the total R1 + R2 reaction and for the R1 and R2 individual reactions.

  7. Fast thermal simulations and temperature optimization for hyperthermia treatment planning, including realistic 3D vessel networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, H P; van den Berg, C A T; Bel, A; Crezee, J

    2013-10-01

    Accurate thermal simulations in hyperthermia treatment planning require discrete modeling of large blood vessels. The very long computation time of the finite difference based DIscrete VAsculature model (DIVA) developed for this purpose is impractical for clinical applications. In this work, a fast steady-state thermal solver was developed for simulations with realistic 3D vessel networks. Additionally, an efficient temperature-based optimization method including the thermal effect of discrete vasculature was developed. The steady-state energy balance for vasculature and tissue was described by a linear system, which was solved with an iterative method on the graphical processing unit. Temperature calculations during optimization were performed by superposition of several precomputed temperature distributions, calculated with the developed thermal solver. The thermal solver and optimization were applied to a human anatomy, with the prostate being the target region, heated with the eight waveguide 70 MHz AMC-8 system. Realistic 3D pelvic vasculature was obtained from angiography. Both the arterial and venous vessel networks consisted of 174 segments and 93 endpoints with a diameter of 1.2 mm. Calculation of the steady-state temperature distribution lasted about 3.3 h with the original DIVA model, while the newly developed method took only ≈ 1-1.5 min. Temperature-based optimization with and without taking the vasculature into account showed differences in optimized waveguide power of more than a factor 2 and optimized tumor T90 differed up to ≈ 0.5°C. This shows the necessity to take discrete vasculature into account during optimization. A very fast method was developed for thermal simulations with realistic 3D vessel networks. The short simulation time allows online calculations and makes temperature optimization with realistic vasculature feasible, which is an important step forward in hyperthermia treatment planning.

  8. Electromagnetic field occupational exposure: non-thermal vs. thermal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, M; Zaryabova, V; Ivanova, M

    2013-06-01

    There are a variety of definitions for "non-thermal effects" included in different international standards. They start by the simple description that they are "effects of electromagnetic energy on a body that are not heat-related effects", passing through the very general definition related to low-level effects: "biological effects ascribed to exposure to low-level electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields, i.e. at or below the corresponding dosimetric reference levels in the frequency range covered in this standard (0 Hz-300 GHz)", and going to the concrete definition of "the stimulation of muscles, nerves, or sensory organs, vertigo or phosfenes". Here, we discuss what kind of effect does the non-thermal one has on human body and give data of measurements in different occupations with low-frequency sources of electromagnetic field such as electric power distribution systems, transformers, MRI systems and : video display units (VDUs), whereas thermal effects should not be expected. In some of these workplaces, values above the exposure limits could be found, nevertheless that they are in the term "non-thermal effects" on human body. Examples are workplaces in MRI, also in some power plants. Here, we will not comment on non-thermal effects as a result of RF or microwave exposure because there are not proven evidence about the existance of such effects and mechanisms for them are not clear.

  9. A Numerical Analysis of the Transient Response of an Ablation System Including Effects of Thermal Nonequilibrium, Mass Transfer and Chemical Kinetics. Ph.D Thesis - Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    The differential equations governing the transient response of a one-dimensional ablative thermal protection system undergoing stagnation ablation are derived. These equations are for thermal nonequilibrium effects between the pyrolysis gases and the char layer and kinetically controlled chemical reactions and mass transfer between the pyrolysis gases and the char layer. The boundary conditions are written for the particular case of stagnation heating with surface removal by oxidation or sublimation and pyrolysis of the uncharred layer occurring in a plane. The governing equations and boundary conditions are solved numerically using the modified implicit method (Crank-Nicolson method). Numerical results are compared with exact solutions for a number of simplified cases. The comparison is favorable in each instance.

  10. LASER INDUCED THERMAL LENS EFFECT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈俊; 黄孟才; 江景云; 施教芳

    1991-01-01

    The thermal lens effect has emerged in recent years as a novel ,highly sensitive tool for the study of the very weak molecular absorption of light energy,This paper discusses the theory and technique of the thermal lens measurement.Some opplications of the thermal lens measurement are described.A mode-mismatched dual-beam thermal lens experimental arragement with a modulated probe beam ,designed by the authors.for trace analysis is presented,and its detection limit was found to be 4.1×10-7 for Cu(Ⅱ) in ethanol and 80 mW excitation power.

  11. Numerical Acoustic Models Including Viscous and Thermal losses: Review of Existing and New Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Risby; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Aage, Niels

    2017-01-01

    This work presents an updated overview of numerical methods including acoustic viscous and thermal losses. Numerical modelling of viscothermal losses has gradually become more important due to the general trend of making acoustic devices smaller. Not including viscothermal acoustic losses in such...

  12. Thermal effects in supercapacitors

    CERN Document Server

    Xiong, Guoping; Fisher, Timothy S

    2015-01-01

    This Brief reviews contemporary research conducted in university and industry laboratories on thermal management in electrochemical energy storage systems (capacitors and batteries) that have been widely used as power sources in many practical applications, such as automobiles, hybrid transport, renewable energy installations, power backup and electronic devices. Placing a particular emphasis on supercapacitors, the authors discuss how supercapacitors, or ultra capacitors, are complementing and  replacing, batteries because of their faster power delivery, longer life cycle and higher coulombic efficiency, while providing higher energy density than conventional electrolytic capacitors. Recent advances in both macro- and micro capacitor technologies are covered. The work facilitates systematic understanding of thermal transport in such devices that can help develop better power management systems.

  13. Utilization of thermal effects for silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Daoxin; Yu, Longhai; Chen, Sitao; Wu, Hao

    2015-08-01

    Thermal effect plays a key role and has been utilized for various photonic devices. For silicon photonics, the thermal effect is usually important because of the large thermo-optical coefficient of silicon material. This paper gives a review for the utilization of thermal effects for silicon photonics. First, the thermal effect is very beneficial to realize energy-efficient silicon photonic devices with tunability/switchability (including switches, variable optical attenuators, etc). Traditionally metal micro-heater sitting on a buried silicon-on-insulator (SOI) nanowire is used to introduce a phase shift for thermal tunability by injecting a electrical current. An effective way to improve the energy-efficiency of thermal tuning is reducing the volume of the optical waveguide as well as the micro-heater. Our recent work on silicon nanophotonic waveguides with novel nano-heaters based on metal wires as well as graphene ribbons will be summarized. Second, the thermal resistance effect of the metal strip on a hybrid plasmonic waveguide structure can be utilized to realize an ultra-small on-chip photodetector available for an ultra-broad band of wavelength, which will also be discussed.

  14. Inlet Guide Vane Wakes Including Rotor Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, R. T.; Fleeter, S.

    2001-02-01

    Fundamental experiments are described directed at the investigation of forcing functions generated by an inlet guide vane (IGV) row, including interactions with the downstream rotor, for application to turbomachine forced response design systems. The experiments are performed in a high-speed research fan facility comprised of an IGV row upstream of a rotor. IGV-rotor axial spacing is variable, with the IGV row able to be indexed circumferentially, thereby allowing measurements to be made across several IGV wakes. With an IGV relative Mach number of 0.29, measurements include the IGV wake pressure and velocity fields for three IGV-rotor axial spacings. The decay characteristics of the IGV wakes are compared to the Majjigi and Gliebe empirical correlations. After Fourier decomposition, a vortical-potential gust splitting analysis is implemented to determine the vortical and potential harmonic wake gust forcing functions both upstream and downstream of the rotor. Higher harmonics of the vortical gust component of the IGV wakes are found to decay at a uniform rate due to viscous diffusion.

  15. Generalized fluid theory including non-Maxwellian kinetic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izacard, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    The results obtained by the plasma physics community for the validation and the prediction of turbulence and transport in magnetized plasmas come mainly from the use of very central processing unit (CPU)-consuming particle-in-cell or (gyro)kinetic codes which naturally include non-Maxwellian kinetic effects. To date, fluid codes are not considered to be relevant for the description of these kinetic effects. Here, after revisiting the limitations of the current fluid theory developed in the 19th century, we generalize the fluid theory including kinetic effects such as non-Maxwellian super-thermal tails with as few fluid equations as possible. The collisionless and collisional fluid closures from the nonlinear Landau Fokker-Planck collision operator are shown for an arbitrary collisionality. Indeed, the first fluid models associated with two examples of collisionless fluid closures are obtained by assuming an analytic non-Maxwellian distribution function (e.g. the INMDF (Izacard, O. 2016b Kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions in magnetized plasmas. Phys. Plasmas 23, 082504) that stands for interpreted non-Maxwellian distribution function). One of the main differences with the literature is our analytic representation of the distribution function in the velocity phase space with as few hidden variables as possible thanks to the use of non-orthogonal basis sets. These new non-Maxwellian fluid equations could initiate the next generation of fluid codes including kinetic effects and can be expanded to other scientific disciplines such as astrophysics, condensed matter or hydrodynamics. As a validation test, we perform a numerical simulation based on a minimal reduced INMDF fluid model. The result of this test is the discovery of the origin of particle and heat diffusion. The diffusion is due to the competition between a growing INMDF on short time scales due to spatial gradients and the thermalization on longer time scales. The results

  16. Effect of Sintering on Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Barrier Effects of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kai; PENG Hui; GUO Hongbo; GONG Shengkai

    2012-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are mostly applied to hot components of advanced turbine engines to insulate the components from hot gas.The effect of sintering on thermal conductivity and thermal barrier effects of conventional plasma sprayed and nanostructured yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are investigated.Remarkable increase in thermal conductivity occurs to both typical coatings after heat treatment.The change of porosity is just the opposite.The grain size of the nanostructured zirconia coating increases more drastically with annealing time compared to that of the conventional plasma sprayed coating,which indicates that coating sintering makes more contributions to the thermal conductivity of the nanostructured coating than that of the conventional coating.Thermal barrier effect tests using temperature difference technique are performed on both coatings.The thermal barrier effects decrease with the increase of thermal conductivity after heat treatment and the decline seems more drastic in low thermal conductivity range.The decline in thermal barrier effects is about 80 ℃for nanostructured coating after 100 h heat treatment,while the conventional coating reduces by less than 60 ℃ compared to the as-sprayed coating.

  17. Atmospheric effects on the mapping of Martian thermal inertia and thermally derived albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Joan N.; Jakosky, Bruce M.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    We examine the effects of a dusty CO2 atmosphere on the thermal inertia and thermally derived albedo of Mars and we present a new map of thermal inertias. This new map was produced using a coupled surface atmosphere (CSA) model, dust opacities from Viking infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) data, and CO2 columns based on topography. The CSA model thermal inertias are smaller than the 2% model thermal inertias, with the difference largest at large thermal inertia. Although the difference between the thermal inertias obtained with the two models is moderate for much of the region studied, it is largest in regions of either high dust opacity or of topographic lows, including the Viking Lander 1 site and some geologically interesting regions. The CSA model thermally derived albedos do not acurately predict the IRTM measured albedos and are very similar to the thermally derived albedos obtained with models making the 2% assumption.

  18. Empirical Validation of a Thermal Model of a Complex Roof Including Phase Change Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Guichard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the empirical validation of a building thermal model of a complex roof including a phase change material (PCM. A mathematical model dedicated to PCMs based on the heat apparent capacity method was implemented in a multi-zone building simulation code, the aim being to increase the understanding of the thermal behavior of the whole building with PCM technologies. In order to empirically validate the model, the methodology is based both on numerical and experimental studies. A parametric sensitivity analysis was performed and a set of parameters of the thermal model has been identified for optimization. The use of the generic optimization program called GenOpt® coupled to the building simulation code enabled to determine the set of adequate parameters. We first present the empirical validation methodology and main results of previous work. We then give an overview of GenOpt® and its coupling with the building simulation code. Finally, once the optimization results are obtained, comparisons of the thermal predictions with measurements are found to be acceptable and are presented.

  19. Thermal resistance matrix representation of thermal effects and thermal design in multi-finger power heterojunction bipolar transistors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Dong-Yue; Zhang Wan-Rong; Chen Liang; Fu Qiang; Xiao Ying; Wang Ren-Qing; Zhao Xin

    2011-01-01

    The thermal resistance matrix including self-heating thermal resistance and thermal coupling resistance is presented to describe the thermal effects of multi-finger power heterojunction bipolar transistors. The dependence of thermal resistance matrix on finger spacing is also investigated. It is shown that both self-heating thermal resistance and thermal coupling resistance are lowered by increasing the finger spacing, in which the downward dissipated heat path is widened and the heat flow from adjacent fingers is effectively suppressed. The decrease of self-heating thermal resistance and thermal coupling resistance is helpful for improving the thermal stability of power devices. Furthermore, with the aid of the thermal resistance matrix, a 10-finger power heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) with non-uniform finger spacing is designed for high thermal stability. The optimized structure can effectively lower the peak temperature while maintaining a uniformity of the temperature profile at various biases and thus the device effectively may operate at a higher power level.

  20. Generalized fluid theory including non-Maxwellian kinetic effects

    CERN Document Server

    Izacard, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The results obtained by the plasma physics community for the validation and the prediction of turbulence and transport in magnetized plasma come mainly from the use of very CPU-consuming particle-in-cell or (gyro)kinetic codes which naturally include non-Maxwellian kinetic effects. To date, fluid codes are not considered to be relevant for the description of these kinetic effects. Here, after revisiting the limitations of the current fluid theory developed in the 19th century, we generalize the fluid theory including kinetic effects such as non-Maxwellian super-thermal tails with as few fluid equations as possible. The collisionless and collisional fluid closures from the nonlinear Landau Fokker-Planck collision operator are shown for an arbitrary collisionality. Indeed, the first fluid models associated with two examples of collisionless fluid closures are obtained by assuming an analytic non-Maxwellian distribution function (e.g., the INMDF [O. Izacard, Phys. Plasmas 23, 082504 (2016)]). One of the main dif...

  1. Economic Dispatch for Power System Included Wind and Solar Thermal Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saoussen BRINI

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available With the fast development of technologies of alternative energy, the electric power network can be composed of several renewable energy resources. The energy resources have various characteristics in terms of operational costs and reliability. In this study, the problem is the Economic Environmental Dispatching (EED of hybrid power system including wind and solar thermal energies. Renewable energy resources depend on the data of the climate such as the wind speed for wind energy, solar radiation and the temperature for solar thermal energy. In this article it proposes a methodology to solve this problem. The resolution takes account of the fuel costs and reducing of the emissions of the polluting gases. The resolution is done by the Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm (SPEA method and the simulations have been made on an IEEE network test (30 nodes, 8 machines and 41 lines.

  2. Generalized fluid theory including non-Maxwellian kinetic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izacard, Olivier

    2017-03-29

    The results obtained by the plasma physics community for the validation and the prediction of turbulence and transport in magnetized plasmas come mainly from the use of very central processing unit (CPU)-consuming particle-in-cell or (gyro)kinetic codes which naturally include non-Maxwellian kinetic effects. To date, fluid codes are not considered to be relevant for the description of these kinetic effects. Here, after revisiting the limitations of the current fluid theory developed in the 19th century, we generalize the fluid theory including kinetic effects such as non-Maxwellian super-thermal tails with as few fluid equations as possible. The collisionless and collisional fluid closures from the nonlinear Landau Fokker–Planck collision operator are shown for an arbitrary collisionality. Indeed, the first fluid models associated with two examples of collisionless fluid closures are obtained by assuming an analytic non-Maxwellian distribution function (e.g. the INMDF (Izacard, O. 2016b Kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions in magnetized plasmas.Phys. Plasmas23, 082504) that stands for interpreted non-Maxwellian distribution function). One of the main differences with the literature is our analytic representation of the distribution function in the velocity phase space with as few hidden variables as possible thanks to the use of non-orthogonal basis sets. These new non-Maxwellian fluid equations could initiate the next generation of fluid codes including kinetic effects and can be expanded to other scientific disciplines such as astrophysics, condensed matter or hydrodynamics. As a validation test, we perform a numerical simulation based on a minimal reduced INMDF fluid model. The result of this test is the discovery of the origin of particle and heat diffusion. The diffusion is due to the competition between a growing INMDF on short time scales due to spatial gradients and the thermalization on longer time

  3. Thermal Hall Effect of Magnons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shuichi; Okamoto, Akihiro

    2017-01-01

    We review recent developments in theories and experiments on the magnon Hall effect. We derive the thermal Hall conductivity of magnons in terms of the Berry curvature of magnonic bands. In addition to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, we show that the dipolar interaction can make the Berry curvature nonzero. We mainly discuss theoretical aspects of the magnon Hall effect and related theoretical works. Experimental progress in this field is also mentioned.

  4. Thermal-hydraulic Analysis in the Pool of PGSFR including the Shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jung; Lee, Taeho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Various design issues relate to this region, and one of them is thermal-hydraulic behavior when shielding exists inside the reactor vessel. The shielding is used for the blockage of the radiation emitted by the reactor core. The shielding is installed at the Intermediate Heat eXchanger (IHX), core shroud, and redan region at the top of core. However, this structure disturbs the normal flow path and heat transfer of the primary heat transfer system. In this study, the multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic characteristics in the pool of PGSFR including the shielding are analyzed. Also these results are compared to a case in which no shielding is installed. A thermal-hydraulic analysis in the pool of the PGSFR considering the shielding structure are performed using STAR-CCM+. The internal major components of the pool inside are modeled, and calculations are performed with a normal operation condition. Also, these results are compared to a no shielding case. The flow and temperature changes owing to the shielding structure at a redan inside are shown, but the overall flow and temperature distributions in both cases are substantially similar. Also the physical properties such as the flow rate, temperature, and static pressure at each major point are almost the same. These results are utilized in the arrangement of the reactor internal structure and design of the shielding structure.

  5. The Effect of Core Configuration on Thermal Barrier Thermal Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Bott, Robert H.; Druesedow, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal barriers and seals are integral components in the thermal protection systems (TPS) of nearly all aerospace vehicles. They are used to minimize heat transfer through interfaces and gaps and protect underlying temperature-sensitive components. The core insulation has a significant impact on both the thermal and mechanical properties of compliant thermal barriers. Proper selection of an appropriate core configuration to mitigate conductive, convective and radiative heat transfer through the thermal barrier is challenging. Additionally, optimization of the thermal barrier for thermal performance may have counteracting effects on mechanical performance. Experimental evaluations have been conducted to better understand the effect of insulation density on permeability and leakage performance, which can significantly impact the resistance to convective heat transfer. The effect of core density on mechanical performance was also previously investigated and will be reviewed. Simple thermal models were also developed to determine the impact of various core parameters on downstream temperatures. An extended understanding of these factors can improve the ability to design and implement these critical TPS components.

  6. Suggestions for revised definitions of noise quantities, including quantum effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, A. R.

    1999-03-01

    Recent advances in millimeter- and submillimeter-wavelength receivers and the development of low-noise optical amplifiers focus attention on inconsistencies and ambiguities in the standard definitions of noise quantities and the procedures for measuring them. The difficulty is caused by the zero-point (quantum) noise hf/2 W/Hz, which is present even at absolute zero temperature, and also by the nonlinear dependence at low temperature of the thermal noise power of a resistor on its physical temperature, as given by the Planck law. Until recently, these effects were insignificant in all but the most exotic experiments, and the familiar Rayleigh-Jeans noise formula P=kT W/Hz could safely be used in most situations, Now, particularly in low-noise millimeter-wave and photonic devices, the quantum noise is prominent and the nonlinearity of the Planck law can no longer be neglected. The IEEE Standard Dictionary of Electrical and Electronics Terms gives several definitions of the noise temperature of a resistor or a port, which include: 1) the physical temperature of the resistor and 2) its available noise power density divided by Boltzmann's constant-definitions which are incompatible because of the nature of the Planck radiation law. In addition, there is no indication of whether the zero-point noise should be included as part of the noise temperature. Revised definitions of the common noise quantities are suggested, which resolve the shortcomings of the present definitions. The revised definitions have only a small effect on most RF and microwave measurements, but they provide a common consistent noise terminology from dc to light frequencies.

  7. Thermal effects and thermal compensation in the OSIRIS camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, J. Jesús; Tejada, Carlos; Farah, Alejandro; Rasilla, Jose L.; Fuentes, F. Javier

    2003-03-01

    Tight stability requirements for the imager/spectrograph OSIRIS (a Day One optical instrument for the GTC telescope) demand a careful treatment of thermal effects within the OSIRIS camera. Mostly due to the thermal response of refraction indices of its glasses (and not so much to curvature, spacing or thickness variations of the lenses), the camera optics alone degrades beyond requirements the image quality and plate scale under the expected ambient temperature variations (about 1.8 °C/hour). Thermal effects and thermal compensator studies of the OSIRIS camera are first summarized, before discussing how the motion (of a few microns per °C) of the 3rd camera doublet, as a sole compensator, practically eliminates thermal influences on both image quality and plate scale. A concept for the passive implementation of the compensator is also discussed.

  8. Numerical models of single- and double-negative metamaterials including viscous and thermal losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2017-01-01

    Negative index acoustic metamaterials are artificial structures made of subwavelength units arranged in a lattice, whose effective acoustic parameters, bulk modulus and mass density, can be negative. In these materials, sound waves propagate inside the periodic structure, assumed rigid, showing...... extraordinary properties. We are interested in two particular cases: a double-negative metamaterial, where both parameters are negative at some frequencies, and a single-negative metamaterial with negative bulk modulus within a broader frequency band. In previous research involving the double......-negative metamaterial, numerical models with viscous and thermal losses were used to explain that the extraordinary behavior, predicted by analytical models and numerical simulations with no losses, disappeared when the metamaterial was measured in physical setups. The improvement of the models is allowing now a more...

  9. Complete Loss and Thermal Model of Power Semiconductors Including Device Rating Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Beczkowski, Szymon;

    2015-01-01

    loading but also the device rating as input variables. The quantified correlation between the power loss, thermal impedance and silicon area of Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) is mathematically established. By this new modeling approach, all factors that have impacts to the loss and thermal......Thermal loading of power devices are closely related to the reliability performance of the whole converter system. The electrical loading and device rating are both important factors that determine the loss and thermal behaviors of power semiconductor devices. In the existing loss and thermal...... models, only the electrical loadings are focused and treated as design variables, while the device rating is normally pre-defined by experience with limited design flexibility. Consequently, a more complete loss and thermal model is proposed in this paper, which takes into account not only the electrical...

  10. Loss and thermal model for power semiconductors including device rating information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Beczkowski, Szymon;

    2014-01-01

    The electrical loading and device rating are both important factors that determine the loss and thermal behaviors of power semiconductor devices. In the existing loss and thermal models, only the electrical loadings are focused and treated as design variables, while the device rating is normally...... pre-defined by experience with poor design flexibility. Consequently a more complete loss and thermal model is proposed in this paper, which takes into account not only the electrical loading but also the device rating as input variables. The quantified correlation between the power loss, thermal...... impedance and silicon area of Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) is mathematically established. By this new modeling approach, all factors that have impacts to the loss and thermal profiles of power devices can be accurately mapped, enabling more design freedom to optimize the efficiency and thermal...

  11. Loss and thermal model for power semiconductors including device rating information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Beczkowski, Szymon

    2014-01-01

    impedance and silicon area of Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) is mathematically established. By this new modeling approach, all factors that have impacts to the loss and thermal profiles of power devices can be accurately mapped, enabling more design freedom to optimize the efficiency and thermal......The electrical loading and device rating are both important factors that determine the loss and thermal behaviors of power semiconductor devices. In the existing loss and thermal models, only the electrical loadings are focused and treated as design variables, while the device rating is normally...... pre-defined by experience with poor design flexibility. Consequently a more complete loss and thermal model is proposed in this paper, which takes into account not only the electrical loading but also the device rating as input variables. The quantified correlation between the power loss, thermal...

  12. Thermal effects in radiation processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagorski, Z.P.

    1984-10-21

    The balance of ionizing radiation energy incident on an object being processed is discussed in terms of energy losses, influencing the amount really absorbed. To obtain the amount of heat produced, the absorbed energy is corrected for the change in internal energy of the system and for the heat effect of secondary reactions developing after the initiation. The temperature of a processed object results from the heat evolved and from the specific heat of the material comprising the object. The specific heat of most materials is usually much lower than that of aqueous systems and therefore temperatures after irradiation are higher. The role of low specific heat in radiation processing at cryogenic conditions is stressed. Adiabatic conditions of accelerator irradiation are contrasted with the steady state thermal conditions prevailing in large gamma sources. Among specific questions discussed in the last part of the paper are: intermediate and final temperature of composite materials, measurement of real thermal effects in situ, neutralization of undesired warming experienced during radiation processing, processing at temperatures other than ambient and administration of very high doses of radiation.

  13. A Model for Hydrogen Thermal Conductivity and Viscosity Including the Critical Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Howard A.; Tunc, Gokturk; Bayazitoglu, Yildiz

    2001-01-01

    In order to conduct a thermal analysis of heat transfer to liquid hydrogen near the critical point, an accurate understanding of the thermal transport properties is required. A review of the available literature on hydrogen transport properties identified a lack of useful equations to predict the thermal conductivity and viscosity of liquid hydrogen. The tables published by the National Bureau of Standards were used to perform a series of curve fits to generate the needed correlation equations. These equations give the thermal conductivity and viscosity of hydrogen below 100 K. They agree with the published NBS tables, with less than a 1.5 percent error for temperatures below 100 K and pressures from the triple point to 1000 KPa. These equations also capture the divergence in the thermal conductivity at the critical point

  14. Complete Loss and Thermal Model of Power Semiconductors Including Device Rating Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Beczkowski, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    profiles of the power devices can accurately be mapped, enabling more design freedom to optimize the efficiency and thermal loading of the power converter. The proposed model can be further improved by experimental tests, and it is well agreed by both circuit and Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation......Thermal loading of power devices are closely related to the reliability performance of the whole converter system. The electrical loading and device rating are both important factors that determine the loss and thermal behaviors of power semiconductor devices. In the existing loss and thermal...... models, only the electrical loadings are focused and treated as design variables, while the device rating is normally pre-defined by experience with limited design flexibility. Consequently, a more complete loss and thermal model is proposed in this paper, which takes into account not only the electrical...

  15. Thermal Testing for Resin Structure Including Artificial Cavity Made by Three-Dimensional Printer

    OpenAIRE

    倉橋, 貴彦; 丸岡, 宏太郎; 井山, 徹郎; Kurahashi, Takahiko; Maruoka, Kotaro; Iyama, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the thermal testing is carried out by using the resin structure with artificial cavity made by three-dimensional printer. There are some non-destructive testing method such as the ultrasonic testing method, the thermal testing method and so on. It is known that the size of defect can be found at the target point by using the ultrasonic testing method. On the other hand, the thermal testing method has a characteristic that the location of the defect, the cavity, the corrosion an...

  16. Thermal effects on fish ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutant, Charles C.

    1976-01-01

    Of all the environmental factors that influence aquatic organisms, temperature is the most all-pervasive. There is always an environmental temperature while other factors may or may not be present to exert their effects. Fish are, for all practical purposes, thermal conformers, or obligate poikilotherms. That is, they are able to exert little significant influence on maintaining a certain body temperature by specialized metabolic or behavioral means. Their body temperature thus fluctuates nearly in concert with the temperature of their aquatic medium (although particularly large, actively-moving fish such as tuna have deep muscle temperatures slightly higher than the water). Intimate contact at the gills of body fluids with the outside water and the high specific heat of water provide a very efficient heat exchanger that insures this near identity of internal and external temperatures.

  17. Scaling thermal effects in radial flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudspeth, R. T.; Guenther, R. B.; Roley, K. L.; McDougal, W. G.

    To adequately evaluate the environmental impact of siting nuclear waste repositories in basalt aquicludes, it is essential to know the effects on parameter identification algorithms of thermal gradients that exist in these basaltic aquicludes. Temperatures of approximately 60°C and pressures of approximately 150 atm can be expected at potential repository sites located at depths of approximately 1000 m. The phenomenon of over-recovery has been observed in some pumping tests conducted at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation located in the Pasco Basin adjacent to the Columbia River in the state of Washington, USA. This over-recovery phenomenon may possibly be due to variations in the fluid density caused by thermal gradients. To assess the potential effects of these thermal gradients on indirect parameter identification algorithms, a systematic scaling of the governing field equations is required in order to obtain dimensionless equations based on the principle of similarity. The constitutive relationships for the specific weight of the fluid and for the porosity of the aquiclude are shown to be exponentially dependent on the pressure gradient. The dynamic pressure is converted to the piezometric head and the flow equation for the piezometric head is then scaled in radial coordinates. Order-of-magnitude estimates are made for all variables in unsteady flow for a typical well test in a basaltic aquiclude. Retaining all nonlinear terms, the parametric dependency of the flow equation on the classical dimensionless thermal and hydraulic parameters is demonstrated. These classical parameters include the Batchelor, Fourier, Froude, Grashof, and Reynolds Numbers associated with thermal flows. The flow equation is linearized from order-of-magnitude estimates based on these classical parameters for application in parameter identification algorithms.

  18. Empirical Validation of a Thermal Model of a Complex Roof Including Phase Change Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Guichard, Stéphane; Bigot, Dimitri; Malet-Damour, Bruno; Libelle, Teddy; Boyer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the empirical validation of a building thermal model using a phase change material (PCM) in a complex roof. A mathematical model dedicated to phase change materials based on the heat apparent capacity method was implemented in a multi-zone building simulation code, the aim being to increase understanding of the thermal behavior of the whole building with PCM technologies. To empirically validate the model, the methodology is based both on numerical and experimental studies. A parametric sensitivity analysis was performed and a set of parameters of the thermal model have been identified for optimization. The use of a generic optimization program called GenOpt coupled to the building simulation code enabled to determine the set of adequate parameters. We first present the empirical validation methodology and main results of previous work. We then give an overview of GenOpt and its coupling with the building simulation code. Finally, once the optimization results are obtained, comparisons o...

  19. An axisymmetric boundary element formulation of sound wave propagation in fluids including viscous and thermal losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2013-01-01

    The formulation presented in this paper is based on the Boundary Element Method (BEM) and implements Kirchhoff’s decomposition into viscous, thermal and acoustic components, which can be treated independently everywhere in the domain except on the boundaries. The acoustic variables with losses ar...

  20. Berry curvature and various thermal Hall effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lifa

    2016-10-01

    Applying the approach of semiclassical wave packet dynamics, we study various thermal Hall effects where carriers can be electron, phonon, magnon, etc. A general formula of thermal Hall conductivity is obtained to provide an essential physics for various thermal Hall effects, where the Berry phase effect manifests naturally. All the formulas of electron thermal Hall effect, phonon Hall effect, and magnon Hall effect can be directly reproduced from the general formula. It is also found that the Strěda formula can not be directly applied to the thermal Hall effects, where only the edge magnetization contributes to the Hall effects. Furthermore, we obtain a combined formula for anomalous Hall conductivity, thermal Hall electronic conductivity and thermal Hall conductivity for electron systems, where the Berry curvature is weighted by a different function. Finally, we discuss particle magnetization and its relation to angular momentum of the carrier, change of which could induce a mechanical rotation; and possible experiments for thermal Hall effect associated with a mechanical rotation are also proposed.

  1. An axisymmetric boundary element formulation of sound wave propagation in fluids including viscous and thermal losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutanda-Henríquez, Vicente; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2013-11-01

    The formulation presented in this paper is based on the boundary element method (BEM) and implements Kirchhoff's decomposition into viscous, thermal, and acoustic components, which can be treated independently everywhere in the domain except on the boundaries. The acoustic variables with losses are solved using extended boundary conditions that assume (i) negligible temperature fluctuations at the boundary and (ii) normal and tangential matching of the boundary's particle velocity. The proposed model does not require constructing a special mesh for the viscous and thermal boundary layers as is the case with the existing finite element method (FEM) implementations with losses. The suitability of this approach is demonstrated using an axisymmetrical BEM and two test cases where the numerical results are compared with analytical solutions.

  2. Implementation aspects of the Boundary Element Method including viscous and thermal losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of viscous and thermal losses using the Boundary Element Method (BEM) is based on the Kirchhoff’s dispersion relation and has been tested in previous work using analytical test cases and comparison with measurements. Numerical methods that can simulate sound fields in fluids...... with mesh definition, geometrical singularities and treatment of closed cavities. These issues are specific of the BEM with losses. Using examples, some strategies are presented that can alleviate shortcomings and improve performance....

  3. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Corrugated Insulating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Etsuro; Kato, Masayasu; Tomikawa, Takayuki; Takahashi, Kaneko

    The effective thermal conductivity of corrugated insulating materials which are made by polypropylene or polycarbonate have been measured by employing steady state comparison method for several specimen having various thickness and specific weight. The thermal conductivity of them evaluated are also by using the thermal resistance models, and are compared with above measured values and raw materials' conductivity. The main results obtained in this paper are as follows: (1) In regard to the specimen in this paper, the effective thermal conductivity increases with increasing temperature, but the increasing rate of them is small. (2) There are considerable differences between the measured values and the predicted ones that are estimated by using the thermal resistance model in which heat flow by conduction only. This differences increase with increasing specimens' thickness. This difference become extinct by considering the coexistence heat flow of conduction and radiation in the air phase of specimen. (3) The thermal resistance of specimen increases linearly with increasing specimens' thickness.

  4. A sonic boom propagation model including mean flow atmospheric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Joe; Sparrow, Victor W.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a time domain formulation of nonlinear lossy propagation in onedimension that also includes the effects of non-collinear mean flow in the acoustic medium. The model equation utilized is an augmented Burgers equation that includes the effects of nonlinearity, geometric spreading, atmospheric stratification, and also absorption and dispersion due to thermoviscous and molecular relaxation effects. All elements of the propagation are implemented in the time domain and the effects of non-collinear mean flow are accounted for in each term of the model equation. Previous authors have presented methods limited to showing the effects of wind on ray tracing and/or using an effective speed of sound in their model equation. The present work includes the effects of mean flow for all terms included in the augmented Burgers equation with all of the calculations performed in the time-domain. The capability to include the effects of mean flow in the acoustic medium allows one to make predictions more representative of real-world atmospheric conditions. Examples are presented for nonlinear propagation of N-waves and shaped sonic booms. [Work supported by Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation.

  5. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Adsorbent Packed Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hideo; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Suguru

    The effective thermal conductivity of adsorbent packed beds of granular zeolite 13X and granular silica gel A in the presence of stagnant steam or air was measured under different conditions of the adsorbent bed temperature, particle size and filler-gas pressure. The measured effective thermal conductivity showed to become smaller with decreasing particle size or decreasing pressure, but it was nearly independent of the bed temperature. When steam was the filler-gas, the rise in the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent particles due to steam adsorption led to the increase in the effective thermal conductivity of the bed, and this effect was not negligible at high steam pressure for the bed of large particle size. It was found that both the predictions of the effective thermal conductivity by the Hayashi et al.'s model and the Bauer-Schlünder model generally agreed well with the measurements, by considering the particle thermal conductivity rise due to steam adsorption. The thermal conductivity of a consolidated bed of granular zeolite 13X was also measured, and it was found to be much larger than that of the packed bed especially at lower pressure. The above prediction models underestimated the effective thermal conductivity of the consolidated bed.

  6. Convection with local thermal non-equilibrium and microfluidic effects

    CERN Document Server

    Straughan, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This book is one of the first devoted to an account of theories of thermal convection which involve local thermal non-equilibrium effects, including a concentration on microfluidic effects. The text introduces convection with local thermal non-equilibrium effects in extraordinary detail, making it easy for readers newer to the subject area to understand. This book is unique in the fact that it addresses a large number of convection theories and provides many new results which are not available elsewhere. This book will be useful to researchers from engineering, fluid mechanics, and applied mathematics, particularly those interested in microfluidics and porous media.

  7. Thermal effects in supernova matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Constantinos

    intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions. To explore the effect momentum-dependent interactions have on the thermal properties of dense matter we study a schematic model constructed by Welke et al. in which the appropriate momentum dependence that fits optical potential data is built through finite-range exchange forces of the Yukawa type. We look into the finite-temperature properties of this model in the context of infinite, isospin-symmetric nucleonic matter. The exact numerical results are compared to analytical ones in the quantum regime where we rely on Landau's Fermi-Liquid Theory, and in the classical regime where the state variables are obtained through a steepest descent calculation. Detailed comparisons with similarly calibrated Skyrme models are also performed. We find that the high-density behavior of the thermal pressure is once again a differentiating feature. We attribute this to the temperature dependence of the energy spectrum of the finite-range and the meson-exchange models which leads to a higher specific heat and thus a lower pressure.

  8. The Langley thermal protection system test facility: A description including design operating boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klich, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    A description of the Langley thermal protection system test facility is presented. This facility was designed to provide realistic environments and times for testing thermal protection systems proposed for use on high speed vehicles such as the space shuttle. Products from the combustion of methane-air-oxygen mixtures, having a maximum total enthalpy of 10.3 MJ/kg, are used as a test medium. Test panels with maximum dimensions of 61 cm x 91.4 cm are mounted in the side wall of the test region. Static pressures in the test region can range from .005 to .1 atm and calculated equilibrium temperatures of test panels range from 700 K to 1700 K. Test times can be as long as 1800 sec. Some experimental data obtained while using combustion products of methane-air mixtures are compared with theory, and calibration of the facility is being continued to verify calculated values of parameters which are within the design operating boundaries.

  9. Cathode material comparison of thermal runaway behavior of Li-ion cells at different state of charges including over charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Hernandez, Omar Samuel; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Nishikawa, Yuuki; Maruyama, Yuki; Umeda, Minoru

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of Li-ion secondary cells under outstanding conditions, as overcharge and high temperatures, is important to determine thermal abuse characteristics of electroactive materials and precise risk assessments on Li-ion cells. In this work, the thermal runaway behavior of LiCoO2 and LiMn2O4 cathode materials were compared at different state of charges (SOCs), including overcharge, by carrying out accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC) measurements using 18650 Li-ion cells. Onset temperatures of self-heating reactions and thermal runaway behavior were identified, and by using these onset points thermal mapping plots were made. We were able to identify non-self-heating, self-heating and thermal runaway regions as a function of state of charge and temperature. The cell using LiMn2O4 cathode material was found to be more thermally stable than the cell using LiCoO2. In parallel with the ARC measurements, the electrochemical behavior of the cells was monitored by measuring the OCV and internal resistance of the cells. The electrochemical behavior of the cells showed a slightly dependency on SOC.

  10. Boron nitride nanotubes included thermally cross-linked gelatin-glucose scaffolds show improved properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, Özlem; Culha, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are increasingly investigated for their medical and biomedical applications due to their unique properties such as resistance to oxidation, thermal and electrical insulation, and biocompatibility. BNNTs can be used to enhance mechanical strength of biomedical structures such as scaffolds in tissue engineering applications. In this study, we report the use of BNNTs and hydroxylated BNNTs (BNNT-OH) to improve the properties of gelatin-glucose scaffolds prepared with electrospinning technique. Human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells are used for the toxicity assessment and cell seeding studies. It is found that the addition of BNNTs into the scaffold does not influence cell viability, decreases the scaffold degradation rate, and improves cell attachment and proliferation compared to only-gelatin scaffold.

  11. Improved Z-scan adjustment to thermal nonlinearities by including nonlinear absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severiano-Carrillo, I.; Alvarado-Méndez, E.; Trejo-Durán, M.; Méndez-Otero, M. M.

    2017-08-01

    We propose a modified mathematical model of thermal optical nonlinearities which allow us to obtain the nonlinear refraction index and the nonlinear absorption coefficient with only one measurement. This modification is motivated by the influence that nonlinear absorption has on the measurement of the nonlinear refraction index at far field, when the material presents a large nonlinearity. This model, where nonlinear absorption is considered to adjust the curves of nonlinear refraction index obtained by Z-scan technique, has the best agreement with experimental data. The model is validated with two ionic liquids and the organic material Eysenhardtia polystachya, in thin media. We present these results after comparing our proposed model to other reported models.

  12. Synaptic channel model including effects of spike width variation

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic Channel Model Including Effects of Spike Width Variation Hamideh Ramezani Next-generation and Wireless Communications Laboratory (NWCL) Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey Ozgur B. Akan Next-generation and Wireless Communications Laboratory (NWCL) Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey ABSTRACT An accu...

  13. A Coupled MHD and Thermal Model Including Electrostatic Sheath for Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Akira; Kubota, Kenichi; Funaki, Ikkoh; Okuno, Yoshihiro

    2016-09-01

    Steady-state and self-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster, which utilizes high-intensity direct-current (DC) discharge, is one of the prospective candidates of future high-power electric propulsion devices. In order to accurately assess the thrust performance and the electrode temperature, input electric power and wall heat flux must correctly be evaluated where electrostatic sheaths formed in close proximity of the electrodes affect these quantities. Conventional model simulates only plasma flows occurring in MPD thrusters with the absence of electrostatic sheath consideration. Therefore, this study extends the conventional model to a coupled magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and thermal model by incorporating the phenomena relevant to the electrostatic sheaths. The sheaths are implemented as boundary condition of the MHD model on the walls. This model simulated the operation of the 100-kW-class thruster at discharge current ranging from 6 to 10 kA with argon propellant. The extended model reproduced the discharge voltages and wall heat load which are consistent with past experimental results. In addition, the simulation results indicated that cathode sheath voltages account for approximately 5-7 V subject to approximately 20 V of discharge voltages applied between the electrodes. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 26289328 and 15J10821.

  14. Development of Thermal Spraying and Coating Techniques by Using Thixotropic Slurries Including Metals and Ceramics Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirihara, S.; Itakura, Y.; Tasaki, S.

    2013-03-01

    Thermal nanoparticles coating and microlines patterning were newly developed as novel technologies to fabricate fine ceramics layers and geometrical intermetallics patterns for mechanical properties modulations of practical alloys substrates. Nanometer sized alumina particles were dispersed into acrylic liquid resins, and the obtained slurries were sputtered by using compressed air jet. The slurry mists could blow into the arc plasma with argon gas spraying. On stainless steels substrates, the fine surface layers with high wear resistance were formed. In cross sectional microstructures of the coated layers, micromater sized cracks or pores were not observed. Subsequently, pure aluminum particles were dispersed into photo solidified acrylic resins, and the slurry was spread on the stainless steel substrates by using a mechanical knife blade. On the substrates, microline patterns with self similar fractal structures were drawn and fixed by using scanning of an ultra violet laser beam. The patterned pure metal particles were heated by the argon arc plasma spray assisting, and the intermetallics or alloys phases with high hardness were created through reaction diffusions. Microstructures in the coated layers and the patterned lines were observed by using a scanning electron microscopy.

  15. Thermal effects testing at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralph, M.E.; Cameron, C.P. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Ghanbari, C.M. (Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility is operated by Sandia National Laboratories and located on Kirkland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The permanent features of the facility include a heliostat field and associated receiver tower, two solar furnaces, two point-focus parabolic concentrators, and Engine Test Facility. The heliostat field contains 220 computer-controlled mirrors, which reflect concentrated solar energy to test stations on a 61-m tower. The field produces a peak flux density of 250 W/cm[sup 2] that is uniform over a 15-cm diameter with a total beam power of over 5 MW[sub t]. The solar beam has been used to simulate aerodynamic heating for several customers. Thermal nuclear blasts have also been simulated using a high-speed shutter in combination with heliostat control. The shutter can accommodate samples up to 1 m [times] 1 m and it has been used by several US and Canadian agencies. A glass-windowed wind tunnel is also available in the Solar Tower. It provides simultaneous exposure to the thermal flux and air flow. Each solar furnace at the facility includes a heliostat, an attenuator, and a parabolic concentrator. One solar furnace produces flux levels of 270 W/cm[sup 2] over and delivers a 6-mm diameter and total power of 16 kW[sub t]. A second furnace produces flux levels up to 1000 W/cm[sup 2] over a 4 cm diameter and total power of 60 kW[sub t]. Both furnaces include shutters and attenuators that can provide square or shaped pulses. The two 11 m diameter tracking parabolic point-focusing concentrators at the facility can each produce peak flux levels of 1500 W/cm[sup 2] over a 2.5 cm diameter and total power of 75 kW[sub t]. High-speed shutters have been used to produce square pulses.

  16. Thermal effects testing at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralph, M.E.; Cameron, C.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ghanbari, C.M. [Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-12-31

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility is operated by Sandia National Laboratories and located on Kirkland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The permanent features of the facility include a heliostat field and associated receiver tower, two solar furnaces, two point-focus parabolic concentrators, and Engine Test Facility. The heliostat field contains 220 computer-controlled mirrors, which reflect concentrated solar energy to test stations on a 61-m tower. The field produces a peak flux density of 250 W/cm{sup 2} that is uniform over a 15-cm diameter with a total beam power of over 5 MW{sub t}. The solar beam has been used to simulate aerodynamic heating for several customers. Thermal nuclear blasts have also been simulated using a high-speed shutter in combination with heliostat control. The shutter can accommodate samples up to 1 m {times} 1 m and it has been used by several US and Canadian agencies. A glass-windowed wind tunnel is also available in the Solar Tower. It provides simultaneous exposure to the thermal flux and air flow. Each solar furnace at the facility includes a heliostat, an attenuator, and a parabolic concentrator. One solar furnace produces flux levels of 270 W/cm{sup 2} over and delivers a 6-mm diameter and total power of 16 kW{sub t}. A second furnace produces flux levels up to 1000 W/cm{sup 2} over a 4 cm diameter and total power of 60 kW{sub t}. Both furnaces include shutters and attenuators that can provide square or shaped pulses. The two 11 m diameter tracking parabolic point-focusing concentrators at the facility can each produce peak flux levels of 1500 W/cm{sup 2} over a 2.5 cm diameter and total power of 75 kW{sub t}. High-speed shutters have been used to produce square pulses.

  17. Thermal Bridge Effects in Walls Separating Rowhouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    In this report the thermal bridge effects at internal wall/roof junctions in rowhouses are evaluated. The analysis is performed using a numerical calculation programme, and different solutions are evaluated with respect to extra heat loss and internal surface temperatures.......In this report the thermal bridge effects at internal wall/roof junctions in rowhouses are evaluated. The analysis is performed using a numerical calculation programme, and different solutions are evaluated with respect to extra heat loss and internal surface temperatures....

  18. Thermal Bridge Effects in Walls Separating Rowhouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    In this report the thermal bridge effects at internal wall/roof junctions in rowhouses are evaluated. The analysis is performed using a numerical calculation programme, and different solutions are evaluated with respect to extra heat loss and internal surface temperatures.......In this report the thermal bridge effects at internal wall/roof junctions in rowhouses are evaluated. The analysis is performed using a numerical calculation programme, and different solutions are evaluated with respect to extra heat loss and internal surface temperatures....

  19. Generalized fluid theory including non-Maxwellian kinetic effects

    OpenAIRE

    Izacard, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The results obtained by the plasma physics community for the validation and the prediction of turbulence and transport in magnetized plasma come mainly from the use of very CPU-consuming particle-in-cell or (gyro)kinetic codes which naturally include non-Maxwellian kinetic effects. To date, fluid codes are not considered to be relevant for the description of these kinetic effects. Here, after revisiting the limitations of the current fluid theory developed in the 19th century, we generalize t...

  20. Tissue-Specific Effects of Bariatric Surgery Including Mitochondrial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon N. Dankel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the molecular links between obesity and disease is potentially of great benefit for society. In this paper we discuss proposed mechanisms whereby bariatric surgery improves metabolic health, including acute effects on glucose metabolism and long-term effects on metabolic tissues (adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and liver and mitochondrial function. More short-term randomized controlled trials should be performed that include simultaneous measurement of metabolic parameters in different tissues, such as tissue gene expression, protein profile, and lipid content. By directly comparing different surgical procedures using a wider array of metabolic parameters, one may further unravel the mechanisms of aberrant metabolic regulation in obesity and related disorders.

  1. Chiral-scale effective theory including a dilatonic meson

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yan-Ling; Rho, Mannque

    2016-01-01

    A scale-invariant chiral effective Lagrangian is constructed for octet pions and a dilaton figuring as Nambu-Goldstone bosons with vector mesons incorporated as hidden gauge fields. The Lagrangian is built to the next-to-leading order in chiral-scale counting without baryon fields and then to leading order including baryons. The resulting theory is hidden scale-symmetric and local symmetric. We also discuss some possible applications of the present Lagrangian.

  2. An experimentally verified model for thermal microactuators including nonlinear material properties, vacuum, and intra-device heat conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, Keegan; Naraghi, Mohammad; Boyd, James G.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a model and computational method to predict the steady-state performance of thermal flexure microactuators at high input powers and various levels of partial vacuum. The model accounts for nonlinear temperature dependence of material properties, heat loss due to radiation, and intra-device heat transfer by conduction across an air gap. The model is validated by comparing the model predictions with the experimentally measured voltage, current, and displacement at standard conditions, prior to adjusting for partial vacuum. In order to understand the effect of nonlinearities on model reliability, the predictions of six additional hypothetical models are considered where (1) intra-device heat transfer is neglected, (2) radiation is neglected, (3) the thermal conductivity of silicon is assumed to be temperature-independent, (4) the thermal conductivity of air is assumed to be temperature-independent, (5) the electrical resistivity of silicon is assumed to be linear in temperature, and (6) the thermal expansion coefficient of silicon is assumed to be temperature-independent. All factors except radiation were shown to have a significant influence on the device performance especially at high input powers. The experimentally validated full model is then employed to predict the effect of reduced air pressure on the displacement and heat transfer properties of the actuator. This aspect of the study targets applications of thermal actuators in controlled environments such as space applications, actuators used for in situ micropositioning and tensile testing inside electron microscopy chambers, or actuators incorporated into the design of MEMS resonators. It was demonstrated that the maximum actuator displacement is not a linear function of reduced pressure and that it reaches a maximum at a certain partial vacuum level.

  3. Experimental Study of Effect of Vents in Thermal Ventilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dong; LIU Xiao-yu; ZHUANG Jiang-ting; SHEN Hui

    2009-01-01

    The effects of vents on thermal ventilation to save energy in the cold roUing workshop of Baosteel were investigated.According to the scale modeling theory,a small chamber was established.The details about construction of experiment On thermal ventilation and the preparation and arrangement of apparatus were dis-cussed,and then the effects of vents on thermal ventilation were studied through experiments,which includes the temperature distribution,the volume of ventilation,the temperature difference between inlets and outlets,the neutral plane,and the effective thermal coefficient of thermal natural ventilation.Based on this,the effects of natural ventilation based on varied area of inlets and oudets and those of vents on one side and on different sides were compared.According to the experiments,the area of inlet vents and outlet vents affect the tempera-ture distribution in chamber, and their effects on ventilation volume are difierent,but the effects of vents in sin-gle side or different sides aare the same under the condition that only thermal ventilation is considered.

  4. Constant-Pressure Combustion Charts Including Effects of Diluent Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, L Richard; Bogart, Donald

    1949-01-01

    Charts are presented for the calculation of (a) the final temperatures and the temperature changes involved in constant-pressure combustion processes of air and in products of combustion of air and hydrocarbon fuels, and (b) the quantity of hydrocarbon fuels required in order to attain a specified combustion temperature when water, alcohol, water-alcohol mixtures, liquid ammonia, liquid carbon dioxide, liquid nitrogen, liquid oxygen, or their mixtures are added to air as diluents or refrigerants. The ideal combustion process and combustion with incomplete heat release from the primary fuel and from combustible diluents are considered. The effect of preheating the mixture of air and diluents and the effect of an initial water-vapor content in the combustion air on the required fuel quantity are also included. The charts are applicable only to processes in which the final mixture is leaner than stoichiometric and at temperatures where dissociation is unimportant. A chart is also included to permit the calculation of the stoichiometric ratio of hydrocarbon fuel to air with diluent addition. The use of the charts is illustrated by numerical examples.

  5. New chemical evolution analytical solutions including environment effects

    CERN Document Server

    Spitoni, E

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, more and more interest has been devoted to analytical solutions, including inflow and outflow, to study the metallicity enrichment in galaxies. In this framework, we assume a star formation rate which follows a linear Schmidt law, and we present new analytical solutions for the evolution of the metallicity (Z) in galaxies. In particular, we take into account environmental effects including primordial and enriched gas infall, outflow, different star formation efficiencies, and galactic fountains. The enriched infall is included to take into account galaxy-galaxy interactions. Our main results can be summarized as: i) when a linear Schmidt law of star formation is assumed, the resulting time evolution of the metallicity Z is the same either for a closed-box model or for an outflow model. ii) The mass-metallicity relation for galaxies which suffer a chemically enriched infall, originating from another evolved galaxy with no pre-enriched gas, is shifted down in parallel at lower Z values, if co...

  6. Neutrinos from Cosmic Accelerators including Magnetic Field and Flavor Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Winter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the particle physics ingredients affecting the normalization, shape, and flavor composition of astrophysical neutrinos fluxes, such as different production modes, magnetic field effects on the secondaries (muons, pions, and kaons, and flavor mixing, where we focus on pγ interactions. We also discuss the interplay with neutrino propagation and detection, including the possibility to detect flavor and its application in particle physics, and the use of the Glashow resonance to discriminate pγ from pp interactions in the source. We illustrate the implications on fluxes and flavor composition with two different models: (1 the target photon spectrum is dominated by synchrotron emission of coaccelerated electrons and (2 the target photon spectrum follows the observed photon spectrum of gamma-ray bursts. In the latter case, the multimessenger extrapolation from the gamma-ray fluence to the expected neutrino flux is highlighted.

  7. Effect of thermal processing on mealworm allergenicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekman, H.; Knulst, A.; Hartog Jager, S. den; Monteleone, F.; Gaspari, M.; Jong, G. de; Houben, G.; Verhoeckx, K.

    2015-01-01

    Scope: The growing world population requires the exploration of new sustainable protein sources to ensure food security. Insects such as mealworm are promising candidates. For safety reasons, a risk assessment, including allergy risks, is needed. Since allergenicity can be influenced by thermal proc

  8. Hybrid (particle in cell-fluid) simulation of ion-acoustic soliton generation including super-thermal and trapped electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nopoush, M.; Abbasi, H. [Faculty of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P. O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    The present paper is devoted to the simulation of the nonlinear disintegration of a localized perturbation into an ion-acoustic soliton in a plasma. Recently, this problem was studied by a simple model [H. Abbasi et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 095007 (2008)]. The main assumptions were (i) in the electron velocity distribution function (DF), the ion-acoustic soliton velocity was neglected in comparison to the electron thermal velocity, (ii) on the ion-acoustic evolution time-scale, the electron velocity DF was assumed to be stationary, and (iii) the calculation was restricted to the small amplitude case. In order to generalize the model, one has to consider the evolution of the electron velocity DF for finite amplitudes. For this purpose, a one dimensional electrostatic hybrid code, particle in cell (PIC)-fluid, was designed. It simulates the electrons dynamics by the PIC method and the cold ions dynamics by the fluid equations. The plasma contains a population of super-thermal electrons and, therefore, a Lorentzian (kappa) velocity DF is used to model the high energy tail in the electron velocity DF. Electron trapping is included in the simulation in view of their nonlinear resonant interaction with the localized perturbation. A Gaussian initial perturbation is used to model the localized perturbation. The influence of both the trapped and the super-thermal electrons on this process is studied and compared with the previous model.

  9. Thermal effects testing at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Mark E.; Cameron, Christopher P.; Ghanbari, Cheryl M.

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility is operated by Sandia National Laboratories and located on Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The permanent features of the facility include a heliostat field and associated receiver tower, two solar furnaces, two point-focus parabolic concentrators, and Engine Test Facility. The heliostat field contains 220 computer-controlled mirrors, which reflect concentrated solar energy to test stations on a 61-m tower. The field produces a peak flux density of 250 W/sq cm that is uniform over a 15-cm diameter with a total beam power of over 5 MWt. One solar furnace produces flux levels of 270 W/sq cm over and delivers a 6-mm diameter and total power of 16 kWt. A second furnace produces flux levels up to 1000 W/sq cm over a 4 cm diameter and total power of 60 kWt. Both furnaces include shutters and attenuators that can provide square or shaped pulses. The two 11-m diameter tracking parabolic point-focusing concentrators at the facility can each produce peak flux levels of 1500 W/sq cm over a 2.5-cm diameter and total power of 75 kWt. High-speed shutters have been used to produce square pulses.

  10. A hydrodynamic model for granular material flows including segregation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilberg, Dominik; Klar, Axel; Steiner, Konrad

    2017-06-01

    The simulation of granular flows including segregation effects in large industrial processes using particle methods is accurate, but very time-consuming. To overcome the long computation times a macroscopic model is a natural choice. Therefore, we couple a mixture theory based segregation model to a hydrodynamic model of Navier-Stokes-type, describing the flow behavior of the granular material. The granular flow model is a hybrid model derived from kinetic theory and a soil mechanical approach to cover the regime of fast dilute flow, as well as slow dense flow, where the density of the granular material is close to the maximum packing density. Originally, the segregation model has been formulated by Thornton and Gray for idealized avalanches. It is modified and adapted to be in the preferred form for the coupling. In the final coupled model the segregation process depends on the local state of the granular system. On the other hand, the granular system changes as differently mixed regions of the granular material differ i.e. in the packing density. For the modeling process the focus lies on dry granular material flows of two particle types differing only in size but can be easily extended to arbitrary granular mixtures of different particle size and density. To solve the coupled system a finite volume approach is used. To test the model the rotational mixing of small and large particles in a tumbler is simulated.

  11. Thermal Bridge Effects in Window Grooves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    In this report thermal bridge effects in window grooves are analyzed. The analysis is performed using different thicknesses of the window groove insulation, to evaluate what the optimal solution is.All analysis in the report is performed using both 2- and 3-dimensional numerical analysis....

  12. Thermal imaging of spin Peltier effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimon, Shunsuke; Iguchi, Ryo; Hioki, Tomosato; Saitoh, Eiji; Uchida, Ken-Ichi

    2016-12-01

    The Peltier effect modulates the temperature of a junction comprising two different conductors in response to charge currents across the junction, which is used in solid-state heat pumps and temperature controllers in electronics. Recently, in spintronics, a spin counterpart of the Peltier effect was observed. The `spin Peltier effect' modulates the temperature of a magnetic junction in response to spin currents. Here we report thermal imaging of the spin Peltier effect; using active thermography technique, we visualize the temperature modulation induced by spin currents injected into a magnetic insulator from an adjacent metal. The thermal images reveal characteristic distribution of spin-current-induced heat sources, resulting in the temperature change confined only in the vicinity of the metal/insulator interface. This finding allows us to estimate the actual magnitude of the temperature modulation induced by the spin Peltier effect, which is more than one order of magnitude greater than previously believed.

  13. Thermal effects on photogeneration of free carriers in organic conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Neto, Pedro H.; da Cunha, Wiliam F.; Roncaratti, Luiz F.; Gargano, Ricardo; Silva, Geraldo M. e.

    2010-06-01

    We performed numerical simulations of two parallel interacting conjugated polymer chains subjected to photoionization. Within the SSH model modified to include thermal effects, an electron is removed from one chain and later absorbed by the other chain. It was obtained that the system relaxes into a free polaron in each chain. For higher electron absorption the system initially relaxes into a pair of half-polarons that spontaneously suffers monomolecular recombination. The time response of the system agrees with experimental results. Although thermal effects are important to carrier creation mechanism, the obtained photogeneration creation time is temperature independent, as suggested experimentally.

  14. Effects of thermal water on skin regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faga, Angela; Nicoletti, Giovanni; Gregotti, Cesarina; Finotti, Valentina; Nitto, Agnese; Gioglio, Luciana

    2012-05-01

    An experimental study was carried out in an animal (New Zealand white rabbit) wound model to evaluate any effects of a hypotonic, bicarbonate-calcium-magnesium mineral water (Comano thermal water) on skin regeneration, comparing the healing rate of split-thickness skin graft donor sites treated with the thermal water wet dressing versus a standard petrolatum gauze dressing versus a saline solution wet dressing. The study was performed in two steps; an overall of 22 animals were enrolled in the study. The wound healing progress was evaluated both by the surgeons and by the histologists. Sixty-four punch biopsies were examined in all. The histological samples were examined after staining with haematoxylin and eosin, Masson's and orcein staining and under a transmission electron microscope. The data were statistically analysed. The Comano thermal water proved to improve skin regeneration, not only by increasing keratinocyte proliferation and migration but also favourably modulating the regenerated collagen and elastic fibres in the dermis. We propose that the results of the topical treatment with the thermal water could be due to the favourable combination of a local wet environment with an anti-inflammatory action and that the regenerative properties of Comano thermal water observed in rabbits could also be applied for human use.

  15. Effects of Dressing Poses on Clothing Thermal Insulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊; 刘岩; 张渭源

    2004-01-01

    With a thermal manikin, the effects of dressing poses on clothing thermal insulation are studied. It is found that the thermal insulation of still air layer over human body has not been influenced by the dressing poses, but the dressing poses have effects on the thermal insulation of clothing system.

  16. Modeling Electric Double-Layers Including Chemical Reaction Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2014-01-01

    A physicochemical and numerical model for the transient formation of an electric double-layer between an electrolyte and a chemically-active flat surface is presented, based on a finite elements integration of the nonlinear Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including chemical reactions. The model works...

  17. Thermal effects on bluegill hematology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, S.A.

    1983-03-01

    Temperature effects on hematological responses of adult bluegill were examined for constant vs fluctuating temperature regimes, for ambient vs high temperature, and for intake vs discharge at an operating power plant. Multivariate statistical methods were used to determine temperature effects. An increased erythrocyte fragility was associated with fluctuating temperature regimes as well as with the suboptimal temperature regime. Thrombocytosis with a concomitant leukopenia was observed for the higher fluctuating and higher acclimating temperatures. Reduced erythrocytic sedimentation rates were observed for the higher temperatures. Although hematology may vary depending on fish size, good hematological indicators of potential thermal stress were associated with red blood cell morphology, particularly cell size and/or shape. However, in situ hematological responses of bluegill at an operating power plant were apparently not affected by the associated thermal gradients.

  18. Stellar cooling bounds on new light particles: including plasma effects

    CERN Document Server

    Hardy, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Strong constraints on the coupling of new light particles to the Standard Model (SM) arise from their production in the hot cores of stars, and the effects of this on stellar cooling. The large electron density in stellar cores significantly modifies the in-medium propagation of SM states. For new light particles which have an effective in-medium mixing with the photon, such plasma effects can result in parametrically different production rates to those obtained from a naive calculation. Taking these previously-neglected contributions into account, we make updated estimates for the stellar cooling bounds on a number of light new particle candidates. In particular, we improve the bounds on light (m < keV) scalars coupling to electrons or nucleons by up to 3 orders of magnitude in the coupling squared, significantly revise the supernova cooling bounds on dark photon couplings, and qualitatively change the mass dependence of stellar bounds on new vectors.

  19. Modeling heart rate variability including the effect of sleep stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliński, Mateusz; Gierałtowski, Jan; Żebrowski, Jan

    2016-02-01

    We propose a model for heart rate variability (HRV) of a healthy individual during sleep with the assumption that the heart rate variability is predominantly a random process. Autonomic nervous system activity has different properties during different sleep stages, and this affects many physiological systems including the cardiovascular system. Different properties of HRV can be observed during each particular sleep stage. We believe that taking into account the sleep architecture is crucial for modeling the human nighttime HRV. The stochastic model of HRV introduced by Kantelhardt et al. was used as the initial starting point. We studied the statistical properties of sleep in healthy adults, analyzing 30 polysomnographic recordings, which provided realistic information about sleep architecture. Next, we generated synthetic hypnograms and included them in the modeling of nighttime RR interval series. The results of standard HRV linear analysis and of nonlinear analysis (Shannon entropy, Poincaré plots, and multiscale multifractal analysis) show that—in comparison with real data—the HRV signals obtained from our model have very similar properties, in particular including the multifractal characteristics at different time scales. The model described in this paper is discussed in the context of normal sleep. However, its construction is such that it should allow to model heart rate variability in sleep disorders. This possibility is briefly discussed.

  20. Scattering from Star Polymers including Excluded Volume Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xin; Liu, Yun; Sánchez-Diáz, Luis E; Hong, Kunlun; Smith, Gregory S; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a new model for the form factor of a star polymer consisting of self-avoiding branches. This new model incorporates excluded volume effects and is derived from the two point correlation function for a star polymer.. We compare this model to small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from polystyrene (PS) stars immersed in a good solvent, tetrahydrofuran (THF). It is shown that this model provides a good description of the scattering signature originating from the excluded volume effect and it explicitly elucidates the connection between the global conformation of a star polymer and the local stiffness of its constituent branch.

  1. Effective equations for isotropic quantum cosmology including matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin; Skirzewski, Aureliano

    2007-01-01

    Effective equations often provide powerful tools to develop a systematic understanding of detailed properties of a quantum system. This is especially helpful in quantum cosmology where several conceptual and technical difficulties associated with the full quantum equations can be avoided in this way. Here, effective equations for Wheeler-DeWitt and loop quantizations of spatially flat, isotropic cosmological models sourced by a massive or interacting scalar are derived and studied. The resulting systems are remarkably different from that given for a free, massless scalar. This has implications for the coherence of evolving states and the realization of a bounce in loop quantum cosmology.

  2. Ground state of a confined Yukawa plasma including correlation effects

    CERN Document Server

    Henning, C; Filinov, A; Piel, A; Bonitz, M

    2007-01-01

    The ground state of an externally confined one-component Yukawa plasma is derived analytically using the local density approximation (LDA). In particular, the radial density profile is computed. The results are compared with the recently obtained mean-field (MF) density profile \\cite{henning.pre06}. While the MF results are more accurate for weak screening, LDA with correlations included yields the proper description for large screening. By comparison with first-principle simulations for three-dimensional spherical Yukawa crystals we demonstrate that both approximations complement each other. Together they accurately describe the density profile in the full range of screening parameters.

  3. Magnetic properties of nickel halide hydrates including deuteration effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFotis, G. C.; Van Dongen, M. J.; Hampton, A. S.; Komatsu, C. H.; Trowell, K. T.; Havas, K. C.; Davis, C. M.; DeSanto, C. L.; Hays, K.; Wagner, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic measurements on variously hydrated nickel chlorides and bromides, including deuterated forms, are reported. Results include locations and sizes of susceptibility maxima, Tmax and χmax, ordering temperatures Tc, Curie constants and Weiss theta in the paramagnetic regime, and primary and secondary exchange interactions from analysis of low temperature data. For the latter a 2D Heisenberg model augmented by interlayer exchange in a mean-field approximation is applied. Magnetization data to 16 kG as a function of temperature show curvature and hysteresis characteristics quite system dependent. For four materials high field magnetization data to 70 kG at 2.00 K are also obtained. Comparison is made with theoretical relations for spin-1 models. Trends are apparent, primarily that Tmax of each bromide hydrate is less than for the corresponding chloride, and that for a given halide nD2O (n=1 or 2) deuterates exhibit lesser Tmax than do nH2O hydrates. A monoclinic unit cell determined from powder X-ray diffraction data on NiBr2·2D2O is different from and slightly larger than that of NiBr2·2H2O. This provides some rationale for the difference in magnetic properties between these.

  4. Death from thermal effects and burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerling, I; Meissner, C; Reiter, A; Oehmichen, M

    2001-01-01

    One hundred and fifteen unselected autopsy cases of death from thermal effects and/or fire between 1990 and 1999 were analyzed with regard to time of death, signs of vitality at the scene of the fire, the manner and cause of death, and the extent of soft tissue loss. The cases represented approximately 6% of all autopsy cases at the Institute of Legal Medicine responsible for a catchment area with approximately 700,000 inhabitants. In 23 victims suffering burn injuries, death occurred during initial medical care or clinical treatment. The causes of death were primary respiratory arrest due to smoke poisoning or delayed shock caused by thermal injuries to the skin. Death occurred at the scene of the fatal event in 85 cases: eight cases exhibited no thermal effects; the cause of death in one of these cases was polytrauma incurred in a leap from a height; in seven cases there was poisoning due to smoke inhalation. The remaining 77 cases were characterized by signs of intensive thermal and/or fire effects. Clear signs of vitality (carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) in blood, inhalation and/or swallowing of soot) were found in 84.7% of the victims dying at the site of the fatal event. Of the 13 victims showing no signs of vitality at the scene, a cause of death could be determined in only seven cases; death in the other six cases remains unexplained. Quantification of the soft tissue loss revealed a possible correlation with the temperature and time course of heat exposure.

  5. Plasma stability theory including the resistive wall effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovitov, V. D.

    2015-12-01

    > Plasma stabilization due to a nearby conducting wall can provide access to better performance in some scenarios in tokamaks. This was proved by experiments with an essential gain in and demonstrated as a long-lasting effect at sufficiently fast plasma rotation in the DIII-D tokamak (see, for example, Strait et al., Nucl. Fusion, vol. 43, 2003, pp. 430-440). The rotational stabilization is the central topic of this review, though eventually the mode rotation gains significance. The analysis is based on the first-principle equations describing the energy balance with dissipation in the resistive wall. The method emphasizes derivation of the dispersion relations for the modes which are faster than the conventional resistive wall modes, but slower than the ideal magnetohydrodynamics modes. Both the standard thin wall and ideal-wall approximations are not valid in this range. Here, these are replaced by an approach incorporating the skin effect in the wall. This new element in the stability theory makes the energy sink a nonlinear function of the complex growth rate. An important consequence is that a mode rotating above a critical level can provide a damping effect sufficient for instability suppression. Estimates are given and applications are discussed.

  6. Climate implications of including albedo effects in terrestrial carbon policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. D.; Collins, W.; Torn, M. S.; Calvin, K. V.

    2012-12-01

    Proposed strategies for managing terrestrial carbon in order to mitigate anthropogenic climate change, such as financial incentives for afforestation, soil carbon sequestration, or biofuel production, largely ignore the direct effects of land use change on climate via biophysical processes that alter surface energy and water budgets. Subsequent influences on temperature, hydrology, and atmospheric circulation at regional and global scales could potentially help or hinder climate stabilization efforts. Because these policies often rely on payments or credits expressed in units of CO2-equivalents, accounting for biophysical effects would require a metric for comparing the strength of biophysical climate perturbation from land use change to that of emitting CO2. One such candidate metric that has been suggested in the literature on land use impacts is radiative forcing, which underlies the global warming potential metric used to compare the climate effects of various greenhouse gases with one another. Expressing land use change in units of radiative forcing is possible because albedo change results in a net top-of-atmosphere radiative flux change. However, this approach has also been critiqued on theoretical grounds because not all climatic changes associated with land use change are principally radiative in nature, e.g. changes in hydrology or the vertical distribution of heat within the atmosphere, and because the spatial scale of land use change forcing differs from that of well-mixed greenhouse gases. To explore the potential magnitude of this discrepancy in the context of plausible scenarios of future land use change, we conduct three simulations with the Community Climate System Model 4 (CCSM4) utilizing a slab ocean model. Each simulation examines the effect of a stepwise change in forcing relative to a pre-industrial control simulation: 1) widespread conversion of forest land to crops resulting in approximately 1 W/m2 global-mean radiative forcing from albedo

  7. Dynamic hysteresis modeling including skin effect using diffusion equation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Souad; Louai, Fatima Zohra; Nait-Said, Nasreddine; Benabou, Abdelkader

    2016-07-01

    An improved dynamic hysteresis model is proposed for the prediction of hysteresis loop of electrical steel up to mean frequencies, taking into account the skin effect. In previous works, the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for low frequency (DELF) was coupled with the inverse static Jiles-Atherton (JA) model in order to represent the hysteresis behavior for a lamination. In the present paper, this approach is improved to ensure the reproducibility of measured hysteresis loops at mean frequency. The results of simulation are compared with the experimental ones. The selected results for frequencies 50 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz and 400 Hz are presented and discussed.

  8. Homogenization of long fiber reinforced composites including fiber bending effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a homogenization method, which accounts for intrinsic size effects related to the fiber diameter in long fiber reinforced composite materials with two independent constitutive models for the matrix and fiber materials. A new choice of internal kinematic variables allows...... of the reinforcing fibers is captured by higher order strain terms, resulting in an accurate representation of the micro-mechanical behavior of the composite. Numerical examples show that the accuracy of the proposed model is very close to a non-homogenized finite-element model with an explicit discretization...

  9. Dynamic hysteresis modeling including skin effect using diffusion equation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Souad, E-mail: souadhamada@yahoo.fr [LSP-IE: Research Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Batna, 05000 Batna (Algeria); Louai, Fatima Zohra, E-mail: fz_louai@yahoo.com [LSP-IE: Research Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Batna, 05000 Batna (Algeria); Nait-Said, Nasreddine, E-mail: n_naitsaid@yahoo.com [LSP-IE: Research Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Batna, 05000 Batna (Algeria); Benabou, Abdelkader, E-mail: Abdelkader.Benabou@univ-lille1.fr [L2EP, Université de Lille1, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2016-07-15

    An improved dynamic hysteresis model is proposed for the prediction of hysteresis loop of electrical steel up to mean frequencies, taking into account the skin effect. In previous works, the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for low frequency (DELF) was coupled with the inverse static Jiles-Atherton (JA) model in order to represent the hysteresis behavior for a lamination. In the present paper, this approach is improved to ensure the reproducibility of measured hysteresis loops at mean frequency. The results of simulation are compared with the experimental ones. The selected results for frequencies 50 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz and 400 Hz are presented and discussed.

  10. Aerodynamic heating of ballistic missile including the effects of gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S N Maitra

    2000-10-01

    The aerodynamic heating of a ballistic missile due to only convection is analysed taking into consideration the effects of gravity. The amount of heat transferred to the wetted area and to the nose region has been separately determined, unlike A Miele's treatise without consideration of gravity. The peak heating ratesto the wetted area and to the nose of the missile are also investigated. Finally four numerical examples are cited to estimate the errors, in heat transfers and heating ratesto both wetted area and nose region of the missile, arising out of neglecting the gravitational forces.

  11. Effective atomic numbers of some composite mixtures including borax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastug, Arif [Department of Physics, Faculty of Art and Science, Aksaray University, Aksaray (Turkey); Guerol, Ali [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Icelli, Orhan, E-mail: oicelli@yildiz.edu.t [Department of Physics, Faculty of Art and Sciences, Yildiz Technical University, Davutpasa 34220, Istanbul (Turkey); Sahin, Yusuf [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2010-07-15

    Effective atomic numbers for (PbO and Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}10H{sub 2}O) and (UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, and Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}10H{sub 2}O) mixtures against changing contents of PbO, Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}10H{sub 2}O, and UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} were measured in the X-ray energy range from 25.0 to 58.0 keV. The gamma rays emitted by a {sup 241}Am annular source have been sent on the absorbers which emits their characteristic X-rays to be used in transmission arrangement. The X-rays were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 146 eV at 5.90 keV. The changing compositions of the compounds were assigned to be 0, 0.167, 0.333, 0.500, 0.666, 0.833 and total masses of the mixtures were adjusted to be identical. Also, the total effective atomic numbers of each mixture were estimated by using the mixture rule. The measured values were compared with estimated values for the mixtures.

  12. Homogenization of long fiber reinforced composites including fiber bending effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian F.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a homogenization method, which accounts for intrinsic size effects related to the fiber diameter in long fiber reinforced composite materials with two independent constitutive models for the matrix and fiber materials. A new choice of internal kinematic variables allows to maintain the kinematics of the two material phases independent from the assumed constitutive models, so that stress-deformation relationships, can be expressed in the framework of hyper-elasticity and hyper-elastoplasticity for the fiber and the matrix materials respectively. The bending stiffness of the reinforcing fibers is captured by higher order strain terms, resulting in an accurate representation of the micro-mechanical behavior of the composite. Numerical examples show that the accuracy of the proposed model is very close to a non-homogenized finite-element model with an explicit discretization of the matrix and the fibers.

  13. Shunted Piezoelectric Vibration Damping Analysis Including Centrifugal Loading Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, James B.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Provenza, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive vibration of turbomachinery blades causes high cycle fatigue problems which require damping treatments to mitigate vibration levels. One method is the use of piezoelectric materials as passive or active dampers. Based on the technical challenges and requirements learned from previous turbomachinery rotor blades research, an effort has been made to investigate the effectiveness of a shunted piezoelectric for the turbomachinery rotor blades vibration control, specifically for a condition with centrifugal rotation. While ample research has been performed on the use of a piezoelectric material with electric circuits to attempt to control the structural vibration damping, very little study has been done regarding rotational effects. The present study attempts to fill this void. Specifically, the objectives of this study are: (a) to create and analyze finite element models for harmonic forced response vibration analysis coupled with shunted piezoelectric circuits for engine blade operational conditions, (b) to validate the experimental test approaches with numerical results and vice versa, and (c) to establish a numerical modeling capability for vibration control using shunted piezoelectric circuits under rotation. Study has focused on a resonant damping control using shunted piezoelectric patches on plate specimens. Tests and analyses were performed for both non-spinning and spinning conditions. The finite element (FE) shunted piezoelectric circuit damping simulations were performed using the ANSYS Multiphysics code for the resistive and inductive circuit piezoelectric simulations of both conditions. The FE results showed a good correlation with experimental test results. Tests and analyses of shunted piezoelectric damping control, demonstrating with plate specimens, show a great potential to reduce blade vibrations under centrifugal loading.

  14. Artificial Retina Project: Electromagnetic and Thermal Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzi, Gianluca

    2014-08-29

    This award supported the investigation on electromagnetic and thermal effects associated with the artificial retina, designed in collaboration with national laboratories, universities, and private companies. Our work over the two years of support under this award has focused mainly on 1) Design of new telemetry coils for optimal power and data transfer between the implant and the external device while achieving a significant size reduction with respect to currently used coils; 2) feasibility study of the virtual electrode configuration 3) study the effect of pulse shape and duration on the stimulation efficacy.

  15. Magnetic behavior of manganese bromide hydrates including deuteration effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeFotis, G.C., E-mail: gxdefo@wm.edu [Chemistry Department, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Van Dongen, M.J.; Hampton, A.S.; Komatsu, C.H.; Pothen, J.M.; Trowell, K.T.; Havas, K.C.; Chan, D.G.; Reed, Z.D. [Chemistry Department, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Hays, K.; Wagner, M.J. [Chemistry Department, George Washington University, Washington, D.C. 20052 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    The magnetic properties of previously unexamined MnBr{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O, MnBr{sub 2}·H{sub 2}O, MnBr{sub 2}·2D{sub 2}O and MnBr{sub 2}·D{sub 2}O are studied. Curie–Weiss fits to high temperature data yield θ of −13.1, −3.9, −8.2 and −5.0 K, respectively, in χ{sub M}=C/(T−θ). The net antiferromagnetic exchange yields susceptibility maxima at 6.34, 3.20, 2.10, and 3.40 K, with χ{sub max} of 0.197, 0.357, 0.465 and 0.348 emu/mol, respectively. Noteworthy is the contrast between dideuterate and dihydrate, the largest deuteration effect observed for hydrated transition metal halides. Antiferromagnetic ordering is estimated to occur at 5.91, 2.65, 2.00 and 2.50 K, respectively. The ratio T{sub c}/T{sub max} is 0.93, 0.83, 0.95 and 0.74 in the same order, implying low dimensional magnetism for monohydrate and monodeuterate. Heisenberg model fits to susceptibilities yield primary and secondary exchange interactions. Magnetization data at moderate fields and different temperatures are presented for each substance, and high field data to 70 kG at 2.00 K. Spin-flop transitions are estimated to occur at 45, 33 and 30 kG, respectively, for dihydrate, monohydrate and monodeuterate, but are not observable for MnBr{sub 2}·2D{sub 2}O. The results are analyzed from various perspectives. A different monoclinic unit cell is determined for MnBr{sub 2}·2D{sub 2}O than for MnBr{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O, with 1.3% larger volume, providing some rationale for the difference in magnetic properties. - Highlights: • The magnetic properties of Mn(II) bromide dihydrate and monohydrate are studied. • The effects of replacing H{sub 2}O by D{sub 2}O are examined for both hydration states. • For monohydrate the change in magnetic behavior on deuteration is small. • For dihydrate the change in magnetic behavior on deuteration is large. • The unit cell of MnBr{sub 2}·2D{sub 2}O is different from and slightly larger than for MnBr{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O.

  16. Fetal thermal effects of diagnostic ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowicz, Jacques S; Barnett, Stanley B; Duck, Francis A; Edmonds, Peter D; Hynynen, Kullervo H; Ziskin, Marvin C

    2008-04-01

    Processes that can produce a biological effect with some degree of heating (ie, about 1 degrees C above the physiologic temperature) act via a thermal mechanism. Investigations with laboratory animals have documented that pulsed ultrasound can produce elevations of temperature and damage in biological tissues in vivo, particularly in the presence of bone (intracranial temperature elevation). Acoustic outputs used to induce these adverse bioeffects are within the diagnostic range, although exposure times are usually considerably longer than in clinical practice. Conditions present in early pregnancy, such as lack of perfusion, may favor bioeffects. Thermally induced teratogenesis has been shown in many animal studies, as well as several controlled human studies; however, human studies have not shown a causal relationship between diagnostic ultrasound exposure during pregnancy and adverse biological effects to the fetus. All human epidemiologic studies, however, were conducted with commercially available devices predating 1992, that is, with acoustic outputs not exceeding a spatial-peak temporal-average intensity of 94 mW/cm2. Current limits in the United States allow a spatial-peak temporal-average intensity of 720 mW/cm2 for fetal applications. The synergistic effect of a raised body temperature (febrile status) and ultrasound insonation has not been examined in depth. Available evidence, experimental or epidemiologic, is insufficient to conclude that there is a causal relationship between obstetric diagnostic ultrasound exposure and obvious adverse thermal effects to the fetus. However, very subtle effects cannot be ruled out and indicate a need for further research, although research in humans may be extremely difficult to realize.

  17. Evaluation of fatigue data including reactor water environmental effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosinski, S.T. [EPRI, Charlotte, NC (United States); Nickell, R.E. [Applied Science and Technology, Poway, CA (United States); Van Der Sluys, W.A. [Alliance, OH (United States); Yukawa, S. [Boulder, CO (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Laboratory data have been gathered in the past decade indicating a significant reduction in component fatigue life when reactor water environmental effects are experimentally simulated. However, these laboratory data have not been supported by nuclear power plant component operating experience. The laboratory data under simulated operating conditions are being used to support arguments for revising the design-basis fatigue curves in the ASME Code Section III, Division 1, for Class 1 components. A thorough review of available laboratory fatigue data and their applicability to actual component operating conditions was performed. The evaluation divided the assembly, review and assessment of existing laboratory fatigue data and its applicability to plant operating conditions into four principal tasks: (1) review of available laboratory data relative to thresholds for environmental parameters, such as temperature, reactor water oxidation potential, strain rate, strain amplitude, reactor water flow rate, and component metal sulfur content; (2) determination of the relevance of the laboratory data to actual plant operating conditions; (3) review of laboratory S-N data curve-fitting models; and (4) assessment of existing ASME Code Section III Class 1 margins This paper summarizes the results of the data review. In addition, recommendations are made for additional laboratory testing intended to improve the applicability of laboratory test results under simulated reactor water environmental conditions. (authors)

  18. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ran, E-mail: jliubme@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: liuran@tsinghua.edu.cn; Liu, Jing, E-mail: jliubme@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: liuran@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Jia [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Hyperthermia (42-46°C), treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR) based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl) than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  19. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia (42-46°C, treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  20. Aeroelastic modal dynamics of wind turbines including anisotropic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisker Skjoldan, P.

    2011-03-15

    Several methods for aeroelastic modal analysis of a rotating wind turbine are developed and used to analyse the modal dynamics of two simplified models and a complex model in isotropic and anisotropic conditions. The Coleman transformation is used to enable extraction of the modal frequencies, damping, and periodic mode shapes of a rotating wind turbine by describing the rotor degrees of freedom in the inertial frame. This approach is valid only for an isotropic system. Anisotropic systems, e.g., with an unbalanced rotor or operating in wind shear, are treated with the general approaches of Floquet analysis or Hill's method which do not provide a unique reference frame for observing the modal frequency, to which any multiple of the rotor speed can be added. This indeterminacy is resolved by requiring that the periodic mode shape be as constant as possible in the inertial frame. The modal frequency is thus identified as the dominant frequency in the response of a pure excitation of the mode observed in the inertial frame. A modal analysis tool based directly on the complex aeroelastic wind turbine code BHawC is presented. It uses the Coleman approach in isotropic conditions and the computationally efficient implicit Floquet analysis in anisotropic conditions. The tool is validated against system identifications with the partial Floquet method on the nonlinear BHawC model of a 2.3 MW wind turbine. System identification results show that nonlinear effects on the 2.3 MW turbine in most cases are small, but indicate that the controller creates nonlinear damping. In isotropic conditions the periodic mode shape contains up to three harmonic components, but in anisotropic conditions it can contain an infinite number of harmonic components with frequencies that are multiples of the rotor speed. These harmonics appear in calculated frequency responses of the turbine. Extreme wind shear changes the modal damping when the flow is separated due to an interaction between

  1. Microscopic description of production cross sections including deexcitation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekizawa, Kazuyuki

    2017-07-01

    Background: At the forefront of the nuclear science, production of new neutron-rich isotopes is continuously pursued at accelerator laboratories all over the world. To explore the currently unknown territories in the nuclear chart far away from the stability, reliable theoretical predictions are inevitable. Purpose: To provide a reliable prediction of production cross sections taking into account secondary deexcitation processes, both particle evaporation and fission, a new method called TDHF+GEMINI is proposed, which combines the microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory with a sophisticated statistical compound-nucleus deexcitation model, GEMINI++. Methods: Low-energy heavy ion reactions are described based on three-dimensional Skyrme-TDHF calculations. Using the particle-number projection method, production probabilities, total angular momenta, and excitation energies of primary reaction products are extracted from the TDHF wave function after collision. Production cross sections for secondary reaction products are evaluated employing GEMINI++. Results are compared with available experimental data and widely used grazing calculations. Results: The method is applied to describe cross sections for multinucleon transfer processes in 40Ca+124Sn (Ec .m .≃128.54 MeV ), 48Ca+124Sn (Ec .m .≃125.44 MeV ), 40Ca+208Pb (Ec .m .≃208.84 MeV ), 58Ni+208Pb (Ec .m .≃256.79 MeV ), 64Ni+238U (Ec .m .≃307.35 MeV ), and 136Xe+198Pt (Ec .m .≃644.98 MeV ) reactions at energies close to the Coulomb barrier. It is shown that the inclusion of secondary deexcitation processes, which are dominated by neutron evaporation in the present systems, substantially improves agreement with the experimental data. The magnitude of the evaporation effects is very similar to the one observed in grazing calculations. TDHF+GEMINI provides better description of the absolute value of the cross sections for channels involving transfer of more than one proton, compared to the grazing

  2. Physical effects of thermal pollution in lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Râman Vinnâ, Love; Wüest, Alfred; Bouffard, Damien

    2017-05-01

    Anthropogenic heat emissions into inland waters influence water temperature and affect stratification, heat and nutrient fluxes, deep water renewal, and biota. Given the increased thermal stress on these systems by growing cooling demands of riparian/coastal infrastructures in combination with climate warming, the question arises on how to best monitor and manage these systems. In this study, we investigate local and system-wide physical effects on the medium-sized perialpine Lake Biel (Switzerland), influenced by point-source cooling water emission from an upstream nuclear power plant (heat emission ˜700 MW, ˜18 W m-2 lake wide). We use one-dimensional (SIMSTRAT) and three-dimensional (Delft3D-Flow) hydrodynamic numerical simulations and provide model resolution guidelines for future studies of thermal pollution. The effects on Lake Biel by the emitted excess heat are summarized as: (i) clear seasonal trend in temperature increase, locally up to 3.4°C and system-wide volume mean ˜0.3°C, which corresponds to one decade of regional surface water climate warming; (ii) the majority of supplied thermal pollution (˜60%) leaves this short residence time (˜58 days) system via the main outlet, whereas the remaining heat exits to the atmosphere; (iii) increased length of stratified period due to the stabilizing effects of additional heat; (iv) system-wide effects such as warmer temperature, prolonged stratified period, and river-caused epilimnion flushing are resolved by both models whereas local raised temperature and river short circuiting was only identifiable with the three-dimensional model approach. This model-based method provides an ideal tool to assess man-made impacts on lakes and their downstream outflows.

  3. Prediction of the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Powder Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lingxue; Park, Jiho; Lee, Cheonkyu; Jeong, Sangkwon

    The powder insulation method is widely used in structural and cryogenic systems such as transportation and storage tanks of cryogenic fluids. The powder insulation layer is constructed by small particle powder with light weight and some residual gas with high porosity. So far, many experiments have been carried out to test the thermal performance of various kinds of powder, including expanded perlite, glass microspheres, expanded polystyrene (EPS). However, it is still difficult to predict the thermal performance of powder insulation by calculation due to the complicated geometries, including various particle shapes, wide powder diameter distribution, and various pore sizes. In this paper, the effective thermal conductivity of powder insulation has been predicted based on an effective thermal conductivity calculationmodel of porous packed beds. The calculation methodology was applied to the insulation system with expanded perlite, glass microspheres and EPS beads at cryogenic temperature and various vacuum pressures. The calculation results were compared with previous experimental data. Moreover, additional tests were carried out at cryogenic temperature in this research. The fitting equations of the deformation factor of the area-contact model are presented for various powders. The calculation results show agood agreement with the experimental results.

  4. The effect of thermal aging on the thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed and EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinwiddie, R.B.; Beecher, S.C.; Porter, W.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Nagaraj, B.A. [General Electric Co., Cincinnati, OH (United States). Aircraft Engine Group

    1996-05-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBCs is of primary importance. Electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EV-PVD) and air plasma spraying (APS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The density of the APS coatings was controlled by varying the spray parameters. The low density APS yttria-partially stabilized zirconia (yttria-PSZ) coatings yielded a thermal conductivity that is lower than both the high density APS coatings and the EB-PVD coatings. The thermal aging of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia are compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposure to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the EB-PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, results suggest that they typically have a higher thermal conductivity than APS coatings before thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for plasma sprayed partially stabilized zirconia have been found to be less than for plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia coatings.

  5. Weak phonon scattering effect of twin boundaries on thermal transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Huicong; Xiao, Jianwei; Melnik, Roderick; Wen, Bin

    2016-01-29

    To study the effect of twin boundaries on thermal transmission, thermal conductivities of twinned diamond with different twin thicknesses have been studied by NEMD simulation. Results indicate that twin boundaries show a weak phonon scattering effect on thermal transmission, which is only caused by the additional twin boundaries' thermal resistance. Moreover, according to phonon kinetic theory, this weak phonon scattering effect of twin boundaries is mainly caused by a slightly reduced average group velocity.

  6. Weak phonon scattering effect of twin boundaries on thermal transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Huicong Dong; Jianwei Xiao; Roderick Melnik; Bin Wen

    2016-01-01

    To study the effect of twin boundaries on thermal transmission, thermal conductivities of twinned diamond with different twin thicknesses have been studied by NEMD simulation. Results indicate that twin boundaries show a weak phonon scattering effect on thermal transmission, which is only caused by the additional twin boundaries’ thermal resistance. Moreover, according to phonon kinetic theory, this weak phonon scattering effect of twin boundaries is mainly caused by a slightly reduced averag...

  7. Effects of Thermal Tension Transients on the Muscle Crossbridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Peter R.

    2016-09-01

    The transverse thermal fluctuations of the myosin molecule are significant. This paper explores the contribution of lateral myosin bending to the developed crossbridge force and power stroke. The equipartition theorem is used to calculate the mode amplitudes for myosin bending. Crossbridge axial force Fx and power stroke Δx are developed by transverse in-plane fluctuations along the y- and z-axes. Practical applications include the effects of temperature on the flexibility of the myosin molecule stiffness and tension, relevant to man-made fabrication of synthetic muscle using micromachines and nanowires. Scaling laws for the S2 bending amplitude depend on filament length, mode number, and stiffness, as n-2,L2, and (EI)-1. This paper quantifies the effects of thermal motion on the mechanics of miniature molecular motors, including the muscle crossbridge.

  8. Models of low-mass helium white dwarfs including gravitational settling, thermal and chemical diffusion, and rotational mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Istrate, Alina; Tauris, Thomas M; Langer, Norbert; Stancliffe, Richard J; Grassitelli, Luca

    2016-01-01

    A large number of extremely low-mass helium white dwarfs (ELM WDs) have been discovered in recent years. The majority of them are found in close binary systems suggesting they are formed either through a common-envelope phase or via stable mass transfer in a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) or a cataclysmic variable (CV) system. Here, we investigate the formation of these objects through the LMXB channel with emphasis on the proto-WD evolution in environments with different metallicities. We study, for the first time, the combined effects of rotational mixing and element diffusion (e.g. gravitational settling, thermal and chemical diffusion) on the evolution of proto-WDs and on the cooling properties of the resulting WDs. We present state-of-the-art binary stellar evolution models computed with MESA for metallicities between Z=0.0002 and Z=0.02, producing WDs with masses between 0.16-0.45 M$_{\\odot}$. Our results confirm that element diffusion plays a significant role in the evolution of proto-WDs that experience...

  9. Negative differential thermal conductance and thermal rectification effects across a graphene-based superconducting junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xingfei; Zhang, Zhi

    2016-05-01

    We study the heat transport in a graphene-based normal-superconducting junction by solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) equation. There are two effects, the competitive and cooperative effects, which come from the interaction between the temperature-dependent energy-gap function in the superconducting region and the occupation difference of quasiparticles. It is found that the competitive effect can not only bring the negative differential thermal conductance effect but also the thermal rectification effect. By contrast, the cooperative effect just causes the thermal rectification effect. Furthermore, the thermal rectification ratio and the magnitude of heat current should be seen as two inseparable signs for characterizing the thermal rectification effect. These discoveries can add more application for the graphene-based superconducting junction, such as heat diode and heat transistor, at cryogenic temperatures.

  10. Effect of an Opaque Reflecting Layer on the Thermal Behavior of a Thermal Barrier Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuckler, Charles M.

    2007-01-01

    A parametric study using a two-flux approximation of the radiative transfer equation was performed to examine the effects of an opaque reflective layer on the thermal behavior of a typical semitransparent thermal barrier coating on an opaque substrate. Some ceramic materials are semitransparent in the wavelength ranges where thermal radiation is important. Even with an opaque layer on each side of the semitransparent thermal barrier coating, scattering and absorption can have an effect on the heat transfer. In this work, a thermal barrier coating that is semitransparent up to a wavelength of 5 micrometers is considered. Above 5 micrometers wavelength, the thermal barrier coating is opaque. The absorption and scattering coefficient of the thermal barrier was varied. The thermal behavior of the thermal barrier coating with an opaque reflective layer is compared to a thermal barrier coating without the reflective layer. For a thicker thermal barrier coating with lower convective loading, which would be typical of a combustor liner, a reflective layer can significantly decrease the temperature in the thermal barrier coating and substrate if the scattering is weak or moderate and for strong scattering if the absorption is large. The layer without the reflective coating can be about as effective as the layer with the reflective coating if the absorption is small and the scattering strong. For low absorption, some temperatures in the thermal barrier coating system can be slightly higher with the reflective layer. For a thin thermal barrier coating with high convective loading, which would be typical of a blade or vane that sees the hot sections of the combustor, the reflective layer is not as effective. The reflective layer reduces the surface temperature of the reflective layer for all conditions considered. For weak and moderate scattering, the temperature of the TBC-substrate interface is reduced but for strong scattering, the temperature of the substrate is increased

  11. Simulations of runaway electron generation including the hot-tail effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuga, H.; Yagi, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2017-08-01

    The hot-tail (H-T) effect in disruption of impurity injections is considered. The contribution of the H-T effect to runaway electron (RE) current, which arises from fast thermal quenching, is studied using a two-dimensional Fokker-Planck simulation. It is found that in a high-density plasma the total RE current is reduced owing to the high collisionality. We also found that if the thermal quench is fast enough to invoke the H-T effect, the effect produces more seed REs than when the H-T effect is excluded even in high-density plasmas. In the high-density region ({{n}\\text{e}}˜ {{10}21}~{{\\text{m}}-3} ) with fast thermal quenching, nevertheless the increment of the seed REs due to the H-T effect is generally small (tens of milliamperes) while the increment of the total RE current reached 2 MA owing to the avalanche effect.

  12. Influence of heat transfer on thermal effects of the endpumped laser crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yin-ke; HE Yan-ping; ZAN Hui-ping; YANG Hao

    2010-01-01

    A thermal model of crystal is established. The temperature field differential equation of the diode-end-pumped laser crystal with circular cross-section and new boundary conditions, in which the convection heat transfer is supposed to exist between laser crystal ends and air, is established. The analytical expressions of temperature field, thermal distortion and additional optical path difference (OPD) of crystal are obtained. By numerical calculation, the influence of heat transfer on the thermal effects of laser crystal Nd:YAG is studied. Results show that crystal's thermal effects, including temperature field, thermal distortion, OPD and thermal focal length, are all weakened as the heat transfer through ends of crystal is strengthened. This conclusion could be used to control thermal effects of laser crystal and improve laser working stability.

  13. Competition between the Thermal Gradient and the Bimorph Effect in Locally Heated MEMS Actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Claus; Mølhave, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    modeling. As a result, bidirectional bending has been experimentally observed and interpreted as the competition between bimorph and thermal gradient effects. The competition has illustrated the importance of including the thermal gradient effect in the behavior analysis of bimorph driven MEMS/NEMS devices....

  14. Prediction of the effective thermal conductivity of microsphere insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Ling Xue; Park, Ji Ho; Lee, Cheon Kyu; Seo, Man Su; Jeong, Sang Kwon [Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Since glass microsphere has high crush strength, low density and small particle size, it becomes alternative thermal insulation material for cryogenic systems, such as storage and transportation tank for cryogenic fluids. Although many experiments have been performed to verify the effective thermal conductivity of microsphere, prediction by calculation is still inaccurate due to the complicated geometries, including wide range of powder diameter distribution and different pore sizes. The accurate effective thermal conductivity model for microsphere is discussed in this paper. There are four mechanisms which contribute to the heat transfer of the evacuated powder: gaseous conduction (k{sub g}), solid conduction (k{sub s}), radiation (k{sub r}) and thermal contact (k{sub c}). Among these components, k{sub g} and k{sub s} were calculated by Zehner and Schlunder model (1970). Other component values for k{sub c} and k{sub r}, which were obtained from experimental data under high vacuum conditions were added. In this research paper, the geometry of microsphere was simplified as a homogeneous solid sphere. The calculation results were compared with previous experimental data by R. Wawryk (1988), H. S. Kim (2010) and the experiment of this paper to show good agreement within error of 46%, 4.6% and 17 % for each result.

  15. Thermal corrections to the Casimir effect

    CERN Document Server

    Brevik, I; Milton, K A; Brevik, Iver; Ellingsen, Simen A.; Milton, Kimball A.

    2006-01-01

    The Casimir effect, reflecting quantum vacuum fluctuations in the electromagnetic field in a region with material boundaries, has been studied both theoretically and experimentally since 1948. The forces between dielectric and metallic surfaces both plane and curved have been measured at the 10 to 1 percent level in a variety of room-temperature experiments, and remarkable agreement with the zero-temperature theory has been achieved. In fitting the data various corrections due to surface roughness, patch potentials, curvature, and temperature have been incorporated. It is the latter that is the subject of the present article. We point out that, in fact, no temperature dependence has yet been detected, and that the experimental situation is still too fluid to permit conclusions about thermal corrections to the Casimir effect. Theoretically, there are subtle issues concerning thermodynamics and electrodynamics which have resulted in disparate predictions concerning the nature of these corrections. However, a ge...

  16. Thermal properties of soils: effect of biochar application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usowicz, Boguslaw; Lukowski, Mateusz; Lipiec, Jerzy

    2014-05-01

    Thermal properties (thermal conductivity, heat capacity and thermal diffusivity) have a significant effect on the soil surface energy partitioning and resulting in the temperature distribution. Thermal properties of soil depend on water content, bulk density and organic matter content. An important source of organic matter is biochar. Biochar as a material is defined as: "charcoal for application as a soil conditioner". Biochar is generally associated with co-produced end products of pyrolysis. Many different materials are used as biomass feedstock for biochar, including wood, crop residues and manures. Additional predictions were done for terra preta soil (also known as "Amazonian dark earth"), high in charcoal content, due to adding a mixture of charcoal, bone, and manure for thousands of years i.e. approximately 10-1,000 times longer than residence times of most soil organic matter. The effect of biochar obtained from the wood biomass and other organic amendments (peat, compost) on soil thermal properties is presented in this paper. The results were compared with wetland soils of different organic matter content. The measurements of the thermal properties at various water contents were performed after incubation, under laboratory conditions using KD2Pro, Decagon Devices. The measured data were compared with predictions made using Usowicz statistical-physical model (Usowicz et al., 2006) for biochar, mineral soil and soil with addition of biochar at various water contents and bulk densities. The model operates statistically by probability of occurrence of contacts between particular fractional compounds. It combines physical properties, specific to particular compounds, into one apparent conductance specific to the mixture. The results revealed that addition of the biochar and other organic amendments into the soil caused considerable reduction of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity. The mineral soil showed the highest thermal conductivity and diffusivity

  17. Thermal Effects in Dense Matter Beyond Mean Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinou, Constantinos; Prakash, Madappa

    2016-01-01

    The formalism of next-to-leading order Fermi Liquid Theory is employed to calculate the thermal properties of symmetric nuclear and pure neutron matter in a relativistic many-body theory beyond the mean field level which includes two-loop effects. For all thermal variables, the semi-analytical next-to-leading order corrections reproduce results of the exact numerical calculations for entropies per baryon up to 2. This corresponds to excellent agreement down to sub-nuclear densities for temperatures up to $20$ MeV. In addition to providing physical insights, a rapid evaluation of the equation of state in the homogeneous phase of hot and dense matter is achieved through the use of the zero-temperature Landau effective mass function and its derivatives.

  18. Metallic layer-by-layer photonic crystals for linearly-polarized thermal emission and thermophotovoltaic device including same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Constant, Kristen P.

    2016-07-26

    Metallic thermal emitters consisting of two layers of differently structured nickel gratings on a homogeneous nickel layer are fabricated by soft lithography and studied for polarized thermal radiation. A thermal emitter in combination with a sub-wavelength grating shows a high extinction ratio, with a maximum value close to 5, in a wide mid-infrared range from 3.2 to 7.8 .mu.m, as well as high emissivity up to 0.65 at a wavelength of 3.7 .mu.m. All measurements show good agreement with theoretical predictions. Numerical simulations reveal that a high electric field exists within the localized air space surrounded by the gratings and the intensified electric-field is only observed for the polarizations perpendicular to the top sub-wavelength grating. This result suggests how the emissivity of a metal can be selectively enhanced at a certain range of wavelengths for a given polarization.

  19. Metallic layer-by-layer photonic crystals for linearly-polarized thermal emission and thermophotovoltaic device including same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Constant, Kristen P.

    2016-07-26

    Metallic thermal emitters consisting of two layers of differently structured nickel gratings on a homogeneous nickel layer are fabricated by soft lithography and studied for polarized thermal radiation. A thermal emitter in combination with a sub-wavelength grating shows a high extinction ratio, with a maximum value close to 5, in a wide mid-infrared range from 3.2 to 7.8 .mu.m, as well as high emissivity up to 0.65 at a wavelength of 3.7 .mu.m. All measurements show good agreement with theoretical predictions. Numerical simulations reveal that a high electric field exists within the localized air space surrounded by the gratings and the intensified electric-field is only observed for the polarizations perpendicular to the top sub-wavelength grating. This result suggests how the emissivity of a metal can be selectively enhanced at a certain range of wavelengths for a given polarization.

  20. Mean-field versus microconvection effects in nanofluid thermal conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Jacob; Williams, Wesley C; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hu, Lin-Wen; Yip, Sidney; Rusconi, Roberto; Piazza, Roberto

    2007-08-31

    Transient hot-wire data on thermal conductivity of suspensions of silica and perfluorinated particles show agreement with the mean-field theory of Maxwell but not with the recently postulated microconvection mechanism. The influence of interfacial thermal resistance, convective effects at microscales, and the possibility of thermal conductivity enhancements beyond the Maxwell limit are discussed.

  1. An effective Handling of Thermal Bridges in the EPBD Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erhorn, Hans; Erhorn-Kluttig, Heike; Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund

    of thermal bridge effects to the energy balance, used software tools and thermal bridge atlases, available good practice guidance and promotion of good building practice to the execution quality and advanced thermal bridge driven technical developments. This report presents the gathered knowledge, draws...

  2. Mean-Field Versus Microconvection Effects in Nanofluid Thermal Conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Jacob; Williams, Wesley C.; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hu, Lin-Wen; Yip, Sidney; Rusconi, Roberto; Piazza, Roberto

    2007-08-01

    Transient hot-wire data on thermal conductivity of suspensions of silica and perfluorinated particles show agreement with the mean-field theory of Maxwell but not with the recently postulated microconvection mechanism. The influence of interfacial thermal resistance, convective effects at microscales, and the possibility of thermal conductivity enhancements beyond the Maxwell limit are discussed.

  3. Thermal transport properties of thermally sprayed coatings: An integrated study of materials, processing and microstructural effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Weiguang

    The complex microstructures of thermally sprayed coatings are very sensitive to processing conditions and have a significant influence on the properties. The thermal transport property is a very important design parameter for thermally sprayed coatings. Despite considerable progress in this area, there is continued need to clarify the interrelationships among processing, microstructure and thermal transport properties. This has been enabled through continued advancements in processing science and control, enhancements in microstructural characterization and new methods of property characterization. The purpose of this research is to seek a successive pathway to prior efforts in understanding the effect of microstructural defects on the thermal transport property of thermally sprayed coatings. Relationship between microstructure and thermal conductivity is investigated for three sets of plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating systems made using different morphology powders, different particle size distribution and controlled modification of particle states via plasma torch parameters. By integrating the results, maps of the thermal conductivity-porosity relationship have been established. Such maps highlight the role of splat thickness and interfaces in thermal conductivity. Furthermore, a new microstructural parameter termed "effective porosity" is proposed which considers the dominating role of interlamellar pores on through thickness thermal transport in thermally sprayed coatings. This effective porosity is rationalized based on the heat transport mechanism and enables better understanding of microstructure-thermal transport property correlation. An inverse linear model and a percolation model are established which can serve as predictive tools for understanding microstructure-thermal conductivity relationships. In addition, a systematic assessment of thermal conductivity anisotropy has been carried out for YSZ, Al2O 3 and several metallic

  4. Effect of Air Velocity on Thermal Comfort under Thermal Environment Ramp Changing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    嵇赟喆; 涂光备; 孙琳

    2004-01-01

    Set points of the indoor air temperature and relative humidity in short-term staying location were studied. In this condition, the thermal reaction of human body varied with the ramp changes of the environmental thermal parameters.The change rules of about 60 subjects'thermal reaction to the ramp change of environment were surveyed, and the effect of air movement on the thermal reaction during transient condition was considered by using a questionnaire. With the experimental results and research findings under stable condition, a way to set environmental parameters of short-time staying location was recommended.

  5. How to measure thermal effects of personal cooling systems : Human, thermal manikin and human simulator study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogerd, N.; Psikuta, A.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Rossi, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal effects, such as cooling power and thermophysiological responses initiated upon application of a personal cooling system, can be assessed with (i) humans, (ii) a thermal manikin and (iii) a thermophysiological human simulator. In order to compare these methods, a cooling shirt (mild cooling)

  6. Transient thermal effects in Alpine permafrost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Noetzli

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In high mountain areas, permafrost is important because it influences the occurrence of natural hazards, because it has to be considered in construction practices, and because it is sensitive to climate change. The assessment of its distribution and evolution is challenging because of highly variable conditions at and below the surface, steep topography and varying climatic conditions. This paper presents a systematic investigation of effects of topography and climate variability that are important for subsurface temperatures in Alpine bedrock permafrost. We studied the effects of both, past and projected future ground surface temperature variations on the basis of numerical experimentation with simplified mountain topography in order to demonstrate the principal effects. The modeling approach applied combines a distributed surface energy balance model and a three-dimensional subsurface heat conduction scheme. Results show that the past climate variations that essentially influence present-day permafrost temperatures at depth of the idealized mountains are the last glacial period and the major fluctuations in the past millennium. Transient effects from projected future warming, however, are likely larger than those from past climate conditions because larger temperature changes at the surface occur in shorter time periods. We further demonstrate the accelerating influence of multi-lateral warming in steep and complex topography for a temperature signal entering the subsurface as compared to the situation in flat areas. The effects of varying and uncertain material properties (i.e., thermal properties, porosity, and freezing characteristics on the subsurface temperature field were examined in sensitivity studies. A considerable influence of latent heat due to water in low-porosity bedrock was only shown for simulations over time periods of decades to centuries. At the end, the model was applied to the topographic setting of the Matterhorn

  7. Non-thermal Dupree diffusivity and shielding effects on atomic collisions in astrophysical turbulent plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-02-01

    The influence of non-thermal Dupree turbulence and the plasma shielding on the electron-ion collision is investigated in astrophysical non-thermal Lorentzian turbulent plasmas. The second-order eikonal analysis and the effective interaction potential including the Lorentzian far-field term are employed to obtain the eikonal scattering phase shift and the eikonal collision cross section as functions of the diffusion coefficient, impact parameter, collision energy, Debye length and spectral index of the astrophysical Lorentzian plasma. It is shown that the non-thermal effect suppresses the eikonal scattering phase shift. However, it enhances the eikonal collision cross section in astrophysical non-thermal turbulent plasmas. The effect of non-thermal turbulence on the eikonal atomic collision cross section is weakened with increasing collision energy. The variation of the atomic cross section due to the non-thermal Dupree turbulence is also discussed.

  8. Effect of Plasma Pretreatment on Thermal Durability of Thermal Barrier Coatings in Cyclic Thermal Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Won Myoung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma pretreatment on the top and bond coats was performed and its influence on the thermal durability of thermal barrier coating (TBC system was investigated through cyclic thermal exposure. Two types of bond coat were prepared by different methods, namely, air plasma spray (APS and high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF, and two kinds of feedstock powder were employed for preparing the top coat in APS process. The better thermal durability was achieved in the vertically cracked TBC with the surface modified bond coat or with the bond coat prepared by APS process. The hardness and fracture toughness values of TBCs increased because of densification of the top coat during cyclic thermal exposure, and the bond coat prepared by HVOF process showed higher values than that by APS process. The TBCs with the surface modified bond coat were more efficient in improving adhesive strength than those without plasma pretreatment on the bond coat. The relationship between microstructure evolution and thermomechanical characteristics of TBCs with plasma pretreatment was discussed in cyclic thermal exposure.

  9. Thermal effects on aquatic organisms. Annotated bibliography of the 1975 literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutant, C.C.; Talmage, S.S.; Carrier, R.F.; Collier, B.N.; Dailey, N.S. (comps.)

    1976-10-01

    Abstracts are presented of 716 papers published during 1975 concerning thermal effects on aquatic organisms. Indexes are included for author, subject category, geographic location, toxon, title, and keywords. (CH)

  10. Thermal effects on decays of a metastable brane configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Yuichiro; Ookouchi, Yutaka

    2016-11-01

    We study thermal effects on a decay process of a false vacuum in type IIA string theory. At finite temperature, the potential of the theory is corrected and also thermally excited modes enhance the decay rate. The false vacuum can accommodate a string-like object. This cosmic string makes the bubble creation rate much larger and causes an inhomogeneous vacuum decay. We investigate thermal corrections to the DBI action for the bubble/string bound state and discuss a thermally assisted tunneling process. We show that thermally excited states enhance the tunneling rate of the decay process, which makes the life-time of the false vacuum much shorter.

  11. An effective Handling of Thermal Bridges in the EPBD Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erhorn, Hans; Erhorn-Kluttig, Heike; Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund;

    The ASIEPI project has collected and analysed international and national information from up to 17 EU Member States plus Norway on the topic of thermal bridges in buildings. Seven different aspects have been addressed, ranging from EU Member States’ approaches in regulations to quantification...... of thermal bridge effects to the energy balance, used software tools and thermal bridge atlases, available good practice guidance and promotion of good building practice to the execution quality and advanced thermal bridge driven technical developments. This report presents the gathered knowledge, draws...... junctions and other building parts with possible thermal bridges....

  12. Experimental Investigation of Effect of Aluminum Filler Material on Thermal Properties of Palmyra Fiber Reinforced Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Pavanu Sai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural fiber composites are renewable, cheap, completely or partially recyclable, carbon neutral and biodegradable. Their easy availability, lower density, higher specific properties, lower cost, satisfactory mechanical and thermal properties, non-corrosive nature, lesser abrasion to processing equipment, makes them an attractive ecological alternative to glass, carbon or other man-made synthetic fibers. Natural fiber composites are generally very good thermal insulators and thus cannot be used where thermal conduction is desirable. Increase in thermal conduction may be done by adding metal filler powders to the matrix. In this work, the effect of aluminum filler material on thermal properties of chemically treated palmyra fiber reinforced composites is investigated. Thermal properties studied include thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, thermal degradation and stability. Five different samples with 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, 100% aluminum powder are considered. With the addition of aluminum filler powder, thermal conductivity increases, specific heat capacity decreases, thermal diffusivity increases and thermal stability improves with maximum at 50% aluminum powder.

  13. The mathematical models of electromagnetic field dynamics and heat transfer in closed electrical contacts including Thomson effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharin, Stanislav; Sarsengeldin, Merey; Kassabek, Samat

    2016-08-01

    We represent mathematical models of electromagnetic field dynamics and heat transfer in closed symmetric and asymmetric electrical contacts including Thomson effect, which are essentially nonlinear due to the dependence of thermal and electrical conductivities on temperature. Suggested solutions are based on the assumption of identity of equipotentials and isothermal surfaces, which agrees with experimental data and valid for both linear and nonlinear cases. Well known Kohlrausch temperature-potential relation is analytically justified.

  14. Thermal Radiation Effects on Thermal Explosion in Polydisperse Fuel Spray-Probabilistic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ophir Navea

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the effect of thermal radiation on the dynamics of a thermal explosion of polydisperse fuel spray with a complete description of the chemistry via a single-step two-reactant model of general order. The polydisperse spray is modeled using a Probability Density Function (PDF. The thermal radiation energy exchange between the evaporation surface of the fuel droplets and the burning gas is described using the Marshak boundary conditions. An explicit expression of the critical condition for thermal explosion limit is derived analytically and represents a generalization of the critical parameter of the classical Semenov theory. Because we investigated the model in the range where the temperature is very high, the effect of the thermal radiation is significant.

  15. Effects of thermal efficiency in DCMD and the preparation of membranes with low thermal conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhehao, E-mail: ccgri_lzh@163.com [Changchun Gold Research Institute, 130012 (China); Peng, Yuelian, E-mail: pyl@live.com.au [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Dong, Yajun; Fan, Hongwei [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Chen, Ping [The Research Institute of Environmental Protection, North China Pharmaceutical Group Corporation, 050015 (China); Qiu, Lin [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Jiang, Qi [National Major Science and Technology Program Management Office for Water Pollution Control and Treatment, MEP, 100029 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • The effects on vapor flux and thermal efficiency were simulated. • The conditions favoring vapor flux also favored thermal efficiency. • Four microporous polymer membranes were compared. • The SiO{sub 2} aerogel coating reduced the thermal conductivity of polymer membranes. • A 3ω technique was used to measure the thermal conductivity of membranes. - Abstract: The effects of the membrane characteristics and operational conditions on the vapor flux and thermal efficiency in a direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) process were studied with a mathematical simulation. The membrane temperature, driving force of vapor transfer, membrane distillation coefficient, etc. were used to analyze the effects. The operating conditions that increased the vapor flux improved the thermal efficiency. The membrane characteristics of four microporous membranes and their performances in DCMD were compared. A polysulfone (PSf) membrane prepared via vapor-induced phase separation exhibited the lowest thermal conductivity. The PSf and polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes were modified using SiO{sub 2} aerogel blending and coating to reduce the thermal conductivity of the membrane. The coating process was more effective than the blending process toward this end. The changes in the structure of the modified membrane were observed with a scanning electron microscope. Si was found on the modified membrane surface with an energy spectrometer. The PVDF composite and support membranes were tested during the DCMD process; the composite membrane had a higher vapor flux and a better thermal efficiency than the support. A new method based on a 3ω technique was used to measure the thermal conductivity of the membranes.

  16. The coke drum thermal kinetic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldescu, Maria M.; Romero, Sim; Larson, Mel [KBC Advanced Technologies plc, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The coke drum thermal kinetic dynamics fundamentally affect the coker unit yields as well as the coke product properties and unit reliability. In the drum the thermal cracking and polymerization or condensation reactions take place in a semi-batch environment. Understanding the fundamentals of the foaming kinetics that occur in the coke drums is key to avoiding a foam-over that could result in a unit shutdown for several months. Although the most dynamic changes with time occur during drum filling, other dynamics of the coker process will be discussed as well. KBC has contributed towards uncovering and modelling the complexities of heavy oil thermal dynamics. (author)

  17. Thermal effects in rapid directional solidification - Linear theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, D. A.; Davis, S. H.

    1993-01-01

    We study the morphological instability of the planar solid/liquid interface for a unidirectionally-solidified dilute binary mixture. We use a model developed by Boettinger et al. (1985, 1986), Aziz (1982), and Jackson et al. (1980), which allows for nonequilibrium effects on the interface through velocity-dependent segregation and attachment kinetics. Two types of instabilities are found in the linear stability analysis: (1) a cellular instability, and (2) an oscillatory instability driven by disequilibrium effects. Merchant and Davis (1990) characterized these instabilities subject to the frozen-temperature approximation (FTA). The present work relaxes the FTA by including the effects of latent heat and the full temperature distribution. Thermal effects slightly postpone the onset of the cellular instability but dramatically postpone the onset of the oscillatory instability; however, the absolute-stability conditions, at which at high speed the cellular and oscillatory instabilities are suppressed, remain unchanged from the FTA.

  18. Investigation on the Thermal Crack Evolution and Oxidation Effect of Compacted Graphite Iron Under Thermal Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaosong; Zhang, Weizheng; Guo, Bingbin

    2015-09-01

    For a better understanding of the thermal fatigue behavior in compacted graphite cast iron (CGI), the cyclic thermal shock test is carried out through alternating induction heating and water quenching. The optical and scanning electron microscopy observations are used to examine the cracks and oxidation behavior on the cross section and heating surface of the material specimen, respectively. The results show that the thermal cracks in CGI initiate at the graphite phases mostly, and the multi-sourced thermal cracks would result in stable cracks morphology finally through crack shielding effect. In the oxidation analysis, it is found that the oxidation of graphite is selective, and the graphite is the potential channels for oxygen diffusion from the outside into the matrix, resulting in local oxidation of matrix around graphite and continuous oxygen diffusion paths in the microstructure. Thermal cracks nucleate from the oxidation holes at graphite caused by decarburization, and they prefer to propagate and coalesce by penetrating the oxide bridges.

  19. Quantized Thermal Transport in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, C. L.; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    1996-01-01

    We analyze thermal transport in the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE), employing a Luttinger liquid model of edge states. Impurity mediated inter-channel scattering events are incorporated in a hydrodynamic description of heat and charge transport. The thermal Hall conductance, $K_H$, is shown to provide a new and universal characterization of the FQHE state, and reveals non-trivial information about the edge structure. The Lorenz ratio between thermal and electrical Hall conductances {\\i...

  20. Thermal effects in high-power Nd:YAG disk-type solid state laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huomu; Feng, Guoying; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2011-09-01

    An investigation of thermal effects in a high-power Nd:YAG disk-type solid state laser pumped with different pump beam transverse profiles is carried out by numerical simulation based on the finite element method (FEM). Impact of the heat sink on the thermal effects is included in the simulation. The distribution of first principle stress, thermally induced birefringence, including the distribution and variation of the birefringence loss, are studied. The characteristics of the phase variation are analyzed with consideration of the temperature gradient, deformation, strain and thermal stress. Thermal lensing is explored as a function of pump power and of the radius pumped with different pump beam transverse profiles. The non-parabolic part of optical phase distortion is simulated. Furthermore, the characteristics of the bi-focus of the disk laser are also studied. Experiments on the maximum tensile stress distribution and depolarization loss are carried out. The presented calculations are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations.

  1. Thermal radiation effect on thermal explosion in gas containing fuel droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Igor; Gol'dshtein, Vladimir; Kuzmenko, Grigory; Sazhin, Sergei

    1999-12-01

    The effect of thermal radiation on the dynamics of a thermal explosion of a flammable gas mixture with the addition of volatile fuel droplets is studied. This is based on an original physical model of self-ignition. The thermal radiation energy exchange between the evaporating surface of the fuel droplets and burning gas is described using the P-1 model with Marshak boundary conditions. The original system of equations describing the effects of heating, evaporation and the combustion of fuel droplets is simplified to enable their analysis using asymptotic methods. The mathematical formulation is eventually reduced to a singularly perturbed system of ordinary differential equations. This allows us to apply the advanced geometric asymptotic technique (integral manifold method) for the qualitative analysis of the behaviour of the solution. Possible types of dynamic behaviour of the system are classified and parametric regions of their existence are determined analytically. The main attention is concentrated on the situations where delays might occur before the final ignition. Our study is focused on the impact of thermal radiation on the delay time. The dimensionless parameter responsible for the impact of thermal radiation is singled out and analysed. The dependence of the delay characteristics on the physical parameters of the problem under consideration is analysed. An explicit expression for the minimum time delay of the thermal explosion of fuel droplets in the presence of thermal radiation is derived and applied to the thermal explosion of n-decane and tetralin droplets. It is pointed out that the effects of thermal radiation can be significant, especially at high temperatures, and cannot be ignored in the analysis of this phenomenon.

  2. Post-test thermal-hydraulic analysis of two intermediate LOCA tests at the ROSA facility including uncertainty evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freixa, J., E-mail: jordi@freixa.net [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Kim, T.-W. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Manera, A. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    The OECD/NEA ROSA-2 project aims at addressing thermal-hydraulic safety issues relevant for light water reactors by building up an experimental database at the ROSA Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF). The ROSA facility simulates a PWR Westinghouse design with a four-loop configuration and a nominal power of 3423 MWth. Two intermediate break loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) experiments (Tests 1 and 2) have been carried out during 2010. The two tests were analyzed by using the US-NRC TRACE best estimate code, employing the same nodalization previously used for the simulation of small-break LOCA experiments of the ROSA-1 programme. A post-test calculation was performed for each test along with uncertainty analysis providing uncertainty bands for each relevant time trend. Uncertainties in the code modelling capabilities as well as in the initial and boundary conditions were taken into account, following the guidelines and lessons learnt through participation in the OECD/NEA BEMUSE programme. Two different versions of the TRACE code were used in the analysis, providing a qualitatively good prediction of the tests. However, the uncertainty analysis revealed differences between the performances of some models in the two versions. The most relevant parameters of the two experimental tests were falling within the computed uncertainty bands.

  3. Post-test thermal-hydraulic analysis of two intermediate LOCA tests at the ROSA facility including uncertainty evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freixa, J.; Kim, T-W.; Manera, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    The OECD/NEA ROSA-2 project aims at addressing thermal-hydraulic safety issues relevant for light water reactors by building up an experimental database at the ROSA Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF). The ROSA facility simulates a PWR Westinghouse design with a four-loop configuration and a nominal power of 3423 MWth. Two intermediate break loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) experiments (Test 1 and 2) have been carried out during 2010. The two tests were analyzed by using the US-NRC TRACE best estimate code, employing the same nodalization previously used for the simulation of small-break LOCA experiments of the ROSA-1 program. A post-test calculation was performed for each test along with uncertainty analysis providing uncertainty bands for each relevant time trend. Uncertainties in the code modeling capabilities as well as in the initial and boundary conditions were taken into account, following the guidelines and lessons learnt through participation in the OECD/NEA BEMUSE program. Two different versions of the TRACE code were used in the analysis, providing a qualitatively good prediction of the tests. However, both versions showed deficiencies that need to be addressed. The most relevant parameters of the two experimental tests were falling within the computed uncertainty bands. (author)

  4. Fuel cell integral bundle assembly including ceramic open end seal and vertical and horizontal thermal expansion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafred, Paolo R [Murrysville, PA; Gillett, James E [Greensburg, PA

    2012-04-24

    A plurality of integral bundle assemblies contain a top portion with an inlet fuel plenum and a bottom portion containing a base support, the base supports a dense, ceramic air exhaust manifold having four supporting legs, the manifold is below and connects to air feed tubes located in a recuperator zone, the air feed tubes passing into the center of inverted, tubular, elongated, hollow electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells having an open end above a combustion zone into which the air feed tubes pass and a closed end near the inlet fuel plenum, where the open end of the fuel cells rest upon and within a separate combination ceramic seal and bundle support contained in a ceramic support casting, where at least one flexible cushion ceramic band seal located between the recuperator and fuel cells protects and controls horizontal thermal expansion, and where the fuel cells operate in the fuel cell mode and where the base support and bottom ceramic air exhaust manifolds carry from 85% to all of the weight of the generator.

  5. Ascent trajectory optimization for stratospheric airship with thermal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao; Zhu, Ming

    2013-09-01

    Ascent trajectory optimization with thermal effects is addressed for a stratospheric airship. Basic thermal characteristics of the stratospheric airship are introduced. Besides, the airship’s equations of motion are constructed by including the factors about aerodynamic force, added mass and wind profiles which are developed based on horizontal-wind model. For both minimum-time and minimum-energy flights during ascent, the trajectory optimization problem is described with the path and terminal constraints in different scenarios and then, is converted into a parameter optimization problem by a direct collocation method. Sparse Nonlinear OPTimizer(SNOPT) is employed as a nonlinear programming solver and two scenarios are adopted. The solutions obtained illustrate that the trajectories are greatly affected by the thermal behaviors which prolong the daytime minimum-time flights of about 20.8% compared with that of nighttime in scenario 1 and of about 10.5% in scenario 2. And there is the same trend for minimum-energy flights. For the energy consumption of minimum-time flights, 6% decrease is abstained in scenario 1 and 5% decrease in scenario 2. However, a few energy consumption reduction is achieved for minimum-energy flights. Solar radiation is the principal component and the natural wind also affects the thermal behaviors of stratospheric airship during ascent. The relationship between take-off time and performance of airship during ascent is discussed. it is found that the take-off time at dusk is best choice for stratospheric airship. And in addition, for saving energy, airship prefers to fly downwind.

  6. The Thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect of Primordial Recombination Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kholupenko, E E; Ivanchik, A V; Varshalovich, D A

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that recombination radiation of primordial hydrogen-helium plasma leads to the distortions of the planckian spectrum shape of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB). We discuss the thermal Sunayev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect with taking into account primordial recombination radiation (PRR). Since in the thermal SZ effect the redistribution of the photons depends on the derivatives of the spectrum, the value of relative correction to SZ effect due to PRR significantly higher than relative corrections due to PRR in the initial spectrum. Calculations of corrections to the thermal SZ effect due to PRR show that depending on the cluster parameters: 1) in the range of frequencies $\

  7. Effect of thermal treatment on Zn nanodisks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acuña-Avila, Pedro E., E-mail: pacunaa004@alumno.uaemex.mx; López, Roberto; Vigueras-Santiago, Enrique; Hernández-López, Susana; Camacho-López, Marco [Laboratorio de Investigación y Desarrollo de Materiales Avanzados (LIDMA). Facultad de Química de la Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México. Paseo Colón esquina Paseo Tollocan C.P. 50120, Toluca, Estado de México, México (Mexico); Ornelas-Gutierrez, Carlos; Antunez, Wilber [Centro de investigación en Materiales Avanzados S. C. (CIMAV). Miguel de Cervantes N° 120. C.P. 31109. Chihuahua, Chihuahua, México (Mexico)

    2015-06-15

    Metallic Zn nanodisks with hexagonal morphology were obtained onto glass substrate under vacuum thermal evaporation. A thermal characterization of Zn nanodiks showed a lower oxidation temperature than source powder Zn. Different thermal treatment on Zn nanodisks played an important role on the morphology, crystal size and surface vibrational modes of ZnO. The growth of ZnO nanoneedles started at the edge of metallic zinc hexagonal structures according with SEM images, the higher temperature the longer needles were grown. XRD diffractogram confirmed the wurtzite structure of ZnO with metallic nuclei. A wide band between 530 and 580 cm{sup −1} of Raman scattering corresponded at surface vibrational modes not observed at higher temperature.

  8. Nonequilibrium Tuning of the Thermal Casimir Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Dean, David S; Maggs, A C; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    In net-neutral systems correlations between charge fluctuations generate strong attractive thermal Casimir forces and engineering these forces to optimize nanodevice performance is an important challenge. We show how the normal and lateral thermal Casimir forces between two plates containing Brownian charges can be modulated by decorrelating the system through the application of an electric field, which generates a nonequilibrium steady state with a constant current in one or both plates, reducing the ensuing fluctuation-generated normal force while at the same time generating a lateral drag force. This hypothesis is confirmed by detailed numerical simulations as well as an analytical approach based on stochastic density functional theory.

  9. Effect of nanoparticle coating on the thermal conductivity of microporous thermal insulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Bok; Kwon, Hyuk-Chon; Kim, Yun-Il; Park, Sung; Lee, Jae Chun; Misture, Scott

    2010-05-01

    Microporous thermal insulations were prepared from mixtures of nano-sized fumed silica, micron-sized fibers and opacifier particles. Those micron-sized particles were dry coated with nano-sized fumed silica particles by mechanical process using a compressive-shear type mill. The effect of nanoparticle coating on the thermal conductivity of the insulation media was investigated using a hot-wire method. Effect of nanoparticle coating was found to be more pronounced for the insulation composed of fumed silica and fiber than for the one composed of fumed silica, fiber and an opacifier. By adding 15% SiC or TiO2 opacifier, the thermal conductivity of the insulation samples could be lowered to 0.08 Wm(-1) K(-1) at temperature range of 805 approximately 817 degrees C. The temperature dependent thermal conductivity of the sample containing glass fiber did not exhibit any remarkable changes compared to the one containing ceramic fiber.

  10. The effects of thermally reversible agents on PVC stability properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Yao, J.; Xiong, X. H.; Jia, C. X.; Ren, R.; Chen, P.; Liu, X. M.

    2016-07-01

    One kind of thermally reversible cross-linking agents for improving PVC thermally stability was synthesized. The chemical structure and thermally reversible characteristics of cross-linking agents were investigated by FTIR and DSC analysis, respectively. FTIR results confirmed that the cyclopentadienyl barium mercaptides ((CPD-C2H4S)2Ba) were successfully synthesized. DSC results showed it has thermally reversible characteristics and the depolymerization temperature was between 170 °C and 205 °C. The effects of cross-linking reaction time on gel content of Poly(vinyl chloride) compounds was evaluated. The gel content value arrived at 42% after being cross-linked for 25 min at 180 C. The static thermally stability measurement proved that the thermally stability of PVC compounds was improved.

  11. Nonlinear Thermal Effects in Ballistic Electron Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Example 1: Rectified heat flow in Peltier coolers, or in thermal management. In Peltier coolers, an applied electric current removes heat from a...material, such that it can be cooled below ambient temperature. The performance of Peltier coolers is limited by the backflow of heat, in a direction

  12. Investigation of thermal effects in through-silicon vias using scanning thermal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielgoszewski, Grzegorz; Jóźwiak, Grzegorz; Babij, Michał; Baraniecki, Tomasz; Geer, Robert; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2014-11-01

    Results of quantitative investigations of copper through-silicon vias (TSVs) are presented. The experiments were performed using scanning thermal microscopy (SThM), enabling highly localized imaging of thermal contrast between the copper TSVs and the surrounding material. Both dc and ac active-mode SThM was used and differences between these variants are shown. SThM investigations of TSVs may provide information on copper quality in TSV, as well as may lead to quantitative investigation of thermal boundaries in micro- and nanoelectronic structures. A proposal for heat flow analysis in a TSV, which includes the influence of the boundary region between the TSV and the silicon substrate, is presented; estimation of contact resistance and boundary thermal conductance is also given.

  13. Effects of Doping on Thermal Conductivity of Pyrochlore Oxides for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    2006-01-01

    Pyrochlore oxides of general composition, A2B2O7, where A is a 3(+) cation (La to Lu) and B is a 4(+) cation (Zr, Hf, Ti, etc.) have high melting point, relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion, and low thermal conductivity which make them suitable for applications as high-temperature thermal barrier coatings. The effect of doping at the A site on the thermal conductivity of a pyrochlore oxide La2Zr2O7, has been investigated. Oxide powders of various compositions La2Zr2O7, La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 were synthesized by the citric acid sol-gel method. These powders were hot pressed into discs and used for thermal conductivity measurements using a steady-state laser heat flux test technique. The rare earth oxide doped pyrochlores La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 had lower thermal conductivity than the un-doped La2Zr2O7. The Gd2O3 and Yb2O3 co-doped composition showed the lowest thermal conductivity.

  14. Effect of thermal shield and gas flow on thermal elastic stresses in 300 mm silicon crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yu; XIAO Qinghua; ZHOU Qigang; DAI Xiaolin; TU Hailing

    2006-01-01

    The thermal elastic stresses induced in 300 mm Si crystal may be great troubles because it can incur the generation of dislocations and undesirable excessive residual stresses.A special thermal modeling tool, CrysVUn, was used for numerical analysis of thermal elastic stresses and stress distribution of 300 mm Si crystal under the consideration of different thermal shields and gas flow conditions.The adopted governing partial equations for stress calculation are Cauchy's first and second laws of motion.It is demonstrated that the presence and shape of thermal shield, the gas pressure and velocity can strongly affect von Mises stress distribution in Si crystal.With steep-wall shield, however, the maximal stress and ratio of high stress area are relatively low.With slope-wall shield or without shield, both maximal stress and ratio of high stress area are increased in evidence.Whether thermal shields are used or not, the increase of gas flow velocity could raise the stress level.In contrast, the increase of gas pressure cannot result in so significant effect.The influence of thermal shield and gas flow should be attributed to the modification of heat conduction and heat radiation by them.

  15. Thermal effects on quantum communication through spin chains

    CERN Document Server

    Bayat, A; Bayat, Abolfazl; Karimipour, Vahid

    2004-01-01

    We study the effect of thermal fluctuations in a recently proposed protocol for transmission of unknown quantum states through quantum spin chains. We develop a low temperature expansion for general spin chains. We then apply this formalism to study exactly thermal effects on short spin chains of four spins. We show that optimal times for extraction of output states are almost independent of the temperature which lowers only the fidelity of the channel. Moreover we show that thermal effects are smaller in the anti-ferromagnetic chains than the ferromagnetic ones.

  16. Laughlin's argument for the quantized thermal Hall effect

    CERN Document Server

    Nakai, Ryota; Nomura, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    We extend Laughlin's magnetic-flux-threading argument to the quantized thermal Hall effect. A proper analogue of Laughlin's adiabatic magnetic-flux threading process for the case of the thermal Hall effect is given in terms of an external gravitational field. From the perspective of the edge theories of quantum Hall systems, the quantized thermal Hall effect is closely tied to the breakdown of large diffeomorphism invariance, that is, a global gravitational anomaly. In addition, we also give an argument from the bulk perspective in which a free energy, decomposed into its Fourier modes, is adiabatically transferred under an adiabatic process involving external gravitational perturbations.

  17. Thermal Arrest Memory Effect in Ni-Mn-Ga Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rudajevova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dilatation characteristics were measured to investigate the thermal arrest memory effect in Ni53.6Mn27.1Ga19.3 and Ni54.2Mn29.4Ga16.4 alloys. Interruption of the martensite-austenite phase transformation is connected with the reduction of the sample length after thermal cycle. If a total phase transformation took place in the complete thermal cycle following the interruption, then the sample length would return to its original length. Analysis of these results has shown that the thermal arrest memory effect is a consequence of a stress-focusing effect and shape memory effect. The stress-focusing effect occurs when the phase transformation propagates radially in a cylindrical sample from the surface, inward to the center. Evolution and release of the thermoelastic deformations in both alloys during heating and cooling are analyzed.

  18. Microwave frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) produce widespread neuropsychiatric effects including depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pall, Martin L

    2016-09-01

    Non-thermal microwave/lower frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) act via voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) activation. Calcium channel blockers block EMF effects and several types of additional evidence confirm this mechanism. Low intensity microwave EMFs have been proposed to produce neuropsychiatric effects, sometimes called microwave syndrome, and the focus of this review is whether these are indeed well documented and consistent with the known mechanism(s) of action of such EMFs. VGCCs occur in very high densities throughout the nervous system and have near universal roles in release of neurotransmitters and neuroendocrine hormones. Soviet and Western literature shows that much of the impact of non-thermal microwave exposures in experimental animals occurs in the brain and peripheral nervous system, such that nervous system histology and function show diverse and substantial changes. These may be generated through roles of VGCC activation, producing excessive neurotransmitter/neuroendocrine release as well as oxidative/nitrosative stress and other responses. Excessive VGCC activity has been shown from genetic polymorphism studies to have roles in producing neuropsychiatric changes in humans. Two U.S. government reports from the 1970s to 1980s provide evidence for many neuropsychiatric effects of non-thermal microwave EMFs, based on occupational exposure studies. 18 more recent epidemiological studies, provide substantial evidence that microwave EMFs from cell/mobile phone base stations, excessive cell/mobile phone usage and from wireless smart meters can each produce similar patterns of neuropsychiatric effects, with several of these studies showing clear dose-response relationships. Lesser evidence from 6 additional studies suggests that short wave, radio station, occupational and digital TV antenna exposures may produce similar neuropsychiatric effects. Among the more commonly reported changes are sleep disturbance/insomnia, headache, depression

  19. Modeling thermal effects in braking systems of railway vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Miloš S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The modeling of thermal effects has become increasingly important in product design in different transport means, road vehicles, airplanes, railway vehicles, and so forth. The thermal analysis is a very important stage in the study of braking systems, especially of railway vehicles, where it is necessary to brake huge masses, because the thermal load of a braked railway wheel prevails compared to other types of loads. In the braking phase, kinetic energy transforms into thermal energy resulting in intense heating and high temperature states of railway wheels. Thus induced thermal loads determine thermomechanical behavior of the structure of railway wheels. In cases of thermal overloads, which mainly occur as a result of long-term braking on down-grade railroads, the generation of stresses and deformations occurs, whose consequences are the appearance of cracks on the rim of a wheel and the final total wheel defect. The importance to precisely determine the temperature distribution caused by the transfer process of the heat generated during braking due to the friction on contact surfaces of the braking system makes it a challenging research task. Therefore, the thermal analysis of a block-braked solid railway wheel of a 444 class locomotive of the national railway operator Serbian Railways is processed in detail in this paper, using analytical and numerical modeling of thermal effects during long-term braking for maintaining a constant speed on a down-grade railroad.

  20. Thermal annealing effects on vanadium pentoxide xerogel films

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    G. N. Barbosa; C. F.O. Graeff; H. P. Oliveira

    2005-01-01

    The effect of water molecules on the conductivity and electrochemical properties of vanadium pentoxide xerogel was studied in connection with changes of morphology upon thermal annealing at different temperatures...

  1. Effect of thermal fluctuations on a charged dilatonic black Saturn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourhassan, Behnam, E-mail: b.pourhassan@du.ac.ir [School of Physics, Damghan University, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faizal, Mir, E-mail: f2mir@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4 (Canada)

    2016-04-10

    In this paper, we will analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of a charged dilatonic black Saturn. These thermal fluctuations will correct the thermodynamics of the charged dilatonic black Saturn. We will analyze the corrections to the thermodynamics of this system by first relating the fluctuations in the entropy to the fluctuations in the energy. Then, we will use the relation between entropy and a conformal field theory to analyze the fluctuations in the entropy. We will demonstrate that similar physical results are obtained from both these approaches. We will also study the effect of thermal fluctuations on the phase transition in this charged dilatonic black Saturn.

  2. Effect of thermal fluctuations on a charged dilatonic black Saturn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Pourhassan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we will analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of a charged dilatonic black Saturn. These thermal fluctuations will correct the thermodynamics of the charged dilatonic black Saturn. We will analyze the corrections to the thermodynamics of this system by first relating the fluctuations in the entropy to the fluctuations in the energy. Then, we will use the relation between entropy and a conformal field theory to analyze the fluctuations in the entropy. We will demonstrate that similar physical results are obtained from both these approaches. We will also study the effect of thermal fluctuations on the phase transition in this charged dilatonic black Saturn.

  3. Geometric doppler effect: spin-split dispersion of thermal radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Nir; Gorodetski, Yuri; Frischwasser, Kobi; Kleiner, Vladimir; Hasman, Erez

    2010-09-24

    A geometric Doppler effect manifested by a spin-split dispersion relation of thermal radiation is observed. A spin-dependent dispersion splitting was obtained in a structure consisting of a coupled thermal antenna array. The effect is due to a spin-orbit interaction resulting from the dynamics of the surface waves propagating along the structure whose local anisotropy axis is rotated in space. The observation of the spin-symmetry breaking in thermal radiation may be utilized for manipulation of spontaneous or stimulated emission.

  4. Effect of Thermal Fluctuations on a Charged Dilatonic Black Saturn

    CERN Document Server

    Pourhassan, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we will analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of a charged dilatonic black Saturn. These thermal fluctuations will correct the thermodynamics of the charged dilatonic black Saturn. We will analyze the corrections to the thermodynamics of this system by first relating the fluctuations in the entropy to the fluctuations in the energy. Then, we will use the relation between entropy and a conformal field theory to analyze the fluctuations in the entropy. We will demonstrate that similar physical results are obtained from both these approaches. We will also study the effect of thermal fluctuations on the phase transition in this charged dilatonic black Saturn.

  5. The thermal maturation degree of organic matter from source rocks revealed by wells logs including examples from Murzuk Basin, Libya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negoita, V.; Gheorghe, A.

    1995-08-01

    The customary technique used to know the organic matter quantity per rock volume it as well as the organic matter maturation stage is based on geochemical analyses accomplished on a preselected number of samples and cuttings drawn from boreholes during the drilling period. But the same objectives can be approached without any extra cost using the continuous measurements of well logs recorded in each well from the ground surface to the total depth. During the diagenetic stage, the identification of potential source rocks out of which no hydrocarbon have been generated may be carried out using a well logging suite including Gamma Ray Spectrometry, the Compensated Neutron/Litho Density combination and a Dual Induction/Sonic Log. During the catagenetic stage the onset of oil generation brings some important changes in the organic matter structure as well as in the fluid distribution throughout the pore space of source rocks. The replacement of electric conductive water by electric non-conductive hydrocarbons, together with water and oil being expelled from source rocks represent a process of different intensities dependent of time/temperature geohistory and kerogen type. The different generation and expulsion scenarios of hydrocarbons taking place during the catagenetic and metagenetic stages of source rocks are very well revealed by Induction and Laterolog investigations. Several crossplots relating vitrinite reflectance, total organic carbon and log-derived physical parameters are illustrated and discussed. The field applications are coming from Murzuk Basin, where Rompetrol of Libya is operating.

  6. High Bypass Ratio Jet Noise Reduction and Installation Effects Including Shielding Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Czech, Michael J.; Doty, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to study the propulsion airframe aeroacoustic installation effects of a separate flow jet nozzle with a Hybrid Wing Body aircraft configuration where the engine is installed above the wing. Prior understanding of the jet noise shielding effectiveness was extended to a bypass ratio ten application as a function of nozzle configuration, chevron type, axial spacing, and installation effects from additional airframe components. Chevron types included fan chevrons that are uniform circumferentially around the fan nozzle and T-fan type chevrons that are asymmetrical circumferentially. In isolated testing without a pylon, uniform chevrons compared to T-fan chevrons showed slightly more low frequency reduction offset by more high frequency increase. Phased array localization shows that at this bypass ratio chevrons still move peak jet noise source locations upstream but not to nearly the extent, as a function of frequency, as for lower bypass ratio jets. For baseline nozzles without chevrons, the basic pylon effect has been greatly reduced compared to that seen for lower bypass ratio jets. Compared to Tfan chevrons without a pylon, the combination with a standard pylon results in more high frequency noise increase and an overall higher noise level. Shielded by an airframe surface 2.17 fan diameters from nozzle to airframe trailing edge, the T-fan chevron nozzle can produce reductions in jet noise of as much as 8 dB at high frequencies and upstream angles. Noise reduction from shielding decreases with decreasing frequency and with increasing angle from the jet inlet. Beyond an angle of 130 degrees there is almost no noise reduction from shielding. Increasing chevron immersion more than what is already an aggressive design is not advantageous for noise reduction. The addition of airframe control surfaces, including vertical stabilizers and elevon deflection, showed only a small overall impact. Based on the test results, the best

  7. Dynamic nonlinear thermal optical effects in coupled ring resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenguang Huang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the dynamic nonlinear thermal optical effects in a photonic system of two coupled ring resonators. A bus waveguide is used to couple light in and out of one of the coupled resonators. Based on the coupling from the bus to the resonator, the coupling between the resonators and the intrinsic loss of each individual resonator, the system transmission spectrum can be classified by three different categories: coupled-resonator-induced absorption, coupled-resonator-induced transparency and over coupled resonance splitting. Dynamic thermal optical effects due to linear absorption have been analyzed for each category as a function of the input power. The heat power in each resonator determines the thermal dynamics in this coupled resonator system. Multiple “shark fins” and power competition between resonators can be foreseen. Also, the nonlinear absorption induced thermal effects have been discussed.

  8. Detecting Thermal Cloaks via Transient Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklan, Sophia R.; Bai, Xue; Li, Baowen; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Recent research on the development of a thermal cloak has concentrated on engineering an inhomogeneous thermal conductivity and an approximate, homogeneous volumetric heat capacity. While the perfect cloak of inhomogeneous κ and inhomogeneous ρcp is known to be exact (no signals scattering and only mean values penetrating to the cloak’s interior), the sensitivity of diffusive cloaks to defects and approximations has not been analyzed. We analytically demonstrate that these approximate cloaks are detectable. Although they work as perfect cloaks in the steady-state, their transient (time-dependent) response is imperfect and a small amount of heat is scattered. This is sufficient to determine the presence of a cloak and any heat source it contains, but the material composition hidden within the cloak is not detectable in practice. To demonstrate the feasibility of this technique, we constructed a cloak with similar approximation and directly detected its presence using these transient temperature deviations outside the cloak. Due to limitations in the range of experimentally accessible volumetric specific heats, our detection scheme should allow us to find any realizable cloak, assuming a sufficiently large temperature difference. PMID:27605153

  9. Detecting Thermal Cloaks via Transient Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklan, Sophia R.; Bai, Xue; Li, Baowen; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-09-01

    Recent research on the development of a thermal cloak has concentrated on engineering an inhomogeneous thermal conductivity and an approximate, homogeneous volumetric heat capacity. While the perfect cloak of inhomogeneous κ and inhomogeneous ρcp is known to be exact (no signals scattering and only mean values penetrating to the cloak’s interior), the sensitivity of diffusive cloaks to defects and approximations has not been analyzed. We analytically demonstrate that these approximate cloaks are detectable. Although they work as perfect cloaks in the steady-state, their transient (time-dependent) response is imperfect and a small amount of heat is scattered. This is sufficient to determine the presence of a cloak and any heat source it contains, but the material composition hidden within the cloak is not detectable in practice. To demonstrate the feasibility of this technique, we constructed a cloak with similar approximation and directly detected its presence using these transient temperature deviations outside the cloak. Due to limitations in the range of experimentally accessible volumetric specific heats, our detection scheme should allow us to find any realizable cloak, assuming a sufficiently large temperature difference.

  10. Effects of anisotropic thermal conductivity in magnetohydrodynamics simulations of a reversed-field pinch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofri, M; Malara, F; Veltri, P

    2010-11-19

    A compressible magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the reversed-field pinch is performed including anisotropic thermal conductivity. When the thermal conductivity is much larger in the direction parallel to the magnetic field than in the perpendicular direction, magnetic field lines become isothermal. As a consequence, as long as magnetic surfaces exist, a temperature distribution is observed displaying a hotter confined region, while an almost uniform temperature is produced when the magnetic field lines become chaotic. To include this effect in the numerical simulation, we use a multiple-time-scale analysis, which allows us to reproduce the effect of a large parallel thermal conductivity. The resulting temperature distribution is related to the existence of closed magnetic surfaces, as observed in experiments. The magnetic field is also affected by the presence of an anisotropic thermal conductivity.

  11. Effect of interfacial treatment on the thermal properties of thermal conductive plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, ZnO, which is processed by different surface treatment approaches, is blended together with polypropylene to produce thermal conductive polymer composites. The composites are analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM to investigate the surface modification of filler, their distribution in the matrix and the condition of two-phase interface. Optimized content of filler surface modifier is investigated as well. The results showed that using low-molecular coupling agent produces positive effect to improve the interface adhesion between filler and matrix, and the thermal conductivity of the composite as well. Macro-molecular coupling agent can strongly improve two-phase interface, but it is not beneficial at obtaining a high thermal conductivity. The blend of ZnO without modification and polypropylene has many defects in the two-phase interface, and the thermal conductivity of the composite is between those of composites produced by previous two approaches. The surface treatment of the filler also allowed producing the composites with lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE. As for the content of low-molecular coupling agent, it obtains the best effect at 1.5 wt%.

  12. Thermal aging effects in refractory metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Joseph R.

    1987-01-01

    The alloys of niobium and tantalum are attractive from a strength and compatibility viewpoint for high operating temperatures required in materials for fuel cladding, liquid metal transfer, and heat pipe applications in space power systems that will supply from 100 kWe to multi-megawatts for advanced space systems. To meet the system requirements, operating temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1600 K have been proposed. Expected lives of these space power systems are from 7 to 10 yr. A program is conducted at NASA Lewis to determine the effects of long-term, high-temperature exposure on the microstructural stability of several commercial tantalum and niobium alloys. Variables studied in the investigation include alloy composition, pre-age annealing temperature, aging time, temperature, and environment (lithium or vacuum), welding, and hydrogen doping. Alloys are investigated by means of cryogenic bend tests and tensile tests. Results show that the combination of tungsten and hafnium or zirconium found in commercial alloys such as T-111 and Cb-752 can lead to aging embrittlement and increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of ternary and more complex alloys. Modification of alloy composition helps to eliminate the embrittlement problem.

  13. Effects of thermal boundary conditions on the joule heating of electrolyte in a microchannel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Y ABDOLLAHZADEH JAMALABADI; J H PARK; M M RASHIDI; J M CHEN

    2016-01-01

    Joule heating effects on a slit microchannel filled with electrolytes are comprehensively investigated with emphasis on the thermal boundary conditions. An accurate analytical expression is proposed for the electrical field and the temperature distributions due to Joule heating are numerically obtained from the energy balance equation. The results show that a thermal design based on the average electric potential difference between electrodes can cause severe underestimation of Joule heating. In addition, the parame- tric study of thermal boundary conditions gives us an insight into the best cooling scenario for microfluidic devices. Other significant thermal characteristics, including Nusselt number, thermophoretic force, and entropy generation, are discussed as well. This study will provide useful information for the optimization of a bioMEMS device in relation to the thermal aspect.

  14. Effect of Moisture Content on Thermal Properties of Porous Building Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kočí, Václav; Vejmelková, Eva; Čáchová, Monika; Koňáková, Dana; Keppert, Martin; Maděra, Jiří; Černý, Robert

    2017-02-01

    The thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity of characteristic types of porous building materials are determined in the whole range of moisture content from dry to fully water-saturated state. A transient pulse technique is used in the experiments, in order to avoid the influence of moisture transport on measured data. The investigated specimens include cement composites, ceramics, plasters, and thermal insulation boards. The effect of moisture-induced changes in thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity on the energy performance of selected building envelopes containing the studied materials is then analyzed using computational modeling of coupled heat and moisture transport. The results show an increased moisture content as a substantial negative factor affecting both thermal properties of materials and energy balance of envelopes, which underlines the necessity to use moisture-dependent thermal parameters of building materials in energy-related calculations.

  15. Thermal Hall Effect of Spin Excitations in a Kagome Magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschberger, Max; Chisnell, Robin; Lee, Young S; Ong, N P

    2015-09-04

    At low temperatures, the thermal conductivity of spin excitations in a magnetic insulator can exceed that of phonons. However, because they are charge neutral, the spin waves are not expected to display a thermal Hall effect. However, in the kagome lattice, theory predicts that the Berry curvature leads to a thermal Hall conductivity κ(xy). Here we report observation of a large κ(xy) in the kagome magnet Cu(1-3, bdc) which orders magnetically at 1.8 K. The observed κ(xy) undergoes a remarkable sign reversal with changes in temperature or magnetic field, associated with sign alternation of the Chern flux between magnon bands. The close correlation between κ(xy) and κ(xx) firmly precludes a phonon origin for the thermal Hall effect.

  16. Determining Effective Thermal Conductivity of Fabrics by Using Fractal Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fanglong; Li, Kejing

    2010-03-01

    In this article, a fractal effective thermal conductivity model for woven fabrics with multiple layers is developed. Structural models of yarn and plain woven fabric are derived based on the fractal characteristics of macro-pores (gap or channel) between the yarns and micro-pores inside the yarns. The fractal effective thermal conductivity model can be expressed as a function of the pore structure (fractal dimension) and architectural parameters of the woven fabric. Good agreement is found between the fractal model and the thermal conductivity measurements in the general porosity ranges. It is expected that the model will be helpful in the evaluation of thermal comfort for woven fabric in the whole range of porosity.

  17. Electric field effects in combustion with non-thermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Tiernan Albert

    Chemically reacting zones such as flames act as sources of charged species and can thus be considered as weakly-ionized plasmas. As such, the action of an externally applied electric field has the potential to affect the dynamics of reaction zones by enhancing transport, altering the local chemical composition, activating reaction pathways, and by providing additional thermal energy through the interaction of electrons with neutral molecules. To investigate these effects, one-dimensional simulations of reacting flows are performed including the treatment of charged species transport and non-thermal electron chemistry using a modified reacting fluid solver. A particular area of interest is that of plasma assisted ignition, which is investigated in a canonical one-dimensional configuration. An incipient ignition kernel, formed by localized energy deposition into a lean mixture of methane and air at atmospheric pressure, is subjected to sub-breakdown electric fields by applied voltages across the domain, resulting in non-thermal behavior of the electron sub-fluid formed during the discharge. Strong electric fields cause charged species to be rapidly transported from the ignition zone across the domain in opposite directions as charge fronts, augmenting the magnitude of the electric field in the fresh gas during the pulse through a dynamic-electrode effect. This phenomenon results in an increase in the energy of the electrons in the fresh mixture with increasing time, accelerating electron impact dissociation processes. A semi-analytic model to represent this dynamic electrode effect is constructed to highlight the relative simplicity of the electrodynamic problem admitted by the far more detailed chemistry and transport. Enhanced fuel and oxidizer decomposition due to electron impact dissociation and interaction with excited neutrals generate a pool of radicals, mostly O and H, in the fresh gas ahead of the flame's preheat zone. The effect of nanosecond pulses are to

  18. Atomic-scale friction : thermal effects and capillary condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jinesh, Kochupurackal Balakrishna Pillai

    2006-01-01

    This work entitled as "Atomic-scale friction: thermal effects and capillary condensation" is a study on the fundamental aspects of the origin of friction from the atomic-scale. We study two realistic aspects of atomic-scale friction, namely the effect of temperature and the effect of relative humidi

  19. Thermal-inertial effects on magnetic reconnection in relativistic pair plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comisso, Luca; Asenjo, Felipe A

    2014-07-25

    The magnetic reconnection process is studied in relativistic pair plasmas when the thermal and inertial properties of the magnetohydrodynamical fluid are included. We find that in both Sweet-Parker and Petschek relativistic scenarios there is an increase of the reconnection rate owing to the thermal-inertial effects, both satisfying causality. To characterize the new effects we define a thermal-inertial number which is independent of the relativistic Lundquist number, implying that reconnection can be achieved even for vanishing resistivity as a result of only thermal-inertial effects. The current model has fundamental importance for relativistic collisionless reconnection, as it constitutes the simplest way to get reconnection rates faster than those accessible with the sole resistivity.

  20. State-space modelling for heater induced thermal effects on LISA Pathfinder's Test Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Gibert, Ferran; Diaz-Aguiló, Marc; Lobo, Alberto; Karnesis, Nikolaos; Mateos, Ignacio; Sanjuán, Josep; Lloro, Ivan; Gesa, Lluís; Martín, Víctor; 10.1088/1742-6596/363/1/012044

    2012-01-01

    The OSE (Offline Simulations Environment) simulator of the LPF (LISA Pathfinder) mission is intended to simulate the different experiments to be carried out in flight. Amongst these, the thermal diagnostics experiments are intended to relate thermal disturbances and interferometer readouts, thereby allowing the subtraction of thermally induced interferences from the interferometer channels. In this paper we report on the modelling of these simulated experiments, including the parametrisation of different thermal effects (radiation pressure effect, radiometer effect) that will appear in the Inertial Sensor environment of the LTP (LISA Technology Package). We report as well how these experiments are going to be implemented in the LTPDA toolbox, which is a dedicated tool for LPF data analysis that will allow full traceability and reproducibility of the analysis thanks to complete recording of the processes.

  1. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Insulating Material made from Recycled Newspapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Etsuro; Takahashi, Kaneko; Sato, Mitsuo; Ishii, Yukihiro

    In this paper, the experimental results are represented on the effective thermal conductivity of cellulose insulation powder which is made from recycled newspapers. This insulating material is useful for energy and resources saving. The steady state cylindrical absolute method is employed by considering the accuracy of measurement. The experimental results are compared with the ones measured previously by other methods. The main results obtained are as follows (1) The effective thermal conductivity of this insulating material increases with increasing temperature and effective specific density, respectively. But, these increasing rate is not so large. (2) The effective thermal conductivity is about 0.04-0.06[W/mK] at the range of the effective specific density less than 100 [kg/m3]. This value is comparable with other industrial insulating materials.

  2. Thermal Stresses in a Cylinder Block Casting Due to Coupled Thermal and Mechanical Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yan; KANG Jinwu; HUANG Tianyou; HU Yongyi

    2008-01-01

    Thermal stress in castings results from nonuniform cooling. The thermal stress and the deforma-tion can change the casting and mold contact conditions which then alter the heat transfer between the cast-ing and the mold. The contact element method was used to study the interaction between a sand mold and a casting. The contact status was then fed back to the heat transfer analysis between the sand mold and the casting to re-evaluate the heat transfer coefficient based on the gap size or pressure between surfaces. The thermal and mechanical phenomena are then coupled in two directions. The method was applied to analyze stress in a stress frame specimen casting and a cylinder block. The results are more accurate than without consideration of the contact effects on the heat transfer.

  3. Effects of Thermal Exposure on Structures of DD6 Single Crystal Superalloy with Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DONG Jianmin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of water grit-blasting and high temperature thermal exposure on the microstructures of DD6 alloy with TBCs, DD6 single crystal superalloy specimens were water grit-blasted with 0.3 MPa pressure, then the specimens were coated with thermal barrier coatings by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD. Specimens with TBCs were exposed at 1100℃ for 50 and 100 hours in the air respectively, and then these specimens were subjected to stress-rupture tests under the condition of 1100℃/130 MPa. The results show that grit-blasting doesn't lead into the recrystallization, thermal exposure can induce element interdiffusion between the bond coat and alloy substrate, the residual stress and element diffusion lead into the changes of γ' phase coarsing direction. After stress rupture tests, the secondary reaction zone emerges into a local area.

  4. Review of interfacial layer's effect on thermal conductivity in nanofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotia, Ankit; Borkakoti, Sheeba; Deval, Piyush; Ghosh, Subrata Kumar

    2017-01-01

    An ordered liquid layer around the particle-liquid interface is called as interfacial layer. It has been observed that interfacial layer is an essential parameter for determining the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids. The review attempts to summarize the prominent articles related to interfacial layer effect on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids. First section of the paper discusses about various experimental approaches used to describe the effect of interfacial layer. Second section deals with about the mathematical models and assumed values regarding the thickness of interfacial layer by several authors. A review of previous works featuring mathematical investigations and experimental approaches seem to be suggesting that, interfacial layer have dominating effect on the effective thermal conductivity of the nanofluids. Third section of the paper deals with various mathematical models available in open literature for interfacial layer thermal conductivity. In the last section, models for effective thermal conductivity of the nanofluids considering the interfacial layer and percentage deviations in the predictions of mathematical models have been discussed.

  5. Modeling of thermal spin transport and spin-orbit effects in ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic mesoscopic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slachter, Abraham; Bakker, Frank Lennart; van Wees, Bart Jan

    2011-01-01

    In this article we extend the currently established diffusion theory of spin-dependent electrical conduction by including spin-dependent thermoelectricity and thermal transport. Using this theory, we propose experiments aimed at demonstrating novel effects such as the spin-Peltier effect, the recipr

  6. Thermal effects of radiation from cellular telephones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Peter

    2000-08-01

    A finite element thermal model of the head has been developed to calculate temperature rises generated in the brain by radiation from cellular telephones and similar electromagnetic devices. A 1 mm resolution MRI dataset was segmented semiautomatically, assigning each volume element to one of ten tissue types. A finite element mesh was then generated using a fully automatic tetrahedral mesh generator developed at NRPB. There are two sources of heat in the model: firstly the natural metabolic heat production; and secondly the power absorbed from the electromagnetic field. The SAR was derived from a finite difference time domain model of the head, coupled to a model `mobile phone', namely a quarter-wavelength antenna mounted on a metal box. The steady-state temperature distribution was calculated using the standard Pennes `bioheat equation'. In the normal cerebral cortex the high blood perfusion rate serves to provide an efficient cooling mechanism. In the case of equipment generally available to the public, the maximum temperature rise found in the brain was about 0.1 °C. These results will help in the further development of criteria for exposure guidelines, and the technique developed may be used to assess temperature rises associated with SARs for different types of RF exposure.

  7. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, W. P.; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S. and others

    2005-02-15

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform various integral effect tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. During the first phase of this project (1997.8{approx}2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished: a full-height, 1/300-volume-scaled full pressure facility for APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor that was developed by Korean industry. Main objectives of the present phase (2002.4{approx}2005.2), was to optimize the facility design and to construct the experimental facility. We have performed following researches: 1) Optimization of the basic design of the thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for PWRs - ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) - Reduced height design for APR1400 (+ specific design features of KSNP safety injection systems) - Thermal-hydraulic scaling based on three-level scaling methodology by Ishii et al. 2) Construction of the ATLAS facility - Detailed design of the test facility - Manufacturing and procurement of components - Installation of the facility 3) Development of supporting technology for integral effect tests - Development and application of advanced instrumentation technology - Preliminary analysis of test scenarios - Development of experimental procedures - Establishment and implementation of QA system/procedure.

  8. Effect of thermal treatments on arsenic species contents in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devesa, V; Vélez, D; Montoro, R

    2008-01-01

    In arsenic-endemic and other areas, food is an important path of exposure to this contaminant. Food is generally consumed in processed form, after a preservation treatment or cooking, which may alter the concentrations and chemical forms of arsenic. This article summarizes and discusses the work so far published on the effect that thermal treatment used in the cooking or processing of food, including sterilization and preservation stages, has on total arsenic and arsenic species contents. It also reviews possible transformations in arsenic species. The studies included use model systems or food products of marine or vegetable origin. Processing may cause a considerable increase or decrease in the real arsenic intake from food. For example, traditional washing and soaking of Hizikia fusiforme seaweed, which has very high inorganic arsenic contents, may reduce the contents by up to 60%. On the other hand, all the arsenic present in cooking water may be retained during boiling of rice, increasing the contents of this metalloid to significant levels from a toxicological viewpoint. This calls for modifications in arsenic risk assessment, hitherto based on analysis of the raw product. It is necessary to consider the effect of processing on total arsenic and arsenical species in order to obtain a realistic view of the risk associated with intake in arsenic-endemic and other areas.

  9. Analysis and Experimental on Aircraft Insulation Thermal Bridge Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XIA Tian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Two kinds of typical aircraft insulation structures were designed for the heat bridge in the metal ribs of aircraft insulation structures. In order to study the influence of heat bridge effect on thermal insulation performance, each configuration was analyzed by the transient heat transfer FEA, check point temperature was obtained in the hot surface temperature of 100 ℃, 200 ℃, 300 ℃, 424 ℃ respectively, and the validity of FEA was proved by insulation performance experiment. The result showed that the thermal bridge has a great influence to the insulation performance of insulation structure, and the thermal bridge influence should be considered adequately when the insulation structure designed. Additionally, the blocking method for thermal bridge is also put forward.

  10. Effect of secondary weld thermal cycle on structure and properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with structure and impact energy of weld HAZ of 10CrNi3MoV steel after secondary weld thermal cycle (t8/5=8(¨)s~120(¨)s; peak temperature Tm=750℃~1(¨)300℃). It is demonstrated that the coarse grain and structure produced by first thermal cycle keep unchanged after secondary thermal cycle above Ac1 critical temperature but below 1(¨)050(¨)℃. At the same time the low temperature impact energy decreases obviously with increasing t8/5. By metallurgical microscope and transmission electron microscope(TEM) , it is revealed that the effect of coarse grain and structure caused by secondary thermal cycle on low temperature impact energy.

  11. Thermal imaging of spin Peltier effect

    OpenAIRE

    Daimon, Shunsuke; Iguchi, Ryo; Hioki, Tomosato; Saitoh, Eiji; Uchida, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    When a charge current is applied to a junction comprising two different conductors, its temperature increases or decreases depending on the direction of the charge current. This phenomenon is called the Peltier effect, which is used in solid-state heat pumps and temperature controllers in electronics. Recently, in spintronics, a spin counterpart of the Peltier effect was observed. The "spin Peltier effect" modulates the temperature of a magnetic junction depending on the direction of a spin c...

  12. NOUR. Daylighting and thermal effects of windows in desert houses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouahrani, Djamel

    1999-07-01

    This study is on a combined effect of window, the daylighting and the thermal effects, in desert houses. It is comprised of two complementary studies. In the introduction a historical review on the development of using daylight has been carried out in order to place the case study in a historical perspective. The first study is comprehensive and contains two main parts. In the first part a study was carried out on the people and history of the town of Ghardaia in Southern Algeria. This was done in order to understand the architectural form of that region. The second part is experimental and consists of two field studies carried out in Ghardaia. Their aim was to investigate the influence of daylight and temperature on the use of residential houses. This investigation included both traditional and 'modern' houses, the modern having relatively large windows similar to those of the northern part of Algeria, the traditional ones having small or no windows. The second study is also experimental consisting of computer parametric studies on window design from two standpoints, namely daylighting level and thermal effects of windows in desert houses. A typical traditional house is described as it was observed. Then the recorded light values are presented and commented upon. In the second part, three types of modern houses observed in the field studies are presented and compared to the traditional archetype. The comparison especially dwells on the relative effectiveness of the two systems of daylighting. In the third part, focusing on various issues of lighting, the results of interviews with the inhabitants are presented. The historical studies indicate that the process of housing development, in several respects, has reached a certain quality (social, technology, and adaptation to climate) appropriate to the local original context, but that development has slowed down. The results of the lighting study indicate that the use of more windows in modern houses

  13. Thermal effects on photon-induced quantum transport in a single quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, M O; de Oliveira, E J R; Villas-Bôas, J M; Souza, F M

    2013-04-03

    We theoretically investigate laser induced quantum transport in a single quantum dot attached to electrical contacts. Our approach, based on a nonequilibrium Green function technique, allows us to include thermal effects on the photon-induced quantum transport and excitonic dynamics, enabling the study of non-Markovian effects. By solving a set of coupled integrodifferential equations, involving correlation and propagator functions, we obtain the photocurrent and the dot occupation as a function of time. Two distinct sources of decoherence, namely, incoherent tunneling and thermal fluctuations, are observed in the Rabi oscillations. As temperature increases, a thermally activated Pauli blockade results in a suppression of these oscillations. Additionally, the interplay between photon and thermally induced electron populations results in a switch of the current sign as time evolves and its stationary value can be maximized by tuning the laser intensity.

  14. Evaluation of thermal effects on the beam quality of disk laser with unstable resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayganmanesh, Mahdi; Beirami, Reza

    2017-01-01

    In this paper thermal effects of the disk active medium and associated effects on the beam quality of laser are investigated. Using Collins integral and iterative method, transverse mode of an unstable resonator including a Yb:YAG active medium in disk geometry is calculated. After that the beam quality of the laser is calculated based on the generalized beam characterization method. Thermal lensing of the disk is calculated based on the OPD (Optical Path Difference) concept. Five factors influencing the OPD including temperature gradient, disk thermal expansion, photo-elastic effect, electronic lens and disk deformation are considered in our calculations. The calculations show that the effect of disk deformation factor on the quality of laser beam in the resonator is strong. However the total effect of all the thermal factors on the internal beam quality is fewer. Also it is shown that thermal effects degrade the output power, beam profile and beam quality of the output laser beam severely. As well the magnitude of each of affecting factors is evaluated distinctly.

  15. Thermal hydraulics of rod bundles: The effect of eccentricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Amit K., E-mail: amit_fmlab@yahoo.co.in [Fluid Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Prasad, B.V.S.S.S., E-mail: prasad@iitm.ac.in [Thermal Turbomachines Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Patnaik, B.S.V., E-mail: bsvp@iitm.ac.in [Fluid Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Present CFD investigation explores, whole bundle eccentricity for the first time. • Fluid flow and thermal characteristics in various subchannels are analyzed. • Mass flux distribution is particularly analyzed to study eccentricity effect. • Higher eccentricity resulted in a shoot up in rod surface temperature distribution. • Both tangential and radial flow in rod bundles has resulted due to eccentricity. -- Abstract: The effect of eccentricity on the fluid flow and heat transfer through a 19-rod bundle is numerically carried out. When the whole bundle shifts downwards with respect to the outer (pressure) tube, flow redistribution happens. This in turn is responsible for changes in mass flux, pressure and differential flow development in various subchannels. The heat flux imposed on the surface of the fuel rods and the mass flux through the subchannels determines the coolant outlet temperatures. The simulations are performed for a coolant flow Reynolds number of 4 × 10{sup 5}. For an eccentricity value of 0.7, the mass flux in the bottom most subchannel (l) was found to decrease by 10%, while the surface temperature of the fuel rod in the vicinity of this subchannel increased by 250% at the outlet section. Parameters of engineering interest including skin friction coefficient, Nusselt number, etc., have been systematically explored to study the effect of eccentricity on the rod bundle.

  16. The effect of various cosmetic pretreatments on protecting hair from thermal damage by hot flat ironing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y; Rigoletto, R; Koelmel, D; Zhang, G; Gillece, T W; Foltis, L; Moore, D J; Qu, X; Sun, C

    2011-01-01

    Hot flat irons are used to create straight hair styles. As these devices operate at temperatures over 200 °C they can cause significant damage to hair keratin. In this study, hair thermal damage and the effect of various polymeric pretreatments were investigated using FTIR imaging spectroscopy, DSC, dynamic vapor sorption (DVS), AFM, SEM, and thermal image analysis. FTIR imaging spectroscopy of hair cross sections provides spatially resolved molecular information such as protein distribution and structure. This approach was used to monitor thermally induced modification of hair protein, including the conversion of α-helix to β-sheet and protein degradation. DSC measurements of thermally treated hair also demonstrated degradation of hair keratin. DVS of thermally treated hair shows the reduced water regain and lower water retention, compared to the non-thermally treated hair, which might be attributed to the protein conformation changes due to heat damage. The protection of native protein structure associated with selected polymer pretreatments leads to improved moisture restoration and water retention of hair. This contributes to heat control on repeated hot flat ironing. Thermally stressing hair led to significantly increased hair breakage when subjected to combing. These studies indicate that hair breakage can be reduced significantly when hair is pretreated with selected polymers such as VP/acrylates/lauryl methacrylate copolymer, polyquaternium-55, and a polyelectrolyte complex of PVM/MA copolymer and polyquaternium-28. In addition, polymeric pretreatments provide thermal protection against thermal degradation of keratin in the cortex as well as hair surface damage. The morphological improvement in cuticle integrity and smoothness with the polymer pretreatment plays an important role in their anti-breakage effect. Insights into structure-property relationships necessary to provide thermal protection to hair are presented.

  17. Determination of effective thermal expansion coefficients of unidirectional fibrous nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ming; Schiavone, Peter; Gao, Cun-Fa

    2016-10-01

    We present an efficient numerical scheme (based on complex variable techniques) to calculate the effective thermal expansion coefficients of a composite containing unidirectional periodic fibers. Moreover, the mechanical behavior of the fibers incorporates interface effects allowing the ensuing analytical model of the composite to accommodate deformations at the nanoscale. The resulting `nanocomposite' is subjected to a uniform temperature variation which leads to periodic deformations within the plane perpendicular to the fibers and uniform deformations along the direction of the fibers. These deformation fields are determined by analyzing a representative unit cell of the composite subsequently leading to the corresponding effective thermal expansion coefficients. Numerical results are illustrated via several physical examples. We find that the influence of interface effects on the effective thermal expansion coefficients (in particular that corresponding to the transverse direction in the plane perpendicular to the fibers) decays rapidly as the fibers become harder. In addition, by comparing the results obtained here with those from effective medium theories, we show that the latter may induce significant errors in the determination of the effective transverse thermal expansion coefficient when the fibers are much softer than the matrix and the fiber volume fraction is relatively high.

  18. Absence of the Thermal Hall Effect in Anomalous Nernst and Spin Seebeck Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Jia; Huang, Ssu-Yen

    2016-12-01

    The anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) and the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) in spin caloritronics are two of the most important mechanisms to manipulate the spin-polarized current and pure spin current by thermal excitation. While the ANE in ferromagnetic metals and the SSE in magnetic insulators have been extensively studied, a recent theoretical work suggests that the signals from the thermal Hall effect (THE) have field dependences indistinguishable from, and may even overwhelm, those of the ANE and SSE. Therefore, it is vital to investigate the contribution of the THE in the ANE and SSE. In this work, we systematically study the THE in a ferromagnetic metal, Permalloy (Py), and magnetic insulator, an yttrium iron garnet (YIG), by using different Seebeck coefficients between electrodes and contact wires. Our results demonstrate that the contribution of the THE by the thermal couple effect in the Py and YIG is negligibly small if one includes the thickness dependence of the Seebeck coefficient. Thus, the spin-polarized current in the ANE and the pure spin current in the SSE remain indispensable for exploring spin caloritronics phenomena.

  19. Lunar Dust Contamination Effects on Lunar Base Thermal Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, John R.; Ewert, Michael K.

    2000-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted to develop a thermal control system that can operate under the extreme thermal environments found on the lunar surface. While these proposed heat rejection systems use different methods to reject heat, each system contains a similar component, a thermal radiator system. These studies have always considered pristine thermal control system components and have overlooked the possible deleterious effects of lunar dust contamination. Since lunar dust has a high emissivity and absorptivity (greater than 0.9) and is opaque, dust accumulation on a surface should radically alter its optical properties and therefore alter its thermal response compared to ideal conditions. In addition, the non-specular nature of the dust particles will alter the performance of systems that employ specular surfaces to enhance heat rejection. To date, few studies have examined the effect of dust deposition on the normal control system components. These studies only focused on a single heat rejection or photovoltaic system. These studies did show that lunar dust accumulations alter the optical properties of any lunar base hardware, which in turn affects component temperatures, and heat rejection. Therefore, a new study was conducted to determine the effect of lunar dust contamination on heat rejection systems. For this study, a previously developed dust deposition model was incorporated into the Thermal Synthesizer System (TSS) model. This modeling scheme incorporates the original method of predicting dust accumulation due to vehicle landings by assuming that the thin dust layer can be treated as a semitransparent surface slightly above and in thermal contact with the pristine surface. The results of this study showed that even small amounts of dust deposits can radically alter the performance of the heat rejection systems. Furthermore. this study indicates that heat rejection systems be either located far from any landing sites or be protected from dust

  20. Coupled flexural-torsional vibration band gap in periodic beam including warping effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Jian-Yu; Yu Dian-Long; Han Xiao-Yun; Cai Li

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of coupled flexural-torsional vibration in the periodic beam including warping effect is investigated with the transfer matrix theory.The band structures of the periodic beam,both including warping effect and ignoring warping effect,are obtained.The frequency response function of the finite periodic beams is simulated with finite element method,which shows large vibration attenuation in the frequency range of the gap as expected.The effect of warping stiffness on the band structure is studied and it is concluded that substantial error can be produced in high frequency range if the effect is ignored.The result including warping effect agrees quite well with the simulated result.

  1. Investigating the thermally induced acoustoelastic effect in isotropic media with Lamb waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Jacob C; Inman, Daniel J

    2014-11-01

    Elastic wave velocities in metallic structures are affected by variations in environmental conditions such as changing temperature. This paper extends the theory of acoustoelasticity by allowing thermally induced strains in unconstrained isotropic media, and it experimentally examines the velocity variation of Lamb waves in aluminum plates (AL-6061) due to isothermal temperature deviations. This paper presents both thermally induced acoustoelastic constants and thermally varying effective Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio which include the third order elastic material constants. The experimental thermal sensitivity of the phase velocity (∂v(P)/∂θ) for both the symmetric and antisymmetric modes are bounded by two theories, the acoustoelastic Lamb wave theory with thermo-acoustoelastic tensors and the thermoelastic Lamb wave theory using an effective thermo-acoustoelastic moduli. This paper shows the theoretical thermally induced acoustoelastic Lamb wave thermal sensitivity (∂v(P)/∂θ) is an upper bound approximation of the experimental thermal changes, but the acoustoelastic Lamb wave theory is not valid for predicting the antisymmetric (A0) phase velocity at low frequency-thickness values, <1.55 MHz mm for various temperatures.

  2. Fractal analysis of the effect of particle aggregation distribution on thermal conductivity of nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Cai, Jianchao; Hu, Xiangyun; Han, Qi; Liu, Shuang; Zhou, Yingfang

    2016-08-01

    A theoretical effective thermal conductivity model for nanofluids is derived based on fractal distribution characteristics of nanoparticle aggregation. Considering two different mechanisms of heat conduction including particle aggregation and convention, the model is expressed as a function of the fractal dimension and concentration. In the model, the change of fractal dimension is related to the variation of aggregation shape. The theoretical computations of the developed model provide a good agreement with the experimental results, which may serve as an effective approach for quantitatively estimating the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids.

  3. Evaluation of effective thermal diffusivity and conductivity of fibrous materials through computational micromechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Isa

    2017-01-01

    The aim of present study is to investigate the effective thermal properties of composite material via micromechanical modeling of the composite material as a heterogeneous material. These properties mainly include the thermal diffusivity and the thermal conductivity of composites. For this purpose, a definition is presented for effective thermal diffusivity for heterogeneous materials based on heat diffusion rate into the material in a transient heat transfer. A micromechanical model based on the Representative Volume Element (RVE) is presented for modeling the heat conduction in the fibrous composite materials. An appropriate heat transfer problem for the RVE is defined so that by the analogy of the numerical results the effective properties of the RVE can be estimated. A numerical method is employed to analyze the steady-state and transient heat flux and temperature in the RVE. To validate the model, the predictions of present model are compared with results of analytical method, FEM and some available experimental data in the open literature. The effective thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity are then obtained for fibrous composites via the present micromechanical model. The SiC/Ti, SiC/Ti6%Al4%V and Glass/Epoxy composites with various fiber volume fractions are considered in this study.

  4. Effect of quantum correction on nonlinear thermal wave of electrons driven by laser heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafari, F.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2016-08-01

    In thermal interaction of laser pulse with a deuterium-tritium (DT) plane, the thermal waves of electrons are generated instantly. Since the thermal conductivity of electron is a nonlinear function of temperature, a nonlinear heat conduction equation is used to investigate the propagation of waves in solid DT. This paper presents a self-similar analytic solution for the nonlinear heat conduction equation in a planar geometry. The thickness of the target material is finite in numerical computation, and it is assumed that the laser energy is deposited at a finite initial thickness at the initial time which results in a finite temperature for electrons at initial time. Since the required temperature range for solid DT ignition is higher than the critical temperature which equals 35.9 eV, the effects of quantum correction in thermal conductivity should be considered. This letter investigates the effects of quantum correction on characteristic features of nonlinear thermal wave, including temperature, penetration depth, velocity, heat flux, and heating and cooling domains. Although this effect increases electron temperature and thermal flux, penetration depth and propagation velocity are smaller. This effect is also applied to re-evaluate the side-on laser ignition of uncompressed DT.

  5. 76 FR 23812 - Reliability and Continuity of Communications Networks, Including Broadband Technologies; Effects...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-28

    ... COMMISSION Reliability and Continuity of Communications Networks, Including Broadband Technologies; Effects on Broadband Communications Networks of Damage or Failure of Network Equipment or Severe Overload; Independent Panel Reviewing the Impact of Hurricane Katrina on Communications Networks AGENCY:...

  6. Improvement of prediction ability for genomic selection of dairy cattle by including dominance effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanyu Sun

    Full Text Available Dominance may be an important source of non-additive genetic variance for many traits of dairy cattle. However, nearly all prediction models for dairy cattle have included only additive effects because of the limited number of cows with both genotypes and phenotypes. The role of dominance in the Holstein and Jersey breeds was investigated for eight traits: milk, fat, and protein yields; productive life; daughter pregnancy rate; somatic cell score; fat percent and protein percent. Additive and dominance variance components were estimated and then used to estimate additive and dominance effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. The predictive abilities of three models with both additive and dominance effects and a model with additive effects only were assessed using ten-fold cross-validation. One procedure estimated dominance values, and another estimated dominance deviations; calculation of the dominance relationship matrix was different for the two methods. The third approach enlarged the dataset by including cows with genotype probabilities derived using genotyped ancestors. For yield traits, dominance variance accounted for 5 and 7% of total variance for Holsteins and Jerseys, respectively; using dominance deviations resulted in smaller dominance and larger additive variance estimates. For non-yield traits, dominance variances were very small for both breeds. For yield traits, including additive and dominance effects fit the data better than including only additive effects; average correlations between estimated genetic effects and phenotypes showed that prediction accuracy increased when both effects rather than just additive effects were included. No corresponding gains in prediction ability were found for non-yield traits. Including cows with derived genotype probabilities from genotyped ancestors did not improve prediction accuracy. The largest additive effects were located on chromosome 14 near DGAT1 for yield traits for both

  7. Evaluation of thermal gradients in longitudinal spin Seebeck effect measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, A.; Kuepferling, M.; Basso, V.; Pasquale, M.; Kikkawa, T.; Uchida, K.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-05-01

    In the framework of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), we developed an experimental setup for the characterization of LSSE devices. This class of device consists in a layered structure formed by a substrate, a ferrimagnetic insulator (YIG) where the spin current is thermally generated, and a paramagnetic metal (Pt) for the detection of the spin current via the inverse spin-Hall effect. In this kind of experiments, the evaluation of a thermal gradient through the thin YIG layer is a crucial point. In this work, we perform an indirect determination of the thermal gradient through the measurement of the heat flux. We developed an experimental setup using Peltier cells that allow us to measure the heat flux through a given sample. In order to test the technique, a standard LSSE device produced at Tohoku University was measured. We find a spin Seebeck SSSE coefficient of 2.8 × 10 - 7 V K-1.

  8. Permeability and effective thermal conductivity of bisized porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Ricardo P. [Departamento de Tecnologia Quimica, Escola Superior de Tecnologia e de Gestao, Instituto Politecnico de Braganca, Campus de Santa Apolonia, Apartado 134, 5301-857 Braganca (Portugal); Fernandes, Carla S. [Departamento de Matematica, Escola Superior de Tecnologia e de Gestao, Instituto Politecnico de Braganca, Campus de Santa Apolonia, Apartado 134, 5301-857 Braganca (Portugal); Mota, Manuel; Teixeira, Jose A.; Yelshin, Alexander [Centro de Eng. Biologica, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)

    2007-04-15

    In the region of minimum porosity of particulate binary mixtures, heat exchange and permeability were found to be higher than the ones obtained with a mono-size packing built with the same small size particles used in the binary packing. This effect was noticed in the range of the particles size ratio 0.1-1.0. The obtained improvement on thermal performance is related to the increase of effective thermal conductivity (ETC) in the binary packing and to the increase in transversal thermal dispersion due to the porosity decrease and tortuosity increase. Permeability can increase by a factor of two, if the size ratio between small and large spheres of a loose packing stays in the range 0.3-0.5. (author)

  9. Scale effects on thermal buckling properties of carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yize, E-mail: wangyize@gmail.co [P.O. Box 137, School of Astronautics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Department of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Li Fengming, E-mail: fmli@hit.edu.c [P.O. Box 137, School of Astronautics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Kishimoto, Kikuo [Department of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    In this Letter, the thermal buckling properties of carbon nanotube with small scale effects are studied. Based on the nonlocal continuum theory and the Timoshenko beam model, the governing equation is derived and the nondimensional critical buckling temperature is presented. The influences of the scale coefficients, the ratio of the length to the diameter, the transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia are discussed. It can be observed that the small scale effects are significant and should be considered for thermal analysis of carbon nanotube. The nondimensional critical buckling temperature becomes higher with the ratio of length to diameter increasing. Furthermore, for smaller ratios of the length to the diameter and higher mode numbers, the transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia have remarkable influences on the thermal buckling behaviors.

  10. Effects of hemin and thermal stress exposure on JWA expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ming; CHEN Rui; LI Aiping; ZHOU Jianwei

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the expression of JWA after hemin and (or) thermal stress exposure,we treated K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia cells) cells with different doses of hemin and thermal stress using different exposure times.The expression of JWA protein was determined by Western blot analysis.Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was carried out to determine JWA mRNA expression.JWA promoter transcription activity analysis was performed by chloramphenicol acetyl transferase-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (CAT-ELISA).The expression of JWA protein was significantly increased by up to (3.23 +0.57) folds compared to the control in K562 cells after hemin treatment (50 μM for one week),and a similar pattern was observed in the cells after treatment with thermal stress (42℃) for 2 hours [increased by (8.00+ 1.73) folds].The expression of JWA mRNA was also significantly elevated by up to (1.37 + 0.06)folds in K562 cells treated with hemin (30 μM for 48 hours),and a similar regulatory pattern [increased by (1.87±0.13)folds] was observed with thermal stress exposure (42℃) for 30 minutes.However,a combined antagonistic effect was observed in the treatment of K562 cells with hemin (30 μM,48 h) followed by thermal stress (42℃,30 min).CAT-ELISA further confirmed that either hemin or thermal stress treatment could up-regulate JWA transcription activity,however,the effects could be counteracted partly by treatment with a combination of both.Hemin and thermal stress might regulate JWA expression via distinct intracellular signal transduction pathways.

  11. Characterization of the Minimum Effective Layer of Thermal Insulation Material Tow-plaster from the Method of Thermal Impedance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Ould Brahim

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Our objective in this study is to determine the effective thermal insulating layer of a composite towplaster. The characterization of thermal insulating material is proposed from the study of the thermal impedance in dynamic two-dimensional frequency. Thermo physical properties of the material tow-plaster are determined from the study of the thermal impedance. Nyquist representations have introduced an interpretation of certain phenomena of heat transfer from the series and shunt resistors. The overall coefficient of heat exchange is determined from the Bode plots. A method for determining the thermal conductivity is proposed.

  12. Effects of anisotropic thermal conduction on wind properties in hot accretion flow

    CERN Document Server

    Bu, De-Fu; Yuan, Ye-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Previous works have clearly shown the existence of winds from black hole hot accretion flow and investigated their detailed properties. In extremely low accretion rate systems, the collisional mean-free path of electrons is large compared with the length-scale of the system, thus thermal conduction is dynamically important. When the magnetic field is present, the thermal conduction is anisotropic and energy transport is along magnetic field lines. In this paper, we study the effects of anisotropic thermal conduction on the wind production in hot accretion flows by performing two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We find that thermal conduction has only moderate effects on the mass flux of wind. But the energy flux of wind can be increased by a factor of $\\sim 10$ due to the increase of wind velocity when thermal conduction is included. The increase of wind velocity is because of the increase of driving forces (e.g. gas pressure gradient force and centrifugal force) when thermal conduction is includ...

  13. An Improved Heat Budget Estimation Including Bottom Effects for General Ocean Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carder, Kendall; Warrior, Hari; Otis, Daniel; Chen, R. F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper studies the effects of the underwater light field on heat-budget calculations of general ocean circulation models for shallow waters. The presence of a bottom significantly alters the estimated heat budget in shallow waters, which affects the corresponding thermal stratification and hence modifies the circulation. Based on the data collected during the COBOP field experiment near the Bahamas, we have used a one-dimensional turbulence closure model to show the influence of the bottom reflection and absorption on the sea surface temperature field. The water depth has an almost one-to-one correlation with the temperature rise. Effects of varying the bottom albedo by replacing the sea grass bed with a coral sand bottom, also has an appreciable effect on the heat budget of the shallow regions. We believe that the differences in the heat budget for the shallow areas will have an influence on the local circulation processes and especially on the evaporative and long-wave heat losses for these areas. The ultimate effects on humidity and cloudiness of the region are expected to be significant as well.

  14. Modelling of single bubble-dynamics and thermal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoulias, D.; Gavaises, M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper evaluates the solution effects of different Rayleigh-Plesset models (R-P) for simulating the growth/collapse dynamics and thermal behaviour of homogeneous gas bubbles. The flow inputs used for the discrete cavitation bubble calculations are obtained from Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations (RANS), performed in high-pressure nozzle holes. Parametric 1-D results are presented for the classical thermal R-P equation [1] as well as for refined models which incorporated compressibility corrections and thermal effects [2, 3]. The thermal bubble model is coupled with the energy equation, which provides the temperature of the bubble as a function of conduction/convection and radiation heat-transfer mechanisms. For approximating gas pressure variations a high-order virial equation of state (EOS) was used, based on Helmholtz free energy principle [4]. The coded thermal R-P model was validated against experimental measurements [5] and model predictions [6] reported in single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL).

  15. Thermal Characterization of a Hall Effect Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Material Curie Temperature Iron 770 °C Nickel 358 °C Cobalt 1130 °C Gadolinium 20 °C Terfenol 380-430 °C Alnico 850 °C Hard Ferrites 400-700...C Barium Ferrite 450 °C Hall Effect thrusters generally use iron magnets with a Curie temperature of 770 °C. Decreasing the magnetic strength

  16. The thermal and kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval-Villalbazo, A

    2003-01-01

    This paper shows that a simple convolution integral expression based on the mean value of the isotropic frequency distribution corresponding to photon scattering off electrons leads to useful analytical expressions describing the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. The approach, to first order in the Compton parameter is able to reproduce the Kompaneets equation describing the effect. Second order effects in the parameter $z=\\frac{kT_{e}}{mc^{2}}$ induce a slight increase in the crossover frequency.

  17. Non-Thermal Effects Mobile Phones at Biological Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Ladislav Balogh

    2003-01-01

    The article deals with non-thermal effects of mobile phones on biological objects. Even though these effects are observed for longer period, there are not so far unequivocal results on obtained biological and biophysical results in this field. Biologicaleffects of electromagnetic field (EMF) depend on its character, its duration as well as on features of organism. As the receptors offield are not known (e.g. inputs of EMF into organism), its effects are judged only by non-specific reaction of...

  18. A Large-scale Finite Element Model on Micromechanical Damage and Failure of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composites Including Thermal Residual Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P. F.; Li, X. K.

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study micromechanical progressive failure properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites with thermal residual stress by finite element analysis (FEA). Composite microstructures with hexagonal fiber distribution are used for the representative volume element (RVE), where an initial fiber breakage is assumed. Fiber breakage with random fiber strength is predicted using Monte Carlo simulation, progressive matrix damage is predicted by proposing a continuum damage mechanics model and interface failure is simulated using Xu and Needleman's cohesive model. Temperature dependent thermal expansion coefficients for epoxy matrix are used. FEA by developing numerical codes using ANSYS finite element software is divided into two steps: 1. Thermal residual stresses due to mismatch between fiber and matrix are calculated; 2. Longitudinal tensile load is further exerted on the RVE to perform progressive failure analysis of carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Numerical convergence is solved by introducing the viscous damping effect properly. The extended Mori-Tanaka method that considers interface debonding is used to get homogenized mechanical responses of composites. Three main results by FEA are obtained: 1. the real-time matrix cracking, fiber breakage and interface debonding with increasing tensile strain is simulated. 2. the stress concentration coefficients on neighbouring fibers near the initial broken fiber and the axial fiber stress distribution along the broken fiber are predicted, compared with the results using the global and local load-sharing models based on the shear-lag theory. 3. the tensile strength of composite by FEA is compared with those by the shear-lag theory and experiments. Finally, the tensile stress-strain curve of composites by FEA is applied to the progressive failure analysis of composite pressure vessel.

  19. The effect of CNTs reinforcement on thermal and electrical properties of cement-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exarchos, D. A.; Dalla, P. T.; Tragazikis, I. K.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    This research aims to investigate the influence of the nano-reinforcement on the thermal properties of cement mortar. Nano-modified cement mortar with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) leading to the development of innovative materials possessing multi-functionality and smartness. Such multifunctional properties include enhanced mechanical behavior, electrical and thermal conductivity, and piezo-electric characteristics. The assessment of the thermal behavior was evaluated using IR Thermography. Two different thermographic techniques are used to monitor the influence of the nano-reinforcement. To eliminate any extrinsic effects (e.g. humidity) the specimens were dried in an oven before testing. The electrical resistivity was measured with a contact test method using a custom made apparatus and applying a known D.C. voltage. This study indicate that the CNTs nano-reinforcement enhance the thermal and electrical properties and demonstrate them useful as sensors in a wide variety of applications.

  20. The effect of linear imperfection in [001] direction on the thermal properties of silver crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Davoodi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available  The aim of this investigation was to calculate the thermal properties of silver crystal in the presence of linear imperfection. The simulations were performed by molecular dynamics simulation technique in NPT as well as NVT ensemble based on quantum Sutton-Chen many body potential. The thermal properties including cohesive energy, melting temperature, isobaric heat capacity and thermal expansion of imperfect silver crystal were calculated and compared to those of the perfect crystal. Moreover, the quantities such as radial distribution function, order parameter and lindemann index were calculated in order to obtain information on crystal structure and disorder in atoms. All calculations were done both with liner imperfection in [001] direction and without imperfection at different temperature. The simulation results show that cohesive energy, linear thermal expansion coefficient increase and melting temperature, latent heat of fusion decrease with increasing linear imperfection. Also, the results show that linear imperfection has no effect on the heat capacity.

  1. Cytoprotective effect of cytoflavinum in the treatment of thermal injuries of various severity levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey J. Bozhedomov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to conduct studying of cytoprotective effect of cytoflavinum in thermal traumas of various severity levels. Material and methods – 169 patients were included into the research with thermal burns and with a favorable outcome and the severity of a thermal injury from 30 to 170 points according Frank index. 28 patients received cytoflavinum in a complex therapy in a standard dosage. Results – During the cytoflavinum usage in patients with the severity of a thermal injury more than 60 points by Frank there had been fixed: the decrease of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, reduction of stab neutrophils content, slower decrease of erythrocytes, smaller activation of thrombopoiesis, decrease of concentration of the vascular endothelial growth factor. In the group of patients with thermal injuries less than 60 points who had been receiving cytoflavinum there had not positive effects been fixed. Conclusion – Cytoflavinum is the most effective when the severity of a thermal trauma is more than 60 points by Frank.

  2. Effective action for hard thermal loops in gravitational fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Francisco

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We examine, through a Boltzmann equation approach, the generating action of hard thermal loops in the background of gravitational fields. Using the gauge and Weyl invariance of the theory at high temperature, we derive an explicit closed-form expression for the effective action.

  3. A review on ergonomics of headgear: Thermal effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogerd, C.P.; Aerts, J.M.; Annaheim, S.; Bröde, P.; Bruyne, G. de; Flouris, A.D.; Kuklane, K.; Sotto Mayor, T.; Rossi, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    The thermal effects related to wearing headgear are complex and different studies have investigated single parts of this topic. This review aims at summarizing the different findings to give a complete overview on this topic as well as to suggest new perspectives. Headgear increases head insulation

  4. Thermal and tilt effects on bearing characteristics of hydrostatic oil pad in rotary table

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志峰; 湛承鹏; 程强; 赵永胜; 李小燕; 王义达

    2016-01-01

    Hydrostatic pads are key components of a constant flow compensation hydrostatic rotary table. The tilt and thermal effects due to the partial load, the manufacturing errors and the friction must be considered. However, designers are more likely inclined to ignore these effects. In this work, the coupled characteristics of the tilt and thermal effects are studied. A coupled mathematical model to calculate the bearing properties of the pads is built. This model takes into consideration of tilt and thermal effects and is used to solve the flow problem by the finite difference method. The characteristics of the oil pad, including, the recess pressures, the load carrying capacity and the damping coefficients, are obtained and the tilt and thermal effects are analyzed. It is observed that the tilt has a tremendous impact on the bearing characteristics of the hydrostatic pad. The recess pressure, the load carrying capacity and the stiffness are reduced by 50% and the pressure distribution and the temperature distribution of the oil film also change significantly. When the pads work under a tilt operation, a larger land width is better for its bearing properties. It is also observed that the thermal effect is significant and cannot be ignored.

  5. Thermally developing MHD peristaltic transport of nanofluids with velocity and thermal slip effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher Akbar, Noreen; Bintul Huda, A.; Tripathi, D.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the velocity slip and thermal slip effects on peristaltically driven thermal transport of nanofluids through the vertical parallel plates under the influence of transverse magnetic field. The wall surface is propagating with sinusoidal wave velocity c. The flow characteristics are governed by the mass, momentum and energy conservation principle. Low Reynolds number and large wavelength approximations are taken into consideration to simplify the non-linear terms. Analytical solutions for axial velocity, temperature field, pressure gradient and stream function are obtained under certain physical boundary conditions. Two types of nanoparticles, SiO2 and Ag, are considered for analysis with water as base fluid. This is the first article in the literature that discusses the SiO2 and Ag nanoparticles for a peristaltic flow with variable viscosity. The effects of physical parameters on velocity, temperature, pressure and trapping are discussed. A comparative study of SiO2 nanofluid, Ag nanofluid and pure water is also presented. This model is applicable in biomedical engineering to make thermal peristaltic pumps and other pumping devices like syringe pumps, etc. It is observed that pressure for pure water is maximum and pressure for Ag nanofluid is minimum.

  6. The Effect of Ethylene Glycol, Glycine Betaine, and Urea on Lysozyme Thermal Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Nordstrom, Anna R.

    2010-01-01

    The four-week student project described in this article is an extension of protein thermal denaturation experiments to include effects of added cosolutes ethylene glycol, glycine betaine, and urea on the unfolding of lysozyme. The transition temperatures and van't Hoff enthalpies for unfolding are evaluated for six concentrations of each cosolute,…

  7. The Effect of Ethylene Glycol, Glycine Betaine, and Urea on Lysozyme Thermal Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Nordstrom, Anna R.

    2010-01-01

    The four-week student project described in this article is an extension of protein thermal denaturation experiments to include effects of added cosolutes ethylene glycol, glycine betaine, and urea on the unfolding of lysozyme. The transition temperatures and van't Hoff enthalpies for unfolding are evaluated for six concentrations of each cosolute,…

  8. Thermal effects in orthotropic porous elastic beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaşan, D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the linear theory of anisotropic porous elastic bodies. The extension and bending of orthotropic porous elastic cylinders subjected to a plane temperature field is investigated. The work is motivated by the recent interest in the using of the orthotropic porous elastic solid as model for bones and various engineering materials. First, the thermoelastic deformation of inhomogeneous beams whose constitutive coefficients are independent of the axial coordinate is studied. Then, the extension and bending effects in orthotropic cylinders reinforced by longitudinal rods are investigated. The three-dimensional problem is reduced to the study of two-dimensional problems. The method is used to solve the problem of an orthotropic porous circular cylinder with a special kind of inhomogeneity.

  9. Fully vectorial laser resonator modeling of continuous-wave solid-state lasers including rate equations, thermal lensing and stress-induced birefringence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asoubar, Daniel; Wyrowski, Frank

    2015-07-27

    The computer-aided design of high quality mono-mode, continuous-wave solid-state lasers requires fast, flexible and accurate simulation algorithms. Therefore in this work a model for the calculation of the transversal dominant mode structure is introduced. It is based on the generalization of the scalar Fox and Li algorithm to a fully-vectorial light representation. To provide a flexible modeling concept of different resonator geometries containing various optical elements, rigorous and approximative solutions of Maxwell's equations are combined in different subdomains of the resonator. This approach allows the simulation of plenty of different passive intracavity components as well as active media. For the numerically efficient simulation of nonlinear gain, thermal lensing and stress-induced birefringence effects in solid-state active crystals a semi-analytical vectorial beam propagation method is discussed in detail. As a numerical example the beam quality and output power of a flash-lamp-pumped Nd:YAG laser are improved. To that end we compensate the influence of stress-induced birefringence and thermal lensing by an aspherical mirror and a 90° quartz polarization rotator.

  10. Smallest quantum thermal machine: The effect of strong coupling and distributed thermal tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Zhong-Xiao; Xia, Yun-Jie

    2017-07-01

    The functions of the smallest self-contained thermal machine consisting of a single qutrit are studied when the weak internal coupling assumption is relaxed. It is shown that in the presence of one target to be cooled the strong coupling is not beneficial to the refrigeration. The reason is explained by examining the effect of the strong coupling on the contributions of all eigenstates transitions to the heat current of the related thermal reservoir. When acting simultaneously on two targets, the machine can be manipulated to implement distributed tasks on them, such as cooling one target and meanwhile heating another one, by adjusting the coupling strengths between the machine with the two targets. In particular, we show that the machine can realize temperature reversal for the two qubits, namely, the qubit that is coupled to the high temperature reservoir is refrigerated to a temperature below that of the qubit contacting with the low temperature reservoir.

  11. Thermal-vacuum effects on polymer matrix composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Mabson, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented on the thermal-vacuum response of a variety of fiber reinforced polymers matrix composites that comprised the UTIAS experiment on the LDEF satellite. Theoretical temperature-time predictions for this experiment are in excellent agreement with test data. Results also show quite clearly the effect of outgassing in the dimensional changes of these materials and the corresponding coefficients of thermal expansion. Finally, comparison with ground-based simulation tests are presented as well. Use of these data for design purposes are also given.

  12. Modeling the population lens effect in thermal lens spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J R; Malacarne, L C; Baesso, M L; Lima, S M; Andrade, L H C; Jacinto, C; Hehlen, M P; Astrath, N G C

    2013-02-15

    We report a theoretical model and experimental results for laser-induced lensing in solids. The model distinguishes and quantifies the contributions from population and thermal effects. Laser-induced lensing in ytterbium-doped fluorozirconate glass ZBLAN:Yb(3+) is measured, and the thermal and optical properties obtained from analyzing the data with the proposed model agree well with published values. Photothermal techniques are used extensively for the investigation of laser and laser-cooling materials, and the model developed here enables the interpretation of convoluted laser-induced lensing signals that have contributions from different sources.

  13. Upgrade of PARC2D to include real gas effects. [computer program for flowfield surrounding aeroassist flight experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladino, Anthony; Praharaj, Sarat C.; Collins, Frank G.; Seaford, C. Mark

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a description of the changes and additions to the perfect gas PARC2D code to include chemical equilibrium effects, resulting in a code called PARCEQ2D. The work developed out of a need to have the capability of more accurately representing the flowfield surrounding the aeroassist flight experiment (AFE) vehicle. Use is made of the partition function of statistical mechanics in the evaluation of the thermochemical properties. This approach will allow the PARC code to be extended to thermal nonequilibrium when this task is undertaken in the future. The transport properties follow from formulae from the kinetic theory of gases. Results are presented for a two-dimensional AFE that compare perfect gas and real gas solutions at flight conditions, showing vast differences between the two cases.

  14. Effective Thermal Conductivity Modeling of Sandstones: SVM Framework Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Alireza; Masoudi, Mohammad; Ghaderi-Ardakani, Alireza; Arabloo, Milad; Amani, Mahmood

    2016-06-01

    Among the most significant physical characteristics of porous media, the effective thermal conductivity (ETC) is used for estimating the thermal enhanced oil recovery process efficiency, hydrocarbon reservoir thermal design, and numerical simulation. This paper reports the implementation of an innovative least square support vector machine (LS-SVM) algorithm for the development of enhanced model capable of predicting the ETCs of dry sandstones. By means of several statistical parameters, the validity of the presented model was evaluated. The prediction of the developed model for determining the ETCs of dry sandstones was in excellent agreement with the reported data with a coefficient of determination value ({R}2) of 0.983 and an average absolute relative deviation of 0.35 %. Results from present research show that the proposed LS-SVM model is robust, reliable, and efficient in calculating the ETCs of sandstones.

  15. Effects of Thermal Fluctuations in the SPOrt Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Carretti, E; Macculi, C; Cortiglioni, S; Sbarra, C

    2004-01-01

    The role of systematic errors induced by thermal fluctuations is analyzed for the SPOrt experiment with the aim at estimating their impact on the measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization (CMBP). The transfer functions of the antenna devices from temperature to data fluctuations are computed, by writing them in terms of both instrument and thermal environment parameters. In addition, the corresponding contamination maps are estimated, along with their polarized power spectra, for different behaviours of the instabilities. The result is that thermal effects are at a negligible level even for fluctuations correlated with the Sun illumination provided their frequency $f_{tf}$ is larger than that of the Sun illumination ($f_{day}$) by a factor $f_{tf} / f_{day} > 30$, which defines a requirement for the statistical properties of the temperature behaviour as well. The analysis with actual SPOrt operative parameters shows that the instrument is only weakly sensitive to temperature instabilities, t...

  16. Thermal Effects of the Substrate on Water Droplet Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobac, Benjamin; Brutin, David

    2012-11-01

    Since a few decades, the evaporation of a drop deposited onto a substrate has been subject to numerous research activities due to the increase of the range of applications underpinned by this phenomenon. However, this process today is always a challenging problem in soft matter physics due to the complexity of present couplings: fluid dynamic, physical chemistry of the substrate, heat and mass transfer. The originality of the presented experiment is to decouple the effects of wetting properties and thermal properties of the substrate. Thus, whereas we previously presented the role of wetting properties on evaporation by changing the surface energy and the roughness while maintaining the thermal properties constant thanks to nanoscale coatings on the substrate surface (B. Sobac and D. Brutin, Langmuir 27, 14999 (2011)), we investigate here the influence of the thermal properties of the substrate while keeping the wetting properties the same (B. Sobac and D. Brutin, Phys. Rev. E, underpress). We experimentally investigate the behavior of a pinned droplet evaporating into air. The influences of the substrate temperature and substrate thermal properties on the evaporation process are studied in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic conditions. Experimental data are compared to the quasi-steady diffusion-driven evaporation model assuming the isothermia of the drop at the substrate temperature. This comparison permits to highlights several thermal mechanisms linked to evaporation and their respective contributions in regard of pure mass diffusion mechanism. The range of validity of the classical evaporation model is also discussed.

  17. Effect of temperature on thermal properties of Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neetu Sorot

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Home About Us » Editorial Board Indexed in Current Issue Coming Issue Archives Submission » Contact Us Effect of temperature on thermal properties of Graphene Volume 31, Number 3 Neetu Sorot and B. R. K.Gupta* Department of physics GLA University, Mathura-U.P. (India . Correspondence Author Email : brk.gupta@gla.ac.in DOI : http://dx.doi.org/10.13005/ojc/310309 ABSTRACT: Many potential applications of graphene in nanotechnology depend on its thermo-mechanical stability. We have calculated the temperature dependent properties such as the volume thermal expansion, and thermal expansion coefficient of the graphene using the equation of state (EOS based on thermodynamic variables. A simple theoretical method is applied to determine the thermal expansion and thermal expansion properties of graphene. The model employed in the present study consists of only two input parameters and independent of potential. The results achieved as reported in this paper are found in good agreement with those obtained from QHA-GGA ab- initio study [25].

  18. Modeling an elastic beam with piezoelectric patches by including magnetic effects

    CERN Document Server

    Ozer, A O

    2014-01-01

    Models for piezoelectric beams using Euler-Bernoulli small displacement theory predict the dynamics of slender beams at the low frequency accurately but are insufficient for beams vibrating at high frequencies or beams with low length-to-width aspect ratios. A more thorough model that includes the effects of rotational inertia and shear strain, Mindlin-Timoshenko small displacement theory, is needed to predict the dynamics more accurately for these cases. Moreover, existing models ignore the magnetic effects since the magnetic effects are relatively small. However, it was shown recently \\cite{O-M1} that these effects can substantially change the controllability and stabilizability properties of even a single piezoelectric beam. In this paper, we use a variational approach to derive models that include magnetic effects for an elastic beam with two piezoelectric patches actuated by different voltage sources. Both Euler-Bernoulli and Mindlin-Timoshenko small displacement theories are considered. Due to the magne...

  19. Decreasing the Effective Thermal Conductivity in Glass Supported Thermoelectric Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethke, Kevin; Andrei, Virgil; Rademann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    As thermoelectric devices begin to make their way into commercial applications, the emphasis is put on decreasing the thermal conductivity. In this purely theoretical study, finite element analysis is used to determine the effect of a supporting material on the thermal conductivity of a thermoelectric module. The simulations illustrate the heat transfer along a sample, consisting from Cu, Cu2O and PbTe thermoelectric layers on a 1 mm thick Pyrex glass substrate. The influence of two different types of heating, at a constant temperature and at a constant heat flux, is also investigated. It is revealed that the presence of a supporting material plays an important role on lowering the effective thermal conductivity of the layer-substrate ensemble. By using thinner thermoelectric layers the effective thermal conductivity is further reduced, almost down to the value of the glass substrate. As a result, the temperature gradient becomes steeper for a fixed heating temperature, which allows the production of devices with improved performance under certain conditions. Based on the simulation results, we also propose a model for a robust thin film thermoelectric device. With this suggestion, we invite the thermoelectric community to prove the applicability of the presented concept for practical purposes.

  20. Effective thermal diffusivity study of powder biocomposites via photoacoustic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariucci, V.V.G.; Cruz, J.A. da; Bonadio, T.G.M.; Picolloto, A.M.; Weinand, W.R.; Lima, W.M.; Medina, A.N.; Bento, A.C., E-mail: vgmariucci@hotmail.com, E-mail: pg51508@uem.br [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica

    2015-10-15

    The effective thermal diffusivity for biocomposites of hydroxyapatite (HAp), and niobium pentoxide (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) on powder form was studied via photoacoustic method adapted for porous materials. The concentration of each element was accompanied with the results of X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A theoretical model for the thermal coupling of a three layered sample, designed to contain the powder material is proposed. The method for mixtures obeyed the formula [(1 - x)HAp + (x)Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}] for 0.0 ≤ x ≤ 1.0. Experimental results for effective thermal diffusivity ranged between (6.4 ± 0.3) x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2} s{sup -1} and (9.8 ± 0.4) x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2} s{sup -1} for x ≤ 0.7. Values of the effective thermal diffusivity have decreased sharply to (0.70 ± 0.03) x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2} s{sup -1} for x > 0.7. SEM micrographs showed a coating of HAp over the particles of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} for some mixtures. (author)

  1. Separate effects tests to determine the effective thermal conductivityin the PBMR HTTU test facility

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Thermal-fluid simulations are used extensively to predict the maximum fuel temperatures, flows, pressure drops and thermal capacitance of pebble bed gas cooled reactors in support of the reactor safety case. The PBMR company developed the HTTU non-nuclear test facility in cooperation with M-Tech Industrial (Pty) Ltd. and the North-West University in South Africa to conduct comprehensive separate effects tests as well as integrated effects tests to study the different thermal-fluid phenomena. ...

  2. Situational effects of the school factors included in the dynamic model of educational effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creerners, Bert; Kyriakides, Leonidas

    2009-01-01

    We present results of a longitudinal study in which 50 schools, 113 classes and 2,542 Cypriot primary students participated. We tested the validity of the dynamic model of educational effectiveness and especially its assumption that the impact of school factors depends on the current situation of th

  3. Fractal analysis of the effect of particle aggregation distribution on thermal conductivity of nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Wei, E-mail: weiw2015@gmail.com [Hubei Subsurface Multi-scale Imaging Key Laboratory, Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Cai, Jianchao, E-mail: caijc@cug.edu.cn [Hubei Subsurface Multi-scale Imaging Key Laboratory, Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Hu, Xiangyun, E-mail: xyhu@cug.edu.cn [Hubei Subsurface Multi-scale Imaging Key Laboratory, Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Han, Qi, E-mail: hanqi426@gmail.com [Hubei Subsurface Multi-scale Imaging Key Laboratory, Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Liu, Shuang, E-mail: lius@cug.edu.cn [Hubei Subsurface Multi-scale Imaging Key Laboratory, Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhou, Yingfang, E-mail: yingfang.zhou@abdn.ac.uk [School of Engineering, University of Aberdeen, FN 264, King' s College, Aberdeen, AB24 3UE (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-26

    A theoretical effective thermal conductivity model for nanofluids is derived based on fractal distribution characteristics of nanoparticle aggregation. Considering two different mechanisms of heat conduction including particle aggregation and convention, the model is expressed as a function of the fractal dimension and concentration. In the model, the change of fractal dimension is related to the variation of aggregation shape. The theoretical computations of the developed model provide a good agreement with the experimental results, which may serve as an effective approach for quantitatively estimating the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids. - Highlights: • A thermal conductivity model is derived based on fractal aggregation distribution. • The relationship between aggregation shape and fractal dimension is analyzed. • Predictions of the proposed model show good agreement with experimental data.

  4. Polarization of the dielectronic recombination satellites including the generalized Breit interaction effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The polarizations of dielectronic recombination satellite lines for hydrogenlike F to U ions are calculated including the generalized Breit interaction(GBI). The calculated values of the asymmetry parameter are compared with other theoretical results and good agreements are obtained for all lines except for those from the level 2s2p3P1. The GBI effects on the polarization become much stronger as the atomic number increases. However, for different lines, the GBI effects on the polarization are different.

  5. MODEL ANALYSIS AND PARAMETER EXTRACTION FOR MOS CAPACITOR INCLUDING QUANTUM MECHANICAL EFFECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-yan Jiang; Ping-wen Zhang

    2006-01-01

    The high frequency CV curves of MOS capacitor have been studied. It is shown that semiclassical model is a good approximation to quantum model and approaches to classical model when the oxide layer is thick. This conclusion provides us an efficient (semiclassical) model including quantum mechanical effects to do parameter extraction for ultrathi noxide device. Here the effective extracting strategy is designed and numerical experiments demonstrate the validity of the strategy.

  6. Effect of cryogenic treatment on thermal conductivity properties of copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadig, D. S.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Sampathkumaran, P.; Prashanth, C. S.

    2012-06-01

    Copper exhibits high thermal conductivity properties and hence it is extensively used in cryogenic applications like cold fingers, heat exchangers, etc. During the realization of such components, copper undergoes various machining operations from the raw material stage to the final component. During these machining processes, stresses are induced within the metal resulting in internal stresses, strains and dislocations. These effects build up resistance paths for the heat carriers which transfer heat from one location to the other. This in turn, results in reduction of thermal conductivity of the conducting metal and as a result the developed component will not perform as per expectations. In the process of cryogenic treatment, the metal samples are exposed to cryogenic temperature for extended duration of time for 24 hours and later tempered. During this process, the internal stresses and strains are reduced with refinement of the atomic structure. These effects are expected to favourably improve thermal conductivity properties of the metal. In this experimental work, OFHC copper samples were cryotreated for 24 hours at 98 K and part of them were tempered at 423K for one hour. Significant enhancement of thermal conductivity values were observed after cryotreating and tempering the copper samples.

  7. Bending of I-beam with the transvers shear effect included – FEM calculated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grygorowicz, Magdalena; Lewiński, Jerzy [Poznan University of Technology, Institute of Applied Mechanics ul. Jana Pawła II No. 24, 60-138 Poznań POLAND (Poland)

    2016-06-08

    The paper is devoted to three-point bending of an I-beam with include of transvers shear effect. Numerical calculations were conducted independently with the use of the SolidWorks system and the multi-purpose software package ANSYS The results of FEM study conducted with the use of two systems were compared and presented in tables and figures.

  8. Bending of I-beam with the transvers shear effect included - FEM calculated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygorowicz, Magdalena; Lewiński, Jerzy

    2016-06-01

    The paper is devoted to three-point bending of an I-beam with include of transvers shear effect. Numerical calculations were conducted independently with the use of the SolidWorks system and the multi-purpose software package ANSYS The results of FEM study conducted with the use of two systems were compared and presented in tables and figures.

  9. Electrical stimulation vs thermal effects in a complex electromagnetic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua, Jesús M; Rufo, Montaña; Jiménez, Antonio; Antolín, Alicia; Sánchez, Miguel

    2009-08-01

    Studies linking exposure to low levels of radiofrequencies with adverse health effects, notwithstanding their present apparent inconsistency, have contributed to a steady improvement in the quality of evaluating that exposure. In complex electromagnetic environments, with a multitude of emissions of different frequencies acting simultaneously, knowledge of the spectral content is fundamental to evaluating human exposure to non-ionizing radiation. In the present work, we quantify the most significant spectral components in the frequency band 0.5-2200 MHz in an urban area. The measurements were made with a spectrum analyzer and monopole, biconical, and log-periodic antennas. Power density levels were calculated separately for the medium wave, short wave, and frequency modulation radio broadcasting bands, and for the television and GSM, DCS, and UMTS mobile telephony bands. The measured levels were compared with the ICNIRP reference levels for exposure to multiple frequency sources for thermal effects and electrical stimulation. The results showed the criterion limiting exposure on the basis of preventing electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves and muscles to be stricter (exposure quotient 24.7 10(-4)) than that based on thermal considerations (exposure quotient 0.16 10(-4)). The bands that contribute most to the latter are short wave, with 46.2%, and mobile telephony with 32.6% of the total exposure. In a complex electromagnetic environment, knowledge of the radiofrequency spectrum is essential in order to quantify the contribution of each type of emission to the public's exposure. It is also necessary to evaluate the electrical effects as well as the thermal effects because the criterion to limit exposure on the basis of the effect of the electrical stimulation of tissues is stricter than that based on thermal effects.

  10. Direct radiative effect modeled for regional aerosols in central Europe including the effect of relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorga, G.; Hitzenberger, R.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Puxbaum, Hans

    2007-01-01

    In view of both the climatic relevance of aerosols and the fact that aerosol burdens in central Europe are heavily impacted by anthropogenic sources, this study is focused on estimating the regional-scale direct radiative effect of aerosols in Austria. The aerosol data (over 80 samples in total) were collected during measurement campaigns at five sampling sites: the urban areas of Vienna, Linz, and Graz and on Mt. Rax (1644 m, regional background aerosol) and Mt. Sonnblick (3106 m, background aerosol). Aerosol mass size distributions were obtained with eight-stage (size range: 0.06-16 μm diameter) and six-stage (size range 0.1-10 μm) low-pressure cascade impactors. The size-segregated samples were analyzed for total carbon (TC), black carbon (BC), and inorganic ions. The aerosol at these five locations is compared in terms of size distributions, optical properties, and direct forcing. Mie calculations are performed for the dry aerosol at 60 wavelengths in the range 0.3-40 μm. Using mass growth factors determined earlier, the optical properties are also estimated for higher relative humidities (60%, 70%, 80%, and 90%). A box model was used to estimate direct radiative forcing (DRF). The presence of absorbing species (BC) was found to reduce the cooling effect of the aerosols. The water-soluble substances dominate radiative forcing at the urban sites, while on Rax and Sonnblick BC plays the most important role. This result can be explained by the effect of the surface albedo, which is much lower in the urban regions (0.16) than at the ice and snow-covered mountain sites. Shortwave (below 4 μm) and longwave surface albedo values for ice were 0.35 and 0.5, while for snow surface albedo, values of 0.8 (shortwave) and 0.5 (longwave) were used. In the case of dry aerosol, especially for urban sites, the unidentified material may contribute a large part to the forcing. Depending on the sampling site the estimated forcing gets more negative with increasing humidity

  11. Comparative Analysis and Approximations of Space -Charge Formation in Langmuir Electrodes Including Temperature Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdeblànquez, Eder

    2001-10-01

    Eder Valdeblànquez,Universidad del Zulia,Apartado 4011-A 526,Maracaibo,Venezuela. ABSTRACT: In this paper by space charge effect in Langmuir probes are compared for different kind of symmetries; plane, cylindrical and spherical. A detailed analysis is performed here including temperature effects, and therefore kinetic theory is used instead of fluid equations as other authors. The strongly non-linear equations obtained here have been solved first by numerical analysis and later by approximations using Bessel functions. The accuracy of each approximaton is also discussed. Space Charge effects are important in plane geometries than in the case of cylindrical or spherical symmetries.

  12. Including Finite Surface Span Effects in Empirical Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of finite span on the jet-surface interaction noise source and the jet mixing noise shielding and reflection effects is considered using recently acquired experimental data. First, the experimental setup and resulting data are presented with particular attention to the role of surface span on far-field noise. These effects are then included in existing empirical models that have previously assumed that all surfaces are semi-infinite. This extended abstract briefly describes the experimental setup and data leaving the empirical modeling aspects for the final paper.

  13. Separate effects tests to determine the effective thermal conductivity in the PBMR HTTU test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, P.G., E-mail: pgr@mtechindustrial.com [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Toit, C.G. du; Antwerpen, W. van [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Antwerpen, H.J. van [M-Tech Industrial (Pty) Ltd., PO Box 19855, Noordbrug 2522 (South Africa)

    2014-05-01

    Thermal-fluid simulations are used extensively to predict the maximum fuel temperatures, flows, pressure drops and thermal capacitance of pebble bed gas cooled reactors in support of the reactor safety case. The PBMR company developed the HTTU non-nuclear test facility in cooperation with M-Tech Industrial (Pty) Ltd. and the North-West University in South Africa to conduct comprehensive separate effects tests as well as integrated effects tests to study the different thermal-fluid phenomena. This paper describes the separate effects tests that were conducted to determine the effective thermal conductivity through the pebble bed under near-vacuum conditions and temperatures up to 1200 °C. It also presents the measured temperature distributions and the methodology applied in the data analysis to derive the resultant values of effective thermal conductivity and its associated uncertainty.

  14. Nonlinear flap-lag-extensional vibrations of rotating, pretwisted, preconed beams including Coriolis effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pretwist, precone, setting angle, Coriolis forces and second degree geometric nonlinearities on the natural frequencies, steady state deflections and mode shapes of rotating, torsionally rigid, cantilevered beams were studied. The governing coupled equations of flap lag extensional motion are derived including the effects of large precone and retaining geometric nonlinearities up to second degree. The Galerkin method, with nonrotating normal modes, is used for the solution of both steady state nonlinear equations and linear perturbation equations. Parametric indicating the individual and collective effects of pretwist, precone, Coriolis forces and second degree geometric nonlinearities on the steady state deflection, natural frequencies and mode shapes of rotating blades are presented. It is indicated that the second degree geometric nonlinear terms, which vanish for zero precone, can produce frequency changes of engineering significance. Further confirmation of the validity of including those generated by MSC NASTRAN. It is indicated that the linear and nonlinear Coriolis effects must be included in analyzing thick blades. The Coriolis effects are significant on the first flatwise and the first edgewise modes.

  15. Effect of including liquid vinasse in the diet of rabbits on growth performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina de Oliveira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of liquid vinasse (LV in the diet for growing rabbits on performance, carcass yield and intestinal morphometry were assessed. Eighty New Zealand white rabbits were used in a randomized block design with five treatments (LV inclusion at 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 g/kg diet and four replications. There was no effect of the treatment on final weight, daily weight gain, mortality rate and carcass yield characteristics. The daily intakes of feed, dry matter, crude protein and energy and feed conversion decreased linearly with increase in LV in the diet. Including LV affected the duodenum crypt depth and the ilium villus perimeter and height linearly and affected the duodenum villus perimeter, height and the absorption surfaces and ilium crypt depth and absorption surface quadratically. There was no effect of including LV on jejunum morphometry. Vinasse can be used to feed growing rabbits at up to 87.8 g per kilogram of diet.

  16. Epidemic spreading in scale-free networks including the effect of individual vigilance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Yong-Wang; Song Yu-Rong; Jiang Guo-Ping

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we study the epidemic spreading in scale-free networks and propose a new susceptible-infectedrecovered (SIR) model that includes the effect of individual vigilance. In our model,the effective spreading rate is dynamically adjusted with the time evolution at the vigilance period.Using the mean-field theory,an analytical result is derived.It shows that individual vigilance has no effect on the epidemic threshold.The numerical simulations agree well with the analytical result.Furthermore,we investigate the effect of individual vigilance on the epidemic spreading speed.It is shown that individual vigilance can slow the epidemic spreading speed effectively and delay the arrival of peak epidemic infection.

  17. The effects of solar radiation and black body re-radiation on thermal comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, Simon; Parsons, Ken

    2008-04-01

    When the sun shines on people in enclosed spaces, such as in buildings or vehicles, it directly affects thermal comfort. There is also an indirect effect as surrounding surfaces are heated exposing a person to re-radiation. This laboratory study investigated the effects of long wave re-radiation on thermal comfort, individually and when combined with direct solar radiation. Nine male participants (26.0 +/- 4.7 years) took part in three experimental sessions where they were exposed to radiation from a hot black panel heated to 100 degrees C; direct simulated solar radiation of 600 Wm(-2) and the combined simulated solar radiation and black panel radiation. Exposures were for 30 min, during which subjective responses and mean skin temperatures were recorded. The results showed that, at a surface temperature of 100 degrees C (close to maximum in practice), radiation from the flat black panel provided thermal discomfort but that this was relatively small when compared with the effects of direct solar radiation. It was concluded that re-radiation, from a dashboard in a vehicle, for example, will not have a major direct influence on thermal comfort and that existing models of thermal comfort do not require a specific modification. These results showed that, for the conditions investigated, the addition of re-radiation from internal components has an effect on thermal sensation when combined with direct solar radiation. However, it is not considered that it will be a major factor in a real world situation. This is because, in practice, dashboards are unlikely to maintain very high surface temperatures in vehicles without an unacceptably high air temperature. This study quantifies the contribution of short- and long-wave radiation to thermal comfort. The results will aid vehicle designers to have a better understanding of the complex radiation environment. These include direct radiation from the sun as well as re-radiation from the dashboard and other internal surfaces.

  18. Effects of thermal environment on sleep and circadian rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto-Mizuno Kazue

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The thermal environment is one of the most important factors that can affect human sleep. The stereotypical effects of heat or cold exposure are increased wakefulness and decreased rapid eye movement sleep and slow wave sleep. These effects of the thermal environment on sleep stages are strongly linked to thermoregulation, which affects the mechanism regulating sleep. The effects on sleep stages also differ depending on the use of bedding and/or clothing. In semi-nude subjects, sleep stages are more affected by cold exposure than heat exposure. In real-life situations where bedding and clothing are used, heat exposure increases wakefulness and decreases slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep. Humid heat exposure further increases thermal load during sleep and affects sleep stages and thermoregulation. On the other hand, cold exposure does not affect sleep stages, though the use of beddings and clothing during sleep is critical in supporting thermoregulation and sleep in cold exposure. However, cold exposure affects cardiac autonomic response during sleep without affecting sleep stages and subjective sensations. These results indicate that the impact of cold exposure may be greater than that of heat exposure in real-life situations; thus, further studies are warranted that consider the effect of cold exposure on sleep and other physiological parameters.

  19. Pressure Effects on the Thermal De-NOx Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Karsten; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1996-01-01

    The effect of pressure on the thermal de-NOx process has been investigated in flow reactor experiments. The experiments were performed at pressures from 1 to 10 bar and temperatures ranging from 925 to 1375 K. The inlet O-2 level was varied from 1000 ppm to 10%, while NH3 and NO were maintained...... at 1000 and 500 ppm, respectively At the highest pressure, CO was added to shift the regime for NO reduction to lower temperatures. The results show that the pressure affects the location and the width of the temperature window for NO reduction. As the pressure is increased, both the lower and the higher...... effect of the pressure but also cause a slight decrease in the NO reduction potential. The results are consistent with recent atmospheric pressure experiments of thermal de-NOx covering a wide range of reactant partial pressures. Comparisons of the experimental data with the recent chemical kinetic model...

  20. Thermal X-ray composites as an effect of projection

    CERN Document Server

    Petruk, O

    2000-01-01

    The new possibility to explain the nature of the thermal X-ray composites as projection effect of 2- or 3-dimensional shell-like supernova remnants (SNRs) evolved in a nonuniform medium is proposed. X-ray and radio morphologies as well as basic theoretical features of such an SNR and surrounding medium are considered. It is shown that the theoretical properties of the shell-like SNR evolved at the edge of molecular cloud with gradient of ambient density along the line of sight correspond to observed properties of the thermal X-ray composites very well. So, at least a part of the objects from the class may be interpreted in the frame of the considered effect.

  1. Thermal Effect in KTP Crystals During High Power Laser Operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Jian-Quan; YU Yi-Zhong; CHEN Jin; ZHANG Fan; WANG Peng; WANG Tao; ZHANG Bai-Gang

    2001-01-01

    We report on the theoretical and experimental studies of the thermal effect of the KTP crystal during high power operation. From the dependence of the refractive index temperature coefficients on wavelength, the dependence of the optimum phase-matching angles on temperature is derived. In the experiment, the angle of the frequency-doubled KTP crystal is tilted to compensate for the thermal effect and to obtain △φ = 0.7° when the green laser output power is 30 W and the KTP crystal temperature is about 80°C. We obtained the highest stable output power greater than 40 W with an L-shaped flat-flat intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The experimental results are very consistent with the theoretical analysis.

  2. Effects of Melt Thermal Treatment on A356 Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    To increase the casting quality of hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys, the effects of melt thermal treatment on the solidification structure of the A356 alloy were analyzed by a factorial experiment, in which the overheated melt was mixed with the low temperature melt. Experimental results show that the elongation ratio and strength of the treated samples increase remarkably compared with the control sample. The primary dendrite size reduces dramatically and the dendrite changes from columnar to equiaxed, with a little change of the secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS).Combined with the measurement of the nucleation undercooling, it is concluded that the solidification structure and refining effect are dependent primarily on the low temperature melt. The refining mechanism is believed as a result of the multiplication of the nuclei in the melt thermal treatment procedure.

  3. Ordered Pinning Arrays with Tunable Geometry via Thermal Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trastoy, Juan; Bernard, Rozenn; Briatico, Javier; Villegas, Javier E.; Malnou, Maxime; Bergeal, Nicolas; Lesueur, Jerome; Ulysse, Christian; Faini, Giancarlo

    2015-03-01

    We have used geometrically frustrated pinning arrays to create artificial vortex-ice. The pinning arrays are fabricated via ion irradiation of high-Tc superconducting films. These arrays present a very unique characteristic: the frustration can be reversibly switched on/off using temperature as a control knob, which allows stabilizing either a vortex-ice or a square vortex lattice. We have further investigated the thermal switching mechanism by studying the matching of the flux lattice to arrays that are incrementally deformed upon fabrication by introducing minute variations of the distance between pins. The array deformation exacerbates the thermal effects, leading to dramatic variations of the vortex distribution as a function of temperature. These results illustrate the strength of the temperature-induced reconfiguration effects, which may constitute a novel knob in fluxtronic devices based on vortex manipulation. Work supported by the French ANR MASTHER, the COST Action NanoSC, the Ville de Paris and the Galician Fundacion Barrie.

  4. Including the effects of debris cover in a distributed glacier energy balance model (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicciotti, F.; Reid, T.; Carenzo, M.; Brock, B. W.

    2010-12-01

    Distributed models of glacier energy balance, which make use of digital elevation models and extensive spatial data on local meteorology, have become very useful tools for predicting glacial ablation and runoff in recent years. They generally function by running a one-dimensional energy balance model at every point on a grid on the glacier surface - for each point in the grid the ablation is calculated based on the balance of heat fluxes at the ice-air boundary. However, one key component has been missing from distributed models to date, namely the effects of debris cover. Many glacier ablation zones are mantled in near-continuous blankets of rock debris, and debris-covered glaciers are important drivers of the water cycle in the European Alps, Andes and Himalayas. Moreover, debris covers have been seen to expand in recent years, so it is essential to assess exactly how the presence of debris may affect a glacier’s surface energy balance and potential responses to climate changes. The effects of a debris cover are complicated by the varying surface roughness, albedo and thermal properties of the debris in question, but generally a debris cover reduces glacier melt rate by insulating the glacier surface from direct solar radiation. Even on glaciers where the debris cover is not continuous, isolated patches of debris caused by rockfalls can affect the glacier evolution by introducing differential ablation across the glacier surface, thus creating ice-cored moraines that may persist after ‘clean’ parts of the glacier have wasted away. This paper presents the results of incorporating a one-dimensional ‘debris energy balance model’ called DEB-Model (Reid and Brock 2010) into a distributed melt model for Haut Glacier d’Arolla, Switzerland. DEB-Model numerically estimates debris surface temperature by considering the balance of heat fluxes at the air-debris interface, then calculates heat conduction through the debris in order to estimate melt rates at the

  5. Non-thermal Dupree diffusivity and shielding effects on atomic collisions in Lorentzian turbulent plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-05-01

    The influence of non-thermal Dupree turbulence and the plasma shielding on the electron-ion collision is investigated in Lorentzian turbulent plasmas. The second-order eikonal analysis and the effective interaction potential including the Lorentzian far-field term are employed to obtain the eikonal scattering phase shift and the eikonal collision cross section as functions of the diffusion coefficient, impact parameter, collision energy, Debye length and spectral index of the astrophysical Lorentzian plasma. It is shown that the non-thermal effect suppresses the eikonal scattering phase shift. However, it enhances the eikonal collision cross section in astrophysical non-thermal turbulent plasmas. The effect of non-thermal turbulence on the eikonal atomic collision cross section is weakened with increasing collision energy. The variation of the atomic cross section due to the non-thermal Dupree turbulence is also discussed. This research was supported by Nuclear Fusion Research Program through NRF funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (Grant No. 2015M1A7A1A01002786).

  6. Effects of Thermal Cycling on Control and Irradiated EPC 2nd Generation GaN FETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    The power systems for use in NASA space missions must work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and exposure to extreme temperatures. Gallium nitride semiconductors show great promise, but information pertaining to their performance is scarce. Gallium nitride N-channel enhancement-mode field effect transistors made by EPC Corporation in a 2nd generation of manufacturing were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling in order to address their reliability for use in space missions. Results of the experimental work are presented and discussed.

  7. Thermal Exposure Effects on Properties of Al-Li Alloy Plate Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sandeep; Wells, Douglas; Wagner, John; Babel, Henry

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this viewgraph representation is to evaluate the effects of thermal exposure on the mechanical properties of both production mature and developmental Al-Li alloys. The researchers find for these alloys, the data clearly shows that there is no deficit in mechanical properties at lower exposure temperatures in some cases, and a signficant deficit in mechanical properties at higher exposure temperatures in all cases. Topics considered include: Al-Li alloys composition, key characteristics of Al-Li alloys and thermal exposure matrix.

  8. Nonlinear effect induced in thermally poled glass waveguides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Yi-tao

    2006-01-01

    Thermally poled germanium-doped channel waveguides are presented. Multilayer waveguides containing a silicon oxynitride layer were used as charge trapper in this investigation on the effect of the internal field inside the waveguide. Compared to waveguides without the trapping layer, experimental results showed that the induced linear electro-optic (EO) coefficient increases about 20% after poling, suggesting strongly that the internal field is relatively enhanced, and showed it is a promising means for improving nonlinearity by poling in waveguides.

  9. Effect of Set-point Variation on Thermal Comfort and Energy Use in a Plus-energy Dwelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Kazanci, Ongun Berk; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2016-01-01

    are allowed to drift, and it also allows the occupants to benefit from adaptive opportunities.This study presents the results of thermal environment measurements and energy use in a single-family dwelling during a one year period. A radiant floor heating and cooling system was used to condition the indoor......When designing buildings and space conditioning systems, the occupant thermal comfort, health, and productivity are the main criteria to satisfy. However, this should be achieved with the most energy-efficient space conditioning systems (heating, cooling, and ventilation). Control strategy, set......-points, and control dead-bands have a direct effect on the thermal environment in and the energy use of a building. The thermal environment in and the energy use of a building are associated with the thermal mass of the building and the control strategy, including set-points and control dead-bands. With thermally...

  10. Topological thermal Hall effect in frustrated kagome antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owerre, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    In frustrated magnets the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction (DMI) arising from spin-orbit coupling can induce a magnetic long-range order. Here, we report a theoretical prediction of the thermal Hall effect in frustrated kagome magnets such as KCr3(OH) 6(SO4) 2 and KFe3(OH) 6(SO4)2 . The thermal Hall effects in these materials are induced by scalar spin chirality as opposed to DMI in previous studies. The scalar spin chirality originates from the magnetic-field-induced chiral spin configuration due to noncoplanar spin textures, but in general it can be spontaneously developed as a macroscopic order parameter in chiral quantum spin liquids. Therefore, we infer that there is a possibility of the thermal Hall effect in frustrated kagome magnets such as herbertsmithite ZnCu3(OH) 6Cl2 and the chromium compound Ca10Cr7O28 , although they also show evidence of magnetic long-range order in the presence of applied magnetic field or pressure.

  11. Nonlinear vibration and stability of rotating, pretwisted, preconed blades including Coriolis effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.; Brown, G. V.; Lawrence, C.

    1987-01-01

    The coupled bending-bending-torsional equations of dynamic motion of rotating, linearly pretwisted blades are derived including large precone, second degree geometric nonlinearities and Coriolis effects. The equations are solved by the Galerkin method and a linear perturbation technique. Accuracy of the present method is verified by conparisons of predicted frequencies and steady state deflections with those from MSC/NASTRAN and from experiments. Parametric results are generated to establish where inclusion of only the second degree geometric nonlinearities is adequate. The nonlinear terms causing torsional divergence in thin blades are identified. The effects of Coriolis terms and several other structurally nonlinear terms are studied, and their relative importance is examined.

  12. Nonlinear bending-torsional vibration and stability of rotating, pretwisted, preconed blades including Coriolis effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.; Brown, G. V.; Lawrence, C.

    1986-01-01

    The coupled bending-bending-torsional equations of dynamic motion of rotating, linearly pretwisted blades are derived including large precone, second degree geometric nonlinearities and Coriolis effects. The equations are solved by the Galerkin method and a linear perturbation technique. Accuracy of the present method is verified by comparisons of predicted frequencies and steady state deflections with those from MSC/NASTRAN and from experiments. Parametric results are generated to establish where inclusion of only the second degree geometric nonlinearities is adequate. The nonlinear terms causing torsional divergence in thin blades are identified. The effects of Coriolis terms and several other structurally nonlinear terms are studied, and their relative importance is examined.

  13. Dynamic dam-reservoir interaction analysis including effect of reservoir boundary absorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN; Gao; DU; JianGuo; HU; ZhiQiang

    2007-01-01

    Based on the scaled boundary finite-element method,the governing equations for the analysis of dam-reservoir interaction including the reservoir boundary absorption are developed.Coupling with the equation of dam-unbounded foundation interaction,it can effectively carry out the earthquake response analysis of dam-reservoir-foundation system.The proposed approach has the advantages that the effect of compressibility of reservoir water as well as the energy absorption of reservoir boundary on the earthquake response of arch dams and gravity dams can be efficiently evaluated and higher accuracy can be achieved.In comparison with the methods available in the literature,the computational cost can be reduced to a great extent.It facilitates the application of earthquake response analysis of dam-reservoir-foundation system including reservoir boundary absorption to the engineering practice.

  14. An air/sea flux model including the effects of capillary waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, Mark A.

    1993-01-01

    An improved model of the air/sea interface is developed. The improvements consist in including the effect of capillary (surface tension) waves on the tropical surface fluxes and the consideration of the sea state, both of which increase the magnitude of tropical surface fluxes. Changes in surface stress are most significant in the low wind-speed regions, which include the areas where westerly bursts occur. It is shown that the changes, from the regular wind conditions to those of a westerly burst or El-Nino, can double when the effects of capillary waves are considered. This implies a much stronger coupling between the ocean and the atmosphere than is predicted by other boundary layer models.

  15. CSR induced microbunching gain estimation including transient effects in transport and recirculation arcs

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Cheng-Ying; Douglas, David; Li, Rui; Tennant, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of a high brightness electron beam traversing a series of dipoles, such as transport or recirculation arcs, may result in the microbunching instability ({\\mu}BI). To accurately quantify the direct consequence of this effect, we further extend our previously developed semi-analytical Vlasov solver [C. -Y. Tsai et al., FEL Conference 2014 (THP022)] to include more relevant coherent radiation models than the steady-state free-space CSR impedance, such as ...

  16. Do Newtonian large-scale structure simulations fail to include relativistic effects?

    CERN Document Server

    Faraoni, Valerio; Prain, Angus

    2015-01-01

    The Newtonian simulations describing the formation of large-scale structures do not include relativistic effects. A new approach to this problem is proposed, which consists of splitting the Hawking-Hayward quasi-local energy of a closed spacelike 2-surface into a "Newtonian" part due to local perturbations and a "relativistic" part due to the cosmology. It is found that the Newtonian part dominates over the relativistic one as time evolves, lending support to the validity of Newtonian simulations.

  17. Extension of a vortex-lattice method to include the effects of leading-edge separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook, D. T.; Maddox, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    Vortex-lattice methods have been used successfully to obtain the aerodynamic coefficients of lifting surfaces without leading-edge separation. It is shown how an existing vortex-lattice method can be modified to include the effects of leading-edge separation. The modified version is then used to calculate the aerodynamic loads on a highly swept delta wing. The results are compared with Peckham's (1958) experimental data.

  18. Simulation of global warming effect on outdoor thermal comfort conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roshan, G.R.; Ranjbar, F. [Univ. of Tehran (IR). Dept. of Physical Geography; Orosa, J.A. [Univ. of A Coruna (Spain). Dept. of Energy

    2010-07-01

    In the coming decades, global warming and increase in temperature, in different regions of the world, may change indoor and outdoor thermal comfort conditions and human health. The aim of this research was to study the effects of global warming on thermal comfort conditions in indoor ambiences in Iran. To study the increase in temperature, model for assessment of greenhouse-gas induced climate change scenario generator compound model has been used together with four scenarios and to estimate thermal comfort conditions, adaptive model of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers has been used. In this study, Iran was divided into 30 zones, outdoor conditions were obtained using meteorological data of 80 climatological stations and changes in neutral comfort conditions in 2025, 2050, 2075 and 2100 were predicted. In accordance with each scenario, findings from this study showed that temperature in the 30 zones will increase by 2100 to between 3.4 C and 5.6 C. In the coming decades and in the 30 studied zones, neutral comfort temperature will increase and be higher and more intense in the central and desert zones of Iran. The low increase in this temperature will be connected to the coastal areas of the Caspian and Oman Sea in southeast Iran. This increase in temperature will be followed by a change in thermal comfort and indoor energy consumption from 8.6 % to 13.1 % in air conditioning systems. As a result, passive methods as thermal inertia are proposed as a possible solution.

  19. Sound propagation in narrow tubes including effects of viscothermal and turbulent damping with application to charge air coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsson, Magnus; Åbom, Mats

    2009-02-01

    Charge air coolers (CACs) are used on turbocharged internal combustion engines to enhance the overall gas-exchange performance. The cooling of the charged air results in higher density and thus volumetric efficiency. It is also important for petrol engines that the knock margin increases with reduced charge air temperature. A property that is still not very well investigated is the sound transmission through a CAC. The losses, due to viscous and thermal boundary layers as well as turbulence, in the narrow cooling tubes result in frequency dependent attenuation of the transmitted sound that is significant and dependent on the flow conditions. Normally, the cross-sections of the cooling tubes are neither circular nor rectangular, which is why no analytical solution accounting for a superimposed mean flow exists. The cross-dimensions of the connecting tanks, located on each side of the cooling tubes, are large compared to the diameters of the inlet and outlet ducts. Three-dimensional effects will therefore be important at frequencies significantly lower than the cut-on frequencies of the inlet/outlet ducts. In this study the two-dimensional finite element solution scheme for sound propagation in narrow tubes, including the effect of viscous and thermal boundary layers, originally derived by Astley and Cummings [Wave propagation in catalytic converters: Formulation of the problem and finite element scheme, Journal of Sound and Vibration 188 (5) (1995) 635-657] is used to extract two-ports to represent the cooling tubes. The approximate solutions for sound propagation, accounting for viscothermal and turbulent boundary layers derived by Dokumaci [Sound transmission in narrow pipes with superimposed uniform mean flow and acoustic modelling of automobile catalytic converters, Journal of Sound and Vibration 182 (5) (1995) 799-808] and Howe [The damping of sound by wall turbulent shear layers, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 98 (3) (1995) 1723-1730], are

  20. Mid-infrared thermal imaging for an effective mapping of surface materials and sub-surface detachments in mural paintings: integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffara, C.; Parisotto, S.; Mariotti, P. I.

    2015-06-01

    Cultural Heritage is discovering how precious is thermal analysis as a tool to improve the restoration, thanks to its ability to inspect hidden details. In this work a novel dual mode imaging approach, based on the integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography (TQR) in the mid-IR is demonstrated for an effective mapping of surface materials and of sub-surface detachments in mural painting. The tool was validated through a unique application: the "Monocromo" by Leonardo da Vinci in Italy. The dual mode acquisition provided two spatially aligned dataset: the TQR image and the thermal sequence. Main steps of the workflow included: 1) TQR analysis to map surface features and 2) to estimate the emissivity; 3) projection of the TQR frame on reference orthophoto and TQR mosaicking; 4) thermography analysis to map detachments; 5) use TQR to solve spatial referencing and mosaicking for the thermal-processed frames. Referencing of thermal images in the visible is a difficult aspect of the thermography technique that the dual mode approach allows to solve in effective way. We finally obtained the TQR and the thermal maps spatially referenced to the mural painting, thus providing the restorer a valuable tool for the restoration of the detachments.

  1. CSR induced microbunching gain estimation including transient effects in transport and recirculation arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Cheng [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Douglas, David R. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Rui [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of a high brightness electron beam traversing a series of dipoles, such as transport or recirculation arcs, may result in the microbunching instability (μBI). To accurately quantify the direct consequence of this effect, we further extend our previously developed semi-analytical Vlasov solver to include more relevant coherent radiation models than the steady-state free-space CSR impedance, such as the entrance and exit transient effects derived from upstream beam entering to and exiting from individual dipoles. The resultant microbunching gain functions and spectra for our example lattices are presented and compared with particle tracking simulation. Some underlying physics with inclusion of these effects are also discussed.

  2. CSR induced microbunching gain estimation including transient effects in transport and recirculation arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Cheng-Ying; Li, Rui; Tennant, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of a high brightness electron beam traversing a series of dipoles, such as transport or recirculation arcs, may result in the microbunching instability ({\\mu}BI). To accurately quantify the direct consequence of this effect, we further extend our previously developed semi-analytical Vlasov solver [C. -Y. Tsai et al., FEL Conference 2014 (THP022)] to include more relevant coherent radiation models than the steady-state free-space CSR impedance, such as the entrance and exit transient effects derived from upstream beam entering to and exiting from individual dipoles. The resultant microbunching gain functions and spectra for our example lattices are presented and compared with particle tracking simulation. Some underlying physics with inclusion of these effects are also discussed.

  3. Real-time monitoring of radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors using thermal-dose calculation by MR temperature imaging: initial results in nine patients, including follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepetit-Coiffe, Matthieu; Quesson, Bruno; Moonen, Chrit T.W. [Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle: de la physiologie a la therapie CNRS UMR 5231, Bordeaux Cedex (France); Laumonier, Herve; Trillaud, Herve [Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle: de la physiologie a la therapie CNRS UMR 5231, Bordeaux Cedex (France); Service de Radiologie, Hopital Saint-Andre, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Seror, Olivier [Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle: de la physiologie a la therapie CNRS UMR 5231, Bordeaux Cedex (France); Service de Radiologie, Hopital Jean Verdier, Bondy (France); Sesay, Musa-Bahazid [Service d' Anesthesie Reanimation III, Hopital Pellegrin, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Grenier, Nicolas [Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle: de la physiologie a la therapie CNRS UMR 5231, Bordeaux Cedex (France); Service d' Imagerie Diagnostique et Therapeutique de l' Adulte, Hopital Pellegrin, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France)

    2010-01-15

    To assess the practical feasibility and effectiveness of real-time magnetic resonance (MR) temperature monitoring for the radiofrequency (RF) ablation of liver tumours in a clinical setting, nine patients (aged 49-87 years, five men and four women) with one malignant tumour (14-50 mm, eight hepatocellular carcinomas and one colorectal metastasis), were treated by 12-min RF ablation using a 1.5-T closed magnet for real-time temperature monitoring. The clinical monopolar RF device was filtered at 64 MHz to avoid electromagnetic interference. Real-time computation of thermal-dose (TD) maps, based on Sapareto and Dewey's equation, was studied to determine its ability to provide a clear end-point of the RF procedure. Absence of local recurrence on follow-up MR images obtained 45 days after the RF ablation was used to assess the apoptotic and necrotic prediction obtained by real-time TD maps. Seven out of nine tumours were completely ablated according to the real-time TD maps. Compared with 45-day follow-up MR images, TD maps accurately predicted two primary treatment failures, but were not relevant in the later progression of one case of secondary local tumour. The real-time TD concept is a feasible and promising monitoring method for the RF ablation of liver tumours. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of thermal gradients in longitudinal spin Seebeck effect measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sola, A., E-mail: a.sola@inrim.it; Kuepferling, M.; Basso, V.; Pasquale, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Turin (Italy); Kikkawa, T. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Uchida, K. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Saitoh, E. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai 319-1195 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    In the framework of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), we developed an experimental setup for the characterization of LSSE devices. This class of device consists in a layered structure formed by a substrate, a ferrimagnetic insulator (YIG) where the spin current is thermally generated, and a paramagnetic metal (Pt) for the detection of the spin current via the inverse spin-Hall effect. In this kind of experiments, the evaluation of a thermal gradient through the thin YIG layer is a crucial point. In this work, we perform an indirect determination of the thermal gradient through the measurement of the heat flux. We developed an experimental setup using Peltier cells that allow us to measure the heat flux through a given sample. In order to test the technique, a standard LSSE device produced at Tohoku University was measured. We find a spin Seebeck S{sub SSE} coefficient of 2.8×10{sup −7} V K{sup −1}.

  5. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Graphite Materials with Cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pestchanyi, S.E.; Landman, I.S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology

    2004-08-01

    The dependence of effective thermal diffusivity on temperature caused by volumetric cracks is modelled for macroscopic graphite samples using the three-dimensional thermomechanics code Pegasus-3D. At high off-normal heat loads typical of the divertor armour, thermostress due to the anisotropy of graphite grains is much larger than that due to the temperature gradient. Numerical simulation demonstrated that the volumetric crack density both in fine grain graphites and in the CFC matrix depends mainly on the local sample temperature, not on the temperature gradient. This allows to define an effective thermal diffusivity for graphite with cracks. The results obtained are used to explain intense cracking and particle release from carbon based materials under electron beam heat load. Decrease of graphite thermal diffusivity with increase of the crack density explains particle release mechanism in the experiments with CFC where a clear energy threshold for the onset of particle release has been observed. Surface temperature measurement is necessary to calibrate the Pegasus-3D code for simulation of ITER divertor armour brittle destruction.

  6. Probing Feedback with the Thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, Devin T.; Atacama Cosmology Telescope Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect imparts a spectral distortion to the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at millimeter wavelengths, the amplitude of which provides a redshift independent probe of the thermal energy of diffuse ionized gas. With the goal of constraining the impact of feedback from active galactic nuclei on the diffuse circumgalactic environment, we have analyzed the tSZ contribution to the stacked spectral energy distributions of both radio galaxies and optically selected quasars, using millimeter and far-infrared surveys from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope and the Herschel Space Observatory. I will present the results of these studies and discuss the evidence we find for the tSZ effect associated with both these samples. While the tSZ signal from radio galaxies is consistent with expectations from purely gravitational heating, the tSZ amplitude associated with the quasar sample is found to be indicative of an additional heating source for the expected range of quasar host halo masses. We attribute this excess thermal energy to feedback influencing the circumgalactic environments of these systems. I will discuss the consequences of these results and additionally provide forecasts for tSZ measurements from future samples and surveys.

  7. Pressure effects on thermal conductivity and expansion of geologic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, J.N.

    1979-02-01

    Through analysis of existing data, an estimate is made of the effect of pressure or depth on the thermal conductivity and expansion of geologic materials which could be present in radioactive waste repositories. In the case of homogeneous dense materials, only small shifts are predicted to occur at depths less than or equal to 3 km, and these shifts will be insignificant as compared with those caused by temperature variations. As the porosity of the medium increases, the variation of conductivity and expansion with pressure becomes greater, with conductivity increasing and expansion decreasing as pressure increases. The pressure dependence of expansion can be found from data on the temperature variation of the isobaric compressibility. In a worst case estimate, a decrease in expansion of approx. 25% is predicted for 5% porous sandstone at a depth of 3 km. The thermal conductivity of a medium with gaseous inclusions increases as the porosity decreases, with the magnitude of the increase being dependent on the details of the porosity collapse. Based on analysis of existing data on tuff and sandstone, a weighted geometric mean formula is recommended for use in calculating the conductivity of porous rock. As a result of this study, it is recommended that measurement of rock porosity versus depth receive increased attention in exploration studies and that the effect of porosity on thermal conductivity and expansion should be examined in more detail.

  8. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Graphite Materials with Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestchaanyi, S. E.; Landman, I. S.

    The dependence of effective thermal diffusivity on temperature caused by volumetric cracks is modelled for macroscopic graphite samples using the three-dimensional thermomechanics code Pegasus-3D. At high off-normal heat loads typical of the divertor armour, thermostress due to the anisotropy of graphite grains is much larger than that due to the temperature gradient. Numerical simulation demonstrated that the volumetric crack density both in fine grain graphites and in the CFC matrix depends mainly on the local sample temperature, not on the temperature gradient. This allows to define an effective thermal diffusivity for graphite with cracks. The results obtained are used to explain intense cracking and particle release from carbon based materials under electron beam heat load. Decrease of graphite thermal diffusivity with increase of the crack density explains particle release mechanism in the experiments with CFC where a clear energy threshold for the onset of particle release has been observed in J. Linke et al. Fusion Eng. Design, in press, Bazyler et al., these proceedings. Surface temperature measurement is necessary to calibrate the Pegasus-3D code for simulation of ITER divertor armour brittle destruction.

  9. Thermal energy conversion by coupled shape memory and piezoelectric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Dmitry; Lebedev, Gor; Cugat, Orphee; Delamare, Jerome; Viala, Bernard; Lafont, Thomas; Gimeno, Leticia; Shelyakov, Alexander

    2012-09-01

    This work gives experimental evidence of a promising method of thermal-to-electric energy conversion by coupling shape memory effect (SME) and direct piezoelectric effect (DPE) for harvesting quasi-static ambient temperature variations. Two original prototypes of thermal energy harvesters have been fabricated and tested experimentally. The first is a hybrid laminated composite consisting of TiNiCu shape memory alloy (SMA) and macro fiber composite piezoelectric. This composite comprises 0.1 cm3 of active materials and harvests 75 µJ of energy for each temperature variation of 60 °C. The second prototype is a SME/DPE ‘machine’ which uses the thermally induced linear strains of the SMA to bend a bulk PZT ceramic plate through a specially designed mechanical structure. The SME/DPE ‘machine’ with 0.2 cm3 of active material harvests 90 µJ over a temperature increase of 35 °C (60 µJ when cooling). In contrast to pyroelectric materials, such harvesters are also compatible with both small and slow temperature variations.

  10. Thermal effects in high average power optical parametric amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothhardt, Jan; Demmler, Stefan; Hädrich, Steffen; Peschel, Thomas; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Optical parametric amplifiers (OPAs) have the reputation of being average power scalable due to the instantaneous nature of the parametric process (zero quantum defect). This Letter reveals serious challenges originating from thermal load in the nonlinear crystal caused by absorption. We investigate these thermal effects in high average power OPAs based on beta barium borate. Absorption of both pump and idler waves is identified to contribute significantly to heating of the nonlinear crystal. A temperature increase of up to 148 K with respect to the environment is observed and mechanical tensile stress up to 40 MPa is found, indicating a high risk of crystal fracture under such conditions. By restricting the idler to a wavelength range far from absorption bands and removing the crystal coating we reduce the peak temperature and the resulting temperature gradient significantly. Guidelines for further power scaling of OPAs and other nonlinear devices are given.

  11. Thermal Stress Effect on Density Changes of Hemp Hurds Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzova, Ivana; Cigasova, Julia; Stevulova, Nadezda

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this article is to study the behavior of prepared biocomposites based on hemp hurds as a filling agent in composite system. In addition to the filler and water, an alternative binder, called MgO-cement was used. For this objective were prepared three types of samples; samples based on untreated hemp hurds as a referential material and samples based on chemically (with NaOH solution) and physically (by ultrasonic procedure) treated hemp hurds. The thermal stress effect on bulk density changes of hemp hurds composites was monitored. Gradual increase in temperature led to composites density reduction of 30-40 %. This process is connected with mass loss of the adsorbed moisture and physically bound water and also with degradation of organic compounds present in hemp hurds aggregates such as pectin, hemicelluloses and cellulose. Therefore the changes in the chemical composition of treated hemp hurds in comparison to original sample and its thermal decomposition were also studied.

  12. Influence of thermal effects induced by nonlinear absorption on four-wave mixing in silicon waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao; Chen, Yaohui; Yvind, Kresten

    2014-01-01

    Influence of thermal effects induced by nonlinear absorption on four-wave mixing in silicon waveguides is investigated. A conversion bandwidth reduction up to 63% is observed in simulation due to the thermal effects.......Influence of thermal effects induced by nonlinear absorption on four-wave mixing in silicon waveguides is investigated. A conversion bandwidth reduction up to 63% is observed in simulation due to the thermal effects....

  13. Thermalization of particle detectors: The Unruh effect and its reverse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garay, Luis J.; Martín-Martínez, Eduardo; de Ramón, José

    2016-11-01

    We study the anti-Unruh effect in general stationary scenarios. We find that, for accelerated trajectories, a particle detector coupled to a Kubo-Martin-Schwinger (KMS) state of a quantum field can cool down (click less often) as the KMS temperature increases. Remarkably, this is so even when the detector is switched on adiabatically for infinitely long times. We also show that the anti-Unruh effect is characteristic of accelerated detectors and cannot appear for inertially moving detectors (e.g., in a thermal bath).

  14. Thermal effects on parallel resonance energy of whistler mode wave

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Devendraa Siingh; Shubha Singh; R P Singh

    2006-02-01

    In this short communication, we have evaluated the effect of thermal velocity of the plasma particles on the energy of resonantly interacting energetic electrons with the propagating whistler mode waves as a function of wave frequency and -value for the normal and disturbed magnetospheric conditions. During the disturbed conditions when the magnetosphere is depleted in electron density, the resonance energy of the electron enhances by an order of magnitude at higher latitudes, whereas the effect is small at low latitudes. An attempt is made to explain the enhanced wave activity observed during magnetic storm periods.

  15. Including shielding effects in application of the TPCA method for detection of embedded radiation sources.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, William C.; Shokair, Isaac R.

    2011-12-01

    Conventional full spectrum gamma spectroscopic analysis has the objective of quantitative identification of all the radionuclides present in a measurement. For low-energy resolution detectors such as NaI, when photopeaks alone are not sufficient for complete isotopic identification, such analysis requires template spectra for all the radionuclides present in the measurement. When many radionuclides are present it is difficult to make the correct identification and this process often requires many attempts to obtain a statistically valid solution by highly skilled spectroscopists. A previous report investigated using the targeted principal component analysis method (TPCA) for detection of embedded sources for RPM applications. This method uses spatial/temporal information from multiple spectral measurements to test the hypothesis of the presence of a target spectrum of interest in these measurements without the need to identify all the other radionuclides present. The previous analysis showed that the TPCA method has significant potential for automated detection of target radionuclides of interest, but did not include the effects of shielding. This report complements the previous analysis by including the effects of spectral distortion due to shielding effects for the same problem of detection of embedded sources. Two examples, one with one target radionuclide and the other with two, show that the TPCA method can successfully detect shielded targets in the presence of many other radionuclides. The shielding parameters are determined as part of the optimization process using interpolation of library spectra that are defined on a 2D grid of atomic numbers and areal densities.

  16. Including shielding effects in application of the TPCA method for detection of embedded radiation sources.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, William C.; Shokair, Isaac R.

    2011-12-01

    Conventional full spectrum gamma spectroscopic analysis has the objective of quantitative identification of all the radionuclides present in a measurement. For low-energy resolution detectors such as NaI, when photopeaks alone are not sufficient for complete isotopic identification, such analysis requires template spectra for all the radionuclides present in the measurement. When many radionuclides are present it is difficult to make the correct identification and this process often requires many attempts to obtain a statistically valid solution by highly skilled spectroscopists. A previous report investigated using the targeted principal component analysis method (TPCA) for detection of embedded sources for RPM applications. This method uses spatial/temporal information from multiple spectral measurements to test the hypothesis of the presence of a target spectrum of interest in these measurements without the need to identify all the other radionuclides present. The previous analysis showed that the TPCA method has significant potential for automated detection of target radionuclides of interest, but did not include the effects of shielding. This report complements the previous analysis by including the effects of spectral distortion due to shielding effects for the same problem of detection of embedded sources. Two examples, one with one target radionuclide and the other with two, show that the TPCA method can successfully detect shielded targets in the presence of many other radionuclides. The shielding parameters are determined as part of the optimization process using interpolation of library spectra that are defined on a 2D grid of atomic numbers and areal densities.

  17. Seismology of adolescent neutron stars: Accounting for thermal effects and crust elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, C J; Andersson, N

    2014-01-01

    We study the oscillations of relativistic stars, incorporating key physics associated with internal composition, thermal gradients and crust elasticity. Our aim is to develop a formalism which is able to account for the state-of-the-art understanding of the complex physics associated with these systems. As a first step, we build models using a modern equation of state including composition gradients and density discontinuities associated with internal phase-transitions (like the crust-core transition and the point where muons first appear in the core). In order to understand the nature of the oscillation spectrum, we carry out cooling simulations to provide realistic snapshots of the temperature distribution in the interior as the star evolves through adolescence. The associated thermal pressure is incorporated in the perturbation analysis, and we discuss the presence of $g$-modes arising as a result of thermal effects. We also consider interface modes due to phase-transitions and the gradual formation of the...

  18. Thermal effects in the Input Optics of the Enhanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory interferometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Katherine L; Arain, Muzammil A; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V; Heintze, Matthew; Hoak, Daniel; Khazanov, Efim A; Lucianetti, Antonio; Martin, Rodica M; Mueller, Guido; Palashov, Oleg; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H; Savage, R L; Tanner, D B; Williams, Luke F; Wu, Wan

    2012-03-01

    We present the design and performance of the LIGO Input Optics subsystem as implemented for the sixth science run of the LIGO interferometers. The Initial LIGO Input Optics experienced thermal side effects when operating with 7 W input power. We designed, built, and implemented improved versions of the Input Optics for Enhanced LIGO, an incremental upgrade to the Initial LIGO interferometers, designed to run with 30 W input power. At four times the power of Initial LIGO, the Enhanced LIGO Input Optics demonstrated improved performance including better optical isolation, less thermal drift, minimal thermal lensing, and higher optical efficiency. The success of the Input Optics design fosters confidence for its ability to perform well in Advanced LIGO.

  19. Similarity transformation for equilibrium flows, including effects of blowing and suction

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xi

    2016-01-01

    A similarity transformation for the mean velocity profiles is obtained in sink flow turbulent boundary layers (TBL), including effects of blowing and suction. It is based on symmetry analysis which transforms the governing partial differential equations (for mean mass and momentum) into an ordinary differential equation and yields a new result including an exact, linear relation between the mean normal ($V$) and streamwise ($U$) velocities. A characteristic length is further introduced which, under a first order expansion in wall blowing/suction velocity, leads to the similarity transformation for $U$. This transformation is shown to be a group invariant under a generalized symmetry analysis and maps different $U$ profiles under different blowing/suction conditions into a (universal) profile under no blowing/suction. Its inverse transformation enables predictions of all mean quantities in the mean mass and momentum equations - $U$, $V$ and the Reynolds shear stress - in good agreement with direct numerical si...

  20. Non-linear simulations of ELMs in ASDEX Upgrade including diamagnetic drift effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lessig, Alexander; Hoelzl, Matthias; Krebs, Isabel; Franck, Emmanuel; Guenter, Sibylle [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Orain, Francois; Morales, Jorge; Becoulet, Marina [CEA-IRFM, Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Huysmans, Guido [ITER Organization, 13067 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2015-05-01

    Large edge localized modes (ELMs) are a severe concern for ITER due to high transient heat loads on divertor targets and wall structures. Using the non-linear MHD code JOREK, we have performed ELM simulations for ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) including diamagnetic drift effects. The influence of diamagnetic terms onto the evolution of the toroidal mode spectrum for different AUG equilibria and the non-linear interaction of the toroidal harmonics are investigated. In particular, we confirm the diamagnetic stabilization of high mode numbers and present new features of a previously introduced quadratic mode coupling model for the early non-linear evolution of the mode structure. Preliminary comparisons of full ELM crashes with experimental observations are shown aiming at code validation and the understanding of different ELM types. Work is ongoing to include toroidal and neoclassical poloidal rotation in our simulations.

  1. Edge Effect on Crack Patterns in Thermally Sprayed Ceramic Splats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2017-02-01

    To explore the edge effect on intrasplat cracking of thermally sprayed ceramic splats, crack patterns of splats were experimentally observed and investigated through mechanical analysis. Both the polycrystalline splats and single-crystal splats showed obvious edge effects, i.e., preferential cracking orientation and differences in domain size between center fragments and edge fragments. In addition, substrate/interface delamination on the periphery was clearly observed for single-crystal splats. Mechanical analysis of edge effect was also carried out, and it was found that both singular normal stress in the substrate and huge peeling stress and shear stress at the interface were induced. Moreover, effective relief of tensile stress in splats is discussed. The good correspondence between experimental observations and mechanical analysis is elaborated. The edge effect can be used to tailor the pattern morphology and shed further light on coating structure design and optimization.

  2. [Evaluation of Cellular Effects Caused by Lunar Regolith Simulant Including Fine Particles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Masanori; Miki, Takeo; Honma, Yoshiyuki; Aoki, Shigeru; Morimoto, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has announced a plan to establish a manned colony on the surface of the moon, and our country, Japan, has declared its participation. The surface of the moon is covered with soil called lunar regolith, which includes fine particles. It is possible that humans will inhale lunar regolith if it is brought into the spaceship. Therefore, an evaluation of the pulmonary effects caused by lunar regolith is important for exploration of the moon. In the present study, we examine the cellular effects of lunar regolith simulant, whose components are similar to those of lunar regolith. We focused on the chemical component and particle size in particular. The regolith simulant was fractionated to effects of fine regolith simulant whose primary particle size is 5.10 μm. These regolith simulants were applied to human lung carcinoma A549 cells at concentrations of 0.1 and 1.0 mg/ml. Cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and immune response were examined after 24 h exposure. Cell membrane damage, mitochondrial dysfunction and induction of Interleukin-8 (IL-8) were observed at the concentration of 1.0 mg/ml. The cellular effects of the regolith simulant at the concentration of 0.1 mg/ml were small, as compared with crystalline silica as a positive control. Secretion of IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was observed at the concentration of 1.0 mg/ml, but induction of gene expression was not observed at 24 h after exposure. Induction of cellular oxidative stress was small. Although the cellular effects tended to be stronger in the effects of lunar regolith simulant such as cell membrane damage, induction of oxidative stress and proinflammatory effect.

  3. Analyzing Ferroresonance Phenomena in Power Transformers Including Zinc Oxide Arrester and Neutral Resistance Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Radmanesh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the effect of zinc oxide arrester (ZnO and neutral earth resistance on controlling nonconventional oscillations of the unloaded power transformer. At first, ferroresonance overvoltage in the power system including ZnO is investigated. It is shown this nonlinear resistance can limit the ferroresonance oscillations but it cannot successfully control these phenomena. Because of the temperature dissipation of ZnO, it can withstand against overvoltage in a short period and after that ferroresonance causes ZnO failure. By applying neutral earth resistance to the system configuration, mitigating ferroresonance has been increased and chaotic overvoltage has been changed to the smoother behavior such as fundamental resonance and periodic oscillation. The simulation results show that connecting the neutral resistance exhibits a great mitigating effect on nonlinear overvoltage.

  4. Finite-temperature effective boundary theory of the quantized thermal Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Ryota; Ryu, Shinsei; Nomura, Kentaro

    2016-02-01

    A finite-temperature effective free energy of the boundary of a quantized thermal Hall system is derived microscopically from the bulk two-dimensional Dirac fermion coupled with a gravitational field. In two spatial dimensions, the thermal Hall conductivity of fully gapped insulators and superconductors is quantized and given by the bulk Chern number, in analogy to the quantized electric Hall conductivity in quantum Hall systems. From the perspective of effective action functionals, two distinct types of the field theory have been proposed to describe the quantized thermal Hall effect. One of these, known as the gravitational Chern-Simons action, is a kind of topological field theory, and the other is a phenomenological theory relevant to the Strěda formula. In order to solve this problem, we derive microscopically an effective theory that accounts for the quantized thermal Hall effect. In this paper, the two-dimensional Dirac fermion under a static background gravitational field is considered in equilibrium at a finite temperature, from which an effective boundary free energy functional of the gravitational field is derived. This boundary theory is shown to explain the quantized thermal Hall conductivity and thermal Hall current in the bulk by assuming the Lorentz symmetry. The bulk effective theory is consistently determined via the boundary effective theory.

  5. Mirage effect from thermally modulated transparent carbon nanotube sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliev, Ali E; Baughman, Ray H [Alan G MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States); Gartstein, Yuri N, E-mail: Ali.Aliev@utdallas.edu [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States)

    2011-10-28

    The single-beam mirage effect, also known as photothermal deflection, is studied using a free-standing, highly aligned carbon nanotube aerogel sheet as the heat source. The extremely low thermal capacitance and high heat transfer ability of these transparent forest-drawn carbon nanotube sheets enables high frequency modulation of sheet temperature over an enormous temperature range, thereby providing a sharp, rapidly changing gradient of refractive index in the surrounding liquid or gas. The advantages of temperature modulation using carbon nanotube sheets are multiple: in inert gases the temperature can reach > 2500 K; the obtained frequency range for photothermal modulation is {approx} 100 kHz in gases and over 100 Hz in high refractive index liquids; and the heat source is transparent for optical and acoustical waves. Unlike for conventional heat sources for photothermal deflection, the intensity and phase of the thermally modulated beam component linearly depends upon the beam-to-sheet separation over a wide range of distances. This aspect enables convenient measurements of accurate values for thermal diffusivity and the temperature dependence of refractive index for both liquids and gases. The remarkable performance of nanotube sheets suggests possible applications as photo-deflectors and for switchable invisibility cloaks, and provides useful insights into their use as thermoacoustic projectors and sonar. Visibility cloaking is demonstrated in a liquid.

  6. Challenges of including nitrogen effects on decomposition in earth system models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbie, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    Despite the importance of litter decomposition for ecosystem fertility and carbon balance, key uncertainties remain about how this fundamental process is affected by nitrogen (N) availability. Nevertheless, resolving such uncertainties is critical for mechanistic inclusion of such processes in earth system models, towards predicting the ecosystem consequences of increased anthropogenic reactive N. Towards that end, we have conducted a series of experiments examining nitrogen effects on litter decomposition. We found that both substrate N and externally supplied N (regardless of form) accelerated the initial decomposition rate. Faster initial decomposition rates were linked to the higher activity of carbohydrate-degrading enzymes associated with externally supplied N and the greater relative abundances of Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria associated with green leaves and externally supplied organic N (assessed using phospholipid fatty acid analysis, PLFA). By contrast, later in decomposition, externally supplied N slowed decomposition, increasing the fraction of slowly decomposing litter and reducing lignin-degrading enzyme activity and relative abundances of Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria. Our results suggest that elevated atmospheric N deposition may have contrasting effects on the dynamics of different soil carbon pools, decreasing mean residence times of active fractions comprising very fresh litter, while increasing those of more slowly decomposing fractions including more processed litter. Incorporating these contrasting effects of N on decomposition processes into models is complicated by lingering uncertainties about how these effects generalize across ecosystems and substrates.

  7. Thermal processing of EVA encapsulants and effects of formulation additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pern, F.J.; Glick, S.H. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The authors investigated the in-situ processing temperatures and effects of various formulation additives on the formation of ultraviolet (UV) excitable chromophores, in the thermal lamination and curing of ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulants. A programmable, microprocessor-controlled, double-bag vacuum laminator was used to study two commercial as formulated EVA films, A9918P and 15295P, and solution-cast films of Elvaxrm (EVX) impregnated with various curing agents and antioxidants. The results show that the actual measured temperatures of EVA lagged significantly behind the programmed profiles for the heating elements and were affected by the total thermal mass loaded inside the laminator chamber. The antioxidant Naugard P{trademark}, used in the two commercial EVA formulations, greatly enhances the formation of UV-excitable, short chromophores upon curing, whereas other tested antioxidants show little effect. A new curing agent chosen specifically for the EVA formulation modification produces little or no effect on chromophore formation, no bubbling problems in the glass/EVX/glass laminates, and a gel content of {approximately}80% when cured at programmed 155{degrees}C for 4 min. Also demonstrated is the greater discoloring effect with higher concentrations of curing-generated chromophores.

  8. Improved multislice calculations for including higher-order Laue zones effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobato, I., E-mail: Ivan.Lobato@ua.ac.be [University of Antwerp, Department of Physics, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Van Dyck, D. [University of Antwerp, Department of Physics, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2012-08-15

    A new method for including higher-order Laue zones (HOLZs) effects in an efficient way in electron scattering simulations has been developed and tested by detail calculations. The calculated results by the conventional multislice (CMS) method and the improved conventional multislice (ICMS) method using a large dynamical aperture to avoid numerical errors are compared with accurate results. We have found that the zero-order Laue zones (ZOLZs) reflection cannot be properly described only using the projected potential in the whole unit cell; in general, we need to subslice the electrostatic potential inside the unit cell. It is shown that the ICMS method has higher accuracy than the CMS method for the calculation of the ZOLZ, HOLZ and Pseudo-HOLZ reflections. Hence, ICMS method allows to use a larger slice thickness than the CMS method and reduces the calculation time. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have developed and tested a new method for including HOLZ effects in an efficient way in electron scattering simulations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ICMS method has higher accuracy than the CMS method for the calculation of the ZOLZ, HOLZ and Pseudo-HOLZ reflections. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ICMS method allows to use a larger slice thickness than the CMS method and reduces the calculation time.

  9. A Model for One-Dimensional Coherent Synchrotron Radiation including Short-Range Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Ryne, Robert D; Qiang, Ji; Yampolsky, Nikolai

    2012-01-01

    A new model is presented for simulating coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in one dimension. The method is based on convolving an integrated Green function (IGF) with the longitudinal charge density. Since it is based on an IGF, the accuracy of this approach is determined by how well one resolves the charge density and not by resolving the single particle wake function. Since short-range wakefield effects are included analytically, the approach can be much more efficient than ordinary (non-IGF) approaches in situations where the wake function and charge density have disparate spatial scales. Two cases are presented: one derived from the full wake including short-range effects, and one derived from the asymptotic wake. In the latter case the algorithm contains the same physics as others based on the asymptotic approximation, but requires only the line charge density and not its derivative. Examples are presented that illustrate the limitations of the asymptotic-wake approximation, and that illustrate how mic...

  10. Thermal and Behavioral Effects of Exposure to 30 kW, 95-GHz Millimeter Wave Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-04

    AFRL-RH-FS-TR-2017-0016 Thermal and Behavioral Effects of Exposure to 30-kW, 95-GHz Millimeter Wave Energy James E. Parker Eric...report was cleared for public release by the 88th ABW Public Affairs Office and is available to the general public, including foreign nationals...This report is published in the interest of scientific and technical information exchange , and its

  11. Effects of thermal hydrolysis temperature on physical characteristics of municipal sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guohong; Guo, Yabing; Tan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Effects of thermal hydrolysis temperature on the physical properties of municipal sludge was further studied by a series of experiments. There was a decrease in bound water content with an increase in hydrolysis temperature, while there was an increase in pH at temperatures below 120 °C, and a decrease at temperatures exceeding 120 °C. An analysis of settleability, centrifugation and vacuum filtration of the treated sludge indicated that the threshold temperature was 120 °C, which was the same as the temperature for the bound water content and particle size. In addition, raw sludge with a solids content of 100 g/L, exhibited significant non-Newtonian fluid characteristics. At thermal hydrolysis temperatures exceeding 120 °C, non-Newtonian fluid characteristics including liquid and solid characteristics were significantly weakened. The consistency index (k) decreased from 5.90 Pa·s to 0.068 Pa·s, while the flow index (n) increased from 0.31 to 0.74, suggesting that thermal hydrolysis sludge was much closer to Newtonian fluids compared to raw sludge. Modification of bound water content, particle size and viscosity with hydrolysis temperature, revealed the nature of improved dewaterability by thermal hydrolysis. The fractal dimension of the sludge floc increased from 2.74 to 2.90, meaning that the floc became more compact after thermal hydrolysis.

  12. Effect of Nanofiller Shape on Effective Thermal Conductivity of Fluoropolymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-24

    12] S.M. Ha, H.L. Lee, S.-G. Lee, B.G. Kim, Y.S. Kim, J.C. Won, et al., Thermal conductivity of graphite filled liquid crystal polymer composites and...walled carbon nanotube- epoxy composites , Compos. Sci. Technol. 66 (2006) 1285–1288. doi:10.1016/j.compscitech.2005.10.016. ...the effective thermal conductivity of a composite . This study examines the effect of nanofiller particle shape in a polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE

  13. Moisture effect on thermal conductivity of some major elements of a typical Libyan house envelope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Bashir M.

    2006-02-01

    The thermal conductivity and the assessment of moisture effect on building materials are essential for the calculation of the thermal loads on houses. Building materials such as simple units e.g. bricks, tiles, cement plasters, mortar and ground soils are investigated in this work. In the eastern coastal province of Libya, old buildings have thick walls (more than 50 cm thick made of mixed clay and stones) and consequently have good capacitive insulation. On the other hand, the relatively new houses have thin walls and need the addition of insulating materials. Unfortunately, these new houses were constructed without having enough technical data on the thermal properties of building materials and thermal loads were not considered. This leads to uncomfortable living conditions during hot and humid summers and cold and wet winters. This article reports the thermal conductivity values of three types of locally produced building materials used in the construction of a typical Libyan house envelope and gives suggestions to improve the thermal performance of such envelopes. The transient plane source technique (TPS) is used to measure the thermal conductivity of these materials at an average room temperature of 25 °C. The TPS technique uses a resistive heater pattern (TPS element) that is cut from a thin sheet of metal and covered on both sides with thin layers of an insulating material. The TPS element/sensor is used both as a heat source and as a temperature sensor. This technique has the dual advantage of short measuring time and low temperature rise (around 1 K) across the sample. This will prevent a non-uniform moisture distribution that may arise when the temperature difference across the wet samples is maintained for a long time. In addition, the flat thin shape of the TPS element substantially reduces the contact resistance between the sample and the sensor. More details about the TPS technique are included.

  14. Transmission line model for strained quantum well lasers including carrier transport and carrier heating effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Mingjun; Ghafouri-Shiraz, H

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports a new model for strained quantum well lasers, which are based on the quantum well transmission line modeling method where effects of both carrier transport and carrier heating have been included. We have applied this new model and studied the effect of carrier transport on the output waveform of a strained quantum well laser both in time and frequency domains. It has been found that the carrier transport increases the turn-on, turn-off delay times and damping of the quantum well laser transient response. Also, analysis in the frequency domain indicates that the carrier transport causes the output spectrum of the quantum well laser in steady state to exhibit a redshift which has a narrower bandwidth and lower magnitude. The simulation results of turning-on transients obtained by the proposed model are compared with those obtained by the rate equation laser model. The new model has also been used to study the effects of pump current spikes on the laser output waveforms properties, and it was found that the presence of current spikes causes (i) wavelength blueshift, (ii) larger bandwidth, and (iii) reduces the magnitude and decreases the side-lobe suppression ratio of the laser output spectrum. Analysis in both frequency and time domains confirms that the new proposed model can accurately predict the temporal and spectral behaviors of strained quantum well lasers.

  15. Hamiltonian and Lagrangian dynamics of charged particles including the effects of radiation damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hong; Burby, Joshua; Davidson, Ronald; Fisch, Nathaniel; Chung, Moses

    2015-11-01

    The effects of radiation damping (radiation reaction) on accelerating charged particles in modern high-intensity accelerators and high-intensity laser beams have becoming increasingly important. Especially for electron accelerators and storage rings, radiation damping is an effective mechanism and technique to achieve high beam luminosity. We develop Hamiltonian and Lagrangian descriptions of the classical dynamics of a charged particle including the effects of radiation damping in the general electromagnetic focusing channels encountered in accelerators. The direct connection between the classical Hamiltonian and Lagrangian theories and the more fundamental QED description of the synchrotron radiation process is also addressed. In addition to their theoretical importance, the classical Hamiltonian and Lagrangian theories of the radiation damping also enable us to numerically integrate the dynamics using advanced structure-preserving geometric algorithms. These theoretical developments can also be applied to runaway electrons and positrons generated during the disruption or startup of tokamak discharges. This research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-09CH11466).

  16. Extension of the Hopkins theory of partially coherent imaging to include thin-film interference effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Michael S.; Lee, Derek; Lee, Robert S.; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    1993-08-01

    In this paper, we extend the Hopkins formulation to take into account high numerical aperture and thin-film interference effects by introducing a new TCC function for each depth inside the photoresist, which completely characterizes the lens/thin-film system with respect to partial coherence, aberrations, defocus and interference effects at the given depth within the photoresist. The basis of the new formulation lies in the fact that, in the presence of the thin- film stack, each point on the exit pupil of the optical system maps linearly not into a single plane wave, but into a family of multiply reflected and generally obliquely propagating plane waves, when bleaching induced scattering effects are neglected. The response within the photoresist due to each incident plane wave is calculated by the method of thin-film optics. The results are then used in the calculation of a new, matrix pupil function of the lens/thin- film system for each depth within the photoresist. Obliquity factors appropriate to high-NA systems are included in the new pupil function. For the Koehler illumination commonly used in reduction projection systems, it is shown that the total irradiance at each depth within the photoresist is expressible in terms of a matrix TCC in the limit when the rays incident on the mask are all nearly vertical, as is the case in a 5X reduction system.

  17. Effects of solid-gas coupling and pore and particle microstructures on the effective gaseous thermal conductivity in aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Junjie; Duan Yuanyuan, E-mail: yyduan@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua University, Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education (China); Wang Xiaodong, E-mail: wangxd99@gmail.com [North China Electric Power University, State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power Systems with Renewable Energy Sources (China); Wang Buxuan [Tsinghua University, Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education (China)

    2012-08-15

    An analytical model was developed to predict the pressure-dependent gaseous thermal conductivity in aerogels based on the spherical porous secondary particle aggregate structure. The model includes the effects of particle size, pore and particle microstructures, and solid-gas coupling including the quasi lattice vibrations for solid-like vibrating gas molecules in the gaps between adjacent secondary particles that are not included in previous models. The results show that the pressure-dependent effective gaseous thermal conductivities of RF and silica aerogels predicted by the present model agree well with experimental results. The solid-gas coupling significantly increases the effective gaseous thermal conductivity in the aerogels as the quasi lattice vibrating gas molecules in the gaps more effectively bridge adjacent particles. The effects of solid-gas coupling and pore and particle microstructures are significant for particle aggregate structures with mean pore and particle diameters in the range of 100 nm-10 {mu}m while the Knudsen formula and the Zeng's model have limited applicability in this size range. Micron and millimeter-scale pores that can occur in nanoporous silica aerogel samples due to the mechanical fragility of these nanostructures can be well represented by the present three pore size model.

  18. Effect of composition on thermal conductivity of silica insulation media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung; Kwon, Young-Pil; Kwon, Hyuk-Chon; Lee, Hae-Weon; Lee, Jae Chun

    2008-10-01

    Nano-sized fumed silica-based insulation media were prepared by adding TiO2 powders and ceramic fibers as opacifiers and structural integrity improvers, respectively. The high temperature thermal conductivities of the fumed silica-based insulation media were investigated using different types of TiO2 opacifier and by varying its content. The opacifying effects of nanostructured TiO2 powders produced by homogeneous precipitation process at low temperatures (HPPLT) were compared with those of commercial TiO2 powder. The nanostructured HPPLT TiO2 powder with a mean particle size of 1.8 microm was more effective to reduce radiative heat transfer than the commercial one with a similar mean particle size. The insulation samples with the HPPLT TiO2 powder showed about 46% lower thermal conductivity at temperatures of about 820 degrees C than those with the commercial one. This interesting result might be due to the more effective radiation scattering efficiency of the nanostructured HPPLT TiO2 powder which has better gap filling and coating capability in nano-sized composite compacts.

  19. Thermal Energy Harvesting Using Pyroelectric and Piezoelectric Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Miwon; Yeatman, Eric M.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a prototype of a thermal energy harvesting mechanism using both pyroelectric and piezoelectric effect. Thermal energy is one of abundant energy sources from various processes. Waste heat from a chip on a circuit board of the electronic device involves temperature differences from a few degrees C to over 100 °C. Therefore, 95 °C of a heat reservoir was used in this study. A repetitive time-dependant temperature variation is applied by a linear sliding table. The influence of heat conditions was investigated, by changing velocity and frequency of this linear sliding table. This energy harvesting mechanism employs Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT-5H), a bimetal beam and two neodymium magnets. The pyroelectric effect is caused by a time-dependent temperature variation, and the piezoelectric effect is caused by stress from deformation of the bimetal. A maximum power output 0.54 μW is obtained at an optimal condition when the load resistance is 610 kΩ.

  20. Experimental Investigation of Mechanical and Thermal properties of sisal fibre reinforced composite and effect of sic filler material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surya Teja, Malla; Ramana, M. V.; Sriramulu, D.; Rao, C. J.

    2016-09-01

    With a view of exploring the potential use of natural recourses, we made an attempt to fabricate sisal fibre polymer composites by hand lay-up method. Natural fiber composites are renewable, cheap and biodegradable. Their easy availability, lower density, higher specific properties, lower cost, satisfactory mechanical and thermal properties, non-corrosive nature, makes them an attractive ecological alternative to glass, carbon or other man-made synthetic fibers. In this work, the effect of SiC on mechanical and thermal properties of natural sisal fiber composites are investigated. The composite has been made with and without SiC incorporating natural sisal fiber with polyester as bonding material. The experimental outcomes exhibited that the tensile strength of composite with 10%SiC 2.53 times greater than that of composite without SiC. The impact strength of composite with 10% SiC is 1.73 times greater than that of composite without SiC plain polyester. Thermal properties studied include thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, thermal degradation and stability. Three different samples with 0%, 5%, 10% SiC powder are considered. With the addition of SiC filler powder, thermal conductivity increases, specific heat capacity gradually increases then decreases, thermal diffusivity increases and thermal stability improves with Sic powder.

  1. Evaluation of different measurements for effective thermal conductivity of fibrous materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Ming-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective thermal conductivity is generally recognized as the intrinsic factor to reveal the thermal responses of fibrous materials. Here, two typical measurements, the step-wise transient method and the guarded hot plate method, were utilized to identify their feasibility for the effective thermal conductivity of fibrous materials (non-woven fabric and twill fabric with different stacking layers.

  2. Coating effects on thermal properties of carbon carbon and carbon silicon carbide composites for space thermal protection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, M.; Morles, R. B.; Cioeta, F.; Marchetti, M.

    2014-06-01

    Many are the materials for hot structures, but the most promising one are the carbon based composites nowadays. This is because they have good characteristics with a high stability at high temperatures, preserving their mechanical properties. Unfortunately, carbon reacts rapidly with oxygen and the composites are subjected to oxidation degradation. From this point of view CC has to be modified in order to improve its thermal and oxidative resistance. The most common solutions are the use of silicon carbide into the carbon composites matrix (SiC composites) to make the thermal properties increase and the use of coating on the surface in order to protect the composite from the space plasma effects. Here is presented an experimental study on coating effects on these composites. Thermal properties of coated and non coated materials have been studied and the thermal impact on the matrix and surface degradation is analyzed by a SEM analysis.

  3. Polarization of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect: relativistic imprint of thermal and non-thermal plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Emritte, M S; Marchegiani, P

    2016-01-01

    [Abridged] Inverse Compton scattering of CMB fluctuations off cosmic electron plasma generates a polarization of the associated Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. This signal has been studied so far mostly in the non-relativistic regime and for a thermal electron population and, as such, has limited astrophysical applications. Partial attempts to extend this calculation for a thermal electron plasma in the relativistic regime have been done but cannot be applied to a general relativistic electron distribution. Here we derive a general form of the SZ effect polarization valid in the full relativistic approach for both thermal and non-thermal electron plasmas, as well as for a generic combination of various electron population co-spatially distributed in the environments of galaxy clusters or radiogalaxy lobes. We derive the spectral shape of the Stokes parameters induced by the IC scattering of every CMB multipole, focusing on the CMB quadrupole and octupole that provide the largest detectable signals in galaxy c...

  4. Triple Active Antiretroviral Regimen Including Enfuvirtide Via the Biojector is Effective and Safe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Loutfy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available For full HIV virological suppression, three fully active antiretroviral agents are required. New drug classes should be included to ensure that agents are fully active. The addition of enfuvirtide and efavirenz to the present patient’s new antiretroviral regimen ensured that two fully active agents were in use in the setting of a moderate degree of nucleoside resistance and a high level of protease resistance, and where non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were still fully active. Both viral load and CD4 count responded favourably to this regimen. The patient received support from physicians and clinic staff in the introduction and use of enfuvirtide. To reduce injection site reactions, a needle-free injection system (Biojector proved effective.

  5. SIMULATION OF STRONG TURBULENCE FLOW WITH FREE SURFACE INCLUDING THE EFFECTS OF STREAMLINE CURVATURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Hui-chao; LIU Yu-ling; WEI Wen-li

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a mathematical model for two-dimensional strong turbulence flow with free surface including the effects of streamline curvature in orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system, with which the characteristics of the turbulence flow field on the ogee spillway was numerical simulated. In the numerical simulation, the flow control equations in orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system were discretized by the finite volume method, the physical parameters( P, U,V,K,ε,γt,etc.) were arranged on a staggered grid, the discretized equations were solved with the SIMPLEC method, and the complex free surface was dealt with VOF method. The computed results show that the velocity fields, pressure field, shear stress distribution and kinetic energy of turbulent flow on the ogee spillway are in agreement with experimental data. This confirms that the model can be used for numerical simulation of the turbulence flow on ogee spillway.

  6. Nucleon-nucleon effective potential in dense matter including rho-meson exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Mornas, L; Pérez, A

    2002-01-01

    We obtain the RPA summed one-meson exchange potential between nucleons in symmetric nuclear matter at zero temperature, from a model which includes rho, sigma, omega and pi mesons. The behavior of rho mesons inside the medium is first discussed using different schemes to extract a finite contribution from the vacuum polarization. These schemes give qualitatively different results for the in-medium rho mass. The results are discussed in connection with the nonrenormalizability of the model. We next study the modified potential as density increases. In the intermediate-distance range, it is qualitatively modified by matter and vacuum effects. In the long-distance range (r>2 fm), one observes the presence of oscillations, which are not present in free space. Features on this distance range are insensitive to the renormalization scheme.

  7. Representation-free description of light-pulse atom interferometry including non-inertial effects

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinert, Stephan; Roura, Albert; Schleich, Wolfgang P

    2015-01-01

    Light-pulse atom interferometers rely on the wave nature of matter and its manipulation with coherent laser pulses. They are used for precise gravimetry and inertial sensing as well as for accurate measurements of fundamental constants. Reaching higher precision requires longer interferometer times which are naturally encountered in microgravity environments such as drop-tower facilities, sounding rockets and dedicated satellite missions aiming at fundamental quantum physics in space. In all those cases, it is necessary to consider arbitrary trajectories and varying orientations of the interferometer set-up in non-inertial frames of reference. Here we provide a versatile representation-free description of atom interferometry entirely based on operator algebra to address this general situation. We show how to analytically determine the phase shift as well as the visibility of interferometers with an arbitrary number of pulses including the effects of local gravitational accelerations, gravity gradients, the ro...

  8. Highly accurate spectral retardance characterization of a liquid crystal retarder including Fabry-Perot interference effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Asticio [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad de La Frontera, Temuco (Chile); Center for Optics and Photonics, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 4016, Concepción (Chile); Mar Sánchez-López, María del [Instituto de Bioingeniería, Universidad Miguel Hernández, 03202 Elche (Spain); García-Martínez, Pascuala [Departament d' Òptica, Universitat de València, 45100 Burjassot (Spain); Arias, Julia; Moreno, Ignacio [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Óptica y Tecnología Electrónica, Universidad Miguel Hernández, 03202 Elche (Spain)

    2014-01-21

    Multiple-beam Fabry-Perot (FP) interferences occur in liquid crystal retarders (LCR) devoid of an antireflective coating. In this work, a highly accurate method to obtain the spectral retardance of such devices is presented. On the basis of a simple model of the LCR that includes FP effects and by using a voltage transfer function, we show how the FP features in the transmission spectrum can be used to accurately retrieve the ordinary and extraordinary spectral phase delays, and the voltage dependence of the latter. As a consequence, the modulation characteristics of the device are fully determined with high accuracy by means of a few off-state physical parameters which are wavelength-dependent, and a single voltage transfer function that is valid within the spectral range of characterization.

  9. Effects of Cannabis Use on Human Behavior, Including Cognition, Motivation, and Psychosis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkow, Nora D; Swanson, James M; Evins, A Eden; DeLisi, Lynn E; Meier, Madeline H; Gonzalez, Raul; Bloomfield, Michael A P; Curran, H Valerie; Baler, Ruben

    2016-03-01

    With a political debate about the potential risks and benefits of cannabis use as a backdrop, the wave of legalization and liberalization initiatives continues to spread. Four states (Colorado, Washington, Oregon, and Alaska) and the District of Columbia have passed laws that legalized cannabis for recreational use by adults, and 23 others plus the District of Columbia now regulate cannabis use for medical purposes. These policy changes could trigger a broad range of unintended consequences, with profound and lasting implications for the health and social systems in our country. Cannabis use is emerging as one among many interacting factors that can affect brain development and mental function. To inform the political discourse with scientific evidence, the literature was reviewed to identify what is known and not known about the effects of cannabis use on human behavior, including cognition, motivation, and psychosis.

  10. Thymoquinone causes multiple effects, including cell death, on dividing plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanien, Sameh E; Ramadan, Ahmed M; Azeiz, Ahmed Z Abdel; Mohammed, Rasha A; Hassan, Sabah M; Shokry, Ahmed M; Atef, Ahmed; Kamal, Khalid B H; Rabah, Samar; Sabir, Jamal S M; Abuzinadah, Osama A; El-Domyati, Fotouh M; Martin, Gregory B; Bahieldin, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) is a major constituent of Nigella sativa oil with reported anti-oxidative activity and anti-inflammatory activity in animal cells. It also inhibits proliferation and induces programmed cell death (apoptosis) in human skin cancer cells. The present study sought to detect the influence of TQ on dividing cells of three plant systems and on expression of Bcl2-associated athanogene-like (BAG-like) genes that might be involved during the process of cell death. BAG genes are known for the regulation of diverse physiological processes in animals, including apoptosis, tumorigenesis, stress responses, and cell division. Synthetic TQ at 0.1mg/mL greatly reduced wheat seed germination rate, whereas 0.2mg/mL completely inhibited germination. An Evans blue assay revealed moderate cell death in the meristematic zone of Glycine max roots after 1h of TQ treatment (0.2mg/mL), with severe cell death occurring in this zone after 2h of treatment. Light microscopy of TQ-treated (0.2mg/mL) onion hairy root tips for 1h revealed anti-mitotic activity and also cell death-associated changes, including nuclear membrane disruption and nuclear fragmentation. Transmission electron microscopy of TQ-treated cells (0.2mg/mL) for 1h revealed shrinkage of the plasma membrane, leakage of cell lysate, degradation of cell walls, enlargement of vacuoles and condensation of nuclei. Expression of one BAG-like gene, previously associated with cell death, was induced 20 min after TQ treatment in Glycine max root tip cells. Thus, TQ has multiple effects, including cell death, on dividing plant cells and plants may serve as a useful system to further investigate the mechanisms underlying the response of eukaryotic cells to TQ.

  11. Effect of including torsional parameters for histidine-metal interactions in classical force fields for metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera-Adasme, Raúl; Sadeghian, Keyarash; Sundholm, Dage; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2014-11-20

    Classical force-field parameters of the metal site of metalloproteins usually comprise only the partial charges of the involved atoms, as well as the bond-stretching and bending parameters of the metal-ligand interactions. Although for certain metal ligands such as histidine residues, the torsional motions at the metal site play an important role for the dynamics of the protein, no such terms have been considered to be crucial in the parametrization of the force fields, and they have therefore been omitted in the parametrization. In this work, we have optimized AMBER-compatible force-field parameters for the reduced state of the metal site of copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and assessed the effect of including torsional parameters for the histidine-metal interactions in molecular dynamics simulations. On the basis of the obtained results, we recommend that torsion parameters of the metal site are included when processes at the metal site are investigated or when free-energy calculations are performed. As the torsion parameters mainly affect the structure of the metal site, other kinds of structural studies can be performed without considering the torsional parameters of the metal site.

  12. Prediction of Broadband Shock-Associated Noise Including Propagation Effects Originating NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven; Morris, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    An acoustic analogy is developed based on the Euler equations for broadband shock-associated noise (BBSAN) that directly incorporates the vector Green s function of the linearized Euler equations and a steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solution (SRANS) to describe the mean flow. The vector Green s function allows the BBSAN propagation through the jet shear layer to be determined. The large-scale coherent turbulence is modeled by two-point second order velocity cross-correlations. Turbulent length and time scales are related to the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate. An adjoint vector Green s function solver is implemented to determine the vector Green s function based on a locally parallel mean flow at different streamwise locations. The newly developed acoustic analogy can be simplified to one that uses the Green s function associated with the Helmholtz equation, which is consistent with a previous formulation by the authors. A large number of predictions are generated using three different nozzles over a wide range of fully-expanded jet Mach numbers and jet stagnation temperatures. These predictions are compared with experimental data from multiple jet noise experimental facilities. In addition, two models for the so-called fine-scale mixing noise are included in the comparisons. Improved BBSAN predictions are obtained relative to other models that do not include propagation effects.

  13. Effectiveness of palliative care including physiotherapy in hiv patients a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Uwimana

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that 41 million people throughout the world are living with HIV/AIDS and of these 39 million are in sub-Saharan Africa(UNAIDS 2004.  The HIV/AIDS epidemic is devastating the African continent.In Africa poorly resourced health care infrastructure further impairs the quality of life in HIV sufferers. Palliative care is an approach that aims to improve the quality of life of people living with threatening diseases such as cancer and HIV/AIDS. This review aimed to determine the efficacy of palliative care. Complementary therapies such as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, peer/counselling group therapy, massage  therapy, and exercise therapy constitute palliative care. Seventeen articles published in peer reviewed journals during the period 1990-2005 were reviewed. The findings of our review demonstrate that there are indications that palliative care can be effective in improving the quality of life in patients with life threatening diseases such HIV/AIDS. Research in this field is complicated by the heterogeneity of study samples, difficulty in patient recruitment, and death before the end of the intervention period. Future research in this area should aim to include larger study samples, using valid tools to assess quality of life and to employ qualitative methods in studies to assess the effectiveness of palliative care.

  14. The Adaptive Thermal Comfort model may not always predict thermal effects on performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyon, David Peter; Wargocki, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    A letter to the editor is presented in response to the article "Progress in thermal comfort research over the last twenty years," by R.J. de Dear and colleagues.......A letter to the editor is presented in response to the article "Progress in thermal comfort research over the last twenty years," by R.J. de Dear and colleagues....

  15. The Effect of Thermal Mass on Annual Heat Load and Thermal Comfort in Cold Climate Construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevens, Vanessa; Kotol, Martin; Grunau, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Thermal mass in building construction refers to a building material's ability to absorb and release heat based on changing environmental conditions. In building design, materials with high thermal mass used in climates with a diurnal temperature swing around the interior set-point temperature hav...

  16. Timing-dependent effects of whisker trimming in thalamocortical slices including the mouse barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kenji; Kamatani, Daiki; Hishida, Ryuichi; Shibuki, Katsuei

    2011-04-18

    Whisker trimming produces depression of cortical responses in the barrel cortex. However, it is unclear how the developmental timing modifies the effects of whisker trimming. We investigated cortical responses in thalamocortical slices that included the mouse barrel cortex using flavoprotein fluorescence imaging. A topological relationship was observed between the thalamic stimulated sites and cortical areas showing fluorescence changes. By adjusting the position of the thalamic stimulated sites and the cortical windows in which amplitudes of the fluorescence changes were measured, we succeeded to reduce the variability of cortical responses between slices. We then investigated the effects of whisker trimming in the thalamocortical slices. Whisker trimming from 4 weeks to 8 weeks (at 4-8 weeks) of age significantly reduced cortical responses at 8 weeks. However, whisker trimming started before 4 weeks produced only slight depression or no significant effect on the thalamocortical responses. As sensory deprivation during a critical developmental period is known to prevent elimination of synapses, the presence of aberrant synapses may compensate the cortical depression induced by whisker trimming started before 4 weeks. To test this possibility, whisker trimming performed at 0-6 or 0-7 weeks of age was followed by regrowth of whiskers for 1-2 weeks. Clear and significant potentiation of cortical responses was observed in these mice at 8 weeks when compared with those of naive mice of the same age. Overall, these data suggest that whisker trimming, producing depression of thalamocortical responses, prevents elimination of aberrant synapses during a critical developmental period before 4 weeks in the mouse barrel cortex. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A surplus production model including environmental effects: Application to the Senegalese white shrimp stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiaw, Modou; Gascuel, Didier; Jouffre, Didier; Thiaw, Omar Thiom

    2009-12-01

    In Senegal, two stocks of white shrimp ( Penaeusnotialis) are intensively exploited, one in the north and another in the south. We used surplus production models including environmental effects to analyse their changes in abundance over the past 10 years and to estimate their Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY) and the related fishing effort ( EMSY). First, yearly abundance indices were estimated from commercial statistics using GLM techniques. Then, two environmental indices were alternatively tested in the model: the coastal upwelling intensity from wind speeds provided by the SeaWifs database and the primary production derived from satellite infrared images of chlorophyll a. Models were fitted, with or without the environmental effect, to the 1996-2005 time series. They express stock abundance and catches as functions of the fishing effort and the environmental index (when considered). For the northern stock, fishing effort and abundance fluctuate over the period without any clear trends. The model based on the upwelling index explains 64.9% of the year-to-year variability. It shows that the stock was slightly overexploited in 2002-2003 and is now close to full exploitation. Stock abundance strongly depends on environmental conditions; consequently, the MSY estimate varies from 300 to 900 tons according to the upwelling intensity. For the southern stock, fishing effort has strongly increased over the past 10 years, while abundance has been reduced 4-fold. The environment has a significant effect on abundance but only explains a small part of the year-to-year variability. The best fit is obtained using the primary production index ( R2 = 0.75), and the stock is now significantly overfished regardless of environmental conditions. MSY varies from 1200 to 1800 tons according to environmental conditions. Finally, in northern Senegal, the upwelling is highly variable from year to year and constitutes the major factor determining productivity. In the south, hydrodynamic

  18. Quantum statistical correlations in thermal field theories: boundary effective theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bessa, A; de Carvalho, C A A; Fraga, E S

    2010-01-01

    We show that the one-loop effective action at finite temperature for a scalar field with quartic interaction has the same renormalized expression as at zero temperature if written in terms of a certain classical field $\\phi_c$, and if we trade free propagators at zero temperature for their finite-temperature counterparts. The result follows if we write the partition function as an integral over field eigenstates (boundary fields) of the density matrix element in the functional Schr\\"{o}dinger field-representation, and perform a semiclassical expansion in two steps: first, we integrate around the saddle-point for fixed boundary fields, which is the classical field $\\phi_c$, a functional of the boundary fields; then, we perform a saddle-point integration over the boundary fields, whose correlations characterize the thermal properties of the system. This procedure provides a dimensionally-reduced effective theory for the thermal system. We calculate the two-point correlation as an example.

  19. Effects of thermal treatments on donkey milk nutritional characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidori, Paolo; Vincenzetti, Silvia

    2013-12-01

    Human breast milk is the best nutritional support to ensure right development and influence immune status of the newborn infant. However, when it is not possible to breast feed it may be necessary to use commercial infant formulas that mimic, where possible, the levels and types of nutrients present in human milk. Despite this, some formula-fed infants develop allergy and/or atopic disease compared to breast-fed infants. Most infants with cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) develop symptoms before 1 month of age, often within 1 week after introduction of cow's milk-based formula. Donkey milk may be considered a good substitute for cow's milk in feeding children with CMPA since its composition is very similar to human milk. An in-depth analysis of the donkey milk protein profile has been performed in this study. The interest was focused on the milk proteins considered safe for the prevention and treatment of various disorders in human. Since donkey milk supply is related to its seasonal availability during the year, in this study were evaluated the effects of different thermal treatments on the protein fractions of donkey milk. The results obtained in fresh, frozen, powdered and lyophilized donkey milk showed different values in total proteins, caseins, whey proteins and lysozyme content. This study demonstrated the possibility of using lyophilization in order to maintain the nutritional characteristics of donkey milk. The article presents some promising patents on the effects of thermal treatments on donkey milk nutritional characteristics.

  20. Cooling Strategies for Vane Leading Edges in a Syngas Environment Including Effects of Deposition and Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, Forrest [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Bons, Jeffrey [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The Department of Energy has goals to move land based gas turbine systems to alternate fuels including coal derived synthetic gas and hydrogen. Coal is the most abundant energy resource in the US and in the world and it is economically advantageous to develop power systems which can use coal. Integrated gasification combined cycles are (IGCC) expected to allow the clean use of coal derived fuels while improving the ability to capture and sequester carbon dioxide. These cycles will need to maintain or increase turbine entry temperatures to develop competitive efficiencies. The use of coal derived syngas introduces a range of potential contaminants into the hot section of the gas turbine including sulfur, iron, calcium, and various alkali metals. Depending on the effectiveness of the gas clean up processes, there exists significant likelihood that the remaining materials will become molten in the combustion process and potentially deposit on downstream turbine surfaces. Past evidence suggests that deposition will be a strong function of increasing temperature. Currently, even with the best gas cleanup processes a small level of particulate matter in the syngas is expected. Consequently, particulate deposition is expected to be an important consideration in the design of turbine components. The leading edge region of first stage vanes most often have higher deposition rates than other areas due to strong fluid acceleration and streamline curvature in the vicinity of the surface. This region remains one of the most difficult areas in a turbine nozzle to cool due to high inlet temperatures and only a small pressure ratio for cooling. The leading edge of a vane often has relatively high heat transfer coefficients and is often cooled using showerhead film cooling arrays. The throat of the first stage nozzle is another area where deposition potentially has a strongly adverse effect on turbine performance as this region meters the turbine inlet flow. Based on roughness

  1. Effects of including electrojet turbulence in LFM-RCM simulations of geospace storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, M. M.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Merkin, V. G.; Zhang, B.; Toffoletto, F.; Wang, W.; Lyon, J.; Liu, J.; Dimant, Y. S.

    2016-12-01

    Global geospace system simulations need to incorporate nonlinear and small-scale physical processes in order to accurately model storms and other intense events. During times of strong magnetospheric disturbances, large-amplitude electric fields penetrate from the Earth's magnetosphere to the E-region ionosphere where they drive Farley-Buneman instabilities (FBI) that create small-scale plasma density turbulence. This induces nonlinear currents and leads to anomalous electron heating. Current global Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere (MIT) models disregard these effects by assuming simple laminar ionospheric currents. This paper discusses the effects of incorporating accurate turbulent conductivities into MIT models. Recently, we showed in Liu et al. (2016) that during storm-time, turbulence increases the electron temperatures and conductivities more than precipitation. In this talk, we present the effect of adding these effects to the combined Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global MHD magnetosphere simulator and the Rice Convection Model (RCM). The LFM combines a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the magnetosphere with a 2D electrostatic solution of the ionosphere. The RCM uses drift physics to accurately model the inner magnetosphere, including a storm enhanced ring current. The LFM and coupled LFM-RCM simulations have previously shown unrealistically high cross-polar-cap potentials during strong solar wind driving conditions. We have recently implemented an LFM module that modifies the ionospheric conductivity to account for FBI driven anomalous electron heating and non-linear cross-field current enhancements as a function of the predicted ionospheric electric field. We have also improved the LFM-RCM code by making it capable of handling dipole tilts and asymmetric ionospheric solutions. We have tested this new LFM version by simulating the March 17, 2013 geomagnetic storm. These simulations showed a significant reduction in the cross-polar-cap potential

  2. Environmental assessment of biofuel chains based on ecosystem modelling, including land-use change effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielle, B.; Gagnaire, N.; Massad, R.; Prieur, V.; Python, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The potential greenhouse gas (GHG) savings resulting from the displacement of fossil energy sources by bioenergy mostly hinges on the uncertainty on the magnitude of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from arable soils occuring during feedstock production. These emissions are broadly related to fertilizer nitrogen input rates, but largely controlled by soil and climate factors which makes their estimation highly uncertain. Here, we set out to improve estimates of N2O emissions from bioenergy feedstocks by using ecosystem models and measurements and modeling of atmospheric N2O in the greater Paris (France) area. Ground fluxes were measured in two locations to assess the effect of soil type and management, crop type (including lignocellulosics such as triticale, switchgrass and miscanthus), and climate on N2O emission rates and dynamics. High-resolution maps of N2O emissions were generated over the Ile-de-France region (around Paris) with two ecosystem models using geographical databases on soils, weather data, land-use and crop management. The models were tested against ground flux measurements and the emission maps were fed into the atmospheric chemistry-transport model CHIMERE. The maps were tested by comparing the CHIMERE simulations with time series of N2O concentrations measured at various heights above the ground in two locations in 2007. The emissions of N2O, as integrated over the region, were used in a life-cycle assessment of representative biofuel pathways: bioethanol from wheat and sugar-beet (1st generation), and miscanthus (2nd generation chain); bio-diesel from oilseed rape. Effects related to direct and indirect land-use changes (in particular on soil carbon stocks) were also included in the assessment based on various land-use scenarios and literature references. The potential deployment of miscanthus was simulated by assuming it would be grown on the current sugar-beet growing area in Ile-de-France, or by converting land currently under permanent fallow

  3. Study of Anti-Fatigue Effect in Rats of Ferrous Chelates Including Hairtail Protein Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saibo Huang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability of ferrous chelates including hairtail protein hydrolysates to prevent and reduce fatigue was studied in rats. After hydrolysis of hairtail surimi with papain, the hairtail protein hydrolysates (HPH were separated into three groups by range of relative molecular weight using ultrafiltration membrane separation. Hairtail proteins were then chelated with ferrous ions, and the antioxidant activity, the amino acid composition and chelation rate of the three kinds of ferrous chelates including hairtail protein hydrolysates (Fe-HPH were determined. Among the three groups, the Fe-HPH chelate showing the best conditions was selected for the anti-fatigue animal experiment. For it, experimental rats were randomly divided into seven groups. Group A was designated as the negative control group given distilled water. Group B, the positive control group, was given glutathione. Groups C, D and E were designated as the Fe-HPH chelate treatment groups and given low, medium, and high doses, respectively. Group F was designated as HPH hydrolysate treatment group, and Group G was designated as FeCl2 treatment group. The different diets were orally administered to rats for 20 days. After that time, rats were subjected to forced swimming training after 1 h of gavage. Rats given Fe-FPH chelate had higher haemoglobin regeneration efficiency (HRE, longer exhaustive swimming time and higher SOD activity. Additionally, Fe-FPH chelate was found to significantly decrease the malondialdehyde content, visibly enhance the GSH-Px activity in liver and reduce blood lactic acid of rats. Fe-HPH chelate revealed an anti-fatigue effect, similar to or better than the positive control substance and superior to HPH or Fe when provided alone.

  4. In vitro effectiveness of Castellani solution including various ingredients against different microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şükran Çopur

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: As the external auditory canal is a moisturearea, it facilitates the growth of bacteria and fungi. Infectionsand inflammation due to Staphylococcus aureus,Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aspergillus spp. and Candidaalbicans can develop in this area. Classical Castellanisolution including boric acid, fenol, fucsin, resorcinol, acetone,and alcohol is used for external ear tract infectionsdue to fungi and bacteria, and also for the superficial dermatophytoses,and eczematous dermatitis of the externalear tract infections.The purpose of this study is to investigate of the in vitroeffectiveness of classical Castellani solution and its differentformulations with different dilutions against the standardyeast and bacteria strains.Methods: C. albicans ATCC 10231, C. krusei ATCC6258, C. dubliniensis CD 36, C. guilliermondii ATCC6260, C. parapsilosis ATCC22019, E. coli ATCC 25922,P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853, MRSA ATCC 43300, Staphylococcusaureus ATCC 25923, and S. epidermidis ATCC12228 strains were included in the study. Broth microdilutionmethod was used for each microorganism and Castellaniformulation. The tests are repeated at least twice.Results: The inhibitory concentration of classical Castellanisolution against bacteria and fungi is 1/64-1/256,1/32-1/64 for fuchsin free solution, 1/32-1/128 for boricacid-free solution and, 1/64-1/128 for resorcinol-free solution.Conclusions: As a conclusion we think that the classicalCastellani solution and its different formulations at variousdilutions may be effective antimicrobial agents for differentpatient populations. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (3:302-305Key words: Castellani solution, antimicrobial activity, in vitro

  5. Study of Anti-Fatigue Effect in Rats of Ferrous Chelates Including Hairtail Protein Hydrolysates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Saibo; Lin, Huimin; Deng, Shang-gui

    2015-01-01

    The ability of ferrous chelates including hairtail protein hydrolysates to prevent and reduce fatigue was studied in rats. After hydrolysis of hairtail surimi with papain, the hairtail protein hydrolysates (HPH) were separated into three groups by range of relative molecular weight using ultrafiltration membrane separation. Hairtail proteins were then chelated with ferrous ions, and the antioxidant activity, the amino acid composition and chelation rate of the three kinds of ferrous chelates including hairtail protein hydrolysates (Fe-HPH) were determined. Among the three groups, the Fe-HPH chelate showing the best conditions was selected for the anti-fatigue animal experiment. For it, experimental rats were randomly divided into seven groups. Group A was designated as the negative control group given distilled water. Group B, the positive control group, was given glutathione. Groups C, D and E were designated as the Fe-HPH chelate treatment groups and given low, medium, and high doses, respectively. Group F was designated as HPH hydrolysate treatment group, and Group G was designated as FeCl2 treatment group. The different diets were orally administered to rats for 20 days. After that time, rats were subjected to forced swimming training after 1 h of gavage. Rats given Fe-FPH chelate had higher haemoglobin regeneration efficiency (HRE), longer exhaustive swimming time and higher SOD activity. Additionally, Fe-FPH chelate was found to significantly decrease the malondialdehyde content, visibly enhance the GSH-Px activity in liver and reduce blood lactic acid of rats. Fe-HPH chelate revealed an anti-fatigue effect, similar to or better than the positive control substance and superior to HPH or Fe when provided alone. PMID:26633476

  6. The Prediction of Broadband Shock-Associated Noise Including Propagation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven; Morris, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    An acoustic analogy is developed based on the Euler equations for broadband shock- associated noise (BBSAN) that directly incorporates the vector Green's function of the linearized Euler equations and a steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solution (SRANS) as the mean flow. The vector Green's function allows the BBSAN propagation through the jet shear layer to be determined. The large-scale coherent turbulence is modeled by two-point second order velocity cross-correlations. Turbulent length and time scales are related to the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation. An adjoint vector Green's function solver is implemented to determine the vector Green's function based on a locally parallel mean flow at streamwise locations of the SRANS solution. However, the developed acoustic analogy could easily be based on any adjoint vector Green's function solver, such as one that makes no assumptions about the mean flow. The newly developed acoustic analogy can be simplified to one that uses the Green's function associated with the Helmholtz equation, which is consistent with the formulation of Morris and Miller (AIAAJ 2010). A large number of predictions are generated using three different nozzles over a wide range of fully expanded Mach numbers and jet stagnation temperatures. These predictions are compared with experimental data from multiple jet noise labs. In addition, two models for the so-called 'fine-scale' mixing noise are included in the comparisons. Improved BBSAN predictions are obtained relative to other models that do not include the propagation effects, especially in the upstream direction of the jet.

  7. Study of Anti-Fatigue Effect in Rats of Ferrous Chelates Including Hairtail Protein Hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Saibo; Lin, Huimin; Deng, Shang-Gui

    2015-12-01

    The ability of ferrous chelates including hairtail protein hydrolysates to prevent and reduce fatigue was studied in rats. After hydrolysis of hairtail surimi with papain, the hairtail protein hydrolysates (HPH) were separated into three groups by range of relative molecular weight using ultrafiltration membrane separation. Hairtail proteins were then chelated with ferrous ions, and the antioxidant activity, the amino acid composition and chelation rate of the three kinds of ferrous chelates including hairtail protein hydrolysates (Fe-HPH) were determined. Among the three groups, the Fe-HPH chelate showing the best conditions was selected for the anti-fatigue animal experiment. For it, experimental rats were randomly divided into seven groups. Group A was designated as the negative control group given distilled water. Group B, the positive control group, was given glutathione. Groups C, D and E were designated as the Fe-HPH chelate treatment groups and given low, medium, and high doses, respectively. Group F was designated as HPH hydrolysate treatment group, and Group G was designated as FeCl₂ treatment group. The different diets were orally administered to rats for 20 days. After that time, rats were subjected to forced swimming training after 1 h of gavage. Rats given Fe-FPH chelate had higher haemoglobin regeneration efficiency (HRE), longer exhaustive swimming time and higher SOD activity. Additionally, Fe-FPH chelate was found to significantly decrease the malondialdehyde content, visibly enhance the GSH-Px activity in liver and reduce blood lactic acid of rats. Fe-HPH chelate revealed an anti-fatigue effect, similar to or better than the positive control substance and superior to HPH or Fe when provided alone.

  8. Coupled Effects of Temperature Gradient and Oxidation on the Thermal Barrier Coating Failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.C.Zhou; T.Hashida

    2000-01-01

    The present article reviews the investigation about the coupled effects of temperature gradient and oxidation on the failure of thermal barrier ceramic coatings in the past ten years in our laboratory. The investigations include the experimental and theoretical study. On the experimental investigation, the heating method, non-destructive evaluation and interface properties are mainly reviewed. An attempt is done for developing four different heating methods, which are furnace heating, burner heating, plasma heating and laser beam heating. The non-destructive evaluation such as temperature test, acoustic emission (AE) signals detected and impedance spectroscopy (IS) method are successfully used in the study of TBCs system degradation. The interface properties such as oxidation and fracture toughness are studied by test and observation. On the theoretical investigation, the temperature fields and the related thermal stresses fields are analytical solved where the coupling effect of temperature gradient, oxidation, thermal fatigue, creep, morphology of the TBC system as well as the cooling rate are considered. The delamination cracking in thermal barrier coating system with ceramic coating deposited on a substrate is analytical studied. Due to the complication of TBCs degradation, a real physical map of TBCs system failure is not obtained up to now. The investigation on the further is proposed.

  9. Effect of non-homogenous thermal stress during sub-lethal photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadura, N.; Kokkinos, D.; Dehipawala, S.; Cheung, E.; Sullivan, R.; Subramaniam, R.; Schneider, P.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Holden, T.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2012-03-01

    Pathogens could be inactivated via a light source coupled with a photosensitizing agent in photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT). This project studied the effect of non-homogenous substrate on cell colony. The non-homogeneity could be controlled by iron oxide nano-particles doping in porous glassy substrates such that each cell would experience tens of hot spots when illuminated with additional light source. The substrate non-homogeneity was characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure at Brookhaven Synchrotron Light Source. Microscopy images of cell motion were used to study the motility. Laboratory cell colonies on non-homogenous substrates exhibit reduced motility similar to those observed with sub-lethal PCAT treatment. Such motility reduction on non-homogenous substrate is interpreted as the presence of thermal stress. The studied pathogens included E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Non-pathogenic microbes Bacillus subtilis was also studied for comparison. The results show that sub-lethal PACT could be effective with additional non-homogenous thermal stress. The use of non-uniform illumination on a homogeneous substrate to create thermal stress in sub-micron length scale is discussed via light correlation in propagation through random medium. Extension to sub-lethal PACT application complemented with thermal stress would be an appropriate application.

  10. Evaluation of the effects of vegetation and green walls on building thermal performance and energy consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susorova, Irina

    This research explored the use of vegetation in building facades as a potential solution to the problems of urban ecology and the excessive energy consumption in buildings. Vegetated facades substantially reduce building energy use, reduce the urban heat island effect, improve air quality, and increase the biodiversity of plants and animals in cities. The goal of this research was to evaluate the effects of plants on building thermal performance and energy consumption by developing a thermal model of a building facade covered with a layer of plants. The developed mathematical model accounts for thermal physical processes in a vegetated exterior wall including solar radiation, infrared radiative exchange between the facade and sky, the facade and ground, the facade and vegetation layer, convection to and from the facade, evapotranspiration from the plant layer, heat storage in the facade material, and heat conduction through the facade. The model calculates vegetated facade surface temperature and heat flux through the facade for multiple weather conditions, plant physiological characteristics, and facade parameters inputs. The model was validated with the results of a one-week long experiment measuring the thermal properties of bare and vegetated facades on the Illinois Institute of Technology campus. The experiment and subsequent sensitivity analysis demonstrated that a plant layer can effectively reduce the facade exterior surface temperature, daily temperature fluctuations, exterior wall temperature gradient, and, as a result, provide as much additional thermal insulation to the facade as a 2.5 cm layer of expanded polystyrene insulation. The vegetated facade model was also used to analyze the reduction in energy consumption in generic office and residential thermal zones for multiple parameters. The simulations showed that energy reduction could be as high as 6.2% of annual total energy use and 34.6% of cooling energy use in residential thermal zones. Overall

  11. Comparative study on effect of blending, thermal barrier coating (LHR)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    But proper deployment of blending the biodiesel with diesel and adopting thermal ... almost comparable engine performance with acceptable emission norms. ... Keywords: Uppage oil, biodiesel, thermal barrier coating, low heat rejection ...

  12. Effect of multipolar interaction on the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Xiao-Feng; Gao Lei

    2007-01-01

    Nanofluids or liquids with suspended nanoparticles are likely to be the future heat transfer media, as they exhibit higher thermal conductivity than those of liquids. It has been proposed that nanoparticles are apt to congregate and form clusters, and hence the interaction between nanoparticles becomes important. In this paper, by taking into account the interaction between nearest-neighbour inclusions, we adopt the multiple image method to investigate the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids. Numerical results show that then the thermal conductivity ratio between the nanoparticles and fluids is large, and the two nanoparticles are close up and even touch, and the point-dipole theory such as Maxwell-Garnett theory becomes rough as many-body interactions are neglected. Our theoretical results on the effective thermal conductivity of CuO/water and Al2O3/water nanofluids are in good agreement with experimental data.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of thermal effects in nanometric cutting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the basic action of how material removing in nanoscale is a critical issue of producing well-formed components.In order to clarify thermal effects on material removal at atomic level,molecular dynamics(MD)simulations of nanometric cutting of mono-crystalline copper are performed with Morse,EAM and Tersoff potential.The effects of cutting speed on temperature distribution are investigated.The simulation results demonstrate that the temperature distribution shows a roughly concentric shape around shear zone and a steep temperature gradient lies in diamond tool,a relative high temperature is located in shear zone and machined surface,but the highest temperature is found in chip.At a high cutting speed mode,the atoms in shear zone with high temperature implies a large stress is built up in a local region.

  14. Effects of supersonic fine particle bombarding on thermal cyclic failure lifetime of thermal barrier coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ya-jun; LIN Xiao-ping; WANG Zhi-ping; WANG Li-jun; JI Zhao-hui; DONG Yun

    2010-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating(TBC)consisting of a NiCoCrAlY bond coat(BC)and a ZrO2-8 wt.%Y2O3 topcoat(TC)was fabricated on the nickel-base supcralloy by air plasma spray(APS).The BC was trea-ted by supersonic fine particle bombarding(SFPB).Thermal cyclic failure and residual stress in thermally grown oxide(TGO)scale were studied by SEM with EDS and ruby fluorescence spectroscopy(RFS).As shown in the results,after treated by SFPB,thickening of TGO was relatively slow,which reduced the level of growth stress.The TBC with SFPB treatment was still remained well undergoing 350 times of thermal cycle.However,after thermal cycle with the same times,the separation of TC was observed in TBC without SFPB treatment.The residual stress analysis by RFS showed that the residual stress of SFPB-treated TBC increased with the increasing number of thermal cycle.The residual stress of conventional TBC reached a value of 650MPa at 350 times of cycle and that of SFPB-treated TBC only reached 532 MPa at 400 times of cycle.The BC with SFPB treatment after 400 times of cycle was analyzed by RFS,the high stress value was not observed in local thickened region of TGO.Thermal cycling resistance of TBC can be improved by the SFPB technology.

  15. Thermal Conductivity of Nanotubes: Effects of Chirality and Isotope Impurity

    OpenAIRE

    Gang, Zhang; Li, Baowen

    2005-01-01

    We study the dependence of thermal conductivity of single walled nanotubes (SWNT) on chirality and isotope impurity by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method with accurate potentials. It is found that, contrary to electronic conductivity, the thermal conductivity is insensitive to the chirality. The isotope impurity, however, can reduce the thermal conductivity up to 60% and change the temperature dependence behavior. We also study the dependence of thermal conductivity on tube length for t...

  16. Innovative Liner Concepts: Experiments and Impedance Modeling of Liners Including the Effect of Bias Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Jeff; Betts, Juan Fernando; Fuller, Chris

    2000-01-01

    The study of normal impedance of perforated plate acoustic liners including the effect of bias flow was studied. Two impedance models were developed by modeling the internal flows of perforate orifices as infinite tubes with the inclusion of end corrections to handle finite length effects. These models assumed incompressible and compressible flows, respectively, between the far field and the perforate orifice. The incompressible model was used to predict impedance results for perforated plates with percent open areas ranging from 5% to 15%. The predicted resistance results showed better agreement with experiments for the higher percent open area samples. The agreement also tended to deteriorate as bias flow was increased. For perforated plates with percent open areas ranging from 1% to 5%, the compressible model was used to predict impedance results. The model predictions were closer to the experimental resistance results for the 2% to 3% open area samples. The predictions tended to deteriorate as bias flow was increased. The reactance results were well predicted by the models for the higher percent open area, but deteriorated as the percent open area was lowered (5%) and bias flow was increased. A fit was done on the incompressible model to the experimental database. The fit was performed using an optimization routine that found the optimal set of multiplication coefficients to the non-dimensional groups that minimized the least squares slope error between predictions and experiments. The result of the fit indicated that terms not associated with bias flow required a greater degree of correction than the terms associated with the bias flow. This model improved agreement with experiments by nearly 15% for the low percent open area (5%) samples when compared to the unfitted model. The fitted model and the unfitted model performed equally well for the higher percent open area (10% and 15%).

  17. Radiofrequency Ablation: Inflammatory Changes in the Periablative Zone Can Induce Global Organ Effects, including Liver Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenblum, Nir; Zeira, Evelyne; Bulvik, Baruch; Gourevitch, Svetlana; Yotvat, Hagit; Galun, Eithan; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2015-08-01

    To determine the kinetics of innate immune and hepatic response to the coagulation necrosis area that remains in situ after radiofrequency (RF) ablation, the cytokine profile of this response, and its local and global effect on the whole organ in a small-animal model. A standardized RF ablation dose (70°C for 5 minutes) was used to ablate more than 7% of the liver in 91 C57BL6 mice (wild type) according to a protocol approved by the animal care committee. The dynamic cellular response in the border zone surrounding ablation-induced coagulation and in the ablated lobe and an untreated lobe were characterized with immunohistochemistry 24 hours, 72 hours, 7 days, and 14 days after ablation (the time points at which cells migrate to necrotic tissues). After characterization of the cellular populations that reacted to the RF treatment, cytokines secreted by these cells were blocked, either by using interleukin-6 knockout mice (n = 24) or c-met inhibitor PHA 665752 (n = 15), to elucidate the key factors facilitating the wound healing response to RF ablation. Statistical significance was assessed with nonparametric analysis of variance. RF ablation induces a strong time-dependent immunologic response at the perimeter of the necrotic zone. This includes massive accumulation of neutrophils, activated myofibroblasts, and macrophages peaking at 24 hours, 7 days, and 14 days after ablation, respectively. In correlation with myofibroblast accumulation, RF ablation induced hepatocyte proliferation in both the ablated lobe and an untreated lobe (mean, 165.15 and 230.4 cyclin-dependent kinase 47-positive cells per ×20 field, respectively, at day 7; P RF ablation induces not only a local periablational inflammatory zone but also more global proliferative effects on the liver. These IL-6- and/or c-met-mediated changes could potentially account for some of the local and distant tumor recurrence observed after treatment. © RSNA, 2015 Online supplemental material is available for

  18. A fractal model for the effective thermal conductivity of nanoparticle suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Buxuan; ZHOU Leping; PENG Xiaofeng

    2004-01-01

    Extending the effective medium approximation with the fractal theory for describing nanoparticle clusters and their radius distribution, a predictive model is proposed for the effective thermal conductivity of nanoparticle suspension, combined with the consideration of size effect and surface adsorption effect of nanoparticles.The predicted effective thermal conductivity of nanoparticle suspension is consistent with experimental data in the dilute limit.

  19. Fine Line Electromigration. The Effect of Crossed Thermal Gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    HORIZONTAL 30 PLANE OF CONDUCTOR OF FIGURE 11-17 III-1- THERMAL GRADIENT TEST CHIP FEATURES 32 111-2 COMPLETE THERMAL TEST CHIP 33 ", ’ V-i OPTICAL...111-2 COMPLETE THERMAL TEST CHIP 33 * . --. . * . -" - . - short lengths of conductors are similarly located on the other side of the diffused resistor

  20. Thermal resistances of air in cavity walls and their effect upon the thermal insulation performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekkouche, S.M.A.; Cherier, M.K.; Hamdani, M.; Benamrane, N. [Application of Renewable Energies in Arid and Semi Arid Environments /Applied Research Unit on Renewable Energies/ EPST Development Center of Renewable Energies, URAER and B.P. 88, ZI, Gart Taam Ghardaia (Algeria); Benouaz, T. [University of Tlemcen, BP. 119, Tlemcen R.p. 13000 (Algeria); Yaiche, M.R. [Development Center of Renewable Energies, CDER and B.P 62, 16340, Route de l' Observatoire, Bouzareah, Algiers (Algeria)

    2013-07-01

    The optimum thickness in cavity walls in buildings is determined under steady conditions; the heat transfer has been calculated according to ISO 15099:2003. Two forms of masonry units are investigated to conclude the advantage of high thermal emissivity. The paper presents also some results from a study of the thermal insulation performance of air cavities bounded by thin reflective material layer 'eta = 0.05'. The results show that the most economical cavity configuration depends on the thermal emissivity and the insulation material used.

  1. Thermal resistances of air in cavity walls and their effect upon the thermal insulation performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. A. Bekkouche, T. Benouaz, M. K. Cherier, M. Hamdani, M.R. Yaiche, N. Benamrane

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimum thickness in cavity walls in buildings is determined under steady conditions; the heat transfer has been calculated according to ISO 15099:2003. Two forms of masonry units are investigated to conclude the advantage of high thermal emissivity. The paper presents also some results from a study of the thermal insulation performance of air cavities bounded by thin reflective material layer "ε = 0.05". The results show that the most economical cavity configuration depends on the thermal emissivity and the insulation material used.

  2. Effect of the environmental stimuli upon the human body in winter outdoor thermal environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondo, Emi; Ishii, Jin; Sakoi, Tomonori;

    2013-01-01

    the psychological thermal responses of the human body and winter outdoor thermal environment variables. Subjective experiments were conducted in the winter outdoor environment. Environmental factors and human psychological responses were measured. The relationship between the psychological thermal responses...... of the human body and the outdoor thermal environment index ETFe (enhanced conduction-corrected modified effective temperature) in winter was shown. The variables which influence the thermal sensation vote of the human body are air temperature, long-wave thermal radiation and short-wave solar radiation....... The variables that influence the thermal comfort vote of the human body are air temperature, humidity, short-wave solar radiation, long-wave thermal radiation, and heat conduction. Short-wave solar radiation, and heat conduction are among the winter outdoor thermal environment variables that affect...

  3. Effects of thermal stress on tumor antigenicity and recognition by immune effector cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Valeria; Noessner, Elfriede

    2006-03-01

    The primary rationale for the application of clinical hyperthermia in the therapy of cancer is based on the direct cytotoxic effect of heat and the radio-chemosensitization of tumor cells. More recently, additional attention is given to the observation that heat and heat-shock proteins can activate the host's immune system. The expression of heat-shock genes and proteins provides an adaptive mechanism for stress tolerance, allowing cells to survive non-physiologic conditions. However, the same adaptive mechanism can ultimately favor malignant transformation by interfering with pathways that regulate cell growth and apoptosis. Cytoprotection and thermotolerance raised the concern that heat-treated tumor cells might also be resistant to attack by immune effector mechanisms. Many studies, including those from our group, address this concern and document that heat-exposure, although transiently modulating sensitivity to CTL, do not hinder CTL attack. Moreover, there are promising reports of heat-related upregulation of NK-activating ligands, rendering those tumors which have lost MHC class I molecules target for NK cell attack. Heat-induced cytoprotection, therefore, does not necessarily extend protection from cytotoxic immune mechanisms. When interpreting the effects of heat, it is important to keep in mind that thermal effects on cell physiology are strongly dependent on the thermal dose, which is a function of the magnitude of change in temperature and the duration of heat exposure. The thermal dose required to induce cell death in vitro strongly varies from cell type to cell type and depends on microenvironmental factors (Dewey 1994). Therefore, to dissect the immunological behaviour of a given tumor and its micro-environment at different thermal doses, it is essential to characterize the thermosensitivity of every single tumor type and assess the proportion of cells surviving a given heat treatment. In this review, we summarize the pleiotropic effects that heat

  4. Analytic determination of the effective thermal conductivity of PEM fuel cell gas diffusion layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi, E.; Bahrami, M.; Djilali, N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Institute for Integrated Energy Systems, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2008-04-15

    Accurate information on the temperature field and associated heat transfer rates are particularly important in devising appropriate heat and water management strategies in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. An important parameter in fuel cell performance analysis is the effective thermal conductivity of the gas diffusion layer (GDL). Estimation of the effective thermal conductivity is complicated because of the random nature of the GDL micro structure. In the present study, a compact analytical model for evaluating the effective thermal conductivity of fibrous GDLs is developed. The model accounts for conduction in both the solid fibrous matrix and in the gas phase; the spreading resistance associated with the contact area between overlapping fibers; gas rarefaction effects in microgaps; and salient geometric and mechanical features including fiber orientation and compressive forces due to cell/stack clamping. The model predictions are in good agreement with existing experimental data over a wide range of porosities. Parametric studies are performed using the proposed model to investigate the effect of bipolar plate pressure, aspect ratio, fiber diameter, fiber angle, and operating temperature. (author)

  5. The Effects of Radial Compression on Thermal Conductivity of Carbon and Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijun Shen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available By using molecular dynamics method, thermal conductivity of (10, 10 carbon and boron nitride (BN nanotubes under radial compression was investigated, and the - (thermal conductivity versus temperature curves of the two nanotubes were obtained. It is found that with the increase of temperature the thermal conductivity of two nanotubes decreases; the nanotubes, under both the local compression and whole compression, have lower thermal conductivity, and the larger the compressive deformation is, the lower the thermal conductivity is; the whole compression has more remarkable effect on thermal conductivity than the local compression.

  6. Representation-free description of light-pulse atom interferometry including non-inertial effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinert, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.kleinert@uni-ulm.de [Institut für Quantenphysik and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology (IQST), Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Kajari, Endre; Roura, Albert [Institut für Quantenphysik and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology (IQST), Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Schleich, Wolfgang P. [Institut für Quantenphysik and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology (IQST), Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Texas A& M University Institute for Advanced Study (TIAS), Institute for Quantum Science and Engineering (IQSE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States)

    2015-12-30

    Light-pulse atom interferometers rely on the wave nature of matter and its manipulation with coherent laser pulses. They are used for precise gravimetry and inertial sensing as well as for accurate measurements of fundamental constants. Reaching higher precision requires longer interferometer times which are naturally encountered in microgravity environments such as drop-tower facilities, sounding rockets and dedicated satellite missions aiming at fundamental quantum physics in space. In all those cases, it is necessary to consider arbitrary trajectories and varying orientations of the interferometer set-up in non-inertial frames of reference. Here we provide a versatile representation-free description of atom interferometry entirely based on operator algebra to address this general situation. We show how to analytically determine the phase shift as well as the visibility of interferometers with an arbitrary number of pulses including the effects of local gravitational accelerations, gravity gradients, the rotation of the lasers and non-inertial frames of reference. Our method conveniently unifies previous results and facilitates the investigation of novel interferometer geometries.

  7. Two phase formation of massive elliptical galaxies : study through cross-correlation including spatial effect

    CERN Document Server

    Modak, Soumita; Chattopadhyay, Asis Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Formation mechanism of present day population of elliptical galaxies have been revisited in the context of hierarchical cosmological models accompanied by accretion and minor mergers through cross correlation function including spatial effect. The present work investigates the formation and evolution of several components of nearby massive early type galaxies (ETGs) through cross-correlation in the spatial coordinates, right ascension and declination (RA, DEC) and mass-size parameter space with high redshift $(0.5\\leq z\\leq2.7)$ ETGs. It is found that innermost components of nearby ETGs are highly correlated with ETGs in the redshift range $(2\\leq z\\leq2.7)$ known as 'red nuggets'. The intermediate and outermost parts have moderate correlations with ETGs in the redshift range $(0.5\\leq z\\leq0.75)$. The quantitative measures are highly consistent with the two phase formation scenario of massive nearby early type galaxies as suggested by various authors and resolves the conflict raised in a previous work sugges...

  8. Effects of thermal cycling on microstructure and properties in Nitinol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelton, A.R., E-mail: alan.pelton@nitinol.com [Nitinol Devices and Components, Inc. 47533 Westinghouse Dr., Fremont, CA 94539 (United States); Huang, G.H. [HuaZhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Moine, P. [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Materiaux en Milieux Agressifs, Universite de La Rochelle, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 01 (France); Sinclair, R., E-mail: bobsinc@stanford.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Annealed Nitinol was thermally cycled from above A{sub f} to below M{sub f}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the microstructural changes by TEM and transformation behavior by DSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing cycles decreased the martensite transformation temperatures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There was a concomitant increase in dislocation density. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermodynamics showed increasing elastic strain energy and irreversible frictional energy. - Abstract: The effects of thermal cycling through the martensite-austenite transformation were investigated in NiTi shape memory alloys with DSC and TEM. Thermal cycling caused a {approx}25 K decrease in M{sub s} with a concomitant increase in dislocation density from {approx}10{sup 12} m{sup -2} to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} m{sup -2} after 100 thermal cycles. Thermodynamic analysis is consistent with increasing elastic strain energy and irreversible frictional energy with cycling. The transformation-induced dislocations were determined to be shear loops with Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 0 1 0 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket {sub A}{l_brace}1 0 1{r_brace}{sub A} slip system, corresponding to the twinning direction and plane in martensite. It is speculated that the loops form during the movement of the martensite interface and that repeated interfacial movement tends to create bands that consist of highly tangled sessile dislocations. These dislocation bands form along (0.756{sup Macron },0.383{sup Macron },0.192){sub A}, which is 2.3 Degree-Sign from the accepted (0.889{sup Macron },0.404{sup Macron },0.215){sub A} lattice invariant plane. Furthermore, plastically deformed austenitic Nitinol exhibits slip on Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 0 1 0 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket {sub A}{l_brace}1 0 1{r_brace}{sub A} slip system and forms {l_brace}1 1 0{r_brace} shear bands with several variants of the dislocations within a given region.

  9. Effects of thermal shape fluctuations and pairing fluctuations on the giant dipole resonance in warm nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, A K Rhine; Dang, N Dinh

    2015-01-01

    Apart from the higher limits of isospin and temperature, the properties of atomic nuclei are intriguing and less explored at the limits of lowest but finite temperatures. At very low temperatures there is a strong interplay between the shell (quantal fluctuations), statistical (thermal fluctuations), and residual pairing effects as evidenced from the studies on giant dipole resonance (GDR). In our recent work [Phys. Rev. C \\textbf{90}, 044308 (2014)], we have outlined some of our results from a theoretical approach for such warm nuclei where all these effects are incorporated along within the thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) extended to include the fluctuations in the pairing field. In this article, we present the complete formalism based on the microscopic-macroscopic approach for determining the deformation energies and a macroscopic approach which links the deformation to GDR observables. We discuss our results for the nuclei $^{97}$Tc, $^{120}$Sn, $^{179}$Au, and $^{208}$Pb, and corroborate with the...

  10. Thermal Conductance and Seebeck Effect in Mesoscopic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Arafa H.; El-Gawaad, N. S. Abd

    2015-11-01

    In this work, thermoelectric transport through a saddle-point potential is discussed with an emphasis on the effects of the chemical potential and temperature. In particular, the thermal conductance and the Seebeck coefficient are calculated for two-dimensional systems of a constriction defined by a saddle-point potential. The solution as a function of temperature and chemical potential has been investigated. The Peltier coefficient and thermal transport in a quantum point contact (QPC), under the influence of external fields and different temperatures, are presented. Also, the oscillations of the Peltier coefficient in external fields are obtained. Numerical calculations of the Peltier coefficient are performed at different applied voltages, amplitudes, and temperatures. Moreover, a method is proposed for measuring the sub-band energies and spin-splitting energies in a bottle-neck of the constriction. For weak non-linearities, the charge and entropy currents across a QPC are expanded as a series in powers of the applied bias voltage and the temperature difference. Expansions of the Seebeck voltage in terms of the temperature difference and the Peltier heat in terms of the current are obtained.

  11. Heater induced thermal effects on the LTP dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gibert, Ferran; Lobo, Alberto; Díaz-Aguiló, Marc; Mateos, Ignacio; Karnesis, Nikolaos; Sanjuán, Josep; Gesa, Lluís; lloro, Ivan; Martín, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    The STOC (Science and Technology Operations Centre) simulator of the LPF (LISA PathFinder) mission is intended to provide a validation tool for the mission operations tele-commanding chain, as well as for a deeper understanding of the underlying physical processes happening in the LTP (LISA Technology Package). Amongst the different physical effects that will appear onboard, temperature fluctuations in the Electrode Housing (EH) could generate disturbances on the interferometer (IFO) readouts, therefore they must be known and controlled. In this article we report on the latest progress in the analysis at IEEC of the LTP response to thermal signals injected by means of heaters. More specifically, we determine the transfer functions relating heat input signals to forces on the Test Masses (TMs) in the LTP frequency band, from 1 mHz to 30 mHz. A complete thermal model of the entire LPF spacecraft plus payload, elaborated and maintained at European Space Technology Center (ESTEC), was used to obtain temperature d...

  12. Effect of thermal stresses on the mechanism of tooth pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskui, Iman Z; Ashtiani, Mohammed N; Hashemi, Ata; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2014-11-01

    Daily hot and cold thermal loadings on teeth may result in structural deformation, mechanical stress, and pain signaling. The aim of this study was to compare the adverse effects of hot and cold beverages on an intact tooth and, then, to provide physical evidence to support the hydrodynamic theory of tooth pain sensation mechanism. Three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed on a premolar model subjected to hot and cold thermal loadings. Elapsed times for heat diffusion and stress detection at the pulp-dentin junction were calculated as measures of the pain sensation. Extreme tensile stress within the enamel resulted in damage in cold loadings. Also, extreme values of stress at the pulpal wall occurred 21.6 seconds earlier than extreme temperatures in hot and cold loadings. The intact tooth was remarkably vulnerable to cold loading. Earlier changes in mechanical stress rather than temperature at the pulp-dentin junction indicate that the dental pain caused by hot or cold beverages may be based on the hydrodynamic theory. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Thermal Stress Effect on Density Changes of Hemp Hurds Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarzova Ivana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to study the behavior of prepared biocomposites based on hemp hurds as a filling agent in composite system. In addition to the filler and water, an alternative binder, called MgO-cement was used. For this objective were prepared three types of samples; samples based on untreated hemp hurds as a referential material and samples based on chemically (with NaOH solution and physically (by ultrasonic procedure treated hemp hurds. The thermal stress effect on bulk density changes of hemp hurds composites was monitored. Gradual increase in temperature led to composites density reduction of 30-40 %. This process is connected with mass loss of the adsorbed moisture and physically bound water and also with degradation of organic compounds present in hemp hurds aggregates such as pectin, hemicelluloses and cellulose. Therefore the changes in the chemical composition of treated hemp hurds in comparison to original sample and its thermal decomposition were also studied.

  14. Thermal stability of the krypton Hall effect thruster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szelecka Agnieszka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Krypton Large IMpulse Thruster (KLIMT ESA/PECS project, which has been implemented in the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM and now is approaching its final phase, was aimed at incremental development of a ~500 W class Hall effect thruster (HET. Xenon, predominantly used as a propellant in the state-of-the-art HETs, is extremely expensive. Krypton has been considered as a cheaper alternative since more than fifteen years; however, to the best knowledge of the authors, there has not been a HET model especially designed for this noble gas. To address this issue, KLIMT has been geared towards operation primarily with krypton. During the project, three subsequent prototype versions of the thruster were designed, manufactured and tested, aimed at gradual improvement of each next exemplar. In the current paper, the heat loads in new engine have been discussed. It has been shown that thermal equilibrium of the thruster is gained within the safety limits of the materials used. Extensive testing with both gases was performed to compare KLIMT’s thermal behaviour when supplied with krypton and xenon propellants.

  15. Effects of Thermal Damage and Confining Pressure on the Mechanical Properties of Coarse Marble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Mengdi; Rong, Guan; Zhou, Chuangbing; Peng, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Heating treatment generally causes thermal damage inside rocks, and the influence of thermal damage on mechanical properties of rocks is an important topic in rock mechanics. The coarse marble specimens drilled out from a rock block were first heated to a specific temperature level of 200, 400 and 600 °C except the control group left at 20 °C. A series of triaxial compression tests subjected to the confining pressure of 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 MPa were conducted. Coupling effects of thermal damage and confining pressure on the mechanical properties of marbles including post-peak behaviors and failure modes, strength and deformation parameters, characteristic stresses in the progressive failure process had been investigated. Meanwhile, accompanied tests of physical properties were carried out to study the effect of thermal damage on microstructure, porosity and P-wave velocity. Finally, the degradation parameter was defined and a strength-degradation model to describe the peak strength was proposed. Physical investigations show that porosity increases slowly and P-wave velocity reduces dramatically, which could be re-demonstrated by the microscopy results. As for the post-peak behaviors and the failure modes, there is a brittle to ductile transition trend with increasing confining pressure and thermal effect reinforces the ductility to some degree. The comparative study on strength and deformation parameters concludes that heating causes damage and confining pressure inhibits the damage to develop. Furthermore, crack damage stress and crack initiation stress increase, while the ratios of crack damage stress to peak strength and crack initiation stress to peak strength show a decreasing trend with the increase of confining pressure; the magnitude of crack damage stress or crack initiation stress shows a tendency of decrease with the increasing heating temperature and the tendency vanishes subjected to high confinement.

  16. Numerical Investigation of the effect of adiabatic section location on thermal performance of a heat pipe network with the application in thermal energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Mahboobe; Tiari, Saeed; Qiu, Songgang

    2015-11-01

    Latent heat thermal energy storage systems benefits from high energy density and isothermal storing process. However, the low thermal conductivity of the phase change material leads to prolong the melting or solidification time. Using a passive device such as heat pipes is required to enhance the heat transfer and to improve the efficiency of the system. In the present work, the performance of a heat pipe network specifically designed for a thermal energy storage system is studied numerically. The network includes a primary heat pipe, which transfers heat received from solar receiver to the heat engine. The excess heat is simultaneously delivered to charge the phase change material via secondary heat pipes. The primary heat pipe composed of a disk shape evaporator, an adiabatic section and a disk shape condenser. The adiabatic section can be either located at the center or positioned outward to the surrounding of the container. Here, the effect of adiabatic section position on thermal performance of the system is investigated. It was concluded that displacing the adiabatic section outwards dramatically increases the average temperatures of the condensers and reduces the thermal resistance of heat pipes.

  17. Effect of powder compaction on radiation-thermal synthesis of lithium-titanium ferrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surzhikov, A. P.; Lysenko, E. N.; Vlasov, V. A.; Malyshev, A. V.; Korobeynikov, M. V.; Mikhailenko, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Effect of powder compaction on the efficiency of thermal and radiation-thermal synthesis of lithium-substituted ferrites was investigated by X-Ray diffraction and specific magnetization analysis. It was shown that the radiation-thermal heating of compacted powder reagents mixture leads to an increase in efficiency of lithium-titanium ferrites synthesis.

  18. Hybrid discrete-continuum modeling for transport, biofilm development and solid restructuring including electrostatic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechtel, Alexander; Ray, Nadja; Rupp, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    We want to present an approach for the mathematical, mechanistic modeling and numerical treatment of processes leading to the formation, stability, and turnover of soil micro-aggregates. This aims at deterministic aggregation models including detailed mechanistic pore-scale descriptions to account for the interplay of geochemistry and microbiology, and the link to soil functions as, e.g., the porosity. We therefore consider processes at the pore scale and the mesoscale (laboratory scale). At the pore scale transport by diffusion, advection, and drift emerging from electric forces can be taken into account, in addition to homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions of species. In the context of soil micro-aggregates the growth of biofilms or other glueing substances as EPS (extracellular polymeric substances) is important and affects the structure of the pore space in space and time. This model is upscaled mathematically in the framework of (periodic) homogenization to transfer it to the mesoscale resulting in effective coefficients/parameters there. This micro-macro model thus couples macroscopic equations that describe the transport and fluid flow at the scale of the porous medium (mesoscale) with averaged time- and space-dependent coefficient functions. These functions may be explicitly computed by means of auxiliary cell problems (microscale). Finally, the pore space in which the cell problems are defined is time and space dependent and its geometry inherits information from the transport equation's solutions. The microscale problems rely on versatile combinations of cellular automata and discontiuous Galerkin methods while on the mesoscale mixed finite elements are used. The numerical simulations allow to study the interplay between these processes.

  19. To Explore the Effect of Trinity Comprehensive Treatment Including Abdominal Cavity Perfusion Chemotherapy, RF Deep Thermal Therapy and the Immune Therapy in the Treatment of Advanced Ovarian Cancer%腹腔热灌注化疗、体外射频深部热疗、免疫治疗三位一体综合治疗在晚期卵巢癌中的临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王俊芳; 崔萍; 毛莉; 张延志; 程丽娟

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of the trinity comprehensive treatment including the peritoneal cavity hot perfusion chemotherapy, the deep in vitro rf heat therapy and the immune therapy of the treatment for the patients with advanced ovarian cancer.Methods42 cases of patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer in our department were selected as the research object. The patients were randomly divided into treatment group and intraperitoneal chemotherapy group. The indicators including the ascites control, KPS score after treatment, CA125 half-life and the incidence of bone marrow suppression were analyzed. Results42 cases of patients had complete 6 courses of chemotherapy. The results of the indicators were: control of ascites (90.9%: 90.9%), KPS score comparison after treatment (31.8%: 60.0%), CA125 half-life (17.3 +/- 5.1 days, 13.4 +/- 4.5 days) and the incidence of bone marrow suppression (18.2%: 40.0%). Conclusion The trinity comprehensive therapy "Hot perfusion chemotherapy combined with abdominal cavity with deep in vitro rf heat therapy, immune therapy" in the treatment of advanced ovarian cancer can signiifcantly improve the ascites control, increase the KPS score, shorten the CA125 half-life and reduce the incidence of bone marrow suppression. This method can improve the body immunity, promote hemopoietic function which is a kind of effective treatment for advanced ovarian cancer. It can improve the survival rate and life quality of advanced ovarian cancer patients.%目的:评价腹腔热灌注化疗联合体外射频深部热疗、免疫治疗三位一体综合治疗在晚期卵巢癌中的临床应用。方法将我科收治晚期上皮性卵巢癌患者42例作为研究对象。将其随机分为综合治疗组和腹腔化疗组。分析两组腹水控制率、治疗后KPS评分、CA125半衰期、骨髓抑制发生率。结果42例病人均完成全部6疗程化疗,两组观察指标分别是:腹水控制率(90.9%:75.0%

  20. Improved hard-thermal-loop effective action for hot QED and QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Flechsig, F; Flechsig, Fritjof; Rebhan, Anton K

    1995-01-01

    The conventional results for hard thermal loops, which are the building blocks of resummed perturbation theory in thermal field theories, have collinear singularities when external momenta are light-like. It is shown that by taking into account asymptotic thermal masses these singularities are removed. The thus improved hard thermal loops can be summarized by compact gauge-invariant effective actions, generalizing the ones found by Taylor and Wong, and by Braaten and Pisarski.

  1. Thermal Effect of the Cable-Stayed Bridge Tower

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hai-long; Li Jun; Liu Chang-guo; Jiang Tian-hua; Wei jun

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies the thermal effect of the cable-stayed bridge tower based on full time accurate measurement and finite element analysis on Xiantao Hanjiang River Highway Bridge. The measured results and the displacement variation of top tower show that the tower rotates periodically when it is exposed in sunshine. But the tower column will not decline when there is no sunshine. In spite of in winter or in summer, the period when the tower column changed smallest is from 0∶00 am to 5∶00 am. The time period when the tower column has maximum deviation lags behind the time when the tower column has maximum temperature difference, and this phenomenon is obvious in winter. The conclusions also have directive value in predicting the tower deformations and their directions in construction control of cable-stayed bridge, and in verifying the finite element program.

  2. Effects of thermally pretreated temperature on bio-hydrogen production from sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ben-Yi; Liu, Jun-Xin

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen can be obtained by anaerobic fermentation of sewage sludge. Therefore, in this paper the effects of thermally pretreated temperatures on hydrogen production from sewage sludge were investigated under different pre-treatment conditions. In the thermal pretreatment, some microbial matters of sludge were converted into soluble matters from insoluble ones. As a result, the suspended solid (SS) and volatile suspended solid (VSS) of sludge decreased and the concentration of soluble COD (SCOD) increased, including soluble carbohydrates and proteins. The experimental results showed that all of those pretreated sludge could produce hydrogen by anaerobic fermentation and the hydrogen yields under the temperatures of 121 degrees C and 50 degrees C were 12.23 ml/g VS (most) and 1.17 ml/g VS (least), respectively. It illuminated that the hydrogen yield of sludge was affected by the thermally pretreated temperatures. Additionally, the endurance of high hydrogen yield depended on the translation of microbial matters and inhibition of methanogens in the sludge. The temperatures of 100 degrees C and 121 degrees C (treated time, 30 min) could kill or inhibit completely the methanogens while the others could not. To produce hydrogen and save energy, 100 degrees C was chosen as the optimal temperature for thermal pretrcatment. The composition changes in liquid phase in the fermentation process were also discussed. The SCOD of sludge increased, which was affected by the pretreatment temperature. The production of volatile fatty acids in the anaerobic fermentation increased with the pretreatment temperature.

  3. Effects of thermally pretreated temperature on bio-hydrogen production from sewage sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Ben-yi; LIU Jun-xin

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen can be obtained by anaerobic fermentation of sewage sludge. Therefore, in this paper the effects of thermally pretreated temperatures on hydrogen production from sewage sludge were investigated under different pre-treatment conditions. In the thermal pretreatment, some microbial matters of sludge were converted into soluble matters from insoluble ones. As a result, the suspended solid(SS) and volatile suspended solid(VSS) of sludge decreased and the concentration of soluble COD(SCOD) increased,including soluble carbohydrates and proteins. The experimental results showed that all of those pretreated sludge could produce hydrogen by anaerobic fermentation and the hydrogen yields under the temperatures of 121 ℃ and 50℃ were 12.23 ml/g VS(most)and 1.17 ml/g VS (least), respectively. It illuminated that the hydrogen yield of sludge was affected by the thermally pretreated temperatures. Additionally, the endurance of high hydrogen yield depended on the translation of microbial matters and inhibition of methanogens in the sludge. The temperatures of 100℃ and 121℃ (treated time, 30 min) could kill or inhibit completely the methanogens while the others could not. To produce hydrogen and save energy, 100℃ was chosen as the optimal temperature for thermal pretreatment. The composition changes in liquid phase in the fermentation process were also discussed. The SCOD of sludge increased, which was affected by the pretreatment temperature. The production of volatile fatty acids in the anaerobic fermentation increased with the pretreatment temperature.

  4. Effect of deformation on the thermal conductivity of granular porous media with rough grain surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Roohollah; Hejazi, S. Hossein; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2017-08-01

    Heat transfer in granular porous media is an important phenomenon that is relevant to a wide variety of problems, including geothermal reservoirs and enhanced oil recovery by thermal methods. Resistance to flow of heat in the contact area between the grains strongly influences the effective thermal conductivity of such porous media. Extensive experiments have indicated that the roughness of the grains' surface follows self-affine fractal stochastic functions, and thus, the contact resistance cannot be accounted for by models based on smooth surfaces. Despite the significance of rough contact area, the resistance has been accounted for by a fitting parameter in the models of heat transfer. In this Letter we report on a study of conduction in a packing of particles that contains a fluid of a given conductivity, with each grain having a rough self-affine surface, and is under an external compressive pressure. The deformation of the contact area depends on the fractal dimension that characterizes the grains' rough surface, as well as their Young's modulus. Excellent qualitative agreement is obtained with experimental data. Deformation of granular porous media with grains that have rough self-affine fractal surface is simulated. Thermal contact resistance between grains with rough surfaces is incorporated into the numerical simulation of heat conduction under compressive pressure. By increasing compressive pressure, thermal conductivity is enhanced more in the grains with smoother surfaces and lower Young's modulus. Excellent qualitative agreement is obtained with the experimental data.

  5. Relative importance of grain boundaries and size effects in thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Huicong; Wen, Bin; Melnik, Roderick

    2014-11-13

    A theoretical model for describing effective thermal conductivity (ETC) of nanocrystalline materials has been proposed, so that the ETC can be easily obtained from its grain size, single crystal thermal conductivity, single crystal phonon mean free path (PMFP), and the Kaptiza thermal resistance. In addition, the relative importance between grain boundaries (GBs) and size effects on the ETC of nanocrystalline diamond at 300 K has been studied. It has been demonstrated that with increasing grain size, both GBs and size effects become weaker, while size effects become stronger on thermal conductivity than GBs effects.

  6. Spectroscopic study of local thermal effect in transparent glass ceramics containing nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Local thermal effect influencing the fluorescence of triply ionized rare earth ions doped in nanocrystals is studied with laser spectroscopy and theory of thermal transportation for transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing nanocrystals. The result shows that the local temperature of the nanocrystals embedded in glass matrices is much higher than the environmental temperature of the sample. It is suggested that the temperature-dependent thermal energy induced by the light absorption must be considered when the theory of thermal transportation is applied to the study of local thermal effect.

  7. Evidence of Non-local Chemical, Thermal and Gravitational Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu H.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum entanglement is ubiquitous in the microscopic world and manifests itself macroscopically under some circumstances. But common belief is that it alone cannot be used to transmit information nor could it be used to produce macroscopic non- local effects. Yet we have recently found evidence of non-local effects of chemical substances on the brain produced through it. While our reported results are under independent verifications by other groups, we report here our experimental findings of non-local chemical, thermal and gravitational effects in simple physical systems such as reservoirs of water quantum-entangled with water being manipulated in a remote reservoir. With the aids of high-precision instruments, we have found that the pH value, temperature and gravity of water in the detecting reservoirs can be non-locally affected through manipulating water in the remote reservoir. In particular, the pH value changes in the same direction as that being manipulated; the temperature can change against that of local environment; and the gravity apparently can also change against local gravity. These non-local effects are all reproducible and can be used for non-local signalling and many other purposes. We suggest that they are mediated by quantum entanglement between nuclear and/or electron spins in treated water and discuss the implications of these results.

  8. Thermal hydraulic similarity analysis of the integral effect test facility for main steam line break events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, K.Y.; Park, H.S.; Euh, D.J.; Kwon, T.S.; Baek, W.P. [Thermal Hydraulic Safety Research Division Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute 150 Dukjin-Dong, Yusong-Gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: A thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility, ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation), is being constructed at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The ATLAS is a 1/2 reduced height and 1/288 volume scaled test facility based on the design features of the APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor developed by Korean industry. The ATLAS will be used to get more realistic understanding of the thermal hydraulic phenomena following postulated events and to carry out performance evaluation and safety analysis of the reference plants. The MSLB (Main Steam Line Break) event is one of the representative non-LOCA events and thermalhydraulic phenomena following the event are to be investigated in the ATLAS. In this paper, thermal hydraulic similarity for MSLB events between the ATLAS and the prototype plant, APR1400 is assessed by using the MARS code, which is a multi-dimensional best-estimate thermal hydraulic code being developed by KAERI. Several cases including SLBFPLOOP and SLBFP are taken into account for similarity analysis in this paper. The neutronic effects such as moderator temperature coefficients and doppler reactivity in APR1400 are not considered in this study. The same control logics for the major sequence of events such as reactor trip, turbine trip, valve opening and actuation of the emergency cooling system are applied to the ATLAS and the APR1400. The present investigation is focused on the scaling and the reduced power effects on thermal hydraulic similarity after initiation of MSLB events. It is found that the ATLAS facility has the similar thermal hydraulic responses against the MSLB events. However, the initial high secondary pressure before the MSLB initiation resulted in different primary pressure and temperature progression from the APR1400. The break flow from the main steam line is found to be one of the most dominating parameters governing the transient

  9. Including sheath effects in the interpretation of planar retarding potential analyzer's low-energy ion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, L. E.; Lynch, K. A.; Fernandes, P. A.; Bekkeng, T. A.; Moen, J.; Zettergren, M.; Miceli, R. J.; Powell, S.; Lessard, M. R.; Horak, P.

    2016-04-01

    The interpretation of planar retarding potential analyzers (RPA) during ionospheric sounding rocket missions requires modeling the thick 3D plasma sheath. This paper overviews the theory of RPAs with an emphasis placed on the impact of the sheath on current-voltage (I-V) curves. It then describes the Petite Ion Probe (PIP) which has been designed to function in this difficult regime. The data analysis procedure for this instrument is discussed in detail. Data analysis begins by modeling the sheath with the Spacecraft Plasma Interaction System (SPIS), a particle-in-cell code. Test particles are traced through the sheath and detector to determine the detector's response. A training set is constructed from these simulated curves for a support vector regression analysis which relates the properties of the I-V curve to the properties of the plasma. The first in situ use of the PIPs occurred during the MICA sounding rocket mission which launched from Poker Flat, Alaska in February of 2012. These data are presented as a case study, providing valuable cross-instrument comparisons. A heritage top-hat thermal ion electrostatic analyzer, called the HT, and a multi-needle Langmuir probe have been used to validate both the PIPs and the data analysis method. Compared to the HT, the PIP ion temperature measurements agree with a root-mean-square error of 0.023 eV. These two instruments agree on the parallel-to-B plasma flow velocity with a root-mean-square error of 130 m/s. The PIP with its field of view aligned perpendicular-to-B provided a density measurement with an 11% error compared to the multi-needle Langmuir Probe. Higher error in the other PIP's density measurement is likely due to simplifications in the SPIS model geometry.

  10. Thermal effects in the dynamics of disordered elastic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustingorry, S.; Kolton, A.B. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche (Argentina); Rosso, A. [CNRS, LPTMS, Univ. Paris-Sud, UMR 8626, Orsay Cedex F-91405 (France); Krauth, W. [CNRS-Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Giamarchi, T. [DPMC-MaNEP, University of Geneva, 24 Quai Ernest Ansermet, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)], E-mail: Thierry.Giamarchi@physics.unige.ch

    2009-03-01

    Many seemingly different macroscopic systems (magnets, ferroelectrics, CDW, vortices, etc.) can be described as generic disordered elastic systems. Understanding their static and dynamics thus poses challenging problems both from the point of view of fundamental physics and of practical applications. Despite important progress many questions remain open. In particular the temperature has drastic effects on the way these systems respond to an external force. We address here the important question of the thermal effect close to depinning, and whether these effects can be understood in the analogy with standard critical phenomena, analogy so useful to understand the zero temperature case. We show that close to the depinning force temperature leads to a rounding of the depinning transition and compute the corresponding exponent. In addition, using a novel algorithm it is possible to study precisely the behavior close to depinning, and to show that the commonly accepted analogy of the depinning with a critical phenomenon does not fully hold, since no divergent lengthscale exists in the steady state properties of the line below the depinning threshold.

  11. Is the societal approach wide enough to include relatives? Incorporating relatives' costs and effects in a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Thomas; Levin, Lars-Ake

    2010-01-01

    It is important for economic evaluations in healthcare to cover all relevant information. However, many existing evaluations fall short of this goal, as they fail to include all the costs and effects for the relatives of a disabled or sick individual. The objective of this study was to analyse how relatives' costs and effects could be measured, valued and incorporated into a cost-effectiveness analysis. In this article, we discuss the theories underlying cost-effectiveness analyses in the healthcare arena; the general conclusion is that it is hard to find theoretical arguments for excluding relatives' costs and effects if a societal perspective is used. We argue that the cost of informal care should be calculated according to the opportunity cost method. To capture relatives' effects, we construct a new term, the R-QALY weight, which is defined as the effect on relatives' QALY weight of being related to a disabled or sick individual. We examine methods for measuring, valuing and incorporating the R-QALY weights. One suggested method is to estimate R-QALYs and incorporate them together with the patient's QALY in the analysis. However, there is no well established method as yet that can create R-QALY weights. One difficulty with measuring R-QALY weights using existing instruments is that these instruments are rarely focused on relative-related aspects. Even if generic quality-of-life instruments do cover some aspects relevant to relatives and caregivers, they may miss important aspects and potential altruistic preferences. A further development and validation of the existing caregiving instruments used for eliciting utility weights would therefore be beneficial for this area, as would further studies on the use of time trade-off or Standard Gamble methods for valuing R-QALY weights. Another potential method is to use the contingent valuation method to find a monetary value for all the relatives' costs and effects. Because cost-effectiveness analyses are used for

  12. Analysis of Viking infrared thermal mapping data of Mars. The effects of non-ideal surfaces on the derived thermal properties of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Jakosky, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal interia of the surface of Mars varies spatially by a factor of eight. This is attributable to changes in the average particle size of the fine material, the surface elevation, the atmospheric opacity due to dust, and the fraction of the surface covered by rocks and fine material. The effects of these non-ideal properties on the surface temperatures and derived thermal inertias are modeled, along with the the effects of slopes, CO2 condensed onto the surface, and layering of fine material upon solid rock. The non-ideal models are capable of producing thermal behavior similar to that observed by the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper, including a morning delay in the post-dawn temperature rise and an enhanced cooling in the afternoon relative to any ideal, homogeneous model. The enhanced afternoon cooling observed at the Viking-1 landing site is reproduced by the non-ideal models while that atop Arsia Mons volcano is not, but may be attributed to the observing geometry.

  13. Characterization of Ti-6Al-4V Tribopairs: Effect of Thermal Oxidation Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Massimo; Boccarusso, Luca; Velotti, Carla; Astarita, Antonello; Squillace, Antonino; Carrino, Luigi

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with the study of the influence of the thermal oxidation (TO) treatment on the tribological properties of Ti-6Al-4V tribopairs. A detailed experimental campaign, including tribological tests, microgeometrical measurements, microhardness tests and phase composition analyses, was carried out on both treated and untreated components. The tribological behavior was studied through the pin-on-disk tests in four different contact conditions: treated disk coupled with untreated pin, untreated disk coupled with treated pin, both treated and both untreated. The effectiveness of the treatment in enhancing the tribological properties of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy sheets was found. In particular, the thermal oxidation treatment, promoting hardness enhancement and the formation of a superficial rutile layer, changed the wear mechanism of the titanium alloy, passing from adhesive wear type, for the untreated case, to abrasive wear, in the treated one.

  14. Marangoni effects on a thin liquid film coating a sphere with axial or radial thermal gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Di; Nadim, Ali; Chugunova, Marina

    2016-11-01

    We study the time evolution of a thin liquid film coating the outer surface of a sphere in the presence of gravity, surface tension and thermal gradients. We derive the fourth-order nonlinear partial differential equation that models the thin film dynamics, including Marangoni terms arising from the dependence of surface tension on temperature. We consider two different heating regimes with axial or radial thermal gradients. We analyze the stability of a uniform coating under small perturbations and carry out numerical simulations in COMSOL for a range of parameter values. In the case of an axial temperature gradient, we find steady states with either uniform film thickness, or with drops forming at the top or bottom of the sphere, depending on the total volume of liquid in the film, dictating whether gravity or Marangoni effects dominate. In the case of a radial temperature gradient, a stability analysis reveals the most unstable non-axisymmetric modes on an initially uniform coating film.

  15. Effect of intergranular interactions on thermal energy barrier distribution in perpendicular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hong; Bertram, H. Neal; Schabes, Manfred E.

    2002-05-01

    Micromagnetic simulations have been performed to simulate dynamic hysteresis loops in perpendicular media. Thermal energy barrier distributions have been calculated. For a fixed percentage of magnetization switched, a linear variation between the scaled applied field Ha(t)/HK and ln(f0t)1/2 is found. Without including intergranular magnetostatic interactions, intergranular exchange coupling reduces the thermal energy barrier distribution width, compared to the physical volume distribution width. However, the magnetostatic interactions increase the energy barrier width substantially. The increase is significantly reduced at smaller magnetostatic interactions. For the effective volume of 50% magnetization switched (V50), the results show V50=√ almost independent of intergranular magnetostatic and exchange interactions.

  16. Radiation and Thermal Cycling Effects on EPC1001 Gallium Nitride Power Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Scheick, Leif Z.; Lauenstein, Jean M.; Casey, Megan C.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Electronics designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work efficiently and reliably under harsh environment conditions. These include radiation, extreme temperatures, and thermal cycling, to name a few. Information pertaining to performance of electronic parts and systems under hostile environments is very scarce, especially for new devices. Such data is very critical so that proper design is implemented in order to ensure mission success and to mitigate risks associated with exposure of on-board systems to the operational environment. In this work, newly-developed enhancement-mode field effect transistors (FET) based on gallium nitride (GaN) technology were exposed to various particles of ionizing radiation and to long-term thermal cycling over a wide temperature range. Data obtained on control (un-irradiated) and irradiated samples of these power transistors are presented and the results are discussed.

  17. Effective Thermal Conductivity of MOF-5 Powder under a Hydrogen Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Effective thermal conductivity is an important thermophysical property in the design of metal-organic framework-5 (MOF-5-based hydrogen storage tanks. A modified thermal conductivity model is built by coupling a theoretical model with the grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation (GCMC to predict the effect of the H2 adsorption process on the effective thermal conductivity of a MOF-5 powder bed at pressures ranging from 0.01 MPa to 50 MPa and temperatures ranging from 273.15 K to 368.15 K. Results show that the mean pore diameter of the MOF-5 crystal decreases with an increase in pressure and increases with an increase in temperature. The thermal conductivity of the adsorbed H2 increases with an increased amount of H2 adsorption. The effective thermal conductivity of the MOF-5 crystal is significantly enhanced by the H2 adsorption at high pressure and low temperature. The effective thermal conductivity of the MOF-5 powder bed increases with an increase in pressure and remains nearly unchanged with an increase in temperature. The thermal conductivity of the MOF-5 powder bed increases linearly with the decreased porosity and increased thermal conductivity of the skeleton of the MOF-5 crystal. The variation in the effective thermal conductivities of the MOF-5 crystals and bed mainly results from the thermal conductivities of the gaseous and adsorption phases.

  18. Effective Thermal Conductivity Analysis of Xonotlite-aerogel Composite Insulation Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gaosheng WEI; Xinxin ZHANG; Fan YU

    2009-01-01

    A 3-dimensional unit cell model is developed for analyzing effective thermal conductivity of xonotlite-aerogel composite insulation material based on its microstructure features. Effective thermal conductivity comparisons between xonotlite-type calcium silicate and aerogel as well as xonotlite-aerogei composite insulation material are presented. It is shown that the density of xonotlite-type calcium silicate is the key factor affecting the effective thermal conductivity of xonotlite-aerogel composite insulation material, and the density of aerogel has tittle in-fluence. The effective thermal conductivity can be lowered greatly by composite of the two materials at an ele-vated temperature.

  19. Including load sequence effects in the fatigue damage estimation of an offshore wind turbine substructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dragt, R.C.; Maljaars, J.; Tuitman, J.T.; Salman, Y.; Otheguy, M.E.

    2016-01-01

    Retardation is a load sequence effect, which causes a reduced fatigue crack growth rate after an overload is encountered. Retardation can be cancelled when the overload is followed by an underload. The net effect is beneficial to the fatigue lifetime of Offshore Wind Turbines (OWTs). To be able to t

  20. A novel method of including Landau level mixing in numerical studies of the quantum Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooten, Rachel; Quinn, John; Macek, Joseph [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville TN 37996-1501 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    Landau level mixing should influence the quantum Hall effect for all except the strongest applied magnetic fields. We propose a simple method for examining the effects of Landau level mixing by incorporating multiple Landau levels into the Haldane pseudopotentials through exact numerical diagonalization. Some of the resulting pseudopotentials for the lowest and first excited Landau levels will be presented.

  1. Including hydrological self-regulating processes in peatland models: Effects on peatmoss drought projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijp, Jelmer J; Metselaar, Klaas; Limpens, Juul; Teutschbein, Claudia; Peichl, Matthias; Nilsson, Mats B; Berendse, Frank; van der Zee, Sjoerd E A T M

    2017-02-15

    The water content of the topsoil is one of the key factors controlling biogeochemical processes, greenhouse gas emissions and biosphere - atmosphere interactions in many ecosystems, particularly in northern peatlands. In these wetland ecosystems, the water content of the photosynthetic active peatmoss layer is crucial for ecosystem functioning and carbon sequestration, and is sensitive to future shifts in rainfall and drought characteristics. Current peatland models differ in the degree in which hydrological feedbacks are included, but how this affects peatmoss drought projections is unknown. The aim of this paper was to systematically test whether the level of hydrological detail in models could bias projections of water content and drought stress for peatmoss in northern peatlands using downscaled projections for rainfall and potential evapotranspiration in the current (1991-2020) and future climate (2061-2090). We considered four model variants that either include or exclude moss (rain)water storage and peat volume change, as these are two central processes in the hydrological self-regulation of peatmoss carpets. Model performance was validated using field data of a peatland in northern Sweden. Including moss water storage as well as peat volume change resulted in a significant improvement of model performance, despite the extra parameters added. The best performance was achieved if both processes were included. Including moss water storage and peat volume change consistently reduced projected peatmoss drought frequency with >50%, relative to the model excluding both processes. Projected peatmoss drought frequency in the growing season was 17% smaller under future climate than current climate, but was unaffected by including the hydrological self-regulating processes. Our results suggest that ignoring these two fine-scale processes important in hydrological self-regulation of northern peatlands will have large consequences for projected climate change impact on

  2. A unified analytical drain current model for Double-Gate Junctionless Field-Effect Transistors including short channel effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raksharam; Dutta, Aloke K.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a unified analytical model for the drain current of a symmetric Double-Gate Junctionless Field-Effect Transistor (DG-JLFET) is presented. The operation of the device has been classified into four modes: subthreshold, semi-depleted, accumulation, and hybrid; with the main focus of this work being on the accumulation mode, which has not been dealt with in detail so far in the literature. A physics-based model, using a simplified one-dimensional approach, has been developed for this mode, and it has been successfully integrated with the model for the hybrid mode. It also includes the effect of carrier mobility degradation due to the transverse electric field, which was hitherto missing in the earlier models reported in the literature. The piece-wise models have been unified using suitable interpolation functions. In addition, the model includes two most important short-channel effects pertaining to DG-JLFETs, namely the Drain Induced Barrier Lowering (DIBL) and the Subthreshold Swing (SS) degradation. The model is completely analytical, and is thus computationally highly efficient. The results of our model have shown an excellent match with those obtained from TCAD simulations for both long- and short-channel devices, as well as with the experimental data reported in the literature.

  3. Turbulent boundary layer heat transfer experiments: Convex curvature effects including introduction and recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, T. W.; Moffat, R. J.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements were made of the heat transfer rate through turbulent and transitional boundary layers on an isothermal, convexly curved wall and downstream flat plate. The effect of convex curvature on the fully turbulent boundary layer was a reduction of the local Stanton numbers 20% to 50% below those predicted for a flat wall under the same circumstances. The recovery of the heat transfer rates on the downstream flat wall was extremely slow. After 60 cm of recovery length, the Stanton number was still typically 15% to 20% below the flat wall predicted value. Various effects important in the modeling of curved flows were studied separately. These are: the effect of initial boundary layer thickness, the effect of freestream velocity, the effect of freestream acceleration, the effect of unheated starting length, and the effect of the maturity of the boundary layer. An existing curvature prediction model was tested against this broad heat transfer data base to determine where it could appropriately be used for heat transfer predictions.

  4. Psychophysiological effects of an iTBS modulated virtual reality challenge including participants with spider phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notzon, S; Deppermann, S; Fallgatter, A; Diemer, J; Kroczek, A; Domschke, K; Zwanzger, P; Ehlis, A-C

    2015-12-01

    Preliminary evidence suggests beneficial effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on anxiety. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) as a form of TMS on acute anxiety provoked by a virtual reality (VR) scenario. Participants with spider phobia (n=41) and healthy controls (n=42) were exposed to a spider scenario in VR after one session of iTBS over the prefrontal cortex or sham treatment. Participants with spider phobia reacted with more anxiety compared to healthy controls. Their heart rate and skin conductance increased compared to baseline. Contrary to expectations, iTBS did not influence these reactions, but modulated heart rate variability (HRV). Sympathetic influence on HRV showed an increase in the active iTBS group only. This study does not support the idea of beneficial effects of a single session of iTBS on anxiety, although other protocols or repeated sessions might be effective.

  5. Deliverable 4.2: Methodology for including specific biological effects and pathogen aspects into LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henrik Fred; Olsen, Stig Irving; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2009-01-01

    .e. endocrine disruptors) and the possibilities and relevance of including impact categories on land use and site-specific assessments have been addressed. Further, the special problems on how to deal with land fill and how to do normalization and weighting of impact potentials are also dealt with. The problem...

  6. Sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium of binary mixtures of charged colloids including volume effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Lyklema, J.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium of binary mixtures of charged colloids in the presence of small ions and for non-dilute conditions, by extending the work of Biben and Hansen (1994 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 6 A345). For a monocomponent system, they included a Carnahan-Starling har

  7. Effect on Mail Survey Return Rates of Including Questionnaires With Follow-Up Letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futrell, Charles M.; Lamb, Charles W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Two thousand questionnaires were mailed to respondents allocated among seven treatments. Controls received an initial mailing (questionnaire and cover letter) only. The remaining six treatments varied by number of follow-up mailings and whether another questionnaire copy was included. Results suggest more than one follow-up letter with a…

  8. Variable thermal resistor based on self-powered Peltier effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min Gao; Yatim, N Md [School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-21

    Heat flow through a thermoelectric material or device can be varied by an electrical resistor connected in parallel to it. This phenomenon is exploited to design a novel thermal component-variable thermal resistor. The theoretical background to this novel application is provided and an experimental result to demonstrate its feasibility is reported. (fast track communication)

  9. Effects of thermal motion on electromagnetically induced absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Tilchin, E; Wilson-Gordon, A D; 10.1103/PhysRevA.83.053812

    2011-01-01

    We describe the effect of thermal motion and buffer-gas collisions on a four-level closed N system interacting with strong pump(s) and a weak probe. This is the simplest system that experiences electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) due to transfer of coherence via spontaneous emission from the excited to ground state. We investigate the influence of Doppler broadening, velocity-changing collisions (VCC), and phase-changing collisions (PCC) with a buffer gas on the EIA spectrum of optically active atoms. In addition to exact expressions, we present an approximate solution for the probe absorption spectrum, which provides physical insight into the behavior of the EIA peak due to VCC, PCC, and wave-vector difference between the pump and probe beams. VCC are shown to produce a wide pedestal at the base of the EIA peak, which is scarcely affected by the pump-probe angular deviation, whereas the sharp central EIA peak becomes weaker and broader due to the residual Doppler-Dicke effect. Using diffusion-like e...

  10. Effects of thermal inflation on small scale density perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Sungwook E; Lee, Young Jae; Stewart, Ewan D; Zoe, Heeseung

    2015-01-01

    In cosmological scenarios with thermal inflation, extra eras of moduli matter domination, thermal inflation and flaton matter domination exist between primordial inflation and the radiation domination of Big Bang nucleosynthesis. During these eras, cosmological perturbations on small scales can enter and re-exit the horizon, modifying the power spectrum on those scales. The largest modified scale, $k_\\mathrm{b}$, touches the horizon size when the expansion changes from deflation to inflation at the transition from moduli domination to thermal inflation. We analytically calculate the evolution of perturbations from moduli domination through thermal inflation and evaluate the curvature perturbation on the constant radiation density hypersurface at the end of thermal inflation to determine the late time curvature perturbation. Our resulting transfer function suppresses the power spectrum by a factor $\\sim 50$ at $k \\gg k_\\mathrm{b}$, with $k_\\mathrm{b}$ corresponding to anywhere from megaparsec to subparsec scal...

  11. Thermal effects of dams in the Willamette River basin, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounds, Stewart A.

    2010-01-01

    Methods were developed to assess the effects of dams on streamflow and water temperature in the Willamette River and its major tributaries. These methods were used to estimate the flows and temperatures that would occur at 14 dam sites in the absence of upstream dams, and river models were applied to simulate downstream flows and temperatures under a no-dams scenario. The dams selected for this study include 13 dams built and operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) as part of the Willamette Project, and 1 dam on the Clackamas River owned and operated by Portland General Electric (PGE). Streamflows in the absence of upstream dams for 2001-02 were estimated for USACE sites on the basis of measured releases, changes in reservoir storage, a correction for evaporative losses, and an accounting of flow effects from upstream dams. For the PGE dam, no-project streamflows were derived from a previous modeling effort that was part of a dam-relicensing process. Without-dam streamflows were characterized by higher peak flows in winter and spring and much lower flows in late summer, as compared to with-dam measured flows. Without-dam water temperatures were estimated from measured temperatures upstream of the reservoirs (the USACE sites) or derived from no-project model results (the PGE site). When using upstream data to estimate without-dam temperatures at dam sites, a typical downstream warming rate based on historical data and downstream river models was applied over the distance from the measurement point to the dam site, but only for conditions when the temperature data indicated that warming might be expected. Regressions with measured temperatures from nearby or similar sites were used to extend the without-dam temperature estimates to the entire 2001-02 time period. Without-dam temperature estimates were characterized by a more natural seasonal pattern, with a maximum in July or August, in contrast to the measured patterns at many of the tall dam sites

  12. Transient performances analysis of wind turbine system with induction generator including flux saturation and skin effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, H.; Zhao, B.; Han, L.

    2010-01-01

    In order to analyze correctly the effect of different models for induction generators on the transient performances of large wind power generation, Wind turbine driven squirrel cage induction generator (SCIG) models taking into account both main and leakage flux saturation and skin effect were pr...... mechancical disturbance and a grid voltage sag, respectively. Simulation results have shown that the effect of the flux saturation is obvious on the transient behavious of the wind power generator system, especially for a grid voltage sag studies.......In order to analyze correctly the effect of different models for induction generators on the transient performances of large wind power generation, Wind turbine driven squirrel cage induction generator (SCIG) models taking into account both main and leakage flux saturation and skin effect were...... proposed. A two-mass lump equivalent model of a wind turbine shaft system was also used to considering shaft flexibility. The transient behaviors of the wind generator system with the different models were investigated and compared with the software platform Matlab/Simulink, under conditions of a large...

  13. Effect of neurosteroids on a model lipid bilayer including cholesterol: An Atomic Force Microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, Mattia; Balleza, Daniel; Vena, Giulia; Puia, Giulia; Facci, Paolo; Alessandrini, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    Amphiphilic molecules which have a biological effect on specific membrane proteins, could also affect lipid bilayer properties possibly resulting in a modulation of the overall membrane behavior. In light of this consideration, it is important to study the possible effects of amphiphilic molecule of pharmacological interest on model systems which recapitulate some of the main properties of the biological plasma membranes. In this work we studied the effect of a neurosteroid, Allopregnanolone (3α,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone or Allo), on a model bilayer composed by the ternary lipid mixture DOPC/bSM/chol. We chose ternary mixtures which present, at room temperature, a phase coexistence of liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains and which reside near to a critical point. We found that Allo, which is able to strongly partition in the lipid bilayer, induces a marked increase in the bilayer area and modifies the relative proportion of the two phases favoring the Ld phase. We also found that the neurosteroid shifts the miscibility temperature to higher values in a way similarly to what happens when the cholesterol concentration is decreased. Interestingly, an isoform of Allo, isoAllopregnanolone (3β,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone or isoAllo), known to inhibit the effects of Allo on GABAA receptors, has an opposite effect on the bilayer properties.

  14. Dilepton yields from Brown-Rho scaled vector mesons including memory effects

    CERN Document Server

    Schenke, B; Greiner, Carsten; Schenke, Bjoern

    2007-01-01

    Brown-Rho scaling, which has been strongly discussed after recent NA60 data was presented, is investigated within a nonequilibrium field theoretical description that includes quantum mechanical memory. Dimuon yields are calculated by application of a model for the fireball, and strong modifications are found in the comparison to quasi-equilibrium calculations, which assume instantaneous adjustment of all meson properties to the surrounding medium. In addition, we show results for the situation of very broad excitations.

  15. A low cycle fatigue model for low carbon manganese steel including the effect of dynamic strain aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhi Yong, E-mail: huangzy@scu.edu.cn [Sichuan University, School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, No.29 Jiuyanqiao Wangjiang Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Wagner, Danièle [Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense (France); Wang, Qing Yuan; Khan, Muhammad Kashif [Sichuan University, School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, No.29 Jiuyanqiao Wangjiang Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Chaboche, Jean–Louis [ONERA, DMSM, 29 avenue de la Division Lecerc, F-92320, Chatillon (France)

    2016-01-27

    Carbon–manganese steel A48 (French standards) is used in steam generator pipes of the nuclear power plant where it is subjected to the cyclic thermal load. The Dynamic Strain Aging (DSA) influences the mechanical behavior of the steel in low cycle fatigue (LCF) at favorable temperature and strain rate. The peak stress of A48 steel experiences hardening–softening–hardening (HSH) evolution at 200 °C and 0.4% s{sup −1} strain rate in fatigue loading. In this study, isotropic and kinematic hardening rules with DSA effect have been modified. The HSH evolution of cyclic stress associated with cumulative plastic deformation has also been estimated.

  16. Effects of sodium mal-distribution on AHX thermal characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Sujin; Hong, Jonggan; Eoh, Jae-Hyuk; Jeong, Ji-Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The uniform distribution of a refrigerant is very important to the heat transfer performance of heat exchangers. In particular, for a sodium-to-air heat exchanger (AHX), transferring heat from high temperature liquid metal to air, a mal-distribution of the refrigerant can cause degradation of heat transfer performance or even failure of system by unexpected sodium solidification in flow paths. However, there are little quantitative studies about the effect of maldistribution on thermal characteristics with liquid metal as a coolant. This paper discusses the effects of mal-distribution on heat transfer performance and cold-spot temperature of liquid sodium coolant at the branched tube outlet in AHX unit. The technical issues, which need to be verified for the robust AHX design regarding uniform flow distribution inside heat transfer sodium tubes, are tentatively proposed as well. In this paper, the effects of sodium mal-distribution on heat removal rate and sodium outlet temperature at the branched tubes of the AHX were quantitatively investigated and the following features were tentatively obtained - The effect of mal-distribution on the total heat removal rate is not significant. - The outlet temperature difference between low and high flow rate tubes (T{sub NA,out}) increases as the degree of mal-distribution increases. - In some conditions, the outlet temperature of branched tube reaches the sodium solidification temperature when the degree of mal-distribution increases. An important point is that the sodium mal-distribution would finally result in a system failure by unexpected sodium solidification. Therefore, the studies about the improvement of coolant distribution at the AHX unit need to be conducted by carefully considering characteristics of liquid metal coolant as a future work.

  17. Calculations of environmental benefits from using geothermal energy must include the rebound effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atlason, R. S.; Unnthorsson, Runar

    2017-01-01

    and energy production patterns are simulated using data from countries with similar environmental conditions but do not use geothermal or hydropower to the same extent as Iceland. Because of the rapid shift towards renewable energy and exclusion of external energy provision, the country is considered......When considering the environmental benefits from converting to renewable energy sources, the rebound effect is often omitted. In this study, the aim is to investigate greenhouse gas emission reduction inclusive of the rebound effect. We use Iceland as a case study where alternative consumption...

  18. Numerical analysis of ionized fields associated with HVDC transmission lines including effect of wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.

    1998-12-31

    The effects of corona discharge on the conductor surface of HVDC power transmission lines were studied. Corona discharges generate ion flow and can cause power losses and environmental concerns. Solving the problem of the ion flow field is difficult because of its nonlinearity and the effect of wind. The following two numerical algorithms were presented which address the problem associated with strong wind or bundled lines: (1) the finite element method (FEM) based optimization algorithm, and (2) the upwind FVM based relaxation algorithm. Both were successfully tested on a coaxial cylindrical configuration and on a unipolar line model in the presence of wind.

  19. The effect of thermal annealing on the properties of thin alumina films prepared by low pressure MOCVD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Vendel, van de D.; Corbach, van H.D.; Fransen, T.; Gellings, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Thin amorphous alumina films were prepared on stainless steel, type AISI 304, by low pressure metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. The effect of thermal annealing in nitrogen (for 2, 4 and 17 h at 600, 700 and 800 °C) on the film properties, including the protection of the underlying substrate

  20. The effect of thermal annealing on the properties of thin alumina films prepared by low pressure MOCVD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Haanappel, V.A.C.; van de Vendel, D.; van Corbach, H.D.; Fransen, T.; Gellings, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Thin amorphous alumina films were prepared on stainless steel, type AISI 304, by low pressure metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. The effect of thermal annealing in nitrogen (for 2, 4 and 17 h at 600, 700 and 800 °C) on the film properties, including the protection of the underlying substrate

  1. Effect of sodium tetraborate (borax) on the thermal properties of frozen aqueous sugar and polyol solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izutsu, Ken-ichi; Rimando, Annie; Aoyagi, Nobuo; Kojima, Shigeo

    2003-06-01

    The effect of sodium tetraborate (Na(2)B(4)O(7), borax) on the thermal property of frozen aqueous sugar and polyol solutions was studied through thermal analysis. Addition of borax raised the thermal transition temperature (glass transition temperature of maximally freeze-concentrated solutes; T(g)') of frozen sucrose solutions depending on the borax/sucrose concentration ratios. Changes in the T(g)' of frozen mono- and disaccharide solutions suggested various forms of complexes, including those of a borate ion and two saccharide molecules. Borax exerted the maximum effect to raise the oligosaccharide and dextran T(g)'s at borax/saccharide molar ratios of approximately 1-2 (maltose and maltooligosaccharides), 2 (dextran 1060), 5 (dextran 4900), and 10 (dextran 10200). Further addition of borax lowered T(g)'s of the saccharide solutions. Borax also raised T(g) and T(g)' temperatures of frozen aqueous glycerol solutions. The decreased solute mobility in frozen solutions by the borate-polyol complexes suggested higher collapse temperature in the freeze-drying process and improved stability of biological systems in frozen solutions.

  2. Sludge thermal oxidation processes: mineral recycling, energy impact, and greenhouse effect gases release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibelin, Eric

    2003-07-01

    Different treatment routes have been studied for a mixed sludge: the conventional agricultural use is compared with the thermal oxidation processes, including incineration (in gaseous phase) and wet air oxidation (in liquid phase). The interest of a sludge digestion prior to the final treatment has been also considered according to the two major criteria, which are the fossil energy utilisation and the greenhouse effect gases (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O) release. Thermal energy has to be recovered on thermal processes to make these processes environmentally friendly, otherwise their main interest is to extract or destroy micropollutants and pathogens from the carbon cycle. In case of continuous energy recovery, incineration can produce more energy than it consumes. Digestion is especially interesting for agriculture: according to these two schemes, the energy final balance can also be in excess. As to wet air oxidation, it is probably one of the best way to minimize greenhouse effect gases emission. (author)

  3. Effect of the environmental stimuli upon the human body in winter outdoor thermal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurazumi, Yoshihito; Kondo, Emi; Ishii, Jin; Sakoi, Tomonori; Fukagawa, Kenta; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Tsuchikawa, Tadahiro; Matsubara, Naoki; Horikoshi, Tetsumi

    2013-01-01

    In order to manage the outdoor thermal environment with regard to human health and the environmental impact of waste heat, quantitative evaluations are indispensable. It is necessary to use a thermal environment evaluation index. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the relationship between the psychological thermal responses of the human body and winter outdoor thermal environment variables. Subjective experiments were conducted in the winter outdoor environment. Environmental factors and human psychological responses were measured. The relationship between the psychological thermal responses of the human body and the outdoor thermal environment index ETFe (enhanced conduction-corrected modified effective temperature) in winter was shown. The variables which influence the thermal sensation vote of the human body are air temperature, long-wave thermal radiation and short-wave solar radiation. The variables that influence the thermal comfort vote of the human body are air temperature, humidity, short-wave solar radiation, long-wave thermal radiation, and heat conduction. Short-wave solar radiation, and heat conduction are among the winter outdoor thermal environment variables that affect psychological responses to heat. The use of thermal environment evaluation indices that comprise short-wave solar radiation and heat conduction in winter outdoor spaces is a valid approach.

  4. Effect of the Environmental Stimuli upon the Human Body in Winter Outdoor Thermal Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihito Kurazumi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to manage the outdoor thermal environment with regard to human health and the environmental impact of waste heat, quantitative evaluations are indispensable. It is necessary to use a thermal environment evaluation index. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the relationship between the psychological thermal responses of the human body and winter outdoor thermal environment variables. Subjective experiments were conducted in the winter outdoor environment. Environmental factors and human psychological responses were measured. The relationship between the psychological thermal responses of the human body and the outdoor thermal environment index ETFe (enhanced conduction-corrected modified effective temperature in winter was shown. The variables which influence the thermal sensation vote of the human body are air temperature, long-wave thermal radiation and short-wave solar radiation. The variables that influence the thermal comfort vote of the human body are air temperature, humidity, short-wave solar radiation, long-wave thermal radiation, and heat conduction. Short-wave solar radiation, and heat conduction are among the winter outdoor thermal environment variables that affect psychological responses to heat. The use of thermal environment evaluation indices that comprise short-wave solar radiation and heat conduction in winter outdoor spaces is a valid approach.

  5. Effect of Dzialoshinski-Moriya interaction on thermal entanglement of a mixed-spin chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The effect of Dzialoshinski-Moriya (DM) interaction on thermal entanglement of a mixed-spin chain in an external magnetic field is investigated. It is found that DM interaction may enhance quantum thermal entanglement to a maximal value even though the magnetic field plays a positive role in shrinking thermal entanglement in the mixed-spin chain. Furthermore, the effect of inhomogeneity of the magnetic field on quantum entanglement is analyzed. Our analysis will shed some light on the understanding of the effect of the DM interaction on thermal entanglement of a mixed-spin chain.

  6. Effects of thermal quenching on the breakup of pyroclasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, A.; Manga, M.; Carey, R. J.; Degruyter, W.; Dufek, J.

    2012-12-01

    It is often assumed that magma fragments when it contacts water. Obsidian chips and glass spheres crack when quenched. Vesicular pyroclasts are made of similar glass, so thermal quenching may cause them to break more easily. We performed a set of experiments on air fall pumice from Medicine Lake, California. Density and texture of similar samples are described in Manga et al., Bull Volc 2010. We made "quenched" samples by heating natural pyroclasts to 600 °C, quenching them in water at 21 °C, drying them at 105 °C, and then cooling them to room temperature. We compare these samples with untreated air fall pumice from the same deposit, hereafter referred to as "regular" pumice. We tested whether quenched pumice would 1) shatter more easily in collisions and 2) abrade faster. Our collision experiment methods are described in Dufek et al., Nature Geoscience 2012. Our abrasion experiment methods are described in Manga et al., Bull Volc 2010. We also tested whether individual clasts lose mass upon quenching and whether they increase in effective wet density. Effective wet density is defined as underwater density of a clast when water occupies part of the pore space. Effective wet density, measured as a function of time after immersion, indicates the volume fraction of the pore space that becomes occupied by water. We compare effective wet density of individual clasts pre-quenching with effective wet density after having been quenched, thoroughly dried and then cooled to room temperature. An increase in effective wet density would suggest that bubble walls had been damaged during quenching, allowing water to occupy the pore space faster. We also compare pre-quenching and post-quenching textures using X-Ray Tomography (XRT) and SEM images. Results from collision experiments show no obvious difference between quenched pumice and regular pumice. Quenched pumice abraded more quickly than regular pumice. We find that 1 to 2 % of mass was lost during quenching. Effective

  7. Doppler broadening effect on collision cross section functions - Deconvolution of the thermal averaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The surprising feature of the Doppler problem in threshold determination is the 'amplification effect' of the target's thermal energy spread. The small thermal energy spread of the target molecules results in a large dispersion in relative kinetic energy. The Doppler broadening effect in connection with thermal energy beam experiments is discussed, and a procedure is recommended for the deconvolution of molecular scattering cross-section functions whose dominant dependence upon relative velocity is approximately that of the standard low-energy form.

  8. A Fractal Model for the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Granular Flow with Non-uniform Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Duan-Ming; LEI Ya-Jie; YU Bo-Ming; ZHANG Mei-Jun; HUANG Ming-Tao; LI Zhi-Hua; GUAN Li

    2002-01-01

    The equipartition of energy applied in binary mixture of granular flow is extended to granular flow withnon-uniform particles. Based on the fractal characteristic of granular flow with non-uniform particles as well as energyequipartition, a fractal velocity distribution function and a fractal model of effective thermal conductivity are derived.Thermal conduction resulted from motions of particles in the granular flow, as well as the effect of fractal dimension oneffective thermal conductivity, is discussed.

  9. The effect of including an opt-out option in discrete choice experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Veldwijk (Jorien); M.S. Lambooij (Mattijs); E.W. de Bekker-Grob (Esther); H.A. Smit (Henriëtte); G.A. De Wit (G. Ardine)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstractObjective: to determine to what extent the inclusion of an opt-out option in a DCE may have an effect on choice behaviour and therefore might influence the attribute level estimates, the relative importance of the attributes and calculated tradeoffs. Methods: 781 Dutch Type 2

  10. Evaluation of plant-wide WWTP control strategies including the effects of filamentous bulking sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores Alsina, Xavier; Comas, J.S.; Rodríguez Roda, I.

    2009-01-01

    concentration in both return and waste flow, less biomass in the bioreactors and a reduction of the TSS removal efficiency. The control alternatives using a TSS controller substantially increase the food to microorganisms (F/M) ratio in the bioreactor, thereby reducing both risk and effects of bulking sludge...

  11. Modeling of etch profile evolution including wafer charging effects using self consistent ion fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoekstra, R.J.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1996-12-31

    As high density plasma reactors become more predominate in industry, the need has intensified for computer aided design tools which address both equipment issues such as ion flux uniformity onto the water and process issues such etch feature profile evolution. A hierarchy of models has been developed to address these issues with the goal of producing a comprehensive plasma processing design capability. The Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM) produces ion and neutral densities, and electric fields in the reactor. The Plasma Chemistry Monte Carlo Model (PCMC) determines the angular and energy distributions of ion and neutral fluxes to the wafer using species source functions, time dependent bulk electric fields, and sheath potentials from the HPEM. These fluxes are then used by the Monte Carlo Feature Profile Model (MCFP) to determine the time evolution of etch feature profiles. Using this hierarchy, the effects of physical modifications of the reactor, such as changing wafer clamps or electrode structures, on etch profiles can be evaluated. The effects of wafer charging on feature evolution are examined by calculating the fields produced by the charge deposited by ions and electrons within the features. The effect of radial variations and nonuniformity in angular and energy distribution of the reactive fluxes on feature profiles and feature charging will be discussed for p-Si etching in inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) sustained in chlorine gas mixtures. The effects of over- and under-wafer topography on etch profiles will also be discussed.

  12. Vibration and buckling of rotating, pretwisted, preconed beams including Coriolis effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pretwist, precone, setting angle and Coriolis forces on the vibration and buckling behavior of rotating, torsionally rigid, cantilevered beams were studied. The beam is considered to be clamped on the axis of rotation in one case, and off the axis of rotation in the other. Two methods are employed for the solution of the vibration problem: (1) one based upon a finite-difference approach using second order central differences for solution of the equations of motion, and (2) based upon the minimum of the total potential energy functional with a Ritz type of solution procedure making use of complex forms of shape functions for the dependent variables. The individual and collective effects of pretwist, precone, setting angle, thickness ratio and Coriolis forces on the natural frequencies and the buckling boundaries are presented. It is shown that the inclusion of Coriolis effects is necessary for blades of moderate to large thickness ratios while these effects are not so important for small thickness ratio blades. The possibility of buckling due to centrifugal softening terms for large values of precone and rotation is shown.

  13. The cost-effectiveness of gestational diabetes screening including prevention of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marseille, Elliot; Lohse, Nicolai; Jiwani, Aliya;

    2013-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with elevated risks of perinatal complications and type 2 diabetes mellitus, and screening and intervention can reduce these risks. We quantified the cost, health impact and cost-effectiveness of GDM screening and intervention in India and Israel...

  14. Renovation and Strengthening of Wooden Beams With CFRP Bands Including the Rheological Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kula Krzysztof

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a work analysis of wooden beams reinforced with glued composite bands from the top and resin inclusions, taking into account the rheology of materials. The paper presents numerical model of the multimaterial beam work including rheological phenomena described by linear equations of viscoelasticity. For the construction of this model one used MES SIMULIA ABAQUS environment in which were prepared its own procedures containing rheological models. The calculation results were compared with the literature data. One has done an analysis of the advisability of the use of CFRP reinforcements bands in terms of rheological phenomena.

  15. Taylor Series Trajectory Calculations Including Oblateness Effects and Variable Atmospheric Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Taylor series integration is implemented in NASA Glenn's Spacecraft N-body Analysis Program, and compared head-to-head with the code's existing 8th- order Runge-Kutta Fehlberg time integration scheme. This paper focuses on trajectory problems that include oblateness and/or variable atmospheric density. Taylor series is shown to be significantly faster and more accurate for oblateness problems up through a 4x4 field, with speedups ranging from a factor of 2 to 13. For problems with variable atmospheric density, speedups average 24 for atmospheric density alone, and average 1.6 to 8.2 when density and oblateness are combined.

  16. Atomistic spin dynamic method with both damping and moment of inertia effects included from first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Satadeep; Nordström, Lars; Fransson, Jonas

    2012-02-03

    We consider spin dynamics for implementation in an atomistic framework and we address the feasibility of capturing processes in the femtosecond regime by inclusion of moment of inertia. In the spirit of an s-d-like interaction between the magnetization and electron spin, we derive a generalized equation of motion for the magnetization dynamics in the semiclassical limit, which is nonlocal in both space and time. Using this result we retain a generalized Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, also including the moment of inertia, and demonstrate how the exchange interaction, damping, and moment of inertia, all can be calculated from first principles.

  17. a Better Description of Liquid Jet Breakup Using a Spatial Model Including Viscous Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschlag, William Brian

    Theoretical models describing the operation and disintegration of a liquid jet are often based on an approximate solution of an inviscid jet in the temporal frame of reference. These models provide only a fair first order prediction of growth rate and breakoff length, and are based solely on a surface tension induced instability. A spatial model yielding jet growth rate and including both jet and surrounding atmosphere viscosity and density is now developed. This model is seen to reproduce all the features and limitations of the Weber viscous jet theory. When tested against experiments of water, water and glycerol mixes and binary eutectic tin/lead solder, only fair agreement is observed.

  18. Renovation and Strengthening of Wooden Beams With CFRP Bands Including the Rheological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, Krzysztof; Socha, Tomasz

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents a work analysis of wooden beams reinforced with glued composite bands from the top and resin inclusions, taking into account the rheology of materials. The paper presents numerical model of the multimaterial beam work including rheological phenomena described by linear equations of viscoelasticity. For the construction of this model one used MES SIMULIA ABAQUS environment in which were prepared its own procedures containing rheological models. The calculation results were compared with the literature data. One has done an analysis of the advisability of the use of CFRP reinforcements bands in terms of rheological phenomena.

  19. Effect of water-ice phase change on thermal performance of building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kočí, Václav; Černý, Robert

    2016-07-01

    The effect of water ice-phase change on thermal performance of integrated building material is investigated in this paper. As a characteristic construction, simple external wall made of aerated autoclaved concrete was assumed which was exposed to dynamic climatic condition of Šerák, Czech Republic. The computational modelling of hygrothermal performance was carried out using computer codes HEMOT and SIFEL that work on the basis of finite element method. The effect of phase change was taken into account by fixed-domain method, when experimentally determined effective specific heat capacity was used as a material parameter. It comprises also the effect of heat consumption and heat release that accompany the water-ice phase change. Comparing to the results with specific heat capacity, the effect of phase change on thermal performance could be quantified. The results showed that temperature fields can differ more than 6 °C. Additionally, the amount energy transported through the wall may be higher up to 4 %. This confirmed, that the effect water-ice phase change should be included in all the relevant energy calculations.

  20. Effect of surrogate aggregates on the thermal conductivity of concrete at ambient and elevated temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Tae Sup; Jeong, Yeon Jong; Youm, Kwang-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The accurate assessment of the thermal conductivity of concretes is an important part of building design in terms of thermal efficiency and thermal performance of materials at various temperatures. We present an experimental assessment of the thermal conductivity of five thermally insulated concrete specimens made using lightweight aggregates and glass bubbles in place of normal aggregates. Four different measurement methods are used to assess the reliability of the thermal data and to evaluate the effects of the various sensor types. The concrete specimens are also assessed at every 100 °C during heating to ~800 °C. Normal concrete is shown to have a thermal conductivity of ~2.25 W m(-1) K(-1). The surrogate aggregates effectively reduce the conductivity to ~1.25 W m(-1) K(-1) at room temperature. The aggregate size is shown not to affect thermal conduction: fine and coarse aggregates each lead to similar results. Surface contact methods of assessment tend to underestimate thermal conductivity, presumably owing to high thermal resistance between the transducers and the specimens. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that the stages of mass loss of the cement paste correspond to the evolution of thermal conductivity upon heating.

  1. Effect of Surrogate Aggregates on the Thermal Conductivity of Concrete at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Sup Yun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The accurate assessment of the thermal conductivity of concretes is an important part of building design in terms of thermal efficiency and thermal performance of materials at various temperatures. We present an experimental assessment of the thermal conductivity of five thermally insulated concrete specimens made using lightweight aggregates and glass bubbles in place of normal aggregates. Four different measurement methods are used to assess the reliability of the thermal data and to evaluate the effects of the various sensor types. The concrete specimens are also assessed at every 100°C during heating to ~800°C. Normal concrete is shown to have a thermal conductivity of ~2.25 W m−1 K−1. The surrogate aggregates effectively reduce the conductivity to ~1.25 W m−1 K−1 at room temperature. The aggregate size is shown not to affect thermal conduction: fine and coarse aggregates each lead to similar results. Surface contact methods of assessment tend to underestimate thermal conductivity, presumably owing to high thermal resistance between the transducers and the specimens. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that the stages of mass loss of the cement paste correspond to the evolution of thermal conductivity upon heating.

  2. A theory of dropwise condensation at large subcooling including the effect of the sweeping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamali, C.; Merte, H., Jr.

    The effect of sweeping by the departing droplets on the heat transfer coefficient in dropwise condensation is studied analytically here. Using basic principles, an analytical model for dropwise condensation is devised, which takes into account the elementary processes that make up the dropwise condensation cycle. The analysis is divided into two parts: in the first part, the heat transfer as a result of nucleation and coalescing of the droplets is considered. In the second part, the effect of sweeping is introduced. The results are presented as the variation of nondimensional heat flux versus the distance from the upper edge of the condenser surface at various surface subcoolings. Calculations show that the variation of heat flux with surface subcooling is linear only at small values of subcooling. As the subcooling is increased the slope of the mean heat flux versus subcooling curve decreases, and for a sufficiently high body force passes through a maximum.

  3. Predictive simulations and optimization of nanowire field-effect PSA sensors including screening

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgartner, Stefan

    2013-05-03

    We apply our self-consistent PDE model for the electrical response of field-effect sensors to the 3D simulation of nanowire PSA (prostate-specific antigen) sensors. The charge concentration in the biofunctionalized boundary layer at the semiconductor-electrolyte interface is calculated using the propka algorithm, and the screening of the biomolecules by the free ions in the liquid is modeled by a sensitivity factor. This comprehensive approach yields excellent agreement with experimental current-voltage characteristics without any fitting parameters. Having verified the numerical model in this manner, we study the sensitivity of nanowire PSA sensors by changing device parameters, making it possible to optimize the devices and revealing the attributes of the optimal field-effect sensor. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  4. Study of the Charge Density Control Method Including the Space Charge Effect in the Proton Synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shinichi; Harada, Hiroyuki; Hotchi, Hideaki; Okabe, Kota; Yamamoto, Kazami; Kinsho, Michikazu

    For high intensity proton accelerators, one of the beam loss sources is the incoherent tune spread caused by the space charge force. In the 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, beams are injected sequentially and shifted slightly from the central orbit in order to increase the beam size intentionally and suppress the charge density and incoherent tune spread. This injection method has been adopted and suppressed the beam loss. However, simulations clarified that beams did not spread as much as expected because of the space charge effect in the high current case. As simulation results of the optimized beam shift pattern when the space charge effect is considered, it was obtained that the incoherent tune spread could be suppressed to an extent that has not been achieved previously.

  5. Dynamic behavior of a rotating delaminated composite beam including rotary inertia and shear deformation effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan-Ali Jafari-Talookolaei

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A finite element (FE model is developed to study the free vibration of a rotating laminated composite beam with a single delamination. The rotary inertia and shear deformation effects, as well as the bending–extension, bending–twist and extension–twist coupling terms are taken into account in the FE model. Comparison between the numerical results of the present model and the results published in the literature verifies the validity of the present model. Furthermore, the effects of various parameters, such as delamination size and location, fiber orientation, hub radius, material anisotropy and rotating speed, on the vibration of the beam are studied in detail. These results provide useful information in the study of the free vibration of rotating delaminated composite beams.

  6. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in prominences from numerical simulations including partial ionization effects

    CERN Document Server

    Khomenko, E; de Vicente, A; Collados, M; Luna, M

    2014-01-01

    We study the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) at a prominence-corona transition region in a non-linear regime. Our aim is to understand how the presence of neutral atoms in the prominence plasma influences the instability growth rate, and the evolution of velocity, magnetic field vector and thermodynamic parameters of turbulent drops. We perform 2.5D numerical simulations of the instability initiated by a multi-mode perturbation at the corona-prominence interface using a single-fluid MHD approach including a generalized Ohm's law. The initial equilibrium configuration is purely hydrostatic and contains a homogeneous horizontal magnetic field forming an angle with the direction in which the plasma is perturbed. We analyze simulations with two different orientations of the magnetic field. For each field orientation we compare two simulations, one for the pure MHD case, and one including the ambipolar diffusion in the Ohm's law (AD case). Other than that, both simulations for each field orientation are identica...

  7. Gutzwiller charge phase diagram of cuprates, including electron-phonon coupling effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, R. S.; Seibold, G.; Lorenzana, J.; Bansil, A.

    2015-02-01

    Besides significant electronic correlations, high-temperature superconductors also show a strong coupling of electrons to a number of lattice modes. Combined with the experimental detection of electronic inhomogeneities and ordering phenomena in many high-Tc compounds, these features raise the question as to what extent phonons are involved in the associated instabilities. Here we address this problem based on the Hubbard model including a coupling to phonons in order to capture several salient features of the phase diagram of hole-doped cuprates. Charge degrees of freedom, which are suppressed by the large Hubbard U near half-filling, are found to become active at a fairly low doping level. We find that possible charge order is mainly driven by Fermi surface nesting, with competition between a near-(π ,π ) order at low doping and antinodal nesting at higher doping, very similar to the momentum structure of magnetic fluctuations. The resulting nesting vectors are generally consistent with photoemission and tunneling observations, evidence for charge density wave order in YBa2Cu3O7-δ including Kohn anomalies, and suggestions of competition between one- and two-q-vector nesting.

  8. Simulation of 3D Flow in Turbine Blade Rows including the Effects of Coolant Ejection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Jun LIU; Bai-Tao AN; Yun-Tao ZENG

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the numerical simulation of three-dimensional viscous flows in air-cooled turbine blade rows with the effects of coolant ejection. A TVD Navier-Stokes flow solver incorporated with Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model and multi-grid convergence acceleration algorithm are used for the simulation. The influences of coolant ejection on the main flow are accounted by volumetric coolant source terms. Numerical results for a four-stage turbine are presented and discussed.

  9. Numerical modeling of shallow flows including bottom topography and friction effects

    OpenAIRE

    Lukácová-Medvid'ová, Maria

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the paper is numerical modeling of the shallow water equation with source terms by genuinely multdimensional finite volume evolution Galerkin schemes. The shallow water system, or its one-dimensional analogy the Saint-Venant equation, is used extensively for numerical simulation of natural rivers. Mathematically the shallow water system belongs to the class of balance laws. A special treatment of the source terms describing the bottom topography as well as frictions effects is nece...

  10. Master Equation Analysis of Thermal and Nonthermal Microwave Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianyi

    2016-10-11

    Master equation is a successful model to describe the conventional heating reaction, it is expanded to capture the "microwave effect" in this work. The work equation of "microwave effect" included master equation presents the direct heating, indirect heating, and nonthermal effect about the microwave field. The modified master equation provides a clear physics picture to the nonthermal microwave effect: (1) The absorption and the emission of the microwave, which is dominated by the transition dipole moment between two corresponding states and the intensity of the microwave field, provides a new path to change the reaction rate constants. (2) In the strong microwave field, the distribution of internal states of the molecules will deviate from the equilibrium distribution, and the system temperature defined in the conventional heating reaction is no longer available. According to the general form of "microwave effect" included master equation, a two states model for unimolecular dissociation is proposed and is used to discuss the microwave nonthermal effect particularly. The average rate constants can be increased up to 2400 times for some given cases without the temperature changed in the two states model. Additionally, the simulation of a model system was executed using our State Specified Master Equation package. Three important conclusions can be obtained in present work: (1) A reasonable definition of the nonthermal microwave effect is given in the work equation of "microwave effect" included master equation. (2) Nonthermal microwave effect possibly exists theoretically. (3) The reaction rate constants perhaps can be changed obviously by the microwave field for the non-RRKM and the mode-specified reactions.

  11. Structural and functional effects of heavy metals on the nervous system, including sense organs, of fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, E

    1991-01-01

    metals are well known pollutants in the aquatic environment. Their interaction with relevant chemical stimuli may interfere with the communication between fish and environment. 5. The affinity for a number of ligands and macromolecules makes heavy metals most potent neurotoxins. 6. The present Mini......1. Today, fish in the environment are inevitably exposed to chemical pollution. Although most hazardous substances are present at concentrations far below the lethal level, they may still cause serious damage to the life processes of these animals. 2. Fish depend on an intact nervous system......, including their sense organs, for mediating relevant behaviour such as food search, predator recognition, communication and orientation. 3. Unfortunately, the nervous system is most vulnerable and injuries to its elements may dramatically change the behaviour and consequently the survival of fish. 4. Heavy...

  12. PTAC: a computer program for pressure-transient analysis, including the effects of cavitation. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kot, C A; Youngdahl, C K

    1978-09-01

    PTAC was developed to predict pressure transients in nuclear-power-plant piping systems in which the possibility of cavitation must be considered. The program performs linear or nonlinear fluid-hammer calculations, using a fixed-grid method-of-characteristics solution procedure. In addition to pipe friction and elasticity, the program can treat a variety of flow components, pipe junctions, and boundary conditions, including arbitrary pressure sources and a sodium/water reaction. Essential features of transient cavitation are modeled by a modified column-separation technique. Comparisons of calculated results with available experimental data, for a simple piping arrangement, show good agreement and provide validation of the computational cavitation model. Calculations for a variety of piping networks, containing either liquid sodium or water, demonstrate the versatility of PTAC and clearly show that neglecting cavitation leads to erroneous predictions of pressure-time histories.

  13. A flexible and qualitatively stable model for cell cycle dynamics including DNA damage effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Clark D; Johnson, Charles R; Zhou, Tong; Simpson, Dennis A; Kaufmann, William K

    2012-01-01

    This paper includes a conceptual framework for cell cycle modeling into which the experimenter can map observed data and evaluate mechanisms of cell cycle control. The basic model exhibits qualitative stability, meaning that regardless of magnitudes of system parameters its instances are guaranteed to be stable in the sense that all feasible trajectories converge to a certain trajectory. Qualitative stability can also be described by the signs of real parts of eigenvalues of the system matrix. On the biological side, the resulting model can be tuned to approximate experimental data pertaining to human fibroblast cell lines treated with ionizing radiation, with or without disabled DNA damage checkpoints. Together these properties validate a fundamental, first order systems view of cell dynamics. Classification Codes: 15A68.

  14. A Novel Approach for the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Porous Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Qiang; ZHANG Fan-wei; ZHANG Yue; ZHANG Da-hai; LI Zhong-ping

    2006-01-01

    A new approach in combination of the effective medium theory with the equivalent unit in numerical simulation was developed to study the effective thermal conductivity of porous ceramics. The finite element method was used to simulate the heat transfer process which enables to acquire accurate results through highly complicated modeling and intensive computation. An alternative approach to mesh the material into small cells was also presented. The effective medium theory accounts for the effective thermal conductivity of cells while the equivalent unit is subsequently applied in numerical simulation to analyze the effective thermal conductivity of the porous ceramics. A new expression for the effective thermal conductivity, allowing for some structure factors such as volume fraction of pores and thermal conductivity, was put forward, and the results of its application was proved to be close to those of the mathematical simulation.

  15. Effects of displacement boundary conditions on thermal deformation in thermal stress problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Kwak

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Most computational structural engineers are paying more attention to applying loads rather than to DBCs (Displacement Boundary Conditions because most static stable mechanical structures are working under already prescribed displacement boundary conditions. In all of the computational analysis of solving a system of algebraic equations, such as FEM (Finite Element Method, three translational and three rotational degrees of freedom (DOF should be constrained (by applying DBCs before solving the system of algebraic equation in order to prevent rigid body motions of the analysis results (singular problem. However, it is very difficult for an inexperienced engineer or designer to apply proper DBCs in the case of thermal stress analysis where no prescribed DBCs or constraints exist, for example in water quenching for heat treatment. Moreover, improper DBCs cause incorrect solutions in thermal stress analysis, such as stress concentration or unreasonable deformation phases. To avoid these problems, we studied a technique which performs the thermal stress analysis without any DBCs; and then removes rigid body motions from the deformation results in a post process step as the need arises. The proposed technique makes it easy to apply DBCs and prevent the error caused by improper DBCs. We proved it was mathematically possible to solve a system of algebraic equations without a step of applying DBCs. We also compared the analysis results with those of a traditional procedure for real castings.

  16. A 1,470 nm diode laser in stapedotomy: Mechanical, thermal, and acoustic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenraads, Simone P C; de Boorder, Tjeerd; Grolman, Wilko; Kamalski, Digna M A

    2017-08-01

    Multiple laser systems have been investigated for their use in stapes surgery in patients with otosclerosis. The diode 1,470 nm laser used in this study is an attractive laser system because it is easily transported and relatively inexpensive in use. This wavelength has relative high absorption in water. This study aimed to investigate the mechanical, thermal, and acoustic effects of the diode 1,470 nm laser on a stapes in an inner ear model. Experiments were performed in an inner ear model including fresh frozen human stapes. High-speed imaging with frame rates up to 2,000 frames per second (f/s) was used to visualize the effects in the vestibule during fenestration of the footplate. A special high-speed color Schlieren technique was used to study thermal effects. The sound produced by perforation was recorded by a hydrophone. Single pulse settings of the diode 1,470 nm laser were 100 ms, 3 W. Diode 1,470 nm laser fenestration showed mechanical effects with small vapor bubbles and pressure waves pushed into the vestibule. Thermal imaging visualized an increase temperature underneath the stapes footplate. Acoustic effects were limited, but larger sounds levels were reached when vaporization bubbles arise and explode in the vestibule. The diode 1,470 nm laser highly absorbs in perilymph and is capable of forming a clear fenestration in the stapes. An overlapping laser pulse will increase the risk of vapor bubbles, pressure waves, and heating the vestibule. As long as we do not know the possible damage of these effects to the inner ear function, it seems advisable to use the laser with less potential harm. Lasers Surg. Med. 49:619-624, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Path-integral calculation of the second virial coefficient including intramolecular flexibility effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garberoglio, Giovanni, E-mail: garberoglio@fbk.eu [Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Computational Science (LISC), FBK-CMM and University of Trento, via Sommarive 18, I-38123 Povo (Italy); Jankowski, Piotr [Department of Quantum Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Gagarina 7, PL-87-100 Toruń (Poland); Szalewicz, Krzysztof [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Harvey, Allan H. [Applied Chemicals and Materials Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305-3337 (United States)

    2014-07-28

    We present a path-integral Monte Carlo procedure for the fully quantum calculation of the second molecular virial coefficient accounting for intramolecular flexibility. This method is applied to molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and deuterium (D{sub 2}) in the temperature range 15–2000 K, showing that the effect of molecular flexibility is not negligible. Our results are in good agreement with experimental data, as well as with virials given by recent empirical equations of state, although some discrepancies are observed for H{sub 2} between 100 and 200 K.

  18. FLEXURAL VIBRATIONS BAND GAPS IN PERIODIC BEAMS INCLUDING ROTARY INERTIA AND SHEAR DEFORMATION EFFECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    With the idea of the phononic crystals, the beams with periodic structure are designed.Flexural vibration through such periodic beams composed of two kinds of materials is studied. The emphasis is laid on the effects of rotary inertia and shear deformation. Based on the vibration equation, plane wave expansion method is provided. The acceleration frequency responses of such beams with finite structure are simulated by the finite element method. The frequency ranges of sharp drops in the calculated acceleration frequency response curves are in good agreement with those in the band structures. The findings will be significant in the application of the periodic beams.

  19. Driver performance-based assessment of thermal display degradation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffner, John W.; Massimi, Michael S.; Choi, Yoon S.; Ferrett, Donald A.

    1998-07-01

    The Driver's Vision Enhancer (DVE) is a thermal sensor and display combination currently being procured for use in U.S. Army combat and tactical wheeled vehicles. During the DVE production process, a given number of sensor or display pixels may either vary from the desired luminance values (nonuniform) or be inactive (nonresponsive). The amount and distribution of pixel luminance nonuniformity (NU) and nonresponsivity (NR) allowable in production DVEs is a significant cost factor. No driver performance-based criteria exist for determining the maximum amount of allowable NU and NR. For safety reasons, these characteristics are specified conservatively. This paper describes an experiment to assess the effects of different levels of display NU and NR on Army drivers' ability to identify scene features and obstacles using a simulated DVE display and videotaped driving scenarios. Baseline, NU, and NR display conditions were simulated using real-time image processing techniques and a computer graphics workstation. The results indicate that there is a small, but statistically insignificant decrease in identification performance with the NU conditions tested. The pattern of the performance-based results is consistent with drivers' subjective assessments of display adequacy. The implications of the results for specifying NU and NR criteria for the DVE display are discussed.

  20. Effect of cation trapping on thermal stability of magnetite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, S S; Philip, John

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the effect of sodium trapping on thermal stability of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. The pure magnetite nanoparticles incubated in sodium hydroxide solutions and subsequently washed with water to remove the excess sodium. The amount of sodium in magnetite is measured using atomic absorption spectroscopy. The size distribution obtained from Small angle X-ray scattering measurements show that particles are fairly monodisperse. The FTIR spectra of nanoparticles show transmission bands at 441 and 611 cm(-1) are due to the symmetric stretching vibrations (v) of Fe-O in octahedral and tetrahedral sites respectively. With 500 ppm of sodium ions (Na+) in magnetite, the cubic ferrite structure of maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) to hexagonal hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) phase transition is enhanced by -150 degrees C in air. The Rietveld analysis of sodium doped magnetite nanoparticles show that above 99% of metastable gamma-Fe2O3 is converted to a thermodynamically stable alpha-Fe2O3 after air annealing at 700 degrees C. A decrease in enthalpy observed in doped magnetite unambiguously confirms that the activation energy for maghemite to hematite transition is increased due to the presence of trapped sodium ions. These results suggest that the trapped cations in ferrite nanoparticles can stabilize them by increasing the activation energy.

  1. Metastable States of Josepshon Vortices: Thermal Processes and Quantum Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallraff, A.; Kemp, A.; Koval, Yu.; Ustinov, A. V.; Fistul, M. V.

    2001-03-01

    We experimentally study the dynamics of a single Josephson vortex in a tilted periodic potential. In the presence of a bias current applied uniformly to a long Josephson junction, metastable vortex-states are induced by the interaction of the vortex with an artificially formed inhomogeneity in the junction, or by shaping the junction subject to a small external magnetic field [1]. At high temperatures, we observe the thermal escape of the vortex out of the metastable state. As temperature and damping is reduced, the macroscopic quantum properties of Josephson vortices, such as energy level quantization and quantum tunneling, are expected to manifest themselves [2,3]. We report on our current experimental work to observe these effects. Our interest in this macroscopic quantum system is related to the possibility of using quantum states of Josephson vortices for performing quantum computation. We have suggested that a vortex trapped in a double-well potential in a narrow long junction can be used as a scalable and well-controllable qubit [1]. [1] A. Wallraff et al. , J. Low Temp. Phys. J. Low Temp. Phys. 188, 543 (2000). [2] T. Kato and M. Imada, J. Phys. Soc. Japan 65, 2963 (1996). [3] A. Shnirman, E. Ben-Jacob, and B. Malomed, Phys. Rev. B 56, 14677 (1997).

  2. Thermal effects and component cooling in Magnum-PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruijt, O.G., E-mail: kruijt@rijnhuizen.nl [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster (Netherlands); Scholten, J.; Smeets, P.H.M.; Brons, S.; Eck, H.J.N. van; Al, R.S.; Berg, M.A. van den; Meiden, H.J. van der; Rooij, G.J. van; Zelijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster (Netherlands)

    2011-10-15

    Magnum-PSI is a linear plasma generator, built at the FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen. Subject of study will be the interaction of plasma with a diversity of surface materials. The machine is designed to provide an environment with a steady state high-flux plasma (up to 10{sup 24} H{sup +} ions/m{sup 2} s) in a 3 T magnetic field with an exposed surface of 80 cm{sup 2} up to 10 MW/m{sup 2}. Magnum-PSI will provide new insights in the complex physics and chemistry that will occur in the divertor region of the future experimental fusion reactor ITER and reactors beyond ITER. The conditions at the surface of the sample can be varied over a wide range, such as plasma temperature, beam diameter, particle flux, inclination angle of the target, background pressure and magnetic field. An important subject of attention in the design of the machine was thermal effects originating in the excess heat and gas flow from the plasma source and radiation from the target.

  3. Thermal grill conditioning: Effect on contact heat evoked potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutzeler, Catherine R.; Warner, Freda M.; Wanek, Johann; Curt, Armin; Kramer, John L. K.

    2017-01-01

    The ‘thermal grill illusion’ (TGI) is a unique cutaneous sensation of unpleasantness, induced through the application of interlacing warm and cool stimuli. While previous studies have investigated optimal parameters and subject characteristics to evoke the illusion, our aim was to examine the modulating effect as a conditioning stimulus. A total of 28 healthy control individuals underwent three testing sessions on separate days. Briefly, 15 contact heat stimuli were delivered to the right hand dorsum, while the left palmar side of the hand was being conditioned with either neutral (32 °C), cool (20 °C), warm (40 °C), or TGI (20/40 °C). Rating of perception (numeric rating scale: 0–10) and evoked potentials (i.e., N1 and N2P2 potentials) to noxious contact heat stimuli were assessed. While cool and warm conditioning decreased cortical responses to noxious heat, TGI conditioning increased evoked potential amplitude (N1 and N2P2). In line with other modalities of unpleasant conditioning (e.g., sound, visual, and olfactory stimulation), cortical and possibly sub-cortical modulation may underlie the facilitation of contact heat evoked potentials. PMID:28079118

  4. Nonlinear Effect of Moisture Content on Effective Thermal Conductivity of Building Materials with Different Pore Size Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanfeng; Ma, Chao; Wang, Dengjia; Wang, Yingying; Liu, Jiaping

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the quantitative relationship between the effective thermal conductivity and the moisture content of a material is required to accurately calculate the envelope heat and mass transfer and, subsequently, the building energy consumption. We experimentally analyzed the pore size distributions and porosities of common building materials and the influence of the moisture content on the effective thermal conductivity of building materials. We determined the quantitative relationship between the effective thermal conductivity and moisture content of building materials. The results showed that a larger porosity led to a more significant effect of the moisture content on the effective thermal conductivity. When the volumetric moisture content reached 10 %, the thermal conductivities of foam concrete and aerated concrete increased by approximately 200 % and 100 %, respectively. The effective thermal conductivity increased rapidly in the low moisture content range and increased slowly in the high moisture content range. The effective thermal conductivity is related to the moisture content of the materials through an approximate power function. As the moisture content in the walls of a new building stabilizes, the effective thermal conductivity of normal concrete varies only slightly, whereas that of aerated concrete varies more significantly. The effective thermal conductivity of the material is proportional to the relative humidity of the environment. This trend is most noticeable when the wall material is aerated concrete.

  5. Aging Effects and Estimating Degradation Mechanisms of Thermally Upgraded Paper in Mineral Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, Katsunori; Oe, Etsuo; Yamagata, Naoki

    The life of a transformer is limited to the deterioration of its solid insulation. Winding conductors and other solid insulation materials in oil-immersed transformers have been insulated using cellulose products. For many years, manufacturers have met the needs of special applications by designing transformers using thermally upgraded materials to achieve lighter weight, higher power density and increased life. Recently, the effect of thermally upgraded insulation on diagnostic techniques such as gas-in oil analysis, and their indication of insulation degradation have been reviewed. This paper describes evaluations of the thermal degradation characteristics and decomposition reactions in mineral transformer oil of amine-impregnated thermally upgraded paper insulation. The thermal resistance of the thermally upgraded paper is evaluated by comparison with Kraft paper insulation. Further, aging degradation mechanisms of decompositional degradation of the thermally upgraded paper due to aging in mineral transformer oil are proposed.

  6. The InSight Mars Lander and Its Effect on the Subsurface Thermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Matthew A.; Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Grott, Matthias; Piqueux, Sylvain; Mueller, Nils; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Spohn, Tilman

    2017-02-01

    The 2018 InSight (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) Mission has the mission goal of providing insitu data for the first measurement of the geothermal heat flow of Mars. The Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package (HP3) will take thermal conductivity and thermal gradient measurements to approximately 5 m depth. By necessity, this measurement will be made within a few meters of the lander. This means that thermal perturbations from the lander will modify local surface and subsurface temperature measurements. For HP3's sensitive thermal gradient measurements, this spacecraft influence will be important to model and parameterize. Here we present a basic 3D model of thermal effects of the lander on its surroundings. Though lander perturbations significantly alter subsurface temperatures, a successful thermal gradient measurement will be possible in all thermal conditions by proper ( >3 m depth) placement of the heat flow probe.

  7. Thermal shock resistance behavior of a functionally graded ceramic: Effects of finite cooling rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihe Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a semi-analytical model to explore the effects of cooling rate on the thermal shock resistance behavior of a functionally graded ceramic (FGC plate with a periodic array of edge cracks. The FGC is assumed to be a thermally heterogeneous material with constant elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio. The cooling rate applied at the FGC surface is modeled using a linear ramp function. An integral equation method and a closed form asymptotic temperature solution are employed to compute the thermal stress intensity factor (TSIF. The thermal shock residual strength and critical thermal shock of the FGC plate are obtained using the SIF criterion. Thermal shock simulations for an Al2O3/Si3N4 FGC indicate that a finite cooling rate leads to a significantly higher critical thermal shock than that under the sudden cooling condition. The residual strength, however, is relatively insensitive to the cooling rate.

  8. INFLUENCE OF THERMAL AND NON—THERMAL EFFECTS OF ULTRASOUND ON ISOTHERMS OF PHENOL ON NKAⅡ RESIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIZhong; LIXiangbin; 等

    2000-01-01

    Adsorption equilibrium experiments of phenol on the NKA II resin are separately conducted in the presence and absence of ultrasound at ambient temperature.The isotherm of phenol on the polymer adsorbent in the presence of ultrasonic field is firstly reported.Results indicated that the isotherm of phenol determined in the presence of ultrasound is lower than that in the absence of ultrasound.In addition,experiments also show that the use of ultrasound to the adsorption system of the phenol aqueous solution and NKA Ⅱ resin could cause the rising of the temperature of the system in the order of 6-C.The effect of ultrasound on the isotherm of the phenol on the NKA Ⅱ resin mostly ascribes to the thermal effect and the non-thermal effect of ultrasonic field.and the role of the later is greater than that of the former.

  9. Kinetic model of water disinfection using peracetic acid including synergistic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Marina J; Brandi, Rodolfo J; Cassano, Alberto E; Labas, Marisol D

    2016-01-01

    The disinfection efficiencies of a commercial mixture of peracetic acid against Escherichia coli were studied in laboratory scale experiments. The joint and separate action of two disinfectant agents, hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid, were evaluated in order to observe synergistic effects. A kinetic model for each component of the mixture and for the commercial mixture was proposed. Through simple mathematical equations, the model describes different stages of attack by disinfectants during the inactivation process. Based on the experiments and the kinetic parameters obtained, it could be established that the efficiency of hydrogen peroxide was much lower than that of peracetic acid alone. However, the contribution of hydrogen peroxide was very important in the commercial mixture. It should be noted that this improvement occurred only after peracetic acid had initiated the attack on the cell. This synergistic effect was successfully explained by the proposed scheme and was verified by experimental results. Besides providing a clearer mechanistic understanding of water disinfection, such models may improve our ability to design reactors.

  10. Comprehensive study in the inhibitory effect of berberine on gene transcription, including TATA box.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yugang Wang

    Full Text Available Berberine (BBR is an established natural DNA intercalator with numerous pharmacological functions. However, currently there are neither detailed reports concerning the distribution of this alkaloid in living cells nor reports concerning the relationship between BBR's association with DNA and the function of DNA. Here we report that the distribution of BBR within the nucleus can be observed 30 minutes after drug administration, and that the content of berberine in the nucleus peaks at around 4 µmol, which is twelve hours after drug administration. The spatial conformation of DNA and chromatin was altered immediately after their association with BBR. Moreover, this association can effectively suppress the transcription of DNA in living cell systems and cell-free systems. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA demonstrated further that BBR can inhibit the association between the TATA binding protein (TBP and the TATA box in the promoter, and this finding was also attained in living cells by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP. Based on results from this study, we hypothesize that berberine can suppress the transcription of DNA in living cell systems, especially suppressing the association between TBP and the TATA box by binding with DNA and, thus, inhibiting TATA box-dependent gene expression in a non-specific way. This novel study has significantly expanded the sphere of knowledge concerning berberine's pharmacological effects, beginning at its paramount initial interaction with the TATA box.

  11. Supernova equations of state including full nuclear ensemble with in-medium effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Shun; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Yamada, Shoichi; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2017-01-01

    We construct new equations of state for baryons at sub-nuclear densities for the use in core-collapse supernova simulations. The abundance of various nuclei is obtained together with thermodynamic quantities. The formulation is an extension of the previous model, in which we adopted the relativistic mean field theory with the TM1 parameter set for nucleons, the quantum approach for d, t, h and α as well as the liquid drop model for the other nuclei under the nuclear statistical equilibrium. We reformulate the model of the light nuclei other than d, t, h and α based on the quasi-particle description. Furthermore, we modify the model so that the temperature dependences of surface and shell energies of heavy nuclei could be taken into account. The pasta phases for heavy nuclei and the Pauli- and self-energy shifts for d, t, h and α are taken into account in the same way as in the previous model. We find that nuclear composition is considerably affected by the modifications in this work, whereas thermodynamical quantities are not changed much. In particular, the washout of shell effect has a great impact on the mass distribution above T ∼ 1 MeV. This improvement may have an important effect on the rates of electron captures and coherent neutrino scatterings on nuclei in supernova cores.

  12. Gender differences in episodic memory and visual working memory including the effects of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, Franz; Petermann, Franz; Lepach, Anja Christina

    2013-01-01

    Analysing the relationship between gender and memory, and examining the effects of age on the overall memory-related functioning, are the ongoing goals of psychological research. The present study examined gender and age group differences in episodic memory with respect to the type of task. In addition, these subgroup differences were also analysed in visual working memory. A sample of 366 women and 330 men, aged between 16 and 69 years of age, participated in the current study. Results indicate that women outperformed men on auditory memory tasks, whereas male adolescents and older male adults showed higher level performances on visual episodic and visual working memory measures. However, the size of gender-linked effects varied somewhat across age groups. Furthermore, results partly support a declining performance on episodic memory and visual working memory measures with increasing age. Although age-related losses in episodic memory could not be explained by a decreasing verbal and visuospatial ability with age, women's advantage in auditory episodic memory could be explained by their advantage in verbal ability. Men's higher level visual episodic memory performance was found to result from their advantage in visuospatial ability. Finally, possible methodological, biological, and cognitive explanations for the current findings are discussed.

  13. Reducing Thermal Effect in End-Diode-Pumped Laser Crystal by Using a Novel Resonator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Ai-Yun; HOU Wei; LI Hui-Qing; BI Yong; LIN Xue-Chun; GENG Ai-Cong; KONG Yu-Peng; CUI Da-Fu; XU Zu-Yan

    2005-01-01

    @@ We report a new way, i.e. double-end-pumping, to extend the stability range of a laser resonator, in advantage of making the thermal loading be effectively divided between the ends of the laser crystal to reduce the thermal effect, thus to extend the stability range.

  14. Effective time-independent studies on resonance Raman spectroscopy of trans-stilbene including the Duschinsky effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Na; Barone, Vincenzo; Cappelli, Chiara; Zhao, Xian; Ruud, Kenneth; Santoro, Fabrizio

    2013-07-01

    We simulate the resonance Raman spectra of trans-stilbene using a recently developed time-independent method that allows computations of the full two-dimensional spectrum as a function of the incident and scattered frequencies, including both the Franck-Condon and the Herzberg-Teller contributions. The potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the ground and resonant states are described in the harmonic approximation using density functional theory PBE0/6-31+G(d,p) calculations in gas phase and in cyclohexane. The simulated spectra are in good agreement with the experimental data [J. Chem. Phys. 83, 5000 (1985)] measured at four different excitation wavelengths, and allow us to unambiguously assign the main experimental bands. We perform an extensive comparison of the performance of four different vertical or adiabatic models for the PES of the resonant state, dissecting the effects of nuclear displacements and Duschinsky mixings on the spectra.

  15. An accurate simulation model for single-photon avalanche diodes including important statistical effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiuyang, He; Yue, Xu; Feifei, Zhao

    2013-10-01

    An accurate and complete circuit simulation model for single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) is presented. The derived model is not only able to simulate the static DC and dynamic AC behaviors of an SPAD operating in Geiger-mode, but also can emulate the second breakdown and the forward bias behaviors. In particular, it considers important statistical effects, such as dark-counting and after-pulsing phenomena. The developed model is implemented using the Verilog-A description language and can be directly performed in commercial simulators such as Cadence Spectre. The Spectre simulation results give a very good agreement with the experimental results reported in the open literature. This model shows a high simulation accuracy and very fast simulation rate.

  16. NONLINEAR VIBRATION FOR MODERATE THICKNESS RECTANGULAR CRACKED PLATES INCLUDING COUPLED EFFECT OF ELASTIC FOUNDATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Yong-gang; FU Yi-ming; ZHA Xu-dong

    2005-01-01

    Based on Reissner plate theory and Hamilton variational principle, the nonlinear equations of motion were derived for the moderate thickness rectangular plates with transverse surface penetrating crack on the two-parameter foundation. Under the condition of free boundary, a set of trial functions satisfying all boundary conditions and crack's continuous conditions were proposed. By employing the Galerkin method and the harmonic balance method, the nonlinear vibration equations were solved and the nonlinear vibration behaviors of the plate were analyzed. In numerical computation, the effects of the different location and depth of crack, the different structural parameters of plates and the different physical parameters of foundation on the nonlinear amplitude frequency response curves of the plate were discussed.

  17. Theory of tunneling ionization of molecules: Weak-field asymptotics including dipole effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Morishita, Toru; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2011-01-01

    The formulation of the parabolic adiabatic expansion approach to the problem of ionization of atomic systems in a static electric field, originally developed for the axially symmetric case [ Phys. Rev. A 82 023416 (2010)], is generalized to arbitrary potentials. This approach is used to rederive...... the asymptotic theory of tunneling ionization in the weak-field limit. In the atomic case, the resulting formulas for the ionization rate coincide with previously known results. In addition, the present theory accounts for the possible existence of a permanent dipole moment of the unperturbed system and, hence......, applies to polar molecules. Accounting for dipole effects constitutes an important difference of the present theory from the so-called molecular Ammosov-Delone-Krainov theory. The theory is illustrated by comparing exact and asymptotic results for a set of model polar molecules and a realistic molecular...

  18. A comprehensive approach to the design of ethanol supply chains including carbon trading effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarola, Sara; Shah, Nilay; Bezzo, Fabrizio

    2012-03-01

    The optimal design of biofuels production systems is a key component in the analysis of the environmental and economic performance of new sustainable transport systems. In this paper a general mixed integer linear programming modelling framework is developed to assess the design and planning of a multi-period and multi-echelon bioethanol upstream supply chain under market uncertainty. The optimisation design process of biofuels production systems aims at selecting the best biomass and technologies options among several alternatives according to economic and environmental (global warming potential) performance. A key feature in the proposed approach is the acknowledgement of an economic value to the overall GHG emissions, which is implemented through an emissions allowances trading scheme. The future Italian biomass-based ethanol production is adopted as a case study. Results show the effectiveness of the model as a decision making-tool to steer long-term decisions and investments.

  19. Multiple Crack Growth Prediction in AA2024-T3 Friction Stir Welded Joints, Including Manufacturing Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlone, Pierpaolo; Citarella, Roberto; Sonne, Mads Rostgaard

    2016-01-01

    boundary element method (FEM-DBEM) procedure, coupling the welding process simulation to the subsequent crack growth assessment, is proposed and applied to simulate multiple crack propagation, with allowance for manufacturing effects. The friction stir butt welding process of the precipitation hardened AA......2024-T3 alloy was simulated using a thermo-mechanical FEM model to predict the process induced residual stress field and material softening. The computed stress field was transferred to a DBEM environment and superimposed to the stress field produced by a remote fatigue traction load applied......A great deal of attention is currently paid by several industries toward the friction stir welding process to realize lightweight structures. Within this aim, the realistic prediction of fatigue behavior of welded assemblies is a key factor. In this work an integrated finite element method - dual...

  20. Screened test-charge - electron interaction including many-body effects in two and three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, A.; Ghazali, A.

    1997-05-01

    Bound states of a negatively charged test particle and an electron are studied by incorporating many-body effects (exchange and correlation) in the screening function of an interacting electron gas via the local-field correction. Using a variational method and a matrix-diagonalization method we determine the energies and the wave functions of the ground state and the excited states as functions of the electron density for three-dimensional and two-dimensional systems. For high electron density no bound states are found. Below a critical density the number and the energy of the bound states increase with decreasing electron density. We also present results for bound-state energies of a positively charged test particle with an electron, and compare them with results obtained within the random-phase approximation where the local-field correction is ignored.